WorldWideScience

Sample records for catalytic ozonation-biological coupled

  1. Catalytic ozonation-biological coupled processes for the treatment of industrial wastewater containing refractory chlorinated nitroaromatic compounds*

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Bing-zhi; Xu, Xiang-Yang; Zhu, Liang

    2010-01-01

    A treatability study of industrial wastewater containing chlorinated nitroaromatic compounds (CNACs) by a catalytic ozonation process (COP) with a modified Mn/Co ceramic catalyst and an aerobic sequencing batch reactor (SBR) was investigated. A preliminary attempt to treat the diluted wastewater with a single SBR resulted in ineffective removal of the color, ammonia, total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD). Next, COP was applied as a pretreatment in order to obtain a bio-c...

  2. Direct catalytic cross-coupling of organolithium compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giannerini, Massimo; Fananas Mastral, Martin; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic carbon-carbon bond formation based on cross-coupling reactions plays a central role in the production of natural products, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and organic materials. Coupling reactions of a variety of organometallic reagents and organic halides have changed the face of modern sy

  3. Direct catalytic cross-coupling of organolithium compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannerini, Massimo; Fañanás-Mastral, Martín; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-08-01

    Catalytic carbon-carbon bond formation based on cross-coupling reactions plays a central role in the production of natural products, pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and organic materials. Coupling reactions of a variety of organometallic reagents and organic halides have changed the face of modern synthetic chemistry. However, the high reactivity and poor selectivity of common organolithium reagents have largely prohibited their use as a viable partner in direct catalytic cross-coupling. Here we report that in the presence of a Pd-phosphine catalyst, a wide range of alkyl-, aryl- and heteroaryl-lithium reagents undergo selective cross-coupling with aryl- and alkenyl-bromides. The process proceeds quickly under mild conditions (room temperature) and avoids the notorious lithium halogen exchange and homocoupling. The preparation of key alkyl-, aryl- and heterobiaryl intermediates reported here highlights the potential of these cross-coupling reactions for medicinal chemistry and material science.

  4. Direct catalytic cross-coupling of alkenyllithium compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hornillos, Valentin; Giannerini, Massimo; Vila, Carlos; Fananas-Mastral, Martin; Feringa, Ben L.

    2015-01-01

    A catalytic method for the direct cross-coupling of alkenyllithium reagents with aryl and alkenyl halides is described. The use of a catalyst comprising Pd-2(dba)(3)/XPhos allows for the stereoselective preparation of a wide variety of substituted alkenes in high yields under mild conditions. In add

  5. Catalytic conversion of methane: Carbon dioxide reforming and oxidative coupling

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Natural gas conversion remains one of the essential technologies for current energy needs. This review focuses on the mechanistic aspects of the development of efficient and durable catalysts for two reactions, carbon dioxide reforming and the oxidative coupling of methane. These two reactions have tremendous technological significance for practical application in industry. An understanding of the fundamental aspects and reaction mechanisms of the catalytic reactions reviewed in this study would support the design of industrial catalysts. CO 2 reforming of methane utilizes CO 2, which is often stored in large quantities, to convert as a reactant. Strategies to eliminate carbon deposition, which is the major problem associated with this reaction, are discussed. The oxidative coupling of methane directly produces ethylene in one reactor through a slightly exothermic reaction, potentially minimizing the capital cost of the natural gas conversion process. The focus of discussion in this review will be on the attainable yield of C 2 products by rigorous kinetic analyses.

  6. Coupling catalytic hydrolysis and oxidation for CS2 removal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Li; WU Diyong; WANG Shudong; YUAN Quan

    2008-01-01

    CS2 removal was Obtained by coupling catalytic hyidation on bi-functional catalyst.On the hydrolysis active sites,CS2 is hydrolyzed to H2S,while on the oxidation active sites,H2S is oxidized to elemental S or sulfuric acid deposited on the porous support.The above process can be expressed as follows:CS2→H2O COS →H2O H2S→O2 S/SO2- 4.H2S oxidation eliminates its prohibition on CS2 hydrolysis so that the rate of coupling removal CS2 is 5 times higher than that of CS2 hydrolysis.The same active energy of hydrolysis and coupling reaction also indicates that H2S oxidation does not change the reaction mechanism of CS2 hydrolysis.Temperature has obvious effect on the process while the mole ratio of O2 concentration to CS2 concentration (O/S) does not,especially in excess of 2.5.The formation of sulfuric acid on the catalyst surface poisons hydrolysis active sites and causes the decrease of left OH-1 concentration on the catalysts surface.Lower temperature is suggested for this bi-functional catalyst owing to the low yield ratio of S/SO4 2-.

  7. Real time chemical imaging of a working catalytic membrane reactor during oxidative coupling of methane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamvakeros, A; Jacques, S D M; Middelkoop, V; Di Michiel, M; Egan, C K; Ismagilov, I Z; Vaughan, G B M; Gallucci, F; van Sint Annaland, M; Shearing, P R; Cernik, R J; Beale, A M

    2015-08-18

    We report the results from an operando XRD-CT study of a working catalytic membrane reactor for the oxidative coupling of methane. These results reveal the importance of the evolving solid state chemistry during catalytic reaction, particularly the chemical interaction between the catalyst and the oxygen transport membrane.

  8. Coupling between catalytic loop motions and enzyme global dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Kurkcuoglu

    Full Text Available Catalytic loop motions facilitate substrate recognition and binding in many enzymes. While these motions appear to be highly flexible, their functional significance suggests that structure-encoded preferences may play a role in selecting particular mechanisms of motions. We performed an extensive study on a set of enzymes to assess whether the collective/global dynamics, as predicted by elastic network models (ENMs, facilitates or even defines the local motions undergone by functional loops. Our dataset includes a total of 117 crystal structures for ten enzymes of different sizes and oligomerization states. Each enzyme contains a specific functional/catalytic loop (10-21 residues long that closes over the active site during catalysis. Principal component analysis (PCA of the available crystal structures (including apo and ligand-bound forms for each enzyme revealed the dominant conformational changes taking place in these loops upon substrate binding. These experimentally observed loop reconfigurations are shown to be predominantly driven by energetically favored modes of motion intrinsically accessible to the enzyme in the absence of its substrate. The analysis suggests that robust global modes cooperatively defined by the overall enzyme architecture also entail local components that assist in suitable opening/closure of the catalytic loop over the active site.

  9. Modular, Catalytic Enantioselective Construction of Quaternary Carbon Stereocenters by Sequential Cross-Coupling Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Bowman; Edelstein, Emma K; Morken, James P

    2016-07-01

    The catalytic Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling with chiral γ,γ-disubstituted allylboronates in the presence of RuPhos ligand occurs with high regioselectivity and enantiospecificity, furnishing nonracemic compounds with quaternary centers. Mechanistic experiments suggest that the reaction occurs by transmetalation with allyl migration, followed by rapid reductive elimination.

  10. Catalytic Olefin Hydroamidation Enabled by Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, David C; Choi, Gilbert J; Orbe, Hudson S; Knowles, Robert R

    2015-10-28

    Here we report a ternary catalyst system for the intramolecular hydroamidation of unactivated olefins using simple N-aryl amide derivatives. Amide activation in these reactions occurs via concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) mediated by an excited state iridium complex and weak phosphate base to furnish a reactive amidyl radical that readily adds to pendant alkenes. A series of H-atom, electron, and proton transfer events with a thiophenol cocatalyst furnish the product and regenerate the active forms of the photocatalyst and base. Mechanistic studies indicate that the amide substrate can be selectively homolyzed via PCET in the presence of the thiophenol, despite a large difference in bond dissociation free energies between these functional groups.

  11. A non-stationary problem coupling PDEs and ODEs modelizing an automotive catalytic converter

    OpenAIRE

    Hoernel, J. -D.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we prove the existence and uniqueness of the solution of a non-stationary problem that modelizes the behaviour of the concentrations and the temperature of gases going through a cylindrical passage of an automotive catalytic converter. This problem couples parabolic partial differential equations in a domain with one parabolic partial differential equation and some ordinary differential equations on a part of its boundary.

  12. Catalytic partial oxidation coupled with membrane purification to improve resource and energy efficiency in syngas production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaquaniello, G; Salladini, A; Palo, E; Centi, G

    2015-02-01

    Catalytic partial oxidation coupled with membrane purification is a new process scheme to improve resource and energy efficiency in a well-established and large scale-process like syngas production. Experimentation in a semi industrial-scale unit (20 Nm(3)  h(-1) production) shows that a novel syngas production scheme based on a pre-reforming stage followed by a membrane for hydrogen separation, a catalytic partial oxidation step, and a further step of syngas purification by membrane allows the oxygen-to-carbon ratio to be decreased while maintaining levels of feed conversion. For a total feed conversion of 40 %, for example, the integrated novel architecture reduces oxygen consumption by over 50 %, with thus a corresponding improvement in resource efficiency and an improved energy efficiency and economics, these factors largely depending on the air separation stage used to produce pure oxygen. PMID:25571881

  13. Catalytic Systems Containing p-Toluenesulfonic Acid for the Coupling Reaction of Formaldehyde and Methyl Formate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kebing Wang; Jie Yao; Yue Wang; Gongying Wang

    2007-01-01

    The coupling reaction of formaldehyde (FA) and methyl formate (MF) to form methyl glycolate (MG) and methyl methoxy acetate(MMAc),catalyzed by p-toluenesulfonic acid(p-TsOH) as well as assisted by different kinds of solvents or Ni-containing compounds.had been investigated.The results showed that when the reaction was carried out at 140℃ with a molar ratio of FA to MF of 0.65:1,molar fraction of p-TsOH to total feedstock of 11.0%,and reaction time of 3 h,the yield of MG and MMAc Was 31.1% and 17.1%.respectively.p-TsOH catalyzed the coupling reaction by means of the synergistic catalysis of protonic acidity and soft basicity.Adding extra solvents to the reaction system Was unfavorable for the reaction.The composite catalytic system consisting of p-TsOH and NiX2(X=Cl,Br,I)exhibited a high catalytic performance for the coupling reaction,and NiX2 acted as a promoter in the reaction,whose promotion for the catalysis increased in the following order:NiCl2<NiBr2<NiI2.The present system is less corrosive when compared with the previous system,in which strong inorganic liquid acids were used as catalysts.

  14. Palladium nanoparticle anchored polyphosphazene nanotubes: preparation and catalytic activity on aryl coupling reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    V Devi; A Ashok Kumar; S Sankar; K Dinakaran

    2015-06-01

    Highly accessible-supported palladium (Pd) nanoparticles anchored polyphosphazene (PPZ) nanotubes (NTs) having average diameter of 120 nm were synthesized rapidly at room temperature and homogeneously decorated with Pd nanoparticles. The resultant PPZ–Pd nanocomposites were morphologically and structurally characterized by means of transmission electron microscope equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. Characterization results showed that the Pd nanoparticles with good dispersibility could be well anchored onto the surfaces of the PPZ NTs. The PPZ–Pd NTs show enhanced catalytic activity for the Suzuki coupling of aryl bromides with arylboronic acid. In addition, these PPZ–Pd NTs show excellent behaviour as reusable catalysts of the Suzuki and Heck coupling reactions.

  15. Coupling thermogravimetric and acoustic emission measurements: its application to study the inhibition of catalytic coke deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ropital, Francois; Dascotte, Philippe; Marchand, Pierre [Institut Francais du Petrole, 1 Avenue Bois Preau, 92952 Rueil-Malmaison (France); Faure, Thierry; Lenain, Jean-Claude; Proust, Alain [Euro Physical Acoustics, 27 Rue Magellan, 94373 Sucy-en-Brie Cedex (France)

    2004-07-01

    In order to improve the knowledge on the high temperature behaviour of metallic materials, the coupling of several in situ physical analysis methods is a promising way. For this purpose a thermogravimetric balance has been equipped with a specific acoustic emission device in order to continuously measure the mass variation of the corrosion sample and the acoustic emission transient under experimental conditions of temperature and gas phase compositions that are representative of the industrial environments. The catalytic coke deposition condition that is a major problem for the refinery and petrochemical industries, has been studied with such a device. The carbon deposition on reactor walls can induce localised disruption in the process such as heat-transfer reduction and pressure drops. To prevent these perturbations, proper selections of the metallurgical or internal coating compositions of the equipment, or the injection of accurate amount of inhibitors have to be decided. The feasibility of the coupling at high temperature of thermogravimetric and acoustic emission has been demonstrated. This new technique has been applied to study the inhibition of the catalytic coke deposition on pure iron by sulphur additives in the temperature range of 650 deg. C and under different mixed atmospheres of hydrocarbon and hydrogen contents. Good correlation has been obtained between the coking rates measured by thermogravimetric measurements and the intensities of the acoustic emission parameters. (authors)

  16. Parkin mitochondrial translocation is achieved through a novel catalytic activity coupled mechanism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinde Zheng; Tony Hunter

    2013-01-01

    Pink1,a mitochondrial kinase,and Parkin,an E3 ubiquitin ligase,function in mitochondrial maintenance.Pink1 accumulates on depolarized mitochondria,where it recruits Parkin to mainly induce K63-1inked chain ubiquitination of outer membrane proteins and eventually mitophagy.Parkin belongs to the RBR E3 iigase family.Recently,it has been proposed that the RBR domain transfers ubiquitin to targets via a cysteine-ubiquitin enzyme intermediate,in a manner similar to HECT domain E3 ligases.However,direct evidence for a ubiquitin transfer mechanism and its importance for Parkin's in vivo function is still missing.Here,we report that Parkin E3 activity relies on cysteinemediated ubiquitin transfer during mitophagy.Mutating the putative catalytic cysteine to serine (Parkin C431S)traps ubiquitin,and surprisingly,also abrogates Parkin mitochondrial translocation,indicating that E3 activity is essential for Parkin translocation.We found that Parkin can bind to K63-1inked ubiquitin chains,and that targeting K63-mimicking ubiquitin chains to mitochondria restores Parkin C431S localization.We propose that Parkin translocation is achieved through a novel catalytic activity coupled mechanism.

  17. Parkin mitochondrial translocation is achieved through a novel catalytic activity coupled mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xinde; Hunter, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Pink1, a mitochondrial kinase, and Parkin, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, function in mitochondrial maintenance. Pink1 accumulates on depolarized mitochondria, where it recruits Parkin to mainly induce K63-linked chain ubiquitination of outer membrane proteins and eventually mitophagy. Parkin belongs to the RBR E3 ligase family. Recently, it has been proposed that the RBR domain transfers ubiquitin to targets via a cysteine∼ubiquitin enzyme intermediate, in a manner similar to HECT domain E3 ligases. However, direct evidence for a ubiquitin transfer mechanism and its importance for Parkin's in vivo function is still missing. Here, we report that Parkin E3 activity relies on cysteine-mediated ubiquitin transfer during mitophagy. Mutating the putative catalytic cysteine to serine (Parkin C431S) traps ubiquitin, and surprisingly, also abrogates Parkin mitochondrial translocation, indicating that E3 activity is essential for Parkin translocation. We found that Parkin can bind to K63-linked ubiquitin chains, and that targeting K63-mimicking ubiquitin chains to mitochondria restores Parkin C431S localization. We propose that Parkin translocation is achieved through a novel catalytic activity coupled mechanism. PMID:23670163

  18. Rate turnover in mechano-catalytic coupling: A model and its microscopic origin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Mahua; Grazioli, Gianmarc; Andricioaei, Ioan, E-mail: andricio@uci.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Irvine, California 92697 (United States)

    2015-07-28

    A novel aspect in the area of mechano-chemistry concerns the effect of external forces on enzyme activity, i.e., the existence of mechano-catalytic coupling. Recent experiments on enzyme-catalyzed disulphide bond reduction in proteins under the effect of a force applied on the termini of the protein substrate reveal an unexpected biphasic force dependence for the bond cleavage rate. Here, using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations combined with Smoluchowski theory, we propose a model for this behavior. For a broad range of forces and systems, the model reproduces the experimentally observed rates by solving a reaction-diffusion equation for a “protein coordinate” diffusing in a force-dependent effective potential. The atomistic simulations are used to compute, from first principles, the parameters of the model via a quasiharmonic analysis. Additionally, the simulations are also used to provide details about the microscopic degrees of freedom that are important for the underlying mechano-catalysis.

  19. Catalytic Activity of Dual Metal Cyanide Complex in Multi-component Coupling Reactions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anaswara RAVINDRAN; Rajendra SRIVASTAVA

    2011-01-01

    Several dual metal cyanide catalysts were prepared from potassium ferrocyanide,metal chloride (where metal =Zn2+,Mn2+,Ni2+,Co2+ and Fe2+),t-butanol (complexing agent) and PEG-4000 (co-complexing agent).The catalysts were characterized by elemental analysis (CHN and X-ray fluorescence),X-ray diffraction,N2 adsorption-desorption,scanning electron microscopy,Fourier-transform infiared spectroscopy,and UV-Visible spectroscopy.The dual metal cyanide catalysts were used in several acid catalyzed multi-component coupling reactions for the synthesis of pharmaceutically important organic derivatives.In all these reactions,the Fe-Fe containing dual metal cyanide catalyst was the best catalyst.The catalysts can be recycled without loss in catalytic activity.The advantage of this method is the use of mild,efficient and reusable catalysts for various reactions,which makes them candidates for commercial use.

  20. Rate turnover in mechano-catalytic coupling: A model and its microscopic origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel aspect in the area of mechano-chemistry concerns the effect of external forces on enzyme activity, i.e., the existence of mechano-catalytic coupling. Recent experiments on enzyme-catalyzed disulphide bond reduction in proteins under the effect of a force applied on the termini of the protein substrate reveal an unexpected biphasic force dependence for the bond cleavage rate. Here, using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations combined with Smoluchowski theory, we propose a model for this behavior. For a broad range of forces and systems, the model reproduces the experimentally observed rates by solving a reaction-diffusion equation for a “protein coordinate” diffusing in a force-dependent effective potential. The atomistic simulations are used to compute, from first principles, the parameters of the model via a quasiharmonic analysis. Additionally, the simulations are also used to provide details about the microscopic degrees of freedom that are important for the underlying mechano-catalysis

  1. A study of measurement and analysis of flow distribution in a close-coupled catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Y.S.; Kim, D.S. [Kookmin University, Seoul (Korea); Joo, Y.C. [Soonchunhyang University, Asan (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    In this study, results from an experimental and numerical study of flow distribution in a close-coupled catalytic converter (CCC) are presented. The experiments were carried out using a flow measurement system. Flow distribution at the exit of the first monolith in the CCC was measured using a pitot tube under steady and transient flow conditions. Numerical analysis was done using a CF D code at the same test conditions, and the results were compared with the experimental results. Experimental results showed that the uniformity index of exhaust gas velocity decreases as Reynolds number increases. Under the steady flow conditions, flow through each exhaust pipe concentrates on a small region of the monolith. Under the transient flow conditions, flow through each exhaust pipe with the engine firing order interacts with each other to spread the flow over the monolith face. The numerical analysis results support the experimental results, and help explain the flow pattern in the entry region of the CCC. (author). 6 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Ozone-biological activated carbon as a pretreatment process for reverse osmosis brine treatment and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lai Yoke; Ng, How Yong; Ong, Say Leong; Hu, Jiang Yong; Tao, Guihe; Kekre, Kiran; Viswanath, Balakrishnan; Lay, Winson; Seah, Harry

    2009-09-01

    Ozonation was used in this study to improve biodegradability of RO brine from water reclamation facilities. An ozone dosage ranging from 3 to 10 mg O(3)/L and contact times of 10 and 20 min in batch studies were found to increase the biodegradability (BOD(5)/TOC ratio) of the RO brine by 1.8-3.5 times. At the same time, total organic carbon (TOC) removal was in the range of 5.3-24.5%. The lab-scale ozone-biological activated carbon (BAC) at an ozone dosage of 6.0mg O(3)/L with 20-min contact time was able to achieve 3 times higher TOC removal compared to using BAC alone. Further processing with Capacitive Deionization (CDI) process was able to generate a product water with better water quality than the RO feed water, i.e., with more than 80% ions removal and a lower TOC concentration. The ozone-BAC pretreatment has the potential of reducing fouling in the CDI process. PMID:19580984

  3. Application of integrated ozone biological aerated filters and membrane filtration in water reuse of textile effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yaozhong; Wang, Xiaojun; Xu, Jinling; Yan, Jinli; Ge, Qilong; Gu, Xiaoyang; Jian, Lei

    2013-04-01

    A combined process including integrated ozone-BAFs (ozone biological aerated filters) and membrane filtration was first applied for recycling textile effluents in a cotton textile mill with capacity of 5000 m(3)/d. Influent COD (chemical oxygen demand) in the range of 82-120 mg/L, BOD5 (5-day biochemical oxygen demand) of 12.6-23.1 mg/L, suspended solids (SSs) of 38-52 mg/L and color of 32-64° were observed during operation. Outflows with COD≤45 mg/L, BOD5≤7.6 mg/L, SS≤15 mg/L, color≤8° were obtained after being decontaminated by ozone-BAF with ozone dosage of 20-25 mg/L. Besides, the average removal rates of PVA (polyvinyl alcohol) and UV254 were 100% and 73.4% respectively. Permeate water produced by RO (reverse osmosis) could be reused in dyeing and finishing processes, while the RO concentrates could be discharged directly under local regulations with COD≤100 mg/L, BOD5≤21 mg/L, SS≤52 mg/L, color≤32°. Results showed that the combined process could guarantee water reuse with high quality, and solve the problem of RO concentrate disposal.

  4. Application of novel catalytic-ceramic-filler in a coupled system for long-chain dicarboxylic acids manufacturing wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Suqing; Qi, Yuanfeng; Fan, Chunzhen; He, Shengbing; Dai, Bibo; Huang, Jungchen; Zhou, Weili; Gao, Lei

    2016-02-01

    To gain systematic technology for long-chain dicarboxylic acids (LDCA) manufacturing wastewater treatment, catalytic micro-electrolysis (CME) coupling with adsorption-biodegradation sludge (AB) process was studied. Firstly, novel catalytic-ceramic-filler was prepared from scrap iron, clay and copper sulfate solution and packed in the CME reactor. To remove residual n-alkane and LDCA, the CME reactor was utilized for LDCA wastewater pretreatment. The results revealed that about 94% of n-alkane, 98% of LDCA and 84% of chemical oxygen demand (COD) were removed by the aerated CME reactor at the optimum hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 3.0 h. In this process, catalysis from Cu and montmorillonites played an important role in improving the contaminants removal. Secondly, to remove residual COD in the wastewater, AB process was designed for the secondary biological treatment, about 90% of the influent COD could be removed by biosorption, bio-flocculation and biodegradation effects. Finally, the effluent COD (about 150 mg L(-1)) discharged from the coupled CME-AB system met the requirement of the national discharged standard (COD ≤ 300 mg L(-1)). All of these results suggest that the coupled CME-AB system is a promising technology due to its high-efficient performance, and has the potential to be applied for the real LDCA wastewater treatment. PMID:26619310

  5. Catalytic Chan–Lam coupling using a ‘tube-in-tube’ reactor to deliver molecular oxygen as an oxidant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallia, Carl J; Burton, Paul M; Smith, Alexander M R; Walter, Gary C

    2016-01-01

    Summary A flow system to perform Chan–Lam coupling reactions of various amines and arylboronic acids has been realised employing molecular oxygen as an oxidant for the re-oxidation of the copper catalyst enabling a catalytic process. A tube-in-tube gas reactor has been used to simplify the delivery of the oxygen accelerating the optimisation phase and allowing easy access to elevated pressures. A small exemplification library of heteroaromatic products has been prepared and the process has been shown to be robust over extended reaction times. PMID:27559412

  6. CFD modeling of reaction and mass transfer through a single pellet:Catalytic oxidative coupling of methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Siavash Seyednej adian; Nakisa Yaghobi; Ramin Maghrebi; Leila Vafajoo

    2011-01-01

    In this study a mathematical model of a small scale single pellet for the oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) over titanite pervoskité isdeveloped.The method is based on a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code which known as Fluent may be adopted to model the reactions that take place inside the porous catalyst pellet.The steady state single pellet model is coupled with a kinetic model and the intra-pellet concentration profiles of species are provided.Subsequent to achieving this goal,a nonlinear reaction network consisting of nine catalytic reactions and one gas phase reaction as an external program is successfully implemented to CFD-code as a reaction term in solving the equations.This study is based on the experimental design which is conducted in a differential reactor with a Sn/BaTiO3 catalyst (7-8 mesh) at atmospheric pressure,GHSV of 12000 h-1,ratio of methane to oxygen of 2,and three different temperatures of 1023,1048 and 1073 K.The modeling results such as selectivity and conversion at the pellet exit are in good agreement with the experimental data.Therefore,it is suggested that to achieve high yield in OCM process the modeling of the single pellet should be considered as the heart of catalytic fixed bed reactor.

  7. Thermal reliability and performance improvement of close-coupled catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hijikata, Toshihiko; Kurachi, Hiroshi; Katsube, Fumio [NGK Insulators, Ltd., Nagoya (Japan); Honacker, H. van

    1996-09-01

    This paper proposes a high temperature catalytic converter design using a ceramic substrate and intumescent matting. It also describes the improvement of converter performance using an advanced thin wall ceramic substrate. Due to future tightening of emission regulations and improvement of fuel economy, higher exhaust gas temperatures are suggested. Therefore, reduction of thermal reliability of an intumescent mat will be a concern because the catalytic converter will be exposed to high temperatures. For this reason, a new design converter has been developed using a dual cone structure for both the inlet and outlet cones. This minimizes heat conduction through the cone and decreases the temperature affecting the mat area. This design converter, without the use of a heat-shield, reduces the converter surface temperature to 441 C despite a catalyst bed temperature of 1,050 C. The long term durability of the converter is demonstrated by the hot vibration test. Since the new design converter does not need a heat-shield, the catalyst diameter can be enlarged by the width of the air gap used in the current design converter. By using an advanced thin wall ceramic substrate, such as 0.11 mm/620 kcpsm (4 mil/400 cpsi), it is possible to improve emission performance and pressure drop compared with the conventional 0.16 mm/620 kcpsm (6 mil/400 cpsi) ceramic substrate.

  8. Biogenic synthesis of palladium nanoparticles using Pulicaria glutinosa extract and their catalytic activity towards the Suzuki coupling reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mujeeb; Khan, Merajuddin; Kuniyil, Mufsir; Adil, Syed Farooq; Al-Warthan, Abdulrahman; Alkhathlan, Hamad Z; Tremel, Wolfgang; Tahir, Muhammad Nawaz; Siddiqui, Mohammed Rafiq H

    2014-06-28

    Green synthesis of nanomaterials finds the edge over chemical methods due to its environmental compatibility. Herein, we report a facile and eco-friendly method for the synthesis of palladium (Pd) nanoparticles (NPs) using an aqueous solution of Pulicaria glutinosa, a plant widely found in a large region of Saudi Arabia, as a bioreductant. The as-prepared Pd NPs were characterized using ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). The hydroxyl groups of the plant extract (PE) molecules were found mainly responsible for the reduction and growth of Pd NPs. FT-IR analysis confirmed the dual role of the PE, both as a bioreductant as well as a capping ligand, which stabilizes the surface of Pd NPs. The crystalline nature of the Pd NPs was identified using XRD analysis which confirmed the formation of a face-centered cubic structure (JCPDS: 87-0641, space group: Fm3m (225)). Furthermore, the as-synthesized Pd NPs demonstrated excellent catalytic activity towards the Suzuki coupling reaction under aqueous and aerobic conditions. Kinetic studies of the catalytic reaction monitored using GC confirmed that the reaction completes in less than 5 minutes.

  9. Catalytic spectrophotometric determination of cerium by ion exchange separation coupled to a flow injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A flow injection method is described intended for the determination of cerium based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of gallocyanine by peroxydisulfate in acidic media. The proposed flow injection manifold incorporates a ion exchange separation system in the carrier stream. The decolorisation of gallocyanine due to its oxidation was used to monitor the reaction by spectrophotometry at 524 nm. The variables which affected the reaction rate were fully investigated. By this method cerium(4) can be determined in the range of 0.30-10.0 μg with a limit of detection of 0.25 μg. The relative standard deviation for ten replicate determinations of 1.0 μg of cerium(4) was 1.8 %

  10. Environmentally benign synthesis of amides and ureas via catalytic dehydrogenation coupling of volatile alcohols and amines in a Pd-Ag membrane reactor

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Tao

    2016-05-31

    In this study, we report the direct synthesis of amides and ureas via the catalytic dehydrogenation of volatile alcohols and amines using the Milstein catalyst in a Pd-Ag/ceramic membrane reactor. A series of amides and ureas, which could not be synthesized in an open system by catalytic dehydrogenation coupling, were obtained in moderate to high yields via catalytic dehydrogenation of volatile alcohols and amines. This process could be monitored by the hydrogen produced. Compared to the traditional method of condensation, this catalytic system avoids the stoichiometric pre-activation or in situ activation of reagents, and is a much cleaner process with high atom economy. This methodology, only possible by employing the Pd-Ag/ceramic membrane reactor, not only provides a new environmentally benign synthetic approach of amides and ureas, but is also a potential method for hydrogen storage.

  11. A Novel and Efficient Catalytic System for Aerobic Oxidative Coupling of 2-Naphthol Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li CHEN; Jing Bo LAN; Zhi Hua MAO; Xiao Qi YU; Ru Gang XIE

    2004-01-01

    The paper reported a novel and efficient aerobic oxidative coupling reaction of 2-naphthol derivatives catalyzed by CuCu (I or II)N-alkylimidazole complexes in excellent yields.The crystal structure of CuCu (II)N-methylimidazole complex to be determined by X-Ray.

  12. Catalytic Chemo- and Regioselective Coupling of 1,3-Dicarbonyls with N-Heterocyclic Nucleophiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Miles; Kitson, Daniel J; Franckevičius, Vilius

    2016-06-17

    The development of a decarboxylative palladium-catalyzed coupling of 1,3-dicarbonyl compounds with indole, pyrrole, imidazole, and pyrazole nucleophiles via an allylic linker under neutral conditions is disclosed. This process enables the installation of an all-carbon quaternary center and new C-C and C-N bonds in a single operation. Despite the weakly acidic nature of N-heterocycles, the reactions proceed with good efficiency and complete regio- and chemoselectivity. PMID:27211875

  13. Strongly coupled Pd nanotetrahedron/tungsten oxide nanosheet hybrids with enhanced catalytic activity and stability as oxygen reduction electrocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yizhong; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Gao, Xiaohui; Wang, Xiaodan; Chen, Wei

    2014-08-20

    The design and synthesis of highly active oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts with strong durability at low cost is extremely desirable but still remains a significant challenge. Here we develop an efficient strategy that utilizes organopalladium(I) complexes containing palladium-palladium bonds as precursors for the synthesis of strongly coupled Pd tetrahedron-tungsten oxide nanosheet hybrids (Pd/W18O49) to improve the electrocatalytic activity and stability of Pd nanocrystals. The hybrid materials are synthesized by direct nucleation, growth, and anchoring of Pd tetrahedral nanocrystals on the in situ-synthesized W18O49 nanosheets. Compared to supportless Pd nanocrystals and W18O49, their hybrids exhibited not only surprisingly high activity but also superior stability to Pt for the ORR in alkaline solutions. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and electrochemical analyses indicated that the enhanced electrocatalytic activity and durability are associated with the increased number and improved catalytic activity of active sites, which is induced by the strong interaction between the Pd tetrahedrons and W18O49 nanosheet supports. The present study provides a novel strategy for synthesizing hybrid catalysts with strong chemical attachment and electrical coupling between nanocatalysts and supports. The strategy is expected to open up exciting opportunities for developing a novel class of metal-support hybrid nanoelectrocatalysts with improved ORR activity and durability for both fuel cells and metal-air batteries. PMID:25054583

  14. Catalytic Asymmetric Coupling of 2-Naphthols by Chiral Tridentate Oxovanadium(IV) Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HON; Sang-Wen

    2001-01-01

    A series of chiral oxovanadium(IV) complexes derived from tridentate N-3,5-substituted-, N-3,4-benzo-and N-5,6-benzo-salicylidene-α-amino acids can serve as efficient catalysts for the enantioselective oxidative couplings of various 3-, 6-, and 7-substituted 2-naphthols under O2. The best scenario involves the use of a vanadyl complex arising from 2-hydroxy-l-naphthaldehyde and valine (or phenylalanine) in CCl4, leading to BINOLs in good yields (75-100%) and with enantioselectivities of up to 68%.……

  15. Catalytic Asymmetric Coupling of 2-Naphthols by Chiral Tridentate Oxovanadium(IV) Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HON Sang-Wen; LI Chun-Hsin; KUO Jen-Huang; BARHATE N. B.; LIU Yi-Hung; WANG Yu; CHEN Chien-Tien

    2001-01-01

    @@ A series of chiral oxovanadium(IV) complexes derived from tridentate N-3,5-substituted-, N-3,4-benzo-and N-5,6-benzo-salicylidene-α-amino acids can serve as efficient catalysts for the enantioselective oxidative couplings of various 3-, 6-, and 7-substituted 2-naphthols under O2. The best scenario involves the use of a vanadyl complex arising from 2-hydroxy-l-naphthaldehyde and valine (or phenylalanine) in CCl4, leading to BINOLs in good yields (75-100%) and with enantioselectivities of up to 68%.

  16. LDV measurement, flow visualization and numerical analysis of flow distribution in a close-coupled catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Duk Sang; Cho, Yong Seok [Kookmin Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-11-01

    Results from an experimental study of flow distribution in a Close-coupled Catalytic Converter (CCC) are presented. The experiments were carried out with a flow measurement system specially designed for this study under steady and transient flow conditions. A pitot tube was a tool for measuring flow distribution at the exit of the first monolith. The flow distribution of the CCC was also measured by LDV system and flow visualization. Results from numerical analysis are also presented. Experimental results showed that the flow uniformity index decreases as flow Reynolds number increases. In steady flow conditions, the flow through each exhaust pipe made some flow concentrations on a specific region of the CCC inlet. The transient test results showed that the flow through each exhaust pipe in the engine firing order, interacted with each other to ensure that the flow distribution was uniform. The results of numerical analysis were qualitatively accepted with experimental results. They supported and helped explain the flow in the entry region of CCC.

  17. Copper(I) complexes with trispyrazolylmethane ligands: synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity in cross-coupling reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldón, Estela; Álvarez, Eleuterio; Nicasio, M Carmen; Pérez, Pedro J

    2012-08-01

    Three novel Cu(I) complexes bearing tris(pyrazolyl)methane ligands, Tpm(x), have been prepared from reactions of equimolar amounts of CuI and the ligands Tpm, (HC(pz)(3)), Tpm*, (HC(3,5-Me(2)-pz)(3)), and Tpm(Ms), (HC(3-Ms-pz)(3)). X-ray diffraction studies have shown that the Tpm and Tpm(Ms) derivatives exhibit a 2:1 Cu:ligand ratio, whereas the Tpm* complex is a mononuclear species in nature. The latter has been employed as a precatalyst in the arylation of amides and aromatic thiols with good activity. The synthesis of a Tpm*Cu(I)-phthalimidate, a feasible intermediate in this catalytic process, has also been performed. Low temperature (1)H NMR studies in CDCl(3) have indicated that this complex exists in solution as a mixture of two, neutral and ionic forms. Conductivity measurements have reinforced this proposal, the ionic form predominating in a very polar solvent such as DMSO. The reaction of Tpm*Cu(I)-phthalimidate with iodobenzene afforded the expected C-N coupling product in 76% yield accounting for its role as an intermediate in this transformation.

  18. Catalytic Upgrading of Biomass-Derived Compounds via C-C Coupling Reactions. Computational and Experimental Studies of Acetaldehyde and Furan Reactions in HZSM-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Cong [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Evans, Tabitha J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Cheng, Lei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Nimlos, Mark R. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Mukarakate, Calvin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Robichaud, David J. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Assary, Rajeev S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Curtiss, Larry A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-10-02

    These catalytic C–C coupling and deoxygenation reactions are essential for upgrading of biomass-derived oxygenates to fuel-range hydrocarbons. Detailed understanding of mechanistic and energetic aspects of these reactions is crucial to enabling and improving the catalytic upgrading of small oxygenates to useful chemicals and fuels. Using periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we have investigated the reactions of furan and acetaldehyde in an HZSM-5 zeolite catalyst, a representative system associated with the catalytic upgrading of pyrolysis vapors. Comprehensive energy profiles were computed for self-reactions (i.e., acetaldehyde coupling and furan coupling) and cross-reactions (i.e., acetaldehyde + furan) of this representative mixture. Major products proposed from the computations are further confirmed using temperature controlled mass spectra measurements. Moreover, the computational results show that furan interacts with acetaldehyde in HZSM-5 via an alkylation mechanism, which is more favorable than the self-reactions, indicating that mixing furans with aldehydes could be a promising approach to maximize effective C–C coupling and dehydration while reducing the catalyst deactivation (e.g., coke formation) from aldehyde condensation.

  19. Catalytic Performance of CeO2/ZnO Nanocatalysts on the Oxidative Coupling of Methane with Carbon Dioxide and their Fractal Features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongjun He; Blun Yang; Haimin Pan; Guozhi Li

    2004-01-01

    CeO2/ZnO nanocatalysts were prepared from the coupling route of homogeneous precipitation with microemulsion and the impregnation method. The catalytic performance of these two kinds of catalysts on the oxidative coupling of methane with carbon dioxide was tested and compared; the fractal behavior of the nanocatalysts was analyzed using fractal theory. The CeO2/ZnO nanocatalysts had much higher activity than the catalysts prepared by impregnation method. There was no regular relationship between the average size of CeO2/ZnO nanocatalysts and their catalytic performance; however, the conversion of methane increased with the increase of the fractal dimension of CeO2/ZnO nanocatalysts.

  20. 2D/2D nano-hybrids of γ-MnO₂ on reduced graphene oxide for catalytic ozonation and coupling peroxymonosulfate activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuxian; Xie, Yongbing; Sun, Hongqi; Xiao, Jiadong; Cao, Hongbin; Wang, Shaobin

    2016-01-15

    Two-dimensional reduced graphene oxide (2D rGO) was employed as both a shape-directing medium and support to fabricate 2D γ-MnO2/2D rGO nano-hybrids (MnO2/rGO) via a facile hydrothermal route. For the first time, the 2D/2D hybrid materials were used for catalytic ozonation of 4-nitrophenol. The catalytic efficiency of MnO2/rGO was much higher than either MnO2 or rGO only, and rGO was suggested to play the role for promoting electron transfers. Quenching tests using tert-butanol, p-benzoquinone, and sodium azide suggested that the major radicals responsible for 4-nitrophenol degradation and mineralization are O2(-) and (1)O2, but not ·OH. Reusability tests demonstrated a high stability of the materials in catalytic ozonation with minor Mn leaching below 0.5 ppm. Degradation mechanism, reaction kinetics, reusability and a synergistic effect between catalytic ozonation and coupling peroxymonosulfate (PMS) activation were also discussed.

  1. Nickel(II) complexes containing ONS donor ligands: Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure and catalytic application towards C-C cross-coupling reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Panneerselvam Anitha; Rajendran Manikandan; Paranthaman Vijayan; Govindan Prakash; Periasamy Viswanathamurthi; Ray Jay Butcher

    2015-04-01

    Nickel(II) complexes containing thiosemicarbazone ligands [Ni(L)2] (1-3) (L = 9,10-phenanthrenequinonethiosemicarbazone (HL1), 9,10-phenanthrenequinone-N-methylthio semicarbazone (HL2) and 9, 10-phenanthrenequinone-N-phenylthiosemicarbazone (HL3)) have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic (IR, UV-Vis, 1H, 13C-NMR and ESI mass) methods. The molecular structures of complexes 1 and 2 were identified by means of single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The analysis revealed that the complexes possess a distorted octahedral geometry with the ligand coordinating in a uni-negative tridentate ONS fashion. The catalytic activity of complexes towards some C–C coupling reactions (viz., Kumada-Corriu, Suzuki-Miyaura and Sonogashira) has been examined. The complexes behave as efficient catalysts in the Kumada-Corriu and Sonogashira coupling reactions rather than Suzuki-Miyaura coupling.

  2. Catalytic Activity of Cationic and Neutral Silver(I)-XPhos Complexes with Nitrogen Ligands or Tolylsulfonate for Mannich and Aza-Diels-Alder Coupling Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grirrane, Abdessamad; Álvarez, Eleuterio; García, Hermenegildo; Corma, Avelino

    2016-01-01

    Cationic and neutral silver(I)-L complexes (L=Buchwald-type biaryl phosphanes) with nitrogen co-ligands or organosulfonate counter ions have been synthesised and characterised through their structural and spectroscopic properties. At room temperature, both cationic and neutral silver(I)-L complexes are extremely active catalysts in the promotion of the single and double A(3) coupling of terminal (di)alkynes, pyrrolidine and formaldehyde. In addition, the aza-Diels-Alder two- and three-component coupling reactions of Danishefsky's diene with an imine or amine and aldehyde are efficiently catalysed by these cationic or neutral silver(I)-L complexes. The solvent influences the catalytic performance due to limited complex solubility or solvent decomposition and reactivity. The isolation of new silver(I)-L complexes with reagents as ligands lends support to mechanistic proposals for such catalytic processes. The activity, stability and metal-distal arene interaction of these silver(I)-L catalysts have been compared with those of analogous cationic gold(I) and copper(I) complexes. PMID:26598792

  3. Development of catalytic systems for selective hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis based on statistical planning methods coupled with kinetic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhorov, Yu.M.; Morozova, E.V.; Panchenkov, G.M.

    1979-01-01

    An efficient catalyst design methodology is described, which was used in developing an active and stable mixed oxide catalytic composition for selective hydrogenation of m-bonds under conditions excluding hydrogenolysis of C-C bonds. Catalysts of optimum composition, i.e., 40-50Vertical Bar3< CuO/25-30Vertical Bar3< NiO/20-35Vertical Bar3< SiO/sub 2/, and structure (20-30 A. average pore radius) can be prepared by coprecipitation of copper and nickel salts with silica gel powder in a sodium silicate solution at 90/sup 0/C. By using these catalysts, crotonaldehyde (CA) was hydrogenated to n-butanol in one stage with over 99Vertical Bar3< yields at 180/sup 0/C. The same catalyst was efficient in selective hydrogenation of acetylene (contained in relatively high concentrations in pyrolysis gases) to ethylene at 130/sup 0/C, hydrogenation of piperylene (a by-product in isoprene manufacture) to n-pentenes at 160/sup 0/C, with almost 100Vertical Bar3< selectivity, and in hydrogenolysis of C-S and C-N bonds at 290/sup 0/-370/sup 0/C. Catalytic hydrorefining of a gasoline fraction (105/sup 0/-180/sup 0/C bp) at 350/sup 0/C and 40 atm, reduced its sulfur content from 0.03Vertical Bar3< to 0.00001Vertical Bar3<, and completely removed nitrogen.

  4. Determination of trace uranium by resonance fluorescence method coupled with photo-catalytic technology and dual cloud point extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiekang; Li, Guirong; Han, Qian

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, two kinds of salophens (Sal) with different solubilities, Sal1 and Sal2, have been respectively synthesized, and they all can combine with uranyl to form stable complexes: [UO2(2+)-Sal1] and [UO2(2+)-Sal2]. Among them, [UO2(2+)-Sal1] was used as ligand to extract uranium in complex samples by dual cloud point extraction (dCPE), and [UO2(2+)-Sal2] was used as catalyst for the determination of uranium by photocatalytic resonance fluorescence (RF) method. The photocatalytic characteristic of [UO2(2+)-Sal2] on the oxidized pyronine Y (PRY) by potassium bromate which leads to the decrease of RF intensity of PRY were studied. The reduced value of RF intensity of reaction system (ΔF) is in proportional to the concentration of uranium (c), and a novel photo-catalytic RF method was developed for the determination of trace uranium (VI) after dCPE. The combination of photo-catalytic RF techniques and dCPE procedure endows the presented methods with enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. Under optimal conditions, the linear calibration curves range for 0.067 to 6.57ngmL(-1), the linear regression equation was ΔF=438.0 c (ngmL(-1))+175.6 with the correlation coefficient r=0.9981. The limit of detection was 0.066ngmL(-1). The proposed method was successfully applied for the separation and determination of uranium in real samples with the recoveries of 95.0-103.5%. The mechanisms of the indicator reaction and dCPE are discussed.

  5. Determination of trace uranium by resonance fluorescence method coupled with photo-catalytic technology and dual cloud point extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiekang; Li, Guirong; Han, Qian

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, two kinds of salophens (Sal) with different solubilities, Sal1 and Sal2, have been respectively synthesized, and they all can combine with uranyl to form stable complexes: [UO2(2+)-Sal1] and [UO2(2+)-Sal2]. Among them, [UO2(2+)-Sal1] was used as ligand to extract uranium in complex samples by dual cloud point extraction (dCPE), and [UO2(2+)-Sal2] was used as catalyst for the determination of uranium by photocatalytic resonance fluorescence (RF) method. The photocatalytic characteristic of [UO2(2+)-Sal2] on the oxidized pyronine Y (PRY) by potassium bromate which leads to the decrease of RF intensity of PRY were studied. The reduced value of RF intensity of reaction system (ΔF) is in proportional to the concentration of uranium (c), and a novel photo-catalytic RF method was developed for the determination of trace uranium (VI) after dCPE. The combination of photo-catalytic RF techniques and dCPE procedure endows the presented methods with enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. Under optimal conditions, the linear calibration curves range for 0.067 to 6.57ngmL(-1), the linear regression equation was ΔF=438.0 c (ngmL(-1))+175.6 with the correlation coefficient r=0.9981. The limit of detection was 0.066ngmL(-1). The proposed method was successfully applied for the separation and determination of uranium in real samples with the recoveries of 95.0-103.5%. The mechanisms of the indicator reaction and dCPE are discussed. PMID:27380304

  6. Carboxylic acid-grafted mesoporous material and its high catalytic activity in one-pot three-component coupling reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Gomes

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available A new carboxylic acid functionalized mesoporous organic polymer has been synthesized via in situ radical polymerization of divinylbenzene and acrylic acid using a mesoporous silica as a seed during the polymerization process under solvothermal conditions. The mesoporous material MPDVAA-1 has been thoroughly characterized employing powder XRD, solid state 13C cross polarization magic angle spinning-nuclear magnetic resonance, FT-IR spectroscopy, N2 sorption, HR-TEM, and NH3 temperature programmed desorption-thermal conductivity detector (TPD-TCD analysis to understand its porosity, chemical environment, bonding, and surface properties. The mesoporous polymer was used as a catalyst for a three comp onent Biginelli condensation between various aldehydes, β-keto esters, and urea/thioureas to give 3,4-dihydropyrimidine-2(1H-ones. The reactions were carried out under conventional heating as well as solvent-free microwave irradiation of solid components, and in both the cases, the mesoporous polymer MPDVAA-1 proved to be a powerful, robust, and reusable catalyst with high catalytic efficiency.

  7. Synthesis, characterization, and catalytic activity in Suzuki coupling and catalase-like reactions of new chitosan supported Pd catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Talat; Inanan, Tülden; Menteş, Ayfer

    2016-07-10

    The aim of this study is to analyze the synthesis of a new chitosan supported Pd catalyst and examination of its catalytic activity in: Pd catalyst was synthesized using chitosan as a biomaterial and characterized with FTIR, TG/DTG, XRD, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, SEM-EDAX, ICP-OES, Uv-vis spectroscopies, and magnetic moment, along with molar conductivity analysis. Biomaterial supported Pd catalyst indicated high activity and long life time as well as excellent turnover number (TON) and turnover frequency (TOF) values in Suzuki reaction. Biomaterial supported Pd catalyst catalyzed H2O2 decomposition reaction with considerable high activity using comparatively small loading catalyst (10mg). Redox potential of biomaterial supported Pd catalyst was still high without negligible loss (13% decrease) after 10 cycles in reusability tests. As a consequence, eco-friendly biomaterial supported Pd catalyst has superior properties such as high thermal stability, long life time, easy removal from reaction mixture and durability to air, moisture and high temperature.

  8. Coupling of photocatalytic and biological processes as a contribution to the detoxification of water: catalytic and technological aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Parra Cardona, Sandra Patricia; Pulgarin, César

    2005-01-01

    This research contributes to the study and development of a new degradation technique that couples solar and biological processes for the treatment of biorecalcitrant, nonbiodegradable, and/or toxic organic substances present in the aqueous medium. Efficient physicochemical pretreatments are necessary to modify the structure of the pollutants, by transforming them into less toxic and biodegradable intermediates, allowing then, a biological procedure to complete the degradation of the pollutan...

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of Graphene and Graphene Oxide Based Palladium Nanocomposites and Their Catalytic Applications in Carbon-Carbon Cross-Coupling Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Minjae [Kunsan National Univ., Gunsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bohyun; Lee, Yuna; Kim, Beomtae; Park, Joon B. [Chonbuk National Univ., Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-15

    We have developed an efficient method to generate highly active Pd and PdO nanoparticles (NPs) dispersed on graphene and graphene oxide (GO) by an impregnation method combined with thermal treatments in H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} gas flows, respectively. The Pd NPs supported on graphene (Pd/G) and the PdO NPs supported on GO (PdO/GO) demonstrated excellent carbon-carbon cross-coupling reactions under a solvent-free, environmentally-friendly condition. The morphological and chemical structures of PdO/GO and Pd/G were fully characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We found that the remarkable reactivity of the Pd/G and PdO/GO catalysts toward the cross-coupling reaction is attributed to the high degree of dispersion of the Pd and PdO NPs while the oxidative states of Pd and the oxygen functionalities of graphene oxide are not critical for their catalytic performance.

  10. Catalytic conversion of sugarcane bagasse to cellulosic ethanol: TiO2 coupled nanocellulose as an effective hydrolysis enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabasingh, S Anuradha; Lalith, D; Prabhu, M Arun; Yimam, Abubekker; Zewdu, Taye

    2016-01-20

    The present study deals with the production of cellulosic ethanol from bagasse using the synthesized TiO2 coupled nanocellulose (NC-TiO2) as catalyst. Aspergillus nidulans AJSU04 cellulase was used for the hydrolysis of bagasse. NC-TiO2 at various concentrations was added to bagasse in order to enhance the yield of reducing sugars. Complex interaction between cellulase, bagasse, NC-TiO2 and the reaction environment is thoroughly studied. A mathematical model was developed to describe the hydrolysis reaction. Ethanol production from enzymatically hydrolyzed sugarcane bagasse catalyzed with NC-TiO2 was carried out using Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 20602. The glucose release rates and ethanol concentrations were determined. Ethanol produced was found to be strongly dependent on pretreatment given, hydrolysis and fermentation conditions. The study confirmed the promising accessibility of NC-TiO2, for enhanced glucose production rates and improved ethanol yield.

  11. Catalytic conversion of sugarcane bagasse to cellulosic ethanol: TiO2 coupled nanocellulose as an effective hydrolysis enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabasingh, S Anuradha; Lalith, D; Prabhu, M Arun; Yimam, Abubekker; Zewdu, Taye

    2016-01-20

    The present study deals with the production of cellulosic ethanol from bagasse using the synthesized TiO2 coupled nanocellulose (NC-TiO2) as catalyst. Aspergillus nidulans AJSU04 cellulase was used for the hydrolysis of bagasse. NC-TiO2 at various concentrations was added to bagasse in order to enhance the yield of reducing sugars. Complex interaction between cellulase, bagasse, NC-TiO2 and the reaction environment is thoroughly studied. A mathematical model was developed to describe the hydrolysis reaction. Ethanol production from enzymatically hydrolyzed sugarcane bagasse catalyzed with NC-TiO2 was carried out using Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 20602. The glucose release rates and ethanol concentrations were determined. Ethanol produced was found to be strongly dependent on pretreatment given, hydrolysis and fermentation conditions. The study confirmed the promising accessibility of NC-TiO2, for enhanced glucose production rates and improved ethanol yield. PMID:26572403

  12. Application Of Ozone-Biological Activated Carbon Technology On Drinking Water%臭氧活性炭技术在饮用水深度处理中的作用

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘丽仪; 谢茵茵; 黄剑明

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces the application of ozone-biological activated carbon technology on drinking water .It indicates the ozone-biological activated carbon technology, mechanism and application in water treatment, and refers to the problems in the application and partly suggests possible solution to the problems as well ,through presenting the development and application of a process for ozone-biological activated carbon in our country and others.%本文介绍了臭氧化活性炭技术在生活饮用水深度处理中的应用。通过研究国内外臭氧生物活性炭工艺的发展现状和应用实践,综述臭氧化-生物活性炭联用技术的作用机理及在水处理中的应用研究,并提出了此项技术在应用中存在的问题,并介绍提高此项技术的应用措施。

  13. Nickel-doped zinc aluminate oxides: starch-assisted synthesis, structural, optical properties, and their catalytic activity in oxidative coupling of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visinescu, Diana; Papa, Florica [' Ilie Murgulescu' Institute of Physical Chemistry, Romanian Academy (Romania); Ianculescu, Adelina C., E-mail: a.ianculescu@rdslink.ro [Polytechnica University, Department of Oxide Materials Science and Engineering (Romania); Balint, Ioan; Carp, Oana, E-mail: ocarp@icf.ro [' Ilie Murgulescu' Institute of Physical Chemistry, Romanian Academy (Romania)

    2013-03-15

    Nanosized nickel-substituted zinc aluminate oxides were obtained by the gradual insertion of nickel cations within the zinc aluminate lattice, using starch as active ingredient. The obtained (Ni{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}Al{sub 2})-starch (x = 0.1, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1) gel precursors were characterized through infrared spectroscopy and thermal analysis. The thermal behavior of the precursors are influenced by the nickel content, the DTA curves for the richer nickel samples revealing stronger, faster and overlapping exothermic reactions, that can be completed at lower temperatures. The corresponding spinelic oxides were obtained after calcination treatments at 800 Degree-Sign C and analyzed by means of NIR-UV-Vis spectroscopy, XRD measurements, SEM, TEM, and HRTEM investigations. The spinelic structure for all oxide samples is confirmed by XRD analysis, although small amounts of NiO cannot be neglected. TEM/HRTEM analysis revealed mesopores embedded in plate-like large (68.8 nm) particles of Ni{sub 0.2}Zn{sub 0.8}Al{sub 2}O{sub 4} sample and smaller (15.7 nm) uniform equiaxial particles, with a more pronounced tendency of agglomeration for Ni{sub 0.8}Zn{sub 0.2}Al{sub 2}O{sub 4} oxide. A formation mechanism for Ni{sub 0.2}Zn{sub 0.8}Al{sub 2}O{sub 4} oxides was proposed based on DTA/TG, XRD, and SEM analyses. NIR-UV-Vis spectra for Ni{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}Al{sub 2}O{sub 4} showed a significant presence of tetrahedral nickel cations that augments with nickel concentration increase. CIE-L{sup *}a{sup *}b{sup *} color parameters shown a variation of the lightness and also of the green and blue color components with x, the best color characteristics being obtained for x = 0.6. The oxides with a substitution degree x = 0.2 and 0.8 tested in the oxidative coupled of methane reaction (OCM) showed positive catalytic activity and selectivity due to an interesting synergetic effect of Zn(II) and Ni(II) ions.

