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Sample records for catalytic wet air

  1. Catalytic wet Air Oxidation of o-Chlorophenol in Wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐新华; 汪大翬

    2003-01-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) was investigated in laboratory-scale experiments for the treatment of o-chlorophenol in wastewater. Experimental results showed that wet air oxidation (WAO) process in the absence of catalyst was also effective for o-chlorophenol in wastewater treatment. Up to 80% of the initial CODCr was removed by wet air oxidation at 270℃ with twice amount of the required stoichiometric oxygen supply. At temperature of 150℃, the removal rate of CODCr was only 30%. Fe2(SO4)3, CuSO4, Cu(NO3)2 and MnSO4 exhibited high catalytic activity. Higher removal rate of CODCr was obtained by CWAO. More than 96% of the initial CODCr was removed at 270℃ and 84.6%-93.6% of the initial CODCr was removed at 150℃. Mixed catalysts had better catalytic activity for the degradation of o-chlorophenol in wastewater.

  2. Wet Air Oxidation and Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation for Refinery Spent Caustics Degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work focuses on evaluating wet air oxidation and catalytic wet air oxidation technique to degrade refinery spent caustics (original COD is 250,781 mg/L) in a milder operation conditions (150-200 degree C, 0.2-2.5MPa). The results show that: in non-catalyst WAO, the highest COD degradation conversion could reach about 75% when 200 degree C, 2MPa oxygen and 300rpm were used. At every temperature, the reaction procedures follow pseudo-first order equations and the activation energy is 45.5 kJ/mol. The reactivity of three main contaminants in wastewater is on the order of sulphide > petroleum > volatile phenol. The COD degradation conversion could improve to about 95% when composite catalyst MnOx-CeO/sub x//sub x/ gamma-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ (W/sub Mn//W gamma-/sub Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ =0.5/ and WCe/W MnOx Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/=0.4) was used. The pseudo-first order equations also could be applied for catalyst system and its activation energy decreases to 27.2 kJ/mol. The catalyst could improve the degradation efficiency of petroleum and volatile phenol. Their conversions could increase to 85% and 74% respectively after catalyst used. (author)

  3. Homogeneous catalytic wet air oxidation for the treatment oftextile wastewaters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An extensive series of experiments was carried out in order to identify suitable catalysts to boost the reaction rate of wet air oxidation of real textile wastewaters at relatively mild temperature and pressure. Experimental results indicated that all catalysts tested in this investigation had shown an impressive increase in the initial COD and TOC removal rate as well as the COD and TOC removal levels in two hours reaction. Among all the catalysts tested, copper salts were more effective than the rest. Anions of the salt soluffonsalso played a role in the catalytic process with nitrate ions having better effect than sulfate ions. Hence copper nitrates were more effective than copper sulfates. It was also found that a mixture of salts with different metals performed better than either of the component single salt alone.

  4. Catalytic wet air oxidation for the treatment of emulsifying wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jian-fu; CHEN Ling; LU Yi-cheng; TANG Wen-wei

    2005-01-01

    The wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic WAO (CWAO) of the high strength emulsifying wastewater containing nonionic surfactants have been investigated in terms of COD and TOC removal. The WAO and homogeneous CWAO processes were carried out at the temperature from 433 K to 513 K, with initial oxygen pressure 1.2 MPa. It was found that homogeneous catalyst copper(Cu ( NO3 )2 )had an fairly good catalytic activity for the WAO process, and the oxidation was catalyzed when the temperature was higher than 473 K.Moreover, several heterogeneous catalysts were proved to be effective for the WAO process. At the temperature 473 K, after 2 h reaction,WAO process could achieve about 75% COD removal and 66% TOC removal, while catalysts Cu/Al2O3 and Mn-Ce/Al2O3 elevated the COD removal up to 86%-89% and that of TOC up to 82%. However, complete elimination of COD and TOC was proved to be difficult even the best non-noble catalyst was used. Therefore, the effluent from WAO or CWAO process need to be further disposed. The bioassay proved that the effluent from WAO process was amenable to the biochemical method.

  5. Copper on activated carbon for catalytic wet air oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora Dolores Martínez

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Textile industry is an important source of water contamination. Some of the organic contaminants cannot be eliminated by nature in a reasonable period. Heterogeneous catalytic wet air oxidation is one of the most effective methods to purify wastewater with organic contaminants. In this work, catalysts based on copper supported on activated carbon were synthesized. The activated carbons were obtained from industrial wastes (apricot core and grape stalk of San Juan, Argentina. These were impregnated with a copper salt and thermically treated in an inert atmosphere. Analysis of specific surface, pore volume, p zc, acidity, basicity and XRD patterns were made in order to characterize the catalysts. The catalytic activity was tested in the oxidation of methylene blue (MB and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA in aqueous phase with pure oxygen. Reaction tests were carried out in a Parr batch reactor at different temperatures, with a 0.2 MPa partial pressure of oxygen. The amount of unconverted organics was measured by spectrophotometry. Higher temperatures were necessary for the degradation of PVA compared to those for methylene blue.

  6. Catalytic wet air oxidation of chlorophenols over supported ruthenium catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Ning [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l' environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), UMR 5256, CNRS/Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Descorme, Claude [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l' environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), UMR 5256, CNRS/Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)]. E-mail: claude.descorme@catalyse.cnrs.fr; Besson, Michele [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l' environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), UMR 5256, CNRS/Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2007-07-31

    A series of noble metal (Pt, Pd, Ru) loaded zirconia catalysts were evaluated in the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of mono-chlorophenols (2-CP, 3-CP, 4-CP) under relatively mild reaction conditions. Among the investigated noble metals, Ru appeared to be the best to promote the CWAO of CPs as far as incipient-wetness impregnation was used to prepare all the catalysts. The position of the chlorine substitution on the aromatic ring was also shown to have a significant effect on the CP reactivity in the CWAO over 3 wt.% Ru/ZrO{sub 2}. 2-CP was relatively easier to degradate compared to 3-CP and 4-CP. One reason could be the higher adsorption of 2-CP on the catalyst surface. Further investigations suggested that 3 wt.% Ru/ZrO{sub 2} is a very efficient catalyst in the CWAO of 2-CP as far as high 2-CP conversion and TOC abatement could still be reached at even lower temperature (393 K) and lower total pressure (3 MPa). Additionally, the conversion of 2-CP was demonstrated to increase with the initial pH of the 2-CP solution. The dechlorination reaction is promoted at higher pH. In all cases, the adsorption of the reactants and the reaction intermediates was shown to play a major role. All parameters that would control the molecule speciation in solution or the catalyst surface properties would have a key effect.

  7. Degradation of paracetamol by catalytic wet air oxidation and sequential adsorption – Catalytic wet air oxidation on activated carbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Three activated carbons (AC) compared as adsorbents and oxidation catalysts. ► Similar evolution for catalytic and adsorptive properties of AC over reuses. ► Acidic and mesoporous AC to be preferred, despite lower initial efficiency. ► Oxidative degradation of paracetamol improves biodegradability. ► Convenient hybrid adsorption–regenerative oxidation process for continuous treatment. - Abstract: The concern about the fate of pharmaceutical products has raised owing to the increasing contamination of rivers, lakes and groundwater. The aim of this paper is to evaluate two different processes for paracetamol removal. The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of paracetamol on activated carbon was investigated both as a water treatment technique using an autoclave reactor and as a regenerative treatment of the carbon after adsorption in a sequential fixed bed process. Three activated carbons (ACs) from different source materials were used as catalysts: two microporous basic ACs (S23 and C1) and a meso- and micro-porous acidic one (L27). During the first CWAO experiment the adsorption capacity and catalytic performance of fresh S23 and C1 were higher than those of fresh L27 despite its higher surface area. This situation changed after AC reuse, as finally L27 gave the best results after five CWAO cycles. Respirometry tests with activated sludge revealed that in the studied conditions the use of CWAO enhanced the aerobic biodegradability of the effluent. In the ADOX process L27 also showed better oxidation performances and regeneration efficiency. This different ageing was examined through AC physico-chemical properties.

  8. Degradation of paracetamol by catalytic wet air oxidation and sequential adsorption - Catalytic wet air oxidation on activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quesada-Penate, I. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 4, Allee Emile Monso, F-31432 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31432 Toulouse (France); Julcour-Lebigue, C., E-mail: carine.julcour@ensiacet.fr [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 4, Allee Emile Monso, F-31432 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31432 Toulouse (France); Jauregui-Haza, U.J. [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, Ave. Salvador Allende y Luaces, Habana (Cuba); Wilhelm, A.M.; Delmas, H. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 4, Allee Emile Monso, F-31432 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31432 Toulouse (France)

    2012-06-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three activated carbons (AC) compared as adsorbents and oxidation catalysts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Similar evolution for catalytic and adsorptive properties of AC over reuses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acidic and mesoporous AC to be preferred, despite lower initial efficiency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative degradation of paracetamol improves biodegradability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Convenient hybrid adsorption-regenerative oxidation process for continuous treatment. - Abstract: The concern about the fate of pharmaceutical products has raised owing to the increasing contamination of rivers, lakes and groundwater. The aim of this paper is to evaluate two different processes for paracetamol removal. The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of paracetamol on activated carbon was investigated both as a water treatment technique using an autoclave reactor and as a regenerative treatment of the carbon after adsorption in a sequential fixed bed process. Three activated carbons (ACs) from different source materials were used as catalysts: two microporous basic ACs (S23 and C1) and a meso- and micro-porous acidic one (L27). During the first CWAO experiment the adsorption capacity and catalytic performance of fresh S23 and C1 were higher than those of fresh L27 despite its higher surface area. This situation changed after AC reuse, as finally L27 gave the best results after five CWAO cycles. Respirometry tests with activated sludge revealed that in the studied conditions the use of CWAO enhanced the aerobic biodegradability of the effluent. In the ADOX process L27 also showed better oxidation performances and regeneration efficiency. This different ageing was examined through AC physico-chemical properties.

  9. CATALYTIC WET AIR OXIDATION OF INDUSTRIAL EFFLUENTS USING A Pt CATALIST SUPPORTED ON MULTIWALLED CARBON NANOTUBES

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel Ovejero; José L. Sotelo; Araceli Rodríguez; Ana Vallet; Juan García

    2011-01-01

    In this work, catalytic wet air oxidation in a batch reactor was studied by catalytic wet air oxidation to treat industrial wastewater. Basic Yellow 11, a basic dye, was employed as a model compound and platinum supported over multi-walled nanotubes (Pt/MWNT) was used as catalyst. Additionally, two different industrial wastewaters were tested. The results prove the high effectivity of this treatment, showing high extents of total organic carbon and toxicity removal of the final effluent. We c...

  10. Pretreatment of apramycin wastewater by catalytic wet air oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Shao-xia; FENG Yu-jie; WAN Jia-feng; LIN Qing-ying; ZHU Wan-peng; JIANG Zhan-peng

    2005-01-01

    The pretreatment technology of wet air oxidation(WAO) and coagulation and acidic hydrolysis for apramycin wastewater was investigated in this paper. The COD, apramycin, NH4+ concentration, and the ratio of BOD5/COD were analyzed, and the color and odor of the effluent were observed. WAO of apramycin wastewater, without catalyst and with RuO2/Al2 O3 and RuO2-CeO2/Al2 O3 catalysts, was carried out at degradation temperature of 200℃ and the total pressure of 4 MPa in a 1 L batch reactor. The result showed that the apramycin removals were respectively 50.2% and 55.0%, COD removals were 40.0% and 46.0%, and the ratio of BOD5/COD was increased to 0.49 and 0.54 with RuO2/Al2 O3 and RuO2-CeO2/Al2 O3 catalysts in catylytic wet air oxidation(CWAO) after the reaction of 150 min. With the pretreatment of coagulation and acidic hydrolysis, COD and apramycin removals were slight decreased, and the ratio of BOD5/COD was increased to 0.45, and the effluents was not suitable to biological treatment. The color and odor of the wastewater were the apramycin wastewater. The addition of CeO2 could promote the activity and stability of RuO2/Al2 O3 in WAO of apramycin wastewater.

  11. Catalytic and non-catalytic wet air oxidation of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate: kinetics and biodegradability enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Ojeda, María Eugenia; Kim, Jungkwon; Carrera, Julián; Metcalfe, Ian S; Font, Josep

    2007-06-18

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) were investigated as suitable precursors for the biological treatment of industrial wastewater containing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Two hours WAO semi-batch experiments were conducted at 15 bar of oxygen partial pressure (P(O2)) and at 180, 200 and 220 degrees C. It was found that the highest temperature provides appreciable total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement of about 42 and 47%, correspondingly. Based on the main identified intermediates (acetic acid and sulfobenzoic acid) a reaction pathway for DBS and a kinetic model in WAO were proposed. In the case of CWAO experiments, seventy-two hours tests were done in a fixed bed reactor in continuous trickle flow regime, using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst. The temperature and P(O2) were 140-160 degrees C and 2-9 bar, respectively. The influence of the operating conditions on the DBS oxidation, the occurrence of oxidative coupling reactions over the AC, and the catalytic activity (in terms of substrate removal) were established. The results show that the AC without any supported active metal behaves bi-functional as adsorbent and catalyst, giving TOC conversions up to 52% at 160 degrees C and 2 bar of P(O2), which were comparable to those obtained in WAO experiments. Respirometric tests were completed before and after CWAO and to the main intermediates identified through the WAO and CWAO oxidation route. Then, the readily biodegradable COD (COD(RB)) of the CWAO and WAO effluents were found. Taking into account these results it was possible to compare whether or not the CWAO or WAO effluents were suitable for a conventional activated sludge plant inoculated with non adapted culture. PMID:17363148

  12. Catalytic and non-catalytic wet air oxidation of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate: Kinetics and biodegradability enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) were investigated as suitable precursors for the biological treatment of industrial wastewater containing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Two hours WAO semi-batch experiments were conducted at 15bar of oxygen partial pressure (PO2) and at 180, 200 and 220deg. C. It was found that the highest temperature provides appreciable total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement of about 42 and 47%, correspondingly. Based on the main identified intermediates (acetic acid and sulfobenzoic acid) a reaction pathway for DBS and a kinetic model in WAO were proposed. In the case of CWAO experiments, seventy-two hours tests were done in a fixed bed reactor in continuous trickle flow regime, using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst. The temperature and PO2 were 140-160deg. C and 2-9bar, respectively. The influence of the operating conditions on the DBS oxidation, the occurrence of oxidative coupling reactions over the AC, and the catalytic activity (in terms of substrate removal) were established. The results show that the AC without any supported active metal behaves bi-functional as adsorbent and catalyst, giving TOC conversions up to 52% at 160deg. C and 2 bar of PO2, which were comparable to those obtained in WAO experiments. Respirometric tests were completed before and after CWAO and to the main intermediates identified through the WAO and CWAO oxidation route. Then, the readily biodegradable COD (CODRB) of the CWAO and WAO effluents were found. Taking into account these results it was possible to compare whether or not the CWAO or WAO effluents were suitable for a conventional activated sludge plant inoculated with non adapted culture

  13. Catalytic and non-catalytic wet air oxidation of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate: Kinetics and biodegradability enhancement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suarez-Ojeda, Maria Eugenia [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Escola Tecnica Superior d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Paisos Catalans 26, 43007 Tarragona, Catalonia (Spain); Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Edifici Q-ETSE, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Kim, Jungkwon [Chemical Engineering and Analytical Sciences Department, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Carrera, Julian [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Edifici Q-ETSE, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Metcalfe, Ian S. [Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials Department, University of Newcastle upon Tyne, Newcastle upon Tyne (United Kingdom); Font, Josep [Departament d' Enginyeria Quimica, Escola Tecnica Superior d' Enginyeria Quimica, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Av. Paisos Catalans 26, 43007 Tarragona, Catalonia (Spain)]. E-mail: jose.font@urv.cat

    2007-06-18

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) were investigated as suitable precursors for the biological treatment of industrial wastewater containing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Two hours WAO semi-batch experiments were conducted at 15bar of oxygen partial pressure (P{sub O{sub 2}}) and at 180, 200 and 220deg. C. It was found that the highest temperature provides appreciable total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement of about 42 and 47%, correspondingly. Based on the main identified intermediates (acetic acid and sulfobenzoic acid) a reaction pathway for DBS and a kinetic model in WAO were proposed. In the case of CWAO experiments, seventy-two hours tests were done in a fixed bed reactor in continuous trickle flow regime, using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst. The temperature and P{sub O{sub 2}} were 140-160deg. C and 2-9bar, respectively. The influence of the operating conditions on the DBS oxidation, the occurrence of oxidative coupling reactions over the AC, and the catalytic activity (in terms of substrate removal) were established. The results show that the AC without any supported active metal behaves bi-functional as adsorbent and catalyst, giving TOC conversions up to 52% at 160deg. C and 2 bar of P{sub O{sub 2}}, which were comparable to those obtained in WAO experiments. Respirometric tests were completed before and after CWAO and to the main intermediates identified through the WAO and CWAO oxidation route. Then, the readily biodegradable COD (COD{sub RB}) of the CWAO and WAO effluents were found. Taking into account these results it was possible to compare whether or not the CWAO or WAO effluents were suitable for a conventional activated sludge plant inoculated with non adapted culture.

  14. SPONTANEOUS CATALYTIC WET AIR OXIDATION DURING PRE-TREATMENT OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE SLUDGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, D.; Herman, C.; Pareizs, J.; Bannochie, C.; Best, D.; Bibler, N.; Fellinger, T.

    2009-10-01

    Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) operates the Defense Waste Processing Facility for the U.S. Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. This facility immobilizes high-level radioactive waste through vitrification following chemical pretreatment. Catalytic destruction of formate and oxalate ions to carbon dioxide has been observed during qualification testing of non-radioactive analog systems. Carbon dioxide production greatly exceeded hydrogen production, indicating the occurrence of a process other than the catalytic decomposition of formic acid. Statistical modeling was used to relate the new reaction chemistry to partial catalytic wet air oxidation of both formate and oxalate ions driven by the low concentrations of palladium, rhodium, and/or ruthenium in the waste. Variations in process conditions led to increases or decreases in the total oxidative destruction, as well as partially shifting the preferred species undergoing destruction from oxalate ion to formate ion.

  15. Kinetics study on catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol by several metal oxide catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WAN Jia-feng; FENG Yu-jie; CAI Wei-min; YANG Shao-xia; SUN Xiao-jun

    2004-01-01

    Four metal oxide catalysts composed of copper (Cu), stannum (Sn), copper-stannum (Cu-Sn) and copper-cerium(Cu-Ce) respectively were prepared by the co-impregnation method, and γ-alumina(γ-Al2O3) is selected as support. A first-order kinetics model was established to study the catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol at different temperature when these catalysts were used. The model simulations are good agreement with present experimental data. Results showed that the reaction rate constants can be significantly increased when catalysts were used, and the catalyst of 6% Cu-10%Ce/γ-Al2O3 showed the best catalytic activity. This is consistent with the result of catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol and the COD removal can be arrived at 98.2% at temperature 210℃, oxygen partial pressure 3 MPa and reaction time 30 min. The activation energies of each reaction with different catalysts are nearly equal, which is found to be about 42 kJ/mol and the reaction in this study is proved to be kinetics control.

  16. Application of Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation to Treatment of Landfill Leachate on Co/Bi Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hai-sheng; LIU Liang; ZHANG Rong; DONG De-ming; LIU Hong-liang; LI Yu

    2004-01-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation(CWAO) was employed to reduce the organic compounds in landfill leachate and the effects of temperature, oxygen pressure, catalyst dosage, and concentration of the organic compounds on the TOC and CODCr removal rates were studied. The degradation kinetics of landfill leachate was also investigated and an exponential experiential model consisting of four influential factors was established to describe the reduction of the organic compounds in the landfill leachate. Meanwhile, the GC-MS technique was used to detect the components of the organic intermediates for the inference of the decomposition mechanisms of the organic compounds in landfill leachate. The results reveal that the reaction temperature and the catalyst dosage are the most important factors affecting the degradation reaction of the organic compounds and that the principal intermediates confirmed by GC-MS are organic acids at a percentage of more than 88% with no aldehydes or alcohols detected. The decomposition mechanisms of the organic compounds in landfill leachate were inferred based on the GC-MS information as follows: the activated gas phase O2 captured the hydrogen of the organic pollutants to produce free radicals, which then initiated the catalytic reaction. So most of the organic compounds were oxidized into CO2 and H2O ultimately. In general, catalytic wet air oxidation over catalyst Co3O4/Bi2O3 was a very promising technique for the treatment of landfill leachate.

  17. Catalytic wet air oxidation of 2-chlorophenol over sewage sludge-derived carbon-based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Yuting [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l’environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), CNRS – Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Xiong, Ya; Tian, Shuanghong [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Environmental Pollution Control and Remediation Technology, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Kong, Lingjun [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510275 (China); Descorme, Claude, E-mail: claude.descorme@ircelyon.univ-lyon1.fr [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse et l’environnement de Lyon (IRCELYON), CNRS – Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • A sewage sludge derived carbon-supported iron oxide catalyst (FeSC) was prepared. • FeSC exhibited high catalytic activity in the wet air oxidation of 2-chlorophenol. • A strong correlation was observed between the 2-CP conversion, the iron leaching and the pH. • Using an acetate buffer, the iron leaching was suppressed while keeping some catalytic activity. • A simplified reaction pathway was proposed for the CWAO of 2-CP over the FeSC catalyst. - Abstract: A sewage sludge derived carbon-supported iron oxide catalyst (FeSC) was prepared and used in the Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO) of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP). The catalysts were characterized in terms of elemental composition, surface area, pH{sub PZC}, XRD and SEM. The performances of the FeSC catalyst in the CWAO of 2-CP was assessed in a batch reactor operated at 120 °C under 0.9 MPa oxygen partial pressure. Complete decomposition of 2-CP was achieved within 5 h and 90% Total Organic Carbon (TOC) was removed after 24 h of reaction. Quite a straight correlation was observed between the 2-CP conversion, the amount of iron leached in solution and the pH of the reaction mixture at a given reaction time, indicating a strong predominance of the homogeneous catalysis contribution. The iron leaching could be efficiently prevented when the pH of the solution was maintained at values higher than 4.5, while the catalytic activity was only slightly reduced. Upon four successive batch CWAO experiments, using the same FeSC catalyst recovered by filtration after pH adjustment, only a very minor catalyst deactivation was observed. Finally, based on all the identified intermediates, a simplified reaction pathway was proposed for the CWAO of 2-CP over the FeSC catalyst.

  18. Catalytic wet air oxidation of 2-chlorophenol over sewage sludge-derived carbon-based catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A sewage sludge derived carbon-supported iron oxide catalyst (FeSC) was prepared. • FeSC exhibited high catalytic activity in the wet air oxidation of 2-chlorophenol. • A strong correlation was observed between the 2-CP conversion, the iron leaching and the pH. • Using an acetate buffer, the iron leaching was suppressed while keeping some catalytic activity. • A simplified reaction pathway was proposed for the CWAO of 2-CP over the FeSC catalyst. - Abstract: A sewage sludge derived carbon-supported iron oxide catalyst (FeSC) was prepared and used in the Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO) of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP). The catalysts were characterized in terms of elemental composition, surface area, pHPZC, XRD and SEM. The performances of the FeSC catalyst in the CWAO of 2-CP was assessed in a batch reactor operated at 120 °C under 0.9 MPa oxygen partial pressure. Complete decomposition of 2-CP was achieved within 5 h and 90% Total Organic Carbon (TOC) was removed after 24 h of reaction. Quite a straight correlation was observed between the 2-CP conversion, the amount of iron leached in solution and the pH of the reaction mixture at a given reaction time, indicating a strong predominance of the homogeneous catalysis contribution. The iron leaching could be efficiently prevented when the pH of the solution was maintained at values higher than 4.5, while the catalytic activity was only slightly reduced. Upon four successive batch CWAO experiments, using the same FeSC catalyst recovered by filtration after pH adjustment, only a very minor catalyst deactivation was observed. Finally, based on all the identified intermediates, a simplified reaction pathway was proposed for the CWAO of 2-CP over the FeSC catalyst

  19. Conversion of the refractory ammonia and acetic acid in catalytic wet air oxidation of animal byproducts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Virginie Fontanier; Sofiane Zalouk; Stéphane Barbati

    2011-01-01

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of slaughtered animal byproducts (ABPs) were investigated.Two step experiment was carried out consisting ofa non-catalysed WAO run followed by a CWAO run at 170-275℃, 20 MPa, and reaction time 180 min.The WAO (1st step) of sample (5 g/L total organic carbon (TOC)) yielded (82.0 ± 4)% TOC removal and (78.4 ± 13.2)%conversion of the initial organic-N into NH4+-N.Four metal catalysts (Pd, Pt, Rh, Ru) supported over alumina have been tested in catalytic WAO (2nd step) at elevated pH to enhance ammonia conversion and organic matter removal, particularly acetic acid.It was found that the catalysts Ru, Pt, and Rh had significant effects on the TOC removal (95.1%, 99.5% and 96.7%, respectively) and on the abatement of ammonia (93.4%, 96.7% and 96.3%, respectively) with high nitrogen selectivity.The catalyst Pd was found to have the less activity while Pt had the best performance.The X-Ray diffraction analysis showed that the support of catalyst was not stable under the experimental conditions since it reacted with phosphate present in solution.Nitrite and nitrate ions were monitored during the oxidation reaction and it was concluded that CWAO of ammonia in real waste treatment framework was in good agreement with the results obtained from the literature for ideal solutions of ammonia.

  20. Preparation of rare-earth metal complex oxide catalysts for catalytic wet air oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ning; LI Guangming; YAO Zhenya; ZHAO Jianfu

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation(CWAO)is one of the most promising technologies for pollution abatement.Developing catalysts with high activity and stability is crucial for the application of the CWAO process.The Mn/Ce complex oxide catalyrsts for CWAO of high concentration phenol containing wastewater were prepared by coprecipitation.The catalyst preparation conditions were optimized by using an orthogonal layout method and single-factor experimental analysis.The Mn/Ce serial catalysts were characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller(BET)analysis and the metal cation leaching was measured by inductively coupled plasma torch-atomic emission spectrometry(ICP-AES).The results show that the catalysts have high catalytic activities even at a low temperature(80℃)and low oxygen partial pressure(0.5 MPa)in a batch reactor.The metallic ion leaching is comparatively low(Mn<6.577 mg/L and Ce<0.6910 mg/L,respectively)in the CWAO process.The phenol,CODCD and TOC removal efficiencies in the solution exceed 98.5% using the optimal catalyst(named CSP).The new catalyst would have a promising application in CWAO treatment of high concentration organic wastewater.

  1. Supported noble metal catalysts in the catalytic wet air oxidation of industrial wastewaters and sewage sludges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besson, M; Descorme, C; Bernardi, M; Gallezot, P; di Gregorio, F; Grosjean, N; Minh, D Pham; Pintar, A

    2010-12-01

    This paper reviews some catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) investigations of industrial wastewaters over platinum and ruthenium catalysts supported on TiO2 and ZrO2 formulated to be active and resistant to leaching, with particular focus on the stability of the catalyst. Catalyst recycling experiments were performed in batch reactors and long-term stability tests were conducted in trickle-bed reactors. The catalyst did not leach upon treatment of Kraft bleaching plant and olive oil mill effluents, and could be either recycled or used for long periods of time in continuous reactors. Conversely, these catalysts were rapidly leached when used to treat effluents from the production of polymeric membranes containing N,N-dimethylformamide. The intermediate formation of amines, such as dimethylamine and methylamine with a high complexing capacity for the metal, was shown to be responsible for the metal leaching. These heterogeneous catalysts also deactivated upon CWAO of sewage sludges due to the adsorption of the solid organic matter. Pre-sonication of the sludge to disintegrate the flocs and improve solubility was inefficient. PMID:21214003

  2. Development of a Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation Method to Produce Feedstock Gases from Waste Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulis, Michael J.; Guerrero-Medina, Karen J.; Hepp, Aloysius F.

    2012-01-01

    Given the high cost of space launch, the repurposing of biological and plastic wastes to reduce the need for logistical support during long distance and long duration space missions has long been recognized as a high priority. Described in this paper are the preliminary efforts to develop a wet air oxidation system in order to produce fuels from waste polymers. Preliminary results of partial oxidation in near supercritical water conditions are presented. Inherent corrosion and salt precipitation are discussed as system design issues for a thorough assessment of a second generation wet air oxidation system. This work is currently being supported by the In-Situ Resource Utilization Project.

  3. Catalytic wet-air oxidation of lignin in a three-phase reactor with aromatic aldehyde production

    OpenAIRE

    Sales F.G.; Abreu C.A.M.; Pereira J. A. F. R.

    2004-01-01

    In the present work a process of catalytic wet air oxidation of lignin obtained from sugar-cane bagasse is developed with the objective of producing vanillin, syringaldehyde and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde in a continuous regime. Palladium supported on g-alumina was used as the catalyst. The reactions in the lignin degradation and aldehyde production were described by a kinetic model as a system of complex parallel and series reactions, in which pseudo-first-order steps are found. For the purpose o...

  4. Catalytic wet-air oxidation of lignin in a three-phase reactor with aromatic aldehyde production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sales F.G.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present work a process of catalytic wet air oxidation of lignin obtained from sugar-cane bagasse is developed with the objective of producing vanillin, syringaldehyde and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde in a continuous regime. Palladium supported on g-alumina was used as the catalyst. The reactions in the lignin degradation and aldehyde production were described by a kinetic model as a system of complex parallel and series reactions, in which pseudo-first-order steps are found. For the purpose of producing aromatic aldehydes in continuous regime, a three-phase fluidized reactor was built, and it was operated using atmospheric air as the oxidizer. The best yield in aromatic aldehydes was of 12%. The experimental results were compatible with those values obtained by the pseudo-heterogeneous axial dispersion model (PHADM applied to the liquid phase.

  5. Thermodynamic and kinetic study of phenol degradation by a non-catalytic wet air oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefèvre, Sébastien; Boutin, Olivier; Ferrasse, Jean-Henry; Malleret, Laure; Faucherand, Rémy; Viand, Alain

    2011-08-01

    This work is dedicated to an accurate evaluation of thermodynamic and kinetics aspects of phenol degradation using wet air oxidation process. Phenol is a well known polluting molecule and therefore it is important having data of its behaviour during this process. A view cell is used for the experimental study, with an internal volume of 150 mL, able to reach pressures up to 30 MPa and temperatures up to 350°C. Concerning the thermodynamic phase equilibria, experimental and modelling results are obtained for different binary systems (water/nitrogen, water/air) and ternary system (water/nitrogen/phenol). The best model is the Predictive Soave Redlich Kwong one. This information is necessary to predict the composition of the gas phase during the process. It is also important for an implementation in a process simulation. The second part is dedicated to kinetics evaluation of the degradation of phenol. Different compounds have been detected using GC coupled with a MS. A kinetic scheme is deduced, taking into account the evolution of phenol, hydroquinones, catechol, resorcinol and acetic acid. The kinetic parameters are calculated for this scheme. These data are important to evaluate the evolution of the concentration of the different polluting molecules during the process. A simplified kinetic scheme, which can be easily implemented in a process simulation, is also determined for the direct degradation of phenol into H(2)O and CO(2). The Arrhenius law data obtained for the phenol disappearance are the following: k=1.8×10(6)±3.9×10(5)M(-1)s(-1) (pre-exponential factor) and E(a)=77±8 kJ mol(-1) (activation energy). PMID:21700312

  6. Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation of o-Chlorophenol in Wastewater%邻氯苯酚废水的催化湿式氧化处理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐新华; 汪大翚

    2003-01-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) was investigated in laboratory-scale experiments for the treatmentof o-chlorophenol in wastewater. Experimental results showed that wet air oxidation (WAO) process in the absence ofcatalyst was also effective for o-chlorophenol in wastewater treatment. Up to 80% of the initial CODCr was removedby wet air oxidation at 270℃ with twice amount of the required stoichiometric oxygen supply. At temperatureof 150℃, the removal rate of CODCr was only 30%. Fe2(SO4)3, CuSO4, Cu(NO3)2 and MnSO4 exhibited highcatalytic activity. Higher removal rate of CODCr was obtained by CWAO. More than 96% of the initial CODCrwas removed at 270℃ and 84.6%-93.6% of the initial CODCr was removed at 150℃. Mixed catalysts had bettercatalytic activity for the degradation of o-chlorophenol in wastewater.

  7. Influence of the different oxidation treatment on the performance of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in the catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Carbon nanotubes were used as catalysts in the catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol. ► Four chemical oxidants (HNO3/H2SO4, H2O2, O3 and air) were used to modify the CNTs. ► The O3-functionalized CNTs exhibit the highest activity and the perfect stability. - Abstract: Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) functionalized by different oxidants (HNO3/H2SO4, H2O2, O3 and air) have been used as catalysts for the wet air oxidation of phenol. To investigate the effect of the oxidation conditions on the structure of the functionalized MWCNTs, various characterization techniques, e.g., scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Raman spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been used. The MWCNTs treated with O3 and H2O2 show higher amounts of oxygen-containing functional groups and carboxylic acid groups, and a weaker acidic nature, in comparison with those treated with other oxidizing agents. All the functionalized MWCNTs exhibit good activity in the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of phenol. However, the MWCNTs treated with O3 show the highest activity with desirable stability in comparison with other functionalized MWCNTs, indicating that the functionalization of carbon nanotubes with O3 is a very promising strategy in synthesizing efficient catalysts for CWAO.

  8. Toxicity to Daphnia magna and Vibrio fischeri of Kraft bleach plant effluents treated by catalytic wet-air oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintar, Albin; Besson, Michèle; Gallezot, Pierre; Gibert, Janine; Martin, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    Two Kraft-pulp bleaching effluents from a sequence of treatments which include chlorine dioxide and caustic soda were treated by catalytic wet-air oxidation (CWAO) at T=463 K in trickle-bed and batch-recycle reactors packed with either TiO2 extrudates or Ru(3 wt%)/TiO2 catalyst. Chemical analyses (TOC removal, color, HPLC) and bioassays (48-h and 30-min acute toxicity tests using Daphnia magna and Vibrio fischeri, respectively) were used to get information about the toxicity impact of the starting effluents and of the treated solutions. Under the operating conditions, complex organic compounds are mostly oxidized into carbon dioxide and water, along with short-chain carboxylic acids. Bioassays were found as a complement to chemical analyses for ensuring the toxicological impact on the ecosystem. In spite of a large decrease of TOC, the solutions of end products were all more toxic to Daphnia magna than the starting effluents by factors ranging from 2 to 33. This observation is attributed to the synergistic effects of acetic acid and salts present in the solutions. On the other hand, toxicity reduction with respect to Vibrio fischeri was achieved: detoxification factors greater than unity were measured for end-product solutions treated in the presence of the Ru(3 wt%)/TiO2 catalyst, suggesting the absence of cumulative effect for this bacteria, or a lower sensitivity to the organic acids and salts. Bleach plant effluents treated by the CWAO process over the Ru/TiO2 catalyst were completely biodegradable. PMID:14675640

  9. Investigation on preparation of CuO-SnO2-CeO2/γ-Al2O3 catalysts for catalytic wet air oxidation process and their catalytic activity for degradation of phenol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Xiao-jun; ZHANG Mi-lin; WAN Jia-feng; XIA Zhi; LIU Xiao-hui; LIU hui

    2008-01-01

    Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation process is an efficient measure for treatment of wastewater with great strength which is not biodegradable. Heterocatalysts now become the key investigation subject of catalytic wet air oxidation process due to their good stability and easy separation. In the paper, CuO-SnOE-CeO2/γ-Al2O3 catalysts are prepared by impregnation method, with SnO2 as a doping component, CuO as an active component, CeO2 as a structure stabilizer, γ-Al2O3 as a substrate. XPS test is carried out to investigate the effect of Sn on the chemical surrounding of Cu and O element on the catalyst surface and their catalytic activity. It is shown that the right do-ping of Sn can increase Cu+ content on the catalyst surface, as a result the quantity of adsorption oxygen is also increased. It is found that Cu + content on the catalyst surface is one of the primary factors that determin catalytic activity of catalyst through analyzing the catalytic wet air oxidation process of phenol.

  10. Treatment of aniline by catalytic wet air oxidation: comparative study over CuO/CeO2 and NiO/Al2O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ersöz, Gülin; Atalay, Süheyda

    2012-12-30

    The treatment of aniline by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) was studied in a bubble reactor. The experiments were performed to investigate the effects of catalyst loading, temperature, reaction time, air flow rate, and pressure on aniline removal. The catalytic effects of the prepared nanostructured catalysts, CuO/CeO(2) (10% wt) and NiO/Al(2)O(3) (10% wt), on the CWAO treatment efficiency were also examined and compared. The prepared catalysts seem to be active having an aniline removal of 45.7% with CuO/CeO(2) and 41.9% with NiO/Al(2)O(3). The amount of N(2) formed was approximately the same for both of the catalysts. PMID:23041516

  11. Carbon and nitrogen removal from glucose-glycine melanoidins solution as a model of distillery wastewater by catalytic wet air oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phuong Thu, Le; Michèle, Besson

    2016-06-01

    Sugarcane molasses distillery wastewater contains melanoidins, which are dark brown recalcitrant nitrogenous polymer compounds. Studies were carried out in batch mode to evaluate Pt and Ru supported catalysts in the Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO) process of a synthetic melanoidins solution, prepared by stoichiometric reaction of glucose with glycine. The addition of a catalyst slightly improved TOC removal compared with the non-catalytic reaction, and especially promoted the conversion of ammonium produced from organically-bound nitrogen in melanoidins to molecular nitrogen and nitrate. The selectivity to N2 attained 89% in the presence of the Pt catalysts in the reaction conditions used (TOC=2200mgL(-1), TN=280mgL(-1), 0.5g catalyst loaded with 3% metal, 210°C, 70bar total air pressure). To avoid leaching of the active metal by organically-bound nitrogen, the reaction was very efficiently performed in a two-step reaction consisting in WAO to convert nitrogen into ammonium, before the introduction of a catalyst. PMID:26900982

  12. Degradation process analysis of the azo dyes by catalytic wet air oxidation with catalyst CuO/γ-Al2O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Li; Ma, Hongrui; Zhang, Lei

    2013-01-01

    Three azo dyes (Methyl Orange, Direct Brown and Direct Green) were treated by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) with the catalysts CuO/γ-Al(2)O(3) prepared by consecutive impregnation. The relationship of decolorization extent, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal extent and total organic carbon (TOC) in dye solution were investigated. The results indicated that the CuO/γ-Al(2)O(3) catalyst had excellent catalytic activity in treating azo dyes. Almost 99% of color and 70% of TOC were removed in 2h. The high removal extent of color and TOC indicated that the CWAO obtained perfect decomposition for pollutants. The degradation pathway of azo dyes was analyzed by UV-Vis, FTIR and MS. According to the examined results, the hydroxyl ((·)OH) radicals induced strong oxidizing effects in the target solution and destroyed the chromophoric groups of azo-benzene conjugated of the molecular structure. Considering characteristics of the dye structure, the azo bond (-N=N-) would first be attacked by the hydroxyl radical and other free radicals. With the continuous oxidization and the long reaction time at high temperature, these intermediates could be oxidized to the final oxidation products, such as water and carbon dioxide. PMID:22795071

  13. 催化湿式氧化预处理造纸黑液%Pretreatment of Black Liquor by Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董振海; 李利敏; 闫海生; 于姗姗; 李秀珍; 毕延文

    2011-01-01

    采用连续式固定床反应器,利用自制稀土类复合金属氧化物催化剂对草浆造纸黑液进行了催化湿式氧化(CWAO)预处理研究.通过正交实验确定了最佳工艺条件为:进水COD 40 800 mg/L,空速0.8h-1,反应温度260℃,反应压力6.5 MPa.在此最佳条件下进行实验,COD去除率达90%.经CWAO工艺处理后,草浆造纸黑液的可生化性显著提高,BOD5/COD由0.11提高至0.62.在1 000 h CWAO连续实验中,自制稀土类复合金属氧化物催化剂显示出较高催化活性和较好的稳定性.%The black liquor from straw pulp paper-making was pretreated by catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) in the continuous fixed bed reactor with self-made rare earth oxide catalyst. The optimum process conditions determined by the orthogonal tests are as follows: influent COD 40 800 mg/L,space velocity 0. 8 h-1 .reaction temperature 260℃, reaction pressure 6. 5 Mpa. Under these conditions, the COD removal rate is 90%. The biodegradability of the treated black liquor is significantly improved with BOD5/COD increased from 0. 11 to 0. 62. During 1 000 h of the CWAO continuous experiment, the catalytic activity and stability of the self-made rare earth oxide catalyst are good.

  14. Catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol over active carbon in fixed bed reactor: steady state and periodic operation

    OpenAIRE

    Habtu, Nigus Gabbiye

    2011-01-01

    La rápida industrialización y urbanización mundial ha creado un sin número de contaminantes para los medios acuosos tóxicos y peligrosos, los cuales en su gran mayoría son difícil de degradar de forma natural. Los fenoles son algunos de estos compuestos tóxicos que se encuentran con frecuencia en muchos efluentes industriales. Revisión literaria específica que la oxidación catalítica en aire húmedo utilizando carbón activado podría ser una solución prometedora para la destrucción de estos con...

  15. Comparative study of supported CuOx and MnOx catalysts for the catalytic wet air oxidation of β-naphthol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Degradation of β-naphthol was carried out by CWAO and the COD removal was 93.7%. ► Comparative study of supported CuOx and MnOx catalysts was implemented. ► Destruction of β-naphthol was catalyzed by metal oxides supported on nano-TiO2. - Abstract: MnOx/nano-TiO2, MnOx/Al2O3–TiO2 (Al-Ti), CuOx/nano-TiO2 and CuOx/Al-Ti were prepared and their application in catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of β-naphthol were investigated. The catalysts had been characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) measurements. Phases of CuO, Cu2O, CuAl2O4, MnO2 and Mn2O3 could be found on the surface of the aforementioned catalysts. Significant differences in activities were observed among the prepared catalysts. Compared to CuOx/nano-TiO2, the combined action of highly dispersed CuO as well as CuAl2O4 of CuOx/Al-Ti helped to achieve higher activity for the CWAO of β-naphthol, while the Cu2O component lead to lower efficiency of CuOx/nano-TiO2. On the surface of MnOx/nano-TiO2, both the larger amount of highly dispersed MnO2 and the stronger electron transfer between MnO2 and Mn2O3 were helpful to promote the activity for the degradation of β-naphthol. However, the higher amount of bulk MnO2 and the weaker electron transfer for MnOx/Al-Ti were unfavorable to increase its efficiency. Among the four catalysts as-prepared, MnOx/nano-TiO2 was identified the highest activity with 93.7% COD removal.

  16. Graphene-based materials in catalytic wet peroxide oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Helder; Ribeiro, Rui; Pastrana-Martínez, Luisa; Figueiredo, José; Faria, Joaquim; Silva, Adrián

    2014-01-01

    In catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO),an advanced oxidation process, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is decomposed catalytically giving rise to hydroxyl radicals (HO•).These radicals, exhibiting high oxidizing potential, serve as effective and non selective species for the degradation of several organic pollutants in liquid phase. Since the report of Lücking et al. [1], carbon materials have been explored as catalysts for CWPO[2]. Recent reports address process intensification issues, br...

  17. Nanostructured Catalytic Reactors for Air Purification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase II project proposes the development of lightweight compact nanostructured catalytic reactors for air purification from toxic gaseous organic...

  18. Nanostructured Catalytic Reactors for Air Purification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I project proposes the development of lightweight compact nanostructured catalytic reactors for air purification from toxic gaseous organic...

  19. Research Progress on Catalyst of Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation for Phenol Wastewater%催化湿式氧化含酚废水催化剂的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李荣; 段大勇

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation ( CWAO ) technology is an effective technology for phenol wastewater, developing and selecting suitable catalyst is a key factor of CWAO. Active components were briefly introduced and CWAO catalyst for phenol wastewater treatment was carried out. It was specified that selecting the best combination of suitable active component and carrier of CWAO catalyst can improve the efficiency of phenol degradation, developing the catalyst with high activity, stability and cheap characteristics was the development direction of CWAO for phenol wastewater treatment.%催化湿式氧化技术是处理含酚废水的有效技术,此技术的关键是合适催化剂的研制和选用。本文对催化湿式氧化含酚废水催化剂的活性组分、载体等情况进行了综述,并指出选用最佳活性组分和载体的组合能够提高催化剂对苯酚的降解效率,研发高活性、高稳定性及廉价的催化剂是催化湿式氧化含酚废水的发展方向。

  20. Degradation of phenol via wet-air oxidation over CuO/CeO2-ZrO2 nanocatalyst synthesized employing ultrasound energy: physicochemical characterization and catalytic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvas, Mohsen; Haghighi, Mohammad; Allahyari, Somaiyeh

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of phenol was carried out under atmospheric pressure of oxygen at 160 degrees C in a stirred batch reactor over copper catalysts supported by CeO2-ZrO2. The copper with different loadings were impregnated over the composite support by a sonication process. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface area and Fourier-transformed infrared analyses. Characteristic peaks attributed to copper were not found in XRD patterns even at high loadings, but based on EDX results, the existence of copper particles was confirmed. It means that sonochemical synthesis method even at high loadings produced small copper particles with low crystallinity and excellent dispersion over the CeO2-ZrO2 composite. FESEM micrographs indicated just slight enhancement in particle size at high loadings of Cu. Blank CWAO experiments illustrated low conversion of phenol using bare CeO2-ZrO2 support. Although some agglomeration of particles was found at high loadings of copper but owning to the fact that almost all ZrO2 particles incorporated into the CeO2 lattice at high contents of Cu, catalyst activity not only did not decrease but also the phenol conversion reached to the higher values. The optimal catalyst loading for phenol degradation was found to be 9 g/l. Complete conversion of phenol was achieved using CuO/CeO2-ZrO2 in 9 g/l catalyst loading with initial phenol concentration of 1000 ppm after 3 h of reaction. PMID:24701909

  1. Process of forming catalytic surfaces for wet oxidation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagow, R. B. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A wet oxidation process was developed for oxidizing waste materials, comprising dissolved ruthenium salt in a reactant feed stream containing the waste materials. The feed stream is introduced into a reactor, and the reactor contents are then raised to an elevated temperature to effect deposition of a catalytic surface of ruthenium black on the interior walls of the reactor. The feed stream is then maintained in the reactor for a period of time sufficient to effect at least partial oxidation of the waste materials.

  2. Degradation of Bagasse Alkaline Lignin by Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation with Five Catalysts%催化剂对甘蔗渣碱木质素催化湿空气氧化降解的催化作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚向荣; 詹怀宇; 周生飞

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, bagasse alkaline lignin was degraded by Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO) with five different catalysts. The results showed that the main degradation products were; p-hydroxybenzaldehyde, vanillin, syringaldehyde, syringic acid, vanillic acid and acetosyringone. The concentration of aromatic substances increased when the reaction time increased. Catalysts had a significant effect on the concentration of aromatic substances. Using CO2O3 as catalyst, the concentration of vanillin, syringaldehyde and acetosyringone were 400.2 mg/L, 351.4 mg/L, and 248.7 mg/L respectively, and the concentration of vanillin increased 82.6% comparing to no catalyst was used. Using AQ as catalyst, the concentration of vanillin was 344. 9 mg/L which was 1. 5 times of that without using catalyst. Using Co2O3, CuSO4, MnO2, AQ, Fe2O3 as catalysts, the total concentrations of phenolic aldehyde compounds were 1696 mg/L, 1658 mg/L, 1584 mg/ L, 1347 mg/L and 1250 mg/L respectively,which explained that using Co2O3 as the catalyst was the best, and CuSO4 and MnO2 were the next, the catalysts of AQ and Fe2O3 only contributed to produce several kinds of phenolic aldehyde compounds with small molecules.%选取5种不同的催化剂对甘蔗渣碱木质素进行了催化湿空气氧化降解。结果表明,甘蔗渣碱木质素催化湿空气氧化降解的主要产物为对羟基苯甲醛、香草醛、丁香醛、丁香酸、香草酸和乙酰丁香酮;在实验条件下,反应时间对催化剂催化效果的影响较大,随着反应时间的延长,大部分小分子酚醛类化合物的浓度逐渐升高;使用催化剂能较大幅度地提高小分子酚醛类化合物的浓度。以Co2O3为催化剂,丁香醛、乙酰丁香酮、香草醛的浓度分别为400.2 mg/L、351.4 mg/L 248.7 mg/L,与未添加催化剂相比较,香草醛浓度提高了 82.6%;当以AQ为催化剂时,香草醛浓度为344.9mg/L,与空白样相比其浓度提高了1.5倍以上。

  3. Study on Catalytic Wet Oxidation of H2S into Sulfur on Fe/Cu Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A wet catalytic oxidation at room temperature was investigated with solution containing ferric, ferrous and cupric ions for H2S removal. The experiments were carried out in a two step process,and the results obtained show that the removal efficiency of H2S can always reach 100% in a 300 mm scrubbing column with four sieve plates, and the regeneration of ferric ions in 200 mm bubble column can match the consumed ferric species in absorption. Removal of H2S, production of elemental sulfur and regeneration of ferric, cupric ions can all be accomplished at the same time. No raw material is consumed except O2 in flue gas or air, the process has no secondary pollution and no problem of catalyst degradation and congestion.

  4. Advanced methods for the treatment of organic aqueous wastes: wet air oxidation and wet peroxide oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debellefontaine, Hubert; Chakchouk, Mehrez; Foussard, Jean Noel [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 31 - Toulouse (France). Dept. de Genie des Procedes Industriels; Tissot, Daniel; Striolo, Phillipe [IDE Environnement S.A., Toulouse (France)

    1993-12-31

    There is a growing concern about the problems of wastes elimination. Various oxidation techniques are suited for elimination of organic aqueous wastes, however, because of the environmental drawbacks of incineration, liquid phase oxidation should be preferred. `Wet Air Oxidation` and `Wet Peroxide Oxidation`are alternative processes which are discussed in this paper. 17 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  5. HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS: WET REMOVAL RATES AND MECHANISMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourteen hazardous organic air pollutants were evaluated for their potentials to be wet deposited by precipitation scavenging. This effort included a survey of solubilities (Henry's Law constants) in the literature, measurement of solubilities of three selected species, developme...

  6. Specific features of aluminum nanoparticle water and wet air oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxidation processes of the electrically exploded aluminum nanopowders in water and in wet air are examined in the paper. The morphology of the intermediate reaction products of aluminum oxidation has been studied using the transmission electron microscopy. It was shown that the aluminum nanopowder water oxidation causes the formation of the hollow spheres with mesoporous boehmite nanosheets coating. The wedge-like bayerite particles are formed during aluminum nanopowder wet air oxidation

  7. Key parameters when developing carbonaceous materials for catalytic wet peroxide oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Rui; Silva, Adrián; Pastrana-Martínez, Luisa; Figueiredo, José; Faria, Joaquim; Gomes, Helder

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) is an advanced oxidation process, operated using simple equipment and mild operating conditians, in which highly oxidizing hydraxyl radicaIs (HO') are generated fram the catalytic decompasition af hydrogen peroxide (H,O,) [L 2). Sinee the report of Lüeking el ai. in 1998 [3], the develapment af suitab-Ie -carbonaceous materials (without any added metal phase) for CWPO has been intensively explored [4). lhe influenee of struetUfal and surr...

  8. Wet-air oxidation cleans up black wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    Sterling Organics produces the analgesic paracetamol (acetaminophen) at its Dudley, England, plant. The wastewater from the batch process contains intermediates such as para-aminophenol (PAP) and byproducts such as thiosulfates, sulfites and sulfides. To stay ahead of increasingly strict environmental legislation, Sterling Organics installed a wet-air oxidation system at the Dudley facility in August 1992. The system is made by Zimpro Environmental Inc. (Rothschild, Wis.). Zimpro's wet-air oxidation system finds a way around the limitations of purely chemical or physical processes. In the process, compressed air at elevated temperature and pressure oxidizes the process intermediates and byproducts and removes the color from the wastewater.

  9. The applicability of the catalytic wet-oxidation to CELSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y.; Nitta, K.; Ohya, H.; Oguchi, M.

    1987-01-01

    The wet oxidation catalysis of Au, Pd, Pt, Rh or Ru on a ceramic honeycomb carrier was traced in detail by 16 to 20 repetitive batch tests each. As a result, Pt or Pd on a honeycomb carrier was shown to catalyze complete nitrogen gasification as N2. Though the catalysts which realize both complete nitrogen gasification and complete oxidation could not be found, the Ru+Rh catalyst was found to be most promising. Ru honeycomb catalyzed both nitrification and nitrogen gasification.

  10. CuO impregnated activated carbon for catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an original approach to the removal of phenol in synthetic wastewater by catalytic wet peroxide oxidation with copper binding activated carbon (CuAC) catalysts. The characteristics and oxidation performance of CuAC in the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation of phenol were studied in a batch reactor at 80 deg. C. Complete conversion of the oxidant, hydrogen peroxide, was observed with CuAC catalyst in 20 min oxidation, and a highly efficient phenol removal and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement were achieved in the first 30 min. The good oxidation performance of CuAC catalyst was contributed to the activity enhancement of copper oxide, which was binding in the carbon matrix. It can be concluded that the efficiency of oxidation dominated by the residual H2O2 in this study. An over 90% COD removal was achieved by using the multiple-step addition in this catalytic oxidation.

  11. Low-temperature catalytic gasification of wet industrial wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, D C; Neuenschwander, G G; Baker, E G; Sealock, Jr, L J; Butner, R S

    1991-04-01

    Bench-scale reactor tests are in progress at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop a low-temperature, catalytic gasification system. The system, licensed under the trade name Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg sign}), is designed for treating a wide variety of feedstocks ranging from dilute organics in water to waste sludges from food processing. This report describes a test program which used a continuous-feed tubular reactor. This test program is an intermediate stage in the process development. The reactor is a laboratory-scale version of the commercial concept as currently envisioned by the process developers. An energy benefit and economic analysis was also completed on the process. Four conceptual commercial installations of the TEES process were evaluated for three food processing applications and one organic chemical manufacturing application. Net energy production (medium-Btu gas) was achieved in all four cases. The organic chemical application was found to be economically attractive in the present situation. Based on sensitivity studies included in the analysis, the three food processing cases will likely become attractive in the near future as waste disposal regulations tighten and disposal costs increase. 21 refs., 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  12. Carbon nanotubes: a suitable material for catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of organic pollutants?

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, Rui; Silva, Adrián; Faria, Joaquim; Gomes, Helder

    2012-01-01

    Carbon materials, such as activated carbons (AC), graphite and activated carbon xerogels, have been explored as metal-free catalysts for the catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) of bio-refractory organic compounds, such as azo dyes and phenolic compounds [1-3]. At the same time, the application of carbon nanomaterials in catalysis, such as carbon nanotubes (CNT), has grown exponentially [4]. In the present work, commercial multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) were used in the CWPO of 2-nitr...

  13. The influence of carbon material properties on the efficiency of catalytic wet peroxide oxidation processes

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Helder; R. Ribeiro; Silva, Adrián; Figueiredo, José; Faria, Joaquim

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materiais are well known catalysts for activatin§ H^O^ into hydroxyl radicais (HO'), which are efficient oxidizin § agents. By making use of highly reactive HO" radicais, the elimination of organic compounds can be accomplished by catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO), a water treatment technology operating under mild conditions of pressure and temperature that hás gained importance due to the decreasing cost of H;0; and its increasing use in wastewater treatm...

  14. Orange II removal by catalytic wet peroxide oxidation using activated carbon xerogels

    OpenAIRE

    Pinho, Maria; Silva, Adrián; Fathy, Nady; Attia, Amina; Gomes, Helder; Faria, Joaquim

    2013-01-01

    Orange II is a synthetic dye widely employed in the textile industry and responsible for serious environrnentaI cancerns. Dyes like this urge the development af new technologies for the treatment af wastewaters generated in this industrial activity. Those include catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO), which is an advanced oxidation process (AOP) based on the generation of hydroxyl radicais (I-lO·) from hydrogen peroxide with tlle aid ofa suitable catalysl [I].

  15. Magnetic carbon xerogels for the catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of 4-nitrophenol solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Ribeiro, R; Silva, Adrián; Faria, Joaquim; Gomes, Helder

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) is a well-known advanced oxidation process for the removal of organic pollutants from industrial process waters and wastewater. Specifically, CWPO employs hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) as oxidation source and a suitable catalyst to promote its decomposition via formation of hydroxyl radicals (HO•), which exhibit high oxidizing potential and serve as effective species in the destruction of a huge range of organic pollutants

  16. Catalytic Converters Maintain Air Quality in Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    At Langley Research Center, engineers developed a tin-oxide based washcoat to prevent oxygen buildup in carbon dioxide lasers used to detect wind shears. Airflow Catalyst Systems Inc. of Rochester, New York, licensed the technology and then adapted the washcoat for use as a catalytic converter to treat the exhaust from diesel mining equipment.

  17. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol solutions over CuO/CeO2 systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three 5% CuO/CeO2 catalysts were synthesized by sol-gel, precipitation and combustion methods, followed by incipient wetness impregnation with copper nitrate. The samples were characterized by XRD, TPR, BET and tested for the catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of a phenol solution (5 g/L). The reaction took place in a batch reactor at atmospheric pressure, in a temperature range of 60-80°C , during 4 h. Phenol conversion, H2O2 consumption, pH and chemical oxygen demand were determined. The reaction temperature and the catalyst loading did improve the phenol and the H2O2 conversions. The effect on the selectivity towards complete mineralization was less marked, with levels among 60-70%. Stepwise addition of H2O2 was also tested.

