WorldWideScience

Sample records for catalytic rna structure

  1. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, J.A.

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the paperclip'' and hammerhead'' RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a hammerhead,'' to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 12{plus minus}1 nucleotides are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  2. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, J.A.

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the ``paperclip`` and ``hammerhead`` RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a ``hammerhead,`` to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 12{plus_minus}1 nucleotides are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus_minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  3. Structural Basis for Telomerase Catalytic Subunit TERT Binding to RNA Template and Telomeric DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, M.; Gillis, A; Futahashi, M; Fujiwara, H; Skordalakes, E

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase is a specialized DNA polymerase that extends the 3{prime} ends of eukaryotic linear chromosomes, a process required for genomic stability and cell viability. Here we present the crystal structure of the active Tribolium castaneum telomerase catalytic subunit, TERT, bound to an RNA-DNA hairpin designed to resemble the putative RNA-templating region and telomeric DNA. The RNA-DNA hybrid adopts a helical structure, docked in the interior cavity of the TERT ring. Contacts between the RNA template and motifs 2 and B{prime} position the solvent-accessible RNA bases close to the enzyme active site for nucleotide binding and selectivity. Nucleic acid binding induces rigid TERT conformational changes to form a tight catalytic complex. Overall, TERT-RNA template and TERT-telomeric DNA associations are remarkably similar to those observed for retroviral reverse transcriptases, suggesting common mechanistic aspects of DNA replication between the two families of enzymes.

  4. Catalytic distillation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  5. Human Dcp2: a catalytically active mRNA decapping enzyme located in specific cytoplasmic structures

    OpenAIRE

    van Dijk, Erwin; Cougot, Nicolas; Meyer, Sylke; Babajko, Sylvie; Wahle, Elmar; Séraphin, Bertrand

    2002-01-01

    We have cloned cDNAs for the human homologues of the yeast Dcp1 and Dcp2 factors involved in the major (5′–3′) and NMD mRNA decay pathways. While yeast Dcp1 has been reported to be the decapping enzyme, we show that recombinant human Dcp2 (hDcp2) is enzymatically active. Dcp2 activity appears evolutionarily conserved. Mutational and biochemical analyses indicate that the hDcp2 MutT/Nudix domain mediates this activity. hDcp2 generates m7GDP and 5′-phosphorylated mRNAs that are 5′–3′ exonucleas...

  6. ADAR proteins: structure and catalytic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Rena A; Macbeth, Mark R; Beal, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of the adenosine deaminase (ADA) acting on RNA (ADAR) family of proteins in 1988 (Bass and Weintraub, Cell 55:1089-1098, 1988) (Wagner et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 86:2647-2651, 1989), we have learned much about their structure and catalytic mechanism. However, much about these enzymes is still unknown, particularly regarding the selective recognition and processing of specific adenosines within substrate RNAs. While a crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human ADAR2 has been solved, we still lack structural data for an ADAR catalytic domain bound to RNA, and we lack any structural data for other ADARs. However, by analyzing the structural data that is available along with similarities to other deaminases, mutagenesis and other biochemical experiments, we have been able to advance the understanding of how these fascinating enzymes function. PMID:21769729

  7. Interaction of human decapping scavenger with 5' mRNA cap analogues: structural requirements for catalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cap structure is a specific feature of the 5' end of mRNA which plays an important role in the post-transcriptional control in gene expression. A major step of gene regulation occurs at the level of mRNA turnover. Degradation of most eukaryotic mRNAs entails the removal of the cap structure in the various pathways. A human scavenger decapping enzyme (hDcpS) catalyses the cleavage of the residual cap structure m7GpppN and/or short oligonucleotides after the 3' to 5' exosom mediated digestion. In this paper we report a fluorescence study of association process of hDcpS with m7GMP, m7GDP and selected dinucleotide cap analogues resistant to enzymatic hydrolysis. The calculated values of association constants (Kas) and corresponding Gibbs free energies (ΔG0) depend on the type of substituents and their positions in the cap molecule, indicating which structural modifications are crucial for the catalysis

  8. Membrane binding of Escherichia coli RNase E catalytic domain stabilizes protein structure and increases RNA substrate affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashko, Oleg N; Kaberdin, Vladimir R; Lin-Chao, Sue

    2012-05-01

    RNase E plays an essential role in RNA processing and decay and tethers to the cytoplasmic membrane in Escherichia coli; however, the function of this membrane-protein interaction has remained unclear. Here, we establish a mechanistic role for the RNase E-membrane interaction. The reconstituted highly conserved N-terminal fragment of RNase E (NRne, residues 1-499) binds specifically to anionic phospholipids through electrostatic interactions. The membrane-binding specificity of NRne was confirmed using circular dichroism difference spectroscopy; the dissociation constant (K(d)) for NRne binding to anionic liposomes was 298 nM. E. coli RNase G and RNase E/G homologs from phylogenetically distant Aquifex aeolicus, Haemophilus influenzae Rd, and Synechocystis sp. were found to be membrane-binding proteins. Electrostatic potentials of NRne and its homologs were found to be conserved, highly positive, and spread over a large surface area encompassing four putative membrane-binding regions identified in the "large" domain (amino acids 1-400, consisting of the RNase H, S1, 5'-sensor, and DNase I subdomains) of E. coli NRne. In vitro cleavage assay using liposome-free and liposome-bound NRne and RNA substrates BR13 and GGG-RNAI showed that NRne membrane binding altered its enzymatic activity. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed no obvious thermotropic structural changes in membrane-bound NRne between 10 and 60 °C, and membrane-bound NRne retained its normal cleavage activity after cooling. Thus, NRne membrane binding induced changes in secondary protein structure and enzymatic activation by stabilizing the protein-folding state and increasing its binding affinity for its substrate. Our results demonstrate that RNase E-membrane interaction enhances the rate of RNA processing and decay. PMID:22509045

  9. An Efficient Catalytic DNA that Cleaves L-RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kha Tram

    Full Text Available Many DNAzymes have been isolated from synthetic DNA pools to cleave natural RNA (D-RNA substrates and some have been utilized for the design of aptazyme biosensors for bioanalytical applications. Even though these biosensors perform well in simple sample matrices, they do not function effectively in complex biological samples due to ubiquitous RNases that can efficiently cleave D-RNA substrates. To overcome this issue, we set out to develop DNAzymes that cleave L-RNA, the enantiomer of D-RNA, which is known to be completely resistant to RNases. Through in vitro selection we isolated three L-RNA-cleaving DNAzymes from a random-sequence DNA pool. The most active DNAzyme exhibits a catalytic rate constant ~3 min-1 and has a structure that contains a kissing loop, a structural motif that has never been observed with D-RNA-cleaving DNAzymes. Furthermore we have used this DNAzyme and a well-known ATP-binding DNA aptamer to construct an aptazyme sensor and demonstrated that this biosensor can achieve ATP detection in biological samples that contain RNases. The current work lays the foundation for exploring RNA-cleaving DNAzymes for engineering biosensors that are compatible with complex biological samples.

  10. Irreducibility in RNA structures

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Emma Y.; Reidys, Christian M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we study irreducibility in RNA structures. By RNA structure we mean RNA secondary as well as RNA pseudoknot structures. In our analysis we shall contrast random and minimum free energy (mfe) configurations. We compute various distributions: of the numbers of irreducible substructures, their locations and sizes, parameterized in terms of the maximal number of mutually crossing arcs, $k-1$, and the minimal size of stacks $\\sigma$. In particular, we analyze the size of the largest ...

  11. Functional identification of catalytic metal ion binding sites within RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L Hougland

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The viability of living systems depends inextricably on enzymes that catalyze phosphoryl transfer reactions. For many enzymes in this class, including several ribozymes, divalent metal ions serve as obligate cofactors. Understanding how metal ions mediate catalysis requires elucidation of metal ion interactions with both the enzyme and the substrate(s. In the Tetrahymena group I intron, previous work using atomic mutagenesis and quantitative analysis of metal ion rescue behavior identified three metal ions (MA, MB, and MC that make five interactions with the ribozyme substrates in the reaction's transition state. Here, we combine substrate atomic mutagenesis with site-specific phosphorothioate substitutions in the ribozyme backbone to develop a powerful, general strategy for defining the ligands of catalytic metal ions within RNA. In applying this strategy to the Tetrahymena group I intron, we have identified the pro-SP phosphoryl oxygen at nucleotide C262 as a ribozyme ligand for MC. Our findings establish a direct connection between the ribozyme core and the functionally defined model of the chemical transition state, thereby extending the known set of transition-state interactions and providing information critical for the application of the recent group I intron crystallographic structures to the understanding of catalysis.

  12. Alignments of RNA structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blin, Guillaume; Denise, Alain; Dulucq, Serge; Herrbach, Claire; Touzet, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    We describe a theoretical unifying framework to express the comparison of RNA structures, which we call alignment hierarchy. This framework relies on the definition of common supersequences for arc-annotated sequences and encompasses the main existing models for RNA structure comparison based on trees and arc-annotated sequences with a variety of edit operations. It also gives rise to edit models that have not been studied yet. We provide a thorough analysis of the alignment hierarchy, including a new polynomial-time algorithm and an NP-completeness proof. The polynomial-time algorithm involves biologically relevant edit operations such as pairing or unpairing nucleotides. It has been implemented in a software, called gardenia, which is available at the Web server http://bioinfo.lifl.fr/RNA/gardenia. PMID:20431150

  13. A novel miRNA processing pathway independent of Dicer requires Argonaute2 catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Daniel; Xue, Huiling; Taylor, David W; Patnode, Heather; Mishima, Yuichiro; Cheloufi, Sihem; Ma, Enbo; Mane, Shrikant; Hannon, Gregory J; Lawson, Nathan D; Wolfe, Scot A; Giraldez, Antonio J

    2010-06-25

    Dicer is a central enzyme in microRNA (miRNA) processing. We identified a Dicer-independent miRNA biogenesis pathway that uses Argonaute2 (Ago2) slicer catalytic activity. In contrast to other miRNAs, miR-451 levels were refractory to dicer loss of function but were reduced in MZago2 (maternal-zygotic) mutants. We found that pre-miR-451 processing requires Ago2 catalytic activity in vivo. MZago2 mutants showed delayed erythropoiesis that could be rescued by wild-type Ago2 or miR-451-duplex but not by catalytically dead Ago2. Changing the secondary structure of Dicer-dependent miRNAs to mimic that of pre-miR-451 restored miRNA function and rescued developmental defects in MZdicer mutants, indicating that the pre-miRNA secondary structure determines the processing pathway in vivo. We propose that Ago2-mediated cleavage of pre-miRNAs, followed by uridylation and trimming, generates functional miRNAs independently of Dicer. PMID:20448148

  14. Domain motions of Argonaute, the catalytic engine of RNA interference

    OpenAIRE

    Wall Michael E; Ming Dengming; Sanbonmatsu Kevin Y

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The Argonaute protein is the core component of the RNA-induced silencing complex, playing the central role of cleaving the mRNA target. Visual inspection of static crystal structures already has enabled researchers to suggest conformational changes of Argonaute that might occur during RNA interference. We have taken the next step by performing an all-atom normal mode analysis of the Pyrococcus furiosus and Aquifex aeolicus Argonaute crystal structures, allowing us to quant...

  15. Structure-based identification of catalytic residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahalom, Ran; Reshef, Dan; Wiener, Ayana; Frankel, Sagiv; Kalisman, Nir; Lerner, Boaz; Keasar, Chen

    2011-06-01

    The identification of catalytic residues is an essential step in functional characterization of enzymes. We present a purely structural approach to this problem, which is motivated by the difficulty of evolution-based methods to annotate structural genomics targets that have few or no homologs in the databases. Our approach combines a state-of-the-art support vector machine (SVM) classifier with novel structural features that augment structural clues by spatial averaging and Z scoring. Special attention is paid to the class imbalance problem that stems from the overwhelming number of non-catalytic residues in enzymes compared to catalytic residues. This problem is tackled by: (1) optimizing the classifier to maximize a performance criterion that considers both Type I and Type II errors in the classification of catalytic and non-catalytic residues; (2) under-sampling non-catalytic residues before SVM training; and (3) during SVM training, penalizing errors in learning catalytic residues more than errors in learning non-catalytic residues. Tested on four enzyme datasets, one specifically designed by us to mimic the structural genomics scenario and three previously evaluated datasets, our structure-based classifier is never inferior to similar structure-based classifiers and comparable to classifiers that use both structural and evolutionary features. In addition to the evaluation of the performance of catalytic residue identification, we also present detailed case studies on three proteins. This analysis suggests that many false positive predictions may correspond to binding sites and other functional residues. A web server that implements the method, our own-designed database, and the source code of the programs are publicly available at http://www.cs.bgu.ac.il/∼meshi/functionPrediction. PMID:21491495

  16. RNA thermodynamic structural entropy

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia-Martin, Juan Antonio; Clote, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Conformational entropy for atomic-level, three dimensional biomolecules is known experimentally to play an important role in protein-ligand discrimination, yet reliable computation of entropy remains a difficult problem. Here we describe the first two accurate and efficient algorithms to compute the conformational entropy for RNA secondary structures, with respect to the Turner energy model, where free energy parameters are determined from UV absorption experiments. An algorithm to compute th...

  17. RNA Thermodynamic Structural Entropy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Garcia-Martin

    Full Text Available Conformational entropy for atomic-level, three dimensional biomolecules is known experimentally to play an important role in protein-ligand discrimination, yet reliable computation of entropy remains a difficult problem. Here we describe the first two accurate and efficient algorithms to compute the conformational entropy for RNA secondary structures, with respect to the Turner energy model, where free energy parameters are determined from UV absorption experiments. An algorithm to compute the derivational entropy for RNA secondary structures had previously been introduced, using stochastic context free grammars (SCFGs. However, the numerical value of derivational entropy depends heavily on the chosen context free grammar and on the training set used to estimate rule probabilities. Using data from the Rfam database, we determine that both of our thermodynamic methods, which agree in numerical value, are substantially faster than the SCFG method. Thermodynamic structural entropy is much smaller than derivational entropy, and the correlation between length-normalized thermodynamic entropy and derivational entropy is moderately weak to poor. In applications, we plot the structural entropy as a function of temperature for known thermoswitches, such as the repression of heat shock gene expression (ROSE element, we determine that the correlation between hammerhead ribozyme cleavage activity and total free energy is improved by including an additional free energy term arising from conformational entropy, and we plot the structural entropy of windows of the HIV-1 genome. Our software RNAentropy can compute structural entropy for any user-specified temperature, and supports both the Turner'99 and Turner'04 energy parameters. It follows that RNAentropy is state-of-the-art software to compute RNA secondary structure conformational entropy. Source code is available at https://github.com/clotelab/RNAentropy/; a full web server is available at http

  18. Topology of RNA-RNA interaction structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard; Huang, Fenix Wenda; Penner, Robert;

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The topological filtration of interacting RNA complexes is studied, and the role is analyzed of certain diagrams called irreducible shadows, which form suitable building blocks for more general structures. We prove that, for two interacting RNAs, called interaction structures, there exist...

  19. Domain motions of Argonaute, the catalytic engine of RNA interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wall Michael E

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Argonaute protein is the core component of the RNA-induced silencing complex, playing the central role of cleaving the mRNA target. Visual inspection of static crystal structures already has enabled researchers to suggest conformational changes of Argonaute that might occur during RNA interference. We have taken the next step by performing an all-atom normal mode analysis of the Pyrococcus furiosus and Aquifex aeolicus Argonaute crystal structures, allowing us to quantitatively assess the feasibility of these conformational changes. To perform the analysis, we begin with the energy-minimized X-ray structures. Normal modes are then calculated using an all-atom molecular mechanics force field. Results The analysis reveals low-frequency vibrations that facilitate the accommodation of RNA duplexes – an essential step in target recognition. The Pyrococcus furiosus and Aquifex aeolicus Argonaute proteins both exhibit low-frequency torsion and hinge motions; however, differences in the overall architecture of the proteins cause the detailed dynamics to be significantly different. Conclusion Overall, low-frequency vibrations of Argonaute are consistent with mechanisms within the current reaction cycle model for RNA interference.

  20. Structure of an Rrp6-RNA exosome complex bound to poly(A) RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasmuth, Elizabeth V.; Januszyk, Kurt; Lima, Christopher D. [MSKCC

    2014-08-20

    The eukaryotic RNA exosome processes and degrades RNA by directing substrates to the distributive or processive 3' to 5' exoribonuclease activities of Rrp6 or Rrp44, respectively. The non-catalytic nine-subunit exosome core (Exo9) features a prominent central channel. Although RNA can pass through the channel to engage Rrp44, it is not clear how RNA is directed to Rrp6 or whether Rrp6 uses the central channel. Here we report a 3.3 Å crystal structure of a ten-subunit RNA exosome complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae composed of the Exo9 core and Rrp6 bound to single-stranded poly(A) RNA. The Rrp6 catalytic domain rests on top of the Exo9 S1/KH ring above the central channel, the RNA 3' end is anchored in the Rrp6 active site, and the remaining RNA traverses the S1/KH ring in an opposite orientation to that observed in a structure of a Rrp44-containing exosome complex. Solution studies with human and yeast RNA exosome complexes suggest that the RNA path to Rrp6 is conserved and dependent on the integrity of the S1/KH ring. Although path selection to Rrp6 or Rrp44 is stochastic in vitro, the fate of a particular RNA may be determined in vivo by the manner in which cofactors present RNA to the RNA exosome.

  1. RNA Structural Alignments, Part I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havgaard, Jakob Hull; Gorodkin, Jan

    Simultaneous alignment and secondary structure prediction of RNA sequences is often referred to as "RNA structural alignment." A class of the methods for structural alignment is based on the principles proposed by Sankoff more than 25 years ago. The Sankoff algorithm simultaneously folds and aligns...

  2. On the Structural Context and Identification of Enzyme Catalytic Residues

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Tung Chien; Shao-Wei Huang

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes play important roles in most of the biological processes. Although only a small fraction of residues are directly involved in catalytic reactions, these catalytic residues are the most crucial parts in enzymes. The study of the fundamental and unique features of catalytic residues benefits the understanding of enzyme functions and catalytic mechanisms. In this work, we analyze the structural context of catalytic residues based on theoretical and experimental structure flexibility. The...

  3. Topology of RNA-RNA interaction structures

    CERN Document Server

    Andersen, Jørgen E; Penner, Robert C; Reidys, Christian M

    2011-01-01

    The topological filtration of interacting RNA complexes is studied and the role is analyzed of certain diagrams called irreducible shadows, which form suitable building blocks for more general structures. We prove that for two interacting RNAs, called interaction structures, there exist for fixed genus only finitely many irreducible shadows. This implies that for fixed genus there are only finitely many classes of interaction structures. In particular the simplest case of genus zero already provides the formalism for certain types of structures that occur in nature and are not covered by other filtrations. This case of genus zero interaction structures is already of practical interest, is studied here in detail and found to be expressed by a multiple context-free grammar extending the usual one for RNA secondary structures. We show that in $O(n^6)$ time and $O(n^4)$ space complexity, this grammar for genus zero interaction structures provides not only minimum free energy solutions but also the complete partit...

  4. Quasispecies-like behavior observed in catalytic RNA populations evolving in a test tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehman Niles

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the RNA World, molecular populations were probably very small and highly susceptible to the force of strong random drift. In conjunction with Muller's Ratchet, this would have imposed difficulties for the preservation of the genetic information and the survival of the populations. Mechanisms that allowed these nascent populations to overcome this problem must have been advantageous. Results Using continuous in vitro evolution experimentation with an increased mutation rate imposed by MnCl2, it was found that clonal 100-molecule populations of ribozymes clearly exhibit certain characteristics of a quasispecies. This is the first time this has been seen with a catalytic RNA. Extensive genotypic sampling from two replicate lineages was gathered and phylogenetic networks were constructed to elucidate the structure of the evolving RNA populations. A common distribution was found in which a mutant sequence was present at high frequency, surrounded by a cloud of mutant with lower frequencies. This is a typical distribution of quasispecies. Most of the mutants in these clouds were connected by short Hamming distance values, indicating their close relatedness. Conclusions The quasispecies nature of mutant RNA clouds facilitates the recovery of genotypes under pressure of being removed from the population by random drift. The empirical populations therefore evolved a genotypic resiliency despite a high mutation rate by adopting the characteristics of quasispecies, implying that primordial RNA pools could have used this strategy to avoid extinction.

  5. Shapes of RNA pseudoknot structures

    CERN Document Server

    Reidys, Christian M

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we study $\\mathcal{I}_k$- and $\\mathcal{J}_k$-shapes of $k$-noncrossing, $\\sigma$-canonical RNA structures. These shapes, if induced by RNA secondary structures coincide with the $\\pi$- and $\\pi'$-shapes introduced by \\cite{Giegerich:04ashape}. Using a novel approach we compute the generating functions of $\\mathcal{I}_k$- and $\\mathcal{J}_k$-shapes as well as the generating functions of all $\\mathcal{I}_k$- and $\\mathcal{J}_k$-shapes induced by $k$-noncrossing, $\\sigma$-canonical RNA structures for fixed $n$. By means of singularity analysis of the generating functions, we derive explicit asymptotic expressions and can prove that $\\mathcal{I}_k$- and $\\mathcal{J}_k$-shapes lead to a meaningful categorization of RNA pseudoknot structures.

  6. The structure and function of catalytic RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Before the discovery of ribozymes,RNA had been proposed to function as a catalyst,based on the discovery that RNA folded into high-ordered structures as protein did.This hypothesis was confirmed in the 1980s,after the discovery of Tetrahymena group I intron and RNase P ribozyme.There have been about ten ribozymes identified during the past thirty years,as well as the fact that ribosomes function as ribozymes.Advances have been made in understanding the structures and functions of ribozymes,with numerous crystal structures resolved in the past years.Here we review the structure-function relationship of both small and large ribozymes,especially the structural basis of their catalysis.

  7. The structure and function of catalytic RNAs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU QiJia; HUANG Lin; ZHANG Yi

    2009-01-01

    Before the discovery of ribozymes, RNA had been proposed to function as a catalyst, based on the discovery that RNA folded into high-ordered structures as protein did. This hypothesis was confirmed in the 1980s, after the discovery of Tetrahymena group I intron and RNase P ribozyme. There have been about ten ribozymes identified during the past thirty years, as well as the fact that ribosomes function as ribozymes. Advances have been made in understanding the structures and functions of ribozymes, with numerous crystal structures resolved in the past years. Here we review the structure-function re-lationship of both small and large ribozymes, especially the structural basis of their catalysis.

  8. RSRE: RNA structural robustness evaluator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Wenjie; Bo, Xiaochen; Zheng, Zhiqiang; Wang, Shengqi

    2007-07-01

    Biological robustness, defined as the ability to maintain stable functioning in the face of various perturbations, is an important and fundamental topic in current biology, and has become a focus of numerous studies in recent years. Although structural robustness has been explored in several types of RNA molecules, the origins of robustness are still controversial. Computational analysis results are needed to make up for the lack of evidence of robustness in natural biological systems. The RNA structural robustness evaluator (RSRE) web server presented here provides a freely available online tool to quantitatively evaluate the structural robustness of RNA based on the widely accepted definition of neutrality. Several classical structure comparison methods are employed; five randomization methods are implemented to generate control sequences; sub-optimal predicted structures can be optionally utilized to mitigate the uncertainty of secondary structure prediction. With a user-friendly interface, the web application is easy to use. Intuitive illustrations are provided along with the original computational results to facilitate analysis. The RSRE will be helpful in the wide exploration of RNA structural robustness and will catalyze our understanding of RNA evolution. The RSRE web server is freely available at http://biosrv1.bmi.ac.cn/RSRE/ or http://biotech.bmi.ac.cn/RSRE/. PMID:17567615

  9. A Novel miRNA Processing Pathway Independent of Dicer Requires Argonaute2 Catalytic Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Cifuentes, Daniel; Xue, Huiling; Taylor, David W.; Patnode, Heather; Mishima, Yuichiro; Cheloufi, Sihem; Ma, Enbo; Mane, Shrikant; Hannon, Gregory J.; Lawson, Nathan D.; Wolfe, Scot A.; Giraldez, Antonio J.

    2010-01-01

    Dicer is a central enzyme in microRNA (miRNA) processing. We identified a Dicer-independent miRNA biogenesis pathway that uses Argonaute2 (Ago2) slicer catalytic activity. In contrast to other miRNAs, miR-451 levels were refractory to dicer loss of function but were reduced in MZago2 (maternal-zygotic) mutants. We found that pre-miR-451 processing requires Ago2 catalytic activity in vivo. MZago2 mutants showed delayed erythropoiesis that could be rescued by wild-type Ago2 or miR-451-duplex bu...

  10. Protein Structure Is Related to RNA Structural Reactivity In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yin; Assmann, Sarah M; Bevilacqua, Philip C

    2016-02-27

    We assessed whether in vivo mRNA structural reactivity and the structure of the encoded protein are related. This is the first investigation of such a relationship that utilizes information on RNA structure obtained in living cells. Based on our recent genome-wide Structure-seq analysis in Arabidopsis thaliana, we report that, as a meta property, regions of individual mRNAs that code for protein domains generally have higher reactivity to DMS (dimethyl sulfate), a chemical that covalently modifies accessible As and Cs, than regions that encode protein domain junctions. This relationship is prominent for proteins annotated for catalytic activity and reversed in proteins annotated for binding and transcription regulatory activity. Upon analyzing intrinsically disordered proteins, we found a similar pattern for disordered regions as compared to ordered regions: regions of individual mRNAs that code for ordered regions have significantly higher DMS reactivity than regions that code for intrinsically disordered regions. Based on these effects, we hypothesize that the decreased DMS reactivity of RNA regions that encode protein domain junctions or intrinsically disordered regions may reflect increased RNA structure that may slow translation, allowing time for the nascent protein domain or ordered region of the protein to fold, thereby reducing protein misfolding. In addition, a drop in DMS reactivity was observed on portions of mRNA sequences that correspond to the C-termini of protein domains, suggesting ribosome protection at these mRNA regions. Structural relationships between mRNAs and their encoded proteins may have evolved to allow efficient and accurate protein folding. PMID:26598238

  11. RNA structures regulating nidovirus RNA synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Born, Erwin van den

    2006-01-01

    Viruses depend on their host cell for the production of their progeny. The genetic information that is required to regulate this process is contained in the viral genome. In the case of plus-stranded RNA viruses, like nidoviruses, the RNA genome is directly involved in translation (resulting in the

  12. Tertiary structure of bacterial selenocysteine tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yuzuru; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Suetsugu, Shiro; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2013-07-01

    Selenocysteine (Sec) is translationally incorporated into proteins in response to the UGA codon. The tRNA specific to Sec (tRNA(Sec)) is first ligated with serine by seryl-tRNA synthetase (SerRS). In the present study, we determined the 3.1 Å crystal structure of the tRNA(Sec) from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus, in complex with the heterologous SerRS from the archaeon Methanopyrus kandleri. The bacterial tRNA(Sec) assumes the L-shaped structure, from which the long extra arm protrudes. Although the D-arm conformation and the extra-arm orientation are similar to those of eukaryal/archaeal tRNA(Sec)s, A. aeolicus tRNA(Sec) has unique base triples, G14:C21:U8 and C15:G20a:G48, which occupy the positions corresponding to the U8:A14 and R15:Y48 tertiary base pairs of canonical tRNAs. Methanopyrus kandleri SerRS exhibited serine ligation activity toward A. aeolicus tRNA(Sec) in vitro. The SerRS N-terminal domain interacts with the extra-arm stem and the outer corner of tRNA(Sec). Similar interactions exist in the reported tRNA(Ser) and SerRS complex structure from the bacterium Thermus thermophilus. Although the catalytic C-terminal domain of M. kandleri SerRS lacks interactions with A. aeolicus tRNA(Sec) in the present complex structure, the conformational flexibility of SerRS is likely to allow the CCA terminal region of tRNA(Sec) to enter the SerRS catalytic site. PMID:23649835

  13. RNA-SSPT: RNA Secondary Structure Prediction Tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Freed; Mahboob, Shahid; Gulzar, Tahsin; Din, Salah U; Hanif, Tanzeela; Ahmad, Hifza; Afzal, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    The prediction of RNA structure is useful for understanding evolution for both in silico and in vitro studies. Physical methods like NMR studies to predict RNA secondary structure are expensive and difficult. Computational RNA secondary structure prediction is easier. Comparative sequence analysis provides the best solution. But secondary structure prediction of a single RNA sequence is challenging. RNA-SSPT is a tool that computationally predicts secondary structure of a single RNA sequence. Most of the RNA secondary structure prediction tools do not allow pseudoknots in the structure or are unable to locate them. Nussinov dynamic programming algorithm has been implemented in RNA-SSPT. The current studies shows only energetically most favorable secondary structure is required and the algorithm modification is also available that produces base pairs to lower the total free energy of the secondary structure. For visualization of RNA secondary structure, NAVIEW in C language is used and modified in C# for tool requirement. RNA-SSPT is built in C# using Dot Net 2.0 in Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 Professional edition. The accuracy of RNA-SSPT is tested in terms of Sensitivity and Positive Predicted Value. It is a tool which serves both secondary structure prediction and secondary structure visualization purposes. PMID:24250115

  14. Contact structure for use in catalytic distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jr., Edward M.

    1984-01-01

    A method for conducting catalytic chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants into a distillation column reactor contracting said reactant in liquid phase with a fixed bed catalyst in the form of a contact catalyst structure consisting of closed porous containers containing the catatlyst for the reaction and a clip means to hold and support said containers, which are disposed above, i.e., on the distillation trays in the tower. The trays have weir means to provide a liquid level on the trays to substantially cover the containers. In other words, the trays function in their ordinary manner with the addition thereto of the catalyst. The reaction mixture is concurrently fractionated in the column.

  15. Exploring tertiary folding in RNA : novel structural motifs in HDV and TYMV RNA studied by NMR spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Kolk, M H

    1999-01-01

    RNA molecules lie at the basis of many cellular processes. They serve as a carrier of information, but can also form intricate complexes with proteins and other RNAs, and can even have catalytic activity, in which case they are called ribozymes. This versatility of RNA function relates to a wide range of structural properties. Apart from the tRNA structure (1973), however, the number of high-resolution structures have long remained very low. Presently, in the midst of a surge of RNA structure...

  16. Structures of two exonucleases involved in controlled RNA turnover in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonstrup, Anette Thyssen; Midtgaard, Søren Fuglsang; Van, Lan Bich;

    2p is a catalytic subunit of the cytoplasmic deadenylase complex [2], which removes the poly(A) tail in the 3'-end of mRNA, the first and rate-limiting step of controlled mRNA turnover in the general eukaryotic mRNA degradation pathway [3]. The crystal structure of the central part of S. cerevisiae...

  17. Structured materials for catalytic and sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokenek, Selma

    been synthesized and characterized to establish the effects of nanoparticle size on catalytic activity in methanol decomposition. The physicochemical properties of the synthesized palladium-nickel nanoparticles will be discussed, as a function of the synthesis parameters. The optical characteristics of the Ag and Pd nanoparticles will be determined, with a view toward tuning the response of the nanoparticles for incorporation in sensors. Analysis of the monometallic palladium particles revealed a dependence of syngas production on nanoparticle size. The peak and steady state TOFs increased roughly linearly with the average nanoparticle diameter. The amount of coke deposited on the particle surfaces was found to be independent on the size of the nanoparticles. Shape control of the nickel-palladium nanoparticles with a high selectivity for (100) and (110) facets (≤ 80%) has been demonstrated. The resulting alloy nanoparticles were found to have homogeneous composition throughout their volume and maintain FCC crystal structure. Substitution of Ni atoms in the Pd lattice at a 1:3 molar ratio was found to induce lattice strains of ~1%. The Ag nanocubes synthesized exhibited behavior very similar to literature values, when taken on their own, exhibiting a pair of distinct absorbance peaks at 350 nm and 455 nm. In physical mixtures with the Pd nanoparticles synthesized, their behavior showed that the peak position of the Ag nanocubes' absorbance in UV-Vis could be tuned based on the relative proportions of the Ag and Pd nanoparticles present in the suspension analysed. The Ag polyhedra synthesized for comparison showed a broad doublet peak throughout the majority of the visible range before testing as a component in a physical mixture with the Pd nanoparticles. The addition of Pd nanoparticles to form a physical mixture resulted in some damping of the doublet peak observed as well as a corresponding shift in the baseline absorbance proportional to the amount of Pd added to

  18. Structure of the Tribolium castaneum Telomerase Catalytic Subunit TERT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillis,A.; Schuller, A.; Skordalakes, E.

    2008-01-01

    A common hallmark of human cancers is the overexpression of telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein complex that is responsible for maintaining the length and integrity of chromosome ends. Telomere length deregulation and telomerase activation is an early, and perhaps necessary, step in cancer cell evolution. Here we present the high-resolution structure of the Tribolium castaneum catalytic subunit of telomerase, TERT. The protein consists of three highly conserved domains, organized into a ring-like structure that shares common features with retroviral reverse transcriptases, viral RNA polymerases and B-family DNA polymerases. Domain organization places motifs implicated in substrate binding and catalysis in the interior of the ring, which can accommodate seven to eight bases of double-stranded nucleic acid. Modelling of an RNA-DNA heteroduplex in the interior of this ring demonstrates a perfect fit between the protein and the nucleic acid substrate, and positions the 3'-end of the DNA primer at the active site of the enzyme, providing evidence for the formation of an active telomerase elongation complex.

  19. Predicting RNA Structure Using Mutual Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Freyhult, E.; Moulton, V.; Gardner, P. P.

    2005-01-01

    Background: With the ever-increasing number of sequenced RNAs and the establishment of new RNA databases, such as the Comparative RNA Web Site and Rfam, there is a growing need for accurately and automatically predicting RNA structures from multiple alignments. Since RNA secondary structure is of...

  20. Evolutionary perspectives of telomerase RNA structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podlevsky, Joshua D; Chen, Julian J-L

    2016-08-01

    Telomerase is the eukaryotic solution to the 'end-replication problem' of linear chromosomes by synthesising the highly repetitive DNA constituent of telomeres, the nucleoprotein cap that protects chromosome termini. Functioning as a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) enzyme, telomerase is minimally composed of the highly conserved catalytic telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and essential telomerase RNA (TR) component. Beyond merely providing the template for telomeric DNA synthesis, TR is an innate telomerase component and directly facilitates enzymatic function. TR accomplishes this by having evolved structural elements for stable assembly with the TERT protein and the regulation of the telomerase catalytic cycle. Despite its prominence and prevalence, TR has profoundly diverged in length, sequence, and biogenesis pathway among distinct evolutionary lineages. This diversity has generated numerous structural and mechanistic solutions for ensuring proper RNP formation and high fidelity telomeric DNA synthesis. Telomerase provides unique insights into RNA and protein coevolution within RNP enzymes. PMID:27359343

  1. Relationship between structure and catalytic performance of dealuminated Y zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dealuminated Y zeolites which have been prepared by hydrothermal and chemical treatments show differences in catalytic performance when tested fresh; however, these differences disappear after the zeolites have been steamed. The catalytic behavior of fresh and steamed zeolites is directly related to zeolite structural and chemical characteristics. Such characteristics determine the strength and density of acid sites for catalytic cracking. Dealuminated zeolites were characterized using x-ray diffraction, porosimetry, solid-state NMR and elemental analysis. Hexadecane cracking was used as a probe reaction to determine catalytic properties. Cracking activity was found to be proportional to total aluminum content in the zeolite. Product selectivity was dependent on unit cell size, presence of extra framework alumina and spatial distribution of active sites. The results from this study elucidate the role that zeolite structure plays in determining catalytic performance

  2. Inverse Folding of RNA Pseudoknot Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, James Z M; Reidys, Christian M

    2010-01-01

    Background: RNA exhibits a variety of structural configurations. Here we consider a structure to be tantamount to the noncrossing Watson-Crick and \\pairGU-base pairings (secondary structure) and additional cross-serial base pairs. These interactions are called pseudoknots and are observed across the whole spectrum of RNA functionalities. In the context of studying natural RNA structures, searching for new ribozymes and designing artificial RNA, it is of interest to find RNA sequences folding into a specific structure and to analyze their induced neutral networks. Since the established inverse folding algorithms, {\\tt RNAinverse}, {\\tt RNA-SSD} as well as {\\tt INFO-RNA} are limited to RNA secondary structures, we present in this paper the inverse folding algorithm {\\tt Inv} which can deal with 3-noncrossing, canonical pseudoknot structures. Results: In this paper we present the inverse folding algorithm {\\tt Inv}. We give a detailed analysis of {\\tt Inv}, including pseudocodes. We show that {\\tt Inv} allows to...

  3. Activities of human RRP6 and structure of the human RRP6 catalytic domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Januszyk, Kurt; Liu, Quansheng; Lima, Christopher D. (SKI)

    2011-08-29

    The eukaryotic RNA exosome is a highly conserved multi-subunit complex that catalyzes degradation and processing of coding and noncoding RNA. A noncatalytic nine-subunit exosome core interacts with Rrp44 and Rrp6, two subunits that possess processive and distributive 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease activity, respectively. While both Rrp6 and Rrp44 are responsible for RNA processing in budding yeast, Rrp6 may play a more prominent role in processing, as it has been demonstrated to be inhibited by stable RNA secondary structure in vitro and because the null allele in budding yeast leads to the buildup of specific structured RNA substrates. Human RRP6, otherwise known as PM/SCL-100 or EXOSC10, shares sequence similarity to budding yeast Rrp6 and is proposed to catalyze 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease activity on a variety of nuclear transcripts including ribosomal RNA subunits, RNA that has been poly-adenylated by TRAMP, as well as other nuclear RNA transcripts destined for processing and/or destruction. To characterize human RRP6, we expressed the full-length enzyme as well as truncation mutants that retain catalytic activity, compared their activities to analogous constructs for Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rrp6, and determined the X-ray structure of a human construct containing the exoribonuclease and HRDC domains that retains catalytic activity. Structural data show that the human active site is more exposed when compared to the yeast structure, and biochemical data suggest that this feature may play a role in the ability of human RRP6 to productively engage and degrade structured RNA substrates more effectively than the analogous budding yeast enzyme.

  4. Scaling behavior of optimally structured catalytic microfluidic reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, Fridolin; Bruus, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    In this study of catalytic microfluidic reactors we show that, when optimally structured, these reactors share underlying scaling properties. The scaling is predicted theoretically and verified numerically. Furthermore, we show how to increase the reaction rate significantly by distributing the...

  5. Resolving the Structure of Active Sites on Platinum Catalytic Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chang, Lan Yun; Barnard, Amanda S.; Gontard, Lionel Cervera; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate understanding of the structure of active sites is fundamentally important in predicting catalytic properties of heterogeneous nanocatalysts. We present an accurate determination of both experimental and theoretical atomic structures of surface monatomic steps on industrial platinum...... nanoparticles. This comparison reveals that the edges of nanoparticles can significantly alter the atomic positions of monatomic steps in their proximity, which can lead to substantial deviations in the catalytic properties compared with the extended surfaces....

  6. Catalytic Molecular Imaging of MicroRNA in Living Cells by DNA-Programmed Nanoparticle Disassembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuewen; Zeng, Tao; Li, Zhi; Wang, Ganglin; Ma, Nan

    2016-02-24

    Molecular imaging is an essential tool for disease diagnostics and treatment. Direct imaging of low-abundance nucleic acids in living cells remains challenging because of the relatively low sensitivity and insufficient signal-to-background ratio of conventional molecular imaging probes. Herein, we report a class of DNA-templated gold nanoparticle (GNP)-quantum dot (QD) assembly-based probes for catalytic imaging of cancer-related microRNAs (miRNA) in living cells with signal amplification capacity. We show that a single miRNA molecule could catalyze the disassembly of multiple QDs with the GNP through a DNA-programmed thermodynamically driven entropy gain process, yielding significantly amplified QD photoluminescence (PL) for miRNA imaging. By combining the robust PL of QDs with the catalytic amplification strategy, three orders of magnitude improvement in detection sensitivity is achieved in comparison with non-catalytic imaging probe, which enables facile and accurate differentiation between cancer cells and normal cells by miRNA imaging in living cells. PMID:26694689

  7. The effect of structure in a long target RNA on ribozyme cleavage efficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, T B; McDonald, C K; Hagen, M.

    1997-01-01

    Inhibition of gene expression by catalytic RNA (ribozymes) requires that ribozymes efficiently cleave specific sites within large target RNAs. However, the cleavage of long target RNAs by ribozymes is much less efficient than cleavage of short oligonucleotide substrates because of higher order structure in the long target RNA. To further study the effects of long target RNA structure on ribozyme cleavage efficiency, we determined the accessibility of seven hammerhead ribozyme cleavage sites i...

  8. RNA structure prediction: progress and perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Ya-Zhou; Wang, Feng-Hua; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2014-01-01

    Many recent exciting discoveries have revealed the versatility of RNAs and their importance in a variety of cellular functions which are strongly coupled to RNA structures. To understand the functions of RNAs, some structure prediction models have been developed in recent years. In this review, the progress in computational models for RNA structure prediction is introduced and the distinguishing features of many outstanding algorithms are discussed, emphasizing three dimensional (3D) structure prediction. A promising coarse-grained model for predicting RNA 3D structure, stability and salt effect is also introduced briefly. Finally, we discuss the major challenges in the RNA 3D structure modeling.

  9. TFB2 is a transient component of the catalytic site of the human mitochondrial RNA polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    Sologub, Marina; Litonin, Dmitry; Anikin, Michael; Mustaev, Arkady; Temiakov, Dmitry

    2009-01-01

    Transcription in human mitochondria is carried out by a single-subunit, T7-like RNA polymerase assisted by several auxiliary factors. We demonstrate that an essential initiation factor, TFB2, forms a network of interactions with DNA near the transcription start site and facilitates promoter melting but may not be essential for promoter recognition. Unexpectedly, catalytic autolabeling reveals that TFB2 interacts with the priming substrate, suggesting that TFB2 acts as a transient component of...

  10. Structure and dynamics of a primordial catalytic fold generated by in vitro evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Chao, Fa-An; Morelli, Aleardo; Haugner, John C.; Churchfield, Lewis; Hagmann, Leonardo N.; Shi, Lei; Masterson, Larry R.; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Veglia, Gianluigi; Seelig, Burckhard

    2012-01-01

    Engineering functional protein scaffolds capable of carrying out chemical catalysis is a major challenge in enzyme design. Starting from a non-catalytic protein scaffold, we recently generated a novel RNA ligase by in vitro directed evolution. This artificial enzyme lost its original fold and adopted an entirely novel structure with dramatically enhanced conformational dynamics, demonstrating that a primordial fold with suitable flexibility is sufficient to carry out enzymatic function.

  11. Structural principles of CRISPR RNA processing

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hong

    2014-01-01

    The Cas6 superfamily, the Cas5d subclass, and the host RNase III endoribonucleases are responsible for generation of small RNAs (crRNA) that function in the CRISPR-Cas immunity. The three enzymes may also interact with the crRNA-associated nucleic acid interference complexes. Recent development in structural biology of Cas6 and Cas5d and their complexes with RNA substrates has lent new insights on principles of crRNA processing and the structural basis for linking crRNA processing to interfer...

  12. Asymmetric catalytic synthesis of the proposed structure of trocheliophorolide B

    OpenAIRE

    Trost, Barry M.; Quintard, Adrien

    2012-01-01

    A concise catalytic asymmetric synthesis of the proposed structure of Trocheliophorolide B is reported. The synthetic sequence notably features an asymmetric acetaldehyde alkynylation, Ru-catalyzed alder-ene reaction and Zn-ProPhenol ynone aldol condensation. Comparison with the reported data suggests a miss-assignment of the natural product structure.

  13. Functional Diversification of Maize RNA Polymerase IV and V subtypes via Alternative Catalytic Subunits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Brower-Toland, Brent; Krieger, Elysia K.; Sidorenko, Lyudmila; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Irsigler, Andre; LaRue, Huachun; Brzeski, Jan; Mcginnis, Karen A.; Ivashuta, Sergey; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Chandler, Vicki L.; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2014-10-01

    Unlike nuclear multisubunit RNA polymerases I, II, and III, whose subunit compositions are conserved throughout eukaryotes, plant RNA polymerases IV and V are nonessential, Pol II-related enzymes whose subunit compositions are still evolving. Whereas Arabidopsis Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in four or five of their 12 subunits, respectively, and differ from one another in three subunits, proteomic ana- lyses show that maize Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in six subunits but differ from each other only in their largest subunits. Use of alternative catalytic second subunits, which are nonredundant for development and paramutation, yields at least two sub- types of Pol IV and three subtypes of Pol V in maize. Pol IV/Pol V associations with MOP1, RMR1, AGO121, Zm_DRD1/CHR127, SHH2a, and SHH2b extend parallels between paramutation in maize and the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway in Arabidopsis.

  14. Four RNA families with functional transient structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing Yun A; Meyer, Irmtraud M

    2015-01-01

    Protein-coding and non-coding RNA transcripts perform a wide variety of cellular functions in diverse organisms. Several of their functional roles are expressed and modulated via RNA structure. A given transcript, however, can have more than a single functional RNA structure throughout its life, a fact which has been previously overlooked. Transient RNA structures, for example, are only present during specific time intervals and cellular conditions. We here introduce four RNA families with transient RNA structures that play distinct and diverse functional roles. Moreover, we show that these transient RNA structures are structurally well-defined and evolutionarily conserved. Since Rfam annotates one structure for each family, there is either no annotation for these transient structures or no such family. Thus, our alignments either significantly update and extend the existing Rfam families or introduce a new RNA family to Rfam. For each of the four RNA families, we compile a multiple-sequence alignment based on experimentally verified transient and dominant (dominant in terms of either the thermodynamic stability and/or attention received so far) RNA secondary structures using a combination of automated search via covariance model and manual curation. The first alignment is the Trp operon leader which regulates the operon transcription in response to tryptophan abundance through alternative structures. The second alignment is the HDV ribozyme which we extend to the 5' flanking sequence. This flanking sequence is involved in the regulation of the transcript's self-cleavage activity. The third alignment is the 5' UTR of the maturation protein from Levivirus which contains a transient structure that temporarily postpones the formation of the final inhibitory structure to allow translation of maturation protein. The fourth and last alignment is the SAM riboswitch which regulates the downstream gene expression by assuming alternative structures upon binding of SAM. All

  15. Enzyme catalytic amplification of miRNA-155 detection with graphene quantum dot-based electrochemical biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Tianxing; Zhang, Le; Wen, Wei; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2016-03-15

    A specific and sensitive method was developed for quantitative detection of miRNA by integrating horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-assisted catalytic reaction with a simple electrochemical RNA biosensor. The electrochemical biosensor was constructed by a double-stranded DNA structure. The structure was formed by the hybridization of thiol-tethered oligodeoxynucleotide probes (capture DNA), assembled on the gold electrode surface, with target DNA and aminated indicator probe (NH2-DNA). After the construction of the double-stranded DNA structure, the activated carboxyl groups of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) assembled on NH2-DNA. GQDs were used as a new platform for HRP immobilization through noncovalent assembly. HRP modified biosensor can effectively catalyze the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-mediated oxidation of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), accompanied by a change from colorless to blue in solution color and an increased electrochemical current signal. Due to GQDs and enzyme catalysis, the proposed biosensor could sensitively detect miRNA-155 from 1 fM to 100 pM with a detection limit of 0.14 fM. High performance of the biosensor is attributed to the large surface-to-volume ratio, excellent compatibility of GQDs. For these advantages, the proposed method holds great potential for analysis of other interesting tumor makers. PMID:26453906

  16. A structural determinant required for RNA editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Nan; Yang, Yun; Sachsenmaier, Nora; Muggenhumer, Dominik; Bi, Jingpei; Waldsich, Christina; Jantsch, Michael F.; Jin, Yongfeng

    2011-01-01

    RNA editing by adenosine deaminases acting on RNAs (ADARs) can be both specific and non-specific, depending on the substrate. Specific editing of particular adenosines may depend on the overall sequence and structural context. However, the detailed mechanisms underlying these preferences are not fully understood. Here, we show that duplex structures mimicking an editing site in the Gabra3 pre-mRNA unexpectedly fail to support RNA editing at the Gabra3 I/M site, although phylogenetic analysis suggest an evolutionarily conserved duplex structure essential for efficient RNA editing. These unusual results led us to revisit the structural requirement for this editing by mutagenesis analysis. In vivo nuclear injection experiments of mutated editing substrates demonstrate that a non-conserved structure is a determinant for editing. This structure contains bulges either on the same or the strand opposing the edited adenosine. The position of these bulges and the distance to the edited base regulate editing. Moreover, elevated folding temperature can lead to a switch in RNA editing suggesting an RNA structural change. Our results indicate the importance of RNA tertiary structure in determining RNA editing. PMID:21427087

  17. Exploring RNA structure by integrative molecular modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masquida, Benoît; Beckert, Bertrand; Jossinet, Fabrice

    2010-01-01

    RNA molecular modelling is adequate to rapidly tackle the structure of RNA molecules. With new structured RNAs constituting a central class of cellular regulators discovered every year, the need for swift and reliable modelling methods is more crucial than ever. The pragmatic method based...... on interactive all-atom molecular modelling relies on the observation that specific structural motifs are recurrently found in RNA sequences. Once identified by a combination of comparative sequence analysis and biochemical data, the motifs composing the secondary structure of a given RNA can be extruded...... in three dimensions (3D) and used as building blocks assembled manually during a bioinformatic interactive process. Comparing the models to the corresponding crystal structures has validated the method as being powerful to predict the RNA topology and architecture while being less accurate regarding...

  18. Crystal structures of two eukaryotic nucleases involved in RNA metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonstrup, Anette Thyssen; Midtgaard, Søren Fuglsang; Van, Lan Bich;

    well as the controlled turnover of these in response to changing surrounding conditions is of vital importance to ensure optimal fitness of a cell. Central to both these processes is the degradation of RNA, either as a means of decreasing the level of particular RNAs or as a way to get rid of aberrant...... of very similar nucleases provide a visualisation of the catalytic cycle of the S. pombe Pop2p protein. In addition, structural comparison of S. pombe Pop2p to other similar proteins identifies Pop2p and deadenylase specific regions near the active site. Contrary to Pop2p Rrp6p is solely a nuclear...

  19. The art of editing RNA structural alignments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ebbe Sloth

    2014-01-01

    rewarded by great insight into the evolution of structure and function of your favorite RNA molecule. In this chapter I will review the methods and considerations that go into constructing RNA structural alignments at the secondary and tertiary structure level; introduce software, databases, and algorithms......Manual editing of RNA structural alignments may be considered more art than science, since it still requires an expert biologist to take multiple levels of information into account and be slightly creative when constructing high-quality alignments. Even though the task is rather tedious, it is...

  20. Random k-noncrossing RNA structures

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, William Y. C.; Han, Hillary S. W.; Reidys, Christian M.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a combinatorial framework that provides an interpretation of RNA pseudoknot structures as sampling paths of a Markov process. Our results facilitate a variety of applications ranging from the energy-based sampling of pseudoknot structures as well as the ab initio folding via hidden Markov models. Our main result is an algorithm that generates RNA pseudoknot structures with uniform probability. This algorithm serves as a steppingstone to sequence-specific as well as...

  1. Structure and catalytic reactivity of Rh oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafson, J.; Westerström, R.; Resta, A.;

    2009-01-01

    as well as on Rh nanoparticles. The detailed structure of this film was previously determined using UHV based techniques and density functional theory. In the present paper, we also examine the structure of the bulk Rh2O3 corundum oxide using surface X-ray diffraction. Being armed with this...... structural information, we have explored the CO oxidation reaction over Rh(1 1 1), Rh(1 0 0) and Pt25Rh75(1 0 0) at realistic pressures using in situ surface X-ray diffraction and online mass spectrometry. In all three cases we find that an increase of the CO2 production coincides with the formation of the...

  2. Viral IRES RNA structures and ribosome interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    In eukaryotes, protein synthesis initiates primarily by a mechanism that requires a modified nucleotide ‘cap’ on the mRNA and also proteins that recruit and position the ribosome. Many pathogenic viruses use an alternative, cap-independent mechanism that substitutes RNA structure for the cap and many proteins. The RNAs driving this process are called internal ribosome-entry sites (IRESs) and some are able to bind the ribosome directly using a specific 3D RNA structure. Recent structures of IR...

  3. First crystal structure and catalytic mechanism of a bacterial glucuronosyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xanthomonas campestris GumK (β-1,2-glucuronosyltransferase) is a membrane associated protein involved in the biosynthesis of xanthan, an exo polysaccharide crucial for this bacterium's phyto pathogenicity. Xanthan is also used in many important industrial applications. The x-ray crystal structure of apo-GumK was solved at 1.9 A resolution. The enzyme has two well defined Rossmann domains with a catalytic cleft between them. Recently, the crystal structure of GumK complexed with the donor substrate was also solved. We identified a number of catalytically important residues, including Asp157, which serves as the general base in the transfer reaction. The biological and structural data reported here shed light on the molecular basis for donor and acceptor selectivity in glucuronosyltransferases. (author)

  4. Current perspectives on RNA secondary structure probing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Julia; Prestwood, Liam; Lever, Andrew

    2014-08-01

    The range of roles played by structured RNAs in biological systems is vast. At the same time as we are learning more about the importance of RNA structure, recent advances in reagents, methods and technology mean that RNA secondary structural probing has become faster and more accurate. As a result, the capabilities of laboratories that already perform this type of structural analysis have increased greatly, and it has also become more widely accessible. The present review summarizes established and recently developed techniques. The information we can derive from secondary structural analysis is assessed, together with the areas in which we are likely to see exciting developments in the near future. PMID:25110033

  5. Macrodomains: Structure, Function, Evolution, and Catalytic Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rack, Johannes Gregor Matthias; Perina, Dragutin; Ahel, Ivan

    2016-06-01

    Recent developments indicate that macrodomains, an ancient and diverse protein domain family, are key players in the recognition, interpretation, and turnover of ADP-ribose (ADPr) signaling. Crucial to this is the ability of macrodomains to recognize ADPr either directly, in the form of a metabolic derivative, or as a modification covalently bound to proteins. Thus, macrodomains regulate a wide variety of cellular and organismal processes, including DNA damage repair, signal transduction, and immune response. Their importance is further indicated by the fact that dysregulation or mutation of a macrodomain is associated with several diseases, including cancer, developmental defects, and neurodegeneration. In this review, we summarize the current insights into macrodomain evolution and how this evolution influenced their structural and functional diversification. We highlight some aspects of macrodomain roles in pathobiology as well as their emerging potential as therapeutic targets. PMID:26844395

  6. RNA Structure Duplications and Flavivirus Host Adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villordo, Sergio M; Carballeda, Juan M; Filomatori, Claudia V; Gamarnik, Andrea V

    2016-04-01

    Flaviviruses include a highly diverse group of arboviruses with a global distribution and a high human disease burden. Most flaviviruses cycle between insects and vertebrate hosts; thus, they are obligated to use different cellular machinery for their replication and mount different mechanisms to evade specific antiviral responses. In addition to coding for viral proteins, the viral genome contains signals in RNA structures that govern the amplification of viral components and participate in triggering or evading antiviral responses. In this review, we focused on new information about host-specific functions of RNA structures present in the 3' untranslated region (3' UTR) of flavivirus genomes. Models and conservation patterns of RNA elements of distinct flavivirus ecological groups are revised. An intriguing feature of the 3' UTR of insect-borne flavivirus genomes is the conservation of complex RNA structure duplications. Here, we discuss new hypotheses of how these RNA elements specialize for replication in vertebrate and invertebrate hosts, and present new ideas associating the significance of RNA structure duplication, small subgenomic flavivirus RNA formation, and host adaptation. PMID:26850219

  7. Methods of using structures including catalytic materials disposed within porous zeolite materials to synthesize hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Harry W.; Petkovic, Lucia M.; Ginosar, Daniel M.

    2011-02-01

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  8. RNA secondary structure prediction using soft computing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Shubhra Sankar; Pal, Sankar K

    2013-01-01

    Prediction of RNA structure is invaluable in creating new drugs and understanding genetic diseases. Several deterministic algorithms and soft computing-based techniques have been developed for more than a decade to determine the structure from a known RNA sequence. Soft computing gained importance with the need to get approximate solutions for RNA sequences by considering the issues related with kinetic effects, cotranscriptional folding, and estimation of certain energy parameters. A brief description of some of the soft computing-based techniques, developed for RNA secondary structure prediction, is presented along with their relevance. The basic concepts of RNA and its different structural elements like helix, bulge, hairpin loop, internal loop, and multiloop are described. These are followed by different methodologies, employing genetic algorithms, artificial neural networks, and fuzzy logic. The role of various metaheuristics, like simulated annealing, particle swarm optimization, ant colony optimization, and tabu search is also discussed. A relative comparison among different techniques, in predicting 12 known RNA secondary structures, is presented, as an example. Future challenging issues are then mentioned. PMID:23702539

  9. Functional Diversification of Maize RNA Polymerase IV and V Subtypes via Alternative Catalytic Subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy R. Haag

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Unlike nuclear multisubunit RNA polymerases I, II, and III, whose subunit compositions are conserved throughout eukaryotes, plant RNA polymerases IV and V are nonessential, Pol II-related enzymes whose subunit compositions are still evolving. Whereas Arabidopsis Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in four or five of their 12 subunits, respectively, and differ from one another in three subunits, proteomic analyses show that maize Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in six subunits but differ from each other only in their largest subunits. Use of alternative catalytic second subunits, which are nonredundant for development and paramutation, yields at least two subtypes of Pol IV and three subtypes of Pol V in maize. Pol IV/Pol V associations with MOP1, RMR1, AGO121, Zm_DRD1/CHR127, SHH2a, and SHH2b extend parallels between paramutation in maize and the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway in Arabidopsis.

  10. Structural alignment of RNA with complex pseudoknot structure

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, TKF; Lam, TW; Sung, WK; Cheung, BWY; Yiu, SM

    2011-01-01

    The secondary structure of an ncRNA molecule is known to play an important role in its biological functions. Aligning a known ncRNA to a target candidate to determine the sequence and structural similarity helps in identifying de novo ncRNA molecules that are in the same family of the known ncRNA. However, existing algorithms cannot handle complex pseudoknot structures which are found in nature. In this article, we propose algorithms to handle two types of complex pseudoknots: simple non-stan...

  11. Viral IRES RNA structures and ribosome interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2008-06-01

    In eukaryotes, protein synthesis initiates primarily by a mechanism that requires a modified nucleotide 'cap' on the mRNA and also proteins that recruit and position the ribosome. Many pathogenic viruses use an alternative, cap-independent mechanism that substitutes RNA structure for the cap and many proteins. The RNAs driving this process are called internal ribosome-entry sites (IRESs) and some are able to bind the ribosome directly using a specific 3D RNA structure. Recent structures of IRES RNAs and IRES-ribosome complexes are revealing the structural basis of viral IRES' 'hijacking' of the protein-making machinery. It now seems that there are fundamental differences in the 3D structures used by different IRESs, although there are some common features in how they interact with ribosomes. PMID:18468443

  12. Structural and functional basis for RNA cleavage by Ire1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stroud Robert M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The unfolded protein response (UPR controls the protein folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Central to this signaling pathway is the ER-resident bifunctional transmembrane kinase/endoribonuclease Ire1. The endoribonuclease (RNase domain of Ire1 initiates a non-conventional mRNA splicing reaction, leading to the production of a transcription factor that controls UPR target genes. The mRNA splicing reaction is an obligatory step of Ire1 signaling, yet its mechanism has remained poorly understood due to the absence of substrate-bound crystal structures of Ire1, the lack of structural similarity between Ire1 and other RNases, and a scarcity of quantitative enzymological data. Here, we experimentally define the active site of Ire1 RNase and quantitatively evaluate the contribution of the key active site residues to catalysis. Results This analysis and two new crystal structures suggest that Ire1 RNase uses histidine H1061 and tyrosine Y1043 as the general acid-general base pair contributing ≥ 7.6 kcal/mol and 1.4 kcal/mol to transition state stabilization, respectively, and asparagine N1057 and arginine R1056 for coordination of the scissile phosphate. Investigation of the stem-loop recognition revealed that additionally to the stem-loops derived from the classic Ire1 substrates HAC1 and Xbp1 mRNA, Ire1 can site-specifically and rapidly cleave anticodon stem-loop (ASL of unmodified tRNAPhe, extending known substrate specificity of Ire1 RNase. Conclusions Our data define the catalytic center of Ire1 RNase and suggest a mechanism of RNA cleavage: each RNase monomer apparently contains a separate catalytic apparatus for RNA cleavage, whereas two RNase subunits contribute to RNA stem-loop docking. Conservation of the key residues among Ire1 homologues suggests that the mechanism elucidated here for yeast Ire1 applies to Ire1 in metazoan cells, and to the only known Ire1 homologue RNase L.

  13. Accelerated probabilistic inference of RNA structure evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmes Ian

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pairwise stochastic context-free grammars (Pair SCFGs are powerful tools for evolutionary analysis of RNA, including simultaneous RNA sequence alignment and secondary structure prediction, but the associated algorithms are intensive in both CPU and memory usage. The same problem is faced by other RNA alignment-and-folding algorithms based on Sankoff's 1985 algorithm. It is therefore desirable to constrain such algorithms, by pre-processing the sequences and using this first pass to limit the range of structures and/or alignments that can be considered. Results We demonstrate how flexible classes of constraint can be imposed, greatly reducing the computational costs while maintaining a high quality of structural homology prediction. Any score-attributed context-free grammar (e.g. energy-based scoring schemes, or conditionally normalized Pair SCFGs is amenable to this treatment. It is now possible to combine independent structural and alignment constraints of unprecedented general flexibility in Pair SCFG alignment algorithms. We outline several applications to the bioinformatics of RNA sequence and structure, including Waterman-Eggert N-best alignments and progressive multiple alignment. We evaluate the performance of the algorithm on test examples from the RFAM database. Conclusion A program, Stemloc, that implements these algorithms for efficient RNA sequence alignment and structure prediction is available under the GNU General Public License.

  14. Structural Biology of Bacterial RNA Polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko S. Murakami

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery and characterization in the early 1960s (Hurwitz, J. The discovery of RNA polymerase. J. Biol. Chem. 2005, 280, 42477–42485, an enormous amount of biochemical, biophysical and genetic data has been collected on bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP. In the late 1990s, structural information pertaining to bacterial RNAP has emerged that provided unprecedented insights into the function and mechanism of RNA transcription. In this review, I list all structures related to bacterial RNAP (as determined by X-ray crystallography and NMR methods available from the Protein Data Bank, describe their contributions to bacterial transcription research and discuss the role that small molecules play in inhibiting bacterial RNA transcription.

  15. Structural Alignment of RNA with Complex Pseudoknot Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Thomas K. F.; Lam, T. W.; Sung, Wing-Kin; Yiu, S. M.