  14. Fundamental studies of the mechanism of catalytic reactions with catalysts effective in the gasification of carbon solids and the oxidative coupling of methane. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, H.; Somorjai, G.A.; Perry, D.L.

    1992-12-01

    Work on catalytic steam gasification with chars and coals will be extended from atmospheric to elevated pressures using the newly built pressure unit. The novel finding that coking of petroleum in the presence of small amounts of caustic greatly improves the gasification rates and characteristics of the coke will be extended to chars; in the oxidative coupling of methane over ternary catalysts, emphasis will be placed on low temperature coupling and on the oxidative production of syngas from methane at low temperature. Experimental work will continue on the synthesis of the mixed catalyst, and they will be characterized by a number of techniques, including elemental analyses, x-ray diffraction, and surface area determination.

  15. Simulation of thermally coupled catalytic distillation flowsheets for C3 alkyne selective hydrogenation%C3选择性加氢热耦合催化精馏流程模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王易卓; 罗祎青; 钱行; 袁希钢

    2016-01-01

    In order to reduce effectively the refrigeration cost for the process of selective hydrogenation of C3 alkyne into alkene, three novel thermally coupled catalytic distillation flowsheets are proposed. In the proposed flowsheets, the reactor for catalytic hydrogenation of C3 components is settled in the lower part of the deethanizer in the original process and the three columns are thermally coupled in different ways. The proposed flowsheets are rigorously simulated and evaluated. The results show that, compared with original process, the proposed processes raise the convert ratio of hydrogenation, and at the same time, significant energy saving can be achieved by the thermal couplings, leading to a decrease in the total annual cost by 4.107%, 6.420%and 10.337%respectively for the three proposed flowsheets.%针对C3选择性加氢过程中冷剂费用过高问题提出将选择性加氢催化反应器设置在脱乙烷精馏塔的提馏段,并通过原流程的3个精馏塔的不同热耦合方式所构成的3种热耦合催化精馏结构;对三热耦合催化精馏结构分别进行严格模拟和评价,表明通过分离和加氢反应的结合增加了加氢反应的转化率,并通过热耦合降低了分离能耗,年度总费用降低显著。模拟结果表明,3种方案的年度总费用节约效果分别为4.107%、6.420%和10.337%。

  16. A novel method for oxidative desulfurization of liquid hydrocarbon fuels based on catalytic oxidation using molecular oxygen coupled with selective adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Xiaoliang; Song, Chunshan [Clean Fuels and Catalysis Program, The Energy Institute, Department of Energy and Geo-Environmental Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, 209 Academic Projects Building, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Zhou, Anning [Clean Fuels and Catalysis Program, The Energy Institute, Department of Energy and Geo-Environmental Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, 209 Academic Projects Building, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xian University of Science and Technology, Xian 710054 (China)

    2007-05-30

    The present study explored a novel oxidative desulfurization (ODS) method of liquid hydrocarbon fuels, which combines a catalytic oxidation step of the sulfur compounds directly in the presence of molecular oxygen and an adsorption step of the oxidation-treated fuel over activated carbon. The ODS of a model jet fuel and a real jet fuel (JP-8) was conducted in a batch system at ambient conditions. It was found that the oxidation in the presence of molecular oxygen with Fe(III) salts was able to convert the thiophenic compounds in the fuel to the corresponding sulfone and/or sulfoxide compounds at 25 C. The oxidation reactivity of the sulfur compounds decreases in the order of 2-methylbenzothiophene > 5-methylbenzothiophene > benzothiophene >> dibenzothiophene. The alkyl benzothiophenes with more alkyl substituents have higher oxidation reactivity. In real JP-8 fuel, 2,3-dimethylbenzothiophene was found to be the most refractory sulfur compound to be oxidized. The catalytic oxidation of the sulfur compounds to form the corresponding sulfones and/or sulfoxides improved significantly the adsorptivity of the sulfur compounds on activated carbon, because the activated carbon has higher adsorptive affinity for the sulfones and sulfoxides than thiophenic compounds due to the higher polarity of the former. The remarkable advantages of the developed ODS method are that the ODS can be run in the presence of O{sub 2} at ambient condition without using peroxides and aqueous solvent and thus without involving the biphasic oil-aqueous-solution system. (author)

  17. EFFECTS OF SOLVENT, BASE, AND TEMPERATURE IN THE OPTIMISATION OF A NEW CATALYTIC SYSTEM FOR SONOGASHIRA CROSS-COUPLING USING NCP PINCER PALLADACYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego S. Rosa

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The optimisation of a new catalyst system using NCP pincer palladacycle 1 was investigated using the experimental design technique. NCP pincer palladacycle 1 was previously investigated in Suzuki-Miyaura and Heck-Mizoroki cross-couplings and found to be a highly efficient catalyst precursor. In this study, the effects of the type of base (K3PO4 or DABCO, solvent (DMF or dioxane and reaction temperature (130 or 150 ºC in the second step on the reactional yield in Sonogashira cross-coupling were assessed using the two-factor design. The results showed that temperature is statistically significant in relation to the reaction yield.

  18. Experimental Study on Ozone-biological Activated Carbon for Advanced Treatment of Petrochemical Wastewater%臭氧-生物活性炭深度处理石化废水的试验研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王亚轩; 赵慧

    2012-01-01

    In this experiment, the technology combination including Bio-SAC bioreactor, effecient fibre filter, ozone-biological activated carbon filter was used to deep treat wastewater after secondary biological treatment of petrochemical plant in Daqing city. The results indicated that the wastewater after treatment could meet the demands of water quality standard of circulating cooling water, Bio-SAC reactor had still high degradation capacity for residual refractory organism of water after secondary biological treatment, ozone-biological activated carbon was superior to normal biology carbon in the aspect of removal of organism, chroma, turbidity and saturated cycle.%试验通过Bio-SAC生物反应器、高效纤维过滤器、臭氧滑性炭过滤器等工艺组合将大庆某石化公司二级生物处理后的废水进行深度处理。试验结果表明经该系统处理后的污水完全满足循环冷却水的水质要求,Bio-SAC生物反应器对二级生物处理后水中残留难降解有机物仍有较强的降解能力,臭氧化生物活性炭在去除有机物、色度、浊度、饱和周期方面均优于普通生物活性炭。

  19. 光催化内循环耦合MBR处理垃圾渗滤液%Study on the treatments of landfill leachate by the internal photo-catalytic circulation coupled with MBR process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯斐; 胡兆吉; 赖劲虎; 吴婷

    2016-01-01

    The novel integrative equipment of internal photo-catalytic circulation coupled with MBR was used to treat landfill leachate in this study.When the inflow CODcr concentration,internal photo-catalytic hydraulic retention time,dosing of H2 O2 ,hydraulic retention time of MBR unit were controlled at 250 mg· L-1 ,3 hour,106 mg·L-1 and 25 hour,respectively.The system could obtain the average CODcr removal ratio of 67.3%.During the tests,the evolution of EPS concentration and transverse membrane pressure were detected under different dosing of H2 O2 .In conclusion,the novel equipment could be easily controlled and operated.%采用自行设计一体化光催化内循环耦合 MBR工艺对垃圾渗滤液进行深度处理。当垃圾渗滤液进水 COD为250 mg·L-1,催化循环段水力停留时间为3 h、双氧水投加量为106 mg·L-1;MBR段水力停留时间为25 h,系统对COD的平均去除率可以达到67.3%。试验过程中检测不同双氧水投加条件下 MBR体系中 EPS的变化及跨膜压差的变化。系统操作灵活,易于控制。

  20. DNA-binding, catalytic oxidation, C—C coupling reactions and antibacterial activities of binuclear Ru(II thiosemicarbazone complexes: Synthesis and spectral characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugam Manimaran

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available New hexa-coordinated binuclear Ru(II thiosemicarbazone complexes of the type {[(B(EPh3(COClRu]2L} (where, E = P or As; B = PPh3 or AsPh3 or pyridine; L = mononucleating NS donor of N-substituted thiosemicarbazones have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, UV–vis and 31P{1H} NMR cyclic voltammetric studies. The DNA-binding studies of Ru(II complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA were investigated by UV–vis, viscosity measurements, gel-electrophoresis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The new complexes have been used as catalysts in C—C coupling reaction and in the oxidation of alcohols to their corresponding carbonyl compounds by using NMO as co-oxidant and molecular oxygen (O2 atmosphere at ambient temperature. Further, the new binucleating thiosemicarbazone ligands and their Ru(II complexes were also screened for their antibacterial activity against Klebsiella pneumoniae, Shigella sp., Micrococcus luteus, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi. From this study, it was found out that the activity of the complexes almost reaches the effectiveness of the conventional bacteriocide.

  1. Catalytic mechanisms of direct pyrrole synthesis via dehydrogenative coupling mediated by PNP-Ir or PNN-Ru pincer complexes: Crucial role of proton-transfer shuttles in the PNP-Ir system

    KAUST Repository

    Qu, Shuanglin

    2014-04-02

    Kempe et al. and Milstein et al. have recently advanced the dehydrogenative coupling methodology to synthesize pyrroles from secondary alcohols (e.g., 3) and β-amino alcohols (e.g., 4), using PNP-Ir (1) and PNN-Ru (2) pincer complexes, respectively. We herein present a DFT study to characterize the catalytic mechanism of these reactions. After precatalyst activation to give active 1A/2A, the transformation proceeds via four stages: 1A/2A-catalyzed alcohol (3) dehydrogenation to give ketone (11), base-facilitated C-N coupling of 11 and 4 to form an imine-alcohol intermediate (18), base-promoted cyclization of 18, and catalyst regeneration via H2 release from 1R/2R. For alcohol dehydrogenations, the bifunctional double hydrogen-transfer pathway is more favorable than that via β-hydride elimination. Generally, proton-transfer (H-transfer) shuttles facilitate various H-transfer processes in both systems. Notwithstanding, H-transfer shuttles play a much more crucial role in the PNP-Ir system than in the PNN-Ru system. Without H-transfer shuttles, the key barriers up to 45.9 kcal/mol in PNP-Ir system are too high to be accessible, while the corresponding barriers (<32.0 kcal/mol) in PNN-Ru system are not unreachable. Another significant difference between the two systems is that the addition of alcohol to 1A giving an alkoxo complex is endergonic by 8.1 kcal/mol, whereas the addition to 2A is exergonic by 8.9 kcal/mol. The thermodynamic difference could be the main reason for PNP-Ir system requiring lower catalyst loading than the PNN-Ru system. We discuss how the differences are resulted in terms of electronic and geometric structures of the catalysts and how to use the features in catalyst development. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  2. The catalytic effect of sodium and lithium ions on coupled sorption-reduction of chromate at the biotite edge-fluid interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilton, Eugene S.; Veblen, David R.; Moses, Carl O.; Raeburn, Stuart P.

    1997-09-01

    Large single crystals of biotite and near-endmember phlogopite were reacted with aqueous solutions bearing 20 μM Cr(VI) and different concentrations of NaCl, LiCl, RbCl, CsCl, NaClO 4, and Na 2SO 4. Solutions were maintained at 25 ± 0.5°C, 1 atm, and pH = 4.00 ± 0.02. Samples were extracted from the reaction chamber at 1, 3, 5, 10, and 20 h. The edges and basal planes of the reacted micas were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) for major elements and Cr. XPS analyses of biotite show trivalent chromium on edge surfaces but no detectable chromium on the basal plane. XPS analyses of near-endmember phlogopites that were reacted in the same experiments as biotite showed no detectable Cr on either the basal plane or edge surfaces. Increasing Na and Li salt concentrations increased the rate of coupled sorption-reduction of chromate at the biotite edge-fluid interface, where the order of effectiveness was NaCl ˜ NaClO 4 > Na 2SO 4 > LiCl. In contrast, no Cr was detected on mica edges after reaction in RbCl and CsCl solutions. Comparison of equimolar NaCl and LiCl experiments indicate that the active agent is Na and Li, not ionic strength or the anion. Sulfate tends to block the reaction more so than chloride. We conclude that it is the substitution of hydrated cations for interlayer K in biotite that enhances the heterogeneous reduction of chromate at the biotite edge-fluid interface.

  3. 饮用水臭氧-生物活性炭深度处理工程调试运行%Commissioning and Operation of Ozone/Biological Activated Carbon Process for Advanced Treatment of Drinking Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘保超; 李家爱; 刘晓威

    2012-01-01

    连云港市第三水厂深度处理改造一期工程设计规模为20×104 m3/d,采用臭氧-生物活性炭工艺.从初期运行出水水质来看,改造效果较好,主要指标满足《生活饮用水卫生标准》( GB 5749-2006).总结了臭氧-生物活性炭深度处理工艺的调试运行经验,对类似水质达标改造工程的建设、设备安装、调试和运行提出了建议.%The treatment capacity of the first-phase project of advanced treatment of drinking water in Third Waterworks in Lianyungang City was 20×104 mVd. The ozone/biological activated carbon (O3/BAC) process was used. The main water quality indexes met the requirement of the Standards for Drinking Water Quality (GB 5749 - 2006 ). The commissioning and operation experience for O3/BAC process was summarized , and suggestions on the construction , equipment installation, commissioning and operation of similar water quality improvement projects were made.

  4. 臭氧-生物活性炭技术在水处理中的应用与研究%Study on the application of ozone-biological activated carbon process to water treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭锋; 王潇; 肖强; 肖禾

    2011-01-01

    Ozone-biological activated carbon (O3-BAC) is a new type of efficient micro-polluted water treatment process. Its application to drinking water (surface water, ground water, domestic water, municipal water supply, etc. ) and industrial wastewater(membrane treatment discharge ,oilfield wastewater,oil refining wastewater, petrochemical wastewater, pharmaceutical wastewater, dyestuff wastewater, food processing wastewater, aquaculture wastewater, etc. ) and their research situations are introduced. The future development directions of the application of O3-BAC to water treatment are pointed out.%臭氧-生物活性炭(O-BAC)技术是一种新型高效的微污染水处理工艺.介绍了O-BAC技术在饮用水(地表水、地下水、生活污水、市政供水等制饮用水)及工业废水(膜处理排水、油田废水、炼油废水、石化废水、制药废水、焦化废水、印染废水、食品加工废水、水产养殖废水)等领域的应用和研究情况,指出了未来O-BAC技术在水处理中的发展研究方向.

  5. Catalytic distillation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1984-01-01

    Catalytic distillation structure for use in reaction distillation columns, a providing reaction sites and distillation structure and consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and being present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consist of at least 10 volume % open space.

  6. Catalytic combustor for hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercea, J.; Grecu, E.; Fodor, T.; Kreibik, S.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of catalytic combustors for hydrogen using platinum-supported catalysts is described. Catalytic plates of different sizes were constructed using fibrous and ceramic supports. The temperature distribution as well as the reaction efficiency as a function of the fuel input rate was determined, and a comparison between the performances of different plates is discussed.

  7. 臭氧-生物活性炭工艺设计中工程方案的选择%Selection of Engineering Scheme in Ozone/Biological Activated Carbon Process Design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李世峰

    2012-01-01

    Ozone/biological activated carbon ( O3/BAC ) process was developed on the basis of biological activated carbon process, which is recognized as one of the most effective advanced treatment processes in removing organic pollutants and odor from drinking water in the world at present. With the implementation of the Standards for Drinking Water Quality ( GB 5749 - 2006 ) , O3/BAC process has been widely used in upgrading and reconstruction of water treatment plants. In the design, selection of gas source for ozone generator and design of activated carbon tank type related to project investment, operation cost and operation management. In order to facilitate the upgrading and reconstruction project of water treatment plants, it needs to choose the ozone source and tank type reasonably according to the actual situation of the plant.%臭氧-生物活性炭(O3-BAC)工艺是在生物活性炭工艺基础上发展起来的,是目前世界上公认的去除饮用水中有机污染物、嗅味等较为有效的深度处理工艺之一.随着《生活饮用水卫生标准》( GB 5749-2006)的实施,臭氧-生物活性炭工艺广泛应用于给水厂的提标改造中.在其设计中,臭氧气源的选择和活性炭池池型的设计关系到工程的投资、运行成本的高低以及操作管理的难易,需根据各给水厂的实际情况,合理选择臭氧气源和活性炭池池型,以利于给水厂提标改造工程的实施.

  8. The plausible role of carbonate in photo-catalytic water oxidation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornweitz, Haya; Meyerstein, Dan

    2016-04-28

    DFT calculations point out that the photo-oxidation of water on GaN is energetically considerably facilitated by adsorbed carbonate. As the redox potential of the couple CO3(˙-)/CO3(2-) is considerably lower than that of the couple OH˙/OH(-) but still enables the oxidation of water it is suggested that carbonate should be considered as a catalyst/co-catalyst in a variety of catalytic/photo-catalytic/electro-catalytic oxidation processes.

  9. Catalytic distillation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.

    1982-01-01

    A method for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C.sub.4 feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  10. Catalytic Functions of Standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Blind (Knut)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe three different areas and the examples have illustrated several catalytic functions of standards for innovation. First, the standardisation process reduces the time to market of inventions, research results and innovative technologies. Second, standards themselves promote the diffusi

  11. Catalytic ignition of light hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. L. Hohn; C.-C. Huang; C. Cao

    2009-01-01

    Catalytic ignition refers to phenomenon where sufficient energy is released from a catalytic reaction to maintain further reaction without additional extemai heating. This phenomenon is important in the development of catalytic combustion and catalytic partial oxidation processes, both of which have received extensive attention in recent years. In addition, catalytic ignition studies provide experimental data which can be used to test theoretical hydrocarbon oxidation models. For these reasons, catalytic ignition has been frequently studied. This review summarizes the experimental methods used to study catalytic ignition of light hydrocarbons and describes the experimental and theoretical results obtained related to catalytic ignition. The role of catalyst metal, fuel and fuel concentration, and catalyst state in catalytic ignition are examined, and some conclusions are drawn on the mechanism of catalytic ignition.

  12. Pd Close Coupled Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Hua SHI; Mao Chu GONG; Yao Qiang CHEN

    2006-01-01

    A catalyst comprised novel high surface area alumina support was prepared to control emission of automobiles. The results showed that prepared catalyst could satisfy the requirements of a high performance close coupled catalyst for its good catalytic activity at low temperature and good stability at high temperature.

  13. Reducing catalytic converter pressure loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-06-01

    This article examines why approximately 30--40% of total exhaust-system pressure loss occurs in the catalytic converter and what can be done to reduce pressure loss. High exhaust-system backpressure is of concern in the design of power trains for passenger cars and trucks because it penalizes fuel economy and limits peak power. Pressure losses occur due to fluid shear and turning during turbulent flow in the converter headers and in entry separation and developing laminar-flow boundary layers within the substrate flow passages. Some of the loss mechanisms are coupled. For example, losses in the inlet header are influenced by the presence of the flow resistance of a downstream substrate. Conversely, the flow maldistribution and pressure loss of the substrate(s) depend on the design of the inlet header.

  14. Catalytic coherence transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Kaifeng; Singh, Uttam; Wu, Junde

    2016-04-01

    Catalytic coherence transformations allow the otherwise impossible state transformations using only incoherent operations with the aid of an auxiliary system with finite coherence that is not being consumed in any way. Here we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for the deterministic and stochastic catalytic coherence transformations between a pair of pure quantum states. In particular, we show that the simultaneous decrease of a family of Rényi entropies of the diagonal parts of the states under consideration is a necessary and sufficient condition for the deterministic catalytic coherence transformations. Similarly, for stochastic catalytic coherence transformations we find the necessary and sufficient conditions for achieving a higher optimal probability of conversion. We thus completely characterize the coherence transformations among pure quantum states under incoherent operations. We give numerous examples to elaborate our results. We also explore the possibility of the same system acting as a catalyst for itself and find that indeed self-catalysis is possible. Further, for the cases where no catalytic coherence transformation is possible we provide entanglement-assisted coherence transformations and find the necessary and sufficient conditions for such transformations.

  15. Catalytic Conversion of Biofuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Betina

    This thesis describes the catalytic conversion of bioethanol into higher value chemicals. The motivation has been the unavoidable coming depletion of the fossil resources. The thesis is focused on two ways of utilising ethanol; the steam reforming of ethanol to form hydrogen and the partial oxida...

  16. Catalytic Phosphination and Arsination

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kwong Fuk Yee; Chan Kin Shing

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic, user-friendly phosphination and arsination of aryl halides and triflates by triphenylphosphine and triphenylarsine using palladium catalysts have provided a facile synthesis of functionalized aryl phosphines and arsines in neutral media. Modification of the cynaoarisne yielded optically active N, As ligands which will be screened in various asymmetric catalysis.

  17. Catalytic efficiency of designed catalytic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korendovych, Ivan V; DeGrado, William F

    2014-08-01

    The de novo design of catalysts that mimic the affinity and specificity of natural enzymes remains one of the Holy Grails of chemistry. Despite decades of concerted effort we are still unable to design catalysts as efficient as enzymes. Here we critically evaluate approaches to (re)design of novel catalytic function in proteins using two test cases: Kemp elimination and ester hydrolysis. We show that the degree of success thus far has been modest when the rate enhancements seen for the designed proteins are compared with the rate enhancements by small molecule catalysts in solvents with properties similar to the active site. Nevertheless, there are reasons for optimism: the design methods are ever improving and the resulting catalyst can be efficiently improved using directed evolution.

  18. Catalytic converter with thermoelectric generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parise, R.J.

    1998-07-01

    The unique design of an electrically heated catalyst (EHC) and the inclusion of an ECO valve in the exhaust of an internal combustion engine will meet the strict new emission requirements, especially at vehicle cold start, adopted by several states in this country as well as in Europe and Japan. The catalytic converter (CC) has been a most useful tool in pollution abatement for the automobile. But the emission requirements are becoming more stringent and, along with other improvements, the CC must be improved to meet these new standards. Coupled with the ECO valve, the EHC can meet these new emission limits. In an internal combustion engine vehicle (ICEV), approximately 80% of the energy consumed leaves the vehicle as waste heat: out the tail pipe, through the radiator, or convected/radiated off the engine. Included with the waste heat out the tail pipe are the products of combustion which must meet strict emission requirements. The design of a new CC is presented here. This is an automobile CC that has the capability of producing electrical power and reducing the quantity of emissions at vehicle cold start, the Thermoelectric Catalytic Power Generator. The CC utilizes the energy of the exothermic reactions that take place in the catalysis substrate to produce electrical energy with a thermoelectric generator. On vehicle cold start, the thermoelectric generator is used as a heat pump to heat the catalyst substrate to reduce the time to catalyst light-off. Thus an electrically heated catalyst (EHC) will be used to augment the abatement of tail pipe emissions. Included with the EHC in the exhaust stream of the automobile is the ECO valve. This valve restricts the flow of pollutants out the tail pipe of the vehicle for a specified amount of time until the EHC comes up to operating temperature. Then the ECO valve opens and allows the full exhaust, now treated by the EHC, to leave the vehicle.

  19. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  20. A catalytic cracking process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degnan, T.F.; Helton, T.E.

    1995-07-20

    Heavy oils are subjected to catalytic cracking in the absence of added hydrogen using a catalyst containing a zeolite having the structure of ZSM-12 and a large-pore crystalline zeolite having a Constraint Index less than about 1. The process is able to effect a bulk conversion of the oil at the same time yielding a higher octane gasoline and increased light olefin content. (author)

  1. A non-stationary model for catalytic converters with cylindrical geometry

    OpenAIRE

    Hoernel, J. -D.

    2006-01-01

    We prove some existence and uniqueness results and some qualitative properties for the solution of a system modelling the catalytic conversion in a cylinder. This model couples parabolic partial differential equations posed in a cylindrical domain and on its boundary.

  2. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayland, B.B.

    1992-12-01

    This project is focused on developing strategies to accomplish the reduction and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. Our approaches to this issue are based on the recognition that rhodium macrocycles have unusually favorable thermodynamic values for producing a series of intermediate implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Observations of metalloformyl complexes produced by reactions of H{sub 2} and CO, and reductive coupling of CO to form metallo {alpha}-diketone species have suggested a multiplicity of routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in constructing energy profiles for a variety of potential pathways, and these schemes are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Variation of the electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Emerging knowledge of the factors that contribute to M-H, M-C and M-O bond enthalpies is directing the search for ligand arrays that will expand the range of metal species that have favorable thermodynamic parameters to produce the primary intermediates for CO hydrogenation. Studies of rhodium complexes are being extended to non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics. Multifunctional catalyst systems designed to couple the ability of rhodium complexes to produce formyl and diketone intermediates with a second catalyst that hydrogenates these imtermediates are promising approaches to accomplish CO hydrogenation at mild conditions.

  3. Catalytic applications of bio-inspired nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacardo, Dennis Kien Balaong

    The biomimetic synthesis of Pd nanoparticles was presented using the Pd4 peptide, TSNAVHPTLRHL, isolated from combinatorial phage display library. Using this approach, nearly monodisperse and spherical Pd nanoparticles were generated with an average diameter of 1.9 +/- 0.4 nm. The peptide-based nanocatalyst were employed in the Stille coupling reaction under energy-efficient and environmentally friendly reaction conditions of aqueous solvent, room temperature and very low catalyst loading. To this end, the Pd nanocatalyst generated high turnover frequency (TOF) value and quantitative yields using ≥ 0.005 mol% Pd as well as catalytic activities with different aryl halides containing electron-withdrawing and electron-donating groups. The Pd4-capped Pd nanoparticles followed the atom-leaching mechanism and were found to be selective with respect to substrate identity. On the other hand, the naturally-occurring R5 peptide (SSKKSGSYSGSKGSKRRIL) was employed in the synthesis of biotemplated Pd nanomaterials which showed morphological changes as a function of Pd:peptide ratio. TOF analysis for hydrogenation of olefinic alcohols showed similar catalytic activity regardless of nanomorphology. Determination of catalytic properties of these bio-inspired nanomaterials are important as they serve as model system for alternative green catalyst with applications in industrially important transformations.

  4. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  5. Optical activity of catalytic elements of hetero-metallic nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antosiewicz, Tomasz J.; Apell, S. Peter; Wadell, Carl; Langhammer, Christoph

    2015-05-01

    Interaction of light with metals in the form of surface plasmons is used in a wide range of applications in which the scattering decay channel is important. The absorption channel is usually thought of as unwanted and detrimental to the efficiency of the device. This is true in many applications, however, recent studies have shown that maximization of the decay channel of surface plasmons has potentially significant uses. One of these is the creation of electron-hole pairs or hot electrons which can be used for e.g. catalysis. Here, we study the optical properties of hetero-metallic nanostructures that enhance light interaction with the catalytic elements of the nanostructures. A hybridized LSPR that matches the spectral characteristic of the light source is excited. This LSPR through coupling between the plasmonic elements maximizes light absorption in the catalytic part of the nanostructure. Numerically calculated visible light absorption in the catalytic nanoparticles is enhanced 12-fold for large catalytic disks and by more 30 for small nanoparticles on the order of 5 nm. In experiments we measure a sizable increase in the absorption cross section when small palladium nanoparticles are coupled to a large silver resonator. These observations suggest that heterometallic nanostructures can enhance catalytic reaction rates.

  6. N, N′-Olefin functionalized Bis-Imidazolium Pd(II) chloride N-Heterocyclic carbene complex builds a supramolecular framework and shows catalytic efficacy for `C–C' coupling reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gourisankar Roymahapatra; Tapastaru Samanta; Saikat Kumar Seth; Ambikesh Mahapatra; Shyamal Kumar Chattopadhyay; Joydev Dinda

    2015-06-01

    The ligand 3,3′-(-phenylenedimethylene)bis{1-(2-methylallyl)} imidazolium bromide (1) and its Palladium(II) N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complex (3) has been synthesized and characterized by several spectroscopic techniques and the solid-state structure of 3 has been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. The Pd(II) complex possesses ring head to tail – stacking interactions (3.767 A°) through imidazole rings. Complex 3 catalyzes Suzuki-Miyaura `C–C' coupling reaction. DFT calculations have been used to understand the HOMO/LUMO energy and hence the stability and reactivity of Pd(II) complex in syn and anti-configuration.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Fixed-Bed Catalytic Reforming Reactors: Hydrodynamics / Chemical Kinetics Coupling Simulation numérique des réacteurs de reformage catalytique en lit fixe : couplage hydrodynamique-cinétique chimique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferschneider G.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Fixed bed reactors with a single fluid phase are widely used in the refining or petrochemical industries for reaction processes catalysed by a solid phase. The design criteria for industrial reactors are relatively well known. However, they rely on a one-dimensional writing and on the separate resolution of the equation of conservation of mass and energy, and of momentum. Thus, with complex geometries, the influence of hydrodynamics on the effectiveness of the catalyst bed cannot be taken into account. The calculation method proposed is based on the multi-dimensional writing and the simultaneous resolution of the local conservation equations. The example discussed concerns fixed-bed catalytic reactors. These reactors are distinguished by their annular geometry and the radial circulation of the feedstock. The flow is assumed to be axisymmetric. The reaction process is reflected by a simplified kinetic mechanism involving ten chemical species. Calculation of the hydrodynamic (mean velocities, pressure, thermal and mass fields (concentration of each species serves to identify the influence of internal components in two industrial reactor geometries. The map of the quantity of coke formed and deposited on the catalyst, calculated by the model, reveals potential areas of poor operation. Les réacteurs à lit fixe avec une seule phase fluide sont largement utilisés dans l'industrie du raffinage et de la pétrochimie, pour mettre en oeuvre un processus réactionnel catalysé par une phase solide. Les règles de conception des réacteurs industriels sont relativement bien connues. Cependant, elles reposent sur l'écriture monodimensionnelle et la résolution séparée, d'une part, des équations de conservation de la masse et de l'énergie et d'autre part, de la quantité de mouvement. Ainsi dans le cas de géométries complexes, l'influence de l'hydrodynamique sur l'efficacité du lit catalytique ne peut être prise en compte. La méthode de calcul

  8. HYDROGEN TRANSFER IN CATALYTIC CRACKING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogen transfer is an important secondary reaction of catalytic cracking reactions, which affects product yield distribution and product quality. It is an exothermic reaction with low activation energy around 43.3 kJ/mol. Catalyst properties and operation parameters in catalytic cracking greatly influence the hydrogen transfer reaction. Satisfactory results are expected through careful selection of proper catalysts and operation conditions.

  9. Bifunctional catalytic electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cisar, Alan (Inventor); Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Clarke, Eric (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to an oxygen electrode for a unitized regenerative hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell and the unitized regenerative fuel cell having the oxygen electrode. The oxygen electrode contains components electrocatalytically active for the evolution of oxygen from water and the reduction of oxygen to water, and has a structure that supports the flow of both water and gases between the catalytically active surface and a flow field or electrode chamber for bulk flow of the fluids. The electrode has an electrocatalyst layer and a diffusion backing layer interspersed with hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions. The diffusion backing layer consists of a metal core having gas diffusion structures bonded to the metal core.

  10. Catalytic quantum error correction

    CERN Document Server

    Brun, T; Hsieh, M H; Brun, Todd; Devetak, Igor; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu

    2006-01-01

    We develop the theory of entanglement-assisted quantum error correcting (EAQEC) codes, a generalization of the stabilizer formalism to the setting in which the sender and receiver have access to pre-shared entanglement. Conventional stabilizer codes are equivalent to dual-containing symplectic codes. In contrast, EAQEC codes do not require the dual-containing condition, which greatly simplifies their construction. We show how any quaternary classical code can be made into a EAQEC code. In particular, efficient modern codes, like LDPC codes, which attain the Shannon capacity, can be made into EAQEC codes attaining the hashing bound. In a quantum computation setting, EAQEC codes give rise to catalytic quantum codes which maintain a region of inherited noiseless qubits. We also give an alternative construction of EAQEC codes by making classical entanglement assisted codes coherent.

  11. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  12. Unsteady catalytic processes and sorption-catalytic technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalytic processes that occur under conditions of the targeted unsteady state of the catalyst are considered. The highest efficiency of catalytic processes was found to be ensured by a controlled combination of thermal non-stationarity and unsteady composition of the catalyst surface. The processes based on this principle are analysed, in particular, catalytic selective reduction of nitrogen oxides, deep oxidation of volatile organic impurities, production of sulfur by the Claus process and by hydrogen sulfide decomposition, oxidation of sulfur dioxide, methane steam reforming and anaerobic combustion, selective oxidation of hydrocarbons, etc.

  13. Unsteady catalytic processes and sorption-catalytic technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zagoruiko, A N [G.K. Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2007-07-31

    Catalytic processes that occur under conditions of the targeted unsteady state of the catalyst are considered. The highest efficiency of catalytic processes was found to be ensured by a controlled combination of thermal non-stationarity and unsteady composition of the catalyst surface. The processes based on this principle are analysed, in particular, catalytic selective reduction of nitrogen oxides, deep oxidation of volatile organic impurities, production of sulfur by the Claus process and by hydrogen sulfide decomposition, oxidation of sulfur dioxide, methane steam reforming and anaerobic combustion, selective oxidation of hydrocarbons, etc.

  14. Catalytic production of biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theilgaard Madsen, A.

    2011-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the catalytic production of diesel from biomass, especially emphasising catalytic conversion of waste vegetable oils and fats. In chapter 1 an introduction to biofuels and a review on different catalytic methods for diesel production from biomass is given. Two of these methods have been used industrially for a number of years already, namely the transesterification (and esterification) of oils and fats with methanol to form fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), and the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of fats and oils to form straight-chain alkanes. Other possible routes to diesel include upgrading and deoxygenation of pyrolysis oils or aqueous sludge wastes, condensations and reductions of sugars in aqueous phase (aqueous-phase reforming, APR) for monofunctional hydrocarbons, and gasification of any type of biomass followed by Fischer-Tropsch-synthesis for alkane biofuels. These methods have not yet been industrialised, but may be more promising due to the larger abundance of their potential feedstocks, especially waste feedstocks. Chapter 2 deals with formation of FAME from waste fats and oils. A range of acidic catalysts were tested in a model fat mixture of methanol, lauric acid and trioctanoin. Sulphonic acid-functionalised ionic liquids showed extremely fast convertion of lauric acid to methyl laurate, and trioctanoate was converted to methyl octanoate within 24 h. A catalyst based on a sulphonated carbon-matrix made by pyrolysing (or carbonising) carbohydrates, so-called sulphonated pyrolysed sucrose (SPS), was optimised further. No systematic dependency on pyrolysis and sulphonation conditions could be obtained, however, with respect to esterification activity, but high activity was obtained in the model fat mixture. SPS impregnated on opel-cell Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and microporous SiO{sub 2} (ISPS) was much less active in the esterification than the original SPS powder due to low loading and thereby low number of strongly acidic sites on the

  15. Catalytic Polymer Multilayer Shell Motors for Separation of Organics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhihua; Wu, Zhiguang; Lin, Xiankun; He, Qiang

    2016-01-26

    A catalytic polymer multilayer shell motor has been developed, which effects fast motion-based separation of charged organics in water. The shell motors are fabricated by sputtering platinum onto the exposed surface of silica templates embedded in Parafilm, followed by layer-by-layer assembly of polyelectrolyte multilayers to the templates. The catalytic shell motors display high bubble propulsion with speeds of up to 260 μm s(-1) (13 body lengths per second). Moreover, the polyelectrolyte multilayers assembled at high pH (pH>9.0) adsorb approximately 89% of dye molecules from water, owing to the electrostatic interaction between the positively charged polymers and the anionic dye molecules, and subsequently release them at neutral pH in a microfluidic device. The efficient propulsion coupled with the effective adsorption behavior of the catalytic shell motors in a microfluidic device results in accelerated separation of organics in water and thus holds considerable promise for water analysis.

  16. Chemically-Modified Cellulose Paper as a Microstructured Catalytic Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirotaka Koga

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the successful use of chemically-modified cellulose paper as a microstructured catalytic reactor for the production of useful chemicals. The chemical modification of cellulose paper was achieved using a silane-coupling technique. Amine-modified paper was directly used as a base catalyst for the Knoevenagel condensation reaction. Methacrylate-modified paper was used for the immobilization of lipase and then in nonaqueous transesterification processes. These catalytic paper materials offer high reaction efficiencies and have excellent practical properties. We suggest that the paper-specific interconnected microstructure with pulp fiber networks provides fast mixing of the reactants and efficient transport of the reactants to the catalytically-active sites. This concept is expected to be a promising route to green and sustainable chemistry.

  17. Catalytic cracking of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.; Nowak, S.; Naegler, T.; Zimmermann, J. [Hochschule Merseburg (Germany); Welscher, J.; Schwieger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany); Hahn, T. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    A most important factor for the chemical industry is the availability of cheap raw materials. As the oil price of crude oil is rising alternative feedstocks like coal are coming into focus. This work, the catalytic cracking of lignite is part of the alliance ibi (innovative Braunkohlenintegration) to use lignite as a raw material to produce chemicals. With this new one step process without an input of external hydrogen, mostly propylene, butenes and aromatics and char are formed. The product yield depends on manifold process parameters. The use of acid catalysts (zeolites like MFI) shows the highest amount of the desired products. Hydrogen rich lignites with a molar H/C ratio of > 1 are to be favoured. Due to primary cracking and secondary reactions the ratio between catalyst and lignite, temperature and residence time are the most important parameter to control the product distribution. Experiments at 500 C in a discontinuous rotary kiln reactor show yields up to 32 wt-% of hydrocarbons per lignite (maf - moisture and ash free) and 43 wt-% char, which can be gasified. Particularly, the yields of propylene and butenes as main products can be enhanced four times to about 8 wt-% by the use of catalysts while the tar yield decreases. In order to develop this innovative process catalyst systems fixed on beads were developed for an easy separation and regeneration of the used catalyst from the formed char. (orig.)

  18. Catalytic Membrane Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, T.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Gardner, T.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Sault, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    The proposed "catalytic membrane sensor" (CMS) was developed to generate a device which would selectively identify a specific reagent in a complex mixture of gases. This was to be accomplished by modifying an existing Hz sensor with a series of thin films. Through selectively sieving the desired component from a complex mixture and identifying it by decomposing it into Hz (and other by-products), a Hz sensor could then be used to detect the presence of the select component. The proposed "sandwich-type" modifications involved the deposition of a catalyst layered between two size selective sol-gel layers on a Pd/Ni resistive Hz sensor. The role of the catalyst was to convert organic materials to Hz and organic by-products. The role of the membraneo was to impart both chemical specificity by molecukir sieving of the analyte and converted product streams, as well as controlling access to the underlying Pd/Ni sensor. Ultimately, an array of these CMS elements encompassing different catalysts and membranes were to be developed which would enable improved selectivity and specificity from a compiex mixture of organic gases via pattern recognition methodologies. We have successfully generated a CMS device by a series of spin-coat deposited methods; however, it was determined that the high temperature required to activate the catalyst, destroys the sensor.

  19. Catalytic gasification of biomass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertus, R. J.; Mudge, L. K.; Sealock, L. J., Jr.; Mitchell, D. H.; Weber, S. L.

    1981-12-01

    Methane and methanol synthesis gas can be produced by steam gasification of biomass in the presence of appropriate catalysts. This concept is to use catalysts in a fluidized bed reactor which is heated indirectly. The objective is to determine the technical and economic feasibility of the concept. Technically the concept has been demonstrated on a 50 lb per hr scale. Potential advantages over conventional processes include: no oxygen plant is needed, little tar is produced so gas and water treatment are simplified, and yields and efficiencies are greater than obtained by conventional gasification. Economic studies for a plant processing 2000 T/per day dry wood show that the cost of methanol from wood by catalytic gasification is competitive with the current price of methanol. Similar studies show the cost of methane from wood is competitive with projected future costs of synthetic natural gas. When the plant capacity is decreased to 200 T per day dry wood, neither product is very attractive in today's market.

  20. Immigration process in catalytic medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The longtime behavior of the immigration process associated with a catalytic super-Brownian motion is studied. A large number law is proved in dimension d≤3 and a central limit theorem is proved for dimension d=3.

  1. Immigration process in catalytic medium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    洪文明; 王梓坤

    2000-01-01

    The longtime behavior of the immigration process associated with a catalytic super-Brown-ian motion is studied. A large number law is proved in dimension d≤3 and a central limit theorem is proved for dimension d = 3.

  2. Studies on catalytic reduction of nitrate in groundwater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG Bing; ZHU Yanfang; JIN Zhaohui; LI Tielong; KANG Haiyan; WANG Shuaima

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic reduction of nitrate in groundwater by sodium formate over the catalyst was investigated.Pd-Cu/γ-Al2O3 catalyst was prepared by impregnation and characterized by brunauer-emmett-teller (BET),inductive coupled plasma (ICP),X-ray diffraction (XRD),transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray (EDX).It was found that total nitrogen was effectively removed from the nitrate solution (100 mg/L) and the removal efficiency was 87%.The catalytic activity was affected by pH,catalyst amount used,concentration of sodium formate,and initial concentration of nitrate.As sodium formate was used as reductant,precise control in the initial pH was needed.Excessively high or low initial pH (7.0 or 3.0) reduced catalytic activity.At initial pH of 4.5,catalytic activity was enhanced by reducing the amount of catalyst,while concentrations of sodium formate increased with a considerable decrease in N2 selectivity.In which case,catalytic reduction followed the first order kinetics.

  3. Studies on the Catalytic Activities of Cyclopalladated Ferrocenylimine in the Suzuki Reaction of Pyridylboronic Acid Derivative with Arylhalides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jin-Li; YANG Liang-Ru; ZHAO Liang; GUI Xiu-Ling; GONG Jun-Fang; WU Yang-Jie

    2003-01-01

    @@ Heterobiaryls have important biologicalproperties. [1] The use of catalytic cross-coupling methodologies forpreparing aryl functionalized heterocycles with pharmaceutical, agrochemical, materials, and supermolecular appli-cations is a burgeoning field of study. [2

  4. Coupled transfers; Transferts couples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicolas, X.; Lauriat, G.; Jimenez-Rondan, J. [Universite de Marne-la-Vallee, Lab. d' Etudes des Transferts d' Energie et de Matiere (LETEM), 77 (France); Bouali, H.; Mezrhab, A. [Faculte des Sciences, Dept. de Physique, Lab. de Mecanique et Energetique, Oujda (Morocco); Abid, C. [Ecole Polytechnique Universitaire de Marseille, IUSTI UMR 6595, 13 Marseille (France); Stoian, M.; Rebay, M.; Lachi, M.; Padet, J. [Faculte des Sciences, Lab. de Thermomecanique, UTAP, 51 - Reims (France); Mladin, E.C. [Universitaire Polytechnique Bucarest, Faculte de Genie Mecanique, Bucarest (Romania); Mezrhab, A. [Faculte des Sciences, Lab. de Mecanique et Energetique, Dept. de Physique, Oujda (Morocco); Abid, C.; Papini, F. [Ecole Polytechnique, IUSTI, 13 - Marseille (France); Lorrette, C.; Goyheneche, J.M.; Boechat, C.; Pailler, R. [Laboratoire des Composites ThermoStructuraux, UMR 5801, 33 - Pessac (France); Ben Salah, M.; Askri, F.; Jemni, A.; Ben Nasrallah, S. [Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Monastir, Lab. d' Etudes des Systemes Thermiques et Energetiques (Tunisia); Grine, A.; Desmons, J.Y.; Harmand, S. [Laboratoire de Mecanique et d' Energetique, 59 - Valenciennes (France); Radenac, E.; Gressier, J.; Millan, P. [ONERA, 31 - Toulouse (France); Giovannini, A. [Institut de Mecanique des Fluides de Toulouse, 31 (France)

    2005-07-01

    This session about coupled transfers gathers 30 articles dealing with: numerical study of coupled heat transfers inside an alveolar wall; natural convection/radiant heat transfer coupling inside a plugged and ventilated chimney; finite-volume modeling of the convection-conduction coupling in non-stationary regime; numerical study of the natural convection/radiant heat transfer coupling inside a partitioned cavity; modeling of the thermal conductivity of textile reinforced composites: finite element homogenization on a full periodical pattern; application of the control volume method based on non-structured finite elements to the problems of axisymmetrical radiant heat transfers in any geometries; modeling of convective transfers in transient regime on a flat plate; a conservative method for the non-stationary coupling of aero-thermal engineering codes; measurement of coupled heat transfers (forced convection/radiant transfer) inside an horizontal duct; numerical simulation of the combustion of a water-oil emulsion droplet; numerical simulation study of heat and mass transfers inside a reactor for nano-powders synthesis; reduction of a combustion and heat transfer model of a direct injection diesel engine; modeling of heat transfers inside a knocking operated spark ignition engine; heat loss inside an internal combustion engine, thermodynamical and flamelet model, composition effects of CH{sub 4}H{sub 2} mixtures; experimental study and modeling of the evolution of a flame on a solid fuel; heat transfer for laminar subsonic jet of oxygen plasma impacting an obstacle; hydrogen transport through a A-Si:H layer submitted to an hydrogen plasma: temperature effects; thermal modeling of the CO{sub 2} laser welding of a magnesium alloy; radiant heat transfer inside a 3-D environment: application of the finite volume method in association with the CK model; optimization of the infrared baking of two types of powder paints; optimization of the emission power of an infrared

  5. Silver-catalyzed coupling reactions of alkyl halides with indenyllithiums

    OpenAIRE

    Someya, Hidenori; Yorimitsu, Hideki; Oshima, Koichiro

    2010-01-01

    Coupling reactions of tertiary and secondary alkyl halides with indenyllithiums proceeded effectively in the presence of a catalytic amount of silver bromide to provide tertiary- and secondary-alkyl-substituted indene derivatives in good yields.

  6. Total Synthesis of Chiral Biaryl Natural Products by Asymmetric Biaryl Coupling

    OpenAIRE

    Kozlowski, Marisa C.; Morgan, Barbara J.; Linton, Elizabeth C.

    2009-01-01

    This tutorial review highlights the use of catalytic asymmetric 2-naphthol couplings in total synthesis. The types of chirality, chiral biaryl natural products, prior approaches to chiral biaryl natural products, and other catalytic asymmetric biaryl couplings are outlined. The three main categories of chiral catalysts for 2-naphthol coupling (Cu, V, Fe) are described with discussion of their limitations and advantages. Applications of the copper catalyzed couplings in biomimetic syntheses ar...

  7. Catalytic arylation methods from the academic lab to industrial processes

    CERN Document Server

    Burke, Anthony J

    2014-01-01

    A current view of the challenging field of catalytic arylation reactions. Clearly structured, the chapters in this one-stop resource are arranged according to the reaction type, and focus on novel, efficient and sustainable processes, rather than the well-known and established cross-coupling methods.The entire contents are written by two authors with academic and industrial expertise to ensure consistent coverage of the latest developments in the field, as well as industrial applications, such as C-H activation, iron and gold-catalyzed coupling reactions, cycloadditions or novel methodologies

  8. Advanced treatment of port cabin washing wastewater by integrated process ozonization-biological aerated filter-biological aerated filter%一体化O3-BAF—BAF组合工艺深度处理港口洗舱废水

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛启龙; 汪晓军

    2013-01-01

    采用一体化臭氧曝气生物滤池(O3-BAF)—曝气生物滤池(BAF)组合工艺对二级生化处理后的港口码头洗舱化学品废水进行深度处理,进水COD约为200~240 mg/L,色度为16~32倍时,经该工艺处理后出水COD<30mg/L,去除率>91%,色度降到4倍以下,出水水质达到《生活杂用水水质标准》(CJ/T48-1999)要求.工程运行实践表明,该深度处理系统运行稳定,处理效率高,具有良好的经济效益与环境效益.%The integrated ozonization-biological aerated filter-biological aerated filter combined process has been applied to the advanced treatment of port cabin washing wastewater after secondary biochemical treatment.When the COD of the influent is 200-240 mg/L,and chroma is 16-32 times,COD of effluent is reduced to less than 30 mg/L after treatment,the removing rate is more than 91%,and chroma is reduced to less than 4 times,reaching the specified Miscellaneous Domestic Water Quality Standard(CJ/T 48-1999).The result shows that the advanced treatment system runs stably,and has high treatment efficiency.It has great economic and environmental benefits.

  9. Catalytic distillation water recovery subsystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budininkas, P.; Rasouli, F.

    1985-01-01

    An integrated engineering breadboard subsystem for the recovery of potable water from untreated urine based on the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal was designed, fabricated and tested. Unlike other evaporative methods, this process catalytically oxidizes ammonia and volatile hydrocarbons vaporizing with water to innocuous products; therefore, no pretreatment of urine is required. Since the subsystem is fabricated from commercially available components, its volume, weight and power requirements are not optimized; however, it is suitable for zero-g operation. The testing program consists of parametric tests, one month of daily tests and a continuous test of 168 hours duration. The recovered water is clear, odorless, low in ammonia and organic carbon, and requires only an adjustment of its pH to meet potable water standards. The obtained data indicate that the vapor phase catalytic ammonia removal process, if further developed, would also be competitive with other water recovery systems in weight, volume and power requirements.

  10. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vivek V Ranade

    2014-03-01

    Catalytic reactions are ubiquitous in chemical and allied industries. A homogeneous or heterogeneous catalyst which provides an alternative route of reaction with lower activation energy and better control on selectivity can make substantial impact on process viability and economics. Extensive studies have been conducted to establish sound basis for design and engineering of reactors for practising such catalytic reactions and for realizing improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so recent) developments in engineering reactors for catalytic reactions is discussed. Some examples where performance enhancement was realized by catalyst design, appropriate choice of reactor, better injection and dispersion strategies and recent advances in process intensification/ multifunctional reactors are discussed to illustrate the approach.

  11. Catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Clausen, Bjerne;

    2007-01-01

    Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change with par......Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change...... with particle size. We find that the fraction of low-coordinated Au atoms scales approximately with the catalytic activity, suggesting that atoms on the corners and edges of Au nanoparticles are the active sites. This effect is explained using density functional calculations....

  12. Pair interaction of catalytically active colloids: from assembly to escape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharifi-Mood, Nima; Mozaffari, Ali; Córdova-Figueroa, Ubaldo M.

    2016-07-01

    The dynamics and pair trajectory of two self-propelled colloids are reported. The autonomous motions of the colloids are due to a catalytic chemical reaction taking place asymmetrically on their surfaces that generates a concentration gradient of interactive solutes around the particles and actuate particle propulsion. We consider two spherical particles with symmetric catalytic caps extending over the local polar angles $\\theta^1_{cap}$ and $\\theta^2_{cap}$ from the centers of active sectors in an otherwise quiescent fluid. A combined analytical-numerical technique was developed to solve the coupled mass transfer equation and the hydrodynamics in the Stokes flow regime. The ensuing pair trajectory of the colloids is controlled by the reacting coverages $\\theta^j_{cap}$ and their initial relative orientation with respect to each other. Our analysis indicates two possible scenarios for pair trajectories of catalytic self-propelled particles: either the particles approach, come into contact and assemble or they interact and move away from each other (escape). For arbitrary motions of the colloids, it is found that the direction of particle rotations is the key factor in determining the escape or assembly scenario. Based on the analysis, a phase diagram is sketched for the pair trajectory of the catalytically active particles as a function of active coverages and their initial relative orientations. We believe this study has important implications in elucidation of collective behaviors of auotophoretically self-propelled colloids.

  13. Catalytic properties of niobium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The catalytic activity and selectivity of niobium compounds including oxides, salts, organometallic compounds and others are outlined. The application of these compounds as catalysts to diversified reactions is reported. The nature and action of niobium catalysts are characteristic and sometimes anomalous, suggesting the necessity of basic research and the potential use as catalysts for important processes in the chemical industry. (Author)

  14. Simple, chemoselective, catalytic olefin isomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossley, Steven W M; Barabé, Francis; Shenvi, Ryan A

    2014-12-01

    Catalytic amounts of Co(Sal(tBu,tBu))Cl and organosilane irreversibly isomerize terminal alkenes by one position. The same catalysts effect cycloisomerization of dienes and retrocycloisomerization of strained rings. Strong Lewis bases like amines and imidazoles, and labile functionalities like epoxides, are tolerated.

  15. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Dickerson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic pyrolysis is a promising thermochemical conversion route for lignocellulosic biomass that produces chemicals and fuels compatible with current, petrochemical infrastructure. Catalytic modifications to pyrolysis bio-oils are geared towards the elimination and substitution of oxygen and oxygen-containing functionalities in addition to increasing the hydrogen to carbon ratio of the final products. Recent progress has focused on both hydrodeoxygenation and hydrogenation of bio-oil using a variety of metal catalysts and the production of aromatics from bio-oil using cracking zeolites. Research is currently focused on developing multi-functional catalysts used in situ that benefit from the advantages of both hydrodeoxygenation and zeolite cracking. Development of robust, highly selective catalysts will help achieve the goal of producing drop-in fuels and petrochemical commodities from wood and other lignocellulosic biomass streams. The current paper will examine these developments by means of a review of existing literature.

