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Sample records for catalytic rna cleavage

  1. Catalytic mechanism of RNA backbone cleavage by ribonuclease H from quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosta, Edina; Nowotny, Marcin; Yang, Wei; Hummer, Gerhard

    2011-06-15

    We use quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations to study the cleavage of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) backbone catalyzed by ribonuclease H. This protein is a prototypical member of a large family of enzymes that use two-metal catalysis to process nucleic acids. By combining Hamiltonian replica exchange with a finite-temperature string method, we calculate the free energy surface underlying the RNA-cleavage reaction and characterize its mechanism. We find that the reaction proceeds in two steps. In a first step, catalyzed primarily by magnesium ion A and its ligands, a water molecule attacks the scissile phosphate. Consistent with thiol-substitution experiments, a water proton is transferred to the downstream phosphate group. The transient phosphorane formed as a result of this nucleophilic attack decays by breaking the bond between the phosphate and the ribose oxygen. In the resulting intermediate, the dissociated but unprotonated leaving group forms an alkoxide coordinated to magnesium ion B. In a second step, the reaction is completed by protonation of the leaving group, with a neutral Asp132 as a likely proton donor. The overall reaction barrier of ∼15 kcal mol(-1), encountered in the first step, together with the cost of protonating Asp132, is consistent with the slow measured rate of ∼1-100/min. The two-step mechanism is also consistent with the bell-shaped pH dependence of the reaction rate. The nonmonotonic relative motion of the magnesium ions along the reaction pathway agrees with X-ray crystal structures. Proton-transfer reactions and changes in the metal ion coordination emerge as central factors in the RNA-cleavage reaction. PMID:21539371

  2. Catalytic Mechanism of RNA Backbone Cleavage by Ribonuclease H from QM/MM Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosta, Edina; Nowotny, Marcin; Yang, Wei; Hummer, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    We use quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) simulations to study the cleavage of the ribonucleic acid (RNA) backbone catalyzed by ribonuclease H. This protein is a prototypical member of a large family of enzymes that use two-metal catalysis to process nucleic acids. By combining Hamiltonian replica exchange with a finite-temperature string method, we calculate the free energy surface underlying the RNA cleavage reaction and characterize its mechanism. We find that the reaction proceeds in two steps. In a first step, catalyzed primarily by magnesium ion A and its ligands, a water molecule attacks the scissile phosphate. Consistent with thiol-substitution experiments, a water proton is transferred to the downstream phosphate group. The transient phosphorane formed as a result of this nucleophilic attack decays by breaking the bond between the phosphate and the ribose oxygen. In the resulting intermediate, the dissociated but unprotonated leaving group forms an alkoxide coordinated to magnesium ion B. In a second step, the reaction is completed by protonation of the leaving group, with a neutral Asp132 as a likely proton donor. The overall reaction barrier of ~15 kcal mol−1, encountered in the first step, together with the cost of protonating Asp132, is consistent with the slow measured rate of ~1–100/min. The two-step mechanism is also consistent with the bell-shaped pH dependence of the reaction rate. The non-monotonic relative motion of the magnesium ions along the reaction pathway agrees with X-ray crystal structures. Proton transfer reactions and changes in the metal ion coordination emerge as central factors in the RNA cleavage reaction. PMID:21539371

  3. Intrinsic transcript cleavage activity of RNA polymerase.

    OpenAIRE

    Orlova, M; Newlands, J; Das, A; Goldfarb, A; Borukhov, S

    1995-01-01

    The GreA and GreB transcript cleavage factors of Escherichia coli suppress elongation arrest and may have a proofreading role in transcription. With the use of E. coli greA-greB- mutant, RNA polymerase is demonstrated to possess substantial intrinsic transcript cleavage activity. Mildly alkaline pH mimics the effect of the Gre proteins by inducing transcript cleavage in ternary complexes and antagonizing elongation arrest through a cleavage-and-restart reaction. Thus, transcript cleavage cons...

  4. The effect of structure in a long target RNA on ribozyme cleavage efficiency.

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, T B; McDonald, C K; Hagen, M.

    1997-01-01

    Inhibition of gene expression by catalytic RNA (ribozymes) requires that ribozymes efficiently cleave specific sites within large target RNAs. However, the cleavage of long target RNAs by ribozymes is much less efficient than cleavage of short oligonucleotide substrates because of higher order structure in the long target RNA. To further study the effects of long target RNA structure on ribozyme cleavage efficiency, we determined the accessibility of seven hammerhead ribozyme cleavage sites i...

  5. Intracellular ribozyme-catalyzed trans-cleavage of RNA monitored by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    OpenAIRE

    Vitiello, D; Pecchia, D B; Burke, J M

    2000-01-01

    Small catalytic RNAs like the hairpin ribozyme are proving to be useful intracellular tools; however, most attempts to demonstrate trans-cleavage of RNA by ribozymes in cells have been frustrated by rapid cellular degradation of the cleavage products. Here, we describe a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay that directly monitors cleavage of target RNA in tissue-culture cells. An oligoribonucleotide substrate was modified to inhibit cellular ribonuclease degradation without int...

  6. Pre-mRNA 3’ Cleavage is Reversibly Inhibited In Vitro by Cleavage Factor Dephosphorylation

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    During 3' end formation most pre-mRNAs undergo endonucleolytic cleavage and polyadenylation in the 3' untranslated region. Very little is known concerning the role that post-translational modifications play in the function and regulation of the factors required for 3' cleavage. Using the reconstituted pre-mRNA cleavage reaction, we find that non-specific dephosphorylation of HeLa cell nuclear extract leads to the loss of 3' cleavage activity. A variety of serine/threonine phosphatases inhibit...

  7. Structural and functional basis for RNA cleavage by Ire1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stroud Robert M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The unfolded protein response (UPR controls the protein folding capacity of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. Central to this signaling pathway is the ER-resident bifunctional transmembrane kinase/endoribonuclease Ire1. The endoribonuclease (RNase domain of Ire1 initiates a non-conventional mRNA splicing reaction, leading to the production of a transcription factor that controls UPR target genes. The mRNA splicing reaction is an obligatory step of Ire1 signaling, yet its mechanism has remained poorly understood due to the absence of substrate-bound crystal structures of Ire1, the lack of structural similarity between Ire1 and other RNases, and a scarcity of quantitative enzymological data. Here, we experimentally define the active site of Ire1 RNase and quantitatively evaluate the contribution of the key active site residues to catalysis. Results This analysis and two new crystal structures suggest that Ire1 RNase uses histidine H1061 and tyrosine Y1043 as the general acid-general base pair contributing ≥ 7.6 kcal/mol and 1.4 kcal/mol to transition state stabilization, respectively, and asparagine N1057 and arginine R1056 for coordination of the scissile phosphate. Investigation of the stem-loop recognition revealed that additionally to the stem-loops derived from the classic Ire1 substrates HAC1 and Xbp1 mRNA, Ire1 can site-specifically and rapidly cleave anticodon stem-loop (ASL of unmodified tRNAPhe, extending known substrate specificity of Ire1 RNase. Conclusions Our data define the catalytic center of Ire1 RNase and suggest a mechanism of RNA cleavage: each RNase monomer apparently contains a separate catalytic apparatus for RNA cleavage, whereas two RNase subunits contribute to RNA stem-loop docking. Conservation of the key residues among Ire1 homologues suggests that the mechanism elucidated here for yeast Ire1 applies to Ire1 in metazoan cells, and to the only known Ire1 homologue RNase L.

  8. Short RNA guides cleavage by eukaryotic RNase III.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Lamontagne

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, short RNAs guide a variety of enzymatic activities that range from RNA editing to translation repression. It is hypothesized that pre-existing proteins evolved to bind and use guide RNA during evolution. However, the capacity of modern proteins to adopt new RNA guides has never been demonstrated. Here we show that Rnt1p, the yeast orthologue of the bacterial dsRNA-specific RNase III, can bind short RNA transcripts and use them as guides for sequence-specific cleavage. Target cleavage occurred at a constant distance from the Rnt1p binding site, leaving the guide RNA intact for subsequent cleavage. Our results indicate that RNase III may trigger sequence-specific RNA degradation independent of the RNAi machinery, and they open the road for a new generation of precise RNA silencing tools that do not trigger a dsRNA-mediated immune response.

  9. Mechanisms for ribotoxin-induced ribosomal RNA cleavage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Kaiyu [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Zhou, Hui-Ren [Food Science and Human Nutrition (United States); Pestka, James J., E-mail: pestka@msu.edu [Department of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics (United States); Food Science and Human Nutrition (United States); Center for Integrative Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    The Type B trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON), a ribotoxic mycotoxin known to contaminate cereal-based foods, induces ribosomal RNA (rRNA) cleavage in the macrophage via p38-directed activation of caspases. Here we employed the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage model to test the hypothesis that this rRNA cleavage pathway is similarly induced by other ribotoxins. Capillary electrophoresis confirmed that the antibiotic anisomycin (≥ 25 ng/ml), the macrocylic trichothecene satratoxin G (SG) (≥ 10 ng/ml) and ribosome-inactivating protein ricin (≥ 300 ng/ml) induced 18s and 28s rRNA fragmentation patterns identical to that observed for DON. Also, as found for DON, inhibition of p38, double-stranded RNA-activated kinase (PKR) and hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck) suppressed MAPK anisomycin-induced rRNA cleavage, while, in contrast, their inhibition did not affect SG- and ricin-induced rRNA fragmentation. The p53 inhibitor pifithrin-μ and pan caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK suppressed rRNA cleavage induced by anisomycin, SG and ricin, indicating that these ribotoxins shared with DON a conserved downstream pathway. Activation of caspases 8, 9 and 3 concurrently with apoptosis further suggested that rRNA cleavage occurred in parallel with both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of programmed cell death. When specific inhibitors of cathepsins L and B (lysosomal cysteine cathepsins active at cytosolic neutral pH) were tested, only the former impaired anisomycin-, SG-, ricin- and DON-induced rRNA cleavage. Taken together, the data suggest that (1) all four ribotoxins induced p53-dependent rRNA cleavage via activation of cathepsin L and caspase 3, and (2) activation of p53 by DON and anisomycin involved p38 whereas SG and ricin activated p53 by an alternative mechanism. Highlights: ► Deoxynivalenol (DON) anisomycin, satratoxin G (SG) and ricin are ribotoxins. ► Ribotoxins induce 18s and 28s rRNA cleavage in the RAW 264.7 macrophage model. ► Ribotoxins induce rRNA cleavage via

  10. Mechanisms for ribotoxin-induced ribosomal RNA cleavage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Type B trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON), a ribotoxic mycotoxin known to contaminate cereal-based foods, induces ribosomal RNA (rRNA) cleavage in the macrophage via p38-directed activation of caspases. Here we employed the RAW 264.7 murine macrophage model to test the hypothesis that this rRNA cleavage pathway is similarly induced by other ribotoxins. Capillary electrophoresis confirmed that the antibiotic anisomycin (≥ 25 ng/ml), the macrocylic trichothecene satratoxin G (SG) (≥ 10 ng/ml) and ribosome-inactivating protein ricin (≥ 300 ng/ml) induced 18s and 28s rRNA fragmentation patterns identical to that observed for DON. Also, as found for DON, inhibition of p38, double-stranded RNA-activated kinase (PKR) and hematopoietic cell kinase (Hck) suppressed MAPK anisomycin-induced rRNA cleavage, while, in contrast, their inhibition did not affect SG- and ricin-induced rRNA fragmentation. The p53 inhibitor pifithrin-μ and pan caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK suppressed rRNA cleavage induced by anisomycin, SG and ricin, indicating that these ribotoxins shared with DON a conserved downstream pathway. Activation of caspases 8, 9 and 3 concurrently with apoptosis further suggested that rRNA cleavage occurred in parallel with both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways of programmed cell death. When specific inhibitors of cathepsins L and B (lysosomal cysteine cathepsins active at cytosolic neutral pH) were tested, only the former impaired anisomycin-, SG-, ricin- and DON-induced rRNA cleavage. Taken together, the data suggest that (1) all four ribotoxins induced p53-dependent rRNA cleavage via activation of cathepsin L and caspase 3, and (2) activation of p53 by DON and anisomycin involved p38 whereas SG and ricin activated p53 by an alternative mechanism. Highlights: ► Deoxynivalenol (DON) anisomycin, satratoxin G (SG) and ricin are ribotoxins. ► Ribotoxins induce 18s and 28s rRNA cleavage in the RAW 264.7 macrophage model. ► Ribotoxins induce rRNA cleavage via

  11. Internal guide RNA interactions interfere with Cas9-mediated cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thyme, Summer B.; Akhmetova, Laila; Montague, Tessa G.; Valen, Eivind; Schier, Alexander F.

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas system uses guide RNAs (gRNAs) to direct sequence-specific DNA cleavage. Not every gRNA elicits cleavage and the mechanisms that govern gRNA activity have not been resolved. Low activity could result from either failure to form a functional Cas9–gRNA complex or inability to recognize targets in vivo. Here we show that both phenomena influence Cas9 activity by comparing mutagenesis rates in zebrafish embryos with in vitro cleavage assays. In vivo, our results suggest that genomic factors such as CTCF inhibit mutagenesis. Comparing near-identical gRNA sequences with different in vitro activities reveals that internal gRNA interactions reduce cleavage. Even though gRNAs containing these structures do not yield cleavage-competent complexes, they can compete with active gRNAs for binding to Cas9. These results reveal that both genomic context and internal gRNA interactions can interfere with Cas9-mediated cleavage and illuminate previously uncharacterized features of Cas9–gRNA complex formation. PMID:27282953

  12. Zinc-dependent cleavage in the catalytic core of the hammerhead ribozyme: evidence for a pH-dependent conformational change

    OpenAIRE

    Borda, Emily J.; Markley, John C.; Sigurdsson, Snorri Th.

    2003-01-01

    We have characterized a novel Zn2+-catalyzed cleavage site between nucleotides C3 and U4 in the catalytic core of the hammerhead ribozyme. In contrast to previously described divalent metal-ion-dependent cleavage of RNA, U4 cleavage is only observed in the presence of Zn2+. This new cleavage site has an unusual pH dependence, in that U4 cleavage products are only observed above pH 7.9 and reach a maximum yield at about pH 8.5. These data, together with the fact that no metal ion-binding site ...

  13. Intracellular ribozyme-catalyzed trans-cleavage of RNA monitored by fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitiello, D; Pecchia, D B; Burke, J M

    2000-04-01

    Small catalytic RNAs like the hairpin ribozyme are proving to be useful intracellular tools; however, most attempts to demonstrate trans-cleavage of RNA by ribozymes in cells have been frustrated by rapid cellular degradation of the cleavage products. Here, we describe a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) assay that directly monitors cleavage of target RNA in tissue-culture cells. An oligoribonucleotide substrate was modified to inhibit cellular ribonuclease degradation without interfering with ribozyme cleavage, and donor (fluorescein) and acceptor (tetramethylrhodamine) fluorophores were introduced at positions flanking the cleavage site. In simple buffers, the intact substrate produces a strong FRET signal that is lost upon cleavage, resulting in a red-to-green shift in dominant fluorescence emission. Hairpin ribozyme and fluorescent substrate were microinjected into murine fibroblasts under conditions in which substrate cleavage can occur only inside the cell. A strong FRET signal was observed by fluorescence microscopy when substrate was injected, but rapid decay of the FRET signal occurred when an active, cognate ribozyme was introduced with the substrate. No acceleration in cleavage rates was observed in control experiments utilizing a noncleavable substrate, inactive ribozyme, or an active ribozyme with altered substrate specificity. Subsequently, the fluorescent substrates were injected into clonal cell lines that expressed cognate or noncognate ribozymes. A decrease in FRET signal was observed only when substrate was microinjected into cells expressing its cognate ribozyme. These results demonstrate trans-cleavage of RNA within mammalian cells, and provide an experimental basis for quantitative analysis of ribozyme activity and specificity within the cell. PMID:10786853

  14. Small Molecule-Mediated Cleavage of RNA in Living Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Guan, Lirui; Disney, Matthew D.

    2012-01-01

    Antisense oligonucleotides and small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) control gene expression by triggering the degradation of a mRNA via recruitment of RNase H or the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), respectively.[1] These approaches are hampered, however, by the poor cellular permeability of oligonucleotides. A small molecule approach to cleave RNA targets could obviate uptake issues. Several compounds can induce RNA cleavage in vitro,[2] however, to the best of our knowledge no small molecul...

  15. Drosha regulates gene expression independently of RNA cleavage function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gromak, Natalia; Dienstbier, Martin; Macias, Sara;

    2013-01-01

    Drosha is the main RNase III-like enzyme involved in the process of microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis in the nucleus. Using whole-genome ChIP-on-chip analysis, we demonstrate that, in addition to miRNA sequences, Drosha specifically binds promoter-proximal regions of many human genes in a transcription......-terminal protein-interaction domain, which associates with the RNA-binding protein CBP80 and RNA Polymerase II. Consequently, we uncover a previously unsuspected RNA cleavage-independent function of Drosha in the regulation of human gene expression.......Drosha is the main RNase III-like enzyme involved in the process of microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis in the nucleus. Using whole-genome ChIP-on-chip analysis, we demonstrate that, in addition to miRNA sequences, Drosha specifically binds promoter-proximal regions of many human genes in a transcription......-dependent manner. This binding is not associated with miRNA production or RNA cleavage. Drosha knockdown in HeLa cells downregulated nascent gene transcription, resulting in a reduction of polyadenylated mRNA produced from these gene regions. Furthermore, we show that this function of Drosha is dependent on its N...

  16. Cross talk between the +73/294 interaction and the cleavage site in RNase P RNA mediated cleavage

    OpenAIRE

    Brännvall, Mathias; Kikovska, Ema; Kirsebom, Leif A.

    2004-01-01

    To monitor functionally important metal ions and possible cross talk in RNase P RNA mediated cleavage we studied cleavage of substrates, where the 2′OH at the RNase P cleavage site (at −1) and/or at position +73 had been replaced with a 2′ amino group (or 2′H). Our data showed that the presence of 2′ modifications at these positions affected cleavage site recognition, ground state binding of substrate and/or rate of cleavage. Cleavage of 2′ amino substituted substrates at different pH showed ...

  17. The short transcript of Leishmania RNA virus is generated by RNA cleavage.

    OpenAIRE

    MacBeth, K J; Patterson, J. L.

    1995-01-01

    Leishmania RNA virus 1 produces a short viral RNA transcript corresponding to the 5' end of positive-sense single-stranded RNAs both in virally infected cells and in in vitro polymerase assays. We hypothesized that this short transcript was generated via cleavage of full-length positive-sense single-stranded RNA. A putative cleavage site was mapped by primer extension analysis to nucleotide 320 of the viral genome. To address the hypothesis that the short transcript is generated via cleavage ...

  18. RNA folding during transcription by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase analyzed by RNA self-cleavage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids (a hammerhead) to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. Transcript elongation is arrested at defined positions using chain-terminating ribonucleoside triphosphate analogues (3'-deoxyNTP's or 3'-O-methylNTP's). When the transcript can form the hammerhead structure it self-cleaves to give a truncated product. The experiment yields an RNA sequencing ladder which terminates at the length at which cleavage becomes possible; the sequencing ladder is compared to those generated by using a noncleaving transcript or by using [α-thio]ATP in place of ATP. They have shown that 15-18 nucleotides (nt) of RNA past the cleavage point must be synthesized before the transcript can self-cleave within a ternary complex, whereas RNA freed from the complex by heating can cleave with only 3 or more nt present beyond the cleavage point. There are sequence-dependent as well as length-dependent effects. The results suggest that 12 ± 1 nt are sequestered within the ternary complex and are consistent with the presence of a DNA-RNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The results indicate that the hammerhead structure does not disrupt the hybrid. Self-cleaving of the transcript offers a simple structural probe for studying less well-characterized transcription complexes. The relevance of the results to models for transcription termination is discussed

  19. RNA folding during transcription by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase analyzed by RNA self-cleavage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, J.A.; Kahn, J.D.; Hearst, J.E. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA) Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA))

    1990-08-28

    The authors have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids (a hammerhead) to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. Transcript elongation is arrested at defined positions using chain-terminating ribonucleoside triphosphate analogues (3{prime}-deoxyNTP's or 3{prime}-O-methylNTP's). When the transcript can form the hammerhead structure it self-cleaves to give a truncated product. The experiment yields an RNA sequencing ladder which terminates at the length at which cleavage becomes possible; the sequencing ladder is compared to those generated by using a noncleaving transcript or by using ({alpha}-thio)ATP in place of ATP. They have shown that 15-18 nucleotides (nt) of RNA past the cleavage point must be synthesized before the transcript can self-cleave within a ternary complex, whereas RNA freed from the complex by heating can cleave with only 3 or more nt present beyond the cleavage point. There are sequence-dependent as well as length-dependent effects. The results suggest that 12 {plus minus} 1 nt are sequestered within the ternary complex and are consistent with the presence of a DNA-RNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The results indicate that the hammerhead structure does not disrupt the hybrid. Self-cleaving of the transcript offers a simple structural probe for studying less well-characterized transcription complexes. The relevance of the results to models for transcription termination is discussed.

  20. Programmable RNA recognition and cleavage by CRISPR/Cas9

    OpenAIRE

    O’Connell, Mitchell R.; Oakes, Benjamin L.; Sternberg, Samuel H.; East-Seletsky, Alexandra; Kaplan, Matias; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    The CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 is an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease that uses RNA:DNA complementarity to identify target sites for sequence-specific doublestranded DNA (dsDNA) cleavage 1-5 . In its native context, Cas9 acts on DNA substrates exclusively because both binding and catalysis require recognition of a short DNA sequence, the protospacer adjacent motif (PAM), next to and on the strand opposite the 20-nucleotide target site in dsDNA 4-7 . Cas9 has proven to be a versatile tool for g...

  1. The short transcript of Leishmania RNA virus is generated by RNA cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacBeth, K J; Patterson, J L

    1995-01-01

    Leishmania RNA virus 1 produces a short viral RNA transcript corresponding to the 5' end of positive-sense single-stranded RNAs both in virally infected cells and in in vitro polymerase assays. We hypothesized that this short transcript was generated via cleavage of full-length positive-sense single-stranded RNA. A putative cleavage site was mapped by primer extension analysis to nucleotide 320 of the viral genome. To address the hypothesis that the short transcript is generated via cleavage at this site, two substrate RNAs that possessed viral sequence encompassing the putative cleavage site were created. When incubated with sucrose-purified viral particles, these substrate RNAs were site-specifically cleaved. The cleavage site of the in vitro-processed RNAs also mapped to viral nucleotide 320. The short-transcript-generating activity could be specifically abolished by proteinase K treatment of sucrose-purified viral particles and high concentrations of EGTA [ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid], suggesting that the activity requires a proteinaceous factor and possibly intact viral particles. The cleavage activity is directly associated with short-transcript-generating activity, since only viral particle preparations which were capable of generating the short transcript in polymerase assays were also active in the cleavage assay. Furthermore, the short-transcript-generating activity is independent of the viral polymerase's transcriptase and replicase activities. We present a working model whereby cleavage of Leishmaniavirus RNA transcripts functions in the maintenance of a low-level persistent infection. PMID:7745692

  2. Mechanisms of RNAi: mRNA cleavage fragments may indicate stalled RISC

    OpenAIRE

    Holen, Torgeir

    2005-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of RNA interference (RNAi) is under intense investigation. We previously demonstrated the existence of inactive siRNAs and also of mRNA cleavage in vivo in human cells. Here it is shown that some siRNAs with low activity leave mRNA cleavage fragments while an siRNA with higher activity does not. The pattern is consistent with both short-term (4-24 hours) and long-term (1-4 days) time-series. Analysis of the putative 3′ mRNA cleavage product showed high GC content immed...

  3. RNA cleavage products generated by antisense oligonucleotides and siRNAs are processed by the RNA surveillance machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Walt F; De Hoyos, Cheryl L; Liang, Xue-Hai; Crooke, Stanley T

    2016-04-20

    DNA-based antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) elicit cleavage of the targeted RNA by the endoribonuclease RNase H1, whereas siRNAs mediate cleavage through the RNAi pathway. To determine the fates of the cleaved RNA in cells, we lowered the levels of the factors involved in RNA surveillance prior to treating cells with ASOs or siRNA and analyzed cleavage products by RACE. The cytoplasmic 5' to 3' exoribonuclease XRN1 was responsible for the degradation of the downstream cleavage products generated by ASOs or siRNA targeting mRNAs. In contrast, downstream cleavage products generated by ASOs targeting nuclear long non-coding RNA Malat 1 and pre-mRNA were degraded by nuclear XRN2. The downstream cleavage products did not appear to be degraded in the 3' to 5' direction as the majority of these products contained intact poly(A) tails and were bound by the poly(A) binding protein. The upstream cleavage products of Malat1 were degraded in the 3' to 5' direction by the exosome complex containing the nuclear exoribonuclease Dis3. The exosome complex containing Dis3 or cytoplasmic Dis3L1 degraded mRNA upstream cleavage products, which were not bound by the 5'-cap binding complex and, consequently, were susceptible to degradation in the 5' to 3' direction by the XRN exoribonucleases. PMID:26843429

  4. Electro-catalytic oxidative cleavage of lignin in a protic ionic liquid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Elena; Wintringer, Reiner; Volmer, Dietrich A; Hempelmann, Rolf

    2012-04-21

    Lignin is a component of lignocellulosic biomass and a promising matrix for recovering important renewable aromatic compounds. We present a new approach of electro-oxidative cleavage of lignin, dissolved in a special protic ionic liquid, using an anode with particular electro-catalytic activity. As appropriate ionic liquid triethylammonium methanesulfonate was identified, synthesised, explored for dissolution of alkali-lignin and used for electrolysis of 5 wt.% lignin solutions. As appropriate anode material, oxidation-stable ruthenium-vanadium-titanium mixed oxide electrodes were prepared and explored for their electro-catalytic activity. The electrolysis was performed at several potentials in the range from 1.0 V to 1.5 V (vs. an Ag pseudo reference electrode). A wide range of aromatic fragments was identified as cleavage products by means of GC-MS and HPLC measurements. PMID:22398694

  5. Crystal structure of A. aeolicus argonaute, a site-specific DNA-guided endoribonuclease, provides insights into RISC-mediated mRNA cleavage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan,Y.; Pei, Y.; Ma, J.; Kuryavyi, V.; Zhadina, M.; Meister, G.; Chen, H.; Dauter, Z.; Tuschi, T.; Patel, D.

    2005-01-01

    Argonaute (Ago) proteins constitute a key component of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). We report the crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus Ago (Aa-Ago) together with binding and cleavage studies, which establish this eubacterial Ago as a bona fide guide DNA strand-mediated site-specific RNA endonuclease. We have generated a stereochemically robust model of the complex, where the guide DNA-mRNA duplex is positioned within a basic channel spanning the bilobal interface, such that the 5' phosphate of the guide strand can be anchored in a basic pocket, and the mRNA can be positioned for site-specific cleavage by RNase H-type divalent cation-coordinated catalytic Asp residues of the PIWI domain. Domain swap experiments involving chimeras of human Ago (hAgo1) and cleavage-competent hAgo2 reinforce the role of the PIWI domain in 'slicer' activity. We propose a four-step Ago-mediated catalytic cleavage cycle model, which provides distinct perspectives into the mechanism of guide strand-mediated mRNA cleavage within the RISC.

  6. Two-step cleavage of hairpin RNA with 5' overhangs by human DICER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzuki Harukazu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DICER is an RNase III family endoribonuclease that processes precursor microRNAs (pre-miRNAs and long double-stranded RNAs, generating microRNA (miRNA duplexes and short interfering RNA duplexes with 20~23 nucleotides (nts in length. The typical form of pre-miRNA processed by the Drosha protein is a hairpin RNA with 2-nt 3' overhangs. On the other hand, production of mature miRNA from an endogenous hairpin RNA with 5' overhangs has also been reported, although the mechanism for this process is unknown. Results In this study, we show that human recombinant DICER protein (rDICER processes a hairpin RNA with 5' overhangs in vitro and generates an intermediate duplex with a 29 nt-5' strand and a 23 nt-3' strand, which was eventually cleaved into a canonical miRNA duplex via a two-step cleavage. The previously identified endogenous pre-miRNA with 5' overhangs, pre-mmu-mir-1982 RNA, is also determined to be a substrate of rDICER through the same two-step cleavage. Conclusions The two-step cleavage of a hairpin RNA with 5' overhangs shows that DICER releases double-stranded RNAs after the first cleavage and binds them again in the inverse direction for a second cleavage. These findings have implications for how DICER may be able to interact with or process differing precursor structures.

  7. Transfer-messenger RNA and SmpB mediate bacteriostasis in Escherichia coli cells against tRNA cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Fusako; Sugita, Risa; Chang, Jung-Wei; Ogawa, Tetsuhiro; Tsumadori, Natsuko; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Hidaka, Makoto; Masaki, Haruhiko

    2015-10-01

    RNAs, such as mRNA, rRNA and tRNA, are essential macromolecules for cell survival and maintenance. Any perturbation of these molecules, such as by degradation or mutation, can be toxic to cells and may occasionally induce cell death. Therefore, cells have mechanisms known as quality control systems to eliminate abnormal RNAs. Although tRNA is a stable molecule, the anticodon loop is quite susceptible to tRNA-targeting RNases such as colicin E5 and colicin D. However, the mechanism underlying cellular reaction to tRNA cleavage remains unclear. It had long been believed that tRNA cleavage by colicins E5 and D promptly induces cell death because colony formation of the sensitive cells is severely reduced; this indicates that cells do not resist the tRNA cleavage. Here, we show that Escherichia coli cells enter a bacteriostatic state against the tRNA cleavage of colicins D and E5. The bacteriostasis requires small protein B (SmpB) and transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA), which are known to mediate trans-translation. Furthermore, another type of colicin, colicin E3 cleaving rRNA, immediately reduces the viability of sensitive cells. Moreover, nascent peptide degradation has an additive effect on bacteriostasis. Considering the recent observation that tRNA cleavage may be used as a means of cell-to-cell communication, tRNA cleavage could be used by bacteria not only to dominate other bacteria living in the same niche, but also to regulate growth of their own or other cells. PMID:26199088

  8. RNase III cleavage of Escherichia coli beta-galactosidase and tryptophan operon mRNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, V; Imamoto, F; Schlessinger, D

    1982-01-01

    Purified RNase III of Escherichia coli cleaved the initial 479-nucleotide sequence of lac operon mRNA at four specific sites and also gave limited cleavage of trp operon mRNA. This action explains the inactivation of mRNA coding capacity by RNase III in vitro.

  9. RNase II is important for A-site mRNA cleavage during ribosome pausing

    OpenAIRE

    Garza-Sánchez, Fernando; Shoji, Shinichiro; Fredrick, Kurt; Hayes, Christopher S.

    2009-01-01

    In Escherichia coli, translational arrest can elicit cleavage of codons within the ribosomal A site. This A-site mRNA cleavage is independent of RelE, and has been proposed to be an endonucleolytic activity of the ribosome. Here, we show that the 3′→5′ exonuclease RNase II plays an important role in RelE-independent A-site cleavage. Instead of A-site cleavage, translational pausing in ΔRNase II cells produces transcripts that are truncated +12 and +28 nucleotides downstream of the A-site codo...

  10. SARS coronavirus nsp1 protein induces template-dependent endonucleolytic cleavage of mRNAs: viral mRNAs are resistant to nsp1-induced RNA cleavage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Huang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available SARS coronavirus (SCoV nonstructural protein (nsp 1, a potent inhibitor of host gene expression, possesses a unique mode of action: it binds to 40S ribosomes to inactivate their translation functions and induces host mRNA degradation. Our previous study demonstrated that nsp1 induces RNA modification near the 5'-end of a reporter mRNA having a short 5' untranslated region and RNA cleavage in the encephalomyocarditis virus internal ribosome entry site (IRES region of a dicistronic RNA template, but not in those IRES elements from hepatitis C or cricket paralysis viruses. By using primarily cell-free, in vitro translation systems, the present study revealed that the nsp1 induced endonucleolytic RNA cleavage mainly near the 5' untranslated region of capped mRNA templates. Experiments using dicistronic mRNAs carrying different IRESes showed that nsp1 induced endonucleolytic RNA cleavage within the ribosome loading region of type I and type II picornavirus IRES elements, but not that of classical swine fever virus IRES, which is characterized as a hepatitis C virus-like IRES. The nsp1-induced RNA cleavage of template mRNAs exhibited no apparent preference for a specific nucleotide sequence at the RNA cleavage sites. Remarkably, SCoV mRNAs, which have a 5' cap structure and 3' poly A tail like those of typical host mRNAs, were not susceptible to nsp1-mediated RNA cleavage and importantly, the presence of the 5'-end leader sequence protected the SCoV mRNAs from nsp1-induced endonucleolytic RNA cleavage. The escape of viral mRNAs from nsp1-induced RNA cleavage may be an important strategy by which the virus circumvents the action of nsp1 leading to the efficient accumulation of viral mRNAs and viral proteins during infection.

  11. Catalytic Properties of Intramembrane Aspartyl Protease Substrate Hydrolysis Evaluated Using a FRET Peptide Cleavage Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naing, Swe-Htet; Vukoti, Krishna M; Drury, Jason E; Johnson, Jennifer L; Kalyoncu, Sibel; Hill, Shannon E; Torres, Matthew P; Lieberman, Raquel L

    2015-09-18

    Chemical details of intramembrane proteolysis remain elusive despite its prevalence throughout biology. We developed a FRET peptide assay for the intramembrane aspartyl protease (IAP) from Methanoculleus marisnigri JR1 in combination with quantitative mass spectrometry cleavage site analysis. IAP can hydrolyze the angiotensinogen sequence, a substrate for the soluble aspartyl protease renin, at a predominant cut site, His-Thr. Turnover is slow (min(-1) × 10(-3)), affinity and Michaelis constant (Km) values are in the low micromolar range, and both catalytic rates and cleavage sites are the same in detergent as reconstituted into bicelles. Three well-established, IAP-directed inhibitors were directly confirmed as competitive, albeit with modest inhibitor constant (Ki) values. Partial deletion of the first transmembrane helix results in a biophysically similar but less active enzyme than full-length IAP, indicating a catalytic role. Our study demonstrates previously unappreciated similarities with soluble aspartyl proteases, provides new biochemical features of IAP and inhibitors, and offers tools to study other intramembrane protease family members in molecular detail. PMID:26118406

  12. Evidence that Transcript Cleavage Is Essential for RNA Polymerase II Transcription and Cell Viability

    OpenAIRE

    Sigurdsson, Stefan; Dirac-Svejstrup, A. Barbara; Svejstrup, Jesper Q.

    2010-01-01

    Summary During transcript elongation in vitro, backtracking of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) is a frequent occurrence that can lead to transcriptional arrest. The polymerase active site can cleave the transcript during such backtracking, allowing transcription to resume. Transcript cleavage is either stimulated by elongation factor TFIIS or occurs much more slowly in its absence. However, whether backtracking actually occurs in vivo, and whether transcript cleavage is important to escape it, has...

  13. Cleavage-induced termination in U2 snRNA gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nabavi, Sadeq [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada); Nazar, Ross N., E-mail: rnnazar@uoguelph.ca [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada N1G 2W1 (Canada)

    2010-03-12

    The maturation of many small nuclear RNAs is dependent on RNase III-like endonuclease mediated cleavage, which generates a loading site for the exosome complex that trims the precursor at its 3' end. Using a temperature sensitive Pac1 nuclease, here we show that the endonuclease cleavage is equally important in terminating the transcription of the U2 snRNA in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Using a temperature sensitive Dhp1p 5' {yields} 3' exonuclease, we demonstrate that it also is an essential component of the termination pathway. Taken together the results support a 'reversed torpedoes' model for the termination and maturation of the U2 snRNA; the Pac1 endonuclease cleavage provides entry sites for the 3' and 5' exonuclease activities, leading to RNA maturation in one direction and transcript termination in the other.

  14. Cleavage-induced termination in U2 snRNA gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The maturation of many small nuclear RNAs is dependent on RNase III-like endonuclease mediated cleavage, which generates a loading site for the exosome complex that trims the precursor at its 3' end. Using a temperature sensitive Pac1 nuclease, here we show that the endonuclease cleavage is equally important in terminating the transcription of the U2 snRNA in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Using a temperature sensitive Dhp1p 5' → 3' exonuclease, we demonstrate that it also is an essential component of the termination pathway. Taken together the results support a 'reversed torpedoes' model for the termination and maturation of the U2 snRNA; the Pac1 endonuclease cleavage provides entry sites for the 3' and 5' exonuclease activities, leading to RNA maturation in one direction and transcript termination in the other.

  15. Metal-Catalyzed Cleavage of tRNA[superscript Phe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Sarah R.; Silverstein, Todd P.; McFarlane Holman, Karen L.

    2008-01-01

    This laboratory project is one component of a semester-long advanced biochemistry laboratory course that uses several complementary techniques to study tRNA[superscript Phe] conformational changes induced by ligand binding. In this article we describe a set of experiments in which students assay metal-catalyzed hydrolysis of tRNA[superscript Phe]…

  16. A novel miRNA processing pathway independent of Dicer requires Argonaute2 catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cifuentes, Daniel; Xue, Huiling; Taylor, David W; Patnode, Heather; Mishima, Yuichiro; Cheloufi, Sihem; Ma, Enbo; Mane, Shrikant; Hannon, Gregory J; Lawson, Nathan D; Wolfe, Scot A; Giraldez, Antonio J

    2010-06-25

    Dicer is a central enzyme in microRNA (miRNA) processing. We identified a Dicer-independent miRNA biogenesis pathway that uses Argonaute2 (Ago2) slicer catalytic activity. In contrast to other miRNAs, miR-451 levels were refractory to dicer loss of function but were reduced in MZago2 (maternal-zygotic) mutants. We found that pre-miR-451 processing requires Ago2 catalytic activity in vivo. MZago2 mutants showed delayed erythropoiesis that could be rescued by wild-type Ago2 or miR-451-duplex but not by catalytically dead Ago2. Changing the secondary structure of Dicer-dependent miRNAs to mimic that of pre-miR-451 restored miRNA function and rescued developmental defects in MZdicer mutants, indicating that the pre-miRNA secondary structure determines the processing pathway in vivo. We propose that Ago2-mediated cleavage of pre-miRNAs, followed by uridylation and trimming, generates functional miRNAs independently of Dicer. PMID:20448148

  17. Specific pre-cleavage and post-cleavage complexes involved in the formation of SV40 late mRNA 3' termini in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Zarkower, D; Wickens, M

    1987-01-01

    Complexes form between processing factors present in a crude nuclear extract from HeLa cells and a simian virus 40 (SV40) late pre-mRNA which spans the polyadenylation [poly(A)] site. A specific 'pre-cleavage complex' forms on the pre-mRNA before cleavage. Formation of this complex requires the highly conserved sequence AAUAAA: it is prevented by mutations in AAUAAA, and by annealing DNA oligonucleotides to that sequence. After cleavage, the 5' half-molecule is found in a distinct 'post-cleav...

  18. Site-specific cleavage of RNA by Fe(II).bleomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, B J; de Vroom, E; Long, E C; van der Marel, G A; van Boom, J H; Hecht, S M

    1990-01-01

    Bleomycin is an antitumor agent whose activity has long been thought to derive from its ability to degrade DNA. Recent findings suggest that cellular RNA may be a therapeutically relevant locus. At micromolar concentrations, Fe(II)-bleomycin readily cleaved a Bacillus subtilis tRNAHis precursor in a highly selective fashion, but Escherichia coli tRNA(Tyr) precursor was largely unaffected even under more forcing conditions. Other substrates included an RNA transcript encoding a large segment of the reverse transcriptase from human immunodeficiency virus 1. RNA cleavage was oxidative, approximately 10-fold more selective than DNA cleavage, and largely unaffected by nonsubstrate RNAs. RNA sequence analysis suggested recognition of RNA tertiary structure, rather than recognition of specific sequences; subsets of nucleotides at the junction of single- and double-stranded regions were especially susceptible to cleavage. The ready accessibility of cellular RNAs to xenobiotic agents, the high selectivity of bleomycin action on RNAs, and the paucity of mechanisms for RNA repair suggest that RNA may be a therapeutically relevant target for bleomycin. Images PMID:1701259

  19. An investigation into the role of ATP in the mammalian pre-mRNA 3' cleavage reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khleborodova, Asya; Pan, Xiaozhou; Nagre, Nagaraja N; Ryan, Kevin

    2016-06-01

    RNA Polymerase II transcribes beyond what later becomes the 3' end of a mature messenger RNA (mRNA). The formation of most mRNA 3' ends results from pre-mRNA cleavage followed by polyadenylation. In vitro studies have shown that low concentrations of ATP stimulate the 3' cleavage reaction while high concentrations inhibit it, but the origin of these ATP effects is unknown. ATP might enable a cleavage factor kinase or activate a cleavage factor directly. To distinguish between these possibilities, we tested several ATP structural analogs in a pre-mRNA 3' cleavage reaction reconstituted from DEAE-fractionated cleavage factors. We found that adenosine 5'-(β,γ-methylene)triphosphate (AMP-PCP) is an effective in vitro 3' cleavage inhibitor with an IC50 of ∼300 μM, but that most other ATP analogs, including adenosine 5'-(β,γ-imido)triphosphate, which cannot serve as a protein kinase substrate, promoted 3' cleavage but less efficiently than ATP. In combination with previous literature data, our results do not support ATP stimulation of 3' cleavage through cleavage factor phosphorylation in vitro. Instead, the more likely mechanism is that ATP stimulates cleavage factor activity through direct cleavage factor binding. The mammalian 3' cleavage factors known to bind ATP include the cleavage factor II (CF IIm) Clp1 subunit, the CF Im25 subunit and poly(A) polymerase alpha (PAP). The yeast homolog of the CF IIm complex also binds ATP through yClp1. To investigate the mammalian complex, we used a cell-line expressing FLAG-tagged Clp1 to co-immunoprecipitate Pcf11 as a function of ATP concentration. FLAG-Clp1 co-precipitated Pcf11 with or without ATP and the complex was not affected by AMP-PCP. Diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A), an ATP analog that binds the Nudix domain of the CF Im25 subunit with higher affinity than ATP, neither stimulated 3' cleavage in place of ATP nor antagonized ATP-stimulated 3' cleavage. The ATP-binding site of PAP was disrupted by site

  20. Bacillus subtilis trp Leader RNA: RNase J1 endonuclease cleavage specificity and PNPase processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deikus, Gintaras; Bechhofer, David H

    2009-09-25

    In the presence of ample tryptophan, transcription from the Bacillus subtilis trp operon promoter terminates to give a 140-nucleotide trp leader RNA. Turnover of trp leader RNA has been shown to depend on RNase J1 cleavage at a single-stranded, AU-rich region just upstream of the 3' transcription terminator. The small size of trp leader RNA and its strong dependence on RNase J1 cleavage for decay make it a suitable substrate for analyzing the requirements for RNase J1 target site specificity. trp leader RNAs with nucleotide changes around the RNase J1 target site were more stable than wild-type trp leader RNA, showing that sequences on either side of the cleavage site contribute to RNase J1 recognition. An analysis of decay intermediates from these mutants suggested limited 3'-to-5' exonuclease processing from the native 3' end. trp leader RNAs were designed that contained wild-type or mutant RNase J1 targets elsewhere on the molecule. The presence of an additional RNase J1 cleavage site resulted in faster RNA decay, depending on its location. Addition of a 5' tail containing 7 A residues caused destabilization of trp leader RNAs. Surprisingly, addition at the 5' end of a strong stem loop structure that is known to stabilize other RNAs did not result in a longer trp leader RNA half-life, suggesting that the RNase J1 cleavage site may be accessed directly. In the course of these experiments, we found evidence that polynucleotide phosphorylase processivity was inhibited by a GCGGCCGC sequence. PMID:19638340

  1. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, J.A.

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the paperclip'' and hammerhead'' RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a hammerhead,'' to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 12{plus minus}1 nucleotides are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  2. Small catalytic RNA: Structure, function and application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monforte, J.A.

    1991-04-01

    We have utilized a combination of photochemical cross-linking techniques and site-directed mutagenesis to obtain secondary and tertiary structure information for the self-cleaving, self-ligating subsequence of RNA from the negative strand of Satellite Tobacco Ringspot Virus. We have found that the helical regions fold about a hinge to promoting four different possible tertiary interactions, creating a molecular of similar shape to a paperclip. A model suggesting that the ``paperclip`` and ``hammerhead`` RNAs share a similar three dimensional structure is proposed. We have used a self-cleaving RNA molecule related to a subsequence of plant viroids, a ``hammerhead,`` to study the length-dependent folding of RNA produced during transcription by RNA polymerase. We have used this method to determine the length of RNA sequestered within elongating E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase complexes. The data show that for E. coli RNA polymerase 12{plus_minus}1 nucleotides are sequestered within the ternary complex, which is consistent with the presence of an RNA-DNA hybrid within the transcription bubble, as proposed by others. The result for T7 RNA polymerase differs from E. coli RNA polymerase, with only 10{plus_minus}1 nucleotides sequestered within the ternary complex, setting a new upper limit for the minimum RNA-DNA required for a stable elongating complex. Comparisons between E. coli and T7 RNA polymerase are made. The relevance of the results to models or transcription termination, abortive initiation, and initiation to elongation mode transitions are discussed.

  3. Mitochondrial tRNA cleavage by tRNA-targeting ribonuclease causes mitochondrial dysfunction observed in mitochondrial disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Tetsuhiro, E-mail: atetsu@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Shimizu, Ayano; Takahashi, Kazutoshi; Hidaka, Makoto; Masaki, Haruhiko, E-mail: amasaki@mail.ecc.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • MTS-tagged ribonuclease was translocated successfully to the mitochondrial matrix. • MTS-tagged ribonuclease cleaved mt tRNA and reduced COX activity. • Easy and reproducible method of inducing mt tRNA dysfunction. - Abstract: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a genome possessed by mitochondria. Since reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated during aerobic respiration in mitochondria, mtDNA is commonly exposed to the risk of DNA damage. Mitochondrial disease is caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, and mutations or deletions on mitochondrial tRNA (mt tRNA) genes are often observed in mtDNA of patients with the disease. Hence, the correlation between mt tRNA activity and mitochondrial dysfunction has been assessed. Then, cybrid cells, which are constructed by the fusion of an enucleated cell harboring altered mtDNA with a ρ{sup 0} cell, have long been used for the analysis due to difficulty in mtDNA manipulation. Here, we propose a new method that involves mt tRNA cleavage by a bacterial tRNA-specific ribonuclease. The ribonuclease tagged with a mitochondrial-targeting sequence (MTS) was successfully translocated to the mitochondrial matrix. Additionally, mt tRNA cleavage, which resulted in the decrease of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity, was observed.

  4. Mitochondrial tRNA cleavage by tRNA-targeting ribonuclease causes mitochondrial dysfunction observed in mitochondrial disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • MTS-tagged ribonuclease was translocated successfully to the mitochondrial matrix. • MTS-tagged ribonuclease cleaved mt tRNA and reduced COX activity. • Easy and reproducible method of inducing mt tRNA dysfunction. - Abstract: Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a genome possessed by mitochondria. Since reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated during aerobic respiration in mitochondria, mtDNA is commonly exposed to the risk of DNA damage. Mitochondrial disease is caused by mitochondrial dysfunction, and mutations or deletions on mitochondrial tRNA (mt tRNA) genes are often observed in mtDNA of patients with the disease. Hence, the correlation between mt tRNA activity and mitochondrial dysfunction has been assessed. Then, cybrid cells, which are constructed by the fusion of an enucleated cell harboring altered mtDNA with a ρ0 cell, have long been used for the analysis due to difficulty in mtDNA manipulation. Here, we propose a new method that involves mt tRNA cleavage by a bacterial tRNA-specific ribonuclease. The ribonuclease tagged with a mitochondrial-targeting sequence (MTS) was successfully translocated to the mitochondrial matrix. Additionally, mt tRNA cleavage, which resulted in the decrease of cytochrome c oxidase (COX) activity, was observed

  5. Single-site cleavage in the 5'-untranslated region of Leishmaniavirus RNA is mediated by the viral capsid protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacBeth, K J; Patterson, J L

    1995-01-01

    Leishmaniavirus (LRV) is a double-stranded RNA virus that persistently infects the protozoan parasite Leishmania. LRV produces a short RNA transcript, corresponding to the 5' end of positive-sense viral RNA, both in vivo and in in vitro polymerase assays. The short transcript is generated by a single site-specific cleavage event in the 5' untranslated region of the 5.3-kb genome. This cleavage event can be reproduced in vitro with purified viral particles and a substrate RNA transcript possessing the viral cleavage site. A region of nucleotides required for cleavage was identified by analyzing the cleavage sites yielding the short transcripts of various LRV isolates. A 6-nt deletion at this cleavage site completely abolished RNA processing. In an in vitro cleavage assay, baculovirus-expressed capsid protein possessed an endonuclease activity identical to that of native virions, showing that the viral capsid protein is the RNA endonuclease. Identification of the LRV capsid protein as an RNA endonuclease is unprecedented among known viral capsid proteins. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7568059

  6. Sequences downstream of AAUAAA signals affect pre-mRNA cleavage and polyadenylation in vitro both directly and indirectly.

    OpenAIRE

    Ryner, L C; Takagaki, Y; Manley, J L

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the role of sequences lying downstream of the conserved AAUAAA hexanucleotide in pre-mRNA cleavage and polyadenylation, deletions or substitutions were constructed in polyadenylation signals from simian virus 40 and adenovirus, and their effects were assayed in both crude and fractionated HeLa cell nuclear extracts. As expected, these sequences influenced the efficiency of both cleavage and polyadenylation as well as the accuracy of the cleavage reaction. Sequences near or upst...

  7. Subcellular RNA profiling links splicing and nuclear DICER1 to alternative cleavage and polyadenylation

    OpenAIRE

    Furger, AM; Neve, J; Burger, K; Patel, R.; Gullerova, M; Li, W.; Hoque, M.; Tian, B.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) plays a crucial role in the regulation of gene expression across eukaryotes. Although APA is extensively studied, its regulation within cellular compartments and its physiological impact remains largely enigmatic. Here, we employed a rigorous subcellular fractionation approach to compare APA profiles of cytoplasmic and nuclear RNA fractions from human cell lines. This approach allowed us to extract APA isoforms that are subjected t...

  8. 5' End-independent RNase J1 endonuclease cleavage of Bacillus subtilis model RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deikus, Gintaras; Bechhofer, David H

    2011-10-01

    Bacillus subtilis trp leader RNA is a small (140-nucleotide) RNA that results from attenuation of trp operon transcription upon binding of the regulatory TRAP complex. Previously, endonucleolytic cleavage by ribonuclease RNase J1 in a 3'-proximal, single-stranded region was shown to be critical for initiation of trp leader RNA decay. RNase J1 is a dual-specificity enzyme, with both 5' exonucleolytic and endonucleolytic activities. Here, we provide in vivo and in vitro evidence that RNase J1 accesses its internal target site on trp leader RNA in a 5' end-independent manner. This has important implications for the role of RNase J1 in RNA decay. We also tested the involvement in trp leader RNA decay of the more recently discovered endonuclease RNase Y. Half-lives of several trp leader RNA constructs, which were designed to probe pathways of endonucleolytic versus exonucleolytic decay, were measured in an RNase Y-deficient mutant. Remarkably, the half-lives of these constructs were indistinguishable from their half-lives in an RNase J1-deficient mutant. These results suggest that lowering RNase Y concentration may affect RNA decay indirectly via an effect on RNase J1, which is thought to exist with RNase Y in a degradosome complex. To generalize our findings with trp leader RNA to other RNAs, we show that the mechanism of trp leader RNA decay is not dependent on TRAP binding. PMID:21862575

  9. A fungal anticodon nuclease ribotoxin exploits a secondary cleavage site to evade tRNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meineke, Birthe; Kast, Alene; Schwer, Beate; Meinhardt, Friedhelm; Shuman, Stewart; Klassen, Roland

    2012-09-01

    PaOrf2 and γ-toxin subunits of Pichia acaciae toxin (PaT) and Kluyveromyces lactis zymocin are tRNA anticodon nucleases. These secreted ribotoxins are assimilated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, wherein they arrest growth by depleting specific tRNAs. Toxicity can be recapitulated by induced intracellular expression of PaOrf2 or γ-toxin in S. cerevisiae. Mutational analysis of γ-toxin has identified amino acids required for ribotoxicity in vivo and RNA transesterification in vitro. Here, we report that PaOrf2 residues Glu9 and His287 (putative counterparts of γ-toxin Glu9 and His209) are essential for toxicity. Our results suggest a similar basis for RNA transesterification by PaOrf2 and γ-toxin, despite their dissimilar primary structures and distinctive tRNA target specificities. PaOrf2 makes two sequential incisions in tRNA, the first of which occurs 3' from the mcm(5)s(2)U wobble nucleoside and depends on mcm(5). A second incision two nucleotides upstream results in the net excision of a di-nucleotide. Expression of phage and plant tRNA repair systems can relieve PaOrf2 toxicity when tRNA cleavage is restricted to the secondary site in elp3 cells that lack the mcm(5) wobble U modification. Whereas the endogenous yeast tRNA ligase Trl1 can heal tRNA halves produced by PaOrf2 cleavage in elp3 cells, its RNA sealing activity is inadequate to complete the repair. Compatible sealing activity can be provided in trans by plant tRNA ligase. The damage-rescuing ability of tRNA repair systems is lost when PaOrf2 can break tRNA at both sites. These results highlight the logic of a two-incision mechanism of tRNA anticodon damage that evades productive repair by tRNA ligases. PMID:22836353

  10. Targeted cleavage of hepatitis E virus 3' end RNA mediated by hammerhead ribozymes inhibits viral RNA replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 3' end of hepatitis E virus (HEV) contains cis-acting regulatory element, which plays an important role in viral replication. To develop specific replication inhibitor at the molecular level, mono- and di-hammerhead ribozymes (Rz) were designed and synthesized against the conserved 3' end sequences of HEV, which cleave at nucleotide positions 7125 and 7112/7125, respectively. Di-hammerhead ribozyme with two catalytic motifs in tandem was designed to cleave simultaneously at two sites spaced 13 nucleotides apart, which increases the overall cleavage efficiency and prevents the development of escape mutants. Specific cleavage products were obtained with both the ribozymes in vitro at physiological conditions. The inactive control ribozymes showed no cleavage. The ribozymes showed specific inhibition of HEV 3' end fused-luciferase reporter gene expression by ∼37 and ∼60%, respectively in HepG2 cells. These results demonstrate a feasible approach to inhibit the HEV replication to a limited extent by targeting the cis-acting 3' end of HEV with hammerhead ribozymes

  11. Efficient site-specific cleavage by RNase MRP requires interaction with two evolutionarily conserved mitochondrial RNA sequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett, J L.; Clayton, D A

    1990-01-01

    RNase MRP is a site-specific endonuclease that processes primer mitochondrial RNA from the leading-strand origin of mitochondrial DNA replication. Using deletional analysis and saturation mutagenesis, we have determined the substrate requirements for cleavage by mouse mitochondrial RNase MRP. Two regions of sequence homology among vertebrate mitochondrial RNA primers, conserved sequence blocks II and III, were found to be critical for both efficient and accurate cleavage; a third region of se...

  12. A microRNA of infectious laryngotracheitis virus can downregulate and direct cleavage of ICP4 mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waidner, Lisa A; Burnside, Joan; Anderson, Amy S; Bernberg, Erin L; German, Marcelo A; Meyers, Blake C; Green, Pamela J; Morgan, Robin W

    2011-03-01

    Viral microRNAs regulate gene expression using either translational repression or mRNA cleavage and decay. Two microRNAs from infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), iltv-miR-I5 and iltv-miR-I6, map antisense to the ICP4 gene. Post-transcriptional repression by these microRNAs was tested against a portion of the ICP4 coding sequence cloned downstream of firefly luciferase. Luciferase activity was downregulated by approximately 60% with the iltv-miR-I5 mimic. Addition of an iltv-miR-I5 antagomiR or mutagenesis of the target seed sequence alleviated this effect. The iltv-miR-I5 mimic, when co-transfected with a plasmid expressing ICP4, reduced ICP4 transcript levels by approximately 50%, and inhibition was relieved by an iltv-miR-I5 antagomiR. In infected cells, iltv-miR-I5 mediated cleavage at the canonical site, as indicated by modified RACE analysis. Thus, in this system, iltv-miR-I5 decreased ILTV ICP4 mRNA levels via transcript cleavage and degradation. Downregulation of ICP4 could impact the balance between the lytic and latent states of the virus in vivo. PMID:21232778

  13. Transcriptional down-regulation and rRNA cleavage in Dictyostelium discoideum mitochondria during Legionella pneumophila infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenyu Zhang

    Full Text Available Bacterial pathogens employ a variety of survival strategies when they invade eukaryotic cells. The amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum is used as a model host to study the pathogenic mechanisms that Legionella pneumophila, the causative agent of Legionnaire's disease, uses to kill eukaryotic cells. Here we show that the infection of D. discoideum by L. pneumophila results in a decrease in mitochondrial messenger RNAs, beginning more than 8 hours prior to detectable host cell death. These changes can be mimicked by hydrogen peroxide treatment, but not by other cytotoxic agents. The mitochondrial large subunit ribosomal RNA (LSU rRNA is also cleaved at three specific sites during the course of infection. Two LSU rRNA fragments appear first, followed by smaller fragments produced by additional cleavage events. The initial LSU rRNA cleavage site is predicted to be on the surface of the large subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome, while two secondary sites map to the predicted interface with the small subunit. No LSU rRNA cleavage was observed after exposure of D. discoideum to hydrogen peroxide, or other cytotoxic chemicals that kill cells in a variety of ways. Functional L. pneumophila type II and type IV secretion systems are required for the cleavage, establishing a correlation between the pathogenesis of L. pneumophila and D. discoideum LSU rRNA destruction. LSU rRNA cleavage was not observed in L. pneumophila infections of Acanthamoeba castellanii or human U937 cells, suggesting that L. pneumophila uses distinct mechanisms to interrupt metabolism in different hosts. Thus, L. pneumophila infection of D. discoideum results in dramatic decrease of mitochondrial RNAs, and in the specific cleavage of mitochondrial rRNA. The predicted location of the cleavage sites on the mitochondrial ribosome suggests that rRNA destruction is initiated by a specific sequence of events. These findings suggest that L. pneumophila specifically disrupts mitochondrial

  14. Single-site cleavage in the 5'-untranslated region of Leishmaniavirus RNA is mediated by the viral capsid protein.

    OpenAIRE

    MacBeth, K J; Patterson, J. L.

    1995-01-01

    Leishmaniavirus (LRV) is a double-stranded RNA virus that persistently infects the protozoan parasite Leishmania. LRV produces a short RNA transcript, corresponding to the 5' end of positive-sense viral RNA, both in vivo and in in vitro polymerase assays. The short transcript is generated by a single site-specific cleavage event in the 5' untranslated region of the 5.3-kb genome. This cleavage event can be reproduced in vitro with purified viral particles and a substrate RNA transcript posses...

  15. Molecular Basis of Catalytic Chamber-assisted Unfolding and Cleavage of Human Insulin by Human Insulin-degrading Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manolopoulou, Marika; Guo, Qing; Malito, Enrico; Schilling, Alexander B.; Tang, Wei-Jen; (UC); (UIC)

    2009-06-02

    Insulin is a hormone vital for glucose homeostasis, and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) plays a key role in its clearance. IDE exhibits a remarkable specificity to degrade insulin without breaking the disulfide bonds that hold the insulin A and B chains together. Using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry to obtain high mass accuracy, and electron capture dissociation (ECD) to selectively break the disulfide bonds in gas phase fragmentation, we determined the cleavage sites and composition of human insulin fragments generated by human IDE. Our time-dependent analysis of IDE-digested insulin fragments reveals that IDE is highly processive in its initial cleavage at the middle of both the insulin A and B chains. This ensures that IDE effectively splits insulin into inactive N- and C-terminal halves without breaking the disulfide bonds. To understand the molecular basis of the recognition and unfolding of insulin by IDE, we determined a 2.6-A resolution insulin-bound IDE structure. Our structure reveals that IDE forms an enclosed catalytic chamber that completely engulfs and intimately interacts with a partially unfolded insulin molecule. This structure also highlights how the unique size, shape, charge distribution, and exosite of the IDE catalytic chamber contribute to its high affinity ( approximately 100 nm) for insulin. In addition, this structure shows how IDE utilizes the interaction of its exosite with the N terminus of the insulin A chain as well as other properties of the catalytic chamber to guide the unfolding of insulin and allowing for the processive cleavages.

  16. An Efficient Catalytic DNA that Cleaves L-RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kha Tram

    Full Text Available Many DNAzymes have been isolated from synthetic DNA pools to cleave natural RNA (D-RNA substrates and some have been utilized for the design of aptazyme biosensors for bioanalytical applications. Even though these biosensors perform well in simple sample matrices, they do not function effectively in complex biological samples due to ubiquitous RNases that can efficiently cleave D-RNA substrates. To overcome this issue, we set out to develop DNAzymes that cleave L-RNA, the enantiomer of D-RNA, which is known to be completely resistant to RNases. Through in vitro selection we isolated three L-RNA-cleaving DNAzymes from a random-sequence DNA pool. The most active DNAzyme exhibits a catalytic rate constant ~3 min-1 and has a structure that contains a kissing loop, a structural motif that has never been observed with D-RNA-cleaving DNAzymes. Furthermore we have used this DNAzyme and a well-known ATP-binding DNA aptamer to construct an aptazyme sensor and demonstrated that this biosensor can achieve ATP detection in biological samples that contain RNases. The current work lays the foundation for exploring RNA-cleaving DNAzymes for engineering biosensors that are compatible with complex biological samples.