    The secondary structure of an ncRNA molecule is known to play an important role in its biological functions. Aligning a known ncRNA to a target candidate to determine the sequence and structural similarity helps in identifying de novo ncRNA molecules that are in the same family of the known ncRNA. However, existing algorithms cannot handle complex pseudoknot structures which are found in nature. In this paper, we propose algorithms to handle two types of complex pseudoknots: simple non-standard pseudoknots and recursive pseudoknots. Although our methods are not designed for general pseudoknots, it already cover all known ncRNAs in both Rfam and PseudoBase databases. A preliminary evaluation on our algorithms show that it is useful to identify ncRNA molecules in other species which are in the same family of a known ncRNA.

  16. Folding 3-noncrossing RNA pseudoknot structures

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Fenix W. D.; Peng, Wade W. J.; Reidys, Christian M.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we present a selfcontained analysis and description of the novel {\\it ab initio} folding algorithm {\\sf cross}, which generates the minimum free energy (mfe), 3-noncrossing, $\\sigma$-canonical RNA structure. Here an RNA structure is 3-noncrossing if it does not contain more than three mutually crossing arcs and $\\sigma$-canonical, if each of its stacks has size greater or equal than $\\sigma$. Our notion of mfe-structure is based on a specific concept of pseudoknots and respectiv...

  17. A reduced-coordinate approach to modeling RNA 3-D structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tung, Chang-Shung

    1997-09-01

    With the realization of RNA molecules capable of performing very specific functions (e.g., catalytic RNAs and RNAs that bind ligand with affinity and specificity of an anti-body) and contrary to the traditional view that structure of RNA molecules being functionally passive, it has become clear that studying the 3-dimensional (3-D) folding of RNA molecules is a very important task. In the absence of sufficient number of experimentally determined RNA structures available up-to-date, folding of RNA structures computationally provides an alternative approach in studying the 3-D structure of RNA molecules. We have developed a computational approach for folding RNA 3-D structures. The method is conceptually simple and general. It consists of two major components. The first being the arrangement of all helices in space. Once the helices are positioned and oriented in space, structures of the connecting loops are modeled and inserted between the helices. Any number of structural constraints derived either experimentally or theoretically can be used to guide the folding processes. A conformational sampling approach is developed with structural equilibration using the Metropolis Monte Carlo simulation. The lengths of various loop sizes (ranging from 1 base to 7 bases) are calculated based on a set of RNA structures deposited in PDB as well as a set of loop structures constructed using our method. The validity of using the averaged loop lengths of the connecting loops as distance constraints for arranging the helices in space is studied.

  18. Loops in canonical RNA pseudoknot structures

    CERN Document Server

    Nebel, Markus E; Wang, Rita R

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we compute the limit distributions of the numbers of hairpin-loops, interior-loops and bulges in k-noncrossing RNA structures. The latter are coarse grained RNA structures allowing for cross-serial interactions, subject to the constraint that there are at most k-1 mutually crossing arcs in the diagram representation of the molecule. We prove central limit theorems by means of studying the corresponding bivariate generating functions. These generating functions are obtained by symbolic inflation of Ik5-shapes.

  19. Combinatorics of locally optimal RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusy, Eric; Clote, Peter

    2014-01-01

    It is a classical result of Stein and Waterman that the asymptotic number of RNA secondary structures is 1.104366∙n-3/2∙2.618034n. Motivated by the kinetics of RNA secondary structure formation, we are interested in determining the asymptotic number of secondary structures that are locally optimal, with respect to a particular energy model. In the Nussinov energy model, where each base pair contributes -1 towards the energy of the structure, locally optimal structures are exactly the saturated structures, for which we have previously shown that asymptotically, there are 1.07427∙n-3/2∙2.35467n many saturated structures for a sequence of length n. In this paper, we consider the base stacking energy model, a mild variant of the Nussinov model, where each stacked base pair contributes -1 toward the energy of the structure. Locally optimal structures with respect to the base stacking energy model are exactly those secondary structures, whose stems cannot be extended. Such structures were first considered by Evers and Giegerich, who described a dynamic programming algorithm to enumerate all locally optimal structures. In this paper, we apply methods from enumerative combinatorics to compute the asymptotic number of such structures. Additionally, we consider analogous combinatorial problems for secondary structures with annotated single-stranded, stacking nucleotides (dangles). PMID:23263300

  20. Asymptotic Enumeration of RNA Structures with Pseudoknots

    CERN Document Server

    Jin, Emma Y

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we present the asymptotic enumeration of RNA structures with pseudoknots. We develop a general framework for the computation of exponential growth rate and the sub exponential factors for $k$-noncrossing RNA structures. Our results are based on the generating function for the number of $k$-noncrossing RNA pseudoknot structures, ${\\sf S}_k(n)$, derived in \\cite{Reidys:07pseu}, where $k-1$ denotes the maximal size of sets of mutually intersecting bonds. We prove a functional equation for the generating function $\\sum_{n\\ge 0}{\\sf S}_k(n)z^n$ and obtain for $k=2$ and $k=3$ the analytic continuation and singular expansions, respectively. It is implicit in our results that for arbitrary $k$ singular expansions exist and via transfer theorems of analytic combinatorics we obtain asymptotic expression for the coefficients. We explicitly derive the asymptotic expressions for 2- and 3-noncrossing RNA structures. Our main result is the derivation of the formula ${\\sf S}_3(n) \\sim \\frac{10.4724\\cdot 4!}{n(n...

  1. Protein Structure and the Sequential Structure of mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunak, Søren; Engelbrecht, Jacob

    1996-01-01

    A direct comparison of experimentally determined protein structures and their corresponding protein coding mRNA sequences has been performed, We examine whether real world data support the hypothesis that clusters of rare codons correlate with the location of structural units in the resulting pro...... nucleotide features of 16S-like ribosomal RNA sequences and related to mechanisms for maintaining the correct reading frame by the ribosome. (C) 1996 Wiley-Liss, Inc....

  2. Resonant active sites in catalytic ammonia synthesis: A structural model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholach, Alexander R.; Bryliakova, Anna A.; Matveev, Andrey V.; Bulgakov, Nikolai N.

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption sites Mn consisted of n adjacent atoms M, each bound to the adsorbed species, are considered within a realistic model. The sum of bonds Σ lost by atoms in a site in comparison with the bulk atoms was used for evaluation of the local surface imperfection, while the reaction enthalpy at that site was used as a measure of activity. The comparative study of Mn sites (n = 1-5) at basal planes of Pt, Rh, Ir, Fe, Re and Ru with respect to heat of N2 dissociative adsorption QN and heat of Nad + Had → NHad reaction QNH was performed using semi-empirical calculations. Linear QN(Σ) increase and QNH(Σ) decrease allowed to specify the resonant Σ for each surface in catalytic ammonia synthesis at equilibrium Nad coverage. Optimal Σ are realizable for Ru2, Re2 and Ir4 only, whereas other centers meet steric inhibition or unreal crystal structure. Relative activity of the most active sites in proportion 5.0 × 10- 5: 4.5 × 10- 3: 1: 2.5: 3.0: 1080: 2270 for a sequence of Pt4, Rh4, Fe4(fcc), Ir4, Fe2-5(bcc), Ru2, Re2, respectively, is in agreement with relevant experimental data. Similar approach can be applied to other adsorption or catalytic processes exhibiting structure sensitivity.

  3. Structure of an unusually stable RNA hairpin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of a very common RNA hairpin, 5'GGAC(UUCG)GUCC, has been determined in solution by NMR spectroscopy. The loop sequence, UUCG, occurs exceptionally often in ribosomal and other RNAs, and may serve as a nucleation site for RNA folding and as a protein recognition site. Reverse transcriptase cannot read through this loop, although it normally transcribes RNA secondary structure motifs. A hairpin with that loop displays unusually high thermodynamic stability; its stability decreases when conserved nucleotides are mutated. The three-dimensional structure for the hairpin was derived from interproton distances and scalar coupling constants determined by NMR using distance geometry, followed by restrained energy minimization. The structure was well-defined despite the conservative use of interproton distances, by constraining the backbone conformation by means of scalar coupling measurements. A mismatch G·U base pair, with syn-guanosine, closes the stem. This hairpin has a loop of only two nucleotides; both adopt C2'-endo sugar pucker. A sharp turn in the phosphodiester backbone is stabilized by a specific cytosine-phosphate contact, probably a hydrogen bond, and by stacking of the cytosine nucleotide on the G·U base pair. The structural features of the loop can explain the unusual thermodynamic stability of this hairpin and its sensitivity to mutations of loop nucleotides

  4. Combinatorics of saturated secondary structures of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clote, P

    2006-11-01

    Following Zuker (1986), a saturated secondary structure for a given RNA sequence is a secondary structure such that no base pair can be added without violating the definition of secondary structure, e.g., without introducing a pseudoknot. In the Nussinov-Jacobson energy model (Nussinov and Jacobson, 1980), where the energy of a secondary structure is -1 times the number of base pairs, saturated secondary structures are local minima in the energy landscape, hence form kinetic traps during the folding process. Here we present recurrence relations and closed form asymptotic limits for combinatorial problems related to the number of saturated secondary structures. In addition, Python source code to compute the number of saturated secondary structures having k base pairs can be found at the web servers link of bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/. PMID:17147486

  5. Evolutionary triplet models of structured RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Robert K; Holmes, Ian

    2009-08-01

    The reconstruction and synthesis of ancestral RNAs is a feasible goal for paleogenetics. This will require new bioinformatics methods, including a robust statistical framework for reconstructing histories of substitutions, indels and structural changes. We describe a "transducer composition" algorithm for extending pairwise probabilistic models of RNA structural evolution to models of multiple sequences related by a phylogenetic tree. This algorithm draws on formal models of computational linguistics as well as the 1985 protosequence algorithm of David Sankoff. The output of the composition algorithm is a multiple-sequence stochastic context-free grammar. We describe dynamic programming algorithms, which are robust to null cycles and empty bifurcations, for parsing this grammar. Example applications include structural alignment of non-coding RNAs, propagation of structural information from an experimentally-characterized sequence to its homologs, and inference of the ancestral structure of a set of diverged RNAs. We implemented the above algorithms for a simple model of pairwise RNA structural evolution; in particular, the algorithms for maximum likelihood (ML) alignment of three known RNA structures and a known phylogeny and inference of the common ancestral structure. We compared this ML algorithm to a variety of related, but simpler, techniques, including ML alignment algorithms for simpler models that omitted various aspects of the full model and also a posterior-decoding alignment algorithm for one of the simpler models. In our tests, incorporation of basepair structure was the most important factor for accurate alignment inference; appropriate use of posterior-decoding was next; and fine details of the model were least important. Posterior-decoding heuristics can be substantially faster than exact phylogenetic inference, so this motivates the use of sum-over-pairs heuristics where possible (and approximate sum-over-pairs). For more exact probabilistic

  6. Evolutionary triplet models of structured RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K Bradley

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The reconstruction and synthesis of ancestral RNAs is a feasible goal for paleogenetics. This will require new bioinformatics methods, including a robust statistical framework for reconstructing histories of substitutions, indels and structural changes. We describe a "transducer composition" algorithm for extending pairwise probabilistic models of RNA structural evolution to models of multiple sequences related by a phylogenetic tree. This algorithm draws on formal models of computational linguistics as well as the 1985 protosequence algorithm of David Sankoff. The output of the composition algorithm is a multiple-sequence stochastic context-free grammar. We describe dynamic programming algorithms, which are robust to null cycles and empty bifurcations, for parsing this grammar. Example applications include structural alignment of non-coding RNAs, propagation of structural information from an experimentally-characterized sequence to its homologs, and inference of the ancestral structure of a set of diverged RNAs. We implemented the above algorithms for a simple model of pairwise RNA structural evolution; in particular, the algorithms for maximum likelihood (ML alignment of three known RNA structures and a known phylogeny and inference of the common ancestral structure. We compared this ML algorithm to a variety of related, but simpler, techniques, including ML alignment algorithms for simpler models that omitted various aspects of the full model and also a posterior-decoding alignment algorithm for one of the simpler models. In our tests, incorporation of basepair structure was the most important factor for accurate alignment inference; appropriate use of posterior-decoding was next; and fine details of the model were least important. Posterior-decoding heuristics can be substantially faster than exact phylogenetic inference, so this motivates the use of sum-over-pairs heuristics where possible (and approximate sum-over-pairs. For more exact

  7. Networks of High Mutual Information Define the Structural Proximity of Catalytic Sites: Implications for Catalytic Residue Identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buslje, Cristina Marino; Teppa, Elin; Di Doménico, Tomas;

    2010-01-01

    to significantly outperform both the Shannon entropy and maximal frequency measurements. Residues in the proximity of catalytic sites were shown to be rich in shared MI. A structural proximity MI average score (termed pMI) was demonstrated to be a strong predictor for CR, thus confirming the proposed...... hypothesis. A structural proximity conservation average score (termed pC) was also calculated and demonstrated to carry distinct information from pMI. A catalytic likeliness score (Cls), combining the KL, pC and pMI measures, was shown to lead to significantly improved prediction accuracy. At a specificity...

  8. Structural computational modeling of RNA aptamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaojun; Dickey, David D; Chen, Shi-Jie; Giangrande, Paloma H

    2016-07-01

    RNA aptamers represent an emerging class of biologics that can be easily adapted for personalized and precision medicine. Several therapeutic aptamers with desirable binding and functional properties have been developed and evaluated in preclinical studies over the past 25years. However, for the majority of these aptamers, their clinical potential has yet to be realized. A significant hurdle to the clinical adoption of this novel class of biologicals is the limited information on their secondary and tertiary structure. Knowledge of the RNA's structure would greatly facilitate and expedite the post-selection optimization steps required for translation, including truncation (to reduce costs of manufacturing), chemical modification (to enhance stability and improve safety) and chemical conjugation (to improve drug properties for combinatorial therapy). Here we describe a structural computational modeling methodology that when coupled to a standard functional assay, can be used to determine key sequence and structural motifs of an RNA aptamer. We applied this methodology to enable the truncation of an aptamer to prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) with great potential for targeted therapy that had failed previous truncation attempts. This methodology can be easily applied to optimize other aptamers with therapeutic potential. PMID:26972787

  9. Computing folding pathways between RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotu, Ivan; Lorenz, William A; Van Hentenryck, Pascal; Clote, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Given an RNA sequence and two designated secondary structures A, B, we describe a new algorithm that computes a nearly optimal folding pathway from A to B. The algorithm, RNAtabupath, employs a tabu semi-greedy heuristic, known to be an effective search strategy in combinatorial optimization. Folding pathways, sometimes called routes or trajectories, are computed by RNAtabupath in a fraction of the time required by the barriers program of Vienna RNA Package. We benchmark RNAtabupath with other algorithms to compute low energy folding pathways between experimentally known structures of several conformational switches. The RNApathfinder web server, source code for algorithms to compute and analyze pathways and supplementary data are available at http://bioinformatics.bc.edu/clotelab/RNApathfinder. PMID:20044352

  10. RNA Structure Determination Using SAXS Data

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Sichun; Parisien, Marc; Major, François; Roux, Benoît

    2010-01-01

    Exploiting the experimental information from small-angle x-ray solution scattering (SAXS) in conjunction with structure prediction algorithms can be advantageous in the case of ribonucleic acids (RNA), where global restraints on the 3D fold are often lacking. Traditional usage of SAXS data often starts by attempting to reconstruct the molecular shape ab initio, which is subsequently used to assess the quality of model Here, an alternative strategy is explored whereby the models from a very la...

  11. The X-ray Structures of Six Octameric RNA Duplexes in the Presence of Different Di- and Trivalent Cations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Michelle F.; Peng, Guanya; Spingler, Bernhard; Schnabl, Joachim; Wang, Meitian; Olieric, Vincent; Sigel, Roland K. O.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the polyanionic nature of RNA, the principles of charge neutralization and electrostatic condensation require that cations help to overcome the repulsive forces in order for RNA to adopt a three-dimensional structure. A precise structural knowledge of RNA-metal ion interactions is crucial to understand the mechanism of metal ions in the catalytic or regulatory activity of RNA. We solved the crystal structure of an octameric RNA duplex in the presence of the di- and trivalent metal ions Ca2+, Mn2+, Co2+, Cu2+, Sr2+, and Tb3+. The detailed investigation reveals a unique innersphere interaction to uracil and extends the knowledge of the influence of metal ions for conformational changes in RNA structure. Furthermore, we could demonstrate that an accurate localization of the metal ions in the X-ray structures require the consideration of several crystallographic and geometrical parameters as well as the anomalous difference map. PMID:27355942

  12. Protein Structure and the Sequential Structure of mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brunak, Søren; Engelbrecht, Jacob

    1996-01-01

    A direct comparison of experimentally determined protein structures and their corresponding protein coding mRNA sequences has been performed, We examine whether real world data support the hypothesis that clusters of rare codons correlate with the location of structural units in the resulting...... protein, The degeneracy of the genetic code allows for a biased selection of codons which may control the translational rate of the ribosome, and may thus in vivo have a catalyzing effect on the folding of the polypeptide chain, A complete search for GenBank nucleotide sequences coding for structural...... entries in the Brookhaven Protein Data Bank produced 719 protein chains with matching mRNA sequence, amino acid sequence, and secondary structure assignment, By neural network analysis, we found strong signals in mRNA sequence regions surrounding helices and sheets, These signals do not originate from the...

  13. Insights into how RNase R degrades structured RNA: analysis of the nuclease domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Helen A; Deutscher, Murray P

    2009-04-01

    RNase R readily degrades highly structured RNA, whereas its paralogue, RNase II, is unable to do so. Furthermore, the nuclease domain of RNase R, devoid of all canonical RNA-binding domains, is sufficient for this activity. RNase R also binds RNA more tightly within its catalytic channel than does RNase II, which is thought to be important for its unique catalytic properties. To investigate this idea further, certain residues within the nuclease domain channel of RNase R were changed to those found in RNase II. Among the many examined, we identified one amino acid residue, R572, that has a significant role in the properties of RNase R. Conversion of this residue to lysine, as found in RNase II, results in weaker substrate binding within the nuclease domain channel, longer limit products, increased activity against a variety of substrates and a faster substrate on-rate. Most importantly, the mutant encounters difficulty in degrading structured RNA, pausing within a double-stranded region. Additional studies show that degradation of structured substrates is dependent upon temperature, suggesting a role for thermal breathing in the mechanism of action of RNase R. On the basis of these data, we propose a model in which tight binding within the nuclease domain allows RNase R to capitalize on the natural thermal breathing of an RNA duplex to degrade structured RNAs. PMID:19361424

  14. Temporal Translational Control by a Metastable RNA Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Franch, Thomas; Gerdes, Kenn

    2001-01-01

    Programmed cell death by the hok/sok locus of plasmid R1 relies on a complex translational control mechanism. The highly stable hok mRNA is activated by 3'-end exonucleolytical processing. Removal of the mRNA 3' end releases a 5'-end sequence that triggers refolding of the mRNA. The refolded hok m......RNA is translatable but can also bind the inhibitory Sok antisense RNA. Binding of Sok RNA leads to irreversible mRNA inactivation by an RNase III-dependent mechanism. A coherent model predicts that during transcription hok mRNA must be refractory to translation and antisense RNA binding. Here we provide...... genetic evidence for the existence of a 5' metastable structure in hok mRNA that locks the nascent transcript in an inactive configuration in vivo. Consistently, the metastable structure reduces the rate of Sok RNA binding and completely blocks hok translation in vitro. Structural analyses of native RNAs...

  15. Synthesis, structure characterization and catalytic activity of nickel tungstate nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pourmortazavi, Seied Mahdi, E-mail: pourmortazavi@yahoo.com [Faculty of Material and Manufacturing Technologies, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimi-Nasrabadi, Mehdi, E-mail: rahiminasrabadi@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Imam Hossein University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khalilian-Shalamzari, Morteza [Department of Chemistry, Imam Hossein University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zahedi, Mir Mahdi; Hajimirsadeghi, Seiedeh Somayyeh [Islamic Azad University, Varamin Pishva Branch, Varamin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Omrani, Ismail [Department of Chemistry, Imam Hossein University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: NiWO{sub 4} nanoparticles were prepared via precipitation technique. Experimental parameters of procedure were optimized statistically. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiWO{sub 4} spherical nanoparticles were synthesized via direct precipitation method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Taguchi robust design was used for optimization of synthesis reaction parameters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Composition and structural properties of NiWO{sub 4} nanoparticles were characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR, UV-vis and photoluminescence techniques were employed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Catalytic activity of the product in a cyclo-addition reaction was investigated. - Abstract: Taguchi robust design was applied to optimize experimental parameters for controllable, simple and fast synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles. NiWO{sub 4} nanoparticles were synthesized by precipitation reaction involving addition of nickel ion solution to the tungstate aqueous reagent and then formation of nickel tungstate nucleolus which are insoluble in aqueous media. Effects of various parameters such as nickel and tungstate concentrations, flow rate of reagent addition and reactor temperature on diameter of synthesized nickel tungstate nanoparticles were investigated experimentally by the aid of orthogonal array design. The results for analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that particle size of nickel tungstate can be effectively tuned by controlling significant variables involving nickel and tungstate concentrations and flow rate; while, temperature of the reactor has a no considerable effect on the size of NiWO{sub 4} particles. The ANOVA results proposed the optimum conditions for synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles via this technique. Also, under optimum condition nanoparticles of NiWO{sub 4} were prepared and their structure and chemical composition were characterized by means of EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, UV

  16. Synthesis, structure characterization and catalytic activity of nickel tungstate nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: NiWO4 nanoparticles were prepared via precipitation technique. Experimental parameters of procedure were optimized statistically. Highlights: ► NiWO4 spherical nanoparticles were synthesized via direct precipitation method. ► Taguchi robust design was used for optimization of synthesis reaction parameters. ► Composition and structural properties of NiWO4 nanoparticles were characterized. ► EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR, UV–vis and photoluminescence techniques were employed. ► Catalytic activity of the product in a cyclo-addition reaction was investigated. - Abstract: Taguchi robust design was applied to optimize experimental parameters for controllable, simple and fast synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles. NiWO4 nanoparticles were synthesized by precipitation reaction involving addition of nickel ion solution to the tungstate aqueous reagent and then formation of nickel tungstate nucleolus which are insoluble in aqueous media. Effects of various parameters such as nickel and tungstate concentrations, flow rate of reagent addition and reactor temperature on diameter of synthesized nickel tungstate nanoparticles were investigated experimentally by the aid of orthogonal array design. The results for analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that particle size of nickel tungstate can be effectively tuned by controlling significant variables involving nickel and tungstate concentrations and flow rate; while, temperature of the reactor has a no considerable effect on the size of NiWO4 particles. The ANOVA results proposed the optimum conditions for synthesis of nickel tungstate nanoparticles via this technique. Also, under optimum condition nanoparticles of NiWO4 were prepared and their structure and chemical composition were characterized by means of EDAX, XRD, SEM, FT-IR spectroscopy, UV–vis spectroscopy, and photoluminescence. Finally, catalytic activity of the nanoparticles in a cycloaddition reaction was examined.

  17. Structure of the catalytic domain of the hepatitis C virus NS2-3 protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz,I.; Marcotrigiano, J.; Dentzer, T.; Rice, C.

    2006-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus is a major global health problem affecting an estimated 170 million people worldwide. Chronic infection is common and can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. There is no vaccine available and current therapies have met with limited success. The viral RNA genome encodes a polyprotein that includes two proteases essential for virus replication. The NS2-3 protease mediates a single cleavage at the NS2/NS3 junction, whereas the NS3-4A protease cleaves at four downstream sites in the polyprotein. NS3-4A is characterized as a serine protease with a chymotrypsin-like fold, but the enzymatic mechanism of the NS2-3 protease remains unresolved. Here we report the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the NS2-3 protease at 2.3 Angstroms resolution. The structure reveals a dimeric cysteine protease with two composite active sites. For each active site, the catalytic histidine and glutamate residues are contributed by one monomer, and the nucleophilic cysteine by the other. The carboxy-terminal residues remain coordinated in the two active sites, predicting an inactive post-cleavage form. Proteolysis through formation of a composite active site occurs in the context of the viral polyprotein expressed in mammalian cells. These features offer unexpected insights into polyprotein processing by hepatitis C virus and new opportunities for antiviral drug design.

  18. Structural imprints in vivo decode RNA regulatory mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitale, Robert C.; Flynn, Ryan A.; Zhang, Qiangfeng Cliff; Crisalli, Pete; Lee, Byron; Jung, Jong-Wha; Kuchelmeister, Hannes Y.; Batista, Pedro J.; Torre, Eduardo A.; Kool, Eric T.; Chang, Howard Y.

    2015-03-01

    Visualizing the physical basis for molecular behaviour inside living cells is a great challenge for biology. RNAs are central to biological regulation, and the ability of RNA to adopt specific structures intimately controls every step of the gene expression program. However, our understanding of physiological RNA structures is limited; current in vivo RNA structure profiles include only two of the four nucleotides that make up RNA. Here we present a novel biochemical approach, in vivo click selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation and profiling experiment (icSHAPE), which enables the first global view, to our knowledge, of RNA secondary structures in living cells for all four bases. icSHAPE of the mouse embryonic stem cell transcriptome versus purified RNA folded in vitro shows that the structural dynamics of RNA in the cellular environment distinguish different classes of RNAs and regulatory elements. Structural signatures at translational start sites and ribosome pause sites are conserved from in vitro conditions, suggesting that these RNA elements are programmed by sequence. In contrast, focal structural rearrangements in vivo reveal precise interfaces of RNA with RNA-binding proteins or RNA-modification sites that are consistent with atomic-resolution structural data. Such dynamic structural footprints enable accurate prediction of RNA-protein interactions and N6-methyladenosine (m6A) modification genome wide. These results open the door for structural genomics of RNA in living cells and reveal key physiological structures controlling gene expression.

  19. Prohead RNA: a noncoding viral RNA of novel structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Alyssa C; Bartley, Laura E; Schroeder, Susan J

    2016-07-01

    Prohead RNA (pRNA) is an essential component of the powerful Φ29-like bacteriophage DNA packaging motor. However, the specific role of this unique RNA in the Φ29 packaging motor remains unknown. This review examines pRNA as a noncoding RNA of novel structure and function. In order to highlight the reasons for exploring the structure and function of pRNA, we (1) provide an overview of Φ29-like bacteriophage and the Φ29 DNA packaging motor, including putative motor mechanisms and structures of its component parts; (2) discuss pRNA structure and possible roles for pRNA in the Φ29 packaging motor; (3) summarize pRNA self-assembly; and (4) describe the prospective therapeutic applications of pRNA. Many questions remain to be answered in order to connect what is currently known about pRNA structure to its novel function in the Φ29 packaging motor. The knowledge gained from studying the structure, function, and sequence variation in pRNA will help develop tools to better navigate the conformational landscapes of RNA. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:428-437. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1330 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26810250

  20. CompaRNA: a server for continuous benchmarking of automated methods for RNA secondary structure prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Puton, T.; Kozlowski, L. P.; Rother, K. M.; Bujnicki, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    We present a continuous benchmarking approach for the assessment of RNA secondary structure prediction methods implemented in the CompaRNA web server. As of 3 October 2012, the performance of 28 single-sequence and 13 comparative methods has been evaluated on RNA sequences/structures released weekly by the Protein Data Bank. We also provide a static benchmark generated on RNA 2D structures derived from the RNAstrand database. Benchmarks on both data sets offer insight into the relative perfor...

  1. A structural basis for the activity of retro-Diels–Alder catalytic antibodies: Evidence for a catalytic aromatic residue

    OpenAIRE

    Hugot, Marina; Bensel, Nicolas; Vogel, Monique; Reymond, Martine T.; Stadler, Beda; Reymond, Jean-Louis; Baumann, Ulrich

    2002-01-01

    The nitroxyl synthase catalytic antibodies 10F11, 9D9, and 27C5 catalyze the release of nitroxyl from a bicyclic pro-drug by accelerating a retro-Diels–Alder reaction. The Fabs (antigen-binding fragments) of these three catalytic antibodies were cloned and sequenced. Fab 9D9 was crystallized in the apo-form and in complex with one transition state analogue of the reaction. Crystal structures of Fab 10F11 in complex with ligands mimicking substrate, transition state, and product have been dete...

  2. Structural Chemistry of Human RNA Methyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schapira, Matthieu

    2016-03-18

    RNA methyltransferases (RNMTs) play important roles in RNA stability, splicing, and epigenetic mechanisms. They constitute a promising target class that is underexplored by the medicinal chemistry community. Information of relevance to drug design can be extracted from the rich structural coverage of human RNMTs. In this work, the structural chemistry of this protein family is analyzed in depth. Unlike most methyltransferases, RNMTs generally feature a substrate-binding site that is largely open on the cofactor-binding pocket, favoring the design of bisubstrate inhibitors. Substrate purine or pyrimidines are often sandwiched between hydrophobic walls that can accommodate planar ring systems. When the substrate base is laying on a shallow surface, a 5' flanking base is sometimes anchored in a druggable cavity. The cofactor-binding site is structurally more diverse than in protein methyltransferases and more druggable in SPOUT than in Rossman-fold enzymes. Finally, conformational plasticity observed both at the substrate and cofactor binding sites may be a challenge for structure-based drug design. The landscape drawn here may inform ongoing efforts toward the discovery of the first human RNMT inhibitors. PMID:26566070

  3. The structural basis of tRNA mimicry and conformational plasticity by a viral RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colussi, Timothy M.; Costantino, David A.; Hammond, John A.; Ruehle, Grant M.; Nix, Jay C.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2014-01-01

    RNA is arguably the most functionally diverse biological macromolecule. In some cases a single discrete RNA sequence performs multiple roles and this can be conferred by a complex three-dimensional structure. This multifunctionality can also be driven or enhanced by the ability of a given RNA to assume different conformational (and therefore functional) states1. Despite its biological importance, a detailed structural understanding of the paradigm of RNA structure-driven multifunctionality is lacking. Examples to address this gap are found in single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses, a prototype being the tRNA-like structure (TLS) found at the 3′ end of the Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus (TYMV). This TLS not only acts like a tRNA to drive aminoacylation of the viral genomic RNA (gRNA)2-4, but also interacts with other structures in the gRNA's 3′ untranslated region5, contains the promoter for negative strand synthesis, and influences several infection-critical processes6. This TLS RNA can provide a glimpse into the structural basis of RNA multifunctionality and plasticity, but for decades its high-resolution structure has remained elusive. Here, we present the crystal structure of the complete TYMV TLS to 2.0 Å resolution. Globally, the RNA adopts a shape that mimics tRNA, but it uses a very different set of intramolecular interactions to achieve this shape. These interactions also allow the TLS to readily switch conformations. In addition, the TLS structure is ‘two-faced’: one ‘face’ closely mimics tRNA and drives aminoacylation, the other ‘face’ diverges from tRNA and enables additional functionality. The TLS is thus structured to perform several functions and interact with diverse binding partners, and we demonstrate its ability to specifically bind to ribosomes. PMID:24909993

  4. Crystal structure of the S. solfataricus archaeal exosome reveals conformational flexibility in the RNA-binding ring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changrui Lu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The exosome complex is an essential RNA 3'-end processing and degradation machinery. In archaeal organisms, the exosome consists of a catalytic ring and an RNA-binding ring, both of which were previously reported to assume three-fold symmetry. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report an asymmetric 2.9 A Sulfolobus solfataricus archaeal exosome structure in which the three-fold symmetry is broken due to combined rigid body and thermal motions mainly within the RNA-binding ring. Since increased conformational flexibility was also observed in the RNA-binding ring of the related bacterial PNPase, we speculate that this may reflect an evolutionarily conserved mechanism to accommodate diverse RNA substrates for degradation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study clearly shows the dynamic structures within the RNA-binding domains, which provides additional insights on mechanism of asymmetric RNA binding and processing.

  5. Structure and Catalytic Behavior of CuO-ZrO-CeO2 Mixed Oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王恩过; 陈诵英

    2002-01-01

    The effect of doping CuO on the structure and properties of zirconia-ceria mixed oxide was studied. The results show that addition of CuO decreases the reduction temperature of ceria, and stabilizes the cubic structure of mixed oxides, and enhances catalytic activity of CuO-ZrO-CeO2 mixed oxides for CO oxidation. Increasing ceria content in the mixed oxides can enhance the catalytic activity, but some impurities such as sulfate make catalytic activity falling. There is little effect of calcination temperature on catalytic activities, implying that these catalysts are effective with good thermal stability.

  6. On comparing two structured RNA multiple alignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vandanaben; Wang, Jason T L; Setia, Shefali; Verma, Anurag; Warden, Charles D; Zhang, Kaizhong

    2010-12-01

    We present a method, called BlockMatch, for aligning two blocks, where a block is an RNA multiple sequence alignment with the consensus secondary structure of the alignment in Stockholm format. The method employs a quadratic-time dynamic programming algorithm for aligning columns and column pairs of the multiple alignments in the blocks. Unlike many other tools that can perform pairwise alignment of either single sequences or structures only, BlockMatch takes into account the characteristics of all the sequences in the blocks along with their consensus structures during the alignment process, thus being able to achieve a high-quality alignment result. We apply BlockMatch to phylogeny reconstruction on a set of 5S rRNA sequences taken from fifteen bacteria species. Experimental results showed that the phylogenetic tree generated by our method is more accurate than the tree constructed based on the widely used ClustalW tool. The BlockMatch algorithm is implemented into a web server, accessible at http://bioinformatics.njit.edu/blockmatch. A jar file of the program is also available for download from the web server. PMID:21121021

  7. Structural Analysis of Monomeric RNA-Dependent Polymerases: Evolutionary and Therapeutic Implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Jácome

    Full Text Available The crystal structures of monomeric RNA-dependent RNA polymerases and reverse transcriptases of more than 20 different viruses are available in the Protein Data Bank. They all share the characteristic right-hand shape of DNA- and RNA polymerases formed by the fingers, palm and thumb subdomains, and, in many cases, "fingertips" that extend from the fingers towards the thumb subdomain, giving the viral enzyme a closed right-hand appearance. Six conserved structural motifs that contain key residues for the proper functioning of the enzyme have been identified in all these RNA-dependent polymerases. These enzymes share a two divalent metal-ion mechanism of polymerization in which two conserved aspartate residues coordinate the interactions with the metal ions to catalyze the nucleotidyl transfer reaction. The recent availability of crystal structures of polymerases of the Orthomyxoviridae and Bunyaviridae families allowed us to make pairwise comparisons of the tertiary structures of polymerases belonging to the four main RNA viral groups, which has led to a phylogenetic tree in which single-stranded negative RNA viral polymerases have been included for the first time. This has also allowed us to use a homology-based structural prediction approach to develop a general three-dimensional model of the Ebola virus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. Our model includes several of the conserved structural motifs and residues described in other viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases that define the catalytic and highly conserved palm subdomain, as well as portions of the fingers and thumb subdomains. The results presented here help to understand the current use and apparent success of antivirals, i.e. Brincidofovir, Lamivudine and Favipiravir, originally aimed at other types of polymerases, to counteract the Ebola virus infection.

  8. Regulatory effects of cotranscriptional RNA structure formation and transitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sheng-Rui; Hu, Chun-Gen; Zhang, Jin-Zhi

    2016-09-01

    RNAs, which play significant roles in many fundamental biological processes of life, fold into sophisticated and precise structures. RNA folding is a dynamic and intricate process, which conformation transition of coding and noncoding RNAs form the primary elements of genetic regulation. The cellular environment contains various intrinsic and extrinsic factors that potentially affect RNA folding in vivo, and experimental and theoretical evidence increasingly indicates that the highly flexible features of the RNA structure are affected by these factors, which include the flanking sequence context, physiochemical conditions, cis RNA-RNA interactions, and RNA interactions with other molecules. Furthermore, distinct RNA structures have been identified that govern almost all steps of biological processes in cells, including transcriptional activation and termination, transcriptional mutagenesis, 5'-capping, splicing, 3'-polyadenylation, mRNA export and localization, and translation. Here, we briefly summarize the dynamic and complex features of RNA folding along with a wide variety of intrinsic and extrinsic factors that affect RNA folding. We then provide several examples to elaborate RNA structure-mediated regulation at the transcriptional and posttranscriptional levels. Finally, we illustrate the regulatory roles of RNA structure and discuss advances pertaining to RNA structure in plants. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:562-574. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1350 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27028291

  9. The structural basis of transfer RNA mimicry and conformational plasticity by a viral RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colussi, Timothy M; Costantino, David A; Hammond, John A; Ruehle, Grant M; Nix, Jay C; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2014-07-17

    RNA is arguably the most functionally diverse biological macromolecule. In some cases a single discrete RNA sequence performs multiple roles, and this can be conferred by a complex three-dimensional structure. Such multifunctionality can also be driven or enhanced by the ability of a given RNA to assume different conformational (and therefore functional) states. Despite its biological importance, a detailed structural understanding of the paradigm of RNA structure-driven multifunctionality is lacking. To address this gap it is useful to study examples from single-stranded positive-sense RNA viruses, a prototype being the tRNA-like structure (TLS) found at the 3' end of the turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV). This TLS not only acts like a tRNA to drive aminoacylation of the viral genomic (g)RNA, but also interacts with other structures in the 3' untranslated region of the gRNA, contains the promoter for negative-strand synthesis, and influences several infection-critical processes. TLS RNA can provide a glimpse into the structural basis of RNA multifunctionality and plasticity, but for decades its high-resolution structure has remained elusive. Here we present the crystal structure of the complete TYMV TLS to 2.0 Å resolution. Globally, the RNA adopts a shape that mimics tRNA, but it uses a very different set of intramolecular interactions to achieve this shape. These interactions also allow the TLS to readily switch conformations. In addition, the TLS structure is 'two faced': one face closely mimics tRNA and drives aminoacylation, the other face diverges from tRNA and enables additional functionality. The TLS is thus structured to perform several functions and interact with diverse binding partners, and we demonstrate its ability to specifically bind to ribosomes. PMID:24909993

  10. Networks of high mutual information define the structural proximity of catalytic sites: implications for catalytic residue identification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Marino Buslje

    Full Text Available Identification of catalytic residues (CR is essential for the characterization of enzyme function. CR are, in general, conserved and located in the functional site of a protein in order to attain their function. However, many non-catalytic residues are highly conserved and not all CR are conserved throughout a given protein family making identification of CR a challenging task. Here, we put forward the hypothesis that CR carry a particular signature defined by networks of close proximity residues with high mutual information (MI, and that this signature can be applied to distinguish functional from other non-functional conserved residues. Using a data set of 434 Pfam families included in the catalytic site atlas (CSA database, we tested this hypothesis and demonstrated that MI can complement amino acid conservation scores to detect CR. The Kullback-Leibler (KL conservation measurement was shown to significantly outperform both the Shannon entropy and maximal frequency measurements. Residues in the proximity of catalytic sites were shown to be rich in shared MI. A structural proximity MI average score (termed pMI was demonstrated to be a strong predictor for CR, thus confirming the proposed hypothesis. A structural proximity conservation average score (termed pC was also calculated and demonstrated to carry distinct information from pMI. A catalytic likeliness score (Cls, combining the KL, pC and pMI measures, was shown to lead to significantly improved prediction accuracy. At a specificity of 0.90, the Cls method was found to have a sensitivity of 0.816. In summary, we demonstrate that networks of residues with high MI provide a distinct signature on CR and propose that such a signature should be present in other classes of functional residues where the requirement to maintain a particular function places limitations on the diversification of the structural environment along the course of evolution.

  11. Catalytic mechanism of RNA backbone cleavage by ribonuclease H from quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosta, Edina; Nowotny, Marcin; Yang, Wei; Hummer, Gerhard

    2011-06-15

    We use quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations to study the cleavage of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) backbone catalyzed by ribonuclease H. This protein is a prototypical member of a large family of enzymes that use two-metal catalysis to process nucleic acids. By combining Hamiltonian replica exchange with a finite-temperature string method, we calculate the free energy surface underlying the RNA-cleavage reaction and characterize its mechanism. We find that the reaction proceeds in two steps. In a first step, catalyzed primarily by magnesium ion A and its ligands, a water molecule attacks the scissile phosphate. Consistent with thiol-substitution experiments, a water proton is transferred to the downstream phosphate group. The transient phosphorane formed as a result of this nucleophilic attack decays by breaking the bond between the phosphate and the ribose oxygen. In the resulting intermediate, the dissociated but unprotonated leaving group forms an alkoxide coordinated to magnesium ion B. In a second step, the reaction is completed by protonation of the leaving group, with a neutral Asp132 as a likely proton donor. The overall reaction barrier of ∼15 kcal mol(-1), encountered in the first step, together with the cost of protonating Asp132, is consistent with the slow measured rate of ∼1-100/min. The two-step mechanism is also consistent with the bell-shaped pH dependence of the reaction rate. The nonmonotonic relative motion of the magnesium ions along the reaction pathway agrees with X-ray crystal structures. Proton-transfer reactions and changes in the metal ion coordination emerge as central factors in the RNA-cleavage reaction. PMID:21539371

  12. Catalytic Mechanism of RNA Backbone Cleavage by Ribonuclease H from QM/MM Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosta, Edina; Nowotny, Marcin; Yang, Wei; Hummer, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    We use quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations to study the cleavage of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) backbone catalyzed by ribonuclease H. This protein is a prototypical member of a large family of enzymes that use two-metal catalysis to process nucleic acids. By combining Hamiltonian replica exchange with a finite-temperature string method, we calculate the free energy surface underlying the RNA cleavage reaction and characterize its mechanism. We find that the reaction proceeds in two steps. In a first step, catalyzed primarily by magnesium ion A and its ligands, a water molecule attacks the scissile phosphate. Consistent with thiol-substitution experiments, a water proton is transferred to the downstream phosphate group. The transient phosphorane formed as a result of this nucleophilic attack decays by breaking the bond between the phosphate and the ribose oxygen. In the resulting intermediate, the dissociated but unprotonated leaving group forms an alkoxide coordinated to magnesium ion B. In a second step, the reaction is completed by protonation of the leaving group, with a neutral Asp132 as a likely proton donor. The overall reaction barrier of ~15 kcal mol−1, encountered in the first step, together with the cost of protonating Asp132, is consistent with the slow measured rate of ~1–100/min. The two-step mechanism is also consistent with the bell-shaped pH dependence of the reaction rate. The non-monotonic relative motion of the magnesium ions along the reaction pathway agrees with X-ray crystal structures. Proton transfer reactions and changes in the metal ion coordination emerge as central factors in the RNA cleavage reaction. PMID:21539371

  13. Polymer supported nickel complex: Synthesis, structure and catalytic application

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Alekha Kumar Sutar; Tungabidya Maharana; Yasobanta Das; Prasanta Rath

    2014-11-01

    In the present investigation, a new synthetic route for a novel recyclable free [3-MOBdMBn-Ni] and polystyrene-anchored [P-3-MOBdMBn-Ni] nickel complexes is presented. The free and polymer-anchored metal complexes were synthesized by the reaction of nickel (II) with one molar equivalent of unsupported N N′-bis (2-Hydroxy-3-methoxybenzaldehyde) 4-Methylbenzene-1,2-diamine (3-MOBdMBn) or polymersupported (P-3-MOBdMBn) Schiff-base ligand in methanol under nitrogen atmosphere. The advantages of these polymer-supported catalysts are the low cost of catalyst and recyclability up to six times, due to easy availability of materials and simple synthetic route. The higher efficiency of complexation of nickel on the polymer-anchored 3-MOBdMBn Schiff base than the unsupported analogue is another advantage of this catalyst system. The structural study reveals that nickel(II) complex of 3-MOBdMBn is square planar in geometry. The catalytic activity of nickel complex towards the oxidation of phenol was investigated in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Experimental results indicate that the reactivity of P-3-MOBdMBn-Ni was dramatically affected by the polymer support compared to free 3-MOBdMBn-Ni. The rates of oxidation (R) for unsupported and supported catalysts are 1.37 × 10-6 mole dm-3 s-1 and 2.33 × 10-6 mole dm-3 s-1 respectively.

  14. RNAComposer and RNA 3D structure prediction for nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesiada, Marcin; Pachulska-Wieczorek, Katarzyna; Adamiak, Ryszard W; Purzycka, Katarzyna J

    2016-07-01

    RNAs adopt specific, stable tertiary architectures to perform their activities. Knowledge of RNA tertiary structure is fundamental to understand RNA functions beginning with transcription and ending with turnover. Contrary to advanced RNA secondary structure prediction algorithms, which allow good accuracy when experimental data are integrated into the prediction, tertiary structure prediction of large RNAs still remains a significant challenge. However, the field of RNA tertiary structure prediction is rapidly developing and new computational methods based on different strategies are emerging. RNAComposer is a user-friendly and freely available server for 3D structure prediction of RNA up to 500 nucleotide residues. RNAComposer employs fully automated fragment assembly based on RNA secondary structure specified by the user. Importantly, this method allows incorporation of distance restraints derived from the experimental data to strengthen the 3D predictions. The potential and limitations of RNAComposer are discussed and an application to RNA design for nanotechnology is presented. PMID:27016145

  15. The structural basis of pathogenic subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA) production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Erich G; Costantino, David A; Rabe, Jennifer L; Moon, Stephanie L; Wilusz, Jeffrey; Nix, Jay C; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2014-04-18

    Flaviviruses are emerging human pathogens and worldwide health threats. During infection, pathogenic subgenomic flaviviral RNAs (sfRNAs) are produced by resisting degradation by the 5'→3' host cell exonuclease Xrn1 through an unknown RNA structure-based mechanism. Here, we present the crystal structure of a complete Xrn1-resistant flaviviral RNA, which contains interwoven pseudoknots within a compact structure that depends on highly conserved nucleotides. The RNA's three-dimensional topology creates a ringlike conformation, with the 5' end of the resistant structure passing through the ring from one side of the fold to the other. Disruption of this structure prevents formation of sfRNA during flaviviral infection. Thus, sfRNA formation results from an RNA fold that interacts directly with Xrn1, presenting the enzyme with a structure that confounds its helicase activity. PMID:24744377

  16. RNA structures that resist degradation by Xrn1 produce a pathogenic Dengue virus RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Erich G; Moon, Stephanie L; Wilusz, Jeffrey; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Dengue virus is a growing global health threat. Dengue and other flaviviruses commandeer the host cell's RNA degradation machinery to generate the small flaviviral RNA (sfRNA), a noncoding RNA that induces cytopathicity and pathogenesis. Host cell exonuclease Xrn1 likely loads on the 5' end of viral genomic RNA and degrades processively through ∼10 kB of RNA, halting near the 3' end of the viral RNA. The surviving RNA is the sfRNA. We interrogated the architecture of the complete Dengue 2 sfRNA, identifying five independently-folded RNA structures, two of which quantitatively confer Xrn1 resistance. We developed an assay for real-time monitoring of Xrn1 resistance that we used with mutagenesis and RNA folding experiments to show that Xrn1-resistant RNAs adopt a specific fold organized around a three-way junction. Disrupting the junction's fold eliminates the buildup of disease-related sfRNAs in human cells infected with a flavivirus, directly linking RNA structure to sfRNA production. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01892.001. PMID:24692447

  17. Structural, electrical and catalytic properties of ion-implanted oxides

    OpenAIRE

    Hassel, van, E Edwin; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    The potential application of ion implantation to modify the surfaces of ceramic materials is discussed. Changes in the chemical composition and microstructure result in important variations of the electrical and catalytic properties of oxides.

  18. Structural characterization of mRNA-tRNA translocation intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Liao, Hstau Y; Schreiner, Eduard; Fu, Jie; Ortiz-Meoz, Rodrigo F; Schulten, Klaus; Green, Rachel; Frank, Joachim

    2012-04-17

    Cryo-EM analysis of a wild-type Escherichia coli pretranslocational sample has revealed the presence of previously unseen intermediate substates of the bacterial ribosome during the first phase of translocation, characterized by intermediate intersubunit rotations, L1 stalk positions, and tRNA configurations. Furthermore, we describe the domain rearrangements in quantitative terms, which has allowed us to characterize the processivity and coordination of the conformational reorganization of the ribosome, along with the associated changes in tRNA ribosome-binding configuration. The results are consistent with the view of the ribosome as a molecular machine employing Brownian motion to reach a functionally productive state via a series of substates with incremental changes in conformation. PMID:22467828

  19. Structural characterization of mRNA-tRNA translocation intermediates

    OpenAIRE

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Liao, Hstau Y.; Schreiner, Eduard; Fu, Jie; Ortiz-Meoz, Rodrigo F.; Schulten, Klaus; Green, Rachel; Frank, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Cryo-EM analysis of a wild-type Escherichia coli pretranslocational sample has revealed the presence of previously unseen intermediate substates of the bacterial ribosome during the first phase of translocation, characterized by intermediate intersubunit rotations, L1 stalk positions, and tRNA configurations. Furthermore, we describe the domain rearrangements in quantitative terms, which has allowed us to characterize the processivity and coordination of the conformational reorganization of t...

  20. Redox status affects the catalytic activity of glutamyl-tRNA synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katz, Assaf; Banerjee, Rajat; de Armas, Merly;

    2010-01-01

    Glutamyl-tRNA synthetases (GluRS) provide Glu-tRNA for different processes including protein synthesis, glutamine transamidation and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis. Many organisms contain multiple GluRSs, but whether these duplications solely broaden tRNA specificity or also play additional roles in...... vitro, GluRS1 activity is reversibly inactivated upon oxidation by hemin and hydrogen peroxide. The targets for oxidation-based inhibition were found to be cysteines from a SWIM zinc-binding motif located in the tRNA acceptor helix-binding domain. tRNA(Glu) was able to protect GluRS1 against oxidative...

  1. High-Throughput Analysis of RNA Structure and Ribonucleoprotein Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinnis, Jennifer L.; Duncan, Caia D. S.; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    RNA folds to form complex structures vital to many cellular functions. Proteins facilitate RNA folding at both the secondary and tertiary structure levels. An absolute prerequisite for understanding RNA folding and ribonucleoprotein (RNP) assembly reactions is a complete understanding of the RNA structure at each stage of the folding or assembly process. Here we provide a guide for comprehensive and high-throughput analysis of RNA secondary and tertiary structure using SHAPE and hydroxyl radical footprinting. As an example of the strong and sometimes surprising conclusions that can emerge from high-throughput analysis of RNA folding and RNP assembly, we summarize the structure of the bI3 group I intron RNA in four distinct states. Dramatic structural rearrangements occur in both secondary and tertiary structure as the RNA folds from the free state to the active, six-component, RNP complex. As high-throughput and high-resolution approaches are applied broadly to large protein-RNA complexes, other proteins previously viewed as making simple contributions to RNA folding are also likely to be found to exert multifaceted, long-range, cooperative, and non-additive effects on RNA folding. These protein-induced contributions add another level of control, and potential regulatory function, in RNP complexes. PMID:20946765

  2. RNAbor: a web server for RNA structural neighbors

    OpenAIRE

    Freyhult, Eva; Moulton, Vincent; Clote, Peter

    2007-01-01

    RNAbor provides a new tool for researchers in the biological and related sciences to explore important aspects of RNA secondary structure and folding pathways. RNAbor computes statistics concerning δ -neighbors of a given input RNA sequence and structure (the structure can, for example, be the minimum free energy (MFE) structure). A δ -neighbor is a structure that differs from the input structure by exactly δ base pairs, that is, it can be obtained from the input structure by adding and/or re...

  3. Structural features of microRNA (miRNA) precursors and their relevance to miRNA biogenesis and small interfering RNA/short hairpin RNA design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krol, Jacek; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Wilczynska, Urszula; Drath, Maria; Jasinska, Anna; Kaczynska, Danuta; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J

    2004-10-01

    We have established the structures of 10 human microRNA (miRNA) precursors using biochemical methods. Eight of these structures turned out to be different from those that were computer-predicted. The differences localized in the terminal loop region and at the opposite side of the precursor hairpin stem. We have analyzed the features of these structures from the perspectives of miRNA biogenesis and active strand selection. We demonstrated the different thermodynamic stability profiles for pre-miRNA hairpins harboring miRNAs at their 5'- and 3'-sides and discussed their functional implications. Our results showed that miRNA prediction based on predicted precursor structures may give ambiguous results, and the success rate is significantly higher for the experimentally determined structures. On the other hand, the differences between the predicted and experimentally determined structures did not affect the stability of termini produced through "conceptual dicing." This result confirms the value of thermodynamic analysis based on mfold as a predictor of strand section by RNAi-induced silencing complex (RISC). PMID:15292246

  4. RNA triplexes: from structural principles to biological and biotech applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Gitali; Zhou, Yuan; Zhong, Zhensheng; Toh, Desiree-Faye Kaixin; Chen, Gang

    2015-01-01

    The diverse biological functions of RNA are determined by the complex structures of RNA stabilized by both secondary and tertiary interactions. An RNA triplex is an important tertiary structure motif that is found in many pseudoknots and other structured RNAs. A triplex structure usually forms through tertiary interactions in the major or minor groove of a Watson-Crick base-paired stem. A major-groove RNA triplex structure is stable in isolation by forming consecutive major-groove base triples such as U·A-U and C(+) ·G-C. Minor-groove RNA triplexes, e.g., A-minor motif triplexes, are found in almost all large structured RNAs. As double-stranded RNA stem regions are often involved in biologically important tertiary triplex structure formation and protein binding, the ability to sequence specifically target any desired RNA duplexes by triplex formation would have great potential for biomedical applications. Programmable chemically modified triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) and triplex-forming peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) have been developed to form TFO·RNA2 and PNA·RNA2 triplexes, respectively, with enhanced binding affinity and sequence specificity at physiological conditions. Here, we (1) provide an overview of naturally occurring RNA triplexes, (2) summarize the experimental methods for studying triplexes, and (3) review the development of TFOs and triplex-forming PNAs for targeting an HIV-1 ribosomal frameshift-inducing RNA, a bacterial ribosomal A-site RNA, and a human microRNA hairpin precursor, and for inhibiting the RNA-protein interactions involving human RNA-dependent protein kinase and HIV-1 viral protein Rev. PMID:25146348

  5. Unified approach to partition functions of RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundschuh, Ralf

    2014-11-01

    RNA secondary structure formation is a field of considerable biological interest as well as a model system for understanding generic properties of heteropolymer folding. This system is particularly attractive because the partition function and thus all thermodynamic properties of RNA secondary structure ensembles can be calculated numerically in polynomial time for arbitrary sequences and homopolymer models admit analytical solutions. Such solutions for many different aspects of the combinatorics of RNA secondary structure formation share the property that the final solution depends on differences of statistical weights rather than on the weights alone. Here, we present a unified approach to a large class of problems in the field of RNA secondary structure formation. We prove a generic theorem for the calculation of RNA folding partition functions. Then, we show that this approach can be applied to the study of the molten-native transition, denaturation of RNA molecules, as well as to studies of the glass phase of random RNA sequences. PMID:24177391

  6. The mRNA expression of apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme-catalytic polypeptide-like 3G in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with chronic hepatitis C and its regulation by interferon-α

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡卫平

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the mRNA expression of apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme-catalytic polypeptide-like 3G(APOBEC3G) in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells(PBMC) in patients with chronic hepatitis C(CHC) and its regulation by exogenous interferon-α

  7. The modeled structure of the RNA dependent RNA polymerase of GBV-C Virus suggests a role for motif E in Flaviviridae RNA polymerases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dutartre Hélène

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Flaviviridae virus family includes major human and animal pathogens. The RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp plays a central role in the replication process, and thus is a validated target for antiviral drugs. Despite the increasing structural and enzymatic characterization of viral RdRps, detailed molecular replication mechanisms remain unclear. The hepatitis C virus (HCV is a major human pathogen difficult to study in cultured cells. The bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV is often used as a surrogate model to screen antiviral drugs against HCV. The structure of BVDV RdRp has been recently published. It presents several differences relative to HCV RdRp. These differences raise questions about the relevance of BVDV as a surrogate model, and cast novel interest on the "GB" virus C (GBV-C. Indeed, GBV-C is genetically closer to HCV than BVDV, and can lead to productive infection of cultured cells. There is no structural data for the GBV-C RdRp yet. Results We show in this study that the GBV-C RdRp is closest to the HCV RdRp. We report a 3D model of the GBV-C RdRp, developed using sequence-to-structure threading and comparative modeling based on the atomic coordinates of the HCV RdRp structure. Analysis of the predicted structural features in the phylogenetic context of the RNA polymerase family allows rationalizing most of the experimental data available. Both available structures and our model are explored to examine the catalytic cleft, allosteric and substrate binding sites. Conclusion Computational methods were used to infer evolutionary relationships and to predict the structure of a viral RNA polymerase. Docking a GTP molecule into the structure allows defining a GTP binding pocket in the GBV-C RdRp, such as that of BVDV. The resulting model suggests a new proposition for the mechanism of RNA synthesis, and may prove useful to design new experiments to implement our knowledge on the initiation mechanism of RNA

  8. RNA targeting by small molecules: Binding of protoberberine, benzophenanthridine and aristolochia alkaloids to various RNA structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gopinatha Suresh Kumar

    2012-07-01

    Studies on RNA targeting by small molecules to specifically control certain cellular functions is an area of remarkable current interest. For this purpose, a basic understanding of the molecular aspects of the interaction of small molecules with various RNA structures is essential. Alkaloids are a group of natural products with potential therapeutic utility, and very recently, their interaction with many RNA structures have been reported. Especially noteworthy are the protoberberines and aristolochia alkaloids distributed widely in many botanical families. Many of the alkaloids of these group exhibit excellent binding affinity to many RNA structures that may be exploited to develop RNA targeted therapeutics. This review attempts to present the current status on the understanding of the interaction of these alkaloids with various RNA structures, mainly highlighting the biophysical aspects.

  9. Crystal Structure and Activity of the Endoribonuclease Domain of the piRNA Pathway Factor Maelstrom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Matsumoto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs protect the genome from transposons in animal gonads. Maelstrom (Mael is an evolutionarily conserved protein, composed of a high-mobility group (HMG domain and a MAEL domain, and is essential for piRNA-mediated transcriptional transposon silencing in various species, such as Drosophila and mice. However, its structure and biochemical function have remained elusive. Here, we report the crystal structure of the MAEL domain from Drosophila melanogaster Mael, at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure reveals that the MAEL domain has an RNase H-like fold but lacks canonical catalytic residues conserved among RNase H-like superfamily nucleases. Our biochemical analyses reveal that the MAEL domain exhibits single-stranded RNA (ssRNA-specific endonuclease activity. Our cell-based analyses further indicate that ssRNA cleavage activity appears dispensable for piRNA-mediated transcriptional transposon silencing in Drosophila. Our findings provide clues toward understanding the multiple roles of Mael in the piRNA pathway.

  10. Classification of non-coding RNA using graph representations ofsecondary structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karklin, Yan; Meraz, Richard F.; Holbrook, Stephen R.

    2004-06-07

    Some genes produce transcripts that function directly in regulatory, catalytic, or structural roles in the cell. These non-coding RNAs are prevalent in all living organisms, and methods that aid the understanding of their functional roles are essential. RNA secondary structure, the pattern of base-pairing, contains the critical information for determining the three dimensional structure and function of the molecule. In this work we examine whether the basic geometric and topological properties of secondary structure are sufficient to distinguish between RNA families in a learning framework. First, we develop a labeled dual graph representation of RNA secondary structure by adding biologically meaningful labels to the dual graphs proposed by Gan et al [1]. Next, we define a similarity measure directly on the labeled dual graphs using the recently developed marginalized kernels [2]. Using this similarity measure, we were able to train Support Vector Machine classifiers to distinguish RNAs of known families from random RNAs with similar statistics. For 22 of the 25 families tested, the classifier achieved better than 70% accuracy, with much higher accuracy rates for some families. Training a set of classifiers to automatically assign family labels to RNAs using a one vs. all multi-class scheme also yielded encouraging results. From these initial learning experiments, we suggest that the labeled dual graph representation, together with kernel machine methods, has potential for use in automated analysis and classification of uncharacterized RNA molecules or efficient genome-wide screens for RNA molecules from existing families.

  11. RNA Structural Homology Search with a Succinct Stochastic Grammar Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Lei Song; Ji-Zhen Zhao; Chun-Mei Liu; Kan Liu; Russell Malmberg; Li-Ming Cai

    2005-01-01

    An increasing number of structural homology search tools, mostly based on profile stochastic context-free grammars (SCFGs) have been recently developed for the non-coding RNA gene identification. SCFGs can include statistical biases that often occur in RNA sequences, necessary to profile specific RNA structures for structural homology search. In this paper, a succinct stochastic grammar model is introduced for RNA that has competitive search effectiveness. More importantly, the profiling model can be easily extended to include pseudoknots, structures that are beyond the capability of profile SCFGs. In addition, the model allows heuristics to be exploited, resulting in a significant speed-up for the CYK algorithm-based search.

  12. Structure of RNA 3′-phosphate cyclase bound to substrate RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Desai, Kevin K.; Bingman, Craig A.; Cheng, Chin L.; Phillips, George N.; Raines, Ronald T.

    2014-01-01

    RNA 3′-phosphate cyclase (RtcA) catalyzes the ATP-dependent cyclization of a 3′-phosphate to form a 2′,3′-cyclic phosphate at RNA termini. Cyclization proceeds through RtcA–AMP and RNA(3′)pp(5′)A covalent intermediates, which are analogous to intermediates formed during catalysis by the tRNA ligase RtcB. Here we present a crystal structure of Pyrococcus horikoshii RtcA in complex with a 3′-phosphate terminated RNA and adenosine in the AMP-binding pocket. Our data reveal that RtcA recognizes s...

  13. A structural and primary sequence comparison of the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases

    OpenAIRE

    Bruenn, Jeremy A.

    2003-01-01

    A systematic bioinformatic approach to identifying the evolutionarily conserved regions of proteins has verified the universality of a newly described conserved motif in RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (motif F). In combination with structural comparisons, this approach has defined two regions that may be involved in unwinding double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) for transcription. One of these is the N-terminal portion of motif F and the second is a large insertion in motif F present in the RNA-depende...

  14. A Potential Protein-RNA Recognition Event Along the RISC-Loading Pathway from the Structure of A. aeolicus Argonaute with Externally Bound siRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan,Y.; Pei, Y.; Chen, H.; Tuschl, T.; Patel, D.

    2006-01-01

    Argonaute proteins are key components of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). They provide both architectural and catalytic functionalities associated with small interfering RNA (siRNA) guide strand recognition and subsequent guide strand-mediated cleavage of complementary mRNAs. We report on the 3.0 {angstrom} crystal structures of 22-mer and 26-mer siRNAs bound to Aquifex aeolicus Argonaute (Aa-Ago), where one 2 nt 3' overhang of the siRNA inserts into a cavity positioned on the outer surface of the PAZ-containing lobe of the bilobal Aa-Ago architecture. The first overhang nucleotide stacks over a tyrosine ring, while the second overhang nucleotide, together with the intervening sugar-phosphate backbone, inserts into a preformed surface cavity. Photochemical crosslinking studies on Aa-Ago with 5-iodoU-labeled single-stranded siRNA and siRNA duplex provide support for this externally bound siRNA-Aa-Ago complex. The structure and biochemical data together provide insights into a protein-RNA recognition event potentially associated with the RISC-loading pathway.

