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Sample records for catalytic water co-existing

  1. Catalytic water co-existing with a product peptide in the active site of HIV-1 protease revealed by X-ray structure analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Prashar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: It is known that HIV-1 protease is an important target for design of antiviral compounds in the treatment of Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS. In this context, understanding the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme is of crucial importance as transition state structure directs inhibitor design. Most mechanistic proposals invoke nucleophilic attack on the scissile peptide bond by a water molecule. But such a water molecule coexisting with any ligand in the active site has not been found so far in the crystal structures. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report here the first observation of the coexistence in the active site, of a water molecule WAT1, along with the carboxyl terminal product (Q product peptide. The product peptide has been generated in situ through cleavage of the full-length substrate. The N-terminal product (P product has diffused out and is replaced by a set of water molecules while the Q product is still held in the active site through hydrogen bonds. The position of WAT1, which hydrogen bonds to both the catalytic aspartates, is different from when there is no substrate bound in the active site. We propose WAT1 to be the position from where catalytic water attacks the scissile peptide bond. Comparison of structures of HIV-1 protease complexed with the same oligopeptide substrate, but at pH 2.0 and at pH 7.0 shows interesting changes in the conformation and hydrogen bonding interactions from the catalytic aspartates. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The structure is suggestive of the repositioning, during substrate binding, of the catalytic water for activation and subsequent nucleophilic attack. The structure could be a snap shot of the enzyme active site primed for the next round of catalysis. This structure further suggests that to achieve the goal of designing inhibitors mimicking the transition-state, the hydrogen-bonding pattern between WAT1 and the enzyme should be replicated.

  2. Catalytic water co-existing with a product peptide in the active site of HIV-1 protease revealed by X-ray structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashar, Vishal; Bihani, Subhash; Das, Amit; Ferrer, Jean-Luc; Hosur, Madhusoodan

    2009-11-17

    It is known that HIV-1 protease is an important target for design of antiviral compounds in the treatment of Acquired Immuno Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). In this context, understanding the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme is of crucial importance as transition state structure directs inhibitor design. Most mechanistic proposals invoke nucleophilic attack on the scissile peptide bond by a water molecule. But such a water molecule coexisting with any ligand in the active site has not been found so far in the crystal structures. We report here the first observation of the coexistence in the active site, of a water molecule WAT1, along with the carboxyl terminal product (Q product) peptide. The product peptide has been generated in situ through cleavage of the full-length substrate. The N-terminal product (P product) has diffused out and is replaced by a set of water molecules while the Q product is still held in the active site through hydrogen bonds. The position of WAT1, which hydrogen bonds to both the catalytic aspartates, is different from when there is no substrate bound in the active site. We propose WAT1 to be the position from where catalytic water attacks the scissile peptide bond. Comparison of structures of HIV-1 protease complexed with the same oligopeptide substrate, but at pH 2.0 and at pH 7.0 shows interesting changes in the conformation and hydrogen bonding interactions from the catalytic aspartates. The structure is suggestive of the repositioning, during substrate binding, of the catalytic water for activation and subsequent nucleophilic attack. The structure could be a snap shot of the enzyme active site primed for the next round of catalysis. This structure further suggests that to achieve the goal of designing inhibitors mimicking the transition-state, the hydrogen-bonding pattern between WAT1 and the enzyme should be replicated.

  3. Water-use strategies of six co-existing Mediterranean woody species during a summer drought

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quero, J.L.; Sterck, F.J.; Martínez-Vilalta, J.; Villar, R.

    2011-01-01

    Drought stress is known to limit plant performance in Mediterranean-type ecosystems. We have investigated the dynamics of the hydraulics, gas exchange and morphology of six co-existing Mediterranean woody species growing under natural field conditions during a drought that continued during the

  4. Catalytic detritiation of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, M.L.; Lamberger, P.H.; Ellis, R.E.; Mills, T.K.

    1977-01-01

    A pilot-scale system has been used at Mound Laboratory to investigate the catalytic detritiation of water. A hydrophobic, precious metal catalyst is used to promote the exchange of tritium between liquid water and gaseous hydrogen at 60 0 C. Two columns are used, each 7.5 m long by 2.5 cm ID and packed with catalyst. Water flow is 5-10 cm 3 /min and countercurrent hydrogen flow is 9,000-12,000 cm 3 /min. The equipment, except for the columns, is housed in an inert atmosphere glovebox and is computer controlled. The hydrogen is obtained by electrolysis of a portion of the water stream. Enriched gaseous tritium is withdrawn for further enrichment. A description of the system is included along with an outline of its operation. Recent experimental data are discussed

  5. High efficient removal of molybdenum from water by Fe2(SO4)3: Effects of pH and affecting factors in the presence of co-existing background constituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiang; Ma, Jun; Lu, Xixin; Huangfu, Xiaoliu; Zou, Jing

    2015-12-30

    Comparatively investigated the different effects of Fe2(SO4)3 coagulation-filtration and FeCl3 coagulation-filtration on the removal of Mo (VI). And the influence of calcium, sulfate, silicate, phosphate and humic acid (HA) were also studied. The following conclusions can be obtained: (1) compared with the case of FeCl3, Fe2(SO4)3 showed a higher Mo (VI) removal efficiency at pH 4.00-5.00, but an equal removal efficiency at pH 6.00-9.00. (2) The optimum Mo (VI) removal by Fe2(SO4)3 was achieved at pH 5.00-6.00; (3) The presence of calcium can reduce the removal of Mo (VI) over the entire pH range in the present study; (4) The effect of co-existing background anions (including HA) was dominated by three factors: Firstly the influence of co-existing background anions on the content of Fe intercepted from water (intercepted Fe). Secondly the competition of co-existing anions with Mo (VI) for adsorption sites. Thirdly the influence of co-existing background anions on the Zeta potential of the iron flocs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Co-existence in multispecies biofilm communities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røder, Henriette Lyng

    with an increased tolerance against e.g. antibiotics, which could otherwise have killed the individual bacteria. In natural environments biofilm consists of several distinct species increasing the complexity of interactions between the species. When several bacterial species co-exist, they influence each other...... environment to evaluate their biofilm formation capability. It was found that multispecies consortia could lead to increased biofilm formation compared to mono species growth. This shows how co-localized isolates are able to influence biofilm production in a community with high relevance for food safety...... and production. The analysis was further extended in manuscript 3, in which the effect of social interac-tions on biofilm formation in multispecies co-cultures isolated from a diverse range of environments was examined. The question raised was whether the interspecific interactions of co-existing bacteria...

  7. Catalytic determination of vanadium in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, M. J.; Skougstad, M.W.

    1964-01-01

    A rapid, accurate, and sensitive spectrophotometric method for the quantitative determination of trace amounts of vanadium in water is based on the catalytic effect of vanadium on the rate of oxidation of gallic acid by persulfate in acid solution. Under given conditions of concentrations of reactants, temperature, and reaction time, the extent of oxidation of gallic acid is proportional to the concentration of vanadium present. Vanadium is determined by measuring the absorbance of the sample at 415 m?? and comparison with standard solutions treated in an identical manner. Concentrations in the range of from 0.1 to 8.0 ??g. per liter may be determined with a standard deviation of 0.2 or less. By reducing the reaction time, the method may be extended to cover the range from 1 to 100 ??g. with a standard deviation of 0.8 or less. Several substances interfere, including chloride above 100 p.p.m., and bromide and iodide in much lower concentrations. Interference from the halides is eliminated or minimized by the addition of mercuric nitrate solution. Most other substances do not interfere at the concentration levels at which they commonly occur in natural waters.

  8. Water recovery by catalytic treatment of urine vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budininkas, P.; Quattrone, P. D.; Leban, M. I.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the feasibility of water recovery on a man-rated scale by the catalytic processing of untreated urine vapor. For this purpose, two catalytic systems, one capable of processing an air stream containing low urine vapor concentrations and another to process streams with high urine vapor concentrations, were designed, constructed, and tested to establish the quality of the recovered water.

  9. Photolytic AND Catalytic Destruction of Organic Waste Water Pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torosyan, V. F.; Torosyan, E. S.; Kryuchkova, S. O.; Gromov, V. E.

    2017-01-01

    The system: water supply source - potable and industrial water - wastewater - sewage treatment - water supply source is necessary for water supply and efficient utilization of water resources. Up-to-date technologies of waste water biological treatment require for special microorganisms, which are technologically complex and expensive but unable to solve all the problems. Application of photolytic and catalytically-oxidizing destruction is quite promising. However, the most reagents are strong oxidizers in catalytic oxidation of organic substances and can initiate toxic substance generation. Methodic and scientific approaches to assess bread making industry influence on the environment have been developed in this paper in order to support forecasting and taking technological decisions concerning reduction of this influence. Destructive methods have been tested: ultra violet irradiation and catalytic oxidation for extraction of organic compounds from waste water by natural reagents.

  10. Magnetic nesting and co-existence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elesin, V.F.; Kapaev, V.V.; Kopaev, Yu.V.

    2004-01-01

    In the case of providing for the magnetic nesting conditions of the electron spin dispersion law the co-existence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity is possible by any high magnetization. The co-existence of ferromagnetism and superconductivity in the layered cuprate compounds of the RuSr 2 GdCu 2 O 8 -type is explained on this basis, wherein due to the nonstrict provision of the magnetic nesting condition there exists the finite but sufficiently high critical magnetization [ru

  11. Molecular catalytic system for efficient water splitting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joya, Khurram Saleem

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this dissertation is to construct and explore artificial oxygen evolving complexes that are synthetically accessible, stable, functionally robust and efficient. To achieve this, a class of mono metal water splitting catalysts is introduced in this manuscript and exploitation of these

  12. Duodenal Diverticulum Co-Existing with a Bleeding Duodenal Ulcer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Duodenal diverticula are characterized by the presence of sac-like mucosal herniations through weak points in the duodenal wall. Duodenal diverticula co-existing with a bleeding duodenal ulcer is rare. Objective: The objective of this case report is to illustrate an uncommon case of two duodenal diverticula ...

  13. Environmental policy evaluation under co-existing evaluation imaginaries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunseler, E.M.; Vasileiadou, E.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines what the co-existence of different evaluation imaginaries – understandings of what environmental policy evaluation ‘is’ and ‘should do’ – means for everyday evaluation practice. We present a case study in which we show how these different understandings influence the evaluation

  14. Catalytic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Hanafi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of dealuminated Y-zeolites impregnated by 0.5 wt% Pt catalysts promoted by different amounts of Ni, Pd or Cr (0.3 and 0.6 wt% were prepared and characterized as hydrocracking catalysts. The physicochemical and structural characterization of the solid catalysts were investigated and reported through N2 physisorption, XRD, TGA-DSC, FT-IR and TEM techniques. Solid catalysts surface acidities were investigated through FT-IR spectroscopy aided by pyridine adsorption. The solid catalytic activities were evaluated through hydroconversion of n-hexane and n-heptane employing micro-catalytic pulse technique directly connected to a gas chromatograph analyzer. The thermal stability of the solids was also investigated up to 800 °C. Crystallinity studies using the XRD technique of all modified samples proved analogous to the parent Y-zeolite, exhibiting nearly an amorphous and microcrystalline character of the second metal oxides. Disclosure of bimetallic catalysts crystalline characterization, through XRD, was not viable. The nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms for all samples concluded type I adsorption isotherms, without any hysteresis loop, indicating that the entire pore system is composed of micropores. TEM micrographs of the solid catalysts demonstrate well-dispersed Pt, Ni and Cr nanoparticles having sizes of 2–4 nm and 7–8 nm, respectively. The catalytic activity results indicate that the bimetallic (0.5Pt–0.3Cr/D18H–Y catalyst is the most active towards n-hexane and n-heptane isomerization while (0.5Pt–0.6Ni/D18H–Y catalyst can be designed as most suitable as a cracking catalyst.

  15. Catalytic membrane reactor for water and wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Samuel

    A double membrane reactor was fabricated and assessed for continuous treatment of water containing organic contaminants by ozonation. This innovative reactor consisted of a zeolite membrane prepared on the inner surface of a porous a-alumina support, which served as water selective extractor and active contactor, and a porous stainless membrane which was the ozone gas diffuser. The coupling of membrane separation and chemical oxidation was found to be highly beneficial to both processes. The total organic carbon (TOC) removal rate at the retentate was enhanced by up to 2.2 times, as compared to membrane ozonation. Simultaneously, clean water (membrane support, was shown to further enhance TOC degradation, permeated TOC concentration, permeate flux, and moreover, ozone yield. The achievements of this project included: (1) The development of a novel low-temperature zeolite membrane activation method that generates consistently high quality membranes (i.e. high reproducibility and fewer defects). (2) The demonstration that gamma-alumina and gamma-alumina supported catalysts do not have significant activity and that the TOC removal enhancement usually observed during catalytic ozonation was due primarily to the contribution of adsorption and metal leaching. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and elemental analysis (EA) of the spent catalyst showed that, during catalytic ozonation, oxygenated by-products of increased adsorbability were concentrated onto the gamma-alumina contactor, and were subsequently degraded. (3) The development of a method for coating high surface area gamma-alumina layers onto the grains of zeolite membrane support used as the active membrane contactor.

  16. Eccrine syringofibroadenoma with co-existent squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadt, Courtney R; Boyd, Alan S

    2007-12-01

    Eccrine syringofibroadenoma (ESFA) is a rare, benign adnexal tumor arising most often on the extremities of elderly individuals. It is typically a slow-growing, flesh- to reddish-colored nodule or plaque. Histologically, the tumor consists of anastomosing cords of cuboidal epithelial cells surrounded by a fibrovascular stroma containing plasma cells. The cords contain scattered ductal structures lined with cuboidal cells resembling eccrine ducts. The co-existence of ESFA with squamous cell carcinoma has been described, eliciting the term eccrine syringofibroadenoma. The differential diagnosis includes poroma, porocarcinoma, fibroepithelioma of Pinkus and clear cell acanthoma. ESFA stain positively with epithelial membrane antigen and carcinoembryonic antigen. Cytokeratin studies have been inconsistent.

  17. Biodiversity and co-existence of competing species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Ahmed; Dasgupta, Debanjan; Pleimling, Michel

    2013-03-01

    Understanding why and how species co-exist is a necessary step to the program of manipulating multispecies environments in order to preserve the biodiversity of the environment of interest. To this end we consider a generalization of the cyclic competition of species model. We show that our model enjoys a Zn symmetry which is explained via a simple graph theoretic technique. This symmetry gives rise to pattern formation and cluster coarsening of the species. We show that biodiversity is achievable in the mean field limit provided that the species in the clusters have reaction rates which correspond to non-trivial equilibria. This work is supported by the US National Science Foundation through grants DMR-0904999 and DMR-1205309.

  18. Education for a Culture of Peace and Co-Existence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Guetta

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Education is a key and fundamental tool required to achieve social change, especially regarding social cohesion and co-existence. Education affects the most critical issues facing humanity, including the proliferation of various forms of violence, environmental degradation, and annihilation of cultures. I argue that the impact of education is equal to that of economics, politics, and technological advances. Therefore, if we wish to see change, educational reform has to be designed to operate in a global-human context, empowering and allowing people to achieve their potential. It should instil in individuals and groups respect for others with whom they interact, in a global as well as local sense. The article draws on the theories of Edgar Morin, Reuven Feuerstein, and Jerome Bruner, and their contributions to the development of educational approaches that encourage a culture of responsible, participatory, and creative coexistence. .

  19. Experimental studies on catalytic hydrogen recombiners for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drinovac, P.

    2006-01-01

    In the course of core melt accidents in nuclear power plants a large amount of hydrogen can be produced and form an explosive or even detonative gas mixture with aerial oxygen in the reactor building. In the containment atmosphere of pressurized water reactors hydrogen combines a phlogistically with the oxygen present to form water vapor even at room temperature. In the past, experimental work conducted at various facilities has contributed little or nothing to an understanding of the operating principles of catalytic recombiners. Hence, the purpose of the present study was to conduct detailed investigations on a section of a recombiner essentially in order to deepen the understanding of reaction kinetics and heat transport processes. The results of the experiments presented in this dissertation form a large data base of measurements which provides an insight into the processes taking place in recombiners. The reaction-kinetic interpretation of the measured data confirms and deepens the diffusion theory - proposed in an earlier study. Thus it is now possible to validate detailed numeric models representing the processes in recombiners. Consequently the present study serves to broaden and corroborate competence in this significant area of reactor technology. In addition, the empirical knowledge thus gained may be used for a critical reassessment of previous numeric model calculations. (orig.)

  20. Conserved water-mediated H-bonding dynamics of catalytic Asn ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    [Nandi T K, Bairagya H R, Mukhopadhyay B P, Sekar K, Sukul D and Bera A K 2009 Conserved water-mediated H-bonding dynamics of catalytic. Asn 175 in plant thiol protease; J. Biosci. 34 27–34]. Keywords. Conserved water in molecular recognition; MD simulation; plant cysteine protease. Abbreviations used: CHASA ...

  1. Catalytical degradation of relevant pollutants from waters using magnetic nanocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadejde, C.; Neamtu, M.; Schneider, R. J.; Hodoroaba, V.-D.; Ababei, G.; Panne, U.

    2015-10-01

    The catalytic efficiency of two magnetically responsive nanocatalysts was evaluated for the degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and Reactive Yellow 84 (RY84) azo dyes using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant under very mild conditions (atmospheric pressure, room temperature). In order to obtain the nanocatalysts, the surface of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles, prepared by a co-precipitation method, was further modified with ferrous oxalate, a highly sensitive non-hazardous reducing agent. The sensitized nanomaterials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry, and used in the catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation (CWHPO) of RB5 and RY84, in laboratory-scale experiments. The effect of important variables such as catalyst dosage, H2O2 concentration, and contact time was studied in the dye degradation kinetics. The results showed that it was possible to remove up to 99.7% dye in the presence of 20 mM H2O2 after 240 min of oxidation for a catalyst concentration of 10 g L-1 at 25 °C and initial pH value of 9.0. CWHPO of reactive dyes using sensitized magnetic nanocatalysts can be a suitable pre-treatment method for complete decolorization of effluents from textile dyeing and finishing processes, once the optimum operating conditions are established.

  2. Catalytic and Non-catalytic Supercritical Water Gasification of Microalgae and Glycerol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chakinala, Anand G.; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Kersten, Sascha R.A.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we present the gasification of microalgae (Chlorella vulgaris) and glycerol in supercritical water (SCW) using batch (quartz capillaries) and continuous flow reactors. Preliminary tests of algae gasification were done with quartz capillaries at varying operating conditions such as

  3. Catalytical degradation of relevant pollutants from waters using magnetic nanocatalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nadejde, C., E-mail: claudia.nadejde@uaic.ro [Interdisciplinary Research Department – Field Science, ‘Alexandru Ioan Cuza’ University, Lascar Catargi 54, 700107 Iasi (Romania); Neamtu, M., E-mail: mariana.neamtu@uaic.ro [Interdisciplinary Research Department – Field Science, ‘Alexandru Ioan Cuza’ University, Lascar Catargi 54, 700107 Iasi (Romania); Schneider, R.J.; Hodoroaba, V.-D. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany); Ababei, G. [National Institute of Research and Development for Technical Physics, Dimitrie Mangeron Bd. 47, 700050 Iasi (Romania); Panne, U. [BAM Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, Unter den Eichen 87, D-12205 Berlin (Germany); Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Department of Chemistry, Brook-Taylor-Str. 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Non-hazardous, facile and inexpensive procedure for efficient wastewater treatment. • Chemical synthesis of ferrous oxalate modified Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles. • Structural characterization confirmed the senzitized catalysts' nanometric size. • The highly magnetic catalysts can be easily recovered from solution. • 99.7% of azo dye was removed in 4 h using Fenton-like process in alkaline media. - Abstract: The catalytic efficiency of two magnetically responsive nanocatalysts was evaluated for the degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and Reactive Yellow 84 (RY84) azo dyes using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant under very mild conditions (atmospheric pressure, room temperature). In order to obtain the nanocatalysts, the surface of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles, prepared by a co-precipitation method, was further modified with ferrous oxalate, a highly sensitive non-hazardous reducing agent. The sensitized nanomaterials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry, and used in the catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation (CWHPO) of RB5 and RY84, in laboratory-scale experiments. The effect of important variables such as catalyst dosage, H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration, and contact time was studied in the dye degradation kinetics. The results showed that it was possible to remove up to 99.7% dye in the presence of 20 mM H{sub 2}O{sub 2} after 240 min of oxidation for a catalyst concentration of 10 g L{sup −1} at 25 °C and initial pH value of 9.0. CWHPO of reactive dyes using sensitized magnetic nanocatalysts can be a suitable pre-treatment method for complete decolorization of effluents from textile dyeing and finishing processes, once the optimum operating conditions are established.

  4. Catalytic Conversion of Glucose into 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural by Hf(OTf4 Lewis Acid in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of Lewis acidic metal salts were used for glucose dehydration to 5-hydroymethylfurfural (HMF in water. Effect of valence state, ionic radii of Lewis acidic cation, and the type of anions on the catalytic performance have been studied systematically. The experimental results showed that the valence state played an important role in determining catalytic activity and selectivity. It was found that a higher glucose conversion rate and HMF selectivity could be obtained over high valent Lewis acid salts, where the ionic radii of these Lewis acidic metal salts are usually relatively small. Analysis on the effect of the anions of Lewis acid salts on the catalytic activity and the selectivity suggested that a higher glucose conversion and HMF selectivity could be readily obtained with Cl−. Furthermore, the recyclability of high valence state Lewis acid salt was also studied, however, inferior catalytic performance was observed. The deactivation mechanism was speculated to be the fact that high valence state Lewis acid salt was comparatively easier to undergo hydrolysis to yield complicated metal aqua ions with less catalytic activity. The Lewis acidic activity could be recovered by introducing a stoichiometric amount of hydrochloric acid (HCl to the catalytic before the reaction.

  5. Photocatalytic Water-Splitting Reaction from Catalytic and Kinetic Perspectives

    KAUST Repository

    Hisatomi, Takashi

    2014-10-16

    Abstract: Some particulate semiconductors loaded with nanoparticulate catalysts exhibit photocatalytic activity for the water-splitting reaction. The photocatalysis is distinct from the thermal catalysis because photocatalysis involves photophysical processes in particulate semiconductors. This review article presents a brief introduction to photocatalysis, followed by kinetic aspects of the photocatalytic water-splitting reaction.Graphical Abstract: [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Conserved water-mediated H-bonding dynamics of catalytic Asn ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    Extensive energy minimization and molecular dynamics simulation studies up to 2 ns on all the PDB and solvated structures clearly revealed the involvement of the H-bonding association of the two water molecules in fixing the orientation of the asparagine residue of the catalytic triad. From this study, it is suggested that ...

  7. Catalytic reforming of glycerol in supercritical water over bimetallic Pt-Ni catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chakinala, A.G.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; de Vlieger, Dennis; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Brilman, Derk Willem Frederik

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic reforming of pure glycerol for the production of hydrogen at low temperature and short residence times in supercritical water was investigated using a bimetallic Pt–Ni catalyst supported on alumina. Initial tests were carried out to study the reforming activity of bimetallic Pt–Ni

  8. Catalytic Water Splitting with an Iridium Carbene Complex: A Theoretical Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venturini, A.; Barbieri, A.; Reek, J.N.H.; Hetterscheid, D.G.H.

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic water oxidation at Ir(OH)(+) (Ir=IrCp*(Me2NHC), where Cp*=pentamethylcyclopentadienyl and Me2NHC=N,N-dimethylimidazolin-2-ylidene) can occur through various competing channels. A potential-energy surface showing these various multichannel reaction pathways provides a picture of how their

  9. Catalytic enantioselective syn hydration of enones in water using a DNA-based catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, Arnold J.; Coquière, David; Geerdink, Danny; Rosati, Fiora; Roelfes, Gerard; Feringa, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The enantioselective addition of water to olefins in an aqueous environment is a common transformation in biological systems, but was beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Here, we present the first examples of a non-enzymatic catalytic enantioselective hydration of enones, for which we used a

  10. Tritium removal from air streams by catalytic oxidation and water adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, A.E.

    1976-06-01

    An effective method of capturing tritium from air streams is by catalytic oxidation followed by water adsorption on a microporous solid adsorbent. Performance of a burner/dryer combination is illustrated by overall mass balance equations. Engineering design methods for packed bed reactors and adsorbers are reviewed, emphasizing the experimental data needed for design and the effect of operating conditions on system performance

  11. Spacecraft Water Regeneration by Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this project is to develop advanced catalysts for a volatile removal assembly used to purify spacecraft water. The innovation of the proposed...

  12. Unification of catalytic water oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions: amorphous beat crystalline cobalt iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indra, Arindam; Menezes, Prashanth W; Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Bergmann, Arno; Das, Chittaranjan; Tallarida, Massimo; Schmeißer, Dieter; Strasser, Peter; Driess, Matthias

    2014-12-17

    Catalytic water splitting to hydrogen and oxygen is considered as one of the convenient routes for the sustainable energy conversion. Bifunctional catalysts for the electrocatalytic oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) are pivotal for the energy conversion and storage, and alternatively, the photochemical water oxidation in biomimetic fashion is also considered as the most useful way to convert solar energy into chemical energy. Here we present a facile solvothermal route to control the synthesis of amorphous and crystalline cobalt iron oxides by controlling the crystallinity of the materials with changing solvent and reaction time and further utilize these materials as multifunctional catalysts for the unification of photochemical and electrochemical water oxidation as well as for the oxygen reduction reaction. Notably, the amorphous cobalt iron oxide produces superior catalytic activity over the crystalline one under photochemical and electrochemical water oxidation and oxygen reduction conditions.

  13. Valorization of horse manure through catalytic supercritical water gasification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Sonil; Dalai, Ajay K; Gökalp, Iskender; Kozinski, Janusz A

    2016-06-01

    The organic wastes such as lignocellulosic biomass, municipal solid waste, sewage sludge and livestock manure have attracted attention as alternative sources of energy. Cattle manure, a waste generated in surplus amounts from the feedlot, has always been a chief environmental concern. This study is focused on identifying the candidacy of horse manure as a next generation feedstock for biofuel production through supercritical water gasification. The horse manure was gasified in supercritical water to examine the effects of temperature (400-600°C), biomass-to-water ratio (1:5 and 1:10) and reaction time (15-45min) at a pressure range of 23-25MPa. The horse manure and resulting biochar were characterized through carbon-hydrogen-nitrogen-sulfur (CHNS), inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effects of alkali catalysts such as NaOH, Na2CO3 and K2CO3 at variable concentrations (1-2wt%) were investigated to maximize the hydrogen yields. Supercritical water gasification of horse manure with 2wt% Na2CO3 at 600°C and 1:10 biomass-to-water ratio for 45min revealed maximum hydrogen yields (5.31mmol/g), total gas yields (20.8mmol/g) with greater carbon conversion efficiency (43.1%) and enhanced lower heating value of gas products (2920kJ/Nm(3)). The manure-derived biochars generated at temperatures higher than 500°C also demonstrated higher thermal stability (weight loss 70wt%) suggesting their application in enhancing soil fertility and carbon sequestration. The results propose that supercritical water gasification could be a proficient remediation technology for horse manure to generate hydrogen-rich gas products. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Synthesis of Improved Catalytic Materials for High-Temperature Water-gas Shift Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zara P. Cherkezova-Zheleva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, we report the preparation and characterization of Co-, Cu- and Mn-substituted iron oxide catalytic materials supported on activated carbon. Co-precipitation method and low temperature treatment were used for their synthesis. The influence of chemical composition, stoichiometry, particle size and dispersity on their catalytic activity was studied. Samples were characterized in all stages of their co-precipitation, heating and spend samples after catalytic tests. The obtained results from room and low temperature Mössbauer spectroscopy were combined with analysis of powder X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD. They revealed the preparation of nano-sized iron oxide materials supported on activated carbon. Relaxation phenomena were registered also for the supported phases. The catalytic performance in the water-gas shift reaction was studied. The activity order was as follows: Cu0.5Fe2.5O4 > Co0.5Fe2.5O4 > Mn0.5Fe2.5O4. Catalytic tests demonstrated very promising results and potential application of studied samples due to their cost-effective composition.

  15. Catalytic water oxidation by single-site ruthenium catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concepcion, Javier J; Jurss, Jonah W; Norris, Michael R; Chen, Zuofeng; Templeton, Joseph L; Meyer, Thomas J

    2010-02-15

    A series of monomeric ruthenium polypyridyl complexes have been synthesized and characterized, and their performance as water oxidation catalysts has been evaluated. The diversity of ligand environments and how they influence rates and reaction thermodynamics create a platform for catalyst design with controllable reactivity based on ligand variations.

  16. Regulating Water-Reduction Kinetics in Cobalt Phosphide for Enhancing HER Catalytic Activity in Alkaline Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun; Ding, Hui; Zhang, Mengxing; Chen, Min; Hao, Zikai; Zhang, Lidong; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2017-07-01

    Electrochemical water splitting to produce hydrogen renders a promising pathway for renewable energy storage. Considering limited electrocatalysts have good oxygen-evolution reaction (OER) catalytic activity in acid solution while numerous economical materials show excellent OER catalytic performance in alkaline solution, developing new strategies that enhance the alkaline hydrogen-evolution reaction (HER) catalytic activity of cost-effective catalysts is highly desirable for achieving highly efficient overall water splitting. Herein, it is demonstrated that synergistic regulation of water dissociation and optimization of hydrogen adsorption free energy on electrocatalysts can significantly promote alkaline HER catalysis. Using oxygen-incorporated Co 2 P as an example, the synergistic effect brings about 15-fold enhancement of alkaline HER activity. Theory calculations confirm that the water dissociation free energy of Co 2 P decreases significantly after oxygen incorporation, and the hydrogen adsorption free energy can also be optimized simultaneously. The finding suggests the powerful effectiveness of synergetic regulation of water dissociation and optimization of hydrogen adsorption free energy on electrocatalysts for alkaline HER catalysis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Combined electrolysis and catalytic exchange (CECE) technology - an economical alternative for heavy water upgraders using water distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryland, D.K.; Sadhankar, R.R.

    2003-01-01

    Heavy water upgrading is a unique and crucial part of a CANDU power station. Water distillation (DW) systems are used for heavy water upgrading in all CANDU stations. The DW upgrader is designed to take advantage of the difference in relative volatility (a measure of separation of isotopes) between H 2 O and D 2 O. However, the low relative volatility of the H 2 O/D 2 O system requires large number of stages (long columns) and large reflux ratios (large reboiler loads) - thus resulting in significant capital and operating costs. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) developed the Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange (CECE) technology as an economical alternative to the DW system. CECE-based upgraders have been demonstrated in pilot scale facilities at AECL Chalk River Laboratories and in Hamilton, Ontario. This design is based on catalytic hydrogen isotope exchange between water and hydrogen gas. (author)

  18. On the study of catalytic membrane reactor for water detritiation: Modeling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liger, Karine, E-mail: karine.liger@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DTN/SMTA/LIPC Cadarache, Saint Paul-lez-Durance F-13108 (France); Mascarade, Jérémy [CEA, DEN, DTN/SMTA/LIPC Cadarache, Saint Paul-lez-Durance F-13108 (France); Joulia, Xavier; Meyer, Xuan-Mi [Université de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, 4, Allée Emile Monso, Toulouse F-31030 (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Génie Chimique, Toulouse F-31030 (France); Troulay, Michèle; Perrais, Christophe [CEA, DEN, DTN/SMTA/LIPC Cadarache, Saint Paul-lez-Durance F-13108 (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Experimental results for the conversion of tritiated water (using deuterium as a simulant of tritium) by means of a catalytic membrane reactor in view of tritium recovery. • Phenomenological 2D model to represent catalytic membrane reactor behavior including the determination of the compositions of gaseous effluents. • Good agreement between the simulation results and experimental measurements performed on the dedicated facility. • Explanation of the unexpected behavior of the catalytic membrane reactor by the modeling results and in particular the gas composition estimation. - Abstract: In the framework of tritium recovery from tritiated water, efficiency of packed bed membrane reactors have been successfully demonstrated. Thanks to protium isotope swamping, tritium bonded water can be recovered under the valuable Q{sub 2} form (Q = H, D or T) by means of isotope exchange reactions occurring on catalyst surface. The use of permselective Pd-based membrane allows withdrawal of reactions products all along the reactor, and thus limits reverse reaction rate to the benefit of the direct one (shift effect). The reactions kinetics, which are still little known or unknown, are generally assumed to be largely greater than the permeation ones so that thermodynamic equilibriums of isotope exchange reactions are generally assumed. This paper proposes a new phenomenological 2D model to represent catalytic membrane reactor behavior with the determination of gas effluents compositions. A good agreement was obtained between the simulation results and experimental measurements performed on a dedicated facility. Furthermore, the gas composition estimation permits to interpret unexpected behavior of the catalytic membrane reactor. In the next future, further sensitivity analysis will be performed to determine the limits of the model and a kinetics study will be conducted to assess the thermodynamic equilibrium of reactions.

  19. Method of generating hydrogen by catalytic decomposition of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Dorris, Stephen E.; Bose, Arun C.; Stiegel, Gary J.; Lee, Tae-Hyun

    2002-01-01

    A method for producing hydrogen includes providing a feed stream comprising water; contacting at least one proton conducting membrane adapted to interact with the feed stream; splitting the water into hydrogen and oxygen at a predetermined temperature; and separating the hydrogen from the oxygen. Preferably the proton conducting membrane comprises a proton conductor and a second phase material. Preferable proton conductors suitable for use in a proton conducting membrane include a lanthanide element, a Group VIA element and a Group IA or Group IIA element such as barium, strontium, or combinations of these elements. More preferred proton conductors include yttrium. Preferable second phase materials include platinum, palladium, nickel, cobalt, chromium, manganese, vanadium, silver, gold, copper, rhodium, ruthenium, niobium, zirconium, tantalum, and combinations of these. More preferably second phase materials suitable for use in a proton conducting membrane include nickel, palladium, and combinations of these. The method for generating hydrogen is preferably preformed in the range between about 600.degree. C. and 1,700.degree. C.

  20. Heterogeneous catalytic ozonation of ciprofloxacin in water with carbon nanotube supported manganese oxides as catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sui, Minghao, E-mail: suiminghao.sui@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China); Xing, Sichu; Sheng, Li; Huang, Shuhang; Guo, Hongguang [State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse, School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, 1239 Siping Road, Shanghai 200092 (China)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ciprofloxacin in water was degraded by heterogeneous catalytic ozonation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MnOx were supported on MWCNTs to serve as catalyst for ozonation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MnOx/MWCNT exhibited highly catalytic activity on ozonation of ciprofloxacin in water. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MnOx/MWCNT resulted in effective antibacterial activity inhibition on ciprofloxacin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MnOx/MWCNT promoted the generation of hydroxyl radicals. - Abstract: Carbon nanotube-supported manganese oxides (MnOx/MWCNT) were used as catalysts to assist ozone in degrading ciprofloxacin in water. Manganese oxides were successfully loaded on multi-walled carbon nanotube surfaces by simply impregnating the carbon nanotube with permanganate solution. The catalytic activities of MnOx/MWCNT in ciprofloxacin ozonation, including degradation, mineralization effectiveness, and antibacterial activity change, were investigated. The presence of MnOx/MWCNT significantly elevated the degradation and mineralization efficiency of ozone on ciprofloxacin. The microbiological assay with a reference Escherichia coli strain indicated that ozonation with MnOx/MWCNT results in more effective antibacterial activity inhibition of ciprofloxacin than that in ozonation alone. The effects of catalyst dose, initial ciprofloxacin concentration, and initial pH conditions on ciprofloxacin ozonation with MnOx/MWCNT were surveyed. Electron spin resonance trapping was applied to assess the role of MnOx/MWCNT in generating hydroxyl radicals (HO{center_dot}) during ozonation. Stronger 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline-N-oxide-OH signals were observed in the ozonation with MnOx/MWCNT compared with those in ozonation alone, indicating that MnOx/MWCNT promoted the generation of hydroxyl radicals. The degradation of ciprofloxacin was studied in drinking water and wastewater process samples to gauge the potential effects of water background matrix on

  1. Catalytic Activities of Ribozymes and DNAzymes in Water and Mixed Aqueous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-ichi Nakano

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic nucleic acids are regarded as potential therapeutic agents and biosensors. The catalytic activities of nucleic acid enzymes are usually investigated in dilute aqueous solutions, although the physical properties of the reaction environment inside living cells and that in the area proximal to the surface of biosensors in which they operate are quite different from those of pure water. The effect of the molecular environment is also an important focus of research aimed at improving and expanding nucleic acid function by addition of organic solvents to aqueous solutions. In this study, the catalytic activities of RNA and DNA enzymes (hammerhead ribozyme, 17E DNAzyme, R3C ribozyme, and 9DB1 DNAzyme were investigated using 21 different mixed aqueous solutions comprising organic compounds. Kinetic measurements indicated that these enzymes can display enhanced catalytic activity in mixed solutions with respect to the solution containing no organic additives. Correlation analyses revealed that the turnover rate of the reaction catalyzed by hammerhead ribozyme increased in a medium with a lower dielectric constant than water, and the turnover rate of the reaction catalyzed by 17E DNAzyme increased in conditions that increased the strength of DNA interactions. On the other hand, R3C ribozyme and 9DB1 DNAzyme displayed no significant turnover activity, but their single-turnover rates increased in many mixed solutions. Our data provide insight into the activity of catalytic nucleic acids under various conditions that are applicable to the medical and technology fields, such as in living cells and in biosensors.

  2. The effect of temperature on the catalytic conversion of Kraft lignin using near-critical water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Thi Dieu Huyen; Maschietti, Marco; Åmand, Lars-Erik

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic conversion of suspended LignoBoost Kraft lignin was performed in near-critical water using ZrO2/K2CO3 as the catalytic system and phenol as the co-solvent and char suppressing agent. The reaction temperature was varied from 290 to 370 C and its effect on the process was investigated...... in a continuous flow (1 kg/h). The yields of water-soluble organics (WSO), bio-oil and char (dry lignin basis) were in the ranges of 5–11%, 69–87% and 16–22%, respectively. The bio-oil, being partially deoxygenated, exhibited higher carbon content and heat value, but lower sulphur content than lignin. The main 1...

  3. A graded catalytic-protective layer for an efficient and stable water-splitting photocathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Jing; Aguiar, Jeffery A.; Ferrere, Suzanne; Steirer, K. Xerxes; Yan, Yong; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Young, James L.; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Neale, Nathan R.; Turner, John A.

    2017-01-01

    Achieving solar-to-hydrogen efficiencies above 15% is key for the commercial success of photoelectrochemical water-splitting devices. While tandem cells can reach those efficiencies, increasing the catalytic activity and long-term stability remains a significant challenge. Here we show that annealing a bilayer of amorphous titanium dioxide (TiOx) and molybdenum sulfide (MoSx) deposited onto GaInP2 results in a photocathode with high catalytic activity (current density of 11 mA cm-2 at 0 V versus the reversible hydrogen electrode under 1 sun illumination) and stability (retention of 80% of initial photocurrent density over a 20 h durability test) for the hydrogen evolution reaction. Microscopy and spectroscopy reveal that annealing results in a graded MoSx/MoOx/TiO2 layer that retains much of the high catalytic activity of amorphous MoSx but with stability similar to crystalline MoS2. Our findings demonstrate the potential of utilizing a hybridized, heterogeneous surface layer as a cost-effective catalytic and protective interface for solar hydrogen production.

  4. GMO neighbourhoods - will co-existence be a geographically realistic possibility?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qvist, H. Witt; Lundsgaard, H.; Brandt, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    In Denmark, there has been widespread opposition to the use of Genetically Modified Organisms (GMO’s) as a result of which rules have been developed relating to the co-existence of GM, conventionally and organically produced crops. This has been in the form of a spatially elaborated implementation...

  5. Co-existing institutional logics and agency among top-level public servants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Toke

    2011-01-01

    with coexisting logics of administration to more skilled agency of combining logics aimed at enhancing their opportunity and action space. The study suggests that the interplay between co-existing institutional logics, action strategies and the practical skills of top-level public servants provides the basis...

  6. Co-existing ericaceous plant species in a subarctic mire community share fungal root endophytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjøller, Rasmus; Olsrud, Maria; Michelsen, Anders

    2010-01-01

    the fungal composition in roots of co-existing ericaceous plants is scarce. In the present paper, the fungal community in roots of four ericaceous plant species, Empetrum hermaphroditum, Andromeda polifolia, Vaccinium uliginosum and Vaccinium vitis-idaea which often dominate subarctic heaths and mires...

  7. Bewitchment, Biology, or Both: The Co-Existence of Natural and Supernatural Explanatory Frameworks across Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legare, Cristine H.; Gelman, Susan A.

    2008-01-01

    Three studies examined the co-existence of natural and supernatural explanations for illness and disease transmission, from a developmental perspective. The participants (5-, 7-, 11-, and 15-year-olds and adults; N = 366) were drawn from 2 Sesotho-speaking South African communities, where Western biomedical and traditional healing frameworks were…

  8. Catalytic Response and Stability of Nickel/Alumina for the Hydrogenation of 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perret, Noémie; Grigoropoulos, Alexios; Zanella, Marco; Manning, Troy D; Claridge, John B; Rosseinsky, Matthew J

    2016-03-08

    The catalytic response of Ni on Al2O3 obtained from Ni-Al layered double hydroxides was studied for the liquid-phase hydrogenation of hydroxymethyl furfural to tetrahydrofuran-2,5-diyldimethanol (THFDM) in water. The successive calcination and reduction of the precursors caused the removal of interlayer hydroxyl and carbonate groups and the reduction of Ni(2+) to Ni(0). Four reduced mixed oxide catalysts were obtained, consisting of different amount of Ni metal contents (47-68 wt%) on an Al-rich amorphous component. The catalytic activity was linked to Ni content whereas selectivity was mainly affected by reaction temperature. THFDM was formed in a stepwise manner at low temperature (353 K) whereas 3-hydroxymethyl cyclopentanone was generated at higher temperature. Coke formation caused deactivation; however, the catalytic activity can be regenerated using heat treatment. The results establish Ni on Al2O3 as a promising catalyst for the production of THFDM in water. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Frequency of co-existence of dengue and malaria in patients presenting with acute febrile illness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hisam, A.; Rahman, M.; Kadir, E.; Ezam, N.; Khan, M.B.

    2014-01-01

    To find out the frequency of co-existence of malaria and dengue fever in patients presenting with acute febrile illness. Methods: The descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted at the Military Hospital Rawalpindi from June to November 2012. A total of 500 patients with complaint of acute febrile illness were selected after applying the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Preliminary data was collected on a pretested proforma. Blood samples of patients were tested for dengue serology and malaria parasite. Results were entered in respective proforma. Co-existence was considered present when a patient had both dengue serology and malaria parasite slide positive. SPSS 20 was used for data analysis. Result: Of the total, 349 (69.8%) were males and 151 (30.2%) females. Dengue serology was positive in 16 (3.2%); 81(16.2%) had malaria parasite slide positive; 403 (80.4%) had none of the two findings. Co-existence of both dengue and malaria was nil among the whole sample. In males, 67 (13.4%) had malaria, while 11 (2.2%) had dengue. In females, 14 (2.8%) had malaria, while 5 (1%) suffered from dengue fever. Conclusion: Co-existence of dengue and malaria was zero per cent in 500 patients visiting Military Hospital Rawalpindi. More studies shall be conducted to find out whether the reason of having zero per cent co-existence is that dengue or/and malaria epidemic did not occur in 2012 or whether there are some other factors involved. (author)

  10. [Influence of catalytic ozonation process on suppressing bromate formation potential in drinking water treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bang-Jun; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Tao; Han, Hong-Da; Shen, Li-Ping; Zhang, Li-Zhu

    2008-03-01

    An investigation is given to the bromate formation of catalytic ozonation in treating drinking water. It is shown that the c x t value of ozone depletion stage plays a more important role in BrO3(-) formation. Catalyst addition not only reduces the residual ozone content by 60.0% - 77.4% but also extends the ozone ID stage time from 4.3 min to 6.8 min, which makes the ozone c x t value shorter. A full-scale study indicates a very effective strength and performance of catalytic ozonation in controlling BrO3(-) formation and it is able to suppress BrO3(-) formation potential by 51.7% on average.

  11. Iron-doped Pt-TiO2 nanotubes for photo-catalytic water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, D; Motta, M; Windle, A H

    2009-02-04

    In this work we report on the photo-catalytic performance of phase-pure and iron-doped anatase and rutile nanotubes, produced via a sol-gel process using pristine carbon nanotubes as templates. The encapsulated iron residues can be used to in situ dope the TiO(2) nanotubes without phase separation. The anatase and rutile nanotubes were further impregnated with platinum crystals with a uniform dispersion and an average size of approximately 2 nm. The materials showed dramatically improved activities for the photo-catalytic splitting of water compared to commercial TiO(2) with similar surface area (up to two orders of magnitudes), due to their higher illumination area, extended absorption range and reduced electron-hole recombination rate. The homogeneous dispersion of platinum nanoparticles further increased the hydrogen evolution rate for anatase nanotubes by a factor of seven in comparison to that for the pristine material, thus proving the great potential for commercial applications.

  12. Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics study of the catalytic cycle of water splitting in photosystem II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproviero, Eduardo M; Gascón, José A; McEvoy, James P; Brudvig, Gary W; Batista, Victor S

    2008-03-19

    This paper investigates the mechanism of water splitting in photosystem II (PSII) as described by chemically sensible models of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in the S0-S4 states. The reaction is the paradigm for engineering direct solar fuel production systems since it is driven by solar light and the catalyst involves inexpensive and abundant metals (calcium and manganese). Molecular models of the OEC Mn3CaO4Mn catalytic cluster are constructed by explicitly considering the perturbational influence of the surrounding protein environment according to state-of-the-art quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) hybrid methods, in conjunction with the X-ray diffraction (XRD) structure of PSII from the cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus. The resulting models are validated through direct comparisons with high-resolution extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic data. Structures of the S3, S4, and S0 states include an additional mu-oxo bridge between Mn(3) and Mn(4), not present in XRD structures, found to be essential for the deprotonation of substrate water molecules. The structures of reaction intermediates suggest a detailed mechanism of dioxygen evolution based on changes in oxidization and protonation states and structural rearrangements of the oxomanganese cluster and surrounding water molecules. The catalytic reaction is consistent with substrate water molecules coordinated as terminal ligands to Mn(4) and calcium and requires the formation of an oxyl radical by deprotonation of the substrate water molecule ligated to Mn(4) and the accumulation of four oxidizing equivalents. The oxyl radical is susceptible to nucleophilic attack by a substrate water molecule initially coordinated to calcium and activated by two basic species, including CP43-R357 and the mu-oxo bridge between Mn(3) and Mn(4). The reaction is concerted with water ligand exchange, swapping the activated water by a water molecule in the second coordination shell of

  13. Synergetic Effects of Alcohol/Water Mixing on the Catalytic Reductive Fractionation of Poplar Wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renders, Tom; Van den Bosch, Sander; Vangeel, Thijs; Ennaert, Thijs; Koelewijn, Steven-Friso; Van den Bossche, Gil; Courtin, Christophe M.; Schutyser, Wouter; Sels, Bert F.

    2016-12-05

    One of the foremost challenges in lignocellulose conversion encompasses the integration of effective lignin valorization in current carbohydrate-oriented biorefinery schemes. Catalytic reductive fractionation (CRF) of lignocellulose offers a technology to simultaneously produce lignin-derived platform chemicals and a carbohydrate-enriched pulp via the combined action of lignin solvolysis and metal-catalyzed hydrogenolysis. Herein, the solvent (composition) plays a crucial role. In this contribution, we study the influence of alcohol/water mixtures by processing poplar sawdust in varying MeOH/water and EtOH/water blends. The results show particular effects that strongly depend on the applied water concentration. Low water concentrations enhance the removal of lignin from the biomass, while the majority of the carbohydrates are left untouched (scenario A). Contrarily, high water concentrations favor the solubilization of both hemicellulose and lignin, resulting in a more pure cellulosic residue (scenario B). For both scenarios, an evaluation was made to determine the most optimal solvent composition, based on two earlier introduced empirical efficiency descriptors (denoted LFDE and LFFE). According to these measures, 30 (A) and 70 vol % water (B) showed to be the optimal balance for both MeOH/water and EtOH/water mixtures. This successful implementation of alcohol/water mixtures allows operation under milder processing conditions in comparison to pure alcohol solvents, which is advantageous from an industrial point of view.

  14. A study on the photo catalytic decomposition reactions of organics dissolved in water (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, K.W.; Na, J. W.; Cho, Y. H.; Chung, H. H.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments on aqueous TiO 2 photo catalytic reaction of nitrogen containing organic compounds such as ethylamine, phenylhydrazine, pyridine, urea and EDTA were carried out. Based on the values calculated for the distribution of ionic species and atomic charge, the characteristics of their photo catalytic decomposition were estimated. It was shown that the decomposition characteristics was linearly proportional to nitrogen atomic charge value. On the other hand, the effects of aqueous pH, oxygen content and concentration on the TiO 2 photo catalytic characteristics of EDTA, EDTA-Cu(II) and EDTA-Fe(III) were experimentally investigated. All EDTA systems were decomposed better in the pH range of 2.5-3.0 and with more dissolved oxygen. These results could be applied to construction of a process for removal of organic impurities dissolved in a source of system water, or for treatment of EDTA-containing liquid waste produced by a chemical cleaning in the domestic NPPs. (author)

  15. A study on the photo catalytic decomposition reactions of organics dissolved in water (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, K.W.; Na, J. W.; Cho, Y. H.; Chung, H. H

    2000-01-01

    Experiments on aqueous TiO{sub 2} photo catalytic reaction of nitrogen containing organic compounds such as ethylamine, phenylhydrazine, pyridine, urea and EDTA were carried out. Based on the values calculated for the distribution of ionic species and atomic charge, the characteristics of their photo catalytic decomposition were estimated. It was shown that the decomposition characteristics was linearly proportional to nitrogen atomic charge value. On the other hand, the effects of aqueous pH, oxygen content and concentration on the TiO{sub 2} photo catalytic characteristics of EDTA, EDTA-Cu(II) and EDTA-Fe(III) were experimentally investigated. All EDTA systems were decomposed better in the pH range of 2.5-3.0 and with more dissolved oxygen. These results could be applied to construction of a process for removal of organic impurities dissolved in a source of system water, or for treatment of EDTA-containing liquid waste produced by a chemical cleaning in the domestic NPPs. (author)

  16. Metal dependent catalytic hydrogenation of nitroarenes over water-soluble glutathione capped metal nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sachil

    2015-03-01

    The water soluble glutathione capped metal nanoparticles (M-GS, where M=Pd, Pt, Au and Ag; GS=glutathione) with size 2.4±0.2 nm were synthesized by borohydride reduction of metal ions in the presence of glutathione as capping ligand and used as catalyst for the hydrogenation of nitroaniline in aqueous phase. The rate of catalytic hydrogenation was dependent on metal type and the trend of catalytic activity over these M-GS nanoparticles was found to be Pd-GS (k(app)=0.0227 (±3×10(-4)))s(-1)≫Pt-GS (k(app)=0.0043 (±1×10(-4)))s(-1)>Au-GS (k(app)=0.0015 (±0.2×10(-4)))s(-1)>Ag-GS (k(app)=0.0008 (±0.2×10(-4)))s(-1). The similar trend of catalytic activity was found for the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene. Our experimental results, along taking into account the theoretical calculations done by other research groups, suggest that the observed catalytic activity trend is attributed to the "different rates of H2 molecule adsorption and dissociation" on the M-GS nanoparticles. The "high rate of H2 molecule adsorption" and "highly oxidized surface" make Pd-GS nanoparticles an ideal candidate for the rapid hydrogenation. On the basis of our experimental results, we proposed that small gaps between less densely packed branched thiol "glutathione molecules" provide the access to metal nanoparticle surface for the hydrogenation reaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Three Co-Existing Sexually Transmitted Diseases in a Heterosexual Male Youth: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theetat M. Surawan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Most sexually transmitted diseases (STDs are asymptomatic, leading to widespread underdiagnoses estimated at 50% or higher. The presence of one STD significantly indicates an individual’s sexual health risk since an STD contributes to the transmission and acquisition of other STDs, including human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. Multiple co-existing STDs, thus, further increase the susceptibility of acquiring and transmitting HIV by twofold or more. Therefore, the comprehensive STD prevention strategies play a major role in reducing the transmission of HIV infection. We report an interesting case of a heterosexual male youth who presented at dermatology clinic with three concurrent sexually transmitted diseases: gonococcal urethritis, genital wart, and late latent syphilis. The case demonstrated significant issues for appropriate approaches and management of multiple co-existing STDs. Also, it reinforced the necessity for STD counselling for the patient, his partners, and family.

  18. Pancreatic insulinoma co-existing with gastric GIST in the absence of neurofibromatosis-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Sullivan Brendan

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GIST frequently occur in patients with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF-1. It has been reported that GIST may co-exist with pancreatic endocrine tumors but this has only been in association with NF-1. Case presentation A 76 year old woman presented with a 12 month history of hypoglycaemia symptoms. Abdominal CT scan demonstrated a 13 mm insulinoma localized in the tail of her pancreas. She was commenced on diazoxide and later underwent surgery for enucleation of insulinoma when a small ( Conclusion This is the first case report of a pancreatic insulinoma co-existing with a GIST in a patient without NF-1. In addition, we make the first report of rapidly growing cystic GIST recurrence following resection of a primary GIST tumour.

  19. Genetically modified and non-genetically modified food supply chains : co-existence and traceability

    OpenAIRE

    Bertheau, Yves

    2013-01-01

    In the European Union nations, and other countries including Japan, Australia and Malaysia, it is a legal requirement that food products containing genetically modified organism (GMO) materials are labelled as such in order that customers may make informed purchasing decisions. For manufacturers and consumers to be confident about these assertions, systems must be in place along the entire food chain which support the co-existence of GM and non GM materials whilst maintaining a strict segrega...

  20. EXAFS studies of catalytic DNA sensors for mercury contamination of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravel, B.; Slimmer, S.C.; Meng, X.; Wong, G.C.L.; Lu, Y.

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring of metallic contaminants in domestic and agricultural water systems requires technology that is fast, flexible, sensitive, and selective. Recently, metal sensors based on catalytic DNA have been demonstrated as a practical monitoring solution. Very little is known, however, about the atomic scale interactions between the DNA-based sensors and the metal contaminant to which the sensor is targeted. Here, we present the results of an X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of a mercury sensor which illustrates the nature of the Hg-DNA interaction.

  1. A new type separation column for the water-hydrogen isotope catalytic exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorchenko, O.A.; Alekseev, I.A.; Trenin, V.D.

    2001-01-01

    The catalytic water/hydrogen isotope exchange process is by right considered the most attractive for the solution a number of urgent problems of hydrogen isotope separation. A new type exchange reaction column is described and studied in details by computer simulation and with the help of McCabe-Thiele diagrams. It is shown that the new column in comparison with a traditional one needs less catalyst quantity and a smaller diameter for the solving of the same separation tasks. Generalized calculation data are presented in graphical form

  2. Co-existence of Gel and Fluid Lipid Domains in Single-component Phospholipid Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, Clare L [McMaster University; Barrett, M [McMaster University; Toppozini, L [McMaster University; Yamani, Zahra [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, National Research Council, Chalk River Laboratorie; Kucerka, Norbert [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre and Comelius University (Slovakia); Katsaras, John [ORNL; Fragneto, Giovanna [Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL); Rheinstadter, Maikel C [McMaster University

    2012-01-01

    Lateral nanostructures in membranes, so-called rafts, are believed to strongly influence membrane properties and functions. The experimental observation of rafts has proven difficult as they are thought to be dynamic structures that likely fluctuate on nano- to microsecond time scales. Using neutron diffraction we present direct experimental evidence for the co-existence of gel and fluid lipid domains in a single-component phospholipid membrane made of DPPC as it undergoes its main phase transition. The coherence length of the neutron beam sets a lower limit for the size of structures that can be observed. Neutron coherence lengths between 30 and 242A used in this study were obtained by varying the incident neutron energy and the resolution of the neutron spectrometer. We observe Bragg peaks corresponding to co-existing nanometer sized structures, both in out-of-plane and in-plane scans, by tuning the neutron coherence length. During the main phase transition, instead of a continuous transition that shows a pseudo-critical behavior, we observe the co-existence of gel and fluid domains.

  3. Co-existence of GM, conventional and organic crops in developing countries: Main debates and concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azadi, Hossein; Taube, Friedhelm; Taheri, Fatemeh

    2017-06-05

    The co-existence approach of GM crops with conventional agriculture and organic farming as a feasible agricultural farming system has recently been placed in the center of hot debates at the EU-level and become a source of anxiety in developing countries. The main promises of this approach is to ensure "food security" and "food safety" on the one hand, and to avoid the adventitious presence of GM crops in conventional and organic farming on the other, as well as to present concerns in many debates on implementing the approach in developing countries. Here, we discuss the main debates on ("what," "why," "who," "where," "which," and "how") applying this approach in developing countries and review the main considerations and tradeoffs in this regard. The paper concludes that a peaceful co-existence between GM, conventional, and organic farming is not easy but is still possible. The goal should be to implement rules that are well-established proportionately, efficiently and cost-effectively, using crop-case, farming system-based and should be biodiversity-focused ending up with "codes of good agricultural practice" for co-existence.

  4. Investigation of simultaneous tritium and deuterium transfer in a catalytic isotope exchange column for water detritiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristescu, I.; Tamm, U.; Cristescu, Ioana-R.; Glugla, M.; Caldwell-Nichols, C.J.

    2002-01-01

    A catalytic isotope exchange facility for water detritiation is operated at the Tritium Laboratory Karlsruhe (TLK) in order to investigate the simultaneous transfer of tritium and deuterium between various molecular hydrogen isotopes and deuteriated/tritiated water. Four catalyst-packing combinations from different manufacturers (SCK-CEN Belgium, Mendeleev University Russia, Institute of Cryogenics and Isotopic Technologies (ICIT) Romania-TLK, Showa Eng. Japan) are currently being tested. Experiments have been performed to determine the height equivalent of theoretical plate (HETP) and the mass transfer coefficients during deuterium, tritium or simultaneous deuterium and tritium exchange between deuteriated and tritiated water and gaseous hydrogen isotopes. In the simultaneously tritium and deuterium transfer experiments, both the transfer of tritium and deuterium from liquid to gas and the transfer of tritium from liquid to gas and deuterium in the opposite direction from gas to liquid was investigated

  5. Decoupled catalytic hydrogen evolution from a molecular metal oxide redox mediator in water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rausch, Benjamin; Symes, Mark D; Chisholm, Greig; Cronin, Leroy

    2014-09-12

    The electrolysis of water using renewable energy inputs is being actively pursued as a route to sustainable hydrogen production. Here we introduce a recyclable redox mediator (silicotungstic acid) that enables the coupling of low-pressure production of oxygen via water oxidation to a separate, catalytic hydrogen production step outside the electrolyzer that requires no post-electrolysis energy input. This approach sidesteps the production of high-pressure gases inside the electrolytic cell (a major cause of membrane degradation) and essentially eliminates the hazardous issue of product gas crossover at the low current densities that characterize renewables-driven water-splitting devices. We demonstrated that a platinum-catalyzed system can produce pure hydrogen over 30 times faster than state-of-the-art proton exchange membrane electrolyzers at equivalent platinum loading. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Catalytic isotope exchange reaction between deuterium gas and water pre-adsorbed on platinum/alumina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Itsuo; Kato, Junko; Tamaru, Kenzi.

    1976-01-01

    The catalytic isotope exchange reaction between deuterium gas and the water pre-adsorbed on Pt/Al 2 O 3 was studied. At reaction temperatures above 273 K, the exchange rate was proportional to the deuterium pressure and independent of the amount of adsorbed water, which suggests that the rate determining step is the supply of deuterium from the gas phase. Its apparent activation energy was 38 kJ mol -1 . Below freezing point of water, the kinetic behaviour was different from that above freezing point. At higher deuterium pressures the rate dropped abruptly at 273 K. Below the temperature the apparent activation energy was 54 kJ mol -1 and the exchange rate depended not on the deuterium pressure but on the amount of the pre-adsorbed water. At lower pressures, however, the kinetic behaviour was the same as the above 273 K, till the rate of the supply of deuterium from the gas phase exceeded the supply of hydrogen from adsorbed water to platinum surface. These results suggest that below 273 K the supply of hydrogen is markedly retarded, the state of the adsorbed water differing from that above 273 K. It was also demonstrated that when the adsorbed water is in the state of capillary condensation, the exchange rate becomes very small. (auth.)

