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Sample records for catalytic hydrogen generation

  1. Liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage: catalytic hydrogen generation under ambient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hai-Long; Singh, Sanjay Kumar; Yan, Jun-Min; Zhang, Xin-Bo; Xu, Qiang

    2010-05-25

    There is a demand for a sufficient and sustainable energy supply. Hence, the search for applicable hydrogen storage materials is extremely important owing to the diversified merits of hydrogen energy. Lithium and sodium borohydride, ammonia borane, hydrazine, and formic acid have been extensively investigated as promising hydrogen storage materials based on their relatively high hydrogen content. Significant advances, such as hydrogen generation temperatures and reaction kinetics, have been made in the catalytic hydrolysis of aqueous lithium and sodium borohydride and ammonia borane as well as in the catalytic decomposition of hydrous hydrazine and formic acid. In this Minireview we briefly survey the research progresses in catalytic hydrogen generation from these liquid-phase chemical hydrogen storage materials.

  2. Formic Acid Free Flowsheet Development To Eliminate Catalytic Hydrogen Generation In The Defense Waste Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, Dan P.; Stone, Michael E.; Newell, J. David; Fellinger, Terri L.; Bricker, Jonathan M.

    2012-09-14

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) processes legacy nuclear waste generated at the Savannah River Site (SRS) during production of plutonium and tritium demanded by the Cold War. The nuclear waste is first treated via a complex sequence of controlled chemical reactions and then vitrified into a borosilicate glass form and poured into stainless steel canisters. Converting the nuclear waste into borosilicate glass canisters is a safe, effective way to reduce the volume of the waste and stabilize the radionuclides. Testing was initiated to determine whether the elimination of formic acid from the DWPF's chemical processing flowsheet would eliminate catalytic hydrogen generation. Historically, hydrogen is generated in chemical processing of alkaline High Level Waste sludge in DWPF. In current processing, sludge is combined with nitric and formic acid to neutralize the waste, reduce mercury and manganese, destroy nitrite, and modify (thin) the slurry rheology. The noble metal catalyzed formic acid decomposition produces hydrogen and carbon dioxide. Elimination of formic acid by replacement with glycolic acid has the potential to eliminate the production of catalytic hydrogen. Flowsheet testing was performed to develop the nitric-glycolic acid flowsheet as an alternative to the nitric-formic flowsheet currently being processed at the DWPF. This new flowsheet has shown that mercury can be reduced and removed by steam stripping in DWPF with no catalytic hydrogen generation. All processing objectives were also met, including greatly reducing the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product yield stress as compared to the baseline nitric/formic flowsheet. Ten DWPF tests were performed with nonradioactive simulants designed to cover a broad compositional range. No hydrogen was generated in testing without formic acid.

  3. Review of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, D. C.

    2004-12-31

    This report was prepared to fulfill the Phase I deliverable for HLW/DWPF/TTR-98-0018, Rev. 2, ''Hydrogen Generation in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell'', 6/4/2001. The primary objective for the preliminary phase of the hydrogen generation study was to complete a review of past data on hydrogen generation and to prepare a summary of the findings. The understanding was that the focus should be on catalytic hydrogen generation, not on hydrogen generation by radiolysis. The secondary objective was to develop scope for follow-up experimental and analytical work. The majority of this report provides a summary of past hydrogen generation work with radioactive and simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) waste sludges. The report also includes some work done with Hanford waste sludges and simulants. The review extends to idealized systems containing no sludge, such as solutions of sodium formate and formic acid doped with a noble metal catalyst. This includes general information from the literature, as well as the focused study done by the University of Georgia for the SRS. The various studies had a number of points of universal agreement. For example, noble metals, such as Pd, Rh, and Ru, catalyze hydrogen generation from formic acid and formate ions, and more acid leads to more hydrogen generation. There were also some points of disagreement between different sources on a few topics such as the impact of mercury on the noble metal catalysts and the identity of the most active catalyst species. Finally, there were some issues of potential interest to SRS that apparently have not been systematically studied, e.g. the role of nitrite ion in catalyst activation and reactivity. The review includes studies covering the period from about 1924-2002, or from before the discovery of hydrogen generation during simulant sludge processing in 1988 through the Shielded Cells qualification testing for Sludge Batch 2. The review of prior studies is followed by a

  4. Marrying gas power and hydrogen energy: A catalytic system for combining methane conversion and hydrogen generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckers, J.; Gaudillère, C.; Farrusseng, D.; Rothenberg, G.

    2009-01-01

    Ceria-based catalysts are good candidates for integrating methane combustion and hydrogen generation. These new, tuneable catalysts are easily prepared. They are robust inorganic crystalline materials, and perform well at the 400 °C-550 °C range, in some cases even without precious metals. This make

  5. CATALYTIC INTERACTIONS OF RHODIUM, RUTHENIUM, AND MERCURY DURING SIMULATED DWPF CPC PROCESSING WITH HYDROGEN GENERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, D

    2008-10-09

    Simulations of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell (CPC) vessels were performed as part of the ongoing investigation into catalytic hydrogen generation. Rhodium, ruthenium, and mercury have been identified as the principal elemental factors affecting the peak hydrogen generation rate in the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) for a given acid addition. The primary goal of this study is to identify any significant interactions between the three factors. Noble metal concentrations were similar to recent sludge batches. Rh ranged from 0.0026-0.013% and Ru ranged from 0.010-0.050% in the dried sludge solids, while initial Hg ranged from 0.5-2.5 wt%. An experimental matrix was developed to ensure that the existence of statistically significant two-way interactions could be determined without confounding of the main effects with the two-way interaction effects. The nominal matrix design consisted of twelve SRAT cycles. Testing included: a three factor (Rh, Ru, and Hg) study at two levels per factor (eight runs), two duplicate midpoint runs, and two additional replicate runs to assess reproducibility away from the midpoint. Midpoint testing can identify potential quadratic effects from the three factors. A single sludge simulant was used for all tests. Acid addition was kept effectively constant except to compensate for variations in the starting mercury concentration. Six Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were performed to supplement the SME hydrogen generation database. Some of the preliminary findings from this study include: (1) Rh was linked to the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate in the first two hours after acid addition in preliminary statistical modeling. (2) Ru was linked conclusively to the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate in the last four hours of reflux in preliminary statistical modeling. (3) Increasing the ratio of Hg/Rh shifted the noble metal controlling the maximum SRAT hydrogen generation rate from

  6. Catalytic combustor for hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercea, J.; Grecu, E.; Fodor, T.; Kreibik, S.

    1982-01-01

    The performance of catalytic combustors for hydrogen using platinum-supported catalysts is described. Catalytic plates of different sizes were constructed using fibrous and ceramic supports. The temperature distribution as well as the reaction efficiency as a function of the fuel input rate was determined, and a comparison between the performances of different plates is discussed.

  7. A novel liquid system of catalytic hydrogenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    On the basis that endothermic aqueous-phase reforming of oxygenated hydrocarbons for H2 production and exothermic liquid phase hydrogenation of organic compounds are carried out under extremely close conditions of temperature and pressure over the same type of catalyst, a novel liquid system of catalytic hydrogenation has been proposed, in which hydrogen produced from aqueous-phase reforming of oxygenated hydrocarbons is in situ used for liquid phase hydrogenation of organic compounds. The usage of active hydrogen generated from aqueous-phase reforming of oxygenated hydrocarbons for liquid catalytic hydrogenation of organic compounds could lead to increasing the selectivity to H2 in the aqueous-phase reforming due to the prompt removal of hydrogen on the active centers of the catalyst. Meanwhile, this novel liquid system of catalytic hydrogenation might be a potential method to improve the selectivity to the desired product in liquid phase catalytic hydrogenation of organic compounds. On the other hand, for this novel liquid system of catalytic hydrogenation, some special facilities for H2 generation, storage and transportation in traditional liquid phase hydrogenation industry process are yet not needed. Thus, it would simplify the working process of liquid phase hydrogenation and increase the energy usage and hydrogen productivity.

  8. Identification of intrinsic catalytic activity for electrochemical reduction of water molecules to generate hydrogen

    KAUST Repository

    Shinagawa, Tatsuya

    2015-01-01

    Insufficient hydronium ion activities at near-neutral pH and under unbuffered conditions induce diffusion-limited currents for hydrogen evolution, followed by a reaction with water molecules to generate hydrogen at elevated potentials. The observed constant current behaviors at near neutral pH reflect the intrinsic electrocatalytic reactivity of the metal electrodes for water reduction. This journal is © the Owner Societies.

  9. Hydrogen Generation from Catalytic Steam Reforming of Acetic Acid by Ni/Attapulgite Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yishuang Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this research, catalytic steam reforming of acetic acid derived from the aqueous portion of bio-oil for hydrogen production was investigated using different Ni/ATC (Attapulgite Clay catalysts prepared by precipitation, impregnation and mechanical blending methods. The fresh and reduced catalysts were characterized by XRD, N2 adsorption–desorption, TEM and temperature program reduction (H2-TPR. The comprehensive results demonstrated that the interaction between active metallic Ni and ATC carrier was significantly improved in Ni/ATC catalyst prepared by precipitation method, from which the mean of Ni particle size was the smallest (~13 nm, resulting in the highest metal dispersion (7.5%. The catalytic performance of the catalysts was evaluated by the process of steam reforming of acetic acid in a fixed-bed reactor under atmospheric pressure at two different temperatures: 550 °C and 650 °C. The test results showed the Ni/ATC prepared by way of precipitation method (PM-Ni/ATC achieved the highest H2 yield of ~82% and a little lower acetic acid conversion efficiency of ~85% than that of Ni/ATC prepared by way of impregnation method (IM-Ni/ATC (~95%. In addition, the deactivation catalysts after reaction for 4 h were analyzed by XRD, TGA-DTG and TEM, which demonstrated the catalyst deactivation was not caused by the amount of carbon deposition, but owed to the significant agglomeration and sintering of Ni particles in the carrier.

  10. HYDROGEN TRANSFER IN CATALYTIC CRACKING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogen transfer is an important secondary reaction of catalytic cracking reactions, which affects product yield distribution and product quality. It is an exothermic reaction with low activation energy around 43.3 kJ/mol. Catalyst properties and operation parameters in catalytic cracking greatly influence the hydrogen transfer reaction. Satisfactory results are expected through careful selection of proper catalysts and operation conditions.

  11. Hydrogen peroxide catalytic decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide in a gaseous stream is converted to nitrogen dioxide using oxidizing species generated through the use of concentrated hydrogen peroxide fed as a monopropellant into a catalyzed thruster assembly. The hydrogen peroxide is preferably stored at stable concentration levels, i.e., approximately 50%-70% by volume, and may be increased in concentration in a continuous process preceding decomposition in the thruster assembly. The exhaust of the thruster assembly, rich in hydroxyl and/or hydroperoxy radicals, may be fed into a stream containing oxidizable components, such as nitric oxide, to facilitate their oxidation.

  12. Facile synthesis of polypyrrole functionalized nickel foam with catalytic activity comparable to Pt for the poly-generation of hydrogen and electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Tiantian; Li, Kan; Shen, Zhemin; Sun, Tonghua; Wang, Yalin; Jia, Jinping

    2016-01-01

    Polypyrrole functionalized nickel foam is facilely prepared through the potentiostatic electrodeposition. The PPy-functionalized Ni foam functions as a hydrogen-evolution cathode in a rotating disk photocatalytic fuel cell, in which hydrogen energy and electric power are generated by consuming organic wastes. The PPy-functionalized Ni foam cathode exhibits stable catalytic activities after thirteen continuous runs. Compared with net or plate structure, the Ni foam with a unique three-dimensional reticulate structure is conducive to the electrodeposition of PPy. Compared with Pt-group electrode, PPy-coated Ni foam shows a satisfactory catalytic performance for the H2 evolution. The combination of PPy and Ni forms a synergistic effect for the rapid trapping and removal of proton from solution and the catalytic reduction of proton to hydrogen. The PPy-functionalized Ni foam could be applied in photocatalytic and photoelectrochemical generation of H2. In all, we report a low cost, high efficient and earth abundant PPy-functionalized Ni foam with a satisfactory catalytic activities comparable to Pt for the practical application of poly-generation of hydrogen and electricity.

  13. Efficient catalytic interconversion between NADH and NAD+ accompanied by generation and consumption of hydrogen with a water-soluble iridium complex at ambient pressure and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maenaka, Yuta; Suenobu, Tomoyoshi; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2012-01-11

    Regioselective hydrogenation of the oxidized form of β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) to the reduced form (NADH) with hydrogen (H(2)) has successfully been achieved in the presence of a catalytic amount of a [C,N] cyclometalated organoiridium complex [Ir(III)(Cp*)(4-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl-κN(2))benzoic acid-κC(3))(H(2)O)](2) SO(4) [1](2)·SO(4) under an atmospheric pressure of H(2) at room temperature in weakly basic water. The structure of the corresponding benzoate complex Ir(III)(Cp*)(4-(1H-pyrazol-1-yl-κN(2))-benzoate-κC(3))(H(2)O) 2 has been revealed by X-ray single-crystal structure analysis. The corresponding iridium hydride complex formed under an atmospheric pressure of H(2) undergoes the 1,4-selective hydrogenation of NAD(+) to form 1,4-NADH. On the other hand, in weakly acidic water the complex 1 was found to catalyze the hydrogen evolution from NADH to produce NAD(+) without photoirradiation at room temperature. NAD(+) exhibited an inhibitory behavior in both catalytic hydrogenation of NAD(+) with H(2) and H(2) evolution from NADH due to the binding of NAD(+) to the catalyst. The overall catalytic mechanism of interconversion between NADH and NAD(+) accompanied by generation and consumption of H(2) was revealed on the basis of the kinetic analysis and detection of the catalytic intermediates.

  14. Catalytic Hydrolysis of Ammonia Borane by Cobalt Nickel Nanoparticles Supported on Reduced Graphene Oxide for Hydrogen Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwen Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Well dispersed magnetically recyclable bimetallic CoNi nanoparticles (NPs supported on the reduced graphene oxide (RGO were synthesized by one-step in situ coreduction of aqueous solution of cobalt(II chloride, nickel (II chloride, and graphite oxide (GO with ammonia borane (AB as the reducing agent under ambient condition. The CoNi/RGO NPs exhibits excellent catalytic activity with a total turnover frequency (TOF value of 19.54 mol H2 mol catalyst−1 min−1 and a low activation energy value of 39.89 kJ mol−1 at room temperature. Additionally, the RGO supported CoNi NPs exhibit much higher catalytic activity than the monometallic and RGO-free CoNi counterparts. Moreover, the as-prepared catalysts exert satisfying durable stability and magnetically recyclability for the hydrolytic dehydrogenation of AB, which make the practical reusing application of the catalysts more convenient. The usage of the low-cost, easy-getting catalyst to realize the production of hydrogen under mild condition gives more confidence for the application of ammonia borane as a hydrogen storage material. Hence, this general method indicates that AB can be used as both a potential hydrogen storage material and an efficient reducing agent, and can be easily extended to facile preparation of other RGO-based metallic systems.

  15. Numerical Study of Passive Catalytic Recombiner for Hydrogen Mitigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan K Sharma

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A significant amount of hydrogen is expected to be released within the containment of a water cooled power reactor after a severe accident. To reduce the risk of deflagration/detonation various means for hydrogen control have been adopted all over the world. Passive catalytic recombiner with vertical flat catalytic plate is one of such hydrogen mitigating device. Passive catalytic recombiners are designed for the removal of hydrogen generated in order to limit the impact of possible hydrogen combustion. Inside a passive catalytic recombiner, numerous thin steel sheets coated with catalyst material are vertically arranged at the bottom opening of a sheet metal housing forming parallel flow channels for the surrounding gas atmosphere. Already below conventional flammability limits, hydrogen and oxygen react exothermally on the catalytic surfaces forming harmless steam. Detailed numerical simulations and experiments are required for an in-depth knowledge of such plate type catalytic recombiners. Specific finite volume based in-house CFD code has been developed to model and analyse the working of these recombiner. The code has been used to simulate the recombiner device used in the Gx-test series of Battelle-Model Containment (B-MC experiments. The present paper briefly describes the working principle of such passive catalytic recombiner and salient feature of the CFD model developed at Bhabha Atomic Research Centre (BARC. Finally results of the calculations and comparison with existing data are discussed.

  16. Facile synthesis of near-monodisperse Ag@Ni core-shell nanoparticles and their application for catalytic generation of hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huizhang; Chen, Yuanzhi; Chen, Xiaozhen; Wen, Ruitao; Yue, Guang-Hui; Peng, Dong-Liang

    2011-05-13

    Magnetically recyclable Ag-Ni core-shell nanoparticles have been fabricated via a simple one-pot synthetic route using oleylamine both as solvent and reducing agent and triphenylphosphine as a surfactant. As characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), the as-synthesized Ag-Ni core-shell nanoparticles exhibit a very narrow size distribution with a typical size of 14.9 ± 1.2 nm and a tunable shell thickness. UV-vis absorption spectroscopy study shows that the formation of a Ni shell on Ag core can damp the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the Ag core and lead to a red-shifted SPR absorption peak. Magnetic measurement indicates that all the as-synthesized Ag-Ni core-shell nanoparticles are superparamagnetic at room temperature, and their blocking temperatures can be controlled by modulating the shell thickness. The as-synthesized Ag-Ni core-shell nanoparticles exhibit excellent catalytic properties for the generation of H(2) from dehydrogenation of sodium borohydride in aqueous solutions. The hydrogen generation rate of Ag-Ni core-shell nanoparticles is found to be much higher than that of Ag and Ni nanoparticles of a similar size, and the calculated activation energy for hydrogen generation is lower than that of many bimetallic catalysts. The strategy employed here can also be extended to other noble-magnetic metal systems.

  17. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan, Monica, E-mail: monica.dan@itim-cj.ro; Mihet, Maria, E-mail: maria.mihet@itim-cj.ro; Lazar, Mihaela D., E-mail: diana.lazar@itim-cj.ro [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 67-103 Donat Street, 400293 Cluj Napoca (Romania)

    2015-12-23

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H{sub 2}. In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO, CO{sub 2}. The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H{sub 2}O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%.

  18. Catalytic glycerol steam reforming for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dan, Monica; Mihet, Maria; Lazar, Mihaela D.

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen production from glycerol by steam reforming combine two major advantages: (i) using glycerol as raw material add value to this by product of bio-diesel production which is obtained in large quantities around the world and have a very limited utilization now, and (ii) by implication of water molecules in the reaction the efficiency of hydrogen generation is increased as each mol of glycerol produces 7 mol of H2. In this work we present the results obtained in the process of steam reforming of glycerol on Ni/Al2O3. The catalyst was prepared by wet impregnation method and characterized through different methods: N2 adsorption-desorption, XRD, TPR. The catalytic study was performed in a stainless steel tubular reactor at atmospheric pressure by varying the reaction conditions: steam/carbon ratio (1-9), gas flow (35 ml/min -133 ml/min), temperature (450-650°C). The gaseous fraction of the reaction products contain: H2, CH4, CO, CO2. The optimum reaction conditions as resulted from this study are: temperature 550°C, Gly:H2O ratio 9:1 and Ar flow 133 ml/min. In these conditions the glycerol conversion to gaseous products was 43% and the hydrogen yield was 30%.

  19. Performance characterization of a hydrogen catalytic heater.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Kanouff, Michael P.

    2010-04-01

    This report describes the performance of a high efficiency, compact heater that uses the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen to provide heat to the GM Hydrogen Storage Demonstration System. The heater was designed to transfer up to 30 kW of heat from the catalytic reaction to a circulating heat transfer fluid. The fluid then transfers the heat to one or more of the four hydrogen storage modules that make up the Demonstration System to drive off the chemically bound hydrogen. The heater consists of three main parts: (1) the reactor, (2) the gas heat recuperator, and (3) oil and gas flow distribution manifolds. The reactor and recuperator are integrated, compact, finned-plate heat exchangers to maximize heat transfer efficiency and minimize mass and volume. Detailed, three-dimensional, multi-physics computational models were used to design and optimize the system. At full power the heater was able to catalytically combust a 10% hydrogen/air mixture flowing at over 80 cubic feet per minute and transfer 30 kW of heat to a 30 gallon per minute flow of oil over a temperature range from 100 C to 220 C. The total efficiency of the catalytic heater, defined as the heat transferred to the oil divided by the inlet hydrogen chemical energy, was characterized and methods for improvement were investigated.

  20. Advanced Catalytic Hydrogenation Retrofit Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinaldo M. Machado

    2002-08-15

    Industrial hydrogenation is often performed using a slurry catalyst in large stirred-tank reactors. These systems are inherently problematic in a number of areas, including industrial hygiene, process safety, environmental contamination, waste production, process operability and productivity. This program proposed the development of a practical replacement for the slurry catalysts using a novel fixed-bed monolith catalyst reactor, which could be retrofitted onto an existing stirred-tank reactor and would mitigate many of the minitations and problems associated with slurry catalysts. The full retrofit monolith system, consisting of a recirculation pump, gas/liquid ejector and monolith catalyst, is described as a monolith loop reactor or MLR. The MLR technology can reduce waste and increase raw material efficiency, which reduces the overall energy required to produce specialty and fine chemicals.

  1. Polarographic catalytic wave of hydrogen--Parallel catalytic hydrogen wave of bovine serum albumin in thepresence of oxidants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO; Wei(过玮); LIU; Limin(刘利民); LIN; Hong(林洪); SONG; Junfeng(宋俊峰)

    2002-01-01

    A polarographic catalytic hydrogen wave of bovine serum albumin (BSA) at about -1.80 V (vs. SCE) in NH4Cl-NH3@H2O buffer is further catalyzed by such oxidants as iodate, persulfate and hydrogen peroxide, producing a kinetic wave. Studies show that the kinetic wave is a parallel catalytic wave of hydrogen, which resulted from that hydrogen ion is electrochemically reduced and chemically regenerated through oxidation of its reduction product, atomic hydrogen, by oxidants mentioned above. It is a new type of poralographic catalytic wave of protein, which is suggested to be named as a parallel catalytic hydrogen wave.