  17. Salicylate, a catalytic inhibitor of topoisomerase II, inhibits DNA cleavage and is selective for the α isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bau, Jason T; Kang, Zhili; Austin, Caroline A; Kurz, Ebba U

    2014-02-01

    Topoisomerase II (topo II) is a ubiquitous enzyme that is essential for cell survival through its role in regulating DNA topology and chromatid separation. Topo II can be poisoned by common chemotherapeutics (such as doxorubicin and etoposide), leading to the accumulation of cytotoxic enzyme-linked DNA double-stranded breaks. In contrast, nonbreak-inducing topo II catalytic inhibitors have also been described and have more limited use in clinical chemotherapy. These agents, however, may alter the efficacy of regimens incorporating topo II poisons. We previously identified salicylate, the primary metabolite of aspirin, as a novel catalytic inhibitor of topo II. We have now determined the mechanism by which salicylate inhibits topo II. As catalytic inhibitors can act at a number of steps in the topo II catalytic cycle, we used multiple independent, biochemical approaches to interrogate the catalytic cycle. Furthermore, as mammalian cells express two isoforms of topo II (α and β), we examined whether salicylate was isoform selective. Our results demonstrate that salicylate is unable to intercalate DNA, and does not prevent enzyme-DNA interaction, nor does it promote stabilization of topo IIα in closed clamps on DNA. Although salicylate decreased topo IIα ATPase activity in a dose-dependent noncompetitive manner, this was secondary to salicylate-mediated inhibition of DNA cleavage. Surprisingly, comparison of salicylate's effects using purified human topo IIα and topo IIβ revealed that salicylate selectively inhibits the α isoform. These findings provide a definitive mechanism for salicylate-mediated inhibition of topo IIα and provide support for further studies determining the basis for its isoform selectivity. PMID:24220011

  18. Small molecule activators of pre-mRNA 3′ cleavage

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Kevin; Khleborodova, Asya; Pan, Jingyi; Ryan, Xiaozhou P.

    2009-01-01

    3′ Cleavage and polyadenylation are obligatory steps in the biogenesis of most mammalian pre-mRNAs. In vitro reconstitution of the 3′ cleavage reaction from human cleavage factors requires high concentrations of creatine phosphate (CP), though how CP activates cleavage is not known. Previously, we proposed that CP might work by competitively inhibiting a cleavage-suppressing serine/threonine (S/T) phosphatase. Here we show that fluoride/EDTA, a general S/T phosphatase inhibitor, activates in ...

  19. AAU-Specific RNA Cleavage Mediated by MazF Toxin Endoribonuclease Conserved in Nitrosomonas europaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuki Miyamoto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nitrosomonas europaea carries numerous toxin-antitoxin systems. However, despite the abundant representation in its chromosome, studies have not surveyed the underlying molecular functions in detail, and their biological roles remain enigmatic. In the present study, we found that a chromosomally-encoded MazF family member, predicted at the locus NE1181, is a functional toxin endoribonuclease, and constitutes a toxin-antitoxin system, together with its cognate antitoxin, MazE. Massive parallel sequencing provided strong evidence that this toxin endoribonuclease exhibits RNA cleavage activity, primarily against the AAU triplet. This sequence-specificity was supported by the results of fluorometric assays. Our results indicate that N. europaea alters the translation profile and regulates its growth using the MazF family of endoribonuclease under certain stressful conditions.

  20. Knockdown of pre-mRNA cleavage factor Im 25 kDa promotes neurite outgrowth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► CFIm25 knockdown promoted NGF-induced neurite out growth from PC12 cells. ► Depletion of CFIm25 did not influence the morphology of proliferating PC12 cells. ► CFIm regulated NGF-induced neurite outgrowth via coordinating RhoA activity. ► CFIm25 knockdown increase the number of primary dendrites of hippocampal neurons. -- Abstract: Mammalian precursor mRNA (pre-mRNA) cleavage factor I (CFIm) plays important roles in the selection of poly(A) sites in a 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR), producing mRNAs with variable 3′ ends. Because 3′-UTRs often contain cis elements that impact stability or localization of mRNA or translation, alternative polyadenylation diversifies utilization of primary transcripts in mammalian cells. However, the physiological role of CFIm remains unclear. CFIm acts as a heterodimer comprising a 25 kDa subunit (CFIm25) and one of the three large subunits—CFIm59, CFIm68, or CFIm72. CFIm25 binds directly to RNA and introduces and anchors the larger subunit. To examine the physiological roles of CFIm, we knocked down the CFIm25 gene in neuronal cells using RNA interference. Knockdown of CFIm25 increased the number of primary dendrites of developing hippocampal neurons and promoted nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced neurite extension from rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells without affecting the morphology of proliferating PC12 cells. On the other hand, CFIm25 knockdown did not influence constitutively active or dominantly negative RhoA suppression or promotion of NGF-induced neurite extension from PC12 cells, respectively. Taken together, our results indicate that endogenous CFIm may promote neuritogenesis in developing neurons by coordinating events upstream of NGF-induced RhoA inactivation.

  1. Evidence for the powerful catalytic ability of imidozirconocene complex from its epoxide ring cleavage reactions - A DFT mechanistic view

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dhurairajan Senthilnathan; Rajadurai Vijay Solomon; Ponnambalam Venuvanalingam

    2012-01-01

    Imidozirconocene complex is known for its bifunctional reactivity and catalytic ability and this complex mediates ring cleavage of epoxides. Cyclooctene oxide (1) Norbornene oxide (2) and 2,5-dimethyl cyclohexene oxide (3) undergo ring cleavage in the presence of imidozirconocene complex. Epoxide 1 has accessible -hydrogens (type I) while epoxide 2 and 3 do not have them (type II). Normally type I epoxides undergo elimination while type II epoxides prefer insertion. All the insertion reactions lead to five-membered metallacycle formation and elimination results in thermodynamically stable allyl-alkoxy product. The insertion is a two-step process following either diradical or zwitterionic pathway, while elimination is a one-step concerted reaction. DFT (density functional theory) modelling of these reactions at B3LYP/LANL2DZ level show that epoxide 1 undergoes elimination in agreement with experiment. However, calculations indicate that epoxide (2) proceeds through diradical intermediate in contrast to experimental observations. Surprisingly, epoxide (3) that has both the positions blocked by methyl groups undergoes elimination rather than insertion. AIM and EDA analyses offer further insights on the reaction mechanism and bifunctional reactivity of imidozirconozene complex.

  2. SKI2 mediates degradation of RISC 5'-cleavage fragments and prevents secondary siRNA production from miRNA targets in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branscheid, Anja; Marchais, Antonin; Schott, Gregory; Lange, Heike; Gagliardi, Dominique; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj; Voinnet, Olivier; Brodersen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Small regulatory RNAs are fundamental in eukaryotic and prokaryotic gene regulation. In plants, an important element of post-transcriptional control is effected by 20-24 nt microRNAs (miRNAs) and short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) bound to the ARGONAUTE1 (AGO1) protein in an RNA induced silencing...... complex (RISC). AGO1 may cleave target mRNAs with small RNA complementarity, but the fate of the resulting cleavage fragments remains incompletely understood. Here, we show that SKI2, SKI3 and SKI8, subunits of a cytoplasmic cofactor of the RNA exosome, are required for degradation of RISC 5', but not 3......'-cleavage fragments in Arabidopsis. In the absence of SKI2 activity, many miRNA targets produce siRNAs via the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6) pathway. These siRNAs are low-abundant, and map close to the cleavage site. In most cases, siRNAs were produced 5' to the cleavage site, but several examples...

  3. Sequence/structure selective thermal and photochemical cleavage of yeast-tRNA(Phe) by UO(2)2+

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E.; Møllegaard, N E

    1997-01-01

    The uranyl(VI) ion, UO(2)2+, cleaves yeast tRNA(Phe) both thermally and photochemically. Photochemical cleavage takes place at all positions but exhibits maxima at G10, G18, G30, A38, C49 and A62. Furthermore, in the presence of stoichiometric concentrations of citrate, the cleavage is generally...... suppressed except that strong cleavage at positions G10 and C48-U50 persists, indicating the presence of a high-affinity metal-ion binding site. It is proposed that these photocleavage sites reflect the tertiary structure of the yeast tRNA(Phe) molecule in terms of D-loop/T-loop interaction and anticodon...

  4. Hermes RNA-binding protein targets RNAs-encoding proteins involved in meiotic maturation, early cleavage, and germline development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hye-Won; Cauffman, Karen; Chan, Agnes P; Zhou, Yi; King, Mary Lou; Etkin, Laurence D; Kloc, Malgorzata

    2007-07-01

    The early development of metazoans is mainly regulated by differential translation and localization of maternal mRNAs in the embryo. In general, these processes are orchestrated by RNA-binding proteins interacting with specific sequence motifs in the 3'-untranslated region (UTR) of their target RNAs. Hermes is an RNA-binding protein, which contains a single RNA recognition motif (RRM) and is found in various vertebrate species from fish to human. In Xenopus laevis, Hermes mRNA and protein are localized in the vegetal region of oocytes. A subpopulation of Hermes protein is concentrated in a specific structure in the vegetal cortex, called the germ plasm (believed to contain determinants of the germ cell fate) where Hermes protein co-localizes with Xcat2 and RINGO/Spy mRNAs. The level of total Hermes protein decreases during maturation. The precocious depletion of Hermes protein by injection of Hermes antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (HE-MO) accelerates the process of maturation and results in cleavage defects in vegetal blastomeres of the embryo. It is known that several maternal mRNAs including RINGO/Spy and Mos are regulated at the translational level during meiotic maturation and early cleavage in Xenopus. The ectopic expression of RINGO/Spy or Mos causes resumption of meiotic maturation and cleavage arrests, which resemble the loss of Hermes phenotypes. We found that the injection of HE-MO enhances the acceleration of maturation caused by the injection of RINGO/Spy mRNA, and that Hermes protein is present as mRNP complex containing RINGO/Spy, Mos, and Xcat2 mRNAs in vivo. We propose that as an RNA-binding protein, Hermes may be involved in maturation, cleavage events at the vegetal pole and germ cell development by negatively regulating the expression of RINGO/Spy, Mos, and Xcat2 mRNAs. PMID:17309605

  5. Essential Structural and Functional Roles of the Cmr4 Subunit in RNA Cleavage by the Cmr CRISPR-Cas Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy F. Ramia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Cmr complex is the multisubunit effector complex of the type III-B clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas immune system. The Cmr complex recognizes a target RNA through base pairing with the integral CRISPR RNA (crRNA and cleaves the target at multiple regularly spaced locations within the complementary region. To understand the molecular basis of the function of this complex, we have assembled information from electron microscopic and X-ray crystallographic structural studies and mutagenesis of a complete Pyrococcus furiosus Cmr complex. Our findings reveal that four helically packed Cmr4 subunits, which make up the backbone of the Cmr complex, act as a platform to support crRNA binding and target RNA cleavage. Interestingly, we found a hook-like structural feature associated with Cmr4 that is likely the site of target RNA binding and cleavage. Our results also elucidate analogies in the mechanisms of crRNA and target molecule binding by the distinct Cmr type III-A and Cascade type I-E complexes.

  6. Characterization of CRISPR RNA Biogenesis and Cas6 Cleavage-Mediated Inhibition of a Provirus in the Haloarchaeon Haloferax mediterranei

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ming; Liu, Hailong; Han, Jing; Liu, Jingfang; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Dahe; Zhou, Jian; Xiang, Hua

    2013-01-01

    The adaptive immune system comprising CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) arrays and cas (CRISPR-associated) genes has been discovered in a wide range of bacteria and archaea and has recently attracted comprehensive investigations. However, the subtype I-B CRISPR-Cas system in haloarchaea has been less characterized. Here, we investigated Cas6-mediated RNA processing in Haloferax mediterranei. The Cas6 cleavage site, as well as the CRISPR transcription start sit...

  7. Functional identification of catalytic metal ion binding sites within RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L Hougland

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The viability of living systems depends inextricably on enzymes that catalyze phosphoryl transfer reactions. For many enzymes in this class, including several ribozymes, divalent metal ions serve as obligate cofactors. Understanding how metal ions mediate catalysis requires elucidation of metal ion interactions with both the enzyme and the substrate(s. In the Tetrahymena group I intron, previous work using atomic mutagenesis and quantitative analysis of metal ion rescue behavior identified three metal ions (MA, MB, and MC that make five interactions with the ribozyme substrates in the reaction's transition state. Here, we combine substrate atomic mutagenesis with site-specific phosphorothioate substitutions in the ribozyme backbone to develop a powerful, general strategy for defining the ligands of catalytic metal ions within RNA. In applying this strategy to the Tetrahymena group I intron, we have identified the pro-SP phosphoryl oxygen at nucleotide C262 as a ribozyme ligand for MC. Our findings establish a direct connection between the ribozyme core and the functionally defined model of the chemical transition state, thereby extending the known set of transition-state interactions and providing information critical for the application of the recent group I intron crystallographic structures to the understanding of catalysis.

  8. Specific Cleavages by RNase H Facilitate Initiation of Plus-Strand RNA Synthesis by Moloney Murine Leukemia Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Schultz, Sharon J.; Zhang, Miaohua; Champoux, James J.

    2003-01-01

    Successful generation, extension, and removal of the plus-strand primer is integral to reverse transcription. For Moloney murine leukemia virus, primer removal at the RNA/DNA junction leaves the 3′ terminus of the plus-strand primer abutting the downstream plus-strand DNA, but this 3′ terminus is not efficiently reutilized for another round of extension. The RNase H cleavage to create the plus-strand primer might similarly result in the 3′ terminus of this primer abutting downstream RNA, yet ...

  9. Role of miRNAs and alternative mRNA 3'-end cleavage and polyadenylation of their mRNA targets in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soetanto, R; Hynes, C J; Patel, H R; Humphreys, D T; Evers, M; Duan, G; Parker, B J; Archer, S K; Clancy, J L; Graham, R M; Beilharz, T H; Smith, N J; Preiss, T

    2016-05-01

    miRNAs play critical roles in heart disease. In addition to differential miRNA expression, miRNA-mediated control is also affected by variable miRNA processing or alternative 3'-end cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) of their mRNA targets. To what extent these phenomena play a role in the heart remains unclear. We sought to explore miRNA processing and mRNA APA in cardiomyocytes, and whether these change during cardiac hypertrophy. Thoracic aortic constriction (TAC) was performed to induce hypertrophy in C57BL/6J mice. RNA extracted from cardiomyocytes of sham-treated, pre-hypertrophic (2days post-TAC), and hypertrophic (7days post-TAC) mice was subjected to small RNA- and poly(A)-test sequencing (PAT-Seq). Differential expression analysis matched expectations; nevertheless we identified ~400 mRNAs and hundreds of noncoding RNA loci as altered with hypertrophy for the first time. Although multiple processing variants were observed for many miRNAs, there was little change in their relative proportions during hypertrophy. PAT-Seq mapped ~48,000 mRNA 3'-ends, identifying novel 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs) for over 7000 genes. Importantly, hypertrophy was associated with marked changes in APA with a net shift from distal to more proximal mRNA 3'-ends, which is predicted to decrease overall miRNA repression strength. We independently validated several examples of 3'UTR proportion change and showed that alternative 3'UTRs associate with differences in mRNA translation. Our work suggests that APA contributes to altered gene expression with the development of cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and provides a rich resource for a systems-level understanding of miRNA-mediated regulation in physiological and pathological states of the heart. PMID:27032571

  10. A Novel miRNA Processing Pathway Independent of Dicer Requires Argonaute2 Catalytic Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Cifuentes, Daniel; Xue, Huiling; Taylor, David W.; Patnode, Heather; Mishima, Yuichiro; Cheloufi, Sihem; Ma, Enbo; Mane, Shrikant; Hannon, Gregory J.; Lawson, Nathan D.; Wolfe, Scot A.; Giraldez, Antonio J.

    2010-01-01

    Dicer is a central enzyme in microRNA (miRNA) processing. We identified a Dicer-independent miRNA biogenesis pathway that uses Argonaute2 (Ago2) slicer catalytic activity. In contrast to other miRNAs, miR-451 levels were refractory to dicer loss of function but were reduced in MZago2 (maternal-zygotic) mutants. We found that pre-miR-451 processing requires Ago2 catalytic activity in vivo. MZago2 mutants showed delayed erythropoiesis that could be rescued by wild-type Ago2 or miR-451-duplex bu...

  11. Predictions of Cleavability of Calpain Proteolysis by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis Using Newly Determined Cleavage Sites and Catalytic Efficiencies of an Oligopeptide Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkai-Ouchi, Fumiko; Koyama, Suguru; Ono, Yasuko; Hata, Shoji; Ojima, Koichi; Shindo, Mayumi; duVerle, David; Ueno, Mika; Kitamura, Fujiko; Doi, Naoko; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    Calpains are intracellular Ca(2+)-regulated cysteine proteases that are essential for various cellular functions. Mammalian conventional calpains (calpain-1 and calpain-2) modulate the structure and function of their substrates by limited proteolysis. Thus, it is critically important to determine the site(s) in proteins at which calpains cleave. However, the calpains' substrate specificity remains unclear, because the amino acid (aa) sequences around their cleavage sites are very diverse. To clarify calpains' substrate specificities, 84 20-mer oligopeptides, corresponding to P10-P10' of reported cleavage site sequences, were proteolyzed by calpains, and the catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) were globally determined by LC/MS. This analysis revealed 483 cleavage site sequences, including 360 novel ones. Thekcat/Kms for 119 sites ranged from 12.5-1,710 M(-1)s(-1) Although most sites were cleaved by both calpain-1 and -2 with a similarkcat/Km, sequence comparisons revealed distinct aa preferences at P9-P7/P2/P5'. The aa compositions of the novel sites were not statistically different from those of previously reported sites as a whole, suggesting calpains have a strict implicit rule for sequence specificity, and that the limited proteolysis of intact substrates is because of substrates' higher-order structures. Cleavage position frequencies indicated that longer sequences N-terminal to the cleavage site (P-sites) were preferred for proteolysis over C-terminal (P'-sites). Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses using partial least-squares regression and >1,300 aa descriptors achievedkcat/Kmprediction withr= 0.834, and binary-QSAR modeling attained an 87.5% positive prediction value for 132 reported calpain cleavage sites independent of our model construction. These results outperformed previous calpain cleavage predictors, and revealed the importance of the P2, P3', and P4' sites, and P1-P2 cooperativity. Furthermore, using our binary-QSAR model

  12. Structural Basis for Telomerase Catalytic Subunit TERT Binding to RNA Template and Telomeric DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, M.; Gillis, A; Futahashi, M; Fujiwara, H; Skordalakes, E

    2010-01-01

    Telomerase is a specialized DNA polymerase that extends the 3{prime} ends of eukaryotic linear chromosomes, a process required for genomic stability and cell viability. Here we present the crystal structure of the active Tribolium castaneum telomerase catalytic subunit, TERT, bound to an RNA-DNA hairpin designed to resemble the putative RNA-templating region and telomeric DNA. The RNA-DNA hybrid adopts a helical structure, docked in the interior cavity of the TERT ring. Contacts between the RNA template and motifs 2 and B{prime} position the solvent-accessible RNA bases close to the enzyme active site for nucleotide binding and selectivity. Nucleic acid binding induces rigid TERT conformational changes to form a tight catalytic complex. Overall, TERT-RNA template and TERT-telomeric DNA associations are remarkably similar to those observed for retroviral reverse transcriptases, suggesting common mechanistic aspects of DNA replication between the two families of enzymes.

  13. Molecular Basis of Catalytic Chamber-assisted Unfolding and Cleavage of Human Insulin by Human Insulin-degrading Enzyme*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolopoulou, Marika; Guo, Qing; Malito, Enrico; Schilling, Alexander B.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-01-01

    Insulin is a hormone vital for glucose homeostasis, and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) plays a key role in its clearance. IDE exhibits a remarkable specificity to degrade insulin without breaking the disulfide bonds that hold the insulin A and B chains together. Using Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry to obtain high mass accuracy, and electron capture dissociation (ECD) to selectively break the disulfide bonds in gas phase fragmentation, we determined the cleavage sites and composition of human insulin fragments generated by human IDE. Our time-dependent analysis of IDE-digested insulin fragments reveals that IDE is highly processive in its initial cleavage at the middle of both the insulin A and B chains. This ensures that IDE effectively splits insulin into inactive N- and C-terminal halves without breaking the disulfide bonds. To understand the molecular basis of the recognition and unfolding of insulin by IDE, we determined a 2.6-Å resolution insulin-bound IDE structure. Our structure reveals that IDE forms an enclosed catalytic chamber that completely engulfs and intimately interacts with a partially unfolded insulin molecule. This structure also highlights how the unique size, shape, charge distribution, and exosite of the IDE catalytic chamber contribute to its high affinity (∼100 nm) for insulin. In addition, this structure shows how IDE utilizes the interaction of its exosite with the N terminus of the insulin A chain as well as other properties of the catalytic chamber to guide the unfolding of insulin and allowing for the processive cleavages. PMID:19321446

  14. Catalytic diastereoselective tandem conjugate addition-elimination reaction of Morita-Baylis-Hillman C adducts by C-C bond cleavage

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Wenguo

    2012-02-08

    Through the cleavage of the C-C bond, the first catalytic tandem conjugate addition-elimination reaction of Morita-Baylis-Hillman C adducts has been presented. Various S N2′-like C-, S-, and P-allylic compounds could be obtained with exclusive E configuration in good to excellent yields. The Michael product could also be easily prepared by tuning the β-C-substituent group of the α-methylene ester under the same reaction conditions. Calculated relative energies of various transition states by DFT methods strongly support the observed chemoselectivity and diastereoselectivity. © 2012 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH&Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Domain motions of Argonaute, the catalytic engine of RNA interference

    OpenAIRE

    Wall Michael E; Ming Dengming; Sanbonmatsu Kevin Y

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The Argonaute protein is the core component of the RNA-induced silencing complex, playing the central role of cleaving the mRNA target. Visual inspection of static crystal structures already has enabled researchers to suggest conformational changes of Argonaute that might occur during RNA interference. We have taken the next step by performing an all-atom normal mode analysis of the Pyrococcus furiosus and Aquifex aeolicus Argonaute crystal structures, allowing us to quant...

  16. Recognition and Cleavage of a non-structured CRISPR RNA by its Processing Endoribonuclease Cas6

    OpenAIRE

    Shao, Yaming; Li, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) confer adaptive immunity to prokaryotes through a small RNA-mediated mechanism. Specific endoribonucleases are required by all CRISPR-bearing organisms to process CRISPR RNAs into small RNA that serve as guides for defensive effector complexes. The molecular mechanism of how the endoribonucleases process the class of CRISPR RNA containing no secondary structural features remains largely elusive. Here we report cocrystal struc...

  17. Crystal Structure of A. aeolicus Argonaute, a Site-Specific DNA-Guided Endoribonuclease, Provides Insights into RISC-Mediated mRNA Cleavage

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Yu-Ren; Pei, Yi; Ma, Jin-Biao; Kuryavyi, Vitaly; Zhadina, Maria; Meister, Gunter; Chen, Hong-Ying; Dauter, Zbigniew; Tuschl, Thomas; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2005-01-01

    Argonaute (Ago) proteins constitute a key component of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). We report the crystal structure of Aquifex aeolicus Ago (Aa-Ago) together with binding and cleavage studies, which establish this eubacterial Ago as a bona fide guide DNA strand-mediated site-specific RNA endonuclease. We have generated a stereochemically robust model of the complex, where the guide DNA-mRNA duplex is positioned within a basic channel spanning the bilobal interface, such that the ...

  18. Domain motions of Argonaute, the catalytic engine of RNA interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wall Michael E

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Argonaute protein is the core component of the RNA-induced silencing complex, playing the central role of cleaving the mRNA target. Visual inspection of static crystal structures already has enabled researchers to suggest conformational changes of Argonaute that might occur during RNA interference. We have taken the next step by performing an all-atom normal mode analysis of the Pyrococcus furiosus and Aquifex aeolicus Argonaute crystal structures, allowing us to quantitatively assess the feasibility of these conformational changes. To perform the analysis, we begin with the energy-minimized X-ray structures. Normal modes are then calculated using an all-atom molecular mechanics force field. Results The analysis reveals low-frequency vibrations that facilitate the accommodation of RNA duplexes – an essential step in target recognition. The Pyrococcus furiosus and Aquifex aeolicus Argonaute proteins both exhibit low-frequency torsion and hinge motions; however, differences in the overall architecture of the proteins cause the detailed dynamics to be significantly different. Conclusion Overall, low-frequency vibrations of Argonaute are consistent with mechanisms within the current reaction cycle model for RNA interference.

  19. Ribosome-associated Asc1/RACK1 is required for endonucleolytic cleavage induced by stalled ribosome at the 3′ end of nonstop mRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeuchi, Ken; Inada, Toshifumi

    2016-01-01

    Dom34-Hbs1 stimulates degradation of aberrant mRNAs lacking termination codons by dissociating ribosomes stalled at the 3′ ends, and plays crucial roles in Nonstop Decay (NSD) and No-Go Decay (NGD). In the dom34Δ mutant, nonstop mRNA is degraded by sequential endonucleolytic cleavages induced by a stalled ribosome at the 3′ end. Here, we report that ribosome-associated Asc1/RACK1 is required for the endonucleolytic cleavage of nonstop mRNA by stalled ribosome at the 3′ end of mRNA in dom34Δ mutant cells. Asc1/RACK1 facilitates degradation of truncated GFP-Rz mRNA in the absence of Dom34 and exosome-dependent decay. Asc1/RACK1 is required for the sequential endonucleolytic cleavages by the stalled ribosome in the dom34Δ mutant, depending on its ribosome-binding activity. The levels of peptidyl-tRNA derived from nonstop mRNA were elevated in dom34Δasc1Δ mutant cells, and overproduction of nonstop mRNA inhibited growth of mutant cells. E3 ubiquitin ligase Ltn1 degrades the arrest products from truncated GFP-Rz mRNA in dom34Δ and dom34Δasc1Δ mutant cells, and Asc1/RACK1 represses the levels of substrates for Ltn1-dependent degradation. These indicate that ribosome-associated Asc1/RACK1 facilitates endonucleolytic cleavage of nonstop mRNA by stalled ribosomes and represses the levels of aberrant products even in the absence of Dom34. We propose that Asc1/RACK1 acts as a fail-safe in quality control for nonstop mRNA. PMID:27312062

  20. Targeted Cleavage of HIV RRE RNA by Rev-Coupled Transition Metal Chelates

    OpenAIRE

    Joyner, Jeff C.; Cowan, J. A.

    2011-01-01

    A series of compounds that target reactive metal-chelates to the HIV-1 Rev Response Element (RRE) mRNA have been synthesized. Dissociation constants and chemical reactivity toward HIV RRE RNA have been determined and evaluated in terms of reduction potential, coordination unsaturation, and overall charge associated with the metal-chelate-rev complex. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), and 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclo-dodec...

  1. Human pre-mRNA cleavage factor II(m) contains homologs of yeast proteins and bridges two other cleavage factors

    OpenAIRE

    de Vries, H.; Rüegsegger, U.; Hübner, W; Friedlein, A.; van Langen, H; Keller, W.

    2000-01-01

    Six different protein factors are required in vitro for 3' end formation of mammalian pre-mRNAs by endonucleolytic cleavage and polyadenylation. Five of the factors have been purified and most of their components cloned, but cleavage factor II(m) (CF II(m)) remained uncharacterized. We have purified CF II(m) from HeLa cell nuclear extract by several chromatographic steps. During purification, CF II(m) activity separated into two components, one essential (CF IIA(m)) and one stimulatory (CF II...

  2. Targeted cleavage of HIV RRE RNA by Rev-coupled transition metal chelates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, Jeff C; Cowan, J A

    2011-06-29

    A series of compounds that target reactive metal chelates to the HIV-1 Rev response element (RRE) mRNA have been synthesized. Dissociation constants and chemical reactivity toward HIV RRE RNA have been determined and evaluated in terms of reduction potential, coordination unsaturation, and overall charge associated with the metal-chelate-Rev complex. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid (DTPA), and 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) were linked to a lysine side chain of a Rev-derived peptide by either EDC/NHS or isothiocyanate coupling. The resulting chelate-Rev (EDTA-Rev, DTPA-Rev, NTA-Rev, and DOTA-Rev) conjugates were used to form coordination complexes with Fe(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), and Cu(2+) such that the arginine-rich Rev peptide could mediate localization of the metal chelates to the Rev peptide's high-affinity mRNA binding partner, RRE stem loop IIB. Metal complexes of the extended peptides GGH-Rev and KGHK-Rev, which also contain N-terminal peptidic chelators (ATCUN motifs), were studied for comparison. A fluorescence titration assay revealed high-affinity RRE RNA binding by all 22 metal-chelate-Rev species, with K(D) values ranging from ~0.2 to 16 nM, indicating little to no loss of RNA affinity due to the coupling of the metal chelates to the Rev peptide. Dissociation constants for binding at a previously unobserved low-affinity site are also reported. Rates of RNA modification by each metal-chelate-Rev species were determined and varied from ~0.28 to 4.9 nM/min but were optimal for Cu(2+)-NTA-Rev. Metal-chelate reduction potentials were determined and varied from -228 to +1111 mV vs NHE under similar solution conditions, allowing direct comparison of reactivity with redox thermodynamics. Optimal activity was observed when the reduction potential for the metal center was poised between those of the two principal co-reagents for metal-promoted formation of

  3. A fungal anticodon nuclease ribotoxin exploits a secondary cleavage site to evade tRNA repair

    OpenAIRE

    Meineke, Birthe; Kast, Alene; Schwer, Beate; Meinhardt, Friedhelm; Shuman, Stewart; Klassen, Roland

    2012-01-01

    The PaOrf2 and γ-toxin subunits of Pichia acaciae toxin (PaT) and Kluyveromyces lactis zymocin are tRNA anticodon nucleases encoded by cytoplasmic DNA plasmids. Toxicity can be recapitulated conveniently by induced intracellular expression of PaOrf2 or γ-toxin in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Mutational analysis of γ-toxin has identified amino acids required for ribotoxicity in vivo and RNA transesterification in vitro. Here, the authors report that PaOrf2 residues Glu9 and His287 (putative count...

  4. MicroRNA390-directed TAS3 cleavage leads to the production of tasiRNA-ARF3/4 during somatic embryogenesis in Dimocarpus longan Lour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuling eLin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Trans-acting short-interfering RNAs (tasiRNAs originate from TAS3 families through microRNA (miRNA 390-guided cleavage of primary transcripts and target auxin response factors (ARF3/-4, which are involved in the normal development of lateral roots and flowers in plants. However, their roles in embryo development are still unclear. Here, the pathway miR390-TAS3-ARF3/-4 was identified systematically for the first time during somatic embryo development in Dimocarpus longan. We identified the miR390 primary transcript and promoter. The promoter contained cis-acting elements responsive to stimuli such as light, salicylic acid, anaerobic induction, fungal elicitor, circadian control and heat stress. The longan TAS3 transcript, containing two miR390-binding sites, was isolated; the miR390- guided cleavage site located near the 3' end of the TAS3 transcript was verified. Eight TAS3-tasiRNAs with the 21-nucleotide phase were found among longan small RNA data, further confirming that miR390-directed TAS3 cleavage leads to the production of tasiRNA in longan. Among them, TAS3_5'D5+ and 5'D6+ tasiRNAs were highly abundant, and verified to target ARF3 and -4, implying that miR390-guided TAS3 cleavage with 21-nucleotide phase leading to the production of tasiRNA-ARF is conserved in plants. Pri-miR390 was highly expressed in friable-embryogenic callus (EC, and less expressed in incomplete compact pro-embryogenic cultures,while miR390 showed its lowest expression in EC and highest expression in torpedo-shaped embryo. DlTAS3 and DlARF4 both exhibited their lowest expressions in EC, and reached their peaks in the globular embryos stage, which were mainly inversely proportional to the expression of miR390, especially at the GE to CE stages. While DlARF3 showed little variation from the EC to torpedo-shaped embryos stages, and exhibited its lowest expression in the cotyledonary embryos stage. There was a general lack of correlation between the expressions of DlARF3

  5. Evidence of tRNA cleavage in apicomplexan parasites: half-tRNAs as new potential regulatory molecules of Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium berghei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several lines of evidence demonstrated that organisms ranging from bacteria to higher animals possess a regulated endonucleolytic cleavage pathway producing half-tRNA fragments. In the present study, we investigated the occurrence of this phenomenon in two distantly related apicomplexan parasites, T...

  6. Catalytic cleavage of lignin b-O-4 link mimics using copper on alumina and magnesia-alumina

    OpenAIRE

    Strassberger, Z.; Alberts, A.H.; Louwerse, M.J.; Tanase, S.; Rothenberg, G.

    2013-01-01

    Copper on γ-alumina and on mixed magnesia-alumina, Cu/MgO-Al2O3, catalyse the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of β-O-4 lignin-type dimers, giving valuable aromatics. The typical selectivity to phenol is as high as 20%. By changing the support's acidity we can modify the dispersion of copper. Interestingly, more HDO occurs with larger copper agglomerates than with finely dispersed particles. The presence of copper also increases the selectivity of the HDO cleavage. Three different pathways are hypoth...

  7. CsrA activates flhDC expression by protecting flhDC mRNA from RNase E-mediated cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakhnin, Alexander V; Baker, Carol S; Vakulskas, Christopher A; Yakhnin, Helen; Berezin, Igor; Romeo, Tony; Babitzke, Paul

    2013-02-01

    Csr is a conserved global regulatory system that controls expression of several hundred Escherichia coli genes. CsrA protein represses translation of numerous genes by binding to mRNA and inhibiting ribosome access. CsrA also activates gene expression, although an activation mechanism has not been reported. CsrA activates flhDC expression, encoding the master regulator of flagellum biosynthesis and chemotaxis, by stabilizing the mRNA. Computer modelling, gel mobility shift and footprint analyses identified two CsrA binding sites extending from positions 1-12 (BS1) and 44-55 (BS2) of the 198 nt flhDC leader transcript. flhD'-'lacZ expression was reduced by mutations in csrA and/or the CsrA binding sites. The position of BS1 suggested that bound CsrA might inhibit 5' end-dependent RNase E cleavage of flhDC mRNA. Consistent with this hypothesis, CsrA protected flhDC leader RNA from RNase E cleavage in vitro and protection depended on BS1 and BS2. Primer extension studies identified flhDC decay intermediates in vivo that correspond to in vitro RNase E cleavage sites. Deletion of these RNase E cleavage sites resulted in increased flhD'-'lacZ expression. Data from mRNA decay studies and quantitative primer extension assays support a model in which bound CsrA activates flhDC expression by inhibiting the 5' end-dependent RNase E cleavage pathway. PMID:23305111

  8. Catalytic Molecular Imaging of MicroRNA in Living Cells by DNA-Programmed Nanoparticle Disassembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xuewen; Zeng, Tao; Li, Zhi; Wang, Ganglin; Ma, Nan

    2016-02-24

    Molecular imaging is an essential tool for disease diagnostics and treatment. Direct imaging of low-abundance nucleic acids in living cells remains challenging because of the relatively low sensitivity and insufficient signal-to-background ratio of conventional molecular imaging probes. Herein, we report a class of DNA-templated gold nanoparticle (GNP)-quantum dot (QD) assembly-based probes for catalytic imaging of cancer-related microRNAs (miRNA) in living cells with signal amplification capacity. We show that a single miRNA molecule could catalyze the disassembly of multiple QDs with the GNP through a DNA-programmed thermodynamically driven entropy gain process, yielding significantly amplified QD photoluminescence (PL) for miRNA imaging. By combining the robust PL of QDs with the catalytic amplification strategy, three orders of magnitude improvement in detection sensitivity is achieved in comparison with non-catalytic imaging probe, which enables facile and accurate differentiation between cancer cells and normal cells by miRNA imaging in living cells. PMID:26694689

  9. TFB2 is a transient component of the catalytic site of the human mitochondrial RNA polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    Sologub, Marina; Litonin, Dmitry; Anikin, Michael; Mustaev, Arkady; Temiakov, Dmitry

    2009-01-01

    Transcription in human mitochondria is carried out by a single-subunit, T7-like RNA polymerase assisted by several auxiliary factors. We demonstrate that an essential initiation factor, TFB2, forms a network of interactions with DNA near the transcription start site and facilitates promoter melting but may not be essential for promoter recognition. Unexpectedly, catalytic autolabeling reveals that TFB2 interacts with the priming substrate, suggesting that TFB2 acts as a transient component of...

  10. Identification of RNA sequences and structures involved in site-specific cleavage of IGF-II mRNAs.

    OpenAIRE

    van Dijk, E L; Sussenbach, J S; Holthuizen, P E

    1998-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II) mRNAs are subject to site-specific endonucleolytic cleavage in the 3' untranslated region (UTR), rendering an unstable 5' cleavage product containing the coding region and a very stable 3' cleavage product of 1.8 kb consisting of the 3'-UTR sequence and the poly(A) tail. Previously, it was established that two widely separated elements in the 3'-UTR (elements I and II), that can form a duplex structure, are necessary and sufficient for cleavage. To furth...

  11. Cleavage of highly structured viral RNA molecules by combinatorial libraries of hairpin ribozymes. The most effective ribozymes are not predicted by substrate selection rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Q; Pecchia, D B; Kingsley, S L; Heckman, J E; Burke, J M

    1998-09-01

    Combinatorial libraries of hairpin ribozymes representing all possible cleavage specificities (>10(5)) were used to evaluate all ribozyme cleavage sites within a large (4.2-kilobase) and highly structured viral mRNA, the 26 S subgenomic RNA of Sindbis virus. The combinatorial approach simultaneously accounts for target site structure and dynamics, together with ribozyme folding, and the sequences that result in a ribozyme-substrate complex with maximal activity. Primer extension was used to map and rank the relative activities of the ribozyme pool against individual sites and revealed two striking findings. First, only a small fraction of potential recognition sites are effectively cleaved (activity-selected sites). Second, nearly all of the most effectively cleaved sites deviated substantially from the established consensus selection rules for the hairpin ribozyme and were not predicted by examining the sequence, or through the use of computer-assisted predictions of RNA secondary structure. In vitro selection methods were used to isolate ribozymes with increased activity against substrates that deviate from the GUC consensus sequence. trans-Acting ribozymes targeting nine of the activity-selected sites were synthesized, together with ribozymes targeting four sites with a perfect match to the cleavage site consensus (sequence-selected sites). Activity-selected ribozymes have much higher cleavage activity against the long, structured RNA molecules than do sequence-selected ribozymes, although the latter are effective in cleaving oligoribonucleotides, as predicted. These results imply that, for Sindbis virus 26 S RNA, designing ribozymes based on matches to the consensus sequence may be an ineffective strategy. PMID:9722591

  12. Functional Diversification of Maize RNA Polymerase IV and V subtypes via Alternative Catalytic Subunits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Brower-Toland, Brent; Krieger, Elysia K.; Sidorenko, Lyudmila; Nicora, Carrie D.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Irsigler, Andre; LaRue, Huachun; Brzeski, Jan; Mcginnis, Karen A.; Ivashuta, Sergey; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Chandler, Vicki L.; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2014-10-01

    Unlike nuclear multisubunit RNA polymerases I, II, and III, whose subunit compositions are conserved throughout eukaryotes, plant RNA polymerases IV and V are nonessential, Pol II-related enzymes whose subunit compositions are still evolving. Whereas Arabidopsis Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in four or five of their 12 subunits, respectively, and differ from one another in three subunits, proteomic ana- lyses show that maize Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in six subunits but differ from each other only in their largest subunits. Use of alternative catalytic second subunits, which are nonredundant for development and paramutation, yields at least two sub- types of Pol IV and three subtypes of Pol V in maize. Pol IV/Pol V associations with MOP1, RMR1, AGO121, Zm_DRD1/CHR127, SHH2a, and SHH2b extend parallels between paramutation in maize and the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway in Arabidopsis.

  13. Quasispecies-like behavior observed in catalytic RNA populations evolving in a test tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehman Niles

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the RNA World, molecular populations were probably very small and highly susceptible to the force of strong random drift. In conjunction with Muller's Ratchet, this would have imposed difficulties for the preservation of the genetic information and the survival of the populations. Mechanisms that allowed these nascent populations to overcome this problem must have been advantageous. Results Using continuous in vitro evolution experimentation with an increased mutation rate imposed by MnCl2, it was found that clonal 100-molecule populations of ribozymes clearly exhibit certain characteristics of a quasispecies. This is the first time this has been seen with a catalytic RNA. Extensive genotypic sampling from two replicate lineages was gathered and phylogenetic networks were constructed to elucidate the structure of the evolving RNA populations. A common distribution was found in which a mutant sequence was present at high frequency, surrounded by a cloud of mutant with lower frequencies. This is a typical distribution of quasispecies. Most of the mutants in these clouds were connected by short Hamming distance values, indicating their close relatedness. Conclusions The quasispecies nature of mutant RNA clouds facilitates the recovery of genotypes under pressure of being removed from the population by random drift. The empirical populations therefore evolved a genotypic resiliency despite a high mutation rate by adopting the characteristics of quasispecies, implying that primordial RNA pools could have used this strategy to avoid extinction.

  14. Design, RNA cleavage and antiviral activity of new artificial ribonucleases derived from mono-, di- and tripeptides connected by linkers of different hydrophobicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamkovich, Nikolay; Koroleva, Lyudmila; Kovpak, Mikhail; Goncharova, Elena; Silnikov, Vladimir; Vlassov, Valentin; Zenkova, Marina

    2016-03-15

    A novel series of metal-free artificial ribonucleases (aRNases) was designed, synthesized and assessed in terms of ribonuclease activity and ability to inactivate influenza virus WSN/A33/H1N1 in vitro. The compounds were built of two short peptide fragments, which include Lys, Ser, Arg, Glu and imidazole residues in various combinations, connected by linkers of different hydrophobicity (1,12-diaminododecane or 4,9-dioxa-1,12-diaminododecane). These compounds efficiently cleaved different RNA substrates under physiological conditions at rates three to five times higher than that of artificial ribonucleases described earlier and displayed RNase A-like cleavage specificity. aRNases with the hydrophobic 1,12-diaminododecane linker displayed ribonuclease activity 3-40 times higher than aRNases with the 4,9-dioxa-1,12-diaminododecane linker. The assumed mechanism of RNA cleavage was typical for natural ribonucleases, that is, general acid-base catalysis via the formation of acid/base pairs by functional groups of amino acids present in the aRNases; the pH profile of cleavage confirmed this mechanism. The most active aRNases under study exhibited high antiviral activity and entirely inactivated influenza virus A/WSN/33/(H1N1) after a short incubation period of viral suspension under physiological conditions. PMID:26899594

  15. A Single RNaseIII Domain Protein from Entamoeba histolytica Has dsRNA Cleavage Activity and Can Help Mediate RNAi Gene Silencing in a Heterologous System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justine M Pompey

    Full Text Available Dicer enzymes process double-stranded RNA (dsRNA into small RNAs that target gene silencing through the RNA interference (RNAi pathway. Dicer enzymes are complex, multi-domain RNaseIII proteins, however structural minimalism of this protein has recently emerged in parasitic and fungal systems. The most minimal Dicer, Saccharomyces castellii Dicer1, has a single RNaseIII domain and two double stranded RNA binding domains. In the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica 27nt small RNAs are abundant and mediate silencing, yet no canonical Dicer enzyme has been identified. Although EhRNaseIII does not exhibit robust dsRNA cleavage in vitro, it can process dsRNA in the RNAi-negative background of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and in conjunction with S. castellii Argonaute1 can partially reconstitute the RNAi pathway. Thus, although EhRNaseIII lacks the domain architecture of canonical or minimal Dicer enzymes, it has dsRNA processing activity that contributes to gene silencing via RNAi. Our data advance the understanding of small RNA biogenesis in Entamoeba as well as broaden the spectrum of non-canonical Dicer enzymes that contribute to the RNAi pathway.

  16. A Single RNaseIII Domain Protein from Entamoeba histolytica Has dsRNA Cleavage Activity and Can Help Mediate RNAi Gene Silencing in a Heterologous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompey, Justine M; Foda, Bardees; Singh, Upinder

    2015-01-01

    Dicer enzymes process double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into small RNAs that target gene silencing through the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. Dicer enzymes are complex, multi-domain RNaseIII proteins, however structural minimalism of this protein has recently emerged in parasitic and fungal systems. The most minimal Dicer, Saccharomyces castellii Dicer1, has a single RNaseIII domain and two double stranded RNA binding domains. In the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica 27nt small RNAs are abundant and mediate silencing, yet no canonical Dicer enzyme has been identified. Although EhRNaseIII does not exhibit robust dsRNA cleavage in vitro, it can process dsRNA in the RNAi-negative background of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and in conjunction with S. castellii Argonaute1 can partially reconstitute the RNAi pathway. Thus, although EhRNaseIII lacks the domain architecture of canonical or minimal Dicer enzymes, it has dsRNA processing activity that contributes to gene silencing via RNAi. Our data advance the understanding of small RNA biogenesis in Entamoeba as well as broaden the spectrum of non-canonical Dicer enzymes that contribute to the RNAi pathway. PMID:26230096

  17. Functional Diversification of Maize RNA Polymerase IV and V Subtypes via Alternative Catalytic Subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy R. Haag

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Unlike nuclear multisubunit RNA polymerases I, II, and III, whose subunit compositions are conserved throughout eukaryotes, plant RNA polymerases IV and V are nonessential, Pol II-related enzymes whose subunit compositions are still evolving. Whereas Arabidopsis Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in four or five of their 12 subunits, respectively, and differ from one another in three subunits, proteomic analyses show that maize Pols IV and V differ from Pol II in six subunits but differ from each other only in their largest subunits. Use of alternative catalytic second subunits, which are nonredundant for development and paramutation, yields at least two subtypes of Pol IV and three subtypes of Pol V in maize. Pol IV/Pol V associations with MOP1, RMR1, AGO121, Zm_DRD1/CHR127, SHH2a, and SHH2b extend parallels between paramutation in maize and the RNA-directed DNA methylation pathway in Arabidopsis.

  18. Identification of DNA cleavage- and recombination-specific hnRNP cofactors for activation-induced cytidine deaminase

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Wenjun; Begum, Nasim A.; Mondal, Samiran; Stanlie, Andre; Honjo, Tasuku

    2015-01-01

    The B-cell–specific antibody gene-diversifying enzyme activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) shows high homology with apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide 1 (APOBEC1), which edits apolipoprotein B-100 mRNA in the presence of cofactor APOBEC1 complementation factor/APOBEC complementation factor (A1CF/ACF). Here we show that the DNA cleavage and recombination functions of AID depend critically on its RNA-dependent interaction with distinct heterogeneous nuclear ribonu...

  19. The 25 kDa subunit of cleavage factor Im Is a RNA-binding protein that interacts with the poly(A polymerase in Entamoeba histolytica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisol Pezet-Valdez

    Full Text Available In eukaryotes, polyadenylation of pre-mRNA 3' end is essential for mRNA export, stability and translation. Taking advantage of the knowledge of genomic sequences of Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan responsible for human amoebiasis, we previously reported the putative polyadenylation machinery of this parasite. Here, we focused on the predicted protein that has the molecular features of the 25 kDa subunit of the Cleavage Factor Im (CFIm25 from other organisms, including the Nudix (nucleoside diphosphate linked to another moiety X domain, as well as the RNA binding domain and the PAP/PAB interacting region. The recombinant EhCFIm25 protein (rEhCFIm25 was expressed in bacteria and used to generate specific antibodies in rabbit. Subcellular localization assays showed the presence of the endogenous protein in nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions. In RNA electrophoretic mobility shift assays, rEhCFIm25 was able to form specific RNA-protein complexes with the EhPgp5 mRNA 3´ UTR used as probe. In addition, Pull-Down and LC/ESI-MS/MS tandem mass spectrometry assays evidenced that the putative EhCFIm25 was able to interact with the poly(A polymerase (EhPAP that is responsible for the synthesis of the poly(A tail in other eukaryotic cells. By Far-Western experiments, we confirmed the interaction between the putative EhCFIm25 and EhPAP in E. histolytica. Taken altogether, our results showed that the putative EhCFIm25 is a conserved RNA binding protein that interacts with the poly(A polymerase, another member of the pre-mRNA 3' end processing machinery in this protozoan parasite.

  20. Formation of C-terminally truncated version of the Taz1 protein employs cleavage-box structure in mRNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When expressed in various hosts the taz1+ gene encoding the fission yeast telomere-binding protein produces two forms of polypeptides: full-length (Taz1p) and truncated (Taz1pΔC) version lacking almost entire Myb-domain. Whereas Taz1p binds telomeric DNA in vitro, Taz1pΔC forms long filaments unable of DNA binding. The formation of Taz1pΔC is a result of neither site-specific proteolysis, nor premature termination of transcription. In silico analysis of the taz1+ RNA transcript revealed a stem-loop structure at the site of cleavage (cleavage box; CB). In order to explore whether it possesses inherent destabilizing effects, we cloned CB sequence into the open reading frame (ORF) of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and observed that when expressed in Escherichia coli the engineered gene produced two forms of the reporter protein. The formation of the truncated version of GST was abolished, when CB was replaced with recoded sequence containing synonymous codons thus indicating that the truncation is based on structural properties of taz1+ mRNA.

  1. Mechanisms of the photo-catalytic water cleavage. Watching catalysts at their work by means of in-situ IR spectroscopy; Mechanismen der photokatalytischen Wasserspaltung. Mit in-situ IR-Spektroskopie dem Katalysator bei der Arbeit zusehen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Ralf [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Abt. Physikalische Chemie

    2012-11-15

    The scarcity of fossil resources and the global warming require the development of sustainable energy technologies. In this respect, the hydrogen production by means of a photo-catalytic water cleavage has a great potential. Solar energy is converted into the transportable and exploitable energy source hydrogen. The author of the contribution under consideration reports, that the in-situ infrared spectroscopy considerably contributes to the understanding of the formation, state and degradation of a catalyst. The development of an effective and environmentally friendly system of catalyst is facilitated.

  2. Circularity and self-cleavage as a strategy for the emergence of a chromosome in the RNA-based protocell

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Wentao; Yu, Chunwu; Zhang, Wentao

    2013-01-01

    Background It is now popularly accepted that an “RNA world” existed in early evolution. During division of RNA-based protocells, random distribution of individual genes (simultaneously as ribozymes) between offspring might have resulted in gene loss, especially when the number of gene types increased. Therefore, the emergence of a chromosome carrying linked genes was critical for the prosperity of the RNA world. However, there were quite a few immediate difficulties for this event to occur. F...

  3. RNase III mediated cleavage of the coding region of mraZ mRNA is required for efficient cell division in Corynebacterium glutamicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Tomoya; Tanaka, Yuya; Takemoto, Norihiko; Hamamoto, Nagisa; Inui, Masayuki

    2016-03-01

    The Corynebacterium glutamicum R cgR_1959 gene encodes an endoribonuclease of the RNase III family. Deletion mutant of cgR_1959 (Δrnc mutant) showed an elongated cell shape, and presence of several lines on the cell surface, indicating a required of RNase III for maintaining normal cell morphology in C. glutamicum. The level of mraZ mRNA was increased, whereas cgR_1596 mRNA encoding a putative cell wall hydrolase and ftsEX mRNA were decreased in the Δrnc mutant. The half-life of mraZ mRNA was significantly prolonged in the Δrnc and the Δpnp mutant strains. This indicated that the degradation of mraZ mRNA was performed by RNase III and the 3'-to-5' exoribonuclease, PNPase. Northern hybridization and primer extension analysis revealed that the cleavage site for mraZ mRNA by RNase III is in the coding region. Overproduction of MraZ resulted in an elongated cell shape. The expression of ftsEX decreased while that of cgR_1596 unchanged in an MraZ-overexpressing strain. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay and a transcriptional reporter assay indicate that MraZ is a transcriptional repressor of ftsEX in C. glutamicum. These results indicate that RNase III is required for efficient expression of MraZ-dependent ftsEX and MraZ-independent cgR_1596. PMID:26713407

  4. High-throughput profiling of off-target DNA cleavage reveals RNA-programmed Cas9 nuclease specificity

    OpenAIRE

    Pattanayak, Vikram; Lin, Steven; Guilinger, John P.; MA, ENBO; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Liu, David R.

    2013-01-01

    The RNA-programmable Cas9 endonuclease cleaves double-stranded DNA at sites complementary to a 20-base-pair guide RNA. The Cas9 system has been used to modify genomes in multiple cells and organisms, demonstrating its potential as a facile genome-engineering tool. We used in vitro selection and high-throughput sequencing to determine the propensity of eight Cas9:guide RNA complexes to cleave each of 10^12 potential off-target DNA sequences. The selection results predicted five off-target site...

  5. Sequence-specific RNA cleavage by PNA conjugates of the metal-free artificial ribonuclease tris(2-aminobenzimidazole).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danneberg, Friederike; Ghidini, Alice; Dogandzhiyski, Plamena; Kalden, Elisabeth; Strömberg, Roger; Göbel, Michael W

    2015-01-01

    Tris(2-aminobenzimidazole) conjugates with antisense oligonucleotides are effective site-specific RNA cleavers. Their mechanism of action is independent of metal ions. Here we investigate conjugates with peptide nucleic acids (PNA). RNA degradation occurs with similar rates and substrate specificities as in experiments with DNA conjugates we performed earlier. Although aggregation phenomena are observed in some cases, proper substrate recognition is not compromised. While our previous synthesis of 2-aminobenzimidazoles required an HgO induced cyclization step, a mercury free variant is described herein. PMID:25977723

  6. Cas9–crRNA ribonucleoprotein complex mediates specific DNA cleavage for adaptive immunity in bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Gasiunas, Giedrius; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Horvath, Philippe; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2012-01-01

    Clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated (Cas) systems provide adaptive immunity against viruses and plasmids in bacteria and archaea. The silencing of invading nucleic acids is executed by ribonucleoprotein complexes preloaded with small, interfering CRISPR RNAs (crRNAs) that act as guides for targeting and degradation of foreign nucleic acid. Here, we demonstrate that the Cas9–crRNA complex of the Streptococcus thermophilus CRISPR3/Cas system in...

  7. Long-range RNA interaction of two sequence elements required for endonucleolytic cleavage of human insulin-like growth factor II mRNAs.

    OpenAIRE

    Scheper, W; Meinsma, D; Holthuizen, P E; Sussenbach, J S

    1995-01-01

    Human insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) mRNAs are subject to site-specific endonucleolytic cleavage in the 3' untranslated region, leading to an unstable 5' cleavage product containing the IGF-II coding region and a very stable 3' cleavage product of 1.8 kb. This endonucleolytic cleavage is most probably the first and rate-limiting step in degradation of IGF-II mRNAs. Two sequence elements within the 3' untranslated region are required for cleavage: element I, located approximately 2 kb ...

  8. Structure and specificity of the RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9 during DNA interrogation, target binding and cleavage

    OpenAIRE

    Josephs, Eric A.; Kocak, D. Dewran; Fitzgibbon, Christopher J.; McMenemy, Joshua; Gersbach, Charles A; Marszalek, Piotr E.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-associated endonuclease Cas9 cuts DNA at variable target sites designated by a Cas9-bound RNA molecule. Cas9's ability to be directed by single ‘guide RNA’ molecules to target nearly any sequence has been recently exploited for a number of emerging biological and medical applications. Therefore, understanding the nature of Cas9's off-target activity is of paramount importance for its practical use. Using atomic force microscopy (AFM), we directly resolve individual Cas9 and nuclease-in...

  9. Kinetics of hairpin ribozyme cleavage in yeast.

    OpenAIRE

    Donahue, C P; Fedor, M J

    1997-01-01

    Hairpin ribozymes catalyze a self-cleavage reaction that provides a simple model for quantitative analyses of intracellular mechanisms of RNA catalysis. Decay rates of chimeric mRNAs containing self-cleaving ribozymes give a direct measure of intracellular cleavage kinetics in yeast. Intracellular ribozyme-mediated cleavage occurs at similar rates and shows similar inhibition by ribozyme mutations as ribozyme-mediated reactions in vitro, but only when ribozymes are located in a favorable mRNA...

  10. Membrane binding of Escherichia coli RNase E catalytic domain stabilizes protein structure and increases RNA substrate affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murashko, Oleg N; Kaberdin, Vladimir R; Lin-Chao, Sue

    2012-05-01

    RNase E plays an essential role in RNA processing and decay and tethers to the cytoplasmic membrane in Escherichia coli; however, the function of this membrane-protein interaction has remained unclear. Here, we establish a mechanistic role for the RNase E-membrane interaction. The reconstituted highly conserved N-terminal fragment of RNase E (NRne, residues 1-499) binds specifically to anionic phospholipids through electrostatic interactions. The membrane-binding specificity of NRne was confirmed using circular dichroism difference spectroscopy; the dissociation constant (K(d)) for NRne binding to anionic liposomes was 298 nM. E. coli RNase G and RNase E/G homologs from phylogenetically distant Aquifex aeolicus, Haemophilus influenzae Rd, and Synechocystis sp. were found to be membrane-binding proteins. Electrostatic potentials of NRne and its homologs were found to be conserved, highly positive, and spread over a large surface area encompassing four putative membrane-binding regions identified in the "large" domain (amino acids 1-400, consisting of the RNase H, S1, 5'-sensor, and DNase I subdomains) of E. coli NRne. In vitro cleavage assay using liposome-free and liposome-bound NRne and RNA substrates BR13 and GGG-RNAI showed that NRne membrane binding altered its enzymatic activity. Circular dichroism spectroscopy showed no obvious thermotropic structural changes in membrane-bound NRne between 10 and 60 °C, and membrane-bound NRne retained its normal cleavage activity after cooling. Thus, NRne membrane binding induced changes in secondary protein structure and enzymatic activation by stabilizing the protein-folding state and increasing its binding affinity for its substrate. Our results demonstrate that RNase E-membrane interaction enhances the rate of RNA processing and decay. PMID:22509045

  11. Redox status affects the catalytic activity of glutamyl-tRNA synthetase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katz, Assaf; Banerjee, Rajat; de Armas, Merly;

    2010-01-01

    Glutamyl-tRNA synthetases (GluRS) provide Glu-tRNA for different processes including protein synthesis, glutamine transamidation and tetrapyrrole biosynthesis. Many organisms contain multiple GluRSs, but whether these duplications solely broaden tRNA specificity or also play additional roles in...... vitro, GluRS1 activity is reversibly inactivated upon oxidation by hemin and hydrogen peroxide. The targets for oxidation-based inhibition were found to be cysteines from a SWIM zinc-binding motif located in the tRNA acceptor helix-binding domain. tRNA(Glu) was able to protect GluRS1 against oxidative...