  7. Theoretical study of catalytic mechanism for single-site water oxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiangsong; Hu, Xiangqian; Concepcion, Javier J; Chen, Zuofeng; Liu, Shubin; Meyer, Thomas J; Yang, Weitao

    2012-09-25

    Water oxidation is a linchpin in solar fuels formation, and catalysis by single-site ruthenium complexes has generated significant interest in this area. Combining several theoretical tools, we have studied the entire catalytic cycle of water oxidation for a single-site catalyst starting with [Ru(II)(tpy)(bpm)(OH(2))](2+) (i.e., [Ru(II)-OH(2)](2+); tpy is 2,2':6',2''-terpyridine and bpm is 2,2'-bypyrimidine) as a representative example of a new class of single-site catalysts. The redox potentials and pK(a) calculations for the first two proton-coupled electron transfers (PCETs) from [Ru(II)-OH(2)](2+) to [Ru(IV) = O](2+) and the following electron-transfer process to [Ru(V) = O](3+) suggest that these processes can proceed readily in acidic or weakly basic conditions. The subsequent water splitting process involves two water molecules, [Ru(V) = O](3+) to generate [Ru(III)-OOH](2+), and H(3)O(+) with a low activation barrier (~10 kcal/mol). After the key O-O bond forming step in the single-site Ru catalysis, another PECT process oxidizes [Ru(III)-OOH](2+) to [Ru(IV)-OO](2+) when the pH is lower than 3.7. Two possible forms of [Ru(IV)-OO](2+), open and closed, can exist and interconvert with a low activation barrier (catalytic cycle. This understanding is helpful in the design of new catalysts for water oxidation.

  8. Energetic basis of catalytic activity of layered nanophase calcium manganese oxides for water oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkner, Nancy; Nayeri, Sara; Pashaei, Babak; Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Casey, William H.; Navrotsky, Alexandra

    2013-01-01

    Previous measurements show that calcium manganese oxide nanoparticles are better water oxidation catalysts than binary manganese oxides (Mn3O4, Mn2O3, and MnO2). The probable reasons for such enhancement involve a combination of factors: The calcium manganese oxide materials have a layered structure with considerable thermodynamic stability and a high surface area, their low surface energy suggests relatively loose binding of H2O on the internal and external surfaces, and they possess mixed-valent manganese with internal oxidation enthalpy independent of the Mn3+/Mn4+ ratio and much smaller in magnitude than the Mn2O3-MnO2 couple. These factors enhance catalytic ability by providing easy access for solutes and water to active sites and facile electron transfer between manganese in different oxidation states. PMID:23667149

  9. A rare challenging case of co-existent craniopharyngioma, acromegaly and squamous cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Fountas

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Co-existence of craniopharyngioma and acromegaly has been very rarely reported. A 65-year-old man presented with visual deterioration, fatigue and frontal headaches. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a suprasellar heterogeneous, mainly cystic, 1.9 × 2 × 1.9 cm mass compressing the optic chiasm and expanding to the third ventricle; the findings were consistent with a craniopharyngioma. Pituitary hormone profile showed hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, mildly elevated prolactin, increased insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1 and normal thyroid function and cortisol reserve. The patient had transsphenoidal surgery and pathology of the specimen was diagnostic of adamantinomatous craniopharyngioma. Post-operatively, he had diabetes insipidus, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and adrenocorticotropic hormone and thyroid-stimulating hormone deficiency. Despite the hypopituitarism, his IGF-1 levels remained elevated and subsequent oral glucose tolerance test did not show complete growth hormone (GH suppression. Further review of the pre-operative imaging revealed a 12 × 4 mm pituitary adenoma close to the right carotid artery and no signs of pituitary hyperplasia. At that time, he was also diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma of the left upper lung lobe finally managed with radical radiotherapy. Treatment with long-acting somatostatin analogue was initiated leading to biochemical control of the acromegaly. Latest imaging has shown no evidence of craniopharyngioma regrowth and stable adenoma. This is a unique case report of co-existence of craniopharyngioma, acromegaly and squamous lung cell carcinoma that highlights diagnostic and management challenges. Potential effects of the GH hypersecretion on the co-existent tumours of this patient are also briefly discussed.

  10. Green Synthesis and Catalytic Activity of Gold Nanoparticles Synthesized by Artemisia capillaris Water Extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Soo Hyeon; Ahn, Eun-Young; Park, Youmie

    2016-10-01

    Gold nanoparticles were synthesized using a water extract of Artemisia capillaris (AC-AuNPs) under different extract concentrations, and their catalytic activity was evaluated in a 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction in the presence of sodium borohydride. The AC-AuNPs showed violet or wine colors with characteristic surface plasmon resonance bands at 534 543 nm that were dependent on the extract concentration. Spherical nanoparticles with an average size of 16.88 ± 5.47 29.93 ± 9.80 nm were observed by transmission electron microscopy. A blue shift in the maximum surface plasmon resonance was observed with increasing extract concentration. The face-centered cubic structure of AC-AuNPs was confirmed by high-resolution X-ray diffraction analysis. Based on phytochemical screening and Fourier transform infrared spectra, flavonoids, phenolic compounds, and amino acids present in the extract contributed to the reduction of Au ions to AC-AuNPs. The average size of the AC-AuNPs decreased as the extract concentration during the synthesis was increased. Higher 4-nitrophenol reduction reaction rate constants were observed for smaller sizes. The extract in the AC-AuNPs was removed by centrifugation to investigate the effect of the extract in the reduction reaction. Interestingly, the removal of extracts greatly enhanced their catalytic activity by up to 50.4 %. The proposed experimental method, which uses simple centrifugation, can be applied to other metallic nanoparticles that are green synthesized with plant extracts to enhance their catalytic activity.

  11. The Principle(s) of Co-existence in the Market for GMOs in Europe: Social, Economic and Legal Avenues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purnhagen, K.; Wesseler, J.H.H.

    2016-01-01

    The European policy of co-existence for GMOs follows a number of well-established social, economic and legal principles. Applying these principles in practice has resulted in a complex “rag rug” of co-existence policies in Europe. This rag rug makes enforcement of these principles difficult, at

  12. Atomistic structure of cobalt-phosphate nanoparticles for catalytic water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiao Liang; Piccinin, Simone; Laio, Alessandro; Fabris, Stefano

    2012-12-21

    Solar-driven water splitting is a key photochemical reaction that underpins the feasible and sustainable production of solar fuels. An amorphous cobalt-phosphate catalyst (Co-Pi) based on earth-abundant elements has been recently reported to efficiently promote water oxidation to protons and dioxygen, a main bottleneck for the overall process. The structure of this material remains largely unknown. We here exploit ab initio and classical atomistic simulations combined with metadynamics to build a realistic and statistically meaningful model of Co-Pi nanoparticles. We demonstrate the emergence and stability of molecular-size ordered crystallites in nanoparticles initially formed by a disordered Co-O network and phosphate groups. The stable crystallites consist of bis-oxo-bridged Co centers that assemble into layered structures (edge-sharing CoO(6) octahedra) as well as in corner- and face-sharing cubane units. These layered and cubane motifs coexist in the crystallites, which always incorporate disordered phosphate groups at the edges. Our computational nanoparticles, although limited in size to ~1 nm, can contain more than one crystallite and incorporate up to 18 Co centers in the cubane/layered structures. The crystallites are structurally stable up to high temperatures. We simulate the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of our nanoparticles. Those containing several complete and incomplete cubane motifs-which are believed to be essential for the catalytic activity-display a very good agreement with the experimental EXAFS spectra of Co-Pi grains. We propose that the crystallites in our nanoparticles are reliable structural models of the Co-Pi catalyst surface. They will be useful to reveal the origin of the catalytic efficiency of these novel water-oxidation catalysts.

  13. Session 6: Water depollution from aniline and phenol by air oxidation and adsorptive-catalytic oxidation in liquid phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobrynkin, N.M.; Batygina, M.V.; Noskov, A.S. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis of Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Pr. Ak. Lavrentieva (Russian Federation)

    2004-07-01

    This paper is devoted to development of carbon catalysts and application of catalytic wet air oxidation for deep cleaning of polluted waters. The described catalysts and method are solving the problem of development environmentally reliable method for fluids treatment and allow carrying out the adsorption of pollutants on carbon CAPM (catalytically active porous material) with following regeneration of the CAPM without the loss of adsorptive qualities. The experiments have shown a principal capability simultaneously to use carbon CAPM as adsorbent and either as catalyst, or as a catalyst support for oxidation of aniline and phenol in water solutions. (authors)

  14. Depressive disorders co-existing with Addison–Biermer anemia – case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Just MJ

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Mark Jean Just,1 Mariusz Kozakiewicz2 1Department of General and Endocronological Surgery, Piekary Medical Centre, Piekary Slaskie, 2Department of Food Chemistry Collegium Medicum in Bydgoszcz, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun, Poland Background: Anemia is a disease that can co-exist with depression, other mental disorders, or somatic diseases. Anemia can imitate symptoms of depression, while depression symptoms can mask concurring symptoms of anemia.Case presentation: I am presenting a case of a 48-year-old woman with Addison–Biermer anemia, with co-existing mood disorders. The clinical analysis of the presented patient’s history indicates diagnostic problems and a need for a detailed analysis of drug-related complications that occurred during previous treatment, eg, in the form of neuroleptic malignant syndrome.Conclusion: The presented case report contains valuable guidelines that can be of assistance in diagnostics and treatment of patients treated for mental disorders, who are also diagnosed with somatic diseases. Keywords: anemia, autoimmune diseases, depression, neuroleptic malignant syndrome

  15. A case of desmoid tumor co-existing with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma in the larynx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinohara, Shogo; Suehiro, Atsushi; Kikuchi, Masahiro; Harada, Hiroyuki; Kishimoto, Ippei; Imai, Yukihiro

    2017-06-01

    Extra-abdominal desmoid tumor, also known as aggressive fibromatosis, has aggressive behavior with local infiltration and tendency for recurrence. Though head and neck is reported to be one of the most common sites, a desmoid tumor in the larynx is extremely rare. A 67-year-old male visited our hospital with prolonged hoarseness and received laryngo-microsurgery with the diagnosis of laryngeal polyp. After the operation, he eventually developed a laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma with papilloma, confirmed by second laryngo-microsurgery and received radiation therapy. After the third laryngo-microsurgery to remove residual papilloma, white irregular mass appeared on the right vocal cord and grew rapidly beneath the glottis, causing dyspnea. After 2 additional laryngo-microsurgeries, he was diagnosed having the dermoid tumor co-existing with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma. He underwent near-total laryngectomy and is currently alive without disease, speaking using a vocal shunt. Only five cases of the desmoid tumors arising in the adult larynx have been reported in the English literature. In this case, repeated surgery and radiation were suspected as the causes. Also, the present report is the first to describe desmoid tumor co-existing with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma in the larynx. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Co-existence and interaction between myxomycetes and other organisms in shared niches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina O. Dudka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The ecology of myxomycetes co-existing with the Latridiidae (Coleoptera, bryophytes and ascomycetous, basidiomycetous and anamorphic fungi were studied in Crimea and at different locations on the left bank of Ukraine. Results from the left bank indicate that the Latridiidae feed on myxomycetes. Colonies of the most common 13 myxomycete species (which included Stemonitis axifera (Bull. Macbr., S. fusca Roth, S. splendens Rost., Fuligo septica (L. Wigg. and Mucilago crustacea Wigg. were inhabited by 5 species of the Latridiidae. Myxomycete spores were present in guts of 19 of the 25 beetle specimens investigated. Beetles Latridius hirtus, Enicmus rugosus and E fungicola seem to be obligate myxomycete feeders, while Corticarina truncatella was clearly facultative. 13 species of myxomycetes were recorded on 9 species of moss and 3 species of liverwort developing on decaying wood or bark in the Crimean Nature Reserve. Relations between myxomycetes and bryophytes on woody substrata are spatial rather than trophic, and are possibly regulated by specific microclimatic conditions inside bryophyte thallomes. 69 species of myxomycetes were found co-existing with 36 species of ascomycetes, 21 species of basidiomycetes and 9 species of anamorphic fungi in the Crimean Nature Reserve. Associations formed by myxomycetes and fungi on different woody substrata are analyzed.

  17. Biodegradation of Volatile Organic Compounds and Their Effects on Biodegradability under Co-Existing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Miho; Zhang, Ming; Toyota, Koki

    2017-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are major pollutants that are found in contaminated sites, particularly in developed countries such as Japan. Various microorganisms that degrade individual VOCs have been reported, and genomic information related to their phylogenetic classification and VOC-degrading enzymes is available. However, the biodegradation of multiple VOCs remains a challenging issue. Practical sites, such as chemical factories, research facilities, and illegal dumping sites, are often contaminated with multiple VOCs. In order to investigate the potential of biodegrading multiple VOCs, we initially reviewed the biodegradation of individual VOCs. VOCs include chlorinated ethenes (tetrachloroethene, trichloroethene, dichloroethene, and vinyl chloride), BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene), and chlorinated methanes (carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, and dichloromethane). We also summarized essential information on the biodegradation of each kind of VOC under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, together with the microorganisms that are involved in VOC-degrading pathways. Interactions among multiple VOCs were then discussed based on concrete examples. Under conditions in which multiple VOCs co-exist, the biodegradation of a VOC may be constrained, enhanced, and/or unaffected by other compounds. Co-metabolism may enhance the degradation of other VOCs. In contrast, constraints are imposed by the toxicity of co-existing VOCs and their by-products, catabolite repression, or competition between VOC-degrading enzymes. This review provides fundamental, but systematic information for designing strategies for the bioremediation of multiple VOCs, as well as information on the role of key microorganisms that degrade VOCs. PMID:28904262

  18. Biodegradation of Volatile Organic Compounds and Their Effects on Biodegradability under Co-Existing Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Miho; Zhang, Ming; Toyota, Koki

    2017-09-27

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are major pollutants that are found in contaminated sites, particularly in developed countries such as Japan. Various microorganisms that degrade individual VOCs have been reported, and genomic information related to their phylogenetic classification and VOC-degrading enzymes is available. However, the biodegradation of multiple VOCs remains a challenging issue. Practical sites, such as chemical factories, research facilities, and illegal dumping sites, are often contaminated with multiple VOCs. In order to investigate the potential of biodegrading multiple VOCs, we initially reviewed the biodegradation of individual VOCs. VOCs include chlorinated ethenes (tetrachloroethene, trichloroethene, dichloroethene, and vinyl chloride), BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene), and chlorinated methanes (carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, and dichloromethane). We also summarized essential information on the biodegradation of each kind of VOC under aerobic and anaerobic conditions, together with the microorganisms that are involved in VOC-degrading pathways. Interactions among multiple VOCs were then discussed based on concrete examples. Under conditions in which multiple VOCs co-exist, the biodegradation of a VOC may be constrained, enhanced, and/or unaffected by other compounds. Co-metabolism may enhance the degradation of other VOCs. In contrast, constraints are imposed by the toxicity of co-existing VOCs and their by-products, catabolite repression, or competition between VOC-degrading enzymes. This review provides fundamental, but systematic information for designing strategies for the bioremediation of multiple VOCs, as well as information on the role of key microorganisms that degrade VOCs.

  19. Mechanisms Leading to Co-Existence of Gas Hydrate in Ocean Sediments [Part 2 of 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Steven; Juanes, Ruben

    2011-12-31

    In this project we have sought to explain the co-existence of gas and hydrate phases in sediments within the gas hydrate stability zone. We have focused on the gas/brine interface at the scale of individual grains in the sediment. The capillary forces associated with a gas/brine interface play a dominant role in many processes that occur in the pores of sediments and sedimentary rocks. The mechanical forces associated with the same interface can lead to fracture initiation and propagation in hydrate-bearing sediments. Thus the unifying theme of the research reported here is that pore scale phenomena are key to understanding large scale phenomena in hydrate-bearing sediments whenever a free gas phase is present. Our analysis of pore-scale phenomena in this project has delineated three regimes that govern processes in which the gas phase pressure is increasing: fracturing, capillary fingering and viscous fingering. These regimes are characterized by different morphology of the region invaded by the gas. On the other hand when the gas phase pressure is decreasing, the corresponding regimes are capillary fingering and compaction. In this project, we studied all these regimes except compaction. Many processes of interest in hydrate-bearing sediments can be better understood when placed in the context of the appropriate regime. For example, hydrate formation in sub-permafrost sediments falls in the capillary fingering regime, whereas gas invasion into ocean sediments is likely to fall into the fracturing regime. Our research provides insight into the mechanisms by which gas reservoirs are converted to hydrate as the base of the gas hydrate stability zone descends through the reservoir. If the reservoir was no longer being charged, then variation in grain size distribution within the reservoir explain hydrate saturation profiles such as that at Mt. Elbert, where sand-rich intervals containing little hydrate are interspersed between intervals containing large hydrate

  20. Mechanisms Leading to Co-Existence of Gas Hydrate in Ocean Sediments [Part 1 of 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Steven; Juanes, Ruben

    2011-12-31

    In this project we have sought to explain the co-existence of gas and hydrate phases in sediments within the gas hydrate stability zone. We have focused on the gas/brine interface at the scale of individual grains in the sediment. The capillary forces associated with a gas/brine interface play a dominant role in many processes that occur in the pores of sediments and sedimentary rocks. The mechanical forces associated with the same interface can lead to fracture initiation and propagation in hydrate-bearing sediments. Thus the unifying theme of the research reported here is that pore scale phenomena are key to understanding large scale phenomena in hydrate-bearing sediments whenever a free gas phase is present. Our analysis of pore-scale phenomena in this project has delineated three regimes that govern processes in which the gas phase pressure is increasing: fracturing, capillary fingering and viscous fingering. These regimes are characterized by different morphology of the region invaded by the gas. On the other hand when the gas phase pressure is decreasing, the corresponding regimes are capillary fingering and compaction. In this project, we studied all these regimes except compaction. Many processes of interest in hydrate-bearing sediments can be better understood when placed in the context of the appropriate regime. For example, hydrate formation in sub-permafrost sediments falls in the capillary fingering regime, whereas gas invasion into ocean sediments is likely to fall into the fracturing regime. Our research provides insight into the mechanisms by which gas reservoirs are converted to hydrate as the base of the gas hydrate stability zone descends through the reservoir. If the reservoir was no longer being charged, then variation in grain size distribution within the reservoir explain hydrate saturation profiles such as that at Mt. Elbert, where sand-rich intervals containing little hydrate are interspersed between intervals containing large hydrate

  1. Development and assessment of photo-catalytic membranes for water purification using solar radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coto, M.; Troughton, S. C.; Duan, J.; Kumar, R. V.; Clyne, T. W.

    2018-03-01

    This paper describes a novel set-up for characterization of the performance of membranes designed for purification of water. It involves a recirculatory system, with continuous monitoring of the concentration in the water of a representative pollutant (Methylene Blue). Pressures, flow rates and temperatures are also measured. Results, in the form of rate constants for reduction in pollutant concentration, are presented for three different types of membrane, all of which incorporate relatively high surface areas of titania and have permeability values in a range making them suitable for this type of processing (∼10-11 m2). These results are rationalized in terms of the surface areas of the membranes, and the likely water flow characteristics within them. It is concluded that all of the titania surfaces within them have similar efficiencies for photo-catalytic oxidation of pollutants, but there are significant differences in the ways that the water is exposed to these surfaces, and hence in the pollutant oxidation rates. These points are relevant to the optimization of membrane design for this purpose.

  2. Controlling catalytic activity of gold cluster on MgO thin film for water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zijing; Yan, Lei; Li, Zi; Ma, Wei; Lu, Gang; Meng, Sheng

    2017-09-01

    We propose that supported gold clusters on MgO thin film can potentially serve as an efficient photocatalyst for water splitting. The catalytic activity of the gold cluster is enhanced by excess electrons occupying its quantum well states (QWSs) and can be controlled by varying the oxide thickness, introducing defects/doping in the substrate, and modulating the plasmonic response of the Au cluster. We find that the bonding between the water molecule and certain QWSs can significantly reduce the water splitting energy barrier in its ground state. More importantly, the water splitting is nearly spontaneous when the QWS is photoexcited. First-principles real-time electron dynamics simulations reveal that the excited QWS in the supported gold cluster has a long lifetime on the scale of picoseconds. Generation of activated hydrogen atoms is predicted to occur spontaneously following photoexcitation, and the yield of H2 gas is maintained by enriching hydrogen concentration without poisoning the catalyst. These results illustrate promising routes for promoting photocatalysis via engineering the energy levels of supported metal clusters.

  3. Model for the simulation of catalytic isotope exchange between tritiated water and hydrogen/deuterium gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristescu, Ioana R.; Cristescu, I.; Bornea, Anisia; Penzhorn, R.-D.; Tamm, U.

    2001-01-01

    The objectives of the models presented in this paper are to simulate the deuterium enrichment performances of several catalytic exchange columns under test at the Tritium Laboratory in Karlsruhe (TLK). The models and the corresponding software are presently being verified by experiments aimed to provide the data required for the design of large isotopic exchange columns such as needed for the recovery of tritium from waste water generated during the operation of the tritium facilities of fusion machines. In the ongoing TLK experiments the transfer of deuterium takes place in a counter current isotopic exchange column. Pre-heated water is fed into the column from the top and deuterated hydrogen from the bottom. Condensed water vapor and deuterium-depleted hydrogen are removed from the top and deuterium enriched water from the bottom and analyzed by standard procedures. To describe the performance of the separation process two approaches were considered: a graphical approach (classical) that uses the operating line and equilibrium curve for the process and an analytical approach that solves the transport equations characterizing the isotopic exchange process. (authors)

  4. Measurement of capacity coefficient of inclined liquid phase catalytic exchange column for tritiated water processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamai, Hideki; Konishi, Satoshi; Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Okuno, Kenji

    1994-01-01

    Liquid phase catalytic exchange (LPCE) is effective method for enrichment and removal of tritium from tritiated water. Capacity coefficients of operating LPCE column that are essential to evaluate column performance were measured. Experiments were performed with short catalyst packed columns and effect of inclination was studied. Method for evaluation of capacity coefficients was established from measurement of isotope concentration of liquid, vapor, gas phases at the two ends of the column. The capacity coefficients were measured under various superficial gas velocities. Feasibility study of helical columns with roughened inner surface was performed with short inclined columns. The column performance was not strongly affected by the inclination. The result indicates technological feasibility of helical LPCE column, that is expected to have operation stability and reduced height

  5. Familiality of co-existing ADHD and tic disorders: evidence from a large sibling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veit Roessner

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstractBackground: The association of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD and tic disorder (TD is frequent and clinically important. Very few and inconclusive attempts have been made to clarify if and how the combination of ADHD+TD runs in families. Aim: To determine the first time in a large-scale ADHD sample whether ADHD+TD increases the risk of ADHD+TD in siblings and, also the first time, if this is independent of their psychopathological vulnerability in general. Methods: The study is based on the International Multicenter ADHD Genetics (IMAGE study. The present sub-sample of 2815 individuals included ADHD-index patients with co-existing TD (ADHD+TD, n=262 and without TD (ADHD-TD, n=947 as well as their 1606 full siblings (n=358 of the ADHD+TD index patients and n=1248 of the ADHD-TD index patients. We assessed psychopathological symptoms in index patients and siblings by using the strength and difficulties questionnaire (SDQ and the parent and teacher Conners’ long version Rating Scales (CRS. For disorder classification the Parental Account of Childhood Symptoms (PACS-Interview was applied in n = 271 children. Odds ratio with the GENMOD procedure (PROCGENMOD was used to test if the risk for ADHD, TD and ADHD+TD in siblings was associated with the related index patients’ diagnoses. In order to get an estimate for specificity we compared the four groups for general psychopathological symptoms.Results: Co-existing ADHD+TD in index patients increased the risk of both comorbid ADHD+TD and TD in the siblings of these index patients. These effects did not extend to general psychopathology. Interpretation: Co-existence of ADHD+TD may segregate in families. The same holds true for TD (without ADHD. Hence, the segregation of TD (included in both groups seems to be the determining factor, independent of further behavioral problems. This close relationship between ADHD and TD supports the clinical approach to carefully assess ADHD in

  6. Familiality of Co-existing ADHD and Tic Disorders: Evidence from a Large Sibling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roessner, Veit; Banaschewski, Tobias; Becker, Andreas; Buse, Judith; Wanderer, Sina; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Sergeant, Joseph A.; Sonuga-Barke, Edmund J.; Gill, Michael; Manor, Iris; Miranda, Ana; Mulas, Fernando; Oades, Robert D.; Roeyers, Herbert; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Faraone, Steven V.; Asherson, Philip; Rothenberger, Aribert

    2016-01-01

    Background: The association of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and tic disorder (TD) is frequent and clinically important. Very few and inconclusive attempts have been made to clarify if and how the combination of ADHD+TD runs in families. Aim: To determine the first time in a large-scale ADHD sample whether ADHD+TD increases the risk of ADHD+TD in siblings and, also the first time, if this is independent of their psychopathological vulnerability in general. Methods: The study is based on the International Multicenter ADHD Genetics (IMAGE) study. The present sub-sample of 2815 individuals included ADHD-index patients with co-existing TD (ADHD+TD, n = 262) and without TD (ADHD–TD, n = 947) as well as their 1606 full siblings (n = 358 of the ADHD+TD index patients and n = 1248 of the ADHD-TD index patients). We assessed psychopathological symptoms in index patients and siblings by using the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) and the parent and teacher Conners' long version Rating Scales (CRS). For disorder classification the Parental Account of Childhood Symptoms (PACS-Interview) was applied in n = 271 children. Odds ratio with the GENMOD procedure (PROCGENMOD) was used to test if the risk for ADHD, TD, and ADHD+TD in siblings was associated with the related index patients' diagnoses. In order to get an estimate for specificity we compared the four groups for general psychopathological symptoms. Results: Co-existing ADHD+TD in index patients increased the risk of both comorbid ADHD+TD and TD in the siblings of these index patients. These effects did not extend to general psychopathology. Interpretation: Co-existence of ADHD+TD may segregate in families. The same holds true for TD (without ADHD). Hence, the segregation of TD (included in both groups) seems to be the determining factor, independent of further behavioral problems. This close relationship between ADHD and TD supports the clinical approach to carefully assess ADHD in any case

  7. Anaesthetic management of the child with co-existing pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, R; Vadi, M; Mason, L

    2012-12-01

    Children with co-existing pulmonary disease have a wide range of clinical manifestations with significant implications for anaesthetists. Although there are a number of pulmonary diseases in children, this review focuses on two of the most common pulmonary disorders, asthma and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). These diseases share the physiology of bronchoconstriction and variably decreased flow in the airways, but also have unique physiological consequences. The anaesthetist can make a difference in outcomes with proper preoperative evaluation and appropriate preparation for surgery in the context of a team approach to perioperative care with implementation of a stepwise approach to disease management. An understanding of the importance of minimizing the risk for bronchoconstriction and having the tools at hand to treat it when necessary is paramount in the care of these patients. Unique challenges exist in the management of pulmonary hypertension in BPD patients. This review covers medical treatment, intraoperative management, and postoperative care for both patient populations.

  8. Balancing Catalytic Activity and Interface Energetics of Electrocatalyst-Coated Photoanodes for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhe; Wang, Haoyu; Wen, Yunzhou; Li, Wenchao; Sun, Chuyu; He, Yuting; Shi, Zhan; Pei, Lang; Chen, Yongda; Yan, Shicheng; Zou, Zhigang

    2018-01-31

    For photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting, the interface interactions among semiconductors, electrocatalysts, and electrolytes affect the charge separation and catalysis in turn. Here, through the changing of the bath temperature, Co-based oxygen evolution catalysts (OEC) with different crystallinities were electrochemically deposited on Ti-doped Fe 2 O 3 (Ti-Fe 2 O 3 ) photoanodes. We found: (1) the OEC with low crystallinity is highly ion-permeable, decreasing the interactions between OEC and photoanode due to the intimate interaction between semiconductor and electrolyte; (2) the OEC with high crystallinity is nearly ion-impermeable, is beneficial to form a constant buried junction with semiconductor, and exhibits the low OEC catalytic activity; and (3) the OEC with moderate crystallinity is partially electrolyte-screened, thus contributing to the formation of ideal band bending underneath surface of semiconductor for charge separation and the highly electrocatalytic activity of OEC for lowering over-potentials of water oxidation. Our results demonstrate that to balance the water oxidation activity of OEC and OEC-semiconductor interface energetics is crucial for highly efficient solar energy conversion; in particular, the energy transducer is a semiconductor with a shallow or moderate valence-band level.

  9. Novel Co(II) phthalocyanines of extended periphery and their water-soluble derivatives. Synthesis, spectral properties and catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippova, Anna; Vashurin, Artur; Znoyko, Serafima; Kuzmin, Ilya; Razumov, Mikhail; Chernova, Alena; Shaposhnikov, Gennady; Koifman, Oscar

    2017-12-01

    Novel complexes of cobalt and copper with substituted phthalocyanines were synthesized and characterized. Their water-soluble derivatives were obtained by sulfonation under mild conditions and structurally proved. Aggregation equilibrium in water mediums was shown and influence of geometrical and electron parameters of macroheterocycle peripheral substituents on these processes was established. Catalytic activity upon liquid-phase oxidation of N,N-diethylcarbamodithiolate to thiuram E was studied. Kinetic parameters of substrate oxidation in presence of cobalt phthalocyanines were considered.

  10. Hydrogen from catalytic reforming of biomass-derived hydrocarbons in liquid water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortright, R D; Davda, R R; Dumesic, J A

    2002-08-29

    Concerns about the depletion of fossil fuel reserves and the pollution caused by continuously increasing energy demands make hydrogen an attractive alternative energy source. Hydrogen is currently derived from nonrenewable natural gas and petroleum, but could in principle be generated from renewable resources such as biomass or water. However, efficient hydrogen production from water remains difficult and technologies for generating hydrogen from biomass, such as enzymatic decomposition of sugars, steam-reforming of bio-oils and gasification, suffer from low hydrogen production rates and/or complex processing requirements. Here we demonstrate that hydrogen can be produced from sugars and alcohols at temperatures near 500 K in a single-reactor aqueous-phase reforming process using a platinum-based catalyst. We are able to convert glucose -- which makes up the major energy reserves in plants and animals -- to hydrogen and gaseous alkanes, with hydrogen constituting 50% of the products. We find that the selectivity for hydrogen production increases when we use molecules that are more reduced than sugars, with ethylene glycol and methanol being almost completely converted into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. These findings suggest that catalytic aqueous-phase reforming might prove useful for the generation of hydrogen-rich fuel gas from carbohydrates extracted from renewable biomass and biomass waste streams.

  11. Hydrogen from catalytic reforming of biomass-derived hydrocarbons in liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortright, R. D.; Davda, R. R.; Dumesic, J. A.

    2002-08-01

    Concerns about the depletion of fossil fuel reserves and the pollution caused by continuously increasing energy demands make hydrogen an attractive alternative energy source. Hydrogen is currently derived from nonrenewable natural gas and petroleum, but could in principle be generated from renewable resources such as biomass or water. However, efficient hydrogen production from water remains difficult and technologies for generating hydrogen from biomass, such as enzymatic decomposition of sugars, steam-reforming of bio-oils and gasification, suffer from low hydrogen production rates and/or complex processing requirements. Here we demonstrate that hydrogen can be produced from sugars and alcohols at temperatures near 500K in a single-reactor aqueous-phase reforming process using a platinum-based catalyst. We are able to convert glucose-which makes up the major energy reserves in plants and animals-to hydrogen and gaseous alkanes, with hydrogen constituting 50% of the products. We find that the selectivity for hydrogen production increases when we use molecules that are more reduced than sugars, with ethylene glycol and methanol being almost completely converted into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. These findings suggest that catalytic aqueous-phase reforming might prove useful for the generation of hydrogen-rich fuel gas from carbohydrates extracted from renewable biomass and biomass waste streams.

  12. A Mobile Asset Tracking System Architecture under Mobile-Stationary Co-Existing WSNs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hyon; Jo, Hyeong Gon; Lee, Jae Shin; Kang, Soon Ju

    2012-01-01

    The tracking of multiple wireless mobile nodes is not easy with current legacy WSN technologies, due to their inherent technical complexity, especially when heavy traffic and frequent movement of mobile nodes are encountered. To enable mobile asset tracking under these legacy WSN systems, it is necessary to design a specific system architecture that can manage numerous mobile nodes attached to mobile assets. In this paper, we present a practical system architecture including a communication protocol, a three-tier network, and server-side middleware for mobile asset tracking in legacy WSNs consisting of mobile-stationary co-existing infrastructures, and we prove the functionality of this architecture through careful evaluation in a test bed. Evaluation was carried out in a microwave anechoic chamber as well as on a straight road near our office. We evaluated communication mobility performance between mobile and stationary nodes, location-awareness performance, system stability under numerous mobile node conditions, and the successful packet transfer rate according to the speed of the mobile nodes. The results indicate that the proposed architecture is sufficiently robust for application in realistic mobile asset tracking services that require a large number of mobile nodes. PMID:23242277

  13. Hypothesis on two different functionalities co-existing in frontal lobe of human brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jue

    2013-09-01

    Human frontal lobe is a key area from where our cognition, memory and emotion display or function. In medical case study, there are patients with social dysfunctions, lack of passion or emotion as result of their frontal lobe damage caused by pathological changes, traumatic damage, and brain tumor remove operations. The syndrome of frontal lobe damage remains at large unanswered medically. From early stage of pregnancy, there exists lobe layers, nerve combine, and neurons synaptic, indicating a completion of growth of functionality inside frontal lobe. However, this completion of growth does not match the growth of human intelligence. Human infants only start and complete their cognition and memory functionality one full year after their birth which is marked by huge amount of neurons synaptic inside their frontal lobe, which is not part of a continual growth of originally developed functions. By reasoning on pathological changes of frontal lobe, a hypothesis was established that two individually functional mechanisms co-existed inside one frontal lobe. This neuron system is particularly for human beings. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Critical Issues in the Identification of Gifted Students With Co-Existing Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Jackson Gilman

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Federal law ensures all students with disabilities the right to a Free, Appropriate Public Education (FAPE. However, current policies governing a student’s eligibility for services may contribute to the underidentification of gifted children with co-existing disabilities—the Twice-Exceptional. The emphasis on below-grade-level (or lower performance, without regard to ability or potential weaknesses, misses twice-exceptional students. Those who perform at grade level, by using advanced conceptual abilities and hard work to compensate, may still require interventions and accommodations to manage increasing educational demands. Otherwise, college and even high school graduation may be out of reach. This article reviews changing laws and policies, explores case studies of twice-exceptional students missed, and examines the diagnosis of twice-exceptionality through comprehensive assessment. Appropriate best practices for the identification of twice-exceptional learners, maintenance of their civil rights, and provision of FAPE are offered for educators, parents, advocates, and legislators as federal, state, and district laws/policies evolve.

  15. Nanoparticle interactions with co-existing contaminants: joint toxicity, bioaccumulation and risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Rui; Lin, Daohui; Zhu, Lizhong; Majumdar, Sanghamitra; White, Jason C; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L; Xing, Baoshan

    2017-06-01

    With their growing production and application, engineered nanoparticles (NPs) are increasingly discharged into the environment. The released NPs can potentially interact with pre-existing contaminants, leading to biological effects (bioaccumulation and/or toxicity) that are poorly understood. Most studies on NPs focus on single analyte exposure; the existing literature on joint toxicity of NPs and co-existing contaminants is rather limited but beginning to develop rapidly. This is the first review paper evaluating the current state of knowledge regarding the joint effects of NPs and co-contaminants. Here, we review: (1) methods for investigating and evaluating joint effects of NPs and co-contaminants; (2) simultaneous toxicities from NPs co-exposed with organic contaminants, metal/metalloid ions, dissolved organic matter (DOM), inorganic ligands and additional NPs; and (3) the influence of NPs co-exposure on the bioaccumulation of organic contaminants and heavy metal ions, as well as the influence of contaminants on NPs bioaccumulation. In addition, future research needs are discussed so as to better understand risk associated with NPs-contaminant co-exposure.

  16. The clinicopathologic differences in papillary thyroid carcinoma with or without co-existing chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yeo-Hoon; Kim, Hak Joon; Lee, Jin Woo; Kim, Jin Man; Koo, Bon Seok

    2012-03-01

    The goal of this study is to determine the clinicopathologic differences in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) with or without chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis (CLT). We reviewed the medical records of 195 consecutive PTC patients who underwent total thyroidectomy and bilateral central lymph node dissection from April 2008 to March 2010. The differences in clinicopathologic factors, such as age, gender, size of primary tumor, perithyroidal invasion, lymphovascular invasion, capsular invasion, and central lymph node (CLN) metastasis, were analyzed in PTC patients with or without CLT. Among 195 patients, 56 (28.7%) had co-existing CLT. Patients with CLT had the following characteristics as compared to patients without CLT: significantly younger, female predominance, smaller tumor size, and lower incidence of capsular invasion (p = 0.038, 0.006, 0.037, and 0.026, respectively). Also, patients with CLT (12.5%) had a significantly lower incidence of CLN metastases than patients without CLT (28.1%; p = 0.025) based on univariate analysis. Moreover, multivariate analysis showed that younger age (p = 0.042, odds ratio = 1.033) and female gender (p = 0.012, odds ratio = 6.865) are independent clinical factors in patients with CLT compared to patients without CLT. CLT was shown to be commonly associated with PTC. Compared to patients with PTC without CLT, patients with CLT were younger with a female predominance, which are the most important and well-known prognostic variables for thyroid cancer mortality.

  17. [Performance Study of Bromochloracetonitrile Degradation in Drinking Water by Fe/Cu Catalytic Reduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Chun-sheng; Ma, Hai-long; Fu, Yang-ping; Zhao, Shi-du; Li, Dong-bing

    2015-06-01

    The paper used the method of iron copper catalyst reduction to degrade low concentrations of bromochloracetonitrile (BCAN) to lighten the damage to human being, which is a kind of disinfection by-products (DBPs) produced during the chlorination process of drinking water. The removal efficiency of BCAN and its influencing factors were investigated. The mechanism of degradation and kinetics were also explored. The results indicated that iron copper had a greater degradation ability towards BCAN, and the degradation rate of iron copper (mass ratio of 10:1) was 1.5 times that of the zero-valent iron. The removal of BCAN increased obviously with the increase of Fe/Cu dosage. When the initial concentration was set at 20 microg x L(-1), after a reaction time of 150 min, removal of BCAN was improved from 51.1% to 89.5% with the increase of iron copper (mass ratio of 10:1) dosage from 5 g x L(-1) to 10 g x L(-1). The temperature also had great impact on BCAN removal and the removal increased with the increase of temperature. However, BCAN removal did not change a lot with the variation of the initial concentration of BCAN when it was at a low level. The BCAN degradation by iron copper catalytic-reduction followed the first-order kinetics model.

  18. Phenomenological modeling and study of a catalytic membrane reactor for water detritiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mascarade, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Tritium is produced in light and heavy water reactor fuel by ternary fission or neutron activation. This by-product is used as fuel in fusion fuel reactors such as JET in Culham or ITER in Cadarache (France). The growing interest of this research area will make the tritium fluxes increase; it is then worth addressing the question of its future whether it will be used or flushed out from liquid and gaseous effluents or waste. This thesis studies the recovery of tritium as fuel for fusion machines by means of packed bed membrane reactor (PBMR). Such a reactor combines catalytic conversion of tritiated water thanks to isotope exchange with hydrogen according to the reversible reaction Q 2 O+H 2 ↔H 2 O+Q 2 (Q=H,D or T) and selective permeation of Q 2 through Pd-based membrane. In fact, palladium has the ability to bond with hydrogen isotopes, creating a selective permeation barrier. In the PBMR, thanks to the reaction products withdrawal, these permeation fluxes drive the heavy water conversion rate, to higher values than those reached in conventional fixed bed reactors (Le Chatelier's law). In order to study PBMRs, the CEA has built a test bench, using deuterium instead of tritium, allowing the analysis of their conversion and separation performances at the laboratory scale. An in-house method has been developed to determine simultaneously hydrogen and water isotopologues content by mass spectrometer analysis. It was experimentally shown that the activity of Ni-based catalyst used in this study was sufficient to allow the isotope exchange reactions to reach their thermodynamic equilibrium in a very short time. In addition, hydrogen permeation flux was shown to follow a Richardson's law. Sensitivity studies performed on the PBMR's main operating parameters revealed that its global performance (i.e. de-deuteration factor) increases with the temperature, the transmembrane pressure difference, the sweep gas flow rate and the residence time in the catalyst

  19. Principles of water oxidation and O2-based hydrocarbon transformation by multinuclear catalytic sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musaev, Djamaladdin G [Chemistry, Emory University; Hill, Craig L [Chemistry, Emory University; Morokuma, Keiji [Chemistry, Emory University

    2014-10-28

    Abstract The central thrust of this integrated experimental and computational research program was to obtain an atomistic-level understanding of the structural and dynamic factors underlying the design of catalysts for water oxidation and selective reductant-free O2-based transformations. The focus was on oxidatively robust polyoxometalate (POM) complexes in which a catalytic active site interacts with proximal metal centers in a synergistic manner. Thirty five publications in high-impact journals arose from this grant. I. Developing an oxidatively and hydrolytically stable and fast water oxidation catalyst (WOC), a central need in the production of green fuels using water as a reductant, has proven particularly challenging. During this grant period we have designed and investigated several carbon-free, molecular (homogenous), oxidatively and hydrolytically stable WOCs, including the Rb8K2[{Ru4O4(OH)2(H2O)4}(γ-SiW10O36)2]·25H2O (1) and [Co4(H2O)2(α-PW9O34)2]10- (2). Although complex 1 is fast, oxidatively and hydrolytically stable WOC, Ru is neither abundant nor inexpensive. Therefore, development of a stable and fast carbon-free homogenous WOC, based on earth-abundant elements became our highest priority. In 2010, we reported the first such catalyst, complex 2. This complex is substantially faster than 1 and stable under homogeneous conditions. Recently, we have extended our efforts and reported a V2-analog of the complex 2, i.e. [Co4(H2O)2(α-VW9O34)2]10- (3), which shows an even greater stability and reactivity. We succeeded in: (a) immobilizing catalysts 1 and 2 on the surface of various electrodes, and (b) elucidating the mechanism of O2 formation and release from complex 1, as well as the Mn4O4L6 “cubane” cluster. We have shown that the direct O-O bond formation is the most likely pathway for O2 formation during water oxidation catalyzed by 1. II. Oxo transfer catalysts that contain two proximal and synergistically interacting redox active metal

  20. Catalytic water splitting with an iridium carbene complex: a theoretical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, Alessandro; Barbieri, Andrea; Reek, Joost N H; Hetterscheid, Dennis G H

    2014-04-25

    Catalytic water oxidation at Ir(OH)(+) (Ir = IrCp*(Me2NHC), where Cp* = pentamethylcyclopentadienyl and Me2NHC = N,N'-dimethylimidazolin-2-ylidene) can occur through various competing channels. A potential-energy surface showing these various multichannel reaction pathways provides a picture of how their importance can be influenced by changes in the oxidant potential. In the most favourable calculated mechanism, water oxidation occurs via a pathway that includes four sequential oxidation steps, prior to formation of the O-O bond. The first three oxidation steps are exothermic upon treatment with cerium ammonium nitrate and lead to formation of Ir(V) (=O)(O(·))(+), which is calculated to be the most stabile species under these conditions, whereas the fourth oxidation step is the potential-energy-determining step. O-O bond formation takes place by coupling of the two oxo ligands along a direct pathway in the rate-limiting step. Dissociation of dioxygen occurs in two sequential steps, regenerating the starting material Ir(OH)(+). The calculated mechanism fits well with the experimentally observed rate law: v = kobs[Ir][oxidant]. The calculated effective barrier of 24.6 kcal mol(-1) fits well with the observed turnover frequency of 0.88 s(-1). Under strongly oxidative conditions, O-O bond formation after four sequential oxidation steps is the preferred pathway, whereas under milder conditions O-O bond formation after three sequential oxidation steps becomes competitive. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Structural instability and phase co-existence driven non-Gaussian resistance fluctuations in metal nanowires at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bid, Aveek; Raychaudhuri, A. K.

    2016-11-01

    We report a detailed experimental study of the resistance fluctuations measured at low temperatures in high quality metal nanowires ranging in diameter from 15-200 nm. The wires exhibit co-existing face-centered-cubic and 4H hcp phases of varying degrees as determined from the x-ray diffraction data. We observe the appearance of a large non-Gaussian noise for nanowires of diameter smaller than 50 nm over a certain temperature range around ≈30 K. The diameter range ˜30 nm, where the noise has maxima coincides with the maximum volume fraction of the co-existing 4H hcp phase thus establishing a strong link between the fluctuation and the phase co-existence. The resistance fluctuation in the same temperature range also shows a deviation of 1/f behavior at low frequency with appearance of single frequency Lorentzian type contribution in the spectral power density. The fluctuations are thermally activated with an activation energy {E}{{a}}˜ 35 meV, which is of same order as the activation energy of creation of stacking fault in FCC metals that leads to the co-existing crystallographic phases. Combining the results of crystallographic studies of the nanowires and analysis of the resistance fluctuations we could establish the correlation between the appearance of the large resistance noise and the onset of phase co-existence in these nanowires.

  2. Catalytic and surface properties of nanocrystalline gold water gas shift catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Hwan

    A series of CeO2 supported gold catalysts were prepared and found to possess a high activities for the water gas shift reaction (WGS), a critical step in the production of H2 for use in petroleum refining, chemicals synthesis, and proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The deposition-precipitation method was employed in synthesizing these highly active, nanocrystalline gold catalysts. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and dynamic sorption analyses were performed to characterize the gold catalysts. While some of these catalysts were initially four times more active than a commercial Cu-based catalyst, they were susceptible to deactivation. Characterization using techniques including temperature programmed oxidation, XPS, and FT-IR indicated that the deactivation was caused primarily by blockage of the active sites by carbonates and/or formates. Formation of these carbonaceous species appeared to be facilitated by oxygen deficient sites on the ceria surface and may have been associated with hydroxyl groups formed on the nanocrystalline gold particles under the H2 rich conditions. The deactivation could be managed by conditioning the CeO2 surface or adding constituents to minimize oxygen deficiency. The catalytic activity was fully recovered by calcining the deactivated materials in flowing air at elevated temperatures. The gold catalyst was washcoated onto microporous Fe-Al alloy foams for use in a micro-channel WGS reactor. The performance of these coated foams was inferior to that of the powder catalyst; however, a two stage micro-channel WGS reactor employing the gold catalyst was sufficient for a 100 W fuel processor system.

  3. Effectiveness of sanitizers, dry heat, hot water, and gas catalytic infrared heat treatments to inactivate Salmonella on almonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bari, Md Latiful; Nei, Daisuke; Sotome, Itaru; Nishina, Ikuo; Isobe, Seiichi; Kawamoto, Shinnichi

    2009-10-01

    The majority of almond-related foodborne outbreaks have been associated with Salmonella. Therefore, it is necessary to find an effective method to inactivate these organisms on raw almond prior to market distribution. This study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of sanitizers (strong or mild electrolyzed water, ozonated water, and distilled water), dry heat treatment, and hot water treatments followed by catalytic infrared (IR) heat treatment to inactivate Salmonella populations on raw almond. Raw almonds inoculated with four-strain cocktails of Salmonella were treated either by soaking in different chemical sanitizers or with dry heat and/or hot water for various periods of time followed by catalytic IR heat treatment for 70 seconds. The treated seeds were then assessed for the efficacy of the treatment in reducing populations of the pathogens. After inoculation and air-drying, 5.73 +/- 0.12 log colony-forming units (CFU)/g Salmonella were detected in nonselective medium. Sanitizer treatment alone did not show significant reduction in the Salmonella population, but in combination with IR drying it reduced the population to 3.0 log CFU/g. Dry heating at 60 degrees C for 4 days followed by IR drying for 70 seconds reduced the Salmonella population an additional 1.0 log CFU/g. Hot water treatments at 85 degrees C for 40 seconds followed by IR drying for 70 seconds reduced pathogens to an undetectable level by direct plating, but not by enrichment.

  4. Study on Influence to Waste Water Treatment Plant’s Sludge by Low-carbon Catalytic Combustion Furnace of Natural Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Ren TianQi; Fang Kai; Zhang Shihong

    2016-01-01

    There are two parts in this experiment. One of is about the concentration of Variation of exhaust gas while heating sludge of waste water treatment plant. The other one is about introduce the problems of the traditional incineration processes of sludge of waste water treatment as compared between the sludge heated by natural gas catalytic combustion furnace and the tradition’s. We can see that natural gas low-carbon catalytic combustion furnace realize the near-zero emission of contaminates.

  5. Understanding the role of gold nanoparticles in enhancing the catalytic activity of manganese oxides in water oxidation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chung-Hao; Li, Weikun; Pahalagedara, Lakshitha; El-Sawy, Abdelhamid M; Kriz, David; Genz, Nina; Guild, Curtis; Ressler, Thorsten; Suib, Steven L; He, Jie

    2015-02-16

    The Earth-abundant and inexpensive manganese oxides (MnOx) have emerged as an intriguing type of catalysts for the water oxidation reaction. However, the overall turnover frequencies of MnOx catalysts are still much lower than that of nanostructured IrO2 and RuO2 catalysts. Herein, we demonstrate that doping MnOx polymorphs with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) can result in a strong enhancement of catalytic activity for the water oxidation reaction. It is observed that, for the first time, the catalytic activity of MnOx/AuNPs catalysts correlates strongly with the initial valence of the Mn centers. By promoting the formation of Mn(3+) species, a small amount of AuNPs (MnO2/AuNP catalysts significantly improved the catalytic activity up to 8.2 times in the photochemical and 6 times in the electrochemical system, compared with the activity of pure α-MnO2. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Removal of Humic Substances from Water by Advanced Oxidation Process Using UV/TiO2 Photo Catalytic Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Khorsandi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Humic substances have been known as precursors to disinfection by-products. Because conventional treatment processes cannot meet disinfection by-product standards, novel methods have been increasingly applied for the removal of disinfection by-products precursors. The UV/TiO2 process is one of the advanced oxidation processes using the photocatalytic technology. The most important advantages of this process are its stability and high efficiency removal. The present study aims to investigate the effect of UV/TiO2 photo-catalytic technology on removal of humic substances. The study was conducted in a lab-scale batch photo-catalytic reactor using the interval experimental method. The UV irradiation source was a low pressure mercury vapor lamp 55w that was axially centered and was immersed in a humic acids solution within a stainless steel tubular 2.8 L reaction volume. Each of the samples taken from the UV/TiO2 process and other processes studied were analyzed for their dissolved organic carbon, UV absorbance at 254nm, and specific UV254 absorbance. The results indicated the high efficiency of the UV/TiO2 photo-catalytic process (TiO2=0.1 g/L and pH=5, compared to other processes, for humic substances removal from water sources. The process was also found to be capable of decreasing the initial dissolved organic carbon from 5 to 0.394 mg/L. The Specific UV254 Absorbance of 2.79 L/mg.m was attained after 1.5 hr. under photo-catalytic first order reaction (k= 0.0267 min-1. It may be concluded that the UV/TiO2 process can provide desirable drinking water quality in terms of humic substance content.

  7. Co-Existence of Tuberous Sclerosis and the Fanconi Syndrome in Two Saudi Male Siblings: Report on Two Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Hwiesh, Abdulla K.; Al-Mueilo, Samir H.; Saeed, Ibrahim; Barak, Infal H.; Al-Muhanna, Fahd A.

    2005-01-01

    In this report, we present two cases of familial tuberous sclerosis co-existing with the Fanconi Syndrome. Both cases presented with history of failure to thrive and mental retardation associated with hypokalemic metabolic acidosis. To our knowledge, the association between tuberous sclerosis and the Fanconi Syndrome has not been reported previously. (author)

  8. Co-existence of wind seas and swells along the west coast of India during non-monsoon season

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rashmi, R.; Aboobacker, V.M.; Vethamony, P.; John, M.P.

    An attempt has been made to understand the co-existence of wind seas and swells along the west coast of India during non-monsoon season. Wave data were collected in different years during non-monsoon season (off Goa during May 2005, off Ratnagiri...

  9. Negotiating Co-Existence in Divided Societies: Teachers, Students and Parents' Perspectives at a Shared School in Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zembylas, Michalinos

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a study conducted at a shared secondary school in Cyprus - that is, a school which co-educates children coming from two conflicting ethnic communities on the island. The study focuses on teachers', students' and parents' perspectives about the struggles to negotiate co-existence in this school. Drawing on a three-month…

  10. Effect of NO2 and water on the catalytic oxidation of soot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2017-01-01

    The influence of adding NO2 to 10 vol% O2/N2 on non-catalytic soot oxidation and soot oxidation in intimate or loose contact with a catalyst has been investigated. In non-catalytic soot oxidation the oxidation rate is increased significantly at lower temperatures by NO2. For soot oxidation in tig...... exhibited a volcano-curve dependence on the heat of oxygen chemisorption, and among the tested pure metals and oxides Cr2O3 was the most active catalyst. Further improvements were achieved with a FeaCrbOx binary oxide catalyst.......The influence of adding NO2 to 10 vol% O2/N2 on non-catalytic soot oxidation and soot oxidation in intimate or loose contact with a catalyst has been investigated. In non-catalytic soot oxidation the oxidation rate is increased significantly at lower temperatures by NO2. For soot oxidation in tight...... contact with a Co3O4 catalyst a more reactive NO2-containg atmosphere did not change the oxidation profile significantly during temperature programmed oxidation. This is consistent with the expected Mars van Krevelen mechanism, where the rate limiting step is reaction between carbon and lattice oxygen...

  11. Applications of the water--gas shift reaction. II. Catalytic exchange of deuterium for hydrogen at saturated carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laine, R.M.; Thomas, D.W.; Cary, L.W.; Buttrill, S.E.

    1978-01-01

    Previous studies on the homogeneous catalysis of the water-gas shift reaction by metal complexes of groups 6 and 8 had been carried out using aqueous alcoholic solutions of group 8 metal carbonyl complexes made basic with KOH. Substitution of triethylamine (Et 3 N) for KOH as base and alcohol for solvent led to the discovery that Et 3 N in the presence of D 2 O, CO, and Rh 6 (CO) 16 at 150 0 C undergoes an unusual catalytic exchange of deuterium for hydrogen. A suggested mechanism for this reaction is given and includes activation of hydrogen at a saturated carbon

  12. Non-Catalytic and MgSO4 - Catalyst based Degradation of Glycerol in Subcritical and Supercritical Water Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahfud Mahfud

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to study the glycerol degradation reaction in subcritical and supercritical water media. The degradation of glycerol into other products was performed both with sulphate salt catalysts and without catalyst. The reactant was made from glycerol and water with the mass ratio of 1:10. The experiments were carried out using a batch reactor at a constant pressure of 250 kgf/cm2, with the temperature range of 200-400oC, reaction time of 30 minutes, and catalyst mol ratio in glycerol of 1:10 and 1:8. The products of the non-catalytic glycerol degradation were acetaldehyde, methanol, and ethanol. The use of sulphate salt as catalyst has high selectivity to acetaldehyde and still allows the formation alcohol product in small quantities. The mechanism of ionic reaction and free radical reaction can occur at lower temperature in hydrothermal area or subcritical water. Conversion of glycerol on catalytic reaction showed a higher yield when compared with the reaction performed without catalyst

  13. A Broad Spectrum Catalytic System for Removal of Toxic Organics from Water by Deep Oxidation - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sen, Ayusman

    2000-12-01

    A most pressing need for the DOE environmental management program is the removal of toxic organic compounds present in groundwater and soil at specific DOE sites. While several remediation procedures have been proposed, they suffer from one or more drawbacks. The objective of the present research was to develop new catalytic procedures for the removal of toxic organic compounds from the environment through their deep oxidation to harmless products. In water, metallic palladium was found to catalyze the deep oxidation of a wide variety of toxic organic compounds by dioxygen at 80-90 C in the presence of carbon monoxide or dihydrogen. Several classes of organic compounds were examined: benzene, phenol and substituted phenols, nitro and halo organics, organophosphorus, and organosulfur compounds. In every case, deep oxidation to carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water occurred in high yields, resulting in up to several hundred turnovers over a 24 hour period. For substrates susceptible to hydrogenation, the conversions were generally high with dihydrogen than with carbon monoxide. It is clear from the results obtained that we have discovered an exceptionally versatile catalytic system for the deep oxidation of toxic organic compounds in water. This system possesses several attractive features not found simultaneously in other reported systems. These are (a) the ability to directly utilize dioxygen as the oxidant, (b) the ability to carry out the deep oxidation of a particularly wide range of functional organics, and (c) the ease of recovery of the catalyst by simple filtration.

  14. Investigation of catalytic oxidation of diamond by water vapor and carbon dioxide in the presence of alkali melts of some rare earth oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulakova, I.I.; Rudenko, A.P.; Sulejmenova, A.S.; Tolstopyatova, A.A.

    1978-01-01

    The results of an investigation of the catalytic oxydation of diamond by carbon dioxide and water vapors at 906 deg C in the presence of melts of some rare earth oxides in potassium hydroxide are given. The ion La 3+ was shown to possess the most catalytic activity. The earlier proposed mechanisms of the diamond oxidation by CO 2 and H 2 O were corroborated. The ions of rare earth elements were found to accelerate the different stages of the process

  15. ADHD in girls and boys – gender differences in co-existing symptoms and executive function measures

    OpenAIRE

    Skogli, Erik Winther; Teicher, Martin H; Andersen, Per Normann; Hovik, Kjell Tore; Øie, Merete

    2013-01-01

    Background: ADHD is diagnosed and treated more often in males than in females. Research on gender differences suggests that girls may be consistently underidentified and underdiagnosed because of differences in the expression of the disorder among boys and girls. One aim of the present study was to assess in a clinical sample of medication naïve boys and girls with ADHD, whether there were significant gender x diagnosis interactions in co-existing symptom severity and executive function (EF) ...

  16. Effect of Co-Existing Biologically Relevant Molecules and Ions on DNA Photocleavage Caused by Pyrene and its Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongtao Yu

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Inorganic ions, coenzymes, amino acids, and saccharides could co-exist with toxic environmental chemicals, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, in the cell. The presence of these co-existing chemicals can modulate the toxicity of the PAHs. One of the genotoxic effects by PAHs is light-induced cleavage, or photocleavage, of DNA. The effect of inorganic ions I-, Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Fe3+, Mn2+, Cu2+, and Zn2+ and biological molecules riboflavin, histidine, mannitol, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD, glutathione, and glutamic acid on the DNA photocleavage by pyrene, 1-hydroxypyrene (1-HP, and 1-aminopyrene (1-AP, is studied. The non-transition metal ions Na+, Ca2+, and Mg2+, usually have very little inhibitory effects, while the transition metal ions Fe3+, Cu2+, and Zn2+ enhance, Mn2+ inhibits the DNA photocleavage. The effect by biological molecules is complex, depending on the photochemical reaction mechanisms of the compounds tested (1-AP, 1-HP and pyrene and on the chemical nature of the added biological molecules. Riboflavin, histidine, and mannitol enhance DNA photocleavage by all three compounds, except that mannitol has no effect on the photocleavage of DNA by pyrene. Glutathione inhibits the DNA photocleavage by 1-AP and 1-HP, but has no effect on that by pyrene. NAD enhances the DNA photocleavage by 1-AP, but has no effect on that by 1-HP and pyrene. Glutamic acid enhances the DNA photocleavage by 1-AP and pyrene, but inhibits that by 1-HP. These results show that the co-existing chemicals may have a profound effect on the toxicity of PAHs, or possibly on the toxicity of many other chemicals. Therefore, if one studies the toxic effects of PAHs or other toxic chemicals, the effect of the co-existing chemicals or ions needs to be considered.

  17. Patchiness and co-existence of indigenous and invasive mussels at small spatial scales: the interaction of facilitation and competition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Erlandsson

    Full Text Available Ecological theory predicts that two species with similar requirements will fail to show long-term co-existence in situations where shared resources are limiting, especially at spatial scales that are small relative to the size of the organisms. Two species of intertidal mussels, the indigenous Perna perna and the invasive Mytilus galloprovincialis, form mixed beds on the south coast of South Africa in a situation that has been stable for several generations of these species, even though these populations are often limited by the availability of space. We examined the spatial structure of these species where they co-exist at small spatial scales in the absence of apparent environmental heterogeneity at two sites, testing: whether conspecific aggregation of mussels can occur (using spatial Monte-Carlo tests; the degree of patchiness (using Korcak B patchiness exponent, and whether there was a relationship between percent cover and patchiness. We found that under certain circumstances there is non-random conspecific aggregation, but that in other circumstances there may be random distribution (i.e. the two species are mixed, so that spatial patterns are context-dependent. The relative cover of the species differed between sites, and within each site, the species with higher cover showed low Korcak B values (indicating low patchiness, i.e. the existence of fewer, larger patches, while the less abundant species showed the reverse, i.e. high patchiness. This relationship did not hold for either species within sites. We conclude that co-existence between these mussels is possible, even at small spatial scales because each species is an ecological engineer and, while they have been shown to compete for space, this is preceded by initial facilitation. We suggest that a patchy pattern of co-existence is possible because of a balance between direct (competitive and indirect (facilitative interactions.

