WorldWideScience

Sample records for catalytic transfer hydrogenation

  1. Transfer Hydrogenation: Employing a Simple, In Situ Prepared Catalytic System

    KAUST Repository

    Ang, Eleanor Pei Ling

    2017-04-01

    Transfer hydrogenation has been recognized to be an important synthetic method in both academic and industrial research to obtain valuable products including alcohols. Transition metal catalysts based on precious metals, such as Ru, Rh and Ir, are typically employed for this process. In recent years, iron-based catalysts have attracted considerable attention as a greener and more sustainable alternative since iron is earth abundant, inexpensive and non-toxic. In this work, a combination of iron disulfide with chelating bipyridine ligand was found to be effective for the transfer hydrogenation of a variety of ketones to the corresponding alcohols in the presence of a simple base. It provided a convenient and economical way to conduct transfer hydrogenation. A plausible role of sulfide next to the metal center in facilitating the catalytic reaction is demonstrated.

  2. Transfer Hydrogenation: Employing a Simple, In Situ Prepared Catalytic System

    KAUST Repository

    Ang, Eleanor Pei Ling

    2017-01-01

    Transfer hydrogenation has been recognized to be an important synthetic method in both academic and industrial research to obtain valuable products including alcohols. Transition metal catalysts based on precious metals, such as Ru, Rh and Ir

  3. Iron Phthalocyanine as New Efficient Catalyst for Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation of Simple Aldehydes and Ketones

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bata, P.; Notheisz, F.; Klusoň, Petr; Zsigmond, A.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 29, JAN 2015 (2015), s. 45-49 ISSN 0268-2605 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : heterogenized complexes * catalytic transfer hydrogenation * reusable catalyst Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.452, year: 2015

  4. Synthesis and Catalytic Hydrogen Transfer Reaction of Ruthenium(II) Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Jung Ik; Kim, Aram; Noh, Hui Bog; Lee, Hyun Ju; Shim, Yoon Bo; Park, Kang Hyun

    2012-01-01

    The ruthenium(II) complex [Ru(bpy) 2 -(PhenTPy)] was synthesized, and used for the transfer hydrogenation of ketones and the desired products were obtained in good yield. Based on the presented results, transition-metal complexes can be used as catalysts for a wide range of organic transformations. The relationship between the electro-reduction current density and temperature are being examined in this laboratory. Attempts to improve the catalytic activity and determine the transfer hydrogenation mechanism are currently in progress. The catalytic hydrogenation of a ketone is a basic and critical process for making many types of alcohols used as the final products and precursors in the pharmaceutical, agrochemical, flavor, fragrance, materials, and fine chemicals industries. The catalytic hydrogenation process developed by Noyori is a very attractive process. Formic acid and 2-propanol have been used extensively as hydrogenation sources. The advantage of using 2-propanol as a hydrogen source is that the only side product will be acetone, which can be removed easily during the workup process. Hydrogen transfer (HT) catalysis, which generates alcohols through the reduction of ketones, is an attractive protocol that is used widely. Ruthenium(II) complexes are the most useful catalysts for the hydrogen transfer (HT) of ketones. In this method, a highly active catalytic system employs a transition metal as a catalyst to synthesize alcohols, and is a replacement for the hydrogen-using hydrogenation process. The most active system is based on Ru, Rh and Ir, which includes a nitrogen ligand that facilitates the formation of a catalytically active hydride and phosphorus

  5. Synthesis and Catalytic Hydrogen Transfer Reaction of Ruthenium(II) Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Jung Ik; Kim, Aram; Noh, Hui Bog; Lee, Hyun Ju; Shim, Yoon Bo; Park, Kang Hyun [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    The ruthenium(II) complex [Ru(bpy){sub 2}-(PhenTPy)] was synthesized, and used for the transfer hydrogenation of ketones and the desired products were obtained in good yield. Based on the presented results, transition-metal complexes can be used as catalysts for a wide range of organic transformations. The relationship between the electro-reduction current density and temperature are being examined in this laboratory. Attempts to improve the catalytic activity and determine the transfer hydrogenation mechanism are currently in progress. The catalytic hydrogenation of a ketone is a basic and critical process for making many types of alcohols used as the final products and precursors in the pharmaceutical, agrochemical, flavor, fragrance, materials, and fine chemicals industries. The catalytic hydrogenation process developed by Noyori is a very attractive process. Formic acid and 2-propanol have been used extensively as hydrogenation sources. The advantage of using 2-propanol as a hydrogen source is that the only side product will be acetone, which can be removed easily during the workup process. Hydrogen transfer (HT) catalysis, which generates alcohols through the reduction of ketones, is an attractive protocol that is used widely. Ruthenium(II) complexes are the most useful catalysts for the hydrogen transfer (HT) of ketones. In this method, a highly active catalytic system employs a transition metal as a catalyst to synthesize alcohols, and is a replacement for the hydrogen-using hydrogenation process. The most active system is based on Ru, Rh and Ir, which includes a nitrogen ligand that facilitates the formation of a catalytically active hydride and phosphorus.

  6. Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation of Furfural to Furfuryl Alcohol with Recyclable Al-Zr@Fe Mixed Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Jian; Li, Hu; Riisager, Anders

    2017-01-01

    A series of magnetic, acid/base bifunctional Al–Zr@Fe3O4 catalysts were successfully prepared by a facile coprecipitation method and utilized in the catalytic transfer hydrogenation (CTH) of furfural to furfuryl alcohol with 2-propanol as hydrogen source. The physicochemical properties and morpho......A series of magnetic, acid/base bifunctional Al–Zr@Fe3O4 catalysts were successfully prepared by a facile coprecipitation method and utilized in the catalytic transfer hydrogenation (CTH) of furfural to furfuryl alcohol with 2-propanol as hydrogen source. The physicochemical properties...... with a Al3+/Zr4+/Fe3O4 molar ratio of 21:9:3 was found to exhibit a high furfuryl alcohol yield of 90.5 % in the CTH from furfural at 180 °C after 4 h with a comparatively low activation energy of 45.3 kJ mol−1, as calculated from the Arrhenius equation. Moreover, leaching and recyclability tests confirmed...

  7. Liquid-Phase Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation of Furfural over Homogeneous Lewis Acid-Ru/C Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotopoulou, Paraskevi; Martin, Nickolas; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2015-06-22

    The catalytic performance of homogeneous Lewis acid catalysts and their interaction with Ru/C catalyst are studied in the catalytic transfer hydrogenation of furfural by using 2-propanol as a solvent and hydrogen donor. We find that Lewis acid catalysts hydrogenate the furfural to furfuryl alcohol, which is then etherified with 2-propanol. The catalytic activity is correlated with an empirical scale of Lewis acid strength and exhibits a volcano behavior. Lanthanides are the most active, with DyCl3 giving complete furfural conversion and a 97 % yield of furfuryl alcohol at 180 °C after 3 h. The combination of Lewis acid and Ru/C catalysts results in synergy for the stronger Lewis acid catalysts, with a significant increase in the furfural conversion and methyl furan yield. Optimum results are obtained by using Ru/C combined with VCl3 , AlCl3 , SnCl4 , YbCl3 , and RuCl3 . Our results indicate that the combination of Lewis acid/metal catalysts is a general strategy for performing tandem reactions in the upgrade of furans. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Magnetic nickel ferrite nanoparticles as highly durable catalysts for catalytic transfer hydrogenation of bio-based aldehydes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Jian; Yang, Song; Riisager, Anders

    2018-01-01

    Magnetic nickel ferrite (NiFe2O4) nanoparticles were exploited as stable and easily separable heterogeneous catalysts for catalytic transfer hydrogenation (CTH) of furfural to furfuryl alcohol with 2-propanol as both the hydrogen source and the solvent providing 94% product yield at 180 degrees C...

  9. Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation of Furfural to 2-Methylfuran and 2-Methyltetrahydrofuran over Bimetallic Copper-Palladium Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xin; Liu, An-Feng; Cai, Bo; Luo, Jin-Yue; Pan, Hui; Huang, Yao-Bing

    2016-12-08

    The catalytic transfer hydrogenation of furfural to the fuel additives 2-methylfuran (2-MF) and 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MTHF) was investigated over various bimetallic catalysts in the presence of the hydrogen donor 2-propanol. Of all the as-prepared catalysts, bimetallic Cu-Pd catalysts showed the highest catalytic activities towards the formation of 2-MF and 2-MTHF with a total yield of up to 83.9 % yield at 220 °C in 4 h. By modifying the Pd ratios in the Cu-Pd catalyst, 2-MF or 2-MTHF could be obtained selectively as the prevailing product. The other reaction conditions also had a great influence on the product distribution. Mechanistic studies by reaction monitoring and intermediate conversion revealed that the reaction proceeded mainly through the hydrogenation of furfural to furfuryl alcohol, which was followed by deoxygenation to 2-MF in parallel to deoxygenation/ring hydrogenation to 2-MTHF. Finally, the catalyst showed a high reactivity and stability in five catalyst recycling runs, which represents a significant step forward toward the catalytic transfer hydrogenation of furfural. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Catalytic biorefining of plant biomass to non-pyrolytic lignin bio-oil and carbohydrates through hydrogen transfer reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrini, Paola; Rinaldi, Roberto

    2014-08-11

    Through catalytic hydrogen transfer reactions, a new biorefining method results in the isolation of depolymerized lignin--a non-pyrolytic lignin bio-oil--in addition to pulps that are amenable to enzymatic hydrolysis. Compared with organosolv lignin, the lignin bio-oil is highly susceptible to further hydrodeoxygenation under low-severity conditions and therefore establishes a unique platform for lignin valorization by heterogeneous catalysis. Overall, the potential of a catalytic biorefining method designed from the perspective of lignin utilization is reported. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Hydrodehalogenation of alkyl iodides with base-mediated hydrogenation and catalytic transfer hydrogenation: application to the asymmetric synthesis of N-protected α-methylamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Pijus K; Birtwistle, J Sanderson; McMurray, John S

    2014-09-05

    We report a very mild synthesis of N-protected α-methylamines from the corresponding amino acids. Carboxyl groups of amino acids are reduced to iodomethyl groups via hydroxymethyl intermediates. Reductive deiodination to methyl groups is achieved by hydrogenation or catalytic transfer hydrogenation under alkaline conditions. Basic hydrodehalogenation is selective for the iodomethyl group over hydrogenolysis-labile protecting groups, such as benzyloxycarbonyl, benzyl ester, benzyl ether, and 9-fluorenyloxymethyl, thus allowing the conversion of virtually any protected amino acid into the corresponding N-protected α-methylamine.

  12. Non-catalytic transfer hydrogenation in supercritical CO2 for coal liquefaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhussien, Hussien

    This thesis presents the results of the investigation on developing and evaluating a low temperature (coal dissolution in supercritical CO2. The main idea behind the thesis was that one hydrogen atom from water and one hydrogen atom from the hydrogen transfer agent (HTA) were used to hydrogenate the coal. The products of coal dissolution were non-polar and polar while the supercritical CO2, which enhanced the rates of hydrogenation and dissolution of the non-polar molecules and removal from the reaction site, was non-polar. The polar modifier (PM) for CO2 was added to the freed to aid in the dissolution and removal of the polar components. The addition of a phase transfer agent (PTA) allowed a seamless transport of the ions and by-product between the aqueous and organic phases. DDAB, used as the PTA, is an effective phase transfer catalyst and showed enhancement to the coal dissolution process. COAL + DH- +H 2O → COAL.H2 + DHO-- This process has a great feature due to the fact that the chemicals were obtained without requir-ing to first convert coal to CO and H2 units as in indirect coal liquefaction. The experiments were conducted in a unique reactor set up that can be connected through two lines. one line to feed the reactor with supercritical CO 2 and the other connected to gas chromatograph. The use of the supercritical CO2 enhanced the solvent option due to the chemical extraction, in addition to the low environmental impact and energy cost. In this thesis the experiment were conducted at five different temperatures from atmos-pheric to 140°C, 3000 - 6000 psi with five component of feed mixture, namely water, HTA, PTA, coal, and PM in semi batch vessels reactor system with a volume of 100 mL. The results show that the chemicals were obtained without requiring to first convert coal to CO and H2 units as in indirect coal liquefaction. The results show that the conversion was found to be 91.8% at opti-mum feed mixtures values of 3, 1.0 and 5.4 for water: PM

  13. Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation of Furfural to Furfuryl Alcohol over Nitrogen-Doped Carbon-Supported Iron Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiang; Liu, Jun-Ling; Zhou, Hong-Jun; Fu, Yao

    2016-06-08

    Iron-based heterogeneous catalysts, which were generally prepared by pyrolysis of iron complexes on supports at elevated temperature, were found to be capable of catalyzing the transfer hydrogenation of furfural (FF) to furfuryl alcohol (FFA). The effects of metal precursor, nitrogen precursor, pyrolysis temperature, and support on catalytic performance were examined thoroughly, and a comprehensive study of the reaction parameters was also performed. The highest selectivity of FFA reached 83.0 % with a FF conversion of 91.6 % under the optimal reaction condition. Catalyst characterization suggested that iron cations coordinated by pyridinic nitrogen functionalities were responsible for the enhanced catalytic activity. The iron catalyst could be recycled without significant loss of catalytic activity for five runs, and the destruction of the nitrogen-iron species, the presence of crystallized Fe2 O3 phase, and the pore structure change were the main reasons for catalyst deactivation. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. High Zn/Al ratios enhance dehydrogenation vs hydrogen transfer reactions of Zn-ZSM-5 catalytic systems in methanol conversion to aromatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinilla-Herrero, Irene; Borfecchia, Elisa; Holzinger, Julian

    2018-01-01

    suggest that catalytic activity is associated with [Zn(H2O)n(OH)]+ species located in the exchange positions of the materials with little or no contribution of ZnO or metallic Zn. The effect of Zn/Al ratio on their catalytic performance in methanol conversion to aromatics has been investigated. In all...... cases, higher Zn content causes an increase in the yield of aromatics while keeping the production of alkanes low. For similar Zn contents, high densities of Al sites favour the hydrogen transfer reactions and alkane formation whereas in samples with low Al contents, and thus higher Zn/Al ratio...

  15. Field-controlled electron transfer and reaction kinetics of the biological catalytic system of microperoxidase-11 and hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongki Choi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Controlled reaction kinetics of the bio-catalytic system of microperoxidase-11 and hydrogen peroxide has been achieved using an electrostatic technique. The technique allowed independent control of 1 the thermodynamics of the system using electrochemical setup and 2 the quantum mechanical tunneling at the interface between microperoxidase-11 and the working electrode by applying a gating voltage to the electrode. The cathodic currents of electrodes immobilized with microperoxidase-11 showed a dependence on the gating voltage in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, indicating a controllable reduction reaction. The measured kinetic parameters of the bio-catalytic reduction showed nonlinear dependences on the gating voltage as the result of modified interfacial electron tunnel due to the field induced at the microperoxidase-11-electrode interface. Our results indicate that the kinetics of the reduction of hydrogen peroxide can be controlled by a gating voltage and illustrate the operation of a field-effect bio-catalytic transistor, whose current-generating mechanism is the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water with the current being controlled by the gating voltage.

  16. Graphene Derivative in Magnetically Recoverable Catalyst Determines Catalytic Properties in Transfer Hydrogenation of Nitroarenes to Anilines with 2-Propanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Vijay Kumar; Mazhar, Sumaira; Gregor, Lennon; Stein, Barry D; Morgan, David Gene; Maciulis, Nicholas A; Pink, Maren; Losovyj, Yaroslav; Bronstein, Lyudmila M

    2018-06-14

    Here, we report transfer hydrogenation of nitroarenes to aminoarenes using 2-propanol as a hydrogen source and Ag-containing magnetically recoverable catalysts based on partially reduced graphene oxide (pRGO) sheets. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data demonstrated that, during the one-pot catalyst synthesis, formation of magnetite nanoparticles (NPs) is accompanied by the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) to pRGO. The formation of Ag 0 NPs on top of magnetite nanoparticles does not change the pRGO structure. At the same time, the catalyst structure is further modified during the transfer hydrogenation, leading to a noticeable increase of sp 2 carbons. These carbons are responsible for the adsorption of substrate and intermediates, facilitating a hydrogen transfer from Ag NPs and creating synergy between the components of the catalyst. The nitroarenes with electron withdrawing and electron donating substituents allow for excellent yields of aniline derivatives with high regio and chemoselectivity, indicating that the reaction is not disfavored by these functionalities. The versatility of the catalyst synthetic protocol was demonstrated by a synthesis of an Ru-containing graphene derivative based catalyst, also allowing for efficient transfer hydrogenation. Easy magnetic separation and stable catalyst performance in the transfer hydrogenation make this catalyst promising for future applications.

  17. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wayland, B.B.

    1993-12-01

    Focus of this project is on developing new approaches for hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. The strategies to accomplish CO reduction are based on favorable thermodynamics manifested by rhodium macrocycles for producing a series of intermediates implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Metalloformyl complexes from reactions of H 2 and CO, and CO reductive coupling to form metallo α-diketone species provide alternate routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics are promising candidates for future development

  18. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayland, B.B.

    1992-12-01

    This project is focused on developing strategies to accomplish the reduction and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. Our approaches to this issue are based on the recognition that rhodium macrocycles have unusually favorable thermodynamic values for producing a series of intermediate implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Observations of metalloformyl complexes produced by reactions of H{sub 2} and CO, and reductive coupling of CO to form metallo {alpha}-diketone species have suggested a multiplicity of routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in constructing energy profiles for a variety of potential pathways, and these schemes are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Variation of the electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Emerging knowledge of the factors that contribute to M-H, M-C and M-O bond enthalpies is directing the search for ligand arrays that will expand the range of metal species that have favorable thermodynamic parameters to produce the primary intermediates for CO hydrogenation. Studies of rhodium complexes are being extended to non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics. Multifunctional catalyst systems designed to couple the ability of rhodium complexes to produce formyl and diketone intermediates with a second catalyst that hydrogenates these imtermediates are promising approaches to accomplish CO hydrogenation at mild conditions.

  19. Activation of the C-H bond: catalytic hydroxylation of hydrocarbons by new cobaltic alkylperoxydic complexes; selective and catalytic cycloalkane dehydrogenation in presence of uranium for hydrogen transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazi, E.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to improve efficiency and selectivity of chemical reactions for alkane transformations. In the first part decomposition of hydroperoxides and hydrocarbon hydroxylation by cobalt complexes is studied. In the second part cycloalkanes are dehydrogenated into aromatics with a Pt catalyst, trapping hydrogen by uranium. Uranium hydride UH 3 can yield very pure hydrogen at reasonable temperature [fr

  20. Iron piano-stool complexes containing NHC ligands outfitted with pendent arms: synthesis, characterization, and screening for catalytic transfer hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthapratim Das; Thomas Elder; William W. Brennessel; Stephen C. Chmely

    2016-01-01

    Catalysis is a fundamental technology that is widely used in the food, petrochemical, pharmaceutical, and agricultural sectors to produce chemical products on an industrial scale. Well-defined molecular organometallic species are a cornerstone of catalytic methodology, and the activity and selectivity of these complexes can be modulated by judicious choice of metal and...

  1. Synthesis and characterization of rhodium(I) complexes with P-N donor ligands and their catalytic application in transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barah, Geetika; Sarmah, Podma Poliov; Boruah, Devajani [Dept. of Chemistry, Dibrugarh University, Dibrugarh (India)

    2015-04-15

    Three rhodium(I) complexes of the types [Rh(COE)Cl(η{sup 2}-L)] (1a,1b) and [RhCl(η{sup 2}-L) (η{sup 1}-L)] (1c), where L = P⁓N donor ligands 2-[2-(diphenylphosphino) ethyl]pyridine, (PPh{sub 2}Etpy) (a), 2-(diphenylphosphino)pyridine (PPh{sub 2}py) (b), and 3-(diphenylphosphino)-1-propylamine (PPh{sub 2}(CH{sub 2}){sub 3}NH{sub 2}) (c), have been synthesized by reacting [Rh(coe){sub 2}Cl]{sub 2} with the respective ligands in 1:2 molar ratio for 1a, 1b and 1:4 molar ratio for 1c in DCM under refluxing condition. The complexes were characterized using different analytical techniques such as FT-IR, ESI(+) mass spectrometry, {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P{"1H} NMR spectrometry, conductivity measurements, and melting point determination. The synthesized complexes were found to exhibit good catalytic activity for the transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds to corresponding alcohols with high conversion rate.

  2. Catalytic transfer hydrogenation for stabilization of bio-oil oxygenates: reduction of p-cresol and furfural over bimetallic Ni-Cu catalysts using isopropanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transfer hydrogenation and hydrodeoxygenation of model bio-oil compounds (p-cresol and furfural) and bio-oils derived from biomass via traditional pyrolysis and tail-gas reactive pyrolysis (TGRP) were conducted. Mild batch reaction conditions were employed, using isopropanol as a hydrogen donor over...

  3. Single step synthesis of gold-amino acid composite, with the evidence of the catalytic hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reaction, for the electrochemical recognition of Serotonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Meenakshi; Siwal, Samarjeet; Nandi, Debkumar; Mallick, Kaushik

    2016-03-01

    A composite architecture of amino acid and gold nanoparticles has been synthesized using a generic route of 'in-situ polymerization and composite formation (IPCF)' [1,2]. The formation mechanism of the composite has been supported by a model hydrogen atom (H•≡H++e-) transfer (HAT) type of reaction which belongs to the proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) mechanism. The 'gold-amino acid composite' was used as a catalyst for the electrochemical recognition of Serotonin.

  4. Catalytic hydrogen recombination for nuclear containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koroll, G.W.; Lau, D.W.P.; Dewit, W.A.; Graham, W.R.C.

    1994-01-01

    Catalytic recombiners appear to be a credible option for hydrogen mitigation in nuclear containments. The passive operation, versatility and ease of back fitting are appealing for existing stations and new designs. Recently, a generation of wet-proofed catalyst materials have been developed at AECL which are highly specific to H 2 -O 2 , are active at ambient temperatures and are being evaluated for containment applications. Two types of catalytic recombiners were evaluated for hydrogen removal in containments based on the AECL catalyst. The first is a catalytic combustor for application in existing air streams such as provided by fans or ventilation systems. The second is an autocatalytic recombiner which uses the enthalpy of reaction to produce natural convective flow over the catalyst elements. Intermediate-scale results obtained in 6 m 3 and 10 m 3 spherical and cylindrical vessels are given to demonstrate self-starting limits, operating limits, removal capacity, scaling parameters, flow resistance, mixing behaviour in the vicinity of an operating recombiner and sensitivity to poisoning, fouling and radiation. (author). 13 refs., 10 figs

  5. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dan, Monica; Mihet, Maria; Lazar, Mihaela D.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H 2 . In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al 2 O 3 . The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N 2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H 2 , CH 4 , CO, CO 2 . The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H 2 O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%

  6. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan, Monica, E-mail: monica.dan@itim-cj.ro; Mihet, Maria, E-mail: maria.mihet@itim-cj.ro; Lazar, Mihaela D., E-mail: diana.lazar@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 67-103 Donat Street, 400293 Cluj Napoca (Romania)

    2015-12-23

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H{sub 2}. In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}. The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H{sub 2}O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%.

  7. Microchannel Reactor System for Catalytic Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeniyi Lawal; Woo Lee; Ron Besser; Donald Kientzler; Luke Achenie

    2010-12-22

    We successfully demonstrated a novel process intensification concept enabled by the development of microchannel reactors, for energy efficient catalytic hydrogenation reactions at moderate temperature, and pressure, and low solvent levels. We designed, fabricated, evaluated, and optimized a laboratory-scale microchannel reactor system for hydrogenation of onitroanisole and a proprietary BMS molecule. In the second phase of the program, as a prelude to full-scale commercialization, we designed and developed a fully-automated skid-mounted multichannel microreactor pilot plant system for multiphase reactions. The system is capable of processing 1 – 10 kg/h of liquid substrate, and an industrially relevant immiscible liquid-liquid was successfully demonstrated on the system. Our microreactor-based pilot plant is one-of-akind. We anticipate that this process intensification concept, if successfully demonstrated, will provide a paradigm-changing basis for replacing existing energy inefficient, cost ineffective, environmentally detrimental slurry semi-batch reactor-based manufacturing practiced in the pharmaceutical and fine chemicals industries.

  8. Intramolecular Energy Transfer, Charge Transfer & Hydrogen Bond

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ultrafast Dynamics of Chemical Reactions in Condensed Phase: Intramolecular Energy Transfer, Charge Transfer & Hydrogen Bond · PowerPoint Presentation · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Slide 8 · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Slide 16 · Slide 17 · Slide 18 · Slide 19.

  9. Hydrogen Production From catalytic reforming of greenhouse gases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    a fixed bed stainless steel reactor. The 20wt%. ... catalytic activity for hydrogen production with the highest yield and selectivity of 32.5% and 17.6% respectively. © JASEM ... CO2 reforming of methane is however not fully developed ..... Design and preparation of .... catalytic nickel membrane for gas to liquid (GTL) process.

  10. Hydrogen assisted catalytic biomass pyrolysis for green fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stummann, Magnus Zingler; Høj, Martin; Gabrielsen, Jostein

    2017-01-01

    due to coking of the catalyst is an inhibitive problem for this technology. The objective of the present work is to produce oxygen free gasoline and diesel from biomass by hydrogen assisted catalytic fast pyrolysis. Fast pyrolysis of beech wood has been performed in high-pressure hydrogen atmosphere...

  11. Short hydrogen bonds in the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR LESKOVAC

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The survey of crystallographic data from the Protein Data Bank for 37 structures of trypsin and other serine proteases at a resolution of 0.78–1.28 Å revealed the presence of hydrogen bonds in the active site of the enzymes, which are formed between the catalytic histidine and aspartate residues and are on average 2.7 Å long. This is the typical bond length for normal hydrogen bonds. The geometric properties of the hydrogen bonds in the active site indicate that the H atom is not centered between the heteroatoms of the catalytic histidine and aspartate residues in the active site. Taken together, these findings exclude the possibility that short “low-barrier” hydrogen bonds are formed in the ground state structure of the active sites examined in this work. Some time ago, it was suggested by Cleland that the “low-barrier hydrogen bond” hypothesis is operative in the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases, and requires the presence of short hydrogen bonds around 2.4 Å long in the active site, with the H atom centered between the catalytic heteroatoms. The conclusions drawn from this work do not exclude the validity of the “low-barrier hydrogen bond” hypothesis at all, but they merely do not support it in this particular case, with this particular class of enzymes.

  12. Liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage: catalytic hydrogen generation under ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hai-Long; Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Yan, Jun-Min; Zhang, Xin-Bo; Xu, Qiang

    2010-05-25

    There is a demand for a sufficient and sustainable energy supply. Hence, the search for applicable hydrogen storage materials is extremely important owing to the diversified merits of hydrogen energy. Lithium and sodium borohydride, ammonia borane, hydrazine, and formic acid have been extensively investigated as promising hydrogen storage materials based on their relatively high hydrogen content. Significant advances, such as hydrogen generation temperatures and reaction kinetics, have been made in the catalytic hydrolysis of aqueous lithium and sodium borohydride and ammonia borane as well as in the catalytic decomposition of hydrous hydrazine and formic acid. In this Minireview we briefly survey the research progresses in catalytic hydrogen generation from these liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage materials.

  13. Hydrogen production via catalytic processing of renewable feedstocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nazim Muradov; Franklyn Smith; Ali T-Raissi

    2006-01-01

    Landfill gas (LFG) and biogas can potentially become important feedstocks for renewable hydrogen production. The objectives of this work were: (1) to develop a catalytic process for direct reforming of CH 4 -CO 2 gaseous mixture mimicking LFG, (2) perform thermodynamic analysis of the reforming process using AspenPlus chemical process simulator, (3) determine operational conditions for auto-thermal (or thermo-neutral) reforming of a model CH 4 -CO 2 feedstock, and (4) fabricate and test a bench-scale hydrogen production unit. Experimental data obtained from catalytic reformation of the CH 4 -CO 2 and CH 4 -CO 2 -O 2 gaseous mixtures using Ni-catalyst were in a good agreement with the simulation results. It was demonstrated that catalytic reforming of LFG-mimicking gas produced hydrogen with the purity of 99.9 vol.%. (authors)

  14. Review of literature on catalytic recombination of hydrogen--oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Homsy, R.V.; Glatron, C.A.

    1968-01-01

    The results are reported of a literature search for information concerning the heterogeneous, gas phase, catalytic hydrogen-oxygen recombination. Laboratory scale experiments to test the performance of specific metal oxide catalysts under conditions simulating the atmosphere within a nuclear reactor containment vessel following a loss-of-coolant blowdown accident are suggested

  15. Theoretical study of catalytic hydrogenation of oxirane and its methyl ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    C3H6O) is its methyl derivative. Theoretical studies on catalytic hydrogenation of both compounds, in presence of aluminium chloride (AlCl3) catalyst, are carried out. The products of reactions are ethanol and propan-1-ol from oxirane and ...

  16. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Acetone to Isopropanol: An Environmentally Benign Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ateeq Rahman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic hydrogenation of acetone is an important area of catalytic process to produce fine chemicals. Hydrogenation of acetone has important applications for heat pumps, fuel cells or in fulfilling the sizeable demand for the production of 2-propanol. Catalytic vapour phase hydrogenation of acetone has gained attention over the decades with variety of homogeneous catalysts notably Iridium, Rh, Ru complexes and heterogeneous catalysts comprising of Raney Nickel, Raney Sponge, Ni/Al2O3, Ni/SiO2, or Co-Al2O3, Pd, Rh, Ru, Re, or Fe/Al2O3 supported on SiO2 or MgO and even CoMgAl, NiMg Al layered double hydroxide, Cu metal, CuO, Cu2O. Nano catalysts are developed for actone reduction Ni maleate, cobalt oxide prepared in organic solvents. Author present a review on acetone hydrogenation under different conditions with various homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts studied so far in literature and new strategies to develop economic and environmentally benign approach. ©2010 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 16th June 2010, Revised: 18th October 2010; Accepted: 25th October 2010[How to Cite:Ateeq Rahman. (2010. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Acetone to Isopropanol: An Environmentally Benign Approach. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 5(2: 113-126. doi:10.9767/bcrec.5.2.798.113-126][DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.5.2.798.113-126 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/798

  17. Reactivity and Catalytic Activity of Hydrogen Atom Chemisorbed Silver Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor, Dar; Pal, Sourav

    2015-06-18

    Metal clusters of silver have attracted recent interest of researchers as a result of their potential in different catalytic applications and low cost. However, due to the completely filled d orbital and very high first ionization potential of the silver atom, the silver-based catalysts interact very weakly with the reacting molecules. In the current work, density functional theory calculations were carried out to investigate the effect of hydrogen atom chemisorption on the reactivity and catalytic properties of inert silver clusters. Our results affirm that the hydrogen atom chemisorption leads to enhancement in the binding energy of the adsorbed O2 molecule on the inert silver clusters. The increase in the binding energy is also characterized by the decrease in the Ag-O and increase in the O-O bond lengths in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Pertinent to the increase in the O-O bond length, a significant red shift in the O-O stretching frequency is also noted in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Moreover, the hydrogen atom chemisorbed silver clusters show low reaction barriers and high heat of formation of the final products for the environmentally important CO oxidation reaction as compared to the parent catalytically inactive clusters. The obtained results were compared with those of the corresponding gold and hydrogen atom chemisorbed gold clusters obtained at the same level of theory. It is expected the current computational study will provide key insights for future advances in the design of efficient nanosilver-based catalysts through the adsorption of a small atom or a ligand.

  18. Simple and rapid hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol with aqueous formic acid in catalytic flow reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahat Javaid

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The inner surface of a metallic tube (i.d. 0.5 mm was coated with a palladium (Pd-based thin metallic layer by flow electroless plating. Simultaneous plating of Pd and silver (Ag from their electroless-plating solution produced a mixed distributed bimetallic layer. Preferential acid leaching of Ag from the Pd–Ag layer produced a porous Pd surface. Hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol was examined in the presence of formic acid simply by passing the reaction solution through the catalytic tubular reactors. p-Aminophenol was the sole product of hydrogenation. No side reaction occurred. Reaction conversion with respect to p-nitrophenol was dependent on the catalyst layer type, the temperature, pH, amount of formic acid, and the residence time. A porous and oxidized Pd (PdO surface gave the best reaction conversion among the catalytic reactors examined. p-Nitrophenol was converted quantitatively to p-aminophenol within 15 s of residence time in the porous PdO reactor at 40 °C. Evolution of carbon dioxide (CO2 was observed during the reaction, although hydrogen (H2 was not found in the gas phase. Dehydrogenation of formic acid did not occur to any practical degree in the absence of p-nitrophenol. Consequently, the nitro group was reduced via hydrogen transfer from formic acid to p-nitrophenol and not by hydrogen generated by dehydrogenation of formic acid.

  19. Catalytic steam reforming of ethanol for hydrogen production: Brief status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bineli Aulus R.R.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen represents a promising fuel since it is considered as a cleanest energy carrier and also because during its combustion only water is emitted. It can be produced from different kinds of renewable feedstocks, such as ethanol, in this sense hydrogen could be treated as biofuel. Three chemical reactions can be used to achieve this purpose: the steam reforming (SR, the partial oxidation (POX and the autothermal reforming (ATR. In this study, the catalysts implemented in steam reforming of ethanol were reviewed. A wide variety of elements can be used as catalysts for this reaction, such as base metals (Ni, Cu and Co or noble metals (Rh, Pt and Ru usually deposited on a support material that increases surface area and improves catalytic function. The use of Rh, Ni and Pt supported or promoted with CeO2, and/or La2O3 shows excellent performance in ethanol SR catalytic process. The ratio of water to ethanol, reaction temperatures, catalysts loadings, selectivity and activity are also discussed as they are extremely important for high hydrogen yields.

  20. Hydrogenation of Maltose in Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Maltitol Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makertihartha I.G.B.N.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Maltitol is one of the low-calorie sweeteners which has a major role in food industries. Due to its characteristics of comparable sweetness level to sucrose, maltitol can be a suitable sugar replacement. In this work, catalytic membrane reactor (CMR was examined in maltitol production through hydrogenation of maltose. Commercial ceramic membrane impregnated with Kalcat 8030 Nickel was used as the CMR. The reaction was conducted at a batch mode operation, 95 to 110°C of temperature, and 5 to 8 bar of pressure. In the range of working conditions used in this study, up to 47% conversion was achieved. The reaction conversion was significantly affected by temperature and pressure. Results of this preliminary study indicated that CMR can be used for hydrogenation of maltose with good performance under a relatively low operating pressure.

  1. Catalytic activation of molecular hydrogen in alkyne hydrogenation reactions by lanthanide metal vapor reaction products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, W.J.; Bloom, I.; Engerer, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    A rotary metal vapor was used in the synthesis of Lu, Er, Nd, Sm, Yb, and La alkyne, diene, and phosphine complexes. A typical catalytic hydrogenation experiment is described. The lanthanide metal vapor product is dissolved in tetrahydrofuran or toluene and placed in a pressure reaction vessel 3-hexyne (or another substrate) is added, the chamber attached to a high vacuum line, cooled to -196 0 C, evacuated, warmed to ambient temperature and hydrogen is added. The solution is stirred magnetically while the pressure in monitored. The reaction products were analyzed by gas chromatography. Rates and products of various systems are listed. This preliminary survey indicates that catalytic reaction chemistry is available to these metals in a wide range of coordination environments. Attempts to characterize these compounds are hampered by their paramagnetic nature and their tendency to polymerize

  2. Mass transfer model liquid phase catalytic exchange column simulation applicable to any column composition profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busigin, A. [NITEK USA Inc., Ocala, FL (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange (LPCE) is a key technology used in water detritiation systems. Rigorous simulation of LPCE is complicated when a column may have both hydrogen and deuterium present in significant concentrations in different sections of the column. This paper presents a general mass transfer model for a homogenous packed bed LPCE column as a set of differential equations describing composition change, and equilibrium equations to define the mass transfer driving force within the column. The model is used to show the effect of deuterium buildup in the bottom of an LPCE column from non-negligible D atom fraction in the bottom feed gas to the column. These types of calculations are important in the design of CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange) water detritiation systems.

  3. Hydrogen production from biomass tar by catalytic steam reforming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, Sang Jun; Choi, Young-Chan; Lee, Jae-Goo

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic steam reforming of model biomass tar, toluene being a major component, was performed at various conditions of temperature, steam injection rate, catalyst size, and space time. Two kinds of nickel-based commercial catalyst, the Katalco 46-3Q and the Katalco 46-6Q, were evaluated and compared with dolomite catalyst. Production of hydrogen generally increased with reaction temperature, steam injection rate and space time and decreased with catalyst size. In particular, zirconia-promoted nickel-based catalyst, Katalco 46-6Q, showed a higher tar conversion efficiency and shows 100% conversion even relatively lower temperature conditions of 600 deg. C. Apparent activation energy was estimated to 94 and 57 kJ/mol for dolomite and nickel-based catalyst respectively.

  4. Electrocatalytic hydrogenation of organic molecules on conductive new catalytic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tountian, D. [Louis Pasteur Univ., Strasbourg (France). Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Chimie Physique du Corps Solide; Sherbrooke Univ., Sherbrooke, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Chimie, Centre de Recherche en Electrochimie et Electrocatalyse; Brisach-Wittmeyer, A.; Menard, H. [Sherbrooke Univ., Sherbrooke, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Chimie, Centre de Recherche en Electrochimie et Electrocatalyse; Nkeng, P.; Poillerat, G. [Louis Pasteur Univ., Strasbourg (France). Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Chimie Physique du Corps Solide

    2008-07-01

    Electrocatalytic hydrogenation (ECH) of organic molecules is a process where chemisorbed hydrogen is produced by electroreduction of water which reacts with the species in bulk. Greater emphasis is being placed on improving the nature of the building material of the electrodes in order to increase ECH efficiency. The effectiveness of the ECH is known to be linked to the nature of electrode materials used and their adsorption properties. This work presented the effect of conductive support material on ECH. The conductive catalysts were obtained from tin dioxide which is chemically stable. Palladium was the catalytic metal used in this study. The production of chemisorbed hydrogen was shown to depend on the quantity of metallic nanoaggregates in electrical contact with the reticulated vitreous carbon use as electrode. The conductive support, F-doped tin dioxide, was obtained by the sol-gel method. The electrocatalysts were characterized by different methods as resistivity measurements, linear sweep voltammetry, XRD, SEM, TGA/DSC, and FTIR analysis. The effects of temperature and time of calcination were also investigated. The study showed that the F-doped SnO2 electrocatalyst appeared to increase the rate of phenol electrohydrogenation. It was concluded that the improved electrocatalytic activity of Pd/F-doped SnO2 can be attributed to the simultaneous polarization of all the metallic Pd nanoaggregates present on the surface as well as in the pores of the matrix by contact with RVC. This results in a better production of chemisorbed atomic hydrogen with a large number of adlienation points. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Dynamic\tmodelling of catalytic three-phase reactors for hydrogenation and oxidation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmi T.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic modelling principles for typical catalytic three-phase reactors, batch autoclaves and fixed (trickle beds were described. The models consist of balance equations for the catalyst particles as well as for the bulk phases of gas and liquid. Rate equations, transport models and mass balances were coupled to generalized heterogeneous models which were solved with respect to time and space with algorithms suitable for stiff differential equations. The aspects of numerical solution strategies were discussed and the procedure was illustrated with three case studies: hydrogenation of aromatics, hydrogenation of aldehydes and oxidation of ferrosulphate. The case studies revealed the importance of mass transfer resistance inside the catalyst pallets as well as the dynamics of the different phases being present in the reactor. Reliable three-phase reactor simulation and scale-up should be based on dynamic heterogeneous models.

  6. Modelling of the aerosol deposition in a hydrogen catalytic recombiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vendel, J.; Studer, E.; Zavaleta, P.; Hadida, Ph.

    1997-01-01

    Catalytic recombiners are used to remove the hydrogen released in case of a severe accident in a nuclear power plant, so as to reduce the risk of deflagration or detonation. H 2 PAR experiments are carried out to precise the behaviour of recombiners in term of poisoning by aerosols. Firstly, some calculations have been done with the Trio-EF code to assess the structure of convection loops in the experimental tent. We note that when the recombiner is active, it may have a strong influence on the flow inside the tent and may even interact with an other heat source such as a furnace. In the second part, we study the deposition of aerosols on catalytic plates for a given recombiner, when it is active or passive. We list the different mechanisms and quantify them by introducing the deposition velocity. In fact, thermophoresis appears to be the main mechanism, compared to brownian diffusion or difrusiophoresis, which governs aerosols deposition. It favours deposition on > plates and acts against it for > plates. (author)

  7. Experimental studies on catalytic hydrogen recombiners for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drinovac, P.

    2006-01-01

    In the course of core melt accidents in nuclear power plants a large amount of hydrogen can be produced and form an explosive or even detonative gas mixture with aerial oxygen in the reactor building. In the containment atmosphere of pressurized water reactors hydrogen combines a phlogistically with the oxygen present to form water vapor even at room temperature. In the past, experimental work conducted at various facilities has contributed little or nothing to an understanding of the operating principles of catalytic recombiners. Hence, the purpose of the present study was to conduct detailed investigations on a section of a recombiner essentially in order to deepen the understanding of reaction kinetics and heat transport processes. The results of the experiments presented in this dissertation form a large data base of measurements which provides an insight into the processes taking place in recombiners. The reaction-kinetic interpretation of the measured data confirms and deepens the diffusion theory - proposed in an earlier study. Thus it is now possible to validate detailed numeric models representing the processes in recombiners. Consequently the present study serves to broaden and corroborate competence in this significant area of reactor technology. In addition, the empirical knowledge thus gained may be used for a critical reassessment of previous numeric model calculations. (orig.)

  8. Air-water transfer of hydrogen sulfide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yongsiri, C.; Vollertsen, J.; Rasmussen, M. R.

    2004-01-01

    The emissions process of hydrogen sulfide was studied to quantify air–water transfer of hydrogen sulfide in sewer networks. Hydrogen sulfide transfer across the air–water interface was investigated at different turbulence levels (expressed in terms of the Froude number) and pH using batch...... experiments. By means of the overall mass–transfer coefficient (KLa), the transfer coefficient of hydrogen sulfide (KLaH2S), referring to total sulfide, was correlated to that of oxygen (KLaO2) (i.e., the reaeration coefficient). Results demonstrate that both turbulence and pH in the water phase play...... a significant role for KLaH2S. An exponential expression is a suitable representation for the relationship between KLaH2S and the Froude number at all pH values studied (4.5 to 8.0). Because of the dissociation of hydrogen sulfide, KLaH2S increased with decreasing pH at a constant turbulence level. Relative...

  9. Graphene oxide as a catalyst for the diastereoselective transfer hydrogenation in the synthesis of prostaglandin derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coman, Simona M; Podolean, Iunia; Tudorache, Madalina; Cojocaru, Bogdan; Parvulescu, Vasile I; Puche, Marta; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2017-09-14

    Modification of GO by organic molecules changes its catalytic activity in the hydrogen transfer from i-propanol to enones, affecting the selectivity to allyl alcohol and diastereoselectivity to the resulting stereoisomers. It is noteworthy the system does not contain metals and is recyclable.

  10. Mass transfer in liquid phase catalytic exchange column of trickle bed type

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanishi, Toshihiko; Iwai, Yasunori; Okuno, Kenji

    1995-09-01

    The mechanism of mass transfer in a liquid phase catalytic exchange column was discussed for a trickle bed type. A new model has been proposed on the basis of this mass transfer mechanism; and several problems for the previous reported models were pointed out in the derivation of the model. An overall rate equation was first derived from the vapor-hydrogen exchange in the model. The mass transfer for the vapor-hydrogen exchange was decomposed to the following three steps: the mass transfer in a gas boundary layer on a catalyst particle; the mass transfer within the pores in the catalyst; and the chemical reaction on the surface of the catalyst. The water-vapor scrubbing process was considered as a series of the mass transfers in gas and liquid boundary layers on the wetted surfaces of the catalyst and packings or wall of the column. Significant subjects to be studied were proposed from the viewpoint of the validity of the model and the optimization of the column. (author)

  11. Simulation of hydrogen mitigation in catalytic recombiner. Part-II: Formulation of a CFD model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prabhudharwadkar, Deoras M.; Iyer, Kannan N.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Hydrogen transport in containment with recombiners is a multi-scale problem. → A novel methodology worked out to lump the recombiner characteristics. → Results obtained using commercial code FLUENT are cast in the form of correlations. → Hence, coarse grids can obtain accurate distribution of H 2 in containment. → Satisfactory working of the methodology is clearly demonstrated. - Abstract: This paper aims at formulation of a model compatible with CFD code to simulate hydrogen distribution and mitigation using a Passive Catalytic Recombiner in the Nuclear power plant containments. The catalytic recombiner is much smaller in size compared to the containment compartments. In order to fully resolve the recombination processes during the containment simulations, it requires the geometric details of the recombiner to be modelled and a very fine mesh size inside the recombiner channels. This component when integrated with containment mixing calculations would result in a large number of mesh elements which may take large computational times to solve the problem. This paper describes a method to resolve this simulation difficulty. In this exercise, the catalytic recombiner alone was first modelled in detail using the best suited option to describe the reaction rate. A detailed parametric study was conducted, from which correlations for the heat of reaction (hence the rate of reaction) and the heat transfer coefficient were obtained. These correlations were then used to model the recombiner channels as single computational cells providing necessary volumetric sources/sinks to the energy and species transport equations. This avoids full resolution of these channels, thereby allowing larger mesh size in the recombiners. The above mentioned method was successfully validated using both steady state and transient test problems and the results indicate very satisfactory modelling of the component.

  12. Measurement of dissolved hydrogen and hydrogen gas transfer in a hydrogen-producing reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shizas, I.; Bagley, D.M. [Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil Engineering

    2004-07-01

    This paper presents a simple method to measure dissolved hydrogen concentrations in the laboratory using standard equipment and a series of hydrogen gas transfer tests. The method was validated by measuring hydrogen gas transfer parameters for an anaerobic reactor system that was purged with 10 per cent carbon dioxide and 90 per cent nitrogen using a coarse bubble diffuser stone. Liquid samples from the reactor were injected into vials and hydrogen was allowed to partition between the liquid and gaseous phases. The concentration of dissolved hydrogen was determined by comparing the headspace injections onto a gas chromatograph and a standard curve. The detection limit was 1.0 x 10{sup -5} mol/L of dissolved hydrogen. The gas transfer rate for hydrogen in basal medium and anaerobic digester sludge was used to validate the method. Results were compared with gas transfer models. In addition to monitoring dissolved hydrogen in reactor systems, this method can help improve hydrogen production potential. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  13. Catalytic production of hydrogen from methanol for mobile, stationary and portable fuel-cell power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lukyanov, Boris N

    2008-01-01

    Main catalytic processes for hydrogen production from methanol are considered. Various schemes of fuel processors for hydrogen production in stationary, mobile and portable power plants based on fuel cells are analysed. The attention is focussed on the design of catalytic reactors of fuel processors and on the state-of-the-art in the design of catalysts for methanol conversion, carbon monoxide steam conversion and carbon monoxide selective oxidation. Prospects for the use of methanol in on-board fuel processors are discussed.

  14. Experimental studies on hydrogen isotopic deuterium from gas to liquid phase by catalytic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Yangming; Wang Heyi; Liu Jun; Fu Zhonghua; Wang Changbin; Han Jun; Xia Xiulong; Tang Lei

    2005-01-01

    The experimental studies on hydrogen isotopic deuterium from gas to liquid phase were completed by mixed ratio 1:4 of Pt-SDB hydrophobic catalyst and hydrophilic packing. The influencing factors on number of transfer units (NTU) and transformation efficiencies of deuterium were researched. The results show that preferable NTU can be obtained by choosing suitable operational temperature and flux of exchange gas. The transformation rate increases with increasing liquid flux, but it cannot obviously be improved when liquid flux attains some level. The length of catalytic column has an obvious influence on transformation rate and 90% of transformation rate is obtained by 4 m column length at gas flux with 2 m 3 /h, liquid flux with 1-2 kg/h and 45 degree C. (author)

  15. Surface spintronics enhanced photo-catalytic hydrogen evolution: Mechanisms, strategies, challenges and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenyan; Gao, Wei; Zhang, Xuqiang; Li, Zhen; Lu, Gongxuan

    2018-03-01

    Hydrogen is a green energy carrier with high enthalpy and zero environmental pollution emission characteristics. Photocatalytic hydrogen evolution (HER) is a sustainable and promising way to generate hydrogen. Despite of great achievements in photocatalytic HER research, its efficiency is still limited due to undesirable electron transfer loss, high HER over-potential and low stability of some photocatalysts, which lead to their unsatisfied performance in HER and anti-photocorrosion properties. In recent years, many spintronics works have shown their enhancing effects on photo-catalytic HER. For example, it was reported that spin polarized photo-electrons could result in higher photocurrents and HER turn-over frequency (up to 200%) in photocatalytic system. Two strategies have been developed for electron spin polarizing, which resort to heavy atom effect and magnetic induction respectively. Both theoretical and experimental studies show that controlling spin state of OHrad radicals in photocatalytic reaction can not only decrease OER over-potential (even to 0 eV) of water splitting, but improve stability and charge lifetime of photocatalysts. A convenient strategy have been developed for aligning spin state of OHrad by utilizing chiral molecules to spin filter photo-electrons. By chiral-induced spin filtering, electron polarization can approach to 74%, which is significantly larger than some traditional transition metal devices. Those achievements demonstrate bright future of spintronics in enhancing photocatalytic HER, nevertheless, there is little work systematically reviewing and analysis this topic. This review focuses on recent achievements of spintronics in photocatalytic HER study, and systematically summarizes the related mechanisms and important strategies proposed. Besides, the challenges and developing trends of spintronics enhanced photo-catalytic HER research are discussed, expecting to comprehend and explore such interdisciplinary research in

  16. Direct catalytic hydrothermal liquefaction of spirulina to biofuels with hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qin; Liao, Hansheng; Zhou, Shiqin; Li, Qiuping; Wang, Lu; Yu, Zhihao; Jing, Li

    2018-01-01

    We report herein on acquiring biofuels from direct catalytic hydrothermal liquefaction of spirulina. The component of bio-oil from direct catalytic hydrothermal liquefaction was similar to that from two independent processes (including liquefaction and upgrading of biocrude). However, one step process has higher carbon recovery, due to the less loss of carbons. It was demonstrated that the yield and HHV of bio-oil from direct catalytic algae with hydrothermal condition is higher than that from two independent processes.

  17. A new approach to inertise the containments during catalytic removal of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, A.K.; Markandeya, S.G.

    1994-01-01

    Use of catalytic recombiners for the removal of hydrogen during a severe accident has been recommended by the German Reactor Safety Commission (RSK) due to numerous successful demonstrations of their performances. At the early stages of the accident, a huge quantity of hydrogen is expected to be released in some compartments requiring supplementary measures to ensure that the excess hydrogen concentration wouldn't pose a threat of deflagration /1/. In this presentation a new idea based on catalytic removal of hydrogen with simultaneous passive inertisation of the atmosphere is proposed for large dry containments particularly for those compartments where high H 2 -concentrations are expected. During the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen, the large exothermic heat of reaction causes strong heating of the catalytic plates as well as a continuous energy input in the containment. This can be limited if this large heat energy is efficiently used for heating some chemical compounds to release inert gases such as steam and/or CO 2 by dissociation at moderate temperatures. Such compounds can be arranged in the form of thin slabs in good thermal contact with the catalytic plates. Several such compounds have been identified which are capable of releasing steam and CO 2 equivalent to about 40 - 75% of their mass. Preliminary calculations have been carded out to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed concept for the case of two such selected chemicals placed adjacent to the catalytic plate type recombiners. The calculations performed show promising results. (author)

  18. Experimental Investigation in Order to Determine Catalytic Package Performances in Case of Tritium Transfer from Water to Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornea, Anisia; Peculea, M.; Zamfirache, M.; Varlam, Carmen

    2005-01-01

    The processes for hydrogen isotope's separation are very important for nuclear technology. One of the most important processes for tritium separation, is the catalyst isotope exchange water-hydrogen.Our catalytic package consists of Romanian patented catalysts with platinum on charcoal and polytetrafluoretylene (Pt/C/PTFE) and the ordered Romanian patented package B7 type. The catalytic package was tested in an isotope exchange facility for water detritiation at the Experimental Pilot Plant from ICIT Rm.Valcea.In a column of isotope exchange tritium is transferred from liquid phase (tritiated heavy water) in gaseous phase (hydrogen). In the experimental set-up, which was used, the column of catalytic isotope exchange is filled with successive layers of catalyst and ordered package. The catalyst consists of 95.5 wt.% of PTFE, 4.1 wt. % of carbon and 0.40 wt. % of platinum and was of Raschig rings 10 x 10 x 2 mm. The ordered package was B7 type consists of wire mesh phosphor bronze 4 x 1 wire and the mesh dimension is 0.18 x 0.48 mm.We analyzed the transfer phenomena of tritium from liquid to gaseous phase, in this system.The mass transfer coefficient which characterized the isotopic exchange on the package, were determined as function of experimental parameters

  19. Asymmetric transfer hydrogenation by synthetic catalysts in cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coverdale, James P. C.; Romero-Canelón, Isolda; Sanchez-Cano, Carlos; Clarkson, Guy J.; Habtemariam, Abraha; Wills, Martin; Sadler, Peter J.

    2018-03-01

    Catalytic anticancer metallodrugs active at low doses could minimize side-effects, introduce novel mechanisms of action that combat resistance and widen the spectrum of anticancer-drug activity. Here we use highly stable chiral half-sandwich organometallic Os(II) arene sulfonyl diamine complexes, [Os(arene)(TsDPEN)] (TsDPEN, N-(p-toluenesulfonyl)-1,2-diphenylethylenediamine), to achieve a highly enantioselective reduction of pyruvate, a key intermediate in metabolic pathways. Reduction is shown both in aqueous model systems and in human cancer cells, with non-toxic concentrations of sodium formate used as a hydride source. The catalytic mechanism generates selectivity towards ovarian cancer cells versus non-cancerous fibroblasts (both ovarian and lung), which are commonly used as models of healthy proliferating cells. The formate precursor N-formylmethionine was explored as an alternative to formate in PC3 prostate cancer cells, which are known to overexpress a deformylase enzyme. Transfer-hydrogenation catalysts that generate reductive stress in cancer cells offer a new approach to cancer therapy.

  20. Tunable preparation of ruthenium nanoparticles with superior size-dependent catalytic hydrogenation properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yuan; Luo, Yaodong; Yang, Xuan; Yang, Yaxin; Song, Qijun, E-mail: qsong@jiangnan.edu.cn

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • A facile and efficient strategy is firstly developed for the synthesis of Ru NPs. • Ru NPs are stable and uniform with the controllable sizes from 2.6 to 51.5 nm. • Ru NPs exhibit size-dependent and superior catalytic hydrogenation activity. - Abstract: Ruthenium (Ru) featured with an unusual catalytic behavior is of great significance in several heterogeneous and electro-catalytic reactions. The preparation of tractable Ru nanocatalysts and the building of highly active catalytic system at ambient temperature remains a grand challenge. Herein, a facile strategy is developed for the controllable preparation of Ru nanoparticles (NPs) with the sizes ranging from 2.6 to 51.5 nm. Ru NPs show superior size-dependent catalytic performance with the best kinetic rate constant as high as −1.52 min{sup −1}, which could far surpass the other traditional noble metals. Ru NPs exert exceedingly efficient low-temperature catalytic activity and good recyclability in the catalytic reduction of nitroaromatic compounds (NACs) and azo dyes. The developed catalytic system provides a distinguishing insight for the artificial preparation of Ru NPs with desired sizes, and allows for the development of rational design rules for exploring catalysts with superior catalytic performances, potentially broadening the applications of metallic NP-enabled catalytic analysis.

  1. Catalytic alkylation of remote C-H bonds enabled by proton-coupled electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Gilbert J; Zhu, Qilei; Miller, David C; Gu, Carol J; Knowles, Robert R

    2016-11-10

    Despite advances in hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) catalysis, there are currently no molecular HAT catalysts that are capable of homolysing the strong nitrogen-hydrogen (N-H) bonds of N-alkyl amides. The motivation to develop amide homolysis protocols stems from the utility of the resultant amidyl radicals, which are involved in various synthetically useful transformations, including olefin amination and directed carbon-hydrogen (C-H) bond functionalization. In the latter process-a subset of the classical Hofmann-Löffler-Freytag reaction-amidyl radicals remove hydrogen atoms from unactivated aliphatic C-H bonds. Although powerful, these transformations typically require oxidative N-prefunctionalization of the amide starting materials to achieve efficient amidyl generation. Moreover, because these N-activating groups are often incorporated into the final products, these methods are generally not amenable to the direct construction of carbon-carbon (C-C) bonds. Here we report an approach that overcomes these limitations by homolysing the N-H bonds of N-alkyl amides via proton-coupled electron transfer. In this protocol, an excited-state iridium photocatalyst and a weak phosphate base cooperatively serve to remove both a proton and an electron from an amide substrate in a concerted elementary step. The resultant amidyl radical intermediates are shown to promote subsequent C-H abstraction and radical alkylation steps. This C-H alkylation represents a catalytic variant of the Hofmann-Löffler-Freytag reaction, using simple, unfunctionalized amides to direct the formation of new C-C bonds. Given the prevalence of amides in pharmaceuticals and natural products, we anticipate that this method will simplify the synthesis and structural elaboration of amine-containing targets. Moreover, this study demonstrates that concerted proton-coupled electron transfer can enable homolytic activation of common organic functional groups that are energetically inaccessible using

  2. The mechanism of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide: II. Kinetics and mechanism of hydrogen sulfide oxidation catalyzed by sulfur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steijns, M.; Derks, F.; Verloop, A.; Mars, P.

    1976-01-01

    The kinetics of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide by molecular oxygen have been studied in the temperature range 20–250 °C. The primary reaction product is sulfur which may undergo further oxidation to SO2 at temperatures above 200 °C. From the kinetics of this autocatalytic reaction we

  3. Determination of the gas-to-membrane mass transfer coefficient in a catalytic membrane reactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldsink, J.W.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1995-01-01

    A novel method to determine the external mass transfer coefficient in catalytic membrane reactors (Sloot et al., 1992a, b) was presented in this study. In a catalytically active membrane reactor, in which a very fast reaction occurs, the external transfer coefficient can conveniently be measured by

  4. Continuous-flow processes for the catalytic partial hydrogenation reaction of alkynes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Moreno-Marrodan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic partial hydrogenation of substituted alkynes to alkenes is a process of high importance in the manufacture of several market chemicals. The present paper shortly reviews the heterogeneous catalytic systems engineered for this reaction under continuous flow and in the liquid phase. The main contributions appeared in the literature from 1997 up to August 2016 are discussed in terms of reactor design. A comparison with batch and industrial processes is provided whenever possible.

  5. The ab initio study of the catalytic hydrogenation of the oxirene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.B. Mensah

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The oxirene is an unsaturated heterocyclic molecule with one oxygen atom and two carbon atoms. Its hydrogenation has been performed on two catalytic site based on molybdenum disulfide (MoS2 and tungsten disulfide (WS2 of MoS3H3+ and WS3H3+ type, respectively. The calculations were carried out using the SCF and MP2 methods and B3LYP functional calculations. The results obtained showed that the hydrogenation of the oxirene is possible on these two kinds of catalytic sites on the one hand, and the reaction product is the acetaldehyde molecule, on the other hand. The reaction process study that led to the results showed that the catalytic hydrogenation of the oxirene is a dissociative process. On the basis of the variation of some parameters during the process, a mechanism of the reaction has been proposed.

  6. Ruthenium(II) pincer complexes with oxazoline arms for efficient transfer hydrogenation reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tao

    2012-08-01

    Well-defined P NN CN pincer ruthenium complexes bearing both strong phosphine and weak oxazoline donors were developed. These easily accessible complexes exhibit significantly better catalytic activity in transfer hydrogenation of ketones compared to their PN 3P analogs. These reactions proceed under mild and base-free conditions via protonation- deprotonation of the \\'NH\\' group in the aromatization-dearomatization process. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Catalytic hydrogenation using complexes of base metals with tridentate ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Susan K.; Zhang, Guoqi; Vasudevan, Kalyan V.

    2017-02-14

    Complexes of cobalt and nickel with tridentate ligand PNHP.sup.R are effective for hydrogenation of unsaturated compounds. Cobalt complex [(PNHP.sup.Cy)Co(CH.sub.2SiMe.sub.3)]BAr.sup.F.sub.4 (PNHP.sup.Cy=bis[2-(dicyclohexylphosphino)ethyl]amine, BAr.sup.F.sub.4=B(3,5-(CF.sub.3).sub.2C.sub.6H.sub.3).sub.4)) was prepared and used with hydrogen for hydrogenation of alkenes, aldehydes, ketones, and imines under mild conditions (25-60.degree. C., 1-4 atm H.sub.2). Nickel complex [(PNHP.sup.Cy)Ni(H)]BPh.sub.4 was used for hydrogenation of styrene and 1-octene under mild conditions. (PNP.sup.Cy)Ni(H) was used for hydrogenating alkenes.

  8. Catalytic hydrogenation using complexes of base metals with tridentate ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasudevan, Kalyan V.; Zhang, Guoqi; Hanson, Susan K.

    2016-09-06

    Complexes of cobalt and nickel with tridentate ligand PNHP.sup.R are effective for hydrogenation of unsaturated compounds. Cobalt complex [(PNHP.sup.Cy)Co(CH.sub.2SiMe.sub.3)]BAr.sup.F.sub.4 (PNHP.sup.Cy=bis[2-(dicyclohexylphosphino)ethyl]amine, BAr.sup.F.sub.4=B(3,5-(CF.sub.3).sub.2C.sub.6H.sub.3).sub.4)) was prepared and used with hydrogen for hydrogenation of alkenes, aldehydes, ketones, and imines under mild conditions (25-60.degree. C., 1-4 atm H.sub.2). Nickel complex [(PNHP.sup.Cy)Ni(H)]BPh.sub.4 was used for hydrogenation of styrene and 1-octene under mild conditions. (PNP.sup.Cy)Ni(H) was used for hydrogenating alkenes.

  9. Combined electrolysis catalytic exchange (CECE) process for hydrogen isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammerli, M.; Stevens, W.H.; Butler, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    Hydrogen isotopes can be separated efficiently by a process which combines an electrolysis cell with a trickle bed column packed with a hydrophobic platinum catalyst. The column effects isotopic exchange between countercurrent streams of electrolytic hydrogen and liquid water while the electrolysis cell contributes to isotope separation by virtue of the kinetic isotope effect inherent in the hydrogen evolution reaction. The main features of the CECE process for heavy water production are presented as well as a discussion of the inherent positive synergistic effects, and other advantages and disadvantages of the process. Several potential applications of the process in the nuclear power industry are discussed. 3 figures, 2 tables

  10. Multifaceted catalytic hydrogenation of amides via diverse activation of a sterically confined bipyridine-ruthenium framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Takashi; Naruto, Masayuki; Toda, Katsuaki; Shimomura, Taiki; Saito, Susumu

    2017-05-16

    Amides are ubiquitous and abundant in nature and our society, but are very stable and reluctant to salt-free, catalytic chemical transformations. Through the activation of a "sterically confined bipyridine-ruthenium (Ru) framework (molecularly well-designed site to confine adsorbed H 2 in)" of a precatalyst, catalytic hydrogenation of formamides through polyamide is achieved under a wide range of reaction conditions. Both C=O bond and C-N bond cleavage of a lactam became also possible using a single precatalyst. That is, catalyst diversity is induced by activation and stepwise multiple hydrogenation of a single precatalyst when the conditions are varied. The versatile catalysts have different structures and different resting states for multifaceted amide hydrogenation, but the common structure produced upon reaction with H 2 , which catalyzes hydrogenation, seems to be "H-Ru-N-H."

  11. Hydrogen production by aqueous phase catalytic reforming of glycerine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozguer, Derya Oncel; Uysal, Bekir Zuehtue

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen is believed to be the one of the main energy carriers in the near future. In this research glycerine, which is produced in large quantities as a by-product of biodiesel process, was converted to hydrogen aiming to contribute to clean energy initiative. Conversion of glycerol to hydrogen was achieved via aqueous-phase reforming (APR) with Pt/Al 2 O 3 catalyst. The experiments were carried out in an autoclave reactor and a continuous fixed-bed reactor. The effects of reaction temperature (160-280 o C), feed flow rate (0.05-0.5 mL/dak) and feed concentration (5-85 wt-% glycerine) on product distribution were investigated. Optimum temperature for hydrogen production with APR was determined as 230 o C. Maximum gas production rate was found at the feed flow rates around 0.1 mL/min. It was also found that hydrogen concentration in the gas product increased with decreasing glycerol concentration in the feed.

  12. Low temperature catalytic reforming of heptane to hydrogen and syngas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E.E. Abashar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The production of hydrogen and syngas from heptane at a low temperature is studied in a circulating fast fluidized bed membrane reactor (CFFBMR. A thin film of palladium-based membrane is employed to the displacement of the thermodynamic equilibrium for high conversion and yield. A mathematical model is developed to simulate the reformer. A substantial improvement of the CFFBMR is achieved by implementing the thin hydrogen membrane. The results showed that almost complete conversion of heptane and 46.25% increase of exit hydrogen yield over the value without membrane are achieved. Also a wide range of the H2/CO ratio within the recommended industrial range is obtained. The phenomena of high spikes of maximum nature at the beginning of the CFFBMR are observed and explanation offered. The sensitivity analysis results have shown that the increase of the steam to carbon feed ratio can increase the exit hydrogen yield up to 108.29%. It was found that the increase of reaction side pressure at a high steam to carbon feed ratio can increase further the exit hydrogen yield by 49.36% at a shorter reactor length. Moreover, the increase of reaction side pressure has an important impact in a significant decrease of the carbon dioxide and this is a positive sign for clean environment.

  13. Capture and transfer of pions in hydrogenous materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armstrong, D.S.

    1990-05-01

    Pionic hydrogen is a short-lived exotic hydrogen isotope in which a negative pion replaces the atomic electron. The formation and subsequent interactions of pionic hydrogen are discussed, with emphasis on the process of pion transfer. Recent results using the pion charge-exchange reaction (π - , π 0 ) obtained at TRIUMF are reviewed. (Author) (35 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs.)

  14. Physical and combustion characterization of pyrolytic oils derived from biomass material upgraded by catalytic hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitolo, S.; Ghetti, P. (Universita di Pisa, Pisa (Italy). Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica)

    1994-11-01

    Physical and combustion properties of a pyrolytic bio-oil are determined both as-obtained and after catalytic hydrodeoxygenation. The tests demonstrate that the hydrogenation treatment improves the oil as regards combustibility, viscosity and acidity. Combustion properties of the oil have been characterized by evaporation and temperature programmed combustion profiles. Short communication. 21 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. H2CAP - Hydrogen assisted catalytic biomass pyrolysis for green fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stummann, Magnus Zingler; Høj, Martin; Gabrielsen, Jostein

    -oil by catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) is challenged by severe polymerization and coking upon heating the oil. Alternatively, performing fast pyrolysis in high-pressure hydrogen atmosphere in a fluid bed reactor with a HDO catalyst as bed medium could immediately stabilize reactive pyrolysis vapors [2...