  2. Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tennakoon, Charles L. K.; Singh, Waheguru; Anderson, Kelvin C.

    2010-01-01

    Two-electron reduction of oxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide is a much researched topic. Most of the work has been done in the production of hydrogen peroxide in basic media, in order to address the needs of the pulp and paper industry. However, peroxides under alkaline conditions show poor stabilities and are not useful in disinfection applications. There is a need to design electrocatalysts that are stable and provide good current and energy efficiencies to produce hydrogen peroxide under acidic conditions. The innovation focuses on the in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide using an electrochemical cell having a gas diffusion electrode as the cathode (electrode connected to the negative pole of the power supply) and a platinized titanium anode. The cathode and anode compartments are separated by a readily available cation-exchange membrane (Nafion 117). The anode compartment is fed with deionized water. Generation of oxygen is the anode reaction. Protons from the anode compartment are transferred across the cation-exchange membrane to the cathode compartment by electrostatic attraction towards the negatively charged electrode. The cathode compartment is fed with oxygen. Here, hydrogen peroxide is generated by the reduction of oxygen. Water may also be generated in the cathode. A small amount of water is also transported across the membrane along with hydrated protons transported across the membrane. Generally, each proton is hydrated with 3-5 molecules. The process is unique because hydrogen peroxide is formed as a high-purity aqueous solution. Since there are no hazardous chemicals or liquids used in the process, the disinfection product can be applied directly to water, before entering a water filtration unit to disinfect the incoming water and to prevent the build up of heterotrophic bacteria, for example, in carbon based filters. The competitive advantages of this process are: 1. No consumable chemicals are needed in the process. The only raw materials

  3. Catalytic Combustion for Ultra-Low NOx Hydrogen Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Etemad, Shahrokh; Baird, Benjamin; Alavandi, Sandeep

    2011-06-30

    Precision Combustion, Inc., (PCI) in close collaboration with Solar Turbines, Incorporated, has developed and demonstrated a combustion system for hydrogen fueled turbines that reduces NOx to low single digit level while maintaining or improving current levels of efficiency and eliminating emissions of carbon dioxide. Full scale Rich Catalytic Hydrogen (RCH1) injector was developed and successfully tested at Solar Turbines, Incorporated high pressure test facility demonstrating low single digit NOx emissions for hydrogen fuel in the range of 2200F-2750F. This development work was based on initial subscale development for faster turnaround and reduced cost. Subscale testing provided promising results for 42% and 52% H2 with NOx emissions of less than 2 ppm with improved flame stability. In addition, catalytic reactor element testing for substrate oxidation, thermal cyclic injector testing to simulate start-stop operation in a gas turbine environment, and steady state 15 atm. operation testing were performed successfully. The testing demonstrated stable and robust catalytic element component life for gas turbine conditions. The benefit of the catalytic hydrogen combustor technology includes capability of delivering near-zero NOx without costly post-combustion controls and without requirement for added sulfur control. In addition, reduced acoustics increase gas turbine component life. These advantages advances Department of Energy (DOE’s) objectives for achievement of low single digit NOx emissions, improvement in efficiency vs. postcombustion controls, fuel flexibility, a significant net reduction in Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system net capital and operating costs, and a route to commercialization across the power generation field from micro turbines to industrial and utility turbines.

  4. Hydrogen storage and generation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Crowell, Jeffrey A. W.

    2010-08-24

    A system for storing and generating hydrogen generally and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses the beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

  5. Microchannel Reactor System for Catalytic Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adeniyi Lawal; Woo Lee; Ron Besser; Donald Kientzler; Luke Achenie

    2010-12-22

    We successfully demonstrated a novel process intensification concept enabled by the development of microchannel reactors, for energy efficient catalytic hydrogenation reactions at moderate temperature, and pressure, and low solvent levels. We designed, fabricated, evaluated, and optimized a laboratory-scale microchannel reactor system for hydrogenation of onitroanisole and a proprietary BMS molecule. In the second phase of the program, as a prelude to full-scale commercialization, we designed and developed a fully-automated skid-mounted multichannel microreactor pilot plant system for multiphase reactions. The system is capable of processing 1 – 10 kg/h of liquid substrate, and an industrially relevant immiscible liquid-liquid was successfully demonstrated on the system. Our microreactor-based pilot plant is one-of-akind. We anticipate that this process intensification concept, if successfully demonstrated, will provide a paradigm-changing basis for replacing existing energy inefficient, cost ineffective, environmentally detrimental slurry semi-batch reactor-based manufacturing practiced in the pharmaceutical and fine chemicals industries.

  6. Heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation reactions in continuous-flow reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irfan, Muhammad; Glasnov, Toma N; Kappe, C Oliver

    2011-03-21

    Microreactor technology and continuous flow processing in general are key features in making organic synthesis both more economical and environmentally friendly. Heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation reactions under continuous flow conditions offer significant benefits compared to batch processes which are related to the unique gas-liquid-solid triphasic reaction conditions present in these transformations. In this review article recent developments in continuous flow heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation reactions using molecular hydrogen are summarized. Available flow hydrogenation techniques, reactors, commonly used catalysts and examples of synthetic applications with an emphasis on laboratory-scale flow hydrogenation reactions are presented.

  7. Storage of hydrogen in floating catalytic carbon nanotubes after graphitizing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱宏伟; 李雪松; 慈立杰; 徐才录; 毛宗强; 梁吉; 吴德海

    2002-01-01

    Hydrogen storage under moderate pressure (~10 Mpa) and ambient temperature (~25℃) in multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) prepared by the floating catalyst method is investigated. The capacity of hydrogen adsorption is evaluated based on both the nanotubes diameter and morphology. Indirect evidence indicates that hydrogen adsorption not only occurs on tube surface and interiors, but also in tube interlayers. The results show that the floating catalytic carbon nanotubes might be a candidate hydrogen storage material for fuel cell electric vehicles.

  8. Hydrogen Generation From Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Cohen; Stephen Porter; Oscar Chow; David Henderson

    2009-03-06

    Small-scale (100-500 kg H2/day) electrolysis is an important step in increasing the use of hydrogen as fuel. Until there is a large population of hydrogen fueled vehicles, the smaller production systems will be the most cost-effective. Performing conceptual designs and analyses in this size range enables identification of issues and/or opportunities for improvement in approach on the path to 1500 kg H2/day and larger systems. The objectives of this program are to establish the possible pathways to cost effective larger Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) water electrolysis systems and to identify areas where future research and development efforts have the opportunity for the greatest impact in terms of capital cost reduction and efficiency improvements. System design and analysis was conducted to determine the overall electrolysis system component architecture and develop a life cycle cost estimate. A design trade study identified subsystem components and configurations based on the trade-offs between system efficiency, cost and lifetime. Laboratory testing of components was conducted to optimize performance and decrease cost, and this data was used as input to modeling of system performance and cost. PEM electrolysis has historically been burdened by high capital costs and lower efficiency than required for large-scale hydrogen production. This was known going into the program and solutions to these issues were the focus of the work. The program provided insights to significant cost reduction and efficiency improvement opportunities for PEM electrolysis. The work performed revealed many improvement ideas that when utilized together can make significant progress towards the technical and cost targets of the DOE program. The cell stack capital cost requires reduction to approximately 25% of today’s technology. The pathway to achieve this is through part count reduction, use of thinner membranes, and catalyst loading reduction. Large-scale power supplies are available

  9. Catalytic microreactors for portable power generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karagiannidis, Symeon [Paul Scherer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01

    ''Catalytic Microreactors for Portable Power Generation'' addresses a problem of high relevance and increased complexity in energy technology. This thesis outlines an investigation into catalytic and gas-phase combustion characteristics in channel-flow, platinum-coated microreactors. The emphasis of the study is on microreactor/microturbine concepts for portable power generation and the fuels of interest are methane and propane. The author carefully describes numerical and experimental techniques, providing a new insight into the complex interactions between chemical kinetics and molecular transport processes, as well as giving the first detailed report of hetero-/homogeneous chemical reaction mechanisms for catalytic propane combustion. The outcome of this work will be widely applied to the industrial design of micro- and mesoscale combustors. (orig.)

  10. Short hydrogen bonds in the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR LESKOVAC

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The survey of crystallographic data from the Protein Data Bank for 37 structures of trypsin and other serine proteases at a resolution of 0.78–1.28 Å revealed the presence of hydrogen bonds in the active site of the enzymes, which are formed between the catalytic histidine and aspartate residues and are on average 2.7 Å long. This is the typical bond length for normal hydrogen bonds. The geometric properties of the hydrogen bonds in the active site indicate that the H atom is not centered between the heteroatoms of the catalytic histidine and aspartate residues in the active site. Taken together, these findings exclude the possibility that short “low-barrier” hydrogen bonds are formed in the ground state structure of the active sites examined in this work. Some time ago, it was suggested by Cleland that the “low-barrier hydrogen bond” hypothesis is operative in the catalytic mechanism of serine proteases, and requires the presence of short hydrogen bonds around 2.4 Å long in the active site, with the H atom centered between the catalytic heteroatoms. The conclusions drawn from this work do not exclude the validity of the “low-barrier hydrogen bond” hypothesis at all, but they merely do not support it in this particular case, with this particular class of enzymes.

  11. A novel liquid organic hydrogen carrier system based on catalytic peptide formation and hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Peng; Fogler, Eran; Diskin-Posner, Yael; Iron, Mark A; Milstein, David

    2015-04-17

    Hydrogen is an efficient green fuel, but its low energy density when stored under high pressure or cryogenically, and safety issues, presents significant disadvantages; hence finding efficient and safe hydrogen carriers is a major challenge. Of special interest are liquid organic hydrogen carriers (LOHCs), which can be readily loaded and unloaded with considerable amounts of hydrogen. However, disadvantages include high hydrogen pressure requirements, high reaction temperatures for both hydrogenation and dehydrogenation steps, which require different catalysts, and high LOHC cost. Here we present a readily reversible LOHC system based on catalytic peptide formation and hydrogenation, using an inexpensive, safe and abundant organic compound with high potential capacity to store and release hydrogen, applying the same catalyst for loading and unloading hydrogen under relatively mild conditions. Mechanistic insight of the catalytic reaction is provided. We believe that these findings may lead to the development of an inexpensive, safe and clean liquid hydrogen carrier system.

  12. Hydrogen production via catalytic processing of renewable feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazim Muradov; Franklyn Smith; Ali T-Raissi [Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida, Cocoa, Florida, (United States)

    2006-07-01

    Landfill gas (LFG) and biogas can potentially become important feedstocks for renewable hydrogen production. The objectives of this work were: (1) to develop a catalytic process for direct reforming of CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} gaseous mixture mimicking LFG, (2) perform thermodynamic analysis of the reforming process using AspenPlus chemical process simulator, (3) determine operational conditions for auto-thermal (or thermo-neutral) reforming of a model CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} feedstock, and (4) fabricate and test a bench-scale hydrogen production unit. Experimental data obtained from catalytic reformation of the CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2}-O{sub 2} gaseous mixtures using Ni-catalyst were in a good agreement with the simulation results. It was demonstrated that catalytic reforming of LFG-mimicking gas produced hydrogen with the purity of 99.9 vol.%. (authors)

  13. Hydrogen production by catalytic partial oxidation of methane

    OpenAIRE

    Enger, Bjørn Christian

    2008-01-01

    Hydrogen production by catalytic partial oxidation of natural gas was investigated using tools ranging from theoretical calculations to experimental work and sophisticated characterization techniques.Catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) was carried out in a conventional continuous flow experimental apparatus using a xed-bed reactor, and operating at 1 atm and furnace temperatures in the range from ambient to 1073 K. The feed typically consisted of a mixture of methane and air, with a CH4/O2 rati...

  14. Development of catalytic hydrogenation reactors for the fine chemicals industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K.R.; Gelder, van K.B.; Janssen, H.J.; Oyevaar, M.H.

    1988-01-01

    A survey is given of the problems to be solved before catalytic hydrogenation reactors can be applied in a multiproduct plant in which selectivity problems are experienced. Some results are reported on work done on the reaction kinetics of two multistep model reactions and on mathematical modelling

  15. Hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zs.; Cormos, C. C.; Agachi, P. S.

    2015-12-01

    This paper is evaluating two power generation concepts based on hydrogen produced from bioethanol steam reforming at industrial scale without and with carbon capture. The power generation from bioethanol conversion is based on two important steps: hydrogen production from bioethanol catalytic steam reforming and electricity generation using a hydrogen-fuelled gas turbine. As carbon capture method to be assessed in hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming, the gas-liquid absorption using methyl-di-ethanol-amine (MDEA) was used. Bioethanol is a renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Steam reforming of bioethanol (SRE) provides a promising method for hydrogen and power production from renewable resources. SRE is performed at high temperatures (e.g. 800-900°C) to reduce the reforming by-products (e.g. ethane, ethene). The power generation from hydrogen was done with M701G2 gas turbine (334 MW net power output). Hydrogen was obtained through catalytic steam reforming of bioethanol without and with carbon capture. For the evaluated plant concepts the following key performance indicators were assessed: fuel consumption, gross and net power outputs, net electrical efficiency, ancillary consumptions, carbon capture rate, specific CO2 emission etc. As the results show, the power generation based on bioethanol conversion has high energy efficiency and low carbon footprint.

  16. Hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tasnadi-Asztalos, Zs., E-mail: tazsolt@chem.ubbcluj.ro; Cormos, C. C., E-mail: cormos@chem.ubbcluj.ro; Agachi, P. S. [Babes-Bolyai University, Faculty of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, 11 Arany Janos, Postal code: 400028, Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2015-12-23

    This paper is evaluating two power generation concepts based on hydrogen produced from bioethanol steam reforming at industrial scale without and with carbon capture. The power generation from bioethanol conversion is based on two important steps: hydrogen production from bioethanol catalytic steam reforming and electricity generation using a hydrogen-fuelled gas turbine. As carbon capture method to be assessed in hydrogen-based power generation from bioethanol steam reforming, the gas-liquid absorption using methyl-di-ethanol-amine (MDEA) was used. Bioethanol is a renewable energy carrier mainly produced from biomass fermentation. Steam reforming of bioethanol (SRE) provides a promising method for hydrogen and power production from renewable resources. SRE is performed at high temperatures (e.g. 800-900°C) to reduce the reforming by-products (e.g. ethane, ethene). The power generation from hydrogen was done with M701G2 gas turbine (334 MW net power output). Hydrogen was obtained through catalytic steam reforming of bioethanol without and with carbon capture. For the evaluated plant concepts the following key performance indicators were assessed: fuel consumption, gross and net power outputs, net electrical efficiency, ancillary consumptions, carbon capture rate, specific CO{sub 2} emission etc. As the results show, the power generation based on bioethanol conversion has high energy efficiency and low carbon footprint.

  17. Hydrogen generation from renewable resources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loges, Bjoern

    2009-09-04

    In this thesis, the hydrogen generation by dehydrogenation of 2-propanol and formic acid as model substances for renewable resources have been studied, which is of importance for hydrogen storage. For the base-assisted dehydrogenation of 2-propanol, a ruthenium diamine catalyst system has been investigated. For the selective decomposition of formic acid to hydrogen and carbon dioxide, a system has been established containing ruthenium catalysts and formic acid amine adducts as substrates. The best catalyst activity and productivity have been achieved with in situ generated ruthenium phosphine catalysts, e.g. [RuCl{sub 2}(benzene)]{sub 2} / dppe (TOF = 900 h{sup -1}, TON = 260,000). The gas evolved has been directly used in fuel cells. Furthermore, the influence of irradiation with visible light has been described for the ruthenium phosphine catalysts. (orig.)

  18. Catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation of a petrochemical wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariente, M I; Melero, J A; Martínez, F; Botas, J A; Gallego, A I

    2010-01-01

    Continuous Catalytic Wet Hydrogen Peroxide Oxidation (CWHPO) for the treatment of a petrochemical industry wastewater has been studied on a pilot plant scale process. The installation, based on a catalytic fixed bed reactor (FBR) coupled with a stirred tank reactor (STR), shows an interesting alternative for the intensification of a continuous CWHPO treatment. Agglomerated SBA-15 silica-supported iron oxide (Fe(2)O(3)/SBA-15) was used as Fenton-like catalyst. Several variables such as the temperature and hydrogen peroxide concentration, as well as the capacity of the pilot plant for the treatment of inlet polluted streams with different dilution degrees were studied. Remarkable results in terms of TOC reduction and increased biodegradability were achieved using 160 degrees C and moderate hydrogen peroxide initial concentration. Additionally, a good stability of the catalyst was evidenced for 8 hours of treatment with low iron leaching (less than 1 mg/L) under the best operating conditions.

  19. Catalytic hydrogen evolution by polyaminoacids using mercury electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marko Živanovič

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available It was shown that using constant current chronopotentiometricstripping (CPS peptides and proteins at nanomolar concentrations produce protein structure–sensitive peak H at mercury electrodes. This peak is due to the catalytic hydrogen evolution reaction (HER. Polyamino acids can be considered as an intermediate model system between peptides and macromolecular proteins. Here we used polyamino acids (poly(aa such as polylysine (polyLys and polyarginine (polyArg and cyclic voltammetry or CPS in combination with hanging mercury drop electrode to explore how different amino acid residues in proteins contribute to the catalyticHER.

  20. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Acetone to Isopropanol: An Environmentally Benign Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ateeq Rahman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic hydrogenation of acetone is an important area of catalytic process to produce fine chemicals. Hydrogenation of acetone has important applications for heat pumps, fuel cells or in fulfilling the sizeable demand for the production of 2-propanol. Catalytic vapour phase hydrogenation of acetone has gained attention over the decades with variety of homogeneous catalysts notably Iridium, Rh, Ru complexes and heterogeneous catalysts comprising of Raney Nickel, Raney Sponge, Ni/Al2O3, Ni/SiO2, or Co-Al2O3, Pd, Rh, Ru, Re, or Fe/Al2O3 supported on SiO2 or MgO and even CoMgAl, NiMg Al layered double hydroxide, Cu metal, CuO, Cu2O. Nano catalysts are developed for actone reduction Ni maleate, cobalt oxide prepared in organic solvents. Author present a review on acetone hydrogenation under different conditions with various homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts studied so far in literature and new strategies to develop economic and environmentally benign approach. ©2010 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved(Received: 16th June 2010, Revised: 18th October 2010; Accepted: 25th October 2010[How to Cite:Ateeq Rahman. (2010. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Acetone to Isopropanol: An Environmentally Benign Approach. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 5(2: 113-126. doi:10.9767/bcrec.5.2.798.113-126][DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.5.2.798.113-126 || or local:  http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/798

  1. Catalytic efficiency of Nb and Nb oxides for hydrogen dissociation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isobe, Shigehito, E-mail: isobe@eng.hokudai.ac.jp [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N-13, W-8, Sapporo 060-0813 (Japan); Creative Research Institution, Hokkaido University, N-20, W-10, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Kudoh, Katsuhiro; Hino, Satoshi; Hashimoto, Naoyuki; Ohnuki, Somei [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N-13, W-8, Sapporo 060-0813 (Japan); Hara, Kenji [Catalysis Research Center, Hokkaido University, N-20, W-10, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan)

    2015-08-24

    In this letter, catalytic efficiency of Nb, NbO, Nb{sub 2}O{sub 3}, NbO{sub 2}, and Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} for dissociation and recombination of hydrogen were experimentally investigated. On the surface of Nb and Nb oxides in a gas mixture of H{sub 2} and D{sub 2}, H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} molecules can be dissociated to H and D atoms; then, H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and HD molecules can be produced according to the law of probability. With increase of frequency of the dissociation and recombination, HD ratio increases. The ratio of H{sub 2} and HD gas was analyzed by quadrupole mass spectrometry. As a result, NbO showed the highest catalytic activity towards hydrogen dissociation and recombination.

  2. CATALYTIC HYDROGENATION AND OXIDATION OF BIOMASS-DERIVED LEVULINIC ACID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Gong

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Levulinic acid (LA, 4-oxo-pentanoic acid, is a new platform chemical with various potential uses. In this paper, catalytic hydrogenation and oxidation of levulinic acid were studied. It was shown from experiments that levulinic acid can be hydrogenated to γ-valerolactone (GVL over transition metal catalysts and oxidative-decarboxylated to 2-butanone (methyl-ethyl-ketone, MEK and methyl-vinyl-ketone (MVK by cupric oxide (CuO, cupric oxide/cerium oxide (CuO/CeO2, cupric oxide/ alumina (CuO/ Al2O3, and silver(I/ peroxydisulfate (Ag(I/S2O82-.

  3. Catalytic hydrogen peroxide decomposition on La1-xSrxCo03-d perovskite oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, Van-Ahn. T.; Olthuis, W.; Bergveld, P.; Berg, van den A.

    2005-01-01

    Lanthanide perovskite oxides are mentioned as material for hydrogen peroxide sensor because they can catalytically decompose hydrogen peroxide in an aqueous medium. The catalytic properties of these perovskite oxides to hydrogen peroxide are suggested due to their oxygen vacancies influenced by the

  4. Design, fabrication and testing of a catalytic microreactor for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taegyu; Kwon, Sejin

    2006-09-01

    A catalytic microreactor for hydrogen production was fabricated by anisotropic wet etching of photosensitive glass, which enables it to be a structure with high tight tolerance and high aspect ratio. As a reactor structure, a microchannel was used for improving heat and mass transfer in the reactor. The primary fuel source is methanol for a mobile device. Endothermic catalytic steam reforming of methanol was chosen for producing gaseous hydrogen. The Cu-based catalyst, Cu/ZnO, was prepared by the co-precipitation method and coated on the surface of the microchannel for methanol steam reforming. An overall microfabrication process was established for a MEMS-based catalytic microreactor. The fabricated reactor has a volume of 1.8 cm3 including the volume of the reaction chamber 0.3 cm3 and produced dry reformate with high hydrogen content, 73%. The hydrogen flow was 4.16 ml min-1, which can generate a power output of 350 mWe for a fuel cell.