  18. Co-existence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and inflammatory bowel disease: A review article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Che-Yung; Battat, Robert; Al Khoury, Alex; Restellini, Sophie; Sebastiani, Giada; Bessissow, Talat

    2016-09-14

    Emerging data have highlighted the co-existence of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and inflammatory bowel disease; both of which are increasingly prevalent disorders with significant complications and impact on future health burden. Cross-section observational studies have shown widely variable prevalence rates of co-existing disease, largely due to differences in disease definition and diagnostic tools utilised in the studies. Age, obesity, insulin resistance and other metabolic conditions are common risks factors in observational studies. However, other studies have also suggested a more dominant role of inflammatory bowel disease related factors such as disease activity, duration, steroid use and prior surgical intervention, in the development of NAFLD. This suggests a potentially more complex pathogenesis and relationship between the two diseases which may be contributed by factors including altered intestinal permeability, gut dysbiosis and chronic inflammatory response. Commonly used immunomodulation agents pose potential hepatic toxicity, however no definitive evidence exist linking them to the development of hepatic steatosis, nor are there any data on the impact of therapy and prognosis in patient with co-existent diseases. Further studies are required to assess the impact and establish appropriate screening and management strategies in order to allow early identification, intervention and improve patient outcomes.

  19. Co-existence of Phenylketonuria and Fabry disease on a 3 year-old boy: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonapace Giuseppe

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The co-existence of two genetically distinct metabolic disorders in the same patient has rarely been reported. Phenylketonuria (PKU is an inborn error of the metabolism resulting from a phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency. Fabry disease (FD is an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder due to a deficiency of the enzyme alpha-galactosidase A. Case presentation We report a case of a 3 year- old boy affected by classic PKU and FD, both confirmed by molecular data. The FD was suspected at the age of 21 months on the presence of non-specific GI symptoms (severe abdominal pain and periodically appearance of not specific episodes of gastroenteritis apparently non related to PKU. Conclusion This is the first report of co-existence of FD and PKU, two different congenital inborn of metabolism and in consideration of the prevalence of each disease this chance association is a very unusual event. The co-existence of this diseases made very difficult the correct interpretation of clinical symptoms as lack of appetite, severe abdominal pain and non-specific gastroenteritis episodes. Furthermore, this case report helps to define the early clinical phenotype of FD.

  20. Culture clash : can oilmen co-exist with farmers, acreage owners?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lea, N.

    2001-05-01

    Concerns about the environment and health risks are the root cause of a culture clash between landowners and the oil industry. Most new developments meet with little opposition, but as the industry moves closer to populated areas, the number of conflicts will increase. This paper presented a rural perspective on oil and gas development. Many of the concerns by rural residents include the location of wells in proximity to their homes, emissions from the sour gas wells, flaring and the impact that it will have on their livestock. Other concerns include issues related to the drilling phase, when the sour zones would be hit, continual monitoring of air quality, potential for groundwater pollution and water testing, emergency evacuation plans, well testing schedules, and location of emergency shut down valves. Companies such as Gulf Canada, have reassured residents that the oilfield activity will not negatively impact property values. If needed, the communities could turn to the Alberta Energy and Utilities Board's new Appropriate Dispute Resolution (ADR) program which was recently introduced in response to complaints. The ADR is designed to resolve disputes between oil companies and communities before they get out of hand and wind up at formal hearings. Since its initiation, the program has had a 70 per cent success rate in mediating disputes. 2 figs.

  1. Dinuclear manganese complexes for water oxidation: evaluation of electronic effects and catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafa, Wael A A; Kärkäs, Markus D; Lee, Bao-Lin; Åkermark, Torbjörn; Liao, Rong-Zhen; Berends, Hans-Martin; Messinger, Johannes; Siegbahn, Per E M; Åkermark, Björn

    2014-06-28

    During recent years significant progress has been made towards the realization of a sustainable and carbon-neutral energy economy. One promising approach is photochemical splitting of H2O into O2 and solar fuels, such as H2. However, the bottleneck in such artificial photosynthetic schemes is the H2O oxidation half reaction where more efficient catalysts are required that lower the kinetic barrier for this process. In particular catalysts based on earth-abundant metals are highly attractive compared to catalysts comprised of noble metals. We have now synthesized a library of dinuclear Mn2(II,III) catalysts for H2O oxidation and studied how the incorporation of different substituents affected the electronics and catalytic efficiency. It was found that the incorporation of a distal carboxyl group into the ligand scaffold resulted in a catalyst with increased catalytic activity, most likely because of the fact that the distal group is able to promote proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) from the high-valent Mn species, thus facilitating O-O bond formation.

  2. The different paths and potential risks of photo(-electro)-catalytic degradation for rhodamine B in water by graphene/TiO2membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Miao; Liu, Haiyang; Qu, Jiao; Zhang, Yanan; Ma, Ying; Yuan, Xing

    2018-03-07

    The graphene (GR)/TiO 2 membrane was prepared by the sol-gel method and coated on the indium tin oxide (ITO) conductive glass, which showed high and stable photo(-electro)-catalytic activities to rhodamine B (Rh-B) in water. Characterization results showed that the GR was dispersed and wrapped in the needle-like TiO 2 . With GR/TiO 2 membrane and simulated sunlight irradiation, the removal efficiency of Rh-B (10 mg l -1 and pH at 5.4) arrived at 87.6% within 300 min. However, the higher removal efficiency for Rh-B reached to 97.8% by the photo-electro-catalytic degradation with the applied voltage 4 v for 30 min. The ·OH that generated in the photo-catalytic degradation process were responsible for Rh-B decomposition. The ·O 2 - played the significant role in the photo-electro-catalytic degradation of Rh-B. Furthermore, the decarboxylation was also occurred in the photo-electro-catalytic degradation for the Rh-B in water except for the deethylation and hydroxylation in the photo-catalytic degradation. In addition, the toxicities of the intermediates were calculated using the ECOSAR program and the EPIWIN software. The results indicated that the toxicities of intermediates from photo-electro-catalytic degradation for the Rh-B were higher than photo-catalytic degradation, due to the generation of decarboxylate.

  3. Burrow characteristics of the co-existing sibling species Mus booduga and Mus terricolor and the genetic basis of adaptation to hypoxic/hypercapnic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Gopeshwar

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The co-existing, sibling species Mus booduga and Mus terricolor show a difference in site-preference for burrows. The former build them in flat portion of the fields while the latter make burrows in earthen mounds raised for holding water in cultivated fields. In northern India which experiences great variation in climatic condition between summer and winter, M. booduga burrows have an average depth of 41 cm, as against 30 cm in southern India with less climatic fluctuation. M. terricolor burrows are about 20 cm deep everywhere. The three chromosomal species M. terricolor I, II and III have identical burrows, including location of the nest which is situated at the highest position. In contrast, in M. booduga burrows, the nest is at the lowest position. Results The nest chamber of M. booduga is located at greater depth than the nest chamber of M. terricolor. Also, in the burrows of M. booduga the exchange of air takes place only from one side (top surface in contrast to the burrows of M. terricolor where air exchange is through three sides. Hence, M. booduga lives in relatively more hypoxic and hypercapnic conditions than M. terricolor. We observed the fixation of alternative alleles in M. booduga and M. terricolor at Superoxide dismutase-1 (Sod-1, Transferrin (Trf and Hemoglobin beta chain (Hbb loci. All the three are directly or indirectly dependent on oxygen concentration for function. In addition to these, there are differences in burrow patterns and site-preference for burrows suggesting difference in probable adaptive strategy in these co-existing sibling species. Conclusion The burrow structure and depth of nest of the chromosomal species M. terricolor I, II and III are same everywhere probably due to the recency of their evolutionary divergence. Moreover, there is lack of competition for the well-adapted 'microhabitats' since they are non-overlapping in distribution. However, the co-existing sibling species M. booduga

  4. Theoretical explanation for the enhanced water-splitting catalytic activity in delithiated LiCoO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajdich, Michal; Lu, Zhiyi; Norskov, Jens K.; Cui, Yi

    Layered LiCoO2 (LCO) is important battery material not well know for its electrochemical catalytic activity. On the other hand, layered 3 d -metal-oxyhydroxides, including CoOOH, are very active water-splitting (oxygen-evolution reaction, OER) catalysts in alkaline media with structure very similar to LCO. In this work, we use DFT+U calculations to explain the enhancement effect in OER catalytic activity in the electrochemically delithiated LCO (De-LCO). We analyze the surface stability and OER activity of the 5 most stable surface facets of LCO and the De-LCO, with 50% Li removed. Using standard thermodynamic approach of the theoretical OER overpotential, we show that all surface facets have more active sites under Li removal. Particularly, the non-polar facets are identified to be highly active and are further activated by the delithiation process, while the dominant (0001) surface has negligible activity. These findings are in very good agreement with our experimental investigation of LCO and De-LCO nanosheets and nanoparticles with well defined surface morphology.

  5. A broad spectrum catalytic system for removal of toxic organics from water by deep oxidation. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, A.

    1998-01-01

    'Toxic organics and polymers pose a serious threat to the environment, especially when they are present in aquatic systems. The objective of the research is the design of practical procedures for the removal and/or recycling of such pollutants by oxidation. This report summarizes the work performed in the first one and half years of a three year project. The authors had earlier described a catalytic system for the deep oxidation of toxic organics, such as benzene, phenol and substituted phenols, aliphatic and aromatic halogenated compounds, organophosphorus, and organosulfur compounds [1]. In this system, metallic palladium was found to catalyze the oxidation of the substrate by dioxygen in aqueous medium at 80--100 C in the presence of carbon monoxide. For all the substrates examined, deep oxidation to carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and water occurred in high yields, resulting in up to several hundred turnovers over a 24 h period. Because of a pressing need for new procedures for the destruction of chemical warfare agents, the authors have examined in detail the deep oxidation of appropriate model compounds containing phosphorus-carbon and sulfur-carbon bonds using the same catalytic system. The result is the first observation of the efficient catalytic oxidative cleavage of phosphorus-carbon and sulfur-carbon bonds under mild conditions, using dioxygen as the oxidant [2]. In addition to the achievements described above, they have unpublished results in several other areas. For example, they have investigated the possibility of using dihydrogen rather than carbon monoxide as a coreductant in the catalytic deep oxidation of substrates. Even more attractive from a practical standpoint is the possibility of using a mixture of carbon monoxide and dihydrogen (synthesis gas). Indeed, experiments indicated that it is possible to substitute carbon monoxide by dihydrogen or synthesis gas. Significantly, in the case of nitro compounds, the deep oxidation in fact proceeded

  6. Study on Influence to Waste Water Treatment Plant’s Sludge by Low-carbon Catalytic Combustion Furnace of Natural Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ren TianQi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available There are two parts in this experiment. One of is about the concentration of Variation of exhaust gas while heating sludge of waste water treatment plant. The other one is about introduce the problems of the traditional incineration processes of sludge of waste water treatment as compared between the sludge heated by natural gas catalytic combustion furnace and the tradition’s. We can see that natural gas low-carbon catalytic combustion furnace realize the near-zero emission of contaminates.

  7. Removal of volatile to semi-volatile organic contaminants from water using hollow fiber membrane contactors and catalytic destruction of the contaminants in the gas phase

    OpenAIRE

    Tarafder, Shamsul Abedin

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Chlorinated organic compounds and ether compounds are frequently found in groundwater and efficient treatment options are needed. In this study, the efficient transferal of the compounds from the water phase to the gas phase was studied followed by the catalytic treatment of the gas phase. For the removal of the organic contaminants from water, a microporous polypropylene hollow fiber membrane (HFM) module was operated under low strip gas flow to water flow ratios (_< 5:1). Rem...

  8. Electrochemical synthesis of Mo{sub 2}C catalytical coatings for the water-gas shift reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, S.A.; Dubrovskiy, A.R. [Inst. of Chemistry, Kola Science Centre RAS, Apatity, Murmansk Region (Russian Federation); Rebrov, E.V.; Schouten, J.C. [Lab. of Chemical Reactor Engineering, Eindhoven Univ. of Tech., Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2007-10-15

    The electroreduction of CO{sub 3}{sup 2-} ions on a molybdenum cathode in a NaCl-KCl-Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} melt was studied by cyclic voltammetry. The electrochemical synthesis of Mo{sub 2}C on molybdenum substrates has been performed at 1123 K for 7 h with a cathodic current density of 5 mA cm{sup -2}. If molybdenum carbide is present as a thin (ca. 500 nm) film on a molybdenum substrate (Mo{sub 2}C/Mo), its catalytic activity in the water gas-shift reaction is enhanced by at least an order of magnitude compared to that of the bulk Mo{sub 2}C phase. (orig.)

  9. Co-existence of tic disorders and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder-recent advances in understanding and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberger, Aribert; Roessner, Veit; Banaschewski, Tobias; Leckman, James F

    2007-06-01

    In daily clinical practice of child psychiatry tic disorders (TD) and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) as well as their co-existence are common and need careful evidence-based approaches in differential diagnostics and treatment choice. Hence, their relationship at different levels (e.g., psychopathology, neuropsychology, neurobiology, treatment) needs to be elucidated in more detail. The articles of this supplement deal with this subject. It is unclear if TD + ADHD represents an own clinical entity and which component (TD vs. ADHD) is most important in case of co-existence with respect to accompanying problems like emotional or cognitive disturbances. This editorial gives a short overview of the essential research topics concerning TD + ADHD and shows where (in this ECAP supplement and other literature) empirically based answers can be found. Probably, the identification of separate or common "endophenotypes" for TD-only, ADHD-only and for TD + ADHD would help to sort out the complexities and this supplement may nurture such a perspective of future research for a better understanding and treatment of youths with TD + ADHD and their families.

  10. Co-existence of distinct prion types enables conformational evolution of human PrPSc by competitive selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldiman, Tracy; Kim, Chae; Cohen, Yvonne; Chen, Wei; Blevins, Janis; Qing, Liuting; Cohen, Mark L; Langeveld, Jan; Telling, Glenn C; Kong, Qingzhong; Safar, Jiri G

    2013-10-11

    The unique phenotypic characteristics of mammalian prions are thought to be encoded in the conformation of pathogenic prion proteins (PrP(Sc)). The molecular mechanism responsible for the adaptation, mutation, and evolution of prions observed in cloned cells and upon crossing the species barrier remains unsolved. Using biophysical techniques and conformation-dependent immunoassays in tandem, we isolated two distinct populations of PrP(Sc) particles with different conformational stabilities and aggregate sizes, which frequently co-exist in the most common human prion disease, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The protein misfolding cyclic amplification replicates each of the PrP(Sc) particle types independently and leads to the competitive selection of those with lower initial conformational stability. In serial propagation with a nonglycosylated mutant PrP(C) substrate, the dominant PrP(Sc) conformers are subject to further evolution by natural selection of the subpopulation with the highest replication rate due to its lowest stability. Cumulatively, the data show that sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease PrP(Sc) is not a single conformational entity but a dynamic collection of two distinct populations of particles. This implies the co-existence of different prions, whose adaptation and evolution are governed by the selection of progressively less stable, faster replicating PrP(Sc) conformers.

  11. Co-existence of Distinct Prion Types Enables Conformational Evolution of Human PrPSc by Competitive Selection*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldiman, Tracy; Kim, Chae; Cohen, Yvonne; Chen, Wei; Blevins, Janis; Qing, Liuting; Cohen, Mark L.; Langeveld, Jan; Telling, Glenn C.; Kong, Qingzhong; Safar, Jiri G.

    2013-01-01

    The unique phenotypic characteristics of mammalian prions are thought to be encoded in the conformation of pathogenic prion proteins (PrPSc). The molecular mechanism responsible for the adaptation, mutation, and evolution of prions observed in cloned cells and upon crossing the species barrier remains unsolved. Using biophysical techniques and conformation-dependent immunoassays in tandem, we isolated two distinct populations of PrPSc particles with different conformational stabilities and aggregate sizes, which frequently co-exist in the most common human prion disease, sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. The protein misfolding cyclic amplification replicates each of the PrPSc particle types independently and leads to the competitive selection of those with lower initial conformational stability. In serial propagation with a nonglycosylated mutant PrPC substrate, the dominant PrPSc conformers are subject to further evolution by natural selection of the subpopulation with the highest replication rate due to its lowest stability. Cumulatively, the data show that sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease PrPSc is not a single conformational entity but a dynamic collection of two distinct populations of particles. This implies the co-existence of different prions, whose adaptation and evolution are governed by the selection of progressively less stable, faster replicating PrPSc conformers. PMID:23974118

  12. Catalytic effect of a single water molecule on the OH + CH2NH reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar Ali, Mohamad; M, Balaganesh; Lin, K C

    2018-02-07

    In recent work, there has been considerable speculation about the atmospheric reaction of methylenimine (CH 2 NH), because this compound is highly reactive, soluble in water, and sticky, thus posing severe experimental challenges. In this work, we have revisited the kinetics of the OH + CH 2 NH reaction assisted by a single water molecule. The potential energy surfaces (PESs) for the water-assisted OH + CH 2 NH reaction were calculated using the CCSD(T)//BH&HLYP/aug-cc-pVTZ levels of theory. The rate coefficients for the bimolecular reaction pathways CH 2 NHH 2 O + OH and CH 2 NH + H 2 OHO were computed using canonical variational transition state theory (CVT) with small curvature tunneling correction. The reaction without water has four elementary reaction pathways, depending on how the hydroxyl radical approaches CH 2 NH. In all cases, the reaction begins with the formation of a single pre-reactive complex before producing abstraction and addition products. When water is added, the products of the reaction do not change, and the reaction becomes quite complex, yielding four different pre-reactive complexes and eight reaction pathways. The calculated rate coefficient for the OH + CH 2 NH (water-free) reaction at 300 K is 1.7 × 10 -11 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 and for OH + CH 2 NH (water-assisted), it is 5.1 × 10 -14 cm 3 molecule -1 s -1 . This result is similar to the isoelectronic analogous reaction OH + CH 2 O (water-assisted). In general, the effective rate coefficients of the water-assisted reaction are 2∼3 orders of magnitude smaller than water-free. Our results show that the water-assisted OH + CH 2 NH reaction cannot accelerate the reaction because the dominated water-assisted process depends parametrically on water concentration. As a result, the overall reaction rate coefficients are smaller.

  13. Corrigendum to Photo catalytic Oxidation of Trichloroethylene in Water Using a Porous Ball of Nano-Zn O and Nano clay Composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bak, S. A.; Song, M. S.; Nam, I.T.; Lee, W.G.

    2015-01-01

    In the published paper entitled Photo catalytic Oxidation of Trichloroethylene in Water Using a Porous Ball of Nano-Zn O and Nano clay Composite [1], we mistakenly used Laponite in our paper. The corrected name is Laponite (BYK Corporations products). So we are making some changes from Laponite to Laponite (BYK Corporations products) in our paper.

  14. Identification of intrinsic catalytic activity for electrochemical reduction of water molecules to generate hydrogen

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Insufficient hydronium ion activities at near-neutral pH and under unbuffered conditions induce diffusion-limited currents for hydrogen evolution, followed by a reaction with water molecules to generate hydrogen at elevated potentials. The observed constant current behaviors at near neutral pH reflect the intrinsic electrocatalytic reactivity of the metal electrodes for water reduction. This journal is © the Owner Societies.

  15. Interworking between IP security and NAT-PT under IPv4/IPv6 co-existent environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Run-Guo; Yu, Shu-Yao; Yang, Hong-Wei; Song, Chuck

    2005-02-01

    Similar to conventional NAT gateways, NAT-PT gateways break traditional TCP/IP"s end-to-end argument property; hence, any IP-based applications protected by IPSec protocol cannot traverse NAT-PT gateways properly. The interworking issues between IPSec and NAT-PT gateways under IPv4/IPv6 co-existent environments were studied: this paper first pointed out the deficiency of current NAT-Traversal scheme when interworking with NAT-PT gateways and proposed an enhanced scheme, which enabled interworking between IPSec and NAT-PT gateways and served the following three scenarios: 1) secure communication between IPv6 hosts and IPv4 hosts; 2) secure communication between IPv6 subnets and IPv4 subnets; 3) secure communication between remote IPv6 hosts and legacy IPv4 subnets.

  16. The co-existence of a myxoid liposarcoma and leiomyoma in the same ovarian mass of a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiwa, Nozomi; Boonsriroj, Hassadin; Kimitsuki, Kazunori; Shimatsu, Taichi; Park, Chun-Ho

    2016-03-01

    A 15-year-old, female mixed-breed dog presented with abdominal distention. An exploratory laparotomy revealed a large left ovarian mass (20 × 15 × 12 cm). Histopathological examination of the mass revealed a mixed myxoid liposarcoma and a well-differentiated leiomyoma. Four months after surgical removal of the mass, the dog died due to multiorgan metastasis. The metastasis was composed solely of the liposarcoma component. The liposarcoma component was Alcian Blue- and Oil red O-positive, and demonstrated immunoreactivity with S-100, adipophilin and vimentin. Electron microscopy revealed that the tumor cell cytoplasms were packed with lipid vacuoles and dilated rough endoplasmic reticulum. To our knowledge, this is the first report of myxoid liposarcoma and leiomyoma co-existing in a canine ovary.

  17. What can density functional theory tell us about artificial catalytic water splitting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavros, Michael G; Tsuchimochi, Takashi; Kowalczyk, Tim; McIsaac, Alexandra; Wang, Lee-Ping; Voorhis, Troy Van

    2014-07-07

    Water splitting by artificial catalysts is a critical process in the production of hydrogen gas as an alternative fuel. In this paper, we examine the essential role of theoretical calculations, with particular focus on density functional theory (DFT), in understanding the water-splitting reaction on these catalysts. First, we present an overview of DFT thermochemical calculations on water-splitting catalysts, addressing how these calculations are adapted to condensed phases and room temperature. We show how DFT-derived chemical descriptors of reactivity can be surprisingly good estimators for reactive trends in water-splitting catalysts. Using this concept, we recover trends for bulk catalysts using simple model complexes for at least the first-row transition-metal oxides. Then, using the CoPi cobalt oxide catalyst as a case study, we examine the usefulness of simulation for predicting the kinetics of water splitting. We demonstrate that the appropriate treatment of solvent effects is critical for computing accurate redox potentials with DFT, which, in turn, determine the rate-limiting steps and electrochemical overpotentials. Finally, we examine the ability of DFT to predict mechanism, using ruthenium complexes as a focal point for discussion. Our discussion is intended to provide an overview of the current strengths and weaknesses of the state-of-the-art DFT methodologies for condensed-phase molecular simulation involving transition metals and also to guide future experiments and computations toward the understanding and development of novel water-splitting catalysts.

  18. Bayesian risk maps for Schistosoma mansoni and hookworm mono-infections in a setting where both parasites co-exist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanna Raso

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available There is growing interest in the use of Bayesian geostatistical models for predicting the spatial distribution of parasitic infections, including hookworm, Schistosoma mansoni and co-infections with both parasites. The aim of this study was to predict the spatial distribution of mono-infections with either hookworm or S. mansoni in a setting where both parasites co-exist. School-based cross-sectional parasitological and questionnaire surveys were carried out in 57 rural schools in the Man region, western Côte d’Ivoire. A single stool specimen was obtained from each schoolchild attending grades 3-5. Stool specimens were processed by the Kato-Katz technique and an ether concentration method and examined for the presence of hookworm and S. mansoni eggs. The combined results from the two diagnostic approaches were considered for the infection status of each child. Demographic data (i.e. age and sex were obtained from readily available school registries. Each child’s socio-economic status was estimated, using the questionnaire data following a household-based asset approach. Environmental data were extracted from satellite imagery. The different data sources were incorporated into a geographical information system. Finally, a Bayesian spatial multinomial regression model was constructed and the spatial patterns of S. mansoni and hookworm mono-infections were investigated using Bayesian kriging. Our approach facilitated the production of smooth risk maps for hookworm and S. mansoni mono-infections that can be utilized for targeting control interventions. We argue that in settings where S. mansoni and hookworm co-exist and control efforts are under way, there is a need for both mono- and co-infection risk maps to enhance the cost-effectiveness of control programmes.

  19. An animal model of co-existing sarcopenia and osteoporotic fracture in senescence accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Chow, Simon Kwoon Ho; Leung, Kwok Sui; Lee, Ho Hin; Cheung, Wing Hoi

    2017-10-15

    Sarcopenia and osteoporotic fracture are common aging-related musculoskeletal problems. Recent evidences report that osteoporotic fracture patients showed high prevalence of sarcopenia; however, current clinical practice basically does not consider sarcopenia in the treatment or rehabilitation of osteoporotic fracture. There is almost no report studying the relationship of the co-existing of sarcopenia and osteoporotic fracture healing. In this study, we validated aged senescence accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) and senescence accelerated mouse resistant 1 (SAMR1) as animal models of senile osteoporosis with/without sarcopenia. Bone mineral density (BMD) at the 5th lumbar and muscle testing of the two animal strains were measured to confirm the status of osteoporosis and sarcopenia, respectively. Closed fracture was created on the right femur of 8-month-old animals. Radiographs were taken weekly post-fracture. MicroCT and histology of the fractured femur were performed at week 2, 4 and 6 post-fracture, while mechanical test of both femora at week 4 and 6 post-fracture. Results showed that the callus of SAMR1 was significantly larger at week 2 but smaller at week 6 post-fracture than SAMP8. Mechanical properties were significantly better at week 4 post-fracture in SAMR1 than SAMP8, indicating osteoporotic fracture healing was delayed in sarcopenic SAMP8. This study validated an animal model of co-existing sarcopenia and osteoporotic fracture, where a delayed fracture healing might be resulted in the presence of sarcopenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Catalytic hydrogen production from fossil fuels via the water gas shift reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gradisher, Logan; Dutcher, Bryce; Fan, Maohong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Hydrogen is a clean alternative to hydrocarbon fuels. • Hydrogen is primarily produced with the water gas shift reaction. • Development of water gas shift catalysts is essential to the energy industry. • This work summarizes recent progress in water gas shift catalyst research. - Abstract: The production of hydrogen is a highly researched topic for many reasons. First of all, it is a clean fuel that can be used instead of hydrocarbons, which produce CO 2 , a greenhouse gas emission that is thought to be the reason for climate change in the world. The largest source of hydrogen is the water gas shift (WGS) reaction, where CO and water are mixed over a catalyst to produce the desired hydrogen. Many researchers have focused on development of WGS catalysts with different metals. The most notable of these metals are precious and rare earth metals which, when combined, have unique properties for the WGS reaction. Research in this area is very important to the energy industry and the future of energy around the world. However, the progress made recently has not been reviewed, and this review was designed to fill the gap

  1. Experimental studies on catalytic hydrogen recombiners for light water reactors; Experimentelle Untersuchungen zu katalytischen Wasserstoffkombinatoren fuer Leichtwasserreaktoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drinovac, P.

    2006-06-19

    In the course of core melt accidents in nuclear power plants a large amount of hydrogen can be produced and form an explosive or even detonative gas mixture with aerial oxygen in the reactor building. In the containment atmosphere of pressurized water reactors hydrogen combines a phlogistically with the oxygen present to form water vapor even at room temperature. In the past, experimental work conducted at various facilities has contributed little or nothing to an understanding of the operating principles of catalytic recombiners. Hence, the purpose of the present study was to conduct detailed investigations on a section of a recombiner essentially in order to deepen the understanding of reaction kinetics and heat transport processes. The results of the experiments presented in this dissertation form a large data base of measurements which provides an insight into the processes taking place in recombiners. The reaction-kinetic interpretation of the measured data confirms and deepens the diffusion theory - proposed in an earlier study. Thus it is now possible to validate detailed numeric models representing the processes in recombiners. Consequently the present study serves to broaden and corroborate competence in this significant area of reactor technology. In addition, the empirical knowledge thus gained may be used for a critical reassessment of previous numeric model calculations. (orig.)

  2. The role of oxygen and water on molybdenum nanoclusters for electro catalytic ammonia production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howalt, Jakob Geelmuyden; Vegge, Tejs

    2014-01-01

    The presence of water often gives rise to oxygen adsorption on catalyst surfaces through decomposition of water and the adsorbed oxygen or hydroxide species often occupy important surfaces sites, resulting in a decrease or a total hindrance of other chemical reactions taking place at that site...... are -0.72 V or lower for all oxygen coverages studied, and it is thus possible to (re)activate (partially) oxidized nanoclusters for electrochemical ammonia production, e.g., using a dry proton conductor or an aqueous electrolyte. At lower oxygen coverages, nitrogen molecules can adsorb to the surface....... In this study, we present theoretical investigations of the influence of oxygen adsorption and reduction on pure and nitrogen covered molybdenum nanocluster electro catalysts for electrochemical reduction of N2 to NH3 with the purpose of understanding oxygen and water poisoning of the catalyst. Density...

  3. Conversion of deuterium gas to heavy water by catalytic isotopic exchange using wetproof catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quaiattini, R.J.; McGauley, M.P.; Burns, D.L.; Tichler, P.R.

    1987-01-01

    The invention at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories of a simple method of wetproofing platinum catalysts allows them to retain their activity in liquid water. High performance catalysts for the hydrogen-water isotope exchange reaction that remain active for years can now be routinely produced. The first commercial application using the ordered-bed-type wetproofed isotope exchange catalyst developed and patented by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. has been successfully completed. Approximately 9100 m/sup 3/ of deuterium gas stored at Brookhaven National Laboratory was converted to high grade heavy water. Conversion efficiency exceeded 99.8%. The product D/sub 2/O concentration was 6.7 percentage points higher than the feed D/sub 2/ gas

  4. Support effects and catalytic trends for water gas shift activity of transition metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Astrid; Janssens, T.V.W.; Schumacher, Nana Maria Pii

    2010-01-01

    Water gas shift activity measurements for 12 transition metals (Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Re, Ir, Pt, Au) supported on inert MgAl2O4 and Ce0.75Zr0.25O2 are presented, to elucidate the influence of the active metal and the support. The activity is related to the adsorption energy of molecular...

  5. Catalytic water dissociation by greigite Fe3S4 surfaces: density functional theory study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldan, A.; de Leeuw, N. H.

    2016-01-01

    The iron sulfide mineral greigite, Fe3S4, has shown promising capability as a hydrogenating catalyst, in particular in the reduction of carbon dioxide to produce small organic molecules under mild conditions. We employed density functional theory calculations to investigate the {001},{011} and {111} surfaces of this iron thiospinel material, as well as the production of hydrogen ad-atoms from the dissociation of water molecules on the surfaces. We systematically analysed the adsorption geometries and the electronic structure of both bare and hydroxylated surfaces. The sulfide surfaces presented a higher flexibility than the isomorphic oxide magnetite, Fe3O4, allowing perpendicular movement of the cations above or below the top atomic sulfur layer. We considered both molecular and dissociative water adsorption processes, and have shown that molecular adsorption is the predominant state on these surfaces from both a thermodynamic and kinetic point of view. We considered a second molecule of water which stabilizes the system mainly by H-bonds, although the dissociation process remains thermodynamically unfavourable. We noted, however, synergistic adsorption effects on the Fe3S4{001} owing to the presence of hydroxyl groups. We concluded that, in contrast to Fe3O4, molecular adsorption of water is clearly preferred on greigite surfaces. PMID:27274698

  6. Gasificación catalítica de lodos de aguas residuales. // Catalytic gasification of residual waters muds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. M. García Rojas

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available A partir de la necesidad de encontrar nuevas alternativas energéticas, se estudia en este trabajo la posibilidad de reducir agran escala la cantidad de alquitranes que acompaña al gas obtenido de la gasificación en lecho fluidizado de los lodos delas depuradoras de aguas residuales, este estudio conduce a una posible utilización de este gas en la generación deelectricidad, Para propiciar tal reducción se han empleado catalizadores secundarios reemplazando, en parte ocompletamente, la arena utilizada como agente fluidizante. Además la presencia de vapor de agua, que puede actuar comoreactante para el reformado de hidrocarburos, también puede ser beneficiosa a la hora de reducir la cantidad de alquitranesen el gas, por lo que, junto con la sustitución de la arena por un catalizador, se han realizado experimentos alimentandovapor de agua al reactor.Palabras claves: Gasificación, lecho fluidizado y lodos.____________________________________________________________________________Abstract.Starting from the necessity of finding new energy alternatives, it is presented in this paper the possibility to reduce in greatscale the quantity of tars that accompanies the gas obtained of the gasification in fluidized bed of muds in residual waters,this study leads to a possible use of this gas in the electricity generation, For propitiate such reduction a secondary catalystshas been used replacing, partly or completely, the sand used as fluidity agent. Also the presence of water steam that can actas reactant for the hydrocarbons reformed, it can also be beneficial when reducing the quantity of tars in the gas, for that,together with the substitution of sand for a catalyst, it have been carried out experiments feeding water steam to the reactor.Key words: Catalytic gasification, fluidity channel, muds.

  7. Catalytic subcritical water liquefaction of flax straw for high yield of furfural

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harry, Inibehe; Ibrahim, Hussameldin; Thring, Ron; Idem, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    There is substantial interest in the application of biomass as a renewable fuel or for production of chemicals. Flax straw can be converted into valuable chemicals and biofuels via liquefaction in sub-critical water. In this study, the yield of furfural and the kinetics of flax straw liquefaction under sub-critical water conditions were investigated using a high-pressure autoclave reactor. The liquefaction was conducted in the temperature range of 175–325 °C, pressure of 0.1 MPa–8 MPa, retention time in the range of 0 min–120 min, and flax straw mass fraction (w F ) of 5–20 %. Also, the effect of acid catalysts on furfural yield was studied. The kinetic parameters of flax straw liquefaction were determined using nonlinear regression of the experimental data, assuming second-order kinetics. The apparent activation energy was found to be 27.97 kJ mol −1 while the reaction order was 2.0. The optimum condition for furfural yield was at 250 °C, 6.0 MPa, w F of 5% and 0 retention time after reaching set conditions. An acid catalyst was found to selectively favour furfural yield with 40% flax straw conversion. - Highlights: • Flax straw liquefaction in subcritical water. • Creation of a reaction pathway that can be used to optimized furfural production. • Acid catalyst selectively favoured furfural yield with respect to other liquid products. • At the highest process temperature of 325 °C, a carbon conversion of 40% was achieved. • Activation energy and reaction order was 28 kJ/mol and 2.0 respectively

  8. Redox and electrochemical water splitting catalytic properties of hydrated metal oxide modified electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Richard L; Godwin, Ian J; Brandon, Michael P; Lyons, Michael E G

    2013-09-07

    This paper presents a review of the redox and electrocatalytic properties of transition metal oxide electrodes, paying particular attention to the oxygen evolution reaction. Metal oxide materials may be prepared using a variety of methods, resulting in a diverse range of redox and electrocatalytic properties. Here we describe the most common synthetic routes and the important factors relevant to their preparation. The redox and electrocatalytic properties of the resulting oxide layers are ascribed to the presence of extended networks of hydrated surface bound oxymetal complexes termed surfaquo groups. This interpretation presents a possible unifying concept in water oxidation catalysis - bridging the fields of heterogeneous electrocatalysis and homogeneous molecular catalysis.

  9. Base-enhanced catalytic water oxidation by a carboxylate–bipyridine Ru(II) complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Na [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Concepcion, Javier J. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Binstead, Robert A. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Rudd, Jennifer A. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Vannucci, Aaron K. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Biochemistry; Dares, Christopher J. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Coggins, Michael K. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Meyer, Thomas J. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2015-04-06

    In aqueous solution above pH 2.4 with 4% (vol/vol) CH3CN, the complex [RuII(bda)(isoq)2] (bda is 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylate; isoq is isoquinoline) exists as the open-arm chelate, [RuII(CO2-bpy-CO2$-$)(isoq)2(NCCH3)], as shown by 1H and 13C-NMR, X-ray crystallography, and pH titrations. Rates of water oxidation with the open-arm chelate are remarkably enhanced by added proton acceptor bases, as measured by cyclic voltammetry (CV). In 1.0 M PO43–, the calculated half-time for water oxidation is ~7 μs. In conclusion, the key to the rate accelerations with added bases is direct involvement of the buffer base in either atom–proton transfer (APT) or concerted electron–proton transfer (EPT) pathways.

  10. Benchmark reaction rates, the stability of biological molecules in water, and the evolution of catalytic power in enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfenden, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The rates of enzyme reactions fall within a relatively narrow range. To estimate the rate enhancements produced by enzymes, and their expected affinities for transition state analog inhibitors, it is necessary to measure the rates of the corresponding reactions in water in the absence of a catalyst. This review describes the spontaneous cleavages of C-C, C-H, C-N, C-O, P-O, and S-O bonds in biological molecules, as well as the uncatalyzed reactions that correspond to phosphoryl transfer reactions catalyzed by kinases and to peptidyl transfer in the ribosome. The rates of these reactions, some with half-lives in excess of one million years, span an overall range of 10¹⁹-fold. Moreover, the slowest reactions tend to be most sensitive to temperature, with rates that increase as much as 10⁷-fold when the temperature is raised from 25° to 100°C. That tendency collapses, by many orders of magnitude, the time that would have been required for chemical evolution on a warm earth. If the catalytic effect of primitive enzymes, like that of modern enzymes and many nonenzymatic catalysts, were mainly to reduce a reaction's enthalpy of activation, then the resulting rate enhancement would have increased automatically as the surroundings cooled. By reducing the time required for early chemical evolution in a warm environment, these findings counter the view that not enough time has passed for terrestrial life to have evolved to its present level of complexity.

  11. Preparation of fluidized catalytic cracking slurry oil-in-water emulsion as anti-collapse agent for drilling fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengqiang Xiong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Fluidized catalytic cracking slurry oil-in-water emulsion (FCCSE was prepared by using interfacial complexes generation method that was simple and versatile. The critical factors influencing the sample preparation process were optimized, for instance, the optimum value of the mixed hydrophile-lipophile balance of compound emulsifier was 11.36, the content of compound emulsifier was 4 wt%, the emulsification temperature was 75 °C, the agitation speed was 200 rpm, and the emulsification time was 30–45 min. The performance as a drilling fluid additive was also investigated with respect to rheological properties, filtration loss and inhibition of FCCSE. Experimental results showed that FCCSE was favorable to inhibiting clay expansion and dispersion and reducing fluid loss. Furthermore, it had good compatibility with other additives and did not affect the rheological properties of drilling fluids. FCCSE exhibited better performance than the available emulsified asphalt. It has a promising application as anti-collapse agent in petroleum and natural gas drilling.

  12. Homogeneous catalytic O2 reduction to water by a cytochrome c oxidase model with trapping of intermediates and mechanistic insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halime, Zakaria; Kotani, Hiroaki; Li, Yuqi; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2011-01-01

    An efficient and selective four-electron plus four-proton (4e-/4H+) reduction of O2 to water by decamethylferrocene and trifluoroacetic acid can be catalyzed by a synthetic analog of the heme a3/CuB site in cytochrome c oxidase (6LFeCu) or its Cu-free version (6LFe) in acetone. A detailed mechanistic-kinetic study on the homogeneous catalytic system reveals spectroscopically detectable intermediates and that the rate-determining step changes from the O2-binding process at 25 °C room temperature (RT) to the O-O bond cleavage of a newly observed FeIII-OOH species at lower temperature (-60 °C). At RT, the rate of O2-binding to 6LFeCu is significantly faster than that for 6LFe, whereas the rates of the O-O bond cleavage of the FeIII-OOH species observed (-60 °C) with either the 6LFeCu or 6LFe catalyst are nearly the same. Thus, the role of the Cu ion is to assist the heme and lead to faster O2-binding at RT. However, the proximate Cu ion has no effect on the O-O bond cleavage of the FeIII-OOH species at low temperature. PMID:21808032

  13. Solar Photo Catalytic Hydrogen Production from water using a dual bed photosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florida Solar Energy Center

    2003-03-30

    A body of work was performed in which the feasibility of photocatalytically decomposing water into its constituent elements using a dual bed, or modular photosystem, under solar radiation was investigated. The system envisioned consists of two modules, each consisting of a shallow, flat, sealed container, in which microscopic photocatalytic particles are immobilized. The photocatalysts absorb light, generating free electrons and lattice vacancy holes, which are capable of performing reductive and oxidative chemistry, respectively. The photocatalysts would be chosen as to whether they specifically promote H{sub 2} or O{sub 2} evolution in their respective containers. An aqueous solution containing a redox mediator is pumped between the two chambers in order to transfer electron equivalents from one reaction to the other.

  14. A non-acid-assisted and non-hydroxyl-radical-related catalytic ozonation with ceria supported copper oxide in efficient oxalate degradation in water

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tao

    2012-06-01

    Oxalate is usually used as a refractory model compound that cannot be effectively removed by ozone and hydroxyl radical oxidation in water. In this study, we found that ceria supported CuO significantly improved oxalate degradation in reaction with ozone. The optimum CuO loading amount was 12%. The molar ratio of oxalate removed/ozone consumption reached 0.84. The catalytic ozonation was most effective in a neutral pH range (6.7-7.9) and became ineffective when the water solution was acidic or alkaline. Moreover, bicarbonate, a ubiquitous hydroxyl radical scavenger in natural waters, significantly improved the catalytic degradation of oxalate. Therefore, the degradation relies on neither hydroxyl radical oxidation nor acid assistance, two pathways usually proposed for catalytic ozonation. These special characters of the catalyst make it suitable to be potentially used for practical degradation of refractory hydrophilic organic matter and compounds in water and wastewater. With in situ characterization, the new surface Cu(II) formed from ozone oxidation of the trace Cu(I) of the catalyst was found to be an active site in coordination with oxalate forming multi-dentate surface complex. It is proposed that the complex can be further oxidized by molecular ozone and then decomposes through intra-molecular electron transfer. The ceria support enhanced the activity of the surface Cu(I)/Cu(II) in this process. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  15. Cobalt-manganese-based spinels as multifunctional materials that unify catalytic water oxidation and oxygen reduction reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Prashanth W; Indra, Arindam; Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Bergmann, Arno; Strasser, Peter; Driess, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Recently, there has been much interest in the design and development of affordable and highly efficient oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts that can resolve the pivotal issues that concern solar fuels, fuel cells, and rechargeable metal-air batteries. Here we present the synthesis and application of porous CoMn2 O4 and MnCo2 O4 spinel microspheres as highly efficient multifunctional catalysts that unify the electrochemical OER with oxidant-driven and photocatalytic water oxidation as well as the ORR. The porous materials were prepared by the thermal degradation of the respective carbonate precursors at 400 °C. The as-prepared spinels display excellent performances in electrochemical OER for the cubic MnCo2 O4 phase in comparison to the tetragonal CoMn2 O4 material in an alkaline medium. Moreover, the oxidant-driven and photocatalytic water oxidations were performed and they exhibited a similar trend in activity to that of the electrochemical OER. Remarkably, the situation is reversed in ORR catalysis, that is, the oxygen reduction activity and stability of the tetragonal CoMn2 O4 catalyst outperformed that of cubic MnCo2 O4 and rivals that of benchmark Pt catalysts. The superior catalytic performance and the remarkable stability of the unifying materials are attributed to their unique porous and robust microspherical morphology and the intrinsic structural features of the spinels. Moreover, the facile access to these high-performance materials enables a reliable and cost-effective production on a large scale for industrial applications. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Monolithic cobalt-doped carbon aerogel for efficient catalytic activation of peroxymonosulfate in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peidong; Long, Mingce; Bai, Xue; Wang, Cheng; Cai, Caiyun; Fu, Jiajun; Zhou, Baoxue; Zhou, Yongfeng

    2017-06-15

    As an emerging carbonaceous material, carbon aerogels (CAs) display a great potential in environmental cleanup. In this study, a macroscopic three-dimensional monolithic cobalt-doped carbon aerogel was developed by co-condensation of graphene oxide sheets and resorcinol-formaldehyde resin in the presence of cobalt ions, followed by lyophilization, carbonization and thermal treatment in air. Cobalt ions were introduced as a polymerization catalyst to bridge the organogel framework, and finally cobalt species were retained as both metallic cobalt and Co 3 O 4 , wrapped by graphitized carbon layers. The material obtained after a thermal treatment in air (CoCA-A) possesses larger BET specific surface area and pore volume, better hydrophilicity and lower leaching of cobalt ions than that without the post-treatment (CoCA). Despite of a lower loading of cobalt content and a larger mass transfer resistance than traditional powder catalysts, CoCA-A can efficiently eliminate organic contaminants by activation of peroxymonosulfate with a low activation energy. CoCA-A can float beneath the surface of aqueous solution and can be taken out completely without any changes in morphology. The monolith is promising to be developed into an alternative water purification technology due to the easily separable feature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Catalytic activity of some oxime-based Pd(II-complexes in Suzuki coupling of aryl and heteroaryl bromides in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal M. Dawood

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic activity of four Pd(II-complexes of benzoazole-oximes was extensively studied in Suzuki–Miyaura C–C cross coupling reactions in water, as an eco-friendly green solvent, under both thermal heating as well as microwave irradiation conditions. The cross-coupling reactions included different activated and deactivated aryl- or heteroaryl-bromides with several arylboronic acids. The protected oxime-complexes were found to be more efficient than the free ones.

  18. Effect of co-existing kaolinite and goethite on the aggregation of graphene oxide in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guanxing; Guo, Huiyuan; Zhao, Jian; Liu, Yonghong; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-10-01

    Broad applications of graphene oxide (GO) will result in the release of GO into aquatic environments, where clay minerals and metal (hydr)oxides are commonly present. Thereby the interactions between GO and a binary system containing clay minerals and metal (hydr)oxides can occur. We investigated the aggregation of GO with kaolinite and kaolinite-goethite associations (KGAs) in aquatic systems under different pHs, ionic strengths, and GO concentrations. GO suspension was unstable at low pHs, and the aggregation of GO occurred in the presence of KGA-4% and KGA-10% until pH 5 and 6, respectively. Kaolinite decreased the critical coagulation concentration (CCC) of GO at pH 5.5 from around 50 to 20 mM NaCl due to the reduced energy barrier. Heteroaggregation of GO with KGAs was extremely sensitive to ionic strength at pH 5.5, and the CCC of GO in the presence of KGA-10% increased from less than 1 mM NaCl to 5 mM NaCl with the increase of pH from 5.5 to 9. The heteroaggregation extent of GO with KGAs was enhanced firstly, then reduced with the increase of GO concentrations at pH 5.0, which is likely because KGA plates were more efficiently wrapped by large-size GO sheets with increasing GO concentrations. These findings are useful for understanding and predicting the fate of GO in the relatively complicated aquatic and soil environments where binary minerals co-exist. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Occurrence of co-existing bla VIM-2 and bla NDM-1 in clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Deepjyoti; Dhar, Debadatta; Maurya, Anand Prakash; Mishra, Shweta; Sharma, Gauri Dutt; Chakravarty, Atanu; Bhattacharjee, Amitabha

    2016-05-06

    bla VIM-2 harboring Pseudomonas aeruginosa has been reported worldwide and considered as the most prevalent metallo-β-lactamase after NDM which are found horizontally transferable and mostly associated with integron gene cassettes. The present study investigates the genetic background, transmission dynamics as well as stability of bla VIM-2 in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa harbor bla NDM-1 as well which were collected from October 2012 to September 2013. Two P. aeruginosa strains harboring bla VIM-2 along with bla NDM-1 were isolated from Silchar Medical College and Hospital, India. Genetic environment of these resistance determinants was determined and transferability was checked by transformation and conjugation assay which was further confirmed by Southern hybridization. Replicon typing was performed to determine the incompatibility group of the resistant plasmid and their stability was checked by serial passage method. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the isolates was determined and their clonal relatedness was checked by pulsed field gel electrophoresis. bla VIM-2 was found to be horizontally transferable through an Inc F type plasmid of approximately 30 kb in size. bla VIM-2 was found to be associated with integron gene cassette and was flanked by two different types of cassette arrays. Both the isolates were co-harboring bla NDM-1 which was carried within Inc N type of plasmid with an approximate 24 kb in size and associated with ISAba125 in their upstream region. Reduced susceptibility rate as well as high MIC range was observed in case of wild strains and transformants carrying bla VIM-2 and bla NDM-1. The detection of this co-existence of multiple carbapenem resistance genes in this part of world is worrisome and further investigation is required in order to trace the source and to initiate proper treatment option.

  20. Experimental model considerations for the study of protein-energy malnutrition co-existing with ischemic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser-Loose, Erin J; Smith, Shari E; Paterson, Phyllis G

    2011-05-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) affects ~16% of patients at admission for stroke. We previously modeled this in a gerbil global cerebral ischemia model and found that PEM impairs functional outcome and influences mechanisms of ischemic brain injury and recovery. Since this model is no longer reliable, we investigated the utility of the rat 2-vessel occlusion (2-VO) with hypotension model of global ischemia for further study of this clinical problem. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to either control diet (18% protein) or PEM induced by feeding a low protein diet (2% protein) for 7d prior to either global ischemia or sham surgery. PEM did not significantly alter the hippocampal CA1 neuron death (p = 0.195 by 2-factor ANOVA) or the increase in dendritic injury caused by exposure to global ischemia. Unexpectedly, however, a strong trend was evident for PEM to decrease the consistency of hippocampal damage, as shown by an increased incidence of unilateral or no hippocampal damage (p=0.069 by chi-square analysis). Although PEM caused significant changes to baseline arterial blood pH, pO(2), pCO(2), and fasting glucose (p0.269). Intra-ischemic tympanic temperature and blood pressure were strictly and equally controlled between ischemic groups. We conclude that co-existing PEM confounded the consistency of hippocampal injury in the 2-VO model. Although the mechanisms responsible were not identified, this model of brain ischemia should not be used for studying this co-morbidity factor. © 2011 Bentham Science Publishers Ltd.

  1. Engineered biochar from microwave-assisted catalytic pyrolysis of switchgrass for increasing water-holding capacity and fertility of sandy soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Badr A.; Ellis, Naoko; Kim, Chang Soo; Bi, Xiaotao; Emam, Ahmed El-raie

    2016-01-01

    Engineered biochars produced from microwave-assisted catalytic pyrolysis of switchgrass have been evaluated in terms of their ability on improving water holding capacity (WHC), cation exchange capacity (CEC) and fertility of loamy sand soil. The addition of K 3 PO 4 , clinoptilolite and/or bentonite as catalysts during the pyrolysis process increased biochar surface area and plant nutrient contents. Adding biochar produced with 10 wt.% K 3 PO 4 + 10 wt.% clinoptilolite as catalysts to the soil at 2 wt% load increased soil WHC by 98% and 57% compared to the treatments without biochar (control) and with 10 wt.% clinoptilolite, respectively. Synergistic effects on increased soil WHC were manifested for biochars produced from combinations of two additives compared to single additive, which may be the result of increased biochar microporosity due to increased microwave heating rate. Biochar produced from microwave catalytic pyrolysis was more efficient in increasing the soil WHC due to its high porosity in comparison with the biochar produced from conventional pyrolysis at the same conditions. The increases in soil CEC varied widely compared to the control soil, ranging from 17 to 220% for the treatments with biochars produced with 10 wt% clinoptilolite at 400 °C, and 30 wt% K 3 PO 4 at 300 °C, respectively. Strong positive correlations also exist among soil WHC with CEC and biochar micropore area. Biochar from microwave-assisted catalytic pyrolysis appears to be a novel approach for producing biochar with high sorption affinity and high CEC. These catalysts remaining in the biochar product would provide essential nutrients for the growth of bioenergy and food crops. - Highlights: • High quality biochar was made by catalytic pyrolysis in a microwave reactor. • High heating rate and good biochar quality were achieved using K 3 PO 4 and clinoptilolite mixture. • Biochars showed significant increase in soil WHC and CEC. • Microwave catalytic pyrolysis can produce

  2. Large scale analysis of co-existing post-translational modifications in histone tails reveals global fine structure of cross-talk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwämmle, Veit; Aspalter, Claudia-Maria; Sidoli, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is a powerful analytical method for the identification and quantification of co-existing post-translational modifications in histone proteins. One of the most important challenges in current chromatin biology is to characterize the relationships between co-existing histone...... marks, the order and hierarchy of their deposition, and their distinct biological functions. We developed the database CrossTalkDB to organize observed and reported co-existing histone marks as revealed by MS experiments of histone proteins and their derived peptides. Statistical assessment revealed...... sample-specific patterns for the co-frequency of histone post-translational modifications. We implemented a new method to identify positive and negative interplay between pairs of methylation and acetylation marks in proteins. Many of the detected features were conserved between different cell types...

  3. Stochastic surface walking reaction sampling for resolving heterogeneous catalytic reaction network: A revisit to the mechanism of water-gas shift reaction on Cu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Jie; Shang, Cheng; Liu, Zhi-Pan

    2017-10-01

    Heterogeneous catalytic reactions on surface and interfaces are renowned for ample intermediate adsorbates and complex reaction networks. The common practice to reveal the reaction mechanism is via theoretical computation, which locates all likely transition states based on the pre-guessed reaction mechanism. Here we develop a new theoretical method, namely, stochastic surface walking (SSW)-Cat method, to resolve the lowest energy reaction pathway of heterogeneous catalytic reactions, which combines our recently developed SSW global structure optimization and SSW reaction sampling. The SSW-Cat is automated and massively parallel, taking a rough reaction pattern as input to guide reaction search. We present the detailed algorithm, discuss the key features, and demonstrate the efficiency in a model catalytic reaction, water-gas shift reaction on Cu(111) (CO + H2O → CO2 + H2). The SSW-Cat simulation shows that water dissociation is the rate-determining step and formic acid (HCOOH) is the kinetically favorable product, instead of the observed final products, CO2 and H2. It implies that CO2 and H2 are secondary products from further decomposition of HCOOH at high temperatures. Being a general purpose tool for reaction prediction, the SSW-Cat may be utilized for rational catalyst design via large-scale computations.

  4. Level of physical activity, well-being, stress and self-rated health in persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krøll, Lotte Skytte; Hammarlund, Catharina Sjödahl; Westergaard, Maria Lurenda; Nielsen, Trine; Sloth, Louise Bönsdorff; Jensen, Rigmor Højland; Gard, Gunvor

    2017-12-01

    The prevalence of migraine with co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain is high in the general population. However, there is very little literature on the characteristics of these combined conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate a) the prevalence of migraine with co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain in a clinic-based sample, b) the level of physical activity, psychological well-being, perceived stress and self-rated health in persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain compared to healthy controls, c) the perceived ability of persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain to perform physical activity, and d) which among the three conditions (migraine, tension-type headache or neck pain) is rated as the most burdensome condition. The study was conducted at a tertiary referral specialised headache centre where questionnaires on physical activity, psychological well-being, perceived stress and self-rated health were completed by 148 persons with migraine and 100 healthy controls matched by sex and average age. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to assess characteristics of migraine, tension-type headache and neck pain. Out of 148 persons with migraine, 100 (67%) suffered from co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain. Only 11% suffered from migraine only. Persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain had lower level of physical activity and psychological well-being, higher level of perceived stress and poorer self-rated health compared to healthy controls. They reported reduced ability to perform physical activity owing to migraine (high degree), tension-type headache (moderate degree) and neck pain (low degree). The most burdensome condition was migraine, followed by tension-type headache and neck pain. Migraine with co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain was highly prevalent in a clinic-based sample. Persons with migraine and co-existing

  5. On the co-existence of chemically peculiar Bp stars, slowly pulsating B stars and constant B stars in the same part of the HR diagram

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briquet, M.; Hubrig, S.; Cat, P. de; Aerts, C.C.; North, P.; Schöller, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aims. In order to better model massive B-type stars, we need to understand the physical processes taking place in slowly pulsating B (SPB) stars, chemically peculiar Bp stars, and non-pulsating normal B stars co-existing in the same part of the H-R diagram. Methods: We carry out a comparative study

  6. Level of physical activity, well-being, stress and self-rated health in persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøll, Lotte Skytte; Hammarlund, Catharina Sjödahl; Westergaard, Maria Lurenda

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The prevalence of migraine with co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain is high in the general population. However, there is very little literature on the characteristics of these combined conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate a) the prevalence of migraine with co...

  7. On the co-existence of chemically peculiar Bp stars, slowly pulsating B stars and constant B stars in the same part of the H-R diagram

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Briquet, M.; Hubrig, S.; Cat, P. de; Aerts, C.; North, P.; Schöller, M.

    2007-01-01

    Aims. In order to better model massive B-type stars, we need to understand the physical processes taking place in slowly pulsating B (SPB) stars, chemically peculiar Bp stars, and non-pulsating normal B stars co-existing in the same part of the H-R diagram. Methods: We carry out a comparative study

  8. Direct and Interaction Effects of Co-Existing Familial Risk Factors and Protective Factors Associated with Internet Addiction among Chinese Students in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Anise M. S.; Lau, Joseph T. F.; Cheng, Kit-man; Law, Rita W.; Tse, Vincent W. S.; Lau, Mason M. C.

    2018-01-01

    Internet addiction (IA) is prevalent among adolescents and imposes a serious public health threat. Familial risk and protective factors may co-exist and interact with each other to determine IA. We conducted a cross-sectional survey among 9,618 Secondary 1 to 4 students in Hong Kong, China. About 16% of the surveyed students were classified as…

  9. Governing the co-existence of GM crops : ex-ante regulation and ex-post liability under uncertainty and irreversibility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckmann, V.; Soregaroli, C.; Wesseler, J.H.H.

    2006-01-01

    The future institutional environment for the co-existence of genetically modified (GM) crops, conventional crops and organic crops in Europe combines measures of ex-ante regulation and ex-post liability rules. Against this background we ask the following two questions: How does ex-ante regulation

  10. Submicron sized water-stable metal organic framework (bio-MOF-11) for catalytic degradation of pharmaceuticals and personal care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, Muhammad Rizwan; Vijay, Periasamy; Tadé, Moses O; Sun, Hongqi; Wang, Shaobin

    2018-04-01

    Water-stable and active metal organic frameworks (MOFs) are important materials for mitigation of water contaminants via adsorption and catalytic reactions. In this study, a highly water-stable Co-based MOF, namely bio-MOF-11-Co, was synthesized by a simplified benign method. Moreover, it was used as a catalyst in successful activation of peroxymonsulfate for catalytic degradation of sulfachloropyradazine (SCP) and para-hydroxybenzoic acid (p-HBA) as representatives of pharmaceuticals and personal care products, respectively. The bio-MOF-11-Co showed rapid degradation of both p-HBA and SCP and could be reused multiple times without losing the activity by simply water washing. The effects of catalyst and PMS loadings as well as temperature were further studied, showing that high catalyst and PMS loadings as well as temperature produced faster kinetic degradation of p-HBA and SCP. The generation of highly reactive and HO radicals during the degradation was investigated by quenching tests and electron paramagnetic resonance. A plausible degradation mechanism was proposed based on the functionalities in the bio-MOF-11-Co. The availability of electron rich nucleobase adenine reinforced the reaction kinetics by electron donation along with cobalt atoms in the bio-MOF-11-Co structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Basic research for nuclear energy : a study on photo-catalytic decomposition reactions of organics dissolved in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, K. W.; Na, J. W.; Cho, Y. H.; Kim, K. R.

    1999-01-01

    In an experiment on TiO 2 photo-catalysis of five nitrogen-containing organic compounds, the changes of pH and total carbon contents were measured, and the dependence of their photo-catalytic characteristic upon their chemical structures were investigated. -- calculation of the effect of ionic carbon species in an aqueous solution on thermodynamic equilibrium, pH and conductivity showed a small quantity of organics could lead conductivity increase and pH reduction. -- Based on the results of photo-catalytic experiment of ethylamine, phenylhydrazine, pyridine, urea or EDTA, irradiated for 180 minutes after adsorption onto titanium dioxide for 60 minutes, relationship between nitrogen atomic charge and the first-order rate constant was as the following: R (1st - order rate constant) = δ (ε - a ) 1/3 + b where, ε : atomic charge of nitrogen in a molecular, δ, a and b : corrective coefficients

  12. Basic research for nuclear energy : a study on photo-catalytic decomposition reactions of organics dissolved in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, K. W.; Na, J. W.; Cho, Y. H.; Kim, K. R

    1999-01-01

    In an experiment on TiO{sub 2} photo-catalysis of five nitrogen-containing organic compounds, the changes of pH and total carbon contents were measured, and the dependence of their photo-catalytic characteristic upon their chemical structures were investigated. -- calculation of the effect of ionic carbon species in an aqueous solution on thermodynamic equilibrium, pH and conductivity showed a small quantity of organics could lead conductivity increase and pH reduction. -- Based on the results of photo-catalytic experiment of ethylamine, phenylhydrazine, pyridine, urea or EDTA, irradiated for 180 minutes after adsorption onto titanium dioxide for 60 minutes, relationship between nitrogen atomic charge and the first-order rate constant was as the following: R (1st - order rate constant) = {delta} ({epsilon} - a ){sup 1/3} + b where, {epsilon} : atomic charge of nitrogen in a molecular, {delta}, a and b : corrective coefficients.