  12. The mRNA expression of apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme-catalytic polypeptide-like 3G in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with chronic hepatitis C and its regulation by interferon-α

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蔡卫平

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the mRNA expression of apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme-catalytic polypeptide-like 3G(APOBEC3G) in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells(PBMC) in patients with chronic hepatitis C(CHC) and its regulation by exogenous interferon-α

  13. Genetic diagnostic test of hepatocellular carcinoma by telomerase catalytic subunit mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, E; Hisatomi, H; Moritoyo, T; Kanamaru, T; Hikiji, K

    1998-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between telomerase activity and telomere length and between telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) mRNA and telomere length. Both cancerous and non-cancerous tissues were studied in individuals with hepatic carcinoma. In this study, the telomere length in HCC livers had a wide range, no clear significant correlation was found between hTERT mRNA and telomere length. Telomerase activity was more strongly correlated with hTERT mRNA than with telomere length. The correlation between hTERT mRNA and telomerase activity shown here indicates that hTERT mRNA has potential for cancer diagnosis. PMID:9769378

  14. Interaction of human decapping scavenger with 5' mRNA cap analogues: structural requirements for catalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cap structure is a specific feature of the 5' end of mRNA which plays an important role in the post-transcriptional control in gene expression. A major step of gene regulation occurs at the level of mRNA turnover. Degradation of most eukaryotic mRNAs entails the removal of the cap structure in the various pathways. A human scavenger decapping enzyme (hDcpS) catalyses the cleavage of the residual cap structure m7GpppN and/or short oligonucleotides after the 3' to 5' exosom mediated digestion. In this paper we report a fluorescence study of association process of hDcpS with m7GMP, m7GDP and selected dinucleotide cap analogues resistant to enzymatic hydrolysis. The calculated values of association constants (Kas) and corresponding Gibbs free energies (ΔG0) depend on the type of substituents and their positions in the cap molecule, indicating which structural modifications are crucial for the catalysis

  15. Enzyme catalytic amplification of miRNA-155 detection with graphene quantum dot-based electrochemical biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Tianxing; Zhang, Le; Wen, Wei; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2016-03-15

    A specific and sensitive method was developed for quantitative detection of miRNA by integrating horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-assisted catalytic reaction with a simple electrochemical RNA biosensor. The electrochemical biosensor was constructed by a double-stranded DNA structure. The structure was formed by the hybridization of thiol-tethered oligodeoxynucleotide probes (capture DNA), assembled on the gold electrode surface, with target DNA and aminated indicator probe (NH2-DNA). After the construction of the double-stranded DNA structure, the activated carboxyl groups of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) assembled on NH2-DNA. GQDs were used as a new platform for HRP immobilization through noncovalent assembly. HRP modified biosensor can effectively catalyze the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-mediated oxidation of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB), accompanied by a change from colorless to blue in solution color and an increased electrochemical current signal. Due to GQDs and enzyme catalysis, the proposed biosensor could sensitively detect miRNA-155 from 1 fM to 100 pM with a detection limit of 0.14 fM. High performance of the biosensor is attributed to the large surface-to-volume ratio, excellent compatibility of GQDs. For these advantages, the proposed method holds great potential for analysis of other interesting tumor makers. PMID:26453906

  16. Involvement of the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A and of HA95 in pre-mRNA splicing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is a holoenzyme consisting of two catalytic (C) subunits bound to a regulatory (R) subunit dimer. Stimulation by cAMP dissociates the holoenzyme and causes translocation to the nucleus of a fraction of the C subunit. Apart from transcription regulation, little is known about the function of the C subunit in the nucleus. In the present report, we show that both Cα and Cβ are localized to spots in the mammalian nucleus. Double immunofluorescence analysis of splicing factor SC35 with the C subunit indicated that these spots are splicing factor compartments (SFCs). Using the E1A in vivo splicing assay, we found that catalytically active C subunits regulate alternative splicing and phosphorylate several members of the SR-protein family of splicing factors in vitro. Furthermore, nuclear C subunits co-localize with the C subunit-binding protein homologous to AKAP95, HA95. HA95 also regulates E1A alternative splicing in vivo, apparently through its N-terminal domain. Localization of the C subunit to SFCs and the E1A splicing pattern were unaffected by cAMP stimulation. Our findings demonstrate that the nuclear PKA C subunit co-locates with HA95 in SFCs and regulates pre-mRNA splicing, possibly through a cAMP-independent mechanism

  17. Detecting deletions, insertions, and single nucleotide substitutions in cloned β-globin genes and new polymorphic nucleotide substitutions in β-globin genes in a Japanese population using ribonuclease cleavage at mismatches in RNA: DNA duplexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The applicability of ribonuclease (RNase) cleavage at mismatches in RNA:DNA duplexes (the RNase cleavage method) for determining nucleotide variant rates was examined in a Japanese population. DNA segments of various lengths obtained from four different regions of one normal and three thalassemic cloned human β-globin genes were inserted into transcription vectors. Sense and antisense RNA probes uniformly labeled with 32P were prepared. When RNA probes of 771 nucleotides (nt) or less were hybridized with cloned DNAs and the resulting duplexes were treated with a mixture of RNases A and T1, the length of products agreed with theoretical values. Twelve possible mismatches were examined. Since both sense and antisense probes were used, uncleavable mismatches such as G:T and G:G which were made from one combination of RNA and DNA strands could be converted to the cleavable C:A and C:C mismatches, respectively, by using the opposite combination. Deletions and insertions of one (G), four(TTCT), five (ATTTT), and 10 (ATTTTATTTT) nt were easily detected. A polymorphic substitution of T to C at position 666 of the second intervening sequence (IVS2-666) of the β-globin gene was detected using genomic DNAs from cell lines established from the peripheral B lymphocytes of 59 unrelated Japanese from Hiroshima or those amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The frequency of the gene with C at the IVS2-666 (allele C) was 0.48 and that of the gene with T (allene T) was 0.52. Two new polymorphic substitutions of C to A and A to T were detected at nucleotide positions 1789 and 1945 from the capping site, respectively, using genomic DNAs amplified by PCR. We conclude that it would be feasible to use the RNase cleavage method combined with PCR for large-scale screening of variation in chromosomal DNA. (J.P.N.)

  18. Bipodal surface organometallic complexes with surface N-donor ligands and application to the catalytic cleavage of C-H and C-C bonds in n -Butane

    KAUST Repository

    Bendjeriou-Sedjerari, Anissa

    2013-11-27

    We present a new generation of "true vicinal" functions well-distributed on the inner surface of SBA15: [(Sî - Si-NH 2)(≡Si-OH)] (1) and [(≡Si-NH2)2] (2). From these amine-modified SBA15s, two new well-defined surface organometallic species [(≡Si-NH-)(≡Si-O-)]Zr(CH2tBu) 2 (3) and [(≡Si-NH-)2]Zr(CH2tBu) 2 (4) have been obtained by reaction with Zr(CH2tBu) 4. The surfaces were characterized with 2D multiple-quantum 1H-1H NMR and infrared spectroscopies. Energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM), mass balance, and elemental analysis unambiguously proved that Zr(CH2tBu)4 reacts with these vicinal amine-modified surfaces to give mainly bipodal bis(neopentyl)zirconium complexes (3) and (4), uniformly distributed in the channels of SBA15. (3) and (4) react with hydrogen to give the homologous hydrides (5) and (6). Hydrogenolysis of n-butane catalyzed by these hydrides was carried out at low temperature (100 C) and low pressure (1 atm). While (6) exhibits a bis(silylamido)zirconium bishydride, [(≡Si-NH-)2]Zr(H) 2 (6a) (60%), and a bis(silylamido)silyloxozirconium monohydride, [(≡Si-NH-)2(≡Si-O-)]ZrH (6b) (40%), (5) displays a new surface organometallic complex characterized by an 1H NMR signal at 14.46 ppm. The latter is assigned to a (silylimido)(silyloxo)zirconium monohydride, [(≡Si-Nî)(≡Si-O-)]ZrH (5b) (30%), coexistent with a (silylamido)(silyloxo)zirconium bishydride, [(≡Si-NH-)(≡Si-O-)] Zr(H)2 (5a) (45%), and a silylamidobis(silyloxo)zirconium monohydride, [(≡Si-NH-)(≡Si-O-)2]ZrH (5c) (25%). Surprisingly, nitrogen surface ligands possess catalytic properties already encountered with silicon oxide surfaces, but interestingly, catalyst (5) with chelating [N,O] shows better activity than (6) with chelating [N,N]. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  19. Directed evolution of an RNA enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudry, Amber A.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    1992-01-01

    An in vitro evolution procedures was used to obtain RNA enzymes with a particular catalytic function. A population of 10 exp 13 variants of the Tetrahymena ribozyme, a group I ribozyme that catalyzes sequence-specific cleavage of RNA via a phosphoester transfer mechanism, was generated. This enzyme has a limited ability to cleave DNA under conditions of high temperature or high MgCl2 concentration, or both. A selection constraint was imposed on the population of ribozyme variants such that only those individuals that carried out DNA cleavage under physiologic conditions were amplified to produce 'progeny' ribozymes. Mutations were introduced during amplification to maintain heterogeneity in the population. This process was repeated for ten successive generations, resulting in enhanced (100 times) DNA cleavage activity.

  20. Alterations in Lipoxygenase and Cyclooxygenase-2 Catalytic Activity and mRNA Expression in Prostate Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott B. Shappell

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies in prostate tissues and especially cell lines have suggested roles for arachidonic acid (AA metabolizing enzymes in prostate adenocarcinoma (Pca development or progression. The goal of this study was to more fully characterize lipoxygenase (LOX and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 gene expression and AA metabolism in benign and malignant prostate using snap-frozen tissues obtained intraoperatively and mRNA analyses and enzyme assays. Formation of 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (15-HETE was detected in 23/29 benign samples and 15-LOX-2 mRNA was detected in 21/25 benign samples. In pairs of pure benign and Pca from the same patients, 15-HETE production and 15-LOX-2 mRNA were reduced in Pca versus benign in 9/14 (P=.04 and 14/17 (P=.002, respectively. Under the same conditions, neither 5HETE nor 12-HETE formation was detectable in 29 benign and 24 tumor samples; with a more sensitive assay, traces were detected in some samples, but there was no clear association with tumor tissue. COX-2 mRNA was detected by nuclease protection assay in 7/16 benign samples and 5/16 tumors. In benign and tumor pairs from 10 patients, COX-2 was higher in tumor versus benign in only 2, with similar results by in situ hybridization. Paraffin immunoperoxidase for COX2 was performed in whole mount sections from 87 additional radical prostatectomy specimens, with strong expression in ejaculatory duct as a positive control and corroboration with in situ hybridization. No immunostaining was detected in benign prostate or tumor in 45% of cases. Greater immunostaining in tumor versus benign was present in only 17% of cases, and correlated with high tumor grade (Gleason score 8 and 9 vs. 5 to 7. In conclusion, reduced 15-LOX-2 expression and 15-HETE formation is the most characteristic alteration of AA metabolism in Pca. Increased 12-HETE and 5-HETE formation in Pca were not discernible. Increased COX-2 expression is not a typical abnormality in Pca in general, but

  1. Human Dcp2: a catalytically active mRNA decapping enzyme located in specific cytoplasmic structures

    OpenAIRE

    van Dijk, Erwin; Cougot, Nicolas; Meyer, Sylke; Babajko, Sylvie; Wahle, Elmar; Séraphin, Bertrand

    2002-01-01

    We have cloned cDNAs for the human homologues of the yeast Dcp1 and Dcp2 factors involved in the major (5′–3′) and NMD mRNA decay pathways. While yeast Dcp1 has been reported to be the decapping enzyme, we show that recombinant human Dcp2 (hDcp2) is enzymatically active. Dcp2 activity appears evolutionarily conserved. Mutational and biochemical analyses indicate that the hDcp2 MutT/Nudix domain mediates this activity. hDcp2 generates m7GDP and 5′-phosphorylated mRNAs that are 5′–3′ exonucleas...

  2. Fusion of catalytically inactive Cas9 to FokI nuclease improves the specificity of genome modification

    OpenAIRE

    Guilinger, John P.; Thompson, David B.; Liu, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Genome editing by Cas9, which cleaves double-stranded DNA at a sequence programmed by a short single-guide RNA (sgRNA), can result in off-target DNA modification that may be detrimental in some applications. To improve DNA cleavage specificity, we generated fusions of catalytically inactive Cas9 and FokI nuclease (fCas9). DNA cleavage by fCas9 requires association of two fCas9 monomers that simultaneously bind target sites ~15 or 25 base pairs apart. In human cells, fCas9 modified target DNA ...

  3. Characterization of Aquifex aeolicus ribonuclease III and the reactivity epitopes of its pre-ribosomal RNA substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Zhongjie; Nicholson, Rhonda H.; Jaggi, Ritu; Nicholson, Allen W.

    2010-01-01

    Ribonuclease III cleaves double-stranded (ds) structures in bacterial RNAs and participates in diverse RNA maturation and decay pathways. Essential insight on the RNase III mechanism of dsRNA cleavage has been provided by crystallographic studies of the enzyme from the hyperthermophilic bacterium, Aquifex aeolicus. However, the biochemical properties of A. aeolicus (Aa)-RNase III and the reactivity epitopes of its substrates are not known. The catalytic activity of purified recombinant Aa-RNa...

  4. Can laccases catalyze bond cleavage in lignin?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Line; Sitarz, Anna Katarzyna; Kalyani, Dayanand;

    2015-01-01

    these enzymes may help degrading lignin, using oxygen as the oxidant. Laccases can catalyze polymerization of lignin, but the question is whether and how laccases can directly catalyze modification of lignin via catalytic bond cleavage. Via a thorough review of the available literature and detailed...

  5. Cleavage site analysis in picornaviral polyproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, Nikolaj; Hansen, Jan; Blaas, Dieter; Brunak, Søren

    1996-01-01

    are indeed cleaved awaits experimental verification. Additionally, we report several errors detected in the protein databases. A computer server for prediction of cleavage sites by picornaviral proteinases is publicly available at the e-mail address NetPicoRNA@cbs.dtu.dk or via WWW at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/NetPicoRNA...

  6. The helicase and RNaseIIIa domains of Arabidopsis Dicer-Like1 modulate catalytic parameters during MicroRNA biogenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Chenggang

    2012-04-03

    Dicer-Like1 (DCL1), an RNaseIII endonuclease, and Hyponastic Leaves1 (HYL1), a double-stranded RNA-binding protein, are core components of the plant microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis machinery. hyl1 mutants accumulate low levels of miRNAs and display pleiotropic developmental phenotypes. We report the identification of five new hyl1 suppressor mutants, all of which are alleles of DCL1. These new alleles affect either the helicase or the RNaseIIIa domains of DCL1, highlighting the critical functions of these domains. Biochemical analysis of the DCL1 suppressor variants reveals that they process the primary transcript (pri-miRNA) more efficiently than wild-type DCL1, with both higher Kcat and lower Km values. The DCL1 variants largely rescue wild-type miRNA accumulation levels in vivo, but do not rescue the MIRNA processing precision defects of the hyl1 mutant. In vitro, the helicase domain confers ATP dependence on DCL1-catalyzed MIRNA processing, attenuates DCL1 cleavage activity, and is required for precise MIRNA processing of some substrates. © 2012 American Society of Plant Biologists.

  7. Identification and assignment of base pairs in four helical segments of Bacillus megaterium ribosomal 5S RNA and its ribonuclease T1 cleavage fragments by means of 500-MHz proton homonuclear Overhauser enhancements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three different fragments of Bacillus megaterium ribosomal 5S RNA have been produced by enzymatic cleavage with ribonuclease T1. Fragment A consists of helices II and III, fragment B contains helix IV, and fragment C contains helix I of the universal 5S rRNA secondary structure. All (eight) imino proton resonances in the downfield region (9-15 ppm) of the 500-MHz proton FT NMR spectrum of fragment B have been identified and assigned as G80·C92·G81·C91-G82·C90-A83·U89-C84·G88 and three unpaired U's in helix IV by proton homonuclear Overhauser enhancement connectivities. The secondary structure in helix IV of the prokaryotic loop is completely demonstrated spectroscopically for the first time in any native or enzyme-cleaved 5S rRNA. In addition, G21·C58-A20·U59-G19·C60-A18·U61 in helix II, U32·A46-G31·C47-C30·G48-C29·G49 in helix III, and G4·C112-G5·C111-U6·G110 in the terminal stem (helix I) have been assigned by means of NOE experiments on intact 5S rRNA and its fragments A and C. Base pairs in helices I-IV of the universal secondary structure of B. megaterium 5S RNA are described

  8. Replicating Potato spindle tuber viroid mediates de novo methylation of an intronic viroid sequence but no cleavage of the corresponding pre-mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalakouras, Athanasios; Dadami, Elena; Bassler, Alexandra; Zwiebel, Michele; Krczal, Gabi; Wassenegger, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In plants, Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) replication triggers post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) and RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) of homologous RNA and DNA sequences, respectively. PTGS predominantly occurs in the cytoplasm, but nuclear PTGS has been also reported. In this study, we investigated whether the nuclear replicating PSTVd is able to trigger nuclear PTGS. Transgenic tobacco plants carrying cytoplasmic and nuclear PTGS sensor constructs were PSTVd-infected resulting in the generation of abundant PSTVd-derived small interfering RNAs (vd-siRNAs). Northern blot analysis revealed that, in contrast to the cytoplasmic sensor, the nuclear sensor transcript was not targeted for RNA degradation. Bisulfite sequencing analysis showed that the nuclear PTGS sensor transgene was efficiently targeted for RdDM. Our data suggest that PSTVd fails to trigger nuclear PTGS, and that RdDM and nuclear PTGS are not necessarily coupled. PMID:25826660

  9. Cleavage of the sarcin–ricin loop of 23S rRNA differentially affects EF-G and EF-Tu binding

    OpenAIRE

    García-Ortega, Lucía; Álvarez-García, Elisa; Gavilanes, José G.; Martínez-del-Pozo, Álvaro; Joseph, Simpson

    2010-01-01

    Ribotoxins are potent inhibitors of protein biosynthesis and inactivate ribosomes from a variety of organisms. The ribotoxin α-sarcin cleaves the large 23S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) at the universally conserved sarcin–ricin loop (SRL) leading to complete inactivation of the ribosome and cellular death. The SRL interacts with translation factors that hydrolyze GTP, and it is important for their binding to the ribosome, but its precise role is not yet understood. We studied the effect of α-sarcin on...

  10. A guanosine quadruplex and two stable hairpins flank a major cleavage site in insulin-like growth factor II mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Jan; Kofod, M; Nielsen, F C

    1994-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) mRNAs are cleaved by an endonucleolytic event in a conserved part of their 3' untranslated region that is predicted to exhibit a complex higher-order RNA structure. In the present study, we have examined the putative secondary structures of in vitro...

  11. A Structured Viroid RNA Serves as a Substrate for Dicer-Like Cleavage To Produce Biologically Active Small RNAs but Is Resistant to RNA-Induced Silencing Complex-Mediated Degradation▿

    OpenAIRE

    Itaya, Asuka; Zhong, Xuehua; Bundschuh, Ralf; Qi, Yijun; Wang, Ying; Takeda, Ryuta; Harris, Ann R.; Molina, Carlos; Nelson, Richard S; Ding, Biao

    2007-01-01

    RNA silencing is a potent means of antiviral defense in plants and animals. A hallmark of this defense response is the production of 21- to 24-nucleotide viral small RNAs via mechanisms that remain to be fully understood. Many viruses encode suppressors of RNA silencing, and some viral RNAs function directly as silencing suppressors as counterdefense. The occurrence of viroid-specific small RNAs in infected plants suggests that viroids can trigger RNA silencing in a host, raising the question...

  12. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor L. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James E. (Madison, WI)

    2007-12-11

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  13. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Waunakee, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Brow; Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James E. (Madison, WI)

    2010-11-09

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  14. Cleavage of nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  15. Construction of Multi-ribozyme Expression System and Its Characterization of Cleavage on the MDR1/MRP1 Double Target Substrate in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Sheng-li; ZHENG Suo; LIU Shi-de; ZHANG Jian-hua; XU Dong-ping; OHNUMA Takao

    2009-01-01

    To improve catalytic activity of ribozyme on its substrate,the multi-ribozyme expression system was designed and constructed from 20 cis-acting hammerhead ribozymes undergoing self-cleavage with 10 trans-acting hammerhead ribozymes inserted altematively regularly and the plasmid of pGEM-MDRI/MRPI used to transcribe the M DRI/MRPI(196/210) substrate containing double target sites was also constructed by DNA recombination.Endonuclease digestion analysis and DNA sequencing indicate all the recombinant plasmids were correct.The cleavage activities were evaluated for the multi-ribozyme expression system on the MDR1/MRP1 substrate in the cell free system.The results demonstrate that the cis-acting hammerhead ribozymes in the multi-ribozyme expression system were able to cleave themselves and the 72 nt of 196Rz and the 71 nt of 210Rz trans-acting hammerhead ribozymes were liberated effectively,and the trans-acting hammerhead ribozymes released were able to act on the MDR1/MRP1 double target RNA substrate and cleave the target RNA at specific sites effectively.The multiribozyme expression system of the [Coat'A196Rz/Coat'B210Rz]5 is more significantly superior to that of the [Coat'A 196Rz/Coat'B210Rz]1 in cleavage of RNA substrate.The fractions cleaved by [Coat'A196Rz/Coat'B210Rz]5 on the MDR1/MRP1 substrate for 8 h at observed temperatures showed no marked difference.The studies of Mg2+ on cleavage efficiency indicate that cleavage reaction is dependent on Mg2+ ions concentration.The plot of Ig(kobs) vs.Igc(Mg2+) displays a linear relationship between 2.5 mmol/L and 20 mmol/L Mg2..It suggests that Mg2+ ions play a crucial role in multi-ribozyme cleavage on the substrate.

  16. Use of chemical modification and mass spectrometry to identify substrate-contacting sites in proteinaceous RNase P, a tRNA processing enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tien-Hao; Tanimoto, Akiko; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Wysocki, Vicki; Gopalan, Venkat

    2016-06-20

    Among all enzymes in nature, RNase P is unique in that it can use either an RNA- or a protein-based active site for its function: catalyzing cleavage of the 5'-leader from precursor tRNAs (pre-tRNAs). The well-studied catalytic RNase P RNA uses a specificity module to recognize the pre-tRNA and a catalytic module to perform cleavage. Similarly, the recently discovered proteinaceous RNase P (PRORP) possesses two domains - pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) and metallonuclease (NYN) - that are present in some other RNA processing factors. Here, we combined chemical modification of lysines and multiple-reaction monitoring mass spectrometry to identify putative substrate-contacting residues in Arabidopsis thaliana PRORP1 (AtPRORP1), and subsequently validated these candidate sites by site-directed mutagenesis. Using biochemical studies to characterize the wild-type (WT) and mutant derivatives, we found that AtPRORP1 exploits specific lysines strategically positioned at the tips of it's V-shaped arms, in the first PPR motif and in the NYN domain proximal to the catalytic center, to bind and cleave pre-tRNA. Our results confirm that the protein- and RNA-based forms of RNase P have distinct modules for substrate recognition and cleavage, an unanticipated parallel in their mode of action. PMID:27166372

  17. Use of chemical modification and mass spectrometry to identify substrate-contacting sites in proteinaceous RNase P, a tRNA processing enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tien-Hao; Tanimoto, Akiko; Shkriabai, Nikoloz; Kvaratskhelia, Mamuka; Wysocki, Vicki; Gopalan, Venkat

    2016-01-01

    Among all enzymes in nature, RNase P is unique in that it can use either an RNA- or a protein-based active site for its function: catalyzing cleavage of the 5′-leader from precursor tRNAs (pre-tRNAs). The well-studied catalytic RNase P RNA uses a specificity module to recognize the pre-tRNA and a catalytic module to perform cleavage. Similarly, the recently discovered proteinaceous RNase P (PRORP) possesses two domains – pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) and metallonuclease (NYN) – that are present in some other RNA processing factors. Here, we combined chemical modification of lysines and multiple-reaction monitoring mass spectrometry to identify putative substrate-contacting residues in Arabidopsis thaliana PRORP1 (AtPRORP1), and subsequently validated these candidate sites by site-directed mutagenesis. Using biochemical studies to characterize the wild-type (WT) and mutant derivatives, we found that AtPRORP1 exploits specific lysines strategically positioned at the tips of it's V-shaped arms, in the first PPR motif and in the NYN domain proximal to the catalytic center, to bind and cleave pre-tRNA. Our results confirm that the protein- and RNA-based forms of RNase P have distinct modules for substrate recognition and cleavage, an unanticipated parallel in their mode of action. PMID:27166372

  18. Cleavage patterns and the topology of the metazoan tree of life

    OpenAIRE

    Valentine, James W.

    1997-01-01

    Several major alliances of metazoan phyla have been identified by small subunit rRNA sequence comparisons. It is possible to arrange the phyla to produce a parsimonious distribution of cleavage types, requiring only one change from a radial ancestral condition to spiral cleavage and one other to “idiosyncratic” cleavage; this arrangement is consistent with most of the recent molecular phylogenies. The cleavage shifts are correlated with changes in many of the features that once were used to d...

  19. MG-132 inhibits the TCDD-mediated induction of Cyp1a1 at the catalytic activity but not the mRNA or protein levels in Hepa 1c1c7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar-Mohamed, Anwar; Elbekai, Reem H; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2008-11-10

    Previous studies have shown that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced degradation of aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is inhibited by MG-132, a potent inhibitor of the 26S proteasome. Therefore, the current study aims to address the effect of MG-132 on the AhR-regulated gene, cytochrome P450 1a1 (Cyp1a1), using murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 cells. Our results showed that MG-132 at the highest concentration tested, 10 microM significantly increased the Cyp1a1 at mRNA, protein and catalytic activity levels through a transcriptional mechanism. On the other hand, MG-132 further potentiated the TCDD-mediated induction of Cyp1a1 at mRNA but not at protein level. In contrast, MG-132 significantly inhibited the TCDD-mediated induction of Cyp1a1 catalytic activity. In addition, we showed that the decrease in Cyp1a1 catalytic activity is not Cyp specific, as MG-132 significantly inhibited Cyp2b1 and total cytochrome P450 catalytic activities. These results prompted us to examine the effect of MG-132 on total cellular heme content and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) mRNA, a rate limiting enzyme of heme degradation. Our results showed that MG-132 significantly induced HO-1 mRNA in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, MG-132 potentiated the induction of HO-1 mRNA by TCDD in a concentration-dependent manner. The induction of HO-1 mRNA level coincided with a decrease in total cellular heme content. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates for the first time that MG-132, despite of increasing Cyp1a1 mRNA expression, it decreases its activity probably through decreasing its heme content. PMID:18835339

  20. Structure of an anti-HIV-1 hammerhead ribozyme complex with a 17-mer DNA substrate analog of HIV-1 gag RNA and a mechanism for the cleavage reaction: 750 MHz NMR and computer experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojha, R. P.; Dhingra, M. M.; Sarma, M. H.; Myer, Y. P.; Setlik, R. F.; Shibata, M.; Kazim, A. L.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.; Turner, C. J.; Sarma, R. H.

    1997-01-01

    The structure of an anti-HIV-1 ribozyme-DNA abortive substrate complex was investigated by 750 MHz NMR and computer modeling experiments. The ribozyme was a chimeric molecule with 30 residues-18 DNA nucleotides, and 12 RNA residues in the conserved core. The DNA substrate analog had 17 residues. The chimeric ribozyme and the DNA substrate formed a shortened ribozyme-abortive substrate complex of 47 nucleotides with two DNA stems (stems I and III) and a loop consisting of the conserved core residues. Circular dichroism spectra showed that the DNA stems assume A-family conformation at the NMR concentration and a temperature of 15 degrees C, contrary to the conventional wisdom that DNA duplexes in aqueous solution populate entirely in the B-form. It is proposed that the A-family RNA residues at the core expand the A-family initiated at the core into the DNA stems because of the large free energy requirement for the formation of A/B junctions. Assignments of the base H8/H6 protons and H1' of the 47 residues were made by a NOESY walk. In addition to the methyl groups of all T's, the imino resonances of stems I and III and AH2's were assigned from appropriate NOESY walks. The extracted NMR data along with available crystallographic data, were used to derive a structural model of the complex. Stems I and III of the final model displayed a remarkable similarity to the A form of DNA; in stem III, a GC base pair was found to be moving into the floor of the minor groove defined by flanking AT pairs; data suggest the formation of a buckled rhombic structure with the adjacent pair; in addition, the base pair at the interface of stem III and the loop region displayed deformed geometry. The loop with the catalytic core, and the immediate region of the stems displayed conformational multiplicity within the NMR time scale. A catalytic mechanism for ribozyme action based on the derived structure, and consistent with biochemical data in the literature, is proposed. The complex

  1. Cleavage factor Im (CFIm) as a regulator of alternative polyadenylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jessica G; Norbury, Chris J

    2016-08-15

    Most mammalian protein coding genes are subject to alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA), which can generate distinct mRNA 3'UTRs with differing regulatory potential. Although this process has been intensely studied in recent years, it remains unclear how and to what extent cleavage site selection is regulated under different physiological conditions. The cleavage factor Im (CFIm) complex is a core component of the mammalian cleavage machinery, and the observation that its depletion causes transcriptome-wide changes in cleavage site use makes it a key candidate regulator of APA. This review aims to summarize current knowledge of the CFIm complex, and explores the evidence surrounding its potential contribution to regulation of APA. PMID:27528751

  2. RNA-seq transcriptome analysis of a Pseudomonas strain with diversified catalytic properties growth under different culture medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jia-Wei; Zheng, Dai-Jun; Cui, Bao-Dong; Yang, Min; Chen, Yong-Zheng

    2016-08-01

    Biocatalysis is an emerging strategy for the production of enantio-pure organic molecules. However, lacking of commercially available enzymes restricts the widespread application of biocatalysis. In this study, we report a Pseudomonas strain which exhibited versatile oxidation activity to synthesize chiral sulfoxides when growing under M9-toluene medium and reduction activity to synthesize chiral alcohols when on Luria-Bertani (LB) medium, respectively. Further comparative transcriptome analysis on samples from these two cultural conditions has identified 1038 differentially expressed genes (DEG). Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment and KEGG pathways analysis demonstrate significant changes in protein synthesis, energy metabolism, and biosynthesis of metabolites when cells cultured under different conditions. We have identified eight candidate enzymes from this bacterial which may have the potential to be used for synthesis of chiral alcohol and sulfoxide chemicals. This work provides insights into the mechanism of diversity in catalytic properties of this Pseudomonas strain growth with different cultural conditions, as well as candidate enzymes for further biocatalysis of enantiomerically pure molecules and pharmaceuticals. PMID:27061463

  3. Cleavage of a viral polyprotein by a cellular proteolytic activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Y. C.; Shih, D S

    1986-01-01

    The 200,000-dalton polyprotein encoded by the bottom component RNA of cowpea mosaic virus was synthesized in rabbit reticulocyte lysates, and this in vitro-synthesized protein was isolated from the lysate reaction mixture by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. Incubation of the isolated polyprotein with buffer caused no change in the protein, but incubation with reticulocyte lysates or with fractionated lysate proteins resulted in cleavage of the protein into the expected cleavage produc...

  4. Evidence for intramolecular self-cleavage of picornaviral replicase precursors.

    OpenAIRE

    Palmenberg, A C; Rueckert, R R

    1982-01-01

    It has previously been shown that when encephalomyocarditis viral RNA is translated in cell-free extracts of rabbit reticulocytes, it synthesizes a virus-coded protease, p22, which is derived by cleavage of a precursor protein, C. Protein C is shown here to be cleaved by two different mechanisms, which were distinguished by their sensitivity to dilution. One mechanism was sensitive to dilution; the other was not. The biphasic cleavage behavior was unchanged by diluting incubation mixtures wit...

  5. Cleavage of Model Substrates by Arabidopsis thaliana PRORP1 Reveals New Insights into Its Substrate Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Guanzhong; Chen, Tien-Hao; Srivastava, Abhishek S; Kosek, David; Biswas, Pradip K; Gopalan, Venkat; Kirsebom, Leif A

    2016-01-01

    Two broad classes of RNase P trim the 5' leader of precursor tRNAs (pre-tRNAs): ribonucleoprotein (RNP)- and proteinaceous (PRORP)-variants. These two RNase P types, which use different scaffolds for catalysis, reflect independent evolutionary paths. While the catalytic RNA-based RNP form is present in all three domains of life, the PRORP family is restricted to eukaryotes. To obtain insights on substrate recognition by PRORPs, we examined the 5' processing ability of recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana PRORP1 (AtPRORP1) using a panel of pre-tRNASer variants and model hairpin-loop derivatives (pATSer type) that consist of the acceptor-T-stem stack and the T-/D-loop. Our data indicate the importance of the identity of N-1 (the residue immediately 5' to the cleavage site) and the N-1:N+73 base pair for cleavage rate and site selection of pre-tRNASer and pATSer. The nucleobase preferences that we observed mirror the frequency of occurrence in the complete suite of organellar pre-tRNAs in eight algae/plants that we analyzed. The importance of the T-/D-loop in pre-tRNASer for tight binding to AtPRORP1 is indicated by the 200-fold weaker binding of pATSer compared to pre-tRNASer, while the essentiality of the T-loop for cleavage is reflected by the near-complete loss of activity when a GAAA-tetraloop replaced the T-loop in pATSer. Substituting the 2'-OH at N-1 with 2'-H also resulted in no detectable cleavage, hinting at the possible role of this 2'-OH in coordinating Mg2+ ions critical for catalysis. Collectively, our results indicate similarities but also key differences in substrate recognition by the bacterial RNase P RNP and AtPRORP1: while both forms exploit the acceptor-T-stem stack and the elbow region in the pre-tRNA, the RNP form appears to require more recognition determinants for cleavage-site selection. PMID:27494328

  6. Cleavage of Model Substrates by Arabidopsis thaliana PRORP1 Reveals New Insights into Its Substrate Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Abhishek S.; Kosek, David; Biswas, Pradip K.; Gopalan, Venkat; Kirsebom, Leif A.

    2016-01-01

    Two broad classes of RNase P trim the 5' leader of precursor tRNAs (pre-tRNAs): ribonucleoprotein (RNP)- and proteinaceous (PRORP)-variants. These two RNase P types, which use different scaffolds for catalysis, reflect independent evolutionary paths. While the catalytic RNA-based RNP form is present in all three domains of life, the PRORP family is restricted to eukaryotes. To obtain insights on substrate recognition by PRORPs, we examined the 5' processing ability of recombinant Arabidopsis thaliana PRORP1 (AtPRORP1) using a panel of pre-tRNASer variants and model hairpin-loop derivatives (pATSer type) that consist of the acceptor-T-stem stack and the T-/D-loop. Our data indicate the importance of the identity of N-1 (the residue immediately 5' to the cleavage site) and the N-1:N+73 base pair for cleavage rate and site selection of pre-tRNASer and pATSer. The nucleobase preferences that we observed mirror the frequency of occurrence in the complete suite of organellar pre-tRNAs in eight algae/plants that we analyzed. The importance of the T-/D-loop in pre-tRNASer for tight binding to AtPRORP1 is indicated by the 200-fold weaker binding of pATSer compared to pre-tRNASer, while the essentiality of the T-loop for cleavage is reflected by the near-complete loss of activity when a GAAA-tetraloop replaced the T-loop in pATSer. Substituting the 2'-OH at N-1 with 2'-H also resulted in no detectable cleavage, hinting at the possible role of this 2'-OH in coordinating Mg2+ ions critical for catalysis. Collectively, our results indicate similarities but also key differences in substrate recognition by the bacterial RNase P RNP and AtPRORP1: while both forms exploit the acceptor-T-stem stack and the elbow region in the pre-tRNA, the RNP form appears to require more recognition determinants for cleavage-site selection. PMID:27494328

  7. In vitro cleavage of the simian virus 40 early polyadenylation site adjacent to a required downstream TG sequence.

    OpenAIRE

    Sperry, A O; Berget, S M

    1986-01-01

    Exogenous RNA containing the simian virus 40 early polyadenylation site was efficiently and accurately polyadenylated in in vitro nuclear extracts. Correct cleavage required ATP. In the absence of ATP, nonpoly(A)+ products accumulated which were 18 to 20 nucleotides longer than the RNA generated by correct cleavage; the longer RNA terminated adjacent to the downstream TG element required for polyadenylation. In the presence of ATP analogs, alternate cleavage was not observed; instead, correct...

  8. The role of the Brr5/Ysh1 C-terminal domain and its homolog Syc1 in mRNA 3′-end processing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasser, Tommy; Tacahashi, Zhelkovsky A.; He, X.;

    2006-01-01

    The cleavage/polyadenylation factor (CPF) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is thought to provide the catalytic activities of the mRNA 3'-end processing machinery, which include endonucleolytic cleavage at the poly(A) site, followed by synthesis of an adenosine polymer onto the new 3'-end by the CPF......5 is necessary for cell viability and mRNA 3'-end processing. It is highly homologous to another CPF subunit, Syc1. Syc1 is not essential, but its removal improves the growth of other processing mutants at restrictive temperatures and restores in vitro processing activity to cleavage....../ polyadenylation-defective brr5-1 extract. Our findings suggest that Syc1, by mimicking the essential Brr5 C-terminus, serves as a negative regulator of mRNA 3'-end formation....

  9. C2c2 is a single-component programmable RNA-guided RNA-targeting CRISPR effector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abudayyeh, Omar O; Gootenberg, Jonathan S; Konermann, Silvana; Joung, Julia; Slaymaker, Ian M; Cox, David B T; Shmakov, Sergey; Makarova, Kira S; Semenova, Ekaterina; Minakhin, Leonid; Severinov, Konstantin; Regev, Aviv; Lander, Eric S; Koonin, Eugene V; Zhang, Feng

    2016-08-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated genes (Cas) adaptive immune system defends microbes against foreign genetic elements via DNA or RNA-DNA interference. We characterize the class 2 type VI CRISPR-Cas effector C2c2 and demonstrate its RNA-guided ribonuclease function. C2c2 from the bacterium Leptotrichia shahii provides interference against RNA phage. In vitro biochemical analysis shows that C2c2 is guided by a single CRISPR RNA and can be programmed to cleave single-stranded RNA targets carrying complementary protospacers. In bacteria, C2c2 can be programmed to knock down specific mRNAs. Cleavage is mediated by catalytic residues in the two conserved Higher Eukaryotes and Prokaryotes Nucleotide-binding (HEPN) domains, mutations of which generate catalytically inactive RNA-binding proteins. These results broaden our understanding of CRISPR-Cas systems and suggest that C2c2 can be used to develop new RNA-targeting tools. PMID:27256883

  10. Ultrasensitive monitoring of ribozyme cleavage product using molecular-beacon-ligation system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG XiangXian; TANG ZhiWen; WANG KeMin; TAN WeiHong; YANG XiaoHai; LI Jun; GUO QiuPing

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports a new approach to detect ribozyme cleavage product based on the molecular- beacon-ligation system. The molecular beacon, designed in such a way that one-half of its loop is complementary to ribozyme cleavage product, is used to monitor ligation process of RNA/DNA complex in a homogeneous solution and to convert directly cleavage product information into fluorescence signal. The method need not label ribozyme and ribozyme substrate, which is fast, simple and ultrasensitive for detection of cleavage product. Detection limit of the assay is 0.05 nmol/L. The cleavage product of hammerhead ribozyme against hepatitis C virus RNA (HCV-RNA) was detected perfectly based on this assay. Owing to its ultrasensitivity, excellent specificity, convenience and fidelity, this method might hold out great promise in ribozyme reaction and ribozyme gene therapy.

  11. DNA interrogation by the CRISPR RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternberg, Samuel H.; Redding, Sy; Jinek, Martin; Greene, Eric C.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2014-03-01

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated enzyme Cas9 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that uses RNA-DNA base-pairing to target foreign DNA in bacteria. Cas9-guide RNA complexes are also effective genome engineering agents in animals and plants. Here we use single-molecule and bulk biochemical experiments to determine how Cas9-RNA interrogates DNA to find specific cleavage sites. We show that both binding and cleavage of DNA by Cas9-RNA require recognition of a short trinucleotide protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). Non-target DNA binding affinity scales with PAM density, and sequences fully complementary to the guide RNA but lacking a nearby PAM are ignored by Cas9-RNA. Competition assays provide evidence that DNA strand separation and RNA-DNA heteroduplex formation initiate at the PAM and proceed directionally towards the distal end of the target sequence. Furthermore, PAM interactions trigger Cas9 catalytic activity. These results reveal how Cas9 uses PAM recognition to quickly identify potential target sites while scanning large DNA molecules, and to regulate scission of double-stranded DNA.

  12. Transcriptome-Wide Cleavage Site Mapping on Cellular mRNAs Reveals Features Underlying Sequence-Specific Cleavage by the Viral Ribonuclease SOX.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Maria Gaglia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Many viruses express factors that reduce host gene expression through widespread degradation of cellular mRNA. An example of this class of proteins is the mRNA-targeting endoribonuclease SOX from the gamma-herpesvirus Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV. Previous studies indicated that cleavage of messenger RNAs (mRNA by SOX occurs at specific locations defined by the sequence of the target RNA, which is at odds with the down-regulation of a large portion of cellular transcripts. In this study, we address this paradox by using high-throughput sequencing of cleavage intermediates combined with a custom bioinformatics-based analysis pipeline to identify SOX cleavage sites across the mRNA transcriptome. These data, coupled with targeted mutagenesis, reveal that while cleavage sites are specific and reproducible, they are defined by a degenerate sequence motif containing a small number of conserved residues rather than a strong consensus sequence. This degenerate element is well represented in both human and KSHV mRNA, and its presence correlates with RNA destabilization by SOX. This represents a new endonuclease targeting strategy, in which use of a degenerate targeting element enables RNA cleavage at specific locations without restricting the range of targets. Furthermore, it shows that strong target selectivity can be achieved without a high degree of sequence specificity.

  13. rRNA fragmentation induced by a yeast killer toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kast, Alene; Klassen, Roland; Meinhardt, Friedhelm

    2014-02-01

    Virus like dsDNA elements (VLE) in yeast were previously shown to encode the killer toxins PaT and zymocin, which target distinct tRNA species via specific anticodon nuclease (ACNase) activities. Here, we characterize a third member of the VLE-encoded toxins, PiT from Pichia inositovora, and identify PiOrf4 as the cytotoxic subunit by conditional expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In contrast to the tRNA targeting toxins, however, neither a change of the wobble uridine modification status by introduction of elp3 or trm9 mutations nor tRNA overexpression rescued from PiOrf4 toxicity. Consistent with a distinct RNA target, expression of PiOrf4 causes specific fragmentation of the 25S and 18S rRNA. A stable cleavage product comprising the first ∼ 130 nucleotides of the 18S rRNA was purified and characterized by linker ligation and subsequent reverse transcription; 3'-termini were mapped to nucleotide 131 and 132 of the 18S rRNA sequence, a region showing some similarity to the anticodon loop of tRNA(Glu)(UUC), the zymocin target. PiOrf4 residues Glu9 and His214, corresponding to catalytic sites Glu9 and His209 in the ACNase subunit of zymocin are essential for in vivo toxicity and rRNA fragmentation, raising the possibility of functionally conserved RNase modules in both proteins. PMID:24308908

  14. Exon size affects competition between splicing and cleavage-polyadenylation in the immunoglobulin mu gene.

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, M L; Bryman, M B; Peiter, M; Cowan, C

    1994-01-01

    The alternative RNA processing of microseconds and microns mRNAs from a single primary transcript depends on competition between a cleavage-polyadenylation reaction to produce microseconds mRNA and a splicing reaction to produce microns mRNA. The ratio of microseconds to microns mRNA is regulated during B-cell maturation; relatively more spliced microns mRNA is made in B cells than in plasma cells. The balance between the efficiencies of splicing and cleavage-polyadenylation is critical to th...

  15. Invasive cleavage of nucleic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prudent, James R. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI); Dahlberg, James E. (Madison, WI)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  16. Invasive cleavage of nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prudent, James R.; Hall, Jeff G.; Lyamichev, Victor I.; Brow, Mary Ann D.; Dahlberg, James E.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof.

  17. Dynamic Contacts of U2, RES, Cwc25, Prp8 and Prp45 Proteins with the Pre-mRNA Branch-Site and 3' Splice Site during Catalytic Activation and Step 1 Catalysis in Yeast Spliceosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cornelius Schneider

    Full Text Available Little is known about contacts in the spliceosome between proteins and intron nucleotides surrounding the pre-mRNA branch-site and their dynamics during splicing. We investigated protein-pre-mRNA interactions by UV-induced crosslinking of purified yeast B(act spliceosomes formed on site-specifically labeled pre-mRNA, and analyzed their changes after conversion to catalytically-activated B* and step 1 C complexes, using a purified splicing system. Contacts between nucleotides upstream and downstream of the branch-site and the U2 SF3a/b proteins Prp9, Prp11, Hsh49, Cus1 and Hsh155 were detected, demonstrating that these interactions are evolutionarily conserved. The RES proteins Pml1 and Bud13 were shown to contact the intron downstream of the branch-site. A comparison of the B(act crosslinking pattern versus that of B* and C complexes revealed that U2 and RES protein interactions with the intron are dynamic. Upon step 1 catalysis, Cwc25 contacts with the branch-site region, and enhanced crosslinks of Prp8 and Prp45 with nucleotides surrounding the branch-site were observed. Cwc25's step 1 promoting activity was not dependent on its interaction with pre-mRNA, indicating it acts via protein-protein interactions. These studies provide important insights into the spliceosome's protein-pre-mRNA network and reveal novel RNP remodeling events during the catalytic activation of the spliceosome and step 1 of splicing.

  18. Engineering a ribozyme cleavage-induced split fluorescent aptamer complementation assay

    OpenAIRE

    Ausländer, Simon; Fuchs, David; Hürlemann, Samuel; Ausländer, David; Fussenegger, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Hammerhead ribozymes are self-cleaving RNA molecules capable of regulating gene expression in living cells. Their cleavage performance is strongly influenced by intra-molecular loop–loop interactions, a feature not readily accessible through modern prediction algorithms. Ribozyme engineering and efficient implementation of ribozyme-based genetic switches requires detailed knowledge of individual self-cleavage performances. By rational design, we devised fluorescent aptamer-ribozyme RNA archit...

  19. Kinetics and regulation of site-specific endonucleolytic cleavage of human IGF-II mRNAs

    OpenAIRE

    van Dijk, Erwin L.; Sussenbach, John S.; Holthuizen, P. Elly

    2001-01-01

    Human insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II) mRNA can be cleaved at a specific site in its 4 kb long 3′-UTR. This yields a stable 3′ cleavage product of 1.8 kb consisting of a 3′-UTR and a poly(A) tail and an unstable 5′ cleavage product containing the IGF-II coding region. After cleavage, the 5′ cleavage product is targeted to rapid degradation and consequently is no longer involved in IGF-II protein synthesis. Cleavage is therefore thought to provide an addit...

  20. Molecular Bases of Viral RNA Targeting by Viral Small Interfering RNA-Programmed RISC▿

    OpenAIRE

    Pantaleo, Vitantonio; Szittya, György; Burgyán, József

    2007-01-01

    RNA silencing is conserved in a broad range of eukaryotes and operates in the development and maintenance of genome integrity in many organisms. Plants have adapted this system for antiviral defense, and plant viruses have in turn developed mechanisms to suppress RNA silencing. RNA silencing-related RNA inactivation is likely based on target RNA cleavage or translational arrest. Although it is widely assumed that virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) promotes the endonucleolytic cleavage of the...

  1. Cleavage behaviors in nuclear vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleavage behaviors of nuclear vessel steels in the transition temperature range are reviewed. Viewpoints are presented to assist understanding of cleavage crack speed, cleavage initiation, cleavage arrest, and the sensitivity of fracture toughness to constraint and temperature. The importance of high local stress elevations by high strain rate is emphasized. This report is designated as HSST Report No. 149

  2. Atomistic Details of the Associative Phosphodiester Cleavage in Human Ribonuclease H

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During translation of the genetic information of DNA into proteins, mRNA is synthesized by RNA polymerase and after the transcription process degraded by RNase H. The endoribonuclease RNase H is a member of the nucleotidyl-transferase (NT) superfamily and is known to hydrolyze the phosphodiester bonds of RNA which is hybridized to DNA. Retroviral RNase H is part of the viral reverse transcriptase enzyme that is indispensable for the proliferation of retroviruses, such as HIV. Inhibitors of this enzyme could therefore provide new drugs against diseases like AIDS. In our study we investigated the molecular mechanism of RNA cleavage by human RNase H using a comprehensive high level DFT/B3LYP QM/MM theoretical method for the calculation of the stationary points and nudged elastic band (NEB) and free energy calculations to identify the transition state structures, the rate limiting step and the reaction barrier. Our calculations reveal that the catalytic mechanism proceeds in two steps and that the nature of the nucleophile is a water molecule. In the first step, the water attack on the scissile phosphorous is followed by a proton transfer from the water to the O2P oxygen and a trigonal bipyramidal pentacoordinated phosphorane is formed. Subsequently, in the second step the proton is shuttled to the O30 oxygen to generate the product state. During the reaction mechanism two Mg2+ ions support the formation of a stable associated in-line SN2-type phosphorane intermediate. Our calculated energy barrier of 19.3 kcal mol*1 is in excellent agreement with experimental findings (20.5 kcal mol*1). These results may contribute to the clarification and understanding of the RNase H reaction mechanism and of further enzymes from the RNase family.

  3. Atomistic Details of the Associative Phosphodiester Cleavage in Human Ribonuclease H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elsasser, Brigitta M.; Fels, Gregor

    2010-07-30

    During translation of the genetic information of DNA into proteins, mRNA is synthesized by RNA polymerase and after the transcription process degraded by RNase H. The endoribonuclease RNase H is a member of the nucleotidyl-transferase (NT) superfamily and is known to hydrolyze the phosphodiester bonds of RNA which is hybridized to DNA. Retroviral RNase H is part of the viral reverse transcriptase enzyme that is indispensable for the proliferation of retroviruses, such as HIV. Inhibitors of this enzyme could therefore provide new drugs against diseases like AIDS. In our study we investigated the molecular mechanism of RNA cleavage by human RNase H using a comprehensive high level DFT/B3LYP QM/MM theoretical method for the calculation of the stationary points and nudged elastic band (NEB) and free energy calculations to identify the transition state structures, the rate limiting step and the reaction barrier. Our calculations reveal that the catalytic mechanism proceeds in two steps and that the nature of the nucleophile is a water molecule. In the first step, the water attack on the scissile phosphorous is followed by a proton transfer from the water to the O2P oxygen and a trigonal bipyramidal pentacoordinated phosphorane is formed. Subsequently, in the second step the proton is shuttled to the O30 oxygen to generate the product state. During the reaction mechanism two Mg2+ ions support the formation of a stable associated in-line SN2-type phosphorane intermediate. Our calculated energy barrier of 19.3 kcal mol*1 is in excellent agreement with experimental findings (20.5 kcal mol*1). These results may contribute to the clarification and understanding of the RNase H reaction mechanism and of further enzymes from the RNase family.

  4. Mechanism of intramembrane cleavage of alcadeins by γ-secretase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Piao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alcadein proteins (Alcs; Alcα, Alcβand Alcγ are predominantly expressed in neurons, as is Alzheimer's β-amyloid (Aβ precursor protein (APP. Both Alcs and APP are cleaved by primary α- or β-secretase to generate membrane-associated C-terminal fragments (CTFs. Alc CTFs are further cleaved by γ-secretase to secrete p3-Alc peptide along with the release of intracellular domain fragment (Alc ICD from the membrane. In the case of APP, APP CTFβ is initially cleaved at the ε-site to release the intracellular domain fragment (AICD and consequently the γ-site is determined, by which Aβ generates. The initial ε-site is thought to define the final γ-site position, which determines whether Aβ40/43 or Aβ42 is generated. However, initial intracellular ε-cleavage sites of Alc CTF to generate Alc ICD and the molecular mechanism that final γ-site position is determined remains unclear in Alcs. METHODOLOGY: Using HEK293 cells expressing Alcs plus presenilin 1 (PS1, a catalytic unit of γ-secretase and the membrane fractions of these cells, the generation of p3-Alc possessing C-terminal γ-cleavage site and Alc ICD possessing N-terminal ε-cleavage site were analysed with MALDI-TOF/MS. We determined the initial ε-site position of all Alcα, Alcβ and Alcγ, and analyzed the relationship between the initially determined ε-site position and the final γ-cleavage position. CONCLUSIONS: The initial ε-site position does not always determine the final γ-cleavage position in Alcs, which differed from APP. No additional γ-cleavage sites are generated from artificial/non-physiological positions of ε-cleavage for Alcs, while the artificial ε-cleavage positions can influence in selection of physiological γ-site positions. Because alteration of γ-secretase activity is thought to be a pathogenesis of sporadic Alzheimer's disease, Alcs are useful and sensitive substrate to detect the altered cleavage of substrates by γ-secretase, which may

  5. The RNR motif of B. subtilis RNase P protein interacts with both PRNA and pre-tRNA to stabilize an active conformer

    OpenAIRE

    Koutmou, Kristin S.; Day-Storms, Jeremy J.; Fierke, Carol A.

    2011-01-01

    Ribonuclease P (RNase P) catalyzes the metal-dependent 5′ end maturation of precursor tRNAs (pre-tRNAs). In Bacteria, RNase P is composed of a catalytic RNA (PRNA) and a protein subunit (P protein) necessary for function in vivo. The P protein enhances pre-tRNA affinity, selectivity, and cleavage efficiency, as well as modulates the cation requirement for RNase P function. Bacterial P proteins share little sequence conservation although the protein structures are homologous. Here we combine s...

  6. Diverse endonucleolytic cleavage sites in the mammalian transcriptome depend upon microRNAs, Drosha, and additional nucleases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karginov, Fedor V; Cheloufi, Sihem; Chong, Mark M W; Stark, Alexander; Smith, Andrew D; Hannon, Gregory J

    2010-06-25

    The life span of a mammalian mRNA is determined, in part, by the binding of regulatory proteins and small RNA-guided complexes. The conserved endonuclease activity of Argonaute2 requires extensive complementarity between a small RNA and its target and is not used by animal microRNAs, which pair with their targets imperfectly. Here we investigate the endonucleolytic function of Ago2 and other nucleases by transcriptome-wide profiling of mRNA cleavage products retaining 5' phosphate groups in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). We detect a prominent signature of Ago2-dependent cleavage events and validate several such targets. Unexpectedly, a broader class of Ago2-independent cleavage sites is also observed, indicating participation of additional nucleases in site-specific mRNA cleavage. Within this class, we identify a cohort of Drosha-dependent mRNA cleavage events that functionally regulate mRNA levels in mESCs, including one in the Dgcr8 mRNA. Together, these results highlight the underappreciated role of endonucleolytic cleavage in controlling mRNA fates in mammals. PMID:20620951

  7. Structure of the catalytic domain of the hepatitis C virus NS2-3 protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz,I.; Marcotrigiano, J.; Dentzer, T.; Rice, C.

    2006-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus is a major global health problem affecting an estimated 170 million people worldwide. Chronic infection is common and can lead to cirrhosis and liver cancer. There is no vaccine available and current therapies have met with limited success. The viral RNA genome encodes a polyprotein that includes two proteases essential for virus replication. The NS2-3 protease mediates a single cleavage at the NS2/NS3 junction, whereas the NS3-4A protease cleaves at four downstream sites in the polyprotein. NS3-4A is characterized as a serine protease with a chymotrypsin-like fold, but the enzymatic mechanism of the NS2-3 protease remains unresolved. Here we report the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the NS2-3 protease at 2.3 Angstroms resolution. The structure reveals a dimeric cysteine protease with two composite active sites. For each active site, the catalytic histidine and glutamate residues are contributed by one monomer, and the nucleophilic cysteine by the other. The carboxy-terminal residues remain coordinated in the two active sites, predicting an inactive post-cleavage form. Proteolysis through formation of a composite active site occurs in the context of the viral polyprotein expressed in mammalian cells. These features offer unexpected insights into polyprotein processing by hepatitis C virus and new opportunities for antiviral drug design.

  8. Sulforaphane induces CYP1A1 mRNA, protein, and catalytic activity levels via an AhR-dependent pathway in murine hepatoma Hepa 1c1c7 and human HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar-Mohamed, Anwar; El-Kadi, Ayman O S

    2009-03-01

    Recent reports have proposed that some naturally occurring phytochemicals can function as anticancer agents mainly through inducing phase II drug detoxification enzymes. Of these phytochemicals, isothiocyanates sulforaphane (SUL), present in broccoli, is by far the most extensively studied. In spite of its positive effect on phase II drug metabolizing enzymes, its effect on the phase I bioactivating enzyme cytochrome P450 1a1 (Cyp1a1) is still a matter of debate. As a first step to investigate this effect, Hepa 1c1c7 and HepG2 cells were treated with various concentration of SUL. Our results showed that SUL-induced CYP1A1 mRNA in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, this induction was further reflected on the protein and catalytic activity levels. Investigating the effect of SUL at the transcriptional level revealed that SUL increases the Cyp1a1 mRNA as early as 1h. The RNA polymerase inhibitor actinomycin D (Act-D) completely abolished the SUL-induced Cyp1a1 mRNA. Furthermore, SUL successfully activated AhR transformation and its subsequent binding to the XRE. At the post-transcriptional level, SUL did not affect the levels of existing Cyp1a1 mRNA transcripts. This is the first demonstration that the broccoli-derived SUL can directly induce Cyp1a1 gene expression in an AhR-dependent manner and represents a novel mechanism by which SUL induces this enzyme. PMID:19013013

  9. Expression and in vitro cleavage activity of anti-caspase-7 hammerhead ribozymes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Qing Xie; Xia-Qiu Zhou; Shan Jiang; You-Xin Jin

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To prepare hammerhead ribozymes against mouse caspase-7 and identify their cleavage activityin vitro, in order to select a ribozyme with specific cleavage activity against mouse caspase-7 as a potential gene therapy for apoptosis-related diseases.METHODS: Anti-caspase-7 ribozymes targeting sites 333and 394 (named Rz333 and Rz394) were designed by computer software, and their DNA sequences encoding ribozymes were synthesized. Caspase-7 DNA sequence was acquired by RT-PCR. Ribozymes and caspase-7 DNA obtained byin vitro transcription were cloned into pBSKneo U6' and pGEM-T vectors, respectively. The cleavage activity of ribozymes against mouse caspase-7 was identified by cleavage experimentsin vitro.RESULTS: Rz333 and Rz394 were designed and their DNA sequences were synthesized respectively. The expression vector of caspase-7 and plasmids containing Rz333 and Rz394 were reconstructed successfully. Ribozymes and caspase-7 mRNA were expressed byin vitro transcription.In vitro cleavage experiment showed that 243-nt and 744-nt segments were produced after caspase-7 mRNA was mixed with Rz333 in equivalent, and the cleavage efficiency was 67.98%. No cleaved segment was observed when caspase-7 mRNA was mixed with Rz394.CONCLUSION: Rz333 can site-specific cleave mouse caspase-7 mRNA, and it shows a potential for gene therapy of apoptosis-related diseases by down-regulating gene expression of caspase-7.

  10. Silencing expression of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase by small interfering RNA sensitizes human cells for radiation-induced chromosome damage, cell killing, and mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yuanlin; Zhang, Qinming; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Liber, Howard L.; Bedford, Joel S.

    2002-01-01

    Targeted gene silencing in mammalian cells by RNA interference (RNAi) using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) was recently described by Elbashir et al. (S. M. Elbashir et al., Nature (Lond.), 411: 494-498, 2001). We have used this methodology in several human cell strains to reduce expression of the Prkdc (DNA-PKcs) gene coding for the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) that is involved in the nonhomologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks. We have also demonstrated a radiosensitization for several phenotypic endpoints of radiation damage. In low-passage normal human fibroblasts, siRNA knock-down of DNA-PKcs resulted in a reduced capacity for restitution of radiation-induced interphase chromosome breaks as measured by premature chromosome condensation, an increased yield of acentric chromosome fragments at the first postirradiation mitosis, and an increased radiosensitivity for cell killing. For three strains of related human lymphoblasts, DNA-PKcs-targeted siRNA transfection resulted in little or no increase in radiosensitivity with respect to cell killing, a 1.5-fold decrease in induced mutant yield in TK6- and p53-null NH32 cells, but about a 2-fold increase in induced mutant yield in p53-mutant WTK1 cells at both the hypoxanthine quanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) and the thymidine kinase loci.

  11. The catalytic residues of Tn3 resolvase

    OpenAIRE

    Olorunniji, F.J.; Stark, W M

    2009-01-01

    To characterize the residues that participate in the catalysis of DNA cleavage and rejoining by the site-specific recombinase Tn3 resolvase, we mutated conserved polar or charged residues in the catalytic domain of an activated resolvase variant. We analysed the effects of mutations at 14 residues on proficiency in binding to the recombination site ('site I'), formation of a synaptic complex between two site Is, DNA cleavage and recombination. Mutations of Y6, R8, S10, D36, R68 and R71 result...

  12. Sequence-Specific Ultrasonic Cleavage of DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Grokhovsky, Sergei L.; Il'icheva, Irina A.; Nechipurenko, Dmitry Yu.; Golovkin, Michail V.; Panchenko, Larisa A.; Polozov, Robert V.; Nechipurenko, Yury D.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the phenomenon of ultrasonic cleavage of DNA by analyzing a large set of cleavage patterns of DNA restriction fragments using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The cleavage intensity of individual phosphodiester bonds was found to depend on the nucleotide sequence and the position of the bond with respect to the ends of the fragment. The relative intensities of cleavage of the central phosphodiester bond in 16 dinucleotides and 256 tetranucleotides were determined by multiva...

  13. A Potential Protein-RNA Recognition Event Along the RISC-Loading Pathway from the Structure of A. aeolicus Argonaute with Externally Bound siRNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan,Y.; Pei, Y.; Chen, H.; Tuschl, T.; Patel, D.

    2006-01-01

    Argonaute proteins are key components of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC). They provide both architectural and catalytic functionalities associated with small interfering RNA (siRNA) guide strand recognition and subsequent guide strand-mediated cleavage of complementary mRNAs. We report on the 3.0 {angstrom} crystal structures of 22-mer and 26-mer siRNAs bound to Aquifex aeolicus Argonaute (Aa-Ago), where one 2 nt 3' overhang of the siRNA inserts into a cavity positioned on the outer surface of the PAZ-containing lobe of the bilobal Aa-Ago architecture. The first overhang nucleotide stacks over a tyrosine ring, while the second overhang nucleotide, together with the intervening sugar-phosphate backbone, inserts into a preformed surface cavity. Photochemical crosslinking studies on Aa-Ago with 5-iodoU-labeled single-stranded siRNA and siRNA duplex provide support for this externally bound siRNA-Aa-Ago complex. The structure and biochemical data together provide insights into a protein-RNA recognition event potentially associated with the RISC-loading pathway.

  14. Association of polyadenylation cleavage factor I with U1 snRNP

    OpenAIRE

    Awasthi, Sita; Alwine, James C.

    2003-01-01

    Splicing and polyadenylation factors interact for the control of polyadenylation and the coupling of splicing and polyadenylation. We document an interaction between the U1 snRNP and mammalian polyadenylation cleavage factor I (CF Im), one of several polyadenylation factors needed for the cleavage of the pre-mRNA at the polyadenylation site. Sucrose density gradient centrifugation demonstrated that CF Im separated into two fractions, a light fraction which contained the known CF Im subunits (...