  16. Combined catalytic converter and afterburner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T.T.-H.

    1994-11-30

    This patent describes the combined use of a catalytic converter and afterburner. An afterburner chamber and a catalyst matrix are disposed in series within a casing. A combustible premixed charge is ignited in the afterburner chamber before it enters the catalyst matrix. This invention overcomes the problem encountered in previous designs of some of the premixed charge passing unreacted through the device unless a very long afterburner chamber is used. (UK)

  17. Thermodynamics of catalytic nanoparticle morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwolak, Michael; Sharma, Renu; Lin, Pin Ann

    Metallic nanoparticles are an important class of industrial catalysts. The variability of their properties and the environment in which they act, from their chemical nature & surface modification to their dispersion and support, allows their performance to be optimized for many chemical processes useful in, e.g., energy applications and other areas. Their large surface area to volume ratio, as well as varying sizes and faceting, in particular, makes them an efficient source for catalytically active sites. These characteristics of nanoparticles - i.e., their morphology - can often display intriguing behavior as a catalytic process progresses. We develop a thermodynamic model of nanoparticle morphology, one that captures the competition of surface energy with other interactions, to predict structural changes during catalytic processes. Comparing the model to environmental transmission electron microscope images of nickel nanoparticles during carbon nanotube (and other product) growth demonstrates that nickel deformation in response to the nanotube growth is due to a favorable interaction with carbon. Moreover, this deformation is halted due to insufficient volume of the particles. We will discuss the factors that influence morphology and also how the model can be used to extract interaction strengths from experimental observations.

  18. Synthesis of (+)-discodermolide by catalytic stereoselective borylation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiyong; Ely, Robert J; Morken, James P

    2014-09-01

    The marine natural product (+)-discodermolide was first isolated in 1990 and, to this day, remains a compelling synthesis target. Not only does the compound possess fascinating biological activity, but it also presents an opportunity to test current methods for chemical synthesis and provides an inspiration for new reaction development. A new synthesis of discodermolide employs a previously undisclosed stereoselective catalytic diene hydroboration and also establishes a strategy for the alkylation of chiral enolates. Furthermore, this synthesis of discodermolide provides the first examples of the asymmetric 1,4-diboration of dienes and borylative diene-aldehyde couplings in complex-molecule synthesis.

  19. Synthesis of (+)-Discodermolide by Catalytic Stereoselective Borylation Reactions**

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhiyong; Ely, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    The marine natural product (+)-discodermolide was first isolated in 1990 and, to this day, remains a compelling synthesis target. Not only does the compound possess fascinating biological activity, but it also presents an opportunity to test current methods for chemical synthesis and provides a forum for the inspiration of new reaction development. In this manuscript, we present a synthesis of discodermolide that employs a previously undisclosed stereoselective catalytic diene hydroboration and also establishes a strategy for chiral enolate alkylation. In addition, this synthesis of discodermolide provides the first examples of diene 1,4-diboration and borylative diene-aldehyde couplings in complex molecule synthesis. PMID:25045037

  20. Kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Boudart, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book is a critical account of the principles of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions in the light of recent developments in surface science and catalysis science. Originally published in 1984. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase acc

  1. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen, is divided into two tasks. Task 1 centers on the activation of dihydrogen by molecular basic reagents such as hydroxide ion to convert it into a reactive adduct (OH{center_dot}H{sub 2}){sup {minus}} that can reduce organic molecules. Such species should be robust withstanding severe conditions and chemical poisons. Task 2 is focused on an entirely different approach that exploits molecular catalysts, derived from organometallic compounds that are capable of reducing monocyclic aromatic compounds under very mild conditions. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  2. Computational Introduction of Catalytic Activity into Proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolani, Steve J; Carlin, Dylan Alexander; Siegel, Justin B

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there have been several successful cases of introducing catalytic activity into proteins. One method that has been used successfully to achieve this is the theozyme placement and enzyme design algorithms implemented in Rosetta Molecular Modeling Suite. Here, we illustrate how to use this software to recapitulate the placement of catalytic residues and ligand into a protein using a theozyme, protein scaffold, and catalytic constraints as input. PMID:27094294

  3. Estimating the temperature of a catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T.T.-H.

    1994-11-02

    A method is described for estimating the temperature in a catalytic converter used in the exhaust system of an internal combustion engine. Pressure sensors monitor the flow resistance across the catalytic converter to provide an indication of the temperature inside. This feedback system allows heating devices to be switched off and thus avoid overheating, while maintaining the catalytic converter's efficiency by assuring that it does not operate below its light off temperature. (UK)

  4. Estimating the temperature of a catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T.T.-H.

    1994-11-02

    A method of estimating the temperature of a catalytic converter used in the exhaust system of an internal combustion engine is described. Heated exhaust gas oxygen (HEGO) sensors are placed upstream and downstream of the catalytic converter. The temperature of the catalytic converter shortly after start-up is measured by monitoring the resistance of the HEGO sensor's heating element. The downstream sensor is used for mixture control and to double check results of the upstream sensor. (UK)

  5. Some Aspects of the Catalytic Organic Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anil; K.Saikia

    2007-01-01

    1 Results Catalytic reactions are gaining importance due to its low cost, operational simplicity, high efficiency and selectivity. It is also getting much attention in green synthesis. Many useful organic reactions, including the acylation of alcohols and aldehydes, carbon-carbon, carbon-nitrogen, carbon-sulfur bond forming and oxidation reactions are carried out by catalyst. We are exploring the catalytic acylation of alcohols and aldehydes in a simple and efficient manner. Catalytic activation of unr...

  6. Catalytic Polymer Multilayer Shell Motors for Separation of Organics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhihua; Wu, Zhiguang; Lin, Xiankun; He, Qiang

    2016-01-26

    A catalytic polymer multilayer shell motor has been developed, which effects fast motion-based separation of charged organics in water. The shell motors are fabricated by sputtering platinum onto the exposed surface of silica templates embedded in Parafilm, followed by layer-by-layer assembly of polyelectrolyte multilayers to the templates. The catalytic shell motors display high bubble propulsion with speeds of up to 260 μm s(-1) (13 body lengths per second). Moreover, the polyelectrolyte multilayers assembled at high pH (pH>9.0) adsorb approximately 89% of dye molecules from water, owing to the electrostatic interaction between the positively charged polymers and the anionic dye molecules, and subsequently release them at neutral pH in a microfluidic device. The efficient propulsion coupled with the effective adsorption behavior of the catalytic shell motors in a microfluidic device results in accelerated separation of organics in water and thus holds considerable promise for water analysis. PMID:26632275

  7. Atmospheric methanol measurement using selective catalytic methanol to formaldehyde conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Solomon

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel atmospheric methanol measurement technique, employing selective gas-phase catalytic conversion of methanol to formaldehyde followed by detection of the formaldehyde product, has been developed and tested. The effects of temperature, gas flow rate, gas composition, reactor-bed length, and reactor-bed composition on the methanol conversion efficiency of a molybdenum-rich, iron-molybdate catalyst [Mo-Fe-O] were studied. Best results were achieved using a 1:4 mixture (w/w of the catalyst in quartz sand. Optimal methanol to formaldehyde conversion (>95% efficiency occurred at a catalyst housing temperature of 345°C and an estimated sample-air/catalyst contact time of <0.2 s. Potential interferences arising from conversion of methane and a number of common volatile organic compounds (VOC to formaldehyde were found to be negligible under most atmospheric conditions and catalyst housing temperatures. Using the new technique, atmospheric measurements of methanol were made at the University of Bremen campus from 1 to 15 July 2004. Methanol mixing ratios ranged from 1 to 5 ppb with distinct maxima at night. Formaldehyde mixing ratios, obtained in conjunction with methanol by periodically bypassing the catalytic converter, ranged from 0.2 to 1.6 ppb with maxima during midday. These results suggest that selective, catalytic methanol to formaldehyde conversion, coupled with existing formaldehyde measurement instrumentation, is an inexpensive and effective means for monitoring atmospheric methanol.

  8. Atmospheric methanol measurement using selective catalytic methanol to formaldehyde conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. J. Solomon

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel atmospheric methanol measurement technique, employing selective gas-phase catalytic conversion of methanol to formaldehyde followed by detection of the formaldehyde product, has been developed and tested. The effects of temperature, gas flow rate, gas composition, reactor-bed length, and reactor-bed composition on the methanol conversion efficiency of a molybdenum-rich, iron-molybdate catalyst [Mo-Fe-O] were studied. Best results were achieved using a 1:4 mixture (w/w of the catalyst in quartz sand. Optimal methanol to formaldehyde conversion (>95% efficiency occurred at a catalyst housing temperature of 345°C and an estimated sample-air/catalyst contact time of <0.2 seconds. Potential interferences arising from conversion of methane and a number of common volatile organic compounds (VOC to formaldehyde were found to be negligible under most atmospheric conditions and catalyst housing temperatures. Using the new technique, atmospheric measurements of methanol were made at the University of Bremen campus from 1 to 15 July 2004. Methanol mixing ratios ranged from 1 to 5 ppb with distinct maxima at night. Formaldehyde mixing ratios, obtained in conjunction with methanol by periodically bypassing the catalytic converter, ranged from 0.2 to 1.6 ppb with maxima during midday. These results suggest that selective, catalytic methanol to formaldehyde conversion, coupled with existing formaldehyde measurement instrumentation, is an inexpensive and effective means for monitoring atmospheric methanol.

  9. Nanostructured Catalytic Reactors for Air Purification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase I project proposes the development of lightweight compact nanostructured catalytic reactors for air purification from toxic gaseous organic...

  10. Nanostructured Catalytic Reactors for Air Purification Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase II project proposes the development of lightweight compact nanostructured catalytic reactors for air purification from toxic gaseous organic...

  11. Catalytic reforming feed characterisation technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larraz Mora, R.; Arvelo Alvarez, R. [Univ. of La Laguna, Chemical Engineering Dept., La Laguna (Spain)

    2002-09-01

    The catalytic reforming of naphtha is one of the major refinery processes, designed to increase the octane number of naphtha or to produce aromatics. The naphtha used as catalytic reformer feedstock usually contains a mixture of paraffins, naphthenes, and aromatics in the carbon number range C{sub 6} to C{sub 10}. The detailed chemical composition of the feed is necessary to predict the aromatics and hydrogen production as well as the operation severity. The analysis of feed naphtha is usually reported in terms of its ASTM distillation curve and API or specific gravity. Since reforming reactions are described in terms of lumped chemical species (paraffins, naphthenes and aromatics), a feed characterisation technique should be useful in order to predict reforming operating conditions and detect feed quality changes. Unfortunately online analyzer applications as cromatography or recently introduced naphtha NMR [1] are scarce in most of refineries. This work proposes an algorithmic characterisation method focusing on its main steps description. The method could help on the subjects previously described, finally a calculation example is shown. (orig.)

  12. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  13. Metal hybrid nanoparticles for catalytic organic and photochemical transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hyunjoon

    2015-03-17

    In order to understand heterogeneous catalytic reactions, model catalysts such as a single crystalline surface have been widely studied for many decades. However, catalytic systems that actually advance the reactions are three-dimensional and commonly have multiple components including active metal nanoparticles and metal oxide supports. On the other hand, as nanochemistry has rapidly been developed and been applied to various fields, many researchers have begun to discuss the impact of nanochemistry on heterogeneous catalysis. Metal hybrid nanoparticles bearing multiple components are structurally very close to the actual catalysts, and their uniform and controllable morphology is suitable for investigating the relationship between the structure and the catalytic properties in detail. In this Account, we introduce four typical structures of metal hybrid nanoparticles that can be used to conduct catalytic organic and photochemical reactions. Metal@silica (or metal oxide) yolk-shell nanoparticles, in which metal cores exist in internal voids surrounded by thin silica (or metal oxide) shells, exhibited extremely high thermal and chemical stability due to the geometrical protection of the silica layers against the metal cores. The morphology of the metal cores and the pore density of the hollow shells were precisely adjusted to optimize the reaction activity and diffusion rates of the reactants. Metal@metal oxide core-shell nanoparticles and inverted structures, where the cores supported the shells serving an active surface, exhibited high activity with no diffusion barriers for the reactants and products. These nanostructures were used as effective catalysts for various organic and gas-phase reactions, including hydrogen transfer, Suzuki coupling, and steam methane reforming. In contrast to the yolk- and core-shell structures, an asymmetric arrangement of distinct domains generated acentric dumbbells and tipped rods. A large domain of each component added multiple

  14. Analysis of heterogeneous oxygen exchange and fuel oxidation on the catalytic surface of perovskite membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Hong, Jongsup

    2013-10-01

    The catalytic kinetics of oxygen surface exchange and fuel oxidation for a perovskite membrane is investigated in terms of the thermodynamic state in the immediate vicinity of or on the membrane surface. Perovskite membranes have been shown to exhibit both oxygen perm-selectivity and catalytic activity for hydrocarbon conversion. A fundamental description of their catalytic surface reactions is needed. In this study, we infer the kinetic parameters for heterogeneous oxygen surface exchange and catalytic fuel conversion reactions, based on permeation rate measurements and a spatially resolved physical model that incorporates detailed chemical kinetics and transport in the gas-phase. The conservation equations for surface and bulk species are coupled with those of the gas-phase species through the species production rates from surface reactions. It is shown that oxygen surface exchange is limited by dissociative/associative adsorption/desorption of oxygen molecules onto/from the membrane surface. On the sweep side, while the catalytic conversion of methane to methyl radical governs the overall surface reactions at high temperature, carbon monoxide oxidation on the membrane surface is dominant at low temperature. Given the sweep side conditions considered in ITM reactor experiments, gas-phase reactions also play an important role, indicating the significance of investigating both homogeneous and heterogeneous chemistry and their coupling when examining the results. We show that the local thermodynamic state at the membrane surface should be considered when constructing and examining models of oxygen permeation and heterogeneous chemistry. © 2013 Elsevier B.V.

  15. A consistent reaction scheme for the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides with ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssens, Ton V.W.; Falsig, Hanne; Lundegaard, Lars Fahl;

    2015-01-01

    For the first time, the standard and fast selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3 are described in a complete catalytic cycle, that is able to produce the correct stoichiometry, while only allowing adsorption and desorption of stable molecules. The standard SCR reaction is a coupling of the ac......For the first time, the standard and fast selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3 are described in a complete catalytic cycle, that is able to produce the correct stoichiometry, while only allowing adsorption and desorption of stable molecules. The standard SCR reaction is a coupling...... of the activation of NO by O2 with the fast SCR reaction, enabled by the release of NO2. According to the scheme, the SCR reaction can be divided in an oxidation of the catalyst by NO + O2 and a reduction by NO + NH3; these steps together constitute a complete catalytic cycle. Furthermore both NO and NH3...... spectroscopy (FTIR). A consequence of the reaction scheme is that all intermediates in fast SCR are also part of the standard SCR cycle. The calculated activation energy by density functional theory (DFT) indicates that the oxidation of an NO molecule by O2 to a bidentate nitrate ligand is rate determining...

  16. 四川什邡市某水厂臭氧-生物活性炭深度处理工艺分析%Process of Advanced Water Treatment with Ozone-Biological Activated Carbon in Shifang Water Treatment Plant in Shichuan Province of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    罗本福; 宁海燕; 杨曦

    2013-01-01

    Ozone-Biological Activated Carbon (BAC/O3 ) process design was introduced in one first bulited water treatmen plant in Shifang Shichuan China.This paper discussed the experience and measures for O 3/BAC technology project.If the thecholgy for separa-ting oxygen from air was provided in project location , when the ozone consumption Q o3≤60 kgo3/h , purchase of liquid oxygen as the raw material would be more economical , when Qo3 >60 kgo3/h, adopting the separated oxygen from air whould be better .In pre-ozona-tion reactor, O3 charging quantity Q had more effect on the ozone oxidation effect than contact time T ,but if the raw water needed to kill alga, adviced T≥5 min;In post-ozonation reactor,usually divided into three phases , the best dosing ratio was 4∶3∶3,and the CT value (CT≥4 min・ mg/L) had representation meaning to kill “two bug”.The key indicators value of the Activated carbon adsorption and structure properties were introduced:iodine value was 900 mg・ g-1 , and JiaLan value was 150 mg・ g-1 , or specific surface area of 1000 1000 m 2・ g-1 , total pore volume was 0.6 cc・ g-1 , etc.; The light seal cover should be bulited above carbon filter , 500 mm sand was added under the carbon layer and design filter speed should be reduced to ensure safety operation and reduce the risk of mi -crobial penetration filter layer.%  对四川什邡市某水厂臭氧-生物活性炭(O3/BAC)深度处理工艺进行分析,阐述了O3/BAC工艺的工程经验和措施,具体工艺方案为:在有空气分离制氧企业的城市,当臭氧耗量Q≤60 kgO3/h时选择外购液氧,反之可考虑现场空气分离制氧;预臭氧氧化效果与O3加注量Q的相关性大于接触时间T的影响,若原水需杀藻,T建议≥5 min;主臭氧接触池三段式最佳投加比例为4∶3∶3,控制CT值(CT≥4 min・ mg/L)对杀灭“两虫”有表征意义;活性炭吸附与结构性能的关键指标建议值为:碘值≥900

  17. Catalytic and non-catalytic wet air oxidation of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate: kinetics and biodegradability enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Ojeda, María Eugenia; Kim, Jungkwon; Carrera, Julián; Metcalfe, Ian S; Font, Josep

    2007-06-18

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) were investigated as suitable precursors for the biological treatment of industrial wastewater containing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Two hours WAO semi-batch experiments were conducted at 15 bar of oxygen partial pressure (P(O2)) and at 180, 200 and 220 degrees C. It was found that the highest temperature provides appreciable total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement of about 42 and 47%, correspondingly. Based on the main identified intermediates (acetic acid and sulfobenzoic acid) a reaction pathway for DBS and a kinetic model in WAO were proposed. In the case of CWAO experiments, seventy-two hours tests were done in a fixed bed reactor in continuous trickle flow regime, using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst. The temperature and P(O2) were 140-160 degrees C and 2-9 bar, respectively. The influence of the operating conditions on the DBS oxidation, the occurrence of oxidative coupling reactions over the AC, and the catalytic activity (in terms of substrate removal) were established. The results show that the AC without any supported active metal behaves bi-functional as adsorbent and catalyst, giving TOC conversions up to 52% at 160 degrees C and 2 bar of P(O2), which were comparable to those obtained in WAO experiments. Respirometric tests were completed before and after CWAO and to the main intermediates identified through the WAO and CWAO oxidation route. Then, the readily biodegradable COD (COD(RB)) of the CWAO and WAO effluents were found. Taking into account these results it was possible to compare whether or not the CWAO or WAO effluents were suitable for a conventional activated sludge plant inoculated with non adapted culture. PMID:17363148

  18. Catalytic and non-catalytic wet air oxidation of sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate: Kinetics and biodegradability enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wet air oxidation (WAO) and catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) were investigated as suitable precursors for the biological treatment of industrial wastewater containing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (DBS). Two hours WAO semi-batch experiments were conducted at 15bar of oxygen partial pressure (PO2) and at 180, 200 and 220deg. C. It was found that the highest temperature provides appreciable total organic carbon (TOC) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement of about 42 and 47%, correspondingly. Based on the main identified intermediates (acetic acid and sulfobenzoic acid) a reaction pathway for DBS and a kinetic model in WAO were proposed. In the case of CWAO experiments, seventy-two hours tests were done in a fixed bed reactor in continuous trickle flow regime, using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst. The temperature and PO2 were 140-160deg. C and 2-9bar, respectively. The influence of the operating conditions on the DBS oxidation, the occurrence of oxidative coupling reactions over the AC, and the catalytic activity (in terms of substrate removal) were established. The results show that the AC without any supported active metal behaves bi-functional as adsorbent and catalyst, giving TOC conversions up to 52% at 160deg. C and 2 bar of PO2, which were comparable to those obtained in WAO experiments. Respirometric tests were completed before and after CWAO and to the main intermediates identified through the WAO and CWAO oxidation route. Then, the readily biodegradable COD (CODRB) of the CWAO and WAO effluents were found. Taking into account these results it was possible to compare whether or not the CWAO or WAO effluents were suitable for a conventional activated sludge plant inoculated with non adapted culture

  19. Acoustics of automotive catalytic converter assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickey, Nolan S.; Selamet, Ahmet; Parks, Steve J.; Tallio, Kevin V.; Miazgowicz, Keith D.; Radavich, Paul M.

    2003-10-01

    In an automotive exhaust system, the purpose of the catalytic converter is to reduce pollutant emissions. However, catalytic converters also affect the engine and exhaust system breathing characteristics; they increase backpressure, affect exhaust system acoustic characteristics, and contribute to exhaust manifold tuning. Thus, radiated sound models should include catalytic converters since they can affect both the source characteristics and the exhaust system acoustic behavior. A typical catalytic converter assembly employs a ceramic substrate to carry the catalytically active noble metals. The substrate has numerous parallel tubes and is mounted in a housing with swelling mat or wire mesh around its periphery. Seals at the ends of the substrate can be used to help force flow through the substrate and/or protect the mat material. Typically, catalytic converter studies only consider sound propagation in the small capillary tubes of the substrate. Investigations of the acoustic characteristics of entire catalytic converter assemblies (housing, substrate, seals, and mat) do not appear to be available. This work experimentally investigates the acoustic behavior of catalytic converter assemblies and the contributions of the separate components to sound attenuation. Experimental findings are interpreted with respect to available techniques for modeling sound propagation in ceramic substrates.

  20. Understanding catalytic biomass conversion through data mining

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.J. Ras; B. McKay; G. Rothenberg

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic conversion of biomass is a key challenge that we chemists face in the twenty-first century. Worldwide, research is conducted into obtaining bulk chemicals, polymers and fuels. Our project centres on glucose valorisation via furfural derivatives using catalytic hydrogenation. We present her

  1. Optical coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bock, J J [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Gundersen, J [Department of Physics, University of Miami, Coral Gables, FL 33146 (United States); Lee, A T [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley CA 94720 Physics Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley CA 94720 (United States); Richards, P L [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley CA 94720 (United States); Wollack, E, E-mail: James.Bock@jpl.nasa.go, E-mail: gunder@physics.miami.ed, E-mail: Adrian.Lee@berkeley.ed, E-mail: Richards@cosmology.berkeley.ed, E-mail: Edward.j.wollack@nasa.go [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2009-03-01

    This paper describes contributions to the CMBpol Technology Study Workshop concerning optical coupling structures. These are structures in or near the focal plane which convert the free space wave to a superconducting microstrip on a SI wafer, or to the waveguide input to a HEMT receiver. In addition to an introduction and conclusions by the editor, this paper includes independent contributions by Bock on 'Planar Antenna-Coupled Bolometers for CMB Polarimetry', by Gunderson and Wollack on 'Millimeter-Wave Platlet Feeds', and by Lee on 'Multi-band Dual-Polarization Lens-coupled Planar Antennas for Bolometric CMB polarimetry.'

  2. Silver nanocluster catalytic microreactors for water purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Silva, B.; Habibi, M.; Ognier, S.; Schelcher, G.; Mostafavi-Amjad, J.; Khalesifard, H. R. M.; Tatoulian, M.; Bonn, D.

    2016-07-01

    A new method for the elaboration of a novel type of catalytic microsystem with a high specific area catalyst is developed. A silver nanocluster catalytic microreactor was elaborated by doping a soda-lime glass with a silver salt. By applying a high power laser beam to the glass, silver nanoclusters are obtained at one of the surfaces which were characterized by BET measurements and AFM. A microfluidic chip was obtained by sealing the silver coated glass with a NOA 81 microchannel. The catalytic activity of the silver nanoclusters was then tested for the efficiency of water purification by using catalytic ozonation to oxidize an organic pollutant. The silver nanoclusters were found to be very stable in the microreactor and efficiently oxidized the pollutant, in spite of the very short residence times in the microchannel. This opens the way to study catalytic reactions in microchannels without the need of introducing the catalyst as a powder or manufacturing complex packed bed microreactors.

  3. Computer-aided modeling framework – a generic modeling template for catalytic membrane fixed bed reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fedorova, Marina; Sin, Gürkan; Gani, Rafiqul

    2013-01-01

    This work focuses on development of computer-aided modeling framework. The framework is a knowledge-based system that is built on a generic modeling language and structured based on workflows for different general modeling tasks. The overall objective of this work is to support the model develope...... catalytic membrane fixed bed models is developed. The application of the modeling template is highlighted with a case study related to the modeling of a catalytic membrane reactor coupling dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene with hydrogenation of nitrobenzene....

  4. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  5. Non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.; Kurek, Harry

    2015-12-22

    A non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot flue gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is embedded in the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot flue gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, extended surfaces of metal material such as stainless steel or metal alloy that are high in nickel content are included within at least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path.

  6. Catalytic Graphitization of Phenolic Resin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mu Zhao; Huaihe Song

    2011-01-01

    The catalytic graphitization of thermal plastic phenolic-formaldehyde resin with the aid of ferric nitrate (FN) was studied in detail. The morphologies and structural features of the products including onion-like carbon nanoparticles and bamboo-shaped carbon nanotubes were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy measurements. It was found that with the changes of loading content of FN and residence time at 1000℃, the products exhibited various morphologies. The TEM images showed that bamboo-shaped carbon nanotube consisted of tens of bamboo sticks and onion-like carbon nanoparticle was made up of quasi-spherically concentrically closed carbon nanocages.

  7. Nonadiabatic Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryachko, Eugene S.

    The general features of the nonadiabatic coupling and its relation to molecular properties are surveyed. Some consequences of the [`]equation of motion', formally expressing a [`]smoothness' of a given molecular property within the diabatic basis, are demonstrated. A particular emphasis is made on the relation between a [`]smoothness' of the electronic dipole moment and the generalized Mulliken-Hush formula for the diabatic electronic coupling.

  8. Revolutionary systems for catalytic combustion and diesel catalytic particulate traps.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuecker, John Nicholas; Witze, Peter O.; Ferrizz, Robert Matthew; Cesarano, Joseph, III; Miller, James Edward

    2004-12-01

    This report is a summary of an LDRD project completed for the development of materials and structures conducive to advancing the state of the art for catalyst supports and diesel particulate traps. An ancillary development for bio-medical bone scaffolding was also realized. Traditionally, a low-pressure drop catalyst support, such as a ceramic honeycomb monolith, is used for catalytic reactions that require high flow rates of gases at high-temperatures. A drawback to the traditional honeycomb monoliths under these operating conditions is poor mass transfer to the catalyst surface in the straight-through channels. ''Robocasting'' is a unique process developed at Sandia National Laboratories that can be used to manufacture ceramic monoliths with alternative 3-dimensional geometries, providing tortuous pathways to increase mass transfer while maintaining low-pressure drops. These alternative 3-dimensional geometries may also provide a foundation for the development of self-regenerating supports capable of trapping and combusting soot particles from a diesel engine exhaust stream. This report describes the structures developed and characterizes the improved catalytic performance that can result. The results show that, relative to honeycomb monolith supports, considerable improvement in mass transfer efficiency is observed for robocast samples synthesized using an FCC-like geometry of alternating rods. Also, there is clearly a trade-off between enhanced mass transfer and increased pressure drop, which can be optimized depending on the particular demands of a given application. Practical applications include the combustion of natural gas for power generation, production of syngas, and hydrogen reforming reactions. The robocast lattice structures also show practicality for diesel particulate trapping. Preliminary results for trapping efficiency are reported as well as the development of electrically resistive lattices that can regenerate the structure

  9. Stable solutions for a catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrne, H.; Norbury, J. (Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom). Mathematical Inst.)

    1994-06-01

    A coupled system of partial differential equations that describes the evolution of solid and gas temperatures and gas concentration inside a catalytic converter is derived and examined. The use of a reaction term, which is a discontinuous function of the solid temperature and gas concentration, implies that two types of nontrivial solutions may occur. These are characterized by the manner in which the reaction switches off: either the solid temperature becomes too low (U-solutions) or the gaseous concentration is exhausted (G-solutions). This reaction term differs from the usual combustion term because the reaction is modeled as two-stage, with the large activation-energy limit then justifying the step-function approach adopted. First, steady solutions for which the gas and solid are in thermal equilibrium are studied, and a constraint relating the system's parameters is derived as a necessary condition for the existence of such solutions. Explicit solutions are presented for a particular class of reaction rates, with a linear stability analysis of one case indicating that G-solutions are stable while U-solutions are not. Steady solutions for which the solid and gas are no longer in thermal equilibrium are then considered. For a particular asymptotic limit (and choice of the reaction term), the construction of asymptotic power series expansions shows that the gas temperature exceeds the solid temperature at all points inside the converter. The analysis indicates that separate treatment of the solid and gaseous temperatures has no effect on the qualitative nature of the steady solutions, that is, their existence, stability, and parameter dependence.

  10. The Multiple Facets of Iodine(III) Compounds in an Unprecedented Catalytic Auto-amination for Chiral Amine Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buendia, Julien; Grelier, Gwendal; Darses, Benjamin; Jarvis, Amanda G; Taran, Frédéric; Dauban, Philippe

    2016-06-20

    Iodine(III) reagents are used in catalytic one-pot reactions, first as both oxidants and substrates, then as cross-coupling partners, to afford chiral polyfunctionalized amines. The strategy relies on an initial catalytic auto C(sp(3) )-H amination of the iodine(III) oxidant, which delivers an amine-derived iodine(I) product that is subsequently used in palladium-catalyzed cross-couplings to afford a variety of useful building blocks with high yields and excellent stereoselectivities. This study demonstrates the concept of self-amination of the hypervalent iodine reagents, which increases the value of the aryl moiety. PMID:27158802

  11. Development of Catalytic Cooking Plates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjelm, Anna-Karin; Silversand, Fredrik [CATATOR AB, Lund (Sweden); Tena, Emmanuel; Berger, Marc [Gaz de France (France)

    2004-04-01

    Gas catalytic combustion for gas stoves or cooking plates (closed catalytic burner system with ceramic plates) is a very promising technique in terms of ease of cleaning, power modulation and emissions. Previous investigations show that wire mesh catalysts, prepared and supplied by Catator AB (CAT), seem to be very well suited for such applications. Beside significantly reducing the NOx-emissions, these catalysts offer important advantages such as good design flexibility, low pressure drop and high heat transfer capacity, where the latter leads to a quick thermal response. Prior to this project, Gaz de France (GdF) made a series of measurements with CAT's wire mesh catalysts in their gas cooking plates and compared the measured performance with similar results obtained with theirs cordierite monolith catalysts. Compared to the monolith catalyst, the wire mesh catalyst was found to enable very promising results with respect to both emission levels (<10 mg NO{sub x} /kWh, <5 mg CO/kWh) and life-time (>8000 h vs. 700 h at 200 kW/m{sup 2}). It was however established that the radiation and hence, the thermal efficiency of the cooking plate, was significantly less than is usually measured in combination with the monolith (15 % vs. 32 %). It was believed that the latter could be improved by developing new burner designs based on CAT's wire mesh concept. As a consequence, a collaboration project between GdF, CAT and the Swedish Gas Technology AB was created. This study reports on the design, the construction and the evaluation of new catalytic burners, based on CAT's wire mesh catalysts, used for the combustion of natural gas in gas cooking stoves. The evaluation of the burners was performed with respect to key factors such as thermal efficiency, emission quality and pressure drop, etc, by the use of theoretical simulations and experimental tests. Impacts of parameters such as the the wire mesh number, the wire mesh structure (planar or folded), the

  12. A catalytic approach to estimate the redox potential of heme-peroxidases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The redox potential of heme-peroxidases varies according to a combination of structural components within the active site and its vicinities. For each peroxidase, this redox potential imposes a thermodynamic threshold to the range of oxidizable substrates. However, the instability of enzymatic intermediates during the catalytic cycle precludes the use of direct voltammetry to measure the redox potential of most peroxidases. Here we describe a novel approach to estimate the redox potential of peroxidases, which directly depends on the catalytic performance of the activated enzyme. Selected p-substituted phenols are used as substrates for the estimations. The results obtained with this catalytic approach correlate well with the oxidative capacity predicted by the redox potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple

  13. Catalytic reaction in confined flow channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hassel, Bart A.

    2016-03-29

    A chemical reactor comprises a flow channel, a source, and a destination. The flow channel is configured to house at least one catalytic reaction converting at least a portion of a first nanofluid entering the channel into a second nanofluid exiting the channel. The flow channel includes at least one turbulating flow channel element disposed axially along at least a portion of the flow channel. A plurality of catalytic nanoparticles is dispersed in the first nanofluid and configured to catalytically react the at least one first chemical reactant into the at least one second chemical reaction product in the flow channel.

  14. Prosthesis coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reswick, J. B.; Mooney, V.; Bright, C. W.; Owens, L. J. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A coupling for use in an apparatus for connecting a prosthesis to the bone of a stump of an amputated limb is described which permits a bio-compatible carbon sleeve forming a part of the prosthesis connector to float so as to prevent disturbing the skin seal around the carbon sleeve. The coupling includes a flexible member interposed between a socket that is inserted within an intermedullary cavity of the bone and the sleeve. A lock pin is carried by the prosthesis and has a stem portion which is adapted to be coaxially disposed and slideably within the tubular female socket for securing the prosthesis to the stump. The skin around the percutaneous carbon sleeve is able to move as a result of the flexing coupling so as to reduce stresses caused by changes in the stump shape and/or movement between the bone and the flesh portion of the stump.

  15. Entrepreneurial Couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Michael S.; Van Praag, Mirjam; Thompson, Peter

    We study possible motivations for co-entrepenurial couples to start up a joint firm, using a sample of 1,069 Danish couples that established a joint enterprise between 2001 and 2010. We compare their pre-entry characteristics, firm performance and postdissolution private and financial outcomes with......, are larger in co-entrepreneurial firms, both during the life of the business and post-dissolution. The start-up of co-entrepreneurial firms seems therefore a sound investment in the human capital of both spouses as well as in the reduction of income inequality in the household. We find no evidence of...

  16. Entrepreneurial Couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Michael S.; Van Praag, Mirjam; Thompson, Peter

    We study possible motivations for co-entrepenurial couples to start up a joint firm, us-ing a sample of 1,069 Danish couples that established a joint enterprise between 2001 and 2010. We compare their pre-entry characteristics, firm performance and post-dissolution private and financial outcomes...... female, are larger in co-entrepreneurial firms, both during the life of the business and post-dissolution. The start-up of co-entrepreneurial firms seems therefore a sound in-vestment in the human capital of both spouses as well as in the reduction of income inequality in the household. We find no...

  17. Entrepreneurial Couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    We study possible motivations for co-entreprenurial couples to start up a joint firm, using a sample of 1,069 Danish couples that established a joint enterprise between 2001 and 2010. We compare their pre-entry characteristics, firm performance and post-dissolution private and financial outcomes......, are larger in co-entrepreneurial firms, both during the life of the business and post-dissolution. The start-up of co-entrepreneurial firms seems therefore a sound investment in the human capital of both spouses as well as in the reduction of income inequality in the household. We find no evidence of non...

  18. Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO)

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

  19. Catalytic Chemistry on Oxide Nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asthagiri, Aravind; Dixon, David A.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.; Rodriquez, Jose A.; Rousseau, Roger J.; Stacchiola, Dario; Weaver, Jason F.

    2016-05-29

    Metal oxides represent one of the most important and widely employed materials in catalysis. Extreme variability of their chemistry provides a unique opportunity to tune their properties and to utilize them for the design of highly active and selective catalysts. For bulk oxides, this can be achieved by varying their stoichiometry, phase, exposed surface facets, defect, dopant densities and numerous other ways. Further, distinct properties from those of bulk oxides can be attained by restricting the oxide dimensionality and preparing them in the form of ultrathin films and nanoclusters as discussed throughout this book. In this chapter we focus on demonstrating such unique catalytic properties brought by the oxide nanoscaling. In the highlighted studies planar models are carefully designed to achieve minimal dispersion of structural motifs and to attain detailed mechanistic understanding of targeted chemical transformations. Detailed level of morphological and structural characterization necessary to achieve this goal is accomplished by employing both high-resolution imaging via scanning probe methods and ensemble-averaged surface sensitive spectroscopic methods. Three prototypical examples illustrating different properties of nanoscaled oxides in different classes of reactions are selected.

  20. Halogen Chemistry on Catalytic Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Maximilian; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Halogens are key building blocks for the manufacture of high-value products such as chemicals, plastics, and pharmaceuticals. The catalytic oxidation of HCl and HBr is an attractive route to recover chlorine and bromine in order to ensure the sustainability of the production processes. Very few materials withstand the high corrosiveness and the strong exothermicity of the reactions and among them RuO2 and CeO2-based catalysts have been successfully applied in HCl oxidation. The search for efficient systems for HBr oxidation was initiated by extrapolating the results of HCl oxidation based on the chemical similarity of these reactions. Interestingly, despite its inactivity in HCl oxidation, TiO2 was found to be an outstanding HBr oxidation catalyst, which highlighted that the latter reaction is more complex than previously assumed. Herein, we discuss the results of recent comparative studies of HCl and HBr oxidation on both rutile-type (RuO2, IrO2, and TiO2) and ceria-based catalysts using a combination of advanced experimental and theoretical methods to provide deeper molecular-level understanding of the reactions. This knowledge aids the design of the next-generation catalysts for halogen recycling. PMID:27131113

  1. Catalytic models developed through social work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    The article develops the concept of catalytic processes in relation to social work with adolescents in an attempt to both reach a more nuanced understanding of social work and at the same time to develop the concept of catalytic processes in psychology. The social work is pedagogical treatment...... of adolescents placed in out-of-home care and is characterised using three situated cases as empirical data. Afterwards the concept of catalytic processes is briefly presented and then applied in an analysis of pedagogical treatment in the three cases. The result is a different conceptualisation of the social...... work with new possibilities of development of the work, but also suggestions for development of the concept of catalytic processes....

  2. Thicker is better? Synthesis and evaluation of well-defined polymer brushes with controllable catalytic loadings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Antony E; Dirani, Ali; d'Haese, Cécile; Deumer, Gladys; Guo, Weiming; Hensenne, Peter; Nahra, Fady; Laloyaux, Xavier; Haufroid, Vincent; Nysten, Bernard; Riant, Olivier; Jonas, Alain M

    2012-12-01

    Polymer brushes (PBs) have been used as supports for the immobilization of palladium complexes on silicon surfaces. The polymers were grown by surface-initiated atom-transfer radical polymerization (SI-ATRP) and postdecorated with dipyridylamine (dpa) ligands. The pendant dpa units were in turn complexed with [Pd(OAc)(2)] to afford hybrid catalytic surfaces. A series of catalytic samples of various thicknesses (ca. 20-160 nm) and associated palladium loadings (ca. 10-45 nmol  cm(-2)) were obtained by adjusting the SI-ATRP reaction time and characterized by ellipsometry, X-ray reflectivity, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). ICP-MS revealed a near-linear relationship between thickness of the polymer brush and palladium content, which confirmed the robustness of the preparation and postmodification sequence presented herein, rendering possible the creation of functional architectures with predefined catalytic potential. The activities of the catalytic PBs were determined by systematically exploring a full range of substrate-to-catalyst ratios in a model palladium(0)-catalyzed reaction. Quantitative transformations were observed for loadings down to 0.03 mol % and a maximum turnover number (TON) of around 3500 was established for the system. Comparison of the catalytic performances evidenced a singular influence of the thickness on conversions and TONs. The limited recyclability of the hairy catalysts has been attributed to palladium leaching. PMID:23032959

  3. MOBILE COMPLEX FOR CATALYTIC THERMAL WASTE TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedi V.E.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The design and purpose of the basic units of the mobile waste processing complex “MPK” are described. Experimental data of catalytic purification of exhaust gases are presented. Experimental data on catalytic clearing of final gases of a designed mobile incinerator plant are shown. It is defined, that concentrating of parasitic bridging in waste gases of the complex are considerably smaller, rather than allowed by normative documents.

  4. MOBILE COMPLEX FOR CATALYTIC THERMAL WASTE TREATMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Vedi V.E.; Rovenskii A.I.

    2012-01-01

    The design and purpose of the basic units of the mobile waste processing complex “MPK” are described. Experimental data of catalytic purification of exhaust gases are presented. Experimental data on catalytic clearing of final gases of a designed mobile incinerator plant are shown. It is defined, that concentrating of parasitic bridging in waste gases of the complex are considerably smaller, rather than allowed by normative documents.

  5. Catalytic Radical Domino Reactions in Organic Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebren, Leanne J.; Devery, James J.; Stephenson, Corey R.J.

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic radical-based domino reactions represent important advances in synthetic organic chemistry. Their development benefits synthesis by providing atom- and step-economical methods to complex molecules. Intricate combinations of radical, cationic, anionic, oxidative/reductive, and transition metal mechanistic steps result in cyclizations, additions, fragmentations, ring-expansions, and rearrangements. This Perspective summarizes recent developments in the field of catalytic domino processes. PMID:24587964

  6. Catalytic ammonia oxidation to nitrogen (I) oxide

    OpenAIRE

    MASALITINA NATALIYA YUREVNA; SAVENKOV ANATOLIY SERGEEVICH

    2015-01-01

    The process of synthesis of nitrous oxide by low-temperature catalytical oxidation of NH has been investigated for organic synthesis. The investigation has been carried out by the stage separation approach with NH oxidation occurring in several reaction zones, which characterized by different catalytic conditions. The selectivity for N₂O was 92–92,5 % at the ammonia conversion of 98–99.5 % in the optimal temperature range.

  7. Temperature Modulation of a Catalytic Gas Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Eike Brauns; Eva Morsbach; Sebastian Kunz; Marcus Baeumer; Walter Lang

    2014-01-01

    The use of catalytic gas sensors usually offers low selectivity, only based on their different sensitivities for various gases due to their different heats of reaction. Furthermore, the identification of the gas present is not possible, which leads to possible misinterpretation of the sensor signals. The use of micro-machined catalytic gas sensors offers great advantages regarding the response time, which allows advanced analysis of the sensor response. By using temperature modulation, additi...

  8. Preparation and Catalytic Oxidation Activity on 2-mercaptoethanol of a Novel Catalytic Cellulose Fibres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Yu-yuan; LI Ying-jie; CHEN Wen-xing; Lü Wang-yang; Lü Su-fang; XU Min-hong; LIU Fan

    2007-01-01

    Cobalt tetra(N-carbonylacylic) aminophthalocyanine was supported on cellulose fibres by graft reaction to obtain a novel polymer catalyst, catalytic cellulose fibres (CCF),and the optimal supporting conditions were pH = 6, 80℃,t = 120 min. The catalytic oxidation activity of CCF towards oxidation of 2-mereaptoethanol (MEA) in aqueous solution was investigated. The experimental results demonstrated that CCF had good catalytic oxidation activity on MEA at room temperature, causing no secondary pollution and remaining efficient for the repetitive tests with no obvious decrease of catalytic activity.

  9. Low efficiency deasphalting and catalytic cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a process for converting an asphaltene and metals containing heavy hydrocarbon feed to lighter, more valuable products the metals comprising Ni and V. It comprises: demetallizing the feed by deasphalting the feed in a solvent deasphalting means operating at solvent deasphalting conditions including a solvent: feed volume ratio of about 1:1 to 4:1, using a solvent selected from the group of C4 to 400 degrees F. hydrocarbons and mixtures thereof; recovering from the solvent rich fraction a demetallized oil intermediate product, having a boiling range and containing at least 10 wt.% of the asphaltenes, and 5 to 30% of the Ni and V, and at least 10 wt.% of the solvent present in the solvent rich phase produced in the deasphalting means; catalytically cracking the demetallized oil intermediate product in a catalytic cracking means operating at catalytic cracking conditions to produce a catalytically cracked product vapor fraction having a lower boiling range than the boiling range of the demetallized oil intermediate product; and fractionating the catalytically cracked product in a fractionation means to produce catalytically cracked product fractions

  10. On the Structural Context and Identification of Enzyme Catalytic Residues

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Tung Chien; Shao-Wei Huang

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes play important roles in most of the biological processes. Although only a small fraction of residues are directly involved in catalytic reactions, these catalytic residues are the most crucial parts in enzymes. The study of the fundamental and unique features of catalytic residues benefits the understanding of enzyme functions and catalytic mechanisms. In this work, we analyze the structural context of catalytic residues based on theoretical and experimental structure flexibility. The...

  11. Deep desulfurization of diesel fuels by catalytic oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Guoxian; CHEN Hui; LU Shanxiang; ZHU Zhongnan

    2007-01-01

    Reaction feed was prepared by dissolving dibenzothiophene (DBT),which was selected as a model organosulfur compound in diesel fuels,in n-octane.The oxidant was a 30 wt-% aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide.Catalytic performance of the activated carbons with saturation adsorption of DBT was investigated in the presence of formic acid.In addition,the effects of activated carbon dosage,formic acid concentration,initial concentration of hydrogen peroxide,initial concentration of DBT and reaction temperature on the oxidation of DBT were investigated.Experimental results indicated that performic acid and the hydroxyl radicals produced are coupled to oxidize DBT with a conversion ratio of 100%.Catalytic performance of the combination of activated carbon and formic acid is higher than that ofouly formic acid.The concentration of formic acid,activated carbon dosage,initial concentration of hydrogen peroxide and reaction temperature affect the oxidative removal of DBT.The higher the initial concentration of DBT in the n-octane solution,the more difficult the deep desulfurization by oxidation is.

  12. Catalytically active single-atom niobium in graphitic layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Guo, Junjie; Guan, Pengfei; Liu, Chunjing; Huang, Hao; Xue, Fanghong; Dong, Xinglong; Pennycook, Stephen J; Chisholm, Matthew F

    2013-01-01

    Carbides of groups IV through VI (Ti, V and Cr groups) have long been proposed as substitutes for noble metal-based electrocatalysts in polymer electrolyte fuel cells. However, their catalytic activity has been extremely limited because of the low density and stability of catalytically active sites. Here we report the excellent performance of a niobium-carbon structure for catalysing the cathodic oxygen reduction reaction. A large number of single niobium atoms and ultra small clusters trapped in graphitic layers are directly identified using state-of-the-art aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy. This structure not only enhances the overall conductivity for accelerating the exchange of ions and electrons, but it suppresses the chemical/thermal coarsening of the active particles. Experimental results coupled with theory calculations reveal that the single niobium atoms incorporated within the graphitic layers produce a redistribution of d-band electrons and become surprisingly active for O2 adsorption and dissociation, and also exhibit high stability. PMID:23715283

  13. Power coupling

    OpenAIRE

    D. AlesiniLNF, INFN, Frascati

    2015-01-01

    Power coupling is the subject of a huge amount of literature and material since for each particular RF structure it is necessary to design a coupler that satisfies some requirements, and several approaches are in principle possible. The choice of one coupler with respect to another depends on the particular RF design expertise. Nevertheless some 'design criteria' can be adopted and the scope of this paper is to give an overview of the basic concepts in power coupler design and techniques. We ...

  14. Oscillatory three-phase flow reactor for studies of bi-phasic catalytic reactions

    OpenAIRE

    Abolhasani, Milad; Bruno, Nicholas C.; Jensen, Klavs F.

    2015-01-01

    A multi-phase flow strategy, based on oscillatory motion of a bi-phasic slug within a fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) tubular reactor, under inert atmosphere, is designed and developed to address mixing and mass transfer limitations associated with continuous slug flow chemistry platforms for studies of bi-phasic catalytic reactions. The technique is exemplified with C–C and C–N Pd catalyzed coupling reactions.

  15. Nitrene Metathesis and Catalytic Nitrene Transfer Promoted by Niobium Bis(imido) Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegel, Benjamin M; Bergman, Robert G; Arnold, John

    2016-01-13

    We report a metathesis reaction in which a nitrene fragment from an isocyanide ligand is exchanged with a nitrene fragment of an imido ligand in a series of niobium bis(imido) complexes. One of these bis(imido) complexes also promotes nitrene transfer to catalytically generate asymmetric dialkylcarbodiimides from azides and isocyanides in a process involving the Nb(V)/Nb(III) redox couple. PMID:26698833

  16. Catalytically stabilized combustion of lean methane-air-mixtures: a numerical model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dogwiler, U.; Benz, P.; Mantharas, I. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The catalytically stabilized combustion of lean methane/air mixtures has been studied numerically under conditions closely resembling the ones prevailing in technical devices. A detailed numerical model has been developed for a laminar, stationary, 2-D channel flow with full heterogeneous and homogeneous reaction mechanisms. The computations provide direct information on the coupling between heterogeneous-homogeneous combustion and in particular on the means of homogeneous ignitions and stabilization. (author) 4 figs., 3 refs.

  17. Kinetically controlled E-selective catalytic olefin metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thach T; Koh, Ming Joo; Shen, Xiao; Romiti, Filippo; Schrock, Richard R; Hoveyda, Amir H

    2016-04-29

    A major shortcoming in olefin metathesis, a chemical process that is central to research in several branches of chemistry, is the lack of efficient methods that kinetically favor E isomers in the product distribution. Here we show that kinetically E-selective cross-metathesis reactions may be designed to generate thermodynamically disfavored alkenyl chlorides and fluorides in high yield and with exceptional stereoselectivity. With 1.0 to 5.0 mole % of a molybdenum-based catalyst, which may be delivered in the form of air- and moisture-stable paraffin pellets, reactions typically proceed to completion within 4 hours at ambient temperature. Many isomerically pure E-alkenyl chlorides, applicable to catalytic cross-coupling transformations and found in biologically active entities, thus become easily and directly accessible. Similarly, E-alkenyl fluorides can be synthesized from simpler compounds or more complex molecules. PMID:27126041

  18. CFD SIMULATION OF FLUID CATALYTIC CRACKING IN DOWNER REACTORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fei; Liu; Fei; Wei; Yu; Zheng; Yong; Jin

    2006-01-01

    A mathematical model has been developed for the simulation of gas-particle flow and fluid catalytic cracking in downer reactors. The model takes into account both cracking reaction and flow behavior through a four-lump reaction kinetics coupled with two-phase turbulent flow. The prediction results show that the relatively large change of gas velocity affects directly the axial distribution of solids velocity and void fraction, which significantly interact with the chemical reaction. Furthermore, model simulations are carried out to determine the effects of such parameters on product yields, as bed diameter, reaction temperature and the ratio of catalyst to oil, which are helpful for optimizing the yields of desired products. The model equations are coded and solved on CFX4.4.

  19. Kinetically controlled E-selective catalytic olefin metathesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thach T; Koh, Ming Joo; Shen, Xiao; Romiti, Filippo; Schrock, Richard R; Hoveyda, Amir H

    2016-04-29

    A major shortcoming in olefin metathesis, a chemical process that is central to research in several branches of chemistry, is the lack of efficient methods that kinetically favor E isomers in the product distribution. Here we show that kinetically E-selective cross-metathesis reactions may be designed to generate thermodynamically disfavored alkenyl chlorides and fluorides in high yield and with exceptional stereoselectivity. With 1.0 to 5.0 mole % of a molybdenum-based catalyst, which may be delivered in the form of air- and moisture-stable paraffin pellets, reactions typically proceed to completion within 4 hours at ambient temperature. Many isomerically pure E-alkenyl chlorides, applicable to catalytic cross-coupling transformations and found in biologically active entities, thus become easily and directly accessible. Similarly, E-alkenyl fluorides can be synthesized from simpler compounds or more complex molecules.

  20. Catalytic coal liquefaction. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, S W

    1981-01-01

    Monolith catalysts of MoO/sub 3/-CoO-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ were prepared and tested for coal liquefaction in a stirred autoclave. In general, the monolith catalysts were not as good as particulate catalysts prepared on Corning alumina supports. Measurement of O/sub 2/ chemisorption and BET surface area has been made on a series of Co/Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts obtained from PETC. The catalysts were derived from Cyanamid 1442A and had been tested for coal liquefaction in batch autoclaves and continuous flow units. MoO/sub 3/-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts over the loading range 3.9 to 14.9 wt % MoO/sub 3/ have been studied with respect to BET surface (before and after reduction), O/sub 2/ chemisorption at -78/sup 0/C, redox behavior at 500/sup 0/C, and activity for cyclohexane dehydrogenation at 500/sup 0/C. In connection with the fate of tin catalysts during coal liquefaction, calculations have been made of the relative thermodynamic stability of SnCl/sub 2/, Sn, SnO/sub 2/, and SnS in the presence of H/sub 2/, HCl, H/sub 2/S and H/sub 2/O. Ferrous sulfate dispersed in methylnaphthalene has been shown to be reduced to ferrous sulfide under typical coal hydroliquefaction conditions (1 hour, 450/sup 0/C, 1000 psi initial p/sub H/sub 2//). This suggests that ferrous sulfide may be the common catalytic ingredient when either (a) ferrous sulfate impregnated on powdered coal, or (b) finely divided iron pyrite is used as the catalyst. Old research on impregnated ferrous sulfate, impregnated ferrous halides, and pyrite is consistent with this assumption. Eight Co/Mo/Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalysts from commercial suppliers, along with SnCl/sub 2/, have been studied for the hydrotreating of 1-methylnaphthalene (1-MN) in a stirred autoclave at 450 and 500/sup 0/C.

  1. Simultaneous probing of bulk liquid phase and catalytic gas-liquid-solid interface under working conditions using attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design and performance of a reactor set-up for attenuated total reflection infrared (ATR-IR) spectroscopy suitable for simultaneous reaction monitoring of bulk liquid and catalytic solid-liquid-gas interfaces under working conditions are presented. As advancement of in situ spectroscopy an operando methodology for gas-liquid-solid reaction monitoring was developed that simultaneously combines catalytic activity and molecular level detection at the catalytically active site of the same sample. Semi-batch reactor conditions are achieved with the analytical set-up by implementing the ATR-IR flow-through cell in a recycle reactor system and integrating a specifically designed gas feeding system coupled with a bubble trap. By the use of only one spectrometer the design of the new ATR-IR reactor cell allows for simultaneous detection of the bulk liquid and the catalytic interface during the working reaction. Holding two internal reflection elements (IRE) the sample compartments of the horizontally movable cell are consecutively flushed with reaction solution and pneumatically actuated, rapid switching of the cell (<1 s) enables to quasi simultaneously follow the heterogeneously catalysed reaction at the catalytic interface on a catalyst-coated IRE and in the bulk liquid on a blank IRE. For a complex heterogeneous reaction, the asymmetric hydrogenation of 2,2,2-trifluoroacetophenone on chirally modified Pt catalyst the elucidation of catalytic activity/enantioselectivity coupled with simultaneous monitoring of the catalytic solid-liquid-gas interface is shown. Both catalytic activity and enantioselectivity are strongly dependent on the experimental conditions. The opportunity to gain improved understanding by coupling measurements of catalytic performance and spectroscopic detection is presented. In addition, the applicability of modulation excitation spectroscopy and phase-sensitive detection are demonstrated

  2. A novel liquid system of catalytic hydrogenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    On the basis that endothermic aqueous-phase reforming of oxygenated hydrocarbons for H2 production and exothermic liquid phase hydrogenation of organic compounds are carried out under extremely close conditions of temperature and pressure over the same type of catalyst, a novel liquid system of catalytic hydrogenation has been proposed, in which hydrogen produced from aqueous-phase reforming of oxygenated hydrocarbons is in situ used for liquid phase hydrogenation of organic compounds. The usage of active hydrogen generated from aqueous-phase reforming of oxygenated hydrocarbons for liquid catalytic hydrogenation of organic compounds could lead to increasing the selectivity to H2 in the aqueous-phase reforming due to the prompt removal of hydrogen on the active centers of the catalyst. Meanwhile, this novel liquid system of catalytic hydrogenation might be a potential method to improve the selectivity to the desired product in liquid phase catalytic hydrogenation of organic compounds. On the other hand, for this novel liquid system of catalytic hydrogenation, some special facilities for H2 generation, storage and transportation in traditional liquid phase hydrogenation industry process are yet not needed. Thus, it would simplify the working process of liquid phase hydrogenation and increase the energy usage and hydrogen productivity.