  13. I2-SDS-H2O System: A highly Efficient Dual Catalytic Green System for Deprotection of Imines and in Situ Preparation of Bis(indolyl)alkanes from Indoles in Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Parasa; Pahari, Pallab; Borah, Manash Jyoti; Konwar, Dilip

    2012-01-01

    A novel catalytic system consisting of I2-SDS-H2O has been developed which cleaves 2,3-diaza-1,3-butadiene, 1-aza-1,3-butadienes, oximes and in presence of indoles in the medium uses the corresponding aldehyde products to produce bis(indolyl)alkanes in situ. This one pot simple and mild dual catalytic system works in water at room temperature under neutral conditions.

  14. Catalytic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ming; Zhang, Xiang

    2018-01-23

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to catalytic devices. In one aspect, a device includes a substrate, an electrically insulating layer disposed on the substrate, a layer of material disposed on the electrically insulating layer, and a catalyst disposed on the layer of material. The substrate comprises an electrically conductive material. The substrate and the layer of material are electrically coupled to one another and configured to have a voltage applied across them.

  15. Engineered biochar from microwave-assisted catalytic pyrolysis of switchgrass for increasing water-holding capacity and fertility of sandy soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Badr A. [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC V6T 1Z3 (Canada); Agricultural Engineering Department, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); Ellis, Naoko [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC V6T 1Z3 (Canada); Kim, Chang Soo [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC V6T 1Z3 (Canada); Clean Energy Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, 14 gil 5 Hwarang-no Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Bi, Xiaotao, E-mail: tony.bi@ubc.ca [Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver BC V6T 1Z3 (Canada); Emam, Ahmed El-raie [Agricultural Engineering Department, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt)

    2016-10-01

    Engineered biochars produced from microwave-assisted catalytic pyrolysis of switchgrass have been evaluated in terms of their ability on improving water holding capacity (WHC), cation exchange capacity (CEC) and fertility of loamy sand soil. The addition of K{sub 3}PO{sub 4}, clinoptilolite and/or bentonite as catalysts during the pyrolysis process increased biochar surface area and plant nutrient contents. Adding biochar produced with 10 wt.% K{sub 3}PO{sub 4} + 10 wt.% clinoptilolite as catalysts to the soil at 2 wt% load increased soil WHC by 98% and 57% compared to the treatments without biochar (control) and with 10 wt.% clinoptilolite, respectively. Synergistic effects on increased soil WHC were manifested for biochars produced from combinations of two additives compared to single additive, which may be the result of increased biochar microporosity due to increased microwave heating rate. Biochar produced from microwave catalytic pyrolysis was more efficient in increasing the soil WHC due to its high porosity in comparison with the biochar produced from conventional pyrolysis at the same conditions. The increases in soil CEC varied widely compared to the control soil, ranging from 17 to 220% for the treatments with biochars produced with 10 wt% clinoptilolite at 400 °C, and 30 wt% K{sub 3}PO{sub 4} at 300 °C, respectively. Strong positive correlations also exist among soil WHC with CEC and biochar micropore area. Biochar from microwave-assisted catalytic pyrolysis appears to be a novel approach for producing biochar with high sorption affinity and high CEC. These catalysts remaining in the biochar product would provide essential nutrients for the growth of bioenergy and food crops. - Highlights: • High quality biochar was made by catalytic pyrolysis in a microwave reactor. • High heating rate and good biochar quality were achieved using K{sub 3}PO{sub 4} and clinoptilolite mixture. • Biochars showed significant increase in soil WHC and CEC.

  16. Association of Co-Existing Impairments in Cognition and Self-Rated Vision and Hearing With Health Outcomes in Older Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Phillip L; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Fillenbaum, Gerda G; Burchett, Bruce M; Whitson, Heather E

    2016-01-01

    To assess the relationship of disability (activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental ADL (IADL)), self-rated health (SRH), and 6-year mortality with co-existing impairments in vision (self-rated), hearing (self-rated) and/or cognition (Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire) in older adults. The study sample was comprised of 3871 participants from the North Carolina Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly study (NC EPESE). Persons with all three impairments had increased odds of ADL/IADL disability, and low SRH. Participants with combined visual and cognitive impairments had increased odds of mortality. While sensory impairments were associated with poor SRH, cognitive impairment was not unless both sensory impairments were present. Co-existent sensory and cognitive impairments were associated with higher risk of impaired functional status. Self-rated auditory impairment alone was not associated with higher odds of death, but mortality was linked to visual, and particularly cognitive impairment, alone or combined.

  17. The effects of aerobic exercise for persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain. A randomized, controlled, clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøll, Lotte Skytte; Hammarlund, Catharina Sjödahl; Linde, Mattias

    2018-01-01

    Aim To evaluate aerobic exercise in migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain. Methods Consecutively recruited persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain were randomized into an exercise group or control group. Aerobic exercise consisted of bike...... impact of tension-type headache and neck pain. Exercise also reduced migraine frequency, pain intensity and duration, although this was not significant compared to controls. These results emphasize the importance of regular aerobic exercise for reduction of migraine burden.......-two persons completed the study. Significant between-group improvements for the exercise group were found for physical fitness, level of physical activity, migraine burden and the ability to engage in physical activity because of reduced impact of tension-type headache and neck pain. Within the exercise group...

  18. Synthesis, characterization and Hydroformylation Catalytic Activity of 1-hexene of Water-soluble RuCl2(DMSO2(PySO3Na2 Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuraima Fonseca

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work we describe the synthesis and characterization of a new water soluble ruthenium complex [Ru(Cl2(DMSO2(PySO3Na2] (complex 1; where [PySO3Na] is the sodium salt of p-sulphonated pyridine. Complex 1 was obtained by slow addition of ligand to a cis-[Ru(Cl2(DMSO4] complex solution under inert atmosphere, the mixture was refluxed for 1 hour. Complex 1 was characterized by FT-IR and 1H NMR techniques. Complex 1 was active in the catalytic 1-hexene hydroformylation and a preliminary test with real naphtha in a biphasic reaction mixture (water/toluene shows little activity. Temperature, pressure, and substrate/catalyst ratio were studied with 1-hexene substrate. Catalysis with metallic particles was tested with a mercury drop trial giving negative results. The reuse of the aqueous phase in several reactions under the same experimental conditions showed loss of catalytic activity after the second reuse. Complex 1 is active for hydroformylation reaction of 1-hexene even in the presence of thiophene compounds.

  19. Revisiting the co-existence of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Chronic Tic Disorder in childhood-The case of colour discrimination, sustained attention and interference control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uebel-von Sandersleben, Henrik; Albrecht, Björn; Rothenberger, Aribert; Fillmer-Heise, Anke; Roessner, Veit; Sergeant, Joseph; Tannock, Rosemary; Banaschewski, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Attention Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Chronic Tic Disorder (CTD) are two common and frequently co-existing disorders, probably following an additive model. But this is not yet clear for the basic sensory function of colour processing sensitive to dopaminergic functioning in the retina and higher cognitive functions like attention and interference control. The latter two reflect important aspects for psychoeducation and behavioural treatment approaches. Colour discrimination using the Farnsworth-Munsell 100-hue Test, sustained attention during the Frankfurt Attention Inventory (FAIR), and interference liability during Colour- and Counting-Stroop-Tests were assessed to further clarify the cognitive profile of the co-existence of ADHD and CTD. Altogether 69 children were classified into four groups: ADHD (N = 14), CTD (N = 20), ADHD+CTD (N = 20) and healthy Controls (N = 15) and compared in cognitive functioning in a 2×2-factorial statistical model. Difficulties with colour discrimination were associated with both ADHD and CTD factors following an additive model, but in ADHD these difficulties tended to be more pronounced on the blue-yellow axis. Attention problems were characteristic for ADHD but not CTD. Interference load was significant in both Colour- and Counting-Stroop-Tests and unrelated to colour discrimination. Compared to Controls, interference load in the Colour-Stroop was higher in pure ADHD and in pure CTD, but not in ADHD+CTD, following a sub-additive model. In contrast, interference load in the Counting-Stroop did not reveal ADHD or CTD effects. The co-existence of ADHD and CTD is characterized by additive as well as sub-additive performance impairments, suggesting that their co-existence may show simple additive characteristics of both disorders or a more complex interaction, depending on demand. The equivocal findings on interference control may indicate limited validity of the Stroop-Paradigm for clinical assessments.

  20. Association of Co-Existing Impairments in Cognition and Self-Rated Vision and Hearing With Health Outcomes in Older Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Phillip L.; Cohen, Harvey Jay; Fillenbaum, Gerda G.; Burchett, Bruce M.; Whitson, Heather E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the relationship of disability (activities of daily living [ADL] and instrumental ADL [IADL]), self-rated health (SRH), and 6-year mortality with co-existing impairments in vision (self-rated), hearing (self-rated), and/or cognition (Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire) in older adults. Method: The study sample comprised of 3,871 participants from the North Carolina Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly stu...

  1. Revisiting the co-existence of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Chronic Tic Disorder in childhood—The case of colour discrimination, sustained attention and interference control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothenberger, Aribert; Fillmer-Heise, Anke; Roessner, Veit; Sergeant, Joseph; Tannock, Rosemary; Banaschewski, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Objective Attention Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Chronic Tic Disorder (CTD) are two common and frequently co-existing disorders, probably following an additive model. But this is not yet clear for the basic sensory function of colour processing sensitive to dopaminergic functioning in the retina and higher cognitive functions like attention and interference control. The latter two reflect important aspects for psychoeducation and behavioural treatment approaches. Methods Colour discrimination using the Farnsworth-Munsell 100-hue Test, sustained attention during the Frankfurt Attention Inventory (FAIR), and interference liability during Colour- and Counting-Stroop-Tests were assessed to further clarify the cognitive profile of the co-existence of ADHD and CTD. Altogether 69 children were classified into four groups: ADHD (N = 14), CTD (N = 20), ADHD+CTD (N = 20) and healthy Controls (N = 15) and compared in cognitive functioning in a 2×2-factorial statistical model. Results Difficulties with colour discrimination were associated with both ADHD and CTD factors following an additive model, but in ADHD these difficulties tended to be more pronounced on the blue-yellow axis. Attention problems were characteristic for ADHD but not CTD. Interference load was significant in both Colour- and Counting-Stroop-Tests and unrelated to colour discrimination. Compared to Controls, interference load in the Colour-Stroop was higher in pure ADHD and in pure CTD, but not in ADHD+CTD, following a sub-additive model. In contrast, interference load in the Counting-Stroop did not reveal ADHD or CTD effects. Conclusion The co-existence of ADHD and CTD is characterized by additive as well as sub-additive performance impairments, suggesting that their co-existence may show simple additive characteristics of both disorders or a more complex interaction, depending on demand. The equivocal findings on interference control may indicate limited validity of the Stroop-Paradigm for

  2. Revisiting the co-existence of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder and Chronic Tic Disorder in childhood?The case of colour discrimination, sustained attention and interference control

    OpenAIRE

    Uebel-von Sandersleben, Henrik; Albrecht, Bj?rn; Rothenberger, Aribert; Fillmer-Heise, Anke; Roessner, Veit; Sergeant, Joseph; Tannock, Rosemary; Banaschewski, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    Objective Attention Deficit / Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and Chronic Tic Disorder (CTD) are two common and frequently co-existing disorders, probably following an additive model. But this is not yet clear for the basic sensory function of colour processing sensitive to dopaminergic functioning in the retina and higher cognitive functions like attention and interference control. The latter two reflect important aspects for psychoeducation and behavioural treatment approaches. Methods Colour...

  3. Co-existence of phenylketonuria either with maple syrup urine disease or Sandhoff disease in two patients from Iran: emphasizing the role of consanguinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abiri, Maryam; Talebi, Saeed; Uitto, Jouni; Youssefian, Leila; Vahidnezhad, Hassan; Shirzad, Tina; Salehpour, Shadab; Zeinali, Sirous

    2016-10-01

    Most inborn errors of metabolism (IEMs) are inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. IEMs are one of the major concerns in Iran due to its extensive consanguineous marriages. Herein, we report two patients with two co-existent IEMs: a girl affected by classic phenylketonuria (PKU) and maple syrup urine disease (MSUD) and a male patient affected with Sandhoff disease and PKU, where Sandhoff disease was suspected due to the presence of a cherry-red spot in the eyes at 6 months which is unrelated to PKU. Sequencing of candidate genes in the first patient revealed one novel and three recurrent compound heterozygous mutations of p.Ser231Pro and p.Ala300Ser in the PAH gene and p.Glu330Lys and p.Arg170Cys mutations in the BCKDHB gene. Genetic testing results in the second patient showed previously reported homozygous mutations of p.Arg261Gln in the PAH and p.Arg533Cys mutation in the HEXB gene. Genetic testing confirmed the clinical diagnosis of both diseases in both patients. To the best of our knowledge; this is the first report of the co-existence of two distinct genetic disorders in two individuals from Iran. Co-existent different IEMs in patients complicated the clinical diagnosis and management of the diseases.

  4. Analysis of the effect of temperature and reaction time on yields, compositions and oil quality in catalytic and non-catalytic lignin solvolysis in a formic acid/water media using experimental design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oregui Bengoechea, Mikel; Miletíc, Nemanja; Vogt, Mari H; Arias, Pedro L; Barth, Tanja

    2017-06-01

    The catalytic solvolysis of Norway spruce (Picea abies L.) lignin in a formic acid/water media was explored at different temperatures and reaction times (283-397°C and 21-700min, respectively). Non-catalyzed experiments were compared with the effect of three different type of bifunctional catalysts (Pd/Al 2 O 3 , Rh/Al 2 O 3 and Ru/Al 2 O 3 ) and a solid Lewis acid (γ-Al 2 O 3 ). We demonstrated that surface response methodology (RSM) and principal component analysis (PCA) were an adequate tool to: (i) evaluate the effect of the catalysts, temperature and reaction time in the oil yield, oil quality (H/C and O/C ratios, and M w ) and composition of the oil, (ii) establish the differences and/or similarities between the three bifunctional catalyst and (iii) to determine the role of the noble metal and the alumina support in the reaction system. In addition, the most active catalysts, Ru/Al 2 O 3 , and the optimum reaction conditions were determined (i.e. 340°C and 6h). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of health-related quality of life among men with different co-existing severe mental disorders in treatment for substance use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adan, Ana; Marquez-Arrico, Julia E; Gilchrist, Gail

    2017-10-23

    Patient-perceived health-related quality of life has become an important outcome in health care as an indicator of treatment effectiveness and recovery for patients with substance use disorder. As no study has assessed health-related quality of life among male patients with substance use disorder and co-existing severe mental illness, we compared health-related quality of life among patients with substance use disorder and the following severe mental illness diagnosis in Barcelona, Spain: schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depressive disorder, and examined the associations with clinically related variables. Additionally, we compared results for health-related quality of life in patients with substance use disorder and severe mental illness, with Spanish population norms. We assessed 107 substance use disorder male patients using the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey comparing results across three groups with: comorbid schizophrenia (n = 37), comorbid bipolar disorder (n = 34), and comorbid major depressive disorder (n = 36). Multiple analyses of variance were performed to explore health-related quality of life by the type of co-existing SMI and linear regression analyses examined clinical correlates for the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey dimensions for each group. There were differences in Physical Functioning, Vitality and the Physical Composite Scale among groups. Poorer Physical Functioning was observed for patients with comorbid schizophrenia (80.13±3.27) and major depressive disorder (81.97±3.11) compared with comorbid bipolar disorder patients (94.26±1.93). Patients with substance use disorder and schizophrenia presented lower scores in Vitality (41.6±2.80) than those with co-existing bipolar disorder (55.68±3.66) and major depressive disorder (53.63±2.92). Finally, results in the Physical Composite Scale showed lower scores for patients with comorbid schizophrenia (51.06±1.41) and major depressive disorder (51.99±1.87) than for those with

  6. Engineered biochar from microwave-assisted catalytic pyrolysis of switchgrass for increasing water-holding capacity and fertility of sandy soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Badr A; Ellis, Naoko; Kim, Chang Soo; Bi, Xiaotao; Emam, Ahmed El-Raie

    2016-10-01

    Engineered biochars produced from microwave-assisted catalytic pyrolysis of switchgrass have been evaluated in terms of their ability on improving water holding capacity (WHC), cation exchange capacity (CEC) and fertility of loamy sand soil. The addition of K3PO4, clinoptilolite and/or bentonite as catalysts during the pyrolysis process increased biochar surface area and plant nutrient contents. Adding biochar produced with 10wt.% K3PO4+10 wt.% clinoptilolite as catalysts to the soil at 2wt% load increased soil WHC by 98% and 57% compared to the treatments without biochar (control) and with 10wt.% clinoptilolite, respectively. Synergistic effects on increased soil WHC were manifested for biochars produced from combinations of two additives compared to single additive, which may be the result of increased biochar microporosity due to increased microwave heating rate. Biochar produced from microwave catalytic pyrolysis was more efficient in increasing the soil WHC due to its high porosity in comparison with the biochar produced from conventional pyrolysis at the same conditions. The increases in soil CEC varied widely compared to the control soil, ranging from 17 to 220% for the treatments with biochars produced with 10wt% clinoptilolite at 400°C, and 30wt% K3PO4 at 300°C, respectively. Strong positive correlations also exist among soil WHC with CEC and biochar micropore area. Biochar from microwave-assisted catalytic pyrolysis appears to be a novel approach for producing biochar with high sorption affinity and high CEC. These catalysts remaining in the biochar product would provide essential nutrients for the growth of bioenergy and food crops. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Catalytic activity of hydrophobic Pt/C/PTFE catalysts of different PTFE content for hydrogen-water liquid exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Sheng; Xiao Chengjian; Zhu Zuliang; Luo Shunzhong; Wang Heyi; Luo Yangming; Wang Changbin

    2007-01-01

    10%Pt/C catalysts were prepared by liquid reduction method. PTFE and Pt/ C catalysts were adhered to porous metal and hydrophobic Pt/C/PTFE catalysts were prepared. The structure and size of Pt crystal particles of Pt/C catalysts were analyzed by XRD, and their mean size was 3.1 nm. The dispersion state of Pt/C and PTFE was analyzed by SEM, and they had good dispersion mostly, but PTFE membrane could be observed on local parts of Pt/C/PTFE surface. Because of low hydrophobicity, Pt/C/ PTFE catalysts have low activity when the mass ratio of PTFE and Pt/C is 0.5: 1, and their catalytic activity increases markedly when the ratio is 1:1. When the ratio increases again, more Pt active sites would be covered by PTFE and interior diffusion effect would increase, which result in the decrease of catalytic activity of Pt/C/PTFE. By PTFE pretreatment of porous metal carrier, the activity of Pt/C/PTFE catalysts decreases when the mass ratio of PTFE and Pt/C is 0.5:1, and their activity decreases when the mass ratio is 1:1. (authors)

  8. Sulfur and Water Resistance of Mn-Based Catalysts for Low-Temperature Selective Catalytic Reduction of NOx: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Gao

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective catalytic reduction (SCR with NH3 is the most efficient and economic flue gas denitrification technology developed to date. Due to its high low-temperature catalytic activity, Mn-based catalysts present a great prospect for application in SCR de-NOx at low temperatures. However, overcoming the poor resistance of Mn-based catalysts to H2O and SO2 poison is still a challenge. This paper reviews the recent progress on the H2O and SO2 resistance of Mn-based catalysts for the low-temperature SCR of NOx. Firstly, the poison mechanisms of H2O and SO2 are introduced in detail, respectively. Secondly, Mn-based catalysts are divided into three categories—single MnOx catalysts, Mn-based multi-metal oxide catalysts, and Mn-based supported catalysts—to review the research progress of Mn-based catalysts for H2O and SO2 resistance. Thirdly, several strategies to reduce the poisonous effects of H2O and SO2, such as metal modification, proper support, the combination of metal modification and support, the rational design of structure and morphology, are summarized. Finally, perspectives and future directions of Mn-based catalysts for the low-temperature SCR of NOx are proposed.

  9. Application of sludge-based carbonaceous materials in a hybrid water treatment process based on adsorption and catalytic wet air oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julcour Lebigue, Carine; Andriantsiferana, Caroline; N'Guessan Krou; Ayral, Catherine; Mohamed, Elham; Wilhelm, Anne-Marie; Delmas, Henri; Le Coq, Laurence; Gerente, Claire; Smith, Karl M; Pullket, Suangusa; Fowler, Geoffrey D; Graham, Nigel J D

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes a preliminary evaluation of the performance of carbonaceous materials prepared from sewage sludges (SBCMs) in a hybrid water treatment process based on adsorption and catalytic wet air oxidation; phenol was used as the model pollutant. Three different sewage sludges were treated by either carbonisation or steam activation, and the physico-chemical properties of the resultant carbonaceous materials (e.g. hardness, BET surface area, ash and elemental content, surface chemistry) were evaluated and compared with a commercial reference activated carbon (PICA F22). The adsorption capacity for phenol of the SBCMs was greater than suggested by their BET surface area, but less than F22; a steam activated, dewatered raw sludge (SA_DRAW) had the greatest adsorption capacity of the SBCMs in the investigated range of concentrations (<0.05 mol L(-1)). In batch oxidation tests, the SBCMs demonstrated catalytic behaviour arising from their substrate adsorptivity and metal content. Recycling of SA_DRAW in successive oxidations led to significant structural attrition and a hardened SA_DRAW was evaluated, but found to be unsatisfactory during the oxidation step. In a combined adsorption-oxidation sequence, both the PICA carbon and a selected SBCM showed deterioration in phenol adsorption after oxidative regeneration, but a steady state performance was reached after 2 or 3 cycles. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Automatic flow analysis method to determine traces of Mn²⁺ in sea and drinking waters by a kinetic catalytic process using LWCC-spectrophotometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro, Laura; Ferrer, Laura; Leal, Luz O; Cerdà, Víctor

    2016-02-01

    A new automatic kinetic catalytic method has been developed for the measurement of Mn(2+) in drinking and seawater samples. The method is based on the catalytic effect of Mn(2+) on the oxidation of tiron by hydrogen peroxide in presence of Pb(2+) as an activator. The optimum conditions were obtained at pH 10 with 0.019 mol L(-1) 2'2 bipyridyl, 0.005 mol L(-1) tiron and 0.38 mol L(-1) hydrogen peroxide. Flow system is based on multisyringe flow injection analysis (MSFIA) coupled with a lab-on-valve (LOV) device exploiting on line spectrophotometric detection by a Liquid Waveguide Capillary Cell (LWCC), 1m optical length and performed at 445 nm. Under the optimized conditions by a multivariate approach, the method allowed the measurement of Mn(2+) in a range of 0.03-35 µg L(-1) with a detection limit of 0.010 µg L(-1), attaining a repeatability of 1.4% RSD. The method was satisfactorily applied to the determination of Mn(2+) in environmental water samples. The reliability of method was also verified by determining the manganese content of the certified standard reference seawater sample, CASS-4. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Biological Macro and Micro Systems Co-existing in the “Fountain of the Two Dragons”, Palermo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enza Di Carlo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Stone works of art located outdoors are exposed to natural deterioration, due to several physical, chemical and biological factors. Biological macro- and micro-systems (e.g. weeds, insects, algae, mosses, fungi and bacteria may induce the biodeterioration of stone materials. In February 2014, the state of conservation of the Fountain of the two Dragons in Palermo was examined, during which time biological colonization in some areas of the fountain and statues, was also detected. The monument represents an excellent substrate for the development and growth of microrganisms and organisms that need a continuous supply of water. Direct solar irradiance promotes the development of photoautotrophic organisms, bryophyte flora, in addition to several microbial genera, responsible for pigmentation, discoloring, efflorescence. After autotrophic colonization, some organisms find an ideal habitat also during wintertime, including two species of gastropods and two species of Hemiptera, omnivorous, a species of Collembola, mostly fungivorous. This interdisciplinary study has enabled the detection and identification of different biological communities, providing information for a subsequent project of preventive conservation of the fountain and its surroundings.

  12. Catalytic Hydrodeoxygenation of Biomass Pyrolysis Vapor Model Compounds over Molybdenum Sulfide Catalysts: Influence of Support, H2S and Water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndal, Trine Marie Hartmann; Høj, Martin; Pintos, Delfina Garcia

    Conventional fast pyrolysis of biomass produces a high yield of bio-oil through well-established technologies1. The produced bio-oil must be further processed in order to decrease the content of oxygen(from 15-30 wt% down to heating...... value,acidity and stability1-2. Upgrading of condensed pyrolysis oil is challenged by severe polymerization andcoking upon heating. Instead, it is proposed to perform pyrolysis in the presence of hydrogen and an HDOcatalyst for immediate stabilization and upgrading of reactive pyrolysis products...... is to provide a proof-ofconceptfor the continuous conversion of solid biomass to low oxygen, fuel-grade bio-oil.In this contribution, a combined experimental, characterization and theoretical study of catalytic hydrodeoxygenationof biomass pyrolysis vapor model compounds over molybdenum sulfide catalysts...

  13. Photobiodegradation of chlorinated water pollutants by a combined TiO2-polyaniline-enzyme catalytic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanella, Luigi; Crescentini, G.; Militerno, S.

    1995-10-01

    The removal of xenobiotic compounds, such as chlorophenols and pesticides, from municipal and industrial wastewaters is an important task because of the toxicity and the tendency to bioaccumulation of these compounds. Among the several methods proposed, photodegradation catalyzed by suspended inorganic semiconductors (i.e. TiO2) has lately received wide attention because this process is fast, leads to non-toxic final products and shows a high degradation efficiency. In this work, the results obtained in the photodegradation of monochlorophenols using a new catalyst, made of TiO2 and polyaniline both immobilized on a polyvinylchloride (PVC) membrane, in presence (and in absence) of an enzyme are presented. Different enzymes have been tested by adding 5, 10 or 15 U/mL to 50 mL of aqueous solution (1 multiplied by 10-4 mol/L) of o-chloro-phenol containing the catalytic membrane. The samples were irradiated using a QUV panel accelerated weathering tester, which simulates very well the solar radiation up to lambda equals 400 nm and HPLC was used to measure the variation of the compound's concentration with the time. While some enzymes (i.e., peroxidase) do not improve the photodegradation process since they do not survive under the irradiation conditions used, some of them show marked effect both in terms of rate degradation and time required to reach the total degradation of the compound examined. For example, the addition of Laccase reduces the 100% degradation time from 35 hrs to about 20 hrs. Attempts to immobilize the enzyme on the catalytic membrane (by adsorption) have been carried out and the performance of the catalyst with non-immobilized and immobilized enzyme has been studied.

  14. Photobiodegradation of chlorinated water pollutants by a combined TiO{sub 2}-polyaniline-enzyme catalytic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campanella, L.; Crescentini, G.; Militerno, S. [Univ. of Rome La Sapienza, Roma (Italy). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-12-31

    The removal of xenobiotic compounds, such as chlorophenols and pesticides, from municipal and industrial wastewaters is an important task because of the toxicity and the tendency to bioaccumulation of these compounds. Among the several methods proposed, photodegradation catalyzed by suspended inorganic semiconductors (i.e. TiO{sub 2}) has lately received wide attention because this process is fast, leads to non-toxic final products and shows a high degradation efficiency. In this work, the results obtained in the photodegradation of monochlorophenols using a new catalyst, made of TiO{sub 2} and polyaniline both immobilized on a polyvinylchloride (PVC) membrane, in presence (and in absence) of an enzyme are presented. Different enzymes have been tested by adding 5, 10 or 15 U/mL to 50 mL of aqueous solution (1{times}10{sup {minus}4} mol/L) of o-chlorophenol containing the catalytic membrane. The samples were irradiated using a QUV Panel Accelerated Weathering Tester, which simulates very well the solar radiation up to {lambda}=400 nm and HPLC was used to measure the variation of the compounds concentration with the time. While some enzymes (i.e. peroxidase) do not improve the photodegradation process since they do to survive under the irradiation conditions used, some of them show a marked effect both in terms of rate of degradation and time required to reach the total degradation of the compound examined. For example, the addition of Laccase reduces the 100% degradation time for 35 hrs to about 20 hrs. Attempts to immobilize the enzyme on the catalytic membrane (by adsorption) have been carried out and the performance of the catalyst with non-immobilized and immobilized enzyme has been studied.

  15. Adsorption and bio-sorption of nickel ions and reuse for 2-chlorophenol catalytic ozonation oxidation degradation from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Wei; Zong, Panpan; Cheng, Zihong; Wang, Baodong; Sun, Qi

    2014-02-15

    This work explored the preparation of an effective and low-cost catalyst and investigated its catalytic capacity for 2-chlorophenol ozonation oxidation degradation in wastewater by using an ozone oxidation batch reactor. The catalyst was directly prepared by the reuse of fly ash and sawdust after saturated adsorption of nickel ions from wastewater, which was proposed as an efficient and economic approach. The obtained catalyst was characterized by TGA, BET, FTIR, XRD, and SEM, the results showed that fly ash as the basic framework has high specific surface area and the addition of sawdust as the porogen agent could improve the pore structure of the catalyst. The adsorption of nickel ions by fly ash and sawdust from aqueous solution was also investigated in this study. The results obtained from the experiments indicated that adsorption of nickel ions by fly ash and biomass sawdust could be well described by Langmuir isotherm model and pseudo second order kinetic model. The catalytic performance of catalyst was studied in terms of the effect of time, liquid-solid ratio and pH on 2-chlorophenol ozonation degradation. It was found that the catalyst could effectively improve the ozonation reaction rate at pH=7 with a 2:1 liquid-solid ratio. The kinetic study demonstrated that the reaction followed the first order model, and the rate constant increased 267% (0.03-0.1 min(-1)) of 2-chlorophenol ozonation degradation with 5 mmol/L concentration at pH=7.0 compared with ozonation alone. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Mechanism of Catalytic Water Oxidation by the Ruthenium Blue Dimer Catalyst: Comparative Study in D2O versus H2O

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Pushkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Water oxidation is critically important for the development of energy solutions based on the concept of artificial photosynthesis. In order to gain deeper insight into the mechanism of water oxidation, the catalytic cycle for the first designed water oxidation catalyst, cis,cis-[(bpy2(H2ORuIIIORuIII(OH2(bpy2]4+ (bpy is 2,2-bipyridine known as the blue dimer (BD, is monitored in D2O by combined application of stopped flow UV-Vis, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR and resonance Raman spectroscopy on freeze quenched samples. The results of these studies show that the rate of formation of BD[4,5] by Ce(IV oxidation of BD[3,4] (numbers in square bracket denote oxidation states of the ruthenium (Ru centers in 0.1 M HNO3, as well as further oxidation of BD[4,5] are slower in D2O by 2.1–2.5. Ce(IV oxidation of BD[4,5] and reaction with H2O result in formation of an intermediate, BD[3,4]′, which builds up in reaction mixtures on the minute time scale. Combined results under the conditions of these experiments at pH 1 indicate that oxidation of BD[3,4]′ is a rate limiting step in water oxidation with the BD catalyst.

  17. Cooperative Catalytic Effect of ZrO2and α-Fe2O3Nanoparticles on BiVO4Photoanodes for Enhanced Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaddad, Maged N; Ghanem, Mohamed A; Al-Mayouf, Abdullah M; Gimenez, Sixto; Bisquert, Juan; Herraiz-Cardona, Isaac

    2016-10-06

    Photoelectrochemical water splitting with metal oxide semiconductors offers a cost-competitive alternative for the generation of solar fuels. Most of the materials studied so far suffer from poor charge-transfer kinetics at the semiconductor/liquid interface, making compulsory the use of catalytic layers to overcome the large overpotentials required for the water oxidation reaction. Herein, we report a very soft electrolytic synthesis deposition method, which allows remarkably enhanced water oxidation kinetics of BiVO 4 photoanodes by the sequential addition of Zr and Fe precursors. Upon a heat treatment cycle, these precursors are converted into monoclinic ZrO 2 and α-Fe 2 O 3 nanoparticles, which mainly act as catalysts, leading to a five-fold increase of the water oxidation photocurrent of BiVO 4 . This method provides a versatile platform that is easy to apply to different semiconductor materials, fully reproducible, and facile to scale-up on large area conductive substrates with attractive implications for technological deployment. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael T.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction (VPCAR) teststand and the results of an experimental program designed to evaluate the potential of the technology as a water purification process. In the experimental program the technology is evaluated based upon product water purity, water recovery rate, and power consumption. The experimental work demonstrates that the technology produces high purity product water and attains high water recovery rates at a relatively high specific power consumption. The experimental program was conducted in 3 phases. In phase I an Igepon(TM) soap and water mixture was used to evaluate the performance of an innovative Wiped-Film Rotating-Disk evaporator and associated demister. In phase II a phenol-water solution was used to evaluate the performance of the high temperature catalytic oxidation reactor. In phase III a urine analog was used to evaluate the performance of the combined distillation/oxidation functions of the processor.

  19. Dynamics of co-existing Escherichia colilineages in situ of the infant gut and multiplex phenotypic targeted recovery of previously uncultivated bacteria from the human gut

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gumpert, Heidi

    were selected due to an observed change in their antibiotic susceptibility profile. Via full genome sequencing, we identified that in both cases a conjugative plasmid harboring antibiotic resistance genes was transferred between co-existing E. coli lineages and is responsible for the change...... conditions. Antibiotictolerance phenotypes were determined, and this mapping was used to carefully tailor antibiotic combinations to specifically select for previously uncultivated bacteria. Usingthis method, four previously uncultivated species were successfully cultured andgenome sequenced, and two...... of which had 16S rRNA identities of less than 95% topreviously cultured bacteria. We assessed the genomic coverage and abundance ofthese sequenced isolates in the gut using publicly available metagenomes....

  20. REM-sleep alterations in children with co-existence of tic disorders and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: impact of hypermotor symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirov, Roumen; Banaschewski, Tobias; Uebel, Henrik; Kinkelbur, Jörg; Rothenberger, Aribert

    2007-06-01

    To characterize precisely the sleep pattern in children with co-existence of TD + ADHD. By means of polysomnography, sleep pattern was investigated in 19 children with TD + ADHD unmedicated before and during study and 19 healthy controls, matched for age, gender, and intelligence. Compared with healthy controls, children with TD + ADHD displayed shorter REM sleep latency and increased REM sleep duration. There was a negative correlational relationship between these REM-sleep alterations and they were determined by hyperactivity symptoms. Sleep in children with coexistence of TD + ADHD may be characterized by an elevated REM sleep drive. Common mechanisms are suggested to underpin hypermotor symptoms and REM sleep regulation.

  1. Co-existence of Endometriotic Cyst of the Ovary and Arias-Stella Reaction in a Non-Pregnant Woman: Report of a Rare Case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harikrishnan, Volga; Esaki, Muthuvel; Srinivasan, Chitra; Arockiasamy, Parimala; Ethirajan, Shanthi

    2016-03-01

    Endometriosis is defined as presence of endometrial tissue outside the uterus. It can occur anywhere in the ovary. In the ovary it is usually presented as cyst, termed as endometriotic cyst or Chocolate cyst. Arias-Stella reaction is usually seen in gestational endometrium or in ectopic gestation site and rarely in non-pregnant uterus with hormonal intake. Co-existence of endometriosis and Arias-Stella reaction is very rare. We present a very rare case of endometriotic cyst of the ovary exhibiting Arias -Stella reaction which was seen in of non pregnant patient without any history of hormonal intake.

  2. The burden of co-existing dermatological disorders and their tendency of being overlooked among patients admitted to muhimbili national hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chale Pauline NF

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Skin diseases are underestimated and overlooked by most clinicians despite being common in clinical practice. Many patients are hospitalized with co-existing dermatological conditions which may not be detected and managed by the attending physicians. The objective of this study was to determine the burden of co-existing and overlooked dermatological disorders among patients admitted to medical wards of Muhimbili National hospital in Dar es Salaam. Study design and settings A hospital-based descriptive cross-sectional study conducted at Muhimbili National hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Methods Patients were consecutively recruited from the medical wards. Detailed interview to obtain clinico-demographic characteristics was followed by a complete physical examination. Dermatological diagnoses were made mainly clinically. Appropriate confirmatory laboratory investigations were performed where necessary. Data was analyzed using the 'Statistical Package for Social Sciences' (SPSS program version 10.0. A p-value of Results Three hundred and ninety patients admitted to medical wards were enrolled into the study of whom, 221(56.7% were females. The mean age was 36.7 ± 17.9 (range 7-84 years. Overall, 232/390 patients (59.5% had co-existing dermatological disorders with 49% (191/390 having one, 9% (36/390 two and 5 patients (1% three. A wide range of co-existing skin diseases was encountered, the most diverse being non-infectious conditions which together accounted for 36.4% (142/390 while infectious dermatoses accounted for 31.5% (123/390. The leading infectious skin diseases were superficial fungal infections accounting for 18%. Pruritic papular eruption of HIV/AIDS (PPE and seborrheic eczema were the most common non-infectious conditions, each accounting for 4.3%. Of the 232/390 patients with dermatological disorders, 191/232 (82.3% and 154/232 (66.3% had been overlooked by their referring and admitting doctors respectively

  3. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  4. Effects of co-existing autoimmune diseases on serum lipids and lipoprotein subclasses profile in paediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojanin, Dragana; Milenkovic, Tatjana; Vekic, Jelena; Vukovic, Rade; Zeljkovic, Aleksandra; Janac, Jelena; Ivanisevic, Jasmina; Todorovic, Sladjana; Mazibrada, Ilijana; Spasojevic-Kalimanovska, Vesna

    2018-02-02

    Paediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) frequently develop other autoimmune disorders; most commonly autoimmune thyroiditis (ATD) and celiac disease (CD). In this study we evaluated whether co-existing autoimmune diseases had significant impact on lipid and lipoprotein subclasses, as known cardiovascular risk factors in T1DM. Study included 201 subjects with T1DM (14.1 ± 2.9 years) and 141 age- and gender-matched controls. ATD was presented in 30 and CD in 15 T1DM patients. Serum lipid parameters were determined by routine laboratory methods and plasma low-density (LDL) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) subclasses by gradient-gel electrophoresis method. Both groups of T1DM patients with concomitant autoimmune disease had significantly lower HDL-C levels (P autoimmune diseases. The patients with co-existing autoimmune diseases had higher risk of low HDL-C level (OR: 2.96; P autoimmune diseases on lipid profile in patients with T1DM. The most prominent changes were found in HDL lipoprotein characteristics in T1DM + CD group. Copyright © 2018 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Association of Co-Existing Impairments in Cognition and Self-Rated Vision and Hearing With Health Outcomes in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip L. Liu MD, MBA

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the relationship of disability (activities of daily living [ADL] and instrumental ADL [IADL], self-rated health (SRH, and 6-year mortality with co-existing impairments in vision (self-rated, hearing (self-rated, and/or cognition (Short Portable Mental Status Questionnaire in older adults. Method: The study sample comprised of 3,871 participants from the North Carolina Established Populations for Epidemiologic Studies of the Elderly study (NC EPESE. Results: Persons with all three impairments had increased odds of ADL/IADL disability and low SRH. Participants with combined visual and cognitive impairments had increased odds of mortality. Whereas sensory impairments were associated with poor SRH, cognitive impairment was not unless both sensory impairments were present. Conclusion: Co-existent sensory and cognitive impairments were associated with higher risk of impaired functional status. Self-rated auditory impairment alone was not associated with higher odds of death, but mortality was linked to visual and, particularly, cognitive impairment, alone or combined.

  6. The perception of parents and teachers of the influence of yoga on the concentration and co-existing behaviour of learners with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Beart

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This pilot study explores the perception of parents and teachers of the influence of yoga on the concentration and some co-existing behaviour of learners diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. The researchers attended to impaired concentration as typical ADHD behaviour and further looked at co-existing phenomena such as aggression, anxiety, and a low self-esteem which the learners may manifest. Semi-structured interviews with parents, teachers and the learners were held. Valuable data, confirming the learners’ behaviour manifestation and serving as triangulation, was collected by using a projection test and a self-esteem questionnaire. Interviews and assessments were conducted to analyse the situation initially and again after the yoga intervention. Based on the data collected and analysed, the perception of parents and teachers was that to an extent yoga had a positive influence on the behaviour of learners with ADHD. Although no long-term influence of yoga is determined in this investigation, there is sufficient evidence to suggest that there is potential in using yoga to support learners with ADHD regarding concentration, aggression, anxiety and an improvement in self-esteem. Keywords: ADHD, aggression, anxiety, concentration, self-esteem, yoga

  7. Fiber mediated receptor masking in non-infected bystander cells restricts adenovirus cell killing effect but promotes adenovirus host co-existence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Rebetz

    Full Text Available The basic concept of conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAD as oncolytic agents is that progenies generated from each round of infection will disperse, infect and kill new cancer cells. However, CRAD has only inhibited, but not eradicated tumor growth in xenograft tumor therapy, and CRAD therapy has had only marginal clinical benefit to cancer patients. Here, we found that CRAD propagation and cancer cell survival co-existed for long periods of time when infection was initiated at low multiplicity of infection (MOI, and cancer cell killing was inefficient and slow compared to the assumed cell killing effect upon infection at high MOI. Excessive production of fiber molecules from initial CRAD infection of only 1 to 2% cancer cells and their release prior to the viral particle itself caused a tropism-specific receptor masking in both infected and non-infected bystander cells. Consequently, the non-infected bystander cells were inefficiently bound and infected by CRAD progenies. Further, fiber overproduction with concomitant restriction of adenovirus spread was observed in xenograft cancer therapy models. Besides the CAR-binding Ad4, Ad5, and Ad37, infection with CD46-binding Ad35 and Ad11 also caused receptor masking. Fiber overproduction and its resulting receptor masking thus play a key role in limiting CRAD functionality, but potentially promote adenovirus and host cell co-existence. These findings also give important clues for understanding mechanisms underlying the natural infection course of various adenoviruses.

  8. Integration of Methane Steam Reforming and Water Gas Shift Reaction in a Pd/Au/Pd-Based Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Process Intensification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Dominguez, Bernardo; Mardilovich, Ivan P; Ma, Liang-Chih; Ma, Rui; Dixon, Anthony G; Kazantzis, Nikolaos K; Ma, Yi Hua

    2016-09-19

    Palladium-based catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs) effectively remove H₂ to induce higher conversions in methane steam reforming (MSR) and water-gas-shift reactions (WGS). Within such a context, this work evaluates the technical performance of a novel CMR, which utilizes two catalysts in series, rather than one. In the process system under consideration, the first catalyst, confined within the shell side of the reactor, reforms methane with water yielding H₂, CO and CO₂. After reforming is completed, a second catalyst, positioned in series, reacts with CO and water through the WGS reaction yielding pure H₂O, CO₂ and H₂. A tubular composite asymmetric Pd/Au/Pd membrane is situated throughout the reactor to continuously remove the produced H₂ and induce higher methane and CO conversions while yielding ultrapure H₂ and compressed CO₂ ready for dehydration. Experimental results involving (i) a conventional packed bed reactor packed (PBR) for MSR, (ii) a PBR with five layers of two catalysts in series and (iii) a CMR with two layers of two catalysts in series are comparatively assessed and thoroughly characterized. Furthermore, a comprehensive 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed to explore further the features of the proposed configuration. The reaction was studied at different process intensification-relevant conditions, such as space velocities, temperatures, pressures and initial feed gas composition. Finally, it is demonstrated that the above CMR module, which was operated for 600 h, displays quite high H₂ permeance and purity, high CH₄ conversion levels and reduced CO yields.

  9. [State of Fungal Lipases of Rhizopus microsporus, Penicillium sp. and Oospora lactis in Border Layers Water-Solid Phase and Factors Affecting Catalytic Properties of Enzymes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasanov, Kh T; Davranov, K; Rakhimov, M M

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrated that a change in the catalytic activity of fungal lipases synthesized by Rhizopus microsporus, Penicillium sp. and Oospora lactis and their ability to absorb on different sorbents depended on the nature of groups on the solid phase surface in the model systems water: lipid and water: solid phase. Thus, the stability of Penicillium sp. lipases increased 85% in the presence ofsorsilen or DEAE-cellulose, and 55% of their initial activity respectively was preserved. In the presence of silica gel and CM-cellulose, a decreased rate of lipid hydrolysis by Pseudomonas sp. enzymes was observed in water medium, and the hydrolysis rate increased by 2.4 and 1.5 times respectively in the presence of aminoaerosil and polykefamid. In an aqueous-alcohol medium, aminoaerosil and polykefamid decreased the rate of substrate hydrolysis by more than 30 times. The addition of aerosil to aqueous and aqueous-alcohol media resulted in an increase in the hydrolysis rate by 1.2-1.3 times. Sorsilen stabilized Penicillium sp. lipase activity at 40, 45, 50 and 55 degrees C. Either stabilization or inactivation of lipases was observed depending on the pH of the medium and the nature of chemical groups localized on the surface of solid phase. The synthetizing activity of lipases also changed depending on the conditions.

  10. Solitude or co-existence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard; Voldborg, Hanne

    2017-01-01

    This study reports on research into the impact of digital technological interventions for including kids with attention and developmental deficits into school class contexts. It describes, how the authors have approached the challenge of researching inclusion of kids with attention and developmen...

  11. Catalytic gasification of dry and wet biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossum, G.; Potic, B.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    2009-01-01

    Catalytic gasification of dry biomass and of wet biomass streams in hot compressed water are reviewed and discussed as potential technologies for the production of synthesis gas, hydrogen- and methane-rich gas. Next to literature data also new experimental results from our laboratory on catalytic

  12. Level of physical activity, well-being, stress and self-rated health in persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krøll, Lotte Skytte; Hammarlund, Catharina Sjödahl; Westergaard, Maria Lurenda

    2017-01-01

    -existing tension-type headache and neck pain in a clinic-based sample, b) the level of physical activity, psychological well-being, perceived stress and self-rated health in persons with migraine and co-existing tension-type headache and neck pain compared to healthy controls, c) the perceived ability of persons...... where questionnaires on physical activity, psychological well-being, perceived stress and self-rated health were completed by 148 persons with migraine and 100 healthy controls matched by sex and average age. Semi-structured interviews were conducted to assess characteristics of migraine, tension-type...... well-being, higher level of perceived stress and poorer self-rated health compared to healthy controls. They reported reduced ability to perform physical activity owing to migraine (high degree), tension-type headache (moderate degree) and neck pain (low degree). The most burdensome condition...

  13. Co-existence generation of XG-PON and single carrier XLG-PON for ultra-high definition TV transmission with entirely passive optical plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazi, Shahab Ahmad; Zhang, Xiao-guang; Xi, Li-xia; Munir, Abid; Idress, Muhammad

    2013-05-01

    International telecommunication union (ITU) recently has standardized ultra-high definition television (UHD-TV) with a resolution which is 16 times more than that of current high definition TV. Increasing the efficiency of video source coding or the capacity of transmission channels will be needed to deliver such programs by passive optical network (PON). In this paper, a complete passive co-existence of 10 Gbit-PON (XG-PON) and single carrier 40 Gbit-PON (XLG-PON) for overlay of UHD-TV distribution to 32 optical network units (ONUs) on broadcast basis is presented. The results show error free transmission performance with negligible power penalty over a 20 km bidirectional fiber.

  14. Statewide Implementation of Parenting with Love and Limits Among Youth with Co-Existing Internalizing and Externalizing Functional Impairments Reduces Return to Service Rates and Treatment Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterrett-Hong, Emma M; Karam, Eli; Kiaer, Lynn

    2017-09-01

    Many community mental health (CMH) systems contain inefficiencies, contributing to unmet need for services among youth. Using a quasi-experimental research design, we examined the implementation of an adapted structural-strategic family intervention, Parenting with Love and Limits, in a state CMH system to increase efficiency of services to youth with co-existing internalizing and externalizing functional impairments (PLL n = 296; Treatment-As-Usual n = 296; 54% male; 81% Caucasian). Youth receiving PLL experienced shorter treatment durations and returned to CMH services at significantly lower rates than youth receiving treatment-as-usual. They also demonstrated significant decreases in internalizing and externalizing symptoms over time. Findings lay the foundation for further examination of the role of an adapted structural-strategic family treatment in increasing the efficiency of CMH systems.

  15. The co-existence of spread spectrum ranging signal in Indian National Satellite-1B (INSAT-1B) with TV or SCPC channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, P. M. C.; Palsule, V. S.; Kumar, Pramod

    Spread Spectrum Systems have the potential of sharing the frequency spectrum with broadcasting, telephony, and data communications services due to their low power density signalling. A study of the feasibility of co-existence of Direct Sequence Spread Spectrum ranging signal with TV or SCPC carriers in a common satellite transponder is presented in this paper. The suitability of this type of ranging for Indian National Satellite-1B system from Master Control Facility, Hassan, India has been examined. The mutual interference effects between spread spectrum ranging signal and TV or SCPC services through various sizes of earth stations in INSAT network have been calculated. The study indicates that simultaneous accurate range measurement by spread spectrum technique from control earth station is possible without any significant degradation in signal quality of TV or SCPC services.

  16. Co-existence of ischemic stroke in Rheumatic and non-rheumatic atrial Fibrillation in a tertiary care teaching hospital of Western Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Chandra Kafle

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Stroke is a major public health burden worldwide leading to long-term morbidity and even mortality. Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common sustained arrhythmia and is an independent factor to increase risk of ischemic stroke. The risk of stroke further enhanced in rheumatic atrial fibrillation and affects younger population of developing countries.  The study has aimed to find out frequency of co-existence of stroke in AF and secondarily to look for age distribution of stroke and risk factors of AF.Materials & Methods: A retrospective analysis of trans-thoracic echocardiographic records of patients from 1st June 2009 to 31st June 2016 was done. Data were collected in a pre-structured proforma and analyzed.Results: Among 15767 echocardiographies, 577 (3.65% cases were recorded to have atrial fibrillation. Mean age 65(±15 years ranging from 14 to 100 years. Rheumatic heart disease was the second most common cause of atrial fibrillation after hypertension. The co-existence of ischemic stroke was seen in 87(15.07% cases with male to female ratio of 1:1.3. The proportion of stroke in rheumatic Atrial fibrillation was 21(18.75% which was higher than in non-Rheumatic atrial fibrillation 66(14.2%.Conclusion: Rheumatic heart disease is contributing as second most common cause of atrial fibrillation after hypertension, nearly one fourth of total stroke and most common (93% cause of stroke below the age of 45 years. Preventive strategies aimed at health awareness about rheumatic fever, screening programs at community level, early detection and treatment for hypertension and Rheumatic heart disease can contribute in reduction of stroke burden. 

  17. Impact of disease control and co-existing risk factors on heart rate variability in Gujarati type 2 diabetics: An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayesh Dalpatbhai Solanki

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a proven threat of cardiac dysautonomia with paucity of studies from India. Poor disease control makes it further worse with co-existence of hypertension in majority. Heart rate variability (HRV is a validated noninvasive tool to assess cardiac autonomic status. Aim: We studied HRV parameters of type 2 diabetics looking for effects of disease control and other co-existing risk factors. Materials and Methods: Ninety-eight hypertensive and forty normotensive under–treatment, Gujarati type 2 diabetics were evaluated for disease control and risk stratification. Five minutes resting, HRV was measured by Variowin HR, software-based instrument, using standard protocols to record time domain, frequency domain, and Poincare plot HRV parameters. They were compared between subgroups for the difference with P< 0.05 defining statistical significance. Results: All HRV parameters were reduced in type 2 diabetics, having mean age 56 years, mean duration 6 years with poor glycemic but comparatively better pressure control. HRV parameters were significantly not different in good compared to poor glycemics or in subjects with optimum pressure control than those without it. Results did not differ significantly, by the presence of individual cardiovascular risk factor in diabetics except resting heart rate. Conclusion: Our findings of HRV suggest that type 2 diabetics with poor glycemic control do not have a significant difference of cardiac dysautonomia by pressure control, glycemic control, and absence of risk cardiovascular factor. It suggests diabetes as a major cause for cardiac dysautonomia, residual risk despite treatment and need for HRV screening, strict glycemic control, and further studies.

  18. Stable solar-driven oxidation of water by semiconducting photoanodes protected by transparent catalytic nickel oxide films

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Ke

    2015-03-11

    Reactively sputtered nickel oxide (NiOx) films provide transparent, antireflective, electrically conductive, chemically stable coatings that also are highly active electrocatalysts for the oxidation of water to O2(g). These NiOx coatings provide protective layers on a variety of technologically important semiconducting photoanodes, including textured crystalline Si passivated by amorphous silicon, crystalline n-type cadmium telluride, and hydrogenated amorphous silicon. Under anodic operation in 1.0 M aqueous potassium hydroxide (pH 14) in the presence of simulated sunlight, the NiOx films stabilized all of these self-passivating, high-efficiency semiconducting photoelectrodes for >100 h of sustained, quantitative solar-driven oxidation of water to O2(g). © 2015, National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.

  19. The catalytic role of tungsten electrode material in the plasmachemical activity of a pulsed corona discharge in water

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukeš, Petr; Člupek, Martin; Babický, Václav; Sisrová, I.; Janda, V.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 3 (2011), 034011-034011 ISSN 0963-0252 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAAX00430802; GA ČR(CZ) GD104/09/H080 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : corona discharge * water * erosion * tungsten * hydrogen peroxide * dimethylsulfoxide Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 2.521, year: 2011 http://www.ipp.cas.cz/Ips/public/lukes_2011a.pdf

  20. Co-existence of Paragonimus harinasutai and Paragonimus bangkokensis metacercariae in fresh water crab hosts in central Viet Nam with special emphasis on their close phylogenetic relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doanh, Pham Ngoc; Hien, Hoang Van; Nonaka, Nariaki; Horii, Yoichiro; Nawa, Yukifumi

    2012-09-01

    During our epidemiological surveys for Paragonimus species in central Viet Nam, we found four morphologically different Paragonimus metacercariae in mountainous crabs. They were identified as metacercariae of Paragonimus westermani, P. bangkokensis, P. proliferus, and P. harinasutai in the order of their prevalence in crab hosts. This is the first discovery of P. harinasutai in Viet Nam, co-inhabiting with P. bangkokensis and other species. Metacercariae of P. harinasutai were given orally to a cat to obtain adult worms. Then, ITS2 and CO1 sequences of metacercariae and adults of P. harinasutai, and metacercariae of P. bangkokensis collected from the same place were determined for analyses of phylogenetic relationships to other P. harinasutai and P. bangkokensis populations as well as related species. The results of molecular analyses showed that P. harinasutai from Quang Binh province of central Viet Nam was almost completely identical with those from Vientiane, Lao PDR; P. bangkokensis from Quang Binh, Viet Nam was also almost completely identical with those from Lao PDR and from Quang Ninh province, Viet Nam. Except for one P. harinasutai isolate from China, all populations of P. harinasutai and P. bangkokensis from Thailand, Lao and Viet Nam make a single clade in both ITS2 and CO1 trees. In ITS2 sequences, AT deletion and ATC insertion were observed in some isolates of both species, indicating recent gene flow between P. harinasutai and P. bangkokensis. Moreover, because of their extremely high genetic similarities and their co-inhabitation in the same crab hosts found in Thailand, Lao PDR and Viet Nam, they should be considered as the sister species at the early stage of divergence. In addition, P. microrchis previously described from Yunnan, China should be placed as the synonym of P. harinasutai, because of their morphological and molecular similarities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Integration of Methane Steam Reforming and Water Gas Shift Reaction in a Pd/Au/Pd-Based Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Process Intensification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo Castro-Dominguez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Palladium-based catalytic membrane reactors (CMRs effectively remove H2 to induce higher conversions in methane steam reforming (MSR and water-gas-shift reactions (WGS. Within such a context, this work evaluates the technical performance of a novel CMR, which utilizes two catalysts in series, rather than one. In the process system under consideration, the first catalyst, confined within the shell side of the reactor, reforms methane with water yielding H2, CO and CO2. After reforming is completed, a second catalyst, positioned in series, reacts with CO and water through the WGS reaction yielding pure H2O, CO2 and H2. A tubular composite asymmetric Pd/Au/Pd membrane is situated throughout the reactor to continuously remove the produced H2 and induce higher methane and CO conversions while yielding ultrapure H2 and compressed CO2 ready for dehydration. Experimental results involving (i a conventional packed bed reactor packed (PBR for MSR, (ii a PBR with five layers of two catalysts in series and (iii a CMR with two layers of two catalysts in series are comparatively assessed and thoroughly characterized. Furthermore, a comprehensive 2D computational fluid dynamics (CFD model was developed to explore further the features of the proposed configuration. The reaction was studied at different process intensification-relevant conditions, such as space velocities, temperatures, pressures and initial feed gas composition. Finally, it is demonstrated that the above CMR module, which was operated for 600 h, displays quite high H2 permeance and purity, high CH4 conversion levels and reduced CO yields.

  2. Removal of distal protein-water hydrogen bonds in a plant epoxide hydrolase increases catalytic turnover but decreases thermostability

    OpenAIRE

    Thomaeus, Ann; Naworyta, Agata; Mowbray, Sherry L.; Widersten, Mikael

    2008-01-01

    A putative proton wire in potato soluble epoxide hydrolase 1, StEH1, was identified and investigated by means of site-directed mutagenesis, steady-state kinetic measurements, temperature inactivation studies, and X-ray crystallography. The chain of hydrogen bonds includes five water molecules coordinated through backbone carbonyl oxygens of Pro186, Leu266, His269, and the His153 imidazole. The hydroxyl of Tyr149 is also an integrated component of the chain, which leads to the hydroxyl of Tyr1...

  3. Water-soluble metal nanoparticles stabilized by plant polyphenols for improving the catalytic properties in oxidation of alcohols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, H.; Liao, Y.; Ma, J.; Zhao, S. L.; Huo, F. W.

    2015-12-01

    Plant polyphenols extracted from plants are one of the most abundant biomasses in nature, which are typical water soluble natural polymers. Herein, we reported a facile approach for the synthesis of platinum nanoparticle (PtNP) aqueous colloid by utilizing black wattle tannin (BWT, a typical plant polyphenol) as amphiphilic stabilizer. The phenolic hydroxyls of BWT provide the PtNPs with enough hydrophilicity, and their reduction ability could protect the PtNPs from deactivation caused by oxygen atmosphere. Additionally, the hydrophilic nature of BWT could efficiently promote the oxidation of alcohols in water, meanwhile, the hydrophobic and rigid backbones of plant polyphenols are able to suppress the PtNPs from aggregating, thus ensuring the high dispersion of the PtNPs during reactions. Under mild aerobic conditions, the as-prepared BWT-Pt colloid catalyst exhibited high activity in a series of biphasic oxidation of aromatic alcohols and aliphatic alcohols. As for the cycling stability, the BWT-Pt catalyst showed no obvious decrease during the 7 cycles, revealing superior cycling stability as compared with the counterparts using PVP or PEG as the stabilizer.Plant polyphenols extracted from plants are one of the most abundant biomasses in nature, which are typical water soluble natural polymers. Herein, we reported a facile approach for the synthesis of platinum nanoparticle (PtNP) aqueous colloid by utilizing black wattle tannin (BWT, a typical plant polyphenol) as amphiphilic stabilizer. The phenolic hydroxyls of BWT provide the PtNPs with enough hydrophilicity, and their reduction ability could protect the PtNPs from deactivation caused by oxygen atmosphere. Additionally, the hydrophilic nature of BWT could efficiently promote the oxidation of alcohols in water, meanwhile, the hydrophobic and rigid backbones of plant polyphenols are able to suppress the PtNPs from aggregating, thus ensuring the high dispersion of the PtNPs during reactions. Under mild aerobic

  4. Effect of iron content on the catalytic activity of Fe-MnOx electrodeposited films in water oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selinger, Elizabeth; Ryczko, Kevin; Lopinski, Gregory; Armandi, Marco; Bonelli, Barbara; Tamblyn, Isaac

    We report on the experimental and computational optimization and characterization of an MnOx structure containing a small amount of Fe, used as a catalyst for the water oxidation reaction (WOR), the key limiting reaction in water splitting. MnOx materials are earth-abundant and known to be efficient for WOR, and the method of cathodically electrodepositing catalysts allows for quick synthesis and a homogeneous coverage of the substrate. We present an increase in WOR activity due to the presence of Fe in this MnOx catalyst structure. First, we explored the optimal range for Fe(NO3)3 concentration in an KMnO4 solution for electrodeposition and tested for WOR activity. The catalyst structure was then analyzed using FESEM, XPS, and a Kelvin probe. We then developed a computational model of this structure, using density functional theory to obtain adsorption energies, work functions, projected density of states, and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics. In this theoretical framework, we explore how these observables change with respect to concentration of Fe, and compare the theoretical model with experiment. special acknowledgement to the Italian Cultural Centre of Durham scholarship program.