  18. Catalytic wet oxidation of thiocyanate with homogeneous copper(II) sulphate catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wet oxidation of thiocyanate has been investigated in a semi-batch reactor at temperatures between 423 and 473 K and pressures between 6.1 x 103 and 1.0 x 104 kPa in the presence of copper(II) sulphate as catalyst. The effects of copper concentration, initial thiocyanate concentration, pressure and temperature on the reaction rate were analyzed and the main products of reaction were identified. A kinetic model for the Cu-catalyzed reaction is here proposed, including temperature, oxygen concentration, and the reduction of Cu2+ to Cu+ that gives an accurate prediction of the oxidation process under the assayed conditions. A mechanistic model based on the formation of a transition complex between a copper cation and two thiocyanate anions has been proposed for the catalytic wet oxidation.

  19. Spacecraft Water Regeneration by Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this project is to develop advanced catalysts for a volatile removal assembly used to purify spacecraft water. The innovation of the proposed...

  20. Catalytic wet air oxidation of organic pollutants in waste waters

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Helder; Figueiredo, José; Boaventura, Rui; Faria, Joaquim

    2001-01-01

    Organic compounds are involved iii the manufacture of a wide variety of chemical products, generating in the process different kinds of liquid effluents with high chemical oxygen demand (COD) and high toxicity. Discharge of these waters without treatment into a river course is unacceptable, due to the toxic potential of some organic compounds or to depletion of the dissolved oxygen level, which can decrease below the level considered necessary to support aquatic life.

  1. Air Entrainment in Dynamic Wetting: Knudsen Effects and the Influence of Ambient Air Pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Sprittles, James E

    2015-01-01

    Recent experiments on coating flows and liquid drop impact both demonstrate that wetting failures caused by air entrainment can be suppressed by reducing the ambient gas pressure. Here, it is shown that non-equilibrium effects in the gas can account for this behaviour, with ambient pressure reductions increasing the gas' mean free path and hence the Knudsen number $Kn$. These effects first manifest themselves through Maxwell slip at the gas' boundaries so that for sufficiently small $Kn$ they can be incorporated into a continuum model for dynamic wetting flows. The resulting mathematical model contains flow structures on the nano-, micro- and milli-metre scales and is implemented into a computational platform developed specifically for such multiscale phenomena. The coating flow geometry is used to show that for a fixed gas-liquid-solid system (a) the increased Maxwell slip at reduced pressures can substantially delay air entrainment, i.e. increase the `maximum speed of wetting', (b) unbounded maximum speeds ...

  2. Kinetics of Wet Air Oxidation of Wastewater from Natural Fiber Web Desizing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This work described the application of wet air oxidation (WAO) to the treatment of desizing wastewater from natural fiber processing. A two-liter autoclave batch reactor was used for the experiments. The range of operating temperature examined was between 150 and 290℃, and partial pressure of oxygen ranged from 0.375 to 2.25 MPa standardized at 25℃. Variations in Chemical Oxygen Demand(COD) and Total Organic Carbon(TOC) were monitored during each experiment and used to assess the performance of the process. Experimental results showed that WAO can be an efficient method for the treatment of desizing wnstewater. Furthermore, Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation (CWAO) was applied to reduce the reaction temperature and pressure in WAO process. A higher COD removal ratio was achieved under more mild reaction condition with the aid of CWAO. A mathematical model was also proposed to simulate the WAO process of desizing wastewater, in which three distinct kinetics steps were considered to describe the degradation of starch. The model simulations were in well agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Leachate Treatment UsingWet Air Oxidation Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Ebrahimi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and Objectives: Wet air oxidation (WAO is One of the advanced oxidation process which reduce organic matter concentration from industrial wastewater, toxic and non biodegradable substances and, solid waste leachate,etc. In this study the efficiency of wet air oxidation method in leachate treatment generating from Esfahan Composting factory was Evaluated."nMaterial and Methods: The experiment was carried out by adding 1.5 Lit of pretreated leachate sample the steel reactor with the volume of 3L. The reactor then underwent10 bar pressure at different temperature (100, 200 and 300 °C and various retention time (30, 60 and 90 min. Leachate sample in 18 stages from composting factory in Isfahan in the volume of 20 Lit was taken and the WAO method, was used for pre-treatments. Removal efficiency of COD, BOD, NH4-N, NO3 and TSS were examined."nResults: The results showed that the removal efficiency was more than 35% for COD, 38% for BOD, and 85% for TSS within one hour of reaction. The Maximum removal efficiency obtained in this study were 53.3% for NH4-N and 73.9 % forNO3-N."nConclusion: the results indicate that the reaction temperatures are the most important factors affecting degradation of organic matter. COD and BOD5 removal efficiency by WAO process increased as the time of reaction went up. In addition, BOD5/COD ratios of the effluents, which are generally regarded as an important index of biodegradability of leachate sample, were determined and improved grately as it reached to 84%. TheWAO process presented in this paper is considered an efficient process for pretreatment of leachate, as the COD, BOD5 and NO3 reduction observed in leachate samples.

  4. Session 6: Water depollution from aniline and phenol by air oxidation and adsorptive-catalytic oxidation in liquid phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrynkin, N.M.; Batygina, M.V.; Noskov, A.S. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Pr. Ak. Lavrentieva (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    This paper is devoted to development of carbon catalysts and application of catalytic wet air oxidation for deep cleaning of polluted waters. The described catalysts and method are solving the problem of development environmentally reliable method for fluids treatment and allow carrying out the adsorption of pollutants on carbon CAPM (catalytically active porous material) with following regeneration of the CAPM without the loss of adsorptive qualities. The experiments have shown a principal capability simultaneously to use carbon CAPM as adsorbent and either as catalyst, or as a catalyst support for oxidation of aniline and phenol in water solutions. (authors)

  5. Development of wet-proofed catalyst and catalytic exchange process for tritium extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Myung Jae; Son, Soon Hwan; Chung, Yang Gun; Lee, Gab Bock [Korea Electric Power Corp. (KEPCO), Taejon (Korea, Republic of). Research Center

    1995-12-31

    To apply a liquid phase catalytic exchange(LPCE) process for the tritium extraction from tritiated heavy water, the wet proofed catalyst to allow the hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction between liquid water and hydrogen gas was developed. A styrene divinyl benzene copolymer was selected as am effective catalyst support and prepared by suspension copolymerization. After post-treatment, final catalyst supports were dipped in chloroplatinic acid solution. The catalyst support had a good physical properties at a particular preparation condition. The catalytic performance was successfully verified through hydrogen isotopic exchange reaction in the exchange column. A mathematical model for the tritium removal process consisted of LPCE front-ended process and cryogenic distillation process was established using the NTU-HTU method for LPCE column and the FUG method for cryogenic distillation column, respectively. A computer program was developed using the model and then used to investigate optimum design variables which affect the size of columns and tritium inventory (author). 84 refs., 113 figs.

  6. Energetic optimization of wet air oxidation process using experimental design coupled with process simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wet air oxidation process (WAO) is used for wastewater treatment, especially when it contains high chemical oxygen demand. With non-catalytic processes, temperatures between 200 and 350 °C and pressures between 15 and 30 MPa are generally applied. A method, based on the coupling of simulations and experimental design, is used to compare and optimize two reactors (adiabatic and isotherm), their volume being equal and fixed. The interest of an experimental design approach is to plan simulation and to present results in immediate response surface. Four parameters have been selected; temperature, pressure, chemical oxygen demand, air ratio. After achieving the 25 simulations of the “numerical design”, mass and energy balances were analysed through two energetic values integrated as the design responses: exergetic efficiency and minimum heat required by the process for the functioning. The surface response methodology determines which are the most influencing parameters on design responses. It also shows that temperature of reaction and air ratio are the most influencing parameters. At least elements to calculate the cost of the plant, for both reactors are given. Both reactors allow to get complete degradation of pollutants, but strategy of investment and control are opposite.

  7. The study of leachate treatment by using three advanced oxidation process based wet air oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Mokhtari Mehdi; Ebrahimi Asghar; Ehrampoush Mohammad Hassan; Karimi Behroz

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Wet air oxidation is regarded as appropriate options for wastewater treatment with average organic compounds. The general purpose of this research is to determine the efficiency of three wet air oxidation methods, wet oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and absorption with activated carbon in removing organic matter and nitrogenous compounds from Isfahan's urban leachate. A leachate sample with the volume of 1.5 liters entered into a steel reactor with the volume of three liters and was...

  8. The Study of LeachateTreatment by Using Three Advanced Oxidation Process Based Wet air Oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Behroz Karimi; Mohammad Hassan Ehrampoush; Asghar Ebrahimi; Mehdi Mokhtari

    2013-01-01

    Wet air oxidation is regarded as appropriate options for wastewater treatment with average organic compounds. The general purpose of this research is to determine the efficiency of three wet air oxidation methods, wet oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and absorption with activated carbon in removing organic matter and nitrogenous compounds from Isfahan's urban leachate. A leachate sample with the volume of 1.5 liters entered into a steel reactor with the volume of three liters and was put unde...

  9. Low temperature catalytic combustion of natural gas - hydrogen - air mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newson, E.; Roth, F. von; Hottinger, P.; Truong, T.B. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The low temperature catalytic combustion of natural gas - air mixtures would allow the development of no-NO{sub x} burners for heating and power applications. Using commercially available catalysts, the room temperature ignition of methane-propane-air mixtures has been shown in laboratory reactors with combustion efficiencies over 95% and maximum temperatures less than 700{sup o}C. After a 500 hour stability test, severe deactivation of both methane and propane oxidation functions was observed. In cooperation with industrial partners, scaleup to 3 kW is being investigated together with startup dynamics and catalyst stability. (author) 3 figs., 3 refs.

  10. Study on a Novel Sensor of Wetness Measurement in Water/Air Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Deliang; Yan, Changqi; Gao, Puzhen

    2007-06-01

    In view of the character that wetness measurement for steam is difficult and inaccurate, a novel sensor of wetness measurement for flowing wet steam is developed by making use of capacitance method based on the fact that the water and steam have great different permittivities. The sensor can be installed in the steam pipe directly, so the steam will flow through it with full flow rate. Therefore the error due to drawing steam sample inaccurately is eliminated. By means of this sensor, on-line measurement of the wetness of wet steam can be realized. Based on the fact that air and steam have almost same permittivities, the flowing wet steam is simulated by spraying water into air flow in the experiment. Experiment with the novel sensor of wetness measurement in water/air flows shows that the frequency output decreases as the absolute humidity of flowing wet air increases. The relationship between the absolute humidity of air and the relative frequency deviation are obtained from the experimental data and this result accords with the theoretic conclusion. The sensor can endure high temperature and high pressure and has preferable precision, so it can be used to measure not only the wetness of flowing wet steam in nuclear power plants but also the water content of solid materials on-line after precise calibration.

  11. 14 CFR 119.53 - Wet leasing of aircraft and other arrangements for transportation by air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wet leasing of aircraft and other arrangements for transportation by air. 119.53 Section 119.53 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... Chapter § 119.53 Wet leasing of aircraft and other arrangements for transportation by air. (a)...

  12. Treatment of hydraulic fracturing wastewater by wet air oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yan, Xiuyi; Zhou, Jinghui; Ma, Jiuli

    2016-01-01

    Wastewater produced by hydraulic fracturing for oil and gas production is characterized by high salinity and high chemical oxygen demand (COD). We applied a combination of flocculation and wet air oxidation technology to optimize the reduction of COD in the treatment of hydraulic fracturing wastewater. The experiments used different values of flocculant, coagulant, and oxidizing agent added to the wastewater, as well as different reaction times and treatment temperatures. The use of flocculants for the pretreatment of fracturing wastewater was shown to improve treatment efficiency. The addition of 500 mg/L of polyaluminum chloride (PAC) and 20 mg/L of anionic polyacrylamide (APAM) during pretreatment resulted in a COD removal ratio of 8.2% and reduced the suspended solid concentration of fracturing wastewater to 150 mg/L. For a solution of pretreated fracturing wastewater with 12 mL of added H2O2, the COD was reduced to 104 mg/L when reacted at 300 °C for 75 min, and reduced to 127 mg/L when reacted at the same temperature for 45 min while using a 1 L autoclave. An optimal combination of these parameters produced treated wastewater that met the GB 8978-1996 'Integrated Wastewater Discharge Standard' level I emission standard. PMID:26942530

  13. Low-temperature catalytic gasification of wet industrial wastes. FY 1991--1992 interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, D.C.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Hart, T.R.; Phelps, M.R.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.

    1993-07-01

    A catalytic gasification system operating in a pressurized water environment has been developed and refined at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for over 12 years. Initial experiments were aimed at developing kinetics information for steam gasification of biomass in the presence of catalysts. The combined use of alkali and metal catalysts was reported for gasification of biomass and its components at low temperatures (350{degrees}C to 450{degrees}C). From the fundamental research evolved the concept of a pressurized, catalytic gasification system for converting wet biomass feedstocks to fuel gas. Extensive batch reactor testing and limited continuous reactor system (CRS) testing were undertaken in the development of this system under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. A wide range of biomass feedstocks were tested, and the importance of the nickel metal catalyst was identified. Specific use of this process for treating food processing wastes was also studied. The concept application was further expanded to encompass cleanup of hazardous wastewater streams, and results were reported for batch reactor tests and continuous reactor tests. Ongoing work at PNL focuses on refining the catalyst and scaling the system to long-term industrial needs. The process is licensed as the Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEES{reg_sign}) to Onsite*Ofsite, Inc., of Duarte, California. This report is a follow-on to the 1989--90 interim report [Elliott et al. 1991], which reviewed the results of the studies conducted with a fixed-bed, continuous-feed, tubular reactor. The discussion here provides an overview of experiments on the wide range of potential feedstock materials conducted in a batch reactor; development of new catalyst materials; and tests performed in continuous-flow reactors at three scales. The appendices contain the history and background of the process development, as well as more detailed descriptions and results of the recent studies.

  14. Catalytic wet peroxidation of pyridine bearing wastewater by cerium supported SBA-15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subbaramaiah, V. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 Uttarakhand (India); Srivastava, Vimal Chandra, E-mail: vimalcsr@yahoo.co.in [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 Uttarakhand (India); Mall, Indra Deo [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 Uttarakhand (India)

    2013-03-15

    Highlights: ► Cerium supported SBA-15 (Ce/SBA-15) synthesized by two-step synthesis. ► Characterization of Ce/SBA-15 by FTIR, XRD and BET surface area. ► Catalytic peroxidation of pyridine by Ce/SBA-15. ► Optimization of parameters like catalyst dose, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} dose, initial concentration and temperature. ► Catalyst reusability and leaching study performed. -- Abstract: Cerium supported SBA-15 (Ce/SBA-15) was synthesized by two-step synthesis method in acidic medium. It was further characterized by various characterization techniques such as X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption pore size distribution analysis. The Ce/SBA-15 showed highly ordered meso-structure with pore diameter ≈ 70–100 A and pore volume ≈ 0.025 cm{sup 3}/g. Ce/SBA-15 was further evaluated as a catalyst for the oxidation of highly toxic and non-biodegradable material, pyridine, by catalytic wet-peroxidation method. The effects of various operating parameters such as catalyst dose (0.5–6 g/l), stoichiometric ratio of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/pyridine (1–6), initial pyridine concentration (50–800 mg/l) and temperature (313–358 K) have been evaluated and optimized. Ce/SBA-15 showed stable performance during reuse for six cycles with negligible cerium leaching. Kinetic and thermodynamic parameters and operation cost have also been determined.

  15. Chloride ions promoted the catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of phenol over clay-based catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shiwei; Zhang, Changbo; Xu, Rui; Gu, Chuantao; Song, Zhengguo; Xu, Minggang

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) of phenol over clay-based catalysts in the presence and absence of NaCl was investigated. Changes in the H2O2, Cl(-), and dissolved metal ion concentration, as well as solution pH during phenol oxidation, were also studied. Additionally, the intermediates formed during phenol oxidation were detected by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy and the chemical bonding information of the catalyst surfaces was analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results showed that the presence of Cl(-) increased the oxidation rate of phenol to 155%, and this phenomenon was ubiquitous during the oxidation of phenolic compounds by H2O2 over clay-based catalysts. Cl(-)-assisted oxidation of phenol was evidenced by several analytical techniques such as mass spectroscopy (MS) and XPS, and it was hypothesized that the rate-limiting step was accelerated in the presence of Cl(-). Based on the results of this study, the CWPO technology appears to be promising for applications in actual saline phenolic wastewater treatment. PMID:26942523

  16. Catalytic wet oxidation of the pretreated synthetic pulp and paper mill effluent under moderate conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Anurag; Mishra, I M; Chand, Shri

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) was investigated for the destruction of organic pollutants in the thermally pretreated effluent from a pulp and paper mill under moderate temperature and pressure conditions. The thermal pretreatment studies were conducted at atmospheric pressure and 368K using copper sulfate as a catalyst. The thermal pretreatment reduced COD by about 61%. The filtrate of the thermal pretreatment step was used at pH 8.0 for CWO at 383-443K temperature and a total pressure of 0.85MPa for 4h. Catalysts used for the reaction include copper sulfate, 5% CuO/95% activated carbon, 60% CuO/40% MnO(2), and 60% CuO/40% CeO(2). Maximum COD reduction was found to be 89% during CWO step using 5% CuO/95% activated carbon with a catalyst loading of 8gl(-1) at 443K and 0.85MPa total pressure. Overall COD reduction for the pretreatment and the CWO was found to be 96%. Besides this, 60% CuO/40% CeO(2) catalyst also exhibited the similar activity as that of obtained with 5% CuO/95% activated carbon catalyst at 423K temperature and 0.85MPa total pressure. The pH of the solution during the experimental runs decreases initially due to the formation of carboxylic acid and then increases due to the decomposition of acids. PMID:16934854

  17. 40 CFR 424.40 - Applicability; description of the covered calcium carbide furnaces with wet air pollution control...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... covered calcium carbide furnaces with wet air pollution control devices subcategory. 424.40 Section 424.40... FERROALLOY MANUFACTURING POINT SOURCE CATEGORY Covered Calcium Carbide Furnaces With Wet Air Pollution... with wet air pollution control devices subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable...

  18. Catalytic oxidation with Al-Ce-Fe-PILC as a post-treatment system for coffee wet processing wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria, Nancy R; Peralta, Yury M; Montañez, Mardelly K; Rodríguez-Valencia, Nelson; Molina, Rafael; Moreno, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    The effluent from the anaerobic biological treatment of coffee wet processing wastewater (CWPW) contains a non-biodegradable compound that must be treated before it is discharged into a water source. In this paper, the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) process using Al-Ce-Fe-PILC catalysts was researched as a post-treatment system for CWPW and tested in a semi-batch reactor at atmospheric pressure and 25 °C. The Al-Ce-Fe-PILC achieved a high conversion rate of total phenolic compounds (70%) and mineralization to CO(2) (50%) after 5 h reaction time. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) of coffee processing wastewater after wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation was reduced in 66%. The combination of the two treatment methods, biological (developed by Cenicafé) and catalytic oxidation with Al-Ce-Fe-PILC, achieved a 97% reduction of COD in CWPW. Therefore, the WHPCO using Al-Ce-Fe-PILC catalysts is a viable alternative for the post-treatment of coffee processing wastewater. PMID:22907449

  19. PERFORMANCE OF ACTIVATED SLUDGE-POWDERED ACTIVATED CARBON-WET AIR REGENERATION SYSTEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The investigation summarized in the report was undertaken to evaluate the performance of powdered activated carbon (PAC) technology used in conjunction with wet air regeneration (WAR) at municipal wastewater treatment plants. Excessive ash concentrations accumulated in the mixed ...

  20. Catalytic oxidation of tritium in air at ambient temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tritium/air oxidation kinetic data are derived from ambient-temperature measurements carried out with three precious-metal catalysts. Each catalyst consists of a high-surface-area substrate in pelletized form, onto which precious metal has been dispersed. The metal/substrate combinations investigated are platinum/alumina, palladium/kaolin, and palladium/zeolite. Electron-microprobe scans reveal that the dispersed metal is deposited in each case near the outer surface of the pellet, with metal concentration decreasing exponentially from the pellet surface. Kinetic oxidation measurements are made in a unique apparatus consisting of a large Lucite enclosure with an air atmosphere processed by a recirculating cleanup system. Dual-ionization chambers with an intermediate adsorption bed permit measurement of tritium gas and tritiated water vapor. Rate coefficients are determined from concentration decay following a spike injection of tritium into the enclosure. The catalytic reaction is first-order in tritium concentration in the range 10 to 105 μCi/m3. Addition of hydrogen carrier gas is unnecessary. Each of the dispersed-metal catalysts is extremely active in promoting tritium oxidation in comparison with self-catalyzed atmospheric conversion; equivalent first-order rate constants are higher by roughly 9 orders of magnitude. The platinum-based catalyst is more effective than the palladium catalysts on a surface-area basis by about a factor of 3. Catalytic activity for all three catalysts declines with time of exposure to air after activation, following a power-law decay with an exponent of -1/2. A model for optimization of the catalyst reactivation cycle is proposed, revealing that the optimum catalyst volume scales with flow rate to the 2/3 power. Ambient-temperature tritium oxidation is cost-effective for small- to intermediate-scale cleanup systems. A heated catalyst is desirable for large-scale systems

  1. Repeated bouncing of drops on wetting and non-wetting surfaces mediated by a persisting thin air film

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruiter, Jolet; Lagraauw, Rudy; van den Ende, Dirk; Mugele, Frieder

    2014-11-01

    Liquid drops impinging onto solid surfaces undergo a variety of impact scenarios such as splashing, sticking, and bouncing, depending on impact conditions and substrate properties. Bouncing requires efficient conversion of initial kinetic energy into surface energy and back into kinetic energy. This process is believed to be limited to non-wetting, in particular superhydrophobic surfaces, for which viscous dissipation during drop-substrate contact is minimal. Here, we report a novel bouncing mechanism that applies equally to non-wetting and wetting systems for flat surfaces with contact angles down to 10 degrees. For initial impact speeds up to about 0.5 m/s we demonstrate using dual wavelength interferometry that aqueous and non-aqueous drops remain separated from the substrate by air films of (sub)micrometer thickness at all times throughout a series of up to 16 consecutive bouncing events. We show that the purely dissipative force arising from the viscous squeeze-out of air is responsible for both the momentum transfer and for a substantial part of the residual energy dissipation.

  2. A compact process for the treatment of olive mill wastewater by combining wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation and biological techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system based on combined actions of catalytic wet oxidation and microbial technologies for the treatment of highly polluted OMW containing polyphenols was studied. The wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) process has been investigated in the semi-batch mode at atmospheric pressure, using aluminium-iron-pillared inter layer clay ((Al-Fe)PILC), under two different catalytic processes: ((Al-Fe)PILC/H2O2/ultraviolet radiations) at 25 deg. C and ((Al-Fe)PILC/H2O2) at 50 deg. C. The results show that raw OMW was resistant to the photocatalytic process. However ((Al-Fe)PILC/H2O2), system operating at 50 deg. C reduced considerably the COD, colour and total phenolic contents, and thus decreased the inhibition of the marine photobacteria Vibrio fischeri luminescence by 70%. This study also examined the feasibility of coupling WHPCO and anaerobic digestion treatment. Biomethanisation experiments performed with raw OMW or pre-treated OMW proved that pre-treatments with ((Al-Fe)PILC/H2O2) system, for more than 2 h, resulted in higher methane production. Both untreated OMW as well as 2-h pre-treated OMW revealed as toxic to anaerobic bacteria.

  3. A compact process for the treatment of olive mill wastewater by combining wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation and biological techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azabou, Samia [Laboratoire des BioProcedes, Centre de Biotechnologie de Sfax, BP 1177, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Najjar, Wahiba [Laboratoire de Chimie des Materiaux et Catalyse, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Bouaziz, Mohamed [Laboratoire des BioProcedes, Centre de Biotechnologie de Sfax, BP 1177, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Ghorbel, Abdelhamid [Laboratoire de Chimie des Materiaux et Catalyse, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Sayadi, Sami, E-mail: sami.sayadi@cbs.rnrt.tn [Laboratoire des BioProcedes, Centre de Biotechnologie de Sfax, BP 1177, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2010-11-15

    A system based on combined actions of catalytic wet oxidation and microbial technologies for the treatment of highly polluted OMW containing polyphenols was studied. The wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) process has been investigated in the semi-batch mode at atmospheric pressure, using aluminium-iron-pillared inter layer clay ((Al-Fe)PILC), under two different catalytic processes: ((Al-Fe)PILC/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/ultraviolet radiations) at 25 deg. C and ((Al-Fe)PILC/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) at 50 deg. C. The results show that raw OMW was resistant to the photocatalytic process. However ((Al-Fe)PILC/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), system operating at 50 deg. C reduced considerably the COD, colour and total phenolic contents, and thus decreased the inhibition of the marine photobacteria Vibrio fischeri luminescence by 70%. This study also examined the feasibility of coupling WHPCO and anaerobic digestion treatment. Biomethanisation experiments performed with raw OMW or pre-treated OMW proved that pre-treatments with ((Al-Fe)PILC/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) system, for more than 2 h, resulted in higher methane production. Both untreated OMW as well as 2-h pre-treated OMW revealed as toxic to anaerobic bacteria.

  4. Analysis of a wet scrubber network in the air remediation of industrial workplaces: benefit for the city air quality

    OpenAIRE

    Avveduto, Alessandro; Salisburgo, Cesare Dari; Pace, Lorenzo; Curci, Gabriele; Monaco, Alessio; De Giovanni, Marina; Giammaria, Franco; SPANTO, Giuseppe; Tripodi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Industrial activities carried out in confined spaces are characterized by a very specific type of air pollution. The extended exposure to this kind of pollution is often highly harmful, resulting in dramatic effects both on health and safety aspects. The indoor industrial abatement systems, adopted to purify the air, are typically applied to the emission points. The processed air is subsequently emitted outside. In this study we present the experimental results of three-stage wet scrubber sys...

  5. Photo-catalytic activity of Zn1-x Mn x S nanocrystals synthesized by wet chemical technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singh Karamjit

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Polyvinyl pyrrolidone capped Zn1-x Mn x S (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.1 nanocrystals have been synthesized using wet chemical co-precipitation method. Crystallographic and morphological characterization of the synthesized materials have been done using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope. Crystallographic studies show the zinc blende crystals having average crystallite size approx. 3 nm, which is almost similar to the average particle size calculated from electron micrographs. Atomic absorption spectrometer has been used for qualitative and quantitative analysis of synthesized nanomaterials. Photo-catalytic activity has been studied using methylene blue dye as a test contaminant. Energy resolved luminescence spectra have been recorded for the detailed description of radiative and non-radiative recombination mechanisms. Photo-catalytic activity dependence on dopant concentration and luminescence quantum yield has been studied in detail.

  6. Catalytic oxidative desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbon fuels using air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararaman, Ramanathan

    Conventional approaches to oxidative desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbons involve use of high-purity, expensive water soluble peroxide for oxidation of sulfur compounds followed by post-treatment for removal of oxidized sulfones by extraction. Both are associated with higher cost due to handling, storage of oxidants and yield loss with extraction and water separation, making the whole process more expensive. This thesis explores an oxidative desulfurization process using air as an oxidant followed by catalytic decomposition of sulfones thereby eliminating the aforementioned issues. Oxidation of sulfur compounds was realized by a two step process in which peroxides were first generated in-situ by catalytic air oxidation, followed by catalytic oxidation of S compounds using the peroxides generated in-situ completing the two step approach. By this technique it was feasible to oxidize over 90% of sulfur compounds present in real jet (520 ppmw S) and diesel (41 ppmw S) fuels. Screening of bulk and supported CuO based catalysts for peroxide generation using model aromatic compound representing diesel fuel showed that bulk CuO catalyst was more effective in producing peroxides with high yield and selectivity. Testing of three real diesel fuels obtained from different sources for air oxidation over bulk CuO catalyst showed different level of effectiveness for generating peroxides in-situ which was consistent with air oxidation of representative model aromatic compounds. Peroxides generated in-situ was then used as an oxidant to oxidize sulfur compounds present in the fuel over MoO3/SiO2 catalyst. 81% selectivity of peroxides for oxidation of sulfur compounds was observed on MoO3/SiO2 catalyst at 40 °C and under similar conditions MoO3/Al2O3 gave only 41% selectivity. This difference in selectivity might be related to the difference in the nature of active sites of MoO3 on SiO2 and Al2O 3 supports as suggested by H2-TPR and XRD analyses. Testing of supported and bulk Mg

  7. A kinetic model of municipal sludge degradation during non-catalytic wet oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince-Pike, Arrian; Wilson, David I; Baroutian, Saeid; Andrews, John; Gapes, Daniel J

    2015-12-15

    Wet oxidation is a successful process for the treatment of municipal sludge. In addition, the resulting effluent from wet oxidation is a useful carbon source for subsequent biological nutrient removal processes in wastewater treatment. Owing to limitations with current kinetic models, this study produced a kinetic model which predicts the concentrations of key intermediate components during wet oxidation. The model was regressed from lab-scale experiments and then subsequently validated using data from a wet oxidation pilot plant. The model was shown to be accurate in predicting the concentrations of each component, and produced good results when applied to a plant 500 times larger in size. A statistical study was undertaken to investigate the validity of the regressed model parameters. Finally the usefulness of the model was demonstrated by suggesting optimum operating conditions such that volatile fatty acids were maximised. PMID:26426294

  8. Catalytic wet oxidation of ammonia solution: Activity of the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqueous solutions of 400-1000 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a trickle-bed reactor (TBR) in this study of nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts, which were prepared by the co-precipitation of H2PtCl6, Pd(NO3)3 and Rh(NO3)3. Hardly any of the dissolved ammonia was removed by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, whereas about 99% of the ammonia was reduced during wet oxidation over nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite oxide catalysts at 503 K in an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. A synergistic effect exists in the nanoscale platinum-palladium-rhodium composite structure, which is the material with the highest ammonia reduction activity. The nanometer-sized particles were characterized by TEM, XRD and FTIR. The effect of the initial concentration and reaction temperature on the removal of ammonia from the effluent streams was also studied at a liquid hourly space velocity of under 9 h-1 in the wet catalytic processes

  9. Combination of coagulation and catalytic wet oxidation for the treatment of pulp and paper mill effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verenich; Laari, A; Nissen, M; Kallas, J

    2001-01-01

    Wet oxidation (WO) is a well established process for purification of concentrated municipal and industrial wastewaters. Many attempts have been made to modify the WO process or to create a suitable combination of processes. This work was undertaken to investigate wet oxidation integrated with coagulation, i.e. to treat the sludge remaining after coagulation with a WO process. The possibility of regeneration of the used coagulant was also considered. Two waters from paper mills were used: TMP (thermomechanical pulp) circulation water and membrane concentrate. About 50% of the COD in the original water can be removed by coagulation using Fe2(SO4)3. The results from the wet oxidation experiments show the positive effect of iron in the chemical sludge as a catalyst. The efficiency of the WO process was enhanced almost by 100%. The remaining dissolved organic matter can be easily removed biologically. PMID:11695452

  10. Air/steam flow and steam wetness dependence on acoustic resonance in safety relief valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many experimental studies related to the flow-induced acoustic resonance closed side branches have been reported. However, few studies have reported on the effects of air/steam flow and steam wetness dependence on fluctuating pressure amplitude. Therefore, we investigated the effect of air/steam flow and steam wetness dependence on fluctuating pressure amplitude by conducting a high temperature and high pressure tests at the Hitachi Utility Steam Test Leading Facility (HUSTLE). The test section consisted of a main pipe and a side branch. The side branch was mounted on the long straight main pipe. Fluctuating pressures at the end face of the side branches were measured. The following two results were obtained; the first is that the air/steam flow had little effect on the fluctuating pressure amplitude normalized by dynamic pressure and frequency normalized by the resonance frequency; the second is that under the acoustic resonance (St = 0.41) and non-resonance (St = 0.55) conditions, fluctuating pressure and frequency changed little with steam wetness. The steam wetness during the boiling water reactor operation was less than 0.1%; thus, there was no effect of steam wetness on the acoustic pressure amplitude and the frequency under this operating condition. (author)

  11. Humidifying system design of PEMFC test platform based on the mixture of dry and wet air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiancai Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on the present humidifying system of PEMFC test platform, a novel design based on dry and wet air mixture is proposed. Key parameters are calculated, and test platform is built. Three experiments are implemented to test the performance of proposed design. Results show that the new design can meet the requirements, and realize the quick response and accurate control.

  12. About sorption-catalytic air cleaning in premises for people habitation in megapolises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.V. Cрechevichkin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic sources of pollution of the air environment in megapolises, and also of internal atmosphere of premises for people habitation, in respect of their possible clearing by sorption-catalytic methods are systematized. Design and principle of action of the room sorption-catalytic three-chambered filter for clearing of turnaround air of a thermo premise of gaseous ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and organic substances are described.

  13. Sulfate Attack Resistance of Air-entrained Silica Fume Concrete under Dry-Wet Cycle Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jiansen; WANG Peiming; LI Haoxin; YANG Xu

    2016-01-01

    Based on the erosion resistant coefficient, the effects of water-cement ratio, air-entrained, silica fume content and sand ratio on the sulfate attack resistance of air-entrained silica fume concrete were studied by orthogonal experiments in order to explore its sulfate attack resistance under dry-wet condition. A more signiifcant model of concrete resistance to sulfate attack was also established, thus this work provided a strategy reference for quantitative design of sulfate attack resistant concrete. The experimental results show that dry-wet cycle deteriorates the concrete resistance to the sulfate attack, and leads to the remarkable declines of concrete strength and sulfate resistance. Air bubbles in the air-entrained silica fume concrete lower and delay the damage resulted from the crystallization sulfate salt. However this delay gradually disappears when most of the close bubbles are breached by the alternative running of the sulfate salt crystallization and the permeating pressure, and then the air bubbles are iflled with sulfate salt crystallization. The concrete is provided with the strongest sulfate resistance when it is prepared with the 0.47 water-binder ratio, 6.0% air-entrained, 5% silica fume and 30% sand ratio. The erosion resistant coefifcientsK80 andK150 of this concrete are increased by 9%, 7%, 9%, and 5% respectively as compared with those of concretes without silica fume and air entraining.

  14. Modifications of oxidized Zircaloy-4 surface in contact with radiolysed wet air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guipponi, C. [Universite de Lyon, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS UMR5822, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Millard-Pinard, N., E-mail: millard@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Universite de Lyon, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS UMR5822, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Bererd, N. [Universite de Lyon, Institut de Physique Nucleaire de Lyon, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, CNRS UMR5822, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Universite de Lyon, UCBL-IUT Lyon 1, departement chimie, 43 Bd du 11 novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Serris, E.; Pijolat, M.; Peres, V. [Ecole Nationale Superieure des Mines de Saint Etienne, Centre SPIN, CNRS UMR5148, 158 cours Fauriel, 42 033 Saint Etienne Cedex (France); Wasselin-Trupin, V. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, BP. 17, 92 262 Fontenay aux Roses (France)

    2012-02-01

    In the framework of radioactive waste geological disposal, the long term evolution of the nuclear wastes packages and the release of the radionuclides from the wastes have to be studied. Regarding compacted wastes (cladding tubes) coming from reprocessing of spent fuel, the Zircaloy-4 (zirconium alloy) cladding tubes have been activated and oxidized in reactors. In the disposal, the radioactive waste is exposed to humid air in a first phase and to water after the resaturation phase. In order to better assess the degradation process of these nuclear waste package, the influence of wet air proton radiolysis on the behavior of surface oxidized Zircaloy-4 has been investigated. Radiolysis experiments were performed using an irradiation cell which is associated to an extracted beam. Samples are exposed to wet air, under and without radiolysis, during 12 and 24 h. The water partial pressure has been fixed at 6 and 50 mbar in order to have, respectively, localized adsorbed water molecules and a thin film of adsorbed water. Before and after each treatment, sample surfaces were characterized by X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) in order to identify the elements at the topmost surface of the solid. The wet air radiolysis causes changes at the surface of oxidized Zircaloy-4 and influences the corrosion phenomenon. Indeed, an enrichment of tin and the presence of nitrogen species were observed. It could be due to the formation of tritin(II) tetrahydroxide dinitrate and a Zr{sup 4+} tetramer on the topmost oxide surface.

  15. Inhibition and deactivation effects in catalytic wet oxidation of high-strength alcohol-distillery liquors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkacemi, K.; Larachi, F.; Hamoudi, S.; Turcotte, G.; Sayari, A. [Laval Univ., Sainte-Foy, Quebec (Canada)

    1999-06-01

    The removal efficiency of total organic carbon (TOC) from raw high-strength alcohol-distillery waste liquors was evaluated using three different treatments: thermolysis (T), noncatalytic wet oxidation (WO), and solid-catalyzed wet oxidation (CWO). The distillery liquors (TOC = 22,500 mg/l, sugars = 18,000 mg/l, and proteins = 13,500 mg/l) were produced by alcoholic fermentation of enzymatic hydrolyzates from steam-exploded timothy grass. TOC-abatement studies were conducted batchwise in a stirred autoclave to evaluate the influence of the catalyst (7:3, MnO{sub 2}/CeO{sub 2} mixed oxide), oxygen partial pressure (0.5--2.5 MPa), and temperature (453--523 K) on T, WO, and CWO processes. Although CWO outperformed T and WO, TOC conversions did not exceed {approximately}60% at the highest temperature used. Experiments provided prima facie evidence for a gradual fouling of the catalyst and a developing inhibition in the liquors which impaired deep TOC removals. Occurrence of catalyst deactivation by carbonaceous deposits was proven experimentally through quantitative and qualitative experiments such as elemental analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Inhibition toward further degradation of the liquors was ascribed to the occurrence of highly stable antioxidant intermediates via the Maillard reactions between dissolved sugars and proteins. A lumping kinetic model involving both reaction inhibition by dissolved intermediates and catalyst deactivation by carbonaceous deposits was proposed to account for the distribution of carbon in the liquid, solid, and the vapor phases.

  16. Treatment of desizing wastewater from the textile industry by wet air oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the application of wet air oxidation to the treatment of desizing wastewater from two textile companies. A two-liter high temperature, high pressure autoclave reactor was used in the study. The range of operating temperatures examined was between 150 and 290℃, and the partial pressure of oxygen ranged from 0. 375 to 2.25 MPa. Variations in pH,CODCr and TOD content were monitored during each experiment and used to assess the extent of conversion of the process. The effects of temperature, pressure and reaction time were explored extensively. More than 90 % CODCr reduction and 80 % TOC removal have been obtained. The results have also been demonstrated that WAO is a suitable pre-treatment methods due to improvement of the BOD5/CODCr ratio of desizing wastewater. The reaction kinetics of wet air oxidation of desizing wastewater has been proved to be two steps, a fast reaction followed by a slow reaction stage.

  17. Removal of Xylene fromWaste Air Stream Using Catalytic Ozonation Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Mokarami

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available "n "n "nBackgrounds and Objectives: Volatile organic compounds (VOCs are one of the common groups of contaminants encountered in the industrial activities, emitted through air stream into the atmosphere. To prevent the human and environmental health from the adverse effects of VOCs, air streams containing VOCs need to be treated before discharging to environment. This study was aimed at investigating the catalytic ozonation process for removing xylene from a contaminated air stream."nMaterials and Methods: In the present work, a bench scale experimental setup was constructed and used for catalytic ozonation of xylene. The performance of catalytic ozonation process was compared with that of single adsorption and ozonation in removal of several concentration of xylene under the similar experimental conditions."nResults: The results indicated that the efficiency of catalytic ozonation was higher than that of single adsorption and ozonation in removal of xylene. The emerging time and elimination capacity of xylene for inlet concentration of 300 ppm was 1.4 and 5.8 times of those in adsorption system. The activated carbon acted as catalyst in the presence of ozone and thus attaining the synergistic effect for xylene degradation."nConclusion: catalytic ozonation process is an efficient technique the treatment of air streams containing high concentrations of xylene. The adsorption systems can also be simply retrofitted to catalytic ozonation process and thereby improving their performance for treating VOCs.

  18. Kinetics and Modelling of Glucose Wet Air Oxidation over Pd/C Catalyst.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gogová, Zuzana; Zedníková, Mária; Hanika, Jiří

    Bratislava: Slovak Society of Chemical Engineering, 2007 - (Markoš, J.; Štefuca, V.), s. 309 ISBN 978-80-227-2640-5. [International Conference of Slovak Society of Chemical Engineering /34./. Tatranské Matliare (SK), 21.05.2007-25.05.2007] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD203/03/H140 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : glucose * wet air oxidation * kinetics Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  19. Wet effluent diffusion technique and determination of C1-C5 alcohols in air

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sklenská, Jana; Pařízek, Petr; Večeřa, Zbyněk

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 1 (2001), s. 121-127. ISSN 1231-7098 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/98/0943 Grant ostatní: COPERNICUS(BE) SUB-AERO EVK2-1999-000327 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4031919 Keywords : wet effluent difussion denuder * determination * air Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation

  20. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of aniline in wastewater using copper modified SBA-15 as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Liming; Zhou, Xiang; Yao, Yuan; Jian, Panming; Diao, Guowang

    2016-01-01

    SBA-15 mesoporous molecular sieves modified with copper (Cu-SBA-15) were prepared by pH-adjusting hydrothermal method and characterized by X-ray diffraction, BET, transmission electron microscopy, UV-Vis and (29)Si MAS NMR. The pH of the synthesis gel has a significant effect on the amount and the dispersion of copper on SBA-15. The Cu-SBA-15(4.5) (where 4.5 denotes the pH value of the synthesis gel) modified with highly dispersed copper was used as catalyst for the oxidation of aniline by H2O2. The Cu-SBA-15(4.5) shows a higher catalytic activity compared to CuO on the surface of SBA-15. The influences of reaction conditions, such as initial pH of the aqueous solutions, temperature, as well as the dosages of H2O2 and catalyst were investigated. Under weakly alkaline aqueous solution conditions, the aniline conversion, the H2O2 decomposition and the total organic carbon (TOC) removal could be increased significantly compared to the acid conditions. The percentage of leaching Cu(2+) could be decreased from 45.0% to 3.66% when the initial pH of solution was increased from 5 to 10. The TOC removal could be enhanced with the increases of temperature, H2O2 and catalyst dosage, but the aniline conversion and H2O2 decomposition change slightly with further increasing dosage of catalyst and H2O2. At 343 K and pH 8.0, 100% aniline conversion and 66.9% TOC removal can be achieved under the conditions of 1.0 g/L catalyst and 0.05 mol/L H2O2 after 180 min. Although copper might be slightly leached from catalyst, the homogeneous Cu(2+) contribution to the whole catalytic activity is unimportant, and the highly dispersed copper on SBA-15 plays a dominant role. PMID:26227827

  1. Low-temperature catalytic gasification of wet industrial wastes. FY 1993--1994 interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, D.C.; Hart, T.R.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Deverman, G.S.; Werpy, T.A.; Phelps, M.R.; Baker, E.G.; Sealock, L.J. Jr.

    1995-03-01

    Process development research is continuing on a low-temperature, catalytic gasification system that has been demonstrated to convert organics in water (dilute or concentrated) to useful and environmentally safe gases. The system, licensed under the trade name Thermochemical Environmental Energy System (TEESO), treats a wide variety of feedstocks ranging from hazardous organics in water to waste sludges from food processing. The current research program is focused on the use of continuous-feed, tubular reactors systems for testing catalysts and feedstocks in the process. A range of catalysts have been tested, including nickel and other base metals, as well as ruthenium and other precious metals. Results of extensive testing show that feedstocks, ranging from 2% para-cresol in water to potato waste and spent grain, can be processed to > 99% reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD). The product fuel gas contains from 40% up to 75% methane, depending on the feedstock. The balance of the gas is mostly carbon dioxide with < 5% hydrogen and usually < 1% ethane and higher hydrocarbons. The byproduct water stream carries residual organics from 10 to 1,000 mg/l COD, depending on the feedstock. The level of development of TEES has progressed to the initial phases of industrial process demonstration. Testing of industrial waste streams is under way at both the bench scale and engineering scale of development.

  2. Development of the Monolith Froth Reactor for Catalytic Wet Oxidation of CELSS Model Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Martin; Fisher, John W.

    1995-01-01

    The aqueous phase oxidation of acetic acid, used as a model compound for the treatment of CELSS (Controlled Ecological Life Support System) waste, was carried out in the monolith froth reactor which utilizes two-phase flow in the monolith channels. The catalytic oxidation of acetic acid was carried out over a Pt/Al2O3 catalyst, prepared at The University of Tulsa, at temperatures and pressures below the critical point of water. The effect of externally controllable parameters (temperature, liquid flow rate, distributor plate orifice size, pitch, and catalyst distance from the distributor plate) on the rate of acetic acid oxidation was investigated. Results indicate reaction rate increased with increasing temperature and exhibited a maximum with respect to liquid flow rate. The apparent activation energy calculated from reaction rate data was 99.7 kJ/mol. This value is similar to values reported for the oxidation of acetic acid in other systems and is comparable to intrinsic values calculated for oxidation reactions. The kinetic data were modeled using simple power law kinetics. The effect of "froth" feed system characteristics was also investigated. Results indicate that the reaction rate exhibits a maximum with respect to distributor plate orifice size, pitch, and catalyst distance from the distributor plate. Fundamental results obtained were used to extrapolate where the complete removal of acetic acid would be obtained and for the design and operation of a full scale CELSS treatment system.

  3. Continuous production of bio-oil by catalytic liquefaction from wet distiller’s grain with solubles (WDGS) from bio-ethanol production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bio-refinery concepts are currently receiving much attention due to the drive toward flexible, highly efficient systems for utilization of biomass for food, feed, fuel and bio-chemicals. One way of achieving this is through appropriate process integration, in this particular case combining enzymatic bio-ethanol production with catalytic liquefaction of the wet distillers grains with soluble, a byproduct from the bio-ethanol process. The catalytic liquefaction process is carried out at sub-critical conditions (280–370 °C and 25 MPa) in the presence of a homogeneous alkaline and a heterogeneous Zirconia catalyst, a process known as the Catliq® process. In the current work, catalytic conversion of WDGS was performed in a continuous pilot plant with a maximum capacity of 30 dm3 h−1 of wet biomass. In the process, WDGS was converted to bio-oil, gases and water-soluble organic compounds. The oil obtained was characterized using several analysis methods, among them elementary analysis and GC–MS. The study shows that WDGS can be converted to bio oil with high yields. The results also indicate that through the combination of bio-ethanol production and catalytic liquefaction, it is possible to significantly increase the liquid product yield and scope, opening up for a wider end use applicability. -- Highlights: ► Hydrothermal liquefaction of wet biomass. ► Product phase analysis: oil, acqeous, gas and mineral phase. ► Energy and mass balance evaluation.

  4. CATALYTIC WET PEROXIDE OXIDATION OF HYDROQUINONE WITH Co(II)/ACTIVE CARBON CATALYST LOADED IN STATIC BED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Catalysts based on Co(II) supported on active carbon were prepared and loaded in static bed. The hydroquinone would be degraded completely after treated by Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation method with Co(II)/active carbon catalyst. After activate treatment, the active carbon was immerged in cobaltous nitrate solution, then put into a drying oven, Co(II) could be loaded on the micro-surface of carbon. Taking the static bed as the equipment, the absorption of active carbon and catalysis of Co(II) was used to reduce activation energy of hydroquinone. Thus hydroquinone could be drastically degraded and the effluent can be drained under the standard. Referring to Fenton reaction mechanism, experiment had been done to study the heterogeneous catalyzed oxidation mechanism of Co(II). The degradation rate of hydroquinone effluent could be achieved to 92% when treated in four columns at H2O2 concentration 10%, reaction temperature 40℃ , pH 5 and reaction time 2.5h.

  5. CATALYTIC WET PEROXIDE OXIDATION OF HYDROQUINONE WITH Co(Ⅱ)/ACTIVE CARBON CATALYST LOADED IN STATIC BED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chunxiang; YAN Yongsheng; XU Wanzhen

    2008-01-01

    Catalysts based on Co(Ⅱ) supported on active carbon were prepared and loaded in static bed.The hydroquinone wouid be degraded completely after treated by Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation method with Co(Ⅱ)/active carbon catalyst.After activate treatment, the active carbon was immerged in cobaltoas nitrate solution, then put into a drying oven, Co(Ⅱ) could be loaded on the micro-surface of carbon.Taking the static bed as the equipment, the absorption of active carbon and catalysis of Co(Ⅱ) was used to reduce activation energy of hydroquinone.Thus hydroquinone could be drastically degraded and the effluent can be drained under the standard.Referring to Fenton reaction mechanism, experiment had been done to study the heterogeneous catalyzed oxidation mechanism of Co(Ⅱ).The degradation rate of hydroquinone effluent could be achieved to 92% when treated in four columns at H2O2 concentration 10%, reaction temperature 40℃, pH 5 and reaction time 2.5h.

  6. Resting Study of Tracer Experiment on Catalytic Wet Oxidation Reactor under Micro-gravity and Earth Gravity Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ji; JIA Jin-ping

    2005-01-01

    The International Space Station(ISS) employs catalytic wet oxidation carried out in a Volatile Reactor Assembly (VRA) for water recycling. Previous earth gravity experiments show that the VRA is very effective at removing polar,low molecular weight organics. To compare the reactor performance under micro-gravity and Earth gravity conditions,a tracer study was performed on a space shuttle in 1999 by using 0. 2% potassium carbonate as the chemical tracer.In this paper, the experimental data were analyzed and it is indicated that the reactor can be considered as a plug flow one under both micro-gravity and earth gravity experimental conditions. It has also been proved that dispersion is not important in the VRA reactor under the experimental conditions. Tracer retardation was observed in the experiments and it is most likely caused by catalyst adsorption. It is concluded that the following reasons may also have influence on the retardation of mean residence time: (1) the liquid can be held by appurtenances, which will retard the mean residence time; (2) the pores can hold the tracer, which can also retard the mean residence time.

  7. Corrosion inhibition of magnesium heated in wet air, by surface fluoridation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The maximum temperature (350 deg. C) of magnesium corrosion resistance in wet air may be raised to 490-500 deg. C by the formation of a superficial fluoride film. This can be obtained by two different ways: either by addition of hydrofluoric acid to the corroding medium in a very small proportion such as 0,003 mg/litre; at atmospheric pressure, or by dipping the magnesium in a dilute aqueous solution of nitric and hydrofluoric acids at room temperature before exposing it to the corroding atmosphere. In both cases the corrosion inhibition is effective over a very long time, even several thousand hours. (author)

  8. High Mercury Wet Deposition at a "Clean Air" Site in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanley, James B; Engle, Mark A; Scholl, Martha; Krabbenhoft, David P; Brunette, Robert; Olson, Mark L; Conroy, Mary E

    2015-10-20

    Atmospheric mercury deposition measurements are rare in tropical latitudes. Here we report on seven years (April 2005 to April 2012, with gaps) of wet Hg deposition measurements at a tropical wet forest in the Luquillo Mountains, northeastern Puerto Rico, U.S. Despite receiving unpolluted air off the Atlantic Ocean from northeasterly trade winds, during two complete years the site averaged 27.9 μg m(-2) yr(-1) wet Hg deposition, or about 30% more than Florida and the Gulf Coast, the highest deposition areas within the U.S. These high Hg deposition rates are driven in part by high rainfall, which averaged 2855 mm yr(-1). The volume-weighted mean Hg concentration was 9.8 ng L(-1), and was highest during summer and lowest during the winter dry season. Rainout of Hg (decreasing concentration with increasing rainfall depth) was minimal. The high Hg deposition was not supported by gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM) at ground level, which remained near global background concentrations (tropical areas may be hotspots for Hg deposition as well. PMID:26368125

  9. The Study of LeachateTreatment by Using Three Advanced Oxidation Process Based Wet air Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behroz Karimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Wet air oxidation is regarded as appropriate options for wastewater treatment with average organic compounds. The general purpose of this research is to determine the efficiency of three wet air oxidation methods, wet oxidation with hydrogen peroxide and absorption with activated carbon in removing organic matter and nitrogenous compounds from Isfahan's urban leachate. A leachate sample with the volume of 1.5 liters entered into a steel reactor with the volume of three liters and was put under a 10-bar pressure, at temperatures of 100, 200, and 300[degree sign] as well as three retention times of 30, 60, and 90 minutes. The sample was placed at 18 stages of leachate storage ponds in Isfahan Compost Plant with the volume of 20 liters, using three WPO, WAO methods and a combination of WAO/GAC for leachate pre-treatment. Thirty percent of pure oxygen and hydrogen peroxide were applied as oxidation agents. The COD removal efficiency in WAO method is 7.8-33.3%, in BOD is 14.7-50.6%, the maximum removal percentage (efficiency for NH4-N is 53.3% and for NO3-N is 56.4-73.9%. The removal efficiency of COD and BOD5 is 4.6%-34 and 24%-50 respectively in WPO method. Adding GAC to the reactor, the removal efficiency of all parameters was improved. The maximum removal efficiency was increased 48% for COD, 31%-43.6 for BOD5 by a combinational method, and the ratio of BOD5/COD was also increased to 90%. In this paper, WAO and WPO process was used for Leachate pre-treatment and WAO/GAC combinational process was applied for improving the organic matter removal and leachate treatment; it was also determined that the recent process is much more efficient in removing resistant organic matter.

  10. Treatment of desizing wastewater from the textile industry by wet air oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the application of wet air oxidation to the treatment of desizing wastewater from two textile companies. A two-liter high temperature, high pressure autoclave reactor was used in the study. The range of operating temperatures examined was between 150 and 290℃, and the partial pressure of oxygen ranged from 0. 375 to 2.25 MPa. Variations in pH,CODCr and TOD content were monitored during each experiment and used to assess the extent of conversion of the process. The effects of temperature, pressure and reaction time were explored extensively. More than 90 % CODCr reduction and 80 % TOC removal have been obtained. The results have also been demonstrated that WAO is a suitable pre-treatment methods due to improvement of the BOD5/CODCr ratio of desizing wastewater. The reaction kinetics of wet air oxidation of desizing wastewater has been proved to be two steps, a fast reaction followed by a slow reaction stage.

  11. Small-angle neutron scattering investigation of polyurethane aged in dry and wet air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Tian

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The microstructures of Estane 5703 aged at 70°C in dry and wet air have been studied by small-angle neutron scattering. The samples were swollen in deuterated toluene for enhancing the contrast. The scattering data show the characteristic domain structure of polyurethanes consisting of soft and hard segments. Debye-Anderson-Brumberger function used with hard sphere structure factor, and the Teubner-Strey model are used to analyze the two-phase domain structure of the polymer. The combined effects of temperature and humidity have a strong disruption effect on the microstructures of Estane. For the sample aged at 70°C in wet air for 1 month, the domain size, described by the correlation length, increases from 2.3 to 3.8 nm and their distance, expressed by hard-sphere interaction radius, increases from 8.4 to 10.6 nm. The structure development is attributed to degradation of polymer chains as revealed by gel permeation chromatography. The hydrolysis of ester links on polymer backbone at 70°C in the presence of water humidity is the main reason for the changes of the microstructure. These findings can contribute to developing predictive models for the safety, performance, and lifetime of polyurethanes.

  12. Analysis of a wet scrubber network in the air remediation of industrial workplaces: benefit for the city air quality

    CERN Document Server

    Avveduto, Alessandro; Pace, Lorenzo; Curci, Gabriele; Monaco, Alessio; De Giovanni, Marina; Giammaria, Franco; Spanto, Giuseppe; Tripodi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Industrial activities carried out in confined spaces are characterized by a very specific type of air pollution. The extended exposure to this kind of pollution is often highly harmful, resulting in dramatic effects both on health and safety aspects. The indoor industrial abatement systems, adopted to purify the air, are typically applied to the emission points. The processed air is subsequently emitted outside. In this study we present the experimental results of three-stage wet scrubber systems installed in the industrial workplace of a (i) fiberglass processing plant, where the highest exposure levels to volatile compounds are nowadays today monitored,and of a (ii) waste-to-energy plant, characterized by a very high particulate matter level. The adopted technology, to be used as complementing strategy,does not require special disposal procedures and the processed air is re-emitted in the same work environment for the benefit of the work operators. The operation of the scrubbers network during the working a...

  13. Thermodynamic study of the effects of ambient air conditions on the thermal performance characteristics of a closed wet cooling tower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermodynamic model was developed and used to assess the sensitivity of thermal performance characteristics of a closed wet cooling tower to inlet air conditions. In the present study, three cases of different ambient conditions are considered: In the first case, the average mid-winter and mid-summer conditions as well as the extreme case of high temperature and relative humidity, in Athens (Greece) during summer are considered according to the Greek Regulation for Buildings Energy Performance. In the second case, the varied inlet air relative humidity while the inlet air dry bulb temperature remains constant were taken into account. In the last case, the effects on cooling tower thermal behaviour when the inlet air wet bulb temperature remains constant were examined. The proposed model is capable of predicting the variation of air thermodynamic properties, sprayed water and serpentine water temperature inside the closed wet cooling tower along its height. The reliability of simulations was tested against experimental data, which were obtained from literature. Thus, the proposed model could be used for the design of industrial and domestic applications of conventional air-conditioning systems as well as for sorption cooling systems with solid and liquid desiccants where closed wet cooling towers are used for precooling the liquid solutions. The most important result of this theoretical investigation is that the highest fall of serpentine water temperature and losses of sprayed water are observed for the lowest value of inlet wet bulb temperature. Hence, the thermal effectiveness, which is associated with the temperature reduction of serpentine water as well as the operational cost, which is related to the sprayed water loss due to evaporation, of a closed wet cooling tower depend predominantly on the degree of saturation of inlet air.

  14. Role of Bismuth Oxide in Bi-MCo2O4(M=Co,Ni,Cu,Zn) Catalysts for Wet Air Oxidation of Acetic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Peng-bo; CHENG Tie-xin; ZHUANG Hong; CUI Xiang-hao; BI Ying-li; ZHEN Kai-ji

    2004-01-01

    Two series of cobalt(Ⅲ)-containing spinel catalysts were prepared by the decomposition of the corresponding nitrates. The catalysts doped with bismuth oxide exhibit a higher activity in the wet air oxidation of acetic acid than those without dopant bismuth oxide. The catalysts were investigated by XRD, TEM, ESR, UV-DRS and XPS, and the interaction between Co and Bi was studied as well. It has been found that nano-sized bismuth oxide is paved on the surface of cobalt spinel crystal and the structures of cobalt(Ⅲ)-containing spinel are still maintained. The shift of the binding energy of Bi4f7/2 is related to the catalytic activity of these catalysts doped with bismuth oxide.