  16. Organo-bridged silsesquioxane titanates for heterogeneous catalytic epoxidation with aqueous hydrogen peroxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, Y.M.; Magusin, P.C.M.M.; Santen, van R.A.; Abbenhuis, H.C.L.

    2007-01-01

    Organo-bridged silsesquioxane titanates for heterogeneous catalytic epoxidation with aqueous hydrogen peroxide were synthesized through the acid-catalyzed hydrolysis and co-condensation of organotrialkoxysilane monomers and a,¿-bis(trialkoxysilyl) alkane cross-linkers in ethanol–water solution, with

  17. Catalytic Reforming of Higher Hydrocarbon Fuels to Hydrogen: Process Investigations with Regard to Auxiliary Power Units

    OpenAIRE

    Kaltschmitt, Torsten

    2012-01-01

    This thesis discusses the investigation of the catalytic partial oxidation on rhodium-coated honeycomb catalysts with respect to the conversion of a model surrogate fuel and commercial diesel fuel into hydrogen for the use in auxiliary power units. Furthermore, the influence of simulated tail-gas recycling was investigated.

  18. Hydrogen from catalytic reforming of biomass-derived hydrocarbons in liquid water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortright, R. D.; Davda, R. R.; Dumesic, J. A.

    2002-08-01

    Concerns about the depletion of fossil fuel reserves and the pollution caused by continuously increasing energy demands make hydrogen an attractive alternative energy source. Hydrogen is currently derived from nonrenewable natural gas and petroleum, but could in principle be generated from renewable resources such as biomass or water. However, efficient hydrogen production from water remains difficult and technologies for generating hydrogen from biomass, such as enzymatic decomposition of sugars, steam-reforming of bio-oils and gasification, suffer from low hydrogen production rates and/or complex processing requirements. Here we demonstrate that hydrogen can be produced from sugars and alcohols at temperatures near 500K in a single-reactor aqueous-phase reforming process using a platinum-based catalyst. We are able to convert glucose-which makes up the major energy reserves in plants and animals-to hydrogen and gaseous alkanes, with hydrogen constituting 50% of the products. We find that the selectivity for hydrogen production increases when we use molecules that are more reduced than sugars, with ethylene glycol and methanol being almost completely converted into hydrogen and carbon dioxide. These findings suggest that catalytic aqueous-phase reforming might prove useful for the generation of hydrogen-rich fuel gas from carbohydrates extracted from renewable biomass and biomass waste streams.

  19. Low temperature catalytic combustion of natural gas - hydrogen - air mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newson, E; Roth, F von; Hottinger, P; Truong, T B [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The low temperature catalytic combustion of natural gas - air mixtures would allow the development of no-NO{sub x} burners for heating and power applications. Using commercially available catalysts, the room temperature ignition of methane-propane-air mixtures has been shown in laboratory reactors with combustion efficiencies over 95% and maximum temperatures less than 700{sup o}C. After a 500 hour stability test, severe deactivation of both methane and propane oxidation functions was observed. In cooperation with industrial partners, scaleup to 3 kW is being investigated together with startup dynamics and catalyst stability. (author) 3 figs., 3 refs.

  20. Catalytic Metal Free Production of Large Cage Structure Carbon Particles: A Candidate for Hydrogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Ferguson, Frank T.

    2005-01-01

    We will demonstrate that carbon particles consisting of large cages can be produced without catalytic metal. The carbon particles were produced in CO gas as well as by introduction of 5% methane gas into the CO gas. The gas-produced carbon particles were able to absorb approximately 16.2 wt% of hydrogen. This value is 2.5 times higher than the 6.5 wt% goal for the vehicular hydrogen storage proposed by the Department of Energy in the USA. Therefore, we believe that this carbon particle is an excellent candidate for hydrogen storage for fuel cells.

  1. Mixed diphosphine/diamine ruthenium (II) isomers: Synthesis, structural characterization and catalytic hydrogenation of ketones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Rebecca D.; Silva, Andressa K.; Lião, Luciano M.; Deflon, Victor M.; Ueno, Leonardo T.; Dinelli, Luis R.; Bogado, André L.

    2018-01-01

    The complexes trans-[RuCl2(dppb)(cydn)] (1), trans-[RuCl2(dppb)(opda)] (2) and cis-[RuCl2(dppb)(cydn)] (3) were synthesized from [{RuCl2(dppb)}2-μ-(dppb)] {where: dppb = 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphino)butane; cydn = cis and trans (±) 1,2-diaminocyclohexane, and opda = o-phenylenediamine}. The complexes were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance of phosphorus (31P{1H} NMR), cyclic voltammetry (CV), infrared and ultraviolet/visible spectra (IR and UV/vis) as well as elemental analyses (CHN). The X-ray structures of (1) and (3) were determined and they are presented here. DFT calculations and experimental data showed that the trans isomers are obtained as thermodynamic products while the cis isomers are kinetic products. This behavior is different than described in the literature for similar complexes, where the cis isomer is obtained from the trans isomer. Additionally, the catalytic activity of the complexes (1), (2) and (3) was investigated, as pre-catalysts, in the reduction of the acetophenone and 4-methylacetophenone by transfer-hydrogenation.

  2. Hydrogen production via catalytic steam reforming of fast pyrolysis oil fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, D.; Czernik, S.; Montane, D.; Mann, M.; Chornet, E.

    1997-01-01

    Hydrogen is the prototype of the environmentally cleanest fuel of interest for power generation using fuel cells, and as a co-adjuvant or autonomous transportation fuel in internal combustion engines. The conversion of biomass to hydrogen can be carried out through two distinct thermochemical strategies: (a) gasification followed by shift conversion; (b) catalytic steam reforming and shift conversion of specific fractions derived from fast pyrolysis and aqueous/steam processes of biomass. This paper shows that fast pyrolysis of biomass results in a bio-oil that can be adequately fractionated into valuable co-products leaving as by-product an aqueous fraction containing soluble organics (a mixture of alcohols, aldehydes and acids). This fraction can be converted to hydrogen by catalytic steam reforming followed by a shift conversion step. The methods used, the yields obtained and their economic significance will be discussed. (author)

  3. Selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides from industrial gases by hydrogen or methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelmann Pirez, M.

    2004-12-01

    This work deals with the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO x ), contained in the effluents of industrial plants, by hydrogen or methane. The aim is to replace ammonia, used as reducing agent, in the conventional process. The use of others reducing agents such as hydrogen or methane is interesting for different reasons: practical, economical and ecological. The catalyst has to convert selectively NO into N 2 , in presence of an excess of oxygen, steam and sulfur dioxide. The developed catalyst is constituted by a support such as perovskites, particularly LaCoO 3 , on which are dispersed noble metals (palladium, platinum). The interaction between the noble metal and the support, generated during the activation of the catalyst, allows to minimize the water and sulfur dioxide inhibitor phenomena on the catalytic performances, particularly in the reduction of NO by hydrogen. (O.M.)

  4. CATALYTICALLY ENHANCED SYSTEMS FOR HYDROGEN STORAGE. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craig M. Jensen

    2007-01-01

    Previous U.S. DOE sponsored research at the University of Hawaii resulted in the development of methods of doping of sodium aluminum hydride, NaAlH4 with titanium, zirconium and other catalysts such that: dehydriding occurs at temperatures as low as 100 C; rehydriding requires less than 1 h; and >4 weight percent hydrogen can be repeatedly cycled through dehydriding/rehydriding. These materials appeared to be on the threshold of practical viability as hydrogen carriers for onboard fuel cells. However, it was apparent that further kinetic enhancement was required to achieve commercial viability. Thus, one of the primary goals of this project was to develop the requisite improved catalysts. Over the course of this project, a variety of titanium and zirconium dopant precursors were investigated. Moreover, the approach was to conduct guided search for improved catalysts by obtaining a fundamental understanding of the chemical nature of the titanium dopants and their mechanism of action. Therefore, the projected also aimed to determined the chemical nature of the titanium species that are formed upon mechanical milling of NaAlH4 with the dopant precursors through synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction as well as transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. In addition to kinetic studies, insight into the mechanism of action of the dopants was gained through studies of the destabilization of hydrogen in NaAlH4 by the dopants through infrared, NMR, and anelastic spectroscopy

  5. Hydrogen Recombination Rates of Plate-type Passive Auto-catalytic Recombiner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jongtae; Hong, Seong-Wan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gun Hong [Kyungwon E-C Co., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The hydrogen mitigation system may include igniters, passive autocatalytic recombiner (PAR), and venting or dilution system. Recently PAR is commonly used as a main component of HMS in a NPP containment because of its passive nature. PARs are categorized by the shape and material of catalytic surface. Catalytic surface coated by platinum is mostly used for the hydrogen recombiners. The shapes of the catalytic surface can be grouped into plate type, honeycomb type and porous media type. Among them, the plate-type PAR is well tested by many experiments. PAR performance analysis can be approached by a multi-scale method which is composed of micro, meso and macro scales. The criterion of the scaling is the ratio of thickness of boundary layer developed on a catalytic surface to representative length of a computational domain. Mass diffusion in the boundary layer must be resolved in the micro scale analysis. In a lumped parameter (LP) analysis using a system code such as MAAP or MELCOR, the chamber of the PAR is much smaller than a computational node. The hydrogen depletion by a PAR is modeled as a source of mass and energy conservation equations. Te catalytic surface reaction of hydrogen must be modeled by a volume-averaged correlation. In this study, a micro scale analysis method is developed using libraries in OpenFOAM to evaluate a hydrogen depletion rate depending on parameters such as size and number of plates and plate arrangement. The analysis code is validated by simulating REKO-3 experiment. And hydrogen depletion analysis is conducted by changing the plate arrangement as a trial of the performance enhancement of a PAR. In this study, a numerical code for an analysis of a PAR performance in a micro scale has been developed by using OpenFOAM libraries. The physical and numerical models were validated by simulating the REKO-3 experiment. As a try to enhance the performance of the plate-type PAR, it was proposed to apply a staggered two-layer arrangement of the

  6. Hydrogen Recombination Rates of Plate-type Passive Auto-catalytic Recombiner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jongtae; Hong, Seong-Wan; Kim, Gun Hong

    2014-01-01

    The hydrogen mitigation system may include igniters, passive autocatalytic recombiner (PAR), and venting or dilution system. Recently PAR is commonly used as a main component of HMS in a NPP containment because of its passive nature. PARs are categorized by the shape and material of catalytic surface. Catalytic surface coated by platinum is mostly used for the hydrogen recombiners. The shapes of the catalytic surface can be grouped into plate type, honeycomb type and porous media type. Among them, the plate-type PAR is well tested by many experiments. PAR performance analysis can be approached by a multi-scale method which is composed of micro, meso and macro scales. The criterion of the scaling is the ratio of thickness of boundary layer developed on a catalytic surface to representative length of a computational domain. Mass diffusion in the boundary layer must be resolved in the micro scale analysis. In a lumped parameter (LP) analysis using a system code such as MAAP or MELCOR, the chamber of the PAR is much smaller than a computational node. The hydrogen depletion by a PAR is modeled as a source of mass and energy conservation equations. Te catalytic surface reaction of hydrogen must be modeled by a volume-averaged correlation. In this study, a micro scale analysis method is developed using libraries in OpenFOAM to evaluate a hydrogen depletion rate depending on parameters such as size and number of plates and plate arrangement. The analysis code is validated by simulating REKO-3 experiment. And hydrogen depletion analysis is conducted by changing the plate arrangement as a trial of the performance enhancement of a PAR. In this study, a numerical code for an analysis of a PAR performance in a micro scale has been developed by using OpenFOAM libraries. The physical and numerical models were validated by simulating the REKO-3 experiment. As a try to enhance the performance of the plate-type PAR, it was proposed to apply a staggered two-layer arrangement of the

  7. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Bio-Oil for Chemicals and Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2006-02-14

    The scope of work includes optimizing processing conditions and demonstrating catalyst lifetime for catalyst formulations that are readily scaleable to commercial operations. We use a bench-scale, continuous-flow, packed-bed, catalytic, tubular reactor, which can be operated in the range of 100-400 mL/hr., from 50-400 C and up to 20MPa (see Figure 1). With this unit we produce upgraded bio-oil from whole bio-oil or useful bio-oil fractions, specifically pyrolytic lignin. The product oils are fractionated, for example by distillation, for recovery of chemical product streams. Other products from our tests have been used in further testing in petroleum refining technology at UOP and fractionation for product recovery in our own lab. Further scale-up of the technology is envisioned and we will carry out or support process design efforts with industrial partners, such as UOP.

  8. Quantum-chemical study of hydride transfer in catalytic transformation of paraffins on zeolites

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kazansky, V.B.; Frash, M.V.; Santen, van R.A.; Chon, H.; Ihm, S.-K.; Uh, Y.S.

    1997-01-01

    Ab initio quantum-chemical cluster calculations demonstrate that the activated complexes of hydride transfer reaction in catalytic transformation of paraffins on zeolites very much resembles adsorbed nonclassical carbonium ions. The calculated activation energies for reactions involving propane and

  9. Production of hydrogen from bio-ethanol in catalytic membrane reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gernot, E.; Aupretre, F.; Deschamps, A.; Etievant, C.; Epron, F.; Marecot, P.; Duprez, D.

    2006-01-01

    Production of hydrogen from renewable energy sources offers a great potential for CO 2 emission reduction, responsible for global warming. Among renewable energies, liquid biofuels are very convenient hydrogen carriers for decentralized applications such as micro-cogeneration and transports. Ethanol, produced from sugar plants and cereals, allows a reduction of more than 60% of CO 2 emissions in comparison to gasoline. BIOSTAR is an R and D project, co-funded by the French Agency for Environment and Energy Management (ADEME) which aims at developing an efficient source of hydrogen from bio-ethanol, suitable for proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems. The objectives are to obtain, through catalytic process at medium temperature range, an efficient conversion of bio-ethanol into pure hydrogen directly usable for PEMFC. CETH has developed a catalytic membrane reformer (CMR), based on a patented technology, integrating a steam reforming catalyst as well as a combustion catalyst. Both catalysts have been developed and optimized for membrane reactor in partnership with the University of Poitiers. The composite metallic membrane developed by CETH allows hydrogen extraction near the hydrogen production sites, which enhances both efficiency and compactness. (authors)

  10. Hydrogenation of o-cresol on platinum catalyst: Catalytic experiments and first-principles calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yaping [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK 74104 (United States); Liu, Zhimin [School of Chemical, Biological and Materials Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Xue, Wenhua [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK 74104 (United States); Crossley, Steven P.; Jentoft, Friederike C. [School of Chemical, Biological and Materials Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019 (United States); Wang, Sanwu, E-mail: sanwu-wang@utulsa.edu [Department of Physics and Engineering Physics, The University of Tulsa, Tulsa, OK 74104 (United States)

    2017-01-30

    Highlights: • Hydrogenation of o-cresol over Pt results in formation of two products. • Dissociation of hydrogen from the −OH group involves a low activation energy. • Following hydrogenation of the aromatic ring forms 2-methyl-cyclohexanone. • Further hydrogenation produces the final product, 2-methyl-cyclohexanol. - Abstract: Catalytic experiments were performed for the hydrogenation of o-cresol in n-dodecane over a platinum catalyst. Batch reactions analyzed with an in-situ ATR IR probe suggest that the hydrogenation results in the formation of the final product, 2-methyl-cyclohexanol, with 2-methyl-cyclohexanone as the intermediate product. Ab initio density-functional theory was employed to investigate the atomic-scale mechanism of o-cresol hydrogenation on the Pt(111) surface. The formation of 2-methyl-cyclohexanone was found to involve two steps. The first step is a hydrogen abstraction, that is, the H atom in the hydroxyl group migrates to the Pt surface. The second step is hydrogenation, that is, the pre-existing H atoms on Pt react with the carbon atoms in the aromatic ring. On the other hand, 2-methyl-cyclohexanonol may be produced through two paths, with activation energies slightly greater than that for the formation of 2-methyl-cyclohexanone. One path involves direct hydrogenation of the aromatic ring. Another path involves three steps, with the partial hydrogenation of the ring as the first step, hydrogen abstraction of the −OH group as the second, and hydrogenation of remaining C atoms and the O atom the last.

  11. Finding furfural hydrogenation catalysts via predictive modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strassberger, Z.; Mooijman, M.; Ruijter, E.; Alberts, A.H.; Maldonado, A.G.; Orru, R.V.A.; Rothenberg, G.

    2010-01-01

    We combine multicomponent reactions, catalytic performance studies and predictive modelling to find transfer hydrogenation catalysts. An initial set of 18 ruthenium-carbene complexes were synthesized and screened in the transfer hydrogenation of furfural to furfurol with isopropyl alcohol complexes

  12. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbonyl group for deuterated compound production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gluhoi, C. Andreea; Marginean, P.; Lazar, Diana; Almasan, V.

    1999-01-01

    The total deuterated isopropyl alcohol can be produced starting from acetone. The developed technology comprises two steps: Deuteration of acetone by H/D isotopic exchange between acetone and heavy water in homogeneous catalysis. Reduction of the deuterated acetone with deuterium in presence of a metal/support catalyst. H/D isotopic exchange reaction of the H atoms from CH 3 groups is easy to occur because carbonyl group weakens C-H bond (ceto-enolyc tautomery). The big difference between boiling points of acetone and water permits an easy separation of acetone by distillation method. The reduction of acetone with deuterium was performed in a dynamic reactor by passing a deuterium flow saturated with acetone vapour through a supported nickel catalyst bed. The reaction products were analysed on-line using a flame ionisation detector. The supported nickel catalysts were checked for this reaction. By using nickel over different supports the selectivity for isopropyl alcohol was about 100%. The propane was detected only as traces. The catalytic activity depends strongly on the support nature: the Ni/SiO 2 is less active, while the Ni/TiO 2 presents the larger value for the intrinsic activity. (authors)

  13. Enhanced catalytic hydrogenation activity of Ni/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite prepared by a solid-state method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yizhao; Cao, Yali; Jia, Dianzeng

    2018-01-01

    A simple solid-state method has been applied to synthesize Ni/reduced graphene oxide (Ni/rGO) nanocomposite under ambient condition. Ni nanoparticles with size of 10-30 nm supported on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets are obtained through one-pot solid-state co-reduction among nickel chloride, graphene oxide, and sodium borohydride. The Ni/rGO nanohybrid shows enhanced catalytic activity toward the reduction of p-nitrophenol (PNP) into p-aminophenol compared with Ni nanoparticles. The results of kinetic research display that the pseudo-first-order rate constant for hydrogenation reaction of PNP with Ni/rGO nanocomposite is 7.66 × 10-3 s-1, which is higher than that of Ni nanoparticles (4.48 × 10-3 s-1). It also presents superior turnover frequency (TOF, 5.36 h-1) and lower activation energy ( E a, 29.65 kJ mol-1) in the hydrogenation of PNP with Ni/rGO nanocomposite. Furthermore, composite catalyst can be magnetically separated and reused for five cycles. The large surface area and high electron transfer property of rGO support are beneficial for good catalytic performance of Ni/rGO nanocomposite. Our study demonstrates a simple approach to fabricate metal-rGO heterogeneous nanostructures with advanced functions.

  14. Formic Acid Free Flowsheet Development To Eliminate Catalytic Hydrogen Generation In The Defense Waste Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, Dan P.; Stone, Michael E.; Newell, J. David; Fellinger, Terri L.; Bricker, Jonathan M.

    2012-09-14

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) processes legacy nuclear waste generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during production of plutonium and tritium demanded by the Cold War. The nuclear waste is first treated via a complex sequence of controlled chemical reactions and then vitrified into a borosilicate glass form and poured into stainless steel canisters. Converting the nuclear waste into borosilicate glass canisters is a safe, effective way to reduce the volume of the waste and stabilize the radionuclides. Testing was initiated to determine whether the elimination of formic acid from the DWPF's chemical processing flowsheet would eliminate catalytic hydrogen generation. Historically, hydrogen is generated in chemical processing of alkaline High Level Waste sludge in DWPF. In current processing, sludge is combined with nitric and formic acid to neutralize the waste, reduce mercury and manganese, destroy nitrite, and modify (thin) the slurry rheology. The noble metal catalyzed formic acid decomposition produces hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Elimination of formic acid by replacement with glycolic acid has the potential to eliminate the production of catalytic hydrogen. Flowsheet testing was performed to develop the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet as an alternative to the nitric-formic flowsheet currently being processed at the DWPF. This new flowsheet has shown that mercury can be reduced and removed by steam stripping in DWPF with no catalytic hydrogen generation. All processing objectives were also met, including greatly reducing the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product yield stress as compared to the baseline nitric/formic flowsheet. Ten DWPF tests were performed with nonradioactive simulants designed to cover a broad compositional range. No hydrogen was generated in testing without formic acid.

  15. A low-barrier hydrogen bond mediates antibiotic resistance in a noncanonical catalytic triad

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    One group of enzymes that confer resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics through covalent modification belongs to the GCN5-related N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) superfamily. We show how a unique GNAT subfamily member uses a previously unidentified noncanonical catalytic triad, consisting of a glutamic acid, a histidine, and the antibiotic substrate itself, which acts as a nucleophile and attacks the acetyl donor molecule. Neutron diffraction studies allow for unambiguous identification of a low-barrier hydrogen bond, predicted in canonical catalytic triads to increase basicity of the histidine. This work highlights the role of this unique catalytic triad in mediating antibiotic resistance while providing new insights into the design of the next generation of aminoglycosides. PMID:29632894

  16. Kinetic Characteristics of Hydrogen Transfer Through Palladium-Modified Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petriev, I. S.; Frolov, V. Yu.; Bolotin, S. N.; Baryshev, M. G.; Kopytov, G. F.

    2018-01-01

    The paper deals with hydrogen transfer through Pd-23%Ag alloy membrane, the surface of which is modified by the electrolytic deposition of highly dispersed palladium. The dependence between the density of hydrogen flow and its excess pressure on the input surface of membrane is well approximated by the first-order curve. This fact indicates that the process of hydrogen permeability is defined by its dissociation on the input surface. Activation energy of this process is 47.9 kJ/mol which considerably exceeds that of the process of hydrogen transfer through palladium (22-30 kJ/mol). This confirms the fact that the chemisorption is a rate-controlling step of the hydrogen transfer through membrane.

  17. Research of Hydrogen Preparation with Catalytic Steam-Carbon Reaction Driven by Photo-Thermochemistry Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An experiment of hydrogen preparation from steam-carbon reaction catalyzed by K2CO3 was carried out at 700°C, which was driven by the solar reaction system simulated with Xenon lamp. It can be found that the rate of reaction with catalyst is 10 times more than that without catalyst. However, for the catalytic reaction, there is no obvious change for the rate of hydrogen generation with catalyst content range from 10% to 20%. Besides, the conversion efficiency of solar energy to chemical energy is more than 13.1% over that by photovoltaic-electrolysis route. An analysis to the mechanism of catalytic steam-carbon reaction with K2CO3 is given, and an explanation to the nonbalanced [H2]/[CO + 2CO2] is presented, which is a phenomenon usually observed in experiment.

  18. Hydrogen cyanide formation in selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides over Cu/ZSM-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radtke, F; Koeppel, R; Baiker, A [Department of Chemical Engineering and Industrial Chemistry, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich, (Switzerland)

    1994-01-06

    Hydrogen cyanide is formed over Cu/ZSM-5 during the selective catalytic reduction of NO[sub x] by either propylene or ethylene in the temperature range 450-600 K. Under the reaction conditions used (reactant feed: 973 ppm NO, 907 ppm propene or 1448 ppm ethylene, 2% oxygen, W/F=0.1 g s cm[sup -3]), the concentration of hydrogen cyanide reaches 20, respectively, 30 ppm, depending on whether ethylene or propene are used as hydrocarbons. In addition, significant N[sub 2]O formation is observed at temperatures lower than 700 K, independent of the hydrocarbon used

  19. A new type separation column for the water-hydrogen isotope catalytic exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedorchenko, O.A.; Alekseev, I.A.; Trenin, V.D.

    2001-01-01

    The catalytic water/hydrogen isotope exchange process is by right considered the most attractive for the solution a number of urgent problems of hydrogen isotope separation. A new type exchange reaction column is described and studied in details by computer simulation and with the help of McCabe-Thiele diagrams. It is shown that the new column in comparison with a traditional one needs less catalyst quantity and a smaller diameter for the solving of the same separation tasks. Generalized calculation data are presented in graphical form

  20. Hydrogen removal from LWR containments by catalytic-coated thermal insulation elements (THINCAT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, K.; Broeckerhoff, P.; Ahlers, G.; Gustavsson, V.; Herranz, L.; Polo, J.; Dominguez, T.; Royl, P.

    2003-01-01

    In the THINCAT project, an alternative concept for hydrogen mitigation in a light water reactor (LWR) containment is being developed. Based on catalytic coated thermal insulation elements of the main coolant loop components, it could be considered either as an alternative to backfitting passive autocatalytic recombiner devices, or as a reinforcement of their preventive effect. The present paper summarises the results achieved at about project mid-term. Potential advantages of catalytic thermal insulation studied in the project are:-reduced risk of unintended ignition,;-no work space obstruction in the containment,;-no need for seismic qualification of additional equipment,;-improved start-up behaviour of recombination reaction. Efforts to develop a suitable catalytic layer resulted in the identification of a coating procedure that ensures high chemical reactivity and mechanical stability. Test samples for use in forthcoming experiments with this coating were produced. Models to predict the catalytic rates were developed, validated and applied in a safety analysis study. Results show that an overall hydrogen concentration reduction can be achieved which is comparable to the reduction obtained using conventional recombiners. Existing experimental information supports the argument of a reduced ignition risk

  1. Hydrogen assisted catalytic biomass pyrolysis. Effect of temperature and pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stummann, M.Z.; Høj, M.; Schandel, C. B.

    2018-01-01

    fraction of 17 and 22% daf, corresponding to an energy recovery of between 40 and 53% in the organic product. The yield of the non-condensable gases varied between a mass fraction of 24 and 32% daf and the char yield varied between 9.6 and 18% daf. The condensed organics contained a mass fraction of 42....... The effect of varying the temperature (365–511 °C) and hydrogen pressure (1.6–3.6 MPa) on the product yield and organic composition was studied. The mass balance closed by a mass fraction between 90 and 101% dry ash free basis (daf). The yield of the combined condensed organics and C4+ varied between a mass......–75% aromatics, based on GC × GC-FID chromatographic peak area, and the remainder was primarily naphthenes with minor amounts of paraffins. The condensed organics were essentially oxygen free (mass fraction below 0.001%) when both reactors were used. Bypassing the HDO reactor increased the oxygen concentration...

  2. State of the art on hydrogen passive auto-catalytic recombiner (european union Parsoar project)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnould, F.; Bachellerie, E.; Auglaire, M.; Boeck, B. de; Braillard, O.; Eckardt, B.; Ferroni, F.; Moffett, R.; Van Goethem, G.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the European Union PARSOAR project, which consists in carrying out a state of the art on hydrogen passive auto-catalytic recombiner (PAR) and a handbook guide for implementing these devices in nuclear power plants. This work is performed in the area ''Operational Safety of Existing Installations'' of the key action ''Nuclear Fission'' of the fifth Euratom Framework Programme (1998-2002). (author)

  3. State of the art on hydrogen passive auto-catalytic recombiner (european union Parsoar project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnould, F.; Bachellerie, E. [Technicatome, 13 - Aix en Provence (France); Auglaire, M. [Tractebel Energy Engineering, Brussels (Belgium); Boeck, B. de [Association Vincotte Nuclear, Brussels (Belgium); Braillard, O. [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Eckardt, B. [Siemens AG, Offenbach am Main (Germany); Ferroni, F. [Electrowatt Engineering Limited, Zurich (Switzerland); Moffett, R. [Atomic Energy Canada Limited, Pinawa (Canada); Van Goethem, G. [European Commission, Brussels (Belgium)

    2001-07-01

    This paper presents an overview of the European Union PARSOAR project, which consists in carrying out a state of the art on hydrogen passive auto-catalytic recombiner (PAR) and a handbook guide for implementing these devices in nuclear power plants. This work is performed in the area ''Operational Safety of Existing Installations'' of the key action ''Nuclear Fission'' of the fifth Euratom Framework Programme (1998-2002). (author)

  4. Liquid hydrogen transfer pipes and level regulation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquet, M.; Prugne, P.; Roubeau, P.

    1961-01-01

    Describes: 1) Transfer pipes - Plunging rods in liquid hydrogen Dewars; transfer pipes: knee-joint system for quick and accurate positioning of plunging Dewar rods; system's rods: combined valve and rod; valves are activated either by a bulb pressure or by a solenoid automatically or hand controlled. The latter allows intermittent filling. 2) Level regulating systems: Level bulbs: accurate to 1 or 4 m; maximum and minimum level bulbs: automatic control of the liquid hydrogen valve. (author) [fr

  5. Heat transfer analysis of liquid piston compressor for hydrogen applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermani, Nasrin Arjomand; Rokni, Masoud

    2015-01-01

    A hydrogen compression technology using liquid as the compression piston is investigated from heat transfer point of view. A thermodynamic model, simulating a single compression stroke, is developed to investigate the heat transfer phenomena inside the compression chamber. The model is developed...... and through the walls, is investigated and compared with the adiabatic case. The results show that depending on heat transfer correlation, the hydrogen temperature reduces slightly between 0.2% and 0.4% compared to the adiabatic case, at 500bar, due to the large wall resistance and small contact area...... at the interface. Moreover, the results of the sensitivity analysis illustrates that increasing the total heat transfer coefficients at the interface and the wall, together with compression time, play key roles in reducing the hydrogen temperature. Increasing the total heat transfer coefficient at the interface...

  6. Catalytic heat exchangers for small-scale production of hydrogen - feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silversand, F [Catator AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2002-02-01

    A feasibility study concerning heat-exchanger reactors in small-scale production of hydrogen has been performed on the request of Svenskt Gastekniskt Center AB and SWEP International AB. The basic idea is to implement different catalysts into brazed plate-type heat exchangers. This can be achieved by installing catalytic cylinders in the inlet-and outlet ports of the heat exchangers or through treatment of the plates to render them catalytically active. It is also possible to sandwich catalytically active wire meshes between the plates. Experiments concerning steam reforming of methanol and methane have been performed in a micro-reactor to gather kinetic data for modelling purposes. Performance calculations concerning heat exchanger reactors have then been conducted with Catator's generic simulation code for catalytic reactors (CatalystExplorer). The simulations clearly demonstrate the technical performance of these reactors. Indeed, the production rate of hydrogen is expected to be about 10 nm{sup 3}/h per litre of heat exchanger. The corresponding value for a conventional steam-reforming unit is about 1 nm{sup 3}/h or less per litre of reactor volume. Also, the compactness and the high degree of integration together with the possibilities of mass production will give an attractive cost for such units. Depending on the demands concerning the purity of the hydrogen it is possible to add secondary catalytic steps like water-gas shifters, methanation and selective oxidation, into a one-train unit, i.e. to design an all-inclusive design. Such reactors can be used for the supply of hydrogen to fuel cells. The production cost for hydrogen can be cut by 60 - 70% through the utilisation of heat exchanger reactors instead of conventional electrolysis. This result is primarily a result of the high price for electricity compared to the feed stock prices in steam reforming. It is important to verify the performance calculations and the simulation results through experimental

  7. Catalytic heat exchangers for small-scale production of hydrogen - feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silversand, F. [Catator AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2002-02-01

    A feasibility study concerning heat-exchanger reactors in small-scale production of hydrogen has been performed on the request of Svenskt Gastekniskt Center AB and SWEP International AB. The basic idea is to implement different catalysts into brazed plate-type heat exchangers. This can be achieved by installing catalytic cylinders in the inlet-and outlet ports of the heat exchangers or through treatment of the plates to render them catalytically active. It is also possible to sandwich catalytically active wire meshes between the plates. Experiments concerning steam reforming of methanol and methane have been performed in a micro-reactor to gather kinetic data for modelling purposes. Performance calculations concerning heat exchanger reactors have then been conducted with Catator's generic simulation code for catalytic reactors (CatalystExplorer). The simulations clearly demonstrate the technical performance of these reactors. Indeed, the production rate of hydrogen is expected to be about 10 nm{sup 3}/h per litre of heat exchanger. The corresponding value for a conventional steam-reforming unit is about 1 nm{sup 3}/h or less per litre of reactor volume. Also, the compactness and the high degree of integration together with the possibilities of mass production will give an attractive cost for such units. Depending on the demands concerning the purity of the hydrogen it is possible to add secondary catalytic steps like water-gas shifters, methanation and selective oxidation, into a one-train unit, i.e. to design an all-inclusive design. Such reactors can be used for the supply of hydrogen to fuel cells. The production cost for hydrogen can be cut by 60 - 70% through the utilisation of heat exchanger reactors instead of conventional electrolysis. This result is primarily a result of the high price for electricity compared to the feed stock prices in steam reforming. It is important to verify the performance calculations and the simulation results through

  8. Electroless preparation and characterization of Ni-B nanoparticles supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes and their catalytic activity towards hydrogenation of styrene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Zheng; Li, Zhilin [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Institute of Carbon Fibers and Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Wang, Feng, E-mail: wangf@mail.buct.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Institute of Carbon Fibers and Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Liu, Jingjun; Ji, Jing [State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Institute of Carbon Fibers and Composites, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Park, Ki Chul [Institute of Carbon Science and Technology (ICST), Shinshu University, 4-17-1 Wakasato, Nagano-shi, Nagano 380-8553 (Japan); Endo, Morinobu [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Shinshu University, 4-17-1 Wakasato, Nagano-shi, Nagano 380-8553 (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    Graphical abstract: The MWCNT/Ni-B catalyst has been successfully prepared by an electroless deposition process. The Ni-B nanoparticles on the supporter are amorphous and are well-distributed. The catalytic conversion towards hydrogenation of styrene shows excellent catalytic activity of the obtained materials. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A two-step treatment of MWCNTs enabled the homogeneous growth of Ni-B nanoparticles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ni-B nanoparticles were amorphous with an average size of 60 nm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There were electron transfer between Ni and B. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The catalyst had excellent catalytic activity towards hydrogenation of styrene. -- Abstract: Nickel-boron (Ni-B) nanoparticles supported on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were successfully synthesized through an electroless deposition process using the plating bath with sodium borohydride as a reducing agent. The structural and morphological analyses using field-emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffractometry and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy have shown that the Ni-B nanoparticles deposited on the sidewalls of MWCNTs are fine spheres comprised of amorphous structure with the morphologically unique fine-structure like flowers, and homogenously dispersed with a narrow particle size distribution centered at around 60 nm diameter. The catalytic activity of MWCNT/Ni-B nanoparticles was evaluated with respect to hydrogenation of styrene. The hydrogenation catalyzed by MWCNT-supported Ni-B nanoparticles has been found to make styrene selectively converted into ethylbenzene. The highest conversion reaches 99.8% under proper reaction conditions, which demonstrates the high catalytic activity of MWCNT/Ni-B nanoparticles.

  9. Production of hydrogen from biomass by catalytic steam reforming of fast pyrolysis oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czernik, S.; Wang, D.; Chornet, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). Center for Renewable Chemical Technologies and Materials

    1998-08-01

    Hydrogen is the prototype of the environmentally cleanest fuel of interest for power generation using fuel cells and for transportation. The thermochemical conversion of biomass to hydrogen can be carried out through two distinct strategies: (a) gasification followed by water-gas shift conversion, and (b) catalytic steam reforming of specific fractions derived from fast pyrolysis and aqueous/steam processes of biomass. This paper presents the latter route that begins with fast pyrolysis of biomass to produce bio-oil. This oil (as a whole or its selected fractions) can be converted to hydrogen via catalytic steam reforming followed by a water-gas shift conversion step. Such a process has been demonstrated at the bench scale using model compounds, poplar oil aqueous fraction, and the whole pyrolysis oil with commercial Ni-based steam reforming catalysts. Hydrogen yields as high as 85% have been obtained. Catalyst initial activity can be recovered through regeneration cycles by steam or CO{sub 2} gasification of carbonaceous deposits.

  10. Substrate-mediated enhanced activity of Ru nanoparticles in catalytic hydrogenation of benzene

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xin

    2012-01-01

    The impact of carbon substrate-Ru nanoparticle interactions on benzene and hydrogen adsorption that is directly related to the performance in catalytic hydrogenation of benzene has been investigated by first-principles based calculations. The stability of Ru 13 nanoparticles is enhanced by the defective graphene substrate due to the hybridization between the dsp states of the Ru 13 particle with the sp 2 dangling bonds at the defect sites. The local curvature formed at the interface will also raise the Ru atomic diffusion barrier, and prohibit the particle sintering. The strong interfacial interaction results in the shift of averaged d-band center of the deposited Ru nanoparticle, from -1.41 eV for a freestanding Ru 13 particle, to -1.17 eV for the Ru/Graphene composites, and to -1.54 eV on mesocellular foam carbon. Accordingly, the adsorption energies of benzene are increased from -2.53 eV for the Ru/mesocellular foam carbon composites, to -2.62 eV on freestanding Ru 13 particles, to -2.74 eV on Ru/graphene composites. A similar change in hydrogen adsorption is also observed, and all these can be correlated to the shift of the d-band center of the nanoparticle. Thus, Ru nanoparticles graphene composites are expected to exhibit both high stability and superior catalytic performance in hydrogenation of arenes. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  11. Mesoporous Silica-Supported Sulfonyldiamine Ligand for Microwave-Assisted Transfer Hydrogenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheen M. Sarkar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available N-Sulfonyl-1,2-diamine ligands, derived from 1,2-diaminocyclohexane and 1,2-diaminopropane, were immobilized onto mesoporous SBA-15 silica. The SBA-15-supported sulfonyldiamine-Ru complex was prepared in situ under microwave heating at 60 W for 3 min. The prepared sulfonyldiamine-Ru complex was used as an efficient catalyst for the transfer hydrogenation of ketones to the corresponding secondary alcohols. The heterogeneous complex showed extremely high catalytic activity with 99% conversion rate under microwave heating condition. The complexes were regenerated by simple filtration and reused two times without significant loss of activity.

  12. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sean M; Kromer, Brian R; Litwin, Michael M; Rosen, Lee J; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R; Kosowski, Lawrence W; Robinson, Charles

    2014-01-07

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the stream reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5.

  13. Oxygen transport membrane system and method for transferring heat to catalytic/process reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sean M.; Kromer, Brian R.; Litwin, Michael M.; Rosen, Lee J.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie R.; Kosowski, Lawrence W.; Robinson, Charles

    2016-01-19

    A method and apparatus for producing heat used in a synthesis gas production process is provided. The disclosed method and apparatus include a plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements adapted to separate oxygen from an oxygen containing stream contacting the retentate side of the membrane elements. The permeated oxygen is combusted with a hydrogen containing synthesis gas stream contacting the permeate side of the tubular oxygen transport membrane elements thereby generating a reaction product stream and radiant heat. The present method and apparatus also includes at least one catalytic reactor containing a catalyst to promote the steam reforming reaction wherein the catalytic reactor is surrounded by the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements. The view factor between the catalytic reactor and the plurality of tubular oxygen transport membrane elements radiating heat to the catalytic reactor is greater than or equal to 0.5

  14. Hydrogen production from palm kernel shell via integrated catalytic adsorption (ICA) steam gasification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Zakir; Yusup, Suzana; Ahmad, Murni Melati; Chin, Bridgid Lai Fui

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The paper presents integrated catalytic adsorption (ICA) steam gasification for H 2 yield. • Effects of adsorbent to biomass, biomass particle size and fluidization velocity on H 2 yield are examined. • The present study produces higher H 2 yield as compared to that obtained in literatures. • The ICA provides enhancement of H 2 yield as compared to independent catalytic and CO 2 adsorption gasification systems. - Abstract: The present study investigates the integrated catalytic adsorption (ICA) steam gasification of palm kernel shell for hydrogen production in a pilot scale atmospheric fluidized bed gasifier. The biomass steam gasification is performed in the presence of an adsorbent and a catalyst in the system. The effect of adsorbent to biomass (A/B) ratio (0.5–1.5 wt/wt), fluidization velocity (0.15–0.26 m/s) and biomass particle size (0.355–2.0 mm) are studied at temperature of 675 °C, steam to biomass (S/B) ratio of 2.0 (wt/wt) and biomass to catalyst ratio of 0.1 (wt/wt). Hydrogen composition and yield, total gas yield, and lower product gas heating values (LHV gas ) increases with increasing A/B ratio, while particle size has no significant effect on hydrogen composition and yield, total gas and char yield, gasification and carbon conversion efficiency. However, gas heating values increased with increasing biomass particle size which is due to presence of high methane content in product gas. Meanwhile, medium fluidization velocity of 0.21 m/s favoured hydrogen composition and yield. The results showed that the maximum hydrogen composition and yield of 84.62 vol% and 91.11 g H 2 /kg biomass are observed at A/B ratio of 1.5, S/B ratio of 2.0, catalyst to biomass ratio of 0.1 and temperature of 675 °C. The product gas heating values are observed in the range of 10.92–17.02 MJ/N m 3 . Gasification and carbon conversion efficiency are observed in the range of 25.66–42.95% and 20.61–41.95%, respectively. These lower

  15. Investigations on the heterogenous catalytic hydrogenation using isotope effect and gamma- and neutron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudlacek, R; Cabicar, J [Ceske Vysoke Uceni Technicke, Prague (Czechoslovakia). Katedra Jaderne Chemie

    1976-01-01

    The kinetic and solvent isotope effects during the maleic acid heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation and deuteration in light and heavy water have been studied. Also the effect of the gamma and neutron irradiation on the Ni-ZnO catalysts (with various ratios of components) on the reaction kinetics and mechanism has been measured, as well as the effect of pH on the adsorption behaviour of maleic acid and the temperature dependence of the reaction rate. Existence of different adsorption centers for hydrogen and maleic acid could be deduced from these experiments. A reaction mechanism based on the two-dimensional diffusion of components in the surface is proposed. The catalyst is formed from Ni and ZnO-microspheres. Hydrogen is bound to nickel and maleic acid is adsorbed on the ZnO-microspheres. The reaction takes place on the boundary layers of these microspheres.

  16. Magnetically Recoverable Supported Ruthenium Catalyst for Hydrogenation of Alkynes and Transfer Hydrogenation of Carbonyl Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    A ruthenium (Ru) catalyst supported on magnetic nanoparticles (NiFe2O4) has been successfully synthesized and used for hydrogenation of alkynes at room temperature as well as transfer hydrogenation of a number of carbonyl compounds under microwave irradiation conditions. The cata...

  17. Contribution to the study of catalytic hydrogen-deuterium exchange between hydrogen and hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravoire, J.

    1958-01-01

    The hydrogen-deuterium exchange between molecular hydrogen and hydrocarbons over a platinum and charcoal catalyst was studied in a static system. The change in isotopic composition of molecular hydrogen was followed by a thermal conductivity method. Cyclo-pentane and cyclohexane were chosen because of their stability. A reversible inactivation of the catalyst was observed with both hydrocarbons. The reasons for this inactivation are unknown but it was shown that reactivation led to satisfactory reproducibility. A kinetic study was done with cyclohexane in the range 30 to 160 deg. C, and 40 to 360 mm for the pressure of hydrogen, and 10 to 70 mm for the pressure of cyclohexane. The order of the reaction with respect to cyclohexane pressure is always close to zero; the order with respect to that of hydrogen is 0.5 above 100 deg. C. It decreases with increasing temperature and becomes negative (-0.5 at 30 deg. C), characterizing an inhibition by hydrogen. At the same time, the apparent activation energy goes from 6 to 13 kcal/mole. (author) [fr

  18. Influence of ionizing radiation on the catalytic properties of oxide catalysts tested by hydrogen peroxide decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mucka, V.

    1987-01-01

    Results of a study of some physical and catalytic properties of different oxide catalysts as affected by ionizing radiation (γ, n, e - ) and tested by the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in aqueous solution are presented in this paper. The oxidation state of the active component present on the catalyst surface was found to be one of the most sensitive properties to the ionizing radiation. Changes of this state induced by γ-irradiation were found to be positive in most cases; electron pre-irradiation of the oxides leads, as a rule, to negative effects and the effects of neutron irradiation may be positive or negative. On the other hand, changes in the catalytic activity of the oxides after γ-or electron-irradiation seem to be mostly negative and positive, respectively; the effects of fast neutrons seem to vary here. Neither quantitative or qualitative correlation was found between the radiation-induced changes in these two quantities. The results give evidence that ionizing radiation principally affects the surface concentration of the catalytic sites. Both the character and magnitude of the changes in surface oxidation abilities and in catalytic activities of the oxide catalysts seem to be dependent upon the actual state of the catalyst surface. (author)

  19. Dynamic simulation of pure hydrogen production via ethanol steam reforming in a catalytic membrane reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hedayati, Ali; Le Corre, Olivier; Lacarrière, Bruno; Llorca, Jordi

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol steam reforming (ESR) was performed over Pd-Rh/CeO 2 catalyst in a catalytic membrane reactor (CMR) as a reformer unit for production of fuel cell grade pure hydrogen. Experiments were performed at 923 K, 6–10 bar, and fuel flow rates of 50–200 μl/min using a mixture of ethanol and distilled water with steam to carbon ratio of 3. A static model for the catalytic zone was derived from the Arrhenius law to calculate the total molar production rates of ESR products, i.e. CO, CO 2 , CH 4 , H 2 , and H 2 O in the catalytic zone of the CMR (coefficient of determination R 2  = 0.993). The pure hydrogen production rate at steady state conditions was modeled by means of a static model based on the Sieverts' law. Finally, a dynamic model was developed under ideal gas law assumptions to simulate the dynamics of pure hydrogen production rate in the case of the fuel flow rate or the operating pressure set point adjustment (transient state) at isothermal conditions. The simulation of fuel flow rate change dynamics was more essential compared to the pressure change one, as the system responded much faster to such an adjustment. The results of the dynamic simulation fitted very well to the experimental values at P = 7–10 bar, which proved the robustness of the simulation based on the Sieverts' law. The simulation presented in this work is similar to the hydrogen flow rate adjustments needed to set the electrical load of a fuel cell, when fed online by the pure hydrogen generating reformer studied. - Highlights: • Ethanol steam reforming (ESR) experiments were performed in a Pd-Ag membrane reactor. • The model of the catalytic zone of the reactor was derived from the Arrhenius law. • The permeation zone (membrane) was modeled based on the Sieverts' law. • The Sieverts' law model showed good results for the range of P = 7–10 bar. • Pressure and fuel flow rate adjustments were considered for dynamic simulation.

  20. Detailed modelling of processes inside a catalytic recombiner for hydrogen removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitsch, M.

    1999-01-01

    Under accidental conditions, considerable amounts of hydrogen may be released into the containment. Catalytic reacting surfaces in recombiners are a reliable method to recombine this hydrogen and other burnable gases like carbon monoxide from the atmosphere in a passive way. Many experiments have been carried out to study the main phenomena occurring inside recombiners, like the efficiency of hydrogen removal, the start-up conditions, poisoning, oxygen starvation, steam and water impact, and others. In addition, the global behavior of a given recombiner device in a larger environment has been investigated in order to demonstrate the effectiveness and to facilitate the derivation of simplified models for long term, severe accident analyses. These long-term severe accident models are complemented by detailed investigations to understand the interaction of chemistry and flow inside a recombiner box. This helps to provide the dependencies of non-measurable variables (e.g. the reaction rate distribution), of local surface temperatures etc. to make long-term or system models more reliable. It also offers possibilities for increasing the chemical efficiency by optimising the geometric design properly. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes are available for use as development tools to include the specifics of catalytic surface reactors. The present paper describes the use of the code system CFX [1] for creating a recombiner model. Some model predictions are compared to existing test data. (author)

  1. Catalytic performance improvement of styrene hydrogenation in trickle bed reactor by using periodic operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wongkia, Atittahn; Praserthdam, Piyasan; Assabumrungrat, Suttichai; Suriye, Kongkiat; Nonkhamwong, Anuwat

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the catalytic performance improvement of styrene hydrogenation in a trickle bed reactor by using periodic operation. The effects of cycle period and split on relative conversion, which is defined as styrene conversion obtained from periodic operation over that from steady state operation, were examined at various operating conditions including gas and average liquid flow rates, pressure and temperature. The experimental results reveal that both cycle period and split have strong influence on the catalytic performance. The fast mode (short cycle period) is a favorable condition. The improvement by the periodic operation becomes less pronounced for operations at high average liquid flow rate, pressure and temperature. From this study, a maximum improvement of styrene conversion of 18% is observed

  2. Catalytic performance improvement of styrene hydrogenation in trickle bed reactor by using periodic operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wongkia, Atittahn; Praserthdam, Piyasan; Assabumrungrat, Suttichai [Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok (Thailand); Suriye, Kongkiat; Nonkhamwong, Anuwat [SCG Chemicals Co. Ltd., Bangkok (Thailand)

    2013-03-15

    We investigated the catalytic performance improvement of styrene hydrogenation in a trickle bed reactor by using periodic operation. The effects of cycle period and split on relative conversion, which is defined as styrene conversion obtained from periodic operation over that from steady state operation, were examined at various operating conditions including gas and average liquid flow rates, pressure and temperature. The experimental results reveal that both cycle period and split have strong influence on the catalytic performance. The fast mode (short cycle period) is a favorable condition. The improvement by the periodic operation becomes less pronounced for operations at high average liquid flow rate, pressure and temperature. From this study, a maximum improvement of styrene conversion of 18% is observed.

  3. Enhancing charge transfer kinetics by nanoscale catalytic cermet interlayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jihwan; Kim, Young-Beom; Gür, Turgut M; Prinz, Fritz B

    2012-12-01

    Enhancing the density of catalytic sites is crucial for improving the performance of energy conversion devices. This work demonstrates the kinetic role of 2 nm thin YSZ/Pt cermet layers on enhancing the oxygen reduction kinetics for low temperature solid oxide fuel cells. Cermet layers were deposited between the porous Pt cathode and the dense YSZ electrolyte wafer using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Not only the catalytic role of the cermet layer itself but the mixing effect in the cermet was explored. For cells with unmixed and fully mixed cermet interlayers, the maximum power density was enhanced by a factor of 1.5 and 1.8 at 400 °C, and by 2.3 and 2.7 at 450 °C, respectively, when compared to control cells with no cermet interlayer. The observed enhancement in cell performance is believed to be due to the increased triple phase boundary (TPB) density in the cermet interlayer. We also believe that the sustained kinetics for the fully mixed cermet layer sample stems from better thermal stability of Pt islands separated by the ALD YSZ matrix, which helped to maintain the high-density TPBs even at elevated temperature.

  4. Control of hydrogen concentration in reactor containment buildings by using passive catalytic recombiners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, U.

    1993-01-01

    Severe accidents in nuclear power plants have the potential to generate hydrogen within the reactor containment building in concentrations likely to deflagrate or even detonate. This could endanger the containment integrity. Autocatalytic devices have been developed by the NIS company in Hanau, Germany, to control the hydrogen concentration within the containment. These devices have been tested by the Battelle Institute in Frankfurt, Germany, under conditions relevant to severe accidents. The catalytic device functions as required in a wide band of gas mixtures ranging from inerted conditions with low-hydrogen and/or low-oxygen concentrations up to detonable mixtures. The device starts up quickly, and has a high resistance against catalyst poisons including the effects of oil or cable fires. The device makes a strong contribution to gas mixing in the containment atmosphere. The paper summarizes the development work done and describes the final design of the device. Theoretical tools for analysis and prediction of catalyst performance in containment environments have been developed by the Battelle Institute and the Technical University of Munich. These tools have been verified and validated against experimental data. A phenomenological discussion of accident scenarios is used to explain the functional requirements for the autocatalytic devices in the control of hydrogen. Both the potential for and limitations of such devices for hydrogen control are discussed for large dry containments (PWRs) and for those which are originally inerted (BWRs)

  5. Muon transfer from hot muonic hydrogen atoms to neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacot-Guillarmod, R.; Beer, G.A.; Knowles, P.E.; Mason, G.R.; Olin, A.; Beveridge, J.L.; Marshall, G.M.; Brewer, J.H.; Forster, B.M.; Huber, T.M.; Kammel, P.; Zmeskal, J.; Petitjean, C.

    1992-01-01

    A negative muon beam has been directed on adjacent solid layers of hydrogen and neon. Three targets differing by their deuterium concentration were investigated. Muonic hydrogen atoms can drift to the neon layer where the muon is immediately transferred. The time structure of the muonic neon X-rays follows the exponential law with a disappearance rate corresponding to the one of μ -p atoms in each target. The rates λ ppμ and λ pd can be extracted

  6. Intermolecular Hydrogen Transfer in Isobutane Hydrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Sugahara

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Electron spin resonance (ESR spectra of butyl radicals induced with γ-ray irradiation in the simple isobutane (2-methylpropane hydrate (prepared with deuterated water were investigated. Isothermal annealing results of the γ-ray-irradiated isobutane hydrate reveal that the isobutyl radical in a large cage withdraws a hydrogen atom from the isobutane molecule through shared hexagonal-faces of adjacent large cages. During this “hydrogen picking” process, the isobutyl radical is apparently transformed into a tert-butyl radical, while the sum of isobutyl and tert-butyl radicals remains constant. The apparent transformation from isobutyl to tert-butyl radicals is an irreversible first-order reaction and the activation energy was estimated to be 35 ± 3 kJ/mol, which was in agreement with the activation energy (39 ± 5 kJ/mol of hydrogen picking in the γ-ray-irradiated propane hydrate with deuterated water.

  7. Properties and application of noble metal catalysts for heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, G; Frohning, C D; Cornils, B [Ruhrchemie A.G., Oberhausen (Germany, F.R.)

    1976-07-01

    The special properties of the six platinum group elements - ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, osmium, iridium, platinum - make them useful as active metals for catalytic reactions. Especially valuable is their property of favouring a single reaction even when the possibility of a number of parallel reactions exists under certain reaction conditions. This selectivity of the noble metal catalyst may be directed or enhanced through appropriate choise of the metal, the reaction conditions, the duration of the reaction, the amount of hydrogen etc. Even the physical state of the catalyst - supported or unsupported - is of influence when using noble metal catalysts as described in this report.

  8. An investigation of turbulent catalytically stabilized channel flow combustion of lean hydrogen - air mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantzaras, I; Benz, P; Schaeren, R; Bombach, R [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The catalytically stabilised thermal combustion (CST) of lean hydrogen-air mixtures was investigated numerically in a turbulent channel flow configuration using a two-dimensional elliptic model with detailed heterogeneous and homogeneous chemical reactions. Comparison between turbulent and laminar cases having the same incoming mean properties shows that turbulence inhibits homogeneous ignition due to increased heat transport away from the near-wall layer. The peak root-mean-square temperature and species fluctuations are always located outside the extent of the homogeneous reaction zone indicating that thermochemical fluctuations have no significant influence on gaseous combustion. (author) 4 figs., 6 refs.

  9. Hydrogen metal hydride storage with integrated catalytic recombiner for mobile application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marinescu-Pasoi, L.; Behrens, U.; Langer, G.; Gramatte, W.; Rastogi, A.K.; Schmitt, R.E. (Battelle-Institut e.V., Frankfurt am Main (DE). Dept. of Energy Technology)

    1991-01-01

    A novel, thermodynamically efficient device is under development at Battelle in Frankfurt, by which the range of hydrogen-driven cars with a metal hydride tank might be roughly doubled. The device makes use of the properties of metal hydrides, combined with catalytic combustion. Its development is funded by the Hessian Ministry of Economic Affairs and Technology; it is to be completed by the end of 1990. High-temperature hydrides (HTH) have about three times the storage capacity of low temperature hydrides (LTH), but require relatively large amounts of heat at high temperatures to release the hydrogen. The exhaust heat from combustion-engine-driven vehicles is insufficient for this, and vehicles with electric (fuel cell) drive produce practically no exhaust heat at all. The Battelle-developed device is a combination of an HTH storage cell, an LTH storage cell and a catalyst. (author).

  10. Biomass-to-hydrogen via fast pyrolysis and catalytic steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chornet, E.; Wang, D.; Czernik, S. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass and reforming the pyroligneous oils is being studied as a strategy for producing hydrogen. Novel technologies for the rapid pyrolysis of biomass have been developed in the past decade. They provide compact and efficient systems to transform biomass into vapors that are condensed to oils, with yields as high as 75-80 wt.% of the anhydrous biomass. This {open_quotes}bio-oil{close_quotes} is a mixture of aldehydes, alcohols, acids, oligomers from the constitutive carbohydrates and lignin, and some water derived from the dehydration reactions. Hydrogen can be produced by reforming the bio-oil or its fractions with steam. A process of this nature has the potential to be cost competitive with conventional means of producing hydrogen. The reforming facility can be designed to handle alternate feedstocks, such as natural gas and naphtha, if necessary. Thermodynamic modeling of the major constituents of the bio-oil has shown that reforming is possible within a wide range of temperatures and steam-to-carbon ratios. Existing catalytic data on the reforming of oxygenates have been studied to guide catalyst selection. Tests performed on a microreactor interfaced with a molecular beam mass spectrometer showed that, by proper selection of the process variables: temperature, steam-to-carbon ratio, gas hourly space velocity, and contact time, almost total conversion of carbon in the feed to CO and CO{sub 2} could be obtained. These tests also provided possible reaction mechanisms where thermal cracking competes with catalytic processes. Bench-scale, fixed bed reactor tests demonstrated high hydrogen yields from model compounds and carbohydrate-derived pyrolysis oil fractions. Reforming bio-oil or its fractions required proper dispersion of the liquid to avoid vapor-phase carbonization of the feed in the inlet to the reactor. A special spraying nozzle injector was designed and successfully tested with an aqueous fraction of bio-oil.

  11. Catalytic process for tritium exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansoo Lee; Kang, H.S.; Paek, S.W.; Hongsuk Chung; Yang Geun Chung; Sook Kyung Lee

    2001-01-01

    The catalytic activities for a hydrogen isotope exchange were measured through the reaction of a vapor and gas mixture. The catalytic activity showed to be comparable with the published data. Since the gas velocity is relatively low, the deactivation was not found clearly during the 5-hour experiment. Hydrogen isotope transfer experiments were also conducted through the liquid phase catalytic exchange reaction column that consisted of a catalytic bed and a hydrophilic bed. The efficiencies of both the catalytic and hydrophilic beds were higher than 0.9, implying that the column performance was excellent. (author)

  12. Probing hydrogen bonding interactions and proton transfer in proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Beining

    Scope and method of study. Hydrogen bonding is a fundamental element in protein structure and function. Breaking a single hydrogen bond may impair the stability of a protein. It is therefore important to probe dynamic changes in hydrogen bonding interactions during protein folding and function. Time-resolved Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is highly sensitive to hydrogen bonding interactions. However, it lacks quantitative correlation between the vibrational frequencies and the number, type, and strength of hydrogen bonding interactions of ionizable and polar residues. We employ quantum physics theory based ab initio calculations to study the effects of hydrogen bonding interactions on vibrational frequencies of Asp, Glu, and Tyr residues and to develop vibrational spectral markers for probing hydrogen bonding interactions using infrared spectroscopy. In addition, proton transfer process plays a crucial role in a wide range of energy transduction, signal transduction, and enzymatic reactions. We study the structural basis for proton transfer using photoactive yellow protein as an excellent model system. Molecular dynamics simulation is employed to investigate the structures of early intermediate states. Quantum theory based ab initio calculations are used to study the impact of hydrogen bond interactions on proton affinity and proton transfer. Findings and conclusions. Our extensive density function theory based calculations provide rich structural, spectral, and energetic information on hydrogen bonding properties of protonated side chain groups of Asp/Glu and Tyr. We developed vibrational spectral markers and 2D FTIR spectroscopy for structural characterization on the number and the type of hydrogen bonding interactions of the COOH group of Asp/Glu and neutral phenolic group of Tyr. These developments greatly enhance the power of time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy as a major experimental tool for structural characterization of functionally important

  13. Molecular weight control in emulsion polymerization by catalytic chain transfer : a reaction engineering approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smeets, N.M.B.; Meda, U.S.; Heuts, J.P.A.; Keurentjes, J.T.F.; Herk, van A.M.; Meuldijk, J.

    2007-01-01

    For the application of catalytic chain transfer in (mini)emulsion polymerization, catalyst partitioning and deactivation are key parameters that govern the actual catalyst concentration at the locus of polymerization and consequently the final molecular weight distribution. A global model, based on

  14. Combining Ru, Ni and Ni(OH){sub 2} active sites for improving catalytic performance in benzene hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Lihua, E-mail: lihuazhu@stu.xmu.edu.cn [School of Metallurgy and Chemical Engineering, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, Ganzhou 341000, Jiang Xi (China); Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Green Productions of Alcohols-Ethers-Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Sun, Hanlei; Zheng, Jinbao [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Green Productions of Alcohols-Ethers-Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Yu, Changlin, E-mail: yuchanglinjx@163.com [School of Metallurgy and Chemical Engineering, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, Ganzhou 341000, Jiang Xi (China); Zhang, Nuowei [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Green Productions of Alcohols-Ethers-Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Shu, Qing [School of Metallurgy and Chemical Engineering, Jiangxi University of Science and Technology, Ganzhou 341000, Jiang Xi (China); Chen, Bing H., E-mail: chenbh@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, National Engineering Laboratory for Green Productions of Alcohols-Ethers-Esters, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2017-05-01

    In this study, the Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.96}/C(T) catalysts were successfully prepared by the simple methods of hydrazine-reduction and galvanic replacement, where 0.04/0.96 and T represented the Ru/Ni atomic ratio and reducing temperature of the catalyst in N{sub 2}+10%H{sub 2}, respectively. The nanostructures of the Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.96} nanoparticles in the Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.96}/C(T) catalysts were controlled by modulating their annealing temperature in N{sub 2}+10%H{sub 2} and characterized by an array of techniques, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), scanning transmission electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (STEM-EDS) mapping and high-sensitivity low-energy ion scattering (HS-LEIS). The Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.96}/C(30) catalyst, which was composed of Ru clusters or single atoms supported on Ni/Ni(OH){sub 2} nanoparticles, exhibited much better catalytic performance for benzene hydrogenation than the Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.96}/C(T) catalysts reduced at above 30 °C, such as Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.96}/C(160) with the nanostructure of partial Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.9} alloy and Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.96}/C(280) with the nanostructure of complete Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.9} alloy. The reason was that the synergistic effect of multiple active sites – Ru, Ni and Ni(OH){sub 2} sites was present in the Ru{sub 0.04}Ni{sub 0.96}/C(30) catalyst, where hydrogen was preferentially activated at Ru sites, benzene was probably activated at Ni(OH){sub 2} surface and Ni acted as a “bridge” for transferring activated H{sup ∗} species to activated benzene by hydrogen spillover effect, hydrogenating and forming product – cyclohexane. This study also provided a typical example to illustrate that the synergy effect of multiple active sites can largely improve the catalytic hydrogenation performance. - Highlights: • The Ru

  15. Hydrogen production by catalytic processing of renewable methane-rich gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradov, Nazim; Smith, Franklyn; T-Raissi, Ali [Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida, Cocoa, FL 32922-5703 (United States)

    2008-04-15

    Biomass-derived methane-rich gases such as landfill gas (LFG), biogas and digester gas are promising renewable resources for near-future production of hydrogen. The technical and economical feasibility of hydrogen production via catalytic reforming of LFG and other methane-rich gases is evaluated in this paper. The thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and experimental measurements of reformation of methane-rich CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixtures over Ni-based catalyst were conducted. The problems associated with the catalyst deactivation due to carbon lay down and effects of steam and oxygen on the process sustainability were explored. Two technological approaches distinguished by the mode of heat input to the endothermic process (i.e., external vs autothermal) were modeled using AspenPlus trademark chemical process simulator and validated experimentally. A 5 kW{sub th} pilot unit for hydrogen production from LFG-mimicking CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixture was fabricated and operated. A preliminary techno-economic assessment indicates that the liquid hydrogen production costs are in the range of 3.00-7.00 per kilogram depending upon the plant capacity, the process heat input option and whether or not carbon sequestration is included in the process. (author)

  16. Production of natural antioxidants from vegetable oil deodorizer distillates: effect of catalytic hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, María Ayelén; Baltanás, Miguel A

    2010-02-01

    Natural tocopherols are one of the main types of antioxidants found in living creatures, but they also have other critical biological functions. The biopotency of natural (+)-alpha-tocopherol (RRR) is 36% higher than that of the synthetic racemic mixture and 300% higher than the SRR stereoisomer. Vegetable oil deodorizer distillates (DD) are an excellent source of natural tocopherols. Catalytic hydrogenation of DD preconcentrates has been suggested as a feasible route for recovery of tocopherols in high yield. However, it is important to know whether the hydrogenation operation, as applied to these tocopherol-rich mixtures, is capable of preserving the chiral (RRR) character, which is critical to its biopotency. Fortified (i.e., (+)-alpha-tocopherol enriched) sunflower oil and methyl stearate, as well as sunflower oil DD, were fully hydrogenated using commercial Ni and Pd catalysts (120-180 degrees C; 20-60 psig). Products were analyzed by chiral HPLC. Results show that the desired chiral configuration (RRR) is fully retained. Thus, the hydrogenation route can be safely considered as a valid alternative for increasing the efficiency of tocopherol recovery processes from DDs while preserving their natural characteristics.

  17. Catalytic processing of high-sulfur fuels for distributed hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradov, Nazim; Ramasamy, Karthik; Huang, Cunping; T-Raissi, Ali [Central Florida Univ., FL (United States)

    2010-07-01

    In this work, the development of a new on-demand hydrogen production technology is reported. In this process, a liquid hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., high-S diesel) is first catalytically pre-reformed to shorter chain gaseous hydrocarbons (predominantly, C{sub 1}-C{sub 3}) before being directed to the steam reformer, where it is converted to syngas and then to high-purity hydrogen. In the pre-reformer, most sulfurous species present in the fuel are catalytically converted to H{sub 2}S. In the desulfurization unit, H{sub 2}S is scrubbed and converted to H{sub 2} and elemental sulfur. Desulfurization of the pre-reformate gas is carried out in a special regenerative redox system, which includes Fe(II)/Fe(III)-containing aqueous phase scrubber coupled with an electrolyzer. The integrated pre-reformer/scrubber/electrolyzer unit operated successfully on high-S diesel fuel for more than 100 hours meeting the required desulfurization target of >95 % sulfur removal. (orig.)