  5. Phase Behaviour of 1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium Thiocyanate Ionic Liquid with Catalytic Deactivated Compounds and Water at Several Temperatures: Experiments and Theoretical Predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramalingam Anantharaj

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Density, surface tension and refractive index were determined for the binary mixture of catalytic deactivated compounds with 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium thiocyanate {[EMIM][SCN]} at temperature of (298.15 to 323.15 K. For all the compounds with ILs, the densities varied linearly in the entire mole fraction with increasing temperature. From the obtained data, the excess molar volume and deviation of surface tension and refractive index have been calculated. A strong interaction was found between similar (cation-thiophene or cation-pyrrole compounds. The interaction of IL with dissimilar compounds such as indoline and quinoline and other multiple ring compounds was found to strongly depend on the composition of IL at any temperatures. For the mixtures, the surface tension decreases in the order of: thiophene > quinoline > pyridine > indoline > pyrrole > water. In general from the excess volume studies, the IL-sulphur/nitrogen mixture has stronger interaction as compared to IL-IL, thiophene-thiophene or pyrrole-pyrrole interaction. The deviation of surface tension was found to be inversely proportional to deviation of refractive index. The quantum chemical based COSMO-RS was used to predict the non-ideal liquid phase activity coefficient for all mixtures. It indicated an inverse relation between activity coefficient and excess molar volumes.

  6. Synthesis of copper sulfides with different morphologies in DMF and water: catalytic activity for methyl orange reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Alireza; Rahmani, Hossein; Zonouzi, Afsaneh

    2017-12-01

    Copper sulfides (covellite, digenite and djurleite) were synthesized using microwave irradiation. Copper acetate and thiourea were chosen as precursors and used at a fixed ratio. Crystalline phase and morphology (particles, spheres and inter-grown belts) were changed by only changing the synthetic media (water, DMF and a 1:1 V/V mixture of them). A domestic microwave oven was used at 1000 watt for only 20 s for each synthesis. The obtained samples were characterized using powder XRD, FESEM, and EDX; results were used to postulate the differences in phase and morphology of the obtained samples. All samples were tested as reduction catalysts for methyl orange degradation by NaBH4 and time-dependent UV-vis spectroscopy was used to compare their activity.

  7. Renal cell carcinoma co-existent with other renal disease: clinico-pathological features in pre-dialysis patients and those receiving dialysis or renal transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, Ramón; Martínez-Ara, Jorge; Miguel, José Luis; Arrieta, Javier; Costero, Olga; Górriz, José Luis; Picazo, Mari-Luz; Fresno, Manuel

    2004-11-01

    Patients on chronic dialysis are prone to developing acquired cystic kidney disease (ACKD), which may lead to the development of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The risk factors for the development of RCC so far have not been determined in pre-dialysis patients with co-existent renal disease. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinico-pathological features of RCC in pre-dialysis patients with associated renal diseases or in those undergoing chronic dialysis and renal transplantation. We studied 32 kidneys from 31 patients with RCC and associated renal diseases. Of those, 18 kidneys were from 17 patients not on renal replacement therapy (RRT) when diagnosed with RCC; 14 patients received dialysis or dialysis followed by renal transplantation. Several clinico-pathological features were analysed and compared between the two groups. Overall, there was a preponderance of males (75%); nephrosclerosis was the predominant co-existent disease (31%). The median intervals from renal disease to RCC in the dialysis and transplanted groups were significantly longer than in the pre-dialysis group (15.8+/-1.1 vs 2.4+/-0.7 years, P<0.0001). In contrast to pre-dialysis RCC, the dialysis and transplant RCC groups had greater frequency of ACKD (100 vs 28%, P<0.0001), papillary type RCC (43 vs 11%, P<0.05) and multifocal tumours (43 vs 5%, P<0.05). At the end of the study, 71% of dialysis and transplanted patients and 72% of pre-dialysis patients were alive. ACKD develops in dialysis patients, as it does in those with renal disease prior to RRT. The duration of renal disease, rather than the dialysis procedure itself, appears to be the main determinant of ACKD and RCC. The RCC occurring in patients with ACKD and prolonged RRT is more frequently of the papillary type and multifocal than the RCC occurring in patients with no or few acquired cysts and a short history of renal disease. Long-term outcomes did not differ between the two groups.

  8. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Levulinic Acid in Water into g-Valerolactone over Bulk Structure of Inexpensive Intermetallic Ni-Sn Alloy Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodiansono Rodiansono

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A bulk structure of inexpensive intermetallic nickel-tin (Ni-Sn alloys catalysts demonstrated highly selective in the hydrogenation of levulinic acid in water into g-valerolactone. The intermetallic Ni-Sn catalysts were synthesized via a very simple thermochemical method from non-organometallic precursor at low temperature followed by hydrogen treatment at 673 K for 90 min. The molar ratio of nickel salt and tin salt was varied to obtain the corresponding Ni/Sn ratio of 4.0, 3.0, 2.0, 1.5, and 0.75. The formation of Ni-Sn alloy species was mainly depended on the composition and temperature of H2 treatment. Intermetallics Ni-Sn that contain Ni3Sn, Ni3Sn2, and Ni3Sn4 alloy phases are known to be effective heterogeneous catalysts for levulinic acid hydrogenation giving very excellence g-valerolactone yield of >99% at 433 K, initial H2 pressure of 4.0 MPa within 6 h. The effective hydrogenation was obtained in H2O without the formation of by-product. Intermetallic Ni-Sn(1.5 that contains Ni3Sn2 alloy species demonstrated very stable and reusable catalyst without any significant loss of its selectivity. © 2015 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved. Received: 26th February 2015; Revised: 16th April 2015; Accepted: 22nd April 2015  How to Cite: Rodiansono, R., Astuti, M.D., Ghofur, A., Sembiring, K.C. (2015. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Levulinic Acid in Water into g-Valerolactone over Bulk Structure of Inexpensive Intermetallic Ni-Sn Alloy Catalysts. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 10 (2: 192-200. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.10.2.8284.192-200Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.10.2.8284.192-200  

  9. CATALYTIC PROPERTY OF DOUBLE LAYERED PEROVSKITES A2MM’O6 FOR RADIOLYTICAL SPLIT OF WATER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru Cecal

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a study of water splitting by gamma rays in the presence of some double perovskites A2MM’O6 and also Sr2Fe1-xTa1+xO6. The irradiation is performed using 60Co as a source with 3·104 Ci activity and 8.3 kGy/h dose rate, which simulated the radioactive wastes, resulted from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel elements much more active: 108-109 Ci. The stable products of radiolysis, as well as the other chemical species are measured by mass spectrometry. The calculated radiation yield (GH2 generally decreases in the order: Sr2Fe1-xTa1+xO6 (x=0.5; 0.4; 0.3; 0.1 > Ca2AlTaO6 > Sr2AlTaO6 > Ba2AlTaO6, under the given experimental conditions; the yield was higher in the presence of these catalysts than in their absence.

  10. Catalytic supercritical water gasification of primary paper sludge using a homogeneous and heterogeneous catalyst: Experimental vs thermodynamic equilibrium results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louw, Jeanne; Schwarz, Cara E; Burger, Andries J

    2016-02-01

    H2, CH4, CO and CO2 yields were measured during supercritical water gasification (SCWG) of primary paper waste sludge (PWS) at 450°C. Comparing these yields with calculated thermodynamic equilibrium values offer an improved understanding of conditions required to produce near-equilibrium yields. Experiments were conducted at different catalyst loads (0-1g/gPWS) and different reaction times (15-120min) in a batch reactor, using either K2CO3 or Ni/Al2O3-SiO2 as catalyst. K2CO3 up to 1g/gPWS increased the H2 yield significantly to 7.5mol/kgPWS. However, these yields and composition were far from equilibrium values, with carbon efficiency (CE) and energy recovery (ER) of only 29% and 20%, respectively. Addition of 0.5-1g/gPWS Ni/Al2O3-SiO2 resulted in high H2 and CH4 yields (6.8 and 14.8mol/kgPWS), CE of 84-90%, ER of 83% and a gas composition relatively close to the equilibrium values (at hold times of 60-120min). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. A study of pharmacokinetic interactions among co-existing ingredients in Viscum coloratum after intravenous administration of three different preparations to rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yuying; Fan, Ronghua; Duan, Mengmeng; Yu, Zhiguo; Zhao, Yunli

    2015-01-01

    Viscum coloratum (Komar) Nakai, known as Hujisheng in china, has been widely used as a herb medicine to treat a variety of diseases, including cardiovascular diseases, cancer, hypertension, hepatitis and hemorrhage. The aim was to investigate pharmacokinetic interactions among co-existing ingredients in V. coloratum after intravenous administration of three different preparations (four monomer solutions, the mixture of them and Viscum coloratum extracts) to rats. After protein precipitation pretreatment with plasma samples, high performance liquid chromatographic methods were developed and applied to quantitatively determinate the four components [syringin (Syri), homoeriodictyol-7-O-β-D-glycoside (Hedt-III), homoeriodictyol-7-O-β-D-apiose (1 → 2)-β-D-glycoside (Hedt-II) and homoeriodictyol-7-O-β-D-apiosiyl-(1 → 5)-β-D-apiosyl-(1 → 2)-β-D-glycoside (Hedt-I)]. The pharmacokinetic parameters (Area under the curve [AUC(0-t)], AUC(0-∞), t 1/2) were calculated using DAS 2.1 software (Chinese Pharmacological Society, Shanghai, China) and compared statistically by One-way analysis of variance using SPSS software (18.0, Chicago, IL, USA) with P dialectic view in the research and development processes.

  12. Co-existence of Blau syndrome and NAID? Diagnostic challenges associated with presence of multiple pathogenic variants in NOD2 gene: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziedzic, Magdalena; Marjańska, Agata; Bąbol-Pokora, Katarzyna; Urbańczyk, Anna; Grześk, Elżbieta; Młynarski, Wojciech; Kołtan, Sylwia

    2017-07-27

    Pediatric autoinflammatory diseases are rare and still poorly understood conditions resulting from defective genetic control of innate immune system, inter alia from anomalies of NOD2 gene. The product of this gene is Nod2 protein, taking part in maintenance of immune homeostasis. Clinical form of resultant autoinflammatory condition depends on NOD2 genotype; usually patients with NOD2 defects present with Blau syndrome, NOD2-associated autoinflammatory disease (NAID) or Crohn's disease. We present the case of a 7-year-old girl with co-existing symptoms of two rare diseases, Blau syndrome and NAID. Overlapping manifestations of two syndromes raised a significant diagnostic challenge, until next-generation molecular test (NGS) identified presence of three pathogenic variants of NOD2 gene: P268S, IVS8 +158 , 1007 fs, and established the ultimate diagnosis. Presence of multiple genetical abnormalities resulted in an ambiguous clinical presentation with overlapping symptoms of Blau syndrome and NAID. Final diagnosis of autoinflammatory disease opened new therapeutic possibilities, including the use of biological treatments.

  13. Study of the water-gas shift reaction on Mo{sub 2}C/Mo catalytic coatings for application in microstructured fuel processors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rebrov, E.V.; De Croon, M.H.J.M.; Schouten, J.C. [Laboratory of Chemical Reactor Engineering, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kuznetsov, S.A. [Institute of Chemistry, Kola Science Centre RAS, 14 Fersman Str., 184209 Apatity, Murmansk Region (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-15

    The activity and stability of two types of molybdenum carbide coatings deposited on molybdenum substrates (Mo{sub 2}C/Mo) were compared in the water-gas shift reaction at 513-631 K. The activity of the Mo{sub 2}C/Mo coatings obtained by carburization of preoxidized molybdenum substrates in a CH{sub 4}/H{sub 2} mixture at 973 K decreased to 20% of the initial value after 23 h on stream at 631 K in a mixture containing 0.5 vol.% CO, 1.5 vol.% H{sub 2}O and 40 vol.% H{sub 2} balanced by helium. The activity of the Mo{sub 2}C/Mo coatings obtained by molten salt synthesis in a melt containing 5 wt.% Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} in an equimolar NaCl-KCl mixture at 1123 K for 7 h, was stable for more than 500 h on stream at similar reaction conditions. There was no evidence of methanation activity on both Mo{sub 2}C/Mo coatings below 621 K. The kinetics of the WGS and reverse WGS reactions was measured on Mo{sub 2}C/Mo coatings obtained by molten salt synthesis in a microstructured reactor operating in a differential mode. A combined power-law Eley-Rideal kinetic model is proposed to describe the reaction in the 531-631 K range. It was shown that, if molybdenum carbide is present as a thin layer over a molybdenum substrate (Mo{sub 2}C/Mo), the catalytic activity is enhanced compared to that of the pure Mo{sub 2}C phase. (author)

  14. GH-3PAD - a new numerical solver for multiphase transport in porous media - new insights on gas hydrate and free gas co-existence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwicz, E.; Rupke, L.; Wallmann, K.

    2013-12-01

    Gas Hydrate-3 Phase Advanced Dynamics (GH-3PAD) code has been developed to study the geophysical and biochemical processes associated with gas hydrate as well as free methane gas formation and dissolution in marine sediments. Biochemical processes influencing in-situ organic carbon decay and, therefore, gas hydrate formation, such as Anaerobic Oxidation of Methane (AOM), sulfate reduction, and methanogenesis have been considered. The new model assumes a Lagrangian reference frame that is attached to the deposited sedimentary layers, which compact according to their individual lithological properties. Differential motion of the pore fluids and free gas is modeled as Darcy flow. Gas hydrate and free gas formation is either controlled by 1) instant gas hydrate crystallization assuming local thermodynamical equilibrium or by a 2) kinetically controlled rate of gas hydrate growth. The thermal evolution is computed from an energy equation that includes contributions from all phases present in the model (sediment grains, saline pore fluids, gas hydrate, and free gas). A first application of the GH-3PAD model has been the Blake Ridge Site, offshore South Carolina. Here seismic and well data points to the out-of-equilibrium co-existence of gas hydrate and free gas. It has been reported that these two distinct phases appear within sediment column with a gaseous phase tending to migrate upwards throughout the Gas Hydrate Stability Zone (GHSZ) until it reaches the seafloor despite relatively low gas hydrate content (4 - 7 vol. % after Paull et al., 1996). With the GH-3PAD model we quantify the complex transport- reaction processes that control three phase (gas hydrate, free gas, and dissolved CH4) out-of-equilibrium state. References: Paull C. K., Matsumoto R., Wallace P. J., 1996. 9. Site 997, Shipboard Scientific Party. Proceeding of the Ocean Drilling Program, Initial Reports, Vol. 164.

  15. Modelling Niche Differentiation of Co-Existing, Elusive and Morphologically Similar Species: A Case Study of Four Macaque Species in Nakai-Nam Theun National Protected Area, Laos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille N. Z. Coudrat

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Species misidentification often occurs when dealing with co-existing and morphologically similar species such as macaques, making the study of their ecology challenging. To overcome this issue, we use reliable occurrence data from camera-trap images and transect survey data to model their respective ecological niche and potential distribution locally in Nakai-Nam Theun National Protected Area (NNT NPA, central-Eastern Laos. We investigate niche differentiation of morphologically similar species using four sympatric macaque species in NNT NPA, as our model species: rhesus Macaca mulatta (Taxonomic Serial Number, TSN 180099, Northern pig-tailed M. leonina (TSN not listed; Assamese M. assamensis (TSN 573018 and stump-tailed M. arctoides (TSN 573017. We examine the implications for their conservation. We obtained occurrence data of macaque species from systematic 2006–2011 camera-trapping surveys and 2011–2012 transect surveys and model their niche and potential distribution with MaxEnt software using 25 environmental and topographic variables. The respective suitable habitat predicted for each species reveals niche segregation between the four species with a gradual geographical distribution following an environmental gradient within the study area. Camera-trapping positioned at many locations can increase elusive-species records with a relatively reduced and more systematic sampling effort and provide reliable species occurrence data. These can be used for environmental niche modelling to study niche segregation of morphologically similar species in areas where their distribution remains uncertain. Examining unresolved species' niches and potential distributions can have crucial implications for future research and species' management and conservation even in the most remote regions and for the least-known species.

  16. The regulation of aortic endothelial cells by purines and pyrimidines involves co-existing P2y-purinoceptors and nucleotide receptors linked to phospholipase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, G F; Purkiss, J R; Boarder, M R

    1993-03-01

    1. We have examined the phospholipase C responses in bovine aortic endothelial cells to purines (ATP, ADP and analogues) and the pyrimidine, uridine triphosphate (UTP). 2. The cells responded to purines in a manner consistent with the presence of P2y purinoceptors; both 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-triphosphate (2MeSATP) and adenosine 5'-0-(2-thiodiphosphate) (ADP beta S) were potent agonists (EC50 0.41 microM and 0.85 microM respectively) while beta, gamma-methylene ATP at 300 microM was not. 3. The cells also responded to UTP. The maximal response to UTP was less than that for either 2MeSATP and ADP beta S while adenosine 5'-0-(3-thiotriphosphate) (ATP gamma S) gave the largest maximal response. 4. The concentration-effect curve to UTP was additive in the presence of either 2MeSATP or ADP beta S. However, the concentration-effect curves to ATP gamma S reached the same maximum in the presence or absence of UTP. 5. Suramin, at concentrations between 10 microM and 100 microM was a competitive antagonist for the response to ADP beta S and 2MeSATP but not the response to UTP. 6. The results show that there are two separate, co-existing, receptor populations: P2y-purinoceptors (responding to purines) and nucleotide receptors (responding to both purines and pyrimidines). We conclude that purines such as ATP/ADP may regulate aortic endothelial cells by interacting with two phospholipase C-linked receptors.

  17. New self-assembled material based on Ru nanoparticles and 4-sulfocalix[4]arene as an efficient and recyclable catalyst for reduction of brilliant yellow azo dye in water: a new model catalytic reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rambabu, Darsi; Pradeep, Chullikkattil P.; Dhir, Abhimanew, E-mail: abhimanew@iitmandi.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology (India)

    2016-12-15

    New self-assembled material (Ru@SC) with ruthenium nanoparticles (Ru NPs) and 4-sulfocalix[4]arene (SC) is synthesized in water at room temperature. Ru@SC is characterized by thermal gravimetric analysis, FT-IR, powder x-ray diffraction, TEM and SEM analysis. The size of Ru nanoparticles in the self-assembly is approximately 5 nm. The self-assembled material Ru@SC shows an efficient catalytic reduction of toxic ‘brilliant yellow’ (BY) azo dye. The reduced amine products were successfully separated and confirmed by single-crystal XRD, NMR and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Ru@SC showed a better catalytic activity in comparison with commercial catalysts Ru/C (ruthenium on charcoal 5 %) and Pd/C (palladium on charcoal 5 and 10 %). The catalyst also showed a promising recyclability and heterogeneous nature as a catalyst for reduction of ‘BY’ azo dye.

  18. The Peaceful Co-existence of Input Frequency and Structural Intervention Effects on the Comprehension of Complex Sentences in German-Speaking Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Adani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The predictions of two contrasting approaches to the acquisition of transitive relative clauses were tested within the same groups of German-speaking participants aged from 3 to 5 years old. The input frequency approach predicts that object relative clauses with inanimate heads (e.g., the pullover that the man is scratching are comprehended earlier and more accurately than those with an animate head (e.g., the man that the boy is scratching. In contrast, the structural intervention approach predicts that object relative clauses with two full NP arguments mismatching in number (e.g., the man that the boys are scratching are comprehended earlier and more accurately than those with number-matching NPs (e.g., the man that the boy is scratching. These approaches were tested in two steps. First, we ran a corpus analysis to ensure that object relative clauses with number-mismatching NPs are not more frequent than object relative clauses with number-matching NPs in child directed speech. Next, the comprehension of these structures was tested experimentally in 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds respectively by means of a color naming task. By comparing the predictions of the two approaches within the same participant groups, we were able to uncover that the effects predicted by the input frequency and by the structural intervention approaches co-exist and that they both influence the performance of children on transitive relative clauses, but in a manner that is modulated by age. These results reveal a sensitivity to animacy mismatch already being demonstrated by 3-year-olds and show that animacy is initially deployed more reliably than number to interpret relative clauses correctly. In all age groups, the animacy mismatch appears to explain the performance of children, thus, showing that the comprehension of frequent object relative clauses is enhanced compared to the other conditions. Starting with 4-year-olds but especially in 5-year-olds, the number mismatch

  19. The Heterogeneity Hidden in Allergic Rhinitis and Its Impact on Co-Existing Asthma in Adults: A Population-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonicelli, Leonardo; Marchetti, Pierpaolo; Accordini, Simone; Bono, Roberto; Carosso, Aurelia; Casali, Lucio; Cazzoletti, Lucia; Corsico, Angelo; Ferrari, Marcello; Fois, Alessandro; Nicolini, Gabriele; Olivieri, Mario; Pirina, Pietro; Verlato, Giuseppe; Villani, Simona; de Marco, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that there is some overlap between allergic rhinitis (AR), sinusitis and polyposis, but this has not been fully documented. The present study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of these co-existing diseases and their impact on bronchial asthma in the general population of Italy. Within the frame of the multicentre Gene Environment Interactions in Respiratory Diseases (GEIRD) study, a postal screening questionnaire including questions about self-reported symptoms of asthma, AR, AR with sinusitis without nasal polyps (AR + SsNP) and AR with sinusitis with nasal polyps (AR + SwNP) was administered. Random samples of subjects aged between 20 and 44 years (n = 5,162) answered the postal questionnaire in 4 Italian centres (Pavia, Sassari, Turin, Verona). In AR subjects, the association among AR only, AR + SsNP, AR + SwNP and bronchial asthma was estimated by the relative risk ratio (RRR) using multinomial regression models. The prevalence of AR in the sample was 25.4% (95% CI 24.2-26.6). A self-reported diagnosis of AR + SsNP and AR + SwNP was reported by 5.7% (95% CI 5.0-6.3) and by 1.2% (95% CI 0.9-1.5) of the subjects, respectively. Current asthma was reported by 17.5% of the AR subjects. In the adjusted multivariate analysis, the risk of having current asthma (RRR = 2.31, 95% CI 1.29-4.15), of having at least 1 asthma attack per year (RRR = 2.30, 95% CI 1.19-4.46) and of having had an emergency department admission for respiratory diseases (RRR = 5.61, 95% CI 1.81-23.92) was higher for subjects with AR + SwNP than subjects with AR only. The diagnosis of AR in the epidemiological setting includes heterogeneous upper airway diseases that affect the clinical features of AR and its interactions with asthma. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Catalytic Oligopeptide Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zijian; Noda, Hidetoshi; Shibasaki, Masakatsu; Kumagai, Naoya

    2018-02-02

    Waste-free catalytic assembly of α-amino acids is fueled by a multiboron catalyst that features a characteristic B 3 NO 2 heterocycle, providing a versatile catalytic protocol wherein functionalized natural α-amino acid units are accommodated and commonly used protecting groups are tolerated. The facile dehydrative conditions eliminate the use of engineered peptide coupling reagents, exemplifying a greener catalytic alternative for peptide coupling. The catalysis is sufficiently robust to enable pentapeptide synthesis, constructing all four amide bond linkages in a catalytic fashion.

  1. Synthesis and application of iron and zinc doped biochar for removal of p-nitrophenol in wastewater and assessment of the influence of co-existed Pb(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Pei; Tang, Lin; Wei, Xue; Zeng, Guangming; Zhou, Yaoyu; Deng, Yaocheng; Wang, Jingjing; Xie, Zhihong; Fang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Iron and zinc doped biochar was developed with larger specific surface area, new generated hydroxyl groups, and beneficial magnetism compared with pristine biochar. • Fe/Zn-biochar presented good performance both for PNP and Pb(II) adsorption as well as their simultaneous removal. • Mechanism of the enhanced adsorption for low concentrations of co-existing PNP and Pb(II) was proposed. - Abstract: The modification of biochar as a low-cost adsorbent is essential to improve its surface properties and shows great potential in water decontamination. The iron and zinc doped sawdust biochar (Fe/Zn-biochar) with large apparent surface area (518.54 m 2 /g) proposed in this work showed good performance for p-nitrophenol (PNP) removal compared with the pristine biochar (P-biochar), iron doped biochar (Fe-biochar) and zinc doped biochar (Zn-biochar) respectively. The batch experiments turned out that Fe/Zn-biochar exhibited larger PNP adsorption capacity under acidic pH solution, and the ionic strength had slightly negative impact on PNP adsorption. The adsorption kinetics and isotherms were discussed, and the experimental data fitted well the Pseudo-second-order equation and Langmuir model. The thermodynamic study indicated that the PNP adsorption was a spontaneous endothermic process. Furthermore, the simultaneous removal for PNP and Pb(II) by Fe/Zn-biochar was investigated. It implied that the adsorption of PNP and Pb(II) at their low concentration might be enhanced by the complexing-bridging mechanism of PNP and Pb(II) ascribing to the affinity between PNP and hydrophobic sites, in addition to the affinity between Pb(II) and oxygen-containing hydrophilic sites on Fe/Zn-biochar surface. However, the predominated competition between PNP and Pb(II) at their high concentrations with Fe/Zn-biochar suppressed their adsorption.

  2. Synthesis and application of iron and zinc doped biochar for removal of p-nitrophenol in wastewater and assessment of the influence of co-existed Pb(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Pei [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China); Tang, Lin, E-mail: tanglin@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China); Wei, Xue [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China); Zeng, Guangming, E-mail: zgming@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China); Zhou, Yaoyu [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China); College of Resources and Environment, Hunan Agricultural University, Changsha 410128 (China); Deng, Yaocheng; Wang, Jingjing; Xie, Zhihong; Fang, Wei [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control, Hunan University, Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082, Hunan (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • Iron and zinc doped biochar was developed with larger specific surface area, new generated hydroxyl groups, and beneficial magnetism compared with pristine biochar. • Fe/Zn-biochar presented good performance both for PNP and Pb(II) adsorption as well as their simultaneous removal. • Mechanism of the enhanced adsorption for low concentrations of co-existing PNP and Pb(II) was proposed. - Abstract: The modification of biochar as a low-cost adsorbent is essential to improve its surface properties and shows great potential in water decontamination. The iron and zinc doped sawdust biochar (Fe/Zn-biochar) with large apparent surface area (518.54 m{sup 2}/g) proposed in this work showed good performance for p-nitrophenol (PNP) removal compared with the pristine biochar (P-biochar), iron doped biochar (Fe-biochar) and zinc doped biochar (Zn-biochar) respectively. The batch experiments turned out that Fe/Zn-biochar exhibited larger PNP adsorption capacity under acidic pH solution, and the ionic strength had slightly negative impact on PNP adsorption. The adsorption kinetics and isotherms were discussed, and the experimental data fitted well the Pseudo-second-order equation and Langmuir model. The thermodynamic study indicated that the PNP adsorption was a spontaneous endothermic process. Furthermore, the simultaneous removal for PNP and Pb(II) by Fe/Zn-biochar was investigated. It implied that the adsorption of PNP and Pb(II) at their low concentration might be enhanced by the complexing-bridging mechanism of PNP and Pb(II) ascribing to the affinity between PNP and hydrophobic sites, in addition to the affinity between Pb(II) and oxygen-containing hydrophilic sites on Fe/Zn-biochar surface. However, the predominated competition between PNP and Pb(II) at their high concentrations with Fe/Zn-biochar suppressed their adsorption.

  3. Catalytic hydrodechlorination of trichloroethylene in a novel NaOH/2-propanol/methanol/water system on ceria-supported Pd and Rh catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobo, Martha; Becerra, Jorge; Castelblanco, Miguel; Cifuentes, Bernay; Conesa, Juan A

    2015-08-01

    The catalytic hydrodechlorination (HDC) of high concentrations of trichloroethylene (TCE) (4.9 mol%, 11.6 vol%) was studied over 1%Pd, 1%Rh and 0.5%Pd-0.5%Rh catalysts supported on CeO2 under conditions of room temperature and pressure. For this, a one-phase system of NaOH/2-propanol/methanol/water was designed with molar percentages of 13.2/17.5/36.9/27.6, respectively. In this system, the alcohols delivered the hydrogen required for the reaction through in-situ dehydrogenation reactions. PdRh/CeO2 was the most active catalyst for the degradation of TCE among the evaluated materials, degrading 85% of the trichloroethylene, with alcohol dehydrogenation rates of 89% for 2-propanol and 83% for methanol after 1 h of reaction. Fresh and used catalysts were characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), and Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). These results showed important differences of the active phase in each catalyst sample. Rh/CeO2 had particle sizes smaller than 1 nm and the active metal was partially oxidized (Rh(0)/Rh(+δ) ratio of 0.43). This configuration showed to be suitable for alcohols dehydrogenation. On the contrary, Pd/CeO2 showed a Pd completed oxidized and with a mean particle size of 1.7 nm, which seemed to be unfavorable for both, alcohols dehydrogenation and TCE HDC. On PdRh/CeO2, active metals presented a mean particle size of 2.7 nm and more reduced metallic species, with ratios of Rh(0)/Rh(+δ) = 0.67 and Pd(0)/Pd(+δ) = 0.28, which showed to be suitable features for the TCE HDC. On the other hand, TGA results suggested some deposition of NaCl residues over the catalyst surfaces. Thus, the new reaction system using PdRh/CeO2 allowed for the degradation of high concentrations of the chlorinated compound by using in situ hydrogen liquid donors in a reaction at room temperature and pressure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A broad spectrum catalytic system for removal of toxic organics from water by deep oxidation. Annual progress report, September 15, 1996 - September 14, 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, A.

    1997-01-01

    'During the first year, the palladium-catalyzed deep oxidation of toxic organics by dioxygen in aqueous solution was examined in some detail. The research performed has established the viability of the catalytic system to effect the deep (and complete) oxidation of a very wide range of organic substrates under mild conditions. One significant observation was that chemical warfare agent models containing phosphorus-carbon and sulfur-carbon bonds could be eliminated by using this procedure.'

  5. Catalytic distillation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  6. Catalytic Functions of Standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Blind (Knut)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe three different areas and the examples have illustrated several catalytic functions of standards for innovation. First, the standardisation process reduces the time to market of inventions, research results and innovative technologies. Second, standards themselves promote the

  7. Catalytic distillation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  8. CATALYTIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION OF Mn(II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    The aim of the present study was to develop a new precise and accurate catalytic spectrophotometric ... manganese sulfate monohydrate (Merck, Darmstadt, Germany) in water and diluted to 250 mL. The working .... and potassium hydrogen phthalate-HCl buffer solutions, the slope of calibration graph was unsatisfactory.

  9. Summer co-existence of small-sized cyprinid and percid individuals in natural and impounded stretches of a lowland river: food niche partitioning among fishes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lik, J; Dukowska, M; Grzybkowska, M; Leszczyńska, J

    2017-04-01

    Due to changes of discharge regime downstream of a dam reservoir, an alluvial natural stretch of the Warta River changed to a macrophyte-dominated ecosystem. Large patches of submersed, aquatic macrophytes appeared in summer and their effect is analysed in this study. These patches contained enriched macroinvertebrate assemblages (epiphyton and benthos) and they were refuge for both zooplankton and young fishes released from the reservoir. Despite these altered conditions in this stretch, roach Rutilus rutilus, perch Perca fluviatilis and ruffe Gymnocephalus cernua dominated, as they did in the natural backwater. Fishes were sampled every 2 weeks from June to August, together with their food resources to assess the partitioning of the diet among small individuals of the three species in both stretches (the natural and affected ones). The aim of the analysis was to answer how animal food associated with water plants was partitioned between the species. In both stretches, G. cernua were primarily benthivorous, but epiphytic fauna, zooplankton and large-sized benthic chironomid larvae replaced lack of many large, benthic insects in the tailwater. Levins' food breath index decreased from 0·36 in the backwater to 0·29 in the tailwater. An opposite trend was observed for P. fluviatilis occurring among macrophytes. Perca fluviatilis were competitors of R. rutilus and took food not only in or on the river bed, but also in the water column. They ate zooplankton and epiphytic fauna and Levins' index increased from 0·32 to 0·44 in the tailwater. Rutilus rutilus fed on adult insects, algae and plant fragments in the natural stretch. In the tailwater, these food types were chiefly complemented by zooplankton. Despite this, the niche breadth of R. rutilus was similar at the two sites. Abundance of food associated with the macrophytes appeared to facilitate cohabitation in the abundant fish populations, but P. fluviatilis appeared to benefit the most in the altered river

  10. Determination of trace amounts of mercury(II) in water samples using a novel kinetic catalytic ligand substitution reaction of hexacyanoruthenate(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Radhey M.; Agarwal, Abhinav; Prasad, Surendra

    2009-11-01

    A simple, sensitive, selective and rapid kinetic catalytic method has been developed for the determination of Hg(II) ions at micro-level. This method is based on the catalytic effect of Hg(II) ion on the rate of substitution of cyanide in hexacyanoruthenate(II) with nitroso-R-salt (NRS) in aqueous medium and provides good accuracy and precision. The concentration of Hg(II) catalyst varied from 4.0 to 10.0 × 10 -6 M and the progress of reaction was followed spectrophotometrically at 525 nm ( λmax of purple-red complex [Ru(CN) 5NRS] 3-, ɛ = 3.1 × 10 3 M -1 s -1) under the optimized reaction conditions; 8.75 × 10 -5 M [Ru(CN) 64-], 3.50 × 10 -4 M [nitroso-R-salt], pH 7.00 ± 0.02, ionic strength, I = 0.1 M (KCl), temp 45.0 ± 0.1 °C. The linear calibration curves, i.e. calibration equations between the absorbance at fixed times ( t = 15, 20 and 25 min) versus concentration of Hg(II) ions were established under the optimized experimental conditions. The detection limit was found to be 1.0 × 10 -7 M of Hg(II). The effect of various foreign ions on the proposed method has also been studied and discussed. The method has been applied to the determination of mercury(II) in aqueous solutions.

  11. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  12. Iridium complexes containing mesoionic C donors: selective C(sp3)-H versus C(sp2)-H bond activation, reactivity towards acids and bases, and catalytic oxidation of silanes and water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronilho, Ana; Woods, James A; Mueller-Bunz, Helge; Bernhard, Stefan; Albrecht, Martin

    2014-11-24

    Metalation of a C2-methylated pyridylimidazolium salt with [IrCp*Cl2]2 affords either an ylidic complex, resulting from C(sp(3))-H bond activation of the C2-bound CH3 group if the metalation is performed in the presence of a base, such as AgO2 or Na2CO3, or a mesoionic complex via cyclometalation and thermally induced heterocyclic C(sp(2))-H bond activation, if the reaction is performed in the absence of a base. Similar cyclometalation and complex formation via C(sp(2))-H bond activation is observed when the heterocyclic ligand precursor consists of the analogous pyridyltriazolium salt, that is, when the metal bonding at the C2 position is blocked by a nitrogen rather than a methyl substituent. Despite the strongly mesoionic character of both the imidazolylidene and the triazolylidene, the former reacts rapidly with D(+) and undergoes isotope exchange at the heterocyclic C5 position, whereas the triazolylidene ligand is stable and only undergoes H/D exchange under basic conditions, where the imidazolylidene is essentially unreactive. The high stability of the Ir-C bond in aqueous solution over a broad pH range was exploited in catalytic water oxidation and silane oxidation. The catalytic hydrosilylation of ketones proceeds with turnover frequencies as high as 6,000 h(-1) with both the imidazolylidene and the triazolylidene system, whereas water oxidation is enhanced by the stronger donor properties of the imidazol-4-ylidene ligands and is more than three times faster than with the triazolylidene analogue. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    acetylchlorophosphonazo(CPApA) by hydrogen peroxide in 0.10 M phosphoric acid. A novel catalytic kinetic-spectrophotometric method is proposed for the determination of copper based on this principle. Copper(II) can be determined spectrophotometrically ...

  14. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on the property that in 0.12 M sulfuric acid medium titanium(IV) catalyzes the discoloring reaction of DBS-arsenazo oxidized by potassium bromate, a new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace titanium (IV) was developed. The linear range of the determination of titanium is

  15. Water-Driven Assembly of Laser Ablation-Induced Au Condensates as Mesomorphic Nano- and Micro-Tubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Shuei-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Reddish Au condensates, predominant atom clusters and minor amount of multiply twinned particles and fcc nanoparticles with internal compressive stress, were produced by pulsed laser ablation on gold target in de-ionized water under a very high power density. Such condensates were self-assembled as lamellae and then nano- to micro-diameter tubes with multiple walls when aged at room temperature in water for up to 40 days. The nano- and micro-tubes have a lamellar- and relaxed fcc-type wall, respectively, both following partial epitaxial relationship with the co-existing multiply twinned nanoparticles. The entangled tubes, being mesomorphic with a large extent of bifurcation, flexibility, opaqueness, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering, may have potential encapsulated and catalytic/label applications in biomedical systems.

  16. Co-adsorption and sequential adsorption of the co-existence four heavy metal ions and three fluoroquinolones on the functionalized ferromagnetic 3D NiFe2O4porous hollow microsphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueyan; Liu, Mingyang; Zhang, Lei

    2018-02-01

    Functionalized magnetic microsphere NiFe 2 O 4 (MS-NiFe 2 O 4 ) with a 3D hierarchical porous hollow structure was fabricated using urea as the modifier and soft templates by a simple one-pot solvothermal method. The constructed MS-NiFe 2 O 4 shows excellent dual functions which can not only undergo simultaneous rapid removal of the co-existence metal ions (Cu 2+ , Cd 2+ , Cr 3+ and Zn 2+ ions), but also availably adsorb fluoroquinolone (FQs) (ciprofloxacin (CIP), enrofloxacin (ENR) and norfloxacin (NOR)), and is easily recycled using an external magnetic field. The removal efficiency of eight targets could all reach up to 80% within 60min at pH 5. The independent adsorption of single contaminants, the competitive adsorption of multiple heavy metal ions/organic contaminants, the simultaneous and sequential adsorption of the co-existence of inorganic and organic contaminants onto MS-NiFe 2 O 4 were explored in detail. Competition adsorption occurred between the same type of contaminants. For different types of contaminants, four metal ions did not affect the adsorption of the other three FQs in the sequential and simultaneously adsorption system, and vice versa. The possible adsorption mechanism between targets and MS-NiFe 2 O 4 was revealed. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  18. Did Australopithecus and Homo co-exist

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, J.C.

    1984-01-01

    Uranium series isotope dating of the tufas at Taung/Buxton suggests a considerably younger age for the Taung child (Australopithecus africanus) than has hitherto been accepted. If this later date is confirmed, it will necessitate a re-think of the evolutionary tree of Man and his ancestors

  19. Nano sponge Mn₂O ₃ as a new adsorbent for the preconcentration of Pd(II) and Rh(III) ions in sea water, wastewater, rock, street sediment and catalytic converter samples prior to FAAS determinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Emre; Tokalıoğlu, Serife; Sahan, Halil; Patat, Saban

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a nano sponge Mn2O3 adsorbent was synthesized and was used for the first time. Various parameters affecting the recovery values of Pd(II) and Rh(III) were examined. The tolerance limits (≥ 90 %) for both Pd(II) and Rh(III) ions were found to be 75,000 mg L(-1) Na(I), 75,000 mg L(-1) K(I), 50,000 mg L(-1) Mg(II) and 50,000 mg L(-1) Ca(II). A 30s contact time was enough for both adsorption and elution. A preconcentration factor of 100 was obtained by using 100mg of the nano sponge Mn2O3. The reusability of the adsorbent was 120 times. Adsorption capacities for Pd(II) and Rh(III) were found to be 42 and 6.2 mg g(-1), respectively. The detection limits were 1.0 µg L(-1) for Pd(II) and 0.37 µg L(-1) for Rh(III) and the relative standard deviations (RSD, %) were found to be ≤ 2.5%. The method was validated by analyzing the standard reference material, SRM 2556 (Used Auto Catalyst Pellets) and spiked real samples. The optimized method was applied for the preconcentration of Pd(II) and Rh(III) ions in water (sea water and wastewater), rock, street sediment and catalytic converter samples. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Catalytic water oxidation by ruthenium(II) quaterpyridine (qpy) complexes: evidence for ruthenium(III) qpy-N,N'''-dioxide as the real catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yingying; Ng, Siu-Mui; Yiu, Shek-Man; Lam, William W Y; Wei, Xi-Guang; Lau, Kai-Chung; Lau, Tai-Chu

    2014-12-22

    Polypyridyl and related ligands have been widely used for the development of water oxidation catalysts. Supposedly these ligands are oxidation-resistant and can stabilize high-oxidation-state intermediates. In this work a series of ruthenium(II) complexes [Ru(qpy)(L)2 ](2+) (qpy=2,2':6',2'':6'',2'''-quaterpyridine; L=substituted pyridine) have been synthesized and found to catalyze Ce(IV) -driven water oxidation, with turnover numbers of up to 2100. However, these ruthenium complexes are found to function only as precatalysts; first, they have to be oxidized to the qpy-N,N'''-dioxide (ONNO) complexes [Ru(ONNO)(L)2 ](3+) which are the real catalysts for water oxidation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. The effect of Rhδ+ dopant in SrTiO3 on the active oxidation state of co-catalytic Pt nanoparticles in overall water splitting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoontjes, M.G.C.; Han, Kai; Han, K.; Huijben, Mark; van der Wiel, Wilfred Gerard; Mul, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We report on the oxidation state of Pt nanoparticles when deposited on SrTiO3 or Rh-doped SrTiO3 under realistic solar water-splitting conditions. The oxidation state was investigated using state-of-the-art analysis of the reaction in a continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR) connected to a micro

  2. Nuclear resonant scattering evidence of the phase co-existence during structural phase transformation in [Fe(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}](ClO{sub 4}){sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanko, Gy. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Research Group for Nuclear Techniques in Structural Chemistry, Hungarian Academy of Sciences at Eoetvoes L. University, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Bottyan, L. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Deak, L. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Fetzer, Cs. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Juhasz, G. [Department of Nuclear Chemistry, Eoetvoes L. University, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Leupold, O. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Molnar, B. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Rueter, H.D. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Szilagyi, E. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary); Nagy, D.L. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)]. E-mail: nagy@rmki.kfki.hu

    2005-09-29

    The phase transition associated with orbital-ground-state inversion of high-spin Fe{sup 2+} in [Fe(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}](ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} was studied with nuclear resonant forward scattering of synchrotron radiation (SR). The sudden change in the {sup 57}Fe{sup 2+} quadrupole interaction results in a change of the quantum-beat frequencies. Quantum-beat patterns taken at the phase transition of [Fe(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}](ClO{sub 4}){sub 2} are in accordance with mainly coherent rather than with incoherent sums of the scattering amplitudes of the high- and low-quadrupole-interaction phases, a fact supporting the real co-existence of the two phases.

  3. Catalytic reforming methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  4. Direct determination of tellurium and its redox speciation at the low nanogram level in natural waters by catalytic cathodic stripping voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biver, Marc; Quentel, François; Filella, Montserrat

    2015-11-01

    Tellurium is one of the elements recently identified as technologically critical and is becoming a new emergent contaminant. No reliable method exists for its determination in environmental samples such as natural waters. This gap is filled by the method described here; it allows the rapid detection of trace concentrations of Te(IV) and Te(VI) in surface waters by differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry. It is based on the proton reduction catalysed by the absorption of Te(IV) on the mercury electrode. Under our conditions (0.1 mol L(-1) HCl) a detection limit of about 5 ng L(-1) for a deposition time of 300 s is achieved. Organic matter does not represent a problem at low concentrations; higher concentrations are eliminated by adsorptive purification. Tellurium occurs primarily as Te(IV) and Te(VI) in natural waters. Thus, determining total Te requires the reduction of Te(VI) that it is not electroactive. A number of reduction procedures have been carefully evaluated and a method based on the addition of TiCl3 to the acidified samples has been proven to reduce Te(VI) at the trace level to Te(IV) reliably and quantitatively. Therefore, the procedure described allows the direct determination of total Te and its redox speciation. It is flexible, reliable and cost effective compared to any possible alternative method based on the common preconcentration-ICPMS approach. It is readily implementable as a routine method and can be deployed in the field with relative ease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhanced bromate formation during chlorination of bromide-containing waters in the presence of CuO: Catalytic disproportionation of hypobromous acid

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Chao

    2012-10-16

    Bromate (BrO3 -) in drinking water is traditionally seen as an ozonation byproduct from the oxidation of bromide (Br-), and its formation during chlorination is usually not significant. This study shows enhanced bromate formation during chlorination of bromide-containing waters in the presence of cupric oxide (CuO). CuO was effective to catalyze hypochlorous acid (HOCl) or hypobromous acid (HOBr) decay (e.g., at least 104 times enhancement for HOBr at pH 8.6 by 0.2 g L-1 CuO). Significant halate concentrations were formed from a CuO-catalyzed hypohalite disproportionation pathway. For example, the chlorate concentration was 2.7 ± 0.2 μM (225.5 ± 16.7 μg L-1) after 90 min for HOCl (Co = 37 μM, 2.6 mg L-1 Cl2) in the presence of 0.2 g L-1 CuO at pH 7.6, and the bromate concentration was 6.6 ± 0.5 μM (844.8 ± 64 μg L -1) after 180 min for HOBr (Co = 35 μM) in the presence of 0.2 g L-1 CuO at pH 8.6. The maximum halate formation was at pHs 7.6 and 8.6 for HOCl or HOBr, respectively, which are close to their corresponding pKa values. In a HOCl-Br--CuO system, BrO3 - formation increases with increasing CuO doses and initial HOCl and Br- concentrations. A molar conversion (Br - to BrO3 -) of up to (90 ± 1)% could be achieved in the HOCl-Br--CuO system because of recycling of Br - to HOBr by HOCl, whereas the maximum BrO3 - yield in HOBr-CuO is only 26%. Bromate formation is initiated by the formation of a complex between CuO and HOBr/OBr-, which then reacts with HOBr to generate bromite. Bromite is further oxidized to BrO3 - by a second CuO-catalyzed process. These novel findings may have implications for bromate formation during chlorination of bromide-containing drinking waters in copper pipes. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  6. Possible influence of the Kuramoto length in a photo-catalytic water splitting reaction revealed by Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations involving ionization in a weak electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yohichi; Seki, Kazuhiko

    2018-03-01

    We studied ion concentration profiles and the charge density gradient caused by electrode reactions in weak electrolytes by using the Poisson-Nernst-Planck equations without assuming charge neutrality. In weak electrolytes, only a small fraction of molecules is ionized in bulk. Ion concentration profiles depend on not only ion transport but also the ionization of molecules. We considered the ionization of molecules and ion association in weak electrolytes and obtained analytical expressions for ion densities, electrostatic potential profiles, and ion currents. We found the case that the total ion density gradient was given by the Kuramoto length which characterized the distance over which an ion diffuses before association. The charge density gradient is characterized by the Debye length for 1:1 weak electrolytes. We discuss the role of these length scales for efficient water splitting reactions using photo-electrocatalytic electrodes.

  7. Catalytic Antibodies: Concept and Promise

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 11. Catalytic Antibodies: Concept and Promise. Desirazu N Rao Bharath Wootla. General Article Volume 12 Issue ... Keywords. Catalytic antibodies; abzymes; hybridome technology; Diels– Alder reaction; Michaelis– Menten kinetics; Factor VIII.

  8. Catalytic interface erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, H.; Cohen, E.G.D.

    1995-01-01

    We study interface erosion processes: catalytic erosions. We present two cases. (1) The erosion of a completely occupied lattice by one single moving particle starting from somewhere inside the lattice, considering deterministic as well as probabilistic erosion rules. In the latter case, the eroded regions appear to have interfaces with continuously tunable fractal dimensions. (2) The kinetic roughening of an initially flat surface, where ballistic or diffusion-limited particles, which remain intact themselves, erode the surface coming from the outside, using the same erosion rules as in (1). Many features resembling realistic interfaces, for example, islands and inlets, are generated. The dependence of the surface width on the system size is due to both the erosion mechanism and the way particles move before reaching the surface

  9. Highly efficient catalytic systems based on Pd-coated microbeads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jin Hyun; Cho, Ahyoung; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Bumkyo; Kang, Dong Woo; Koo, Chong Min; Yu, Taekyung; Park, Bum Jun

    2018-01-01

    The efficiency of two prototype catalysis systems using palladium (Pd)-coated microparticles was investigated with regard to the recovery and recyclability of the catalytic particles. One such system was the interface-adsorption method, in which polymer particles coated with Pd nanoparticles strongly and irreversibly attach to the oil-water interface. Due to the irreversible adsorption of the catalytic particles to the interface, particle loss was completely prevented while mixing the aqueous solution and while collecting the products. The other system was based on the magnetic field-associated particle recovery method. The use of polymeric microparticles containing Pd nanoparticles and magnetite nanoparticles accelerated the sedimentation of the particles in the aqueous phase by applying a strong magnetic field, consequently suppressing drainage of the particles from the reactor along the product stream. Upon multiple runs of the catalytic reactions, it was found that conversion does not change significantly, demonstrating the excellent recyclability and performance efficiency in the catalytic processes.

  10. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  11. Catalytic production of biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theilgaard Madsen, A.

    2011-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the catalytic production of diesel from biomass, especially emphasising catalytic conversion of waste vegetable oils and fats. In chapter 1 an introduction to biofuels and a review on different catalytic methods for diesel production from biomass is given. Two of these methods have been used industrially for a number of years already, namely the transesterification (and esterification) of oils and fats with methanol to form fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), and the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of fats and oils to form straight-chain alkanes. Other possible routes to diesel include upgrading and deoxygenation of pyrolysis oils or aqueous sludge wastes, condensations and reductions of sugars in aqueous phase (aqueous-phase reforming, APR) for monofunctional hydrocarbons, and gasification of any type of biomass followed by Fischer-Tropsch-synthesis for alkane biofuels. These methods have not yet been industrialised, but may be more promising due to the larger abundance of their potential feedstocks, especially waste feedstocks. Chapter 2 deals with formation of FAME from waste fats and oils. A range of acidic catalysts were tested in a model fat mixture of methanol, lauric acid and trioctanoin. Sulphonic acid-functionalised ionic liquids showed extremely fast convertion of lauric acid to methyl laurate, and trioctanoate was converted to methyl octanoate within 24 h. A catalyst based on a sulphonated carbon-matrix made by pyrolysing (or carbonising) carbohydrates, so-called sulphonated pyrolysed sucrose (SPS), was optimised further. No systematic dependency on pyrolysis and sulphonation conditions could be obtained, however, with respect to esterification activity, but high activity was obtained in the model fat mixture. SPS impregnated on opel-cell Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and microporous SiO{sub 2} (ISPS) was much less active in the esterification than the original SPS powder due to low loading and thereby low number of strongly acidic sites on the

  12. Co-existence of COPD and bronchiectasis: a risk factor for a high ratio of main pulmonary artery to aorta diameter (PA:A) from computed tomography in COPD patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Shuang; Zheng, Chunyan; Ji, Xiuli; Wang, Wei; Xie, Mengshuang; Cui, Liwei; Xiao, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular disease, especially pulmonary hypertension, is an important complication of COPD. Bronchiectasis is considered not only a comorbidity of COPD, but also a risk factor for vascular diseases. The main pulmonary artery to aorta diameter ratio (PA:A ratio) has been found to be a reliable indicator of pulmonary vascular disease. It is hypothesized that the co-existence of COPD and bronchiectasis may be associated with relative pulmonary artery enlargement (PA:A ratio >1). This retrospective study enrolled COPD patients from 2012 through 2016. Demographic and clinical data were collected. Bhalla score was used to determine the severity of bronchiectasis. Patient characteristics were analyzed in two ways: the high (PA:A >1) and low (PA:A ≤1) ratio groups; and COPD with and without bronchiectasis groups. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess risk factors for high PA:A ratios. In this study, 480 COPD patients were included, of whom 168 had radiographic bronchiectasis. Patients with pulmonary artery enlargement presented with poorer nutrition (albumin, 35.6±5.1 vs 38.3±4.9, P PA:A ratios ( P PA:A ratio was significantly closely correlated with a higher Bhalla score (r=0.412, P PA:A ratios in COPD patients (OR =3.707; 95% CI =1.888-7.278; P <0.001). Bronchiectasis in COPD has been demonstrated to be independently associated with relative pulmonary artery enlargement.

  13. Advances in gas flow metering - end of the history, peaceful co-existence or a new beginning; Les avancees dans le mesurage des debits de gaz - fin de l'histoire, coexistence pacifique ou nouveau commencement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Studzinski, W. [NOVA Research and Technology Centre, Calgary (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    Gas flow metering plays an important role in the technical and fiscal operations of pipeline systems. Over the last hundred years, the industry has gone through several technical revolutions. The recent two decades were characterized by the introduction of flow computers in the 80's and acceptance of ultrasonic meters in the 90's. These changes, associated with measurement technology, have had a profound impact on pipeline operation, deregulation of the gas industry and gas trading. Significant advances were made, however, it is certainly not the end for progress in gas flow metering. The future development of optoelectronic and mass flow meters combined with advances in telemetry and tele-calibration may significantly reduce capital and maintenance costs. Classical flow meters will be upgraded to a new level of performance and will co-exist with the newest technologies. The uncertainty of flow measurement will be improved, mainly in terms of stability over longer periods of time. Old and new meters will be able to perform in environments other than dry natural gas. Processing of flow measurement data will evolve with the progress in flow computers and smart transmitters. The advances in gas flow metering will be driven by life cycle cost reduction as well as new business and service requirements. (author)

  14. Microstructural and compositional change of NaOH-activated high calcium fly ash by incorporating Na-aluminate and co-existence of geopolymeric gel and C–S–H(I)

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Jae Eun

    2012-05-01

    This study explores the reaction products of alkali-activated Class C fly ash-based aluminosilicate samples by means of high-resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction (HSXRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and compressive strength tests to investigate how the readily available aluminum affects the reaction. Class C fly ash-based aluminosilicate raw materials were prepared by incorporating Na-aluminate into the original fly ashes, then alkali-activated by 10 M NaOH solution. Incorporating Na-aluminate reduced the compressive strength of samples, with the reduction magnitude relatively constant regardless of length of curing period. The HSXRD provides evidence of the co-existence of C-S-H with geopolymeric gels and strongly suggests that the C-S-H formed in the current system is C-S-H(I). The back-scattered electron images suggest that the C-S-H(I) phase exists as small grains in a finely intermixed form with geopolymeric gels. Despite providing extra source of aluminum, adding Na-aluminate to the mixes did not decrease the Si/Al ratio of the geopolymeric gel. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Catalytic pyrolysis of olive mill wastewater sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellaoui, Hamza

    From 2008 to 2013, an average of 2,821.4 kilotons/year of olive oil were produced around the world. The waste product of the olive mill industry consists of solid residue (pomace) and wastewater (OMW). Annually, around 30 million m3 of OMW are produced in the Mediterranean area, 700,000 m3 year?1 in Tunisia alone. OMW is an aqueous effluent characterized by an offensive smell and high organic matter content, including high molecular weight phenolic compounds and long-chain fatty acids. These compounds are highly toxic to micro-organisms and plants, which makes the OMW a serious threat to the environment if not managed properly. The OMW is disposed of in open air evaporation ponds. After evaporation of most of the water, OMWS is left in the bottom of the ponds. In this thesis, the effort has been made to evaluate the catalytic pyrolysis process as a technology to valorize the OMWS. The first section of this research showed that 41.12 wt. % of the OMWS is mostly lipids, which are a good source of energy. The second section proved that catalytic pyrolysis of the OMWS over red mud and HZSM-5 can produce green diesel, and 450 °C is the optimal reaction temperature to maximize the organic yields. The last section revealed that the HSF was behind the good fuel-like properties of the OMWS catalytic oils, whereas the SR hindered the bio-oil yields and quality.

  16. Electrochemical catalytic treatment of phenol wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Hongzhu; Zhang Xinhai; Ma Qingliang; Wang Bo

    2009-01-01

    The slurry bed catalytic treatment of contaminated water appears to be a promising alternative for the oxidation of aqueous organic pollutants. In this paper, the electrochemical oxidation of phenol in synthetic wastewater catalyzed by ferric sulfate and potassium permanganate adsorbed onto active bentonite in slurry bed electrolytic reactor with graphite electrode has been investigated. In order to determine the optimum operating condition, the orthogonal experiments were devised and the results revealed that the system of ferric sulfate, potassium permanganate and active bentonite showed a high catalytic efficiency on the process of electrochemical oxidation phenol in initial pH 5. When the initial concentration of phenol was 0.52 g/L (the initial COD 1214 mg/L), up to 99% chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was obtained in 40 min. According to the experimental results, a possible mechanism of catalytic degradation of phenol was proposed. Environmental estimation was also done and the results showed that the treated wastewater have little impact on plant growth and could totally be applied to irrigation.

  17. Catalytic cracking with deasphalted oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaton, W.I.; Taylor, J.L.; Peck, L.B.; Mosby, J.F.

    1990-07-10

    This patent describes a catalytic cracking process. It comprises: hydrotreating resid; thereafter deasphalting the hydrotreated resid to produce substantially deasphalted oil; catalytically cracking the hydrotreated oil in a catalytic cracking unit in the presence of a cracking catalyst to produce upgraded oil leaving coked catalyst; and regenerating the coked catalyst in the presence of a combustion-supporting gas comprising excess molecular oxygen in an amount greater than the stoichiometric amount required for substantially completely combusting the coke on the catalyst to carbon dioxide.

  18. Catalytic Membrane Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, T.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Gardner, T.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Sault, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    The proposed "catalytic membrane sensor" (CMS) was developed to generate a device which would selectively identify a specific reagent in a complex mixture of gases. This was to be accomplished by modifying an existing Hz sensor with a series of thin films. Through selectively sieving the desired component from a complex mixture and identifying it by decomposing it into Hz (and other by-products), a Hz sensor could then be used to detect the presence of the select component. The proposed "sandwich-type" modifications involved the deposition of a catalyst layered between two size selective sol-gel layers on a Pd/Ni resistive Hz sensor. The role of the catalyst was to convert organic materials to Hz and organic by-products. The role of the membraneo was to impart both chemical specificity by molecukir sieving of the analyte and converted product streams, as well as controlling access to the underlying Pd/Ni sensor. Ultimately, an array of these CMS elements encompassing different catalysts and membranes were to be developed which would enable improved selectivity and specificity from a compiex mixture of organic gases via pattern recognition methodologies. We have successfully generated a CMS device by a series of spin-coat deposited methods; however, it was determined that the high temperature required to activate the catalyst, destroys the sensor.

  19. Catalytic cracking of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.; Nowak, S.; Naegler, T.; Zimmermann, J. [Hochschule Merseburg (Germany); Welscher, J.; Schwieger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany); Hahn, T. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    A most important factor for the chemical industry is the availability of cheap raw materials. As the oil price of crude oil is rising alternative feedstocks like coal are coming into focus. This work, the catalytic cracking of lignite is part of the alliance ibi (innovative Braunkohlenintegration) to use lignite as a raw material to produce chemicals. With this new one step process without an input of external hydrogen, mostly propylene, butenes and aromatics and char are formed. The product yield depends on manifold process parameters. The use of acid catalysts (zeolites like MFI) shows the highest amount of the desired products. Hydrogen rich lignites with a molar H/C ratio of > 1 are to be favoured. Due to primary cracking and secondary reactions the ratio between catalyst and lignite, temperature and residence time are the most important parameter to control the product distribution. Experiments at 500 C in a discontinuous rotary kiln reactor show yields up to 32 wt-% of hydrocarbons per lignite (maf - moisture and ash free) and 43 wt-% char, which can be gasified. Particularly, the yields of propylene and butenes as main products can be enhanced four times to about 8 wt-% by the use of catalysts while the tar yield decreases. In order to develop this innovative process catalyst systems fixed on beads were developed for an easy separation and regeneration of the used catalyst from the formed char. (orig.)

  20. Catalytic pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Sa, Jacinto

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reports on the latest developments of biomass catalytic pyrolysis for the production of fuels. The primary focus is on the role of catalysts in the process, namely, their influence in the liquefaction of lignocellulosic biomass.