  15. Degradation of H-acid in aqueous solution by microwave assisted wet air oxidation using Ni-loaded GAC as catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yao-bin; QUAN Xie; ZHAO Hui-min; CHEN Shuo; YANG Feng-lin

    2005-01-01

    A novel process, microwave assisted catalytic wet air oxidation(MW-CWO), was applied for the degradation of H-acid( 1-amino8-naphthol-3, 6-disulfonic acid) in aqueous solution. Ni-loaded granular activated carbon (GAG), prepared by immersion-calcination method, was used as catalyst. The results showed that the MW-CWO process was very effective for the degradation of H-acid in aqueous solution under atmospheric pressure with 87.4% TOC (total organic carbon) reduction in 20 min. Ni on GAC existed in the form of NiO as specified by XRD. Loss of Ni was significant in the initial stage, and then remained almost constant after 20 min reaction. BET surface area results showed that the surface property of GAC after MW-CWO process was superior to that of blank GAC.

  16. Intrinsic catalytic properties of extruded clay honeycomb monolith toward complete oxidation of air pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assebban, Mhamed; El Kasmi, Achraf; Harti, Sanae; Chafik, Tarik

    2015-12-30

    The present work highlights the intrinsic catalytic properties of extruded clay honeycomb monolith toward complete oxidation of various air pollutants namely CO, methane, propane, acetylene, propene, n-butene, methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, n-butanol, acetone, dimethyl ether, benzene, toluene, o-xylene, monochlorobenzene and 1,2-dichlorobenzene. Total catalytic conversion was achieved for all tested compounds with different behaviors depending on pollutants' structural and chemical nature. The comparison of T50 values obtained from light-off curves allowed the establishment of the following reactivity sequence: ketone>alcohol>ether>CO>alkyne>aromatic>alkene>chlorinated aromatic>alkane. The intrinsic catalytic performances of the natural clay was ascribed to the implication of a quite complex mixture constituted by OH groups (Brønsted acids) and coordinately-unsaturated cations, such as Al(3+), Fe(3+) and Fe(2+) (Lewis acids). Hence, the combination of the clay's intrinsic catalytic performances and easier extrudability suggests a promissory potential for application in air pollution control. PMID:26259164

  17. Experimental evaluation of dry/wet air-cooled heat exchangers. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauser, S.G.; Gruel, R.L.; Huenefeld, J.C.; Eschbach, E.J.; Johnson, B.M.; Kreid, D.K.

    1982-08-01

    The ultimate goal of this project was to contribute to the development of improved cooling facilities for power plants. Specifically, the objective during FY-81 was to experimentally determine the thermal performance and operating characteristics of an air-cooled heat exchanger surface manufactured by the Unifin Company. The performance of the spiral-wound finned tube surface (Unifin) was compared with two inherently different platefin surfaces (one developed by the Trane Co. and the other developed by the HOETERV Institute) which were previously tested as a part of the same continuing program. Under dry operation the heat transfer per unit frontal area per unit inlet temperature difference (ITD) of the Unifin surface was 10% to 20% below that of the other two surfaces at low fan power levels. At high fan power levels, the performances of the Unifin and Trane surfaces were essentially the same, and 25% higher than the HOETERV surface. The design of the Unifin surface caused a significantly larger air-side pressure drop through the heat exchanger both in dry and deluge operation. Generally higher overall heat transfer coefficients were calculated for the Unifin surface under deluged operation. They ranged from 2.0 to 3.5 Btu/hr-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F as compared to less than 2.0 Btu hr-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F for the Trane and HOETERV surfaces under similar conditions. The heat transfer enhancement due to the evaporative cooling effect was also measureably higher with the Unifin surface as compared to the Trane surface. This can be primarily attributed to the better wetting characteristics of the Unifin surface. If the thermal performance of the surfaces are compared at equal face velocities, the Unifin surface is as much as 35% better. This method of comparison accounts for the wetting characteristics while neglecting the effect of pressure drop. Alternatively the surfaces when compared at equal pressure drop essentially the same thermal performance.

  18. Oxidation Behavior of Mo-Si-B Alloys in Wet Air; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multiphase composite alloys based on the Mo-Si-B system are candidate materials for ultra-high temperature applications. In non load-bearing uses such as thermal barrier coatings or heat exchangers in fossil fuel burners, these materials may be ideally suited. The present work investigated the effect of water vapor on the oxidation behavior of Mo-Si-B phase assemblages. Three alloys were studied: Alloy 1= Mo(sub 5)Si(sub 3)B(sub x) (T1)- MoSi(sub 2)- MoB, Alloy 2= T1- Mo(sub 5)SiB(sub 2) (T2)- Mo(sub 3)Si, and Alloy 3= Mo- T2- Mo(sub 3)Si. Tests were conducted at 1000 and 1100C in controlled atmospheres of dry air and wet air nominally containing 18, 55, and 150 Torr H(sub 2)O. The initial mass loss of each alloy was approximately independent of the test temperature and moisture content of the atmosphere. The magnitude of these initial losses varied according to the Mo content of the alloys. All alloys formed a continuous, external silica scale that protected against further mass change after volatilization of the initially formed MoO(sub 3). All alloys experienced a small steady state mass change, but the calculated rates cannot be quantitatively compared due to statistical uncertainty in the individual mass measurements. Of particular interest is that Alloy 3, which contains a significant volume fraction of Mo metal, formed a protective scale. All alloys formed varying amounts of subscale Mo and MoO(sub 2). This implies that oxygen transport through the external silica scale has been significantly reduced. For all alloys, water vapor accelerated the growth of a multiphase interlayer at the silica scale/unoxidized alloy interface. This interlayer is likely composed of fine Mo and MoO(sub 2) that is dispersed within a thin silica matrix. Alloy 3 was particularly sensitive to water accelerated growth of this interlayer. At 1100 C, the scale thickness after 300 hours increased from about 20 mm in dry air to nearly 100 mm in wet air

  19. Catalytically stabilized combustion of lean methane-air-mixtures: a numerical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogwiler, U.; Benz, P.; Mantharas, I. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The catalytically stabilized combustion of lean methane/air mixtures has been studied numerically under conditions closely resembling the ones prevailing in technical devices. A detailed numerical model has been developed for a laminar, stationary, 2-D channel flow with full heterogeneous and homogeneous reaction mechanisms. The computations provide direct information on the coupling between heterogeneous-homogeneous combustion and in particular on the means of homogeneous ignitions and stabilization. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  20. Tailoring activated carbons as catalyst for catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol

    OpenAIRE

    Baricot Mendoza, Maretva Denise

    2008-01-01

    Debido al marcado desarrollo que han tenido las actividades industriales en el mundo, el acceso al agua potable es cada vez más difícil. Durante el último siglo el consumo mundial de agua se ha incrementado 10 veces y de acuerdo con información de la Organización Mundial de la Salud 1.1 miles de millones de personas no tienen acceso a agua potable y 2.4 miles de millones no disponen de las condiciones sanitarias apropiadas. Adicionalmente, sólo 0.8% de la reserva global de agua es apta para e...

  1. Catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol in a trickle bed reactor: kinteics and reactor modelling.

    OpenAIRE

    Eftaxias, Athanasios

    2003-01-01

    El tratamiento y el reciclaje de afluentes acuosos son de máximo interés para conseguir un desarrollo sostenible de las actividades humanas. La necesidad de aprovechar en un futuro cercano las aguas residuales de procesos industriales de un modo eficaz ha reforzado la investigación sobre métodos de bajo coste para su recuperación, dado que las tecnologías existentes ya no son universalmente aplicables. La oxidación catalítica por vía húmeda (CWAO) es uno de los procesos emergentes más promete...

  2. Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation Coupled with an Aerobic Treatment to Deal with Industrial Wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Suárez Ojeda, María Eugenia

    2006-01-01

    La reducción del agua residual y su tratamiento es uno de los retos a los que se enfrenta nuestra sociedad de consumo. Por ejemplo, en la UE se vierten 5400 toneladas al año de efluentes industriales de compuestos aromáticos, los cuales presentan efectos tóxicos y bactericidas. Hoy en día, existen varias tecnologías que han demostrado su potencial para tratar este tipo de efluentes industriales. La mayoría de ellas están basadas en la oxidación del contaminante orgánico, el cual es transforma...

  3. Dry/wet performance of a plate-fin air-cooled heat exchanger with continuous corrugated fins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance and operating characteristics of a plate-fin heat exchanger in dry/wet or deluge operations was experimentally determined. Development of the deluge heat/mass transfer model continued. The experiments were conducted in a specially-designed wind tunnel at the PNL. Air that was first heated and humidified to specified conditions was circulated at a controlled rate through a 2 ft x 6 ft heat exchanger module. The heat exchanger used in the tests was a wavy surface, plate fin on tube configuration. Hot water was circulated through the tubes at high flow rates to maintain an essentially isothermal condition on the tube side. Deionized water sprayed on the top of the vertically oriented plate fins was collected at the bottom of the core and recirculated. Instrumentation was provided for measurement of flow rates and thermodynamic conditions in the air, in the core circulation water, and in the deluge water. Measurements of the air side pressure drop and heat rejection rate were made as a function of air flow rate, air inlet temperature and humidity, deluge water flow rate, and the core inclination from the vertical. An overall heat transfer coefficient and an effective deluge film convective coefficient was determined. The deluge model, for predicting heat transfer from a wet finned heat exchanger was further developed and refined, and a major extension of the model was formulated that permits simultaneous calculation of both the heat transfer and evaporation rates from the wetted surface. The experiments showed an increase in the heat rejection rate due to wetting, accompanied by a proportional increase in the air side pressure drop. For operation at the same air side pressure drop, the enhancement ratio Q/sub w//Q/sub d/ varied between 2 and 5 for the conditions tested. Thus, the potential enhancement of heat transfer due to wetting can be substantial

  4. Dry/wet performance of a plate-fin air-cooled heat exchanger with continuous corrugated fins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauser, S.G.; Kreid, D.K.; Johnson, B.M.

    1981-01-01

    The performance and operating characteristics of a plate-fin heat exchanger in dry/wet or deluge operations was experimentally determined. Development of the deluge heat/mass transfer model continued. The experiments were conducted in a specially-designed wind tunnel at the PNL. Air that was first heated and humidified to specified conditions was circulated at a controlled rate through a 2 ft x 6 ft heat exchanger module. The heat exchanger used in the tests was a wavy surface, plate fin on tube configuration. Hot water was circulated through the tubes at high flow rates to maintain an essentially isothermal condition on the tube side. Deionized water sprayed on the top of the vertically oriented plate fins was collected at the bottom of the core and recirculated. Instrumentation was provided for measurement of flow rates and thermodynamic conditions in the air, in the core circulation water, and in the deluge water. Measurements of the air side pressure drop and heat rejection rate were made as a function of air flow rate, air inlet temperature and humidity, deluge water flow rate, and the core inclination from the vertical. An overall heat transfer coefficient and an effective deluge film convective coefficient was determined. The deluge model, for predicting heat transfer from a wet finned heat exchanger was further developed and refined, and a major extension of the model was formulated that permits simultaneous calculation of both the heat transfer and evaporation rates from the wetted surface. The experiments showed an increase in the heat rejection rate due to wetting, accompanied by a proportional increase in the air side pressure drop. For operation at the same air side pressure drop, the enhancement ratio Q/sub w//Q/sub d/ varied between 2 and 5 for the conditions tested. Thus, the potential enhancement of heat transfer due to wetting can be substantial.

  5. Methodology to determine the appropriate amount of excess air for the operation of a gas turbine in a wet environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lugo-Leyte, R.; Zamora-Mata, J.M.; Torres-Aldaco, A. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Departamento de Ingenieria de Procesos e Hidraulica, San Rafael Atlixco 186, Col Vicentina 09340, Iztapalapa, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Toledo-Velazquez, M. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Escuela Superior de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, Seccion de Estudios de Posgrado e Investigacion, Laboratorio de Ingenieria Termica e Hidraulica Aplicada, Unidad Profesional Adolfo Lopez Mateos, Edificio 5, 3er piso SEPI-ESIME, C.P. 07738, Col. Lindavista, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Salazar-Pereyra, M. [Tecnologico de Estudios Superiores de Ecatepec, Division de Ingenieria Mecatronica e Industrial, Posgrado en Ciencias en Ingenieria Mecatronica, Av. Tecnologico s/n, Col. Valle de Anahuac, C.P. 55210, Ecatepec de Morelos, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2010-02-15

    This paper addresses the impact of excess air on turbine inlet temperature, power, and thermal efficiency at different pressure ratios. An explicit relationship is developed to determine the turbine inlet temperature as a function of excess air, pressure ratio and relative humidity. The effect of humidity on the calculation of excess air to achieve a pre-established power output is analyzed and presented. Likewise it is demonstrated that dry air calculations provide a valid upper bound for the performance of a gas turbine under a wet environment. (author)

  6. Oxidation of a novel CeO{sub 2}-dispersed chromium coating in wet air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, X.; Yan, J.; Zheng, L.; Wang, F. [State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2011-06-15

    An electrodeposited Ni-CeO{sub 2} composite was used as a ''precursor film'' for a novel CeO{sub 2}-dispersed chromium coating deposited using a traditional pack cementation method. The substrate was a carbon steel. For comparison, chromium coatings were also prepared on the untreated and pure Ni-film-treated carbon steel using the same pack cementation conditions. Oxidation in 5% O{sub 2} + 40% H{sub 2}O + N{sub 2} at 900 C showed that, compared to the CeO{sub 2}-free coating counterparts, the CeO{sub 2}-dispersed chromium coating exhibited greatly increased oxidation resistance, owing to the development of a denser and more slowly growing chromia scale. The slow growth of the scale was correlated with the CeO{sub 2} dispersion exerting the so-called ''reactive elemental effect (REE)'' on oxidation. The oxidation mechanisms in wet air of the various types of coatings were compared to those in dry air and are fully discussed in this work. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  7. Study on dynamics characteristics of wet air oxidation of non-ionic surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Wet air oxidation is an effective method to deal with highly concentrated nondegradable emulsification wastewater which contains non-ionic surfactants. This article illustrates our investigation on dynamic characteristics of wet air oxidation of typical non-ionic surfactants like polyether, phenol ether and widely used alcohol ether. The experimental results indicated that the oxidation rate of polyether, phenol ether and alcohol ether obviously ascended as the temperature rose. A good oxidation effect was available at 240℃. The TOC removal rate could reach 88.0%, 94% and 91.5%, after 125 min reaction. Alcohol ether was prone to an easier oxidation compared with polyether and phenol ether when the temperature was 220℃ or below. The oxidation rate of alcohol ether was higher than that of polyether at 160℃, while the oxidation rate of polyether was higher than that of phenol ether between 180℃ and 220℃. During the later period of the reaction at 240℃, the rate of phenol ether was higher than that of alcohol ether, which was still higher than that of polyether. Partitioned first order kinetics model analy-sis showed that the apparent activation energy of alcohol ether was lower than that of both polyether and phenol ether in the leading stage and lagging stage, and it was easy to acquire a higher oxidation rate for alcohol ether at low temperature. Three parameter general dynamics model analyses showed that the reason why the oxidation rate of polyether was lower than that of alcohol ether was that the oxidation of polyether was more apt to be converted to intermediate production than that of alcohol ether, whereas between 200℃ and 220℃, the direct oxidation rate of polyether and the oxidation rate of intermediate product were obviously lower than that of alcohol ether. The apparent activation energy of direct and indirect oxidation of polyether was 43.37 and 60.45 kJ?mol?1, respectively, while the corre-sponding apparent activation energy of alcohol

  8. Study on dynamics characteristics of wet air oxidation of non-ionic surfactants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENG XinPing; TANG WenWei; ZHAO JianFu; GU GuoWei

    2008-01-01

    Wet air oxidation is an effective method to deal with highly concentrated nondegradable emulsification wastewater which contains non-ionic surfactants. This article illustrates our investigation on dynamic characteristics of wet air oxidation of typical non-ionic surfactants like polyether, phenol ether and widely used alcohol ether. The experimental results indicated that the oxidation rate of polyether, phenol ether and alcohol ether obviously ascended as the temperature rose. A good oxidation effect was available at 240℃. The TOC removal rate could reach 88.0%, 94% and 91.5%, after 125 min reaction. Alcohol ether was prone to an easier oxidation compared with polyether and phenol ether when the temperature was 220℃ or below. The oxidation rate of alcohol ether was higher than that of polyether at 160℃, while the oxidation rate of polyether was higher than that of phenol ether between 180℃ and 220℃. During the later period of the reaction at 240℃, the rate of phenol ether was higher than that of alcohol ether, which was still higher than that of polyether. Partitioned first order kinetics model analysis showed that the apparent activation energy of alcohol ether was lower than that of both polyether and phenol ether in the leading stage and lagging stage, and it was easy to acquire a higher oxidation rate for alcohol ether at low temperature. Three parameter general dynamics model analyses showed that the reason why the oxidation rate of polyether was lower than that of alcohol ether was that the oxidation of polyether was more apt to be converted to intermediate production than that of alcohol ether, whereas between 200℃ and 220℃, the direct oxidation rate of polyether and the oxidation rate of intermediate product were obviously lower than that of alcohol ether. The apparent activation energy of direct and indirect oxidation of polyether was 43.37 and 60.45 kJ·mol-1, respectively, while the corresponding apparent activation energy of alcohol

  9. ADVECTION-DIFFUSION NUMERICAL MODEL OF AN AIR POLLUTANT EMITTED FROM AN AREA SOURCE OF PRIMARY POLLUTANT WITH WET DEPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C M SURESHA

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A two dimensional advection-diffusion numerical model of air pollutant emitted from an area source of primary pollutant with wet deposition is presented. We study the effect of removal mechanism i.e. wet deposition on primary pollutant with respect to distance and height for stable and neutral cases. The numerical model has been solved by using Crank-Nicolson implicit finite difference technique. Concentration contours are plotted and results are analysed for primary pollutant in stable and neutral atmospheric situations for various meteorological parameters.

  10. Characteristics of titania supported copper oxide catalysts for wet air oxidation of phenol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various techniques have been used to characterize the CuO x/TiO2 catalysts with different copper loading. Surface area, pore volume and pore size distribution of the prepared catalysts were estimated from nitrogen adsorption isotherm. Temperature programmed reduction (TPR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron spin resonance (ESR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) experiments were performed to investigate the chemical state of the copper species. The chemical state of copper in the CuO x/TiO2 catalysts varied with copper loading (1-25 wt.%): highly dispersed Cu2+ cluster for 1 and 5 wt.%, and bulk CuO for 7-25 wt.%. The activity and mineralization selectivity of the CuO x/TiO2 catalysts increased with copper loading up to 20 wt.%, and remained almost constant for higher copper loading. The optimum copper loading was 20 wt.% for the wet air oxidation of phenol over the CuO x/TiO2 catalysts in this work. The stability of the CuO x/TiO2 catalysts with different copper loading was also studied with respect to carbonaceous deposits and copper leaching

  11. An investigation of turbulent catalytically stabilized channel flow combustion of lean hydrogen - air mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantzaras, I.; Benz, P.; Schaeren, R.; Bombach, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The catalytically stabilised thermal combustion (CST) of lean hydrogen-air mixtures was investigated numerically in a turbulent channel flow configuration using a two-dimensional elliptic model with detailed heterogeneous and homogeneous chemical reactions. Comparison between turbulent and laminar cases having the same incoming mean properties shows that turbulence inhibits homogeneous ignition due to increased heat transport away from the near-wall layer. The peak root-mean-square temperature and species fluctuations are always located outside the extent of the homogeneous reaction zone indicating that thermochemical fluctuations have no significant influence on gaseous combustion. (author) 4 figs., 6 refs.

  12. ESR ST study of hydroxyl radical generation in wet peroxide system catalyzed by heterogeneous ruthenium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rokhina, E.V.; Golovina, E.A.; As, van H.; Virkutyte, J.

    2009-01-01

    Ru-based catalysts gained popularity because of their applicability for a variety of processes, including carbon monoxide oxidation, wet air catalytic oxidation and wastewater treatment. The focus of a current study was generation of hydroxyl radicals in the wet peroxide system catalyzed by heteroge

  13. WETTING AND REACTIVE AIR BRAZING OF BSCF FOR OXYGEN SEPARATION DEVICES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaDouceur, Richard M.; Meier, Alan; Joshi, Vineet V.

    2014-10-13

    Reactive air brazes Ag-CuO and Ag-V2O5 were evaluated for brazing Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O(3-δ) (BSCF). BSCF has been determined in previous work to have the highest potential mixed ionic/electronic conducting (MIEC) ceramic material based on the design and oxygen flux requirements of an oxy-fuel plant such as an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) used to facilitate high-efficiency carbon capture. Apparent contact angles were observed for Ag-CuO and Ag-V2O5 mixtures at 1000 °C for isothermal hold times of 0, 10, 30, and 60 minutes. Wetting apparent contact angles (θ<90°) were obtained for 1%, 2%, and 5% Ag-CuO and Ag-V2O5 mixtures, with the apparent contact angles between 74° and 78° for all compositions and furnace dwell times. Preliminary microstructural analysis indicates that two different interfacial reactions are occurring: Ag-CuO interfacial microstructures revealed the same dissolution of copper oxide into the BSCF matrix to form copper-cobalt-oxygen rich dissolution products along the BSCF grain boundaries and Ag-V2O5 interfacial microstructures revealed the infiltration and replacement of cobalt and iron with vanadium and silver filling pores in the BSCF microstructure. The Ag-V2O5 interfacial reaction product layer was measured to be significantly thinner than the Ag-CuO reaction product layer. Using a fully articulated four point flexural bend test fixture, the flexural fracture strength for BSCF was determined to be 95 ± 33 MPa. The fracture strength will be used to ascertain the success of the reactive air braze alloys. Based on these results, brazes were fabricated and mechanically tested to begin to optimize the brazing parameters for this system. Ag-2.5% CuO braze alloy with a 2.5 minute thermal cycle achieved a hermetic seal with a joint flexural strength of 34 ± 15 MPa and Ag-1% V2O5 with a 30 minute thermal cycle had a joint flexural strength of 20 ± 15 MPa.

  14. Wetting Splashing

    CERN Document Server

    Tsai, Peichun; Dijkstra, Remko; Lohse, Detlef

    2010-01-01

    We present fluid dynamics videos illustrating wetting splashing-produced by water drop impact onto hydrophobic microstructures at high impact velocity ($\\sim 3$ ms$^{-1}$). The substrate consists of regular and transparent microtextures in square or hexagonal lattice, yielding a high contact angle of $\\sim 150 ^\\circ$. Our high speed top-or-bottom view recordings through the transparent surface shed light on the solid-liquid-air interfaces at impact. Despite the superhydrophobicity of the latticed micropillars (of a periodicity of $10 {\\mu}m), water droplet wets a certain central area and moreover entraps an air bubble beneath the droplet. Besides the central wet area, lamella surf on air splashing outward at high impinging velocity. The effects of micropatterns and air pressure on the impact outcome are also examined. We show that microscopic boundary condition, imposed by the solid texture, profoundly influences the macroscopic flow dynamics upon superhydrophobic surfaces at high impinging velocity. In addi...

  15. Sewage-sludge-derived carbonaceous materials for catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation of m-cresol in batch and continuous reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Wei, Huangzhao; Yu, Li; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Ying; Gu, Bin; Sun, Chenglin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, four sewage-sludge-derived carbonaceous materials (SWs) were evaluated for their catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation (CWPO) performance of m-cresol in batch reactor and continuous reactor, respectively. The SWs were produced by carbonization (SW); carbonization with the addition of CaO (CaO-SW); HNO3 pretreatment (HNO3-SW) and steam activation (Activated-SW). The properties of SW catalysts were assessed by thermogravimetric analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, X-ray Fluorescence, Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and zeta potential. The results showed that SW treated by HNO3 (HNO3-SW) had a high conversion of m-cresol in batch reactor and continuous reactor, respectively. Under the conditions of batch reaction (Cm-cresol = 100 mg L(-1), CH2O2 = 15.7 mmol L(-1), initial pH=7.0, 0.5 g L(-1) catalyst, 80°C, 180 min adsorption and 210 min oxidation), the conversion of m-cresol reached 100% and total organic carbon removal was 67.1%. It had a high catalytic activity and stability on the treatment of m-cresol in CWPO for more than 1100 h. Furthermore, a possible reaction mechanism for the oxidation of m-cresol to 2-methyl-p-benzoquinone by CWPO was proposed. PMID:26109374

  16. THE INFLUENCE OF AIR-DRYING ON HYPER-REMINERALIZATION OF DEMINERALIZED DENTIN - A STUDY ON BULK AS WELL AS ON THIN WET SECTION OF BOVINE DENTIN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    INABA, D; IIJIMA, Y; TAKAGI, O; RUBEN, J; ARENDS, J

    1995-01-01

    The influence of air-drying on the remineralization of demineralized bovine dentine was examined in wet bulk samples, in dried bulk samples as well as in wet thin sections. Bulk samples of bovine dentine were first demineralized in an acidic gel (pH = 5) at 37 degrees C for 3 weeks. After 24-hour pr

  17. Research on Synergy of Combining Electrochemical Oxidation and Catalytic Wet Oxidation%电场效应与催化湿式氧化协同作用研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王华; 李光明; 张芳; 黄菊文

    2009-01-01

    A new catalytic wet oxidation fixed-bed reactor combined with three-dimensional electric-field was developed to investigate catalytic wet oxidation, electrochemical oxidation and electroassisted catalytic wet oxidation of the solution containing phenol in the presence of a catalyst Mn-Sn-Sb-3/γ-Al_2O_3 . Good eleetroassisted catalytic wet oxidation efficiency was obtained in the setup for the combination system even at mild conditions ( T = 130℃, po_2 =1.0 MPa) that the phenol conversion and TOC reduction were up to 94.0% and 88.4% after 27 min treatment, respectively. The result also shows that the rate constants of electroassisted catalytic wet oxidation are much higher than that of not only both catalytic wet oxidation and electrochemical oxidation process alone but also additive efficiencies of catalytic wet oxidation and electrochemical oxidation processes, which indicates an apparent synergetic effect between CWO and ECO processes.%在自行研制开发的一套固定床和复合三维电场一体化连续式催化湿式氧化反应器中,采用浸渍法制备的Mn-Sn-Sb-3/γAl_2O_3催化剂,实验研究了苯酚催化湿式氧化、电催化氧化以及电场效应下的催化湿式氧化过程的行为.结果表明,一体化反应器在较低反应温度(T=130℃)和氧分压(Po_2=1.0 MPa)下即可获得相当满意的处理效果,空时仅为27min时苯酚和TOC的去除率就分别可达到94.0%和88.4%.电场效应下的催化湿式氧化协同降解苯酚的反应速率常数大于单独电催化或催化湿式氧化降解苯酚的反应速率常数,而且还大大超过两者之和,电催化氧化对催化湿式氧化工艺存在明显的协同增效作用.

  18. Treatment of biomass-gasification wastewaters by wet-air oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    English, C.J.

    1981-09-01

    Production of synthetic natural gas from gasification of biomass results in the generation of a high-strength wastewater that is difficult to treat by conventional means. This study investigated the use of wet air oxidation (WAO) as a treatment method for these wastewaters. A literature review was conducted to identify the suitability of WAO for the treatment of high-strength industrial wastewaters and to determine typical operating conditions for such treatment. Data presented in the literature showed that WAO should be suitable for treatment. Data presented in the literature showed that WAO should be suitable for treatment of biomass gasification wastewaters (BGW), and a laboratory treatability study was designed. BGW, having an initial chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 30,800 mg/1 and initial color of 183,000 APHA units, was treated in a laboratory autoclave for 20, 40, 60, 120, and 180 min at temperatures and pressures of 150/sup 0/C, 5.1 MPa (750 psi); 200/sup 0/C, 6.9 MPa (1000 psi); 250/sup 0/C, 10.3 MPa (1500 psi); and 300/sup 0/C, 13.8 MPa (2000 psi). Maximum COD removals of 0% for the 150/sup 0/C, 5.2 MPa (750 psi) runs; 40% for the 200/sup 0/C, 6.9 MPa (1000 psi) runs, 55% for the 250/sup 0/C, 10.3 MPa (1500 psi) runs; and 85% for the 300/sup 0/C, 13.8 MPa (2000 psi) runs were measured. Maximum color removals for these respective runs were 56%, 82%, 97%, and 99%. Initial removal rates of COD and color were observed to increase with reaction temperature. The experimental results suggest that oxidation of BGW organics by WAO occurs in a stepwise fashion with large organic molecules first being hydrolyzed and then partially oxidized to low molecular weight intermediates. Complete oxidation of these intermediates is more difficult and most easily accomplished at high reaction temperatures. The best application of WAO to treatment of BGW appears to be as a pretreatment to biological treatment and it is recommended that this application be investigated.

  19. The incidence of antibiotic resistant bacteria in industrial and residential air / Jahne de Wet

    OpenAIRE

    De Wet, Jahne

    2006-01-01

    Few studies have been undertaken to assess microbial air quality in South Africa. At present not enough is known about the state of microbial air quality in the North-West Province. Past efforts to collect information on provincial air quality have been scattered, random and incomplete. However, the activities in the province provide a good indication of the potential pollutants and air quality. An international study noted a possible link between air pollution and bacterial resistance ...

  20. Wet effluent diffusion denuder technique and the determination of volatile organic compounds in air. II. Monoterpenes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sklenská, Jana; Broškovičová, Anna; Večeřa, Zbyněk

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 973, 1-2 (2002), s. 211-216. ISSN 0021-9673 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/98/0943 Grant ostatní: SPSDII(XE) EV/02/11 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4031919 Keywords : wet effluent denuder technique * volatile organic compounds * monoterpenes Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 3.098, year: 2002

  1. Analisis Pengaruh Salinitas dan Temperatur Air Laut pada Wet Underwater Welding terhadap Laju Korosi

    OpenAIRE

    Adrian Dwilaksono; Heri Supomo; Triwilaswandio Wuruk Pribadi

    2013-01-01

    Struktur konstruksi badan kapal lambat laut mengalami kerusakan . Apabila kapal mengalami kerusakan pada konisi darurat, pekerjaan las bawah air menjadi hal yang diutamakan. Sedangkan faktor korosi pada pengelasan basah bawah air merupakan masalah yang pasti terjadi. Melalu penelitian ini dikaji perbandingan laju korosi sambungan las material baja karbon rendah yang diberi perlakuan pengelasan basah bawah air dengan salinitas 33‰ , 35‰ dan suhu 200C, 250C. Dari keempat variasi pengelasan ters...

  2. Wet chemical treatments of high purity Ge crystals for γ-ray detectors: Surface structure, passivation capabilities and air stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carturan, S., E-mail: carturan@lnl.infn.it [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Padova, Padova (Italy); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Maggioni, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Padova, Padova (Italy); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Rezvani, S.J. [Department of Physics, University of Camerino, Camerino, Macerata (Italy); Gunnella, R. [Department of Physics, University of Camerino, Camerino, Macerata (Italy); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Italy); Pinto, N. [Department of Physics, University of Camerino, Camerino, Macerata (Italy); INFN, Sezione di Perugia, Perugia (Italy); Gelain, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Padova, Padova (Italy); INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro, Padova (Italy); Napoli, D.R. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro, Padova (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    Aiming at the production of HPGe diodes for γ-ray detection, surface passivation of the pristine Germanium surface is pursued by treatment of freshly etched, highly reactive Ge (100) surface by different chemicals, to obtain chemisorbed species with sufficient insulating properties for allowing high voltage application (up to 1100 V) with low leakage currents (lower than 30 pA). (100) surface termination of Ge crystal with hydride, methoxide, and sulphide is carried out by wet chemical treatments using suitable reactants. The chemical composition of the newly formed monolayers is investigated with regards to the nature of chemical bonding with Ge atop atoms. To this aim Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) were used; the performance as dielectric layer of each native Ge compound/complex is measured directly from I–V measurements of a HPGe diode. Atomic stability of each surface layer is monitored detecting structural changes after air exposure by XPS and FTIR spectroscopies and by relevant leakage current variations. - Highlights: • Different surface passivations were applied to HPGe by wet chemical methods. • New chemical bonds were characterized by FTIR and XPS. • Air stability: hydride and sulphide treatments display the best oxidation resistance. • I–V measurements: all the treatments provided efficient passivation.

  3. Development of a New Type of Green Switch Air Entraining Agent for Wet-Mix Shotcrete and Its Engineering Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guoming Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Air entraining agent (AEA can bring a lot of microbubbles into fresh concrete for improving its fluidity; however, high fluidity has adverse effect on the shootability of wet-mix shotcrete. In order to solve the contradictory issue, the paper developed a new type of green switch air entraining agent (GSAE that can improve both the pumpability and shootability. The single-admixture and combination tests containing foaming ability and surface tension were performed with Deer agitator and automatic tension meter. The new AEA was developed with two constituents A and B. A was prepared with Sapindus mukorossi(S-1, dodecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride(1231, and polyacrylamide. B was prepared with lauryl sodium sulfate (K12 and silicone oil. The mass mix proportion was S-1 : 1231 : polyacrylamide : K12 : silicone oil = 1 : 0.33 : 0.2 : 0.33 : 0.47. The application method of GSAE proposed that A was premixed with fresh concrete and then B was added at nozzle. Experimental investigation showed that the optimal mixing amount of GSAE was 0.1%–0.2% relative to cement. All performance measured of wet-mix shotcrete with 0.12% GSAE met the first-grade product requirements of the China National Standard. Compared with the conventional type of AEA, the proposed GSAE is capable of effectively improving pumpability and shootability.

  4. Wet chemical treatments of high purity Ge crystals for γ-ray detectors: Surface structure, passivation capabilities and air stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiming at the production of HPGe diodes for γ-ray detection, surface passivation of the pristine Germanium surface is pursued by treatment of freshly etched, highly reactive Ge (100) surface by different chemicals, to obtain chemisorbed species with sufficient insulating properties for allowing high voltage application (up to 1100 V) with low leakage currents (lower than 30 pA). (100) surface termination of Ge crystal with hydride, methoxide, and sulphide is carried out by wet chemical treatments using suitable reactants. The chemical composition of the newly formed monolayers is investigated with regards to the nature of chemical bonding with Ge atop atoms. To this aim Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) were used; the performance as dielectric layer of each native Ge compound/complex is measured directly from I–V measurements of a HPGe diode. Atomic stability of each surface layer is monitored detecting structural changes after air exposure by XPS and FTIR spectroscopies and by relevant leakage current variations. - Highlights: • Different surface passivations were applied to HPGe by wet chemical methods. • New chemical bonds were characterized by FTIR and XPS. • Air stability: hydride and sulphide treatments display the best oxidation resistance. • I–V measurements: all the treatments provided efficient passivation

  5. Impact of Hong Kong's Voluntary Catalytic Converter Replacement Programme on Roadside Air Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, I. J.; Guo, H.; Louie, P. K. K.; Luk, C.; Lyu, X.; Meinardi, S.; Yam, Y. S.; Blake, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    As part of its ongoing policies to improve roadside air quality, in 2013 the Hong Kong government launched an incentive programme to replace catalytic converters and oxygen sensors in taxis and light buses mainly fueled by liquefied petroleum gas (LPG). The majority of replacements occurred from October 2013 to April 2014, with 75% of eligible vehicles participating in the programme, or 16,472 vehicles. Based on taxi exhaust measurements at a Hong Kong vehicle testing facility, the concentrations of n-butane, propane and i-butane (the primary components of LPG) decreased by 97% following the replacements. To determine the impact of the programme on roadside air quality, long-term measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were analyzed before, during and after the replacement programme, mainly at a busy roadside location in Mong Kok, Hong Kong. A clear decrease in the levels of major pollutants associated with LPG vehicle exhaust was observed at the roadside. For example, average (± 1 standard deviation) n-butane levels from October to April decreased from 13.0 ± 3.6 and 13.9 ± 2.6 ppbv in the two years preceding the programme, to 9.2 ± 2.9 ppbv during the programme, to 6.2 ± 1.7 ppbv the year after the programme. By contrast, compounds such as i-pentane that are not strongly associated with LPG or with LPG exhaust remained steady, averaging 0.90 ± 0.34, 1.01 ± 0.31, 0.93 ± 0.37, and 0.91 ± 0.42 ppbv from October to April of 2011/12, 2012/13, 2013/14 and 2014/15, respectively. Impacts of the programme on roadside levels of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and ozone (O3) will also be discussed. Because many taxis are high mileage vehicles that travel several hundred kilometers daily, their catalytic converters need to be replaced approximately every 18 months. Therefore ongoing vehicle maintenance will be required in order to preserve the gains made from this initial subsidy programme.

  6. Estimation of air to grass - dry and wet deposition rates, velocities, and mass interception factors for iodine for a postulated accidental scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of air to grass - dry and wet deposition rates, velocities, and mass interception factors for iodine are sparse in India. Data on these parameters are the basic input for the estimation of radiation dose to the public around a nuclear power plant. We have carried out systematic studies on air to grass - dry and wet deposition rates, velocities, and mass interception factors for iodine for a postulated emergency situation. The main objective of this study was to generate air to grass transfer factors for iodine for the environmental conditions prevailing in Kaiga

  7. Analisis Pengaruh Salinitas dan Temperatur Air Laut pada Wet Underwater Welding terhadap Laju Korosi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian Dwilaksono

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Struktur konstruksi badan kapal lambat laut mengalami kerusakan . Apabila kapal mengalami kerusakan pada konisi darurat, pekerjaan las bawah air menjadi hal yang diutamakan. Sedangkan faktor korosi pada pengelasan basah bawah air merupakan masalah yang pasti terjadi. Melalu penelitian ini dikaji perbandingan laju korosi sambungan las material baja karbon rendah yang diberi perlakuan pengelasan basah bawah air dengan salinitas 33‰ , 35‰ dan suhu 200C, 250C. Dari keempat variasi pengelasan tersebut diberikan variasi ketebalan pelat sebagai pembanding. Penelitian laju korosi dilakukan dengan pengujian terhadap material baja A36 yang dilas menggunakan metode SMAW pada pengelasan basah bawah air pada posisi 1G (datar dengan elektroda AWS E-6013 yang dilapisi isolasi yang bersifat kedap air. Dari data pengujian laju korosi  diketahui bahwa pengelasan basah bawah air dengan salinitas 35‰ lebih tinggi di bandingkan dengan pengelasan basah bawah air dengan salinitas 33‰, sedangkan untuk pengujian laju korosi dengan variasi suhu diketahui bahwa dengan suhu 250C cenderung lebih besar, meskipun hasil nya tidak signifikan dibandingkan dengan suhu 200C, dan semakin tebal pelat, laju korosinya juga cenderung lebih tinggi. Hasil pengujian menunjukkan bahwa ketebalan yang berkurang pada Salinitas 33‰ dan Suhu 200C yaitu sebesar 0.2124 (mm/year , untuk Suhu 250C yaitu sebesar 0.2139(mm/year pada plat 10mm, Sedangkan untuk plat 12 mm , suhu 200C yaitu sebesar 0.3203 (mm/year , untuk Suhu 250C yaitu sebesar 0.3205 (mm/year. Untuk Salinitas 35‰ dan Suhu 200C yaitu sebesar 0.4521 (mm/year , untuk Suhu 250C yaitu sebesar 0.4538(mm/year pada plat 10mm, Sedangkan untuk plat 12 mm , suhu 200C yaitu sebesar 0.5547 (mm/year , untuk Suhu 250C yaitu sebesar 0.5550 (mm/year.

  8. Post-treatment of biologically treated wastewater containing organic contaminants using a sequence of H2O2 based advanced oxidation processes: photolysis and catalytic wet oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Márquez, J J; Sillanpää, M; Pocostales, P; Acevedo, A; Manzano, M A

    2015-03-15

    In this paper the feasibility of a multi-barrier treatment (MBT) for the regeneration of synthetic industrial wastewater (SIWW) was evaluated. Industrial pollutants (orange II, phenol, 4-chlorophenol and phenanthrene) were added to the effluent of municipal wastewater treatment plant. The proposed MBT begins with a microfiltration membrane pretreatment (MF), followed by hydrogen peroxide photolysis (H2O2/UVC) and finishing, as a polishing step, with catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) using granular activated carbon (GAC) at ambient conditions. During the microfiltration step (0.7 μm) the decrease of suspended solids concentration, turbidity and Escherichia coli in treated water were 88, 94 and 99%, respectively. Also, the effluent's transmittance (254 nm) was increased by 14.7%. Removal of more than 99.9% of all added pollutants, mineralization of 63% of organic compounds and complete disinfection of total coliforms were reached during the H2O2/UVC treatment step (H2O2:TOC w/w ratio = 5 and an UVC average dose accumulated by wastewater 8.80 WUVC s cm(-2)). The power and efficiency of the lamp, the water transmittance and photoreactor geometry are taken into account and a new equation to estimate the accumulated dose in water is suggested. Remaining organic pollutants with a higher oxidation state of carbon atoms (+0.47) and toxic concentration of residual H2O2 were present in the effluent of the H2O2/UVC process. After 2.3 min of contact time with GAC at CWPO step, 90 and 100% of total organic carbon and residual H2O2 were removed, respectively. Also, the wastewater toxicity was studied using Vibrio fischeri and Sparus aurata larvae. The MBT operational and maintenance costs (O&M) was estimated to be 0.59 € m(-3). PMID:25600300

  9. Abatement of phenolic mixtures by catalytic wet oxidation enhanced by Fenton's pretreatment: Effect of H2O2 dosage and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) of a phenolic mixture containing phenol, o-cresol and p-cresol (500 mg/L on each pollutant) has been carried out using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst, placed in a continuous three-phase reactor. Total pressure was 16 bar and temperature was 127 deg. C. Pollutant conversion, mineralization, intermediate distribution, and toxicity were measured at the reactor outlet. Under these conditions no detoxification of the inlet effluent was found even at the highest catalyst weight (W) to liquid flow rate (QL) ratio used. On the other hand, some Fenton Runs (FR) have been carried out in a batch way using the same phenolic aqueous mixture previously cited. The concentration of Fe2+ was set to 10 mg/L. The influence of the H2O2 amount (between 10 and 100% of the stoichiometric dose) and temperature (30, 50, and 70 deg. C) on phenols conversion, mineralization, and detoxification have been analyzed. Phenols conversion was near unity at low hydrogen peroxide dosage but mineralization and detoxification achieved an asymptotic value at each temperature conditions. The integration of Fenton reagent as pretreatment of the CWO process remarkably improves the efficiency of the CWO reactor and allows to obtain detoxified effluents at mild temperature conditions and relatively low W/QL values. For a given phenolic mixture a temperature range of 30-50 deg. C in the Fenton pretreatment with a H2O2 dosage between 20 and 40% of the stoichiometric amount required can be proposed

  10. CuZnAl Mixed Oxide Catalyst Prepared from Hydrotalcite-like Precursor for Catalytic Wet Oxidation of Phenol%由类水滑石前驱体制备的CuZnAl复合氧化物催化剂催化湿氧化处理苯酚

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙颖; 杨民; 窦和瑞; 何雨; 王炜; 孙承林

    2003-01-01

    @@ The efficiency of several noble metals for catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) of various pollutants has been demonstrated[1,2]. However, the noble metals are expensive, affecting greatly the economics of the corresponding process.

  11. Gas Dispersion in Granular Porous Media under Air-Dry and Wet Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Hamamoto, S; Kawamoto, K;

    2012-01-01

    dispersion and soil physical characteristics. In this study, a series of advection–dispersion experiments was performed on granular porous media to identify the effects of soil column dimensions (length and diameter), particle size and shape, dry bulk density, and moisture content on the magnitude of gas...... dispersion. Glass beads and various sands of different shapes (angular and rounded) with mean particle diameters (d50) ranging from 0.19 to 1.51 mm at both air-dry and variable moisture contents were used as granular porous media. Gas dispersion coefficients and gas dispersivities (a = DH/v, where v is the...... pore-gas velocity) were determined by fitting the advection–dispersion equation to the measured breakthrough curves. For all test conditions, DH increased linearly with v. The test results showed that neither soil column length nor diameter had significant effect on gas dispersivity. Under air...

  12. Experimental investigation of burning velocities of ultra-wet methane-air-steam mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Albin, Eric; Nawroth, Holger; Göke, Sebastian; D'Angelo, Yves; Paschereit, Christian Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Global burning velocities of methane-air-steam mixtures are measured on prismatic laminar Bunsen flames and lifted turbulent V-flames for various preheating temperatures, equivalence ratios and steam mixture fractions at atmospheric pressure. Experiments are conducted on a new rectangular slot-burner. Experimental burning velocities are compared to computed flame speeds of one dimensional adiabatic premixed flames using detailed mechanisms (Konnov 0.5 and GRI Mech 3.0). Mean profiles of radic...

  13. Sustainability of the Catalytic Activity of a Silica-Titania Composite (STC) for Long-Term Indoor Air Quality Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, Janelle L.; Levine, Lanfang H.; Richards, Jeffrey T.

    2011-01-01

    TiO2-assisted photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) is an emerging technology for indoor air quality control and is also being evaluated as an alternative trace contaminant control technology for crew habitats in space exploration. Though there exists a vast range of literature on the development of photocatalysts and associated reactor systems, including catalyst performance and performance-influencing factors, the critical question of whether photocatalysts can sustain their initial catalytic activity over an extended period of operation has not been adequately addressed. For a catalyst to effectively serve as an air quality control product, it must be rugged enough to withstand exposure to a multitude of low concentration volatile organic compounds (VOCs) over long periods of time with minimal loss of activity. The objective of this study was to determine the functional lifetime of a promising photocatalyst - the silica-titania composite (STC) from Sol Gel Solutions, LLC in a real-world scenario. A bench-scale STC-packed annular reactor under continuous irradiation by a UV-A fluorescent black-light blue lamp ((lambda)max = 365 nm) was exposed to laboratory air continuously at an apparent contact time of 0.27 sand challenged with a known concentration of ethanol periodically to assess any changes in catalytic activity. Laboratory air was also episodically spiked with halocarbons (e.g., octafluoropropane), organosulfur compounds (e.g., sulfur hexafluoride), and organosilicons (e.g., siloxanes) to simulate accidental releases or leaks of such VOCs. Total organic carbon (TOC) loading and contaminant profiles of the laboratory air were also monitored. Changes in STC photocatalytic performance were evaluated using the ethanol mineralization rate, mineralization efficiency, and oxidation intermediate (acetaldehyde) formation. Results provide insights to any potential catalyst poisoning by trace halocarbons and organosulfur compounds.

  14. 湿法烟气脱硫环境下亚硫酸钙的非催化氧化%NON-CATALYTIC OXIDATION KINETICS OF CALCIUM SULFITE IN WET LIMESTONE-GYPSUM FGD PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杜谦; 吴少华; 朱群益; 秦裕琨

    2003-01-01

    A study on non-catalytic oxidation kinetics of calcium sulfite is presented under typical conditions of wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD)in this paper. A laboratory-scale mechanically stirred tank reactor is used with continuous feed of both gas and liquid phase. The results show that increasing CaSO3 load from a lower value, the reaction rate increases and is limited by solid sulfite dissolution. The oxidation rate limitation is observed at loads exceeding certain concentration. The rate limitation is possibly caused by solid sulfite solubility or oxygen gas-liquid diffusion. The experimental conclusions are useful for design and operation of the holding tank in forced-oxidation wet FGD.

  15. Wet air oxidation of resorcinol as a model treatment for refractory organics in wastewaters from the wood processing industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Bernd; Chavez, Alma; Morales-Mejia, Julio; Eichenauer, Sabrina; Stadlbauer, Ernst A; Almanza, Rafael

    2015-09-15

    Wastewater treatment systems are important tools to enhance sustainability in terms of reducing environmental impact and complying with sanitary requirements. This work addresses the wet air oxidation (WAO) process for pre-treatment of phenolic wastewater effluents. The aim was to increase biodegradability prior to a subsequent anaerobic stage. In WAO laboratory experiments using a micro-autoclave, the model compound resorcinol was degraded under different oxygen availability regims within the temperature range 150 °C-270 °C. The activation energy was determined to be 51.5 kJ/mol. Analysis of the products revealed that after 3 h of reaction at 230 °C, 97.5% degradation of resorcinol was achieved. At 250 °C and the same reaction time complete removal of resorcinol was observed. In this case the total organic carbon content was reduced down to 29%, from 118.0 mg/L down to 34.4 mg/L. Under these process conditions, the pollutant was only partially mineralized and the ratio of the biological oxygen demand relative to the chemical oxygen demand, which is 0.07 for resorcinol, was increased to a value exceeding 0.5. The main by-product acetic acid, which is a preferred compound for methanogenic bacteria, was found to account for 33% of the total organic carbon. PMID:26164636

  16. Combustion of hydrogen-air in micro combustors with catalytic Pt layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micro power generators have high power density. However, their key components micro combustors have low stability. In this experiment, catalyst is applied to improve the stability. The catalytic micro combustor is made from an alumina ceramic tube. It has inner diameter of 1 mm, outer diameter of 2.02 mm and length of 24.5 mm. It is prepared through impregnation of aqueous solution of H2PtCl6. The flammability limits and surface temperatures under different operation conditions are measured. The flow rates range from 0.08 to 0.4 L/min. According to the experimental results, catalyst is effective to inhibit extinction. For example, At 0.8 L/min, the stability limit is 0.193-14.9 in the non-catalytic combustor. After applying catalyst, the lean limit is near 0, and the rich limit is 29.3. But catalyst is less effective to inhibit blow out. Increasing flow rates also inhibits extinction. In the non-catalytic combustor, while the flow rates increase from 0.08 to 0.2 L/min, the lean stability limit decreases from 0.193 to 0.125. The experimental results indicate that catalyst induces shift downstream in the stoichiometric and rich cases. The numeric simulation verifies that the heterogeneous reaction weakens the homogeneous reaction through consuming fuels. Thus, the insufficient heat recirculation makes the reaction region shift downstream. However, lean mixture has intense reaction in the catalytic combustor. It is attributed to the high mass diffusion and low thermal diffusion of lean mixture.

  17. Study on the active sites of Cu-ZSM-5 in trichloroethylene catalytic combustion with air

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Hua Xu; Chuan Qi Liu; Yan Zhong; Xiu Zhou Yang; Jian Ying Liu; Ying Chun Yang; Zhi Xiang Ye

    2008-01-01

    The catalytic activity of Cu-ZSM-5 in trichloroethylene (TCE) combustion increases with the increasing skeletal Cu amount and however decreases with the increase of surface amorphous CuO,which is detected by infrared spectroscopy (IR) and diffuse reflectance ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (DRS-UV-vis),therefore the skeletal Cu species are concluded to be the active sites for the TCE combustion.

  18. Catalytic cracking process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; Baker, Richard W.

    2001-01-01

    Processes and apparatus for providing improved catalytic cracking, specifically improved recovery of olefins, LPG or hydrogen from catalytic crackers. The improvement is achieved by passing part of the wet gas stream across membranes selective in favor of light hydrocarbons over hydrogen.

  19. Toluene removal from waste air stream by the catalytic ozonation process with MgO/GAC composite as catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Fatemeh; Moussavi, Gholamreza; Bakhtiari, Alireza Riyahi; Yamini, Yadollah

    2016-04-01

    This paper investigates the catalytic potential of MgO/GAC composite for toluene elimination from waste air in the catalytic ozonation process (COP). The MgO/GAC composite was a micro-porous material with the BET surface area of 1082m(2)/g. Different functional groups including aromatic CC, saturated CO of anhydrates, hydroxyl groups and SH bond of thiols were identified on the surface of MgO/GAC. Effects of residence time (0.5-4s), inlet toluene concentration (100-400ppmv) and bed temperature (25-100°C) were investigated on degradation of toluene in COP. Impregnation of GAC with MgO increased the breakthrough time and removal capacity by 73.9% and 64.6%, respectively, at the optimal conditions. The catalytic potential of the GAC and MgO/GAC for toluene degradation was 11.1% and 90.6%, respectively, at the optimum condition. The highest removal capacity using MgO/GAC (297.9gtoulene/gMgO/GAC) was attained at 100°C, whereas the highest removal capacity of GAC (128.5mgtoulene/gGAC) was obtained at 25°C. Major by-products of the toluene removal in COP with GAC were Formic acid, benzaldehyde, O-nitro-p-cresol and methyl di-phenyl-methane. MgO/GAC could greatly catalyze the decomposition of toluene in COPand formic acid was the main compound desorbed from the catalyst. Accordingly, the MgO/GAC is an efficient material to catalyze the ozonation of hydrocarbon vapors. PMID:26784452

  20. Catalytic properties of Co3O4 nanoparticles for rechargeable Li/air batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Kwan Su; Park, Yong Joon

    2012-01-01

    Three types of Co3O4 nanoparticles are synthesized and characterized as a catalyst for the air electrode of a Li/air battery. The shape and size of the nanoparticles are observed using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy analyses. The formation of the Co3O4 phase is confirmed by X-ray diffraction. The electrochemical property of the air electrodes containing Co3O4 nanoparticles is significantly associated with the shape and size of the nanoparticles. It appears t...

  1. Numerical study of the behavior of methane-hydrogen/air pre-mixed flame in a micro reactor equipped with catalytic segmented bluff body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, combustion characteristics of premixed methane-hydrogen/air in a micro reactor equipped with a catalytic bluff body is investigated numerically. In this regard, the detailed chemistry schemes for gas phase (homogeneous) and the catalyst surface (heterogeneous) are used. The applied catalytic bluff body is coated with a thin layer of platinum (Pt) on its surface. Also, the lean reactive mixture is entered to the reactor with equivalence ratio 0.9. The results of this study showed that the use of catalytic bluff body in the center of a micro reactor can significantly increase the flame stability, especially at high velocities. Moreover, it is found that a catalytic bluff body with several cavities on its surface and also high thermal conductivity improves the flame stability more than a catalytic bluff body without cavities and low thermal conductivity. Finally, it is maintained that the most advantage of using the catalytic bluff body is its easy manufacturing process as compared to the catalytic wall. This matter seems to be more prevalent when we want to create several cavities with various sizes on the bluff-body. - Highlights: • Presence of a bluff body in a micro reactor can move the flame towards the upstream. • Catalytic bluff body can significantly increase flame stability at high velocities. • Creating non-catalytic cavities on the bluff body promotes homogeneous reactions. • Segmented catalytic bluff body improves the flame stability more than a simple one. • Creating the segments on a bluff body is easier compared to a wall

  2. Understanding the wetting properties of nanostructured selenium coatings: the role of nanostructured surface roughness and air-pocket formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran PA

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Phong A Tran,1,2 Thomas J Webster31Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 2The Particulate Fluid Processing Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia; 3Department of Chemical Engineering and Program in Bioengineering, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, USAAbstract: Wetting properties of biomaterials, in particular nanomaterials, play an important role, as these influence interactions with biological elements, such as proteins, bacteria, and cells. In this study, the wetting phenomenon of titanium substrates coated with selenium nanoparticles was studied using experimental and mathematical modeling tools. Importantly, these selenium-coated titanium substrates were previously reported to increase select protein adsorption (such as vitronectin and fibronectin, to decrease bacteria growth, and increase bone cell growth. Increased selenium nanoparticle coating density resulted in higher contact angles but remained within the hydrophilic regime. This trend was found in disagreement with the Wenzel model, which is widely used to understand the wetting properties of rough surfaces. The trend also did not fit well with the Cassie–Baxter model, which was developed to understand the wetting properties of composite surfaces. A modified wetting model was thus proposed in this study, to understand the contributing factors of material properties to the hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of these nanostructured selenium-coated surfaces. The analysis and model created in this study can be useful in designing and/or understanding the wetting behavior of numerous biomedical materials and in turn, biological events (such as protein adsorption as well as bacteria and mammalian cell functions.Keywords: hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity, Wenzel model, Cassie–Baxter model, free energy, implant material, proteins, cells, bacteria

  3. Catalytic Reductive Degradation of Methyl Orange Using Air Resilient Copper Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razium Ali Soomro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The study describes the application of oxidation resistant copper nanostructures as an efficient heterogeneous catalyst for the treatment of organic dye containing waste waters. Copper nanostructures were synthesized in an aqueous environment using modified surfactant assisted chemical reduction route. The synthesized nanostructures have been characterized by UV-Vis, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy FTIR spectroscopy, Atomic force microscopy (AFM, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, and X-ray diffractometry (XRD. These surfactant capped Cu nanostructures have been used as a heterogeneous catalyst for the comparative reductive degradation of methyl orange (MO in the presence of sodium borohydride (NaBH4 used as a potential reductant. Copper nanoparticles (Cu NPs were found to be more efficient compared to copper nanorods (Cu NRds with the degradation reaction obeying pseudofirst order reaction kinetics. Shape dependent catalytic efficiency was further evaluated from activation energy (EA of reductive degradation reaction. The more efficient Cu NPs were further employed for reductive degradation of real waste water samples containing dyes collected from the drain of different local textile industries situated in Hyderabad region, Pakistan.