  5. Hydrogen generation in tru waste transportation packages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, B; Sheaffer, M K; Fischer, L E

    2000-03-27

    This document addresses hydrogen generation in TRU waste transportation packages. The potential sources of hydrogen generation are summarized with a special emphasis on radiolysis. After defining various TRU wastes according to groupings of material types, bounding radiolytic G-values are established for each waste type. Analytical methodologies are developed for prediction of hydrogen gas concentrations for various packaging configurations in which hydrogen generation is due to radiolysis. Representative examples are presented to illustrate how analytical procedures can be used to estimate the hydrogen concentration as a function of time. Methodologies and examples are also provided to show how the time to reach a flammable hydrogen concentration in the innermost confinement layer can be estimated. Finally, general guidelines for limiting the hydrogen generation in the payload and hydrogen accumulation in the innermost confinement layer are described.

  6. Research of Hydrogen Preparation with Catalytic Steam-Carbon Reaction Driven by Photo-Thermochemistry Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An experiment of hydrogen preparation from steam-carbon reaction catalyzed by K2CO3 was carried out at 700°C, which was driven by the solar reaction system simulated with Xenon lamp. It can be found that the rate of reaction with catalyst is 10 times more than that without catalyst. However, for the catalytic reaction, there is no obvious change for the rate of hydrogen generation with catalyst content range from 10% to 20%. Besides, the conversion efficiency of solar energy to chemical energy is more than 13.1% over that by photovoltaic-electrolysis route. An analysis to the mechanism of catalytic steam-carbon reaction with K2CO3 is given, and an explanation to the nonbalanced [H2]/[CO + 2CO2] is presented, which is a phenomenon usually observed in experiment.

  7. Spectroelectrochemical analysis of the mechanism of (photo)electrochemical hydrogen evolution at a catalytic interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Ernest; Le Formal, Florian; Mayer, Matthew T.; Tilley, S. David; Francàs, Laia; Mesa, Camilo A.; Grätzel, Michael; Durrant, James R.

    2017-02-01

    Multi-electron heterogeneous catalysis is a pivotal element in the (photo)electrochemical generation of solar fuels. However, mechanistic studies of these systems are difficult to elucidate by means of electrochemical methods alone. Here we report a spectroelectrochemical analysis of hydrogen evolution on ruthenium oxide employed as an electrocatalyst and as part of a cuprous oxide-based photocathode. We use optical absorbance spectroscopy to quantify the densities of reduced ruthenium oxide species, and correlate these with current densities resulting from proton reduction. This enables us to compare directly the catalytic function of dark and light electrodes. We find that hydrogen evolution is second order in the density of active, doubly reduced species independent of whether these are generated by applied potential or light irradiation. Our observation of a second order rate law allows us to distinguish between the most common reaction paths and propose a mechanism involving the homolytic reductive elimination of hydrogen.

  8. Spectroelectrochemical analysis of the mechanism of (photo)electrochemical hydrogen evolution at a catalytic interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor, Ernest; Le Formal, Florian; Mayer, Matthew T.; Tilley, S. David; Francàs, Laia; Mesa, Camilo A.; Grätzel, Michael; Durrant, James R.

    2017-01-01

    Multi-electron heterogeneous catalysis is a pivotal element in the (photo)electrochemical generation of solar fuels. However, mechanistic studies of these systems are difficult to elucidate by means of electrochemical methods alone. Here we report a spectroelectrochemical analysis of hydrogen evolution on ruthenium oxide employed as an electrocatalyst and as part of a cuprous oxide-based photocathode. We use optical absorbance spectroscopy to quantify the densities of reduced ruthenium oxide species, and correlate these with current densities resulting from proton reduction. This enables us to compare directly the catalytic function of dark and light electrodes. We find that hydrogen evolution is second order in the density of active, doubly reduced species independent of whether these are generated by applied potential or light irradiation. Our observation of a second order rate law allows us to distinguish between the most common reaction paths and propose a mechanism involving the homolytic reductive elimination of hydrogen. PMID:28233785

  9. Simple and rapid hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol with aqueous formic acid in catalytic flow reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahat Javaid

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The inner surface of a metallic tube (i.d. 0.5 mm was coated with a palladium (Pd-based thin metallic layer by flow electroless plating. Simultaneous plating of Pd and silver (Ag from their electroless-plating solution produced a mixed distributed bimetallic layer. Preferential acid leaching of Ag from the Pd–Ag layer produced a porous Pd surface. Hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol was examined in the presence of formic acid simply by passing the reaction solution through the catalytic tubular reactors. p-Aminophenol was the sole product of hydrogenation. No side reaction occurred. Reaction conversion with respect to p-nitrophenol was dependent on the catalyst layer type, the temperature, pH, amount of formic acid, and the residence time. A porous and oxidized Pd (PdO surface gave the best reaction conversion among the catalytic reactors examined. p-Nitrophenol was converted quantitatively to p-aminophenol within 15 s of residence time in the porous PdO reactor at 40 °C. Evolution of carbon dioxide (CO2 was observed during the reaction, although hydrogen (H2 was not found in the gas phase. Dehydrogenation of formic acid did not occur to any practical degree in the absence of p-nitrophenol. Consequently, the nitro group was reduced via hydrogen transfer from formic acid to p-nitrophenol and not by hydrogen generated by dehydrogenation of formic acid.

  10. Cobaloxime-based photo-catalytic devices for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fihri, A.; Artero, V.; Razavet, M.; Baffert, C.; Fontecave, M. [CEA Grenoble, DSV, iRTSV, Lab Chim et Biol Metaux, CNRS, UMR 5249, Univ Grenoble 1, F-38054 Grenoble 9 (France); Leibl, W. [CEA, DSV, iBiTecS, Lab Photocatalyse et Biohydrogene, CNRS, URA 2096, Gif Sur Yvette (France)

    2008-07-01

    In this paper is described the synthesis and activity of a series of novel hetero-dinuclear ruthenium-cobaloxime photo-catalysts able to achieve the photochemical production of hydrogen with the highest turnover numbers so far reported for such devices. First of all, substituting cobalt for rare and expensive platinum, palladium, or rhodium metals in photo-catalysts is a first step toward economically viable hydrogen production. Cobaloximes appear to be good candidates for H{sub 2}-evolving catalysts, and they may provide a good basis for the design of photo-catalysts that function in pure water as both the solvent and the sustainable proton source. Secondly, a molecular connection between the sensitizer and the H{sub 2}-evolving catalyst seems to provide advantages regarding the photo-catalytic activity. Structural modifications of this connection should allow a better tuning of the electron transfer between the light-harvesting unit and the catalytic center and thus an increase of the efficiency of the system. (O.M.)

  11. Catalytic Hydrogenation Reaction of Naringin-Chalcone. Study of the Electrochemical Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. A. López de Mishima

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The electrocatalytic hydrogenation reaction of naringin derivated chalcone is studied. The reaction is carried out with different catalysts in order to compare with the classic catalytic hydrogenation.

  12. CATALYTIC HYDROGENATION OF ACRYLATE ASMMETRIC Dd(Ⅱ)—CHELATING RESINS CONTAINING AMINO ACID LIGANDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wangying; WangHongzuo; 等

    1995-01-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of palladium chelating resins containing chiral amino acid ligands based on lower crosslinked poly(chloroethyl acrylate) and some effects on the rate of hydrogenation were studied.

  13. Efficient photothermal catalytic hydrogen production over nonplasmonic Pt metal supported on TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Rui; Luo, Bing; Jing, Dengwei

    2016-10-01

    Most of the traditional photocatalytic hydrogen productions were conducted under room temperature. In this work, we selected nonplasmonic Pt metal anchored on TiO2 nanoparticles with photothermal activity to explore more efficient hydrogen production technology over the whole solar spectrum. Photothermal experiments were carried out in a carefully designed top irradiated photocatalytic reactor that can withstand high temperature and relatively higher pressure. Four typical organic materials, i.e., methyl alcohol (MeOH), trielthanolamne (TEOA), formic acid (HCOOH) and glucose, were investigated. Formic acid, a typical hydrogen carrier, was found to show the best activity. In addition, the effects of different basic parameters such as sacrificial agent concentration and the temperature on the activity of hydrogen generation were systematically investigated for understanding the qualitative and quantitative effects of the photothermal catalytic reaction process. The hydrogen yields at 90 °C of the photothermal catalytic reaction with Pt/TiO2 are around 8.1 and 4.2 times higher than those of reactions carried out under photo or thermal conditions alone. We can see that the photothermal hydrogen yield is not the simple sum of the photo and thermal effects. This result indicated that the Pt/TiO2 nanoparticles can efficiently couple photo and thermal energy to more effectively drive hydrogen production. As a result, the excellent ability makes it superior to other conventional semiconductor photocatalysts and thermal catalysts. Future works could concentrate on exploring photothermal catalysis as well as the potential synergism between photo and thermal effects to find more efficient hydrogen production technology using the whole solar spectrum.

  14. Catalytic nanoarchitectonics for environmentally compatible energy generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Abe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmentally compatible energy management is one of the biggest challenges of the 21st century. Low-temperature conversion of chemical to electrical energy is of particular importance to minimize the impact to the environment while sustaining the consumptive economy. In this review, we shed light on one of the most versatile energy-conversion technologies: heterogeneous catalysts. We establish the integrity of structural tailoring in heterogeneous catalysts at different scales in the context of an emerging paradigm in materials science: catalytic nanoarchitectonics. Fundamental backgrounds of energy-conversion catalysis are first provided together with a perspective through state-of-the-art energy-conversion catalysis including catalytic exhaust remediation, fuel-cell electrocatalysis and photosynthesis of solar fuels. Finally, the future evolution of catalytic nanoarchitectonics is overviewed: possible combinations of heterogeneous catalysts, organic molecules and even enzymes to realize reaction-selective, highly efficient and long-life energy conversion technologies which will meet the challenge we face.

  15. Experimental and Numerical Evaluation of the By-Pass Flow in a Catalytic Plate Reactor for Hydrogen Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdsson, Haftor Örn; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    Numerical and experimental study is performed to evaluate the reactant by-pass flow in a catalytic plate reactor with a coated wire mesh catalyst for steam reforming of methane for hydrogen generation. By-pass of unconverted methane is evaluated under different wire mesh catalyst width to reactor...

  16. Production of hydrogen from biomass by catalytic steam reforming of fast pyrolysis oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czernik, S.; Wang, D.; Chornet, E. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States). Center for Renewable Chemical Technologies and Materials

    1998-08-01

    Hydrogen is the prototype of the environmentally cleanest fuel of interest for power generation using fuel cells and for transportation. The thermochemical conversion of biomass to hydrogen can be carried out through two distinct strategies: (a) gasification followed by water-gas shift conversion, and (b) catalytic steam reforming of specific fractions derived from fast pyrolysis and aqueous/steam processes of biomass. This paper presents the latter route that begins with fast pyrolysis of biomass to produce bio-oil. This oil (as a whole or its selected fractions) can be converted to hydrogen via catalytic steam reforming followed by a water-gas shift conversion step. Such a process has been demonstrated at the bench scale using model compounds, poplar oil aqueous fraction, and the whole pyrolysis oil with commercial Ni-based steam reforming catalysts. Hydrogen yields as high as 85% have been obtained. Catalyst initial activity can be recovered through regeneration cycles by steam or CO{sub 2} gasification of carbonaceous deposits.

  17. Electrocatalytic hydrogenation of organic molecules on conductive new catalytic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tountian, D. [Louis Pasteur Univ., Strasbourg (France). Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Chimie Physique du Corps Solide; Sherbrooke Univ., Sherbrooke, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Chimie, Centre de Recherche en Electrochimie et Electrocatalyse; Brisach-Wittmeyer, A.; Menard, H. [Sherbrooke Univ., Sherbrooke, PQ (Canada). Dept. de Chimie, Centre de Recherche en Electrochimie et Electrocatalyse; Nkeng, P.; Poillerat, G. [Louis Pasteur Univ., Strasbourg (France). Laboratoire d' Electrochimie et de Chimie Physique du Corps Solide

    2008-07-01

    Electrocatalytic hydrogenation (ECH) of organic molecules is a process where chemisorbed hydrogen is produced by electroreduction of water which reacts with the species in bulk. Greater emphasis is being placed on improving the nature of the building material of the electrodes in order to increase ECH efficiency. The effectiveness of the ECH is known to be linked to the nature of electrode materials used and their adsorption properties. This work presented the effect of conductive support material on ECH. The conductive catalysts were obtained from tin dioxide which is chemically stable. Palladium was the catalytic metal used in this study. The production of chemisorbed hydrogen was shown to depend on the quantity of metallic nanoaggregates in electrical contact with the reticulated vitreous carbon use as electrode. The conductive support, F-doped tin dioxide, was obtained by the sol-gel method. The electrocatalysts were characterized by different methods as resistivity measurements, linear sweep voltammetry, XRD, SEM, TGA/DSC, and FTIR analysis. The effects of temperature and time of calcination were also investigated. The study showed that the F-doped SnO2 electrocatalyst appeared to increase the rate of phenol electrohydrogenation. It was concluded that the improved electrocatalytic activity of Pd/F-doped SnO2 can be attributed to the simultaneous polarization of all the metallic Pd nanoaggregates present on the surface as well as in the pores of the matrix by contact with RVC. This results in a better production of chemisorbed atomic hydrogen with a large number of adlienation points. 9 refs., 3 figs.

  18. High Selective Determination of Anionic Surfactant Using Its Parallel Catalytic Hydrogen Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    过玮; 何盈盈; 宋俊峰

    2003-01-01

    A faradaic response of anionic surfactants (AS), such as linear aikylbenzene sulfonate (LAS), dodecyl benzene sulfonate and dodecyl sulfate, was observed in weak acidic medium. The faradaic response of AS includes (1) a catalytic hydrogen wave of AS in HAc/NaAc buffer that was attributed to the reduction of proton associated with the sulfo-group of AS, and (2) a parallel catalytic hydrogen wave of AS in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, which was due to the catalysis of the catalytic hydrogen wave of AS by hydroxyl radical OH electrogenerated in the reduction of hydrogen peroxide. The parallel catalytic hydrogen wave is about 50 times as sensitive as the catalytic hydrogen wave. Based on the parallel catalytic hydrogen wave, a high selective method for the determination of AS was developed. In 0.1mol/L HAc/NaAc (pH=6.2±0.1)/1.0×10-3mol/L H2O2 supporting electrolyte, the second-order derivative peak current of the parallel catalytic hydrogen wave located at-1.33 V (vs. SCE) was rectilinear to AS concentration in the range of 3.0×10-6-2.5×10-4mol/L, without the interference of other surfactants. The proposed method was evaluated by quantitative analysis of AS in environmental wastewater.

  19. Hydrogen production from methane through catalytic partial oxidation reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freni, S.; Calogero, G.; Cavallaro, S.

    This paper reviews recent developments in syn-gas production processes used for partial methane oxidation with and/or without steam. In particular, we examined different process charts (fixed bed, fluidised bed, membrane, etc.), kinds of catalysts (powders, foams, monoliths, etc.) and catalytically active phases (Ni, Pt, Rh, etc.). The explanation of the various suggested technical solutions accounted for the reaction mechanism that may selectively lead to calibrated mixtures of CO and H 2 or to the unwanted formation of products of total oxidation (CO 2 and H 2O) and pyrolysis (coke). Moreover, the new classes of catalysts allow the use of small reactors to treat large amounts of methane (monoliths) or separate hydrogen in situ from the other reaction products (membrane). This leads to higher conversions and selectivity than could have been expected thermodynamically. Although catalysts based on Rh are extremely expensive, they can be used to minimise H 2O formation by maximising H 2 yield.

  20. Double heterojunction nanowire photocatalysts for hydrogen generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongying, P.; Vietmeyer, F.; Aleksiuk, D.; Ferraudi, G. J.; Krylova, G.; Kuno, M.

    2014-03-01

    Charge separation and charge transfer across interfaces are key aspects in the design of efficient photocatalysts for solar energy conversion. In this study, we investigate the hydrogen generating capabilities and underlying photophysics of nanostructured photocatalysts based on CdSe nanowires (NWs). Systems studied include CdSe, CdSe/CdS core/shell nanowires and their Pt nanoparticle-decorated counterparts. Femtosecond transient differential absorption measurements reveal how semiconductor/semiconductor and metal/semiconductor heterojunctions affect the charge separation and hydrogen generation efficiencies of these hybrid photocatalysts. In turn, we unravel the role of surface passivation, charge separation at semiconductor interfaces and charge transfer to metal co-catalysts in determining photocatalytic H2 generation efficiencies. This allows us to rationalize why Pt nanoparticle decorated CdSe/CdS NWs, a double heterojunction system, performs best with H2 generation rates of ~434.29 +/- 27.40 μmol h-1 g-1 under UV/Visible irradiation. In particular, we conclude that the CdS shell of this double heterojunction system serves two purposes. The first is to passivate CdSe NW surface defects, leading to long-lived charges at the CdSe/CdS interface capable of carrying out reduction chemistries. Upon photoexcitation, we also find that CdS selectively injects charges into Pt NPs, enabling simultaneous reduction chemistries at the Pt NP/solvent interface. Pt nanoparticle decorated CdSe/CdS NWs thus enable reduction chemistries at not one, but rather two interfaces, taking advantage of each junction's optimal catalytic activities.Charge separation and charge transfer across interfaces are key aspects in the design of efficient photocatalysts for solar energy conversion. In this study, we investigate the hydrogen generating capabilities and underlying photophysics of nanostructured photocatalysts based on CdSe nanowires (NWs). Systems studied include CdSe, CdSe/CdS core

  1. Novel catalytic and mechanistic studies on wastewater denitrification with hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theologides, C P; Olympiou, G G; Savva, P G; Pantelidou, N A; Constantinou, B K; Chatziiona, V K; Valanidou, L Y; Piskopianou, C T; Costa, C N

    2014-01-01

    The present work reports up-to-date information regarding the reaction mechanism of the catalytic hydrogenation of nitrates in water media. In the present mechanistic study, an attempt is made, for the first time, to elucidate the crucial role of several catalysts and reaction parameters in the mechanism of the NO(3)(-)/H(2) reaction. Steady-state isotopic transient kinetic analysis (SSITKA) experiments coupled with ex situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) were performed on supported Pd-Cu catalysts for the NO(3)(-)/H(2) and NO(3)(-)/H(2)/O(2) reactions. The latter experiments revealed that the formation and surface coverage of various adsorbed active intermediate N-species on the support or Pd/Cu metal surface is significantly favored in the presence of TiO(2) in the support mixture and in the presence of oxygen in the reaction's gaseous feed stream. The differences in the reactivity of these adsorbed N-species, found in the present work, adequately explain the large effect of the chemical composition of the support and the gas feed composition on catalyst behaviour (activity and selectivity). The present study leads to solid mechanistic evidence concerning the presence of a hydrogen spillover process from the metal to the support. Moreover, this study shows that Cu clusters are active sites for the reduction of nitrates to nitrites.

  2. Recent advances in catalytic asymmetric hydrogenation:Renaissance of the monodentate phosphorus ligands

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Hongchao; DING Kuiling; DAI Lixin

    2004-01-01

    The history for the development of chiral phosphorus ligands in catalytic asymmetric hydrogenation is briefly highlighted. This review focuses on the recent advances in the synthesis of the monodentate phosphorus ligands and their applications in catalytic asymmetric hydrogenation. The examples highlighted in this article clearly demonstrated the importance and advantages of monodentate phosphorus ligands, which had been ignored for 30 a and experienced a renaissance at the very beginning of this millennium, particularly in the area of asymmetric hydrogenation.

  3. Hydrogen production by catalytic gasification of cellulose in supercritical water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Cellulose,one of the important components of biomass,was gasified in supercritical water to produce hydrogen-rich gas in an autoclave which was operated batch-wise under high-pressure.K2CO3 and Ca(OH)2 were selected as the catalysts (or promoters).The temperature was kept between 450℃ and 500℃ while pressure was maintained at 24-26 MPa.The reaction time was 20 min.Experimental results showed that the two catalysts had good catalytic effect and optimum amounts were observed for each catalyst.When 0.2 g K2CO3 was added,the hydrogen yield could reach 9.456 mol.kg-1 which was two times of the H2 amount produced without catalyst.When 1.6 g Ca(OH)2 was added,the H2 yield was K2CO3 as catalyst but is still 1.7 times that achieved without catalyst.Comparing with the results obtained using KaCO3 or Ca(OH)2 alone,the use of a combination of K2CO3 and Ca(OH)2 could increase the H2 yield by up to 2.5 times that without catalyst and 25% and 45% more than that obtained using K2CO3 and Ca(OH)2 alone,respectively.It was found that methane was the dominant product at relatively low temperature.When the temperature was increased,the methane reacts with water and is converted to hydrogen and carbon dioxide.

  4. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Organic Compounds without H2 Supply: An Electrochemical System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Daniela Maria do Amaral Ferraz; Navarro, Marcelo

    2004-01-01

    An experiment developed for an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory course that can be used to introduce the catalytic hydrogenation reaction, catalysis electrochemical principles and gas chromatography is presented. The organic compounds hydrogenated by the electrocatalytic hydrogenation (ECH) process were styrene, benzaldehyde and…

  5. Novel Applications of the Methyltrioxorhenium/Hydrogen Peroxide Catalytic System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stankovic, Sasa [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2000-09-12

    Methylrhenium trioxide (MTO), CH3Re03, was first prepared in 1979. An improved synthetic route to MTO was devised from dirhenium heptoxide and tetramethyltin in the presence of hexafluoro glutaric anhydride was reported by Herrmann in 1992. During the course of research on this dissertation we uncovered other reactions where the presence or absence of pyridine can, in some cases dramatically, affect the reaction outcome. This dissertation consists of four chapters. The first two chapters deal with the ,oxidation of water sensitive olefinic compounds with the hydrogen perox’ide/MTO system. Chapters 111 and IV focus on the oxidation of hydrazones with the same catalytic system. Chapter I has been published in The Journal of Organic Chemistry and Chapter III in Chemical Communications. Chapters II and IV have been submitted for publication in The Journal of Organic Chemistry. Each section is selfcontained with its own equations, tables, figures and references. All of the work in this dissertation was performed by this author.