  1. Catalytic activities of zeolite compounds for decomposing aqueous ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuda, Ai; Kitayama, Mikito; Ohta, Yoshio

    2013-12-01

    The advanced oxidation process (AOP), chemical oxidation using aqueous ozone in the presence of appropriate catalysts to generate highly reactive oxygen species, offers an attractive option for removing poorly biodegradable pollutants. Using the commercial zeolite powders with various Si/Al ratios and crystal structures, their catalytic activities for decomposing aqueous ozone were evaluated by continuously flowing ozone to water containing the zeolite powders. The hydrophilic zeolites (low Si/Al ratio) with alkali cations in the crystal structures were found to possess high catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. The hydrophobic zeolite compounds (high Si/Al ratio) were found to absorb ozone very well, but to have no catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. Their catalytic activities were also evaluated by using the fixed bed column method. When alkali cations were removed by acid rinsing or substituted by alkali-earth cations, the catalytic activities was significantly deteriorated. These results suggest that the metal cations on the crystal surface of the hydrophilic zeolite would play a key role for catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. Copyright © 2013 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Perovskite-type catalytic materials for environmental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labhasetwar, Nitin; Saravanan, Govindachetty; Kumar Megarajan, Suresh; Manwar, Nilesh; Khobragade, Rohini; Doggali, Pradeep; Grasset, Fabien

    2015-06-01

    Perovskites are mixed-metal oxides that are attracting much scientific and application interest owing to their low price, adaptability, and thermal stability, which often depend on bulk and surface characteristics. These materials have been extensively explored for their catalytic, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties. They are promising candidates for the photocatalytic splitting of water and have also been extensively studied for environmental catalysis applications. Oxygen and cation non-stoichiometry can be tailored in a large number of perovskite compositions to achieve the desired catalytic activity, including multifunctional catalytic properties. Despite the extensive uses, the commercial success for this class of perovskite-based catalytic materials has not been achieved for vehicle exhaust emission control or for many other environmental applications. With recent advances in synthesis techniques, including the preparation of supported perovskites, and increasing understanding of promoted substitute perovskite-type materials, there is a growing interest in applied studies of perovskite-type catalytic materials. We have studied a number of perovskites based on Co, Mn, Ru, and Fe and their substituted compositions for their catalytic activity in terms of diesel soot oxidation, three-way catalysis, N 2 O decomposition, low-temperature CO oxidation, oxidation of volatile organic compounds, etc. The enhanced catalytic activity of these materials is attributed mainly to their altered redox properties, the promotional effect of co-ions, and the increased exposure of catalytically active transition metals in certain preparations. The recent lowering of sulfur content in fuel and concerns over the cost and availability of precious metals are responsible for renewed interest in perovskite-type catalysts for environmental applications.

  3. Detection of protozoans Babesia microti and [i]Toxoplasma gondii[/i] and their co-existence in ticks (Acari: Ixodida collected in Tarnogórski district (Upper Silesia, Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Asman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available [b]Introduction[/b]. Ticks (Acari: Ixodida are vectors of many pathogens i. a: [i]Babesia microti [/i][Bm] and [i]Toxoplasma gondii[/i] [Tg]. In Poland, Ixodes ricinus [Ir] is the main vector of both pathogens. This tick species and pathogens transmitted by them are a significant threat to human and animal health. objectives of the study. Detection of the protozoans Bm and Tg in ticks collected in the Tarnogórski district area. [b]Material and methods[/b]. The ticks were collected from vegetation and pets in the spring period of their activity on the territory of the Tarnogórski district. The parasites were preserved in 70% ethanol. DNA was isolated by ammonia method. Bm was detected by nested-PCR using specific primers for the 18S rRNA sequence. To detect the Tg a commercial kit was used. The PCR products were separated on 2% ethidium bromide stained agarose gels and visualised under UV light. [b]Results[/b]. It was showed that all collected ticks belonged to the species Ir. Bm was detected in 50.87% and Tg in 64.91% of all examined ticks. Co-existence of these both protozoans in 36.84% of total examined ticks was noted. [b]Conclusions[/b]. The study showed a high risk of exposure to Bm and Tg in the studied area. Ticks Ir play an important role in the transmission of Bm in this region. Demonstrating a high percentage of ticks collected from animals infected with Tg may indicate their important role in the transmission of this pathogen, but it requires a further studies.

  4. Preparation of Mg-doped Ce-Zr Solid Catalysts and Their Catalytic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NICO

    Knoevenagel condensation using aromatic aldehydes and 2,4-thiazolidinedione in ethanol:water medium. The best catalytic activity was ... Addition of MgO to the Ce-Zr mixed metal oxides affected both particle size and catalytic activity. KEYWORDS ... piperidine in EtOH,9 NaOAc in DMF-AcOH10, ethylene- diammonium ...

  5. The tritium labeling of Butibufen by heterogeneous catalytic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamaria, J.; Rebollo, D.

    1986-01-01

    The labeling of a new non-steroidal antiinflammatory agent, Butibufen (2-(4-isobutylphenyl) butyric acid) was studied. The method used was heterogeneous catalytic exchange between Butibufen and tritiated water, obtained in situ. Purification was accomplished through thin layer chromatography. Concentration, purity and specific activity of the labeled drug were determined by ultraviolet and liquid scintillation techniques. (Author) 7 refs

  6. Catalytic Synthesis of Ethyl Ester From Some Common Oils ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Catalytic conversion of ethanol to fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEE) was carried out by homogeneous and heterogeneous transesterification of melon seed, shea butter and neem seed oils using NaOH, KOH and 5wt%CaO/Al2O3 catalyst systems respectively. Oil content of the seeds from n-hexane or hot water extract ranged ...

  7. Co-existence of Rhizobia and Diverse Non-rhizobial Bacteria in the Rhizosphere and Nodules of Dalbergia odorifera Seedlings Inoculated with Bradyrhizobium elkanii, Rhizobium multihospitium–Like and Burkholderia pyrrocinia–Like Strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junkun Lu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Rhizobia induce root nodules and fix atmospheric N2 for most legume species in exchange for carbon. However, the diverse endophytic non-rhizobial bacteria in legume nodules that co-exist with rhizobia are often ignored because they are difficult to cultivate using routine cultivation approaches. To enhance our understanding of the incidence and diversity of legume–bacteria associations, a high-throughput sequencing analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes was used to examine the bacterial community in the rhizospheres and root nodules of Dalbergia odorifera seedlings that were uninoculated or inoculated with Bradyrhizobium elkanii H255, Rhizobium multihospitium–like HT221, or Burkholderia pyrrocinia–like H022238, in two growth media (nitrogen [N]-supplied soil or N-omitted potting mix. Seedlings inoculated with Bradyrhizobium had significantly more nodules than seedlings in the other inoculation conditions, regardless of growth media. Using the 15N natural abundance method, it was shown that the inoculated plants had significantly higher N2 fixation efficiency (48–57% and specific nodule activity [269–313 μg N mg−1 of dry weight (dwt nodule] compared to the uninoculated plants (203 μg N mg−1 dwt nodule. The 16S rRNA gene analysis showed that there was generally a higher bacterial diversity in the rhizosphere than in the nodules in the corresponding condition. Both rhizobial inoculation and media status significantly altered the bacterial communities in the rhizospheres and nodules (P < 0.05, with the exception of the inoculated soil rhizospheres. Regarding non-rhizobial bacteria, three genera, i.e., Lactococcus, Bacillus, and Pseudomonas, were consistently enriched in the rhizosphere and Bradyrhizobium, Chloroplast norank (which belongs to Cyanobacteria, and Lactococcus were commonly found in the nodules. In contrast, common rhizobial genera (including Rhizobium, Mesorhizobium, and Burkholderia were only present in the nodules at low

  8. Catalytic bioreactors and methods of using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, Robert Mark; Liu, Yangmu Chloe

    2017-07-25

    Various embodiments provide a bioreactor for producing a bioproduct comprising one or more catalytically active zones located in a housing and adapted to keep two incompatible gaseous reactants separated when in a gas phase, wherein each of the one or more catalytically active zones may comprise a catalytic component retainer and a catalytic component retained within and/or thereon. Each of the catalytically active zones may additionally or alternatively comprise a liquid medium located on either side of the catalytic component retainer. Catalytic component may include a microbial cell culture located within and/or on the catalytic component retainer, a suspended catalytic component suspended in the liquid medium, or a combination thereof. Methods of using various embodiments of the bioreactor to produce a bioproduct, such as isobutanol, are also provided.

  9. High temperature solid lubrication by catalytically generated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, James L.; Bunting, Bruce G.

    1988-01-01

    The wear process in bearings generates a clean active surface. Carbon is known to form readily on catalytic surfaces through the reduction of carbon oxides or hydrocarbon. Carbon, through the adsorption of hydrocarbons, water vapor, or oxygen, becomes an effective lubricant. If these three phenomena can be made to work together, a new concept of high temperature lubrication would be available. This paper presents laboratory investigations towards the development of this concept. Carbon has been successfully produced through catalytic reduction of ethylene on a variety of metallic and ceramic surfaces containing nickel. This carbon has been shown to reduce friction at a sliding interface at elevated temperatures.

  10. Low and medium heating value coal gas catalytic combustor characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, J. A.

    1982-01-01

    Catalytic combustion with both low and medium heating value coal gases obtained from an operating gasifier was demonstrated. A practical operating range for efficient operation was determined, and also to identify potential problem areas were identified for consideration during stationary gas turbine engine design. The test rig consists of fuel injectors, a fuel-air premixing section, a catalytic reactor with thermocouple instrumentation and a single point, water cooled sample probe. The test rig included inlet and outlet transition pieces and was designed for installation into an existing test loop.

  11. Hydrophilic Pt nanoflowers: synthesis, crystallographic analysis and catalytic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourdikoudis, Stefanos; Altantzis, Thomas; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Bals, Sara; Pastoriza-Santos, Isabel; Pérez-Juste, Jorge

    2016-05-21

    Water-soluble Pt nanoflowers (NFs) were prepared by diethylene glycol-mediated reduction of Pt acetylacetonate (Pt(acac) 2 ) in the presence of polyethylenimine. Advanced electron microscopy analysis showed that the NFs consist of multiple branches with a truncated cubic morphology and different crystallographic orientations. We demonstrate that the nature of the solvent strongly influences the resulting morphology. The catalytic performance of the Pt NFs in 4-nitrophenol reduction was found to be superior to that of other nanoparticle-based catalysts. Additionally, the Pt NFs display good catalytic reusability with no loss of activity after five consecutive cycles.

  12. Catalytic Decoupling of Quantum Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majenz, Christian; Berta, Mario; Dupuis, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    The decoupling technique is a fundamental tool in quantum information theory with applications ranging from quantum thermodynamics to quantum many body physics to the study of black hole radiation. In this work we introduce the notion of catalytic decoupling, that is, decoupling in the presence...... of an uncorrelated ancilla system. This removes a restriction on the standard notion of decoupling, which becomes important for structureless resources, and yields a tight characterization in terms of the max-mutual information. Catalytic decoupling naturally unifies various tasks like the erasure of correlations...

  13. Catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Clausen, Bjerne

    2007-01-01

    Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change with par......Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change...

  14. Catalytically and noncatalytically treated automobile exhaust: biological effects in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, G.P. (Univ. of Cincinnati); Lewkowski, J.P.; Hastings, L.; Malanchuk, M.

    1977-12-01

    Chronic exposure to catalytically treated or noncatalytically treated automobile exhaust significantly depressed the spontaneous locomotor activity (SLA) of rats. Exposure to H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ alone or CO at comparable levels did not alter the SLA. Exposure to noncatalytically treated exhaust resulted in significant reductions in growth rate and food and water intake. However, these effects were not evident in the exposure to catalytically treated exhaust or in the control H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and CO exposures. Blood acid-base analyses indicated that exposure to either catalytically treated exhaust or H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ elicits a metabolic alkalosis, while exposure to CO alone results in a metabolic acidosis. All acid-base parameters were within the normal range several weeks after the termination of exposure.

  15. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so recent) developments in engineering reactors for catalytic reactions is discussed. Some examples where performance enhancement was realized by catalyst design, appropriate choice of reactor, better injection and dispersion strategies ...

  16. Catalytic properties of niobium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, K.; Iizuka, T.

    1983-04-01

    The catalytic activity and selectivity of niobium compounds including oxides, salts, organometallic compounds and others are outlined. The application of these compounds as catalysts to diversified reactions is reported. The nature and action of niobium catalysts are characteristic and sometimes anomalous, suggesting the necessity of basic research and the potential use as catalysts for important processes in the chemical industry. (Author) [pt

  17. Catalytic carboxyester hydrolysis by diaminodiphenols

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Two diaminodiphenols, 1 and 2, have been examined as catalysts for the hydrolysis of 4- nitrophenyl acetate (NA) and 4-nitrophenylphosphate (NP) in aqueous-acetonitrile (25% acetonitrile v/v) media at 35ºC, I = 1·0 mol dm–3. The compound 1 enhances the hydrolysis rate of NA more than 105 times. Its catalytic efficiency ...

  18. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    on selectivity can make substantial impact on process viability and economics. Extensive studies have been conducted to establish sound basis for design and engineering of reactors for practising such catalytic reactions and for realizing improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so ...

  19. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Nutrition Nutrition basics Water Water Did you know that water makes up more ... to drink more water Other drinks How much water do you need? top Water is very important, ...

  20. Co-existence of COPD and bronchiectasis: a risk factor for a high ratio of main pulmonary artery to aorta diameter (PA:A from computed tomography in COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dou S

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Shuang Dou,1 Chunyan Zheng,1 Xiuli Ji,2 Wei Wang,1 Mengshuang Xie,1 Liwei Cui,1 Wei Xiao1 1Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Qilu Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Pulmonary Disease, Jinan Traditional Chinese Medicine Hospital, Jinan, People’s Republic of China Background: Pulmonary vascular disease, especially pulmonary hypertension, is an important complication of COPD. Bronchiectasis is considered not only a comorbidity of COPD, but also a risk factor for vascular diseases. The main pulmonary artery to aorta diameter ratio (PA:A ratio has been found to be a reliable indicator of pulmonary vascular disease. It is hypothesized that the co-existence of COPD and bronchiectasis may be associated with relative pulmonary artery enlargement (PA:A ratio >1.Methods: This retrospective study enrolled COPD patients from 2012 through 2016. Demographic and clinical data were collected. Bhalla score was used to determine the severity of bronchiectasis. Patient characteristics were analyzed in two ways: the high (PA:A >1 and low (PA:A ≤1 ratio groups; and COPD with and without bronchiectasis groups. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess risk factors for high PA:A ratios.Results: In this study, 480 COPD patients were included, of whom 168 had radiographic bronchiectasis. Patients with pulmonary artery enlargement presented with poorer nutrition (albumin, 35.6±5.1 vs 38.3±4.9, P<0.001, lower oxygen partial pressure (74.4±34.5 vs 81.3±25.4, P<0.001, more severe airflow obstruction (FEV1.0, 0.9±0.5 vs 1.1±0.6, P=0.004, and a higher frequency of bronchiectasis (60% vs 28.8%, P<0.001 than patients in the low ratio group. Patients with both COPD and bronchiectasis had higher levels of systemic inflammation (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, P<0.001 and fibrinogen, P=0.006 and PA:A ratios (P<0.001. A higher PA:A ratio was significantly closely correlated with a higher Bhalla score (r=0.412, P<0

  1. Study of catalytic phenomena in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dran, J.C.

    1965-01-01

    Two phenomena have been studied: the action of γ rays from radio-cobalt on the adsorption and catalytic properties of ZnO and NiO in. relationship with the heterogeneous oxidation of CO, and the homogeneous catalysis by OsO 4 of the oxidation of various aqueous phase solutes by the same radiation. The prior irradiation of ZnO and of NiO does not modify their catalytic activity but generally increases the adsorption energy of -the gases CO and O 2 . The influence of the radiations appears to be connected with the presence of traces of water on ZnO and of an excess of oxygen on NiO. Osmium tetroxide which is not degraded by irradiation in acid solution, accelerates the radiolytic oxidation of certain compounds (Te IV , Pt 11 , As 111 ) in the presence of oxygen, as a result of its sensitizing effect on the oxidation by H 2 O 2 . In the case of phosphites on the other hand, OsO 4 has a protecting action under certain conditions of acidity and may suppress entirely the chain reaction which characterizes the oxidation of this solute byγ rays. A general mechanism is proposed for these phenomena. The rate constant for the OsO 4 + HO 2 reaction is calculated to be 5.7 x 10 5 l.mol -1 . sec -1 . (author) [fr

  2. Inorganic membranes and catalytic reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Rangel, Maria do Carmo

    1997-01-01

    Membrane reactors are reviewed with emphasis in their applications in catalysis field. The basic principles of these systems are presented as well as a historical development. The several kinds of catalytic membranes and their preparations are discussed including the problems, needs and challenges to be solved in order to use these reactors in commercial processes. Some applications of inorganic membrane reactors are also shown. It was concluded that these systems have a great potential for i...

  3. Catalytic combustion in gas stoves - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjelm, Anna-Karin [CATATOR AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2003-06-01

    . To overcome the latter, improved aeration of the system is needed, e.g. modification of nozzle-size and/or flame port plate. The effects of installing a retro-fit catalytic design onto the burner in the gas oven were also examined. Similar to the burners of the cooking plates, the emitted NO{sub x} was greatly reduced, i.e. up to 90 %. Other on-going projects using similar catalyst concepts as in this study have shown that the life-time of the catalyst, i.e. the mechanical stability and the catalytic activity, is extremely good (> 1000 h). To examine if this durability of the catalyst is limited in this specific application by deactivation caused by possible food spillage, a number of commonly used food ingredients were painted onto the catalysts and the activity of the catalyst prior to and after the 'deactivation' was investigated. The results show that no ingredients of organic type (fat, milk, egg, sugar) have any significant impact on the catalytic activity. Salt however was seen to block active reaction sites of the catalyst, but the tests showed that the catalyst could in this case be easily re-activated by simply washing it in water. The design modifications are very modest and the amount of catalyst is small, costing about 6-10 SEK (0.80-1.2 USD) per cooking plate.

  4. Catalytic skeletal isomerization of linear butenes to isobutene

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Butler, AC

    1993-12-31

    Full Text Available with a solution of hydrofluoric acid. The solid was then dried at 100?C followed by calcination at 530 ?C. The olefin feed used was a C4 cut whose composition is listed in Table 3. The catalytic reactions were... the catalyst is replenished by adding HF (or CF4) to the fresh water stream. Regeneration of the catalyst by calcination at the reaction temperature was shown to be possible, provided that the fluorine is replenished, either...

  5. The tritium labelling of ibuprofen by heterogeneous catalytic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santamaria, J.; Rebollo, D.V.; Rivera, P.; Estaban, M.

    1986-01-01

    The tritium labelling of 2-(4-isobutylphenyl) propionic acid (ibuprofen) was performed. The method employed was heterogeneous catalytic exchange between ibuprofen and tritiated water. Prior to labelling, thermic stability of ibuprofen was studied. Purification was accomplished through thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Concentration, purity and specific activity of the labelled compound were determined by ultraviolet, HPLC and liquid scintillation techniques. (author)

  6. Automatic prediction of catalytic residues by modeling residue structural neighborhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passerini Andrea

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prediction of catalytic residues is a major step in characterizing the function of enzymes. In its simpler formulation, the problem can be cast into a binary classification task at the residue level, by predicting whether the residue is directly involved in the catalytic process. The task is quite hard also when structural information is available, due to the rather wide range of roles a functional residue can play and to the large imbalance between the number of catalytic and non-catalytic residues. Results We developed an effective representation of structural information by modeling spherical regions around candidate residues, and extracting statistics on the properties of their content such as physico-chemical properties, atomic density, flexibility, presence of water molecules. We trained an SVM classifier combining our features with sequence-based information and previously developed 3D features, and compared its performance with the most recent state-of-the-art approaches on different benchmark datasets. We further analyzed the discriminant power of the information provided by the presence of heterogens in the residue neighborhood. Conclusions Our structure-based method achieves consistent improvements on all tested datasets over both sequence-based and structure-based state-of-the-art approaches. Structural neighborhood information is shown to be responsible for such results, and predicting the presence of nearby heterogens seems to be a promising direction for further improvements.

  7. Catalytic Activity Control via Crossover between Two Different Microstructures

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Yuheng

    2017-09-08

    Metal nanocatalysts hold great promise for a wide range of heterogeneous catalytic reactions, while the optimization strategy of catalytic activity is largely restricted by particle size or shape control. Here, we demonstrate that a reversible microstructural control through the crossover between multiply-twinned nanoparticle (MTP) and single crystal (SC) can be readily achieved by solvent post-treatment on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). Polar solvents (e.g. water, methanol) direct the transformation from MTP to SC accompanied by the disappearance of twinning and stacking faults. A reverse transformation from SC to MTP is achieved in non-polar solvent (e.g. toluene) mixed with thiol ligands. The transformation between two different microstructures is directly observed by in-situ TEM and leads to a drastic modulation of catalytic activity towards the gas-phase selective oxidation of alcohols. There is a quasi-linear relationship between TOFs and MTP concentrations. Based on the combined experimental and theoretical investigations of alcohol chemisorption on these nanocatalysts, we propose that the exposure of {211}-like microfacets associated with twin boundaries and stack faults accounts for the strong chemisorption of alcohol molecules on MTP AuNPs and thus the exceptionally high catalytic activity.

  8. Performance of a Novel Hydrophobic Mesoporous Material for High Temperature Catalytic Oxidation of Naphthalene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guotao Zhao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A high surface area, hydrophobic mesoporous material, MFS, has been successfully synthesized by a hydrothermal synthesis method using a perfluorinated surfactant, SURFLON S-386, as the single template. N2 adsorption and TEM were employed to characterize the pore structure and morphology of MFS. Static water adsorption test indicates that the hydrophobicity of MFS is significantly higher than that of MCM-41. XPS and Py-GC/MS analysis confirmed the existence of perfluoroalkyl groups in MFS which led to its high hydrophobicity. MFS was used as a support for CuO in experiments of catalytic combustion of naphthalene, where it showed a significant advantage over MCM-41 and ZSM-5. SEM was helpful in understanding why CuO-MFS performed so well in the catalytic combustion of naphthalene. Experimental results indicated that MFS was a suitable support for catalytic combustion of large molecular organic compounds, especially for some high temperature catalytic reactions when water vapor was present.

  9. Low co-existence rates of Lactobacillus spp. and Helicobacter pylori detected in gastric biopsies from patients with gastrointestinal symptoms Bajas tasas de coexistencia de Lactobacillus spp. y Helicobacter pylorien biopsias gástricas de pacientes con síntomas gastrointestinales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apolinaria García

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: bacterial diversity of the stomach includes various species. Among them, Helicobacter pylori, a microorganism which has been associated to gastric diseases, is frequently isolated in this habitat. In addition, Lactobacillus spp., a genus including probiotic strains, has also been documented in this habitat. The co-existence of these two species in the stomach of symptomatic patient needs to be elucidated. Aims: our goal was to establish if Lactobacillus spp. and H. pylori co-exist in the stomach mucosa of symptomatic patients. Methods: gastric biopsies (antrum and/or the body from 427 Chilean patients with gastrointestinal discomfort were analyzed. The H. pylori infection and/or Lactobacillus spp. colonization status was determined for each patient by standard culture techniques, and statistical correlations between the presence of those species and the age, gender, or the severity of the gastric disease were also established. Results: only 6.1% of the samples presented co-existence of Lactobacillus spp. and H. pylori. This former species was isolated in 42.6% of the patients as unique species, while Lactobacillus spp. was isolated as single species in 19.4% of the individuals. Chronic non-atrophic gastritis was prevalent in Lactobacillus spp. non colonized individuals, while chronic non-atrophic and chronic atrophic gastritis diagnosis was similar in Lactobacillus spp. harbouring individuals (p < 0.001. The presence of Lactobacillus spp. significantly increased with age (p = 0.005, independently of gender. Conclusion: the negative Pearson correlation between Lactobacillus spp. and H. pylori(r = -0.112, p = 0.020 indicates that the co-existence of both species is low in human gastric mucosa of symptomatic patients.

  10. Plasma catalytic process for CO2 methanation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nizio, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    The limited resources of oil and natural gas, together with an increasing energy demand, forces us to seek more and more efficient and cleaner energy production alternatives. Hydrogen has been recently considered as a promising energy carrier. However, there are several inherent problems to the utilization of H 2 , from its transportation to its distribution. Transformation of the H 2 molecule by fixing into a carbon-containing compound, i.e. CH 4 , will offer the possibility of using the conventional transportation network. Indeed, the Sabatier reaction, which is highly exothermic, involves the reaction of carbon dioxide and hydrogen gas in order to produce methane and water. This process, called methanation, represents a feasible approach contributing to the reduction of the CO 2 emissions in our atmosphere, through a closed carbon cycle involving the valorization of CO 2 , i.e. from capture. However, below a temperature of 250 C, the conversion becomes practically close to 0 %, whereas at higher temperatures, i.e., (≥300 C), the co-existence of secondary reactions favours the formation of CO and H 2 . This is the reason why new catalysts and process conditions are continuously being investigated in order to maximize the methane selectivity at low reaction temperatures at atmospheric pressure. Therefore, by using catalysts combined to Dielectric Barrier Discharge plasmas (DBD), the activation of the methanation reaction can be enhanced and overcome the drawbacks of existing conventional processes. Several Ni-containing catalysts were prepared using various ceria-zirconia oxides as supports, with different Ce/Zr ratios. The results obtained in the adiabatic conditions at low temperatures (ranging between 100-150 C), in the presence of catalysts activated by plasma, are promising. Indeed, the conversion of CO 2 to CH 4 is about 85 % with a selectivity close to 100 %. The same conversion in the absence of the plasma activation of the catalyst is observed at 350 C

  11. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen, is divided into two tasks. Task 1 centers on the activation of dihydrogen by molecular basic reagents such as hydroxide ion to convert it into a reactive adduct (OH{center_dot}H{sub 2}){sup {minus}} that can reduce organic molecules. Such species should be robust withstanding severe conditions and chemical poisons. Task 2 is focused on an entirely different approach that exploits molecular catalysts, derived from organometallic compounds that are capable of reducing monocyclic aromatic compounds under very mild conditions. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  12. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  13. Studies of Catalytic Model Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holse, Christian

    of the Cu/ZnO nanoparticles is highly relevant to industrial methanol synthesis for which the direct interaction of Cu and ZnO nanocrystals synergistically boost the catalytic activity. The dynamical behavior of the nanoparticles under reducing and oxidizing environments were studied by means of ex situ X...... as the nanoparticles are reduced. The Cu/ZnO nanoparticles are tested on a  µ-reactor platform and prove to be active towards methanol synthesis, making it an excellent model system for further investigations into activity depended morphology changes....

  14. Catalytic Combustion of Ethyl Acetate

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZÇELİK, Tuğba GÜRMEN; ATALAY, Süheyda; ALPAY, Erden

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic combustion of ethyl acetate over prepared metal oxide catalysts was investigated. CeO, Co2O3, Mn2O3, Cr2O3, and CeO-Co2O3 catalysts were prepared on monolith supports and they were tested. Before conducting the catalyst experiments, we searched for the homogeneous gas phase combustion reaction of ethyl acetate. According to the homogeneous phase experimental results, 45% of ethyl acetate was converted at the maximum reactor temperature tested (350 °C). All the prepare...

  15. Kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Boudart, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book is a critical account of the principles of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions in the light of recent developments in surface science and catalysis science. Originally published in 1984. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase acc

  16. Catalytic enantioselective Reformatsky reaction with ketones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez-Ibanez, M. Angeles; Macia, Beatriz; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2008-01-01

    Chiral tertiary alcohols were obtained with good yields and enantioselectivities via a catalytic Reformatsky reaction with ketones, including the challenging diaryl ketones, using chiral BINOL derivatives.

  17. Paraben degradation using catalytic ozonation over volcanic rocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, João F; Quinta-Ferreira, Maria Emília; Costa, Raquel; Quinta-Ferreira, Rosa M; Martins, Rui C

    2018-03-01

    Parabens are widely used as antimicrobial and preservatives in pharmaceutical and personal care products and are continuously reaching the water streams. Conventional wastewater treatments are proven inefficient on the removal of this kind of contaminants from wastewater. Therefore, catalytic ozonation appears as a suitable option, due to the oxidant power of ozone and its high capacity of hydroxyl radical generation in the presence of a suitable catalyst. The main drawback of catalytic ozonation is related with the choice of stable and active catalysts at low cost. On this way, two volcanic rocks were tested to enhance the removal of a mixture of parabens by ozonation, improving their degradation. Indeed, catalytic ozonation with volcanic rock allowed total paraben degradation using a transferred ozone dose (TOD) of 55 mg/L which corresponds to a reduction of about threefold the amount of TOD comparatively with single ozonation (170 mg/L of TOD). Due to the presence of semiconductors on volcanic rock composition, the effect of UVA irradiation on paraben degradation was analyzed. The neutral and basic conditions enhanced catalytic ozonation comparatively to acid conditions. Higher pH values allowed a total methylparaben degradation with 35 mg O 3 /L, whereas for low pH values, 55 mg O 3 /L was required. The use of a radical scavenger proven that hydroxyl radicals are the main responsible for paraben degradation with catalytic ozonation. This was confirmed through the analysis of the by-products, where 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid (3,4-diHBA), 2,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, and hydroquinone were quantified.

  18. Catalytic converters in the fireplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouki, J.

    1995-01-01

    In addition to selecting the appropriate means of heating and using dry fuel, the amount of harmful emissions contained by flue gases produced by fireplaces can be reduced by technical means. One such option is to use an oxidising catalytic converter. Tests at TTS Institute's Heating Studies Experimental Station have focused on two such converters (dense and coarse) mounted in light-weight iron heating stoves. The ability of the dense catalytic converter to oxidise carbon monoxide gases proved to be good. The concentration of carbon monoxide in the flue gases was reduced by as much as 90 %. Measurements conducted by VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland) showed that the conversion of other gases, e.g. of methane, was good. The exhaust resistance caused by the dense converter was so great as to necessitate the mounting of a fluegas evacuation fan in the chimney for the purpose of creating sufficient draught. When relying on natural draught, the dense converter requires a chimney of at least 7 metres and a by-pass connection while the fire is being lit. In addition, the converter will have to be constructed to be less dense and this will mean that it's capability to oxidise non-combusted gases will be reduced. The coarse converter did not impair the draught but it's oxidising property was insufficient. With the tests over, the converter was not observed to have become blocked up by impurities

  19. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  20. Catalytic hot gas cleaning of gasification gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simell, P. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1997-12-31

    The aim of this work was to study the catalytic cleaning of gasification gas from tars and ammonia. In addition, factors influencing catalytic activity in industrial applications were studied, as well as the effects of different operation conditions and limits. Also the catalytic reactions of tar and ammonia with gasification gas components were studied. The activities of different catalyst materials were measured with laboratory-scale reactors fed by slip streams taken from updraft and fluid bed gasifiers. Carbonate rocks and nickel catalysts proved to be active tar decomposing catalysts. Ammonia decomposition was in turn facilitated by nickel catalysts and iron materials like iron sinter and iron dolomite. Temperatures over 850 deg C were required at 2000{sup -1} space velocity at ambient pressure to achieve almost complete conversions. During catalytic reactions H{sub 2} and CO were formed and H{sub 2}O was consumed in addition to decomposing hydrocarbons and ammonia. Equilibrium gas composition was almost achieved with nickel catalysts at 900 deg C. No deactivation by H{sub 2}S or carbon took place in these conditions. Catalyst blocking by particulates was avoided by using a monolith type of catalyst. The apparent first order kinetic parameters were determined for the most active materials. The activities of dolomite, nickel catalyst and reference materials were measured in different gas atmospheres using laboratory apparatus. This consisted of nitrogen carrier, toluene as tar model compound, ammonia and one of the components H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}+H{sub 2}O or CO+CO{sub 2}. Also synthetic gasification gas was used. With the dolomite and nickel catalyst the highest toluene decomposition rates were measured with CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. In gasification gas, however, the rate was retarded due to inhibition by reaction products (CO, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}). Tar decomposition over dolomite was modelled by benzene reactions with CO{sub 2}, H

  1. Three-Dimensional Structure and Catalytic Mechanism of Cytosine Deaminase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R Hall; A Fedorov; C Xu; E Fedorov; S Almo; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from E. coli is a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily. The structure of the zinc-activated enzyme was determined in the presence of phosphonocytosine, a mimic of the tetrahedral reaction intermediate. This compound inhibits the deamination of cytosine with a K{sub i} of 52 nM. The zinc- and iron-containing enzymes were characterized to determine the effect of the divalent cations on activation of the hydrolytic water. Fe-CDA loses activity at low pH with a kinetic pKa of 6.0, and Zn-CDA has a kinetic pKa of 7.3. Mutation of Gln-156 decreased the catalytic activity by more than 5 orders of magnitude, supporting its role in substrate binding. Mutation of Glu-217, Asp-313, and His-246 significantly decreased catalytic activity supporting the role of these three residues in activation of the hydrolytic water molecule and facilitation of proton transfer reactions. A library of potential substrates was used to probe the structural determinants responsible for catalytic activity. CDA was able to catalyze the deamination of isocytosine and the hydrolysis of 3-oxauracil. Large inverse solvent isotope effects were obtained on k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, consistent with the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond during the conversion of cytosine to uracil. A chemical mechanism for substrate deamination by CDA was proposed.

  2. Catalytic Conversion of Cellulose to Levulinic Acid by Metal Chlorides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beixiao Zhang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic performance of various metal chlorides in the conversion of cellulose to levulinic acid in liquid water at high temperatures was investigated. The effects of reaction parameters on the yield of levulinic acid were also explored. The results showed that alkali and alkaline earth metal chlorides were not effective in conversion of cellulose, while transition metal chlorides, especially CrCl3, FeCl3 and CuCl2 and a group IIIA metal chloride (AlCl3, exhibited high catalytic activity. The catalytic performance was correlated with the acidity of the reaction system due to the addition of the metal chlorides, but more dependent on the type of metal chloride. Among those metal chlorides, chromium chloride was found to be exceptionally effective for the conversion of cellulose to levulinic acid, affording an optimum yield of 67 mol % after a reaction time of 180 min, at 200 °C, with a catalyst dosage of 0.02 M and substrate concentration of 50 wt %. Chromium metal, most of which was present in its oxide form in the solid sample and only a small part in solution as Cr3+ ion, can be easily separated from the resulting product mixture and recycled. Finally, a plausible reaction scheme for the chromium chloride catalyzed conversion of cellulose in water was proposed.

  3. Catalytic conversion of cellulose to levulinic acid by metal chlorides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lincai; Lin, Lu; Zhang, Junhua; Zhuang, Junping; Zhang, Beixiao; Gong, Yan

    2010-08-02

    The catalytic performance of various metal chlorides in the conversion of cellulose to levulinic acid in liquid water at high temperatures was investigated. The effects of reaction parameters on the yield of levulinic acid were also explored. The results showed that alkali and alkaline earth metal chlorides were not effective in conversion of cellulose, while transition metal chlorides, especially CrCl(3), FeCl(3) and CuCl(2) and a group IIIA metal chloride (AlCl(3)), exhibited high catalytic activity. The catalytic performance was correlated with the acidity of the reaction system due to the addition of the metal chlorides, but more dependent on the type of metal chloride. Among those metal chlorides, chromium chloride was found to be exceptionally effective for the conversion of cellulose to levulinic acid, affording an optimum yield of 67 mol % after a reaction time of 180 min, at 200 degrees C, with a catalyst dosage of 0.02 M and substrate concentration of 50 wt %. Chromium metal, most of which was present in its oxide form in the solid sample and only a small part in solution as Cr3+ ion, can be easily separated from the resulting product mixture and recycled. Finally, a plausible reaction scheme for the chromium chloride catalyzed conversion of cellulose in water was proposed.

  4. Heterogeneous catalytic degradation of polyacrylamide solution | Hu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Modified with trace metal elements, the catalytic activity of Fe2O3/Al2O3 could be changed greatly. Among various trace metal elements, Fe2O3/Al2O3 catalysts modified with Co and Cu showed great increase on catalytic activity. International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology, Vol. 2, No. 7, 2010, pp. 110- ...

  5. Catalytic strategy used by the myosin motor to hydrolyze ATP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiani, Farooq Ahmad; Fischer, Stefan

    2014-07-22

    Myosin is a molecular motor responsible for biological motions such as muscle contraction and intracellular cargo transport, for which it hydrolyzes adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). Early steps of the mechanism by which myosin catalyzes ATP hydrolysis have been investigated, but still missing are the structure of the final ADP·inorganic phosphate (Pi) product and the complete pathway leading to it. Here, a comprehensive description of the catalytic strategy of myosin is formulated, based on combined quantum-classical molecular mechanics calculations. A full exploration of catalytic pathways was performed and a final product structure was found that is consistent with all experiments. Molecular movies of the relevant pathways show the different reorganizations of the H-bond network that lead to the final product, whose γ-phosphate is not in the previously reported HPγO4(2-) state, but in the H2PγO4(-) state. The simulations reveal that the catalytic strategy of myosin employs a three-pronged tactic: (i) Stabilization of the γ-phosphate of ATP in a dissociated metaphosphate (PγO3(-)) state. (ii) Polarization of the attacking water molecule, to abstract a proton from that water. (iii) Formation of multiple proton wires in the active site, for efficient transfer of the abstracted proton to various product precursors. The specific role played in this strategy by each of the three loops enclosing ATP is identified unambiguously. It explains how the precise timing of the ATPase activation during the force generating cycle is achieved in myosin. The catalytic strategy described here for myosin is likely to be very similar in most nucleotide hydrolyzing enzymes.

  6. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... environment and your health: Green living Sun Water Health effects of water pollution How to protect yourself from water pollution Air ... can hurt your health. Learn more about the health effects of polluted water. You can also learn more ... Source: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Here are ...

  7. Non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.; Kurek, Harry

    2015-12-22

    A non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot flue gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is embedded in the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot flue gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, extended surfaces of metal material such as stainless steel or metal alloy that are high in nickel content are included within at least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path.

  8. Electrochemical promotion of catalytic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbihl, R.

    2010-05-01

    The electrochemical promotion of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions (EPOC) became feasible through the use of porous metal electrodes interfaced to a solid electrolyte. With the O 2- conducting yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ), the Na + conducting β″-Al 2O 3 (β-alumina), and several other types of solid electrolytes the EPOC effect has been demonstrated for about 100 reaction systems in studies conducted mainly in the mbar range. Surface science investigations showed that the physical basis for the EPOC effect lies in the electrochemically induced spillover of oxygen and alkali metal, respectively, onto the surface of the metal electrodes. For the catalytic promotion effect general concepts and mechanistic schemes were proposed but these concepts and schemes are largely speculative. Applying surface analytical tools to EPOC systems the proposed mechanistic schemes can be verified or invalidated. This report summarizes the progress which has been achieved in the mechanistic understanding of the EPOC effect.

  9. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  10. Diesel engine catalytic combustor system. [aircraft engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ream, L. W. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A low compression turbocharged diesel engine is provided in which the turbocharger can be operated independently of the engine to power auxiliary equipment. Fuel and air are burned in a catalytic combustor to drive the turbine wheel of turbine section which is initially caused to rotate by starter motor. By opening a flapper value, compressed air from the blower section is directed to catalytic combustor when it is heated and expanded, serving to drive the turbine wheel and also to heat the catalytic element. To start, engine valve is closed, combustion is terminated in catalytic combustor, and the valve is then opened to utilize air from the blower for the air driven motor. When the engine starts, the constituents in its exhaust gas react in the catalytic element and the heat generated provides additional energy for the turbine section.

  11. The evolution of catalytic function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurel, Marie-Christine; Ricard, Jacques

    2006-03-01

    It is very likely that the main driving force of enzyme evolution is the requirement to improve catalytic and regulatory efficiency which results from the intrinsic performance as well as from the spatial and functional organization of enzymes in living cells. Kinetic co-operativity may occur in simple monomeric proteins if they display “slow” conformational transitions, at the cost of catalytic efficiency. Oligomeric enzymes on the other hand can be both efficient and co-operative. We speculate that the main reason for the emergence of co-operative oligomeric enzymes is the need for catalysts that are both cooperative and efficient. As it is not useful for an enzyme to respond to a change of substrate concentration in a complex kinetic way, the emergence of symmetry has its probable origin in a requirement for “functional simplicity”. In a living cell, enzyme are associated with other macromolecules and membranes. The fine tuning of their activity may also be reached through mutations of the microenvironment. Our hypothesis is that these mutations are related to the vectorial transport of molecules, to achieve the hysteresis loops of enzyme reactions generated by the coupling of reaction and diffusion, through the co-operativity brought about by electric interactions between a charged substrate and a membrane, and last but not least, through oscillations. As the physical origins of these effects are very simple and do not require complex molecular devices, it is very likely that the functional advantage generated by the spatial and functional organization of enzyme molecules within the cell have appeared in prebiotic catalysis or very early during the primeval stages of biological evolution. We shall began this paper by presenting the nature of the probable earliest catalysts in the RNA world.

  12. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Luna Bergere; Baldwin, Helene L.

    1962-01-01

    What do you use water for?If someone asked you this question you would probably think right away of water for drinking. Then you would think of water for bathing, brushing teeth, flushing the toilet. Your list would get longer as you thought of water for cooking, washing the dishes, running the garbage grinder. Water for lawn watering, for play pools, for swimming pools, for washing the car and the dog. Water for washing machines and for air conditioning. You can hardly do without water for fun and pleasure—water for swimming, boating, fishing, water-skiing, and skin diving. In school or the public library, you need water to wash your hands, or to have a drink. If your home or school bursts into flames, quantities of water are needed to put it out.In fact, life to Americans is unthinkable without large supplies of fresh, clean water. If you give the matter a little thought, you will realize that people in many countries, even in our own, may suffer from disease and dirt simply because their homes are not equipped with running water. Imagine your own town if for some reason - an explosion, perhaps - water service were cut off for a week or several weeks. You would have to drive or walk to a neighboring town and bring water back in pails. Certainly if people had to carry water themselves they might not be inclined to bathe very often; washing clothes would be a real chore.Nothing can live without water. The earth is covered by water over three-fourths of its surface - water as a liquid in rivers, lakes and oceans, and water as ice and snow on the tops of high mountains and in the polar regions. Only one-quarter of our bodies is bone and muscle; the other three-fourths is made of water. We need water to live, and so do plants and animals. People and animals can live a long time without food, but without water they die in a few days. Without water, everything would die, and the world would turn into a huge desert.

  13. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan, Monica; Mihet, Maria; Lazar, Mihaela D.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H 2 . In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al 2 O 3 . The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N 2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H 2 , CH 4 , CO, CO 2 . The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H 2 O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%

  14. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Christpher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2013-12-17

    A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and show to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hyrdocarbons into hydrocarbons removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  15. Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chovanec, A.; Grath, J.; Kralik, M.; Vogel, W.

    2002-01-01

    An up-date overview of the situation of the Austrian waters is given by analyzing the status of the water quality (groundwater, surface waters) and water protection measures. Maps containing information of nitrate and atrazine in groundwaters (analyses at monitoring stations), nitrate contents and biological water quality of running waters are included. Finally, pollutants (nitrate, orthophosphate, ammonium, nitrite, atrazine etc.) trends in annual mean values and median values for the whole country for the years 1992-1999 are presented in tables. Figs. 5. (nevyjel)

  16. Water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Wyk, Llewellyn V

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available to explore desalination for future capacity. Water is essential to life: the human body is about 75 percent water, with up to 85 percent of brain cells liquid. Around 71 percent of the planet is covered in water, but 97,5 percent of it is salt water... risen to 90 percent, leaving only 10 percent for animals and plants. Yet 40 percent of the water used globally is for sanitation and other uses in buildings. The operation of buildings places a strain on raw water reserves, while wastewater and sewage...

  17. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Marion County, Indiana Salt Lake County, Utah Seattle-King County, Washington Tools and Training CLPPP CAP Healthy ... wish to use tap water for drinking or cooking, especially when the water has been off and ...

  18. Modelling of procecces in catalytic recombiners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, J.

    2007-01-01

    In order to achieve a high degree of safety in nuclear power plants and prevent possible accident scenarios, their consequences are calculated and analysed with numeric codes. One of the most important part of nuclear safety research of hazardous incidents are development and validation of these numeric models, which are implemented into accident codes. The severe hydrogen release during a core meltdown is one of the considered scenario of performed accident analyses. One of the most important measure for the elimination of the hydrogen is catalytic recombiners. Converting the hydrogen with the atmospheric oxygen to water vapor in an exothermic reaction will prevent possible detonation of the hydrogen/air atmosphere. Within the dissertation the recombiner simulation REKO-DIREKT was developed and validated by an extensive experimental database. The performance of recombiners with regard to the conversion of the hydrogen and the temperature development is modelled. The REKO-DIREKT program is unique and has made significant revolution in research of hydrogen safety. For the first time it has been possible to show the performance of the recombiner so great in detail by using REKO-DIREKT. In the future engineers of nuclear power plants will have opportunity to have precise forecasts about the process of the possible accidents with hydrogen release. Also with presence of water vapor or with oxygen depletion which are included in the model. The major discussion of the hydrogen ignition at hot catalyst steel plates can be evaluated in the future with REKO-DIREKT more reliably than the existing used models. (orig.)

  19. Model catalytic oxidation studies using supported monometallic and heterobimetallic oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekerdt, J.G.

    1992-02-03

    This research program is directed toward a more fundamental understanding of the effects of catalyst composition and structure on the catalytic properties of metal oxides. Metal oxide catalysts play an important role in many reactions bearing on the chemical aspects of energy processes. Metal oxides are the catalysts for water-gas shift reactions, methanol and higher alcohol synthesis, isosynthesis, selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides, and oxidation of hydrocarbons. A key limitation to developing insight into how oxides function in catalytic reactions is in not having precise information of the surface composition under reaction conditions. To address this problem we have prepared oxide systems that can be used to study cation-cation effects and the role of bridging (-O-) and/or terminal (=O) surface oxygen anion ligands in a systematic fashion. Since many oxide catalyst systems involve mixtures of oxides, we selected a model system that would permit us to examine the role of each cation separately and in pairwise combinations. Organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes were proposed for use, to prepare model systems consisting of isolated monomeric cations, isolated monometallic dimers and isolated bimetallic dimers supported on silica and alumina. The monometallic and bimetallic dimers were to be used as models of more complex mixed- oxide catalysts. Our current program was to develop the systems and use them in model oxidation reactions.

  20. New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Yi

    2003-01-01

    The goals of the project are to develop new catalytic DNA biosensors for simultaneous detection and quantification of bioavailable radionuclides and metal ions, and apply the sensors for on-site, real-time assessment of concentration, speciation and stability of the individual contaminants during and after bioremediation. A negative selection strategy was tested and validated. In vitro selection was shown to yield highly active and specific transition metal ion-dependent catalytic DNA/RNA. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) study of in vitro selected DNA demonstrated that the trifluorophore labeled system is a simple and powerful tool in studying complex biomolecules structure and dynamics, and is capable of revealing new sophisticated structural changes. New fluorophore/quenchers in a single fluorosensor yielded improved signal to noise ratio in detection, identification and quantification of metal contaminants. Catalytic DNA fluorescent and colorimetric sensors were shown useful in sensing lead in lake water and in leaded paint. Project results were described in two papers and two patents, and won an international prize

  1. Catalytic partial oxidation of pyrolysis oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennard, David Carl

    2009-12-01

    details the catalytic partial oxidation of glycerol without preheat: droplets of glycerol are sprayed directly onto the top of the catalyst bed, where they react autothermally with contact times on the order of tau ≈ 30 ms. The reactive flash volatilization of glycerol results in equilibrium syngas production over Rh-Ce catalysts. In addition, water can be added to the liquid glycerol, resulting in true autothermal reforming. This highly efficient process can increase H2 yields and alter the H2 to CO ratio, allowing for flexibility in syngas quality depending on the purpose. Chapter 5 details the results of a time on stream experiment, in which optimal syngas conditions are chosen. Although conversion is 100% for 450 hours, these experiments demonstrate the deactivation of the catalyst over time. Deactivation is exhibited by decreases in H2 and CO 2 production accompanied by a steady increase in CO and temperature. These results are explained as a loss of water-gas shift equilibration. SEM images suggest catalyst sintering may play a role; EDS indicates the presence of impurities on the catalyst. In addition, the instability of quartz in the reactor is demonstrated by etching, resulting in a hole in the reactor tube at the end of the experiment. These results suggest prevaporization may be desirable in this application, and that quartz is not a suitable material for the reactive flash volatilization of oxygenated fuels. In Chapter 6, pyrolysis oil samples from three sources - poplar, pine, and hardwoods - are explored in the context of catalytic partial oxidation. Lessons derived from the tests with model compounds are applied to reactor design, resulting in the reactive flash vaporization of bio oils. Syngas is successfully produced, though deactivation due to coke and ash deposition keeps H2 below equlibrium. Coke formation is observed on the reactor walls, but is avoided between the fuel injection site and catalyst by increasing the proximity of these in the reactor

  2. Catalytic Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqi Lao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This review surveys the literature regarding the development of catalytic versions of the Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions. The first section summarizes how arsenic and tellurium-based catalytic Wittig-type reaction systems were developed first due to the relatively easy reduction of the oxides involved. This is followed by a presentation of the current state of the art regarding phosphine-catalyzed Wittig reactions. The second section covers the field of related catalytic aza-Wittig reactions that are catalyzed by both phosphine oxides and phosphines.

  3. Catalytic Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Zhiqi; Toy, Patrick H

    2016-01-01

    This review surveys the literature regarding the development of catalytic versions of the Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions. The first section summarizes how arsenic and tellurium-based catalytic Wittig-type reaction systems were developed first due to the relatively easy reduction of the oxides involved. This is followed by a presentation of the current state of the art regarding phosphine-catalyzed Wittig reactions. The second section covers the field of related catalytic aza-Wittig reactions that are catalyzed by both phosphine oxides and phosphines.

  4. The tritium labelling of organic molecules by heterogeneous catalytic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angoso Marina, M.; Kaiser Ruiz del Olmo, F.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of the temperature at 65 degree centigree and 120 degree centigree on the labelling of three organic molecules with tritium was studied. The compounds were: benzoic acid, de phenyl glyoxal and 2,3-tetramethylene-4-pantothenyl-7-oxo diacetin.The method employed was the heterogeneous catalytic exchange between tritiated water and the organic compound. The purification was made by thin-layer chromatography and the concentration, purity and specific activity of the products were determined by counting and ultraviolet techniques. The thermal stability and the radiolytic effects on labelled benzoic acid were also considered. (Author) 9 refs

  5. Method for low temperature catalytic production of hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Devinder

    2003-07-22

    The invention provides a process for the catalytic production of a hydrogen feed by exposing a hydrogen feed to a catalyst which promotes a base-catalyzed water-gas-shift reaction in a liquid phase. The hydrogen feed can be provided by any process known in the art of making hydrogen gas. It is preferably provided by a process that can produce a hydrogen feed for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The step of exposing the hydrogen feed takes place preferably from about 80.degree. C. to about 150.degree. C.

  6. The tritium labelling of organic molecules by heterogeneous catalytic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angoso, M.; Kaiser, F.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of the temperature at 65degC and 120degC on the labelling of three organic molecules with tritium was studied. The compounds were: benzoic acid, diphenyl glioxal and 2,3-tetramethylene-4-phenylthien-7-oxodiacetin. The method employed was the heterogeneous catalytic exchange between tritiaded water and the organic compound. The purification was made by thin-layer chromatography and the concentration, purity and specific activity of the products were determined by counting and ultraviolet techniques. The thermal stability and the radiolitic effects on labelled benzoic acid were also considered. (author) [es

  7. Sonographic assessment of pregnancy co-existing with uterine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    consenting pregnant women who met the inclusion criteria was evaluated during routine prenatal ultrasound scan. The ... An increase was observed in myoma mean size from 60mm to 63mm from the 1st scan sequence to the 2nd scan sequence and a reduction from .... The choice of these probes was based on varying ...

  8. Crohn's disease and intestinal endometriosis: an intriguing co-existence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Craninx, M.; D'Haens, G.; Cokelaere, K.; Baert, F.; Penninckx, F.; D'Hoore, A.; Ectors, N.; Rutgeerts, P.; Geboes, K.

    2000-01-01

    We present a series of eight female patients who came to surgery for complicated Crohn's disease of the terminal ileum (n = 7) or colon (n = 1). Indications for surgery were medically intractable disease in three, steroid dependence in four and ileal perforation in one. Histological examination

  9. Scientific Research & Subsistence: Protocols to Ensure Co-Existence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachman, C.; Holman, A.; DeMaster, D.

    2017-12-01

    Commercial, industrial, and research interests in the Arctic are expanding rapidly. Potentials are numerous and exciting, giving rise to the need for guidelines to ensure interactions among waterway users do not conflict. Of particular concern is the potential for adverse impacts to U.S. Arctic coastal communities that rely on living marine resources for nutritional and cultural health, through subsistence hunts from small craft, ice edges, and shore. Recent events raised concerns over research surveys potentially interfering with subsistence hunts in the Bering, Chukchi, and Beaufort Seas. Incidents led to calls by Native Alaskan communities to restrict science activities with a mixed response from the scientific community (i.e., some sympathetic, some defensive). With a common goal of wanting to mitigate this potential interaction, Federal agencies made a commitment in the National Strategy for the Arctic Region to coordinate and consult with Alaska Natives and also to pursue responsible Arctic stewardship, with understanding through scientific research and traditional knowledge. The effort to create a "Standard of Care" for research surveys incorporates years of experience by subsistence hunters working to mitigate impacts of other anthropogenic activities in the region, as well as best practices by many in the research community. The protocols are designed to ensure potential conflicts between the scientific research community and subsistence hunters are avoided and to encourage mutual assistance and collaboration between researchers and hunters. The guidelines focus on enhancing communication between researchers and subsistence hunters before, during, and after research occurs. The best management practices outlined in the Standard of Care assist those overseeing and funding scientific research in making decisions about how best to accomplish the goals of the research while ensuring protection of the Alaska subsistence lifestyle. These protocols could also be used in a larger context to address concerns over increased vessel traffic from other activities. We will outline the importance of establishing the guidelines, describe the general process, and highlight examples of positive interactions with Alaska Native hunters during scientific research operations using this protocol.

  10. Co-existence of syndrome X and hypertension among Ghanaians ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cardiovascular risk factors such as obesity, diabetes and dyslipidaemia have been commonly associated with hypertension. The clustering of such risk factors is termed the metabolic syndrome (i.e. Syndrome X). The syndrome has been associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease especially in the ...

  11. The Co-existence of Innovation and Platforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Poul H. Kyvsgård; Gertsen, Frank; Bessant, John

    2006-01-01

    This paper present explorative results from an initial effort to explore the current state and the actual requirements to combine the challenges in meeting the need for efficient platforms and the need for effectiveness in terms of a sufficient high degree of newness to the customer. Empirical ob...

  12. Tobacco or healthy children: the two cannot co-exist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Keith Pattemore

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tobacco exposure increases mortality and morbidity of the fetus, the child, the adolescent, and their children in turn. Nearly half the children in the world are exposed. Smoking is not merely personal choice or personal responsibility; those subtle phrases undermine those who have no choice in the matter.Tobacco control must take a multi-pronged attack. Smoking cessation by adults in childbearing years must take centre stage of these efforts, because it is the only way to ensure a smoke-free environment for children. Smoke-free parents provide a role model for smoke-free young people, and erode the image of smoking as a desirable adult behaviour to emulate. Pediatricians and pediatric pulmonologists have a key role to play here. This goal will reduce morbidity and mortality among adults and children. Legislation regarding taxation, environments, tobacco constituents, product placement and display, packaging, and media education are all key to this core goal. Smokefree policy must be protected from attack based on trade agreements.Research is needed into more effective ways to attract and help people give up smoking, and into educating and re-deploying tobacco industry workers in emerging and developed countries.

  13. Dams and river dolphins: Can they co-exist?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reeves, R.R.; Leatherwood, S.

    1994-01-01

    Dam construction is one of many ways that humans have modified river-dolphin habitats. It is suggested that physiographic and hydrologic complexity plays an important role in making rivers suitable for dolphins. If this hypothesis is true, then it can be assumed that dams and other artificial obstructions degrade dolphin habitat insofar as they reduce such complexity. This paper identifies some of the impacts that dams, barrages, and dikes might have on dolphins. Research is needed at project sites, both before and after construction, to document impacts. Specially designed ''swimways'' may allow upstream and downstream passage by dolphins and thus mitigate at least one of the adverse effects of dam projects, namely population fragmentation, but such measures aimed at benefiting single species are no substitute for protecting ecosystems. 30 refs

  14. Molar Pregnancy with a Co-Existing Viable Fetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruya Deveer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available     The aim of this study was to report the clinical features, management, and outcome of a case of molar pregnancy with a coexisting viable fetus and to review the literature. In this article, we report a case of pregnancy with diffuse placental molar change and a normal fetus which presented with hyperemesis gravidarum and hyperthyroidism. Genetic amniocentesis showed normal fetal karyotype. A healthy full-term live male infant was delivered by cesarean section. In molar pregnancies with a normal karyotype fetus, with intensive maternal follow-up, continuation of pregnancy can be suggested.

  15. Retrosternal goiter and thymic carcinoid: A rare co-existence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulsalam Yaseen Taha

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Retrosternal goiter is diagnosed when more than 50% of the thyroid gland extends below the thoracic inlet. Surgery is the treatment of choice. Carcinoid tumor of thymus gland is very rare. Although both conditions develop in the anterior mediastinum, literature search revealed no patient having both lesions at the same time. Reported herein, is a 55-year old Iraqi man with retrosternal multinodular goiter and a localized solitary primary thymic carcinoid. Thymic tumor was simultaneously removed along right thyroid lobectomy via median sternotomy extended to the neck. Early outcome was good. The patient had no evidence of recurrence after surgery.

  16. Complimentarity not competition: Co-existence of community-based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... changes, complementarity of the PA and CBC approaches will even be more important. Without serious transformations on the government side to practically embrace CBC as a complementary conservation strategy, complementarity of the two approaches will remain elusive and hence continued loss of biodiversity.

  17. The co-existence of primary hyperparathyroidism and osteogenesis imperfecta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salti, I S; Nassar, V H; Bulos, S

    1973-04-07

    A 47-year-old patient suffering from osteogenesis imperfecta was found to have mild hypercalcemia. The latter proved to be due to a parathyroid adenoma. The clinical and laboratory features of this association are summarized, and the implications of serum calcium abnormalities in osteogenesis imperfecta are discussed.

  18. Sheehan fs syndrome co.existing with Graves' disease | Arpaci ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sheehanfs syndrome (SS), which is an important cause of hypopituitarism, is common in developing countries. The most common presentation is the absence of lactation and amenorrhea. Hypothyroidism rather than hyperthyroidism is the usual expected phenomenon in SS. Postpartum hyperthyroidism is also common and ...

  19. CO-EXISTENCE OF OVER- AND UNDERNUTRITION RELATED ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adequate nutrition is a basic human right, but globally it remains unmet for many pre-school children. Poverty, food insecurity and malnutrition continue to be obstacles to human rights, quality of life and dignity. The 1995 goal to eradicate poverty in the world by 2020 is not on target in developing countries; rather, poverty ...

  20. MOBILE COMPLEX FOR CATALYTIC THERMAL WASTE TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedi V.E.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The design and purpose of the basic units of the mobile waste processing complex “MPK” are described. Experimental data of catalytic purification of exhaust gases are presented. Experimental data on catalytic clearing of final gases of a designed mobile incinerator plant are shown. It is defined, that concentrating of parasitic bridging in waste gases of the complex are considerably smaller, rather than allowed by normative documents.

  1. Catalytic flash pyrolysis of oil-impregnated-wood and jatropha cake using sodium based catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Imran, Ali

    2015-11-24

    Catalytic pyrolysis of wood with impregnated vegetable oil was investigated and compared with catalytic pyrolysis of jatropha cake making use of sodium based catalysts to produce a high quality bio-oil. The catalytic pyrolysis was carried out in two modes: in-situ catalytic pyrolysis and post treatment of the pyrolysis vapors. The in-situ catalytic pyrolysis was carried out in an entrained flow reactor system using a premixed feedstock of Na2CO3 and biomass and post treatment of biomass pyrolysis vapor was conducted in a downstream fixed bed reactor of Na2CO3/γ-Al2O3. Results have shown that both Na2CO3 and Na2CO3/γ-Al2O3 can be used for the production of a high quality bio-oil from catalytic pyrolysis of oil-impregnated-wood and jatropha cake. The catalytic bio-oil had very low oxygen content, water content as low as 1wt.%, a neutral pH, and a high calorific value upto 41.8MJ/kg. The bio-oil consisted of high value chemical compounds mainly hydrocarbons and undesired compounds in the bio-oil were either completely removed or considerably reduced. Increasing the triglycerides content (vegetable oil) in the wood enhanced the formation of hydrocarbons in the bio-oil. Post treatment of the pyrolysis vapor over a fixed bed of Na2CO3/γ-Al2O3 produced superior quality bio-oil compared to in-situ catalytic pyrolysis with Na2CO3. This high quality bio-oil may be used as a precursor in a fractionating process for the production of alternative fuels. © 2015 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Water

    OpenAIRE

    Hertie School of Governance

    2010-01-01

    All human life depends on water and air. The sustainable management of both is a major challenge for today's public policy makers. This issue of Schlossplatz³ taps the streams and flows of the current debate on the right water governance.