  15. RNA 3D modules in genome-wide predictions of RNA 2D structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theis, Corinna; Zirbel, Craig L; Zu Siederdissen, Christian Höner;

    2015-01-01

    Recent experimental and computational progress has revealed a large potential for RNA structure in the genome. This has been driven by computational strategies that exploit multiple genomes of related organisms to identify common sequences and secondary structures. However, these computational....... These modules can, for example, occur inside structural elements which in RNA 2D predictions appear as internal loops. Hence one question is if the use of such RNA 3D information can improve the prediction accuracy of RNA secondary structure at a genome-wide level. Here, we use RNAz in combination with...... below 25% when certain 3D module predictions are present in the window of the 2D prediction. We discuss the implications and prospects for further development of computational strategies for detection of RNA 2D structure in genomic sequence....

  16. Non-Watson Crick base pairs might stabilize RNA structural motifs in ribozymes – A comparative study of group-I intron structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    K Chandrasekhar; R Malathi

    2003-09-01

    In recent decades studies on RNA structure and function have gained significance due to discoveries on diversified functions of RNA. A common element for RNA secondary structure formed by series of non-Watson/Watson Crick base pairs, internal loops and pseudoknots have been the highlighting feature of recent structural determination of RNAs. The recent crystal structure of group-I introns has demonstrated that these might constitute RNA structural motifs in ribozymes, playing a crucial role in their enzymatic activity. To understand the functional significance of these non-canonical base pairs in catalytic RNA, we analysed the sequences of group-I introns from nuclear genes. The results suggest that they might form the building blocks of folded RNA motifs which are crucial to the catalytic activity of the ribozyme. The conservation of these, as observed from divergent organisms, argues for the presence of non-canonical base pairs as an important requisite for the structure and enzymatic property of ribozymes by enabling them to carry out functions such as replication, polymerase activity etc. in primordial conditions in the absence of proteins.

  17. Genetic diagnostic test of hepatocellular carcinoma by telomerase catalytic subunit mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, E; Hisatomi, H; Moritoyo, T; Kanamaru, T; Hikiji, K

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between telomerase activity and telomere length and between telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) mRNA and telomere length. Both cancerous and non-cancerous tissues were studied in individuals with hepatic carcinoma. In this study, the telomere length in HCC livers had a wide range, no clear significant correlation was found between hTERT mRNA and telomere length. Telomerase activity was more strongly correlated with hTERT mRNA than with telomere length. The correlation between hTERT mRNA and telomerase activity shown here indicates that hTERT mRNA has potential for cancer diagnosis. PMID:9769378

  18. Structural basis for catalytically restrictive dynamics of a high-energy enzyme state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovermann, Michael; Ådén, Jörgen; Grundström, Christin; Elisabeth Sauer-Eriksson, A.; Sauer, Uwe H.; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2015-07-01

    An emerging paradigm in enzymology is that transient high-energy structural states play crucial roles in enzymatic reaction cycles. Generally, these high-energy or `invisible' states cannot be studied directly at atomic resolution using existing structural and spectroscopic techniques owing to their low populations or short residence times. Here we report the direct NMR-based detection of the molecular topology and conformational dynamics of a catalytically indispensable high-energy state of an adenylate kinase variant. On the basis of matching energy barriers for conformational dynamics and catalytic turnover, it was found that the enzyme's catalytic activity is governed by its dynamic interconversion between the high-energy state and a ground state structure that was determined by X-ray crystallography. Our results show that it is possible to rationally tune enzymes' conformational dynamics and hence their catalytic power--a key aspect in rational design of enzymes catalysing novel reactions.

  19. A folding algorithm for extended RNA secondary structures

    OpenAIRE

    zu Siederdissen, Christian Höner; Bernhart, Stephan H.; Stadler, Peter F.; Hofacker, Ivo L.

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: RNA secondary structure contains many non-canonical base pairs of different pair families. Successful prediction of these structural features leads to improved secondary structures with applications in tertiary structure prediction and simultaneous folding and alignment. Results: We present a theoretical model capturing both RNA pair families and extended secondary structure motifs with shared nucleotides using 2-diagrams. We accompany this model with a number of programs for para...

  20. Dengue Virus RNA Structure Specialization Facilitates Host Adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    Villordo, Sergio M.; Filomatori, Claudia V.; Sánchez-Vargas, Irma; Blair, Carol D; Gamarnik, Andrea V.

    2015-01-01

    Many viral pathogens cycle between humans and insects. These viruses must have evolved strategies for rapid adaptation to different host environments. However, the mechanistic basis for the adaptation process remains poorly understood. To study the mosquito-human adaptation cycle, we examined changes in RNA structures of the dengue virus genome during host adaptation. Deep sequencing and RNA structure analysis, together with fitness evaluation, revealed a process of host specialization of RNA...

  1. BRASERO: A Resource for Benchmarking RNA Secondary Structure Comparison Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Chauve, Cedric; Allali, Julien; Saule, Cedric

    2012-01-01

    The pairwise comparison of RNA secondary structures is a fundamental problem, with direct application in mining databases for annotating putative noncoding RNA candidates in newly sequenced genomes. An increasing number of software tools are available for comparing RNA secondary structures, based on different models (such as ordered trees or forests, arc annotated sequences, and multilevel trees) and computational principles (edit distance, alignment). We describe here the website BRASERO tha...

  2. BRASERO: A Resource for Benchmarking RNA Secondary Structure Comparison Algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allali, Julien; Saule, Cédric; Chauve, Cédric; d'Aubenton-Carafa, Yves; Denise, Alain; Drevet, Christine; Ferraro, Pascal; Gautheret, Daniel; Herrbach, Claire; Leclerc, Fabrice; de Monte, Antoine; Ouangraoua, Aida; Sagot, Marie-France; Termier, Michel; Thermes, Claude; Touzet, Hélène

    2012-01-01

    The pairwise comparison of RNA secondary structures is a fundamental problem, with direct application in mining databases for annotating putative noncoding RNA candidates in newly sequenced genomes. An increasing number of software tools are available for comparing RNA secondary structures, based on different models (such as ordered trees or forests, arc annotated sequences, and multilevel trees) and computational principles (edit distance, alignment). We describe here the website BRASERO that offers tools for evaluating such software tools on real and synthetic datasets. PMID:22675348

  3. Structural Insights into tRNA Dynamics on the Ribosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xabier Agirrezabala

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution structures at different stages, as well as biochemical, single molecule and computational approaches have highlighted the elasticity of tRNA molecules when bound to the ribosome. It is well acknowledged that the inherent structural flexibility of the tRNA lies at the heart of the protein synthesis process. Here, we review the recent advances and describe considerations that the conformational changes of the tRNA molecules offer about the mechanisms grounded in translation.

  4. Structural Insights into tRNA Dynamics on the Ribosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agirrezabala, Xabier; Valle, Mikel

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution structures at different stages, as well as biochemical, single molecule and computational approaches have highlighted the elasticity of tRNA molecules when bound to the ribosome. It is well acknowledged that the inherent structural flexibility of the tRNA lies at the heart of the protein synthesis process. Here, we review the recent advances and describe considerations that the conformational changes of the tRNA molecules offer about the mechanisms grounded in translation. PMID:25941930

  5. Structural Insights into tRNA Dynamics on the Ribosome

    OpenAIRE

    Xabier Agirrezabala; Mikel Valle

    2015-01-01

    High-resolution structures at different stages, as well as biochemical, single molecule and computational approaches have highlighted the elasticity of tRNA molecules when bound to the ribosome. It is well acknowledged that the inherent structural flexibility of the tRNA lies at the heart of the protein synthesis process. Here, we review the recent advances and describe considerations that the conformational changes of the tRNA molecules offer about the mechanisms grounded in translation.

  6. Structural architecture of an RNA that competitively inhibits RNase L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keel, Amanda Y; Jha, Babal Kant; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2012-01-01

    Activation of RNase L endonuclease activity is part of the mammalian innate immune response to viral infection. The poliovirus RNA genome contains a sequence in its protein-coding region that can act as a competitive inhibitor of RNase L. Mutation, sequence, and functional analysis of this competitive inhibitor RNA (ciRNA) revealed that its activity depends on specific sequences, showed that a loop-loop hairpin interaction forms in the ciRNA, and suggested the presence of a loop E motif. These features lead to the hypothesis that the ciRNA's function is conferred in part by a specific three-dimensional folded RNA architecture. By using a combination of biophysical, mutational, and functional studies, we have mapped features of the three-dimensional architecture of the ciRNA in its unbound form. We show that the loop-loop interaction forms in the free ciRNA and affects the overall structure, perhaps forming long-range tertiary interactions with the loop E motif. Local tight RNA-RNA backbone packing occurs in parts of the structure, but the fold appears to be less stable than many other tightly packed RNAs. This feature may allow the ciRNA to accommodate the translocation of ribosomes and polymerase across this multifunctional region of the viral RNA but also to function as an RNase L inhibitor. PMID:22114318

  7. RNA Secondary Structure Modulates FMRP's Bi-Functional Role in the MicroRNA Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Phillip; Ceman, Stephanie

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs act by post-transcriptionally regulating the gene expression of 30%-60% of mammalian genomes. MicroRNAs are key regulators in all cellular processes, though the mechanism by which the cell activates or represses microRNA-mediated translational regulation is poorly understood. In this review, we discuss the RNA binding protein Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP) and its role in microRNA-mediated translational regulation. Historically, FMRP is known to function as a translational suppressor. However, emerging data suggests that FMRP has both an agonistic and antagonistic role in regulating microRNA-mediated translational suppression. This bi-functional role is dependent on FMRP's interaction with the RNA helicase Moloney leukemia virus 10 (MOV10), which modifies the structural landscape of bound mRNA, therefore facilitating or inhibiting its association with the RNA-Induced Silencing Complex. PMID:27338369

  8. Computational RNA secondary structure design: empirical complexity and improved methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Condon Anne

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We investigate the empirical complexity of the RNA secondary structure design problem, that is, the scaling of the typical difficulty of the design task for various classes of RNA structures as the size of the target structure is increased. The purpose of this work is to understand better the factors that make RNA structures hard to design for existing, high-performance algorithms. Such understanding provides the basis for improving the performance of one of the best algorithms for this problem, RNA-SSD, and for characterising its limitations. Results To gain insights into the practical complexity of the problem, we present a scaling analysis on random and biologically motivated structures using an improved version of the RNA-SSD algorithm, and also the RNAinverse algorithm from the Vienna package. Since primary structure constraints are relevant for designing RNA structures, we also investigate the correlation between the number and the location of the primary structure constraints when designing structures and the performance of the RNA-SSD algorithm. The scaling analysis on random and biologically motivated structures supports the hypothesis that the running time of both algorithms scales polynomially with the size of the structure. We also found that the algorithms are in general faster when constraints are placed only on paired bases in the structure. Furthermore, we prove that, according to the standard thermodynamic model, for some structures that the RNA-SSD algorithm was unable to design, there exists no sequence whose minimum free energy structure is the target structure. Conclusion Our analysis helps to better understand the strengths and limitations of both the RNA-SSD and RNAinverse algorithms, and suggests ways in which the performance of these algorithms can be further improved.

  9. Structure-function analysis of Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum RNA ligase – engineering a thermostable ATP independent enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhelkovsky Alexander M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA ligases are essential reagents for many methods in molecular biology including NextGen RNA sequencing. To prevent ligation of RNA to itself, ATP independent mutant ligases, defective in self-adenylation, are often used in combination with activated pre-adenylated linkers. It is important that these ligases not have de-adenylation activity, which can result in activation of RNA and formation of background ligation products. An additional useful feature is for the ligase to be active at elevated temperatures. This has the advantage or reducing preferences caused by structures of single-stranded substrates and linkers. Results To create an RNA ligase with these desirable properties we performed mutational analysis of the archaeal thermophilic RNA ligase from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum. We identified amino acids essential for ATP binding and reactivity but dispensable for phosphodiester bond formation with 5’ pre-adenylated donor substrate. The motif V lysine mutant (K246A showed reduced activity in the first two steps of ligation reaction. The mutant has full ligation activity with pre-adenylated substrates but retained the undesirable activity of deadenylation, which is the reverse of step 2 adenylation. A second mutant, an alanine substitution for the catalytic lysine in motif I (K97A abolished activity in the first two steps of the ligation reaction, but preserved wild type ligation activity in step 3. The activity of the K97A mutant is similar with either pre-adenylated RNA or single-stranded DNA (ssDNA as donor substrates but we observed two-fold preference for RNA as an acceptor substrate compared to ssDNA with an identical sequence. In contrast, truncated T4 RNA ligase 2, the commercial enzyme used in these applications, is significantly more active using pre-adenylated RNA as a donor compared to pre-adenylated ssDNA. However, the T4 RNA ligases are ineffective in ligating ssDNA acceptors. Conclusions

  10. The structure and role of RNA polymerases in Plasmodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzik, D J

    1991-08-01

    During the past few years the characterization of several Plasmodium falciparum RNA polymerase subunits has revealed potentially significant differences between the corresponding subunits of the host and parasite enzymes(1-3). The largest subunits of P. falciparum RNA polymerase II and III contain enlarged variable domains that separate conserved domains in these subunits. The partially characterized beta and beta '-like subunits of an organellar P. falciparum RNA polymerase also appear to be distinct from the host RNA polymerases. In this review David Bzik discusses the structure and role of RNA polymerases in Plasmodium. PMID:15463499

  11. Oscillatory Behavior during the Catalytic Partial Oxidation of Methane: Following Dynamic Structural Changes of Palladium Using the QEXAFS Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoetzel, Jan; Frahm, Ronald; Kimmerle, Bertram;

    2012-01-01

    Pd/Al2O3 catalysts oscillate between ignition and extinction of the catalytic partial oxidation of methane when they are exposed to a 2:1 reaction mixture of methane and oxygen. The oscillations of the catalytic performance and the structure of Pd/Al2O3 catalysts in a fixed-bed reactor were...... combination of total oxidation and reforming in the catalytic capillary reactor was observed. This change in catalytic performance was directly linked to changes in the oxidation state of the Pd/Al2O3 catalysts at different positions along the catalytic reactor. During the ignition of the catalytic partial...

  12. Protein–RNA interactions: a structural analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Susan; Daley, David T A; Luscombe, Nicholas M.; Berman, Helen M.; Thornton, Janet M.

    2001-01-01

    A detailed computational analysis of 32 protein–RNA complexes is presented. A number of physical and chemical properties of the intermolecular interfaces are calculated and compared with those observed in protein–double-stranded DNA and protein–single-stranded DNA complexes. The interface properties of the protein–RNA complexes reveal the diverse nature of the binding sites. van der Waals contacts played a more prevalent role than hydrogen bond contacts, and prefer...

  13. Conserved RNA secondary structures promote alternative splicing

    OpenAIRE

    Shepard, PJ; Hertel, KJ

    2008-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is carried out by the spliceosome, which identifies exons and removes intervening introns. Alternative splicing in higher eukaryotes results in the generation of multiple protein isoforms from gene transcripts. The extensive alternative splicing observed implies a flexibility of the spliceosome to identify exons within a given pre-mRNA. To reach this flexibility, splice-site selection in higher eukaryotes has evolved to depend on multiple parameters such as splice-site stren...

  14. Crystal structure of catalytic domain of the initiation factor 2B epsilon subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Thomas; Mohammad, Sarah S.; Pavitt, Graham D.; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF CATALYTIC DOMAIN OF THE INITIATION FACTOR 2B EPSILON SUBUNIT Thomas Boesen1,Sarah S. Mohammad2, Graham Pavitt2, and Gregers R. Andersen1* 1Department of Molecular Biology, University of Aarhus, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, DK-8000 Århus C, Denmark 2Department of Biomolecular Science...... of residues important for catalytic function and the location of residues for which mutations in humans give rise the the fatal brain disorder leukoencephalopathy with vanishing white matter....

  15. Designing novel synthetic enzyme-like structures with inducible dynamic catalytic properties

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, Michelle Lillian

    2012-01-01

    Over the past three decades considerable efforts have been made to create synthetic versions of enzymes, sometimes called synzymes. Most have failed, and the few so-called successes are at best only marginal exhibiting properties that can barely be described as catalytic. While these synthetic nano-structures look similar to the enzyme active site, they do not have the unique mechanical or dynamic catalytic properties to transform a substrate molecule into the desired product molecule with tu...

  16. Use of tiling array data and RNA secondary structure predictions to identify noncoding RNA genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weile, Christian; Gardner, Paul P; Hedegaard, Mads M;

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Within the last decade a large number of noncoding RNA genes have been identified, but this may only be the tip of the iceberg. Using comparative genomics a large number of sequences that have signals concordant with conserved RNA secondary structures have been discovered in the human...

  17. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatase-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swingle, M. R.; Honkanen, R.; Ciszak, E. M.

    2004-01-01

    Serinehhreonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) affects many signaling networks that regulate cell growth and cellular responses to stress. Here we report the crystal structure of the PP5 catalytic domain (PP5c) at a resolution of 1.6 A. From this structure we resolved the mechanism for PP5-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoprotein substrates, which requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a con served Aspn-271-M(sub 1):M(sub 2)-W(sup 1)-His-427-His-304-Asp-274 catalytic motif. The structure of PPSc provides a structural basis for explaining the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases, which are among the most powerful known catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of the PP5c should also aid development of type-specific inhibitors.

  18. Involvement of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and of HA95 in pre-mRNA splicing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is a holoenzyme consisting of two catalytic (C) subunits bound to a regulatory (R) subunit dimer. Stimulation by cAMP dissociates the holoenzyme and causes translocation to the nucleus of a fraction of the C subunit. Apart from transcription regulation, little is known about the function of the C subunit in the nucleus. In the present report, we show that both Cα and Cβ are localized to spots in the mammalian nucleus. Double immunofluorescence analysis of splicing factor SC35 with the C subunit indicated that these spots are splicing factor compartments (SFCs). Using the E1A in vivo splicing assay, we found that catalytically active C subunits regulate alternative splicing and phosphorylate several members of the SR-protein family of splicing factors in vitro. Furthermore, nuclear C subunits co-localize with the C subunit-binding protein homologous to AKAP95, HA95. HA95 also regulates E1A alternative splicing in vivo, apparently through its N-terminal domain. Localization of the C subunit to SFCs and the E1A splicing pattern were unaffected by cAMP stimulation. Our findings demonstrate that the nuclear PKA C subunit co-locates with HA95 in SFCs and regulates pre-mRNA splicing, possibly through a cAMP-independent mechanism

  19. Crystal structure and catalytic mechanism of pyridoxal kinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Meong Il; Hong, Minsun

    2016-09-01

    Pyridoxal kinase is a ubiquitous enzyme essential for pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP) homeostasis since PLP is required for the catalytic activity of a variety of PLP-dependent enzymes involved in amino acid, lipid, and sugar metabolism as well as neurotransmitter biosynthesis. Previously, two catalytic mechanisms were proposed with regard to Pdx kinases, in which either the aspartate or the cysteine residue is involved as a catalytic residue. Because the Pdx kinase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PaPdxK) contains both residues, the catalytic mechanism of PaPdxK remains elusive. To elucidate the substrate-recognition and catalytic mechanisms of PaPdxK, the crystal structure of PaPdxK was determined at a 2.0 Å resolution. The PaPdxK structure possesses a channel that can accommodate substrates and a metallic cofactor. Our structure-based biochemical and mutational analyses in combination with modeling studies suggest that PaPdxK catalysis is mediated by an acid-base mechanism through the catalytic acid Asp225 and a helical dipole moment. PMID:27425248

  20. Characterizing 3D RNA structure by single molecule FRET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, James D; Kenyon, Julia C; Symmons, Martyn F; Lever, Andrew M L

    2016-07-01

    The importance of elucidating the three dimensional structures of RNA molecules is becoming increasingly clear. However, traditional protein structural techniques such as NMR and X-ray crystallography have several important drawbacks when probing long RNA molecules. Single molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (smFRET) has emerged as a useful alternative as it allows native sequences to be probed in physiological conditions and allows multiple conformations to be probed simultaneously. This review serves to describe the method of generating a three dimensional RNA structure from smFRET data from the biochemical probing of the secondary structure to the computational refinement of the final model. PMID:26853327

  1. Mapping RNA–RNA interactome and RNA structure in vivo by MARIO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tri C.; Cao, Xiaoyi; Yu, Pengfei; Xiao, Shu; Lu, Jia; Biase, Fernando H.; Sridhar, Bharat; Huang, Norman; Zhang, Kang; Zhong, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    The pervasive transcription of our genome presents a possibility of revealing new genomic functions by investigating RNA interactions. Current methods for mapping RNA–RNA interactions have to rely on an ‘anchor' protein or RNA and often require molecular perturbations. Here we present the MARIO (Mapping RNA interactome in vivo) technology to massively reveal RNA–RNA interactions from unperturbed cells. We mapped tens of thousands of endogenous RNA–RNA interactions from mouse embryonic stem cells and brain. We validated seven interactions by RNA antisense purification and one interaction using single-molecule RNA–FISH. The experimentally derived RNA interactome is a scale-free network, which is not expected from currently perceived promiscuity in RNA–RNA interactions. Base pairing is observed at the interacting regions between long RNAs, including transposon transcripts, suggesting a class of regulatory sequences acting in trans. In addition, MARIO data reveal thousands of intra-molecule interactions, providing in vivo data on high-order RNA structures. PMID:27338251

  2. G–quadruplex RNA structure as a signal for neurite mRNA targeting

    OpenAIRE

    Subramanian, Murugan; Rage, Florence; Tabet, Ricardos; Flatter, Eric; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Moine, Hervé

    2011-01-01

    Guanine-quadruplex structures in the 3'-UTR of neuronal mRNAs are shown to function as a neurite mRNA localization signal in mouse cortical neurons in a metabotrobic glutamate receptor-responsive manner.

  3. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human SER/THR Protein Phosphatase-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swingle, M. R.; Honkanen, R.; Ciszak, E.

    2004-01-01

    Serinekhreonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) affects many signaling networks that regulate cell growth. Here we report the 1.6 Angstrom resolution crystal structure of PP5 catalytic domain with metal and phosphate ions in the active site. The structure reveals a mechanism for PPS-mediated catalysis that requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a conserved Asp(sup 271)-M(sub 1),-M(sub 2)-His(sup 427)-W(sup 2)-His(sup 304)-Asp(sup 274) catalytic motif, and provides a structural basis for the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases placing them among the most powerful catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of PP5 should aid development of specific inhibitors.

  4. RNA secondary structure prediction from multi-aligned sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Hamada, Michiaki

    2013-01-01

    It has been well accepted that the RNA secondary structures of most functional non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are closely related to their functions and are conserved during evolution. Hence, prediction of conserved secondary structures from evolutionarily related sequences is one important task in RNA bioinformatics; the methods are useful not only to further functional analyses of ncRNAs but also to improve the accuracy of secondary structure predictions and to find novel functional RNAs from the...

  5. Towards a structural understanding of IRES RNA function

    OpenAIRE

    Filbin, Megan E.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2009-01-01

    Protein synthesis of an RNA template can initiate by two different known mechanisms: cap-dependent translation initiation and cap-independent translation initiation. The latter is driven by RNA sequences called internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) that are found in both viral RNAs and cellular mRNAs. The diverse mechanisms used by IRESs are reflected in their structural diversity, and this structural diversity challenges us to develop a cohesive model linking IRES function to structure. With...

  6. Evolution of Tertiary Structure of Viral RNA Dependent Polymerases

    OpenAIRE

    Černý, Jiří; Černá Bolfíková, Barbora; Valdés, James J.; Grubhoffer, Libor; Růžek, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Viral RNA dependent polymerases (vRdPs) are present in all RNA viruses; unfortunately, their sequence similarity is too low for phylogenetic studies. Nevertheless, vRdP protein structures are remarkably conserved. In this study, we used the structural similarity of vRdPs to reconstruct their evolutionary history. The major strength of this work is in unifying sequence and structural data into a single quantitative phylogenetic analysis, using powerful a Bayesian approach. The resulting phylog...

  7. Structural models of vanadate-dependent haloperoxidases, their reactivity, immobilization on polymer support and catalytic activities

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Mannar R Maurya

    2011-03-01

    The design of structural and functional models of enzymes vanadate-dependent haloperoxidases (VHPO) and the isolation and/or generation of species having {VO(H2O)}, {VO2}, {VO(OH)} and {VO(O2)} cores, proposed as intermediate(s) during catalytic action, in solution have been studied. Catalytic potential of these complexes have been tested for oxo-transfer as well as oxidative bromination and sulfide oxidation reactions. Some of the oxidovanadium(IV) and dioxidovanadium(V) complexes have been immobilized on polymer support in order to improve their recycle ability during catalytic activities and turn over number. The formulations of the polymer-anchored complexes are based on the respective neat complexes and conclusions drawn from the various characterization studies. These catalysts have successfully been used for all catalytic reactions mentioned above. These catalysts are stable and recyclable.

  8. Structural Insights into the Catalytic Mechanism of Escherichia coli Selenophosphate Synthetase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noinaj, Nicholas; Wattanasak, Rut; Lee, Duck-Yeon; Wally, Jeremy L.; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Chock, P. Boon; Stadtman, Thressa C.; Buchanan, Susan K. (NIH)

    2012-03-26

    Selenophosphate synthetase (SPS) catalyzes the synthesis of selenophosphate, the selenium donor for the biosynthesis of selenocysteine and 2-selenouridine residues in seleno-tRNA. Selenocysteine, known as the 21st amino acid, is then incorporated into proteins during translation to form selenoproteins which serve a variety of cellular processes. SPS activity is dependent on both Mg{sup 2+} and K{sup +} and uses ATP, selenide, and water to catalyze the formation of AMP, orthophosphate, and selenophosphate. In this reaction, the gamma phosphate of ATP is transferred to the selenide to form selenophosphate, while ADP is hydrolyzed to form orthophosphate and AMP. Most of what is known about the function of SPS has derived from studies investigating Escherichia coli SPS (EcSPS) as a model system. Here we report the crystal structure of the C17S mutant of SPS from E. coli (EcSPS{sup C17S}) in apo form (without ATP bound). EcSPS{sup C17S} crystallizes as a homodimer, which was further characterized by analytical ultracentrifugation experiments. The glycine-rich N-terminal region (residues 1 through 47) was found in the open conformation and was mostly ordered in both structures, with a magnesium cofactor bound at the active site of each monomer involving conserved aspartate residues. Mutating these conserved residues (D51, D68, D91, and D227) along with N87, also found at the active site, to alanine completely abolished AMP production in our activity assays, highlighting their essential role for catalysis in EcSPS. Based on the structural and biochemical analysis of EcSPS reported here and using information obtained from similar studies done with SPS orthologs from Aquifex aeolicus and humans, we propose a catalytic mechanism for EcSPS-mediated selenophosphate synthesis.

  9. Combinatorics of RNA Secondary Structures with Base Triples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Robert; Nebel, Markus E

    2015-07-01

    The structure of RNA has been the subject of intense research over the last decades due to its importance for the correct functioning of RNA molecules in biological processes. Hence, a large number of models for RNA folding and corresponding algorithms for structure prediction have been developed. However, previous models often only consider base pairs, although every base is capable of up to three edge-to-edge interactions with other bases. Recently, Höner zu Siederdissen et al. presented an extended model of RNA secondary structure, including base triples together with a folding algorithm-the first thermodynamics-based algorithm that allows the prediction of secondary structures with base triples. In this article, we investigate the search space processed by this new algorithm, that is, the combinatorics of extended RNA secondary structures with base triples. We present generalized definitions for structural motifs like hairpins, stems, bulges, or interior loops occurring in structures with base triples. Furthermore, we prove precise asymptotic results for the number of different structures (size of search space) and expectations for various parameters associated with structural motifs (typical shape of folding). Our analysis shows that the asymptotic number of secondary structures of size n increases exponentially to [Formula: see text] compared to the classic model by Stein and Waterman for which [Formula: see text] structures exist. A comparison with the classic model reveals large deviations in the expected structural appearance, too. The inclusion of base triples constitutes a significant refinement of the combinatorial model of RNA secondary structure, which, by our findings, is quantitatively characterized. Our results are of special theoretical interest, because a closer look at the numbers involved suggests that extended RNA secondary structures constitute a new combinatorial class not bijective with any other combinatorial objects studied so far. PMID

  10. The 5'-3' Distance of RNA Secondary Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Hillary S W; Reidys, Christian

    2012-01-01

    this article, we compute the exact distribution of 5'-3' distances of RNA secondary structures for any finite n. Furthermore, we compute the limit distribution and show that for n = 30 the exact distribution and the limit distribution are very close. Our results show that the distances of random RNA...

  11. Crystal Structure of the Catalytic Domain of a Serine Threonine Protein Phosphatase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinglel, Mark; Honkanel, Richard; Ciszak, Ewa

    2003-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues is a well-recognized mechanism in eukaryotic cells for the regulation of cell-cycle progression, cell growth and metabolism. Human serine/threonine phosphatases can be placed into two major families, PPP and PPM. To date the structure on one PPP family member (PPl) has been determined. Here we present the structure of a 323-residue catalytic domain of a second phosphatase belonging to the PPP family of enzyme. catalytic domain of the enzyme has been determined to 1.60Angstrom resolution and refined to R=17.5 and Rfree = 20.8%. The catalytic domain possesses a unique fold consisting of a largely monolithic structure, divisible into closely-associated helical and sheet regions. The catalytic site contains two manganese ions that are involved in substrate binding and catalysis. The enzyme crystallizes as a dimer that completely buries catalytic surfaces of both monomers, Also, the structure shows evidence of some flexibility around the active site cleft that may be related to substrate specificity of this enzyme.

  12. Statistical mechanics of secondary structures formed by random RNA sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundschuh, Ralf

    2003-03-01

    In addition to its importance for the biological function of RNA molecules RNA secondary structure formation is an interesting system from the statistical physics point of view. The ensemble of secondary structures of random RNA sequences shows a rich phase diagram with distinct native, denatured, molten, and glassy phases separated by thermodynamical phase transitions. These phase transitions are driven by the competition between thermal fluctuations, the disorder frozen into the specific sequence of a given RNA molecule, and the evolutionary bias towards the formation of some biologically relevant structure. Yet, in contrast to the protein folding problem which is driven by very similar principles and shows a similar phase diagram RNA secondary structure formation can be represented by a simple diagrammatic language which allows the application of various analytical and numerical methods. This makes RNA secondary structure formation an ideal model system for heteropolymer folding. In the talk, I will characterize and explain the complex behaviour of RNA folding using several simple models and discuss possible implications to biological processes.

  13. Alterations in Lipoxygenase and Cyclooxygenase-2 Catalytic Activity and mRNA Expression in Prostate Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott B. Shappell

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies in prostate tissues and especially cell lines have suggested roles for arachidonic acid (AA metabolizing enzymes in prostate adenocarcinoma (Pca development or progression. The goal of this study was to more fully characterize lipoxygenase (LOX and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 gene expression and AA metabolism in benign and malignant prostate using snap-frozen tissues obtained intraoperatively and mRNA analyses and enzyme assays. Formation of 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE was detected in 23/29 benign samples and 15-LOX-2 mRNA was detected in 21/25 benign samples. In pairs of pure benign and Pca from the same patients, 15-HETE production and 15-LOX-2 mRNA were reduced in Pca versus benign in 9/14 (P=.04 and 14/17 (P=.002, respectively. Under the same conditions, neither 5HETE nor 12-HETE formation was detectable in 29 benign and 24 tumor samples; with a more sensitive assay, traces were detected in some samples, but there was no clear association with tumor tissue. COX-2 mRNA was detected by nuclease protection assay in 7/16 benign samples and 5/16 tumors. In benign and tumor pairs from 10 patients, COX-2 was higher in tumor versus benign in only 2, with similar results by in situ hybridization. Paraffin immunoperoxidase for COX2 was performed in whole mount sections from 87 additional radical prostatectomy specimens, with strong expression in ejaculatory duct as a positive control and corroboration with in situ hybridization. No immunostaining was detected in benign prostate or tumor in 45% of cases. Greater immunostaining in tumor versus benign was present in only 17% of cases, and correlated with high tumor grade (Gleason score 8 and 9 vs. 5 to 7. In conclusion, reduced 15-LOX-2 expression and 15-HETE formation is the most characteristic alteration of AA metabolism in Pca. Increased 12-HETE and 5-HETE formation in Pca were not discernible. Increased COX-2 expression is not a typical abnormality in Pca in general, but

  14. A method for rapid similarity analysis of RNA secondary structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Na

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Owing to the rapid expansion of RNA structure databases in recent years, efficient methods for structure comparison are in demand for function prediction and evolutionary analysis. Usually, the similarity of RNA secondary structures is evaluated based on tree models and dynamic programming algorithms. We present here a new method for the similarity analysis of RNA secondary structures. Results Three sets of real data have been used as input for the example applications. Set I includes the structures from 5S rRNAs. Set II includes the secondary structures from RNase P and RNase MRP. Set III includes the structures from 16S rRNAs. Reasonable phylogenetic trees are derived for these three sets of data by using our method. Moreover, our program runs faster as compared to some existing ones. Conclusion The famous Lempel-Ziv algorithm can efficiently extract the information on repeated patterns encoded in RNA secondary structures and makes our method an alternative to analyze the similarity of RNA secondary structures. This method will also be useful to researchers who are interested in evolutionary analysis.

  15. Structure of a mitochondrial ribosome with minimal RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Manjuli R; Booth, Timothy M; Simpson, Larry; Maslov, Dmitri A; Agrawal, Rajendra K

    2009-06-16

    The Leishmania tarentolae mitochondrial ribosome (Lmr) is a minimal ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-containing ribosome. We have obtained a cryo-EM map of the Lmr. The map reveals several features that have not been seen in previously-determined structures of eubacterial or eukaryotic (cytoplasmic or organellar) ribosomes to our knowledge. Comparisons of the Lmr map with X-ray crystallographic and cryo-EM maps of the eubacterial ribosomes and a cryo-EM map of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome show that (i) the overall structure of the Lmr is considerably more porous, (ii) the topology of the intersubunit space is significantly different, with fewer intersubunit bridges, but more tunnels, and (iii) several of the functionally-important rRNA regions, including the alpha-sarcin-ricin loop, have different relative positions within the structure. Furthermore, the major portions of the mRNA channel, the tRNA passage, and the nascent polypeptide exit tunnel contain Lmr-specific proteins, suggesting that the mechanisms for mRNA recruitment, tRNA interaction, and exiting of the nascent polypeptide in Lmr must differ markedly from the mechanisms deduced for ribosomes in other organisms. Our study identifies certain structural features that are characteristic solely of mitochondrial ribosomes and other features that are characteristic of both mitochondrial and chloroplast ribosomes (i.e., organellar ribosomes). PMID:19497863

  16. Quantifying sequence and structural features of protein-RNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Songling; Yamashita, Kazuo; Amada, Karlou Mar; Standley, Daron M

    2014-09-01

    Increasing awareness of the importance of protein-RNA interactions has motivated many approaches to predict residue-level RNA binding sites in proteins based on sequence or structural characteristics. Sequence-based predictors are usually high in sensitivity but low in specificity; conversely structure-based predictors tend to have high specificity, but lower sensitivity. Here we quantified the contribution of both sequence- and structure-based features as indicators of RNA-binding propensity using a machine-learning approach. In order to capture structural information for proteins without a known structure, we used homology modeling to extract the relevant structural features. Several novel and modified features enhanced the accuracy of residue-level RNA-binding propensity beyond what has been reported previously, including by meta-prediction servers. These features include: hidden Markov model-based evolutionary conservation, surface deformations based on the Laplacian norm formalism, and relative solvent accessibility partitioned into backbone and side chain contributions. We constructed a web server called aaRNA that implements the proposed method and demonstrate its use in identifying putative RNA binding sites. PMID:25063293

  17. Topological classification and enumeration of RNA structures by genus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard; Penner, Robert; Reidys, C. M.; Waterman, M.S.

    2013-01-01

    To an RNA pseudoknot structure is naturally associated a topological surface, which has its associated genus, and structures can thus be classified by the genus. Based on earlier work of Harer-Zagier, we compute the generating function for the number of those structures of fixed genus and minimum...

  18. Toward a structural understanding of IRES RNA function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filbin, Megan E; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2009-06-01

    Protein synthesis of an RNA template can start by two different known mechanisms: cap-dependent translation initiation and cap-independent translation initiation. The latter is driven by RNA sequences called internal ribosome entry sites (IRESs) that are found in both viral RNAs and cellular mRNAs. The diverse mechanisms used by IRESs are reflected in their structural diversity, and this structural diversity challenges us to develop a cohesive model linking IRES function to structure. With more direct structural information available for the viral IRESs, data suggest an inverse correlation between the degree to which an IRES RNA can form a stable structure on its own and the number of factors that it requires to function. Lessons learned from the viral IRESs may help understand the cellular IRESs, although more structural data are needed before any strong links can be made. PMID:19362464

  19. HD-RNAS: An automated hierarchical database of RNA structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubhra Sankar eRay

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available One of the important goals of most biological investigations is to classify and organize the experimental findings so that they are readily useful for deriving generalized rules. Although there is a huge amount of information on RNA structures in PDB, there are redundant files, ambiguous synthetic sequences etc. Moreover, a systematic hierarchical organization, reflecting RNA classification, is missing in PDB. In this investigation, we have classified all the available RNA crystal structures from PDB through a programmatic approach. Hence, it would be now a simple assignment to regularly update the classification as and when new structures are released. The classification can further determine (i a non-redundant set of RNA structures and (ii if available, a set of structures of identical sequence and function, which can highlight structural polymorphism, ligand-induced conformational alterations etc. Presently, we have classified the available structures (2095 PDB entries having RNA chain longer than 9 nucleotides solved by X-ray crystallography or NMR spectroscopy into nine functional classes. The structures of same function and same source are mostly seen to be similar with subtle differences depending on their functional complexation. The web-server is available online at http://www.saha.ac.in/biop/www/HD-RNAS.html and is updated regularly.

  20. Structure of human mitochondrial RNA polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    Ringel, Rieke; Sologub, Marina; Morozov, Yaroslav I.; Litonin, Dmitry; Cramer, Patrick; Temiakov, Dmitry

    2011-01-01

    Transcription of the mitochondrial genome is performed by a single-subunit RNA polymerase (mtRNAP) that is distantly related to the RNAP of bacteriophage T7, the pol I family of DNA polymerases, and single-subunit RNAPs from chloroplasts1, 2, 3, 4. Whereas T7 RNAP can initiate transcription by itself, mtRNAP requires the factors TFAM and TFB2M for binding and melting promoter DNA5, 6, 7. TFAM is an abundant protein that binds and bends promoter DNA 15–40 base pairs upstream of the transcripti...

  1. Insights into tRNA-Dependent Amidotransferase Evolution and Catalysis from the Structure of the Aquifex aeolicus Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Jing; Bu, Weishu; Sheppard, Kelly; Kitabatake, Makoto; Kwon, Suk-Tae; Söll, Dieter; Smith, Janet L.; (Yale); (Michigan); (Kyoto)

    2010-08-17

    Many bacteria form Gln-tRNA{sup Gln} and Asn-tRNA{sup ASN} by conversion of the misacylated Glu-tRNA{sup Gln} and Asp-tRNA{sup ASN} species catalyzed by the GatCAB amidotransferase in the presence of ATP and an amide donor (glutamine or asparagine). Here, we report the crystal structures of GatCAB from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus, complexed with glutamine, asparagine, aspartate, ADP, or ATP. In contrast to the Staphylococcus aureus GatCAB, the A. aeolicus enzyme formed acyl-enzyme intermediates with either glutamine or asparagine, in line with the equally facile use by the amidotransferase of these amino acids as amide donors in the transamidation reaction. A water-filled ammonia channel is open throughout the length of the A. aeolicus GatCAB from the GatA active site to the synthetase catalytic pocket in the B-subunit. A non-catalytic Zn{sup 2+} site in the A. aeolicus GatB stabilizes subunit contacts and the ammonia channel. Judged from sequence conservation in the known GatCAB sequences, the Zn{sup 2+} binding motif was likely present in the primordial GatB/E, but became lost in certain lineages (e.g., S. aureus GatB). Two divalent metal binding sites, one permanent and the other transient, are present in the catalytic pocket of the A. aeolicus GatB. The two sites enable GatCAB to first phosphorylate the misacylated tRNA substrate and then amidate the activated intermediate to form the cognate products, Gln-tRNA{sup Gln} or Asn-tRNA{sup ASN}.

  2. The 5'-3' distance of RNA secondary structures

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Hillary S W

    2011-01-01

    Recently Yoffe {\\it et al.} \\citep{Yoffe} observed that the average distances between 5'-3' ends of RNA molecules are very small and largely independent of sequence length. This observation is based on numerical computations as well as theoretical arguments maximizing certain entropy functionals. In this paper we compute the exact distribution of 5'-3' distances of RNA secondary structures for any finite $n$. We furthermore compute the limit distribution and show that already for $n=30$ the exact distribution and the limit distribution are very close. Our results show that the distances of random RNA secondary structures are distinctively lower than those of minimum free energy structures of random RNA sequences.

  3. Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, C.; Saini, A.; Huang, L.; Wenzel, K.; Hatcher, P.G.; Schobert, H.H.

    1992-01-01

    Low-temperature catalytic pretreatment is a promising approach to the development of an improved liquefaction process. This work is a fundamental study on effects of pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. The main objectives of this project are to study the coal structural changes induced by low-temperature catalytic and thermal pretreatments by using spectroscopic techniques; and to clarify the pretreatment-induced changes in reactivity or convertibility of coals in the subsequent liquefaction. This report describes the progress of our work during the first quarterly period. Substantial progress has been made in the spectroscopic characterization of fresh and THF-extracted samples of two subbituminous coals and fresh samples of three bituminous coals using cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CPMAS) solid state {sup 13}C NMR and pyrolysis-GC-MS techniques. CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR and pyrolysis-GC-MS provided important information on carbon distribution/functionality and molecular components/structural units, respectively, for these coal samples. Pyrolysis-GC-MS revealed that there are remarkable structural differences in structural units between the subbituminous coals and the bituminous coals. Furthermore, significant progress has been made in the pretreatments and spectroscopic characterization of catalytically and thermally pretreated as well as physically treated Wyodak subbituminous coal, and temperature-staged and temperature-programmed thermal and catalytic liquefaction of a Montana subbituminous coal.

  4. Structure of noncoding RNA is a determinant of function of RNA binding proteins in transcriptional regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyoshi Takanori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The majority of the noncoding regions of mammalian genomes have been found to be transcribed to generate noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs, resulting in intense interest in their biological roles. During the past decade, numerous ncRNAs and aptamers have been identified as regulators of transcription. 6S RNA, first described as a ncRNA in E. coli, mimics an open promoter structure, which has a large bulge with two hairpin/stalk structures that regulate transcription through interactions with RNA polymerase. B2 RNA, which has stem-loops and unstructured single-stranded regions, represses transcription of mRNA in response to various stresses, including heat shock in mouse cells. The interaction of TLS (translocated in liposarcoma with CBP/p300 was induced by ncRNAs that bind to TLS, and this in turn results in inhibition of CBP/p300 histone acetyltransferase (HAT activity in human cells. Transcription regulator EWS (Ewing's sarcoma, which is highly related to TLS, and TLS specifically bind to G-quadruplex structures in vitro. The carboxy terminus containing the Arg-Gly-Gly (RGG repeat domains in these proteins are necessary for cis-repression of transcription activation and HAT activity by the N-terminal glutamine-rich domain. Especially, the RGG domain in the carboxy terminus of EWS is important for the G-quadruplex specific binding. Together, these data suggest that functions of EWS and TLS are modulated by specific structures of ncRNAs.

  5. Strategies for measuring evolutionary conservation of RNA secondary structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofacker Ivo L

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolutionary conservation of RNA secondary structure is a typical feature of many functional non-coding RNAs. Since almost all of the available methods used for prediction and annotation of non-coding RNA genes rely on this evolutionary signature, accurate measures for structural conservation are essential. Results We systematically assessed the ability of various measures to detect conserved RNA structures in multiple sequence alignments. We tested three existing and eight novel strategies that are based on metrics of folding energies, metrics of single optimal structure predictions, and metrics of structure ensembles. We find that the folding energy based SCI score used in the RNAz program and a simple base-pair distance metric are by far the most accurate. The use of more complex metrics like for example tree editing does not improve performance. A variant of the SCI performed particularly well on highly conserved alignments and is thus a viable alternative when only little evolutionary information is available. Surprisingly, ensemble based methods that, in principle, could benefit from the additional information contained in sub-optimal structures, perform particularly poorly. As a general trend, we observed that methods that include a consensus structure prediction outperformed equivalent methods that only consider pairwise comparisons. Conclusion Structural conservation can be measured accurately with relatively simple and intuitive metrics. They have the potential to form the basis of future RNA gene finders, that face new challenges like finding lineage specific structures or detecting mis-aligned sequences.

  6. The Structural Basis of Ribozyme-Catalyzed RNA Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, M.P.; Scott, W.G.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2007-07-12

    Life originated, according to the RNA World hypothesis, from self-replicating ribozymes that catalyzed ligation of RNA fragments. We have solved the 2.6 angstrom crystal structure of a ligase ribozyme that catalyzes regiospecific formation of a 5' to 3' phosphodiester bond between the 5'-triphosphate and the 3'-hydroxyl termini of two RNA fragments. Invariant residues form tertiary contacts that stabilize a flexible stem of the ribozyme at the ligation site, where an essential magnesium ion coordinates three phosphates. The structure of the active site permits us to suggest how transition-state stabilization and a general base may catalyze the ligation reaction required for prebiotic RNA assembly.

  7. Picornavirus IRES elements: RNA structure and host protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Salas, Encarnación; Francisco-Velilla, Rosario; Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Lozano, Gloria; Diaz-Toledano, Rosa

    2015-08-01

    Internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements were discovered in picornaviruses. These elements are cis-acting RNA sequences that adopt diverse three-dimensional structures and recruit the translation machinery using a 5' end-independent mechanism assisted by a subset of translation initiation factors and various RNA binding proteins termed IRES transacting factors (ITAFs). Many of these factors suffer important modifications during infection including cleavage by picornavirus proteases, changes in the phosphorylation level and/or redistribution of the protein from the nuclear to the cytoplasm compartment. Picornavirus IRES are amongst the most potent elements described so far. However, given their large diversity and complexity, the mechanistic basis of its mode of action is not yet fully understood. This review is focused to describe recent advances on the studies of RNA structure and RNA-protein interactions modulating picornavirus IRES activity. PMID:25617758

  8. The Effect of Cytidine on the Structure and Function of an RNA Ligase Ribozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Jeff; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2001-01-01

    A cytidine-free ribozyme with RNA ligase activity was obtained by in vitro evolution, starting from a pool of random- sequence RNAs that contained only guanosine, adenosine, and uridine. This ribozyme contains 74 nt and catalyzes formation of a 3',5' -phosphodiester linkage with a catalytic rate of 0.016/min. The RNA adopts a simple secondary structure based on a three-way junction motif, with ligation occurring at the end of a stem region located several nucleotides away from the junction. Cytidine was introduced to the cytidine-free ribozyme in a combinatorial fashion and additional rounds of in vitro evolution were carried out to allow the molecule to adapt to this added component. The resulting cytidine-containing ribozyme formed a 3',5' linkage with a catalytic rate of 0.32/min. The improved rate of the cytidine-containing ribozyme was the result of 12 mutations, including seven added cytidines, that remodeled the internal bulge loops located adjacent to the three-way junction and stabilized the peripheral stem regions.

  9. Structure of the Cmr2 Subunit of the CRISPR-Cas RNA Silencing Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocozaki, Alexis I.; Ramia, Nancy F.; Shao, Yaming; Hale, Caryn R.; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.; Li, Hong (FSU); (Georgia)

    2012-08-10

    Cmr2 is the largest and an essential subunit of a CRISPR RNA-Cas protein complex (the Cmr complex) that cleaves foreign RNA to protect prokaryotes from invading genetic elements. Cmr2 is thought to be the catalytic subunit of the effector complex because of its N-terminal HD nuclease domain. Here, however, we report that the HD domain of Cmr2 is not required for cleavage by the complex in vitro. The 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of Pyrococcus furiosus Cmr2 (lacking the HD domain) reveals two adenylyl cyclase-like and two {alpha}-helical domains. The adenylyl cyclase-like domains are arranged as in homodimeric adenylyl cyclases and bind ADP and divalent metals. However, mutagenesis studies show that the metal- and ADP-coordinating residues of Cmr2 are also not critical for cleavage by the complex. Our findings suggest that another component provides the catalytic function and that the essential role by Cmr2 does not require the identified ADP- or metal-binding or HD domains in vitro.

  10. High-Throughput Sequencing Based Methods of RNA Structure Investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielpinski, Lukasz Jan

    In this thesis we describe the development of four related methods for RNA structure probing that utilize massive parallel sequencing. Using them, we were able to gather structural data for multiple, long molecules simultaneously. First, we have established an easy to follow experimental and...... RTTS-Seq to detect antisense oligonucleotide binding sites within a transcriptome. In this case, we applied an enrichment strategy to greatly reduce the background. Finally, we have modified the RTTS-Seq to study the secondary structure of 3’ untranslated regions. In the course of this thesis we...... computational protocol for detecting the reverse transcription termination sites (RTTS-Seq). This protocol was subsequently applied to hydroxyl radical footprinting of three dimensional RNA structures to give a probing signal that correlates well with the RNA backbone solvent accessibility. Moreover, we applied...

  11. Large finite size effects in RNA secondary structures

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, T; Liu, Tsunglin; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2003-01-01

    The ensemble of RNA secondary structures of uniform sequences is studied analytically. We calculate the partition function for very long sequences and discuss how the cross-over length, beyond which asymptotic scaling laws apply, depends on thermodynamic parameters. For realistic choices of parameters this length can be much longer than natural RNA molecules. This has to be taken into account when applying asymptotic theory to interpret experiments or numerical results.

  12. Distinctive structures between chimpanzee and humanin a brain noncoding RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Beniaminov, Artemy; Westhof, Eric; Krol, Alain

    2008-01-01

    Human accelerated region 1 (HAR1) is a short DNA region identified recently to have evolved the most rapidly among highly constrained regions since the divergence from our common ancestor with chimpanzee. It is transcribed as part of a noncoding RNA specifically expressed in the developing human neocortex. Employing a panoply of enzymatic and chemical probes, our analysis of HAR1 RNA proposed a secondary structure model differing from that published. Most surprisingly, we discovered that the ...

  13. Stochastic sampling of the RNA structural alignment space

    OpenAIRE

    Harmanci, Arif Ozgun; Sharma, Gaurav; Mathews, David H.

    2009-01-01

    A novel method is presented for predicting the common secondary structures and alignment of two homologous RNA sequences by sampling the ‘structural alignment’ space, i.e. the joint space of their alignments and common secondary structures. The structural alignment space is sampled according to a pseudo-Boltzmann distribution based on a pseudo-free energy change that combines base pairing probabilities from a thermodynamic model and alignment probabilities from a hidden Markov model. By virtu...

  14. A Model for Folding and Aggregation in RNA Secondary Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Guttal, V; Guttal, Vishwesha; Bundschuh, Ralf

    2006-01-01

    We study the statistical mechanics of RNA secondary structures designed to have an attraction between two different types of structures as a model system for heteropolymer aggregation. The competition between the branching entropy of the secondary structure and the energy gained by pairing drives the RNA to undergo a `temperature independent' second order phase transition from a molten to an aggregated phase'. The aggregated phase thus obtained has a macroscopically large number of contacts between different RNAs. The partition function scaling exponent for this phase is \\theta ~ 1/2 and the crossover exponent of the phase transition is \

  15. Crystal structure of 2-nitropropane dioxygenase complexed with FMN and substrate. Identification of the catalytic base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Jun Yong; Min, Ji Young; Lee, Su Kyung; Kim, Hyoun Sook; Kim, Do Jin; Kim, Kyoung Hoon; Lee, Hyung Ho; Kim, Hye Kyung; Yoon, Hye-Jin; Suh, Se Won

    2006-07-01

    Nitroalkane compounds are widely used in chemical industry and are also produced by microorganisms and plants. Some nitroalkanes have been demonstrated to be carcinogenic, and enzymatic oxidation of nitroalkanes is of considerable interest. 2-Nitropropane dioxygenases from Neurospora crassa and Williopsis mrakii (Hansenula mrakii), members of one family of the nitroalkane-oxidizing enzymes, contain FMN and FAD, respectively. The enzymatic oxidation of nitroalkanes by 2-nitropropane dioxygenase operates by an oxidase-style catalytic mechanism, which was recently shown to involve the formation of an anionic flavin semiquinone. This represents a unique case in which an anionic flavin semiquinone has been experimentally observed in the catalytic pathway for oxidation catalyzed by a flavin-dependent enzyme. Here we report the first crystal structure of 2-nitropropane dioxygenase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa in two forms: a binary complex with FMN and a ternary complex with both FMN and 2-nitropropane. The structure identifies His(152) as the proposed catalytic base, thus providing a structural framework for a better understanding of the catalytic mechanism. PMID:16682407

  16. Structural and thermodynamic signatures that define pseudotriloop RNA hairpins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. van der Werf (Ramon); S.S. Wijmenga (Sybren); H.A. Heus (Hans); R.C.L. Olsthoorn (René)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPseudotriloop (PTL) structures in RNAs have been recognized as essential elements in RNA folding and recognition of proteins. PTL structures are derived from hexaloops by formation of a cross-loop base pair leaving a triloop and 3′ bulged out residue. Despite their common presence and fu

  17. A comprehensive comparison of comparative RNA structure prediction approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gardner, P. P.; Giegerich, R.

    2004-01-01

    Background An increasing number of researchers have released novel RNA structure analysis and prediction algorithms for comparative approaches to structure prediction. Yet, independent benchmarking of these algorithms is rarely performed as is now common practice for protein-folding, gene-finding...

  18. RNA secondary structure diagrams for very large molecules: RNAfdl

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hecker, Nikolai; Wiegels, Tim; Torda, Andrew E.

    2013-01-01

    There are many programs that can read the secondary structure of an RNA molecule and draw a diagram, but hardly any that can cope with 10 3 bases. RNAfdl is slow but capable of producing intersection-free diagrams for ribosome-sized structures, has a graphical user interface for adjustments and...... produces output in common formats....

  19. The Crystal Structures of the Open and Catalytically Competent Closed Conformation of Escherichia coli Glycogen Synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Fang; Jia, Xiaofei; Yep, Alejandra; Preiss, Jack; Geiger, James H.; (MSU)

    2009-07-06

    Escherichia coli glycogen synthase (EcGS, EC 2.4.1.21) is a retaining glycosyltransferase (GT) that transfers glucose from adenosine diphosphate glucose to a glucan chain acceptor with retention of configuration at the anomeric carbon. EcGS belongs to the GT-B structural superfamily. Here we report several EcGS x-ray structures that together shed considerable light on the structure and function of these enzymes. The structure of the wild-type enzyme bound to ADP and glucose revealed a 15.2 degrees overall domain-domain closure and provided for the first time the structure of the catalytically active, closed conformation of a glycogen synthase. The main chain carbonyl group of His-161, Arg-300, and Lys-305 are suggested by the structure to act as critical catalytic residues in the transglycosylation. Glu-377, previously thought to be catalytic is found on the alpha-face of the glucose and plays an electrostatic role in the active site and as a glucose ring locator. This is also consistent with the structure of the EcGS(E377A)-ADP-HEPPSO complex where the glucose moiety is either absent or disordered in the active site

  20. Aspartoacylase catalytic deficiency as the cause of Canavan disease: a structural perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayasinghe, Yasanandana S; Pavlovsky, Alexander G; Viola, Ronald E

    2014-08-01

    Canavan disease (CD) is a fatal, childhood neurological disorder caused by mutations in the ASPA gene, leading to catalytic deficiencies in the aspartoacylase (ASPA) enzyme and impaired N-acetyl-l-aspartic acid metabolism in the brain. To study the possible structural defects triggered by these mutations, four ASPA missense mutations associated with different disease severities have been structurally characterized. These mutant enzymes each have overall structures similar to that of the native ASPA enzyme, but with varying degrees of alterations that offer explanations for the respective loss of catalytic activity. The K213E mutant, a nonconservative mutant associated with a mild disease phenotype, has minimal structural differences compared to the native enzyme. In contrast, the loss of van der Waals contacts in the F295S mutant and the loss of hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions in the Y231C mutant lead to a local collapse of the hydrophobic core structure in the carboxyl-terminal domain, contributing to a decrease in protein stability. The structure of the E285A mutant, the most common clinical mutant, reveals that the loss of hydrogen bonding interactions with the carboxylate side chain of Glu285 disturbs the active site architecture, leading to altered substrate binding and lower catalytic activity. Our improved understanding of the nature of these structural defects provides a basis for the development of treatment therapies for CD. PMID:25003821

  1. RNA structure and scalar coupling constants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinoco, I. Jr.; Cai, Z.; Hines, J.V.; Landry, S.M.; SantaLucia, J. Jr.; Shen, L.X.; Varani, G. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Signs and magnitudes of scalar coupling constants-spin-spin splittings-comprise a very large amount of data that can be used to establish the conformations of RNA molecules. Proton-proton and proton-phosphorus splittings have been used the most, but the availability of {sup 13}C-and {sup 15}N-labeled molecules allow many more coupling constants to be used for determining conformation. We will systematically consider the torsion angles that characterize a nucleotide unit and the coupling constants that depend on the values of these torsion angles. Karplus-type equations have been established relating many three-bond coupling constants to torsion angles. However, one- and two-bond coupling constants can also depend on conformation. Serianni and coworkers measured carbon-proton coupling constants in ribonucleosides and have calculated their values as a function of conformation. The signs of two-bond coupling can be very useful because it is easier to measure a sign than an accurate magnitude.

  2. Structure of the ATP Synthase Catalytic Complex (F1) from Escherichia coli in an Autoinhibited conformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G Cingolani; T Duncan

    2011-12-31

    ATP synthase is a membrane-bound rotary motor enzyme that is critical for cellular energy metabolism in all kingdoms of life. Despite conservation of its basic structure and function, autoinhibition by one of its rotary stalk subunits occurs in bacteria and chloroplasts but not in mitochondria. The crystal structure of the ATP synthase catalytic complex (F{sub 1}) from Escherichia coli described here reveals the structural basis for this inhibition. The C-terminal domain of subunit {var_epsilon} adopts a heretofore unknown, highly extended conformation that inserts deeply into the central cavity of the enzyme and engages both rotor and stator subunits in extensive contacts that are incompatible with functional rotation. As a result, the three catalytic subunits are stabilized in a set of conformations and rotational positions distinct from previous F{sub 1} structures.

  3. Structural and population genetic determinants of RNA secondary structure evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Piskol, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Since their discovery, RNA molecules have been shown to carry functions that extend far beyond their initially ascribed role as intermediates in protein biosynthesis. These noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) are involved in fundamental cellular processes including the regulation of gene expression and maintenance of genome stability. In most cases the biogenesis or function of the RNA molecule is only possible if the molecule folds into a characteristic two- and three-dimensional shape via formation of ...

  4. Structural Insights into the Polyphyletic Origins of Glycyl tRNA Synthetases*♦

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia-Sánchez, Marco Igor; Rodríguez-Hernández, Annia; Ferreira, Ruben; Santamaría-Suárez, Hugo Aníbal; Arciniega, Marcelino; Dock-Bregeon, Anne-Catherine; Moras, Dino; Beinsteiner, Brice; Brieba, Luis G.; Grøtli, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Glycyl tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) provides a unique case among class II aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, with two clearly widespread types of enzymes: a dimeric (α2) species present in some bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes; and a heterotetrameric form (α2β2) present in most bacteria. Although the differences between both types of GlyRS at the anticodon binding domain level are evident, the extent and implications of the variations in the catalytic domain have not been described, and it is unclear whether the mechanism of amino acid recognition is also dissimilar. Here, we show that the α-subunit of the α2β2 GlyRS from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus is able to perform the first step of the aminoacylation reaction, which involves the activation of the amino acid with ATP. The crystal structure of the α-subunit in the complex with an analog of glycyl adenylate at 2.8 Å resolution presents a conformational arrangement that properly positions the cognate amino acid. This work shows that glycine is recognized by a subset of different residues in the two types of GlyRS. A structural and sequence analysis of class II catalytic domains shows that bacterial GlyRS is closely related to alanyl tRNA synthetase, which led us to define a new subclassification of these ancient enzymes and to propose an evolutionary path of α2β2 GlyRS, convergent with α2 GlyRS and divergent from AlaRS, thus providing a possible explanation for the puzzling existence of two proteins sharing the same fold and function but not a common ancestor. PMID:27226617

  5. Structural Insights into the Polyphyletic Origins of Glycyl tRNA Synthetases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia-Sánchez, Marco Igor; Rodríguez-Hernández, Annia; Ferreira, Ruben; Santamaría-Suárez, Hugo Aníbal; Arciniega, Marcelino; Dock-Bregeon, Anne-Catherine; Moras, Dino; Beinsteiner, Brice; Mertens, Haydyn; Svergun, Dmitri; Brieba, Luis G; Grøtli, Morten; Torres-Larios, Alfredo

    2016-07-01

    Glycyl tRNA synthetase (GlyRS) provides a unique case among class II aminoacyl tRNA synthetases, with two clearly widespread types of enzymes: a dimeric (α2) species present in some bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes; and a heterotetrameric form (α2β2) present in most bacteria. Although the differences between both types of GlyRS at the anticodon binding domain level are evident, the extent and implications of the variations in the catalytic domain have not been described, and it is unclear whether the mechanism of amino acid recognition is also dissimilar. Here, we show that the α-subunit of the α2β2 GlyRS from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus is able to perform the first step of the aminoacylation reaction, which involves the activation of the amino acid with ATP. The crystal structure of the α-subunit in the complex with an analog of glycyl adenylate at 2.8 Å resolution presents a conformational arrangement that properly positions the cognate amino acid. This work shows that glycine is recognized by a subset of different residues in the two types of GlyRS. A structural and sequence analysis of class II catalytic domains shows that bacterial GlyRS is closely related to alanyl tRNA synthetase, which led us to define a new subclassification of these ancient enzymes and to propose an evolutionary path of α2β2 GlyRS, convergent with α2 GlyRS and divergent from AlaRS, thus providing a possible explanation for the puzzling existence of two proteins sharing the same fold and function but not a common ancestor. PMID:27226617

  6. Informatics guided discovery of surface structure-chemistry relationships in catalytic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A data driven discovery strategy based on statistical learning principles is used to discover new correlations between electronic structure and catalytic activity of metal surfaces. From the quantitative formulations derived from this informatics based model, a high throughput computational framework for predicting binding energy as a function of surface chemistry and adsorption configuration that bypasses the need for repeated electronic structure calculations has been developed

  7. X-ray Structure of Gelatinase A Catalytic Domain Complexed with a Hydroxamate Inhibitor

    OpenAIRE

    Dhanaraj, Venugopal; Williams, Mark G.; Ye, Qi-Zhuang; Molina, Franck; Linda L. Johnson; Ortwine, Daniel F.; Pavlovsky, Alexander; Rubin, J. Ron; Skeean, Richard W.; White, Andy D.; Humblet, Christine; Hupe, Donald J.; Tom L Blundell

    1999-01-01

    Gelatinase A is a key enzyme in the family of matrix metalloproteinases (matrixins) that are involved in the degradation of the extracellular matrix. As this process is an integral part of tumour cell metastasis and angiogenesis, gelatinase is an important target for therapeutic intervention. The X-ray crystal structure of the gelatinase A catalytic domain (GaCD) complexed with batimastat (BB94), a hydroxamate inhibitor, shows an active site with a large S1' specificity pocket. The structure ...