  4. Catalytic activity trends of oxygen reduction reaction for nonaqueous Li-air batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi-Chun; Gasteiger, Hubert A; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2011-11-30

    We report the intrinsic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity of polycrystalline palladium, platinum, ruthenium, gold, and glassy carbon surfaces in 0.1 M LiClO(4) 1,2-dimethoxyethane via rotating disk electrode measurements. The nonaqueous Li(+)-ORR activity of these surfaces primarily correlates to oxygen adsorption energy, forming a "volcano-type" trend. The activity trend found on the polycrystalline surfaces was in good agreement with the trend in the discharge voltage of Li-O(2) cells catalyzed by nanoparticle catalysts. Our findings provide insights into Li(+)-ORR mechanisms in nonaqueous media and design of efficient air electrodes for Li-air battery applications. PMID:22044022

  5. DRY/WET PERFORMANCE OF A PLATE-FIN AIR COOLED HEAT EXCHANGER WITH CONTINUOUS CORRUGATED FINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report describes work to (1) determine experimentally the performance and operating characteristics of a plate-fin heat exchanger during dry/wet or 'deluge' operation and (2) continue developing the deluge heat/mass transfer model. This work supports the improvement of power ...

  6. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and chlorinated pesticides in background air in central Europe - investigating parameters affecting wet scavenging of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahpoury, P.; Lammel, G.; Holubová Šmejkalová, A.; Klánová, J.; Přibylová, P.; Váňa, M.

    2014-10-01

    Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and chlorinated pesticides (CPs) were measured in air and precipitation at a background site in central Europe. Σ PAH concentrations in air and rainwater ranged from 0.7 to 327.9 ng m-3 and below analytical method detection limit (particulate matter and rainwater properties were investigated. The concentrations of ionic species in particulate matter and rainwater were significantly correlated, highlighting the importance of particle scavenging process. Overall, higher scavenging efficiencies were found for relatively less volatile PAHs, underlining the effect of analyte gas-particle partitioning on scavenging process. The PAH wet scavenging was more effective when the concentrations of ionic species were high. In addition, the elemental and organic carbon contents of the particulate matter were found to influence the PAH scavenging.

  7. Numerical study of methanol–steam reforming and methanol–air catalytic combustion in annulus reactors for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Performance of mini-scale integrated annulus reactors for hydrogen production. ► Flow rates fed to combustor and reformer control the reactor performance. ► Optimum performance is found from balance of flow rates to combustor and reformer. ► Better performance can be found when shell side is designed as combustor. -- Abstract: This study presents the numerical simulation on the performance of mini-scale reactors for hydrogen production coupled with liquid methanol/water vaporizer, methanol/steam reformer, and methanol/air catalytic combustor. These reactors are designed similar to tube-and-shell heat exchangers. The combustor for heat supply is arranged as the tube or shell side. Based on the obtained results, the methanol/air flow rate through the combustor (in terms of gas hourly space velocity of combustor, GHSV-C) and the methanol/water feed rate to the reformer (in terms of gas hourly space velocity of reformer, GHSV-R) control the reactor performance. With higher GHSV-C and lower GHSV-R, higher methanol conversion can be achieved because of higher reaction temperature. However, hydrogen yield is reduced and the carbon monoxide concentration is increased due to the reversed water gas shift reaction. Optimum reactor performance is found using the balance between GHSV-C and GHSV-R. Because of more effective heat transfer characteristics in the vaporizer, it is found that the reactor with combustor arranged as the shell side has better performance compared with the reactor design having the combustor as the tube side under the same operating conditions.

  8. Electrical behaviour of catalytic nanostructured CeO2/CuO x composites under air-methane gas impulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanostructured composites based on copper oxide and cerium dioxide phases [CuO-CeO2] were elaborated from sol-gel route, with weight fractions of CuO phase ranging between 0 and 0.4. They are interesting potential catalysts allowing conversion of CH4 and CO into CO2 and H2O and might be used in miniaturized gas sensors. An electrical study of this nanostructured system was carried out to determine catalytic behaviours under air-methane impulses at 350 oC. The electrical analysis was based on a specific homemade electronic device. Time dependent interactions between gas pulses and solid catalyst (CuO/CeO2) were analyzed from a frequency modification of the electronic device. Kinetic parameters were determined from a model describing adsorption and desorption of gases adapted to short interaction time between gas and solid. These time dependent electrical behaviours were then correlated with infrared spectroscopy analyses allowing time dependent analysis of methane conversion into CO2 gas, for long interaction time between gas and solid

  9. Catalytic Partial Oxidation of Methane with Air to Syngas in a Pilot-Plant-Scale Spouted Bed Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏伟胜; 徐建; 方大伟; 鲍晓军

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of hydrodynamic and scaling-up studies, a pilot-plant-scale thermal spouted bed reactor (50 mm in ID and 1500 mm in height) was designed and fabricated by scaling-down cold simulators. It was tested for making syngas via catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) of methane by air. The effects of various operating conditions such as operating pressure and temperature, feed composition, and gas flowrate etc. on the CPO process were investigated. CH4 conversion of 92.20% and selectivity of 92.3% and 83.30/0 to CO and H2, respectively, were achieved at the pressure of 2.1 MPa. It was found that when the spouted bed reactor was operated within the stable spouting flow regime, the temperature profiles along the bed axis were much more uniform than those operated within the fixed-bed regime. The CH4 conversion and syngas selectivity were found to be close to thermodynamic equilibrium limits. The results of the present investigation showed that spouted bed could be considered as a potential type of chemical reactor for the CPO process of methane.

  10. A review of induction and attachment times of wetting thin films between air bubbles and particles and its relevance in the separation of particles by flotation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albijanic, Boris; Ozdemir, Orhan; Nguyen, Anh V; Bradshaw, Dee

    2010-08-11

    Bubble-particle attachment in water is critical to the separation of particles by flotation which is widely used in the recovery of valuable minerals, the deinking of wastepaper, the water treatment and the oil recovery from tar sands. It involves the thinning and rupture of wetting thin films, and the expansion and relaxation of the gas-liquid-solid contact lines. The time scale of the first two processes is referred to as the induction time, whereas the time scale of the attachment involving all the processes is called the attachment time. This paper reviews the experimental studies into the induction and attachment times between minerals and air bubbles, and between oil droplets and air bubbles. It also focuses on the experimental investigations and mathematical modelling of elementary processes of the wetting film thinning and rupture, and the three-phase contact line expansion relevant to flotation. It was confirmed that the time parameters, obtained by various authors, are sensitive enough to show changes in both flotation surface chemistry and physical properties of solid surfaces of pure minerals. These findings should be extended to other systems. It is proposed that measurements of the bubble-particle attachment can be used to interpret changes in flotation behaviour or, in conjunction with other factors, such as particle size and gas dispersion, to predict flotation performance. PMID:20478547

  11. Effects of humidity on the plasma-catalytic removal of low-concentration BTX in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of relative humidity (30%, 50% and 80% RH) on the removal of low-concentration benzene, toluene and p-xylene (BTX mixture) in air by non-thermal plasma (NTP) and the combination of NTP and MnOx/Al2O3 catalyst (CPC) were systematically investigated in a link tooth wheel-cylinder plasma reactor. A long-term (150 h) CPC experiment under 30% RH was also conducted to investigate the stability of the catalyst. Results show that increasing humidity inhibits the O3 production in plasma and its decomposition over the catalyst. As for BTX conversion, increasing humidity suppresses the benzene conversion by both NTP and CPC; although higher humidity slightly promotes the toluene conversion by NTP, it negatively influences that by CPC; while the conversion of p-xylene by both NTP and CPC is insensitive to the humidity levels. Irrespective of the RH, the introduction of MnOx/Al2O3 catalyst significantly promotes BTX conversion and improves the energy efficiency. On the other hand, CPC under 30% RH shows the best performance towards COx formation during BTX oxidation processes. However, for a specific input energy of 10 J L-1 in this study, organic intermediates generated and accumulated over the catalyst surface, resulting in a slight deactivation of the MnOx/Al2O3 catalyst after 150-h reactions.

  12. 1 - Aromatization of n-hexane and natural gasoline over ZSM-5 zeolite, 2- Wet catalytic oxidation of phenol on fixed bed of active carbon; 1 - Aromatisation de n-hexane et d'essence sur zeolithe ZSM-5, 2 - Oxydation catalytique en voie humide du phenol sur charbon actif

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suwanprasop, S.

    2005-04-15

    I - The production of aromatic hydrocarbons from n-hexane and natural gasoline over Pd loaded ZSM-5 zeolite in a tubular reactor was achieved under the suitable conditions at 400 deg. C, and 0.4 ml/min reactant feeding rate, employing ZSM-5 (0.5% Pd content) as a catalyst. Under these conditions, n-hexane and natural gasoline conversions were found to be 99.7% and 94.3%, respectively (with respective aromatic selectivity of 92.3% and 92.6%). II - Wet catalytic air oxidation of phenol over a commercial active carbon was studied in a three phase fixed bed reactor under mild temperature and oxygen partial pressure. Exit phenol concentration, COD, and intermediates were analysed. Oxidation of phenol was significantly improved when increasing operating temperature, oxygen partial pressure, and liquid space time, while up or down flow modes had only marginal effect. A complete model involving intrinsic kinetics and all mass transfer limitations gave convenient reactor simulation. (author)

  13. Total catalytic wet oxidation of phenol and its chlorinated derivates with MnO2/CeO2 catalyst in a slurry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Luna

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, a synthetic effluent of phenol was treated by means of a total oxidation process-Catalyzed Wet Oxidation (CWO. A mixed oxide of Mn-Ce (7:3, the catalyst, was synthesized by co-precipitation from an aqueous solution of MnCl2 and CeCl3 in a basic medium. The mixed oxide, MnO2/CeO2, was characterized and used in the oxidation of phenol in a slurry reactor in the temperature range of 80-130ºC and pressure of 2.04-4.76 MPa. A phenol solution containing 2.4-dichlorophenol and 2.4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid was also degraded with good results. A lumped kinetic model, with two parallel reaction steps, fits precisely with the integrated equation and the experimental data. The kinetic parameters obtained are in agreement with the Arrhenius equation. The activation energies were determined to be 38.4 for the total oxidation and 53.4 kJ/mol for the organic acids formed.

  14. Oil sands development and its impact on atmospheric wet deposition of air pollutants to the Athabasca Oil Sands Region, Alberta, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynam, Mary M; Dvonch, J Timothy; Barres, James A; Morishita, Masako; Legge, Allan; Percy, Kevin

    2015-11-01

    Characterization of air pollutant deposition resulting from Athabasca oil sands development is necessary to assess risk to humans and the environment. To investigate this we collected event-based wet deposition during a pilot study in 2010-2012 at the AMS 6 site 30 km from the nearest upgrading facility in Fort McMurray, AB, Canada. Sulfate, nitrate and ammonium deposition was (kg/ha) 1.96, 1.60 and 1.03, respectively. Trace element pollutant deposition ranged from 2 × 10(-5) - 0.79 and exhibited the trend Hg oil sands development, urban activities and forest fires were deposited. High deposition of the elements Sr, Mn, Fe and Mg which are tracers for soil and crustal dust implies land-clearing, mining and hauling emissions greatly impacted surrounding human settlements and ecosystems. PMID:26277649

  15. Wet effluent diffusion denuder technique and determination of volatile organic compounds in air. I. Oxo compounds (alcohols and ketones)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sklenská, Jana; Pařízek, Petr; Večeřa, Zbyněk

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 918, č. 1 (2001), s. 153-158. ISSN 0021-9673 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/98/0943 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4031919 Keywords : diffusion denuders * alcohols * air analysis Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 2.793, year: 2001

  16. Control of oil-wetting on technical textiles by means of photo-chemical surface modification and its relevance to the performance of compressed air filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahners, Thomas, E-mail: bahners@dtnw.de [Deutsches Textilforschungszentrum Nord-West gGmbH (DTNW), Adlerstr. 1, 47798 Krefeld (Germany); Mölter-Siemens, Wolfgang; Haep, Stefan [Institut für Energie- und Umwelttechnik e.V. (IUTA), Bliersheimer Str. 60, 47229 Duisburg (Germany); Gutmann, Jochen S. [Deutsches Textilforschungszentrum Nord-West gGmbH (DTNW), Adlerstr. 1, 47798 Krefeld (Germany); Universität Duisburg-Essen, Physikalische Chemie and CENIDE, Universitätsstr. 2, 45141 Essen (Germany)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • The oil repellence of textile fabrics was increased following the Wenzel concept. • Fiber surfaces were micro-roughened by means of pulsed UV laser irradiation. • Subsequent UV-induced grafting yielded pronounced oil repellence. • The grafting process conserved the delicate topography of the fiber surfaces. • The modified fabrics showed favorable drainage behavior in oil droplet separation. - Abstract: A two-step process comprising a surface roughening step by excimer laser irradiation and a post-treatment by photo-grafting to decrease the surface free energy was employed to increase the oil repellence of technical fabrics made of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). The modification was designed to improve the performance of multi-layer filters for compressed air filtration, in which the fabrics served to remove, i.e. drain, oil separated from the air stream. In detail, the fibers surfaces were roughened by applying several laser pulses at a wavelength of 248 nm and subsequently photo-grafted with 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluoro-decyl acrylate (PPFDA). The oil wetting behavior was increased by the treatments from full wetting on the as-received fabrics to highly repellent with oil contact angles of (131 ± 7)°. On surfaces in the latter state, oil droplets did not spread or penetrate even after one day. The grafting of PPFDA alone without any surface roughening yielded an oil contact angle of (97 ± 11)°. However, the droplet completely penetrated the fabric over a period of one day. The drainage performance was characterized by recording the pressure drop over a two-layer model filter as a function of time. The results proved the potential of the treatment, which reduced the flow resistance after 1-h operation by approximately 25%.

  17. Control of oil-wetting on technical textiles by means of photo-chemical surface modification and its relevance to the performance of compressed air filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The oil repellence of textile fabrics was increased following the Wenzel concept. • Fiber surfaces were micro-roughened by means of pulsed UV laser irradiation. • Subsequent UV-induced grafting yielded pronounced oil repellence. • The grafting process conserved the delicate topography of the fiber surfaces. • The modified fabrics showed favorable drainage behavior in oil droplet separation. - Abstract: A two-step process comprising a surface roughening step by excimer laser irradiation and a post-treatment by photo-grafting to decrease the surface free energy was employed to increase the oil repellence of technical fabrics made of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). The modification was designed to improve the performance of multi-layer filters for compressed air filtration, in which the fabrics served to remove, i.e. drain, oil separated from the air stream. In detail, the fibers surfaces were roughened by applying several laser pulses at a wavelength of 248 nm and subsequently photo-grafted with 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluoro-decyl acrylate (PPFDA). The oil wetting behavior was increased by the treatments from full wetting on the as-received fabrics to highly repellent with oil contact angles of (131 ± 7)°. On surfaces in the latter state, oil droplets did not spread or penetrate even after one day. The grafting of PPFDA alone without any surface roughening yielded an oil contact angle of (97 ± 11)°. However, the droplet completely penetrated the fabric over a period of one day. The drainage performance was characterized by recording the pressure drop over a two-layer model filter as a function of time. The results proved the potential of the treatment, which reduced the flow resistance after 1-h operation by approximately 25%

  18. Wet deposition of air pollution at southwest monsoon outbreak and its impact on groundwater resources of Greater Kochi region

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Joseph, T.; Nair, M.; Balachandran, K.K.; Nair, K.K.C.

    manded that factories in this industrial city should make public the names and quantities of chemicals contained in their inputs and effluents and be made acces sible to interested persons as is legally provided under the Water Act and Environ mental... of this city has become comparable with other major cities in the country. Pronounced as the most dreaded effect of air pollution, the acid rain, refers to the precipitation of carbonic, sulfuric. sulphurous and nitric acids during the rain fall. The analysis...

  19. Wet Oxidation of PVA-Containing Desizing Wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    雷乐成; 汪大翬

    2000-01-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-containing desizing wastewater was treated by various wet oxidation methods.Parameters such as reaction temperature, initial solution pH, and the dosage of H2O2 were investigated in terms of chemical oxygen demand (CODcr) and total organic carbon (TOC) removal rate. Up to 90% of the initial CODcr was removed by wet air oxidation(WAO) at 270℃ with stoichiometric oxygen supply, while at temperature of 200℃, the CODcr removal rate was found to be 80%. Similar results were obtained by Promoted WAO (PWAO) and wet peroxide oxidation(WPO) at a lower temperature of 150℃. Reaction temperature was found to have a significant effect on the oxidation performance for all the methods. Initial solution pH was observed to play a significant role in PWAO and WPO where H2O2 was employed. Comparison of WAO, CWAO(catalytic wet air oxidation), PWAO and WPO shows that the rate of CODcr removal increases in the order: WAO, CWAO, PWAO and WPO.

  20. Zipping Wetting

    CERN Document Server

    Sbragaglia, Mauro; Pirat, Christophe; Borkent, Bram M; Lammertink, Rob G H; Wessling, Matthias; Lohse, Detlef

    2007-01-01

    Water droplets can completely wet micro-structured superhydrophobic surfaces. The {\\it dynamics} of this rapid process is analyzed by ultra-high-speed imaging. Depending on the scales of the micro-structure, the wetting fronts propagate smoothly and circularly or -- more interestingly -- in a {\\it stepwise} manner, leading to a growing {\\it square-shaped} wetted area: entering a new row perpendicular to the direction of front propagation takes milliseconds, whereas once this has happened, the row itself fills in microseconds ({\\it ``zipping''}). Numerical simulations confirm this view and are in quantitative agreement with the experiments.

  1. Wetting transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When a liquid droplet is put onto a surface, two situations distinguishable by the contact angle may result. If the contact angle is zero, the droplet spreads across the surface, a situation referred to as complete wetting. On the other hand, if the contact angle is between 0 deg. and 180 deg., the droplet does not spread, a situation called partial wetting. A wetting transition is a surface phase transition from partial wetting to complete wetting. We review the key experimental findings on this transition, together with simple theoretical models that account for the experiments. The wetting transition is generally first order (discontinuous), implying a discontinuity in the first derivative of the surface free energy. In this case, if one measures the thickness of the adsorbed film beside the droplet, at the wetting transition a discontinuous jump in film thickness occurs from a microscopically thin to a thick film. We show that this can lead to the observation of metastable surface states and an accompanying hysteresis. The observed hysteresis poses, in turn, a number of questions concerning the nucleation of wetting films that we also consider here. In addition, we consider the equilibrium wetting film thickness that results from a competition between the long-range van der Waals forces and gravity. Finally, the first-order character of the wetting transition can lead to a similar transition even when the phase that does the wetting is not (yet) stable in the bulk. For such prewetting transitions, a discontinuous thin-to-thick film transition occurs off bulk coexistence. We show that, for the large variety of systems for which prewetting transitions have been observed, the behaviour is surprisingly uniform, and can be mapped onto a simple generic phase diagram. The second part of the review deals with the exceptions to the first-order nature of the wetting transition. Two different types of continuous or critical wetting transition have been reported, for which

  2. Hydrogen peroxide detection in wet air with a Prussian Blue based solid salt bridged three electrode system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komkova, Maria A; Karyakina, Elena E; Marken, Frank; Karyakin, Arkady A

    2013-03-01

    We report on a novel electroanalytical system for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) detection in humidity or droplets of aerosol, formed by air bubbling through a washing chamber; the resulting flow mimics the exhaled human breath. The system is based on a planar three-electrode structure (with a Prussian Blue based H2O2 transducer modified working electrode) bridged by a solid salt-saturated filament material (filter paper, cotton textile). Respective to the hydrogen peroxide content in the washing valve, the response of the aerosol-sensing system is linear in the concentration range of 0.1-10 μM, which overlaps the generally accepted H2O2 content in exhaled breath condensate (EBC), with the sensitivity of 8 A M(-1) cm(-2). The response to the upper limit of the calibration range is stable for more than 50 injection cycles recorded within 3 days. Both the stability and the suitable calibration range allow one to consider the reported aerosol-sensing system as a prototype for a simple (avoiding intermediate EBC collection) noninvasive diagnostic tool for pulmonary patients. PMID:23374034

  3. Precipitation of antimony from the solution of sodium thioantimonite by air oxidation in the presence of catalytic agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨天足; 赖琼琳; 唐建军; 楚广

    2002-01-01

    The behavior of antimony oxidation in the solution of sodium thioantimonite was studied in the presence of catalytic agents. The catalytic effects of the respective addition of cupric sulfate, sodium tartrate, potassium permanganate, phenol, 1,2-dihydroxybenzene and their combination on the oxidation of sodium thioantimonite were investigated. A pilot test was carried out. The results show that the respective use of sodium tartrate, cupric sulfate, potassium permanganate, phenol and 1,2-dihydroxybenzene have little catalytic effect on the oxidation of sodium thioantimonite. However there exists obvious catalytic oxidation by the combination of 0.25 g/L 1,2-dihydroxybenzene, 0.5 g/L potassium permanganate and 1.0 g/L phenol. Moreover, high blast intensity, the increase of temperature and NaOH concentration favor the oxidation of antimony. The oxidation process of antimony has such advantages as quick reaction and low operation costs. The results of the pilot test are consistent with those of laboratory experiments.

  4. Regional-scale impacts of Phase 1 of the Clean Air Act Amendments in the USA: the relation between emissions and concentrations, both wet and dry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison of data records in the 1990s, both before (1991-1994) and after (1995-1997) implementation of Phase I of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 for the eastern US, shows a significant reduction in SO2 emissions for most states, except for Texas, North Carolina, Illinois, Florida, and Alabama. However, of the major NOx emitting states, only two eastern states (New York and Pennsylvania) show significant declines in NOx. A pattern of large declines in SO2 emissions (>20%) after CAAA implementation, and large declines in precipitation SO42- and H+, as well as air concentrations of SO2 and SO42- (components of dry deposition), exists for most regions of the eastern US. In most cases, the emission/concentration relations are close to 1:1 when the source region based on 15-h back trajectories is used for the New England region, and source regions based on 9-h back trajectories are used for the six other eastern US regions that were studied. The southern Appalachian Mountain region, an acid-sensitive area receiving high levels of acidic deposition, has not seen an appreciable improvement in precipitation acidity. This area has also shown the least improvement in wet and dry sulfur concentrations, of the areas examined. Precipitation base cations (Ca2+ and Mg2+) show a pattern of either increasing or level concentrations when comparing 1990-1994 to 1995-1998 data, for six of the seven regions examined. Ammonium concentrations have generally changed 15%. (Author)

  5. Catalytic Coanda combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, J.D.; Smith, A.G.; Kopmels, M.

    1992-09-16

    A catalytic reaction is enhanced by the use of the Coanda effect to maximise contact between reactant and catalyst. A device utilising this principle comprises a Coanda surface which directs the flow of fuel from a slot to form a primary jet which entrains the surrounding ambient air and forms a combustible mixture for reaction on a catalytic surface. The Coanda surface may have an internal or external nozzle which may be axi-symmetric or two-dimensional. (author)

  6. Recovery and characterization of Balanites aegyptiaca Del. kernel proteins. Effect of defatting, air classification, wet sieving and aqueous ethanol treatment on solubility, digestibility, amino acid composition and sapogenin content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, A M; Wolf, W; Spiess, W E

    2000-02-01

    In order to find alternative protein sources in African regions where protein deficiency in nutrition is prevailing, solubility, in-vitro digestibility, amino acid composition and chemical score of Balanites aegyptiaca Del. kernel proteins were investigated as a function of different processing steps including defatting, air classification, wet sieving and aqueous ethanol treatment. Air classification delivered a fine fraction of 58.1% of the total protein. Applying a wet sieving process, a protein concentrate of 72.9% protein content was achieved but the recovery was very low (35.6%). However, in case of isoelectric precipitation followed by aqueous ethanol treatment both protein content (78.2%) and recovery (53.7%) were high. Data concerning the chemical score revealed, that lysine content of the defatted kernel flour amounted to 74.2% of the recommended FAO/WHO standard level. In-vitro protein digestibility was found to be higher than of legume proteins. The digestible protein of the full fat flour, defatted flour, air classified and wet sieved fine fractions and protein concentrate were 91.9, 93.7, 82.0, 86.4 and 94.2%, respectively. The sapogenin content per 100 g protein of the investigated protein preparations was significantly lower (46% to 62%) than of the initial material (oilcake). PMID:10702992

  7. The roles of various plasma species in the plasma and plasma-catalytic removal of low-concentration formaldehyde in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Roles of various plasma species in plasma and plasma-catalytic removal of formaldehyde (HCHO) in air were studied. ► Both short- and long-living plasma species contribute to HCHO removal in gas phase. ► O3 does not initiate HCHO removal in gas phase but does over MnOx/Al2O3 catalyst. ► O3 initiated catalytic reactions are mainly responsible for the enhanced HCHO removal by plasma-catalysis. ► The presence of downstream MnOx/Al2O3 catalyst greatly reduces the emission of discharge byproducts (O3) and organic intermediates (HCOOH). - Abstract: The contributions of various plasma species to the removal of low-concentration formaldehyde (HCHO) in air by DC corona discharge plasma in the presence and absence of downstream MnOx/Al2O3 catalyst were systematically investigated in this study. Experimental results show that HCHO can be removed not only by short-living active species in the discharge zone, but also by long-living species except O3 downstream the plasma reactor. O3 on its own is incapable of removing HCHO in the gas phase but when combined with the MnOx/Al2O3 catalyst, considerable HCHO conversion is seen, well explaining the greatly enhanced HCHO removal by combining plasma with catalysis. The plasma-catalysis hybrid process where HCHO is introduced through the discharge zone and then the catalyst bed exhibits the highest energy efficiency concerning HCHO conversion, due to the best use of plasma-generated active species in a two-stage HCHO destruction process. Moreover, the presence of downstream MnOx/Al2O3 catalyst significantly reduced the emission of discharge byproducts (O3) and organic intermediates (HCOOH).

  8. Catalytic hydrogen recombination for nuclear containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalytic recombiners appear to be a credible option for hydrogen mitigation in nuclear containments. The passive operation, versatility and ease of back fitting are appealing for existing stations and new designs. Recently, a generation of wet-proofed catalyst materials have been developed at AECL which are highly specific to H2-O2, are active at ambient temperatures and are being evaluated for containment applications. Two types of catalytic recombiners were evaluated for hydrogen removal in containments based on the AECL catalyst. The first is a catalytic combustor for application in existing air streams such as provided by fans or ventilation systems. The second is an autocatalytic recombiner which uses the enthalpy of reaction to produce natural convective flow over the catalyst elements. Intermediate-scale results obtained in 6 m3 and 10 m3 spherical and cylindrical vessels are given to demonstrate self-starting limits, operating limits, removal capacity, scaling parameters, flow resistance, mixing behaviour in the vicinity of an operating recombiner and sensitivity to poisoning, fouling and radiation. (author). 13 refs., 10 figs

  9. Post-treatment of refinery wastewater effluent using a combination of AOPs (H2O2 photolysis and catalytic wet peroxide oxidation) for possible water reuse. Comparison of low and medium pressure lamp performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueda-Márquez, J J; Levchuk, I; Salcedo, I; Acevedo-Merino, A; Manzano, M A

    2016-03-15

    The main aim of this work was to study the feasibility of multi-barrier treatment (MBT) consisting of filtration, hydrogen peroxide photolysis (H2O2/UVC) and catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO) for post-treatment of petroleum refinery effluent. Also the possibility of water reuse or safe discharge was considered. The performance of MBT using medium (MP) and low (LP) pressure lamps was compared as well as operation and maintenance (O&M) cost. Decomposition of organic compounds was followed by means of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) analysis. After filtration step (25 μm) turbidity and concentration of suspended solids decreased by 92% and 80%, respectively. During H2O2/UVC process with LP lamp at optimal conditions (H2O2:TOC ratio 8 and UVC dose received by water 5.28 WUVC s cm(-2)) removal of phenolic compounds, TOC and COD was 100%, 52.3% and 84.3%, respectively. Complete elimination of phenolic compounds, 47.6% of TOC and 91% of COD was achieved during H2O2/UVC process with MP lamp at optimal conditions (H2O2:TOC ratio 5, UVC dose received by water 6.57 WUVC s cm(-2)). In order to compare performance of H2O2/UVC treatment with different experimental set up, the UVC dose required for removal of mg L(-1) of COD was suggested as a parameter and successfully applied. The hydrophilicity of H2O2/UVC effluent significantly increased which in turn enhanced the oxidation of organic compounds during CWPO step. After H2O2/UVC treatment with LP and MP lamps residual H2O2 concentration was 160 mg L(-1) and 96.5 mg L(-1), respectively. Remaining H2O2 was fully consumed during subsequent CWPO step (6 and 3.5 min of contact time for LP and MP, respectively). Total TOC and COD removal after MBT was 94.7% and 92.2% (using LP lamp) and 89.6% and 95%, (using MP lamp), respectively. The O&M cost for MBT with LP lamp was estimated to be 0.44 € m(-3) while with MP lamp it was nearly five

  10. Synthesis of ammonia directly from wet air using new perovskite oxide La0.8Cs0.2Fe0.8Ni0.2O3-δ as catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single phase perovskite oxide La0.8Cs0.2Fe0.8Ni0.2O3-δ was synthesised to be used as electrocatalyst for electrochemical synthesis of ammonia directly from wet air. It exhibits an orthorhombic structure with space group Pnma(62); a = 5.5493(5) Å, b = 7.8352(10) Å, c = 5. 5295(5) Å, V = 240.42(4) Å3. Composite made of Ce0.8Gd0.2O2-δ (CGO) and (Li,Na,K)2CO3 was used as electrolyte. An ammonia formation rate of 9.21 × 10−7 mol s−1 m−2 was obtained at 400 °C when applied a voltage of 1.4 V, while wet air (3 mol% H2O) was introduced to the single chamber reactor. This is just slightly lower than the value of 1.23 × 10−6 mol s−1 m−2 when wet N2 (3 mol% H2O) was fed under the same experimental conditions. These values are more than two orders of magnitude higher than the reported ammonia formation rates when synthesised from N2 and H2O at ∼ 600 °C. The perovskite catalyst is also low cost compared to the Ru/MgO and Pt/C catalysts in previous reports. This experiment indicates that ammonia can be directly synthesised from wet air using low-cost catalysts. This is a very promising simple technology for sustainable synthesis of ammonia in the future

  11. Scalable Fabrication of Nanoporous Carbon Fiber Films as Bifunctional Catalytic Electrodes for Flexible Zn-Air Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qin; Wang, Yaobing; Dai, Liming; Yao, Jiannian

    2016-04-01

    A flexible nanoporous carbon-fiber film for wearable electronics is prepared by a facile and scalable method through pyrolysis of electrospun polyimide. It exhibits excellent bifunctional electrocatalytic activities for oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution. Flexible rechargeable zinc-air batteries based on the carbon-fiber film show high round-trip efficiency and mechanical stability. PMID:26914270

  12. DESTRUCTION OF TETRAPHENYLBORATE IN TANK 48H USING WET AIR OXIDATION BATCH BENCH SCALE AUTOCLAVE TESTING WITH ACTUAL RADIOACTIVE TANK 48H WASTE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adu-Wusu, K; Paul Burket, P

    2009-03-31

    Wet Air Oxidation (WAO) is one of the two technologies being considered for the destruction of Tetraphenylborate (TPB) in Tank 48H. Batch bench-scale autoclave testing with radioactive (actual) Tank 48H waste is among the tests required in the WAO Technology Maturation Plan. The goal of the autoclave testing is to validate that the simulant being used for extensive WAO vendor testing adequately represents the Tank 48H waste. The test objective was to demonstrate comparable test results when running simulated waste and real waste under similar test conditions. Specifically: (1) Confirm the TPB destruction efficiency and rate (same reaction times) obtained from comparable simulant tests, (2) Determine the destruction efficiency of other organics including biphenyl, (3) Identify and quantify the reaction byproducts, and (4) Determine off-gas composition. Batch bench-scale stirred autoclave tests were conducted with simulated and actual Tank 48H wastes at SRNL. Experimental conditions were chosen based on continuous-flow pilot-scale simulant testing performed at Siemens Water Technologies Corporation (SWT) in Rothschild, Wisconsin. The following items were demonstrated as a result of this testing. (1) Tetraphenylborate was destroyed to below detection limits during the 1-hour reaction time at 280 C. Destruction efficiency of TPB was > 99.997%. (2) Other organics (TPB associated compounds), except biphenyl, were destroyed to below their respective detection limits. Biphenyl was partially destroyed in the process, mainly due to its propensity to reside in the vapor phase during the WAO reaction. Biphenyl is expected to be removed in the gas phase during the actual process, which is a continuous-flow system. (3) Reaction byproducts, remnants of MST, and the PUREX sludge, were characterized in this work. Radioactive species, such as Pu, Sr-90 and Cs-137 were quantified in the filtrate and slurry samples. Notably, Cs-137, boron and potassium were shown as soluble as a

  13. The Influence of Slight Protuberances in a Micro-Tube Reactor on Methane/Moist Air Catalytic Combustion

    OpenAIRE

    Ruirui Wang; Jingyu Ran; Xuesen Du; Juntian Niu; Wenjie Qi

    2016-01-01

    The combustion characteristics of methane/moist air in micro-tube reactors with different numbers and shapes of inner wall protuberances are investigated in this paper. The micro-reactor with one rectangular protuberance (six different sizes) was studied firstly, and it is shown that reactions near the protuberance are mainly controlled by diffusion, which has little effect on the outlet temperature and methane conversion rate. The formation of cavities and recirculation zones in the vicinity...

  14. Drop splashing is independent of substrate wetting

    CERN Document Server

    Latka, Andrzej; Nagel, Sidney R; de Pablo, Juan J

    2016-01-01

    A liquid drop impacting a dry solid surface with sufficient kinetic energy will splash, breaking apart into numerous secondary droplets. This phenomenon shows many similarities to forced wetting, including the entrainment of air at the contact line. Because of these similarities and the fact that forced wetting has been shown to depend on the wetting properties of the surface, existing theories predict splashing to depend on wetting properties as well. However, using high-speed interference imaging we observe that wetting properties have no effect on splashing for various liquid-surface combinations. Additionally, by fully resolving the Navier-Stokes equations at length and time scales inaccessible to experiments, we find that the shape and motion of the air-liquid interface at the contact line are independent of wettability. We use these findings to evaluate existing theories and to compare splashing with forced wetting.

  15. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  16. Enhanced Control of Mercury and other HAPs by Innovative Modifications to Wet FGD Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The overall objective of this project was to learn more about controlling emissions of hazardous air pollutants (HAPs) from coal-fired power plants that are equipped with wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems. The project was included by FETC as a Phase I project in its Mega-PRDA program. Phase I of this project focused on three research areas. These areas in order of priority were: (1) Catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury; (2) Enhanced particulate-phase HAPs removal by electrostatic charging of liquid droplets; and (3) Enhanced mercury removal by addition of additives to FGD process liquor. Mercury can exist in two forms in utility flue gas--as elemental mercury and as oxidized mercury (predominant form believed to be HgCl2). Previous test results have shown that wet scrubbers effectively remove the oxidized mercury from the gas but are ineffective in removing elemental mercury. Recent improvements in mercury speciation techniques confirm this finding. Catalytic oxidation of vapor-phase elemental mercury is of interest in cases where a wet scrubber exists or is planned for SO2 control. If a loW--cost process could be developed to oxidize all of the elemental mercury in the flue gas, then the maximum achievable mercury removal across the existing or planned wet scrubber would increase. Other approaches for improving control of HAPs included a method for improving particulate removal across the FGD process and the use of additives to increase mercury solubility. This paper discusses results related only to catalytic oxidation of elemental mercury

  17. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and chlorinated pesticides in background air in central Europe – investigating parameters affecting wet scavenging of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    Shahpoury, P.; Lammel, G; A. Holubová Šmejkalová; J. Klánová; P. Přibylová; Váňa, M.

    2014-01-01

    Concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and chlorinated pesticides (CPs) were measured in air and precipitation at a background site in central Europe. Σ PAH concentrations in air and rainwater ranged from 0.7 to 327.9 ng m−3 and below analytical method detection limit (< MDL) to 2.1 × 103 ng L−1. The concentrations of PCBs and CPs in rainwater were < MDL. Σ PCB and Σ CP concentrations in air ranged fr...

  18. Photo-catalytic activity of Zn1-x Mn x S nanocrystals synthesized by wet chemical technique

    OpenAIRE

    Singh Karamjit; Bhatti Harbhajan; Chitkara Mansi; Sandhu Inderjeet

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Polyvinyl pyrrolidone capped Zn1-x Mn x S (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.1) nanocrystals have been synthesized using wet chemical co-precipitation method. Crystallographic and morphological characterization of the synthesized materials have been done using X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope. Crystallographic studies show the zinc blende crystals having average crystallite size approx. 3 nm, which is almost similar to the average particle size calculated from electron micr...

  19. Conference: the wet catalytic oxidation, a technology for the removal of organic pollutants in industrial waters; Conference: l'oxydation voie humide catalytique, une technologie pour l'elimination des polluants organiques dans les eaux industrielles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besson, M. [Institut de recherches sur la catalyse - CNRS, 2 avenue Albert Einstein, 69626 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    In this conference, it is taken stock on the use of catalysts in the wet oxidation process. Supported (TiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}....) heterogeneous metallic catalysts (Pt, Ru...) are particularly studied. It is shown that this type of catalysts can answer to the required characteristics: activity for the removal of organic matter, lack of active metal leaching in aqueous acid medium, no deactivation...Examples are given. (O.M.)

  20. Fe salts as catalyst for the wet oxidation of o-chlorophenol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xin-hua; HE Ping; JIN Jian; HAO Zhi-wei

    2005-01-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of o-chlorophenol in wastewater was studied in a stainless steel autoclave using four different Fe catalysts in the temperature range of 100-200 ℃. Experimental results showed that high rate of o-chlorophenol and CODcr (Chemical Oxygen Demand, mg/L) removal by CWAO was obtained at relatively low temperature and pressure. The catalysts Fe2(SO4)3, FeSO4, Fe2O3 and FeCl3 all exhibited high catalytic activity. More than 93.7% of the initial CODCr and nearly100% of o-chlorophenol were removed at 150 ℃ after 150 min with FeSO4 as catalyst. The CWAO of o-chlorophenol was found to be pseudo-first order reaction with respect to o-chlorophenol, with activation energy of 75.56 k J/mol in the temperature range of100-175 ℃.

  1. 正丁烷/氢气/空气混合物催化着火的实验研究%Experimental study on catalytic ignition ofn-C4H10/H2/air mixtures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钟北京; 于亚薇; 熊鹏飞

    2014-01-01

    通过实验研究了正丁烷/氢气/空气混合物在 Pt 催化剂表面上的催化着火特性。实验发现,氢气在正丁烷/空气混合物的催化着火过程中既存在热作用,也存在化学作用。当化学作用为主导时,可燃混合物的化学催化着火温度明显低于热着火温度。实验结果表明,只有当氢气在可燃混合物的含量大于某个临界值时,化学催化着火才能发生,而且该临界值的大小以及催化着火温度均与可燃混合物的当量比有关。%An experimental study on catalytic ignition ofn-C4H10/H2/air mixtures in the Pt-coated catalyst surface was conducted. Hydrogen had not only thermal, but also chemical effects on the catalytic ignition of the n-C4H10/air mixtures. The chemical catalytic ignition temperature of the combustible mixtures was obviously lower than thermal ignition when chemical effect was dominant. However, chemical catalytic ignition occurred only when hydrogen content in the combustible mixtures was greater than a critical value. The critical value and the catalytic ignition temperature were related to equivalence ratio of the combustible mixtures.

  2. Catalytic performance of heteroatom-modified carbon nanotubes in advanced oxidation processes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    João Restivo; Raquel P. Rocha; Adrián M. T. Silva; José J. M. Órfão; Manuel F. R. Pereira; José L. Figueiredo

    2014-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were submitted to chemical and thermal treatments in or-der to incorporate different heteroatoms on the surface. O-, S-and N-containing groups were suc-cessfully introduced onto the CNTs without significant changes of the textural properties. The cata-lytic activity of these heteroatom-modified CNTs was studied in two liquid phase oxidation pro-cesses:catalytic ozonation and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO), using oxalic acid and phenol as model compounds. In both cases, the presence of strongly acidic O-containing groups was found to decrease the catalytic activity of the CNTs. On the other hand, the introduction of S species (mainly sulfonic acids) enhanced the removal rate of the model compounds, particularly in the CWAO of phenol. Additional experiments were performed with a radical scavenger and sodium persulfate, in order to clarify the reaction mechanism. Nitrogen functionalities improve the catalytic performance of the original CNTs, regardless of the process or of the pollutant.

  3. TiO2-sludge carbon enhanced catalytic oxidative reaction in environmental wastewaters applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athalathil, Sunil; Erjavec, Boštjan; Kaplan, Renata; Stüber, Frank; Bengoa, Christophe; Font, Josep; Fortuny, Agusti; Pintar, Albin; Fabregat, Azael

    2015-12-30

    The enhanced oxidative potential of sludge carbon/TiO2 nano composites (SNCs), applied as heterogeneous catalysts in advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), was studied. Fabrification of efficient SNCs using different methods and successful evaluation of their catalytic oxidative activity is reported for the first time. Surface modification processes of hydrothermal deposition, chemical treatment and sol-gel solution resulted in improved catalytic activity and good surface chemistry of the SNCs. The solids obtained after chemical treatment and hydrothermal deposition processes exhibit excellent crystallinity and photocatalytic activity. The highest photocatalytic rate was obtained for the material prepared using hydrothermal deposition technique, compared to other nanocomposites. Further, improved removal of bisphenol A (BPA) from aqueous phase by means of catalytic ozonation and catalytic wet air oxidation processes is achieved over the solid synthesized using chemical treatment method. The present results demonstrate that the addition of TiO2 on the surface of sludge carbon (SC) increases catalytic oxidative activity of SNCs. The latter produced from harmful sludge materials can be therefore used as cost-effective and efficient sludge derived catalysts for the removal of hazardous pollutants. PMID:26223014

  4. Modeled Wet Nitrate Deposition

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Modeled data on nitrate wet deposition was obtained from Dr. Jeff Grimm at Penn State Univ. Nitrate wet depostion causes acidification and eutrophication of surface...

  5. Introduction to wetting phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In these lectures the field of wetting phenomena is introduced from the point of view of statistical physics. The phase transition from partial to complete wetting is discussed and examples of relevant experiments in binary liquid mixtures are given. Cahn's concept of critical-point wetting is examined in detail. Finally, a connection is drawn between wetting near bulk criticality and the universality classes of surface critical phenomena. (author)

  6. Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... house) Industrial emissions (like smoke and chemicals from factories) Household cleaners (spray cleaners, air fresheners) Car emissions (like carbon monoxide) *All of these things make up “particle pollution.” They mostly come from cars, trucks, buses, and ...

  7. Haptic perception of wetness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergmann Tiest, W.M.; Kosters, N.D.; Daanen, H.A.M.; Kappers, A.M.L.

    2011-01-01

    The sensation of wetness is well-known but barely investigated. There are no specific wetness receptors in the skin, but the sensation is mediated by temperature and pressure perception. In our study, we have measured discrimination thresholds for the haptic perception of wetness of three di erent t

  8. Cycled storage-discharge plasma catalytic process for toluene removal from indoor air%循环的存储-放电等离子体催化新过程脱除室内空气中甲苯

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范红玉; 李小松; 刘艳霞; 刘景林; 赵德志; 朱爱民

    2011-01-01

    Non-thermal plasmas (NTPs) technique has a great potential for indoor air purification, however, the high energy cost and secondary pollutants formation limit its practical application. To resolve these problems, a cycled storage-discharge (CSD) plasma catalytic process was explored for the removal of low-concentration toluene from indoor air in this study. The performance of toluene storage and plasma catalytic oxidation of adsorbed-state toluene over non-loaded and silver-loaded HZSM-5 catalysts was investigated. The experimental results showed that silver-loaded HZSM-5 catalysts gave a longer breakthrough time than non-loaded HZSM-5 catalysts at the storage stage (storage condition: 0. 1 g · m-3 C7H8, 40% relative humidity (RH, 25℃), 2000 ml · min-1 flow rate of simulated air). With input power of 40 W, the adsorbed-state toluene could be almost oxidized to CO2 in 10 min at the discharge stage (carbon balance about 100%, CO2 selectivity 98. 2%). It was further proved that there was no toluene desorbed during the process of plasma catalytic oxidation by on-line detection with mass spectrometry (MS) and Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). Preliminary investigation on the stability of the CSD process for toluene removal was conducted. This study provides a novel plasma catalytic process for removing toluene from indoor air.%@@ 引言 室内空气中的挥发性有机化合物(VOCs),如甲醛(HCHO)、苯(CH)、甲苯(CH)等,是一类对人体有极大危害的室内空气污染物[1-2].传统的脱除VOCs的方法有吸附法、催化氧化法、热焚烧法等,这些方法在经济上或处理效率上或多或少存在缺陷.用于室内空气中VOCs脱除的理想方法应该同时具备脱除效率高、室温脱除、操作简单、能耗低及无二次污染物等特点.

  9. Surface and Hydrodynamic Forces in Wetting Films

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Lei

    2013-01-01

    The process of froth flotation relies on using air bubbles to collect desired mineral particles dispersed in aqueous media on the surface, while leaving undesirous mineral particles behind. For a particle to be collected on the surface of a bubble, the thin liquid films (or wetting films) of water formed in between must rupture. According to the Frumkin-Derjaguin isotherm, it is necessary that wetting films can rupture when the disjoining pressures are negative. However, the negative disjoini...

  10. Air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years several regulations and standards for air quality and limits for air pollution were issued or are in preparation by the European Union, which have severe influence on the environmental monitoring and legislation in Austria. This chapter of the environmental control report of Austria gives an overview about the legal situation of air pollution control in the European Union and in specific the legal situation in Austria. It gives a comprehensive inventory of air pollution measurements for the whole area of Austria of total suspended particulates, ozone, volatile organic compounds, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, carbon monoxide, heavy metals, benzene, dioxin, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and eutrophication. For each of these pollutants the measured emission values throughout Austria are given in tables and geographical charts, the environmental impact is discussed, statistical data and time series of the emission sources are given and legal regulations and measures for an effective environmental pollution control are discussed. In particular the impact of fossil-fuel power plants on the air pollution is analyzed. (a.n.)

  11. Enhanced NOx removal in wet FGD systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dominant method for high-efficiency NOx removal is ammonia-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR). However, no full-scale, commercial SCR process exists for coal-fired power plants in North America. This paper describes wet flue gas desulphurization (FGD), the leading control technology for sulphur dioxide emissions from coal-fired power plants. The feasibility of using wet FGD systems for simultaneous NOx and SO2 removal was studied in a mini-pilot scale perforated tray absorber by varying the NO to NO2 ratio in the inlet gas. It was shown that the presence of sulphite ions in stoichiometric excess in the liquid phase had a significant positive effect on the absorption of NOx in wet FGD systems. The pH of the absorbing solution was also found to have a major effect on NOx removal efficiency. 49 refs., 6 tabs., 14 figs

  12. PREFACE: Dynamics of wetting Dynamics of wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grest, Gary S.; Oshanin, Gleb; Webb, Edmund B., III

    2009-11-01

    Capillary phenomena associated with fluids wetting other condensed matter phases have drawn great scientific interest for hundreds of years; consider the recent bicentennial celebration of Thomas Young's paper on equilibrium contact angles, describing the geometric shape assumed near a three phase contact line in terms of the relevant surface energies of the constituent phases [1]. Indeed, nearly a century has passed since the seminal papers of Lucas and Washburn, describing dynamics of capillary imbibition [2, 3]. While it is generally appreciated that dynamics of fluid wetting processes are determined by the degree to which a system is out of capillary equilibrium, myriad complications exist that challenge the fundamental understanding of dynamic capillary phenomena. The topic has gathered much interest from recent Nobel laureate Pierre-Gilles de Gennes, who provided a seminal review of relevant dissipation mechanisms for fluid droplets spreading on solid surfaces [4] Although much about the dynamics of wetting has been revealed, much remains to be learned and intrinsic technological and fundamental interest in the topic drives continuing high levels of research activity. This is enabled partly by improved experimental capabilities for resolving wetting processes at increasingly finer temporal, spatial, and chemical resolution. Additionally, dynamic wetting research advances via higher fidelity computational modeling capabilities, which drive more highly refined theory development. The significance of this topic both fundamentally and technologically has resulted in a number of reviews of research activity in wetting dynamics. One recent example addresses the evaluation of existing wetting dynamics theories from an experimentalist's perspective [5]. A Current Opinion issue was recently dedicated to high temperature capillarity, including dynamics of high temperature spreading [6]. New educational tools have recently emerged for providing instruction in wetting

  13. Wetting in electrolyte solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibagon, Ingrid; Bier, Markus; Dietrich, S

    2013-06-01

    Wetting of a charged substrate by an electrolyte solution is investigated by means of classical density functional theory applied to a lattice model. Within the present model the pure, i.e., salt-free solvent, for which all interactions are of the nearest-neighbor type only, exhibits a second-order wetting transition for all strengths of the substrate-particle and the particle-particle interactions for which the wetting transition temperature is nonzero. The influences of the substrate charge density and of the ionic strength on the wetting transition temperature and on the order of the wetting transition are studied. If the substrate is neutral, the addition of salt to the solvent changes neither the order nor the transition temperature of the wetting transition of the system. If the surface charge is nonzero, upon adding salt this continuous wetting transition changes to first-order within the wide range of substrate surface charge densities and ionic strengths studied here. As the substrate surface charge density is increased, at fixed ionic strength, the wetting transition temperature decreases and the prewetting line associated with the first-order wetting transition becomes longer. This decrease of the wetting transition temperature upon increasing the surface charge density becomes more pronounced by decreasing the ionic strength. PMID:23758391

  14. The Relationship Between Soil Air Filled Porosity and Soil Methane Oxidation is Almost Identical in Both Dry and Wet Temperate Eucalypt Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fest, B. J.; Wardlaw, T.; Hinko-Najera, N.; Arndt, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    In order to gain a better understanding of the temporal variation in soil methane (CH4) exchange in temperate evergreen eucalypt forests in south-eastern Australia we measured soil CH4 exchange in high temporal resolution (every 2 hours or less) over two consecutive years (Wombat State Forest, Victoria, AUS) and over one year (Warra, Tasmania, AUS) in two temperate Eucalyptus obliqua (L. Her) forests with contrasting annual precipitation (Wombat State Forest = 870 mm yr-1, Warra = 1700 mm yr-1). Both forests were continuous CH4 sinks with the Victorian site having a sink strength of -1.79 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1 and the Tasmanian site having a sink strength of -3.83 kg CH4 ha-1 yr-1. Our results show that CH4 uptake was strongly controlled by soil moisture at both sites and explained up to 90% of the temporal variability in CH4 uptake. Furthermore, when soil moisture was expressed as soil air filled porosity (AFP) we were able to predict the CH4 uptake of one site by the linear regression between AFP and CH4 uptake from the other site. Soil temperature only had an apparent control over seasonal variation in CH4 uptake during periods when soil moisture and soil temperature were closely correlated. The fluctuation of the generally low soil nitrogen levels did not influence soil CH4 uptake at either site.

  15. Wet oxidation of quinoline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.; Kilen, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of oxygen pressure (0.4 and 2 MPa). reaction time (30 and 60 min) and temperature (260 and 280 degrees C) on the wet oxidation of quinoline has been studied. The dominant parameters for the decomposition of quinoline were oxygen pressure and reaction temperature. whereas the reaction...... time was less important within the range studied. Nitrifying bacteria were used to measure the inhibition from wet oxidative-treated samples to study the effect of the (wet oxidation) reaction conditions. Wet oxidation made quinoline more toxic to Nitrosomonas. This was observed for Nitrobacter as well....... The combined wet oxidation and biological treatment of reaction products resulted in 91% oxidation of the parent compound to CO2 and water. Following combined wet oxidation and biological treatment the sample showed low toxicity towards Nitrosomonas and no toxicity towards Nitrobacter. (C) 1998 Elsevier...

  16. Automobile air pollution: control equipment--catalytic converters. Volume 2. 1977-January, 1980 (citations from the Engineering Index Data Base). Report for 1977-Jan 80

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavagnaro, D.M.

    1980-02-01

    The citations of worldwide engineering literature cover automotive catalytic converters. Included are such topics as converter design and materials, performance tests, effectiveness in pollutant reduction, catalyst poisoning, catalyst selection, chemistry involved in the emission control, and the overall feasibility of using these converters under normal driving conditions. Control of sulfuric acid and sulfate emissions is also discussed. (This updated bibliography contains 142 abstracts, 37 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  17. Wet Gas Compressor Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Natås, Erik

    2014-01-01

    The world’s energy demand is increasing and more attention is given to increase the recovery of gas fields. Installing a compressor near the wellhead can contribute to this. Constantly changing reservoir conditions requires the system to handle small amounts of liquid water and condensate. Wet gas compression is a cost efficient and compact alternative to liquid separation on the seabed. A wet gas compressor test facility exists at NTNU`s thermal laboratory and research on wet gas fundam...

  18. EFFECTS OF FEED CONCENTRATION AND WATER VAPOR ON CATALYTIC COMBUSTION OF ETHYL ACETATE AND BENZENE IN AIR OVER CR-ZSM-5 CATALYST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Zuhairi Abdullah

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic combustion of ethyl acetate (EAc and benzene (Bz over chromium exchanged ZSM-5 (Si/Al=240 is reported. An 11 mm i.d. fixed-bed catalytic reactor, operated at temperatures between 100 oC and 500 oC, and under excess oxygen condition, was used for the catalytic activity measurement. Apparent order of reaction and apparent activation energy were determined by operating the reactor differentially at a gas hourly space velocity (GHSV of 78,900 h-1 and feed concentrations between 3,500 ppm to 17,700 ppm and 3,700 to 12,400 ppm for ethyl acetate and benzene, respectively. Ethyl acetate was more reactive than benzene due to highly reactive carbonyl group in the molecule. The combustion process satisfactorily fitted pseudo first-order kinetics with respect to organic concentration and a zero-order dependence on the oxygen concentration. The presence of water vapor (9,000 ppm in the feed stream was found to weaken the reactivity of these organics which could also be demonstrated with increases in the activation energy from 23.1 kJ/mole to 37.6 kJ/mole for ethyl acetate and from 27.6 kJ/mole to 46.1 kJ/mole for benzene. Water vapor was found to play a positive role in the formation of carbon dioxide yield in ethyl acetate combustion. Deactivation of catalyst by water appeared to be only temporary and the activity reverted back to its original value once the source of water vapor was removed.

  19. Wet Gas Compressor Transients

    OpenAIRE

    Owren, Bjørn Berge

    2014-01-01

    This master thesis considers three subtasks related to transient operation of wet gas compressors.HYSYS Dynamics is used to establish a dynamic simulation model in the first subtask. The model is designed to predict transient behavior of the compressor test facility at NTNU during dry and wet gas trip scenarios. Its steady state performance has been validated against test data. The deviation of polytropic head and suction volume flow is less than 1% for all test points but one.Dry and wet gas...

  20. Catalytic effect of heat-treated iron and copper phthalocyanines in non-aqueous electrolyte Li/air batteries. A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Sheng S.; Ren, Xiaoming; Tran, Dat T.; Read, Jeffrey [U.S. Army Research Laboratory, RDRL-SED-C, Adelphi, MD (United States)

    2012-07-01

    In this review, we summarize our research on the characterization of FeCu/C catalyst and its effect in non-aqueous electrolyte Li/air cells. The catalyst is synthesized by impregnating metal phthalocyanine complex into a high surface area carbon, followed by pyrolyzing the complex-loaded carbon under argon atmosphere. High resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HR-XPS) results indicate that the metals in the catalyst are present in the form of a mixture of metal-nitrogen complexes (MN) and metal oxides (MO). Using coin-type Li/air cells as the testing vehicle, the FeCu/C is determined to affect the Li/air cells in three manners: (1) It catalyzes two-electron oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) to form Li{sub 2}O{sub 2}, which reduces discharge polarization of the Li/air cells, (2) It promotes chemical disproportionation of Li{sub 2}O{sub 2}, which leads to an apparent four-electron ORR, and (3) It induces reduction of electrolyte solvents, which adds a second lower discharge voltage plateau at {proportional_to} 1.7 V. In addition, the FeCu/C catalyst increases the open circle voltage (OCV) recovery rate of the Li/air cells as a result of the chemical disproportionation of Li{sub 2}O{sub 2}, which releases oxygen and the resulting oxygen participates in OCV recovery. (orig.)

  1. Adsorption and wetting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlangen, L.J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Adsorption and wetting are related phenomena. In order to improve knowledge of both and their relations, experiments, thermodynamics and a theoretical interpretation have been connected, starring n-alkanes.Starting from the Gibbs adsorption equation thermodynamic relations between vapour adsorption

  2. Wetting of soluble polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Dupas, Julien

    2012-01-01

    The wetting of a soluble substrate is a situation commonly encountered in day-to-day life. For instance, the practical motivation of this study concerns the preparation of beverages using dehydrated powders, consisting of water-soluble substances such as carbohydrates. Hydrodynamical theories describing wetting onto insoluble substrates cannot account for experimental observations in the case of a liquid spreading onto a soluble substrate. Tay et al.(1) made the hypothesis that the water cont...

  3. Adsorption and wetting.

    OpenAIRE

    Schlangen, L.J.M.

    1995-01-01

    Adsorption and wetting are related phenomena. In order to improve knowledge of both and their relations, experiments, thermodynamics and a theoretical interpretation have been connected, starring n-alkanes.Starting from the Gibbs adsorption equation thermodynamic relations between vapour adsorption and wetting are derived. The surface pressure of a film, formed by vapour adsorption on a solid surface, is calculated by integrating the vapour adsorption isotherm. The surface pressure at the sat...

  4. Study on flaking of wet corn by heating

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Mingming; WANG Defu

    2007-01-01

    Flaking on high-moisture corn (wet corn) by hot-air heating was studied in the paper. The wet-heating approach was beneficial to improve corn gelatinization by experimental results. By the experiments, a set of optimal parameters was obtained: hot-air temperature 120-130 ℃, heating duration 70 min, gap between rollers 0.5-1.0 mm, 150-200 r·min-1 for rotational speed of rollers.