  3. Adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles and methods of using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slowing, Igor Ivan; Kandel, Kapil

    2017-01-31

    The present invention provides an adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle including a mesoporous silica nanoparticle having at least one adsorbent functional group bound thereto. The adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle also includes at least one catalytic material. In various embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using and making the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles. In some examples, the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles can be used to selectively remove fatty acids from feedstocks for biodiesel, and to hydrotreat the separated fatty acids.

  4. Contributions to the theory of catalytic titrations-III Neutralization catalytic titrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaál, F F; Abramović, B F

    1985-07-01

    Neutralization catalytic titrations of weak monoprotic adds and bases with both volumetric and coulometric addition of the titrant (strong base/acid) have been simulated by taking into account the equilibrium concentration of the catalyst during the titration. The influence of several factors on the shape of the simulated catalytic titration curve has been investigated and is discussed.

  5. Catalytic non-thermal plasma reactor for the decomposition of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Among the catalytic study, MnOx/SMF (manganese oxide on sintered metal fibres electrode) shows better performance, probably due to the formation of active oxygen species by in situ decomposition of ozone on the catalyst surface. Water vapour further enhanced the performance due to the in situ ...

  6. Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Sanmuga Priya

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Phytoremediation through aquatic macrophytes treatment system (AMATS for the removal of pollutants and contaminants from various natural sources is a well established environmental protection technique. Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes, a worst invasive aquatic weed has been utilised for various research activities over the last few decades. The biosorption capacity of the water hyacinth in minimising various contaminants present in the industrial wastewater is well studied. The present review quotes the literatures related to the biosorption capacity of the water hyacinth in reducing the concentration of dyestuffs, heavy metals and minimising certain other physiochemical parameters like TSS (total suspended solids, TDS (total dissolved solids, COD (chemical oxygen demand and BOD (biological oxygen demand in textile wastewater. Sorption kinetics through various models, factors influencing the biosorption capacity, and role of physical and chemical modifications in the water hyacinth are also discussed.

  7. Catalytic steam reforming of ethanol for hydrogen production: Brief status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bineli Aulus R.R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen represents a promising fuel since it is considered as a cleanest energy carrier and also because during its combustion only water is emitted. It can be produced from different kinds of renewable feedstocks, such as ethanol, in this sense hydrogen could be treated as biofuel. Three chemical reactions can be used to achieve this purpose: the steam reforming (SR, the partial oxidation (POX and the autothermal reforming (ATR. In this study, the catalysts implemented in steam reforming of ethanol were reviewed. A wide variety of elements can be used as catalysts for this reaction, such as base metals (Ni, Cu and Co or noble metals (Rh, Pt and Ru usually deposited on a support material that increases surface area and improves catalytic function. The use of Rh, Ni and Pt supported or promoted with CeO2, and/or La2O3 shows excellent performance in ethanol SR catalytic process. The ratio of water to ethanol, reaction temperatures, catalysts loadings, selectivity and activity are also discussed as they are extremely important for high hydrogen yields.

  8. Atomically Precise Metal Nanoclusters for Catalytic Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Rongchao [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-11-18

    The central goal of this project is to explore the catalytic application of atomically precise gold nanoclusters. By solving the total structures of ligand-protected nanoclusters, we aim to correlate the catalytic properties of metal nanoclusters with their atomic/electronic structures. Such correlation unravel some fundamental aspects of nanocatalysis, such as the nature of particle size effect, origin of catalytic selectivity, particle-support interactions, the identification of catalytically active centers, etc. The well-defined nanocluster catalysts mediate the knowledge gap between single crystal model catalysts and real-world conventional nanocatalysts. These nanoclusters also hold great promise in catalyzing certain types of reactions with extraordinarily high selectivity. These aims are in line with the overall goals of the catalytic science and technology of DOE and advance the BES mission “to support fundamental research to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the level of electrons, atoms, and molecules”. Our group has successfully prepared different sized, robust gold nanoclusters protected by thiolates, such as Au25(SR)18, Au28(SR)20, Au38(SR)24, Au99(SR)42, Au144(SR)60, etc. Some of these nanoclusters have been crystallographically characterized through X-ray crystallography. These ultrasmall nanoclusters (< 2 nm diameter) exhibit discrete electronic structures due to quantum size effect, as opposed to quasicontinuous band structure of conventional metal nanoparticles or bulk metals. The available atomic structures (metal core plus surface ligands) of nanoclusters serve as the basis for structure-property correlations. We have investigated the unique catalytic properties of nanoclusters (i.e. not observed in conventional nanogold catalysts) and revealed the structure-selectivity relationships. Highlights of our

  9. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1 - Implementation Plan, Phase 2 - Validation Testing and Phase 3 - Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  10. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laster, W. R.; Anoshkina, E.

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1- Implementation Plan, Phase 2- Validation Testing and Phase 3 – Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  11. Water Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The Vision Catalyst Purifier employs the basic technology developed by NASA to purify water aboard the Apollo spacecraft. However, it also uses an "erosion" technique. The purifier kills bacteria, viruses, and algae by "catalytic corrosion." A cartridge contains a silver-impregnated alumina bed with a large surface area. The catalyst bed converts oxygen in a pool of water to its most oxidative state, killing over 99 percent of the bacteria within five seconds. The cartridge also releases into the pool low levels of ionic silver and copper through a controlled process of erosion. Because the water becomes electrochemically active, no electricity is required.

  12. Synthesis gas production via catalytic partial oxidation reforming of liquid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheekatamarla, P.K.; Finnerty, C.M. [NanoDynamics Energy Inc., 901 Fuhrmann Boulevard, Buffalo, NY 14203 (United States)

    2008-10-15

    This work deals with the performance of waterless catalytic partial oxidation (CPOX)-based catalytic reformer system fed by different liquid fuels including ethanol, isooctane, hexadecane, synthetic JP8, kerosene and diesel for solid oxide fuel cell applications. The effect of different fuel components on product composition was studied and the operational parameters were optimized to provide a stable reforming performance. The system provided negligible pressure drop combined with the simpler system design due to the lack of water requirement making the POX reformer an attractive choice. (author)

  13. Electro Catalytic Oxidation (ECO) Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan Jones

    2011-03-31

    The power industry in the United States is faced with meeting many new regulations to reduce a number of air pollutants including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, fine particulate matter, and mercury. With over 1,000 power plants in the US, this is a daunting task. In some cases, traditional pollution control technologies such as wet scrubbers and SCRs are not feasible. Powerspan's Electro-Catalytic Oxidation, or ECO{reg_sign} process combines four pollution control devices into a single integrated system that can be installed after a power plant's particulate control device. Besides achieving major reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and mercury (Hg), ECO produces a highly marketable fertilizer, which can help offset the operating costs of the process system. Powerspan has been operating a 50-MW ECO commercial demonstration unit (CDU) at FirstEnergy Corp.'s R.E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio, since February 2004. In addition to the CDU, a test loop has been constructed beside the CDU to demonstrate higher NOx removal rates and test various scrubber packing types and wet ESP configurations. Furthermore, Powerspan has developed the ECO{reg_sign}{sub 2} technology, a regenerative process that uses a proprietary solvent to capture CO{sub 2} from flue gas. The CO{sub 2} capture takes place after the capture of NOx, SO{sub 2}, mercury, and fine particulate matter. Once the CO{sub 2} is captured, the proprietary solution is regenerated to release CO{sub 2} in a form that is ready for geological storage or beneficial use. Pilot scale testing of ECO{sub 2} began in early 2009 at FirstEnergy's Burger Plant. The ECO{sub 2} pilot unit is designed to process a 1-MW flue gas stream and produce 20 tons of CO{sub 2} per day, achieving a 90% CO{sub 2} capture rate. The ECO{sub 2} pilot program provided the opportunity to confirm process design and cost estimates, and prepare for large

  14. Biodiesel from waste cooking oil via base-catalytic and supercritical methanol transesterification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demirbas, Ayhan

    2009-01-01

    In this study, waste cooking oil has subjected to transesterification reaction by potassium hydroxide (KOH) catalytic and supercritical methanol methods obtaining for biodiesel. In catalyzed methods, the presence of water has negative effects on the yields of methyl esters. In the catalytic transesterification free fatty acids and water always produce negative effects since the presence of free fatty acids and water causes soap formation, consumes catalyst, and reduces catalyst effectiveness. Free fatty acids in the waste cooking oil are transesterified simultaneously in supercritical methanol method. Since waste cooking oil contains water and free fatty acids, supercritical transesterification offers great advantage to eliminate the pre-treatment and operating costs. The effects of methanol/waste cooking oils ratio, potassium hydroxide concentration and temperature on the biodiesel conversion were investigated

  15. Highly Dense Isolated Metal Atom Catalytic Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaxin; Kasama, Takeshi; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    -ray diffraction. A combination of electron microscopy images with X-ray absorption spectra demonstrated that the silver atoms were anchored on five-fold oxygen-terminated cavities on the surface of the support to form highly dense isolated metal active sites, leading to excellent reactivity in catalytic oxidation......Atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites are promising materials with which to maximise metal efficiency and to enhance catalytic performance; however, their fabrication remains challenging because metal atoms are prone to sintering, especially at a high metal...... loading. A dynamic process of formation of isolated metal atom catalytic sites on the surface of the support, which was achieved starting from silver nanoparticles by using a thermal surface-mediated diffusion method, was observed directly by using in situ electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron X...

  16. Catalytic Organic Transformations Mediated by Actinide Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabell S. R. Karmel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This review article presents the development of organoactinides and actinide coordination complexes as catalysts for homogeneous organic transformations. This chapter introduces the basic principles of actinide catalysis and deals with the historic development of actinide complexes in catalytic processes. The application of organoactinides in homogeneous catalysis is exemplified in the hydroelementation reactions, such as the hydroamination, hydrosilylation, hydroalkoxylation and hydrothiolation of alkynes. Additionally, the use of actinide coordination complexes for the catalytic polymerization of α-olefins and the ring opening polymerization of cyclic esters is presented. The last part of this review article highlights novel catalytic transformations mediated by actinide compounds and gives an outlook to the further potential of this field.

  17. Porous media for catalytic renewable energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotz, Nico

    2012-05-01

    A novel flow-based method is presented to place catalytic nanoparticles into a reactor by sol-gelation of a porous ceramic consisting of copper-based nanoparticles, silica sand, ceramic binder, and a gelation agent. This method allows for the placement of a liquid precursor containing the catalyst into the final reactor geometry without the need of impregnating or coating of a substrate with the catalytic material. The so generated foam-like porous ceramic shows properties highly appropriate for use as catalytic reactor material, e.g., reasonable pressure drop due to its porosity, high thermal and catalytic stability, and excellent catalytic behavior. The catalytic activity of micro-reactors containing this foam-like ceramic is tested in terms of their ability to convert alcoholic biofuel (e.g. methanol) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture with low concentrations of carbon monoxide (up to 75% hydrogen content and less than 0.2% CO, for the case of methanol). This gas mixture is subsequently used in a low-temperature fuel cell, converting the hydrogen directly to electricity. A low concentration of CO is crucial to avoid poisoning of the fuel cell catalyst. Since conventional Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells require CO concentrations far below 100 ppm and since most methods to reduce the mole fraction of CO (such as Preferential Oxidation or PROX) have CO conversions of up to 99%, the alcohol fuel reformer has to achieve initial CO mole fractions significantly below 1%. The catalyst and the porous ceramic reactor of the present study can successfully fulfill this requirement.

  18. Toward a catalytic site in DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Ulla; Rohr, Katja; Vogel, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    A number of functionalized polyaza crown ether building blocks have been incorporated into DNA-conjugates as catalytic Cu(2+) binding sites. The effect of the DNA-conjugate catalyst on the stereochemical outcome of a Cu(2+)-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction will be presented.......A number of functionalized polyaza crown ether building blocks have been incorporated into DNA-conjugates as catalytic Cu(2+) binding sites. The effect of the DNA-conjugate catalyst on the stereochemical outcome of a Cu(2+)-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction will be presented....

  19. Thermal and catalytic pyrolysis of plastic waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Almeida

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The amount of plastic waste is growing every year and with that comes an environmental concern regarding this problem. Pyrolysis as a tertiary recycling process is presented as a solution. Pyrolysis can be thermal or catalytical and can be performed under different experimental conditions. These conditions affect the type and amount of product obtained. With the pyrolysis process, products can be obtained with high added value, such as fuel oils and feedstock for new products. Zeolites can be used as catalysts in catalytic pyrolysis and influence the final products obtained.

  20. Catalytic Wastewater Treatment Using Pillared Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perathoner, Siglinda; Centi, Gabriele

    After introduction on the use of solid catalysts in wastewater treatment technologies, particularly advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), this review discussed the use of pillared clay (PILC) materials in three applications: (i) wet air catalytic oxidation (WACO), (ii) wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) on Cu-PILC and Fe-PILC, and (iii) behavior of Ti-PILC and Fe-PILC in the photocatalytic or photo-Fenton conversion of pollutants. Literature data are critically analyzed to evidence the main direction to further investigate, in particularly with reference to the possible practical application of these technologies to treat industrial, municipal, or agro-food production wastewater.

  1. Catalytic gasification of oil-shales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, A.; Avakyan, T. [I.M. Gubkin Russian State Univ. of Oil and Gas, Moscow (Russian Federation); Strizhakova, Yu. [Samara State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    Nowadays, the problem of complex usage of solid fossil fuels as raw materials for obtaining of motor fuels and chemical products is becoming increasingly important. A one of possible solutions of the problem is their gasification with further processing of gaseous and liquid products. In this work we have investigated the process of thermal and catalytic gasification of Baltic and Kashpir oil-shales. We have shown that, as compared with non-catalytic process, using of nickel catalyst in the reaction increases the yield of gas, as well as hydrogen content in it, and decreases the amount of liquid products. (orig.)

  2. Polyethersulfone hollow fiber modified with poly(styrenesulfonate) and Pd nanoparticles for catalytic reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emin, C.; Gu, Y.; Remigy, J.-C.; Lahitte, J.-F.

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this work is the synthesis of polymer-stabilized Pd nanoparticles (PdNP) inside a functionalized polymeric porous membrane in order to develop hybrid catalytic membrane reactors and to test them in model metal-catalyzed organic reactions. For this goal, a polymeric membrane support (Polyethersulfone hollow fiber-shaped) was firstly functionalized with an ionogenic polymer (i.e. poly(styrenesulfonate) capable to retain PdNP precursors using an UV photo-grafting method. PdNP were then generated inside the polymeric matrix by chemical reduction of precursor salts (intermatrix synthesis). The catalytic performance of the PdNP catalytic membranes was evaluated using reduction of nitrophenol by sodium borohydride (NaBH4) in water.

  3. Novel synthesis and shape-dependent catalytic performance of Cu-Mn oxides for CO oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhixun; Wang, Honglei; Wu, Xingxing; Ye, Qinglan; Xu, Xuetang; Li, Bin; Wang, Fan

    2017-05-01

    Transition metal oxides with large specific surface area are attractive for high-activity catalysts, and hierarchical structures of transition metal oxides with porous feature possess the structural advantage in the transfer of gaseous reactant and product. In this work, porous Cu-Mn oxides with high surface area were successfully obtained through low-temperature coprecipitation method in alcohol/water solvent and then post-annealing. The addition of alcohol showed great influences on the shape and catalytic performances for CO oxidation. Dumbbell-like Cu-Mn oxide particles with splitting ends displayed high catalytic activity and a complete conversion of CO was achieved at 45 °C, suggesting a shape-dependent catalytic activity. The oxidative activity was attributed to a combination of factors including specific surface area, active surface oxygen species and Mn(IV) cations. The results may supply a new thought to design high-performance Cu-Mn oxide catalysts.

  4. Heteropoly acid catalytic treatment for reactivity enhancement and viscosity control of dissolving pulp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinqi; Duan, Chao; Zhao, Chengxin; Meng, Jingru; Qin, Xiaoyu; Xu, Yongjian; Ni, Yonghao

    2018-04-01

    The reactivity enhancement and viscosity control are of practical importance during the manufacture of high-quality cellulose (also known as dissolving pulp). In the study, the concept of using phosphotungstic acid (HPW) for this purpose was demonstrated. The Fock reactivity of resultant pulp increased from 49.1% to 74.1% after the HPW catalytic treatment at a dosage of 86.4 mg HPW/g odp. The improved results can be attributed to the increased fiber accessibility, thanks to the favorable fiber morphologic changes, such as increased pore volume/size, water retention value and specific surface area. HPW can be readily recycled/reused by evaporating method, where maintaining 87.1% catalytic activity after six recycle times. The HPW catalytic treatment concept may provide a green alternative for the manufacture of high-quality dissolving pulp. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Heterogeneous Catalytic Oligomerization of Ethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Oliver Dennis

    increased with temperature, with 17 wt.% observed at 190ºC. Higher reaction temperatures led to the formation of odd-numbered oligomers primarily due to acid-catalyzed cracking reactions. In the range of space velocities tested, a moderate WHSV of 2.0 hr-1 resulted in a local maximum of 10.6 wt.% of liquid hydrocarbon yield. A moderate nickel loading of 3.4 wt.% also resulted in the highest liquid yield out of the three loadings tested (10.6 wt.%). The variation in nickel loading revealed the importance of having a synergistic balance of nickel and acid sites on the catalyst to maximize ethylene conversion and maintain high liquid hydrocarbon yield. Lastly, we used supercritical ethylene as both a solvent and as a reactant for ethylene oligomerization over two silica-alumina type catalysts: Ni-Hbeta and Ni-Al-SBA-15. Specifically, the effect of pressure and temperature on the overall conversion and product selectivity were evaluated in the range from 0 to 65 bar and 30 to 120ºC. At subcritical conditions, the ethylene conversion reached a plateau of around 50%. By increasing the pressure past the critical point of ethylene, the conversion drastically increased to 71%. The increased conversion can be attributed to the solubility of certain oligomers, namely butene, in supercritical ethylene that promotes desorption from catalytic active site before further oligomerization. We also tested a mesoporous catalyst, Ni-Al-SBA-15 and observed conversion trends analogous to that of Ni-Hbeta. At supercritical conditions, ethylene oligomerization over Ni-Al-SBA-15 was more selective towards the butene product, with nearly 74 wt.% butenes observed. The catalyst activity increased with temperature from 30ºC to 120ºC. The experiment conducted at 30ºC showed very little activity and ethylene conversion, however it effectively heavy molecular weight species from the catalyst. This condition, albeit being not effective for ethylene oligomerization, could be implemented as an in

  6. Degradation of paracetamol by catalytic wet air oxidation and sequential adsorption - Catalytic wet air oxidation on activated carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quesada-Penate, I. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 4, Allee Emile Monso, F-31432 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31432 Toulouse (France); Julcour-Lebigue, C., E-mail: carine.julcour@ensiacet.fr [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 4, Allee Emile Monso, F-31432 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31432 Toulouse (France); Jauregui-Haza, U.J. [Instituto Superior de Tecnologias y Ciencias Aplicadas, Ave. Salvador Allende y Luaces, Habana (Cuba); Wilhelm, A.M.; Delmas, H. [Universite de Toulouse, INPT, UPS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, 4, Allee Emile Monso, F-31432 Toulouse (France); CNRS, Laboratoire de Genie Chimique, F-31432 Toulouse (France)

    2012-06-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Three activated carbons (AC) compared as adsorbents and oxidation catalysts. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Similar evolution for catalytic and adsorptive properties of AC over reuses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acidic and mesoporous AC to be preferred, despite lower initial efficiency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative degradation of paracetamol improves biodegradability. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Convenient hybrid adsorption-regenerative oxidation process for continuous treatment. - Abstract: The concern about the fate of pharmaceutical products has raised owing to the increasing contamination of rivers, lakes and groundwater. The aim of this paper is to evaluate two different processes for paracetamol removal. The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of paracetamol on activated carbon was investigated both as a water treatment technique using an autoclave reactor and as a regenerative treatment of the carbon after adsorption in a sequential fixed bed process. Three activated carbons (ACs) from different source materials were used as catalysts: two microporous basic ACs (S23 and C1) and a meso- and micro-porous acidic one (L27). During the first CWAO experiment the adsorption capacity and catalytic performance of fresh S23 and C1 were higher than those of fresh L27 despite its higher surface area. This situation changed after AC reuse, as finally L27 gave the best results after five CWAO cycles. Respirometry tests with activated sludge revealed that in the studied conditions the use of CWAO enhanced the aerobic biodegradability of the effluent. In the ADOX process L27 also showed better oxidation performances and regeneration efficiency. This different ageing was examined through AC physico-chemical properties.

  7. Catalytic enantioselective conjugate addition with Grignard reagents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez, Fernando; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Feringa, Ben L.

    In this Account, recent advances in catalytic asymmetric conjugate addition of Grignard reagents are discussed. Synthetic methodology to perform highly enantioselective Cu-catalyzed conjugate addition of Grignard reagents to cyclic enones with ee's up to 96% was reported in 2004 from our

  8. Catalytic models developed through social work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    of adolescents placed in out-of-home care and is characterised using three situated cases as empirical data. Afterwards the concept of catalytic processes is briefly presented and then applied in an analysis of pedagogical treatment in the three cases. The result is a different conceptualisation of the social...

  9. Fluid catalytic cracking : Feedstocks and reaction mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dupain, X.

    2006-01-01

    The Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) process is one of the key units in a modern refinery. Traditionally, its design is primarily aimed for the production of gasoline from heavy oil fractions, but as co-products also diesel blends and valuable gasses (e.g. propene and butenes) are formed in

  10. Catalytic dehydrogenations of ethylbenzene to styrene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederlof, C.

    2012-01-01

    This research work on the catalytic dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene (EB) to styrene (ST) had a primary goal of developing improved catalysts for dehydrogenation processes both in CO2 as well as with O2 that can compete with the conventional dehydrogenation process in steam. In order to achieve this

  11. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and catalytic oxidation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 123; Issue 3. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and catalytic oxidation properties of ONO/ONS donor Schiff base ruthenium(III) complexes containing PPh3/AsPh3. Priyarega M Muthu Tamizh R Karvembu R Prabhakaran K Natarajan. Volume 123 Issue 3 May ...

  12. DEALUMINATION OF MORDENITE ZEOLITE AND ITS CATALYTIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The xylene mixtures result from the catalytic reforming of petroleum NAFTA and the isomers of xylenes are usually obtained from this mixture by separation. After separation of o-isomers and p-isomers, the remainder richer in m-xylene, needs to be subjected to isomerization [2]. Xylene isomerization has received growing ...

  13. Novel Metal Nanomaterials and Their Catalytic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqing Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the rapidly developing areas of nanotechnology, nano-scale materials as heterogeneous catalysts in the synthesis of organic molecules have gotten more and more attention. In this review, we will summarize the synthesis of several new types of noble metal nanostructures (FePt@Cu nanowires, Pt@Fe2O3 nanowires and bimetallic Pt@Ir nanocomplexes; Pt-Au heterostructures, Au-Pt bimetallic nanocomplexes and Pt/Pd bimetallic nanodendrites; Au nanowires, CuO@Ag nanowires and a series of Pd nanocatalysts and their new catalytic applications in our group, to establish heterogeneous catalytic system in “green” environments. Further study shows that these materials have a higher catalytic activity and selectivity than previously reported nanocrystal catalysts in organic reactions, or show a superior electro-catalytic activity for the oxidation of methanol. The whole process might have a great impact to resolve the energy crisis and the environmental crisis that were caused by traditional chemical engineering. Furthermore, we hope that this article will provide a reference point for the noble metal nanomaterials’ development that leads to new opportunities in nanocatalysis.

  14. Catalytic site interactions in yeast OMP synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Barr, Eric W.; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    2014-01-01

    45 (2006) 5330-5342]. This behavior was investigated in the yeast enzyme by mutations in the conserved catalytic loop and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-diphosphate (PRPP) binding motif. Although the reaction is mechanistically sequential, the wild-type (WT) enzyme shows parallel lines in double reciprocal...

  15. THEORETICAL STUDY OF CATALYTIC HYDROGENATION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Catalytic hydrotreating process is a technique of purification of the crude oil with the aim of the improvement of the quality and the stability of fuels and lubricants. This is performed by the destruction of heterocyclic compounds and by the saturation of unsaturated hydrocarbons under the effect of the hydrogen pressure in ...

  16. Catalytic Converters Maintain Air Quality in Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    At Langley Research Center, engineers developed a tin-oxide based washcoat to prevent oxygen buildup in carbon dioxide lasers used to detect wind shears. Airflow Catalyst Systems Inc. of Rochester, New York, licensed the technology and then adapted the washcoat for use as a catalytic converter to treat the exhaust from diesel mining equipment.

  17. Electrochemical Promotion of Catalytic Reactions Using

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrushina, Irina; Bjerrum, Niels; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on electrochemical promotion (EP) of catalytic reactions using Pt/C/polybenzimidazole(H3PO4)/Pt/C fuel cell performed by the Energy and Materials Science Group (Technical University of Denmark) during the last 6 years[1-4]. The development of our...

  18. An Evaluation of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal Process for Use in a Mars Transit Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael; Borchers, Bruce

    1998-01-01

    An experimental program has been developed to evaluate the potential of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction (VPCAR) technology for use as a Mars Transit Vehicle water purification system. Design modifications which will be required to ensure proper operation of the VPCAR system in reduced gravity are also evaluated. The VPCAR system is an integrated wastewater treatment technology that combines a distillation process with high temperature catalytic oxidation. The distillation portion of the system utilizes a vapor compression distillation process to provide an energy efficient phase change separation. This portion of the system removes any inorganic salts and large molecular weight, organic contaminates, i.e., non-volatile, from the product water stream and concentrates these contaminates into a byproduct stream. To oxidize the volatile organic compounds and ammonia, a vapor phase, high temperature catalytic oxidizer is used. This catalytic system converts these compounds along with the aqueous product into CO2, H2O, and N2O. A secondary catalytic bed can then be used to reduce the N2O to nitrogen and oxygen (although not evaluated in this study). This paper describes the design specification of the VPCAR process, the relative benefits of its utilization in a Mars Transit Vehicle, and the design modification which will be required to ensure its proper operation in reduced gravity. In addition, the results of an experimental evaluation of the processors is presented. This evaluation presents the processors performance based upon product water purity, water recovery rates, and power.

  19. Sintering of Catalytic Nanoparticles: Particle Migration or Ostwald Ripening?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; DeLaRiva, Andrew T.; Challa, Sivakumar R.

    2013-01-01

    deactivation, is an important mechanism for the loss of catalyst activity. This is especially true for high temperature catalytic processes, such as steam reforming, automotive exhaust treatment, or catalytic combustion. With dwindling supplies of precious metals and increasing demand, fundamental...

  20. Cobaloxime-based photo-catalytic devices for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fihri, A.; Artero, V.; Razavet, M.; Baffert, C.; Fontecave, M. [CEA Grenoble, DSV, iRTSV, Lab Chim et Biol Metaux, CNRS, UMR 5249, Univ Grenoble 1, F-38054 Grenoble 9 (France); Leibl, W. [CEA, DSV, iBiTecS, Lab Photocatalyse et Biohydrogene, CNRS, URA 2096, Gif Sur Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    In this paper is described the synthesis and activity of a series of novel hetero-dinuclear ruthenium-cobaloxime photo-catalysts able to achieve the photochemical production of hydrogen with the highest turnover numbers so far reported for such devices. First of all, substituting cobalt for rare and expensive platinum, palladium, or rhodium metals in photo-catalysts is a first step toward economically viable hydrogen production. Cobaloximes appear to be good candidates for H{sub 2}-evolving catalysts, and they may provide a good basis for the design of photo-catalysts that function in pure water as both the solvent and the sustainable proton source. Secondly, a molecular connection between the sensitizer and the H{sub 2}-evolving catalyst seems to provide advantages regarding the photo-catalytic activity. Structural modifications of this connection should allow a better tuning of the electron transfer between the light-harvesting unit and the catalytic center and thus an increase of the efficiency of the system. (O.M.)

  1. Apparatus for the investigation of high-temperature, high-pressure gas-phase heterogeneous catalytic and photo-catalytic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvino, Jason F; Bennett, Trystan; Kler, Rantej; Hudson, Rohan J; Aupoil, Julien; Nann, Thomas; Golovko, Vladimir B; Andersson, Gunther G; Metha, Gregory F

    2017-05-01

    A high-temperature, high-pressure, pulsed-gas sampling and detection system has been developed for testing new catalytic and photocatalytic materials for the production of solar fuels. The reactor is fitted with a sapphire window to allow the irradiation of photocatalytic samples from a lamp or solar simulator light source. The reactor has a volume of only 3.80 ml allowing for the investigation of very small quantities of a catalytic material, down to 1 mg. The stainless steel construction allows the cell to be heated to 350 °C and can withstand pressures up to 27 bar, limited only by the sapphire window. High-pressure sampling is made possible by a computer controlled pulsed valve that delivers precise gas flow, enabling catalytic reactions to be monitored across a wide range of pressures. A residual gas analyser mass spectrometer forms a part of the detection system, which is able to provide a rapid, real-time analysis of the gas composition within the photocatalytic reaction chamber. This apparatus is ideal for investigating a number of industrially relevant reactions including photocatalytic water splitting and CO 2 reduction. Initial catalytic results using Pt-doped and Ru nanoparticle-doped TiO 2 as benchmark experiments are presented.

  2. Apparatus for the investigation of high-temperature, high-pressure gas-phase heterogeneous catalytic and photo-catalytic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvino, Jason F.; Bennett, Trystan; Kler, Rantej; Hudson, Rohan J.; Aupoil, Julien; Nann, Thomas; Golovko, Vladimir B.; Andersson, Gunther G.; Metha, Gregory F.

    2017-05-01

    A high-temperature, high-pressure, pulsed-gas sampling and detection system has been developed for testing new catalytic and photocatalytic materials for the production of solar fuels. The reactor is fitted with a sapphire window to allow the irradiation of photocatalytic samples from a lamp or solar simulator light source. The reactor has a volume of only 3.80 ml allowing for the investigation of very small quantities of a catalytic material, down to 1 mg. The stainless steel construction allows the cell to be heated to 350 °C and can withstand pressures up to 27 bar, limited only by the sapphire window. High-pressure sampling is made possible by a computer controlled pulsed valve that delivers precise gas flow, enabling catalytic reactions to be monitored across a wide range of pressures. A residual gas analyser mass spectrometer forms a part of the detection system, which is able to provide a rapid, real-time analysis of the gas composition within the photocatalytic reaction chamber. This apparatus is ideal for investigating a number of industrially relevant reactions including photocatalytic water splitting and CO2 reduction. Initial catalytic results using Pt-doped and Ru nanoparticle-doped TiO2 as benchmark experiments are presented.

  3. An Assessment of the Technical Readiness of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal Process (VPCAR) Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael

    2000-01-01

    This poster provides an assessment of the technical readiness of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal Process (VPCAR). The VPCAR technology is a fully regenerative water recycling technology designed specifically for applications such as a near term Mars exploration mission. The VPCAR technology is a highly integrated distillation/catalytic oxidation based water processor. It is designed to accept a combined wastewater stream (urine, condensate, and hygiene) and produces potable water in a single process step which requires -no regularly scheduled re-supply or maintenance for a 3 year mission. The technology is designed to be modular and to fit into a volume comparable to a single International Space Station Rack (when sized for a crew of 6). This poster provides a description of the VPCAR technology and a summary of the current performance of the technology. Also provided are the results of two separate NASA sponsored system trade studies which investigated the potential payback of further development of the VPCAR technology.

  4. Active Component Migration and Catalytic Properties of Nitrogen Modified Composite Catalytic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miaomiao Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available During the catalytic combustion reaction of methane, the migration of the active species on surface facilitates the catalytic reaction, and the element doping can improve the redox performance of the catalyst. Nitrogen-modified perovskite type composite catalysts were prepared by hydrothermal method and then characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET, temperature-programmed reductions (TPR, and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS. The results revealed that nitrogen sources (urea, biuret, melamine, carbohydrazide, and semicarbazide hydrochloride and nitrogen source addition changed the catalytic performance in physical and chemical properties, the migration of reactive species and the catalytic performance. When the addition amount of semicarbazide hydrochloride was three times that of LaCoO3, the composite catalysts had high Co3+/Co2+ (1.39 and Oads/Olat (15.18 and showed the best catalytic performance: the temperatures that are required for achieving methane conversion of 50% and 90% were 277 and 360 °C, which are more effective than noble metal oxides. Moreover, the in situ diffuse reflectance infrared fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS were applied to elucidate the efficient for CH4 removal and also can further explain the surface reaction mechanism of the composite catalyst during the methane catalytic combustion.

  5. Structural determinants of APOBEC3B non-catalytic domain for molecular assembly and catalytic regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xiao; Yang, Hanjing; Arutiunian, Vagan; Fang, Yao; Besse, Guillaume; Morimoto, Cherie; Zirkle, Brett; Chen, Xiaojiang S. (USC)

    2017-05-30

    The catalytic activity of human cytidine deaminase APOBEC3B (A3B) has been correlated with kataegic mutational patterns within multiple cancer types. The molecular basis of how the N-terminal non-catalytic CD1 regulates the catalytic activity and consequently, biological function of A3B remains relatively unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of a soluble human A3B-CD1 variant and delineate several structural elements of CD1 involved in molecular assembly, nucleic acid interactions and catalytic regulation of A3B. We show that (i) A3B expressed in human cells exists in hypoactive high-molecular-weight (HMW) complexes, which can be activated without apparent dissociation into low-molecular-weight (LMW) species after RNase A treatment. (ii) Multiple surface hydrophobic residues of CD1 mediate the HMW complex assembly and affect the catalytic activity, including one tryptophan residue W127 that likely acts through regulating nucleic acid binding. (iii) One of the highly positively charged surfaces on CD1 is involved in RNA-dependent attenuation of A3B catalysis. (iv) Surface hydrophobic residues of CD1 are involved in heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) binding to A3B. The structural and biochemical insights described here suggest that unique structural features on CD1 regulate the molecular assembly and catalytic activity of A3B through distinct mechanisms.

  6. Lipase immobilized catalytically active membrane for synthesis of lauryl stearate in a pervaporation membrane reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weidong; Qing, Weihua; Ren, Zhongqi; Li, Wei; Chen, Jiangrong

    2014-11-01

    A composite catalytically active membrane immobilized with Candida rugosa lipase has been prepared by immersion phase inversion technique for enzymatic synthesis of lauryl stearate in a pervaporation membrane reactor. SEM images showed that a "sandwich-like" membrane structure with a porous lipase-PVA catalytic layer uniformly coated on a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)/polyethersulfone (PES) bilayer was obtained. Optimum conditions for lipase immobilization in the catalytic layer were determined. The membrane was proved to exhibit superior thermal stability, pH stability and reusability than free lipase under similar conditions. In the case of pervaporation coupled synthesis of lauryl stearate, benefited from in-situ water removal by the membrane, a conversion enhancement of approximately 40% was achieved in comparison to the equilibrium conversion obtained in batch reactors. In addition to conversion enhancement, it was also found that excess water removal by the catalytically active membrane appears to improve activity of the lipase immobilized. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. High-pressure catalytic reactions over single-crystal metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, JoséA.; Wayne Goodman, D.

    1991-11-01

    Studies dealing with high-pressure catalytic reactions over single-crystal surfaces are reviewed. The coupling of an apparatus for the measurement of reaction kinetics at elevated pressures with an ultrahigh vacuum system for surface analysis allows detailed study of structure sensitivity, the effects of promoters and inhibitors on catalytic activity, and, in certain cases, identification of reaction intermediates by post-reaction surface analysis. Examples are provided which demonstrate the relevance of single-crystal studies for modeling the behaviour of high-surface-area supported catalysts. Studies of CO methanation and CO oxidation over single-crystal surfaces provide convincing evidence that these reactions are structure insensitive. For structure-sensitive reactions (ammonia synthesis, alkane hydrogenolysis, alkane isomerization, water-gas shift reaction, etc.) model single-crystal studies allow correlations to be established between surface structure and catalytic activity. The effects of both electronegative (S and P) and electropositive (alkali metals) impurities upon the catalytic activity of metal single crystals for ammonia synthesis, CO methanation, alkane hydrogenolysis, ethylene epoxidation and water-gas shift are discussed. The roles of "ensemble" and "ligand" effects in bimetallic catalysts are examined in light of data obtained using surfaces prepared by vapor-depositing one metal onto a crystal face of a dissimilar metal.

  8. Electrochemical, H2O2-Boosted Catalytic Oxidation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akse, James R.; Thompson, John O.; Schussel, Leonard J.

    2004-01-01

    An improved water-sterilizing aqueous-phase catalytic oxidation system (APCOS) is based partly on the electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). This H2O2-boosted system offers significant improvements over prior dissolved-oxygen water-sterilizing systems in the way in which it increases oxidation capabilities, supplies H2O2 when needed, reduces the total organic carbon (TOC) content of treated water to a low level, consumes less energy than prior systems do, reduces the risk of contamination, and costs less to operate. This system was developed as a variant of part of an improved waste-management subsystem of the life-support system of a spacecraft. Going beyond its original intended purpose, it offers the advantage of being able to produce H2O2 on demand for surface sterilization and/or decontamination: this is a major advantage inasmuch as the benign byproducts of this H2O2 system, unlike those of systems that utilize other chemical sterilants, place no additional burden of containment control on other spacecraft air- or water-reclamation systems.

  9. Advances in solid-catalytic and non-catalytic technologies for biodiesel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, Aminul; Taufiq-Yap, Yun Hin; Chan, Eng-Seng; Moniruzzaman, M.; Islam, Saiful; Nabi, Md. Nurun

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The recent technologies for promoting biodiesel synthesis were elucidated. • The design of catalyst consideration of biodiesel production was proposed. • The recent advances and remaining difficulties in biodiesel synthesis were outlined. • The future research trend in biodiesel synthesis was highlighted. - Abstract: The insecure supply of fossil fuel coerces the scientific society to keep a vision to boost investments in the renewable energy sector. Among the many renewable fuels currently available around the world, biodiesel offers an immediate impact in our energy. In fact, a huge interest in related research indicates a promising future for the biodiesel technology. Heterogeneous catalyzed production of biodiesel has emerged as a preferred route as it is environmentally benign needs no water washing and product separation is much easier. The number of well-defined catalyst complexes that are able to catalyze transesterification reactions efficiently has been significantly expanded in recent years. The activity of catalysts, specifically in application to solid acid/base catalyst in transesterification reaction depends on their structure, strength of basicity/acidity, surface area as well as the stability of catalyst. There are various process intensification technologies based on the use of alternate energy sources such as ultrasound and microwave. The latest advances in research and development related to biodiesel production is represented by non-catalytic supercritical method and focussed exclusively on these processes as forthcoming transesterification processes. The latest developments in this field featuring highly active catalyst complexes are outlined in this review. The knowledge of more extensive research on advances in biofuels will allow a deeper insight into the mechanism of these technologies toward meeting the critical energy challenges in future

  10. Catalytic aerobic oxidation of bio-renewable chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbanev, Yury

    , EDS, XRF and other methods. Supported gold and ruthenium hydroxide catalyst systems were explored for the aerobic oxidation of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) to 2,5-furandicarboxylic acid (FDA), a potential polymer building block for the plastic industry, or its dimethyl ester (FDMC). High product...... selectivities and yields were obtained under optimized conditions. Heterogeneous catalysts consisting of Au nanoparticles on different supports were shown to efficiently oxidize HMF to FDA or FDMC in water or methanol, respectively. Additionally, the reaction conditions were shown to be adjustable...... with supported Ru(OH)x catalysts in organic solvents. The examined catalyst systems and reaction conditions were also shown to be applicable for the efficient oxidation of other substituted furans. Furthermore, novel catalytic systems comprising vanadia supported on zeolites were investigated for the aerobic...

  11. Triggering activity of catalytic rod-like supramolecular polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, Elisa; van Genabeek, Bas; Lamers, Brigitte A G; Koenigs, Marcel M E; Meijer, E W; Palmans, Anja R A

    2015-02-23

    Supramolecular polymers based on benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamides (BTAs) functionalized with an L- or D-proline moiety display high catalytic activity towards aldol reactions in water. High turnover frequencies (TOF) of up to 27×10(-4) s(-1) and excellent stereoselectivities (up to 96% de, up to 99% ee) were observed. In addition, the catalyst could be reused and remained active at catalyst loadings and substrate concentrations as low as 0.1 mol % and 50 mM, respectively. A temperature-induced conformational change in the supramolecular polymer triggers the high activity of the catalyst. The supramolecular polymer's helical sense in combination with the configuration of the proline (L- or D-) is responsible for the observed selectivity. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Functional tuning of the catalytic residue pKa in a de novo designed esterase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebler, Katharina; Lengyel, Zsófia; Castañeda, Carlos A; Makhlynets, Olga V

    2017-09-01

    AlleyCatE is a de novo designed esterase that can be allosterically regulated by calcium ions. This artificial enzyme has been shown to hydrolyze p-nitrophenyl acetate (pNPA) and 4-nitrophenyl-(2-phenyl)-propanoate (pNPP) with high catalytic efficiency. AlleyCatE was created by introducing a single-histidine residue (His 144 ) into a hydrophobic pocket of calmodulin. In this work, we explore the determinants of catalytic properties of AlleyCatE. We obtained the pK a value of the catalytic histidine using experimental measurements by NMR and pH rate profile and compared these values to those predicted from electrostatics pK a calculations (from both empirical and continuum electrostatics calculations). Surprisingly, the pK a value of the catalytic histidine inside the hydrophobic pocket of calmodulin is elevated as compared to the model compound pK a value of this residue in water. We determined that a short-range favorable interaction with Glu 127 contributes to the elevated pK a of His 144 . We have rationally modulated local electrostatic potential in AlleyCatE to decrease the pK a of its active nucleophile, His 144 , by 0.7 units. As a direct result of the decrease in the His 144 pK a value, catalytic efficiency of the enzyme increased by 45% at pH 6. This work shows that a series of simple NMR experiments that can be performed using low field spectrometers, combined with straightforward computational analysis, provide rapid and accurate guidance to rationally improve catalytic efficiency of histidine-promoted catalysis. Proteins 2017; 85:1656-1665. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Effect of inlet cone pipe angle in catalytic converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amira Zainal, Nurul; Farhain Azmi, Ezzatul; Arifin Samad, Mohd

    2018-03-01

    The catalytic converter shows significant consequence to improve the performance of the vehicle start from it launched into production. Nowadays, the geometric design of the catalytic converter has become critical to avoid the behavior of backpressure in the exhaust system. The backpressure essentially reduced the performance of vehicles and increased the fuel consumption gradually. Consequently, this study aims to design various models of catalytic converter and optimize the volume of fluid flow inside the catalytic converter by changing the inlet cone pipe angles. Three different geometry angles of the inlet cone pipe of the catalytic converter were assessed. The model is simulated in Solidworks software to determine the optimum geometric design of the catalytic converter. The result showed that by decreasing the divergence angle of inlet cone pipe will upsurge the performance of the catalytic converter.

  14. On the Structural Context and Identification of Enzyme Catalytic Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yu-Tung; Huang, Shao-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes play important roles in most of the biological processes. Although only a small fraction of residues are directly involved in catalytic reactions, these catalytic residues are the most crucial parts in enzymes. The study of the fundamental and unique features of catalytic residues benefits the understanding of enzyme functions and catalytic mechanisms. In this work, we analyze the structural context of catalytic residues based on theoretical and experimental structure flexibility. The results show that catalytic residues have distinct structural features and context. Their neighboring residues, whether sequence or structure neighbors within specific range, are usually structurally more rigid than those of noncatalytic residues. The structural context feature is combined with support vector machine to identify catalytic residues from enzyme structure. The prediction results are better or comparable to those of recent structure-based prediction methods. PMID:23484160

  15. Catalytic combustion for the elimination of methane, BTEX and other VOC : IV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, R.E.; Wanke, S.E.

    2008-01-01

    Options for volatile organic compound combustion include homogeneous combustion (flaring) or catalytic combustion involving a flameless combustion process that uses a solid catalyst to promote the combustion reaction. This presentation discussed relative reactivity testing for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) over commercial catalysts. Several commercial pad catalysts were tested, as well as other powders. The relative reactivity of methane as well as benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylene (BTEX) were investigated. The purpose of the project was to evaluate combustion of concentrated methane streams that contained BTEX compounds; evaluate catalytic combustion using a counter diffusive radiant heater; develop mathematical models for the reactor to enhance design and understanding; improve the catalyst for BTEX combustion; and target application-dehydrator units. Topics that were addressed in the presentation included methane and benzene conversion; catalytic radiant heaters; small industrial and commercial units; measured temperature distribution; fuel slippage, methane conversion; the effect of water and hydrocarbons; the effect of water-liquid injection; and water addition as vapour. Several observations were offered, including that high percentages of injected liquid water can reduce reactor operating temperature; combustion of BTEX remained highly efficient, however liquid injection could also cause temperature reductions and ultimately the reactor would extinguish; and pre-heating the feed can eliminate the temperature drop and pad wetness problem. It was concluded that BTEX compounds are reactive, and the technology appears promising. 19 figs

  16. Synthesis and catalytic properties of ferrocenophane phosphines

    OpenAIRE

    Škoch, Karel

    2014-01-01

    6 Title: Sythesis and catalytic properties of ferrocenophane phosphines Author: Karel Škoch Institution: Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Department of Inorganic Chemistry Supervisor: prof. RNDr. Petr Štěpnička, Ph.D. Keywords: ferrocene, ferrocenophane, phosphine ligands, palladium, asymetric catalysis, aza- Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction, asymetric allylic alkylation Abstract: This Thesis describes the preparation of five sterically and electronically different ferrocene ph...

  17. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2017-12-19

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  18. Materials for High-Temperature Catalytic Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersson, Anders

    2003-04-01

    Catalytic combustion is an environmentally friendly technique to combust fuels in e.g. gas turbines. Introducing a catalyst into the combustion chamber of a gas turbine allows combustion outside the normal flammability limits. Hence, the adiabatic flame temperature may be lowered below the threshold temperature for thermal NO{sub X} formation while maintaining a stable combustion. However, several challenges are connected to the application of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The first part of this thesis reviews the use of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The influence of the fuel has been studied and compared over different catalyst materials. The material section is divided into two parts. The first concerns bimetallic palladium catalysts. These catalysts showed a more stable activity compared to their pure palladium counterparts for methane combustion. This was verified both by using an annular reactor at ambient pressure and a pilot-scale reactor at elevated pressures and flows closely resembling the ones found in a gas turbine combustor. The second part concerns high-temperature materials, which may be used either as active or washcoat materials. A novel group of materials for catalysis, i.e. garnets, has been synthesised and tested in combustion of methane, a low-heating value gas and diesel fuel. The garnets showed some interesting abilities especially for combustion of low-heating value, LHV, gas. Two other materials were also studied, i.e. spinels and hexa aluminates, both showed very promising thermal stability and the substituted hexa aluminates also showed a good catalytic activity. Finally, deactivation of the catalyst materials was studied. In this part the sulphur poisoning of palladium, platinum and the above-mentioned complex metal oxides has been studied for combustion of a LHV gas. Platinum and surprisingly the garnet were least deactivated. Palladium was severely affected for methane combustion while the other washcoat materials were

  19. Enantioselective catalytic fluorinative aza-semipinacol rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov-Michailidis, Fedor; Pupier, Marion; Besnard, Céline; Bürgi, Thomas; Alexakis, Alexandre

    2014-10-03

    An efficient and highly stereoselective fluorinative aza-semipinacol rearrangement is described. The catalytic reaction requires use of Selectfluor in combination with the chiral, enantiopure phosphate anion derived from acid L3. Under optimized conditions, cyclopropylamines A were transformed into β-fluoro cyclobutylimines B in good yields and high levels of diastereo- and enantiocontrol. Furthermore, the optically active cyclobutylimines were reduced diastereoselectively with L-Selectride in the corresponding fluorinated amines C, compounds of significant interest in the pharmacological industry.

  20. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2016-02-09

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  1. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2018-04-10

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  2. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alochols to hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2017-01-03

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  3. Antibody proteases: induction of catalytic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabibov, A G; Friboulet, A; Thomas, D; Demin, A V; Ponomarenko, N A; Vorobiev, I I; Pillet, D; Paon, M; Alexandrova, E S; Telegin, G B; Reshetnyak, A V; Grigorieva, O V; Gnuchev, N V; Malishkin, K A; Genkin, D D

    2002-10-01

    Most of the data accumulated throughout the years on investigation of catalytic antibodies indicate that their production increases on the background of autoimmune abnormalities. The different approaches to induction of catalytic response toward recombinant gp120 HIV-1 surface protein in mice with various autoimmune pathologies are described. The peptidylphosphonate conjugate containing structural part of gp120 molecule is used for reactive immunization of NZB/NZW F1, MRL, and SJL mice. The specific modification of heavy and light chains of mouse autoantibodies with Val-Ala-Glu-Glu-Glu-Val-PO(OPh)2 reactive peptide was demonstrated. Increased proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies in SJL mice encouraged us to investigate the production of antigen-specific catalytic antibodies on the background of induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The immunization of autoimmune-prone mice with the engineered fusions containing the fragments of gp120 and encephalitogenic epitope of myelin basic protein (MBP(89-104)) was made. The proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies isolated from the sera of autoimmune mice immunized by the described antigen was shown. Specific immune response of SJL mice to these antigens was characterized. Polyclonal antibodies purified from sera of the immunized animals revealed proteolytic activity. The antiidiotypic approach to raise the specific proteolytic antibody as an "internal image" of protease is described. The "second order" monoclonal antibodies toward subtilisin Carlsberg revealed pronounced proteolytic activity.

  4. Catalytic hydrogen recombination for nuclear containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koroll, G.W.; Lau, D.W.P.; Dewit, W.A.; Graham, W.R.C.

    1994-01-01

    Catalytic recombiners appear to be a credible option for hydrogen mitigation in nuclear containments. The passive operation, versatility and ease of back fitting are appealing for existing stations and new designs. Recently, a generation of wet-proofed catalyst materials have been developed at AECL which are highly specific to H 2 -O 2 , are active at ambient temperatures and are being evaluated for containment applications. Two types of catalytic recombiners were evaluated for hydrogen removal in containments based on the AECL catalyst. The first is a catalytic combustor for application in existing air streams such as provided by fans or ventilation systems. The second is an autocatalytic recombiner which uses the enthalpy of reaction to produce natural convective flow over the catalyst elements. Intermediate-scale results obtained in 6 m 3 and 10 m 3 spherical and cylindrical vessels are given to demonstrate self-starting limits, operating limits, removal capacity, scaling parameters, flow resistance, mixing behaviour in the vicinity of an operating recombiner and sensitivity to poisoning, fouling and radiation. (author). 13 refs., 10 figs

  5. Tailoring Catalytic Properties of Pd/Co₃O₄ Catalysts via Structure Engineering for Methane Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lufei; Zhu, Yan

    2018-04-01

    The catalytic behavior of Co3O4 catalysts loaded by Pd for methane oxidation can be tailored by distinct spatial architectures and surface structures of such catalysts. Pd nanoparticles nested in Co3O4 with hexagonal-like microflakes exhibited superior catalytic activity, that is, T10 = 250 °C and T90 = 325 °C are correlated to 10% and 90% conversion of methane. Further Pd/Co3O4 microflakes catalyst can almost restore to its initial value in the absence of water when water vapor was cut off. This excellent catalysis should be attributed to its exposed more open surface, more active oxygen species and stronger redox properties.

  6. Incorporation of catalytic dehydrogenation into fischer-tropsch synthesis to significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Gerald P.

    2012-11-13

    A new method of producing liquid transportation fuels from coal and other hydrocarbons that significantly reduces carbon dioxide emissions by combining Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with catalytic dehydrogenation is claimed. Catalytic dehydrogenation (CDH) of the gaseous products (C1-C4) of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) can produce large quantities of hydrogen while converting the carbon to multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). Incorporation of CDH into a FTS-CDH plant converting coal to liquid fuels can eliminate all or most of the CO.sub.2 emissions from the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction that is currently used to elevate the H.sub.2 level of coal-derived syngas for FTS. Additionally, the FTS-CDH process saves large amounts of water used by the WGS reaction and produces a valuable by-product, MWCNT.

  7. Effect of support on the catalytic activity of manganese oxide catalyts for toluene combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozan, Gulin Selda, E-mail: gpozan@istanbul.edu.tr [Istanbul University, Faculty of Engineering, Chemical Engineering Department, Avcilar 34320, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2012-06-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, obtained from Bohmite, as a support for enhancing of the activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The support material for catalytic oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The manganese state and oxygen species effect on the catalytic combustion reaction. - Abstract: The aim of this work was to study combustion of toluene (1000 ppm) over MnO{sub 2} modified with different supports. {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} obtained from Boehmite, {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (commercial), SiO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} were used as commercial support materials. In view of potential interest of this process, the influence of support material on the catalytic performance was discussed. The deposition of 9.5MnO{sub 2} was performed by impregnation over support. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), temperature programmed reduction and oxidation (TPR/TPO) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The catalytic tests were carried out at atmospheric pressure in a fixed-bed flow reactor. 9.5MnO{sub 2}/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(B) (synthesized from Boehmite) catalyst exhibits the highest catalytic activity, over which the toluene conversion was up to 90% at a temperature of 289 Degree-Sign C. Considering all the characterization and reaction data reported in this study, it was concluded that the manganese state and oxygen species played an important role in the catalytic activity.

  8. Effect of support on the catalytic activity of manganese oxide catalyts for toluene combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozan, Gulin Selda

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► α-Al 2 O 3 , obtained from Bohmite, as a support for enhancing of the activity. ► The support material for catalytic oxidation. ► The manganese state and oxygen species effect on the catalytic combustion reaction. - Abstract: The aim of this work was to study combustion of toluene (1000 ppm) over MnO 2 modified with different supports. α-Al 2 O 3 and γ-Al 2 O 3 obtained from Boehmite, γ-Al 2 O 3 (commercial), SiO 2 , TiO 2 and ZrO 2 were used as commercial support materials. In view of potential interest of this process, the influence of support material on the catalytic performance was discussed. The deposition of 9.5MnO 2 was performed by impregnation over support. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), temperature programmed reduction and oxidation (TPR/TPO) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The catalytic tests were carried out at atmospheric pressure in a fixed-bed flow reactor. 9.5MnO 2 /α-Al 2 O 3 (B) (synthesized from Boehmite) catalyst exhibits the highest catalytic activity, over which the toluene conversion was up to 90% at a temperature of 289 °C. Considering all the characterization and reaction data reported in this study, it was concluded that the manganese state and oxygen species played an important role in the catalytic activity.

  9. Heterogeneous Molecular Catalysis of Electrochemical Reactions: Volcano Plots and Catalytic Tafel Plots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costentin, Cyrille; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2017-06-14

    We analyze here, in the framework of heterogeneous molecular catalysis, the reasons for the occurrence or nonoccurrence of volcanoes upon plotting the kinetics of the catalytic reaction versus the stabilization free energy of the primary intermediate of the catalytic process. As in the case of homogeneous molecular catalysis or catalysis by surface-active metallic sites, a strong motivation of such studies relates to modern energy challenges, particularly those involving small molecules, such as water, hydrogen, oxygen, proton, and carbon dioxide. This motivation is particularly pertinent for what concerns heterogeneous molecular catalysis, since it is commonly preferred to homogeneous molecular catalysis by the same molecules if only for chemical separation purposes and electrolytic cell architecture. As with the two other catalysis modes, the main drawback of the volcano plot approach is the basic assumption that the kinetic responses depend on a single descriptor, viz., the stabilization free energy of the primary intermediate. More comprehensive approaches, investigating the responses to the maximal number of experimental factors, and conveniently expressed as catalytic Tafel plots, should clearly be preferred. This is more so in the case of heterogeneous molecular catalysis in that additional transport factors in the supporting film may additionally affect the current-potential responses. This is attested by the noteworthy presence of maxima in catalytic Tafel plots as well as their dependence upon the cyclic voltammetric scan rate.

  10. Heterogeneous catalytic materials solid state chemistry, surface chemistry and catalytic behaviour

    CERN Document Server

    Busca, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous Catalytic Materials discusses experimental methods and the latest developments in three areas of research: heterogeneous catalysis; surface chemistry; and the chemistry of catalysts. Catalytic materials are those solids that allow the chemical reaction to occur efficiently and cost-effectively. This book provides you with all necessary information to synthesize, characterize, and relate the properties of a catalyst to its behavior, enabling you to select the appropriate catalyst for the process and reactor system. Oxides (used both as catalysts and as supports for cata

  11. A Two-Continua Approach to Eulerian Simulation of Water Spray

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Michael Bang; Østerby, Ole

    2013-01-01

    and water phases co-existing at each point in space. The fundamental equations originate in applied physics and we present a number of contributions that make Eulerian two-continua spray simulation feasible for computer graphics applications. The contributions include a Poisson equation that fits...

  12. Degradation of the ammonia wastewater in aqueous medium with ozone in combination with mesoporous TiO2 catalytic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiwu; Qiu, Jianping; Zheng, Chaocan; Li, Liqing

    2017-03-01

    TiO2 mesoporous nanomaterials are now widely used in catalytic ozone technology. In this paper, the market P25 as precursor hydrothermal method to prepare TiO2 mesoporous materials, ozone catalyst material characterization by transmission electron microscopy, surface area analyzers, and X-ray diffraction technique and found that nanotubes, nanosheets, nanorods through characterization results, nano-particles of different morphology and anatase and rutile proportion of the ozone catalytic material can be controlled by the calcination temperature and the temperature of hot water to give, and with the hot water temperature and calcination temperature, the catalyst becomes small aperture size larger catalyst crystalline phase from anatase to rutile gradually shift. Catalytic materials have been prepared by the Joint ozone degradation of ammonia wastewater to evaluate mesoporous TiO2 nanomaterials ozone catalytic performance, the results showed that: ammonia wastewater removal efficiency of various catalytic materials relatively separate ozone and markets P25 effects are significantly improved, and TiO2 nanotubes cooperate with ozone degradation ammonia wastewater highest efficiency, in addition, rutile TiO2 catalysts, the more the better the performance of their ozone catalysis.

  13. The tritium labeling of Butibufen by heterogeneous catalytic exchange; Marcado del Butibufen con Tritio por inter- cambio catalitico en disolucion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santamaria, J.; Rebollo, D.

    1986-07-01

    The labeling of a new non-steroidal antiinflammatory agent, Butibufen (2-(4-isobutylphenyl) butyric acid) was studied. The method used was heterogeneous catalytic exchange between Butibufen and tritiated water, obtained in situ. Purification was accomplished through thin layer chromatography. Concentration, purity and specific activity of the labeled drug were determined by ultraviolet and liquid scintillation techniques. (Author) 7 refs.

  14. Protein structure based prediction of catalytic residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Worldwide structural genomics projects continue to release new protein structures at an unprecedented pace, so far nearly 6000, but only about 60% of these proteins have any sort of functional annotation. Results We explored a range of features that can be used for the prediction of functional residues given a known three-dimensional structure. These features include various centrality measures of nodes in graphs of interacting residues: closeness, betweenness and page-rank centrality. We also analyzed the distance of functional amino acids to the general center of mass (GCM) of the structure, relative solvent accessibility (RSA), and the use of relative entropy as a measure of sequence conservation. From the selected features, neural networks were trained to identify catalytic residues. We found that using distance to the GCM together with amino acid type provide a good discriminant function, when combined independently with sequence conservation. Using an independent test set of 29 annotated protein structures, the method returned 411 of the initial 9262 residues as the most likely to be involved in function. The output 411 residues contain 70 of the annotated 111 catalytic residues. This represents an approximately 14-fold enrichment of catalytic residues on the entire input set (corresponding to a sensitivity of 63% and a precision of 17%), a performance competitive with that of other state-of-the-art methods. Conclusions We found that several of the graph based measures utilize the same underlying feature of protein structures, which can be simply and more effectively captured with the distance to GCM definition. This also has the added the advantage of simplicity and easy implementation. Meanwhile sequence conservation remains by far the most influential feature in identifying functional residues. We also found that due the rapid changes in size and composition of sequence databases, conservation calculations must be recalibrated for specific

  15. Catalytic bioscavengers in nerve agent poisoning: A promising approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worek, Franz; Thiermann, Horst; Wille, Timo

    2016-02-26

    The repeated use of the nerve agent sarin against civilians in Syria in 2013 emphasizes the continuing threat by chemical warfare agents. Multiple studies demonstrated a limited efficacy of standard atropine-oxime treatment in nerve agent poisoning and called for the development of alternative and more effective treatment strategies. A novel approach is the use of stoichiometric or catalytic bioscavengers for detoxification of nerve agents in the systemic circulation prior to distribution into target tissues. Recent progress in the design of enzyme mutants with reversed stereo selectivity resulting in improved catalytic activity and their use in in vivo studies supports the concept of catalytic bioscavengers. Yet, further research is necessary to improve the catalytic activity, substrate spectrum and in vivo biological stability of enzyme mutants. The pros and cons of catalytic bioscavengers will be discussed in detail and future requirements for the development of catalytic bioscavengers will be proposed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Plasma-catalytic reforming of liquid hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedybaliuk, O.A.; Chernyak, V.Ya; Kolgan, V.V.; Iukhymenko, V.V.; Solomenko, O.V.; Fedirchyk, I.I.; Martysh, E.V.; Demchina, V.P.; Klochok, N.V.; Dragnev, S.V.