  18. Hydrogen generator, via catalytic partial oxidation of methane for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recupero, Vincenzo; Pino, Lidia; Di Leonardo, Raffaele; Lagana', Massimo; Maggio, Gaetano

    It is well known that the most acknowledged process for generation of hydrogen for fuel cells is based upon the steam reforming of methane or natural gas. A valid alternative could be a process based on partial oxidation of methane, since the process is mildly exothermic and therefore not energy intensive. Consequently, great interest is expected from conversion of methane into syngas, if an autothermal, low energy intensive, compact and reliable process could be developed. This paper covers the activities, performed by the CNR Institute of Transformation and Storage of Energy (CNR-TAE), on theoretical and experimental studies for a compact hydrogen generator, via catalytic selective partial oxidation of methane, integrated with second generation fuel cells (EC-JOU2 contract). In particular, the project focuses the attention on methane partial oxidation via heterogeneous selective catalysts, in order to: demonstrate the basic catalytic selective partial oxidation of methane (CSPOM) technology in a subscale prototype, equivalent to a nominal output of 5 kWe; develop the CSPOM technology for its application in electric energy production by means of fuel cells; assess, by a balance of plant analysis, and a techno-economic evaluation, the potential benefits of the CSPOM for different categories of fuel cells.

  19. Effective modeling of hydrogen mixing and catalytic recombination in containment atmosphere with an Eulerian Containment Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bott, E.; Frepoli, C.; Monti, R.; Notini, V.; Carcassi, M.; Fineschi, F.; Heitsch, M.

    1999-01-01

    Large amounts of hydrogen can be generated in the containment of a nuclear power plant following a postulated accident with significant fuel damage. Different strategies have been proposed and implemented to prevent violent hydrogen combustion. An attractive one aims to eliminate hydrogen without burning processes; it is based on the use of catalytic hydrogen recombiners. This paper describes a simulation methodology which is being developed by Ansaldo, to support the application of the above strategy, in the frame of two projects sponsored by the Commission of the European Communities within the IV Framework Program on Reactor Safety. Involved organizations also include the DCMN of Pisa University (Italy), Battelle Institute and GRS (Germany), Politechnical University of Madrid (Spain). The aims to make available a simulation approach, suitable for use for containment design at industrial level (i.e. with reasonable computer running time) and capable to correctly capture the relevant phenomenologies (e.g. multiflow convective flow patterns, hydrogen, air and steam distribution in the containment atmosphere as determined by containment structures and geometries as well as by heat and mass sources and sinks). Eulerian algorithms provide the capability of three dimensional modelling with a fairly accurate prediction, however lower than CFD codes with a full Navier Stokes formulation. Open linking of an Eulerian code as GOTHIC to a full Navier Stokes CFD code as CFX 4.1 allows to dynamically tune the solving strategies of the Eulerian code itself. The effort in progress is an application of this innovative methodology to detailed hydrogen recombination simulation and a validation of the approach itself by reproducing experimental data. (author)

  20. Catalytic enantioselective alkene aminohalogenation/cyclization involving atom transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovino, Michael T; Chemler, Sherry R

    2012-04-16

    Problem solved: the title reaction was used for the synthesis of chiral 2-bromo, chloro, and iodomethyl indolines and 2-iodomethyl pyrrolidines. Stereocenter formation is believed to occur by enantioselective cis aminocupration and C-X bond formation is believed to occur by atom transfer. The ultility of the products as versatile synthetic intermediates was demonstrated, as was a radical cascade cyclization sequence. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Current Topics in the Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation of Imines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Januščák, J.; Václavík, Jiří; Šot, P.; Pecháček, J.; Vilhanová, B.; Kuzma, Marek; Kačer, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 109, č. 7 (2015), s. 492-498 ISSN 0009-2770 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP106/12/1276; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1509 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : asymmetric transfer hydrogenation * ruthenium * isoquinoline Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 0.279, year: 2015

  2. Numerical study of methanol–steam reforming and methanol–air catalytic combustion in annulus reactors for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chein, Reiyu; Chen, Yen-Cho; Chung, J.N.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Performance of mini-scale integrated annulus reactors for hydrogen production. ► Flow rates fed to combustor and reformer control the reactor performance. ► Optimum performance is found from balance of flow rates to combustor and reformer. ► Better performance can be found when shell side is designed as combustor. -- Abstract: This study presents the numerical simulation on the performance of mini-scale reactors for hydrogen production coupled with liquid methanol/water vaporizer, methanol/steam reformer, and methanol/air catalytic combustor. These reactors are designed similar to tube-and-shell heat exchangers. The combustor for heat supply is arranged as the tube or shell side. Based on the obtained results, the methanol/air flow rate through the combustor (in terms of gas hourly space velocity of combustor, GHSV-C) and the methanol/water feed rate to the reformer (in terms of gas hourly space velocity of reformer, GHSV-R) control the reactor performance. With higher GHSV-C and lower GHSV-R, higher methanol conversion can be achieved because of higher reaction temperature. However, hydrogen yield is reduced and the carbon monoxide concentration is increased due to the reversed water gas shift reaction. Optimum reactor performance is found using the balance between GHSV-C and GHSV-R. Because of more effective heat transfer characteristics in the vaporizer, it is found that the reactor with combustor arranged as the shell side has better performance compared with the reactor design having the combustor as the tube side under the same operating conditions.

  3. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide. Progress report, December 15, 1991--December 14, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayland, B.B.

    1992-12-01

    This project is focused on developing strategies to accomplish the reduction and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. Our approaches to this issue are based on the recognition that rhodium macrocycles have unusually favorable thermodynamic values for producing a series of intermediate implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Observations of metalloformyl complexes produced by reactions of H{sub 2} and CO, and reductive coupling of CO to form metallo {alpha}-diketone species have suggested a multiplicity of routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in constructing energy profiles for a variety of potential pathways, and these schemes are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Variation of the electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Emerging knowledge of the factors that contribute to M-H, M-C and M-O bond enthalpies is directing the search for ligand arrays that will expand the range of metal species that have favorable thermodynamic parameters to produce the primary intermediates for CO hydrogenation. Studies of rhodium complexes are being extended to non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics. Multifunctional catalyst systems designed to couple the ability of rhodium complexes to produce formyl and diketone intermediates with a second catalyst that hydrogenates these imtermediates are promising approaches to accomplish CO hydrogenation at mild conditions.

  4. Ferric hydroxide supported gold subnano clusters or quantum dots: enhanced catalytic performance in chemoselective hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lequan; Qiao, Botao; Ma, Yubo; Zhang, Juan; Deng, Youquan

    2008-05-21

    An attempt to prepare ferric hydroxide supported Au subnano clusters via modified co-precipitation without any calcination was made. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) have been employed to study the structure and chemical states of these catalysts. No Au species could be observed in the HRTEM image nor from the XRD pattern, suggesting that the sizes of the Au species in and on the ferric hydroxide support were less than or around 1 nm. Chemoselective hydrogenation of aromatic nitro compounds and alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehydes was selected as a probe reaction to examine the catalytic properties of this catalyst. Under the same reaction conditions, such as 100 degrees C and 1 MPa H2 in the hydrogenation of aromatic nitro compounds, a 96-99% conversion (except for 4-nitrobenzonitrile) with 99% selectivity was obtained over the ferric hydroxide supported Au catalyst, and the TOF values were 2-6 times higher than that of the corresponding ferric oxide supported catalyst with 3-5 nm size Au particles. For further evaluation of this Au catalyst in the hydrogenation of citral and cinnamaldehyde, selectivity towards unsaturated alcohols was 2-20 times higher than that of the corresponding ferric oxide Au catalyst.

  5. Catalytic Activities of Noble Metal Phosphides for Hydrogenation and Hydrodesulfurization Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuharu Kanda

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the development of a highly active noble metal phosphide (NMXPY-based hydrodesulfurization (HDS catalyst with a high hydrogenating ability for heavy oils was studied. NMXPY catalysts were obtained by reduction of P-added noble metals (NM-P, NM: Rh, Pd, Ru supported on SiO2. The order of activities for the hydrogenation of biphenyl was Rh-P > NiMoS > Pd-P > Ru-P. This order was almost the same as that of the catalytic activities for the HDS of dibenzothiophene. In the HDS of 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene (4,6-DMDBT, the HDS activity of the Rh-P catalyst increased with increasing reaction temperature, but the maximum HDS activity for the NiMoS catalyst was observed at 270 °C. The Rh-P catalyst yielded fully hydrogenated products with high selectivity compared with the NiMoS catalyst. Furthermore, XRD analysis of the spent Rh-P catalysts revealed that the Rh2P phase possessed high sulfur tolerance and resistance to sintering.

  6. Catalytic on-board hydrogen production from methanol and ammonia for mobile application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerijanto, H.

    2008-08-15

    This PhD thesis deals with the catalytic hydrogen production for mobile application, for example for the use in fuel cells for electric cars. Electric powered buses with fuel cells as driving system are well known, but the secure hydrogen storage in adequate amounts for long distance drive is still a topic of discussion. Methanol is an excellent hydrogen carrier. First of all it has a high H:C ratio and therefore a high energy density. Secondly the operating temperature of steam reforming of methanol is comparatively low (250 C) and there is no risk of coking since methanol has no C-C bond. Thirdly methanol is a liquid, which means that the present gasoline infrastructure can be used. For the further development of catalysts and for the construction of a reformer it is very important to characterize the catalysts very well. For the dimensioning and the control of an on-board production of hydrogen it is essential to draw accurately on the thermodynamic, chemical and kinetic data of the reaction. At the first part of this work the mesoporous Cu/ZrO{sub 2}/CeO{sub 2}-catalysts with various copper contents were characterized and their long-term stability and selectivity were investigated, and the kinetic data were determined. Carbon monoxide is generated by reforming of carbon containing material. This process is undesired since CO poisons the Pt electrode of the fuel cell. The separation of hydrogen by metal membranes is technically feasible and a high purity of hydrogen can be obtained. However, due to their high density this procedure is not favourable because of its energy loss. In this study a concept is presented, which enables an autothermal mode by application of ceramic membrane and simultaneously could help to deal with the CO problem. The search for an absolutely selective catalyst is uncertain. The production of CO can be neither chemically nor thermodynamically excluded, if carbon is present in the hydrogen carrier. Since enrichment or separation are

  7. Catalytic on-board hydrogen production from methanol and ammonia for mobile application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerijanto, H

    2008-08-15

    This PhD thesis deals with the catalytic hydrogen production for mobile application, for example for the use in fuel cells for electric cars. Electric powered buses with fuel cells as driving system are well known, but the secure hydrogen storage in adequate amounts for long distance drive is still a topic of discussion. Methanol is an excellent hydrogen carrier. First of all it has a high H:C ratio and therefore a high energy density. Secondly the operating temperature of steam reforming of methanol is comparatively low (250 C) and there is no risk of coking since methanol has no C-C bond. Thirdly methanol is a liquid, which means that the present gasoline infrastructure can be used. For the further development of catalysts and for the construction of a reformer it is very important to characterize the catalysts very well. For the dimensioning and the control of an on-board production of hydrogen it is essential to draw accurately on the thermodynamic, chemical and kinetic data of the reaction. At the first part of this work the mesoporous Cu/ZrO{sub 2}/CeO{sub 2}-catalysts with various copper contents were characterized and their long-term stability and selectivity were investigated, and the kinetic data were determined. Carbon monoxide is generated by reforming of carbon containing material. This process is undesired since CO poisons the Pt electrode of the fuel cell. The separation of hydrogen by metal membranes is technically feasible and a high purity of hydrogen can be obtained. However, due to their high density this procedure is not favourable because of its energy loss. In this study a concept is presented, which enables an autothermal mode by application of ceramic membrane and simultaneously could help to deal with the CO problem. The search for an absolutely selective catalyst is uncertain. The production of CO can be neither chemically nor thermodynamically excluded, if carbon is present in the hydrogen carrier. Since enrichment or separation are

  8. Sustainable production of hydrogen and chemical commodities from biodiesel waste crude glycerol and cellulose by biological and catalytic processes

    OpenAIRE

    Maru, Biniam Taddele

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogen has a significant potential as clean and ‘green’ fuel of the future. Accordingly, this thesis investigated how to generate a sustainable production of hydrogen and other chemical commodities through study of: 1) Fermentative behavior of anaerobichydrogen producing microorganisms from pure glycerol and biodiesel waste crude glycerol; 2) The advantage of using a solid supportimmobilisationof microorganisms 3) The integration of the dark fermentative system with the catalytic hydrolysi...

  9. Efficient, crosswise catalytic promiscuity among enzymes that catalyze phosphoryl transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Mark F; Hollfelder, Florian

    2013-01-01

    The observation that one enzyme can accelerate several chemically distinct reactions was at one time surprising because the enormous efficiency of catalysis was often seen as inextricably linked to specialization for one reaction. Originally underreported, and considered a quirk rather than a fundamental property, enzyme promiscuity is now understood to be important as a springboard for adaptive evolution. Owing to the large number of promiscuous enzymes that have been identified over the last decade, and the increased appreciation for promiscuity's evolutionary importance, the focus of research has shifted to developing a better understanding of the mechanistic basis for promiscuity and the origins of tolerant or restrictive specificity. We review the evidence for widespread crosswise promiscuity amongst enzymes that catalyze phosphoryl transfer, including several members of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily, where large rate accelerations between 10(6) and 10(17) are observed for both native and multiple promiscuous reactions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Chemistry and mechanism of phosphatases, diesterases and triesterases. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of Catalytic Cylinders on Autothermal Reforming of Methane for Hydrogen Production in a Microchamber Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfei Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new multicylinder microchamber reactor is designed on autothermal reforming of methane for hydrogen production, and its performance and thermal behavior, that is, based on the reaction mechanism, is numerically investigated by varying the cylinder radius, cylinder spacing, and cylinder layout. The results show that larger cylinder radius can promote reforming reaction; the mass fraction of methane decreased from 26% to 21% with cylinder radius from 0.25 mm to 0.75 mm; compact cylinder spacing corresponds to more catalytic surface and the time to steady state is decreased from 40 s to 20 s; alteration of staggered and aligned cylinder layout at constant inlet flow rates does not result in significant difference in reactor performance and it can be neglected. The results provide an indication and optimize performance of reactor; it achieves higher conversion compared with other reforming reactors.

  11. Effect of catalytic cylinders on autothermal reforming of methane for hydrogen production in a microchamber reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yunfei; Guo, Hongliang; Zhang, Li; Zhu, Junchen; Yang, Zhongqing; Tang, Qiang; Ji, Xin

    2014-01-01

    A new multicylinder microchamber reactor is designed on autothermal reforming of methane for hydrogen production, and its performance and thermal behavior, that is, based on the reaction mechanism, is numerically investigated by varying the cylinder radius, cylinder spacing, and cylinder layout. The results show that larger cylinder radius can promote reforming reaction; the mass fraction of methane decreased from 26% to 21% with cylinder radius from 0.25 mm to 0.75 mm; compact cylinder spacing corresponds to more catalytic surface and the time to steady state is decreased from 40 s to 20 s; alteration of staggered and aligned cylinder layout at constant inlet flow rates does not result in significant difference in reactor performance and it can be neglected. The results provide an indication and optimize performance of reactor; it achieves higher conversion compared with other reforming reactors.

  12. Pt3Co concave nanocubes: synthesis, formation understanding, and enhanced catalytic activity toward hydrogenation of styrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenyu; Lin, Cuikun; Zhang, Lihua; Quan, Zewei; Sun, Kai; Zhao, Bo; Wang, Feng; Porter, Nathan; Wang, Yuxuan; Fang, Jiye

    2014-02-03

    We report a facile synthesis route to prepare high-quality Pt3Co nanocubes with a concave structure, and further demonstrate that these concave Pt3Co nanocubes are terminated with high-index crystal facets. The success of this preparation is highly dependent on an appropriate nucleation process with a successively anisotropic overgrowth and a preservation of the resultant high-index planes by control binding of oleyl-amine/oleic acid with a fine-tuned composition. Using a hydrogenation of styrene as a model reaction, these Pt3Co concave nanocubes as a new class of nanocatalysts with more open structure and active atomic sites located on their high-index crystallographic planes exhibit an enhanced catalytic activity in comparison with low-indexed surface terminated Pt3Co nanocubes in similar size. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations for the role of hydrogen in catalytic reactions of furfural on Pd(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wenhua; Dang, Hongli; Liu, Yingdi; Jentoft, Friederike; Resasco, Daniel; Wang, Sanwu

    2014-03-01

    In the study of catalytic reactions of biomass, furfural conversion over metal catalysts with the presence of hydrogen has attracted wide attention. We report ab initio molecular dynamics simulations for furfural and hydrogen on the Pd(111) surface at finite temperatures. The simulations demonstrate that the presence of hydrogen is important in promoting furfural conversion. In particular, hydrogen molecules dissociate rapidly on the Pd(111) surface. As a result of such dissociation, atomic hydrogen participates in the reactions with furfural. The simulations also provide detailed information about the possible reactions of hydrogen with furfural. Supported by DOE (DE-SC0004600). This research used the supercomputer resources of the XSEDE, the NERSC Center, and the Tandy Supercomputing Center.

  14. Construction of Polarized Carbon-Nickel Catalytic Surfaces for Potent, Durable, and Economic Hydrogen Evolution Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Min; Weng, Qunhong; Popov, Zakhar I; Yang, Yijun; Antipina, Liubov Yu; Sorokin, Pavel B; Wang, Xi; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri

    2018-05-22

    Electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in alkaline solution is hindered by its sluggish kinetics toward water dissociation. Nickel-based catalysts, as low-cost and effective candidates, show great potentials to replace platinum (Pt)-based materials in the alkaline media. The main challenge regarding this type of catalysts is their relatively poor durability. In this work, we conceive and construct a charge-polarized carbon layer derived from carbon quantum dots (CQDs) on Ni 3 N nanostructure (Ni 3 N@CQDs) surfaces, which simultaneously exhibit durable and enhanced catalytic activity. The Ni 3 N@CQDs shows an overpotential of 69 mV at a current density of 10 mA cm -2 in a 1 M KOH aqueous solution, lower than that of Pt electrode (116 mV) at the same conditions. Density functional theory (DFT) simulations reveal that Ni 3 N and interfacial oxygen polarize charge distributions between originally equal C-C bonds in CQDs. The partially negatively charged C sites become effective catalytic centers for the key water dissociation step via the formation of new C-H bond (Volmer step) and thus boost the HER activity. Furthermore, the coated carbon is also found to protect interior Ni 3 N from oxidization/hydroxylation and therefore guarantees its durability. This work provides a practical design of robust and durable HER electrocatalysts based on nonprecious metals.

  15. β-Molybdenum nitride: synthesis mechanism and catalytic response in the gas phase hydrogenation of p-chloronitrobenzene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cárdenas-Lizana, F.; Gómez-Quero, S.; Perret, N.; Kiwi-Minsker, L.; Keane, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    A temperature programmed treatment of MoO3 in flowing N2 + H2 has been employed to prepare β-phase molybdenum nitride (β-Mo2N) which has been used to promote, for the first time, the catalytic hydrogenation of p-chloronitrobenzene. The reduction/nitridation synthesis steps have been monitored in

  16. Experimental and Numerical Evaluation of the By-Pass Flow in a Catalytic Plate Reactor for Hydrogen Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdsson, Haftor Örn; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    Numerical and experimental study is performed to evaluate the reactant by-pass flow in a catalytic plate reactor with a coated wire mesh catalyst for steam reforming of methane for hydrogen generation. By-pass of unconverted methane is evaluated under different wire mesh catalyst width to reactor...

  17. Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Engineering Development Unit Hydrogen Tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werkheiser, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    The Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) project has been a long-running program in the Space Technology Mission Directorate to enhance the knowledge and technology related to handling cryogenic propellants, specifically liquid hydrogen. This particular effort, the CPST engineering development unit (EDU), was a proof of manufacturability effort in support of a flight article. The EDU was built to find and overcome issues related to manufacturability and collect data to anchor the thermal models for use on the flight design.

  18. Application of microscopy technology in thermo-catalytic methane decomposition to hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Irene Lock Sow, E-mail: irene.sowmei@gmail.com; Lock, S. S. M., E-mail: serenelock168@gmail.com; Abdullah, Bawadi, E-mail: bawadi-abdullah@petronas.com.my [Chemical Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Sri Iskandar, 31750, Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    Hydrogen production from the direct thermo-catalytic decomposition of methane is a promising alternative for clean fuel production because it produces pure hydrogen without any CO{sub x} emissions. However, thermal decomposition of methane can hardly be of any practical and empirical interest in the industry unless highly efficient and effective catalysts, in terms of both specific activity and operational lifetime have been developed. In this work, bimetallic Ni-Pd on gamma alumina support have been developed for methane cracking process by using co-precipitation and incipient wetness impregnation method. The calcined catalysts were characterized to determine their morphologies and physico-chemical properties by using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Thermogravimetric Analysis. The results suggested that that the catalyst which is prepared by the co-precipitation method exhibits homogeneous morphology, higher surface area, have uniform nickel and palladium dispersion and higher thermal stability as compared to the catalyst which is prepared by wet impregnation method. This characteristics are significant to avoid deactivation of the catalysts due to sintering and carbon deposition during methane cracking process.

  19. Numerical simulation of hydrogen-air reacting flows in rectangular channels with catalytic surface reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Ryoichi S.; Abou-Ellail, Mohsen M.; Elhaw, Samer; Saeed Ibrahim, Mohamed

    2013-09-01

    In this work a prediction was numerically modeled for a catalytically stabilized thermal combustion of a lean homogeneous mixture of air and hydrogen. The mixture flows in a narrow rectangular channel lined with a thin coating of platinum catalyst. The solution using an in-house code is based on the steady state partial differential continuity, momentum and energy conservation equations for the mixture and species involved in the reactions. A marching technique is used along the streamwise direction to solve the 2-D plane-symmetric laminar flow of the gas. Two chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms were included; one for the gas phase reactions consisting of 17 elementary reactions; of which 7 are forward-backward reactions while the other mechanism is for the surface reactions—which are the prime mover of the combustion under a lean mixture condition—consisting of 16 elementary reactions. The results were compared with a former congruent experimental work where temperature was measured using thermocouples, while using PLIF laser for measuring water and hydrogen mole fractions. The comparison showed good agreement. More results for the velocities, mole fractions of other species were carried out across the transverse and along the streamwise directions providing a complete picture of overall mechanism—gas and surface—and on the production, consumptions and travel of the different species. The variations of the average OH mole fraction with the streamwise direction showed a sudden increase in the region where the ignition occurred. Also the rate of reactions of the entire surface species were calculated along the streamwise direction and a surface water production flux equation was derived by calculating the law of mass action's constants from the concentrations of hydrogen, oxygen and the rate of formation of water near the surface.

  20. [Study of hydrogen bonds in the "catalytic triad" of trypsin by NMR spectra at 1H, 13C, and 15N nuclei].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubeb, N S; Gindin, V A; Ligaĭ, S S; Smirnov, S N

    1994-05-01

    The 1H and 13C NMR of trypsin stabilized by chemical modification with a hydrophilic polymer have been obtained in a wide range of pH (1.0-11.0). The spectral features referred to some nuclei of the "catalytic triad" have been identified using different NMR techniques as well as chemical modification with selective reagents. It was found that the monoprotonation of this system results in a quasi-symmetrical hydrogen bond formed between the basic groups which provided explanation for the discrepancies between the experimental findings obtained by different authors concerning the protonation site in this catalytic system. Simulation of the catalytic triad by a 15N-labelled low molecular model suggests that an increase in the OH-group acidity is unaccompanied by a discrete double proton transfer; however, a smooth shift of the bridging protons from one basic atom to another occurs with quasi-symmetrical hydrogen bonds formed in intermediate cases. On the basis of experimental data a new concept has been proposed for the mechanism of acid-base catalysis performed by pains of weak basic groups, such as His-Im and Asp(Glu)-COO- (pKa = 3-7) which are not capable of proton abstraction from alcoholic or water OH-groups (pKa > 13). The catalysis may consist in changing the charge densities on the reacting groups due to strong H-bonding and, on the other hand, in facilitating the free movement of a proton in the field of several basic atoms when going along the reaction coordinate. The energy of very strong hydrogen bonds thus formed diminishes the activation energy of the reaction.

  1. Energy distribution and transfer in flowing hydrogen microwave plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    This thesis is an experimental investigation of the physical and chemical properties of a hydrogen discharge in a flowing microwave plasma system. The plasma system is the mechanisms utilized in an electrothermal propulsion concept to convert electromagnetic energy into the kinetic energy of flowing hydrogen gas. The plasmas are generated inside a 20-cm ID resonant cavity at a driving frequency of 2.45 GHz. The flowing gas is contained in a coaxially positioned 22-mm ID quartz discharge tube. The physical and chemical properties are examined for absorbed powers of 20-100 W, pressures of 0.5-10 torr, and flow rates of 0-10,000 μ-moles/sec. A calorimetry system enclosing the plasma system to accurately measure the energy inputs and outputs has been developed. The rate of energy that is transferred to the hydrogen gas as it flows through the plasma system is determined as a function of absorbed power, pressure, and flow rate to +/-1.8 W from an energy balance around the system. The percentage of power that is transferred to the gas is found to increase with increasing flow rate, decrease with increasing pressure, and to be independent of absorbed power

  2. A study on the hydrogen recombination rates of catalytic recombiners and deliberate ignition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fineschi, F.; Bazzichi, M.; Carcassi, M.

    1994-01-01

    A study is being carried out by the Department of Nuclear and Mechanical Constructions (DCMN) at the University of Pisa on catalytic recombiners and on deliberately induced weak deflagration. The recombination rates of different types of catalytic devices were obtained from a thorough analysis of published experimental data. The main parameter that affects the effectiveness of these devices seems to be the molar density of the deficiency reactant rather than its volumetric concentration. The recombination rate of weak deflagrations in vented compartments has been assessed with experimental tests carried out in a small scale glass vessel. Through a computerized system of analysis of video recordings of the deflagrations, the flame surface and the burned gas volume were obtained as functions of time. Although approximations are inevitable, the method adopted to identify the position of the flame during propagation is more reliable than other non-visual methods (thermocouples and ion-probes). It can only easily be applied to vented weak deflagrations, i.e. when the hydrogen concentration is far from stoichiometric conditions and near to flammability limits, because the pressurization has to be limited due to the low mechanical resistance of the glass. The values of flame surface and burned gas volume were used as inputs for a computer code to calculate the recombining rate, the burning velocity and the pressure transient in the experimental test. The code is being validated with a methodology principally based on a comparison of the measurements of pressure with the calculated values. The research gave some very interesting results on a small scale which should in the future be compared with large scale data

  3. Catalytic activity of mono and bimetallic Zn/Cu/MWCNTs catalysts for the thermocatalyzed conversion of methane to hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdelyi, B. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, P.J. Šafárik University, Moyzesova 11, 041 54 Košice (Slovakia); Institute of Physics, Faculty of Science, P.J. Šafárik University, Park Angelium 9, 040 01 Košice (Slovakia); Oriňak, A., E-mail: andrej.orinak@upjs.sk [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, P.J. Šafárik University, Moyzesova 11, 041 54 Košice (Slovakia); Oriňaková, R. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, P.J. Šafárik University, Moyzesova 11, 041 54 Košice (Slovakia); Lorinčík, J. [Research Center Rez, Hlavní 130, 250 68 Husinec-Řež (Czech Republic); Jerigová, M. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina 842 15 Bratislava 4 (Slovakia); Velič, D. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Comenius University, Mlynská dolina 842 15 Bratislava 4 (Slovakia); International Laser Centre, Ilkovičová 3, 841 01 Bratislava (Slovakia); Mičušík, M. [Polymer institute, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravská cesta 9, 84541 Bratislava (Slovakia); and others

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Zn/Cu/MWCNTs catalyst with good activity. • Methane conversion to hydrogen with high effectivity. • ZnO/Cu responsible for catalytic activity. - Abstract: Mono and bimetallic multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) fortified with Cu and Zn metal particles were studied to improve the efficiency of the thermocatalytic conversion of methane to hydrogen. The surface of the catalyst and the dispersion of the metal particles were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). It was confirmed that the metal particles were successfully dispersed on the MWCNT surface and XPS analysis showed that the Zn was oxidised to ZnO at high temperatures. The conversion of methane to hydrogen during the catalytic pyrolysis was studied by pyrolysis gas chromatography using different amounts of catalyst. The best yields of hydrogen were obtained using pyrolysis conditions of 900 °C and 1.2 mg of Zn/Cu/MWCNT catalyst for 1.5 mL of methane.The initial conversion of methane to hydrogen obtained with Zn/Cu/MWCNTs was 49%, which represent a good conversion rate of methane to hydrogen for a non-noble metal catalyst.

  4. Hydrogen transfer preventive device in FBR power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshi, Yuichi.

    1987-01-01

    Purpose: To prevent transfer of hydrogen, etc. in FBR power plant. Constitution: Since H 2 permeates heat conduction pipes in a steam generator, it is necessary to eliminate all of permeation hydrogen, etc. by primary cold traps particularly in the case of saving the intermediate heat exchange. In view of the above, the heat conduction pipes of the steam generator are constituted as a double pipe structure and helium gases are recycled through the gaps thereof and hydrogen traps are disposed to the recycling path. H 2 released into water flowing through the inside of the inner pipe is permeated through the inner pipe and leached into the gap, but the leached H 2 is carried by the helium recycling stream to the hydrogen trap and then the H 2 stream removed with H 2 is returned to the gaps. In this way, the capacity of the primary cold traps disposed in the liquid sodium recycling circuit can be reduced remarkably and the capacity of the purifying device, if an intermediate heat exchanger is disposed, is also reduced to decrease the plant cost. Further, diffusion of deleterious gases from the primary to the secondary circuits can be prevented as well. (Kamimura, M.)

  5. Selective Catalytic Hydrogenation of Arenols by a Well-Defined Complex of Ruthenium and Phosphorus–Nitrogen PN3–Pincer Ligand Containing a Phenanthroline Backbone

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huaifeng; Wang, Yuan; Lai, Zhiping; Huang, Kuo-Wei

    2017-01-01

    Selective catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic compounds is extremely challenging using transition-metal catalysts. Hydrogenation of arenols to substituted tetrahydronaphthols or cyclohexanols has been reported only with heterogeneous catalysts. Herein, we demonstrate the selective hydrogenation of arenols to the corresponding tetrahydronaphthols or cyclohexanols catalyzed by a phenanthroline-based PN3-ruthenium pincer catalyst.

  6. Selective Catalytic Hydrogenation of Arenols by a Well-Defined Complex of Ruthenium and Phosphorus–Nitrogen PN3–Pincer Ligand Containing a Phenanthroline Backbone

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Huaifeng

    2017-05-30

    Selective catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic compounds is extremely challenging using transition-metal catalysts. Hydrogenation of arenols to substituted tetrahydronaphthols or cyclohexanols has been reported only with heterogeneous catalysts. Herein, we demonstrate the selective hydrogenation of arenols to the corresponding tetrahydronaphthols or cyclohexanols catalyzed by a phenanthroline-based PN3-ruthenium pincer catalyst.

  7. Charge transfer in proton-hydrogen collisions under Debye plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharya, Arka [Department of Mathematics, Burdwan University, Golapbag, Burdwan 713 104, West Bengal (India); Kamali, M. Z. M. [Centre for Foundation Studies in Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ghoshal, Arijit, E-mail: arijit98@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, Burdwan University, Golapbag, Burdwan 713 104, West Bengal (India); Department of Mathematics, Kazi Nazrul University, B.C.W. Campus, Asansol 713 304, West Bengal (India); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ratnavelu, K. [Department of Mathematics, Kazi Nazrul University, B.C.W. Campus, Asansol 713 304, West Bengal (India)

    2015-02-15

    The effect of plasma environment on the 1s → nlm charge transfer, for arbitrary n, l, and m, in proton-hydrogen collisions has been investigated within the framework of a distorted wave approximation. The effect of external plasma has been incorporated using Debye screening model of the interacting charge particles. Making use of a simple variationally determined hydrogenic wave function, it has been possible to obtain the scattering amplitude in closed form. A detailed study has been made to investigate the effect of external plasma environment on the differential and total cross sections for electron capture into different angular momentum states for the incident energy in the range of 20–1000 keV. For the unscreened case, our results are in close agreement with some of the most accurate results available in the literature.

  8. Hydrogen transfer reactions of interstellar Complex Organic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez-Barcia, S.; Russ, P.; Kästner, J.; Lamberts, T.

    2018-06-01

    Radical recombination has been proposed to lead to the formation of complex organic molecules (COMs) in CO-rich ices in the early stages of star formation. These COMs can then undergo hydrogen addition and abstraction reactions leading to a higher or lower degree of saturation. Here, we have studied 14 hydrogen transfer reactions for the molecules glyoxal, glycoaldehyde, ethylene glycol, and methylformate and an additional three reactions where CHnO fragments are involved. Over-the-barrier reactions are possible only if tunneling is invoked in the description at low temperature. Therefore the rate constants for the studied reactions are calculated using instanton theory that takes quantum effects into account inherently. The reactions were characterized in the gas phase, but this is expected to yield meaningful results for CO-rich ices due to the minimal alteration of reaction landscapes by the CO molecules. We found that rate constants should not be extrapolated based on the height of the barrier alone, since the shape of the barrier plays an increasingly larger role at decreasing temperature. It is neither possible to predict rate constants based only on considering the type of reaction, the specific reactants and functional groups play a crucial role. Within a single molecule, though, hydrogen abstraction from an aldehyde group seems to be always faster than hydrogen addition to the same carbon atom. Reactions that involve heavy-atom tunneling, e.g., breaking or forming a C-C or C-O bond, have rate constants that are much lower than those where H transfer is involved.

  9. Long-Range Electrostatics-Induced Two-Proton Transfer Captured by Neutron Crystallography in an Enzyme Catalytic Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlits, Oksana; Wymore, Troy; Das, Amit; Shen, Chen-Hsiang; Parks, Jerry M; Smith, Jeremy C; Weiss, Kevin L; Keen, David A; Blakeley, Matthew P; Louis, John M; Langan, Paul; Weber, Irene T; Kovalevsky, Andrey

    2016-04-11

    Neutron crystallography was used to directly locate two protons before and after a pH-induced two-proton transfer between catalytic aspartic acid residues and the hydroxy group of the bound clinical drug darunavir, located in the catalytic site of enzyme HIV-1 protease. The two-proton transfer is triggered by electrostatic effects arising from protonation state changes of surface residues far from the active site. The mechanism and pH effect are supported by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations. The low-pH proton configuration in the catalytic site is deemed critical for the catalytic action of this enzyme and may apply more generally to other aspartic proteases. Neutrons therefore represent a superb probe to obtain structural details for proton transfer reactions in biological systems at a truly atomic level. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Selective Catalytic Synthesis Using the Combination of Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen: Catalytic Chess at the Interface of Energy and Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klankermayer, Jürgen; Wesselbaum, Sebastian; Beydoun, Kassem; Leitner, Walter

    2016-06-20

    The present Review highlights the challenges and opportunities when using the combination CO2 /H2 as a C1 synthon in catalytic reactions and processes. The transformations are classified according to the reduction level and the bond-forming processes, covering the value chain from high volume basic chemicals to complex molecules, including biologically active substances. Whereas some of these concepts can facilitate the transition of the energy system by harvesting renewable energy into chemical products, others provide options to reduce the environmental impact of chemical production already in today's petrochemical-based industry. Interdisciplinary fundamental research from chemists and chemical engineers can make important contributions to sustainable development at the interface of the energetic and chemical value chain. The present Review invites the reader to enjoy this exciting area of "catalytic chess" and maybe even to start playing some games in her or his laboratory. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Radical species involved in hotwire (catalytic) deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Wengang; Gallagher, Alan

    2008-01-01

    Threshold ionization mass spectroscopy is used to measure the radicals that cause deposition of hydrogenated amorphous silicon by 'hotwire' (HW), or 'catalytic,' chemical vapor deposition. We provide the probability of silane (SiH 4 ) decomposition on the HW, and of Si and H release from the HW. The depositing radicals, and H atoms, are measured versus conditions to obtain their radical-silane reaction rates and contributions to film growth. A 0.01-3 Pa range of silane pressures and 1400-2400 K range of HW temperatures were studied, encompassing optimum device production conditions. Si 2 H 2 is the primary depositing radical under optimum conditions, accompanied by a few percent of Si atoms and a lot of H-atom reactions. Negligible SiH n radical production is observed and only a small flux of disilane is produced, but at the higher pressures some Si 3 H n is observed. A Si-SiH 4 reaction rate coefficient of 1.65 * 10 -11 cm 3 /s and a H + SiH 4 reaction rate coefficient of 5 * 10 -14 cm 3 /s are measured

  12. Proton-coupled electron transfer versus hydrogen atom transfer: generation of charge-localized diabatic states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirjoosingh, Andrew; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-03-24

    The distinction between proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) and hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) mechanisms is important for the characterization of many chemical and biological processes. PCET and HAT mechanisms can be differentiated in terms of electronically nonadiabatic and adiabatic proton transfer, respectively. In this paper, quantitative diagnostics to evaluate the degree of electron-proton nonadiabaticity are presented. Moreover, the connection between the degree of electron-proton nonadiabaticity and the physical characteristics distinguishing PCET from HAT, namely, the extent of electronic charge redistribution, is clarified. In addition, a rigorous diabatization scheme for transforming the adiabatic electronic states into charge-localized diabatic states for PCET reactions is presented. These diabatic states are constructed to ensure that the first-order nonadiabatic couplings with respect to the one-dimensional transferring hydrogen coordinate vanish exactly. Application of these approaches to the phenoxyl-phenol and benzyl-toluene systems characterizes the former as PCET and the latter as HAT. The diabatic states generated for the phenoxyl-phenol system possess physically meaningful, localized electronic charge distributions that are relatively invariant along the hydrogen coordinate. These diabatic electronic states can be combined with the associated proton vibrational states to generate the reactant and product electron-proton vibronic states that form the basis of nonadiabatic PCET theories. Furthermore, these vibronic states and the corresponding vibronic couplings may be used to calculate rate constants and kinetic isotope effects of PCET reactions.

  13. Data acquisition and quantitative analysis of stable hydrogen isotope in liquid and gas in the liquid phase catalytic exchange process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, H. J.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, K. R.; Cheong, H. S.; Ahn, D. H.; Lee, S. H.; Paek, S. W.; Kang, H. S.; Kim, J. G.

    2001-01-01

    A pilot plant for the Liquid Phase Catalytic Exchange process was built and has been operating to test the hydrophobic catalyst developed to remove the tritium generated at the CANDU nuclear power plants. The methods of quantitative analysis of hydrogen stable isotope were compared. Infrared spectroscopy was used for the liquid samples, and gas chromatography with hydrogen carrier gas showed the best result for gas samples. Also, a data acquisition system was developed to record the operation parameters. This record was very useful to investigate the causes of the system trip

  14. Catalytic Ammonia Decomposition over High-Performance Ru/Graphene Nanocomposites for Efficient COx-Free Hydrogen Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly-dispersed Ru nanoparticles were grown on graphene nanosheets by simultaneously reducing graphene oxide and Ru ions using ethylene glycol (EG, and the resultant Ru/graphene nanocomposites were applied as a catalyst to ammonia decomposition for COx-free hydrogen production. Tuning the microstructures of Ru/graphene nanocomposites was easily accomplished in terms of Ru particle size, morphology, and loading by adjusting the preparation conditions. This was the key to excellent catalytic activity, because ammonia decomposition over Ru catalysts is structure-sensitive. Our results demonstrated that Ru/graphene prepared using water as a co-solvent greatly enhanced the catalytic performance for ammonia decomposition, due to the significantly improved nano architectures of the composites. The long-term stability of Ru/graphene catalysts was evaluated for COx-free hydrogen production from ammonia at high temperatures, and the structural evolution of the catalysts was investigated during the catalytic reactions. Although there were no obvious changes in the catalytic activities at 450 °C over a duration of 80 h, an aggregation of the Ru nanoparticles was still observed in the nanocomposites, which was ascribed mainly to a sintering effect. However, the performance of the Ru/graphene catalyst was decreased gradually at 500 °C within 20 h, which was ascribed mainly to both the effect of the methanation of the graphene nanosheet under a H2 atmosphere and to enhanced sintering under high temperatures.

  15. Catalytic effect of additional metallic phases on the hydrogen absorption behavior of a Zr-Based alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, F; Peretti, H; Castro, E; Real, S; Visitin, A; Triaca, W

    2005-01-01

    The electrochemical hydrogen absorption of electrodes containing Zr 0 .9Ti 0 .1(Ni 0 .5Mn 0 .25Cr 0 .20V 0 .05) 2 is studied in alkaline media by monitoring the activation and discharge capacity along charge-discharge cycling.The considered alloy is tested in both as melted and annealed condition in order to investigate the catalytic effect of small amounts of micro segregated secondary phases of the Zr-Ni system. Since these catalytic phases are only present in the as melted alloys, tests are also carried out using a composite material elaborated from powders of the annealed alloy with the addition of 18 wt.% of the suspected catalytic phases, melted separately.The hydrogen absorption-desorption behavior for the different cases is discussed and correlated with the metallurgical characterization of the materials.The catalytic effects are studied employing cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance techniques. The results are analyzed in terms of a developed physicochemical model

  16. Palladium-pyridyl catalytic films: a highly active and recyclable catalyst for hydrogenation of styrene under mild conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shuiying; Li, Weijin; Cao, Rong

    2015-03-01

    Palladium-pyridyl catalytic films, (PdCl2/bpy)n, were created by alternating immersions of a substrate in PdCl2 and bpy (bpy=4, 4'-bipyridyl) solutions. The as-prepared (PdCl2/bpy)10 catalyst demonstrated a remarkable catalytic activity toward hydrogenation of styrene under mild conditions and the turnover frequency (TOF) is as high as 6944h(-1). Pd(II) ions of (PdCl2/bpy)n films are in situ reduced to Pd nanoparticles (NPs) during the hydrogenation of styrene process, which results in the catalytic activity of the films. The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) further demonstrate that Pd(II) ions of (PdCl2/bpy)n films were gradually converted to Pd(0) states. The catalytic activity is related to bilayer numbers and the activity increases with the number of bilayers below 10 bilayers. The solid substrates coated with (PdCl2/bpy)n multilayer catalysts were easily removed from the reaction mixture without separation filtration. Moreover, (PdCl2/bpy)n catalysts were reused for 10 consecutive reactions without loss of activity. The present (PdCl2/bpy)n heterogeneous catalysts have the advantages of easy separation and good recyclability. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and 4-chlorophenol in the presence of modified activated carbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hsu-Hui; Lu, Ming-Chun; Chen, Jong-Nan; Lee, Cheng-Te

    2003-06-01

    The objective of this research was to examine the heterogeneous catalytic decomposition of H(2)O(2) and 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) in the presence of activated carbons modified with chemical pretreatments. The decomposition of H(2)O(2) was suppressed significantly by the change of surface properties including the decreased pH(pzc) modified with oxidizing agent and the reduced active sites occupied by the adsorption of 4-CP. The apparent reaction rate of H(2)O(2) decomposition was dominated by the intrinsic reaction rates on the surface of activated carbon rather than the mass transfer rate of H(2)O(2) to the solid surface. By the detection of chloride ion in suspension, the reduction of 4-CP was not only attributed to the advanced adsorption but also the degradation of 4-CP. The catalytic activity toward 4-CP for the activated carbon followed the inverse sequence of the activity toward H(2)O(2), suggesting that acidic surface functional group could retard the H(2)O(2) loss and reduce the effect of surface scavenging resulting in the increase of the 4-CP degradation efficiency. Few effective radicals were expected to react with 4-CP for the strong effect of surface scavenging, which could explain why the degradation rate of 4-CP observed in this study was so slow and the dechlorination efficiency was independent of the 4-CP concentration in aqueous phase. Results show that the combination of H(2)O(2) and granular activated carbon (GAC) did increase the total removal of 4-CP than that by single GAC adsorption.

  18. A conserved hydrogen-bond network in the catalytic centre of animal glutaminyl cyclases is critical for catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kai-Fa; Wang, Yu-Ruei; Chang, En-Cheng; Chou, Tsung-Lin; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2008-04-01

    QCs (glutaminyl cyclases; glutaminyl-peptide cyclotransferases, EC 2.3.2.5) catalyse N-terminal pyroglutamate formation in numerous bioactive peptides and proteins. The enzymes were reported to be involved in several pathological conditions such as amyloidotic disease, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and melanoma. The crystal structure of human QC revealed an unusual H-bond (hydrogen-bond) network in the active site, formed by several highly conserved residues (Ser(160), Glu(201), Asp(248), Asp(305) and His(319)), within which Glu(201) and Asp(248) were found to bind to substrate. In the present study we combined steady-state enzyme kinetic and X-ray structural analyses of 11 single-mutation human QCs to investigate the roles of the H-bond network in catalysis. Our results showed that disrupting one or both of the central H-bonds, i.e., Glu(201)...Asp(305) and Asp(248)...Asp(305), reduced the steady-state catalysis dramatically. The roles of these two COOH...COOH bonds on catalysis could be partly replaced by COOH...water bonds, but not by COOH...CONH(2) bonds, reminiscent of the low-barrier Asp...Asp H-bond in the active site of pepsin-like aspartic peptidases. Mutations on Asp(305), a residue located at the centre of the H-bond network, raised the K(m) value of the enzyme by 4.4-19-fold, but decreased the k(cat) value by 79-2842-fold, indicating that Asp(305) primarily plays a catalytic role. In addition, results from mutational studies on Ser(160) and His(319) suggest that these two residues might help to stabilize the conformations of Asp(248) and Asp(305) respectively. These data allow us to propose an essential proton transfer between Glu(201), Asp(305) and Asp(248) during the catalysis by animal QCs.

  19. Incorporating nitrogen atoms into cobalt nanosheets as a strategy to boost catalytic activity toward CO2 hydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liangbing; Zhang, Wenbo; Zheng, Xusheng; Chen, Yizhen; Wu, Wenlong; Qiu, Jianxiang; Zhao, Xiangchen; Zhao, Xiao; Dai, Yizhou; Zeng, Jie

    2017-11-01

    Hydrogenation of CO2 into fuels and useful chemicals could help to reduce reliance on fossil fuels. Although great progress has been made over the past decades to improve the activity of catalysts for CO2 hydrogenation, more efficient catalysts, especially those based on non-noble metals, are desired. Here we incorporate N atoms into Co nanosheets to boost the catalytic activity toward CO2 hydrogenation. For the hydrogenation of CO2, Co4N nanosheets exhibited a turnover frequency of 25.6 h-1 in a slurry reactor under 32 bar pressure at 150 °C, which was 64 times that of Co nanosheets. The activation energy for Co4N nanosheets was 43.3 kJ mol-1, less than half of that for Co nanosheets. Mechanistic studies revealed that Co4N nanosheets were reconstructed into Co4NHx, wherein the amido-hydrogen atoms directly interacted with the CO2 to form HCOO* intermediates. In addition, the adsorbed H2O* activated amido-hydrogen atoms via the interaction of hydrogen bonds.

  20. Copolymerization of Styrene and Methacrylates in the presence of Catalytic Chain Transfer Agents (Cacti's)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, M.Sakhawat; Khan, M.A.; Ahmad, Shafique

    2005-01-01

    The present paper focuses on the use of a Co (II) complex, [Co(afdo-H)] as a catalytic chain transfer agent (CCTA) for controlling molecular weight in copolymerization of styrene (STY) with butyl methacrylate (BMA) and methylmethacrylate (MMA). The catalyst is structurally similar to [co(dmg-H) (BF)] patented by Du Pont as a CCTA. Average catalytic chain transfer constant, C8 of [co(afdo-H) (BF)] for coplymerization of STY with BMA and MMA determined from Maya plot, was found to be in the range of 10-10.This value is lower than the value reported for the [Co(dmg-H)(BF)). In the case of STY-BMA or STY-MMA copolymerization, a considerable reduction in the viscosity average molecular weights (Mv) was observed in the copolymers. The average molecular weight of poly (MMA-BMA) was reduced by a factor of ten compared to the reduction in poly (STY-MMA) and poly (STY-BMA) for the same concentration of the CCTA. (author)

  1. Hydrogen storage evaluation based on investigations of the catalytic properties of metal/metal oxides in electrospun carbon fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Ji Sun; Lee, Young-Seak [Department of Fine Chemical Engineering and Chemistry, Chungnam National University, Daejeon 305-764 (Korea); Park, Soo-Jin [Department of Chemistry, Inha University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea); Kim, Taejin [Core Technology Research Center for Fuel Cell, Jeollabuk-do 561-844 (Korea)

    2009-05-15

    In order to investigate the catalytic capacity of metals and metal oxides based on electrospun carbon fibers for improving hydrogen storage, electrospinning and heat treatments were carried out to obtain metal/metal oxide-embedded carbon fibers. Although the fibers were treated with the same activation procedure, they had different pore structures, due to the nature of the metal oxide. When comparing the catalytic capacity of metal and metal oxide, metal exhibits better performance as a catalyst for the improvement of hydrogen storage, when considering the hydrogen storage system. When a metal oxide with an m.p. lower than the temperature of heat treatment was used, the metal oxide was changed to metal during the heat treatment, developing a micropore structure. The activation process produced a high specific surface area of up to 2900 m{sup 2}/g and a pore volume of up to 2.5 cc/g. The amount of hydrogen adsorption reached approximately 3 wt% at 100 bar and room temperature. (author)

  2. Energy Efficient Catalytic Activation of Hydrogen peroxide for Green Chemical Processes: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Terrence J.; Horwitz, Colin

    2004-11-12

    A new, highly energy efficient approach for using catalytic oxidation chemistry in multiple fields of technology has been pursued. The new catalysts, called TAML® activators, catalyze the reactions of hydrogen peroxide and other oxidants for the exceptionally rapid decontamination of noninfectious simulants (B. atrophaeus) of anthrax spores, for the energy efficient decontamination of thiophosphate pesticides, for the facile, low temperature removal of color and organochlorines from pulp and paper mill effluent, for the bleaching of dyes from textile mill effluents, and for the removal of recalcitrant dibenzothiophene compounds from diesel and gasoline fuels. Highlights include the following: 1) A 7-log kill of Bacillus atrophaeus spores has been achieved unambiguously in water under ambient conditions within 15 minutes. 2) The rapid total degradation under ambient conditions of four thiophosphate pesticides and phosphonate degradation intermediates has been achieved on treatment with TAML/peroxide, opening up potential applications of the decontamination system for phosphonate structured chemical warfare agents, for inexpensive, easy to perform degradation of stored and aged pesticide stocks (especially in Africa and Asia), for remediation of polluted sites and water bodies, and for the destruction of chemical warfare agent stockpiles. 3) A mill trial conducted in a Pennsylvanian bleached kraft pulp mill has established that TAML catalyst injected into an alkaline peroxide bleach tower can significantly lower color from the effluent stream promising a new, more cost effective, energy-saving approach for color remediation adding further evidence of the value and diverse engineering capacity of the approach to other field trials conducted on effluent streams as they exit the bleach plant. 4) Dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), including 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene, the most recalcitrant sulfur compounds in diesel and gasoline, can be completely removed from model gasoline

  3. Ruthenium supported on magnetic nanoparticles: An efficient and recoverable catalyst for hydrogenation of alkynes and transfer hydrogenation of carbonyl compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthenium supported on surface modified magnetic nanoparticles (NiFe2O4) has been successfully synthesized and applied for hydrogenation of alkynes at room temperature as well as transfer hydrogenation of a number of carbonyl compounds under microwave irradiation conditions. The ...

  4. Catalytic hydrolysis of ammonia borane for hydrogen generation using cobalt nanocluster catalyst supported on polydopamine functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, Ernest Evans; Li, Fang; Momade, Francis W.Y.; Kim, Hern

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen was generated from ammonia borane complex by hydrolysis using cobalt nanocluster catalyst supported on polydopamine functionalized MWCNTs (multi-walled carbon nanotubes). The impregnation-chemical reduction method was used for the preparation of the supported catalyst. The nanocluster catalyst support was formed by in-situ oxidative polymerization of dopamine on the MWCNTs in alkaline solution at room temperature. The structural and physical–chemical properties of the nanocluster catalyst were characterized by FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), EDX (energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), SEM (scanning electron microscope), XRD (X-ray diffraction) and TEM (transmission electron microscopy). The nanocluster catalyst showed good catalytic activity for the hydrogen generation from aqueous ammonia borane complex. A reusability test to determine the practical usage of the catalyst was also investigated. The result revealed that the catalyst maintained an appreciable catalytic performance and stability in terms of its reusability after three cycle of reuse for the hydrolysis reaction. Also, the activation energy for the hydrolysis of ammonia borane complex was estimated to be 50.41 kJmol −1 , which is lower than the values of some of the reported catalyst. The catalyst can be considered as a promising candidate in developing highly efficient portable hydrogen generation systems such as PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cells). - Highlights: • Co/Pdop-o-MWCNT (Pdop functionalized MWCNT supported cobalt nanocluster) catalyst was synthesized for hydrogen generation. • It is an active catalyst for hydrogen generation via hydrolysis of ammonia borane. • It showed good stability in terms of reusability for the hydrogen generation

  5. Effect of Co crystallinity on Co/CNT catalytic activity in CO/CO{sub 2} hydrogenation and CO disproportionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernyak, Sergei A., E-mail: chernyak.msu@gmail.com [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry, Leninskiye Gory 1-3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Department of Physical Chemistry, Leninsky Avenue 31, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Suslova, Evgeniya V.; Egorov, Alexander V.; Maslakov, Konstantin I. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry, Leninskiye Gory 1-3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Savilov, Serguei V.; Lunin, Valery V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry, Leninskiye Gory 1-3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Department of Physical Chemistry, Leninsky Avenue 31, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-30

    Highlights: • Amorphous and crystalline Co supported on CNTs were obtained by tuning of CNT surface. • CO and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation does not occur on amorphous Co particles. • Thermal activation of amorphous Co led to crystallization of metal. • Amorphous Co promotes CO disproportionation. • Carbon shells around the amorphous metal particles after the CO hydrogenation. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with different degree of surface oxidation were used as supports for 5 wt.% Co catalysts. CNTs and Co/CNT catalysts were analyzed by XPS, nitrogen adsorption, TEM and electron diffraction to reveal their structure. High oxidation degree of CNT surface (8.6 at.% of O) and low Co loading led to predominantly amorphous Co species. This resulted in the absence of catalytic activity in both CO and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation in opposite to the catalyst supported on less oxidized CNTs (5.4 at.% of O) where Co species were found to be crystalline. Thermal treatment of inactive catalyst in H{sub 2} and He led to the formation of Co crystal phase which was active in catalysis. Co particle size in catalyst supported on strongly oxidized CNTs was unchanged during CO hydrogenation in opposite to Co supported on less oxidized CNTs. Carbon shell formation on the surface of amorphous Co particles during CO hydrogenation was revealed, which testified CO disproportionation. Qualitative mechanism of CO hydrogenation on small Co particles was proposed.

  6. Charge transfer of O3+ ions with atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.G.; Stancil, P.C.; Turner, A.R.; Cooper, D.L.

    2003-01-01

    Charge transfer processes due to collisions of ground state O 3+ (2s 2 2p 2 P) ions with atomic hydrogen are investigated using the quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling (MOCC) method. The MOCC calculations utilize ab initio adiabatic potentials and nonadiabatic radial and rotational coupling matrix elements obtained with the spin-coupled valence-bond approach. Total and state-selective cross sections and rate coefficients are presented. Comparison with existing experimental and theoretical data shows our results to be in better agreement with the measurements than the previous calculations, although problems with some of the state-selective measurements are noted. Our calculations demonstrate that rotational coupling is not important for the total cross section, but for state-selective cross sections, its relevance increases with energy. For the ratios of triplet to singlet cross sections, significant departures from a statistical value are found, generally in harmony with experiment

  7. Charge transfer of O3+ ions with atomic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. G.; Stancil, P. C.; Turner, A. R.; Cooper, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    Charge transfer processes due to collisions of ground state O3+(2s22p 2P) ions with atomic hydrogen are investigated using the quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling (MOCC) method. The MOCC calculations utilize ab initio adiabatic potentials and nonadiabatic radial and rotational coupling matrix elements obtained with the spin-coupled valence-bond approach. Total and state-selective cross sections and rate coefficients are presented. Comparison with existing experimental and theoretical data shows our results to be in better agreement with the measurements than the previous calculations, although problems with some of the state-selective measurements are noted. Our calculations demonstrate that rotational coupling is not important for the total cross section, but for state-selective cross sections, its relevance increases with energy. For the ratios of triplet to singlet cross sections, significant departures from a statistical value are found, generally in harmony with experiment.

  8. Production of hydrogen, liquid fuels, and chemicals from catalytic processing of bio-oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, George W; Vispute, Tushar P; Routray, Kamalakanta

    2014-06-03

    Disclosed herein is a method of generating hydrogen from a bio-oil, comprising hydrogenating a water-soluble fraction of the bio-oil with hydrogen in the presence of a hydrogenation catalyst, and reforming the water-soluble fraction by aqueous-phase reforming in the presence of a reforming catalyst, wherein hydrogen is generated by the reforming, and the amount of hydrogen generated is greater than that consumed by the hydrogenating. The method can further comprise hydrocracking or hydrotreating a lignin fraction of the bio-oil with hydrogen in the presence of a hydrocracking catalyst wherein the lignin fraction of bio-oil is obtained as a water-insoluble fraction from aqueous extraction of bio-oil. The hydrogen used in the hydrogenating and in the hydrocracking or hydrotreating can be generated by reforming the water-soluble fraction of bio-oil.

  9. Furfural to Furfuryl Alcohol: Computational Study of the Hydrogen Transfer on Lewis Acidic BEA Zeolites and Effects of Cation Exchange and Tetravalent Metal Substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasertsab, Anittha; Maihom, Thana; Probst, Michael; Wattanakit, Chularat; Limtrakul, Jumras

    2018-06-04

    The hydrogen transfer of furfural to furfuryl alcohol with i-propanol as the hydrogen source over cation-exchanged Lewis acidic BEA zeolite has been investigated by means of density functional calculations. The reaction proceeds in three steps. First the O-H bond of i-propanol is broken to form a propoxide intermediate. After that, the furylmethoxy intermediate is formed via hydrogen transfer process, and finally furylmethoxy abstracts the proton to form the furfuryl alcohol product. The second step is rate-determining by requiring the highest activation energy (23.8 kcal/mol) if the reaction takes place on Li-Sn-BEA zeolite. We find that the catalytic activity of various cation-exchanged Sn-BEA zeolites is in the order Li-Sn-BEA > Na-Sn-BEA > K-Sn-BEA. The lower activation energy for Li-Sn-BEA compared to Na-Sn-BEA and K-Sn-BEA can be explained by the larger charge transfer from the carbonyl bond to the catalyst, leading to its activation and to the attraction of the hydrogen being transferred. The larger charge transfer in turn is due to the smaller gap between the energies of furfural HOMO and the zeolite LUMO in Li-Sn-BEA, compared to both Na-Sn-BEA and K-Sn-BEA. In a similar way, we also compare the catalytic activity of tetravalent metal centers (Sn, Zr, and Hf) substituted into BEA and find in the order Zr ≥ Hf > Sn, based on activation energies. Finally we investigate statistically which property of the reactants is a suitable descriptor for an approximative prediction of the reaction rate in order to be able to quickly screen promising catalytic materials for this reaction.

  10. Catalytic performance and durability of Ni/AC for HI decomposition in sulfur–iodine thermochemical cycle for hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Guangshi; He, Yong; Zhang, Yanwei; Zhu, Yanqun; Wang, Zhihua; Cen, Kefa

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The relation between Ni content and Ni particle dispersion were disclosed. • The effect of Ni content on the catalytic activity of Ni/AC catalyst was revealed. • The optimal content of Ni for Ni/AC catalysts in HI decomposition was found. - Abstract: This work reports the Ni content effect on the Ni/AC catalytic performance in the HI decomposition reaction of the sulfur–iodine (SI) thermochemical cycle for hydrogen production and the Ni/AC catalyst durability in a long-term test. Accordingly, five catalysts with the Ni content ranging from 5% to 15% were prepared by an incipient-wetness impregnation method. The activity of all catalysts was examined under the temperature range of 573–773 K. The catalytic performance evaluation suggests that Ni content plays a significant role in the Ni dispersion, Ni particle size, and eventually the catalytic activity in HI decomposition. 12% is the optimal Ni content for Ni/AC catalysts in HI decomposition which is balanced between poor dispersion of Ni particles and increasing active center. The results of 24 h durability test, which incorporated with BET and TEM investigations of the 12%Ni/AC catalyst before and after the reaction, indicate that establishing a better Ni particle dispersion pattern and improving the stability of Ni particles on the support should be considered in the future.

  11. Manganese-Oxygen Intermediates in O-O Bond Activation and Hydrogen-Atom Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Derek B; Massie, Allyssa A; Jackson, Timothy A

    2017-11-21

    Biological systems capitalize on the redox versatility of manganese to perform reactions involving dioxygen and its derivatives superoxide, hydrogen peroxide, and water. The reactions of manganese enzymes influence both human health and the global energy cycle. Important examples include the detoxification of reactive oxygen species by manganese superoxide dismutase, biosynthesis by manganese ribonucleotide reductase and manganese lipoxygenase, and water splitting by the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. Although these enzymes perform very different reactions and employ structurally distinct active sites, manganese intermediates with peroxo, hydroxo, and oxo ligation are commonly proposed in catalytic mechanisms. These intermediates are also postulated in mechanisms of synthetic manganese oxidation catalysts, which are of interest due to the earth abundance of manganese. In this Account, we describe our recent efforts toward understanding O-O bond activation pathways of Mn III -peroxo adducts and hydrogen-atom transfer reactivity of Mn IV -oxo and Mn III -hydroxo complexes. In biological and synthetic catalysts, peroxomanganese intermediates are commonly proposed to decay by either Mn-O or O-O cleavage pathways, although it is often unclear how the local coordination environment influences the decay mechanism. To address this matter, we generated a variety of Mn III -peroxo adducts with varied ligand environments. Using parallel-mode EPR and Mn K-edge X-ray absorption techniques, the decay pathway of one Mn III -peroxo complex bearing a bulky macrocylic ligand was investigated. Unlike many Mn III -peroxo model complexes that decay to oxo-bridged-Mn III Mn IV dimers, decay of this Mn III -peroxo adduct yielded mononuclear Mn III -hydroxo and Mn IV -oxo products, potentially resulting from O-O bond activation of the Mn III -peroxo unit. These results highlight the role of ligand sterics in promoting the formation of mononuclear products and mark an important

  12. A conceptual design of catalytic gasification fuel cell hybrid power plant with oxygen transfer membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Wangying; Han, Minfang

    2017-09-01

    A hybrid power generation system integrating catalytic gasification, solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), oxygen transfer membrane (OTM) and gas turbine (GT) is established and system energy analysis is performed. In this work, the catalytic gasifier uses steam, recycled anode off-gas and pure oxygen from OTM system to gasify coal, and heated by hot cathode off-gas at the same time. A zero-dimension SOFC model is applied and verified by fitting experimental data. Thermodynamic analysis is performed to investigate the integrated system performance, and system sensitivities on anode off-gas back flow ratio, SOFC fuel utilization, temperature and pressure are discussed. Main conclusions are as follows: (1) System overall electricity efficiency reaches 60.7%(HHV) while the gasifier operates at 700 °C and SOFC at 850 °C with system pressure at 3.04 bar; (2) oxygen enriched combustion simplify the carbon-dioxide capture process, which derives CO2 of 99.2% purity, but results in a penalty of 6.7% on system electricity efficiency; (3) with SOFC fuel utilization or temperature increasing, the power output of SOFC increases while GT power output decreases, and increasing system pressure can improve both the performance of SOFC and GT.

  13. Charge transfer between O6+ and atomic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y.; Stancil, P. C.; Liebermann, H. P.; Buenker, R. J.; Schultz, D. R.; Hui, Y.

    2011-05-01

    The charge exchange process has been found to play a dominant role in the production of X-rays and/or EUV photons observed in cometary and planetary atmospheres and from the heliosphere. Charge transfer cross sections, especially state-selective cross sections, are necessary parameters in simulations of X-ray emission. In the present work, charge transfer due to collisions of ground state O6+(1s2 1 S) with atomic hydrogen has been investigated theoretically using the quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling method (QMOCC). The multi-reference single- and double-excitation configuration interaction approach (MRDCI) has been applied to compute the adiabatic potential and nonadiabatic couplings, and the atomic basis sets used have been optimized with the method proposed previously to obtain precise potential data. Total and state-selective cross sections are calculated for energies between 10 meV/u and 10 keV/u. The QMOCC results are compared to available experimental and theoretical data as well as to new atomic-orbital close-coupling (AOCC) and classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) calculations. A recommended set of cross sections, based on the MOCC, AOCC, and CTMC calculations, is deduced which should aid in X-ray modeling studies.

  14. Effect of heat and mass transfer coefficients on the performance of automotive catalytic converters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamim, T. [Michigan Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Dearborn, MI (United States)

    2003-06-01

    This paper numerically investigates the role of heat and mass transfer coefficients on the performance of automotive catalytic converters, which are employed to reduce engine exhaust emissions. The pollutant conversion performance of a converter is influenced by a number of physical and chemical processes that take place in gaseous and solid phases as the exhaust gases flow through the catalyst. A quantitative predictive understanding of these complex catalyst processes involving flow dynamics, heterogeneous surface reactions and heat and mass transport mechanisms is important in improving the converter design. The role of convective transport phenomena becomes important at high temperature when the mass transfer becomes rate-limiting to an increasing extent. The objective of the present study is to elucidate the influence of convective heat and mass transfer coefficients (mechanisms). The mathematical model considers the conservation of mass, momentum and energy in both gaseous and solid phases. In addition to the heterogeneous surface reactions, the model also takes into account the adsorption/desorption of oxygen in the catalyst during non-stoichiometric composition of air/fuel mixtures. The governing equations are solved by an implicit scheme using a successive line under a relaxation method. The converter performance under the transient conditions as simulated by the US Federal Test Procedure (US-FTP) is analysed. (Author)

  15. Catalytic Hydrolysis of Ammonia Borane by Cobalt Nickel Nanoparticles Supported on Reduced Graphene Oxide for Hydrogen Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwen Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Well dispersed magnetically recyclable bimetallic CoNi nanoparticles (NPs supported on the reduced graphene oxide (RGO were synthesized by one-step in situ coreduction of aqueous solution of cobalt(II chloride, nickel (II chloride, and graphite oxide (GO with ammonia borane (AB as the reducing agent under ambient condition. The CoNi/RGO NPs exhibits excellent catalytic activity with a total turnover frequency (TOF value of 19.54 mol H2 mol catalyst−1 min−1 and a low activation energy value of 39.89 kJ mol−1 at room temperature. Additionally, the RGO supported CoNi NPs exhibit much higher catalytic activity than the monometallic and RGO-free CoNi counterparts. Moreover, the as-prepared catalysts exert satisfying durable stability and magnetically recyclability for the hydrolytic dehydrogenation of AB, which make the practical reusing application of the catalysts more convenient. The usage of the low-cost, easy-getting catalyst to realize the production of hydrogen under mild condition gives more confidence for the application of ammonia borane as a hydrogen storage material. Hence, this general method indicates that AB can be used as both a potential hydrogen storage material and an efficient reducing agent, and can be easily extended to facile preparation of other RGO-based metallic systems.