  5. Electro Catalytic Oxidation (ECO) Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan Jones

    2011-03-31

    The power industry in the United States is faced with meeting many new regulations to reduce a number of air pollutants including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, fine particulate matter, and mercury. With over 1,000 power plants in the US, this is a daunting task. In some cases, traditional pollution control technologies such as wet scrubbers and SCRs are not feasible. Powerspan's Electro-Catalytic Oxidation, or ECO{reg_sign} process combines four pollution control devices into a single integrated system that can be installed after a power plant's particulate control device. Besides achieving major reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and mercury (Hg), ECO produces a highly marketable fertilizer, which can help offset the operating costs of the process system. Powerspan has been operating a 50-MW ECO commercial demonstration unit (CDU) at FirstEnergy Corp.'s R.E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio, since February 2004. In addition to the CDU, a test loop has been constructed beside the CDU to demonstrate higher NOx removal rates and test various scrubber packing types and wet ESP configurations. Furthermore, Powerspan has developed the ECO{reg_sign}{sub 2} technology, a regenerative process that uses a proprietary solvent to capture CO{sub 2} from flue gas. The CO{sub 2} capture takes place after the capture of NOx, SO{sub 2}, mercury, and fine particulate matter. Once the CO{sub 2} is captured, the proprietary solution is regenerated to release CO{sub 2} in a form that is ready for geological storage or beneficial use. Pilot scale testing of ECO{sub 2} began in early 2009 at FirstEnergy's Burger Plant. The ECO{sub 2} pilot unit is designed to process a 1-MW flue gas stream and produce 20 tons of CO{sub 2} per day, achieving a 90% CO{sub 2} capture rate. The ECO{sub 2} pilot program provided the opportunity to confirm process design and cost estimates, and prepare for large

  6. Mathematical model and general laws of wet compression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王永青; 刘铭; 廉乐明; 何健勇; 严家騄

    2002-01-01

    Wet compression is an effective way to enhance the performance of gas turbines and it has attracted a good deal of attention in recent years. The one-sidedness and inaccuracy of previous studies,which took concentration gradient as mass transfer potential are discussed. The mass transfer process is analyzed from the viewpoint of non-equilibrium thermodynamics,by taking generalized thermodynamic driving force as mass transfer potential,and the corresponding mass-transfer coefficient is obtained using the heat and mass transfer equilibrium occurring between moist air and water droplets at wet-bulb temperature for the sake of avoiding complex tests and providing more accurate formulas. A mathematical model of wet compression is therefore established,and the general laws of wet compression are investigated. The results show that the performance of atomizer is critical for wet compression and wet compression is more suitable for compressors with higher pressure ratio and longer compression time.

  7. Wet storage integrity update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report includes information from various studies performed under the Wet Storage Task of the Spent Fuel Integrity Project of the Commercial Spent Fuel Management (CSFM) Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. An overview of recent developments in the technology of wet storage of spent water reactor fuel is presented. Licensee Event Reports pertaining to spent fuel pools and the associated performance of spent fuel and storage components during wet storage are discussed. The current status of fuel that was examined under the CSFM Program is described. Assessments of the effect of boric acid in spent fuel pool water on the corrosion and stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel and the stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel piping containing stagnant water at spent fuel pools are discussed. A list of pertinent publications is included. 84 references, 21 figures, 11 tables

  8. Study on the Degradation of Bamboo Alkaline Lignin by Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation to Obtain Aromatic Aldehydes%竹子碱木素催化湿空气氧化降解生成芳香醛的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周生飞; 詹怀宇; 付时雨

    2010-01-01

    对竹子碱木素进行了催化湿空气氧化降解.结果表明,竹子碱木素催化湿空气氧化的丰要降解产物为 3 种芳香醛,含量从高到低依次为香草醛、对羟基苯甲醛和丁香醛.芳香醛浓度随降解时间的增加先升高后降低;催化剂的使用对芳香醛浓度有显著的影响,但不改变 3 种芳香醛的含量相对大小顺序;催化剂能较大地提高芳香醛的最岛浓度,且能明显缩短芳香醛浓度达到极大值的时间;与无催化剂或蒽醌(AQ)作为催化剂相比,CuSO4/FeCl3 作为催化剂时,能使芳香醛的浓度提高 1 倍以上,香草醛、对羟基苯甲醛、丁香醛的最高浓度分别为 1.34、1.07、0.59 g/L,总芳香醛的最高浓度为 2.87 g/L.

  9. Evaluatie wet op orgaandonatie

    OpenAIRE

    Rosendal, H.; Beekum, W.T. van; Legemaate, J.; Buisen, M.A.J.M.; Hulst, E.H.; Berg, M. van den; Assink, A.; Veen, E.B. van; Davidse, W.; Swagerman, M.B.; Chorus, A.M.J.; Brodin, H.F.T.; Riet, A. van 't; van Dijk, P.

    2001-01-01

    Met de invoering van de Wet op de orgaandonatie (WOD) is een viertal doelen nagestreefd, namelijk het bieden van rechtszekerheid aan betrokkenen, het bevorderen van het aanbod van geschikte organen en weefsels, een rechtvaardige verdeling hiervan en het voorkomen van handel in organen en weefsels. De onderzoekers concluderen dat bovengenoemde doelen ten dele zijn gerealiseerd.

  10. Wetting of real surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bormashenko, Edward Yu

    2013-01-01

    The problem of wetting and drop dynamics on various surfaces is very interesting from both the scientificas well as thepractical viewpoint, and subject of intense research.The results are scattered across papers in journals, sothis workwill meet the need for a unifying, comprehensive work.

  11. Wet hydrate dissolution plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Mirjana S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for a wet hydrate dissolution plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects, a production plant with capacity of 50,000 t/y was manufactured, at "Zeolite Mira", Mira (VE, Italy, in 1997, for increasing detergent zeolite production from 50,000 to 100,000 t/y. Several goals were realized by designing a wet hydrate dissolution plant. Main goal was increasing the detergent zeolite production capacity. The technological cycle of NaOH was closed, and no effluents emitted, and there is no pollution. Wet hydrate dissolution is now fully continuous, which is important for maintaining zeolite production quality, as well as for simplifying production. The wet hydrate production process is fully automatized, and the product has uniform quality. The production process can be controlled manually, which is necessary during start-up, and repairs. By installing additional process equipment (centrifugal pumps and dissolving reactors technological bottlenecks were overcome, and by adjusting NaOH tanks and dissolving reactors, the capacities of the process equipment was fully utilized.

  12. Recycled High-Density Polyethylene and Rice Husk as a Wetted Pad in Evaporative Cooling System

    OpenAIRE

    Nitipong Soponpongpipat; Sukum Kositchaimongkol

    2011-01-01

    Problem statement: The low cost and easy-to-find materials, for being used as wetted pad of evaporative cooling system, are necessary for agriculture. This study, thus, studied the evaporative cooling efficiency and pressure drop of recycled High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE) and rice husk as a wetted pad in evaporative cooling system. Approach: The study was done by establishing the tested wetted pad with 25.4 and 50.8 mm of thickness. The velocity air flow through wetted p...

  13. Controlled synthesis of porous platinum nanostructures for catalytic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yanqin; Zhang, Junwei; Yang, Yong; Huang, Zhengren; Long, Nguyen Viet; Nogami, Masayuki

    2014-02-01

    Porous platinum, that has outstanding catalytic and electrical properties and superior resistant characteristics to corrosion, has been widely applied in chemical, petrochemical, pharmaceutical, electronic, and automotive industries. As the catalytic activity and selectivity depend on the size, shape and structure of nanomaterials, the strategies for controlling these factors of platinum nanomaterials to get excellent catalytic properties are discussed. Here, recent advances in the design and preparation of various porous platinum nanostructures are reviewed, including wet-chemical synthesis, electro-deposition, galvanic replacement reaction and de-alloying technology. The applications of various platinum nanostructures are also discussed, especially in fuel cells. PMID:24749422

  14. Catalytic Partial Oxidation of Methane with Air to Syngas in a Pilot-Plant-Scale Spouted Bed Reactor%甲烷空气部分氧化制合成气喷动床反应器的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏伟胜; 徐建; 方大伟; 鲍晓军

    2003-01-01

    On the basis of hydrodynamic and scaling-up studies, a pilot-plant-scale thermal spouted bed reactor (50 mm in ID and 1500 mm in height) was designed and fabricated by scaling-down cold simulators. It was tested for making syngas via catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) of methane by air. The effects of various operating conditions such as operating pressure and temperature, feed composition, and gas fiowrate etc. on the CPO process were investigated. CH4 conversion of 92.2% and selectivity of 92.3% and 83.3% to CO and H2, respectively, were achieved at the pressure of 2.1 MPa. It was found that when the spouted bed reactor was operated within the stable spouting flow regime, the temperature profiles along the bed axis were much more uniform than those operated within the fixed-bed regime. The CH4 conversion and syngas selectivity were found to be close to thermodynamic equilibrium limits. The results of the present investigation showed that spouted bed could be considered as a potential type of chemical reactor for the CPO process of methane.

  15. WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2001-03-25

    The yield locus, tensile strength and fracture mechanisms of wet granular materials were studied. The yield locus of a wet material was shifted to the left of that of the dry specimen by a constant value equal to the compressive isostatic stress due to pendular bridges. for materials with straight yield loci, the shift was computed from the uniaxial tensile strength, either measured in a tensile strength tester or calculated from the correlation, and the angle of internal friction of the material. The predicted shift in the yield loci due to different moisture contents compare well with the measured shift in the yield loci of glass beads, crushed limestone, super D catalyst and Leslie coal. Measurement of the void fraction during the shear testing was critical to obtain the correct tensile strength theoretically or experimentally.

  16. Methods and apparatus for catalytic hydrothermal gasification of biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Butner, Robert Scott; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Zacher, Alan H.; Hart, Todd R.

    2012-08-14

    Continuous processing of wet biomass feedstock by catalytic hydrothermal gasification must address catalyst fouling and poisoning. One solution can involve heating the wet biomass with a heating unit to a temperature sufficient for organic constituents in the feedstock to decompose, for precipitates of inorganic wastes to form, for preheating the wet feedstock in preparation for subsequent separation of sulfur contaminants, or combinations thereof. Treatment further includes separating the precipitates out of the wet feedstock, removing sulfur contaminants, or both using a solids separation unit and a sulfur separation unit, respectively. Having removed much of the inorganic wastes and the sulfur that can cause poisoning and fouling, the wet biomass feedstock can be exposed to the heterogeneous catalyst for gasification.

  17. Wetting phenomena in electrolyte solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Ibagon, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    The present study analyzes wetting phenomena in electrolyte solutions. They are investigated by means of classical density functional theory. First, the wetting of a charged substrate by an electrolyte solution is studied with emphasis on the influence of the substrate charge density and of the ionic strength on the wetting transition temperature and on the order of the wetting transition. The corresponding models consist of solvent particles, anions, and cations. Two mean field approaches ar...

  18. 水蒸气和空气活化对VPO催化剂物性及催化性能的影响%INFLUENCE OF STEAM AND AIR ACTIVATION ON THE PHYSICAL PTOPERTY AND CATALYTIC PERFORMANCE OF VPO CATALYSTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许磊; 薛东; 王海波; 佟明友

    2012-01-01

    Vanadium phosphate oxide (VPO) catalyst precursor was activated under the atmosphere of air and steam/air (S/A) mixed gas respectively. The activated catalyst samples were characterized by XRD, XPS and SEM to study their crystal structure and surface property. Results showed that after activation under S/A mixed gas and air, the main crystal phase of the catalyst was (VO)2P2O7 and VO-PO4, respectively. The presence of water vapor during activation reduced the average valence state of vanadium (AV),but increased the P/V atomic ratio of catalyst surface. The catalytic performance of these prepared catalysts was evaluated by selective oxidation of w-butane to maleic anhydride reaction. It was shown that catalyst FVO-1 activated by mixed gas with S/A volume ratio of 1/3, having an AV of 4. 198 and P/V atomic ratio of 1. 17 exhibited good catalytic performance: its conversion of butane was 87. 10% and the selectivity of maleic anhydride reached 72. 89%.%在对钒磷氧(VPO)催化剂的前躯体进行活化的过程中,分别采用空气和水蒸气/空气混合气作为活化氛围.通过X射线衍射(XRD)、X射线光电子能谱(XPS)、扫描电子显微镜(SEM)等表征手段,考察了不同气氛活化催化剂的晶相结构和表面性质.结果表明:采用水蒸气/空气活化的VPO催化剂的主要晶相是(VO)2P2O7,而采用空气活化的催化剂的主要晶相是VOPO4;水蒸气的加入降低了催化剂中钒的平均价态(AV值),提高了表面P/V原子比.当采用水蒸气/空气体积比1:3的混合气活化时,所得催化剂FVO-1的P/V原子比为1.17,AV值为4.198.FVO-1催化剂对正丁烷选择性氧化制顺丁烯二酸酐反应的催化性能评价结果表明,正丁烷转化率达到87.10%,顺丁烯二酸酐选择性达到72.89%.

  19. Natural wet-snow shedding from overhead cables

    OpenAIRE

    Kollar, László E.; Olqma, Ossama; Farzaneh, Masoud

    2010-01-01

    The initiation of wet-snow shedding from overhead cables with negligible sag due to natural processes was modeled experimentally and theoretically. The experiments were carried out in a cold chamber where wet-snow sleeves were prepared on a suspended cable, and then exposed to natural processes leading to snow shedding: air temperature above freezing point, wind effect, and heat radiation. The theoretical model is based on heat balance, and simulates water migration in the cross section at th...

  20. 常温常压下等离子体催化脱除空气中的苯%Plasma-catalytic removal of benzene from atmospheric pressure air at normal temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁慧贤; 张增凤; 徐占春

    2012-01-01

    苯是典型的室内空气污染物,严重影响人体健康。在大气压及35℃下,通过在催化剂上进行介质阻挡放电的方式,进行了等离子体一催化氧化脱除空气中苯的研究。当气体中C6H6的体积分数为103.5X10~、H:0的体积分数为1.0%、空气为平衡气,输入能量密度为114J/L,空速为16500h^-1时,苯的脱除率可达93.5%。而在同样实验条件下,单纯等离子体脱除苯和单纯催化氧化脱除苯的脱除率分别为62.8%和9.0%。这一实验结果说明,等离子体与Ag/CeO,催化剂在催化氧化空气中苯的过程中产生了协同效应,等离子体产生的活性自由基在Ag/CeO,催化剂催化氧化苯的氧化一还原循环过程中起到了至关重要的作用。%Aimed at addressing benzene (C6H6 ) , a typical indoor air pollutant threatening to cause serious health disorders in human beings, this paper reports plasma-catalytic oxidation of benzene in gas streams via dielectric barrier discharges over Ag/Ce02 pellets at atmospheric pressure and 35 ℃. A feed gas mixture of 103.5 x 10-6 C6H6, 1.0% H20 in air, GHSV of 16 500 h^-l, and input discharge energy density of 114 J/L contribute to the benzene removal rate of 93.5%. But the same experimental conditions

  1. Wet steam wetness measurement in a 10 MW steam turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolovratník Michal

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to introduce a new design of the extinction probes developed for wet steam wetness measurement in steam turbines. This new generation of small sized extinction probes was developed at CTU in Prague. A data processing technique is presented together with yielded examples of the wetness distribution along the last blade of a 10MW steam turbine. The experimental measurement was done in cooperation with Doosan Škoda Power s.r.o.

  2. PREFACE: Wetting: introductory note

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herminghaus, S.

    2005-03-01

    The discovery of wetting as a topic of physical science dates back two hundred years, to one of the many achievements of the eminent British scholar Thomas Young. He suggested a simple equation relating the contact angle between a liquid surface and a solid substrate to the interfacial tensions involved [1], γlg cos θ = γsg - γsl (1) In modern terms, γ denotes the excess free energy per unit area of the interface indicated by its indices, with l, g and s corresponding to the liquid, gas and solid, respectively [2]. After that, wetting seems to have been largely ignored by physicists for a long time. The discovery by Gabriel Lippmann that θ may be tuned over a wide range by electrochemical means [3], and some important papers about modifications of equation~(1) due to substrate inhomogeneities [4,5] are among the rare exceptions. This changed completely during the seventies, when condensed matter physics had become enthusiastic about critical phenomena, and was vividly inspired by the development of the renormalization group by Kenneth Wilson [6]. This had solved the long standing problem of how to treat fluctuations, and to understand the universal values of bulk critical exponents. By inspection of the critical exponents of the quantities involved in equation~(1), John W Cahn discovered what he called critical point wetting: for any liquid, there should be a well-defined transition to complete wetting (i.e., θ = 0) as the critical point of the liquid is approached along the coexistence curve [7]. His paper inspired an enormous amount of further work, and may be legitimately viewed as the entrance of wetting into the realm of modern physics. Most of the publications directly following Cahn's work were theoretical papers which elaborated on wetting in relation to critical phenomena. A vast amount of interesting, and in part quite unexpected, ramifications were discovered, such as the breakdown of universality in thin film systems [8]. Simultaneously, a number

  3. Catalytic distillation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  4. Wetting front instability in an initially wet unsaturated fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental results exploring gravity-driven wetting front instability in a pre-wetted, rough-walled analog fracture are presented. Initial conditions considered include a uniform moisture field wetted to field capacity of the analog fracture and the structured moisture field created by unstable infiltration into an initially dry fracture. As in previous studies performed under dry initial conditions, instability was found to result both at the cessation of stable infiltration and at flux lower than the fracture capacity under gravitational driving force. Individual fingers were faster, narrower, longer, and more numerous than observed under dry initial conditions. Wetting fronts were found to follow existing wetted structure, providing a mechanism for rapid recharge and transport

  5. Fundamental Difficulties Associated With Underwater Wet Welding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua E. Omajene,

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The offshore industries carry out welding activities in the wet environment. It is evident that the wet environments possess difficulties in carrying out underwater welding. Therefore there is the need to improve the quality of weld achieved in underwater welding. This paper investigates the difficulties associated with underwater welding. The objective of this research paper is to identify and analyze the different difficulties in underwater welding so as to make a clear background for further research to identifying the processes of eliminating these difficulties. The major difficulties in underwater welding are the cooling rate of the weld metal and arc stability during underwater wet welding at a higher depth. Methods of decreasing the cooling rate of weld metal and how to achieve arc stability are the major methods of approach. The result of welds achieved in underwater welding will be much improved as compared to air welding if the effects of the difficulties associated with underwater welding are eliminated. This will lead to a more robust welding activities being carried out underwater.

  6. Use catalytic combustion for LHV gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucci, E.R.

    1982-03-01

    This paper shows how low heating value (LHV) waste gases can be combusted to recover energy even when the gases won't burn in a normal manner. Significant energy and economic savings can result by adopting this process. Catalytic combustion is a heterogeneous surface-catalyzed air oxidation of fuel, gaseous or liquid, to generate thermal energy in a flameless mode. The catalytic combustion process is quite complex since it involves numerous catalytic surface and gas-phase chemical reactions. During low temperature surface-catalyzed combustion, as in start-up, the combustion stage is under kinetically controlled conditions. The discussion covers the following topics - combustor substrates; combustor washcoating and catalyzing; combustor operational modes (turbine or tabular modes); applications in coal gasification and in-situ gasification; waste process gases. 16 refs.

  7. Squeezing wetting and nonwetting liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Samoilov, V. N.; Persson, B. N. J.

    2004-01-01

    We present molecular-dynamics results for the squeezing of octane (C8H18) between two approaching solid elastic walls with different wetting properties. The interaction energy between the octane bead units and the solid walls is varied from a very small value (1 meV), corresponding to a nonwetting surface with a very large contact angle (nearly 180 degrees), to a high value (18.6 meV) corresponding to complete wetting. When at least one of the solid walls is wetted by octane we observe well d...

  8. Catalytic Synthesis Lactobionic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Borodina

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles are obtained, characterized and deposited on the carrier. Conducted catalytic synthesis of lactobionic acid from lactose. Received lactobionic acid identify on the IR spectrum.

  9. Catalytic distillation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1982-01-01

    A method for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C.sub.4 feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  10. Facile Growth of Suspended SWNTs by Wet Catalyst Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, G.-H.; Yamazaki, A.; Takagi, D.; Okuda, M.; Suzuki, S.; Yoshimura, H.; Kobayashi, Y.; Homma, Y.

    2005-03-01

    Nanosized wet catalysts have recently employed for the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) growth with a uniform diameter, which is a key factor governing electronic properties of the SWNTs. Suspended SWNTs are useful for clarification of the physical/optical properties due to their interaction-free feature between substrate. For this reason, we tried to grow the diameter-controlled suspended SWNTs using pillar substrates and catalytic-metal containing organic molecules, which have refined catalyst size. Ferritin consisting of protein shell and encaging iron particles in its inner space and Co-filled apoferritin are utilized as a wet catalyst. By controlled experiments, SWNTs are successfully synthesized not only on flat substrates but also on Si-substrates with nanopillars. Low concentration of the ferritin gives the narrow diameter distribution of the SWNTs, which is confirmed by Raman spectroscopy. In addition, suspended SWNTs with narrow tube-diameter ranges are for the first time achieved using Co-filled aopferritins.

  11. Catalytic ignition of light hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. L. Hohn; C.-C. Huang; C. Cao

    2009-01-01

    Catalytic ignition refers to phenomenon where sufficient energy is released from a catalytic reaction to maintain further reaction without additional extemai heating. This phenomenon is important in the development of catalytic combustion and catalytic partial oxidation processes, both of which have received extensive attention in recent years. In addition, catalytic ignition studies provide experimental data which can be used to test theoretical hydrocarbon oxidation models. For these reasons, catalytic ignition has been frequently studied. This review summarizes the experimental methods used to study catalytic ignition of light hydrocarbons and describes the experimental and theoretical results obtained related to catalytic ignition. The role of catalyst metal, fuel and fuel concentration, and catalyst state in catalytic ignition are examined, and some conclusions are drawn on the mechanism of catalytic ignition.

  12. Development studies of a novel wet oxidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, T.W.; Dhooge, P.M. [Delphi Research, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Many DOE waste streams and remediates contain complex and variable mixtures of organic compounds, toxic metals, and radionuclides. These materials are often dispersed in organic or inorganic matrices, such as personal protective equipment, various sludges, soils, and water. Incineration and similar combustive processes do not appear to be viable options for treatment of these waste streams due to various considerations. The objective of this project is to develop a novel catalytic wet oxidation process for the treatment of multi-component wastes. The DETOX process uses a unique combination of metal catalysts to increase the rate of oxidation of organic materials.

  13. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  14. Wet Gas Compressor Surge Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Jellum, Marie Rennemo

    2013-01-01

    The development of wet gas compressors for installation subsea is key to increase the recovery of oil and gas from the Norwegian Continental Shelf. Safe operation of the compressor depends on understanding of how wet gas affects the behavior of the machine. The compressor operating range is limited by stall and surge, and it is therefore particularly important to determine how liquid will affect the inception of these phenomena. Measuring pressure transients within the compressor or in the in...

  15. Subsea Wet Gas Compressor Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Perez Aguilera, Luber Carlui

    2013-01-01

    In this Thesis the Aspen HYSYS dynamic functionalities were explored in order to build a dynamic Wet Gas Compressor model. In particular the Automation feature was used to implement two different correction methods, interpolation and Wood?s correction, that accounts for wet gas impact on compression performance, in dynamic-state. This was done through the creation of a VBA script in Microsoft Excel. The implementation of the correction methods showed to be fast and effective.The HYSYS dynamic...

  16. Reentrant Wetting of Network Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardino, N. R.; Telo da Gama, M. M.

    2012-09-01

    We use a simple mesoscopic Landau-Safran theory of network fluids to show that a reentrant phase diagram, in the “empty liquid” regime, leads to nonmonotonic surface tension and reentrant wetting, as previously reported for binary mixtures. One of the wetting transitions is of the usual kind, but the low temperature transition may allow the display of the full range of fluctuation regimes predicted by renormalization group theory.

  17. Transport kinetics of wetting layers

    OpenAIRE

    Herminghaus, Stephan; Paatzsch, Thomas; Häcker, T.; Leiderer, Paul

    1995-01-01

    The transport kinetics of wetting layers of ethanol and propane on silver substrates is investigated by monitoring the temporal decay of pulsed-laser-induced spatial thickness modulations. Our method allows to distinguish between different transport mechanisms, such as direct exchange with the vapour phase, viscous flow within the wetting layer, or surface diffusion. In either ease, the activation energy found for the lateral transport points to viscous flow as the dominant mechanism in the i...

  18. Wetting film dynamics and stability

    OpenAIRE

    Radoev, B.; Stoeckelhuber, K. W.; Tsekov, R.; Letocart, P

    2011-01-01

    Although the wetting films are similar in many aspects to other thin liquid films, there are some differences in their behavior, too. In contrast to soap and emulsion films, whose surfaces are homogeneous, solid substrates of wetting films are heterogeneous as a rule, unless special measures for their homogenization are taken. Here we mean primarily heterogeneous distribution of surface energy leading to existence of hydrophobic domains on hydrophilic surfaces and vice versa. As is known, suc...

  19. Wetting of polymer covered surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Halperin, A.; De Gennes, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    We consider solid surfaces, partly covered with flexible, neutral, linear polymers (by adsorption or by grafting), wetted by a liquid which is a good solvent of the poymer. We give formulae for the spreading coefficient S as a function of chain length, solvent quality and adsorption strength. We also discuss the wetting films obtained in spreading a droplet of (non volatile) solvent : the equilibrium thickness e of the film is a compromise between S (favouring thin films) and the coil entropi...

  20. Wet Gas Compression : Impeller Rig

    OpenAIRE

    Amundsen, Siren Carstens

    2009-01-01

    Wet gas compression technology is of great value to the oil and gas industry for boosting of unprocessed well stream and to reduce investment costs related to equipment and personnel. The growing interest in wet gas compression leads to a general request for accurate performance calculation procedures and proper measurement techniques for multiphase flow metering in compressors. An impeller rig for examination of single-phase and multiphase performance and aerodynamic stability is under con...

  1. Wet flue gas desulfurization processes

    OpenAIRE

    Hayrunnisa Çavuşoğlu; Mustafa Şahin Gülaboğlu

    2013-01-01

    The wet flue gas desulfurization process is widely used for the treatment of exhaust gases in power stations. Due to its high level of effectiveness over the already available processes, it has also been the mostly preferred method by industry. Its high SO2 removal efficiency, wide applicability of absorption chemicals and the ease of the chemical process handling which does not require comprehensive konowledge are among the main advantages of this process. In this article, various wet flue g...

  2. Catalytic Decomposition of Methylene Chloride by Sulfated Titania Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Catalytic decomposition of methylene chloride in air below 300℃ was studied.Sulfated titania was very effective in converting 959ppm methylene chloride selectively to CO,CO2 and HCl.Complete decomposition of methylene chloride was achieved at low temperature(275℃).It was found that the acidic property of catalyst was a determinant factor for the catalytic activity.The presence of water vapor in the feed stream remarkably reduced the catalytic activity,which could be due to the blockage of acidic sites on the surface of catalyst by water molecules.A bifunctional catalyst comprising copper oxide was developed to improve the selectivity of catalytic oxidation,which indicated that copper oxide can promote the deep oxidation of methylene chloride.The crystal form of TiO2 imposes an important influence upon the catalytic oxidation.

  3. Topographical Anisotropy and Wetting of Ground Stainless Steel Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelia Bellmann

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic and physico-chemical methods were used for a comprehensive surface characterization of different mechanically modified stainless steel surfaces. The surfaces were analyzed using high-resolution confocal microscopy, resulting in detailed information about the topographic properties. In addition, static water contact angle measurements were carried out to characterize the surface heterogeneity of the samples. The effect of morphological anisotropy on water contact angle anisotropy was investigated. The correlation between topography and wetting was studied by means of a model of wetting proposed in the present work, that allows quantifying the air volume of the interface water drop-stainless steel surface.

  4. Water recovery by catalytic treatment of urine vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budininkas, P.; Quattrone, P. D.; Leban, M. I.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the feasibility of water recovery on a man-rated scale by the catalytic processing of untreated urine vapor. For this purpose, two catalytic systems, one capable of processing an air stream containing low urine vapor concentrations and another to process streams with high urine vapor concentrations, were designed, constructed, and tested to establish the quality of the recovered water.

  5. Investigations of VOx/SBA-15 catalytic performance in propane dehydrogenation with CO2

    OpenAIRE

    Ze?czak, Kamila; Michorczyk, Piotr; Ogonowski, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The catalytic activity of V-containing SBA-15 materials wereprepared by incipient wetness method and tested in propane dehydrogenation with carbon dioxide. It has been found that vanadium catalysts show relatively high catalytic activity and selectivity to propene. The highest activity exhibits the sample containing 5 wt. % of V. At temperature 823 K, propane conversion and propene selectivity were 26,7%, while 70 %, respectively.

  6. Development of Pillared Clays for Wet Hydrogen Peroxide Oxidation of Phenol and Its Application in the Posttreatment of Coffee Wastewater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy R. Sanabria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the use of pillared clays as catalysts for the Fenton-like advanced oxidation, specifically wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO. This paper discusses the limitations on the application of a homogeneous Fenton system, development of solid catalysts for the oxidation of phenol, advances in the synthesis of pillared clays, and their potential application as catalysts for phenol oxidation. Finally, it analyzes the use of pillared clays as heterogeneous Fenton-like catalysts for a real wastewater treatment, emphasizing the oxidation of phenolic compounds present in coffee wastewater. Typically, the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation in a real effluent system is used as pretreatment, prior to biological treatment. In the specific case of coffee wet processing wastewater, catalytic oxidation with pillared bentonite with Al-Fe is performed to supplement the biological treatment, that is, as a posttreatment system. According to the results of catalytic activity of pillared bentonite with Al-Fe for oxidation of coffee processing wastewater (56% phenolic compounds conversion, 40% selectivity towards CO2, and high stability of active phase, catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation emerges as a viable alternative for management of this type of effluent.

  7. Catalytic coherence transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Kaifeng; Singh, Uttam; Wu, Junde

    2016-04-01

    Catalytic coherence transformations allow the otherwise impossible state transformations using only incoherent operations with the aid of an auxiliary system with finite coherence that is not being consumed in any way. Here we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for the deterministic and stochastic catalytic coherence transformations between a pair of pure quantum states. In particular, we show that the simultaneous decrease of a family of Rényi entropies of the diagonal parts of the states under consideration is a necessary and sufficient condition for the deterministic catalytic coherence transformations. Similarly, for stochastic catalytic coherence transformations we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for achieving a higher optimal probability of conversion. We thus completely characterize the coherence transformations among pure quantum states under incoherent operations. We give numerous examples to elaborate our results. We also explore the possibility of the same system acting as a catalyst for itself and find that indeed self-catalysis is possible. Further, for the cases where no catalytic coherence transformation is possible we provide entanglement-assisted coherence transformations and find the necessary and sufficient conditions for such transformations.

  8. Fabrication of Core-Shell Structural SiO2@H3[PM12O40] Material and Its Catalytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Through a natural tree grain template and sol-gel technology, the heterogeneous catalytic materials based on polyoxometalate compounds H3[PM12O40] encapsulating SiO2: SiO2@H3[PM12O40] (SiO2@PM12, M = W, Mo with core-shell structure had been prepared. The structure and morphology of the core-shell microspheres were characterized by the XRD, IR spectroscopy, UV-Vis absorbance, and SEM. These microsphere materials can be used as heterogeneous catalysts with high activity and stability for catalytic wet air oxidation of pollutant dyes safranine T (ST at room condition. The results show that the catalysts have excellent catalytic activity in treatment of wastewater containing 10 mg/L ST, and 94% of color can be removed within 60 min. Under different cycling runs, it is shown that the catalysts are stable under such operating conditions and the leaching tests show negligible leaching effect owing to the lesser dissolution.

  9. Wet sipping system at Wolsong-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After many years of operation, the on-power failed fuel detection and location systems along with alarm area gamma monitors at Wolsong-1 have successfully demonstrated that most, if not all, defective and suspect fuel bundles can be located before discharge to the fuel bay. Today, discharged bundles are now being transferred from the fuel bay to the AECL designed Modular Air-Cooled Storage (MACSTOR) canister facilities. Since these canisters are licensed for storing intact fuel bundles only, a procedure was needed at Wolsong-1 to separate any suspect or defective bundles that do not release fission products in detectable quantities. Therefore, KNF designed and built a wet sipper to enclose an irradiated bundle inside a sealed container at the bottom of the fuel bay. Various techniques were then used to enhance the release of water soluble fission products from defective fuel elements before circulating water samples from the immediate vicinity of an irradiated fuel bundle to an inspection station located at the top of the fuel bay. Any water samples with elevated levels of gamma activity were direct indications of a fuel cladding breach. The presence of defective fuel elements were then verified by visual inspection. The system performance test was performed in the Wolsong-1 nuclear power plant on March 2009.This paper describes the results of the wet sipping tests. (author)

  10. Squeezing wetting and nonwetting liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoilov, V N; Persson, B N J

    2004-01-22

    We present molecular-dynamics results for the squeezing of octane (C8H18) between two approaching solid elastic walls with different wetting properties. The interaction energy between the octane bead units and the solid walls is varied from a very small value (1 meV), corresponding to a nonwetting surface with a very large contact angle (nearly 180 degrees), to a high value (18.6 meV) corresponding to complete wetting. When at least one of the solid walls is wetted by octane we observe well defined molecular layers develop in the lubricant film when the thickness of the film is of the order of a few atomic diameters. An external squeezing-pressure induces discontinuous, thermally activated changes in the number n of lubricant layers (n-->n-1 layering transitions). With increasing interaction energy between the octane bead units and the solid walls, the transitions from n to n-1 layers occur at higher average pressure. This results from the increasing activation barrier to nucleate the squeeze-out with increasing lubricant-wall binding energy (per unit surface area) in the contact zone. Thus, strongly wetting lubricant fluids are better boundary lubricants than the less wetting ones, and this should result in less wear. We analyze in detail the effect of capillary bridge formation (in the wetting case) and droplets formation (in the nonwetting case) on the forces exerted by the lubricant on the walls. For the latter case small liquid droplets may be trapped at the interface, resulting in a repulsive force between the walls during squeezing, until the solid walls come into direct contact, where the wall-wall interaction may be initially attractive. This effect is made use of in some practical applications, and we give one illustration involving conditioners for hair care application. PMID:15268334

  11. Performance characterization of a hydrogen catalytic heater.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Kanouff, Michael P.

    2010-04-01

    This report describes the performance of a high efficiency, compact heater that uses the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen to provide heat to the GM Hydrogen Storage Demonstration System. The heater was designed to transfer up to 30 kW of heat from the catalytic reaction to a circulating heat transfer fluid. The fluid then transfers the heat to one or more of the four hydrogen storage modules that make up the Demonstration System to drive off the chemically bound hydrogen. The heater consists of three main parts: (1) the reactor, (2) the gas heat recuperator, and (3) oil and gas flow distribution manifolds. The reactor and recuperator are integrated, compact, finned-plate heat exchangers to maximize heat transfer efficiency and minimize mass and volume. Detailed, three-dimensional, multi-physics computational models were used to design and optimize the system. At full power the heater was able to catalytically combust a 10% hydrogen/air mixture flowing at over 80 cubic feet per minute and transfer 30 kW of heat to a 30 gallon per minute flow of oil over a temperature range from 100 C to 220 C. The total efficiency of the catalytic heater, defined as the heat transferred to the oil divided by the inlet hydrogen chemical energy, was characterized and methods for improvement were investigated.

  12. Wet flue gas desulfurization processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayrunnisa Çavuşoğlu

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The wet flue gas desulfurization process is widely used for the treatment of exhaust gases in power stations. Due to its high level of effectiveness over the already available processes, it has also been the mostly preferred method by industry. Its high SO2 removal efficiency, wide applicability of absorption chemicals and the ease of the chemical process handling which does not require comprehensive konowledge are among the main advantages of this process. In this article, various wet flue gas desulfurization processes such as lime/limestone have beendiscussed.

  13. Effects of carrier and Mn loading on supported manganese oxide catalysts for catalytic combustion of methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinyan Hu; Wei Chu; Limin Shi

    2008-01-01

    Supported manganese oxide catalysts were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation method for methane cat-alytic combustion, and effects of the support (Al2O3, SiO2 and TiO2) and Mn loading were investigated. These catalysts were characterized with N2 adsorption, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and temperature-programmed reduction techniques. Methane conversion varied in a large range depending on supports or Mn loading. Al2O3 supported 15% Mn cata-lyst exhibited better activity toward methane catalytic oxidation. The manganese state and oxygen species played an important role in the catalytic performance.

  14. Catalytic methanol dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the methanol dissociation study on copper/potassium catalyst with alumina support at various temperatures are presented. The following gaseous and liquid products at. The catalytic methanol dissociation is obtained: hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, and dimethyl ether. Formation rates of these products are discussed. Activation energies of corresponding reactions are calculated

  15. Catalytic Phosphination and Arsination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwong Fuk Yee; Chan Kin Shing

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic, user-friendly phosphination and arsination of aryl halides and triflates by triphenylphosphine and triphenylarsine using palladium catalysts have provided a facile synthesis of functionalized aryl phosphines and arsines in neutral media. Modification of the cynaoarisne yielded optically active N, As ligands which will be screened in various asymmetric catalysis.

  16. Monolithic catalytic igniters

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Ferla, R.; Tuffias, R. H.; Jang, Q.

    1993-01-01

    Catalytic igniters offer the potential for excellent reliability and simplicity for use with the diergolic bipropellant oxygen/hydrogen as well as with the monopropellant hydrazine. State-of-the-art catalyst beds - noble metal/granular pellet carriers - currently used in hydrazine engines are limited by carrier stability, which limits the hot-fire temperature, and by poor thermal response due to the large thermal mass. Moreover, questions remain with regard to longevity and reliability of these catalysts. In this work, Ultramet investigated the feasibility of fabricating monolithic catalyst beds that overcome the limitations of current catalytic igniters via a combination of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) iridium coatings and chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) refractory ceramic foams. It was found that under all flow conditions and O2:H2 mass ratios tested, a high surface area monolithic bed outperformed a Shell 405 bed. Additionally, it was found that monolithic catalytic igniters, specifically porous ceramic foams fabricated by CVD/CVI processing, can be fabricated whose catalytic performance is better than Shell 405 and with significantly lower flow restriction, from materials that can operate at 2000 C or higher.

  17. Robust Non-Wetting PTFE Surfaces by Femtosecond Laser Machining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Liang

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Nature shows many examples of surfaces with extraordinary wettability, which can often be associated with particular air-trapping surface patterns. Here, robust non-wetting surfaces have been created by femtosecond laser ablation of polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE. The laser-created surface structure resembles a forest of entangled fibers, which support structural superhydrophobicity even when the surface chemistry is changed by gold coating. SEM analysis showed that the degree of entanglement of hairs and the depth of the forest pattern correlates positively with accumulated laser fluence and can thus be influenced by altering various laser process parameters. The resulting fibrous surfaces exhibit a tremendous decrease in wettability compared to smooth PTFE surfaces; droplets impacting the virgin or gold coated PTFE forest do not wet the surface but bounce off. Exploratory bioadhesion experiments showed that the surfaces are truly air-trapping and do not support cell adhesion. Therewith, the created surfaces successfully mimic biological surfaces such as insect wings with robust anti-wetting behavior and potential for antiadhesive applications. In addition, the fabrication can be carried out in one process step, and our results clearly show the insensitivity of the resulting non-wetting behavior to variations in the process parameters, both of which make it a strong candidate for industrial applications.

  18. Proefproject aandachtstoffen Wet milieugevaarlijke stoffen

    OpenAIRE

    Poel P van der; Ros JPM

    1988-01-01

    Dit rapport behandelt de uitvoering van het proefproject aandachtstoffen en geeft aanbevelingen aan het DGM voor vervolgonderzoek. De aandachtstoffenlijst wordt krachtens art. 22 Wet milieugevaarlijke stoffen vastgesteld en minstens eenmaal per jaar herzien, terwijl regelmatig onderzoek uitgevoerd moet worden naar stoffen die op deze lijst voorkomen. Voor het beschreven proefproject werden schriftelijke enquetes uitgevoerd voor vertegenwoordigers uit de categorieen kleurstoffen (trypan blue),...

  19. Inhibiting Wet Oxidation of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onisko, D. B. L.

    1985-01-01

    Simple modification of wet-oxidation process for treating organicwaste reduces loss of fixed nitrogen, potentially valuable byproduct of process. Addition of sufficient sulfuric acid to maintain reaction pH below 3 greatly reduces oxidation of ammonia to free nitrogen. No equipment modification required.

  20. Does Surface Roughness Amplify Wetting?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malijevský, Alexandr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 141, č. 18 (2014), s. 184703. ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-09914S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : density functional theory * wetting * roughness Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.952, year: 2014

  1. Preparation and characteristics of carbon-supported platinum catalyst and its application in the removal of phenolic pollutants in aqueous solution by microwave-assisted catalytic oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granular activated carbon-supported platinum (Pt/GAC) catalysts were prepared by microwave irradiation and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Pt particles dispersing onto the surface of GAC could be penetrated by microwave and acted as 'reaction centre' in the degradations of p-nitrophenol (PNP) and pentachlorophenol (PCP) in aqueous solution by microwave-assisted catalytic oxidation. The reaction was carried out through a packed bed reactor under ambient pressure and continuous flow mode. Under the conditions of microwave power 400 W, influent flow 6.4 mL min-1 and air flow 120 mL min-1, phenolic solutions with high concentration (initial concentrations of PNP and PCP solutions were 1469 and 1454 mg L-1, respectively) were treated effectively by Pt/GAC, 86% PNP and 90% PCP were degraded and total organic carbon (TOC) removal reached 85% and 71%, respectively. Compared with GAC, loaded Pt apparently accelerated oxidative reaction so that Pt/GAC had a better degrading and mineralizing efficiencies for PNP. Hydraulic retention time was only 16 min in experiment, which was shortened greatly compared with catalytic wet air oxidation. Pyrolysis and oxidation of phenolic pollutants occurred simultaneously on the surface of Pt/GAC by microwave irradiation

  2. Methods for sulfate removal in liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification of biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Douglas C; Oyler, James

    2013-12-17

    Processing of wet biomass feedstock by liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification must address catalyst fouling and poisoning. One solution can involve heating the wet biomass with a heating unit to a pre-treatment temperature sufficient for organic constituents in the feedstock to decompose, for precipitates of inorganic wastes to form, for preheating the wet feedstock in preparation for subsequent removal of soluble sulfate contaminants, or combinations thereof. Processing further includes reacting the soluble sulfate contaminants with cations present in the feedstock material to yield a sulfate-containing precipitate and separating the inorganic precipitates and/or the sulfate-containing precipitates out of the wet feedstock. Having removed much of the inorganic wastes and the sulfate contaminants that can cause poisoning and fouling, the wet biomass feedstock can be exposed to the heterogenous catalyst for gasification.

  3. Gas phase heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of alkanes to aliphatic ketones and/or other oxygenates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Manhua; Wang, Xiang; Yeom, Younghoon

    2015-09-29

    A catalyst, its method of preparation and its use for producing aliphatic ketones by subjecting alkanes C.sub.3 to C.sub.9 to a gas phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen, and, optionally, steam and/or one or more diluting gases. The catalyst comprises a catalytically active mixed metal oxide phase and a suitable support material onto and/or into which the active catalytic phase is dispersed.

  4. Gas phase heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of alkanes to aliphatic ketones and/or other oxygenates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Manhua; Wang, Xiang; Yeom, Younghoon

    2015-03-17

    A catalyst, its method of preparation and its use for producing aliphatic ketones by subjecting alkanes C.sub.3 to C.sub.9 to a gas phase catalytic oxidation in the presence of air or oxygen, and, optionally, steam and/or one or more diluting gases. The catalyst comprises a catalytically active mixed metal oxide phase and a suitable support material onto and/or into which the active catalytic phase id dispersed.

  5. Experimental Simulation of Wet-Snow Shedding from Sagged Cables

    OpenAIRE

    Fonyó, András; Kollar, László E.; Farzaneh, Masoud; Montpellier, Patrice

    2009-01-01

    The process of wet-snow shedding from overhead cables was simulated in cold-chamber experiments under different ambient conditions. The main objective of the study was to examine how cable sag influences the snow-shedding process. However, the effects of several other parameters were also considered, such as air temperature, solar radiation, snow-sleeve length, and periodic excitation of the cable. Periodic excitation was applied at the suspension point of the cable, leading to cable vibratio...

  6. Modeling Wet-Snow Shedding from Current-Carrying Conductors

    OpenAIRE

    Olqma, Ossama; Kollar, László E.; Farzaneh, Masoud; Pellet, Laure

    2009-01-01

    The initiation of wet-snow shedding from currentcarrying conductors was studied experimentally and theoretically. A suspended cable with cylindrical snow accretion was considered, and some of the snow properties at the end of sleeve were measured and calculated until snow shedding. The current in the cable appears to be a heat source which accelerates snow melting, similarly to air temperatures above freezing, wind and heat radiation. All of these effects were taken into account to study how ...

  7. 174 Reduction in Allergic Rhinitis Index by Decreasing Aero-Allergens and Malodor Causing Volatile Organic Compounds by Luna Air Purifiers Using Photo-Catalytic Oxidation (PCO) Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Ghosh, Nabarun; Aguaiza, Cristina; Guzman, Alicia; Chudasama, Jay; Bennert, Jeff; Das, A. B.

    2012-01-01

    Background The quality of the environment within buildings is a topic of major importance for public health. Breathing pure and clean air allows us to think more clearly, sleep more soundly, and stay healthier. Studies show that we receive 56% of our energy from the air we breathe, more than from water and food combined. On average we breathe 37 pounds of air a day. It has been established that the use of negative ions in a purification system is an effective means of eradicating aeroallergen...

  8. Andreas Acrivos Dissertation Award: Onset of Dynamic Wetting Failure - The Mechanics of High-Speed Fluid Displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandre, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Dynamic wetting is crucial to processes where a liquid displaces another fluid along a solid surface, such as the deposition of a coating liquid onto a moving substrate. Dynamic wetting fails when process speed exceeds some critical value, leading to incomplete fluid displacement and transient phenomena that impact a variety of applications, such as microfluidic devices, oil-recovery systems, and splashing droplets. Liquid coating processes are particularly sensitive to wetting failure, which can induce air entrainment and other catastrophic coating defects. Despite the industrial incentives for careful control of wetting behavior, the hydrodynamic factors that influence the transition to wetting failure remain poorly understood from empirical and theoretical perspectives. This work investigates the fundamentals of wetting failure in a variety of systems that are relevant to industrial coating flows. A hydrodynamic model is developed where an advancing fluid displaces a receding fluid along a smooth, moving substrate. Numerical solutions predict the onset of wetting failure at a critical substrate speed, which coincides with a turning point in the steady-state solution path for a given set of system parameters. Flow-field analysis reveals a physical mechanism where wetting failure results when capillary forces can no longer support the pressure gradients necessary to steadily displace the receding fluid. Novel experimental systems are used to measure the substrate speeds and meniscus shapes associated with the onset of air entrainment during wetting failure. Using high-speed visualization techniques, air entrainment is identified by the elongation of triangular air films with system-dependent size. Air films become unstable to thickness perturbations and ultimately rupture, leading to the entrainment of air bubbles. Meniscus confinement in a narrow gap between the substrate and a stationary plate is shown to delay air entrainment to higher speeds for a variety of

  9. IDENTIFICATION AND RESPONSES TO POTENTIAL EFFECTS OF SCR AND WET SCRUBBERS ON SUBMICRON PARTICULATE EMISSIONS AND PLUME CHARACTERISTICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Applications of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers on coal-fired boilers have led to substantial reductions in emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOX) and sulfur dioxide (SO2). However, observations of pilot- and full-scale tes...

  10. Analysis of the snow-atmosphere energy balance during wet-snow instabilities and implications for avalanche prediction

    OpenAIRE

    C. Mitterer; Schweizer, J.

    2013-01-01

    Wet-snow avalanches are notoriously difficult to predict; their formation mechanism is poorly understood since in situ measurements representing the thermal and mechanical evolution are difficult to perform. Instead, air temperature is commonly used as a predictor variable for days with high wet-snow avalanche danger – often with limited success. As melt water is a major driver of wet-snow instability and snow melt depends on the energy input into the snow cover, we computed the energy balanc...

  11. Wet gas compression. Experimental investigation of the aerodynamics within a centrifugal compressor exposed to wet gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gruener, Trond Gammelsaeter

    2012-07-01

    The demand for more efficient oil and gas production requires improved technology to increase production rates and enhance profitable operation. The centrifugal compressor is the key elements in the compression system. Preliminary studies of wet gas compressor concepts have demonstrated the benefits of wet gas boosting. An open-loop test facility was designed for single-stage wet gas compressor testing. Experimental investigators have been performed to reveal the impact of liquid on the aerodynamics of centrifugal compressor. The investigation consisted of two test campaigns with different impeller/diffuser configurations. Atmospheric air and water were used as experimental fluids. The two configurations showed a different pressure ratio characteristics when liquid as present. The results from test campaign A demonstrated a pronounced pressure ratio decrease at high flow and a minor pressure ration increase pressure ratio with reducing gas mass fraction (GMF). The deviation in pressure ratio characteristic for the two test campaigns was attributed to the volute operating characteristic. Both impeller/diffuser configurations demonstrated a reduction in maximum volume flow with decreasing GMF. The impeller pressure ratio was related to the diffuser and/or the volute performance). Air and water are preferable experimental fluids for safety reasons and because a less extensive facility design is required. An evaluation of the air/water tests versus hydrocarbon tests was performed in order to reveal whether the results were representative. Air/water tests at atmospheric conditions reproduced the general performance trend of hydrocarbon wet gas compressor tests with an analogous impeller at high pressures. Aerodynamic instability limits the operating range because of feasible severe damage of the compressor and adverse influence on the performance. It is essential to establish the surge margin at different operating conditions. A delayed instability inception was

  12. Catalytic Combustion Characteristics of H2/n-CaH10/Air Mixtures in Swiss-Roll Combustor%H2/n-C4H10/Air预混气在Swiss—roll燃烧器中的催化燃烧特性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨帆; 钟北京

    2012-01-01

    In micro catalytic combustion, due to the competitive adsorption between fuel and oxygen molecular on the catalyst surface, the lower combustion limits are at the fuel rich condition. To enhance the utilization of fuel and enlarge the flammable range, hydrogen was added into the n-butane/air mixtures. Then catalytic combustion characteristics of H2/n-C4H10/air mixtures in Swiss-roll combustor were studied. Experimental results indicate that the addition of hydrogen and enlarge the flammable range of n-butane and the lower limits is fuel lean. Thus the utilization of fuel is high. The steady state combustion experiments show that the highest temperature of combustor is at fuel rich.%在微尺度催化燃烧中,由于燃料和氧气对于催化剂表面活性位的竞争,导致了可燃下限为富燃的情况。为了提高燃料利用率,拓宽可燃范围,本文在正丁烷/空气的混合气中加入一定量的氢气,在Swiss—roll燃烧器内研究了氯气/正丁烷/空气预混气的燃烧特性。结果表明,氢气能够有效拓宽正丁烷的可燃范围,可燃下限能够低于1,以贫燃的条件实现高燃料利用率。对于稳定燃烧温度的实验结果表明,燃烧器最高温度出现在富燃料一侧。

  13. WET SOLIDS FLOW ENHANCEMENT; FINAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The yield locus, tensile strength and fracture mechanisms of wet granular materials were studied. The yield locus of a wet material was shifted to the left of that of the dry specimen by a constant value equal to the compressive isostatic stress due to pendular bridges. for materials with straight yield loci, the shift was computed from the uniaxial tensile strength, either measured in a tensile strength tester or calculated from the correlation, and the angle of internal friction of the material. The predicted shift in the yield loci due to different moisture contents compare well with the measured shift in the yield loci of glass beads, crushed limestone, super D catalyst and Leslie coal. Measurement of the void fraction during the shear testing was critical to obtain the correct tensile strength theoretically or experimentally

  14. Low-temperature gas from marine shales: wet gas to dry gas over experimental time

    OpenAIRE

    Jarvie Daniel M; Mango Frank D

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Marine shales exhibit unusual behavior at low temperatures under anoxic gas flow. They generate catalytic gas 300° below thermal cracking temperatures, discontinuously in aperiodic episodes, and lose these properties on exposure to trace amounts of oxygen. Here we report a surprising reversal in hydrocarbon generation. Heavy hydrocarbons are formed before light hydrocarbons resulting in wet gas at the onset of generation grading to dryer gas over time. The effect is moderate under ga...

  15. Review of Wet Gas Compressor Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Rofiqi, Zaenuddin Ar

    2014-01-01

    Subsea wet gas compression without preliminary separation give an opportunity to develop mature and remote gas/condensate field. Predicting wet gas compressor performance is important to develop those fields. Currently there is no standard exist for wet gas compression performance calculation (Hundseid et al., 2008). The current standards (ISO 5389:2005) exist only for dry gas by utilizing Schultz method. In wet gas compression, fluid properties are changing as fluid being compressed. Schult...

  16. Preparation and Use of a Room-Temperature Catalytic Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Gareth; Mark, Bernard; Chen, Xijia; Furch, Toran; Singmaster, K. A.; Wagenknecht, Paul S.

    2001-12-01

    A solid-state catalyst that effectively converts a CO/air mixture to CO2 at room temperature is readily prepared. The catalyst, which is composed of metallic gold on iron(III) oxide, is loaded into a simple flow cell to test its catalytic activity. Mixtures of CO and air are run through the catalyst and subsequently analyzed by gas-phase infrared spectroscopy to determine the effectiveness of the catalyst.

  17. Wetting hysteresis induced by nanodefects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacomello, Alberto; Schimmele, Lothar; Dietrich, Siegfried

    2016-01-19

    Wetting of actual surfaces involves diverse hysteretic phenomena stemming from ever-present imperfections. Here, we clarify the origin of wetting hysteresis for a liquid front advancing or receding across an isolated defect of nanometric size. Various kinds of chemical and topographical nanodefects, which represent salient features of actual heterogeneous surfaces, are investigated. The most probable wetting path across surface heterogeneities is identified by combining, within an innovative approach, microscopic classical density functional theory and the string method devised for the study of rare events. The computed rugged free-energy landscape demonstrates that hysteresis emerges as a consequence of metastable pinning of the liquid front at the defects; the barriers for thermally activated defect crossing, the pinning force, and hysteresis are quantified and related to the geometry and chemistry of the defects allowing for the occurrence of nanoscopic effects. The main result of our calculations is that even weak nanoscale defects, which are difficult to characterize in generic microfluidic experiments, can be the source of a plethora of hysteretical phenomena, including the pinning of nanobubbles. PMID:26721395

  18. Erosion corrosion in wet steam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of different remedies against erosion corrosion in wet steam has been studied in Barsebaeck 1. Accessible steam systems were inspected in 1984, 1985 and 1986. The effect of hydrogen peroxide injection of the transport of corrosion products in the condensate and feed water systems has also been followed through chemical analyses. The most important results of the project are: - Low alloy chromium steels with a chromium content of 1-2% have shown excellent resistance to erosion corrosion in wet steam. - A thermally sprayed coating has shown good resistance to erosion corrosion in wet steam. In a few areas with restricted accessibility minor attacks have been found. A thermally sprayed aluminium oxide coating has given poor results. - Large areas in the moisture separator/reheater and in steam extraction no. 3 have been passivated by injection of 20 ppb hydrogen peroxide to the high pressure steam. In other inspected systems no significant effect was found. Measurements of the wall thickness in steam extraction no. 3 showed a reduced rate of attack. - The injection of 20 ppb hydrogen peroxide has not resulted in any significant reduction of the iron level result is contrary to that of earlier tests. An increase to 40 ppb resulted in a slight decrease of the iron level. - None of the feared disadvantages with hydrogen peroxide injection has been observed. The chromium and cobalt levels did not increase during the injection. Neither did the lifetime of the precoat condensate filters decrease. (author)

  19. Wet water glass production plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanković Mirjana S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The IGPC Engineering Department designed basic projects for a wet hydrate dissolution plant, using technology developed in the IGPC laboratories. Several projects were completed: technological, machine, electrical, automation. On the basis of these projects, a production plant of a capacity of 75,000 t/y was manufactured, at "Zeolite Mira", Mira (VE, Italy, in 1997. and 1998, increasing detergent zeolite production, from 50,000 to 100,000 t/y. Several goals were realized by designing a wet hydrate dissolution plant. The main goal was increasing the detergent zeolite production. The technological cycle of NaOH was closed, and no effluents emitted, and there is no pollution (except for the filter cake. The wet water glass production process is fully automatized, and the product has uniform quality. The production process can be controlled manually, which is necessary during start - up, and repairs. By installing additional process equipment (centrifugal pumps and heat exchangers technological bottlenecks were overcome, and by adjusting the operation of autoclaves, and water glass filters and also by optimizing the capacities of process equipment.

  20. Wet friction materials and lubricants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Takayuki

    1988-02-01

    There are wet and dry friction materials used for friction clutches and friction brakes. Wet friction materials include sintered alloys and semimetallic substances. Paper friction materials which are the most common wet friction materials used in automobiles were studied for their performance and their relation to lubricants. All present paper friction materials are non-asbestos paper friction materials. The requirements for paper friction material performance are as follows: (1) The heat resistance and durability are so high that the material can stand sliding for a long time. (2) The friction curve is flat. (3) The mechanical strength, wear resistance, and resistance to oil pressure are high. (4) The coefficient of friction (particularly, of static friction) is very high. (5) Variations in the coefficient of friction with time are low. The friction characteristics and wear of paper friction materials are influenced by the lubricant used together with the paper friction materials. It is necessary to develop materials which are immune to the influence of the lubricant. (11 figs, 3 tabs, 21 refs)

  1. Olefin metathesis in air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Piola

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the discovery and now widespread use of olefin metathesis, the evolution of metathesis catalysts towards air stability has become an area of significant interest. In this fascinating area of study, beginning with early systems making use of high oxidation state early transition metal centers that required strict exclusion of water and air, advances have been made to render catalysts more stable and yet more functional group tolerant. This review summarizes the major developments concerning catalytic systems directed towards water and air tolerance.