    2015-01-01

    The series of experiments studying the plasma-catalytic reforming of liquid hydrocarbons was carried out. The dynamic plasma-liquid system based on a low-power rotating gliding arc with solid electrodes was used for the investigation of liquid hydrocarbons reforming process. Conversion was done via partial oxidation. A part of oxidant flow was activated by the discharge. Synthesis-gas composition was analysed by means of mass-spectrometry and gas-chromatography. A standard boiler, which operates on natural gas and LPG, was used for the burning of synthesis-gas

  17. Catalytic oxidation of soot over alkaline niobates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecchi, G.; Cabrera, B.; Buljan, A.; Delgado, E.J.; Gordon, A.L.; Jimenez, R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► No previous reported studies about alkaline niobates as catalysts for soot oxidation. ► NaNbO 3 and KNbO 3 perovskite-type oxides show lower activation energy than other lanthanoid perovskite-type oxides. ► The alkaline niobate does not show deactivation by metal loss. - Abstract: The lack of studies in the current literature about the assessment of alkaline niobates as catalysts for soot oxidation has motivated this research. In this study, the synthesis, characterization and assessment of alkaline metal niobates as catalysts for soot combustion are reported. The solids MNbO 3 (M = Li, Na, K, Rb) are synthesized by a citrate method, calcined at 450 °C, 550 °C, 650 °C, 750 °C, and characterized by AAS, N 2 adsorption, XRD, O 2 -TPD, FTIR and SEM. All the alkaline niobates show catalytic activity for soot combustion, and the activity depends basically on the nature of the alkaline metal and the calcination temperature. The highest catalytic activity, expressed as the temperature at which combustion of carbon black occurs at the maximum rate, is shown by KNbO 3 calcined at 650 °C. At this calcination temperature, the catalytic activity follows an order dependent on the atomic number, namely: KNbO 3 > NaNbO 3 > LiNbO 3 . The RbNbO 3 solid do not follow this trend presumably due to the perovskite structure was not reached. The highest catalytic activity shown by of KNbO 3 , despite the lower apparent activation energy of NaNbO 3 , stress the importance of the metal nature and suggests the hypothesis that K + ions are the active sites for soot combustion. It must be pointed out that alkaline niobate subjected to consecutive soot combustion cycles does not show deactivation by metal loss, due to the stabilization of the alkaline metal inside the perovskite structure.

  18. Catalytic wet oxidation of black liquor

    OpenAIRE

    Viader Riera, Gerard

    2012-01-01

    The major aspects of wet air oxidation and catalytic wet air oxidation have been reviewed in this work paying special attention to the reaction mechanisms, kinetics and the industrial process. In the experimental section a set of heterogeneous catalysts have been tested in the wet oxidation of non-wood black liquor. The oxidation runs were performed batchwise in a laboratory-scale mechanically stirred slurry reactor for 1 h at a temperature of 170°C and total pressure of 12 bar. Pure oxygen w...

  19. Atomic Distribution in Catalytic Amorphous Metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanghita Mridha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The atomic distribution in catalytically active metallic glass alloys, Pd43Cu27Ni10P20 and Pt57.5Cu14.7Ni5.3P22.5, was investigated using three-dimensional atom probe microscopy. Atom probe analysis showed uniform distribution of constituent elements for both the starting amorphous alloys, with no phase separation. Both the crystallized alloys showed eutectic microstructure with a very sharp interface (~0.5 nm as determined from atom probe. The atomic distribution in the devitrified state is explained based on the “fragile liquid” behavior for these noble-metal glassy alloys.

  20. Catalytic Synthesis of Nitriles in Continuous Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordvang, Emily Catherine

    , alternative path to acetonitrile from ethanol via the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylamine. The catalytic activity and product ratios of the batch and continuous flow reactions are compared and the effect of reaction conditions on the reaction is investigated. The effects of ammonia in the reaction...... dehydrogenation of ethylamine and post-reaction purging.Chapter 4 outlines the application of RuO2/Al2O3 catalysts to the oxidative dehydrogenation of benzylamine in air, utilizing a new reaction setup. Again, batch and continuous flow reactions are compared and the effects of reaction conditions, ammonia...

  1. Methane combustion in catalytic premixed burners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerri, I.; Saracco, G.; Specchia, V.

    1999-01-01

    Catalytic premixed burners for domestic boiler applications were developed with the aim of achieving a power modularity from 10 to 100% and pollutant emissions limited to NO x 2 , where the combustion took place entirely inside the burner heating it to incandescence and allowing a decrease in the flame temperature and NO x emissions. Such results were confirmed through further tests carried out in a commercial industrial-scale boiler equipped with the conical panels. All the results, by varying the excess air and the heat power employed, are presented and discussed [it

  2. Tritium stripping by a catalytic exchange stripper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heung, L.K.; Gibson, G.W.; Ortman, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    A catalytic exchange process for stripping elemental tritium from gas streams has been demonstrated. The process uses a catalyzed isotopic exchange reaction between tritium in the gas phase and protium or deuterium in the solid phase on alumina. The reaction is catalyzed by platinum deposited on the alumina. The process has been tested with both tritium and deuterium. Decontamination factors (ration of inlet and outlet tritium concentrations) as high as 1000 have been achieved, depending on inlet concentration. The test results and some demonstrated applications are presented

  3. Direct catalytic hydrothermal liquefaction of spirulina to biofuels with hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qin; Liao, Hansheng; Zhou, Shiqin; Li, Qiuping; Wang, Lu; Yu, Zhihao; Jing, Li

    2018-01-01

    We report herein on acquiring biofuels from direct catalytic hydrothermal liquefaction of spirulina. The component of bio-oil from direct catalytic hydrothermal liquefaction was similar to that from two independent processes (including liquefaction and upgrading of biocrude). However, one step process has higher carbon recovery, due to the less loss of carbons. It was demonstrated that the yield and HHV of bio-oil from direct catalytic algae with hydrothermal condition is higher than that from two independent processes.

  4. A study on naphtha catalytic reforming reactor simulation and analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ke-min; Guo, Hai-yan; Pan, Shi-wei

    2005-06-01

    A naphtha catalytic reforming unit with four reactors in series is analyzed. A physical model is proposed to describe the catalytic reforming radial flow reactor. Kinetics and thermodynamics equations are selected to describe the naphtha catalytic reforming reactions characteristics based on idealizing the complex naphtha mixture by representing the paraffin, naphthene, and aromatic groups by single compounds. The simulation results based above models agree very well with actual operation unit data.

  5. A study on naphtha catalytic reforming reactor simulation and analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Ke-min; Guo, Hai-yan; Pan, Shi-wei

    2005-01-01

    A naphtha catalytic reforming unit with four reactors in series is analyzed. A physical model is proposed to describe the catalytic reforming radial flow reactor. Kinetics and thermodynamics equations are selected to describe the naphtha catalytic reforming reactions characteristics based on idealizing the complex naphtha mixture by representing the paraffin, naphthene, and aromatic groups by single compounds. The simulation results based above models agree very well with actual operation uni...

  6. Including lateral interactions into microkinetic models of catalytic reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellman, Anders; Honkala, Johanna Karoliina

    2007-01-01

    In many catalytic reactions lateral interactions between adsorbates are believed to have a strong influence on the reaction rates. We apply a microkinetic model to explore the effect of lateral interactions and how to efficiently take them into account in a simple catalytic reaction. Three differ...... different approximations are investigated: site, mean-field, and quasichemical approximations. The obtained results are compared to accurate Monte Carlo numbers. In the end, we apply the approximations to a real catalytic reaction, namely, ammonia synthesis....

  7. Conventional and catalytic pyrolysis of pinyon juniper biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yathavan, Bhuvanesh Kumar

    Pinyon and juniper are invasive woody species in Western United States that occupy over 47 million acres of land. The US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) has embarked on harvesting these woody species to make room for range grasses for grazing. The major application of harvested pinyon-juniper (PJ) is low value firewood. Thus, there is a need to develop new high value products from this woody biomass to reduce the cost of harvesting. In this research PJ biomass was processed through pyrolysis technology to produce value added products. The first part of the thesis demonstrates the effect of PJ wood, bark and mixture biomass and temperature on the product yield and on the quality of the bio-oil produced. The second part focuses on the optimization of process parameters for maximum yield and the third part focuses on upgrading the bio-oil with an industrial catalyst (HZSM5) and an industrial waste product (red mud). The results obtained from the first part showed that PJ wood produced maximum bio-oil yield, followed by PJ mixture and bark. The bio-oil yield from PJ wood had low viscosity when compared to PJ mixture and PJ bark. The second part focused on studying the effect of process parameters (temperature, feed rate and the gas flow rate) on the total liquid, organic, water, char and gas yield. The results show that each response is affected by different factor level combinations, and maximum yield for each response was obtained at different factors level. The third part focused on catalytic pyrolysis of PJ biomass using both HZSM-5 catalyst and red mud. The mechanisms of catalysis by the two catalysts were quite different. Whereas the HZSM-5 rejected oxygen mostly as carbon monoxide and water and produced lower amounts of carbon dioxide, on the contrary the red mud produced more carbon dioxide and water and less carbon monoxide. The higher heating value of the red mud catalyzed oil (29.46 MJ/kg) was slightly higher than that catalyzed by HZSM-5 (28.55 MJ/kg). Thus

  8. Nanostructured Catalytic Reactors for Air Purification, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I project proposes the development of lightweight compact nanostructured catalytic reactors for air purification from toxic gaseous organic...

  9. Nanostructured Catalytic Reactors for Air Purification, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase II project proposes the development of lightweight compact nanostructured catalytic reactors for air purification from toxic gaseous organic...

  10. Catalytically favorable surface patterns in Pt-Au nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental demonstrations of novel PtAu nanoparticles with highly enhanced catalytic properties, we present a systematic theoretical study that explores principal catalytic indicators as a function of the particle size and composition. We find that Pt electronic states in the vicinity of the Fermi level combined with a modified electron distribution in the nanoparticle due to Pt-to-Au charge transfer are the origin of the outstanding catalytic properties. From our model we deduce the catalytically favorable surface patterns that induce ensemble and ligand effects. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.

  11. Microwave Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrocarbons in Aqueous Solutions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cha, Chang

    2003-01-01

    .... A sufficient amount of experimental work has been completed evaluating the performance of the microwave catalytic oxidation process and determining the effect of different operating parameters...

  12. Catalytic Properties of Lipase Extracts from Aspergillus niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cintia M. Romero

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Screening of lipolytic strains using Rhodamine-B/olive oil plate technique allowed the selection of Aspergillus niger MYA 135. Lipase production in submerged culture containing 2 % olive oil was enhanced by more than 50 % compared to basal cultural conditions. Optimal catalytic conditions for olive oil-induced lipase were pH=6.5 and 30–35 °C. These values were shifted to the acid region (4.0–6.5 and 35–37 °C when lipase extract was produced under basal conditions. Slight changes of the residual lipase activity against the pH were found. However, preincubation at either 37 or 40 °C caused an increase in the olive oil-inducible lipolytic activity. On the contrary, lipase residual activity decreases in the 30–55 °C range when it was produced in basal medium. Lipolytic extracts were almost not deactivated in presence of 50 % water-miscible organic solvents. However, water-immiscible aliphatic solvents reduced the lipase activity between 20 and 80 %.

  13. Low concentration volatile organic pollutants removal in combined adsorber-desorber-catalytic reactor system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsenijević Zorana

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs from numerous emission sources is of crucial importance due to more rigorous demands on air quality. Different technologies can be used to treat the VOCs from effluent gases: absorption, physical adsorption, open flame combustion, thermal and catalytic incineration. Their appropriateness for the specific process depends on several factors such as efficiency, energy consumption, secondary pollution, capital investments etc. The distinctive features of the catalytic combustion are high efficiency and selectivity toward be­nign products, low energy consumption and absence of secondary polluti­on. The supported noble catalysts are widely used for catalytic incineration due to their low ignition temperatures and high thermal and chemical stability. In our combined system adsorption and desorption are applied in the spouted bed with draft tube (SBDT unit. The annular zone, loaded with sorbent, was divided in adsorption and desorption section. Draft tube enabled sorbent recirculation between sections. Combustion of desorbed gases to CO2 and water vapor are realized in additive catalytic reactor. This integrated device provided low concentrations VOCs removal with reduced energy consumption. Experiments were conducted on a pilot unit of 220 m3/h nominal capacity. The sorbent was activated carbon, type K81/B - Trayal Corporation, Krusevac. A sphere shaped commercial Pt/Al2O3 catalyst with "egg-shell" macro-distribution was used for the investigation of xylene deep oxidation. Within this paper the investigations of removal of xylene vapors, a typical pollutant in production of liquid pesticides, in combined adsorber/desorber/catalytic reactor system is presented.

  14. Catalytic reactor for low-Btu fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lance; Etemad, Shahrokh; Karim, Hasan; Pfefferle, William C.

    2009-04-21

    An improved catalytic reactor includes a housing having a plate positioned therein defining a first zone and a second zone, and a plurality of conduits fabricated from a heat conducting material and adapted for conducting a fluid therethrough. The conduits are positioned within the housing such that the conduit exterior surfaces and the housing interior surface within the second zone define a first flow path while the conduit interior surfaces define a second flow path through the second zone and not in fluid communication with the first flow path. The conduit exits define a second flow path exit, the conduit exits and the first flow path exit being proximately located and interspersed. The conduits define at least one expanded section that contacts adjacent conduits thereby spacing the conduits within the second zone and forming first flow path exit flow orifices having an aggregate exit area greater than a defined percent of the housing exit plane area. Lastly, at least a portion of the first flow path defines a catalytically active surface.

  15. Structured materials for catalytic and sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokenek, Selma

    The optical and chemical properties of the materials used in catalytic and sensing applications directly determine the characteristics of the resultant catalyst or sensor. It is well known that a catalyst needs to have high activity, selectivity, and stability to be viable in an industrial setting. The hydrogenation activity of palladium catalysts is known to be excellent, but the industrial applications are limited by the cost of obtaining catalyst in amounts large enough to make their use economical. As a result, alloying palladium with a cheaper, more widely available metal while maintaining the high catalytic activity seen in monometallic catalysts is, therefore, an attractive option. Similarly, the optical properties of nanoscale materials used for sensing must be attuned to their application. By adjusting the shape and composition of nanoparticles used in such applications, very fine changes can be made to the frequency of light that they absorb most efficiently. The design, synthesis, and characterization of (i) size controlled monometallic palladium nanoparticles for catalytic applications, (ii) nickel-palladium bimetallic nanoparticles and (iii) silver-palladium nanoparticles with applications in drug detection and biosensing through surface plasmon resonance, respectively, will be discussed. The composition, size, and shape of the nanoparticles formed were controlled through the use of wet chemistry techniques. After synthesis, the nanoparticles were analyzed using physical and chemical characterization techniques such as X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy- Energy-Dispersive Spectrometry (STEM-EDX). The Pd and Ni-Pd nanoparticles were then supported on silica for catalytic testing using mass spectrometry. The optical properties of the Ag-Pd nanoparticles in suspension were further investigated using ultraviolet-visible spectrometry (UV-Vis). Monometallic palladium particles have

  16. Catalytic Deoxydehydration of Carbohydrates and Polyols to Chemicals and Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas, Kenneth M. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2016-01-15

    As the world's fossil fuel resources are being depleted and their costs increase, there is an urgent need to discover and develop new processes for the conversion of renewable, biomass resources into fuels and chemical feedstocks. Research and development in this area have been given high priority by both governmental agencies and industry. To increase the energy content and decrease the boiling points of biomass-derived carbohydrates and polyols to the useful liquid range it is necessary to chemically remove water (dehydrate) and, preferably, oxygen (deoxygenate/reduce). The poly-hydroxylic nature of carbohydrates is attractive for their use as functionalized chemical building blocks, but it presents a daunting challenge for their selective conversion to single product chemicals or fuels. The long term, practical objective of this project is to develop catalytic processes for the deoxydehydration (DODH) of biomass-derived carbohydrates and polyols to produce unsaturated alcohols and hydrocarbons of value as chemical feedstocks and fuels; DODH: polyol + reductant --(LMOx catalyst)--> unsaturate + oxidized reductant + H2O. Limited prior studies have established the viability of the DODH process with expensive phosphine reductants and rhenium-catalysts. Initial studies in the PI's laboratory have now demonstrated: 1) the moderately efficient conversion of glycols to olefins by the economical sulfite salts is catalyzed by MeReO3 and Z+ReO4-; 2) effective phosphine-based catalytic DODH of representative glycols to olefins by cheap LMoO2 complexes; and 3) computational studies (with K. Houk, UCLA) have identified several Mo-, W-, and V-oxo complexes that are likely to catalyze glycol DODH. Seeking practically useful DODH reactions of complex polyols and new understanding of the reactivity of polyoxo-metal species with biomass-oxygenates we will employ a two-pronged approach: 1) investigate experimentally the reactivity, both stoichiometric and catalytic, of

  17. Catalytic Y-tailed amphiphilic homopolymers - aqueous nanoreactors for high activity, low loading SCS pincer catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Joseph P; Cotanda, Pepa; Kelley, Elizabeth G; Moughton, Adam O; Lu, Annhelen; Epps, Thomas H; O'Reilly, Rachel K

    2013-01-01

    A new amphiphilic homopolymer bearing an SCS pincer palladium complex has been synthesized by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The amphiphile has been shown to form spherical and worm-like micelles in water by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy and small angle neutron scattering. Segregation of reactive components within the palladium containing core results in increased catalytic activity of the pincer compound compared to small molecule analogues. This allows carbon-carbon bond forming reactions to be performed in water with reduced catalyst loadings and enhanced activity.

  18. Fabricating highly catalytically active block copolymer/metal nanoparticle microstructures at the liquid/liquid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Qi; Li, Xiaoyang; Diao, Mengxiao; Lee, Yong-Ill; Liu, Hong-Guo

    2018-03-22

    Our previous studies have shown that the metal nanoparticle/polymer composite structures fabricated at the liquid/liquid interface have good reusability but lower catalytic activity for heterogeneous reactions in aqueous solutions. This should be attributed to the poor water wettability and more compact structure of the polymer matrices. Therefore, it should be possible to improve the catalytic activity through designing and fabricating a porous composite structure with good water wettability. A modified liquid/liquid interface adsorption and fabrication method was used. An aqueous solution of copper acetate and a chloroform/DMF mixed solution of PS-b-PAA acted as the two phases. Through spontaneous emulsification, self-assembly of the polymer molecules with Cu 2+ ions in the droplets, and adsorption of the formed spherical micelles and nanofibers to the planar liquid/liquid interface, a porous composite microstructure was formed. This structure consisted of nanofiber-connected nanospheres which have a PS core and a PAA corona. Tiny and well-dispersed Cu nanoparticles were embedded in the hydrophilic corona and were adsorbed on the nanofibers surface as well. After physical cross-linking with 1,6-diaminohexane, the composite material exhibited high catalytic activity and good reusability for the reactions in aqueous solutions. For example, the rate constant for the reduction of p-nitroaniline reached 1965 s -1  g -1 . Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. One pot in situ growth of gold nanoparticles on amine-modified graphene oxide and their high catalytic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Yuyun; Li, Xi; Feng, Jie; Ma, Yanhua; Hu, Jing; Chen, Xingguo

    2014-10-01

    In this work, one pot strategy was proposed for in situ growth of Au nanoparticles (Au NPs) on the surface of amine-modified graphene oxide (GO@NH2) nanosheets. Au NPs were generated via an in situ reduction of Au3+ by Cu+ which was linked to the surface of GO@NH2 nanosheets through inorganic grafting. The initial Au NPs then served as seed for subsequent particle growth. The as-obtained GO@NH2-Au nanocomposites (GO@NH2-Au NCs) exhibited high catalytic activity for the degradation of 4-nitrophenol, which was a refractory pollutant that occur in industrial waste water. The catalytic efficiency was examined by turnover frequency (TOF). It was calculated to be 595 h-1, which was higher than that of other Au catalysts. Furthermore, the as-prepared catalyst showed high cycle stabilization during the catalytic reduction.

  20. Catalytic conversion of nonfood woody biomass solids to organic liquids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barta, Katalin; Ford, Peter C

    2014-05-20

    This Account outlines recent efforts in our laboratories addressing a fundamental challenge of sustainability chemistry, the effective utilization of biomass for production of chemicals and fuels. Efficient methods for converting renewable biomass solids to chemicals and liquid fuels would reduce society's dependence on nonrenewable petroleum resources while easing the atmospheric carbon dioxide burden. The major nonfood component of biomass is lignocellulose, a matrix of the biopolymers cellulose, hemicellulose, and lignin. New approaches are needed to effect facile conversion of lignocellulose solids to liquid fuels and to other chemical precursors without the formation of intractable side products and with sufficient specificity to give economically sustainable product streams. We have devised a novel catalytic system whereby the renewable feedstocks cellulose, organosolv lignin, and even lignocellulose composites such as sawdust are transformed into organic liquids. The reaction medium is supercritical methanol (sc-MeOH), while the catalyst is a copper-doped porous metal oxide (PMO) prepared from inexpensive, Earth-abundant starting materials. This transformation occurs in a single stage reactor operating at 300-320 °C and 160-220 bar. The reducing equivalents for these transformations are derived by the reforming of MeOH (to H2 and CO), which thereby serves as a "liquid syngas" in the present case. Water generated by deoxygenation processes is quickly removed by the water-gas shift reaction. The Cu-doped PMO serves multiple purposes, catalyzing substrate hydrogenolysis and hydrogenation as well as the methanol reforming and shift reactions. This one-pot "UCSB process" is quantitative, giving little or no biochar residual. Provided is an overview of these catalysis studies beginning with reactions of the model compound dihydrobenzofuran that help define the key processes occurring. The initial step is phenyl-ether bond hydrogenolysis, and this is followed by

  1. A combinatorial study on catalytic synergism in supported metal catalysts for fuel cell technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tetsuhiko; Ueda, Atsushi; Yamada, Yusuke; Shioyama, Hiroshi

    2004-02-01

    In order to accelerate the catalyst development for the increasing demand on the fuel cell technology, it has been attempted to adopt a combinatorial approach. The catalytic synergism, often observed on the supported metal catalysts for the fuel cell utilization, has been subjected to study. It is proposed herein that not only a comparison of catalysts in one reaction, but also the comparison of interrelated reactions by use of a common catalyst library brings about important information to elucidate the catalytic synergism. Preliminary results of the comparison between the water-gas shift reaction and the steam reforming of MeOH on a given set of catalyst library are presented. An important indicator to predict the serendipitous synergism is expected to be obtained from such information by use of artificial intelligence.

  2. H2CAP - Hydrogen assisted catalytic biomass pyrolysis for green fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndal, Trine Marie Hartmann; Høj, Martin; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2014-01-01

    Pyrolysis of biomass produces a high yield of condensable oil at moderate temperature and low pressure.This bio-oil has adverse properties such as high oxygen and water contents, high acidity and immiscibility with fossil hydrocarbons. Catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) is a promising technology...... that can be used to upgrade the crude bio-oil to fuel-grade oil. The development of the HDO process is challenged by rapid catalyst deactivation, instability of the pyrolysis oil, poorly investigated reaction conditions and a high complexity and variability of the input oil composition. However, continuous...... catalytic hydropyrolysis coupled with downstream HDO of the pyrolysis vapors before condensation shows promise (Figure 1). A bench scale experimental setup will be constructed for the continuous conversion of solid biomass (100g /h) to low oxygen, fuel-grade bio-oil. The aim is to provide a proof...

  3. Catalytic oxidation for treatment of ECLSS and PMMS waste streams. [Process Material Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akse, James R.; Thompson, John; Scott, Bryan; Jolly, Clifford; Carter, Donald L.

    1992-01-01

    Catalytic oxidation was added to the baseline multifiltration technology for use on the Space Station Freedom in order to convert low-molecular weight organic waste components such as alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, amides, and thiocarbamides to CO2 at low temperature (121 C), thereby reducing the total organic carbon (TOC) to below 500 ppb. The rate of reaction for the catalytic oxidation of aqueous organics to CO2 and water depends primarily upon the catalyst, temperature, and concentration of reactants. This paper describes a kinetic study conducted to determine the impact of each of these parameters upon the reaction rate. The results indicate that a classic kinetic model, the Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate equation for heterogeneous catalysis, can accurately represent the functional dependencies of this rate.

  4. Selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides from industrial gases by hydrogen or methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann Pirez, M.

    2004-12-01

    This work deals with the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO x ), contained in the effluents of industrial plants, by hydrogen or methane. The aim is to replace ammonia, used as reducing agent, in the conventional process. The use of others reducing agents such as hydrogen or methane is interesting for different reasons: practical, economical and ecological. The catalyst has to convert selectively NO into N 2 , in presence of an excess of oxygen, steam and sulfur dioxide. The developed catalyst is constituted by a support such as perovskites, particularly LaCoO 3 , on which are dispersed noble metals (palladium, platinum). The interaction between the noble metal and the support, generated during the activation of the catalyst, allows to minimize the water and sulfur dioxide inhibitor phenomena on the catalytic performances, particularly in the reduction of NO by hydrogen. (O.M.)

  5. Selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide by ammonia over Cu-exchanged Cuban natural zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Tost, Ramon; Santamaria-Gonzalez, Jose; Rodriguez-Castellon, Enrique; Jimenez-Lopez, Antonio [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Cristalografia y Mineralogia, Facultad de Ciencias, Unidad Asociada del Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, CSIC, Universidad de Malaga, Campus de Teatinos, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Autie, Miguel A.; Glacial, Marisol Carreras [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas, Ciudad de la Habana, La Habana (Cuba); Gonzalez, Edel [Instituto Superior Pedagogico ' Enrique Jose Varona' , La Habana (Cuba); Pozas, Carlos De las [Centro de Gerencia de Programas y Proyectos Priorizados, La Habana (Cuba)

    2004-07-15

    The catalytic selective reduction of NO over Cu-exchanged natural zeolites (mordenite (MP) and clinoptilolite (HC)) from Cuba using NH{sub 3} as reducing agent and in the presence of excess oxygen was studied. Cu(II)-exchanged zeolites are very active catalysts, with conversions of NO of 95%, a high selectivity to N{sub 2} at low temperatures, and exhibiting good water tolerance. The chemical state of the Cu(II) in exchanged zeolites was characterized by H{sub 2}-TPR and XPS. Cu(II)-exchanged clinoptilolite underwent a severe deactivation in the presence of SO{sub 2}. However, Cu(II)-exchanged mordenite not only maintained its catalytic activity, but even showed a slight improvement after 20h of reaction in the presence of 100ppm of SO{sub 2}.

  6. Selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide by ammonia over Cu-exchanged Cuban natural zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno-Tost, Ramon; Santamaria-Gonzalez, Jose; Rodriguez-Castellon, Enrique; Jimenez-Lopez, Antonio; Autie, Miguel A.; Glacial, Marisol Carreras; Gonzalez, Edel; Pozas, Carlos De las

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic selective reduction of NO over Cu-exchanged natural zeolites (mordenite (MP) and clinoptilolite (HC)) from Cuba using NH 3 as reducing agent and in the presence of excess oxygen was studied. Cu(II)-exchanged zeolites are very active catalysts, with conversions of NO of 95%, a high selectivity to N 2 at low temperatures, and exhibiting good water tolerance. The chemical state of the Cu(II) in exchanged zeolites was characterized by H 2 -TPR and XPS. Cu(II)-exchanged clinoptilolite underwent a severe deactivation in the presence of SO 2 . However, Cu(II)-exchanged mordenite not only maintained its catalytic activity, but even showed a slight improvement after 20h of reaction in the presence of 100ppm of SO 2

  7. Fractional Multistage Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass and Catalytic Conversion into Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortright, Randy [Virent, Inc., Madison, WI (United States); Rozmiarek, Robert [Virent, Inc., Madison, WI (United States); Dally, Brice [Virent, Inc., Madison, WI (United States); Holland, Chris [Virent, Inc., Madison, WI (United States)

    2017-08-31

    The objective of this project was to develop an improved multistage process for the hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) of biomass to serve as a new front-end, deconstruction process ideally suited to feed Virent’s well-proven catalytic technology, which is already being scaled up. This process produced water soluble, partially de-oxygenated intermediates that are ideally suited for catalytic finishing to fungible distillate hydrocarbons. Through this project, Virent, with its partners, demonstrated the conversion of pine wood chips to drop-in hydrocarbon distillate fuels using a multi-stage fractional conversion system that is integrated with Virent’s BioForming® process. The majority of work was in the liquefaction task and included temperature scoping, solvent optimization, and separations.

  8. Catalytic transformation of carbon dioxide and methane into syngas over ruthenium and platinum supported hydroxyapatites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rêgo De Vasconcelos, Bruna; Zhao, Lulu; Sharrock, Patrick; Nzihou, Ange; Pham Minh, Doan

    2016-12-01

    This work focused on the catalytic transformation of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) into syngas (mixture of CO and H2). Ruthenium- and platinum-based catalysts were prepared using hydroxyapatite (HAP) as catalyst support. Different methods for metal deposition were used including incipient wetness impregnation (IWI), excess liquid phase impregnation (LIM), and cationic exchange (CEX). Metal particle size varied in large range from less than 1 nm to dozens nm. All catalysts were active at 400-700 °C but only Pt catalyst prepared by IWI method (Pt/HAP IWI) was found stable. The catalytic performance of Pt/HAP IWI could be comparable with the literature data on noble metal-based catalysts, prepared on metal oxide supports. For the first time, water was experimentally quantified as a by-product of the reaction. This helped to correctly buckle the mass balance of the process.

  9. Pt@Ag and Pd@Ag core/shell nanoparticles for catalytic degradation of Congo red in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Mohamed A; Bakr, Eman A; El-Attar, Heba G

    2018-01-05

    Platinum/silver (Pt@Ag) and palladium/silver (Pd@Ag) core/shell NPs have been synthesized in two steps reaction using the citrate method. The progress of nanoparticle formation was followed by the UV/Vis spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy revealed spherical shaped core/shell nanoparticles with average particle diameter 32.17nm for Pt@Ag and 8.8nm for Pd@Ag. The core/shell NPs were further characterized by FT-IR and XRD. Reductive degradation of the Congo red dye was chosen to demonstrate the excellent catalytic activity of these core/shell nanostructures. The nanocatalysts act as electron mediators for the transfer of electrons from the reducing agent (NaBH 4 ) to the dye molecules. Effect of reaction parameters such as nanocatalyst dose, dye and NaBH 4 concentrations on the dye degradation was investigated. A comparison between the catalytic activities of both nanocatalysts was made to realize which of them the best in catalytic performance. Pd@Ag was the higher in catalytic activity over Pt@Ag. Such greater activity is originated from the smaller particle size and larger surface area. Pd@Ag nanocatalyst was catalytically stable through four subsequent reaction runs under the utilized reaction conditions. These findings can thus be considered as possible economical alternative for environmental safety against water pollution by dyes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Relationship between surface property and catalytic application of amorphous NiP/Hβ catalyst for n-hexane isomerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinshe; Duan, Zunbin; Song, Zhaoyang; Zhu, Lijun; Zhou, Yulu; Xiang, Yuzhi; Xia, Daohong

    2017-12-01

    The amorphous NiP nanoparticles were synthesized and a novel amorphous NiP/Hβ catalyst was prepared successfully further. Due to the superior surface property of amorphous NiP/Hβ catalyst, it exhibited good catalytic application for n-hexane isomerization. The catalytic activity of amorphous NiP/Hβ catalyst was close to that of the prepared Pt/Hβ sample, and better than that of commercial catalyst and crystalline Ni2P/Hβ catalyst. What's more, the amorphous NiP/Hβ catalyst shows high resistance to different sulfur compounds and water on account of its unique surface property. The effect of loading amounts on surface property and catalytic performance was investigated, and the structure-function relationship among them was studied ulteriorly. The results demonstrate that loading amounts have effect on textural property and surface acid property, which further affect the catalytic performance. The 10 wt.% NiP/Hβ sample has appropriate pore structure and acid property with uniformly dispersed NiP nanoparticles on surface, which is helpful for providing suitable synergistic effect. The effects of reaction conditions on surface reactions and the mechanism for n-hexane isomerization were investigated further. Based on these results, the amorphous NiP/Hβ catalyst with superior surface property probably pavesa way to overcome the drawbacks of traditional noble metal catalyst, which shows good catalytic application prospects.

  11. Pt@Ag and Pd@Ag core/shell nanoparticles for catalytic degradation of Congo red in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Mohamed A.; Bakr, Eman A.; El-Attar, Heba G.

    2018-01-01

    Platinum/silver (Pt@Ag) and palladium/silver (Pd@Ag) core/shell NPs have been synthesized in two steps reaction using the citrate method. The progress of nanoparticle formation was followed by the UV/Vis spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy revealed spherical shaped core/shell nanoparticles with average particle diameter 32.17 nm for Pt@Ag and 8.8 nm for Pd@Ag. The core/shell NPs were further characterized by FT-IR and XRD. Reductive degradation of the Congo red dye was chosen to demonstrate the excellent catalytic activity of these core/shell nanostructures. The nanocatalysts act as electron mediators for the transfer of electrons from the reducing agent (NaBH4) to the dye molecules. Effect of reaction parameters such as nanocatalyst dose, dye and NaBH4 concentrations on the dye degradation was investigated. A comparison between the catalytic activities of both nanocatalysts was made to realize which of them the best in catalytic performance. Pd@Ag was the higher in catalytic activity over Pt@Ag. Such greater activity is originated from the smaller particle size and larger surface area. Pd@Ag nanocatalyst was catalytically stable through four subsequent reaction runs under the utilized reaction conditions. These findings can thus be considered as possible economical alternative for environmental safety against water pollution by dyes.

  12. Catalytic performance of heterogeneous Rh/C3N4 for the carbonylation of methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiman, Anatta Wahyu; Choi, Myoung Jae; Nur, Adrian

    2018-02-01

    The excess of water in homogeneous the carbonylation of methanol system could increase the amount of by-products formed through water-gas shift reaction and could accelerate the rusting of equipment. Many scientists tried to decrease the content of water in the carbonylation of methanol system by using lithium and iodide promoter that results a moderate catalytic activity in the water content at 2wt%. The heterogenized catalyst offers several distinct advantages such as it was enables increased catalyst concentration in the reaction mixture, which is directly proportional to acetic acid production rate, without the addition of an alkali iodide salt promoter. The heterogeneous catalyst also results in reduced by-product formation. This study is aimed to produce a novel catalyst (Rh/C3N4) with a high selectivity of acetic acid in a relatively lower water and halide content. This novel catalyst performs high conversion and selectivity of acetic acid as the result of the strong ionic bonding of melamine and rhodium complex species that was caused by the presence of methyl iodide species. The CO2 in feed gas significantly decreases the catalytic activity of Rh-melamine because of its inert characteristics. The kinetic test was performed as that the first order kinetic equation. The kinetic tests revealed the reaction route of the the carbonylation of methanol in this system was performed trough the methyl acetate.

  13. Facile synthesis and catalytic properties of silver colloidal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    obtained with high dispersion (2–3 nm), which has high catalytic activity on reduction of 4-nitrobenzoic acid to 4-aminobenzoic acid. Keywords. Silver colloidal nanoparticles; SDBS; catalytic reduction; 4-nitrobenzoic acid. 1. Introduction. Silver colloidal nanoparticles (AgCNPs) have been studied extensively in catalysis ...

  14. Green synthesis and catalytic application of curcumin stabilized ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    These c-AgNPs were used as catalysts in the catalytic reduction of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol. The c-AgNPs with narrower size distribution exhibited better catalytic activity as well as lower activation energy. Variation of apparent rate constant with the reactant concentration agreed with the Langmuir- Hinshelwood (LH) ...

  15. Microscale Synthesis of Chiral Alcohols via Asymmetric Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Christine M.; Deliever, Rik; De Vos, Dirk

    2009-01-01

    Synthesis of pure enantiomers is a key issue in industry, especially in areas connected to life sciences. Catalytic asymmetric synthesis has emerged as a powerful and practical tool. Here we describe an experiment on racemic reduction and asymmetric reduction via a catalytic hydrogen transfer process. Acetophenone and substituted acetophenones are…

  16. Magnetic, catalytic, EPR and electrochemical studies on binuclear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    prepared. Spectral, catalytic, magnetic, EPR and electrochemical studies have been carried out. A catecholase activity study indicates that only HL1 complexes have efficient catalytic activity due to a less sterically hindered methyl group and enhanced planarity (larger –2J values) with respect to the oxidation of 3 ...

  17. Catalytic synthesis of ammonia using vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Billing, Gert D.

    1992-01-01

    The dissociation of nitrogen is the rate-limiting step in the catalytic synthesis of ammonia. Theoretical calculations have shown that the dissociative sticking probability of molecular nitrogen on catalytic active metal surfaces is enhanced by orders of magnitude when the molecules...

  18. Platinum recovery from used auto catalytic converters in electrorefining process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fornalczyk

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents possibility of removing platinum from the used catalytic converters applying copper as a metal collector in pyrometallurgical methods. The catalytic converter carrier was grinded and melted with copper. During the research obtained Cu-Pt alloy was casted as an anode. Such anode was electrically refined in order to recover platinum. Obtained results were discussed.

  19. A QM/MM study of the catalytic mechanism of nicotinamidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xiang; Liu, Yongjun

    2014-02-28

    Nicotinamidase (Pnc1) is a member of Zn-dependent amidohydrolases that hydrolyzes nicotinamide (NAM) to nicotinic acid (NA), which is a key step in the salvage pathway of NAD(+) biosynthesis. In this paper, the catalytic mechanism of Pnc1 has been investigated by using a combined quantum-mechanical/molecular-mechanical (QM/MM) approach based on the recently obtained crystal structure of Pnc1. The reaction pathway, the detail of each elementary step, the energetics of the whole catalytic cycle, and the roles of key residues and Zn-binding site are illuminated. Our calculation results indicate that the catalytic water molecule comes from the bulk solvent, which is then deprotonated by residue D8. D8 functions as a proton transfer station between C167 and NAM, while the activated C167 serves as the nucleophile. The residue K122 only plays a role in stabilizing intermediates and transition states. The oxyanion hole formed by the amide backbone nitrogen atoms of A163 and C167 has the function to stabilize the hydroxyl anion of nicotinamide. The Zn-binding site rather than a single Zn(2+) ion acts as a Lewis acid to influence the reaction. Two elementary steps, the activation of C167 in the deamination process and the decomposition of catalytic water in the hydrolysis process, correspond to the large energy barriers of 25.7 and 28.1 kcal mol(-1), respectively, meaning that both of them contribute a lot to the overall reaction barrier. Our results may provide useful information for the design of novel and efficient Pnc1 inhibitors and related biocatalytic applications.

  20. Smoke emissions from a catalytic wood stove

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowburn, D.A.; Stephens, N.P.J.

    1994-01-01

    The work reported here was concerned with testing a catalytic wood burning stove (roomheater) following the most applicable UK procedures. The identical stove has also been tested in several other nations to their individual procedures. The results will be submitted to the International Energy Agency (IEA) such that appropriate comparisons can be made. The results comprised: burning rate; an indicative appliance efficiency; heat output; carbon dioxide emissions; carbon monoxide emissions; and smoke emissions. These results were determined with the appliance at three nominal burning rates (high, medium and low). Comparing the results with those obtained in other countries indicates good agreement except when the appliance was operated at low burning rates, under which conditions the UK results indicate significantly worse smoke emissions than those measured by other researchers. (author)

  1. Catalytic Conia-ene and related reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Daniel; Blümel, Marcus; Chauhan, Pankaj; Philipps, Arne R; Enders, Dieter

    2015-10-07

    Since its initial inception, the Conia-ene reaction, known as the intramolecular addition of enols to alkynes or alkenes, has experienced a tremendous development and appealing catalytic protocols have emerged. This review fathoms the underlying mechanistic principles rationalizing how substrate design, substrate activation, and the nature of the catalyst work hand in hand for the efficient synthesis of carbocycles and heterocycles at mild reaction conditions. Nowadays, Conia-ene reactions can be found as part of tandem reactions, and the road for asymmetric versions has already been paved. Based on their broad applicability, Conia-ene reactions have turned into a highly appreciated synthetic tool with impressive examples in natural product synthesis reported in recent years.

  2. Carbon nanofibers: a versatile catalytic support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelize Maria de Almeida Coelho

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is present an overview of the promising results obtained while using carbon nanofibers based composites as catalyst support for different practical applications: hydrazine decomposition, styrene synthesis, direct oxidation of H2S into elementary sulfur and as fuel-cell electrodes. We have also discussed some prospects of the use of these new materials in total combustion of methane and in ammonia decomposition. The macroscopic carbon nanofibers based composites were prepared by the CVD method (Carbon Vapor Deposition employing a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and ethane. The results showed a high catalytic activity and selectivity in comparison to the traditional catalysts employed in these reactions. The fact was attributed, mainly, to the morphology and the high external surface of the catalyst support.

  3. Contact structure for use in catalytic distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jr., Edward M.

    1984-01-01

    A method for conducting catalytic chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants into a distillation column reactor contracting said reactant in liquid phase with a fixed bed catalyst in the form of a contact catalyst structure consisting of closed porous containers containing the catatlyst for the reaction and a clip means to hold and support said containers, which are disposed above, i.e., on the distillation trays in the tower. The trays have weir means to provide a liquid level on the trays to substantially cover the containers. In other words, the trays function in their ordinary manner with the addition thereto of the catalyst. The reaction mixture is concurrently fractionated in the column.

  4. Stoichiometric and Catalytic Synthesis of Alkynylphosphines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie-Claude Gaumont

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Alkynylphosphines or their borane complexes are available either through C–P bond forming reactions or through modification of the phosphorus or the alkynyl function of various alkynyl phosphorus derivatives. The latter strategy, and in particular the one involving phosphoryl reduction by alanes or silanes, is the method of choice for preparing primary and secondary alkynylphosphines, while the former strategy is usually employed for the synthesis of tertiary alkynylphosphines or their borane complexes. The classical C–P bond forming methods rely on the reaction between halophosphines or their borane complexes with terminal acetylenes in the presence of a stoichiometric amount of organometallic bases, which precludes the access to alkynylphosphines bearing sensitive functional groups. In less than a decade, efficient catalytic procedures, mostly involving copper complexes and either an electrophilic or a nucleophilic phosphorus reagent, have emerged. By proceeding under mild conditions, these new methods have allowed a significant broadening of the substituent scope and structure complexity.

  5. Flowthrough Reductive Catalytic Fractionation of Biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Eric M.; Stone, Michael L.; Katahira, Rui; Reed, Michelle; Beckham, Gregg T.; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2017-11-01

    Reductive catalytic fractionation (RCF) has emerged as a leading biomass fractionation and lignin valorization strategy. Here, flowthrough reactors were used to investigate RCF of poplar. Most RCF studies to date have been conducted in batch, but a flow-based process enables the acquisition of intrinsic kinetic and mechanistic data essential to accelerate the design, optimization, and scale-up of RCF processes. Time-resolved product distributions and yields obtained from experiments with different catalyst loadings were used to identify and deconvolute events during solvolysis and hydrogenolysis. Multi-bed RCF experiments provided unique insights into catalyst deactivation, showing that leaching, sintering, and surface poisoning are causes for decreased catalyst performance. The onset of catalyst deactivation resulted in higher concentrations of unsaturated lignin intermediates and increased occurrence of repolymerization reactions, producing high-molecular-weight species. Overall, this study demonstrates the concept of flowthrough RCF, which will be vital for realistic scale-up of this promising approach.

  6. Catalytic steam reforming of bio-oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trane, R.; Dahl, S.; Skjøth-Rasmussen, M.S.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen and synthesis gas can be produced in an environmentally friendly and sustainable way through steam reforming (SR) of bio-oil and this review presents the state-of-the-art of SR of bio-oil and model compounds hereof. The possible reactions, which can occur in the SR process and the influe......Hydrogen and synthesis gas can be produced in an environmentally friendly and sustainable way through steam reforming (SR) of bio-oil and this review presents the state-of-the-art of SR of bio-oil and model compounds hereof. The possible reactions, which can occur in the SR process...... and the influence of operating conditions will be presented along with the catalysts and processes investigated in the literature.Several catalytic systems with Ni, Ru, or Rh can achieve good performance with respect to initial conversion and yield of hydrogen, but the main problem is that the catalysts...

  7. Radiant non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.

    2017-10-31

    A radiant, non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot exhaust gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is positioned adjacent to the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot exhaust gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is positioned outside of flue gas flow path for a relatively large residence time.

  8. Flame assisted synthesis of catalytic ceramic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Johnny; Mosleh, Majid; Johannessen, Tue

    2004-01-01

    Membranes consisting of one or more metal oxides can be synthesized by flame pyrolysis. The general principle behind flame pyrolysis is the decomposition and oxidation of evaporated organo-metallic precursors in a flame, thereby forming metal oxide monomers. Because of the extreme supersaturation...... technology it is possible to make supported catalysts, composite metal oxides, catalytically active surfaces, and porous ceramic membranes. Membrane layers can be formed by using a porous substrate tube (or surface) as a nano-particle filter. The aerosol gas from the flame is led through a porous substrate......, membranes with pore sizes below 5 nm have been produced by this continuous filtration of nano-particles. In this way, top-layers with Knudsen separation have been achieved by a reduction of the pore size of three orders of magnitude within an hour. It has previously been shown that it also is possible...

  9. Make the most of catalytic hydrogenations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landert, J.P.; Scubla, T. [Biazzi S.A., Chailly-Montreux (Switzerland)

    1995-03-01

    Liquid-phase catalytic hydrogenation is one of the most useful and versatile reactions available for organic synthesis. Because it is environmentally clean, it has replaced other reduction processes, such as the Bechamp reaction, and zinc and sulfide reductions. Moreover, the economics are favorable, provided that raw materials free of catalyst poisons are used. The hydrogenation reaction is very selective with appropriate catalysts and can often be carried out without a solvent. Applications include reduction of unsaturated carbon compounds to saturated derivatives (for example, in vegetable-oil processing), carbonyl compounds to alcohols (such as sorbitol), and nitrocompounds to amines. the reactions are usually run in batch reactors to rapidly reach complete conversion and allow quick change-over of products. The paper describes the basics of hydrogenation; steering clear of process hazards; scale-up and optimization; and system design in practice.

  10. Lignin Valorization using Heterogenous Catalytic Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melián Rodríguez, Mayra; Shunmugavel, Saravanamurugan; Kegnæs, Søren

    The research interests in biomass conversion to fuels and chemicals has increased significantly in the last decade in view of current problems such as global warming, high oil prices, food crisis and other geopolitical scenarios. Many different reactions and processes to convert biomass into high......-value products and fuels have been proposed in the literature, giving special attention to the conversion of lignocellulosic biomass, which does not compete with food resources and is widely available as a low cost feedstock 1. Lignocellulose biomass is a complex material composed of three main fractions...... be obtained 2. Heiko Lange et al., has reported that the catalytic oxidation products of lignin and lignin model compounds range from aromatic aldehyde and carboxylic acid and they must be originate form oxidation of side chain. The products we obtained in these reactions are based on the severity...

  11. Catalytic combustion in small wood burning appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oravainen, H. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    There is over a million hand fired small heating appliances in Finland where about 5,4 million cubic meters of wood fuel is used. Combustion in such heating appliances is a batch-type process. In early stages of combustion when volatiles are burned, the formation of carbon monoxide (CO) and other combustible gases are difficult to avoid when using fuels that have high volatile matter content. Harmful emissions are formed mostly after each fuel adding but also during char burnout period. When the CO-content in flue gases is, say over 0.5 %, also other harmful emissions will be formed. Methane (CH{sub 4}) and other hydrocarbons are released and the amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)-compounds can be remarkable. Some PAH-compounds are very carcinogenic. It has been estimated that in Finland even more than 90 % of hydrocarbon and PAH emissions are due to small scale wood combustion. Emissions from transportation is excluded from these figures. That is why wood combustion has a net effect on greenhouse gas phenomena. For example carbon monoxide emissions from small scale wood combustion are two fold compared to that of energy production in power plants. Methane emission is of the same order as emission from transportation and seven fold compared with those of energy production. Emissions from small heating appliances can be reduced by developing the combustion techniques, but also by using other means, for example catalytic converters. In certain stages of the batch combustion, temperature is not high enough, gas mixing is not good enough and residence time is too short for complete combustion. When placed to a suitable place inside a heating appliance, a catalytic converter can oxidize unburned gases in the flue gas into compounds that are not harmful to the environment. (3 refs.)

  12. Catalytic oxidative desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbon fuels using air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararaman, Ramanathan

    Conventional approaches to oxidative desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbons involve use of high-purity, expensive water soluble peroxide for oxidation of sulfur compounds followed by post-treatment for removal of oxidized sulfones by extraction. Both are associated with higher cost due to handling, storage of oxidants and yield loss with extraction and water separation, making the whole process more expensive. This thesis explores an oxidative desulfurization process using air as an oxidant followed by catalytic decomposition of sulfones thereby eliminating the aforementioned issues. Oxidation of sulfur compounds was realized by a two step process in which peroxides were first generated in-situ by catalytic air oxidation, followed by catalytic oxidation of S compounds using the peroxides generated in-situ completing the two step approach. By this technique it was feasible to oxidize over 90% of sulfur compounds present in real jet (520 ppmw S) and diesel (41 ppmw S) fuels. Screening of bulk and supported CuO based catalysts for peroxide generation using model aromatic compound representing diesel fuel showed that bulk CuO catalyst was more effective in producing peroxides with high yield and selectivity. Testing of three real diesel fuels obtained from different sources for air oxidation over bulk CuO catalyst showed different level of effectiveness for generating peroxides in-situ which was consistent with air oxidation of representative model aromatic compounds. Peroxides generated in-situ was then used as an oxidant to oxidize sulfur compounds present in the fuel over MoO3/SiO2 catalyst. 81% selectivity of peroxides for oxidation of sulfur compounds was observed on MoO3/SiO2 catalyst at 40 °C and under similar conditions MoO3/Al2O3 gave only 41% selectivity. This difference in selectivity might be related to the difference in the nature of active sites of MoO3 on SiO2 and Al2O 3 supports as suggested by H2-TPR and XRD analyses. Testing of supported and bulk Mg

  13. [Catalytic Degradation of Diclofenac Sodium over the Catalyst of 3D Flower-like alpha-FeOOH Synergized with H2O2 Under Visible Light Irradiation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun-ge; Li, Yun-qin; Huang, Hua-shan; Yuan, Bao-ling; Cui, Hao-jie; Fu, Ming-lai

    2015-06-01

    Three dimensional (3D) flower-like alpha-FeOOH nanomaterials were prepared by oil bath reflux method using FeSO4, urea, ethanol and water, and the products which were characterized by XRD, FT-IR and SEM techniques. The SEM images showed that the 3D flower-like samples consisted of nanorods with a length of 400-500 nm and a diameter of 40-60 nm. The catalytic performance of the samples was evaluated by catalytic degradation of diclofenac sodium using H2O2 as the oxidant under simulated visible light. The results showed that the as-prepared samples presented high efficient catalytic performances, and more than 99% of the initial diclofenac sodium (30 mg x L(-1)) was degraded in 90 min. A radical mechanism can be proposed for the catalytic degradation of diclofenac sodium solution.

  14. Catalytic Three-Component Machinery: Control of Catalytic Activity by Machine Speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Indrajit; Goswami, Abir; Mittal, Nikita; Schmittel, Michael

    2018-01-02

    Three supramolecular slider-on-deck systems DS1-DS3 were obtained as two-component aggregates from the sliders S1-S3 and deck D with its three zinc porphyrin (ZnPor) binding sites. The binding of the two-footed slider to the deck varies with the donor qualities of and the steric hindrance at the pyridine/pyrimidine (pyr) feet, and was effected by two N pyr →ZnPor interactions. Accordingly, the sliders move over the three zinc porphyrins in the deck at different speeds, namely with 32.2, 220, and 440 kHz at room temperature. The addition of N-methylpyrrolidine as an organocatalyst to DS1-DS3 generates catalytic three-component machineries. By using a conjugate addition as a probe reaction, we observed a correlation between the operating speed of the slider-on-deck systems and the yields of the catalytic reaction. As the thermodynamic binding of the slider decreases, both the frequency of the sliding motion and the yield of the catalytic reaction increase. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Development of a catalytic system for gasification of wet biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, D.C.; Sealock, L.J.; Phelps, M.R.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Hart, T.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    A gasification system is under development at Pacific Northwest Laboratory that can be used with high-moisture biomass feedstocks. The system operates at 350{degrees}C and 205 atm using a liquid water phase as the processing medium. Since a pressurized system is used, the wet biomass can be fed as a slurry to the reactor without drying. Through the development of catalysts, a useful processing system has been produced. This paper includes assessment of processing test results of different catalysts. Reactor system results including batch, bench-scale continuous, and engineering-scale processing results are presented to demonstrate the applicability of this catalytic gasification system to biomass. The system has utility both for direct conversion of biomass to fuel gas or as a wastewater cleanup system for treatment of unconverted biomass from bioconversion processes. By the use of this system high conversions of biomass to fuel gas can be achieved. Medium-Btu is the primary product. Potential exists for recovery/recycle of some of the unreacted inorganic components from the biomass in the aqueous byproduct stream.

  16. Role of Zinc in Catalytic Activity of Carbonic Anhydrase IX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Chingkuang; Foster, Lauren; Alvarado, Andrea; McKenna, Robert; Silverman, David N.; Frost, Susan C.

    2012-01-01

    The carbonic anhydrases (CAs) in the α class are zinc-dependent metalloenzymes. Previous studies have reported that recombinant forms of carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), a membrane-bound form of CA expressed in solid tumors, appear to be activated by low levels of zinc independent of its well-studied role at the catalytic site. In this study, we sought to determine if CAIX is stimulated by zinc in its native environment. MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells express CAIX in response to hypoxia. We compared CAIX activity associated with membrane ghosts isolated from hypoxic cells with that in intact hypoxic cells. We measured CA activity directly using 18O exchange from 13CO2 into water determined by membrane inlet mass spectrometry. In membrane ghosts, there was little effect of zinc at low concentrations on CAIX activity, although at high concentration zinc was inhibitory. In intact cells, zinc had no significant effect on CAIX activity. This suggests that there is an appreciable decrease in sensitivity to zinc when CAIX is in its natural membrane milieu compared to the purified forms. PMID:22465027

  17. CO2 sequestration via dry catalytic reforming of CH4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanchard, J.; Abatzoglou, N.

    2003-01-01

    Synthesis gas can be produced by a process known as dry-reforming of methane. However, the process is rarely used in industry due to its endothermicity and the technical challenges regarding carbon formation. This paper proposes that carbon formation be used to sequester carbon dioxide for the production of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) or as a raw material for chemical synthesis. The study focused on developing a catalytic process to allow for carbon deposition and carbon dioxide sequestration. The chemical reactions used in this study were presented along with the results of a theoretical thermodynamics study based on Gibbs minimization. At a temperature of 800 degrees C, a conversion of more than 98 and 97 per cent was noted for methane and carbon dioxide respectively. A reactor configuration was defined which allowed for continuous unloading of the deposited carbon. The reactor configuration also preserved the catalyst activity as for as long, and as high, as possible. Carbon can be retrieved with water and gas spray most readily when the catalyst is in monolith form. Current experiments are focusing on reaction kinetics and a commercial catalyst at a temperature range between 650 and 850 degrees C at atmospheric pressure. A thermodynamic prediction of the optimum operational conditions was presented along with preliminary results

  18. Catalytic ozonation of oxalate with a cerium supported palladium oxide: An efficient degradation not relying on hydroxyl radical oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Tao

    2011-11-01

    The cerium supported palladium oxide (PdO/CeO 2) at a low palladium loading was found very effective in catalytic ozonation of oxalate, a probe compound that is difficult to be efficiently degraded in water with hydroxyl radical oxidation and one of the major byproducts in ozonation of organic matter. The oxalate was degraded into CO 2 during the catalytic ozonation. The molar ratio of oxalate degraded to ozone consumption increased with increasing catalyst dose and decreasing ozone dosage and pH under the conditions of this study. The maximum molar ratio reached around 1, meaning that the catalyst was highly active and selective for oxalate degradation in water. The catalytic ozonation, which showed relatively stable activity, does not promote hydroxyl radical generation from ozone. Analysis with ATR-FTIR and in situ Raman spectroscopy revealed that 1) oxalate was adsorbed on CeO 2 of the catalyst forming surface complexes, and 2) O 3 was adsorbed on PdO of the catalyst and further decomposed to surface atomic oxygen (*O), surface peroxide (*O 2), and O 2 gas in sequence. The results indicate that the high activity of the catalyst is related to the synergetic function of PdO and CeO 2 in that the surface atomic oxygen readily reacts with the surface cerium-oxalate complex. This kind of catalytic ozonation would be potentially effective for the degradation of polar refractory organic pollutants and hydrophilic natural organic matter. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  19. IVIg treatment reduces catalytic antibody titers of renal transplanted patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Mahendra

    Full Text Available Catalytic antibodies are immunoglobulins endowed with enzymatic activity. Catalytic IgG has been reported in several human autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. In particular, low levels of catalytic IgG have been proposed as a prognostic marker for chronic allograft rejection in patients undergoing kidney transplant. Kidney allograft is a treatment of choice for patients with end-stage renal failure. Intravenous immunoglobulins, a therapeutic pool of human IgG, is used in patients with donor-specific antibodies, alone or in conjunction with other immunosuppressive treatments, to desensitize the patients and prevent the development of acute graft rejection. Here, we followed for a period of 24 months the levels of catalytic IgG towards the synthetic peptide Pro-Phe-Arg-methylcoumarinimide in a large cohort of patients undergoing kidney transplantation. Twenty-four percent of the patients received IVIg at the time of transplantation. Our results demonstrate a marked reduction in levels of catalytic antibodies in all patients three months following kidney transplant. The decrease was significantly pronounced in patients receiving adjunct IVIg therapy. The results suggests that prevention of acute graft rejection using intravenous immunoglobulins induces a transient reduction in the levels of catalytic IgG, thus potentially jeopardizing the use of levels of catalytic antibodies as a prognosis marker for chronic allograft nephropathy.

  20. IVIg Treatment Reduces Catalytic Antibody Titers of Renal Transplanted Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendra, Ankit; Peyron, Ivan; Dollinger, Cécile; Gilardin, Laurent; Sharma, Meenu; Wootla, Bharath; Padiolleau-Lefevre, Séverine; Friboulet, Alain; Boquet, Didier; Legendre, Christophe; Kaveri, Srinivas V.

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic antibodies are immunoglobulins endowed with enzymatic activity. Catalytic IgG has been reported in several human autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. In particular, low levels of catalytic IgG have been proposed as a prognostic marker for chronic allograft rejection in patients undergoing kidney transplant. Kidney allograft is a treatment of choice for patients with end-stage renal failure. Intravenous immunoglobulins, a therapeutic pool of human IgG, is used in patients with donor-specific antibodies, alone or in conjunction with other immunosuppressive treatments, to desensitize the patients and prevent the development of acute graft rejection. Here, we followed for a period of 24 months the levels of catalytic IgG towards the synthetic peptide Pro-Phe-Arg-methylcoumarinimide in a large cohort of patients undergoing kidney transplantation. Twenty-four percent of the patients received IVIg at the time of transplantation. Our results demonstrate a marked reduction in levels of catalytic antibodies in all patients three months following kidney transplant. The decrease was significantly pronounced in patients receiving adjunct IVIg therapy. The results suggests that prevention of acute graft rejection using intravenous immunoglobulins induces a transient reduction in the levels of catalytic IgG, thus potentially jeopardizing the use of levels of catalytic antibodies as a prognosis marker for chronic allograft nephropathy. PMID:23967092