  15. Controlling mRNA stability and translation with the CRISPR endoribonuclease Csy4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchardt, Erin K; Vandoros, Leonidas A; Huang, Michael; Lackey, Patrick E; Marzluff, William F; Asokan, Aravind

    2015-11-01

    The bacterial CRISPR endoribonuclease Csy4 has recently been described as a potential RNA processing tool. Csy4 recognizes substrate RNA through a specific 28-nt hairpin sequence and cleaves at the 3' end of the stem. To further explore applicability in mammalian cells, we introduced this hairpin at various locations in mRNAs derived from reporter transgenes and systematically evaluated the effects of Csy4-mediated processing on transgene expression. Placing the hairpin in the 5' UTR or immediately after the start codon resulted in efficient degradation of target mRNA by Csy4 and knockdown of transgene expression by 20- to 40-fold. When the hairpin was incorporated in the 3' UTR prior to the poly(A) signal, the mRNA was cleaved, but only a modest decrease in transgene expression (∼2.5-fold) was observed. In the absence of a poly(A) tail, Csy4 rescued the target mRNA substrate from degradation, resulting in protein expression, which suggests that the cleaved mRNA was successfully translated. In contrast, neither catalytically inactive (H29A) nor binding-deficient (R115A/R119A) Csy4 mutants were able to exert any of the effects described above. Generation of a similar 3' end by RNase P-mediated cleavage was unable to rescue transgene expression independent of Csy4. These results support the idea that the selective generation of the Csy4/hairpin complex resulting from cleavage of target mRNA might serve as a functional poly(A)/poly(A) binding protein (PABP) surrogate, stabilizing the mRNA and supporting translation. Although the exact mechanism(s) remain to be determined, our studies expand the potential utility of CRISPR nucleases as tools for controlling mRNA stability and translation. PMID:26354771

  16. Centralspindlin in Rappaport's cleavage signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishima, Masanori

    2016-05-01

    Cleavage furrow in animal cell cytokinesis is formed by cortical constriction driven by contraction of an actomyosin network activated by Rho GTPase. Although the role of the mitotic apparatus in furrow induction has been well established, there remain discussions about the detailed molecular mechanisms of the cleavage signaling. While experiments in large echinoderm embryos highlighted the role of astral microtubules, data in smaller cells indicate the role of central spindle. Centralspindlin is a constitutive heterotetramer of MKLP1 kinesin and the non-motor CYK4 subunit and plays crucial roles in formation of the central spindle and recruitment of the downstream cytokinesis factors including ECT2, the major activator of Rho during cytokinesis, to the site of division. Recent reports have revealed a role of this centralspindlin-ECT2 pathway in furrow induction both by the central spindle and by the astral microtubules. Here, a unified view of the stimulation of cortical contractility by this pathway is discussed. Cytokinesis, the division of the whole cytoplasm, is an essential process for cell proliferation and embryonic development. In animal cells, cytokinesis is executed using a contractile network of actin filaments driven by a myosin-II motor that constricts the cell cortex (cleavage furrow ingression) into a narrow channel between the two daughter cells, which is resolved by scission (abscission) [1-3]. The anaphase-specific organization of the mitotic apparatus (MA, spindle with chromosomes plus asters) positions the cleavage furrow and plays a major role in spatial coupling between mitosis and cytokinesis [4-6]. The nucleus and chromosomes are dispensable for furrow specification [7-10], although they contribute to persistent furrowing and robust completion in some cell types [11,12]. Likewise, centrosomes are not essential for cytokinesis, but they contribute to the general fidelity of cell division [10,13-15]. Here, classical models of cleavage furrow

  17. A mutational study of the site-specific cleavage of EC83, a multicopy single-stranded DNA (msDNA): nucleotides at the msDNA stem are important for its cleavage.

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, K.(Korea University, Seoul, 136-713, South Korea); D. Jeong; Lim, D.

    1997-01-01

    Multicopy single-stranded DNA (msDNA) molecules consist of single-stranded DNA covalently linked to RNA. Such molecules are encoded by genetic elements called retrons. Unlike other retrons, retron EC83 isolated from Escherichia coli 161 produces RNA-free msDNA by site-specific cleavage of msDNA at 5'-TTGA/A-3', where the slash indicates the cleavage site. In order to investigate factors responsible for the msDNA cleavage, retron EC83 was treated with hydroxylamine and colonies were screened f...

  18. Development of an RNA-based theophylline-specific microarray biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Katherine M.

    We are developing an extremely sensitive and compact biosensor that is adaptable to a variety of target analytes. Hammerhead ribozymes have been engineered such that they rearrange from a catalytically inactive to an active conformation upon binding to a target molecule. A donor-acceptor fluorophore pair is coupled to the substrate RNA of such an aptamer, to form a complex referred to as an aptazyme, to monitor real-time cleavage activity in a fluid environment. The fluorophores interact by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) until binding of the target molecule, when the FRET signal breaks down as the substrate is cleaved and the products dissociate. FRET assays with immobilized aptazymes and using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy on the single-molecule scale are presented showing an enhancement of substrate cleavage in the presence of theophylline over background. The aptazyme is hybridized onto a DNA microarray and incorporated into a chip specifically designed to allow for measurement in a controlled fluid environment. The use of these microarrays allows for either one spot, or a series of spots, to be addressed independently within the biosensor. This allows for multiple analytes to be tested simultaneously. An enhancement in the substrate cleavage is again observed in the presence of theophylline. Results are presented toward the characterization of a theophylline-specific aptamer-based biosensor using this RNA microarray platform and analogous measurement techniques.

  19. Structure of the Cmr2 Subunit of the CRISPR-Cas RNA Silencing Complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocozaki, Alexis I.; Ramia, Nancy F.; Shao, Yaming; Hale, Caryn R.; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.; Li, Hong (FSU); (Georgia)

    2012-08-10

    Cmr2 is the largest and an essential subunit of a CRISPR RNA-Cas protein complex (the Cmr complex) that cleaves foreign RNA to protect prokaryotes from invading genetic elements. Cmr2 is thought to be the catalytic subunit of the effector complex because of its N-terminal HD nuclease domain. Here, however, we report that the HD domain of Cmr2 is not required for cleavage by the complex in vitro. The 2.3 {angstrom} crystal structure of Pyrococcus furiosus Cmr2 (lacking the HD domain) reveals two adenylyl cyclase-like and two {alpha}-helical domains. The adenylyl cyclase-like domains are arranged as in homodimeric adenylyl cyclases and bind ADP and divalent metals. However, mutagenesis studies show that the metal- and ADP-coordinating residues of Cmr2 are also not critical for cleavage by the complex. Our findings suggest that another component provides the catalytic function and that the essential role by Cmr2 does not require the identified ADP- or metal-binding or HD domains in vitro.

  20. Sequence features associated with the cleavage efficiency of CRISPR/Cas9 system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxi; Homma, Ayaka; Sayadi, Jamasb; Yang, Shu; Ohashi, Jun; Takumi, Toru

    2016-01-01

    The CRISPR-Cas9 system has recently emerged as a versatile tool for biological and medical research. In this system, a single guide RNA (sgRNA) directs the endonuclease Cas9 to a targeted DNA sequence for site-specific manipulation. In addition to this targeting function, the sgRNA has also been shown to play a role in activating the endonuclease activity of Cas9. This dual function of the sgRNA likely underlies observations that different sgRNAs have varying on-target activities. Currently, our understanding of the relationship between sequence features of sgRNAs and their on-target cleavage efficiencies remains limited, largely due to difficulties in assessing the cleavage capacity of a large number of sgRNAs. In this study, we evaluated the cleavage activities of 218 sgRNAs using in vitro Surveyor assays. We found that nucleotides at both PAM-distal and PAM-proximal regions of the sgRNA are significantly correlated with on-target efficiency. Furthermore, we also demonstrated that the genomic context of the targeted DNA, the GC percentage, and the secondary structure of sgRNA are critical factors contributing to cleavage efficiency. In summary, our study reveals important parameters for the design of sgRNAs with high on-target efficiencies, especially in the context of high throughput applications. PMID:26813419

  1. Nucleolar protein PinX1p regulates telomerase by sequestering its protein catalytic subunit in an inactive complex lacking telomerase RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Jue; Elizabeth H. Blackburn

    2004-01-01

    Human TRF1-binding protein PinX1 inhibits telomerase activity. Here we report that overexpression of yeast PinX1p (yPinX1p) results in shortened telomeres and decreased in vitro telomerase activity. yPinX1p coimmunoprecipitated withyeast telomerase protein Est2p even in cells lacking the telomerase RNA TLC1, or the telomerase-associated proteins Est1p and Est3p. Est2p regions required for binding to yPinX1p or TLC1 were similar. Furthermore, we found two distinct Est2p complexes exist, contai...

  2. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the catalytic domain of pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase from the methanogenic archaeon Methanosarcina mazei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) from M. mazei has been overexpressed in an N-terminally truncated form PylRS(c270) in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. Pyrrolysyl-tRNA synthetase (PylRS) from Methanosarcina mazei was overexpressed in an N-terminally truncated form PylRS(c270) in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity and crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using polyethylene glycol as a precipitant. The native PylRS(c270) crystals in complex with an ATP analogue belonged to space group P64, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 104.88, c = 70.43 Å, α = β = 90, γ = 120°, and diffracted to 1.9 Å resolution. The asymmetric unit contains one molecule of PylRS(c270). Selenomethionine-substituted protein crystals were prepared in order to solve the structure by the MAD phasing method

  3. Generation of siRNA Nanosheets for Efficient RNA Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyejin; Lee, Jae Sung; Lee, Jong Bum

    2016-04-01

    After the discovery of small interference RNA (siRNA), nanostructured siRNA delivery systems have been introduced to achieve an efficient regulation of the target gene expression. Here we report a new siRNA-generating two dimensional nanostructure in a formation of nanosized sheet. Inspired by tunable mechanical and functional properties of the previously reported RNA membrane, siRNA nanosized sheets (siRNA-NS) with multiple Dicer cleavage sites were prepared. The siRNA-NS has two dimensional structure, providing a large surface area for Dicer to cleave the siRNA-NS for the generation of functional siRNAs. Furthermore, downregulation of the cellular target gene expression was achieved by delivery of siRNA-NS without chemical modification of RNA strands or conjugation to other substances.

  4. Sequence Features of Drosha and Dicer Cleavage Sites Affect the Complexity of IsomiRs

    OpenAIRE

    Julia Starega-Roslan; Witkos, Tomasz M.; Paulina Galka-Marciniak; Krzyzosiak, Wlodzimierz J.

    2015-01-01

    The deep-sequencing of small RNAs has revealed that different numbers and proportions of miRNA variants called isomiRs are formed from single miRNA genes and that this effect is attributable mainly to imprecise cleavage by Drosha and Dicer. Factors that influence the degree of cleavage precision of Drosha and Dicer are under investigation, and their identification may improve our understanding of the mechanisms by which cells modulate the regulatory potential of miRNAs. In this study, we focu...

  5. Thermodynamic Strategies for C-O Bond Formation and Cleavage via Tandem Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohr, Tracy L; Li, Zhi; Marks, Tobin J

    2016-05-17

    To reduce global reliance on fossil fuels, new renewable sources of energy that can be used with the current infrastructure are required. Biomass represents a major source of renewable carbon based fuel; however, the high oxygen content (∼40%) limits its use as a conventional fuel. To utilize biomass as an energy source, not only with current infrastructure, but for maximum energy return, the oxygen content must be reduced. One method to achieve this is to develop selective catalytic methods to cleave C-O bonds commonly found in biomass (aliphatic and aromatic ethers and esters) for the eventual removal of oxygen in the form of volatile H2O or carboxylic acids. Once selective methods of C-O cleavage are understood and perfected, application to processing real biomass feedstocks such as lignin can be undertaken. This Laboratory previously reported that recyclable "green" lanthanide triflates are excellent catalysts for C-O bond-forming hydroalkoxylation reactions. Based on the virtues of microscopic reversibility, the same lanthanide triflate catalyst should catalyze the reverse C-O cleavage process, retrohydroalkoxylation, to yield an alcohol and an alkene. However, ether C-O bond-forming (retrohydroalkoxylation) to form an alcohol and alkene is endothermic. Guided by quantum chemical analysis, our strategy is to couple endothermic, in tandem, ether C-O bond cleavage with exothermic alkene hydrogenation, thereby leveraging the combined catalytic cycles thermodynamically to form an overall energetically favorable C-O cleavage reaction. This Account reviews recent developments on thermodynamically leveraged tandem catalysis for ether and more recently, ester C-O bond cleavage undertaken at Northwestern University. First, the fundamentals of lanthanide-catalyzed hydroelementation are reviewed, with particular focus on ether C-O bond formation (hydroalkoxylation). Next, the reverse C-O cleavage/retrohydroalkoxylation processes enabled by tandem catalysis are

  6. Cleavage speed and implantation potential of early-cleavage embryos in IVF or ICSI cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Meng-Ju; Lee, Robert Kuo-Kuang; Lin, Ming-Huei; Hwu, Yuh-Ming

    2012-01-01

    We examined whether there is a correlation among early embryo cleavage, speed of cleavage, and implantation potential for in-vitro fertilization (IVF) treatment and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). This retrospective study examined 112 cycles of IVF and 82 cycles of ICSI in patients less than 40 years of age. Early cleavage was defined as embryonic mitosis occurring 25–27 h after insemination. These day-3 embryos were then grouped according to cleavage speed (rapid, normal, and slow) ...

  7. The solvent effect on the electrocatalytic cleavage of carbon-halogen bonds on Ag and Au

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years it has been shown in detail how the electrocatalytic cleavage of carbon-halogen bonds is modulated by (a) the stepwise or concerted nature of the dissociative electron-transfer mechanism, which is influenced by the nature of the electrode surface, the type of halogen atom and the molecular structure of RX as a whole, and (b) the double-layer structure (as a function of the nature and bulkiness of the supporting electrolyte ions). In order to both complete and support the interpretative scheme thus developed, this work is focused on the solvent role. When one compares aprotic with protic organic solvents after appropriate intersolvental normalization, interesting peculiarities emerge, especially concerning protic media. Solvent proticity deeply affects both the reaction mechanism (on both non-catalytic and catalytic electrodes) and the extent of the catalytic effects. These items are discussed on the basis of a complete investigation carried out with a carefully controlled experimental protocol on two chloride and bromide couples, one aromatic and one aliphatic, representative of stepwise and concerted mechanisms, respectively, in four aprotic and four protic solvents, on both non−catalytic GC and catalytic Ag and Au electrodes. The results are discussed in the framework of a recently developed interpretative scheme of the carbon-halogen cleavage mechanism

  8. Autosomal-Recessive Mutations in the tRNA Splicing Endonuclease Subunit TSEN15 Cause Pontocerebellar Hypoplasia and Progressive Microcephaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuss, Martin W; Sultan, Tipu; James, Kiely N; Rosti, Rasim O; Scott, Eric; Musaev, Damir; Furia, Bansri; Reis, André; Sticht, Heinrich; Al-Owain, Mohammed; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Reuter, Miriam S; Abou Jamra, Rami; Trotta, Christopher R; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2016-07-01

    The tRNA splicing endonuclease is a highly evolutionarily conserved protein complex, involved in the cleavage of intron-containing tRNAs. In human it consists of the catalytic subunits TSEN2 and TSEN34, as well as the non-catalytic TSEN54 and TSEN15. Recessive mutations in the corresponding genes of the first three are known to cause pontocerebellar hypoplasia (PCH) types 2A-C, 4, and 5. Here, we report three homozygous TSEN15 variants that cause a milder version of PCH2. The affected individuals showed progressive microcephaly, delayed developmental milestones, intellectual disability, and, in two out of four cases, epilepsy. None, however, displayed the central visual failure seen in PCH case subjects where other subunits of the TSEN are mutated, and only one was affected by the extensive motor defects that are typical in other forms of PCH2. The three amino acid substitutions impacted the protein level of TSEN15 and the stoichiometry of the interacting subunits in different ways, but all resulted in an almost complete loss of in vitro tRNA cleavage activity. Taken together, our results demonstrate that mutations in any known subunit of the TSEN complex can cause PCH and progressive microcephaly, emphasizing the importance of its function during brain development. PMID:27392077

  9. Fracto—emissions in Catastrophic Cleavage Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HonglaiTAN; WeiYANG

    1996-01-01

    Fracto-emissions accompanying crack propagation are observed in the recent experiments.The energy impulses during and after fracture stimulate the fracto-emissions.Model concerning atomic scale cleavage processes is proposed to formulate a catastrophic fracure theory relevant to these phenomena.A criterion for catastrophic jump of the cleavage potential is applied to representative crystals.

  10. Multiple RNA processing defects and impaired chloroplast function in plants deficient in the organellar protein-only RNase P enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenbin Zhou

    Full Text Available Transfer RNA (tRNA precursors undergo endoribonucleolytic processing of their 5' and 3' ends. 5' cleavage of the precursor transcript is performed by ribonuclease P (RNase P. While in most organisms RNase P is a ribonucleoprotein that harbors a catalytically active RNA component, human mitochondria and the chloroplasts (plastids and mitochondria of seed plants possess protein-only RNase P enzymes (PRORPs. The plant organellar PRORP (PRORP1 has been characterized to some extent in vitro and by transient gene silencing, but the molecular, phenotypic and physiological consequences of its down-regulation in stable transgenic plants have not been assessed. Here we have addressed the function of the dually targeted organellar PRORP enzyme in vivo by generating stably transformed Arabidopsis plants in which expression of the PRORP1 gene was suppressed by RNA interference (RNAi. PRORP1 knock-down lines show defects in photosynthesis, while mitochondrial respiration is not appreciably affected. In both plastids and mitochondria, the effects of PRORP1 knock-down on the processing of individual tRNA species are highly variable. The drastic reduction in the levels of mature plastid tRNA-Phe(GAA and tRNA-Arg(ACG suggests that these two tRNA species limit plastid gene expression in the PRORP1 mutants and, hence, are causally responsible for the mutant phenotype.

  11. RNA decay by messenger RNA interferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Mikkel; Overgaard, Martin; Winther, Kristoffer Skovbo; Gerdes, Kenn

    2008-01-01

    Two abundant toxin-antitoxin (TA) gene families, relBE and mazEF, encode mRNA cleaving enzymes whose ectopic overexpression abruptly inhibits translation and thereby induces a bacteriostatic condition. Here we describe and discuss protocols for the overproduction, purification, and analysis of mRNA...... cleaving enzymes such as RelE of Escherichia coli and the corresponding antitoxin RelB. In particular, we describe a set of plasmid vectors useful for the detailed analysis of cleavage sites in model mRNAs....

  12. Microstructure and cleavage in lath martensitic steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we discuss the microstructure of lath martensitic steels and the mechanisms by which it controls cleavage fracture. The specific experimental example is a 9Ni (9 wt% Ni) steel annealed to have a large prior austenite grain size, then examined and tested in the as-quenched condition to produce a relatively coarse lath martensite. The microstructure is shown to approximate the recently identified ‘classic’ lath martensite structure: prior austenite grains are divided into packets, packets are subdivided into blocks, and blocks contain interleaved laths whose variants are the two Kurjumov–Sachs relations that share the same Bain axis of the transformation. When the steel is fractured in brittle cleavage, the laths in the block share {100} cleavage planes and cleave as a unit. However, cleavage cracks deflect or blunt at the boundaries between blocks with different Bain axes. It follows that, as predicted, the block size governs the effective grain size for cleavage. (paper)

  13. Motoneurons secrete angiogenin to induce RNA cleavage in astroglia.

    OpenAIRE

    Skorupa, Alexandra; King, Matthew A; Aparicio, Isabela M.; Dussmann, Heiko; Coughlan, Karen; Breen, Bridget; Kieran, Dairin; Concannon, Caoimhin G.; Marin, Philippe; Prehn, Jochen HM

    2012-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an incurable neurodegenerative disorder affecting motoneurons. Mutations in angiogenin, encoding a member of the pancreatic RNase A superfamily, segregate with ALS. We previously demonstrated that angiogenin administration shows promise as a neuroprotective therapeutic in studies using transgenic ALS mice and primary motoneuron cultures. Its mechanism of action and target cells in the spinal cord, however, are largely unknown. Using mixed motoneuron cult...

  14. Cleavage of Maize chlorotic dwarf virus R78 protein by the viral 3C protease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maize chlorotic dwarf virus (MCDV) is a member of the genus Waikavirus and encodes a 389 kDa polyprotein from its 11784 nt genomic RNA. Like many polyprotein-encoding viruses, MCDV contains a 3C-like virus protease that is presumably responsible for maturation cleavages of the polyprotein. However,...

  15. Chemical evolution of RNA under hydrothermal conditions and the role of thermal copolymers of amino acids for the prebiotic degradation and formation of RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, K.; Nagahama, M.; Kuranoue, K.

    2005-01-01

    The roles of thermal copolymers of amino acids (TCAA) were studied for the prebiotic degradation of RNA. A weak catalytic ability of TCAA consisted of Glu, L-Ala, L-Val, L-Glu, L-Asp, and optionally L-His was detected for the cleavage of the ribose phosphodiester bond of a tetranucleotide (5'-dCrCdGdG) in aqueous solution at 80 degees C. The rate constants of the disappearance of 5'-dCrCdGdG were determined in aqueous solutions using different pH buffer and TCAA. The degradation rates were enhanced 1.3-3.0 times in the presence of TCAA at pH 7.5 and 8.0 at 80 degrees C, while the hydrolysis of oligoguanylate (oligo(G)) was accelerated about 1.6 times at pH 8.0. A weak inhibitory activity for the cleavage of oligo(G) was detected in the presence of 0.055 M TCAA-Std. On the other hand, our recent study on the influences of TCAA for the template-directed reaction of oligo(G) on a polycytidylic acid template showed that TCAA has an acceleration activity for the degradation of the activated nucleotide monomer and an acceleration activity for the formation of G5' ppG capped oligo(G). This series of studies suggest that efficient and selective catalytic or inhibitory activities for either the degradation or formation of RNA under hydrothermal conditions could have hardly emerged from the simple thermal condensation products of amino acids. A scenario is going to be deduced on the chemical evolution of enzymatic activities and RNA molecules concerning hydrothermal earth conditions. c2005 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Analyzing MiRNA-LncRNA Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskevopoulou, Maria D; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are noncoding transcripts usually longer than 200 nts that have recently emerged as one of the largest and significantly diverse RNA families. The biological role and functions of lncRNAs are still mostly uncharacterized. Their target-mimetic, sponge/decoy function on microRNAs was recently uncovered. miRNAs are a class of noncoding RNA species (~22 nts) that play a central role in posttranscriptional regulation of protein coding genes by mRNA cleavage, direct translational repression and/or mRNA destabilization. LncRNAs can act as miRNA sponges, reducing their regulatory effect on mRNAs. This function introduces an extra layer of complexity in the miRNA-target interaction network. This chapter focuses on the study of miRNA-lncRNA interactions with either in silico or experimentally supported analyses. The proposed methodologies can be appropriately adapted in order to become the backbone of advanced multistep functional miRNA analyses. PMID:26721498

  17. Crystal Structure and Activity of the Endoribonuclease Domain of the piRNA Pathway Factor Maelstrom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Matsumoto

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs protect the genome from transposons in animal gonads. Maelstrom (Mael is an evolutionarily conserved protein, composed of a high-mobility group (HMG domain and a MAEL domain, and is essential for piRNA-mediated transcriptional transposon silencing in various species, such as Drosophila and mice. However, its structure and biochemical function have remained elusive. Here, we report the crystal structure of the MAEL domain from Drosophila melanogaster Mael, at 1.6 Å resolution. The structure reveals that the MAEL domain has an RNase H-like fold but lacks canonical catalytic residues conserved among RNase H-like superfamily nucleases. Our biochemical analyses reveal that the MAEL domain exhibits single-stranded RNA (ssRNA-specific endonuclease activity. Our cell-based analyses further indicate that ssRNA cleavage activity appears dispensable for piRNA-mediated transcriptional transposon silencing in Drosophila. Our findings provide clues toward understanding the multiple roles of Mael in the piRNA pathway.

  18. DSP-PP precursor protein cleavage by tolloid-related-1 protein and by bone morphogenetic protein-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena H Ritchie

    Full Text Available Dentin sialoprotein (DSP and phosphophoryn (PP, acidic proteins critical to dentin mineralization, are translated from a single transcript as a DSP-PP precursor that undergoes specific proteolytic processing to generate DSP and PP. The cleavage mechanism continues to be controversial, in part because of the difficulty of obtaining DSP-PP from mammalian cells and dentin matrix. We have infected Sf9 cells with a recombinant baculovirus to produce large amounts of secreted DSP-PP(240, a variant form of rat DSP-PP. Mass spectrometric analysis shows that DSP-PP(240 secreted by Sf9 cells undergoes specific cleavage at the site predicted from the N-terminal sequence of PP extracted from dentin matrix: SMQG(447↓D(448DPN. DSP-PP(240 is cleaved after secretion by a zinc-dependent activity secreted by Sf9 cells, generating DSP(430 and PP(240 products that are stable in the medium. DSP-PP processing activity is constitutively secreted by Sf9 cells, but secretion is diminished 3 days after infection. Using primers corresponding to the highly conserved catalytic domain of Drosophila melanogaster tolloid (a mammalian BMP1 homolog, we isolated a partial cDNA for a Spodopotera frugiperda tolloid-related-1 protein (TLR1 that is 78% identical to Drosophila TLR1 but only 65% identical to Drosophila tolloid. Tlr1 mRNA decreased rapidly in Sf9 cells after baculovirus infection and was undetectable 4d after infection, paralleling the observed decrease in secretion of the DSP-PP(240 processing activity after infection. Human BMP1 is more similar to Sf9 and Drosophila TLR1 than to tolloid, and Sf9 TLR1 is more similar to BMP1 than to other mammalian homologs. Recombinant human BMP1 correctly processed baculovirus-expressed DSP-PP(240 in a dose-dependent manner. Together, these data suggest that the physiologically accurate cleavage of mammalian DSP-PP(240 in the Sf9 cell system represents the action of a conserved processing enzyme and support the proposed role of BMP

  19. Tailing cDNAs with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase in RT-PCR assays to identify ribozyme cleavage products.

    OpenAIRE

    Albuquerque-Silva, J; Houard, S.; Bollen, A.

    1998-01-01

    Polytailing a cDNA with terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase (TdT) results in the addition of a homopolymeric sequence at its 3'-end. Here we describe the use of tailing in competitive RT-PCR assays to evaluate cleavage efficiency of ribozymes. Using a system that perfectly mimics intracellular cleavage, we were able to detect as few as 1% of cleaved moieties. Furthermore, employing primers overlapping the junction between tails and the cleaved RNA moiety in non-competitive assays, the sensit...

  20. Experiments on schistosity and slaty cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, George Ferdinand

    1904-01-01

    Schistosity as a structure is important, and it is a part of the business of geologists to explain its origin. Slaty cleavage has further and greater importance as a possible tectonic feature. Scarcely a great mountain range exists, or has existed, along the course of which belts of slaty rock are not found, the dip of the cleavage usually approaching verticality. Are these slate belts equivalent to minutely distributed step faults of great total throw, or do they indicate compression perpendicular to the cleavage without attendant relative dislocation? Evidently the answer to this question is of first importance in the interpretation of orogenic phenomena.

  1. Modeling the Complete Catalytic Cycle of Aspartoacylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kots, Ekaterina D; Khrenova, Maria G; Lushchekina, Sofya V; Varfolomeev, Sergei D; Grigorenko, Bella L; Nemukhin, Alexander V

    2016-05-12

    The complete catalytic cycle of aspartoacylase (ASPA), a zinc-dependent enzyme responsible for cleavage of N-acetyl-l-aspartate, is characterized by the methods of molecular modeling. The reaction energy profile connecting the enzyme-substrate (ES) and the enzyme-product (EP) complexes is constructed by the quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) method assisted by the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations with the QM/MM potentials. Starting from the crystal structure of ASPA complexed with the intermediate analogue, the minimum-energy geometry configurations and the corresponding transition states are located. The stages of substrate binding to the enzyme active site and release of the products are modeled by MD calculations with the replica-exchange umbrella sampling technique. It is shown that the first reaction steps, nucleophilic attack of a zinc-bound nucleophilic water molecule at the carbonyl carbon and the amide bond cleavage, are consistent with the glutamate-assisted mechanism hypothesized for the zinc-dependent hydrolases. The stages of formation of the products, acetate and l-aspartate, and regeneration of the enzyme are characterized for the first time. The constructed free energy diagram from the reactants to the products suggests that the enzyme regeneration, but not the nucleophilic attack of the catalytic water molecule, corresponds to the rate-determining stage of the full catalytic cycle of ASPA. PMID:27089954

  2. Efficient and stable expression of GFP through Wheat streak mosaic virus-based vectors in cereal hosts using a range of cleavage sites: Formation of dense fluorescent aggregates for sensitive virus tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    A series of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV)-based expression vectors were developed by engineering cycle 3 GFP (GFP) cistron between P1 and HC-Pro cistrons with several catalytic/cleavage peptides at the C-terminus of GFP. WSMV-GFP vectors with the Foot-and-mouth disease virus 1D/2A or 2A catalytic...

  3. Cleavage site analysis in picornaviral polyproteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blom, Nikolaj; Hansen, Jan; Blaas, Dieter;

    1996-01-01

    Picornaviral proteinases are responsible for maturation cleavages of the viral polyprotein, but also catalyze the degradation of cellular targets. Using graphical visualization techniques and neural network algorithms, we have investigated the sequence specificity of the two proteinases 2Apro and 3......Cpro. The cleavage of VP0 (giving rise to VP2 and VP4), which is carried out by a so-far unknown proteinase, was also examined. In combination with a novel surface exposure prediction algorithm, our neural network approach successfully distinguishes known cleavage sites from nocleavage sites and yields...... a more consistent definition of features common to these sites. The method is able to predict experimentally determined cleavage sites in cellular proteins. We present a list of mammalian and other proteins that are predicted to be possible targets for the viral proteinases. Whether these proteins...

  4. Centrosomes: CNN's Broadcast Reaches the Cleavage Furrow

    OpenAIRE

    Sullivan, William

    2009-01-01

    Centrosomin (CNN), a core Drosophila centrosome protein, interacts with the newly identified protein Centrocortin to promote cleavage furrow formation in the early embryo. Significantly, this activity is distinct from CNN's well-established role in centrosome-based microtubule organization.

  5. Cytoplasmic translocation, aggregation, and cleavage of TDP-43 by enteroviral proteases modulate viral pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, G; Shi, J; Deng, H; Hou, J; Wang, C; Hong, A; Zhang, J; Jia, W; Luo, H

    2015-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated that infection by coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3), a positive-stranded RNA enterovirus, results in the accumulation of insoluble ubiquitin-protein aggregates, which resembles the common feature of neurodegenerative diseases. The importance of protein aggregation in viral pathogenesis has been recognized; however, the underlying regulatory mechanisms remain ill-defined. Transactive response DNA-binding protein-43 (TDP-43) is an RNA-binding protein that has an essential role in regulating RNA metabolism at multiple levels. Cleavage and cytoplasmic aggregation of TDP-43 serves as a major molecular marker for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and frontotemporal lobar degeneration and contributes significantly to disease progression. In this study, we reported that TDP-43 is translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm during CVB3 infection through the activity of viral protease 2A, followed by the cleavage mediated by viral protease 3C. Cytoplasmic translocation of TDP-43 is accompanied by reduced solubility and increased formation of protein aggregates. The cleavage takes place at amino-acid 327 between glutamine and alanine, resulting in the generation of an N- and C-terminal cleavage fragment of ~35 and ~8 kDa, respectively. The C-terminal product of TDP-43 is unstable and quickly degraded through the proteasome degradation pathway, whereas the N-terminal truncation of TDP-43 acts as a dominant-negative mutant that inhibits the function of native TDP-43 in alternative RNA splicing. Lastly, we demonstrated that knockdown of TDP-43 results in an increase in viral titers, suggesting a protective role for TDP-43 in CVB3 infection. Taken together, our findings suggest a novel model by which cytoplasmic redistribution and cleavage of TDP-43 as a consequence of CVB3 infection disrupts the solubility and transcriptional activity of TDP-43. Our results also reveal a mechanism evolved by enteroviruses to support efficient viral infection. PMID

  6. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  7. Catalytic deallylation of allyl- and diallylmalonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Necas, David; Turský, Matyás; Kotora, Martin

    2004-08-25

    Substituted allylmalonates undergo the selective C-C bond cleavage in the presence of triethylaluminum and a catalytic amount of nickel and ruthenium phosphine complexes, resulting in the loss of the allyl moiety and formation of monosubstituted malonates. Comparison of reactivity of the nickel and ruthenium complexes showed that the use of the former is general with respect to the structure of the substituted allylmalonates, and the activity of the latter depended on the substitution pattern of the double bond of the allylic moiety. The smooth deallylation may encourage the use of the allyl group as a protective group for the acidic hydrogen in malonates. PMID:15315416

  8. Distance determination by GIY-YIG intron endonucleases: discrimination between repression and cleavage functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingqing; Derbyshire, Victoria; Belfort, Marlene; Edgell, David R

    2006-01-01

    GIY-YIG homing endonucleases are modular proteins, with conserved N-terminal catalytic domains connected by linkers to C-terminal DNA-binding domains. I-TevI, the T4 phage GIY-YIG intron endonuclease, functions both in promoting td intron homing, and in acting as a transcriptional autorepressor. Repression is achieved by binding to an operator, which is cleaved at 100-fold reduced efficiency relative to the intronless homing site. The linker includes a zinc finger, which functions in distance determination, to constrain the catalytic domain to cleave the homing site at a fixed position. Here we show that I-BmoI, a related GIY-YIG endonuclease lacking a zinc finger, also possesses some cleavage distance discrimination. Furthermore, hybrid endonucleases constructed by swapping the domains of I-BmoI and I-TevI are active, precise and demonstrate that features other than the zinc finger facilitate distance determination. Most importantly, I-TevI zinc finger mutants cleave the operator more efficiently than the homing site, the converse of wild-type protein. These results are consistent with the zinc finger acting as a measuring device, directing efficient cleavage of the homing site to promote intron mobility, while reducing cleavage at the operator to ensure transcriptional autorepression and phage viability. PMID:16582101

  9. Does Cleavage Work at Work? Men, but Not Women, Falsely Believe Cleavage Sells a Weak Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Peter; Chrislock, Karyna; Petersik, Korinne; Vijay, Madhuri; Turek, Aleksandra

    2008-01-01

    We examined whether men, but not women, would be distracted by a female sales representative's exposed cleavage, leading to greater perceived efficacy for a weak, but not for a strong product. A community sample of 88 men and 97 women viewed a video of a female pharmaceutical sales representative who (a) had exposed cleavage or dressed modestly…

  10. Selective cleavage of pepsin by molybdenum metallopeptidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yenjai, Sudarat; Malaikaew, Pinpinat; Liwporncharoenvong, Teerayuth [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Srinakharinwirot University, Sukhumvit 23, Bangkok 10110 (Thailand); Buranaprapuk, Apinya, E-mail: apinyac@swu.ac.th [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Srinakharinwirot University, Sukhumvit 23, Bangkok 10110 (Thailand)

    2012-03-02

    Graphical abstract: Molybdenum metallopeptidase: the Mo(VI) cluster with six molybdenum cations has the ability to cleave protein under mild conditions (37 Degree-Sign C, pH 7) without reducing agents. The reaction required only low concentration of ammonium heptamolybdatetetrahydrate ((NH{sub 4}){sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O) (0.125 mM). The reaction undergoes possibly via a hydrolytic mechanism. This is the first demonstration of protein cleavage by a molybdenum cluster. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This is the first demonstration of protein cleavage by a Mo(VI) cluster with six molybdenum cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cleavage reaction undergoes at mild conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No need of reducing agents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Only low concentration of Mo(VI) cluster and short time of incubation are needed. -- Abstract: In this study, the cleavage of protein by molybdenum cluster is reported for the first time. The protein target used is porcine pepsin. The data presented in this study show that pepsin is cleaved to at least three fragments with molecular weights of {approx}23, {approx}19 and {approx}16 kDa when the mixture of the protein and ammonium heptamolybdate tetrahydrate ((NH{sub 4}){sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O) was incubated at 37 Degree-Sign C for 24 h. No self cleavage of pepsin occurs at 37 Degree-Sign C, 24 h indicating that the reaction is mediated by the metal ions. N-terminal sequencing of the peptide fragments indicated three cleavage sites of pepsin between Leu 112-Tyr 113, Leu 166-Leu 167 and Leu 178-Asn 179. The cleavage reaction occurs after incubation of the mixture of pepsin and (NH{sub 4}){sub 6}Mo{sub 7}O{sub 24}{center_dot}4H{sub 2}O) only for 2 h. However, the specificity of the cleavage decreases when incubation time is longer than 48 h. The mechanism for cleavage of pepsin is expected to be hydrolytic chemistry of the amide bonds in the protein

  11. Selective cleavage of pepsin by molybdenum metallopeptidase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Molybdenum metallopeptidase: the Mo(VI) cluster with six molybdenum cations has the ability to cleave protein under mild conditions (37 °C, pH 7) without reducing agents. The reaction required only low concentration of ammonium heptamolybdatetetrahydrate ((NH4)6Mo7O24·4H2O) (0.125 mM). The reaction undergoes possibly via a hydrolytic mechanism. This is the first demonstration of protein cleavage by a molybdenum cluster. Highlights: ► This is the first demonstration of protein cleavage by a Mo(VI) cluster with six molybdenum cations. ► The cleavage reaction undergoes at mild conditions. ► No need of reducing agents. ► Only low concentration of Mo(VI) cluster and short time of incubation are needed. -- Abstract: In this study, the cleavage of protein by molybdenum cluster is reported for the first time. The protein target used is porcine pepsin. The data presented in this study show that pepsin is cleaved to at least three fragments with molecular weights of ∼23, ∼19 and ∼16 kDa when the mixture of the protein and ammonium heptamolybdate tetrahydrate ((NH4)6Mo7O24·4H2O) was incubated at 37 °C for 24 h. No self cleavage of pepsin occurs at 37 °C, 24 h indicating that the reaction is mediated by the metal ions. N-terminal sequencing of the peptide fragments indicated three cleavage sites of pepsin between Leu 112-Tyr 113, Leu 166-Leu 167 and Leu 178-Asn 179. The cleavage reaction occurs after incubation of the mixture of pepsin and (NH4)6Mo7O24·4H2O) only for 2 h. However, the specificity of the cleavage decreases when incubation time is longer than 48 h. The mechanism for cleavage of pepsin is expected to be hydrolytic chemistry of the amide bonds in the protein backbone.

  12. Eurosceptism: the Birth of a New Cleavage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorenzo Viviani

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Euroscepticism is an ambivalent and polysemic concept, consisting of the theme of the European identity, the construction of European Union as new polity, the development of an opposition as expression of new social cleavage, and finally the perspective of an ideological politicization of the european integration by national and supranational political actors. The article attempts to make light on the nature and on the dynamics of development of the euroscepticism through a sequence of analysis that starts from the identity of Europe (what we mean by euroscepticism, then addresses the social dimension of Europe (what we mean by the new european cleavage, and it finally examines the political dimension (the risks and opportunities of politicization by political parties of the european cleavage.

  13. Cleavage specificity analysis of six type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs using PICS with proteome-derived peptide libraries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Barré

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs are a family of cell membrane tethered serine proteases with unclear roles as their cleavage site specificities and substrate degradomes have not been fully elucidated. Indeed just 52 cleavage sites are annotated in MEROPS, the database of proteases, their substrates and inhibitors. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: To profile the active site specificities of the TTSPs, we applied Proteomic Identification of protease Cleavage Sites (PICS. Human proteome-derived database searchable peptide libraries were assayed with six human TTSPs (matriptase, matriptase-2, matriptase-3, HAT, DESC and hepsin to simultaneously determine sequence preferences on the N-terminal non-prime (P and C-terminal prime (P' sides of the scissile bond. Prime-side cleavage products were isolated following biotinylation and identified by tandem mass spectrometry. The corresponding non-prime side sequences were derived from human proteome databases using bioinformatics. Sequencing of 2,405 individual cleaved peptides allowed for the development of the family consensus protease cleavage site specificity revealing a strong specificity for arginine in the P1 position and surprisingly a lysine in P1' position. TTSP cleavage between R↓K was confirmed using synthetic peptides. By parsing through known substrates and known structures of TTSP catalytic domains, and by modeling the remainder, structural explanations for this strong specificity were derived. CONCLUSIONS: Degradomics analysis of 2,405 cleavage sites revealed a similar and characteristic TTSP family specificity at the P1 and P1' positions for arginine and lysine in unfolded peptides. The prime side is important for cleavage specificity, thus making these proteases unusual within the tryptic-enzyme class that generally has overriding non-prime side specificity.

  14. ADAR proteins: structure and catalytic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Rena A; Macbeth, Mark R; Beal, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of the adenosine deaminase (ADA) acting on RNA (ADAR) family of proteins in 1988 (Bass and Weintraub, Cell 55:1089-1098, 1988) (Wagner et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 86:2647-2651, 1989), we have learned much about their structure and catalytic mechanism. However, much about these enzymes is still unknown, particularly regarding the selective recognition and processing of specific adenosines within substrate RNAs. While a crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human ADAR2 has been solved, we still lack structural data for an ADAR catalytic domain bound to RNA, and we lack any structural data for other ADARs. However, by analyzing the structural data that is available along with similarities to other deaminases, mutagenesis and other biochemical experiments, we have been able to advance the understanding of how these fascinating enzymes function. PMID:21769729

  15. Consequences of Cas9 cleavage in the chromosome of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lun; Bikard, David

    2016-05-19

    The RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease from CRISPR-Cas systems has emerged as a powerful biotechnological tool. The specificity of Cas9 can be reprogrammed to cleave desired sequences in a cell's chromosome simply by changing the sequence of a small guide RNA. Unlike in most eukaryotes, Cas9 cleavage in the chromosome of bacteria has been reported to kill the cell. However, the mechanism of cell death remains to be investigated. Bacteria mainly rely on homologous recombination (HR) with sister chromosomes to repair double strand breaks. Here, we show that the simultaneous cleavage of all copies of the Escherichia coli chromosome at the same position cannot be repaired, leading to cell death. However, inefficient cleavage can be tolerated through continuous repair by the HR pathway. In order to kill cells reliably, HR can be blocked using the Mu phage Gam protein. Finally, the introduction of the non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway from Mycobacterium tuberculosis was not able to rescue the cells from Cas9-mediated killing, but did introduce small deletions at a low frequency. This work provides a better understanding of the consequences of Cas9 cleavage in bacterial chromosomes which will be instrumental in the development of future CRISPR tools. PMID:27060147

  16. Site-specific cleavage of the host poly(A) binding protein by the encephalomyocarditis virus 3C proteinase stimulates viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Mariko; Arias, Carolina; Garabedian, Alexandra; Palmenberg, Ann C; Mohr, Ian

    2012-10-01

    Although picornavirus RNA genomes contain a 3'-terminal poly(A) tract that is critical for their replication, the impact of encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) infection on the host poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) remains unknown. Here, we establish that EMCV infection stimulates site-specific PABP proteolysis, resulting in accumulation of a 45-kDa N-terminal PABP fragment in virus-infected cells. Expression of a functional EMCV 3C proteinase was necessary and sufficient to stimulate PABP cleavage in uninfected cells, and bacterially expressed 3C cleaved recombinant PABP in vitro in the absence of any virus-encoded or eukaryotic cellular cofactors. N-terminal sequencing of the resulting C-terminal PABP fragment identified a 3C(pro) cleavage site on PABP between amino acids Q437 and G438, severing the C-terminal protein-interacting domain from the N-terminal RNA binding fragment. Single amino acid substitution mutants with changes at Q437 were resistant to 3C(pro) cleavage in vitro and in vivo, validating that this is the sole detectable PABP cleavage site. Finally, while ongoing protein synthesis was not detectably altered in EMCV-infected cells expressing a cleavage-resistant PABP variant, viral RNA synthesis and infectious virus production were both reduced. Together, these results establish that the EMCV 3C proteinase mediates site-specific PABP cleavage and demonstrate that PABP cleavage by 3C regulates EMCV replication. PMID:22837200

  17. Cleavage of cytoplasm within the oligonucleate zoosporangia of allomyces macrogynus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yunjeong; Song, Youngsun; Kim, Namhun; Youn, Hyunjoo; Kang, Minkook; Song, Yurim; Cho, Chungwon

    2014-01-01

    Allomyces macrogynus produces zoosporangia that discharge uninucleate zoospores after cleavage of multinucleate cytoplasm. Cleavage of cytoplasm within the oligonucleate zoosporangia of A. macrogynus was visualized by constructing three-dimensional models based on electron micrographs and confocal images. In oligonucleate zoosporangia, three adjacent nuclei can form three cleavage planes with a line of intersection of the planes. The position and boundary of the cleavage planes are thought to be determined by the relative positions of the nuclei. The establishment of three cleavage planes by cleavage membranes occurred sequentially, and the nuclear axis connecting the centers of two nuclei affected the development of cleavage membranes on each cleavage plane. In multinucleate zoosporangia, groups of three neighboring nuclei near the cell cortex may initiate the sequential establishment of cleavage planes and then may interact with the nuclei further from the cortex until the interactions of nuclei are propagated to the central region of the cytoplasm. PMID:24871589

  18. Modulation of RNA function by aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    OpenAIRE

    Schroeder, R; Waldsich, C; Wank, H

    2000-01-01

    One of the most important families of antibiotics are the aminoglycosides, including drugs such as neomycin B, paromomycin, gentamicin and streptomycin. With the discovery of the catalytic potential of RNA, these antibiotics became very popular due to their RNA-binding capacity. They serve for the analysis of RNA function as well as for the study of RNA as a potential therapeutic target. Improvements in RNA structure determination recently provided first insights into the decoding site of the...

  19. Recovery of Recombinant Crimean Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus Reveals a Function for Non-structural Glycoproteins Cleavage by Furin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Éric; Zivcec, Marko; Chakrabarti, Ayan K; Nichol, Stuart T; Albariño, César G; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2015-05-01

    Crimean Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a negative-strand RNA virus of the family Bunyaviridae (genus: Nairovirus). In humans, CCHFV causes fever, hemorrhage, severe thrombocytopenia, and high fatality. A major impediment in precisely determining the basis of CCHFV's high pathogenicity has been the lack of methodology to produce recombinant CCHFV. We developed a reverse genetics system based on transfecting plasmids into BSR-T7/5 and Huh7 cells. In our system, bacteriophage T7 RNA polymerase produced complementary RNA copies of the viral S, M, and L segments that were encapsidated with the support, in trans, of CCHFV nucleoprotein and L polymerase. The system was optimized to systematically recover high yields of infectious CCHFV. Additionally, we tested the ability of the system to produce specifically designed CCHFV mutants. The M segment encodes a polyprotein that is processed by host proprotein convertases (PCs), including the site-1 protease (S1P) and furin-like PCs. S1P and furin cleavages are necessary for producing the non-structural glycoprotein GP38, while S1P cleavage yields structural Gn. We studied the role of furin cleavage by rescuing a recombinant CCHFV encoding a virus glycoprotein precursor lacking a functional furin cleavage motif (RSKR mutated to ASKA). The ASKA mutation blocked glycoprotein precursor's maturation to GP38, and Gn precursor's maturation to Gn was slightly diminished. Furin cleavage was not essential for replication, as blocking furin cleavage resulted only in transient reduction of CCHFV titers, suggesting that either GP38 and/or decreased Gn maturation accounted for the reduced virion production. Our data demonstrate that nairoviruses can be produced by reverse genetics, and the utility of our system uncovered a function for furin cleavage. This viral rescue system could be further used to study the CCHFV replication cycle and facilitate the development of efficacious vaccines to counter this biological and public

  20. RNA nanoparticles come of age

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John J.Rossi

    2011-01-01

    @@ RNA has multiple functions in nature, including informa- tional transfer (mRNA) Ill, adaptor function (tRNAs) [2], guide functions (snRNAs, snoRNAs) [3,4]catalytic func- tion (ribozymes and the large ribosomal RNA) [5-7], and environmental sensing (riboswitehes) [8].In contrast, DNA only serves as an information storage molecule, and proteins serve as structural and enzymatic molecules.

  1. Hermes is a localized factor regulating cleavage of vegetal blastomeres in Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zearfoss, N R; Chan, A P; Wu, C F; Kloc, M; Etkin, L D

    2004-03-01

    We have identified the RNA-binding protein Hermes in a screen for vegetally localized RNAs in Xenopus oocytes. The RNA localizes to the vegetal cortex through both the message transport organizer (METRO) and late pathways. Hermes mRNA and protein are both detected at the vegetal cortex of the oocyte; however, the protein is degraded within a several hour period during oocyte maturation. Injection of antisense morpholino oligonucleotides (HE-MO) against Hermes caused a precocious reduction in Hermes protein present during maturation and resulted in a phenotype characterized by cleavage defects in vegetal blastomeres. The phenotype can be partially rescued by injecting Hermes mRNA. These results demonstrate that the localized RNA-binding protein Hermes functions during oocyte maturation to regulate the cleavage of specific vegetally derived cell lineages. Hermes most likely performs its function by regulating the translation or processing of one or more target RNAs. This is an important mechanism by which the embryo can generate unique cell lineages. The regulation of region-specific cell division is a novel function for a localized mRNA. PMID:14975717

  2. Modeling study on the cleavage step of the self-splicing reaction in group I introns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlik, R. F.; Garduno-Juarez, R.; Manchester, J. I.; Shibata, M.; Ornstein, R. L.; Rein, R.

    1993-01-01

    A three-dimensional model of the Tetrahymena thermophila group I intron is used to further explore the catalytic mechanism of the transphosphorylation reaction of the cleavage step. Based on the coordinates of the catalytic core model proposed by Michel and Westhof (Michel, F., Westhof, E. J. Mol. Biol. 216, 585-610 (1990)), we first converted their ligation step model into a model of the cleavage step by the substitution of several bases and the removal of helix P9. Next, an attempt to place a trigonal bipyramidal transition state model in the active site revealed that this modified model for the cleavage step could not accommodate the transition state due to insufficient space. A lowering of P1 helix relative to surrounding helices provided the additional space required. Simultaneously, it provided a better starting geometry to model the molecular contacts proposed by Pyle et al. (Pyle, A. M., Murphy, F. L., Cech, T. R. Nature 358, 123-128. (1992)), based on mutational studies involving the J8/7 segment. Two hydrated Mg2+ complexes were placed in the active site of the ribozyme model, using the crystal structure of the functionally similar Klenow fragment (Beese, L.S., Steitz, T.A. EMBO J. 10, 25-33 (1991)) as a guide. The presence of two metal ions in the active site of the intron differs from previous models, which incorporate one metal ion in the catalytic site to fulfill the postulated roles of Mg2+ in catalysis. The reaction profile is simulated based on a trigonal bipyramidal transition state, and the role of the hydrated Mg2+ complexes in catalysis is further explored using molecular orbital calculations.

  3. Prediction of proprotein convertase cleavage sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duckert, Peter; Brunak, Søren; Blom, Nikolaj

    2004-01-01

    has created additional focus on proprotein processing. We have developed a method for prediction of cleavage sites for PCs based on artificial neural networks. Two different types of neural networks have been constructed: a furin-specific network based on experimental results derived from the...

  4. Reductive cleavage of the peptide bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holian, J.; Garrison, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    In many biological research efforts, long chain organic molecules are studied by breaking large molecules into smaller components. Cleavage technique of recent interest is the use of solvated electrons. These are formed when aqueous solutions are bombarded with gamma radiation. Solvated electron is very reactive and can reduce most any species present, even to form free radicals.

  5. Diverse endonucleolytic cleavage sites in the mammalian transcriptome depend upon microRNAs, Drosha, and additional nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Karginov, Fedor V.; Cheloufi, Sihem; Chong, Mark M.W.; Stark, Alexander; Smith, Andrew D; Hannon, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    The lifespan of a mammalian mRNA is determined, in part, by the binding of regulatory proteins and small RNA-guided complexes. The conserved endonuclease activity of Argonaute2 requires extensive complementarity between a small RNA and its target and is not used by animal microRNAs, which pair with their targets imperfectly. Here, we investigate the endonucleolytic function of Ago2 and other nucleases by transcriptome-wide profiling of mRNA cleavage products retaining 5′-phosphate groups in m...

  6. PROSPER: an integrated feature-based tool for predicting protease substrate cleavage sites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangning Song

    Full Text Available The ability to catalytically cleave protein substrates after synthesis is fundamental for all forms of life. Accordingly, site-specific proteolysis is one of the most important post-translational modifications. The key to understanding the physiological role of a protease is to identify its natural substrate(s. Knowledge of the substrate specificity of a protease can dramatically improve our ability to predict its target protein substrates, but this information must be utilized in an effective manner in order to efficiently identify protein substrates by in silico approaches. To address this problem, we present PROSPER, an integrated feature-based server for in silico identification of protease substrates and their cleavage sites for twenty-four different proteases. PROSPER utilizes established specificity information for these proteases (derived from the MEROPS database with a machine learning approach to predict protease cleavage sites by using different, but complementary sequence and structure characteristics. Features used by PROSPER include local amino acid sequence profile, predicted secondary structure, solvent accessibility and predicted native disorder. Thus, for proteases with known amino acid specificity, PROSPER provides a convenient, pre-prepared tool for use in identifying protein substrates for the enzymes. Systematic prediction analysis for the twenty-four proteases thus far included in the database revealed that the features we have included in the tool strongly improve performance in terms of cleavage site prediction, as evidenced by their contribution to performance improvement in terms of identifying known cleavage sites in substrates for these enzymes. In comparison with two state-of-the-art prediction tools, PoPS and SitePrediction, PROSPER achieves greater accuracy and coverage. To our knowledge, PROSPER is the first comprehensive server capable of predicting cleavage sites of multiple proteases within a single substrate

  7. Autoproteolytic Cleavage and Activation of Human Acid Ceramidase*

    OpenAIRE

    Shtraizent, Nataly; Eliyahu, Efrat; Park, Jae-Ho; He, Xingxuan; Shalgi, Ruth; Schuchman, Edward H.

    2008-01-01

    Herein we report the mechanism of human acid ceramidase (AC; N-acylsphingosine deacylase) cleavage and activation. A highly purified, recombinant human AC precursor underwent self-cleavage into α and β subunits, similar to other members of the N-terminal nucleophile hydrolase superfamily. This reaction proceeded with first order kinetics, characteristic of self-cleavage. AC self-cleavage occurred most rapidly at acidic pH, but also at neutral pH. Site-directed mutagene...

  8. Calcium waves along the cleavage furrows in cleavage-stage Xenopus embryos and its inhibition by heparin

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Calcium signaling is known to be associated with cytokinesis; however, the detailed spatio-temporal pattern of calcium dynamics has remained unclear. We have studied changes of intracellular free calcium in cleavage-stage Xenopus embryos using fluorescent calcium indicator dyes, mainly Calcium Green-1. Cleavage formation was followed by calcium transients that localized to cleavage furrows and propagated along the furrows as calcium waves. The calcium transients at the cleavage furrows were o...

  9. An interaction between gramicidin and the sigma subunit of RNA polymerase.

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, R.; Blumenthal, T

    1982-01-01

    Gramicidin, a peptide antibiotic produced by Bacillus brevis, inhibits initiation of transcription by RNA polymerase (nucleosidetriphosphate:RNA nucleotidyltransferase, EC 2.7.7.6). We show here that the presence of gramicidin causes an increase in the rate of cleavage of the sigma subunit of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase by trypsin, although it does not alter the cleavage rate of any of the core subunits. Furthermore, whereas isolated sigma is cleaved much faster than is sigma in holoenzym...

  10. Reaction Pathways and Energetics of Etheric C–O Bond Cleavage Catalyzed by Lanthanide Triflates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assary, Rajeev S.; Atesin, Abdurrahman C.; Li, Zhi; Curtiss, Larry A.; Marks, Tobin J.

    2013-09-06

    Efficient and selective cleavage of etheric C-O bonds is crucial for converting biomass into platform chemicals and liquid transportation fuels. In this contribution, computational methods at the DFT B3LYP level of theory are employed to understand the efficacy of lanthanide triflate catalysts (Ln(OTf)3, Ln = La, Ce, Sm, Gd, Yb, and Lu) in cleaving etheric C-O bonds. In agreement with experiment, the calculations indicate that the reaction pathway for C-O cleavage occurs via a C-H → O-H proton transfer in concert with weakening of the C-O bond of the coordinated ether substrate to ultimately yield a coordinated alkenol. The activation energy for this process falls as the lanthanide ionic radius decreases, reflecting enhanced metal ion electrophilicity. Details of the reaction mechanism for Yb(OTf)3-catalyzed ring opening are explored in depth, and for 1-methyl-d3-butyl phenyl ether, the computed primary kinetic isotope effect of 2.4 is in excellent agreement with experiment (2.7), confirming that etheric ring-opening pathway involves proton transfer from the methyl group alpha to the etheric oxygen atom, which is activated by the electrophilic lanthanide ion. Calculations of the catalytic pathway using eight different ether substrates indicate that the more rapid cleavage of acyclic versus cyclic ethers is largely due to entropic effects, with the former C-O bond scission processes increasing the degrees of freedom/particles as the transition state is approached.

  11. Structural Basis for Accelerated Cleavage of Bovine Pancreatic Trypsin Inhibitor (BPTI) by Human Mesotrypsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salameh,M.; Soares, A.; Hockla, A.; Radisky, E.

    2008-01-01

    Human mesotrypsin is an isoform of trypsin that displays unusual resistance to polypeptide trypsin inhibitors and has been observed to cleave several such inhibitors as substrates. Whereas substitution of arginine for the highly conserved glycine 193 in the trypsin active site has been implicated as a critical factor in the inhibitor resistance of mesotrypsin, how this substitution leads to accelerated inhibitor cleavage is not clear. Bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI) forms an extremely stable and cleavage-resistant complex with trypsin, and thus provides a rigorous challenge of mesotrypsin catalytic activity toward polypeptide inhibitors. Here, we report kinetic constants for mesotrypsin and the highly homologous (but inhibitor sensitive) human cationic trypsin, describing inhibition by, and cleavage of BPTI, as well as crystal structures of the mesotrypsin-BPTI and human cationic trypsin-BPTI complexes. We find that mesotrypsin cleaves BPTI with a rate constant accelerated 350-fold over that of human cationic trypsin and 150,000-fold over that of bovine trypsin. From the crystal structures, we see that small conformational adjustments limited to several side chains enable mesotrypsin-BPTI complex formation, surmounting the predicted steric clash introduced by Arg-193. Our results show that the mesotrypsin-BPTI interface favors catalysis through (a) electrostatic repulsion between the closely spaced mesotrypsin Arg-193 and BPTI Arg-17, and (b) elimination of two hydrogen bonds between the enzyme and the amine leaving group portion of BPTI. Our model predicts that these deleterious interactions accelerate leaving group dissociation and deacylation.

  12. Cleavage crystallography of liquid metal embrittled aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, A. P.; Stoner, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    The crystallography of liquid metal-induced transgranular cleavage in six aluminum alloys having a variety of microstructures has been determined via Laue X-ray back reflection. The cleavage crystallography was independent of alloy microstructure, and the cleavage plane was 100-plane oriented in all cases. It was further determined that the cleavage crystallography was not influenced by alloy texture. Examination of the fracture surface indicated that there was not a unique direction of crack propagation. In addition, the existence of 100-plane cleavage on alloy 2024 fracture surfaces was inferred by comparison of secondary cleavage crack intersection geometry on the 2024 surfaces with the geometry of secondary cleavage crack intersections on the test alloys.

  13. Regioselectivity in the Reductive Bond Cleavage of Diarylalkylsulfonium Salts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampmeier, Jack; Mansurul Hoque, AKM; D. Saeva, Franklin;

    2009-01-01

    This investigation was stimulated by reports that one-electron reductions of monoaryldialkylsulfonium salts never give aryl bond cleavage whereas reductions of diarylmonoalkylsulfonium salts preferentially give aryl bond cleavage. We studied the product ratios from the reductive cleavage of di-4......- tolylethylsulfonium and di-4-tolyl-2-phenylethylsulfonium salts by a variety of one-electron reducing agents ranging in potential from -0.77 to +2.5 eV (vs SCE) and including thermal reductants, indirect electrolyses mediated by a series of cyanoaromatics, and excited singlet states. We report that the cleavage...... products vary from regiospecific alkyl cleavage to predominant aryl cleavage as a function of the potential of the reducing agent. We conclude that differences between the reductive cleavages of mono- and diarylsulfonium salts are direct consequences of the structures of the sulfuranyl radical...