  16. Project of CO{sub 2} fixation and utilization using catalytic hydrogenation reaction for coping with the global environment issues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Discussions were given on a carbon dioxide fixing and utilizing project utilizing hydrogenating reaction by means of a catalytic method. In the discussions, development was made on such foundation technologies as CO2 separation by using Cardo type CO2 membrane, a technology to synthesize methanol through hydrogen addition by means of the catalytic method, and an electrolytic technology of membrane-electrode mixed type, as well as a methanol synthesis bench test of 50 kg/d scale. In order to develop this result into specific applications, demonstration tests are required that use methanol synthesizing pilot plants of 4 t/d and 80 t/d capacities. In addition, for the electric power to produce a huge amount of hydrogen, development is necessary on a solar energy utilizing technology of large scale and low cost. Furthermore, from the economic and social viewpoints, the achievements of this project are regarded to depend on understanding of the necessity of a policy of putting a large number of methanol fuel cell automobiles into use, and dealing with the global warming problem. Energy required to change CO2 into useful chemical substance requires five times as much energy as has been produced, hence prevention of the global warming through this channel is difficult. (NEDO)

  17. Preparation of Cu-Fe-Al-O nanosheets and their catalytic application in methanol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Leilei; Zhang, Fan; Miao, Dinghao; Zhang, Lei; Ren, Tiezhen; Hui, Xidong; He, Zhanbing

    2017-03-01

    Candidates of precious metal catalysts, prepared in a facile and environmental way and showing high catalytic performances at low temperatures, are always highly desired by industry. In this work, large-scale Cu-Fe-Al-O nanosheets were synthesized by facile dealloying of Al-Cu-Fe alloys in NaOH solution. The composition, microscopic morphology, and crystal structure were respectively investigated using wavelength-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy with an electron probe microanalyzer, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, we found that the 2D Cu-Fe-Al-O nanosheets gave excellent catalytic performances in hydrogen production by methanol steam reforming at relatively low temperatures, e.g. 513 K.

  18. Intermolecula transfer and elimination of molecular hydrogen in thermal reactions of unsaturated organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suria, Sabartanty [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-02-10

    Two reactions which are important to coal liquefaction include intermolecular transfer and the elimination of two hydrogen atoms. We have designed several model reactions to probe the viability of several hydrogen transfer and elimination pathways. This report described studies on these reactions using organic model compounds.

  19. Flame stability and heat transfer analysis of methane-air mixtures in catalytic micro-combustors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Junjie; Song, Wenya; Xu, Deguang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • The mechanisms of heat and mass transfer for loss of stability were elucidated. • Stability diagrams were constructed and design recommendations were made. • Flame characteristics were examined to determine extinction and blowout limits. • Heat loss greatly affects extinction whereas wall materials greatly affect blowout. • Radiation causes the flame to shift downstream. - Abstract: The flame stability and heat transfer characteristics of methane-air mixtures in catalytic micro-combustors were studied, using a two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model with detailed chemistry and transport. The effects of wall thermal conductivity, surface emissivity, fuel, flow velocity, and equivalence ratio were explored to provide guidelines for optimal design. Furthermore, the underlying mechanisms of heat and mass transfer for loss of flame stability were elucidated. Finally, stability diagrams were constructed and design recommendations were made. It was found that the heat loss strongly affects extinction, whereas the wall thermal conductivity greatly affects blowout. The presence of homogeneous chemistry extends blowout limits, especially for inlet velocities higher than 6 m/s. Increasing transverse heat transfer rate reduces stability, whereas increasing transverse mass transfer rate improves stability. Surface radiation behaves similarly to the heat conduction within the walls, but opposite trends are observed. High emissivity causes the flame to shift downstream. Methane exhibits much broader blowout limits. For a combustor with gap size of 0.8 mm, a residence time higher than 3 ms is required to prevent breakthrough, and inlet velocities lower than 0.8 m/s are the most desirable operation regime. Further increase of the wall thermal conductivity beyond 80 W/(m·K) could not yield an additional increase in stability.

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF CATALYTIC COMBUSTOR TURBULENCE AND ITS INFLUENCE ON VANE AND ENDWALL HEAT TRANSFER AND ENDWALL FILM COOLING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forrest E. Ames

    2002-10-01

    Endwall heat transfer distributions taken in a large-scale low speed linear cascade facility are documented for mock catalytic and dry low NOx (DLN) combustion systems. Inlet turbulence levels range from about 1.0 percent for the mock Catalytic combustor condition to 14 percent for the mock dry low NOx combustor system. Stanton number contours are presented at both turbulence conditions for Reynolds numbers based on true chord length and exit conditions ranging from 500,000 to 2,000,000. Catalytic combustor endwall heat transfer shows the influence of the complex three-dimensional flow field, while the effects of individual vortex systems are less evident for the mock dry low NOx cases. Turbulence scales have been documented for both cases. Inlet boundary layers are relatively thin for the mock catalytic combustor case while inlet flow approximates a channel flow with high turbulence for the mock DLN combustor case. Inlet boundary layer parameters are presented across the inlet passage for the three Reynolds numbers and both the mock catalytic and DLN combustor inlet cases. Both midspan and 95 percent span pressure contours are included. This research provides a well-documented database taken across a range of Reynolds numbers and turbulence conditions for assessment of endwall heat transfer predictive capabilities.

  1. Identification of intrinsic catalytic activity for electrochemical reduction of water molecules to generate hydrogen

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Insufficient hydronium ion activities at near-neutral pH and under unbuffered conditions induce diffusion-limited currents for hydrogen evolution, followed by a reaction with water molecules to generate hydrogen at elevated potentials. The observed

  2. Microscale Enhancement of Heat and Mass Transfer for Hydrogen Energy Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drost, Kevin [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Jovanovic, Goran [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Paul, Brian [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2015-09-30

    The document summarized the technical progress associated with OSU’s involvement in the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence. OSU focused on the development of microscale enhancement technologies for improving heat and mass transfer in automotive hydrogen storage systems. OSU’s key contributions included the development of an extremely compact microchannel combustion system for discharging hydrogen storage systems and a thermal management system for adsorption based hydrogen storage using microchannel cooling (the Modular Adsorption Tank Insert or MATI).

  3. Determination of molybdenum (VI) by its catalytic effect on the oxidation of nile blue by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensafi, Ali A.; Sadeghie, Majid M.; Alaie-Yazdie, F.

    1998-01-01

    A spectrophotometric reaction rate method for the determination of molybdenum is described, based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of nile blue by hydrogen peroxide. The decrease in absorbance of nile blue with time from 0.5 to 4 min at 590 nm is proportional to the concentration of Mo(VI) over the range 0.022-1000 μg/ml. The limit of detection of molybdenum(VI) is 0.008 μg/ml. The precision and the effect of more than forty ions are reported. The procedure has been successfully applied for the determination of molybdenum (VI) in plant materials and steel samples. (author)

  4. Enantioselective syntheses of aeruginosin 298-A and its analogues using a catalytic asymmetric phase-transfer reaction and epoxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Takashi; Gnanadesikan, Vijay; Shibuguchi, Tomoyuki; Fukuta, Yuhei; Nemoto, Tetsuhiro; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2003-09-17

    We developed a versatile synthetic process for aeruginosin 298-A as well as several attractive analogues, in which all stereocenters were controlled by a catalytic asymmetric phase-transfer reaction and epoxidation. Furthermore, drastic counteranion effects in phase-transfer catalysis were observed for the first time, making it possible to three-dimensionally fine-tune the catalyst (ketal part, aromatic part, and counteranion).

  5. Session 4: Combinatorial research of methane catalytic decomposition on supported nitride catalysts for CO-free hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jianghan, Shen; Hua, Wang; Zhongmin, Liu; Hongchao, Liu [Natural Gas Utilization and Applied Catalysis Lab., Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian P. R. (China)

    2004-07-01

    CO-free Hydrogen production is needed for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMs) because CO strongly poisons the anode-electrocatalysts. Methane directly catalytic decomposition is an attractive way to produce CO-free hydrogen for the large abundance of methane and its high H/C ratio. It is more effective to employ high-throughput screening (HTS) technology in heterogeneous catalysis. In this paper, a combinatorial multi-stream reaction system with online multi-stream mass spectrometer screening (MSMSS) detection technique was applied to study the decomposition of methane over supported MoN{sub x}O{sub y} catalysts (supports = Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}, SBA-15, ZSM-5,13X, and NaY), which is a catalyst system seldom reported recently. (authors)

  6. Ruthenium dioxide nanoparticles in ionic liquids: synthesis, characterization and catalytic properties in hydrogenation of olefins and arenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, Liane M.; Dupont, Jairton; Machado, Giovanna; Fichtner, Paulo F.P.; Radtke, Claudio; Baumvol, Israel J.R.; Teixeira, Sergio R.

    2004-01-01

    The reaction of NaBH 4 with RuCl 3 dissolved in 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate (BMI.PF 6 ) ionic liquid is a simple and reproducible method for the synthesis of stable RuO 2 nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution within 2-3 nm. RuO 2 nanoparticles were characterized by XRD, XPS, EDS and TEM. These nanoparticles showed high catalytic activity either in the solventless or liquid-liquid biphasic hydrogenation of olefins and arenes under mild reaction conditions. Hg(0) and CS 2 poisoning experiments and XRD and TEM analysis of particles isolated after catalysis indicated the formation of Ru(0) nanoparticles. The nanoparticles could be re-used in solventless conditions up to 10 times in the hydrogenation of 1-hexene yielding a total turnover number for exposed Ru atoms of 175,000. (author)

  7. A compact process for the treatment of olive mill wastewater by combining wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation and biological techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azabou, Samia; Najjar, Wahiba; Bouaziz, Mohamed; Ghorbel, Abdelhamid; Sayadi, Sami

    2010-01-01

    A system based on combined actions of catalytic wet oxidation and microbial technologies for the treatment of highly polluted OMW containing polyphenols was studied. The wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) process has been investigated in the semi-batch mode at atmospheric pressure, using aluminium-iron-pillared inter layer clay ((Al-Fe)PILC), under two different catalytic processes: ((Al-Fe)PILC/H 2 O 2 /ultraviolet radiations) at 25 deg. C and ((Al-Fe)PILC/H 2 O 2 ) at 50 deg. C. The results show that raw OMW was resistant to the photocatalytic process. However ((Al-Fe)PILC/H 2 O 2 ), system operating at 50 deg. C reduced considerably the COD, colour and total phenolic contents, and thus decreased the inhibition of the marine photobacteria Vibrio fischeri luminescence by 70%. This study also examined the feasibility of coupling WHPCO and anaerobic digestion treatment. Biomethanisation experiments performed with raw OMW or pre-treated OMW proved that pre-treatments with ((Al-Fe)PILC/H 2 O 2 ) system, for more than 2 h, resulted in higher methane production. Both untreated OMW as well as 2-h pre-treated OMW revealed as toxic to anaerobic bacteria.

  8. Catalytic oxidative desulfurization of diesel utilizing hydrogen peroxide and functionalized-activated carbon in a biphasic diesel-acetonitrile system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haw, Kok-Giap; Bakar, Wan Azelee Wan Abu; Ali, Rusmidah; Chong, Jiunn-Fat [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia); Kadir, Abdul Aziz Abdul [Department of Petroleum Engineering, Faculty of Chemical and Natural Resources Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM Skudai, Johor (Malaysia)

    2010-09-15

    This paper presents the development of granular functionalized-activated carbon as catalysts in the catalytic oxidative desulfurization (Cat-ODS) of commercial Malaysian diesel using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. Granular functionalized-activated carbon was prepared from oil palm shell using phosphoric acid activation method and carbonized at 500 C and 700 C for 1 h. The activated carbons were characterized using various analytical techniques to study the chemistry underlying the preparation and calcination treatment. Nitrogen adsorption/desorption isotherms exhibited the characteristic of microporous structure with some contribution of mesopore property. The Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy results showed that higher activation temperature leads to fewer surface functional groups due to thermal decomposition. Micrograph from Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope showed that activation at 700 C creates orderly and well developed pores. Furthermore, X-ray Diffraction patterns revealed that pyrolysis has converted crystalline cellulose structure of oil palm shell to amorphous carbon structure. The influence of the reaction temperature, the oxidation duration, the solvent, and the oxidant/sulfur molar ratio were examined. The rates of the catalytic oxidative desulfurization reaction were found to increase with the temperature, and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/S molar ratio. Under the best operating condition for the catalytic oxidative desulfurization: temperature 50 C, atmospheric pressure, 0.5 g activated carbon, 3 mol ratio of hydrogen peroxide to sulfur, 2 mol ratio of acetic acid to sulfur, 3 oxidation cycles with 1 h for each cycle using acetonitrile as extraction solvent, the sulfur content in diesel was reduced from 2189 ppm to 190 ppm with 91.3% of total sulfur removed. (author)

  9. Enantioselective syntheses and biological studies of aeruginosin 298-A and its analogs: application of catalytic asymmetric phase-transfer reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Yuhei; Ohshima, Takashi; Gnanadesikan, Vijay; Shibuguchi, Tomoyuki; Nemoto, Tetsuhiro; Kisugi, Takaya; Okino, Tatsufumi; Shibasaki, Masakatsu

    2004-04-13

    Aeruginosin 298-A was isolated from the freshwater cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa (NIES-298) and is an equipotent thrombin and trypsin inhibitor. A variety of analogs were synthesized to gain insight into the structure-activity relations. We developed a versatile synthetic process for aeruginosin 298-A as well as several attractive analogs, in which all stereocenters were controlled by catalytic asymmetric phase-transfer reaction promoted by two-center asymmetric catalysts and catalytic asymmetric epoxidation promoted by a lanthanide-BINOL complex. Furthermore, serine protease inhibitory activities of aeruginosin 298-A and its analogs were examined.

  10. Prediction of Improved Performance of Catalytic Hydrogenation Reactor by Periodic Modulation of the Feed Rate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Staněk, Vladimír; Hanika, Jiří; Jiřičný, Vladimír; Stavárek, Petr; Tukač, V.; Lederer, J.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 3 (2009), s. 251-257 ISSN 1451-9372 R&D Projects: GA MPO FT-TA/039 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : trickle bed * feed modulation * catalytic reactor Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  11. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis of Biomass Impregnated with Potassium Phosphate in a Hydrogen Atmosphere for the Production of Phenol and Activated Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiang; Zhang, Zhen-xi; Wang, Xin; Guo, Hao-qiang; Cui, Min-shu; Yang, Yong-ping

    2018-01-01

    A new technique was proposed to co-produce phenol and activated carbon (AC) from catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass impregnated with K3PO4 in a hydrogen atmosphere, followed by activation of the pyrolytic solid residues. Lab-scale catalytic fast pyrolysis experiments were performed to quantitatively determine the pyrolytic product distribution, as well as to investigate the effects of several factors on the phenol production, including pyrolysis atmosphere, catalyst type, biomass type, catalytic pyrolysis temperature, and catalyst impregnation content. In addition, the pyrolytic solid residues were activated to prepare ACs with high specific surface areas. The results indicated that phenol could be obtained due to the synergistic effects of K3PO4 and hydrogen atmosphere, with the yield and selectivity reaching 5.3 wt% and 17.8% from catalytic fast pyrolysis of poplar wood with 8 wt% K3PO4 at 550°C in a hydrogen atmosphere. This technique was adaptable to different woody materials for phenol production. Moreover, gas product generated from the pyrolysis process was feasible to be recycled to provide the hydrogen atmosphere, instead of extra hydrogen supply. In addition, the pyrolytic solid residue was suitable for AC preparation, using CO2 activation method, the specific surface area was as high as 1,605 m2/g. PMID:29515994

  12. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass impregnated with potassium phosphate in a hydrogen atmosphere for the production of phenol and activated carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qiang; Zhang, Zhen-xi; Wang, Xin; Guo, Hao-qiang; Cui, Min-shu; Yang, Yong-ping

    2018-02-01

    A new technique was proposed to co-produce phenol and activated carbon (AC) from catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass impregnated with K3PO4 in a hydrogen atmosphere, followed by activation of the pyrolytic solid residues. Lab-scale catalytic fast pyrolysis experiments were performed to quantitatively determine the pyrolytic product distribution, as well as to investigate the effects of several factors on the phenol production, including pyrolysis atmosphere, catalyst type, biomass type, catalytic pyrolysis temperature, and catalyst impregnation content. In addition, the pyrolytic solid residues were activated to prepare ACs with high specific surface areas. The results indicated that phenol could be obtained due to the synergistic effects of K3PO4 and hydrogen atmosphere, with the yield and selectivity reaching 5.3 wt% and 17.8% from catalytic fast pyrolysis of poplar wood with 8 wt% K3PO4 at 550 oC in a hydrogen atmosphere. This technique was adaptable to different woody materials for phenol production. Moreover, gas product generated from the pyrolysis process was feasible to be recycled to provide the hydrogen atmosphere, instead of extra hydrogen supply. In addition, the pyrolytic solid residue was suitable for AC preparation, using CO2 activation method, the specific surface area was as high as 1605 m2/g.

  13. Comparison methods between methane and hydrogen combustion for useful transfer in furnaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghiea, V.V.

    2009-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of hydrogen use by industrial combustion are critically presented. Greenhouse effect due natural water vapors from atmosphere and these produced by hydrogen industrial combustion is critically analyzed, together with problems of gas fuels containing hydrogen as the relative largest component. A comparison method between methane and hydrogen combustion for pressure loss in burner feeding pipe, is conceived. It is deduced the ratio of radiation useful heat transfer characteristics and convection heat transfer coefficients from combustion gases at industrial furnaces and heat recuperators for hydrogen and methane combustion, establishing specific comparison methods. Using criterial equations special processed for convection heat transfer determination, a calculation generalizing formula is established. The proposed comparison methods are general valid for different gaseous fuels. (author)

  14. Efficient transfer hydrogenation reaction Catalyzed by a dearomatized PN 3P ruthenium pincer complex under base-free Conditions

    KAUST Repository

    He, Lipeng

    2012-03-01

    A dearomatized complex [RuH(PN 3P)(CO)] (PN 3PN, N′-bis(di-tert-butylphosphino)-2,6-diaminopyridine) (3) was prepared by reaction of the aromatic complex [RuH(Cl)(PN 3P)(CO)] (2) with t-BuOK in THF. Further treatment of 3 with formic acid led to the formation of a rearomatized complex (4). These new complexes were fully characterized and the molecular structure of complex 4 was further confirmed by X-ray crystallography. In complex 4, a distorted square-pyramidal geometry around the ruthenium center was observed, with the CO ligand trans to the pyridinic nitrogen atom and the hydride located in the apical position. The dearomatized complex 3 displays efficient catalytic activity for hydrogen transfer of ketones in isopropanol. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Activating basal-plane catalytic activity of two-dimensional MoS2 monolayer with remote hydrogen plasma

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Chia-Chin

    2016-09-10

    Two-dimensional layered transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) materials such as Molybdenum disufide (MoS2) have been recognized as one of the low-cost and efficient electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The crystal edges that account for a small percentage of the surface area, rather than the basal planes, of MoS2 monolayer have been confirmed as their active catalytic sites. As a result, extensive efforts have been developing in activating the basal planes of MoS2 for enhancing their HER activity. Here, we report a simple and efficient approach-using a remote hydrogen-plasma process-to creating S-vacancies on the basal plane of monolayer crystalline MoS2; this process can generate high density of S-vacancies while mainly maintaining the morphology and structure of MoS2 monolayer. The density of S-vacancies (defects) on MoS2 monolayers resulted from the remote hydrogen-plasma process can be tuned and play a critical role in HER, as evidenced in the results of our spectroscopic and electrical measurements. The H2-plasma treated MoS2 also provides an excellent platform for systematic and fundamental study of defect-property relationships in TMDs, which provides insights for future applications including electrical, optical and magnetic devices. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Enzyme catalytic resonance scattering spectral detection of trace hydrogen peroxide using guaiacol as substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiwen Huang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide oxidized guaiacol to form tetramer particles that exhibited a strong resonance scattering (RS peak at 530 nm in the presence of horseradish peroxidase (HRP in citric acid-Na2HPO4 buffer solution of pH 4.4. The RS peak increased when the concentration of hydrogen peroxide increased. The increased RS intensity (ΔI530 nm was linear to the hydrogen peroxide concentration in the range of 0.55-27.6 μM, with a linear regression equation of ΔI530 nm = 17.1C + 1.6, a relative coefficient of 0.9996 and a detection limit of 0.03 μM H2O2. This proposed method was applied to detect hydrogen peroxide in rain water, with sensitivity, selectivity, rapidity, and recovery of 98.0-104 %.

  17. Catalytic hydrogenation of alkyne and alkadiene impurities from alkenes. Practical and theoretical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaev, S A; Smirnov, V V; Zanaveskin, Leonid N; Zanaveskin, K L; Averyanov, Vyacheslav A

    2009-01-01

    The review is devoted to heterogeneous catalysts for selective hydrogenation of highly unsaturated impurities (dienes and acetylenes) in hydrocarbonic streams. The most promising systems are nanocomposites on the basis of palladium or gold.

  18. Hybrid fiber gratings coated with a catalytic sensitive layer for hydrogen sensing in air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caucheteur, Christophe; Debliquy, Marc; Lahem, Driss; Megret, Patrice

    2008-10-13

    Using hydrogen as fuel presents a potential risk of explosion and requires low cost and efficient leak sensors. We present here a hybrid sensor configuration consisting of a long period fiber grating (LPFG) and a superimposed uniform fiber Bragg grating (FBG). Both gratings are covered with a sensitive layer made of WO(3) doped with Pt on which H(2) undergoes an exothermic reaction. The released heat increases the temperature around the gratings. In this configuration, the LPFG favors the exothermic reaction thanks to a light coupling to the sensitive layer while the FBG reflects the temperature change linked to the hydrogen concentration. Our sensor is very fast and suitable to detect low hydrogen concentrations in air whatever the relative humidity level and for temperatures down to -50 degrees C, which is without equivalent for other hydrogen optical sensors reported so far.

  19. Investigation of tritium removal by means of organic compounds. Catalytic hydrogenation (tritiation) of linoleic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sharnouby, A.; Weichselgartner, H.

    1984-11-01

    In the presence of noble-metal catalysts unsaturated fatty acids such as eruic acid and linoleic acid capture hydrogen (and tritium) quantitatively. The hydrogenation reaction of eruic acid has already been reported. The experimental results of the reaction of hydrogen (and tritium) with linoleic acid are now discussed in this paper. Obviously, the use of linoleic acid shows some advantages compared with eruic acid: - the hydrogenation reaction is faster, - linoleic acid is liquid, so that the choice of additional solvents is easier, and - linoleic acid is a more or less cheap natural product, which is available from a series of seeds, so that the cost of a technical tritium removal plant is not increased by the basic chemical material. (orig.)

  20. Maximizing renewable hydrogen production from biomass in a bio/catalytic refinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westermann, Peter; Jørgensen, Betina; Lange, L.

    2007-01-01

    Biological production of hydrogen from biomass by fermentative or photofermentative microorganisms has been described in numerous research articles and reviews. The major challenge of these techniques is the low yield from fermentative production, and the large reactor volumes necessary for photo......Biological production of hydrogen from biomass by fermentative or photofermentative microorganisms has been described in numerous research articles and reviews. The major challenge of these techniques is the low yield from fermentative production, and the large reactor volumes necessary...

  1. Identification of intrinsic catalytic activity for electrochemical reduction of water molecules to generate hydrogen

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Insufficient hydronium ion activities at near-neutral pH and under unbuffered conditions induce diffusion-limited currents for hydrogen evolution, followed by a reaction with water molecules to generate hydrogen at elevated potentials. The observed constant current behaviors at near neutral pH reflect the intrinsic electrocatalytic reactivity of the metal electrodes for water reduction. This journal is © the Owner Societies.

  2. Renewable hydrogen production by catalytic steam reforming of peanut shells pyrolysis products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, R.J.; Chornet, E.; Czernik, S.; Feik, C.; French, R.; Phillips, S. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Abedi, J.; Yeboah, Y.D. [Clark Atlanta Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States); Day, D.; Howard, J. [Scientific Carbons Inc., Blakely, GA (United States); McGee, D. [Enviro-Tech Enterprises Inc., Matthews, NC (United States); Realff, M.J. [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2002-07-01

    A project was initiated to determine the feasibility of producing hydrogen from agricultural wastes at a cost comparable to methane-reforming technologies. It is possible that hydrogen can be produced cost competitively with natural gas reforming by integrating hydrogen production with existing waste product utilization processes. This report presents initial results of an engineering demonstration project involving the development of a steam reforming process by a team of government, industrial and academic organizations working at the thermochemical facility at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The process is to be used on the gaseous byproducts from a process for making activated carbon from densified peanut shells. The reactor is interfaced with a 20 kg/hour fluidized-bed fast pyrolysis system and takes advantage of process chemical analysis and computer control and monitoring capacity. The reactor will be tested on the pyrolysis vapors produced in the activated carbon process. The final phase of the project will look at the production of hydrogen through the conversion of residual CO to H{sub 2} over a shift catalyst and separating hydrogen from CO{sub 2} using pressure swing adsorption. The purified oxygen will be mixed with natural gas and used for transportation purposes. The study demonstrates the potential impact of hydrogen and bioenergy on the economic development and diversification of rural areas. 11 refs., 2 tabs., 5 figs.

  3. Catalytic Proton Coupled Electron Transfer from Metal Hydrides to Titanocene Amides, Hydrazides and Imides: Determination of Thermodynamic Parameters Relevant to Nitrogen Fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Iraklis; Chirik, Paul J

    2016-10-03

    The hydrogenolysis of titanium-nitrogen bonds in a series of bis(cyclopentadienyl) titanium amides, hydrazides and imides by proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) is described. Twelve different N-H bond dissociation free energies (BDFEs) among the various nitrogen-containing ligands were measured or calculated, and effects of metal oxidation state and N-ligand substituent were determined. Two metal hydride complexes, (η 5 -C 5 Me 5 )(py-Ph)Rh-H (py-Ph = 2-pyridylphenyl, [Rh]-H) and (η 5 -C 5 R 5 )(CO) 3 Cr-H ([Cr] R -H, R= H, Me) were evaluated for formal H atom transfer reactivity and were selected due to their relatively weak M-H bond strengths yet ability to activate and cleave molecular hydrogen. Despite comparable M-H BDFEs, disparate reactivity between the two compounds was observed and was traced to the vastly different acidities of the M-H bonds and overall redox potentials of the molecules. With [Rh]-H, catalytic syntheses of ammonia, silylamine and N,N-dimethylhydrazine have been accomplished from the corresponding titanium(IV) complex using H 2 as the stoichiometric H atom source. The data presented in this study provides the thermochemical foundation for the synthesis of NH 3 by proton coupled electron transfer at a well-defined transition metal center.

  4. H2CAP - Hydrogen assisted catalytic biomass pyrolysis for green fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndal, Trine Marie Hartmann; Høj, Martin; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2014-01-01

    Pyrolysis of biomass produces a high yield of condensable oil at moderate temperature and low pressure.This bio-oil has adverse properties such as high oxygen and water contents, high acidity and immiscibility with fossil hydrocarbons. Catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) is a promising technology...... that can be used to upgrade the crude bio-oil to fuel-grade oil. The development of the HDO process is challenged by rapid catalyst deactivation, instability of the pyrolysis oil, poorly investigated reaction conditions and a high complexity and variability of the input oil composition. However, continuous...... catalytic hydropyrolysis coupled with downstream HDO of the pyrolysis vapors before condensation shows promise (Figure 1). A bench scale experimental setup will be constructed for the continuous conversion of solid biomass (100g /h) to low oxygen, fuel-grade bio-oil. The aim is to provide a proof...

  5. Combustion of hydrogen-air in micro combustors with catalytic Pt layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang Wang; Zhijun Zhou; Weijuan Yang; Junhu Zhou; Jianzhong Liu; Zhihua Wang; Cen, Kefa [State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang (China)

    2010-06-15

    Micro power generators have high power density. However, their key components micro combustors have low stability. In this experiment, catalyst is applied to improve the stability. The catalytic micro combustor is made from an alumina ceramic tube. It has inner diameter of 1 mm, outer diameter of 2.02 mm and length of 24.5 mm. It is prepared through impregnation of aqueous solution of H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}. The flammability limits and surface temperatures under different operation conditions are measured. The flow rates range from 0.08 to 0.4 L/min. According to the experimental results, catalyst is effective to inhibit extinction. For example, At 0.8 L/min, the stability limit is 0.193-14.9 in the non-catalytic combustor. After applying catalyst, the lean limit is near 0, and the rich limit is 29.3. But catalyst is less effective to inhibit blow out. Increasing flow rates also inhibits extinction. In the non-catalytic combustor, while the flow rates increase from 0.08 to 0.2 L/min, the lean stability limit decreases from 0.193 to 0.125. The experimental results indicate that catalyst induces shift downstream in the stoichiometric and rich cases. The numeric simulation verifies that the heterogeneous reaction weakens the homogeneous reaction through consuming fuels. Thus, the insufficient heat recirculation makes the reaction region shift downstream. However, lean mixture has intense reaction in the catalytic combustor. It is attributed to the high mass diffusion and low thermal diffusion of lean mixture. (author)

  6. Combustion of hydrogen-air in micro combustors with catalytic Pt layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yang; Zhou Zhijun [State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang (China); Yang Weijuan, E-mail: 10508107@zju.edu.c [State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang (China); Zhou Junhu; Liu Jianzhong; Wang Zhihua; Cen Kefa [State Key Laboratory of Clean Energy Utilization, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, Zhejiang (China)

    2010-06-15

    Micro power generators have high power density. However, their key components micro combustors have low stability. In this experiment, catalyst is applied to improve the stability. The catalytic micro combustor is made from an alumina ceramic tube. It has inner diameter of 1 mm, outer diameter of 2.02 mm and length of 24.5 mm. It is prepared through impregnation of aqueous solution of H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6}. The flammability limits and surface temperatures under different operation conditions are measured. The flow rates range from 0.08 to 0.4 L/min. According to the experimental results, catalyst is effective to inhibit extinction. For example, At 0.8 L/min, the stability limit is 0.193-14.9 in the non-catalytic combustor. After applying catalyst, the lean limit is near 0, and the rich limit is 29.3. But catalyst is less effective to inhibit blow out. Increasing flow rates also inhibits extinction. In the non-catalytic combustor, while the flow rates increase from 0.08 to 0.2 L/min, the lean stability limit decreases from 0.193 to 0.125. The experimental results indicate that catalyst induces shift downstream in the stoichiometric and rich cases. The numeric simulation verifies that the heterogeneous reaction weakens the homogeneous reaction through consuming fuels. Thus, the insufficient heat recirculation makes the reaction region shift downstream. However, lean mixture has intense reaction in the catalytic combustor. It is attributed to the high mass diffusion and low thermal diffusion of lean mixture.

  7. Combustion of hydrogen-air in micro combustors with catalytic Pt layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yang; Zhou Zhijun; Yang Weijuan; Zhou Junhu; Liu Jianzhong; Wang Zhihua; Cen Kefa

    2010-01-01

    Micro power generators have high power density. However, their key components micro combustors have low stability. In this experiment, catalyst is applied to improve the stability. The catalytic micro combustor is made from an alumina ceramic tube. It has inner diameter of 1 mm, outer diameter of 2.02 mm and length of 24.5 mm. It is prepared through impregnation of aqueous solution of H 2 PtCl 6 . The flammability limits and surface temperatures under different operation conditions are measured. The flow rates range from 0.08 to 0.4 L/min. According to the experimental results, catalyst is effective to inhibit extinction. For example, At 0.8 L/min, the stability limit is 0.193-14.9 in the non-catalytic combustor. After applying catalyst, the lean limit is near 0, and the rich limit is 29.3. But catalyst is less effective to inhibit blow out. Increasing flow rates also inhibits extinction. In the non-catalytic combustor, while the flow rates increase from 0.08 to 0.2 L/min, the lean stability limit decreases from 0.193 to 0.125. The experimental results indicate that catalyst induces shift downstream in the stoichiometric and rich cases. The numeric simulation verifies that the heterogeneous reaction weakens the homogeneous reaction through consuming fuels. Thus, the insufficient heat recirculation makes the reaction region shift downstream. However, lean mixture has intense reaction in the catalytic combustor. It is attributed to the high mass diffusion and low thermal diffusion of lean mixture.

  8. Preparation and characterization of LTA-type zeolite framework dispersed ruthenium nanoparticles and their catalytic application in the hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia–borane for efficient hydrogen generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahmakiran, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Ru(0)NPs-ZK-4 were prepared and characterized by advanced analytical techniques. ► They achieve the hydrolysis of ammonia-borane with TOF = 5410 h −1 and TTO = 36700. ► They maintain 85% of their activity even at the fifth catalytic run. - Abstract: The safe and efficient hydrogen storage and production are major obstacles to use hydrogen as an energy carrier. Therefore, significant efforts have been focused on the development of new materials for the chemical hydrogen storage and production. Of particular importance, ammonia–borane (NH 3 BH 3 ) is emerging as one of the most promising solid hydrogen carrier due to its high gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity (19.6 wt.%) and low molecular weight (30.8 g/mol). ammonia–borane can release hydrogen gas upon catalytic hydrolysis under mild conditions. Herein, the discovery of a new catalytic material, ruthenium nanoparticles stabilized by ZK-4 zeolite framework, for this important reaction has been reported. This new catalyst system was prepared by borohydride reduction of ruthenium(III)-exchanged ZK-4 zeolite in water at room temperature. The characterization of the resulting material by advanced analytical tools shows the formation of ZK-4 zeolite dispersed ruthenium nanoparticles (2.9 ± 0.9 nm). The catalytic performance of the resulting supported ruthenium nanoparticles depending on activity, lifetime and reusability was demonstrated in the hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia–borane. They were found to be highly active (initial TOF = 5410 h −1 ), long-lived (TTO = 36,700) and reusable catalyst (retaining of >85% of initial activity in the 5th reuse) in this important catalytic reaction at room temperature under air.

  9. Study on hydrogen transfer in coal liquefaction by tritium and carbon-14 tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitoh, Osamu; Kabe, Toshiaki; Kabe, Yaeko.

    1985-01-01

    For the analysis of mechanism of hydrogenation and cracking of coal, the liquefaction of Taiheiyo coal using tritium labeled gaseous hydrogen and tritium labeled tetralin with small amounts of carbon-14 labeled naphthalene has been studied. Taiheiyo coal(25g) was thermally decomposed in tetralin or naphthalene solvent(75g) at 400--440 0 C under the initial hydrogen pressure of 5.9MPa for 30min with Ni-Mo-Al 2 O 3 catalyst(0--5g). The reaction mixture in an autoclave was separated by filtration, distillation and solvent extraction. Produced gas, oils and the solvent were analyzed by gas chromatography. The tritium and carbon-14 contents of separated reaction products were measured with a liquid scintilation counter to study the hydrogen transfer mechanism. The distribution of reaction products and the amount of hydrogen transfer from gas or solvent to the products were also determined. In hydrogen donor solvent such as tetralin, the coal liquefaction yield was independent from the catalyst, but the catalyst was effective in hydrocracking of preasphaltene and asphaltene. In naphthalene solvent, the coal liquefaction reaction hardly occured in the absence of the catalyst, because hydrogen transfer from both the solvent and gaseous hydrogen was scarce. Tritium distribution in the reaction products showed that complicated hydrogen exchange reactions between gaseous hydrogen, coal liquids and solvent came out by the presence of coal liquids and catalyst. The very small amounts of carbon-14 transferred to the liquefaction products showed that carbon exchange or transfer between solvent and coal did not take place. (author)

  10. Size Control of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Using Reverse Microemulsion Method: Morphology, Reduction, and Catalytic Activity in CO Hydrogenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Housaindokht

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by microemulsion method and evaluated in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The precipitation process was performed in a single-phase microemulsion operating region. Different HLB values of surfactant were prepared by mixing of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS and Triton X-100. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, surface area, pore volume, average pore diameter, pore size distribution, and XRD patterns were used to analyze size distribution, shape, and structure of precipitated hematite nanoparticles. Furthermore, temperature programmed reduction (TPR and catalytic activity in CO hydrogenation were implemented to assess the performance of the samples. It was found that methane and CO2 selectivity and also the syngas conversion increased as the HLB value of surfactant decreased. In addition, the selectivity to heavy hydrocarbons and chain growth probability (α decreased by decreasing the catalyst crystal size.

  11. Catalytic activity of Pd-doped Cu nanoparticles for hydrogenation as a single-atom-alloy catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xinrui; Fu, Qiang; Luo, Yi

    2014-05-14

    The single atom alloy of extended surfaces is known to provide remarkably enhanced catalytic performance toward heterogeneous hydrogenation. Here we demonstrate from first principles calculations that this approach can be extended to nanostructures, such as bimetallic nanoparticles. The catalytic properties of the single-Pd-doped Cu55 nanoparticles have been systemically examined for H2 dissociation as well as H atom adsorption and diffusion, following the concept of single atom alloy. It is found that doping a single Pd atom at the edge site of the Cu55 shell can considerably reduce the activation energy of H2 dissociation, while the single Pd atom doped at the top site or in the inner layers is much less effective. The H atom adsorption on Cu55 is slightly stronger than that on the Cu(111) surface; however, a larger nanoparticle that contains 147 atoms could effectively recover the weak binding of the H atoms. We have also investigated the H atom diffusion on the 55-atom nanoparticle and found that spillover of the produced H atoms could be a feasible process due to the low diffusion barriers. Our results have demonstrated that facile H2 dissociation and weak H atom adsorption could be combined at the nanoscale. Moreover, the effects of doping one more Pd atom on the H2 dissociation and H atom adsorption have also been investigated. We have found that both the doping Pd atoms in the most stable configuration could independently exhibit their catalytic activity, behaving as two single-atom-alloy catalysts.

  12. Modeling and Simulation of the Hydrogenation of α-Methylstyrene on Catalytically Active Metal Foams as Tubular Reactor Packing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Lali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a one-dimensional reactor model for a tubular reactor packed with a catalytically active foam packing with a pore density of 30 PPI in cocurrent upward flow in the example of hydrogenation reaction of α-methylstyrene to cumene. This model includes material, enthalpy, and momentum balances as well as continuity equations. The model was solved within the parameter space applied for experimental studies under assumption of a bubbly flow. The method of orthogonal collocation on finite elements was applied. For isothermal and polytropic processes and steady state conditions, axial profiles for concentration, temperature, fluid velocities, pressure, and liquid holdup were computed and the conversions for various gas and liquid flow rates were validated with experimental results. The obtained results were also compared in terms of space time yield and catalytic activity with experimental results and stirred tank and also with random packed bed reactor. The comparison shows that the application of solid foams as reactor packing is advantageous compared to the monolithic honeycombs and random packed beds.

  13. Catalytic reduction of nitrate and nitrite ions by hydrogen : investigation of the reaction mechanism over Pd and Pd-Cu catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilinitch, OM; Nosova, LV; Gorodetskii, VV; Ivanov, VP; Trukhan, SN; Gribov, EN; Bogdanov, SV; Cuperus, FP

    2000-01-01

    The catalytic behavior of mono- and bimetallic catalysts with Pd and/or Cu supported over gamma-Al2O3 in the reduction of aqueous nitrate and nitrite ions by hydrogen was investigated. The composition of the supported metal catalysts was analysed using secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and

  14. Negative Effect of Calcination to Catalytic Performance of Coal Char-loaded TiO2 Catalyst in Styrene Oxidation with Hydrogen Peroxide as Oxidant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhamad Nurhadi

    2018-01-01

    How to Cite: Nurhadi, M., Kusumawardani, R., Nur, H. (2018. Negative Effect of Calcination to Catalytic Performance of Coal Char-loaded TiO2 Catalyst in Styrene Oxidation with Hydrogen Peroxide as Oxidant. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 13 (1: 113-118 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.13.1.1171.113-118

  15. Facile synthesis of polypyrrole functionalized nickel foam with catalytic activity comparable to Pt for the poly-generation of hydrogen and electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tiantian; Li, Kan; Shen, Zhemin; Sun, Tonghua; Wang, Yalin; Jia, Jinping

    2016-01-01

    Polypyrrole functionalized nickel foam is facilely prepared through the potentiostatic electrodeposition. The PPy-functionalized Ni foam functions as a hydrogen-evolution cathode in a rotating disk photocatalytic fuel cell, in which hydrogen energy and electric power are generated by consuming organic wastes. The PPy-functionalized Ni foam cathode exhibits stable catalytic activities after thirteen continuous runs. Compared with net or plate structure, the Ni foam with a unique three-dimensional reticulate structure is conducive to the electrodeposition of PPy. Compared with Pt-group electrode, PPy-coated Ni foam shows a satisfactory catalytic performance for the H2 evolution. The combination of PPy and Ni forms a synergistic effect for the rapid trapping and removal of proton from solution and the catalytic reduction of proton to hydrogen. The PPy-functionalized Ni foam could be applied in photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical generation of H2. In all, we report a low cost, high efficient and earth abundant PPy-functionalized Ni foam with a satisfactory catalytic activities comparable to Pt for the practical application of poly-generation of hydrogen and electricity.

  16. Hydrogen-bond dynamics and proton transfer in nanoconfinement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Loop, T.H.

    2015-01-01

    Proton transfer is of fundamental importance to both biology and chemistry. Much is known about proton transfer in large water volumes but often proton transfer reactions take place in very small nanometer sized volumes for example between lipid layers and in proton channels in mitochondria and

  17. Regularities of catalytic reactions of hydrogen, ethane and ethylene with elementary sulfur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zazhigalov, V.A.

    1978-01-01

    Shown is the decisive role of metal-sulfur bond stability for activity determination of metal sulfides (WS 2 , MoS 2 , CdS) in interaction reactions of elementary sulfur and hydrogen, ethane and ethylene. Found is the regularity of changing the relative reactiveness of the given substances and a conclusion is made about uniformity of the investigated catalyst processes. The results of hydrogen, ethane and ethylene oxidation by oxygen and sulfur are compared, the semilarity of these processes being pointed out

  18. Heat transfer comparison between methane and hydrogen in a spark ignited engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierens, Roger; Demuynck, Joachim; Paepe, Michel de; Verhelst, Sebastian [Ghent Univ. (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    Hydrogen is one of the alternative fuels which are being investigated at Ghent University. NO{sub x} emissions will occur at high engine loads and they are a constraint for power and efficiency optimization. The formation of NO{sub x} emissions is temperature dependent. Consequently, the heat transfer from the burning gases to the cylinder walls has to be accurately modelled if precise computer calculations of the emissions are wanted. Several engine heat transfer models exist but they have been cited to be inaccurate for hydrogen. We have measured the heat flux in a spark ignited engine with a commercially available heat flux sensor. This paper investigates the difference between the heat transfer of hydrogen and a fossil fuel, in this case methane. Measurements with the same indicated power output are compared and the effect of the heat loss on the indicated efficiency is investigated. The power output of hydrogen combustion is lowered by burning lean in contrast to using a throttle in the case of methane. Although the peak in the heat flux of hydrogen is 3 times higher compared to methane for a high engine power output, the indicated efficiency is only 3% lower. The heat loss for hydrogen at a low engine load is smaller than that of methane which results in a higher indicated efficiency. The richness of the hydrogen-air mixture has a great influence on the heat transfer process in contrast to the in-cylinder mass in the case of methane. (orig.)

  19. Numerical study of the behavior of methane-hydrogen/air pre-mixed flame in a micro reactor equipped with catalytic segmented bluff body

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baigmohammadi, Mohammadreza; Tabejamaat, Sadegh; Zarvandi, Jalal

    2015-01-01

    In this work, combustion characteristics of premixed methane-hydrogen/air in a micro reactor equipped with a catalytic bluff body is investigated numerically. In this regard, the detailed chemistry schemes for gas phase (homogeneous) and the catalyst surface (heterogeneous) are used. The applied catalytic bluff body is coated with a thin layer of platinum (Pt) on its surface. Also, the lean reactive mixture is entered to the reactor with equivalence ratio 0.9. The results of this study showed that the use of catalytic bluff body in the center of a micro reactor can significantly increase the flame stability, especially at high velocities. Moreover, it is found that a catalytic bluff body with several cavities on its surface and also high thermal conductivity improves the flame stability more than a catalytic bluff body without cavities and low thermal conductivity. Finally, it is maintained that the most advantage of using the catalytic bluff body is its easy manufacturing process as compared to the catalytic wall. This matter seems to be more prevalent when we want to create several cavities with various sizes on the bluff-body. - Highlights: • Presence of a bluff body in a micro reactor can move the flame towards the upstream. • Catalytic bluff body can significantly increase flame stability at high velocities. • Creating non-catalytic cavities on the bluff body promotes homogeneous reactions. • Segmented catalytic bluff body improves the flame stability more than a simple one. • Creating the segments on a bluff body is easier compared to a wall

  20. Sustainable hydrogen from bio-oil - Catalytic steam reforming of acetic acid as a model oxygenate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Seshan, K.; Lefferts, Leon; Aika, Ken-ichi

    2004-01-01

    Steam reforming of acetic acid as a model oxygenate present in bio-oil over Pt/ZrO2 catalysts has been studied. Pt/ZrO2 catalysts are very active, completely converting acetic acid and give hydrogen yield close to thermodynamic equilibrium. The catalyst deactivated by formation of oligomers, which

  1. CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF ALCOHOLS AND EPOXIDATION OF OLEFINS WITH HYDROGEN PEROXIDE AS OXIDANT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is an ideal oxidant of choice for these oxidations due to economic and environmental reasons by giving water as a by-product. Two catalysts used are vanadium phosphorus oxide (VPO) and Fe3+/montmorillonite-K10 catalyst prepared by ion-exchange method at a...

  2. Role of bonding mechanisms during transfer hydrogenation reaction on heterogeneous catalysts of platinum nanoparticles supported on zinc oxide nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Alawi, Reem A.; Laxman, Karthik; Dastgir, Sarim; Dutta, Joydeep

    2016-07-01

    For supported heterogeneous catalysis, the interface between a metal nanoparticle and the support plays an important role. In this work the dependency of the catalytic efficiency on the bonding chemistry of platinum nanoparticles supported on zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods is studied. Platinum nanoparticles were deposited on ZnO nanorods (ZnO NR) using thermal and photochemical processes and the effects on the size, distribution, density and chemical state of the metal nanoparticles upon the catalytic activities are presented. The obtained results indicate that the bonding at Pt-ZnO interface depends on the deposition scheme which can be utilized to modulate the surface chemistry and thus the activity of the supported catalysts. Additionally, uniform distribution of metal on the catalyst support was observed to be more important than the loading density. It is also found that oxidized platinum Pt(IV) (platinum hydroxide) provided a more suitable surface for enhancing the transfer hydrogenation reaction of cyclohexanone with isopropanol compared to zero valent platinum. Photochemically synthesized ZnO supported nanocatalysts were efficient and potentially viable for upscaling to industrial applications.

  3. Visible-light promoted catalytic activity of dumbbell-like Au nanorods supported on graphene/TiO2 sheets towards hydrogenation reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yunqian; Zhu, Mingyun; Wang, Xiaotian; Wu, Yanan; Huang, Chengqian; Fu, Wanlin; Meng, Xiangyu; Sun, Yueming

    2018-06-01

    In this work, the rationally-designed sharp corners on Au nanorods tremendously improved the catalytic activity, particularly in the presence of visible light irradiation, towards the hydrogenation of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol. A strikingly increased rate constant of 50.6 g‑1 s‑1 L was achieved in M-Au-3, which was 41.8 times higher than that of parent Au nanorods under dark conditions. The enhanced activities were proportional to the extent of the protruding sharp corners. Furthermore, remarkably enhanced activities were achieved in novel ternary Au/RGO/TiO2 sheets, which were endowed with a 52.0 times higher rate constant than that of straight Au nanorods. These remarkably enhanced activities were even higher than those of previously reported 3–5 nm Au and 3 nm Pt nanoparticles. It was systematically observed that there are three aspects to the synergistic effects between Au and RGO sheets: (i) electron transfer from RGO to Au, (ii) a high concentration of p-nitrophenol close to dumbbell-like Au nanorods on RGO sheets, and (iii) increased local reaction temperature from the photothermal effect of both dumbbell-like Au nanorods and RGO sheets.

  4. Interdisciplinary study of the influence on effectiveness of catalytic hydrogen recombiners of operating conditions in the reactor containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelm, S.; Reinecke, E.A.; Schoppe, L.; Dornseiffer, J.; Leistner, F.; Juehe, S.

    2008-01-01

    At the Emsland nuclear power station, a total of 58 autocatalytic hydrogen recombiners were backfitted in 1999 as an additional measure of risk reduction in connection with major hydrogen releases after events going beyond the design basis. Annual in-service inspections after 2002 revealed that some of the catalyst sheets developed startup delays and marked evolutions of smoke and smell. Recombiners not meeting the inspection criterion were completely regenerated as a measure of precaution. A preventive study was conducted jointly with institutes of the Juelich Research Center and the Aachen Technical University to analyze the composition of the deposits, which was then compared with the chemical characteristics of potential sources in the reactor containment. At the same time, the influence on effectiveness of the catalyst sheets was examined. On the basis of a random evaluation of the in-service inspection logs of the past few years, representative samples were taken whose startup behavior and operating characteristics were studied in a test rig alongside chemical analyses so as to allow a correlation to be established between the analytical findings and the catalytic activity of the samples. The findings made allowed internal sources of the catalyst deposits to be excluded. The impurities are introduced with the outside air. As a consequence, the air ducts in the vicinity of the respective recombiners were inspected and optimization steps were taken in connection with in-service inspections and regeneration procedures. (orig.)

  5. Sub-10 nm Platinum Nanocrystals with Size and Shape Control: Catalytic Study for Ethylene and Pyrrole Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Kuhn, John N.; Huang, Wenyu; Aliaga, Cesar; Hung, Ling-I; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Yang, Peidong

    2009-03-02

    Platinum nanocubes and nanopolyhedra with tunable size from 5 to 9 nm were synthesized by controlling the reducing rate of metal precursor ions in a one-pot polyol synthesis. A two-stage process is proposed for the simultaneous control of size and shape. In the first stage, the oxidation state of the metal ion precursors determined the nucleation rate and consequently the number of nuclei. The reaction temperature controlled the shape in the second stage by regulation of the growth kinetics. These well-defined nanocrystals were loaded into MCF-17 mesoporous silica for examination of catalytic properties. Pt loadings and dispersions of the supported catalysts were determined by elemental analysis (ICP-MS) and H2 chemisorption isotherms, respectively. Ethylene hydrogenation rates over the Pt nanocrystals were independent of both size and shape and comparable to Pt single crystals. For pyrrole hydrogenation, the nanocubes enhanced ring-opening ability and thus showed a higher selectivity to n-butylamine as compared to nanopolyhedra.

  6. Transfer of π- from hydrogen to deuterium in H2O + D2O mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanislaus, S.; Measday, D.F.; Vetterli, D.; Weber, P.; Aniol, K.A.; Harston, M.R.; Armstrong, D.S.

    1989-07-01

    The transfer of stopping π - mesons from hydrogen to deuterium has been investigated in mixtures of H 2 O+D 2 O as a function of D 2 O concentration. The concentration dependence of the transfer probability is similar to that observed for the gas mixtures of H 2 and D 2 but slightly more transfer is found for H 2 O+D 2 O. (Author) 17 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs

  7. Removal of distal protein-water hydrogen bonds in a plant epoxide hydrolase increases catalytic turnover but decreases thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomaeus, Ann; Naworyta, Agata; Mowbray, Sherry L; Widersten, Mikael

    2008-07-01

    A putative proton wire in potato soluble epoxide hydrolase 1, StEH1, was identified and investigated by means of site-directed mutagenesis, steady-state kinetic measurements, temperature inactivation studies, and X-ray crystallography. The chain of hydrogen bonds includes five water molecules coordinated through backbone carbonyl oxygens of Pro(186), Leu(266), His(269), and the His(153) imidazole. The hydroxyl of Tyr(149) is also an integrated component of the chain, which leads to the hydroxyl of Tyr(154). Available data suggest that Tyr(154) functions as a final proton donor to the anionic alkylenzyme intermediate formed during catalysis. To investigate the role of the putative proton wire, mutants Y149F, H153F, and Y149F/H153F were constructed and purified. The structure of the Y149F mutant was solved by molecular replacement and refined to 2.0 A resolution. Comparison with the structure of wild-type StEH1 revealed only subtle structural differences. The hydroxyl group lost as a result of the mutation was replaced by a water molecule, thus maintaining a functioning hydrogen bond network in the proton wire. All mutants showed decreased catalytic efficiencies with the R,R-enantiomer of trans-stilbene oxide, whereas with the S,S-enantiomer, k (cat)/K (M) was similar or slightly increased compared with the wild-type reactions. k (cat) for the Y149F mutant with either TSO enantiomer was increased; thus the lowered enzyme efficiencies were due to increases in K (M). Thermal inactivation studies revealed that the mutated enzymes were more sensitive to elevated temperatures than the wild-type enzyme. Hence, structural alterations affecting the hydrogen bond chain caused increases in k (cat) but lowered thermostability.

  8. Study on the synthesis of dimethyl 1,4-cyclohexanedicarboxylate by catalytic hydrogenation of dimethyl terephthalate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LI Yuanhua

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In the field of polymer industry,1,4-cyclohexanedimethanol (CHDM occupies an important position especially for the synthesis of highly valued polyester products.In industry,CHDM is prepared from dimethyl terephthalate (DMT through a two-step hydrogenation process Palladium supported on magnesium oxide (Pd/MgO was prepared by animpregnation method and was characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD,transmission electron microscope (TEM and scan electron microscope (SEM.During the hydrogenation of DMT to synthesize dimethyl 1,4-cyclohexanedicarboxylate (DMCD,the as-prepared Pd/MgO was used as the catalyst with methyl acetate as the solvent.Under optimized reaction conditions (reaction temperature:180 ℃,reaction pressure:4.5 MPa,the conversion of DMT was 100% and the selectivity of DMCD was 99%.Such a catalyst shows a good potential in industrial applications.

  9. Muon transfer from muonic hydrogen to heavier atoms; Transfert de charge muonique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dupays, A

    2004-06-01

    This work concerns muon transfer from muonic hydrogen to heavier atoms. Recently, a method of measurement of the hyperfine structure of ground-state muonic hydrogen based on the collision energy dependence of the muon transfer rate to oxygen has been proposed. This proposal is based on measurements which where performed at the Paul Scherrer Institute in the early nineties which indicate that the muon transfer from muonic hydrogen to oxygen increases by a factor of 4 going from thermal to 0.12 eV energies. The motivation of our calculations was to confirm this behaviour. To study the collision energy dependence of the muon transfer rate, we have used a time-independent close-coupling method. We have set up an hyperspherical elliptic formalism valid for nonzero total angular momentum which allows accurate computations of state-to-state reactive and charge exchange processes. We have applied this formalism to muon-transfer process to oxygen and neon. The comparison with experimental results is in both cases excellent. Finally, the neon transfer rate dependence with energy suggests to use neon instead of oxygen to perform a measurement of the hyperfine structure of muonic hydrogen. The results of accurate calculations of the muon transfer rates from muonic protium and deuterium atoms to nitrogen, oxygen and neon are also reported. Very good agreement with measured rates is obtained and for the three systems, the isotopic effect is perfectly reproduced. (author)

  10. CFD simulation of hydrogen mixing and mitigation by means of passive auto-catalytic recombiners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelm, S.; Reinecke, E-A.; Jahn, W.; Allelein, H-J.

    2011-01-01

    Modeling of passive auto-catalytic recombiners (PARs) operation in containment geometries involves a large variety of scales; thus, a CFD calculation resolving all these scales would be much too expensive. Therefore, the mechanistic PAR model REKO-DIREKT, developed at Forschungszentrum Juelich, has been coupled with the commercial CFD code ANSYS CFX in order to simulate PAR operation as well as the induced flow and transport phenomena. Based on a short introduction of REKO-DIREKT, its interface to CFX and the explicit coupling scheme is discussed. The paper is finalized by a first demonstration of simulation capabilities on the basis of the ThAI PAR-4 experiment (Becker Technologies GmbH, Eschborn, Germany). (author)

  11. Biomedical and Forensic Applications of Combined Catalytic Hydrogenation-Stable Isotope Ratio Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Sephton

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of biological molecules such as fatty acids and the steroid hormones have the potential to benefit enormously from stable carbon isotope ratio measurements of individual molecules. In their natural form, however, the body’s molecules interact too readily with laboratory equipment designed to separate them for accurate measurements to be made.Some methods overcome this problem by adding carbon to the target molecule, but this can irreversibly overprint the carbon source ‘signal’. Hydropyrolysis is a newly-applied catalytic technique that delicately strips molecules of their functional groups but retains their carbon skeletons and stereochemistries intact, allowing precise determination of the carbon source. By solving analytical problems, the new technique is increasing the ability of scientists to pinpoint molecular indicators of disease, elucidate metabolic pathways and recognise administered substances in forensic investigations.

  12. Catalytic performance and characterization of cobalt-nickel nano catalysts for CO hydrogenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feyzi, Mostafa; Gholivand, Mohammad Bagher; Babakhanian, Arash

    2014-01-01

    A series of Co-Ni nano catalysts were prepared by co-precipitation method. We investigated the effect of Co/Ni molar ratios precipitate and calcination conditions on the catalytic performance of cobalt nickel catalysts for Fisher-Tropsch synthesis (FTS). The catalyst containing 90%Co/10%Ni was found to be optimal for the conversion of synthesis gas to light olefins. The activity and selectivity of the optimal catalyst were studied in different operational conditions. The results show that the best operational conditions are the H 2 /CO=2/1 molar feed ratio at 310 .deg. C and GHSV=1,200 h - 1 under 5 bar of pressure. The prepared catalysts were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), N 2 adsorption-desorption measurements such as BET and BJH methods, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA)

  13. Biomedical and Forensic Applications of Combined Catalytic Hydrogenation-Stable Isotope Ratio Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sephton, Mark A.; Meredith, Will; Sun, Cheng-Gong; Snape, Colin E.

    2007-01-01

    Studies of biological molecules such as fatty acids and the steroid hormones have the potential to benefit enormously from stable carbon isotope ratio measurements of individual molecules. In their natural form, however, the body’s molecules interact too readily with laboratory equipment designed to separate them for accurate measurements to be made. Some methods overcome this problem by adding carbon to the target molecule, but this can irreversibly overprint the carbon source ‘signal’. Hydropyrolysis is a newly-applied catalytic technique that delicately strips molecules of their functional groups but retains their carbon skeletons and stereochemistries intact, allowing precise determination of the carbon source. By solving analytical problems, the new technique is increasing the ability of scientists to pinpoint molecular indicators of disease, elucidate metabolic pathways and recognise administered substances in forensic investigations. PMID:19662175

  14. Electro-catalytic conversion of ethanol in solid electrolyte cells for distributed hydrogen generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, HyungKuk; Giddey, Sarbjit; Badwal, Sukhvinder P.S.; Mulder, Roger J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Ethanol assisted water electrolysis reduces electric energy input by more than 50%. • Partial oxidation of ethanol leads to formation of undesired chemicals. • Degradation occurs due to formation of by-products and poisoning of catalyst. • Better catalyst has the potential to increase ethanol to H_2 conversion efficiency. • A plausible ethanol electro-oxidation mechanism has been proposed - Abstract: The global interest in hydrogen/fuel cell systems for distributed power generation and transport applications is rapidly increasing. Many automotive companies are now bringing their pre-commercial fuel cell vehicles in the market, which will need extensive hydrogen generation, distribution and storage infrastructure for fueling of these vehicles. Electrolytic water splitting coupled to renewable sources offers clean on-site hydrogen generation option. However, the process is energy intensive requiring electric energy >4.2 kWh for the electrolysis stack and >6 kWh for the complete system per m"3 of hydrogen produced. This paper investigates using ethanol as a renewable fuel to assist with water electrolysis process to substantially reduce the energy input. A zero-gap cell consisting of polymer electrolyte membrane electrolytic cells with Pt/C and PtSn/C as anode catalysts were employed. Current densities up to 200 mA cm"−"2 at 70 °C were achieved at less than 0.75 V corresponding to an energy consumption of about 1.62 kWh m"−"3 compared with >4.2 kWh m"−"3 required for conventional water electrolysis. Thus, this approach for hydrogen generation has the potential to substantially reduce the electric energy input to less than 40% with the remaining energy provided by ethanol. However, due to performance degradation over time, the energy consumption increased and partial oxidation of ethanol led to lower conversion efficiency. A plausible ethanol electro-oxidation mechanism has been proposed based on the Faradaic conversion of ethanol and

  15. Ni-Pt nanoparticles growing on metal organic frameworks (MIL-96) with enhanced catalytic activity for hydrogen generation from hydrazine at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Lan; Du, Xiaoqiong; Su, Jun; Luo, Wei; Cai, Ping; Cheng, Gongzhen

    2015-04-07

    Well-dispersed bimetallic Ni-Pt nanoparticles (NPs) with different compositions have been successfully grown on the MIL-96 by a simple liquid impregnation method using NaBH4 as the reducing agent. Powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, N2 adsorption-desorption, and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy measurements were employed to characterize the NiPt/MIL-96. Catalytic activity of NiPt/MIL-96 catalysts was tested in the hydrogen generation from the aqueous alkaline solution of hydrazine at room temperature. These catalysts are composition dependent on their catalytic activity, while Ni64Pt36/MIL-96 exhibits the highest catalytic activity among all the catalysts tested, with a turnover frequency value of 114.3 h(-1) and 100% hydrogen selectivity. This excellent catalytic performance might be due to the synergistic effect of the MIL-96 support and NiPt NPs, while NiPt NPs supported on other conventional supports, such as SiO2, carbon black, γ-Al2O3, poly(N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone) (PVP), and the physical mixture of NiPt and MIL-96, all of them exhibit inferior catalytic activity compared to that of NiPt/MIL-96.

  16. Enhanced catalytic activity of the nanostructured Co-W-B film catalysts for hydrogen evolution from the hydrolysis of ammonia borane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Wang, Dan; Wang, Yan; Li, Guode; Hu, Guijuan; Wu, Shiwei; Cao, Zhongqiu; Zhang, Ke

    2018-08-15

    In this work, nanostructured Co-W-B films are successfully synthesized on the foam sponge by electroless plating method and employed as the catalysts with enhanced catalytic activity towards hydrogen evolution from the hydrolysis of ammonia borane (NH 3 BH 3 , AB) at room temperature. The particle size of the as-prepared Co-W-B film catalysts is varied by adjusting the depositional pH value to identify the most suitable particle size for hydrogen evolution of AB hydrolysis. The Co-W-B film catalyst with the particle size of about 67.3 nm shows the highest catalytic activity and can reach a hydrogen generation rate of 3327.7 mL min -1 g cat -1 at 298 K. The activation energy of the hydrolysis reaction of AB is determined to be 32.2 kJ mol -1 . Remarkably, the as-obtained Co-W-B film is also a reusable catalyst preserving 78.4% of their initial catalytic activity even after 5 cycles in hydrolysis of AB at room temperature. Thus, the enhanced catalytic activity illustrates that the Co-W-B film is a promising catalyst for AB hydrolytic dehydrogenation in fuel cells and the related fields. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Relating catalytic activity and electrochemical properties: The case of arene-ruthenium phenanthroline complexes catalytically active in transfer hydrogenation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěpnička, P.; Ludvík, Jiří; Canivet, J.; Süss-Fink, G.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 359, č. 8 (2006), s. 2369-2374 ISSN 0020-1693 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4040304 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : arene complexes * chloro complexes * aqua complexes Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 1.674, year: 2006

  18. Determination of the level of DNA modification with cisplatin by catalytic hydrogen evolution at mercury-based electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horáková, Petra; Tesnohlídková, Lucie; Havran, Ludek; Vidláková, Pavlína; Pivonková, Hana; Fojta, Miroslav

    2010-04-01

    Electrochemical methods proved useful as simple and inexpensive tools for the analysis of natural as well as chemically modified nucleic acids. In particular, covalently attached metal-containing groups usually render the DNA well-pronounced electrochemical activity related to redox processes of the metal moieties, which can in some cases be coupled to catalytic hydrogen evolution at mercury or some types of amalgam electrodes. In this paper we used voltammetry at the mercury-based electrodes for the monitoring of DNA modification with cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (cisplatin), a representative of metallodrugs used in the treatment of various types of cancer or being developed for such purpose. In cyclic voltammetry at the mercury electrode, the cisplatin-modified DNA yielded catalytic currents the intensity of which reflected DNA modification extent. In square-wave voltammetry, during anodic polarization after prereduction of the cisplatinated DNA, a well-developed, symmetrical signal (peak P) was obtained. Intensity of the peak P linearly responded to the extent of DNA modification at levels relevant for biochemical studies (rb = 0.01-0.10, where rb is the number of platinum atoms bound per DNA nucleotide). We demonstrate a correlation between the peak P intensity and a loss of sequence-specific DNA binding by tumor suppressor protein p53, as well as blockage of DNA digestion by a restriction endonuclease Msp I (both caused by the DNA cisplatination). Application of the electrochemical technique in studies of DNA reactivity with various anticancer platinum compounds, as well as for an easy determination of the extent of DNA platination in studies of its biochemical effects, is discussed.

  19. Transfer Hydrogenation in Open-Shell Nucleotides — A Theoretical Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Achrainer

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The potential of a larger number of sugar models to act as dihydrogen donors in transfer hydrogenation reactions has been quantified through the calculation of hydrogenation energies of the respective oxidized products. Comparison of the calculated energies to hydrogenation energies of nucleobases shows that many sugar fragment radicals can reduce pyrimidine bases such as uracil in a strongly exothermic fashion. The most potent reducing agent is the C3' ribosyl radical. The energetics of intramolecular transfer hydrogenation processes has also been calculated for a number of uridinyl radicals. The largest driving force for such a process is found for the uridin-C3'-yl radical, whose rearrangement to the C2'-oxidized derivative carrying a dihydrouracil is predicted to be exothermic by 61.1 kJ/mol in the gas phase.