  3. Tubular Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Bernard J. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A system for coupling a vascular overflow graft or cannula to a heart pump. A pump pipe outlet is provided with an external tapered surface which receives the end of a compressible connula. An annular compression ring with a tapered internal bore surface is arranged about the cannula with the tapered internal surface in a facing relationship to the external tapered surface. The angle of inclination of the tapered surfaces is converging such that the spacing between the tapered surfaces decreases from one end of the external tapered surface to the other end thereby providing a clamping action of the tapered surface on a cannula which increases as a function of the length of cannula segment between the tapered surfaces. The annular compression ring is disposed within a tubular locking nut which threadedly couples to the pump and provides a compression force for urging the annular ring onto the cannula between the tapered surfaces. The nut has a threaded connection to the pump body. The threaded coupling to the pump body provides a compression force for the annular ring. The annular ring has an annular enclosure space in which excess cannula material from the compression between the tapered surfaces to "bunch up" in the space and serve as an enlarged annular ring segment to assist holding the cannula in place. The clamped cannula provides a seamless joint connection to the pump pipe outlet where the clamping force is uniformly applied to the cannula because of self alignment of the tapered surfaces. The nut can be easily disconnected to replace the pump if necessary.

  4. Catalytic nanoarchitectonics for environmentally compatible energy generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Abe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmentally compatible energy management is one of the biggest challenges of the 21st century. Low-temperature conversion of chemical to electrical energy is of particular importance to minimize the impact to the environment while sustaining the consumptive economy. In this review, we shed light on one of the most versatile energy-conversion technologies: heterogeneous catalysts. We establish the integrity of structural tailoring in heterogeneous catalysts at different scales in the context of an emerging paradigm in materials science: catalytic nanoarchitectonics. Fundamental backgrounds of energy-conversion catalysis are first provided together with a perspective through state-of-the-art energy-conversion catalysis including catalytic exhaust remediation, fuel-cell electrocatalysis and photosynthesis of solar fuels. Finally, the future evolution of catalytic nanoarchitectonics is overviewed: possible combinations of heterogeneous catalysts, organic molecules and even enzymes to realize reaction-selective, highly efficient and long-life energy conversion technologies which will meet the challenge we face.

  5. ADAR proteins: structure and catalytic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Rena A; Macbeth, Mark R; Beal, Peter A

    2012-01-01

    Since the discovery of the adenosine deaminase (ADA) acting on RNA (ADAR) family of proteins in 1988 (Bass and Weintraub, Cell 55:1089-1098, 1988) (Wagner et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 86:2647-2651, 1989), we have learned much about their structure and catalytic mechanism. However, much about these enzymes is still unknown, particularly regarding the selective recognition and processing of specific adenosines within substrate RNAs. While a crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human ADAR2 has been solved, we still lack structural data for an ADAR catalytic domain bound to RNA, and we lack any structural data for other ADARs. However, by analyzing the structural data that is available along with similarities to other deaminases, mutagenesis and other biochemical experiments, we have been able to advance the understanding of how these fascinating enzymes function. PMID:21769729

  6. Catalytic Organic Transformations Mediated by Actinide Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabell S. R. Karmel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This review article presents the development of organoactinides and actinide coordination complexes as catalysts for homogeneous organic transformations. This chapter introduces the basic principles of actinide catalysis and deals with the historic development of actinide complexes in catalytic processes. The application of organoactinides in homogeneous catalysis is exemplified in the hydroelementation reactions, such as the hydroamination, hydrosilylation, hydroalkoxylation and hydrothiolation of alkynes. Additionally, the use of actinide coordination complexes for the catalytic polymerization of α-olefins and the ring opening polymerization of cyclic esters is presented. The last part of this review article highlights novel catalytic transformations mediated by actinide compounds and gives an outlook to the further potential of this field.

  7. Highly Dense Isolated Metal Atom Catalytic Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaxin; Kasama, Takeshi; Huang, Zhiwei;

    2015-01-01

    -ray diffraction. A combination of electron microscopy images with X-ray absorption spectra demonstrated that the silver atoms were anchored on five-fold oxygen-terminated cavities on the surface of the support to form highly dense isolated metal active sites, leading to excellent reactivity in catalytic oxidation......Atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites are promising materials with which to maximise metal efficiency and to enhance catalytic performance; however, their fabrication remains challenging because metal atoms are prone to sintering, especially at a high metal...... loading. A dynamic process of formation of isolated metal atom catalytic sites on the surface of the support, which was achieved starting from silver nanoparticles by using a thermal surface-mediated diffusion method, was observed directly by using in situ electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron X...

  8. Reactivity of organic compounds in catalytic synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minachev, Kh.M.; Bragin, O.V.

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive review of 1976 Soviet research on catalysis delivered to the 1977 annual session of the USSR Academy of Science Council on Catalysis (Baku 6/16-20/77) covers hydrocarbon reactions, including hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis, dehydrogenation, olefin dimerization and disproportionation, and cyclization and dehydrocyclization (e.g., piperylene cyclization and ethylene cyclotrimerization); catalytic and physicochemical properties of zeolites, including cracking, dehydrogenation, and hydroisomerization catalytic syntheses and conversion of heterocyclic and functional hydrocarbon derivatives, including partial and total oxidation (e.g., of o-xylene to phthalic anhydride); syntheses of thiophenes from alkanes and hydrogen sulfide over certain dehydrogenation catalysts; catalytic syntheses involving carbon oxides ( e.g., the development of a new heterogeneous catalyst for hydroformylation of olefins), and of Co-MgO zeolitic catalysts for synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons from carbon dioxide and hydrogen, and fabrication of high-viscosity lubricating oils over bifunctional aluminosilicate catalysts.

  9. Catalytic microreactors for portable power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karagiannidis, Symeon [Paul Scherer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    ''Catalytic Microreactors for Portable Power Generation'' addresses a problem of high relevance and increased complexity in energy technology. This thesis outlines an investigation into catalytic and gas-phase combustion characteristics in channel-flow, platinum-coated microreactors. The emphasis of the study is on microreactor/microturbine concepts for portable power generation and the fuels of interest are methane and propane. The author carefully describes numerical and experimental techniques, providing a new insight into the complex interactions between chemical kinetics and molecular transport processes, as well as giving the first detailed report of hetero-/homogeneous chemical reaction mechanisms for catalytic propane combustion. The outcome of this work will be widely applied to the industrial design of micro- and mesoscale combustors. (orig.)

  10. Use catalytic combustion for LHV gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucci, E.R.

    1982-03-01

    This paper shows how low heating value (LHV) waste gases can be combusted to recover energy even when the gases won't burn in a normal manner. Significant energy and economic savings can result by adopting this process. Catalytic combustion is a heterogeneous surface-catalyzed air oxidation of fuel, gaseous or liquid, to generate thermal energy in a flameless mode. The catalytic combustion process is quite complex since it involves numerous catalytic surface and gas-phase chemical reactions. During low temperature surface-catalyzed combustion, as in start-up, the combustion stage is under kinetically controlled conditions. The discussion covers the following topics - combustor substrates; combustor washcoating and catalyzing; combustor operational modes (turbine or tabular modes); applications in coal gasification and in-situ gasification; waste process gases. 16 refs.

  11. Xylan-Degrading Catalytic Flagellar Nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Ágnes; Szabó, Veronika; Kovács, Mátyás; Patkó, Dániel; Tóth, Balázs; Vonderviszt, Ferenc

    2015-09-01

    Flagellin, the main component of flagellar filaments, is a protein possessing polymerization ability. In this work, a novel fusion construct of xylanase A from B. subtilis and Salmonella flagellin was created which is applicable to build xylan-degrading catalytic nanorods of high stability. The FliC-XynA chimera when overexpressed in a flagellin deficient Salmonella host strain was secreted into the culture medium by the flagellum-specific export machinery allowing easy purification. Filamentous assemblies displaying high surface density of catalytic sites were produced by ammonium sulfate-induced polymerization. FliC-XynA nanorods were resistant to proteolytic degradation and preserved their enzymatic activity for a long period of time. Furnishing enzymes with self-assembling ability to build catalytic nanorods offers a promising alternative approach to enzyme immobilization onto nanostructured synthetic scaffolds. PMID:25966869

  12. Electro Catalytic Oxidation (ECO) Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan Jones

    2011-03-31

    The power industry in the United States is faced with meeting many new regulations to reduce a number of air pollutants including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, fine particulate matter, and mercury. With over 1,000 power plants in the US, this is a daunting task. In some cases, traditional pollution control technologies such as wet scrubbers and SCRs are not feasible. Powerspan's Electro-Catalytic Oxidation, or ECO{reg_sign} process combines four pollution control devices into a single integrated system that can be installed after a power plant's particulate control device. Besides achieving major reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and mercury (Hg), ECO produces a highly marketable fertilizer, which can help offset the operating costs of the process system. Powerspan has been operating a 50-MW ECO commercial demonstration unit (CDU) at FirstEnergy Corp.'s R.E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio, since February 2004. In addition to the CDU, a test loop has been constructed beside the CDU to demonstrate higher NOx removal rates and test various scrubber packing types and wet ESP configurations. Furthermore, Powerspan has developed the ECO{reg_sign}{sub 2} technology, a regenerative process that uses a proprietary solvent to capture CO{sub 2} from flue gas. The CO{sub 2} capture takes place after the capture of NOx, SO{sub 2}, mercury, and fine particulate matter. Once the CO{sub 2} is captured, the proprietary solution is regenerated to release CO{sub 2} in a form that is ready for geological storage or beneficial use. Pilot scale testing of ECO{sub 2} began in early 2009 at FirstEnergy's Burger Plant. The ECO{sub 2} pilot unit is designed to process a 1-MW flue gas stream and produce 20 tons of CO{sub 2} per day, achieving a 90% CO{sub 2} capture rate. The ECO{sub 2} pilot program provided the opportunity to confirm process design and cost estimates, and prepare for large

  13. Mutational analysis of a ras catalytic domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, B M; Papageorge, A G; Kung, H F;

    1986-01-01

    We used linker insertion-deletion mutagenesis to study the catalytic domain of the Harvey murine sarcoma virus v-rasH transforming protein, which is closely related to the cellular rasH protein. The mutants displayed a wide range of in vitro biological activity, from those that induced focal...... transformation of NIH 3T3 cells with approximately the same efficiency as the wild-type v-rasH gene to those that failed to induce any detectable morphologic changes. Correlation of transforming activity with the location of the mutations enabled us to identify three nonoverlapping segments within the catalytic...

  14. Thermal and catalytic pyrolysis of plastic waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Almeida

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The amount of plastic waste is growing every year and with that comes an environmental concern regarding this problem. Pyrolysis as a tertiary recycling process is presented as a solution. Pyrolysis can be thermal or catalytical and can be performed under different experimental conditions. These conditions affect the type and amount of product obtained. With the pyrolysis process, products can be obtained with high added value, such as fuel oils and feedstock for new products. Zeolites can be used as catalysts in catalytic pyrolysis and influence the final products obtained.

  15. A catalytic surface for amyloid fibril formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammarstroem, P; Ali, M M; Mishra, R; Tengvall, P; Lundstroem, I [Department of Physics, Biology and Chemistry, Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden); Svensson, S [Astra Zeneca R and D, SE-151 85 Soedertaelje (Sweden)], E-mail: ingemar@ifm.liu.se

    2008-03-15

    A hydrophobic surface incubated in a solution of protein molecules (insulin monomers) was made into a catalytic surface for amyloid fibril formation by repeatedly incubate, rinse and dry the surface. The present contribution describes how this unexpected transformation occurred and its relation to rapid fibrillation of insulin solutions in contact with the surface. A tentative model of the properties of the catalytic surface is given, corroborated by ellipsometric measurements of the thickness of the organic layer on the surface and by atomic force microscopy. The surfaces used were spontaneously oxidized silicon made hydrophobic through treatment in dichlorodimethylsilane.

  16. Catalytic gasification of oil-shales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, A.; Avakyan, T. [I.M. Gubkin Russian State Univ. of Oil and Gas, Moscow (Russian Federation); Strizhakova, Yu. [Samara State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    Nowadays, the problem of complex usage of solid fossil fuels as raw materials for obtaining of motor fuels and chemical products is becoming increasingly important. A one of possible solutions of the problem is their gasification with further processing of gaseous and liquid products. In this work we have investigated the process of thermal and catalytic gasification of Baltic and Kashpir oil-shales. We have shown that, as compared with non-catalytic process, using of nickel catalyst in the reaction increases the yield of gas, as well as hydrogen content in it, and decreases the amount of liquid products. (orig.)

  17. Heterogeneous Catalytic Ozonization of Sulfosalicylic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the potential of heterogeneous catalytic ozonization of sulfo-salicylic acid (SSal). It was found that catalytic ozonization in the presence of Mn-Zr-O (a modified manganese dioxide supported on silica gel) had significantly enhanced the removal rate (72%) of total organic carbon (TOC) compared with that of ozonization alone (19%). The efficient removal rate of TOC was probably due to increasing the adsorption ability of catalyst and accelerating decomposition of ozone to produce more powerful oxidants than ozone.

  18. Palladium-Catalyzed Heck Coupling Reaction of Aryl Bromides in Aqueous Media Using Tetrahydropyrimidinium Salts as Carbene Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsmail Özdemir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available An efficient and stereoselective catalytic system for the Heck cross coupling reaction using novel 1,3-dialkyl-3,4,5,6-tetrahydropyrimidinium salts (1, LHX and Pd(OAc2 loading has been reported. The palladium complexes derived from the salts 1a-f prepared in situ exhibit good catalytic activity in the Heck coupling reaction of aryl bromides under mild conditions.

  19. Aged nano-structured platinum based catalyst: effect of chemical treatment on adsorption and catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Wang Geun; Nahm, Seung Won; Park, Hyuk Ryeol; Yun, Hyung Sun; Seo, Seong Gyu; Kim, Sang Chai

    2011-02-01

    To examine the effect of chemical treatment on the adsorption and catalytic activity of nanostructured platinum based catalyst, the aged commercial Pt/AC catalyst was pretreated with sulfuric acid (H2SO4) and a cleaning agent (Hexane). Several reliable methods such as nitrogen adsorption, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and inductively coupled plasma (ICP) were employed to characterize the aged Pt/AC catalyst and its chemically pretreated Pt/AC catalysts. The catalytic and adsorption activities of nano-structured heterogeneous Pt/AC catalyst were investigated on the basis of toluene oxidation and adsorption isotherm data. In addition, the adsorption isotherms of toluene were used to calculate the adsorption energy distribution functions for the parent catalyst and its pre-treated nano-structured Pt/AC catalysts. It was found that sulfuric acid aqueous treatment can enhance the catalytic performance of aged Pt/AC catalyst toward catalytic oxidation of toluene. It was also shown that a comparative analysis of the energy distribution functions for nano-structured Pt/AC catalysts as well as the pore size distribution provides valuable information about their structural and energetic heterogeneity.

  20. Dual-Bed Catalytic System for Direct Conversion of Methane to Liquid Hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    N.A.S.Amin; Sriraj Ammasi

    2006-01-01

    A dual-bed catalytic system is proposed for the direct conversion of methane to liquid hydrocarbons. In this system, methane is converted in the first stage to oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) products by selective catalytic oxidation with oxygen over La-supported MgO catalyst. The second bed, comprising of the HZSM-5 zeolite catalyst, is used for the oligomerization of OCM light hydrocarbon products to liquid hydrocarbons. The effects of temperature (650-800 ℃), methane to oxygen ratio (4-10), and SiO2/Al2O3 ratio of the HZSM-5 zeolite catalyst on the process are studied. At higher reaction temperatures, there is considerable dealumination of HZSM-5, and thus its catalytic performance is reduced. The acidity of HZSM-5 in the second bed is responsible for the oligomerization reaction that leads to the formation of liquid hydrocarbons. The activities of the oligomerization sites were unequivocally affected by the SiO2/Al2O3 ratio. The relation between the acidity and the activity of HZSM-5 is studied by means of TPD-NH3 techniques. The rise in oxygen concentration is not beneficial for the C5+ selectivity, where the combustion reaction of intermediate hydrocarbon products that leads to the formation of carbon oxide (CO+CO2) products is more dominant than the oligomerization reaction. The dual-bed catalytic system is highly potential for directly converting methane to liquid fuels.

  1. Silica-gel Supported V Complexes:Preparation, Characterization and Catalytic Oxidative Desulfurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎俊波; 刘习文; 曹灿灿; 郭嘉; 潘志权

    2013-01-01

    In this manuscript, a series of catalyst SGn-[VVO2-PAMAM-MSA] (SG=silica gel, PAMAM=poly-amidoamine, MSA=5-methyl salicylaldehyde, n=0, 1, 2, 3) was prepared and their structures were fully charac-terized by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelec-tron spectroscopy (XPS) and inductive coupled plasma emission spectrometer (ICP) etc. XPS revealed that the metal V and SGn-PAMAM-MSA combined more closely after the formation of Schiff base derivatives. Their cata-lytic activities for oxidation of dibenzothiophene were evaluated using tert-butyl hydroperoxide as oxidant. The results showed that the catalyst SG2.0-[VVO2-PAMAM-MSA] presented good catalytic activity and recycling time. Mean-while, the optimal condition for the catalytic oxidation of SG2.0-[VVO2-PAMAM-MSA] was also investigated, which showed that when the oxidation temperature was 90 °C, time was 60 min, the O/S was 3︰1, and the mass content of catalyst was 1%, the rate of desulfurization could reach 85.2%. Moreover, the catalyst can be recycled several times without significant decline in catalytic activity.

  2. High-pressure catalytic reactions over single-crystal metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, JoséA.; Wayne Goodman, D.

    1991-11-01

    Studies dealing with high-pressure catalytic reactions over single-crystal surfaces are reviewed. The coupling of an apparatus for the measurement of reaction kinetics at elevated pressures with an ultrahigh vacuum system for surface analysis allows detailed study of structure sensitivity, the effects of promoters and inhibitors on catalytic activity, and, in certain cases, identification of reaction intermediates by post-reaction surface analysis. Examples are provided which demonstrate the relevance of single-crystal studies for modeling the behaviour of high-surface-area supported catalysts. Studies of CO methanation and CO oxidation over single-crystal surfaces provide convincing evidence that these reactions are structure insensitive. For structure-sensitive reactions (ammonia synthesis, alkane hydrogenolysis, alkane isomerization, water-gas shift reaction, etc.) model single-crystal studies allow correlations to be established between surface structure and catalytic activity. The effects of both electronegative (S and P) and electropositive (alkali metals) impurities upon the catalytic activity of metal single crystals for ammonia synthesis, CO methanation, alkane hydrogenolysis, ethylene epoxidation and water-gas shift are discussed. The roles of "ensemble" and "ligand" effects in bimetallic catalysts are examined in light of data obtained using surfaces prepared by vapor-depositing one metal onto a crystal face of a dissimilar metal.

  3. Novel Metal Nanomaterials and Their Catalytic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqing Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the rapidly developing areas of nanotechnology, nano-scale materials as heterogeneous catalysts in the synthesis of organic molecules have gotten more and more attention. In this review, we will summarize the synthesis of several new types of noble metal nanostructures (FePt@Cu nanowires, Pt@Fe2O3 nanowires and bimetallic Pt@Ir nanocomplexes; Pt-Au heterostructures, Au-Pt bimetallic nanocomplexes and Pt/Pd bimetallic nanodendrites; Au nanowires, CuO@Ag nanowires and a series of Pd nanocatalysts and their new catalytic applications in our group, to establish heterogeneous catalytic system in “green” environments. Further study shows that these materials have a higher catalytic activity and selectivity than previously reported nanocrystal catalysts in organic reactions, or show a superior electro-catalytic activity for the oxidation of methanol. The whole process might have a great impact to resolve the energy crisis and the environmental crisis that were caused by traditional chemical engineering. Furthermore, we hope that this article will provide a reference point for the noble metal nanomaterials’ development that leads to new opportunities in nanocatalysis.

  4. Catalytic site interactions in yeast OMP synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Barr, Eric W.; Jensen, Kaj Frank;

    2014-01-01

    45 (2006) 5330-5342]. This behavior was investigated in the yeast enzyme by mutations in the conserved catalytic loop and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-diphosphate (PRPP) binding motif. Although the reaction is mechanistically sequential, the wild-type (WT) enzyme shows parallel lines in double reciprocal...

  5. Lignin Valorization using Heterogenous Catalytic Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melián Rodríguez, Mayra; Shunmugavel, Saravanamurugan; Kegnæs, Søren;

    is complex so different model compounds are often used to study lignin valorization. These model compounds contain the linkages present in lignin, simplifying catalytic analysis and present analytical challenges related to the study of the complicated lignin polymer and the plethora of products that could...

  6. Performance characterization of a hydrogen catalytic heater.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Kanouff, Michael P.

    2010-04-01

    This report describes the performance of a high efficiency, compact heater that uses the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen to provide heat to the GM Hydrogen Storage Demonstration System. The heater was designed to transfer up to 30 kW of heat from the catalytic reaction to a circulating heat transfer fluid. The fluid then transfers the heat to one or more of the four hydrogen storage modules that make up the Demonstration System to drive off the chemically bound hydrogen. The heater consists of three main parts: (1) the reactor, (2) the gas heat recuperator, and (3) oil and gas flow distribution manifolds. The reactor and recuperator are integrated, compact, finned-plate heat exchangers to maximize heat transfer efficiency and minimize mass and volume. Detailed, three-dimensional, multi-physics computational models were used to design and optimize the system. At full power the heater was able to catalytically combust a 10% hydrogen/air mixture flowing at over 80 cubic feet per minute and transfer 30 kW of heat to a 30 gallon per minute flow of oil over a temperature range from 100 C to 220 C. The total efficiency of the catalytic heater, defined as the heat transferred to the oil divided by the inlet hydrogen chemical energy, was characterized and methods for improvement were investigated.

  7. Electrochemical Promotion of Catalytic Reactions Using

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrushina, Irina; Bjerrum, Niels; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen;

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on electrochemical promotion (EP) of catalytic reactions using Pt/C/polybenzimidazole(H3PO4)/Pt/C fuel cell performed by the Energy and Materials Science Group (Technical University of Denmark) during the last 6 years[1-4]. The development of our...

  8. Toward Facilitative Mentoring and Catalytic Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Melissa K.; Lewis, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    In TESOL teacher mentoring, giving advice can be conceptualized as a continuum, ranging from directive to facilitative feedback. The goal, over time, is to lead toward the facilitative end of the continuum and specifically to catalytic interventions that encourage self-reflection and autonomous learning. This study begins by examining research on…

  9. Catalytic treatment of diesel engines, NOx emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some aspects of the operation of diesel engines are revised together with the pollutant emissions they produce, as well as the available catalytic technologies for the treatment of diesel emissions. Furthermore the performance of a catalyst developed in the environmental catalysis group for NOx reduction using synthetic gas mixtures simulating the emissions from diesel engines is presented

  10. Catalytic Converters Maintain Air Quality in Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    At Langley Research Center, engineers developed a tin-oxide based washcoat to prevent oxygen buildup in carbon dioxide lasers used to detect wind shears. Airflow Catalyst Systems Inc. of Rochester, New York, licensed the technology and then adapted the washcoat for use as a catalytic converter to treat the exhaust from diesel mining equipment.

  11. Rapid Deployment of Rich Catalytic Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard S. Tuthill

    2004-06-10

    The overall objective of this research under the Turbines Program is the deployment of fuel flexible rich catalytic combustion technology into high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbines. The resulting combustion systems will provide fuel flexibility for gas turbines to burn coal derived synthesis gas or natural gas and achieve NO{sub x} emissions of 2 ppmvd or less (at 15 percent O{sub 2}), cost effectively. This advance will signify a major step towards environmentally friendly electric power generation and coal-based energy independence for the United States. Under Phase 1 of the Program, Pratt & Whitney (P&W) performed a system integration study of rich catalytic combustion in a small high-pressure ratio industrial gas turbine with a silo combustion system that is easily scalable to a larger multi-chamber gas turbine system. An implementation plan for this technology also was studied. The principal achievement of the Phase 1 effort was the sizing of the catalytic module in a manner which allowed a single reactor (rather than multiple reactors) to be used by the combustion system, a conclusion regarding the amount of air that should be allocated to the reaction zone to achieve low emissions, definition of a combustion staging strategy to achieve low emissions, and mechanical integration of a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) combustor liner with the catalytic module.

  12. Catalytic dehydrogenations of ethylbenzene to styrene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederlof, C.

    2012-01-01

    This research work on the catalytic dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene (EB) to styrene (ST) had a primary goal of developing improved catalysts for dehydrogenation processes both in CO2 as well as with O2 that can compete with the conventional dehydrogenation process in steam. In order to achieve this

  13. Shungite carbon catalytic effect on coal treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigorieva, E.N.; Rozhkova, N.N. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Institute for High Temperature

    1999-07-01

    The catalytic ability of shungite carbon in reactions of coal organic matter models appeared to be due to its fullerene structure only. Transition metal sulphides present in shungite carbon are not active in the conditions of coal treatment. Shungite carbon was shown to exhibit an acceleration of thermolysis of coal and organic matter models, mainly dehydrogenation. 5 refs., 1 tabs.

  14. Toward a catalytic site in DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Ulla; Rohr, Katja; Vogel, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    A number of functionalized polyaza crown ether building blocks have been incorporated into DNA-conjugates as catalytic Cu(2+) binding sites. The effect of the DNA-conjugate catalyst on the stereochemical outcome of a Cu(2+)-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction will be presented....

  15. Catalytic asymmetric synthesis of mycocerosic acid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Horst, B.; Feringa, B.L.; J. Minnaard, A.

    2007-01-01

    The first catalytic asymmetric total synthesis of mycocerosic acid was achieved via the application of iterative enantioselective 1,4-addition reactions and allows for the efficient construction of 1,3-polymethyl arrays with full stereocontrol; further exemplified by the synthesis of tetramethyl-dec

  16. SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION MERCURY FIELD SAMPLING PROJECT

    Science.gov (United States)

    A lack of data still exists as to the effect of selective catalytic reduction (SCR), selective noncatalytic reduction (SNCR), and flue gas conditioning on the speciation and removal of mercury (Hg) at power plants. This project investigates the impact that SCR, SNCR, and flue gas...

  17. Final Technical Report [Development of Catalytic Alkylation and Fluoroalkylation Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vicic, David A.

    2014-05-01

    In the early stages of this DOE-funded research project, we sought to prepare and study a well-defined nickel-alkyl complex containing tridentate nitrogen donor ligands. We found that reaction of (TMEDA)NiMe2 (1) with terpyridine ligand cleanly led to the formation of (terpyridyl)NiMe (2), which we also determined to be an active alkylation catalyst. The thermal stability of 2 was unlike that seen for any of the active pybox ligands, and enabled a number of key studies on alkyl transfer reactions to be performed, providing new insights into the mechanism of nickel-mediated alkyl-alkyl cross-coupling reactions. In addition to the mechanistic studies, we showed that the terpyridyl nickel compounds can catalytically cross-couple alkyl iodides in yields up to 98% and bromides in yields up to 46 %. The yields for the bromides can be increased up to 67 % when the new palladium catalyst [(tpy’)Pd-Ph]I is used. The best route to the targeted [(tpy)NiBr] (1) was found to involve the comproportionation reaction of [(dme)NiBr{sub 2}] and [Ni(COD){sub 2}] in the presence of two equivalents of terpyridine. This reaction was driven to high yields of product formation (72 % isolated) by the precipitation of 1 from THF solvent.

  18. Catalytic Activity of Metal and Metal-Oxide Catalysts in Oxidative Coupling of CH4 with CO2 under Pulse Corona Plasma%等离子体条件下金属和金属氧化物对甲烷氧化反应的催化活性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张秀玲; 朱爱民; 刘中凡; 李学慧; 宫为民

    2003-01-01

    @@ The uses of methane, the major component in natural gas, have been investigated by many research groups throughout the world. A number of catalysts, single or binary, have been proposed for the oxidative coupling of CH4 with CO2 as the oxidant[1~6]. Binary metal-oxide catalysts, such as La2O3-ZnO and CaO-ZnO, showed higher C2 hydrocarbon selectivity (>80%) with low CH4 conversion (<6%) at high temperatures (750~850 ℃)[7~9].

  19. Cross—Coupling of Aryl Iodides with Malononitrile Catalyzed by Palladium N—Heterocyclic Carbene Complex System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高诚伟; 陶晓春; 等

    2002-01-01

    Eight N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHC),generated in situ from their imidazolium salts,as ligands of palladium complexes were used for the catalytic coupling of iodobenzene with malononi-trile anion,It was found that 1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)-imidazolium chloride (IMesHCl)-Pd2(dba)3 catalytic system has the highest activity to obtain phenyl malononitrile among the imidazolium salts.The substituted iodoarenes reacted with malononitrile anions by using the catalytic system to give cross-coupling products in yields from 50% to 96%.

  20. Cross-coupling of propargylated arabinogalactan with 2-bromothiophene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parshina, Lidiya N; Grishchenko, Lyudmila A; Larina, Lyudmila I; Novikova, Lyubov N; Trofimov, Boris A

    2016-10-01

    Novel pharmacologically prospective derivatives of arabinogalactan (a polysaccharide from larch wood) containing acetylenic and thiophene moieties have been obtained in up to 90% yield by cross-coupling of propargylic ethers of arabinogalactan with 2-bromothiophene. The reaction proceeds in the presence of the catalytic system Pd(Ph3P)4/CuBr/LiBr and piperidine in DMSO at 80-85°С. An advantageous feature of the synthesis is that it requires 5-25 times lesser catalytic loading than in common Sonogashira protocols thus making the reaction particularly beneficial to synthesize pharmaceutically-oriented polysaccharides. PMID:27312616

  1. Asymmetric Catalytic Reactions Catalyzed by Chiral Titanium Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ Chiral titanium complexes is very importance catalyst to asymmetric catalytic reactions. A series of catalytic systems based on titanium-chiral ligands complexes has been reported. This presentation will discuss some of our recent progress on asymmetric catalytic reactions catalyzed by chiral titanium complexes.

  2. Asymmetric Catalytic Reactions Catalyzed by Chiral Titanium Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FENG; XiaoMing

    2001-01-01

    Chiral titanium complexes is very importance catalyst to asymmetric catalytic reactions. A series of catalytic systems based on titanium-chiral ligands complexes has been reported. This presentation will discuss some of our recent progress on asymmetric catalytic reactions catalyzed by chiral titanium complexes.  ……

  3. Catalytic Synthesis of Oxygenates: Mechanisms, Catalysts and Controlling Characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klier, Kamil; Herman, Richard G

    2005-11-30

    This research focused on catalytic synthesis of unsymmetrical ethers as a part of a larger program involving oxygenated products in general, including alcohols, ethers, esters, carboxylic acids and their derivatives that link together environmentally compliant fuels, monomers, and high-value chemicals. The catalysts studied here were solid acids possessing strong Brnsted acid functionalities. The design of these catalysts involved anchoring the acid groups onto inorganic oxides, e.g. surface-grafted acid groups on zirconia, and a new class of mesoporous solid acids, i.e. propylsulfonic acid-derivatized SBA-15. The former catalysts consisted of a high surface concentration of sulfate groups on stable zirconia catalysts. The latter catalyst consists of high surface area, large pore propylsulfonic acid-derivatized silicas, specifically SBA-15. In both cases, the catalyst design and synthesis yielded high concentrations of acid sites in close proximity to one another. These materials have been well-characterization in terms of physical and chemical properties, as well as in regard to surface and bulk characteristics. Both types of catalysts were shown to exhibit high catalytic performance with respect to both activity and selectivity for the bifunctional coupling of alcohols to form ethers, which proceeds via an efficient SN2 reaction mechanism on the proximal acid sites. This commonality of the dual-site SN2 reaction mechanism over acid catalysts provides for maximum reaction rates and control of selectivity by reaction conditions, i.e. pressure, temperature, and reactant concentrations. This research provides the scientific groundwork for synthesis of ethers for energy applications. The synthesized environmentally acceptable ethers, in part derived from natural gas via alcohol intermediates, exhibit high cetane properties, e.g. methylisobutylether with cetane No. of 53 and dimethylether with cetane No. of 55-60, or high octane properties, e.g. diisopropylether with

  4. N-heterocyclic carbene organocatalytic reductive β,β-coupling reactions of nitroalkenes via radical intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yu; Wang, Yuhuang; Li, Xin; Shao, Yaling; Li, Guohui; Webster, Richard D; Chi, Yonggui Robin

    2014-11-01

    An unprecedented N-heterocyclic carbene catalytic reductive β,β-carbon coupling of α,β-nitroalkenes, by using an organic substrate to mimic the one-electron oxidation role of the pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) in living systems, has been developed. The reaction goes through a radical anion intermediate generated under a catalytic redox process. For the first time, the presence of radical anion intermediate in NHC organocatalysis is observed and clearly verified. PMID:25343564

  5. Reforming of methane in tubes with a catalytic active wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heterogeneous steam reforming process in tubes with catalytic active inner surface is studied. The purpose of this ivestigation is to find a method of predicting the reaction rate of the catalytic conversion of methane by steam. The dependency of the reaction rate upon the temperature, pressure, gas composition, Reynolds number, geometrical sizes of tubes and catalytic behaviour of the catalytic active inner wall of these tubes has been examined. It was found that the reaction rate mainly depends on the temperature. The reaction rate is limited by the catalytic behaviour and the heat resisting properties of the materials used. (author)

  6. Synthesis and characterization of vanadium nanoparticles on activated carbon and their catalytic activity in thiophene hydrodesulphurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, Susana [Centro de Catalisis, Petroleo y Petroquimica, Escuela de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, AP, Caracas 40679 (Venezuela); Centro de Quimica Organometalica y Macromolecular, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, AP, Caracas 47778 (Venezuela); D' Ornelas, Lindora [Centro de Quimica Organometalica y Macromolecular, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, AP, Caracas 47778 (Venezuela); Betancourt, Paulino [Centro de Catalisis, Petroleo y Petroquimica, Escuela de Quimica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Central de Venezuela, AP, Caracas 40679 (Venezuela)], E-mail: pbetanco@strix.ciens.ucv.ve

    2008-06-30

    Vanadium nanoparticles ({approx}7 nm) stabilized on activated carbon were synthesized by the reduction of VCl{sub 3}.3THF with K[BEt{sub 3}H]. This material was characterized by inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. The catalytic performance of the carbon-supported vanadium was studied using thiophene hydrodesulfurization (HDS) as model reaction at 300 deg. C and P = 1 atm. The catalytic activity of the vanadium carbide phase on the activated carbon carrier was more significant than that of the reference catalysts, alumina supported NiMoS. The method proposed for the synthesis of such a catalyst led to an excellent performance of the HDS process.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of vanadium nanoparticles on activated carbon and their catalytic activity in thiophene hydrodesulphurization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Susana; D'Ornelas, Lindora; Betancourt, Paulino

    2008-06-01

    Vanadium nanoparticles (˜7 nm) stabilized on activated carbon were synthesized by the reduction of VCl 3·3THF with K[BEt 3H]. This material was characterized by inductive coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analyses. The catalytic performance of the carbon-supported vanadium was studied using thiophene hydrodesulfurization (HDS) as model reaction at 300 °C and P = 1 atm. The catalytic activity of the vanadium carbide phase on the activated carbon carrier was more significant than that of the reference catalysts, alumina supported NiMoS. The method proposed for the synthesis of such a catalyst led to an excellent performance of the HDS process.

  8. Chiral linker-bridged bis-N-heterocyclic carbenes: design, synthesis, palladium complexes, and catalytic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dao; He, Yu; Tang, Junkai

    2016-08-01

    A series of chiral bis(benzimidazolium) salts 10-19 with (1R,2R)-cyclohexene, (1R,2R)-diphenylethylene and (aR)-binaphthylene linkers have been designed and synthesized in 30-94% yield. Ten chiral bis(NHC) palladium complexes 20-28 have been synthesized and characterized by NMR, HRMS, elemental analysis and further confirmed by X-ray single crystal analysis. These bis(NHC)-Pd complexes showed obviously different catalytic properties in the asymmetric Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reactions. The (1R,2R)-cyclohexene-bridged bis(NHC)-Pd complex, (R,R)-23, achieved the highest yield of 90%, while complex (aR)-28, with a binaphthylene linker, showed the best enantioselectivity of 60 ee%. The structural analysis of these complexes suggested that such difference of catalytic performance has a close relationship with their coordination surroundings around metal centres. PMID:27230553

  9. Synthetic and Thermodynamic Investigations of Ancillary Ligand Influence on Catalytic Organometallic Systems. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nolan, Steven

    2003-03-20

    During the grant period we have been involved in synthesizing and experimentally determining solution enthalpy values associated with partially fluorinated ligands. This has lead to the publication of manuscripts dealing with synthetic, calorimetric and catalytic behavior of partially fluorinated ligands. The collaboration with Los Alamos researchers has lead to the publication of catalytic results in sc CO{sub 2} which have proven very interesting. Furthermore, we have also examined ligands that behave as phosphine mimics. The N-heterocyclic carbenes have been explored as alternatives for tertiary phosphines and have resulted in the design and construction of efficient palladium and nickel system capable of performing C-C and C-N cross coupling reactions. The initial studies in this areas were made possible by exploratory work conducted under the DOE/EPSCoR grant.

  10. Engineering a hyper-catalytic enzyme by photo-activated conformation modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Pratul K [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Enzyme engineering for improved catalysis has wide implications. We describe a novel chemical modification of Candida antarctica lipase B that allows modulation of the enzyme conformation to promote catalysis. Computational modeling was used to identify dynamical enzyme regions that impact the catalytic mechanism. Surface loop regions located distal to active site but showing dynamical coupling to the reaction were connected by a chemical bridge between Lys136 and Pro192, containing a derivative of azobenzene. The conformational modulation of the enzyme was achieved using two sources of light that alternated the azobenzene moiety in cis and trans conformations. Computational model predicted that mechanical energy from the conformational fluctuations facilitate the reaction in the active-site. The results were consistent with predictions as the activity of the engineered enzyme was found to be enhanced with photoactivation. Preliminary estimations indicate that the engineered enzyme achieved 8-52 fold better catalytic activity than the unmodulated enzyme.

  11. Study on the Carbon-Methanation and Catalytic Activity of Ru/AC for Ammonia Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝一锋; 李小年; 季德春; 刘化章

    2004-01-01

    The effects of promoters K, Ba, Sm on the resistance to carbon-methanation and catalytic activity of ruthenium supported on active carbon (Ru/AC) for ammonia synthesis have been studied by means of TG-DTG (thermalgravity-differential thermalgravity), temperature-programmed desorption, and activity test. Promoters Ba,K, and Sm increased the activity of Ru/AC catalysts for ammonia synthesis significantly. Much higher activity can be reached for Ru/AC catalyst with bi- or tri-promoters. Indeed, the triply promoted catalyst showed the highest activity, coupled to a surprisingly high resistance to methanation. The ability of resistance of promoter to methanation of Ru/AC catalyst is dependent on the adsorption intensity of hydrogen. The strong adsorption of hydrogen would enhance methanation and impact the adsorption of nitrogen, which results in the decrease of catalytic activity.

  12. Synthesis,Characterization and Catalytic Properties of Mesoporous HPMo/SiO2 Composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Xuemin; YAN Jiabao; MEI Ping; LEI Jiaheng

    2008-01-01

    A novel mesoporous HPMo/SiO2 composite was synthesized by the sol-gel method with triblock copolymer EO20PO70EO20 as template.The properties of the product were characterized by X-ray diffraction,transmission electron microscopy,N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms,Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and inductively-coupled plasma analysis.The experimental results show that the product has a very ordered hexagonal mesostructure,and the HPMo is immobilized into the framework of silica.The final mesoporous composite shows excellent stability in polar solvents.Results of catalytic tests indicate that the composite is an effective catalyst for oxidation of dibenzothiophen,and there are few activity losses even after the third cycle of uses.The high catalytic activity and good insolubility make it a promising catalyst in oxidative desulfurization process.

  13. H2CAP - Hydrogen assisted catalytic biomass pyrolysis for green fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndal, Trine Marie Hartmann; Høj, Martin; Jensen, Peter Arendt;

    2014-01-01

    Pyrolysis of biomass produces a high yield of condensable oil at moderate temperature and low pressure.This bio-oil has adverse properties such as high oxygen and water contents, high acidity and immiscibility with fossil hydrocarbons. Catalytic hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) is a promising technology...... that can be used to upgrade the crude bio-oil to fuel-grade oil. The development of the HDO process is challenged by rapid catalyst deactivation, instability of the pyrolysis oil, poorly investigated reaction conditions and a high complexity and variability of the input oil composition. However, continuous...... catalytic hydropyrolysis coupled with downstream HDO of the pyrolysis vapors before condensation shows promise (Figure 1). A bench scale experimental setup will be constructed for the continuous conversion of solid biomass (100g /h) to low oxygen, fuel-grade bio-oil. The aim is to provide a proof...

  14. Imaging Isolated Gold Atom Catalytic Sites in Zeolite NaY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Jing; Aydin, C.; Browning, Nigel D.; Gates, Bruce C.

    2012-06-11

    Gold, the most stable metallic element, attracted wide attention as a catalyst only after the discovery that gold nanoclusters on oxide supports are highly active and selective for reactions including numerous oxidation,[1–8] hydrogenation,[9–11] hydroamination,[12, 13] ring expansion,[14, 15] and coupling[16, 17] reactions. The catalytic properties of supported gold strongly dependent on the gold–support interactions and the size of the active species, which must be small—typically clusters with diameters of the order of 1 nm.[18–20] Frequent discoveries of new gold-catalyzed reactions are leading the science; understanding has been slow to emerge.[21] Major challenges are to identify the catalytically active species and to characterize gold–support interactions.

  15. Molecular basis of the general base catalysis of an α/β-hydrolase catalytic triad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yueru; Yin, Shuhui; Feng, Yitao; Li, Jie; Zhou, Jiahai; Liu, Changdong; Zhu, Guang; Guo, Zhihong

    2014-05-30

    The serine-histidine-aspartate triad is well known for its covalent, nucleophilic catalysis in a diverse array of enzymatic transformations. Here we show that its nucleophilicity is shielded and its catalytic role is limited to being a specific general base by an open-closed conformational change in the catalysis of (1R,6R)-2-succinyl-6-hydroxy-2,4-cyclohexadiene-1-carboxylate synthase (or MenH), a typical α/β-hydrolase fold enzyme in the vitamin K biosynthetic pathway. This enzyme is found to adopt an open conformation without a functional triad in its ligand-free form and a closed conformation with a fully functional catalytic triad in the presence of its reaction product. The open-to-closed conformational transition involves movement of half of the α-helical cap domain, which causes extensive structural changes in the α/β-domain and forces the side chain of the triad histidine to adopt an energetically disfavored gauche conformation to form the functional triad. NMR analysis shows that the inactive open conformation without a triad prevails in ligand-free solution and is converted to the closed conformation with a properly formed triad by the reaction product. Mutation of the residues crucial to this open-closed transition either greatly decreases or completely eliminates the enzyme activity, supporting an important catalytic role for the structural change. These findings suggest that the open-closed conformational change tightly couples formation of the catalytic triad to substrate binding to enhance the substrate specificities and simultaneously shield the nucleophilicity of the triad, thus allowing it to expand its catalytic power beyond the nucleophilic catalysis.

  16. Method and apparatus for a catalytic firebox reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Lance L. (North Haven, CT); Etemad, Shahrokh (Trumbull, CT); Ulkarim, Hasan (Hamden, CT); Castaldi, Marco J. (Bridgeport, CT); Pfefferle, William C. (Madison, CT)

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic firebox reactor employing an exothermic catalytic reaction channel and multiple cooling conduits for creating a partially reacted fuel/oxidant mixture. An oxidation catalyst is deposited on the walls forming the boundary between the multiple cooling conduits and the exothermic catalytic reaction channel, on the side of the walls facing the exothermic catalytic reaction channel. This configuration allows the oxidation catalyst to be backside cooled by any fluid passing through the cooling conduits. The heat of reaction is added to both the fluid in the exothermic catalytic reaction channel and the fluid passing through the cooling conduits. After discharge of the fluids from the exothermic catalytic reaction channel, the fluids mix to create a single combined flow. A further innovation in the reactor incorporates geometric changes in the exothermic catalytic reaction channel to provide streamwise variation of the velocity of the fluids in the reactor.

  17. From Catalytic Reaction Networks to Protocells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2013-12-01

    In spite of recent advances, there still remains a large gape between a set of chemical reactions and a biological cell. Here we discuss several theoretical efforts to fill in the gap. The topics cover (i) slow relaxation to equilibrium due to glassy behavior in catalytic reaction networks (ii) consistency between molecule replication and cell growth, as well as energy metabolism (iii) control of a system by minority molecules in mutually catalytic system, which work as a carrier of genetic information, and leading to evolvability (iv) generation of a compartmentalized structure as a cluster of molecules centered around the minority molecule, and division of the cluster accompanied by the replication of minority molecule (v) sequential, logical process over several states from concurrent reaction dynamics, by taking advantage of discreteness in molecule number.

  18. Janus droplet as a catalytic micromotor

    CERN Document Server

    Shklyaev, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    Self-propulsion of a Janus droplet in a solution of surfactant, which reacts on a half of a drop surface, is studied theoretically. The droplet acts as a catalytic motor creating a concentration gradient, which generates its surface-tension-driven motion; the self-propulsion speed is rather high, $60\\; {\\rm \\mu m/s}$ and more. This catalytic motor has several advantages over other micromotors: simple manufacturing, easily attained neutral buoyancy. In contrast to a single-fluid droplet, which demonstrates a self-propulsion as a result of symmetry breaking instability, for Janus one no stability threshold exists; hence, the droplet radius can be scaled down to micrometers. The paper was finalized and submitted by Denis S. Goldobin after Sergey Sklyaev had sadly passed away on June 2, 2014.

  19. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molten Metal Technology was awarded a contract to demonstrate the applicability of the Catalytic Extraction Process, a proprietary process that could be applied to US DOE's inventory of low level mixed waste. This paper is a description of that technology, and included within this document are discussions of: (1) Program objectives, (2) Overall technology review, (3) Organic feed conversion to synthetic gas, (4) Metal, halogen, and transuranic recovery, (5) Demonstrations, (6) Design of the prototype facility, and (7) Results

  20. Materials for High-Temperature Catalytic Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersson, Anders

    2003-04-01

    Catalytic combustion is an environmentally friendly technique to combust fuels in e.g. gas turbines. Introducing a catalyst into the combustion chamber of a gas turbine allows combustion outside the normal flammability limits. Hence, the adiabatic flame temperature may be lowered below the threshold temperature for thermal NO{sub X} formation while maintaining a stable combustion. However, several challenges are connected to the application of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The first part of this thesis reviews the use of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The influence of the fuel has been studied and compared over different catalyst materials. The material section is divided into two parts. The first concerns bimetallic palladium catalysts. These catalysts showed a more stable activity compared to their pure palladium counterparts for methane combustion. This was verified both by using an annular reactor at ambient pressure and a pilot-scale reactor at elevated pressures and flows closely resembling the ones found in a gas turbine combustor. The second part concerns high-temperature materials, which may be used either as active or washcoat materials. A novel group of materials for catalysis, i.e. garnets, has been synthesised and tested in combustion of methane, a low-heating value gas and diesel fuel. The garnets showed some interesting abilities especially for combustion of low-heating value, LHV, gas. Two other materials were also studied, i.e. spinels and hexa aluminates, both showed very promising thermal stability and the substituted hexa aluminates also showed a good catalytic activity. Finally, deactivation of the catalyst materials was studied. In this part the sulphur poisoning of palladium, platinum and the above-mentioned complex metal oxides has been studied for combustion of a LHV gas. Platinum and surprisingly the garnet were least deactivated. Palladium was severely affected for methane combustion while the other washcoat materials were

  1. Ubiquitous "glassy" relaxation in catalytic reaction networks

    OpenAIRE

    Awazu, Akinori; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2009-01-01

    Study of reversible catalytic reaction networks is important not only as an issue for chemical thermodynamics but also for protocells. From extensive numerical simulations and theoretical analysis, slow relaxation dynamics to sustain nonequlibrium states are commonly observed. These dynamics show two types of salient behaviors that are reminiscent of glassy behavior: slow relaxation along with the logarithmic time dependence of the correlation function and the emergence of plateaus in the rel...

  2. Thermal and catalytic pyrolysis of plastic waste

    OpenAIRE

    Débora Almeida; Maria de Fátima Marques

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The amount of plastic waste is growing every year and with that comes an environmental concern regarding this problem. Pyrolysis as a tertiary recycling process is presented as a solution. Pyrolysis can be thermal or catalytical and can be performed under different experimental conditions. These conditions affect the type and amount of product obtained. With the pyrolysis process, products can be obtained with high added value, such as fuel oils and feedstock for new products. Zeolit...

  3. Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO with Methane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Gao; Qi Yu; Limin Chen

    2003-01-01

    The removal of nitrogen oxides from exhaust gases has attracted great attention in recent years, and many approaches have been developed depending on the application. Methane, the main component of natural gas, has great potential as a NO reductant. In this paper, a number of catalysts previous reported for this catalytic reduction of NO have been reviewed, including a direct comparison of the relative activities and effective factors of the catalysts. Reaction mechanisms have also been explored preliminarily.

  4. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Changjun; Wang, Huamin; Karim, Ayman M.; Sun, Junming; Wang, Yong

    2014-11-21

    Increasing energy demand, especially in the transportation sector, and soaring CO2 emissions necessitate the exploitation of renewable sources of energy. Despite the large variety of new energy Q3 carriers, liquid hydrocarbon still appears to be the most attractive and feasible form of transportation fuel taking into account the energy density, stability and existing infrastructure. Biomass is an abundant, renewable source of energy; however, utilizing it in a cost-effective way is still a substantial challenge. Lignocellulose is composed of three major biopolymers, namely cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin. Fast pyrolysis of biomass is recognized as an efficient and feasible process to selectively convert lignocellulose into a liquid fuel—bio-oil. However bio-oil from fast pyrolysis contains a large amount of oxygen, distributed in hundreds of oxygenates. These oxygenates are the cause of many negative properties, such as low heating values, high corrosiveness, high viscosity, and instability; they also greatly Q4 limit the application of bio-oil particularly as transportation fuel. Hydrocarbons derived from biomass are most attractive because of their high energy density and compatibility with the existing infrastructure. Thus, converting lignocellulose into transportation fuels via catalytic fast pyrolysis has attracted much attention. Many studies related to catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass have been published. The main challenge of this process is the development of active and stable catalysts that can deal with a large variety of decomposition intermediates from lignocellulose. This review starts with the current understanding of the chemistry in fast pyrolysis of lignocellulose and focuses on the development of catalysts in catalytic fast pyrolysis. Recent progress in the experimental studies on catalytic fast pyrolysis of biomass is also summarized with the emphasis on bio-oil yields and quality.

  5. Materials for High-Temperature Catalytic Combustion

    OpenAIRE

    Ersson, Anders

    2003-01-01

    Catalytic combustion is an environmentally friendlytechnique to combust fuels in e.g. gas turbines. Introducing acatalyst into the combustion chamber of a gas turbine allowscombustion outside the normal flammability limits. Hence, theadiabatic flame temperature may be lowered below the thresholdtemperature for thermal NOXformation while maintaining a stable combustion.However, several challenges are connected to the application ofcatalytic combustion in gas turbines. The first part of thisthe...

  6. Control of a catalytic fluid cracker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arbel, A.; Huang, Z.; Rinard, I.; Shinnar, R.

    1993-12-13

    Control offers an important tool for savings in refineries, mainly by integration of process models into on-line control. This paper is part of a research effort to better understand problems of partial control; control of a Fluid Catalytic Cracker (FCC) is used as example. Goal is to understand better the control problems of an FCC in context of model based control of a refinery, and to understand the general problem of designing partial control systems.

  7. Probing catalytic rate enhancement during intramembrane proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arutyunova, Elena; Smithers, Cameron C; Corradi, Valentina; Espiritu, Adam C; Young, Howard S; Tieleman, D Peter; Lemieux, M Joanne

    2016-09-01

    Rhomboids are ubiquitous intramembrane serine proteases involved in various signaling pathways. While the high-resolution structures of the Escherichia coli rhomboid GlpG with various inhibitors revealed an active site comprised of a serine-histidine dyad and an extensive oxyanion hole, the molecular details of rhomboid catalysis were unclear because substrates are unknown for most of the family members. Here we used the only known physiological pair of AarA rhomboid with its psTatA substrate to decipher the contribution of catalytically important residues to the reaction rate enhancement. An MD-refined homology model of AarA was used to identify residues important for catalysis. We demonstrated that the AarA active site geometry is strict and intolerant to alterations. We probed the roles of H83 and N87 oxyanion hole residues and determined that substitution of H83 either abolished AarA activity or reduced the transition state stabilization energy (ΔΔG‡) by 3.1 kcal/mol; substitution of N87 decreased ΔΔG‡ by 1.6-3.9 kcal/mol. Substitution M154, a residue conserved in most rhomboids that stabilizes the catalytic general base, to tyrosine, provided insight into the mechanism of nucleophile generation for the catalytic dyad. This study provides a quantitative evaluation of the role of several residues important for hydrolytic efficiency and oxyanion stabilization during intramembrane proteolysis. PMID:27071148

  8. Catalytic pyrolysis of olive mill wastewater sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellaoui, Hamza

    From 2008 to 2013, an average of 2,821.4 kilotons/year of olive oil were produced around the world. The waste product of the olive mill industry consists of solid residue (pomace) and wastewater (OMW). Annually, around 30 million m3 of OMW are produced in the Mediterranean area, 700,000 m3 year?1 in Tunisia alone. OMW is an aqueous effluent characterized by an offensive smell and high organic matter content, including high molecular weight phenolic compounds and long-chain fatty acids. These compounds are highly toxic to micro-organisms and plants, which makes the OMW a serious threat to the environment if not managed properly. The OMW is disposed of in open air evaporation ponds. After evaporation of most of the water, OMWS is left in the bottom of the ponds. In this thesis, the effort has been made to evaluate the catalytic pyrolysis process as a technology to valorize the OMWS. The first section of this research showed that 41.12 wt. % of the OMWS is mostly lipids, which are a good source of energy. The second section proved that catalytic pyrolysis of the OMWS over red mud and HZSM-5 can produce green diesel, and 450 °C is the optimal reaction temperature to maximize the organic yields. The last section revealed that the HSF was behind the good fuel-like properties of the OMWS catalytic oils, whereas the SR hindered the bio-oil yields and quality.