  14. Substrate recognition and cleavage-site selection by a single-subunit protein-only RNase P.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillante, Nadia; Gößringer, Markus; Lindenhofer, Dominik; Toth, Ursula; Rossmanith, Walter; Hartmann, Roland K

    2016-03-18

    RNase P is the enzyme that removes 5' extensions from tRNA precursors. With its diversity of enzyme forms-either protein- or RNA-based, ranging from single polypeptides to multi-subunit ribonucleoproteins-the RNase P enzyme family represents a unique model system to compare the evolution of enzymatic mechanisms. Here we present a comprehensive study of substrate recognition and cleavage-site selection by the nuclear single-subunit proteinaceous RNase P PRORP3 from Arabidopsis thaliana. Compared to bacterial RNase P, the best-characterized RNA-based enzyme form, PRORP3 requires a larger part of intact tRNA structure, but little to no determinants at the cleavage site or interactions with the 5' or 3' extensions of the tRNA. The cleavage site depends on the combined dimensions of acceptor stem and T domain, but also requires the leader to be single-stranded. Overall, the single-subunit PRORP appears mechanistically more similar to the complex nuclear ribonucleoprotein enzymes than to the simpler bacterial RNase P. Mechanistic similarity or dissimilarity among different forms of RNase P thus apparently do not necessarily reflect molecular composition or evolutionary relationship. PMID:26896801

  15. Regulated Cleavage of Prothrombin by Prothrombinase: REPOSITIONING A CLEAVAGE SITE REVEALS THE UNIQUE KINETIC BEHAVIOR OF THE ACTION OF PROTHROMBINASE ON ITS COMPOUND SUBSTRATE*♦

    OpenAIRE

    Bradford, Harlan N.; Micucci, Joseph A.; Krishnaswamy, Sriram

    2009-01-01

    Prothrombinase converts prothrombin to thrombin via cleavage at Arg320 followed by cleavage at Arg271. Exosite-dependent binding of prothrombin to prothrombinase facilitates active site docking by Arg320 and initial cleavage at this site. Precise positioning of the Arg320 site for cleavage is implied by essentially normal cleavage at Arg320 in recombinant prothrombin variants...

  16. Multiple nucleic acid cleavage modes in divergent type III CRISPR systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Graham, Shirley; Tello, Agnes; Liu, Huanting; White, Malcolm F.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas is an RNA-guided adaptive immune system that protects bacteria and archaea from invading nucleic acids. Type III systems (Cmr, Csm) have been shown to cleave RNA targets in vitro and some are capable of transcription-dependent DNA targeting. The crenarchaeon Sulfolobus solfataricus has two divergent subtypes of the type III system (Sso-IIID and a Cmr7-containing variant of Sso-IIIB). Here, we report that both the Sso-IIID and Sso-IIIB complexes cleave cognate RNA targets with a ruler mechanism and 6 or 12 nt spacing that relates to the organization of the Cas7 backbone. This backbone-mediated cleavage activity thus appears universal for the type III systems. The Sso-IIIB complex is also known to possess a distinct ‘UA’ cleavage mode. The predominant activity observed in vitro depends on the relative molar concentration of protein and target RNA. The Sso-IIID complex can cleave plasmid DNA targets in vitro, generating linear DNA products with an activity that is dependent on both the cyclase and HD nuclease domains of the Cas10 subunit, suggesting a role for both nuclease active sites in the degradation of double-stranded DNA targets. PMID:26801642

  17. Small RNAs tackle large viruses: RNA interference-based antiviral defense against DNA viruses in insects

    OpenAIRE

    Bronkhorst, Alfred W.; Miesen, Pascal; Ronald P. van Rij

    2013-01-01

    The antiviral RNA interference (RNAi) pathway processes viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into viral small interfering RNAs (vsiRNA) that guide the recognition and cleavage of complementary viral target RNAs. In RNA virus infections, viral replication intermediates, dsRNA genomes or viral structured RNAs have been implicated as Dicer-2 substrates. In a recent publication, we demonstrated that a double-stranded DNA virus, Invertebrate iridescent virus 6, is a target of the Drosophila RNAi mach...

  18. Catalytic cracking process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A.; Baker, Richard W.

    2001-01-01

    Processes and apparatus for providing improved catalytic cracking, specifically improved recovery of olefins, LPG or hydrogen from catalytic crackers. The improvement is achieved by passing part of the wet gas stream across membranes selective in favor of light hydrocarbons over hydrogen.

  19. Catalytic distillation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  20. Characterization of self-cleaving RNA sequences on the genome and antigenome of human hepatitis delta virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuo, M Y; Sharmeen, L; Dinter-Gottlieb, G; Taylor, J

    1988-01-01

    Recently we reported that in vitro RNA transcripts complementary to the genome of hepatitis delta virus (HDV) contain a unique site at which self-cleavage can occur. Subsequent studies showed that a similar self-cleavage site was present on in vitro RNA transcripts of genomic HDV RNA. The same self-cleavage reactions were also found to occur on HDV RNAs from the livers of infected chimpanzees. Using the in vitro RNA it was also possible to determine that the minimum length of contiguous seque...

  1. A Historical Trend of Ethnic Cleavages in Contemporary Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hussein Mohammadzadeh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is evaluation social and historical content of social cleavage in contemporary Iran. Analytical framework rooted in Rokan theory. Rokan believed that social cleavage appearance post of revolutions. Method of study was historical comparatives.The method of this research is comparative historical in which we used of historical documents and data. In this field, I have compared data of indexes of socio-economic of ethnic states.Assessment of data and documents show that social cleavages and particularly ethnic cleavages rise after Reza shah revolution. He established centralized and dictated government and divided society of Iran and institutionalization the inequality in social structure. Sense of deprivation about inequality and suited circumstance activated ethnic cleavage in Iran. Decrease of inequality and justice could decrease of social deprivation and deactivated social cleavages.

  2. Switching off small RNA regulation with trap-mRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Martin; Johansen, Jesper; Møller-Jensen, Jakob; Valentin-Hansen, Poul

    2009-01-01

    Small non-coding regulatory RNAs in bacteria have been shown predominantly to be tightly regulated at the level of transcription initiation, and sRNAs that function by an antisense mechanism on trans-encoded target mRNAs have been shown or predicted to act stoichiometrically. Here we show that Mic......M, which silences the expression of an outer membrane protein, YbfM under most growth conditions, does not become destabilized by target mRNA overexpression, indicating that the small RNA regulator acts catalytically. Furthermore, our regulatory studies suggested that control of micM expression is unlikely...... to operate at the level of transcription initiation. By employing a highly sensitive genetic screen we uncovered a novel RNA-based regulatory principle in which induction of a trap-mRNA leads to selective degradation of a small regulatory RNA molecule, thereby abolishing the sRNA-based silencing of...

  3. SVM-based prediction of caspase substrate cleavage sites

    OpenAIRE

    Wee, Lawrence JK; Tan, Tin Wee; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2006-01-01

    Background Caspases belong to a class of cysteine proteases which function as critical effectors in apoptosis and inflammation by cleaving substrates immediately after unique sites. Prediction of such cleavage sites will complement structural and functional studies on substrates cleavage as well as discovery of new substrates. Recently, different computational methods have been developed to predict the cleavage sites of caspase substrates with varying degrees of success. As the support vector...

  4. Modeling and Inferring Cleavage Patterns in Proliferating Epithelia

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Ankit B.; Gibson, William T.; Gibson, Matthew C; Radhika Nagpal

    2009-01-01

    The regulation of cleavage plane orientation is one of the key mechanisms driving epithelial morphogenesis. Still, many aspects of the relationship between local cleavage patterns and tissue-level properties remain poorly understood. Here we develop a topological model that simulates the dynamics of a 2D proliferating epithelium from generation to generation, enabling the exploration of a wide variety of biologically plausible cleavage patterns. We investigate a spectrum of models that incorp...

  5. DNA interrogation by the CRISPR RNA-guided endonuclease Cas9

    OpenAIRE

    Sternberg, Samuel H.; Redding, Sy; Jinek, Martin; Greene, Eric C.; Doudna, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    The CRISPR-associated enzyme Cas9 is an RNA-guided endonuclease that uses RNA:DNA base-pairing to target foreign DNA in bacteria. Cas9:guide RNA complexes are also effective genome engineering agents in animals and plants. Here we use single-molecule and bulk biochemical experiments to determine how Cas9:RNA interrogates DNA to find specific cleavage sites. We show that both binding and cleavage of DNA by Cas9:RNA require recognition of a short trinucleotide protospacer adjacent motif (PAM). ...

  6. Direct measurement of acylenzyme hydrolysis demonstrates rate-limiting deacylation in cleavage of physiological sequences by the processing protease Kex2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwell, N C; Fuller, R S

    2001-03-27

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae Kex2 protease is the prototype for the family of eukaryotic proprotein convertases that includes furin, PC1/3, and PC2. These enzymes belong to the subtilase superfamily of serine proteases and are distinguished from degradative subtilisins by structural features and by their much more stringent substrate specificity. Pre-steady-state studies have shown that both Kex2 and furin exhibit an initial burst of 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin release in cleavage of peptidyl methylcoumarinamide substrates that are based on physiological cleavage sites. Thus, in cleavage of such substrates, formation of the acylenzyme intermediate is fast relative to some later step (deacylation or N-terminal product release). This behavior is significant, because Kex2 also exhibits burst kinetics in cleavage of peptide bonds. k(cat) for cleavage of a tetrapeptidyl methylcoumarinamide substrate based on the physiological yeast substrate pro-alpha-factor exhibits a weak solvent isotope effect, but neither this isotope effect nor temperature dependence studies with this substrate conclusively identify the rate-limiting step for Kex2 cleavage of this substrate. We therefore developed an assay to measure deacylation directly by pulse-chase incorporation of H(2)(18)O in a rapid-quenched-flow mixer followed by mass spectrometric quantitation. The results given by this assay rule out rate-limiting product release for cleavage of this substrate by Kex2. These experiments demonstrate that cleavage of the acylenzyme ester bond, as opposed to either the initial attack on the amide bond or product release, is rate-limiting for the action of Kex2 at physiological sequences. This work demonstrates a fundamental difference in the catalytic strategy of proprotein processing enzymes and degradative subtilisins. PMID:11297433

  7. The influenza A virus NS1 protein binds small interfering RNAs and suppresses RNA silencing in plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bucher, E.C.; Hemmes, J.C.; Haan, de P.; Goldbach, R.W.; Prins, M.W.

    2004-01-01

    RNA silencing comprises a set of sequence-specific RNA degradation pathways that occur in a wide range of eukaryotes, including animals, fungi and plants. A hallmark of RNA silencing is the presence of small interfering RNA molecules (siRNAs). The siRNAs are generated by cleavage of larger double-st

  8. Analysis of the cleavage site of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 glycoprotein: requirement of precursor cleavage for glycoprotein incorporation.

    OpenAIRE

    Dubay, J W; Dubay, S R; Shin, H. J.; Hunter, E

    1995-01-01

    Endoproteolytic cleavage of the glycoprotein precursor to the mature SU and TM proteins is an essential step in the maturation of retroviral glycoproteins. Cleavage of the precursor polyprotein occurs at a conserved, basic tetrapeptide sequence and is carried out by a cellular protease. The glycoprotein of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 contains two potential cleavage sequences immediately preceding the N terminus of the TM protein. To determine the functional significance of these t...

  9. PNA-mediated modulation and redirection of Her-2 pre-mRNA splicing: specific skipping of erbB-2 exon 19 coding for the ATP catalytic domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pankratova, Stanislava; Nielsen, Birgit N; Shiraishi, Takehiko;

    2010-01-01

    The Her-2 receptor coded for by the proto-oncogenic erbB-2 gene is a clinically validated target for treatment of a significant genetic subclass of breast cancers, and Her-2 is also overexpressed or mutated in a range of other cancers. In an approach to exploit antisense mediated splicing...... oligomers that specifically induce skipping of exon 19 as this exon is coding for the ATP catalytic domain of Her-2, and if expressed such truncated version of the Her-2 protein should be functionally inactive in a dominant negative fashion. Therefore, antisense compounds having efficient erbB-2 exon 19...... skipping activity could be very interesting in terms of drug discovery. In the present study we identified PNA oligomers having such activity in SK-BR-3 and HeLa cancer cells in culture....

  10. Catalytic Synthesis Lactobionic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.G. Borodina

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles are obtained, characterized and deposited on the carrier. Conducted catalytic synthesis of lactobionic acid from lactose. Received lactobionic acid identify on the IR spectrum.

  11. Catalytic distillation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1982-01-01

    A method for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C.sub.4 feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  12. Catalytic Coanda combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, J.D.; Smith, A.G.; Kopmels, M.

    1992-09-16

    A catalytic reaction is enhanced by the use of the Coanda effect to maximise contact between reactant and catalyst. A device utilising this principle comprises a Coanda surface which directs the flow of fuel from a slot to form a primary jet which entrains the surrounding ambient air and forms a combustible mixture for reaction on a catalytic surface. The Coanda surface may have an internal or external nozzle which may be axi-symmetric or two-dimensional. (author)

  13. Artificial reaction coordinate "tunneling" in free-energy calculations: the catalytic reaction of RNase H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosta, Edina; Woodcock, H Lee; Brooks, Bernard R; Hummer, Gerhard

    2009-08-01

    We describe a method for the systematic improvement of reaction coordinates in quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations of reaction free-energy profiles. In umbrella-sampling free-energy calculations, a biasing potential acting on a chosen reaction coordinate is used to sample the system in reactant, product, and transition states. Sharp, nearly discontinuous changes along the resulting reaction path are used to identify coordinates that are relevant for the reaction but not properly sampled. These degrees of freedom are then included in an extended reaction coordinate. The general formalism is illustrated for the catalytic cleavage of the RNA backbone of an RNA/DNA hybrid duplex by the RNase H enzyme of Bacillus halodurans. We find that in the initial attack of the phosphate diester by water, the oxygen-phosphorus distances alone are not sufficient as reaction coordinates, resulting in substantial hysteresis in the proton degrees of freedom and a barrier that is too low (approximately 10 kcal/mol). If the proton degrees of freedom are included in an extended reaction coordinate, we obtain a barrier of 21.6 kcal/mol consistent with the experimental rates. As the barrier is approached, the attacking water molecule transfers one of its protons to the O1P oxygen of the phosphate group. At the barrier top, the resulting hydroxide ion forms a penta-coordinated phosphate intermediate. The method used to identify important degrees of freedom, and the procedure to optimize the reaction coordinate are general and should be useful both in classical and in QM/MM free-energy calculations. PMID:19462398

  14. Artificial reaction coordinate “tunneling” in free energy calculations: the catalytic reaction of RNase H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosta, Edina; Woodcock, H. Lee; Brooks, Bernard R.; Hummer, Gerhard

    2011-01-01

    We describe a method for the systematic improvement of reaction coordinates in quantum mechanical / molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations of reaction free energy profiles. In umbrella-sampling free energy calculations, a biasing potential acting on a chosen reaction coordinate is used to sample the system in reactant, product, and transition states. Sharp, nearly discontinuous changes along the resulting reaction path are used to identify coordinates that are relevant for the reaction but not properly sampled. These degrees of freedom are then included in an extended reaction coordinate. The general formalism is illustrated for the catalytic cleavage of the RNA backbone of an RNA/DNA hybrid duplex by the RNase H enzyme of bacillus halodurans. We find that in the initial attack of the phosphate diester by water, the oxygen-phosphorus distances alone are not sufficient as reaction coordinates, resulting in substantial hysteresis in the proton degrees of freedom and a barrier that is too low (~10 kcal/mol). If the proton degrees of freedom are included in an extended reaction coordinate, we obtain a barrier of 21.6 kcal/mol consistent with the experimental rates. As the barrier is approached, the attacking water molecule transfers one of its protons to the O1P oxygen of the phosphate group. At the barrier top, the resulting hydroxide ion forms a penta-coordinated phosphate intermediate. The method used to identify important degrees of freedom, and the procedure to optimize the reaction coordinate are general and should be useful both in classical and in QM/MM free energy calculations. PMID:19462398

  15. Initiation of decay of Bacillus subtilis trp leader RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deikus, Gintaras; Bechhofer, David H

    2007-07-13

    Transcription termination in the leader region of the Bacillus subtilis trp operon is regulated by binding of the 11-mer TRAP complex to nascent trp RNA, which results in formation of a terminator structure. Rapid decay of trp leader RNA, which is required to release the TRAP complex and maintain a sufficient supply of free TRAP, is mediated by polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase). Using purified B. subtilis PNPase, we showed that, when TRAP was present, PNPase binding to the 3' end of trp leader RNA and PNPase digestion of trp leader RNA from the 3' end were inefficient. These results suggested that initiation of trp leader RNA may begin with an endonuclease cleavage upstream of the transcription terminator structure. Such cleavage was observed in vivo. Mutagenesis of nucleotides at the cleavage site abolished processing and resulted in a 4-fold increase in trp leader RNA half-life. This is the first mapping of a decay-initiating endonuclease cleavage site on a native B. subtilis RNA. PMID:17507374

  16. Catalysis of poliovirus VP0 maturation cleavage is not mediated by serine 10 of VP2.

    OpenAIRE

    Harber, J J; Bradley, J.; Anderson, C W; Wimmer, E

    1991-01-01

    The maturation of the poliovirus capsid occurs as the result of a single unexplained proteolytic event during which 58 to 59 copies of the 60 VP0 capsid protein precursors are cleaved. An autocatalytic mechanism for cleavage of VP0 to VP4 and VP2 was proposed by Arnold et al. (E. Arnold, M. Luo, G. Vriend, M. G. Rossman, A. C. Palmenberg, G. D. Parks, M. J. Nicklin, and E. Wimmer, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84:21-25, 1987) in which serine 10 of VP2 is activated by virion RNA to catalyze VP4-V...

  17. Catalytic ignition of light hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. L. Hohn; C.-C. Huang; C. Cao

    2009-01-01

    Catalytic ignition refers to phenomenon where sufficient energy is released from a catalytic reaction to maintain further reaction without additional extemai heating. This phenomenon is important in the development of catalytic combustion and catalytic partial oxidation processes, both of which have received extensive attention in recent years. In addition, catalytic ignition studies provide experimental data which can be used to test theoretical hydrocarbon oxidation models. For these reasons, catalytic ignition has been frequently studied. This review summarizes the experimental methods used to study catalytic ignition of light hydrocarbons and describes the experimental and theoretical results obtained related to catalytic ignition. The role of catalyst metal, fuel and fuel concentration, and catalyst state in catalytic ignition are examined, and some conclusions are drawn on the mechanism of catalytic ignition.

  18. Analysis of the Proteolytic Processing of ABCA3: Identification of Cleavage Site and Involved Proteases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Hofmann

    Full Text Available ABCA3 is a lipid transporter in the limiting membrane of lamellar bodies in alveolar type II cells. Mutations in the ABCA3 gene cause respiratory distress syndrome in new-borns and childhood interstitial lung disease. ABCA3 is N-terminally cleaved by an as yet unknown protease, a process believed to regulate ABCA3 activity.The exact site where ABCA3 is cleaved was localized using mass spectrometry (MS. Proteases involved in ABCA3 processing were identified using small molecule inhibitors and siRNA mediated gene knockdown. Results were verified by in vitro digestion of a synthetic peptide substrate mimicking ABCA3's cleavage region, followed by MS analysis.We found that cleavage of ABCA3 occurs after Lys174 which is located in the proteins' first luminal loop. Inhibition of cathepsin L and, to a lesser extent, cathepsin B resulted in attenuation of ABCA3 cleavage. Both enzymes showed activity against the ABCA3 peptide in vitro with cathepsin L being more active.We show here that, like some other proteins of the lysosomal membrane, ABCA3 is a substrate of cathepsin L. Therefore, cathepsin L may represent a potential target to therapeutically influence ABCA3 activity in ABCA3-associated lung disease.

  19. Phylogenetic footprinting of non-coding RNA: hammerhead ribozyme sequences in a satellite DNA family of Dolichopoda cave crickets (Orthoptera, Rhaphidophoridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venanzetti Federica

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The great variety in sequence, length, complexity, and abundance of satellite DNA has made it difficult to ascribe any function to this genome component. Recent studies have shown that satellite DNA can be transcribed and be involved in regulation of chromatin structure and gene expression. Some satellite DNAs, such as the pDo500 sequence family in Dolichopoda cave crickets, have a catalytic hammerhead (HH ribozyme structure and activity embedded within each repeat. Results We assessed the phylogenetic footprints of the HH ribozyme within the pDo500 sequences from 38 different populations representing 12 species of Dolichopoda. The HH region was significantly more conserved than the non-hammerhead (NHH region of the pDo500 repeat. In addition, stems were more conserved than loops. In stems, several compensatory mutations were detected that maintain base pairing. The core region of the HH ribozyme was affected by very few nucleotide substitutions and the cleavage position was altered only once among 198 sequences. RNA folding of the HH sequences revealed that a potentially active HH ribozyme can be found in most of the Dolichopoda populations and species. Conclusions The phylogenetic footprints suggest that the HH region of the pDo500 sequence family is selected for function in Dolichopoda cave crickets. However, the functional role of HH ribozymes in eukaryotic organisms is unclear. The possible functions have been related to trans cleavage of an RNA target by a ribonucleoprotein and regulation of gene expression. Whether the HH ribozyme in Dolichopoda is involved in similar functions remains to be investigated. Future studies need to demonstrate how the observed nucleotide changes and evolutionary constraint have affected the catalytic efficiency of the hammerhead.

  20. RNA genetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, E. (Instituto de Biologia Molecular, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Canto Blanco, Madrid (ES)); Holland, J.J. (California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla, CA (USA). Dept. of Biology); Ahlquist, P. (Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (USA). Dept. of Plant Pathology)

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on RNA genetics: Retroviruses, Viroids, and RNA recombination, Volume 2. Topics covered include: Replication of retrovirus genomes, Hepatitis B virus replication, and Evolution of RNA viruses.

  1. Presence of Meiotic Spindles Indicates Early Cleavage of Embryos

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To assess whether the detection of the meiotic spindle could anticipate the appearance of early cleavage.Methods Oocytes were obtained from stimulated ovaries of consenting patients undergoing oocytes retrieval for ICSI.Spindles were imaged with the Polscope.After ICSI,oocytes with or without spindles were cultured for examination of early cleavage and embryo development.A total of 328 oocytes from 50 cycles were examined with the Polscope and inseminated by ICSI.Results Spindles were imaged in 81.7% of oocytes.After ICSI,more oocytes with spindles (78.4%) fertilized normally than oocytes without spindles (53.3%)(P<0.001).At 25-27 h post ICSI.more fertilized oocytes developed from oocytes with spindles (81.9%) were detected early cleavage than those from oocytes without spindles(28.1%)(P<0.001).Significantly more embryos with early cleavage (82.2%) developed to high quality embryos at d 3 compared with the embryos without early cleavage(48.3%)(P=0.001).The value of rs related to the relationship between spindles and early cleavage was 0.420(P<0.0001).Conclusion The existing of the early cleavage may have a predictive value on the opportunity of high quality embryos and the existing of the spindle may have a predictive value in the appearance of early cleavage.

  2. Deletion Mapping of the Encephalomyocarditis Virus Primary Cleavage Site

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Harry; Palmenberg, Ann C.

    2001-01-01

    The cotranslational, primary self-cleavage reaction of cardiovirus polyprotein relies on a highly conserved, short segment of amino acids at the 2A-2B protein boundary. The amino terminus of the required element for encephalomyocarditis virus has now been mapped to include Tyr126 of the 2A protein, the 18th amino acid before the cleavage site.

  3. Si(111) cleavage and the (2 x 1) reconstruction process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, E. M.; Halicioglu, T.; Tiller, W. A.

    1987-01-01

    Using a computer simulation technique with a semiempirical potential, a Si crystal was cleaved along the (111) plane. The pi-bonded chain structural features of the Si(111) cleavage surface are observed and found to be a consequence of the dynamics of this cleavage process and seem not to be influenced by the final energetics.

  4. A photoinduced cleavage of DNA useful for determining T residues.

    OpenAIRE

    Simoncsits, A; Török, I

    1982-01-01

    Irradiation of 5'-[32P]-phosphate labeled DNA fragments with ultraviolet light in the presence of primary amines followed by piperidine treatment resulted in base-specific cleavage of the DNA chain at T residues, accompanied by a less intensive G reaction. This simple, T greater than G cleavage offers an alternative method for determining T residues in chemical DNA sequencing.

  5. GUIDE-Seq enables genome-wide profiling of off-target cleavage by CRISPR-Cas nucleases

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Shengdar Q.; Zheng, Zongli; Nguyen, Nhu T.; Liebers, Matthew; Topkar, Ved V.; Thapar, Vishal; Wyvekens, Nicolas; Khayter, Cyd; Iafrate, A. John; Le, Long P.; Aryee, Martin J.; Joung, J. Keith

    2014-01-01

    CRISPR RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs) are widely used genome-editing reagents, but methods to delineate their genome-wide off-target cleavage activities have been lacking. Here we describe an approach for global detection of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) introduced by RGNs and potentially other nucleases. This method, called Genome-wide Unbiased Identification of DSBs Enabled by Sequencing (GUIDE-Seq), relies on capture of double-stranded oligodeoxynucleotides into breaks Application of GUID...

  6. RNA Binding Domain of Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Cary K.; Mitchell, James R.; Collins, Kathleen

    2001-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein reverse transcriptase that extends the ends of chromosomes. The two telomerase subunits essential for catalysis in vitro are the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) and the telomerase RNA. Using truncations and site-specific mutations, we identified sequence elements of TERT and telomerase RNA required for catalytic activity and protein-RNA interaction for Tetrahymena thermophila telomerase. We found that the TERT amino and carboxyl termini, although evol...

  7. Reductive cleavage of the O-O bond in multicopper oxidases: a QM/MM and QM study

    OpenAIRE

    Srnec, Martin; Ryde, Ulf; Rulisek, Lubomir

    2011-01-01

    The key step in the reaction mechanism of multicopper oxidases (MCOs)-the cleavage of the O-O bond in O-2-has been investigated using combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) methods. This process represents a reaction pathway from the peroxy intermediate after it accepts one electron from the nearby type-1 Cu site to the experimentally-observed native intermediate, which is the only fully oxidised catalytically relevant state in MCOs. Scans of the QM(DFT)/MM potential ene...

  8. RNA catalysis and the origins of life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgel, Leslie E.

    1986-01-01

    The role of RNA catalysis in the origins of life is considered in connection with the discovery of riboszymes, which are RNA molecules that catalyze sequence-specific hydrolysis and transesterification reactions of RNA substrates. Due to this discovery, theories positing protein-free replication as preceding the appearance of the genetic code are more plausible. The scope of RNA catalysis in biology and chemistry is discussed, and it is noted that the development of methods to select (or predict) RNA sequences with preassigned catalytic functions would be a major contribution to the study of life's origins.

  9. Catalytic coherence transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Kaifeng; Singh, Uttam; Wu, Junde

    2016-04-01

    Catalytic coherence transformations allow the otherwise impossible state transformations using only incoherent operations with the aid of an auxiliary system with finite coherence that is not being consumed in any way. Here we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for the deterministic and stochastic catalytic coherence transformations between a pair of pure quantum states. In particular, we show that the simultaneous decrease of a family of Rényi entropies of the diagonal parts of the states under consideration is a necessary and sufficient condition for the deterministic catalytic coherence transformations. Similarly, for stochastic catalytic coherence transformations we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for achieving a higher optimal probability of conversion. We thus completely characterize the coherence transformations among pure quantum states under incoherent operations. We give numerous examples to elaborate our results. We also explore the possibility of the same system acting as a catalyst for itself and find that indeed self-catalysis is possible. Further, for the cases where no catalytic coherence transformation is possible we provide entanglement-assisted coherence transformations and find the necessary and sufficient conditions for such transformations.

  10. Coordinated DNA dynamics during the human telomerase catalytic cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Joseph W. Parks; Stone, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) utilizes a template within the integral RNA subunit (hTR) to direct extension of telomeres. Telomerase exhibits repeat addition processivity (RAP) and must therefore translocate the nascent DNA product into a new RNA:DNA hybrid register to prime each round of telomere repeat synthesis. Here we use single-molecule FRET and nuclease protection assays to monitor telomere DNA structure and dynamics during the telomerase catalytic cycle. DNA trans...

  11. Formation of mRNA 3' termini: stability and dissociation of a complex involving the AAUAAA sequence.

    OpenAIRE

    Zarkower, D; Wickens, M

    1987-01-01

    Formation of the 3' termini of mRNAs in animal cells involves endonucleolytic cleavage of a pre-mRNA, followed by polyadenylation of the newly formed end. Here we demonstrate that, during cleavage in vitro, the highly conserved AAUAAA sequence of the pre-mRNA forms a complex with a factor present in a crude nuclear extract. This complex is required for cleavage and polyadenylation. It normally is transient, but is very stable on cleaved RNA to which a single terminal cordycepin residue has be...

  12. Translocation-coupled DNA cleavage by the Type ISP restriction-modification enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chand, Mahesh K; Nirwan, Neha; Diffin, Fiona M; van Aelst, Kara; Kulkarni, Manasi; Pernstich, Christian; Szczelkun, Mark D; Saikrishnan, Kayarat

    2015-11-01

    Production of endonucleolytic double-strand DNA breaks requires separate strand cleavage events. Although catalytic mechanisms for simple, dimeric endonucleases are known, there are many complex nuclease machines that are poorly understood. Here we studied the single polypeptide Type ISP restriction-modification (RM) enzymes, which cleave random DNA between distant target sites when two enzymes collide after convergent ATP-driven translocation. We report the 2.7-Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of a Type ISP enzyme-DNA complex, revealing that both the helicase-like ATPase and nuclease are located upstream of the direction of translocation, an observation inconsistent with simple nuclease-domain dimerization. Using single-molecule and biochemical techniques, we demonstrate that each ATPase remodels its DNA-protein complex and translocates along DNA without looping it, leading to a collision complex in which the nuclease domains are distal. Sequencing of the products of single cleavage events suggests a previously undescribed endonuclease model, where multiple, stochastic strand-nicking events combine to produce DNA scission. PMID:26389736

  13. Use of Cleavage as an Aid in the Optical Determination of Minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Ernest G.

    1980-01-01

    Described is the use of cleavage as an aid to microscopic determination of unknown minerals by immersion methods. Cleavages are examined in relation to fragment shapes, types of extinction, and cleavage-optical relationships. (Author/DS)

  14. Peptidase specificity from the substrate cleavage collection in the MEROPS database and a tool to measure cleavage site conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlings, Neil D

    2016-03-01

    One peptidase can usually be distinguished from another biochemically by its action on proteins, peptides and synthetic substrates. Since 1996, the MEROPS database (http://merops.sanger.ac.uk) has accumulated a collection of cleavages in substrates that now amounts to 66,615 cleavages. The total number of peptidases for which at least one cleavage is known is 1700 out of a total of 2457 different peptidases. This paper describes how the cleavages are obtained from the scientific literature, how they are annotated and how cleavages in peptides and proteins are cross-referenced to entries in the UniProt protein sequence database. The specificity profiles of 556 peptidases are shown for which ten or more substrate cleavages are known. However, it has been proposed that at least 40 cleavages in disparate proteins are required for specificity analysis to be meaningful, and only 163 peptidases (6.6%) fulfil this criterion. Also described are the various displays shown on the website to aid with the understanding of peptidase specificity, which are derived from the substrate cleavage collection. These displays include a logo, distribution matrix, and tables to summarize which amino acids or groups of amino acids are acceptable (or not acceptable) in each substrate binding pocket. For each protein substrate, there is a display to show how it is processed and degraded. Also described are tools on the website to help with the assessment of the physiological relevance of cleavages in a substrate. These tools rely on the hypothesis that a cleavage site that is conserved in orthologues is likely to be physiologically relevant, and alignments of substrate protein sequences are made utilizing the UniRef50 database, in which in each entry sequences are 50% or more identical. Conservation in this case means substitutions are permitted only if the amino acid is known to occupy the same substrate binding pocket from at least one other substrate cleaved by the same peptidase. PMID

  15. Putative intermediary stages for the molecular evolution from a ribozyme to a catalytic RNP

    OpenAIRE

    IKAWA, YOSHIYA; Tsuda, Kentaro; Matsumura, Shigeyoshi; Atsumi, Shota; Inoue, Tan

    2003-01-01

    A hypothetical evolutionary pathway from a ribozyme to a catalytic RNA–protein complex (RNP) is proposed and examined. In this hypothesis for an early phase of molecular evolution, one RNA–RNA interaction in the starting ribozyme is replaced with an RNA–protein interaction via two intermediary stages. At each stage, the original RNA–RNA interaction and a newly introduced RNA–protein interaction are designed to coexist. The catalytic RNPs corresponding to the intermediary stages were construct...

  16. Mutant allele of rna14 in fission yeast affects pre-mRNA splicing

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    SUDHANSHU YADAV; AMIT SONKAR; NAFEES AHAMAD; SHAKIL AHMED

    2016-06-01

    complex removes noncoding introns, while 3'end processing involves in cleavage and addition of poly(A) tails to the nascent transcript. Rna14 protein in budding yeast has been implicated in cleavage and polyadenylation of mRNA in the nucleus but their role in the pre-mRNA splicing has not been studied. Here, we report the isolation of a mutant allele of rna14 in fission yeast,Schizosaccharomyces pombe that exhibits reduction in protein level of Chk1 at the nonpermissive temperature, primarily due to the defects in posttranscriptional processing. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis reveals defective splicing of the chk1¹+transcript at the nonpermissive temperature. Apart from chk1¹+, the splicing of some other genes were also found to be defective at the nonpermissive temperature suggesting that Rna14 might be involved in pre-mRNA splicing. Subsequently, genetic interaction of Rna14 with prp1 and physical interactions with Prp28 suggest that the Rna14 might be part of a larger protein complex responsible for the pre-mRNA maturation.

  17. The evolution of catalytic function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurel, Marie-Christine; Ricard, Jacques

    2006-03-01

    It is very likely that the main driving force of enzyme evolution is the requirement to improve catalytic and regulatory efficiency which results from the intrinsic performance as well as from the spatial and functional organization of enzymes in living cells. Kinetic co-operativity may occur in simple monomeric proteins if they display “slow” conformational transitions, at the cost of catalytic efficiency. Oligomeric enzymes on the other hand can be both efficient and co-operative. We speculate that the main reason for the emergence of co-operative oligomeric enzymes is the need for catalysts that are both cooperative and efficient. As it is not useful for an enzyme to respond to a change of substrate concentration in a complex kinetic way, the emergence of symmetry has its probable origin in a requirement for “functional simplicity”. In a living cell, enzyme are associated with other macromolecules and membranes. The fine tuning of their activity may also be reached through mutations of the microenvironment. Our hypothesis is that these mutations are related to the vectorial transport of molecules, to achieve the hysteresis loops of enzyme reactions generated by the coupling of reaction and diffusion, through the co-operativity brought about by electric interactions between a charged substrate and a membrane, and last but not least, through oscillations. As the physical origins of these effects are very simple and do not require complex molecular devices, it is very likely that the functional advantage generated by the spatial and functional organization of enzyme molecules within the cell have appeared in prebiotic catalysis or very early during the primeval stages of biological evolution. We shall began this paper by presenting the nature of the probable earliest catalysts in the RNA world.

  18. Quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical free energy simulations of the self-cleavage reaction in the hepatitis delta virus ribozyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, Abir; Thaplyal, Pallavi; Rosta, Edina; Bevilacqua, Philip C; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2014-01-29

    The hepatitis delta virus (HDV) ribozyme catalyzes a self-cleavage reaction using a combination of nucleobase and metal ion catalysis. Both divalent and monovalent ions can catalyze this reaction, although the rate is slower with monovalent ions alone. Herein, we use quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) free energy simulations to investigate the mechanism of this ribozyme and to elucidate the roles of the catalytic metal ion. With Mg(2+) at the catalytic site, the self-cleavage mechanism is observed to be concerted with a phosphorane-like transition state and a free energy barrier of ∼13 kcal/mol, consistent with free energy barrier values extrapolated from experimental studies. With Na(+) at the catalytic site, the mechanism is observed to be sequential, passing through a phosphorane intermediate, with free energy barriers of 2-4 kcal/mol for both steps; moreover, proton transfer from the exocyclic amine of protonated C75 to the nonbridging oxygen of the scissile phosphate occurs to stabilize the phosphorane intermediate in the sequential mechanism. To explain the slower rate observed experimentally with monovalent ions, we hypothesize that the activation of the O2' nucleophile by deprotonation and orientation is less favorable with Na(+) ions than with Mg(2+) ions. To explore this hypothesis, we experimentally measure the pKa of O2' by kinetic and NMR methods and find it to be lower in the presence of divalent ions rather than only monovalent ions. The combined theoretical and experimental results indicate that the catalytic Mg(2+) ion may play three key roles: assisting in the activation of the O2' nucleophile, acidifying the general acid C75, and stabilizing the nonbridging oxygen to prevent proton transfer to it. PMID:24383543

  19. Specific Cleavage of the Nucleoprotein of Fish Rhabdovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, G-Z; Yi, Y-J; Chen, Z-Y; Zhang, Q-Y

    2015-11-01

    Siniperca chuatsi rhabdovirus (SCRV) is one of myriad rhabdoviruses recorded in fish. Preliminary data show that inhibition of the SCRV nucleoprotein (N) could significantly reduce the progeny virus titers in infected Epithelioma papulosum cyprinid (EPC) cells. Here, the authors propose that cleavage of the viral 47-kDa N protein is caspase-mediated based on caspase inhibition experiments, transient expression in EPC transfection, and analysis of cleavage sites. Cleavage of the SCRV N protein in culture was prevented by a pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-FMK (z-Val-Ala-DL-Asp-fluoromethyl ketone). Subsequently, N was transiently expressed in EPC cells, the results of which indicated that the specific cleavage of N also occurred in the cells transfected with N-GFP plasmid. Several truncated fragments of the N gene were constructed and transiently transfected into EPC cells. Immunoblotting results indicated that D324 and D374 are the cleavage sites of N by caspases. The authors also found that z-VAD-FMK could inhibit the cytopathic effect in SCRV-infected EPC cells but not affect the production of infectious progeny, suggesting that the caspase-mediated cleavage of N protein is not required for in vitro SCRV replication. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report on the cleavage of rhabdovirus proteins. PMID:25689989

  20. Bundled slaty cleavage in laminated argillite, north-central minnesota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwick, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    Exceptional bundled slaty cleavage (defined herein) has been found in drill cores of laminated, folded, weakly metamorphosed argillite at several localities in the early Proterozoic Animikie basin of north-central Minnesota. The cleavage domains are more closely spaced within the cleavage bundles than outside them, the mean tectosilicate grain size of siltstone layers, measured normal to cleavage, is less in the cleavage bundles than outside them, and the cleavage bundles are enriched in opaque phases and phyllosilicates relative to extra-bundle segments. These facts suggest that pressure solution was a major factor in bundle development. If it is assumed that opaque phases have been conserved during pressure solution, the modal differences in composition between intra-bundle and extra-bundle segments of beds provide a means for estimating bulk material shortening normal to cleavage. Argillite samples from the central part of the Animikie basin have been shortened a minimum of about 22%, as estimated by this method. These estimates are similar to the shortening values derived from other strain markers in other rock types interbedded with the argillite, and are also consistent with the regional pattern of deformation. ?? 1987.

  1. Measurement of temperature rise during Si cleavage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A transient temperature change has been measured during the cleavage of Si(100) wafers both in air and in vacuum (5xl06 torr). A fine thermocouple(TC) (E type) formed by wires of diameter 25 μm was placed in a groove cut on the (100) surface where the crack was to occur. A tiny drop of thermal transfer compound was applied to enhance the thermal conduction between TC and sample surface. The thermocouple signal was recorded by a digital storage adaptor after an amplification of 10,000 by a special low noise amplifier. The width of the pulse appeared to be narrower in vacuum than in air. The difference is ascribed to effects of adsorption. Great care was taken to avoid spurious effects. The technique was tested by experiments on perspex and glass, where the results show reasonable agreement with those from previous work. Theoretical analysis of the measurements shows that the freshly cleaved surface can temporarily attain high temperatures, which is very significant for formation of surface structures

  2. A cleavage toughness master curve model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of fusion power will require a fracture toughness database, derived largely from small specimen tests, closely integrated with methods to assess first wall and blanket structural integrities. A master curve-shift (MC-ΔT) method has been proposed as an engineering expedient to treat the effects of structural geometry, irradiation, loading rates and safety margins. However, a number of issues related to the MC-ΔT method remain to be resolved, including the universality of MC shapes. A new micromechanical model of fracture toughness in the cleavage transition regime is proposed that combines analytical representations of finite element analysis simulations of crack-tip stress fields with a local critical stress-critical stressed area (σ*-A*) fracture criterion. This model, has been successful in predicting geometry effects, as well as high loading rate and irradiation hardening-induced Charpy shifts. By incorporating a modest temperature dependence in σ*(T), an inconsistency between model predictions and an observed universal-type MC shape is resolved

  3. Determination of the protease cleavage site repertoire—The RNase H but not the RT domain is essential for foamy viral protease activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spannaus, Ralf; Bodem, Jochen, E-mail: Jochen.Bodem@vim.uni-wuerzburg.de

    2014-04-15

    In contrast to orthoretroviruses, the foamy virus protease is only active as a protease-reverse transcriptase fusion protein and requires viral RNA for activation. Maturation of foamy viral proteins seems to be restricted to a single cleavage site in Gag and Pol. We provide evidence that unprocessed Gag is required for optimal infectivity, which is unique among retroviruses. Analyses of the cleavage site sequences of the Gag and Pol cleavage sites revealed a high similarity compared to those of Lentiviruses. We show that positions P2' and P2 are invariant and that Gag and Pol cleavage sites are processed with similar efficiencies. The RNase H domain is essential for protease activity, but can functionally be substituted by RNase H domains of other retroviruses. Thus, the RNase H domain might be involved in the stabilization of the protease dimer, while the RT domain is essential for RNA dependent protease activation. - Highlights: • Unprocessed Gag is required for optimal infectivity of foamy viruses. • Positions P2 and P2' are invariant in the foamy viral cleavage sites. • The RNaseH domain is essential for protease activity. • The RNaseH domains of other retroviruses support foamy viral protease activity.

  4. Determination of the protease cleavage site repertoire—The RNase H but not the RT domain is essential for foamy viral protease activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In contrast to orthoretroviruses, the foamy virus protease is only active as a protease-reverse transcriptase fusion protein and requires viral RNA for activation. Maturation of foamy viral proteins seems to be restricted to a single cleavage site in Gag and Pol. We provide evidence that unprocessed Gag is required for optimal infectivity, which is unique among retroviruses. Analyses of the cleavage site sequences of the Gag and Pol cleavage sites revealed a high similarity compared to those of Lentiviruses. We show that positions P2' and P2 are invariant and that Gag and Pol cleavage sites are processed with similar efficiencies. The RNase H domain is essential for protease activity, but can functionally be substituted by RNase H domains of other retroviruses. Thus, the RNase H domain might be involved in the stabilization of the protease dimer, while the RT domain is essential for RNA dependent protease activation. - Highlights: • Unprocessed Gag is required for optimal infectivity of foamy viruses. • Positions P2 and P2' are invariant in the foamy viral cleavage sites. • The RNaseH domain is essential for protease activity. • The RNaseH domains of other retroviruses support foamy viral protease activity

  5. A transcript cleavage factor of Mycobacterium tuberculosis important for its survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnab China

    Full Text Available After initiation of transcription, a number of proteins participate during elongation and termination modifying the properties of the RNA polymerase (RNAP. Gre factors are one such group conserved across bacteria. They regulate transcription by projecting their N-terminal coiled-coil domain into the active center of RNAP through the secondary channel and stimulating hydrolysis of the newly synthesized RNA in backtracked elongation complexes. Rv1080c is a putative gre factor (MtbGre in the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The protein enhanced the efficiency of promoter clearance by lowering abortive transcription and also rescued arrested and paused elongation complexes on the GC rich mycobacterial template. Although MtbGre is similar in domain organization and shares key residues for catalysis and RNAP interaction with the Gre factors of Escherichia coli, it could not complement an E. coli gre deficient strain. Moreover, MtbGre failed to rescue E. coli RNAP stalled elongation complexes, indicating the importance of specific protein-protein interactions for transcript cleavage. Decrease in the level of MtbGre reduced the bacterial survival by several fold indicating its essential role in mycobacteria. Another Gre homolog, Rv3788 was not functional in transcript cleavage activity indicating that a single Gre is sufficient for efficient transcription of the M. tuberculosis genome.

  6. Forms and Functions of Telomerase RNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kathleen

    Telomerase adds single-stranded telomeric DNA repeats to chromosome ends. Unlike other polymerases involved in genome replication, telomerase synthe¬sizes DNA without use of a DNA template. Instead, the enzyme active site copies a template carried within the integral RNA subunit of the telomerase ribonucleo-protein (RNP) complex. In addition to providing a template, telomerase RNA has non-template motifs with critical functions in the catalytic cycle of repeat synthesis. In its complexity of structure and function, telomerase RNA resembles the non-coding RNAs of RNP machines like the ribosome and spliceosome that evolved from catalytic RNAs of the RNA World. However, unlike these RNPs, telomerase evolved its RNP identity after advent of the Protein World. Insights about telomer-ase have broad significance for understanding non-coding RNA biology as well as chromosome end maintenance and human disease.

  7. Localized Calcium Signals along the Cleavage Furrow of the Xenopus Egg Are Not Involved in Cytokinesis

    OpenAIRE

    Noguchi, Tatsuhiko; Mabuchi, Issei

    2002-01-01

    It has been proposed that a localized calcium (Ca) signal at the growing end of the cleavage furrow triggers cleavage furrow formation in large eggs. We have examined the possible role of a Ca signal in cleavage furrow formation in the Xenopus laevis egg during the first cleavage. We were able to detect two kinds of Ca waves along the cleavage furrow. However, the Ca waves appeared after cleavage furrow formation in late stages of the first cleavage. In addition, cleavage was not affected by ...

  8. Detection of nucleic acid sequences by invader-directed cleavage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brow, Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI); Hall, Jeff Steven Grotelueschen (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor (Madison, WI); Olive, David Michael (Madison, WI); Prudent, James Robert (Madison, WI)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The 5' nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based by charge.

  9. Detection of nucleic acid sequences by invader-directed cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brow, Mary Ann D.; Hall, Jeff Steven Grotelueschen; Lyamichev, Victor; Olive, David Michael; Prudent, James Robert

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The 5' nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based by charge.

  10. Prediction of proteasome cleavage motifs by neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kesimir, C.; Nussbaum, A.K.; Schild, H.;

    2002-01-01

    We present a predictive method that can simulate an essential step in the antigen presentation in higher vertebrates, namely the step involving the proteasomal degradation of polypeptides into fragments which have the potential to bind to MHC Class I molecules. Proteasomal cleavage prediction...... the prediction of MHC Class I ligand boundaries more accurate: 65% of the cleavage sites and 85% of the non-cleavage sites are correctly determined. Moreover, we show that the neural networks trained on the constitutive proteasome data learns a specificity that differs from that of the networks...

  11. Mechanism of Ribonuclease III Catalytic Regulation by Serine Phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gone, Swapna; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Paudyal, Samridhdi; Nicholson, Allen W.

    2016-05-01

    Ribonuclease III (RNase III) is a conserved, gene-regulatory bacterial endonuclease that cleaves double-helical structures in diverse coding and noncoding RNAs. RNase III is subject to multiple levels of control, reflective of its global regulatory functions. Escherichia coli (Ec) RNase III catalytic activity is known to increase during bacteriophage T7 infection, reflecting the expression of the phage-encoded protein kinase, T7PK. However, the mechanism of catalytic enhancement is unknown. This study shows that Ec-RNase III is phosphorylated on serine in vitro by purified T7PK, and identifies the targets as Ser33 and Ser34 in the N-terminal catalytic domain. Kinetic experiments reveal a 5-fold increase in kcat and a 1.4-fold decrease in Km following phosphorylation, providing a 7.4–fold increase in catalytic efficiency. Phosphorylation does not change the rate of substrate cleavage under single-turnover conditions, indicating that phosphorylation enhances product release, which also is the rate-limiting step in the steady-state. Molecular dynamics simulations provide a mechanism for facilitated product release, in which the Ser33 phosphomonoester forms a salt bridge with the Arg95 guanidinium group, thereby weakening RNase III engagement of product. The simulations also show why glutamic acid substitution at either serine does not confer enhancement, thus underscoring the specific requirement for a phosphomonoester.

  12. Structure of an Rrp6-RNA exosome complex bound to poly(A) RNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wasmuth, Elizabeth V.; Januszyk, Kurt; Lima, Christopher D. [MSKCC

    2014-08-20

    The eukaryotic RNA exosome processes and degrades RNA by directing substrates to the distributive or processive 3' to 5' exoribonuclease activities of Rrp6 or Rrp44, respectively. The non-catalytic nine-subunit exosome core (Exo9) features a prominent central channel. Although RNA can pass through the channel to engage Rrp44, it is not clear how RNA is directed to Rrp6 or whether Rrp6 uses the central channel. Here we report a 3.3 Å crystal structure of a ten-subunit RNA exosome complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae composed of the Exo9 core and Rrp6 bound to single-stranded poly(A) RNA. The Rrp6 catalytic domain rests on top of the Exo9 S1/KH ring above the central channel, the RNA 3' end is anchored in the Rrp6 active site, and the remaining RNA traverses the S1/KH ring in an opposite orientation to that observed in a structure of a Rrp44-containing exosome complex. Solution studies with human and yeast RNA exosome complexes suggest that the RNA path to Rrp6 is conserved and dependent on the integrity of the S1/KH ring. Although path selection to Rrp6 or Rrp44 is stochastic in vitro, the fate of a particular RNA may be determined in vivo by the manner in which cofactors present RNA to the RNA exosome.

  13. Catalytic methanol dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the methanol dissociation study on copper/potassium catalyst with alumina support at various temperatures are presented. The following gaseous and liquid products at. The catalytic methanol dissociation is obtained: hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, and dimethyl ether. Formation rates of these products are discussed. Activation energies of corresponding reactions are calculated

  14. Catalytic Phosphination and Arsination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwong Fuk Yee; Chan Kin Shing

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic, user-friendly phosphination and arsination of aryl halides and triflates by triphenylphosphine and triphenylarsine using palladium catalysts have provided a facile synthesis of functionalized aryl phosphines and arsines in neutral media. Modification of the cynaoarisne yielded optically active N, As ligands which will be screened in various asymmetric catalysis.

  15. Monolithic catalytic igniters

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Ferla, R.; Tuffias, R. H.; Jang, Q.

    1993-01-01

    Catalytic igniters offer the potential for excellent reliability and simplicity for use with the diergolic bipropellant oxygen/hydrogen as well as with the monopropellant hydrazine. State-of-the-art catalyst beds - noble metal/granular pellet carriers - currently used in hydrazine engines are limited by carrier stability, which limits the hot-fire temperature, and by poor thermal response due to the large thermal mass. Moreover, questions remain with regard to longevity and reliability of these catalysts. In this work, Ultramet investigated the feasibility of fabricating monolithic catalyst beds that overcome the limitations of current catalytic igniters via a combination of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) iridium coatings and chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) refractory ceramic foams. It was found that under all flow conditions and O2:H2 mass ratios tested, a high surface area monolithic bed outperformed a Shell 405 bed. Additionally, it was found that monolithic catalytic igniters, specifically porous ceramic foams fabricated by CVD/CVI processing, can be fabricated whose catalytic performance is better than Shell 405 and with significantly lower flow restriction, from materials that can operate at 2000 C or higher.

  16. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages 02

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Mast, Andrea L. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  17. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Jeff G. (Madison, WI); Lyamichev, Victor I. (Madison, WI); Mast, Andrea L. (Madison, WI); Brow, Mary Ann D. (Madison, WI)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  18. Implementation of a combinatorial cleavage and deprotection scheme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John; Rasmussen, Palle H.

    1996-01-01

    Phthalhydrazide libraries are synthesized in solution from substituted hydrazines and phthalimides in several different library formats including single compounds, indexed sub-libraries and a full library. When carried out during solid-phase synthesis, this combinatorial cleavage and deprotection...

  19. Scanning tunneling microscopy of the cleavage surface of bismuth crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of in situ studies of the surface structure of the cleavages of bismuth crystals by the method of scanning tunneling microscopy are presented. It is established that cleavage 'opens' the (111) surface with atomically smooth terraces of diatomic steps whose heights are equal to 0.4 nm or a multiple of this value. If the cleavage is made at room temperature, the boundaries of the terraces are usually curved and diffuse owing to the thermal motion with the activation energy of ∼700 K. The cleavage at liquid nitrogen or helium temperatures provides the formation of straight boundaries along the atomic rows on the surface. Twin interlayers of the quantized width of ∼7 nm are revealed. This width value indicates that the atomic planes on both sides of such interlayers intergrow with the interlayer planes inclined to them at a small angle

  20. Detection of nucleic acids by multiple sequential invasive cleavages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, Jeff G; Lyamichev, Victor I; Mast, Andrea L; Brow, Mary Ann D

    2012-10-16

    The present invention relates to means for the detection and characterization of nucleic acid sequences, as well as variations in nucleic acid sequences. The present invention also relates to methods for forming a nucleic acid cleavage structure on a target sequence and cleaving the nucleic acid cleavage structure in a site-specific manner. The structure-specific nuclease activity of a variety of enzymes is used to cleave the target-dependent cleavage structure, thereby indicating the presence of specific nucleic acid sequences or specific variations thereof. The present invention further relates to methods and devices for the separation of nucleic acid molecules based on charge. The present invention also provides methods for the detection of non-target cleavage products via the formation of a complete and activated protein binding region. The invention further provides sensitive and specific methods for the detection of human cytomegalovirus nucleic acid in a sample.

  1. A Historical Trend of Ethnic Cleavages in Contemporary Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Hussein Mohammadzadeh

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study is evaluation social and historical content of social cleavage in contemporary Iran. Analytical framework rooted in Rokan theory. Rokan believed that social cleavage appearance post of revolutions. Method of study was historical comparatives.The method of this research is comparative historical in which we used of historical documents and data. In this field, I have compared data of indexes of socio-economic of ethnic states.Assessment of data and documents show that so...

  2. Microbial cleavage of organic C-S bonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilbane, II, John J.

    1994-01-01

    A microbial process for selective cleavage of organic C--S bonds which may be used for reducing the sulfur content of sulfur-containing organic carbonaceous materials, Microorganisms of Rhodococcus rhodochrous and Bacillus sphaericus have been found which have the ability of selective cleavage of organic C--S bonds. Particularly preferred microorganisms are Rhodococcus rhodochrous strain ATCC 53968 and Bacillus sphaericus strain ATCC 53969 and their derivatives.

  3. Mutational analysis of the encephalomyocarditis virus primary cleavage.

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, H.; Palmenberg, A C

    1996-01-01

    Sixteen substitution mutations of the conserved DvExNPGP sequence, implicated in cardiovirus and aphthovirus primary polyprotein cleavage, were created in encephalomyocarditis virus cDNA, expressed, and characterized for processing activity. Nearly all the mutations severely decreased the efficiency of the primary cleavage reaction during cell-free synthesis of viral precursors, indicating a stringent requirement for the natural sequence in this processing event. When representative mutations...

  4. Modulation of RNA function by aminoglycoside antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, R; Waldsich, C; Wank, H

    2000-01-01

    One of the most important families of antibiotics are the aminoglycosides, including drugs such as neomycin B, paromomycin, gentamicin and streptomycin. With the discovery of the catalytic potential of RNA, these antibiotics became very popular due to their RNA-binding capacity. They serve for the analysis of RNA function as well as for the study of RNA as a potential therapeutic target. Improvements in RNA structure determination recently provided first insights into the decoding site of the ribosome at high resolution and how aminoglycosides might induce misreading of the genetic code. In addition to inhibiting prokaryotic translation, aminoglycosides inhibit several catalytic RNAs such as self-splicing group I introns, RNase P and small ribozymes in vitro. Furthermore, these antibiotics interfere with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication by disrupting essential RNA-protein contacts. Most exciting is the potential of many RNA-binding antibiotics to stimulate RNA activities, conceiving small-molecule partners for the hypothesis of an ancient RNA world. SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) has been used in this evolutionary game leading to small synthetic RNAs, whose NMR structures gave valuable information on how aminoglycosides interact with RNA, which could possibly be used in applied science. PMID:10619838

  5. Single Guide RNA Library Design and Construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tim; Lander, Eric S; Sabatini, David M

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes how to generate a single guide RNA (sgRNA) library for use in genetic screens. There are many online tools available for predicting sgRNA sequences with high target specificity and/or cleavage activity. Here, we refer the user to genome-wide sgRNA sequence predictions that we have developed for both the human and mouse and that are available from the Broad Institute website. Once a set of target genes and corresponding sgRNA sequences has been identified, customized oligonucleotide pools can be rapidly synthesized by a number of commercial vendors. Thereafter, as described here, the oligonucleotides can be efficiently cloned into an appropriate lentiviral expression vector backbone. The resulting plasmid pool can then be packaged into lentiviral particles and used to generate knockouts in any cell line of choice. PMID:26933249

  6. Chemical feasibility of the general acid/base mechanism of glmS ribozyme self-cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubecký, Matúš; Walter, Nils G; Šponer, Jiří; Otyepka, Michal; Banáš, Pavel

    2015-10-01

    In numerous Gram-positive bacteria, the glmS ribozyme or catalytic riboswitch regulates the expression of glucosamine-6-phosphate (GlcN6P) synthase via site-specific cleavage of its sugar-phosphate backbone in response to GlcN6P ligand binding. Biochemical data have suggested a crucial catalytic role for an active site guanine (G40 in Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis, G33 in Bacillus anthracis). We used hybrid quantum chemical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) calculations to probe the mechanism where G40 is deprotonated and acts as a general base. The calculations suggest that the deprotonated guanine G40(-) is sufficiently reactive to overcome the thermodynamic penalty arising from its rare protonation state, and thus is able to activate the A-1(2'-OH) group toward nucleophilic attack on the adjacent backbone. Furthermore, deprotonation of A-1(2'-OH) and nucleophilic attack are predicted to occur as separate steps, where activation of A-1(2'-OH) precedes nucleophilic attack. Conversely, the transition state associated with the rate-determining step corresponds to concurrent nucleophilic attack and protonation of the G1(O5') leaving group by the ammonium moiety of the GlcN6P cofactor. Overall, our calculations help to explain the crucial roles of G40 (as a general base) and GlcN6P (as a general acid) during glmS ribozyme self-cleavage. In addition, we show that the QM/MM description of the glmS ribozyme self-cleavage reaction is significantly more sensitive to the size of the QM region and the quality of the QM-MM coupling than that of other small ribozymes. PMID:25858644

  7. Genome-wide analysis for discovery of new rice miRNA reveals natural antisense miRNA (nat-miRNAs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Small RNAs (21-24nt) are involved in gene regulation through translation inhibition, mRNA cleavage, or directing chromatin modifications. In rice, currently ~240 miRNAs have been annotated. We sequenced more than four million small RNAs from rice and identified another 24 miRNA genes. Among these, w...

  8. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  9. Slicing tRNAs to boost functional ncRNA diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Gebetsberger, Jennifer; Polacek, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Post-transcriptional cleavage of RNA molecules to generate smaller fragments is a widespread mechanism that enlarges the structural and functional complexity of cellular RNomes. Substrates for such RNA fragmentations are coding as well as non-protein-coding RNAs. In particular, fragments derived from both precursor and mature tRNAs represent one of the rapidly growing classes of post-transcriptional RNA pieces. Importantly, these tRNA fragments possess distinct expression patterns, abundance,...