  2. Direct measurement of the wetting front capillary pressure in a clay brick ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The absorption of a liquid into a rectangular bar of an initially dry porous material that is sealed on all surfaces except the inflow face is analysed in terms of Sharp Front theory. Sharp Front models are developed for both complete and incomplete displacement of air ahead of the advancing wetting front. Experiments are described from which a characteristic capillary potential of the material is obtained by measuring the equilibrium pressure of the air displaced and compressed ahead of the advancing wetting front. Results for the absorption of water and n-heptane by a fired clay brick ceramic suggest that this wetting front capillary pressure (or capillary potential) scales approximately with the surface tension and also that the permeability scales inversely with the liquid viscosity. The pressure of the air trapped in the wetted region is found to be the same as the pressure of the displaced air. For this material the wetting front capillary pressure for water at 20 C is 0.113 MPa, equivalent to a hydraulic tension head of 11.5 m and to a Young-Laplace pore diameter of 2.6 μm. The capillary pressure so measured is apparently a fundamental percolation property of the material that can be interpreted as the air pressure at which liquid phase continuity and unsaturated conductivity both vanish. The method described can be applied generally to porous materials

  3. Influence of physicochemical treatments on iron-based spent catalyst for catalytic oxidation of toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Chai; Shim, Wang Geun

    2008-06-15

    The catalytic oxidation of toluene was studied over an iron-based spent and regenerated catalysts. Air, hydrogen, or four different acid solutions (oxalic acid (C2H2O4), citric acid (C6H8O7), acetic acid (CH3COOH), and nitric acid (HNO3)) were employed to regenerate the spent catalyst. The properties of pretreated spent catalyst were characterized by the Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), temperature programmed reduction (TPR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. The air pretreatment significantly enhanced the catalytic activity of the spent catalyst in the pretreatment temperature range of 200-400 degrees C, but its catalytic activity diminished at the pretreatment temperature of 600 degrees C. The catalytic activity sequence with respect to the air pretreatment temperatures was 400 degrees C>200 degrees C>parent>600 degrees C. The TPR results indicated that the catalytic activity was correlated with both the oxygen mobility and the amount of available oxygen on the catalyst. In contrast, the hydrogen pretreatment had a negative effect on the catalytic activity, and toluene conversion decreased with increasing pretreatment temperatures (200-600 degrees C). The XRD and TPR results confirmed the formation of metallic iron which had a negative effect on the catalytic activity with increasing pretreatment temperature. The acid pretreatment improved the catalytic activity of the spent catalyst. The catalytic activity sequence with respect to different acids pretreatment was found to be oxalic acid>citric acid>acetic acid>or=nitric acid>parent. The TPR results of acid pretreated samples showed an increased amount of available oxygen which gave a positive effect on the catalytic activity. Accordingly, air or acid pretreatments were more promising methods of regenerating the iron-based spent catalyst. In particular, the oxalic acid pretreatment was found to be most effective in the formation of FeC2O4 species which contributed highly to the

  4. Influence of physicochemical treatments on iron-based spent catalyst for catalytic oxidation of toluene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The catalytic oxidation of toluene was studied over an iron-based spent and regenerated catalysts. Air, hydrogen, or four different acid solutions (oxalic acid (C2H2O4), citric acid (C6H8O7), acetic acid (CH3COOH), and nitric acid (HNO3)) were employed to regenerate the spent catalyst. The properties of pretreated spent catalyst were characterized by the Brunauer Emmett Teller (BET), inductively coupled plasma (ICP), temperature programmed reduction (TPR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. The air pretreatment significantly enhanced the catalytic activity of the spent catalyst in the pretreatment temperature range of 200-400 deg. C, but its catalytic activity diminished at the pretreatment temperature of 600 deg. C. The catalytic activity sequence with respect to the air pretreatment temperatures was 400 deg. C > 200 deg. C > parent > 600 deg. C. The TPR results indicated that the catalytic activity was correlated with both the oxygen mobility and the amount of available oxygen on the catalyst. In contrast, the hydrogen pretreatment had a negative effect on the catalytic activity, and toluene conversion decreased with increasing pretreatment temperatures (200-600 deg. C). The XRD and TPR results confirmed the formation of metallic iron which had a negative effect on the catalytic activity with increasing pretreatment temperature. The acid pretreatment improved the catalytic activity of the spent catalyst. The catalytic activity sequence with respect to different acids pretreatment was found to be oxalic acid > citric acid > acetic acid ≥ nitric acid > parent. The TPR results of acid pretreated samples showed an increased amount of available oxygen which gave a positive effect on the catalytic activity. Accordingly, air or acid pretreatments were more promising methods of regenerating the iron-based spent catalyst. In particular, the oxalic acid pretreatment was found to be most effective in the formation of FeC2O4 species which contributed highly to the

  5. Catalytic pyrolysis of olive mill wastewater sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellaoui, Hamza

    From 2008 to 2013, an average of 2,821.4 kilotons/year of olive oil were produced around the world. The waste product of the olive mill industry consists of solid residue (pomace) and wastewater (OMW). Annually, around 30 million m3 of OMW are produced in the Mediterranean area, 700,000 m3 year?1 in Tunisia alone. OMW is an aqueous effluent characterized by an offensive smell and high organic matter content, including high molecular weight phenolic compounds and long-chain fatty acids. These compounds are highly toxic to micro-organisms and plants, which makes the OMW a serious threat to the environment if not managed properly. The OMW is disposed of in open air evaporation ponds. After evaporation of most of the water, OMWS is left in the bottom of the ponds. In this thesis, the effort has been made to evaluate the catalytic pyrolysis process as a technology to valorize the OMWS. The first section of this research showed that 41.12 wt. % of the OMWS is mostly lipids, which are a good source of energy. The second section proved that catalytic pyrolysis of the OMWS over red mud and HZSM-5 can produce green diesel, and 450 °C is the optimal reaction temperature to maximize the organic yields. The last section revealed that the HSF was behind the good fuel-like properties of the OMWS catalytic oils, whereas the SR hindered the bio-oil yields and quality.

  6. Catalytic reforming process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Absil, R.P.; Huss, A. Jr.; McHale, W.D.; Partridge, R.D.

    1989-06-13

    This patent describes a catalytic reforming process which comprises contacting a naphtha range feed with a low acidity extrudate comprising an intermediate and/or a large pore acidic zeolite bound with a low acidity refractory oxide under reforming conditions to provide a reaction product of increased aromatic content, the extrudate having been prepared with at least an extrusion-facilitating amount of a low acidity refractory oxide in colloidal form and containing at least one metal species selected from the platinum group metals.

  7. Low-temperature gas from marine shales: wet gas to dry gas over experimental time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarvie Daniel M

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Marine shales exhibit unusual behavior at low temperatures under anoxic gas flow. They generate catalytic gas 300° below thermal cracking temperatures, discontinuously in aperiodic episodes, and lose these properties on exposure to trace amounts of oxygen. Here we report a surprising reversal in hydrocarbon generation. Heavy hydrocarbons are formed before light hydrocarbons resulting in wet gas at the onset of generation grading to dryer gas over time. The effect is moderate under gas flow and substantial in closed reactions. In sequential closed reactions at 100°C, gas from a Cretaceous Mowry shale progresses from predominately heavy hydrocarbons (66% C5, 2% C1 to predominantly light hydrocarbons (56% C1, 8% C5, the opposite of that expected from desorption of preexisting hydrocarbons. Differences in catalyst substrate composition explain these dynamics. Gas flow should carry heavier hydrocarbons to catalytic sites, in contrast to static conditions where catalytic sites are limited to in-place hydrocarbons. In-place hydrocarbons and their products should become lighter with conversion thus generating lighter hydrocarbon over time, consistent with our experimental results. We recognize the similarities between low-temperature gas generation reported here and the natural progression of wet gas to dry gas over geologic time. There is now substantial evidence for natural catalytic activity in source rocks. Natural gas at thermodynamic equilibrium and the results reported here add to that evidence. Natural catalysis provides a plausible and unique explanation for the origin and evolution of gas in sedimentary basins.

  8. Wet deposition of poly- and perfluorinated compounds in Northern Germany

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreyer, Annekatrin, E-mail: annekatrin.dreyer@gkss.d [GKSS Research Centre, Institute for Coastal Research, Max Planck Str. 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Matthias, Volker; Weinberg, Ingo; Ebinghaus, Ralf [GKSS Research Centre, Institute for Coastal Research, Max Planck Str. 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany)

    2010-05-15

    Twenty precipitation samples were taken concurrently with air samples at a northern German monitoring site over a period of 7 months in 2007 and 2008. Thirty four poly- and perfluorinated compounds (PFC) were determined in rain water samples by solid phase extraction and HPLC-MS/MS analysis. Seventeen compounds were detected in rain water with SIGMAPFC concentrations ranging from 1.6 ng L{sup -1} to 48.6 ng L{sup -1}. Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorobutanate (PFBA) were the compounds that were usually observed in highest concentrations. Calculated SIGMAPFC deposition rates were between 2 and 91 ng m{sup -2} d{sup -1}. These findings indicate that particle phase PFC are deposited from the atmosphere by precipitation. A relationship between PFC wet deposition and air concentration may be established via precipitation amounts. Trajectory analysis revealed that PFC concentration and deposition estimates in precipitation can only be explained if a detailed air mass history is considered. - Information on air mass history, meteorological conditions, and distribution of PFC sources is necessary to understand and estimate PFC concentrations and wet deposition.

  9. Coal combustion by wet oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettinger, J.A.; Lamparter, R.A.; McDowell, D.C.

    1980-11-15

    The combustion of coal by wet oxidation was studied by the Center for Waste Management Programs, of Michigan Technological University. In wet oxidation a combustible material, such as coal, is reacted with oxygen in the presence of liquid water. The reaction is typically carried out in the range of 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 353/sup 0/C (650/sup 0/F) with sufficient pressure to maintain the water present in the liquid state, and provide the partial pressure of oxygen in the gas phase necessary to carry out the reaction. Experimental studies to explore the key reaction parameters of temperature, time, oxidant, catalyst, coal type, and mesh size were conducted by running batch tests in a one-gallon stirred autoclave. The factors exhibiting the greatest effect on the extent of reaction were temperature and residence time. The effect of temperature was studied from 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) with a residence time from 600 to 3600 seconds. From this data, the reaction activation energy of 2.7 x 10/sup 4/ calories per mole was determined for a high-volatile-A-Bituminous type coal. The reaction rate constant may be determined at any temperature from the activation energy using the Arrhenius equation. Additional data were generated on the effect of mesh size and different coal types. A sample of peat was also tested. Two catalysts were evaluated, and their effects on reaction rate presented in the report. In addition to the high temperature combustion, low temperature desulfurization is discussed. Desulfurization can improve low grade coal to be used in conventional combustion methods. It was found that 90% of the sulfur can be removed from the coal by wet oxidation with the carbon untouched. Further desulfurization studies are indicated.

  10. Full scale calcium bromide injection with subsequent mercury oxidation and removal within wet flue gas desulphurization system: Experience at a 700 MW coal-fired power facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Mark Simpson

    The Environmental Protection Agency promulgated the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards rule, which requires that existing power plants reduce mercury emissions to meet an emission rate of 1.2 lb/TBtu on a 30-day rolling average and that new plants meet a 0.0002 lb/GWHr emission rate. This translates to mercury removals greater than 90% for existing units and greater than 99% for new units. Current state-of-the-art technology for the control of mercury emissions uses activated carbon injected upstream of a fabric filter, a costly proposition. For example, a fabric filter, if not already available, would require a 200M capital investment for a 700 MW size unit. A lower-cost option involves the injection of activated carbon into an existing cold-side electrostatic precipitator. Both options would incur the cost of activated carbon, upwards of 3M per year. The combination of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) reactors and wet flue gas desulphurization (wet FGD) systems have demonstrated the ability to substantially reduce mercury emissions, especially at units that burn coals containing sufficient halogens. Halogens are necessary for transforming elemental mercury to oxidized mercury, which is water-soluble. Plants burning halogen-deficient coals such as Power River Basin (PRB) coals currently have no alternative but to install activated carbon-based approaches to control mercury emissions. This research consisted of investigating calcium bromide addition onto PRB coal as a method of increasing flue gas halogen concentration. The treated coal was combusted in a 700 MW boiler and the subsequent treated flue gas was introduced into a wet FGD. Short-term parametric and an 83-day longer-term tests were completed to determine the ability of calcium bromine to oxidize mercury and to study the removal of the mercury in a wet FGD. The research goal was to show that calcium bromine addition to PRB coal was a viable approach for meeting the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards rule

  11. Precursor films in wetting phenomena

    OpenAIRE

    Popescu, M. N.; Oshanin, G.; Dietrich, S.; Cazabat, A. -M.

    2012-01-01

    The spontaneous spreading of non-volatile liquid droplets on solid substrates poses a classic problem in the context of wetting phenomena. It is well known that the spreading of a macroscopic droplet is in many cases accompanied by a thin film of macroscopic lateral extent, the so-called precursor film, which emanates from the three-phase contact line region and spreads ahead of the latter with a much higher speed. Such films have been usually associated with liquid-on-solid systems, but in t...

  12. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  13. The use of catalyst to enhance the wet oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maugans, C; Kumfer, B

    2007-01-01

    Wet oxidation tests were performed on two pure compound streams: acetic acid and ammonia; and on two wastewater streams: acrylic acid wastewater and sulphide laden spent caustic. Test results showed that Mn/Ce and Pt/TiO2 were effective catalysts that greatly enhanced acetic acid, ammonia and acrylic acid wastewater destruction. However, the Mn/Ce catalyst performance appears to be inhibited by concentrated salts dissolved in solution. This could limit the applicability of this catalyst for the treatment of brackish wastewaters. Zr, Ce and Ce nanoparticles were also shown to exhibit some catalytic activity, however not to the extent of the Mn/Ce and the Pt/TiO2. PMID:17674847

  14. Two-Phase Flow Simulation of Heat Exchanger of Wet Enthalpy Recycling Energy-Saving Fresh Air Condition%回收湿焓的新风换气节能空调换热部件的两相流模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱冬生; 区志江; 蒋翔

    2012-01-01

    This paper focus on wet enthalpy recycling energy-saving fresh air condition.Established a computational model of corrugated plate evaporative condenser base on the volume of fluid(VOF) method.Using this model,this paper simulated and analyzed the influence factors of the plate heat transfer performance,such as heat flux density,water inlet temperature,water spray,gas inlet velocity and plate spacing.Results show that:the effects of heat flux on the wall temperature and gas-liquid interface temperature is linear;in the same heat flux,the interface temperature be reduced accordingly with the spray density increases;increasing gas flow rate or reducing the plate space can play the role of enhancing heat transfer.%本文着眼于一种回收湿焓的新风换气节能空调,基于Volume of Fluid算法,建立其核心换热部件波纹板换热器板外两相流传热传质的计算模型,并利用该模型模拟分析了壁面热流密度、喷淋水入口温度、喷淋水量、气相进口速度及板间距等因素对板外传热性能的影响。结果表明:热流密度对壁面温度、两相界面温度的影响是线性的;壁面热流密度增大、冷却水喷淋密度减小、气相进口速度提高、板间距减小对传热传质效果具有强化作用。

  15. Evaluation of mercury speciation and removal through air pollution control devices of a 190 MW boiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chengli; Cao, Yan; Dong, Zhongbing; Cheng, Chinmin; Li, Hanxu; Pan, Weiping

    2010-01-01

    Air pollution control devices (APCDs) are installed at coal-fired power plants for air pollutant regulation. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) and wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems have the co-benefits of air pollutant and mercury removal. Configuration and operational conditions of APCDs and mercury speciation affect mercury removal efficiently at coal-fired utilities. The Ontario Hydro Method (OHM) recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was used to determine mercury speciation simultaneously at five sampling locations through SCR-ESP-FGD at a 190 MW unit. Chlorine in coal had been suggested as a factor affecting the mercury speciation in flue gas; and low-chlorine coal was purported to produce less oxidized mercury (Hg2+) and more elemental mercury (Hg0) at the SCR inlet compared to higher chlorine coal. SCR could oxidize elemental mercury into oxidized mercury when SCR was in service, and oxidation efficiency reached 71.0%. Therefore, oxidized mercury removal efficiency was enhanced through a wet FGD system. In the non-ozone season, about 89.5%-96.8% of oxidized mercury was controlled, but only 54.9%-68.8% of the total mercury was captured through wet FGD. Oxidized mercury removal efficiency was 95.9%-98.0%, and there was a big difference in the total mercury removal efficiencies from 78.0% to 90.2% in the ozone season. Mercury mass balance was evaluated to validate reliability of OHM testing data, and the ratio of mercury input in the coal to mercury output at the stack was from 0.84 to 1.08. PMID:20397418

  16. Gold-Copper Nanoparticles: Nanostructural Evolution and Bifunctional Catalytic Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Jun; Shan, Shiyao; Yang, Lefu; Mott, Derrick; Malis, Oana; Petkov, Valeri; Cai, Fan; Ng, Mei; Luo, Jin; Chen, Bing H.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2012-12-12

    Understanding of the atomic-scale structure is essential for exploiting the unique catalytic properties of any nanoalloy catalyst. This report describes novel findings of an investigation of the nanoscale alloying of gold-copper (AuCu) nanoparticles and its impact on the surface catalytic functions. Two pathways have been explored for the formation of AuCu nanoparticles of different compositons, including wet chemical synthesis from mixed Au- and Cu-precursor molecules, and nanoscale alloying via an evolution of mixed Au- and Cu-precursor nanoparticles near the nanoscale melting temperatures. For the evolution of mixed precursor nanoparticles, synchrotron x-ray based in-situ real time XRD was used to monitor the structural changes, revealing nanoscale alloying and reshaping towards an fcc-type nanoalloy (particle or cube) via a partial melting–resolidification mechanism. The nanoalloys supported on carbon or silica were characterized by in-situ high-energy XRD/PDFs, revealing an intriguing lattice "expanding-shrinking" phenomenon depending on whether the catalyst is thermochemically processed under oxidative or reductive atmosphere. This type of controllable structural changes is found to play an important role in determining the catalytic activity of the catalysts for carbon monoxide oxidation reaction. The tunable catalytic activities of the nanoalloys under thermochemically oxidative and reductive atmospheres are also discussed in terms of the bifunctional sites and the surface oxygenated metal species for carbon monoxide and oxygen activation.

  17. Microwave assisted wet oxidation of p-nitrophenol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BO; Longli; CHEN; Shuo; QUAN; Xie; LIU; Xitao; ZHAO; Huimin

    2005-01-01

    Aqueous solution of p-nitrophenol (PNP) was treated continuously by microwave assisted wet oxidation while flowing through a granular activated carbon (GAC) fixed bed. PNP was pre-adsorbed onto GAC prior to being put into the reactor so as to prevent PNP adsorption on GAC during microwave irradiation. PNP solutions with different initial concentration (218.6 mg/L and 1200 mg/L) were treated under conditions of microwave power 500 W, liquid flow 6.4 mL/min and air flow 40 mL/min or 60 mL/min. The results indicated that the removal of PNP was higher than 90% and more than 65% PNP was mineralized. Phenol, nitrobenzene, hydroquinone and benzoquinone occurred as course products during the operation process, which were degraded further. The biodegradability of the outflow was improved greatly by microwave assisted wet oxidation.

  18. Wetting on micro-structured surfaces: modelling and optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalli, Andrea

    -patterns, and suggests that there is a balance between optimal wetting properties and mechanical robustness of the microposts. We subsequently analyse liquid spreading on surfaces patterned with slanted microposts. Such a geometry induces unidirectional liquid spreading, as observed in several recent......-off angles. Such behaviour arises when drops are suspended on a micron or submicron texture, so that their contact with the substrate is minute. This suspended state (known as Cassie-Baxter state) is however prone to failure if the liquid-air interface is perturbed, a common situation in real life...... experiments. Our numerical analysis shows how such spreading can be tuned and controlled in terms of lattice properties of the texture and wetting properties of the materials. We conclude by analysing the phenomenon of self-propelled ejection of coalescing droplets on superhydrophobic surfaces. This...

  19. Transformations in oil shale ash at wet deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estonian oil shale ash contains chemically active compounds which would undergo different spontaneous transformations in the atmosphere of air. For explaining these processes the system ash-water-air was studied storing moisture samples of ash in laboratory in open-air as well as hermetic conditions. The samples of dry ash formed at pulverized combustion of oil shale at the Baltic Power Plant, and samples obtained from ash storing plateau from different depth of different boreholes were under investigation. Storing conditions as well as the properties of initial samples have a great influence upon the processes taking place at storing of ashes. The results obtained could be used to explain and control the processes taking place at storing of ashes under atmospheric (wet) conditions

  20. Elucidating the mysteries of wetting.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Edmund Blackburn, III (,; ); Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Grillet, Anne Mary; Sackinger, Philip A.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Emerson, John Allen; Ash, Benjamin Jesse; Heine, David R.; Brooks, Carlton, F.; Gorby, Allen D.

    2005-11-01

    Nearly every manufacturing and many technologies central to Sandia's business involve physical processes controlled by interfacial wetting. Interfacial forces, e.g. conjoining/disjoining pressure, electrostatics, and capillary condensation, are ubiquitous and can surpass and even dominate bulk inertial or viscous effects on a continuum level. Moreover, the statics and dynamics of three-phase contact lines exhibit a wide range of complex behavior, such as contact angle hysteresis due to surface roughness, surface reaction, or compositional heterogeneities. These thermodynamically and kinetically driven interactions are essential to the development of new materials and processes. A detailed understanding was developed for the factors controlling wettability in multicomponent systems from computational modeling tools, and experimental diagnostics for systems, and processes dominated by interfacial effects. Wettability probed by dynamic advancing and receding contact angle measurements, ellipsometry, and direct determination of the capillary and disjoining forces. Molecular scale experiments determined the relationships between the fundamental interactions between molecular species and with the substrate. Atomistic simulations studied the equilibrium concentration profiles near the solid and vapor interfaces and tested the basic assumptions used in the continuum approaches. These simulations provide guidance in developing constitutive equations, which more accurately take into account the effects of surface induced phase separation and concentration gradients near the three-phase contact line. The development of these accurate models for dynamic multicomponent wetting allows improvement in science based engineering of manufacturing processes previously developed through costly trial and error by varying material formulation and geometry modification.

  1. Reactive wetting properties of TiO2 nanoparticles predicted by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Erik G.; Agosta, Lorenzo; Lyubartsev, Alexander P.

    2016-07-01

    Small-sized wet TiO2 nanoparticles have been investigated by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Chemical and physical adsorption of water on the TiO2-water interface was studied as a function of water content, ranging from dry nanoparticles to wet nanoparticles with monolayer coverage of water. The surface reactivity was shown to be a concave function of water content and driven by surface defects. The local coordination number at the defect was identified as the key factor to decide whether water adsorption proceeds through dissociation or physisorption on the surface. A consistent picture of TiO2 nanoparticle wetting at the microscopic level emerges, which corroborates existing experimental data and gives further insight into the molecular mechanisms behind nanoparticle wetting. These calculations will facilitate the engineering of metal oxide nanoparticles with a controlled catalytic water activity.Small-sized wet TiO2 nanoparticles have been investigated by ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. Chemical and physical adsorption of water on the TiO2-water interface was studied as a function of water content, ranging from dry nanoparticles to wet nanoparticles with monolayer coverage of water. The surface reactivity was shown to be a concave function of water content and driven by surface defects. The local coordination number at the defect was identified as the key factor to decide whether water adsorption proceeds through dissociation or physisorption on the surface. A consistent picture of TiO2 nanoparticle wetting at the microscopic level emerges, which corroborates existing experimental data and gives further insight into the molecular mechanisms behind nanoparticle wetting. These calculations will facilitate the engineering of metal oxide nanoparticles with a controlled catalytic water activity. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Simulation data on equilibration of energies and structures (root-mean-square-deviations and

  2. Evolution of random catalytic networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, S.M. [Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States); Reidys, C.M. [Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States)]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-06-01

    In this paper the authors investigate the evolution of populations of sequences on a random catalytic network. Sequences are mapped into structures, between which are catalytic interactions that determine their instantaneous fitness. The catalytic network is constructed as a random directed graph. They prove that at certain parameter values, the probability of some relevant subgraphs of this graph, for example cycles without outgoing edges, is maximized. Populations evolving under point mutations realize a comparatively small induced subgraph of the complete catalytic network. They present results which show that populations reliably discover and persist on directed cycles in the catalytic graph, though these may be lost because of stochastic effects, and study the effect of population size on this behavior.

  3. Bifunctional catalytic electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisar, Alan (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Clarke, Eric (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to an oxygen electrode for a unitized regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell and the unitized regenerative fuel cell having the oxygen electrode. The oxygen electrode contains components electrocatalytically active for the evolution of oxygen from water and the reduction of oxygen to water, and has a structure that supports the flow of both water and gases between the catalytically active surface and a flow field or electrode chamber for bulk flow of the fluids. The electrode has an electrocatalyst layer and a diffusion backing layer interspersed with hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. The diffusion backing layer consists of a metal core having gas diffusion structures bonded to the metal core.

  4. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  5. Mechanisms of wet oxidation by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A research programme is currently under way at BNL and MEL to investigate the possible use of Hydrogen Peroxide with metal ion catalysts as a wet oxidation treatment system for CEGB organic radioactive wastes. The published literature relating to the kinetics and mechanism of oxidation and decomposition reactions of hydrogen peroxide is reviewed and the links with practical waste management by wet oxidation are examined. Alternative wet oxidation systems are described and the similarities to the CEGB research effort are noted. (author)

  6. Wetting on Lines and Lattices of Cylinders

    OpenAIRE

    Osborn, W. R.; Yeomans, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses wetting and capillary condensation transitions on a line and a rectangular array of cylinders using an interface potential formalism. For a line of cylinders, there is a capillary condensation transition followed by complete wetting if the cylinders are sufficiently close together. Both transitions disappear as the cylinder separation is increased. The dependence of the wetting phase diagram of a rectangular array of cylinders is discussed as a function of the chemical po...

  7. Unsteady catalytic processes and sorption-catalytic technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalytic processes that occur under conditions of the targeted unsteady state of the catalyst are considered. The highest efficiency of catalytic processes was found to be ensured by a controlled combination of thermal non-stationarity and unsteady composition of the catalyst surface. The processes based on this principle are analysed, in particular, catalytic selective reduction of nitrogen oxides, deep oxidation of volatile organic impurities, production of sulfur by the Claus process and by hydrogen sulfide decomposition, oxidation of sulfur dioxide, methane steam reforming and anaerobic combustion, selective oxidation of hydrocarbons, etc.

  8. Carbon nanotube fiber spun from wetted ribbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Yuntian T; Arendt, Paul; Zhang, Xiefei; Li, Qingwen; Fu, Lei; Zheng, Lianxi

    2014-04-29

    A fiber of carbon nanotubes was prepared by a wet-spinning method involving drawing carbon nanotubes away from a substantially aligned, supported array of carbon nanotubes to form a ribbon, wetting the ribbon with a liquid, and spinning a fiber from the wetted ribbon. The liquid can be a polymer solution and after forming the fiber, the polymer can be cured. The resulting fiber has a higher tensile strength and higher conductivity compared to dry-spun fibers and to wet-spun fibers prepared by other methods.

  9. A mesoscopic model for (de)wetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merabia, S; Pagonabarraga, I

    2006-06-01

    We present a mesoscopic model for simulating the dynamics of a non-volatile liquid on a solid substrate. The wetting properties of the solid can be tuned from complete wetting to total non-wetting. This model opens the way to study the dynamics of drops and liquid thin films at mesoscopic length scales of the order of the nanometer. As particular applications, we analyze the kinetics of spreading of a liquid drop wetting a solid substrate and the dewetting of a liquid film on a hydrophobic substrate. In all these cases, very good agreement is found between simulations and theoretical predictions. PMID:16775662

  10. ZnO/MoO 3 mixed oxide nanotube: A highly efficient and stable catalyst for degradation of dye by air under room conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiguo; Wang, Xiaohong; Li, Sen; Wang, Yu

    2010-10-01

    As a continuation of our work to develop catalysts with high activity for catalytic air wet oxidation process under mild conditions, degradation of wastewater containing 0.3 g/L Safranin-T (ST) by air oxidation over ZnO/MoO 3 nanotube catalyst was studied. It was found the decolorization efficiency and the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal of ST reached above 98% and 95%, respectively, within 18 min at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. And the organic pollutants were totally mineralized to simple inorganic species such as HCO 3-, Cl - and NO 3-, while the total organic carbon (TOC) decreased 99.3%. The structure and morphology of the catalyst after ten cycling runs showed that the catalyst was stable under such operating condition and the leaching test showed negligible leaching effect. This ZnO/MoO 3 nanotube is proved to be an active and stable heterogeneous catalyst in CWAO of ST under extremely mild conditions.

  11. Catalytic production of biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theilgaard Madsen, A.

    2011-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the catalytic production of diesel from biomass, especially emphasising catalytic conversion of waste vegetable oils and fats. In chapter 1 an introduction to biofuels and a review on different catalytic methods for diesel production from biomass is given. Two of these methods have been used industrially for a number of years already, namely the transesterification (and esterification) of oils and fats with methanol to form fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), and the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of fats and oils to form straight-chain alkanes. Other possible routes to diesel include upgrading and deoxygenation of pyrolysis oils or aqueous sludge wastes, condensations and reductions of sugars in aqueous phase (aqueous-phase reforming, APR) for monofunctional hydrocarbons, and gasification of any type of biomass followed by Fischer-Tropsch-synthesis for alkane biofuels. These methods have not yet been industrialised, but may be more promising due to the larger abundance of their potential feedstocks, especially waste feedstocks. Chapter 2 deals with formation of FAME from waste fats and oils. A range of acidic catalysts were tested in a model fat mixture of methanol, lauric acid and trioctanoin. Sulphonic acid-functionalised ionic liquids showed extremely fast convertion of lauric acid to methyl laurate, and trioctanoate was converted to methyl octanoate within 24 h. A catalyst based on a sulphonated carbon-matrix made by pyrolysing (or carbonising) carbohydrates, so-called sulphonated pyrolysed sucrose (SPS), was optimised further. No systematic dependency on pyrolysis and sulphonation conditions could be obtained, however, with respect to esterification activity, but high activity was obtained in the model fat mixture. SPS impregnated on opel-cell Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and microporous SiO{sub 2} (ISPS) was much less active in the esterification than the original SPS powder due to low loading and thereby low number of strongly acidic sites on the

  12. 排气质量流量和过量空气系数对三效催化转换器动态特性的影响%Effect of Exhaust Mass Flow and Inlet Excess Air Ratio on Dynamic Characteristic of Three-Way Catalytic Converter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何玲; 于秀敏; 李国良; 李想; 杜婷婷; 许艳军

    2011-01-01

    在发动机瞬态工况下,试验研究了排气质量流量、过量空气系数的阶跃幅值和周期对三效催化转换器动态特性的影响规律.试验结果表明,排气质量流量、过量空气系数的阶跃幅值和周期对三效催化转换器活性层中铈(Ce)表面氧气吸附和脱附存储能力(OSC)、排放影响显著.稀混合气向浓混合气阶跃后,排气质量流量增加,出口过量空气系数在理论混合气的时间并不线性增加,三效催化转换器出口排放降低,排气流量增加到一定值时,排放性能恶化.由浓混合气向稀混合气阶跃后,催化转换器出口的过量空气系数在理论混合气的时间随排气质量流量、过量空气系数的幅值线性增加.老化三效催化转换器的氧存储力减弱,是车载自动诊断系统(OBD)检测催化转换器是否老化的依据.%Dynamic response of three-way catalytic converter with different exhaust mass flows, inlet amplitude and period was analyzed experimentally under transient conditions. Results show that engine emissions and oxygen storage capacity (OSC)of three-way catalytic converter with Ceria (Ce)catalyst on the washcoat is affected by exhaust mass flow, amplitude and period of inlet excess air ratio. When ex- haust mass flow increases, emissions decrease at the beginning and turn deteriorated at some mass flow, and duration of outlet excess air ratio at stoichiometry increases non-linearly after the lean-rich step. Dura- tion of outlet excess air ratio at stoichiometry increases linearly as increasing exhaust mass flow and outlet excess air ratio amplitude after the rich-lean step. Oxygen storage capacity of Ceria of aged three-way cata- lytic converter is low and the on-board diagnostics (OBD) can diagnose the condition of three-way cata- lytic converter.

  13. Catalytic combustion over high temperature stable metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, M. [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1996-12-31

    This thesis presents a study of the catalytic effects of two interesting high temperature stable metal oxides - magnesium oxide and manganese substituted barium hexa-aluminate (BMA) - both of which can be used in the development of new monolithic catalysts for such applications. In the first part of the thesis, the development of catalytic combustion for gas turbine applications is reviewed, with special attention to alternative fuels such as low-BTU gas, e.g. produced in an air blown gasifier. When catalytic combustion is applied for such a fuel, the primary advantage is the possibility of decreasing the conversion of fuel nitrogen to NO{sub x}, and achieving flame stability. In the experimental work, MgO was shown to have a significant activity for the catalytic combustion of methane, lowering the temperature needed to achieve 10 percent conversion by 270 deg C compared with homogeneous combustion.The reaction kinetics for methane combustion over MgO was also studied. It was shown that the heterogeneous catalytic reactions were dominant but that the catalytically initiated homogeneous gas phase reactions were also important, specially at high temperatures. MgO and BMA were compared. The latter showed a higher catalytic activity, even when the differences in activity decreased with increasing calcination temperature. For BMA, CO{sub 2} was the only product detected, but for MgO significant amounts of CO and C{sub 2}-hydrocarbons were formed. BMA needed a much lower temperature to achieve total conversion of other fuels, e.g. CO and hydrogen, compared to the temperature for total conversion of methane. This shows that BMA-like catalysts are interesting for combustion of fuel mixtures with high CO and H{sub 2} content, e.g. gas produced from gasification of biomass. 74 refs

  14. Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2015-05-31

    The term “hydrothermal” used here refers to the processing of biomass in water slurries at elevated temperature and pressure to facilitate the chemical conversion of the organic structures in biomass into useful fuels. The process is meant to provide a means for treating wet biomass materials without drying and to access ionic reaction conditions by maintaining a liquid water processing medium. Typical hydrothermal processing conditions are 523-647K of temperature and operating pressures from 4-22 MPa of pressure. The temperature is sufficient to initiate pyrolytic mechanisms in the biopolymers while the pressure is sufficient to maintain a liquid water processing phase. Hydrothermal gasification is accomplished at the upper end of the process temperature range. It can be considered an extension of the hydrothermal liquefaction mechanisms that begin at the lowest hydrothermal conditions with subsequent decomposition of biopolymer fragments formed in liquefaction to smaller molecules and eventually to gas. Typically, hydrothermal gasification requires an active catalyst to accomplish reasonable rates of gas formation from biomass.

  15. Fast and Slow Wetting Dynamics on nanostructured surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandyala, Dhiraj; Rahmani, Amir; Cubaud, Thomas; Colosqui, Carlos

    2015-11-01

    This talk will present force-displacement and spontaneous drop spreading measurements on diverse nanostructured surfaces (e.g., mesoporous titania thin films, nanoscale pillared structures, on silica or glass substrates). Experimental measurements are performed for water-air and water-oil systems. The dynamics of wetting observed in these experiments can present remarkable crossovers from fast to slow or arrested dynamics. The emergence of a slow wetting regime is attributed to a multiplicity of metastable equilibrium states induced by nanoscale surface features. The crossover point can be dramatically advanced or delayed by adjusting specific physical parameters (e.g., viscosity of the wetting phases) and geometric properties of the surface nanostructure (e.g., nanopore/pillar radius and separation). Controlling the crossover point to arrested dynamics can effectively modify the degree of contact angle hysteresis and magnitude of liquid adhesion forces observed on surfaces of different materials. This work is supported by a SEED Award from The Office of Brookhaven National Laboratory Affairs at Stony Brook University.

  16. Characteristics of wet work in nurses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungbauer, FHW; Steenstra, FB; Groothoff, JW; Coenraads, PJ

    2005-01-01

    Background objectives: Nursing is known for its high prevalence of hand dermatitis, mainly caused by the intense exposure to wet work in nursing activities. We aimed to study the characteristics of wet work exposure in nursing. Method: Trained observers monitored the duration and frequency of differ

  17. Anomalous wetting of helium on cesium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report studies of the anomalous wetting of a cesium substrate by a liquid helium film by means of the technique of third sound. A hysteretic pre-wetting transition is observed as a function of the amount of helium in the experimental cell. 10 refs., 2 figs

  18. Immigration process in catalytic medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The longtime behavior of the immigration process associated with a catalytic super-Brownian motion is studied. A large number law is proved in dimension d≤3 and a central limit theorem is proved for dimension d=3.

  19. Structured materials for catalytic and sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokenek, Selma

    The optical and chemical properties of the materials used in catalytic and sensing applications directly determine the characteristics of the resultant catalyst or sensor. It is well known that a catalyst needs to have high activity, selectivity, and stability to be viable in an industrial setting. The hydrogenation activity of palladium catalysts is known to be excellent, but the industrial applications are limited by the cost of obtaining catalyst in amounts large enough to make their use economical. As a result, alloying palladium with a cheaper, more widely available metal while maintaining the high catalytic activity seen in monometallic catalysts is, therefore, an attractive option. Similarly, the optical properties of nanoscale materials used for sensing must be attuned to their application. By adjusting the shape and composition of nanoparticles used in such applications, very fine changes can be made to the frequency of light that they absorb most efficiently. The design, synthesis, and characterization of (i) size controlled monometallic palladium nanoparticles for catalytic applications, (ii) nickel-palladium bimetallic nanoparticles and (iii) silver-palladium nanoparticles with applications in drug detection and biosensing through surface plasmon resonance, respectively, will be discussed. The composition, size, and shape of the nanoparticles formed were controlled through the use of wet chemistry techniques. After synthesis, the nanoparticles were analyzed using physical and chemical characterization techniques such as X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy- Energy-Dispersive Spectrometry (STEM-EDX). The Pd and Ni-Pd nanoparticles were then supported on silica for catalytic testing using mass spectrometry. The optical properties of the Ag-Pd nanoparticles in suspension were further investigated using ultraviolet-visible spectrometry (UV-Vis). Monometallic palladium particles have

  20. Long term wet spent nuclear fuel storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting showed that there is continuing confidence in the use of wet storage for spent nuclear fuel and that long-term wet storage of fuel clad in zirconium alloys can be readily achieved. The importance of maintaining good water chemistry has been identified. The long-term wet storage behaviour of sensitized stainless steel clad fuel involves, as yet, some uncertainties. However, great reliance will be placed on long-term wet storage of spent fuel into the future. The following topics were treated to some extent: Oxidation of the external surface of fuel clad, rod consolidation, radiation protection, optimum methods of treating spent fuel storage water, physical radiation effects, and the behaviour of spent fuel assemblies of long-term wet storage conditions. A number of papers on national experience are included

  1. Catalytic DNA with phosphatase activity

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrasekar, Jagadeeswaran; Silverman, Scott K.

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic DNA sequences (deoxyribozymes, DNA enzymes, or DNAzymes) have been identified by in vitro selection for various catalytic activities. Expanding the limits of DNA catalysis is an important fundamental objective and may facilitate practical utility of catalysts that can be obtained from entirely unbiased (random) sequence populations. In this study, we show that DNA can catalyze Zn2+-dependent phosphomonoester hydrolysis of tyrosine and serine side chains (i.e., exhibit phosphatase ac...

  2. Toluene removal by oxidation reaction in spray wet scrubber: experimental, modeling and optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Roumporn Nikom; Juntima Chungsiriporn; Charun Bunyakan

    2006-01-01

    Toluene, an important volatile organic compound (VOC), is used in many kinds of industries, such as painting, printing, coating, and petrochemical industries. The emission of toluene causes serious air pollution, odor problem, flammability problem and affects human health. This paper proposes the removal of toluene from waste air using a spray wet scrubber combining the absorption and oxidation reaction. Aqueous sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) solution was used as the scrubbing liquid in the syst...

  3. Precursor films in wetting phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spontaneous spreading of non-volatile liquid droplets on solid substrates poses a classic problem in the context of wetting phenomena. It is well known that the spreading of a macroscopic droplet is in many cases accompanied by a thin film of macroscopic lateral extent, the so-called precursor film, which emanates from the three-phase contact line region and spreads ahead of the latter with a much higher speed. Such films have been usually associated with liquid-on-solid systems, but in the last decade similar films have been reported to occur in solid-on-solid systems. While the situations in which the thickness of such films is of mesoscopic size are fairly well understood, an intriguing and yet to be fully understood aspect is the spreading of microscopic, i.e. molecularly thin, films. Here we review the available experimental observations of such films in various liquid-on-solid and solid-on-solid systems, as well as the corresponding theoretical models and studies aimed at understanding their formation and spreading dynamics. Recent developments and perspectives for future research are discussed. (topical review)

  4. Precursor films in wetting phenomena.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, M N; Oshanin, G; Dietrich, S; Cazabat, A-M

    2012-06-20

    The spontaneous spreading of non-volatile liquid droplets on solid substrates poses a classic problem in the context of wetting phenomena. It is well known that the spreading of a macroscopic droplet is in many cases accompanied by a thin film of macroscopic lateral extent, the so-called precursor film, which emanates from the three-phase contact line region and spreads ahead of the latter with a much higher speed. Such films have been usually associated with liquid-on-solid systems, but in the last decade similar films have been reported to occur in solid-on-solid systems. While the situations in which the thickness of such films is of mesoscopic size are fairly well understood, an intriguing and yet to be fully understood aspect is the spreading of microscopic, i.e. molecularly thin, films. Here we review the available experimental observations of such films in various liquid-on-solid and solid-on-solid systems, as well as the corresponding theoretical models and studies aimed at understanding their formation and spreading dynamics. Recent developments and perspectives for future research are discussed. PMID:22627067

  5. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H2. In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al2O3. The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H2, CH4, CO, CO2. The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H2O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%

  6. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan, Monica, E-mail: monica.dan@itim-cj.ro; Mihet, Maria, E-mail: maria.mihet@itim-cj.ro; Lazar, Mihaela D., E-mail: diana.lazar@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 67-103 Donat Street, 400293 Cluj Napoca (Romania)

    2015-12-23

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H{sub 2}. In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}. The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H{sub 2}O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%.

  7. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Monica; Mihet, Maria; Lazar, Mihaela D.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H2. In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al2O3. The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H2, CH4, CO, CO2. The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H2O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%.

  8. Catalytic combustion of actual low and medium heating value gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulzan, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    Catalytic combustion of both low and medium heating value gases using actual coal derived gases obtained from operating gasifiers was demonstrated. A fixed bed gasifier with a complete product gas cleanup system was operated in an air blown mode to produce low heating value gas. A fluidized bed gasifier with a water quench product gas cleanup system was operated in both an air enriched and an oxygen blown mode to produce low and medium, heating value gas. Noble metal catalytic reactors were evaluated in 12 cm flow diameter test rigs on both low and medium heating value gases. Combustion efficiencies greater than 99.5% were obtained with all coal derived gaseous fuels. The NOx emissions ranged from 0.2 to 4 g NO2 kg fuel.

  9. Surface Modifications in Adhesion and Wetting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longley, Jonathan

    Advances in surface modification are changing the world. Changing surface properties of bulk materials with nanometer scale coatings enables inventions ranging from the familiar non-stick frying pan to advanced composite aircraft. Nanometer or monolayer coatings used to modify a surface affect the macro-scale properties of a system; for example, composite adhesive joints between the fuselage and internal frame of Boeing's 787 Dreamliner play a vital role in the structural stability of the aircraft. This dissertation focuses on a collection of surface modification techniques that are used in the areas of adhesion and wetting. Adhesive joints are rapidly replacing the familiar bolt and rivet assemblies used by the aerospace and automotive industries. This transition is fueled by the incorporation of composite materials into aircraft and high performance road vehicles. Adhesive joints have several advantages over the traditional rivet, including, significant weight reduction and efficient stress transfer between bonded materials. As fuel costs continue to rise, the weight reduction is accelerating this transition. Traditional surface pretreatments designed to improve the adhesion of polymeric materials to metallic surfaces are extremely toxic. Replacement adhesive technologies must be compatible with the environment without sacrificing adhesive performance. Silane-coupling agents have emerged as ideal surface modifications for improving composite joint strength. As these coatings are generally applied as very thin layers (method to surface vibration for moving drops in microfluidic devices. The final surface modification considered is the application of a thin layer of rubber to a rigid surface. While this technique has many practical uses, such as easy release coatings in marine environments, it is applied herein to enable spontaneous healing between a rubber surface and a glass cover slip. Study of the diffusion controlled healing of a blister can be made by

  10. 湿式氧化-磷酸盐固定化组合工艺处理磷霉素制药废水及其资源化%Fosfomycin pharmaceutical wastewater treatment and phosphorus recovery using hybrid wet air oxidation-phosphate immobilization process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱光磊; 宋永会; 曾萍; 肖书虎; 段亮; 彭剑峰; 袁鹏

    2011-01-01

    采用湿式氧化-磷酸盐固定化组合工艺处理COD为72750mg·L-1、总有机磷(TOP)为8225 mg·L-1的磷霉素制药废水并对废水中磷进行资源化回收.首先,采用湿式氧化工艺,利用分子氧作为氧化剂,将废水中有机磷转化成无机磷酸盐,分别考察了反应温度、氧分压和废水初始pH值对湿式氧化处理效果的影响,结果显示:在反应温度200℃、氧分压为1.0 MPa、废水初始pH值为11.2的条件下,湿式氧化工艺可实现废水中COD去除率57%、TOP去除率99%以上,高反应温度、高氧分压以及高废水初始pH值对COD和TOP的去除有利.采用磷酸钙(CP)沉淀和磷酸铵镁(MgNH4PO46H2O,MAP)结晶方法,对湿式氧化处理后废水中磷酸盐进行固定化回收,考察了不同Ca2+/PO34-摩尔比以及Mg2+/NH4+/PO34-摩尔比条件下,磷酸盐固定化工艺对湿式氧化处理后磷霉素废水中磷的回收效果,结果显示:在Ca2+/PO34-摩尔比2∶1以及Mg2+/NH4+/PO34-摩尔比1.1∶1∶1,废水PO34--P浓度9500mg·L-1条件下,CP沉淀和MAP结晶工艺均可以实现磷酸盐固定化回收率99.9%以上,出水PO34--P浓度低于5.0 mg·L-1.采用扫描电子显微镜(SEM)和X射线衍射(XRD)对固定化磷回收产物进行了表征,结果表明回收产物分别为具有较高纯净度的MAP和掺杂有一定量无定形磷酸钙的羟基磷灰石(Ca5(PO4)3OH,HAP).%Hybrid wet air oxidation-phosphate immobilization was applied to fosfomycin wastewater treatment and phosphorus recovery. The chemical oxygen demand (COD) and total organic phosphorus (TOP) concentrations of the wastewater were 72750 mg·L-1 and 8225 mg·L-1 , respectively. Firstly, O2 was used as oxidant in the wet air oxidation process to break down and transform concentrated and refractory organic phosphorus substances into phosphate, and the effects of reaction temperature, oxygen partial pressure and initial wastewater pH value were studied. The

  11. Determination of fungal spore release from wet building materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kildesø, J.; Wurtz, H.; Nielsen, Kristian Fog; Kruse, P.; Wilkins, K.; Thrane, Ulf; Gravesen, S.; Nielsen, P.A.; Schneider, T.

    2003-01-01

    The release and transport of fungal spores from water-damaged building materials is a key factor for understanding the exposure to particles of fungal origin as a possible cause of adverse health effects associated to growth of fungi indoors. In this study, the release of spores from nine species...... of typical indoor fungi has been measured under controlled conditions. The fungi were cultivated for a period of 4-6 weeks on sterilized wet wallpapered gypsum boards at a relative humidity (RH) of approximately 97%. A specially designed small chamber (P-FLEC) was placed on the gypsum board. The...... release of fungal spores was induced by well-defined jets of air impacting from rotating nozzles. The spores and other particles released from the surface were transported by the air flowing from the chamber through a top outlet to a particle counter and sizer. For two of the fungi (Penicillium...

  12. FIELD EXPERIMENT TO PARTITION THE EFFECTS OF DRY AND WET DEPOSITION ON METALLIC MATERIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    At a material exposure site located at the Research Triangle Park, NC, the Environmental Protection Agency began in 1982 a study to partition the effects of dry and wet deposition on galvanized and weathering steel panels. At the site, air quality and meteorological parameters ar...

  13. Catalytic Hydrothermal Conversion of Wet Biomass Feedstocks and Upgrading – Process Design and Optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Jessica; Toor, Saqib; Rosendahl, Lasse

    Liquid biofuels will play a major role for a more sustainable energy system of the future. The CatLiq® process is a 2nd generation biomass conversion process that is based on hydrothermal liquefaction. Hydrothermal liquefaction offers a very efficient and feedstock flexible way of converting...... biomass to bio-oil. Bio-oils from hydrothermal liquefaction are characterised by their high feedstock flexibility. Upgrading of complete bio-oils derived from hydrothermal conversion has not yet been extensively studied. Purpose of this work is to reduce the oxygen content of the bio-oil to improve the...

  14. Characterization of Catalytic Porous Medium Using Platinum for Micro-combustion Application

    OpenAIRE

    Miskam Muhamad Azman; Hassan Suhaimi; Zainal Alauddin Zainal Alimuddin; Ishak Mohammad Zulfikar

    2014-01-01

    In this study, catalytic alumina porous medium has been fabricated by using platinum as an active material for micro-combustion application. Platinum has been deposited onto porous medium surface via wet impregnation method. The porous medium undergoes surface modification process via wash coating method using gamma alumina (γ-Al2O3) solution, before being impregnated with platinum in order to increase the surface area. The surface morphology of porous medium entirely changes from smooth “sol...

  15. Wetting in mixtures of water, nonionic amphiphiles, and nonpolar solvents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlweit, M.; Busse, G.

    1989-07-01

    As is well known, medium- and long-chain alkanes do not spread across H2O-air interfaces, but shape a lens. In this paper it is shown that the same holds for the upper amphiphile-rich phase in binary H2O-amphiphile mixtures with medium- and long-chain nonionic amphiphiles that show a (closed) miscibility gap with water. This finding is somewhat unexpected because surfactants form monolayers at H2O-air interfaces which should facilitate the spreading of the amphiphile-rich phase. This wetting behavior corresponds to that in ternary H2O-oil-nonionic amphiphile mixtures with a three-phase body, in which the middle amphiphile-rich phase does not spread across the H2O-oil interface. The results may stimulate further studies on critical-point wetting [for a recent review see, e.g., S. Dietrich, in Phase Transitions and Critical Phenomena, edited by C. Domb and J. L. Lebowitz (Academic, London, 1988), Vol. 12, p. 1.], and may also help clarifying the properties of microemulsions [for a recent review see, e.g., M. Kahlweit, R. Strey, P. Firman, D. Haase, J. Jen, and R. Schomäcker, Langmuir 4, 499 (1988)].

  16. Order of wetting transitions in electrolyte solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ibagon, Ingrid, E-mail: ingrid@is.mpg.de; Bier, Markus, E-mail: bier@is.mpg.de; Dietrich, S. [Max-Planck-Institut für Intelligente Systeme, Heisenbergstr. 3, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany and IV. Institut für Theoretische Physik, Universität Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 57, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2014-05-07

    For wetting films in dilute electrolyte solutions close to charged walls we present analytic expressions for their effective interface potentials. The analysis of these expressions renders the conditions under which corresponding wetting transitions can be first- or second-order. Within mean field theory we consider two models, one with short- and one with long-ranged solvent-solvent and solvent-wall interactions. The analytic results reveal in a transparent way that wetting transitions in electrolyte solutions, which occur far away from their critical point (i.e., the bulk correlation length is less than half of the Debye length) are always first-order if the solvent-solvent and solvent-wall interactions are short-ranged. In contrast, wetting transitions close to the bulk critical point of the solvent (i.e., the bulk correlation length is larger than the Debye length) exhibit the same wetting behavior as the pure, i.e., salt-free, solvent. If the salt-free solvent is governed by long-ranged solvent-solvent as well as long-ranged solvent-wall interactions and exhibits critical wetting, adding salt can cause the occurrence of an ion-induced first-order thin-thick transition which precedes the subsequent continuous wetting as for the salt-free solvent.

  17. Order of wetting transitions in electrolyte solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For wetting films in dilute electrolyte solutions close to charged walls we present analytic expressions for their effective interface potentials. The analysis of these expressions renders the conditions under which corresponding wetting transitions can be first- or second-order. Within mean field theory we consider two models, one with short- and one with long-ranged solvent-solvent and solvent-wall interactions. The analytic results reveal in a transparent way that wetting transitions in electrolyte solutions, which occur far away from their critical point (i.e., the bulk correlation length is less than half of the Debye length) are always first-order if the solvent-solvent and solvent-wall interactions are short-ranged. In contrast, wetting transitions close to the bulk critical point of the solvent (i.e., the bulk correlation length is larger than the Debye length) exhibit the same wetting behavior as the pure, i.e., salt-free, solvent. If the salt-free solvent is governed by long-ranged solvent-solvent as well as long-ranged solvent-wall interactions and exhibits critical wetting, adding salt can cause the occurrence of an ion-induced first-order thin-thick transition which precedes the subsequent continuous wetting as for the salt-free solvent

  18. Development of Pillared Clays for Wet Hydrogen Peroxide Oxidation of Phenol and Its Application in the Posttreatment of Coffee Wastewater

    OpenAIRE

    Nancy R. Sanabria; Rafael Molina; Sonia Moreno

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the use of pillared clays as catalysts for the Fenton-like advanced oxidation, specifically wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO). This paper discusses the limitations on the application of a homogeneous Fenton system, development of solid catalysts for the oxidation of phenol, advances in the synthesis of pillared clays, and their potential application as catalysts for phenol oxidation. Finally, it analyzes the use of pillared clays as heterogeneous Fenton-l...

  19. Is dry cleaning all wet?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical solvents from dry cleaning, particularly perchloroethylene (perc), have contributed to groundwater contamination, significant levels of air pollution in and around cleaners, and chemical accumulation in food. Questions are being raised about the process of cleaning clothes with chemical, and other less toxic cleaning methods are being explored. The EPA has focused attention on the 50 year old Friedburg method of cleaning, Ecoclean, which uses no dangerous chemicals and achieves comparable results. Unfortunately, the cleaning industry is resistant to change, so cutting back on amount of clothes that need dry cleaning and making sure labels aren't exaggerating when they say dry clean only, is frequently the only consumer option now

  20. Wetting reversal in colloid-polymer systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blokhuis, Edgar M; Kuipers, Joris

    2010-05-01

    The wetting of a phase-separated colloid-polymer mixture in contact with a hard wall is analyzed using free volume theory in a Nakanishi-Fisher-type approach. We present results for the wetting phase diagram for several model approximations. Our analysis is compared with a previous analysis by Aarts [J. Chem. Phys. 120, 1973 (2004)]. We find that there is a crossover from wetting to drying at a threshold value for the colloid-polymer size ratio and that the transitions are close to the critical point and of second order in nature. PMID:20866234

  1. Effects of Gas Velocity and Temperature on Nitric Oxide Conversion in Simulated Catalytic Converter

    OpenAIRE

    Sathaporn Chuepeng

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: Gaseous emissions from gasoline engine such as carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbon and nitrogen oxides were usually reduced in three-way catalytic converter simultaneously around theoretical fuel and air combustion. Engine speed and load and other parameters were varied over a wide range of operating conditions, resulting in different exhaust gas composition and condition intake into catalytic converter. This work was studied the conversion of Nitric Oxide (NO) in exhaust...

  2. Study of biomass combustion characteristics for the development of a catalytic combustor/gasifier

    OpenAIRE

    Dody, Joseph W.

    1985-01-01

    The research reported here explored, a "new" approach to biomass energy conversion for small-scale process heat-applications. The conversion process uses close-coupled catalytic. combustion to burn combustibles in effluent generated by primary combustion or gasification of biomass fuels. Computer control of primary and secondary air flow rates allow control of the devices output power while maintaining fuel-lean or stoichiometric conditions in the effluent entering the catalytic combustion...

  3. Catalytic Conversion of Biofuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Betina

    catalysts, and two different experimental methods, namely, a batch system and a continuous flow system. In the batch reaction the process was carried out in the liquid phase using a gold catalyst and atmospheric air as the oxidant. Experiments were conducted at moderate pressures and temperatures (90-200 °C...... investigated and a simple kinetic model proposed, which could be fitted nicely to the experimental data. By changing the concentration of ethanol, it was possible to shift the selectivity towards ethyl acetate instead of acetic acid. However a concentration above 60 wt% was required for the ester to become...... oxidation of ethanol to form acetyl compounds. The steam reforming has been covered by a literature study of the research work done so far giving an introduction to the use of ethanol as a feedstock. The partial oxidation of ethanol has been studied experimentally using gold and vanadium based heterogeneous...

  4. Kinetics of wet peroxide oxidation of phenol with a gold/activated carbon catalyst

    OpenAIRE

    Domínguez, Carmen M.; Quintanilla, Asunción; Casas, José Antonio; Rodríguez, Juan José

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles supported on activated carbon (Au/AC) have been tested in catalytic wet peroxide oxidation using phenol as target pollutant. In the current work, the effect of several operating conditions, including initial pH (3.5–10.5), catalyst load (0–6 g/L), initial phenol concentration (0.1–5 g/L), hydrogen peroxide dose (4–100% of the theoretical stoichiometric amount) and reaction temperature (50–80 °C) has been investigated. The results show that the Au/AC catalyst would be useful...