  9. Highly sensitive catalytic spectrophotometric determination of ruthenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Radhey M.; Srivastava, Abhishek; Prasad, Surendra

    2008-01-01

    A new and highly sensitive catalytic kinetic method (CKM) for the determination of ruthenium(III) has been established based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of L-phenylalanine ( L-Pheala) by KMnO 4 in highly alkaline medium. The reaction has been followed spectrophotometrically by measuring the decrease in the absorbance at 526 nm. The proposed CKM is based on the fixed time procedure under optimum reaction conditions. It relies on the linear relationship where the change in the absorbance (Δ At) versus added Ru(III) amounts in the range of 0.101-2.526 ng ml -1 is plotted. Under the optimum conditions, the sensitivity of the proposed method, i.e. the limit of detection corresponding to 5 min is 0.08 ng ml -1, and decreases with increased time of analysis. The method is featured with good accuracy and reproducibility for ruthenium(III) determination. The ruthenium(III) has also been determined in presence of several interfering and non-interfering cations, anions and polyaminocarboxylates. No foreign ions interfered in the determination ruthenium(III) up to 20-fold higher concentration of foreign ions. In addition to standard solutions analysis, this method was successfully applied for the quantitative determination of ruthenium(III) in drinking water samples. The method is highly sensitive, selective and very stable. A review of recently published catalytic spectrophotometric methods for the determination of ruthenium(III) has also been presented for comparison.

  10. Concept and progress in coupling of dehydrogenation and hydrogenation reactions through catalysts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C V Pramod; C Raghavendra; K Hari Prasad Reddy; G V Ramesh Babu; K S Rama Rao; B David Raju

    2014-03-01

    This review focuses on the importance of coupling of catalytic reactions which involves dehydrogenation and hydrogenation simultaneously and the study of catalytic materials that are designed, adopted and/or modified for these reactions. The special features of these reactions are minimization of H2 utilization and reduction in production cost. Structural and textural properties also play a decisive role in this kind of coupled reactions. This particular review although not comprehensive discusses the significant progress made in the area of coupled reactions and also helps future researchers or engineers to find out the improvements required in areas such as advancements in catalytic material preparation, design of the new reactors and the application of new technologies.

  11. Coupling coefficients for coupled-cavity lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, R.J.; Yariv, A.

    1987-03-01

    The authors derive simple, analytic formulas for the field coupling coefficients in a two-section coupled-cavity laser using a local field rate equation treatment. They show that there is a correction to the heuristic formulas based on power flow calculated by Marcuse; the correction is in agreement with numerical calculations from a coupled-mode approach.

  12. Modeling the oxidative coupling of methane:Heterogeneous chemistry coupled with 3D flow field simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yaghobi Nakisa; Ghoreishy Mir Hamid Reza

    2009-01-01

    The oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) over titanate perovskite catalyst has been developed by three-dimensional numerical simulations of flow field coupled with heat transfer as well as heterogeneous kinetic model.The reaction was assumed to take place both in the gas phase and on the catalytic surface.Kinetic rate constants were experimentally obtained using a ten step kinetic model.The simulation results agree quite well with the data of OCM experiments,which were used to investigate the effect of temperature on the selectivity and conversion obtained in the methane oxidative coupling process.The conversion of methane linearly increased with temperature and the selectivity of C2 was practically constant in the temperature range of 973-1073 K.The study shows that CFD tools make it possible to implement the heterogeneous kinetic model even for high exothermic reaction such as OCM.

  13. Turning goals into results: the power of catalytic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J

    1999-01-01

    Most executives have a big, hairy, audacious goal. They write vision statements, formalize procedures, and develop complicated incentive programs--all in pursuit of that goal. In other words, with the best of intentions, they install layers of stultifying bureaucracy. But it doesn't have to be that way. In this article, Jim Collins introduces the catalytic mechanism, a simple yet powerful managerial tool that helps translate lofty aspirations into concrete reality. Catalytic mechanisms are the crucial link between objectives and performance; they are a galvanizing, nonbureaucratic means to turn one into the other. What's the difference between catalytic mechanisms and most traditional managerial controls? Catalytic mechanisms share five characteristics. First, they produce desired results in unpredictable ways. Second, they distribute power for the benefit of the overall system, often to the discomfort of those who traditionally hold power. Third, catalytic mechanisms have teeth. Fourth, they eject "viruses"--those people who don't share the company's core values. Finally, they produce an ongoing effect. Catalytic mechanisms are just as effective for reaching individual goals as they are for corporate ones. To illustrate how catalytic mechanisms work, the author draws on examples of individuals and organizations that have relied on such mechanisms to achieve their goals. The same catalytic mechanism that works in one organization, however, will not necessarily work in another. Catalytic mechanisms must be tailored to specific goals and situations. To help readers get started, the author offers some general principles that support the process of building catalytic mechanisms effectively. PMID:10539210

  14. Heterogeneous catalytic materials solid state chemistry, surface chemistry and catalytic behaviour

    CERN Document Server

    Busca, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous Catalytic Materials discusses experimental methods and the latest developments in three areas of research: heterogeneous catalysis; surface chemistry; and the chemistry of catalysts. Catalytic materials are those solids that allow the chemical reaction to occur efficiently and cost-effectively. This book provides you with all necessary information to synthesize, characterize, and relate the properties of a catalyst to its behavior, enabling you to select the appropriate catalyst for the process and reactor system. Oxides (used both as catalysts and as supports for cata

  15. One-pot synthesis of amides by aerobic oxidative coupling of alcohols or aldehydes with amines using supported gold and base as catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kegnæs, Søren; Mielby, Jerrik Jørgen; Mentzel, Uffe Vie;

    2012-01-01

    Synthesis of amides by aerobic oxidative coupling of alcohols or aldehydes with amines via intermediate formation of methyl esters is highly efficient and selective when using a catalytic system comprised of supported gold nanoparticles and added base in methanol.......Synthesis of amides by aerobic oxidative coupling of alcohols or aldehydes with amines via intermediate formation of methyl esters is highly efficient and selective when using a catalytic system comprised of supported gold nanoparticles and added base in methanol....

  16. Selectivity, Compatibility, Downstream Functionalization, and Silver Effect in the Gold and Palladium Dual-Catalytic Synthesis of Lactones

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Amin, Mohammad; Johnson, Joel S.; Blum, Suzanne A.

    2014-01-01

    The chemo- and regioselectivity and functional group compatibility in gold and palladium cooperatively catalyzed cross-coupling reactions were determined in the synthesis of lactones; the selectivity in the gold and palladium dual-metal catalysis system was distinct from that available for the same class of substrates in systems with only gold catalysis or only palladium catalysis rather than dual catalysis. The dual-catalytic rearrangement reaction selectively promoted oxidative addition at ...

  17. Facile synthesis and excellent catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles on graphene oxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong Qiang He; Na Na Zhang; Yu Liu; Jian Ping Gao; Mao Cong Yi; Qiao Juan Gong; Hai Xia Qiu

    2012-01-01

    For the first time,Au nanoparticles on graphene oxide (GO-AuNPs) were successfully fabricated without applying any additional reductants,just by the redox reaction between AuCl4-1 and GO.Their structure was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction.The results show that flower-like AuNPs were successfully dispersed on GO surface.Importantly,they showed a high catalytic activity for the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction in an aqueous medium.

  18. Catalytic bioscavengers in nerve agent poisoning: A promising approach?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worek, Franz; Thiermann, Horst; Wille, Timo

    2016-02-26

    The repeated use of the nerve agent sarin against civilians in Syria in 2013 emphasizes the continuing threat by chemical warfare agents. Multiple studies demonstrated a limited efficacy of standard atropine-oxime treatment in nerve agent poisoning and called for the development of alternative and more effective treatment strategies. A novel approach is the use of stoichiometric or catalytic bioscavengers for detoxification of nerve agents in the systemic circulation prior to distribution into target tissues. Recent progress in the design of enzyme mutants with reversed stereo selectivity resulting in improved catalytic activity and their use in in vivo studies supports the concept of catalytic bioscavengers. Yet, further research is necessary to improve the catalytic activity, substrate spectrum and in vivo biological stability of enzyme mutants. The pros and cons of catalytic bioscavengers will be discussed in detail and future requirements for the development of catalytic bioscavengers will be proposed.

  19. Engineering Metallic Nanoparticles for Enhancing and Probing Catalytic Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Gillian; Holmes, Justin D

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments in tailoring the structural and chemical properties of colloidal metal nanoparticles (NPs) have led to significant enhancements in catalyst performance. Controllable colloidal synthesis has also allowed tailor-made NPs to serve as mechanistic probes for catalytic processes. The innovative use of colloidal NPs to gain fundamental insights into catalytic function will be highlighted across a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic applications. The engineering of future heterogenous catalysts is also moving beyond size, shape and composition considerations. Advancements in understanding structure-property relationships have enabled incorporation of complex features such as tuning surface strain to influence the behavior of catalytic NPs. Exploiting plasmonic properties and altering colloidal surface chemistry through functionalization are also emerging as important areas for rational design of catalytic NPs. This news article will highlight the key developments and challenges to the future design of catalytic NPs. PMID:26823380

  20. Fluid catalytic cracking of biomass pyrolysis vapors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mante, Ofei Daku [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Biological Systems Engineering, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Agblevor, Foster A. [Utah State University, Biological Engineering, Logan, UT (United States); McClung, Ron [BASF Inc, Florham, NJ (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Catalytic cracking of pyrolysis oils/vapors offers the opportunity of producing bio-oils which can potentially be coprocessed with petroleum feedstocks in today's oil refinery to produce transportation fuel and chemicals. Catalyst properties and process conditions are critical in producing and maximizing desired product. In our studies, catalyst matrix (kaolin) and two commercial fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts, FCC-H and FCC-L, with different Y-zeolite contents were investigated. The catalytic cracking of hybrid poplar wood was conducted in a 50-mm bench-scale bubbling fluidized-bed pyrolysis reactor at 465 C with a weight hourly space velocity of 1.5 h{sup -1}. The results showed that the yields and quality of the bio-oils was a function of the Y-zeolite content of the catalyst. The char/coke yield was highest for the higher Y-zeolite catalyst. The organic liquid yields decreased inversely with increase in zeolite content of the catalyst whereas the water and gas yields increased. Analysis of the oils by both Fourier-transform infrared and {sup 13}C-nuclear magnetic resonance indicated that the catalyst with higher zeolite content (FCC-H) was efficient in the removal of compounds like levoglucosan, carboxylic acids and the conversion of methoxylated phenols to substituted phenols and benzenediols. The cracking of pyrolysis products by kaolin suggests that the activity of the FCC catalyst on biomass pyrolysis vapors can be attributed to both Y-zeolite and matrix. The FCC-H catalyst produced much more improved oil. The oil was low in oxygen (22.67 wt.%), high in energy (29.79 MJ/kg) and relatively stable over a 12-month storage period. (orig.)

  1. Catalytic Mechanism of Human Alpha-galactosidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guce, A.; Clark, N; Salgado, E; Ivanen, D; Kulinskaya, A; Brumer, H; Garman, S

    2010-01-01

    The enzyme {alpha}-galactosidase ({alpha}-GAL, also known as {alpha}-GAL A; E.C. 3.2.1.22) is responsible for the breakdown of {alpha}-galactosides in the lysosome. Defects in human {alpha}-GAL lead to the development of Fabry disease, a lysosomal storage disorder characterized by the buildup of {alpha}-galactosylated substrates in the tissues. {alpha}-GAL is an active target of clinical research: there are currently two treatment options for Fabry disease, recombinant enzyme replacement therapy (approved in the United States in 2003) and pharmacological chaperone therapy (currently in clinical trials). Previously, we have reported the structure of human {alpha}-GAL, which revealed the overall structure of the enzyme and established the locations of hundreds of mutations that lead to the development of Fabry disease. Here, we describe the catalytic mechanism of the enzyme derived from x-ray crystal structures of each of the four stages of the double displacement reaction mechanism. Use of a difluoro-{alpha}-galactopyranoside allowed trapping of a covalent intermediate. The ensemble of structures reveals distortion of the ligand into a {sup 1}S{sub 3} skew (or twist) boat conformation in the middle of the reaction cycle. The high resolution structures of each step in the catalytic cycle will allow for improved drug design efforts on {alpha}-GAL and other glycoside hydrolase family 27 enzymes by developing ligands that specifically target different states of the catalytic cycle. Additionally, the structures revealed a second ligand-binding site suitable for targeting by novel pharmacological chaperones.

  2. A method for controlling catalytic reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karamyshev, M.S.; Denilov, N.A.; Kamyshnikov, A.I.; Kirilin, Yu.A.; Lozinskiy, V.N.; Melman, A.Z.; Ovchinnikova, T.F.; Shpunt, M.I.; Shuvalov, V.V.; Zayashnikov, Ye.N.

    1983-01-01

    In the method for controlling the process of catalytic reforming, which includes mixing the raw material components with the production of a raw material, reforming and isolation of the final products, through changing the relationship of the expenditures of the raw material components relative to the content of the target components in the raw material, in order to support and stabilize an assigned production of the final products, the relationship of the expenditures of the raw material components are changed with correction based on the flow rates of the final products. A block diagram of the installation which realizes the proposed method is cited.

  3. Transport in a Microfluidic Catalytic Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, H G; Chung, J; Grigoropoulos, C P; Greif, R; Havstad, M; Morse, J D

    2003-04-30

    A study of the heat and mass transfer, flow, and thermodynamics of the reacting flow in a catalytic microreactor is presented. Methanol reforming is utilized in the fuel processing system driving a micro-scale proton exchange membrane fuel cell. Understanding the flow and thermal transport phenomena as well as the reaction mechanisms is essential for improving the efficiency of the reforming process as well as the quality of the processed fuel. Numerical studies have been carried out to characterize the transport in a silicon microfabricated reactor system. On the basis of these results, optimized conditions for fuel processing are determined.

  4. Submicron Polyethylene Particles from Catalytic Emulsion Polymerization

    OpenAIRE

    Bauers, Florian Martin; Thomann, Ralf; Mecking, Stefan

    2003-01-01

    Particles of linear polyethylene (Mn = (2-3)X 10000 g mol-1; Mw/Mn = 2-4) obtained by catalytic emulsion polymerization of ethylene possess a nonspherical, lentil-like shape with an average aspect ratio of ca. 10 and diameters from 30 to > 300 nm, as determined by TEM and AFM. The particle structure results from a stacking of the lamellae along the one shorter axis of the lentils (i.e., their height, by contrast to the diameter). In addition to these multilamellae particles, remarkably, a con...

  5. Temperature control of a catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, T.T.-H.

    1994-06-08

    In an ic engine having a catalytic convertor, the catalyst heater is controlled in dependence upon an estimate of the temperature of the catalyst so that there is no need for a sensor in the hostile environment of the exhaust. A valve indicative of the catalyst temperature is stored and modified in accordance with a model of the catalyst temperature. The model can be a mathematical mood carried out by a signal processor or an electrical model with the catalyst temperature being represented by the charge stored on a capacitor. (Author)

  6. Biomimetic, Catalytic Oxidation in Organic Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shun-lchi Murahashi

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Oxidation is one of the most fundamental reactions in organic synthesis. Owing to the current need to develop forward-looking technology that is environmentally acceptable with respect many aspects. The most attractive approaches are biomimetic oxidation reactions that are closely related to the metabolism of living things. The metabolisms are governed by a variety of enzymes such as cytochrome P-450 and flavoenzyme.Simulation of the function of these enzymes with simple transition metal complex catalyst or organic catalysts led to the discovery of biomimetic, catalytic oxidations with peroxides[1]. We extended such biomimetic methods to the oxidation with molecular oxygen under mild conditions.

  7. Catalytic Pyrolysis of Olive Mill Wastewater Sludge

    OpenAIRE

    Abdellaoui, Hamza

    2015-01-01

    Olive mill wastewater sludge (OMWS) is the solid residue that remains in the evaporation ponds after evaporation of the majority of water in the olive mill wastewater (OMW). OMWS is a major environmental pollutant in the olive oil producing regions. Approximately 41.16 wt. % of the OMWS was soluble in hexanes (HSF). The fatty acids in this fraction consist mainly of oleic and palmitic acid. Catalytic pyrolysis of the OMWS over red mud and HZSM-5 has been demonstrated to be an effective techno...

  8. Tritium stripping by a catalytic exchange stripper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A catalytic exchange process for stripping elemental tritium from gas streams has been demonstrated. The process uses a catalyzed isotopic exchange reaction between tritium in the gas phase and protium or deuterium in the solid phase on alumina. The reaction is catalyzed by platinum deposited on the alumina. The process has been tested with both tritium and deuterium. Decontamination factors (ration of inlet and outlet tritium concentrations) as high as 1000 have been achieved, depending on inlet concentration. The test results and some demonstrated applications are presented

  9. Heterogeneous Photooxidation of Phenol by Catalytic Membranes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Enrica Fontananova; Enrico Drioli; Laura Donato; Marcella Bonchio; Mauro Carraro; Gianfranco Scorrano

    2006-01-01

    In this work the heterogenization in polymeric membranes of decatungstate, a photocatalyst for oxidation reactions,was reported. Solid state characterization techniques confirmed that the catalyst structure was preserved within the polymeric membranes. The catalytic membranes were successfully applied in the aerobic photo-oxidation of phenol, one of the main organic pollutants in wastewater, providing stable and recyclable photocatalytic systems. The dependence of the phenol degradation rate by the catalyst loading and transmembrane pressure was shown. By comparison with homogeneous reaction,the catalyst heterogenized in membrane appears to be more efficient concerning the rate of phenol photodegradation and mineralization.

  10. Catalytic Synthesis Methods for Triazolopyrimidine Derivatives

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A new method for catalyzed synthesis of triazolopyrimidine derivatives is reported. Aikylamine reaction with dialkyl cyanodithioiminocarbonate was catalyzed by quaternary ammonium salts at room temperature to yield 3-alkylamine-5-amino-1,2,4-triazole in good quality and high yields. After imidization and reaction with an α,β-unsaturated acid derivative, the reaction intermediate was hydrolyzed in the presence of a Lewis acid to obtain the target product. This novel catalytic method for triazolopyrimidine derivatives can be carried out under inexpen-sive and mild conditions, and is safe and environmentally friendly. IH NMR results for all intermediates are re-ported.

  11. The catalytic residues of Tn3 resolvase

    OpenAIRE

    Olorunniji, F.J.; Stark, W M

    2009-01-01

    To characterize the residues that participate in the catalysis of DNA cleavage and rejoining by the site-specific recombinase Tn3 resolvase, we mutated conserved polar or charged residues in the catalytic domain of an activated resolvase variant. We analysed the effects of mutations at 14 residues on proficiency in binding to the recombination site ('site I'), formation of a synaptic complex between two site Is, DNA cleavage and recombination. Mutations of Y6, R8, S10, D36, R68 and R71 result...

  12. Study and Analysis on Naphtha Catalytic Reforming Reactor Simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang Ke min; Song Yongji; Pan Shiwei

    2004-01-01

    A naphtha catalytic reforming unit with four reactors connected in series is analyzed. A physical model is proposed to describe the catalytic reforming radial flow reactor. Kinetics and thermodynamics equations are selected to describe the naphtha catalytic reforming reaction characteristics based on idealizing the complex naphtha mixture to represent the paraffin, naphthene, and aromatic groups with individual compounds. The simulation results based on above models agree very well with actual operating data of process unit.

  13. A study on naphtha catalytic reforming reactor simulation and analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Ke-min; GUO Hai-yan; PAN Shi-wei

    2005-01-01

    A naphtha catalytic reforming unit with four reactors in series is analyzed. A physical model is proposed to describe the catalytic reforming radial flow reactor. Kinetics and thermodynamics equations are selected to describe the naphtha catalytic reforming reactions characteristics based on idealizing the complex naphtha mixture by representing the paraffin, naphthene, and aromatic groups by single compounds. The simulation results based above models agree very well with actual operation unit data.

  14. Non-thermal plasmas for non-catalytic and catalytic VOC abatement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We review the current status of catalytic and non-catalytic VOC abatement based on a vast number of research papers. → The underlying mechanisms of plasma-catalysis for VOC abatement are discussed. → Critical process parameters that determine the influent are discussed and compared. - Abstract: This paper reviews recent achievements and the current status of non-thermal plasma (NTP) technology for the abatement of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Many reactor configurations have been developed to generate a NTP at atmospheric pressure. Therefore in this review article, the principles of generating NTPs are outlined. Further on, this paper is divided in two equally important parts: plasma-alone and plasma-catalytic systems. Combination of NTP with heterogeneous catalysis has attracted increased attention in order to overcome the weaknesses of plasma-alone systems. An overview is given of the present understanding of the mechanisms involved in plasma-catalytic processes. In both parts (plasma-alone systems and plasma-catalysis), literature on the abatement of VOCs is reviewed in close detail. Special attention is given to the influence of critical process parameters on the removal process.

  15. Light-concentrating plasmonic Au superstructures with significantly visible-light-enhanced catalytic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jinhu; Li, Ying; Zu, Lianhai; Tong, Lianming; Liu, Guanglei; Qin, Yao; Shi, Donglu

    2015-04-22

    Noble metals are well-known for their surface plasmon resonance effect that enables strong light absorption typically in the visible regions for gold and silver. However, unlike semiconductors, noble metals are commonly considered incapable of catalyzing reactions via photogenerated electron-hole pairs due to their continuous energy band structures. So far, photonically activated catalytic system based on pure noble metal nanostructures has seldom been reported. Here, we report the development of three different novel plasmonic Au superstructures comprised of Au nanoparticles, multiple-twinned nanoparticles and nanoworms assembling on the surfaces of SiO2 nanospheres respectively via a well-designed synthetic strategy. It is found that these novel Au superstructures show enhanced broadband visible-light absorption due to the plasmon resonance coupling within the superstructures, and thus can effectively focus the energy of photon fluxes to generate much more excited hot electrons and holes for promoting catalytic reactions. Accordingly, these Au superstructures exhibit significantly visible-light-enhanced catalytic efficiency (up to ∼264% enhancement) for the commercial reaction of p-nitrophenol reduction. PMID:25840556

  16. Catalytically favorable surface patterns in Pt-Au nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental demonstrations of novel PtAu nanoparticles with highly enhanced catalytic properties, we present a systematic theoretical study that explores principal catalytic indicators as a function of the particle size and composition. We find that Pt electronic states in the vicinity of the Fermi level combined with a modified electron distribution in the nanoparticle due to Pt-to-Au charge transfer are the origin of the outstanding catalytic properties. From our model we deduce the catalytically favorable surface patterns that induce ensemble and ligand effects. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.

  17. Facile preparation of modified carbon black-LaMnO3 hybrids and the effect of covalent coupling on the catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction%改性炭黑-LaMnO3复合材料的制备及其共价复合效应对氧还原性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘景军; 金学民; 宋薇薇; 王峰; 王楠; 宋夜

    2014-01-01

    以Vulcan XC-72炭黑为载体,通过对炭载体石墨化处理和表面化学修饰,将其与化学沉淀法制备的纳米级LaMnO3颗粒共混,再经特定温度下煅烧,制备出改性炭黑-LaMnO3复合材料. X射线光电子能谱和热重分析表明,当煅烧温度在300°C时,炭载体与LaMnO3纳米颗粒之间形成了大量C-O-M (M = La, Mn)化学键.扫描电子显微镜和高分辨透射电子显微镜分析发现,纯相LaMnO3纳米颗粒主要呈现短棒、三支棒或竹节棒的形貌特征,炭载体则为具有完整石墨层的空心球结构, LaMnO3均匀分散在炭载体上.在25°C,1 mol/L NaOH溶液中的电化学测试结果表明,成分比(LaMnO3:C)为2:3的复合材料具有很高的氧还原电催化活性,氧还原反应电子数为3.81,中间产物H2O2产率为9.5%,其活性接近商业Pt/C催化剂(E-TEK).高的氧还原电催化活性主要归因于LaMnO3纳米颗粒与炭载体之间形成了大量共价键.%Covalent coupling between LaMnO3 nanoparticles and carbon black to produce a composite catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was achieved by physical mixing of modified carbon and per-ovskite-type LaMnO3 nanoparticles, followed by sintering at different temperatures. Perovskite-type LaMnO3 nanoparticles were first synthesized via chemical precipitation, and the carbon sup-port (Vulcan XC-72) was modified using graphitization, followed by HNO3 and ammonia treatments. The morphology and electronic states of the carbon black-LaMnO3 hybrid catalyst were character-ized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The loaded LaMnO3 particles featured rod-like, three bars-like, and bamboo rod-like structures and were homogeneously dispersed in the carbon matrix that featured a hollow spherical structure. At a sintering temperature of about 300 °C, C-O-M (M = La, Mn) bonds formed at the interface between the carbon and LaMnO3 nanoparticles. Electrochemical measurements in 1

  18. Facile preparation of modified carbon black-LaMnO3 hybrids and the effect of covalent coupling on the catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction%改性炭黑-LaMnO3复合材料的制备及其共价复合效应对氧还原性能的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘景军; 金学民; 宋薇薇; 王峰; 王楠; 宋夜

    2014-01-01

    Covalent coupling between LaMnO3 nanoparticles and carbon black to produce a composite catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was achieved by physical mixing of modified carbon and per-ovskite-type LaMnO3 nanoparticles, followed by sintering at different temperatures. Perovskite-type LaMnO3 nanoparticles were first synthesized via chemical precipitation, and the carbon sup-port (Vulcan XC-72) was modified using graphitization, followed by HNO3 and ammonia treatments. The morphology and electronic states of the carbon black-LaMnO3 hybrid catalyst were character-ized by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The loaded LaMnO3 particles featured rod-like, three bars-like, and bamboo rod-like structures and were homogeneously dispersed in the carbon matrix that featured a hollow spherical structure. At a sintering temperature of about 300 °C, C-O-M (M = La, Mn) bonds formed at the interface between the carbon and LaMnO3 nanoparticles. Electrochemical measurements in 1 mol/L NaOH showed that the carbon-LaMnO3 hybrid prepared at a LaMnO3/GCB mass ratio of 2:3 displayed the highest electrocatalytic activity towards ORR among all the synthesized hybrid catalysts. The electrocata-lytic activity was comparable with that obtained by commercial Pt/C catalyst (E-TEK). The average electron transfer number of ORR was ~3.81, and the corresponding yield of the hydrogen peroxide intermediate was ~9.5%. The remarkably improved electrocatalytic activity towards ORR was likely because of the formation of covalent bonds (C-O-M) between the LaMnO3 nanoparticles and carbon that can effectively enhance the ORR kinetics. This information is important to understand the physical origin of the electrocatalytic activity of carbon-supported rare earth oxides as catalysts for ORR.%以Vulcan XC-72炭黑为载体,通过对炭载体石墨化处理和表面化学修饰,将其与化学沉淀法制备的纳米级LaMnO3颗粒共混,再经特定温

  19. Aluminosilicate nanoparticles for catalytic hydrocarbon cracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Pinnavaia, Thomas J

    2003-03-01

    Aluminosilicate nanoparticles containing 9.0-20 nm mesopores were prepared through the use of protozeolitic nanoclusters as the inorganic precursor and starch as a porogen. The calcined, porogen-free composition containing 2 mol % aluminum exhibited the porosity, hydrothermal stability, and acidity needed for the cracking of very large hydrocarbons. In fact, the hydrothermal stability of the nanoparticles to pure steam at 800 degrees C, along with the cumene cracking activity, surpassed the analogous performance properties of ultrastable Y zeolite, the main catalyst component of commercial cracking catalysts. The remarkable hydrothermal stability and catalytic reactivity of the new nanoparticles are attributable to a unique combination of two factors, the presence of protozeolitic nanoclusters in the pore walls and the unprecedented pore wall thickness (7-15 nm). In addition, the excellent catalytic longevity of the nanoparticles is most likely facilitated by the small domain size of the nanoparticles that greatly improves access to the acid sites on the pore walls and minimizes the diffusion length of coke precursors out of the pores. PMID:12603109

  20. Catalytic converter for next generation turbine engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saruhan, B.; Schulz, U.; Leyens, C. [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Inst. of Materials Research, Cologne (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used on advanced turbine blades to increase the engine efficiency and improve the blade performance. partially yttria stabilized zirconia (PYSZ) is the standard material for current TBC applications. Lower thermal stability of the PYSZ-based TBCs, however, seriously affects the performance at demanding service temperatures. For the new generation turbines where higher operating gas temperatures (> 1200 C) are to expect, the performance of turbine blades can be improved by replacing the state-art-of-material PYSZ with superior thermal barrier coatings which belong to different crystal structures such as magnetoplumbite. Magnetoplumbite structure through its interlocking grain morphology and unique crystal structure provides essentially a sintering resistant, low thermal conductive layer, but also imparts a catalytic layer to reduce the environmentally harmful substances produced during propulsion and increase the catalytic performance. The complex structures of these compounds make it difficult to realize by conventional methods and requires careful adjustment of process parameters. The morphology and crystallographic aspects of these coatings as well as the mechanisms controlling the improvement are highlighted. (orig.)

  1. Catalytic reactor for low-Btu fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Lance; Etemad, Shahrokh; Karim, Hasan; Pfefferle, William C.

    2009-04-21

    An improved catalytic reactor includes a housing having a plate positioned therein defining a first zone and a second zone, and a plurality of conduits fabricated from a heat conducting material and adapted for conducting a fluid therethrough. The conduits are positioned within the housing such that the conduit exterior surfaces and the housing interior surface within the second zone define a first flow path while the conduit interior surfaces define a second flow path through the second zone and not in fluid communication with the first flow path. The conduit exits define a second flow path exit, the conduit exits and the first flow path exit being proximately located and interspersed. The conduits define at least one expanded section that contacts adjacent conduits thereby spacing the conduits within the second zone and forming first flow path exit flow orifices having an aggregate exit area greater than a defined percent of the housing exit plane area. Lastly, at least a portion of the first flow path defines a catalytically active surface.

  2. Electrochemical promotion of sulfur dioxide catalytic oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrushina, Irina; Bandur, Viktor; Cappeln, Frederik Vilhelm;

    2000-01-01

    The effect of electrochemical polarization on the catalytic SO2 oxidation in the molten V2O5-K2S2O7 system has been studied using a gold working electrode in the temperature range 400-460 degrees C. A similar experiment has been performed with the industrial catalyst VK-58. The aim of the present...... investigation was to study a possible non-Faradaic electrochemical promotion of the liquid-phase catalytic reaction. It has been shown that there are two negative potential promotion areas with maximum effects at approximately -0.1 and -0.2 V, and one positive potential promotion area with the maximum effect...... caused by the negative charge on the electrode. The Faradaic part of the promoting effect under positive polarization has been explained as the electrochemical pushing of the V(V) V(IV) equilibrium in the direction of V(V) formation. It has also been shown that when using the industrial VK-58 catalyst...

  3. Computational and Physical Analysis of Catalytic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Richard; Sohn, Jung Jae; Kyung, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Nanoparticles exhibit unique physical and chemical properties depending on their geometrical properties. For this reason, synthesis of nanoparticles with controlled shape and size is important to use their unique properties. Catalyst supports are usually made of high-surface-area porous oxides or carbon nanomaterials. These support materials stabilize metal catalysts against sintering at high reaction temperatures. Many studies have demonstrated large enhancements of catalytic behavior due to the role of the oxide-metal interface. In this paper, the catalyzing ability of supported nano metal oxides, such as silicon oxide and titanium oxide compounds as catalysts have been analyzed using computational chemistry method. Computational programs such as Gamess and Chemcraft has been used in an effort to compute the efficiencies of catalytic compounds, and bonding energy changes during the optimization convergence. The result illustrates how the metal oxides stabilize and the steps that it takes. The graph of the energy computation step(N) versus energy(kcal/mol) curve shows that the energy of the titania converges faster at the 7th iteration calculation, whereas the silica converges at the 9th iteration calculation.

  4. Catalytic combustion in gas stoves - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjelm, Anna-Karin [CATATOR AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2003-06-01

    Several independent studies show that gas stoves to some degree contribute to the indoor emissions of NO{sub x} especially in situations were the ventilation flow is poor. The peak-NO{sub x} concentrations can reach several hundred ppb but the integral concentration seldom exceeds about 20 - 50 ppb, which corresponds to an indoor-outdoor ratio of about 1 - 2.5. Epidemiological studies indicate increasing problems with respiratory symptoms in sensitive people at concentrations as low as 15 ppb of NO{sub 2}. Consequently, the NO{sub x}-concentration in homes where gas stoves are used is high enough to cause health effects. However, in situations where the ventilation flow is high (utilisation of ventilation hoods) the NO{sub x}-emissions are not likely to cause any health problems. This study has been aimed at investigating the possibilities to reduce the NO{sub x} emissions from gas stoves by replacing the conventional flame combustion with catalytic combustion. The investigation is requested by Swedish Gas Center, and is a following-up work of an earlier conducted feasibility study presented in April-2002. The present investigation reports on the possibility to use cheap and simple retro-fit catalytic design suggestions for traditional gas stoves. Experiments have been conducted with both natural and town gas, and parameters such as emissions of NO{sub x}, CO and unburned fuel gas and thermal efficiency, etc, have been examined and are discussed. The results show that it is possible to reduce the NO{sub x} emissions up to 80% by a simple retro-fit installation, without decreasing the thermal efficiency of the cooking plate. The measured source strengths correspond to indoor NO{sub x} concentrations that are below or equal to the average outdoor concentration, implying that no additional detrimental health effects are probable. The drawback of the suggested installations is that the concentration of CO and in some cases also CH{sub 4} are increased in the flue gases

  5. Polarographic catalytic wave of hydrogen--Parallel catalytic hydrogen wave of bovine serum albumin in thepresence of oxidants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO; Wei(过玮); LIU; Limin(刘利民); LIN; Hong(林洪); SONG; Junfeng(宋俊峰)

    2002-01-01

    A polarographic catalytic hydrogen wave of bovine serum albumin (BSA) at about -1.80 V (vs. SCE) in NH4Cl-NH3@H2O buffer is further catalyzed by such oxidants as iodate, persulfate and hydrogen peroxide, producing a kinetic wave. Studies show that the kinetic wave is a parallel catalytic wave of hydrogen, which resulted from that hydrogen ion is electrochemically reduced and chemically regenerated through oxidation of its reduction product, atomic hydrogen, by oxidants mentioned above. It is a new type of poralographic catalytic wave of protein, which is suggested to be named as a parallel catalytic hydrogen wave.

  6. The influence of copper in dealloyed binary platinum–copper electrocatalysts on methanol electroxidation catalytic activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we prepared and characterized carbon paper-supported dealloyed binary Pt–Cu core–shell electrocatalysts (denoted as PtxCu(100−x)/CP) by cyclic co-electrodeposition and selective copper dealloying in an acidic medium, and we investigated the effect of the copper content in the samples on the catalytic activities toward methanol electroxidation reaction (MOR). X-ray photo-emission spectroscopy (XPS) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) indicated that the structure of dealloyed binary Pt–Cu catalysts possessed a Pt-rich shell and a Cu rich core. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) displayed that the oxidation states of Pt and Cu were zero and one, respectively, implying the formation of metallic Pt and Cu2O, respectively. X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD) confirmed that Cu was inserted into a face-centered cubic Pt structure forming Pt–Cu alloys. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) displayed a cubic shape of Pt/CP and a spherical shape of PtxCu(100−x)/CP with several hundred nanometer sizes of agglomeration that depended on the Cu content. Cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were performed to confirm that the sample of Pt70Cu30/CP exhibited the best catalytic activities in terms of the specific current, current density, catalytic poisoning tolerance, and stability. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Binary electrocatalysts of PtxCu(100−x)/CP were prepared by cyclic co-electrodeposition and selective copper dealloying. • The structures of PtxCu(100−x)/CP were a Pt rich shell and a Cu rich core. • The Pt70Cu30/CP was the excellent catalytic activity towards methanol electrooxidation and COads tolerance

  7. Desorption and catalytic study of vanadium modified MCM-41 silica by 11C radiolabeled methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. Vanadium modified MCM-41 (V-MCM-41) materials were prepared by solid state reduction technique with V2O5 and catalytically tested in ethylacetate oxidation. In the recent study, 11C-labeling methanol is introduced as a probe molecule for characterization of the state of various catalytic active sites, which were obtained after the V-MCM-41 treatment in oxidative (V-MCM-41o) or reductive (VMCM- 41r) atmosphere. Solid state vanadium modified mesoporous MCM-41 silica is characterised by XRD, N2 physisorption, FTIR and UV-Vis spectroscopies. Novel consecutive 11C- and 12C-methanol adsorption technique was used for the elucidation of the contribution of various vanadium species in methanol conversion. The radiodetectors are placed in front of the reactor to follow the methanol desorption at different temperatures as well as for radio-GC analysis (including FID coupled on-line with radiodetector) of methanol conversion. The rates of 11C-methanol desorption was negligible for V-MCM-41o, while a sharp increase is observed for V-MCM-41r in the temperature range of 160-180 deg C, indicating the presence of various types of catalytic active sites for both materials. Radio-GC results also reveal different catalytic behaviour for these vanadium modifications. On V-MCM- 41o, at lower temperature (250-280 deg C) a small amount of dimethyl ether (DME) was registered. The selectivity to CH4, CO, CO2, HCHO and methylal was strongly increased between 280-360 deg C. On V-MCM-41r, no DME and only a negligible amount of methylal were detected. The process was carried out exclusively to HCHO, and similarly to V-MCM- 41o, at higher temperatures - to CO formation. The desorption and catalytic measurements reveal that the variation in the pretreatment medium provides the formation of catalytic centers with different redox and acidic activity. While the products of methanol decomposition (CH4, CO, HCHO, CO2) are typical of the presence of redox sites

  8. CFD simulation of hydrogen mixing and mitigation by means of passive auto-catalytic recombiners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelm, S.; Reinecke, E-A.; Jahn, W., E-mail: s.kelm@fz-juelich.de [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Juelich (Germany); Allelein, H-J. [RWTH Aachen Univ.. Aachen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Modeling of passive auto-catalytic recombiners (PARs) operation in containment geometries involves a large variety of scales; thus, a CFD calculation resolving all these scales would be much too expensive. Therefore, the mechanistic PAR model REKO-DIREKT, developed at Forschungszentrum Juelich, has been coupled with the commercial CFD code ANSYS CFX in order to simulate PAR operation as well as the induced flow and transport phenomena. Based on a short introduction of REKO-DIREKT, its interface to CFX and the explicit coupling scheme is discussed. The paper is finalized by a first demonstration of simulation capabilities on the basis of the ThAI PAR-4 experiment (Becker Technologies GmbH, Eschborn, Germany). (author)

  9. Resting State and Elementary Steps of the Coupling of Aryl Halides with Thiols Catalyzed by Alkylbisphosphine Complexes of Palladium

    OpenAIRE

    Alvaro, Elsa; Hartwig, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Detailed mechanistic studies on the coupling of aryl halides with thiols catalyzed by palladium complexes of the alkylbisphosphine ligand CyPF-tBu (1-dicyclohexylphosphino-2-di-tert-butylphosphinoethylferrocene) are reported. The elementary steps that constitute the catalytic cycle, i.e. oxidative addition, transmetalation and reductive elimination, have been studied, and their relative rates are reported. Each of the steps of the catalytic process occurs at temperatures that are much lower t...

  10. Cross-Coupling of Aryl Iodides with Malononitrile Catalyzed by Palladium N-Heterocyclic Carbene Complex System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO,Cheng-Wei(高诚伟); TAO,Xiao-Chun(陶晓春); LIU,Tao-Ping(刘涛平); HUANG,Ji-Ling(黄吉玲); QIAN,Yan-Long(钱延龙)

    2002-01-01

    Eight N-heterocyclic carbenes (NHC), generated in situ from their imidazolium salts, as ligands of palladium complexes were used for the catalytic coupling of iodobenzene with malononitrile anion. It was found that 1,3-bis(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)imidazolium chloride (IMesHC1)-Pd2(dba)3 catalytic system has the highest activity to obtain phenyl malononitrile among the imidazolium salts. The substituted iodoarenes reacted with malononitrile anions by using the catalytic system to give crosscoupling products in yields from 50% to 96%.

  11. In situ and operando transmission electron microscopy of catalytic materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Crozier, Peter A.; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2015-01-01

    measurements of gas-phase catalytic products. To overcome this deficiency, operando TEM techniques are being developed that combine atomic characterization with the simultaneous measurement of catalytic products. This article provides a short review of the current status and major developments in the...

  12. Catalytic activities of platinum nanotubes: a density functional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Prajna; Gupta, Bikash C.; Jena, Puru

    2015-10-01

    In this work we investigate the catalytic properties of platinum nanotubes using density functional theory based calculations. In particular, we study the dissociation of hydrogen and oxygen molecules as well as oxidation of CO molecules. The results indicate that platinum nanotubes have good catalytic properties and can be effectively used in converting CO molecule to CO2.

  13. Including lateral interactions into microkinetic models of catalytic reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellman, Anders; Honkala, Johanna Karoliina

    2007-01-01

    In many catalytic reactions lateral interactions between adsorbates are believed to have a strong influence on the reaction rates. We apply a microkinetic model to explore the effect of lateral interactions and how to efficiently take them into account in a simple catalytic reaction. Three...

  14. Catalytic pyrolysis of oilsand bitumen over nanoporous catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, See-Hoon; Heo, Hyeon Su; Jeong, Kwang-Eun; Yim, Jin-Heong; Jeon, Jong-Ki; Jung, Kyeong Youl; Ko, Young Soo; Kim, Seung-Soo; Park, Young-Kwon

    2011-01-01

    The catalytic cracking of oilsand bitumen was performed over nanoporous materials at atmospheric conditions. The yield of gas increased with application of nanoporous catalysts, with the catalytic conversion to gas highest for Meso-MFI. The cracking activity seemed to correlate with pore size rather than weak acidity or surface area. PMID:21446540

  15. Functionalized TUD-1: synthesis, characterization and (photo-)catalytic performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamdy M. Saad, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    The new mesoporous material; TUD-1 is chosen of which the synthesis, characterization, and functionalization for (photo)-catalytic performance are extensively investigated in this study. The synthesis of the new catalytic materials M TUD-1 (M = Ti, V, Cr, Mo, Fe, Co and Cu) is carried out through an

  16. Catalytic hydrocarbon reactions over supported metal oxides. Final report, August 1, 1986--July 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekerdt, J.G.

    1995-10-20

    Oxide catalysis plays a central role in hydrocarbon processing and improvements in catalytic activity or selectivity are of great technological importance because these improvements will translate directly into more efficient utilization of hydrocarbon supplies and lower energy consumption in separation processes. An understanding of the relationships between surface structure and catalytic properties is needed to describe and improve oxide catalysts. The approach has been to prepare supported oxides that have a specific structure and oxidation state and then employ these structures in reaction studies. The current research program is focused on studying the fundamental relationships between structure and reactivity for two important reactions that are present in many oxide-catalyzed processes, partial oxidation and carbon-carbon bond formation. During the course of these studies the author has: (1) developed methods to form and stabilize various Mo and W oxide structures on silica; (2) studied C-H abstraction reactions over the fully oxidized cations; (3) studied C-C bond coupling by metathesis and reductive coupling of aldehydes and ketones over reduced cation structures; and (4) initiated a study of hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis over reduced cation structures.

  17. Facile synthesis of pristine graphene-palladium nanocomposites with extraordinary catalytic activities using swollen liquid crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vats, T; Dutt, S; Kumar, R; Siril, P F

    2016-01-01

    Amazing conductivity, perfect honeycomb sp(2) arrangement and the high theoretical surface area make pristine graphene as one of the best materials suited for application as catalyst supports. Unfortunately, the low reactivity of the material makes the formation of nanocomposite with inorganic materials difficult. Here we report an easy approach to synthesize nanocomposites of pristine graphene with palladium (Pd-G) using swollen liquid crystals (SLCs) as a soft template. The SLC template gives the control to deposit very small Pd particles of uniform size on G as well as RGO. The synthesized nanocomposite (Pd-G) exhibited exceptionally better catalytic activity compared with Pd-RGO nanocomposite in the hydrogenation of nitrophenols and microwave assisted C-C coupling reactions. The catalytic activity of Pd-G nanocomposite during nitrophenol reduction reaction was sixteen times higher than Pd nanoparticles and more than double than Pd-RGO nanocomposite. The exceptionally high activity of pristine graphene supported catalysts in the organic reactions is explained on the basis of its better pi interacting property compared to partially reduced RGO. The Pd-G nanocomposite showed exceptional stability under the reaction conditions as it could be recycled upto a minimum of 15 cycles for the C-C coupling reactions without any loss in activity. PMID:27619321

  18. Catalytic Decomposition of Methylene Chloride by Sulfated Titania Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Catalytic decomposition of methylene chloride in air below 300℃ was studied.Sulfated titania was very effective in converting 959ppm methylene chloride selectively to CO,CO2 and HCl.Complete decomposition of methylene chloride was achieved at low temperature(275℃).It was found that the acidic property of catalyst was a determinant factor for the catalytic activity.The presence of water vapor in the feed stream remarkably reduced the catalytic activity,which could be due to the blockage of acidic sites on the surface of catalyst by water molecules.A bifunctional catalyst comprising copper oxide was developed to improve the selectivity of catalytic oxidation,which indicated that copper oxide can promote the deep oxidation of methylene chloride.The crystal form of TiO2 imposes an important influence upon the catalytic oxidation.

  19. Relationship between structure and catalytic performance of dealuminated Y zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dealuminated Y zeolites which have been prepared by hydrothermal and chemical treatments show differences in catalytic performance when tested fresh; however, these differences disappear after the zeolites have been steamed. The catalytic behavior of fresh and steamed zeolites is directly related to zeolite structural and chemical characteristics. Such characteristics determine the strength and density of acid sites for catalytic cracking. Dealuminated zeolites were characterized using x-ray diffraction, porosimetry, solid-state NMR and elemental analysis. Hexadecane cracking was used as a probe reaction to determine catalytic properties. Cracking activity was found to be proportional to total aluminum content in the zeolite. Product selectivity was dependent on unit cell size, presence of extra framework alumina and spatial distribution of active sites. The results from this study elucidate the role that zeolite structure plays in determining catalytic performance

  20. Contact structure for use in catalytic distillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jr., Edward M.

    1984-01-01

    A method for conducting catalytic chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants into a distillation column reactor contracting said reactant in liquid phase with a fixed bed catalyst in the form of a contact catalyst structure consisting of closed porous containers containing the catatlyst for the reaction and a clip means to hold and support said containers, which are disposed above, i.e., on the distillation trays in the tower. The trays have weir means to provide a liquid level on the trays to substantially cover the containers. In other words, the trays function in their ordinary manner with the addition thereto of the catalyst. The reaction mixture is concurrently fractionated in the column.

  1. Stoichiometric and Catalytic Synthesis of Alkynylphosphines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie-Claude Gaumont

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Alkynylphosphines or their borane complexes are available either through C–P bond forming reactions or through modification of the phosphorus or the alkynyl function of various alkynyl phosphorus derivatives. The latter strategy, and in particular the one involving phosphoryl reduction by alanes or silanes, is the method of choice for preparing primary and secondary alkynylphosphines, while the former strategy is usually employed for the synthesis of tertiary alkynylphosphines or their borane complexes. The classical C–P bond forming methods rely on the reaction between halophosphines or their borane complexes with terminal acetylenes in the presence of a stoichiometric amount of organometallic bases, which precludes the access to alkynylphosphines bearing sensitive functional groups. In less than a decade, efficient catalytic procedures, mostly involving copper complexes and either an electrophilic or a nucleophilic phosphorus reagent, have emerged. By proceeding under mild conditions, these new methods have allowed a significant broadening of the substituent scope and structure complexity.

  2. Studies on Catalytic Conversion of Ethylene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fuyu Liu; Chunyi Li; Xue Ding; Xinghua You

    2007-01-01

    FCC dry gas contains a large amount of ethylene.It is used by most of the refineries in China as fuel or simply burned in atmosphere.Few refineries make good use of the dry gas,so the precious ethylene resource in the dry gas is wasted.In this article,the possibility of catalytic conversion of ethylene to C3,C4,and some high molecular weight hydrocarbons in a fixed bed micro-reactor using LTB-1 catalyst,with pure ethylene as feedstock was studied.Effects of reaction temperature,reaction pressure,and feedstock flow rate,on the conversion of ethylene and the distribution of products were investigated to determine the proper reaction parameters to be used in practice.Good results indicate that this study may provide a new way of using the ethylene resource in the FCC dry gas.

  3. Ubiquitous ``glassy'' relaxation in catalytic reaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awazu, Akinori; Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2009-10-01

    Study of reversible catalytic reaction networks is important not only as an issue for chemical thermodynamics but also for protocells. From extensive numerical simulations and theoretical analysis, slow relaxation dynamics to sustain nonequlibrium states are commonly observed. These dynamics show two types of salient behaviors that are reminiscent of glassy behavior: slow relaxation along with the logarithmic time dependence of the correlation function and the emergence of plateaus in the relaxation-time course. The former behavior is explained by the eigenvalue distribution of a Jacobian matrix around the equilibrium state that depends on the distribution of kinetic coefficients of reactions. The latter behavior is associated with kinetic constraints rather than metastable states and is due to the absence of catalysts for chemicals in excess and the negative correlation between two chemical species. Examples are given and generality is discussed with relevance to bottleneck-type dynamics in biochemical reactions as well.

  4. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of individual catalytic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tong; Yu, Yun; Zacher, Brian J; Mirkin, Michael V

    2014-12-15

    Electrochemistry at individual metal nanoparticles (NPs) can provide new insights into their electrocatalytic behavior. Herein, the electrochemical activity of single AuNPs attached to the catalytically inert carbon surface is mapped by using extremely small (≥3 nm radius) polished nanoelectrodes as tips in the scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM). The use of such small probes resulted in the spatial resolution significantly higher than in previously reported electrochemical images. The currents produced by either rapid electron transfer or the electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution reaction at a single 10 or 20 nm NP were measured and quantitatively analyzed. The developed methodology should be useful for studying the effects of nanoparticle size, geometry, and surface attachment on electrocatalytic activity in real-world application environment. PMID:25332196

  5. Catalytic Synthesis of Nitriles in Continuous Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordvang, Emily Catherine

    The objective of this thesis is to report the development of a new, alternative process for the flexible production of nitrile compounds in continuous flow. Nitriles are an important class of compounds that find applications as solvents, chemical intermediates and pharmaceutical compounds......, alternative path to acetonitrile from ethanol via the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylamine. The catalytic activity and product ratios of the batch and continuous flow reactions are compared and the effect of reaction conditions on the reaction is investigated. The effects of ammonia in the reaction...... dehydrogenation of ethylamine and post-reaction purging.Chapter 4 outlines the application of RuO2/Al2O3 catalysts to the oxidative dehydrogenation of benzylamine in air, utilizing a new reaction setup. Again, batch and continuous flow reactions are compared and the effects of reaction conditions, ammonia...

  6. Flame assisted synthesis of catalytic ceramic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Johnny; Mosleh, Majid; Johannessen, Tue;

    2004-01-01

    will be spherical due to the fast coalescence at the high temperatures in the flame. The primary product from the flame pyrolysis is an aerosol of metal oxide nanoparticles. The aerosol gas from the flame can be utilized for several different purposes, depending on the precursors fed to the flame. With the present...... technology it is possible to make supported catalysts, composite metal oxides, catalytically active surfaces, and porous ceramic membranes. Membrane layers can be formed by using a porous substrate tube (or surface) as a nano-particle filter. The aerosol gas from the flame is led through a porous substrate...... tube, where a part of the gas is sucked through the wall of the substrate, thereby creating a thin filter cake on the inner surface of the substrate tube. The top-layer can be deposited directly on a coarse pore structure. Since the Brownian motion of the aerosol particles is fast compared to the fluid...

  7. Carbon nanofibers: a versatile catalytic support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelize Maria de Almeida Coelho

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is present an overview of the promising results obtained while using carbon nanofibers based composites as catalyst support for different practical applications: hydrazine decomposition, styrene synthesis, direct oxidation of H2S into elementary sulfur and as fuel-cell electrodes. We have also discussed some prospects of the use of these new materials in total combustion of methane and in ammonia decomposition. The macroscopic carbon nanofibers based composites were prepared by the CVD method (Carbon Vapor Deposition employing a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and ethane. The results showed a high catalytic activity and selectivity in comparison to the traditional catalysts employed in these reactions. The fact was attributed, mainly, to the morphology and the high external surface of the catalyst support.

  8. Propulsion Mechanism of Catalytic Microjet Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fomin, Vladimir M.; Hippler, Markus; Magdanz, Veronika; Soler, Lluís; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G.