  10. Role of the interdomain linker in distance determination for remote cleavage by homing endonuclease I-TevI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qingqing; Dansereau, John T; Puttamadappa, Shadakshara S; Shekhtman, Alexander; Derbyshire, Victoria; Belfort, Marlene

    2008-06-20

    I-TevI is a modular intron-encoded endonuclease, consisting of an N-terminal catalytic domain and a C-terminal DNA-binding domain, joined by a 75 amino acid linker. This linker can be divided into three regions, starting at the N terminus: the deletion-intolerant (DI) region; the deletion-tolerant (DT) region; and a zinc finger, which acts as a distance determinant for cleavage. To further explore linker function, we generated deletion and substitution mutants that were tested for their preference to cleave at a particular distance or at the correct sequence. Our results demonstrate that the I-TevI linker is multi-functional, a property that sets it apart from junction sequences in most other proteins. First, the linker DI region has a role in I-TevI cleavage activity. Second, the DT linker region participates in distance determination, as evident from DT mutants that display a phenotype similar to that of the zinc-finger mutants in their selection of a cleavage site. Finally, NMR analysis of a freestanding 56 residue linker segment showed an unstructured stretch corresponding to the DI region and a portion of the DT region, followed by a beta-strand corresponding to the remainder of the DT region and containing a key distance-determining arginine, R129. Mutation of this arginine to alanine abolished distance determination and disrupted the beta-strand, indicating that the structure of the DT linker region has a role in cleavage at a fixed distance. PMID:18499124

  11. Hierarchical RNA Processing Is Required for Mitochondrial Ribosome Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rackham, Oliver; Busch, Jakob D; Matic, Stanka; Siira, Stefan J; Kuznetsova, Irina; Atanassov, Ilian; Ermer, Judith A; Shearwood, Anne-Marie J; Richman, Tara R; Stewart, James B; Mourier, Arnaud; Milenkovic, Dusanka; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Filipovska, Aleksandra

    2016-08-16

    The regulation of mitochondrial RNA processing and its importance for ribosome biogenesis and energy metabolism are not clear. We generated conditional knockout mice of the endoribonuclease component of the RNase P complex, MRPP3, and report that it is essential for life and that heart and skeletal-muscle-specific knockout leads to severe cardiomyopathy, indicating that its activity is non-redundant. Transcriptome-wide parallel analyses of RNA ends (PARE) and RNA-seq enabled us to identify that in vivo 5' tRNA cleavage precedes 3' tRNA processing, and this is required for the correct biogenesis of the mitochondrial ribosomal subunits. We identify that mitoribosomal biogenesis proceeds co-transcriptionally because large mitoribosomal proteins can form a subcomplex on an unprocessed RNA containing the 16S rRNA. Taken together, our data show that RNA processing links transcription to translation via assembly of the mitoribosome. PMID:27498866

  12. Structural analyses of Avocado sunblotch viroid reveal differences in the folding of plus and minus RNA strands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delan-Forino, Clémentine; Deforges, Jules; Benard, Lionel; Sargueil, Bruno; Maurel, Marie-Christine; Torchet, Claire

    2014-02-01

    Viroids are small pathogenic circular single-stranded RNAs, present in two complementary sequences, named plus and minus, in infected plant cells. A high degree of complementarities between different regions of the RNAs allows them to adopt complex structures. Since viroids are naked non-coding RNAs, interactions with host factors appear to be closely related to their structural and catalytic characteristics. Avocado sunblotch viroid (ASBVd), a member of the family Avsunviroidae, replicates via a symmetric RNA-dependant rolling-circle process, involving self-cleavage via hammerhead ribozymes. Consequently, it is assumed that ASBVd plus and minus strands adopt similar structures. Moreover, by computer analyses, a quasi-rod-like secondary structure has been predicted. Nevertheless, secondary and tertiary structures of both polarities of ASBVd remain unsolved. In this study, we analyzed the characteristic of each strand of ASBVd through biophysical analyses. We report that ASBVd transcripts of plus and minus polarities exhibit differences in electrophoretic mobility under native conditions and in thermal denaturation profiles. Subsequently, the secondary structures of plus and minus polarities of ASBVd were probed using the RNA-selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) method. The models obtained show that both polarities fold into different structures. Moreover, our results suggest the existence of a kissing-loop interaction within the minus strand that may play a role in in vivo viroid life cycle. PMID:24481250

  13. Structural Analyses of Avocado sunblotch viroid Reveal Differences in the Folding of Plus and Minus RNA Strands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clémentine Delan-Forino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Viroids are small pathogenic circular single-stranded RNAs, present in two complementary sequences, named plus and minus, in infected plant cells. A high degree of complementarities between different regions of the RNAs allows them to adopt complex structures. Since viroids are naked non-coding RNAs, interactions with host factors appear to be closely related to their structural and catalytic characteristics. Avocado sunblotch viroid (ASBVd, a member of the family Avsunviroidae, replicates via a symmetric RNA-dependant rolling-circle process, involving self-cleavage via hammerhead ribozymes. Consequently, it is assumed that ASBVd plus and minus strands adopt similar structures. Moreover, by computer analyses, a quasi-rod-like secondary structure has been predicted. Nevertheless, secondary and tertiary structures of both polarities of ASBVd remain unsolved. In this study, we analyzed the characteristic of each strand of ASBVd through biophysical analyses. We report that ASBVd transcripts of plus and minus polarities exhibit differences in electrophoretic mobility under native conditions and in thermal denaturation profiles. Subsequently, the secondary structures of plus and minus polarities of ASBVd were probed using the RNA-selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE method. The models obtained show that both polarities fold into different structures. Moreover, our results suggest the existence of a kissing-loop interaction within the minus strand that may play a role in in vivo viroid life cycle.

  14. Early cleavages influence the molecular and the metabolic pattern of individually cultured bovine blastocysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milazzotto, Marcella Pecora; Goissis, Marcelo Demarchi; Chitwood, James Lee; Annes, Kelly; Soares, Carlos Alexandre; Ispada, Jéssica; Assumpção, Mayra Elena Ortiz Ávila; Ross, Pablo Juan

    2016-04-01

    Embryo morphokinetics suggests that the timing of the first embryonic cell divisions may predict the developmental potential of an embryo; however, correlations between embryonic morphokinetics and physiology are not clear. Here, we used RNA sequencing to determine the gene expression profile of in vitro-produced early- and late-dividing bovine embryos and their respective blastocysts, and compared these profiles to in vivo-produced blastocysts to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Principal component analysis revealed that fast- and slow-dividing embryos possess similar transcript abundance over the first cleavages. By the blastocyst stage, however, more DEGs were observed between the fast- and slow-dividing embryo groups, whereas blastocysts from the slow-dividing group were more similar to in vivo-produced blastocysts. Gene ontology enrichment analysis showed that the slow-dividing and in vivo-produced blastocysts shared biological processes related to groups of up- or down-regulated genes when compared to the fast-dividing blastocysts. Based on these DEG results, we characterized the relationship between developmental kinetics and energy metabolism of in vitro-produced bovine embryos. Embryos from fast- and slow-dividing groups exhibited different pyruvate and lactate metabolism at 22 hr post-in vitro culture (hpc), glucose consumption at 96 hpc, and glutamate metabolism at 168 hpc. Glycogen storage was similar between cleavage-stage and morulae groups, but was higher in the blastocysts of the slow-dividing group. On the other hand, blastocysts of the fast-dividing group had a higher concentration of lipids. Taken together, these data identify transcriptomic and metabolic differences between embryos with different morphokinetics, suggesting that sorting embryos based on cleavage speed may select for different metabolic patterns. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 83: 324-336, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26822777

  15. Pripper: prediction of caspase cleavage sites from whole proteomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmi Jussi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caspases are a family of proteases that have central functions in programmed cell death (apoptosis and inflammation. Caspases mediate their effects through aspartate-specific cleavage of their target proteins, and at present almost 400 caspase substrates are known. There are several methods developed to predict caspase cleavage sites from individual proteins, but currently none of them can be used to predict caspase cleavage sites from multiple proteins or entire proteomes, or to use several classifiers in combination. The possibility to create a database from predicted caspase cleavage products for the whole genome could significantly aid in identifying novel caspase targets from tandem mass spectrometry based proteomic experiments. Results Three different pattern recognition classifiers were developed for predicting caspase cleavage sites from protein sequences. Evaluation of the classifiers with quality measures indicated that all of the three classifiers performed well in predicting caspase cleavage sites, and when combining different classifiers the accuracy increased further. A new tool, Pripper, was developed to utilize the classifiers and predict the caspase cut sites from an arbitrary number of input sequences. A database was constructed with the developed tool, and it was used to identify caspase target proteins from tandem mass spectrometry data from two different proteomic experiments. Both known caspase cleavage products as well as novel cleavage products were identified using the database demonstrating the usefulness of the tool. Pripper is not restricted to predicting only caspase cut sites, but it gives the possibility to scan protein sequences for any given motif(s and predict cut sites once a suitable cut site prediction model for any other protease has been developed. Pripper is freely available and can be downloaded from http://users.utu.fi/mijopi/Pripper. Conclusions We have developed Pripper, a tool for

  16. Cell-surface acceleration of urokinase-catalyzed receptor cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høyer-Hansen, G; Ploug, M; Behrendt, N;

    1997-01-01

    or indirectly mediated by uPA itself. In a soluble system, uPA can cleave purified uPAR, but the low efficiency of this reaction has raised doubts as to whether uPA is directly responsible for uPAR cleavage on the cells. We now report that uPA-catalyzed cleavage of uPAR on the cell surface is...... strongly favored relative to the reaction in solution. The time course of uPA-catalyzed cleavage of cell-bound uPAR was studied using U937 cells stimulated with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Only 30 min was required for 10 nM uPA to cleave 50% of the cell-bound uPAR. This uPA-catalyzed cleavage reaction...... was inhibited by a prior incubation of the cells with uPA inactivated by diisopropyl fluorophosphate, demonstrating a requirement for specific receptor binding of the active uPA to obtain the high-efficiency cleavage of cell-bound uPAR. Furthermore, amino-terminal sequence analysis revealed that u...

  17. Cas9-mediated targeting of viral RNA in eukaryotic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Aryn A.; Sampson, Timothy R.; Ratner, Hannah K.; Grakoui, Arash; Weiss, David S

    2015-01-01

    The clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats associated endonuclease, Cas9, has quickly become a revolutionary tool in genome engineering. Utilizing small guiding RNAs, Cas9 can be targeted to specific DNA sequences of interest, where it catalyzes DNA cleavage. We now demonstrate that Cas9 from the Gram-negative bacterium Francisella novicida (FnCas9) can be reprogrammed to target a specific RNA substrate, the genome of the +ssRNA virus, hepatitis C virus, in eukaryotic cel...

  18. Nuclear distribution and chromatin association of DNA polymerase α-primase is affected by TEV protease cleavage of Cdc23 (Mcm10 in fission yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregan Juraj

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cdc23/Mcm10 is required for the initiation and elongation steps of DNA replication but its biochemical function is unclear. Here, we probe its function using a novel approach in fission yeast, involving Cdc23 cleavage by the TEV protease. Results Insertion of a TEV protease cleavage site into Cdc23 allows in vivo removal of the C-terminal 170 aa of the protein by TEV protease induction, resulting in an S phase arrest. This C-terminal fragment of Cdc23 is not retained in the nucleus after cleavage, showing that it lacks a nuclear localization signal and ability to bind to chromatin. Using an in situ chromatin binding procedure we have determined how the S phase chromatin association of DNA polymerase α-primase and the GINS (Sld5-Psf1-Psf2-Psf3 complex is affected by Cdc23 inactivation. The chromatin binding and sub-nuclear distribution of DNA primase catalytic subunit (Spp1 is affected by Cdc23 cleavage and also by inactivation of Cdc23 using a degron allele, implying that DNA polymerase α-primase function is dependent on Cdc23. In contrast to the effect on Spp1, the chromatin association of the Psf2 subunit of the GINS complex is not affected by Cdc23 inactivation. Conclusion An important function of Cdc23 in the elongation step of DNA replication may be to assist in the docking of DNA polymerase α-primase to chromatin.

  19. Characterization of the psbH precursor RNAs reveals a precise endoribonuclease cleavage site in the psbT/psbH intergenic region that is dependent on psbN gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Fabien; Ghulam, Mustafa Malik; Rondet, Damien; Pfannschmidt, Thomas; Merendino, Livia; Lerbs-Mache, Silva

    2015-07-01

    The plastid psbB operon harbours 5 genes, psbB, psbT, psbH, petB and petD. A sixth gene, the psbN gene, is located on the opposite DNA strand in the psbT/psbH intergenic region. Its transcription produces antisense RNA to a large part of the psbB pentacistronic mRNA. We have investigated whether transcription of the psbN gene, i.e. production of antisense RNA, influences psbT/psbH intergenic processing. Results reveal the existence of four different psbH precursor RNAs. Three of them result from processing and one is produced by transcription initiation. One of the processed RNAs is probably created by site-specific RNA cleavage. This RNA is absent in plants where the psbN gene is not transcribed suggesting that cleavage at this site is dependent on the formation of sense/antisense double-stranded RNA. In order to characterize the nuclease that might be responsible for double-stranded RNA cleavage, we analysed csp41a and csp41b knock-out mutants and the corresponding double mutant. Both CSP41 proteins are known to interact physically and CSP41a had been shown to cleave within 3'-untranslated region stem-loop structures, which contain double-stranded RNA, in vitro. We demonstrate that the psbH RNA, that is absent in plants where the psbN gene is not transcribed, is also strongly diminished in all csp41 plants. Altogether, results reveal a site-specific endoribonuclease cleavage event that seems to depend on antisense RNA and might implicate endoribonuclease activity of CSP41a. PMID:26012647

  20. TRAIL-induced cleavage and inactivation of SPAK sensitizes cells to apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ste20-related proline-alanine-rich kinase (SPAK) has been linked to various cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, and ion transport regulation. Recently, we showed that SPAK mediates signaling by the TNF receptor, RELT. The presence of a caspase cleavage site in SPAK prompted us to study its involvement in apoptotic signaling induced by another TNF member, TRAIL. We show that TRAIL stimulated caspase 3-like proteases that cleaved SPAK at two distinct sites. Cleavage had little effect on the activity of SPAK but removed its substrate-binding domain. In addition, TRAIL reduced the activity of SPAK in HeLa cells in a caspase-independent manner. Thus, TRAIL inhibited SPAK by two mechanisms: activation of caspases, which removed its substrate-binding domain, and caspase-independent down-regulation of SPAK activity. Furthermore, reducing the amount of SPAK by siRNA increased the sensitivity of HeLa cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Thus, TRAIL down-regulation of SPAK is an important event that enhances its apoptotic effects

  1. The Oxygenase CAO-1 of Neurospora crassa Is a Resveratrol Cleavage Enzyme

    KAUST Repository

    Diaz-Sanchez, V.

    2013-07-26

    The genome of the ascomycete Neurospora crassa encodes CAO-1 and CAO-2, two members of the carotenoid cleavage oxygenase family that target double bonds in different substrates. Previous studies demonstrated the role of CAO-2 in cleaving the C40 carotene torulene, a key step in the synthesis of the C35 apocarotenoid pigment neurosporaxanthin. In this work, we investigated the activity of CAO-1, assuming that it may provide retinal, the chromophore of the NOP-1 rhodopsin, by cleaving β-carotene. For this purpose, we tested CAO-1 activity with carotenoid substrates that were, however, not converted. In contrast and consistent with its sequence similarity to family members that act on stilbenes, CAO-1 cleaved the interphenyl Cα-Cβ double bond of resveratrol and its derivative piceatannol. CAO-1 did not convert five other similar stilbenes, indicating a requirement for a minimal number of unmodified hydroxyl groups in the stilbene background. Confirming its biological function in converting stilbenes, adding resveratrol led to a pronounced increase in cao-1 mRNA levels, while light, a key regulator of carotenoid metabolism, did not alter them. Targeted Δcao-1 mutants were not impaired by the presence of resveratrol, a phytoalexin active against different fungi, which did not significantly affect the growth and development of wild-type Neurospora. However, under partial sorbose toxicity, the Δcao-1 colonies exhibited faster radial growth than control strains in the presence of resveratrol, suggesting a moderate toxic effect of resveratrol cleavage products.

  2. Several RNase T2 enzymes function in induced tRNA and rRNA turnover in the ciliate Tetrahymena

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Langebjerg; Collins, Kathleen

    2012-01-01

    RNase T2 enzymes are produced by a wide range of organisms and have been implicated to function in diverse cellular processes, including stress-induced anticodon loop cleavage of mature tRNAs to generate tRNA halves. Here we describe a family of eight RNase T2 genes (RNT2A-RNT2H) in the ciliate...

  3. Human nonsense-mediated RNA decay initiates widely by endonucleolysis and targets snoRNA host genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke-Andersen, Søren; Chen, Yun; Ardal, Britt; Lilje, Berit; Waage, Johannes Eichler; Sandelin, Albin Gustav; Jensen, Torben Heick

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNAs with premature termination codons (PTCs) are eliminated by nonsense-mediated decay (NMD). While human nonsense RNA degradation can be initiated either by an endonucleolytic cleavage event near the PTC or through decapping, the individual contribution of these activities on endogen...

  4. Catalytic reforming process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Absil, R.P.; Huss, A. Jr.; McHale, W.D.; Partridge, R.D.

    1989-06-13

    This patent describes a catalytic reforming process which comprises contacting a naphtha range feed with a low acidity extrudate comprising an intermediate and/or a large pore acidic zeolite bound with a low acidity refractory oxide under reforming conditions to provide a reaction product of increased aromatic content, the extrudate having been prepared with at least an extrusion-facilitating amount of a low acidity refractory oxide in colloidal form and containing at least one metal species selected from the platinum group metals.

  5. Analytical model for intergrain expansion and cleavage: random grain boundaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description of rigid-body grain boundary relaxation and cleavage in tungsten is performed using a pair-wise Morse interatomic potential in real and reciprocal spaces. Cleavage energies and grain boundary dilatation of random grain boundaries were formulated and computed using atomic layer interaction energies. These values were determined using a model for a relaxed random grain boundary that consists of rigid grains on either side of the boundary plane that are allowed to float to reach the equilibrium position. Expressions are given that describe in real space the energy of interatomic interaction on random grain boundaries with twist orientation. It was shown that grain-boundary expansion and cleavage energies of the most widespread random grain boundaries are mainly determined by grain boundary atomic density

  6. A new cultural cleavage in post-modern society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan-Erik Lane

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The attitudes towards gender and homosexuality tend to be linked at the micro level (individuals, which explains the political saliency of this newly emerging cleavage. At the macro level (country, the main finding is that the value orientations towards gender and homosexuality are strongly embedded in the basic cultural or civilisation differences among countries. As developing countries modernise and enter post-modernity, they will also experience the gender cleavage, especially when they adhere to an individualistic culture. Cultural cleavages in the post-modern society, whether in rich or developing countries, can only be properly researched by the survey method. It opens up a large area for both micro and macro analyses in the social sciences.

  7. Translation termination factor eRF3 is targeted for caspase-mediated proteolytic cleavage and degradation during DNA damage-induced apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yoshifumi; Hosoda, Nao; Datta, Pinaki; Alnemri, Emad S; Hoshino, Shin-ichi

    2012-12-01

    Polypeptide chain release factor eRF3 plays pivotal roles in translation termination and post-termination events including ribosome recycling and mRNA decay. It is not clear, however, if eRF3 is targeted for the regulation of gene expression. Here we show that DNA-damaging agents (UV and etoposide) induce the immediate cleavage and degradation of eRF3 in a caspase-dependent manner. The effect is selective since the binding partners of eRF3, eRF1 and PABP, and an unrelated control, GAPDH, were not affected. Point mutations of aspartate residues within overlapping DXXD motifs near the amino terminus of eRF3 prevented the appearance of the UV-induced cleavage product, identifying D32 as the major cleavage site. The cleavage and degradation occurred in a similar time-dependent manner to those of eIF4G, a previously established caspase-3 target involved in the inhibition of translation during apoptosis. siRNA-mediated knockdown of eRF3 led to inhibition of cellular protein synthesis, supporting the idea that the decrease in the amount of eRF3 caused by the caspase-mediated degradation contributes to the inhibition of translation during apoptosis. This is the first report showing that eRF3 could serve as a target in the regulation of gene expression. PMID:23054082

  8. Three-dimensional interpretation of cleavage fracture tests of cladded specimens with local approach to cleavage fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electricite de France has conducted during these last years an experimental and numerical research programme in order to evaluate fracture mechanics analyses used in nuclear reactor pressure vessels integrity assessment, regarding the risk of brittle fracture. Two cladded specimens made of ferritic steel A508 Cl3 with stainless steel cladding, and containing shallow subclad flaws, have been tested in four point bending at very low temperature to obtain cleavage failure. The crack instability was obtained in base metal by cleavage fracture, without crack arrest. The tests have been interpreted by local approach to cleavage fracture (Beremin model) using three-dimensional finite element computations. After the elastic-plastic computation of stress intensity factor KJ along the crack front, the probability of cleavage failure of each specimen is evaluated using m, σu Beremin model parameters identified on the same material. The failure of two specimens is conservatively predicted by both analyses. The elastic-plastic stress intensity factor KJ in base metal is always greater than base metal fracture toughness K1c. The calculated probabilities of cleavage failure are in agreement with experimental results. The sensitivity of Beremin model to numerical aspects is finally exposed. (orig.)

  9. RNA Thermodynamic Structural Entropy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Garcia-Martin

    Full Text Available Conformational entropy for atomic-level, three dimensional biomolecules is known experimentally to play an important role in protein-ligand discrimination, yet reliable computation of entropy remains a difficult problem. Here we describe the first two accurate and efficient algorithms to compute the conformational entropy for RNA secondary structures, with respect to the Turner energy model, where free energy parameters are determined from UV absorption experiments. An algorithm to compute the derivational entropy for RNA secondary structures had previously been introduced, using stochastic context free grammars (SCFGs. However, the numerical value of derivational entropy depends heavily on the chosen context free grammar and on the training set used to estimate rule probabilities. Using data from the Rfam database, we determine that both of our thermodynamic methods, which agree in numerical value, are substantially faster than the SCFG method. Thermodynamic structural entropy is much smaller than derivational entropy, and the correlation between length-normalized thermodynamic entropy and derivational entropy is moderately weak to poor. In applications, we plot the structural entropy as a function of temperature for known thermoswitches, such as the repression of heat shock gene expression (ROSE element, we determine that the correlation between hammerhead ribozyme cleavage activity and total free energy is improved by including an additional free energy term arising from conformational entropy, and we plot the structural entropy of windows of the HIV-1 genome. Our software RNAentropy can compute structural entropy for any user-specified temperature, and supports both the Turner'99 and Turner'04 energy parameters. It follows that RNAentropy is state-of-the-art software to compute RNA secondary structure conformational entropy. Source code is available at https://github.com/clotelab/RNAentropy/; a full web server is available at http

  10. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  11. Synthesis, antioxidant and DNA cleavage activities of novel indole derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biradar, J S; Sasidhar, B S; Parveen, R

    2010-09-01

    A new series of novel indole derivatives containing barbitone moiety (5a-i) are synthesized by simple and efficient condensation of chalcones (3a-i) with barbituric acid (4). The synthesized compounds are screened for their antioxidant (free radical scavenging, total antioxidant capacity and ferric reducing antioxidant power) and DNA cleavage activities were evaluated. Among the synthesized compounds (5a), (5d) and (5g) exhibited excellent antioxidant activity and all the tested compounds in the series have exhibited promising DNA cleavage activities. The structures of the synthesized compounds are assigned on the basis of elemental analysis, IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and mass spectral data. PMID:20594623

  12. Sensitive and fast mutation detection by solid phase chemical cleavage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lise Lotte; Justesen, Just; Kruse, Torben A

    1996-01-01

    We have developed a solid phase chemical cleavage method (SpCCM) for screening large DNA fragments for mutations. All reactions can be carried out in microtiterwells from the first amplification of the patient (or test) DNA through the search for mutations. The reaction time is significantly...... reduced compared to the conventional chemical cleavage method (CCM), and even by using a uniformly labelled probe, the exact position and nature of the mutation can be revealed. The SpCCM is suitable for automatization using a workstation to carry out the reactions and a fluorescent detection-based DNA...

  13. Evolution of DNA and RNA as catalysts for chemical reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäschke, A; Seelig, B

    2000-06-01

    In vitro selection from combinatorial nucleic acid libraries has provided new RNA and DNA molecules that have catalytic properties. Catalyzed reactions now go far beyond self-modifying reactions of nucleic acid molecules. The future application of in vitro selected RNA and DNA catalysts in bioorganic synthesis appears promising. PMID:10826969

  14. Inhibition of Cleavage of a Plant Viral Polyprotein by an Inhibitor Activity Present in Wheat Germ and Cowpea Embryos †

    OpenAIRE

    Shih, Ding S.; Bu, Ming; Price, Mary A.; Shih, Chao-Yun T.

    1987-01-01

    In rabbit reticulocyte lysate, the bottom component RNA of cowpea mosaic virus directs the synthesis of a 200,000-molecular-weight precursor protein (200K protein) that is cleaved during synthesis by a reticulocyte enzyme to form a 32K protein and a 170K protein. Cleavage of the 200K protein was found to be effectively inhibited by inhibitor activity in wheat germ and cowpea embryo extracts. The inhibitor was nondialyzable, precipitatable by ammonium sulfate, and partially stable at high temp...

  15. Expression of Recombinant Chinese Bovine Enterokinase Catalytic Subunit in P.pastoris and Its Purification and Characterization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei FANG; Qi-Ming SUN; Zi-Chun HUA

    2004-01-01

    Enterokinase is a tool protease widely utilized in the cleavage of recombinant fusion proteins.cDNA encoding the catalytic subunit of Chinese bovine enterokinase (EKL) was amplified by PCR and then to get the α-MF signal-EKL-His6 encoding gene by PCR. Then the whole coding sequence was cloned into the integrative plasmid pAO815 under the control of a methanol-inducible promoter and transformed GS 115methylotrophic strain of Pichiapastoris. Secreted expression of recombinant EKL-His6 was attained by methanol induction and its molecular weight is 43 kD. Because of the existence of His6-tag, EKL-His6 was easily purified from P. pastoris fermentation supernatant by using Ni2+ affinity chromatography and the yield is 5.4 mg per liter of fermentation culture. This purified EKL-His6 demonstrates excellent cleavage activity towards fusion protein containing EK cleavage site.

  16. Integration of Expressed Sequence Tag Data Flanking Predicted RNA Secondary Structures Facilitates Novel Non-Coding RNA Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzyzanowski, Paul M.; Price, Feodor D.; Muro, Enrique M.; Rudnicki, Michael A.; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Many computational methods have been used to predict novel non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), but none, to our knowledge, have explicitly investigated the impact of integrating existing cDNA-based Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) data that flank structural RNA predictions. To determine whether flanking EST data can assist in microRNA (miRNA) prediction, we identified genomic sites encoding putative miRNAs by combining functional RNA predictions with flanking ESTs data in a model consistent with miRNAs undergoing cleavage during maturation. In both human and mouse genomes, we observed that the inclusion of flanking ESTs adjacent to and not overlapping predicted miRNAs significantly improved the performance of various methods of miRNA prediction, including direct high-throughput sequencing of small RNA libraries. We analyzed the expression of hundreds of miRNAs predicted to be expressed during myogenic differentiation using a customized microarray and identified several known and predicted myogenic miRNA hairpins. Our results indicate that integrating ESTs flanking structural RNA predictions improves the quality of cleaved miRNA predictions and suggest that this strategy can be used to predict other non-coding RNAs undergoing cleavage during maturation. PMID:21698286

  17. Kinetic analysis of the effects of target structure on siRNA efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiawen; Zhang, Wenbing

    2012-12-01

    RNAi efficiency for target cleavage and protein expression is related to the target structure. Considering the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) as a multiple turnover enzyme, we investigated the effect of target mRNA structure on siRNA efficiency with kinetic analysis. The 4-step model was used to study the target cleavage kinetic process: hybridization nucleation at an accessible target site, RISC-mRNA hybrid elongation along with mRNA target structure melting, target cleavage, and enzyme reactivation. At this model, the terms accounting for the target accessibility, stability, and the seed and the nucleation site effects are all included. The results are in good agreement with that of experiments which show different arguments about the structure effects on siRNA efficiency. It shows that the siRNA efficiency is influenced by the integrated factors of target's accessibility, stability, and the seed effects. To study the off-target effects, a simple model of one siRNA binding to two mRNA targets was designed. By using this model, the possibility for diminishing the off-target effects by the concentration of siRNA was discussed.

  18. Evolution of random catalytic networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, S.M. [Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States); Reidys, C.M. [Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States)]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-06-01

    In this paper the authors investigate the evolution of populations of sequences on a random catalytic network. Sequences are mapped into structures, between which are catalytic interactions that determine their instantaneous fitness. The catalytic network is constructed as a random directed graph. They prove that at certain parameter values, the probability of some relevant subgraphs of this graph, for example cycles without outgoing edges, is maximized. Populations evolving under point mutations realize a comparatively small induced subgraph of the complete catalytic network. They present results which show that populations reliably discover and persist on directed cycles in the catalytic graph, though these may be lost because of stochastic effects, and study the effect of population size on this behavior.

  19. Fe-Catalyzed Oxidative Cleavage of Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spannring, P.

    2013-01-01

    The oxidative cleavage of unsaturated fatty acids into aldehydes or carboxylic acids gives access to valuable products. The products can be used as chemical building blocks, as emulsifiers or in the paint or polymer industry. Ozonolysis is applied industrially to cleave the fatty acid oleic acid int

  20. Perceiving Social Cleavages and Inequalities: The Case of Israeli Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Yechezkel; Erhard, Rachel; Resh, Nura

    1998-01-01

    An analysis of perceptions of social cleavage and inequality among approximately 9000 Israeli eighth and ninth graders showed students accurately comprehended a multifaceted society with major social divisions. A social map with inequality was revealed in which ethnicity played the least prominent role. Personal and social traits influenced…

  1. The pattern of DNA cleavage intensity around indels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei; Zhang, Liqing

    2015-01-01

    Indels (insertions and deletions) are the second most common form of genetic variations in the eukaryotic genomes and are responsible for a multitude of genetic diseases. Despite its significance, detailed molecular mechanisms for indel generation are still unclear. Here we examined 2,656,597 small human and mouse germline indels, 16,742 human somatic indels, 10,599 large human insertions, and 5,822 large chimpanzee insertions and systematically analyzed the patterns of DNA cleavage intensities in the 200 base pair regions surrounding these indels. Our results show that DNA cleavage intensities close to the start and end points of indels are significantly lower than other regions, for both small human germline and somatic indels and also for mouse small indels. Compared to small indels, the patterns of DNA cleavage intensity around large indels are more complex, and there are two low intensity regions near each end of the indels that are approximately 13 bp apart from each other. Detailed analyses of a subset of indels show that there is slight difference in cleavage intensity distribution between insertion indels and deletion indels that could be contributed by their respective enrichment of different repetitive elements. These results will provide new insight into indel generation mechanisms. PMID:25660536

  2. Cleavage sites within the poliovirus capsid protein precursors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partial amino-terminal sequence analysis was performed on radiolabeled poliovirus capsid proteins VP1, VP2, and VP3. A computer-assisted comparison of the amino acid sequences obtained with that predicted by the nucleotide sequence of the poliovirus genome allows assignment of the amino terminus of each capsid protein to a unique position within the virus polyprotein. Sequence analysis of trypsin-digested VP4, which has a blocked amino terminus, demonstrates that VP4 is encoded at or very near to the amino terminus of the polyprotein. The gene order of the capsid proteins is VP4-VP2-VP3-VP1. Cleavage of VP0 to VP4 and VP2 is shown to occur between asparagine and serine, whereas the cleavages that separate VP2/VP3 and VP3/VP1 occur between glutamine and glycine residues. This finding supports the hypothesis that the cleavage of VP0, which occurs during virion morphogenesis, is distinct from the cleavages that separate functional regions of the polyprotein

  3. Selective cleavage enhanced by acetylating the side chain of lysine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Leixiaomeng; Chen, Tingting; Xue, Gaiqing; Zu, Lily; Fang, Weihai

    2013-01-01

    Selective cleavage is of great interest in mass spectrometry studies as it can help sequence identification by promoting simple fragmentation pattern of peptides and proteins. In this work, the collision-induced dissociation of peptides containing internal lysine and acetylated lysine residues were studied. The experimental and computational results revealed that multiple fragmentation pathways coexisted when the lysine residue was two amino acid residues away from N-terminal of the peptide. After acetylation of the lysine side-chain, b(n)+ ions were the most abundant primary fragment products and the Lys(Ac)-Gly amide bond became the dominant cleavage site via an oxazolone pathway. Acetylating the side-chain of lysine promoted the selective cleavage of Lys-Xxx amide bond and generated much more information of the peptide backbone sequence. The results re-evaluate the selective cleavage due to the lysine basic side-chain and provide information for studying the post-translational modification of proteins and other bio-molecules containing Lys residues. PMID:23303756

  4. Phosphate diester cleavage promoted by the novel artificial biomimetic agent

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bím, Daniel; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Hodačová, J.

    Praha: Czech Chemical Society, 2014. s. 51. [Liblice 2014. Advances in Organic, Bioorganic and Pharmaceutical Chemistry /49./. 07.11.2014-09.11.2014, Lázně Bělohrad] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : phosphate diesters * bond cleavage Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  5. Modeling Radial Holoblastic Cleavage: A Laboratory Activity for Developmental Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Linda K.

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a laboratory activity designed for an undergraduate developmental biology course. Uses Play-Doh (plastic modeling clay) to build a multicellular embryo in order to provide a 3-D demonstration of cleavage. Includes notes for the instructor and student directions. (YDS)

  6. Sequence specific inhibition of DNA restriction enzyme cleavage by PNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, P.E.; Egholm, M.; Berg, R.H.;

    1993-01-01

    Plasmids containing double-stranded 10-mer PNA (peptide nucleic acid chimera) targets proximally flanked by two restriction enzyme sites were challenged with the complementary PNA or PNAs having one or two mismatches, and the effect on the restriction enzyme cleavage of the flanking sites was...

  7. Rhodium-catalyzed C-C bond cleavage reactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nečas, D.; Kotora, Martin

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 17 (2007), s. 1566-1591. ISSN 1385-2728 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : rhodium * catalysis * C-C bond cleavage Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.961, year: 2007

  8. Bifunctional catalytic electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisar, Alan (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Clarke, Eric (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to an oxygen electrode for a unitized regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell and the unitized regenerative fuel cell having the oxygen electrode. The oxygen electrode contains components electrocatalytically active for the evolution of oxygen from water and the reduction of oxygen to water, and has a structure that supports the flow of both water and gases between the catalytically active surface and a flow field or electrode chamber for bulk flow of the fluids. The electrode has an electrocatalyst layer and a diffusion backing layer interspersed with hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. The diffusion backing layer consists of a metal core having gas diffusion structures bonded to the metal core.

  9. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  10. Catalytic mechanism and product specificity of cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase, a prototypical transglycosylase from the α-amylase family

    OpenAIRE

    Uitdehaag, Joost C.M.; Veen, Bart A. van der; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    2002-01-01

    The catalytic mechanism of cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase, a member of the α-amylase family, is reviewed. The focus is put on the bond cleavage mechanism, the nature of the transition state and of the covalent intermediate, and on the stereo-electronic and lateral protonation contributions to catalysis. The functions in catalysis of the absolutely conserved residues in this family are discussed. Finally, the fascinating capability of cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase to produce cyclodextrins...

  11. Catalytic ring opening of decalin. Biofunctional versus hydrogenolytic pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weitkamp, J.; Rabl, S.; Haas, A.; Santi, D. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Chemical Technology; Ferrari, M.; Calemma, V. [Eni R and M Div., San Donato Milanese (Italy)

    2010-12-30

    Ir/silica, Pt/La-X and Rh/H-Beta were prepared and tested in the hydroconversion of cisdecalin at different temperatures. The catalytic tests were carried out under hydrogen in a high-pressure flow-type apparatus at 5.2 MPa. On the three catalysts open-chain decane yields up to 20 % were achieved, which is much higher than the yields reported so far in the literature. Pt/La-X and Rh/H-Beta behave as bifunctional catalysts with a high tendency for skeletal isomerization. On these catalysts the so-called paring reaction via carbenium ions occurs, leading to iso-butane and methylcyclopentane as main hydrocracked products. On Ir/SiO{sub 2}, carbon-carbon bond cleavage occurs through hydrogenolysis on the noble metal without prior isomerization. As a consequence the product spectrum is less complex than on the bifunctional catalysts which makes the system particularly amenable to mechanistic studies. (orig.)

  12. The dynamics and efficacy of antiviral RNA silencing: A model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogeweg Paulien

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mathematical modeling is important to provide insight in the complicated pathway of RNA silencing. RNA silencing is an RNA based mechanism that is widely used by eukaryotes to fight viruses, and to control gene expression. Results We here present the first mathematical model that combines viral growth with RNA silencing. The model involves a plus-strand RNA virus that replicates through a double-strand RNA intermediate. The model of the RNA silencing pathway consists of cleavage of viral RNA into siRNA by Dicer, target cleavage of viral RNA via the RISC complex, and a secondary response. We found that, depending on the strength of the silencing response, different viral growth patterns can occur. Silencing can decrease viral growth, cause oscillations, or clear the virus completely. Our model can explain various observed phenomena, even when they seem contradictory at first: the diverse responses to the removal of RNA dependent RNA polymerase; different viral growth curves; and the great diversity in observed siRNA ratios. Conclusion The model presented here is an important step in the understanding of the natural functioning of RNA silencing in viral infections.

  13. Crack tip blunting and cleavage under dynamic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, V. P.; Curtin, W. A.

    2016-05-01

    In structural materials with both brittle and ductile phases, cracks often initiate within the brittle phase and propagate dynamically towards the ductile phase. The macroscale, quasistatic toughness of the material thus depends on the outcome of this microscale, dynamic process. Indeed, dynamics has been hypothesized to suppress dislocation emission, which may explain the occurrence of brittle transgranular fracture in mild steels at low temperatures (Lin et al., 1987). Here, crack tip blunting and cleavage under dynamic conditions are explored using continuum mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations. The focus is on two questions: (1) whether dynamics can affect the energy barriers for dislocation emission and cleavage, and (2) what happens in the dynamic "overloaded" situation, in which both processes are energetically possible. In either case, dynamics may shift the balance between brittle cleavage and ductile blunting, thereby affecting the intrinsic ductility of the material. To explore these effects in simulation, a novel interatomic potential is used for which the intrinsic ductility is tunable, and a novel simulation technique is employed, termed as a "dynamic cleavage test", in which cracks can be run dynamically at a prescribed energy release rate into a material. Both theory and simulation reveal, however, that the intrinsic ductility of a material is unaffected by dynamics. The energy barrier to dislocation emission appears to be identical in quasi-static and dynamic conditions, and, in the overloaded situation, ductile crack tip behavior ultimately prevails since a single emission event can blunt and arrest the crack, preventing further cleavage. Thus, dynamics cannot embrittle a ductile material, and the origin of brittle failure in certain alloys (e.g., mild steels) appears unrelated to dynamic effects at the crack tip.

  14. Determinant nucleotides of yeast tRNA(Asp) interact directly with aspartyl-tRNA synthetase.

    OpenAIRE

    Rudinger, J; Puglisi, J D; Pütz, J.; Schatz, D; Eckstein, F; Florentz, C; Giegé, R

    1992-01-01

    The interaction of wild-type and mutant yeast tRNA(Asp) transcripts with yeast aspartyl-tRNA synthetase (AspRS; EC 6.1.1.12) has been probed by using iodine cleavage of phosphorothioate-substituted transcripts. AspRS protects phosphates in the anticodon (G34, U35), D-stem (U25), and acceptor end (G73) that correspond to determinant nucleotides for aspartylation. This protection, as well as that in anticodon stem (C29, U40, G41) and D-stem (U11 to U13), is consistent with direct interaction of...

  15. Identification of Two RNA-binding Proteins Associated with Human Telomerase RNA

    OpenAIRE

    Le, Siyuan; Sternglanz, Rolf; Greider, Carol W

    2000-01-01

    Telomerase plays a crucial role in telomere maintenance in vivo. To understand telomerase regulation, we have been characterizing components of the enzyme. To date several components of the mammalian telomerase holoenzyme have been identified: the essential RNA component (human telomerase RNA [hTR]), the catalytic subunit human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), and telomerase-associated protein 1. Here we describe the identification of two new proteins that interact with hTR: hStau an...

  16. Crystal structures of yellowtail ascites virus VP4 protease: trapping an internal cleavage site trans acyl-enzyme complex in a native Ser/Lys dyad active site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ivy Yeuk Wah; Paetzel, Mark

    2013-05-01

    Yellowtail ascites virus (YAV) is an aquabirnavirus that causes ascites in yellowtail, a fish often used in sushi. Segment A of the YAV genome codes for a polyprotein (pVP2-VP4-VP3), where processing by its own VP4 protease yields the capsid protein precursor pVP2, the ribonucleoprotein-forming VP3, and free VP4. VP4 protease utilizes the rarely observed serine-lysine catalytic dyad mechanism. Here we have confirmed the existence of an internal cleavage site, preceding the VP4/VP3 cleavage site. The resulting C-terminally truncated enzyme (ending at Ala(716)) is active, as shown by a trans full-length VP4 cleavage assay and a fluorometric peptide cleavage assay. We present a crystal structure of a native active site YAV VP4 with the internal cleavage site trapped as trans product complexes and trans acyl-enzyme complexes. The acyl-enzyme complexes confirm directly the role of Ser(633) as the nucleophile. A crystal structure of the lysine general base mutant (K674A) reveals the acyl-enzyme and empty binding site states of VP4, which allows for the observation of structural changes upon substrate or product binding. These snapshots of three different stages in the VP4 protease reaction mechanism will aid in the design of anti-birnavirus compounds, provide insight into previous site-directed mutagenesis results, and contribute to understanding of the serine-lysine dyad protease mechanism. In addition, we have discovered that this protease contains a channel that leads from the enzyme surface (adjacent to the substrate binding groove) to the active site and the deacylating water. PMID:23511637

  17. Unsteady catalytic processes and sorption-catalytic technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalytic processes that occur under conditions of the targeted unsteady state of the catalyst are considered. The highest efficiency of catalytic processes was found to be ensured by a controlled combination of thermal non-stationarity and unsteady composition of the catalyst surface. The processes based on this principle are analysed, in particular, catalytic selective reduction of nitrogen oxides, deep oxidation of volatile organic impurities, production of sulfur by the Claus process and by hydrogen sulfide decomposition, oxidation of sulfur dioxide, methane steam reforming and anaerobic combustion, selective oxidation of hydrocarbons, etc.

  18. Distinctive interactions of the Arabidopsis homolog of the 30 kD subunit of the cleavage and polyadenylation specificity factor (AtCPSF30) with other polyadenylation factor subunits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: The Arabidopsis ortholog of the 30 kD subunit of the mammalian Cleavage and Polyadenylation Specificity Factor (AtCPSF30) is an RNA-binding endonuclease that is associated with other Arabidopsis CPSF subunits (orthologs of the 160, 100, and 73 kD subunits of CPSF). In order to better u...

  19. HU-331 is a catalytic inhibitor of topoisomerase IIα.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regal, Kellie M; Mercer, Susan L; Deweese, Joseph E

    2014-12-15

    Topoisomerases are essential enzymes that are involved in DNA metabolism. Topoisomerase II generates transient DNA strand breaks that are stabilized by anticancer drugs, such as doxorubicin, causing an accumulation of DNA damage. However, doxorubicin causes cardiac toxicity and, like etoposide and other topoisomerase II-targeted agents, can induce DNA damage, resulting in secondary cancers. The cannabinoid quinone HU-331 has been identified as a potential anticancer drug that demonstrates more potency in cancer cells with less off-target toxicity than that of doxorubicin. Reports indicate that HU-331 does not promote cell death via apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, caspase activation, or DNA strand breaks. However, the precise mechanism of action is poorly understood. We employed biochemical assays to study the mechanism of action of HU-331 against purified topoisomerase IIα. These assays examined DNA binding, cleavage, ligation, relaxation, and ATPase activities of topoisomerase IIα. Our results demonstrate that HU-331 inhibits topoisomerase IIα-mediated DNA relaxation at micromolar levels. We find that HU-331 does not induce DNA strand breaks in vitro. When added prior to the DNA substrate, HU-331 blocks DNA cleavage and relaxation activities of topoisomerase IIα in a redox-sensitive manner. The action of HU-331 can be blocked, but not reversed, by the presence of dithiothreitol. Our results also show that HU-331 inhibits the ATPase activity of topoisomerase IIα using a noncompetitive mechanism. Preliminary binding studies also indicate that HU-331 decreases the ability of topoisomerase IIα to bind DNA. In summary, HU-331 inhibits relaxation activity without poisoning DNA cleavage. This action is sensitive to reducing agents and appears to involve noncompetitive inhibition of the ATPase activity and possibly inhibition of DNA binding. These studies provide a promising foundation for the exploration of HU-331 as a catalytic inhibitor of topoisomerase IIα. PMID

  20. Deletion of the thrombin cleavage domain of osteopontin mediates breast cancer cell adhesion, proteolytic activity, tumorgenicity, and metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osteopontin (OPN) is a secreted phosphoprotein often overexpressed at high levels in the blood and primary tumors of breast cancer patients. OPN contains two integrin-binding sites and a thrombin cleavage domain located in close proximity to each other. To study the role of the thrombin cleavage site of OPN, MDA-MB-468 human breast cancer cells were stably transfected with either wildtype OPN (468-OPN), mutant OPN lacking the thrombin cleavage domain (468-ΔTC) or an empty vector (468-CON) and assessed for in vitro and in vivo functional differences in malignant/metastatic behavior. All three cell lines were found to equivalently express thrombin, tissue factor, CD44, αvβ5 integrin and β1 integrin. Relative to 468-OPN and 468-CON cells, 468-ΔTC cells expressing OPN with a deleted thrombin cleavage domain demonstrated decreased cell adhesion (p < 0.001), decreased mRNA expression of MCAM, maspin and TRAIL (p < 0.01), and increased uPA expression and activity (p < 0.01) in vitro. Furthermore, injection of 468-ΔTC cells into the mammary fat pad of nude mice resulted in decreased primary tumor latency time (p < 0.01) and increased primary tumor growth and lymph node metastatic burden (p < 0.001) compared to 468-OPN and 468-CON cells. The results presented here suggest that expression of thrombin-uncleavable OPN imparts an early tumor formation advantage as well as a metastatic advantage for breast cancer cells, possibly due to increased proteolytic activity and decreased adhesion and apoptosis. Clarification of the mechanisms responsible for these observations and the translation of this knowledge into the clinic could ultimately provide new therapeutic opportunities for combating breast cancer

  1. Prokaryotic expression of Chinese bovine enterokinase catalytic subunit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄鹤; 赵阳; 甘一如

    2004-01-01

    Background To express in vitro the bovine enterokinase catalytic subunit (EKL ) protein, which could be used in the future for the cleavage and purification of fusion proteins. Methods Bovine enterokinase catalytic subunit cDNA was obtained by RT-PCR from the duodenal mucosa of a bovine obtained at a wholesale market, and then cloned into a pUCmT cloning vector and sequenced. The desired gene fragment was inserted into a pET39b expression plasmid and the recombinant vector pET39b-EKL was transformed into E. coli BL21 (DE3). Protein expression was induced using IPTG. The recombinant DsbA-EK, was purified with His · Tag affinity chromatography, and its bioactivity was analyzed. Results Compared with the sequence deposited in GenBank, the sequence of the EKL gene cloned in the present study is correct. It was also confirmed that the nucleotide sequence of expression plasmid pET39b-EKL was correct at the conjunction site between the recombinant DNA 5'terminal multi-cloning site and the recombinant fragment. SDS-PAGE analysis indicated that the target product was about 65 kDa and represented 28% of total cell protein. Purified recombinant protein was obtained by metal chelating chromatography using a NJ-IDA resin, After desalting and changing the buffer, the crude kinase was incubated at 21℃ overnight and shown to have a high autocatalytic cleavage activity. Conclusion The EKE gene from a Chinese bovine has been cloned successfully and expressed. This investigation has layed the foundation for future enterokinase activity research and for further large-scale application of expression products.

  2. Site-specific excision from RNA by RNase H and mixed-phosphate-backbone oligodeoxynucleotides.

    OpenAIRE

    S Agrawal; Mayrand, S H; Zamecnik, P. C.; Pederson, T

    1990-01-01

    Oligodeoxynucleotides containing phosphodiester or modified internucleoside linkages were investigated with respect to their ability to be acted on by ribonuclease H activities present in a HeLa cell nuclear extract after hybridization with complementary sequences in RNA. Oligodeoxynucleotides complementary to nucleotides 2-14 of human U1 small nuclear RNA were investigated. Extensive cleavage of U1 RNA was observed with the unmodified oligodeoxynucleotide and with the phosphorothioate analog...

  3. Target-triggered triple isothermal cascade amplification strategy for ultrasensitive microRNA-21 detection at sub-attomole level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fang-Fang; Jiang, Nan; Li, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Li; Hu, Lihui; Chen, Xiaojun; Jiang, Li-Ping; Abdel-Halim, E S; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2016-11-15

    MicroRNA-21 (miR-21) is a promising diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer screening and disease progression, thus the method for the sensitive and selective detection of miR-21 is vital to its clinical diagnosis. Herein, we develop a novel method to quantify miR-21 levels as low as attomolar sensitivity by a target-triggered triple isothermal cascade amplification (3TICA) strategy. An ingenious unimolecular DNA template with three functional parts has been designed: 5'-fragment as the miR-21 recognition unit, middle fragment as the miR-21 analogue amplification unit, and 3'-fragment as the 8-17 DNAzyme production unit. Triggered by miR-21 and accompanied by polymerase-nicking enzyme cascade, new miR-21 analogues autonomously generated for the successive re-triggering and cleavage process. Simultaneously, the 8-17 DNAzyme-contained sequence could be exponentially released and activated for the second cyclic cleavage toward a specific ribonucleotide (rA)-contained substrate, inducing a remarkably amplified generation of HRP-mimicking DNAzyme in the presence of hemin. Finally, the amperometric technique was used to record the catalytic reduction current of 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of H2O2. The increase in the steady-state current was proportional with the increase of the miR-21 concentration from 1 aM to 100 pM. An ultra-low detection limit of 0.5 aM with an excellent selectivity for even discriminating differences between 1-base mismatched target and miR-21 was achieved. This simple and cost-effective 3TICA strategy is promising for the detection of any short oligonucleotides, simply by altering the target recognition unit in the template sequence. PMID:27311114

  4. School Desegregation and Racial Cleavage, 1954-1970: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carithers, Martha W.

    1970-01-01

    Reviews the empirical studies dealing with school desegregation and racial cleavage which have appeared since the 1954 Supreme Court decision. Focuses on patterns and consequences of interracial association, and attitude change relevant to racial cleavage. (DM)

  5. Transcriptome Analysis of Honeybee (Apis Mellifera) Haploid and Diploid Embryos Reveals Early Zygotic Transcription during Cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Camilla Valente; Freitas, Flávia Cristina de Paula; Cristino, Alexandre S.; Dearden, Peter K.; Simões, Zilá Luz Paulino

    2016-01-01

    In honeybees, the haplodiploid sex determination system promotes a unique embryogenesis process wherein females develop from fertilized eggs and males develop from unfertilized eggs. However, the developmental strategies of honeybees during early embryogenesis are virtually unknown. Similar to most animals, the honeybee oocytes are supplied with proteins and regulatory elements that support early embryogenesis. As the embryo develops, the zygotic genome is activated and zygotic products gradually replace the preloaded maternal material. The analysis of small RNA and mRNA libraries of mature oocytes and embryos originated from fertilized and unfertilized eggs has allowed us to explore the gene expression dynamics in the first steps of development and during the maternal-to-zygotic transition (MZT). We localized a short sequence motif identified as TAGteam motif and hypothesized to play a similar role in honeybees as in fruit flies, which includes the timing of early zygotic expression (MZT), a function sustained by the presence of the zelda ortholog, which is the main regulator of genome activation. Predicted microRNA (miRNA)-target interactions indicated that there were specific regulators of haploid and diploid embryonic development and an overlap of maternal and zygotic gene expression during the early steps of embryogenesis. Although a number of functions are highly conserved during the early steps of honeybee embryogenesis, the results showed that zygotic genome activation occurs earlier in honeybees than in Drosophila based on the presence of three primary miRNAs (pri-miRNAs) (ame-mir-375, ame-mir-34 and ame-mir-263b) during the cleavage stage in haploid and diploid embryonic development. PMID:26751956

  6. Catalytic production of biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theilgaard Madsen, A.

    2011-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the catalytic production of diesel from biomass, especially emphasising catalytic conversion of waste vegetable oils and fats. In chapter 1 an introduction to biofuels and a review on different catalytic methods for diesel production from biomass is given. Two of these methods have been used industrially for a number of years already, namely the transesterification (and esterification) of oils and fats with methanol to form fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), and the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of fats and oils to form straight-chain alkanes. Other possible routes to diesel include upgrading and deoxygenation of pyrolysis oils or aqueous sludge wastes, condensations and reductions of sugars in aqueous phase (aqueous-phase reforming, APR) for monofunctional hydrocarbons, and gasification of any type of biomass followed by Fischer-Tropsch-synthesis for alkane biofuels. These methods have not yet been industrialised, but may be more promising due to the larger abundance of their potential feedstocks, especially waste feedstocks. Chapter 2 deals with formation of FAME from waste fats and oils. A range of acidic catalysts were tested in a model fat mixture of methanol, lauric acid and trioctanoin. Sulphonic acid-functionalised ionic liquids showed extremely fast convertion of lauric acid to methyl laurate, and trioctanoate was converted to methyl octanoate within 24 h. A catalyst based on a sulphonated carbon-matrix made by pyrolysing (or carbonising) carbohydrates, so-called sulphonated pyrolysed sucrose (SPS), was optimised further. No systematic dependency on pyrolysis and sulphonation conditions could be obtained, however, with respect to esterification activity, but high activity was obtained in the model fat mixture. SPS impregnated on opel-cell Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and microporous SiO{sub 2} (ISPS) was much less active in the esterification than the original SPS powder due to low loading and thereby low number of strongly acidic sites on the

  7. Ultrasensitive electrochemical DNAzyme sensor for lead ion based on cleavage-induced template-independent polymerization and alkaline phosphatase amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shufeng; Wei, Wenji; Sun, Xinya; Wang, Li

    2016-09-15

    In this article, a simple, highly sensitive and selective electrochemical DNAzyme sensor for Pb(2+) was developed on the basis of a 8-17 DNAzyme cleavage-induced template-independent polymerization and alkaline phosphatase amplification strategy. The hairpin-like substrate strand (HP DNA) of 8-17 DNAzyme was firstly immobilized onto the electrode. In the presence of Pb(2+) and the catalytic strand of 8-17 DNAzyme, the HP DNA could be cleaved to expose the free 3'-OH terminal, which could be then utilized for the cascade operation by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdTase) for the base extension to incorporate biotinylated dUTP (dUTP-biotin). The further conjugated streptavidin-labeled alkaline phosphatase (SA-ALP) then catalyzed conversion of electrochemically inactive 1-naphthyl phosphate (1-NP) for the generation of electrochemical response signal. The currently fabricated Pb(2+) sensor effectively combines triply cascade amplification effects including cyclic Pb(2+)-dependent DNAzyme cleavage, TdTase-mediated base extension and enzymatic catalysis of ALP. An impressive detection limit of 0.043nM toward Pb(2+) with an excellent selectivity could be ultimately obtained, which was superior than most of the electrochemical methods. Thus, the developed amplification strategy opens a promising avenue for the detection of metal ions and may extend for the detection of other nucleic acid-related analytes. PMID:27093488

  8. Self-assembly Controls Self-cleavage of HHR from ASBVd (−): a Combined SANS and Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Fabrice; Zaccai, Giuseppe; Vergne, Jacques; Řìhovà, Martina; Martel, Anne; Maurel, Marie-Christine

    2016-01-01

    In the Avocado Sunblotch Viroid (ASBVd: 249-nt) from the Avsunviroidae family, a symmetric rolling-circle replication operates through an autocatalytic mechanism mediated by hammerhead ribozymes (HHR) embedded in both polarity strands. The concatenated multimeric ASBVd (+) and ASBVd (−) RNAs thus generated are processed by cleavage to unit-length where ASBVd (−) self-cleaves with more efficiency. Absolute scale small angle neutron scattering (SANS) revealed a temperature-dependent dimer association in both ASBVd (−) and its derived 79-nt HHR (−). A joint thermodynamic analysis of SANS and catalytic data indicates the rate-determining step corresponds to the dimer/monomer transition. 2D and 3D models of monomeric and dimeric HHR (−) suggest that the inter-molecular contacts stabilizing the dimer (between HI and HII domains) compete with the intra-molecular ones stabilizing the active conformation of the full-length HHR required for an efficient self-cleavage. Similar competing intra- and inter-molecular contacts are proposed in ASBVd (−) though with a remoter region from an extension of the HI domain. PMID:27456224

  9. Self-assembly Controls Self-cleavage of HHR from ASBVd (‑): a Combined SANS and Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Fabrice; Zaccai, Giuseppe; Vergne, Jacques; Řìhovà, Martina; Martel, Anne; Maurel, Marie-Christine

    2016-07-01

    In the Avocado Sunblotch Viroid (ASBVd: 249-nt) from the Avsunviroidae family, a symmetric rolling-circle replication operates through an autocatalytic mechanism mediated by hammerhead ribozymes (HHR) embedded in both polarity strands. The concatenated multimeric ASBVd (+) and ASBVd (‑) RNAs thus generated are processed by cleavage to unit-length where ASBVd (‑) self-cleaves with more efficiency. Absolute scale small angle neutron scattering (SANS) revealed a temperature-dependent dimer association in both ASBVd (‑) and its derived 79-nt HHR (‑). A joint thermodynamic analysis of SANS and catalytic data indicates the rate-determining step corresponds to the dimer/monomer transition. 2D and 3D models of monomeric and dimeric HHR (‑) suggest that the inter-molecular contacts stabilizing the dimer (between HI and HII domains) compete with the intra-molecular ones stabilizing the active conformation of the full-length HHR required for an efficient self-cleavage. Similar competing intra- and inter-molecular contacts are proposed in ASBVd (‑) though with a remoter region from an extension of the HI domain.

  10. Self-assembly Controls Self-cleavage of HHR from ASBVd (-): a Combined SANS and Modeling Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Fabrice; Zaccai, Giuseppe; Vergne, Jacques; Řìhovà, Martina; Martel, Anne; Maurel, Marie-Christine

    2016-01-01

    In the Avocado Sunblotch Viroid (ASBVd: 249-nt) from the Avsunviroidae family, a symmetric rolling-circle replication operates through an autocatalytic mechanism mediated by hammerhead ribozymes (HHR) embedded in both polarity strands. The concatenated multimeric ASBVd (+) and ASBVd (-) RNAs thus generated are processed by cleavage to unit-length where ASBVd (-) self-cleaves with more efficiency. Absolute scale small angle neutron scattering (SANS) revealed a temperature-dependent dimer association in both ASBVd (-) and its derived 79-nt HHR (-). A joint thermodynamic analysis of SANS and catalytic data indicates the rate-determining step corresponds to the dimer/monomer transition. 2D and 3D models of monomeric and dimeric HHR (-) suggest that the inter-molecular contacts stabilizing the dimer (between HI and HII domains) compete with the intra-molecular ones stabilizing the active conformation of the full-length HHR required for an efficient self-cleavage. Similar competing intra- and inter-molecular contacts are proposed in ASBVd (-) though with a remoter region from an extension of the HI domain. PMID:27456224

  11. Structures of two exonucleases involved in controlled RNA turnover in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jonstrup, Anette Thyssen; Midtgaard, Søren Fuglsang; Van, Lan Bich;

    2p is a catalytic subunit of the cytoplasmic deadenylase complex [2], which removes the poly(A) tail in the 3'-end of mRNA, the first and rate-limiting step of controlled mRNA turnover in the general eukaryotic mRNA degradation pathway [3]. The crystal structure of the central part of S. cerevisiae...

  12. Topoisomerase 1 Regulates Gene Expression in Neurons through Cleavage Complex-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabb, Angela M.; Simon, Jeremy M.; King, Ian F.; Lee, Hyeong-Min; An, Lin-Kun; Philpot, Benjamin D.; Zylka, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase 1 (TOP1) inhibitors, including camptothecin and topotecan, covalently trap TOP1 on DNA, creating cleavage complexes (cc’s) that must be resolved before gene transcription and DNA replication can proceed. We previously found that topotecan reduces the expression of long (>100 kb) genes and unsilences the paternal allele of Ube3a in neurons. Here, we sought to evaluate overlap between TOP1cc-dependent and -independent gene regulation in neurons. To do this, we utilized Top1 conditional knockout mice, Top1 knockdown, the CRISPR-Cas9 system to delete Top1, TOP1 catalytic inhibitors that do not generate TOP1cc’s, and a TOP1 mutation (T718A) that stabilizes TOP1cc’s. We found that topotecan treatment significantly alters the expression of many more genes, including long neuronal genes, immediate early genes, and paternal Ube3a, when compared to Top1 deletion. Our data show that topotecan has a stronger effect on neuronal transcription than Top1 deletion, and identifies TOP1cc-dependent and -independent contributions to gene expression. PMID:27231886

  13. Topoisomerase 1 Regulates Gene Expression in Neurons through Cleavage Complex-Dependent and -Independent Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M Mabb

    Full Text Available Topoisomerase 1 (TOP1 inhibitors, including camptothecin and topotecan, covalently trap TOP1 on DNA, creating cleavage complexes (cc's that must be resolved before gene transcription and DNA replication can proceed. We previously found that topotecan reduces the expression of long (>100 kb genes and unsilences the paternal allele of Ube3a in neurons. Here, we sought to evaluate overlap between TOP1cc-dependent and -independent gene regulation in neurons. To do this, we utilized Top1 conditional knockout mice, Top1 knockdown, the CRISPR-Cas9 system to delete Top1, TOP1 catalytic inhibitors that do not generate TOP1cc's, and a TOP1 mutation (T718A that stabilizes TOP1cc's. We found that topotecan treatment significantly alters the expression of many more genes, including long neuronal genes, immediate early genes, and paternal Ube3a, when compared to Top1 deletion. Our data show that topotecan has a stronger effect on neuronal transcription than Top1 deletion, and identifies TOP1cc-dependent and -independent contributions to gene expression.