  8. Small-Pore Molecular Sieves SAPO-34 with Chabazite Structure: Theoretical Study of Silicon Incorporation and Interrelated Catalytic Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Lewis, James; Liu, Zhongmin

    2011-03-01

    The catalytic conversion of methonal to olefin (MTO) has attracted attention both in industrial and academic fields. Strong evidence shows that small-pore molecular sieves with certain amount silicon incorporated (SAPO) present promising high catalytic activity in MTO conversion. Using DFT, we study the structural and electronic properties of chabazite SAPO-34. Although there are extensively experimental results show that silicon incorporation does not change the overall structure as the original AlPO structure, local structural changes are still created by silicon substitution, which probably accounted for the high catalytic activity. It is noted that the catalytic activity of SAPO-34 presents increasing trend along with the silicon incorporation amount increasing and maintain a flat peak even with more silicon incorporated. Hence, there is an optimal silicon incorporation amount which possibly yields the highest catalytic MTO conversion.

  9. Evolutionary rate variation and RNA secondary structure prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, B; Andersen, E S; Damgaard, Christian Kroun;

    2004-01-01

    regions. In addition we obtained an alignment of the 5' HIV-1 region that is more consistent with the structure than that currently in the database. We added randomized noise to the original values of the rates to investigate the stability of predictions to rate matrix deviations. We find that changes...... by applying rates derived from tRNA and rRNA to the prediction of the much more rapidly evolving 5'-region of HIV-1. We find that the HIV-1 prediction is in agreement with experimental data, even though the relative evolutionary rate between A and G is significantly increased, both in stem and loop...... of approach. Determining these rates can be hard to do reliably without a large and accurate initial alignment, which ideally also has structural annotation. Hence, one must often apply rates extracted from other RNA families with trusted alignments and structures. Here, we investigate this problem...

  10. Two-dimensional structure Au nanosheets are super active for the catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan; Cui, Zhimin; Li, Lidong; Guo, Lin; Yang, Shihe

    2015-06-14

    Two-dimensional structure Au nanosheets with a polygon morphology and controlled thicknesses of ∼15 nm, ∼35 nm, and ∼50 nm were successfully synthesized by a one-step solution reduction method. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM), selected area electron diffraction (SEAD) analyses, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to thoroughly study the structure and the formation mechanism of the nanosheets. The catalytic activity of the Au nanosheets was investigated for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy. Against all expectation, the Au nanosheets with such a big lateral (more than 1 μm) size exhibited superior catalytic activity on the selective reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) to 4-aminophenol (4-AP) in the presence of NaBH4. On the other hand, the catalytic activity does closely depend on the thickness of the nanosheets; that is, it decreases with increasing thickness. The reaction can be completed in less than 1 min when catalyzed by Au nanosheets about 15 nm thick. The 100% conversion efficiency was further demonstrated after two catalytic cycles with the thinnest Au nanosheets. PMID:25971868

  11. Disease-associated mutations that alter the RNA structural ensemble.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Halvorsen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome-wide association studies (GWAS often identify disease-associated mutations in intergenic and non-coding regions of the genome. Given the high percentage of the human genome that is transcribed, we postulate that for some observed associations the disease phenotype is caused by a structural rearrangement in a regulatory region of the RNA transcript. To identify such mutations, we have performed a genome-wide analysis of all known disease-associated Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs from the Human Gene Mutation Database (HGMD that map to the untranslated regions (UTRs of a gene. Rather than using minimum free energy approaches (e.g. mFold, we use a partition function calculation that takes into consideration the ensemble of possible RNA conformations for a given sequence. We identified in the human genome disease-associated SNPs that significantly alter the global conformation of the UTR to which they map. For six disease-states (Hyperferritinemia Cataract Syndrome, beta-Thalassemia, Cartilage-Hair Hypoplasia, Retinoblastoma, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD, and Hypertension, we identified multiple SNPs in UTRs that alter the mRNA structural ensemble of the associated genes. Using a Boltzmann sampling procedure for sub-optimal RNA structures, we are able to characterize and visualize the nature of the conformational changes induced by the disease-associated mutations in the structural ensemble. We observe in several cases (specifically the 5' UTRs of FTL and RB1 SNP-induced conformational changes analogous to those observed in bacterial regulatory Riboswitches when specific ligands bind. We propose that the UTR and SNP combinations we identify constitute a "RiboSNitch," that is a regulatory RNA in which a specific SNP has a structural consequence that results in a disease phenotype. Our SNPfold algorithm can help identify RiboSNitches by leveraging GWAS data and an analysis of the mRNA structural ensemble.

  12. A phase transition in energy-filtered RNA secondary structures

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Hillary Siwei; Reidys, Christian

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study the effect of energy parameters on minimum free energy (mfe) RNA secondary structures. Employing a simplified combinatorial energy model, that is only dependent on the diagram representation and that is not sequence specific, we prove the following dichotomy result. Mfe structures derived via the Turner energy parameters contain only finitely many complex irreducible substructures and just minor parameter changes produce a class of mfe-structures that contain a large nu...

  13. Approaches to link RNA secondary structures with splicing regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plass, Mireya; Eyras, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    facilitating or hindering the interaction with factors and small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) that regulate splicing. Moreover, the secondary structure could play a fundamental role in the splicing of yeast species, which lack many of the regulatory splicing factors present in metazoans. This chapter......In higher eukaryotes, alternative splicing is usually regulated by protein factors, which bind to the pre-mRNA and affect the recognition of splicing signals. There is recent evidence that the secondary structure of the pre-mRNA may also play an important role in this process, either by...

  14. Structure and catalytic properties of magnesia-supported copper salts of molybdovanadophosphoric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guangdong; Yang, Xiaomei; Liu, Jie; Zhen, Kaiji; Wang, Haishui; Cheng, Tiexin

    2006-05-25

    The structure and stability of magnesia-supported copper salts of molybdovanadophosphoric acid (Cu(2)PMo(11)VO(40)) were characterized by different techniques. The catalyst was prepared in ethanol by impregnation because this solvent does not hurt texture of the water-sensitive MgO and Cu(2)PMo(11)VO(40). The Keggin-type structure compound may be degraded partially to form oligomerized polyoxometalate when supported on MgO. However, the oligomers can rebuild as the Keggin structure again after thermal treatment in air or during the reaction. Meanwhile, the V atoms migrate out of the Keggin structure to form a lacunary structure, as observed by Fourier transform IR spectroscopy. Moreover, the presence of Cu(2+) as a countercation showed an affirmative influence on the migration of V atoms, and the active sites derived from the lacunary species generated after release of V from the Keggin anion. The electron paramagnetic resonance data imply that V(5+) autoreduces to V(4+) in the fresh catalyst, and during the catalytic reaction a large number of V(4+) ions are produced, which enhance the formation of O(2-) vacancies around the metal atoms. These oxygen vacancies may also improve the reoxidation function of the catalyst. This behavior is correlated to higher catalytic properties of this catalyst. The oxidative dehydrogenation of hexanol to hexanal was studied over this catalyst. After reaction at 553.2 K for 50 h, catalytic properties did not decrease and exhibited higher selectivity (>96.0%) toward hexanal. PMID:16706435

  15. Structural Basis for Telomerase RNA Recognition and RNP Assembly by the Holoenzyme La Family Protein p65

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Mahavir; Wang, Zhonghua; Koo, Bon-Kyung; Patel, Anooj; Cascio, Duilio; Collins, Kathleen; Feigon, Juli (UCLA); (UCB)

    2012-07-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex essential for maintenance of telomere DNA at linear chromosome ends. The catalytic core of Tetrahymena telomerase comprises a ternary complex of telomerase RNA (TER), telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), and the essential La family protein p65. NMR and crystal structures of p65 C-terminal domain and its complex with stem IV of TER reveal that RNA recognition is achieved by a combination of single- and double-stranded RNA binding, which induces a 105{sup o} bend in TER. The domain is a cryptic, atypical RNA recognition motif with a disordered C-terminal extension that forms an {alpha} helix in the complex necessary for hierarchical assembly of TERT with p65-TER. This work provides the first structural insight into biogenesis and assembly of TER with a telomerase-specific protein. Additionally, our studies define a structurally homologous domain (xRRM) in genuine La and LARP7 proteins and suggest a general mode of RNA binding for biogenesis of their diverse RNA targets.

  16. Structure of the catalytic domain of Plasmodium falciparum ARF GTPase-activating protein (ARFGAP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, William J.; Senkovich, Olga; Chattopadhyay, Debasish (UAB)

    2012-03-26

    The crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the ADP ribosylation factor GTPase-activating protein (ARFGAP) from Plasmodium falciparum has been determined and refined to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution. Multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) data were collected utilizing the Zn{sup 2+} ion bound at the zinc-finger domain and were used to solve the structure. The overall structure of the domain is similar to those of mammalian ARFGAPs. However, several amino-acid residues in the area where GAP interacts with ARF1 differ in P. falciparum ARFGAP. Moreover, a number of residues that form the dimer interface in the crystal structure are unique in P. falciparum ARFGAP.

  17. Local Structural Alignment of RNA with Affine Gap Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Thomas K. F.; Cheung, Brenda W. Y.; Lam, T. W.; Yiu, S. M.

    Predicting new non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) of a family can be done by aligning the potential candidate with a member of the family with known sequence and secondary structure. Existing tools either only consider the sequence similarity or cannot handle local alignment with gaps. In this paper, we consider the problem of finding the optimal local structural alignment between a query RNA sequence (with known secondary structure) and a target sequence (with unknown secondary structure) with the affine gap penalty model. We provide the algorithm to solve the problem. Based on a preliminary experiment, we show that there are ncRNA families in which considering local structural alignment with gap penalty model can identify real hits more effectively than using global alignment or local alignment without gap penalty model.

  18. Comparing the three-dimensional structures of Dicistroviridae IGR IRES RNAs with other viral RNA structures

    OpenAIRE

    Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    The intergenic region (IGR) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs do not require any of the canonical translation initiation factors to recruit the ribosome to the viral RNA, they eliminate the need for initiator tRNA, and they begin translation from the A-site. The function of these IRESs depends on a specific three-dimensional folded RNA structure. Thus, a complete understanding of the mechanisms of action of these IRESs requires that we understand their structure in detail. Recently, th...

  19. Dissecting the chemical interactions and substrate structural signatures governing RNA polymerase II trigger loop closure by synthetic nucleic acid analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Liang; Butler, Kyle Vincent; Chong, Jenny; Wengel, Jesper; Kool, Eric T; Wang, Dong

    2014-01-01

    The trigger loop (TL) of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is a conserved structural motif that is crucial for Pol II catalytic activity and transcriptional fidelity. The TL remains in an inactive open conformation when the mismatched substrate is bound. In contrast, TL switches from an inactive open...... remains elusive. Here we employed synthetic nucleotide analogues as 'chemical mutation' tools coupling with α-amanitin transcription inhibition assay to systematically dissect the key chemical interactions and structural signatures governing the substrate-coupled TL closure in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pol...

  20. Structure, microstructure, and size dependent catalytic properties of nanostructured ruthenium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanostructured powders of ruthenium dioxide RuO2 were synthesized via a sol gel route involving acidic solutions with pH varying between 0.4 and 4.5. The RuO2 nanopowders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM). Rietveld refinement of mean crystal structure was performed on RuO2 nanopowders and crystallized standard RuO2 sample. Crystallite sizes measured from X-ray diffraction profiles and TEM analysis varied in the range of 4-10 nm, with a minimum of crystallite dimension for pH=1.5. A good agreement between crystallite sizes calculated from Williamson Hall approach of X-ray data and from direct TEM observations was obtained. The tetragonal crystal cell parameter (a) and cell volumes of nanostructured samples were characterized by values greater than the values of standard RuO2 sample. In addition, the [Ru-O6] oxygen octahedrons of rutile structure also depended on crystal size. Catalytic conversion of methane by these RuO2 nanostructured catalysts was studied as a function of pH, catalytic interaction time, air methane composition, and catalysis temperature, by the way of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy coupled to homemade catalytic cell. The catalytic efficiency defined as FTIR absorption band intensities I(CO2) was maximum for sample prepared at pH=1.5, and mainly correlated to crystallite dimensions. No significant catalytic effect was observed from sintered RuO2 samples. - Graphical abstract: Nanosized crystals of RuO2 prepared by sol gel route, at pH=0.4 and 1.5. Mean size values , respectively, 10 and 8 nm

  1. Structure, microstructure, and size dependent catalytic properties of nanostructured ruthenium dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowakowski, Pawel; Dallas, Jean-Pierre; Villain, Sylvie; Kopia, Agnieszka; Gavarri, Jean-Raymond

    2008-05-01

    Nanostructured powders of ruthenium dioxide RuO 2 were synthesized via a sol gel route involving acidic solutions with pH varying between 0.4 and 4.5. The RuO 2 nanopowders were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM). Rietveld refinement of mean crystal structure was performed on RuO 2 nanopowders and crystallized standard RuO 2 sample. Crystallite sizes measured from X-ray diffraction profiles and TEM analysis varied in the range of 4-10 nm, with a minimum of crystallite dimension for pH=1.5. A good agreement between crystallite sizes calculated from Williamson Hall approach of X-ray data and from direct TEM observations was obtained. The tetragonal crystal cell parameter (a) and cell volumes of nanostructured samples were characterized by values greater than the values of standard RuO 2 sample. In addition, the [Ru-O 6] oxygen octahedrons of rutile structure also depended on crystal size. Catalytic conversion of methane by these RuO 2 nanostructured catalysts was studied as a function of pH, catalytic interaction time, air methane composition, and catalysis temperature, by the way of Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy coupled to homemade catalytic cell. The catalytic efficiency defined as FTIR absorption band intensities I(CO 2) was maximum for sample prepared at pH=1.5, and mainly correlated to crystallite dimensions. No significant catalytic effect was observed from sintered RuO 2 samples.

  2. Structural basis of viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase catalysis and translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Bo; Gong, Peng

    2016-07-12

    Viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RdRPs) play essential roles in viral genome replication and transcription. We previously reported several structural states of the poliovirus RdRP nucleotide addition cycle (NAC) that revealed a unique palm domain-based active site closure mechanism and proposed a six-state NAC model including a hypothetical state representing translocation intermediates. Using the RdRP from another human enterovirus, enterovirus 71, here we report seven RdRP elongation complex structures derived from a crystal lattice that allows three NAC events. These structures suggested a key order of events in initial NTP binding and NTP-induced active site closure and revealed a bona fide translocation intermediate featuring asymmetric movement of the template-product duplex. Our work provides essential missing links in understanding NTP recognition and translocation mechanisms in viral RdRPs and emphasizes the uniqueness of the viral RdRPs compared with other processive polymerases. PMID:27339134

  3. RNAMotifScanX: a graph alignment approach for RNA structural motif identification

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Cuncong; Zhang, Shaojie

    2015-01-01

    RNA structural motifs are recurrent three-dimensional (3D) components found in the RNA architecture. These RNA structural motifs play important structural or functional roles and usually exhibit highly conserved 3D geometries and base-interaction patterns. Analysis of the RNA 3D structures and elucidation of their molecular functions heavily rely on efficient and accurate identification of these motifs. However, efficient RNA structural motif search tools are lacking due to the high complexit...

  4. In Situ Synthesis of Bimetallic Hybrid Nanocatalysts on a Paper-Structured Matrix for Catalytic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Koga

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Bimetallic nanoparticles have attracted significant attention as their electrochemical and catalytic properties being superior to those of the individual component nanoparticles. In this study, gold-silver hybrid nanoparticles (AuAgNPs with an Aucore-Agshell nanostructure were successfully synthesized on zinc oxide (ZnO whiskers. The as-prepared nanocatalyst, denoted AuAgNPs@ZnO whisker, exhibits an excellent catalytic efficiency in the aqueous reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol; the turnover frequency was up to 40 times higher than that of each component nanoparticle. Their unique features were attributed to the electronic ligand effect at the bimetallic interface. In addition, the AuAgNPs were synthesized on a ZnO whisker-containing paper with a fiber-network microstructure, which was prepared via a papermaking technique. The paper-structured AuAgNPs composite possessed both a paper-like practical utility and a good catalytic performance. Furthermore, the on-paper synthesis process for these bimetallic nanocatalysts is facile. These easy-to-handle nanocatalyst hybrid composites are expected to find a wide range of applications in various chemical and catalytic processes.

  5. On the effect of atomic structure on the deactivation of catalytic gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Here we present atomic scale studies into the nature of both the internal structure and external surfaces of catalytic Au nanoparticles using aberration corrected in-situ electron microscopy. The activity of catalytic nanoparticles is thought to be highly sensitive to the particles' structure, meaning typical local atomic rearrangements are likely to significantly affect the overall performance of the catalyst. As-deposited Au nanoparticles are found to exhibit a variety of morphologies, with many being internally strained or highly stepped at the surface. Upon heating, surface atoms are observed to minimise the particles' surface energy by restructuring towards planar (111) facets, resulting in the removal of low co-ordinated sites thought to be crucial in catalysis by Au nanoparticles. These results suggest the process of surface energy minimisation made possible by heating may lead to a loss of active sites and consequently contribute to the deactivation of the catalyst.

  6. Influence of Rare Earth Doping on the Structural and Catalytic Properties of Nanostructured Tin Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciel Adeilton

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractNanoparticles of tin oxide, doped with Ce and Y, were prepared using the polymeric precursor method. The structural variations of the tin oxide nanoparticles were characterized by means of nitrogen physisorption, carbon dioxide chemisorption, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The synthesized samples, undoped and doped with the rare earths, were used to promote the ethanol steam reforming reaction. The SnO2-based nanoparticles were shown to be active catalysts for the ethanol steam reforming. The surface properties, such as surface area, basicity/base strength distribution, and catalytic activity/selectivity, were influenced by the rare earth doping of SnO2and also by the annealing temperatures. Doping led to chemical and micro-structural variations at the surface of the SnO2particles. Changes in the catalytic properties of the samples, such as selectivity toward ethylene, may be ascribed to different dopings and annealing temperatures.

  7. Structure and function of C-terminal catalytic region of pasteurella multocida toxin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) is one of virulence factors responsible for the pathogenesis in some Pasteurellosis. We determined the crystal structure of the C-terminal region of PMT (C-PMT), which carries an intracellularly active moiety. The overall structure of C-PMT displays three different domains designated C1, C2 and C3. We found in the C3 domain the Cys-His-Asp catalytic triad that is organized only when the Cys is released from a disulfide bond. The steric alignment of the triad corresponded well to that of papain or other enzymes carrying the Cys-His-Asp triad. Our results demonstrate that PMT is an enzymatic toxin carrying the cysteine-protease like catalytic triad, which is organized only under reducing conditions. (author)

  8. Probing Structural and Catalytic Characteristics of Galactose Oxidase Confined in Nanoscale Chemical Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ikemoto, Hideki; Mossin, Susanne; Ulstrup, Jens;

    2014-01-01

    Galactose oxidase (GAOX) is a special metalloenzyme in terms of its active site structure and catalytic mechanisms. This work reports a study where the enzyme confined in a nanoscale chemical environment provided by mesoporous silicas (MPS) is probed. Two types of MPS, i.e. SBA-15 and MCF, were...... synthesized and used to accommodate GAOX. SBA-15-ROD is rod-shaped particles with periodically ordered nanopores (9.5 nm), while MCF has a mesocellular foam-like structure with randomly distributed pores (23 nm) interconnected by smaller windows (8.8 nm). GAOX is non-covalently confined in SBA-15- ROD, while...... Michaelis constant (KM) of the enzyme is largely unchanged upon immobilization, while the turnover number (kcat) is slightly reduced. The overall catalytic efficiency, represented by the ratio of kcat/KM, is retained around 70% and 60% for SBA-15 and MCF immobilization, respectively. The thermal resistance...

  9. Comparing the three-dimensional structures of Dicistroviridae IGR IRES RNAs with other viral RNA structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2009-02-01

    The intergenic region (IGR) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs do not require any of the canonical translation initiation factors to recruit the ribosome to the viral RNA, they eliminate the need for initiator tRNA, and they begin translation from the A-site. The function of these IRESs depends on a specific three-dimensional folded RNA structure. Thus, a complete understanding of the mechanisms of action of these IRESs requires that we understand their structure in detail. Recently, the structures of both domains of the IGR IRES RNAs were solved by X-ray crystallography, providing the first glimpse into an entire IRES RNA structure. Here, I present an analysis of these structures, emphasizing how the structures explain many aspects of IGR IRES function, discussing how these structures have similarities to motifs found in other viral RNAs, and illustrating how these structures give rise to new mechanistic hypotheses. PMID:18672012

  10. Modified siRNA Structure With a Single Nucleotide Bulge Overcomes Conventional siRNA-mediated Off-target Silencing

    OpenAIRE

    Dua, Pooja; Yoo, Jae Wook; Kim, Soyoun; Lee, Dong-ki

    2011-01-01

    Off-target gene silencing is a major concern when using RNA interference. Imperfect pairing of the antisense strand with unintended mRNA targets is one of the main causes of small interfering RNA (siRNA) off-target silencing. To overcome this, we have developed “bulge-siRNA,” a modified siRNA backbone structure with a single nucleotide (nt) bulge placed in the antisense strand. We found that siRNAs with a bulge at position 2 of the antisense strand were able to discriminate better between per...

  11. Quaternion representation of RNA sequences and tertiary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magarshak, Y

    1993-01-01

    A quaternion representation of nucleotides is proposed, with representation of RNA sequences by vectors whose elements are quaternions. Structure and transition matrices in quaternion representation are defined. Correspondence between diagrammatic technique in complex-number and quaternion representation of nucleotides is delineated. PMID:7690609

  12. Structural Insights into RNA Recognition by RIG-I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Dahai; Ding, Steve C.; Vela, Adriana; Kohlway, Andrew; Lindenbach, Brett D.; Pyle, Anna Marie (Yale)

    2011-10-27

    Intracellular RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs, including RIG-I, MDA-5, and LGP2) recognize viral RNAs as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) and initiate an antiviral immune response. To understand the molecular basis of this process, we determined the crystal structure of RIG-I in complex with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). The dsRNA is sheathed within a network of protein domains that include a conserved 'helicase' domain (regions HEL1 and HEL2), a specialized insertion domain (HEL2i), and a C-terminal regulatory domain (CTD). A V-shaped pincer connects HEL2 and the CTD by gripping an {alpha}-helical shaft that extends from HEL1. In this way, the pincer coordinates functions of all the domains and couples RNA binding with ATP hydrolysis. RIG-I falls within the Dicer-RIG-I clade of the superfamily 2 helicases, and this structure reveals complex interplay between motor domains, accessory mechanical domains, and RNA that has implications for understanding the nanomechanical function of this protein family and other ATPases more broadly.

  13. Structure-function Studies of Nucleocytoplasmic Transport of Retroviral Genomic RNA by mRNA Export Factor TAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M Teplova; L Wohlbold; N Khin; E Izaurralde; D Patel

    2011-12-31

    mRNA export is mediated by the TAP-p15 heterodimer, which belongs to the family of NTF2-like export receptors. TAP-p15 heterodimers also bind to the constitutive transport element (CTE) present in simian type D retroviral RNAs, and they mediate the export of viral unspliced RNAs to the host cytoplasm. We have solved the crystal structure of the RNA recognition and leucine-rich repeat motifs of TAP bound to one symmetrical half of the CTE RNA. L-shaped conformations of protein and RNA are involved in a mutual molecular embrace on complex formation. We have monitored the impact of structure-guided mutations on binding affinities in vitro and transport assays in vivo. Our studies define the principles by which CTE RNA subverts the mRNA export receptor TAP, thereby facilitating the nuclear export of viral genomic RNAs, and, more generally, provide insights on cargo RNA recognition by mRNA export receptors.

  14. MWW-type titanosilicate synthesis, structural modification and catalytic applications to green oxidations

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Peng; Xu, Le; Liu, Yueming; He, Mingyuan

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive review of a new generation of selective oxidation titanosilicate catalysts with the MWW topology (Ti-MWW) based on the research achievements of the past 12 years. It gives an overview of the synthesis, structure modification and catalytic properties of Ti-MWW. Ti-MWW can readily be prepared by means of direct hydrothermal synthesis with crystallization-supporting agents, using dual-structure-directing agents and a dry-gel conversion technique. It also can be post-synthesized through unique reversible structure transformation and liquid-phase isomorphous subst

  15. Expected distance between terminal nucleotides of RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clote, Peter; Ponty, Yann; Steyaert, Jean-Marc

    2012-09-01

    In "The ends of a large RNA molecule are necessarily close", Yoffe et al. (Nucleic Acids Res 39(1):292-299, 2011) used the programs RNAfold [resp. RNAsubopt] from Vienna RNA Package to calculate the distance between 5' and 3' ends of the minimum free energy secondary structure [resp. thermal equilibrium structures] of viral and random RNA sequences. Here, the 5'-3' distance is defined to be the length of the shortest path from 5' node to 3' node in the undirected graph, whose edge set consists of edges {i, i + 1} corresponding to covalent backbone bonds and of edges {i, j} corresponding to canonical base pairs. From repeated simulations and using a heuristic theoretical argument, Yoffe et al. conclude that the 5'-3' distance is less than a fixed constant, independent of RNA sequence length. In this paper, we provide a rigorous, mathematical framework to study the expected distance from 5' to 3' ends of an RNA sequence. We present recurrence relations that precisely define the expected distance from 5' to 3' ends of an RNA sequence, both for the Turner nearest neighbor energy model, as well as for a simple homopolymer model first defined by Stein and Waterman. We implement dynamic programming algorithms to compute (rather than approximate by repeated application of Vienna RNA Package) the expected distance between 5' and 3' ends of a given RNA sequence, with respect to the Turner energy model. Using methods of analytical combinatorics, that depend on complex analysis, we prove that the asymptotic expected 5'-3' distance of length n homopolymers is approximately equal to the constant 5.47211, while the asymptotic distance is 6.771096 if hairpins have a minimum of 3 unpaired bases and the probability that any two positions can form a base pair is 1/4. Finally, we analyze the 5'-3' distance for secondary structures from the STRAND database, and conclude that the 5'-3' distance is correlated with RNA sequence length. PMID:21984358

  16. Automated identification of RNA 3D modules with discriminative power in RNA structural alignments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theis, Corinna; Höner Zu Siederdissen, Christian; Hofacker, Ivo L; Gorodkin, Jan

    2013-12-01

    Recent progress in predicting RNA structure is moving towards filling the 'gap' in 2D RNA structure prediction where, for example, predicted internal loops often form non-canonical base pairs. This is increasingly recognized with the steady increase of known RNA 3D modules. There is a general interest in matching structural modules known from one molecule to other molecules for which the 3D structure is not known yet. We have created a pipeline, metaRNAmodules, which completely automates extracting putative modules from the FR3D database and mapping of such modules to Rfam alignments to obtain comparative evidence. Subsequently, the modules, initially represented by a graph, are turned into models for the RMDetect program, which allows to test their discriminative power using real and randomized Rfam alignments. An initial extraction of 22 495 3D modules in all PDB files results in 977 internal loop and 17 hairpin modules with clear discriminatory power. Many of these modules describe only minor variants of each other. Indeed, mapping of the modules onto Rfam families results in 35 unique locations in 11 different families. The metaRNAmodules pipeline source for the internal loop modules is available at http://rth.dk/resources/mrm. PMID:24005040

  17. Modulation of RNA function by aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    OpenAIRE

    Schroeder, R; Waldsich, C; Wank, H

    2000-01-01

    One of the most important families of antibiotics are the aminoglycosides, including drugs such as neomycin B, paromomycin, gentamicin and streptomycin. With the discovery of the catalytic potential of RNA, these antibiotics became very popular due to their RNA-binding capacity. They serve for the analysis of RNA function as well as for the study of RNA as a potential therapeutic target. Improvements in RNA structure determination recently provided first insights into the decoding site of the...

  18. Ensemble-based prediction of RNA secondary structures

    OpenAIRE

    Aghaeepour, Nima; Hoos, Holger H

    2013-01-01

    Background Accurate structure prediction methods play an important role for the understanding of RNA function. Energy-based, pseudoknot-free secondary structure prediction is one of the most widely used and versatile approaches, and improved methods for this task have received much attention over the past five years. Despite the impressive progress that as been achieved in this area, existing evaluations of the prediction accuracy achieved by various algorithms do not provide a comprehensive,...

  19. Quantitative DMS mapping for automated RNA secondary structure inference

    OpenAIRE

    Cordero, Pablo; Kladwang, Wipapat; VanLang, Christopher C.; Das, Rhiju

    2012-01-01

    For decades, dimethyl sulfate (DMS) mapping has informed manual modeling of RNA structure in vitro and in vivo. Here, we incorporate DMS data into automated secondary structure inference using a pseudo-energy framework developed for 2'-OH acylation (SHAPE) mapping. On six non-coding RNAs with crystallographic models, DMS- guided modeling achieves overall false negative and false discovery rates of 9.5% and 11.6%, comparable or better than SHAPE-guided modeling; and non-parametric bootstrappin...

  20. Integrating chemical footprinting data into RNA secondary structure prediction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kourosh Zarringhalam

    Full Text Available Chemical and enzymatic footprinting experiments, such as shape (selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension, yield important information about RNA secondary structure. Indeed, since the [Formula: see text]-hydroxyl is reactive at flexible (loop regions, but unreactive at base-paired regions, shape yields quantitative data about which RNA nucleotides are base-paired. Recently, low error rates in secondary structure prediction have been reported for three RNAs of moderate size, by including base stacking pseudo-energy terms derived from shape data into the computation of minimum free energy secondary structure. Here, we describe a novel method, RNAsc (RNA soft constraints, which includes pseudo-energy terms for each nucleotide position, rather than only for base stacking positions. We prove that RNAsc is self-consistent, in the sense that the nucleotide-specific probabilities of being unpaired in the low energy Boltzmann ensemble always become more closely correlated with the input shape data after application of RNAsc. From this mathematical perspective, the secondary structure predicted by RNAsc should be 'correct', in as much as the shape data is 'correct'. We benchmark RNAsc against the previously mentioned method for eight RNAs, for which both shape data and native structures are known, to find the same accuracy in 7 out of 8 cases, and an improvement of 25% in one case. Furthermore, we present what appears to be the first direct comparison of shape data and in-line probing data, by comparing yeast asp-tRNA shape data from the literature with data from in-line probing experiments we have recently performed. With respect to several criteria, we find that shape data appear to be more robust than in-line probing data, at least in the case of asp-tRNA.

  1. Modulation of Aminoacylation and Editing Properties of Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase by a Conserved Structural Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei; Ye, Qing; Tan, Min; Chen, Xi; Eriani, Gilbert; Wang, En-Duo

    2015-05-01

    A conserved structural module following the KMSKS catalytic loop exhibits α-α-β-α topology in class Ia and Ib aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases. However, the function of this domain has received little attention. Here, we describe the effect this module has on the aminoacylation and editing capacities of leucyl-tRNA synthetases (LeuRSs) by characterizing the key residues from various species. Mutation of highly conserved basic residues on the third α-helix of this domain impairs the affinity of LeuRS for the anticodon stem of tRNA(Leu), which decreases both aminoacylation and editing activities. Two glycine residues on this α-helix contribute to flexibility, leucine activation, and editing of LeuRS from Escherichia coli (EcLeuRS). Acidic residues on the β-strand enhance the editing activity of EcLeuRS and sense the size of the tRNA(Leu) D-loop. Incorporation of these residues stimulates the tRNA-dependent editing activity of the chimeric minimalist enzyme Mycoplasma mobile LeuRS fused to the connective polypeptide 1 editing domain and leucine-specific domain from EcLeuRS. Together, these results reveal the stem contact-fold to be a functional as well as a structural linker between the catalytic site and the tRNA binding domain. Sequence comparison of the EcLeuRS stem contact-fold domain with editing-deficient enzymes suggests that key residues of this module have evolved an adaptive strategy to follow the editing functions of LeuRS. PMID:25817995

  2. Canonical RNA Pseudoknot Structures with Arc Length $\\geq 4$

    CERN Document Server

    Reidys, Christian M; Zhao, Albus Y Y

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we compute the generating function of the arguably most important target class of folding algorithms into RNA pseudoknot structures. This class consists of $k$-noncrossing, canonical RNA structures having minimum arc length four and generalizes directly the canonical secondary structures, studied by Schuster {\\it et al.} \\cite{Schuster:98}. The combinatorics of this class is important since, in analogy to the case of secondary structures, generic properties of genotype phenotype maps into RNA pseudoknot structures, like shape space covering \\cite{Schuster:94} and neutral networks \\cite{Reidys:97a} are a result of the combinatorics and not of the particulars of energy parameters. Let ${\\sf Q}_k(n)$ denote the number of these structures over $n$ vertices. We derive exact enumeration results as well as the asymptotic formula ${\\sf Q}_k(n)\\sim c_k n^{-(k-1)^2-\\frac{k-1}{2}}(\\gamma_{\\theta,k})^{-n}$ for $k=3, ..., 9$ and derive a new proof of Schuster's result, ${\\sf Q}_2(n)\\sim 1.4848\\, n^{-3/2}\\,1...

  3. Structure of a mitochondrial ribosome with minimal RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Sharma, Manjuli R.; Booth, Timothy M.; Simpson, Larry; Maslov, Dmitri A.; Agrawal, Rajendra K.

    2009-01-01

    The Leishmania tarentolae mitochondrial ribosome (Lmr) is a minimal ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-containing ribosome. We have obtained a cryo-EM map of the Lmr. The map reveals several features that have not been seen in previously-determined structures of eubacterial or eukaryotic (cytoplasmic or organellar) ribosomes to our knowledge. Comparisons of the Lmr map with X-ray crystallographic and cryo-EM maps of the eubacterial ribosomes and a cryo-EM map of the mammalian mitochondrial ribosome show th...

  4. Visualizing transient low-populated structures of RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dethoff, Elizabeth A; Petzold, Katja; Chugh, Jeetender; Casiano-Negroni, Anette; Al-Hashimi, Hashim M

    2012-11-29

    The visualization of RNA conformational changes has provided fundamental insights into how regulatory RNAs carry out their biological functions. The RNA structural transitions that have been characterized so far involve long-lived species that can be captured by structure characterization techniques. Here we report the nuclear magnetic resonance visualization of RNA transitions towards 'invisible' excited states (ESs), which exist in too little abundance (2-13%) and for too short a duration (45-250 μs) to allow structural characterization by conventional techniques. Transitions towards ESs result in localized rearrangements in base-pairing that alter building block elements of RNA architecture, including helix-junction-helix motifs and apical loops. The ES can inhibit function by sequestering residues involved in recognition and signalling or promote ATP-independent strand exchange. Thus, RNAs do not adopt a single conformation, but rather exist in rapid equilibrium with alternative ESs, which can be stabilized by cellular cues to affect functional outcomes. PMID:23041928

  5. Structure of the RNA-Binding Domain of Telomerase: Implications For RNA Recognition and Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rouda,S.; Skordalakes, E.

    2007-01-01

    Telomerase, a ribonucleoprotein complex, replicates the linear ends of eukaryotic chromosomes, thus taking care of the 'end of replication problem.' TERT contains an essential and universally conserved domain (TRBD) that makes extensive contacts with the RNA (TER) component of the holoenzyme, and this interaction is thought to facilitate TERT/TER assembly and repeat-addition processivity. Here, we present a high-resolution structure of TRBD from Tetrahymena thermophila. The nearly all-helical structure comprises a nucleic acid-binding fold suitable for TER binding. An extended pocket on the surface of the protein, formed by two conserved motifs (CP and T motifs) comprises TRBD's RNA-binding pocket. The width and the chemical nature of this pocket suggest that it binds both single- and double-stranded RNA, possibly stem I, and the template boundary element (TBE). Moreover, the structure provides clues into the role of this domain in TERT/TER stabilization and telomerase repeat-addition processivity.

  6. Random generation of RNA secondary structures according to native distributions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nebel Markus E

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Random biological sequences are a topic of great interest in genome analysis since, according to a powerful paradigm, they represent the background noise from which the actual biological information must differentiate. Accordingly, the generation of random sequences has been investigated for a long time. Similarly, random object of a more complicated structure like RNA molecules or proteins are of interest. Results In this article, we present a new general framework for deriving algorithms for the non-uniform random generation of combinatorial objects according to the encoding and probability distribution implied by a stochastic context-free grammar. Briefly, the framework extends on the well-known recursive method for (uniform random generation and uses the popular framework of admissible specifications of combinatorial classes, introducing weighted combinatorial classes to allow for the non-uniform generation by means of unranking. This framework is used to derive an algorithm for the generation of RNA secondary structures of a given fixed size. We address the random generation of these structures according to a realistic distribution obtained from real-life data by using a very detailed context-free grammar (that models the class of RNA secondary structures by distinguishing between all known motifs in RNA structure. Compared to well-known sampling approaches used in several structure prediction tools (such as SFold ours has two major advantages: Firstly, after a preprocessing step in time O(n2 for the computation of all weighted class sizes needed, with our approach a set of m random secondary structures of a given structure size n can be computed in worst-case time complexity Om⋅n⋅ log(n while other algorithms typically have a runtime in O(m⋅n2. Secondly, our approach works with integer arithmetic only which is faster and saves us from all the discomforting details of using floating point arithmetic with

  7. Structural and kinetic contributions of the oxyanion binding site to the catalytic activity of acylaminoacyl peptidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, András L; Palló, Anna; Náray-Szabó, Gábor; Harmat, Veronika; Polgár, László

    2008-05-01

    It is widely accepted that the catalytic activity of serine proteases depends primarily on the Asp-His-Ser catalytic triad and other residues within the vicinity of this motif. Some of these residues form the oxyanion binding site that stabilizes the tetrahedral intermediate by hydrogen bonding to the negatively charged oxyanion. In acylaminoacyl peptidase from the thermophile Aeropyrum pernix, the main chain NH group of Gly369 is one of the hydrogen bond donors forming the oxyanion binding site. The side chain of His367, a conserved residue in acylaminoacyl peptidases across all species, fastens the loop holding Gly369. Determination of the crystal structure of the H367A mutant revealed that this loop, including Gly369, moves away considerably, accounting for the observed three orders of magnitude decrease in the specificity rate constant. For the wild-type enzyme ln(k(cat)/K(m)) vs. 1/T deviates from linearity indicating greater rate enhancement with increasing temperature for the dissociation of the enzyme-substrate complex compared with its decomposition to product. In contrast, the H367A variant provided a linear Arrhenius plot, and its reaction was associated with unfavourable entropy of activation. These results show that a residue relatively distant from the active site can significantly affect the catalytic activity of acylaminoacyl peptidase without changing the overall structure of the enzyme. PMID:18325786

  8. Structure and catalytic properties of metal β-diketonate complexes with oxygen-containing compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of researches published in recent 15-20 years of complexes of metal β-diketonates (including Cr3+, VO2+, MoOΛ22+, Co3+, Mn3+, Ni2+, Fe3+) with oxygen-containing compounds (alcohols, glycols, phenols, hydroperoxides, aldehydes, esters, etc.) playing an important role in catalytic processes of oxidation, addition, polymerization and copolymerization are reviewed. Data on the nature of chemical bond of oxygen-containing reacting agents with metal β-diketonates, on structure of metal β-diketonate complexes with oxygen-containing reacting agents and thermodynamics of complexing as well as on activation of reacting agents in complexes and catalytic properties of metal β-diketonates are discussed. Stored materials make it possible to exercise directed control of metal β-diketonate activity

  9. Structural features of HNb3O8 nanosheets and their catalytic performance in toluene nitration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Pan; Li, Qingjie; He, Jie; Li, Dewei; Li, Zhong

    2015-11-01

    HNb3O8 nanosheet aggregates ( e-HNb3O8) were prepared by exfoliation and aggregation of layered HNb3O8, which was obtained by protonation of KNb3O8. Especially, in this research, KNb3O8 was synthesized through a novel polymerized complex method (PC) from niobium oxalate. The as-prepared samples were characterized by SEM, HRTEM, XRD, LRS, NH3-TPD, and FT-IR methods. The toluene nitration was used to evaluate the acid catalytic performance of HNb3O8 and e-HNb3O8 samples. The catalytic activity in toluene nitration was related to the structure and acidity of the as-prepared samples. The results show that e-HNb3O8 has a higher specific surface area, stronger acidity and better para-selectivity than the precursor HNb3O8.

  10. The crystal structure of the catalytic domain of a eukaryotic guanylate cyclase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marletta Michael A

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Soluble guanylate cyclases generate cyclic GMP when bound to nitric oxide, thereby linking nitric oxide levels to the control of processes such as vascular homeostasis and neurotransmission. The guanylate cyclase catalytic module, for which no structure has been determined at present, is a class III nucleotide cyclase domain that is also found in mammalian membrane-bound guanylate and adenylate cyclases. Results We have determined the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of a soluble guanylate cyclase from the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii at 2.55 Å resolution, and show that it is a dimeric molecule. Conclusion Comparison of the structure of the guanylate cyclase domain with the known structures of adenylate cyclases confirms the close similarity in architecture between these two enzymes, as expected from their sequence similarity. The comparison also suggests that the crystallized guanylate cyclase is in an inactive conformation, and the structure provides indications as to how activation might occur. We demonstrate that the two active sites in the dimer exhibit positive cooperativity, with a Hill coefficient of ~1.5. Positive cooperativity has also been observed in the homodimeric mammalian membrane-bound guanylate cyclases. The structure described here provides a reliable model for functional analysis of mammalian guanylate cyclases, which are closely related in sequence.

  11. Crystal Structure of a Novel Viral Protease with a Serine/Lysine Catalytic Dyad Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman,A.; Lee, J.; Delmas, B.; Paetzel, M.

    2006-01-01

    The blotched snakehead virus (BSNV), an aquatic birnavirus, encodes a polyprotein (NH2-pVP2-X-VP4-VP3-COOH) that is processed through the proteolytic activity of its own protease (VP4) to liberate itself and the viral proteins pVP2, X and VP3. The protein pVP2 is further processed by VP4 to give rise to the capsid protein VP2 and four structural peptides. We report here the crystal structure of a VP4 protease from BSNV, which displays a catalytic serine/lysine dyad in its active site. This is the first crystal structure of a birnavirus protease and the first crystal structure of a viral protease that utilizes a lysine general base in its catalytic mechanism. The topology of the VP4 substrate binding site is consistent with the enzymes substrate specificity and a nucleophilic attack from the si-face of the substrates scissile bond. Despite low levels of sequence identity, VP4 shows similarities in its active site to other characterized Ser/Lys proteases such as signal peptidase, LexA protease and Lon protease. Together, the structure of VP4 provides insights into the mechanism of a recently characterized clan of serine proteases that utilize a lysine general base and reveals the structure of potential targets for antiviral therapy, especially for other related and economically important viruses, such as infectious bursal disease virus in poultry and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus in aquaculture.

  12. Structural evidence for a programmed general base in the active site of a catalytic antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Golinelli-Pimpaneau, Béatrice; Gonçalves, Olivier; Dintinger, Thierry; Blanchard, Dominique; Knossow, Marcel; Tellier, Charles

    2000-01-01

    The crystal structure of the complex of a catalytic antibody with its cationic hapten at 1.9-Å resolution demonstrates that the hapten amidinium group is stabilized through an ionic pair interaction with the carboxylate of a combining-site residue. The location of this carboxylate allows it to act as a general base in an allylic rearrangement. When compared with structures of other antibody complexes in which the positive moiety of the hapten is stabilized mostly by cation–π interactions, thi...

  13. Structure and reactivity of surface oxides on Pt(110) during catalytic CO oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Ackermann, M. D.; Pedersen, T. M.; Hendriksen, B.L.M.; ROBACH, O.; Bobaru, S. C.; Quiros, C.; Kim, H.; Hammer, B; Ferrer Fàbregas, Salvador; Frenke, J. W. M.

    2005-01-01

    We present the first structure determination by surface x-ray diffraction during the restructuring of a model catalyst under reaction conditions, i.e., at high pressure and high temperature, and correlate the restructuring with a change in catalytic activity. We have analyzed the Pt(110) surface during CO oxidation at pressures up to 0.5 bar and temperatures up to 625 K. Depending on the O2/CO pressure ratio, we find three well-defined structures: namely, (i) the bulk-terminated Pt(110) surfa...

  14. Structures to complement the archaeo-eukaryotic primases catalytic cycle description: What's next?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Boudet

    2015-01-01

    Primase activity has been studied in the last decades but the detailed molecular steps explaining some unique features remain unclear. High-resolution structures of free and bound primases domains have brought significant insights in the understanding of the primase reaction cycle. Here, we give a short review of the structural work conducted in the field of archaeo-eukaryotic primases and we underline the missing “pictures” of the active forms of the enzyme which are of major interest. We organized our analysis with respect to the progression through the catalytic pathway.

  15. SAXS studies of RNA: structures, dynamics, and interactions with partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yujie; Pollack, Lois

    2016-07-01

    Small-angle X-ray scattering, SAXS, is a powerful and easily employed experimental technique that provides solution structures of macromolecules. The size and shape parameters derived from SAXS provide global structural information about these molecules in solution and essentially complement data acquired by other biophysical methods. As applied to protein systems, SAXS is a relatively mature technology: sophisticated tools exist to acquire and analyze data, and to create structural models that include dynamically flexible ensembles. Given the expanding appreciation of RNA's biological roles, there is a need to develop comparable tools to characterize solution structures of RNA, including its interactions with important biological partners. We review the progress toward achieving this goal, focusing on experimental and computational innovations. The use of multiphase modeling, absolute calibration and contrast variation methods, among others, provides new and often unique ways of visualizing this important biological molecule and its essential partners: ions, other RNAs, or proteins. WIREs RNA 2016, 7:512-526. doi: 10.1002/wrna.1349 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27071649

  16. An experimental and computational investigation of structural dependence of catalytic properties of Pt-Ru nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasai, Binay

    An approach to determining the 3D atomic structure of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) in fine detail is described and exemplified on Pt-Ru alloy NPs of importance to the development of devices for clean energy conversion such as fuel cells. NPs are characterized structurally by total scattering experiments involving high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution functions (PDFs) analysis. 3D structure models are built by molecular dynamics simulations and further refined against the experimental PDF data by reverse Monte Carlo simulations and analyzed in terms of structural characteristics. Structural characteristics of activated NPs and data for their catalytic activity are compared side by side and strong evidence found that electronic effects, indicated by significant changes in Pt-Pt and Ru-Ru metal bond lengths at NP surface, and practically unrecognized so far atomic ensemble effects, indicated by distinct stacking of atomic layers near NP surface and prevalence of particular configurations of Pt and Ru atoms in these layers, contribute to the observed enhancement of the catalytic activity of PtxRu100 -x alloy NPs at x ~ 50. Central Michigan University, Department of Energy.

  17. Structure of the third catalytic domain of the protein disulfide isomerase ERp46

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of the third catalytic domain of the human protein disulfide isomerase ERp46 has been determined to 2.0 Å resolution. Protein disulfide isomerases are responsible for catalyzing the proper oxidation and isomerization of disulfide bonds of newly synthesized proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum. Here, the crystal structure of the third catalytic domain of protein disulfide isomerase ERp46 (also known as protein disulfide isomerase A5 and TXNDC5) was determined to 2.0 Å resolution. The structure shows a typical thioredoxin-like fold, but also identifies regions of high structural variability. In particular, the loop between helix α2 and strand β3 adopts strikingly different conformations among the five chains of the asymmetric unit. Cys381 and Cys388 form a structural disulfide and its absence in one of the molecules leads to dramatic conformational changes. The tryptophan residue Trp349 of this molecule inserts into the cavity formed by helices α1 and α3 of a neighbouring molecule, potentially mimicking the interactions of ERp46 with misfolded substrates

  18. A phase transition in energy-filtered RNA secondary structures

    CERN Document Server

    Han, Hillary S W

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study the effect of energy parameters on minimum free energy (mfe) RNA secondary structures. Employing a simplified combinatorial energy model, that is only dependent on the diagram representation and that is not sequence specific, we prove the following dichotomy result. Mfe structures derived via the Turner energy parameters contain only finitely many complex irreducible substructures and just minor parameter changes produce a class of mfe-structures that contain a large number of small irreducibles. We localize the exact point where the distribution of irreducibles experiences this phase transition from a discrete limit to a central limit distribution and subsequently put our result into the context of quantifying the effect of sparsification of the folding of these respective mfe-structures. We show that the sparsification of realistic mfe-structures leads to a constant time and space reduction and that the sparsifcation of the folding of structures with modified parameters leads to a lin...

  19. Synthetic Peptides as Structural Maquettes of Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme Catalytic Sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zinovia Spyranti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The rational design of synthetic peptides is proposed as an efficient strategy for the structural investigation of crucial protein domains difficult to be produced. Only after half a century since the function of ACE was first reported, was its crystal structure solved. The main obstacle to be overcome for the determination of the high resolution structure was the crystallization of the highly hydrophobic transmembrane domain. Following our previous work, synthetic peptides and Zinc(II metal ions are used to build structural maquettes of the two Zn-catalytic active sites of the ACE somatic isoform. Structural investigations of the synthetic peptides, representing the two different somatic isoform active sites, through circular dichroism and NMR experiments are reported.

  20. A novel combined RNA-protein interaction analysis distinguishes HIV-1 Gag protein binding sites from structural change in the viral RNA leader

    OpenAIRE

    Kenyon, Julia C.; Liam J. Prestwood; Lever, Andrew M. L.

    2015-01-01

    RNA-protein interactions govern many viral and host cell processes. Conventional ‘footprinting’ to examine RNA-protein complex formation often cannot distinguish between sites of RNA-protein interaction and sites of RNA structural remodelling. We have developed a novel technique combining photo crosslinking with RNA 2′ hydroxyl reactivity (‘SHAPE’) that achieves rapid and hitherto unachievable resolution of both RNA structural changes and the sites of protein interaction within an RNA-protein...

  1. Toward rational thermostabilization of Aspergillus oryzae cutinase: Insights into catalytic and structural stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirke, Abhijit N; Basore, Danielle; Butterfoss, Glenn L; Bonneau, Richard; Bystroff, Christopher; Gross, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Cutinases are powerful hydrolases that can cleave ester bonds of polyesters such as poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET), opening up new options for enzymatic routes for polymer recycling and surface modification reactions. Cutinase from Aspergillus oryzae (AoC) is promising owing to the presence of an extended groove near the catalytic triad which is important for the orientation of polymeric chains. However, the catalytic efficiency of AoC on rigid polymers like PET is limited by its low thermostability; as it is essential to work at or over the glass transition temperature (Tg) of PET, that is, 70 °C. Consequently, in this study we worked toward the thermostabilization of AoC. Use of Rosetta computational protein design software in conjunction with rational design led to a 6 °C improvement in the thermal unfolding temperature (Tm) and a 10-fold increase in the half-life of the enzyme activity at 60 °C. Surprisingly, thermostabilization did not improve the rate or temperature optimum of enzyme activity. Three notable findings are presented as steps toward designing more thermophilic cutinase: (a) surface salt bridge optimization produced enthalpic stabilization, (b) mutations to proline reduced the entropy loss upon folding, and (c) the lack of a correlative increase in the temperature optimum of catalytic activity with thermodynamic stability suggests that the active site is locally denatured at a temperature below the Tm of the global structure. PMID:26522152

  2. Designing Novel Synthetic Enzyme-Like Structures with Inducible Dynamic Catalytic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Michelle Lillian

    Over the past three decades considerable efforts have been made to create synthetic versions of enzymes, sometimes called synzymes. Most have failed, and the few so-called successes are at best only marginal exhibiting properties that can barely be described as catalytic. While these synthetic nano-structures look similar to the enzyme active site, they do not have the unique mechanical or dynamic catalytic properties to transform a substrate molecule into the desired product molecule with turnover capability. In our study, a series of synzymes that mimics the active catalytic site of proteases which utilizes serine/hydroxyl, cysteine/sulfhydryl, histidine/imidazole and aspartate/carboxyl groups were designed and fabricated. The acetylation and the deacylation kinetics of the synzyme peptides were studied through molecular modeling and UV/Vis spectrophotometry. The intramolecular interactions of synzyme residues were measured with proton NMR. These synzymes were shown to be able to hydrolyze p-nitrophenyl acetate esters and acetic anhydride. Synzymes with phenylalanines between the cysteine and histidine yield a significantly higher deacylation rate, suggesting that the large bulky R-groups of phenylalanine bends the backbone of the synzyme, thus bringing the cysteine thiol group and the histidine imidazole group closer for acetyl exchange. When oscillating pulse electric field was applied to the synzymes, an increase in acetylation rate is observed, suggesting the possibility that PEF treatment aids the electroconformation change of the synzyme during the catalysis process, which in turn increased its deacylation ability and turnover rate.

  3. Evolution of Tertiary Structure of Viral RNA Dependent Polymerases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Černý, Jiří; Černá, B.; Valdés, James J.; Grubhoffer, Libor; Růžek, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 5 (2014), e96070. E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP502/11/2116; GA ČR GAP302/12/2490; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Q-BETA replicase * C virus RNA * crystal structure Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.234, year: 2014

  4. RNA structure and the mechanisms of alternative splicing

    OpenAIRE

    McManus, C. Joel; Graveley, Brenton R.

    2011-01-01

    Alternative splicing is a widespread means of increasing protein diversity and regulating gene expression in eukaryotes. Much progress has been made in understanding the proteins involved in regulating alternative splicing, the sequences they bind to, and how these interactions lead to changes in splicing patterns. However, several recent studies have identified other players involved in regulating alternative splicing. A major theme emerging from these studies is that RNA secondary structure...

  5. Femtomole SHAPE reveals regulatory structures in the authentic XMRV RNA genome

    OpenAIRE

    Grohman, Jacob K.; Kottegoda, Sumith; Gorelick, Robert J.; Allbritton, Nancy L.; Weeks, Kevin M.

    2011-01-01

    Higher-order structure influences critical functions in nearly all non-coding and coding RNAs. Most single-nucleotide resolution RNA structure determination technologies cannot be used to analyze RNA from scarce biological samples, like viral genomes. To make quantitative RNA structure analysis applicable to a much wider array of RNA structure-function problems, we developed and applied high-sensitivity selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) to structural analysi...

  6. A probabilistic model for the evolution of RNA structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holmes Ian

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background For the purposes of finding and aligning noncoding RNA gene- and cis-regulatory elements in multiple-genome datasets, it is useful to be able to derive multi-sequence stochastic grammars (and hence multiple alignment algorithms systematically, starting from hypotheses about the various kinds of random mutation event and their rates. Results Here, we consider a highly simplified evolutionary model for RNA, called "The TKF91 Structure Tree" (following Thorne, Kishino and Felsenstein's 1991 model of sequence evolution with indels, which we have implemented for pairwise alignment as proof of principle for such an approach. The model, its strengths and its weaknesses are discussed with reference to four examples of functional ncRNA sequences: a riboswitch (guanine, a zipcode (nanos, a splicing factor (U4 and a ribozyme (RNase P. As shown by our visualisations of posterior probability matrices, the selected examples illustrate three different signatures of natural selection that are highly characteristic of ncRNA: (i co-ordinated basepair substitutions, (ii co-ordinated basepair indels and (iii whole-stem indels. Conclusions Although all three types of mutation "event" are built into our model, events of type (i and (ii are found to be better modeled than events of type (iii. Nevertheless, we hypothesise from the model's performance on pairwise alignments that it would form an adequate basis for a prototype multiple alignment and genefinding tool.

  7. Alphavirus RNA synthesis and non-structural protein functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupp, Jonathan C; Sokoloski, Kevin J; Gebhart, Natasha N; Hardy, Richard W

    2015-09-01

    The members of the genus Alphavirus are positive-sense RNA viruses, which are predominantly transmitted to vertebrates by a mosquito vector. Alphavirus disease in humans can be severely debilitating, and depending on the particular viral species, infection may result in encephalitis and possibly death. In recent years, alphaviruses have received significant attention from public health authorities as a consequence of the dramatic emergence of chikungunya virus in the Indian Ocean islands and the Caribbean. Currently, no safe, approved or effective vaccine or antiviral intervention exists for human alphavirus infection. The molecular biology of alphavirus RNA synthesis has been well studied in a few species of the genus and represents a general target for antiviral drug development. This review describes what is currently understood about the regulation of alphavirus RNA synthesis, the roles of the viral non-structural proteins in this process and the functions of cis-acting RNA elements in replication, and points to open questions within the field. PMID:26219641

  8. A phase transition in energy-filtered RNA secondary structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Hillary Siwei; reidys, Christian

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we study the effect of energy parameters on minimum free energy (mfe) RNA secondary structures. Employing a simplified combinatorial energy model, that is only dependent on the diagram representation and that is not sequence specific, we prove the following dichotomy result. Mfe...... structures derived via the Turner energy parameters contain only finitely many complex irreducible substructures and just minor parameter changes produce a class of mfe-structures that contain a large number of small irreducibles. We localize the exact point where the distribution of irreducibles experiences...... this phase transition from a discrete limit to a central limit distribution and subsequently put our result into the context of quantifying the effect of sparsification of the folding of these respective mfe-structures. We show that the sparsification of realistic mfe-structures leads to a constant...

  9. Base pairing in RNA structures: A computational analysis of structural aspects and interaction energies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Purshotam Sharma; Abhijit Mitra; Sitansh Sharma; Harjinder Singh

    2007-09-01

    The base pairing patterns in RNA structures are more versatile and completely different as compared to DNA. We present here results of ab-initio studies of structures and interaction energies of eight selected RNA base pairs reported in literature. Interaction energies, including BSSE correction, of hydrogen added crystal geometries of base pairs have been calculated at the HF/6-31G∗∗ level. The structures and interaction energies of the base pairs in the crystal geometry are compared with those obtained after optimization of the base pairs. We find that the base pairs become more planar on full optimization. No change in the hydrogen bonding pattern is seen. It is expected that the inclusion of appropriate considerations of many of these aspects of RNA base pairing would significantly improve the accuracy of RNA secondary structure prediction.

  10. Asymptotic connectivity for the network of RNA secondary structures

    OpenAIRE

    Clote, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Given an RNA sequence a, consider the network G = (V;E), where the set V of nodes consists of all secondary structures of a, and whose edge set E consists of all edges connecting two secondary structures whose base pair distance is 1. De?ne the network connectivity, or expected network degree, as the average number of edges incident to vertices of G. Using algebraic combinatorial methods, we prove that the asymptotic connectivity of length n homopolymer sequences is 0:473418 ? n. This raises ...

  11. RNA intrusions change DNA elastic properties and structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Koh, Kyung Duk; Evich, Marina; Lesiak, Annie L.; Germann, Markus W.; Bongiorno, Angelo; Riedo, Elisa; Storici, Francesca

    2014-08-01

    The units of RNA, termed ribonucleoside monophosphates (rNMPs), have been recently found as the most abundant defects present in DNA. Despite the relevance, it is largely unknown if and how rNMPs embedded in DNA can change the DNA structure and mechanical properties. Here, we report that rNMPs incorporated in DNA can change the elastic properties of DNA. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single molecule elasticity measurements show that rNMP intrusions in short DNA duplexes can decrease - by 32% - or slightly increase the stretch modulus of DNA molecules for two sequences reported in this study. Molecular dynamics simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy identify a series of significant local structural alterations of DNA containing embedded rNMPs, especially at the rNMPs and nucleotide 3' to the rNMP sites. The demonstrated ability of rNMPs to locally alter DNA mechanical properties and structure may help in understanding how such intrusions impact DNA biological functions and find applications in structural DNA and RNA nanotechnology.The units of RNA, termed ribonucleoside monophosphates (rNMPs), have been recently found as the most abundant defects present in DNA. Despite the relevance, it is largely unknown if and how rNMPs embedded in DNA can change the DNA structure and mechanical properties. Here, we report that rNMPs incorporated in DNA can change the elastic properties of DNA. Atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single molecule elasticity measurements show that rNMP intrusions in short DNA duplexes can decrease - by 32% - or slightly increase the stretch modulus of DNA molecules for two sequences reported in this study. Molecular dynamics simulations and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy identify a series of significant local structural alterations of DNA containing embedded rNMPs, especially at the rNMPs and nucleotide 3' to the rNMP sites. The demonstrated ability of rNMPs to locally alter DNA mechanical properties and structure

  12. Fine-tuning structural RNA alignments in the twilight zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schirmer Stefanie

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A widely used method to find conserved secondary structure in RNA is to first construct a multiple sequence alignment, and then fold the alignment, optimizing a score based on thermodynamics and covariance. This method works best around 75% sequence similarity. However, in a "twilight zone" below 55% similarity, the sequence alignment tends to obscure the covariance signal used in the second phase. Therefore, while the overall shape of the consensus structure may still be found, the degree of conservation cannot be estimated reliably. Results Based on a combination of available methods, we present a method named planACstar for improving structure conservation in structural alignments in the twilight zone. After constructing a consensus structure by alignment folding, planACstar abandons the original sequence alignment, refolds the sequences individually, but consistent with the consensus, aligns the structures, irrespective of sequence, by a pure structure alignment method, and derives an improved sequence alignment from the alignment of structures, to be re-submitted to alignment folding, etc.. This circle may be iterated as long as structural conservation improves, but normally, one step suffices. Conclusions Employing the tools ClustalW, RNAalifold, and RNAforester, we find that for sequences with 30-55% sequence identity, structural conservation can be improved by 10% on average, with a large variation, measured in terms of RNAalifold's own criterion, the structure conservation index.

  13. Structure of an A-form RNA duplex obtained by degradation of 6S RNA in a crystallization droplet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Jiro; Dock-Bregeon, Anne Catherine; Willkomm, Dagmar K; Hartmann, Roland K; Westhof, Eric

    2013-06-01

    In the course of a crystallographic study of a 132 nt variant of Aquifex aeolicus 6S RNA, a crystal structure of an A-form RNA duplex containing 12 base pairs was solved at a resolution of 2.6 Å. In fact, the RNA duplex is part of the 6S RNA and was obtained by accidental but precise degradation of the 6S RNA in a crystallization droplet. 6S RNA degradation was confirmed by microscopic observation of crystals and gel electrophoresis of crystallization droplets. The RNA oligomers obtained form regular A-form duplexes containing three GoU wobble-type base pairs, one of which engages in intermolecular contacts through a ribose-zipper motif at the crystal-packing interface. PMID:23722840

  14. RNA Secondary Structure Modulates FMRP’s Bi-Functional Role in the MicroRNA Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Kenny

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs act by post-transcriptionally regulating the gene expression of 30%–60% of mammalian genomes. MicroRNAs are key regulators in all cellular processes, though the mechanism by which the cell activates or represses microRNA-mediated translational regulation is poorly understood. In this review, we discuss the RNA binding protein Fragile X Mental Retardation Protein (FMRP and its role in microRNA-mediated translational regulation. Historically, FMRP is known to function as a translational suppressor. However, emerging data suggests that FMRP has both an agonistic and antagonistic role in regulating microRNA-mediated translational suppression. This bi-functional role is dependent on FMRP’s interaction with the RNA helicase Moloney leukemia virus 10 (MOV10, which modifies the structural landscape of bound mRNA, therefore facilitating or inhibiting its association with the RNA-Induced Silencing Complex.