    2014-01-01

    We describe the propulsion mechanism of the catalytic microjet engines that are fabricated using rolled-up nanotech. Microjets have recently shown numerous potential applications in nanorobotics but currently there is a lack of an accurate theoretical model that describes the origin of the motion as well as the mechanism of self-propulsion. The geometric asymmetry of a tubular microjet leads to the development of a capillary force, which tends to propel a bubble toward the larger opening of the tube. Because of this motion in an asymmetric tube, there emerges a momentum transfer to the fluid. In order to compensate this momentum transfer, a jet force acting on the tube occurs. This force, which is counterbalanced by the linear drag force, enables tube velocities of the order of 100 μm/s. This mechanism provides a fundamental explanation for the development of driving forces that are acting on bubbles in tubular microjets. PMID:25177214

  9. Catalytic Hydrolysis of Borohydride for Fuel Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lianbang; ZHAN Xingyue; YANG Zhenzhen; MA Chun'an

    2011-01-01

    Borohydrides present interesting options for the electrochemical power generation acting either as hydrogen source or anodic fuel for direct borohydride fuel cells(DBFC).In this work,Mg-Ni composite synthesized by mechanically alloying method,used as the catalyst for the hydrolysis of borohydride,has been investigated.Co-doping treatment has been carried out for the purpose of improving the hydrolysis rate further.The as-prepared and Co-doped Mg-Ni composites with low cost showed high catalytic activity to the hydrolysis of borohydride for hydrogen generation.After Co-doping,the hydrogen generation rate was around 280 ml·g-1·min-1.Borohydride would be a promising hydrogen source for fuel cells.

  10. Catalytic Acylation of Ethylidenecyclohexane over Zeolite Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Some environmentally friendly catalysts such as HY and H-β zeolites,various cation-exchanged β zeolites,and some other solids have been used in the acylation reaction of ethylidenecyclohexane with acetic anhydride at room temperature to synthesize 3-(1-cyclohexenyl)-2-butanone instead of conventional catalysts.The effect of the amount of HY zeolite used on the acylation reaction was investigated.The yield of the acylated product was 72% in the case of n(ethylidenecyclohexane)∶n(acetic anhydride)∶m(HY zeolite)=1 mmol∶10 mmol∶0.100 g,reaction temperature:25 ℃,and reaction time:2 h.The regenerated HY zeolite showed almost the same catalytic activity as the fresh zeolite.

  11. Catalytic hot gas cleaning of gasification gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simell, P. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1997-12-31

    The aim of this work was to study the catalytic cleaning of gasification gas from tars and ammonia. In addition, factors influencing catalytic activity in industrial applications were studied, as well as the effects of different operation conditions and limits. Also the catalytic reactions of tar and ammonia with gasification gas components were studied. The activities of different catalyst materials were measured with laboratory-scale reactors fed by slip streams taken from updraft and fluid bed gasifiers. Carbonate rocks and nickel catalysts proved to be active tar decomposing catalysts. Ammonia decomposition was in turn facilitated by nickel catalysts and iron materials like iron sinter and iron dolomite. Temperatures over 850 deg C were required at 2000{sup -1} space velocity at ambient pressure to achieve almost complete conversions. During catalytic reactions H{sub 2} and CO were formed and H{sub 2}O was consumed in addition to decomposing hydrocarbons and ammonia. Equilibrium gas composition was almost achieved with nickel catalysts at 900 deg C. No deactivation by H{sub 2}S or carbon took place in these conditions. Catalyst blocking by particulates was avoided by using a monolith type of catalyst. The apparent first order kinetic parameters were determined for the most active materials. The activities of dolomite, nickel catalyst and reference materials were measured in different gas atmospheres using laboratory apparatus. This consisted of nitrogen carrier, toluene as tar model compound, ammonia and one of the components H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}+H{sub 2}O or CO+CO{sub 2}. Also synthetic gasification gas was used. With the dolomite and nickel catalyst the highest toluene decomposition rates were measured with CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. In gasification gas, however, the rate was retarded due to inhibition by reaction products (CO, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}). Tar decomposition over dolomite was modelled by benzene reactions with CO{sub 2}, H

  12. Catalytic combustion in small wood burning appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oravainen, H. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    There is over a million hand fired small heating appliances in Finland where about 5,4 million cubic meters of wood fuel is used. Combustion in such heating appliances is a batch-type process. In early stages of combustion when volatiles are burned, the formation of carbon monoxide (CO) and other combustible gases are difficult to avoid when using fuels that have high volatile matter content. Harmful emissions are formed mostly after each fuel adding but also during char burnout period. When the CO-content in flue gases is, say over 0.5 %, also other harmful emissions will be formed. Methane (CH{sub 4}) and other hydrocarbons are released and the amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)-compounds can be remarkable. Some PAH-compounds are very carcinogenic. It has been estimated that in Finland even more than 90 % of hydrocarbon and PAH emissions are due to small scale wood combustion. Emissions from transportation is excluded from these figures. That is why wood combustion has a net effect on greenhouse gas phenomena. For example carbon monoxide emissions from small scale wood combustion are two fold compared to that of energy production in power plants. Methane emission is of the same order as emission from transportation and seven fold compared with those of energy production. Emissions from small heating appliances can be reduced by developing the combustion techniques, but also by using other means, for example catalytic converters. In certain stages of the batch combustion, temperature is not high enough, gas mixing is not good enough and residence time is too short for complete combustion. When placed to a suitable place inside a heating appliance, a catalytic converter can oxidize unburned gases in the flue gas into compounds that are not harmful to the environment. (3 refs.)

  13. Plasma Catalytic Synthesis of Silver Nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yu-Tao; GUO Ying; MA Teng-Cai

    2011-01-01

    We present the experimental results of plasma catalytic synthesis of colloidal silver nanoparticles, using AgNO3 as the precursor, ethanol as the solvent and reducing agent, and poly vinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as the macromolecular surfactant. The plasma is generated by an atmospheric argon dielectric barrier discharge jet. Silver nanoparticles are produced instantly once the plasma is ignited. The system is not heated so it is necessary to use traditional chemical methods. The samples are characterized by UV-visible absorbance and transmission electron microscopy. For glow discharge mode no obvious silver nanoparticles are observed. For low voltage filamentary streamer discharge mode a lot of silver nanoparticles with the mean diameter of ~3.5nm are generated and a further increase of the voltage causes the occurrence of agglomeration.%We present the experimental results of plasma catalytic synthesis of colloidal silver nanoparticles,using AgNO3 as the precursor,ethanol as the solvent and reducing agent,and poly vinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as the macromolecular surfactant.The plasma is generated by an atmospheric argon dielectric barrier discharge jet.Silver nanoparticles are produced instantly once the plasma is ignited.The system is not heated so it is necessary to use traditional chemical methods.The samples are characterized by UV-visible absorbance and transmission electron microscopy.For glow discharge mode no obvious silver nanoparticles are observed.For low voltage filamentary streamer discharge mode a lot of silver nanoparticles with the mean diameter of ~3.5nm are generated and a further increase of the voltage causes the occurrence of agglomeration.The study of silver nanoparticles has been an extremely active area in recent years because of their important physical and chemical properties as a catalyst and antimicrobial reagent,for example.A number of methods for silver nanoparticle preparation have been developed,[1-3] among them chemical reduction is

  14. Modelling of automotive catalytic converter; Modellierung von Autoabgaskatalysatoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mladenov, Nikolay

    2010-07-01

    This thesis focuses on the numerical modeling of monolithic converters coupling diverse gas-phase and porous media transport models and detailed heterogeneous reaction mechanisms. It investigates the impact of a wide spectrum of model parameters on the conversion rate of the catalysts using the CFD software package DETCHEM. The first part of the work presents a parameter study based on the fundamentals of the conventional laminar and recently developed turbulent converters. It has been found out that an optimization at every step of the catalytic process is required in order to increase the efficiency of the exhaust gas converters. Here, calculations with a single steady-state isothermal channel of cylindrical shape are carried out using the boundary layer approach. The simulated channel is coated by a porous washcoat layer containing platinum as an active component. The transport limitation within the washcoat is described by means of a reaction-diffusion model which accounts for the distribution of macro- and micro-pores in the porous media. The study shows that an optimization with respect to operating temperature, washcoat thickness, pore radius distribution and noble metal loading results in increased conversion of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons. However, these parameters can be varied only in certain ranges of values due to limitations such as catalyst deactivation and manufacturing costs. Structured channels and perforated metal foils represent a further option to increase the efficiency of catalytic converters. The local turbulence effects within these constructions lead to intensification of the mass transport. In the current work, this intensification is taken into account by introducing an enhanced plug-flow model with amplified mass transfer coefficients. The second part of the thesis handles the thermal aging of three way catalysts (TWC). The applied simulation approach allows for qualitative prediction of the deactivation state along the catalyst

  15. An experimental study of diffusion and convection of multicomponent gases through catalytic and non-catalytic membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldsink, J.W.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1994-01-01

    Diffusion of binary and ternary gases through catalytic and non-catalytic membranes has been studied experimentally at atmospheric pressure. These experiments were conducted in a modified Wicke-Kallenbach diffusion cell consisting of two continuously stirred gas volumes separated by a membrane. The

  16. Preparation of Pt-Ru hydrophobic catalysts and catalytic activities for liquid phase catalytic exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pt/C and Pt-Ru/C catalysts with different ratios of Pt to Ru were synthesized, using ethylene glycol as both the dispersant and reducing agent at 1-2 MPa by microwave-assisted method. The catalysts were characterized by XRD, TEM and XPS. The mean particle sizes of the Pt/C and Pt-Ru/C catalysts were 1.9-2.0 nm. Pt and Ru existed as Pt(0), Pt(II), Pt(IV), Ru(0) and Ru(IV) for Pt-Ru/C catalysts, respectively. The face-centered cubic structure of the active mental particles would be changed upon the addition of Ru gradually. Then polytetrafluoroethylene and carbon-supported Pt and Pt-Ru catalysts were supported on foamed nickel to obtain hydrophobic catalysts. The catalytic activity was increased for liquid phase catalytic exchange (LPCE) when uniform Pt based hydrophobic catalysts was mixed into appropriate Ru. Hydrogen isotope exchange reaction occurs between hydration layer(H2O)nH+(ads)(n≥2) and D atoms due to intact water molecules being on Pt surface for LPCE. Water molecules have a tendency to dissociate to OH(ads) and H(ads) on metal Ru surface, and there is the other reaction path for Pt-Ru binary catalysts, which is probably the main reason of the increase of the catalytic activity of the hydrophobic Pt-Ru catalyst. (authors)

  17. Pd(II/HPMoV-Catalyzed Direct Oxidative Coupling Reaction of Benzenes with Olefins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasutaka Ishii

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The direct aerobic coupling reaction of arenes with olefins was successfully achieved by the use of Pd(OAc2/molybdovanadophosphoric acid (HPMoV as a key catalyst under 1 atm of dioxygen. This catalytic system could be extended to the coupling reaction of various substituted benzenes with olefins such as acrylates, aclrolein, and ethylene through the direct aromatic C-H bond activation.

  18. Methane Coupling Using Hydrogen Plasma and Pt/γ-Al2O3 Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, methane coupling at ambient temperature, under atmospheric pressure and in the presence of hydrogen was firstly investigated by using pulse corona plasma and Pt/γ-Al2O3 catalyst. Experimental results showed that Pt/γ-Al2O3 catalyst has catalytic activity for methane coupling to C2H4. Over sixty percent of outcomes of C2 hydrocarbons were detected to be ethylene.

  19. Efficient Sonogashira and Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction catalyzed by Pd-Nanoparticles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kishor E Balsane; Suresh S Shendage; Jayashree M Nagarkar

    2015-03-01

    The Pd nano particles were electrochemically deposited on nafion-graphene. They showed excellent catalytic activity towards Sonogashira and Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction. Benzenediazonium salts were used as alternative to aromatic halide. The developed protocol offers recyclability, easy workups with short reaction time and good-to-excellent product yield.

  20. Palladium-catalysed direct cross-coupling of secondary alkyllithium reagents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vila, Carlos; Giannerini, Massimo; Hornillos, Valentin; Fananas-Mastral, Martin; Feringa, Ben L.

    2014-01-01

    Palladium-catalysed cross-coupling of secondary C(sp(3)) organometallic reagents has been a long-standing challenge in organic synthesis, due to the problems associated with undesired isomerisation or the formation of reduction products. Based on our recently developed catalytic C-C bond formation w

  1. Biorhythm in Couple Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araoz, Daniel L.

    1977-01-01

    Twelve couples in marital counseling were studied during 12 months on the basis of their biorhythms. For each couple a compatibility percentage was obtained. It was found that difficulties in their interaction correlated highly with dissonance in their biorhythms. (Author)

  2. Targeted Catalytic Inactivation of Angiotensin Converting Enzyme by Lisinopril-Coupled Transition Metal Chelates

    OpenAIRE

    Joyner, Jeff C.; Hocharoen, Lalintip; Cowan, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    A series of compounds that target reactive transition metal chelates to somatic Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (sACE-1) have been synthesized. Half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) and rate constants for both inactivation and cleavage of full length sACE-1 have been determined and evaluated in terms of metal-chelate size, charge, reduction potential, coordination unsaturation, and coreactant selectivity. Ethylenediamine-tetraacetic acid (EDTA), nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA), 1,4,7,10-tet...

  3. Catalytic production of methyl acrylates by gold-mediated cross coupling of unsaturated aldehydes with methanol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakalos, Stavros; Zugic, Branko; Stowers, Kara J.; Biener, Monika M.; Biener, Juergen; Friend, Cynthia M.; Madix, Robert J.

    2016-10-01

    Modern methods of esterification, one of the most important reactions in organic synthesis, are reaching their limits, as far as waste and expense are concerned. Novel chemical approaches to ester formation are therefore of importance. Here we report a simple procedure free of caustic reagents or byproducts for the facile direct oxidative methyl esterification of aldehydes over nanoporous Au catalysts. Complementary model studies on single crystal gold surfaces establish the fundamental reactions involved. We find that methanol more readily reacts with adsorbed active oxygen than do the aldehydes, but that once the aldehydes do react, they form strongly-bound acrylates that block reactive sites and decrease the yields of acrylic esters under steady flow conditions at 420 K. Significant improvements in yield can be achieved by operating at higher temperatures, which render the site-blocking acrylates unstable.

  4. Palladium/Imidazolium Salts: A General and Highly Efficient Catalytic System for Coupling Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Chu-Luo; Steven P. Nolan

    2003-01-01

    @@ Nucleophilic N-heterocyclic carbenes have attracted considerable attention. These ligands are strong σ-donor with negligible π-accepting ability, and in this regard, they resemble electron-donor phosphines and can be addressed as "phosphine mimics". [ 1

  5. Orion EFT-1 Catalytic Tile Experiment Overview and Flight Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Giovanni; Amar, Adam; Hyatt, Andrew; Rezin, Marc D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the design and results of a surface catalysis flight experiment flown on the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle during Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT1). Similar to previous Space Shuttle catalytic tile experiments, the present test consisted of a highly catalytic coating applied to an instrumented TPS tile. However, the present catalytic tile experiment contained significantly more instrumentation in order to better resolve the heating overshoot caused by the change in surface catalytic efficiency at the interface between two distinct materials. In addition to collecting data with unprecedented spatial resolution of the "overshoot" phenomenon, the experiment was also designed to prove if such a catalytic overshoot would be seen in turbulent flow in high enthalpy regimes. A detailed discussion of the results obtained during EFT1 is presented, as well as the challenges associated with data interpretation of this experiment. Results of material testing carried out in support of this flight experiment are also shown. Finally, an inverse heat conduction technique is employed to reconstruct the flight environments at locations upstream and along the catalytic coating. The data and analysis presented in this work will greatly contribute to our understanding of the catalytic "overshoot" phenomenon, and have a significant impact on the design of future spacecraft.

  6. Numerical Study of Passive Catalytic Recombiner for Hydrogen Mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan K Sharma

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A significant amount of hydrogen is expected to be released within the containment of a water cooled power reactor after a severe accident. To reduce the risk of deflagration/detonation various means for hydrogen control have been adopted all over the world. Passive catalytic recombiner with vertical flat catalytic plate is one of such hydrogen mitigating device. Passive catalytic recombiners are designed for the removal of hydrogen generated in order to limit the impact of possible hydrogen combustion. Inside a passive catalytic recombiner, numerous thin steel sheets coated with catalyst material are vertically arranged at the bottom opening of a sheet metal housing forming parallel flow channels for the surrounding gas atmosphere. Already below conventional flammability limits, hydrogen and oxygen react exothermally on the catalytic surfaces forming harmless steam. Detailed numerical simulations and experiments are required for an in-depth knowledge of such plate type catalytic recombiners. Specific finite volume based in-house CFD code has been developed to model and analyse the working of these recombiner. The code has been used to simulate the recombiner device used in the Gx-test series of Battelle-Model Containment (B-MC experiments. The present paper briefly describes the working principle of such passive catalytic recombiner and salient feature of the CFD model developed at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC. Finally results of the calculations and comparison with existing data are discussed.

  7. Electromagnetic clutches and couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Vorob'Yeva, T M; Fry, D W; Higinbotham, W

    2013-01-01

    Electromagnetic Clutches and Couplings contains a detailed description of U.S.S.R. electromagnetic friction clutches, magnetic couplings, and magnetic particle couplings. This book is divided into four chapters. The first chapter discusses the design and construction of magnetic (solenoid-operated) couplings, which are very quick-acting devices and used in low power high-speed servo-systems. Chapter 2 describes the possible fields of application, design, construction, and utilization of magnetic particle couplings. The aspects of construction, design, and utilization of induction clutches (sli

  8. Catalytic partial oxidation of pyrolysis oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennard, David Carl

    2009-12-01

    This thesis explores the catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) of pyrolysis oils to syngas and chemicals. First, an exploration of model compounds and their chemistries under CPO conditions is considered. Then CPO experiments of raw pyrolysis oils are detailed. Finally, plans for future development in this field are discussed. In Chapter 2, organic acids such as propionic acid and lactic acid are oxidized to syngas over Pt catalysts. Equilibrium production of syngas can be achieved over Rh-Ce catalysts; alternatively mechanistic evidence is derived using Pt catalysts in a fuel rich mixture. These experiments show that organic acids, present in pyrolysis oils up to 25%, can undergo CPO to syngas or for the production of chemicals. As the fossil fuels industry also provides organic chemicals such as monomers for plastics, the possibility of deriving such species from pyrolysis oils allows for a greater application of the CPO of biomass. However, chemical production is highly dependent on the originating molecular species. As bio oil comprises up to 400 chemicals, it is essential to understand how difficult it would be to develop a pure product stream. Chapter 3 continues the experimentation from Chapter 2, exploring the CPO of another organic functionality: the ester group. These experiments demonstrate that equilibrium syngas production is possible for esters as well as acids in autothermal operation with contact times as low as tau = 10 ms over Rh-based catalysts. Conversion for these experiments and those with organic acids is >98%, demonstrating the high reactivity of oxygenated compounds on noble metal catalysts. Under CPO conditions, esters decompose in a predictable manner: over Pt and with high fuel to oxygen, non-equilibrium products show a similarity to those from related acids. A mechanism is proposed in which ethyl esters thermally decompose to ethylene and an acid, which decarbonylates homogeneously, driven by heat produced at the catalyst surface. Chapter 4

  9. Enhanced propylene production in FCC by novel catalytic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelkar, C.P.; Harris, D.; Xu, M.; Fu, J. [BASF Catalyst LLC, Iselin, NJ (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking is expected to increasingly supply the additional incremental requirements for propylene. The most efficient route to increase propylene yield from an FCC unit is through the use of medium pore zeolites such as ZSM-5. ZSM-5 zeolite cracks near linear olefins in the gasoline range to LPG olefins such as propylene and butylenes. This paper will describe catalytic approaches to increase gasoline range olefins and the chemistry of ZSM-5 to crack those olefins. The paper will also describe novel catalytic materials designed to increase propylene. (orig.)

  10. Bring into Full Play the Role of Catalytic Reforming Unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This article after analyzing the current status of catalytic reforming technology in China puts forward a host of problems related with catalytic reforming capacity, feedstock, size and techno-economic indicators. To solve these problems it is proposed to properly increase the catalytic reforming capacity,extend the feedstock source, and eliminate the bottlenecks to boost the capacity of existing units, improve the operating and management level, as well as speed up R&D work, disseminate new technologies, new processes and novel catalysts.

  11. Catalytic hydrocarbon reactions over supported metal oxides. Progress report, April 1, 1994--January 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekerdt, J.G.

    1995-01-31

    Oxide catalysis plays a central role in hydrocarbon processing and improvements in catalytic activity or selectivity are of great technological importance because these improvements will translate directly into more efficient utilization of hydrocarbon supplies and lower energy consumption in separation processes. An understanding of the relationships between surface structure and catalytic properties is needed to describe and improve oxide catalysts. Our approach has been to prepare supported oxides that have a specific structure and oxidation state and then employ these structures in reaction studies. Our current research program is focused on studying the fundamental relationships between structure and reactivity for two important reactions that are present in many oxide-catalyzed processes, partial oxidation and carbon-carbon bond formation. Oxide catalysis can be a complex process with both metal cation and oxygen anions participating in the chemical reactions. From an energy perspective carbon-carbon bond formation is particularly relevant to CO hydrogenation in isosynthesis. Hydrogenolysis and hydrogenation form the basis for heteroatom removal in fuels processing. Understanding the catalysis of these processes (and others) requires isolating reaction steps in the overall cycle and determining how structure and composition influence the individual reaction steps. Specially designed oxides, such as we use, permit one to study some of the steps in oxidation, carbon-carbon coupling and heteroatom removal catalysis. During the course of our studies we have: (1) developed methods to form and stabilize various Mo and W oxide structures on silica; (2) studied C-H abstraction reactions over the fully oxidized cations; (3) studied C-C bond coupling by methathesis and reductive coupling of aldehydes and ketones over reduced cation structures; and (4) initiated a study of hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis over reduced cation structures.

  12. Study of the dynamics of the MoO2-Mo2C system for catalytic partial oxidation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuba Torres, Christian Martin

    On a global scale, the energy demand is largely supplied by the combustion of non-renewable fossil fuels. However, their rapid depletion coupled with environmental and sustainability concerns are the main drivers to seek for alternative energetic strategies. To this end, the sustainable generation of hydrogen from renewable resources such as biodiesel would represent an attractive alternative solution to fossil fuels. Furthermore, hydrogen's lower environmental impact and greater independence from foreign control make it a strong contender for solving this global problem. Among a wide variety of methods for hydrogen production, the catalytic partial oxidation offers numerous advantages for compact and mobile fuel processing systems. For this reaction, the present work explores the versatility of the Mo--O--C catalytic system under different synthesis methods and reforming conditions using methyl oleate as a surrogate biodiesel. MoO2 exhibits good catalytic activity and exhibits high coke-resistance even under reforming conditions where long-chain oxygenated compounds are prone to form coke. Moreover, the lattice oxygen present in MoO2 promotes the Mars-Van Krevelen mechanism. Also, it is introduced a novel beta-Mo2C synthesis by the in-situ formation method that does not utilize external H2 inputs. Herein, the MoO 2/Mo2C system maintains high catalytic activity for partial oxidation while the lattice oxygen serves as a carbon buffer for preventing coke formation. This unique feature allows for longer operation reforming times despite slightly lower catalytic activity compared to the catalysts prepared by the traditional temperature-programmed reaction method. Moreover, it is demonstrated by a pulse reaction technique that during the phase transformation of MoO2 to beta-Mo2C, the formation of Mo metal as an intermediate is not responsible for the sintering of the material wrongly assumed by the temperature-programmed method.

  13. Enhancing catalytic performance of palladium in gold and palladium alloy nanoparticles for organic synthesis reactions through visible light irradiation at ambient temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarina, Sarina; Zhu, Huaiyong; Jaatinen, Esa; Xiao, Qi; Liu, Hongwei; Jia, Jianfeng; Chen, Chao; Zhao, Jian

    2013-04-17

    The intrinsic catalytic activity of palladium (Pd) is significantly enhanced in gold (Au)-Pd alloy nanoparticles (NPs) under visible light irradiation at ambient temperatures. The alloy NPs strongly absorb light and efficiently enhance the conversion of several reactions, including Suzuki-Miyaura cross coupling, oxidative addition of benzylamine, selective oxidation of aromatic alcohols to corresponding aldehydes and ketones, and phenol oxidation. The Au/Pd molar ratio of the alloy NPs has an important impact on performance of the catalysts since it determines both the electronic heterogeneity and the distribution of Pd sites at the NP surface, with these two factors playing key roles in the catalytic activity. Irradiating with light produces an even more profound enhancement in the catalytic performance of the NPs. For example, the best conversion rate achieved thermally at 30 °C for Suzuki-Miyaura cross coupling was 37% at a Au/Pd ratio of 1:1.86, while under light illumination the yield increased to 96% under the same conditions. The catalytic activity of the alloy NPs depends on the intensity and wavelength of incident light. Light absorption due to the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance of gold nanocrystals plays an important role in enhancing catalyst performance. We believe that the conduction electrons of the NPs gain the light absorbed energy producing energetic electrons at the surface Pd sites, which enhances the sites' intrinsic catalytic ability. These findings provide useful guidelines for designing efficient catalysts composed of alloys of a plasmonic metal and a catalytically active transition metal for various organic syntheses driven by sunlight. PMID:23566035

  14. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan, Monica, E-mail: monica.dan@itim-cj.ro; Mihet, Maria, E-mail: maria.mihet@itim-cj.ro; Lazar, Mihaela D., E-mail: diana.lazar@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 67-103 Donat Street, 400293 Cluj Napoca (Romania)

    2015-12-23

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H{sub 2}. In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}. The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H{sub 2}O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%.

  15. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Monica; Mihet, Maria; Lazar, Mihaela D.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H2. In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al2O3. The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H2, CH4, CO, CO2. The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H2O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%.

  16. Effective function annotation through catalytic residue conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Richard A; Spriggs, Ruth V; Bartlett, Gail J; Gutteridge, Alex; MacArthur, Malcolm W; Porter, Craig T; Al-Lazikani, Bissan; Thornton, Janet M; Swindells, Mark B

    2005-08-30

    Because of the extreme impact of genome sequencing projects, protein sequences without accompanying experimental data now dominate public databases. Homology searches, by providing an opportunity to transfer functional information between related proteins, have become the de facto way to address this. Although a single, well annotated, close relationship will often facilitate sufficient annotation, this situation is not always the case, particularly if mutations are present in important functional residues. When only distant relationships are available, the transfer of function information is more tenuous, and the likelihood of encountering several well annotated proteins with different functions is increased. The consequence for a researcher is a range of candidate functions with little way of knowing which, if any, are correct. Here, we address the problem directly by introducing a computational approach to accurately identify and segregate related proteins into those with a functional similarity and those where function differs. This approach should find a wide range of applications, including the interpretation of genomics/proteomics data and the prioritization of targets for high-throughput structure determination. The method is generic, but here we concentrate on enzymes and apply high-quality catalytic site data. In addition to providing a series of comprehensive benchmarks to show the overall performance of our approach, we illustrate its utility with specific examples that include the correct identification of haptoglobin as a nonenzymatic relative of trypsin, discrimination of acid-d-amino acid ligases from a much larger ligase pool, and the successful annotation of BioH, a structural genomics target.

  17. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas, Christpher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2013-12-17

    A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and show to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hyrdocarbons into hydrocarbons removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  18. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nicholas, Christopher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2014-10-07

    A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and shown to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub.1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hydrocarbons into hydrocarbons and removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  19. Microchannel Reactor System for Catalytic Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeniyi Lawal; Woo Lee; Ron Besser; Donald Kientzler; Luke Achenie

    2010-12-22

    We successfully demonstrated a novel process intensification concept enabled by the development of microchannel reactors, for energy efficient catalytic hydrogenation reactions at moderate temperature, and pressure, and low solvent levels. We designed, fabricated, evaluated, and optimized a laboratory-scale microchannel reactor system for hydrogenation of onitroanisole and a proprietary BMS molecule. In the second phase of the program, as a prelude to full-scale commercialization, we designed and developed a fully-automated skid-mounted multichannel microreactor pilot plant system for multiphase reactions. The system is capable of processing 1 – 10 kg/h of liquid substrate, and an industrially relevant immiscible liquid-liquid was successfully demonstrated on the system. Our microreactor-based pilot plant is one-of-akind. We anticipate that this process intensification concept, if successfully demonstrated, will provide a paradigm-changing basis for replacing existing energy inefficient, cost ineffective, environmentally detrimental slurry semi-batch reactor-based manufacturing practiced in the pharmaceutical and fine chemicals industries.

  20. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M. [Molten Metal Technology, Inc., Waltham, MA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy issued a Planned Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) in 1993, with the objective of identifying unique technologies which could be applied to the most hazardous waste streams at DOE sites. The combination of radioactive contamination with additional contamination by hazardous constituents such as those identified by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) pose an especially challenging problem. Traditional remediation technologies are increasingly becoming less acceptable to stakeholders and regulators because of the risks they pose to public health and safety. Desirable recycling technologies were described by the DOE as: (1) easily installed, operated, and maintained; (2) exhibiting superior environmental performance; (3) protective of worker and public health and safety; (4) readily acceptable to a wide spectrum of evaluators; and (5) economically feasible. Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT) was awarded a contract as a result of the PRDA initiative to demonstrate the applicability of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP), MMT`s proprietary elemental recycling technology, to DOE`s inventory of low level mixed waste. This includes DOE`s inventory of radioactively- and RCRA-contaminated scrap metal and other waste forms expected to be generated by the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of DOE sites.

  1. Process for catalytic flue gas denoxing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the increasing concern for the environment, stringency of legislation and industry's awareness of its own environmental responsibility, the demand for the reduction of emission levels of nitrogen oxides is becoming increasingly urgent. This paper reports that Shell has developed a low temperature catalytic deNOx system for deep removal of nitrogen oxides, which includes a low-pressure-drop reactor. This process is able to achieve over 90% removal of nitrogen oxides and therefore can be expected to meet legislation requirements for the coming years. The development of a low-temperature catalyst makes it possible to operate at temperatures as low as 120 degrees C, compared to 300-400 degrees C for the conventional honeycomb and plate-type catalysts. This allows an add-on construction, which is most often a more economical solution than the retrofits in the hot section required with conventional deNOx catalysts. The Lateral Flow Reactor (LFR), which is used for dust-free flue gas applications, and the Parallel Passage Reactor (PPR) for dust-containing flue gas applications, have been developed to work with pressure drops below 10 mbar

  2. Coupled Dynamics and Entropic Contribution to the Allosteric Mechanism of Pin1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barman, Arghya; Hamelberg, Donald

    2016-08-25

    Allosteric communication in proteins regulates a plethora of downstream processes in subcellular signaling pathways. Describing the effects of cooperative ligand binding on the atomic level is a key to understanding many regulatory processes involving biomolecules. Here, we use microsecond-long molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the allosteric mechanism of Pin1, a potential therapeutic target and a phosphorylated-Ser/Thr dependent peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase that regulates several subcellular processes and has been implicated in many diseases, including cancer and Alzheimer's. Experimental studies suggest that the catalytic domain and the noncatalytic WW domain are allosterically coupled; however, an atomic level description of the dynamics associated with the interdomain communication is lacking. We show that binding of the substrate to the WW domain is directly coupled to the dynamics of the catalytic domain, causing rearrangement of the residue-residue contact dynamics from the WW domain to the catalytic domain. The binding affinity of the substrate in the catalytic domain is also enhanced upon binding of the substrate to the WW domain. Modulation of the dynamics of the catalytic domain upon binding of the substrate to the WW domain leads to prepayment of the entropic cost of binding the substrate to the catalytic domain. This study shows that Ile 28 at the interfacial region between the catalytic and WW domains is certainly one of the residues responsible for bridging the communication between the two domains. The results complement previous experiments and provide valuable atomistic insights into the role of dynamics and possible entropic contribution to the allosteric mechanism of proteins. PMID:27077947

  3. Plasma Catalytic Extraction of Oxygen from the Martian Atmosphere Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Plasma catalytic techniques are proposed for the extraction of oxygen from the abundant carbon dioxide contained in the Martian atmosphere (95% CO2).. The Phase I...

  4. Enantiocontrol in Macrocycle Formation from Catalytic MetalCarbene Transformations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DOYLE, Michael P.; DOYLE, Michael P; HU, Wen-Hao(胡文浩); 胡文浩

    2001-01-01

    The development of catalytic metal carbene transformations for the construction of macrocyclic lactones has dramatically increased their synthetic advantages.This is the first review of this developing methodology.

  5. Mesoporous zeolite single crystals for catalytic hydrocarbon conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, I.; Christensen, C.H.; Hasselriis, Peter;

    2005-01-01

    Recently, mesoporous zeolite single crystals were discovered. They constitute a novel family of materials that features a combined micropore and mesopore architecture within each individual crystal. Here, we briefly summarize recent catalytic results from cracking and isomerization of alkalies, a...

  6. Size-dependent catalytic activity of supported metal clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Z.; Xiao, F.-S.; Purnell, S. K.; Alexeev, O.; Kawi, S.; Deutsch, S. E.; Gates, B. C.

    1994-11-01

    BECAUSE catalysis by metals is a surface phenomenon, many technological catalysts contain small (typically nanometre-sized) supported metal particles with a large fraction of the atoms exposed1. Many reactions, such as hydrocarbon hydrogenations, are structure-insensitive, proceeding at approximately the same rate on metal particles of various sizes provided that they are larger than about 1 nm and show bulk-like metallic behaviour1. But it is not known whether the catalytic properties of metal particles become size-dependent as the particles become so small that they are no longer metallic in character. Here we investigate the catalytic behaviour of precisely defined clusters of just four and six iridium atoms on solid supports. We find that the Ir4 and Ir6 clusters differ in catalytic activity both from each other and from metallic Ir particles. This raises the possibility of tailoring the catalytic behaviour of metal clusters by controlling the cluster size.

  7. Scaling behavior of optimally structured catalytic microfluidic reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okkels, Fridolin; Bruus, Henrik

    2007-01-01

    In this study of catalytic microfluidic reactors we show that, when optimally structured, these reactors share underlying scaling properties. The scaling is predicted theoretically and verified numerically. Furthermore, we show how to increase the reaction rate significantly by distributing the...

  8. Optimized Combination of Residue Hydrodesulfurization and Residue Fluid Catalytic Cracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Junwu

    2003-01-01

    @@1 Introduction Combination of residue hydrodesulfurization (HDS) and resi-due fluid catalytic cracking (RFCC) is a unique technologyfor processing high-sulfur residue. This paper discusses theoptimized combination of these two processes.

  9. Synthesis and Catalytic Activity of Two New Cyclic Tetraaza Ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burkhard König

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Two new chiral cyclic tetraaza ligands were synthesized and characterized. Their catalytic activity was tested in the asymmetric addition of diethylzinc to benzaldehyde. The expected secondary alcohol was obtained in moderate yields, but with very low enantioselectivity.

  10. Northwestern University Facility for Clean Catalytic Process Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marks, Tobin Jay [Northwestern University

    2013-05-08

    Northwestern University with DOE support created a Facility for Clean Catalytic Process Research. This facility is designed to further strengthen our already strong catalysis research capabilities and thus to address these National challenges. Thus, state-of-the art instrumentation and experimentation facility was commissioned to add far greater breadth, depth, and throughput to our ability to invent, test, and understand catalysts and catalytic processes, hence to improve them via knowledge-based design and evaluation approaches.

  11. Catalytic Upgrading of Sugars to Hydrocarbons Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddy, M.; Jones, S.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the catalytic conversion of solubilized carbohydrate streams to hydrocarbon biofuels, utilizing data from recent efforts within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium (NABC) in collaboration with Virent, Inc. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for the catalytic conversion of sugars pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks have been identified.

  12. Water recovery by catalytic treatment of urine vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budininkas, P.; Quattrone, P. D.; Leban, M. I.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to demonstrate the feasibility of water recovery on a man-rated scale by the catalytic processing of untreated urine vapor. For this purpose, two catalytic systems, one capable of processing an air stream containing low urine vapor concentrations and another to process streams with high urine vapor concentrations, were designed, constructed, and tested to establish the quality of the recovered water.

  13. Graphene-based materials in catalytic wet peroxide oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Helder; Ribeiro, Rui; Pastrana-Martínez, Luisa; Figueiredo, José; Faria, Joaquim; Silva, Adrián

    2014-01-01

    In catalytic wet peroxide oxidation (CWPO),an advanced oxidation process, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is decomposed catalytically giving rise to hydroxyl radicals (HO•).These radicals, exhibiting high oxidizing potential, serve as effective and non selective species for the degradation of several organic pollutants in liquid phase. Since the report of Lücking et al. [1], carbon materials have been explored as catalysts for CWPO[2]. Recent reports address process intensification issues, br...

  14. Catalytic Ozonation of Phenolic Wastewater: Identification and Toxicity of Intermediates

    OpenAIRE

    Mahdi Farzadkia; Yousef Dadban Shahamat; Simin Nasseri; Amir Hossein Mahvi; Mitra Gholami; Ali Shahryari

    2014-01-01

    A new strategy in catalytic ozonation removal method for degradation and detoxification of phenol from industrial wastewater was investigated. Magnetic carbon nanocomposite, as a novel catalyst, was synthesized and then used in the catalytic ozonation process (COP) and the effects of operational conditions such as initial pH, reaction time, and initial concentration of phenol on the degradation efficiency and the toxicity assay have been investigated. The results showed that the highest catal...

  15. Catalytic flash pyrolysis of oil-impregnated-wood and jatropha cake using sodium based catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali Imran, A.; Bramer, E.A.; Seshan, K.; Brem, G.

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of wood with impregnated vegetable oil was investigated and compared with catalytic pyrolysis of jatropha cake making use of sodium based catalysts to produce a high quality bio-oil. The catalytic pyrolysis was carried out in two modes: in-situ catalytic pyrolysis and post treatm

  16. Catalytic and thermal depolymerization of low value post-consumer high density polyethylene plastic

    Science.gov (United States)

    The feasibility of catalytic and non-catalytic pyrolytic conversion of low value post-consumer high density polyethylene (HDPE) plastic into crude oil and subsequent distillation was explored. Translation of optimized conditions for catalytic and non-catalytic pyrolysis from TGA to a bench-scale sys...

  17. Catalytic pyrolysis of waste rice husk over mesoporous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis of waste rice husk was carried out using pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry [Py-GC/MS]. Meso-MFI zeolite [Meso-MFI] was used as the catalyst. In addition, a 0.5-wt.% platinum [Pt] was ion-exchanged into Meso-MFI to examine the effect of Pt addition. Using a catalytic upgrading method, the activities of the catalysts were evaluated in terms of product composition and deoxygenation. The structure and acid site characteristics of the catalysts were analyzed by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller surface area measurement and NH3 temperature-programmed desorption analysis. Catalytic upgrading reduced the amount of oxygenates in the product vapor due to the cracking reaction of the catalysts. Levoglucosan, a polymeric oxygenate species, was completely decomposed without being detected. While the amount of heavy phenols was reduced by catalytic upgrading, the amount of light phenols was increased because of the catalytic cracking of heavy phenols into light phenols and aromatics. The amount of aromatics increased remarkably as a result of catalytic upgrading, which is attributed to the strong Brönsted acid sites and the shape selectivity of the Meso-MFI catalyst. The addition of Pt made the Meso-MFI catalyst even more active in deoxygenation and in the production of aromatics. PMID:22221540

  18. Catalytic pyrolysis of car tire waste using expanded perlite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Y

    2011-08-01

    In this study, the non-catalytic and catalytic pyrolysis experiments were conducted on the sample of tire waste using expanded perlite as an additive material to determine especially the effect of temperature and catalyst-to-tire ratio on the products yields and the compositions and qualities of pyrolytic oils (NCPO and CPO). Non-catalytic studies, which were carried out under the certain conditions (a nitrogen flow of 100mL/min and a heating rate of 10°C/min), showed that the highest yield of pyrolytic oil (NCPO) was 60.02wt.% at 425°C. Then, the catalytic pyrolysis studies were carried out at catalyst-to-tire ratio range of 0.05-0.25 and the highest catalytic pyrolytic oil (CPO) yield was 65.11wt.% at the ratio of 0.10 with the yield increase of 8.48wt.% compared with the non-catalytic pyrolysis. Lastly, the pyrolytic oils were characterized with applying a various techniques such as elemental analyses and various chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques (GC-MS, (1)H NMR, FT-IR, etc.). The characterization results revealed that the pyrolytic oils which were complex mixtures of C(5)-C(15) organic compounds (predominantly aromatic compounds) and also the CPO compared to the NCPO was more similar to conventional fuels in view of the certain fuel properties.

  19. Catalytic activities of zeolite compounds for decomposing aqueous ozone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusuda, Ai; Kitayama, Mikito; Ohta, Yoshio

    2013-12-01

    The advanced oxidation process (AOP), chemical oxidation using aqueous ozone in the presence of appropriate catalysts to generate highly reactive oxygen species, offers an attractive option for removing poorly biodegradable pollutants. Using the commercial zeolite powders with various Si/Al ratios and crystal structures, their catalytic activities for decomposing aqueous ozone were evaluated by continuously flowing ozone to water containing the zeolite powders. The hydrophilic zeolites (low Si/Al ratio) with alkali cations in the crystal structures were found to possess high catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. The hydrophobic zeolite compounds (high Si/Al ratio) were found to absorb ozone very well, but to have no catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone. Their catalytic activities were also evaluated by using the fixed bed column method. When alkali cations were removed by acid rinsing or substituted by alkali-earth cations, the catalytic activities was significantly deteriorated. These results suggest that the metal cations on the crystal surface of the hydrophilic zeolite would play a key role for catalytic activity for decomposing aqueous ozone.

  20. Molecular Self-Assembly Strategy for Generating Catalytic Hybrid Polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikezoe, Yasuhiro; Pike, Douglas H.; Nanda, Vikas; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Recently, catalytic peptides were introduced that mimicked protease activities and showed promising selectivity of products even in organic solvents where protease cannot perform well. However, their catalytic efficiency was extremely low compared to natural enzyme counterparts presumably due to the lack of stable tertiary fold. We hypothesized that assembling these peptides along with simple hydrophobic pockets, mimicking enzyme active sites, could enhance the catalytic activity. Here we fused the sequence of catalytic peptide CP4, capable of protease and esterase-like activities, into a short amyloidogenic peptide fragment of Aβ. When the fused CP4-Aβ construct assembled into antiparallel β-sheets and amyloid fibrils, a 4.0-fold increase in the hydrolysis rate of p-nitrophenyl acetate (p-NPA) compared to neat CP4 peptide was observed. The enhanced catalytic activity of CP4-Aβ assembly could be explained both by pre-organization of a catalytically competent Ser-His-acid triad and hydrophobic stabilization of a bound substrate between the triad and p-NPA, indicating that a design strategy for self-assembled peptides is important to accomplish the desired functionality. PMID:27116246

  1. Catalytic decarboxylations of fatty acids in immature oil source rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李哲; 张再龙; 孙燕华; 劳永新; 蔺五正; 吴卫芳

    2003-01-01

    Catalytic decarboxylations of fatty acids in immature oil source rock samples were examined in this study. The rock samples were obtained from seven oil fields in China. In order to clarify the effect of each mineral matter in the rock samples, both the Fe M?ssbauer effect and the X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to determine the relative content of each mineral in the rock samples, and the catalytic activities of several minerals like clays, carbonates and pyrite were determined. The Fe M?ssbauer effect and the XRD studies show that clays are the main mineral components in the rock samples except for the samples from Biyang and Jianghan in which the main mineral component is ankerite. The other mineral components include calcite, plagioclase, quartz, feldspar, siderite, aragonite, pyrite, analcime, pyroxene and anhydrite. The studies of the catalytic decarboxylations of fatty acids suggest that carbonates and pyrite can make much greater contributions to the catalytic activities of the rock samples than clays. It is found that the overall catalytic activities of the rock samples are well related to the relative contents and the catalytic activities of clays, carbonates and pyrite in the rock samples.

  2. Coupling Reduces Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Kia, Behnam; Kia, Sarvenaz; Lindner, John. F.; Sinha, Sudeshna; Ditto, William L.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate how coupling nonlinear dynamical systems can reduce the effects of noise. For simplicity we investigate noisy coupled map lattices. Noise from different lattice nodes can diffuse across the lattice and lower the noise level of individual nodes. We develop a theoretical model that explains this observed noise evolution and show how the coupled dynamics can naturally function as an averaging filter. Our numerical simulations are in excellent agreement with the model predictions.

  3. Human P-glycoprotein exhibits reduced affinity for substrates during a catalytic transition state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandra, M; Ambudkar, S V; Chen, D; Hrycyna, C A; Dey, S; Gottesman, M M; Pastan, I

    1998-04-01

    Human P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a plasma membrane protein that confers multidrug resistance, functions as an ATP-dependent drug efflux pump. Pgp contains two ATP binding/utilization sites and exhibits ATPase activity that is stimulated in the presence of substrates and modulating agents. The mechanism of coupling of ATP hydrolysis to drug transport is not known. To understand the role of ATP hydrolysis in drug binding, it is necessary to develop methods for purifying and reconstituting Pgp that retains properties including stimulation of ATPase activity by known substrates to an extent similar to that in the native membrane. In this study, (His)6-tagged Pgp was expressed in Trichoplusia ni (High Five) cells using the recombinant baculovirus system and purified by metal affinity chromatography. Upon reconstitution into phospholipid vesicles, purified Pgp exhibited specific binding to analogues of substrates and ATP in affinity labeling experiments and displayed a high level of drug-stimulated ATPase activity (specific activity ranging from 4.5 to 6.5 micromol min-1 mg-1). The ATPase activity was inhibited by ADP in a competitive manner, and by vanadate and N-ethylmaleimide at low concentrations. Vanadate which is known to inhibit ATPase activity by trapping MgADP at the catalytic site inhibited photoaffinity labeling of Pgp with substrate analogues, [125I]iodoarylazidoprazosin and [3H]azidopine, only under ATP hydrolysis conditions. Because vanadate-trapped Pgp is known to resemble the ADP and phosphate-bound catalytic transition state, our findings indicate that ATP hydrolysis results in a conformation with reduced affinity for substrates. A catalytic transition conformation with reduced affinity would essentially result in substrate dissociation and supports a model for drug transport in which an ATP hydrolysis-induced conformational change leads to drug release toward the extracellular medium.

  4. Nonlinearity Induced Critical Coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, K Nireekshan; Gupta, S Dutta

    2013-01-01

    We study a critically coupled system (Opt. Lett., \\textbf{32}, 1483 (2007)) with a Kerr-nonlinear spacer layer. Nonlinearity is shown to inhibit null-scattering in a critically coupled system at low powers. However, a system detuned from critical coupling can exhibit near-complete suppression of scattering by means of nonlinearity-induced changes in refractive index. Our studies reveal clearly an important aspect of critical coupling as a delicate balance in both the amplitude and the phase relations, while a nonlinear resonance in dispersive bistability concerns only the phase.

  5. Separation of electron-transfer and coupled chemical reaction components of biocatalytic processes using Fourier transform ac voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Barry D; Zhang, Jie; Bond, Alan M; Bell, Stephen G; Wong, Luet-Lok

    2005-06-01

    The underlying electron-transfer and coupled chemical processes associated with biologically important catalytic reactions can be resolved using a combination of Fourier transform ac voltammetry with an analysis of the separated dc and ac components. This outcome can be achieved because the response associated with generation of the catalytic current is essentially confined to the steady-state dc component, whereas the electron-transfer step is dominant in the fundamental and higher harmonics. For the mediated oxidation of glucose with glucose oxidase, it was found that the underlying reversible redox chemistry of the mediator, ferrocenemonocarboxylic acid, as detected in the third and higher harmonics, was totally unaffected by introduction of the catalytic process. In contrast, for the catalytic reduction of molecular oxygen by cytochrome P450, slight changes in the P450 redox process were detected when the catalytic reaction was present. Simulations of a simple catalytic reaction scheme support the fidelity of this novel FT ac voltammetric approach for examining mechanistic nuances of catalytic forms of electrochemical reaction schemes.

  6. Unraveling Surface Plasmon Decay in Core-Shell Nanostructures toward Broadband Light-Driven Catalytic Organic Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao; Zhang, Lei; Lv, Zhiheng; Long, Ran; Zhang, Chao; Lin, Yue; Wei, Kecheng; Wang, Chengming; Chen, Lu; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Zhang, Qun; Luo, Yi; Xiong, Yujie

    2016-06-01

    Harnessing surface plasmon of metal nanostructures to promote catalytic organic synthesis holds great promise in solar-to-chemical energy conversion. High conversion efficiency relies not only on broadening the absorption spectrum but on coupling the harvested energy into chemical reactions. Such coupling undergoes hot-electron transfer and photothermal conversion during the decay of surface plasmon; however, the two plasmonic effects are unfortunately entangled, making their individual roles still under debate. Here, we report that in a model system of bimetallic Au-Pd core-shell nanostructures the two effects can be disentangled through tailoring the shell thickness at atomic-level precision. As demonstrated by our ultrafast absorption spectroscopy characterizations, the achieved tunability of the two effects in a model reaction of Pd-catalyzed organic hydrogenation offers a knob for enhancing energy coupling. In addition, the two intrinsic plasmonic modes at 400-700 and 700-1000 nm in the bar-shaped nanostructures allow for utilizing photons to a large extent in full solar spectrum. This work establishes a paradigmatic guidance toward designing plasmonic-catalytic nanomaterials for enhanced solar-to-chemical energy conversion.

  7. Catalytic conversion of chloromethane to methanol and dimethyl ether over two catalytic beds: a study of acid strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, D.R.; Leite, T.C.M.; Mota, C.J.A. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica], e-mail: cmota@iq.ufrj.br

    2010-07-15

    The catalytic hydrolysis of chloromethane to methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) was studied over metal-exchanged Beta and Mordenite zeolites, acidic MCM-22 and SAPO-5. The use of a second catalytic bed with HZSM-5 zeolite increased the selectivity to DME, due to methanol dehydration on the acid sites. The effect was more significant on catalysts presenting medium and weak acid site distribution, showing that dehydration of methanol to DME is accomplished over sites of higher acid strength. (author)

  8. Treatment of waste metalworking fluid by a hybrid ozone-biological process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagadevan, Sheeja; Graham, Nigel J; Thompson, Ian P

    2013-01-15

    In metal machining processes, the regulation of heat generation and lubrication at the contact point are achieved by application of a fluid referred to as metalworking fluid (MWF). MWFs inevitably become operationally exhausted with age and intensive use, which leads to compromised properties, thereby necessitating their safe disposal. Disposal of this waste through a biological route is an increasingly attractive option, since it is effective with relatively low energy demands. However, successful biological treatment is challenging since MWFs are chemically complex, and include biocides specifically to retard microbial deterioration whilst the fluids are operational. In this study remediation of the recalcitrant component of a semi-synthetic MWF by a novel hybrid ozone-bacteriological treatment, was investigated. The hybrid treatment proved to be effective and reduced the chemical oxygen demand by 72% (26.9% and 44.9% reduction after ozonation and biological oxidation respectively). Furthermore, a near-complete degradation of three non-biodegradable compounds (viz. benzotriazole, monoethanolamine, triethanolamine), commonly added as biocides and corrosion inhibitors in MWF formulations, under ozonation was observed. PMID:23274939

  9. Synthesis and catalytic application of palladium nanoparticles supported on kaolinite-based nanohybrid materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngnie, Gaelle; Dedzo, Gustave K; Detellier, Christian

    2016-05-31

    Palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs) were deposited on the surface of the modified clay mineral, kaolinite. To improve compatibility, abundance and control of the size of the nanoparticles, kaolinite was modified by the grafting of an amino alcohol (triethanolamine (TEA)) and an ionic liquid (1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-3-methylimidazolium (ImIL)). Characterization techniques (XRD, TGA, solid state (13)C NMR and FTIR spectroscopy) confirmed the effective grafting of these compounds on the internal surface of kaolinite. After the synthesis of PdNPs onto clay particles, TEM allowed the visualization of abundant PdNPs with sizes ranging from 4 to 6 nm, uniformly distributed onto the platelets of modified kaolinite. Unmodified clay showed low abundance and random distribution of the nanoparticles. The catalysts obtained were effective for the catalytic reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP), the material with TEA being the most effective. These materials have exhibited excellent performance during the Heck and particularly the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reactions, with reaction yields up to 100%. These catalysts showed a very slight loss in activity for three consecutive catalytic cycles (less than 10% decrease of the activity compared to the first cycle). This was an evidence that the prior grafting modification of kaolinite helps in significantly improving the quality of the synthesized NPs and also promotes their strong attachment onto the clay mineral surface. PMID:27160392

  10. A hybrid process combining homogeneous catalytic ozonation and membrane distillation for wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Peng; Li, Jie; Hou, Deyin; Wang, Jun; Liu, Huijuan

    2016-10-01

    A novel catalytic ozonation membrane reactor (COMR) coupling homogeneous catalytic ozonation and direct contact membrane distillation (DCMD) was developed for refractory saline organic pollutant treatment from wastewater. An ozonation process took place in the reactor to degrade organic pollutants, whilst the DCMD process was used to recover ionic catalysts and produce clean water. It was found that 98.6% total organic carbon (TOC) and almost 100% salt were removed and almost 100% metal ion catalyst was recovered. TOC in the permeate water was less than 16 mg/L after 5 h operation, which was considered satisfactory as the TOC in the potassium hydrogen phthalate (KHP) feed water was as high as 1000 mg/L. Meanwhile, the membrane distillation flux in the COMR process was 49.8% higher than that in DCMD process alone after 60 h operation. Further, scanning electron microscope images showed less amount and smaller size of contaminants on the membrane surface, which indicated the mitigation of membrane fouling. The tensile strength and FT-IR spectra tests did not reveal obvious changes for the polyvinylidene fluoride membrane after 60 h operation, which indicated the good durability. This novel COMR hybrid process exhibited promising application prospects for saline organic wastewater treatment. PMID:27372262

  11. CO oxidation over ruthenium: identification of the catalytically active phases at near-atmospheric pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Feng; Goodman, Wayne D.

    2012-05-21

    CO oxidation was carried out over Ru(0001) and RuO2(110) thin film grown on Ru(0001) at various O2/CO ratios near atmospheric pressures. Reaction kinetics, coupled with in situ polarization modulation infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRAS) and post-reaction Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) measurements were used to identify the catalytically relevant phases at different reaction conditions. Under stoichiometric and reducing conditions at all reaction temperatures, as well as net-oxidizing reaction conditions below {approx}475 K, a reduced metallic phase with chemisorbed oxygen is the thermodynamically stable and catalytically active phase. On this surface CO oxidation occurs at surface defect sites, for example step edges. Only at net-oxidizing reaction conditions and above {approx}475 K is the RuO2 thin film grown on metallic Ru stable and active. However, RuO2 is not active itself without the existence of the metal substrate, suggesting the importance of a strong metal-substrate interaction (SMSI).