  14. Sequence-specific interactions of drugs interfering with the topoisomerase-DNA cleavage complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Manlio; Gatto, Barbara; Moro, Stefano; Sissi, Claudia; Zagotto, Giuseppe

    2002-07-18

    DNA-processing enzymes, such as the topoisomerases (tops), represent major targets for potent anticancer (and antibacterial) agents. The drugs kill cells by poisoning the enzymes' catalytic cycle. Understanding the molecular details of top poisoning is a fundamental requisite for the rational development of novel, more effective antineoplastic drugs. In this connection, sequence-specific recognition of the top-DNA complex is a key step to preferentially direct the action of the drugs onto selected genomic sequences. In fact, the (reversible) interference of drugs with the top-DNA complex exhibits well-defined preferences for DNA bases in the proximity of the cleavage site, each drug showing peculiarities connected to its structural features. A second level of selectivity can be observed when chemically reactive groups are present in the structure of the top-directed drug. In this case, the enzyme recognizes or generates a unique site for covalent drug-DNA binding. This will further subtly modulate the drug's efficiency in stimulating DNA damage at selected sites. Finally, drugs can discriminate not only among different types of tops, but also among different isoenzymes, providing an additional level of specific selection. Once the molecular basis for DNA sequence-dependent recognition has been established, the above-mentioned modes to generate selectivity in drug poisoning can be rationally exploited, alone or in combination, to develop tailor-made drugs targeted at defined loci in cancer cells. PMID:12084456

  15. The Structural Basis of [beta]-Peptide-Specific Cleavage by the Serine Protease Cyanophycinase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Law, Adrienne M.; Lai, Sandy W.S.; Tavares, John; Kimber, Matthew S.; (Guelph)

    2010-10-01

    Cyanophycin, or poly-L-Asp-multi-L-Arg, is a non-ribosomally synthesized peptidic polymer that is used for nitrogen storage by cyanobacteria and other select eubacteria. Upon synthesis, it self-associates to form insoluble granules, the degradation of which is uniquely catalyzed by a carboxy-terminal-specific protease, cyanophycinase. We have determined the structure of cyanophycinase from the freshwater cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 at 1.5-{angstrom} resolution, showing that the structure is dimeric, with individual protomers resembling aspartyl dipeptidase. Kinetic characterization of the enzyme demonstrates that the enzyme displays Michaelis-Menten kinetics with a k{sub cat} of 16.5 s{sup -1} and a k{sub cat}/K{sub M} of 7.5 x 10{sup -6} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments confirm that cyanophycinase is a serine protease and that Gln101, Asp172, Gln173, Arg178, Arg180 and Arg183, which form a conserved pocket adjacent to the catalytic Ser132, are functionally critical residues. Modeling indicates that cyanophycinase binds the {beta}-Asp-Arg dipeptide residue immediately N-terminal to the scissile bond in an extended conformation in this pocket, primarily recognizing this penultimate {beta}-Asp-Arg residue of the polymeric chain. Because binding and catalysis depend on substrate features unique to {beta}-linked aspartyl peptides, cyanophycinase is able to act within the cytosol without non-specific cleavage events disrupting essential cellular processes.

  16. Mutational analysis of a type II topoisomerase cleavage site: distinct requirements for enzyme and inhibitors.

    OpenAIRE

    Freudenreich, C H; Kreuzer, K. N.

    1993-01-01

    We have analyzed the DNA sequence requirements for cleavage of a 30 bp oligonucleotide that contains a strong bacteriophage T4 type II topoisomerase site. A novel method was used to generate substrates with each of the four nucleotides at 10 positions surrounding the cleavage site, and mutant substrates were also prepared for the four internal positions of the staggered cleavage site. The substrates were tested for cleavage in the presence of several inhibitors that induce enzyme-mediated cle...

  17. A nickel complex cleaves uridine in folded RNA structures: application to E. coli tmRNA and related engineered molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickerson, R P; Watkins-Sims, C D; Burrows, C J; Atkins, J F; Gesteland, R F; Felden, B

    1998-06-12

    To gain more insight about Escherichia coli tmRNA structure, NiCR, a square planar macrocyclic nickel (II) complex, was used to probe guanine N7 exposure. On the basis of this additional structural information, a refined secondary structure of the molecule is proposed. In addition to its known specificity for guanine N7, we show here that the chemical probe can also cleave at specific uridine residues. In contrast to the alkaline-labile modification of guanine, the reactivity of NiCR at these uridine residues results in direct strand scission. To better characterize the uridine cleavage sites and assess the importance of the RNA structure for the reaction to occur, smaller RNA molecules derived from one pseudoknot (PK4) of E. coli tmRNA containing two uridine cleavage sites were engineered and probed. It is shown that this pseudoknot can fold by itself in solution and that the expected uridine residues are also cleaved by the nickel complex, suggesting that only a local sequence and/or structural context is required for cleavage. In E. coli tmRNA, the five uridine cleavage sites are located in double-stranded regions. These sites contain a G-U wobble base-pair and a downstream uridine which is cleaved. Using smaller RNAs derived from one stem of PK4, systematic changes in the proposed recognition motif indicate that the G-U pair is required for cleavage. Furthermore, there is no cleavage if the G-U pair is reversed. If the recognition motif is moved within the stem, the cleavage site moves accordingly. Additionally, if the recognition motif is changed such that the G-U pair is flanked by two uridine residues, the reactivity occurs only at the 3' uridine. Radical quenching studies have indicated that sulfate radical, as in the case of guanine oxidation, is involved in uridine oxidation. Although additional studies are required to better characterize the reaction, this paper reports a novel specificity for a chemical probe which may be useful for investigating

  18. Bifunctional alkylating agent-mediated MGMT-DNA cross-linking and its proteolytic cleavage in 16HBE cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jin; Ye, Feng; Dan, Guorong; Zhao, Yuanpeng; Wang, Bin; Zhao, Jiqing; Sai, Yan; Zou, Zhongmin

    2016-08-15

    Nitrogen mustard (NM), a bifunctional alkylating agent (BAA), contains two alkyl arms and can act as a cross-linking bridge between DNA and protein to form a DNA-protein cross-link (DPC). O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT), a DNA repair enzyme for alkyl adducts removal, is found to enhance cell sensitivity to BAAs and to promote damage, possibly due to its stable covalent cross-linking with DNA mediated by BAAs. To investigate MGMT-DNA cross-link (mDPC) formation and its possible dual roles in NM exposure, human bronchial epithelial cell line 16HBE was subjected to different concentrations of HN2, a kind of NM, and we found mDPC was induced by HN2 in a concentration-dependent manner, but the mRNA and total protein of MGMT were suppressed. As early as 1h after HN2 treatment, high mDPC was achieved and the level maintained for up to 24h. Quick total DPC (tDPC) and γ-H2AX accumulation were observed. To evaluate the effect of newly predicted protease DVC1 on DPC cleavage, we applied siRNA of MGMT and DVC1, MG132 (proteasome inhibitor), and NMS-873 (p97 inhibitor) and found that proteolysis plays a role. DVC1 was proven to be more important in the cleavage of mDPC than tDPC in a p97-dependent manner. HN2 exposure induced DVC1 upregulation, which was at least partially contributed to MGMT cleavage by proteolysis because HN2-induced mDPC level and DNA damage was closely related with DVC1 expression. Homologous recombination (HR) was also activated. Our findings demonstrated that MGMT might turn into a DNA damage promoter by forming DPC when exposed to HN2. Proteolysis, especially DVC1, plays a crucial role in mDPC repair. PMID:27342729

  19. Immigration process in catalytic medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The longtime behavior of the immigration process associated with a catalytic super-Brownian motion is studied. A large number law is proved in dimension d≤3 and a central limit theorem is proved for dimension d=3.

  20. Sequence specificity of DNA cleavage by Micrococcus luteus γ endonuclease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA fragments of defined sequence have been used to determine the sites of cleavage by γ-endonuclease activity in extracts prepared from Micrococcus luteus. End-labeled DNA restriction fragments of pBR322 DNA that had been irradiated under nitrogen in the presence of potassium iodide or t-butanol were treated with M. luteus γ endonuclease and analyzed on irradiated DNA preferentially at the positions of cytosines and thymines. DNA cleavage occurred immediately to the 3' side of pyrimidines in irradiated DNA and resulted in fragments that terminate in a 5'-phosphoryl group. These studies indicate that both altered cytosines and thymines may be important DNA lesions requiring repair after exposure to γ radiation

  1. Catalytic DNA with phosphatase activity

    OpenAIRE

    Chandrasekar, Jagadeeswaran; Silverman, Scott K.

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic DNA sequences (deoxyribozymes, DNA enzymes, or DNAzymes) have been identified by in vitro selection for various catalytic activities. Expanding the limits of DNA catalysis is an important fundamental objective and may facilitate practical utility of catalysts that can be obtained from entirely unbiased (random) sequence populations. In this study, we show that DNA can catalyze Zn2+-dependent phosphomonoester hydrolysis of tyrosine and serine side chains (i.e., exhibit phosphatase ac...

  2. An mRNA is capped by a 2', 5' lariat catalyzed by a group I-like ribozyme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik; Westhof, Eric; Johansen, Steinar

    2005-01-01

    Twin-ribozyme introns are formed by two ribozymes belonging to the group I family and occur in some ribosomal RNA transcripts. The group I-like ribozyme, GIR1, liberates the 5' end of a homing endonuclease messenger RNA in the slime mold Didymium iridis. We demonstrate that this cleavage occurs...

  3. Mutagenesis of the yellow fever virus NS2B/3 cleavage site: determinants of cleavage site specificity and effects on polyprotein processing and viral replication.

    OpenAIRE

    Chambers, T J; Nestorowicz, A.; Rice, C.M.

    1995-01-01

    The determinants of cleavage site specificity of the yellow fever virus (YF) NS3 proteinase for its 2B/3 cleavage site have been studied by using site-directed mutagenesis. Mutations at residues within the GARR decreases S sequence were tested for effects on cis cleavage of an NS2B-3(181) polyprotein during cell-free translation. At the P1 position, only the conservative substitution R-->K exhibited significant levels of cleavage. Conservative and nonconservative substitutions were tolerated ...

  4. Effects of Cysteamine on Sheep Embryo Cleavage Rates

    OpenAIRE

    ENGİNLER, Sinem Ö; ÖZDAŞ, Özen B.; SANDAL, Asiye İ.; ARICI, Ramazan; GÜNDÜZ, Mehmet C.; BARAN, Alper; TEK, Çağatay; KILIÇARSLAN, Mehmet R.; Ak, Kemal

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress during in vitro culture leads to defects in development of gametes and embryos. Several antioxidants such as cysteamine, L-ascorbic acid, beta mercaptoethanol, cysteine, glutathione, proteins, vitamins have been used to supplement culture media to counter the oxidative stress. This study was conducted to detect the effect of adding cysteamine to the maturation medium to subsequent cleavage rates of sheep embryos. Totally 604 ovaries were obtained by ten replica and 2060 oocyt...

  5. Interrelation between local and global characteristics of cleavage fracture

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grishchenko, W.; Kotrechko, S.; Mamedov, S.; Zatsarna, O.; Dlouhý, Ivo

    Zurich : Trans Tech Publications, 2014 - (Šandera, P.), s. 221-224 ISBN 978-3-03785-934-6. ISSN 1013-9826. - (Key Engineering Materials. 592-593). [MSMF 7 - International Conference on Materials Structure and Micromechanics of Fracture /7./. Brno (CZ), 01.07.2013-03.07.2013] Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : local stress * fracture * cleavage * embrittlement * strength Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics

  6. Fe-Catalyzed Oxidative Cleavage of Unsaturated Fatty Acids

    OpenAIRE

    Spannring, P.

    2013-01-01

    The oxidative cleavage of unsaturated fatty acids into aldehydes or carboxylic acids gives access to valuable products. The products can be used as chemical building blocks, as emulsifiers or in the paint or polymer industry. Ozonolysis is applied industrially to cleave the fatty acid oleic acid into the aldehydes nonanal and 9-oxo-nonanoic acid or into pelargonic and azelaic acid. Considerable hazards, including explosion risks, are associated with the use of ozone, and alternative processes...

  7. Developing a programmed restriction endonuclease for highly specific DNA cleavage

    OpenAIRE

    Eisenschmidt, Kristin; Lanio, Thomas; Simoncsits, András; Jeltsch, Albert; Pingoud, Vera; Wende, Wolfgang; Pingoud, Alfred

    2005-01-01

    Specific cleavage of large DNA molecules at few sites, necessary for the analysis of genomic DNA or for targeting individual genes in complex genomes, requires endonucleases of extremely high specificity. Restriction endonucleases (REase) that recognize DNA sequences of 4–8 bp are not sufficiently specific for this purpose. In principle, the specificity of REases can be extended by fusion to sequence recognition modules, e.g. specific DNA-binding domains or triple-helix forming oligonucleotid...

  8. The pattern of DNA cleavage intensity around indels

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Chen; Liqing Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Indels (insertions and deletions) are the second most common form of genetic variations in the eukaryotic genomes and are responsible for a multitude of genetic diseases. Despite its significance, detailed molecular mechanisms for indel generation are still unclear. Here we examined 2,656,597 small human and mouse germline indels, 16,742 human somatic indels, 10,599 large human insertions, and 5,822 large chimpanzee insertions and systematically analyzed the patterns of DNA cleavage intensiti...

  9. Mycothiol synthesis by an anomerization reaction through endocyclic cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Summary Mycothiol is found in Gram-positive bacteria, where it helps in maintaining a reducing intracellular environment and it plays an important role in protecting the cell from toxic chemicals. The inhibition of the mycothiol biosynthesis is considered as a treatment for tuberculosis. Mycothiol contains an α-aminoglycoside, which is difficult to prepare stereoselectively by a conventional glycosylation reaction. In this study, mycothiol was synthesized by an anomerization reaction from an easily prepared β-aminoglycoside through endocyclic cleavage. PMID:26977192

  10. Centrocortin Cooperates with Centrosomin to Organize Drosophila Embryonic Cleavage Furrows

    OpenAIRE

    Kao, Ling-Rong; Timothy L Megraw

    2009-01-01

    In the Drosophila early embryo the centrosome coordinates assembly of cleavage furrows [1–3]. Currently, the molecular pathway that links the centrosome and the cortical microfilaments is unknown. In centrosomin (cnn) mutants, where the centriole forms but the centrosome pericentriolar material (PCM) fails to assemble [4, 5], actin microfilaments are not organized into furrows at the syncytial cortex [6]. While CNN is required for centrosome assembly and function [4, 6, 7], little is known of...

  11. Embryo apoptosis identification: Oocyte grade or cleavage stage?

    OpenAIRE

    Bakri, Noraina Mohd; Ibrahim, Siti Fatimah; Osman, Nurul Atikah; Hasan, Nurhaslina; Jaffar, Farah Hanan Fathihah; Rahman, Zulaiha Abdul; Osman, Khairul

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a programed cell death that is vital for tissue homeostasis. However, embryo apoptosis had been known to be related to embryo fragmentation which should be avoided in in vitro fertilization (IVF). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship of embryo apoptosis with the grade of immature oocytes and cleavage stage of in vitro produced (IVP) cattle embryos. This study consisted of 345 oocytes collected through ovary slicing. Immature oocytes were graded as A, B and C...

  12. VapC20 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Cleaves the Sarcin Ricin Loop of 23S rRNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winther, Kristoffer Skovbo; Brodersen, Ditlev E.; Brown, Alistair K;

    2013-01-01

    exhibited by M. tuberculosis. VapC20 cleavage is inhibited by mutations in the SRL that flank the cleavage site but not by changes elsewhere in the loop. Disruption of the SRL stem abolishes cleavage; however, further mutations that restore the SRL stem structure restore cleavage, revealing that the...... translation by cleavage of the Sarcin–Ricin loop (SRL) of 23S ribosomal RNA at the same position where Sarcin and other eukaryotic ribotoxins cleave. Toxin-inhibited cells can be rescued by the expression of the antitoxin, thereby raising the possibility that vapC20 contributes to the extreme persistence...... structure rather than the exact sequence of the SRL is important for this activity...

  13. Mechanism of Action and Antiviral Activity of Benzimidazole-Based Allosteric Inhibitors of the Hepatitis C Virus RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    OpenAIRE

    Tomei, Licia; Altamura, Sergio; Bartholomew, Linda; Biroccio, Antonino; Ceccacci, Alessandra; Pacini, Laura; Narjes, Frank; Gennari, Nadia; Bisbocci, Monica; Incitti, Ilario; Orsatti, Laura; Harper, Steven; Stansfield, Ian; Rowley, Michael; De Francesco, Raffaele

    2003-01-01

    The RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is the catalytic subunit of the viral RNA amplification machinery and is an appealing target for the development of new therapeutic agents against HCV infection. Nonnucleoside inhibitors based on a benzimidazole scaffold have been recently reported. Compounds of this class are efficient inhibitors of HCV RNA replication in cell culture, thus providing attractive candidates for further development. Here we report the detailed analysis...

  14. DNAzyme-Controlled Cleavage of Dimer and Trimer Origami Tiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Na; Willner, Itamar

    2016-04-13

    Dimers of origami tiles are bridged by the Pb(2+)-dependent DNAzyme sequence and its substrate or by the histidine-dependent DNAzyme sequence and its substrate to yield the dimers T1-T2 and T3-T4, respectively. The dimers are cleaved to monomer tiles in the presence of Pb(2+)-ions or histidine as triggers. Similarly, trimers of origami tiles are constructed by bridging the tiles with the Pb(2+)-ion-dependent DNAzyme sequence and the histidine-dependent DNAzyme sequence and their substrates yielding the trimer T1-T5-T4. In the presence of Pb(2+)-ions and/or histidine as triggers, the programmed cleavage of trimer proceeds. Using Pb(2+) or histidine as trigger cleaves the trimer to yield T5-T4 and T1 or the dimer T1-T5 and T4, respectively. In the presence of Pb(2+)-ions and histidine as triggers, the cleavage products are the monomer tiles T1, T5, and T4. The different cleavage products are identified by labeling the tiles with 0, 1, or 2 streptavidin labels and AFM imaging. PMID:26931508

  15. Cleavage mechanoluminescence in elemental and III-V semiconductors

    CERN Document Server

    Chandra, B P; Gour, A S; Chandra, V K; Gupta, R K

    2003-01-01

    The present paper reports the theory of mechanoluminescence (ML) produced during cleavage of elemental and III-V semiconductors. It seems that the formation of crack-induced localized states is responsible for the ML excitation produced during the cleavage of elemental and III-V semiconductors. According to this mechanism, as the atoms are drawn away from each other in an advancing crack tip, the decreasing wave function overlap across the crack may result in localized states which is associated with increasing electron energy. If the energy of these localized states approach that of the conduction band, transition to the conduction band via tunnelling would be possible, creating minority carriers, and consequently the electron-hole recombination may give rise to mechanoluminescence. When an elemental or III-V semiconductor is cleaved, initially the ML intensity increases with time, attains a peak value I sub m at the time t sub m corresponding to completion of the cleavage of the semiconductor, and then it d...

  16. Mechanism of metabolic cleavage of a furan ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, T.; Sugihara, J.; Harigaya, S.

    1987-11-01

    We studied the mechanism of metabolic cleavage of a furan ring, using a new hypolipidemic agent, ethyl 2-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-(2-furyl)oxazole-4-acetate (TA-1801), as a model compound. A TA-1801 analogue labeled with deuterium at the 5-position of its furan ring was administered orally to rats. The analysis of urinary metabolites by GC/MS revealed that the deuterium of the furan was retained in the ring-opened metabolite (M3). Metabolic cleavage of furan has been generally considered to proceed by hydroxylation of the 5-position followed by tautomerism and hydrolysis of the resulting 5-hydroxyfuran derivative. However, if the cleavage proceeded by this pathway, the deuterium of the 5-position would be eliminated during hydroxylation. Therefore, we propose that the ring was cleaved directly to form an unsaturated aldehyde, considering the mechanism of oxidation by cytochrome P-450. Although this intermediate was not detected in the biological specimens, a synthetic unsaturated aldehyde was transformed to the actual urinary metabolites M2 and M3 (major ring-opened metabolites) in the isolated rat liver.

  17. Mechanism of metabolic cleavage of a furan ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We studied the mechanism of metabolic cleavage of a furan ring, using a new hypolipidemic agent, ethyl 2-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-(2-furyl)oxazole-4-acetate (TA-1801), as a model compound. A TA-1801 analogue labeled with deuterium at the 5-position of its furan ring was administered orally to rats. The analysis of urinary metabolites by GC/MS revealed that the deuterium of the furan was retained in the ring-opened metabolite (M3). Metabolic cleavage of furan has been generally considered to proceed by hydroxylation of the 5-position followed by tautomerism and hydrolysis of the resulting 5-hydroxyfuran derivative. However, if the cleavage proceeded by this pathway, the deuterium of the 5-position would be eliminated during hydroxylation. Therefore, we propose that the ring was cleaved directly to form an unsaturated aldehyde, considering the mechanism of oxidation by cytochrome P-450. Although this intermediate was not detected in the biological specimens, a synthetic unsaturated aldehyde was transformed to the actual urinary metabolites M2 and M3 (major ring-opened metabolites) in the isolated rat liver

  18. Cleavage mechanoluminescence in elemental and III-V semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper reports the theory of mechanoluminescence (ML) produced during cleavage of elemental and III-V semiconductors. It seems that the formation of crack-induced localized states is responsible for the ML excitation produced during the cleavage of elemental and III-V semiconductors. According to this mechanism, as the atoms are drawn away from each other in an advancing crack tip, the decreasing wave function overlap across the crack may result in localized states which is associated with increasing electron energy. If the energy of these localized states approach that of the conduction band, transition to the conduction band via tunnelling would be possible, creating minority carriers, and consequently the electron-hole recombination may give rise to mechanoluminescence. When an elemental or III-V semiconductor is cleaved, initially the ML intensity increases with time, attains a peak value Im at the time tm corresponding to completion of the cleavage of the semiconductor, and then it decreases following power law decay. Expressions are derived for the ML intensity Im corresponding to the peak of the ML intensity versus time curve and for the total ML intensity IT. It is shown that both Im and IT should increase directly with the area of the newly created surfaces of the crystals. From the measurements of the ML intensity, the velocity of crack propagation in material can be determined by using the relation v=H/tm

  19. Demethylation and cleavage of dimethylsulfoniopropionate in marine intertidal sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, P.T.; Kiene, R.P.; Taylor, B.F.

    1994-01-01

    Demethylation and cleavage of dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) was measured in three different types of,intertidal marine sediments: a cyanobacterial mat, a diatom-covered tidal flat and a carbonate sediment. Consumption rates of added DMSP were highest in cyanobacterial mat slurries (59 ?? mol DMSP l-1 slurry h-1) and lower in slurries from a diatom mat and a carbonate tidal sediment (24 and 9 ??mol DMSP l-1 h-1, respectively). Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) and 3-mercaptopropionate (MPA) were produced simultaneously during DMSP consumption, indicating that cleavage and demethylation occurred at the same time. Viable counts of DMSP-utilizing bacteria revealed a population of 2 x 107 cells cm-3 sediment (90% of these cleaved DMSP to DMS, 10% demethylated DMSP to MPA) in the cyanobacterial mat, 7 x 105 cells cm-3 in the diatom mat (23% cleavers, 77% demethylators), and 9 x 104 cells cm-3 (20% cleavers and 80% demethylators) in the carbonate sediment. In slurries of the diatom mat, the rate of MPA production from added 3-methiolpropionate (MMPA) was 50% of the rate of MPA formation from DMSP. The presence of a large population of demethylating bacteria and the production of MPA from DMSP suggest that the demethylation pathway, in addition to cleavage, contributes significantly to DMSP consumption in coastal sediments.

  20. Numerical modeling of ductile tearing effects on cleavage fracture toughness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies demonstrate a significant effect of specimen size, a/W ratio and prior ductile tearing on cleavage fracture toughness values (Jc) measured in the ductile-to-brittle transition region of ferritic materials. In the lower-transition region, cleavage fracture often occurs under conditions of large-scale yielding but without prior ductile crack extension. The increased toughness develops when plastic zones formed at the crack tip interact with nearby specimen surfaces which relaxes crack-tip constraint (stress triaxiality). In the mid-to-upper transition region, small amounts of ductile crack extension (often c-values. Previous work by the authors described a micromechanics fracture model to correct measured Jc-values for the mechanistic effects of large-scale yielding. This new work extends the model to also include the influence of ductile crack extension prior to cleavage. The paper explores development of the new model, provides necessary graphs and procedures for its application and demonstrates the effects of the model on fracture data sets for two pressure vessel steels (A533B and A515)

  1. Hyperphosphorylation and cleavage at D421 enhance tau secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Plouffe

    Full Text Available It is well established that tau pathology propagates in a predictable manner in Alzheimer's disease (AD. Moreover, tau accumulates in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of AD's patients. The mechanisms underlying the propagation of tau pathology and its accumulation in the CSF remain to be elucidated. Recent studies have reported that human tau was secreted by neurons and non-neuronal cells when it was overexpressed indicating that tau secretion could contribute to the spreading of tau pathology in the brain and could lead to its accumulation in the CSF. In the present study, we showed that the overexpression of human tau resulted in its secretion by Hela cells. The main form of tau secreted by these cells was cleaved at the C-terminal. Surprisingly, secreted tau was dephosphorylated at several sites in comparison to intracellular tau which presented a strong immunoreactivity to all phospho-dependent antibodies tested. Our data also revealed that phosphorylation and cleavage of tau favored its secretion by Hela cells. Indeed, the mimicking of phosphorylation at 12 sites known to be phosphorylated in AD enhanced tau secretion. A mutant form of tau truncated at D421, the preferential cleavage site of caspase-3, was also significantly more secreted than wild-type tau. Taken together, our results indicate that hyperphosphorylation and cleavage of tau by favoring its secretion could contribute to the propagation of tau pathology in the brain and its accumulation in the CSF.

  2. Regioselective Cleavage of Thioether Linkages in Microcystin Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemskov, Ivan; Kropp, Heike M; Wittmann, Valentin

    2016-07-25

    Microcystins are cyanobacterial toxins that can be found in fresh and coastal waters during algal blooms. Microcystin contamination of water can cause severe poisoning of animals and humans. Quantification of these toxins in biological samples is complicated because a major proportion of microcystins is covalently linked to proteins through thioether bonds formed through a Michael-type addition of cysteine residues of proteins to an N-methyldehydroalanine residue in the microcystins. We investigated chemical methods that can be used to cleave such thioether bonds by means of an elimination reaction that leaves the microcystin backbone intact for subsequent analysis. The known reagent O-mesitylenesulfonylhydroxylamine (MSH) led to regioselective thioether cleavage, but a large excess of reagent was needed, thus making purification challenging. An unexpected side reaction observed during the investigation of the base-induced elimination inspired us to develop a new thioether-cleavage methodology based on the addition of propargylamine as a nucleophile that can trap the elimination product. This methodology could be successfully applied to the quantitative cleavage of a microcystin-LF-glutathione conjugate. The alkyne moiety introduced by this procedure offers the possibility for further reactions with azides by using click chemistry, which might be useful for the derivatization or isolation of microcystins. PMID:27346324

  3. Sequence specificity of DNA cleavage by Micrococcus luteus gamma endonuclease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma irradiation induces the formation of lesions in DNA that are cleaved by an endonuclease activity in Micrococcus luteus extract. DNA fragments of defined sequence an DNA sequencing techniques were used to determine the sites of cleavage by this activity. /sup 32/P end-labelled DNA restriction fragments were gamma irradiated under N/sub 2/ and in the presence of KI (conditions which maximize the enzyme sensitive site to strand break ratio), treated with M. luteus extract, and analyzed by electrophoresis on denaturing polyacrylamide gels. Irradiated DNA was preferentially cleaved by the extract at sites of cytosine and thymine. Little or no cleavage was observed at purines. Scission of 3' end-labelled DNA at altered pyrimidines resulted in fragments that had electrophoretic mobilities similar to those of DNA fragments that were phosphorylated at the 5' terminus. The presence of a 5' phosphate was confirmed by a change in electrophoretic mobility after phosphatase treatment of the fragments. The sites of endonucleolytic cleavage by M. luteus extract were compared to those of the purified Escherichia coli endonuclease III, which has been shown to be active against x-irradiated DNA. Preliminary results from velocity sedimentation studies indicate that these two enzyme preparations differ in specificity

  4. Sequence-specific RNA Photocleavage by Single-stranded DNA in Presence of Riboflavin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongyun; Chen, Gangyi; Yuan, Yi; Li, Na; Dong, Juan; Huang, Xin; Cui, Xin; Tang, Zhuo

    2015-10-01

    Constant efforts have been made to develop new method to realize sequence-specific RNA degradation, which could cause inhibition of the expression of targeted gene. Herein, by using an unmodified short DNA oligonucleotide for sequence recognition and endogenic small molecue, vitamin B2 (riboflavin) as photosensitizer, we report a simple strategy to realize the sequence-specific photocleavage of targeted RNA. The DNA strand is complimentary to the target sequence to form DNA/RNA duplex containing a G•U wobble in the middle. The cleavage reaction goes through oxidative elimination mechanism at the nucleoside downstream of U of the G•U wobble in duplex to obtain unnatural RNA terminal, and the whole process is under tight control by using light as switch, which means the cleavage could be carried out according to specific spatial and temporal requirements. The biocompatibility of this method makes the DNA strand in combination with riboflavin a promising molecular tool for RNA manipulation.

  5. Dissecting the interactions of SERRATE with RNA and DICER-LIKE 1 in Arabidopsis microRNA precursor processing

    KAUST Repository

    Iwata, Yuji

    2013-08-05

    Efficient and precise microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis in Arabidopsis is mediated by the RNaseIII-family enzyme DICER-LIKE 1 (DCL1), double-stranded RNA-binding protein HYPONASTIC LEAVES 1 and the zinc-finger (ZnF) domain-containing protein SERRATE (SE). In the present study, we examined primary miRNA precursor (pri-miRNA) processing by highly purified recombinant DCL1 and SE proteins and found that SE is integral to pri-miRNA processing by DCL1. SE stimulates DCL1 cleavage of the pri-miRNA in an ionic strength-dependent manner. SE uses its N-terminal domain to bind to RNA and requires both N-terminal and ZnF domains to bind to DCL1. However, when DCL1 is bound to RNA, the interaction with the ZnF domain of SE becomes indispensible and stimulates the activity of DCL1 without requiring SE binding to RNA. Our results suggest that the interactions among SE, DCL1 and RNA are a potential point for regulating pri-miRNA processing. 2013 The Author(s) 2013.

  6. Catalytic Properties of Botulinum Neurotoxins Subtypes A3 and A4

    OpenAIRE

    Henkel, James S.; Jacobson, Mark; Tepp, William; Pier, Christina; Johnson, Eric A.; Barbieri, Joseph T.

    2009-01-01

    Botulinum toxins (BoNT) are zinc proteases (serotypes A-G) which cause flaccid paralysis through the cleavage of SNARE proteins within motor neurons. BoNT/A was originally organized into two subtypes: BoNT/A1 and BoNT/A2, which are ~ 95 % homologous and possess similar catalytic activities. Subsequently, two additional subtypes were identified; BoNT/A3 (Loch Maree), and BoNT/A4 (657Ba), which have 81 and 88% homology with BoNT/A1, respectively. Alignment studies predicted that BoNT/A3 and BoN...

  7. Catalytic hydrolysis of phosphate diester (BNPP) and plasmid DNA by mononuclear macrocyclic polyamine metal complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qing Xiang Xiang; Li Qun Zhang; Xiao Qi Yu; Ru Gang Xie

    2009-01-01

    The activities of the catalytic hydrolysis of phosphate diester (BNPP) [bis(p-nitrophenyl)phosphate diester]and plasmid DNA (pUC 18) by mononuclear macrocyclic polyamine metal complexes have been investigated in this paper.The results showed that the highest activity in hydrolysis of BNPP was obtained with le-Zn(II) complex (composed of lipophilic group) as catalyst.The hydrolysis rate enhancement is up to 3.64 × 104 fold.These metal complexes could effectively promote the cleavage of plasmid DNA (pUC18) at physiological conditions.

  8. Coordinated DNA dynamics during the human telomerase catalytic cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parks, Joseph W.; Stone, Michael D.

    2014-06-01

    The human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) utilizes a template within the integral RNA subunit (hTR) to direct extension of telomeres. Telomerase exhibits repeat addition processivity (RAP) and must therefore translocate the nascent DNA product into a new RNA:DNA hybrid register to prime each round of telomere repeat synthesis. Here, we use single-molecule FRET and nuclease protection assays to monitor telomere DNA structure and dynamics during the telomerase catalytic cycle. DNA translocation during RAP proceeds through a previously uncharacterized kinetic substep during which the 3‧-end of the DNA substrate base pairs downstream within the hTR template. The rate constant for DNA primer realignment reveals this step is not rate limiting for RAP, suggesting a second slow conformational change repositions the RNA:DNA hybrid into the telomerase active site and drives the extrusion of the 5‧-end of the DNA primer out of the enzyme complex.

  9. Four RNA families with functional transient structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jing Yun A; Meyer, Irmtraud M

    2015-01-01

    Protein-coding and non-coding RNA transcripts perform a wide variety of cellular functions in diverse organisms. Several of their functional roles are expressed and modulated via RNA structure. A given transcript, however, can have more than a single functional RNA structure throughout its life, a fact which has been previously overlooked. Transient RNA structures, for example, are only present during specific time intervals and cellular conditions. We here introduce four RNA families with transient RNA structures that play distinct and diverse functional roles. Moreover, we show that these transient RNA structures are structurally well-defined and evolutionarily conserved. Since Rfam annotates one structure for each family, there is either no annotation for these transient structures or no such family. Thus, our alignments either significantly update and extend the existing Rfam families or introduce a new RNA family to Rfam. For each of the four RNA families, we compile a multiple-sequence alignment based on experimentally verified transient and dominant (dominant in terms of either the thermodynamic stability and/or attention received so far) RNA secondary structures using a combination of automated search via covariance model and manual curation. The first alignment is the Trp operon leader which regulates the operon transcription in response to tryptophan abundance through alternative structures. The second alignment is the HDV ribozyme which we extend to the 5' flanking sequence. This flanking sequence is involved in the regulation of the transcript's self-cleavage activity. The third alignment is the 5' UTR of the maturation protein from Levivirus which contains a transient structure that temporarily postpones the formation of the final inhibitory structure to allow translation of maturation protein. The fourth and last alignment is the SAM riboswitch which regulates the downstream gene expression by assuming alternative structures upon binding of SAM. All

  10. RNA oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L. K.; Cejvanovic, V.; Henriken, T.;

    2015-01-01

    .9 significant hazard ratio for death compared with the quartile with the lowest 8oxoGuo excretion when adjusted for age, sex, BMI, smoker status, s-HbA1c, urine protein excretion and s-cholesterol. We conclude that it is now established that RNA oxidation is an independent risk factor for death in type 2...

  11. In Silico Reconstruction of Viral Genomes from Small RNAs Improves Virus-Derived Small Interfering RNA Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Vodovar, Nicolas; Goic, Bertsy; Blanc, Hervé; Saleh, Maria-Carla

    2011-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is the essential component of antiviral immunity in invertebrates and plants. One of the landmarks of the antiviral RNAi response is the production of virus-derived small interfering RNA (vsiRNA) from viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA). vsiRNAs constitute a fragmented image of the viral genome sequence that results from Dicer cleavage. vsiRNA sequence profiling is used extensively as a surrogate to study the antiviral RNAi response by determining the nature of the viral...

  12. The influenza A virus NS1 protein binds small interfering RNAs and suppresses RNA silencing in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Bucher, E.C.; Hemmes, J.C.; Haan, de, L.; Goldbach, R.W.; Prins, M.W.

    2004-01-01

    RNA silencing comprises a set of sequence-specific RNA degradation pathways that occur in a wide range of eukaryotes, including animals, fungi and plants. A hallmark of RNA silencing is the presence of small interfering RNA molecules (siRNAs). The siRNAs are generated by cleavage of larger double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) and provide the sequence specificity for degradation of cognate RNA molecules. In plants, RNA silencing plays a key role in developmental processes and in control of virus repl...

  13. METABOLIC ENGINEERING TO DEVELOP A PATHWAY FOR THE SELECTIVE CLEAVAGE OF CARBON-NITROGEN BONDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John J. Kilbane III

    2003-12-01

    The objective of the project is to develop biochemical pathways for the selective cleavage of C-N bonds in molecules found in petroleum. The initial phase of the project will focus on the isolation or development of an enzyme capable of cleaving the C-N bond in aromatic amides, specifically 2-aminobiphenyl. The objective of the second phase of the research will be to construct a biochemical pathway for the selective removal of nitrogen from carbazole by combining the carA genes from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11 with the gene(s) encoding an appropriate amidase. The objective of the final phase of the project will be to develop derivative CN bond cleaving enzymes that have broader substrate ranges and to demonstrate the use of such strains to selectively remove nitrogen from petroleum. The project is on schedule and no major difficulties have been encountered. During the first year of the project (October, 2002-September, 2003) enrichment culture experiments have resulted in the isolation of promising cultures that may be capable of cleaving C-N bonds in aromatic amides, several amidase genes have been cloned and are currently undergoing directed evolution to obtain derivatives that can cleave C-N bonds in aromatic amides, and the carA genes from Sphingomonas sp. GTIN11, and Pseudomonas resinovorans CA10 were cloned in vectors capable of replicating in Escherichia coli. Future research will address expression of these genes in Rhodococcus erythropolis. Enrichment culture experiments and directed evolution experiments continue to be a main focus of research activity and further work is required to obtain an appropriate amidase that will selectively cleave C-N bonds in aromatic substrates. Once an appropriate amidase gene is obtained it must be combined with genes encoding an enzyme capable of converting carbazole to 2'aminobiphenyl-2,3-diol: specifically carA genes. The carA genes from two sources have been cloned and are ready for construction of C-N bond cleavage

  14. Impact of an extruded nucleotide on cleavage activity and dynamic catalytic core conformation of the hepatitis delta virus ribozyme

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šefčíková, J.; Krasovská, Maryna V.; Špačková, Naďa; Šponer, Jiří; Walter, N.G.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 85, 5-6 (2007), s. 392-406. ISSN 0006-3525 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/0388; GA ČR(CZ) GA203/05/0009; GA AV ČR(CZ) 1QS500040581; GA MŠk(CZ) LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : conformational dynamics * hepatitis delta virus * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 2.389, year: 2007

  15. Mini-ribozymes and freezing environment: a new scenario for the early RNA world

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Vlassov

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The RNA World hypothesis states that the present-day life, which is based on DNA genomes and protein enzymes, was preceded by a simpler life form based primarily on RNA. During this era, the genetic information resided in the sequence of RNA molecules and the phenotype derived from the catalytic properties of RNA. Though it is a widely accepted scenario, a number of problems remain unsolved. One of the biggest questions is how complex RNAs could evolve, survive and replicate under typically assumed ''warm and wet'' conditions, taking into account that the RNA phosphodiester backbone is chemically unstable under these conditions. We suggest that prebiotic conditions associated with freezing could have been of key importance in the early RNA World, and discuss the role of primitive catalytic RNA in the evolution of RNA size and complexity.

  16. DARWIN REVIEW: microRNA, seeds and Darwin? – Diverse Function of miRNA in Seed Biology and Plant Responses to Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, single-stranded RNAs that downregulate target genes at the post-transcriptional level. miRNAs regulate target genes by guiding mRNA cleavage or by repressing translation. miRNAs play crucial roles in a broad range of developmental processes in plants. Multiple miRNAs ar...

  17. Accurate placement of substrate RNA by Gar1 in H/ACA RNA-guided pseudouridylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Yang, Lijiang; Gao, Yi Qin; Zhao, Xin Sheng

    2015-09-01

    H/ACA RNA-guided ribonucleoprotein particle (RNP), the most complicated RNA pseudouridylase so far known, uses H/ACA guide RNA for substrate capture and four proteins (Cbf5, Nop10, L7Ae and Gar1) for pseudouridylation. Although it was shown that Gar1 not only facilitates the product release, but also enhances the catalytic activity, the chemical role that Gar1 plays in this complicated machinery is largely unknown. Kinetics measurement on Pyrococcus furiosus RNPs at different temperatures making use of fluorescence anisotropy showed that Gar1 reduces the catalytic barrier through affecting the activation entropy instead of enthalpy. Site-directed mutagenesis combined with molecular dynamics simulations demonstrated that V149 in the thumb loop of Cbf5 is critical in placing the target uridine to the right position toward catalytic D85 of Cbf5. The enzyme elegantly aligns the position of uridine in the catalytic site with the help of Gar1. In addition, conversion of uridine to pseudouridine results in a rigid syn configuration of the target nucleotide in the active site and causes Gar1 to pull out the thumb. Both factors guarantee the efficient release of the product. PMID:26206671

  18. Determination of the Specificity Landscape for Ribonuclease P Processing of Precursor tRNA 5' Leader Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niland, Courtney N; Zhao, Jing; Lin, Hsuan-Chun; Anderson, David R; Jankowsky, Eckhard; Harris, Michael E

    2016-08-19

    Maturation of tRNA depends on a single endonuclease, ribonuclease P (RNase P), to remove highly variable 5' leader sequences from precursor tRNA transcripts. Here, we use high-throughput enzymology to report multiple-turnover and single-turnover kinetics for Escherichia coli RNase P processing of all possible 5' leader sequences, including nucleotides contacting both the RNA and protein subunits of RNase P. The results reveal that the identity of N(-2) and N(-3) relative to the cleavage site at N(1) primarily control alternative substrate selection and act at the level of association not the cleavage step. As a consequence, the specificity for N(-1), which contacts the active site and contributes to catalysis, is suppressed. This study demonstrates high-throughput RNA enzymology as a means to globally determine RNA specificity landscapes and reveals the mechanism of substrate discrimination by a widespread and essential RNA-processing enzyme. PMID:27336323

  19. BCL10GFP fusion protein as a substrate for analysis of determinants required for Mucosa-Associated Lymphoid Tissue 1 (MALT1-mediated cleavage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jou Shin-Yi

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MALT1 belongs to a family of paracaspase and modulates NF-κB signaling pathways through its scaffolding function and proteolytic activity. MALT1 cleaves protein substrates after a positively charged Arginine residue. BCL10, a 233 amino acids polypeptide, is identified as one of the MALT1 proteolytic substrates. MALT1 cleaves BCL10 at the C-terminal end of Arg228. A mere 5 amino acids difference between the substrate and the proteolytic product made it difficult to tell whether the cleavage event took place by using a simple western blot analysis. Here, BCL10GFP was constructed and utilized to examine the specificity and domain determinants for MALT1 cleavage in cells. Methods Various BCL10GFP constructs were transfected into HEK293T cell with MALT1 construct by using calcium phosphate-DNA precipitation method. Lysates of transfectants were resolved by SDS/PAGE and analyzed by western blot analysis. Results BCL10GFP was proteolytically processed by MALT1 as BCL10. The integrity of caspase recruitment domain (CARD and MALT1-interacting domain on BCL10 were required for MALT1 proteolytic activity. Besides the invariant P1 cleavage site Arg228, P4 Leu225 played a role in defining BCL10 as a good substrate for MALT1. Conclusions We offered a way of monitoring the catalytic activity of MALT1 in HEK293T cells using BCL10GFP as a substrate. BCL10GFP can be utilized as a convenient tool for studying the determinants for efficient MALT1 cleavage in HEK293T cells

  20. Catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Clausen, Bjerne;

    2007-01-01

    Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change with par......Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change...... with particle size. We find that the fraction of low-coordinated Au atoms scales approximately with the catalytic activity, suggesting that atoms on the corners and edges of Au nanoparticles are the active sites. This effect is explained using density functional calculations....

  1. Catalytic distillation water recovery subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budininkas, P.; Rasouli, F.

    1985-01-01

    An integrated engineering breadboard subsystem for the recovery of potable water from untreated urine based on the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal was designed, fabricated and tested. Unlike other evaporative methods, this process catalytically oxidizes ammonia and volatile hydrocarbons vaporizing with water to innocuous products; therefore, no pretreatment of urine is required. Since the subsystem is fabricated from commercially available components, its volume, weight and power requirements are not optimized; however, it is suitable for zero-g operation. The testing program consists of parametric tests, one month of daily tests and a continuous test of 168 hours duration. The recovered water is clear, odorless, low in ammonia and organic carbon, and requires only an adjustment of its pH to meet potable water standards. The obtained data indicate that the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal process, if further developed, would also be competitive with other water recovery systems in weight, volume and power requirements.

  2. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vivek V Ranade

    2014-03-01

    Catalytic reactions are ubiquitous in chemical and allied industries. A homogeneous or heterogeneous catalyst which provides an alternative route of reaction with lower activation energy and better control on selectivity can make substantial impact on process viability and economics. Extensive studies have been conducted to establish sound basis for design and engineering of reactors for practising such catalytic reactions and for realizing improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so recent) developments in engineering reactors for catalytic reactions is discussed. Some examples where performance enhancement was realized by catalyst design, appropriate choice of reactor, better injection and dispersion strategies and recent advances in process intensification/ multifunctional reactors are discussed to illustrate the approach.

  3. Biochemistry and Function of the RNA Exosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lubas, Michal Szymon; Chlebowski, Aleksander; Dziembowski, Andrzej;

    2012-01-01

    Discovery of the evolutionary conserved RNA exosome was a milestone in RNA biology. First identified as an activity essential for the processing of ribosomal RNA, the exosome has since proved to be central for RNA processing and degradation in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells....... This multisubunit protein complex consists of a catalytically inert 9-subunit core endowed with associated ribonucleolytic activities and further assisted by compartment-specific cofactors required for its activation and substrate targeting. Although many features of exosome biology are known, fundamental aspects...... are still under investigation. In this chapter, we review current biochemical and functional knowledge of eukaryotic exosomes. After introducing some of their nuclear and cytoplasmic functions, we discuss the structural organization and evolutionary aspects of exosome complexes. Finally, we describe...

  4. Copper-dependent cleavage of DNA of bleomycin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DNA strand scission by bleomycin in the presence of Cu and Fe was further characterized. It was found that DNA degradation occurred readily upon admixture of Cu(I) or Cu(II) + dithiothreitol + bleomycin, but only where the order of addition precluded initial formation of Cu(II)-bleomycin or where sufficient time was permitted for reduction of formed Cu(II)-bleomycin to Cu(I)-bleomycin. DNA strand scission mediated by Cu + dithiothreitol + bleomycin was inhibited by the copper-selective agent bathocuproine when the experiment was carried out under conditions consistent with Cu chelation by bathocuproine on the time scale of the experiment. Remarkably, it was found that the extent of DNA degradation obtained with bleomycin in the presence of Fe and Cu was greater than that obtained with either metal ion alone. A comparison of the sequence selectivity of bleomycin in the presence of Cu and Fe using32P-end-labeled DNA duplexes as substrates revealed significant differences in sites of DNA cleavage and in the extent of cleavage at sites shared in common. For deglycobleomycin and decarbamoylbleomycin, whose metal ligation is believed to differ from that of bleomycin itself, it was found that the relative extents of DNA cleavage in the presence of Cu were not in the same order as those obtained in the presence of Fe. The results of these experiments are entirely consistent with the work of Sugiura who first demonstrate the generation of reactive oxygen species upon admixture of O2 and Cu(I)-bleomycin

  5. Synthesis and enzymatic cleavage of dual-ligand quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sewell, Sarah L. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Giorgio, Todd D., E-mail: todd.d.giorgio@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States); Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2009-05-05

    Site directed therapy promises to minimize treatment-limiting systemic effects associated with cytotoxic agents that have no specificity for pathologic tissues. One general strategy is to target cell surface receptors uniquely presented on particular tissues. Highly specific in vivo targeting of an emerging neoplasm through a single molecular recognition mechanism has not generally been successful. Nonspecific binding and specific binding to non-target cells compromise the therapeutic index of small molecule, ubiquitous cancer targeting ligands. In this work, we have designed and fabricated a nanoparticle (NP) construct that could potentially overcome the current limitations of targeted in vivo delivery. Quantum dots (QDs) were functionalized with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) modified to enable specific cleavage by matrix metalloprotease-7 (MMP-7). The QDs were further functionalized with folic acid, a ligand for a cell surface receptor that is overexpressed in many tumors, but also expressed in some normal tissues. The nanomolecular construct is designed so that the PEG initially conceals the folate ligand and construct binding to cells is inhibited. MMP-7 activated peptide cleavage and subsequent unmasking of the folate ligand occurs only near tumor tissue, resulting in a proximity activated (PA) targeting system. QDs functionalized with both the MMP-7 cleavable substrate and folic acid were successfully synthesized and characterized. The proteolytic capability of the dual ligand QD construct was quantitatively assessed by fluorometric analysis and compared to a QD construct functionalized with only the PA ligand. The dual ligand PA nanoparticles studied here exhibit significant susceptibility to cleavage by MMP-7 at physiologically relevant conditions. The capacity to autonomously convert a biopassivated nanostructure to a tissue-specific targeted delivery agent in vivo represents a paradigm change for site-directed therapies.

  6. Synthesis and enzymatic cleavage of dual-ligand quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Site directed therapy promises to minimize treatment-limiting systemic effects associated with cytotoxic agents that have no specificity for pathologic tissues. One general strategy is to target cell surface receptors uniquely presented on particular tissues. Highly specific in vivo targeting of an emerging neoplasm through a single molecular recognition mechanism has not generally been successful. Nonspecific binding and specific binding to non-target cells compromise the therapeutic index of small molecule, ubiquitous cancer targeting ligands. In this work, we have designed and fabricated a nanoparticle (NP) construct that could potentially overcome the current limitations of targeted in vivo delivery. Quantum dots (QDs) were functionalized with a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) modified to enable specific cleavage by matrix metalloprotease-7 (MMP-7). The QDs were further functionalized with folic acid, a ligand for a cell surface receptor that is overexpressed in many tumors, but also expressed in some normal tissues. The nanomolecular construct is designed so that the PEG initially conceals the folate ligand and construct binding to cells is inhibited. MMP-7 activated peptide cleavage and subsequent unmasking of the folate ligand occurs only near tumor tissue, resulting in a proximity activated (PA) targeting system. QDs functionalized with both the MMP-7 cleavable substrate and folic acid were successfully synthesized and characterized. The proteolytic capability of the dual ligand QD construct was quantitatively assessed by fluorometric analysis and compared to a QD construct functionalized with only the PA ligand. The dual ligand PA nanoparticles studied here exhibit significant susceptibility to cleavage by MMP-7 at physiologically relevant conditions. The capacity to autonomously convert a biopassivated nanostructure to a tissue-specific targeted delivery agent in vivo represents a paradigm change for site-directed therapies.

  7. Embryo apoptosis identification: Oocyte grade or cleavage stage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakri, Noraina Mohd; Ibrahim, Siti Fatimah; Osman, Nurul Atikah; Hasan, Nurhaslina; Jaffar, Farah Hanan Fathihah; Rahman, Zulaiha Abdul; Osman, Khairul

    2016-01-01

    Apoptosis is a programed cell death that is vital for tissue homeostasis. However, embryo apoptosis had been known to be related to embryo fragmentation which should be avoided in in vitro fertilization (IVF). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship of embryo apoptosis with the grade of immature oocytes and cleavage stage of in vitro produced (IVP) cattle embryos. This study consisted of 345 oocytes collected through ovary slicing. Immature oocytes were graded as A, B and C. This grading was based on cumulus cell thickness and compactness. All oocytes then underwent an in vitro maturation (IVM) procedure. An IVF was done 24 h after IVM culture. Prior to staining, stage of cleaved embryos was determined and classified as either 2, 4, 8 or >8-cell embryo stage. Apoptosis status of cleaved IVP embryos was determined by using annexin V-FITC staining technique at 48 and 72 h post insemination (hpi). Apoptosis status for each embryo was classified as either early or late. The result showed that there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) of apoptosis status among grade A, B and C embryos. All grades of oocytes showed embryo apoptosis where 1.5% late apoptosis for grade A, 4.5% and 10.4% of early and late apoptosis for grade B and grade C. Early apoptosis was not seen in grade A embryo. We also noted no significant difference (p > 0.05) of apoptosis status between 2, 4, 8 and >8-cell embryo stage. Early apoptosis was also not seen in >8-cell stage. Even though there were no differences in apoptosis expression between the three classes, the cleavage rate of grade A oocytes was significantly higher (p quality and the cleavage stage of the embryo produced. PMID:26858565

  8. Highly Efficient Self-Replicating RNA Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Robertson, Michael P; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2014-01-01

    An RNA enzyme has been developed that catalyzes the joining of oligonucleotide substrates to form additional copies of itself, undergoing self-replication with exponential growth. The enzyme also can cross-replicate with a partner enzyme, resulting in their mutual exponential growth and enabling self-sustained Darwinian evolution. The opportunity for inventive evolution within this synthetic genetic system depends on the diversity of the evolving population, which is limited by the catalytic ...

  9. HuSiDa—the human siRNA database: an open-access database for published functional siRNA sequences and technical details of efficient transfer into recipient cells

    OpenAIRE

    Truss, Matthias; Swat, Maciej; Kielbasa, Szymon M.; Schäfer, Reinhold; Herzel, Hanspeter; Hagemeier, Christian

    2004-01-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) have become a standard tool in functional genomics. Once incorporated into the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), siRNAs mediate the specific recognition of corresponding target mRNAs and their cleavage. However, only a small fraction of randomly chosen siRNA sequences is able to induce efficient gene silencing. In common laboratory practice, successful RNA interference experiments typically require both, the labour and cost-intensive identification of an ac...

  10. Features of Controlled Laser Thermal Cleavage of Crystalline Silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Controlled laser thermal cleavage of crystalline silicon has been numerically simulated. A 3D analysis of the thermoelastic fields formed in a single-crystal silicon wafer as a result of successive laser heating and exposure to a coolant was performed for three different versions of anisotropy. The simulation was performed for laser irradiation with different wavelengths: 1.06 and 0.808 μm. The calculation results have been experimentally verified using a YAG laser. The results can be used in the electronics industry to optimize the precise separation of silicon wafers into crystals.

  11. RNA-guided genome editing à la carte

    OpenAIRE

    Horvath, Philippe; Barrangou, Rodolphe

    2013-01-01

    Two recent papers in Science illustrate how the prokaryotic CRISPR-Cas immune system machinery, which typically targets invasive genetic elements such as viruses and plasmids, can be converted into a sophisticated molecular tool for next-generation human genome editing. The versatile Cas9 RNA-guided endonuclease can be readily reprogrammed using customizable small RNAs for sequence-specific single- or double-stranded DNA cleavage.

  12. Exploring tertiary folding in RNA : novel structural motifs in HDV and TYMV RNA studied by NMR spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Kolk, M H

    1999-01-01

    RNA molecules lie at the basis of many cellular processes. They serve as a carrier of information, but can also form intricate complexes with proteins and other RNAs, and can even have catalytic activity, in which case they are called ribozymes. This versatility of RNA function relates to a wide range of structural properties. Apart from the tRNA structure (1973), however, the number of high-resolution structures have long remained very low. Presently, in the midst of a surge of RNA structure...

  13. Cleavage of DAP5 by coxsackievirus B3 2A protease facilitates viral replication and enhances apoptosis by altering translation of IRES-containing genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, P J; Ye, X; Qiu, Y; Zhang, H M; Hemida, M G; Wang, F; Lim, T; Gu, A; Cho, B; Kim, H; Fung, G; Granville, D J; Yang, D

    2016-05-01

    Cleavage of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) by enterovirus proteases during infection leads to the shutoff of cellular cap-dependent translation, but does not affect the initiation of cap-independent translation of mRNAs containing an internal ribosome entry site (IRES). Death-associated protein 5 (DAP5), a structural homolog of eIF4G, is a translation initiation factor specific for IRES-containing mRNAs. Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) is a positive single-stranded RNA virus and a primary causal agent of human myocarditis. Its RNA genome harbors an IRES within the 5'-untranslated region and is translated by a cap-independent, IRES-driven mechanism. Previously, we have shown that DAP5 is cleaved during CVB3 infection. However, the protease responsible for cleavage, cleavage site and effects on the translation of target genes during CVB3 infection have not been investigated. In the present study, we demonstrated that viral protease 2A but not 3C is responsible for DAP5 cleavage, generating 45- and 52-kDa N- (DAP5-N) and C-terminal (DAP5-C) fragments, respectively. By site-directed mutagenesis, we found that DAP5 is cleaved at amino acid G434. Upon cleavage, DAP5-N largely translocated to the nucleus at the later time points of infection, whereas the DAP5-C largely remained in the cytoplasm. Overexpression of these DAP5 truncates demonstrated that DAP5-N retained the capability of initiating IRES-driven translation of apoptosis-associated p53, but not the prosurvival Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) when compared with the full-length DAP5. Similarly, DAP5-N expression promoted CVB3 replication and progeny release; on the other hand, DAP5-C exerted a dominant-negative effect on cap-dependent translation. Taken together, viral protease 2A-mediated cleavage of DAP5 results in the production of two truncates that exert differential effects on protein translation of the IRES-containing genes, leading to enhanced host cell death. PMID:26586572

  14. METABOLIC ENGINEERING TO DEVELOP A PATHWAY FOR THE SELECTIVE CLEAVAGE OF CARBON-NITROGEN BONDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John J. Kilbane II

    2004-10-01

    poisoning, by nitrogen, of catalysts used in the hydrotreating and catalytic cracking of petroleum. Aromatic compounds such as carbazole are representative of the difficult-to-treat organonitrogen compounds most commonly encountered in petroleum. There are two C-N bonds in carbazole and the construction of a metabolic pathway for the removal of nitrogen from carbazole will require enzymes capable cleaving both C-N bonds. A multi-component enzyme, carbazole dioxygenase, which can selectively cleave the first C-N bond has been identified and the genes that encode this enzyme have been cloned, sequenced, and are being expressed in Rhodococcus erythropolis, a bacterial culture that tolerates exposure to petroleum. An enzyme capable of selectively cleaving the second C-N bond in carbazole has not yet been identified, but enrichment culture experiments have recently succeeded in isolating a bacterial culture that is a likely candidate and may possess a suitable enzyme. Research in the near future will verify if a suitable enzyme for the cleavage of the second C-N bond in carbazole has indeed been found, then the genes encoding a suitable enzyme will be identified, cloned, and sequenced. Ultimately genes encoding enzymes for selective cleavage of both C-N bonds in carbazole will be assembled into a new metabolic pathway and the ability of the resulting bacterial culture to remove nitrogen from petroleum will be determined.

  15. Adsorption of Thiophene on the Catalytically Active Surface of MoS2: An Ab Initio Local-Density-Functional Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybaud, P.; Hafner, J.; Kresse, G.; Toulhoat, H.

    1998-02-01

    The adsorption of thiophene on the catalytically active MoS2(010) surfaces has been studied using ab initio local-density-functional molecular dynamics. It is shown that thiophene adsorbs in an η5 configuration with the molecular ring parallel to the surface, centered above a coordinatively unsaturated Mo atom, and with the sulfur atom in a binding position between two Mo surface atoms. This configuration provides not only the highest adsorption energy, but activates in addition the thiophene molecule with respect to both C-S bond cleavage (and hence desulfurization) and hydrogenation. Hence it represents a realistic scenario for the first step in catalytic hydrodesulfurization.

  16. Functional requirements of AID's higher order structures and their interaction with RNA-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Samiran; Begum, Nasim A; Hu, Wenjun; Honjo, Tasuku

    2016-03-15

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for the somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) of Ig genes. Although both the N and C termini of AID have unique functions in DNA cleavage and recombination, respectively, during SHM and CSR, their molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Using a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay combined with glycerol gradient fractionation, we revealed that the AID C terminus is required for a stable dimer formation. Furthermore, AID monomers and dimers form complexes with distinct heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). AID monomers associate with DNA cleavage cofactor hnRNP K whereas AID dimers associate with recombination cofactors hnRNP L, hnRNP U, and Serpine mRNA-binding protein 1. All of these AID/ribonucleoprotein associations are RNA-dependent. We propose that AID's structure-specific cofactor complex formations differentially contribute to its DNA-cleavage and recombination functions. PMID:26929374

  17. Cleavage of silicon by laser-based shock waves: Interpretation by nanoscopic length scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cleavage along the weakest Si{1 1 1} cleavage plane is measured by impulsive fracture using surface acoustic waves (SAWs) with steep shock fronts, generated by pulsed laser irradiation and recorded with a laser probe–beam-deflection setup. The theoretical cleavage strength, obtained by ab initio calculations for perfect single-crystal silicon lattices is compared with the strength resulting from an improved Polanyi–Orowan cleavage model. The critical strength of a real silicon crystal, measured by using calibrated elastic surface pulses with shocks, was employed to extract the corresponding critical length scale characterizing the cleavage process on the basis of the modified cleavage model. The extracted length scale of 7 nm can be connected with the size of the microstructural defect initiating failure. Usually stress generating surface defects are responsible for the nucleation of brittle fracture, especially in nanoscale systems with large surface areas.

  18. Microscopic investigation of cleavage initiation in modified A508B pressure vessel steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microscopic study on ductile-brittle crack growth in a modified version of the A508B pressure vessel steel has been performed. Small SEN(B)-specimens tested at different temperatures in and above the transition region have been thoroughly examined with a scanning electron microscope. Focus was directed towards: amount of ductile crack growth prior to cleavage, distance from the crack front to cleavage initiation sites, and type of defect that caused the cleavage initiation. The results show, among other things, that cleavage facets are present in specimens tested at all temperatures, even on the upper shelf where no global failure by cleavage was observed. These preliminary results give an indication that the ability of the matrix material to arrest and sustain small cleavage cracks can be crucial in explaining why ferritic steels show a transition behaviour. (orig.)