  15. Structural analyses of Legionella LepB reveal a new GAP fold that catalytically mimics eukaryotic RasGAP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qin Yu; Liyan Hu; Qing Yao; Yongqun Zhu; Na Dong; Da-Cheng Wang; Feng Shao

    2013-01-01

    Rab GTPases are emerging targets of diverse bacterial pathogens.Here,we perform biochemical and structural analyses of LepB,a Rab GTPase-activating protein (GAP) effector from Legionellapneumophila.We map LepB GAP domain to residues 313-618 and show that the GAP domain is Rab1 specific with a catalytic activity higher than the canonical eukaryotic TBC GAP and the newly identified VirA/EspG family of bacterial RabGAP effectors.Exhaustive mutation analyses identify Arg444 as the arginine finger,but no catalytically essential glutamine residues.Crystal structures of LepB313-618 alone and the GAP domain of Legionella drancourtii LepB in complex with Rab1-GDP-AIF3 support the catalytic role of Arg444,and also further reveal a 3D architecture and a GTPase-binding mode distinct from all known GAPs.Glu449,structurally equivalent to TBC RabGAP glutamine finger in apo-LepB,undergoes a drastic movement upon Rab1 binding,which induces Rab1 Gin70 side-chain flipping towards GDP-AIF3 through a strong ionic interaction.This conformationally rearranged Gln70 acts as the catalytic cis-glutamine,therefore uncovering an unexpected RasGAP-like catalytic mechanism for LepB.Our studies highlight an extraordinary structural and catalytic diversity of RabGAPs,particularly those from bacterial pathogens.

  16. Structure-Based Alignment and Consensus Secondary Structures for Three HIV-Related RNA Genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A Lavender

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available HIV and related primate lentiviruses possess single-stranded RNA genomes. Multiple regions of these genomes participate in critical steps in the viral replication cycle, and the functions of many RNA elements are dependent on the formation of defined structures. The structures of these elements are still not fully understood, and additional functional elements likely exist that have not been identified. In this work, we compared three full-length HIV-related viral genomes: HIV-1NL4-3, SIVcpz, and SIVmac (the latter two strains are progenitors for all HIV-1 and HIV-2 strains, respectively. Model-free RNA structure comparisons were performed using whole-genome structure information experimentally derived from nucleotide-resolution SHAPE reactivities. Consensus secondary structures were constructed for strongly correlated regions by taking into account both SHAPE probing structural data and nucleotide covariation information from structure-based alignments. In these consensus models, all known functional RNA elements were recapitulated with high accuracy. In addition, we identified multiple previously unannotated structural elements in the HIV-1 genome likely to function in translation, splicing and other replication cycle processes; these are compelling targets for future functional analyses. The structure-informed alignment strategy developed here will be broadly useful for efficient RNA motif discovery.

  17. TurboKnot: rapid prediction of conserved RNA secondary structures including pseudoknots

    OpenAIRE

    Seetin, Matthew G.; Mathews, David H.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Many RNA molecules function without being translated into proteins, and function depends on structure. Pseudoknots are motifs in RNA secondary structures that are difficult to predict but are also often functionally important.

  18. RNA nanoparticles come of age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John J.Rossi

    2011-01-01

    @@ RNA has multiple functions in nature, including informa- tional transfer (mRNA) Ill, adaptor function (tRNAs) [2], guide functions (snRNAs, snoRNAs) [3,4]catalytic func- tion (ribozymes and the large ribosomal RNA) [5-7], and environmental sensing (riboswitehes) [8].In contrast, DNA only serves as an information storage molecule, and proteins serve as structural and enzymatic molecules.

  19. Preparation and characterization of VOx/TiO2 catalytic coatings on stainless steel plates for structured catalytic reactors.

    OpenAIRE

    Giornelli, Thierry; Löfberg, Axel; Bordes-Richard, Elisabeth

    2006-01-01

    1 The parameters to be controlled to coat metallic walls by VOx/TiO2 catalysts which are used in the mild oxidation of hydrocarbons and NOx abatement are studied. Stainless steel (316 L) was chosen because of its large application in industrial catalytic reactors. TiO2 films on stainless steel were obtained by dip-coating in two steps. Superficially oxidized plates were first dipped in Ti-alkoxide sol-gel to be coated by a very thin layer of TiO2. On this anchoring layer was then deposited a ...

  20. Biochemical properties and catalytic domain structure of the CcmH protein from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xue-Ming; Hong, Jing; Li, Hai-Yin; Lin, Dong-Hai; Hu, Hong-Yu

    2012-12-01

    In the Gram-negative bacterium of Escherichia coli, eight genes organized as a ccm operon (ccmABCDEFGH) are involved in the maturation of c-type cytochromes. The proteins encoded by the last three genes ccmFGH are believed to form a lyase complex functioning in the reduction of apocytochrome c and haem attachment. Among them, CcmH is a membrane-associated protein; its N-terminus is a catalytic domain with the active CXXC motif and the C-terminus is predicted as a TPR-like domain with unknown function. By using SCAM (scanning cysteine accessibility mutagenesis) and Gaussia luciferase fusion assays, we provide experimental evidence for the entire topological structure of E. coli CcmH. The mature CcmH is a periplasm-resident oxidoreductase anchored to the inner membrane by two transmembrane segments. Both N- and C-terminal domains are located and function in the periplasmic compartment. Moreover, the N-terminal domain forms a monomer in solution, while the C-terminal domain is a compact fold with helical structures. The NMR solution structure of the catalytic domain in reduced form exhibits mainly a three-helix bundle, providing further information for the redox mechanism. The redox potential suggests that CcmH exhibits a strong reductase that may function in the last step of reduction of apocytochrome c for haem attachment. PMID:22789558

  1. Structural rearrangements of a polyketide synthase module during its catalytic cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whicher, Jonathan R; Dutta, Somnath; Hansen, Douglas A; Hale, Wendi A; Chemler, Joseph A; Dosey, Annie M; Narayan, Alison R H; Håkansson, Kristina; Sherman, David H; Smith, Janet L; Skiniotis, Georgios

    2014-06-26

    The polyketide synthase (PKS) mega-enzyme assembly line uses a modular architecture to synthesize diverse and bioactive natural products that often constitute the core structures or complete chemical entities for many clinically approved therapeutic agents. The architecture of a full-length PKS module from the pikromycin pathway of Streptomyces venezuelae creates a reaction chamber for the intramodule acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain that carries building blocks and intermediates between acyltransferase, ketosynthase and ketoreductase active sites (see accompanying paper). Here we determine electron cryo-microscopy structures of a full-length pikromycin PKS module in three key biochemical states of its catalytic cycle. Each biochemical state was confirmed by bottom-up liquid chromatography/Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. The ACP domain is differentially and precisely positioned after polyketide chain substrate loading on the active site of the ketosynthase, after extension to the β-keto intermediate, and after β-hydroxy product generation. The structures reveal the ACP dynamics for sequential interactions with catalytic domains within the reaction chamber, and for transferring the elongated and processed polyketide substrate to the next module in the PKS pathway. During the enzymatic cycle the ketoreductase domain undergoes dramatic conformational rearrangements that enable optimal positioning for reductive processing of the ACP-bound polyketide chain elongation intermediate. These findings have crucial implications for the design of functional PKS modules, and for the engineering of pathways to generate pharmacologically relevant molecules. PMID:24965656

  2. Crystal Structure of the Catalytic Domain of Drosophila [beta]1,4-Galactosyltransferase-7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Boopathy; Qasba, Pradman K. (NIH)

    2010-11-03

    The {beta}1,4-galactosyltransferase-7 ({beta}4Gal-T7) enzyme, one of seven members of the {beta}4Gal-T family, transfers in the presence of manganese Gal from UDP-Gal to an acceptor sugar (xylose) that is attached to a side chain hydroxyl group of Ser/Thr residues of proteoglycan proteins. It exhibits the least protein sequence similarity with the other family members, including the well studied family member {beta}4Gal-T1, which, in the presence of manganese, transfers Gal from UDP-Gal to GlcNAc. We report here the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of {beta}4Gal-T7 from Drosophila in the presence of manganese and UDP at 1.81 {angstrom} resolution. In the crystal structure, a new manganese ion-binding motif (HXH) has been observed. Superposition of the crystal structures of {beta}4Gal-T7 and {beta}4Gal-T1 shows that the catalytic pocket and the substrate-binding sites in these proteins are similar. Compared with GlcNAc, xylose has a hydroxyl group (instead of an N-acetyl group) at C2 and lacks the CH{sub 2}OH group at C5; thus, these protein structures show significant differences in their acceptor-binding site. Modeling of xylose in the acceptor-binding site of the {beta}4Gal-T7 crystal structure shows that the aromatic side chain of Tyr{sup 177} interacts strongly with the C5 atom of xylose, causing steric hindrance to any additional group at C5. Because Drosophila Cd7 has a 73% protein sequence similarity to human Cd7, the present crystal structure offers a structure-based explanation for the mutations in human Cd7 that have been linked to Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

  3. Relation between the structure and catalytic activity for automotive emissions. Use of x-ray anomalous dispersion effect

    CERN Document Server

    Mizuki, J; Tanaka, H

    2003-01-01

    The employment of the X-ray anomalous dispersion effect allows us to detect the change in structure of catalytic converters with the environment exposed. Here we show that palladium atoms in a perovskite crystal move into and out of the crystal by anomalous X-ray diffraction and absorption techniques. This movement of the precious metal plays an important role to keep the catalytic activity long-lived. (author)

  4. Short, synthetic and selectively 13C-labeled RNA sequences for the NMR structure determination of protein–RNA complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Wenter, Philipp; Reymond, Luc; Auweter, Sigrid D.; Allain, Frédéric H.-T.; Pitsch, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    We report an optimized synthesis of all canonical 2′-O-TOM protected ribonucleoside phosphoramidites and solid supports containing [13C5]-labeled ribose moieties, their sequence-specific introduction into very short RNA sequences and their use for the structure determination of two protein–RNA complexes. These specifically labeled sequences facilitate RNA resonance assignments and are essential to assign a high number of sugar–sugar and intermolecular NOEs, which ultimately improve the precis...

  5. A comparative method for finding and folding RNA secondary structures within protein-coding regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Skou; Meyer, Irmtraud Margret; Forsberg, Roald; Simmonds, Peter; Hein, Jotun

    2004-01-01

    Existing computational methods for RNA secondary-structure prediction tacitly assume RNA to only encode functional RNA structures. However, experimental studies have revealed that some RNA sequences, e.g. compact viral genomes, can simultaneously encode functional RNA structures as well as proteins...... that RNA-DECODER's parameters can be automatically trained to successfully fold known secondary structures within the HCV genome. We scan the genomes of HCV and polio virus for conserved secondary-structure elements, and analyze performance as a function of available evolutionary information. On known...... secondary structures, RNA-DECODER shows a sensitivity similar to the programs MFOLD, PFOLD and RNAALIFOLD. When scanning the entire genomes of HCV and polio virus for structure elements, RNA-DECODER's results indicate a markedly higher specificity than MFOLD, PFOLD and RNAALIFOLD....

  6. Improved measurements of RNA structure conservation with generalized centroid estimators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yohei eOkada

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Identification of non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs in genomes is acrucial task for not only molecular cell biology but alsobioinformatics. Secondary structures of ncRNAs are employed as a keyfeature of ncRNA analysis since biological functions of ncRNAs aredeeply related to their secondary structures. Although the minimumfree energy (MFE structure of an RNA sequence is regarded as the moststable structure, MFE alone could not be an appropriate measure foridentifying ncRNAs since the free energy is heavily biased by thenucleotide composition. Therefore, instead of MFE itself, severalalternative measures for identifying ncRNAs have been proposed such asthe structure conservation index (SCI and the base pair distance(BPD, both of which employ MFE structures. However, thesemeasurements are unfortunately not suitable for identifying ncRNAs insome cases including the genome-wide search and incur high falsediscovery rate. In this study, we propose improved measurements basedon SCI and BPD, applying generalized centroid estimators toincorporate the robustness against low quality multiple alignments.Our experiments show that our proposed methods achieve higher accuracythan the original SCI and BPD for not only human-curated structuralalignments but also low quality alignments produced by CLUSTALW. Furthermore, the centroid-based SCI on CLUSTAL W alignments is moreaccurate than or comparable with that of the original SCI onstructural alignments generated with RAF, a high quality structuralaligner, for which two-fold expensive computational time is requiredon average. We conclude that our methods are more suitable forgenome-wide alignments which are of low quality from the point of viewon secondary structures than the original SCI and BPD.

  7. ConStruct: Improved construction of RNA consensus structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steger Gerhard

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aligning homologous non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs correctly in terms of sequence and structure is an unresolved problem, due to both mathematical complexity and imperfect scoring functions. High quality alignments, however, are a prerequisite for most consensus structure prediction approaches, homology searches, and tools for phylogeny inference. Automatically created ncRNA alignments often need manual corrections, yet this manual refinement is tedious and error-prone. Results We present an extended version of CONSTRUCT, a semi-automatic, graphical tool suitable for creating RNA alignments correct in terms of both consensus sequence and consensus structure. To this purpose CONSTRUCT combines sequence alignment, thermodynamic data and various measures of covariation. One important feature is that the user is guided during the alignment correction step by a consensus dotplot, which displays all thermodynamically optimal base pairs and the corresponding covariation. Once the initial alignment is corrected, optimal and suboptimal secondary structures as well as tertiary interaction can be predicted. We demonstrate CONSTRUCT's ability to guide the user in correcting an initial alignment, and show an example for optimal secondary consensus structure prediction on very hard to align SECIS elements. Moreover we use CONSTRUCT to predict tertiary interactions from sequences of the internal ribosome entry site of CrP-like viruses. In addition we show that alignments specifically designed for benchmarking can be easily be optimized using CONSTRUCT, although they share very little sequence identity. Conclusion CONSTRUCT's graphical interface allows for an easy alignment correction based on and guided by predicted and known structural constraints. It combines several algorithms for prediction of secondary consensus structure and even tertiary interactions. The CONSTRUCT package can be downloaded from the URL listed in the Availability and

  8. NMR Structure and Dynamics of the Resuscitation Promoting Factor RpfC Catalytic Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Maione

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis latent infection is maintained for years with no clinical symptoms and no adverse effects for the host. The mechanism through which dormant M. tuberculosis resuscitates and enters the cell cycle leading to tuberculosis is attracting much interest. The RPF family of proteins has been found to be responsible for bacteria resuscitation and normal proliferation. This family of proteins in M. tuberculosis is composed by five homologues (named RpfA-E and understanding their conformational, structural and functional peculiarities is crucial to the design of therapeutic strategies.Therefore, we report the structural and dynamics characterization of the catalytic domain of RpfC from M. tubercolosis by combining Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Circular Dichroism and Molecular Dynamics data. We also show how the formation of a disulfide bridge, highly conserved among the homologues, is likely to modulate the shape of the RpfC hydrophobic catalytic cleft. This might result in a protein function regulation via a "conformational editing" through a disulfide bond formation.

  9. Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, C.; Huang, L.; Wenzel, K.; Saini, A.K.; Burgess, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Schobert, H.H.

    1992-12-01

    During this quarterly period progress has been made in the following three subjects related to the effects of low-temperature thermal and catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. First, the liquefaction behavior of three bituminous coals with a carbon content ranging from 77% to 85% was evaluated spectroscopically by [sup 13]C NMR and pyrolysis/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry to delineate the structural changes that occur in the coal during liquefaction. Complementary data includes ultimate and proximate analysis, along with optical microscopy for maceral determinations. Even though these are all bituminous coals they exhibit quite different physical and chemical characteristics. The coals vary in rank, ranging from HvC b to HvA b, in petrographic composition, different maceral percentages, and in chemical nature, percent of carbon and of volatiles. It is these variations that govern the products, their distribution, and conversion percentages. Some of the products formed can be traced to a specific maceral group. Second, pyrolysis-GC-MS and FTIR techniques were used to characterize Wyodak coal before and after drying in vacuum and in air and the residues from its thermal and catalytic liquefactions. The analysis of the air-dried coal shows a decrease in the phenolic type structures in the coal network and increase in the carbonyl structures as the oxidative drying proceeds. An enhanced decrease in the carbonyl structure is observed in the liquefaction residues from the raw coal as compared to that of the vacuum dried coal. The analyses of the liquefaction residues of the air-dried coal show an increase in the ether linkages which may have a negative impact on liquefaction. The extent of the solvent adduction also increases during liquefaction with the extent of oxidation of the coal. Finally, the effects of reaction conditions were investigated on conversion of low-rank coals using a Texas subbituminous coal.

  10. Exoelectrogenic biofilm as a template for sustainable formation of a catalytic mesoporous structure

    KAUST Repository

    Yates, Matthew D.

    2014-06-04

    © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Actively respiring biofilms of Geobacter sulfurreducens were used as a biotemplate to form a palladium mesoporous layer directly on an electrode surface. Cells and proteins within the biofilm acted as the reductant and stabilizer to facilitate the reduction, dispersion, and attachment of palladium nanoparticles to the electrode surface without using synthetic chemicals. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mesoporous structures can increase catalytic activity by maximizing the ratio of surface area to volume, but current synthesis techniques utilize expensive polymers and toxic chemicals. A Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilm was used as a sustainable template to form mesoporous Pd structures while eliminating the need for synthetic chemicals. The bulk of the biofilm material was removed by thermal treatments after nanoparticle formation, producing a catalytic Pd mesoporous (pore size 9.7±0.1nm) structure attached to the graphite electrode with a 1.5-2μm thick backbone composed of nanoparticles (~200nm). A control electrode electrochemically plated with Pd in the absence of a biofilm exhibited a variable planar Pd base (~0.5-3μm thick) with sporadic Pd extrusions (~2μm across, 1-5μm tall) from the surface. The biotemplated mesoporous structure produced 15-20% higher stable current densities during H2 oxidation tests than the electrochemically plated control electrode, even though 30% less Pd was present in the biotemplated catalyst. These results indicate that electroactive biofilms can be used as a sustainable base material to produce nanoporous structures without the need for synthetic polymers. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2014;111: 2349-2354.

  11. Integration of Expressed Sequence Tag Data Flanking Predicted RNA Secondary Structures Facilitates Novel Non-Coding RNA Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzanowski, Paul M.; Price, Feodor D.; Muro, Enrique M.; Rudnicki, Michael A.; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Many computational methods have been used to predict novel non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), but none, to our knowledge, have explicitly investigated the impact of integrating existing cDNA-based Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) data that flank structural RNA predictions. To determine whether flanking EST data can assist in microRNA (miRNA) prediction, we identified genomic sites encoding putative miRNAs by combining functional RNA predictions with flanking ESTs data in a model consistent with miRNAs undergoing cleavage during maturation. In both human and mouse genomes, we observed that the inclusion of flanking ESTs adjacent to and not overlapping predicted miRNAs significantly improved the performance of various methods of miRNA prediction, including direct high-throughput sequencing of small RNA libraries. We analyzed the expression of hundreds of miRNAs predicted to be expressed during myogenic differentiation using a customized microarray and identified several known and predicted myogenic miRNA hairpins. Our results indicate that integrating ESTs flanking structural RNA predictions improves the quality of cleaved miRNA predictions and suggest that this strategy can be used to predict other non-coding RNAs undergoing cleavage during maturation. PMID:21698286

  12. Form Follows Function: Structural and Catalytic Variation in the Class A Flavoprotein Monooxygenases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham R. Moran

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Flavoprotein monooxygenases (FPMOs exhibit an array of mechanistic solutions to a common chemical objective; the monooxygenation of a target substrate. Each FPMO efficiently couples reduction of a flavin cofactor by NAD(PH to oxygenation of the target substrate via a (hydroperoxyflavin intermediate. This purpose of this review is to describe in detail the Class A flavoprotein hydroxylases (FPMO in the context of the other FPMO classes (B–F. Both one and two component FPMOs are found in nature. Two-component enzymes require, in addition to the monooxygenase, the involvement of a reductase that first catalyzes the reduction of the flavin by NAD(PH. The Class A and B FPMOs are single-component and manage to orchestrate the same net reaction within a single peptide. The Class A enzymes have, by some considerable margin, the most complete research record. These enzymes use choreographed movements of the flavin ring that facilitate access of the organic substrates to the active site, provide a means for interaction of NADPH with the flavin, offer a mechanism to sequester the dioxygen reduction chemistry from solvent and a means to release the product. The majority of the discrete catalytic events of the catalytic cycle can be observed directly in exquisite detail using spectrophotometric kinetic methods and many of the key mechanistic conclusions are further supported by structural data. This review attempts to compile each of the key observations made for both paradigm and newly discovered examples of Class A FPMOs into a complete catalytic description of one enzymatic turnover.

  13. De Novo Discovery of Structured ncRNA Motifs in Genomic Sequences

    OpenAIRE

    RUZZO, WALTER L.; Gorodkin, Jan

    2014-01-01

    De novo discovery of "motifs" capturing the commonalities among related noncoding ncRNA structured RNAs is among the most difficult problems in computational biology. This chapter outlines the challenges presented by this problem, together with some approaches towards solving them, with an emphasis on an approach based on the CMfinder CMfinder program as a case study. Applications to genomic screens for novel de novo structured ncRNA ncRNA s, including structured RNA elements in untranslated ...

  14. Avian reovirus L2 genome segment sequences and predicted structure/function of the encoded RNA-dependent RNA polymerase protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wanhong

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The orthoreoviruses are infectious agents that possess a genome comprised of 10 double-stranded RNA segments encased in two concentric protein capsids. Like virtually all RNA viruses, an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp enzyme is required for viral propagation. RdRp sequences have been determined for the prototype mammalian orthoreoviruses and for several other closely-related reoviruses, including aquareoviruses, but have not yet been reported for any avian orthoreoviruses. Results We determined the L2 genome segment nucleotide sequences, which encode the RdRp proteins, of two different avian reoviruses, strains ARV138 and ARV176 in order to define conserved and variable regions within reovirus RdRp proteins and to better delineate structure/function of this important enzyme. The ARV138 L2 genome segment was 3829 base pairs long, whereas the ARV176 L2 segment was 3830 nucleotides long. Both segments were predicted to encode λB RdRp proteins 1259 amino acids in length. Alignments of these newly-determined ARV genome segments, and their corresponding proteins, were performed with all currently available homologous mammalian reovirus (MRV and aquareovirus (AqRV genome segment and protein sequences. There was ~55% amino acid identity between ARV λB and MRV λ3 proteins, making the RdRp protein the most highly conserved of currently known orthoreovirus proteins, and there was ~28% identity between ARV λB and homologous MRV and AqRV RdRp proteins. Predictive structure/function mapping of identical and conserved residues within the known MRV λ3 atomic structure indicated most identical amino acids and conservative substitutions were located near and within predicted catalytic domains and lining RdRp channels, whereas non-identical amino acids were generally located on the molecule's surfaces. Conclusion The ARV λB and MRV λ3 proteins showed the highest ARV:MRV identity values (~55% amongst all currently known ARV and MRV

  15. Structural and Catalytic Characterization of a Fungal Baeyer-Villiger Monooxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferroni, Felix Martin; Tolmie, Carmien; Smit, Martha Sophia; Opperman, Diederik Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases (BVMOs) are biocatalysts that convert ketones to esters. Due to their high regio-, stereo- and enantioselectivity and ability to catalyse these reactions under mild conditions, they have gained interest as alternatives to chemical Baeyer-Villiger catalysts. Despite their widespread occurrence within the fungal kingdom, most of the currently characterized BVMOs are from bacterial origin. Here we report the catalytic and structural characterization of BVMOAFL838 from Aspergillus flavus. BVMOAFL838 converts linear and aryl ketones with high regioselectivity. Steady-state kinetics revealed BVMOAFL838 to show significant substrate inhibition with phenylacetone, which was more pronounced at low pH, enzyme and buffer concentrations. Para substitutions on the phenyl group significantly improved substrate affinity and increased turnover frequencies. Steady-state kinetics revealed BVMOAFL838 to preferentially oxidize aliphatic ketones and aryl ketones when the phenyl group are separated by at least two carbons from the carbonyl group. The X-ray crystal structure, the first of a fungal BVMO, was determined at 1.9 Å and revealed the typical overall fold seen in type I bacterial BVMOs. The active site Arg and Asp are conserved, with the Arg found in the "in" position. Similar to phenylacetone monooxygenase (PAMO), a two residue insert relative to cyclohexanone monooxygenase (CHMO) forms a bulge within the active site. Approximately half of the "variable" loop is folded into a short α-helix and covers part of the active site entry channel in the non-NADPH bound structure. This study adds to the current efforts to rationalize the substrate scope of BVMOs through comparative catalytic and structural investigation of different BVMOs. PMID:27472055

  16. RNA Structures as Mediators of Neurological Diseases and as Drug Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernat, Viachaslau; Disney, Matthew D

    2015-07-01

    RNAs adopt diverse folded structures that are essential for function and thus play critical roles in cellular biology. A striking example of this is the ribosome, a complex, three-dimensionally folded macromolecular machine that orchestrates protein synthesis. Advances in RNA biochemistry, structural and molecular biology, and bioinformatics have revealed other non-coding RNAs whose functions are dictated by their structure. It is not surprising that aberrantly folded RNA structures contribute to disease. In this Review, we provide a brief introduction into RNA structural biology and then describe how RNA structures function in cells and cause or contribute to neurological disease. Finally, we highlight successful applications of rational design principles to provide chemical probes and lead compounds targeting structured RNAs. Based on several examples of well-characterized RNA-driven neurological disorders, we demonstrate how designed small molecules can facilitate the study of RNA dysfunction, elucidating previously unknown roles for RNA in disease, and provide lead therapeutics. PMID:26139368

  17. Structural Characterization of the Catalytic Sites of Mononuclear Nonheme Fe Hydroxylases Using ²H-ESEEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, John

    2015-01-01

    Aromatic amino acid hydroxylases are members of a larger group of enzymes that use a mononuclear nonheme Fe center to catalyze a variety of thermodynamically challenging reactions in which O2 is used in the oxidative transformation of substrates. The hydroxylase enzymes are catalytically active in the ferrous oxidation state and are high-spin. To render the catalytic site EPR-active, we have used nitric oxide (NO) as a surrogate for substrate O2 to form an S=3/2 paramagnetic center. While the continuous-wave (cw)-EPR spectra of NO-enzyme adducts are rather generic, they provide electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) data that are rich with structural information derived from ligand hyperfine couplings. This chapter will focus on (2)H-ESEEM spectroscopy, an approach that we have taken for assigning these spectra and harvesting the unique information on Fe(II) coordination chemistry that they provide. While these spectroscopic measurements are routine, an emphasis will be placed on the analysis of cw-EPR and (2)H-ESEEM data using an unconstrained nonlinear optimization approach. These analysis methods are based on simple custom "scripts" that run in the MATLAB environment and that use EasySpin, a public-domain EPR simulation package, as their calculation engine. The examples provided here use a strategy that can be adapted for the treatment of most EPR measurements. PMID:26478489

  18. Analysis of the Staphylococcus aureus DgkB Structure Reveals a Common Catalytic Mechanism for the Soluble Diacylglycerol Kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Darcie J.; Jerga, Agoston; Rock, Charles O.; White, Stephen W. (SJCH)

    2008-08-11

    Soluble diacylglycerol (DAG) kinases function as regulators of diacylglycerol metabolism in cell signaling and intermediary metabolism. We report the structure of a DAG kinase, DgkB from Staphylococcus aureus, both as the free enzyme and in complex with ADP. The molecule is a tight homodimer, and each monomer comprises two domains with the catalytic center located within the interdomain cleft. Two distinctive features of DkgB are a structural Mg{sup 2+} site and an associated Asp{center_dot}water{center_dot}Mg{sup 2+} network that extends toward the active site locale. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that these features play important roles in the catalytic mechanism. The key active site residues and the components of the Asp{center_dot}water{center_dot}Mg{sup 2+} network are conserved in the catalytic cores of the mammalian signaling DAG kinases, indicating that these enzymes use the same mechanism and have similar structures as DgkB.

  19. Analysis of the Staphylococcus aureus DgkB structure reveals a common catalytic mechanism for the soluble diacylglycerol kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Darcie J; Jerga, Agoston; Rock, Charles O; White, Stephen W

    2008-07-01

    Soluble diacylglycerol (DAG) kinases function as regulators of diacylglycerol metabolism in cell signaling and intermediary metabolism. We report the structure of a DAG kinase, DgkB from Staphylococcus aureus, both as the free enzyme and in complex with ADP. The molecule is a tight homodimer, and each monomer comprises two domains with the catalytic center located within the interdomain cleft. Two distinctive features of DkgB are a structural Mg2+ site and an associated Asp*water*Mg2+ network that extends toward the active site locale. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that these features play important roles in the catalytic mechanism. The key active site residues and the components of the Asp*water*Mg2+ network are conserved in the catalytic cores of the mammalian signaling DAG kinases, indicating that these enzymes use the same mechanism and have similar structures as DgkB. PMID:18611377

  20. Structural analyses of Avocado sunblotch viroid reveal differences in the folding of plus and minus RNA strands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delan-Forino, Clémentine; Deforges, Jules; Benard, Lionel; Sargueil, Bruno; Maurel, Marie-Christine; Torchet, Claire

    2014-02-01

    Viroids are small pathogenic circular single-stranded RNAs, present in two complementary sequences, named plus and minus, in infected plant cells. A high degree of complementarities between different regions of the RNAs allows them to adopt complex structures. Since viroids are naked non-coding RNAs, interactions with host factors appear to be closely related to their structural and catalytic characteristics. Avocado sunblotch viroid (ASBVd), a member of the family Avsunviroidae, replicates via a symmetric RNA-dependant rolling-circle process, involving self-cleavage via hammerhead ribozymes. Consequently, it is assumed that ASBVd plus and minus strands adopt similar structures. Moreover, by computer analyses, a quasi-rod-like secondary structure has been predicted. Nevertheless, secondary and tertiary structures of both polarities of ASBVd remain unsolved. In this study, we analyzed the characteristic of each strand of ASBVd through biophysical analyses. We report that ASBVd transcripts of plus and minus polarities exhibit differences in electrophoretic mobility under native conditions and in thermal denaturation profiles. Subsequently, the secondary structures of plus and minus polarities of ASBVd were probed using the RNA-selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) method. The models obtained show that both polarities fold into different structures. Moreover, our results suggest the existence of a kissing-loop interaction within the minus strand that may play a role in in vivo viroid life cycle. PMID:24481250

  1. Structural Analyses of Avocado sunblotch viroid Reveal Differences in the Folding of Plus and Minus RNA Strands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémentine Delan-Forino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Viroids are small pathogenic circular single-stranded RNAs, present in two complementary sequences, named plus and minus, in infected plant cells. A high degree of complementarities between different regions of the RNAs allows them to adopt complex structures. Since viroids are naked non-coding RNAs, interactions with host factors appear to be closely related to their structural and catalytic characteristics. Avocado sunblotch viroid (ASBVd, a member of the family Avsunviroidae, replicates via a symmetric RNA-dependant rolling-circle process, involving self-cleavage via hammerhead ribozymes. Consequently, it is assumed that ASBVd plus and minus strands adopt similar structures. Moreover, by computer analyses, a quasi-rod-like secondary structure has been predicted. Nevertheless, secondary and tertiary structures of both polarities of ASBVd remain unsolved. In this study, we analyzed the characteristic of each strand of ASBVd through biophysical analyses. We report that ASBVd transcripts of plus and minus polarities exhibit differences in electrophoretic mobility under native conditions and in thermal denaturation profiles. Subsequently, the secondary structures of plus and minus polarities of ASBVd were probed using the RNA-selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE method. The models obtained show that both polarities fold into different structures. Moreover, our results suggest the existence of a kissing-loop interaction within the minus strand that may play a role in in vivo viroid life cycle.

  2. Alternative RNA Structure-Coupled Gene Regulations in Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Chi Chen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Alternative RNA structures (ARSs, or alternative transcript isoforms, are critical for regulating cellular phenotypes in humans. In addition to generating functionally diverse protein isoforms from a single gene, ARS can alter the sequence contents of 5'/3' untranslated regions (UTRs and intronic regions, thus also affecting the regulatory effects of these regions. ARS may introduce premature stop codon(s into a transcript, and render the transcript susceptible to nonsense-mediated decay, which in turn can influence the overall gene expression level. Meanwhile, ARS can regulate the presence/absence of upstream open reading frames and microRNA targeting sites in 5'UTRs and 3'UTRs, respectively, thus affecting translational efficiencies and protein expression levels. Furthermore, since ARS may alter exon-intron structures, it can influence the biogenesis of intronic microRNAs and indirectly affect the expression of the target genes of these microRNAs. The connections between ARS and multiple regulatory mechanisms underline the importance of ARS in determining cell fate. Accumulating evidence indicates that ARS-coupled regulations play important roles in tumorigenesis. Here I will review our current knowledge in this field, and discuss potential future directions.

  3. New in silico approach to assessing RNA secondary structures with non-canonical base pairs

    OpenAIRE

    Rybarczyk, Agnieszka; Szostak, Natalia; Antczak, Maciej; Zok, Tomasz; Popenda, Mariusz; Adamiak, Ryszard; Blazewicz, Jacek; Szachniuk, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Background The function of RNA is strongly dependent on its structure, so an appropriate recognition of this structure, on every level of organization, is of great importance. One particular concern is the assessment of base-base interactions, described as the secondary structure, the knowledge of which greatly facilitates an interpretation of RNA function and allows for structure analysis on the tertiary level. The RNA secondary structure can be predicted from a sequence using in silico meth...

  4. Structural features in TAR RNA of human and simian immunodeficiency viruses: a phylogenetic analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Berkhout, B.

    1992-01-01

    A comparative analysis of TAR RNA structures in human and simian immunodeficiency viruses reveals the conservation of certain structural features despite the divergence in sequence. Both the TAR elements of HIV-1 and SIV-chimpanzee can be folded into relatively simple one-stem hairpin structures. Chemical and RNAase probes were used to analyze the more complex structure of HIV-2 TAR RNA, which folds into a branched hairpin structure. A surprisingly similar RNA conformation can be proposed for...

  5. RNA structure analysis using methidiumpropyl-EDTA.Fe(II): a base-pair-specific RNA structure probe.

    OpenAIRE

    Vary, C P; Vournakis, J N

    1984-01-01

    Methidiumpropyl-EDTA.Fe(II) [MPE.Fe(II)] in the presence of dithiothreitol, is shown to cleave phenylalanine-accepting tRNA (tRNAPhe) in a structure-specific fashion. Molar ratios of MPE.Fe(II) to tRNAPhe of less than 1 preferentially cleave phosphodiester bonds known to occur in double-stranded regions of the tRNAPhe molecule. Microdensitometric analysis of autoradiograms of MPE.Fe(II) cleavage products following gel electrophoresis reveals a correspondence between preferred sites of MPE.Fe(...

  6. Constructing kinetic models to elucidate structural dynamics of a complete RNA polymerase II elongation cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RNA polymerase II elongation is central in eukaryotic transcription. Although multiple intermediates of the elongation complex have been identified, the dynamical mechanisms remain elusive or controversial. Here we build a structure-based kinetic model of a full elongation cycle of polymerase II, taking into account transition rates and conformational changes characterized from both single molecule experimental studies and computational simulations at atomistic scale. Our model suggests a force-dependent slow transition detected in the single molecule experiments corresponds to an essential conformational change of a trigger loop (TL) opening prior to the polymerase translocation. The analyses on mutant study of E1103G and on potential sequence effects of the translocation substantiate this proposal. Our model also investigates another slow transition detected in the transcription elongation cycle which is independent of mechanical force. If this force-independent slow transition happens as the TL gradually closes upon NTP binding, the analyses indicate that the binding affinity of NTP to the polymerase has to be sufficiently high. Otherwise, one infers that the slow transition happens pre-catalytically but after the TL closing. Accordingly, accurate determination of intrinsic properties of NTP binding is demanded for an improved characterization of the polymerase elongation. Overall, the study provides a working model of the polymerase II elongation under a generic Brownian ratchet mechanism, with most essential structural transition and functional kinetics elucidated. (paper)

  7. RNA FRABASE version 1.0: an engine with a database to search for the three-dimensional fragments within RNA structures

    OpenAIRE

    Popenda, Mariusz; Błażewicz, Marek; Szachniuk, Marta; Adamiak, Ryszard W.

    2007-01-01

    The RNA FRABASE is a web-accessible engine with a relational database, which allows for the automatic search of user-defined, 3D RNA fragments within a set of RNA structures. This is a new tool to search and analyse RNA structures, directed at the 3D structure modelling. The user needs to input either RNA sequence(s) and/or secondary structure(s) given in a ‘dot-bracket’ notation. The algorithm searching for the requested 3D RNA fragments is very efficient. As of August 2007, the database con...

  8. Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes and graphene composite structures for energy and catalytic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Jun; Maiti, Uday Narayan; Lee, Ju Min; Lim, Joonwon; Han, Tae Hee; Kim, Sang Ouk

    2014-07-01

    Substitutional heteroatom doping is a promising route to modulate the outstanding material properties of carbon nanotubes and graphene for customized applications. Recently, (nitrogen-) N-doping has been introduced to ensure tunable work-function, enhanced n-type carrier concentration, diminished surface energy, and manageable polarization. Along with the promising assessment of N-doping effects, research on the N-doped carbon based composite structures is emerging for the synergistic integration with various functional materials. This invited feature article reviews the current research progress, emerging trends, and opening opportunities in N-doped carbon based composite structures. Underlying basic principles are introduced for the effective modulation of material properties of graphitic carbons by N-doping. Composite structures of N-doped graphitic carbons with various functional materials, including (i) polymers, (ii) transition metals, (iii) metal oxides, nitrides, sulphides, and (iv) semiconducting quantum dots are highlighted. Practical benefits of the synergistic composite structures are investigated in energy and catalytic applications, such as organic photovoltaics, photo/electro-catalysts, lithium ion batteries and supercapacitors, with a particular emphasis on the optimized interfacial structures and properties. PMID:24710592

  9. Simultaneous characterization of cellular RNA structure and function with in-cell SHAPE-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Kyle E; Abbott, Timothy R; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-01-29

    Many non-coding RNAs form structures that interact with cellular machinery to control gene expression. A central goal of molecular and synthetic biology is to uncover design principles linking RNA structure to function to understand and engineer this relationship. Here we report a simple, high-throughput method called in-cell SHAPE-Seq that combines in-cell probing of RNA structure with a measurement of gene expression to simultaneously characterize RNA structure and function in bacterial cells. We use in-cell SHAPE-Seq to study the structure-function relationship of two RNA mechanisms that regulate translation in Escherichia coli. We find that nucleotides that participate in RNA-RNA interactions are highly accessible when their binding partner is absent and that changes in RNA structure due to RNA-RNA interactions can be quantitatively correlated to changes in gene expression. We also characterize the cellular structures of three endogenously expressed non-coding RNAs: 5S rRNA, RNase P and the btuB riboswitch. Finally, a comparison between in-cell and in vitro folded RNA structures revealed remarkable similarities for synthetic RNAs, but significant differences for RNAs that participate in complex cellular interactions. Thus, in-cell SHAPE-Seq represents an easily approachable tool for biologists and engineers to uncover relationships between sequence, structure and function of RNAs in the cell. PMID:26350218

  10. FASTR: A novel data format for concomitant representation of RNA sequence and secondary structure information

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tungadri Bose; Anirban Dutta; Mohammed Mh; Hemang Gandhi; Sharmila S Mande

    2015-09-01

    Given the importance of RNA secondary structures in defining their biological role, it would be convenient for researchers seeking RNA data if both sequence and structural information pertaining to RNA molecules are made available together. Current nucleotide data repositories archive only RNA sequence data. Furthermore, storage formats which can frugally represent RNA sequence as well as structure data in a single file, are currently unavailable. This article proposes a novel storage format, `FASTR’, for concomitant representation of RNA sequence and structure. The storage efficiency of the proposed FASTR format has been evaluated using RNA data from various microorganisms. Results indicate that the size of FASTR formatted files (containing both RNA sequence as well as structure information) are equivalent to that of FASTA-format files, which contain only RNA sequence information. RNA secondary structure is typically represented using a combination of a string of nucleotide characters along with the corresponding dot-bracket notation indicating structural attributes. `FASTR’ – the novel storage format proposed in the present study enables a frugal representation of both RNA sequence and structural information in the form of a single string. In spite of having a relatively smaller storage footprint, the resultant `fastr’ string(s) retain all sequence as well as secondary structural information that could be stored using a dot-bracket notation. An implementation of the `FASTR’ methodology is available for download at http://metagenomics.atc.tcs.com/compression/fastr.

  11. An RNA secondary structure prediction method based on minimum and suboptimal free energy structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Haoyue; Yang, Lianping; Zhang, Xiangde

    2015-09-01

    The function of an RNA-molecule is mainly determined by its tertiary structures. And its secondary structure is an important determinant of its tertiary structure. The comparative methods usually give better results than the single-sequence methods. Based on minimum and suboptimal free energy structures, the paper presents a novel method for predicting conserved secondary structure of a group of related RNAs. In the method, the information from the known RNA structures is used as training data in a SVM (Support Vector Machine) classifier. Our method has been tested on the benchmark dataset given by Puton et al. The results show that the average sensitivity of our method is higher than that of other comparative methods such as CentroidAlifold, MXScrana, RNAalifold, and TurboFold. PMID:26100179

  12. RNA three-way junctions can act as flexible RNA structural elements in large RNA molecules: a molecular simulation analysis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Beššeová, Ivana; Réblová, Kamila; Leontis, N.B.; Šponer, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 6 (2009), s. 830-831. ISSN 0739-1102. [The 17th Conversation. 16.06.2009-20.06.2009, Albany] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : RNA three-way junctions * RNA Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics

  13. Synthesis, Structure and Catalytic Activity Comparison of Tris- and Tetracoordinated Lanthanide Amides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE,Mei-Hua(谢美华); LIU,Xin-Yuan(刘心元); WANG,Shao-Wu(王绍武); LIU,Li(刘莉); WU,Yong-Yong(吴勇勇); YANG,Gao-Sheng(杨高升); ZHOU,Shuang-Liu(周双六); SHENG,En-Hong(盛恩宏); HUANG,Zi-Xiang(黄子祥)

    2004-01-01

    Tetracoordinated lanthanide amides [(Me3Si)2N]3Ln (μ-Cl)Li(THF)3 (Ln=La (1), Pr (2)) were synthesized by the reaction of anhydrous lanthanide(Ⅲ) chlorides LnCl3 (Ln=La, Pr) with 3 equiv. of lithium bis(trimethylsilyl)amide (Me3Si)2NLi in THF, followed by recrystallization from toluene. Sublimation of 1 and 2 afforded the triscoordinate lanthanide amides [(Me3Si)2N]3Ln (Ln =La, Pr). The crystal structure of 2 was determined by X-ray diffraction analysis. The catalytic activity studies show that the tetracoordinate amides can be used as single-component MMA (methyl methacrylate) polymerization catalysts, while the triscoordinate amides showed poor activity on MMA polymerization under the same conditions.

  14. Design of a monomeric human glutathione transferase GSTP1, a structurally stable but catalytically inactive protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Abdel-Monem; Bruns, Christopher M; Tainer, John A; Mannervik, Bengt; Stenberg, Gun

    2002-10-01

    By the introduction of 10 site-specific mutations in the dimer interface of human glutathione transferase P1-1 (GSTP1-1), a stable monomeric protein variant, GSTP1, was obtained. The monomer had lost the catalytic activity but retained the affinity for a number of electrophilic compounds normally serving as substrates for GSTP1-1. Fluorescence and circular dichroism spectra of the monomer and wild-type proteins were similar, indicating that there are no large structural differences between the subunits of the respective proteins. The GSTs have potential as targets for in vitro evolution and redesign with the aim of developing proteins with novel properties. To this end, a monomeric GST variant may have distinct advantages. PMID:12468717

  15. Crystal Structure and Catalytic Properties of Tetrakis(4-hydroxyphenyl) Porphyrinato Manganese (Ⅲ) Chloride (MnTHPPCl)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jun-wei; HUANG Xiao-chun; LIU Jin-bin; CHEN Tie; XIANG Jing; TONG Shan-ling; YANG Ke-er; YAN Yan

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of meso-tetrakis (4-hydroxyphenyl) porphyrinato manganese chloride (MnTHPPCl) and its supramolecular architecture based on the hydrogen bonds of one counter Cl anion with four hydrogen atoms of four -OH groups from different MnTHPPCl molecules cooperated by self-assembly of the porphyrin units were first reported. This compound crystallized in the tetragonal space group I4/m with a = 1.39928(7) nm, b = 1.39928(7) nm,c =0.94498(10) nm, V = 1.8503(2) nm3, and Z = 2.As a catalyst, MnTHPPCl also showed a high catalytic activity in the conversion from 1-naphthylamine (1-NA) to bis (4-oxo-benzo-2-cyclohexen-1-yl) amine ( BOBCHA ) via oxidative coupling under mild conditions.

  16. An efficient algorithm for planar drawing of RNA structures with pseudoknots of any type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Yanga; Han, Kyungsook

    2016-06-01

    An RNA pseudoknot is a tertiary structural element in which bases of a loop pair with complementary bases are outside the loop. A drawing of RNA secondary structures is a tree, but a drawing of RNA pseudoknots is a graph that has an inner cycle within a pseudoknot and possibly outer cycles formed between the pseudoknot and other structural elements. Visualizing a large-scale RNA structure with pseudoknots as a planar drawing is challenging because a planar drawing of an RNA structure requires both pseudoknots and an entire structure enclosing the pseudoknots to be embedded into a plane without overlapping or crossing. This paper presents an efficient heuristic algorithm for visualizing a pseudoknotted RNA structure as a planar drawing. The algorithm consists of several parts for finding crossing stems and page mapping the stems, for the layout of stem-loops and pseudoknots, and for overlap detection between structural elements and resolving it. Unlike previous algorithms, our algorithm generates a planar drawing for a large RNA structure with pseudoknots of any type and provides a bracket view of the structure. It generates a compact and aesthetic structure graph for a large pseudoknotted RNA structure in O([Formula: see text]) time, where n is the number of stems of the RNA structure. PMID:26932273

  17. Evaluation of the information content of RNA structure mapping data for secondary structure prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarrier, Scott; Martin, Joshua S; Davis-Neulander, Lauren; Beauregard, Arthur; Laederach, Alain

    2010-06-01

    Structure mapping experiments (using probes such as dimethyl sulfate [DMS], kethoxal, and T1 and V1 RNases) are used to determine the secondary structures of RNA molecules. The process is iterative, combining the results of several probes with constrained minimum free-energy calculations to produce a model of the structure. We aim to evaluate whether particular probes provide more structural information, and specifically, how noise in the data affects the predictions. Our approach involves generating "decoy" RNA structures (using the sFold Boltzmann sampling procedure) and evaluating whether we are able to identify the correct structure from this ensemble of structures. We show that with perfect information, we are always able to identify the optimal structure for five RNAs of known structure. We then collected orthogonal structure mapping data (DMS and RNase T1 digest) under several solution conditions using our high-throughput capillary automated footprinting analysis (CAFA) technique on two group I introns of known structure. Analysis of these data reveals the error rates in the data under optimal (low salt) and suboptimal solution conditions (high MgCl(2)). We show that despite these errors, our computational approach is less sensitive to experimental noise than traditional constraint-based structure prediction algorithms. Finally, we propose a novel approach for visualizing the interaction of chemical and enzymatic mapping data with RNA structure. We project the data onto the first two dimensions of a multidimensional scaling of the sFold-generated decoy structures. We are able to directly visualize the structural information content of structure mapping data and reconcile multiple data sets. PMID:20413617

  18. PseudoViewer: web application and web service for visualizing RNA pseudoknots and secondary structures

    OpenAIRE

    Byun, Yanga; Han, Kyungsook

    2006-01-01

    Visualizing RNA secondary structures and pseudoknot structures is essential to bioinformatics systems that deal with RNA structures. However, many bioinformatics systems use heterogeneous data structures and incompatible software components, so integration of software components (including a visualization component) into a system can be hindered by incompatibilities between the components of the system. This paper presents an XML web service and web application program for visualizing RNA sec...

  19. Crystal Structure of the APOBEC3G Catalytic Domain Reveals Potential Oligomerization Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shandilya, Shivender M.D.; Nalam, Madhavi N.L.; Nalivaika, Ellen A.; Gross, Phillip J.; Valesano, Johnathan C.; Shindo, Keisuke; Li, Ming; Munson, Mary; Royer, William E.; Harjes, Elena; Kono, Takahide; Matsuo, Hiroshi; Harris, Reuben S.; Somasundaran, Mohan; Schiffer, Celia A. (UMASS, MED); (UMM)

    2010-02-11

    APOBEC3G is a DNA cytidine deaminase that has antiviral activity against HIV-1 and other pathogenic viruses. In this study the crystal structure of the catalytically active C-terminal domain was determined to 2.25 {angstrom}. This structure corroborates features previously observed in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies, a bulge in the second {beta} strand and a lengthening of the second {alpha} helix. Oligomerization is postulated to be critical for the function of APOBEC3G. In this structure, four extensive intermolecular interfaces are observed, suggesting potential models for APOBEC3G oligomerization. The structural and functional significance of these interfaces was probed by solution NMR and disruptive variants were designed and tested for DNA deaminase and anti-HIV activities. The variant designed to disrupt the most extensive interface lost both activities. NMR solution data provides evidence that another interface, which coordinates a novel zinc site, also exists. Thus, the observed crystallographic interfaces of APOBEC3G may be important for both oligomerization and function.

  20. Uniform Catalytic Site in Sn-beta Zeolite Determined using X-ray Absorption Fine Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bare,S.; Kelly, S.; Sinkler, W.; Low, J.; Modica, F.; Valencia, S.; Corma, A.; Nemeth, L.

    2005-01-01

    The Sn silicate zeolite, Sn-{beta}, has been shown to be an efficient, selective heterogeneous catalyst for Baeyer-Villiger oxidations. Using primarily a multishell fit to extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data, we show that the Sn does not randomly insert into the {beta}-zeolite structure but rather occupies identical, specific, crystallographic sites. These sites are the T5/T6 sites in the six-membered rings. Moreover, the Sn is substituted in pairs on opposite sides of these six-membered rings. We believe that it is the specific, uniform crystallographic location of the Sn in the crystal structure that leads to sites with uniform catalytic activity, and consequently to the high chemical selectivity demonstrated for this catalyst. This manifests itself in the almost enzyme-like selectivity of this catalyst in Baeyer-Villiger oxidations. This uniform site distribution of the Sn suggests that there is likely a symbiotic relationship between the structure-directing agent in the zeolite synthesis and the Sn heteroatoms during the framework formation.

  1. Crystal structure of A. aeolicus argonaute, a site-specific DNA-guided endoribonuclease, provides insights into RISC-mediated mRNA cleavage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan,Y.; Pei, Y.; Ma, J.; Kuryavyi, V.; Zhadina, M.; Meister, G.; Chen, H.; Dauter, Z.; Tuschi, T.; Patel, D.

    2005-01-01

    Argonaute (Ago) proteins constitute a key component of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). We report the crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus Ago (Aa-Ago) together with binding and cleavage studies, which establish this eubacterial Ago as a bona fide guide DNA strand-mediated site-specific RNA endonuclease. We have generated a stereochemically robust model of the complex, where the guide DNA-mRNA duplex is positioned within a basic channel spanning the bilobal interface, such that the 5' phosphate of the guide strand can be anchored in a basic pocket, and the mRNA can be positioned for site-specific cleavage by RNase H-type divalent cation-coordinated catalytic Asp residues of the PIWI domain. Domain swap experiments involving chimeras of human Ago (hAgo1) and cleavage-competent hAgo2 reinforce the role of the PIWI domain in 'slicer' activity. We propose a four-step Ago-mediated catalytic cleavage cycle model, which provides distinct perspectives into the mechanism of guide strand-mediated mRNA cleavage within the RISC.

  2. Structural and mechanistic characterization of 6S RNA from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Karen; Duchardt-Ferner, Elke; Lechner, Marcus; Damm, Katrin; Hoch, Philipp G; Salas, Margarita; Hartmann, Roland K

    2015-10-01

    Bacterial 6S RNAs competitively inhibit binding of RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzymes to DNA promoters, thereby globally regulating transcription. RNAP uses 6S RNA itself as a template to synthesize short transcripts, termed pRNAs (product RNAs). Longer pRNAs (approx. ≥ 10 nt) rearrange the 6S RNA structure and thereby disrupt the 6S RNA:RNAP complex, which enables the enzyme to resume transcription at DNA promoters. We studied 6S RNA of the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus, representing the thermodynamically most stable 6S RNA known so far. Applying structure probing and NMR, we show that the RNA adopts the canonical rod-shaped 6S RNA architecture with little structure formation in the central bulge (CB) even at moderate temperatures (≤37 °C). 6S RNA:pRNA complex formation triggers an internal structure rearrangement of 6S RNA, i.e. formation of a so-called central bulge collapse (CBC) helix. The persistence of several characteristic NMR imino proton resonances upon pRNA annealing demonstrates that defined helical segments on both sides of the CB are retained in the pRNA-bound state, thus representing a basic framework of the RNA's architecture. RNA-seq analyses revealed pRNA synthesis from 6S RNA in A. aeolicus, identifying 9 to ∼17-mers as the major length species. A. aeolicus 6S RNA can also serve as a template for in vitro pRNA synthesis by RNAP from the mesophile Bacillus subtilis. Binding of a synthetic pRNA to A. aeolicus 6S RNA blocks formation of 6S RNA:RNAP complexes. Our findings indicate that A. aeolicus 6S RNA function in its hyperthermophilic host is mechanistically identical to that of other bacterial 6S RNAs. The use of artificial pRNA variants, designed to disrupt helix P2 from the 3'-CB instead of the 5'-CB but preventing formation of the CBC helix, indicated that the mechanism of pRNA-induced RNAP release has been evolutionarily optimized for transcriptional pRNA initiation in the 5'-CB. PMID:25771336

  3. Solution structure of the SL1 RNA of the M1 double-stranded RNA virus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Yoo, J. S.; Cheong, H. K.; Lee, B.J.; Kim, Y. B.; Cheong, C

    2001-01-01

    The 20-nucleotide SL1 VBS RNA, 5'-GGAGACGC[GAUUC]GCGCUCC (bulged A underlined and loop bases in brackets), plays a crucial role in viral particle binding to the plus strand and packaging of the RNA. Its structure was determined by NMR spectroscopy. Structure calculations gave a precisely defined structure, with an average pairwise root mean square deviation (RMSD) of 1.28 A for the entire molecule, 0.57 A for the loop region (C8-G14), and 0.46 A for the bulge region (G4-G7, C15-C17). Base sta...

  4. Mechanisms of Lin28-Mediated miRNA and mRNA Regulation—A Structural and Functional Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Udo Heinemann

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Lin28 is an essential RNA-binding protein that is ubiquitously expressed in embryonic stem cells. Its physiological function has been linked to the regulation of differentiation, development, and oncogenesis as well as glucose metabolism. Lin28 mediates these pleiotropic functions by inhibiting let-7 miRNA biogenesis and by modulating the translation of target mRNAs. Both activities strongly depend on Lin28’s RNA-binding domains (RBDs, an N-terminal cold-shock domain (CSD and a C-terminal Zn-knuckle domain (ZKD. Recent biochemical and structural studies revealed the mechanisms of how Lin28 controls let-7 biogenesis. Lin28 binds to the terminal loop of pri- and pre-let-7 miRNA and represses their processing by Drosha and Dicer. Several biochemical and structural studies showed that the specificity of this interaction is mainly mediated by the ZKD with a conserved GGAGA or GGAGA-like motif. Further RNA crosslinking and immunoprecipitation coupled to high-throughput sequencing (CLIP-seq studies confirmed this binding motif and uncovered a large number of new mRNA binding sites. Here we review exciting recent progress in our understanding of how Lin28 binds structurally diverse RNAs and fulfills its pleiotropic functions.

  5. Structure of the Photo-catalytically Active Surface of SrTiO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaza, Manuel; Huang, Xin; Ko, J Y Peter; Shen, Mei; Simpson, Burton H; Rodríguez-López, Joaquín; Ritzert, Nicole L; Letchworth-Weaver, Kendra; Gunceler, Deniz; Schlom, Darrell G; Arias, Tomás A; Brock, Joel D; Abruña, Héctor D

    2016-06-29

    A major goal of energy research is to use visible light to cleave water directly, without an applied voltage, into hydrogen and oxygen. Although SrTiO3 requires ultraviolet light, after four decades, it is still the "gold standard" for the photo-catalytic splitting of water. It is chemically robust and can carry out both hydrogen and oxygen evolution reactions without an applied bias. While ultrahigh vacuum surface science techniques have provided useful insights, we still know relatively little about the structure of these electrodes in contact with electrolytes under operating conditions. Here, we report the surface structure evolution of a n-SrTiO3 electrode during water splitting, before and after "training" with an applied positive bias. Operando high-energy X-ray reflectivity measurements demonstrate that training the electrode irreversibly reorders the surface. Scanning electrochemical microscopy at open circuit correlates this training with a 3-fold increase of the activity toward the photo-induced water splitting. A novel first-principles joint density functional theory simulation, constrained to the X-ray data via a generalized penalty function, identifies an anatase-like structure as the more active, trained surface. PMID:27281231

  6. Crystal structure of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2 from Zea mays at 2.1 A resolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niefind, K; Guerra, B; Pinna, L A;

    1998-01-01

    CK2alpha is the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2, an acidophilic and constitutively active eukaryotic Ser/Thr kinase involved in cell proliferation. A crystal structure, at 2.1 A resolution, of recombinant maize CK2alpha (rmCK2alpha) in the presence of ATP and Mg2+, shows the enzyme in an ...

  7. Crystal structure of the anti-viral APOBEC3G catalytic domain and functional implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, Lauren G.; Prochnow, Courtney; Chang, Y. Paul; Bransteitter, Ronda; Chelico, Linda; Sen, Udayaditya; Stevens, Raymond C.; Goodman, Myron F.; Chen, Xiaojiang S. (USC); (Scripps)

    2009-04-07

    The APOBEC family members are involved in diverse biological functions. APOBEC3G restricts the replication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus and retroelements by cytidine deamination on single-stranded DNA or by RNA binding. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of the carboxy-terminal deaminase domain of APOBEC3G (APOBEC3G-CD2) purified from Escherichia coli. The APOBEC3G-CD2 structure has a five-stranded {beta}-sheet core that is common to all known deaminase structures and closely resembles the structure of another APOBEC protein, APOBEC2. A comparison of APOBEC3G-CD2 with other deaminase structures shows a structural conservation of the active-site loops that are directly involved in substrate binding. In the X-ray structure, these APOBEC3G active-site loops form a continuous 'substrate groove' around the active centre. The orientation of this putative substrate groove differs markedly (by 90 degrees) from the groove predicted by the NMR structure. We have introduced mutations around the groove, and have identified residues involved in substrate specificity, single-stranded DNA binding and deaminase activity. These results provide a basis for understanding the underlying mechanisms of substrate specificity for the APOBEC family.

  8. Oscillatory Behavior during the Catalytic Partial Oxidation of Methane: Following Dynamic Structural Changes of Palladium Using the QEXAFS Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Stoetzel, Jan; Frahm, Ronald; Kimmerle, Bertram; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk

    2012-01-01

    Pd/Al2O3 catalysts oscillate between ignition and extinction of the catalytic partial oxidation of methane when they are exposed to a 2:1 reaction mixture of methane and oxygen. The oscillations of the catalytic performance and the structure of Pd/Al2O3 catalysts in a fixed-bed reactor were investigated using spatially and time-resolved in situ quick scanning X-ray absorption spectroscopy with online mass spectrometry. The dynamic methane conversion oscillated between an inactive state, where...

  9. Catalytic activities enhanced by abundant structural defects and balanced N distribution of N-doped graphene in oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiaogong; Shi, Yantao; Guo, Jiahao; Gao, Liguo; Wang, Kai; Du, Yi; Ma, Tingli

    2016-02-01

    N-doped graphene (NG) is a promising candidate for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in the cathode of fuel cells. However, the catalytic activity of NG is lower than that of commercial Pt/C in alkaline and acidic media. In this study, NG samples were obtained using urea as N source. The structural defects and N distribution in the samples were adjusted by regulating the pyrolysis temperature. The new NG type exhibited remarkable catalytic activities for ORR in both alkaline and acidic media.

  10. Structure of the catalytic domain of the Tannerella forsythia matrix metallopeptidase karilysin in complex with a tetrapeptidic inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guevara, Tibisay; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Skottrup, Peter Durand;

    2013-01-01

    Karilysin is the only metallopeptidase identified as a virulence factor in the odontopathogen Tannerella forsythia owing to its deleterious effect on the host immune response during bacterial infection. The very close structural and sequence-based similarity of its catalytic domain (Kly18...... to the primed side of the active-site cleft in a substrate-like manner. The catalytic zinc ion is clamped by the α-amino group and the carbonyl O atom of the serine, thus distantly mimicking the general manner of binding of hydroxamate inhibitors to metallopeptidases and contributing, together with three zinc...

  11. MG-132 inhibits the TCDD-mediated induction of Cyp1a1 at the catalytic activity but not the mRNA or protein levels in Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar-Mohamed, Anwar; Elbekai, Reem H; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2008-11-10

    Previous studies have shown that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced degradation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is inhibited by MG-132, a potent inhibitor of the 26S proteasome. Therefore, the current study aims to address the effect of MG-132 on the AhR-regulated gene, cytochrome P450 1a1 (Cyp1a1), using murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells. Our results showed that MG-132 at the highest concentration tested, 10 microM significantly increased the Cyp1a1 at mRNA, protein and catalytic activity levels through a transcriptional mechanism. On the other hand, MG-132 further potentiated the TCDD-mediated induction of Cyp1a1 at mRNA but not at protein level. In contrast, MG-132 significantly inhibited the TCDD-mediated induction of Cyp1a1 catalytic activity. In addition, we showed that the decrease in Cyp1a1 catalytic activity is not Cyp specific, as MG-132 significantly inhibited Cyp2b1 and total cytochrome P450 catalytic activities. These results prompted us to examine the effect of MG-132 on total cellular heme content and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mRNA, a rate limiting enzyme of heme degradation. Our results showed that MG-132 significantly induced HO-1 mRNA in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, MG-132 potentiated the induction of HO-1 mRNA by TCDD in a concentration-dependent manner. The induction of HO-1 mRNA level coincided with a decrease in total cellular heme content. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates for the first time that MG-132, despite of increasing Cyp1a1 mRNA expression, it decreases its activity probably through decreasing its heme content. PMID:18835339

  12. Isolation of high-affinity GTP aptamers from partially structured RNA libraries

    OpenAIRE

    DAVIS, JONATHAN H.; Szostak, Jack W.