  20. Literature research on the production, loading, flow, and heat transfer of slush hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Young Moo [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Ajou University, Wonchon-dong san 5, Paldal-Gu, Suwon 442-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    This study summarizes the available information on slush hydrogen and answer pending engineering questions that arise in the design of slush hydrogen propellant systems. The four methods for the production of slush are discussed. For storage, slush hydrogen must be pressurized, free from impurities, and continuously upgraded. Slush flowing at low flow rates has a higher viscosity than the liquid, however at higher velocities it approaches the viscosity of neat liquid. For the entire range of natural convection and nucleate boiling, the heat transfer at the triple-point temperature and pressure is nearly the same for the liquid and slush. The natural convection from smooth surfaces for slush can be predicted using available correlations. However, for engineering analysis and design of a system involving a slush cryogenic propellant, reliable information is required on production, flow, heat transfer, and instrumentation of these fluids. Some relevant and important aspects of slush hydrogen which have not yet been fully answered are presented. (author)

  1. Selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides from industrial gases by hydrogen or methane; Reduction catalytique selective des oxydes d'azote (NO{sub x}) provenant d'effluents gazeux industriels par l'hydrogene ou le methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelmann Pirez, M

    2004-12-15

    This work deals with the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), contained in the effluents of industrial plants, by hydrogen or methane. The aim is to replace ammonia, used as reducing agent, in the conventional process. The use of others reducing agents such as hydrogen or methane is interesting for different reasons: practical, economical and ecological. The catalyst has to convert selectively NO into N{sub 2}, in presence of an excess of oxygen, steam and sulfur dioxide. The developed catalyst is constituted by a support such as perovskites, particularly LaCoO{sub 3}, on which are dispersed noble metals (palladium, platinum). The interaction between the noble metal and the support, generated during the activation of the catalyst, allows to minimize the water and sulfur dioxide inhibitor phenomena on the catalytic performances, particularly in the reduction of NO by hydrogen. (O.M.)

  2. Insights into the Hydrogen-Atom Transfer of the Blue Aroxyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bächle, Josua; Marković, Marijana; Kelterer, Anne-Marie; Grampp, Günter

    2017-10-19

    An experimental and theoretical study on hydrogen-atom transfer dynamics in the hydrogen-bonded substituted phenol/phenoxyl complex of the blue aroxyl (2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl) is presented. The experimental exchange dynamics is determined in different organic solvents from the temperature-dependent alternating line-width effect in the continuous-wave ESR spectrum. From bent Arrhenius plots, effective tunnelling contributions with parallel heavy-atom motion are concluded. To clarify the transfer mechanism, reaction paths for different conformers of the substituted phenol/phenoxyl complex are modelled theoretically. Various DFT and post-Hartree-Fock methods including multireference methods are applied. From the comparison of experimental and theoretical data it is concluded that the system favours concerted hydrogen-atom transfer along a parabolic reaction path caused by heavy-atom motion. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Tuning of catalytic CO2 hydrogenation by changing composition of CuO–ZnO–ZrO2 catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witoon, Thongthai; Kachaban, Nantana; Donphai, Waleeporn; Kidkhunthod, Pinit; Faungnawakij, Kajornsak; Chareonpanich, Metta

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The catalyst with an optimum composition of Cu:Zn:Zr (38.2:28.6:33.2) exhibited a homogeneous dispersion of metal components, and achieved the highest methanol yield. - Highlights: • A series of CuO–ZnO–ZrO 2 catalysts with different metal compositions were prepared. • Binary CuO–ZrO 2 catalyst exhibited higher methanol selectivity. • Increasing Zn/Cu ratios provided a better inter-dispersion of metal components. • The optimum catalyst composition of Cu–Zn–Zr (CZZ-4) was 38.2:28.6:33.2. • The CZZ-4 achieved the highest methanol yield (219.7 g CH3OH kg cat −1 h −1 ) at 240 °C. - Abstract: CO 2 hydrogenation was carried out over a series of CuO–ZnO–ZrO 2 catalysts prepared via a reverse co-precipitation method. The influence of catalyst compositions on the physicochemical properties of the catalysts as well as their catalytic performance was investigated. The catalysts were characterized by means of N 2 -sorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), H 2 -temperature programmed reduction (H 2 -TPR), H 2 and CO 2 temperature-programmed desorption (H 2 - and CO 2 -TPD). The binary CuO–ZrO 2 (67:33) catalyst exhibits the highest methanol selectivity at all reaction temperature and its maximum yield of methanol (144.5 g methanol kg cat −1 h −1 ) is achieved at 280 °C, owing to the strong basic sites and the largest CuO crystallite size. The addition of Zn to the binary CuO–ZrO 2 catalyst causes a higher Cu dispersion and an increased number of active sites for CO 2 and H 2 adsorption. However, the basic strength of the ternary CuO–ZnO–ZrO 2 catalysts is lower than the binary CuO–ZrO 2 catalyst which provides the maximum yield of methanol at lower reaction tempertures (240 and 250 °C), depending on the catalyst compositions. The optimum catalyst composition of Cu–Zn–Zr (38.2:28.6:33.2) gives a superior methanol

  4. Catalytic Activity of Urchin-like Ni nanoparticles Prepared by Solvothermal Method for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction in Alkaline Solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, Syed Asad; Iqbal, Muhammad Ibrahim; Kim, Seong-Hoon; Jung, Kwang-Deog

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Urchin-like Ni is prepared in solvothermal reaction. • Urchin-like Ni is formed via Ni(OH) 2 aggregates in ethanol and oleylamine. • Exchange current density of urchin-like Ni is 0.191 mA cm −2 . • Urchin-like Ni exceeds the catalytic performance of commercial Pt/C in HER. - Abstract: Ni nanoparticles with different morphologies were synthesized for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in alkaline solution. Here, Ni(acac) 2 was converted into Ni metal nanoparticles in solvothermal reactions with simple alcohols and oleylamine (OAm). The morphology of the resulting Ni nanoparticles was dependent mainly on the OAm/Ni molar ratio in alcohol solvent. Aggregates of spherical Ni nanoparticles (NiEt-OAm1) were observed at the OAm/Ni molar ratio of 1.0, whereas two echinoid Ni nanoparticles (NiEt-OAm4 and NiEt-OAm6) could be prepared in ethanol at the OAm/Ni molar ratios of 4.0 and 6.0. Ni(OH) 2 formed in ethanol during a reaction time of 5 h was then reduced into echinoid Ni nanoparticles after 8 h. Echinoid Ni nanoparticles were formed by atomic addition on the tops of the multipod Ni particles formed via Ni(OH) 2 /NiO aggregates. Webbed feet-like particles (NiIPA-OAm4) with plate edges were also observed in isopropanol under the same reaction conditions. The catalytic activities of the prepared Ni nanoparticles for the hydrogen evolution reaction were evaluated in alkaline solution. The NiEt-OAm4 with urchin-like morphology was much more active than the NiIPA-OAm4 with webbed feet-like morphology. The exchange current density of Ni catalysts was increased with increasing the OAm/Ni molar ratio. The NiEt-OAm6 exhibited an exchange current of 0.191 mA cm −2 and the NiEt-OAm4 exceeded electrocatalytic performance of a commercial Pt catalysts (40% Pt on Vulcan XC 72) in a stability test for 100 kiloseconds at −1.5 V (vs. Hg/HgO) in 1.0 M NaOH due to its high stability.

  5. Catalytic Performance of Fe-Mn/SiO2 Nanocatalysts for CO Hydrogenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Feyzi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of x(Fe, Mn/SiO2 nanocatalysts (x=5, 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 wt.% were prepared by sol-gel method and studied for the light olefins production from synthesis gas. It was found that the catalyst containing 20 wt.% (Fe, Mn/SiO2 is an optimal nano catalyst for production of C2–C4 olefins. Effects of sulfur treatment on the catalyst performance of optimal catalyst have been studied by espousing different volume fractions of H2S in a fixed bed stainless steel reactor. The results show that the catalyst treated with 6 v% of H2S had high catalytic performance for C2–C4 light olefins production. The best operational conditions were H2/CO = 3/2 molar feed ratio at 260°C and GHSV = 1100 h−1 under 1 bar total pressure. Characterization of catalysts was carried out using X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and surface area measurements.

  6. An S-N2-model for proton transfer in hydrogen-bonded systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2004-01-01

    A new mechanism of proton transfer in donor-acceptor complexes with long hydrogen bonds is suggested. The transition is regarded as totally adiabatic. Two closest water molecules that move synchronously by hindered translation to and from the reaction complex are crucial. The water molecules induce...... a shift of the proton from the donor to the acceptor with simultaneous breaking/formation of hydrogen bonds between these molecules and the proton donor and acceptor. Expressions for the activation barrier and kinetic hydrogen isotope effect are derived. The general scheme is illustrated with the use...... of model molecular potentials, and with reference to the excess proton conductivity in aqueous solution....

  7. Catalytic activity of γ-irradiated transition metal ions in the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arnikar, H.J.; Kapadi, A.H.; Gohad, A.S.; Bhosale, S.B.

    1988-01-01

    The catalystic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by transition metal ions, Fe 2+ , Fe 3+ , Co 2+ and Cu 2+ , adsorbed on neutral α-alumina was studied over the temperature range of 295-313 K. γ-irradiation of the catalysts to a dose of 0.12 MGy enhanced markedly the first order decomposition rate. Negligible in the case of Cu 2+ , the radiation effect increased roughly in the order of the number of unpaired d electrons in these ions: Cu(II), Fe(II), Co(II) and Fe(III). Results are explained on the basis of Kremer's mechanism of electron induced heterogeneous decomposition of H 2 O 2 . The radiation effect is attributed to the initial excess of electrons released from traps in the beginning of the reaction

  8. Coordination number constraint models for hydrogenated amorphous Si deposited by catalytic chemical vapour deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Toshio; Tabuchi, Norikazu; Arai, Takashi; Sato, Yoshikazu; Morimoto, Jun; Matsumura, Hideki

    2005-02-01

    We measured structure factors of hydrogenated amorphous Si by x-ray diffraction and analysed the obtained structures using a reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) technique. A small shoulder in the measured structure factor S(Q) was observed on the larger Q side of the first peak. The RMC results with an unconstrained model did not clearly show the small shoulder. Adding constraints for coordination numbers 2 and 3, the small shoulder was reproduced and the agreement with the experimental data became better. The ratio of the constrained coordination numbers was consistent with the ratio of Si-H and Si-H2 bonds which was estimated by the Fourier transformed infrared spectra of the same sample. This shoulder and the oscillation of the corresponding pair distribution function g(r) at large r seem to be related to the low randomness of cat-CVD deposited a-Si:H.

  9. Coordination number constraint models for hydrogenated amorphous Si deposited by catalytic chemical vapour deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahara, Toshio; Tabuchi, Norikazu; Arai, Takashi; Sato, Yoshikazu; Morimoto, Jun; Matsumura, Hideki

    2005-01-01

    We measured structure factors of hydrogenated amorphous Si by x-ray diffraction and analysed the obtained structures using a reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) technique. A small shoulder in the measured structure factor S(Q) was observed on the larger Q side of the first peak. The RMC results with an unconstrained model did not clearly show the small shoulder. Adding constraints for coordination numbers 2 and 3, the small shoulder was reproduced and the agreement with the experimental data became better. The ratio of the constrained coordination numbers was consistent with the ratio of Si-H and Si-H 2 bonds which was estimated by the Fourier transformed infrared spectra of the same sample. This shoulder and the oscillation of the corresponding pair distribution function g(r) at large r seem to be related to the low randomness of cat-CVD deposited a-Si:H

  10. General Tritium Labelling of Gentamicin C by catalytic hydrogen exchange Reaction with Tritiated Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, C.; Diaz, D.; Paz, D.

    1991-01-01

    Gentamicin C was labelled with tritium by means of a PtO2 catalyzed hydrogen exchange reaction. Under the conditions of the exchange (100 mg of gentamicin, basic form, 0,3 ml H2O-3H, and 50 mg of prereduced PtO2) the radiochemical yield was 0,24, 0,38 and 0,48 % at 120 degree celsius, for 8, 16 and 24 hours respectively. Chemical yield for purified gentamicin was about 60 %. Purification was accomplished with a cellulose column eluted with the lower phase of chloroform-methanol 17 % ammonium hydroxide (2:1:1, v/v) . Chemical purity, determined by HPLC, was 96,5 % and radiochemical one was 95. Main exchange degradation products show biological activity. (Author) 12 refs

  11. General Tritium labelling of gentamicin C by catalytic hydrogen exchange reaction with tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suarez, C.; Diaz, D.

    1991-01-01

    Gentamicin C was labelled with tritium by means of a PtO 2 catalized hydrogen exchange reaction. Under the conditions of the exchange (100 mg of gentamicin, basic form, 0,3 ml H 2 O- 3 H, and 50 mg of prereduced PtO 2 ) the radiochemical yield was 0,24, 0,38 and 0,48 % at 120 o C, for 8, 16 and 24 hours respectively. Chemical yield for purified gentamicin was about 60 %. Purification was accoumplished with a cellulose column eluted with the lower phase of chloroform-methanol 17 % ammonium hydroxide (2:1:1, v/v). Chemical purity, determined by HPLC, was 96,5 % and radiochemical one was 95 % . Main exchange degradation products show biological activity. (Author). 12 refs

  12. Controllable pneumatic generator based on the catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung-Rok; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a novel compact and controllable pneumatic generator that uses hydrogen peroxide decomposition. A fuel micro-injector using a piston-pump mechanism is devised and tested to control the chemical decomposition rate. By controlling the injection rate, the feedback controller maintains the pressure of the gas reservoir at a desired pressure level. Thermodynamic analysis and experiments are performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed pneumatic generator. Using a prototype of the pneumatic generator, it takes 6 s to reach 3.5 bars with a reservoir volume of 200 ml at the room temperature, which is sufficiently rapid and effective to maintain the repetitive lifting of a 1 kg mass

  13. Controllable pneumatic generator based on the catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Rok; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a novel compact and controllable pneumatic generator that uses hydrogen peroxide decomposition. A fuel micro-injector using a piston-pump mechanism is devised and tested to control the chemical decomposition rate. By controlling the injection rate, the feedback controller maintains the pressure of the gas reservoir at a desired pressure level. Thermodynamic analysis and experiments are performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed pneumatic generator. Using a prototype of the pneumatic generator, it takes 6 s to reach 3.5 bars with a reservoir volume of 200 ml at the room temperature, which is sufficiently rapid and effective to maintain the repetitive lifting of a 1 kg mass.

  14. Catalytic Glycerol Hydrodeoxygenation under Inert Atmosphere: Ethanol as a Hydrogen Donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efterpi S. Vasiliadou

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Glycerol hydrodeoxygenation to 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PDO is a reaction of high interest. However, the need for hydrogen supply is a main drawback of the process. According to the concept investigated here, 1,2-propanediol is efficiently formed using bio-glycerol feedstock with H2 formed in situ via ethanol aqueous phase reforming. Ethanol is thought to be a promising H2 source, as it is alcohol that can be used instead of methanol for transesterification of oils and fats. The H2 generated is consumed in the tandem reaction of glycerol hydrodeoxygenation. The reaction cycle proceeds in liquid phase at 220–250 °C and 1.5–3.5 MPa initial N2 pressure for a 2 and 4-h reaction time. Pt-, Ni- and Cu-based catalysts have been synthesized, characterized and evaluated in the reaction. Among the materials tested, Pt/Fe2O3-Al2O3 exhibited the most promising performance in terms of 1,2-propanediol productivity, while reusability tests showed a stable behavior. Structural integrity and no formation of carbonaceous deposits were verified via Temperature Programmed Desorption of hydrogen (TPD-H2 and thermogravimetric analysis of the fresh and used Pt/FeAl catalyst. A study on the effect of various operating conditions (reaction time, temperature and pressure indicated that in order to maximize 1,2-propanediol productivity and yield, milder reaction conditions should be applied. The highest 1,2-propanediol yield, 53% (1.1 g1,2-PDO gcat−1·h−1, was achieved at a lower reaction temperature of 220 °C.

  15. Single cobalt sites in mesoporous N-doped carbon matrix for selective catalytic hydrogenation of nitroarenes

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Xiaohui

    2017-11-20

    A supported cobalt catalyst with atomically dispersed Co-Nx sites (3.5 wt% Co) in a mesoporous N-doped carbon matrix (named Co@mesoNC) is synthesized by hydrolysis of tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) in a Zn/Co bimetallic zeolitic imidazolate framework (BIMZIF(Co,Zn)), followed by high-temperature pyrolysis and SiO2 leaching. A combination of TEM, XRD XPS and X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies confirm the absence of cobalt nanoparticles and indicate that these highly dispersed cobalt species are present in the form of Co-Nx. The exclusive formation of Co-Nx sites in the carbon matrix is attributed to the presence of a large amount of Zn and N in the BIMZIF precursor together with the presence of SiO2 in the pore space of this framework, extending the initial spatial distance between cobalt atoms and thereby impeding their agglomeration. The presence of SiO2 during high-temperature pyrolysis is proven crucial to create mesoporosity and a high BET area and pore volume in the N-doped carbon support (1780 m2 g−1, 1.54 cm3 g−1). This heterogeneous Co@mesoNC catalyst displays high activity and selectivity (>99%) for the selective hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to aniline at mild conditions (0.5–3 MPa, 343–383 K). When more challenging substrates (functionalized nitroarenes) are hydrogenated, the catalyst Co@mesoNC displays an excellent chemoselectivity to the corresponding substituted anilines.The presence of mesoporosity improves mass transport of reactants and/or products and the accessibility of the active Co-Nx sites, and greatly reduces deactivation due to fouling.

  16. Single cobalt sites in mesoporous N-doped carbon matrix for selective catalytic hydrogenation of nitroarenes

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Xiaohui; Olivos-Suarez, Alma I.; Osadchii, Dmitrii; Romero, Maria Jose Valero; Kapteijn, Freek; Gascon, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    A supported cobalt catalyst with atomically dispersed Co-Nx sites (3.5 wt% Co) in a mesoporous N-doped carbon matrix (named Co@mesoNC) is synthesized by hydrolysis of tetramethyl orthosilicate (TMOS) in a Zn/Co bimetallic zeolitic imidazolate framework (BIMZIF(Co,Zn)), followed by high-temperature pyrolysis and SiO2 leaching. A combination of TEM, XRD XPS and X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies confirm the absence of cobalt nanoparticles and indicate that these highly dispersed cobalt species are present in the form of Co-Nx. The exclusive formation of Co-Nx sites in the carbon matrix is attributed to the presence of a large amount of Zn and N in the BIMZIF precursor together with the presence of SiO2 in the pore space of this framework, extending the initial spatial distance between cobalt atoms and thereby impeding their agglomeration. The presence of SiO2 during high-temperature pyrolysis is proven crucial to create mesoporosity and a high BET area and pore volume in the N-doped carbon support (1780 m2 g−1, 1.54 cm3 g−1). This heterogeneous Co@mesoNC catalyst displays high activity and selectivity (>99%) for the selective hydrogenation of nitrobenzene to aniline at mild conditions (0.5–3 MPa, 343–383 K). When more challenging substrates (functionalized nitroarenes) are hydrogenated, the catalyst Co@mesoNC displays an excellent chemoselectivity to the corresponding substituted anilines.The presence of mesoporosity improves mass transport of reactants and/or products and the accessibility of the active Co-Nx sites, and greatly reduces deactivation due to fouling.

  17. One-pot reduction of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural via hydrogen transfer from supercritical methanol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Søndergaard; Barta, Katalin; Anastas, Paul T.

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic conversion of HMF to valuable chemicals was achieved over a Cu-doped porous metal oxide in supercritical methanol. The hydrotalcite catalyst precursor is prepared following simple synthetic procedures, using inexpensive and earth-abundant starting materials in aqueous solutions. The hyd......Catalytic conversion of HMF to valuable chemicals was achieved over a Cu-doped porous metal oxide in supercritical methanol. The hydrotalcite catalyst precursor is prepared following simple synthetic procedures, using inexpensive and earth-abundant starting materials in aqueous solutions....... The hydrogen equivalents needed for the reductive deoxygenation of HMF originate from the solvent itself upon its reforming. Dimethylfuran, dimethyltetrahydrofuran and 2-hexanol were obtained in good yields. At milder reaction temperatures, a combined yield (DMF + DMTHF) of 58% was achieved. Notably...

  18. Magnetic porous PtNi/SiO2 nanofibers for catalytic hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Huijuan; Chao, Cong; Kong, Weixiao; Hu, Zonggao; Zhao, Yafei; Yuan, Siguo; Zhang, Bing

    2017-06-01

    In this work, the mesoporous SiO2 nanofibers from pyrolyzing precursor of electrospun nanofibers were employed as support to immobilize PtNi nanocatalyst (PtNi/SiO2 nanofibers). AFM, XRD, SEM, TEM, XPS, ICP-AES and N2 adsorption/desorption analysis were applied to systematically investigate the morphology and microstructure of as-prepared products. Results showed that PtNi alloy nanoparticles with average diameter of 18.7 nm were formed and could be homogeneously supported on the surface of porous SiO2 nanofiber, which further indicated that the SiO2 nanofibers with well-developed porous structure, large specific surface area, and roughened surface was a benefit for the support of PtNi alloy nanoparticles. The PtNi/SiO2 nanofibers catalyst exhibited an excellent catalytic activity towards the reduction of p-nitrophenol, and the catalyst's kinetic parameter ( k n = 434 × 10-3 mmol s-1 g-1) was much higher than those of Ni/SiO2 nanofibers (18 × 10-3 mmol s-1 g-1), Pt/SiO2 nanofibers (55 × 10-3 mmol s-1 g-1) and previous reported PtNi catalysts. The catalyst could be easily recycled from heterogeneous reaction system based on its good magnetic properties (the Ms value of 11.48 emu g-1). In addition, PtNi/SiO2 nanofibers also showed an excellent stability and the conversion rate of p-nitrophenol still could maintain 94.2% after the eighth using cycle.

  19. Formation of polyhedral ceria nanoparticles with enhanced catalytic CO oxidation activity in thermal plasma via a hydrogen mediated shape control mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Jie; Zhang Yaohua; Song Xubo; Li Xingguo

    2011-01-01

    Ceria nanoparticles with well defined facets are prepared in argon–hydrogen thermal plasma followed by controlled oxidation. With increasing hydrogen fraction in the plasma, a clear sphere-to-polyhedron shape transition is observed. The heat released during the hydrogenation of cerium, which significantly enhances the species mobility on the surface, favors the growth of well defined facets. The polyhedron ceria nanoparticles, though lower in specific surface area, exhibit superior catalytic performance for CO oxidation over the round particles, which is attributed to the higher density of the reactive {200} and {220} facets on the surface. The hydrogen mediated shape control mechanism provides new insights into the shape control of nanoparticles during thermal plasma processing.

  20. Altering intra- to inter-molecular hydrogen bonding by dimethylsulfoxide: A TDDFT study of charge transfer for coumarin 343

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaochun; Yin, Hang; Li, Hui; Shi, Ying

    2017-04-01

    DFT and TDDFT methods were carried out to investigate the influences of intramolecular and intermolecular hydrogen bonding on excited state charge transfer for coumarin 343 (C343). Intramolecular hydrogen bonding is formed between carboxylic acid group and carbonyl group in C343 monomer. However, in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) solution, DMSO 'opens up' the intramolecular hydrogen bonding and forms solute-solvent intermolecular hydrogen bonded C343-DMSO complex. Analysis of frontier molecular orbitals reveals that intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) occurs in the first excited state both for C343 monomer and complex. The results of optimized geometric structures indicate that the intramolecular hydrogen bonding interaction is strengthened while the intermolecular hydrogen bonding is weakened in excited state, which is confirmed again by monitoring the shifts of characteristic peaks of infrared spectra. We demonstrated that DMSO solvent can not only break the intramolecular hydrogen bonding to form intermolecular hydrogen bonding with C343 but also alter the mechanism of excited state hydrogen bonding strengthening.

  1. Mass and heat transfer on B7 ordered packing in hydrogen isotope separation by distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croitoru, Cornelia; Pop, Floarea; Titescu, Gheorghe; Stefanescu, Ioan; Trancota, Dan; Peculea, Marius

    2002-01-01

    This work presents theoretical and experimental data referring to mass and heat transfer on B7 ordered packing in deuterium isotope separation by distillation. The first part is devoted to the study of mass transfer in hydrogen isotopic distillation while the second one treats the mass and heat transfer in water isotopic distillation. A stationary mathematical model for the mass and heat transfer was developed based on multitubular column model with wet wall. This model allowed the calculation starting from theoretical data of the ordered packing efficiency, expressed by the transfer unit height, TUH. Also, from theoretical data the mass and heat transfer coefficients were determined. A test of the mathematical model was performed with the experimental data obtained from two laboratory installations for hydrogen isotope separation by distillation. From the first installation, experimental data concerning the B7 ordered packing efficiency were obtained for the deuterium separation by cryogenic distillation at the - 250 deg C level. With the second one data referring to the mass and heat transfer on the same packing were obtained for the deuterium separation by water distillation under vacuum at the 60 deg C level. The values of TUH, mass and heat transfer coefficients as theoretically evaluate and experimentally checked are in agreement with the respective values obtained in separation processes in chemical industry. This is the fact which endorses utilization of the model of multitubular column with wet wall for describing the transfer processes in distillation columns equipped with B7 ordered packing

  2. Surface kinetics for catalytic combustion of hydrogen-air mixtures on platinum at atmospheric pressure in stagnation flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, H.; Sato, J.; Williams, F. A.

    1995-03-01

    Experimental studies of the combustion of premixed hydrogen-air mixtures impinging on the surface of a heated platinum plate at normal atmospheric pressure were performed and employed to draw inferences concerning surface reaction mechanisms and rate parameters applicable under practical conditions of catalytic combustion. Plate and gas temperatures were measured by thermocouples, and concentration profiles of major stable species in the gas were measured by gas-chromatographic analyses of samples withdrawn by quartz probes. In addition, ignition and extinction phenomena were recorded and interpreted with the aid of a heat balance at the surface and a previous flow-field analysis of the stagnation-point boundary layer. From the experimental and theoretical results, conclusions were drawn concerning the surface chemical-kinetic mechanisms and values of the elementary rate parameters that are consistent with the observations. In particular, the activation energy for the surface oxidation step H + OH → H 2O is found to be appreciably less at these high surface coverages than in the low-coverage limit.

  3. Kinetic spectrophotometric determination of Bi(III based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of phenylfluorone by hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOFIJA M. RANČIĆ

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A new reaction was suggested and a new kinetic method was elaborated for determination of Bi(III in solution, based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of phenyl-fluorone (PF by hydrogen peroxide in ammonia buffer. By application of spectrophotometric technique, a limit of quantification (LQ of 128 ng cm-3 was reached, and the limit of detection (LD of 37 ng cm-3 was obtained, where LQ was defined as the ratio signal:noise = 10:1 and LD was defined as signal 3:1 against the blank. The RSD value was found to be in the range 2.8–4.8 % for the investigated concentration range of Bi(III. The influence of some ions upon the reaction rate was tested. The method was confirmed by determining Bi(III in a stomach ulcer drug (“Bicit HP”, Hemofarm A.D.. The obtained results were compared to those obtained by AAS and good agreement of results was obtained.

  4. Pyrolysis of de-oiled seed cake of Jatropha Curcas and catalytic steam reforming of pyrolytic bio-oil to hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renny, Andrew; Santhosh, Viswanathan; Somkuwar, Nitin; Gokak, D T; Sharma, Pankaj; Bhargava, Sanjay

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study the pyrolysis of de-oiled seed cake of Jatropha Curcas and catalytic steam reforming of pyrolytic bio-oil to hydrogen. As per literature, presence of heavy nitrogenous and oxygenated compounds leads to catalyst deactivation. Here, an attempt has been made to tune pyrolytic reactions to optimize the N and O content of the pyrolytic bio-oil. Bio-oil conversion and hydrogen yield decreased as reaction progressed, which attributes to temporary loss of catalytic activity by blockage of catalyst pores by carbon deposition. Further, retention of steam reforming activity after repetitive steam activation suggests long-term catalyst usage. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Catalytic hydrogen production over RhPd/CeO2 catalysts and CO purification over Au/TiO2 catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez Divins, Núria

    2015-01-01

    La consulta íntegra de la tesi, inclosos els articles no comunicats públicament per drets d'autor, es pot realitzar prèvia petició a l'Arxiu UPC Premi Extraordinari de Doctorat, promoció 2014-2015. Àmbit d'Enginyeria Industrial This Thesis focuses on the study of the catalytic production of hydrogen from a biofuel, namely the bioethanol. It also studies the subsequent purification of pre-cleaned reformate streams. The end use of the hydrogen produced is to feed fuel cells to power porta...

  6. Photo-catalytic hydrogen production over Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudjemaa, A. [Technical and Scientific Research Centre of Physico-chemistry Analysis (CRAPC), BP 248, RP 16004, Algiers (Algeria); Laboratory of Chemistry of Natural Gas, Faculty of Chemistry (USTHB) BP 32, 16111 Algiers (Algeria); Trari, M. [Laboratory of Storage and Valorization of Renewable Energies, Faculty of Chemistry (USTHB) BP 32, 16111 Algiers (Algeria)

    2010-08-15

    The hydrogen photo-evolution was successfully achieved in aqueous (Fe{sub 1-x}Cr{sub x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} suspensions (0 {<=} x {<=} 1). The solid solution has been prepared by incipient wetness impregnation and characterized by X-ray diffraction, BET, transport properties and photo-electrochemistry. The oxides crystallize in the corundum structure, they exhibit n-type conductivity with activation energy of {proportional_to}0.1 eV and the conduction occurs via adiabatic polaron hops. The characterization of the band edges has been studied by the Mott Schottky plots. The onset potential of the photo-current is {proportional_to}0.2 V cathodic with respect to the flat band potential, implying a small existence of surface states within the gap region. The absorption of visible light promotes electrons into (Fe{sub 1-x}Cr{sub x}){sub 2}O{sub 3}-CB with a potential ({proportional_to}-0.5 V{sub SCE}) sufficient to reduce water into hydrogen. As expected, the quantum yield increases with decreasing the electro affinity through the substitution of iron by the more electropositive chromium which increases the band bending at the interface and favours the charge separation. The generated photo-voltage was sufficient to promote simultaneously H{sub 2}O reduction and SO{sub 3}{sup 2-} oxidation in the energetically downhill reaction (H{sub 2}O + SO{sub 3}{sup 2-} {yields} H{sub 2} + SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, {delta}G = -17.68 kJ mol{sup -1}). The best activity occurs over Fe{sub 1.2}Cr{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} in SO{sub 3}{sup 2-} (0.1 M) solution with H{sub 2} liberation rate of 21.7 {mu}mol g{sup -1} min{sup -1} and a quantum yield 0.06% under polychromatic light. Over time, a pronounced deceleration occurs, due to the competitive reduction of the end product S{sub 2}O{sub 6}{sup 2-}. (author)

  7. Modification of Coal Char-loaded TiO2 by Sulfonation and Alkylsilylation to Enhance Catalytic Activity in Styrene Oxidation with Hydrogen Peroxide as Oxidant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhamad Nurhadi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The modified coal char from low-rank coal by sulfonation, titanium impregnation and followed by alkyl silylation possesses high catalytic activity in styrene oxidation. The surface of coal char was undergone several steps as such: modification using concentrated sulfuric acid in the sulfonation process, impregnation of 500 mmol titanium(IV isopropoxide and followed by alkyl silylation of n-octadecyltriclorosilane (OTS. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, IR spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption, and hydrophobicity. The catalytic activity of the catalysts has been examined in the liquid phase styrene oxidation by using aqueous hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. The catalytic study showed the alkyl silylation could enhance the catalytic activity of Ti-SO3H/CC-600(2.0. High catalytic activity and reusability of the o-Ti-SO3H/CC-600(2.0 were related to the modification of local environment of titanium active sites and the enhancement the hydrophobicity of catalyst particle by alkyl silylation. Copyright © 2017 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 24th May 2016; Revised: 11st October 2016; Accepted: 18th October 2016 How to Cite: Nurhadi, M. (2017. Modification of Coal Char-loaded TiO2 by Sulfonation and Alkylsilylation to Enhance Catalytic Activity in Styrene Oxidation with Hydrogen Peroxide as Oxidant. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (1: 55-61 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.1.501.55-61 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.12.1.501.55-61

  8. New advances in hydrogen production via the catalytic decomposition of wax by-products using nanoparticles of SBA frame-worked MoO_3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Naggar, Ahmed M.A.; Gobara, Heba M.; El Sayed, Hussien A.; Soliman, Fathi S.

    2015-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Feedstock-to-gases & hydrogen conversion using the Mo-SBA15 catalyst compared to commercial catalysts. - Highlights: • Synthesis of meso-porous molybdenum oxide catalyst in SBA framework. • Confirming the structural characteristics of this catalyst by different analyses. • New trend for the H_2 & CH_4, production is revealed in this work. • Nano-carbon species of well-ordered structure was produced. • In-situ non-pressurized-low temperature wax isomerization was imposed. - Abstract: The alternative energy sources in general and hydrogen based energy in particular have been currently grabbing great attention. Hydrogen is an efficient green source for power generation owing to its huge energy content. The operational costs and the hydrogen output are the key factors in the selection of a certain technique for the hydrogen production industrially. This study summarizes a new route for hydrogen production starting from a bit complicated hydrogen-containing molecules. Particular attention is given during this work towards a direct pyrrolysis catalytic conversion of long chains n-paraffin into hydrogen with in-situ production of nano-structured carbon particles. The simultaneous isomerization of the n-paraffin contented in the feedstock is also discussed during this process. This research study had provided new advances in the hydrogen production based on carrying out the production process at non-severe conditions namely; low operational temperatures and no pressure was applied. The introduction of a meso-porous molybdenum oxide catalyst for the catalytic hydrogen production is also a point of novelty for the presented work. Promising results have been disclosed at the end of this investigation; approximately 60 wt.% of the feedstock was converted to fuel gases while nearly 30 wt.% of the feed had turned as nano-carbon species. The hydrogen productivity had been detected as high as 42 wt.% of the original feedstock. This in fact might

  9. Improving the catalytic activity of amorphous molybdenum sulfide for hydrogen evolution reaction using polydihydroxyphenylalanine modified MWCNTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Maoguo; Yu, Muping; Li, Xiang

    2018-05-01

    Molybdenum sulfides are promising electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) in acid medium due to their unique properties. In order to improve their HER activity, different strategies have been developed. In this study, amorphous molybdenum sulfide was prepared by a simple wet chemical method and its HER activity was further improved by using polydihydroxyphenylalanine (PDOPA) modified MWCNTs as supports. It was found that the PDOPA can effectively improve the hydrophilic properties of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and amorphous MoSx can uniformly grow on the surface of PDOPA@MWCNTs. Compared with MoSx and MoSx/MWCNTs, MoSx/PDOPA@MWCNTs show obviously enhanced HER activities due to the superior electrical conductivity and more exposed active sites. In addition, the effect of the ratio of MoSx and PDOPA@MWCNTs and the loading amount of catalysts on the electrodes are also investigated in detail. At the optimum conditions, MoSx/PDOPA@MWCNTs display an overpotential of 198 mV at 10 mA/cm2, a Tafel slope of 53 mV/dec and a good long-term stability in 0.5 M H2SO4, which make them promising candidates for HER application.

  10. Functionalized cyclopentadienyl rhodium(III) bipyridine complexes: synthesis, characterization, and catalytic application in hydrogenation of ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wan-Hui; Suna, Yuki; Himeda, Yuichiro; Muckerman, James T; Fujita, Etsuko

    2013-07-14

    A series of highly functionalized cyclopentadienyl rhodium(III) complexes, [Cp'Rh(bpy)Br](ClO4) (Cp' = substituted cyclopentadienyl), was synthesized from various multi-substituted cyclopentadienes (Cp'H). [Rh(cod)Cl]2 and Cp'H were firstly converted to [Cp'Rh(cod)] complexes, which were then treated with Br2 to give the rhodium(III) dibromides [Cp'RhBr2]2. The novel complexes [Cp'Rh(bpy)Br](ClO4) were obtained readily by the reaction of 2,2'-bipyridine with [Cp'RhBr2]2. These rhodium complexes [Cp'Rh(bpy)Br](ClO4) were fully characterized and utilized in the hydrogenation of cyclohexanone and acetophenone with generally high yields, but they did not exhibit the same reactivity trends for the two substrate ketones. The different activity of these complexes for the different substrates may be due to the influence of the substituents on the Cp' rings.

  11. Effect of the method for rhenium neptasulfide preparation on its catalytic properties in hydrogenation of nitrobenzene and m-nitrobenzoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal'chevskaya, T.A.; Bogutskaya, L.V.; Belousov, V.M.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of conditions of rhenium heptasulfide synthesis by thiosulfate method on its physicochemical and catalytic properties during hydrogenation of nitrobenzene and m-nitrobenzoic acid has been studied. It is shown that the maximum yield of m-aminobenzoic acid can be attained on insoluble sulfide rhenium contacts, containing excessive amount of sulfur (3.5 %). Under certain conditions of catalyst synthesis particles of Re 2 S 7 soluble in dimethylformamide are formed, which possess selectivity towards amine

  12. Vibrational energy transfer in hydrogen liquid and its isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gale, G.M.; Delalande, C.

    1978-01-01

    The transfer of vibrational energy (V-V) from H 2 to isotopic impurities (HD or D 2 ) has been studied in the liquid state, between 15 and 30 K. The subsequent ralaxation (V-T) of the excited impurity by the H 2 liquid host has also been measured and contrasted with the vibrational relaxation behaviour of pure H 2 and D 2 liquids. The isothermal density dependence of both V-V and V-T transfer has been investigated in the fluid state at 30 K. High density relaxation rates are also compared to the data in the pure gases and to other available gas phase results. Measurements in the solid, near the triple-point temperature, are equally reported for each process studied. (Auth.)

  13. Solar Photo Catalytic Hydrogen Production from water using a dual bed photosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florida Solar Energy Center

    2003-03-30

    A body of work was performed in which the feasibility of photocatalytically decomposing water into its constituent elements using a dual bed, or modular photosystem, under solar radiation was investigated. The system envisioned consists of two modules, each consisting of a shallow, flat, sealed container, in which microscopic photocatalytic particles are immobilized. The photocatalysts absorb light, generating free electrons and lattice vacancy holes, which are capable of performing reductive and oxidative chemistry, respectively. The photocatalysts would be chosen as to whether they specifically promote H{sub 2} or O{sub 2} evolution in their respective containers. An aqueous solution containing a redox mediator is pumped between the two chambers in order to transfer electron equivalents from one reaction to the other.

  14. Green diesel production via catalytic hydrogenation/decarboxylation of triglycerides and fatty acids of vegetable oil and brown grease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Elvan

    than activated carbon itself for both decarboxylation of oleic acid and hydrogenation of alkenes. In an additional effort to reduce Pd amount in the catalyst, Pd2Co/C catalysts with various Pd content were prepared and the catalytic activity study showed that 0.5 wt% Pd2Co/C catalyst performs even better than a 5 wt% Pd/C catalyst. Pd and Co alloys were very well dispersed and formed fine clusters, which led to a higher active metal surface area and hence favored the decarboxylation of oleic acid. This study showed that an alloy of Pd on carbon with a significantly low Pd content is much more active and selective to diesel hydrocarbons production from an unsaturated fatty acid in super-critical water and may be regarded as a prospective feasible decarboxylation catalyst for the removal of oxygen from vegetable oil/animal fat without the need of additional hydrogen.

  15. Hydrogen Transfer during Liquefaction of Elbistan Lignite to Biomass; Total Reaction Transformation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyunoglu, Cemil; Karaca, Hüseyin

    2017-12-01

    Given the high cost of the tetraline solvent commonly used in liquefaction, the use of manure with EL is an important factor when considering the high cost of using tetraline as a hydrogen transfer source. In addition, due to the another cost factor which is the catalyst prices, red mud (commonly used, produced as a byproduct in the production of aluminium) is reduced cost in the work of liquefaction of coal, biomass, even coal combined biomass, corresponding that making the EL liquefaction an agenda for our country is another important factor. Conditions for liquefaction experiments conducted for hydrogen transfer from manure to coal; Catalyst concentration of 9%, liquid/solid ratio of 3/1, reaction time of 60 min, fertilizer/lignite ratio of 1/3, and the reaction temperature of 400 °C, the stirred speed of 400 rpm and the initial nitrogen pressure of 20 bar was fixed. In order to demonstrate the hydrogen, transfer from manure to coal, coal is used solely, by using tetraline (also known as a hydrogen carrier) and distilled water which is not hydrogen donor as a solvent in the co-liquefaction of experiments, and also the liquefaction conditions are carried out under an inert (N2) gas atmosphere. According to the results of the obtained liquefaction test; using tetraline solvent the total liquid product conversion percentage of the oil + gas conversion was 38.3 %, however, the results of oil+gas conversion obtained using distilled water and EL combined with manure the total liquid product conversion percentage was 7.4 %. According to the results of calorific value and elemental analysis, only the ratio of (H/C)atomic of coal obtained by using tetraline increased with the liquefaction of manure and distilled water. The reason of the increase in the amount of hydrogen due to hydrogen transfer from the manure on the solid surface of the coal, and also on the surface of the inner pore of the coal during the liquefaction, brings about the evaluation of the coal as a

  16. Ruthenacycles and Iridacycles as Catalysts for Asymmetric Transfer Hydrogenation and Racemisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jerphagnon, Thomas; Haak, Robert; Berthiol, Florian; Gayet, Arnaud J.A.; Ritleng, Vincent; Holuigue, Alexandre; Pannetier, Nicolas; Pfeffer, Michel; Voelklin, Adeline; Lefort, Laurent; Verzijl, Gerard; Tarabiono, Chiara; Janssen, Dick B.; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Feringa, Ben L.; Vries, Johannes G. de

    2010-01-01

    Ruthenacycles, which are easily prepared in a single step by reaction between enantiopure aromatic amines and [Ru(arene)Cl2]2 in the presence of NaOH and KPF6, are very good asymmetric transfer hydrogenation catalysts. A range of aromatic ketones were reduced using isopropanol in good yields with

  17. Charge transfer to the continuum by heavy ions in atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellin, I.A.

    1981-01-01

    Design and installation of an atomic hydrogen target for measurements of charge transfer to the continuum by heavy ions are discussed. The design consists of a tungsten gas cell operated at temperatures of 2500 to 2600 0 K. Initial testing is underway

  18. Charge transfer between hydrogen(deuterium) ions and atoms in metal vapors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez T, I.; Cisneros G, C.

    1981-01-01

    The current state of the experiments on charge transfer between hydrogen (deuterium) ions and atoms in metal vapors are given. Emphasis is given to describing different experimental techniques. The results of calculations if available, are compared with existing experimental data. (author)

  19. Bimetallic promotion of cooperative hydrogen transfer and heteroatom removal in coal liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisch, J.J.

    1992-04-07

    The ultimate objective of this research has been to uncover novel reagents and experimental conditions for heteroatom removal and hydrogen transfer processes, which would be applicable to the liquefaction of coal under low-severity conditions. To this end, one phase of this research has investigated the cleavage of carbon-heteroatom bonds involving sulfur, oxygen, nitrogen and halogen by subvalent transition-metal complexes. A second phase of the study has assessed the capability of the same transition-metal complexes or of organoaluminum Lewis acids to catalyze the cleavage of carbon-hydrogen bonds in aromatics and hence to promote hydrogen shuttling. Finally, a third phase of our work has uncovered a remarkable synergistic effect of combinations of transition metals with organoaluminum Lewis acids on hydrogen shuttling between aromatics and hydroaromatics. (VC)

  20. Momentum Transfer and Viscosity from Proton-Hydrogen Collisions Relevant to Shocks and Other Astrophysical Environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schultz, David Robert; Krstic, Predrag S.; Lee, Teck G.; Raymond, J.C.

    2008-01-01

    The momentum transfer and viscosity cross sections for proton-hydrogen collisions are computed in the velocity range of ∼200-20,000 km s -1 relevant to a wide range of astrophysical environments such as SNR shocks, the solar wind, winds within young stellar objects or accretion disks, and the interstellar protons interacting with the heliosphere. A variety of theoretical approaches are used to arrive at a best estimate of these cross sections in this velocity range that smoothly connect with very accurate results previously computed for lower velocities. Contributions to the momentum transfer and viscosity cross sections from both elastic scattering and charge transfer are included

  1. Angular distribution in proton-hydrogen charge-transfer collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glembocki, O.; Halpern, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    Theoretical angular distributions for p-H charge transfer to the 1s state for energies of 1 keV and above have been examined and compared for three approximation schemes: the plane-wave Born approximation of Jackson and Schiff (JS), the Coulomb projected Born approximation of Geltman (G), and the distorted-wave eikonal approximation of one of the authors (D). The sharp dip in the forward distribution characteristic of JS is found to exist in G and D as well. As expected, G and D give identical results for all but the lowest energies. In the cases of G and D the dip, which is located close to that of JS, disappears and then reappears as the energy rises. Analytic high-energy limits for the angular dependence in both the JS and G cases have been found and are discussed

  2. Hydrogen production by steam reforming of bio-alcohols. The use of conventional and membrane-assisted catalytic reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seelam, P. K.

    2013-11-01

    The energy consumption around the globe is on the rise due to the exponential population growth and urbanization. There is a need for alternative and non-conventional energy sources, which are CO{sub 2}-neutral, and a need to produce less or no environmental pollutants and to have high energy efficiency. One of the alternative approaches is hydrogen economy with the fuel cell (FC) technology which is forecasted to lead to a sustainable society. Hydrogen (H{sub 2}) is recognized as a potential fuel and clean energy carrier being at the same time a carbon-free element. Moreover, H{sub 2} is utilized in many processes in chemical, food, metallurgical, and pharmaceutical industry and it is also a valuable chemical in many reactions (e.g. refineries). Non-renewable resources have been the major feedstock for H{sub 2} production for many years. At present, {approx}50% of H{sub 2} is produced via catalytic steam reforming of natural gas followed by various down-stream purification steps to produce {approx}99.99% H{sub 2}, the process being highly energy intensive. Henceforth, bio-fuels like biomass derived alcohols (e.g. bio-ethanol and bio-glycerol), can be viable raw materials for the H{sub 2} production. In a membrane based reactor, the reaction and selective separation of H{sub 2} occur simultaneously in one unit, thus improving the overall reactor efficiency. The main motivation of this work is to produce H{sub 2} more efficiently and in an environmentally friendly way from bio-alcohols with a high H{sub 2} selectivity, purity and yield. In this thesis, the work was divided into two research areas, the first being the catalytic studies using metal decorated carbon nanotube (CNT) based catalysts in steam reforming of ethanol (SRE) at low temperatures (<450 deg C). The second part was the study of steam reforming (SR) and the water-gas-shift (WGS) reactions in a membrane reactor (MR) using dense and composite Pd-based membranes to produce high purity H{sub 2}. CNTs

  3. Experimental and numerical investigations of a hydrogen-assisted laser-induced materials transfer procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toet, D.; Smith, P. M.; Sigmon, T. W.; Thompson, M. O.

    2000-01-01

    We present investigations of the mechanisms of a laser-induced transfer technique, which can be used for the spatially selective deposition of materials such as Si. This transfer is effected by irradiating the backside of a hydrogenated amorphous silicon film, deposited on a transparent substrate with an excimer laser pulse. The resulting release and accumulation of hydrogen at the film/substrate interface propels the silicon onto an adjacent receptor wafer. Time-resolved infrared transmission measurements indicate that the amorphous film is melted by the laser pulse and breaks into droplets during ejection. These droplets travel towards the receptor substrate and coalesce upon arrival. The transfer velocity increases as a function of fluence, the rate of increase dropping noticeably around the full melt threshold of the film. At this fluence, the transfer velocity reaches values of around 1000 m/s for typical films. Atomic force microscopy reveals that films transferred below the full melt threshold only partially cover the receptor substrate, while uniform, well-adhering films, which can be smoothed by subsequent laser irradiation, are obtained above it. Transfer of hydrogen-free Si films, on the other hand, does not occur until much higher fluences. The dynamics of the process have been simulated using a semiquantitative numerical model. In this model, hydrogen released from the melt front is instantaneously accumulated at the interface with an initial kinetic energy given by the melting temperature of Si and the enthalpy of solution. The resulting pressure accelerates the Si film, the dynamics of which are modeled using Newtonian mechanics, and the gas cools adiabatically as its kinetic energy is converted to the film's momentum. The results of the calculations are in good agreement with the experimental data. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics

  4. Simple method to transfer graphene from metallic catalytic substrates to flexible surfaces without chemical etching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, P J; Takahashi, H; Sakai, H; Thu, T V; Okada, H; Sandhu, A; Koide, S

    2013-01-01

    Graphene shows promise for applications in flexible electronics. Here, we describe our procedure to transfer graphene grown on copper substrates by chemical vapor deposition to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and SiO 2 /Si surfaces. The transfer of graphene was achieved by a simple, etching-free method onto flexible PDMS substrates.

  5. Hydrogen production from catalytic decomposition of methane; Produccion de hidrogeno a partir de la descomposicion termica catalitica del biogas de digestion anaerobia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belsue Echevarria, M.; Etxebeste Juarez, O.; Perez Gil, S.

    2002-07-01

    The need of substitution of part of the energy obtained from fossil fuels instead of energy from renewable sources, together with the minimal emissions of CO{sub ''} and CO that are expected with these technologies, make renewable sources a very attractive predecessor for the production of hydrogen. In this situation, a usable source for hydrogen production is the biogas achieved by means of technologies like the anaerobic digestion of different kinds of biomass (MSW, sewage sludge, stc.). In this article we suggest the Thermal Catalytic Decomposition of the methane contained in this biogas, after separation of pollutants like CO{sub ''}, H{sub 2}S. steam. This technology will give hydrogen, usable in fuel cells, and nanoestructured carbon as products. (Author) 7 refs.

  6. Effect of hydrogen on the growth and morphology of single wall carbon nanotubes synthesized on a Fe-Mo/MgO catalytic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biris, Alexandru R. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Cluj Napoca, RO-3400 (Romania)], E-mail: biris@oc1.itim-cj.ro; Li Zhongrui; Dervishi, Enkeleda [Applied Science Department, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 S. University Ave, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States); Nanotechnology Center, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 S. University Ave, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States); Lupu, Dan [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Cluj Napoca, RO-3400 (Romania); Xu Yang; Saini, Viney [Applied Science Department, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 S. University Ave, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States); Nanotechnology Center, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 S. University Ave, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States); Watanabe, Fumiya [Nanotechnology Center, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 S. University Ave, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States); Biris, Alexandru S. [Applied Science Department, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 S. University Ave, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States); Nanotechnology Center, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 S. University Ave, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States)], E-mail: asbiris@ualr.edu

    2008-04-21

    Single wall carbon nanotubes were synthesized from thermal pyrolysis of methane on a Fe-Mo/MgO catalyst by radio frequency catalytic chemical vapor deposition (RF-CVD) using argon as a carrier gas. Controlled amounts of hydrogen (H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}=0-1 v/v) were introduced in separate experiments along with the carbon source. The properties and morphology of the synthesized single wall carbon nanotubes were monitored by transmission electron microscopy, Raman scattering, and thermogravimetric analysis. The nanotubes with the highest crystallinity were obtained with H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}=0.6. By monitoring the Radial Breathing Modes present in the Raman spectra of the single-wall carbon nanotube samples, the variation of the structural and morphological properties of the carbon nanotubes with the flow level of hydrogen, reflect changes of the catalyst systems induced by the presence of hydrogen.

  7. Liquid Transfer Cryogenic Test Facility: Initial hydrogen and nitrogen no-vent fill data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Matthew E.; Nyland, Ted W.; Papell, S. Stephen

    1990-01-01

    The Liquid Transfer Cryogenic Test Facility is a versatile testbed for ground-based cryogenic fluid storage, handling, and transfer experimentation. The test rig contains two well instrumented tanks, and a third interchangeable tank, designed to accommodate liquid nitrogen or liquid hydrogen testing. The internal tank volumes are approx. 18, 5, and 1.2 cu. ft. Tank pressures can be varied from 2 to 30 psia. Preliminary no vent fill tests with nitrogen and hydrogen were successfully completed with the test rig. Initial results indicate that no vent fills of nitrogen above 90 percent full are achievable using this test configuration, in a 1-g environment, and with inlet liquid temperatures as high as 143 R, and an average tank wall temperature of nearly 300 R. This inlet temperature corresponds to a saturation pressure of 19 psia for nitrogen. Hydrogen proved considerably more difficult to transfer between tanks without venting. The highest temperature conditions resulting in a fill level greater than 90 percent were with an inlet liquid temperature of 34 R, and an estimated tank wall temperature of slightly more than 100 R. Saturation pressure for hydrogen at this inlet temperature is 10 psia. All preliminary no vent fill tests were performed with a top mounted full cone nozzle for liquid injection. The nozzle produces a 120 degree conical droplet spray at a differential pressure of 10 psi. Pressure in the receiving tank was held to less than 30 psia for all tests.

  8. Transfer of hydrogen and helium through corrugated, flexible tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schippl, K.

    2001-01-01

    The transfer of liquid gas or cold gas through corrugated tubes is an alternative to rigid systems for the use in reactor technique. Advantages: flexibility for easy installation; these tubes together with their associated terminations and hardware are assembled, leak-tested and evacuated at the factory. This permits simple and cost saving installation on site. All tubes are helium leak-tested with a sensitivity of 10E -9 mbar 1/sec. Following the leak test, the vacuum space is pumped down to the operation vacuum level and properly sealed. The vacuum integrity is guaranteed as a result of the high degree of cleanliness observed during production and from the use of a specially selected better material inside the vacuum space. Disadvantage: pressure is limited to 20 bar. To fulfil all rules of the reactor safety, different tests have to be done. Because of the longitudinal weld of the corrugated tube, a bursting test of different sizes gives the best information of the liability of this kind of tube. It can be shown that the bursting pressure of such a tube is more than 5 times higher than the max. working pressure

  9. Cyanogel-derived N-doped C nanosheets immobilizing Pd-P nanoparticles: One-pot synthesis and enhanced hydrogenation catalytic performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Hao; Yan, Xiaohong; Huang, Yundi; Zhang, Mengru; Tang, Yawen; Sun, Dongmei; Xu, Lin, E-mail: njuxulin@gmail.com; Wei, Shaohua, E-mail: weishaohua@njnu.edu.cn

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • Cyanogel-bridged approach was developed for the synthesis of Pd-P@N-Cnanosheets. • Pd-P@N-C nanosheets exhibit high activity and stability for reduction of 4-NP. • Compositional and structural advantages account for the high catalytic activity. • The feasible synthesis could be extendable to other carbon-based nanohybrids. - Abstract: For Pd-based nanocatalysts, stabilization of Pd nanoparticles on carbon support could not only effectively avoid particle aggregation and maintain catalytic stability during catalytic processes, but also facilitate enhancing the catalytic activity due to the synergy between Pd nanoparticles and carbon support. Furthermore, the incorporation of non-metal of phosphorus (P) into Pd could effectively modulate the electronic structure of Pd and thus help to boost the catalytic properties. However, one-pot synthesis of such nanohybrids remains a great challenge due to the distinct physiochemical properties of Pd, P and C components. Herein, we demonstrate a one-pot and scalable synthesis of highly dispersed PdP alloy nanoparticle-immobilized on N-doped graphitic carbon nanosheets (abbreviated as Pd-P@N-C nanosheets) by using inorganic-organic hybrid cyanogel as a reaction precursor. In virtue of both compositional and structural advantages, the as-synthesized Pd-P@N-C nanosheets manifest a superior catalytic activity and stability toward the hydrogenation of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP). We believe that the present work will provide a feasible and versatile strategy for the development of efficient catalysts for environmental remediation and can also be extendable to other carbon-based nanohybrids with desirable functionalities.

  10. Hydrogen-transfer and charge-transfer in photochemical and radiation induced reactions. Progress report, November 1, 1975--October 31, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.G.

    1976-10-01

    The relative importance of light absorption, quenching of triplet, and hydrogen transfer repair has been examined in retardation by mercaptans of photoreduction of aromatic ketones by alcohols. In the reduction of benzophenone by 2-propanol, retardation is efficient and, after correction for the first two effects, is due entirely to hydrogen-transfer repair, as indicated by deuterium labeling. In reduction of acetophenone by α-methylbenzyl alcohol, repair by hydrogen transfer is also operative. In reduction of benzophenone by benzhydrol, retardation is less efficient and is due to quenching, as the ketyl radical does not abstract hydrogen from mercaptan rapidly in competition with coupling. Deuterium isotope effects are discussed in terms of competitive reactions. Photoreduction of benzophenone by 2-butylamine and by triethylamine is retarded by aromatic mercaptans and disulfides. Of the retardation not due to light absorption and triplet quenching by the sulfur compounds, half is due to hydrogen-transfer repair, as indicated by racemization and deuterium labeling. The remainder is attributed to quenching by the sulfur compound of the charge-transfer-complex intermediate. Photoreduction by primary and secondary amines, but not by tertiary amines, is accelerated by aliphatic mercaptans. The acceleration is attributed to catalysis of hydrogen transfer by the mercaptan in the charge-transfer complex. The effect is large in hydrocarbon solvent, less in polar organic solvents and absent in water

  11. Influence of different preparation conditions on catalytic activity of ag /gama-al/sub 2/o/sub 3/ for hydrogenation of coal slime pyrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Z.; Rong, C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper, introducing variable conditional factors with Ag/AL/sub 2/O/sub 3/ as catalyst, selects five variables to investigate the influences of experimental conditions on Ag/Al2O/sub 3/ catalytic activity and define the optimal process conditions. These variables include Ag loading amount, calcinations temperature, calcinations time, reduction temperature, reduction time. X ray diffraction (XRD), hydrogen temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), X ray photoelectron spectrum (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were utilized to characterize the catalytic activity of Ag/-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, active center structure and state and those of carrier were emphatically studied, In the meantime the effects of active center and carrier on catalytic activity are studied. The results showed that: (1) In the range of 600 degree C-900 degree C, the catalytic activity of Ag/-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ with different loading showed little difference when changing loading amount, in the range of 900 degree C-1100 degree C, when the loading was 5%, the catalytic activity was very high; From the XRD and SEM characterizations, when the loading was 5%, it showed strong intensity diffraction peak of Ag crystal, crystal Ag is the most important activity center to promote hydrogen yield. (2) the catalytic activity of Ag/-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ at 450 degree C was considerably higher than that at 400 degree C and 500 degree C. By BET, XRD and SEM characterization, it can be seen, the diffraction peaks intensity of Ag crystal at 450 degree C is higher and sharper than that at 400 degree C and 500 degree C and with the increase of calcinations temperature, the specific surface area of catalysts also increased. (3) In the range of 600 degree C - 1000 degree C, the effects of calcinations time can be negligible, while, with temperature higher than 1000 degree C, 4-hour-calcinations-time catalyst exhibits a more noticeable catalytic activity than 3-hour and 5-hour catalyst do; From the XRD

  12. Finding Furfural Hydrogenation Catalysts via Predictive Modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Strassberger, Zea; Mooijman, Maurice; Ruijter, Eelco; Alberts, Albert H; Maldonado, Ana G; Orru, Romano V A; Rothenberg, Gadi

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We combine multicomponent reactions, catalytic performance studies and predictive modelling to find transfer hydrogenation catalysts. An initial set of 18 ruthenium-carbene complexes were synthesized and screened in the transfer hydrogenation of furfural to furfurol with isopropyl alcohol complexes gave varied yields, from 62% up to >99.9%, with no obvious structure/activity correlations. Control experiments proved that the carbene ligand remains coordinated to the ruthenium centre t...

  13. Vectorial electron transfer for improved hydrogen evolution by mercaptopropionic-acid-regulated CdSe quantum-dots-TiO2 -Ni(OH)2 assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shan; Li, Zhi-Jun; Fan, Xiang-Bing; Li, Jia-Xin; Zhan, Fei; Li, Xu-Bing; Tao, Ye; Tung, Chen-Ho; Wu, Li-Zhu

    2015-02-01

    A visible-light-induced hydrogen evolution system based on a CdSe quantum dots (QDs)-TiO2 -Ni(OH)2 ternary assembly has been constructed under an ambient environment, and a bifunctional molecular linker, mercaptopropionic acid, is used to facilitate the interaction between CdSe QDs and TiO2 . This hydrogen evolution system works effectively in a basic aqueous solution (pH 11.0) to achieve a hydrogen evolution rate of 10.1 mmol g(-1)  h(-1) for the assembly and a turnover frequency of 5140 h(-1) with respect to CdSe QDs (10 h); the latter is comparable with the highest value reported for QD systems in an acidic environment. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and control experiments demonstrate that Ni(OH)2 is an efficient hydrogen evolution catalyst. In addition, inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy and the emission decay of the assembly combined with the hydrogen evolution experiments show that TiO2 functions mainly as the electron mediator; the vectorial electron transfer from CdSe QDs to TiO2 and then from TiO2 to Ni(OH)2 enhances the efficiency for hydrogen evolution. The assembly comprises light antenna CdSe QDs, electron mediator TiO2 , and catalytic Ni(OH)2 , which mimics the strategy of photosynthesis exploited in nature and takes us a step further towards artificial photosynthesis. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. A comparative parametric study of a catalytic plate methane reformer coated with segmented and continuous layers of combustion catalyst for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhwa, Mayur; Parmar, Rajesh D.; Thurgood, Christopher P.

    2017-03-01

    A parametric comparison study is carried out between segmented and conventional continuous layer configurations of the coated combustion-catalyst to investigate their influence on the performance of methane steam reforming (MSR) for hydrogen production in a catalytic plate reactor (CPR). MSR is simulated on one side of a thin plate over a continuous layer of nickel-alumina catalyst by implementing an experimentally validated surface microkinetic model. Required thermal energy for the MSR reaction is supplied by simulating catalytic methane combustion (CMC) on the opposite side of the plate over segmented and continuous layer of a platinum-alumina catalyst by implementing power law rate model. The simulation results of both coating configurations of the combustion-catalyst are compared using the following parameters: (1) co-flow and counter-flow modes between CMC and MSR, (2) gas hourly space velocity and (3) reforming-catalyst thickness. The study explains why CPR designed with the segmented combustion-catalyst and co-flow mode shows superior performance not only in terms of high hydrogen production but also in terms of minimizing the maximum reactor plate temperature and thermal hot-spots. The study shows that the segmented coating requires 7% to 8% less combustion-side feed flow and 70% less combustion-catalyst to produce the required flow of hydrogen (29.80 mol/h) on the reforming-side to feed a 1 kW fuel-cell compared to the conventional continuous coating of the combustion-catalyst.

  15. Muon transfer rates in collisions of hydrogen isotope mesic atoms on 'bare' nuclei. Multichannel adiabatic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korobov, V.I.; Melezhik, V.S.; Ponomarev, L.I.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical scheme for solving the problem of slow collisions in the three-body adiabatic approach is applied for calculation of muon transfer rates in collisions of hydrogen isotope atoms on bare nuclei. It is demonstrated that the multichannel adiabatic approach allows one to reach high accuracy results (∼3%) estimating the cross sections of charge transfer processes which are the best ones up to date. The method is appliable in a wide range of energies (0.001-50 eV) which is of interest for analysis of muon catalysed fusion experiments. 20 refs.; 3 figs.; 5 tabs

  16. Hydrogen transfer in Pb–Li forced convection flow with permeable wall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukada, Satoshi, E-mail: sfukada@nucl.kyushu-u.ac.jp; Muneoka, Taiki; Kinjyo, Mao; Yoshimura, Rhosuke; Katayama, Kazunari

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The paper presents experimental and analytical results of Pb–Li eutectic alloy forced convection flow. • Analytical results are in good agreement with ones of hydrogen permeation in Pb–Li forced convection flow. • The results are useful for the design of liquid blanket of fusion reactors. - Abstract: Transient- or steady-state hydrogen permeation from a primary fluid of Li{sub 17}Pb{sub 83} (Pb–Li) through a permeable tube of Inconel-625 alloy to a secondary Ar purge is investigated experimentally under a forced convection flow in a dual cylindrical tube system. Results of the overall hydrogen permeation flux are correlated in terms of diffusivity, solubility and an average axial velocity of Pb–Li and diffusivity and solubility of the solid wall. Analytical solutions under proper assumptions are derived to simulate the transient- and steady-state rates of the overall hydrogen permeation, and close agreement is obtained between experiment and analysis. Two things are clarified from the comparison: (i) how the steady-state permeation rate is affected by the mass-transfer properties and the average velocity of Pb–Li and the properties of Inconel-625, and (ii) how its transient behavior is done by the diffusivity of the two materials. The results obtained here will give important information to estimate or to analyze the tritium transfer rate in fluidized Pb–Li blankets of DEMO or the future commercial fusion reactors.

  17. The asymmetric total synthesis of (+)- and (-)-trypargine via Noyori asymmetric transfer hydrogenation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilli, Ronaldo A.; Rodrigues Junior, Manoel Trindade

    2009-01-01

    A concise and efficient total synthesis of (+)- and (-)-trypargine (6 steps and 38% overall yield), a 1-substituted β-carboline guanidine alkaloid isolated from the skin of the African frog K. senegalensis, was developed based on the construction of the b-carboline moiety via Bischler-Napieralski reaction and the enantioselective reduction of the dihydro-β-carboline intermediate via an asymmetric transfer hydrogenation reaction using Noyori's protocol. (author)

  18. Hydrogen production by using Rhodobacter capsulatus mutants with genetically modified electron transfer chains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OEztuerk, Yavuz; Yuecel, Meral; Guenduez, Ufuk [Department of Biology, Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey); Daldal, Fevzi [Department of Biology, Plant Science Institute, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6018 (United States); Mandaci, Sevnur [TUEBITAK Research Institute for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Gebze Kocaeli 41470 (Turkey); Tuerker, Lemi [Department of Chemistry, Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey); Eroglu, Inci [Department of Chemical Engineering, Middle East Technical University, Ankara (Turkey)

    2006-09-15

    In Rhodobacter capsulatus excess reducing equivalents generated by organic acid oxidation is consumed to reduce protons into hydrogen by the activity of nitrogenase. Nitrogenase serves as a redox-balancing tool and is activated by the RegB/RegA global regulatory system during photosynthetic growth. The terminal cytochrome cbb{sub 3} oxidase and the redox state of the cyclic photosynthetic electron transfer chain serve redox signaling to the RegB/RegA regulatory systems in Rhodobacter. In this study, hydrogen production of various R. capsulatus strains harboring the genetically modified electron carrier cytochromes or lacking the cyt cbb{sub 3} oxidase or the quinol oxidase were compared with the wild type. The results indicated that hydrogen production of mutant strains with modified electron carrier cytochromes decreased 3- to 4-fold, but the rate of hydrogen production increased significantly in a cbb{sub 3}{sup -} mutant. Moreover, hydrogen production efficiency of various R. capsulatus strains further increased by inactivation of uptake hydrogenase genes. (author)

  19. Catalytic Hydrogenation of the Sweet Principles of Stevia rebaudiana, Rebaudioside B, Rebaudioside C, and Rebaudioside D and Sensory Evaluation of Their Reduced Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Indra; Campbell, Mary; Chaturvedula, Venkata Sai Prakash

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic hydrogenation of rebaudioside B, rebaudioside C, and rebaudioside D; the three ent-kaurane diterpene glycosides isolated from Stevia rebaudiana was carried out using Pd(OH)2. Reduction of steviol glycosides was performed using straightforward synthetic chemistry with the catalyst Pd(OH)2 and structures of the corresponding dihydro derivatives were characterized on the basis of 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral data indicating that all are novel compounds being reported for the first time. Also, the taste properties of all reduced compounds were evaluated against their corresponding original steviol glycosides and sucrose. PMID:23203115

  20. Metal-Free Catalytic Asymmetric Fluorination of Keto Esters Using a Combination of Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) and Oxidant: Experiment and Computation

    KAUST Repository

    Pluta, Roman

    2018-02-09

    A chiral iodoarene organocatalyst for the catalytic asymmetric fluorination has been developed. The catalyst was used in the asymmetric fluorination of carbonyl compounds, providing the products with a quaternary stereocenter with high enantioselectivities. Chiral hypervalent iodine difluoride intermediates were generated in situ by treatment of the catalyst with an oxidant and hydrogen fluoride as fluoride source. As such, the α-fluorination of a carbonyl compound was achieved with a nucleophilic fluorine source. A combined computational and experimental approach provided insight into the reaction mechanism and the origin of enantioselectivity.