  5. Bubble Meets Droplet: Particle-Assisted Reconfiguration of Wetting Morphologies in Colloidal Multiphase Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Shitta, Abiola; Meredith, J Carson; Behrens, Sven H

    2016-06-01

    Wetting phenomena are ubiquitous in nature and play key functions in various industrial processes and products. When a gas bubble encounters an oil droplet in an aqueous medium, it can experience either partial wetting or complete engulfment by the oil. Each of these morphologies can have practical benefits, and controlling the morphology is desirable for applications ranging from particle synthesis to oil recovery and gas flotation. It is known that the wetting of two fluids within a fluid medium depends on the balance of interfacial tensions and can thus be modified with surfactant additives. It is reported that colloidal particles, too, can be used to promote both wetting and dewetting in multifluid systems. This study demonstrates the surfactant-free tuning and dynamic reconfiguration of bubble-droplet morphologies with the help of cellulosic particles. It further shows that the effect can be attributed to particle adsorption at the fluid interfaces, which can be probed by interfacial tensiometry, making particle-induced transitions in the wetting morphology predictable. Finally, particle adsorption at different rates to air-water and oil-water interfaces can even lead to slow, reentrant wetting behavior not familiar from particle-free systems. PMID:27167839

  6. Tualatin River - Wet Prairie Restoration Phase III

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Forty five acres of wet prairie and 11 acres of adjacent lands were treated for reed canarygrass in this ongoing project. Federally threatened Nelson’s...

  7. ROE Wet Nitrate Deposition 1989-1991

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet nitrate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 1989 to 1991. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  8. ROE Wet Sulfate Deposition 2009-2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The raster data represent the amount of wet sulfate deposition in kilograms per hectare from 2009 to 2011. Summary data in this indicator were provided by EPA’s...

  9. Wet Chemistry of Spinel Iron oxide Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Jolivet, J.; Chanéac, C.; Prené, P.; Vayssières, L.; Tronc, E.

    1997-01-01

    Various properties of spinel iron oxide nanograins are reviewed, illustrating the broad possibilities of wet chemistry for tailoring materials for a wide range of utilizations, from catalysis and sensors to cast magnetic materials.

  10. National Ignition Facility wet weather construction plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kugler, A N

    1998-01-01

    This report presents a wet weather construction plan for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) construction project. Construction of the NIF commenced in mid- 1997, and excavation of the site was completed in the fall. Preparations for placing concrete foundations began in the fall, and above normal rainfall is expected over the tinter. Heavy rainfall in late November impacted foundation construction, and a wet weather construction plan was determined to be needed. This wet weather constiction plan recommends a strategy, techniques and management practices to prepare and protect the site corn wet weather effects and allow construction work to proceed. It is intended that information in this plan be incorporated in the Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) as warranted.

  11. Roles of catalytic oxidation in control of vehicle exhaust emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalytic oxidation was initially associated with the early development of catalysis and it subsequently became a part of many industrial processes, so it is not surprising it was used to remove hydrocarbons and CO when it became necessary to control these emissions from cars. Later NOx was reduced in a process involving reduction over a Pt/Rh catalyst followed by air injection in front of a Pt-based oxidation catalyst. If over-reduction of NO to NH3 took place, or if H2S was produced, it was important these undesirable species were converted to NOx and SOx in the catalytic oxidation stage. When exhaust gas composition could be kept stoichiometric hydrocarbons, CO and NOx were simultaneously converted over a single Pt/Rh three-way catalyst (TWC). With modern TWCs car tailpipe emissions can be exceptionally low. NO is not catalytically dissociated to O2 and N2 in the presence of O2, it can only be reduced to N2. Its control from lean-burn gasoline engines involves catalytic oxidation to NO2 and thence nitrate that is stored and periodically reduced to N2 by exhaust gas enrichment. This method is being modified for diesel engines. These engines produce soot, and filtration is being introduced to remove it. The exhaust temperature of heavy-duty diesels is sufficient (250-400oC) for NO to be catalytically oxidised to NO2 over an upstream platinum catalyst that smoothly oxidises soot in the filter. The exhaust gas temperature of passenger car diesels is too low for this to take place all of the time, so trapped soot is periodically burnt in O2 above 550oC. Catalytic oxidation of higher than normal amounts of hydrocarbon and CO over an upstream catalyst is used to give sufficient temperature for soot combustion with O2 to take place. (author)

  12. Analysis of the snow-atmosphere energy balance during wet-snow instabilities and implications for avalanche prediction

    OpenAIRE

    C. Mitterer; Schweizer, J.

    2012-01-01

    Wet-snow avalanches are notoriously difficult to predict, as their formation mechanism is poorly understood and in-situ measurements closely related to instability are inexistent. Instead, air temperature is commonly used as predictor variable for days with high wet-snow avalanche danger – with limited success. As melt water is a major driver of wet-snow instability and snow melt depends on the energy input into the snow cover, we computed the energy balance and study whether it is a bet...

  13. Hydrolysis of Miscanthus for bioethanol production using dilute acid presoaking combined with wet explosion pre-treatment and enzymatic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Annette; Teller, Philip J; Hilstrøm, Troels; Ahring, Birgitte K

    2008-09-01

    Miscanthus is a high yielding bioenergy crop. In this study we used acid presoaking, wet explosion, and enzymatic hydrolysis to evaluate the combination of the different pre-treatment methods for bioethanol production with Miscanthus. Acid presoaking is primarily carried out in order to remove xylose prior to wet explosion. The acid presoaking extracted 63.2% xylose and 5.2% glucose. Direct enzymatic hydrolysis of the presoaked biomass was found to give only low sugar yields of 24-26% glucose. Wet explosion is a pre-treatment method that combines wet-oxidation and steam explosion. The effect of wet explosion on non-presoaked and presoaked Miscanthus was investigated using both atmospheric air and hydrogen peroxide as the oxidizing agent. All wet explosion pre-treatments showed to have a disrupting effect on the lignocellulosic biomass, making the sugars accessible for enzymatic hydrolysis. The combination of presoaking, wet explosion, and enzymatic hydrolysis was found to give the highest sugar yields. The use of atmospheric air gave the highest xylose yield (94.9% xylose, 61.3% glucose), while hydrogen peroxide gave the highest glucose yield (82.4% xylose, 63.7% glucose). PMID:18164954

  14. Biodegradation of wet-white leather

    OpenAIRE

    Ollé Otero, Lluís; Jorba Rafart, Montse; Font Vallès, Joaquim; Shendrik, Alexander; Bacardit Dalmases, Anna

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with the study of the physical, chemical and biological processes associated with the deterioration of wet-white leather. The samples of leather were exposed for eight months to outdoor weathering and then their properties were subsequently evaluated. The results indicate that resistance and dimensional stability of wet-white (THPS-syntan) leather is higher than that of chrometanned leather. The comparative work with chrome leather was described earlier.

  15. Curvature controlled wetting in two dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, Tamir; Mikheev, Lev V.

    1995-01-01

    A complete wetting transition at vanishing curvature of the substrate in two-dimensional circular geometry is studied by the transfer matrix method. We find an exact formal mapping of the partition function of the problem onto that of a (1+1)-dimensional wetting problem in planar geometry. As the...... term reduces the thickness by the amount proportional to r0-1/3...

  16. Fundamental Difficulties Associated With Underwater Wet Welding

    OpenAIRE

    Joshua E. Omajene,; Jukka Martikainen

    2014-01-01

    The offshore industries carry out welding activities in the wet environment. It is evident that the wet environments possess difficulties in carrying out underwater welding. Therefore there is the need to improve the quality of weld achieved in underwater welding. This paper investigates the difficulties associated with underwater welding. The objective of this research paper is to identify and analyze the different difficulties in underwater welding so as to make a clear back...

  17. Wetting and phase separation at surfaces

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sanjay Puri; Kurt Binder

    2005-06-01

    We study the problem of surface-directed spinodal decomposition, viz., the dynamical interplay of wetting and phase separation at surfaces. In particular, we focus on the kinetics of wetting-layer growth in a semi-infinite geometry for arbitrary surface potentials and mixture compositions. We also present representative results for phase separation in confined geometries, e.g., cylindrical pores, thin films, etc.

  18. Complete wetting of graphene by biological lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Binquan; Huynh, Tien; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-03-01

    Graphene nanosheets have been demonstrated to extract large amounts of lipid molecules directly out of the cell membrane of bacteria and thus cause serious damage to the cell's integrity. This interesting phenomenon, however, is so far not well understood theoretically. Here through extensive molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical analyses, we show that this phenomenon can be categorized as a complete wetting of graphene by membrane lipids in water. A wetting-based theory was utilized to associate the free energy change during the microscopic extraction of a lipid with the spreading parameter for the macroscopic wetting. With a customized thermodynamic cycle for detailed energetics, we show that the dispersive adhesion between graphene and lipids plays a dominant role during this extraction as manifested by the curved graphene. Our simulation results suggest that biological lipids can completely wet the concave, flat or even convex (with a small curvature) surface of a graphene sheet.Graphene nanosheets have been demonstrated to extract large amounts of lipid molecules directly out of the cell membrane of bacteria and thus cause serious damage to the cell's integrity. This interesting phenomenon, however, is so far not well understood theoretically. Here through extensive molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical analyses, we show that this phenomenon can be categorized as a complete wetting of graphene by membrane lipids in water. A wetting-based theory was utilized to associate the free energy change during the microscopic extraction of a lipid with the spreading parameter for the macroscopic wetting. With a customized thermodynamic cycle for detailed energetics, we show that the dispersive adhesion between graphene and lipids plays a dominant role during this extraction as manifested by the curved graphene. Our simulation results suggest that biological lipids can completely wet the concave, flat or even convex (with a small curvature) surface of a

  19. Estimating evaporation from a wet grassland

    OpenAIRE

    Gasca-Tucker, D. L.; Acreman, M. C.; Agnew, C. T.; Thompson, J R

    2007-01-01

    Wet grasslands are being restored across the UK and Europe to reinstate their high biodiversity following over 50 years of drainage and conversion to arable agriculture. The water balance of many wet grasslands is dominated by precipitation and evaporation and it is essential to quantify evaporation rates to understand the hydrological functioning of wetlands and the implications for water resources in catchments where wetlands are being restored. This paper considers data from direct measure...

  20. Avalanche Dynamics in Wet Granular Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Tegzes, P.; Vicsek, T.; P. Schiffer

    2002-01-01

    We have studied the dynamics of avalanching wet granular media in a rotating drum apparatus. Quantitative measurements of the flow velocity and the granular flux during avalanches allow us to characterize novel avalanche types unique to wet media. We also explore the details of viscoplastic flow (observed at the highest liquid contents) in which there are lasting contacts during flow, leading to coherence across the entire sample. This coherence leads to a velocity independent flow depth at h...

  1. Catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Clausen, Bjerne;

    2007-01-01

    Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change with par......Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change...... with particle size. We find that the fraction of low-coordinated Au atoms scales approximately with the catalytic activity, suggesting that atoms on the corners and edges of Au nanoparticles are the active sites. This effect is explained using density functional calculations....

  2. Catalytic distillation water recovery subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budininkas, P.; Rasouli, F.

    1985-01-01

    An integrated engineering breadboard subsystem for the recovery of potable water from untreated urine based on the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal was designed, fabricated and tested. Unlike other evaporative methods, this process catalytically oxidizes ammonia and volatile hydrocarbons vaporizing with water to innocuous products; therefore, no pretreatment of urine is required. Since the subsystem is fabricated from commercially available components, its volume, weight and power requirements are not optimized; however, it is suitable for zero-g operation. The testing program consists of parametric tests, one month of daily tests and a continuous test of 168 hours duration. The recovered water is clear, odorless, low in ammonia and organic carbon, and requires only an adjustment of its pH to meet potable water standards. The obtained data indicate that the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal process, if further developed, would also be competitive with other water recovery systems in weight, volume and power requirements.

  3. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vivek V Ranade

    2014-03-01

    Catalytic reactions are ubiquitous in chemical and allied industries. A homogeneous or heterogeneous catalyst which provides an alternative route of reaction with lower activation energy and better control on selectivity can make substantial impact on process viability and economics. Extensive studies have been conducted to establish sound basis for design and engineering of reactors for practising such catalytic reactions and for realizing improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so recent) developments in engineering reactors for catalytic reactions is discussed. Some examples where performance enhancement was realized by catalyst design, appropriate choice of reactor, better injection and dispersion strategies and recent advances in process intensification/ multifunctional reactors are discussed to illustrate the approach.

  4. Pt-TiO2/MWCNTs Hybrid Composites for Monitoring Low Hydrogen Concentrations in Air

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Trocino

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen is a valuable fuel for the next energy scenario. Unfortunately, hydrogen is highly flammable at concentrations higher than 4% in air. This aspect makes the monitoring of H2 leaks an essential issue for safety reasons, especially in the transportation field. In this paper, nanocomposites based on Pt-doped TiO2/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs have been introduced as sensitive materials for H2 at low temperatures. Pt-TiO2/MWNTs nanocomposites with different composition have been prepared by a simple wet chemical procedure and their morphological, microstructural and electrical properties were investigated. Resistive thick-film devices have been fabricated printing the hybrid nanocomposites on alumina substrates provided with Pt interdigitated electrodes. Electrical tests in air have shown that embedding MWCNTs in the TiO2 matrix modify markedly the electrical conductivity, providing a means to decrease the resistance of the sensing layer. Pt acts as a catalytic additive. Pt-TiO2/MWNTs-based sensors were found to be sensitive to hydrogen at concentrations between 0.5 and 3% in air, satisfying the requisites for practical applications in hydrogen leak detection devices.

  5. Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, dust, ... a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, it's ...

  6. Air Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air pollution is a mixture of solid particles and gases in the air. Car emissions, chemicals from factories, dust, pollen and ... Ozone, a gas, is a major part of air pollution in cities. When ozone forms air pollution, ...

  7. Catalytic destruction of tar in biomass derived producer gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to investigate catalytic destruction of tar formed during gasification of biomass, with the goal of improving the quality of the producer gas. This work focuses on nickel based catalysts treated with alkali in an effort to promote steam gasification of the coke that deposits on catalyst surfaces. A tar conversion system consisting of a guard bed and catalytic reactor was designed to treat the producer gas from an air blown, fluidized bed biomass gasifier. The guard bed used dolomite to crack the heavy tars. The catalytic reactor was used to evaluate three commercial steam reforming catalysts. These were the ICI46-1 catalyst from Imperial Chemical Industry and Z409 and RZ409 catalysts from Qilu Petrochemical Corp. in China. A 0.5-3 l/min slipstream from a 5 tpd biomass gasifier was used to test the tar conversion system. Gas and tar were sampled before and after the tar conversion system to evaluate the effectiveness of the system. Changes in gas composition as functions of catalytic bed temperature, space velocity and steam/TOC (total organic carbon) ratio are presented. Structural changes in the catalysts during the tests are also described

  8. Catalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Muhammad Shahzad; Razzak, Shaikh A.; Hossain, Mohammad M.

    2016-09-01

    Emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is one of the major contributors to air pollution. The main sources of VOCs are petroleum refineries, fuel combustions, chemical industries, decomposition in the biosphere and biomass, pharmaceutical plants, automobile industries, textile manufacturers, solvents processes, cleaning products, printing presses, insulating materials, office supplies, printers etc. The most common VOCs are halogenated compounds, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, aromatic compounds, and ethers. High concentrations of these VOCs can cause irritations, nausea, dizziness, and headaches. Some VOCs are also carcinogenic for both humans and animals. Therefore, it is crucial to minimize the emission of VOCs. Among the available technologies, the catalytic oxidation of VOCs is the most popular because of its versatility of handling a range of organic emissions under mild operating conditions. Due to that fact, there are numerous research initiatives focused on developing advanced technologies for the catalytic destruction of VOCs. This review discusses recent developments in catalytic systems for the destruction of VOCs. Review also describes various VOCs and their sources of emission, mechanisms of catalytic destruction, the causes of catalyst deactivation, and catalyst regeneration methods.

  9. Catalytic properties of niobium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The catalytic activity and selectivity of niobium compounds including oxides, salts, organometallic compounds and others are outlined. The application of these compounds as catalysts to diversified reactions is reported. The nature and action of niobium catalysts are characteristic and sometimes anomalous, suggesting the necessity of basic research and the potential use as catalysts for important processes in the chemical industry. (Author)

  10. Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary Blythe; Conor Braman; Katherine Dombrowski; Tom Machalek

    2010-12-31

    This document is the final technical report for Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT41992, 'Pilot Testing of Mercury Oxidation Catalysts for Upstream of Wet FGD Systems,' which was conducted over the time-period January 1, 2004 through December 31, 2010. The objective of this project has been to demonstrate at pilot scale the use of solid catalysts and/or fixed-structure mercury sorbents to promote the removal of total mercury and oxidation of elemental mercury in flue gas from coal combustion, followed by wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) to remove the oxidized mercury at high efficiency. The project was co-funded by the U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE-NETL), EPRI, Great River Energy (GRE), TXU Energy (now called Luminant), Southern Company, Salt River Project (SRP) and Duke Energy. URS Group was the prime contractor. The mercury control process under development uses fixed-structure sorbents and/or catalysts to promote the removal of total mercury and/or oxidation of elemental mercury in the flue gas from coal-fired power plants that have wet lime or limestone FGD systems. Oxidized mercury not adsorbed is removed in the wet FGD absorbers and leaves with the byproducts from the FGD system. The project has tested candidate materials at pilot scale and in a commercial form, to provide engineering data for future full-scale designs. Pilot-scale catalytic oxidation tests have been completed for periods of approximately 14 to19 months at three sites, with an additional round of pilot-scale fixed-structure sorbent tests being conducted at one of those sites. Additionally, pilot-scale wet FGD tests have been conducted downstream of mercury oxidation catalysts at a total of four sites. The sites include the two of three sites from this project and two sites where catalytic oxidation pilot testing was conducted as part of a previous DOE-NETL project. Pilot-scale wet FGD tests were also conducted at a fifth site, but with no catalyst or fixed

  11. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A catalytic wet oxidation process (DETOX), which uses an acidic iron solution to oxidize organic compounds to carbon dioxide, water, and other simple products, was investigated as a potential method for the treatment of multicomponent hazardous and mixed wastes. The organic compounds picric acid, poly(vinyl chloride), tetrachlorothiophene, pentachloropyridine, Aroclor 1260 (a polychlorinated biphenyl), and hexachlorobenzene were oxidized in 125 ml reaction vessels. The metals arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cerium (as a surrogate for plutonium), chromium, lead, mercury, neodymium (as a surrogate for uranium), nickel, and vanadium were tested in the DETOX solution. Barium, beryllium, cerium, chromium, mercury, neodymium, nickel, and vanadium were all found to be very soluble (>100 g/l) in the DETOX chloride-based solution. Arsenic, barium, cadmium, and lead solubilities were lower. Lead could be selectively precipitated from the DETOX solution. Chromium(VI) was reduced to relatively non-toxic chromium(III) by the solution. Six soils were contaminated with arsenic, barium, beryllium, chromium, lead, and neodymium oxides at approximately 0.1% by weight, and benzene, trichloroethene, mineral oil, and Aroclor 1260 at approximately 5% by weight total, and 5.g amounts treated with the DETOX solution in unstirred 125. ml reaction bombs. It is felt that soil treatment in a properly designed system is entirely possible despite incomplete oxidation of the less volatile organic materials in these unstirred tests

  12. Development studies for a novel wet oxidation process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhooge, P.M.; Hakim, L.B.

    1994-01-01

    A catalytic wet oxidation process (DETOX), which uses an acidic iron solution to oxidize organic compounds to carbon dioxide, water, and other simple products, was investigated as a potential method for the treatment of multicomponent hazardous and mixed wastes. The organic compounds picric acid, poly(vinyl chloride), tetrachlorothiophene, pentachloropyridine, Aroclor 1260 (a polychlorinated biphenyl), and hexachlorobenzene were oxidized in 125 ml reaction vessels. The metals arsenic, barium, beryllium, cadmium, cerium (as a surrogate for plutonium), chromium, lead, mercury, neodymium (as a surrogate for uranium), nickel, and vanadium were tested in the DETOX solution. Barium, beryllium, cerium, chromium, mercury, neodymium, nickel, and vanadium were all found to be very soluble (>100 g/l) in the DETOX chloride-based solution. Arsenic, barium, cadmium, and lead solubilities were lower. Lead could be selectively precipitated from the DETOX solution. Chromium(VI) was reduced to relatively non-toxic chromium(III) by the solution. Six soils were contaminated with arsenic, barium, beryllium, chromium, lead, and neodymium oxides at approximately 0.1% by weight, and benzene, trichloroethene, mineral oil, and Aroclor 1260 at approximately 5% by weight total, and 5.g amounts treated with the DETOX solution in unstirred 125. ml reaction bombs. It is felt that soil treatment in a properly designed system is entirely possible despite incomplete oxidation of the less volatile organic materials in these unstirred tests.

  13. Quantum confinement of lead titanate nanocrystals by wet chemical method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaviyarasu, K., E-mail: kaviyarasuloyolacollege@gmail.com [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology Laboratories, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, P O Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department (MSD), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation - NRF, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, P O Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Manikandan, E., E-mail: maniphysics@gmail.com [Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department (MSD), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation - NRF, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, P O Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Central Research Laboratory, Sree Balaji Medical College & Hospital, Bharath University, Chrompet, Chennai, Tamil Nadu (India); Nuru, Z.Y. [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology Laboratories, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, P O Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department (MSD), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation - NRF, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, P O Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa); Maaza, M., E-mail: likmaaz@gmail.com [UNESCO-UNISA Africa Chair in Nanosciences/Nanotechnology Laboratories, College of Graduate Studies, University of South Africa (UNISA), Muckleneuk Ridge, P O Box 392, Pretoria (South Africa); Nanosciences African Network (NANOAFNET), Materials Research Department (MSD), iThemba LABS-National Research Foundation - NRF, 1 Old Faure Road, 7129, P O Box 722, Somerset West, Western Cape Province (South Africa)

    2015-11-15

    Lead Titanate (PbTiO{sub 3)} is a category of the practical semiconductor metal oxides, which is widely applied in various scientific and industrial fields because of its catalytic, optical, and electrical properties. PbTiO{sub 3} nanocrystalline materials have attracted a wide attention due to their unique properties. PbTiO{sub 3} nanocrystals were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) to identify the PbTiO{sub 3} nanocrystals were composed a tetragonal structure. The diameter of a single sphere was around 20 nm and the diameter reached up to 3 μm. The chemical composition of the samples and the valence states of elements were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in detail. - Highlights: • Single crystalline NSs of PbTiO{sub 3} fabricated by wet chemical method. • PbTiO{sub 3} NSs were uniform and continuous along the long axis. • Tetragonal perovskite structure with the diameter 20 nm and length 3 μm. • XPS spectrum was fitted with Lorentzian function respectively. • The size of the images is also 10 μm × 10 μm.

  14. Quantum confinement of lead titanate nanocrystals by wet chemical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lead Titanate (PbTiO3) is a category of the practical semiconductor metal oxides, which is widely applied in various scientific and industrial fields because of its catalytic, optical, and electrical properties. PbTiO3 nanocrystalline materials have attracted a wide attention due to their unique properties. PbTiO3 nanocrystals were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD) to identify the PbTiO3 nanocrystals were composed a tetragonal structure. The diameter of a single sphere was around 20 nm and the diameter reached up to 3 μm. The chemical composition of the samples and the valence states of elements were determined by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) in detail. - Highlights: • Single crystalline NSs of PbTiO3 fabricated by wet chemical method. • PbTiO3 NSs were uniform and continuous along the long axis. • Tetragonal perovskite structure with the diameter 20 nm and length 3 μm. • XPS spectrum was fitted with Lorentzian function respectively. • The size of the images is also 10 μm × 10 μm

  15. Modeling the pyrolysis of wet wood using FireFOAM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Authors improve the pyrolysis model of wet wood considering oxidation and flame. • A simple one-step nth-order Arrhenius pyrolysis expression is employed. • The predicted results agree well with Shen et al.’s measured values in cone. • The gas mass fluxes are analyzed as a function of thickness and radiation flux. • The fitting correlations among the above three variables are obtained. - Abstract: A wet wood pyrolysis model was developed involving the combined influence of moisture, char oxidation, flame radiation and chemical reaction kinetics. Especially instead of multiple parallel reactions, a simple one-step nth-order Arrhenius expression for dry wood pyrolysis was combined with moisture drying reaction, which aimed at reducing the difficulty of obtaining kinetic and thermophysical parameters of intermediate solids. Code validation shows that the predicted surface temperature and total solid conversion ratio agree well with Shen et al.’s measured values in cone calorimeter under air atmosphere. The mass fluxes of water vapor and pyrolysate are analyzed as a function of wet wood thickness under various external radiation heat fluxes. The thickness has no effect on the maximum mass flux of vapor. The thickness of 8 mm is found to be the critical value with two peaks appearing simultaneously at pyrolysate mass flux profiles under 40 kW m−2. For the cases with two peaks of pyrolysate mass flux, the thickness has little effect on the time and value at the first peak of pyrolysate. However, those at second peak vary obviously with thickness. The fitting correlations of vapor duration and second pyrolysate flux peak time were also obtained

  16. The role of bio-inspired hierarchical structures in wetting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewal, H S; Cho, Il-Joo; Yoon, Eui-Sung

    2015-04-01

    Superhydrophobicity facilitates the development of self-cleaning, anti-biofouling, and anti-corrosion surfaces. The leaves of the lotus (Nelumbo nucifera) and taro (Colocasia esculenta) plants are well known for their self-cleaning properties. A hierarchical structure comprising papillae epidermal cells superimposed with epicuticular wax crystalloids of varying shapes, sizes, and orientations is an important aspect of the surface of these plant leaves. We fabricated two types of hierarchical structures biomimicking the surface topography of the lotus leaf. The hierarchical patterns successfully demonstrated the superhydrophobic state in comparison with nano and micro patterns. We used the finite element method (FEM) to simulate and understand the wetting process. The FEM simulations showed good correlation with the experimental results. FEM was helpful in understanding the wetting of enormously complex biological surfaces with relative ease, and it qualifies as a potential tool for designing superhydrophobic surfaces. Using the FEM framework, we further designed surfaces to optimize the order of the shapes in hierarchy. The results showed that the superhydrophobic surface with the lowest wetted area was obtained by placing shapes with smaller geometric angles at the top of the hierarchy. This arrangement of shapes provides the optimum combination of superhydrophobicity and surface integrity. This observation explains why the hierarchical structure of many superhydrophobic leaves follows this order. We also investigated the complex hierarchical structure of Salvinia minima. Owing to its remarkable ability to entrap air and pin the contact line, it exhibits superhydrophobicity along with the much-required Cassie state. These properties of Salvinia minima make it an excellent candidate for developing omniphobic surfaces. PMID:25856043

  17. Can I Stop Myself From Having a Wet Dream?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Can I Stop Myself From Having a Wet Dream? KidsHealth > For Teens > Can I Stop Myself From Having a Wet Dream? Print A A A Text Size Can I stop myself from having a wet dream? – Tom* You really can't stop wet dreams, ...

  18. Wetting and adsorption modification in the system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuliya Bogdanova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Regularities of wetting and adsorption modification of surfaces of continual membranes made from highly permeable glassy polymers poly[1-(trimethylsilyl-1-propyne] (PTMSP and poly(4-methyl-2-pentyn (PMP with aqueous ethanol solutions and alcohol solutions containing organic dyes (Solvent Blue 35 and Remazol Brilliant Blue were investigated. Isotherms of stress wetting of polymer membrane surface by etanol solutions were found out to have maximums in the range of concentrations corresponding to the beginning of liquid sorption into the membrane and polymer swelling. Thus, the principal possibility of optimization of nanofiltration experiments by liquid wetting angle measurements on continuous polymer membrane surfaces was shown. The presence of the dye was shown not to affect PMP wetting. But in the case of PTMSP, it leads to shear of the maximum of stress wetting isotherms to the range of higher concentrations. It was found out the effectiveness of the adsorption surface modification of continuous polymer membrane surfaces by ethanol solutions containing dyes does not dependent on chemical nature of the dye. At the same time, there are different trends in the energy characteristics of the membrane surface.

  19. WET STRENGTH PAPER REPULPING: LABORATORY EVALUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NishiK.Bhardwaj; VikasRajan; A.G.Kulkarni

    2004-01-01

    The recycling of wet strength papers in a normal recycling mill is often troublesome due to the severe operating conditions required to defibre wet strength papers. The various methods are presented which will quickly allow mills to determine the most effective pulping aids to use when repulping wet strength papers. The repulping of wet strength paper with inorganic chemicals was investigated in the laboratory. The effects of major variables, that is, repulping time, pulp consistency, soaking time, temperature, and reactant concentration in the repulping stage were examined using Plackett-Burman design. The repulping time was the most crucial & influential process variable affecting repulping characteristic and formation related properties. The more significant repulping process variables affecting pulp yield were repulping time, soaking temperature and pulp consistency whereas for formation index and feature size, repulping time, pulp consistency, soaking temperature and time were the more important variables. The formation index is increased by an increase in repulping time, pulp consistency and soaking time whereas the feature size is decreased by an increase in repulping time, soaking temperature and pulp consistency. The formation index and the rejects were more sensitive to changes in process variables than were the feature size or the pulp yield. The pulp recycled from wet strength waste paper had good physical strength properties.

  20. WET STRENGTH PAPER REPULPING:LABORATORY EVALUATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nishi K. Bhardwaj; Vikas Rajan; A.G. Kulkarni

    2004-01-01

    The recycling of wet strength papers in a normal recycling mill is often troublesome due to the severe operating conditions required to defibre wet strength papers. The various methods are presented which will quickly allow mills to determine the most effective pulping aids to use when repulping wet strength papers. The repulping of wet strength paper with inorganic chemicals was investigated in the laboratory. The effects of major variables, that is,repulping time, pulp consistency, soaking time,temperature, and reactant concentration in the repulping stage were examined using Plackett-Burman design. The repulping time was the most crucial & influential process variable affecting repulping characteristic and formation related properties. The more significant repulping process variables affecting pulp yield were repulping time,soaking temperature and pulp consistency whereas for formation index and feature size, repulping time,pulp consistency, soaking temperature and time were the more important variables. The formation index is increased by an increase in repulping time, pulp consistency and soaking time whereas the feature size is decreased by an increase in repulping time,soaking temperature and pulp consistency. The formation index and the rejects were more sensitive to changes in process variables than were the feature size or the pulp yield. The pulp recycled from wet strength waste paper had good physical strength properties.

  1. Wetting films on chemically patterned surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakashev, Stoyan I; Stöckelhuber, Klaus W; Tsekov, Roumen

    2011-11-15

    The behavior of thin wetting films on chemically patterned surfaces was investigated. The patterning was performed by means of imprinting of micro-grid on methylated glass surface with UV-light (λ=184.8 nm). Thus imprinted image of the grid contained hydrophilic cells and hydrophobic bars on the glass surface. For this aim three different patterns of grids were utilized with small, medium and large size of cells. The experiment showed that the drainage of the wetting aqueous films was not affected by the type of surface patterning. However, after film rupturing in the cases of small and medium cells of the patterned grid the liquid from the wetting film underwent fast self-organization in form of regularly ordered droplets covering completely the cells of the grid. The droplets reduced significantly their size upon time due to evaporation. In the cases of the largest cell grid, a wet spot on the place of the imprinted grid was formed after film rupturing. This wet spot disassembled slowly in time. In addition, formation of a periodical zigzag three-phase contact line (TPCL) was observed. This is a first study from the planned series of studies on this topic. PMID:21875710

  2. Energy and heat balance in wet DCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxena, Viren; Moser, Alexander; Schaefer, Michael; Ritschel, Michael [BorgWarner Drivetrain Engineering GmbH, Ketsch (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    Wet clutch systems are well known for their thermal robustness and versatility in a wide range of automotive applications. Conventional automatics have used them for a long time as torque converter lock-up clutches, shift elements and launch clutches. With the development of DCTs, wet clutch technology has evolved in terms of launch and shift performance, controllability, robustness and efficiency. This paper discusses improvements in the wet clutch and their impact on today's vehicle applications in terms of heat and energy management. Thermal robustness is a crucial aspect for an automatic transmission. In addition to the clutch thermal performance, the influence of transmission oil cooler and oil sump warm-up behavior are discussed. Based on our latest development activities, test results and simulations, we shall discuss the latest friction material enhancement and its impact on DCTs in terms of efficiency and performance. Drag loss is a much-discussed topic during the development of wet clutch systems. This paper discusses in detail the cause and break-up of various energy losses in a wet DCT. Efficient energy management strategies for actuation systems, cooling, and lubrication, clutch apply, and pre-selection in modern power trains with engine start / stop are evaluated based on the latest test and simulation results. Finally, the paper summarizes the performance and efficiency optimized moist clutch system. (orig.)

  3. Design consideration for wet welded joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szelagowski, P.; Osthus, V. [GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht (Germany); Petershagen, H.; Pohl, R. [Univ. Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Schiffbau; Lafaye, G. [Stolt Comex Seaway S.A., Marseille (France)

    1996-12-01

    Wet welding has become a joining technique that under certain circumstances can provide results which cannot be distinguished between wet or dry production and the achievable mechanical quality is comparable to dry atmospheric welds. Wet welding is not a process which can be applied easily and which can be properly handled by untrained diver welders. Wet welding is more than any other kind of welding process or procedure a joining technique that requires the full job-concentration and -knowledge of an excellent trained and skilled diver welder throughout the whole production time, who is 100% identifying himself with his task. Furthermore he must be fully aware of the production requirements and possible metallurgical/environmental reactions and outcomes. He must be able to be fully concentrated on the process performance throughout his total work shift. In short: he must be an outstanding expert in his field. The following paper will highlight these subjects and show the necessity of their exact observation to achieve excellent quality in wet welding.

  4. Evaporation from rain-wetted forest in relation to canopy wetness, canopy cover, and net radiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, W.

    2001-01-01

    Evaporation from wet canopies is commonly calculated using E-PM, the Penman-Monteith equation with zero surface resistance. However, several observations show a lower evaporation from rain-wetted forest. Possible causes for the difference between E-PM and experiments are evaluated to provide rules f

  5. NANOFILLERS FOR PAPERMAKING WET END APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Shen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The papermaking industry can benefit a lot from nanotechnology. This versatile technology can also be used in the area of fillers for papermaking wet end applications. In such applications the main technological examples currently available include wet end addition of commercially available nanofillers, formation of nanofiller/fiber or nanofiller/fibril hybrids, development of novel categories of nanofillers such as high aspect ratio nanofillers, and combination of microfillers with nanostructures by specially controlled routes to obtain composite nanofillers. It is worth noting that there are certain challenges associated with nanofillers, such as high cost, difficulty in structure and performance control, poor dispersability and retention, possible severe negative effects on paper strength, possible detrimental interactions between nanofillers with some wet end additives, and the industry-related limitations. However, in the long run, the research and development in the area of nanofillers will surely create many fruitful results.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Simulations for Predicting Surface Wetting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Chen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The investigation of wetting of a solid surface by a liquid provides important insights; the contact angle of a liquid droplet on a surface provides a quantitative measurement of this interaction and the degree of attraction or repulsion of that liquid type by the solid surface. Molecular dynamics (MD simulations are a useful way to examine the behavior of liquids on solid surfaces on a nanometer scale. Thus, we surveyed the state of this field, beginning with the fundamentals of wetting calculations to an examination of the different MD methodologies used. We highlighted some of the advantages and disadvantages of the simulations, and look to the future of computer modeling to understand wetting and other liquid-solid interaction phenomena.

  7. Handling of wet residues in industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villanueva, Alejandro

    operational tools geared to assist industries in the selection of disposal routes for wet residues. The target group of the study are the wet residue producing companies. The study is structured in the form of a handbook, with the aim of making it simpler and faster for industries to find their way to...... feasible considering also economic and environmental criteria. It has been found that the advantages and disadvantages of a given disposal option, as a basis for decision-making, can be analysed using five assessment criteria:  legislation  technology  economy  environment  society concerns These five...... characterise the technical options, the costs, and the legal, environmental and social implications of residue disposal. The handbook contains a series of decision-support tools that enables a company to select a solution. In this way, wet residue handling can be tackled at an early phase of project design...

  8. Power generation characteristics of tubular type SOFC by wet process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tajiri, H.; Nakayama, T. [Kyushu Electric Power Company, Inc., Fukuoka (Japan); Kuroishi, M. [TOTO Ltd., Kanagawa (Japan)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The development of a practical solid oxide fuel cell requires improvement of a cell performance and a cell manufacturing technology suitable for the mass production. In particular tubular type SOFC is thought to be superior in its reliability because its configuration can avoid the high temperature sealing and reduce the thermal stress resulting from the contact between cells. The authors have fabricated a tubular cell with an air electrode support by a wet processing technique, which is suitable for mass production in improving a power density. To enhance the power output of the module, the Integrated Tubular-Type (ITT) cell has been developed. This paper reports the performance of the single cells with various active anode areas and the bundle with series-connected 9-ITT cells with an active anode area of 840 cm{sup 2}.

  9. Root cause analysis for wet waste generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since, typically, most utility radioactive waste is dry waste, volume reduction efforts should start with this. However, significant cost can still be saved with a modest reduction in the wet radioactive waste volume. Even though there may be several potential solutions to wet waste volume reduction, a Root Cause Analysis should be performed to identify the solution that will be the most effective for volume reduction. The method described here provides for a logical sequence of determining root causes. Finally, the solution adopted must be evaluated after implementation to determine its effectiveness and verify that the root cause was addressed

  10. Equilibrating nanoparticle monolayers using wetting films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontoni, Diego; Alvine, Kyle J; Checco, Antonio; Gang, Oleg; Ocko, Benjamin M; Pershan, Peter S

    2009-01-01

    Monolayers of bimodal gold nanoparticles on silicon are investigated by a combination of microscopy (dry monolayers) and x-ray diffraction (dry and wet monolayers). In the presence of an excess of small particles, the nanoscale packing structure closely resembles the small-particle-rich scenario of the structural crossover transition that has been predicted and also observed with micron-scale hard-sphere colloids. Structural morphology is monitored in situ during monolayer dissolution and reassembly within the thin liquid wetting film. This approach allows investigation of size and solvent effects on nanoparticles in quasi-two-dimensional confinement. PMID:19257214

  11. Sphere impact and penetration into wet sand

    KAUST Repository

    Marston, J. O.

    2012-08-07

    We present experimental results for the penetration of a solid sphere when released onto wet sand. We show, by measuring the final penetration depth, that the cohesion induced by the water can result in either a deeper or shallower penetration for a given release height compared to dry granular material. Thus the presence of water can either lubricate or stiffen the granular material. By assuming the shear rate is proportional to the impact velocity and using the depth-averaged stopping force in calculating the shear stress, we derive effective viscosities for the wet granular materials.

  12. Ethanol-selective catalytic reduction of NO by Ag/Al2O3 catalysts: Activity and deactivation by alkali salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schill, Leonhard; Putluru, Siva Sankar Reddy; Jacobsen, Casper Funk;

    2012-01-01

    Ag/Al2O3 catalysts with and without potassium doping were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation and characterized by N2 physisorption, XRPD, NH3-TPD and SEM. The influence of the Ag content from 1 to 5 wt.% was investigated for the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with ethanol. The 3...

  13. Wet scrubbing of biomass producer gas tars using vegetable oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhoi, Prakashbhai Ramabhai

    The overall aims of this research study were to generate novel design data and to develop an equilibrium stage-based thermodynamic model of a vegetable oil based wet scrubbing system for the removal of model tar compounds (benzene, toluene and ethylbenzene) found in biomass producer gas. The specific objectives were to design, fabricate and evaluate a vegetable oil based wet scrubbing system and to optimize the design and operating variables; i.e., packed bed height, vegetable oil type, solvent temperature, and solvent flow rate. The experimental wet packed bed scrubbing system includes a liquid distributor specifically designed to distribute a high viscous vegetable oil uniformly and a mixing section, which was designed to generate a desired concentration of tar compounds in a simulated air stream. A method and calibration protocol of gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy was developed to quantify tar compounds. Experimental data were analyzed statistically using analysis of variance (ANOVA) procedure. Statistical analysis showed that both soybean and canola oils are potential solvents, providing comparable removal efficiency of tar compounds. The experimental height equivalent to a theoretical plate (HETP) was determined as 0.11 m for vegetable oil based scrubbing system. Packed bed height and solvent temperature had highly significant effect (p0.05) effect on the removal of model tar compounds. The packing specific constants, Ch and CP,0, for the Billet and Schultes pressure drop correlation were determined as 2.52 and 2.93, respectively. The equilibrium stage based thermodynamic model predicted the removal efficiency of model tar compounds in the range of 1-6%, 1-4% and 1-2% of experimental data for benzene, toluene and ethylbenzene, respectively, for the solvent temperature of 30° C. The NRTL-PR property model and UNIFAC for estimating binary interaction parameters are recommended for modeling absorption of tar compounds in vegetable oils. Bench scale

  14. Catalytic behaviors of ruthenium dioxide films deposited on ferroelectrics substrates, by spin coating process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalytic ruthenium dioxide films were deposited by spin-coating process on ferroelectric films mainly constituted of SrBi2Ta2O9 (SBT) and Ba2NaNb5O15 (BNN) phases. After thermal treatment under air, these ferroelectric-catalytic systems were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM images showed that RuO2 film morphology depended on substrate nature. A study of CH4 conversion into CO2 and H2O was carried out using these catalytic-ferroelectric multilayers: the conversion was analyzed from Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, at various temperatures. Improved catalytic properties were observed for RuO2 films deposited on BNN oxide layer

  15. Wetted-region structure in horizontal unsaturated fractures: Water entry through the surrounding porous matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Small-scale processes that influence wetted structure within the plane of a horizontal fracture as the fracture wets or drains through the matrix are investigated. Our approach integrates both aperture-scale modeling and physical experimentation. Several types of aperture-scale models have been defined and implemented. A series of physical experimental systems that allow us to measure wetted-region structure as a function of system parameters and water pressure head in analogue fractures also have been designed. In our preliminary proof-of-concept experiment, hysteresis is clearly evident in the measured saturation/pressure relation, as is the process of air entrapment, which causes a reduction in the connected areas between blocks and the wetted region available for flow in the plane of the fracture. A percolation threshold where the system is quickly spanned, allowing fluid conduction in the fracture plane, is observed which is analogous to that found in the aperture-scale models. A fractal wetted and entrapped-region structure is suggested by both experiment and modeling. This structure implies that flow tortuosity for both flow in the fracture and for inter-block fluid transfer is a scale-dependent function of pressure head

  16. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Dickerson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic pyrolysis is a promising thermochemical conversion route for lignocellulosic biomass that produces chemicals and fuels compatible with current, petrochemical infrastructure. Catalytic modifications to pyrolysis bio-oils are geared towards the elimination and substitution of oxygen and oxygen-containing functionalities in addition to increasing the hydrogen to carbon ratio of the final products. Recent progress has focused on both hydrodeoxygenation and hydrogenation of bio-oil using a variety of metal catalysts and the production of aromatics from bio-oil using cracking zeolites. Research is currently focused on developing multi-functional catalysts used in situ that benefit from the advantages of both hydrodeoxygenation and zeolite cracking. Development of robust, highly selective catalysts will help achieve the goal of producing drop-in fuels and petrochemical commodities from wood and other lignocellulosic biomass streams. The current paper will examine these developments by means of a review of existing literature.

  17. Combined catalytic converter and afterburner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T.T.-H.

    1994-11-30

    This patent describes the combined use of a catalytic converter and afterburner. An afterburner chamber and a catalyst matrix are disposed in series within a casing. A combustible premixed charge is ignited in the afterburner chamber before it enters the catalyst matrix. This invention overcomes the problem encountered in previous designs of some of the premixed charge passing unreacted through the device unless a very long afterburner chamber is used. (UK)

  18. Investigations for designing catalytic recombiners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In case of a severe accident in pressurised water reactors (PWR) a high amount of hydrogen up to about 20,000 m3 might be generated and released into the containments. The mixture consisting of hydrogen and oxygen may either burn or detonate, if ignited. In case of detonation the generated shock wave may endanger the components of the plant or the plant itself. Consequently, effective removal of hydrogen is required. The fact that hydrogen and oxygen react exo-thermally on catalytically acting surfaces already at low temperatures generating steam and heat is made use of in catalytic recombiners. They consist of substrates coated with catalyst (mainly platinum or palladium) which are arranged inside a casing. Being passively acting measures, recombiners do not need any additional energy supply. Experimental investigations on catalytic hydrogen recombination are conducted at FZJ (Forschungszentrum Juelich) using three test facilities. The results yield insight in the development potential of contemporary recombiner systems as well as of innovative systems. Detailed investigations on a recombiner section show strong temperature gradients over the surface of a catalytically coated sample. Dependent on the flow velocity, ignition temperature may be reached at the leading edge already at an inlet hydrogen concentration of about 5 vol.-%. The thermal strain of the substrate leads to considerable detachment of catalyst particles probably causing unintended ignition of the flammable mixture. Temperature peaks can be prevented effectively by leaving the first part of the plate uncoated. In order to avoid overheating of the catalyst elements of a recombiner even at high hydrogen concentrations a modular system of porous substrates is proposed. The metallic substrates are coated with platinum at low catalyst densities thus limiting the activity of the single specimen. A modular arrangement of these elements provides high recombination rates over a large hydrogen concentration

  19. Recent developments in research on catalytic reaction networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Serra

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last years, analyses performed on a stochastic model of catalytic reaction networks have provided some indications about the reasons why wet-lab experiments hardly ever comply with the phase transition typically predicted by theoretical models with regard to the emergence of collectively self-replicating sets of molecule (also defined as autocatalytic sets, ACSs, a phenomenon that is often observed in nature and that is supposed to have played a major role in the emergence of the primitive forms of life. The model at issue has allowed to reveal that the emerging ACSs are characterized by a general dynamical fragility, which might explain the difficulty to observe them in lab experiments. In this work, the main results of the various analyses are reviewed, with particular regard to the factors able to affect the generic properties of catalytic reactions network, for what concerns, not only the probability of ACSs to be observed, but also the overall activity of the system, in terms of production of new species, reactions and matter.

  20. Noble metal/functionalized cellulose nanofiber composites for catalytic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopiraman, Mayakrishnan; Bang, Hyunsik; Yuan, Guohao; Yin, Chuan; Song, Kyung-Hun; Lee, Jung Soon; Chung, Ill Min; Karvembu, Ramasamy; Kim, Ick Soo

    2015-11-01

    In this study, cellulose acetate nanofibers (CANFs) with a mean diameter of 325 ± 2.0 nm were electrospun followed by deacetylation and functionalization to produce anionic cellulose nanofibers (f-CNFs). The noble metal nanoparticles (RuNPs and AgNPs) were successfully decorated on the f-CNFs by a simple wet reduction method using NaBH4 as a reducing agent. TEM and SEM images of the nanocomposites (RuNPs/CNFs and AgNPs/CNFs) confirmed that the very fine RuNPs or AgNPs were homogeneously dispersed on the surface of f-CNFs. The weight percentage of the Ru and Ag in the nanocomposites was found to be 13.29 wt% and 22.60 wt% respectively; as confirmed by SEM-EDS analysis. The metallic state of the Ru and Ag in the nanocomposites was confirmed by XPS and XRD analyses. The usefulness of these nanocomposites was realized from their superior catalytic activity. In the aerobic oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde, the RuNPs/CNFs system gave a better yield of 89% with 100% selectivity. Similarly, the AgNPs/CNFs produced an excellent yield of 99% (100% selectivity) in the aza-Michael reaction of 1-phenylpiperazine with acrylonitrile. Mechanism has been proposed for the catalytic systems. PMID:26256382

  1. Catalytic removal of carbon monoxide over carbon supported palladium catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Carbon supported palladium (Pd/C) catalyst was prepared. ► Catalytic removal of CO over Pd/C catalyst was studied under dynamic conditions. ► Effects of Pd %, CO conc., humidity, GHSV and reaction environment were studied. - Abstract: Carbon supported palladium (Pd/C) catalyst was prepared by impregnation of palladium chloride using incipient wetness technique, which was followed by liquid phase reduction with formaldehyde. Thereafter, Pd/C catalyst was characterized using X-ray diffractometery, scanning electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy, thermo gravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry and surface characterization techniques. Catalytic removal of carbon monoxide (CO) over Pd/C catalyst was studied under dynamic conditions. Pd/C catalyst was found to be continuously converting CO to CO2 through the catalyzed reaction, i.e., CO + 1/2O2 → CO2. Pd/C catalyst provided excellent protection against CO. Effects of palladium wt%, CO concentration, humidity, space velocity and reaction environment were also studied on the breakthrough behavior of CO.

  2. Catalytical degradation of relevant pollutants from waters using magnetic nanocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadejde, C.; Neamtu, M.; Schneider, R. J.; Hodoroaba, V.-D.; Ababei, G.; Panne, U.

    2015-10-01

    The catalytic efficiency of two magnetically responsive nanocatalysts was evaluated for the degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and Reactive Yellow 84 (RY84) azo dyes using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant under very mild conditions (atmospheric pressure, room temperature). In order to obtain the nanocatalysts, the surface of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles, prepared by a co-precipitation method, was further modified with ferrous oxalate, a highly sensitive non-hazardous reducing agent. The sensitized nanomaterials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry, and used in the catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation (CWHPO) of RB5 and RY84, in laboratory-scale experiments. The effect of important variables such as catalyst dosage, H2O2 concentration, and contact time was studied in the dye degradation kinetics. The results showed that it was possible to remove up to 99.7% dye in the presence of 20 mM H2O2 after 240 min of oxidation for a catalyst concentration of 10 g L-1 at 25 °C and initial pH value of 9.0. CWHPO of reactive dyes using sensitized magnetic nanocatalysts can be a suitable pre-treatment method for complete decolorization of effluents from textile dyeing and finishing processes, once the optimum operating conditions are established.

  3. Wettability alteration by trimeric cationic surfactant at water-wet/oil-wet mica mineral surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wettability of oil reservoir rock affects the efficiency of the oil recovery process by reducing the capillary force. Methyldodecylbis [2-(dimethyldodecylammonio) ethyl] ammonium tribromide is a trimeric cationic surfactant that contains three dodecyl chains and three quaternary ammonium head groups connected by divinyl groups. The surfactant was synthesized, purified and used as a new wetting alteration agent. This paper focuses on the ability of this trimeric cationic surfactant to alter the wettability of water-wet and oil-wet mica mineral surfaces. The contact angle data of the solid-liquid interface in oil/water/solid three-phase system show that the trimeric cationic surfactant, when compared with single- and double-chain cationic surfactant, is a more effective wetting agent for water-wet and oil-wet mica surfaces at lower concentration. Measurements by atomic force microscopy (AFM) show that the surfactant molecules have formed a monolayer to reverse the wetting properties. On the water-wet surface, the surface is suffused with negative charge, which could attract the cationic head of surfactant, and leave the hydrophobic tails exposed. In contrast, on the oil-wet surface, the hydrophobic tails were attracted by hydrophobic interactions to the oil film between the surfactant and the crude oil. The hydrophilic heads were left outside to form a hydrophilic layer, which could explain the wettable to hydrophilic trend. Alteration to the degree of wettability is mainly dependent on the adsorption areas of the surfactant. The data show that the ability of the trimeric cationic surfactant affect the wettability is independent of surface tension.

  4. Turbulent flow over wetted and non-wetted superhydrophobic counterparts with random structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajdi Hokmabad, B.; Ghaemi, S.

    2016-01-01

    The turbulent structure of a channel flow over a non-wetted superhydrophobic (SHO) surface is experimentally investigated at Re = 9600 (based on channel width) at the region of y+ > 10 within the buffer and logarithmic layers. The SHO surface has a random pattern produced by spray coating and is compared with a wetted counterpart and also a smooth surface. Two planar particle image velocimetry measurements are carried out in the streamwise/spanwise and streamwise/wall-normal planes. The vector fields are obtained from both ensemble averaging and individual cross-correlations of double-frame images. The results showed a small increase (˜5%) of the mean velocity profile at y+ = 10 over the non-wetted surface in comparison with the wetted and the smooth surfaces. Up to 15% reduction of normal and shear Reynolds stresses is observed in the inner layer over the non-wetted SHO surface. The wetted SHO counterpart demonstrates no effect on the mean velocity and Reynolds stresses in comparison with the smooth surface. The result confirms the comment of Gad-el-Hak ["Experimental study of skin friction drag reduction on superhydrophobic flat plates in high Reynolds number boundary layer flow," Phys. Fluids 25, 025103 (2013)] that the wetted SHO is hydrodynamically smooth if the surface pores are smaller than the viscous sublayer thickness. A noticeable suppression of the sweep and ejection events, increase of the spanwise spacing of the low and high speed streaks, and attenuation of vortical structures are observed over the non-wetted SHO. These indicate attenuation of the turbulence regeneration cycle due to the slip boundary condition over the non-wetted SHO surfaces with random texture.

  5. Controlling Factors of Long-Term Trends in Mercury Wet Deposition and Precipitation Concentrations at Huntington Wildlife Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Z.; Mao, H.; Driscoll, C. T.

    2015-12-01

    Observations from the Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) at Huntington Wildlife Forest (HWF) suggested that a significant decline (r2 = 0.34, p = 0.03) from 2000 to 2013 in volume weighted mean (VWM) Hg concentrations in precipitation was linked to Hg emission decreases in the United States, especially in the Northeast and Midwest, and yet Hg wet deposition has remained fairly constant over the past two decades. The present study aimed to investigate the climatic, terrestrial, and anthropogenic factors that influenced the decadal pattern in Hg wet deposition in upstate NY. In spring and summer, when Hg wet deposition was the strongest, significant positive correlation (r2 = 0.89, p analysis indicated that large-scale dynamical forcing was likely an important factor influencing the long term trend in springtime Hg wet deposition at HWF. To further quantify the roles of meteorological and anthropogenic factors in Hg wet deposition, the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model was employed using an algorithm depicting state-of-the-art Hg chemistry mechanism and up-to-date Hg emission inventories evaluated with MDN and Atmospheric Mercury Network (AMNet) measurement data. CMAQ simulations with a constant vs. realistic meteorological conditions for multiple warm seasons (including spring and summer) were used to characterize and quantify the impacts of inter-annual variability of precipitation and atmospheric circulation on Hg wet deposition. In addition, contributions to Hg wet deposition from decreases in anthropogenic emissions in NYS and nation-wide were quantified from the model results.

  6. Differential photoacoustic cell to study the wetting process during porous silicon formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    German Espinosa-Arbelaez, Diego [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Posgrado en Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, Edificio de Posgrado, Coyoacan, CP 04530, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Departamento de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Blvd Juriquilla 3001, Campus Juriquilla, CP 76230, Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico); Velazquez-Hernandez, Ruben [Division de Investigacion y Posgrado, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma de Queretaro, Cerro de las Campanas, CP 76010, Queretaro, Qro (Mexico); Petricioli-Carranco, Julio; Quintero-Torres, Rafael; Rodriguez-Garcia, Mario Enrique [Departamento de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Blvd Juriquilla 3001, Campus Juriquilla, CP 76230, Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico)

    2011-06-15

    This paper shows the in-situ study of the wetting process in Silicon during anodization process using an electrochemical Differential photoacoustic Cell (DPC). The Photoacoustic amplitude and phase signals were obtained for samples in air, ethanol, ethanol/HF and finally air. According to these results ethanol is responsible for a mechanical contact reducing the superficial tension and ethanol/HF produce the removing of the SiO{sub x} and SiO{sub 2}species on the Silicon surface. It was found that the DPC is a powerful technique to study the wet surface before the formation of the porous silicon layer (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Simple wet-chemical synthesis of alloyed PdAu nanochain networks with improved electrocatalytic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: PdAu alloyed nanochain networks were prepared by a simple and facile one-pot wet-chemical method using allantoin as the structure-directing agent and stabilizing agent. The as-prepared nanocrystals displayed improved catalytic performances for ORR and MOR as compared to commercial Pd black catalyst. - Highlights: • Bimetallic PdAu nanochain networks were synthesized by a simple and facile one-pot wet-chemical approach. • Allantoin was used as the structure-directing agent and stabilizing agent. • The PdAu nanocrystals had large electrochemical active surface area. • The PdAu nanocrystals showed highly catalytic activity and good stability for ORR and MOR. - Abstract: Bimetallic PdAu alloyed nanochain networks (PdAu NCNs) were facilely prepared by a simple wet-chemical method with the assistance of allantoin as the structure-directing agent and stabilizing agent. Allantoin played an important role in the formation of chain-like networks. The products were mainly characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The as-prepared PdAu NCNs had enlarged electrochemical active surface area, and displayed enhanced electrocatalytic activity toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and methanol oxidation reaction (MOR), showing higher resistance to poisoning CO-like intermediates in MOR and more positive onset potential in ORR as compared to commercial Pd black catalyst. This approach provides a promising route for large-scale preparation of desirable bimetallic catalysts with the assistance of small biomolecules

  8. Two remarks on wetting and emulsions

    OpenAIRE

    de Gennes, Pierre-Gilles

    2000-01-01

    This paper is extracted from an opening address given at the workshop "Wetting: from microscopic origins to industrial applications" (Giens, May 6-12, 2000). It discusses two special points a) the nature of line energies for a contact line b) the aging of emulsions.

  9. Wet oxidation of a spacecraft model waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, C. C.; Wydeven, T.

    1985-01-01

    Wet oxidation was used to oxidize a spacecraft model waste under different oxidation conditions. The variables studied were pressure, temperature, duration of oxidation, and the use of one homogeneous and three heterogeneous catalysts. Emphasis is placed on the final oxidation state of carbon and nitrogen since these are the two major components of the spacecraft model waste and two important plant nutrients.