    2002-01-01

    Aptamers, RNA sequences that bind to target ligands, are typically isolated by in vitro selection from RNA libraries containing completely random sequences. To see whether higher-affinity aptamers can be isolated from partially structured RNA libraries, we selected for aptamers that bind GTP, starting from a mixture of fully random and partially structured libraries. Because stem-loops are common motifs in previously characterized aptamers, we designed the partially structured library to cont...

  13. RNA global alignment in the joint sequence–structure space using elastic shape analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Laborde, Jose; Robinson, Daniel; Srivastava, Anuj; Klassen, Eric; Zhang, Jinfeng

    2013-01-01

    The functions of RNAs, like proteins, are determined by their structures, which, in turn, are determined by their sequences. Comparison/alignment of RNA molecules provides an effective means to predict their functions and understand their evolutionary relationships. For RNA sequence alignment, most methods developed for protein and DNA sequence alignment can be directly applied. RNA 3-dimensional structure alignment, on the other hand, tends to be more difficult than protein structure alignme...

  14. Catalytic domain structure and hypothesis for function of GIY-YIG intron endonuclease I-TevI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Roey, Patrick; Meehan, Lisa; Kowalski, Joseph C; Belfort, Marlene; Derbyshire, Victoria

    2002-11-01

    I-TevI, a member of the GIY-YIG family of homing endonucleases, consists of an N-terminal catalytic domain and a C-terminal DNA-binding domain joined by a flexible linker. The GIY-YIG motif is in the N-terminal domain of I-TevI, which corresponds to a phylogenetically widespread catalytic cartridge that is often associated with mobile genetic elements. The crystal structure of the catalytic domain of I-TevI, the first of any GIY-YIG endonuclease, reveals a novel alpha/beta-fold with a central three-stranded antiparallel beta-sheet flanked by three helices. The most conserved and putative catalytic residues are located on a shallow, concave surface and include a metal coordination site. Similarities in the three-dimensional arrangement of the catalytically important residues and the cation-binding site with those of the His-Cys box endonuclease I-PpoI suggest the possibility of mechanistic relationships among these different families of homing endonucleases despite completely different folds. PMID:12379841

  15. Biotemplating of Luffa cylindrica sponges to self-supporting hierarchical zeolite macrostructures for bio-inspired structured catalytic reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biomorphic self-supporting MFI-type zeolite frameworks with hierarchical porosity and complex architecture were prepared using a 2-step (in-situ seeding and secondary crystal growth) hydrothermal synthesis in the presence of a biological template (Luffa sponge), employed as a macroscale sacrificial structure builder. The bio-inspired zeolitic replica inherited the complex spongy morphology and the intricate open-porous architecture of the biotemplate. Moreover, it exhibited reasonable mechanical stability in order to study the applicability of the biomorphic catalyst in a technical catalytic process. A bio-inspired catalytic reactor utilising the self-supporting ZSM-5 scaffold in monolithic configuration was developed in order to test the catalytic performance of the material

  16. Biotemplating of Luffa cylindrica sponges to self-supporting hierarchical zeolite macrostructures for bio-inspired structured catalytic reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zampieri, Alessandro [Institute of Chemical Reaction Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Egerlandstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Mabande, Godwin T.P. [Institute of Chemical Reaction Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Egerlandstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Selvam, Thangaraj [Institute of Chemical Reaction Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Egerlandstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Schwieger, Wilhelm [Institute of Chemical Reaction Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Egerlandstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)]. E-mail: Wilhelm.Schwieger@rzmail.uni-erlangen.de; Rudolph, Alexander [Institute of Chemical Reaction Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Egerlandstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Hermann, Ralph [Institute of Chemical Reaction Engineering, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Egerlandstr. 3, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Sieber, Heino [Department of Materials Science III, Glass and Ceramics, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Martenstr. 5, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Greil, Peter [Department of Materials Science III, Glass and Ceramics, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Erlangen, Martenstr. 5, 91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2006-01-15

    Biomorphic self-supporting MFI-type zeolite frameworks with hierarchical porosity and complex architecture were prepared using a 2-step (in-situ seeding and secondary crystal growth) hydrothermal synthesis in the presence of a biological template (Luffa sponge), employed as a macroscale sacrificial structure builder. The bio-inspired zeolitic replica inherited the complex spongy morphology and the intricate open-porous architecture of the biotemplate. Moreover, it exhibited reasonable mechanical stability in order to study the applicability of the biomorphic catalyst in a technical catalytic process. A bio-inspired catalytic reactor utilising the self-supporting ZSM-5 scaffold in monolithic configuration was developed in order to test the catalytic performance of the material.

  17. Displaying the information contents of structural RNA alignments: the structure logos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Heyer, L.J.; Brunak, Søren;

    1997-01-01

    We extend the standard `Sequence Logo' method of Schneider and Stevens to incorporate prior frequencies on the bases, allow for gaps in the alignments, and indicate the mutual information of base-paired regions in RNA. Given an alignment of RNA sequences with the base pairings indicated, the...... program will calculate the information at each position, including the mutual information of the base pairs, and display the results in a `Structure Logo'. Alignments without base pairing can also be displayed in a `Sequence Logo', but still allowing gaps and incorporating prior frequencies if desired...

  18. Sequence-Dependent Structure/Function Relationships of Catalytic Peptide-Enabled Gold Nanoparticles Generated under Ambient Synthetic Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedford, Nicholas M.; Hughes, Zak E.; Tang, Zhenghua; Li, Yue; Briggs, Beverly D.; Ren, Yang; Swihart, Mark T.; Petkov, Valeri G.; Naik, Rajesh R.; Knecht, Mark R.; Walsh, Tiffany R.

    2016-01-20

    Peptide-enabled nanoparticle (NP) synthesis routes can create and/or assemble functional nanomaterials under environmentally friendly conditions, with properties dictated by complex interactions at the biotic/abiotic interface. Manipulation of this interface through sequence modification can provide the capability for material properties to be tailored to create enhanced materials for energy, catalysis, and sensing applications. Fully realizing the potential of these materials requires a comprehensive understanding of sequence-dependent structure/function relationships that is presently lacking. In this work, the atomic-scale structures of a series of peptide-capped Au NPs are determined using a combination of atomic pair distribution function analysis of high-energy X-ray diffraction data and advanced molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The Au NPs produced with different peptide sequences exhibit varying degrees of catalytic activity for the exemplar reaction 4-nitrophenol reduction. The experimentally derived atomic-scale NP configurations reveal sequence-dependent differences in structural order at the NP surface. Replica exchange with solute-tempering MD simulations are then used to predict the morphology of the peptide overlayer on these Au NPs and identify factors determining the structure/catalytic properties relationship. We show that the amount of exposed Au surface, the underlying surface structural disorder, and the interaction strength of the peptide with the Au surface all influence catalytic performance. A simplified computational prediction of catalytic performance is developed that can potentially serve as a screening tool for future studies. Our approach provides a platform for broadening the analysis of catalytic peptide-enabled metallic NP systems, potentially allowing for the development of rational design rules for property enhancement.

  19. Structural Basis for the Catalytic Activity of Human Serine/Threonine Protein Phosphatase type 5 (PP5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swingle, Mark R.; Ciszak, Ewa M.; Honkanen, Richard E.

    2004-01-01

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatase-5 (PP5) is a member of the PPP-gene family of protein phosphatases that is widely expressed in mammalian tissues and is highly conserved among eukaryotes. PP5 associates with several proteins that affect signal transduction networks, including the glucocorticoid receptor (GR)-heat shock protein-90 (Hsp90)-heterocomplex, the CDC16 and CDC27 subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex, elF2alpha kinase, the A subunit of PP2A, the G12-alpha / G13-alpha subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins and DNA-PK. The catalytic domain of PP5 (PP5c) shares 35-45% sequence identity with the catalytic domains of other PPP-phosphatases, including protein phosphatase-1 (PP1), -2A (PP2A), -2B / calcineurin (PP2B), -4 (PP4), -6 (PP6), and -7 (PP7). Like PP1, PP2A and PP4, PP5 is also sensitive to inhibition by okadaic acid, microcystin, cantharidin, tautomycin, and calyculin A. Here we report the crystal structure of the PP5 catalytic domain (PP5c) at a resolution of 1.6 angstroms. From this structure we propose a mechanism for PP5-mediated hydrolysis of phosphoprotein substrates, which requires the precise positioning of two metal ions within a conserved Asp(sup 271)-M(sub 1):M(sub 2)-W(sup 1)-His(sup 304)-Asp(sup 274) catalytic motif. The structure of PP5c provides a possible structural basis for explaining the exceptional catalytic proficiency of protein phosphatases, which are among the most powerful known catalysts. Resolution of the entire C-terminus revealed a novel subdomain, and the structure of the PP5c should also aid development of type-specific inhibitors.

  20. Structure-Guided Control of siRNA Off-Target Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suter, Scott R; Sheu-Gruttadauria, Jessica; Schirle, Nicole T; Valenzuela, Rachel; Ball-Jones, Alexi A; Onizuka, Kazumitsu; MacRae, Ian J; Beal, Peter A

    2016-07-20

    Short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are promising therapeutics that make use of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway, but liabilities arising from the native RNA structure necessitate chemical modification for drug development. Advances in the structural characterization of components of the human RNAi pathway have enabled structure-guided optimization of siRNA properties. Here we report the 2.3 Å resolution crystal structure of human Argonaute 2 (hAgo2), a key nuclease in the RNAi pathway, bound to an siRNA guide strand bearing an unnatural triazolyl nucleotide at position 1 (g1). Unlike natural nucleotides, this analogue inserts deeply into hAgo2's central RNA binding cleft and thus is able to modulate pairing between guide and target RNAs. The affinity of the hAgo2-siRNA complex for a seed-only matched target was significantly reduced by the triazolyl modification, while the affinity for a fully matched target was unchanged. In addition, siRNA potency for off-target repression was reduced (4-fold increase in IC50) by the modification, while on-target knockdown was improved (2-fold reduction in IC50). Controlling siRNA on-target versus microRNA (miRNA)-like off-target potency by projection of substituent groups into the hAgo2 central cleft from g1 is a new approach to enhance siRNA selectivity with a strong structural rationale. PMID:27387838

  1. Surface structure and catalytic activity of electrodeposited Ni-Fe-Co-Mo alloy electrode by partially leaching Mo and Fe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Bei-ping; GONG Zhu-qing; REN Bi-ye; YANG Yu-fang; CHEN Meng-jun

    2006-01-01

    Ni-Fe-Mo-Co alloy electrode was prepared in a citrate solution by electrodeposition, and then Mo and Fe were partially leached out from the electrode in 30% KOH solution. The unique surface micromorphology of a hive-like structure was obtained with an average pore size of about 50 nm. The electrode has a very large real surface area and a stable structure. The effects of sodium molybdate concentration on the composition, surface morphology, and structure of electrodes were analyzed by EDS, SEM and XRD. The polarization curves of the different electrodes show that the catalytic activity of electrodes is strongly correlated with the mole fraction of alloy elements (Ni, Fe, Mo, Co), and the addition of cobalt element to Ni-Fe-Mo alloy improves the catalytic activity. The Ni35.63Fe24.67Mo23.52Co16.18 electrode has the best activity for hydrogen evolution reaction(HER), with an over-potential of 66.2 mV, in 30% KOH at 80 ℃ and 200 mA/cm2. The alloy maintains its good catalytic activity for HER during continuous or intermittent electrolysis. Its electrochemical activity and catalytic stability are much higher than the other iron-group with Mo alloy electrodes.

  2. The in vitro loose dimer structure and rearrangements of the HIV-2 leader RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Purzycka, Katarzyna J.; Pachulska-Wieczorek, Katarzyna; Adamiak, Ryszard W.

    2011-01-01

    RNA dimerization is an essential step in the retroviral life cycle. Dimerization and encapsidation signals, closely linked in HIV-2, are located in the leader RNA region. The SL1 motif and nucleocapsid protein are considered important for both processes. In this study, we show the structure of the HIV-2 leader RNA (+1–560) captured as a loose dimer. Potential structural rearrangements within the leader RNA were studied. In the loose dimer form, the HIV-2 leader RNA strand exists in vitro as a...

  3. Catalytic pyrogenation synthesis of C/Ni composite nanoparticles: controllable carbon structures and high permittivities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, B; Huang, H; Dong, X L; Lei, J P, E-mail: dongxl@dlut.edu.c [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian, Liaoning 116024 (China)

    2010-03-17

    Catalytic pyrogenation of methane gas in the presence of Ni nanoparticles was employed to synthesize C/Ni composite nanoparticles at various reaction temperatures. The Ni nanoparticles prepared by the arc-discharge method served as a catalyst to decompose the hydrocarbon molecules and also provided isolated templates for the formation of carbon nanocapsules at 400 and 500 {sup 0}C or multi-walled carbon nanotubes at 600 and 650 {sup 0}C. The generation and growth mechanism of the carbon shells are discussed on the basis of structure evolution. By dispersing the nanoparticles homogeneously into a paraffin matrix, the electromagnetic parameters of the nanoparticles have been investigated in the frequency range 2-18 GHz. The samples exhibit high permittivities varying with the microstructures of the nanoparticles. The relationship between the dielectric properties and diverse carbon structures is indicated. The high permittivities of the nanoparticles are attributed to the better conductivity of the carbon shells and the charge polarizations at the defects or interfaces between metal cores and carbon shells.

  4. Structural Aspects of the Antiparallel and Parallel Duplexes Formed by DNA, 2’-O-Methyl RNA and RNA Oligonucleotides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szabat, Marta; Pedzinski, Tomasz; Czapik, Tomasz; Kierzek, Elzbieta; Kierzek, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of the nature of oligonucleotides on the abilities to form antiparallel and parallel duplexes. Base pairing of homopurine DNA, 2’-O-MeRNA and RNA oligonucleotides with respective homopyrimidine DNA, 2’-O-MeRNA and RNA as well as chimeric oligonucleotides containing LNA resulted in the formation of 18 various duplexes. UV melting, circular dichroism and fluorescence studies revealed the influence of nucleotide composition on duplex structure and thermal stability depending on the buffer pH value. Most duplexes simultaneously adopted both orientations. However, at pH 5.0, parallel duplexes were more favorable. Moreover, the presence of LNA nucleotides within a homopyrimidine strand favored the formation of parallel duplexes. PMID:26579720

  5. Catalytic activity of bimetallic catalysts highly sensitive to the atomic composition and phase structure at the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Shiyao; Petkov, Valeri; Prasai, Binay; Wu, Jinfang; Joseph, Pharrah; Skeete, Zakiya; Kim, Eunjoo; Mott, Derrick; Malis, Oana; Luo, Jin; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2015-11-01

    The ability to determine the atomic arrangement in nanoalloy catalysts and reveal the detailed structural features responsible for the catalytically active sites is essential for understanding the correlation between the atomic structure and catalytic properties, enabling the preparation of efficient nanoalloy catalysts by design. Herein we describe a study of CO oxidation over PdCu nanoalloy catalysts focusing on gaining insights into the correlation between the atomic structures and catalytic activity of nanoalloys. PdCu nanoalloys of different bimetallic compositions are synthesized as a model system and are activated by a controlled thermochemical treatment for assessing their catalytic activity. The results show that the catalytic synergy of Pd and Cu species evolves with both the bimetallic nanoalloy composition and temperature of the thermochemical treatment reaching a maximum at a Pd : Cu ratio close to 50 : 50. The nanoalloys are characterized structurally by ex situ and in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction, including atomic pair distribution function analysis. The structural data show that, depending on the bimetallic composition and treatment temperature, PdCu nanoalloys adopt two different structure types. One features a chemically ordered, body centered cubic (B2) type alloy consisting of two interpenetrating simple cubic lattices, each occupied with Pd or Cu species alone, and the other structure type features a chemically disordered, face-centered cubic (fcc) type of alloy wherein Pd and Cu species are intermixed at random. The catalytic activity for CO oxidation is strongly influenced by the structural features. In particular, it is revealed that the prevalence of chemical disorder in nanoalloys with a Pd : Cu ratio close to 50 : 50 makes them superior catalysts for CO oxidation in comparison with the same nanoalloys of other bimetallic compositions. However, the catalytic synergy can be diminished if the Pd50Cu50 nanoalloys undergo phase

  6. Structural Basis for Binding of RNA and Cofactor by a KsgA Methyltransferase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tu, Chao; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Court, Donald L.; Waugh, David S.; Ji, Xinhua; (NCI)

    2009-03-27

    Among methyltransferases, KsgA and the reaction it catalyzes are conserved throughout evolution. However, the specifics of substrate recognition by the enzyme remain unknown. Here we report structures of Aquifex aeolicus KsgA, in its ligand-free form, in complex with RNA, and in complex with both RNA and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH, reaction product of cofactor S-adenosylmethionine), revealing critical structural information on KsgA-RNA and KsgA-SAH interactions. Moreover, the structures show how conformational changes that occur upon RNA binding create the cofactor-binding site. There are nine conserved functional motifs (motifs IVIII and X) in KsgA. Prior to RNA binding, motifs I and VIII are flexible, each exhibiting two distinct conformations. Upon RNA binding, the two motifs become stabilized in one of these conformations, which is compatible with the binding of SAH. Motif X, which is also stabilized upon RNA binding, is directly involved in the binding of SAH.

  7. FR3D: finding local and composite recurrent structural motifs in RNA 3D structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver, Michael; Zirbel, Craig L; Stombaugh, Jesse; Mokdad, Ali; Leontis, Neocles B

    2008-01-01

    New methods are described for finding recurrent three-dimensional (3D) motifs in RNA atomic-resolution structures. Recurrent RNA 3D motifs are sets of RNA nucleotides with similar spatial arrangements. They can be local or composite. Local motifs comprise nucleotides that occur in the same hairpin or internal loop. Composite motifs comprise nucleotides belonging to three or more different RNA strand segments or molecules. We use a base-centered approach to construct efficient, yet exhaustive search procedures using geometric, symbolic, or mixed representations of RNA structure that we implement in a suite of MATLAB programs, "Find RNA 3D" (FR3D). The first modules of FR3D preprocess structure files to classify base-pair and -stacking interactions. Each base is represented geometrically by the position of its glycosidic nitrogen in 3D space and by the rotation matrix that describes its orientation with respect to a common frame. Base-pairing and base-stacking interactions are calculated from the base geometries and are represented symbolically according to the Leontis/Westhof basepairing classification, extended to include base-stacking. These data are stored and used to organize motif searches. For geometric searches, the user supplies the 3D structure of a query motif which FR3D uses to find and score geometrically similar candidate motifs, without regard to the sequential position of their nucleotides in the RNA chain or the identity of their bases. To score and rank candidate motifs, FR3D calculates a geometric discrepancy by rigidly rotating candidates to align optimally with the query motif and then comparing the relative orientations of the corresponding bases in the query and candidate motifs. Given the growing size of the RNA structure database, it is impossible to explicitly compute the discrepancy for all conceivable candidate motifs, even for motifs with less than ten nucleotides. The screening algorithm that we describe finds all candidate motifs whose

  8. Fingerprinting the junctions of RNA structure by an open-paddlewheel diruthenium compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Gloria; Jimenez-Aparicio, Reyes; Herrero, Santiago; Martinez-Salas, Encarnacion

    2016-03-01

    RNA function is determined by its structural organization. The RNA structure consists of the combination of distinct secondary structure motifs connected by junctions that play an essential role in RNA folding. Selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) probing is an established methodology to analyze the secondary structure of long RNA molecules in solution, which provides accurate data about unpaired nucleotides. However, the residues located at the junctions of RNA structures usually remain undetected. Here we report an RNA probing method based on the use of a novel open-paddlewheel diruthenium (OPW-Ru) compound [Ru2Cl2(µ-DPhF)3(DMSO)] (DPhF = N,N'-diphenylformamidinate). This compound has four potential coordination sites in a singular disposition to establish covalent bonds with substrates. As a proof of concept, we have analyzed the reactivity of OPW-Ru toward RNA using two viral internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements whose function depends on the structural organization of the molecule. Our study suggests that the compound OPW-Ru preferentially attacks at positions located one or two nucleotides away from junctions or bulges of the RNA structure. The OPW-Ru fingerprinting data differ from that obtained by other chemical reagents and provides new information about RNA structure features. PMID:26759454

  9. RNA-seq transcriptome analysis of a Pseudomonas strain with diversified catalytic properties growth under different culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jia-Wei; Zheng, Dai-Jun; Cui, Bao-Dong; Yang, Min; Chen, Yong-Zheng

    2016-08-01

    Biocatalysis is an emerging strategy for the production of enantio-pure organic molecules. However, lacking of commercially available enzymes restricts the widespread application of biocatalysis. In this study, we report a Pseudomonas strain which exhibited versatile oxidation activity to synthesize chiral sulfoxides when growing under M9-toluene medium and reduction activity to synthesize chiral alcohols when on Luria-Bertani (LB) medium, respectively. Further comparative transcriptome analysis on samples from these two cultural conditions has identified 1038 differentially expressed genes (DEG). Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment and KEGG pathways analysis demonstrate significant changes in protein synthesis, energy metabolism, and biosynthesis of metabolites when cells cultured under different conditions. We have identified eight candidate enzymes from this bacterial which may have the potential to be used for synthesis of chiral alcohol and sulfoxide chemicals. This work provides insights into the mechanism of diversity in catalytic properties of this Pseudomonas strain growth with different cultural conditions, as well as candidate enzymes for further biocatalysis of enantiomerically pure molecules and pharmaceuticals. PMID:27061463

  10. Structural architecture of an RNA that competitively inhibits RNase L

    OpenAIRE

    Keel, Amanda Y.; Jha, Babal Kant; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2012-01-01

    Activation of RNase L endonuclease activity is part of the mammalian innate immune response to viral infection. The poliovirus RNA genome contains a sequence in its protein-coding region that can act as a competitive inhibitor (ciRNA) of RNase L, the first example of an RNA that directly inhibits the activity of an RNase. By using a combination of biophysical, mutational, and functional studies, the authors have mapped features of the three-dimensional architecture of the ciRNA in its unbound...

  11. RNA FRABASE 2.0: an advanced web-accessible database with the capacity to search the three-dimensional fragments within RNA structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasik Szymon

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent discoveries concerning novel functions of RNA, such as RNA interference, have contributed towards the growing importance of the field. In this respect, a deeper knowledge of complex three-dimensional RNA structures is essential to understand their new biological functions. A number of bioinformatic tools have been proposed to explore two major structural databases (PDB, NDB in order to analyze various aspects of RNA tertiary structures. One of these tools is RNA FRABASE 1.0, the first web-accessible database with an engine for automatic search of 3D fragments within PDB-derived RNA structures. This search is based upon the user-defined RNA secondary structure pattern. In this paper, we present and discuss RNA FRABASE 2.0. This second version of the system represents a major extension of this tool in terms of providing new data and a wide spectrum of novel functionalities. An intuitionally operated web server platform enables very fast user-tailored search of three-dimensional RNA fragments, their multi-parameter conformational analysis and visualization. Description RNA FRABASE 2.0 has stored information on 1565 PDB-deposited RNA structures, including all NMR models. The RNA FRABASE 2.0 search engine algorithms operate on the database of the RNA sequences and the new library of RNA secondary structures, coded in the dot-bracket format extended to hold multi-stranded structures and to cover residues whose coordinates are missing in the PDB files. The library of RNA secondary structures (and their graphics is made available. A high level of efficiency of the 3D search has been achieved by introducing novel tools to formulate advanced searching patterns and to screen highly populated tertiary structure elements. RNA FRABASE 2.0 also stores data and conformational parameters in order to provide "on the spot" structural filters to explore the three-dimensional RNA structures. An instant visualization of the 3D RNA

  12. An efficient genetic algorithm for structural RNA pairwise alignment and its application to non-coding RNA discovery in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taneda Akito

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aligning RNA sequences with low sequence identity has been a challenging problem since such a computation essentially needs an algorithm with high complexities for taking structural conservation into account. Although many sophisticated algorithms for the purpose have been proposed to date, further improvement in efficiency is necessary to accelerate its large-scale applications including non-coding RNA (ncRNA discovery. Results We developed a new genetic algorithm, Cofolga2, for simultaneously computing pairwise RNA sequence alignment and consensus folding, and benchmarked it using BRAliBase 2.1. The benchmark results showed that our new algorithm is accurate and efficient in both time and memory usage. Then, combining with the originally trained SVM, we applied the new algorithm to novel ncRNA discovery where we compared S. cerevisiae genome with six related genomes in a pairwise manner. By focusing our search to the relatively short regions (50 bp to 2,000 bp sandwiched by conserved sequences, we successfully predict 714 intergenic and 1,311 sense or antisense ncRNA candidates, which were found in the pairwise alignments with stable consensus secondary structure and low sequence identity (≤ 50%. By comparing with the previous predictions, we found that > 92% of the candidates is novel candidates. The estimated rate of false positives in the predicted candidates is 51%. Twenty-five percent of the intergenic candidates has supports for expression in cell, i.e. their genomic positions overlap those of the experimentally determined transcripts in literature. By manual inspection of the results, moreover, we obtained four multiple alignments with low sequence identity which reveal consensus structures shared by three species/sequences. Conclusion The present method gives an efficient tool complementary to sequence-alignment-based ncRNA finders.

  13. An automated procedure for covariation-based detection of RNA structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winker, S.; Overbeek, R.; Woese, C.R.; Olsen, G.J.; Pfluger, N.

    1989-12-01

    This paper summarizes our investigations into the computational detection of secondary and tertiary structure of ribosomal RNA. We have developed a new automated procedure that not only identifies potential bondings of secondary and tertiary structure, but also provides the covariation evidence that supports the proposed bondings, and any counter-evidence that can be detected in the known sequences. A small number of previously unknown bondings have been detected in individual RNA molecules (16S rRNA and 7S RNA) through the use of our automated procedure. Currently, we are systematically studying mitochondrial rRNA. Our goal is to detect tertiary structure within 16S rRNA and quaternary structure between 16S and 23S rRNA. Our ultimate hope is that automated covariation analysis will contribute significantly to a refined picture of ribosome structure. Our colleagues in biology have begun experiments to test certain hypotheses suggested by an examination of our program's output. These experiments involve sequencing key portions of the 23S ribosomal RNA for species in which the known 16S ribosomal RNA exhibits variation (from the dominant pattern) at the site of a proposed bonding. The hope is that the 23S ribosomal RNA of these species will exhibit corresponding complementary variation or generalized covariation. 24 refs.

  14. An automated procedure for covariation-based detection of RNA structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes our investigations into the computational detection of secondary and tertiary structure of ribosomal RNA. We have developed a new automated procedure that not only identifies potential bondings of secondary and tertiary structure, but also provides the covariation evidence that supports the proposed bondings, and any counter-evidence that can be detected in the known sequences. A small number of previously unknown bondings have been detected in individual RNA molecules (16S rRNA and 7S RNA) through the use of our automated procedure. Currently, we are systematically studying mitochondrial rRNA. Our goal is to detect tertiary structure within 16S rRNA and quaternary structure between 16S and 23S rRNA. Our ultimate hope is that automated covariation analysis will contribute significantly to a refined picture of ribosome structure. Our colleagues in biology have begun experiments to test certain hypotheses suggested by an examination of our program's output. These experiments involve sequencing key portions of the 23S ribosomal RNA for species in which the known 16S ribosomal RNA exhibits variation (from the dominant pattern) at the site of a proposed bonding. The hope is that the 23S ribosomal RNA of these species will exhibit corresponding complementary variation or generalized covariation. 24 refs

  15. GTfold: Enabling parallel RNA secondary structure prediction on multi-core desktops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Swenson, M Shel; Anderson, Joshua; Ash, Andrew; Gaurav, Prashant; Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Bader, David A; Harvey, Stephen C; Heitsch, Christine E

    2012-01-01

    Accurate and efficient RNA secondary structure prediction remains an important open problem in computational molecular biology. Historically, advances in computing technology have enabled faster and more accurate RNA secondary structure predictions. Previous parallelized prediction programs...... achieved significant improvements in runtime, but their implementations were not portable from niche high-performance computers or easily accessible to most RNA researchers. With the increasing prevalence of multi-core desktop machines, a new parallel prediction program is needed to take full advantage of...

  16. Analysis of energy-based algorithms for RNA secondary structure prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Hajiaghayi Monir; Condon Anne; Hoos Holger H

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background RNA molecules play critical roles in the cells of organisms, including roles in gene regulation, catalysis, and synthesis of proteins. Since RNA function depends in large part on its folded structures, much effort has been invested in developing accurate methods for prediction of RNA secondary structure from the base sequence. Minimum free energy (MFE) predictions are widely used, based on nearest neighbor thermodynamic parameters of Mathews, Turner et al. or those of Andr...

  17. Louse (Insecta : Phthiraptera) mitochondrial 12S rRNA secondary structure is highly variable

    OpenAIRE

    Page, R.D.M.; Cruickshank, R.; Johnson, K P

    2002-01-01

    Lice are ectoparasitic insects hosted by birds and mammals. Mitochondrial 12S rRNA sequences obtained from lice show considerable length variation and are very difficult to align. We show that the louse 12S rRNA domain III secondary structure displays considerable variation compared to other insects, in both the shape and number of stems and loops. Phylogenetic trees constructed from tree edit distances between louse 12S rRNA structures do not closely resemble trees constructed from sequence ...

  18. Cytochrome c oxidase loses catalytic activity and structural integrity during the aging process in Drosophila melanogaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Jian-Ching; Rebrin, Igor [Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States); Klichko, Vladimir; Orr, William C. [Department of Biological Sciences, Southern Methodist University, Dallas, TX 75275 (United States); Sohal, Rajindar S., E-mail: sohal@usc.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90033 (United States)

    2010-10-08

    Research highlights: {yields} Cytochrome c oxidase loses catalytic activity during the aging process. {yields} Abundance of seven nuclear-encoded subunits of cytochrome c oxidase decreased with age in Drosophila. {yields} Cytochrome c oxidase is specific intra-mitochondrial site of age-related deterioration. -- Abstract: The hypothesis, that structural deterioration of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is a causal factor in the age-related decline in mitochondrial respiratory activity and an increase in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generation, was tested in Drosophila melanogaster. CcO activity and the levels of seven different nuclear DNA-encoded CcO subunits were determined at three different stages of adult life, namely, young-, middle-, and old-age. CcO activity declined progressively with age by 33%. Western blot analysis, using antibodies specific to Drosophila CcO subunits IV, Va, Vb, VIb, VIc, VIIc, and VIII, indicated that the abundance these polypeptides decreased, ranging from 11% to 40%, during aging. These and previous results suggest that CcO is a specific intra-mitochondrial site of age-related deterioration, which may have a broad impact on mitochondrial physiology.

  19. Cytochrome c oxidase loses catalytic activity and structural integrity during the aging process in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Cytochrome c oxidase loses catalytic activity during the aging process. → Abundance of seven nuclear-encoded subunits of cytochrome c oxidase decreased with age in Drosophila. → Cytochrome c oxidase is specific intra-mitochondrial site of age-related deterioration. -- Abstract: The hypothesis, that structural deterioration of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) is a causal factor in the age-related decline in mitochondrial respiratory activity and an increase in H2O2 generation, was tested in Drosophila melanogaster. CcO activity and the levels of seven different nuclear DNA-encoded CcO subunits were determined at three different stages of adult life, namely, young-, middle-, and old-age. CcO activity declined progressively with age by 33%. Western blot analysis, using antibodies specific to Drosophila CcO subunits IV, Va, Vb, VIb, VIc, VIIc, and VIII, indicated that the abundance these polypeptides decreased, ranging from 11% to 40%, during aging. These and previous results suggest that CcO is a specific intra-mitochondrial site of age-related deterioration, which may have a broad impact on mitochondrial physiology.

  20. Novel plasma catalytic reaction for structural-controlled growth of graphene and graphene nanoribbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Toshiaki

    2013-09-01

    An advanced plasma chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method has outstanding advantages for the structural-controlled growth and functionalization of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene. Graphene nanoribbons combine the unique electronic and spin properties of graphene with a transport gap. This makes them an attractive candidate material for the channels of next-generation transistors. However, the reliable site and alignment control of nanoribbons with high on/off current ratios remains a challenge. We have developed a new, simple, scalable method based on novel plasma catalytic reaction for directly fabricating narrow (23 nm) graphene nanoribbon devices with a clear transport gap (58.5 meV) and a high on/off ratio (10000). Indeed, graphene nanoribbons can be grown at any desired position on an insulating substrate without any post-growth treatment, and large-scale, two- and three dimensional integration of graphene nanoribbon devices should be realizable, thereby accelerating the practical evolution of graphene nanoribbon-based electrical applications.

  1. Hydrothermal synthesis, structure, and catalytic properties of UO2Sb2O4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new uranyl antimonite, UO2Sb2O4 (1), has been prepared from the hydrothermal reaction of UO3 with Sb2O3 and KCl. The structure of 1 consists of neutral two-dimensional ∞2[UO2Sb2O4] layers. The U(VI) centers are ligated by two trans oxo ligands and four square pyramidal antimonite anions. In addition, the U(VI) also forms long contacts with two additional oxygen atoms that are distorted by 12.7(2) degree sign out of the equatorial plane perpendicular to the uranyl unit. These long interactions are significant owing to evidence supplied by bond valence sum calculations. The two-dimensional layers found in 1 are built from one-dimensional chains formed from edge-sharing UO6 octahedra that run along the b-axis, and are linked together by [Sb2O4]2- chains. A flow microreactor system has been used to study the catalytic activity of 1, and these results show that it can be used as a catalyst in the conversion of propene and O2 to acrolein. Crystallographic data: 1, monoclinic, space group C2/m, a=13.490(2) A, b=4.0034(6) A, c=5.1419(8) A, β=104.165(3) deg., Z=2, MoKα, λ=0.71073, R(F)=1.74% for 30 parameters with 365 reflections with I>2σ(I)

  2. Reconstitution and structure of a bacterial Pnkp1RnlHen1 RNA repair complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Pei; Selvadurai, Kiruthika; Huang , Raven H. (UIUC)

    2016-01-22

    Ribotoxins cleave essential RNAs for cell killing, and RNA repair neutralizes the damage inflicted by ribotoxins for cell survival. We report a new bacterial RNA repair complex that performs RNA repair linked to immunity. This new RNA repair complex is a 270-kDa heterohexamer composed of three proteins—Pnkp1, Rnl and Hen1—that are required to repair ribotoxin-cleaved RNA in vitro. The crystal structure of the complex reveals the molecular architecture of the heterohexamer as two rhomboid-shaped ring structures of Pnkp1–Rnl–Hen1 heterotrimer fused at the Pnkp1 dimer interface. The four active sites required for RNA repair are located on the inner rim of each ring. Furthermore, the architecture and the locations of the active sites of the Pnkp1–Rnl–Hen1 heterohexamer suggest an ordered series of repair reactions at the broken RNA ends that confer immunity to recurrent damage.

  3. Structural basis for the modular recognition of single-stranded RNA by PPR proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ping; Li, Quanxiu; Yan, Chuangye; Liu, Ying; Liu, Junjie; Yu, Feng; Wang, Zheng; Long, Jiafu; He, Jianhua; Wang, Hong-Wei; Wang, Jiawei; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Shi, Yigong; Yan, Nieng

    2013-12-01

    Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins represent a large family of sequence-specific RNA-binding proteins that are involved in multiple aspects of RNA metabolism. PPR proteins, which are found in exceptionally large numbers in the mitochondria and chloroplasts of terrestrial plants, recognize single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) in a modular fashion. The maize chloroplast protein PPR10 binds to two similar RNA sequences from the ATPI-ATPH and PSAJ-RPL33 intergenic regions, referred to as ATPH and PSAJ, respectively. By protecting the target RNA elements from 5' or 3' exonucleases, PPR10 defines the corresponding 5' and 3' messenger RNA termini. Despite rigorous functional characterizations, the structural basis of sequence-specific ssRNA recognition by PPR proteins remains to be elucidated. Here we report the crystal structures of PPR10 in RNA-free and RNA-bound states at resolutions of 2.85 and 2.45Å, respectively. In the absence of RNA binding, the nineteen repeats of PPR10 are assembled into a right-handed superhelical spiral. PPR10 forms an antiparallel, intertwined homodimer and exhibits considerable conformational changes upon binding to its target ssRNA, an 18-nucleotide PSAJ element. Six nucleotides of PSAJ are specifically recognized by six corresponding PPR10 repeats following the predicted code. The molecular basis for the specific and modular recognition of RNA bases A, G and U is revealed. The structural elucidation of RNA recognition by PPR proteins provides an important framework for potential biotechnological applications of PPR proteins in RNA-related research areas.

  4. Investigation of RNA Structure by High-Throughput SHAPE-Based Probing Methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Line Dahl

    of highthroughput SHAPE-based approaches to investigate RNA structure based on novel SHAPE reagents that permit selection of full-length cDNAs. The SHAPE Selection (SHAPES) method is applied to the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) plus strand RNA genome, and the data is used to construct a genome-wide structural...

  5. Differential accumulation of nif structural gene mRNA in Azotobacter vinelandii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Jacobson, Marty; Ludwig, Marcus; Boyd, Eric S; Bryant, Donald A; Dean, Dennis R; Peters, John W

    2011-09-01

    Northern analysis was employed to investigate mRNA produced by mutant strains of Azotobacter vinelandii with defined deletions in the nif structural genes and in the intergenic noncoding regions. The results indicate that intergenic RNA secondary structures effect the differential accumulation of transcripts, supporting the high Fe protein-to-MoFe protein ratio required for optimal diazotrophic growth. PMID:21725008

  6. Kinetic analysis of the effects of target structure on siRNA efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiawen; Zhang, Wenbing

    2012-12-01

    RNAi efficiency for target cleavage and protein expression is related to the target structure. Considering the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) as a multiple turnover enzyme, we investigated the effect of target mRNA structure on siRNA efficiency with kinetic analysis. The 4-step model was used to study the target cleavage kinetic process: hybridization nucleation at an accessible target site, RISC-mRNA hybrid elongation along with mRNA target structure melting, target cleavage, and enzyme reactivation. At this model, the terms accounting for the target accessibility, stability, and the seed and the nucleation site effects are all included. The results are in good agreement with that of experiments which show different arguments about the structure effects on siRNA efficiency. It shows that the siRNA efficiency is influenced by the integrated factors of target's accessibility, stability, and the seed effects. To study the off-target effects, a simple model of one siRNA binding to two mRNA targets was designed. By using this model, the possibility for diminishing the off-target effects by the concentration of siRNA was discussed.

  7. The Structure of a Rigorously Conserved RNA Element within the SARS Virus Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson Michael P

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We have solved the three-dimensional crystal structure of the stem-loop II motif (s2m RNA element of the SARS virus genome to 2.7-A resolution. SARS and related coronaviruses and astroviruses all possess a motif at the 3' end of their RNA genomes, called the s2m, whose pathogenic importance is inferred from its rigorous sequence conservation in an otherwise rapidly mutable RNA genome. We find that this extreme conservation is clearly explained by the requirement to form a highly structured RNA whose unique tertiary structure includes a sharp 90degrees kink of the helix axis and several novel longer-range tertiary interactions. The tertiary base interactions create a tunnel that runs perpendicular to the main helical axis whose interior is negatively charged and binds two magnesium ions. These unusual features likely form interaction surfaces with conserved host cell components or other reactive sites required for virus function. Based on its conservation in viral pathogen genomes and its absence in the human genome, we suggest that these unusual structural features in the s2m RNA element are attractive targets for the design of anti-viral therapeutic agents. Structural genomics has sought to deduce protein function based on three-dimensional homology. Here we have extended this approach to RNA by proposing potential functions for a rigorously conserved set of RNA tertiary structural interactions that occur within the SARS RNA genome itself. Based on tertiary structural comparisons, we propose the s2m RNA binds one or more proteins possessing an oligomer-binding-like fold, and we suggest a possible mechanism for SARS viral RNA hijacking of host protein synthesis, both based upon observed s2m RNA macromolecular mimicry of a relevant ribosomal RNA fold.

  8. In Situ Synthesis of Bimetallic Hybrid Nanocatalysts on a Paper-Structured Matrix for Catalytic Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Hirotaka Koga; Takuya Kitaoka; Yuuka Umemura

    2011-01-01

    Bimetallic nanoparticles have attracted significant attention as their electrochemical and catalytic properties being superior to those of the individual component nanoparticles. In this study, gold-silver hybrid nanoparticles (AuAgNPs) with an Aucore-Agshell nanostructure were successfully synthesized on zinc oxide (ZnO) whiskers. The as-prepared nanocatalyst, denoted AuAgNPs@ZnO whisker, exhibits an excellent catalytic efficiency in the aqueous reduction of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol; t...

  9. Electrical, thermal, catalytic and magnetic properties of nano-structured materials and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zuwei

    properties are briefly reviewed in Chapter One, including the concepts of ferro-magnetism, plasmonics, photocatalysis, thermal emission, and Raman spectra of carbon nanotubes. In Chapter Two, we focus on the magnetic properties of ferro-magnetic cobalt nanowires with high crystalline quality synthesized via a low voltage electro-deposition method. The crystal structure of these Co nanowires is characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The magnetic properties of individual nanowires and nanowire arrays are investigated by magnetic force microscope (MFM) and superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) measurements. A theoretical model is developed to explain these experimental observations. In Chapter Three, we exploit the strong plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles. We also demonstrate a new method for patterning SERS (surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy) aggregates of gold nanoparticles by using a focused laser beam to optically trap the nanoparticles in a water suspension. Raman spectroscopy is used to estimate the temperature in the laser spot during the in-situ aggregation, by measuring the Raman peak of the hydroxyl bond of water. In Chapter Four, we demonstrate plasmonic enhancement of photocatalytic water splitting under visible illumination by integrating strongly plasmonic Au nanoparticles with strongly catalytic TiO2. Electromagnetic simulations indicate that the near-field optical enhancement increases the electron-hole pair generation rate at the surface of the TiO2, thus increasing the amount of photo-generated charge contributing to catalysis. Our results suggest that enhancement factors many times larger than this are possible if this mechanism can be optimized. In Chapter Five, we study the Raman spectra and thermal emission spectra of individual suspended carbon nanotubes induced by electrical heating. Semiconducting and metallic devices exhibit different spectra, based on their distinctive band

  10. A structural interpretation of the effect of GC-content on efficiency of RNA interference

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Background RNA interference (RNAi) mediated by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) or short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) has become a powerful technique for eukaryotic gene knockdown. siRNA GC-content negatively correlates with RNAi efficiency, and it is of interest to have a convincing mechanistic interpretation of this observation. We here examine this issue by considering the secondary structures for both the target messenger RNA (mRNA) and the siRNA guide strand. Results By analyzing a unique homoge...

  11. Stable interactions between DNA polymerase δ catalytic and structural subunits are essential for efficient DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eukaryotic DNA polymerase δ (Pol δ) activity is crucial for chromosome replication and DNA repair and thus, plays an essential role in genome stability. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pol δ is a heterotrimeric complex composed of the catalytic subunit Pol3, the structural B subunit Pol31, and Pol32, an additional auxiliary subunit. Pol3 interacts with Pol31 thanks to its C-terminal domain (CTD) and this interaction is of functional importance both in DNA replication and DNA repair. Interestingly, deletion of the last four C-terminal Pol3 residues, LSKW, in the Pol3-ct mutant does not affect DNA replication but leads to defects in homologous recombination and in break-induced replication (BIR) repair pathways. The defect associated with pol3-ct could result from a defective interaction between Pol δ and a protein involved in recombination. However, we show that the LSKW motif is required for the interaction between Pol3 C-terminal end and Pol31. This loss of interaction is relevant in vivo since we found that pol3-ct confers HU sensitivity on its own and synthetic lethality with a Pol32 deletion. Moreover, Pol3-ct shows genetic interactions, both suppression and synthetic lethality, with Pol31 mutant alleles. Structural analyses indicate that the B subunit of Pol displays a major conserved region at its surface and that Pol31 alleles interacting with Pol3-ct, correspond to substitutions of Pol31 amino acids that are situated in this particular region. Superimposition of our Pol31 model on the 3D architecture of the phylo-genetically related DNA polymerase α (Pol α) suggests that Pol3 CTD interacts with the conserved region of Pol31, thus providing a molecular basis to understand the defects associated with pol3-ct. Taken together, our data highlight a stringent dependence on Pol δ complex stability in DNA repair. (authors)

  12. Bis(imidazolin-2-iminato) rare earth metal complexes: synthesis, structural characterization, and catalytic application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trambitas, Alexandra G; Melcher, Daniel; Hartenstein, Larissa; Roesky, Peter W; Daniliuc, Constantin; Jones, Peter G; Tamm, Matthias

    2012-06-18

    Reaction of anhydrous rare earth metal halides MCl(3) with 2 equiv of 1,3-bis(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imidazolin-2-imine (Im(Dipp)NH) and 2 equiv of trimethylsilylmethyl lithium (Me(3)SiCH(2)Li) in THF furnished the complexes [(Im(Dipp)N)(2)MCl(THF)(n)] (M = Sc, Y, Lu). The molecular structures of all three compounds were established by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses. The coordination spheres around the pentacoordinate metal atoms are best described as trigonal bipyramids. Reaction of YbI(2) with 2 equiv of LiCH(2)SiMe(3) and 2 equiv of the imino ligand Im(Dipp)NH in tetrahydrofuran did not result in a divalent complex, but instead the Yb(III) complex [(Im(Dipp)N)(2)YbI(THF)(2)] was obtained and structurally characterized. Treatment of [(Im(Dipp)N)(2)MCl(THF)(n)] with 1 equiv of LiCH(2)SiMe(3) resulted in the formation of [(Im(Dipp)N)(2)M(CH(2)SiMe(3))(THF)(n)]. The coordination arrangement of these compounds in the solid state at the metal atoms is similar to that found for the starting materials, although the introduction of the neosilyl ligand induces a significantly greater distortion from the ideal trigonal-bipyramidal geometry. [(Im(Dipp)N)(2)Y(CH(2)SiMe(3))(THF)(2)] was used as precatalyst in the intramolecular hydroamination/cyclization reaction of various terminal aminoalkenes and of one aminoalkyne. The complex showed high catalytic activity and selectivity. A comparison with the previously reported dialkyl yttrium complex [(Im(Dipp)N)Y(CH(2)SiMe(3))(2)(THF)(3)] showed no clear tendency in terms of activity. PMID:22662762

  13. Mutational interference mapping experiment (MIME) for studying RNA structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, Redmond P; Despons, Laurence; Huili, Gong; Bernacchi, Serena; Hijnen, Marcel; Mak, Johnson; Jossinet, Fabrice; Weixi, Li; Paillart, Jean-Christophe; von Kleist, Max; Marquet, Roland

    2015-09-01

    RNA regulates many biological processes; however, identifying functional RNA sequences and structures is complex and time-consuming. We introduce a method, mutational interference mapping experiment (MIME), to identify, at single-nucleotide resolution, the primary sequence and secondary structures of an RNA molecule that are crucial for its function. MIME is based on random mutagenesis of the RNA target followed by functional selection and next-generation sequencing. Our analytical approach allows the recovery of quantitative binding parameters and permits the identification of base-pairing partners directly from the sequencing data. We used this method to map the binding site of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) Pr55(Gag) protein on the viral genomic RNA in vitro, and showed that, by analyzing permitted base-pairing patterns, we could model RNA structure motifs that are crucial for protein binding. PMID:26237229

  14. Structures of the Bacterial Ribosome in Classical and Hybrid States of tRNA Binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunkle, Jack A.; Wang, Leyi; Feldman, Michael B.; Pulk, Arto; Chen, Vincent B.; Kapral, Gary J.; Noeske, Jonas; Richardson, Jane S.; Blanchard, Scott C.; Cate, Jamie H. Doudna (Cornell); (UCB); (Duke)

    2011-09-06

    During protein synthesis, the ribosome controls the movement of tRNA and mRNA by means of large-scale structural rearrangements. We describe structures of the intact bacterial ribosome from Escherichia coli that reveal how the ribosome binds tRNA in two functionally distinct states, determined to a resolution of {approx}3.2 angstroms by means of x-ray crystallography. One state positions tRNA in the peptidyl-tRNA binding site. The second, a fully rotated state, is stabilized by ribosome recycling factor and binds tRNA in a highly bent conformation in a hybrid peptidyl/exit site. The structures help to explain how the ratchet-like motion of the two ribosomal subunits contributes to the mechanisms of translocation, termination, and ribosome recycling.

  15. Structural comparisons of the nucleoprotein from three negative strand RNA virus families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsao Jun

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Structures of the nucleoprotein of three negative strand RNA virus families, borna disease virus, rhabdovirus and influenza A virus, are now available. Structural comparisons showed that the topology of the RNA binding region from the three proteins is very similar. The RNA was shown to fit into a cavity formed by the two distinct domains of the RNA binding region in the rhabdovirus nucleoprotein. Two helices connecting the two domains characterize the center of the cavity. The nucleoproteins contain at least 5 conserved helices in the N-terminal domain and 3 conserved helices in the C-terminal domain. Since all negative strand RNA viruses are required to have the ribonucleoprotein complex as their active genomic templates, it is perceivable that the (5H+3H structure is a common motif in the nucleoprotein of negative strand RNA viruses.

  16. Structural and Biochemical Analyses of Shikimate Dehydrogenase AroE from Aquifex aeolicus: Implications for the Catalytic Mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gan,J.; Wu, Y.; Prabakaran, P.; Gu, Y.; Li, Y.; Andrykovitch, M.; Liu, H.; Gong, Y.; Yan, H.; Ji, X.

    2007-01-01

    The shikimate biosynthetic pathway is essential to microorganisms, plants, and parasites but absent from mammals. Therefore, shikimate dehydrogenase (SD) and other enzymes in the pathway are attractive targets for developing nontoxic antimicrobial agents, herbicides, and antiparasite drugs. SD catalyzes the fourth reaction in the pathway, the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate- (NADP-) dependent reduction of 3-dehydroshikimic acid to shikimic acid (SA), as well as its reverse, by the transfer of a hydride. Previous structural studies reveal that the enzyme exists in two major conformations, an open and a closed form. For the reaction to occur, it is believed that the catalytic complex assumes the closed conformation. Nonetheless, the only structure containing both SA and NADP{sup +} exhibits an open conformation (PDB entry 2EV9). Here, we present two crystal structures of Aquifex aeolicus SD, including a ternary complex with both SA and NADP{sup +}, which assumes the closed conformation and therefore contains a catalytically competent active site. On the basis of preexisting and novel structural and biochemical data, a catalytic mechanism is proposed.

  17. The Conservation of Structure and Mechanism of Catalytic Action in a Family of Thiamin Pyrophosphate (TPP)-dependent Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominiak, P.; Ciszak, Ewa

    2004-01-01

    Thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP)-dependent enzymes are a divergent family of TPP and metal ion binding proteins that perform a wide range of functions with the common decarboxylation steps of a -(O=)C-C(OH)- fragment of alpha-ketoacids and alpha- hydroxyaldehydes. To determine how structure and catalytic action are conserved in the context of large sequence differences existing within this family of enzymes, we have carried out an analysis of TPP-dependent enzymes of known structures. The common structure of TPP-dependent enzymes is formed at the interface of four alpha/beta domains from at least two subunits, which provide for two metal and TPP-binding sites. Residues around these catalytic sites are conserved for functional purpose, while those further away from TPP are conserved for structural reasons. Together they provide a network of contacts required for flip-flop catalytic action within TPP-dependent enzymes. Thus our analysis defines a TPP-action motif that is proposed for annotating TPP-dependent enzymes for advancing functional proteomics.

  18. Structure and Activity of an Aminoacyl-tRNA Synthetase that Charges tRNA with Nitro-Tryptophan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buddha,M.; Crane, B.

    2005-01-01

    The most divergent of two tryptophanyl tRNA synthetases (TrpRS II) found in Deinococcus radiodurans interacts with a nitric oxide synthase protein that produces 4-nitro-tryptophan (4-NRP). TrpRS II efficiently charges transfer RNATrp with 4-NRP and 5-hydroxy-tryptophan (5-HRP). The crystal structures of TrpRS II bound to tryptophan and 5-HRP reveal residue substitutions that accommodate modified indoles. A class of auxiliary bacterial TrpRSs conserve this capacity to charge tRNA with nonstandard amino acids.

  19. Crumple: a method for complete enumeration of all possible pseudoknot-free RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleckley, Samuel; Stone, Jonathan W; Schroeder, Susan J

    2012-01-01

    The diverse landscape of RNA conformational space includes many canyons and crevices that are distant from the lowest minimum free energy valley and remain unexplored by traditional RNA structure prediction methods. A complete description of the entire RNA folding landscape can facilitate identification of biologically important conformations. The Crumple algorithm rapidly enumerates all possible non-pseudoknotted structures for an RNA sequence without consideration of thermodynamics while filtering the output with experimental data. The Crumple algorithm provides an alternative approach to traditional free energy minimization programs for RNA secondary structure prediction. A complete computation of all non-pseudoknotted secondary structures can reveal structures that would not be predicted by methods that sample the RNA folding landscape based on thermodynamic predictions. The free energy minimization approach is often successful but is limited by not considering RNA tertiary and protein interactions and the possibility that kinetics rather than thermodynamics determines the functional RNA fold. Efficient parallel computing and filters based on experimental data make practical the complete enumeration of all non-pseudoknotted structures. Efficient parallel computing for Crumple is implemented in a ring graph approach. Filters for experimental data include constraints from chemical probing of solvent accessibility, enzymatic cleavage of paired or unpaired nucleotides, phylogenetic covariation, and the minimum number and lengths of helices determined from crystallography or cryo-electron microscopy. The minimum number and length of helices has a significant effect on reducing conformational space. Pairing constraints reduce conformational space more than single nucleotide constraints. Examples with Alfalfa Mosaic Virus RNA and Trypanosome brucei guide RNA demonstrate the importance of evaluating all possible structures when pseduoknots, RNA-protein interactions

  20. Crumple: a method for complete enumeration of all possible pseudoknot-free RNA secondary structures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Bleckley

    Full Text Available The diverse landscape of RNA conformational space includes many canyons and crevices that are distant from the lowest minimum free energy valley and remain unexplored by traditional RNA structure prediction methods. A complete description of the entire RNA folding landscape can facilitate identification of biologically important conformations. The Crumple algorithm rapidly enumerates all possible non-pseudoknotted structures for an RNA sequence without consideration of thermodynamics while filtering the output with experimental data. The Crumple algorithm provides an alternative approach to traditional free energy minimization programs for RNA secondary structure prediction. A complete computation of all non-pseudoknotted secondary structures can reveal structures that would not be predicted by methods that sample the RNA folding landscape based on thermodynamic predictions. The free energy minimization approach is often successful but is limited by not considering RNA tertiary and protein interactions and the possibility that kinetics rather than thermodynamics determines the functional RNA fold. Efficient parallel computing and filters based on experimental data make practical the complete enumeration of all non-pseudoknotted structures. Efficient parallel computing for Crumple is implemented in a ring graph approach. Filters for experimental data include constraints from chemical probing of solvent accessibility, enzymatic cleavage of paired or unpaired nucleotides, phylogenetic covariation, and the minimum number and lengths of helices determined from crystallography or cryo-electron microscopy. The minimum number and length of helices has a significant effect on reducing conformational space. Pairing constraints reduce conformational space more than single nucleotide constraints. Examples with Alfalfa Mosaic Virus RNA and Trypanosome brucei guide RNA demonstrate the importance of evaluating all possible structures when pseduoknots, RNA

  1. RNACompress: Grammar-based compression and informational complexity measurement of RNA secondary structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Chun

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the rapid emergence of RNA databases and newly identified non-coding RNAs, an efficient compression algorithm for RNA sequence and structural information is needed for the storage and analysis of such data. Although several algorithms for compressing DNA sequences have been proposed, none of them are suitable for the compression of RNA sequences with their secondary structures simultaneously. This kind of compression not only facilitates the maintenance of RNA data, but also supplies a novel way to measure the informational complexity of RNA structural data, raising the possibility of studying the relationship between the functional activities of RNA structures and their complexities, as well as various structural properties of RNA based on compression. Results RNACompress employs an efficient grammar-based model to compress RNA sequences and their secondary structures. The main goals of this algorithm are two fold: (1 present a robust and effective way for RNA structural data compression; (2 design a suitable model to represent RNA secondary structure as well as derive the informational complexity of the structural data based on compression. Our extensive tests have shown that RNACompress achieves a universally better compression ratio compared with other sequence-specific or common text-specific compression algorithms, such as Gencompress, winrar and gzip. Moreover, a test of the activities of distinct GTP-binding RNAs (aptamers compared with their structural complexity shows that our defined informational complexity can be used to describe how complexity varies with activity. These results lead to an objective means of comparing the functional properties of heteropolymers from the information perspective. Conclusion A universal algorithm for the compression of RNA secondary structure as well as the evaluation of its informational complexity is discussed in this paper. We have developed RNACompress, as a useful tool

  2. Conservation of mRNA secondary structures may filter out mutations in Escherichia coli evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Chursov, Andrey; Frishman, Dmitrij; Shneider, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Recent reports indicate that mutations in viral genomes tend to preserve RNA secondary structure, and those mutations that disrupt secondary structural elements may reduce gene expression levels, thereby serving as a functional knockout. In this article, we explore the conservation of secondary structures of mRNA coding regions, a previously unknown factor in bacterial evolution, by comparing the structural consequences of mutations in essential and nonessential Escherichia coli genes accumul...

  3. Transcriptional regulation mechanism mediated by miRNA-DNA•DNA triplex structure stabilized by Argonaute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toscano-Garibay, Julia D; Aquino-Jarquin, Guillermo

    2014-11-01

    Transcription regulation depends on interactions between repressor or activator proteins with promoter sequences, while post-transcriptional regulation typically relies on microRNA (miRNA) interaction with sequences in 5' and 3'-Untranslated regions (UTRs) of messenger RNA (mRNA). However, several pieces of evidence suggest that miRNA:Argonaute (AGO) complexes may also suppress transcription through RNA interference (RNAi) components and epigenetic mechanisms. However, recent observations suggest that miRNA-induced transcriptional silencing could be exerted by an unknown mechanism independent of chromatin modifiers. The RNA-DNA•DNA triplex structure has emerged as an important RNA tertiary motif in which successive non-canonical base pairs form between a DNA-DNA duplex and a third strand. Frequently, promoters have Purine (PU)-rich tracts, and some Triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs) targeting these regulatory regions have been shown to inhibit transcription selectively. Here, we summarize observations suggesting that miRNAs exert regulation over promoter regions through miRNA-DNA•DNA triplex structure formation stabilized by AGO proteins which represents a plausible model of RNA-mediated Transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). PMID:25086339

  4. Regulation of primate lentiviral RNA dimerization by structural entrapment

    OpenAIRE

    Lodmell J Stephen; Strong Christy L; Baig Tayyba T; Lanchy Jean-Marc

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Genomic RNA dimerization is an important process in the formation of an infectious lentiviral particle. One of the signals involved is the stem-loop 1 (SL1) element located in the leader region of lentiviral genomic RNAs which also plays a role in encapsidation and reverse transcription. Recent studies revealed that HIV types 1 and 2 leader RNAs adopt different conformations that influence the presentation of RNA signals such as SL1. To determine whether common mechanisms ...

  5. NMR Analysis of RNA Bulged Structures: Tabu Search Application in NOE Signal Assignment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulges are the most frequently occurring RNA secondary structural elements of high functional importance. At present, they are known to participate in the process of RNA folding, RNA-RNA and RNA-protein interactions. It has been shown that bulges can induce destabilization in RNA duplexes and the extent of the destabilization depends on many factors such as the size of the bulge, the nature of the bulge bases, and the flanking residues. However, relatively very little is known about these structural elements. Only several studies have been performed to address the preferred conformations of bulged residues in DNA and RNA duplexes. The knowledge of spatial structure of RNA bulges in solution requires application of NMR spectroscopy. A considerable part of NMR analytical process of RNA fragment is based on automatic methods. However, manual assistance is still essential in resonance assignment. Thus, there has been a great need to introduce automatic procedures also at this level. We propose a tabu search algorithm being a tool for an automatic resonance assignment. The assignment is determined by NOE pathways, which can be constructed in aromatic/anomeric region of 2D NOESY spectrum generated during NMR experiment. Computational tests demonstrate performance of the tabu search applied to the experimental spectra of RNA bulged duplexes. (author)

  6. Structural Basis for the Coevolution of a Viral RNA-Protein Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao,J.; Patskovsky, Y.; Almo, S.; Singer, R.

    2008-01-01

    The cocrystal structure of the PP7 bacteriophage coat protein in complex with its translational operator identifies a distinct mode of sequence-specific RNA recognition when compared to the well-characterized MS2 coat protein-RNA complex. The structure reveals the molecular basis of the PP7 coat protein's ability to selectively bind its cognate RNA, and it demonstrates that the conserved beta-sheet surface is a flexible architecture that can evolve to recognize diverse RNA hairpins.

  7. Hierarchical folding of multiple sequence alignments for the prediction of structures and RNA-RNA interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seemann, Ernst Stefan; Richter, Andreas S.; Gorodkin, Jan; Backofen, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many regulatory non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) function through complementary binding with mRNAs or other ncRNAs, e.g., microRNAs, snoRNAs and bacterial sRNAs. Predicting these RNA interactions is essential for functional studies of putative ncRNAs or for the design of artificial RNAs. Many...

  8. Mutations in an essential U2 small nuclear RNA structure cause cold-sensitive U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein function by favoring competing alternative U2 RNA structures.

    OpenAIRE

    Zavanelli, M I; Britton, J S; Igel, A H; Ares, M

    1994-01-01

    Mutations in stem-loop IIa of yeast U2 RNA cause cold-sensitive growth and cold-sensitive U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein function in vitro. Cold-sensitive U2 small nuclear RNA adopts an alternative conformation that occludes the loop and disrupts the stem but does so at both restrictive and permissive temperatures. To determine whether alternative U2 RNA structure causes the defects, we tested second-site mutations in U2 predicted to disrupt the alternative conformation. We find that such...

  9. Structure of Hepatitis C Virus Polymerase in Complex with Primer-Template RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mosley, Ralph T.; Edwards, Thomas E.; Murakami, Eisuke; Lam, Angela M.; Grice, Rena L.; Du, Jinfa; Sofia, Michael J.; Furman, Philip A.; Otto, Michael J. (Pharmasset); (Emerald)

    2012-08-01

    The replication of the hepatitis C viral (HCV) genome is accomplished by the NS5B RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), for which mechanistic understanding and structure-guided drug design efforts have been hampered by its propensity to crystallize in a closed, polymerization-incompetent state. The removal of an autoinhibitory {beta}-hairpin loop from genotype 2a HCV NS5B increases de novo RNA synthesis by >100-fold, promotes RNA binding, and facilitated the determination of the first crystallographic structures of HCV polymerase in complex with RNA primer-template pairs. These crystal structures demonstrate the structural realignment required for primer-template recognition and elongation, provide new insights into HCV RNA synthesis at the molecular level, and may prove useful in the structure-based design of novel antiviral compounds. Additionally, our approach for obtaining the RNA primer-template-bound structure of HCV polymerase may be generally applicable to solving RNA-bound complexes for other viral RdRps that contain similar regulatory {beta}-hairpin loops, including bovine viral diarrhea virus, dengue virus, and West Nile virus.