  6. Catalytic Hydrogenation over Palladium Complex of Molecular Complex of Poly(4-vinylpyridine) with Acetic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The palladium complex of the molecular complex of poly(4-vinylpyridine) with acetic acid(PVP/HAc-Pd) was prepared. Its catalytic activity for the hydrogenation of nitrobenzene was found much higher than that of the corresponding palladium complex of poly(4-vinylpyridine). In the presence of a strong inorganic alkali, especially potassium hydroxide, the catalytic activity is greatly improved. The suitable hydrogenation condition for PVP/HAc-Pd is to use 0.1 mol/L ethanol solution of potassium hydroxide as the hydrogenation medium and the hydrogenation is carried out at 45 ℃.

  7. Hydrogen Generation from Plasmatron Reforming Ethanol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YOU Fu-bing; HU You-ping; LI Ge-sheng; GAO Xiao-hong

    2006-01-01

    Hydrogen generation through plasmatron reforming of ethanol has been carried out in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. The reforming of pure ethanol and mixtures of ethanol-water have been studied. The gas chromatography (GC) analysis has shown that in all conditions the reforming yield was H2, CO, CH4 and CO2 as the main products, and with little C2* . The hydrogen-rich gas can be used as fuel for gasoline engine and other applications.

  8. Nitric-glycolic flowsheet testing for maximum hydrogen generation rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martino, C. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Newell, J. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Williams, M. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-03-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site is developing for implementation a flowsheet with a new reductant to replace formic acid. Glycolic acid has been tested over the past several years and found to effectively replace the function of formic acid in the DWPF chemical process. The nitric-glycolic flowsheet reduces mercury, significantly lowers the chemical generation of hydrogen and ammonia, allows purge reduction in the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT), stabilizes the pH and chemistry in the SRAT and the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME), allows for effective adjustment of the SRAT/SME rheology, and is favorable with respect to melter flammability. The objective of this work was to perform DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) testing at conditions that would bound the catalytic hydrogen production for the nitric-glycolic flowsheet.

  9. Hydrogen production by catalytic partial oxidation of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enger, Bjoern Christian

    2008-12-15

    Hydrogen production by catalytic partial oxidation of natural gas was investigated using tools ranging from theoretical calculations to experimental work and sophisticated characterization techniques. Catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) was carried out in a conventional continuous flow experimental apparatus using a fixed-bed reactor, and operating at 1 atm and furnace temperatures in the range from ambient to 1073 K. The feed typically consisted of a mixture of methane and air, with a CH{sub 4}/O{sub 2} ratio of 2, and the average bed residence time was in the range 10-250 ms. Steam methane reforming (SMR) was carried out in the same apparatus at similar temperatures and pressure in a feed consisting of methane, nitrogen and water, with a steam to carbon ratio of 2.0-4.0. Temperature programmed (TP) techniques, including oxidation (TPO), reduction (TPR), reaction (TPCPO) and methane dissociation (TPMD) was used to characterize catalytic properties such as ignition temperatures, the catalyst reducibility and activation energies. Dispersions from catalyst surface area measurements were compared to X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques and electron microscopy (SEM, TEM,STEM) to obtain information on catalyst particle sizes and dispersion. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) provided information on the specific catalyst surface composition, which was compared to results on the bulk structure obtained by XRD. The effect of modifying cobalt catalysts supported on alumina was investigated by adding small amounts of Ni, Fe, Cr, Re, Mn, W, Mo, V and Ta oxides. The idea behind this work was to investigate whether the cobalt crystals were decorated, covered or encircled by a modifier and to what extent this affected catalyst performance. The choice of modifiers in this study was based on the principle that in any chemical process it may be just as important to identify groups of elements that have negative effects as identifying the best promoters. It was found that the

  10. Field-controlled electron transfer and reaction kinetics of the biological catalytic system of microperoxidase-11 and hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongki Choi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Controlled reaction kinetics of the bio-catalytic system of microperoxidase-11 and hydrogen peroxide has been achieved using an electrostatic technique. The technique allowed independent control of 1 the thermodynamics of the system using electrochemical setup and 2 the quantum mechanical tunneling at the interface between microperoxidase-11 and the working electrode by applying a gating voltage to the electrode. The cathodic currents of electrodes immobilized with microperoxidase-11 showed a dependence on the gating voltage in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, indicating a controllable reduction reaction. The measured kinetic parameters of the bio-catalytic reduction showed nonlinear dependences on the gating voltage as the result of modified interfacial electron tunnel due to the field induced at the microperoxidase-11-electrode interface. Our results indicate that the kinetics of the reduction of hydrogen peroxide can be controlled by a gating voltage and illustrate the operation of a field-effect bio-catalytic transistor, whose current-generating mechanism is the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to water with the current being controlled by the gating voltage.

  11. Catalytic membrane reactors based on macroporous silicon for hydrogen production

    OpenAIRE

    Vega Bru, Didac; Hernández Díaz, David; López, E. (Eduardo); Jiménez, Nuria; Todorov Trifonov, Trifon; Rodríguez Martínez, Ángel; Alcubilla González, Ramón; Llorca Piqué, Jordi

    2010-01-01

    The typology of using hydrogen as an energy carrier and its implementation in portable fuel cells has motivated a considerable research interest in the development of new efficient hydrogen production technologies. Hydrogen storage and manipulation is however a problematic and hazardous issue. Therefore, the low temperature on-site steam reforming of alcohols for hydrogen supply offers a nice solution to safety and storage issues, while providing several environment advantages […] Peer Rev...

  12. Development of photovoltaic hydrogen and hypochlorite generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, J.L.; Beltran, E.D.; Meas, Y.; Ortega, R.; Orozco, G. [Centro de Investigacion y Desarrollo Tecnologico en Electroquimica, Mexico City (Mexico)

    2010-07-15

    Sodium hypochlorite is among the most efficient methods to disinfect water. Although sodium hypochlorite can be generated from chemical reactions of chlorine gas, the transportation of chlorine is a safety concern. In-situ generation of sodium hypochlorite in an electrolysis cell is therefore desirable. This study examined the feasibility of electrolytically producing both hypochlorite and hydrogen using photovoltaic energy. Since the hydrogen can be used in fuel cells to generate electricity and the hypochlorite can be used to purify drinking water, the integrated process may be operated economically because the products from both the anode and the cathode are valuable. The apparatus used in this study was designed and constructed in such a way that the photovoltaic module was coupled to the hydrogen and hypochlorite generator. The apparatus is suitable for operation in remote areas. The rates of hydrogen and hypochlorite generation were measured and the current/voltage characteristics of both the PV module and the electrolysis cell were analyzed. The electrolytic process yielded a sodium hypochlorite solution that was stable at pH 7. This study showed that environmental conditions such as solar intensity, ambient temperature and surface temperature of the photovoltaic module have a small effect on the rate of hydrogen production. Photovoltaic cells can supply the necessary electric current and voltage to produce 5 litres of 3.5 g/l NaOCl daily when a membrane is incorporated in the cell. The quantity of sodium hypochlorite produced by membraneless electrolysis with 2 photovoltaic modules could purify water for 40 families. It was concluded that long-term testing under real operating conditions is needed in order to estimate the capital cost of the equipment. 15 refs., 8 tabs., 5 figs.

  13. Simultaneous in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide and Fenton reaction over Pd-Fe catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Yalfani, Mohammad S.; Contreras, Sandra; Llorca Piqué, Jordi; Domínguez Escalante, Montserrat; Sueiras, Jesús; Medina, Francesc

    2010-01-01

    High mineralization degree of organic compounds can be achieved by a novel environmentally-friendly full heterogeneous Pd–Fe catalytic system, which involves in situ generation of hydrogen peroxide from formic acid and oxygen, and oxidation of organic compounds by Fenton process in a one-pot reaction.

  14. Production of hydrogen, liquid fuels, and chemicals from catalytic processing of bio-oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, George W; Vispute, Tushar P; Routray, Kamalakanta

    2014-06-03

    Disclosed herein is a method of generating hydrogen from a bio-oil, comprising hydrogenating a water-soluble fraction of the bio-oil with hydrogen in the presence of a hydrogenation catalyst, and reforming the water-soluble fraction by aqueous-phase reforming in the presence of a reforming catalyst, wherein hydrogen is generated by the reforming, and the amount of hydrogen generated is greater than that consumed by the hydrogenating. The method can further comprise hydrocracking or hydrotreating a lignin fraction of the bio-oil with hydrogen in the presence of a hydrocracking catalyst wherein the lignin fraction of bio-oil is obtained as a water-insoluble fraction from aqueous extraction of bio-oil. The hydrogen used in the hydrogenating and in the hydrocracking or hydrotreating can be generated by reforming the water-soluble fraction of bio-oil.

  15. Catalytic on-board hydrogen production from methanol and ammonia for mobile application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerijanto, H.

    2008-08-15

    This PhD thesis deals with the catalytic hydrogen production for mobile application, for example for the use in fuel cells for electric cars. Electric powered buses with fuel cells as driving system are well known, but the secure hydrogen storage in adequate amounts for long distance drive is still a topic of discussion. Methanol is an excellent hydrogen carrier. First of all it has a high H:C ratio and therefore a high energy density. Secondly the operating temperature of steam reforming of methanol is comparatively low (250 C) and there is no risk of coking since methanol has no C-C bond. Thirdly methanol is a liquid, which means that the present gasoline infrastructure can be used. For the further development of catalysts and for the construction of a reformer it is very important to characterize the catalysts very well. For the dimensioning and the control of an on-board production of hydrogen it is essential to draw accurately on the thermodynamic, chemical and kinetic data of the reaction. At the first part of this work the mesoporous Cu/ZrO{sub 2}/CeO{sub 2}-catalysts with various copper contents were characterized and their long-term stability and selectivity were investigated, and the kinetic data were determined. Carbon monoxide is generated by reforming of carbon containing material. This process is undesired since CO poisons the Pt electrode of the fuel cell. The separation of hydrogen by metal membranes is technically feasible and a high purity of hydrogen can be obtained. However, due to their high density this procedure is not favourable because of its energy loss. In this study a concept is presented, which enables an autothermal mode by application of ceramic membrane and simultaneously could help to deal with the CO problem. The search for an absolutely selective catalyst is uncertain. The production of CO can be neither chemically nor thermodynamically excluded, if carbon is present in the hydrogen carrier. Since enrichment or separation are

  16. Aluminum chloride for accelerating hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, U. B.; Akdim, O.; Miele, P.

    The present research paper reports preliminary results about the utilization of anhydrous aluminum chloride (AlCl 3) for accelerating hydrogen generation through hydrolysis of aqueous solution of sodium borohydride (NaBH 4) at 80 °C. To the best of our knowledge, AlCl 3 has never been considered for that reaction although many transition metal salts had already been assessed. AlCl 3 reactivity was compared to those of AlCl 3·6H 2O, AlF 3, CoCl 2, RuCl 3 and NiCl 2. With AlCl 3 and a NaBH 4 solution having a gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity (GHSC) of 2.9 wt.%, almost 100% hydrogen was generated in few seconds, i.e., with a hydrogen generation rate (HGR) of 354 L min -1 g -1(Al). This HGR is one of the highest rates ever reported. Higher HGRs were obtained by mixing AlCl 3 with CoCl2, RuCl 3 or NiCl 2. For example, the system RuCl 3:AlCl 3 (50:50 mass proportion) showed a HGR > 1000 L min -1 g -1(Ru:Al). The hydrolysis by-products (once dried) were identified (by XRD, IR and elemental analysis) as being Al(OH) 3, NaCl and Na 2B(OH) 4Cl and it was observed that even in situ formed Al(OH) 3 has catalytic abilities with HGRs of 5 L min -1 g -1(Al). All of these preliminary results are discussed, which concludes that AlCl 3 has a potential as accelerator for single-use NaBH 4-based storage system.

  17. Catalytic nanoreactors in continuous flow: hydrogenation inside single-walled carbon nanotubes using supercritical CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Thomas W; Earley, James H; Anderson, Daniel P; Khlobystov, Andrei N; Bourne, Richard A

    2014-05-25

    One nanometre wide carbon nanoreactors are utilised as the reaction vessel for catalytic chemical reactions on a preparative scale. Sub-nanometre ruthenium catalytic particles which are encapsulated solely within single-walled carbon nanotubes offering a unique reaction environment are shown to be active when embedded in a supercritical CO2 continuous flow reactor. A range of hydrogenation reactions were tested and the catalyst displayed excellent stability over extended reaction times.

  18. Catalytic hydrogenation using complexes of base metals with tridentate ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasudevan, Kalyan V.; Zhang, Guoqi; Hanson, Susan K.

    2016-09-06

    Complexes of cobalt and nickel with tridentate ligand PNHP.sup.R are effective for hydrogenation of unsaturated compounds. Cobalt complex [(PNHP.sup.Cy)Co(CH.sub.2SiMe.sub.3)]BAr.sup.F.sub.4 (PNHP.sup.Cy=bis[2-(dicyclohexylphosphino)ethyl]amine, BAr.sup.F.sub.4=B(3,5-(CF.sub.3).sub.2C.sub.6H.sub.3).sub.4)) was prepared and used with hydrogen for hydrogenation of alkenes, aldehydes, ketones, and imines under mild conditions (25-60.degree. C., 1-4 atm H.sub.2). Nickel complex [(PNHP.sup.Cy)Ni(H)]BPh.sub.4 was used for hydrogenation of styrene and 1-octene under mild conditions. (PNP.sup.Cy)Ni(H) was used for hydrogenating alkenes.

  19. Catalytic hydrogenation using complexes of base metals with tridentate ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Susan K.; Zhang, Guoqi; Vasudevan, Kalyan V.

    2017-02-14

    Complexes of cobalt and nickel with tridentate ligand PNHP.sup.R are effective for hydrogenation of unsaturated compounds. Cobalt complex [(PNHP.sup.Cy)Co(CH.sub.2SiMe.sub.3)]BAr.sup.F.sub.4 (PNHP.sup.Cy=bis[2-(dicyclohexylphosphino)ethyl]amine, BAr.sup.F.sub.4=B(3,5-(CF.sub.3).sub.2C.sub.6H.sub.3).sub.4)) was prepared and used with hydrogen for hydrogenation of alkenes, aldehydes, ketones, and imines under mild conditions (25-60.degree. C., 1-4 atm H.sub.2). Nickel complex [(PNHP.sup.Cy)Ni(H)]BPh.sub.4 was used for hydrogenation of styrene and 1-octene under mild conditions. (PNP.sup.Cy)Ni(H) was used for hydrogenating alkenes.

  20. 97e Intermediate Temperature Catalytic Reforming of Bio-Oil for Distributed Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marda, J. R.; Dean, A. M.; Czernik, S.; Evans, R. J.; French, R.; Ratcliff, M.

    2008-01-01

    With the world's energy demands rapidly increasing, it is necessary to look to sources other than fossil fuels, preferably those that minimize greenhouse emissions. One such renewable source of energy is biomass, which has the added advantage of being a near-term source of hydrogen. While there are several potential routes to produce hydrogen from biomass thermally, given the near-term technical barriers to hydrogen storage and delivery, distributed technologies such that hydrogen is produced at or near the point of use are attractive. One such route is to first produce bio-oil via fast pyrolysis of biomass close to its source to create a higher energy-density product, then ship this bio-oil to its point of use where it can be reformed to hydrogen and carbon dioxide. This route is especially well suited for smaller-scale reforming plants located at hydrogen distribution sites such as filling stations. There is also the potential for automated operation of the conversion system. A system has been developed for volatilizing bio-oil with manageable carbon deposits using ultrasonic atomization and by modifying bio-oil properties, such as viscosity, by blending or reacting bio-oil with methanol. Non-catalytic partial oxidation of bio-oil is then used to achieve significant conversion to CO with minimal aromatic hydrocarbon formation by keeping the temperature at 650 C or less and oxygen levels low. The non-catalytic reactions occur primarily in the gas phase. However, some nonvolatile components of bio-oil present as aerosols may react heterogeneously. The product gas is passed over a packed bed of precious metal catalyst where further reforming as well as water gas shift reactions are accomplished completing the conversion to hydrogen. The approach described above requires significantly lower catalyst loadings than conventional catalytic steam reforming due to the significant conversion in the non-catalytic step. The goal is to reform and selectively oxidize the

  1. Hydrogen generation via photoelectrochemical water splitting using chemically exfoliated MoS2 layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. K. Joshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Study on hydrogen generation has been of huge interest due to increasing demand for new energy sources. Photoelectrochemical reaction by catalysts was proposed as a promising technique for hydrogen generation. Herein, we report the hydrogen generation via photoelectrochecmial reaction using films of exfoliated 2-dimensional (2D MoS2, which acts as an efficient photocatalyst. The film of chemically exfoliated MoS2 layers was employed for water splitting, leading to hydrogen generation. The amount of hydrogen was qualitatively monitored by observing overpressure of a water container. The high photo-current generated by MoS2 film resulted in hydrogen evolution. Our work shows that 2D MoS2 is one of the promising candidates as a photocatalyst for light-induced hydrogen generation. High photoelectrocatalytic efficiency of the 2D MoS2 shows a new way toward hydrogen generation, which is one of the renewable energy sources. The efficient photoelectrocatalytic property of the 2D MoS2 is possibly due to availability of catalytically active edge sites together with minimal stacking that favors the electron transfer.

  2. Hydrogen generation via photoelectrochemical water splitting using chemically exfoliated MoS{sub 2} layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, R. K., E-mail: r.joshi@unsw.edu.au, E-mail: alwarappan@cecri.res.in; Sahajwalla, V. [Centre for Sustainable Materials Research and Technology, School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 (Australia); Shukla, S.; Saxena, S. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering and Materials Science, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai (India); Lee, G.-H. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Alwarappan, S., E-mail: r.joshi@unsw.edu.au, E-mail: alwarappan@cecri.res.in [CSIR-Central Electrochemical Research Institute, Karaikudi 630006, Tamilnadu (India)

    2016-01-15

    Study on hydrogen generation has been of huge interest due to increasing demand for new energy sources. Photoelectrochemical reaction by catalysts was proposed as a promising technique for hydrogen generation. Herein, we report the hydrogen generation via photoelectrochecmial reaction using films of exfoliated 2-dimensional (2D) MoS{sub 2}, which acts as an efficient photocatalyst. The film of chemically exfoliated MoS{sub 2} layers was employed for water splitting, leading to hydrogen generation. The amount of hydrogen was qualitatively monitored by observing overpressure of a water container. The high photo-current generated by MoS{sub 2} film resulted in hydrogen evolution. Our work shows that 2D MoS{sub 2} is one of the promising candidates as a photocatalyst for light-induced hydrogen generation. High photoelectrocatalytic efficiency of the 2D MoS{sub 2} shows a new way toward hydrogen generation, which is one of the renewable energy sources. The efficient photoelectrocatalytic property of the 2D MoS{sub 2} is possibly due to availability of catalytically active edge sites together with minimal stacking that favors the electron transfer.

  3. Maximizing renewable hydrogen production from biomass in a bio/catalytic refinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westermann, Peter; Jørgensen, Betina; Lange, L.;

    2007-01-01

    Biological production of hydrogen from biomass by fermentative or photofermentative microorganisms has been described in numerous research articles and reviews. The major challenge of these techniques is the low yield from fermentative production, and the large reactor volumes necessary...... for photofermentative production. Due to these constraints biological hydrogen production from biomass has so far not been considered a significant source in most scenarios of a future hydrogen-based economy. In this review we briefly summarize the current state of art of biomass-based hydrogen production and suggest...... a combination of a biorefinery for the production of multiple fuels (hydrogen, ethanol, and methane) and chemical catalytic technologies which could lead to a yield of 10-12 mol hydrogen per mol glucose derived from biological waste products. Besides the high hydrogen yield, the advantage of the suggested...

  4. Partial catalytic oxidation of CH{sub 4} to synthesis gas for power generation - Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantzaras, I.; Schneider, A.

    2006-03-15

    The partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas over rhodium catalysts has been investigated experimentally and numerically in the pressure range of 4 to 10 bar. The methane/oxidizer feed has been diluted with large amounts of H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} (up to 70% vol.) in order to simulate new power generation cycles with large exhaust gas recycle. Experiments were carried out in an optically accessible channel-flow reactor that facilitated laser-based in situ measurements, and also in a subscale gas-turbine catalytic reactor. Full-elliptic steady and transient two-dimensional numerical codes were used, which included elementary hetero-/homogeneous chemical reaction schemes. The following are the key conclusions: a) Heterogeneous (catalytic) and homogeneous (gas-phase) schemes have been validated for the partial catalytic oxidation of methane with large exhaust gas recycle. b) The impact of added H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} has been elucidated. The added H{sub 2}O increased the methane conversion and hydrogen selectivity, while it decreased the CO selectivity. The chemical impact of CO{sub 2} (dry reforming) was minimal. c) The numerical model reproduced the measured catalytic ignition times. It was further shown that the chemical impact of H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} on the catalytic ignition delay times was minimal. d) The noble metal dispersion increased with different support materials, in the order Rh/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Rh/ZrO{sub 2}, and Rh/Ce-ZrO{sub 2}. An evident relationship was established between the noble metal dispersion and the catalytic behavior. (authors)

  5. Tunable Molecular MoS2 Edge-Site Mimics for Catalytic Hydrogen Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Benjamin R; Polen, Shane M; Click, Kevin A; He, Mingfu; Huang, Zhongjie; Hadad, Christopher M; Wu, Yiying

    2016-04-18

    Molybdenum sulfides represent state-of-the-art, non-platinum electrocatalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). According to the Sabatier principle, the hydrogen binding strength to the edge active sites should be neither too strong nor too weak. Therefore, it is of interest to develop a molecular motif that mimics the catalytic sites structurally and possesses tunable electronic properties that influence the hydrogen binding strength. Furthermore, molecular mimics will be important for providing mechanistic insight toward the HER with molybdenum sulfide catalysts. In this work, a modular method to tune the catalytic properties of the S-S bond in MoO(S2)2L2 complexes is described. We studied the homogeneous electrocatalytic hydrogen production performance metrics of three catalysts with different bipyridine substitutions. By varying the electron-donating abilities, we present the first demonstration of using the ligand to tune the catalytic properties of the S-S bond in molecular MoS2 edge-site mimics. This work can shed light on the relationship between the structure and electrocatalytic activity of molecular MoS2 catalysts and thus is of broad importance from catalytic hydrogen production to biological enzyme functions.