  12. Preparation and photo-catalytic activities of FeOOH/ZnO/MMT composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yao; Liu, Fusheng; Yu, Shitao

    2015-11-01

    Montmorillonite (MMT) was used as the carrier for synthesis of FeOOH and FeOOH/ZnO nano-material. FeOOH and FeOOH/ZnO were synthesized by the aqueous solutions of Fe(NO3)3-HNO3 and Zn(NO3)2-NaOH/Fe(NO3)3-HNO3 with the carrier of montmorillonite respectively. Transmission electron-microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to study the morphology form and structure of the nano-materials. TEM was also used to demonstrate that FeOOH/ZnO can be formed with the appropriate interface. According to UV-vis absorption spectra, FeOOH/ZnO has a better response to visible light than FeOOH and ZnO, which indicates there is some coupling effect between FeOOH and ZnO. Pentachlorophenol (PCP) was used as a representative organic pollutant to evaluate the photo-catalytic efficiency of the FeOOH/ZnO and FeOOH catalysts in visible light (λ > 400 nm). The photo-catalytic efficiency of FeOOH/ZnO/MMT is better than FeOOH/MMT. According to FTIR, changes of pH and TOC, the degradation mechanism was also discussed. PCP was degraded to aromatic ketone and chloro-hydrocarbon compounds and then to H2O, CO2 and HCl.

  13. An experimental and computational investigation of structural dependence of catalytic properties of Pt-Ru nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasai, Binay

    An approach to determining the 3D atomic structure of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) in fine detail is described and exemplified on Pt-Ru alloy NPs of importance to the development of devices for clean energy conversion such as fuel cells. NPs are characterized structurally by total scattering experiments involving high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution functions (PDFs) analysis. 3D structure models are built by molecular dynamics simulations and further refined against the experimental PDF data by reverse Monte Carlo simulations and analyzed in terms of structural characteristics. Structural characteristics of activated NPs and data for their catalytic activity are compared side by side and strong evidence found that electronic effects, indicated by significant changes in Pt-Pt and Ru-Ru metal bond lengths at NP surface, and practically unrecognized so far atomic ensemble effects, indicated by distinct stacking of atomic layers near NP surface and prevalence of particular configurations of Pt and Ru atoms in these layers, contribute to the observed enhancement of the catalytic activity of PtxRu100 -x alloy NPs at x ~ 50. Central Michigan University, Department of Energy.

  14. Preparation of rare-earth metal complex oxide catalysts for catalytic wet air oxidation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Ning; LI Guangming; YAO Zhenya; ZHAO Jianfu

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation(CWAO)is one of the most promising technologies for pollution abatement.Developing catalysts with high activity and stability is crucial for the application of the CWAO process.The Mn/Ce complex oxide catalyrsts for CWAO of high concentration phenol containing wastewater were prepared by coprecipitation.The catalyst preparation conditions were optimized by using an orthogonal layout method and single-factor experimental analysis.The Mn/Ce serial catalysts were characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller(BET)analysis and the metal cation leaching was measured by inductively coupled plasma torch-atomic emission spectrometry(ICP-AES).The results show that the catalysts have high catalytic activities even at a low temperature(80℃)and low oxygen partial pressure(0.5 MPa)in a batch reactor.The metallic ion leaching is comparatively low(Mn<6.577 mg/L and Ce<0.6910 mg/L,respectively)in the CWAO process.The phenol,CODCD and TOC removal efficiencies in the solution exceed 98.5% using the optimal catalyst(named CSP).The new catalyst would have a promising application in CWAO treatment of high concentration organic wastewater.

  15. [Nitric Oxide Removal with a Fe-TiO₂/PSF Hybrid Catalytic Membrane Bioreactor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao-ren; Chen, Zhou-yang; Wang, Jian-bin; Zhang, Zai-li; Fan, Qing-juan; Wei, Zai-shan

    2016-03-15

    The Fe-doped titanium dioxide (Fe-TiO₂) was prepared by the sol-gel method and was loaded on polysulfone (PSF) hollow fiber membrane. A novel Fe-TiO₂/PSF hybrid catalytic membrane biofilm reactor (HCMBfR) was investigated for nitric oxide removal, to further improve the elimination capacity. HCMBfR exhibited a good stability in the 180-day operation period, the NO removal efficiency was up to 93.2% and the maximum elimination capacity reached 167.1 g · (m³ · h)⁻1. The additional use of the biofilm to wet Fe-TiO₂/PSF membrane catalysis reactor led to the enhancement of NO removal efficiency from 59. 5% to 66% . The NO removal efficiency in the intimate coupling of Fe-TiO₂/PSF hybrid catalytic membrane and biofilm reactor ( HCMBfR) increased from 1.4% to 13% as compared to that of the membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) only. The optimal illumination intensity, gas residence time, pH and nC/nN were 670 lx, 9 a, 6.8-7.2 and 3.7, respectively. PMID:27337874

  16. Palladium supported on natural phosphate: Catalyst for Suzuki coupling reactions in water

    KAUST Repository

    Hassine, Ayoub

    2013-01-01

    The Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction is one of the most important synthetic catalytic reactions developed in the 20th century. However, the use of toxic organic solvents for this reaction still poses a scientific challenge and is an aspect of economical and ecological relevance. The use of water as a reaction medium overcomes this issue. In the present work, we described efficient Suzuki coupling reactions in water, without any phase transfer reagents and it is possible to couple challenging substrates like aryl chlorides. Notably, this protocol also works with ultra-low loading of catalyst with high turnover numbers. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  17. International Migration of Couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Martin D.; Junge, Martin; Poutvaara, Panu

    2016-01-01

    We develop a theoretical model regarding the migration of dual-earner couples and test it in the context of international migration. Our model predicts that the probability that a couple emigrates increases with the income of the primary earner, whereas the income of the secondary earner may affect...

  18. Translation-coupling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleger, Brian; Mendez-Perez, Daniel

    2013-11-05

    Disclosed are systems and methods for coupling translation of a target gene to a detectable response gene. A version of the invention includes a translation-coupling cassette. The translation-coupling cassette includes a target gene, a response gene, a response-gene translation control element, and a secondary structure-forming sequence that reversibly forms a secondary structure masking the response-gene translation control element. Masking of the response-gene translation control element inhibits translation of the response gene. Full translation of the target gene results in unfolding of the secondary structure and consequent translation of the response gene. Translation of the target gene is determined by detecting presence of the response-gene protein product. The invention further includes RNA transcripts of the translation-coupling cassettes, vectors comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, hosts comprising the translation-coupling cassettes, methods of using the translation-coupling cassettes, and gene products produced with the translation-coupling cassettes.

  19. Study of Single Catalytic Events at Copper-in-Charcoal: Localization of Click Activity Through Subdiffraction Observation of Single Catalytic Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decan, Matthew R; Scaiano, Juan C

    2015-10-15

    Single molecule fluorescence microscopy reveals that copper-in-charcoal--a high performance click catalyst- has remarkably few catalytic sites, with 90% of the charcoal particles being inactive, and for the catalytic ones the active sites represent a minute fraction (∼0.003%) of the surface. The intermittent nature of the catalytic events enables subdiffraction resolution and mapping of the catalytic sites. PMID:26722775

  20. Carboxylic acid derivatives via catalytic carboxylation of unsaturated hydrocarbons: whether the nature of a reductant may determine the mechanism of CO2 incorporation?

    OpenAIRE

    Kirillov, E.; Carpentier, J.-F.; Bunel, E

    2015-01-01

    International audience Application of CO2 as a renewable feedstock and C1 building block for prodn. of commodity and fine chems. is a highly challenging but obvious industry-relevant task. Of particular interest is the catalytic coupling of CO2 with inexpensive unsatd. hydrocarbons (olefins, dienes, styrenes, alkynes), providing direct access to carboxylic acids and their derivs. Although not brand new for the scientific community, it is still a complete challenge, as no truly effective ca...

  1. Millisecond dynamics in glutaredoxin during catalytic turnover is dependent on substrate binding and absent in the resting states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristine Steen; Winther, Jakob R; Teilum, Kaare

    2011-01-01

    on the time scale of catalytic turnover were not observed for the enzyme in the resting states, implying that alternative conformers do not accumulate to significant concentrations. These results infer that the turnover rate in glutaredoxin is governed by formation of a productive enzyme-substrate encounter...... to the glutathione exchange rate was observed for 23 residues. Binding of reduced glutathione resulted in competitive inhibition of the reduced enzyme having kinetics similar to that of the reaction. This observation couples the motions observed during catalysis directly to substrate binding. Backbone motions...

  2. From Electronic Structure to Catalytic Activity: A Single Descriptor for Adsorption and Reactivity on Transition-Metal Carbides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vojvodic, A.; Hellman, Anders; Ruberto, C.;

    2009-01-01

    Adsorption and catalytic properties of the polar (111) surface of transition-metal carbides (TMC's) are investigated by density-functional theory. Atomic and molecular adsorption are rationalized with the concerted-coupling model, in which two types of TMC surface resonances (SR's) play key roles....... The transition-metal derived SR is found to be a single measurable descriptor for the adsorption processes, implying that the Bronsted-Evans-Polanyi relation and scaling relations apply. This gives a picture with implications for ligand and vacancy effects and which has a potential for a broad screening...

  3. From electronic structure to catalytic activity: A single descriptor for adsorption and reactivity on transition-metal carbides

    CERN Document Server

    Vojvodic, Aleksandra; Ruberto, Carlo; Lundqvist, Bengt I

    2009-01-01

    Adsorption and catalytic properties of the polar (111) surface of transition-metal carbides (TMC's) are investigated by density-functional theory. Atomic and molecular adsorption are rationalized with the concerted-coupling model, in which two types of TMC surface resonances (SR's) play key roles. The transition-metal derived SR is found to be a single measurable descriptor for the adsorption processes, implying that the Br{\\o}nsted-Evans-Polanyi relation and scaling relations apply. This gives a picture with implications for ligand and vacancy effects and which has a potential for a broad screening procedure for heterogeneous catalysts.

  4. Ground energy coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, P. D.

    The feasibility of ground coupling for various heat pump systems was investigated. Analytical heat flow models were developed to approximate design ground coupling devices for use in solar heat pump space conditioning systems. A digital computer program called GROCS (GRound Coupled Systems) was written to model 3-dimensional underground heat flow in order to simulate the behavior of ground coupling experiments and to provide performance predictions which have been compared to experimental results. GROCS also has been integrated with TRNSYS. Soil thermal property and ground coupling device experiments are described. Buried tanks, serpentine earth coils in various configurations, lengths and depths, and sealed vertical wells are being investigated. An earth coil used to heat a house without use of resistance heating is described.

  5. Nickel(II) complexes containing thiosemicarbazone and triphenylphosphine: Synthesis, spectroscopy, crystallography and catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyarega, S.; Kalaivani, P.; Prabhakaran, R.; Hashimoto, T.; Endo, A.; Natarajan, K.

    2011-09-01

    Four new Ni(II) complexes of the general formula [Ni(PPh 3)(L)] (L = dibasic tridentate ligand derived from 4-diethylamino-salicylaldehyde and thiosemicarbazide or 4-N-substituted thiosemicarbazide) have been reported. The new complexes have been synthesized and characterized by analytical and spectroscopic (IR, electronic, 1H NMR and 31P NMR) techniques. Molecular structure of one of the complexes has been determined by X-ray crystallography. The complex, [Ni(PPh 3)(L4)] (H 2L4 = thiosemicarbazone prepared from 4-diethylamino-salicylaldehyde and 4-phenylthiosemicarbazide) crystallized in monoclinic space group with two molecules per unit cell and has the dimensions of a = 13.232(6) Å, b = 10.181(5) Å, c = 13.574(7) Å, α = 90°, β = 98.483(2)° and γ = 90°. Catalytic activity of the complexes has been explored for aryl-aryl coupling reaction.

  6. Crystal Structure and Catalytic Properties of Tetrakis(4-hydroxyphenyl) Porphyrinato Manganese (Ⅲ) Chloride (MnTHPPCl)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Jun-wei; HUANG Xiao-chun; LIU Jin-bin; CHEN Tie; XIANG Jing; TONG Shan-ling; YANG Ke-er; YAN Yan

    2007-01-01

    The crystal structure of meso-tetrakis (4-hydroxyphenyl) porphyrinato manganese chloride (MnTHPPCl) and its supramolecular architecture based on the hydrogen bonds of one counter Cl anion with four hydrogen atoms of four -OH groups from different MnTHPPCl molecules cooperated by self-assembly of the porphyrin units were first reported. This compound crystallized in the tetragonal space group I4/m with a = 1.39928(7) nm, b = 1.39928(7) nm,c =0.94498(10) nm, V = 1.8503(2) nm3, and Z = 2.As a catalyst, MnTHPPCl also showed a high catalytic activity in the conversion from 1-naphthylamine (1-NA) to bis (4-oxo-benzo-2-cyclohexen-1-yl) amine ( BOBCHA ) via oxidative coupling under mild conditions.

  7. Precursor type affecting surface properties and catalytic activity of sulfated zirconia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarubica Aleksandra R.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Zirconium-hydroxide precursor samples are synthesized from Zr-hydroxide, Zr-nitrate, and Zr-alkoxide, by precipitation/impregnation, as well as by a modified sol-gel method. Precursor samples are further sulphated for the intended SO4 2- content of 4 wt.%, and calcined at 500-700oC. Differences in precursors’ origin and calcination temperature induce the incorporation of SO4 2- groups into ZrO2 matrices by various mechanisms. As a result, different amounts of residual sulphates are coupled with other structural, as well as surface properties, resulting in various catalytic activities of sulphated zirconia samples. Catalyst activity and selectivity are a complex synergistic function of tetragonal phase fraction, sulphates contents, textural and surface characteristics. Superior activity of SZ of alkoxide origin can be explained by a beneficial effect of meso-pores owing to a better accommodation of coke deposits.

  8. A theoretical study for one-dimensional modeling for VOC in a catalytic converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, S.; Sharma, L.; Srivastava, V. K.

    2010-07-01

    Modeling for catalytic oxidation of a volatile organic compound, acetaldehyde for the purpose of controlling tail-pipe emissions from vehicular exhaust was carried out. The model developed was one-dimensional unsteady state model, using mass and energy balance equations to predict results for acetaldehyde conversion in an adiabatic monolith operating under warm-up conditions. The equations consisted of a set of partial differential equations that are coupled and solved using Backward Implicit Scheme. Analysis of the behavior of the converter during warm up period was carried out and it was observed that the warm up was faster for a fresh catalyst and this warm up period could be reduced by introducing hot incoming exhaust gas at higher temperature.

  9. Carbon supported trimetallic nickel-palladium-gold hollow nanoparticles with superior catalytic activity for methanol electrooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Changshuai; Hong, Wei; Wang, Jin; Wang, Erkang

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, Ni nanoparticles (NPs) are prepared in an aqueous solution by using sodium borohydride as reducing agent. With Ni NPs as the sacrificial template, hollow NiPdAu NPs are successfully prepared via partly galvanic displacement reaction between suitable metal precursors and Ni NPs. The as-synthesized hollow NiPdAu NPs can well dispersed on the carbon substrate. Transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry are taken to analyze the morphology, structure and composition of the as-synthesized catalysts. The prepared catalysts show superior catalytic activity and stability for methanol electrooxidation in alkaline media compared with commercial Pd/C and Pt/C. Catalysts prepared in this work show great potential to be anode catalysts in direct methanol fuel cells.

  10. Electro-catalytic effect of manganese oxide on oxygen reduction at teflonbonded carbon electrode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Oxygen reduction(OR)on Teflon-bonded carbon electrodes with manganese oxide as catalyst in 6 mol/L KOH solution was investigated using AC impedance spectroscopy combined with other techniques. For OR at this electrode, the Tafel slope is-0.084V/dec and the apparent exchange current density is (1.02-3.0)×10-7 A/cm2. In the presence of manganese oxide on carbon electrode,the couple Mn3+/Mn4+ reacts with the O2 adsorbed on carbon sites forming O2- radicals and acceletes the dismutation of O2-, which contributes to the catalytic effect of manganese oxide for OR reaction.

  11. Dynamic\tmodelling of catalytic three-phase reactors for hydrogenation and oxidation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmi T.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic modelling principles for typical catalytic three-phase reactors, batch autoclaves and fixed (trickle beds were described. The models consist of balance equations for the catalyst particles as well as for the bulk phases of gas and liquid. Rate equations, transport models and mass balances were coupled to generalized heterogeneous models which were solved with respect to time and space with algorithms suitable for stiff differential equations. The aspects of numerical solution strategies were discussed and the procedure was illustrated with three case studies: hydrogenation of aromatics, hydrogenation of aldehydes and oxidation of ferrosulphate. The case studies revealed the importance of mass transfer resistance inside the catalyst pallets as well as the dynamics of the different phases being present in the reactor. Reliable three-phase reactor simulation and scale-up should be based on dynamic heterogeneous models.

  12. Catalytic combustion over high temperature stable metal oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, M. [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1996-12-31

    This thesis presents a study of the catalytic effects of two interesting high temperature stable metal oxides - magnesium oxide and manganese substituted barium hexa-aluminate (BMA) - both of which can be used in the development of new monolithic catalysts for such applications. In the first part of the thesis, the development of catalytic combustion for gas turbine applications is reviewed, with special attention to alternative fuels such as low-BTU gas, e.g. produced in an air blown gasifier. When catalytic combustion is applied for such a fuel, the primary advantage is the possibility of decreasing the conversion of fuel nitrogen to NO{sub x}, and achieving flame stability. In the experimental work, MgO was shown to have a significant activity for the catalytic combustion of methane, lowering the temperature needed to achieve 10 percent conversion by 270 deg C compared with homogeneous combustion.The reaction kinetics for methane combustion over MgO was also studied. It was shown that the heterogeneous catalytic reactions were dominant but that the catalytically initiated homogeneous gas phase reactions were also important, specially at high temperatures. MgO and BMA were compared. The latter showed a higher catalytic activity, even when the differences in activity decreased with increasing calcination temperature. For BMA, CO{sub 2} was the only product detected, but for MgO significant amounts of CO and C{sub 2}-hydrocarbons were formed. BMA needed a much lower temperature to achieve total conversion of other fuels, e.g. CO and hydrogen, compared to the temperature for total conversion of methane. This shows that BMA-like catalysts are interesting for combustion of fuel mixtures with high CO and H{sub 2} content, e.g. gas produced from gasification of biomass. 74 refs

  13. OXIDATIVE COUPLING OF METHANE USING INORGANIC MEMBRANE REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Y.H. Ma; Dr. W.R. Moser; Dr. A.G. Dixon; Dr. A.M. Ramachandra; Dr. Y. Lu; C. Binkerd

    1998-04-01

    The objective of this research is to study the oxidative coupling of methane in catalytic inorganic membrane reactors. A specific target is to achieve conversion of methane to C{sub 2} hydrocarbons at very high selectivity and higher yields than in conventional non-porous, co-feed, fixed bed reactors by controlling the oxygen supply through the membrane. A membrane reactor has the advantage of precisely controlling the rate of delivery of oxygen to the catalyst. This facility permits balancing the rate of oxidation and reduction of the catalyst. In addition, membrane reactors minimize the concentration of gas phase oxygen thus reducing non selective gas phase reactions, which are believed to be a main route for the formation of CO{sub x} products. Such gas phase reactions are a cause of decreased selectivity in the oxidative coupling of methane in conventional flow reactors. Membrane reactors could also produce higher product yields by providing better distribution of the reactant gases over the catalyst than the conventional plug flow reactors. Membrane reactor technology also offers the potential for modifying the membranes both to improve catalytic properties as well as to regulate the rate of the permeation/diffusion of reactants through the membrane to minimize by-product generation. Other benefits also exist with membrane reactors, such as the mitigation of thermal hot-spots for highly exothermic reactions such as the oxidative coupling of methane. The application of catalytically active inorganic membranes has potential for drastically increasing the yield of reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity.

  14. The influence of copper in dealloyed binary platinum–copper electrocatalysts on methanol electroxidation catalytic activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poochai, Chatwarin [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Veerasai, Waret, E-mail: waret.vee@mahidol.ac.th [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Somsook, Ekasith [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Center of Excellence for Innovation in Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Dangtip, Somsak [Department of Physics, and NANOTEC COE at Mahidol University, Faculty of Science, Mahidol University, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2015-08-01

    In this study, we prepared and characterized carbon paper-supported dealloyed binary Pt–Cu core–shell electrocatalysts (denoted as Pt{sub x}Cu{sub (100−x)/}CP) by cyclic co-electrodeposition and selective copper dealloying in an acidic medium, and we investigated the effect of the copper content in the samples on the catalytic activities toward methanol electroxidation reaction (MOR). X-ray photo-emission spectroscopy (XPS) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) indicated that the structure of dealloyed binary Pt–Cu catalysts possessed a Pt-rich shell and a Cu rich core. X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) displayed that the oxidation states of Pt and Cu were zero and one, respectively, implying the formation of metallic Pt and Cu{sub 2}O, respectively. X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD) confirmed that Cu was inserted into a face-centered cubic Pt structure forming Pt–Cu alloys. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) displayed a cubic shape of Pt/CP and a spherical shape of Pt{sub x}Cu{sub (100−x)/}CP with several hundred nanometer sizes of agglomeration that depended on the Cu content. Cyclic voltammetry, chronoamperometry, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were performed to confirm that the sample of Pt{sub 70}Cu{sub 30}/CP exhibited the best catalytic activities in terms of the specific current, current density, catalytic poisoning tolerance, and stability. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Binary electrocatalysts of Pt{sub x}Cu{sub (100−x)}/CP were prepared by cyclic co-electrodeposition and selective copper dealloying. • The structures of Pt{sub x}Cu{sub (100−x)}/CP were a Pt rich shell and a Cu rich core. • The Pt{sub 70}Cu{sub 30}/CP was the excellent catalytic activity towards methanol electrooxidation and CO{sub ads} tolerance.

  15. Ultra Low NOx Catalytic Combustion for IGCC Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahrokh Etemad; Benjamin Baird; Sandeep Alavandi; William Pfefferle

    2008-03-31

    In order to meet DOE's goals of developing low-emissions coal-based power systems, PCI has further developed and adapted it's Rich-Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL{reg_sign}) catalytic reactor to a combustion system operating on syngas as a fuel. The technology offers ultra-low emissions without the cost of exhaust after-treatment, with high efficiency (avoidance of after-treatment losses and reduced diluent requirements), and with catalytically stabilized combustion which extends the lower Btu limit for syngas operation. Tests were performed in PCI's sub-scale high-pressure (10 atm) test rig, using a two-stage (catalytic then gas-phase) combustion process for syngas fuel. In this process, the first stage consists of a fuel-rich mixture reacting on a catalyst with final and excess combustion air used to cool the catalyst. The second stage is a gas-phase combustor, where the air used for cooling the catalyst mixes with the catalytic reactor effluent to provide for final gas-phase burnout and dilution to fuel-lean combustion products. During testing, operating with a simulated Tampa Electric's Polk Power Station syngas, the NOx emissions program goal of less than 0.03 lbs/MMBtu (6 ppm at 15% O{sub 2}) was met. NOx emissions were generally near 0.01 lbs/MMBtu (2 ppm at 15% O{sub 2}) (PCI's target) over a range on engine firing temperatures. In addition, low emissions were shown for alternative fuels including high hydrogen content refinery fuel gas and low BTU content Blast Furnace Gas (BFG). For the refinery fuel gas increased resistance to combustor flashback was achieved through preferential consumption of hydrogen in the catalytic bed. In the case of BFG, stable combustion for fuels as low as 88 BTU/ft{sup 3} was established and maintained without the need for using co-firing. This was achieved based on the upstream catalytic reaction delivering a hotter (and thus more reactive) product to the flame zone. The PCI catalytic reactor was also shown

  16. Depression: The Differing Narratives of Couples in Couple Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautiainen, Eija-Liisa; Aaltonen, Jukka

    2010-01-01

    How does the spouse of a person with depression take part in constructing narratives of depression in couple therapy? In this study we examined couples' ways of co-constructing narratives of depression in couple therapy. Three couple therapy processes were chosen for the study, one spouse in each couple having been referred to an outpatient clinic…

  17. A compact process for the treatment of olive mill wastewater by combining wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation and biological techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azabou, Samia [Laboratoire des BioProcedes, Centre de Biotechnologie de Sfax, BP 1177, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Najjar, Wahiba [Laboratoire de Chimie des Materiaux et Catalyse, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Bouaziz, Mohamed [Laboratoire des BioProcedes, Centre de Biotechnologie de Sfax, BP 1177, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia); Ghorbel, Abdelhamid [Laboratoire de Chimie des Materiaux et Catalyse, Faculte des Sciences de Tunis, Campus Universitaire, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Sayadi, Sami, E-mail: sami.sayadi@cbs.rnrt.tn [Laboratoire des BioProcedes, Centre de Biotechnologie de Sfax, BP 1177, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2010-11-15

    A system based on combined actions of catalytic wet oxidation and microbial technologies for the treatment of highly polluted OMW containing polyphenols was studied. The wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) process has been investigated in the semi-batch mode at atmospheric pressure, using aluminium-iron-pillared inter layer clay ((Al-Fe)PILC), under two different catalytic processes: ((Al-Fe)PILC/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/ultraviolet radiations) at 25 deg. C and ((Al-Fe)PILC/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) at 50 deg. C. The results show that raw OMW was resistant to the photocatalytic process. However ((Al-Fe)PILC/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), system operating at 50 deg. C reduced considerably the COD, colour and total phenolic contents, and thus decreased the inhibition of the marine photobacteria Vibrio fischeri luminescence by 70%. This study also examined the feasibility of coupling WHPCO and anaerobic digestion treatment. Biomethanisation experiments performed with raw OMW or pre-treated OMW proved that pre-treatments with ((Al-Fe)PILC/H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) system, for more than 2 h, resulted in higher methane production. Both untreated OMW as well as 2-h pre-treated OMW revealed as toxic to anaerobic bacteria.

  18. Photo-catalytic Activities of Plant Hormones on Semiconductor Nanoparticles by Laser-Activated Electron Tunneling and Emitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xuemei; Huang, Lulu; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Zhong, Hongying

    2015-03-01

    Understanding of the dynamic process of laser-induced ultrafast electron tunneling is still very limited. It has been thought that the photo-catalytic reaction of adsorbents on the surface is either dependent on the number of resultant electron-hole pairs where excess energy is lost to the lattice through coupling with phonon modes, or dependent on irradiation photon wavelength. We used UV (355 nm) laser pulses to excite electrons from the valence band to the conduction band of titanium dioxide (TiO2), zinc oxide (ZnO) and bismuth cobalt zinc oxide (Bi2O3)0.07(CoO)0.03(ZnO)0.9 semiconductor nanoparticles with different photo catalytic properties. Photoelectrons are extracted, accelerated in a static electric field and eventually captured by charge deficient atoms of adsorbed organic molecules. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer was used to detect negative molecules and fragment ions generated by un-paired electron directed bond cleavages. We show that the probability of electron tunneling is determined by the strength of the static electric field and intrinsic electron mobility of semiconductors. Photo-catalytic dissociation or polymerization reactions of adsorbents are highly dependent on the kinetic energy of tunneling electrons as well as the strength of laser influx. By using this approach, photo-activities of phytohormones have been investigated.

  19. Preconversion catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic functional groups. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1991--June 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubiak, C.P.

    1991-12-31

    The deoxygenation of phenols is a conceptually simple, but unusually difficult chemical transformation to achieve. Aryl carbon-oxygen bond cleavage is a chemical transformation of importance in coal liquefaction and the upgrading of coal liquids as well as in the synthesis of natural products. This proposed research offers the possibility of effecting the selective catalytic deoxygenation of phenolic functional groups using CO. A program of research for the catalytic deoxygenation of phenols, via a low energy mechanistic pathway that is based on the use of the CO/CO{sub 2} couple to remove phenolic oxygen atoms, is underway. We are focusing on systems which have significant promise as catalysts: Ir(triphos)OPh, [Pt(triphos)OPh]{sup +} and Rh(triphos)OPh. Our studies of phenol deoxygenation focus on monitoring the reactions for the elementary processes upon which catalytic activity will depend: CO insertion into M-OPh bonds, CO{sub 2} elimination from aryloxy carbonyls {l_brace}M-C(O)-O-Ph{r_brace}, followed by formation of a coordinated benzyne intermediate.

  20. A compact process for the treatment of olive mill wastewater by combining wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation and biological techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system based on combined actions of catalytic wet oxidation and microbial technologies for the treatment of highly polluted OMW containing polyphenols was studied. The wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) process has been investigated in the semi-batch mode at atmospheric pressure, using aluminium-iron-pillared inter layer clay ((Al-Fe)PILC), under two different catalytic processes: ((Al-Fe)PILC/H2O2/ultraviolet radiations) at 25 deg. C and ((Al-Fe)PILC/H2O2) at 50 deg. C. The results show that raw OMW was resistant to the photocatalytic process. However ((Al-Fe)PILC/H2O2), system operating at 50 deg. C reduced considerably the COD, colour and total phenolic contents, and thus decreased the inhibition of the marine photobacteria Vibrio fischeri luminescence by 70%. This study also examined the feasibility of coupling WHPCO and anaerobic digestion treatment. Biomethanisation experiments performed with raw OMW or pre-treated OMW proved that pre-treatments with ((Al-Fe)PILC/H2O2) system, for more than 2 h, resulted in higher methane production. Both untreated OMW as well as 2-h pre-treated OMW revealed as toxic to anaerobic bacteria.

  1. Photo-catalytic activities of plant hormones on semiconductor nanoparticles by laser-activated electron tunneling and emitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xuemei; Huang, Lulu; Zhang, Wenyang; Jiang, Ruowei; Zhong, Hongying

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of the dynamic process of laser-induced ultrafast electron tunneling is still very limited. It has been thought that the photo-catalytic reaction of adsorbents on the surface is either dependent on the number of resultant electron-hole pairs where excess energy is lost to the lattice through coupling with phonon modes, or dependent on irradiation photon wavelength. We used UV (355 nm) laser pulses to excite electrons from the valence band to the conduction band of titanium dioxide (TiO₂), zinc oxide (ZnO) and bismuth cobalt zinc oxide (Bi₂O₃)₀.₀₇(CoO)₀.₀₃(ZnO)₀.₉ semiconductor nanoparticles with different photo catalytic properties. Photoelectrons are extracted, accelerated in a static electric field and eventually captured by charge deficient atoms of adsorbed organic molecules. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer was used to detect negative molecules and fragment ions generated by un-paired electron directed bond cleavages. We show that the probability of electron tunneling is determined by the strength of the static electric field and intrinsic electron mobility of semiconductors. Photo-catalytic dissociation or polymerization reactions of adsorbents are highly dependent on the kinetic energy of tunneling electrons as well as the strength of laser influx. By using this approach, photo-activities of phytohormones have been investigated.

  2. Catalytic conversion of biomass to fuels. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garten, R. L.; Ushiba, K. K.; Cooper, M.; Mahawili, I.

    1978-01-01

    This report presents an assessment and perspective concerning the application of catalytic technologies to the thermochemical conversion of biomass resources to fuels. The major objectives of the study are: to provide a systematic assessment of the role of catalysis in the direct thermochemical conversion of biomass into gaseous and liquid fuels; to establish the relationship between potential biomass conversion processes and catalytic processes currently under development in other areas, with particular emphasis on coal conversion processes; and to identify promising catalytic systems which could be utilized to reduce the overall costs of fuels production from biomass materials. The report is divided into five major parts which address the above objectives. In Part III the physical and chemical properties of biomass and coal are compared, and the implications for catalytic conversion processes are discussed. With respect to chemical properties, biomass is shown to have significant advantages over coal in catalytic conversion processes because of its uniformly high H/C ratio and low concentrations of potential catalyst poisons. The physical properties of biomass can vary widely, however, and preprocessing by grinding is difficult and costly. Conversion technologies that require little preprocessing and accept a wide range of feed geometries, densities, and particle sizes appear desirable. Part IV provides a comprehensive review of existing and emerging thermochemical conversion technologies for biomass and coal. The underlying science and technology for gasification and liquefaction processes are presented.

  3. Poisoning of bubble propelled catalytic micromotors: the chemical environment matters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guanjia; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Pumera, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Self-propelled catalytic microjets have attracted considerable attention in recent years and these devices have exhibited the ability to move in complex media. The mechanism of propulsion is via the Pt catalysed decomposition of H2O2 and it is understood that the Pt surface is highly susceptible to poisoning by sulphur-containing molecules. Here, we show that important extracellular thiols as well as basic organic molecules can significantly hamper the motion of catalytic microjet engines. This is due to two different mechanisms: (i) molecules such as dimethyl sulfoxide can quench the hydroxyl radicals produced at Pt surfaces and reduce the amount of oxygen gas generated and (ii) molecules containing -SH, -SSR, and -SCH3 moieties can poison the catalytically active platinum surface, inhibiting the motion of the jet engines. It is essential that the presence of such molecules in the environment be taken into consideration for future design and operation of catalytic microjet engines. We show this effect on catalytic micromotors prepared by both rolled-up and electrodeposition approaches, demonstrating that such poisoning is universal for Pt catalyzed micromotors. We believe that our findings will contribute significantly to this field to develop alternative systems or catalysts for self-propulsion when practical applications in the real environment are considered.

  4. Reduction of nitrate from groundwater: powder catalysts and catalytic membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Ying-xu; ZHANG Yan; LIU Hong-yuan

    2003-01-01

    The reduction of nitrate contaminant in groundwater has gained renewed and intensive attention due to the environmental problems and health risks. Catalytic denetrification presents one of the most promising approaches for the removal of nitrate from water. Catalytic nitrate reduction from water by powder catalysts and catalytic membrane in a batch reactor was studied. And the effects of the initial concentration, the amounts of catalyst, and the flux H2 on the nitrate reduction were also discussed. The results demonstrated that nitrate reduction activity and the selectivity to nitrogen gas were mainly controlled by diffusion limitations and the mass transfer of the reactants. The selectivity can improved while retaining a high catalytic activity under controlled diffusion condition or the intensification of the mass transfer, and a good reaction condition. The total nitrogen removal efficiency reached above 80%. Moreover, catalytic membrane can create a high effective gas/liquid/solid interface, and show a good selectivity to nitrogen in comparative with the powder catalyst, the selectivity to nitrogen was improved from 73.4% to 89.4%.

  5. International Migration of Couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Martin D.; Junge, Martin; Poutvaara, Panu

    2016-01-01

    Migrant self-selection is important to both origin and destination countries. We develop a theoretical model regarding the migration of dual-earner couples and test it in the context of international migration, using population-wide administrative data from Denmark. Our model predicts...... that the probability that a couple emigrates increases with the primary earner’s income, whereas the secondary earner’s income may drive the decision in either direction. The results are consistent with our model. We find that primary earners in couples are more strongly self-selected with respect to income than...... singles. This novel result counters the intuition that family ties weaken self-selection....

  6. Monomeric G protein-coupled receptor rhodopsin in solution activates its G protein transducin at the diffusion limit

    OpenAIRE

    Ernst, Oliver P.; Gramse, Verena; Kolbe, Michael; Hofmann, Klaus Peter; Heck, Martin

    2007-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors mediate biological signals by stimulating nucleotide exchange in heterotrimeric G proteins (Gαβγ). Receptor dimers have been proposed as the functional unit responsible for catalytic interaction with Gαβγ. To investigate whether a G protein-coupled receptor monomer can activate Gαβγ, we used the retinal photoreceptor rhodopsin and its cognate G protein transducin (Gt) to determine the stoichiometry of rhodopsin/Gt binding and the rate of catalyzed nucleotide exchan...

  7. Application of bisphosphomide-palladium(II) pincer complex in Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction under microwave irradiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maruthai Kumaravel; Pawan Kumar; Maravanji S Balakrishna

    2014-05-01

    The bisphosphomide-based pincer complex [PdBr{2,6-{Ph2PC(O)}2(C6H3)}] (2) has shown very high catalytic activity in Suzuki-Miyaura cross coupling reaction under microwave irradiation for a variety of aryl bromides and aryl boronic acids. The complex showed the same efficiency for gram scale reactions.

  8. A catalytic distillation process for light gas oil hydrodesulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas-Villamil, F.D.; Marroquin, J.O.; Paz, C. de la; Rodriguez, E. [Prog. de Matematicas Aplicadas y Computacion, Prog. de Tratamiento de Crudo Maya, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico City, DF (Mexico)

    2004-07-01

    A light gas oil hydrodesulfurization process via catalytic distillation is developed and compared to a conventional process. By integrating the separation and reaction into a single unit, the catalytic distillation may produce a diesel with low concentration of sulfur compounds at a lower cost than the traditional reaction/separation process. The process proposed in this work is compared to an optimised conventional hydrodesulfurization unit which represents fairly well a plant that belongs to the National System of Refineries. During the optimisation of the conventional process, a compromise is established among the production of diesel and naphtha and the operating costs. The results show that the light gas oil hydrodesulfurization via catalytic distillation is as or more efficient than the conventional process. However, the removal of the sulfur compounds is carried out under less rigorous conditions. This design reduces the fix and operational costs. (author)

  9. Catalytic wet Air Oxidation of o-Chlorophenol in Wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐新华; 汪大翬

    2003-01-01

    Catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) was investigated in laboratory-scale experiments for the treatment of o-chlorophenol in wastewater. Experimental results showed that wet air oxidation (WAO) process in the absence of catalyst was also effective for o-chlorophenol in wastewater treatment. Up to 80% of the initial CODCr was removed by wet air oxidation at 270℃ with twice amount of the required stoichiometric oxygen supply. At temperature of 150℃, the removal rate of CODCr was only 30%. Fe2(SO4)3, CuSO4, Cu(NO3)2 and MnSO4 exhibited high catalytic activity. Higher removal rate of CODCr was obtained by CWAO. More than 96% of the initial CODCr was removed at 270℃ and 84.6%-93.6% of the initial CODCr was removed at 150℃. Mixed catalysts had better catalytic activity for the degradation of o-chlorophenol in wastewater.

  10. Studies on Nitrogen Oxides Removal Using Plasma Assisted Catalytic Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V. Ravi; Young Sun Mok; B. S. Rajanikanth; Ho-Chul Kang

    2003-01-01

    An electric discharge plasma reactor combined with a catalytic reactor was studied for removing nitrogen oxides. To understand the combined process thoroughly, discharge plasma and catalytic process were separately studied first, and then the two processes were combined for the study. The plasma reactor was able to oxidize NO to NO2 well although the oxidation rate decreased with temperature. The plasma reactor alone did not reduce the NOx (NO+NO2)level effectively, but the increase in the ratio of NO2 to NO as a result of plasma discharge led to the enhancement of NOx removal efficiency even at lower temperatures over the catalyst surface (V2O5-WOa/TiO2). At a gas temperature of 100℃, the NOx removal efficiency obtained using the combined plasma catalytic process was 88% for an energy input of 36 eV/molecule or 30 J/1.

  11. Catalytically and noncatalytically treated automobile exhaust: biological effects in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, G.P. (Univ. of Cincinnati); Lewkowski, J.P.; Hastings, L.; Malanchuk, M.

    1977-12-01

    Chronic exposure to catalytically treated or noncatalytically treated automobile exhaust significantly depressed the spontaneous locomotor activity (SLA) of rats. Exposure to H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ alone or CO at comparable levels did not alter the SLA. Exposure to noncatalytically treated exhaust resulted in significant reductions in growth rate and food and water intake. However, these effects were not evident in the exposure to catalytically treated exhaust or in the control H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and CO exposures. Blood acid-base analyses indicated that exposure to either catalytically treated exhaust or H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ elicits a metabolic alkalosis, while exposure to CO alone results in a metabolic acidosis. All acid-base parameters were within the normal range several weeks after the termination of exposure.

  12. The subfertile couple.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, M P

    1982-01-01

    When pregnancy is achieved through fertility awareness, there are further long-range benefits to the couple: information which will permit them the choice to avoid, delay or achieve subsequent pregnancies. Thus, the opportunity for responsible parenthood continues. The goal of nursing in subfertility care is to identify factors which may contribute to lowered fertility, and to teach and/or refer appropriately. The most comprehensive single intervention may be to teach the couple awareness of their own fertility through the Billings Method of natural family planning. If conception does not occur, the couple may progress to infertility investigation, knowing that the expense, inconvenience, and possible trauma are justified. Whether pregnancy occurs or not, it is likely that the couple will have had the benefit of clarifying their relationship, further understanding their bodies, and generally growing toward fuller personhood. PMID:6920464

  13. Disformally coupled inflation

    CERN Document Server

    van de Bruck, Carsten; Longden, Chris

    2015-01-01

    A disformal coupling between two scalar fields is considered in the context of cosmological inflation. The coupling introduces novel derivative interactions mixing the kinetic terms of the fields but without introducing superluminal or unstable propagation of the two scalar fluctuation modes. Though the typical effect of the disformal coupling is to inhibit one of the fields from inflating the universe, the energy density of the other field can drive viable near Sitter -inflation in the presence of nontrivial disformal dynamics, in particular when one assumes exponential instead of power-law form for the couplings. The linear perturbation equations are written for the two-field system, its canonical degrees of freedom are quantised, their spectra are derived and the inflationary predictions are reported for numerically solved exponential models. A generic prediction is low tensor-to-scalar ratio.

  14. Kinetic and catalytic performance of a BI-porous composite material in catalytic cracking and isomerisation reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Khattaf, S.

    2012-01-10

    Catalytic behaviour of pure zeolite ZSM-5 and a bi-porous composite material (BCM) were investigated in transformation of m-xylene, while zeolite HY and the bi-porous composite were used in the cracking of 1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene (TIPB). The micro/mesoporous material was used to understand the effect of the presence of mesopores on these reactions. Various characterisation techniques, that is, XRD, SEM, TGA, FT-IR and nitrogen sorption measurements were applied for complete characterisation of the catalysts. Catalytic tests using CREC riser simulator showed that the micro/mesoporous composite catalyst exhibited higher catalytic activity as compared with the conventional microporous ZSM-5 and HY zeolite for transformation of m-xylene and for the catalytic cracking of TIPB, respectively. The outstanding catalytic reactivity of m-xylene and TIPB molecules were mainly attributed to the easier access of active sites provided by the mesopores. Apparent activation energies for the disappearance of m-xylene and TIPB over all catalysts were found to decrease in the order: EBCM>EZSM-5 and EBCM>EHY, respectively. © 2012 Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering.

  15. Site-specific growth of Au-Pd alloy horns on Au nanorods: A platform for highly sensitive monitoring of catalytic reactions by surface enhancement raman spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Jianfeng

    2013-06-12

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a highly sensitive probe for molecular detection. The aim of this study was to develop an efficient platform for investigating the kinetics of catalytic reactions with SERS. To achieve this, we synthesized a novel Au-Pd bimetallic nanostructure (HIF-AuNR@AuPd) through site-specific epitaxial growth of Au-Pd alloy horns as catalytic sites at the ends of Au nanorods. Using high-resolution electron microscopy and tomography, we successfully reconstructed the complex three-dimensional morphology of HIF-AuNR@AuPd and identified that the horns are bound with high-index {11l} (0.25 < l < 0.43) facets. With an electron beam probe, we visualized the distribution of surface plasmon over the HIF-AuNR@AuPd nanorods, finding that strong longitudinal surface plasmon resonance concentrated at the rod ends. This unique crystal morphology led to the coupling of high catalytic activity with a strong SERS effect at the rod ends, making HIF-AuNR@AuPd an excellent bifunctional platform for in situ monitoring of surface catalytic reactions. Using the hydrogenation of 4-nitrothiophenol as a model reaction, we demonstrated that its first-order reaction kinetics could be accurately determined from this platform. Moreover, we clearly identified the superior catalytic activity of the rod ends relative to that of the rod bodies, owing to the different SERS activities at the two positions. In comparison with other reported Au-Pd bimetallic nanostructures, HIF-AuNR@AuPd offered both higher catalytic activity and greater detection sensitivity. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  16. Coupled transverse motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teng, L.C.

    1989-01-01

    The magnetic field in an accelerator or a storage ring is usually so designed that the horizontal (x) and the vertical (y) motions of an ion are uncoupled. However, because of imperfections in construction and alignment, some small coupling is unavoidable. In this lecture, we discuss in a general way what is known about the behaviors of coupled motions in two degrees-of-freedom. 11 refs., 6 figs.

  17. Fuel Flexible, Low Emission Catalytic Combustor for Opportunity Fuel Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eteman, Shahrokh

    2013-06-30

    Limited fuel resources, increasing energy demand and stringent emission regulations are drivers to evaluate process off-gases or process waste streams as fuels for power generation. Often these process waste streams have low energy content and/or highly reactive components. Operability of low energy content fuels in gas turbines leads to issues such as unstable and incomplete combustion. On the other hand, fuels containing higher-order hydrocarbons lead to flashback and auto-ignition issues. Due to above reasons, these fuels cannot be used directly without modifications or efficiency penalties in gas turbine engines. To enable the use of these wide variety of fuels in gas turbine engines a rich catalytic lean burn (RCL®) combustion system was developed and tested in a subscale high pressure (10 atm.) rig. The RCL® injector provided stability and extended turndown to low Btu fuels due to catalytic pre-reaction. Previous work has shown promise with fuels such as blast furnace gas (BFG) with LHV of 85 Btu/ft3 successfully combusted. This program extends on this work by further modifying the combustor to achieve greater catalytic stability enhancement. Fuels containing low energy content such as weak natural gas with a Lower Heating Value (LHV) of 6.5 MJ/m3 (180 Btu/ft3 to natural gas fuels containing higher hydrocarbon (e.g ethane) with LHV of 37.6 MJ/m3 (1010 Btu/ft3) were demonstrated with improved combustion stability; an extended turndown (defined as the difference between catalytic and non-catalytic lean blow out) of greater than 250oF was achieved with CO and NOx emissions lower than 5 ppm corrected to 15% O2. In addition, for highly reactive fuels the catalytic region preferentially pre-reacted the higher order hydrocarbons with no events of flashback or auto-ignition allowing a stable and safe operation with low NOx and CO emissions.

  18. Roles of catalytic oxidation in control of vehicle exhaust emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalytic oxidation was initially associated with the early development of catalysis and it subsequently became a part of many industrial processes, so it is not surprising it was used to remove hydrocarbons and CO when it became necessary to control these emissions from cars. Later NOx was reduced in a process involving reduction over a Pt/Rh catalyst followed by air injection in front of a Pt-based oxidation catalyst. If over-reduction of NO to NH3 took place, or if H2S was produced, it was important these undesirable species were converted to NOx and SOx in the catalytic oxidation stage. When exhaust gas composition could be kept stoichiometric hydrocarbons, CO and NOx were simultaneously converted over a single Pt/Rh three-way catalyst (TWC). With modern TWCs car tailpipe emissions can be exceptionally low. NO is not catalytically dissociated to O2 and N2 in the presence of O2, it can only be reduced to N2. Its control from lean-burn gasoline engines involves catalytic oxidation to NO2 and thence nitrate that is stored and periodically reduced to N2 by exhaust gas enrichment. This method is being modified for diesel engines. These engines produce soot, and filtration is being introduced to remove it. The exhaust temperature of heavy-duty diesels is sufficient (250-400oC) for NO to be catalytically oxidised to NO2 over an upstream platinum catalyst that smoothly oxidises soot in the filter. The exhaust gas temperature of passenger car diesels is too low for this to take place all of the time, so trapped soot is periodically burnt in O2 above 550oC. Catalytic oxidation of higher than normal amounts of hydrocarbon and CO over an upstream catalyst is used to give sufficient temperature for soot combustion with O2 to take place. (author)

  19. OPERATING SPECIFICATIONS OF CATALYTIC CLEANING OF GAS FROM BIOMASS GASIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Lisý

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the theoretical description of the cleaning of syngas from biomass and waste gasification using catalytic methods, and on the verification of the theory through experiments. The main obstruction to using syngas from fluid gasification of organic matter is the presence of various high-boiling point hydrocarbons (i.e., tar in the gas. The elimination of tar from the gas is a key factor in subsequent use of the gas in other technologies for cogeneration of electrical energy and heat. The application of a natural or artificial catalyst for catalytic destruction of tar is one of the methods of secondary elimination of tar from syngas. In our experiments, we used a natural catalyst (dolomite or calcium magnesium carbonate from Horní Lánov with great mechanical and catalytic properties, suitable for our purposes. The advantages of natural catalysts in contrast to artificial catalysts include their availability, low purchase prices and higher resilience to the so-called catalyst poison. Natural calcium catalysts may also capture undesired compounds of sulphure and chlorine. Our paper presents a theoretical description and analysis of catalytic destruction of tar into combustible gas components, and of the impact of dolomite calcination on its efficiency. The efficiency of the technology is verified in laboratories. The facility used for verification was a 150 kW pilot gasification unit with a laboratory catalytic filter. The efficiency of tar elimination reached 99.5%, the tar concentration complied with limits for use of the gas in combustion engines, and the tar content reached approximately 35 mg/mn3. The results of the measurements conducted in laboratories helped us design a pilot technology for catalytic gas cleaning.

  20. Biofuel production from catalytic cracking of woody oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Junming; Jiang, Jianchun; Chen, Jie; Sun, Yunjuan

    2010-07-01

    The catalytic cracking reactions of several kinds of woody oils have been studied. The products were analyzed by GC-MS and FTIR and show the formation of olefins, paraffins and carboxylic acids. Several kinds of catalysts were compared. It was found that the fraction distribution of product was modified by using base catalysts such as CaO. The products from woody oils showed good cold flow properties compared with diesel used in China. The results presented in this work have shown that the catalytic cracking of woody oils generates fuels that have physical and chemical properties comparable to those specified for petroleum based fuels. PMID:20206508

  1. Catalytic Preparation of Methyl Formate from Methanol over Silver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zhi; LI Jing; YANG Xiang-guang; WU Yue

    2005-01-01

    A catalytic reaction over a silver catalyst performed in an unregarded temperature region(473-873 K) with a long catalytic lifetime for the production of methyl formate from methanol was provided as a potential preparing route. The optimal yield of methyl formate(ca. 14.8%) with a selectivity >90% was obtained at about 573 K. Because α-oxygen species and bulk oxygen species coexist in the unregarded temperature region, a synergistic process concerning α-oxygen species and bulk oxygen species was proved over Oα -rich and Oγ-rich samples.

  2. Solid catalytic growth mechanism of micro-coiled carbon fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Micro-coiled carbon fibers were prepared by catalytic pyrolysisof acetylene with nano-sized nickel powder catalyst using the substrate method. The morphology of micro-coiled carbon fibers was observed through field emission scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the fiber and coil diameter of the obtained micro-coiled carbon fibers is about 500—600 nm and 4—5 μm, respectively. Most of the micro-coiled carbon fibers obtained were regular double carbon coils, but a few irregular ones were also observed. On the basis of the experimental observation, a solid catalytic growth mechanism of micro-coiled carbon fibers was proposed.

  3. Simulation of Suspension Catalytic Distillation for Synthesis of Linear Alkylbenzene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王二强; 李成岳

    2003-01-01

    Suspension catalytic distillation (SCD) has been developed recently as an innovative technology in catalytic distillation. In this paper, a brief introduction to SCD is given and an equilibrium stage (EQ) model is developed to simulate this new process for synthesis of linear alkylbenzene (LAB) from benzene and 1-dodecene.Since non-ideality of this reaction system is not strong, EQ model developed could be applied to it successfully.Simulation results agree well with experimental data, and indicate some characteristics of SCD process as an advanced technology for the production of LAB: 100% conversion of olefins, low temperature (90-100℃) and low benzene/olefin mole ratio.

  4. Degradation of Organic Pollutants in Water by Catalytic Ozonation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xin; YAO Jun-hai; QI Jing-yao

    2007-01-01

    Different series of transition metal catalysts supported on Al2O3 were prepared by the impregnation method. The catalytic activity was measured in a batch reactor with ozone as the oxidizing reagent. The experimental results indicate that Cu/Al2O3 has a very effective catalytic activity during the ozonation of organic pollutants in water. The optimum conditions for preparing Cu/Al2O3 were systematically investigated with the orthogonal testing method. Furthermore, the results also show that the surface properties of catalyst are not compulsory for effective oxidation.

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF HIGH ACTIVITY, CATALYTIC SYSTEMS FOR NOx REDUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2001-12-01

    This project was directed at an investigation of catalytic NO{sub x} reduction on carbonaceous supports at low temperatures. The experimental work was conducted primarily in a packed bed reactor/gas flow system that was constructed for this work. The analytical techniques employed were mass spectrometry, NO{sub x} chemiluminescence, and gas chromatography. The experimental plan was focused on steady-state reactivity experiments, followed by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) of surface intermediates, and also selected temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) experiments. Both uncatalyzed and catalyzed (potassium-promoted) phenolic resin char, were investigated as well as the catalytic effect of additional CO in the gas phase.

  6. Catalytic hydrogen evolution by polyaminoacids using mercury electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Živanovič

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available It was shown that using constant current chronopotentiometricstripping (CPS peptides and proteins at nanomolar concentrations produce protein structure–sensitive peak H at mercury electrodes. This peak is due to the catalytic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER. Polyamino acids can be considered as an intermediate model system between peptides and macromolecular proteins. Here we used polyamino acids (poly(aa such as polylysine (polyLys and polyarginine (polyArg and cyclic voltammetry or CPS in combination with hanging mercury drop electrode to explore how different amino acid residues in proteins contribute to the catalyticHER.

  7. Effect of praseodymium on catalytic graphitization of furan resin carbon

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    易守军; 陈金华; 肖雄; 刘露; 樊桢

    2010-01-01

    We introduced a new catalyst,rare earth element praseodymium,for the catalytic graphitization of furan resin carbon.The extent of graphitization of the furan resin carbon was examined by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy.The morphology of furan resin carbon was characterized by scanning electron microscopy.The effects of the praseodymium content and the heat-treatment temperature on the catalytic graphitization of furan resin carbon were also investigated.The results indicated that the praseodymium c...