  10. De Novo Discovery of Structured ncRNA Motifs in Genomic Sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruzzo, Walter L; Gorodkin, Jan

    2014-01-01

    De novo discovery of "motifs" capturing the commonalities among related noncoding ncRNA structured RNAs is among the most difficult problems in computational biology. This chapter outlines the challenges presented by this problem, together with some approaches towards solving them, with an emphas...... on an approach based on the CMfinder CMfinder program as a case study. Applications to genomic screens for novel de novo structured ncRNA ncRNA s, including structured RNA elements in untranslated portions of protein-coding genes, are presented.......De novo discovery of "motifs" capturing the commonalities among related noncoding ncRNA structured RNAs is among the most difficult problems in computational biology. This chapter outlines the challenges presented by this problem, together with some approaches towards solving them, with an emphasis...

  11. Decameric SelA•tRNA(Sec) ring structure reveals mechanism of bacterial selenocysteine formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yuzuru; Bröcker, Markus J; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Hammond, Gifty; Suetsugu, Shiro; Söll, Dieter; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2013-04-01

    The 21st amino acid, selenocysteine (Sec), is synthesized on its cognate transfer RNA (tRNA(Sec)). In bacteria, SelA synthesizes Sec from Ser-tRNA(Sec), whereas in archaea and eukaryotes SepSecS forms Sec from phosphoserine (Sep) acylated to tRNA(Sec). We determined the crystal structures of Aquifex aeolicus SelA complexes, which revealed a ring-shaped homodecamer that binds 10 tRNA(Sec) molecules, each interacting with four SelA subunits. The SelA N-terminal domain binds the tRNA(Sec)-specific D-arm structure, thereby discriminating Ser-tRNA(Sec) from Ser-tRNA(Ser). A large cleft is created between two subunits and accommodates the 3'-terminal region of Ser-tRNA(Sec). The SelA structures together with in vivo and in vitro enzyme assays show decamerization to be essential for SelA function. SelA catalyzes pyridoxal 5'-phosphate-dependent Sec formation involving Arg residues nonhomologous to those in SepSecS. Different protein architecture and substrate coordination of the bacterial enzyme provide structural evidence for independent evolution of the two Sec synthesis systems present in nature. PMID:23559248

  12. Electronic structure and magnetism of various surfaces of the catalytic material Pt3Ni: Density-functional study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Pt-skin Pt3Ni(111) surface was reported to show high catalytic activity. In this study, we investigated the magnetic properties and electronic structures of the various oriented surfaces of bulk-terminated and Pt-segregated Pt3Ni by using a first-principles calculation method. The magnetic moments of Pt and Ni are appreciably enhanced at the bulk-terminated surfaces compared to the corresponding bulk values, whereas the magnetic moment of Pt on the Pt-segregated Pt3Ni(111) surface is just slightly enhanced because of the reduced number of Ni neighboring atoms. Spin-decomposed density of states shows that the dz2 orbital plays a dominant role in determining the magnetic moments of Pt atoms in the different orientations. The lowering of the d-band center energy (−2.22 to −2.46 to −2.51 to −2.65 eV) in the sequence of bulk-terminated (100), (110), (111), and Pt-segregated (111) surfaces may explain the observed dependence of catalytic activity on surface orientation. Our d-band center calculation suggests that an observed enhanced catalytic activity of a Pt3Ni(111) surface originates from the Pt-segregation. - Highlights: ► We calculated the magnetic and electronic properties of catalytic alloy Pt3Ni surfaces. ► The dz2 orbital plays a dominant role in determining the magnetism of Pt atoms. ► Possible correlation between |m|-decomposed DOS and the catalysis is discussed. ► The |m|-decomposed d-band centers might be a good descriptor for catalytic activity

  13. Mechanistic Insights into the Structure-Dependent Selectivity of Catalytic Furfural Conversion on Platinum Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Qiuxia; Wang, Jianguo; Wang, Yang-Gang; Mei, Donghai

    2015-11-01

    The effects of structure and size on the selectivity of catalytic furfural conversion over supported Pt catalysts in the presence of hydrogen have been studied using first principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations and microkinetic modeling. Four Pt model systems, i.e., periodic Pt(111), Pt(211) surfaces, as well as small nanoclusters (Pt13 and Pt55) are chosen to represent the terrace, step, and corner sites of Pt nanoparticles. Our DFT results show that the reaction routes for furfural hydrogenation and decarbonylation are strongly dependent on the type of reactive sites, which lead to the different selectivity. On the basis of the size-dependent site distribution rule, we correlate the site distributions as a function of the Pt particle size. Our microkinetic results indicate the critical particle size that controls the furfural selectivity is about 1.0 nm, which is in good agreement with the reported experimental value under reaction conditions. This work was supported by National Basic Research Program of China (973 Program) (2013CB733501) and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC-21306169, 21176221, 21136001, 21101137 and 91334103). This work was also partially supported by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is a multiprogram national laboratory operated for DOE by Battelle. Computing time was granted by the grand challenge of computational catalysis of the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL). EMSL is a national scientific user facility located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and sponsored by DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research.

  14. Structural and biochemical characterization of peroxiredoxin Qbeta from Xylella fastidiosa: catalytic mechanism and high reactivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horta, Bruno Brasil; de Oliveira, Marcos Antonio; Discola, Karen Fulan; Cussiol, José Renato Rosa; Netto, Luis Eduardo Soares

    2010-05-21

    The phytopathogenic bacterium Xylella fastidiosa is the etiological agent of various plant diseases. To survive under oxidative stress imposed by the host, microorganisms express antioxidant proteins, including cysteine-based peroxidases named peroxiredoxins. This work is a comprehensive analysis of the catalysis performed by PrxQ from X. fastidiosa (XfPrxQ) that belongs to a peroxiredoxin class still poorly characterized and previously considered as moderately reactive toward hydroperoxides. Contrary to these assumptions, our competitive kinetics studies have shown that the second-order rate constants of the peroxidase reactions of XfPrxQ with hydrogen peroxide and peroxynitrite are in the order of 10(7) and 10(6) M(-1) S(-1), respectively, which are as fast as the most efficient peroxidases. The XfPrxQ disulfides were only slightly reducible by dithiothreitol; therefore, the identification of a thioredoxin system as the probable biological reductant of XfPrxQ was a relevant finding. We also showed by site-specific mutagenesis and mass spectrometry that an intramolecular disulfide bond between Cys-47 and Cys-83 is generated during the catalytic cycle. Furthermore, we elucidated the crystal structure of XfPrxQ C47S in which Ser-47 and Cys-83 lie approximately 12.3 A apart. Therefore, significant conformational changes are required for disulfide bond formation. In fact, circular dichroism data indicated that there was a significant redox-dependent unfolding of alpha-helices, which is probably triggered by the peroxidatic cysteine oxidation. Finally, we proposed a model that takes data from this work as well data as from the literature into account. PMID:20335172

  15. Displaying the information contents of structural RNA alignments: the structure logos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorodkin, Jan; Heyer, L.J.; Brunak, Søren; Stormo, G.D.

    1997-01-01

    program will calculate the information at each position, including the mutual information of the base pairs, and display the results in a `Structure Logo'. Alignments without base pairing can also be displayed in a `Sequence Logo', but still allowing gaps and incorporating prior frequencies if desired......We extend the standard `Sequence Logo' method of Schneider and Stevens to incorporate prior frequencies on the bases, allow for gaps in the alignments, and indicate the mutual information of base-paired regions in RNA. Given an alignment of RNA sequences with the base pairings indicated, the....... The code is available from, and an Internet server can be used to run the program at, http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/gorodkin/appl/slogo.html...

  16. Sequence-Specific Assignment and Secondary Structure of the Catalytic Domain of Protein from Ubiquitination Pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ubiquitination is a post-translational protein modification which plays an important role in a wide variety of cellular processes including cell cycle, DNA repair and cell apoptosis. It is well known, that the ubiquitination requires sequential activity of three enzymes with different functions: activation, conjugation and ligation. Unfortunately, the three-dimensional structures of all three proteins responsible for these processes are not available at present and the process of proteins ubiquitination still is not understood in detail. In our communication, we present first, preliminary NMR data for the sequence-specific assignments for 112 amino acid residues long domain of one of the proteins from the ubiquitination pathway. The NMR samples were prepared by dissolving 1 mm either 15N-labeled or 15N, 13C-double labeled protein in 90%/10% H2O/D2O, 50 mm TRIS buffer, and 50 mm NaCl. The ph was adjusted to 6.5 (uncorrected value). All NMR measurements were performed on the Varian Unity+ 500 NMR spectrometer (11.7 T) equipped with three channels, Performa II PFG unit and 5 mm 1H, 13C, 15N-triple resonance pro behead. The 1H, 15N, and 13C backbone resonances were assigned by standard methods using 3D heteronuclear HNCACB, CBCA(CO)NH, HNCA, HN(CO)CA, HNCO, (HCA)CO(CA)NH NMR spectra collected at 303 K. The aliphatic 1H and 13C resonances were assigned on the basis of C(CO)NH, HBHA(CO)NH, and H(CO)NH experiments. After finishing of assignment procedure, solution of secondary structure in studied protein has been performed. The exact position of the α-helices and β-strands were solved on base analysis of cross-peaks between HN and Hα protons in 3D 15N-edited NOESY-HSQC spectrum, 3JNHα coupling constants evaluated from 3D HNHA experiment, and chemical shifts of backbone nuclei (TALOS software). Obtained results will be used in future for solution of three-dimensional structure of catalytic domain with high resolution by means NMR methods. (author)

  17. Full-length RNA structure prediction of the HIV-1 genome reveals a conserved core domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sukosd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe S.; Seemann, Stefan E.;

    2015-01-01

    A distance constrained secondary structural model of the approximate to 10 kb RNA genome of the HIV-1 has been predicted but higher-order structures, involving long distance interactions, are currently unknown. We present the first global RNA secondary structure model for the HIV-1 genome, which...... integrates both comparative structure analysis and information from experimental data in a full-length prediction without distance constraints. Besides recovering known structural elements, we predict several novel structural elements that are conserved in HIV-1 evolution. Our results also indicate that the...... structure of the HIV-1 genome is highly variable in most regions, with a limited number of stable and conserved RNA secondary structures. Most interesting, a set of long distance interactions form a core organizing structure (COS) that organize the genome into three major structural domains. Despite...

  18. Identification and structural analysis of a novel snoRNA gene cluster from Arabidopsis thaliana

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周惠; 孟清; 屈良鹄

    2000-01-01

    A 22 snoRNA gene cluster, consisting of four antisense snoRNA genes, was identified from Arabidopsis thaliana. The sequence and structural analysis showed that the 22 snoRNA gene cluster might be transcribed as a polycistronic precursor from an upstream promoter, and the in-tergenic spacers of the gene cluster encode the ’hairpin’ structures similar to the processing recognition signals of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae polycistronic snoRNA precursor. The results also revealed that plant snoRNA gene with multiple copies is a characteristic in common, and provides a good system for further revealing the transcription and expression mechanism of plant snoRNA gene cluster.

  19. A nickel complex cleaves uridine in folded RNA structures: application to E. coli tmRNA and related engineered molecules.

    OpenAIRE

    Hickerson, Robyn,; Watkins-Sims, Cristi,; Burrows, Cynthia; Atkins, John,; Gesteland, Raymond,; Felden, Brice

    1998-01-01

    To gain more insight about Escherichia coli tmRNA structure, NiCR, a square planar macrocyclic nickel (II) complex, was used to probe guanine N7 exposure. On the basis of this additional structural information, a refined secondary structure of the molecule is proposed. In addition to its known specificity for guanine N7, we show here that the chemical probe can also cleave at specific uridine residues. In contrast to the alkaline-labile modification of guanine, the reactivity of NiCR at these...

  20. Recognition and Cleavage of a non-structured CRISPR RNA by its Processing Endoribonuclease Cas6

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Yaming; Li, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) confer adaptive immunity to prokaryotes through a small RNA-mediated mechanism. Specific endoribonucleases are required by all CRISPR-bearing organisms to process CRISPR RNAs into small RNA that serve as guides for defensive effector complexes. The molecular mechanism of how the endoribonucleases process the class of CRISPR RNA containing no secondary structural features remains largely elusive. Here we report cocrystal struc...

  1. A structural linkage between the dimerization and encapsidation signals in HIV-2 leader RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Lanchy, Jean-Marc; Ivanovitch, John D.; Lodmell, J. Stephen

    2003-01-01

    The 5′ untranslated leader region of retroviral RNAs contains noncoding information that is essential for viral replication, including signals for transcriptional transactivation, splicing, primer binding for reverse transcription, dimerization of the genomic RNA, and encapsidation of the viral RNA into virions. These RNA motifs have considerable structural and functional overlap. In this study, we investigate the conformational dynamics associated with the use and silencing of a sequence in ...

  2. Coordinated DNA dynamics during the human telomerase catalytic cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph W. Parks; Stone, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) utilizes a template within the integral RNA subunit (hTR) to direct extension of telomeres. Telomerase exhibits repeat addition processivity (RAP) and must therefore translocate the nascent DNA product into a new RNA:DNA hybrid register to prime each round of telomere repeat synthesis. Here we use single-molecule FRET and nuclease protection assays to monitor telomere DNA structure and dynamics during the telomerase catalytic cycle. DNA trans...

  3. Computational Approaches for determination of Most Probable RNA Secondary Structure Using Different Thermodynamics Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binod Kumar,

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Many bioinformatics studies require the analysis of RNA structures. More specifically, extensive work is done to elaborate efficient algorithms able to predict the 2-D folding structures of RNA. The core of RNA structure is a dynamic programming algorithm to predict RNA secondary structures from sequence based on the principle of minimizing free energy. In this paper the thermodynamic data have been used for RNA predictions. In this paper the free energy inimization and the partition function code has been used to predictinternal loops of any size in O (N3 time. The free energy table for multibranch loops has been used by Dynalign. Base pair probabilities have been determined by the partition function calculation. Parameters controlling the prediction of suboptimal structures are Max % Energy Difference and Max Number of Structures. The foldmodule provides the basic implementation of RNA secondary structure prediction. A Dynalign dot plot, a separate dot plot is generated foreach of the two sequences involved. OligoScreen calculates the unimolecular and bimolecular folding free energies for a set of RNA oligonucleotides.

  4. Crystal structure analysis reveals functional flexibility in the selenocysteine-specific tRNA from mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleg M Ganichkin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selenocysteine tRNAs (tRNA(Sec exhibit a number of unique identity elements that are recognized specifically by proteins of the selenocysteine biosynthetic pathways and decoding machineries. Presently, these identity elements and the mechanisms by which they are interpreted by tRNA(Sec-interacting factors are incompletely understood. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We applied rational mutagenesis to obtain well diffracting crystals of murine tRNA(Sec. tRNA(Sec lacking the single-stranded 3'-acceptor end ((ΔGCCARNA(Sec yielded a crystal structure at 2.0 Å resolution. The global structure of (ΔGCCARNA(Sec resembles the structure of human tRNA(Sec determined at 3.1 Å resolution. Structural comparisons revealed flexible regions in tRNA(Sec used for induced fit binding to selenophosphate synthetase. Water molecules located in the present structure were involved in the stabilization of two alternative conformations of the anticodon stem-loop. Modeling of a 2'-O-methylated ribose at position U34 of the anticodon loop as found in a sub-population of tRNA(Secin vivo showed how this modification favors an anticodon loop conformation that is functional during decoding on the ribosome. Soaking of crystals in Mn(2+-containing buffer revealed eight potential divalent metal ion binding sites but the located metal ions did not significantly stabilize specific structural features of tRNA(Sec. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We provide the most highly resolved structure of a tRNA(Sec molecule to date and assessed the influence of water molecules and metal ions on the molecule's conformation and dynamics. Our results suggest how conformational changes of tRNA(Sec support its interaction with proteins.

  5. Synthesis, structural characterization, and catalytic properties of tungsten-exchanged H-ZSM5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    W-exchanged H-ZSM5 was prepared by sublimation of WCl6 at 673 K followed by hydrolysis of exchanged WClx species at 523 K. D2 exchange with residual OH groups showed that each W initially replaced about two zeolitic protons for W/Al ratios of 0.29 and 0.44, consistent with the formation of (WO2)2+ containing W6+ species bridging two cation exchange sites. As temperatures reached973 K during D2-OH exchange, these species reduced to (WO2)+ with the concurrent formation of one OD group. CH4 conversion turnover rates (per W) and C2-C1 2 selectivities are very similar to those observed on a Mo/H-ZSM5 sample with similar cation exchange level. As in the case of Mo/H-ZSM5, WOx/H-ZSM5 precursors are initially inactive in CH4 reactions, but they activate during induction with the concurrent evolution of CO, H2O, and an excess amount of H2. The reduction and carburization processes occurring during CH4 reactions and the structure of the exchanged WOx precursors was probed using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). XAS studies confirmed the isolated initial nature of the exchanged WOx precursors after hydrolysis and dehydration and the formation of WCx clusters 0.6 nm in diameter during CH4 reactions at 973 K. The structural and catalytic resemblance between W- and Mo-exchanged H-ZSM5 is not unexpected, in view of chemical similarities between oxides or carbides of Mo and W. The synthesis of exchanged WOx precursors and their subsequent carburization during CH4 reactions, however, are more difficult than the corresponding processes for the MoOx counterparts. This may account for previous reports of lower CH4 reaction rates and aromatics selectivities on W/H-ZSM5 compared with those observed on Mo/H-ZSM5 and with those reported here for rigorously exchanged W/H-ZSM5

  6. Synthesis, structural characterization, and catalytic properties of tungsten-exchanged H-ZSM5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Weiping; Meitzner, George D.; Marler, David O.; Iglesia, Enrique

    2001-01-18

    W-exchanged H-ZSM5 was prepared by sublimation of WCl6 at 673 K followed by hydrolysis of exchanged WClx species at 523 K. D2 exchange with residual OH groups showed that each W initially replaced about two zeolitic protons for W/Al ratios of 0.29 and 0.44, consistent with the formation of (WO2)2+ containing W6+ species bridging two cation exchange sites. As temperatures reached973 K during D2-OH exchange, these species reduced to (WO2)+ with the concurrent formation of one OD group. CH4 conversion turnover rates (per W) and C2-C1 2 selectivities are very similar to those observed on a Mo/H-ZSM5 sample with similar cation exchange level. As in the case of Mo/H-ZSM5, WOx/H-ZSM5 precursors are initially inactive in CH4 reactions, but they activate during induction with the concurrent evolution of CO, H2O, and an excess amount of H2. The reduction and carburization processes occurring during CH4 reactions and the structure of the exchanged WOx precursors was probed using in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). XAS studies confirmed the isolated initial nature of the exchanged WOx precursors after hydrolysis and dehydration and the formation of WCx clusters 0.6 nm in diameter during CH4 reactions at 973 K. The structural and catalytic resemblance between W- and Mo-exchanged H-ZSM5 is not unexpected, in view of chemical similarities between oxides or carbides of Mo and W. The synthesis of exchanged WOx precursors and their subsequent carburization during CH4 reactions, however, are more difficult than the corresponding processes for the MoOx counterparts. This may account for previous reports of lower CH4 reaction rates and aromatics selectivities on W/H-ZSM5 compared with those observed on Mo/H-ZSM5 and with those reported here for rigorously exchanged W/H-ZSM5.

  7. Redefining the structural motifs that determine RNA binding and RNA editing by pentatricopeptide repeat proteins in land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Shifeng; Gutmann, Bernard; Zhong, Xiao; Ye, Yongtao; Fisher, Mark F; Bai, Fengqi; Castleden, Ian; Song, Yue; Song, Bo; Huang, Jiaying; Liu, Xin; Xu, Xun; Lim, Boon L; Bond, Charles S; Yiu, Siu-Ming; Small, Ian

    2016-02-01

    The pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins form one of the largest protein families in land plants. They are characterised by tandem 30-40 amino acid motifs that form an extended binding surface capable of sequence-specific recognition of RNA strands. Almost all of them are post-translationally targeted to plastids and mitochondria, where they play important roles in post-transcriptional processes including splicing, RNA editing and the initiation of translation. A code describing how PPR proteins recognise their RNA targets promises to accelerate research on these proteins, but making use of this code requires accurate definition and annotation of all of the various nucleotide-binding motifs in each protein. We have used a structural modelling approach to define 10 different variants of the PPR motif found in plant proteins, in addition to the putative deaminase motif that is found at the C-terminus of many RNA-editing factors. We show that the super-helical RNA-binding surface of RNA-editing factors is potentially longer than previously recognised. We used the redefined motifs to develop accurate and consistent annotations of PPR sequences from 109 genomes. We report a high error rate in PPR gene models in many public plant proteomes, due to gene fusions and insertions of spurious introns. These consistently annotated datasets across a wide range of species are valuable resources for future comparative genomics studies, and an essential pre-requisite for accurate large-scale computational predictions of PPR targets. We have created a web portal (http://www.plantppr.com) that provides open access to these resources for the community. PMID:26764122

  8. Sulfur-Functionalized N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complexes of Pd(II: Syntheses, Structures and Catalytic Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Yuan

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHCs can be easily modified by introducing functional groups at the nitrogen atoms, which leads to versatile coordination chemistry as well as diverse catalytic applications of the resulting complexes. This article summarizes our contributions to the field of NHCs bearing different types of sulfur functions, i.e., thioether, sulfoxide, thiophene, and thiolato. The experimental evidence for the truly hemilabile coordination behavior of a Pd(II thioether-NHC complex has been reported as well. In addition, complexes bearing rigid CSC-pincer ligands have been synthesized and the reasons for pincer versus pseudo-pincer formation investigated. Incorporation of the electron-rich thiolato function resulted in the isolation of structurally diverse complexes. The catalytic activities of selected complexes have been tested in Suzuki-Miyaura, Mizoroki-Heck and hydroamination reactions.

  9. Crystal structures of Trypanosoma brucei MRP1/MRP2 guide-RNA binding complex reveal RNA matchmaking mechanism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schumacher, M. A.; Karamooz, E.; Zíková, Alena; Trantírek, Lukáš; Lukeš, Julius

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 126, č. 4 (2006), s. 701-711. ISSN 0092-8674 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP204/04/P191 Grant ostatní: National Institutes of Health(US) 5R03TW6445; Burroughs Wellcome Career Development Award(US) 992863 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : MRP 1/ MRP 2 * structure * RNA matchmaker Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 29.194, year: 2006

  10. Structure of the Rift Valley fever virus nucleocapsid protein reveals another architecture for RNA encapsidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raymond, Donald D.; Piper, Mary E.; Gerrard, Sonja R.; Smith, Janet L. (Michigan)

    2010-07-13

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) is a negative-sense RNA virus (genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae) that infects livestock and humans and is endemic to sub-Saharan Africa. Like all negative-sense viruses, the segmented RNA genome of RVFV is encapsidated by a nucleocapsid protein (N). The 1.93-{angstrom} crystal structure of RVFV N and electron micrographs of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) reveal an encapsidated genome of substantially different organization than in other negative-sense RNA virus families. The RNP polymer, viewed in electron micrographs of both virus RNP and RNP reconstituted from purified N with a defined RNA, has an extended structure without helical symmetry. N-RNA species of {approx}100-kDa apparent molecular weight and heterogeneous composition were obtained by exhaustive ribonuclease treatment of virus RNP, by recombinant expression of N, and by reconstitution from purified N and an RNA oligomer. RNA-free N, obtained by denaturation and refolding, has a novel all-helical fold that is compact and well ordered at both the N and C termini. Unlike N of other negative-sense RNA viruses, RVFV N has no positively charged surface cleft for RNA binding and no protruding termini or loops to stabilize a defined N-RNA oligomer or RNP helix. A potential protein interaction site was identified in a conserved hydrophobic pocket. The nonhelical appearance of phlebovirus RNP, the heterogeneous {approx}100-kDa N-RNA multimer, and the N fold differ substantially from the RNP and N of other negative-sense RNA virus families and provide valuable insights into the structure of the encapsidated phlebovirus genome.

  11. EFFECT OF MORPHOLOGICAL STRUCTURE OF AMINOMETHYL POLYSTYRENE RESIN ON THE CATALYTIC PROPERTIES OF POLYMER-SUPPORTED RUTHENIUM COMPLEXES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ren-ren Wang; Jia-qin Wang; Ce Luo; Zhe Zhang; Bi-tao Su; Zi-qiang Lei

    2009-01-01

    Polymer-supported ruthenium complexes (p)-Phen-Ru-①,(p)-Phen-Ru-②,(P)-Phen-Ru-③,(p)-Phen-Ru-④,morphological structures as supports.A variety of alcohols were oxidized efficiently into the corresponding ketones,carboxylic acids or aldehydes with iodosylbenzene (PhIO) catalyzed by aminomethyl polystyrene-supported ruthenium complexes under mild reaction conditions in acetonitrile.The influences of morphological structure of the polymer supporters on the catalytic properties of these metal complexes were investigated in detail.

  12. Pairwise local structural alignment of RNA sequences with sequence similarity less than 40%

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havgaard, Jakob Hull; Lyngsø, Rune B.; Stormo, Gary D.; Gorodkin, Jan

    2005-01-01

    ability to conduct mutual scans of two sequences of arbitrary length while searching for common local structural motifs of some maximum length. This drastically reduces the complexity of the algorithm. The scoring scheme includes structural parameters corresponding to those available for free energy as......Motivation: Searching for non-coding RNA (ncRNA) genes and structural RNA elements (eleRNA) are major challenges in gene finding todya as these often are conserved in structure rather than in sequence. Even though the number of available methods is growing, it is still of interest to pairwise...... detect two genes with low sequence similarity, where the genes are part of a larger genomic region. Results: Here we present such an approach for pairwise local alignment which is based on FILDALIGN and the Sankoff algorithm for simultaneous structural alignment of multiple sequences. We include the...

  13. Visualization of NRAS RNA G-Quadruplex Structures in Cells with an Engineered Fluorogenic Hybridization Probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shuo-Bin; Hu, Ming-Hao; Liu, Guo-Cai; Wang, Jin; Ou, Tian-Miao; Gu, Lian-Quan; Huang, Zhi-Shu; Tan, Jia-Heng

    2016-08-24

    The RNA G-quadruplex is an important secondary structure formed by guanine-rich RNA sequences. However, its folding studies have mainly been studied in vitro. Accurate identification of RNA G-quadruplex formation within a sequence of interest remains difficult in cells. Herein, and based on the guanine-rich sequence in the 5'-UTR of NRAS mRNA, we designed and synthesized the first G-quadruplex-triggered fluorogenic hybridization (GTFH) probe, ISCH-nras1, for the unique visualization of the G-quadruplexes that form in this region. ISCH-nras1 is made up of two parts: The first is a fluorescent light-up moiety specific to G-quadruplex structures, and the second is a DNA molecule that can hybridize with a sequence that is adjacent to the guanine-rich sequence in the NRAS mRNA 5'-UTR. Further evaluation studies indicated that ISCH-nras1 could directly and precisely detect the targeted NRAS RNA G-quadruplex structures, both in vitro and in cells. Thus, this GTFH probe was a useful tool for directly investigating the folding of G-quadruplex structures within an RNA of interest and represents a new direction for the design of smart RNA G-quadruplex probes. PMID:27508892

  14. The impact of CRISPR repeat sequence on structures of a Cas6 protein-RNA complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruiying; Zheng, Han; Preamplume, Gan; Shao, Yaming; Li, Hong [FSU

    2012-03-15

    The repeat-associated mysterious proteins (RAMPs) comprise the most abundant family of proteins involved in prokaryotic immunity against invading genetic elements conferred by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) system. Cas6 is one of the first characterized RAMP proteins and is a key enzyme required for CRISPR RNA maturation. Despite a strong structural homology with other RAMP proteins that bind hairpin RNA, Cas6 distinctly recognizes single-stranded RNA. Previous structural and biochemical studies show that Cas6 captures the 5' end while cleaving the 3' end of the CRISPR RNA. Here, we describe three structures and complementary biochemical analysis of a noncatalytic Cas6 homolog from Pyrococcus horikoshii bound to CRISPR repeat RNA of different sequences. Our study confirms the specificity of the Cas6 protein for single-stranded RNA and further reveals the importance of the bases at Positions 5-7 in Cas6-RNA interactions. Substitutions of these bases result in structural changes in the protein-RNA complex including its oligomerization state.

  15. Differential Accumulation of nifStructural Gene mRNA in Azotobacter vinelandii ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, Trinity L.; Jacobson, Marty; Ludwig, Marcus; Boyd, Eric S.; Bryant, Donald A.; Dean, Dennis R.; Peters, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Northern analysis was employed to investigate mRNA produced by mutant strains of Azotobacter vinelandiiwith defined deletions in the nifstructural genes and in the intergenic noncoding regions. The results indicate that intergenic RNA secondary structures effect the differential accumulation of transcripts, supporting the high Fe protein-to-MoFe protein ratio required for optimal diazotrophic growth.

  16. An NMR Approach to tRNA Tertiary Structure in Solution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Robillard, G.T.; Tarr, C.E.; Vosman, F.; Sussman, J.L.

    1977-01-01

    Atomic coordinates of E. Coli tRNA1Val have been generated from the X-ray crystal structure of Yeast tRNAPhe by base substitution followed by idealization. The NMR spectrum of E. Coli tRNA1Val was then calculated using these coordinates and ring current calculations. The similarity between the calcu

  17. Conformational flexibility in the catalytic triad revealed by the high-resolution crystal structure of Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin in an unliganded state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work reports the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of S. erythraeus trypsin. The detailed model of a prototypical serine protease at a catalytically relevant pH with an unoccupied active site is presented and is compared with other high-resolution serine protease structures. With more than 500 crystal structures determined, serine proteases make up greater than one-third of all proteases structurally examined to date, making them among the best biochemically and structurally characterized enzymes. Despite the numerous crystallographic and biochemical studies of trypsin and related serine proteases, there are still considerable shortcomings in the understanding of their catalytic mechanism. Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin (SET) does not exhibit autolysis and crystallizes readily at physiological pH; hence, it is well suited for structural studies aimed at extending the understanding of the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases. While X-ray crystallographic structures of this enzyme have been reported, no coordinates have ever been made available in the Protein Data Bank. Based on this, and observations on the extreme stability and unique properties of this particular trypsin, it was decided to crystallize it and determine its structure. Here, the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of an unmodified, unliganded trypsin crystallized at physiological pH is reported. Detailed structural analysis reveals the geometry and structural rigidity of the catalytic triad in the unoccupied active site and comparison to related serine proteases provides a context for interpretation of biochemical studies of catalytic mechanism and activity

  18. Conformational flexibility in the catalytic triad revealed by the high-resolution crystal structure of Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin in an unliganded state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blankenship, Elise; Vukoti, Krishna [Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Miyagi, Masaru, E-mail: mxm356@cwru.edu [Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Lodowski, David T., E-mail: mxm356@cwru.edu [Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States); Case Western Reserve University, 10900 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44106 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    This work reports the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of S. erythraeus trypsin. The detailed model of a prototypical serine protease at a catalytically relevant pH with an unoccupied active site is presented and is compared with other high-resolution serine protease structures. With more than 500 crystal structures determined, serine proteases make up greater than one-third of all proteases structurally examined to date, making them among the best biochemically and structurally characterized enzymes. Despite the numerous crystallographic and biochemical studies of trypsin and related serine proteases, there are still considerable shortcomings in the understanding of their catalytic mechanism. Streptomyces erythraeus trypsin (SET) does not exhibit autolysis and crystallizes readily at physiological pH; hence, it is well suited for structural studies aimed at extending the understanding of the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases. While X-ray crystallographic structures of this enzyme have been reported, no coordinates have ever been made available in the Protein Data Bank. Based on this, and observations on the extreme stability and unique properties of this particular trypsin, it was decided to crystallize it and determine its structure. Here, the first sub-angstrom resolution structure of an unmodified, unliganded trypsin crystallized at physiological pH is reported. Detailed structural analysis reveals the geometry and structural rigidity of the catalytic triad in the unoccupied active site and comparison to related serine proteases provides a context for interpretation of biochemical studies of catalytic mechanism and activity.

  19. Tailoring the electronic structure of graphene for catalytic and nanoelectronic applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vallejo, Federico Calle; García Lastra, Juan Maria

    2011-01-01

    We explore possible routes to tailor the catalytic and electronic properties of graphitic materials through doping. The investigation is carried out by theoretical Density Functional Theory (DFT) and tight-binding calculations. We show that Feporphyrin- like sites inserted in graphitic sheets, cr...

  20. Session 6: Catalytic Dechlorination Reaction of Chlorinated Hydrocarbons with Water Using nano-structured Alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Khaleel [United Arab Emirates Univ., Dept. of Chemistry, Al-Ain (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Herein, we report our recent results from a study on the catalytic dechlorination reactions of 1,2-dichloroethane (DCE) and carbon tetrachloride (CTC) with water using HSA-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as the catalyst. The obtained experimental results are explained. (O.M.)

  1. A nickel complex cleaves uridine in folded RNA structures: application to E. coli tmRNA and related engineered molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickerson, R P; Watkins-Sims, C D; Burrows, C J; Atkins, J F; Gesteland, R F; Felden, B

    1998-06-12

    To gain more insight about Escherichia coli tmRNA structure, NiCR, a square planar macrocyclic nickel (II) complex, was used to probe guanine N7 exposure. On the basis of this additional structural information, a refined secondary structure of the molecule is proposed. In addition to its known specificity for guanine N7, we show here that the chemical probe can also cleave at specific uridine residues. In contrast to the alkaline-labile modification of guanine, the reactivity of NiCR at these uridine residues results in direct strand scission. To better characterize the uridine cleavage sites and assess the importance of the RNA structure for the reaction to occur, smaller RNA molecules derived from one pseudoknot (PK4) of E. coli tmRNA containing two uridine cleavage sites were engineered and probed. It is shown that this pseudoknot can fold by itself in solution and that the expected uridine residues are also cleaved by the nickel complex, suggesting that only a local sequence and/or structural context is required for cleavage. In E. coli tmRNA, the five uridine cleavage sites are located in double-stranded regions. These sites contain a G-U wobble base-pair and a downstream uridine which is cleaved. Using smaller RNAs derived from one stem of PK4, systematic changes in the proposed recognition motif indicate that the G-U pair is required for cleavage. Furthermore, there is no cleavage if the G-U pair is reversed. If the recognition motif is moved within the stem, the cleavage site moves accordingly. Additionally, if the recognition motif is changed such that the G-U pair is flanked by two uridine residues, the reactivity occurs only at the 3' uridine. Radical quenching studies have indicated that sulfate radical, as in the case of guanine oxidation, is involved in uridine oxidation. Although additional studies are required to better characterize the reaction, this paper reports a novel specificity for a chemical probe which may be useful for investigating

  2. RNA structure-based ribosome recruitment: Lessons from the Dicistroviridae intergenic region IRESes

    OpenAIRE

    Pfingsten, Jennifer S; Kieft, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the canonical process of initiating protein synthesis on an mRNA depends on many large protein factors and the modified nucleotide cap on the 5′ end of the mRNA. However, certain RNA sequences can bypass the need for these proteins and cap, using an RNA structure-based mechanism called internal initiation of translation. These RNAs are called internal ribosome entry sites (IRESes), and the cap-independent initiation pathway they support is critical for successful infection by m...

  3. The PETfold and PETcofold web servers for intra- and intermolecular structures of multiple RNA sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seemann, Ernst Stefan; Menzel, Karl Peter; Backofen, Rolf;

    2011-01-01

    to interactive usage of the predictors. Additionally, the web servers provide direct access to annotated RNA alignments, such as the Rfam 10.0 database and multiple alignments of 16 vertebrate genomes with human. The web servers are freely available at: http://rth.dk/resources/petfold/...... gene. We present web servers to analyze multiple RNA sequences for common RNA structure and for RNA interaction sites. The web servers are based on the recent PET (Probabilistic Evolutionary and Thermodynamic) models PETfold and PETcofold, but add user friendly features ranging from a graphical layer...

  4. MEG3 long noncoding RNA regulates the TGF-β pathway genes through formation of RNA-DNA triplex structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Tanmoy; Subhash, Santhilal; Vaid, Roshan; Enroth, Stefan; Uday, Sireesha; Reinius, Björn; Mitra, Sanhita; Mohammed, Arif; James, Alva Rani; Hoberg, Emily; Moustakas, Aristidis; Gyllensten, Ulf; Jones, Steven J M; Gustafsson, Claes M; Sims, Andrew H; Westerlund, Fredrik; Gorab, Eduardo; Kanduri, Chandrasekhar

    2015-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) regulate gene expression by association with chromatin, but how they target chromatin remains poorly understood. We have used chromatin RNA immunoprecipitation-coupled high-throughput sequencing to identify 276 lncRNAs enriched in repressive chromatin from breast cancer cells. Using one of the chromatin-interacting lncRNAs, MEG3, we explore the mechanisms by which lncRNAs target chromatin. Here we show that MEG3 and EZH2 share common target genes, including the TGF-β pathway genes. Genome-wide mapping of MEG3 binding sites reveals that MEG3 modulates the activity of TGF-β genes by binding to distal regulatory elements. MEG3 binding sites have GA-rich sequences, which guide MEG3 to the chromatin through RNA-DNA triplex formation. We have found that RNA-DNA triplex structures are widespread and are present over the MEG3 binding sites associated with the TGF-β pathway genes. Our findings suggest that RNA-DNA triplex formation could be a general characteristic of target gene recognition by the chromatin-interacting lncRNAs. PMID:26205790

  5. Catalytic Features of the Botulinum Neurotoxin A Light Chain Revealed by High Resolution Structure of an Inhibitory Peptide Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silvaggi,N.; Wilson, D.; Tzipori, S.; Allen, K.

    2008-01-01

    The Clostridium botulinum neurotoxin serotype A light chain (BoNT/A-LC) is a Zn(II)-dependent metalloprotease that blocks the release of acetylcholine at the neuromuscular junction by cleaving SNAP-25, one of the SNARE proteins required for exocytosis. Because of the potential for use of the toxin in bioterrorism and the increasingly widespread application of the toxin in the medical field, there is significant interest in the development of small-molecule inhibitors of the metalloprotease. Efforts to design such inhibitors have not benefited from knowledge of how peptides bind to the active site since the enzyme-peptide structures available previously either were not occupied in the vicinity of the catalytic Zn(II) ion or did not represent the product of SNAP-25 substrate cleavage. Herein we report the 1.4 Angstroms-resolution X-ray crystal structure of a complex between the BoNT/A-LC and the inhibitory peptide N-Ac-CRATKML, the first structure of the light chain with an inhibitory peptide bound at the catalytic Zn(II) ion. The peptide is bound with the Cys S? atom coordinating the metal ion. Surprisingly, the cysteine sulfur is oxidized to the sulfenic acid form. Given the unstable nature of this species in solution, is it likely that oxidation occurs on the enzyme. In addition to the peptide-bound structure, we report two structures of the unliganded light chain with and without the Zn(II) cofactor bound at 1.25 and 1.20 Angstroms resolution, respectively. The two structures are nearly identical, confirming that the Zn(II) ion plays a purely catalytic role. Additionally, the structure of the Zn(II)-bound uncomplexed enzyme allows identification of the catalytic water molecule and a second water molecule that occupies the same position as the peptidic oxygen in the tetrahedral intermediate. This observation suggests that the enzyme active site is prearranged to stabilize the tetrahedral intermediate of the protease reaction.

  6. The ribonucleoprotein structures along the pathway of mRNA formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heterogeneous nuclear RNAs (hnRNAs), some of which are mRNA precursors, and the mature mRNAs are associated in eukaryotic cells with specific proteins to form ribonucleoprotein complexes (RNP). The RNP proteins are likely to play a major role in the formation, packaging, processing, and function of mRNA. The major proteins that interact with hnRNA and with mRNA were identified by photochemical RNA-protein cross-linking in intact cells and monoclonal antibodies to several of these proteins were produced. Using these antibodies the hnRNP proteins were characterized and the hnRNP complex was isolated from vertebrate cell nuclei. The hnRNP complex is a unitary structure of consistent, defined and conserved components. The proteins of the hnRNP complex were identified and the general organization of hnRNA and proteins in the hRNP complex were studied. 19 references

  7. The crystal structure and RNA-binding of an orthomyxovirus nucleoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjie Zheng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Genome packaging for viruses with segmented genomes is often a complex problem. This is particularly true for influenza viruses and other orthomyxoviruses, whose genome consists of multiple negative-sense RNAs encapsidated as ribonucleoprotein (RNP complexes. To better understand the structural features of orthomyxovirus RNPs that allow them to be packaged, we determined the crystal structure of the nucleoprotein (NP of a fish orthomyxovirus, the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV (genus Isavirus. As the major protein component of the RNPs, ISAV-NP possesses a bi-lobular structure similar to the influenza virus NP. Because both RNA-free and RNA-bound ISAV NP forms stable dimers in solution, we were able to measure the NP RNA binding affinity as well as the stoichiometry using recombinant proteins and synthetic oligos. Our RNA binding analysis revealed that each ISAV-NP binds ~12 nts of RNA, shorter than the 24-28 nts originally estimated for the influenza A virus NP based on population average. The 12-nt stoichiometry was further confirmed by results from electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering. Considering that RNPs of ISAV and the influenza viruses have similar morphologies and dimensions, our findings suggest that NP-free RNA may exist on orthomyxovirus RNPs, and selective RNP packaging may be accomplished through direct RNA-RNA interactions.

  8. Structural basis of RNA recognition and activation by innate immune receptor RIG-I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Fuguo; Ramanathan, Anand; Miller, Matthew T.; Tang, Guo-Qing; Gale, Jr., Michael; Patel, Smita S.; Marcotrigiano, Joseph (Rutgers); (RWJ-Med); (UW-MED)

    2012-05-29

    Retinoic-acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I; also known as DDX58) is a cytoplasmic pathogen recognition receptor that recognizes pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) motifs to differentiate between viral and cellular RNAs. RIG-I is activated by blunt-ended double-stranded (ds)RNA with or without a 5'-triphosphate (ppp), by single-stranded RNA marked by a 5'-ppp and by polyuridine sequences. Upon binding to such PAMP motifs, RIG-I initiates a signalling cascade that induces innate immune defences and inflammatory cytokines to establish an antiviral state. The RIG-I pathway is highly regulated and aberrant signalling leads to apoptosis, altered cell differentiation, inflammation, autoimmune diseases and cancer. The helicase and repressor domains (RD) of RIG-I recognize dsRNA and 5'-ppp RNA to activate the two amino-terminal caspase recruitment domains (CARDs) for signalling. Here, to understand the synergy between the helicase and the RD for RNA binding, and the contribution of ATP hydrolysis to RIG-I activation, we determined the structure of human RIG-I helicase-RD in complex with dsRNA and an ATP analogue. The helicase-RD organizes into a ring around dsRNA, capping one end, while contacting both strands using previously uncharacterized motifs to recognize dsRNA. Small-angle X-ray scattering, limited proteolysis and differential scanning fluorimetry indicate that RIG-I is in an extended and flexible conformation that compacts upon binding RNA. These results provide a detailed view of the role of helicase in dsRNA recognition, the synergy between the RD and the helicase for RNA binding and the organization of full-length RIG-I bound to dsRNA, and provide evidence of a conformational change upon RNA binding. The RIG-I helicase-RD structure is consistent with dsRNA translocation without unwinding and cooperative binding to RNA. The structure yields unprecedented insight into innate immunity and has a broader impact on other areas of biology, including

  9. Effects of surface activation on the structural and catalytic properties of ruthenium nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xianfeng; Lin, Rui; Beuerle, Christopher; Jackson, James E; Obare, Sherine O; Ofoli, Robert Y

    2014-01-31

    Using colloid-based methods to prepare supported catalytic metallic nanoparticles (NPs) often faces the challenge of removing the stabilizer used during synthesis and activating the catalyst without modifying the particles or the support. We explored three surface activation protocols (thermal oxidation at 150 °C, thermal reduction at 350 °C, and argon-protected calcination at 650 °C) to activate ruthenium NPs supported on mesoporous silica (MSU-F), and assessed their effects on the structural and catalytic properties of the catalysts, and their activity by the aqueous phase hydrogenation of pyruvic acid. The NPs were synthesized by polyol reduction using poly-N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone (PVP) as a stabilizer, and supported on MSU-F by sonication-assisted deposition. The NPs maintained their original morphology on the support during activation. Ar-protected calcination was the most efficient of the three for completely removing PVP from particle surfaces, and provided the highest degree of particle crystallinity and a metal dispersion comparable to commercial Ru/SiO2. Its catalytic performance was significantly higher than the other two protocols, although all three thermally activated catalysts achieved higher activity than the commercial catalyst at the same Ru loading. Post-reaction analysis also showed that the supported catalyst activated at 650 °C retained its morphology during the reaction, which is an important requirement for recyclability. PMID:24394435

  10. Structural and functional perturbation of Giardia lamblia triosephosphate isomerase by modification of a non-catalytic, non-conserved region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Hernández-Alcántara

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously proposed triosephosphate isomerase of Giardia lamblia (GlTIM as a target for rational drug design against giardiasis, one of the most common parasitic infections in humans. Since the enzyme exists in the parasite and the host, selective inhibition is a major challenge because essential regions that could be considered molecular targets are highly conserved. Previous biochemical evidence showed that chemical modification of the non-conserved non-catalytic cysteine 222 (C222 inactivates specifically GlTIM. The inactivation correlates with the physicochemical properties of the modifying agent: addition of a non-polar, small chemical group at C222 reduces the enzyme activity by one half, whereas negatively charged, large chemical groups cause full inactivation. RESULTS: In this work we used mutagenesis to extend our understanding of the functional and structural effects triggered by modification of C222. To this end, six GlTIM C222 mutants with side chains having diverse physicochemical characteristics were characterized. We found that the polarity, charge and volume of the side chain in the mutant amino acid differentially alter the activity, the affinity, the stability and the structure of the enzyme. The data show that mutagenesis of C222 mimics the effects of chemical modification. The crystallographic structure of C222D GlTIM shows the disruptive effects of introducing a negative charge at position 222: the mutation perturbs loop 7, a region of the enzyme whose interactions with the catalytic loop 6 are essential for TIM stability, ligand binding and catalysis. The amino acid sequence of TIM in phylogenetic diverse groups indicates that C222 and its surrounding residues are poorly conserved, supporting the proposal that this region is a good target for specific drug design. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrate that it is possible to inhibit species-specifically a ubiquitous, structurally highly conserved enzyme by

  11. An Exact Mathematical Programming Approach to Multiple RNA Sequence-Structure Alignment

    OpenAIRE

    Bauer, M.; Klau, Gunnar; Reinert, K.

    2008-01-01

    One of the main tasks in computational biology is the computation of alignments of genomic sequences to reveal their commonalities. In case of DNA or protein sequences, sequence information alone is usually sufficient to compute reliable alignments. RNA molecules, however, build spatial conformations, which can be represented by graph-like secondary structures. Often, secondary structures are more conserved than the actual sequence. Hence, computing reliable alignments of RNA molecules ...

  12. CPU-GPU hybrid accelerating the Zuker algorithm for RNA secondary structure prediction applications

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background Prediction of ribonucleic acid (RNA) secondary structure remains one of the most important research areas in bioinformatics. The Zuker algorithm is one of the most popular methods of free energy minimization for RNA secondary structure prediction. Thus far, few studies have been reported on the acceleration of the Zuker algorithm on general-purpose processors or on extra accelerators such as Field Programmable Gate-Array (FPGA) and Graphics Processing Units (GPU). To the best of ou...

  13. Minimum-Free-Energy Distribution of RNA Secondary Structures: Entropic and Thermodynamic Properties of Rare Events

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfsheimer, S; Hartmann, A. K.

    2008-01-01

    We study the distribution of the minimum free energy (MFE) for the Turner model of pseudoknot free RNA secondary structures over ensembles of random RNA sequences. In particular, we are interested in those rare and intermediate events of unexpected low MFEs. Generalized ensemble Markov-chain Monte Carlo methods allow us to explore the rare-event tail of the MFE distribution down to probabilities like $10^{-70}$ and to study the relationship between the sequence entropy and structural properti...

  14. Forms and Functions of Telomerase RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kathleen

    Telomerase adds single-stranded telomeric DNA repeats to chromosome ends. Unlike other polymerases involved in genome replication, telomerase synthe¬sizes DNA without use of a DNA template. Instead, the enzyme active site copies a template carried within the integral RNA subunit of the telomerase ribonucleo-protein (RNP) complex. In addition to providing a template, telomerase RNA has non-template motifs with critical functions in the catalytic cycle of repeat synthesis. In its complexity of structure and function, telomerase RNA resembles the non-coding RNAs of RNP machines like the ribosome and spliceosome that evolved from catalytic RNAs of the RNA World. However, unlike these RNPs, telomerase evolved its RNP identity after advent of the Protein World. Insights about telomer-ase have broad significance for understanding non-coding RNA biology as well as chromosome end maintenance and human disease.

  15. Structural Basis for Binding of RNA and Cofactor by a KsgA Methyltransferase

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Chao; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P; Court, Donald L.; Waugh, David S.; Ji, Xinhua

    2009-01-01

    Among methyltransferases, KsgA and the reaction it catalyzes are conserved throughout evolution. However, the specifics of substrate recognition by the enzyme remain unknown. Here, we report structures of Aquifex aeolicus KsgA, in its ligand-free form, in complex with RNA and in complex with both RNA and S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH, reaction product of cofactor S-adenosylmethionine), providing the first pieces of structural information on KsgA-RNA and KsgA-SAH interactions. Moreover, the stru...

  16. Comparison and functional implications of the 3D architectures of viral tRNA-like structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, John A; Rambo, Robert P; Filbin, Megan E; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2009-02-01

    RNA viruses co-opt the host cell's biological machinery, and their infection strategies often depend on specific structures in the viral genomic RNA. Examples are tRNA-like structures (TLSs), found at the 3' end of certain plant viral RNAs, which can use the cell's aminoacyl tRNA-synthetases (AARSs) to drive addition of an amino acid to the 3' end of the viral RNA. TLSs are multifunctional RNAs involved in processes such as viral replication, translation, and viral RNA stability; these functions depend on their fold. Experimental result-based structural models of TLSs have been published. In this study, we further examine these structures using a combination of biophysical and biochemical approaches to explore the three-dimensional (3D) architectures of TLSs from the turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV), tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), and brome mosaic virus (BMV). We find that despite similar function, these RNAs are biophysically diverse: the TYMV TLS adopts a characteristic tRNA-like L shape, the BMV TLS has a large compact globular domain with several helical extensions, and the TMV TLS aggregates in solution. Both the TYMV and BMV TLS RNAs adopt structures with tight backbone packing and also with dynamic structural elements, suggesting complexities and subtleties that cannot be explained by simple tRNA mimicry. These results confirm some aspects of existing models and also indicate how these models can be improved. The biophysical characteristics of these TLSs show how these multifunctional RNAs might regulate various viral processes, including negative strand synthesis, and also allow comparison with other structured RNAs. PMID:19144910

  17. Investigation of Catalytic Loop Structure, Dynamics and Function Relationship of Yersinia Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase by Temperature-Jump Relaxation Spectroscopy and X-ray Structural Determination

    OpenAIRE

    Ke, Shan; Ho, Meng-Chiao; Zhadin, Nickolay; Deng, Hua; Callender, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Yersinia Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase (YopH) is the most efficient enzyme amongst all PTPases and YopH is hyperactive compared to human PTPases, interferes with mammalian cellular pathways to achieve the pathogenicity of Yersinia. Two properties related to the catalytic loop structure differences have been proposed to affect its dynamics and enzyme efficiency. One is the ability of the loop to form stabilizing interactions to bound ligand after loop closure, which has long been recognized. In...

  18. Structural basis for dsRNA recognition and interferon antagonism by Ebola VP35

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, Daisy W.; Prins, Kathleen C.; Borek, Dominika M.; Farahbakhsh, Mina; Tufariello, JoAnn M.; Ramanan, Parameshwaran; Nix, Jay C.; Helgeson, Luke A.; Otwinowski, Zbyszek; Honzatko, Richard B.; Basler, Christopher F.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K. (Sinai); (Iowa State); (LBNL); (UTSMC)

    2010-03-12

    Ebola viral protein 35 (VP35), encoded by the highly pathogenic Ebola virus, facilitates host immune evasion by antagonizing antiviral signaling pathways, including those initiated by RIG-I-like receptors. Here we report the crystal structure of the Ebola VP35 interferon inhibitory domain (IID) bound to short double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), which together with in vivo results reveals how VP35-dsRNA interactions contribute to immune evasion. Conserved basic residues in VP35 IID recognize the dsRNA backbone, whereas the dsRNA blunt ends are 'end-capped' by a pocket of hydrophobic residues that mimic RIG-I-like receptor recognition of blunt-end dsRNA. Residues critical for RNA binding are also important for interferon inhibition in vivo but not for viral polymerase cofactor function of VP35. These results suggest that simultaneous recognition of dsRNA backbone and blunt ends provides a mechanism by which Ebola VP35 antagonizes host dsRNA sensors and immune responses.

  19. Structural Basis for dsRNA Recognition by NS1 Protein of Influenza A Virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, A.; Wong, S; Yuan, Y

    2009-01-01

    Influenza A viruses are important human pathogens causing periodic pandemic threats. Nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) protein of influenza A virus (NS1A) shields the virus against host defense. Here, we report the crystal structure of NS1A RNA-binding domain (RBD) bound to a double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) at 1.7A. NS1A RBD forms a homodimer to recognize the major groove of A-form dsRNA in a length-independent mode by its conserved concave surface formed by dimeric anti-parallel alpha-helices. dsRNA is anchored by a pair of invariable arginines (Arg38) from both monomers by extensive hydrogen bonds. In accordance with the structural observation, isothermal titration calorimetry assay shows that the unique Arg38-Arg38 pair and two Arg35-Arg46 pairs are crucial for dsRNA binding, and that Ser42 and Thr49 are also important for dsRNA binding. Agrobacterium co-infiltration assay further supports that the unique Arg38 pair plays important roles in dsRNA binding in vivo.

  20. Structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1, a fission yeast MAPK target RNA binding protein, and implication for its RNA recognition and regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Solution structure of the second RRM of Nrd1 was determined. •RNA binding site of the second RRM was estimated. •Regulatory mechanism of RNA binding by phosphorylation is discussed. -- Abstract: Negative regulator of differentiation 1 (Nrd1) is known as a negative regulator of sexual differentiation in fission yeast. Recently, it has been revealed that Nrd1 also regulates cytokinesis, in which physical separation of the cell is achieved by a contractile ring comprising many proteins including actin and myosin. Cdc4, a myosin II light chain, is known to be required for cytokinesis. Nrd1 binds and stabilizes Cdc4 mRNA, and thereby suppressing the cytokinesis defects of the cdc4 mutants. Interestingly, Pmk1 MAPK phosphorylates Nrd1, resulting in markedly reduced RNA binding activity. Furthermore, Nrd1 localizes to stress granules in response to various stresses, and Pmk1 phosphorylation enhances the localization. Nrd1 consists of four RRM domains, although the mechanism by which Pmk1 regulates the RNA binding activity of Nrd1 is unknown. In an effort to delineate the relationship between Nrd1 structure and function, we prepared each RNA binding domain of Nrd1 and examined RNA binding to chemically synthesized oligo RNA using NMR. The structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1 was determined and the RNA binding site on the second RRM domain was mapped by NMR. A plausible mechanism pertaining to the regulation of RNA binding activity by phosphorylation is also discussed

  1. Structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1, a fission yeast MAPK target RNA binding protein, and implication for its RNA recognition and regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Ayaho; Kanaba, Teppei [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Satoh, Ryosuke [Institute of Microbial Chemistry, 3-14-23 Kamiosaki, Shinagawa-ku 141-0021, Tokyo (Japan); Fujiwara, Toshinobu [Institute of Microbial Chemistry, 3-14-23 Kamiosaki, Shinagawa-ku 141-0021, Tokyo (Japan); Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 3-1 Tanabe-dori, Mizuho-ku,Nagoya 467-8603 (Japan); Ito, Yutaka [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Sugiura, Reiko [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Mishima, Masaki, E-mail: mishima-masaki@tmu.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan)

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •Solution structure of the second RRM of Nrd1 was determined. •RNA binding site of the second RRM was estimated. •Regulatory mechanism of RNA binding by phosphorylation is discussed. -- Abstract: Negative regulator of differentiation 1 (Nrd1) is known as a negative regulator of sexual differentiation in fission yeast. Recently, it has been revealed that Nrd1 also regulates cytokinesis, in which physical separation of the cell is achieved by a contractile ring comprising many proteins including actin and myosin. Cdc4, a myosin II light chain, is known to be required for cytokinesis. Nrd1 binds and stabilizes Cdc4 mRNA, and thereby suppressing the cytokinesis defects of the cdc4 mutants. Interestingly, Pmk1 MAPK phosphorylates Nrd1, resulting in markedly reduced RNA binding activity. Furthermore, Nrd1 localizes to stress granules in response to various stresses, and Pmk1 phosphorylation enhances the localization. Nrd1 consists of four RRM domains, although the mechanism by which Pmk1 regulates the RNA binding activity of Nrd1 is unknown. In an effort to delineate the relationship between Nrd1 structure and function, we prepared each RNA binding domain of Nrd1 and examined RNA binding to chemically synthesized oligo RNA using NMR. The structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1 was determined and the RNA binding site on the second RRM domain was mapped by NMR. A plausible mechanism pertaining to the regulation of RNA binding activity by phosphorylation is also discussed.

  2. The effect of CNTs on structures and catalytic properties of AuPd clusters for H2O2 synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua-feng; Xie, Peng-yang; Yu, Hui-you; Li, Xiao-nian; Wang, Jian-guo

    2012-12-28

    The structures and catalytic properties of AuPd clusters supported on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for H(2)O(2) synthesis have been investigated by means of density functional theory calculations. Firstly, the structures of AuPd clusters are strongly influenced by CNTs, in which the bottom layers are mainly composed of Pd and the top layers are a mix of Au and Pd due to the stronger binding of Pd than Au on CNTs. Especially, it is found that O(2) adsorption on the Pd/CNTs interfacial sites is much weaker than that on the only Pd sites, which is in contrast to transition metal oxide (for example TiO(2), Al(2)O(3), CeO(2)) supported metal clusters. Furthermore, Pd ensembles on the interfacial sites have far superior catalytic properties for H(2)O(2) formation than those away from CNT supports due to the changes in electronic structures caused by the CNTs. Therefore, our study provides a physical insight into the enhanced role of carbon supports in H(2)O(2) synthesis over supported AuPd catalysts. PMID:23032860

  3. Structural profiles of human miRNA families from pairwise clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaczkowski, Bogumil; Þórarinsson, Elfar; Reiche, Kristin; Havgaard, Jakob Hull; Stadler, Peter F.; Gorodkin, Jan

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a group of small, approximately 21 nt long, riboregulators inhibiting gene expression at a post-transcriptional level. Their most distinctive structural feature is the foldback hairpin of their precursor pre-miRNAs. Even though each pre-miRNA deposited in miRBase has its...... secondary structure already predicted, little is known about the patterns of structural conservation among pre-miRNAs. We address this issue by clustering the human pre-miRNA sequences based on pairwise, sequence and secondary structure alignment using FOLDALIGN, followed by global multiple alignment of...