  19. Study of mechanism of cleavage fracture at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J. H.; Wang, G. Z.

    1992-02-01

    In this investigation, a series of crack opening displacement (COD) tests were carried out at several low temperatures for C-Mn weld steel. Some of the specimens were loaded until fracture, and the mechanical properties and microscopic parameters on fracture surfaces were measured. Other specimens were unloaded before fracture at different applied loads. The distributions of the elongated cavities and the cleavage microcracks ahead of fatigue crack tips were observed in detail. Based on the experimental results, the combined criterion of a critical strain ɛ p ≥ ɛc) for initiating a crack nucleus, a critical stress triaxiality (σ m/σ ≥ tc) for preventing it from blunting, and a critical normal stress (σ yy/σf) for the cleavage extension was proposed again, and the critical values of ɛp and σm/-σ for the C-Mn weld steel were measured. The reason why the minimum COD value could not be zero is explained. The mechanism of generation of the lower limit COD value on the lower shelf of the toughness transition curve is proposed.

  20. Catalytic properties of niobium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The catalytic activity and selectivity of niobium compounds including oxides, salts, organometallic compounds and others are outlined. The application of these compounds as catalysts to diversified reactions is reported. The nature and action of niobium catalysts are characteristic and sometimes anomalous, suggesting the necessity of basic research and the potential use as catalysts for important processes in the chemical industry. (Author)

  1. A pathway sensor for genome-wide screens of intracellular proteolytic cleavage

    OpenAIRE

    Ketteler, Robin; Sun, Zairen; Kovacs, Karl F; He, Wei-Wu; Seed, Brian

    2008-01-01

    Protein cleavage is a central event in many regulated biological processes. We describe a system for detecting intracellular proteolysis based on non-conventional secretion of Gaussia luciferase (GLUC). GLUC exits the cell without benefit of a secretory leader peptide, but can be anchored in the cell by fusion to \\(\\beta\\)-actin. By including protease cleavage sites between GLUC and \\(\\beta\\)-actin, proteolytic cleavage can be detected. Using this assay, we have identified regulators of autop...

  2. A real-time assay for monitoring nucleic acid cleavage by quadruplex formation

    OpenAIRE

    Kankia, Besik I.

    2006-01-01

    Direct and straightforward methods to follow nucleic acid cleavage are needed. A spectrophotometric quadruplex formation assay (QFA) was developed, which allows real-time monitoring of site-specific cleavage of nucleic acids. QFA was applied to study both protein and nucleic acid restriction enzymes, and was demonstrated to accurately determine Michaelis–Menten parameters for the cleavage reaction catalyzed by EcoRI. QFA can be used to study the mechanisms of protein–nucleic acid recognition....

  3. Sea urchin akt activity is Runx-dependent and required for post-cleavage stage cell division

    KAUST Repository

    Robertson, Anthony J.

    2013-03-25

    In animal development following the initial cleavage stage of embryogenesis, the cell cycle becomes dependent on intercellular signaling and controlled by the genomically encoded ontogenetic program. Runx transcription factors are critical regulators of metazoan developmental signaling, and we have shown that the sea urchin Runx gene runt-1, which is globally expressed during early embryogenesis, functions in support of blastula stage cell proliferation and expression of the mitogenic genes pkc1, cyclinD, and several wnts. To obtain a more comprehensive list of early runt-1 regulatory targets, we screened a Strongylocentrotus purpuratus microarray to identify genes mis-expressed in mid-blastula stage runt-1 morphants. This analysis showed that loss of Runx function perturbs the expression of multiple genes involved in cell division, including the pro-growth and survival kinase Akt (PKB), which is significantly underexpressed in runt-1 morphants. Further genomic analysis revealed that Akt is encoded by two genes in the S. purpuratus genome, akt-1 and akt-2, both of which contain numerous canonical Runx target sequences. The transcripts of both genes accumulate several fold during blastula stage, contingent on runt-1 expression. Inhibiting Akt expression or activity causes blastula stage cell cycle arrest, whereas overexpression of akt-1 mRNA rescues cell proliferation in runt-1 morphants. These results indicate that post-cleavage stage cell division requires Runx-dependent expression of akt.

  4. Inorganic phosphate blocks binding of pre-miRNA to Dicer-2 via its PAZ domain

    OpenAIRE

    Fukunaga, Ryuya; Colpan, Cansu; Han, Bo W.; Zamore, Phillip D.

    2014-01-01

    In Drosophila, Dicer-1 produces microRNAs (miRNAs) from pre-miRNAs, whereas Dicer-2 generates small interfering RNAs from long double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), a process that requires ATP hydrolysis. We previously showed that inorganic phosphate inhibits Dicer-2 cleavage of pre-miRNAs, but not long dsRNAs. Here, we report that phosphate-dependent substrate discrimination by Dicer-2 reflects dsRNA substrate length. Efficient processing by Dicer-2 of short dsRNA requires a 5′ terminal phosphate and...

  5. Protein composition of catalytically active human telomerase from immortal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cohen, Scott B; Graham, Mark E; Lovrecz, George O;

    2007-01-01

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein enzyme complex that adds 5'-TTAGGG-3' repeats onto the ends of human chromosomes, providing a telomere maintenance mechanism for approximately 90% of human cancers. We have purified human telomerase approximately 10(8)-fold, with the final elution dependent on the...... enzyme's ability to catalyze nucleotide addition onto a DNA oligonucleotide of telomeric sequence, thereby providing specificity for catalytically active telomerase. Mass spectrometric sequencing of the protein components and molecular size determination indicated an enzyme composition of two molecules...... each of telomerase reverse transcriptase, telomerase RNA, and dyskerin....

  6. A MicroRNA repertoire for functional genome research in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: MicroRNAs (miRNA) are small, highly conserved, non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression of target mRNAs through cleavage or translational inhibition. MiRNAs are most often identified through computational prediction from genome sequences. The rainbow trout genome sequence is not ava...

  7. Hairpin DNA Sequences Bound Strongly by Bleomycin Exhibit Enhanced Double-Strand Cleavage

    OpenAIRE

    Roy, Basab; Hecht, Sidney M.

    2014-01-01

    Clinically used bleomycin A5 has been employed in a study of double-strand cleavage of a library of 10 hairpin DNAs originally selected on the basis of their strong binding to bleomycin. Each of the DNAs underwent double-strand cleavage at more than one site, and all of the cleavage sites were within, or in close proximity to, an eight-base-pair region of the duplex that had been randomized to create the original library. A total of 31 double-strand cleavage sites were identified on the 10 DN...

  8. The First Example of Cation Radical Induced Ether Cleavage of Benzyl Phenyl Ether

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermally stable benzyl phenyl ether has been shown to cleavage under mild conditions. The new reaction described herein further expands the chemistry of the ether cleavage by cation radicals. Over the last several years, our lab has discovered cation radical-induced oxidative C-O bond cleavages such as carbonates (eq 1), carbamates (eq 2), peroxides (eq 3), and alcohols (eq 4), where R is either tert-butyl or benzyl. It was recognized from those reactions that carbocationic chemistry with C-O bond cleavages was predominant, with a 2:1 stoichiometry of Th+·:oxidized molecules

  9. Cleavage of RseA by RseP requires a carboxyl-terminal hydrophobic amino acid following DegS cleavage

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiaochun; Wang, Boyuan; Feng, Lihui; Kang, Hui; Qi, Yang; Wang, Jiawei; Shi, Yigong

    2009-01-01

    Regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP) by the Site-2 protease (S2P) results in the release of a transmembrane signaling protein. Curiously, however, S2P cleavage must be preceded by the action of the Site-1 protease (S1P). To decipher the underlying mechanism, we reconstituted sequential, in vitro cleavages of the Escherichia coli transmembrane protein RseA by DegS (S1P) and RseP (S2P). After DegS cleavage, the newly exposed carboxyl-terminal residue Val-148 of RseA plays an essential role...

  10. The importance of RT-qPCR primer design for the detection of siRNA-mediated mRNA silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lasham Annette

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of RNAi to analyse gene function in vitro is now widely applied in biological research. However, several difficulties are associated with its use in vivo, mainly relating to inefficient delivery and non-specific effects of short RNA duplexes in animal models. The latter can lead to false positive results when real-time RT-qPCR alone is used to measure target mRNA knockdown. Findings We observed that detection of an apparent siRNA-mediated knockdown in vivo was dependent on the primers used for real-time RT-qPCR measurement of the target mRNA. Two siRNAs specific for RRM1 with equivalent activity in vitro were administered to A549 xenografts via intratumoural injection. In each case, apparent knockdown of RRM1 mRNA was observed only when the primer pair used in RT-qPCR flanked the siRNA cleavage site. This false-positive result was found to result from co-purified siRNA interfering with both reverse transcription and qPCR. Conclusions Our data suggest that using primers flanking the siRNA-mediated cleavage site in RT-qPCR-based measurements of mRNA knockdown in vivo can lead to false positive results. This is particularly relevant where high concentrations of siRNA are introduced, particularly via intratumoural injection, as the siRNA may be co-purified with the RNA and interfere with downstream enzymatic steps. Based on these results, using primers flanking the siRNA target site should be avoided when measuring knockdown of target mRNA by real-time RT-qPCR.

  11. The purified yeast pre-mRNA splicing factor PRP2 is an RNA-dependent NTPase.

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, S. H.; J. Smith; Claude, A; Lin, R J

    1992-01-01

    Unlike autocatalyzed self-splicing reactions, nuclear pre-mRNA splicing requires transacting macromolecules and ATP. A protein encoded by the PRP2 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required, in conjunction with ATP, for the first cleavage-ligation reaction of pre-mRNA splicing. In this study, we have purified two forms of the PRP2 gene product with apparent molecular weights of 100 kDa and 92 kDa, from a yeast strain overproducing the protein. Both proteins were indistinguishable in their a...

  12. Stochastic resetting in backtrack recovery by RNA polymerases

    CERN Document Server

    Roldán, Édgar; Sánchez-Taltavull, Daniel; Grill, Stephan W

    2016-01-01

    Transcription is a key process in gene expression, in which RNA polymerases produce a complementary RNA copy from a DNA template. RNA polymerization is frequently interrupted by backtracking, a process in which polymerases perform a random walk along the DNA template. Recovery of polymerases from the transcriptionally-inactive backtracked state is determined by a kinetic competition between 1D diffusion and RNA cleavage. Here we describe backtrack recovery as a continuous-time random walk, where the time for a polymerase to recover from a backtrack of a given depth is described as a first-passage time of a random walker to reach an absorbing state. We represent RNA cleavage as a stochastic resetting process, and derive exact expressions for the recovery time distributions and mean recovery times from a given initial backtrack depth for both continuous and discrete-lattice descriptions of the random walk. We show that recovery time statistics do not depend on the discreteness of the DNA lattice when the rate o...

  13. Embryo apoptosis identification: Oocyte grade or cleavage stage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakri, Noraina Mohd; Ibrahim, Siti Fatimah; Osman, Nurul Atikah; Hasan, Nurhaslina; Jaffar, Farah Hanan Fathihah; Rahman, Zulaiha Abdul; Osman, Khairul

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is a programed cell death that is vital for tissue homeostasis. However, embryo apoptosis had been known to be related to embryo fragmentation which should be avoided in in vitro fertilization (IVF). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship of embryo apoptosis with the grade of immature oocytes and cleavage stage of in vitro produced (IVP) cattle embryos. This study consisted of 345 oocytes collected through ovary slicing. Immature oocytes were graded as A, B and C. This grading was based on cumulus cell thickness and compactness. All oocytes then underwent an in vitro maturation (IVM) procedure. An IVF was done 24 h after IVM culture. Prior to staining, stage of cleaved embryos was determined and classified as either 2, 4, 8 or >8-cell embryo stage. Apoptosis status of cleaved IVP embryos was determined by using annexin V-FITC staining technique at 48 and 72 h post insemination (hpi). Apoptosis status for each embryo was classified as either early or late. The result showed that there was no significant difference (p > 0.05) of apoptosis status among grade A, B and C embryos. All grades of oocytes showed embryo apoptosis where 1.5% late apoptosis for grade A, 4.5% and 10.4% of early and late apoptosis for grade B and grade C. Early apoptosis was not seen in grade A embryo. We also noted no significant difference (p > 0.05) of apoptosis status between 2, 4, 8 and >8-cell embryo stage. Early apoptosis was also not seen in >8-cell stage. Even though there were no differences in apoptosis expression between the three classes, the cleavage rate of grade A oocytes was significantly higher (p < 0.01) than grade B and grade C. In conclusion, the apoptosis expression in the embryo can occur regardless of the oocyte quality and the cleavage stage of the embryo produced. PMID:26858565

  14. Picornavirus IRES elements: RNA structure and host protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Salas, Encarnación; Francisco-Velilla, Rosario; Fernandez-Chamorro, Javier; Lozano, Gloria; Diaz-Toledano, Rosa

    2015-08-01

    Internal ribosome entry site (IRES) elements were discovered in picornaviruses. These elements are cis-acting RNA sequences that adopt diverse three-dimensional structures and recruit the translation machinery using a 5' end-independent mechanism assisted by a subset of translation initiation factors and various RNA binding proteins termed IRES transacting factors (ITAFs). Many of these factors suffer important modifications during infection including cleavage by picornavirus proteases, changes in the phosphorylation level and/or redistribution of the protein from the nuclear to the cytoplasm compartment. Picornavirus IRES are amongst the most potent elements described so far. However, given their large diversity and complexity, the mechanistic basis of its mode of action is not yet fully understood. This review is focused to describe recent advances on the studies of RNA structure and RNA-protein interactions modulating picornavirus IRES activity. PMID:25617758

  15. Catalysts of DNA Strand Cleavage at Apurinic/Apyrimidinic Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minko, Irina G; Jacobs, Aaron C; de Leon, Arnie R; Gruppi, Francesca; Donley, Nathan; Harris, Thomas M; Rizzo, Carmelo J; McCullough, Amanda K; Lloyd, R Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites are constantly formed in cellular DNA due to instability of the glycosidic bond, particularly at purines and various oxidized, alkylated, or otherwise damaged nucleobases. AP sites are also generated by DNA glycosylases that initiate DNA base excision repair. These lesions represent a significant block to DNA replication and are extremely mutagenic. Some DNA glycosylases possess AP lyase activities that nick the DNA strand at the deoxyribose moiety via a β- or β,δ-elimination reaction. Various amines can incise AP sites via a similar mechanism, but this non-enzymatic cleavage typically requires high reagent concentrations. Herein, we describe a new class of small molecules that function at low micromolar concentrations as both β- and β,δ-elimination catalysts at AP sites. Structure-activity relationships have established several characteristics that appear to be necessary for the formation of an iminium ion intermediate that self-catalyzes the elimination at the deoxyribose ring. PMID:27363485

  16. Cleavage of an amide bond by a ribozyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, X.; De Mesmaeker, A.; Joyce, G. F.; Miller, S. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    A variant form of a group I ribozyme, optimized by in vitro evolution for its ability to catalyze magnesium-dependent phosphoester transfer reactions involving DNA substrates, also catalyzes the cleavage of an unactivated alkyl amide when that linkage is presented in the context of an oligodeoxynucleotide analog. Substrates containing an amide bond that joins either two DNA oligos, or a DNA oligo and a short peptide, are cleaved in a magnesium-dependent fashion to generate the expected products. The first-order rate constant, kcat, is 0.1 x 10(-5) min-1 to 1 x 10(-5) min-1 for the DNA-flanked substrates, which corresponds to a rate acceleration of more than 10(3) as compared with the uncatalyzed reaction.

  17. Dinitrogen cleavage and hydrogenation by a trinuclear titanium polyhydride complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Takanori; Hu, Shaowei; Luo, Gen; Kang, Xiaohui; Luo, Yi; Hou, Zhaomin

    2013-06-28

    Both the Haber-Bosch and biological ammonia syntheses are thought to rely on the cooperation of multiple metals in breaking the strong N≡N triple bond and forming an N-H bond. This has spurred investigations of the reactivity of molecular multimetallic hydrides with dinitrogen. We report here the reaction of a trinuclear titanium polyhydride complex with dinitrogen, which induces dinitrogen cleavage and partial hydrogenation at ambient temperature and pressure. By (1)H and (15)N nuclear magnetic resonance, x-ray crystallographic, and computational studies of some key reaction steps and products, we have determined that the dinitrogen (N2) reduction proceeds sequentially through scission of a N2 molecule bonded to three Ti atoms in a μ-η(1):η(2):η(2)-end-on-side-on fashion to give a μ2-N/μ3-N dinitrido species, followed by intramolecular hydrogen migration from Ti to the μ2-N nitrido unit. PMID:23812710

  18. Huntingtin cleavage product A forms in neurons and is reduced by gamma-secretase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betschart Claudia

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mutation in Huntington's disease is a polyglutamine expansion near the N-terminus of huntingtin. Huntingtin expressed in immortalized neurons is cleaved near the N-terminus to form N-terminal polypeptides known as cleavage products A and B (cpA and cpB. CpA and cpB with polyglutamine expansion form inclusions in the nucleus and cytoplasm, respectively. The formation of cpA and cpB in primary neurons has not been established and the proteases involved in the formation of these fragments are unknown. Results Delivery of htt cDNA into the mouse striatum using adeno-associated virus or into primary cortical neurons using lentivirus generated cpA and cpB, indicating that neurons in brain and in vitro can form these fragments. A screen of small molecule protease inhibitors introduced to clonal striatal X57 cells and HeLa cells identified compounds that reduced levels of cpA and are inhibitors of the aspartyl proteases cathepsin D and cathepsin E. The most effective compound, P1-N031, is a transition state mimetic for aspartyl proteases. By western blot analysis, cathepsin D was easily detected in clonal striatal X57 cells, mouse brain and primary neurons, whereas cathepsin E was only detectible in clonal striatal X57 cells. In primary neurons, levels of cleavage product A were not changed by the same compounds that were effective in clonal striatal cells or by mRNA silencing to partially reduce levels of cathepsin D. Instead, treating primary neurons with compounds that are known to inhibit gamma secretase activity either indirectly (Imatinib mesylate, Gleevec or selectively (LY-411,575 or DAPT reduced levels of cpA. LY-411,575 or DAPT also increased survival of primary neurons expressing endogenous full-length mutant huntingtin. Conclusion We show that cpA and cpB are produced from a larger huntingtin fragment in vivo in mouse brain and in primary neuron cultures. The aspartyl protease involved in forming cpA has cathepsin

  19. Modelling of ductile and cleavage fracture by local approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the modelling of ductile and cleavage fracture processes by local approach. It is now well known that the conventional fracture mechanics method based on single parameter criteria is not adequate to model the fracture processes. It is because of the existence of effect of size and geometry of flaw, loading type and rate on the fracture resistance behaviour of any structure. Hence, it is questionable to use same fracture resistance curves as determined from standard tests in the analysis of real life components because of existence of all the above effects. So, there is need to have a method in which the parameters used for the analysis will be true material properties, i.e. independent of geometry and size. One of the solutions to the above problem is the use of local approaches. These approaches have been extensively studied and applied to different materials (including SA33 Gr.6) in this report. Each method has been studied and reported in a separate section. This report has been divided into five sections. Section-I gives a brief review of the fundamentals of fracture process. Section-II deals with modelling of ductile fracture by locally uncoupled type of models. In this section, the critical cavity growth parameters of the different models have been determined for the primary heat transport (PHT) piping material of Indian pressurised heavy water reactor (PHWR). A comparative study has been done among different models. The dependency of the critical parameters on stress triaxiality factor has also been studied. It is observed that Rice and Tracey's model is the most suitable one. But, its parameters are not fully independent of triaxiality factor. For this purpose, a modification to Rice and Tracery's model is suggested in Section-III. Section-IV deals with modelling of ductile fracture process by locally coupled type of models. Section-V deals with the modelling of cleavage fracture process by Beremins model, which is based on Weibulls

  20. Delay of HeLa cell cleavage into interphase using dihydrocytochalasin B: retention of a postmitotic spindle and telophase disc correlates with synchronous cleavage recovery

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    The molecular signals that determine the position and timing of the cleavage furrow during mammalian cell cytokinesis are presently unknown. We have studied in detail the effect of dihydrocytochalasin B (DCB), a drug that interferes with actin assembly, on specific late mitotic events in synchronous HeLa cells. When cleavage furrow formation is blocked at 10 microM DCB, cells return to interphase by the criteria of reformation of nuclei with lamin borders, degradation of the cyclin B componen...

  1. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Dickerson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic pyrolysis is a promising thermochemical conversion route for lignocellulosic biomass that produces chemicals and fuels compatible with current, petrochemical infrastructure. Catalytic modifications to pyrolysis bio-oils are geared towards the elimination and substitution of oxygen and oxygen-containing functionalities in addition to increasing the hydrogen to carbon ratio of the final products. Recent progress has focused on both hydrodeoxygenation and hydrogenation of bio-oil using a variety of metal catalysts and the production of aromatics from bio-oil using cracking zeolites. Research is currently focused on developing multi-functional catalysts used in situ that benefit from the advantages of both hydrodeoxygenation and zeolite cracking. Development of robust, highly selective catalysts will help achieve the goal of producing drop-in fuels and petrochemical commodities from wood and other lignocellulosic biomass streams. The current paper will examine these developments by means of a review of existing literature.

  2. Combined catalytic converter and afterburner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T.T.-H.

    1994-11-30

    This patent describes the combined use of a catalytic converter and afterburner. An afterburner chamber and a catalyst matrix are disposed in series within a casing. A combustible premixed charge is ignited in the afterburner chamber before it enters the catalyst matrix. This invention overcomes the problem encountered in previous designs of some of the premixed charge passing unreacted through the device unless a very long afterburner chamber is used. (UK)

  3. Investigations for designing catalytic recombiners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In case of a severe accident in pressurised water reactors (PWR) a high amount of hydrogen up to about 20,000 m3 might be generated and released into the containments. The mixture consisting of hydrogen and oxygen may either burn or detonate, if ignited. In case of detonation the generated shock wave may endanger the components of the plant or the plant itself. Consequently, effective removal of hydrogen is required. The fact that hydrogen and oxygen react exo-thermally on catalytically acting surfaces already at low temperatures generating steam and heat is made use of in catalytic recombiners. They consist of substrates coated with catalyst (mainly platinum or palladium) which are arranged inside a casing. Being passively acting measures, recombiners do not need any additional energy supply. Experimental investigations on catalytic hydrogen recombination are conducted at FZJ (Forschungszentrum Juelich) using three test facilities. The results yield insight in the development potential of contemporary recombiner systems as well as of innovative systems. Detailed investigations on a recombiner section show strong temperature gradients over the surface of a catalytically coated sample. Dependent on the flow velocity, ignition temperature may be reached at the leading edge already at an inlet hydrogen concentration of about 5 vol.-%. The thermal strain of the substrate leads to considerable detachment of catalyst particles probably causing unintended ignition of the flammable mixture. Temperature peaks can be prevented effectively by leaving the first part of the plate uncoated. In order to avoid overheating of the catalyst elements of a recombiner even at high hydrogen concentrations a modular system of porous substrates is proposed. The metallic substrates are coated with platinum at low catalyst densities thus limiting the activity of the single specimen. A modular arrangement of these elements provides high recombination rates over a large hydrogen concentration

  4. New Catalytic DNA Biosensors for Radionuclides and Metal ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goals of the project are to develop new catalytic DNA biosensors for simultaneous detection and quantification of bioavailable radionuclides and metal ions, and apply the sensors for on-site, real-time assessment of concentration, speciation and stability of the individual contaminants during and after bioremediation. A negative selection strategy was tested and validated. In vitro selection was shown to yield highly active and specific transition metal ion-dependent catalytic DNA/RNA. A fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) study of in vitro selected DNA demonstrated that the trifluorophore labeled system is a simple and powerful tool in studying complex biomolecules structure and dynamics, and is capable of revealing new sophisticated structural changes. New fluorophore/quenchers in a single fluorosensor yielded improved signal to noise ratio in detection, identification and quantification of metal contaminants. Catalytic DNA fluorescent and colorimetric sensors were shown useful in sensing lead in lake water and in leaded paint. Project results were described in two papers and two patents, and won an international prize

  5. Recombinant dengue type 1 virus NS5 protein expressed in Escherichia coli exhibits RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, B H; Fu, J; Sugrue, R J; Yap, E H; Chan, Y C; Tan, Y H

    1996-02-15

    The complete nonstructural NS5 gene of dengue type 1 virus, Singapore strain S275/90 (D1-S275/90) was expressed in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein (126 kDa). The GST-NS5 fusion protein was purified and the recombinant NS5 protein released from the fusion protein by thrombin cleavage. The recombinant NS5 had a predicted molecular weight of 100 kDa and reacted with antiserum against D1-S275/90 virus in Western blot analysis. The purified recombinant NS5 protein possessed RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activity which was inhibited (>99%) by antibodies against the recombinant NS5 protein. The polymerase product was shown to be a negative-stranded RNA molecule, of template size, which forms a double-stranded complex with the template RNA. PMID:8607261

  6. Reversed DNA strand cleavage specificity in initiation of Cre-LoxP recombination induced by the His289Ala active-site substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelato, Kathy A; Martin, Shelley S; Baldwin, Enoch P

    2005-11-25

    During the first steps of site-specific recombination, Cre protein cleaves and religates a specific homologous pair of LoxP strands to form a Holliday junction (HJ) intermediate. The HJ is resolved into recombination products through exchange of the second homologous strand pair. CreH289A, containing a His to Ala substitution in the conserved R-H-R catalytic motif, has a 150-fold reduced recombination rate and accumulates HJs. However, to produce these HJs, CreH289A exchanges the opposite set of strands compared to wild-type Cre (CreWT). To investigate how CreH289A and CreWT impose strand exchange order, we characterized their reactivities and strand cleavage preferences toward LoxP duplex and HJ substrates containing 8bp spacer substitutions. Remarkably, CreH289A had different and often opposite strand exchange preferences compared to CreWT with nearly all substrates. CreH289N was much less perturbed, implying that overall recombination rate and strand exchange depend more on His289 hydrogen bonding capability than on its acid/base properties. LoxP substitutions immediately 5' (S1 nucleotide) or 3' (S1' nucleotide) of the scissile phosphate had large effects on substrate utilization and strand exchange order. S1' substitutions, designed to alter base-unstacking events concomitant with Cre-induced LoxP bending, caused HJ accumulation and dramatically inverted the cleavage preferences. That pre-formed HJs were resolved via either strand in vitro suggests that inhibition of the "conformational switch" isomerization required to trigger the second strand exchange accounts for the observed HJ accumulation. Rather than reflecting CreWT behavior, CreH289A accumulates HJs of opposite polarity through a combination of its unique cleavage specificity and an HJ isomerization defect. The overall implication is that cleavage specificity is mediated by sequence-dependent DNA deformations that influence the scissile phosphate positioning and reactivity. A role of His289 may be to

  7. Reversed DNA Strand Cleavage Specificity in Initiation of Cre–LoxP Recombination Induced by the His289Ala Active-site Substitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelato, Kathy A.; Martin, Shelley S.; Baldwin, Enoch P.

    2010-01-01

    During the first steps of site-specific recombination, Cre protein cleaves and religates a specific homologous pair of LoxP strands to form a Holliday junction (HJ) intermediate. The HJ is resolved into recombination products through exchange of the second homologous strand pair. CreH289A, containing a His to Ala substitution in the conserved R-H-R catalytic motif, has a 150-fold reduced recombination rate and accumulates HJs. However, to produce these HJs, CreH289A exchanges the opposite set of strands compared to wild-type Cre (CreWT). To investigate how CreH289A and CreWT impose strand exchange order, we characterized their reactivities and strand cleavage preferences toward LoxP duplex and HJ substrates containing 8 bp spacer substitutions. Remarkably, CreH289A had different and often opposite strand exchange preferences compared to CreWT with nearly all substrates. CreH289N was much less perturbed, implying that overall recombination rate and strand exchange depend more on His289 hydrogen bonding capability than on its acid/base properties. LoxP substitutions immediately 5′(S1 nucleotide) or 3′(S1′nucleotide) of the scissile phosphate had large effects on substrate utilization and strand exchange order. S1′substitutions, designed to alter base-unstacking events concomitant with Cre-induced LoxP bending, caused HJ accumulation and dramatically inverted the cleavage preferences. That pre-formed HJs were resolved via either strand in vitro suggests that inhibition of the “conformational switch” isomerization required to trigger the second strand exchange accounts for the observed HJ accumulation. Rather than reflecting CreWT behavior, CreH289A accumulates HJs of opposite polarity through a combination of its unique cleavage specificity and an HJ isomerization defect. The overall implication is that cleavage specificity is mediated by sequence-dependent DNA deformations that influence the scissile phosphate positioning and reactivity. A role of His289

  8. A comprehensive review of microRNA-related polymorphisms in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, B W; Li, Z H; Liu, S F; Han, H B; Dong, S J; Zou, H J; Sun, R F; Jia, J

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non-coding RNA molecules of about 22 nucleotides in length. miRNAs are highly conserved in both plants and animals, and function as gene regulators by binding to the 3'-untranslated region of target mRNAs for cleavage and/or translational repression. miRNA biogenesis, stability, and regulation of expression are strongly sequence dependent. Sequence variants, such as single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in pri-miRNA, pre-miRNA, promoter regions, or miRNA-target sites, can influence miRNA function, thereby contributing to the pathological features of human disease. In this review, we focus on miRNA-related SNPs in gastric cancer and comprehensively analyze some commonly studied SNPs. PMID:27421013

  9. Cleavage-based voting behavior in cross-national perspective : Evidence from six postwar democracies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brooks, Clem; Nieuwbeerta, Paul; Manza, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    We investigate trends and cross-national variation in the impact of class, religious, and gender cleavages on voting behavior in six advanced capitalist democracies in the postwar period. Earlier research on cleavage voting has been criticized for utilizing outdated ‘‘two-class’’ models of class str

  10. Cleavage-based voting behavior in cross-national perspective: evidence from six postwar democracies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brooks, Clem; Nieuwbeerta, Paul; Manza, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    We investigate trends and cross-national variation in the impact of class, religious, and gender cleavages on voting behavior in six advanced capitalist democracies in the postwar period. Earlier research on cleavage voting has been criticized for utilizing outdated “two-class” models of class struc

  11. Coronavirus 3CL(pro) proteinase cleavage sites: Possible relevance to SARS virus pathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiemer, Lars; Lund, Ole; Brunak, Søren;

    2004-01-01

    in proteins such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator ( CFTR), transcription factors CREB-RP and OCT-I, and components of the ubiquitin pathway. Conclusions: Our prediction method NetCorona predicts coronavirus cleavage sites with high specificity and several potential cleavage...

  12. Inhibition of RecA-mediated cleavage in covalent dimers of UmuD.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, M. H.; Guzzo, A; Walker, G C

    1996-01-01

    Disulfide-cross-linked UmuD2 derivatives were cleaved poorly upon incubation with activated RecA. Reducing the disulfide bonds prior to incubating the derivatives with RecA dramatically increased their extent of cleavage. These observations suggest that the UmuD monomer is a better substrate for the RecA-mediated cleavage reaction than the dimer.

  13. Unexpected tolerance of alpha-cleavage of the prion protein to sequence variations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José B Oliveira-Martins

    Full Text Available The cellular form of the prion protein, PrP(C, undergoes extensive proteolysis at the alpha site (109K [see text]H110. Expression of non-cleavable PrP(C mutants in transgenic mice correlates with neurotoxicity, suggesting that alpha-cleavage is important for PrP(C physiology. To gain insights into the mechanisms of alpha-cleavage, we generated a library of PrP(C mutants with mutations in the region neighbouring the alpha-cleavage site. The prevalence of C1, the carboxy adduct of alpha-cleavage, was determined for each mutant. In cell lines of disparate origin, C1 prevalence was unaffected by variations in charge and hydrophobicity of the region neighbouring the alpha-cleavage site, and by substitutions of the residues in the palindrome that flanks this site. Instead, alpha-cleavage was size-dependently impaired by deletions within the domain 106-119. Almost no cleavage was observed upon full deletion of this domain. These results suggest that alpha-cleavage is executed by an alpha-PrPase whose activity, despite surprisingly limited sequence specificity, is dependent on the size of the central region of PrP(C.

  14. A plant snoRNP complex containing snoRNAs, fibrillarin, and nucleolin-like proteins is competent for both rRNA gene binding and pre-rRNA processing in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sáez-Vasquez, Julio; Caparros-Ruiz, David; Barneche, Fredy; Echeverría, Manuel

    2004-08-01

    In eukaryotes the primary cleavage of the precursor rRNA (pre-rRNA) occurs in the 5' external transcribed spacer (5'ETS). In Saccharomyces cerevisiae and animals this cleavage depends on a conserved U3 small nucleolar ribonucleoprotein particle (snoRNP), including fibrillarin, and on other transiently associated proteins such as nucleolin. This large complex can be visualized by electron microscopy bound to the nascent pre-rRNA soon after initiation of transcription. Our group previously described a radish rRNA gene binding activity, NF D, that specifically binds to a cluster of conserved motifs preceding the primary cleavage site in the 5'ETS of crucifer plants including radish, cauliflower, and Arabidopsis thaliana (D. Caparros-Ruiz, S. Lahmy, S. Piersanti, and M. Echeverria, Eur. J. Biochem. 247:981-989, 1997). Here we report the purification and functional characterization of NF D from cauliflower inflorescences. Remarkably NF D also binds to 5'ETS RNA and accurately cleaves it at the primary cleavage site mapped in vivo. NF D is a multiprotein factor of 600 kDa that dissociates into smaller complexes. Two polypeptides of NF D identified by microsequencing are homologues of nucleolin and fibrillarin. The conserved U3 and U14 snoRNAs associated with fibrillarin and required for early pre-rRNA cleavages are also found in NF D. Based on this it is proposed that NF D is a processing complex that assembles on the rDNA prior to its interaction with the nascent pre-rRNA. PMID:15282326

  15. DICER-LIKE1 processed trans-acting siRNAs mediate DNA methylation: Case study of complex small RNA biogenesis and action pathways in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Liang

    2012-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) emerge as exquisite molecules that are guided for transcriptional and posttranscriptional gene regulation in eukaryotes. As one class of most important sRNAs in plants, trans-acting small interfering RNAs (ta-siRNAs) initiate from microRNA (miRNA) – mediated cleavage of TAS gene transcripts and subsequently are stabilized by SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SILENCING3 (SGS3) and converted to double–stranded RNA (dsRNA) by the actions of RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE6 (RDR6). Ge...

  16. Stem-Loop Binding Protein Facilitates 3′-End Formation by Stabilizing U7 snRNP Binding to Histone Pre-mRNA

    OpenAIRE

    Dominski, Zbigniew; Zheng, Lian-Xing; Sanchez, Ricardo; Marzluff, William F

    1999-01-01

    The 3′ end of histone mRNA is formed by an endonucleolytic cleavage of the primary transcript after a conserved stem-loop sequence. The cleavage reaction requires at least two trans-acting factors: the stem-loop binding protein (SLBP), which binds the stem-loop sequence, and the U7 snRNP that interacts with a sequence downstream from the cleavage site. Removal of SLBP from a nuclear extract abolishes 3′-end processing, and the addition of recombinant SLBP restores processing activity of the d...

  17. Tertiary structure of bacterial selenocysteine tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Yuzuru; Sekine, Shun-ichi; Suetsugu, Shiro; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2013-07-01

    Selenocysteine (Sec) is translationally incorporated into proteins in response to the UGA codon. The tRNA specific to Sec (tRNA(Sec)) is first ligated with serine by seryl-tRNA synthetase (SerRS). In the present study, we determined the 3.1 Å crystal structure of the tRNA(Sec) from the bacterium Aquifex aeolicus, in complex with the heterologous SerRS from the archaeon Methanopyrus kandleri. The bacterial tRNA(Sec) assumes the L-shaped structure, from which the long extra arm protrudes. Although the D-arm conformation and the extra-arm orientation are similar to those of eukaryal/archaeal tRNA(Sec)s, A. aeolicus tRNA(Sec) has unique base triples, G14:C21:U8 and C15:G20a:G48, which occupy the positions corresponding to the U8:A14 and R15:Y48 tertiary base pairs of canonical tRNAs. Methanopyrus kandleri SerRS exhibited serine ligation activity toward A. aeolicus tRNA(Sec) in vitro. The SerRS N-terminal domain interacts with the extra-arm stem and the outer corner of tRNA(Sec). Similar interactions exist in the reported tRNA(Ser) and SerRS complex structure from the bacterium Thermus thermophilus. Although the catalytic C-terminal domain of M. kandleri SerRS lacks interactions with A. aeolicus tRNA(Sec) in the present complex structure, the conformational flexibility of SerRS is likely to allow the CCA terminal region of tRNA(Sec) to enter the SerRS catalytic site. PMID:23649835

  18. Processing of nuclear viroids in vivo: an interplay between RNA conformations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María-Eugenia Gas

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Replication of viroids, small non-protein-coding plant pathogenic RNAs, entails reiterative transcription of their incoming single-stranded circular genomes, to which the (+ polarity is arbitrarily assigned, cleavage of the oligomeric strands of one or both polarities to unit-length, and ligation to circular RNAs. While cleavage in chloroplastic viroids (family Avsunviroidae is mediated by hammerhead ribozymes, where and how cleavage of oligomeric (+ RNAs of nuclear viroids (family Pospiviroidae occurs in vivo remains controversial. Previous in vitro data indicated that a hairpin capped by a GAAA tetraloop is the RNA motif directing cleavage and a loop E motif ligation. Here we have re-examined this question in vivo, taking advantage of earlier findings showing that dimeric viroid (+ RNAs of the family Pospiviroidae transgenically expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana are processed correctly. Using this methodology, we have mapped the processing site of three members of this family at equivalent positions of the hairpin I/double-stranded structure that the upper strand and flanking nucleotides of the central conserved region (CCR can form. More specifically, from the effects of 16 mutations on Citrus exocortis viroid expressed transgenically in A. thaliana, we conclude that the substrate for in vivo cleavage is the conserved double-stranded structure, with hairpin I potentially facilitating the adoption of this structure, whereas ligation is determined by loop E and flanking nucleotides of the two CCR strands. These results have deep implications on the underlying mechanism of both processing reactions, which are most likely catalyzed by enzymes different from those generally assumed: cleavage by a member of the RNase III family, and ligation by an RNA ligase distinct from the only one characterized so far in plants, thus predicting the existence of at least a second plant RNA ligase.

  19. Review and perspective on approaches of evaluating cleavage fracture toughness of pressure vessel steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although efforts have been made to establish cleavage fracture model in the past 30 years or so, uncertainties remain in predicting the cleavage fracture toughness behavior of reactor pressure vessel steels in the transition region. Confusions may be raised in cases such as that there are still outliers while ASME fracture toughness curve indexed to the reference temperature is generally considered as very conservative. The advantage and potentials of using Finite Element method to predict the cleavage fracture behavior of irradiated materials are obvious. However, its effectiveness depends on the rightness of the physical model and criteria established. In this paper, approaches of describing cleavage fracture toughness of pressure vessel steels in the transition region are discussed and compared. The need for focusing on the physical fundamental and criteria of cleavage fracture is addressed. (authors)

  20. Sequence fingerprints of microRNA conservation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Shi

    Full Text Available It is known that the conservation of protein-coding genes is associated with their sequences both various species, such as animals and plants. However, the association between microRNA (miRNA conservation and their sequences in various species remains unexplored. Here we report the association of miRNA conservation with its sequence features, such as base content and cleavage sites, suggesting that miRNA sequences contain the fingerprints for miRNA conservation. More interestingly, different species show different and even opposite patterns between miRNA conservation and sequence features. For example, mammalian miRNAs show a positive/negative correlation between conservation and AU/GC content, whereas plant miRNAs show a negative/positive correlation between conservation and AU/GC content. Further analysis puts forward the hypothesis that the introns of protein-coding genes may be a main driving force for the origin and evolution of mammalian miRNAs. At the 5' end, conserved miRNAs have a preference for base U, while less-conserved miRNAs have a preference for a non-U base in mammals. This difference does not exist in insects and plants, in which both conserved miRNAs and less-conserved miRNAs have a preference for base U at the 5' end. We further revealed that the non-U preference at the 5' end of less-conserved mammalian miRNAs is associated with miRNA function diversity, which may have evolved from the pressure of a highly sophisticated environmental stimulus the mammals encountered during evolution. These results indicated that miRNA sequences contain the fingerprints for conservation, and these fingerprints vary according to species. More importantly, the results suggest that although species share common mechanisms by which miRNAs originate and evolve, mammals may develop a novel mechanism for miRNA origin and evolution. In addition, the fingerprint found in this study can be predictor of miRNA conservation, and the findings are helpful

  1. Anacardic acid inhibits the catalytic activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omanakuttan, Athira; Nambiar, Jyotsna; Harris, Rodney M; Bose, Chinchu; Pandurangan, Nanjan; Varghese, Rebu K; Kumar, Geetha B; Tainer, John A; Banerji, Asoke; Perry, J Jefferson P; Nair, Bipin G

    2012-10-01

    Cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL) has been used in traditional medicine for the treatment of a wide variety of pathophysiological conditions. To further define the mechanism of CNSL action, we investigated the effect of cashew nut shell extract (CNSE) on two matrix metalloproteinases, MMP-2/gelatinase A and MMP-9/gelatinase B, which are known to have critical roles in several disease states. We observed that the major constituent of CNSE, anacardic acid, markedly inhibited the gelatinase activity of 3T3-L1 cells. Our gelatin zymography studies on these two secreted gelatinases, present in the conditioned media from 3T3-L1 cells, established that anacardic acid directly inhibited the catalytic activities of both MMP-2 and MMP-9. Our docking studies suggested that anacardic acid binds into the MMP-2/9 active site, with the carboxylate group of anacardic acid chelating the catalytic zinc ion and forming a hydrogen bond to a key catalytic glutamate side chain and the C15 aliphatic group being accommodated within the relatively large S1' pocket of these gelatinases. In agreement with the docking results, our fluorescence-based studies on the recombinant MMP-2 catalytic core domain demonstrated that anacardic acid directly inhibits substrate peptide cleavage in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC₅₀ of 11.11 μM. In addition, our gelatinase zymography and fluorescence data confirmed that the cardol-cardanol mixture, salicylic acid, and aspirin, all of which lack key functional groups present in anacardic acid, are much weaker MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitors. Our results provide the first evidence for inhibition of gelatinase catalytic activity by anacardic acid, providing a novel template for drug discovery and a molecular mechanism potentially involved in CNSL therapeutic action. PMID:22745359

  2. Most microRNAs in the single-cell alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii are produced by Dicer-like 3-mediated cleavage of introns and untranslated regions of coding RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valli, Adrian A; Santos, Bruno A C M; Hnatova, Silvia; Bassett, Andrew R; Molnar, Attila; Chung, Betty Y; Baulcombe, David C

    2016-04-01

    We describe here a forward genetic screen to investigate the biogenesis, mode of action, and biological function of miRNA-mediated RNA silencing in the model algal species,Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Among the mutants from this screen, there were three atDicer-like 3that failed to produce both miRNAs and siRNAs and others affecting diverse post-biogenesis stages of miRNA-mediated silencing. The DCL3-dependent siRNAs fell into several classes including transposon- and repeat-derived siRNAs as in higher plants. The DCL3-dependent miRNAs differ from those of higher plants, however, in that many of them are derived from mRNAs or from the introns of pre-mRNAs. Transcriptome analysis of the wild-type anddcl3mutant strains revealed a further difference from higher plants in that the sRNAs are rarely negative switches of mRNA accumulation. The few transcripts that were more abundant indcl3mutant strains than in wild-type cells were not due to sRNA-targeted RNA degradation but to direct DCL3 cleavage of miRNA and siRNA precursor structures embedded in the untranslated (and translated) regions of the mRNAs. Our analysis reveals that the miRNA-mediated RNA silencing inC. reinhardtiidiffers from that of higher plants and informs about the evolution and function of this pathway in eukaryotes. PMID:26968199

  3. Specificity and catalysis hardwired at the RNA-protein interface in a translational proofreading enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Sadeem; Muthukumar, Sowndarya; Kuncha, Santosh Kumar; Routh, Satya Brata; Yerabham, Antony S. K.; Hussain, Tanweer; Kamarthapu, Venu; Kruparani, Shobha P.; Sankaranarayanan, Rajan

    2015-06-01

    Proofreading modules of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases are responsible for enforcing a high fidelity during translation of the genetic code. They use strategically positioned side chains for specifically targeting incorrect aminoacyl-tRNAs. Here, we show that a unique proofreading module possessing a D-aminoacyl-tRNA deacylase fold does not use side chains for imparting specificity or for catalysis, the two hallmark activities of enzymes. We show, using three distinct archaea, that a side-chain-stripped recognition site is fully capable of solving a subtle discrimination problem. While biochemical probing establishes that RNA plays the catalytic role, mechanistic insights from multiple high-resolution snapshots reveal that differential remodelling of the catalytic core at the RNA-peptide interface provides the determinants for correct proofreading activity. The functional crosstalk between RNA and protein elucidated here suggests how primordial enzyme functions could have emerged on RNA-peptide scaffolds before recruitment of specific side chains.

  4. Mechanistic aspects of dinitrogen cleavage and hydrogenation to produce ammonia in catalysis and organometallic chemistry: relevance of metal hydride bonds and dihydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Hong-Peng; Quadrelli, Elsje Alessandra

    2014-01-21

    Dinitrogen cleavage and hydrogenation by transition-metal centers to produce ammonia is central in industry and in Nature. After an introductory section on the thermodynamic and kinetic challenges linked to N2 splitting, this tutorial review discusses three major classes of transition-metal systems (homogeneous, heterogeneous and biological) capable of achieving dissociation and hydrogenation of dinitrogen. Molecular complexes, solid-state Haber-Bosch catalytic systems, silica-supported tantalum hydrides and nitrogenase will be discussed. Emphasis is focused on the reaction mechanisms operating in the process of dissociation and hydrogenation of dinitrogen, and in particular on the key role played by metal hydride bonds and by dihydrogen in such reactions. PMID:24108246

  5. Extracellular RNA Communication (ExRNA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Until recently, scientists believed RNA worked mostly inside the cell that produced it. Some types of RNA help translate genes into proteins that are necessary for...

  6. RNA Interference Induced by the Cationic Lipid Delivery of siRNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouxsein, Nathan

    2005-03-01

    Recent discoveries demonstrate that the introduction of synthetically prepared duplexes of 19-21 bp short interfering RNAs (siRNA) into mammalian cells results in the cleavage of target mRNA leading to post transcriptional gene silencing [1]. Our work focuses on the cationic-lipid (CL) mediated delivery of siRNA into mammalian cell lines in an approach similar to CL based gene delivery [2]. Co-transfection of a target and a non-target reporter plasmid followed by the CL delivery of a sequence specific siRNA allows us to probe the silencing efficiency (SE) of the target plasmid relative to non-specific silencing of both plasmids. We have created a phase diagram for SE as a function of the complex membrane charge density and as a function of the CL:siRNA charge ratio. X-ray diffraction was performed to probe the structure of the complexes at points along the phase diagram. Funding provided by NIH AI-12520, AI-20611 and GM-59288. [1] Elbashir et. al., Nature, 411 494-498 (2001) [2] Ewert et. al., Curr. Med. Chem. 11 133-149 (2004)

  7. DNA cleavage by CgII and NgoAVII requires interaction between N- and R-proteins and extensive nucleotide hydrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaremba, Mindaugas; Toliusis, Paulius; Grigaitis, Rokas; Manakova, Elena; Silanskas, Arunas; Tamulaitiene, Giedre; Szczelkun, Mark D; Siksnys, Virginijus

    2014-12-16

    The stress-sensitive restriction-modification (RM) system CglI from Corynebacterium glutamicum and the homologous NgoAVII RM system from Neisseria gonorrhoeae FA1090 are composed of three genes: a DNA methyltransferase (M.CglI and M.NgoAVII), a putative restriction endonuclease (R.CglI and R.NgoAVII, or R-proteins) and a predicted DEAD-family helicase/ATPase (N.CglI and N.NgoAVII or N-proteins). Here we report a biochemical characterization of the R- and N-proteins. Size-exclusion chromatography and SAXS experiments reveal that the isolated R.CglI, R.NgoAVII and N.CglI proteins form homodimers, while N.NgoAVII is a monomer in solution. Moreover, the R.CglI and N.CglI proteins assemble in a complex with R2N2 stoichiometry. Next, we show that N-proteins have ATPase activity that is dependent on double-stranded DNA and is stimulated by the R-proteins. Functional ATPase activity and extensive ATP hydrolysis (∼170 ATP/s/monomer) are required for site-specific DNA cleavage by R-proteins. We show that ATP-dependent DNA cleavage by R-proteins occurs at fixed positions (6-7 nucleotides) downstream of the asymmetric recognition sequence 5'-GCCGC-3'. Despite similarities to both Type I and II restriction endonucleases, the CglI and NgoAVII enzymes may employ a unique catalytic mechanism for DNA cleavage. PMID:25429977

  8. Molecular Basis for the Recognition and Cleavages of IGF-II, TGF-[alpha], and Amylin by Human Insulin-Degrading Enzyme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Qing; Manolopoulou, Marika; Bian, Yao; Schilling, Alexander B.; Tang, Wei-Jen (UC); (UIC)

    2010-02-11

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is involved in the clearance of many bioactive peptide substrates, including insulin and amyloid-{beta}, peptides vital to the development of diabetes and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. IDE can also rapidly degrade hormones that are held together by intramolecular disulfide bond(s) without their reduction. Furthermore, IDE exhibits a remarkable ability to preferentially degrade structurally similar peptides such as the selective degradation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II and transforming growth factor-{alpha} (TGF-{alpha}) over IGF-I and epidermal growth factor, respectively. Here, we used high-accuracy mass spectrometry to identify the cleavage sites of human IGF-II, TGF-{alpha}, amylin, reduced amylin, and amyloid-{beta} by human IDE. We also determined the structures of human IDE-IGF-II and IDE-TGF-{alpha} at 2.3 {angstrom} and IDE-amylin at 2.9 {angstrom}. We found that IDE cleaves its substrates at multiple sites in a biased stochastic manner. Furthermore, the presence of a disulfide bond in amylin allows IDE to cut at an additional site in the middle of the peptide (amino acids 18-19). Our amylin-bound IDE structure offers insight into how the structural constraint from a disulfide bond in amylin can alter IDE cleavage sites. Together with NMR structures of amylin and the IGF and epidermal growth factor families, our work also reveals the structural basis of how the high dipole moment of substrates complements the charge distribution of the IDE catalytic chamber for the substrate selectivity. In addition, we show how the ability of substrates to properly anchor their N-terminus to the exosite of IDE and undergo a conformational switch upon binding to the catalytic chamber of IDE can also contribute to the selective degradation of structurally related growth factors.

  9. Molecular basis for the recognition and cleavages of IGF-II, TGF-α, and amylin by human insulin degrading enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qing; Manolopoulou, Marika; Bian, Yao; Schilling, Alexander B.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-01-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is involved in the clearance of many bioactive peptide substrates, including insulin and amyloid-β (Aβ), peptides vital to the development of diabetes and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. IDE can also rapidly degrade hormones that are held together by intra-molecular disulfide bond(s) without their reduction. Furthermore, IDE exhibits a remarkable ability to preferentially degrade structurally similar peptides such as the selective degradation of insulin-growth factor-II (IGF-II) and transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α) over IGF-I and epidermal growth factor (EGF), respectively. Here, we used high accuracy mass spectrometry to identify the cleavage sites of human IGF-II, TGF-α, amylin, reduced amylin, and Aβ by human IDE. We also determined the structures of human IDE-IGF-II and IDE-TGF-α at 2.3 Å and IDE-amylin at 2.9 Å. We found that IDE cleaves its substrates at multiple sites in a biased stochastic manner. Furthermore, the presence of a disulfide bond in amylin allows IDE to cut at an additional site in the middle of the peptide (aa 18-19). Our amylin-bound IDE structure offers insight into how the structural constraint from a disulfide bond in amylin can alter IDE cleavage sites. Together with NMR structures of amylin and the IGF and EGF families, our work also reveals the structural basis of how the high dipole moment of substrates complements the charge distribution of the IDE catalytic chamber for the substrate selectivity. In addition, we show how the ability of substrates to properly anchor their N-terminus to the exosite of IDE and undergo a conformational switch upon binding to the catalytic chamber of IDE can also contribute to the selective degradation of structurally related growth factors. PMID:19896952

  10. EXPLORATION OF SCHISTOSOMA MANSONI HAMMERHEAD RIBOZYME CATALYSIS AND STRUCTURE: TOWARDS DIRECT OBSERVATION OF CLEAVAGE AND LIGATION, AND A 1.55 Å FULL-LENGTH MG2+-BOUND CRYSTAL STRUCTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    As a relatively simple and well-studied molecule, the hammerhead ribozyme is an ideal system to study RNA catalysis and structure. A deeper understanding of the hammerhead catalytic mechanism and the role of divalent ions in catalysis lends support to the exploration of more complex RNA machinery such as the ribosome, and ultimately may assist in the design of new medical therapies. Kinetic study of the hammerhead ribozyme to date has largely derived from bulk assays monitoring millions of ...

  11. Combinatorics of RNA-RNA interaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Thomas J X; Reidys, Christian

    2012-01-01

    RNA-RNA binding is an important phenomenon observed for many classes of non-coding RNAs and plays a crucial role in a number of regulatory processes. Recently several MFE folding algorithms for predicting the joint structure of two interacting RNA molecules have been proposed. Here joint structure...

  12. Determinants in mammalian telomerase RNA that mediate enzyme processivity and cross-species incompatibility

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jiunn-Liang; Greider, Carol W

    2003-01-01

    Telomerase contains two essential components: an RNA molecule that templates telomeric repeat synthesis and a catalytic protein component. Human telomerase is processive, while the mouse enzyme has much lower processivity. We have identified nucleotide determinants in the telomerase RNA that are responsible for this difference in processivity. Mutations adjacent to the template region of human and mouse telomerase RNA significantly altered telomerase processivity both in vitro and in vivo. We...

  13. Repurposing CRISPR as an RNA-Guided Platform for Sequence-Specific Control of Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Qi, Lei S.; Larson, Matthew H.; Gilbert, Luke A.; Doudna, Jennifer A.; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Arkin, Adam P; Lim, Wendell A.

    2013-01-01

    Targeted gene regulation on a genome-wide scale is a powerful strategy for interrogating, perturbing, and engineering cellular systems. Here, we develop a method for controlling gene expression based on Cas9, an RNA-guided DNA endonuclease from a type II CRISPR system. We show that a catalytically dead Cas9 lacking endonuclease activity, when coexpressed with a guide RNA, generates a DNA recognition complex that can specifically interfere with transcriptional elongation, RNA polymerase bindin...

  14. Crosstalk between Wnt Signaling and RNA Processing in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bordonaro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA processing involves a variety of processes affecting gene expression, including the removal of introns through RNA splicing, as well as 3' end processing (cleavage and polyadenylation. Alternative RNA processing is fundamentally important for gene regulation, and aberrant processing is associated with the initiation and progression of cancer. Deregulated Wnt signaling, which is the initiating event in the development of most cases of human colorectal cancer (CRC, has been linked to modified RNA processing, which may contribute to Wnt-mediated colonic carcinogenesis. Crosstalk between Wnt signaling and alternative RNA splicing with relevance to CRC includes effects on the expression of Rac1b, an alternatively spliced gene associated with tumorigenesis, which exhibits alternative RNA splicing that is influenced by Wnt activity. In addition, Tcf4, a crucial component of Wnt signaling, also exhibits alternative splicing, which is likely involved in colonic tumorigenesis. Modulation of 3' end formation, including of the Wnt target gene COX-2, also can influence the neoplastic process, with implications for CRC. While many human genes are dependent on introns and splicing for normal levels of gene expression, naturally intronless genes exist with a unique metabolism that allows for intron-independent gene expression. Effects of Wnt activity on the RNA metabolism of the intronless Wnt-target gene c-jun is a likely contributor to cancer development. Further, butyrate, a breakdown product of dietary fiber and a histone deacetylase inhibitor, upregulates Wnt activity in CRC cells, and also modulates RNA processing; therefore, the interplay between Wnt activity, the modulation of this activity by butyrate, and differential RNA metabolism in colonic cells can significantly influence tumorigenesis. Determining the role played by altered RNA processing in Wnt-mediated neoplasia may lead to novel interventions aimed at restoring normal RNA metabolism for

  15. Enzymatic Cleavage of Glycosidic Bonds: Strategies on How to Set Up and Control a QM/MM Metadynamics Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raich, L; Nin-Hill, A; Ardèvol, A; Rovira, C

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrates play crucial roles in many biological processes, from cell-cell adhesion to chemical signaling. Their complexity and diversity, related to α/β anomeric configuration, ring substituents, and conformational variations, require a diverse set of enzymes for their processing. Among them, glycoside hydrolases (GHs) are responsible for the hydrolysis of one of the strongest bonds in nature: the glycosidic bond. These highly specialized biological catalysts select particular conformations their carbohydrate substrates to enhance catalysis. The evolution of this conformation during the reaction of glycosidic bond cleavage, known as the conformational catalytic itinerary, is of fundamental interest in glycobiology, with impact on inhibitor and drug design. Here we review some of the aspects and the main strategies one needs to take into account when simulating a reaction in a GH enzyme using QM/MM metadynamics. Several specific aspects are highlighted, from the importance of the distortion of the substrate at the Michaelis complex to the variable control during the metadynamics simulation or the analysis of the reaction mechanism and conformational itinerary. The increasing speed of computer power and methodological advances have added a vital tool to the study of GH mechanisms, as shown here and recent reviews. It is hoped that this chapter will serve as a first guide for those attempting to perform a metadynamics simulation of these relevant and fascinating enzymes. PMID:27498638

  16. In-vivo quantification of primary microRNA processing by Drosha with a luciferase based system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allegra, Danilo [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 23, 89081 Ulm (Germany); Cooperation Unit ' Mechanisms of Leukemogenesis' , B061, DKFZ, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Mertens, Daniel, E-mail: daniel.mertens@uniklinik-ulm.de [Department of Internal Medicine III, University Hospital Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 23, 89081 Ulm (Germany); Cooperation Unit ' Mechanisms of Leukemogenesis' , B061, DKFZ, Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, 69120 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-03-25

    Research highlights: {yields} Posttranscriptional regulation of miRNA processing is difficult to quantify. {yields} Our in-vivo processing assay can quantify Drosha cleavage in live cells. {yields} It is based on luciferase reporters fused with pri-miRNAs. {yields} The assay validates the processing defect caused by a mutation in pri-16-1. {yields} It is a sensitive method to quantify pri-miRNA cleavage by Drosha in live cells. -- Abstract: The RNAse III Drosha is responsible for the first step of microRNA maturation, the cleavage of primary miRNA to produce the precursor miRNA. Processing by Drosha is finely regulated and influences the amount of mature microRNA in a cell. We describe in the present work a method to quantify Drosha processing activity in-vivo, which is applicable to any microRNA. With respect to other methods for measuring Drosha activity, our system is faster and scalable, can be used with any cellular system and does not require cell sorting or use of radioactive isotopes. This system is useful to study regulation of Drosha activity in physiological and pathological conditions.

  17. In-vivo quantification of primary microRNA processing by Drosha with a luciferase based system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Posttranscriptional regulation of miRNA processing is difficult to quantify. → Our in-vivo processing assay can quantify Drosha cleavage in live cells. → It is based on luciferase reporters fused with pri-miRNAs. → The assay validates the processing defect caused by a mutation in pri-16-1. → It is a sensitive method to quantify pri-miRNA cleavage by Drosha in live cells. -- Abstract: The RNAse III Drosha is responsible for the first step of microRNA maturation, the cleavage of primary miRNA to produce the precursor miRNA. Processing by Drosha is finely regulated and influences the amount of mature microRNA in a cell. We describe in the present work a method to quantify Drosha processing activity in-vivo, which is applicable to any microRNA. With respect to other methods for measuring Drosha activity, our system is faster and scalable, can be used with any cellular system and does not require cell sorting or use of radioactive isotopes. This system is useful to study regulation of Drosha activity in physiological and pathological conditions.

  18. Extension of microwave-accelerated residue-specific acid cleavage to proteins with carbohydrate side chains and disulfide linkages

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Jinxi; Shefcheck, Kevin; Callahan, John; Fenselau, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    This laboratory has introduced a chemical method for residue-specific protein cleavage and has provided a preliminary assessment of the suitability of microwave accelerated acid cleavage as a proteomic tool. This report is a continuing assessment of the fate of common protein modifications in microwave-accelerated acid cleavage. We have examined the cleavage of ribonuclease A and the related N-linked glycoprotein ribonuclease B, and the O-linked glycoprotein alpha crystallin A chain, using MA...

  19. Not all social cleavages are the same: On the relationship between religious diversity and party system fragmentation

    OpenAIRE

    Raymond, Christopher D.

    2016-01-01

    Most studies examining the relationship between social cleavages and party system fragmentation maintain that higher levels of social diversity lead to greater party system fragmentation. However, most aggregate-level studies focus on one type of social cleavage:ethnic diversity. In order to develop a better understanding of how different cleavages impact electoral competition, this paper considers another type of social cleavage: religious diversity.Contrary to previous literature, higher le...

  20. Party agency and the religious-secular cleavage in post-Communist countries: The case of Romania

    OpenAIRE

    Raymond, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Research focusing on several post-communist countries has found evidence of social cleavage effects on political behaviour similar to those found in Western Europe. In some post-communist countries, however, social cleavage effects appear far weaker (if at all). To understand why this is the case, I perform a case study of Romania, focusing on the religious–secular cleavage. Drawing upon research that emphasises the role of parties in forming cleavages, I argue that the reason for the absence...