  10. A literature review on wet deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The literature on wet deposition or precipitation scavenging have been reviewed with special reference to predicting the radiological consequences of accidental contamination. The work was part of the EEC Radiation Protection Programme and done under a subcontract with Association Euratom-C.E.A. No. SC-014-BIAF-423-DK(SD). (author)

  11. Starch in the Wet-End

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Clerck, Peter

    Starch has been used in papermaking almost since the invention of paper. The global paper industry consumes almost 5 million tonnes of starch per year, making starch the third most important raw material in papermaking. Roughly 20% of this is used in the wet-end.

  12. 49 CFR 173.159 - Batteries, wet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Batteries, wet. (a) Electric storage batteries, containing electrolyte acid or alkaline corrosive battery... (h) of this section and in §§ 173.220 and 173.222; and any battery or battery-powered device must be..., but not limited to: (i) Packaging each battery or each battery-powered device when practicable,...

  13. Characteristics of wetting temperature during spray cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental study has been done to elucidate the effects of mass flux and subcooling of liquid and thermal properties of solid on the wetting temperature during cooling of a hot block with spray. A water spray was impinged at one of the end surfaces of a cylindrical block initially heated at 400 or 500degC. The experimental condition was mass fluxes G=1-9 kg/m2 s and degrees of subcooling ΔTsub =20, 50, 80 K. Three blocks of copper, brass and carbon steel were prepared. During spray cooling internal block temperature distribution and sputtering sound pressure level were recorded and the surface temperature and heat flux were evaluated with 2D inverse heat conducting analysis. Cooling process on cooling curves is divided into four regimes categorized by change in a flow situation and the sound level. The wetting temperature defined as the wall temperature at a minimum heat flux point was measured over an extensive experimental range. The wetting wall temperature was correlated well with the parameter of GΔTsub. The wetting wall temperature increases as GΔTsub increases and reaches a constant value depending on the material of the surface at higher region of GΔTsub. (author)

  14. Verification of wet blasting decontamination technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macoho Co., Ltd. participated in the projects of 'Decontamination Verification Test FY 2011 by the Ministry of the Environment' and 'Decontamination Verification Test FY 2011 by the Cabinet Office.' And we tested verification to use a wet blasting technology for decontamination of rubble and roads contaminated by the accident of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant of the Tokyo Electric Power Company. As a results of the verification test, the wet blasting decontamination technology showed that a decontamination rate became 60-80% for concrete paving, interlocking, dense-grated asphalt pavement when applied to the decontamination of the road. When it was applied to rubble decontamination, a decontamination rate was 50-60% for gravel and approximately 90% for concrete and wood. It was thought that Cs-134 and Cs-137 attached to the fine sludge scraped off from a decontamination object and the sludge was found to be separated from abrasives by wet cyclene classification: the activity concentration of the abrasives is 1/30 or less than the sludge. The result shows that the abrasives can be reused without problems when the wet blasting decontamination technology is used. (author)

  15. Rhizoctonia seed, seedling, and wet root rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wet root rot caused by Rhizoctonia solani Kühn can cause seed and seedling rot of both lentil and chickpea as well as many other agricultural crops worldwide. The pathogen is favored in cool, sandy soil with high organic matter under no-till or reduced-till soil management practices. Survival spor...

  16. Analysis of Altimeter Wet Troposphere Range Correction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    纪永刚; 张杰; 姬光荣; 张有广

    2004-01-01

    Wet path delay caused by tropospheric water vapor must be considered before altimeter data are used in oceanic application. This paper analyzed several methods of atmosphere water range correction (AWRC) using Seasat, Geosat, TOPEX and ERS-1 data, especially the calculated delay path using brightness temperature of TMR on TOPEX and EMR on ERS-1; and discussed some other problems of AWRC.

  17. Air Abrasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... delivered directly to your desktop! more... What Is Air Abrasion? Article Chapters What Is Air Abrasion? What Happens? The Pros and Cons Will I Feel Anything? Is Air Abrasion for Everyone? print full article print this ...

  18. Investigation of a wet ethanol operated HCCI engine based on first and second law analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a conceptual wet ethanol operated homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine is proposed to shift the energy balance in favor of ethanol. The investigated option, HCCI engine is a relatively new type of engine that has some fundamental differences with respect to other prime movers. Combined first and second law of thermodynamic approach is applied for a HCCI engine operating on wet ethanol and computational analysis is performed to investigate the effects of turbocharger compressor ratio, ambient temperature, and compressor adiabatic efficiency on first law efficiency, second law efficiency, and exergy destruction in each component. First law and second law efficiencies are found to be an increasing function of the turbocharger pressure ratio, while they are found to be a decreasing function of the ambient temperature. The effect of turbocharger pressure ratio on exergy destruction is found to be more significant than compressor efficiency and ambient temperature. Exergy analysis indicates that maximum exergy is destroyed in HCCI engine which represents about 90.09% of the total exergy destruction in the overall system. Around 4.39% exergy is destroyed by the process of heat transfer in fuel vaporizer and heat exchanger. Catalytic converter contributes about 4.08% of the total exergy destruction. This will provide some original information on the role of operating variables and will be quite useful in obtaining the optimum design of ethanol fuelled HCCI engines. - Highlights: → Direct utilization of wet ethanol in HCCI engines shift the energy balance in favor of ethanol. → First and second law efficiencies of wet ethanol operated HCCI engine increases with the increase in the turbocharger pressure ratio and its polytropic efficiency. → Second law analysis provides a suitable ranking among the components of the system in terms of exergy destruction. → Analysis of the results clearly showed that the highest irreversibility sources

  19. Bubble Hair and Other Acquired Hair Shaft Anomalies due to Hot Ironing on Wet Hair

    OpenAIRE

    Savitha, AS; Sacchidanand, S; Revathy, TN

    2011-01-01

    Bubble hair is an acquired hair shaft abnormality characterized by multiple airfilled spaces within the hair shaft. It is a result of thermal injury. We report a classic case of 22-year-old female who complained of dry brittle hair of two-week duration. Patient had used hot iron on wet hair twice to straighten hair. Hair microscopy was diagnostic and showed multiple air-filled spaces within the hair shaft.

  20. Characteristics of flow in wet conical spouted beds of unequal-sized spherical Particles

    OpenAIRE

    M. S. Bacelos; PASSOS M. L.; J. T. Freire

    2008-01-01

    Interparticle forces, developed in wet spouted beds composed of a mixture of spherical particles with different size distributions, intensify particle segregation mechanisms interfering in gas distribution inside the bed and, consequently, in the spouting flow characteristics. Therefore, this paper is aimed at describing the effect of interparticle forces on the air-solid flow distribution in conical spouted beds of unequal-sized particles coated by a thin glycerol film. Experimental results ...

  1. Catalytic partial oxidation of methane over porous silica supported VO{sub x} catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirovano, C.; Schoenborn, E.; Kalevaru, V.N.; Wohlrab, S.; Luecke, B.; Martin, A. [University Rostock e.V., Rostock (Germany). Leibniz Inst. for Catalysis

    2011-07-01

    High surface area mesoporous siliceous MCM-41 and SBA-15 materials have been used as supports to disperse vanadium oxide species using wet impregnation and incipient wetness impregnation methods. These materials were used as catalysts for the partial oxidation of methane (POM) to formaldehyde. The physico-chemical properties of the solids were studied by means of BET, DR-UV/Vis spectroscopy, Py-FTIR and TEM. The influence of support and the preparation method on the dispersion of VOx is also investigated. The catalytic properties of the catalysts were examined in a fixed bed stainless steel reactor at 923 K. So far a maximum production of formaldehyde can be detected on SBA-15 supported VOx-catalysts prepared by incipient wetness impregnation. On this V/SBA-15 material a covalent attachment of catalytic active molecular vanadium species dominates, which in turn leads to a lower activation temperature and thereby reduced over-oxidation. From the best case, the space time yield of HCHO could be reached close to 775 g{sub HCHO} Kg{sub cat}{sup -1} h{sup -1}. (orig.)

  2. Transition-metal nitro-nitrosyl redox couple: catalytic oxidation of olefins to ketones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new nitroso-nitrosyl redox couple based on the readily prepared complex bis(acetonitrile)chloronitropalladium(II) is reported which catalytically air oxidizes olefines to ketones. Results of 18O labelling mechanistic studies are included, and spectroscopic evidence for an intermediate involved in oxygen-atom transfer by a nitro group is presented. The effects of olefin substituents were also investigated

  3. Stepwise approach to establishing an ophthalmology wet laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Bonnie An; Grimes, Kelly J; Fintelmann, Robert E; Oetting, Thomas A

    2009-06-01

    Wet laboratories (wet labs) play an increasingly important role in ophthalmology surgical residency training. We summarize the necessary components in establishing and maintaining a well-functioning wet lab and offer a stepwise guide for educators to improve the quality of the wet lab experience. We present 6 key factors in creating an ophthalmology wet lab; that is, setting up the physical space, establishing appropriate faculty and curriculum, obtaining the practice eye, stabilizing the eye, preparing the eye, and funding the wet lab. PMID:19465299

  4. Plasma coating formed TIO2 catalysts usage in cleaning the air from nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide

    OpenAIRE

    Vitalij Kolodynskij; Pranas Baltrėnas

    2015-01-01

    The present catalytic air purification device–air cleaning device is capable to reduce nitrogen oxide sand carbon monoxide concentrations in polluted air stream and to achieve high cleaning efficiency. The principle of operation of catalytic air cleaning device is based on plasma coating formed catalysts usage. At high temperatures and oxygen concentrations in the experimental device channel, catalysts become active and reactions of conversion of pollutants start. In this research, the effici...

  5. A review of liquid-phase catalytic hydrodechlorination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Nelly Ardila Arias

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This survey was aimed at introducing the effect of light organochlorinated compound emissions on the envi-ronment, particularly on water, air, soil, biota and human beings. The characteristics and advantages of liquid phase catalytic hydrodechlorination as a technology for degrading these chlorinated compounds is also outlined and the main catalysts used in the hydrodechlorination process are described. Special emphasis is placed on palladium catalysts, their activity, the nature of active species and deactivation. The effect of several parameters is introduced, such as HCl, solvent, base addition and type of reducing agent used. The main results of kinetic studies, reactors used and the most important survey conclusions are presented.

  6. Wet adhesion and adhesive locomotion of snails on anti-adhesive non-wetting surfaces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil J Shirtcliffe

    Full Text Available Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted, texture (smooth, rough or granular or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces.

  7. Wet Adhesion and Adhesive Locomotion of Snails on Anti-Adhesive Non-Wetting Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirtcliffe, Neil J.; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael I.

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and the effectiveness of this adhesive locomotion on modern super-slippy superhydrophobic surfaces are unclear. Here we report that snail adhesion overcomes a wide range of these microscale and nanoscale topographically structured non-stick surfaces. For the one surface which we found to be snail resistant, we show that the effect is correlated with the wetting response of the surface to a weak surfactant. Our results elucidate some critical wetting factors for the design of anti-adhesive and bio-adhesion resistant surfaces. PMID:22693563

  8. The effect of noble metals on catalytic methanation reaction over supported Mn/Ni oxide based catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Wan Azelee Wan Abu Bakar; Rusmidah Ali; Nurul Shafeeqa Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) in sour natural gas can be removed using green technology via catalytic methanation reaction by converting CO2 to methane (CH4) gas. Using waste to wealth concept, production of CH4 would increase as well as creating environmental friendly approach for the purification of natural gas. In this research, a series of alumina supported manganese–nickel oxide based catalysts doped with noble metals such as ruthenium and palladium were prepared by wetness impregnation method. T...

  9. Radioisotope applications on fluidized catalytic cracking units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioisotopes are used to trace the flow of all the phases of Fluidized Catalytic Cracking process in oil refineries. The gaseous phases, steam, hydrocarbon vapour and air, are generally traced using a noble-gas isotope, 41Ar, 79Kr or 85Kr. An appropriate tracer for the catalyst is produced by irradiating a catalyst sample in a nuclear reactor. The activation products,140La and 24Na provide appropriate radioactive 'labels' for the catalyst, which is reinjected into the FCC. An advantage of this approach is that it facilitates the study of the behaviour of different particle size fractions. Radioisotopes as sealed sources of gamma radiation are used to measure catalyst density variations and density distributions in critical parts of the unit. An important trend in radioisotope applications is the increasing use of the information they produce as inputs to or as validation of, mathematical process models. In line with the increasing sophistication of the models, the technology is undergoing continuous refinement. Developments include the investigation of more efficient, more convenient tracers, the introduction of systems to facilitate more rapid and comprehensive data acquisition and software refinements for enhanced data analysis

  10. Wet Adhesion and Adhesive Locomotion of Snails on Anti-Adhesive Non-Wetting Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Shirtcliffe, Neil; McHale, Glen; Newton, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Creating surfaces capable of resisting liquid-mediated adhesion is extremely difficult due to the strong capillary forces that exist between surfaces. Land snails use this to adhere to and traverse across almost any type of solid surface of any orientation (horizontal, vertical or inverted), texture (smooth, rough or granular) or wetting property (hydrophilic or hydrophobic) via a layer of mucus. However, the wetting properties that enable snails to generate strong temporary attachment and th...

  11. A Capillary-Based Static Phase Separator for Highly Variable Wetting Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Evan A.; Graf, John C.; Weislogel, Mark M.

    2010-01-01

    The invention, a static phase separator (SPS), uses airflow and capillary wetting characteristics to passively separate a two-phase (liquid and air) flow. The device accommodates highly variable liquid wetting characteristics. The resultant design allows for a range of wetting properties from about 0 to over 90 advancing contact angle, with frequent complete separation of liquid from gas observed when using appropriately scaled test conditions. Additionally, the design accommodates a range of air-to-liquid flow-rate ratios from only liquid flow to over 200:1 air-to-liquid flow rate. The SPS uses a helix input section with an ice-cream-cone-shaped constant area cross section (see figure). The wedge portion of the cross section is on the outer edge of the helix, and collects the liquid via centripetal acceleration. The helix then passes into an increasing cross-sectional area vane region. The liquid in the helix wedge is directed into the top of capillary wedges in the liquid containment section. The transition from diffuser to containment section includes a 90 change in capillary pumping direction, while maintaining inertial direction. This serves to impinge the liquid into the two off-center symmetrical vanes by the airflow. Rather than the airflow serving to shear liquid away from the capillary vanes, the design allows for further penetration of the liquid into the vanes by the air shear. This is also assisted by locating the air exit ports downstream of the liquid drain port. Additionally, any droplets not contained in the capillary vanes are re-entrained downstream by a third opposing capillary vane, which directs liquid back toward the liquid drain port. Finally, the dual air exit ports serve to slow the airflow down, and to reduce the likelihood of shear. The ports are stove-piped into the cavity to form an unfriendly capillary surface for a wetting fluid to carryover. The liquid drain port is located at the start of the containment region, allowing for

  12. Effects of Interrupted Wetness Periods on Conidial Germination, Germ Tube Elongation and Infection Periods of Botryosphaeria dothidea Causing Apple White Rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ki Woo; Kim, Kyu Rang; Park, Eun Woo

    2016-01-01

    Responses of Botryosphaeria dothidea to interrupted wetness periods were investigated under in vivo and in vitro conditions. Conidia of B. dothidea were allowed to germinate on apple fruits under wetting condition at 25ºC for 5 hr. They were air-dried for 0, 1, 2 or 4 hr, and then rewetted at 25ºC for 5 hr. Following an initial wetness period of 5 hr, 83% of the conidia germinated. The percent conidial germination increased to 96% when wetting was extended continuously another 5 hr. However, no further conidial germination was observed when wetting was interrupted by dry periods of 1, 2 and 4 hr, resulting in 83, 81 and 82%, respectively. The mean length of the germ tubes was 37 μm after 5 hr of wetting and elongated to 157 μm after 10 hr of continuous wetting. On the other hand, interruption of wetting by a dry period of 1 hr or longer after the 5 hr of initial wetting arrested the germ tube elongation at approximately 42 μm long. Prolonged rewetting up to 40 hr did not restore germ tube elongation on slide glasses under substrate treatments. Model simulation using weather data sets revealed that ending infection periods by a dry period of at least 1 hr decreased the daily infection periods, avoiding the overestimation of infection warning. This information can be incorpo- rated into infection models for scheduling fungicide sprays to control apple white rot with fewer fungicide applications. PMID:26889109

  13. Freeze-drying wet digital prints: An option for salvage?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the occasion of the collapse of the Historical Archive of the City of Cologne in March 2009 and the ensuing salvage effort, questions were raised about the use of freeze-drying for soaked digital prints, a technique that has not yet been evaluated for these materials. This study examines the effects of immersion, air-drying, drying in a blotter stack, freezing and freeze-drying on 35 samples of major digital printing processes. The samples were examined visually before, during and after testing; evaluation of the results was qualitative. Results show that some prints were already damaged by immersion alone (e.g. bleeding inks and soluble coatings) to the extent that the subsequent choice of drying method made no significant difference any more. For those samples that did survive immersion, air-drying proved to be crucial for water-sensitive prints, since any contact with the wet surface caused serious damage. Less water-sensitive prints showed no damage throughout the entire procedure, regardless of drying method. Some prints on coated media suffered from minor surface disruption up to total delamination of the surface coating due to the formation of ice crystals during shock-freezing. With few exceptions, freeze-drying did not cause additional damage to any of the prints that hadn't already been damaged by freezing. It became clear that an understanding of the process and materials is important for choosing an appropriate drying method.

  14. Gecko Adhesion on Wet and Dry Patterned Substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Y Stark

    Full Text Available Perhaps one of the most astounding characteristics of the gecko adhesive system is its versatility. Geckos can locomote across complex substrates in a variety of conditions with apparent ease. In contrast, many of our synthetic pressure sensitive adhesives fail on substrates that are dirty, wet or rough. Although many studies have investigated the effect of environmental challenges on performance, the interaction of multiple, potentially compromising variables is studied less often. Here we focus on substrate structure and surface water, both of which are highly relevant to the biological system and to synthetic design. To do this we utilized a highly controlled, patterned substrate (Sharklet®, by Sharklet® Technologies Inc.. This allowed us to test independently and jointly the effects of reduced surface area substrates, with a defined pattern, on adhesion in both air and water. Our results show that adhesion is not significantly impaired in air, whereas surface area and pattern significantly affect adhesion in water. These findings highlight the need to study multiple parameters that are relevant to the gecko adhesive system to further improve our understanding of the biological system and to design better, more versatile synthetics.

  15. Gecko Adhesion on Wet and Dry Patterned Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Alyssa Y; Palecek, Amanda M; Argenbright, Clayton W; Bernard, Craig; Brennan, Anthony B; Niewiarowski, Peter H; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Perhaps one of the most astounding characteristics of the gecko adhesive system is its versatility. Geckos can locomote across complex substrates in a variety of conditions with apparent ease. In contrast, many of our synthetic pressure sensitive adhesives fail on substrates that are dirty, wet or rough. Although many studies have investigated the effect of environmental challenges on performance, the interaction of multiple, potentially compromising variables is studied less often. Here we focus on substrate structure and surface water, both of which are highly relevant to the biological system and to synthetic design. To do this we utilized a highly controlled, patterned substrate (Sharklet®, by Sharklet® Technologies Inc.). This allowed us to test independently and jointly the effects of reduced surface area substrates, with a defined pattern, on adhesion in both air and water. Our results show that adhesion is not significantly impaired in air, whereas surface area and pattern significantly affect adhesion in water. These findings highlight the need to study multiple parameters that are relevant to the gecko adhesive system to further improve our understanding of the biological system and to design better, more versatile synthetics. PMID:26696412

  16. Influence of pH on wetting kinetics of a pine forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amer, Ahmad; Schaumann, Gabriele; Diehl, Dörte

    2014-05-01

    Water repellent properties of organic matter significantly alter soil water dynamics. Various environmental factors control appearance and breakup of repellency in soil. Beside water content and temperature also pH exerts an influence on soil water repellency although investigations achieved partly ambiguous results; some found increasing repellency with increasing pH (Terashima et al. 2004; Duval et al. 2005), other with decreasing pH (Karnok et al. 1993; Roper 2005) and some found repellency maxima at intermediate pH and an increase with decreasing and with increasing pH (Bayer and Schaumann 2007; Diehl et al. 2010). The breakup of repellency may be observed via the time dependent sessile drop contact angle (TISED). With water contact time, soil-water contact angle decreases until complete wetting is reached. Diehl and Schaumann (2007) calculated the activation energy of the wetting process from the rate of sessile drop wetting obtained at different temperatures and draw conclusions on chemical or physical nature of repellency. The present study aims at the influence of pH on the wetting kinetics of soil. Therefore, TISED of soil was determined as a function of pH and temperature. We used upper soil samples (0 - 10 cm) from a pine forest in the southwest of Germany (Rheinland-Pfalz). Samples were air-dried, sieved soil sample. Apparent work of adhesion was calculated, plotted vs. time and mathematically fitted using double exponential function. Rate constants of wetting were used to determine the activation energy by Arrhenius equation. First results indicated that despite comparable initial contact angles, pH alteration strongly changed the wetting rate suggesting maximum wetting resistance at the natural pH of 4.3 and decreasing wetting resistance at lower and at higher pH. The poster will present further current results of the ongoing study and discuss the activation energy of the wetting process in dependence of artificially altered soil pH. References: Bayer

  17. Atmospheric methanol measurement using selective catalytic methanol to formaldehyde conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Solomon

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel atmospheric methanol measurement technique, employing selective gas-phase catalytic conversion of methanol to formaldehyde followed by detection of the formaldehyde product, has been developed and tested. The effects of temperature, gas flow rate, gas composition, reactor-bed length, and reactor-bed composition on the methanol conversion efficiency of a molybdenum-rich, iron-molybdate catalyst [Mo-Fe-O] were studied. Best results were achieved using a 1:4 mixture (w/w of the catalyst in quartz sand. Optimal methanol to formaldehyde conversion (>95% efficiency occurred at a catalyst housing temperature of 345°C and an estimated sample-air/catalyst contact time of <0.2 s. Potential interferences arising from conversion of methane and a number of common volatile organic compounds (VOC to formaldehyde were found to be negligible under most atmospheric conditions and catalyst housing temperatures. Using the new technique, atmospheric measurements of methanol were made at the University of Bremen campus from 1 to 15 July 2004. Methanol mixing ratios ranged from 1 to 5 ppb with distinct maxima at night. Formaldehyde mixing ratios, obtained in conjunction with methanol by periodically bypassing the catalytic converter, ranged from 0.2 to 1.6 ppb with maxima during midday. These results suggest that selective, catalytic methanol to formaldehyde conversion, coupled with existing formaldehyde measurement instrumentation, is an inexpensive and effective means for monitoring atmospheric methanol.

  18. Atmospheric methanol measurement using selective catalytic methanol to formaldehyde conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Solomon

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel atmospheric methanol measurement technique, employing selective gas-phase catalytic conversion of methanol to formaldehyde followed by detection of the formaldehyde product, has been developed and tested. The effects of temperature, gas flow rate, gas composition, reactor-bed length, and reactor-bed composition on the methanol conversion efficiency of a molybdenum-rich, iron-molybdate catalyst [Mo-Fe-O] were studied. Best results were achieved using a 1:4 mixture (w/w of the catalyst in quartz sand. Optimal methanol to formaldehyde conversion (>95% efficiency occurred at a catalyst housing temperature of 345°C and an estimated sample-air/catalyst contact time of <0.2 seconds. Potential interferences arising from conversion of methane and a number of common volatile organic compounds (VOC to formaldehyde were found to be negligible under most atmospheric conditions and catalyst housing temperatures. Using the new technique, atmospheric measurements of methanol were made at the University of Bremen campus from 1 to 15 July 2004. Methanol mixing ratios ranged from 1 to 5 ppb with distinct maxima at night. Formaldehyde mixing ratios, obtained in conjunction with methanol by periodically bypassing the catalytic converter, ranged from 0.2 to 1.6 ppb with maxima during midday. These results suggest that selective, catalytic methanol to formaldehyde conversion, coupled with existing formaldehyde measurement instrumentation, is an inexpensive and effective means for monitoring atmospheric methanol.

  19. Kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Boudart, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book is a critical account of the principles of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions in the light of recent developments in surface science and catalysis science. Originally published in 1984. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase acc

  20. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen, is divided into two tasks. Task 1 centers on the activation of dihydrogen by molecular basic reagents such as hydroxide ion to convert it into a reactive adduct (OH{center_dot}H{sub 2}){sup {minus}} that can reduce organic molecules. Such species should be robust withstanding severe conditions and chemical poisons. Task 2 is focused on an entirely different approach that exploits molecular catalysts, derived from organometallic compounds that are capable of reducing monocyclic aromatic compounds under very mild conditions. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  1. Studies of Catalytic Model Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holse, Christian

    the Cu/ZnO nanoparticles is highly relevant to industrial methanol synthesis for which the direct interaction of Cu and ZnO nanocrystals synergistically boost the catalytic activity. The dynamical behavior of the nanoparticles under reducing and oxidizing environments were studied by means of ex situ...... observed by XPS as the nanoparticles are reduced. The Cu/ZnO nanoparticles are tested on a  µ-reactor platform and prove to be active towards methanol synthesis, making it an excellent model system for further investigations into activity depended morphology changes....

  2. Catalytic Spectrophotometric Determination of Chromium

    OpenAIRE

    STOYANOVA, Angelina Miltcheva

    2005-01-01

    The catalytic effect of chromium(III) and chromium(VI) on the oxidation of sulfanilic acid by hydrogen peroxide was studied. The reaction was followed spectrophotometrically by measuring the absorbance of the reaction product at 360 nm. Under the optimum conditions 2 calibration graphs (for chromium(III) up to 100 ng mL-1, and for chromium(VI) up to 200 ng mL-1) were obtained, using the ``fixed time'' method with detection limits of 4.9 ng mL-1 and 3.8 ng mL-1, respectively...

  3. Catalytic Combustion of Ethyl Acetate

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZÇELİK, Tuğba GÜRMEN; ATALAY, Süheyda; ALPAY, Erden

    2007-01-01

    The catalytic combustion of ethyl acetate over prepared metal oxide catalysts was investigated. CeO, Co2O3, Mn2O3, Cr2O3, and CeO-Co2O3 catalysts were prepared on monolith supports and they were tested. Before conducting the catalyst experiments, we searched for the homogeneous gas phase combustion reaction of ethyl acetate. According to the homogeneous phase experimental results, 45% of ethyl acetate was converted at the maximum reactor temperature tested (350 °C). All the prepare...

  4. Estimating the temperature of a catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T.T.-H.

    1994-11-02

    A method is described for estimating the temperature in a catalytic converter used in the exhaust system of an internal combustion engine. Pressure sensors monitor the flow resistance across the catalytic converter to provide an indication of the temperature inside. This feedback system allows heating devices to be switched off and thus avoid overheating, while maintaining the catalytic converter's efficiency by assuring that it does not operate below its light off temperature. (UK)

  5. Estimating the temperature of a catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T.T.-H.

    1994-11-02

    A method of estimating the temperature of a catalytic converter used in the exhaust system of an internal combustion engine is described. Heated exhaust gas oxygen (HEGO) sensors are placed upstream and downstream of the catalytic converter. The temperature of the catalytic converter shortly after start-up is measured by monitoring the resistance of the HEGO sensor's heating element. The downstream sensor is used for mixture control and to double check results of the upstream sensor. (UK)

  6. Experimental Investigation of Wetting with Magnetic Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukyan, Selin; Schneider, Marius

    2016-05-24

    Here we report the experimental results of the general wetting behavior of an oil-based ferrofluid and a water-based magnetic paint droplet on a hydrophobic surface under the effect of an external magnetic field. By increasing the magnetic field in the vertical direction, the height of the oil-based ferrofluid droplet increases while the width decreases; on the contrary, under the same circumstances, the height of the water-based magnetic paint droplet decreases whereas the width increases. The wetting behavior of the oil-based ferrofluid and the water-based magnetic paint droplets is evaluated as a function of the contact angle, contact line diameter, and hysteresis curve alterations. Conclusively, a general explanation is given for the contrary behavior of both liquids, and some application processes for future implementations are introduced. PMID:27119597

  7. Liquid holdup in wet-gas pipelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental study of two-phase flow was conducted to investigate liquid holdup in wet-gas pipelines. The liquid-holdup data were obtained by passing spheres through a 1,333-ft [406.3-m] -long, 3.068-in. [77.93-mm] -ID horizontal pipe and measuring the liquid volumes removed. Three different two-phase mixtures were used. The holdup data were compared with predicted holdup values and were used to evaluate a mechanistic model for stratified flow. None of the methods could accuratly predict liquid holdup in this low-holdup region. Two new empirical liquid-holdup correlations for horizontal flow were proposed. The first is strictly for wet-gas pipelines (0< y/sub L/<0.35); the second is for any horizontal pipeline (0< y/sub L/<1.0)

  8. Wet precipitators for sulphuric acid plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both the service requirements and design construction details have changed considerably in recent years for wet electrostatic precipitators as used for gas cleaning ahead of metallurgical sulphuric acid plants. Increased concern over acid quality has resulted in more emphasis on dust efficiencies compared to collection of acid mist. Also, higher static operating pressures have caused large structural loads on casing and internal components. In this paper these two issues are addressed in the following ways: Recognition that all dusts do not collect similarly. The mechanism by which various dusts collect affect the design of the entire wet gas cleaning system. Use of both traditional and newer materials of construction to accommodate the higher design pressures while still maintaining corrosion resistance

  9. Dry-Wet Fermentation for Biogas Production

    OpenAIRE

    Ahlhaus, M; Barz, M; Vogel, T.

    2008-01-01

    At present biogas plants produce biogas mainly from slurry by liquid fermentation. But the low substrate digestation of herbaceous biomass by liquid fermentation permits to use only a low amount of herbaceous biomass. Since April 2007 the collaborative project entitled “Development of a combined dry-wet fermentation process to produce biogas from herbaceous biomass substrates” is conducted at the Laboratory for Integrated Energy Systems of the University of Applied Sciences in ...

  10. Study of polycaprolactone wet electrospinning process

    OpenAIRE

    E. Kostakova; M. Seps; P. Pokorny; Lukas, D.

    2014-01-01

    Wet electrospinning is a useful method for 3-dimensional structure control of nanofibrous materials. This innovative technology uses a liquid collector instead of the metal one commonly used for standard electrospinning. The article compares the internal structural features of polycaprolactone (PCL) nanofibrous materials prepared by both technologies. We analyze the influence of different water/ethanol compositions used as a liquid collector on the morphology of the resultant polycaprolactone...

  11. Wet flue gas desulphurization and new fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiil, S.; Dam-Johansen, K.; Michelsen, M.L.

    1998-04-01

    This thesis describes experimental and theoretical investigations of wet flue gas desulphurization (FGD). A review of the current knowledge of the various rate determining steps in wet FDG plants is presented. The mechanism underlying the rate of dissolution of finely grained limestone particles was examined in a laboratory batch apparatus using acid titration. Three Danish limestones of different origin were tested. A transient, mass transport controlled, mathematical model was developed to describe the dissolution process. Model predictions were found to be qualitatively in good agreement with experimental data. Empirical correlations for the dimensionless mass transfer coefficients in a pilot plant (falling-film column) were determined. The presence of inert particles in the liquid phase was found to decrease the rate of gas phase mass transport with up to 15%, though the effect could not be correlated. A detailed model for a wet FGD pilot plant, based on the falling film principle, was developed. All important rate determining steps, absorption of SO{sub 2}, oxidation of HSO{sub 3}{sup -}, dissolution of limestone, and crystallisation of gypsum were included. Model predictions were compared to experimental data such as gas phase concentration profiles of SO{sub 2}, slurry pH-profiles, solids contents of slurry, liquid phase concentrations, and residual limestone in the gypsum. The possibility of co-firing straw and coal was investigated in a full-scale power plant. No effects on the overall performance of the wet FGD plant were observed, though laboratory experiments with fine dust and fly ash from the full-scale experiments showed a decrease in limestone reactivity. (EG) EFP-95. 45 refs.; Also ph.d. thesis of Soeren Kiil

  12. Thermal Equilibrium and Wet Gas Compressor Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Aalvik, Marthe

    2011-01-01

    The wet gas performance model established for this master s thesis is based on results achieved from a single stage, low pressure ratio, centrifugal compressor set up at NTNU. Water droplets are injected to the flow right before the inlet. The GMF varies from 0.9 to 0.65 throughout the experiments preformed. Compressor performance is achieved by simulations in HYSYS with atmospheric inlet conditions. The importance of accurate measurements is evident to achieve the correct performance. A lite...

  13. Static wetting behaviour of diblock copolymers

    OpenAIRE

    Ausserre, D.; Raghunathan, V.; Maaloum, M.

    1993-01-01

    Thin liquid films of ordered diblock copolymers deposited on a solid substrate form a multilayer stacking parallel to the solid surface. A multilayer with a finite extend can be stable, metastable, or unstable, depending on the relative values of the surface energies of the various interfaces. The spreading parameter and chemical potential of a n-layer are derived, and used for classifying all possible situations. It is shown that only mono- and bilayers can be stable, and that non-wetting mu...

  14. The role of thin films in wetting

    OpenAIRE

    Marmur, Abraham

    1988-01-01

    The role of thin films in wetting is reviewed. Three modes of spontaneous spreading are discussed : incomplete spreading, complete spreading and mixed-mode spreading. A thin film can be either molecular or colloidal in thickness. Molecularly adsorbed films are mainly associated with incomplete spreading. Colloidal films usually extend from the bulk of the liquid in dynamic situations of complete spreading. Their existence at equilibriuim with the bulk depends on the orientation in the gravita...

  15. A new model for the V-Cone meter in low pressure wet gas metering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wet gas metering with differential pressure (DP) devices (e.g. the orifice plate, the Venturi and the V-Cone) has gained increasing interest in the oil and gas industry. Many investigations have been performed and several models have been proposed. Among the DP devices, the V-Cone flow meter has received increasing attention owing to its remarkable performance characteristics, including high accuracy, excellent repeatability, wide turndowns, shorter straight length and stable signals. In this work, we developed a new method for predicting the gas flow rate in low pressure wet gas flow using a V-Cone flow meter with the diameter ratio of 0.55. The experimental fluid was air and tap water. The test pressure ranged from 0.10 to 0.48 MPa, and the gas and liquid mass flow rates ranged from 100 to 500 N m3 h−1 and from 0.030 to 0.358 m3 h−1, respectively. Thus, the Lockhart–Martinelli parameter, XLM, was up to 0.158 and the gas volume fraction ranged from 98.94% to 100%. A dimensionless parameter, K, was proposed in this work and defined as the two-phase flow coefficient of the flow meter. The results indicated that the K linearly increased with the Lockhart–Martinelli parameter. In addition, the K increased with the gas densiometric Froude number and decreased with the operating pressure when other parameters were kept constant. On the basis of the two-phase flow coefficient, a new wet gas model was developed and compared with seven popular wet gas models. It was found that with the V-Cone flow meter and under the present experimental conditions the new model produced a more accurate prediction of the wet gas than other models. The research approach to obtaining the model can also be used in the studies on other DP devices and thus will benefit the design of wet gas meters. (paper)

  16. A new model for the V-Cone meter in low pressure wet gas metering

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Denghui; Bai, Bofeng; Xu, Yong; Li, Xing

    2012-12-01

    Wet gas metering with differential pressure (DP) devices (e.g. the orifice plate, the Venturi and the V-Cone) has gained increasing interest in the oil and gas industry. Many investigations have been performed and several models have been proposed. Among the DP devices, the V-Cone flow meter has received increasing attention owing to its remarkable performance characteristics, including high accuracy, excellent repeatability, wide turndowns, shorter straight length and stable signals. In this work, we developed a new method for predicting the gas flow rate in low pressure wet gas flow using a V-Cone flow meter with the diameter ratio of 0.55. The experimental fluid was air and tap water. The test pressure ranged from 0.10 to 0.48 MPa, and the gas and liquid mass flow rates ranged from 100 to 500 N m3 h-1 and from 0.030 to 0.358 m3 h-1, respectively. Thus, the Lockhart-Martinelli parameter, XLM, was up to 0.158 and the gas volume fraction ranged from 98.94% to 100%. A dimensionless parameter, K, was proposed in this work and defined as the two-phase flow coefficient of the flow meter. The results indicated that the K linearly increased with the Lockhart-Martinelli parameter. In addition, the K increased with the gas densiometric Froude number and decreased with the operating pressure when other parameters were kept constant. On the basis of the two-phase flow coefficient, a new wet gas model was developed and compared with seven popular wet gas models. It was found that with the V-Cone flow meter and under the present experimental conditions the new model produced a more accurate prediction of the wet gas than other models. The research approach to obtaining the model can also be used in the studies on other DP devices and thus will benefit the design of wet gas meters.

  17. A round robin evaluation of the corrosiveness of wet residential insulation by electrochemical measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stansbury, E.E. (Stansbury (E.E.), Knoxville, TN (United States))

    1991-10-01

    The results of a round cabin evaluation of the use of an electrochemical method of calculating the corrosion rate of low carbon steel in environments related to cellulosic building insulations are reported. Environments included the leachate from a wet cellulosic insulation and solutions based on pure and commercial grades of borax, ammonium sulfate and aluminum sulfate. The pH values of these environments were in the range of 2.5 to 9.5. Electrochemical measurements were made using a direct reading corrosion rate instrument. The calculated corrosion rates were compared with those determined directly by weight loss measurements. Electrochemical measurements were made over a period of 48 hours and weight loss exposures were for two weeks. Poor agreement was observed for the corrosion rates determined electrochemically and the values were consistently larger than those based on weight loss. Reasons proposed for these results included the complex nature of the corrosion product deposits and the control these deposits have on oxygen diffusion to the metal interface. Both factors influence the validity of the calculation of the corrosion rate by the direct reading instrument. It was concluded that development of a viable electrochemical method of general applicability to the evaluation of the corrosiveness of wet residential building thermal insulations were doubtful. Because of the controlling influence of dissolved oxygen on the corrosion rate in the insulation leachate, an alternate evaluation method is proposed in which a thin steel specimen is partially immersed in wet insulation for three weeks. The corrosiveness of the wet insulation is evaluated in terms of the severity of attack near the metal-air-wet insulation interface. With thin metal specimens, complete penetration along the interface is proposed as a pass/fail criterion. An environment of sterile cotton wet with distilled water is proposed as a comparative standard. 9 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Effects of air humidity on ionization chamber response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the effect of air humidity on four different ionization chamber cap materials verified earlier studies (Kristensen and Sundbom, 1981; Mijnheer et al., 1983) and extended our understanding of the problem. We found nylon and A-150 plastic caps swell as they absorb water from the air. This accounts for as much as 2.5% increase in ionization response. Graphite chambers readily absorb and desorb water from the air. This creates a problem in maintaining dry air in a wet graphite chamber. Humid air has a different density and W value than dry air (Niatel, 1969, 1975). This decreases the charge collected in a wet graphite chamber. We observe a decrease in response of approximately 2%, a value greater than can be accounted for by these effects alone. Polyethylene chambers are unaffected by humid air. 4 refs., 9 figs

  19. Nanotemplated High-Temperature Materials for Catalytic Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elm Svensson, Erik

    2008-06-15

    Catalytic combustion is a promising technology for heat and power applications, especially gas turbines. By using catalytic combustion ultra low emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO) and unburned hydrocarbons (UHC) can be reached simultaneously, which is very difficult with conventional combustion technologies. Besides achieving low emission levels, catalytic combustion can stabilize the combustion and thereby be used to obtain stable combustion with low heating-value gases. This thesis is focused on the high-temperature part of the catalytic combustor. The level of performance demanded on this part has proven hard to achieve. In order to make the catalytic combustor an alternative to the conventional flame combustor, more stable catalysts with higher activity have to be developed. The objective of this work was to develop catalysts with higher activity and stability, suitable for the high-temperature part of a catalytic combustor fueled by natural gas. Two template-based preparation methods were developed for this purpose. One method was based on soft templates (microemulsion) and the other on hard templates (carbon). Supports known for their stability, magnesia and hexaaluminate, were prepared using the developed methods. Catalytically active materials, perovskite (LaMnO{sub 3}) and ceria (CeO{sub 2}), were added to the supports in order to obtain catalysts with high activities and stabilities. The supports were impregnated with active materials by using a conventional technique as well as by using the microemulsion technique. It was shown that the microemulsion method can be used to prepare catalysts with higher activity compared to the conventional methods. Furthermore, by using a microemulsion to apply active materials onto the support a significantly higher activity was obtained than when using the conventional impregnation technique. Since the catalysts will operate in the catalytic combustor for extended periods of time under harsh

  20. Sullivan model for wetting transition in closed system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wetting transition in a closed system is analytically discussed based on the Sullivan model. In order to have a wetting transition in the system the wall potential must have intermediate strength. The wetting transition is first order for the finite system, while it becomes of second order for the infinite one. In addition, the temperature TW of the wetting transition becomes lower as the separation of the two walls decreases. (author). 8 refs, 5 figs

  1. Hydrogen and helium films as model systems of wetting

    OpenAIRE

    Herminghaus, Stephan; Vorberg, Jens; Gau, Hartmut; Conradt, Robert N. J.; Reinelt, Dietmar; Ulmer, Holger; Leiderer, Paul; Przyrembel, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Optical experiments on the wetting properties of liquid 4He and molecular hydrogen are reviewed. Hydrogen films on noble metal surfaces serve as model systems for studying triple point wetting, a continuous transition between wetting and non-wetting. By means of optically excited surface plasmons, the adsorbed film thickness for temperatures around, and far below, the bulk melting temperature is measured, and the physical mechanisms responsible for the transition are elucidated. Possible appl...

  2. STUDY ON WET STRENGTH PERFORMANCE OF KENAF MULCH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinghui Zhou; Xinge Wu; Hongwei Zhu

    2004-01-01

    Optimum applied technical conditions of wet strength agent for kenaf mulch were studied in this article. Breaking length, wet-dry strength ratio, tear index and burst index of kenaf mulch were measured and optimum wet strength agent was selected. The aim is to make mulch have properties of heat preservation, humidity preservation, growth prompting, biodegradation and maximum wet strength and to improve impact resistance of mulch to rainwater so as to assure growth of plant and replace plastic film.

  3. Study of polycaprolactone wet electrospinning process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kostakova

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Wet electrospinning is a useful method for 3-dimensional structure control of nanofibrous materials. This innovative technology uses a liquid collector instead of the metal one commonly used for standard electrospinning. The article compares the internal structural features of polycaprolactone (PCL nanofibrous materials prepared by both technologies. We analyze the influence of different water/ethanol compositions used as a liquid collector on the morphology of the resultant polycaprolactone nanofibrous materials. Scanning electron micro-photographs have revealed a bimodal structure in the wet electrospun materials composed of micro and nanofibers uniformly distributed across the sample bulk. We have shown that the full-faced, twofold fiber distribution is due to the solvent composition and is induced and enhanced by increasing the ethanol weight ratio. Moreover, the comparison of fibrous layers morphology obtained by wet and dry spinning have revealed that beads that frequently appeared in dry spun materials are created by Plateau-Rayleigh instability of the fraction of thicker fibers. Theoretical conditions for spontaneous and complete immersion of cylindrical fibers into a liquid collector are also derived here.

  4. Estimating soil wetness using satellite data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Bhaskar J.; Golus, Robert E.

    1988-01-01

    Improved estimates of soil wetness were obtained using observations from both the NIMBUS-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) and the NOAA-7 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR). SMMR 66 GHz frequency, horizontal polarization, brightness temperature T(BH) was first correlated with soil wetness, as computed using an Antecedent Precipitation Index (API) model, for a number of SMMR ground resolution areas involving a fairly wide range of vegetation densities. The API generally accounted for more than 70 percent of the observed temporal variability in T(BH), with linear correlations being significant at the 1 percent level. The regression slope of T(BH) versus API correlated well, at the 1 percent level, with a vegetation index derived from AVHRR visible and near-infrared observations. The regression intercept was found to correlate less satisfactorily, but was significant at the 5 percent level. These linear regression results were used to develop a diagnostic model for soil wetness using SMMR and AVHRR data only.

  5. Wetting properties of molecularly rough surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We employ molecular dynamics simulations to study the wettability of nanoscale rough surfaces in systems governed by Lennard-Jones (LJ) interactions. We consider both smooth and molecularly rough planar surfaces. Solid substrates are modeled as a static collection of LJ particles arranged in a face-centered cubic lattice with the (100) surface exposed to the LJ fluid. Molecularly rough solid surfaces are prepared by removing several strips of LJ atoms from the external layers of the substrate, i.e., forming parallel nanogrooves on the surface. We vary the solid-fluid interactions to investigate strongly and weakly wettable surfaces. We determine the wetting properties by measuring the equilibrium droplet profiles that are in turn used to evaluate the contact angles. Macroscopic arguments, such as those leading to Wenzel’s law, suggest that surface roughness always amplifies the wetting properties of a lyophilic surface. However, our results indicate the opposite effect from roughness for microscopically corrugated surfaces, i.e., surface roughness deteriorates the substrate wettability. Adding the roughness to a strongly wettable surface shrinks the surface area wet with the liquid, and it either increases or only marginally affects the contact angle, depending on the degree of liquid adsorption into the nanogrooves. For a weakly wettable surface, the roughness changes the surface character from lyophilic to lyophobic due to a weakening of the solid-fluid interactions by the presence of the nanogrooves and the weaker adsorption of the liquid into the nanogrooves

  6. Estimating evaporation from a wet grassland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Wet grasslands are being restored across the UK and Europe to reinstate their high biodiversity following over 50 years of drainage and conversion to arable agriculture. The water balance of many wet grasslands is dominated by precipitation and evaporation and it is essential to quantify evaporation rates to understand the hydrological functioning of wetlands and the implications for water resources in catchments where wetlands are being restored. This paper considers data from direct measurements of evaporation from the Pevensey Levels wet grassland using the eddy correlation method. Equations are derived to predict actual evaporation using meteorological data on the site or from standard meteorological station observations. It was found that evaporation could be estimated reliably from meteorological variables, such as wind speed, temperature and humidity and by water availability. It was also found that when water availability is high, evaporation is high and may exceed reference evaporation values, raising questions over the deployment of the two-step Penman-Monteith model unless reliable crop coefficients and relative evaporation figures can be determined.

  7. Catalytic converters in the fireplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to selecting the appropriate means of heating and using dry fuel, the amount of harmful emissions contained by flue gases produced by fireplaces can be reduced by technical means. One such option is to use an oxidising catalytic converter. Tests at TTS Institute's Heating Studies Experimental Station have focused on two such converters (dense and coarse) mounted in light-weight iron heating stoves. The ability of the dense catalytic converter to oxidise carbon monoxide gases proved to be good. The concentration of carbon monoxide in the flue gases was reduced by as much as 90 %. Measurements conducted by VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland) showed that the conversion of other gases, e.g. of methane, was good. The exhaust resistance caused by the dense converter was so great as to necessitate the mounting of a fluegas evacuation fan in the chimney for the purpose of creating sufficient draught. When relying on natural draught, the dense converter requires a chimney of at least 7 metres and a by-pass connection while the fire is being lit. In addition, the converter will have to be constructed to be less dense and this will mean that it's capability to oxidise non-combusted gases will be reduced. The coarse converter did not impair the draught but it's oxidising property was insufficient. With the tests over, the converter was not observed to have become blocked up by impurities

  8. Catalytic reforming feed characterisation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larraz Mora, R.; Arvelo Alvarez, R. [Univ. of La Laguna, Chemical Engineering Dept., La Laguna (Spain)

    2002-09-01

    The catalytic reforming of naphtha is one of the major refinery processes, designed to increase the octane number of naphtha or to produce aromatics. The naphtha used as catalytic reformer feedstock usually contains a mixture of paraffins, naphthenes, and aromatics in the carbon number range C{sub 6} to C{sub 10}. The detailed chemical composition of the feed is necessary to predict the aromatics and hydrogen production as well as the operation severity. The analysis of feed naphtha is usually reported in terms of its ASTM distillation curve and API or specific gravity. Since reforming reactions are described in terms of lumped chemical species (paraffins, naphthenes and aromatics), a feed characterisation technique should be useful in order to predict reforming operating conditions and detect feed quality changes. Unfortunately online analyzer applications as cromatography or recently introduced naphtha NMR [1] are scarce in most of refineries. This work proposes an algorithmic characterisation method focusing on its main steps description. The method could help on the subjects previously described, finally a calculation example is shown. (orig.)

  9. 7 CFR 51.1563 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1563 Section 51.1563... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Potatoes 1 Definitions § 51.1563 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  10. 7 CFR 51.1582 - Soft rot or wet breakdown.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Soft rot or wet breakdown. 51.1582 Section 51.1582... STANDARDS) United States Consumer Standards for Potatoes Definitions § 51.1582 Soft rot or wet breakdown. Soft rot or wet breakdown means any soft, mushy, or leaky condition of the tissue such as slimy...

  11. Characteristics of wet work in the cleaning industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungbauer, F H W; Van Der Harst, J J; Schuttelaar, M L; Groothoff, J W; Coenraads, P J

    2004-01-01

    Wet work is the main cause of occupational contact dermatitis in the cleaning industry. Dermatologists and occupational physicians need to base their primary and secondary prevention for workers in the cleaning industry on the characteristics of wet work exposures. We quantified the burden of wet wo

  12. Wetting of doped carbon nanotubes by water droplets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsalis, E. M.; Demosthenous, E.; Walther, Jens Honore;

    2005-01-01

    We study the wetting of doped single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes by water droplets using molecular dynamics simulations. Chemisorbed hydrogen is considered as a model of surface impurities. We study systems with varying densities of surface impurities and we observe increased wetting, as c...... doping sites leading to enhanced wetting. (c) 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  13. Advanced wet--dry cooling tower concept performance prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snyder, T.; Bentley, J.; Giebler, M.; Glicksman, L.R.; Rohsenow, W.M.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this year's work has been to test and analyze the new dry cooling tower surface previously developed. The model heat transfer test apparatus built last year has been instrumented for temperature, humidity and flow measurement and performance has been measured under a variety of operating conditions. Tower Tests showed approximately 40 to 50% of the total energy transfer as taking place due to evaporation. This can be compared to approximately 80 to 85% for a conventional wet cooling tower. Comparison of the model tower test results with those of a computer simulation has demonstrated the validity of that simulation and its use as a design tool. Computer predictions have been made for a full-size tower system operating at several locations. Experience with this counterflow model tower has suggested that several design problems may be avoided by blowing the cooling air horizontally through the packing section. This crossflow concept was built from the previous counterflow apparatus and included the design and fabrication of new packing plates. Instrumentation and testing of the counterflow model produced data with an average experimental error of 10%. These results were compared to the predictions of a computer model written for the crossflow configuration. In 14 test runs the predicted total heat transfer differed from the measured total heat transfer by no more than 8% with most runs coming well within 5%. With the computer analogy's validity established, it may now be used to help predict the performance of fullscale wet-dry towers.

  14. Characterization of Catalytic Porous Medium Using Platinum for Micro-combustion Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miskam Muhamad Azman

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, catalytic alumina porous medium has been fabricated by using platinum as an active material for micro-combustion application. Platinum has been deposited onto porous medium surface via wet impregnation method. The porous medium undergoes surface modification process via wash coating method using gamma alumina (γ-Al2O3 solution, before being impregnated with platinum in order to increase the surface area. The surface morphology of porous medium entirely changes from smooth “solid-rock” into rough “sand-like” after the wash coating process. The amount of platinum deposited onto the treated porous medium is 1.66 wt.%. LPG combustion analysis shows that the combustion is successfully occur inside the catalytic porous media with overall efficiency of 71%.

  15. Block copolymer hollow fiber membranes with catalytic activity and pH-response

    KAUST Repository

    Hilke, Roland

    2013-08-14

    We fabricated block copolymer hollow fiber membranes with self-assembled, shell-side, uniform pore structures. The fibers in these membranes combined pores able to respond to pH and acting as chemical gates that opened above pH 4, and catalytic activity, achieved by the incorporation of gold nanoparticles. We used a dry/wet spinning process to produce the asymmetric hollow fibers and determined the conditions under which the hollow fibers were optimized to create the desired pore morphology and the necessary mechanical stability. To induce ordered micelle assembly in the doped solution, we identified an ideal solvent mixture as confirmed by small-angle X-ray scattering. We then reduced p-nitrophenol with a gold-loaded fiber to confirm the catalytic performance of the membranes. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  16. Recycle attuned catalytic exchange (RACE) for reliable and low inventory processing of highly tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The detritiation of highly tritiated water by liquid phase catalytic exchange needs dilution of the feed with water to tritium concentrations suitable for catalyst and safety rules and to assure flow rates large enough for wetting the catalyst. Dilution by recycling detritiated water from within the exchange process has three advantages: the amount and concentration of the water for dilution is controlled within the exchange process, there is no additional water load to processes located downstream RACE, and the ratio of gas to liquid flow rates in the exchange column could be adjusted by using several recycles differing in amount and concentration to avoid an excessively large number of theoretical separation stages. In this paper, the flexibility of the recycle attuned catalytic exchange (RACE) and its effect on the cryogenic distillation are demonstrated for the detritiation of the highly tritiated water from a tritium breeding blanket

  17. Low-temperature catalytic gasification of food processing wastes. 1995 topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, D.C.; Hart, T.R.

    1996-08-01

    The catalytic gasification system described in this report has undergone continuing development and refining work at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for over 16 years. The original experiments, performed for the Gas Research Institute, were aimed at developing kinetics information for steam gasification of biomass in the presence of catalysts. From the fundamental research evolved the concept of a pressurized, catalytic gasification system for converting wet biomass feedstocks to fuel gas. Extensive batch reactor testing and limited continuous stirred-tank reactor tests provided useful design information for evaluating the preliminary economics of the process. This report is a follow-on to previous interim reports which reviewed the results of the studies conducted with batch and continuous-feed reactor systems from 1989 to 1994, including much work with food processing wastes. The discussion here provides details of experiments on food processing waste feedstock materials, exclusively, that were conducted in batch and continuous- flow reactors.

  18. The composition of wet deposition in El Paso, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmert, Sonny

    The composition of precipitation reflects the transport of particles from varying air mass source regions as well as input from local environmental and anthropogenic activities. Air research in El Paso, TX, U.S.A/Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, Mexico has been traditionally limited to studies of local inputs of air pollution; no transition has been made to studying the scavenging, washout, and transport of pollutants by precipitation. The goal of this research project was to identify transported pollutants in precipitation, and determine if there were any health and ecological implications. The research investigated biological, chemical, and geological constituents in precipitation samples collected between September 2004 and October 2005. A variety of analysis techniques were used to determine composition of the precipitation. These techniques included bacterial and fungal plate counts, inductively coupled plasma/mass spectrometry, ion chromatography, transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electron microprobe analysis. Samples were collected from an urban site in El Paso, Texas at the campus of the University of Texas at El Paso. Wet only samples were the target of the sample collection. Particulate matter <10 microns was correlated with fungal growth while particulate matter < 2.5 microns was correlated with bacterial growth in analyzed samples. Microscopy methods revealed new techniques in particle characterization, evidence of anthropogenic influence, and a wide variety of particle compositions. The ionic chemistry results reflected elevated levels of ions as well as an overall alkalinity of rainwater samples. Elemental analysis of the inorganic fraction suggested elevated enrichment of Phosphorus in the study area and possible ratios for transport identification of southwestern dust storms.

  19. Removal of ammonia from aqueous solutions by catalytic oxidation with copper-based rare earth composite metal materials: catalytic performance, characterization, and cytotoxicity evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Mao Hung

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia (NH3) has an important use in the chemical industry and is widely found in industrial wastewater.For this investigation of copper-based rare earth composite metal materials,aqueous solutions containing 400 mg/L of ammonia were oxidized in a batch-bed reactor with a catalyst prepared by the co-precipitation of copper nitrate,lanthanum nitrate and cerium nitrate.Barely any of the dissolved ammonia was removed by wet oxidation without a catalyst,but about 88% of the ammonia was reduced during wet oxidation over the catalysts at 423 K with an oxygen partial pressure of 4.0 MPa.The catalytic redox behavior was determined by cyclic voltammetry (CV).Furthermore,the catalysts were characterized using thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX),which showed that the catalytic behavior was related to the metal oxide properties of the catalyst.In addition,the copper-lanthanum-cerium composite-induced cytotoxicity in the human lung MRC-5 cell line was tested,and the percentage cell survival was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetra-zolium (MTS) analysis in vitro.No apparent cytotoxicity was observed when the human lung cells were exposed to the copper-lanthanum-cerium composite.

  20. Effect of dry and wet ambient environment on the pulsed laser ablation of titanium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surface and structural properties of the laser irradiated titanium targets have been investigated under dry and wet ambient environments. For this purpose KrF Excimer laser of wavelength 248 nm, pulse duration of 20 ns and repetition rate of 20 Hz has been employed. The targets were exposed for various number of laser pulses ranging from 500 to 2000 in the ambient environment of air, de-ionized water and propanol at a fluence of 3.6 J/cm2. The surface morphology, chemical composition and crystallographical analysis were performed by using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDS) and X-ray Diffraction (XRD), respectively. For both central and peripheral ablated areas, significant difference in surface morphology has been observed in case of dry and wet ambient conditions. Large sized and diffused grains are observed in case of dry ablation. Whereas, in case of wet ablation, small sized, and well defined grains with distinct grain boundaries and significantly enhanced density are revealed. This difference is ascribed to the confinement effects of the liquid. The peripheral ablated area shows redeposition in case of dry ablation whereas small sized grain like structures are formed in case of wet ablation. EDS analysis exhibits variation in chemical composition under both ambient conditions. When the targets are treated in air environment, enhancement of the oxygen as well as nitrogen content is observed while in case of de-ionized water and propanol only increase in content of oxygen is observed. X-ray diffraction analysis exhibits formation of oxides and nitrides in case of air, whereas, in case of de-ionized water and propanol only oxides along with hydrides are formed. For various number of laser pulses the variation in the peak intensity, crystallinity and d-spacing is observed under both ambient conditions.