  6. Influence of catalytic systems on process of model object hydrogenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Murzabek Ispolovich Baikenov; Gulzhan Gausilevna Baikenova; Bolat Shaimenovich Sarsembayev; Alma Baimagambetova Tateeva; Almas Tusipkhan; Aisha Zharasovna Matayeva

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of b-FeOOH, Fe(OA)3, Fe3O4 iron and spherical catalysts NiO/SiO2, Fe2O3/SiO2 derived from slag waste coals of heating electrical stations, the hydrogenation of model polycyclic hydrocarbon at presence of nan-odimensioned catalysts antracene was studied. On the example of conversion of anthracene, it was shown that upon release of hydrogenation of the product yield and degradation of polycyclic hydrocarbons in the hydrogenation, the mentioned catalyst systems appeared to be in the following order:nanoparticles b-FeOOH, Fe(OA)3 and Fe3O4[spherical catalysts NiO/SiO2, Fe2O3/SiO2[commercial cobalt-molybdenum catalyst. The results showed that the catalysts studied are promising catalysts for the hydrogenation of polycyclic hydrocarbons and may be used for direct coal liquefaction.

  7. Hydrogen generation and storage from hydrolysis of sodium borohydride in batch reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinto, A.M.F.R.; Falcao, D.S. [Departamento de Eng. Quimica, Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Silva, R.A.; Rangel, C.M. [Instituto Nacional de Engenharia e Tecnologia e Inovacao, Paco do Lumiar 22, 1649-038 (Portugal)

    2006-08-15

    The catalytic hydrolysis of alkaline sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) solution was studied using a non-noble; nickel-based powered catalyst exhibiting strong activity even after long time storage. This easy-to-prepare catalyst showed an enhanced activity after being recovered from previous use. The effects of temperature, NaBH{sub 4} concentration, NaOH concentration and pressure on the hydrogen generation rate were investigated. Particular importance has the effect of pressure, since the maximum reached pressure of hydrogen is always substantially lower than predictions (considering 100% conversion) due to solubility effects. The solubility of hydrogen is greatly enhanced by the rising pressure during reaction, leading to storage of hydrogen in the liquid phase. This effect can induce new ways of using this type of catalyst and reactor for the construction of hydrogen generators and even containers for portable and in situ applications. (author)

  8. Low temperature catalytic reforming of heptane to hydrogen and syngas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E.E. Abashar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The production of hydrogen and syngas from heptane at a low temperature is studied in a circulating fast fluidized bed membrane reactor (CFFBMR. A thin film of palladium-based membrane is employed to the displacement of the thermodynamic equilibrium for high conversion and yield. A mathematical model is developed to simulate the reformer. A substantial improvement of the CFFBMR is achieved by implementing the thin hydrogen membrane. The results showed that almost complete conversion of heptane and 46.25% increase of exit hydrogen yield over the value without membrane are achieved. Also a wide range of the H2/CO ratio within the recommended industrial range is obtained. The phenomena of high spikes of maximum nature at the beginning of the CFFBMR are observed and explanation offered. The sensitivity analysis results have shown that the increase of the steam to carbon feed ratio can increase the exit hydrogen yield up to 108.29%. It was found that the increase of reaction side pressure at a high steam to carbon feed ratio can increase further the exit hydrogen yield by 49.36% at a shorter reactor length. Moreover, the increase of reaction side pressure has an important impact in a significant decrease of the carbon dioxide and this is a positive sign for clean environment.

  9. Preparation of Hydrogen through Catalytic Steam Reforming of Bio-oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴层; 颜涌捷; 李庭琛; 亓伟

    2007-01-01

    Hydrogen was prepared via catalytic steam reforming of bio-oil which was obtained from fast pyrolysis of biomass in a fluidized bed reactor. Influential factors including temperature, weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) of bio-oil, mass ratio of steam to bio-oil (S/B) as well as catalyst type on hydrogen selectivity and other desirable gas products were investigated. Based on hydrogen in stoichiometric potential and carbon balance in gaseous phase and feed, hydrogen yield and carbon selectivity were examined. The experimental results show that higher temperature favors the hydrogen selectivity by H2 mole fraction in gaseous products stream and it plays an important role in hydrogen yield and carbon selectivity. Higher hydrogen selectivity and yield, and carbon selectivity were obtained at lower bio-oil WHSV. In catalytic steam reforming system a maximum steam concentration value exists, at which hydrogen selectivity and yield, and carbon selectivity keep constant. Through experiments, preferential operation conditions were obtained as follows: temperature 800~850℃, bio-oil WHSV below 3.0 h-1, and mass ratio of steam to bio-oil 10~12. The performance tests indicate that Ni-based catalysts are optional, especially Ni/a-Al2O3 effective in the steam reforming process.

  10. Asymmetric Catalytic Hydrogenation Using Rhodium Diphosphinites Derived From D-glucose and D-mannitol

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Three diphosphinites were synthesized for preparing rhodium-diphosphinite complexes. The complexes were used for asymmetric catalytic hydrogenation of amino acid precursor a -acetamidocinnamic acid and its methyl ester. With all complexes, D-amino acid is the most abundant product.

  11. Synthesis of Ultraviolet Absorber Benzotriazole by Nanoparticles Ag/SiO2 Catalytic Hydrogenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI Gang; ZHANG Wen-Guo; DAI Yong

    2012-01-01

    The Ag/SiO2 nanoparticles had been successfully synthesized. The Ag/SiO2 nano- particles can be an excellent catalyst for the synthesis of ultraviolet absorber benzotriazole by catalytic hydrogenation. The synthesis route is very efficient with less pollution and excellent yields. It is also easy to industrialized production.

  12. Hydrogen evolution at catalytically-modified nickel foam in alkaline solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierozynski, Boguslaw; Mikolajczyk, Tomasz; Kowalski, Ireneusz M.

    2014-12-01

    This work reports on hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) studied at catalytically modified nickel foam material. The HER was examined in 0.1 M NaOH solution on as received, as well as for Pd and Ru-activated nickel foam catalyst materials, produced via spontaneous deposition of trace amounts of these elements. Catalytic modification of nickel foam results in significant facilitation of the HER kinetics, as manifested through considerably reduced, a.c. impedance-derived values of charge-transfer resistance parameter and substantially altered Tafel polarization slopes. The presence of catalytic additives is clearly revealed through hydrogen underpotential deposition (H UPD) phenomenon, as well as spectroscopically from SEM (Scanning Electron Microscopy) analysis.

  13. Electroless Nickel-Based Catalyst for Diffusion Limited Hydrogen Generation through Hydrolysis of Borohydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon P. Anderson

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Catalysts based on electroless nickel and bi-metallic nickel-molybdenum nanoparticles were synthesized for the hydrolysis of sodium borohydride for hydrogen generation. The catalysts were synthesized by polymer-stabilized Pd nanoparticle-catalyzation and activation of Al2O3 substrate and electroless Ni or Ni-Mo plating of the substrate for selected time lengths. Catalytic activity of the synthesized catalysts was tested for the hydrolyzation of alkaline-stabilized NaBH4 solution for hydrogen generation. The effects of electroless plating time lengths, temperature and NaBH4 concentration on hydrogen generation rates were analyzed and discussed. Compositional analysis and surface morphology were carried out for nano-metallized Al2O3 using Scanning Electron Micrographs (SEM and Energy Dispersive X-Ray Microanalysis (EDAX. The as-plated polymer-stabilized electroless nickel catalyst plated for 10 min and unstirred in the hydrolysis reaction exhibited appreciable catalytic activity for hydrolysis of NaBH4. For a zero-order reaction assumption, activation energy of hydrogen generation using the catalyst was estimated at 104.6 kJ/mol. Suggestions are provided for further work needed prior to using the catalyst for portable hydrogen generation from aqueous alkaline-stabilized NaBH4 solution for fuel cells.

  14. Low temperature catalytic combustion of natural gas - hydrogen - air mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newson, E.; Roth, F. von; Hottinger, P.; Truong, T.B. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The low temperature catalytic combustion of natural gas - air mixtures would allow the development of no-NO{sub x} burners for heating and power applications. Using commercially available catalysts, the room temperature ignition of methane-propane-air mixtures has been shown in laboratory reactors with combustion efficiencies over 95% and maximum temperatures less than 700{sup o}C. After a 500 hour stability test, severe deactivation of both methane and propane oxidation functions was observed. In cooperation with industrial partners, scaleup to 3 kW is being investigated together with startup dynamics and catalyst stability. (author) 3 figs., 3 refs.

  15. Catalytic Metal Free Production of Large Cage Structure Carbon Particles: A Candidate for Hydrogen Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuki; Nuth, Joseph A., III; Ferguson, Frank T.

    2005-01-01

    We will demonstrate that carbon particles consisting of large cages can be produced without catalytic metal. The carbon particles were produced in CO gas as well as by introduction of 5% methane gas into the CO gas. The gas-produced carbon particles were able to absorb approximately 16.2 wt% of hydrogen. This value is 2.5 times higher than the 6.5 wt% goal for the vehicular hydrogen storage proposed by the Department of Energy in the USA. Therefore, we believe that this carbon particle is an excellent candidate for hydrogen storage for fuel cells.

  16. Hydrogen-based tubular catalytic membrane for removing nitrate from groundwater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Y X; Zhang, Y; Liu, H Y; Sharma, K R; Chen, G H

    2004-02-01

    A porous tubular ceramic membrane coated with palladium-cupper (Pd-Cu) catalyst on its surface was prepared and evaluated for catalytic reduction of nitrate from groundwater. Nitrate reduction activity and selectivity with the catalytic membrane were compared with Pd-Cu/Al2O3 catalyst particles. The catalytic membrane reactor exhibited a better selectivity by enabling an effective control of hydrogen gas, thus minimizing ammonium production. No leaching of palladium and copper into aqueous phase was observed, thereby indicating a high chemical stability of the metallic ions on the carrier support. This was also evidenced by the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) profiles of fresh and used catalysts, which showed no significant difference in surface compositions. Due to its higher selectivity in nitrate reduction and better flexibility in terms of operating conditions, the tubular catalytic ceramic membrane could be useful in removing nitrate from groundwater.

  17. Molecular catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and hydrotreating of coal liquids.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Shiyong; Stock, L.M.

    1996-05-01

    This report presents the results of research on the development of new catalytic pathways for the hydrogenation of multiring aromatic hydrocarbons and the hydrotreating of coal liquids at The University of Chicago under DOE Contract No. DE-AC22-91PC91056. The work, which is described in three parts, is primarily concerned with the research on the development of new catalytic systems for the hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons and for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen. Part A discusses the activation of dihydrogen by very basic molecular reagents to form adducts that can facilitate the reduction of multiring aromatic hydrocarbons. Part B examines the hydrotreating of coal liquids catalyzed by the same base-activated dihydrogen complexes. Part C concerns studies of molecular organometallic catalysts for the hydrogenation of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons under mild conditions.

  18. Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant hydrogen generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, R.B.; King, A.D. Jr.; Bhattacharyya, N.K. [and others

    1996-02-01

    The most promising method for the disposal of highly radioactive nuclear wastes is a vitrification process in which the wastes are incorporated into borosilicate glass logs, the logs are sealed into welded stainless steel canisters, and the canisters are buried in suitably protected burial sites for disposal. The purpose of the research supported by the Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) project of the Department of Energy through Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and summarized in this report was to gain a basic understanding of the hydrogen generation process and to predict the rate and amount of hydrogen generation during the treatment of HWVP feed simulants with formic acid. The objectives of the study were to determine the key feed components and process variables which enhance or inhibit the.production of hydrogen. Information on the kinetics and stoichiometry of relevant formic acid reactions were sought to provide a basis for viable mechanistic proposals. The chemical reactions were characterized through the production and consumption of the key gaseous products such as H{sub 2}. CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}0, NO, and NH{sub 3}. For this mason this research program relied heavily on analyses of the gases produced and consumed during reactions of the HWVP feed simulants with formic acid under various conditions. Such analyses, used gas chromatographic equipment and expertise at the University of Georgia for the separation and determination of H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O and NO.

  19. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Bio-Oil for Chemicals and Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2006-02-14

    The scope of work includes optimizing processing conditions and demonstrating catalyst lifetime for catalyst formulations that are readily scaleable to commercial operations. We use a bench-scale, continuous-flow, packed-bed, catalytic, tubular reactor, which can be operated in the range of 100-400 mL/hr., from 50-400 C and up to 20MPa (see Figure 1). With this unit we produce upgraded bio-oil from whole bio-oil or useful bio-oil fractions, specifically pyrolytic lignin. The product oils are fractionated, for example by distillation, for recovery of chemical product streams. Other products from our tests have been used in further testing in petroleum refining technology at UOP and fractionation for product recovery in our own lab. Further scale-up of the technology is envisioned and we will carry out or support process design efforts with industrial partners, such as UOP.

  20. Hydrogen Recombination Rates of Plate-type Passive Auto-catalytic Recombiner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jongtae; Hong, Seong-Wan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Gun Hong [Kyungwon E-C Co., Seongnam (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The hydrogen mitigation system may include igniters, passive autocatalytic recombiner (PAR), and venting or dilution system. Recently PAR is commonly used as a main component of HMS in a NPP containment because of its passive nature. PARs are categorized by the shape and material of catalytic surface. Catalytic surface coated by platinum is mostly used for the hydrogen recombiners. The shapes of the catalytic surface can be grouped into plate type, honeycomb type and porous media type. Among them, the plate-type PAR is well tested by many experiments. PAR performance analysis can be approached by a multi-scale method which is composed of micro, meso and macro scales. The criterion of the scaling is the ratio of thickness of boundary layer developed on a catalytic surface to representative length of a computational domain. Mass diffusion in the boundary layer must be resolved in the micro scale analysis. In a lumped parameter (LP) analysis using a system code such as MAAP or MELCOR, the chamber of the PAR is much smaller than a computational node. The hydrogen depletion by a PAR is modeled as a source of mass and energy conservation equations. Te catalytic surface reaction of hydrogen must be modeled by a volume-averaged correlation. In this study, a micro scale analysis method is developed using libraries in OpenFOAM to evaluate a hydrogen depletion rate depending on parameters such as size and number of plates and plate arrangement. The analysis code is validated by simulating REKO-3 experiment. And hydrogen depletion analysis is conducted by changing the plate arrangement as a trial of the performance enhancement of a PAR. In this study, a numerical code for an analysis of a PAR performance in a micro scale has been developed by using OpenFOAM libraries. The physical and numerical models were validated by simulating the REKO-3 experiment. As a try to enhance the performance of the plate-type PAR, it was proposed to apply a staggered two-layer arrangement of the

  1. On the mechanism of catalytic hydrogenation of thiophene on hydrogen tungsten bronze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Yongjie; Chen, Zhangxian; Gan Wei Kiat, Vincent; Huang, Liang; Cheng, Hansong

    2015-04-21

    Hydrogenation of unsaturated organosulfur compounds is an essential process through which these species are converted into cleaner and more useful compounds. Hydrogen bronze materials have been demonstrated to be efficient catalysts in hydrogenation of simple unsaturated compounds. Herein, we performed density functional theory calculations to investigate hydrogenation of thiophene on hydrogen tungsten bronze. Various reaction pathways were investigated and the most favourable routes were identified. Our results suggest that the reaction proceeds with moderate barriers, and formation of tetrahydrothiophene is facile both thermochemically and kinetically. The present study provides a useful insight into the design of hydrogenation thiophene and its derivatives and effective hydrodesulfurization catalysts.

  2. Modeling of hydrogen/deuterium dynamics and heat generation on palladium nanoparticles for hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuaki Tanabe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We modeled the dynamics of hydrogen and deuterium adsorbed on palladium nanoparticles including the heat generation induced by the chemical adsorption and desorption, as well as palladium-catalyzed reactions. Our calculations based on the proposed model reproduce the experimental time-evolution of pressure and temperature with a single set of fitting parameters for hydrogen and deuterium injection. The model we generated with a highly generalized set of formulations can be applied for any combination of a gas species and a catalytic adsorbent/absorbent. Our model can be used as a basis for future research into hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion technologies.

  3. Modeling of hydrogen/deuterium dynamics and heat generation on palladium nanoparticles for hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Katsuaki

    2016-01-01

    We modeled the dynamics of hydrogen and deuterium adsorbed on palladium nanoparticles including the heat generation induced by the chemical adsorption and desorption, as well as palladium-catalyzed reactions. Our calculations based on the proposed model reproduce the experimental time-evolution of pressure and temperature with a single set of fitting parameters for hydrogen and deuterium injection. The model we generated with a highly generalized set of formulations can be applied for any combination of a gas species and a catalytic adsorbent/absorbent. Our model can be used as a basis for future research into hydrogen storage and solid-state nuclear fusion technologies.

  4. Hydrogenation of o-cresol on platinum catalyst: Catalytic experiments and first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yaping; Liu, Zhimin; Xue, Wenhua; Crossley, Steven P.; Jentoft, Friederike C.; Wang, Sanwu

    2017-01-01

    Catalytic experiments were performed for the hydrogenation of o-cresol in n-dodecane over a platinum catalyst. Batch reactions analyzed with an in-situ ATR IR probe suggest that the hydrogenation results in the formation of the final product, 2-methyl-cyclohexanol, with 2-methyl-cyclohexanone as the intermediate product. Ab initio density-functional theory was employed to investigate the atomic-scale mechanism of o-cresol hydrogenation on the Pt(111) surface. The formation of 2-methyl-cyclohexanone was found to involve two steps. The first step is a hydrogen abstraction, that is, the H atom in the hydroxyl group migrates to the Pt surface. The second step is hydrogenation, that is, the pre-existing H atoms on Pt react with the carbon atoms in the aromatic ring. On the other hand, 2-methyl-cyclohexanonol may be produced through two paths, with activation energies slightly greater than that for the formation of 2-methyl-cyclohexanone. One path involves direct hydrogenation of the aromatic ring. Another path involves three steps, with the partial hydrogenation of the ring as the first step, hydrogen abstraction of the sbnd OH group as the second, and hydrogenation of remaining C atoms and the O atom the last.

  5. Nitrogen-Doped Graphene for Photocatalytic Hydrogen Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Dong Wook; Baek, Jong-Beom

    2016-04-20

    Photocatalytic hydrogen (H2 ) generation in a water splitting process has recently attracted tremendous interest because it allows the direct conversion of clean and unlimited solar energy into the ideal energy resource of H2 . For efficient photocatalytic H2 generation, the role of the photocatalyst is critical. With increasing demand for more efficient, sustainable, and cost-effective photocatalysts, various types of semiconductor photocatalysts have been intensively developed. In particular, on the basis of its superior catalytic and tunable electronic properties, nitrogen-doped graphene is a potential candidate for a high-performance photocatalyst. Nitrogen-doped graphene also offers additional advantages originating from its unique two-dimensional sp(2) -hybridized carbon network including a large specific surface area and exceptional charge transport properties. It has been reported that nitrogen-doped graphene can play diverse but positive functions including photo-induced charge acceptor/meditator, light absorber from UV to visible light, n-type semiconductor, and giant molecular photocatalyst. Herein, we summarize the recent progress and general aspects of nitrogen-doped graphene as a photocatalyst for photocatalytic H2 generation. In addition, challenges and future perspectives in this field are also discussed.

  6. CATALYTIC BEHAVIOR OF A SILICA-SUPPORTED POLYTITAZANE-PLATINUM COMPLEX FOR THE HYDROGENATION OF PHENOL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chunwei; HUANG Meiyu; JIANG Yingyan

    1996-01-01

    A new kind of inorganic polymer, viz. silica-supported polytitazane (Ti-N), and its platinum complex (Ti-N-Pt) were prepared. Cyclohexanone can be obtained in a maximum yield of about 62.2% in the hydrogenation of phenol over Ti-N-Pt at room temperature under atmospheric pressure. The effects of mole ratio of N/Pt in the complex, concentration of the catalyst and reaction temperature on the catalytic activity and selectivity have been studied. The complex can be reused several times without loss in its catalytic activity.

  7. Catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide on anthraquinonecyanine and phthalocyanine metal complexes in acid and alkaline electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pobedinskiy, S.N.; Trofimenko, A.A.; Zharnikova, M.A.

    1985-12-01

    A study of octaoxyanthraquinonecyanines (OOATsM) and phthalocyanines (FTs) of cobalt, iron, and manganese determined their catalytic activity in the hydrogen peroxide decomposition reaction. Hydrogen peroxide decomposition on OOATsM and FTs of the metals studied follows the kinetic mechanisms of a reaction of the first order regardless of the central ion of the metal. Complexes with a central atom of iron are most active in decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. Catalytic activity of FTsFe exceeds that of FTsCo more than 10-fold. FTs are 10-fold greater than OOATsM in catalytic activity. Change from an acid to an alkali medium did not affect the kinetic mechanisms of the decomposition reaction but the reaction rate on both a carrier and on metal complexes is higher in an alkaline medium than in an acid medium. The affect of an alkaline medium on the hydrogen peroxide decomposition rate is greater for FTS complexes than for anthraquinone-cyanines. 5 references, 2 figures.