  1. Catalytic Hydrogenation of the Sweet Principles of Stevia rebaudiana, Rebaudioside B, Rebaudioside C, and Rebaudioside D and Sensory Evaluation of Their Reduced Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Campbell

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic hydrogenation of rebaudioside B, rebaudioside C, and rebaudioside D; the three ent-kaurane diterpene glycosides isolated from Stevia rebaudiana was carried out using Pd(OH2. Reduction of steviol glycosides was performed using straightforward synthetic chemistry with the catalyst Pd(OH2 and structures of the corresponding dihydro derivatives were characterized on the basis of 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectral data indicating that all are novel compounds being reported for the first time. Also, the taste properties of all reduced compounds were evaluated against their corresponding original steviol glycosides and sucrose.

  2. Metal-Free Catalytic Asymmetric Fluorination of Keto Esters Using a Combination of Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) and Oxidant: Experiment and Computation

    KAUST Repository

    Pluta, Roman; Krach, Patricia E.; Cavallo, Luigi; Falivene, Laura; Rueping, Magnus

    2018-01-01

    A chiral iodoarene organocatalyst for the catalytic asymmetric fluorination has been developed. The catalyst was used in the asymmetric fluorination of carbonyl compounds, providing the products with a quaternary stereocenter with high enantioselectivities. Chiral hypervalent iodine difluoride intermediates were generated in situ by treatment of the catalyst with an oxidant and hydrogen fluoride as fluoride source. As such, the α-fluorination of a carbonyl compound was achieved with a nucleophilic fluorine source. A combined computational and experimental approach provided insight into the reaction mechanism and the origin of enantioselectivity.

  3. Theoretical Investigation of the Enzymatic Phosphoryl Transfer of β-phosphoglucomutase: Revisiting Both Steps of the Catalytic Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsasser, Brigitta M.; Dohmeier-Fischer, Silvia; Fels, Gregor

    2012-07-12

    Enzyme catalyzed phosphate transfer is a part of almost all metabolic processes. Such reactions are of central importance for the energy balance in all organisms and play important roles in cellular control at all levels. Mutases transfer a phosphoryl group while nucleases cleave the phosphodiester linkages between two nucleotides. The subject of our present study is the Lactococcus lactis β-phosphoglucomutase (β-PGM), which effectively catalyzes the interconversion of β-D-glucose-1-phosphate (β-G1P) to β- D-glucose-6-phosphate (β-G6P) and vice versa via stabile intermediate β-D-glucose-1,6-(bis)phosphate (β-G1,6diP) in the presence of Mg2+. In this paper we revisited the reaction mechanism of the phosphoryl transfer starting from the bisphosphate β-G1,6diP in both directions (toward β-G1P and β-G6P) combining docking techniques and QM/MM theoretical method at the DFT/PBE0 level of theory. In addition we performed NEB (nudged elastic band) and free energy calculations to optimize the path and to identify the transition states and the energies involved in the catalytic cycle. Our calculations reveal that both steps proceed via dissociative pentacoordinated phosphorane, which is not a stabile intermediate but rather a transition state. In addition to the Mg2+ ion, Ser114 and Lys145 also play important roles in stabilizing the large negative charge on the phosphate through strong coordination with the phosphate oxygens and guiding the phosphate group throughout the catalytic process. The calculated energy barrier of the reaction for the β-G1P to β-G1,6diP step is only slightly higher than for the β-G1,6diP to β-G6P step (16.10 kcal mol-1 versus 15.10 kcal mol-1) and is in excellent agreement with experimental findings (14.65 kcal mol-1).

  4. Study of reactive transfer of hydrogen within intact clay-rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didier, M.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogen gas will be produced by anaerobic corrosion of radioactive waste containers in the geological repository. This gas could affect the geological layer (Callovo-Oxfordian) stability, first due to its reductive capacity and then also due to its continuous production for about 100,000 years. The local pressure increase could affect the properties of hydro-gaseous dynamic of hydrogen transfers. The reductive capacity of H 2 could change the redox properties of the Callovo-Oxfordian and the barrier hydraulic properties, and therefore (1) its mineralogy, (2) the speciation of outgoing radionuclides and (3) their transfer. Moreover, if the hydrogen gas transport is difficult within the geological layer, the pressure increase could cause cracking and create preferential pathways for radionuclides migration. An experimental device was developed to measure the entry pressure of H 2 (g) and transport parameters as permeability and diffusion coefficient through the CO x . The entry pressure is estimated to be between 49 and 63 bar. Knowing that the maximum expected pressure is about 80 bar, there may therefore be a displacement of hydrogen gas into the water saturated clay-rock. Moreover, for a saturation greater than 0.90 and at T = 23 C, permeability is measured to be close to 10 -23 m 2 and the diffusion coefficient to be as low as 10 -12 m 2 .s -1 . Therefore hydrogen gas will move slowly in the geological layer, for example it will take about 31,710 years to go through one meter of clay-rock by diffusion. These transport parameters are found to depend mainly on the sample water saturation and not much on temperature. Regarding hydrogen reactivity, under conditions close to those in the storage, H 2 will reduce up to 9 wt% of structural Fe (III) at 90 C and PH 2 = 5 bar. This reaction is not complete and hydrogen gas will mainly sorb on the material, with a sorption up to 0.05 wt% at 90 C and PH 2 = 0.45 bar. This process depends strongly on the water saturation of

  5. Catalytic steam gasification of biomass in fluidized bed at low temperature: Conversion from livestock manure compost to hydrogen-rich syngas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao, Xianbin; Le, Duc Dung; Li, Liuyun; Meng, Xianliang; Cao, Jingpei; Morishita, Kayoko; Takarada, Takayuki

    2010-01-01

    Utilizing large amounts of animal waste as a source of renewable energy has the potential to reduce its disposal problems and associated pollution issues. Gasification characteristics of the manure compost make it possible for low temperature gasification. In this paper, an energy efficient approach to hydrogen-rich syngas from manure compost is represented at relatively low temperature, around 600 o C, in a continuous-feeding fluidized bed reactor. The effects of catalyst performance, reactor temperature, steam, and reaction type on gas yield, gas composition, and carbon conversion efficiency are discussed. The Ni-Al 2 O 3 catalyst simultaneously promotes tar cracking and steam reforming. Higher temperature contributes to higher gas yield and carbon conversion. The steam introduction increases hydrogen yield, by steam reforming and water-gas shift reaction. Two-stage gasification is also tried, showing the advantage of better catalyst utilization and enhancing the catalytic reactions to some extent.

  6. Classical/quantum correspondence in state selective charge transfer and excitation reactions involving highly charged ions and hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purkait, M

    2009-01-01

    State selective charge transfer and excitation cross sections for collisions of Ne q+ (q = 1-10) with atomic hydrogen are calculated within the framework of Classical Trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) method and Boundary Corrected Continuum Intermediate State (BCCIS) approximation.

  7. A forced convective heat transfer model for two-phase hydrogen systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasch, J.; Anghaie, S.

    2007-01-01

    A consistent event in the use of hydrogen in nuclear thermal propulsion is film boiling, in which the wall heat is so large that liquid can not exist at the wall. Instead, vapor interfaces with the wall and liquid flows in the core of the duct. To better understand heat transfer under these conditions, a select set of hydrogen test data from these conditions are analyzed. This paper presents the results of an extensive literature search for film boiling heat transfer models. A representative cross-section of these models is then applied to the data. The heat transfer coefficient data were found difficult to predict and highly dependent upon the flow regime. Pre-critical heat flux correlations completely fail to predict the heat transfer of inverted film boiling conditions. Pool boiling models for inverted film boiling also are inappropriate. Current force convection models for inverted film boiling, while far better than the previous two classes of models, still generate large predictive errors. It is recommended that for the inverted annular film boiling flow regime the modified equilibrium bulk Dittus-Boelter model be used. For agitated inverted annular film boiling and dispersed film boiling regimes associated with positive equilibrium qualities, the Hendricks model should be used. (A.C.)

  8. Specific features of hydrogen boiling heat transfer on the AMg-6 alloy massive heater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirichenko, Yu.A.; Kozlov, S.M.; Rusanov, K.V.; Tyurina, E.G.

    1989-01-01

    Heat transfer and nucleate burns-out saturated with hydrogen at a plate heater (thickness-13 mm, diameter of heat-transferring surface - 30 mm) made of an aluminium alloy with the low value of a heat assimilation coefficient in the pressure range from 7.2x10 3 to 6x10 5 Pa is experimentally investigated. Value of start of boiling characteristics and heat transfer coefficients during nucleate burn-out, as well as the first critical densities of a heat flux and temperature heads are obtained. Existence of certain differrences of heat exchange during boiling is shown using a massive heater made of low-heat-conductive material in comparison with other cases of hydrogen boiling. Hypothesis concerning the existence of so-called mixed boiling on the heat transfer surface, which has been detected earlier only in helium boiling, as well as concerning possible reasons of stability of film boiling ficii in preburn-out region of heat duty is discussed

  9. Kinetics and the mass transfer mechanism of hydrogen sulfide removal by biochar derived from rice hull.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Guofeng; Liu, Liang; Chen, Ping; Shen, Guoqing; Li, Qiwu

    2016-05-01

    The biochar derived from rice hull was evaluated for its abilities to remove hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from gas phase. The surface area and pH of the biochar were compared. The biochar derived from rice hull was evaluated for its abilities to remove hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from gas phase. The surface area and pH of the biochar were compared. The different pyrolysis temperature has great influence on the adsorption of H2S. At the different pyrolysis temperature, the H2S removal efficiency of rice hull-derived biochar was different. The adsorption capacities of biochar were 2.09 mg·g(-1), 2.65 mg·g(-1), 16.30 mg·g(-1), 20.80 mg·g(-1), and 382.70 mg·g(-1), which their pyrolysis temperatures were 100 °C, 200 °C, 300 °C, 400 °C and 500 °C respectively. Based on the Yoon-Nelson model, it analyzed the mass transfer mechanism of hydrogen sulfide adsorption by biochar. The paper focuses on the biochar derived from rice hull-removed hydrogen sulfide (H2S) from gas phase. The surface area and pH of the biochar were compared. The different pyrolysis temperatures have great influence on the adsorption of H2S. At the different pyrolysis temperatures, the H2S removal efficiency of rice hull-derived biohar was different. The adsorption capacities of biochar were 2.09, 2.65, 16.30, 20.80, and 382.70 mg·g(-1), and their pyrolysis temperatures were 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 °C, respectively. Based on the Yoon-Nelson model, the mass transfer mechanism of hydrogen sulfide adsorption by biochar was analyzed.

  10. Reactivity of hydropersulfides toward the hydroxyl radical unraveled: disulfide bond cleavage, hydrogen atom transfer, and proton-coupled electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglada, Josep M; Crehuet, Ramon; Adhikari, Sarju; Francisco, Joseph S; Xia, Yu

    2018-02-14

    Hydropersulfides (RSSH) are highly reactive as nucleophiles and hydrogen atom transfer reagents. These chemical properties are believed to be key for them to act as antioxidants in cells. The reaction involving the radical species and the disulfide bond (S-S) in RSSH, a known redox-active group, however, has been scarcely studied, resulting in an incomplete understanding of the chemical nature of RSSH. We have performed a high-level theoretical investigation on the reactions of the hydroxyl radical (˙OH) toward a set of RSSH (R = -H, -CH 3 , -NH 2 , -C(O)OH, -CN, and -NO 2 ). The results show that S-S cleavage and H-atom abstraction are the two competing channels. The electron inductive effect of R induces selective ˙OH substitution at one sulfur atom upon S-S cleavage, forming RSOH and ˙SH for the electron donating groups (EDGs), whereas producing HSOH and ˙SR for the electron withdrawing groups (EWGs). The H-Atom abstraction by ˙OH follows a classical hydrogen atom transfer (hat) mechanism, producing RSS˙ and H 2 O. Surprisingly, a proton-coupled electron transfer (pcet) process also occurs for R being an EDG. Although for RSSH having EWGs hat is the leading channel, S-S cleavage can be competitive or even dominant for the EDGs. The overall reactivity of RSSH toward ˙OH attack is greatly enhanced with the presence of an EDG, with CH 3 SSH being the most reactive species found in this study (overall rate constant: 4.55 × 10 12 M -1 s -1 ). Our results highlight the complexity in RSSH reaction chemistry, the extent of which is closely modulated by the inductive effect of the substituents in the case of the oxidation by hydroxyl radicals.

  11. Numerical and experimental analysis of heat transfer in injector plate of hydrogen peroxide hybrid rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Guobiao; Li, Chengen; Tian, Hui

    2016-11-01

    This paper is aimed to analyze heat transfer in injector plate of hydrogen peroxide hybrid rocket motor by two-dimensional axisymmetric numerical simulations and full-scale firing tests. Long-time working, which is an advantage of hybrid rocket motor over conventional solid rocket motor, puts forward new challenges for thermal protection. Thermal environments of full-scale hybrid rocket motors designed for long-time firing tests are studied through steady-state coupled numerical simulations of flow field and heat transfer in chamber head. The motor adopts 98% hydrogen peroxide (98HP) oxidizer and hydroxyl-terminated poly-butadiene (HTPB) based fuel as the propellants. Simulation results reveal that flowing liquid 98HP in head oxidizer chamber could cool the injector plate of the motor. The cooling of 98HP is similar to the regenerative cooling in liquid rocket engines. However, the temperature of the 98HP in periphery portion of the head oxidizer chamber is higher than its boiling point. In order to prevent the liquid 98HP from unexpected decomposition, a thermal protection method for chamber head utilizing silica-phenolics annular insulating board is proposed. The simulation results show that the annular insulating board could effectively decrease the temperature of the 98HP in head oxidizer chamber. Besides, the thermal protection method for long-time working hydrogen peroxide hybrid rocket motor is verified through full-scale firing tests. The ablation of the insulating board in oxygen-rich environment is also analyzed.

  12. Agro-industrial waste-mediated synthesis and characterization of gold and silver nanoparticles and their catalytic activity for 4-nitroaniline hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauthal, Preeti; Mukhopadhyay, Mausumi [S.V. National Institute of Technology, Surat (India)

    2015-05-15

    The biosynthesis of gold (Au-NPs) and silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) using agro-industrial waste Citrus aurantifolia peel extract as a bio-reducing agent is reported. Catalytic activity of nanoparticles (NPs) was evaluated for hydrogenation of anthropogenic pollutant 4-nitroaniline (4-NA). Both synthesized NPs were nearly spherical and distributed in size range of 6-46 and 10-32 nm for Au-NPs and Ag-NPs, respectively. XRD analysis revealed face centered cubic (fcc) structure of both NPs. ζ potential value obtained from colloidal solution of Au-NPs and Ag-NPs was −28.0 and −26.1mV, respectively, indicating the stability of the NPs in colloidal solution. FTIR spectra supported the role of citric and ascorbic acids of peel extract for biosynthesis and stabilization of NPs. The biosynthesized NPs exhibited excellent catalytic activity for hydrogenation of 4-NA in the presence of NaBH{sub 4}.

  13. Selective heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation of ketone (C═O) to alcohol (OH) by magnetite nanoparticles following Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Muhammad Tariq; Balouch, Aamna; Rajar, Kausar; Sirajuddin; Brohi, Imdad Ali; Umar, Akrajas Ali

    2015-04-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were successfully synthesized and effectively employed as heterogeneous catalyst for hydrogenation of ketone moiety to alcohol moiety by NaBH4 under the microwave radiation process. The improvement was achieved in percent recovery of isopropyl alcohol by varying and optimizing reaction time, power of microwave radiations and amount of catalyst. The catalytic study revealed that acetone would be converted into isopropyl alcohol (IPA) with 99.5% yield in short period of reaction time, using 10 μg of magnetite NPs (Fe3O4). It was observed that the catalytic hydrogenation reaction, followed second-order of reaction and the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic mechanism, which elucidated that both reactants get adsorb onto the surface of silica coated magnetite nanocatalyst to react. Consequently, the rate-determining step was the surface reaction of acetone and sodium borohydride. The current study revealed an environment friendly conversion of acetone to IPA on the basis of its fast, efficient, and highly economical method of utilization of microwave irradiation process and easy catalyst recovery.

  14. Photochemically engineering the metal-semiconductor interface for room-temperature transfer hydrogenation of nitroarenes with formic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin-Hao; Cai, Yi-Yu; Gong, Ling-Hong; Fu, Wei; Wang, Kai-Xue; Bao, Hong-Liang; Wei, Xiao; Chen, Jie-Sheng

    2014-12-08

    A mild photochemical approach was applied to construct highly coupled metal-semiconductor dyads, which were found to efficiently facilitate the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene. Aniline was produced in excellent yield (>99 %, TOF: 1183) using formic acid as hydrogen source and water as solvent at room temperature. This general and green catalytic process is applicable to a wide range of nitroarenes without the involvement of high-pressure gases or sacrificial additives. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Liquid Acquisition Device Hydrogen Outflow Testing on the Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer Engineering Design Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerli, Greg; Statham, Geoff; Garces, Rachel; Cartagena, Will

    2015-01-01

    As part of the NASA Cryogenic Propellant Storage and Transfer (CPST) Engineering Design Unit (EDU) testing with liquid hydrogen, screen-channel liquid acquisition devices (LADs) were tested during liquid hydrogen outflow from the EDU tank. A stainless steel screen mesh (325x2300 Dutch T will weave) was welded to a rectangular cross-section channel to form the basic LAD channel. Three LAD channels were tested, each having unique variations in the basic design. The LADs fed a common outflow sump at the aft end of the 151 cu. ft. volume aluminum tank, and included a curved section along the aft end and a straight section along the barrel section of the tank. Wet-dry sensors were mounted inside the LAD channels to detect when vapor was ingested into the LADs during outflow. The use of warm helium pressurant during liquid hydrogen outflow, supplied through a diffuser at the top of the tank, always led to early breakdown of the liquid column. When the tank was pressurized through an aft diffuser, resulting in cold helium in the ullage, LAD column hold-times as long as 60 minutes were achieved, which was the longest duration tested. The highest liquid column height at breakdown was 58 cm, which is 23 less than the isothermal bubble-point model value of 75 cm. This paper discusses details of the design, construction, operation and analysis of LAD test data from the CPST EDU liquid hydrogen test.

  16. Tritium-tracer study of catalytic hydrogenation reaction of ethylene on Ni, Pt and Ni-Pt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuyama, M.; Yasuda, Y.; Takeuchi, T.

    1978-01-01

    The influence of the pressure of tritiated hydrogen on the rate of the formation of tritiated ethylene, X, and that of tritiated ethane, Z, in the hydrogenation reaction of ethylene on Ni, Pt and Ni-Pt (1:1) alloy catalysts was investigated. The ratio of the rate of the exchange to that of the hydrogenation, selectivity X/Z, decreased markedly with the increase in the pressure of the tritiated hydrogen and the order of X/Z was Ni>Ni-Pt>Pt. These results were interpreted in terms of the difference in the amount of chemisorbed tritium on each metal catalyst. (orig.) [de

  17. Contribution to the study of catalytic hydrogen-deuterium exchange between hydrogen and hydrocarbons; Contribution a l'etude de l'echange catalytique hydrogene-deuterium entre l'hydrogene et les hydrocarbures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravoire, J

    1958-12-20

    The hydrogen-deuterium exchange between molecular hydrogen and hydrocarbons over a platinum and charcoal catalyst was studied in a static system. The change in isotopic composition of molecular hydrogen was followed by a thermal conductivity method. Cyclo-pentane and cyclohexane were chosen because of their stability. A reversible inactivation of the catalyst was observed with both hydrocarbons. The reasons for this inactivation are unknown but it was shown that reactivation led to satisfactory reproducibility. A kinetic study was done with cyclohexane in the range 30 to 160 deg. C, and 40 to 360 mm for the pressure of hydrogen, and 10 to 70 mm for the pressure of cyclohexane. The order of the reaction with respect to cyclohexane pressure is always close to zero; the order with respect to that of hydrogen is 0.5 above 100 deg. C. It decreases with increasing temperature and becomes negative (-0.5 at 30 deg. C), characterizing an inhibition by hydrogen. At the same time, the apparent activation energy goes from 6 to 13 kcal/mole. (author) [French] L'echange hydrogene-deuterium entre l'hydrogene moleculaire et les hydrocarbures sur un catalyseur au platine depose sur charbon a ete etudie a l'aide d'un appareil statique. La teneur en deuterium de L'hydrogene moleculaire a ete suivie par conductibilite thermique. Le cyclopentane et le cyclohexane ont ete choisis en raison de leur stabilite. Une desactivation reversible du catalyseur pendant son utilisation a ete observee pour les deux hydrocarbures. Les causes de la desactivation n'ont pas ete determinees, mais il a ete montre qu'une reactivation conduisait une reproductibilite satisfaisante. Une etude cinetique a ete conduite avec le cyclohexane dans le domaine: 30 deg C - 160 deg C, 40 mm - 360 mm comme pression d'hydrogene, 10 mm - 70 mm comme pression de cyclohexane. L'ordre par rapport a la pression de cyclohexane est toujours voisin de zero; l'ordre par rapport a la pression d'hydrogene est de 0,5 au-dessus de

  18. Hydrogen production from cheese whey by catalytic steam reforming: Preliminary study using lactose as a model compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remón, J.; Laseca, M.; García, L.; Arauzo, J.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Steam reforming of lactose: a promising strategy for cheese whey management. • Thermodynamic and experimental analyses of the effect of the operating conditions. • Reaction pathway showing the formation of the most important gas and liquid products. • Technical/energetic assessment: H_2 rich gas, C-free liquid and neutral energy process. - Abstract: Cheese whey is a yellowish liquid by-product of the cheese making process. Owing to its high BOD and COD values, this feedstock should not be directly discharged into the environment without appropriate treatment. Before dealing with real cheese whey, this work addresses the production of a rich hydrogen gas from lactose (the largest organic constituent of this waste) by catalytic steam reforming. This reforming process has been theoretically and experimentally studied. The theoretical study examines the effect of the temperature (300–600 °C), lactose concentration (1–10 wt.%) and N_2 (0–80 cm"3 STP/min) and liquid flow (0.1–0.5 mL/min) rates on the thermodynamic composition of the gas. The results show that the temperature and lactose concentration exerted the greatest influence on the thermodynamics. The experimental study, conducted in a fixed bed reactor using a Ni-based catalyst, considers the effect of the temperature (300–600 °C), lactose concentration (1–10 wt.%) and spatial time (4–16 g catalyst min/g lactose) on the global lactose conversion, product distribution on a carbon basis (gas, liquid and solid) and the compositions of the gas and liquid phases. Complete lactose conversion was achieved under all the experimental conditions. The carbon converted into gas, liquid and solid was 2–97%, 0–66% and 0–94%, respectively. The gas phase was made up of a mixture of H_2 (0–70 vol.%), CO_2 (20–70 vol.%), CO (2–34 vol.%) and CH_4 (0–3 vol.%). The liquid phase consisted of a mixture of aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids, sugars, furans, alcohols and phenols

  19. Natural spectroscopic hydrogen isotope transfer in alcohol dehydrogenase-catalysed reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Li Zhang; Pionnier, S.

    2002-01-01

    The enantiomeric purity of natural α-mono deuterated enantiomers, (R) and (S)ethanol-1-d 1 , in the alcohol produced by sugar fermentation with yeast was studied by 2 H NMR using their esters derived from optical mandelic acid. The results of isotope tracing experiments show that the transfer pathways of the two eantiotopic hydrogens of the methylene group are different. It was observed that (S)-deuterium comes only from the medium water. The (R)-deuterium transferred by NADH in alcohol dehydrogenase reduction of the acetaldehyde is complex origin. Some of them originates from carbon bound hydrogen of the sugar, especially from C(4) position of glucose and most of them comes from water. Only a small portion of the NADH deuterium is incorporated indirectly from water through enzyme catalysed exchange between the pro-S site of NADH and flavin. When a carbonyl compound (ethyl acetoacetate) was reduced under the same conditions during the alcoholic fermentation, among the NADH-transferred deuterium, only a small portion comes from water while most comes from the unexchangeable positions of the glucose. (author)

  20. Excitation and charge transfer in low-energy hydrogen atom collisions with neutral iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barklem, P. S.

    2018-05-01

    Data for inelastic processes due to hydrogen atom collisions with iron are needed for accurate modelling of the iron spectrum in late-type stars. Excitation and charge transfer in low-energy Fe+H collisions is studied theoretically using a previously presented method based on an asymptotic two-electron linear combination of atomic orbitals model of ionic-covalent interactions in the neutral atom-hydrogen-atom system, together with the multi-channel Landau-Zener model. An extensive calculation including 166 covalent states and 25 ionic states is presented and rate coefficients are calculated for temperatures in the range 1000-20 000 K. The largest rates are found for charge transfer processes to and from two clusters of states around 6.3 and 6.6 eV excitation, corresponding in both cases to active 4d and 5p electrons undergoing transfer. Excitation and de-excitation processes among these two sets of states are also significant. Full Tables and rate coefficient data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/612/A90

  1. Electrochemical catalytic reforming of oxygenated-organic compounds: a highly efficient method for production of hydrogen from bio-oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lixia; Chen, Yaqiong; Song, Chongfu; Ye, Tongqi; Guo, Qingxiang; Zhu, Qingshi; Torimoto, Youshifumi; Li, Quanxin

    2008-11-07

    A novel approach to produce hydrogen from bio-oil was obtained with high carbon conversion (>90%) and hydrogen yield (>90%) at Tcatalytic reforming of oxygenated-organic compounds over 18%NiO/Al(2)O(3) reforming catalyst; thermal electrons play important promoting roles in the decomposition and reforming of the oxygenated-organic compounds in the bio-oil.

  2. Sensitive non-radioactive determination of aminotransferase stereospecificity for C-4' hydrogen transfer on the coenzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomrit, Juntratip; Summpunn, Pijug; Meevootisom, Vithaya; Wiyakrutta, Suthep

    2011-02-25

    A sensitive non-radioactive method for determination of the stereospecificity of the C-4' hydrogen transfer on the coenzymes (pyridoxal phosphate, PLP; and pyridoxamine phosphate, PMP) of aminotransferases has been developed. Aminotransferase of unknown stereospecificity in its PLP form was incubated in (2)H(2)O with a substrate amino acid resulted in PMP labeled with deuterium at C-4' in the pro-S or pro-R configuration according to the stereospecificity of the aminotransferase tested. The [4'-(2)H]PMP was isolated from the enzyme protein and divided into two portions. The first portion was incubated in aqueous buffer with apo-aspartate aminotransferase (a reference si-face specific enzyme), and the other was incubated with apo-branched-chain amino acid aminotransferase (a reference re-face specific enzyme) in the presence of a substrate 2-oxo acid. The (2)H at C-4' is retained with the PLP if the aminotransferase in question transfers C-4' hydrogen on the opposite face of the coenzyme compared with the reference aminotransferase, but the (2)H is removed if the test and reference aminotransferases catalyze hydrogen transfer on the same face. PLP formed in the final reactions was analyzed by LC-MS/MS for the presence or absence of (2)H. The method was highly sensitive that for the aminotransferase with ca. 50 kDa subunit molecular weight, only 2mg of the enzyme was sufficient for the whole test. With this method, the use of radioactive substances could be avoided without compromising the sensitivity of the assay. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Some recent results on μ-transfer in systems with bound hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, J.D.; Mausner, L.F.; Orth, C.J.; Schillaci, M.E.; Naumann, R.A.; Schmidt, G.

    1977-01-01

    Preliminary results are given for two sets of experiments conducted in order to obtain information on the role of bound hydrogen in possible μ transfer processes by comparisons of muonic Lyman spectra. Muonic x-ray intensity patterns of Cl in CCl 4 , CH 2 Cl 2 and a CCl 4 + C 8 H 18 mixture. Secondly the same type of experiment was performed but with F as the test element. Muonic x-ray spectra of the normal and deutero forms of a compound were compared

  4. State-selective charge transfer cross sections for light ion impact of atomic hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schultz, D. R. [University of North Texas; Stancil, Phillip C. [University of Georgia, Athens; Havener, C. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the utility of diagnosing plasma properties such as impurity concentration and spatial distribution, and plasma temperature and rotation, by detection of photon emission following capture of electrons from atomic hydrogen to excited states of multiply charged ions, new calculations of state-selective charge transfer involving light ions have been carried out using the atomic orbital close-coupling and the classical trajectory Monte Carlo methods. By comparing these with results of other approaches applicable in a lower impact energy regime, and by benchmarking them using key experimental data, knowledge of the cross sections can be made available across the range parameters needed by fusion plasma diagnostics.

  5. Hydrogen transfer reduction of polyketones catalyzed by iridium complexes: a novel route towards more biocompatible materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Barbara; Crottib, Corrado; Farnetti, Erica

    2008-09-14

    Transfer hydrogenation from 2-propanol to CO/4-methylstyrene and CO/styrene polyketones was catalyzed by [Ir(diene)(N-N)X] (N-N = nitrogen chelating ligand; X = halogen) in the presence of a basic cocatalyst. The reactions were performed using dioxane as cosolvent, in order to overcome problems due to low polyketone solubility. The polyalcohols were obtained in yields up to 95%, the conversions being markedly dependent on the nature of the ligands coordinated to iridium as well as on the experimental conditions.

  6. Activating basal-plane catalytic activity of two-dimensional MoS2 monolayer with remote hydrogen plasma

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Chia-Chin; Lu, Ang-Yu; Tseng, Chien-Chih; Yang, Xiulin; Hedhili, Mohamed N.; Chen, Min-Cheng; Wei, Kung-Hwa; Li, Lain-Jong

    2016-01-01

    that account for a small percentage of the surface area, rather than the basal planes, of MoS2 monolayer have been confirmed as their active catalytic sites. As a result, extensive efforts have been developing in activating the basal planes of MoS2

  7. Bane of Hydrogen-Bond Formation on the Photoinduced Charge-Transfer Process in Donor–Acceptor Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Alsam, Amani Abdu

    2017-03-14

    Controlling the ultrafast dynamical process of photoinduced charge transfer at donor acceptor interfaces remains a major challenge for physical chemistry and solar cell communities. The process is complicated by the involvement of other complex dynamical processes, including hydrogen bond formation, energy transfer, and solvation dynamics occurring on similar time scales. In this study, we explore the remarkable impact of hydrogen-bond formation on the interfacial charge transfer between a negatively charged electron donating anionic porphyrin and a positively charged electron accepting pi-conjugated polymer, as a model system in solvents with different polarities and capabilities for hydiogen bonding using femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. Unlike the conventional understanding of the key role of hydrogen bonding in promoting the charge-transfer process, our steadystate and time-resolved results reveal that the intervening hydrogen-bonding environment and, consequently, the probable longer spacing between the donor and acceptor molecules significantly hinders the charge-transfer process between them. These results show that site-specific hydrogen bonding and geometric considerations between donor and acceptor can be exploited to control both the charge-transfer dynamics and its efficiency not only at donor acceptor interfaces but also in complex biological systems.

  8. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Levulinic Acid in Water into g-Valerolactone over Bulk Structure of Inexpensive Intermetallic Ni-Sn Alloy Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodiansono Rodiansono

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A bulk structure of inexpensive intermetallic nickel-tin (Ni-Sn alloys catalysts demonstrated highly selective in the hydrogenation of levulinic acid in water into g-valerolactone. The intermetallic Ni-Sn catalysts were synthesized via a very simple thermochemical method from non-organometallic precursor at low temperature followed by hydrogen treatment at 673 K for 90 min. The molar ratio of nickel salt and tin salt was varied to obtain the corresponding Ni/Sn ratio of 4.0, 3.0, 2.0, 1.5, and 0.75. The formation of Ni-Sn alloy species was mainly depended on the composition and temperature of H2 treatment. Intermetallics Ni-Sn that contain Ni3Sn, Ni3Sn2, and Ni3Sn4 alloy phases are known to be effective heterogeneous catalysts for levulinic acid hydrogenation giving very excellence g-valerolactone yield of >99% at 433 K, initial H2 pressure of 4.0 MPa within 6 h. The effective hydrogenation was obtained in H2O without the formation of by-product. Intermetallic Ni-Sn(1.5 that contains Ni3Sn2 alloy species demonstrated very stable and reusable catalyst without any significant loss of its selectivity. © 2015 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved. Received: 26th February 2015; Revised: 16th April 2015; Accepted: 22nd April 2015  How to Cite: Rodiansono, R., Astuti, M.D., Ghofur, A., Sembiring, K.C. (2015. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Levulinic Acid in Water into g-Valerolactone over Bulk Structure of Inexpensive Intermetallic Ni-Sn Alloy Catalysts. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 10 (2: 192-200. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.10.2.8284.192-200Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.10.2.8284.192-200  

  9. Flow injection determination of hydrogen peroxide using catalytic effect of cobalt(II) ion on a dye formation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Makoto; Muramatsu, Miyuki; Yamada, Mari; Kitamura, Naoya

    2012-07-15

    A novel flow injection photometric method was developed for the determination of hydrogen peroxide in rainwater. This method is based on a cobalt(II)-catalyzed oxidative coupling of 3-methyl-2-benzothiazolinone hydrazone (MBTH) with N-ethyl-N-(2-hydroxy-3-sulfopropyl)-3,5-dimethoxyaniline (DAOS) as a modified Trinder's reagent to produce intensely colored dye (λ(max)=530nm) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide at pH 8.4. In this method, 1,2-dihydroxy-3,5-benzenedisulfonic acid (Tiron) acted as an activator for the cobalt(II)-catalyzed reaction and effectively increased the peak height for hydrogen peroxide. The linear calibration graphs were obtained in the hydrogen peroxide concentration range 5×10(-8) to 2.2×10(-6)mol dm(-3) at a sampling rate of 20h(-1). The relative standard deviations for ten determinations of 2.2×10(-6) and 2×10(-7)mol dm(-3) hydrogen peroxide were 1.1% and 3.7%, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of hydrogen peroxide in rainwater samples and the analytical results agreed fairly well with the results obtained by different two reference methods; peroxidase method and hydrogen peroxide electrode method. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Microscopic models for proton transfer in water and strongly hydrogen-bonded complexes with a single-well proton potential

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2004-01-01

    A new mechanism and formalism for proton transfer in donor-acceptor complexes with long hydrogen bonds introduced recently [1], is applied to a proton transfer in liquid water. "Structural diffusion" of hydroxonium ions is regarded as totally adiabatic process, with synchronous hindered translation...... of two closest water molecules to and from the reaction complex as crucial steps. The water molecules induce a "gated" shift of the proton from the donor to the acceptor in the double-well potential with simultaneous breaking/formation of hydrogen bonds between these molecules and the proton donor...... and acceptor. The short-range and long-range proton transfer as "structural diffusion" of Zundel complexes is also considered. The theoretical formalism is illustrated with the use of Morse, exponential, and harmonic molecular potentials. This approach is extended to proton transfer in strongly hydrogen...

  11. Catalytic mechanisms of direct pyrrole synthesis via dehydrogenative coupling mediated by PNP-Ir or PNN-Ru pincer complexes: Crucial role of proton-transfer shuttles in the PNP-Ir system

    KAUST Repository

    Qu, Shuanglin

    2014-04-02

    Kempe et al. and Milstein et al. have recently advanced the dehydrogenative coupling methodology to synthesize pyrroles from secondary alcohols (e.g., 3) and β-amino alcohols (e.g., 4), using PNP-Ir (1) and PNN-Ru (2) pincer complexes, respectively. We herein present a DFT study to characterize the catalytic mechanism of these reactions. After precatalyst activation to give active 1A/2A, the transformation proceeds via four stages: 1A/2A-catalyzed alcohol (3) dehydrogenation to give ketone (11), base-facilitated C-N coupling of 11 and 4 to form an imine-alcohol intermediate (18), base-promoted cyclization of 18, and catalyst regeneration via H2 release from 1R/2R. For alcohol dehydrogenations, the bifunctional double hydrogen-transfer pathway is more favorable than that via β-hydride elimination. Generally, proton-transfer (H-transfer) shuttles facilitate various H-transfer processes in both systems. Notwithstanding, H-transfer shuttles play a much more crucial role in the PNP-Ir system than in the PNN-Ru system. Without H-transfer shuttles, the key barriers up to 45.9 kcal/mol in PNP-Ir system are too high to be accessible, while the corresponding barriers (<32.0 kcal/mol) in PNN-Ru system are not unreachable. Another significant difference between the two systems is that the addition of alcohol to 1A giving an alkoxo complex is endergonic by 8.1 kcal/mol, whereas the addition to 2A is exergonic by 8.9 kcal/mol. The thermodynamic difference could be the main reason for PNP-Ir system requiring lower catalyst loading than the PNN-Ru system. We discuss how the differences are resulted in terms of electronic and geometric structures of the catalysts and how to use the features in catalyst development. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  12. Hydrogenation of nitriles on a well-characterized nickel surface: From surface science studies to liquid phase catalytic activity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardin, Denis Emmanuel [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Nitrile hydrogenation is the most commonly used method for preparing diverse amines. This thesis is aimed at the mechanism and factors affecting the performance of Ni-based catalysts in nitrile hydrogenations. Surface science techniques are used to study bonding of nitriles and amines to a Ni(111) surface and to identify surface intermediates. Liquid-phase hydrogenations of cyclohexene and 1-hexene on a Pt foil were carried out successfully. Finally, knowledge about the surface structure, surface chemical bond, dynamics of surface atoms (diffusion, growth), and reactivity of metal surfaces from solid-gas interface studies, is discussed.

  13. An efficient route for catalytic activity promotion via hybrid electro-depositional modification on commercial nickel foam for hydrogen evolution reaction in alkaline water electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Guanshui; He, Yongwei; Wang, Mei; Zhu, Fuchun; Tang, Bin [Research Institute of Surface Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Yingze West Road 79, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Wang, Xiaoguang, E-mail: wangxiaog1982@163.com [Research Institute of Surface Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Yingze West Road 79, Taiyuan 030024 (China); International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory (INL), 4715-330 Braga (Portugal)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Mono-Cu surface modification depress the HER activity of Ni-foam. • Hybrid Ni-foam/Cu0.01/Co0.05 exhibits superior HER performance. • Layer-by-layer structure may contribute to a synergistic promoting effect. - Abstract: In this paper, the single- and hybrid-layered Cu, Ni and Co thin films were electrochemically deposited onto the three-dimensional nickel foam as composite cathode catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction in alkaline water electrolysis. The morphology, structure and chemical composition of the electrodeposited composite catalysts were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Electrochemical measurement depicted that, for the case of the monometallic layered samples, the general activity for hydrogen evolution reaction followed the sequence: Ni-foam/Ni > Ni-foam/Co > bare Ni-foam > Ni-foam/Cu. It is noteworthy that, the hybrid-layered Ni-foam/Cu0.01/Co0.05 exhibited the highest catalytic activity towards hydrogen evolution reaction with the current density as high as 2.82 times that of the bare Ni-foam. Moreover, both excellent electrochemical and physical stabilities can also be acquired on the Ni-foam/Cu0.01/Co0.05, making this hybrid-layered composite structure as a promising HER electro-catalyst.

  14. On the role of metal particle size and surface coverage for photo-catalytic hydrogen production; a case study of the Au/CdS system

    KAUST Repository

    Majeed, I.

    2015-09-25

    Photo-catalytic hydrogen production has been studied on Au supported CdS catalysts under visible light irradiation in order to understand the effect of Au particle size as well as the reaction medium properties. Au nanoparticles of size about 2-5 nm were deposited over hexagonal CdS particles using a new simple method involving reduction of Au3+ ions with iodide ions. Within the investigated range of Au (between 1 and 5 wt. %) fresh particles with mean size of 4 nm and XPS Au4f/Cd3d surface ratio of 0.07 showed the highest performance (ca. 1 molecule of H2 / Auatom s−1) under visible light irradiation (>420 nm and a flux of 35 mW/cm2). The highest hydrogen production rate was obtained from water (92%)-ethanol (8%) in an electrolyte medium (Na2S-Na2SO3). TEM studies of fresh and used catalysts showed that Au particle size increases (almost 5 fold) with increasing photo-irradiation time due to photo-agglomeration effect yet no sign of deactivation was observed. A mechanism for hydrogen production from ethanol-water electrolyte mixture is presented and discussed.

  15. CuNi Nanoparticles Assembled on Graphene for Catalytic Methanolysis of Ammonia Borane and Hydrogenation of Nitro/Nitrile Compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Here we report a solution phase synthesis of 16 nm CuNi nanoparticles (NPs) with the Cu/Ni composition control. These NPs are assembled on graphene (G) and show Cu/Ni composition-dependent catalysis for methanolysis of ammonia borane (AB) and hydrogenation of aromatic nitro (nitrile) compounds to primary amines in methanol at room temperature. Among five different CuNi NPs studied, the G-Cu 36 Ni 64 NPs are the best catalyst for both AB methanolysis (TOF = 49.1 mol H2 mol CuNi -1 min -1 and E a = 24.4 kJ/mol) and hydrogenation reactions (conversion yield >97%). In conclusion, the G-CuNi represents a unique noble-metal-free catalyst for hydrogenation reactions in a green environment without using pure hydrogen.

  16. Excitation and charge transfer in low-energy hydrogen atom collisions with neutral oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barklem, P. S.

    2018-02-01

    Excitation and charge transfer in low-energy O+H collisions is studied; it is a problem of importance for modelling stellar spectra and obtaining accurate oxygen abundances in late-type stars including the Sun. The collisions have been studied theoretically using a previously presented method based on an asymptotic two-electron linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) model of ionic-covalent interactions in the neutral atom-hydrogen-atom system, together with the multichannel Landau-Zener model. The method has been extended to include configurations involving excited states of hydrogen using an estimate for the two-electron transition coupling, but this extension was found to not lead to any remarkably high rates. Rate coefficients are calculated for temperatures in the range 1000-20 000 K, and charge transfer and (de)excitation processes involving the first excited S-states, 4s.5So and 4s.3So, are found to have the highest rates. Data are available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/vizbin/qcat?J/A+A/610/A57. The data are also available at http://https://github.com/barklem/public-data

  17. Metal-free photochemical silylations and transfer hydrogenations of benzenoid hydrocarbons and graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Raffaello; Li, Hu; Bergman, Joakim; Lundstedt, Anna; Jorner, Kjell; Ayub, Rabia; Haldar, Soumyajyoti; Jahn, Burkhard O.; Denisova, Aleksandra; Zietz, Burkhard; Lindh, Roland; Sanyal, Biplab; Grennberg, Helena; Leifer, Klaus; Ottosson, Henrik

    2016-10-01

    The first hydrogenation step of benzene, which is endergonic in the electronic ground state (S0), becomes exergonic in the first triplet state (T1). This is in line with Baird's rule, which tells that benzene is antiaromatic and destabilized in its T1 state and also in its first singlet excited state (S1), opposite to S0, where it is aromatic and remarkably unreactive. Here we utilized this feature to show that benzene and several polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to various extents undergo metal-free photochemical (hydro)silylations and transfer-hydrogenations at mild conditions, with the highest yield for naphthalene (photosilylation: 21%). Quantum chemical computations reveal that T1-state benzene is excellent at H-atom abstraction, while cyclooctatetraene, aromatic in the T1 and S1 states according to Baird's rule, is unreactive. Remarkably, also CVD-graphene on SiO2 is efficiently transfer-photohydrogenated using formic acid/water mixtures together with white light or solar irradiation under metal-free conditions.

  18. Kinetics of liquid-phase catalytic heterogeneous protium-tritium isotope exchange with participation of gaseous hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akulov, G.P.; Snetkova, E.V.; Kayumov, V.G.; Kaminskij, Yu.L.

    1990-01-01

    Reaction rate constants of catalytic (PdO/BaSO 4 (Al 2 O 3 ) catalyst) heterogeneous protium - tritium isotopic exchange D - [1- 3 H] of carbohydrates and gaseous oxygen have been measured. It is ascertained that the rate of isotopic exchange depends on the nature of carbohydrate, catalyst, buffer and medium acidity. The value of concentration of carbohydrate acyclic forms plays the determining role in the process

  19. Intermolecular hydrogen transfer catalyzed by a flavodehydrogenase, bakers' yeast flavocytochrome b2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, P.; Lederer, F.

    1985-01-01

    Bakers yeast flavocytochrome b2 is a flavin-dependent L-2-hydroxy acid dehydrogenase which also exhibits transhydrogenase activity. When a reaction takes place between [2- 3 H]lactate and a halogenopyruvate, tritium is found in water and at the halogenolactate C2 position. When the halogenopyruvate undergoes halide ion elimination, tritium is also found at the C3 position of the resulting pyruvate. The amount tau of this intermolecular tritium transfer depends on the initial keto acid-acceptor concentration. At infinite acceptor concentration, extrapolation yields a maximal transfer of 97 +/- 11%. This indicates that the hydroxy acid-derived hydrogen resides transiently on enzyme monoprotic heteroatoms and that exchange with bulk solvent occurs only at the level of free reduced enzyme. Using a minimal kinetic scheme, the rate constant for hydrogen exchange between Ered and solvent is calculated to be on the order of 10(2) M-1 S-1, which leads to an estimated pK approximately equal to 15 for the ionization of the substrate-derived proton while on the enzyme. It is suggested that this hydrogen could be shared between the active site base and Flred N5 anion. It is furthermore shown that some tritium is incorporated into the products when the transhydrogenation is carried out in tritiated water. Finally, with [2-2H]lactate-reduced enzyme, a deuterium isotope effect is observed on the rate of bromopyruvate disappearance. Extrapolation to infinite bromopyruvate concentration yields DV = 4.4. An apparent inverse isotope effect is determined for bromide ion elimination. These results strengthen the idea that oxidoreduction and elimination pathways involve a common carbanionic intermediate

  20. Insight into the mechanism revealing the peroxidase mimetic catalytic activity of quaternary CuZnFeS nanocrystals: colorimetric biosensing of hydrogen peroxide and glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalui, Amit; Pradhan, Bapi; Thupakula, Umamahesh; Khan, Ali Hossain; Kumar, Gundam Sandeep; Ghosh, Tanmay; Satpati, Biswarup; Acharya, Somobrata

    2015-05-01

    Artificial enzyme mimetics have attracted immense interest recently because natural enzymes undergo easy denaturation under environmental conditions restricting practical usefulness. We report for the first time chalcopyrite CuZnFeS (CZIS) alloyed nanocrystals (NCs) as novel biomimetic catalysts with efficient intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. Novel peroxidase activities of CZIS NCs have been evaluated by catalytic oxidation of the peroxidase substrate 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). CZIS NCs demonstrate the synergistic effect of elemental composition and photoactivity towards peroxidase-like activity. The quaternary CZIS NCs show enhanced intrinsic peroxidase-like activity compared to the binary NCs with the same constituent elements. Intrinsic peroxidase-like activity has been correlated with the energy band position of CZIS NCs extracted using scanning tunneling spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Kinetic analyses indicate Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetic model catalytic behavior describing the rate of the enzymatic reaction by correlating the reaction rate with substrate concentration. Typical color reactions arising from the catalytic oxidation of TMB over CZIS NCs with H2O2 have been utilized to establish a simple and sensitive colorimetric assay for detection of H2O2 and glucose. CZIS NCs are recyclable catalysts showing high efficiency in multiple uses. Our study may open up the possibility of designing new photoactive multi-component alloyed NCs as enzyme mimetics in biotechnology applications.Artificial enzyme mimetics have attracted immense interest recently because natural enzymes undergo easy denaturation under environmental conditions restricting practical usefulness. We report for the first time chalcopyrite CuZnFeS (CZIS) alloyed nanocrystals (NCs) as novel biomimetic catalysts with efficient intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. Novel peroxidase activities of CZIS NCs have been

  1. Effect of Copper Nanoparticles Dispersion on Catalytic Performance of Cu/SiO2 Catalyst for Hydrogenation of Dimethyl Oxalate to Ethylene Glycol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajing Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cu/SiO2 catalysts, for the synthesis of ethylene glycol (EG from hydrogenation of dimethyl oxalate (DMO, were prepared by ammonia-evaporation and sol-gel methods, respectively. The structure, size of copper nanoparticles, copper dispersion, and the surface chemical states were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and N2 adsorption. It is found the structures and catalytic performances of the catalysts were highly affected by the preparation method. The catalyst prepared by sol-gel method had smaller average size of copper nanoparticles (about 3-4 nm, better copper dispersion, higher Cu+/C0 ratio and larger BET surface area, and higher DMO conversion and EG selectivity under the optimized reaction conditions.

  2. Numerical modeling of heat transfer during hydrogen absorption in thin double-layered annular ZrCo beds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yehui Cui

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work a three-dimensional (3D hydrogen absorption model was proposed to study the heat transfer behavior in thin double-layered annular ZrCo beds. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate the effects of conversion layer thickness, thermal conductivity, cooling medium and its flow velocity on the efficiency of heat transfer. Results reveal that decreasing the layer thickness and improving the thermal conductivity enhance the ability of heat transfer. Compared with nitrogen and helium, water appears to be a better medium for cooling. In order to achieve the best efficiency of heat transfer, the flow velocity needs to be maximized. Keywords: Hydrogen storage, ZrCo metal hydride, Heat transfer, Three-dimensional simulation

  3. Enhanced safety margins during wet transport of irradiated fuel by catalytic recombination of radiolysis hydrogen and oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, J.T.; Bankhead, M.; Hodge, N.A.

    2004-01-01

    BNFL has developed and tested a new method for use in wet transport of irradiated fuel. The method uses a catalyst to recombine the hydrogen and oxygen produced from radiolysis. The catalyst is installed in the nitrogen ullage gas region. It has twin benefits as it eliminates a gas mixture that could, in principle, exceed the safe target levels set to ensure safety during Transport, and it also reduces overall gas pressure. Pure water radiolysis predictions, from experiment and theory, indicate very low levels of hydrogen and oxygen generation. BNFL's historic experience is that in some transport packages it is possible to produce higher levels of hydrogen and oxygen. This drives the need to improve on our existing ullage gas remediation technology. Our studies of the radiolysis science and our flask data suggest it is the interaction of the liquors and material surfaces that is giving rise to the enhanced levels of hydrogen and/or oxygen. This technical paper demonstrates the performance of the recombiner catalyst under normal and extreme conditions of transport. The paper will present experimental data that shows the recombiner catalyst working to manage the hydrogen and oxygen levels

  4. Treatment of Row Leachate Using Catalytic Wet Oxidation Processes in Combination Hydrogen Peroxide, A Case Study of Isfahan Composting Factory Leachate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrouz Karimi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Treatment of toxic organic compounds is one of the major applications of the Wet Air Oxidation (WAO processes. The process can be defined  as the oxidation of substances, either in the form of solutions or suspensions, with the use of an oxidant (oxygen or air at elevated pressure and temperature. The aim of this paper was to study of Catalytic Wet Oxidation (CWAO with hydrogen peroxide to improve removal efficiency of organic matter and ammonia mainly produced in Isfahan composting factory leachate. The experiment was carried out by adding 1.5 Lit pretreated leachate sample to 3 Lit autoclave reactor. Four parameters are considered: pressure (8–12 bar; temperature (100–300 °C; retention time (30–90 min; H2O2 (1–5 mL/L.The highest removal efficiencies of COD and BOD were achieved at 300°C; approximately 44% and 48% were destroyed, respectively. On the other hand, highest ammonium removal efficiency was achieved at 100 °C in which approximately 63.8% was removed. The efficiency of aqueous phase oxidation can be largely improved by the use of H2O2 as catalyst. Therefore, catalytic wet oxidation would provide an environmentally attractive option for control of organic and toxic wastes problems. Temperature was found to be the most important control variable of the wet oxidation process of leachate.

  5. A conserved residue of l-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus pseudofirmus, Lys-73, participates in the catalytic reaction through hydrogen bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guangzheng; Xu, Shujing; Wang, Shanshan; Zhang, Qing; Liu, Dong; Chen, Yuling; Ju, Jiansong; Zhao, Baohua

    2018-03-01

    A multiple protein sequence alignment of l-alanine dehydrogenases from different bacterial species revealed that five highly conserved amino acid residues Arg-15, Lys-73, Lys-75, His-96 and Asp-269 are potential catalytic residues of l-alanine dehydrogenase from Bacillus pseudofirmus OF4. In this study, recombinant OF4Ald and its mutants of five conserved residues were constructed, expressed in Escherichia coli, purified by His 6 -tag affinity column and gel filtration chromatography, structure homology modeling, and characterized. The purified protein OF4Ald displayed high specificity to l-alanine (15Umg -1 ) with an optimal temperature and pH of 40°C and 10.5, respectively. Enzymatic assay and activity staining in native gels showed that mutations at four conserved residue Arg-15, Lys-75, His-96 and Asp-269 (except residue Lys-73) resulted in a complete loss in enzymatic activity, which signified that these predicted active sites are indispensable for OF4Ald activity. In contrast, the mutant K73A resulted in 6-fold improvement in k cat /K m towards l-alanine as compared to the wild type protein. Further research of the residue Lys-73 substituted by various amino acids and structural modeling revealed that residue Lys-73 might be involved in the catalytic reaction of the enzyme by influencing the enzyme-substrate binding through the hydrogen-bonding interaction with conserved residue Lys-75. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The criteria of critical runaway and stable temperatures of catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide in the presence of hydrochloric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, K.-T.; Yang, C.-C.; Lin, P.-C.

    2006-01-01

    The hydrogen peroxide and hydrochloric acid are used in close proximity in the computer chip manufacture. The hydrochloric acid catalyzes an exothermic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide into oxygen and water. The accumulation of heat and non-condensable gas increases temperature and pressure in this reaction process always lead to runaway reaction and accident owing to inadvertent mixing. Thus, the chemical reaction hazard has to be clearly identified. Its critical runaway temperatures and unstable reaction criteria in this reaction process have to be determined urgently. In this investigation, we estimated its kinetic parameters at various volumetric ratios of the hydrogen peroxide to hydrochloric acid. Then, used these kinetic parameters to evaluate their critical temperatures and stable criteria in each reaction processes. The analytic results are important and useful for the design of safety system in the computer chip manufacture

  7. Theoretical and computational study of the energy dependence of the muon transfer rate from hydrogen to higher-Z gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakalov, Dimitar, E-mail: dbakalov@inrne.bas.bg [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tsarigradsko chaussée 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Adamczak, Andrzej [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Stoilov, Mihail [Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Tsarigradsko chaussée 72, Sofia 1784 (Bulgaria); Vacchi, Andrea [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Trieste, Via A. Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy)

    2015-01-23

    The recent PSI Lamb shift experiment and the controversy about proton size revived the interest in measuring the hyperfine splitting in muonic hydrogen as an alternative possibility for comparing ordinary and muonic hydrogen spectroscopy data on proton electromagnetic structure. This measurement critically depends on the energy dependence of the muon transfer rate to heavier gases in the epithermal range. The available data provide only qualitative information, and the theoretical predictions have not been verified. We propose a new method by measurements of the transfer rate in thermalized target at different temperatures, estimate its accuracy and investigate the optimal experimental conditions. - Highlights: • Method for measuring the energy dependence of muon transfer rate to higher-Z gases. • Thermalization and depolarization of muonic hydrogen studied by Monte Carlo method. • Optimal experimental conditions determined by Monte Carlo simulations. • Mathematical model and for estimating the uncertainty of the experimental results.

  8. Efficient and Adaptive Methods for Computing Accurate Potential Surfaces for Quantum Nuclear Effects: Applications to Hydrogen-Transfer Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeGregorio, Nicole; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2018-01-09

    We present two sampling measures to gauge critical regions of potential energy surfaces. These sampling measures employ (a) the instantaneous quantum wavepacket density, an approximation to the (b) potential surface, its (c) gradients, and (d) a Shannon information theory based expression that estimates the local entropy associated with the quantum wavepacket. These four criteria together enable a directed sampling of potential surfaces that appears to correctly describe the local oscillation frequencies, or the local Nyquist frequency, of a potential surface. The sampling functions are then utilized to derive a tessellation scheme that discretizes the multidimensional space to enable efficient sampling of potential surfaces. The sampled potential surface is then combined with four different interpolation procedures, namely, (a) local Hermite curve interpolation, (b) low-pass filtered Lagrange interpolation, (c) the monomial symmetrization approximation (MSA) developed by Bowman and co-workers, and (d) a modified Shepard algorithm. The sampling procedure and the fitting schemes are used to compute (a) potential surfaces in highly anharmonic hydrogen-bonded systems and (b) study hydrogen-transfer reactions in biogenic volatile organic compounds (isoprene) where the transferring hydrogen atom is found to demonstrate critical quantum nuclear effects. In the case of isoprene, the algorithm discussed here is used to derive multidimensional potential surfaces along a hydrogen-transfer reaction path to gauge the effect of quantum-nuclear degrees of freedom on the hydrogen-transfer process. Based on the decreased computational effort, facilitated by the optimal sampling of the potential surfaces through the use of sampling functions discussed here, and the accuracy of the associated potential surfaces, we believe the method will find great utility in the study of quantum nuclear dynamics problems, of which application to hydrogen-transfer reactions and hydrogen

  9. Hydrogen atom transfer reactions in thiophenol: photogeneration of two new thione isomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, Igor; Nowak, Maciej J; Lapinski, Leszek; Fausto, Rui

    2015-02-21

    Photoisomerization reactions of monomeric thiophenol have been investigated for the compound isolated in low-temperature argon matrices. The initial thiophenol population consists exclusively of the thermodynamically most stable thiol form. Phototransformations were induced by irradiation of the matrices with narrowband tunable UV light. Irradiation at λ > 290 nm did not induce any changes in isolated thiophenol molecules. Upon irradiation at 290-285 nm, the initial thiol form of thiophenol converted into its thione isomer, cyclohexa-2,4-diene-1-thione. This conversion occurs by transfer of an H atom from the SH group to a carbon atom at the ortho position of the ring. Subsequent irradiation at longer wavelengths (300-427 nm) demonstrated that this UV-induced hydrogen-atom transfer is photoreversible. Moreover, upon irradiation at 400-425 nm, the cyclohexa-2,4-diene-1-thione product converts, by transfer of a hydrogen atom from the ortho to para position, into another thione isomer, cyclohexa-2,5-diene-1-thione. The latter thione isomer is also photoreactive and is consumed if irradiated at λ atom-transfer isomerization reactions dominate the unimolecular photochemistry of thiophenol confined in a solid argon matrix. A set of low-intensity infrared bands, observed in the spectra of UV irradiated thiophenol, indicates the presence of a phenylthiyl radical with an H- atom detached from the SH group. Alongside the H-atom-transfer and H-atom-detachment processes, the ring-opening photoreaction occurred in cyclohexa-2,4-diene-1-thione by the cleavage of the C-C bond at the alpha position with respect to the thiocarbonyl C[double bond, length as m-dash]S group. The resulting open-ring conjugated thioketene adopts several isomeric forms, differing by orientations around single and double bonds. The species photogenerated upon UV irradiation of thiophenol were identified by comparison of their experimental infrared spectra with the spectra theoretically calculated for

  10. A nano-engineered graphene/carbon nitride hybrid for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaobo Li; Yao Zheng; Anthony F.Masters; Thomas Maschmeyer

    2016-01-01

    A metal-free photocatalytic hydrogen evolution system was successfully fabricated using heteroatom doped graphene materials as electron-transfer co-catalysts and carbon nitride as a semiconductor.The catalytic role of graphene is significantly dependent on the heteroatom dopant of the graphene,such as O,S,B,N doped/undoped graphene co-catalysts,and N-graphene shows the best catalytic hydrogen evolution rate.

  11. Palladium-Catalyzed Atom-Transfer Radical Cyclization at Remote Unactivated C(sp3 )-H Sites: Hydrogen-Atom Transfer of Hybrid Vinyl Palladium Radical Intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratushnyy, Maxim; Parasram, Marvin; Wang, Yang; Gevorgyan, Vladimir

    2018-03-01

    A novel mild, visible-light-induced palladium-catalyzed hydrogen atom translocation/atom-transfer radical cyclization (HAT/ATRC) cascade has been developed. This protocol involves a 1,5-HAT process of previously unknown hybrid vinyl palladium radical intermediates, thus leading to iodomethyl carbo- and heterocyclic structures. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Numerical modeling of heat transfer during hydrogen absorption in thin double-layered annular ZrCo beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yehui; Zeng, Xiangguo; Kou, Huaqin; Ding, Jun; Wang, Fang

    2018-06-01

    In this work a three-dimensional (3D) hydrogen absorption model was proposed to study the heat transfer behavior in thin double-layered annular ZrCo beds. Numerical simulations were performed to investigate the effects of conversion layer thickness, thermal conductivity, cooling medium and its flow velocity on the efficiency of heat transfer. Results reveal that decreasing the layer thickness and improving the thermal conductivity enhance the ability of heat transfer. Compared with nitrogen and helium, water appears to be a better medium for cooling. In order to achieve the best efficiency of heat transfer, the flow velocity needs to be maximized.

  13. Autothermal catalytic pyrolysis of methane as a new route to hydrogen production with reduced CO{sub 2} emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradov, Nazim; Smith, Franklyn; Huang, Cunping; T-Raissi, Ali [Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida, Cocoa, FL 32922 (United States)

    2006-08-15

    Hydrogen production plants are among major sources of CO{sub 2} emissions into the atmosphere. The objective of this paper is to explore new routes to hydrogen production from natural gas (or methane) with drastically reduced CO{sub 2} emissions. One approach analyzed in this paper is based on thermocatalytic decomposition (or pyrolysis) of methane into hydrogen gas and elemental carbon over carbon-based catalysts. Several heat input options to the endothermic process are discussed in the paper. The authors conduct thermodynamic analysis of methane decomposition in the presence of small amounts of oxygen in an autothermal (or thermo-neutral) regime using AspenPlus(TM) chemical process simulator. Methane conversion, products yield, effluent gas composition, process enthalpy flows as a function of temperature, pressure and O{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} ratio has been determined. CO{sub 2} emissions (per m{sup 3} of H{sub 2} produced) from the process could potentially be a factor of 3-5 less than from conventional hydrogen production processes. Oxygen-assisted decomposition of methane over activated carbon (AC) and AC-supported iron catalysts over wide range of temperatures and O{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} ratios was experimentally verified. Problems associated with the catalyst deactivation and the effect of iron doping on the catalyst stability are discussed. (author)

  14. Ni(0-CMC-Na Nickel Colloids in Sodium Carboxymethyl-Cellulose: Catalytic Evaluation in Hydrogenation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah Karim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A recyclable catalyst, Ni(0-CMC-Na, composed of nickel colloids dispersed in a water soluble bioorganic polymer, sodium carboxymethylcellulose (CMC-Na, was synthesized by a simple procedure from readily available reagents. The catalyst thus obtained is stable and highly active in alkene hydrogenations.

  15. Gas cleaning and hydrogen sulfide removal for COREX coal gas by sorption enhanced catalytic oxidation over recyclable activated carbon desulfurizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tonghua; Shen, Yafei; Jia, Jinping

    2014-02-18

    This paper proposes a novel self-developed JTS-01 desulfurizer and JZC-80 alkaline adsorbent for H2S removal and gas cleaning of the COREX coal gas in small-scale and commercial desulfurizing devices. JTS-01 desulfurizer was loaded with metal oxide (i.e., ferric oxides) catalysts on the surface of activated carbons (AC), and the catalyst capacity was improved dramatically by means of ultrasonically assisted impregnation. Consequently, the sulfur saturation capacity and sulfur capacity breakthrough increased by 30.3% and 27.9%, respectively. The whole desulfurizing process combined selective adsorption with catalytic oxidation. Moreover, JZC-80 adsorbent can effectively remove impurities such as HCl, HF, HCN, and ash in the COREX coal gas, stabilizing the system pressure drop. The JTS-01 desulfurizer and JZC-80 adsorbent have been successfully applied for the COREX coal gas cleaning in the commercial plant at Baosteel, Shanghai. The sulfur capacity of JTS-01 desulfurizer can reach more than 50% in industrial applications. Compared with the conventional dry desulfurization process, the modified AC desulfurizers have more merit, especially in terms of the JTS-01 desulfurizer with higher sulfur capacity and low pressure drop. Thus, this sorption enhanced catalytic desulfurization has promising prospects for H2S removal and other gas cleaning.

  16. Catalytic activity of hydrophobic Pt/C/PTFE catalysts of different PTFE content for hydrogen-water liquid exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Sheng; Xiao Chengjian; Zhu Zuliang; Luo Shunzhong; Wang Heyi; Luo Yangming; Wang Changbin

    2007-01-01

    10%Pt/C catalysts were prepared by liquid reduction method. PTFE and Pt/ C catalysts were adhered to porous metal and hydrophobic Pt/C/PTFE catalysts were prepared. The structure and size of Pt crystal particles of Pt/C catalysts were analyzed by XRD, and their mean size was 3.1 nm. The dispersion state of Pt/C and PTFE was analyzed by SEM, and they had good dispersion mostly, but PTFE membrane could be observed on local parts of Pt/C/PTFE surface. Because of low hydrophobicity, Pt/C/ PTFE catalysts have low activity when the mass ratio of PTFE and Pt/C is 0.5: 1, and their catalytic activity increases markedly when the ratio is 1:1. When the ratio increases again, more Pt active sites would be covered by PTFE and interior diffusion effect would increase, which result in the decrease of catalytic activity of Pt/C/PTFE. By PTFE pretreatment of porous metal carrier, the activity of Pt/C/PTFE catalysts decreases when the mass ratio of PTFE and Pt/C is 0.5:1, and their activity decreases when the mass ratio is 1:1. (authors)

  17. A Au/Cu2O-TiO2 system for photo-catalytic hydrogen production. A pn-junction effect or a simple case of in situ reduction?