  4. Structural basis for specific single-stranded RNA recognition by designer pentatricopeptide repeat proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Cuicui; Zhang, Delin; Guan, Zeyuan; Liu, Yexing; Yang, Zhao; Yang, Yan; Wang, Xiang; Wang, Qiang; Zhang, QunXia; Fan, Shilong; Zou, Tingting; Yin, Ping

    2016-01-01

    As a large family of RNA-binding proteins, pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins mediate multiple aspects of RNA metabolism in eukaryotes. Binding to their target single-stranded RNAs (ssRNAs) in a modular and base-specific fashion, PPR proteins can serve as designable modules for gene manipulation. However, the structural basis for nucleotide-specific recognition by designer PPR (dPPR) proteins remains to be elucidated. Here, we report four crystal structures of dPPR proteins in complex with their respective ssRNA targets. The dPPR repeats are assembled into a right-handed superhelical spiral shell that embraces the ssRNA. Interactions between different PPR codes and RNA bases are observed at the atomic level, revealing the molecular basis for the modular and specific recognition patterns of the RNA bases U, C, A and G. These structures not only provide insights into the functional study of PPR proteins but also open a path towards the potential design of synthetic sequence-specific RNA-binding proteins. PMID:27088764

  5. 3'-Terminal RNA secondary structures are important for accumulation of tomato bushy stunt virus DI RNAs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plus-strand RNA genome of tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) contains a 351-nucleotide (nt)-long 3'-untranslated region. We investigated the role of the 3'-proximal 130 nt of this sequence in viral RNA accumulation within the context of a TBSV defective interfering (DI) RNA. Sequence comparisons between different tombusviruses revealed that the 3' portion of the 130-nt sequence is highly conserved and deletion analysis confirmed that this segment is required for accumulation of DI RNAs in protoplasts. Computer-aided sequence analysis and in vitro solution structure probing indicated that the conserved sequence consists of three stem-loop (SL) structures (5'-SL3-SL2-SL1-3'). The existence of SLs 1 and 3 was also supported by comparative secondary structure analysis of sequenced tombusvirus genomes. Formation of the stem regions in all three SLs was found to be very important, and modification of the terminal loop sequences of SL1 and SL2, but not SL3, decreased DI RNA accumulation in vivo. For SL3, alterations to an internal loop resulted in significantly reduced DI RNA levels. Collectively, these data indicate that all three SLs are functionally relevant and contribute substantially to DI RNA accumulation. In addition, secondary structure analysis of other tombusvirus replicons and related virus genera revealed that a TBSV satellite RNA and members of the closely related genus Aureusvirus (family Tombusviridae) share fundamental elements of this general structural arrangement. Thus, this secondary structure model appears to extend beyond tombusvirus genomes. These conserved 3'-terminal RNA elements likely function in vivo by promoting and/or regulating minus-strand synthesis

  6. Crystal structures and functional studies of T4moD, the toluene 4-monooxygenase catalytic effector protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lountos, George T; Mitchell, Kevin H; Studts, Joey M; Fox, Brian G; Orville, Allen M

    2005-05-17

    Toluene 4-monooxygenase (T4MO) is a four-component complex that catalyzes the regiospecific, NADH-dependent hydroxylation of toluene to yield p-cresol. The catalytic effector (T4moD) of this complex is a 102-residue protein devoid of metals or organic cofactors. It forms a complex with the diiron hydroxylase component (T4moH) that influences both the kinetics and regiospecificity of catalysis. Here, we report crystal structures for native T4moD and two engineered variants with either four (DeltaN4-) or 10 (DeltaN10-) residues removed from the N-terminal at 2.1-, 1.7-, and 1.9-A resolution, respectively. The crystal structures have C-alpha root-mean-squared differences of less than 0.8 A for the central core consisting of residues 11-98, showing that alterations of the N-terminal have little influence on the folded core of the protein. The central core has the same fold topology as observed in the NMR structures of T4moD, the methane monooxygenase effector protein (MmoB) from two methanotrophs, and the phenol hydroxylase effector protein (DmpM). However, the root-mean-squared differences between comparable C-alpha positions in the X-ray structures and the NMR structures vary from approximately 1.8 A to greater than 6 A. The X-ray structures exhibit an estimated overall coordinate error from 0.095 (0.094) A based on the R-value (R free) for the highest resolution DeltaN4-T4moD structure to 0.211 (0.196) A for the native T4moD structure. Catalytic studies of the DeltaN4-, DeltaN7-, and DeltaN10- variants of T4moD show statistically insignificant changes in k(cat), K(M), k(cat)/K(M), and K(I) relative to the native protein. Moreover, there was no significant change in the regiospecificity of toluene oxidation with any of the T4moD variants. The relative insensitivity to changes in the N-terminal region distinguishes T4moD from the MmoB homologues, which each require the approximately 33 residue N-terminal region for catalytic activity. PMID:15882052

  7. Modulation of RNA function by aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, R; Waldsich, C; Wank, H

    2000-01-01

    One of the most important families of antibiotics are the aminoglycosides, including drugs such as neomycin B, paromomycin, gentamicin and streptomycin. With the discovery of the catalytic potential of RNA, these antibiotics became very popular due to their RNA-binding capacity. They serve for the analysis of RNA function as well as for the study of RNA as a potential therapeutic target. Improvements in RNA structure determination recently provided first insights into the decoding site of the ribosome at high resolution and how aminoglycosides might induce misreading of the genetic code. In addition to inhibiting prokaryotic translation, aminoglycosides inhibit several catalytic RNAs such as self-splicing group I introns, RNase P and small ribozymes in vitro. Furthermore, these antibiotics interfere with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by disrupting essential RNA-protein contacts. Most exciting is the potential of many RNA-binding antibiotics to stimulate RNA activities, conceiving small-molecule partners for the hypothesis of an ancient RNA world. SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) has been used in this evolutionary game leading to small synthetic RNAs, whose NMR structures gave valuable information on how aminoglycosides interact with RNA, which could possibly be used in applied science. PMID:10619838

  8. Catalytic Activity and Stability of Oxides: The Role of Near-Surface Atomic Structures and Compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhenxing; Hong, Wesley T; Fong, Dillon D; Lee, Yueh-Lin; Yacoby, Yizhak; Morgan, Dane; Shao-Horn, Yang

    2016-05-17

    Electrocatalysts play an important role in catalyzing the kinetics for oxygen reduction and oxygen evolution reactions for many air-based energy storage and conversion devices, such as metal-air batteries and fuel cells. Although noble metals have been extensively used as electrocatalysts, their limited natural abundance and high costs have motivated the search for more cost-effective catalysts. Oxides are suitable candidates since they are relatively inexpensive and have shown reasonably high activity for various electrochemical reactions. However, a lack of fundamental understanding of the reaction mechanisms has been a major hurdle toward improving electrocatalytic activity. Detailed studies of the oxide surface atomic structure and chemistry (e.g., cation migration) can provide much needed insights for the design of highly efficient and stable oxide electrocatalysts. In this Account, we focus on recent advances in characterizing strontium (Sr) cation segregation and enrichment near the surface of Sr-substituted perovskite oxides under different operating conditions (e.g., high temperature, applied potential), as well as their influence on the surface oxygen exchange kinetics at elevated temperatures. We contrast Sr segregation, which is associated with Sr redistribution in the crystal lattice near the surface, with Sr enrichment, which involves Sr redistribution via the formation of secondary phases. The newly developed coherent Bragg rod analysis (COBRA) and energy-modulated differential COBRA are uniquely powerful ways of providing information about surface and interfacial cation segregation at the atomic scale for these thin film electrocatalysts. In situ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (APXPS) studies under electrochemical operating conditions give additional insights into cation migration. Direct COBRA and APXPS evidence for surface Sr segregation was found for La1-xSrxCoO3-δ and (La1-ySry)2CoO4±δ/La1-xSrxCoO3-δ oxide thin films, and

  9. New families of human regulatory RNA structures identified by comparative analysis of vertebrate genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, Brian John; Moltke, Ida; Roth, Adam;

    2011-01-01

    comparative method, EvoFam, for genome-wide identification of families of regulatory RNA structures, based on primary sequence and secondary structure similarity. We apply EvoFam to a 41-way genomic vertebrate alignment. Genome-wide, we identify 220 human, high-confidence families outside protein......-coding regions comprising 725 individual structures, including 48 families with known structural RNA elements. Known families identified include both noncoding RNAs, e.g., miRNAs and the recently identified MALAT1/MEN β lincRNA family; and cis-regulatory structures, e.g., iron-responsive elements. We also...... identify tens of new families supported by strong evolutionary evidence and other statistical evidence, such as GO term enrichments. For some of these, detailed analysis has led to the formulation of specific functional hypotheses. Examples include two hypothesized auto-regulatory feedback mechanisms: one...

  10. Automated identification of RNA 3D modules with discriminative power in RNA structural alignments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theis, Corinna; Höner zu Siederdissen, Christian; Hofacker, Ivo L.;

    2013-01-01

    interest in matching structural modules known from one molecule to other molecules for which the 3D structure is not known yet. We have created a pipeline, metaRNAmodules, which completely automates extracting putative modules from the FR3D database and mapping of such modules to Rfam alignments to obtain...... comparative evidence. Subsequently, the modules, initially represented by a graph, are turned into models for the RMDetect program, which allows to test their discriminative power using real and randomized Rfam alignments. An initial extraction of 22495 3D modules in all PDB files results in 977 internal loop...

  11. Molecular Cloning, Structural Analysis and Tissue Expression of Protein Phosphatase 3 Catalytic Subunit Alpha Isoform (PPP3CA Gene in Tianfu Goat Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Wan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Calcineurin, a Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase, plays a critical role in controlling skeletal muscle fiber type. However, little information is available concerning the expression of calcineurin in goat. Therefore, protein phosphatase 3 catalytic subunit alpha isoform (PPP3CA gene, also called calcineurin Aα, was cloned and its expression characterized in Tianfu goat muscle. Real time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR analyses revealed that Tianfu goat PPP3CA was detected in cardiac muscle, biceps femoris muscle, abdominal muscle, longissimus dors muscle, and soleus muscle. High expression levels were found in biceps femoris muscle, longissimus muscle and abdominal muscle (p < 0.01, and low expression levels were seen in cardiac muscle and soleus muscle (p > 0.05. In addition, the spatial-temporal mRNA expression levels showed different variation trends in different muscles with the age of the goats. Western blotting further revealed that PPP3CA protein was expressed in the above-mentioned tissues, with the highest level in biceps femoris muscle, and the lowest level in soleus muscle. In this study, we isolated the full-length coding sequence of Tianfu goat PPP3CA gene, analyzed its structure, and investigated its expression in different muscle tissues from different age stages. These results provide a foundation for understanding the function of the PPP3CA gene in goats.

  12. RNA structure-based ribosome recruitment: lessons from the Dicistroviridae intergenic region IRESes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfingsten, Jennifer S; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2008-07-01

    In eukaryotes, the canonical process of initiating protein synthesis on an mRNA depends on many large protein factors and the modified nucleotide cap on the 5' end of the mRNA. However, certain RNA sequences can bypass the need for these proteins and cap, using an RNA structure-based mechanism called internal initiation of translation. These RNAs are called internal ribosome entry sites (IRESes), and the cap-independent initiation pathway they support is critical for successful infection by many viruses of medical and economic importance. In this review, we briefly describe and compare mechanistic and structural groups of viral IRES RNAs, focusing on those IRESes that are capable of direct ribosome recruitment using specific RNA structures. We then discuss in greater detail some recent advances in our understanding of the intergenic region IRESes of the Dicistroviridae, which use the most streamlined ribosome-recruitment mechanism yet discovered. By combining these findings with knowledge of canonical translation and the behavior of other IRESes, mechanistic models of this RNA structure-based process are emerging. PMID:18515544

  13. Inferring noncoding RNA families and classes by means of genome-scale structure-based clustering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Will

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The RFAM database defines families of ncRNAs by means of sequence similarities that are sufficient to establish homology. In some cases, such as microRNAs and box H/ACA snoRNAs, functional commonalities define classes of RNAs that are characterized by structural similarities, and typically consist of multiple RNA families. Recent advances in high-throughput transcriptomics and comparative genomics have produced very large sets of putative noncoding RNAs and regulatory RNA signals. For many of them, evidence for stabilizing selection acting on their secondary structures has been derived, and at least approximate models of their structures have been computed. The overwhelming majority of these hypothetical RNAs cannot be assigned to established families or classes. We present here a structure-based clustering approach that is capable of extracting putative RNA classes from genome-wide surveys for structured RNAs. The LocARNA (local alignment of RNA tool implements a novel variant of the Sankoff algorithm that is sufficiently fast to deal with several thousand candidate sequences. The method is also robust against false positive predictions, i.e., a contamination of the input data with unstructured or nonconserved sequences. We have successfully tested the LocARNA-based clustering approach on the sequences of the RFAM-seed alignments. Furthermore, we have applied it to a previously published set of 3,332 predicted structured elements in the Ciona intestinalis genome (Missal K, Rose D, Stadler PF (2005 Noncoding RNAs in Ciona intestinalis. Bioinformatics 21 (Supplement 2: i77-i78. In addition to recovering, e.g., tRNAs as a structure-based class, the method identifies several RNA families, including microRNA and snoRNA candidates, and suggests several novel classes of ncRNAs for which to date no representative has been experimentally characterized.

  14. Catalytic Metal Free Production of Large Cage Structure Carbon Particles: A Candidate for Hydrogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Ferguson, Frank T.

    2005-01-01

    We will demonstrate that carbon particles consisting of large cages can be produced without catalytic metal. The carbon particles were produced in CO gas as well as by introduction of 5% methane gas into the CO gas. The gas-produced carbon particles were able to absorb approximately 16.2 wt% of hydrogen. This value is 2.5 times higher than the 6.5 wt% goal for the vehicular hydrogen storage proposed by the Department of Energy in the USA. Therefore, we believe that this carbon particle is an excellent candidate for hydrogen storage for fuel cells.

  15. Antigenic and structural differences in the catalytic subunits of the molecular forms of acetylcholinesterase.

    OpenAIRE

    Doctor, B. P.; Camp, S; Gentry, M. K.; Taylor, S S; Taylor, P

    1983-01-01

    A mixture of the 5.6S hydrophobic dimer and the asymmetric, tail-containing (17 + 13)S forms of acetylcholinesterase (acetylcholine acetylhydrolase, EC 3.1.1.7) from Torpedo californica was used to immunize mice, and spleen cells from these mice were used to produce nine hybridoma lines secreting antibodies against acetylcholinesterase. Antibodies from one of the lines showed a 100-fold greater affinity for the 5.6S species when compared with the catalytic subunits of the (17 + 13)S species. ...

  16. A permutation based simulated annealing algorithm to predict pseudoknotted RNA secondary structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, Herbert H; Wiese, Kay C

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoknots are RNA tertiary structures which perform essential biological functions. This paper discusses SARNA-Predict-pk, a RNA pseudoknotted secondary structure prediction algorithm based on Simulated Annealing (SA). The research presented here extends previous work of SARNA-Predict and further examines the effect of the new algorithm to include prediction of RNA secondary structure with pseudoknots. An evaluation of the performance of SARNA-Predict-pk in terms of prediction accuracy is made via comparison with several state-of-the-art prediction algorithms using 20 individual known structures from seven RNA classes. We measured the sensitivity and specificity of nine prediction algorithms. Three of these are dynamic programming algorithms: Pseudoknot (pknotsRE), NUPACK, and pknotsRG-mfe. One is using the statistical clustering approach: Sfold and the other five are heuristic algorithms: SARNA-Predict-pk, ILM, STAR, IPknot and HotKnots algorithms. The results presented in this paper demonstrate that SARNA-Predict-pk can out-perform other state-of-the-art algorithms in terms of prediction accuracy. This supports the use of the proposed method on pseudoknotted RNA secondary structure prediction of other known structures. PMID:26558299

  17. The crystal structure of Cpf1 in complex with CRISPR RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, De; Ren, Kuan; Qiu, Xiaolin; Zheng, Jianlin; Guo, Minghui; Guan, Xiaoyu; Liu, Hongnan; Li, Ningning; Zhang, Bailing; Yang, Daijun; Ma, Chuang; Wang, Shuo; Wu, Dan; Ma, Yunfeng; Fan, Shilong; Wang, Jiawei; Gao, Ning; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-04-28

    The CRISPR-Cas systems, as exemplified by CRISPR-Cas9, are RNA-guided adaptive immune systems used by bacteria and archaea to defend against viral infection. The CRISPR-Cpf1 system, a new class 2 CRISPR-Cas system, mediates robust DNA interference in human cells. Although functionally conserved, Cpf1 and Cas9 differ in many aspects including their guide RNAs and substrate specificity. Here we report the 2.38 Å crystal structure of the CRISPR RNA (crRNA)-bound Lachnospiraceae bacterium ND2006 Cpf1 (LbCpf1). LbCpf1 has a triangle-shaped architecture with a large positively charged channel at the centre. Recognized by the oligonucleotide-binding domain of LbCpf1, the crRNA adopts a highly distorted conformation stabilized by extensive intramolecular interactions and the (Mg(H2O)6)(2+) ion. The oligonucleotide-binding domain also harbours a looped-out helical domain that is important for LbCpf1 substrate binding. Binding of crRNA or crRNA lacking the guide sequence induces marked conformational changes but no oligomerization of LbCpf1. Our study reveals the crRNA recognition mechanism and provides insight into crRNA-guided substrate binding of LbCpf1, establishing a framework for engineering LbCpf1 to improve its efficiency and specificity for genome editing. PMID:27096363

  18. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the catalytic domain of pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase from the methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina mazei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) from M. mazei has been overexpressed in an N-terminally truncated form PylRS(c270) in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) from Methanosarcina mazei was overexpressed in an N-terminally truncated form PylRS(c270) in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using polyethylene glycol as a precipitant. The native PylRS(c270) crystals in complex with an ATP analogue belonged to space group P64, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 104.88, c = 70.43 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°, and diffracted to 1.9 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of PylRS(c270). Selenomethionine-substituted protein crystals were prepared in order to solve the structure by the MAD phasing method

  19. Crystal structure of the two-subunit tRNA m1A58 methyltransferase TRM6-TRM61 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingxing; Zhu, Yuwei; Wang, Chongyuan; Fan, Xiaojiao; Jiang, Xuguang; Ebrahimi, Mohammad; Qiao, Zhi; Niu, Liwen; Teng, Maikun; Li, Xu

    2016-01-01

    The N1 methylation of adenine at position 58 (m1A58) of tRNA is an important post-transcriptional modification, which is vital for maintaining the stability of the initiator methionine tRNAiMet. In eukaryotes, this modification is performed by the TRM6-TRM61 holoenzyme. To understand the molecular mechanism that underlies the cooperation of TRM6 and TRM61 in the methyl transfer reaction, we determined the crystal structure of TRM6-TRM61 holoenzyme from Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence and absence of its methyl donor S-Adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM). In the structures, two TRM6-TRM61 heterodimers assemble as a heterotetramer. Both TRM6 and TRM61 subunits comprise an N-terminal β-barrel domain linked to a C-terminal Rossmann-fold domain. TRM61 functions as the catalytic subunit, containing a methyl donor (SAM) binding pocket. TRM6 diverges from TRM61, lacking the conserved motifs used for binding SAM. However, TRM6 cooperates with TRM61 forming an L-shaped tRNA binding regions. Collectively, our results provide a structural basis for better understanding the m1A58 modification of tRNA occurred in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:27582183

  20. Preparation and Catalytic Activity for Aerobic Glucose Oxidation of Crown Jewel Structured Pt/Au Bimetallic Nanoclusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Haijun; Wang, Liqiong; Lu, Lilin; Toshima, Naoki

    2016-08-01

    Understanding of the “structure-activity” relations for catalysts at an atomic level has been regarded as one of the most important objectives in catalysis studies. Bimetallic nanoclusters (NCs) in its many types, such as core/shell, random alloy, cluster-in-cluster, bi-hemisphere, and crown jewel (one kind of atom locating at the top position of another kind of NC), attract significant attention owing to their excellent optical, electronic, and catalytic properties. PVP-protected crown jewel-structured Pt/Au (CJ-Pt/Au) bimetallic nanoclusters (BNCs) with Au atoms located at active top sites were synthesized via a replacement reaction using 1.4-nm Pt NCs as mother clusters even considering the fact that the replacement reaction between Pt and Au3+ ions is difficult to be occurred. The prepared CJ-Pt/Au colloidal catalysts characterized by UV-Vis, TEM, HR-TEM and HAADF-STEM-EELS showed a high catalytic activity for aerobic glucose oxidation, and the top Au atoms decorating the Pt NCs were about 15 times more active than the Au atoms of Au NCs with similar particle size.

  1. Hierarchical ZnO microspheres built by sheet-like network: Large-scale synthesis and structurally enhanced catalytic performances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Hierarchical ZnO microspheres were prepared through a facile precursor procedure in the absence of self-assembled templates, organic additives, or matrices. ► The building blocks of microspheres, sheet-like ZnO networks, are porous mesocrystal terminated with (0 1 −1 0) crystal planes. ► The hierarchical ZnO microsphere catalyst exhibits structure-induced enhancement of catalytic performance and a strong durability. - Abstract: Large-scale novel hierarchical ZnO microspheres were fabricated by a facile precursor procedure in the absence of self-assembled templates, organic additives, or matrices. A field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) image reveals that the ZnO microspheres with diameter of 5–18 μm are built by sheet-like ZnO networks with average thickness of 40 nm and length of several microns. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) image indicates that the building blocks, sheet-like ZnO networks, are porous mesocrystal terminated with {0 1 −1 0} crystal planes. A potential application of the ZnO microspheres as a catalyst in the synthesis of 5-substituted 1H-tetrazoles was investigated. It was found that the hierarchical ZnO microsphere catalyst exhibits structure-induced enhancement of catalytic performance and a strong durability.

  2. Structure of a low-population binding intermediate in protein-RNA recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardaro, Michael F.; Aprile, Francesco A.; Varani, Gabriele; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of the HIV-1 protein transactivator of transcription (Tat) and its cognate transactivation response element (TAR) RNA transactivates viral transcription and represents a paradigm for the widespread occurrence of conformational rearrangements in protein-RNA recognition. Although the structures of free and bound forms of TAR are well characterized, the conformations of the intermediates in the binding process are still unknown. By determining the free energy landscape of the complex using NMR residual dipolar couplings in replica-averaged metadynamics simulations, we observe two low-population intermediates. We then rationally design two mutants, one in the protein and another in the RNA, that weaken specific nonnative interactions that stabilize one of the intermediates. By using surface plasmon resonance, we show that these mutations lower the release rate of Tat, as predicted. These results identify the structure of an intermediate for RNA-protein binding and illustrate a general strategy to achieve this goal with high resolution. PMID:27286828

  3. Transcriptome-wide interrogation of RNA secondary structure in living cells with icSHAPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Ryan A; Zhang, Qiangfeng Cliff; Spitale, Robert C; Lee, Byron; Mumbach, Maxwell R; Chang, Howard Y

    2016-02-01

    icSHAPE (in vivo click selective 2-hydroxyl acylation and profiling experiment) captures RNA secondary structure at a transcriptome-wide level by measuring nucleotide flexibility at base resolution. Living cells are treated with the icSHAPE chemical NAI-N3 followed by selective chemical enrichment of NAI-N3-modified RNA, which provides an improved signal-to-noise ratio compared with similar methods leveraging deep sequencing. Purified RNA is then reverse-transcribed to produce cDNA, with SHAPE-modified bases leading to truncated cDNA. After deep sequencing of cDNA, computational analysis yields flexibility scores for every base across the starting RNA population. The entire experimental procedure can be completed in ∼5 d, and the sequencing and bioinformatics data analysis take an additional 4-5 d with no extensive computational skills required. Comparing in vivo and in vitro icSHAPE measurements can reveal in vivo RNA-binding protein imprints or facilitate the dissection of RNA post-transcriptional modifications. icSHAPE reactivities can additionally be used to constrain and improve RNA secondary structure prediction models. PMID:26766114

  4. GC content around splice sites affects splicing through pre-mRNA secondary structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Liang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alternative splicing increases protein diversity by generating multiple transcript isoforms from a single gene through different combinations of exons or through different selections of splice sites. It has been reported that RNA secondary structures are involved in alternative splicing. Here we perform a genomic study of RNA secondary structures around splice sites in humans (Homo sapiens, mice (Mus musculus, fruit flies (Drosophila melanogaster, and nematodes (Caenorhabditis elegans to further investigate this phenomenon. Results We observe that GC content around splice sites is closely associated with the splice site usage in multiple species. RNA secondary structure is the possible explanation, because the structural stability difference among alternative splice sites, constitutive splice sites, and skipped splice sites can be explained by the GC content difference. Alternative splice sites tend to be GC-enriched and exhibit more stable RNA secondary structures in all of the considered species. In humans and mice, splice sites of first exons and long exons tend to be GC-enriched and hence form more stable structures, indicating the special role of RNA secondary structures in promoter proximal splicing events and the splicing of long exons. In addition, GC-enriched exon-intron junctions tend to be overrepresented in tissue-specific alternative splice sites, indicating the functional consequence of the GC effect. Compared with regions far from splice sites and decoy splice sites, real splice sites are GC-enriched. We also found that the GC-content effect is much stronger than the nucleotide-order effect to form stable secondary structures. Conclusion All of these results indicate that GC content is related to splice site usage and it may mediate the splicing process through RNA secondary structures.

  5. RF sputtered CuO thin films: Structural, optical and photo-catalytic behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghamdi, Attieh A.; Khedr, M. H.; Shahnawaze Ansari, M.; Hasan, P. M. Z.; Abdel-wahab, M. Sh.; Farghali, A. A.

    2016-07-01

    Nanocrystalline CuO thin films were deposited for 600, 1200 and 1800 s on glass substrate using RF magnetron sputtering technique. The films deposited at room temperature were crystalline and showed Tenorite phase of CuO. The increase in average particle size from 6.67 nm to 9.09 nm and the thickness from 160 nm to 490 nm was observed with the increase in deposition time. The optical band gap was decreased from 2.2 eV to 1.73 eV as the film thickness was increased. The intensity of PL peak showed its maximum for the film deposited for 600 s and minimum for 1800 s. Some unusual emission peaks were observed due to the quantization effect and lattice/surface defects. The CuO films with different thicknesses could be used as photo-catalysts for the degradation of Methylene blue (MB) from the wastewater. Under the exposure of 200 W energy of tungsten lamp, CuO thin films showed excellent photo-catalytic activities. CuO thin film of minimum thickness of around 160 nm responded as a best catalyst for MB degradation. The films were very stable and have a speciality to be recycled without much loss of their photo-catalytic activity. These characteristics have proved the high possibility of commercial applications of CuO thin films in environmental remediation.

  6. Initiation of translation in bacteria by a structured eukaryotic IRES RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colussi, Timothy M; Costantino, David A; Zhu, Jianyu; Donohue, John Paul; Korostelev, Andrei A; Jaafar, Zane A; Plank, Terra-Dawn M; Noller, Harry F; Kieft, Jeffrey S

    2015-03-01

    The central dogma of gene expression (DNA to RNA to protein) is universal, but in different domains of life there are fundamental mechanistic differences within this pathway. For example, the canonical molecular signals used to initiate protein synthesis in bacteria and eukaryotes are mutually exclusive. However, the core structures and conformational dynamics of ribosomes that are responsible for the translation steps that take place after initiation are ancient and conserved across the domains of life. We wanted to explore whether an undiscovered RNA-based signal might be able to use these conserved features, bypassing mechanisms specific to each domain of life, and initiate protein synthesis in both bacteria and eukaryotes. Although structured internal ribosome entry site (IRES) RNAs can manipulate ribosomes to initiate translation in eukaryotic cells, an analogous RNA structure-based mechanism has not been observed in bacteria. Here we report our discovery that a eukaryotic viral IRES can initiate translation in live bacteria. We solved the crystal structure of this IRES bound to a bacterial ribosome to 3.8 Å resolution, revealing that despite differences between bacterial and eukaryotic ribosomes this IRES binds directly to both and occupies the space normally used by transfer RNAs. Initiation in both bacteria and eukaryotes depends on the structure of the IRES RNA, but in bacteria this RNA uses a different mechanism that includes a form of ribosome repositioning after initial recruitment. This IRES RNA bridges billions of years of evolutionary divergence and provides an example of an RNA structure-based translation initiation signal capable of operating in two domains of life. PMID:25652826

  7. NMR-study of dynamic structural transtions in RNA-molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Fürtig, Boris

    2007-01-01

    The following thesis is concerned with the elucidation of structural changes of RNA molecules during the time course of dynamic processes that are commonly denoted as folding reactions. In contrast to the field of protein folding, the concept of RNA folding comprises not only folding reactions itself but also refolding- or conformational switching- and assembly processes (see chapter III). The method in this thesis to monitor these diverse processes is high resolution liquid-state NMR spectro...

  8. Ebola Virus RNA Editing Depends on the Primary Editing Site Sequence and an Upstream Secondary Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Mehedi, Masfique; Hoenen, Thomas; Robertson, Shelly; Ricklefs, Stacy; Dolan, Michael A.; Taylor, Travis; Falzarano, Darryl; Ebihara, Hideki; Porcella, Stephen F.; Feldmann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Ebolavirus (EBOV), the causative agent of a severe hemorrhagic fever and a biosafety level 4 pathogen, increases its genome coding capacity by producing multiple transcripts encoding for structural and nonstructural glycoproteins from a single gene. This is achieved through RNA editing, during which non-template adenosine residues are incorporated into the EBOV mRNAs at an editing site encoding for 7 adenosine residues. However, the mechanism of EBOV RNA editing is currently not understood. I...

  9. Predicting RNA 3D structure using a coarse-grain helix-centered model

    OpenAIRE

    Kerpedjiev, Peter; Höner zu Siederdissen, Christian; Hofacker, Ivo L

    2015-01-01

    A 3D model of RNA structure can provide information about its function and regulation that is not possible with just the sequence or secondary structure. Current models suffer from low accuracy and long running times and either neglect or presume knowledge of the long-range interactions which stabilize the tertiary structure. Our coarse-grained, helix-based, tertiary structure model operates with only a few degrees of freedom compared with all-atom models while preserving the ability to sampl...

  10. Use of electrophoretic mobility to determine the secondary structure of a small antisense RNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacques, J P; Susskind, M M

    1991-01-01

    Natural antisense RNAs have stem-loop (hairpin) secondary structures that are important for their function. The sar antisense RNA of phage P22 is unusual: the 3' half of the molecule forms an extensive stem-loop, but potential structures for the 5' half are not predicted to be thermodynamically stable. We devised a novel method to determine the secondary structure of sar RNA by examining the electrophoretic mobility on non-denaturing gels of numerous sar mutants. The results show that the wil...

  11. Dynamic Contacts of U2, RES, Cwc25, Prp8 and Prp45 Proteins with the Pre-mRNA Branch-Site and 3' Splice Site during Catalytic Activation and Step 1 Catalysis in Yeast Spliceosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelius Schneider

    Full Text Available Little is known about contacts in the spliceosome between proteins and intron nucleotides surrounding the pre-mRNA branch-site and their dynamics during splicing. We investigated protein-pre-mRNA interactions by UV-induced crosslinking of purified yeast B(act spliceosomes formed on site-specifically labeled pre-mRNA, and analyzed their changes after conversion to catalytically-activated B* and step 1 C complexes, using a purified splicing system. Contacts between nucleotides upstream and downstream of the branch-site and the U2 SF3a/b proteins Prp9, Prp11, Hsh49, Cus1 and Hsh155 were detected, demonstrating that these interactions are evolutionarily conserved. The RES proteins Pml1 and Bud13 were shown to contact the intron downstream of the branch-site. A comparison of the B(act crosslinking pattern versus that of B* and C complexes revealed that U2 and RES protein interactions with the intron are dynamic. Upon step 1 catalysis, Cwc25 contacts with the branch-site region, and enhanced crosslinks of Prp8 and Prp45 with nucleotides surrounding the branch-site were observed. Cwc25's step 1 promoting activity was not dependent on its interaction with pre-mRNA, indicating it acts via protein-protein interactions. These studies provide important insights into the spliceosome's protein-pre-mRNA network and reveal novel RNP remodeling events during the catalytic activation of the spliceosome and step 1 of splicing.

  12. Characterization of a Trifunctional Mimivirus mRNA Capping Enzyme and Crystal Structure of the RNA Triphosphatase Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benarroch,D.; Smith, P.; Shuman, S.

    2008-01-01

    The RNA triphosphatase (RTPase) components of the mRNA capping apparatus are a bellwether of eukaryal taxonomy. Fungal and protozoal RTPases belong to the triphosphate tunnel metalloenzyme (TTM) family, exemplified by yeast Cet1. Several large DNA viruses encode metal-dependent RTPases unrelated to the cysteinyl-phosphatase RTPases of their metazoan host organisms. The origins of DNA virus RTPases are unclear because they are structurally uncharacterized. Mimivirus, a giant virus of amoeba, resembles poxviruses in having a trifunctional capping enzyme composed of a metal-dependent RTPase module fused to guanylyltransferase (GTase) and guanine-N7 methyltransferase domains. The crystal structure of mimivirus RTPase reveals a minimized tunnel fold and an active site strikingly similar to that of Cet1. Unlike homodimeric fungal RTPases, mimivirus RTPase is a monomer. The mimivirus TTM-type RTPase-GTase fusion resembles the capping enzymes of amoebae, providing evidence that the ancestral large DNA virus acquired its capping enzyme from a unicellular host.

  13. Homology Modeling and Analysis of Structure Predictions of the Bovine Rhinitis B Virus RNA Dependent RNA Polymerase (RdRp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra K. Rai

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bovine Rhinitis B Virus (BRBV is a picornavirus responsible for mild respiratory infection of cattle. It is probably the least characterized among the aphthoviruses. BRBV is the closest relative known to Foot and Mouth Disease virus (FMDV with a ~43% identical polyprotein sequence and as much as 67% identical sequence for the RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp, which is also known as 3D polymerase (3Dpol. In the present study we carried out phylogenetic analysis, structure based sequence alignment and prediction of three-dimensional structure of BRBV 3Dpol using a combination of different computational tools. Model structures of BRBV 3Dpol were verified for their stereochemical quality and accuracy. The BRBV 3Dpol structure predicted by SWISS-MODEL exhibited highest scores in terms of stereochemical quality and accuracy, which were in the range of 2Å resolution crystal structures. The active site, nucleic acid binding site and overall structure were observed to be in agreement with the crystal structure of unliganded as well as template/primer (T/P, nucleotide tri-phosphate (NTP and pyrophosphate (PPi bound FMDV 3Dpol (PDB, 1U09 and 2E9Z. The closest proximity of BRBV and FMDV 3Dpol as compared to human rhinovirus type 16 (HRV-16 and rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV 3Dpols is also substantiated by phylogeny analysis and root-mean square deviation (RMSD between C-α traces of the polymerase structures. The absence of positively charged α-helix at C terminal, significant differences in non-covalent interactions especially salt bridges and CH-pi interactions around T/P channel of BRBV 3Dpol compared to FMDV 3Dpol, indicate that despite a very high homology to FMDV 3Dpol, BRBV 3Dpol may adopt a different mechanism for handling its substrates and adapting to physiological requirements. Our findings will be valuable in the

  14. Prediction of RNA secondary structures: from theory to models and real molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RNA secondary structures are derived from RNA sequences, which are strings built form the natural four letter nucleotide alphabet, {AUGC}. These coarse-grained structures, in turn, are tantamount to constrained strings over a three letter alphabet. Hence, the secondary structures are discrete objects and the number of sequences always exceeds the number of structures. The sequences built from two letter alphabets form perfect structures when the nucleotides can form a base pair, as is the case with {GC} or {AU}, but the relation between the sequences and structures differs strongly from the four letter alphabet. A comprehensive theory of RNA structure is presented, which is based on the concepts of sequence space and shape space, being a space of structures. It sets the stage for modelling processes in ensembles of RNA molecules like evolutionary optimization or kinetic folding as dynamical phenomena guided by mappings between the two spaces. The number of minimum free energy (mfe) structures is always smaller than the number of sequences, even for two letter alphabets. Folding of RNA molecules into mfe energy structures constitutes a non-invertible mapping from sequence space onto shape space. The preimage of a structure in sequence space is defined as its neutral network. Similarly the set of suboptimal structures is the preimage of a sequence in shape space. This set represents the conformation space of a given sequence. The evolutionary optimization of structures in populations is a process taking place in sequence space, whereas kinetic folding occurs in molecular ensembles that optimize free energy in conformation space. Efficient folding algorithms based on dynamic programming are available for the prediction of secondary structures for given sequences. The inverse problem, the computation of sequences for predefined structures, is an important tool for the design of RNA molecules with tailored properties. Simultaneous folding or cofolding of two or more RNA

  15. RNAsnp: efficient detection of local RNA secondary structure changes induced by SNPs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radhakrishnan, Sabarinathan; Tafer, Hakim; Seemann, Ernst Stefan; Hofacker, Ivo L.; Stadler, Peter F.; Gorodkin, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Structural characteristics are essential for the functioning of many noncoding RNAs and cis-regulatory elements of mRNAs. SNPs may disrupt these structures, interfere with their molecular function, and hence cause a phenotypic effect. RNA folding algorithms can provide detailed insights into stru...

  16. Hydration sites of unpaired RNA bases: a statistical analysis of the PDB structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carugo Oliviero

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydration is crucial for RNA structure and function. X-ray crystallography is the most commonly used method to determine RNA structures and hydration and, therefore, statistical surveys are based on crystallographic results, the number of which is quickly increasing. Results A statistical analysis of the water molecule distribution in high-resolution X-ray structures of unpaired RNA nucleotides showed that: different bases have the same penchant to be surrounded by water molecules; clusters of water molecules indicate possible hydration sites, which, in some cases, match those of the major and minor grooves of RNA and DNA double helices; complex hydrogen bond networks characterize the solvation of the nucleotides, resulting in a significant rigidity of the base and its surrounding water molecules. Interestingly, the hydration sites around unpaired RNA bases do not match, in general, the positions that are occupied by the second nucleotide when the base-pair is formed. Conclusions The hydration sites around unpaired RNA bases were found. They do not replicate the atom positions of complementary bases in the Watson-Crick pairs.

  17. Full-length RNA structure prediction of the HIV-1 genome reveals a conserved core domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe S; Seemann, Stefan E; Jensen, Mads Krogh; Hansen, Mathias; Gorodkin, Jan; Kjems, Jørgen

    2015-12-01

    A distance constrained secondary structural model of the ≈10 kb RNA genome of the HIV-1 has been predicted but higher-order structures, involving long distance interactions, are currently unknown. We present the first global RNA secondary structure model for the HIV-1 genome, which integrates both comparative structure analysis and information from experimental data in a full-length prediction without distance constraints. Besides recovering known structural elements, we predict several novel structural elements that are conserved in HIV-1 evolution. Our results also indicate that the structure of the HIV-1 genome is highly variable in most regions, with a limited number of stable and conserved RNA secondary structures. Most interesting, a set of long distance interactions form a core organizing structure (COS) that organize the genome into three major structural domains. Despite overlapping protein-coding regions the COS is supported by a particular high frequency of compensatory base changes, suggesting functional importance for this element. This new structural element potentially organizes the whole genome into three major domains protruding from a conserved core structure with potential roles in replication and evolution for the virus. PMID:26476446

  18. Predicting 3D structure, flexibility and stability of RNA hairpins in monovalent and divalent ion solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Ya-Zhou; Wang, Feng-Hua; Zhu, Xiao-Long; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2015-01-01

    A full understanding of RNA-mediated biology would require the knowledge of three-dimensional (3D) structures, structural flexibility and stability of RNAs. To predict RNA 3D structures and stability, we have previously proposed a three-bead coarse-grained predictive model with implicit salt/solvent potentials. In this study, we will further develop the model by improving the implicit-salt electrostatic potential and involving a sequence-dependent coaxial stacking potential to enable the model to simulate RNA 3D structure folding in divalent/monovalent ion solutions. As compared with the experimental data, the present model can predict 3D structures of RNA hairpins with bulge/internal loops (<77nt) from their sequences at the corresponding experimental ion conditions with an overall improved accuracy, and the model also makes reliable predictions for the flexibility of RNA hairpins with bulge loops of different length at extensive divalent/monovalent ion conditions. In addition, the model successfully pred...

  19. ProbeAlign: incorporating high-throughput sequencing-based structure probing information into ncRNA homology search

    OpenAIRE

    Ge, Ping; Zhong, Cuncong; Zhang, Shaojie

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent advances in RNA structure probing technologies, including the ones based on high-throughput sequencing, have improved the accuracy of thermodynamic folding with quantitative nucleotide-resolution structural information. Results In this paper, we present a novel approach, ProbeAlign, to incorporate the reactivities from high-throughput RNA structure probing into ncRNA homology search for functional annotation. To reduce the overhead of structure alignment on large-scale data,...

  20. Exoemission and catalytic activity of oxides of the perovskite and spinel structures in the processes of CO and hydrocarbons oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-temperature (20-400 deg C) exoemission of negative charges from complex oxides featuring perovskite structure AMO3 (A = La; M = Co, Mn, Ni) and spinel structure A'M'2O4 (A' = Cu; M' = Fe, Co, Cr) was studied using the Geiger gas-flow counter. The experiments were carried out under conditions of thermally induced emission, photo- and thermally induced emission during irradiation of samples by UV light with the wavelength of 313 nm, as well as thermally induced emission under effect of β-radiation of 90Y-90Sr with dose of 0.23 Gy. Correlation between emissivity of the oxides and catalytic activity was established. The role of weakly bound oxygen and variable valency ions in exoemission and oxidizing catalysis processes involving the complex oxides was discussed

  1. Ebola virus RNA editing depends on the primary editing site sequence and an upstream secondary structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehedi, Masfique; Hoenen, Thomas; Robertson, Shelly; Ricklefs, Stacy; Dolan, Michael A; Taylor, Travis; Falzarano, Darryl; Ebihara, Hideki; Porcella, Stephen F; Feldmann, Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Ebolavirus (EBOV), the causative agent of a severe hemorrhagic fever and a biosafety level 4 pathogen, increases its genome coding capacity by producing multiple transcripts encoding for structural and nonstructural glycoproteins from a single gene. This is achieved through RNA editing, during which non-template adenosine residues are incorporated into the EBOV mRNAs at an editing site encoding for 7 adenosine residues. However, the mechanism of EBOV RNA editing is currently not understood. In this study, we report for the first time that minigenomes containing the glycoprotein gene editing site can undergo RNA editing, thereby eliminating the requirement for a biosafety level 4 laboratory to study EBOV RNA editing. Using a newly developed dual-reporter minigenome, we have characterized the mechanism of EBOV RNA editing, and have identified cis-acting sequences that are required for editing, located between 9 nt upstream and 9 nt downstream of the editing site. Moreover, we show that a secondary structure in the upstream cis-acting sequence plays an important role in RNA editing. EBOV RNA editing is glycoprotein gene-specific, as a stretch encoding for 7 adenosine residues located in the viral polymerase gene did not serve as an editing site, most likely due to an absence of the necessary cis-acting sequences. Finally, the EBOV protein VP30 was identified as a trans-acting factor for RNA editing, constituting a novel function for this protein. Overall, our results provide novel insights into the RNA editing mechanism of EBOV, further understanding of which might result in novel intervention strategies against this viral pathogen. PMID:24146620

  2. Ebola virus RNA editing depends on the primary editing site sequence and an upstream secondary structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masfique Mehedi

    Full Text Available Ebolavirus (EBOV, the causative agent of a severe hemorrhagic fever and a biosafety level 4 pathogen, increases its genome coding capacity by producing multiple transcripts encoding for structural and nonstructural glycoproteins from a single gene. This is achieved through RNA editing, during which non-template adenosine residues are incorporated into the EBOV mRNAs at an editing site encoding for 7 adenosine residues. However, the mechanism of EBOV RNA editing is currently not understood. In this study, we report for the first time that minigenomes containing the glycoprotein gene editing site can undergo RNA editing, thereby eliminating the requirement for a biosafety level 4 laboratory to study EBOV RNA editing. Using a newly developed dual-reporter minigenome, we have characterized the mechanism of EBOV RNA editing, and have identified cis-acting sequences that are required for editing, located between 9 nt upstream and 9 nt downstream of the editing site. Moreover, we show that a secondary structure in the upstream cis-acting sequence plays an important role in RNA editing. EBOV RNA editing is glycoprotein gene-specific, as a stretch encoding for 7 adenosine residues located in the viral polymerase gene did not serve as an editing site, most likely due to an absence of the necessary cis-acting sequences. Finally, the EBOV protein VP30 was identified as a trans-acting factor for RNA editing, constituting a novel function for this protein. Overall, our results provide novel insights into the RNA editing mechanism of EBOV, further understanding of which might result in novel intervention strategies against this viral pathogen.

  3. Mathematical and Biological Modelling of RNA Secondary Structure and Its Effects on Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Hughes

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Secondary structures within the 5′ untranslated regions of messenger RNAs can have profound effects on the efficiency of translation of their messages and thereby on gene expression. Consequently they can act as important regulatory motifs in both physiological and pathological settings. Current approaches to predicting the secondary structure of these RNA sequences find the structure with the global-minimum free energy. However, since RNA folds progressively from the 5′ end when synthesised or released from the translational machinery, this may not be the most probable structure. We discuss secondary structure prediction based on local-minimisation of free energy with thermodynamic fluctuations as nucleotides are added to the 3′ end and show that these can result in different secondary structures. We also discuss approaches for studying the extent of the translational inhibition specified by structures within the 5′ untranslated region.

  4. A model of 3D-structure of H+,K+-ATPase catalytic subunit derived by homology modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong YAN; Yuan-dong HU; Song LI; Mao-sheng CHENG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To build a model of 3D-structure of H+, K+-ATPase catalytic subunit for theoretical study and anti-ulcer drug design. METHODS: The model was built on the basis of structural data from the Ca2+-ATPase. Structurally conserved regions were defined by amino acid sequence comparisons, optimum interconnecting loops were selected from the protein databank, and amino (N)- and carboxyl (C)-terminal ends were generated as random coil structures. Applying molecular mechanics method then minimized the model energy. Molecular dynamics technique was used to do further structural optimization. RESULTS: The model of 3D-structure of H+, K+-ATPase was derived. The model is reasonable according to several validation criteria. There were ten transmembrane helices (TM1-TM 10) in the model and inhibitor-binding site was identified on the TM5-8 riched negatively charged residues.CONCLUSION: The 3D-structure model from our study is informative to guide future molecular biology study about H+, K+-ATPase and drug design based on database searching.

  5. The ribosome structure controls and directs mRNA entry, translocation and exit dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The protein-synthesizing ribosome undergoes large motions to effect the translocation of tRNAs and mRNA; here, the domain motions of this system are explored with a coarse-grained elastic network model using normal mode analysis. Crystal structures are used to construct various model systems of the 70S complex with/without tRNA, elongation factor Tu and the ribosomal proteins. Computed motions reveal the well-known ratchet-like rotational motion of the large subunits, as well as the head rotation of the small subunit and the high flexibility of the L1 and L7/L12 stalks, even in the absence of ribosomal proteins. This result indicates that these experimentally observed motions during translocation are inherently controlled by the ribosomal shape and only partially dependent upon GTP hydrolysis. Normal mode analysis further reveals the mobility of A- and P-tRNAs to increase in the absence of the E-tRNA. In addition, the dynamics of the E-tRNA is affected by the absence of the ribosomal protein L1. The mRNA in the entrance tunnel interacts directly with helicase proteins S3 and S4, which constrain the mRNA in a clamp-like fashion, as well as with protein S5, which likely orients the mRNA to ensure correct translation. The ribosomal proteins S7, S11 and S18 may also be involved in assuring translation fidelity by constraining the mRNA at the exit site of the channel. The mRNA also interacts with the 16S 3' end forming the Shine–Dalgarno complex at the initiation step; the 3' end may act as a 'hook' to reel in the mRNA to facilitate its exit

  6. The Structure of the RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase of a Permutotetravirus Suggests a Link between Primer-Dependent and Primer-Independent Polymerases.

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrero, Diego S.; Mònica Buxaderas; Rodríguez, José F.; Núria Verdaguer

    2015-01-01

    Thosea asigna virus (TaV), an insect virus belonging to the Permutatetraviridae family, has a positive-sense single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) genome with two overlapping open reading frames, encoding for the replicase and capsid proteins. The particular TaV replicase includes a structurally unique RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) with a sequence permutation in the palm sub-domain, where the active site is anchored. This non-canonical arrangement of the RdRP palm is also found in double-stranded...

  7. Role of RNA structure and RNA binding activity of foot-and-mouth disease virus 3C protein in VPg uridylylation and virus replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nayak, A.; Goodfellow, I. G.; Woolaway, K. E.;

    2006-01-01

    /bus. We show that certain RNA sequences within the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 5' untranslated region but outside of the cre/bus can enhance VPg uridylylation activity. Furthermore, we have shown that the FMDV X protein alone can substitute for 3CD, albeit less efficiently. In addition, the VPg...... precursors, 3B(3)3C and 3B(123)3C, can function as substrates for uridylylation in the absence of added 3C or 3CD. Residues within the FMDV 3C protein involved in interaction with the cre/bus RNA have been identified and are located on the face of the protein opposite from the catalytic site. These residues...

  8. Crystal structure and catalytic properties of three inorganic–organic hybrid constructed from heteropolymolybdate and aminopyridine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three new organic–inorganic hybrid compounds (2-C5H7N2)3·(SiMo12O40)·(C4H8N4)0.5·(C5H6N2)2·(H2O)2 (1), (3-C5H7N2)8·(SiMo12O40)2·(C5H7N3)2·(H8O4)·(H2O)8 (2) and (4-C5H7N2)6·(SiMo12O40) (3) composed the heteropolymolybdate α-H4SiMo12O40 and the organic substrate 2/3/4-aminopyridine have been hydrothermally synthesized and characterized by routine methods. Compounds 1 and 2 exhibit a three-dimensional supramolecular network via hydrogen bond and π–π stacking interactions. Compound 2 contains a tetramolecular water cluster which consists of four water molecules connected by hydrogen bonds. These compounds exhibit good thermal stability and photoluminescent phenomena. Compounds 1 and 3 are active for catalytic oxidation of methanol in a continuous-flow fixed-bed micro-reactor, when the initial concentration of methanol is 2.75 g m−3 in air and flow rate is 10 mL min−1 at 150 °C, corresponding to the elimination rate of methanol i.e. 87.7% and 76.8%, respectively. - Three new Keggin type inorganic organic hybrid frameworks were synthesized. Compounds exhibit an extended three-dimensional supramolecular network. Compounds 1 and 3 have better catalytic activity for eliminating methanol. Highlights: ► Three 3-D Keggin inorganic–organic hybrid frameworks were synthesized. ► The π–π stacking interactions are existed in Compounds 1 and 2. ► Compound 2 contains a tetramolecular water cluster connected by hydrogen bond. ► Compounds 1 and 3 are active in the catalytic oxidation of methanol into CO2 and H2O

  9. 4SALE – A tool for synchronous RNA sequence and secondary structure alignment and editing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schultz Jörg

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In sequence analysis the multiple alignment builds the fundament of all proceeding analyses. Errors in an alignment could strongly influence all succeeding analyses and therefore could lead to wrong predictions. Hand-crafted and hand-improved alignments are necessary and meanwhile good common practice. For RNA sequences often the primary sequence as well as a secondary structure consensus is well known, e.g., the cloverleaf structure of the t-RNA. Recently, some alignment editors are proposed that are able to include and model both kinds of information. However, with the advent of a large amount of reliable RNA sequences together with their solved secondary structures (available from e.g. the ITS2 Database, we are faced with the problem to handle sequences and their associated secondary structures synchronously. Results 4SALE fills this gap. The application allows a fast sequence and synchronous secondary structure alignment for large data sets and for the first time synchronous manual editing of aligned sequences and their secondary structures. This study describes an algorithm for the synchronous alignment of sequences and their associated secondary structures as well as the main features of 4SALE used for further analyses and editing. 4SALE builds an optimal and unique starting point for every RNA sequence and structure analysis. Conclusion 4SALE, which provides an user-friendly and intuitive interface, is a comprehensive toolbox for RNA analysis based on sequence and secondary structure information. The program connects sequence and structure databases like the ITS2 Database to phylogeny programs as for example the CBCAnalyzer. 4SALE is written in JAVA and therefore platform independent. The software is freely available and distributed from the website at http://4sale.bioapps.biozentrum.uni-wuerzburg.de

  10. Structure of the paramyxovirus parainfluenza virus 5 nucleoprotein-RNA complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alayyoubi, Maher; Leser, George P.; Kors, Christopher A.; Lamb, Robert A. [NWU

    2015-05-20

    Parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) is a member of the Paramyxoviridae family of membrane-enveloped viruses with a negative-sense RNA genome that is packaged and protected by long filamentous nucleocapsid-helix structures (RNPs). These RNPs, consisting of ~2,600 protomers of nucleocapsid (N) protein, form the template for viral transcription and replication. We have determined the 3D X-ray crystal structure of the nucleoprotein (N)-RNA complex from PIV5 to 3.11-Å resolution. The structure reveals a 13-mer nucleocapsid ring whose diameter, cavity, and pitch/height dimensions agree with EM data from early studies on the Paramyxovirinae subfamily of native RNPs, indicating that it closely represents one-turn in the building block of the RNP helices. The PIV5-N nucleocapsid ring encapsidates a nuclease resistant 78-nt RNA strand in its positively charged groove formed between the N-terminal (NTD) and C-terminal (CTD) domains of its successive N protomers. Six nucleotides precisely are associated with each N protomer, with alternating three-base-in three-base-out conformation. The binding of six nucleotides per protomer is consistent with the "rule of six" that governs the genome packaging of the Paramyxovirinae subfamily of viruses. PIV5-N protomer subdomains are very similar in structure to the previously solved Nipah-N structure, but with a difference in the angle between NTD/CTD at the RNA hinge region. Based on the Nipah-N structure we modeled a PIV5-N open conformation in which the CTD rotates away from the RNA strand into the inner spacious nucleocapsid-ring cavity. This rotation would expose the RNA for the viral polymerase activity without major disruption of the nucleocapsid structure.

  11. STAR3D: a stack-based RNA 3D structural alignment tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Ping; Zhang, Shaojie

    2015-11-16

    The various roles of versatile non-coding RNAs typically require the attainment of complex high-order structures. Therefore, comparing the 3D structures of RNA molecules can yield in-depth understanding of their functional conservation and evolutionary history. Recently, many powerful tools have been developed to align RNA 3D structures. Although some methods rely on both backbone conformations and base pairing interactions, none of them consider the entire hierarchical formation of the RNA secondary structure. One of the major issues is that directly applying the algorithms of matching 2D structures to the 3D coordinates is particularly time-consuming. In this article, we propose a novel RNA 3D structural alignment tool, STAR3D, to take into full account the 2D relations between stacks without the complicated comparison of secondary structures. First, the 3D conserved stacks in the inputs are identified and then combined into a tree-like consensus. Afterward, the loop regions are compared one-to-one in accordance with their relative positions in the consensus tree. The experimental results show that the prediction of STAR3D is more accurate for both non-homologous and homologous RNAs than other state-of-the-art tools with shorter running time. PMID:26184875

  12. Tuning the structural and catalytic properties of ceria by doping with Zr4+, La3+ and Eu3+ cations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Vinodkumar; D Naga Durgasri; Swamy Maloth; Benjaram M Reddy

    2015-07-01

    This work attempts to gain information about the role of trivalent and tetravalent dopants on the structural and catalytic properties of ceria (CeO2). In this study, we have prepared Zr4+, La3+, and Eu3+ doped ceria (CZ, CL, and CE) by coprecipitation method and calcined at 773 K. The physicochemical characterization was achieved by using various techniques, namely, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), Raman spectroscopy, temperature programmed reduction (TPR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. The catalytic efficiency for soot oxidation was evaluated by thermogravimetric (TG) method and compared with undoped CeO2. Doped CeO2 catalysts decreased the soot oxidation temperature by more than 158 K compared to pure ceria. This is ascribed to mutual interaction and synergistic effect between the dopant species and the ceria. Among the synthesized nanocatalysts, the CE sample exhibited better performance. The observed better activity of CE was attributed to the presence of more number of oxygen vacancies, a high specific surface area, and easy reducibility as confirmed from Raman, BET surface area, and TPR measurements, respectively.

  13. Mono(boratabenzene) rare-earth metal dialkyl complexes: synthesis, structure and catalytic behaviors for styrene polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiufang; Leng, Xuebing; Chen, Yaofeng

    2015-03-28

    Four mono(boratabenzene) rare-earth metal dialkyl complexes, [(3,5-Me2-C5H3BR)Ln(CH2SiMe3)2(THF)] (1: R = NEt2, Ln = Sc; 2: R = NEt2, Ln = Lu; 3: R = Ph, Ln = Sc; 4: R = Ph, Ln = Lu), were synthesized efficiently via a one-pot strategy with Li[3,5-Me2-C5H3BR] (R = NEt2, Ph), LnCl3(THF)x (Ln = Sc, x = 3; Ln = Lu, x = 0), and LiCH2SiMe3. The solid-state structures of 1 and 2 were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Variable-temperature NMR studies indicated that the energy barrier for the rotation of aminoboratabenzene in 1 (ΔG‡ ≈ 71 kJ mol−1) is higher than that of phenylboratabenzene in 3 (ΔG‡ ≈ 59 kJ mol−1). These mono(boratabenzene) rare-earth metal dialkyl complexes’ catalytic behaviors for styrene polymerization were investigated, and found that mono(boratabenzene) scandium dialkyl complexes show high catalytic activities for syndiotactic polymerization upon activation with cocatalysts. PMID:25714489

  14. Structured Perovskite-Based Catalysts and Their Application as Three-Way Catalytic Converters—A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvain Keav

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Automotive Three-Way Catalysts (TWC were introduced more than 40 years ago. Despite that, the development of a sustainable TWC still remains a critical research topic owing to the increasingly stringent emission regulations together with the price and scarcity of precious metals. Among other material classes, perovskite-type oxides are known to be valuable alternatives to conventionally used TWC compositions and have demonstrated to be suitable for a wide range of automotive applications, ranging from TWC to Diesel Oxidation Catalysts (DOC, from NOx Storage Reduction catalysts (NSR to soot combustion catalysts. The interest in these catalysts has been revitalized in the past ten years by the introduction of the concept of catalyst regenerability of perovskite-based TWC, which is in principle well applicable to other catalytic processes as well, and by the possibility to reduce the amounts of critical elements, such as precious metals without seriously lowering the catalytic performance. The aim of this review is to show that perovskite-type oxides have the potential to fulfil the requirements (high activity, stability, and possibility to be included into structured catalysts for implementation in TWC.

  15. Catalytic properties of crystalline titanium silicalites. 1. Synthesis and characterization of titanium-rich zeolites with MFI structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thangaraj, A.; Kumar, R.; Mirajkar, S.P.; Ratnasamy, P. (National Chemical Lab., Pune (India))

    1991-07-01

    Crystalline titanium silicalites with the MFI structure and high titanium content (Si/Ti{double bond}10) have been prepared using improved synthesis procedures. The monoclinic lattice symmetry of silicalite-1 changes to orthorhombic on introduction of titanium. The titanium silicalites retain their orthorhombic symmetry even after calcination in air. On progressive incorporation of titanium, (1) the unit cell dimensions and volume (from XRD) increase linearly, (2) the crystal size decreases progressively, (3) the intensity of the framework IR band at 960 cm{sup {minus}1} increases, (4) a band around 47,000 c{sup {minus}1} appears in the electronic spectra due to charge transfer transitions involving Ti(IV) sites, (5) the hydrophilicity of the zeolite (from water adsorptions measurements) increases, (6) the adsorption capacity for cyclohexane increases, (7) the {sup 29}Si MAS NMR lines exhibit progressive broadening, and finally (8) the catalytic activity in the hydroxylation of phenol to catechol and hydroquinone also increases markedly. Based on these observations, it is concluded that a significant fraction of titanium in these samples is situated in framework positions. The catalytic properties of these well-defined titanium-modified zeolites will be described in more detail in the subsequent parts of this series.

  16. Synthesis, electronic structure and catalytic activity of ruthenium-iodo-carbonyl complexes with thioether containing NNS donor ligand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Subrata; Jana, Mahendra Sekhar; Biswas, Sujan; Sinha, Chittaranjan; Mondal, Tapan Kumar

    2014-05-01

    The ruthenium carbonyl complexes 1 and 2 with redox noninnocent NNS donor ligand, 1-methyl-2-{(o-thiomethyl)phenylazo}imidazole (L) have been synthesized and characterized by various analytical and spectroscopic (IR, UV-Vis and 1H NMR) techniques. The complexes exhibit a quasi-reversible one electron Ru(II)/Ru(III) oxidation couple at 1.11 V for 1 and 0.76 V for 2 along with two successive one electron ligand reductions. Catalytic activity of the compounds has been investigated to the oxidation of PhCH2OH to PhCHO, 2-butanol (C4H9OH) to 2-butanone, 1-phenylethanol (PhC2H4OH) to acetophenone, cyclopentanol (C5H9OH) to cyclopentanone, cyclohexanol to cyclohexanone, cycloheptanol to cycloheptanone and cycloctanol to cycloctanone using N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide (NMO) as oxidant. The catalytic efficiency of 2 is greater than complex 1 and well correlate with the metal oxidation potential. DFT, NBO and TDDFT calculations in DFT/B3LYP/6-31G(d)/lanL2TZ(f) method are employed to interpret the structural and electronic features of the complexes.

  17. A computational analysis of the structural determinants of APOBEC3's catalytic activity and vulnerability to HIV-1 Vif

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandilya, M.D. Shivender; Bohn, Markus-Frederik; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2016-01-01

    APOBEC3s (A3) are Zn2+ dependent cytidine deaminases with diverse biological functions and implications for cancer and immunity. Four of the seven human A3s restrict HIV by 'hypermutating' the reverse-transcribed viral genomic DNA. HIV Virion Infectivity Factor (Vif) counters this restriction by targeting A3s to proteasomal degradation. However, there is no apparent correlation between catalytic activity, Vif binding, and sequence similarity between A3 domains. Our comparative structural analysis reveals features required for binding Vif and features influencing polynucleotide deaminase activity in A3 proteins. All Vif-binding A3s share a negatively charged surface region that includes residues previously implicated in binding the highly-positively charged Vif. Additionally, catalytically active A3s share a positively charged groove near the Zn2+ coordinating active site, which may accommodate the negatively charged polynucleotide substrate. Our findings suggest surface electrostatics, as well as the spatial extent of substrate accommodating region, are critical determinants of substrate and Vif binding across A3 proteins with implications for anti-retroviral and anti-cancer therapeutic design. PMID:25461536

  18. Structure determination of an 11-subunit exosome in complex with RNA by molecular replacement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The crystallographic steps towards the structure determination of a complete eukaryotic exosome complex bound to RNA are presented. Phasing of this 11-protein subunit complex was carried out via molecular replacement. The RNA exosome is an evolutionarily conserved multi-protein complex involved in the 3′ degradation of a variety of RNA transcripts. In the nucleus, the exosome participates in the maturation of structured RNAs, in the surveillance of pre-mRNAs and in the decay of a variety of noncoding transcripts. In the cytoplasm, the exosome degrades mRNAs in constitutive and regulated turnover pathways. Several structures of subcomplexes of eukaryotic exosomes or related prokaryotic exosome-like complexes are known, but how the complete assembly is organized to fulfil processive RNA degradation has been unclear. An atomic snapshot of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae 420 kDa exosome complex bound to an RNA substrate in the pre-cleavage state of a hydrolytic reaction has been determined. Here, the crystallographic steps towards the structural elucidation, which was carried out by molecular replacement, are presented

  19. Structure determination of an 11-subunit exosome in complex with RNA by molecular replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makino, Debora Lika, E-mail: dmakino@biochem.mpg.de; Conti, Elena [Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry, Am Klopferspitz 18, 82152 Martinsried (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    The crystallographic steps towards the structure determination of a complete eukaryotic exosome complex bound to RNA are presented. Phasing of this 11-protein subunit complex was carried out via molecular replacement. The RNA exosome is an evolutionarily conserved multi-protein complex involved in the 3′ degradation of a variety of RNA transcripts. In the nucleus, the exosome participates in the maturation of structured RNAs, in the surveillance of pre-mRNAs and in the decay of a variety of noncoding transcripts. In the cytoplasm, the exosome degrades mRNAs in constitutive and regulated turnover pathways. Several structures of subcomplexes of eukaryotic exosomes or related prokaryotic exosome-like complexes are known, but how the complete assembly is organized to fulfil processive RNA degradation has been unclear. An atomic snapshot of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae 420 kDa exosome complex bound to an RNA substrate in the pre-cleavage state of a hydrolytic reaction has been determined. Here, the crystallographic steps towards the structural elucidation, which was carried out by molecular replacement, are presented.

  20. Structure of the prolyl-tRNA synthetase from the eukaryotic pathogen Giardia lamblia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, Eric T.; Kim, Jessica E.; Napuli, Alberto J.; Verlinde, Christophe L. M. J.; Fan, Erkang; Zucker, Frank H.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Buckner, Frederick S.; Hol, Wim G. J.; Merritt, Ethan A., E-mail: merritt@u.washington.edu [Medical Structural Genomics of Pathogenic Protozoa, (United States); University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2012-09-01

    The structure of Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase cocrystallized with proline and ATP shows evidence for half-of-the-sites activity, leading to a corresponding mixture of reaction substrates and product (prolyl-AMP) in the two active sites of the dimer. The genome of the human intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia contains only a single aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase gene for each amino acid. The Giardia prolyl-tRNA synthetase gene product was originally misidentified as a dual-specificity Pro/Cys enzyme, in part owing to its unexpectedly high off-target activation of cysteine, but is now believed to be a normal representative of the class of archaeal/eukaryotic prolyl-tRNA synthetases. The 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of the G. lamblia enzyme presented here is thus the first structure determination of a prolyl-tRNA synthetase from a eukaryote. The relative occupancies of substrate (proline) and product (prolyl-AMP) in the active site are consistent with half-of-the-sites reactivity, as is the observed biphasic thermal denaturation curve for the protein in the presence of proline and MgATP. However, no corresponding induced asymmetry is evident in the structure of the protein. No thermal stabilization is observed in the presence of cysteine and ATP. The implied low affinity for the off-target activation product cysteinyl-AMP suggests that translational fidelity in Giardia is aided by the rapid release of misactivated cysteine.