  8. Biomass to hydrogen via fast pyrolysis and catalytic steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chornet, E.; Wang, D.; Montane, D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Fast pyrolysis of biomass results in a pyrolytic oil which is a mixture of (a) carbohydrate-derived acids, aldehydes and polyols, (b) lignin-derived substituted phenolics, and (c) extractives-derived terpenoids and fatty acids. The conversion of this pyrolysis oil into H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} is thermodynamically favored under appropriate steam reforming conditions. Our efforts have focused in understanding the catalysis of steam reforming which will lead to a successful process at reasonable steam/carbon ratios arid process severities. The experimental work, carried out at the laboratory and bench scale levels, has centered on the performance of Ni-based catalysts using model compounds as prototypes of the oxygenates present in the pyrolysis oil. Steam reforming of acetic acid, hydroxyacetaldehyde, furfural and syringol has been proven to proceed rapidly within a reasonable range of severities. Time-on-stream studies are now underway using a fixed bed barometric pressure reactor to ascertain the durability of the catalysts and thus substantiate the scientific and technical feasibility of the catalytic reforming option. Economic analyses are being carried out in parallel to determine the opportunity zones for the combined fast pyrolysis/steam reforming approach. A discussion on the current state of the project is presented.

  9. Nanostructured, complex hydride systems for hydrogen generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert A. Varin

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Complex hydride systems for hydrogen (H2 generation for supplying fuel cells are being reviewed. In the first group, the hydride systems that are capable of generating H2 through a mechanical dehydrogenation phenomenon at the ambient temperature are discussed. There are few quite diverse systems in this group such as lithium alanate (LiAlH4 with the following additives: nanoiron (n-Fe, lithium amide (LiNH2 (a hydride/hydride system and manganese chloride MnCl2 (a hydride/halide system. Another hydride/hydride system consists of lithium amide (LiNH2 and magnesium hydride (MgH2, and finally, there is a LiBH4-FeCl2 (hydride/halide system. These hydride systems are capable of releasing from ~4 to 7 wt.% H2 at the ambient temperature during a reasonably short duration of ball milling. The second group encompasses systems that generate H2 at slightly elevated temperature (up to 100 °C. In this group lithium alanate (LiAlH4 ball milled with the nano-Fe and nano-TiN/TiC/ZrC additives is a prominent system that can relatively quickly generate up to 7 wt.% H2 at 100 °C. The other hydride is manganese borohydride (Mn(BH42 obtained by mechano-chemical activation synthesis (MCAS. In a ball milled (2LiBH4 + MnCl2 nanocomposite, Mn(BH42 co-existing with LiCl can desorb ~4.5 wt.% H2 at 100 °C within a reasonable duration of dehydrogenation. Practical application aspects of hydride systems for H2 generation/storage are also briefly discussed.

  10. A new process for preparing dialdehyde by catalytic oxidation of cyclic olefins with aqueous hydrogen peroxide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU, Hong-Kun; PANG, Zhen; HUANG, Zu-En; CAI, Rui-Fang

    2000-01-01

    A novel peroxo-nioboplosphate was synthesized for the first time and used as a catalyst in the oxidation reaction of cyclic olefins with aqueous hydrogen peroxide to prepare dialdehydes. The catalyst was characterized by elemental analysis,thermographic analyses, IR, UV/vis, 31P NMR and XPS ~ as [ π-C5H5N(CH2)i3CH3 ]2 [Nb406 (O2)2 (PO4)2] ·6H20 (PTNP). It showed high selectivity to glutaraldehyde in the catalytic oxidation of cyclopentene with aqueous hydrogen peroxide in ethanol.

  11. State of the art on hydrogen passive auto-catalytic recombiner (european union Parsoar project)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnould, F.; Bachellerie, E. [Technicatome, 13 - Aix en Provence (France); Auglaire, M. [Tractebel Energy Engineering, Brussels (Belgium); Boeck, B. de [Association Vincotte Nuclear, Brussels (Belgium); Braillard, O. [CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France); Eckardt, B. [Siemens AG, Offenbach am Main (Germany); Ferroni, F. [Electrowatt Engineering Limited, Zurich (Switzerland); Moffett, R. [Atomic Energy Canada Limited, Pinawa (Canada); Van Goethem, G. [European Commission, Brussels (Belgium)

    2001-07-01

    This paper presents an overview of the European Union PARSOAR project, which consists in carrying out a state of the art on hydrogen passive auto-catalytic recombiner (PAR) and a handbook guide for implementing these devices in nuclear power plants. This work is performed in the area ''Operational Safety of Existing Installations'' of the key action ''Nuclear Fission'' of the fifth Euratom Framework Programme (1998-2002). (author)

  12. Liquid-Phase Catalytic Transfer Hydrogenation of Furfural over Homogeneous Lewis Acid-Ru/C Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotopoulou, Paraskevi; Martin, Nickolas; Vlachos, Dionisios G

    2015-06-22

    The catalytic performance of homogeneous Lewis acid catalysts and their interaction with Ru/C catalyst are studied in the catalytic transfer hydrogenation of furfural by using 2-propanol as a solvent and hydrogen donor. We find that Lewis acid catalysts hydrogenate the furfural to furfuryl alcohol, which is then etherified with 2-propanol. The catalytic activity is correlated with an empirical scale of Lewis acid strength and exhibits a volcano behavior. Lanthanides are the most active, with DyCl3 giving complete furfural conversion and a 97 % yield of furfuryl alcohol at 180 °C after 3 h. The combination of Lewis acid and Ru/C catalysts results in synergy for the stronger Lewis acid catalysts, with a significant increase in the furfural conversion and methyl furan yield. Optimum results are obtained by using Ru/C combined with VCl3 , AlCl3 , SnCl4 , YbCl3 , and RuCl3 . Our results indicate that the combination of Lewis acid/metal catalysts is a general strategy for performing tandem reactions in the upgrade of furans.

  13. 污泥基载体负载Co基催化剂催化NaBH4水解制氢反应性能研究%Hydrogen Generation from Catalytic Hydrolysis of Alkaline Sodium Borohydride Solution Using Sludge-Ssupported Co-B Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张璇; 付国家; 田红景; 郭庆杰

    2013-01-01

    污水处理厂的污泥经NaOH溶液浸泡去除灰分开孔后用作载体,通过多步浸渍-还原法负载Co制得Co基催化剂。采用XRD、SEM和N2吸附测试对该催化剂进行表征分析,结果表明:Co成功负载到了污泥基载体上,催化剂表面孔结构发达,具有较大比表面积和分布较均一的孔径。今系统性考察了催化剂用量、反应温度和循环次数对污泥基催化剂催化性能的影响;实验证明该催化剂稳定性及活性均较高,在循环使用9次后,催化产氢产率仅由179.2 mL×min-1×g-1催化剂下降至106.7 mL×min-1×g-1催化剂。催化剂催化产氢反应的活化能为55.12 kJ×mol-1。污泥来源广泛,以其为载体制备产氢催化剂可应用于便携式氢燃料电池领域,具有很好的环境、社会和经济效益。%The sewage sludge from the Wastewater Treatment Plant of Qingdao was soaked by high concentration NaOH solution to reduce its ash content. Cobalt nitrate was impregnated with the treated sludge by multiple impregnation-reduction procedures to generate a sludge-supported Co catalyst. The prepared catalysts were characterized by X ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and N2 adsorption measurements. The results indicate that the Co is successfully loaded on the sludge-based support. A systematic study was conducted to evaluate the effects of the amount of catalysts, the reaction temperature, the concentration of NaOH and the concentration of NaBH4 on stability and catalytic performance of the prepared catalysts. The results confirm that the sludge-supported Co catalyst exhibits good stability and catalytic activity. After being used for 9 times, the hydrogen generation ratio of the catalyst decreases from 179.2 mL×min-1×g-1 to 106.7 mL×min-1×g-1. The activation energy of the hydrogen generation reaction of the catalyst is 55.12 kJ×mol-1. Sludge is abundant in nature, and using sludge as Co support provides a way

  14. Dendrimer Templated Synthesis of One Nanometer Rh and Pt Particles Supported on Mesoporous Silica: Catalytic Activity for Ethylene and Pyrrole Hydrogenation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Wenyu; Kuhn, John N.; Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Zhang, Yawen; Habas, Susan E.; Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-05-09

    Monodisperse rhodium (Rh) and platinum (Pt) nanoparticles as small as {approx}1 nm were synthesized within a fourth generation polyaminoamide (PAMAM) dendrimer, a hyperbranched polymer, in aqueous solution and immobilized by depositing onto a high-surface-area SBA-15 mesoporous support. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that the as-synthesized Rh and Pt nanoparticles were mostly oxidized. Catalytic activity of the SBA-15 supported Rh and Pt nanoparticles was studied with ethylene hydrogenation at 273 and 293 K in 10 torr of ethylene and 100 torr of H{sub 2} after reduction (76 torr of H{sub 2} mixed with 690 torr of He) at different temperatures. Catalysts were active without removing the dendrimer capping but reached their highest activity after hydrogen reduction at a moderate temperature (423 K). When treated at a higher temperature (473, 573, and 673 K) in hydrogen, catalytic activity decreased. By using the same treatment that led to maximum ethylene hydrogenation activity, catalytic activity was also evaluated for pyrrole hydrogenation.

  15. Catalytic heat exchangers for small-scale production of hydrogen - feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silversand, F. [Catator AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2002-02-01

    A feasibility study concerning heat-exchanger reactors in small-scale production of hydrogen has been performed on the request of Svenskt Gastekniskt Center AB and SWEP International AB. The basic idea is to implement different catalysts into brazed plate-type heat exchangers. This can be achieved by installing catalytic cylinders in the inlet-and outlet ports of the heat exchangers or through treatment of the plates to render them catalytically active. It is also possible to sandwich catalytically active wire meshes between the plates. Experiments concerning steam reforming of methanol and methane have been performed in a micro-reactor to gather kinetic data for modelling purposes. Performance calculations concerning heat exchanger reactors have then been conducted with Catator's generic simulation code for catalytic reactors (CatalystExplorer). The simulations clearly demonstrate the technical performance of these reactors. Indeed, the production rate of hydrogen is expected to be about 10 nm{sup 3}/h per litre of heat exchanger. The corresponding value for a conventional steam-reforming unit is about 1 nm{sup 3}/h or less per litre of reactor volume. Also, the compactness and the high degree of integration together with the possibilities of mass production will give an attractive cost for such units. Depending on the demands concerning the purity of the hydrogen it is possible to add secondary catalytic steps like water-gas shifters, methanation and selective oxidation, into a one-train unit, i.e. to design an all-inclusive design. Such reactors can be used for the supply of hydrogen to fuel cells. The production cost for hydrogen can be cut by 60 - 70% through the utilisation of heat exchanger reactors instead of conventional electrolysis. This result is primarily a result of the high price for electricity compared to the feed stock prices in steam reforming. It is important to verify the performance calculations and the simulation results through

  16. Substrate-mediated enhanced activity of Ru nanoparticles in catalytic hydrogenation of benzene

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Xin

    2012-01-01

    The impact of carbon substrate-Ru nanoparticle interactions on benzene and hydrogen adsorption that is directly related to the performance in catalytic hydrogenation of benzene has been investigated by first-principles based calculations. The stability of Ru 13 nanoparticles is enhanced by the defective graphene substrate due to the hybridization between the dsp states of the Ru 13 particle with the sp 2 dangling bonds at the defect sites. The local curvature formed at the interface will also raise the Ru atomic diffusion barrier, and prohibit the particle sintering. The strong interfacial interaction results in the shift of averaged d-band center of the deposited Ru nanoparticle, from -1.41 eV for a freestanding Ru 13 particle, to -1.17 eV for the Ru/Graphene composites, and to -1.54 eV on mesocellular foam carbon. Accordingly, the adsorption energies of benzene are increased from -2.53 eV for the Ru/mesocellular foam carbon composites, to -2.62 eV on freestanding Ru 13 particles, to -2.74 eV on Ru/graphene composites. A similar change in hydrogen adsorption is also observed, and all these can be correlated to the shift of the d-band center of the nanoparticle. Thus, Ru nanoparticles graphene composites are expected to exhibit both high stability and superior catalytic performance in hydrogenation of arenes. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  17. Liquid-Phase Catalytic Hydrogenation of Furfural in Variable Solvent Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    夏淑倩; 李阳; 商巧燕; 张成武; 马沛生

    2016-01-01

    Water is the most abundant compound inherently existing in bio-oils. Thus understanding the role of water within bio-oils upgrading process is essential for future engineering scale-up design. In this study, furfural was chosen as bio-oils model compound, and the catalytic hydrogenation of furfural over commercial 5%, Ru/C catalyst was firstly investigated in a series of gradient variable water/ethanol mixture solvents. Water had a signifi-cant effect on the distribution of product yields. The dominant reaction pathways varied with the water contents in the water/ethanol mixture solvents. Typically, when ethanol was used as the solvent, the main products were ob-tained by the hydrogenation of carbonyl group or furan ring. When pure water was used as the solvent, the rear-rangement reaction of furfural to cyclopentanone should be selectively promoted theoretically. However, serious polymerization and resinification were observed herein in catalytic hydrogenation system of pure water. The cata-lyst surface was modified by the water-insoluble polymers, and consequently, a relative low yield of cyclopenta-none was obtained. A plausible multiple competitive reaction mechanism between polymerization reaction and the hydrogenation of furfural was suggested in this study. Characterizations(TG,FT-IR,SEM)were employed to analyze and explain our experiments.

  18. Wax: A benign hydrogen-storage material that rapidly releases H2-rich gases through microwave-assisted catalytic decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Cortes, S; Slocombe, D R; Xiao, T; Aldawsari, A; Yao, B; Kuznetsov, V L; Liberti, E; Kirkland, A I; Alkinani, M S; Al-Megren, H A; Thomas, J M; Edwards, P P

    2016-10-19

    Hydrogen is often described as the fuel of the future, especially for application in hydrogen powered fuel-cell vehicles (HFCV's). However, its widespread implementation in this role has been thwarted by the lack of a lightweight, safe, on-board hydrogen storage material. Here we show that benign, readily-available hydrocarbon wax is capable of rapidly releasing large amounts of hydrogen through microwave-assisted catalytic decomposition. This discovery offers a new material and system for safe and efficient hydrogen storage and could facilitate its application in a HFCV. Importantly, hydrogen storage materials made of wax can be manufactured through completely sustainable processes utilizing biomass or other renewable feedstocks.

  19. Hydrogen generation from magnesium hydride by using organic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yen-Hsi

    In this paper, the hydrolysis of solid magnesium hydride has been studied with the high concentration of catalyst at the varying temperature. An organic acid (acetic acid, CH3COOH) has been chosen as the catalyst. The study has three objectives: first, using three different weights of MgH 2 react with aqueous solution of acid for the hydrogen generation experiments. Secondly, utilizing acetic acid as the catalyst accelerates hydrogen generation. Third, emphasizing the combination of the three operating conditions (the weight of MgH2, the concentration of acetic acid, and the varying temperature) influence the amount of hydrogen generation. The experiments results show acetic acid truly can increase the rate of hydrogen generation and the weight of MgH2 can affect the amount of hydrogen generation more than the varying temperature.

  20. Continuous catalytic hydrogenation of polyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in hydrogen-supercritical carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Tao; Fournier, Anick R; Proudlock, Raymond; Marshall, William D

    2007-03-15

    A continuous hydrogenation device was evaluated for the detoxification of selected tri-, tetra-, or pentacyclic polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds {anthracene, phenanthrene, chrysene, and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P)} by hydrogenation. A substrate stream in hexane, 0.05-1.0% (w/v), was mixed with hydrogen-carbon dioxide (H2-CO2, 5-30% v/v) and delivered to a heated reactor column (25 cm x 1 cm) containing palladium supported on gamma alumina (Pd0/gamma-Al2O3) that was terminated with a capillary restrictor. The flow rate from the reactor, approximately 800 mL min(-1) decompressed gas, corresponded to 4 mL min(-1) fluid under the operating conditions of the trials. Reaction products were recovered by passing the reactor effluent through hexane. At 90 degrees C, the anthracene or phenanthrene substrate was hydrogenated only partially to octahydro and dodecahydro species and contained only a minor quantity of totally hydrogenated products. For substrates with increasing numbers of fused aromatic rings, the hydrogenation efficiency was decreased further. However, at an increasing temperature (90-150 degrees C) and increasing mobile phase flow rate (20.68 MPa corresponding to 2100 mL min(-1) decompressed gas), B[a]P and chrysene were hydrogenated, virtuallytotally, to their corresponding perhydro analogues (eicosahydrobenzo[a]pyrenes and octadecahydrochrysenes), respectively. That this approach might be useful for decontaminating soil extracts was supported by companion in vitro trials in which the substrate and products were assayed for mutagenic activity with five bacterial strains that are auxotrophic for histidine (Salmonella typhimurium TA98, TA100, TA1535, and TA1537) or tryptophan (Escherichia coliWP2 uvrA), using the bacterial reverse mutation assay (modified Ames test). Generally, substantial increases in revertant colony counts were not observed with any of the strains following exposure to the hydrogenation products in the absence or presence of the 10 or 30

  1. Surface Structure and Catalytic Performance of Ni-Fe Catalyst for Low-Temperature CO Hydrogenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanhui Meng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalysts 16NixFe/Al2O3 (x is 0, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8 were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation method and the catalytic performance for the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG from CO hydrogenation in slurry-bed reactor were studied. The catalysts were characterized by BET, XRD, UV-Vis DRS, H2-TPR, CO-TPD, and XPS, and the results showed that the introduction of iron improved the dispersion of Ni species, weakened the interaction between Ni species and support and decreased the reduction temperature and that catalyst formed Ni-Fe alloy when the content of iron exceeded 2%. Experimental results revealed that the addition of iron to the catalyst can effectively improve the catalytic performance of low-temperature CO methanation. Catalyst 16Ni4Fe/Al2O3 with the iron content of 4% exhibited the best catalytic performance, the conversion of CO and the yield of CH4 reached 97.2% and 84.9%, respectively, and the high catalytic performance of Ni-Fe catalyst was related to the property of formed Ni-Fe alloy. Further increase of iron content led to enhancing the water gas shift reaction.

  2. Room temperature hydrogen generation from hydrolysis of ammonia-borane over an efficient NiAgPd/C catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Lei

    2014-12-01

    NiAgPd nanoparticles are successfully synthesized by in-situ reduction of Ni, Ag and Pd salts on the surface of carbon. Their catalytic activity was examined in ammonia borane (NH3BH3) hydrolysis to generate hydrogen gas. This nanomaterial exhibits a higher catalytic activity than those of monometallic and bimetallic counterparts and a stoichiometric amount of hydrogen was produced at a high generation rate. Hydrogen production rates were investigated in different concentrations of NH3BH3 solutions, including in the borates saturated solution, showing little influence of the concentrations on the reaction rates. The hydrogen production rate can reach 3.6-3.8 mol H2 molcat -1 min-1 at room temperature (21 °C). The activation energy and TOF value are 38.36 kJ/mol and 93.8 mol H2 molcat -1 min-1, respectively, comparable to those of Pt based catalysts. This nanomaterial catalyst also exhibits excellent chemical stability, and no significant morphology change was observed from TEM after the reaction. Using this catalyst for continuously hydrogen generation, the hydrogen production rate can be kept after generating 6.2 L hydrogen with over 10,000 turnovers and a TOF value of 90.3 mol H2 molcat -1 min-1.

  3. Molecular Self-Assembly Strategy for Generating Catalytic Hybrid Polypeptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikezoe, Yasuhiro; Pike, Douglas H.; Nanda, Vikas; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Recently, catalytic peptides were introduced that mimicked protease activities and showed promising selectivity of products even in organic solvents where protease cannot perform well. However, their catalytic efficiency was extremely low compared to natural enzyme counterparts presumably due to the lack of stable tertiary fold. We hypothesized that assembling these peptides along with simple hydrophobic pockets, mimicking enzyme active sites, could enhance the catalytic activity. Here we fused the sequence of catalytic peptide CP4, capable of protease and esterase-like activities, into a short amyloidogenic peptide fragment of Aβ. When the fused CP4-Aβ construct assembled into antiparallel β-sheets and amyloid fibrils, a 4.0-fold increase in the hydrolysis rate of p-nitrophenyl acetate (p-NPA) compared to neat CP4 peptide was observed. The enhanced catalytic activity of CP4-Aβ assembly could be explained both by pre-organization of a catalytically competent Ser-His-acid triad and hydrophobic stabilization of a bound substrate between the triad and p-NPA, indicating that a design strategy for self-assembled peptides is important to accomplish the desired functionality. PMID:27116246

  4. New nanosized catalytic membrane reactors for hydrogenation with stored hydrogen: Prerequisites and the experimental basis for their creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldatov, A. P.; Tsodikov, M. V.; Parenago, O. P.; Teplyakov, V. V.