    KAUST Repository

    Sinatra, Lutfan

    2015-02-01

    Photo-catalytic H2 production from water has been studied over Au-Cu2O nanoparticle deposited on TiO2 (anatase) in order to probe into both the plasmon resonance effect (Au nanoparticles) and the pn-junction at the Cu2O-TiO2 interface. The Au-Cu2O composite is in the form of ∼10 nm Au nanoparticles grown on ∼475 nm Cu2O octahedral nanocrystals with (111) facets by partial galvanic replacement. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) Cu2p and Auger L3M4,5M4,5 lines indicate that the surface of Cu2O is mainly composed of Cu+. The rate for H2 production (from 95 water/5 ethylene glycol; vol.%) over 2 wt.% (Au/Cu2O)-TiO2 is found to be ∼10 times faster than that on 2 wt.% Au-TiO2 alone. Raman spectroscopy before and after reaction showed the disappearance of Cu+ lines (2Eu) at 220 cm-1. These observations coupled with the induction time observed for the reaction rate suggest that in situ reduction from Cu+ to Cu0 occurs upon photo-excitation. The reduction requires the presence of TiO2 (electron transfer). The prolonged activity of the reaction (with no signs of deactivation) despite the reduction to Cu0 indicates that the latter takes part in the reaction by providing additional sites for the reaction, most likely as recombination centers for hydrogen atoms to form molecular hydrogen. This phenomenon provides an additional route for enhancing the efficiency and lifetime of Cu2O-TiO2 photocatalytic systems, beyond the usually ascribed pn-junction effect.

  18. Low-energy charge transfer for collisions of Si3+ with atomic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruhns, H.; Kreckel, H.; Savin, D. W.; Seely, D. G.; Havener, C. C.

    2008-06-01

    Cross sections of charge transfer for Si3+ ions with atomic hydrogen at collision energies of ≈40-2500eV/u were carried out using a merged-beam technique at the Multicharged Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The data span an energy range in which both molecular orbital close coupling (MOCC) and classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) calculations are available. The influence of quantum mechanical effects of the ionic core as predicted by MOCC is clearly seen in our results. However, discrepancies between our experiment and MOCC results toward higher collision energies are observed. At energies above 1000 eV/u good agreement is found with CTMC results.

  19. Ab initio study of charge transfer in B2+ low-energy collisions with atomic hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, A. R.; Cooper, D. L.; Wang, J. G.; Stancil, P. C.

    2003-07-01

    Charge transfer processes due to collisions of ground state B2+(2s 2S) ions with atomic hydrogen are investigated using the quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling (MOCC) method. The MOCC calculations utilize ab initio adiabatic potentials and nonadiabatic radial and rotational coupling matrix elements obtained with the spin-coupled valence-bond approach. Total and state-selective cross sections and rate coefficients are presented. Comparison with the existing experiments shows our results to be in good agreement. When EMOCC cross sections with and without rotational coupling are small (400 eV/u, inclusion of rotational coupling increases the total cross section by 50% 80%, improving the agreement between the current calculations and experiments. For state-selective cross sections, rotational coupling induces mixing between different symmetries; however, its effect, especially at low collision energies, is not as important as had been suggested in previous work.

  20. Low Energy Charge Transfer for Collisions of Si3+ with Atomic Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruhns, H. [Columbia University; Kreckel, H. [Columbia University; Savin, D. W. [Columbia University; Seely, D. G. [Albion College; Havener, Charles C [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Cross sections of charge transfer for Si{sup 3+} ions with atomic hydrogen at collision energies of {approx} 40-2500 eV/u were carried out using a merged-beam technique at the Multicharged Ion Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The data span an energy range in which both molecular orbital close coupling (MOCC) and classical trajectory Monte Carlo (CTMC) calculations are available. The influence of quantum mechanical effects of the ionic core as predicted by MOCC is clearly seen in our results. However, discrepancies between our experiment and MOCC results toward higher collision energies are observed. At energies above 1000 eV/u good agreement is found with CTMC results.

  1. Ab initio study of charge transfer in B2+ low-energy collisions with atomic hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, A.R.; Cooper, D.L.; Wang, J.G.; Stancil, P.C.

    2003-01-01

    Charge transfer processes due to collisions of ground state B 2+ (2s 2 S) ions with atomic hydrogen are investigated using the quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling (MOCC) method. The MOCC calculations utilize ab initio adiabatic potentials and nonadiabatic radial and rotational coupling matrix elements obtained with the spin-coupled valence-bond approach. Total and state-selective cross sections and rate coefficients are presented. Comparison with the existing experiments shows our results to be in good agreement. When E 400 eV/u, inclusion of rotational coupling increases the total cross section by 50%-80%, improving the agreement between the current calculations and experiments. For state-selective cross sections, rotational coupling induces mixing between different symmetries; however, its effect, especially at low collision energies, is not as important as had been suggested in previous work

  2. Hydrogen transfer experiments and modelization in clay rocks for radioactive waste deep geological repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulin, P.

    2008-10-01

    Gases will be generated by corrosion of high radioactive waste containers in deep geological repositories. A gas phase will be generated. Gas pressure will build up and penetrated the geological formation. If gases do not penetrate the geological barrier efficiently, the pressure build up may create a risk of fracturing and of creation of preferential pathways for radionuclide migration. The present work focuses on Callovo-Oxfordian argillites characterisation. An experiment, designed to measure very low permeabilities, was used with hydrogen/helium and analysed using the Dusty Gas Model. Argillites close to saturation have an accessible porosity to gas transfer that is lower than 0,1% to 1% of the porosity. Analysis of the Knudsen effect suggests that this accessible network should be made of 50 nm to 200 nm diameter pores. The permeabilities values were integrated to an ANDRA operating model. The model showed that the maximum pressure expected near the repository would be 83 bar. (author)

  3. Experimental, kinetic and numerical modeling of hydrogen production by catalytic reforming of crude ethanol over a commercial catalyst in packed bed tubular reactor and packed bed membrane reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aboudheir, Ahmed; Akande, Abayomi; Idem, Raphael

    2006-01-01

    The demand for hydrogen energy has increased tremendously in recent years essentially because of the increase in the word energy consumption as well as recent developments in fuel cell technologies. The energy information administration has projected that world energy consumption will increase by 59% over the next two decades, from 1999 to 2020, in which the largest share is still dominated by fossil fuels (oil, natural gas and coal). Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions resulting from the combustion of these fossil fuels currently are estimated to account for three-fourth of human-caused CO 2 emissions worldwide. Greenhouse gas emission, including CO 2 , should be limited, as recommended at the Kyoto Conference, Japan, in December 1997. In this regard, hydrogen (H 2 ) has a significant future potential as an alternative fuel that can solve the problems of CO 2 emissions as well as the emissions of other air contaminants. One of the techniques to produce hydrogen is by reforming of hydrocarbons or biomass. Crude ethanol (a form of biomass, which essentially is fermentation broth) is easy to produce, is free of sulphur, has low toxicity, and is also safe to handle, transport and store. In addition, crude ethanol consists of oxygenated hydrocarbons, such as ethanol, lactic acid, glycerol, and maltose. These oxygenated hydrocarbons can be reformed completely to H 2 and CO 2 , the latter of which could be separated from H 2 by membrane technology. This provides for CO 2 capture for eventual storage or destruction. In the case of using crude ethanol, this will result in negative CO 2 , emissions. In this paper, we conducted experimental work on production of hydrogen by the catalytic reforming of crude ethanol over a commercial promoted Ni-based catalyst in a packed bed tubular reactor as well as a packed bed membrane reactor. As well, a rigorous numerical model was developed to simulate this process in both the catalytic packed bed tubular reactor and packed bed membrane

  4. Polymerization of Acetonitrile via a Hydrogen Transfer Reaction from CH3 to CN under Extreme Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Haiyan; Li, Kuo; Cody, George D; Tulk, Christopher A; Dong, Xiao; Gao, Guoying; Molaison, Jamie J; Liu, Zhenxian; Feygenson, Mikhail; Yang, Wenge; Ivanov, Ilia N; Basile, Leonardo; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Guthrie, Malcolm; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2016-09-19

    Acetonitrile (CH3 CN) is the simplest and one of the most stable nitriles. Reactions usually occur on the C≡N triple bond, while the C-H bond is very inert and can only be activated by a very strong base or a metal catalyst. It is demonstrated that C-H bonds can be activated by the cyano group under high pressure, but at room temperature. The hydrogen atom transfers from the CH3 to CN along the CH⋅⋅⋅N hydrogen bond, which produces an amino group and initiates polymerization to form a dimer, 1D chain, and 2D nanoribbon with mixed sp(2) and sp(3) bonded carbon. Finally, it transforms into a graphitic polymer by eliminating ammonia. This study shows that applying pressure can induce a distinctive reaction which is guided by the structure of the molecular crystal. It highlights the fact that very inert C-H can be activated by high pressure, even at room temperature and without a catalyst. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Ruthenium(II) Complexes Containing Lutidine-Derived Pincer CNC Ligands: Synthesis, Structure, and Catalytic Hydrogenation of C-N bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Juárez, Martín; López-Serrano, Joaquín; Lara, Patricia; Morales-Cerón, Judith P; Vaquero, Mónica; Álvarez, Eleuterio; Salazar, Verónica; Suárez, Andrés

    2015-05-11

    A series of Ru complexes containing lutidine-derived pincer CNC ligands have been prepared by transmetalation with the corresponding silver-carbene derivatives. Characterization of these derivatives shows both mer and fac coordination of the CNC ligands depending on the wingtips of the N-heterocyclic carbene fragments. In the presence of tBuOK, the Ru-CNC complexes are active in the hydrogenation of a series of imines. In addition, these complexes catalyze the reversible hydrogenation of phenantridine. Detailed NMR spectroscopic studies have shown the capability of the CNC ligand to be deprotonated and get involved in ligand-assisted activation of dihydrogen. More interestingly, upon deprotonation, the Ru-CNC complex 5 e(BF4 ) is able to add aldimines to the metal-ligand framework to yield an amido complex. Finally, investigation of the mechanism of the hydrogenation of imines has been carried out by means of DFT calculations. The calculated mechanism involves outer-sphere stepwise hydrogen transfer to the C-N bond assisted either by the pincer ligand or a second coordinated H2 molecule. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Superior catalytic effect of TiF{sub 3} over TiCl{sub 3} in improving the hydrogen sorption kinetics of MgH{sub 2}: Catalytic role of fluorine anion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, L.-P.; Kang, X.-D.; Dai, H.-B.; Liang, Y.; Fang, Z.-Z.; Wang, P.-J. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, P. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)], E-mail: pingwang@imr.ac.cn; Cheng, H.-M. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2009-04-15

    TiF{sub 3} shows a superior catalytic effect over TiCl{sub 3} in improving the hydrogen sorption kinetics of MgH{sub 2}. Combined phase analysis and microstructure characterization suggest that both titanium halide additives react with host MgH{sub 2} in a similar way. However, systematic X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies reveal that the incorporated fluorine (F) differs significantly from its analog chlorine (Cl) in terms of bonding state. The asymmetry of F 1s spectra and the sputtering-induced peak shift suggest that, in addition to the Mg-F bond, a new Ti-F-Mg bonding is formed in the TiF{sub 3}-doped MgH{sub 2}. In contrast, only one stable binding state of Cl is identified in the form of MgCl{sub 2} for the TiCl{sub 3}-doped MgH{sub 2}. In combination with the designed experiments, these findings suggest that the generation of active F-containing species may be responsible for the advantage of TiF{sub 3} over TiCl{sub 3} in improving both the absorption and desorption kinetics of MgH{sub 2}. Fundamentally, it emphasizes the functionality of F anion in tuning the activity of compound catalyst.

  7. Superior catalytic effect of TiF3 over TiCl3 in improving the hydrogen sorption kinetics of MgH2: Catalytic role of fluorine anion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, L.-P.; Kang, X.-D.; Dai, H.-B.; Liang, Y.; Fang, Z.-Z.; Wang, P.-J.; Wang, P.; Cheng, H.-M.

    2009-01-01

    TiF 3 shows a superior catalytic effect over TiCl 3 in improving the hydrogen sorption kinetics of MgH 2 . Combined phase analysis and microstructure characterization suggest that both titanium halide additives react with host MgH 2 in a similar way. However, systematic X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies reveal that the incorporated fluorine (F) differs significantly from its analog chlorine (Cl) in terms of bonding state. The asymmetry of F 1s spectra and the sputtering-induced peak shift suggest that, in addition to the Mg-F bond, a new Ti-F-Mg bonding is formed in the TiF 3 -doped MgH 2 . In contrast, only one stable binding state of Cl is identified in the form of MgCl 2 for the TiCl 3 -doped MgH 2 . In combination with the designed experiments, these findings suggest that the generation of active F-containing species may be responsible for the advantage of TiF 3 over TiCl 3 in improving both the absorption and desorption kinetics of MgH 2 . Fundamentally, it emphasizes the functionality of F anion in tuning the activity of compound catalyst

  8. New Ru(II)N'NN'-type pincer complexes: synthesis, characterization and the catalytic hydrogenation of CO_2 or bicarbonates to formate salts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zengjin Dai; Qi Luo; Hengjiang Cong; Jing Zhang; Tianyou Peng

    2017-01-01

    [RuCl(L1)(MeCN)_2]Cl (1) and [RuCl(L2)(MeCN)_2]Cl (2) complexes were prepared through the reaction of [RuCl2(p-cymene)]_2 with 2,6-bis(benzimidazole-2-yl)-4-hydroxy-pyridine (L1) or 2,6-bis(benzimidazole- 2-yl) pyridine (L2) in acetonitrile, respectively. The treatment of [Ru(OTf)(L2)(MeCN)_2]OTf (3) with 1 equivalent of PPh_3 in ethanol resulted in the formation of [Ru(L2"-"1)(MeCN)(PPh_3)_2]OTf (4), in which one of the N-H moieties of L2 is deprotonated to give an anionic ligand (L2"-"1). It was found that complex 1 can catalyze the hydrogenation of CO_2 to formate salts, producing sodium formate in 34.0% yield with a turnover number (TON) of 407 under the optimized conditions. Further investigations revealed that complexes 1-4 can efficiently catalyze the hydrogenation of sodium bicarbonate to sodium formate, and the catalytic activity follows the order 4 ≥ 1 ≥ 2 ≅ 3. In particular, sodium formate was obtained in good yield (77%) with a high TON (1530) when complex 4 was used as the catalyst. The present results illustrate a new example of Ru(II) complexes bearing a rigid N'NN' framework for the efficient hydrogenation of CO_2 to formate salts in a homogeneous system. (authors)

  9. Use of Heterogenized Metal Complexes in Hydrogenation Reactions: Comparison of Hydrogenation and CTH Reactions.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bata, P.; Zsigmond, A.; Gyémánt, M.; Czeglédi, A.; Klusoň, Petr

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 12 (2015), s. 9281-9294 ISSN 0922-6168. [Pannonian Symposium on Catalysis /12./. Castle Trest, 16.09.2014-20.09.2014] Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : catalytic transfer hydrogenation * iron-phthalocyanine catalyst * chemoselectivity Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.833, year: 2015

  10. Synthesis of zirconia-immobilized copper chelates for catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and the oxidation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baldrian, Petr; Merhautová, Věra; Cajthaml, Tomáš; Nerud, František; Stopka, Pavel; Gorbacheva, O.; Hrubý, Martin; Beneš, Milan J.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 11 (2008), s. 1721-1726 ISSN 0045-6535 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS5020306 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510; CEZ:AV0Z40320502; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : degradation * polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons * hydrogen peroxide Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.054, year: 2008

  11. Hydrogenation of unactivated enamines to tertiary amines: rhodium complexes of fluorinated phosphines give marked improvements in catalytic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Tin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the hydrogenation of sluggish unactivated enamine substrates, Rh complexes of electron-deficient phosphines are demonstrated to be far more reactive catalysts than those derived from triphenylphosphine. These operate at low catalyst loadings (down to 0.01 mol % and are able to reduce tetrasubstituted enamines. The use of the sustainable and environmentally benign solvent (R-limonene for the reaction is also reported with the amine isolated by acid extraction.

  12. Catalytically Enhanced Hydrogen Sorption in Mg-MgH2 by Coupling Vanadium-Based Catalyst and Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atikah Kadri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mg (MgH2-based composites, using carbon nanotubes (CNTs and pre-synthesized vanadium-based complex (VCat as the catalysts, were prepared by high-energy ball milling technique. The synergistic effect of coupling CNTs and VCat in MgH2 was observed for an ultra-fast absorption rate of 6.50 wt. % of hydrogen per minute and 6.50 wt. % of hydrogen release in 10 min at 200 °C and 300 °C, respectively. The temperature programmed desorption (TPD results reveal that coupling VCat and CNTs reduces both peak and onset temperatures by more than 60 °C and 114 °C, respectively. In addition, the presence of both VCat and CNTs reduces the enthalpy and entropy of desorption of about 7 kJ/mol H2 and 11 J/mol H2·K, respectively, as compared to those of the commercial MgH2, which ascribe to the decrease of desorption temperature. From the study of the effect of CNTs milling time, it is shown that partially destroyed CNTs (shorter milling time are better to enhance the hydrogen sorption performance.

  13. On the transferability of atomic contributions to the optical rotatory power of hydrogen peroxide, methyl hydroperoxide and dimethyl peroxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sánchez, Marina; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2014-01-01

    for the hydrogen, oxygen and carbon atoms as well as for the methyl group at the level of time-dependent density functional theory with the B3LYP exchange-correlation functional employing a large Gaussian basis set. We find that the atomic or group contributions are not transferable among these three molecules....

  14. Strong isotope effects on the charge transfer in slow collisions of He2+ with atomic hydrogen, deuterium, and tritium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stolterfoht, N.; Cabrera-Trujillo, R.; Oehrn, Y.; Deumens, E.; Hoekstra, R.; Sabin, J. R.

    2007-01-01

    Probabilities and cross sections for charge transfer by He2+ impact on atomic hydrogen (H), deuterium (D), and tritium (T) at low collision energies are calculated. The results are obtained using an ab initio theory, which solves the time-dependent Schrodinger equation. For the H target, excellent

  15. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  16. Valorization of Waste Lipids through Hydrothermal Catalytic Conversion to Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuels with in Situ Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dongwook; Vardon, Derek R.; Murali, Dheeptha; Sharma, Brajendra K.; Strathmann, Timothy J.

    2016-03-07

    We demonstrate hydrothermal (300 degrees C, 10 MPa) catalytic conversion of real waste lipids (e.g., waste vegetable oil, sewer trap grease) to liquid hydrocarbon fuels without net need for external chemical inputs (e.g., H2 gas, methanol). A supported bimetallic catalyst (Pt-Re/C; 5 wt % of each metal) previously shown to catalyze both aqueous phase reforming of glycerol (a triacylglyceride lipid hydrolysis coproduct) to H2 gas and conversion of oleic and stearic acid, model unsaturated and saturated fatty acids, to linear alkanes was applied to process real waste lipid feedstocks in water. For reactions conducted with an initially inert headspace gas (N2), waste vegetable oil (WVO) was fully converted into linear hydrocarbons (C15-C17) and other hydrolyzed byproducts within 4.5 h, and H2 gas production was observed. Addition of H2 to the initial reactor headspace accelerated conversion, but net H2 production was still observed, in agreement with results obtained for aqueous mixtures containing model fatty acids and glycerol. Conversion to liquid hydrocarbons with net H2 production was also observed for a range of other waste lipid feedstocks (animal fat residuals, sewer trap grease, dry distiller's grain oil, coffee oil residual). These findings demonstrate potential for valorization of waste lipids through conversion to hydrocarbons that are more compatible with current petroleum-based liquid fuels than the biodiesel and biogas products of conventional waste lipid processing technologies.

  17. Eosin Y as a Direct Hydrogen Atom Transfer Photocatalyst for the Functionalization of C-H Bonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xuan-Zi; Rong, Jia-Wei; Wu, Hao-Lin; Zhou, Quan; Deng, Hong-Ping; Tan, Jin Da; Xue, Cheng-Wen; Wu, Li-Zhu; Tao, Hai-Rong; Wu, Jie

    2018-05-02

    Eosin Y, a well-known economical alternative to metal catalysts in visible-light-driven single-electron transfer-based organic transformations, can behave as an effective direct hydrogen atom transfer catalyst for C-H activation. Using the alkylation of C-H bonds with electron-deficient alkenes as a model study revealed an extremely broad substrate scope, enabling easy access to a variety of important synthons. This eosin Y-based photocatalytic hydrogen atom transfer strategy is promising for diverse functionalization of a wide range of native C-H bonds in a green and sustainable manner. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. A detailed chemistry model for transient hydrogen and carbon monoxide catalytic recombination on parallel flat Pt surfaces implemented in an integral code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, Miguel A.; Martin-Valdepenas, Juan M.; Martin-Fuertes, Francisco; Fernandez, Jose A.

    2007-01-01

    A detailed chemistry model has been adapted and developed for surface chemistry, heat and mass transfer between H 2 /CO/air/steam/CO 2 mixtures and vertical parallel Pt-coated surfaces. This model is based onto a simplified Deutschmann reaction scheme for methane surface combustion and the analysis by Elenbaas for buoyancy-induced heat transfer between parallel plates. Mass transfer is treated by the heat and mass transfer analogy. The proposed model is able to simulate the H 2 /CO recombination phenomena characteristic of parallel-plate Passive Autocatalytic Recombiners (PARs), which have been proposed and implemented as a promising hydrogen-control strategy in the safety of nuclear power stations or other industries. The transient model is able to approach the warm-up phase of the PAR and its shut-down as well as the dynamic changes within the surrounding atmosphere. The model has been implemented within the MELCOR code and assessed against results of the Battelle Model Containment tests of the Zx series. Results show accurate predictions and a better performance than traditional methods in integral codes, i.e. empirical correlations, which are also much case-specific. Influence of CO present in the mixture on the PAR performance is also addressed in this paper

  19. Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bockris, John O'M

    2011-11-30

    The idea of a "Hydrogen Economy" is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO₂ in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H₂ from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO₂ from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan). Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs) by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  20. Effect of hydrogen on passivation quality of SiNx/Si-rich SiNx stacked layers deposited by catalytic chemical vapor deposition on c-Si wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thi, Trinh Cham; Koyama, Koichi; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Matsumura, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the role of hydrogen content and fixed charges of catalytic chemical vapor deposited (Cat-CVD) SiN x /Si-rich SiN x stacked layers on the quality of crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface passivation. Calculated density of fixed charges is on the order of 10 12 cm −2 , which is high enough for effective field effect passivation. Hydrogen content in the films is also found to contribute significantly to improvement in passivation quality of the stacked layers. Furthermore, Si-rich SiN x films deposited with H 2 dilution show better passivation quality of SiN x /Si-rich SiN x stacked layers than those prepared without H 2 dilution. Effective minority carrier lifetime (τ eff ) in c-Si passivated by SiN x /Si-rich SiN x stacked layers is as high as 5.1 ms when H 2 is added during Si-rich SiN x deposition, which is much higher than the case of using Si-rich SiN x films prepared without H 2 dilution showing τ eff of 3.3 ms. - Highlights: • Passivation mechanism of Si-rich SiN x /SiN x stacked layers is investigated. • H atoms play important role in passivation quality of the stacked layer. • Addition of H 2 gas during Si-rich SiN x film deposition greatly enhances effective minority carrier lifetime (τ eff ). • For a Si-rich SiN x film with refractive index of 2.92, τ eff improves from 3.3 to 5.1 ms by H 2 addition

  1. Hydrogen production with short contact time. Catalytic partial oxidation of hydrocarbons and oxygenated compounds: Recent advances in pilot- and bench-scale testing and process design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guarinoni, A.; Ponzo, R.; Basini, L. [ENI Refining and Marketing Div., San Donato Milanese (Italy)

    2010-12-30

    ENI R and D has been active for fifteen years in the development of Short Contact Time - Catalytic Partial Oxidation (SCT-CPO) technologies for producing Hydrogen/Synthesis Gas. From the beginning the experimental work addressed either at defining the fundamental principles or the technical and economical potential of the technology. Good experimental responses, technical solutions' simplicity and flexibility, favourable techno-economical evaluations promoted the progressive widening of the field of the investigations. From Natural Gas (NG) the range of ''processable'' Hydrocarbons extended to Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) and Gasoils, including those characterised by high levels of unsaturated and sulphurated molecules and, lately, to other compounds with biological origin. The extensive work led to the definition of different technological solutions, grouped as follows: Technology 1: Air Blown SCT-CPO of Gaseous Hydrocarbons and/or Light Compounds with biological origin Technology 2: Enriched Air/Oxygen Blown SCT-CPO of Gaseous Hydrocarbons and/or Light Compounds with biological origin Technology 3: Enriched Air/Oxygen Blown SCT-CPO of Liquid Hydrocarbons and/or Compounds with biological origin Recently, the licence rights on a non-exclusive basis for the commercialisation of SCT-CPO based processes for H{sub 2}/Synthesis gas production from light hydrocarbons with production capacity lower than 5,000 Nm{sup 3}/h of H{sub 2} or 7,500 Nm3/h of syngas have been assigned to two external companies. In parallel, development of medium- and large-scale plant solutions is progressing within the ENI group framework. These last activities are addressed to the utilisation of SCT-CPO for matching the variable Hydrogen demand in several contexts of oil refining operation. This paper will report on the current status of SCT-CPO with a focus on experimental results obtained, either at pilot- and bench- scale level. (orig.)

  2. Temperature-dependent kinetics of charge transfer, hydrogen-atom transfer, and hydrogen-atom expulsion in the reaction of CO+ with CH4 and CD4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melko, Joshua J; Ard, Shaun G; Johnson, Ryan S; Shuman, Nicholas S; Guo, Hua; Viggiano, Albert A

    2014-09-18

    We have determined the rate constants and branching ratios for the reactions of CO(+) with CH4 and CD4 in a variable-temperature selected ion flow tube. We find that the rate constants are collisional for all temperatures measured (193-700 K for CH4 and 193-500 K for CD4). For the CH4 reaction, three product channels are identified, which include charge transfer (CH4(+) + CO), H-atom transfer (HCO(+) + CH3), and H-atom expulsion (CH3CO(+) + H). H-atom transfer is slightly preferred to charge transfer at low temperature, with the charge-transfer product increasing in contribution as the temperature is increased (H-atom expulsion is a minor product for all temperatures). Analogous products are identified for the CD4 reaction. Density functional calculations on the CO(+) + CH4 reaction were also conducted, revealing that the relative temperature dependences of the charge-transfer and H-atom transfer pathways are consistent with an initial charge transfer followed by proton transfer.

  3. Electrochemical studies of a reconstituted photosynthetic electron-transfer chain or towards a biomimetic photoproduction of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fourmond, V.

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this work is to find an efficient process to convert solar energy into hydrogen. The electrons transfers in reconstituted photosynthetic chains have been particularly studied with the aims 1)in one hand, to better understand the interactions of the different molecules of the photosynthetic chain in order to optimize the changes of the entire organisms for hydrogen production 2)in another hand, to insert the hydrogenases in a photosynthetic chain and then to photo reduce them in order to obtain kinetic data to better understand how it works. (O.M.)

  4. Production of bio-hydrogenated diesel by catalytic hydrotreating of palm oil over NiMoS2/γ-Al2O3 catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srifa, Atthapon; Faungnawakij, Kajornsak; Itthibenchapong, Vorranutch; Viriya-Empikul, Nawin; Charinpanitkul, Tawatchai; Assabumrungrat, Suttichai

    2014-04-01

    Catalytic hydrotreating of palm oil (refined palm olein type) to produce bio-hydrogenated diesel (BHD) was carried out in a continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor over NiMoS2/γ-Al2O3 catalyst. Effects of dominant hydrotreating parameters: temperature: 270-420°C; H2 pressure: 15-80 bar; LHSV: 0.25-5.0 h(-1); and H2/oil ratio: 250-2000 N(cm(3)/cm(3)) on the conversion, product yield, and a contribution of hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) and decarbonylation/decarboxylation (DCO/DCO2) were investigated to find the optimal hydrotreating conditions. All calculations including product yield and the contribution of HDO and DCO/DCO2 were extremely estimated based on mole balance corresponding to the fatty acid composition in feed to fully understand deoxygenation behaviors at different conditions. These analyses demonstrated that HDO, DCO, and DCO2 reactions competitively occurred at each condition, and had different optimal and limiting conditions. The differences in the hydrotreating reactions, liquid product compositions, and gas product composition were also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Study of the Mo(VI) catalytic response in the oxidation of iodide by hydrogen peroxide using a monosegmented continuous-flow system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, J.C. de; Eiras, S.P.; Bruns, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    Fractional factorial, modified simplex and response surface studies of the Mo(VI)-catalysed and non-catalysed oxidation of iodide by hydrogen peroxide in acidic medium were executed using a monosegmented continuous-flow system (MCFS). As this reaction is commonly used for the spectrophotometric catalytic determination of Mo(VI), the behaviour of the analytically useful response, ΔA, the difference of the average absorbance values of the Mo(VI)-catalysed and non-catalysed reactions, was studied over a large range of experimental conditions. The effects of simultaneous changes in the sample flow-rate, the H 2 SO 4 , KI and H 2 O 2 concentrations and the reaction time on the signals were measured. The optimum concentrations found using MCFS are 0.0665, 0.1528 and 0.0041 M for H 2 SO 4 , KI and H 2 O 2 , respectively. Rigorous control of the acid concentration is essential to maintain the sensitivity of the analytical signal for operating conditions close to the optimum values recommended here. On the other hand, the ΔA values are much less sensitive to variations in the H 2 O 2 concentration. Increasing KI concentrations can improve the sensitivity but can also cause baseline instability. The response surface is convenient for visualizing the overall behaviour of the system for the experimental control values investigated. (author). 24 refs.; 3 figs.; 1 tab

  6. Coumarin or benzoxazinone bearing benzimidazolium and bis(benzimidazolium salts; involvement in transfer hydrogenation of acetophenone derivatives and hCA inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mert Olgun Karataş

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Four new salts of benzimidazolium and bis(benzimidazolium which include coumarin or benzoxazinone moieties were synthesized and the structures of the newly synthesized compounds were elucidated on the basis of spectral analyses such as 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR, HSQC, IR, LC-MS and elemental analysis. Benzimidazolium salts were used intensively as N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC precursors in the various catalytic reactions such as transfer hydrogenation (TH, C-H bond activation, Heck, Suzuki reaction etc. With the prospect of potential NHC precursor properties of the synthesized compounds, they were employed in the (TH reaction of p-substitute acetophenones (acetophenone, p-methyl acetophenone, p-chloro acetophenone and good yields were observed. Coumarin compounds are known as inhibitor of carbonic anhydrase and inhibition effects of the synthesized compounds on human carbonic anhydrases (hCA were investigated as in vitro. The in vitro results demonstrated that all compounds inhibited hCA I and hCA II activity. Among the synthesized compounds 1,4-bis(1-((6,8-dimethyl-2H-chromen-2-one-4-ylmethylbenzimidazolium-3-ylbutane dichloride was found to be the most active IC50= 5.55 mM and 6.06 mM for hCA I and hCA II, respectively.

  7. Mass and heat transfer on B7 structured packing in the separation of hydrogen isotopes by distillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croitoru, C.; Pop, F.; Titescu, Gh.; Culcer, M.; Iliescu, M.; Stefanescu, I.; Trancota, D.; Peculea, M.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents theoretical and experimental data concerning mass and heat transfer on B7 ordered packing, at deuterium separation by distillation. The first section of the paper is dedicated to the mass transfer study of hydrogen distillation, while the second section deals with mass and heat transfer in water distillation. A mathematical model was worked out and compared with experimental data, obtained from two laboratory distillation plants for deuterium separation. From the first plant experimental data concerning B7 ordered packing efficiency of hydrogen cryogenic distillation at 250 deg. C level were obtained. Data concerning mass and heat transfer on the same packing in deuterium separation by water vacuum distillation at 60 deg. C level were obtained in the second plant. HUT values, mass and heat transfer coefficients both theoretically evaluated and experimentally determined were found to be comparable with those obtained from chemical industry separation processes. The fact justifies the use of multi-tubular column model for description of transfer processes in distillation columns equipped with B7 structured packing. (authors)

  8. Non-typical fluorescence studies of excited and ground state proton and hydrogen transfer

    KAUST Repository

    Gil, Michał; Kijak, Michał; Piwonski, Hubert Marek; Herbich, Jerzy; Waluk, Jacek

    2017-01-01

    Fluorescence studies of tautomerization have been carried out for various systems that exhibit single and double proton or hydrogen translocation in various environments, such as liquid and solid condensed phases, ultracold supersonic jets, and finally, polymer matrices with single emitters.We focus on less explored areas of application of fluorescence for tautomerization studies, using porphycene, a porphyrin isomer, as an example. Fluorescence anisotropy techniques allow investigations of self-exchange reactions, where the reactant and product are formally identical. Excitation with polarized light makes it possible to monitor tautomerization in single molecules and to detect their three-dimensional orientation. Analysis of fluorescence from single vibronic levels of jet-isolated porphycene not only demonstrates coherent tunneling of two internal protons, but also indicates that the process is vibrational mode-specific. Next, we present bifunctional proton donoracceptor systems, molecules that are able, depending on the environment, to undergo excited state single intramolecular or double intermolecular proton transfer. For molecules that have donor and acceptor groups located in separate moieties linked by a single bond, excited state tautomerization can be coupled to mutual twisting of the two subunits.

  9. Dinuclear Tetrapyrazolyl Palladium Complexes Exhibiting Facile Tandem Transfer Hydrogenation/Suzuki Coupling Reaction of Fluoroarylketone

    KAUST Repository

    Dehury, Niranjan

    2016-07-18

    Herein, we report an unprecedented example of dinuclear pyrazolyl-based Pd complexes exhibiting facile tandem catalysis for fluoroarylketone: Tetrapyrazolyl di-palladium complexes with varying Pd-Pd distances efficiently catalyze the tandem reaction involving transfer hydrogenation of fluoroarylketone to the corresponding alcohol and Suzuki-Miyaura cross coupling reaction of the resulting fluoroarylalcohol under moderate reaction conditions, to biaryl alcohol. The complex with the shortest Pd-Pd distance exhibits the highest tandem activity among its di-metallic analogues, and exceeds in terms of activity and selectivity the analogous mononuclear compound. The kinetics of the reaction indicates clearly that reductive transformation of haloarylketone into haloaryalcohol is the rate determining step in the tandem reaction. Interestingly while fluoroarylketone undergoes the multistep tandem catalysis, the chloro- and bromo-arylketones undergo only a single step C-C coupling reaction resulting in biarylketone as the final product. Unlike the pyrazole based Pd compounds, the precursor PdCl2 and the phosphine based relevant complexes (PPh3)2PdCl2 and (PPh3)4Pd are found to be unable to exhibit the tandem catalysis.

  10. Non-typical fluorescence studies of excited and ground state proton and hydrogen transfer

    KAUST Repository

    Gil, Michał

    2017-02-03

    Fluorescence studies of tautomerization have been carried out for various systems that exhibit single and double proton or hydrogen translocation in various environments, such as liquid and solid condensed phases, ultracold supersonic jets, and finally, polymer matrices with single emitters.We focus on less explored areas of application of fluorescence for tautomerization studies, using porphycene, a porphyrin isomer, as an example. Fluorescence anisotropy techniques allow investigations of self-exchange reactions, where the reactant and product are formally identical. Excitation with polarized light makes it possible to monitor tautomerization in single molecules and to detect their three-dimensional orientation. Analysis of fluorescence from single vibronic levels of jet-isolated porphycene not only demonstrates coherent tunneling of two internal protons, but also indicates that the process is vibrational mode-specific. Next, we present bifunctional proton donoracceptor systems, molecules that are able, depending on the environment, to undergo excited state single intramolecular or double intermolecular proton transfer. For molecules that have donor and acceptor groups located in separate moieties linked by a single bond, excited state tautomerization can be coupled to mutual twisting of the two subunits.

  11. Reaction mechanisms and evaluation of effective process operation for catalytic oxidation and coagulation by ferrous solution and hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.H.; Moon, H.J.; Kim, Y.M. [Dept. of Environmental Engineering, Sangmyung Univ., Cheonan (Korea); Bae, W.K. [Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hanyang Univ., Ansan, Kyounggi (Korea)

    2003-07-01

    This research was carried out to evaluate the removal efficiencies of COD{sub cr} and colour for the dyeing wastewater by ferrous solution and the different dosage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in Fenton process. In the case of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} divided dosage, 7:3 was more effective than 3:7 to remove COD{sub cr} and colour. The results showed that COD was mainly removed by Fenton coagulation, where the ferric ions are formed in the initial step of Fenton reaction. On the other hand colour was removed by Fenton oxidation rather than Fenton coagulation. This paper also aims at pursuing to investigate the effective removal mechanisms using ferrous ion coagulation, ferric ion coagulation and Fenton oxidation process. The removal mechanism of COD{sub cr} and colour was mainly coagulation by ferrous ion, ferric ion and Fenton oxidation. The removal efficiencies were dependent on the ferric ion amount at the beginning of the reaction. However the final removal efficiency of COD and colour was in the order of Fenton oxidation, ferric ion coagulation and ferrous ion coagulation. The reason of the highest removal efficiency by Fenton oxidation can be explained by the chain reactions with ferrous solution, ferric ion and hydrogen peroxide. (orig.)

  12. Efficient Electron Transfer across a ZnO-MoS2 -Reduced Graphene Oxide Heterojunction for Enhanced Sunlight-Driven Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Suneel; Reddy, Nagappagari Lakshmana; Kushwaha, Himmat Singh; Kumar, Ashish; Shankar, Muthukonda Venkatakrishnan; Bhattacharyya, Kaustava; Halder, Aditi; Krishnan, Venkata

    2017-09-22

    The development of noble metal-free catalysts for hydrogen evolution is required for energy applications. In this regard, ternary heterojunction nanocomposites consisting of ZnO nanoparticles anchored on MoS 2 -RGO (RGO=reduced graphene oxide) nanosheets as heterogeneous catalysts show highly efficient photocatalytic H 2 evolution. In the photocatalytic process, the catalyst dispersed in an electrolytic solution (S 2- and SO 3 2- ions) exhibits an enhanced rate of H 2 evolution, and optimization experiments reveal that ZnO with 4.0 wt % of MoS 2 -RGO nanosheets gives the highest photocatalytic H 2 production of 28.616 mmol h -1  g cat -1 under sunlight irradiation; approximately 56 times higher than that on bare ZnO and several times higher than those of other ternary photocatalysts. The superior catalytic activity can be attributed to the in situ generation of ZnS, which leads to improved interfacial charge transfer to the MoS 2 cocatalyst and RGO, which has plenty of active sites available for photocatalytic reactions. Recycling experiments also proved the stability of the optimized photocatalyst. In addition, the ternary nanocomposite displayed multifunctional properties for hydrogen evolution activity under electrocatalytic and photoelectrocatalytic conditions owing to the high electrode-electrolyte contact area. Thus, the present work provides very useful insights for the development of inexpensive, multifunctional catalysts without noble metal loading to achieve a high rate of H 2 generation. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  14. Heterogeneous kinetic modeling of the catalytic conversion of cycloparaffins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sabawi, Mustafa N.

    The limited availability of high value light hydrocarbon feedstocks along with the rise in crude prices has resulted in the international recognition of the vast potential of Canada's oil sands. With the recent expansion of Canadian bitumen production come, however, many technical challenges, one of which is the significant presence of aromatics and cycloparaffins in bitumen-derived feedstocks. In addition to their negative environmental impact, aromatics limit fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) feedstock conversion, decrease the yield and quality of valuable products such as gasoline and middle distillates, increase levels of polyaromatic hydrocarbons prone to form coke on the catalyst, and ultimately compromise the FCC unit performance. Although cycloparaffins do not have such negative impacts, they are precursors of aromatics as they frequently undergo hydrogen transfer reactions. However, cycloparaffin cracking chemistry involves other competing reactions that are complex and need much investigation. This dissertation provides insights and understanding of the fundamentals of the catalytic cracking of cycloparaffins using carefully selected model compounds such as methylcyclohexane (MCH) and decalin. Thermal and catalytic cracking of these cycloparaffins on FCC-type catalysts are carried out using the CREC Riser Simulator under operating conditions similar to those of the industrial FCC units in terms of temperature, reaction time, reactant partial pressure and catalyst-to-hydrocarbon ratio. The crystallite size of the supported zeolites is varied between 0.4 and 0.9 microns, with both activity and selectivity being monitored. Catalytic conversions ranged between 4 to 16 wt% for MCH and between 8 to 27 wt% for decalin. Reaction pathways of cycloparaffins are determined, and these include ring-opening, protolytic cracking, isomerization, hydrogen transfer and transalkylation. The yields and selectivities of over 60 and 140 products, formed during MCH and decalin

  15. How Formaldehyde Inhibits Hydrogen Evolution by [FeFe]-Hydrogenases: Determination by ¹³C ENDOR of Direct Fe-C Coordination and Order of Electron and Proton Transfers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachmeier, Andreas; Esselborn, Julian; Hexter, Suzannah V; Krämer, Tobias; Klein, Kathrin; Happe, Thomas; McGrady, John E; Myers, William K; Armstrong, Fraser A

    2015-04-29

    Formaldehyde (HCHO), a strong electrophile and a rapid and reversible inhibitor of hydrogen production by [FeFe]-hydrogenases, is used to identify the point in the catalytic cycle at which a highly reactive metal-hydrido species is formed. Investigations of the reaction of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii [FeFe]-hydrogenase with formaldehyde using pulsed-EPR techniques including electron-nuclear double resonance spectroscopy establish that formaldehyde binds close to the active site. Density functional theory calculations support an inhibited super-reduced state having a short Fe-(13)C bond in the 2Fe subsite. The adduct forms when HCHO is available to compete with H(+) transfer to a vacant, nucleophilic Fe site: had H(+) transfer already occurred, the reaction of HCHO with the Fe-hydrido species would lead to methanol, release of which is not detected. Instead, Fe-bound formaldehyde is a metal-hydrido mimic, a locked, inhibited form analogous to that in which two electrons and only one proton have transferred to the H-cluster. The results provide strong support for a mechanism in which the fastest pathway for H2 evolution involves two consecutive proton transfer steps to the H-cluster following transfer of a second electron to the active site.

  16. Catalytic Conversion of Biofuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Betina

    This thesis describes the catalytic conversion of bioethanol into higher value chemicals. The motivation has been the unavoidable coming depletion of the fossil resources. The thesis is focused on two ways of utilising ethanol; the steam reforming of ethanol to form hydrogen and the partial oxida...

  17. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    acetylchlorophosphonazo(CPApA) by hydrogen peroxide in 0.10 M phosphoric acid. A novel catalytic kinetic-spectrophotometric method is proposed for the determination of copper based on this principle. Copper(II) can be determined spectrophotometrically ...

  18. Catalytic methanol dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcinikov, Y.; Fainberg, V.; Garbar, A.; Gutman, M.; Hetsroni, G.; Shindler, Y.; Tatrtakovsky, L.; Zvirin, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Results of the methanol dissociation study on copper/potassium catalyst with alumina support at various temperatures are presented. The following gaseous and liquid products at. The catalytic methanol dissociation is obtained: hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, and dimethyl ether. Formation rates of these products are discussed. Activation energies of corresponding reactions are calculated

  19. Selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides from industrial gases by hydrogen or methane; Reduction catalytique selective des oxydes d'azote (NO{sub x}) provenant d'effluents gazeux industriels par l'hydrogene ou le methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelmann Pirez, M

    2004-12-15

    This work deals with the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), contained in the effluents of industrial plants, by hydrogen or methane. The aim is to replace ammonia, used as reducing agent, in the conventional process. The use of others reducing agents such as hydrogen or methane is interesting for different reasons: practical, economical and ecological. The catalyst has to convert selectively NO into N{sub 2}, in presence of an excess of oxygen, steam and sulfur dioxide. The developed catalyst is constituted by a support such as perovskites, particularly LaCoO{sub 3}, on which are dispersed noble metals (palladium, platinum). The interaction between the noble metal and the support, generated during the activation of the catalyst, allows to minimize the water and sulfur dioxide inhibitor phenomena on the catalytic performances, particularly in the reduction of NO by hydrogen. (O.M.)

  20. Height determination at the transfer unit in isotopic distillation of hydrogen on type B7 ordered column packing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pop, F.; Croitoru, C.; Peculea, M.

    2001-01-01

    Owing to the low pressure drop implied by ordered column packings these are often utilized for vacuum distillations and separation of mixtures in which the important component occurs at a very low concentration, as for instance is the case of water, deuterium or oxygen isotopic distillation. The paper presents a model for determination of the height of transfer unit (HTU) in the hydrogen isotopic distillation installation, equipped with ordered column packing of B7 type. The computed values for HUT based on the analogy between heat, moment and mass transfer, were compared with the experimental data

  1. Salt-assisted clean transfer of continuous monolayer MoS2 film for hydrogen evolution reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Heung-Yeol; Nguyen, Tri Khoa; Ullah, Farman; Yun, Jong-Won; Nguyen, Cao Khang; Kim, Yong Soo

    2018-03-01

    The transfer of two-dimensional (2D) materials from one substrate to another is challenging but of great importance for technological applications. Here, we propose a facile etching and residue-free method for transferring a large-area monolayer MoS2 film continuously grown on a SiO2/Si by chemical vapor deposition. Prior to synthesis, the substrate is dropped with water- soluble perylene-3, 4, 9, 10-tetracarboxylic acid tetrapotassium salt (PTAS). The as-grown MoS2 on the substrate is simply dipped in water to quickly dissolve PTAS to yield the MoS2 film floating on the water surface, which is subsequently transferred to the desired substrate. The morphological, optical and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic results show that our method is useful for fast and clean transfer of the MoS2 film. Specially, we demonstrate that monolayer MoS2 film transferred onto a conducting substrate leads to excellent performance for hydrogen evolution reaction with low overpotential (0.29 V vs the reversible hydrogen electrode) and Tafel slope (85.5 mV/decade).

  2. Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, David K.

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

  3. Direct Aldehyde C-H Arylation and Alkylation via the Combination of Nickel, Hydrogen Atom Transfer, and Photoredox Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaheng; MacMillan, David W C

    2017-08-23

    A mechanism that enables direct aldehyde C-H functionalization has been achieved via the synergistic merger of photoredox, nickel, and hydrogen atom transfer catalysis. This mild, operationally simple protocol transforms a wide variety of commercially available aldehydes, along with aryl or alkyl bromides, into the corresponding ketones in excellent yield. This C-H abstraction coupling technology has been successfully applied to the expedient synthesis of the medicinal agent haloperidol.

  4. Magnetic gold nanocatalyst (nanocat-Fe–Au): catalytic applications for the oxidative esterification and hydrogen transfer reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    An efficient and sustainable protocol is described for the oxidative esterification of aldehydes and the reduction of aromatic nitro compounds that uses magnetically separable and reusable maghemite-supported gold nanocatalyst (nanocat-Fe-Au) under mild conditions. The complex ch...

  5. Direct Observation of Double Hydrogen Transfer via Quantum Tunneling in a Single Porphycene Molecule on a Ag(110) Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Matthias; Pagan, Mark; Persson, Mats; Gawinkowski, Sylwester; Waluk, Jacek; Kumagai, Takashi

    2017-09-13

    Quantum tunneling of hydrogen atoms (or protons) plays a crucial role in many chemical and biological reactions. Although tunneling of a single particle has been examined extensively in various one-dimensional potentials, many-particle tunneling in high-dimensional potential energy surfaces remains poorly understood. Here we present a direct observation of a double hydrogen atom transfer (tautomerization) within a single porphycene molecule on a Ag(110) surface using a cryogenic scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The tautomerization rates are temperature independent below ∼10 K, and a large kinetic isotope effect (KIE) is observed upon substituting the transferred hydrogen atoms by deuterium, indicating that the process is governed by tunneling. The observed KIE for three isotopologues and density functional theory calculations reveal that a stepwise transfer mechanism is dominant in the tautomerization. It is also found that the tautomerization rate is increased by vibrational excitation via an inelastic electron tunneling process. Moreover, the STM tip can be used to manipulate the tunneling dynamics through modification of the potential landscape.

  6. [Two-dimensional model of a double-well potential: proton transfer when a hydrogen bond is deformed].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasilnikov, P M

    2014-01-01

    The potential energy cross-section profile along a hydrogen bond may contain two minima in certain conditions; it is so-called a double well potential. The H-bond double well potential is essential for proton transfer along this hydrogen bond. We have considered the two-dimensional model of such double well potential in harmonic approximation, and we have also investigated the proton tunneling in it. In real environments thermal motion of atoms or conformational changes may cause reorientation and relative shift of molecule fragment forming the hydrogen bond and, as a result, the hydrogen bond isdeformed. This deformation is liable to change the double well potential form and, hence, the probability of the proton tunneling is changed too. As it is shown the characteristic time of proton tunneling is essentially increased by even small relative shift of heavy atoms forming the H-bond and also rotational displacement of covalent bond generated by one of heavy atoms and the proton (hydrogen atom). However, it is also shown, at the certain geometry of the H-bond deformation the opposite effect occurred, i.e., the characteristic time is not increased and even decreased. Notice that such its behavior arises from two-dimensionality of potential wells; this and other properties of our model are discussed in detail.

  7. ARGAZ: a new device for experimental study of the coupling between hydrogen production and hydrogen transfer through saturated Callovian-Oxfordian argillite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imbert, C.; Bataillon, C.; Touze, G.; Vigier, P.; Talandier, J.

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. A specific experimental device has been designed to produce hydrogen at the metal-argillite interface by electrochemistry. The target is for one hand to reproduce the production of hydrogen occurring when a metal is corroded by the water contained in the porosity of the mud-stone. On the other hand, the transfer of the hydrogen through the mud-stone can be studied. The specific features of the experiment are the following: - Hydrogen is generated inside a cell by electrochemistry, at the interface between the argillite and a metallic surface; no gas injection is required; - Electrochemistry gives the possibility to control the hydrogen production rate; - Hydrogen generation implies water consumption: the water comes from the porosity of the bulk argillite, near the interface; - That one-dimensional experiment has been built around a cylindrical sample of bulk and undamaged argillite coming from the Callovian-Oxfordian formation. Inside the device a cylindrical sample of argillite is placed above a nickel plate. Around the argillite, a ring of compacted bentonite ensures a mechanical confinement. When saturated, the bentonite will apply a swelling pressure close to the total pressure encountered by the sample in the geological formation. The hydrogen is generated at the interface nickel-argillite. The nickel plate is one of the two electrodes required for electrochemistry. At the top face of bentonite, iron electrode is used to close the electrical circuit. The hydrogen produced at the bottom face of the mud-stone is expected to go across the argillite towards the top face. A porous plate connected with a sampling bottle allows the capture of hydrogen. The argillite sample has a diameter of 50 mm, and a height of 50 mm. It is obtained by over-coring a core sample, and by a careful machining leading to a perfect geometry and surface quality. The production rate of hydrogen can be calculated from the current intensity

  8. Enhanced catalytic performance in hydrogen generation from NaBH4 hydrolysis by super porous cryogel supported Co and Ni catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seven, Fahriye; Sahiner, Nurettin

    2014-12-01

    The neutral 3-D superporous cryogel is prepared from a poly(acrylamide) (p(AAm)) hydrogel network modified with an amidoximation reaction to induce chemical changes to produce superporous amidoximated-p(AAm) (amid-p(AAm)) cryogel. The newly-formed strongly ionizable matrices can readily absorb metal ions such as Co(II) and Ni(II) enabling in situ preparation of corresponding metal nanoparticles by NaBH4 treatments. It is found that the superporous amid-p(AAm)-Co cryogel composite is very effective as a catalyst for H2 generation from hydrolysis of NaBH4 in alkaline medium. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the metal ion loading capacity and catalytic activity of superporous amid-p(AAm)-Co cryogel composites increased with 2nd and 3rd Co(II) ion loading and reduction cycles. The hydrogen generation rate of p(AAm)-Co metal composites is increased to 1926.3 ± 1.1 from 1130.2 ± 1.5 (mL H2) (min)-1 (g of M)-1. The effect of various parameters such as porosity, metal type, the number of reloading and reduction cycles of the metal ion, and temperature are investigated for the hydrolysis of NaBH4. The kinetic parameters such as energy, enthalpy and entropy are determined as Ea = 39.7 ± 0.2 kJ mol-1, ΔH = 37.2 ± 0.1 kJ mol-1 and ΔS = -171.9 ± 0.5 J mol-1 K-1, respectively.

  9. Preparation method of Ni@Pt/C nanocatalyst affects the performance of direct borohydride-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell: Improved power density and increased catalytic oxidation of borohydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Mir Ghasem; Mahmoodi, Raana

    2017-08-15

    The Ni@Pt/C electrocatalysts were synthesized using two different methods: with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and without SDS. The metal loading in synthesized nanocatalysts was 20wt% and the molar ratio of Ni: Pt was 1:1. The structural characterizations of Ni@Pt/C electrocatalysts were investigated by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). The electrocatalytic activity of Ni@Pt/C electrocatalysts toward BH 4 - oxidation in alkaline medium was studied by means of cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronopotentiometry (CP), chronoamperometry (CA) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results showed that Ni@Pt/C electrocatalyst synthesized without SDS has superior catalytic activity toward borohydride oxidation (22016.92Ag Pt -1 ) in comparison with a catalyst prepared in the presence of SDS (17766.15Ag Pt -1 ) in NaBH 4 0.1M at 25°C. The Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) used in fuel cell set-up was fabricated with catalyst-coated membrane (CCM) technique. The effect of Ni@Pt/C catalysts prepared with two methods as anode catalyst on the performance of direct borohydride-hydrogen peroxide fuel cell was studied. The maximum power density was obtained using Ni@Pt/C catalyst synthesized without SDS at 60°C, 1M NaBH 4 and 2M H 2 O 2 (133.38mWcm -2 ). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Charge transfer-resistance in nitrogen-doped/undoped graphene: Its influence on the electro-catalytic reduction of H2O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magerusan, Lidia; Pogacean, Florina; Socaci, Crina; Coros, Maria; Rosu, Marcela-Corina; Pruneanu, Stela

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen doped (N-Gr) and undoped (TRGO) graphene were chemically synthesized and characterized by TEM, STEM-EDX and XPS. The electrochemical reduction of H 2 O 2 was investigated with bare glassy carbon (GC) electrode and with GC modified with each graphene sample. The active area of TRGO/GC and N-Gr/GC modified electrodes were found to be 0.75 and 0.295 cm 2 , respectively. Both were considerably larger than that of bare GC (0.07 cm 2 ). We carefully looked at the kinetic of interfacial electron transfer process and found that the charge-transfer resistance (R ct ) of TRGO/GC electrode (7.83 × 10 6 Ω) was significantly lower than that of N-Gr/GC electrode (4.81 × 10 7 Ω) or bare GC (1.74 × 10 9 Ω). Interestingly, although TRGO/GC electrode had the largest active area and the smallest charge transfer resistance, it did not promote the H 2 O 2 electrochemical reduction. In contrast, N-Gr/GC modified electrode exhibited an enhanced electro-catalytic activity towards H 2 O 2 reduction, which was related to the presence of heterogeneous atoms into the sp 2 carbon network.

  11. Role of the sulfonamide moiety of Ru(II) half-sandwich complexes in the asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of 3,4-dihydroisoquinolines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matuška, O.; Zápal, J.; Hrdličková, R.; Mikoška, M.; Pecháček, J.; Vilhanová, B.; Václavík, Jiří; Kuzma, M.; Kačer, P.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 118, č. 1 (2016), s. 215-222 ISSN 1878-5190 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ruthenium * asymmetric transfer hydrogenation * dihydroisoquinolines * sulfonamide Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.264, year: 2016

  12. Heat transfer in pool boiling liquid neon, deuterium and hydrogen, and critical heat flux in forced convection of liquid neon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Astruc, J.M.

    1967-12-01

    In the first part, free-convection and nucleate pool boiling heat transfer (up to burn-out heat flux) between a platinum wire of 0.15 mm in diameter in neon, deuterium and hydrogen has been studied at atmospheric pressure. These measurements were continued in liquid neon up to 23 bars (Pc ≅ 26.8 b). Film boiling heat transfer coefficients have been measured in pool boiling liquid neon at atmospheric pressure with three heating wires (diameters 0.2, 0.5, 2 mm). All the results have been compared with existing correlations. The second part is devoted to measurements of the critical heat flux limiting heat transfer with small temperature differences between the wall and the liquid neon flowing inside a tube (diameters 3 x 3.5 mm) heated by joule effect on 30 cm of length. Influences of flow stability, nature of electrical current, pressure, mass flow rate and subcooling are shown. In conclusion, the similarity of the heat transfer characteristics in pool boiling as well as in forced convection of liquid neon and hydrogen is emphasized. (author) [fr

  13. Solvent-dependent excited-state hydrogen transfer and intersystem crossing in 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)-benzothiazole

    KAUST Repository

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede

    2015-02-12

    The excited-state intramolecular hydrogen transfer (ESIHT) of 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl) benzothiazole (HBT) has been investigated in a series of nonpolar, polar aprotic, and polar protic solvents. A variety of state-of-the-art experimental methods were employed, including femto- and nanosecond transient absorption and fluorescence upconversion spectroscopy with broadband capabilities. We show that the dynamics and mechanism of ESIHT of the singlet excited HBT are strongly solvent-dependent. In nonpolar solvents, the data demonstrate that HBT molecules adopt a closed form stabilized by O-H⋯N chelated hydrogen bonds with no twisting angle, and the photoinduced H transfer occurs within 120 fs, leading to the formation of a keto tautomer. In polar solvents, owing to dipole-dipole cross talk and hydrogen bonding interactions, the H transfer process is followed by ultrafast nonradiative deactivation channels, including ultrafast internal conversion (IC) and intersystem crossing (ISC). This is likely to be driven by the twisting motion around the C-C bond between the hydroxyphenyl and thiazole moieties, facilitating the IC back to the enol ground state or to the keto triplet state. In addition, our femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence experiments indicate, for the first time, that the lifetime of the enol form in ACN is approximately 280 fs. This observation indicates that the solvent plays a crucial role in breaking the H bond and deactivating the excited state of the HBT. Interestingly, the broadband transient absorption and fluorescence up-conversion data clearly demonstrate that the intermolecular proton transfer from the excited HBT to the DMSO solvent is about 190 fs, forming the HBT anion excited state.

  14. Solvent-dependent excited-state hydrogen transfer and intersystem crossing in 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)-benzothiazole

    KAUST Repository

    Aly, Shawkat Mohammede; Usman, Anwar; Alzayer, Maytham; Hamdi, Ghada A.; Alarousu, Erkki; Mohammed, Omar F.

    2015-01-01

    The excited-state intramolecular hydrogen transfer (ESIHT) of 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl) benzothiazole (HBT) has been investigated in a series of nonpolar, polar aprotic, and polar protic solvents. A variety of state-of-the-art experimental methods were employed, including femto- and nanosecond transient absorption and fluorescence upconversion spectroscopy with broadband capabilities. We show that the dynamics and mechanism of ESIHT of the singlet excited HBT are strongly solvent-dependent. In nonpolar solvents, the data demonstrate that HBT molecules adopt a closed form stabilized by O-H⋯N chelated hydrogen bonds with no twisting angle, and the photoinduced H transfer occurs within 120 fs, leading to the formation of a keto tautomer. In polar solvents, owing to dipole-dipole cross talk and hydrogen bonding interactions, the H transfer process is followed by ultrafast nonradiative deactivation channels, including ultrafast internal conversion (IC) and intersystem crossing (ISC). This is likely to be driven by the twisting motion around the C-C bond between the hydroxyphenyl and thiazole moieties, facilitating the IC back to the enol ground state or to the keto triplet state. In addition, our femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence experiments indicate, for the first time, that the lifetime of the enol form in ACN is approximately 280 fs. This observation indicates that the solvent plays a crucial role in breaking the H bond and deactivating the excited state of the HBT. Interestingly, the broadband transient absorption and fluorescence up-conversion data clearly demonstrate that the intermolecular proton transfer from the excited HBT to the DMSO solvent is about 190 fs, forming the HBT anion excited state.

  15. Multi-arrangement quantum dynamics in 6D: cis-trans isomerization and 1,3-hydrogen transfer in HONO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luckhaus, David

    2004-01-01

    The overtone spectrum and wave packet dynamics of nitrous acid (HONO) are studied with a global six-dimensional potential energy function interpolated directly from density functional calculations together with the corresponding dipole hypersurfaces. The quantum dynamics for the cis-trans isomerization and the symmetric 1,3-hydrogen transfer are treated in full dimensionality in terms of the generalized Z-matrix discrete variable representation. For the quantum mechanical description of complicated rearrangements a new approach to multi-arrangement quantum dynamics is introduced and applied to the symmetric hydrogen exchange tunneling in cis-HONO. The cis-trans isomerization is found to be dominated by adiabatic barrier crossing with only minor tunneling contributions, but with pronounced mode selectivity. The OH-stretching overtones of trans-HONO are adiabatically almost completely separated from the OH torsional dynamics with extremely slow intramolecular energy redistribution. The 1,3-hydrogen transfer, by contrast, proceeds largely via coherent tunneling even significantly below the barrier. The process is clearly non-adiabatic (at least in terms of valence coordinates) but remains highly state specific. While the absorption spectrum of trans-HONO remains largely unaffected, OH-stretching overtones of cis-HONO (above the barrier between 2ν OH and 3ν OH ) decompose into highly fragmented absorption patterns with corresponding tunneling periods on the picosecond time scale

  16. Hydrogen bond strengthening induces fluorescence quenching of PRODAN derivative by turning on twisted intramolecular charge transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yonggang; Li, Donglin; Li, Chaozheng; Liu, YuFang; Jiang, Kai

    2017-12-01

    Researchers have proposed different effective mechanisms of hydrogen bonding (HB) on the fluorescence of 6-propionyl-2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (PRODAN) and its derivatives. Herein, excited state transition and dynamics analysis confirm that the fluorescence of PD (a derivative of PRODAN with ethyl replaced by 3-hydroxy-2,2-dimethylpropan) emits from the planar intramolecular charge transfer (PICT) state rather than twist ICT (TICT) state, because the fluorescence emission and surface hopping from the TICT state to the twist ground (T-S0) state is energy forbidden. Nevertheless, the strengthening of intramolecular-HB (intra-HB) and intermolecular-HB (inter-HB) of PD-(methanol)2 smooth the pathway of surface hopping from TICT to T-S0 state and the external conversion going to planar ground state by decreasing the energy difference of the two states. This smoothing changes the fluorescence state of PD-(methanol)2 to the TICT state in which fluorescence emission does not occur but surface hopping, leading to the partial fluorescence quenching of PD in methanol solvent. This conclusion is different from previous related reports. Moreover, the inter-HB strengthening of PD-methanol in PICT state induces the cleavage of intra-HB and a fluorescence red-shift of 54 nm compared to PD. This red-shift increases to 66 nm for PD-(methanol)2 for the strengthening of the one intra-HB and two inter-HBs. The dipole moments of PD-methanol and PD-(methanol)2 respectively increase about 10.3D and 8.1D in PICT state compared to PD. The synergistic effect of intra-HB and inter-HB induces partial quenching of PD in methanol solvent by turning on the TICT state and fluorescence red-shift. This work gives a reasonable description on the fluorescence red-shift and partial quenching of PD in methanol solvent, which will bring insight into the study of spectroscopic properties of molecules owning better spectral characteristics.

  17. Evidence of quantum correlations in the H/D-transfer dynamics in the hydrogen bonds in partially deuterated benzoic acid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Sadamu; Tsuzumitani, Akihiko; Chatzidimitriou-Dreismann, C. A.

    1992-10-01

    A precise investigation of spin—lattice relaxation rates for protons and deuterons of partially deuterated benzoic acid crystals showed a remarkable quenching of the transfer rate of an HD pair in hydrogen-bonded dimeric units of carboxyl groups with increasing concentration of D in the surrounding hydrogen bonds. A similar effect was also observed for partially deuterated crystals of acetylenedicarboxylic acid. This finding supports recent theoretical predictions of thermally activated protonic quantum correlation in condensed matter and proposes a new mechanism for the proton transfer in hydrogen bonds in condensed matter.

  18. Technology Development for Hydrogen Propellant Storage and Transfer at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youngquist, Robert; Starr, Stanley; Krenn, Angela; Captain, Janine; Williams, Martha

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is a major user of liquid hydrogen. In particular, NASA's John F. Kennedy (KSC) Space Center has operated facilities for handling and storing very large quantities of liquid hydrogen (LH2) since the early 1960s. Safe operations pose unique challenges and as a result NASA has invested in technology development to improve operational efficiency and safety. This paper reviews recent innovations including methods of leak and fire detection and aspects of large storage tank health and integrity. We also discuss the use of liquid hydrogen in space and issues we are addressing to ensure safe and efficient operations should hydrogen be used as a propellant derived from in-situ volatiles.

  19. Catalytic Hydrogenation of CO2 to Methanol: Study of Synergistic Effect on Adsorption Properties of CO2 and H2 in CuO/ZnO/ZrO2 System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjie Huang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of CuO/ZnO/ZrO2 (CZZ catalysts with different CuO/ZnO weight ratios have been synthesized by citrate method and tested in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol. Experimental results showed that the catalyst with the lowest CuO/ZnO weight ratio of 2/7 exhibited the best catalytic performance with a CO2 conversion of 32.9%, 45.8% methanol selectivity, and a process delivery of 193.9 gMeOH·kgcat−1·h−1. A synergetic effect is found by systematic temperature-programmed-desorption (TPD studies. Comparing with single and di-component systems, the interaction via different components in a CZZ system provides additional active sites to adsorb more H2 and CO2 in the low temperature range, resulting in higher weight time yield (WTY of methanol.

  20. Photoinduced electron transfer pathways in hydrogen-evolving reduced graphene oxide-boosted hybrid nano-bio catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Dimitrijevic, Nada M; Chang, Angela Y; Schaller, Richard D; Liu, Yuzi; Rajh, Tijana; Rozhkova, Elena A

    2014-08-26

    Photocatalytic production of clean hydrogen fuels using water and sunlight has attracted remarkable attention due to the increasing global energy demand. Natural and synthetic dyes can be utilized to sensitize semiconductors for solar energy transformation using visible light. In this study, reduced graphene oxide (rGO) and a membrane protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) were employed as building modules to harness visible light by a Pt/TiO2 nanocatalyst. Introduction of the rGO boosts the nano-bio catalyst performance that results in hydrogen production rates of approximately 11.24 mmol of H2 (μmol protein)(-1) h(-1). Photoelectrochemical measurements show a 9-fold increase in photocurrent density when TiO2 electrodes were modified with rGO and bR. Electron paramagnetic resonance and transient absorption spectroscopy demonstrate an interfacial charge transfer from the photoexcited rGO to the semiconductor under visible light.