  8. Study on Synthesis and Catalytic Performance of Hierarchical Zeolite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Lingling; Li Fengyan; ZhaoTianbo; Sun Guida

    2007-01-01

    A kind of hierarchical zeolite catalyst was synthesized by hydrothermal method.X-ray diffraction (XRD)and nitrogen adsorption-desorption method were used to study the phase and aperture structure of the prepared catalyst.Infrared(IR)spectra of pyridine adsorbed on the sample showed that the hierarchical zeolite really had much more Bronsted and Lewis acidic sites than the HZSM-5 zeolite.The catalytic cracking of large hydrocarbon molecules showed that the hierarchical zeolite had a higher catalytic activity than the HZSM-5 zeolite.

  9. Bubble driven quasioscillatory translational motion of catalytic micromotors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjare, Manoj; Yang, Bo; Zhao, Y-P

    2012-09-21

    A new quasioscillatory translational motion has been observed for big Janus catalytic micromotors with a fast CCD camera. Such motional behavior is found to coincide with both the bubble growth and burst processes resulting from the catalytic reaction, and the competition of the two processes generates a net forward motion. Detailed physical models have been proposed to describe the above processes. It is suggested that the bubble growth process imposes a growth force moving the micromotor forward, while the burst process induces an instantaneous local pressure depression pulling the micromotor backward. The theoretic predictions are consistent with the experimental data.

  10. Hydrophobic catalysts for liquid phase catalytic exchange: a review of preparation methods and influencing factors of catalytic activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liquid phase catalytic exchange (LPCE) between liquid water and gaseous hydro- gen has been developed for various applications, such as tritium recovery, water upgrade and heavy-water production. Good wetproofing properties of the hydrophobic catalysts can make the reaction to proceed smoothly. In this article, the preparation methods of the hydrophobic catalysts and the factors affecting the catalytic activities are reviewed. In particular, progress on the hydrophobic Pt/C/inert carrier catalysts is introduced, including the selection of inert carrier and active metal carrier, and the preparation methods of carbon- supported Pt based catalysts. Basic research activities on controllable fabrication of hydro- phobic catalysts are discussed, including the LPCE reaction mechanism, and the relation between the microstructure of active metal and the catalytic activity, etc. Finally, questions remaining to be answered and future directions in the field of hydrophobic catalysts are discussed. (authors)

  11. An Efficient Palladium and Bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine-based System for Suzuki-Miyaura Cross-Coupling under Aqueous and Aerobic Condition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    余建军; 王利民; 刘明涛; 裘鋆; 沈强; 方磊; 唐俊

    2012-01-01

    A novel PdC12/bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine-based ligand (1) catalytic system, which is water-soluble and air-stable, has been successfully synthesized and applied for Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction. In the presence of catalytic amount of PdCl2/1 system, arylboronic acids can couple with a wide range of aryl halides, including aryl bromides and aryl chlorides. The reactions proceed under mild conditions to give excellent yields, and a wide range of functionalities is tolerated.

  12. The copper-free Sonogashira cross-coupling reaction promoted by palladium complexes of nitrogen-containing chelating ligands in neat water at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hong; Wang, Jinyun; Li, Liuyi; Wang, Ruihu

    2014-02-01

    The commercially available 2,2'-dipyridylamine was used as a supporting ligand in the palladium-catalyzed Sonogashira cross-coupling reaction. The reactions between aryl iodides and terminal alkynes with different steric hindrance can be efficiently performed in the absence of copper in neat water at room temperature. The superior catalytic performance of the catalytic system was attributed to water solubility of the palladium 2,2'-dipyridylamine complex. Palladium nanoparticles with small size and narrow size distribution were formed after the cross-coupling reaction. PMID:24281778

  13. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of chromium substituted cobalt ferrospinels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chromium substituted cobalt ferrospinels were prepared by soft citrate gel method. The synthesized material was characterized by various physico-chemical methods. All the samples showed a single-phase cubic structure. Lattice constant varies from 8.389 to 8.323 A. Transmission electron microscopic study indicated the nanostructure of the catalysts while homogenous grain distribution was presented by scanning electron microscopic studies. The catalytic activity of the samples was investigated towards acetylation of phenols. The presence of active centers on the surface of the material was confirmed through pyridine adsorption studies. The surface acidity of the catalyst is responsible for better catalytic performance. The material was found to serve as a promising catalyst for acylation and benzoylation of phenols under solvent free condition. These catalysts are ∼100% selective towards o-acylation of phenols, a promising reaction for perfumery intermediates. The catalysts were seen to be reusable without any further treatment. Catalytic activities of cobalt, chromium and iron oxides were also investigated for comparison. The cobalt ferrospinel was found to have better catalytic activity as compared to the Cr-substituted ferrospinels and the pure oxides. Cobalt ferrite catalyst offers high yields in a short reaction time under solvent-free conditions.

  14. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of chromium substituted cobalt ferrospinels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hankare, P.P., E-mail: p_hankarep@rediffmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Shivaji University, Kolhapur, Maharashtra, 416 004 (India); Sankpal, U.B., E-mail: sankpalumesh@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Shivaji University, Kolhapur, Maharashtra, 416 004 (India); Patil, R.P. [Department of Chemistry, Shivaji University, Kolhapur, Maharashtra, 416 004 (India); Lokhande, P.D. [Department of Chemistry, University of Pune, Pune, Maharashtra, 411 007 (India); Sasikala, R. [Chemistry Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2011-02-15

    Chromium substituted cobalt ferrospinels were prepared by soft citrate gel method. The synthesized material was characterized by various physico-chemical methods. All the samples showed a single-phase cubic structure. Lattice constant varies from 8.389 to 8.323 A. Transmission electron microscopic study indicated the nanostructure of the catalysts while homogenous grain distribution was presented by scanning electron microscopic studies. The catalytic activity of the samples was investigated towards acetylation of phenols. The presence of active centers on the surface of the material was confirmed through pyridine adsorption studies. The surface acidity of the catalyst is responsible for better catalytic performance. The material was found to serve as a promising catalyst for acylation and benzoylation of phenols under solvent free condition. These catalysts are {approx}100% selective towards o-acylation of phenols, a promising reaction for perfumery intermediates. The catalysts were seen to be reusable without any further treatment. Catalytic activities of cobalt, chromium and iron oxides were also investigated for comparison. The cobalt ferrospinel was found to have better catalytic activity as compared to the Cr-substituted ferrospinels and the pure oxides. Cobalt ferrite catalyst offers high yields in a short reaction time under solvent-free conditions.

  15. Gold-Copper Nanoparticles: Nanostructural Evolution and Bifunctional Catalytic Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Jun; Shan, Shiyao; Yang, Lefu; Mott, Derrick; Malis, Oana; Petkov, Valeri; Cai, Fan; Ng, Mei; Luo, Jin; Chen, Bing H.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

    2012-12-12

    Understanding of the atomic-scale structure is essential for exploiting the unique catalytic properties of any nanoalloy catalyst. This report describes novel findings of an investigation of the nanoscale alloying of gold-copper (AuCu) nanoparticles and its impact on the surface catalytic functions. Two pathways have been explored for the formation of AuCu nanoparticles of different compositons, including wet chemical synthesis from mixed Au- and Cu-precursor molecules, and nanoscale alloying via an evolution of mixed Au- and Cu-precursor nanoparticles near the nanoscale melting temperatures. For the evolution of mixed precursor nanoparticles, synchrotron x-ray based in-situ real time XRD was used to monitor the structural changes, revealing nanoscale alloying and reshaping towards an fcc-type nanoalloy (particle or cube) via a partial melting–resolidification mechanism. The nanoalloys supported on carbon or silica were characterized by in-situ high-energy XRD/PDFs, revealing an intriguing lattice "expanding-shrinking" phenomenon depending on whether the catalyst is thermochemically processed under oxidative or reductive atmosphere. This type of controllable structural changes is found to play an important role in determining the catalytic activity of the catalysts for carbon monoxide oxidation reaction. The tunable catalytic activities of the nanoalloys under thermochemically oxidative and reductive atmospheres are also discussed in terms of the bifunctional sites and the surface oxygenated metal species for carbon monoxide and oxygen activation.

  16. Short hydrogen bonds in the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR LESKOVAC

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The survey of crystallographic data from the Protein Data Bank for 37 structures of trypsin and other serine proteases at a resolution of 0.78–1.28 Å revealed the presence of hydrogen bonds in the active site of the enzymes, which are formed between the catalytic histidine and aspartate residues and are on average 2.7 Å long. This is the typical bond length for normal hydrogen bonds. The geometric properties of the hydrogen bonds in the active site indicate that the H atom is not centered between the heteroatoms of the catalytic histidine and aspartate residues in the active site. Taken together, these findings exclude the possibility that short “low-barrier” hydrogen bonds are formed in the ground state structure of the active sites examined in this work. Some time ago, it was suggested by Cleland that the “low-barrier hydrogen bond” hypothesis is operative in the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases, and requires the presence of short hydrogen bonds around 2.4 Å long in the active site, with the H atom centered between the catalytic heteroatoms. The conclusions drawn from this work do not exclude the validity of the “low-barrier hydrogen bond” hypothesis at all, but they merely do not support it in this particular case, with this particular class of enzymes.

  17. Zeolite ZSM-12: Hydrothermal synthesis and catalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weitkamp, J.; Kumar, R.; Ernst, S.

    1987-02-01

    ZSM-12 was produced by hydrothermal synthesis. To obtain detailed information on the catalytic and type-selective properties of the bi-functional type (Pd/HZSM-12), the hydrocracking of butyl cyclohexane and the isomerisation and hydrocracking of long-chain n-alkanes were investigated as test reactions.

  18. Single-species reactions on a random catalytic chain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oshanin, G [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique des Liquides, Universite Paris 6, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris (France); Burlatsky, S F [United Technologies Research Center, United Technologies Corporation, 411 Silver Lane, 129-21 East Hartford, CT (United States)

    2002-11-29

    We present an exact solution for a catalytically activated annihilation A+A {yields} 0 reaction taking place on a one-dimensional chain in which some segments (placed at random, with mean concentration p) possess special, catalytic properties. An annihilation reaction takes place as soon as any two A particles land from the reservoir onto two vacant sites at the extremities of the catalytic segment, or when any A particle lands onto a vacant site on a catalytic segment while the site at the other extremity of this segment is already occupied by another A particle. We find that the disorder-average pressure P{sup (quen)} per site of such a chain is given by P{sup (quen)} P{sup (Lan)} + {beta}{sup -1}F, where P{sup (Lan)}={beta}{sup -1} ln(1+z) is the Langmuir adsorption pressure, (z being the activity and {beta}{sup -1} the temperature), while {beta}{sup -1}F is the reaction-induced contribution, which can be expressed, under appropriate change of notation, as the Lyapunov exponent for the product of 2x2 random matrices, obtained exactly by Derrida and Hilhorst (1983 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 16 2641). Explicit asymptotic formulae for the particle mean density and the compressibility are also presented. (letter to the editor)

  19. Life and death of a single catalytic cracking particle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meirer, Florian; Kalirai, Samanbir; Morris, Darius; Soparawalla, Santosh; Liu, Yijin; Mesu, Gerbrand; Andrews, Joy C; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-01-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particles account for 40 to 45% of worldwide gasoline production. The hierarchical complex particle pore structure allows access of long-chain feedstock molecules into active catalyst domains where they are cracked into smaller, more valuable hydrocarbon products (for

  20. Catalytic destruction of tar in biomass derived producer gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to investigate catalytic destruction of tar formed during gasification of biomass, with the goal of improving the quality of the producer gas. This work focuses on nickel based catalysts treated with alkali in an effort to promote steam gasification of the coke that deposits on catalyst surfaces. A tar conversion system consisting of a guard bed and catalytic reactor was designed to treat the producer gas from an air blown, fluidized bed biomass gasifier. The guard bed used dolomite to crack the heavy tars. The catalytic reactor was used to evaluate three commercial steam reforming catalysts. These were the ICI46-1 catalyst from Imperial Chemical Industry and Z409 and RZ409 catalysts from Qilu Petrochemical Corp. in China. A 0.5-3 l/min slipstream from a 5 tpd biomass gasifier was used to test the tar conversion system. Gas and tar were sampled before and after the tar conversion system to evaluate the effectiveness of the system. Changes in gas composition as functions of catalytic bed temperature, space velocity and steam/TOC (total organic carbon) ratio are presented. Structural changes in the catalysts during the tests are also described

  1. Trends in the Catalytic CO Oxidation Activity of Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Falsig, Hanne; Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk;

    2008-01-01

    Going for gold: Density functional calculations show how gold nanoparticles are more active catalysts for CO oxidation than other metal nanoparticles. The high catalytic activity of nanosized gold clusters at low temperature is found to be related to the ability of low-coordinate metal atoms...

  2. Catalytic Deoxygenation of Fatty Acids: Elucidation of the Inhibition Process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollak, S.A.W.; Jong, de K.P.; Es, van D.S.

    2014-01-01

    Catalytic deoxygenation of unsaturated fatty acids in the absence of H2 is known to suffer from significant catalyst inhibition. Thus far, no conclusive results have been reported on the cause of deactivation. Here we show that CC double bonds present in the feed or the products dramatically reduce

  3. Catalytic upgrading of biomass pyrolysis vapours using Faujasite zeolite catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, T.S.; Zabeti, M.; Lefferts, L.; Brem, G.; Seshan, K.

    2012-01-01

    Bio-oil produced via fast pyrolysis of biomass has the potential to be processed in a FCC (fluid catalytic cracking) unit to generate liquid fuel. However, this oil requires a significant upgrade to become an acceptable feedstock for refinery plants due to its high oxygen content. One promising rout

  4. Catalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Muhammad Shahzad; Razzak, Shaikh A.; Hossain, Mohammad M.

    2016-09-01

    Emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is one of the major contributors to air pollution. The main sources of VOCs are petroleum refineries, fuel combustions, chemical industries, decomposition in the biosphere and biomass, pharmaceutical plants, automobile industries, textile manufacturers, solvents processes, cleaning products, printing presses, insulating materials, office supplies, printers etc. The most common VOCs are halogenated compounds, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, aromatic compounds, and ethers. High concentrations of these VOCs can cause irritations, nausea, dizziness, and headaches. Some VOCs are also carcinogenic for both humans and animals. Therefore, it is crucial to minimize the emission of VOCs. Among the available technologies, the catalytic oxidation of VOCs is the most popular because of its versatility of handling a range of organic emissions under mild operating conditions. Due to that fact, there are numerous research initiatives focused on developing advanced technologies for the catalytic destruction of VOCs. This review discusses recent developments in catalytic systems for the destruction of VOCs. Review also describes various VOCs and their sources of emission, mechanisms of catalytic destruction, the causes of catalyst deactivation, and catalyst regeneration methods.

  5. Simulation for Synthesis of TAME with Catalytic Distillation Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Boxue; Deng Zhengyong; Weng Huixin; Gao Buliang

    2008-01-01

    The triangular matrixing modified relaxation model equation was established for the synthesis of TAME with catalytic distillation process, and a new accelerated convergence technique was adopted. The simulation on the synthesis of TAME showed that the calculated data agreed well with the experimental results.

  6. Integrated approach for the intensification of heterogeneous catalytic processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiwi-Minsker, Lioubov; Crespo-Quesada, Micaela

    2011-01-01

    The integrated approach for the design of solid catalysts for process intensification is presented addressing simultaneously different levels of scale and complexity involved in the development starting from the molecular/nano-scale of the active phase optimization up to the macro-scale of the catalytic reactor design. The feasibility of this approach is demonstrated through case studies carried out in our group.

  7. DNAzyme catalytic beacon sensors that resist temperature-dependent variations†

    OpenAIRE

    Nagraj, Nandini; Liu, Juewen; Sterling, Stephanie; Wu, Jenny; Lu, Yi

    2009-01-01

    The temperature-dependent variability of a Pb2+-specific 8-17E DNAzyme catalytic beacon sensor has been addressed through the introduction of mismatches in the DNAzyme, and the resulting sensors resist temperature-dependent variations from 4 to 30 °C.

  8. Enhanced Heterogeneous Catalytic Conversion of Furfuryl Alcohol into Butyl Levulinate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.D.. Carà; R. Ciriminna; N.R. Shiju; G. Rothenberg; M. Pagliaro

    2014-01-01

    We study the catalytic condensation of furfuryl alcohol with 1-butanol to butyl levulinate. A screening of several commercial and as-synthesized solid acid catalysts shows that propylsulfonic acid-functionalized mesoporous silica outperforms the state-of-the-art phosphotungstate acid catalysts. The

  9. Advanced catalytic converter system for natural gas powered diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strots, V.O.; Bunimovich, G.A.; Matros, Y.S. [Matros Technologies Inc., Chesterfield, Missouri (United States); Zheng, M.; Mirosh, E.A. [Alternative Fuel Systems Inc., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    1998-12-31

    The paper discusses the development of catalytic converter for aftertreatment of exhaust gas from diesel engines powered with natural gas. The converter, operated with periodical reversals of the flow, ensures destruction of CO and hydrocarbons, including methane. Both computer simulation and engine testing results are presented. 8 refs.

  10. Demonstration of a Catalytic Converter Using a Lawn Mower Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic conversion is an important tool in environmental-remediation strategies and source removal of pollutants. Because a catalyst is regenerated, the chemistry can be extremely effective for conversion of undesirable pollutant species to less harmful products in situations where the pollutants have accumulated or are being continuously…

  11. Ex-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using ex-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

  12. In-Situ Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates converting woody biomass using in-situ catalytic fast pyrolysis followed by upgrading to gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Technical barriers and key research needs that should be pursued for this pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived blendstocks have been identified.

  13. Clay Minerals as Solid Acids and Their Catalytic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsen, J.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses catalytic properties of clays, attributed to acidity of the clay surface. The formation of carbonium ions on montmorillonite is used as a demonstration of the presence of surface acidity, the enhanced dissociation of water molecules when polarized by cations, and the way the surface can interact with organic substances. (Author/JN)

  14. Asymmetric catalytic synthesis of the proposed structure of trocheliophorolide B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, Barry M; Quintard, Adrien

    2012-09-01

    A concise catalytic asymmetric synthesis of the proposed structure of trocheliophorolide B is reported. The synthetic sequence notably features an asymmetric acetaldehyde alkynylation, a Ru-catalyzed alder-ene reaction, and a Zn-ProPhenol ynone aldol condensation. Comparison with the reported data suggests a misassignment of the natural product structure.

  15. Asymmetric catalytic synthesis of the proposed structure of trocheliophorolide B

    OpenAIRE

    Trost, Barry M.; Quintard, Adrien

    2012-01-01

    A concise catalytic asymmetric synthesis of the proposed structure of Trocheliophorolide B is reported. The synthetic sequence notably features an asymmetric acetaldehyde alkynylation, Ru-catalyzed alder-ene reaction and Zn-ProPhenol ynone aldol condensation. Comparison with the reported data suggests a miss-assignment of the natural product structure.

  16. Catalytic mechanisms by biological systems : Special issue introduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraaije, Marco W; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2013-01-01

    Research on enzyme mechanisms is advancing knowledge of the chemistry and biochemistry of catalytic mechanisms by biological systems. The structural-dynamical properties of enzymes are of key importance. Advanced methodological approaches and new insights into enzyme functioning, and new emerging ap

  17. The tritium labelling of butibufen by herterogeneous catalytic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The labelling of a new non-steroidal antiinflammatory agent, butibufen (2-(4-isobutylphenyl) butyric acid) was studied. The method used was heterogeneous catalytic exchange between butibufen and tritiated water, obtained ''in situ''. Purification was accomplished through thin layer chromatography. Concentration, purity and specific activity of the labeled drug were determined by ultraviolet and liquid scintillation techniques. (author)

  18. Design parameters for measurements of local catalytic activity on surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Martin; Johannessen, Tue; Jørgensen, Jan Hoffmann;

    2006-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics in combination with experiments is used to characterize a gas sampling device for measurements of the local catalytic activity on surfaces. The device basically consists of a quartz capillary mounted concentrically inside an aluminum tube. Reactant gas is blown toward...

  19. Mechanism of Ribonuclease III Catalytic Regulation by Serine Phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gone, Swapna; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Paudyal, Samridhdi; Nicholson, Allen W.

    2016-05-01

    Ribonuclease III (RNase III) is a conserved, gene-regulatory bacterial endonuclease that cleaves double-helical structures in diverse coding and noncoding RNAs. RNase III is subject to multiple levels of control, reflective of its global regulatory functions. Escherichia coli (Ec) RNase III catalytic activity is known to increase during bacteriophage T7 infection, reflecting the expression of the phage-encoded protein kinase, T7PK. However, the mechanism of catalytic enhancement is unknown. This study shows that Ec-RNase III is phosphorylated on serine in vitro by purified T7PK, and identifies the targets as Ser33 and Ser34 in the N-terminal catalytic domain. Kinetic experiments reveal a 5-fold increase in kcat and a 1.4-fold decrease in Km following phosphorylation, providing a 7.4–fold increase in catalytic efficiency. Phosphorylation does not change the rate of substrate cleavage under single-turnover conditions, indicating that phosphorylation enhances product release, which also is the rate-limiting step in the steady-state. Molecular dynamics simulations provide a mechanism for facilitated product release, in which the Ser33 phosphomonoester forms a salt bridge with the Arg95 guanidinium group, thereby weakening RNase III engagement of product. The simulations also show why glutamic acid substitution at either serine does not confer enhancement, thus underscoring the specific requirement for a phosphomonoester.

  20. Catalytic behavior of Cu, Ag and Au nanoparticles. A comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lippits, Meindert Jan

    2010-01-01

    Clearly gold deposited as nanoparticles on a support is a very active catalyst in contrast to bulk gold which does not show any catalytic activity. The question arises if this particle size effect is exclusively valid for gold catalysis or can a similar effect be found in other metals? In the resear

  1. Catalytic abatement of nitrous oxide from nitric and production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, J.

    1998-01-01

    Nitric acid production is identified as a main source of nitrous oxide. Options for emission reduction however are not available. TNO and Hydro Agri studied the technological and economic feasibility of catalytic decomposition of nitrous oxide in nitric acid tail-gases. Although in literature promis

  2. Biodiesel by catalytic reactive distillation powered by metal oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.A. Kiss; A.C. Dimian; G. Rothenberg

    2008-01-01

    The properties and use of biodiesel as a renewable fuel as well as the problems associated with its current production processes are outlined. A novel sustainable esterification process based on catalytic reactive distillation is proposed. The pros and cons of manufacturing biodiesel via fatty acid

  3. Catalytic oxidative cracking of hexane as a route to olefins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boyadjian, Cassia; Lefferts, Leon; Seshan, K.

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic oxidative cracking of naphtha is conceptually an alternative process to steam cracking. The performance of sol–gel synthesized Li/MgO in oxidative cracking of hexane as a model compound of naphtha, has been studied and compared to that of conventionally prepared catalyst. At a temperature

  4. The tritium labeling of Butibufen by heterogeneous catalytic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The labeling of a new non-steroidal antiinflammatory agent, Butibufen (2-(4-isobutylphenyl) butyric acid) was studied. The method used was heterogeneous catalytic exchange between Butibufen and tritiated water, obtained in situ. Purification was accomplished through thin layer chromatography. Concentration, purity and specific activity of the labeled drug were determined by ultraviolet and liquid scintillation techniques. (Author) 7 refs

  5. Review of literature on catalytic recombination of hydrogen--oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results are reported of a literature search for information concerning the heterogeneous, gas phase, catalytic hydrogen-oxygen recombination. Laboratory scale experiments to test the performance of specific metal oxide catalysts under conditions simulating the atmosphere within a nuclear reactor containment vessel following a loss-of-coolant blowdown accident are suggested

  6. Methods of using structures including catalytic materials disposed within porous zeolite materials to synthesize hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Harry W.; Petkovic, Lucia M.; Ginosar, Daniel M.

    2011-02-01

    Catalytic structures include a catalytic material disposed within a zeolite material. The catalytic material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of methanol from carbon monoxide and/or carbon dioxide, and the zeolite material may be capable of catalyzing a formation of hydrocarbon molecules from methanol. The catalytic material may include copper and zinc oxide. The zeolite material may include a first plurality of pores substantially defined by a crystal structure of the zeolite material and a second plurality of pores dispersed throughout the zeolite material. Systems for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules also include catalytic structures. Methods for synthesizing hydrocarbon molecules include contacting hydrogen and at least one of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide with such catalytic structures. Catalytic structures are fabricated by forming a zeolite material at least partially around a template structure, removing the template structure, and introducing a catalytic material into the zeolite material.

  7. Theoretical Study on the Mechanism of Sonogashira Coupling Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Li-Ping; HONG San-Guo; HOU Hao-Qing

    2008-01-01

    The mechanism of palladium-catalyzed Sonogashira cross-coupling reaction has been studied theoretically by DFT (density functional theory) calculations. The model system studied consists of Pd(PH3)2 as the starting catalyst complex, phenyl bromide as the substrate and acetylene as the terminal alkyne, without regarding to the co-catalyst and base. Mechanistically and energetically plausible catalytic cycles for the cross-coupling have been identified. The DFT analysis shows that the catalytic cycle occurs in three stages: oxidative addition of phenyl bromide to the palladium center, alkynylation of palladium(II) intermediate, and reductive elimination to phenylacetylene. In the oxidative addition, the neutral and anionic pathways have been investigated, which could both give rise to cis-configured palladium(II) diphosphine intermediate. Starting from the palladium(II) diphosphine intermediate, the only identifiable pathway in alkynylation involves the dissociation of Br group and the formation of square-planar palladium(II) intermediate, in which the phenyl and alkynyl groups are oriented cis to each other. Due to the close proximity of phenyl and alkynyl groups, the reductive elimination of phenylacetylene proceeds smoothly.

  8. Conduit coupling assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A conduit coupling assembly for coupling pipes with an interposed seal has a first part for receiving a pipe and is in splined engagement with a bush fixed to a pipe. A second part having radial fingers so that it can be turned by a manipulator, has a threaded engagement with the first part which is the same hand but different pitch to a threaded engagement between the second part and the bush. Pitches of 8:7 for couplings will give a mechanical advantage of 56:1 thus reducing the force needed to obtain a given axial movement of the bush and thus of the pipe and compression of the seal. (author)

  9. EMP coupling to ships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scale-model tests were conducted to establish the adequacy and limitations of model measurements as tools for predicting electromagnetic pulse (EMP) coupling voltages and currents to the critical antennas, cables, and metallic structures on ships. The scale-model predictions are compared with the results of the full-scale EMP simulation test of the Canadian ASW ship, HMCS Huron. (The EMP coupling predictions in this report were made without prior knowledge of the results of the data from the HMCS Huron tests.) This report establishes that the scale-model tests in conjunction with the data base from EMP coupling modules provides the necessary information for source model development and permits effective, low-cost study of particular system configurations. 184 figures, 9 tables

  10. Industrial Gas Turbine Engine Catalytic Pilot Combustor-Prototype Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etemad, Shahrokh [Precision Combustion, Inc., North Haven, CT (United States); Baird, Benjamin [Precision Combustion, Inc., North Haven, CT (United States); Alavandi, Sandeep [Precision Combustion, Inc., North Haven, CT (United States); Pfefferle, William [Precision Combustion, Inc., North Haven, CT (United States)

    2010-04-01

    PCI has developed and demonstrated its Rich Catalytic Lean-burn (RCL®) technology for industrial and utility gas turbines to meet DOE's goals of low single digit emissions. The technology offers stable combustion with extended turndown allowing ultra-low emissions without the cost of exhaust after-treatment and further increasing overall efficiency (avoidance of after-treatment losses). The objective of the work was to develop and demonstrate emission benefits of the catalytic technology to meet strict emissions regulations. Two different applications of the RCL® concept were demonstrated: RCL® catalytic pilot and Full RCL®. The RCL® catalytic pilot was designed to replace the existing pilot (a typical source of high NOx production) in the existing Dry Low NOx (DLN) injector, providing benefit of catalytic combustion while minimizing engine modification. This report discusses the development and single injector and engine testing of a set of T70 injectors equipped with RCL® pilots for natural gas applications. The overall (catalytic pilot plus main injector) program NOx target of less than 5 ppm (corrected to 15% oxygen) was achieved in the T70 engine for the complete set of conditions with engine CO emissions less than 10 ppm. Combustor acoustics were low (at or below 0.1 psi RMS) during testing. The RCL® catalytic pilot supported engine startup and shutdown process without major modification of existing engine controls. During high pressure testing, the catalytic pilot showed no incidence of flashback or autoignition while operating over a wide range of flame temperatures. In applications where lower NOx production is required (i.e. less than 3 ppm), in parallel, a Full RCL® combustor was developed that replaces the existing DLN injector providing potential for maximum emissions reduction. This concept was tested at industrial gas turbine conditions in a Solar Turbines, Incorporated high-pressure (17 atm.) combustion rig and in a modified Solar

  11. Removal of platinum group metals from the used auto catalytic converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Fornalczyk

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Recycling of platinum group metals from the used auto catalytic converters is profitable from ecological and also economical point of view. This work presents the analysis of the chances of removing the platinum group metals (PGM from the used auto catalytic converters applying pyrometallurgical and hydrometallurgical methods. The characteristics of auto catalytic converter is shown as well the available technologies used for processing the auto catalytic converters are also presented.

  12. Life Cycle Analysis of a Ceramic Three-Way Catalytic Converter

    OpenAIRE

    Belcastro, Elizabeth Lynn

    2012-01-01

    The life cycle analysis compares the environmental impacts of catalytic converters and the effects of not using these devices. To environmentally evaluate the catalytic converter, the emissions during extraction, processing, use of the product are considered. All relevant materials and energy supplies are evaluated for the catalytic converter. The goal of this life cycle is to compare the pollutants of a car with and without a catalytic converter. Pollutants examined are carbon monoxide (...

  13. Removal of platinum group metals from the used auto catalytic converter

    OpenAIRE

    A. Fornalczyk; M. Saternus

    2009-01-01

    Recycling of platinum group metals from the used auto catalytic converters is profitable from ecological and also economical point of view. This work presents the analysis of the chances of removing the platinum group metals (PGM) from the used auto catalytic converters applying pyrometallurgical and hydrometallurgical methods. The characteristics of auto catalytic converter is shown as well the available technologies used for processing the auto catalytic converters are also presented.

  14. Component Development to Accelerate Commercial Implementation of Ultra-Low Emissions Catalytic Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarty, Jon; Berry, Brian; Lundberg, Kare; Anson, Orris

    2003-03-31

    This final report describes a 2000-2003 program for the development of components and processes to enhance the commercialization of ultra-low emissions catalytic combustion in industrial gas turbines. The range of project tasks includes: development of more durable, lower-cost catalysts and catalytic combustor components; development and design of a catalytic pre-burner and a catalytic pilot burner for gas turbines, and on-site fuel conversion processing for utilization of liquid fuel.

  15. Selenium utilization in thioredoxin and catalytic advantage provided by selenocysteine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Moon-Jung [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung Cheon [Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Division of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences & Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Kwang Yeon [Division of Biotechnology, College of Life Sciences & Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul 136-701 (Korea, Republic of); Gladyshev, Vadim N. [Division of Genetics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kim, Hwa-Young, E-mail: hykim@ynu.ac.kr [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Yeungnam University College of Medicine, Daegu 705-717 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-12

    Thioredoxin (Trx) is a major thiol-disulfide reductase that plays a role in many biological processes, including DNA replication and redox signaling. Although selenocysteine (Sec)-containing Trxs have been identified in certain bacteria, their enzymatic properties have not been characterized. In this study, we expressed a selenoprotein Trx from Treponema denticola, an oral spirochete, in Escherichia coli and characterized this selenoenzyme and its natural cysteine (Cys) homologue using E. coli Trx1 as a positive control. {sup 75}Se metabolic labeling and mutation analyses showed that the SECIS (Sec insertion sequence) of T. denticola selenoprotein Trx is functional in the E. coli Sec insertion system with specific selenium incorporation into the Sec residue. The selenoprotein Trx exhibited approximately 10-fold higher catalytic activity than the Sec-to-Cys version and natural Cys homologue and E. coli Trx1, suggesting that Sec confers higher catalytic activity on this thiol-disulfide reductase. Kinetic analysis also showed that the selenoprotein Trx had a 30-fold higher K{sub m} than Cys-containing homologues, suggesting that this selenoenzyme is adapted to work efficiently with high concentrations of substrate. Collectively, the results of this study support the hypothesis that selenium utilization in oxidoreductase systems is primarily due to the catalytic advantage provided by the rare amino acid, Sec. - Highlights: • The first characterization of a selenoprotein Trx is presented. • The selenoenzyme Trx exhibits 10-fold higher catalytic activity than Cys homologues. • Se utilization in Trx is primarily due to the catalytic advantage provided by Sec residue.

  16. Catalytic combustion in environmental protection and energy production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahlstroem-Silversand, F.

    1996-12-01

    This thesis is focused on three different areas of catalytic combustion: -Catalytic combustion of diesel soot, -Development of catalytically active wire meshes through thermal spraying, -Stabilisation and activation of {gamma}-alumina for methane combustion. Emissions of diesel soot may be trapped and combusted in a particulate trap coated with catalytically active materials. The soot particles must be combusted at temperatures prevailing in diesel exhausts, generally between 150 and 400 deg C. To facilitate effective combustion at these temperatures, the particulate trap should be coated with an oxide catalyst consisting of V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/CuO (V:Cu=0.9 on molar basis). Catalytically active wire meshes offer a number of advantages over pellets and monolith catalysts. They combine geometric flexibility with excellent mass- and heat- transfer characteristics and a low pressure drop. By using a modified thermal spray technique, it is possible to produce porous adhesive ceramic coatings on metal surfaces. The specific surface area can be increased through deposition of a high-surface-area material into the macro-porosity of the as-sprayed layer. The ceramic layer is finally activated through a conventional impregnation technique. Palladium dispersed onto a Si-stabilised {gamma}-alumina is an appropriate combustion catalyst at temperatures below 1000 deg C. Adding small amounts of rhodium or platinum to the palladium increases the catalyst activity but decreases the catalyst`s stability to thermal deactivation. The addition of rare-earth-metal oxides will lead to increased thermal stability but to a decreased activity. Long-term deactivation tests show that the activity for combustion of methane decreases to the same extent as the value of the specific surface area, thus indicating that the alumina surface may play an important role during the activation of adsorbed methane molecules. 29 refs, 14 figs

  17. Wakefields and coupling impedances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurennoy, S. (Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory, 2550 Beckleymeade Ave., Dallas, Texas 75237 (United States))

    1995-02-01

    After a short introduction of the wake potentials and coupling impedances, a few new results in impedance calculations are discussed. The first example is a new analytical method for calculating impedances of axisymmetric structures in the low frequency range, below the cutoff frequency of the vacuum chamber. The second example demonstrates that even very small discontinuities on a smooth waveguide can result in appearance of trapped modes, with frequencies slightly below the waveguide cutoff frequency. The high-frequency (above the cutoff) behavior of the coupling impedance of many small discontinuities is discussed in the third example. [copyright] 1995 [ital American] [ital Institute] [ital of] [ital Physics

  18. Wakefields and coupling impedances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurennoy, Sergey

    1995-02-01

    After a short introduction of the wake potentials and coupling impedances, a few new results in impedance calculations are discussed. The first example is a new analytical method for calculating impedances of axisymmetric structures in the low frequency range, below the cutoff frequency of the vacuum chamber. The second example demonstrates that even very small discontinuities on a smooth waveguide can result in appearance of trapped modes, with frequencies slightly below the waveguide cutoff frequency. The high-frequency (above the cutoff) behavior of the coupling impedance of many small discontinuities is discussed in the third example.

  19. Coupled moderator neutronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optimizing the neutronic performance of a coupled-moderator system for a Long-Pulse Spallation Source is a new and challenging area for the spallation target-system designer. For optimal performance of a neutron source, it is essential to have good communication with instrument scientists to obtain proper design criteria and continued interaction with mechanical, thermal-hydraulic, and materials engineers to attain a practical design. A good comprehension of the basics of coupled-moderator neutronics will aid in the proper design of a target system for a Long-Pulse Spallation Source

  20. [Couples counseling with Latinos].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zumaya, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Intimate ties and emotional relationship gain the function to confirm, to stabilize and, afterwards, to structure the coherency's model of the structured self-organization up to that moment. When the couple perceives the bond of the relationship such as a sole and exclusive for a person, they take a leading role to be able to deduce a sense of individuality and uniqueness in the way to feel himself in the world. Based on these considerations, in this paper I propose a brief description of a counselling method, which characterises the work I am carrying out since several years in the counselling and therapy with couples.

  1. Strong-coupling approximations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standard path-integral techniques such as instanton calculations give good answers for weak-coupling problems, but become unreliable for strong-coupling. Here we consider a method of replacing the original potential by a suitably chosen harmonic oscillator potential. Physically this is motivated by the fact that potential barriers below the level of the ground-state energy of a quantum-mechanical system have little effect. Numerically, results are good, both for quantum-mechanical problems and for massive phi4 field theory in 1 + 1 dimensions. 9 references, 6 figures

  2. Carbon-Carbon Cross Coupling Reactions in Ionic Liquids Catalysed by Palladium Metal Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Martin H. G. Prechtl; Scholten, Jackson D.; Jairton Dupont

    2010-01-01

    A brief summary of selected pioneering and mechanistic contributions in the field of carbon-carbon cross-coupling reactions with palladium nanoparticles (Pd-NPs) in ionic liquids (ILs) is presented. Five exemplary model systems using the Pd-NPs/ILs approach are presented: Heck, Suzuki, Stille, Sonogashira and Ullmann reactions which all have in common the use of ionic liquids as reaction media and the use of palladium nanoparticles as reservoir for the catalytically active palladium species.

  3. Enantioselective CuH-Catalyzed Reductive Coupling of Aryl Alkenes and Activated Carboxylic Acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandar, Jeffrey S; Ascic, Erhad; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2016-05-11

    A new method for the enantioselective reductive coupling of aryl alkenes with activated carboxylic acid derivatives via copper hydride catalysis is described. Dual catalytic cycles are proposed, with a relatively fast enantioselective hydroacylation cycle followed by a slower diastereoselective ketone reduction cycle. Symmetrical aryl carboxyclic anhydrides provide access to enantioenriched α-substituted ketones or alcohols with excellent stereoselectivity and functional group tolerance. PMID:27121395

  4. Functional Carbon Nanocomposite, Optoelectronic, and Catalytic Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu Teng

    Over the past couple decades, fundamental research into carbon nanomaterials has produced a steady stream of groundbreaking physical science. Their record setting mechanical strength, chemical stability, and optoelectronic performance have fueled many optimistic claims regarding the breadth and pace of carbon nanotube and graphene integration. However, present synthetic, processing, and economic constraints have precluded these materials from many practical device applications. To overcome these limitations, novel synthetic techniques, processing methodologies, device geometries, and mechanistic insight were developed in this dissertation. The resulting advancements in material production and composite device performance have brought carbon nanomaterials ever closer to commercial implementation. For improved materials processing, vacuum co-deposition was first demonstrated as viable technique for forming carbon nanocomposite films without property distorting covalent modifications. Co-deposited nanoparticle, carbon nanotube, and graphene composite films enabled rapid device prototyping and compositional optimization. Cellulosic polymer stabilizers were then shown to be highly effective carbon nanomaterial dispersants, improving graphene production yields by two orders of magnitude in common organic solvents. By exploiting polarity interactions, iterative solvent exchange was used to further increase carbon nanomaterial dispersion concentrations by an additional order of magnitude, yielding concentrated inks. On top of their low causticity, these cellulosic nanomaterial inks have highly tunable viscosities, excellent film forming capacity, and outstanding thermal stability. These processing characteristics enable the efficient scaling of carbon nanomaterial coatings and device production using existing roll-to-roll fabrication techniques. Utilizing these process improvements, high-performance gas sensing, energy storage, transparent conductor, and photocatalytic

  5. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart Uuu of... - Organic HAP Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... unit must not exceed 500 parts per million volume (ppmv) (dry basis). 2. Not subject to the NSPS for CO... Catalytic Cracking Units 8 Table 8 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units Pt. 63, Subpt....

  6. Catalytic and non-catalytic roles for the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase Arr in the mycobacterial DNA damage response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina L Stallings

    Full Text Available Recent evidence indicates that the mycobacterial response to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs differs substantially from previously characterized bacteria. These differences include the use of three DSB repair pathways (HR, NHEJ, SSA, and the CarD pathway, which integrates DNA damage with transcription. Here we identify a role for the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase Arr in the mycobacterial DNA damage response. Arr is transcriptionally induced following DNA damage and cellular stress. Although Arr is not required for induction of a core set of DNA repair genes, Arr is necessary for suppression of a set of ribosomal protein genes and rRNA during DNA damage, placing Arr in a similar pathway as CarD. Surprisingly, the catalytic activity of Arr is not required for this function, as catalytically inactive Arr was still able to suppress ribosomal protein and rRNA expression during DNA damage. In contrast, Arr substrate binding and catalytic activities were required for regulation of a small subset of other DNA damage responsive genes, indicating that Arr has both catalytic and noncatalytic roles in the DNA damage response. Our findings establish an endogenous cellular function for a mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase apart from its role in mediating Rifampin resistance.

  7. Catalytic and non-catalytic roles for the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase Arr in the mycobacterial DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, Christina L; Chu, Linda; Li, Lucy X; Glickman, Michael S

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that the mycobacterial response to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) differs substantially from previously characterized bacteria. These differences include the use of three DSB repair pathways (HR, NHEJ, SSA), and the CarD pathway, which integrates DNA damage with transcription. Here we identify a role for the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase Arr in the mycobacterial DNA damage response. Arr is transcriptionally induced following DNA damage and cellular stress. Although Arr is not required for induction of a core set of DNA repair genes, Arr is necessary for suppression of a set of ribosomal protein genes and rRNA during DNA damage, placing Arr in a similar pathway as CarD. Surprisingly, the catalytic activity of Arr is not required for this function, as catalytically inactive Arr was still able to suppress ribosomal protein and rRNA expression during DNA damage. In contrast, Arr substrate binding and catalytic activities were required for regulation of a small subset of other DNA damage responsive genes, indicating that Arr has both catalytic and noncatalytic roles in the DNA damage response. Our findings establish an endogenous cellular function for a mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase apart from its role in mediating Rifampin resistance.

  8. DISCUSSIONS ON STRUCTURAL COUPLING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Wenbin; GUO Lingzhi; MA Ruishi; SUN Yan; WANG Feng

    2004-01-01

    The structural coupling is a common geological phenomenon. The structural differences between eastern and western active continental margins of modern Pacific and between paleo-Pacific and modern-Pacific continental margins are related to the characteristics and status of the subducting oceanic plate, namely, 1. subducting angle; 2. change in subducting angle; 3. subducting velocity; 4. change in subducting velocity; 5. subduction depth; 6. horizontal distance between the leading edge of the subducting plate and the trench; 7. the structural form of the subducting plate at the 670km boundary between the upper and lower mantle; 8. the displacement and the direction of displacement of subducting plate. The control and influence toward the shallow-level structures by the deep-level structural activities is a detailed representation of the structural coupling on active continental margin.The basin-maintain coupling phenomenon is an intracontinental structural coupling. The far field effect of collision between Indian plate and Eurasian plate results in the occurrence of intracontinental A-type subduction in central Asia, and the A-type subduction is the key factor that results in the atrophy of basins and the formation of mountain systems.

  9. International Migration of Couples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junge, Martin; Munk, Martin D.; Poutvaara, Panu

    2016-01-01

    Migrant self-selection is important to both origin and destination countries. We develop a theoretical model regarding the migration of dual-earner couples and test it in the context of international migration, using population-wide administrative data from Denmark. Our model predicts...

  10. Coupling Dimers to CDT

    CERN Document Server

    Glaser, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    This contribution reviews some recent results on dimers coupled to CDT. A bijective mapping between dimers and tree-like graphs allows for a simple way to introduce dimers to CDT. This can be generalized further to obtain different multicritcal points.

  11. Coupling Gammasphere and ORRUBA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ratkiewicz, A.; Cizewski, J. A.; Manning, B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 (United States); Pain, S. D.; Bardayan, D. W. [Physics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Blackmon, J. C.; Matos, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Chipps, K. A. [Department of Physics, Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO 80401 (United States); Hardy, S.; Shand, C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903 and Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Jones, K. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Kozub, R. L. [Physics Department, Tennessee Technological University, Cookeville, TN 38505 (United States); Lister, C. J. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 and Department of Physics and Applied Physics, University of Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA 01854 (United States); Peters, W. A. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Seweryniak, D. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2013-04-19

    The coincident detection of particles and gamma rays allows the study of the structure of exotic nuclei via inverse kinematics reactions using radioactive ion beams and thick targets. We report on the status of the project to couple the highresolution charged-particle detector ORRUBA to Gammasphere, a high-efficiency, high-resolution gamma ray detector.

  12. Advances in solid-catalytic and non-catalytic technologies for biodiesel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The recent technologies for promoting biodiesel synthesis were elucidated. • The design of catalyst consideration of biodiesel production was proposed. • The recent advances and remaining difficulties in biodiesel synthesis were outlined. • The future research trend in biodiesel synthesis was highlighted. - Abstract: The insecure supply of fossil fuel coerces the scientific society to keep a vision to boost investments in the renewable energy sector. Among the many renewable fuels currently available around the world, biodiesel offers an immediate impact in our energy. In fact, a huge interest in related research indicates a promising future for the biodiesel technology. Heterogeneous catalyzed production of biodiesel has emerged as a preferred route as it is environmentally benign needs no water washing and product separation is much easier. The number of well-defined catalyst complexes that are able to catalyze transesterification reactions efficiently has been significantly expanded in recent years. The activity of catalysts, specifically in application to solid acid/base catalyst in transesterification reaction depends on their structure, strength of basicity/acidity, surface area as well as the stability of catalyst. There are various process intensification technologies based on the use of alternate energy sources such as ultrasound and microwave. The latest advances in research and development related to biodiesel production is represented by non-catalytic supercritical method and focussed exclusively on these processes as forthcoming transesterification processes. The latest developments in this field featuring highly active catalyst complexes are outlined in this review. The knowledge of more extensive research on advances in biofuels will allow a deeper insight into the mechanism of these technologies toward meeting the critical energy challenges in future

  13. Microlith-Based Catalytic Reactor for Air Quality and Trace Contaminant Control Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilekar, Saurabh; Hawley, Kyle; Junaedi, Christian; Crowder, Bruce; Prada, Julian; Mastanduno, Richard; Perry, Jay L.; Kayatin, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, gaseous compounds such as methane, carbon monoxide, and trace contaminants have posed challenges for maintaining clean air in enclosed spaces such as crewed spacecraft cabins as they are hazardous to humans and are often difficult to remove by conventional adsorption technology. Catalytic oxidizers have provided a reliable and robust means of disposing of even trace levels of these compounds by converting them into carbon dioxide and water. Precision Combustion, Inc. (PCI) and NASA - Marshall (MSFC) have been developing, characterizing, and optimizing high temperature catalytic oxidizers (HTCO) based on PCI's patented Microlith® technology to meet the requirements of future extended human spaceflight explorations. Current efforts have focused on integrating the HTCO unit with a compact, simple recuperative heat exchanger to reduce the overall system size and weight while also reducing its energy requirements. Previous efforts relied on external heat exchangers to recover the waste heat and recycle it to the oxidizer to minimize the system's power requirements; however, these units contribute weight and volume burdens to the overall system. They also result in excess heat loss due to the separation of the HTCO and the heat recuperator, resulting in lower overall efficiency. Improvements in the recuperative efficiency and close coupling of HTCO and heat recuperator lead to reductions in system energy requirements and startup time. Results from testing HTCO units integrated with heat recuperators at a variety of scales for cabin air quality control and heat melt compactor applications are reported and their benefits over previous iterations of the HTCO and heat recuperator assembly are quantified in this paper.

  14. Networks of high mutual information define the structural proximity of catalytic sites: implications for catalytic residue identification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Marino Buslje

    Full Text Available Identification of catalytic residues (CR is essential for the characterization of enzyme function. CR are, in general, conserved and located in the functional site of a protein in order to attain their function. However, many non-catalytic residues are highly conserved and not all CR are conserved throughout a given protein family making identification of CR a challenging task. Here, we put forward the hypothesis that CR carry a particular signature defined by networks of close proximity residues with high mutual information (MI, and that this signature can be applied to distinguish functional from other non-functional conserved residues. Using a data set of 434 Pfam families included in the catalytic site atlas (CSA database, we tested this hypothesis and demonstrated that MI can complement amino acid conservation scores to detect CR. The Kullback-Leibler (KL conservation measurement was shown to significantly outperform both the Shannon entropy and maximal frequency measurements. Residues in the proximity of catalytic sites were shown to be rich in shared MI. A structural proximity MI average score (termed pMI was demonstrated to be a strong predictor for CR, thus confirming the proposed hypothesis. A structural proximity conservation average score (termed pC was also calculated and demonstrated to carry distinct information from pMI. A catalytic likeliness score (Cls, combining the KL, pC and pMI measures, was shown to lead to significantly improved prediction accuracy. At a specificity of 0.90, the Cls method was found to have a sensitivity of 0.816. In summary, we demonstrate that networks of residues with high MI provide a distinct signature on CR and propose that such a signature should be present in other classes of functional residues where the requirement to maintain a particular function places limitations on the diversification of the structural environment along the course of evolution.

  15. Quantitative study of catalytic activity and catalytic deactivation of Fe–Co/Al2O3 catalysts for multi-walled carbon nanotube synthesis by the CCVD process

    OpenAIRE

    Pirard, Sophie; Heyen, Georges; Pirard, Jean-Paul

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic deactivation during multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) synthesis by the CCVD process and the influence of hydrogen on it were quantified. Initial specific reaction rate, relative specific productivity and catalytic deactivation were studied. Carbon source was ethylene, and a bimetallic iron–cobalt catalyst supported on alumina was used. The catalytic deactivation was modeled by a decreasing hyperbolic law, reflecting the progressive accumulation of amorphous carbon on active si...

  16. Chemical Reactions and Kinetics of the Carbon Monoxide Coupling in the Presence of Hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fandong Meng; Genhui Xu; Zhenhua Li; Pa Du

    2002-01-01

    The chemical reactions and kinetics of the catalytic coupling reaction of carbon monoxide to diethyl oxalate were studied in the presence of hydrogen over a supported palladium catalyst in the gaseous phase at the typical coupling reaction conditions. The experiments were performed in a continuous flow fixed-bed reactor. The results indicated that hydrogen only reacts with ethyl nitrite to form ethanol, and kinetic studies revealed that the rate-determining step is the surface reaction of adsorbed hydrogen and the ethoxy radical (EtO-). A kinetic model is proposed and a comparison of the observed and calculated conversions showed that the rate expressions are of rather high confidence.

  17. Catalytic pyrolysis of palm kernel shell waste in a fluidized bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Won; Koo, Bon Seok; Lee, Dong Hyun

    2014-09-01

    The catalytic pyrolysis of palm kernel shell was investigated in a fluidized bed with zsm-5 and equilibrium FCC (Ecat) catalysts. Catalytic pyrolysis oil yields were remarkably reduced and gas yields were increased due to the higher catalytic reaction of primary volatiles compared to non-catalytic pyrolysis. Char yields were affected by temperature and the pore structure of the catalysts. The pyrolysis oil was characterized by lower H/C and O/C molar ratios due to aromatization and deoxygenation of volatiles by the catalysts. The catalytic pyrolysis oils contained more oxygen and nitrogen and less sulfur than petroleum oils. The oils had a high concentration of nitriles, with a carbon number distribution similar to fatty acids. The catalytic pyrolysis oils featured high nitriles yield with Ecat and high aromatics yield in the light fraction with zsm-5, due to characteristics of the catalyst. The catalytic pyrolysis oils showed potentials as feedstocks for bio-diesel and chemicals.

  18. Natural gas combustion in a catalytic turbulent fluidized bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foka, M.; Chaouki, J.; Guy, C.; Klvana, D. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Quebec (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1994-12-01

    Catalytic fluidized bed combustion of natural gas is shown to be an emerging technology capable of meeting all environmental constraints as far as nitrogen oxides and carbon monoxide are concerned. This technology uses powder catalysts in the turbulent flow regime where the gas-solid contact is optimal so as to maintain a high combustion efficiency. In fact, the catalytic combustion carried out in both the bubbling and the turbulent regimes at 450-500{sup o}C shows that the turbulent regime is more favorable. A single phase plug flow model with axial dispersion is shown to fit satisfactorily the data obtained at 500{sup o}C where the combustion efficiency is very good. A self-sustained combustion was achieved with a mixture of 4% methane at around 500{sup o}C with a complete conversion of methane and a zero emission of NO{sub x} and CO. (author)

  19. Guiding catalytically active particles with chemically patterned surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Uspal, W E; Dietrich, S; Tasinkevych, M

    2016-01-01

    Catalytically active Janus particles suspended in solution create gradients in the chemical composition of the solution along their surfaces, as well as along any nearby container walls. The former leads to self-phoresis, while the latter gives rise to chemi-osmosis, providing an additional contribution to self-motility. Chemi-osmosis strongly depends on the molecular interactions between the diffusing chemical species and the wall. We show analytically, using an approximate "point-particle" approach, that by chemically patterning a planar substrate one can direct the motion of Janus particles: the induced chemi-osmotic flows can cause particles to either "dock" at the chemical step between the two materials, or to follow a chemical stripe. These theoretical predictions are confirmed by full numerical calculations. Generically, docking occurs for particles which tend to move away from their catalytic caps, while stripe-following occurs in the opposite case. Our analysis reveals the physical mechanisms governi...

  20. The catalytic inactivation of cellulase enzyme components by palladium complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodward, J.; Gooch, M.G.; Shultz, M.D.

    1993-10-01

    It has been discovered that sodium hexachloropalladate is a strong inhibitor of cellobiohydrolase I (CBH I) from Trichoderma reesei having an I{sub 50} of <50 {mu}M with p-nitrophenylcellobioside (PNPC) as the substrate. Similar complexes of the metals platinum, osmium, iridium, and rhodium have little effect on CBH I. Other cellulase activities (Avicelase, {beta}-glucanase) are also inhibited by the palladium complex, suggesting that inhibition of two major types of catalytic activity in cellulase are affected. Preliminary data on the kinetics of inhibition of CBH I by sodium hexachloropalladate indicate that the inhibition is reversible and, possibly, uncompetitive. It is anticipated that sodium hexachloropalladate and other palladium complexes will be useful for determining the effect of the binding of catalytically inactivated CBH I and other cellulase components on the structure of cellulose fibers.