    2010-12-01

    The prerequisites and prospects for creating a new generation of nanosized membrane reactors are considered. For the first time, hydrogenation reactions take place in ceramic membrane pores with hydrogen adsorbed beforehand in mono- and multilayered oriented carbon nanotubes with graphene walls (OCNTGs) formed on the internal pore surface. It is shown for Trumem microfiltration membranes with D avg ˜130 nm that oxidation reactions of CO on a Cu0.03Ti0.97O2 ± δ catalyst and the oxidative conversion of methane into synthesis gas and light hydrocarbons on La + Ce/MgO are considerably enhanced when they occur in membranes. Regularities of hydrogen adsorption, storage, and desorption in nanosized membrane reactors are investigated through OCNTG formation in Trumem ultrafiltration membrane pores with D avg = 50 and 90 nm and their saturation with hydrogen at a pressure of 10-13 MPa. It is shown that the amount of adsorbed hydrogen reaches 14.0% of OCNTG mass. Using thermogravimetric analysis in combination with mass-spectrometric analysis, hydrogen adsorption in OCNTG is first determined and its desorption is found to proceed at atmospheric pressure at a temperature of ˜175°C. It is shown that adsorbed hydrogen affects the transport properties of the membranes, reducing their efficiency with respect to liquids by 4-26 times. This is indirect confirmation of its high activity, due apparently the dissociative mechanism of adsorption.

  5. Activating basal-plane catalytic activity of two-dimensional MoS2 monolayer with remote hydrogen plasma

    KAUST Repository

    Cheng, Chia-Chin

    2016-09-10

    Two-dimensional layered transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) materials such as Molybdenum disufide (MoS2) have been recognized as one of the low-cost and efficient electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The crystal edges that account for a small percentage of the surface area, rather than the basal planes, of MoS2 monolayer have been confirmed as their active catalytic sites. As a result, extensive efforts have been developing in activating the basal planes of MoS2 for enhancing their HER activity. Here, we report a simple and efficient approach-using a remote hydrogen-plasma process-to creating S-vacancies on the basal plane of monolayer crystalline MoS2; this process can generate high density of S-vacancies while mainly maintaining the morphology and structure of MoS2 monolayer. The density of S-vacancies (defects) on MoS2 monolayers resulted from the remote hydrogen-plasma process can be tuned and play a critical role in HER, as evidenced in the results of our spectroscopic and electrical measurements. The H2-plasma treated MoS2 also provides an excellent platform for systematic and fundamental study of defect-property relationships in TMDs, which provides insights for future applications including electrical, optical and magnetic devices. © 2016 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Determination of iron and aluminum based on the catalytic effect on the reaction of xylene cyanol FF with hydrogen peroxide and potassium periodate

    OpenAIRE

    Cai, Longfei; Xu, Chunxiu

    2011-01-01

    A simple, sensitive and selective method for the simultaneous determination of trace iron and aluminum by catalytic spectrophotometry is presented. This method is based on the catalytic effects of iron and aluminum on the reaction of xylene cyanol FF with hydrogen peroxide and potassium periodate. Both iron and aluminum did not show catalytic effects on the oxidation reaction of xylene cyanol FF in the presence of either hydrogen peroxide or potassium periodate. However, significant catalytic...

  7. Excellent catalytic effects of highly crumpled graphene nanosheets on hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of magnesium hydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guang; Wang, Yijing; Xu, Changchang; Qiu, Fangyuan; An, Cuihua; Li, Li; Jiao, Lifang; Yuan, Huatang

    2013-01-01

    Highly crumpled graphene nanosheets (GNS) with a BET surface area as high as 1159 m2 g-1 was fabricated by a thermal exfoliation method. A systematic investigation was performed on the hydrogen sorption properties of MgH2-5 wt% GNS nanocomposites acquired by ball-milling. It was found that the as-synthesized GNS exhibited a superior catalytic effect on hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of MgH2. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and isothermal hydrogenation/dehydrogenation measurements indicated that both hydrogen sorption capacity and dehydrogenation/hydrogenation kinetics of the composites improved with increasing milling time. The composites MgH2-GNS milled for 20 h can absorb 6.6 wt% H2 within 1 min at 300 °C and 6.3 wt% within 40 min at 200 °C, even at 150 °C, it can also absorb 6.0 wt% H2 within 180 min. It was also demonstrated that MgH2-GNS-20 h could release 6.1 wt% H2 at 300 °C within 40 min. In addition, microstructure measurements based on XRD, SEM, TEM as well as Raman spectra revealed that the grain size of thus-prepared MgH2-GNS nanocomposites decreased with increasing milling time, moreover, the graphene layers were broken into smaller graphene nanosheets in a disordered and irregular manner during milling. It was confirmed that these smaller graphene nanosheets on the composite surface, providing more edge sites and hydrogen diffusion channels, prevented the nanograins from sintering and agglomerating, thus, leading to promotion of the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation kinetics of MgH2.Highly crumpled graphene nanosheets (GNS) with a BET surface area as high as 1159 m2 g-1 was fabricated by a thermal exfoliation method. A systematic investigation was performed on the hydrogen sorption properties of MgH2-5 wt% GNS nanocomposites acquired by ball-milling. It was found that the as-synthesized GNS exhibited a superior catalytic effect on hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of MgH2. Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and isothermal hydrogenation

  8. Effect of hydrogen combustion reaction on the dehydrogenation of ethane in a fixed-bed catalytic membrane reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masoud Hasany; Mohammad Malakootikhah; Vahid Rahmanian; Soheila Yaghmaei

    2015-01-01

    A two-dimensional non-isothermal mathematical model has been developed for the ethane dehydrogenation reaction in a fixed-bed catalytic membrane reactor. Since ethane dehydrogenation is an equilibrium reaction, removal of produced hydrogen by the membrane shifts the thermodynamic equilibrium to ethylene production. For further displacement of the dehydrogenation reaction, oxidative dehydrogenation method has been used. Since ethane dehydrogenation is an endothermic reaction, the energy produced by the oxidative dehydrogena-tion method is consumed by the dehydrogenation reaction. The results show that the oxidative dehydrogenation method generated a substantial improvement in the reactor performance in terms of high conversions and significant energy saving. It was also established that the sweep gas velocity in the shell side of the reactor is one of the most important factors in the effectiveness of the reactor.

  9. A Highly Efficient Heterogenized Iridium Complex for the Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Dioxide to Formate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwangho; Gunasekar, Gunniya Hariyanandam; Prakash, Natarajan; Jung, Kwang-Deog; Yoon, Sungho

    2015-10-26

    A heterogenized catalyst on a highly porous covalent triazine framework was synthesized and characterized to have a coordination environment similar to that of its homogeneous counterpart. The catalyst efficiently converted CO2 into formate through hydrogenation with a turnover number of 5000 after 2 h and an initial turnover frequency of up to 5300 h(-1) ; both of these values are the highest reported to date for a heterogeneous catalyst, which makes it attractive toward industrial application. Furthermore, the synthesized catalyst was found to be stable in air and was recycled by simple filtration without significant loss of catalytic activity.

  10. An investigation of turbulent catalytically stabilized channel flow combustion of lean hydrogen - air mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantzaras, I.; Benz, P.; Schaeren, R.; Bombach, R. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The catalytically stabilised thermal combustion (CST) of lean hydrogen-air mixtures was investigated numerically in a turbulent channel flow configuration using a two-dimensional elliptic model with detailed heterogeneous and homogeneous chemical reactions. Comparison between turbulent and laminar cases having the same incoming mean properties shows that turbulence inhibits homogeneous ignition due to increased heat transport away from the near-wall layer. The peak root-mean-square temperature and species fluctuations are always located outside the extent of the homogeneous reaction zone indicating that thermochemical fluctuations have no significant influence on gaseous combustion. (author) 4 figs., 6 refs.

  11. Dynamic\tmodelling of catalytic three-phase reactors for hydrogenation and oxidation processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salmi T.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic modelling principles for typical catalytic three-phase reactors, batch autoclaves and fixed (trickle beds were described. The models consist of balance equations for the catalyst particles as well as for the bulk phases of gas and liquid. Rate equations, transport models and mass balances were coupled to generalized heterogeneous models which were solved with respect to time and space with algorithms suitable for stiff differential equations. The aspects of numerical solution strategies were discussed and the procedure was illustrated with three case studies: hydrogenation of aromatics, hydrogenation of aldehydes and oxidation of ferrosulphate. The case studies revealed the importance of mass transfer resistance inside the catalyst pallets as well as the dynamics of the different phases being present in the reactor. Reliable three-phase reactor simulation and scale-up should be based on dynamic heterogeneous models.

  12. Hydrogen Production From Crude Bio-oil and Biomass Char by Electrochemical Catalytic Reforming

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xing-long Li; Shen Ning; Li-xia Yuan; Quan-xin Li

    2011-01-01

    We reports an efficient approach for production of hydrogen from crude bio-oil and biomass char in the dual fixed-bed system by using the electrochemical catalytic reforming method.The maximal absolute hydrogen yield reached 110.9 g H2/kg dry biomass.The product gas was a mixed gas containing 72%H2,26%CO2,1.9%CO,and a trace amount of CH4.It was observed that adding biomass char (a by-product of pyrolysis of biomass) could remarkably increase the absolute H2 yield (about 20%-50%).The higher reforming temperature could enhance the steam reforming reaction of organic compounds in crude bio-oil and the reaction of CO and H2O.In addition,the CuZn-Al2O3 catalyst in the water-gas shift bed could also increase the absolute H2 yield via shifting CO to CO2.

  13. Hydrogen Production From Crude Bio-oil and Biomass Char by Electrochemical Catalytic Reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xing-long; Ning, Shen; Yuan, Li-xia; Li, Quan-xin

    2011-08-01

    We reports an efficient approach for production of hydrogen from crude bio-oil and biomass char in the dual fixed-bed system by using the electrochemical catalytic reforming method. The maximal absolute hydrogen yield reached 110.9 g H2/kg dry biomass. The product gas was a mixed gas containing 72%H2, 26%CO2, 1.9%CO, and a trace amount of CH4. It was observed that adding biomass char (a by-product of pyrolysis of biomass) could remarkably increase the absolute H2 yield (about 20%-50%). The higher reforming temperature could enhance the steam reforming reaction of organic compounds in crude bio-oil and the reaction of CO and H2O. In addition, the CuZn-Al2O3 catalyst in the water-gas shift bed could also increase the absolute H2 yield via shifting CO to CO2.

  14. Biomass-to-hydrogen via fast pyrolysis and catalytic steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chornet, E.; Wang, D.; Czernik, S. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1996-10-01

    Pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass and reforming the pyroligneous oils is being studied as a strategy for producing hydrogen. Novel technologies for the rapid pyrolysis of biomass have been developed in the past decade. They provide compact and efficient systems to transform biomass into vapors that are condensed to oils, with yields as high as 75-80 wt.% of the anhydrous biomass. This {open_quotes}bio-oil{close_quotes} is a mixture of aldehydes, alcohols, acids, oligomers from the constitutive carbohydrates and lignin, and some water derived from the dehydration reactions. Hydrogen can be produced by reforming the bio-oil or its fractions with steam. A process of this nature has the potential to be cost competitive with conventional means of producing hydrogen. The reforming facility can be designed to handle alternate feedstocks, such as natural gas and naphtha, if necessary. Thermodynamic modeling of the major constituents of the bio-oil has shown that reforming is possible within a wide range of temperatures and steam-to-carbon ratios. Existing catalytic data on the reforming of oxygenates have been studied to guide catalyst selection. Tests performed on a microreactor interfaced with a molecular beam mass spectrometer showed that, by proper selection of the process variables: temperature, steam-to-carbon ratio, gas hourly space velocity, and contact time, almost total conversion of carbon in the feed to CO and CO{sub 2} could be obtained. These tests also provided possible reaction mechanisms where thermal cracking competes with catalytic processes. Bench-scale, fixed bed reactor tests demonstrated high hydrogen yields from model compounds and carbohydrate-derived pyrolysis oil fractions. Reforming bio-oil or its fractions required proper dispersion of the liquid to avoid vapor-phase carbonization of the feed in the inlet to the reactor. A special spraying nozzle injector was designed and successfully tested with an aqueous fraction of bio-oil.

  15. Effects of acido-basic support properties on the catalytic hydrogenation of acetylene on gold nano-particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manda, Abdullah Ahmed

    Metallic gold nanoparticles supported on gamma-Al2O 3 and magnesia-alumina mixed oxide, with different magnesia content have been prepared by sol-gel method and characterized by different techniques (inductive coupled plasma-mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS), XRD, BET surface area analysis, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), CO2 and NH 3 temperature programmed desorption (TPD), H2 temperature programmed reduction (TPR) and FTIR of adsorbed CO2). Such systems were found to produce catalysts with controllable acidity, varying from catalyst possessing large density of acidic and low density of basic sites, others with acidic and basic sites of equal strength and density, and others with large basic and low acid sites densities, respectively. The catalytic assessment of the generated acidity was carried out using 2-propanol decomposition as a test reaction. The results obtained indicate that the presence of magnesia and reduced gold nanopartilces has imparted the catalysts, 1%Au/4%Mg-Al 2O3 and 1%Au/8%Mg-Al2O3, with significant base-catalytic properties. Acetylene hydrogenation and formation of coke deposits were investigated on a gold catalyst supported on gamma-Al2O3 and gold supported on alumina-magnisia mixed oxide with different gold content; 1%Au/gamma-Al 2O3, 1%Au/15%Mg-Al2O3, 2%Au/15%Mg-Al 2O3 and 4%Au/15%Mg-Al2O3. The effect of the H2/C2H2 ratio was studied over a range of values. The catalytic activity and selectivity towards ethylene and other products were investigated at different reaction temperatures. Acetylene hydrogenation was investigated in the presence and absence of ethylene in stream. It is investigated that the adsorption of the triple bond is preferred over the double bond and during selective catalytic (SCR) of C2H2 the two hydrocarbons do not compete for the same adsorption sites. The deactivation of catalysts was studied by temperature programmed oxidation (TPO). Higher content of coke over 1%Au/Al2O3 catalyst was investigated in contrast to

  16. Hydrogen production by catalytic processing of renewable methane-rich gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradov, Nazim; Smith, Franklyn; T-Raissi, Ali [Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida, Cocoa, FL 32922-5703 (United States)

    2008-04-15

    Biomass-derived methane-rich gases such as landfill gas (LFG), biogas and digester gas are promising renewable resources for near-future production of hydrogen. The technical and economical feasibility of hydrogen production via catalytic reforming of LFG and other methane-rich gases is evaluated in this paper. The thermodynamic equilibrium calculations and experimental measurements of reformation of methane-rich CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixtures over Ni-based catalyst were conducted. The problems associated with the catalyst deactivation due to carbon lay down and effects of steam and oxygen on the process sustainability were explored. Two technological approaches distinguished by the mode of heat input to the endothermic process (i.e., external vs autothermal) were modeled using AspenPlus trademark chemical process simulator and validated experimentally. A 5 kW{sub th} pilot unit for hydrogen production from LFG-mimicking CH{sub 4}-CO{sub 2} mixture was fabricated and operated. A preliminary techno-economic assessment indicates that the liquid hydrogen production costs are in the range of 3.00-7.00 per kilogram depending upon the plant capacity, the process heat input option and whether or not carbon sequestration is included in the process. (author)

  17. Production of natural antioxidants from vegetable oil deodorizer distillates: effect of catalytic hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, María Ayelén; Baltanás, Miguel A

    2010-02-01

    Natural tocopherols are one of the main types of antioxidants found in living creatures, but they also have other critical biological functions. The biopotency of natural (+)-alpha-tocopherol (RRR) is 36% higher than that of the synthetic racemic mixture and 300% higher than the SRR stereoisomer. Vegetable oil deodorizer distillates (DD) are an excellent source of natural tocopherols. Catalytic hydrogenation of DD preconcentrates has been suggested as a feasible route for recovery of tocopherols in high yield. However, it is important to know whether the hydrogenation operation, as applied to these tocopherol-rich mixtures, is capable of preserving the chiral (RRR) character, which is critical to its biopotency. Fortified (i.e., (+)-alpha-tocopherol enriched) sunflower oil and methyl stearate, as well as sunflower oil DD, were fully hydrogenated using commercial Ni and Pd catalysts (120-180 degrees C; 20-60 psig). Products were analyzed by chiral HPLC. Results show that the desired chiral configuration (RRR) is fully retained. Thus, the hydrogenation route can be safely considered as a valid alternative for increasing the efficiency of tocopherol recovery processes from DDs while preserving their natural characteristics.

  18. Biomass Catalytic Pyrolysis with Ni Based Catalyst to Produce Hydrogen Rich Gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Mingfeng; LIU Min; XU Xiwei; LI Bosong; ZHANG Qiang; JIAN Enchen

    2010-01-01

    Hydrogen rich gas was produced using rice husk as biomass material on the continuous biomass pyrolysis apparatus which consisted of continuous pyrolysis reactor and secondary catalytic cracking reactor. Ni based catalysts of different Ni/Al mass ratio and calcined temperature were prepared by impregnating method. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD),scan electron microscope (SEM) and FT-IR Spectrometer (FT-IR). Ni based catalyst showed good selectivity for H2 production from biomass. Catalysts prepared under different conditions had little influence on the yields of three states products when used at the same cracking temperature. Ni/Al mass ratio played an important role in products selectivity. However, the content of NiO increased further when Ni/Al mass ratio values reached 0.7 : 10, and the yield of H2 slightly increased. Hydrogen yield was greatly impacted by calcined temperature. Catalyst calcined at 550"C performed best. When the catalyst was calcined at high temperature, NiO in the catalyst transformed into NiAl2O4, and the acid site also changed, which caused the deactivation of the catalyst. The hydrogen yield increased with the cracking temperature. The highest stable yield of hydrogen was about 30% without increasing with the cracking temperature.

  19. Thermochemical hydrogen generation of indium oxide thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Taekyung; Ju, Sanghyun

    2017-03-01

    Development of alternative energy resources is an urgent requirement to alleviate current energy constraints. As such, hydrogen gas is gaining attention as a future alternative energy source to address existing issues related to limited energy resources and air pollution. In this study, hydrogen generation by a thermochemical water-splitting process using two types of In2O3 thin films was investigated. The two In2O3 thin films prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and sputtering deposition systems contained different numbers of oxygen vacancies, which were directly related to hydrogen generation. The as-grown In2O3 thin film prepared by CVD generated a large amount of hydrogen because of its abundant oxygen vacancies, while that prepared by sputtering had few oxygen vacancies, resulting in low hydrogen generation. Increasing the temperature of the In2O3 thin film in the reaction chamber caused an increase in hydrogen generation. The oxygen-vacancy-rich In2O3 thin film is expected to provide a highly effective production of hydrogen as a sustainable and efficient energy source.

  20. Efficient Electrochemical Hydrogen Peroxide Generation in Water Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An electrochemical cell is proposed for the efficient generation of 3% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in pure water using only power, oxygen and water. H2O2 is an...

  1. A resource recycling technique of hydrogen production from the catalytic degradation of organics in wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI XiaoNian; ZHANG QunFeng; KONG LingNiao; XIANG YiZhi; JU YaoMing; WU XiaoQiong; FENG Feng; YUAN JunFeng; MA Lei; LU ChunShan

    2008-01-01

    A resource recycling technique of hydrogen production from the catalytic degradation of organics in wastewater by aqueous phase reforming (APR) has been proposed. It is worthy of noting that this technique may be a potential way for the purification of refractory and highly toxic organics in water for hydrogen production. Hazardous organics (such as phenol, aniline, nitrobenzene, tetrahydrofuran (THF), toluene, N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and cyclohexanol) in water could be completely de-graded into H2 and CO2 with high selectivity over Raney Ni, and Sn-modified Raney Ni (Sn-Raney-Ni) or Pd/C catalyst under mild conditions. The experimental results operated in tubular and autoclave reactors, indicated that the degradation degree of organics and H2 selectivity could reach 100% under the optimal reaction conditions. The Sn-Raney-Ni (Sn/Ni=0.06) and Pd/C catalysts show better catalytic performances than the Raney Ni catalyst for the degradation of organics in water into H2 and CO2 by the aqueous phase reforming process.

  2. Cold weather hydrogen generation system and method of operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreier, Ken Wayne; Kowalski, Michael Thomas; Porter, Stephen Charles; Chow, Oscar Ken; Borland, Nicholas Paul; Goyette, Stephen Arthur

    2010-12-14

    A system for providing hydrogen gas is provided. The system includes a hydrogen generator that produces gas from water. One or more heat generation devices are arranged to provide heating of the enclosure during different modes of operation to prevent freezing of components. A plurality of temperature sensors are arranged and coupled to a controller to selectively activate a heat source if the temperature of the component is less than a predetermined temperature.

  3. Co-production of hydrogen and carbon nanotubes on nickel foam via methane catalytic decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ping, Dan; Wang, Chaoxian; Dong, Xinfa; Dong, Yingchao

    2016-04-01

    The co-production of COx-free hydrogen and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was achieved on 3-dimensional (3D) macroporous nickel foam (NF) via methane catalytic decomposition (MCD) over nano-Ni catalysts using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique. By a simple coating of a NiO-Al2O3 binary mixture sol followed by a drying-calcination-reduction treatment, NF supported composite catalysts (denoted as NiyAlOx/NF) with Al2O3 transition-layer incorporated with well-dispersed nano-Ni catalysts were successfully prepared. The effects of Ni loading, calcination temperature and reaction temperature on the performance for simultaneous production of COx-free hydrogen and CNTs were investigated in detail. Catalysts before and after MCD were characterized by XRD, TPR, SEM, TEM, TG and Raman spectroscopy technology. Results show that increasing Ni loading, lowering calcination temperature and optimizing MCD reaction temperature resulted in high production efficiency of COx-free H2 and carbon, but broader diameter distribution of CNTs. Through detailed parameter optimization, the catalyst with a Ni/Al molar ratio of 0.1, calcination temperature of 550 °C and MCD temperature of 650 °C was favorable to simultaneously produce COx-free hydrogen with a growth rate as high as 10.3% and CNTs with uniform size on NF.

  4. Wax: A benign hydrogen-storage material that rapidly releases H2-rich gases through microwave-assisted catalytic decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Cortes, S.; Slocombe, D. R.; Xiao, T.; Aldawsari, A.; Yao, B.; Kuznetsov, V. L.; Liberti, E.; Kirkland, A. I.; Alkinani, M. S.; Al-Megren, H. A.; Thomas, J. M.; Edwards, P. P.