  1. Research and development on process components for hydrogen production. (1) Test-fabrication of sulfuric acid transfer pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwatsuki, Jin; Terada, Atsuhiko; Hino, Ryutaro; Kubo, Shinji; Onuki, Kaoru; Watanabe, Yutaka

    2009-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency has been conducting a research and development on hydrogen production system using High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor. As a part of this effort, thermochemical water-splitting cycle featuring iodine- and sulfur-compounds (IS process) is under development considering its potential of large-scale economical hydrogen production. The IS process constitutes very severe environments to the materials of construction because of the corrosive nature of process chemicals, especially of the high temperature acidic solutions of sulfuric acid and hydriodic acid dissolving iodine. Therefore, selection of the corrosion-resistant materials and development of the components have been the crucial subjects of process development. This paper concerns the sulfuric acid transfer pump. The development has been implemented of a pump for transporting concentrated sulfuric acid at temperatures of higher than 300degC and at elevated pressure. Recent progress of these activities will be reported. (author)

  2. Peptide-Driven Charge-Transfer Organogels Built from Synergetic Hydrogen Bonding and Pyrene-Naphthalenediimide Donor-Acceptor Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartocci, Silvia; Berrocal, José Augusto; Guarracino, Paola; Grillaud, Maxime; Franco, Lorenzo; Mba, Miriam

    2018-02-26

    The peptide-driven formation of charge transfer (CT) supramolecular gels featuring both directional hydrogen-bonding and donor-acceptor (D-A) complexation is reported. Our design consists of the coassembly of two dipeptide-chromophore conjugates, namely diphenylalanine (FF) dipeptide conveniently functionalized at the N-terminus with either a pyrene (Py-1, donor) or naphthalene diimide (NDI-1, acceptor). UV/Vis spectroscopy confirmed the formation of CT complexes. FTIR and 1 H NMR spectroscopy studies underlined the pivotal role of hydrogen bonding in the gelation process, and electronic paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements unraveled the advantage of preorganized CT supramolecular architectures for charge transport over solutions containing non-coassembled D and A molecular systems. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Nickel-based xerogel catalysts: Synthesis via fast sol-gel method and application in catalytic hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Jin; Wang, Qiang; Fan, Dongliang; Ma, Lirong; Jiang, Deli; Xie, Jimin, E-mail: xiejm391@sohu.com; Zhu, Jianjun, E-mail: zhjj029@sina.com

    2016-09-30

    out to investigate the reducibility of nickel species and the interaction between nickel species and alumina. The catalytic hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol was investigated over the prepared nickel-based xerogel catalysts. The conversion of p-nitrophenol was monitored by UV spectrophotometry and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results show that the catalysts are highly selective for the conversion of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol and the order of catalytic activities of the catalysts is Ni < Ni-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} < Ni-Ca-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The catalysts were recycled and were used to evaluate the reutilization.

  4. Hydrogen-transfer and charge transfer in photochemical and high energy radiation induced reactions: effects of thiols. Final report, February 1, 1960-january 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, S.G.

    1980-03-01

    Absorption of ultraviolet or visible light, or high energy radiation, may lead to highly reactive free radicals. Thiols affect the reactions of these radicals in the following ways: (1) transfer of hydrogen from sulfur of the thiol to a substrate radical, converting the radical to a stable molecule, and the thiol to a reactive thiyl radical; and (2) transfer of hydrogen from a substrate radical or molecule to thiyl, regenerating thiol. The thiol is thus used repeatedly and a single molecule may affect the consequences of many quanta. Three effects may ensue, depending upon the system irradiated: (1) the substrate radicals may be converted by thiol-thiyl to the original molecules, and protection against radiation damage is afforded. (2) The radicals may be converted to molecules not identical with the starting materials, and in both cases damage caused by radical combination processes is prevented. (3) Product yields may be increased where the initial radicals might otherwise regenerate starting materials. It was shown that rates of reaction of excited species can be correlated with triplet energies and reduction potentials, and with ionization potentials, that amines are very reactive toward excited carbonyl compounds of all types, and that yields of products from these reactions can be increased by thiols, leading to increased efficiency in utilization of light

  5. Hydrogénations catalytiques. De la recherche de base à l'application industrielle Catalytic Hydrogenation from Basic Research to Industrial Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boitiaux J. P.

    2006-11-01

    additifs ou impuretés des charges et de donner des idées claires sur la façon de modifier les supports ou les sites métalliques. Les conséquences ont été tirées de ces études et des applications industrielles ont démontré clairement l'intérêt de ces travaux. Néanmoins certains problèmes sont encore à résoudre qu'il serait nécessaire de considérer d'un point de vue encore plus fondamental en prenant en considération le mécanisme de la réaction d'hydrogénation. Early research on catalytic hydrogenation showed the specificity of different metals for different types of hydrogenation (acetylenes, olefins, aromatics, aldehydes, nitriles, etc. . This observation somewhat vaguely included the concept of the importance of the metal/substrate pair. A contradiction with the insensitive character to the structure of such reactions then appeared. Recent research on palladium catalysts of various dispersions has clearly demonstrated the influence of particle size on the hydrogenation rate of C4 acetylenes and diolefins. Such a behavior has now been confirmed by further research on platinum and rhodium. The phenomenon is due to excessive adsorption of reactants on small particles. These particles are electrodeficient and very strongly adsorb electrodonor compounds such as unsaturated hydrocarbons. The explanation has been confirmed by the additive effect caused by piperidine. Its coadsorption on the catalyst destabilizes the metal/substrate bond and increases the activity. A complete kinetic analysis has refined this interpretation by demonstrating the constancy of intrinsic activity and the relation between sensitivity to metal dispersion and a complexing of the metallic site of the type encountered on homogeneous catalysts. This fundamental research has very important consequences on the development of industrial catalysts. For each process and hence for each hydrogenation, the optimum dispersion of the metal has to be determined to obtain the highest possible

  6. Development of Novel Electrode Materials for the Electrocatalysis of Oxygen-Transfer and Hydrogen-Transfer Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Brett Kimball [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Throughout this thesis, the fundamental aspects involved in the electrocatalysis of anodic O-transfer reactions and cathodic H-transfer reactions have been studied. The investigation into anodic O-transfer reactions at undoped and Fe(III)[doped MnO2 films] revealed that MnO2 film electrodes prepared by a cycling voltammetry deposition show improved response for DMSO oxidation at the film electrodes vs. the Au substrate. Doping of the MnO2 films with Fe(III) further enhanced electrode activity. Reasons for this increase are believed to involve the adsorption of DMSO by the Fe(III) sites. The investigation into anodic O-transfer reactions at undoped and Fe(III)-doped RuO2 films showed that the Fe(III)-doped RuO2-film electrodes are applicable for anodic detection of sulfur compounds. The Fe(III) sites in the Fe-RuO2 films are speculated to act as adsorption sites for the sulfur species while the Ru(IV) sites function for anodic discharge of H2O to generate the adsorbed OH species. The investigation into cathodic H-transfer reactions, specifically nitrate reduction, at various pure metals and their alloys demonstrated that the incorporation of metals into alloy materials can create a material that exhibits bifunctional properties for the various steps involved in the overall nitrate reduction reaction. The Sb10Sn20Ti70, Cu63Ni37 and Cu25Ni75 alloy electrodes exhibited improved activity for nitrate reduction as compared to their pure component metals. The Cu63Ni37 alloy displayed the highest activity for nitrate reduction. The final investigation was a detailed study of the electrocatalytic activity of cathodic H-transfer reactions (nitrate reduction) at various compositions of Cu-Ni alloy electrodes. Voltammetric response for NO3- at the Cu-Ni alloy electrode is superior to

  7. Determination of Backbone Amide Hydrogen Exchange Rates of Cytochrome c Using Partially Scrambled Electron Transfer Dissociation Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo; E, Sook Yen

    2018-05-01

    The technological goal of hydrogen/deuterium exchange-mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is to determine backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates. The most critical challenge to achieve this goal is obtaining the deuterium incorporation in single-amide resolution, and gas-phase fragmentation may provide a universal solution. The gas-phase fragmentation may generate the daughter ions which differ by a single amino acid and the difference in deuterium incorporations in the two analogous ions can yield the deuterium incorporation at the sub-localized site. Following the pioneering works by Jørgensen and Rand, several papers utilized the electron transfer dissociation (ETD) to determine the location of deuterium in single-amide resolution. This paper demonstrates further advancement of the strategy by determining backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates, instead of just determining deuterium incorporation at a single time point, in combination with a wide time window monitoring. A method to evaluate the effects of scrambling and to determine the exchange rates from partially scrambled HDX-ETD-MS data is described. All parent ions for ETD fragmentation were regio-selectively scrambled: The deuterium in some regions of a peptide ion was scrambled while that in the other regions was not scrambled. The method determined 31 backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates of cytochrome c in the non-scrambled regions. Good fragmentation of a parent ion, a low degree of scrambling, and a low number of exchangeable hydrogens in the preceding side chain are the important factors to determine the exchange rate. The exchange rates determined by the HDX-MS are in good agreement with those determined by NMR. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  8. Determination of Backbone Amide Hydrogen Exchange Rates of Cytochrome c Using Partially Scrambled Electron Transfer Dissociation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo; E, Sook Yen

    2018-05-01

    The technological goal of hydrogen/deuterium exchange-mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is to determine backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates. The most critical challenge to achieve this goal is obtaining the deuterium incorporation in single-amide resolution, and gas-phase fragmentation may provide a universal solution. The gas-phase fragmentation may generate the daughter ions which differ by a single amino acid and the difference in deuterium incorporations in the two analogous ions can yield the deuterium incorporation at the sub-localized site. Following the pioneering works by Jørgensen and Rand, several papers utilized the electron transfer dissociation (ETD) to determine the location of deuterium in single-amide resolution. This paper demonstrates further advancement of the strategy by determining backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates, instead of just determining deuterium incorporation at a single time point, in combination with a wide time window monitoring. A method to evaluate the effects of scrambling and to determine the exchange rates from partially scrambled HDX-ETD-MS data is described. All parent ions for ETD fragmentation were regio-selectively scrambled: The deuterium in some regions of a peptide ion was scrambled while that in the other regions was not scrambled. The method determined 31 backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates of cytochrome c in the non-scrambled regions. Good fragmentation of a parent ion, a low degree of scrambling, and a low number of exchangeable hydrogens in the preceding side chain are the important factors to determine the exchange rate. The exchange rates determined by the HDX-MS are in good agreement with those determined by NMR. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  9. Electron transfer across multiple hydrogen bonds: the case of ureapyrimidinedione-substituted vinyl ruthenium and osmium complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichlmaier, Markus; Winter, Rainer F; Zabel, Manfred; Zális, Stanislav

    2009-04-08

    Ruthenium and osmium complexes 2a,b and 3a,b featuring the N-4,6-dioxo-5,5-dibutyl- or the N-4,6-dioxo-5,5-di-(2-propenyl)-1,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidin-2-yl-N'(4-ethenylphenyl)-urea ligand dimerize by a self-complementary quadruply hydrogen-bonding donor/donor/acceptor/acceptor (DDAA) motif. We provide evidence that the dimeric structures are maintained in nonpolar solvents and in 0.1 M NBu(4)PF(6)/CH(2)Cl(2) supporting electrolyte solution. All complexes are reversibly oxidized in two consecutive two-electron oxidations (DeltaE(1/2) approximately = 500 mV) without any discernible potential splitting for the oxidation of the individual hydrogen-bridged redox active moieties. IR and UV/vis/NIR spectroelectrochemistry show a one-step conversion of the neutral to the dication without any discernible features of an intermediate monooxidized radical cation. Oxidation-induced IR changes of the NH and CO groups that are involved in hydrogen bonding are restricted to the styryl-bonded urea NH function. IR band assignments are aided by quantum chemical calculations. Our experimental findings clearly show that, at least in the present systems, the ureapyrimidinedione (Upy) DDAA hydrogen-bonding motif does not support electron transfer. The apparent reason is that neither of the hydrogen-bonding functionalities contributes to the occupied frontier levels. This results in nearly degenerate pairs of MOs representing the in-phase and out-of-phase combinations of the individual monomeric building blocks.

  10. Determination of Backbone Amide Hydrogen Exchange Rates of Cytochrome c Using Partially Scrambled Electron Transfer Dissociation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamuro, Yoshitomo; E, Sook Yen

    2018-03-01

    The technological goal of hydrogen/deuterium exchange-mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) is to determine backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates. The most critical challenge to achieve this goal is obtaining the deuterium incorporation in single-amide resolution, and gas-phase fragmentation may provide a universal solution. The gas-phase fragmentation may generate the daughter ions which differ by a single amino acid and the difference in deuterium incorporations in the two analogous ions can yield the deuterium incorporation at the sub-localized site. Following the pioneering works by Jørgensen and Rand, several papers utilized the electron transfer dissociation (ETD) to determine the location of deuterium in single-amide resolution. This paper demonstrates further advancement of the strategy by determining backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates, instead of just determining deuterium incorporation at a single time point, in combination with a wide time window monitoring. A method to evaluate the effects of scrambling and to determine the exchange rates from partially scrambled HDX-ETD-MS data is described. All parent ions for ETD fragmentation were regio-selectively scrambled: The deuterium in some regions of a peptide ion was scrambled while that in the other regions was not scrambled. The method determined 31 backbone amide hydrogen exchange rates of cytochrome c in the non-scrambled regions. Good fragmentation of a parent ion, a low degree of scrambling, and a low number of exchangeable hydrogens in the preceding side chain are the important factors to determine the exchange rate. The exchange rates determined by the HDX-MS are in good agreement with those determined by NMR. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  11. γ-Sultam-cored N,N-ligands in the ruthenium(ii)-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of aryl ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rast, Slavko; Modec, Barbara; Stephan, Michel; Mohar, Barbara

    2016-02-14

    The synthesis of new enantiopure syn- and anti-3-(α-aminobenzyl)-benzo-γ-sultam ligands 6 and their application in the ruthenium(ii)-catalyzed asymmetric transfer hydrogenation (ATH) of ketones using formic acid/triethylamine is described. In particular, benzo-fused cyclic ketones afforded excellent enantioselectivities in reasonable time employing a low loading of the syn ligand-containing catalyst. A never-before-seen dynamic kinetic resolution (DKR) during reduction of a γ-keto carboxylic ester (S7) derivative of 1-indanone is realized leading as well to excellent induction.

  12. Base free N-alkylation of anilines with ArCH2OH and transfer hydrogenation of aldehydes/ketones catalyzed by the complexes of η5-Cp*Ir(iii) with chalcogenated Schiff bases of anthracene-9-carbaldehyde.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Pooja; Gupta, Sonu; Singh, Ajai K

    2018-03-12

    The condensation of anthracene-9-carbaldehyde with 2-(phenylthio/seleno)ethylamine results in Schiff bases [PhS(CH 2 ) 2 C[double bond, length as m-dash]N-9-C 14 H 9 ](L1) and [PhSe(CH 2 ) 2 C[double bond, length as m-dash]N-9-C 14 H 9 ] (L2). On their reaction with [(η 5 -Cp*)IrCl(μ-Cl)] 2 and CH 3 COONa at 50 °C followed by treatment with NH 4 PF 6 , iridacycles, [(η 5 -Cp*)Ir(L-H)][PF 6 ] (1: L = L1; 2: L = L2), result. The same reaction in the absence of CH 3 COONa gives complexes [(η 5 -Cp*)Ir(L)Cl][PF 6 ] (3-4) in which L = L1(3)/L2(4) ligates in a bidentate mode. The ligands and complexes were authenticated with HR-MS and NMR spectra [ 1 H, 13 C{ 1 H} and 77 Se{ 1 H} (in the case of L2 and its complexes only)]. Single crystal structures of L2 and half sandwich complexes 1-4 were established with X-ray crystallography. Three coordination sites of Ir in each complex are covered with η 5 -Cp* and on the remaining three, donor atoms present are: N, S/Se and C - /Cl - , resulting in a piano-stool structure. The moisture and air insensitive 1-4 act as efficient catalysts under mild conditions for base free N-alkylation of amines with benzyl alcohols and transfer hydrogenation (TH) of aldehydes/ketones. The optimum loading of 1-4 as a catalyst is 0.1-0.5 mol% for both the activations. The best reaction temperature is 80 °C for transfer hydrogenation and 100 °C for N-alkylation. The mercury poisoning test supports a homogeneous pathway for both the reactions catalyzed by 1-4. The two catalytic processes are most efficient with 3 followed by 4 > 1 > 2. The mechanism proposed on the basis of HR-MS of the reaction mixtures of the two catalytic processes taken after 1-2 h involves the formation of an alkoxy and hydrido species. The real catalytic species proposed in the case of iridacycles results due to the loss of the Cp* ring.

  13. CdS/TiO2 photoanodes via solution ion transfer method for highly efficient solar hydrogen generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna Karuturi, Siva; Yew, Rowena; Reddy Narangari, Parvathala; Wong-Leung, Jennifer; Li, Li; Vora, Kaushal; Tan, Hark Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2018-03-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) is a unique semiconducting material for solar hydrogen generation applications with a tunable, narrow bandgap that straddles water redox potentials. However, its potential towards efficient solar hydrogen generation has not yet been realized due to low photon-to-current conversions, high charge carrier recombination and the lack of controlled preparation methods. In this work, we demonstrate a highly efficient CdS/TiO2 heterostructured photoelectrode using atomic layer deposition and solution ion transfer reactions. Enabled by the well-controlled deposition of CdS nanocrystals on TiO2 inverse opal (TiIO) nanostructures using the proposed method, a saturation photocurrent density of 9.1 mA cm-2 is realized which is the highest ever reported for CdS-based photoelectrodes. We further demonstrate that the passivation of a CdS surface with an ultrathin amorphous layer (˜1.5 nm) of TiO2 improves the charge collection efficiency at low applied potentials paving the way for unassisted solar hydrogen generation.

  14. Role of pendant proton relays and proton-coupled electron transfer on the hydrogen evolution reaction by nickel hangman porphyrins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bediako, D. Kwabena; Solis, Brian H.; Dogutan, Dilek K.; Roubelakis, Manolis M.; Maher, Andrew G.; Lee, Chang Hoon; Chambers, Matthew B.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Nocera, Daniel G.

    2014-01-01

    The hangman motif provides mechanistic insights into the role of pendant proton relays in governing proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) involved in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We now show improved HER activity of Ni compared with Co hangman porphyrins. Cyclic voltammogram data and simulations, together with computational studies using density functional theory, implicate a shift in electrokinetic zone between Co and Ni hangman porphyrins due to a change in the PCET mechanism. Unlike the Co hangman porphyrin, the Ni hangman porphyrin does not require reduction to the formally metal(0) species before protonation by weak acids in acetonitrile. We conclude that protonation likely occurs at the Ni(I) state followed by reduction, in a stepwise proton transfer–electron transfer pathway. Spectroelectrochemical and computational studies reveal that upon reduction of the Ni(II) compound, the first electron is transferred to a metal-based orbital, whereas the second electron is transferred to a molecular orbital on the porphyrin ring. PMID:25298534

  15. External Mass Transfer Model for Hydrogen Peroxide Decomposition by Terminox Ultra Catalase in a Packed-Bed Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grubecki Ireneusz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is known that external diffusional resistances are significant in immobilized enzyme packed-bed reactors, especially at large scales. Thus, the external mass transfer effects were analyzed for hydrogen peroxide decomposition by immobilized Terminox Ultra catalase in a packed-bed bioreactor. For this purpose the apparent reaction rate constants, kP, were determined by conducting experimental works at different superficial velocities, U, and temperatures. To develop an external mass transfer model the correlation between the Colburn factor, JD, and the Reynolds number, Re, of the type JD = K Re(n-1 was assessed and related to the mass transfer coefficient, kmL. The values of K and n were calculated from the dependence (am kp-1 - kR-1 vs. Re-1 making use of the intrinsic reaction rate constants, kR, determined before. Based on statistical analysis it was found that the mass transfer correlation JD = 0.972 Re-0.368 predicts experimental data accurately. The proposed model would be useful for the design and optimization of industrial-scale reactors.

  16. Ultraviolet Absorption Induces Hydrogen-Atom Transfer in G⋅C Watson-Crick DNA Base Pairs in Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röttger, Katharina; Marroux, Hugo J B; Grubb, Michael P; Coulter, Philip M; Böhnke, Hendrik; Henderson, Alexander S; Galan, M Carmen; Temps, Friedrich; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J; Roberts, Gareth M

    2015-12-01

    Ultrafast deactivation pathways bestow photostability on nucleobases and hence preserve the structural integrity of DNA following absorption of ultraviolet (UV) radiation. One controversial recovery mechanism proposed to account for this photostability involves electron-driven proton transfer (EDPT) in Watson-Crick base pairs. The first direct observation is reported of the EDPT process after UV excitation of individual guanine-cytosine (G⋅C) Watson-Crick base pairs by ultrafast time-resolved UV/visible and mid-infrared spectroscopy. The formation of an intermediate biradical species (G[-H]⋅C[+H]) with a lifetime of 2.9 ps was tracked. The majority of these biradicals return to the original G⋅C Watson-Crick pairs, but up to 10% of the initially excited molecules instead form a stable photoproduct G*⋅C* that has undergone double hydrogen-atom transfer. The observation of these sequential EDPT mechanisms across intermolecular hydrogen bonds confirms an important and long debated pathway for the deactivation of photoexcited base pairs, with possible implications for the UV photochemistry of DNA. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Study on transfer-free graphene synthesis process utilizing spontaneous agglomeration of catalytic Ni and Co metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, Makoto; Mizuno, Masaya; Banno, Kazuya; Kubo, Toshiharu; Egawa, Takashi; Soga, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    Transfer-free graphene synthesis process utilizing metal agglomeration phenomena was investigated by using carbon films deposited on Ni or Co catalyst metals on SiO 2 /Si substrates. As a result of metal agglomeration at high temperatures, multilayer graphene films appeared to be formed directly on SiO 2 films. The microscopic Raman mapping study revealed that graphene films were preferentially synthesized around areas where metal films disappeared at an early stage of agglomeration, and that they finally covered almost the whole surface. It was also found that the synthesized graphene films tended to have better structural qualities and lower layer numbers with the increase in the starting metal thicknesses regardless of the kinds of catalyst metals. Raman study also showed that they had good two-dimensional uniformity in the structural quality. (paper)

  18. Chemistry - Toward efficient hydrogen production at surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Christensen, Claus H.

    2006-01-01

    Calculations are providing a molecular picture of hydrogen production on catalytic surfaces and within enzymes, knowledge that may guide the design of new, more efficient catalysts for the hydrogen economy.......Calculations are providing a molecular picture of hydrogen production on catalytic surfaces and within enzymes, knowledge that may guide the design of new, more efficient catalysts for the hydrogen economy....

  19. Non-catalytic plasma-arc reforming of natural gas with carbon dioxide as the oxidizing agent for the production of synthesis gas or hydrogen

    OpenAIRE

    Blom, P.W.E.; Basson, G.W.

    2013-01-01

    The world’s energy consumption is increasing constantly due to the growing population of the world. The increasing energy consumption has a negative effect on the fossil fuel reserves of the world. Hydrogen has the potential to provide energy for all our needs by making use of fossil fuel such as natural gas and nuclear-based electricity. Hydrogen can be produced by reforming methane with carbon dioxide as the oxidizing agent. Hydrogen can be produced in a Plasma-arc reforming ...

  20. Catalytic mechanism of Sep-tRNA:Cys-tRNA synthase: sulfur transfer is mediated by disulfide and persulfide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuchen; Dos Santos, Patricia C; Zhu, Xiang; Orlando, Ron; Dean, Dennis R; Söll, Dieter; Yuan, Jing

    2012-02-17

    Sep-tRNA:Cys-tRNA synthase (SepCysS) catalyzes the sulfhydrylation of tRNA-bound O-phosphoserine (Sep) to form cysteinyl-tRNA(Cys) (Cys-tRNA(Cys)) in methanogens that lack the canonical cysteinyl-tRNA synthetase (CysRS). A crystal structure of the Archaeoglobus fulgidus SepCysS apoenzyme provides information on the binding of the pyridoxal phosphate cofactor as well as on amino acid residues that may be involved in substrate binding. However, the mechanism of sulfur transfer to form cysteine was not known. Using an in vivo Escherichia coli complementation assay, we showed that all three highly conserved Cys residues in SepCysS (Cys(64), Cys(67), and Cys(272) in the Methanocaldococcus jannaschii enzyme) are essential for the sulfhydrylation reaction in vivo. Biochemical and mass spectrometric analysis demonstrated that Cys(64) and Cys(67) form a disulfide linkage and carry a sulfane sulfur in a portion of the enzyme. These results suggest that a persulfide group (containing a sulfane sulfur) is the proximal sulfur donor for cysteine biosynthesis. The presence of Cys(272) increased the amount of sulfane sulfur in SepCysS by 3-fold, suggesting that this Cys residue facilitates the generation of the persulfide group. Based upon these findings, we propose for SepCysS a sulfur relay mechanism that recruits both disulfide and persulfide intermediates.

  1. 2D heat and mass transfer modeling of methane steam reforming for hydrogen production in a compact reformer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Meng

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► A heat and mass transfer model is developed for a compact reformer. ► Hydrogen production from methane steam reforming is simulated. ► Increasing temperature greatly increases the reaction rates at the inlet. ► Temperature in the downstream is increased at higher rate of heat supply. ► Larger permeability enhances gas flow and reaction rates in the catalyst layer. - Abstract: Compact reformers (CRs) are promising devices for efficient fuel processing. In CRs, a thin solid plate is sandwiched between two catalyst layers to enable efficient heat transfer from combustion duct to the reforming duct for fuel processing. In this study, a 2D heat and mass transfer model is developed to investigate the fundamental transport phenomenon and chemical reaction kinetics in a CR for hydrogen production by methane steam reforming (MSR). Both MSR reaction and water gas shift reaction (WGSR) are considered in the numerical model. Parametric simulations are performed to examine the effects of various structural/operating parameters, such as pore size, permeability, gas velocity, temperature, and rate of heat supply on the reformer performance. It is found that the reaction rates of MSR and WGSR are the highest at the inlet but decrease significantly along the reformer. Increasing the operating temperature raises the reaction rates at the inlet but shows very small influence in the downstream. For comparison, increasing the rate of heat supply raises the reaction rates in the downstream due to increased temperature. A high gas velocity and permeability facilitates gas transport in the porous structure thus enhances reaction rates in the downstream of the reformer.

  2. Hydrogen bonds between the alpha and beta subunits of the F1-ATPase allow communication between the catalytic site and the interface of the beta catch loop and the gamma subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boltz, Kathryn W; Frasch, Wayne D

    2006-09-19

    F(1)-ATPase mutations in Escherichia coli that changed the strength of hydrogen bonds between the alpha and beta subunits in a location that links the catalytic site to the interface between the beta catch loop and the gamma subunit were examined. Loss of the ability to form the hydrogen bonds involving alphaS337, betaD301, and alphaD335 lowered the k(cat) of ATPase and decreased its susceptibility to Mg(2+)-ADP-AlF(n) inhibition, while mutations that maintain or strengthen these bonds increased the susceptibility to Mg(2+)-ADP-AlF(n) inhibition and lowered the k(cat) of ATPase. These data suggest that hydrogen bonds connecting alphaS337 to betaD301 and betaR323 and connecting alphaD335 to alphaS337 are important to transition state stabilization and catalytic function that may result from the proper alignment of catalytic site residues betaR182 and alphaR376 through the VISIT sequence (alpha344-348). Mutations betaD301E, betaR323K, and alphaR282Q changed the rate-limiting step of the reaction as determined by an isokinetic plot. Hydrophobic mutations of betaR323 decreased the susceptibility to Mg(2+)-ADP-AlF(n)() inhibition and lowered the number of interactions required in the rate-limiting step yet did not affect the k(cat) of ATPase, suggesting that betaR323 is important to transition state formation. The decreased rate of ATP synthase-dependent growth and decreased level of lactate-dependent quenching observed with alphaD335, betaD301, and alphaE283 mutations suggest that these residues may be important to the formation of an alternative set of hydrogen bonds at the interface of the alpha and beta subunits that permits the release of intersubunit bonds upon the binding of ATP, allowing gamma rotation in the escapement mechanism.

  3. Modifications on the hydrogen bond network by mutations of Escherichia coli copper efflux oxidase affect the process of proton transfer to dioxygen leading to alterations of enzymatic activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajikawa, Takao; Kataoka, Kunishige [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan); Sakurai, Takeshi, E-mail: tsakurai@se.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Natural Science and Technology, Kanazawa University, Kakuma, Kanazawa 920-1192 (Japan)

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proton transfer pathway to dioxygen in CueO was identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Glu506 is the key amino acid to transport proton. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ala mutation at Glu506 formed a compensatory proton transfer pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ile mutation at Glu506 shut down the hydrogen bond network. -- Abstract: CueO has a branched hydrogen bond network leading from the exterior of the protein molecule to the trinuclear copper center. This network transports protons in the four-electron reduction of dioxygen. We replaced the acidic Glu506 and Asp507 residues with the charged and uncharged amino acid residues. Peculiar changes in the enzyme activity of the mutants relative to the native enzyme indicate that an acidic amino acid residue at position 506 is essential for effective proton transport. The Ala mutation resulted in the formation of a compensatory hydrogen bond network with one or two extra water molecules. On the other hand, the Ile mutation resulted in the complete shutdown of the hydrogen bond network leading to loss of enzymatic activities of CueO. In contrast, the hydrogen bond network without the proton transport function was constructed by the Gln mutation. These results exerted on the hydrogen bond network in CueO are discussed in comparison with proton transfers in cytochrome oxidase.

  4. Loss of ammonia during electron-transfer dissociation of deuterated peptides as an inherent gauge of gas-phase hydrogen scrambling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, Kasper D; Zehl, Martin; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2010-01-01

    detected by a depletion of deuterium when deuterated ammonia is lost from peptides during ETD. This straightforward method requires no modifications to the experimental workflow and has the great advantage that the occurrence of hydrogen scrambling can be directly detected in the actual peptides analyzed......The application of electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) to obtain single-residue resolution in hydrogen exchange-mass spectrometry (HX-MS) experiments has recently been demonstrated. For such measurements, it is critical to ensure that the level of gas-phase hydrogen scrambling is negligible. Here...... we utilize the abundant loss of ammonia upon ETD of peptide ions as a universal reporter of positional randomization of the exchangeable hydrogens (hydrogen scrambling) during HX-ETD experiments. We show that the loss of ammonia from peptide ions proceeds without depletion of deuterium when employing...

  5. Complementary Strategies for Directed C(sp3 )-H Functionalization: A Comparison of Transition-Metal-Catalyzed Activation, Hydrogen Atom Transfer, and Carbene/Nitrene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, John C K; Rovis, Tomislav

    2018-01-02

    The functionalization of C(sp 3 )-H bonds streamlines chemical synthesis by allowing the use of simple molecules and providing novel synthetic disconnections. Intensive recent efforts in the development of new reactions based on C-H functionalization have led to its wider adoption across a range of research areas. This Review discusses the strengths and weaknesses of three main approaches: transition-metal-catalyzed C-H activation, 1,n-hydrogen atom transfer, and transition-metal-catalyzed carbene/nitrene transfer, for the directed functionalization of unactivated C(sp 3 )-H bonds. For each strategy, the scope, the reactivity of different C-H bonds, the position of the reacting C-H bonds relative to the directing group, and stereochemical outcomes are illustrated with examples in the literature. The aim of this Review is to provide guidance for the use of C-H functionalization reactions and inspire future research in this area. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Direct electron transfer biosensor for hydrogen peroxide carrying nanocomplex composed of horseradish peroxidase and Au-nanoparticle – Characterization and application to bienzyme systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke Okawa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A reagentless electrochemical biosensor for hydrogen peroxide was fabricated. The sensor carries a monolayer of nanocomplex composed of horseradish peroxidase and Au-nanoparticle, and responds to hydrogen peroxide through the highly efficient direct electron transfer at a mild electrode potential without any soluble mediator. Formation of the nanocomplex was studied with visible spectroscopy and size exclusion chromatography. The sensor performance was analyzed based on a hydrodynamic electrochemical technique and enzyme kinetics. The sensor was applied to fabrication of sensors for glucose and uric acid through further modification of the nanocomplex-carrying electrode with the corresponding hydrogen peroxide-generating oxidases, glucose oxidase and urate oxidase, respectively.

  7. Proton transfer through hydrogen bonds in two-dimensional water layers: A theoretical study based on ab initio and quantum-classical simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bankura, Arindam; Chandra, Amalendu

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics of proton transfer (PT) through hydrogen bonds in a two-dimensional water layer confined between two graphene sheets at room temperature are investigated through ab initio and quantum-classical simulations. The excess proton is found to be mostly solvated as an Eigen cation where the hydronium ion donates three hydrogen bonds to the neighboring water molecules. In the solvation shell of the hydronium ion, the three coordinated water molecules with two donor hydrogen bonds are found to be properly presolvated to accept a proton. Although no hydrogen bond needs to be broken for transfer of a proton to such presolvated water molecules from the hydronium ion, the PT rate is still found to be not as fast as it is for one-dimensional chains. Here, the PT is slowed down as the probability of finding a water with two donor hydrogen bonds in the solvation shell of the hydronium ion is found to be only 25%-30%. The hydroxide ion is found to be solvated mainly as a complex anion where it accepts four H-bonds through its oxygen atom and the hydrogen atom of the hydroxide ion remains free all the time. Here, the presolvation of the hydroxide ion to accept a proton requires that one of its hydrogen bonds is broken and the proton comes from a neighboring water molecule with two acceptor and one donor hydrogen bonds. The coordination number reduction by breaking of a hydrogen bond is a slow process, and also the population of water molecules with two acceptor and one donor hydrogen bonds is only 20%-25% of the total number of water molecules. All these factors together tend to slow down the hydroxide ion migration rate in two-dimensional water layers compared to that in three-dimensional bulk water

  8. Palladium nanoparticles supported on fibrous-structured silica nanospheres (KCC-1): An efficient and selective catalyst for the transfer hydrogenation of alkenes

    KAUST Repository

    Qureshi, Ziyauddin; Sarawade, Pradip; Albert, Matthias; D'Elia, Valerio; Hedhili, Mohamed Nejib; Kö hler, Klaus; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    An efficient palladium catalyst supported on fibrous silica nanospheres (KCC-1) has been developed for the hydrogenation of alkenes and α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds, providing excellent yields of the corresponding products with remarkable chemoselectivity. Comparison (high-resolution TEM, chemisorption) with analogous mesoporous (MCM-41, SBA-15) silica-supported Pd nanocatalysts prepared under identical conditions, demonstrates the advantage of employing the fibrous KCC-1 morphology versus traditional supports because it ensures superior accessibility of the catalytically active cores along with excellent Pd dispersion at high metal loading. This morphology ultimately leads to higher catalytic activity for the KCC-1-supported nanoparticles. The protocol developed for hydrogenation is advantageous and environmentally benign owing to the use of HCOOH as a source of hydrogen, water as a solvent, and because of efficient catalyst recyclability and durability. The recycled catalyst has been analyzed by XPS spectroscopy and TEM showing only minor changes in the oxidation state of Pd and in the morphology after the reaction, thus confirming the robustness of the catalyst.

  9. Palladium nanoparticles supported on fibrous-structured silica nanospheres (KCC-1): An efficient and selective catalyst for the transfer hydrogenation of alkenes

    KAUST Repository

    Qureshi, Ziyauddin

    2015-01-09

    An efficient palladium catalyst supported on fibrous silica nanospheres (KCC-1) has been developed for the hydrogenation of alkenes and α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds, providing excellent yields of the corresponding products with remarkable chemoselectivity. Comparison (high-resolution TEM, chemisorption) with analogous mesoporous (MCM-41, SBA-15) silica-supported Pd nanocatalysts prepared under identical conditions, demonstrates the advantage of employing the fibrous KCC-1 morphology versus traditional supports because it ensures superior accessibility of the catalytically active cores along with excellent Pd dispersion at high metal loading. This morphology ultimately leads to higher catalytic activity for the KCC-1-supported nanoparticles. The protocol developed for hydrogenation is advantageous and environmentally benign owing to the use of HCOOH as a source of hydrogen, water as a solvent, and because of efficient catalyst recyclability and durability. The recycled catalyst has been analyzed by XPS spectroscopy and TEM showing only minor changes in the oxidation state of Pd and in the morphology after the reaction, thus confirming the robustness of the catalyst.

  10. Catalytic detritiation of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, M.L.; Lamberger, P.H.; Ellis, R.E.; Mills, T.K.

    1977-01-01

    A pilot-scale system has been used at Mound Laboratory to investigate the catalytic detritiation of water. A hydrophobic, precious metal catalyst is used to promote the exchange of tritium between liquid water and gaseous hydrogen at 60 0 C. Two columns are used, each 7.5 m long by 2.5 cm ID and packed with catalyst. Water flow is 5-10 cm 3 /min and countercurrent hydrogen flow is 9,000-12,000 cm 3 /min. The equipment, except for the columns, is housed in an inert atmosphere glovebox and is computer controlled. The hydrogen is obtained by electrolysis of a portion of the water stream. Enriched gaseous tritium is withdrawn for further enrichment. A description of the system is included along with an outline of its operation. Recent experimental data are discussed

  11. Protein hydrogen exchange measured at single-residue resolution by electron transfer dissociation mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rand, Kasper D; Zehl, Martin; Jensen, Ole Nørregaard

    2009-01-01

    Because of unparalleled sensitivity and tolerance to protein size, mass spectrometry (MS) has become a popular method for measuring the solution hydrogen (1H/2H) exchange (HX) of biologically relevant protein states. While incorporated deuterium can be localized to different regions by pepsin....... The deuterium labeling pattern of beta2-microglobulin is retained in the gaseous fragment ions by employing mild declustering conditions for electrospray ionization. A recently developed model peptide is used to arrive at such ion source declustering conditions that prevent the occurrence of intramolecular gas...

  12. Deprotonation of flavonoids severely alters the thermodynamics of the hydrogen atom transfer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klein, E.; Rimarčík, J.; Senajová, E.; Vagánek, A.; Lengyel, Jozef

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 1085, JUN 2016 (2016), s. 7-17 ISSN 2210-271X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-14082S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Primary antioxidant * Flavonoid * dft * Bond dissociation enthalpy * Sequential proton-loss electron-transfer Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.549, year: 2016

  13. Heat transfer problems for the production of hydrogen from geothermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sigurvinsson, J.; Mansilla, C.; Arnason, B.; Bontemps, A.; Marechal, A.; Sigfusson, T.I.; Werkoff, F.

    2006-01-01

    Electrolysis at low temperature is currently used to produce Hydrogen. From a thermodynamic point of view, it is possible to improve the performance of electrolysis while functioning at high temperature (high temperature electrolysis: HTE). That makes it possible to reduce energy consumption but requires a part of the energy necessary for the dissociation of water to be in the form of thermal energy. A collaboration between France and Iceland aims at studying and then validating the possibilities of producing hydrogen with HTE coupled with a geothermal source. The influence of the exit temperature on the cost of energy consumption of the drilling well is detailed. To vaporize the water to the electrolyser, it should be possible to use the same technology currently used in the Icelandic geothermal context for producing electricity by using a steam turbine cycle. For heating the steam up to the temperature needed at the entrance of the electrolyser three kinds of heat exchangers could be used, according to specific temperature intervals

  14. Evaluation of power transfer efficiency for a high power inductively coupled radio-frequency hydrogen ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, P.; Recchia, M.; Cavenago, M.; Fantz, U.; Gaio, E.; Kraus, W.; Maistrello, A.; Veltri, P.

    2018-04-01

    Neutral beam injection (NBI) for plasma heating and current drive is necessary for International Thermonuclear Experimental reactor (ITER) tokamak. Due to its various advantages, a radio frequency (RF) driven plasma source type was selected as a reference ion source for the ITER heating NBI. The ITER relevant RF negative ion sources are inductively coupled (IC) devices whose operational working frequency has been chosen to be 1 MHz and are characterized by high RF power density (˜9.4 W cm-3) and low operational pressure (around 0.3 Pa). The RF field is produced by a coil in a cylindrical chamber leading to a plasma generation followed by its expansion inside the chamber. This paper recalls different concepts based on which a methodology is developed to evaluate the efficiency of the RF power transfer to hydrogen plasma. This efficiency is then analyzed as a function of the working frequency and in dependence of other operating source and plasma parameters. The study is applied to a high power IC RF hydrogen ion source which is similar to one simplified driver of the ELISE source (half the size of the ITER NBI source).

  15. Efficient Synthesis of Functionalized 1-oxo-1-phenyl-2-acetic Acids through Ru(II)-catalyzed Transfer Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiaowei; Gong, Binwei; Meng, Yanqiu [Shenyang Univ. of Chemical Technology, Shenyang (Korea, Republic of); Yan, Yunnan [Gannan Medical Univ., Ganzhou (Korea, Republic of); Tang, Xiaobo; Eric Xu, H.; Yi, Wei [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai (China); Li, Qiu [Univ. of Science and Technology of China, Suzhou (China)

    2013-10-15

    A new and alternative method for the efficient synthesis of indanylacetic acid 2 has been developed. The methodology used RuCl(p-cymene)[(R,R)-TsDPEN] as the catalyst and formic acid-triethylamine as the hydrogen source at room temperature under solvent-free conditions, and the reactions have excellent chemoselectivity and good compatibility of substrates. Used our developed method as the starting step, gram scale synthesis of GR24 was achieved smoothly with an overall yield of 72%. All the results suggested that further development of such methodology may be of interest. Further work to establish the mechanistic reasons for selectivity and to further explore the synthetic scope of this mode of transfer hydrogenation is in progress. The synthetic SL analog, GR24 is a very potent germination stimulant, which is widely used in parasitic weed research to stimulate germination and as a standard for comparison of new germinating agents. Owing to the prevalence of GR24, its total synthesis constitutes a hot area of research. So far all known synthetic routes of GR24 used indanylacetic acid 2 as a key intermediate, for which very few methods of building compound 2 have been reported.

  16. Catalytic effect of Ni, Mg2Ni and Mg2NiH4 upon hydrogen desorption from MgH2

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čermák, Jiří; David, Bohumil

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 21 (2011), s. 13614-13620 ISSN 0360-3199 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/09/0814; GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/11/0148 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : MgH2 * Hydrogen storage * Hydrogen desorption * Catalysis Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 4.054, year: 2011

  17. Heat and momentum transfer from an atmospheric argon hydrogen plasma jet to spherical particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaessen, P.H.M.

    1984-01-01

    In this thesis the author describes the energy and momentum transfer from the plasma jet to the spray particles. This is done both experimentally and theoretically. Also the internal energy process of the recombining plasma is discussed. All elastic and inelastic collisional and radiative processes, as well as transport effects within the plasma are considered. In the next section, the so called passive spectroscopy is treated. It describes the diagnostics of electron density and temperature measurement, as well as the investigation on heat content of the particles. Spatially resolved electron density and temperature profiles are presented. Next, the active spectroscopy, i.e. the laser Doppler anemometer is dealt with. With this diagnostic, axial spray-particle velocities inside the plasma jet were determined. The author also presents heat and momentum transfer modelling of the plasma, related to the plasma particle interaction. Finally, a one dimensional model verification is made, using the experimentally determined particle velocity and plasma temperature profiles. (Auth.)

  18. Facile Synthesis and Superior Catalytic Activity of Nano-TiN@N-C for Hydrogen Storage in NaAlH4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Ren, Zhuanghe; Lu, Yunhao; Yao, Jianhua; Gao, Mingxia; Liu, Yongfeng; Pan, Hongge

    2018-05-09

    Herein, we synthesize successfully ultrafine TiN nanoparticles (hydrogen storage in NaAlH 4 . Adding 7 wt % nano-TiN@N-C induces more than 100 °C reduction in the onset dehydrogenation temperature of NaAlH 4 . Approximately 4.9 wt % H 2 is rapidly released from the 7 wt % nano-TiN@N-C-containing NaAlH 4 at 140 °C within 60 min, and the dehydrogenation product is completely hydrogenated at 100 °C within 15 min under 100 bar of hydrogen, exhibiting significantly improved desorption/absorption kinetics. No capacity loss is observed for the nano-TiN@N-C-containing sample within 25 de-/hydrogenation cycles because nano-TiN functions as an active catalyst instead of a precursor. A severe structural distortion with extended bond lengths and reduced bond strengths for Al-H bonding when the [AlH 4 ] - group adsorbs on the TiN cluster is demonstrated for the first time by density functional theory calculations, which well-explains the reduced de-/hydrogenation temperatures of the nano-TiN@N-C-containing NaAlH 4 . These findings provide new insights into designing and synthesizing high-performance catalysts for hydrogen storage in complex hydrides.

  19. Catalytic Hydrogenation and Hydrodeoxygenation of Furfural over Pt(111): A Model System for the Rational Design and Operation of Practical Biomass Conversion Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Martin J; Jiang, Li; Reichert, Joachim; Papageorgiou, Anthoula C; Beaumont, Simon K; Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F; Barth, Johannes V; Kyriakou, Georgios

    2017-04-20

    Furfural is a key bioderived platform chemical whose reactivity under hydrogen atmospheres affords diverse chemical intermediates. Here, temperature-programmed reaction spectrometry and complementary scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) are employed to investigate furfural adsorption and reactivity over a Pt(111) model catalyst. Furfural decarbonylation to furan is highly sensitive to reaction conditions, in particular, surface crowding and associated changes in the adsorption geometry: furfural adopts a planar geometry on clean Pt(111) at low coverage, tilting at higher coverage to form a densely packed furfural adlayer. This switch in adsorption geometry strongly influences product selectivity. STM reveals the formation of hydrogen-bonded networks for planar furfural, which favor decarbonylation on clean Pt(111) and hydrogenolysis in the presence of coadsorbed hydrogen. Preadsorbed hydrogen promotes furfural hydrogenation to furfuryl alcohol and its subsequent hydrogenolysis to methyl furan, while suppressing residual surface carbon. Furfural chemistry over Pt is markedly different from that over Pd, with weaker adsorption over the former affording a simpler product distribution than the latter; Pd catalyzes a wider range of chemistry, including ring-opening to form propene. Insight into the role of molecular orientation in controlling product selectivity will guide the design and operation of more selective and stable Pt catalysts for furfural hydrogenation.

  20. Microscopic mechanism of electron transfer through the hydrogen bonds between carboxylated alkanethiol molecules connected to gold electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yang; Tu, Xingchen; Wang, Minglang; Wang, Hao; Sanvito, Stefano; Hou, Shimin

    2014-01-01

    © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC. The atomic structure and the electron transfer properties of hydrogen bonds formed between two carboxylated alkanethiol molecules connected to gold electrodes are investigated by employing the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. Three types of molecular junctions are constructed, in which one carboxyl alkanethiol molecule contains two methylene, -CH2, groups and the other one is composed of one, two, or three -CH2 groups. Our calculations show that, similarly to the cases of isolated carboxylic acid dimers, in these molecular junctions the two carboxyl, -COOH, groups form two H-bonds resulting in a cyclic structure. When self-interaction corrections are explicitly considered, the calculated transmission coefficients of these three H-bonded molecular junctions at the Fermi level are in good agreement with the experimental values. The analysis of the projected density of states confirms that the covalent Au-S bonds localized at the molecule-electrode interfaces and the electronic coupling between -COOH and S dominate the low-bias junction conductance. Following the increase of the number of the -CH2 groups, the coupling between -COOH and S decreases deeply. As a result, the junction conductance decays rapidly as the length of the H-bonded molecules increases. These findings not only provide an explanation to the observed distance dependence of the electron transfer properties of H-bonds, but also help the design of molecular devices constructed through H-bonds.

  1. Microscopic mechanism of electron transfer through the hydrogen bonds between carboxylated alkanethiol molecules connected to gold electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yang

    2014-11-07

    © 2014 AIP Publishing LLC. The atomic structure and the electron transfer properties of hydrogen bonds formed between two carboxylated alkanethiol molecules connected to gold electrodes are investigated by employing the non-equilibrium Green\\'s function formalism combined with density functional theory. Three types of molecular junctions are constructed, in which one carboxyl alkanethiol molecule contains two methylene, -CH2, groups and the other one is composed of one, two, or three -CH2 groups. Our calculations show that, similarly to the cases of isolated carboxylic acid dimers, in these molecular junctions the two carboxyl, -COOH, groups form two H-bonds resulting in a cyclic structure. When self-interaction corrections are explicitly considered, the calculated transmission coefficients of these three H-bonded molecular junctions at the Fermi level are in good agreement with the experimental values. The analysis of the projected density of states confirms that the covalent Au-S bonds localized at the molecule-electrode interfaces and the electronic coupling between -COOH and S dominate the low-bias junction conductance. Following the increase of the number of the -CH2 groups, the coupling between -COOH and S decreases deeply. As a result, the junction conductance decays rapidly as the length of the H-bonded molecules increases. These findings not only provide an explanation to the observed distance dependence of the electron transfer properties of H-bonds, but also help the design of molecular devices constructed through H-bonds.

  2. Analysis of the effects of explosion of a hydrogen cylinder on the transfer of radioactive liquid wastes at nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopes, Karina B.; Melo, Paulo Fernando F.F. e

    2011-01-01

    This work presents a study of explosion effects of a stored hydrogen cylinder on the transfer of radioactive liquid wastes at nuclear power plants. The peak overpressure is calculated, as well as the strength of resulting fragments, thus confirming the main harmful effect of an explosion of flammable vapor cloud, based on the TNT equivalent method. The scenarios identified are calculated and compared with the overpressure ranges of 1%, 50% and 99% of structural damages, which were determined by the Eisenberg's vulnerability model. The results show that the overpressure and the resulting fragments from the explosion of a hydrogen gas cylinder are not able to cause the overturning of the tanker under study, and also show that a minimum distance of 30 meters between the hydrogen cylinder and the tanker can be considered a safe distance to the passage of this tanker during the transfer of radioactive liquid waste, in which the likelihood of occurrence of structural damages is less than 1%. (author)

  3. Bimetallic promotion of cooperative hydrogen transfer and heteroatom removal in coal liquefaction. Final technical report, September 1, 1988--December 31, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisch, J.J.

    1992-04-07

    The ultimate objective of this research has been to uncover novel reagents and experimental conditions for heteroatom removal and hydrogen transfer processes, which would be applicable to the liquefaction of coal under low-severity conditions. To this end, one phase of this research has investigated the cleavage of carbon-heteroatom bonds involving sulfur, oxygen, nitrogen and halogen by subvalent transition-metal complexes. A second phase of the study has assessed the capability of the same transition-metal complexes or of organoaluminum Lewis acids to catalyze the cleavage of carbon-hydrogen bonds in aromatics and hence to promote hydrogen shuttling. Finally, a third phase of our work has uncovered a remarkable synergistic effect of combinations of transition metals with organoaluminum Lewis acids on hydrogen shuttling between aromatics and hydroaromatics. (VC)

  4. Preparation and catalytic effect of porous Co3O4 on the hydrogen storage properties of a Li-B-N-H system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    You Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A porous Co3O4 with a particle size of 1–3 µm was successfully prepared by heating Co-based metal organic frameworks MOF-74(Co up to 500 °C in air atmospheric conditions. The as-prepared porous Co3O4 significantly reduced the dehydrogenation temperatures of the LiBH4-2LiNH2 system and improved the purity of the released hydrogen. The LiBH4-2LiNH2-0.05/3Co3O4 sample started to release hydrogen at 140 °C and released hydrogen levels of approximately 9.7 wt% at 225 °C. The end temperature for hydrogen release was lowered by 125 °C relative to that of the pristine sample. Structural analyses revealed that the as-prepared porous Co3O4 is in-situ reduced to metallic Co, which functions as an active catalyst, reducing the kinetic barriers and lowering the dehydrogenation temperatures of the LiBH4-2LiNH2 system. More importantly, the porous Co3O4-containing sample exhibited partially improved reversibility for hydrogen storage in the LiBH4-2LiNH2 system.

  5. Transferring metallic nano-island on hydrogen passivated silicon surface for nano-electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deng, J; Troadec, C; Joachim, C

    2009-01-01

    In a planar configuration, precise positioning of ultra-flat metallic nano-islands on semiconductor surface opens a way to construct nanostructures for atomic scale interconnects. Regular triangular Au nano-islands have been grown on atomically flat MoS 2 substrates and manipulated by STM to form nanometer gap metal-pads connector for single molecule electronics study. The direct assembly of regular shaped metal nano-islands on H-Si(100) is not achievable. Here we present how to transfer Au triangle nano-islands from MoS 2 onto H-Si(100) in a clean manner. In this experiment, clean MoS 2 substrates are patterned as array of MoS 2 pillars with height of 8 μm. The Au triangle nano-islands are grown on top of the pillars. Successful printing transfer of these Au nano-islands from the MoS 2 pillars to the H-Si(100) is demonstrated.

  6. Electrochemical studies of a reconstituted photosynthetic electron-transfer chain or towards a biomimetic photoproduction of hydrogen; Etudes electrochimiques de chaines de transfert d'electrons photosynthetiques ou vers une photoproduction biomimetique d'hydrogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourmond, V

    2007-04-15

    The aim of this work is to find an efficient process to convert solar energy into hydrogen. The electrons transfers in reconstituted photosynthetic chains have been particularly studied with the aims 1)in one hand, to better understand the interactions of the different molecules of the photosynthetic chain in order to optimize the changes of the entire organisms for hydrogen production 2)in another hand, to insert the hydrogenases in a photosynthetic chain and then to photo reduce them in order to obtain kinetic data to better understand how it works. (O.M.)

  7. A novel sodium iodide and ammonium molybdate co-catalytic system for the efficient synthesis of 2-benzimidazoles using hydrogen peroxide under ultrasound irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Guo-Yi; Lan, Xing-Wang; Chen, Guo-Feng; Liu, Xiao-Fang; Li, Tian-Yu; Shi, Ling-Juan

    2014-03-01

    The reaction of aldehydes and o-phenylenediamine for the preparation of 2-benzimidazoles has been studied using hydrogen peroxide as an oxidant under ultrasound irradiation at room temperature in this paper. The combination of substoichiometric sodium iodide and ammonium molybdate as co-catalysts, together with using small amounts of hydrogen peroxide, makes this transformation very efficient and attractive under ultrasound. Thus, a mild, green and efficient method is established to carry out this reaction in high yield. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Vibrationally-resolved Charge Transfer of O^3+ Ions with Molecular Hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. G.; Stancil, P. C.; Turner, A. R.; Cooper, D. L.

    2003-05-01

    Charge transfer processes due to collisions of ground state O^3+ ions with H2 are investigated using the quantum-mechanical molecular-orbital close-coupling (MOCC) method. The MOCC calculations utilize ab initio adiabatic potentials and nonadiabatic radial coupling matrix elements obtained with the spin-coupled valence-bond approach. Vibrationally-resolved cross sections for energies between 0.1 eV/u and 2 keV/u using the infinite order sudden approximation (IOSA), vibrational sudden approximation (VSA), and electronic approximation (EA), but including Frank-Condon factors (the centroid approximation) will be presented. Comparison with existing experimental data for total cross sections shows best agreement with IOSA and discrepancies for VSA and EA. Triplet-singlet cross section ratios obtained with IOSA are found generally to be in harmony with experiment. JGW and PCS acknowledge support from NASA grant 11453.

  9. Study on influencing factors for hydrogen isotopic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Mei; Liu Jun; Luo Yangming

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hydrogen-water catalytic exchange reaction offers an approach to hydrogen isotope separation, which can be applied in heavy water detritiation. Purpose: To optimize the operating condition for hydrogen-water catalytic exchange reaction, we analysed the influence of different factors on the transfer coefficient. Methods: In detail, the isotope exchange experiments of H-D system were carried out in a self-designed catalytic bed loaded with hydrophobic catalyst and hydrophilic packing with certain volume ratio. The experiments showed the changes of both the transfer coefficient and the pressure drop of column with the changing of the operational temperatures (29℃, 45℃, 60℃ and 75℃), the ratios of gas to liquid (0.58, 1.17, 2.65, 3.54) and the deuterium concentrations (5.05×10 -3 , 1.0144×10 -2 , 2.01×10 -2 ). Results: Results showed that 45℃ is the optimal temperature for operating. The transfer coefficient increases with the increasing of the ratio of gas to liquid in the ranges of 0.58 to 1.17 and 2.65 to 3.56, while decreases with the deuterium concentration increases from 5.05×10 -3 to 2.01×10 -2 . The pressure drop of column increases with increasing of gas flow rate. Conclusions: The experiment proves that the ratio of gas to liquid, the reaction temperature and the deuterium concentration are all important factors, which influence the transfer coefficient of deuterium obviously. The optimal operating condition for hydrogen-water catalytic exchange reaction are as follows: the temperature is 45℃, the ratio of gas to liquid is 3.56, and the deuterium concentration is 2.01×10 -2 . (authors)

  10. Comparison of thermally and mechanically induced Si layer transfer in hydrogen-implanted Si wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoechbauer, T.; Misra, A.; Nastasi, M.; Henttinen, K.; Suni, T.; Suni, I.; Lau, S.S.; Ensinger, W.

    2004-01-01

    Hydrogen ion-implantation into Si and subsequent heat treatment has been shown to be an effective means of cleaving thin layer of Si from its parent wafer. This process has been called Smart Cut TM or ion-cut. We investigated the cleavage process in H-implanted silicon samples, in which the ion-cut was provoked thermally and mechanically, respectively. A oriented p-type silicon wafer was irradiated at room temperature with 100 keV H 2 + -ions to a dose of 5 x 10 16 H 2 /cm 2 and subsequently joined to a handle wafer. Ion-cutting was achieved by two different methods: (1) thermally by annealing to 350 deg. C and (2) mechanically by insertion of a razor blade sidewise into the bonded wafers near the bond interface. The H-concentration and the crystal damage depth profiles before and after the ion-cut were investigated through the combined use of elastic recoil detection analysis and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS). The location at which the ion-cut occurred was determined by RBS in channeling mode and cross-section transmission electron spectroscopy. The ion-cut depth was found to be independent on the cutting method. The gained knowledge was correlated to the depth distribution of the H-platelet density in the as-implanted sample, which contains two separate peaks in the implantation zone. The obtained results suggest that the ion-cut location coincides with the depth of the H-platelet density peak located at a larger depth

  11. Interactions of the (R) Ru-BINAP Catalytic Complex with an Inorganic Matrix in Stereoselective Hydrogenation of Methylacetoacetate – Kinetic, XPS and DRIFT Studies.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klusoň, Petr; Krystyník, Pavel; Dytrych, Pavel; Bártek, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 2 (2016), s. 393-413 ISSN 1878-5190 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-14228S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : (R)-Ru-BINAP complex * stereoselective hydrogenation * montmorillonite Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 1.264, year: 2016

  12. Catalytic Hydrogenation and Hydrodeoxygenation of Furfural over Pt(111): A Model System for the Rational Design and Operation of Practical Biomass Conversion Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Martin J.; Jiang, Li; Reichert, Joachim; Papageorgiou, Anthoula C.; Beaumont, Simon K.; Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F.; Barth, Johannes V.; Kyriakou, Georgios

    2017-01-01

    Furfural is a key bioderived platform chemical whose reactivity under hydrogen atmospheres affords diverse chemical intermediates. Here, temperature-programmed reaction spectrometry and complementary scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) are employed to investigate furfural adsorption and reactivity over a Pt(111) model catalyst. Furfural decarbonylation to furan is highly sensitive to reaction conditions, in particular, surface crowding and associated changes in the adsorption geometry: furfur...

  13. Catalytic hydrogenation of CO2 to formates by lutidine-derived Ru-CNC pincer complex : theoretical insight into unrealized potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Filonenko, G.; Smykowski, D.; Szyja, B.M.; Li, G.; Szczygiel, J.; Hensen, E.J.M.; Pidko, E.A.

    2015-01-01

    Metal-ligand cooperative properties of a bis-N-heterocyclic carbene ruthenium CNC-pincer catalyst and its activity in CO2 hydrogenation to formates were studied by DFT calculations complemented by NMR spectroscopy and kinetic measurements. The dearomatized Ru-CNC* pincer (1*) is significantly more

  14. Size- and shape-controlled synthesis and catalytic performance of iron-aluminum mixed oxide nanoparticles for NOX and SO₂ removal with hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jie; Zhong, Qin; Zhang, Shule; Cai, Wei

    2015-01-01

    A novel, simple, reproducible and low-cost strategy is introduced for the size- and shape-controlled synthesis of iron-aluminum mixed oxide nanoparticles (NIAO(x/y)). The as-synthesized NIAO(x/y) catalyze decomposition of H2O2 yielding highly reactive hydroxyl radicals (OH) for NOX and SO2 removal. 100% SO2 removal is achieved. NIAO(x/y) with Fe/Al molar ratio of 7/3 (NIAO(7/3)) shows the highest NOX removal of nearly 80% at >170°C, whereas much lower NOX removal (oxides in NIAO(7/3) promotes the formation of lamellar products, thus improving the specific surface areas and mesoporous distribution, benefiting the production of OH radicals. Furthermore, the NIAO(7/3) leads to the minor increase of points of zero charges (PZC), apparent enhancement of FeOH content and high oxidizing ability of Fe(III), further improving the production of OH radicals. However, the NIAO(3/7) results in the formation of aluminum surface-enriched spherical particles, thus decreasing the surface atomic ratio of iron oxides, decreasing OH radical production. More importantly, the generation of FeOAl causes the decline of active sites. Finally, the catalytic decomposition of H2O2 on NIAO(x/y) is proposed. And the well catalytic stability of NIAO(7/3) is obtained for evaluation of 30 h. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Catalytic treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindley, W T.R.

    1931-04-18

    An apparatus is described for the catalytic treatment of liquids, semi-liquids, and gases comprising a vessel into which the liquid, semi-liquid, or gas to be treated is introduced through a common inlet to a chamber within the vessel whence it passes to contact with a catalyst through radially arranged channels or passages to a common outlet chamber.

  16. Studies on transfer phenomena of tritium from liquid to gaseous phase in a successive catalyst and ordered packing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bornea, Anisia; Cristescu, Ion; Zamfirache, Marius; Varlam, Carmen

    2001-01-01

    The processes for hydrogen isotope separation are very important for nuclear technology. One of the most important processes in tritium separation, is the water-hydrogen catalytic isotope exchange. In a column of isotope exchange, tritium is transferred from the liquid phase (tritiated heavy water) to the gaseous phase (hydrogen). In the experimental set-up, which was used, the column of catalytic isotope exchange is filled with successive layers of catalyst Pt/C/PtFe and B7 type ordered packing of phosphor bronze. The tritium transfer from liquid phase to water vapours, is achieved on ordered packing by distillation process: (DTO)L+(D 2 O)V → (D 2 O)L+(DTO)V. On the catalytic tritium transfer from water vapours to hydrogen gas is achieved by the catalytic isotopic exchange process: (DTO)V+(D 2 )G → (D 2 O)V+(DT)G. We analyzed the transfer phenomena of tritium in this system by using the experimental data obtained. The mathematical model presented in the paper allowed computing experimental data for testing the catalyst performances. The transfer equations are solved using the Runge - Kutta method. In this way the speed constants which characterized the isotopic exchange on the catalysis bed ks, and the distillation on the ordered packing kd, were expressed as function of experimental concentrations and hydrodynamic conditions. (authors)

  17. Stationary inverted Lyman population formed from incandescently heated hydrogen gas with certain catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, Randell L; Ray, Paresh C; Mayo, Robert M

    2003-01-01

    A new chemically generated plasma source is reported. The presence of gaseous Rb + or K + ions with thermally dissociated hydrogen formed a low applied temperature, extremely low voltage plasma called a resonant transfer or rt-plasma having strong vacuum ultraviolet emission. We propose an energetic catalytic reaction involving a resonant energy transfer between hydrogen atoms and Rb + or 2K + since Rb + to Rb 2+ , 2K + to K + K 2+ , and K to K 3+ each provide a reaction with a net enthalpy equal to the potential energy of atomic hydrogen. Remarkably, a stationary inverted Lyman population was observed; thus, these catalytic reactions may pump a cw HI laser as predicted by a collisional radiative model used to determine that the observed overpopulation was above threshold

  18. Stationary inverted Lyman population formed from incandescently heated hydrogen gas with certain catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mills, Randell L; Ray, Paresh C; Mayo, Robert M [BlackLight Power, Inc., 493 Old Trenton Road, Cranbury, NJ 08512 (United States)

    2003-07-07

    A new chemically generated plasma source is reported. The presence of gaseous Rb{sup +} or K{sup +} ions with thermally dissociated hydrogen formed a low applied temperature, extremely low voltage plasma called a resonant transfer or rt-plasma having strong vacuum ultraviolet emission. We propose an energetic catalytic reaction involving a resonant energy transfer between hydrogen atoms and Rb{sup +} or 2K{sup +} since Rb{sup +} to Rb{sup 2+}, 2K{sup +} to K + K{sup 2+}, and K to K{sup 3+} each provide a reaction with a net enthalpy equal to the potential energy of atomic hydrogen. Remarkably, a stationary inverted Lyman population was observed; thus, these catalytic reactions may pump a cw HI laser as predicted by a collisional radiative model used to determine that the observed overpopulation was above threshold.

  19. Bio-hydrogen production based on catalytic reforming of volatiles generated by cellulose pyrolysis: An integrated process for ZnO reduction and zinc nanostructures fabrication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciel, Adriana Veloso; Job, Aldo Eloizo; Nova Mussel, Wagner da; Brito, Walter de; Duarte Pasa, Vanya Marcia

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents a process of cellulose thermal degradation with bio-hydrogen generation and zinc nanostructures synthesis. Production of zinc nanowires and zinc nanoflowers was performed by a novel processes based on cellulose pyrolysis, volatiles reforming and direct reduction of ZnO. The bio-hydrogen generated in situ promoted the ZnO reduction with Zn nanostructures formation by vapor-solid (VS) route. The cellulose and cellulose/ZnO samples were characterized by thermal analyses (TG/DTG/DTA) and the gases evolved were analyzed by FTIR spectroscopy (TG/FTIR). The hydrogen was detected by TPR (Temperature Programmed Reaction) tests. The results showed that in the presence of ZnO the cellulose thermal degradation produced larger amounts of H 2 when compared to pure cellulose. The process was also carried out in a tubular furnace with N 2 atmosphere, at temperatures up to 900 o C, and different heating rates. The nanostructures growth was catalyst-free, without pressure reduction, at temperatures lower than those required in the carbothermal reduction of ZnO with fossil carbon. The nanostructures were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The optical properties were investigated by photoluminescence (PL). One mechanism was presented in an attempt to explain the synthesis of zinc nanostructures that are crystalline, were obtained without significant re-oxidation and whose morphologies are dependent on the heating rates of the process. This route presents a potential use as an industrial process taking into account the simple operational conditions, the low costs of cellulose and the importance of bio-hydrogen and nanostructured zinc.

  20. Comparison of the Effects of Fluidized-Bed and Fixed-Bed Reactors in Microwave-Assisted Catalytic Decomposition of TCE by Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Ren

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichloroethylene (TCE decomposition by hydrogen with microwave heating under different reaction systems was investigated. The activities of a series of catalysts for microwave-assisted TCE hydrodechlorination were tested through the fixed-bed and the fluidized-bed reactor systems. This study found that the different reaction system is suitable for different catalyst type. And there is an interactive relationship between the catalyst type and the reaction bed type.