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen is often described as the fuel of the future, especially for application in hydrogen powered fuel-cell vehicles (HFCV’s). However, its widespread implementation in this role has been thwarted by the lack of a lightweight, safe, on-board hydrogen storage material. Here we show that benign, readily-available hydrocarbon wax is capable of rapidly releasing large amounts of hydrogen through microwave-assisted catalytic decomposition. This discovery offers a new material and system for safe and efficient hydrogen storage and could facilitate its application in a HFCV. Importantly, hydrogen storage materials made of wax can be manufactured through completely sustainable processes utilizing biomass or other renewable feedstocks. PMID:27759014

  5. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations for the role of hydrogen in catalytic reactions of furfural on Pd(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wenhua; Dang, Hongli; Liu, Yingdi; Jentoft, Friederike; Resasco, Daniel; Wang, Sanwu

    2014-03-01

    In the study of catalytic reactions of biomass, furfural conversion over metal catalysts with the presence of hydrogen has attracted wide attention. We report ab initio molecular dynamics simulations for furfural and hydrogen on the Pd(111) surface at finite temperatures. The simulations demonstrate that the presence of hydrogen is important in promoting furfural conversion. In particular, hydrogen molecules dissociate rapidly on the Pd(111) surface. As a result of such dissociation, atomic hydrogen participates in the reactions with furfural. The simulations also provide detailed information about the possible reactions of hydrogen with furfural. Supported by DOE (DE-SC0004600). This research used the supercomputer resources of the XSEDE, the NERSC Center, and the Tandy Supercomputing Center.

  6. Effect of Catalytic Cylinders on Autothermal Reforming of Methane for Hydrogen Production in a Microchamber Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfei Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new multicylinder microchamber reactor is designed on autothermal reforming of methane for hydrogen production, and its performance and thermal behavior, that is, based on the reaction mechanism, is numerically investigated by varying the cylinder radius, cylinder spacing, and cylinder layout. The results show that larger cylinder radius can promote reforming reaction; the mass fraction of methane decreased from 26% to 21% with cylinder radius from 0.25 mm to 0.75 mm; compact cylinder spacing corresponds to more catalytic surface and the time to steady state is decreased from 40 s to 20 s; alteration of staggered and aligned cylinder layout at constant inlet flow rates does not result in significant difference in reactor performance and it can be neglected. The results provide an indication and optimize performance of reactor; it achieves higher conversion compared with other reforming reactors.

  7. Effect of catalytic cylinders on autothermal reforming of methane for hydrogen production in a microchamber reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yunfei; Guo, Hongliang; Zhang, Li; Zhu, Junchen; Yang, Zhongqing; Tang, Qiang; Ji, Xin

    2014-01-01

    A new multicylinder microchamber reactor is designed on autothermal reforming of methane for hydrogen production, and its performance and thermal behavior, that is, based on the reaction mechanism, is numerically investigated by varying the cylinder radius, cylinder spacing, and cylinder layout. The results show that larger cylinder radius can promote reforming reaction; the mass fraction of methane decreased from 26% to 21% with cylinder radius from 0.25 mm to 0.75 mm; compact cylinder spacing corresponds to more catalytic surface and the time to steady state is decreased from 40 s to 20 s; alteration of staggered and aligned cylinder layout at constant inlet flow rates does not result in significant difference in reactor performance and it can be neglected. The results provide an indication and optimize performance of reactor; it achieves higher conversion compared with other reforming reactors.

  8. Methane catalytic decomposition over ordered mesoporous carbons: A promising route for hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botas, J.A.; Serrano, D.P. [Department of Chemical and Environmental Technology, ESCET, Rey Juan Carlos University, c/ Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); IMDEA Energia, c/Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain); Guil-Lopez, R.; Pizarro, P.; Gomez, G. [Department of Chemical and Environmental Technology, ESCET, Rey Juan Carlos University, c/ Tulipan s/n, 28933 Mostoles, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-09-15

    Methane decomposition offers an interesting route for the CO{sub 2}-free hydrogen production. The use of carbon catalysts, in addition to lowering the reaction temperature, presents a number of advantages, such as low cost, possibility of operating under autocatalytic conditions and feasibility of using the produced carbons in non-energy applications. In this work, a novel class of carbonaceous materials, having an ordered mesoporous structure (CMK-3 and CMK-5), has been checked as catalysts for methane decomposition, the results obtained being compared to those corresponding to a carbon black sample (CB-bp) and two activated carbons, presenting micro- (AC-mic) and mesoporosity (AC-mes), respectively. Ordered mesoporous carbons, and especially CMK-5, possess a remarkable activity and stability for the hydrogen production through that reaction. Under both temperature programmed and isothermal experiments, CMK-5 has shown to be a superior catalyst for methane decomposition than the AC-mic and CB-bp materials. Likewise, the catalytic activity of CMK-5 is superior to that of AC-mes in spite of the presence of mesoporosity and a high surface area in the latter. The remarkable stability of the CMK-5 catalyst is demonstrated by the high amount of carbon deposits that can be formed on this sample. This result has been assigned to the growth of the carbon deposits from methane decomposition towards the outer part of the catalyst particles, avoiding the blockage of the uniform mesopores present in CMK-5. Thus, up to 25 g of carbon deposits have been formed per gram of CMK-5, while the latter still retains a significant catalytic activity. (author)

  9. Hydrogen generation via anaerobic fermentation of paper mill wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez-Vazquez, Idania; Sparling, Richard; Risbey, Derek; Rinderknecht-Seijas, Noemi; Poggi-Varaldo, Héctor M

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the hydrogen production from paper mill wastes using microbial consortia of solid substrate anaerobic digesters. Inocula from mesophilic, continuous solid substrate anaerobic digestion (SSAD) reactors were transferred to small lab scale, batch reactors. Milled paper (used as a surrogate paper waste) was added as substrate and acetylene or 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) was spiked for methanogenesis inhibition. In the first phase of experiments it was found that acetylene at 1% v/v in the headspace was as effective as BES in inhibiting methanogenic activity. Hydrogen gas accumulated in the headspace of the bottles, reaching a plateau. Similar final hydrogen concentrations were obtained for reactors spiked with acetylene and BES. In the second phase of tests the headspace of the batch reactors was flushed with nitrogen gas after the first plateau of hydrogen was reached, and subsequently incubated, with no further addition of inhibitor nor substrate. It was found that hydrogen production resumed and reached a second plateau, although somewhat lower than the first one. This procedure was repeated a third time and an additional amount of hydrogen was obtained. The plateaux and initial rates of hydrogen accumulation decreased in each subsequent incubation cycle. The total cumulative hydrogen harvested in the three cycles was much higher (approx. double) than in the first cycle alone. We coined this procedure as IV-SSAH (intermittently vented solid substrate anaerobic hydrogen generation). Our results point out to a feasible strategy for obtaining higher hydrogen yields from the fermentation of industrial solid wastes, and a possible combination of waste treatment processes consisting of a first stage IV-SSAH followed by a second SSAD stage. Useful products of this approach would be hydrogen, organic acids or methane, and anaerobic digestates that could be used as soil amenders after post-treatment.

  10. Hydrogen generation via anaerobic fermentation of paper mill wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valdez Vazquez, I.; Poggi Varaldo, H.M. [CINVESTAV-IPN, Mexico D.F. (Mexico). Dept. of Biotechnology and Bioengineering; Sparling, R.; Risbey, D. [Manitoba Univ., Winnipeg (Canada). Dept. of Microbiology; Rinderknecht Seijas, N. [ESIQUIE-IPN, Mexico D.F. (Mexico). Division Base Sciences

    2005-11-15

    The objective of this work was to determine the hydrogen production from paper mill wastes using microbial consortia of solid substrate anaerobic digesters. Inocula from mesophilic, continuous solid substrate anaerobic digestion (SSAD) reactors were transferred to small lab scale, batch reactors. Milled paper (used as a surrogate paper waste) was added as substrate and acetylene or 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) was spiked for methanogenesis inhibition. In the first phase of experiments it was found that acetylene at 1% v/v in the headspace was as effective as BES in inhibiting methanogenic activity. Hydrogen gas accumulated in the headspace of the bottles, reaching a plateau. Similar final hydrogen concentrations were obtained for reactors spiked with acetylene and BES. In the second phase of tests the headspace of the batch reactors was flushed with nitrogen gas after the first plateau of hydrogen was reached, and subsequently incubated, with no further addition of inhibitor nor substrate. It was found that hydrogen production resumed and reached a second plateau, although somewhat lower than the first one. This procedure was repeated a third time and an additional amount of hydrogen was obtained. The plateaux and initial rates of hydrogen accumulation decreased in each subsequent incubation cycle. The total cumulative hydrogen harvested in the three cycles was much higher (approx. double) than in the first cycle alone. We coined this procedure as IV-SSAH (intermittently vented solid substrate anaerobic hydrogen generation). Our results point out to a feasible strategy for obtaining higher hydrogen yields from the fermentation of industrial solid wastes, and a possible combination of waste treatment processes consisting of a first stage IV-SSAH followed by a second SSAD stage. Useful products of this approach would be hydrogen, organic acids or methane, and anaerobic digestates that could be used as soil amenders after post-treatment. (author)

  11. Highly active metastable ruthenium nanoparticles for hydrogen production through the catalytic hydrolysis of ammonia borane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo-Hamed, Enass K; Pennycook, Timothy; Vaynzof, Yana; Toprakcioglu, Chris; Koutsioubas, Alexandros; Scherman, Oren A

    2014-08-13

    Late transition metal nanoparticles (NPs) with a favorably high surface area to volume ratio have garnered much interest for catalytic applications. Yet, these NPs are prone to aggregation in solution, which has been mitigated through attachment of surface ligands, additives or supports; unfortunately, protective ligands can severely reduce the effective surface area on the NPs available for catalyzing chemical transformations. The preparation of 'metastable' NPs can readily address these challenges. We report herein the first synthesis of monodisperse metastable ruthenium nanoparticles (RuNPs), having sub 5 nm size and an fcc structure, in aqueous media at room temperature, which can be stored for a period of at least 8 months. The RuNPs can subsequently be used for the catalytic, quantitative hydrolysis of ammonia-borane (AB) yielding hydrogen gas with 21.8 turnovers per min at 25 °C. The high surface area available for hydrolysis of AB on the metastable RuNPs translated to an Ea of 27.5 kJ mol(-1) , which is notably lower than previously reported values for RuNP based catalysts.

  12. High performing and stable supported nano-alloys for the catalytic hydrogenation of levulinic acid to gamma-valerolactone

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, Wenhao; Meenakshisundaram, Sankar; Beale, Andrew M.; He, Qian; Kiely, Christopher J.; Bruijnincx, Pieter C. A.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic hydrogenation of levulinic acid, a key platform molecule in many biorefinery schemes, into gamma-valerolactone is considered as one of the pivotal reactions to convert lignocellulose-based biomass into renewable fuels and chemicals. Here we report on the development of highly active, s

  13. Catalytic Hydrogenation ofα,β-Epoxyketones to β-Hydroxy-ketones with Two Sulfinyl Analogues of Coenzyme NADH Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE,Kun; GUI,Yi; LIU,You-Cheng; FU,Yao

    2007-01-01

    An efficient method for the selective hydrogenation of a series of α,β-epoxyketones to β-hydroxyketones using catalytic amount of two sulfinyl analogues of NAD+ model compounds is reported. The lack of any diastereoselectivily for the formation of β-hydroxyketones with optically pure sulfinyl analogue of NAD+ model supports the radical mechanism proposed previously.

  14. β-Molybdenum nitride: synthesis mechanism and catalytic response in the gas phase hydrogenation of p-chloronitrobenzene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cárdenas-Lizana, F.; Gómez-Quero, S.; Perret, N.; Kiwi-Minsker, L.; Keane, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    A temperature programmed treatment of MoO3 in flowing N2 + H2 has been employed to prepare β-phase molybdenum nitride (β-Mo2N) which has been used to promote, for the first time, the catalytic hydrogenation of p-chloronitrobenzene. The reduction/nitridation synthesis steps have been monitored in sit

  15. Catalytic hydrogenation of cyclic carbonates: a practical approach from CO2 and epoxides to methanol and diols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zhaobin; Rong, Liangce; Wu, Jiang; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Zheng; Ding, Kuiling

    2012-12-21

    Two birds with one stone: the simultaneous production of two important bulk chemicals, methanol and ethylene glycol, from CO(2) and ethylene oxide has been achieved under mild conditions by the highly efficient homogeneous catalytic hydrogenation of ethylene carbonate in the presence of a (PNP)Ru(II) catalyst.

  16. The role of sulfur trapped in micropores in the catalytic partial oxidation of hydrogen sulfide with oxygen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steijns, M.; Mars, P.

    1974-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide into sulfur with molecular oxygen has been studied in the temperature range 130–200 °C. Active carbon, molecular sieve 13X and liquid sulfur were used as catalysts. Sulfur is adsorbed in the micropores (3 < r < 40 Å) of the catalysts. Experiments with a su

  17. Hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride solution using a ruthenium supported on graphite catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Yan; Dai, Hong-Bin; Ma, Lai-Peng; Wang, Ping; Cheng, Hui-Ming [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2010-04-15

    The catalyst with high activity and durability plays a crucial role in the hydrogen generation systems for the portable fuel cell generators. In the present study, a ruthenium supported on graphite catalyst (Ru/G) for hydrogen generation from sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) solution is prepared by a modified impregnation method. This is done by surface pretreatment with NH{sub 2} functionalization via silanization, followed by adsorption of Ru (III) ion onto the surface, and then reduced by a reducing agent. The obtained catalyst is characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Very uniform Ru nanoparticles with sizes of about 10 nm are chemically bonded on the graphite surface. The hydrolysis kinetics measurements show that the concentrations of NaBH{sub 4} and NaOH all exert considerable influence on the catalytic activity of Ru/G catalyst towards the hydrolysis reaction of NaBH{sub 4}. A hydrogen generation rate of 32.3 L min{sup -1} g{sup -1} (Ru) in a 10 wt.% NaBH{sub 4} + 5 wt.% NaOH solution has been achieved, which is comparable to other noble catalysts that have been reported. (author)

  18. SYNTHESIS OF POLYMER-STABILIZED PLATINUM/RUTHENIUM BIMETALLIC COLLOIDS AND THEIR CATALYTIC PROPERTIES FOR SELECTIVE HYDROGENATION OF CROTONALDEHYDE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-xia Tu; Han-fan Liu

    2005-01-01

    Polymer-stabilized platinum/ruthenium bimetallic colloids (Pt/Ru) were synthesized by polyol reduction with microwave irradiation and characterized by TEM and XPS. The colloidal nanoparticles have small and narrow size distributions. Catalytic performance of the Pt/Ru colloidal catalysts was investigated on the selective hydrogenation of crontonaldehyde (CRAL). A suitable amount of the added metal ions and base can improve the selectivity of CRAL to crotylalcohol (CROL) remarkably. The catalytic activity and the selectivity are dependent on the compositions of bimetallic colloids. Thereinto, PVP-stabilized 9Pt/1Ru colloid with a molar ratio of metals Pt:Ru = 9:1 shows the highest catalytic selectivity 77.3% to CROL at 333 K under 4.0 MPa of hydrogen.

  19. Acetaldehyde behavior over platinum based catalyst in hydrogen stream generated by ethanol reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Lima, Adriana F.F. [Laboratorio de Catalise, Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia, Av. Venezuela 82/507, 20081-310 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Instituto de Quimica e INOG (Instituto Nacional de Oleo Gas), UERJ-CNPq, FAPERJ, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Sao Francisco Xavier, 524, 20550-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Colman, Rita C. [Departamento de Engenharia Quimica e de Petroleo, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Av. Passos da Patria, 156/bl E/240, 24210-240 Niteroi, RJ (Brazil); Zotin, Fatima M.Z. [Instituto de Quimica e INOG (Instituto Nacional de Oleo Gas), UERJ-CNPq, FAPERJ, Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Sao Francisco Xavier, 524, 20550-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); CETEM-MCT, Av. Pedro Calmon, 900, Cidade Universitaria, 21941-908 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Appel, Lucia G. [Laboratorio de Catalise, Instituto Nacional de Tecnologia, Av. Venezuela 82/507, 20081-310 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2010-12-15

    Due to the greenhouse effect, hydrogen production from bioethanol reforming is a very important subject in heterogeneous catalysis research. Pt based catalysts are employed in H{sub 2} purification processes and also as electrocatalysts of PEM (''Proton Exchange Membrane'') fuel cells. Hydrogen obtained from ethanol reforming may contain, as contaminants, acetaldehyde and small amounts of CO. This aldehyde can be decarbonylated on Pt based catalysts generating carbon monoxide and methane, rendering the hydrogen purification more challenging. Moreover, acetaldehyde might also change the electrocatalyst behavior. Therefore, this contribution aims at studying the acetaldehyde behavior in the presence of platinum based catalysts in hydrogen atmosphere. The Pt/SiO{sub 2}, Pt/USY catalysts and an electrocatalyst were characterized by n-butylamine, H{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} adsorption, ATG/DTG measurements and cyclohexane dehydrogenation reaction. It was observed that the acid-basic properties of the supports promote condensation reactions. When in contact with Pt based catalysts, acetaldehyde undergoes C-C and C=O bond scissions. The former occurs at a wide range of temperatures, whereas the latter only at low temperatures (<200 C). The C-C bond scission (decarbonylation) produces methane and CO. The C=O bond scission generates carbon residues on the catalyst as well as oxygen species, which in turn is able to eliminate CO from the catalytic surface. The data also show that decarbonylation is not a structure-sensitive reaction. (author)

  20. Hydrogen generation from methanolysis of sodium borohydride over Co/Al2O3 catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongyan Xu; Lin Zhao; Ping Dai; Shengfu Ji

    2012-01-01

    Co/Al2O3 catalyst is prepared with an impregnation-chemical reduction method and used to catalyze the methanolysis of sodium borohydride (NaBH4) for hydrogen generation.At solution temperature of 0℃,the methanolysis reaction can be effectively accelerated using Co/Al2O3 catalyst and provide a desirable hydrogen generation rate,which makes it suitable for apphcations under the circumstance of low environmental temperature.The byproduct of methanolysis reaction is analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR).The characterization results indicate that methanol can be easily recovered after methanolysis reaction by hydrolysis of the methanolysis byproduct,NaB(OCH3)4.The catalytic activity of Co/Al2O3 towards NaBH4 methanolysis can be further improved by appropriate calcination treatment.The catalytic methanolysis kinetics and catalyst reusability are also studied over the Co/Al2O3 catalyst calcined at the optimized temperature.

  1. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Co-Ru Alloy Particle Catalysts for Hydrogen Generation from Sodium Borohydride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Kurtinaitienė

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the synthesis of μm and sub-μm-sized Co, Ru, and Co-Ru alloy species by hydrothermal approach in the aqueous alkaline solutions (pH ≥ 13 containing CoCl2 and/or RuCl3, sodium citrate, and hydrazine hydrate and a study of their catalytic properties for hydrogen generation by hydrolysis of sodium borohydride solution. This way provides a simple platform for fabrication of the ball-shaped Co-Ru alloy catalysts containing up to 12 wt% Ru. Note that bimetallic Co-Ru alloy bowls containing even 7 at.% Ru have demonstrated catalytic properties that are comparable with the ones of pure Ru particles fabricated by the same method. This result is of great importance in view of the preparation of cost-efficient catalysts for hydrogen generation from borohydrides. The morphology and composition of fabricated catalyst particles have been characterized using scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray diffraction, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry.

  2. Application of microscopy technology in thermo-catalytic methane decomposition to hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Irene Lock Sow, E-mail: irene.sowmei@gmail.com; Lock, S. S. M., E-mail: serenelock168@gmail.com; Abdullah, Bawadi, E-mail: bawadi-abdullah@petronas.com.my [Chemical Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Sri Iskandar, 31750, Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    Hydrogen production from the direct thermo-catalytic decomposition of methane is a promising alternative for clean fuel production because it produces pure hydrogen without any CO{sub x} emissions. However, thermal decomposition of methane can hardly be of any practical and empirical interest in the industry unless highly efficient and effective catalysts, in terms of both specific activity and operational lifetime have been developed. In this work, bimetallic Ni-Pd on gamma alumina support have been developed for methane cracking process by using co-precipitation and incipient wetness impregnation method. The calcined catalysts were characterized to determine their morphologies and physico-chemical properties by using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Thermogravimetric Analysis. The results suggested that that the catalyst which is prepared by the co-precipitation method exhibits homogeneous morphology, higher surface area, have uniform nickel and palladium dispersion and higher thermal stability as compared to the catalyst which is prepared by wet impregnation method. This characteristics are significant to avoid deactivation of the catalysts due to sintering and carbon deposition during methane cracking process.

  3. Characterization of Ni and W co-loaded SBA-15 catalyst and its hydrogen production catalytic ability on ethanol steam reforming reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongjin; Kwak, Byeong Sub; Min, Bong-Ki; Kang, Misook

    2015-03-01

    This study evaluated the application of advanced bimetallic catalytic species of Ni and W to effectively produce hydrogen gases from ethanol steam reforming. The highest reactivity was achieved using the Ni0.95W0.05/SBA-15 catalyst. The maximum H2 production and ethanol conversion of 90% and 85%, respectively, were obtained for 0.4 g catalyst at 600 °C after 10 h with a EtOH:H2O ratio of 1:3 and a gas hourly space velocity of 6000 h-1. This highlights a synergy between the Ni and W loading on SBA-15 during ethanol steam reforming that occurs through the inhibition of Ni particle agglomeration and consequent decrease in catalytic deactivation. Additionally, the supplied W ingredients promoted CO2 selectivity, which was generated from the CO-water gas shift reaction.

  4. Molecular cobalt pentapyridine catalysts for generating hydrogen from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jeffrey R; Chang, Christopher J; Sun, Yujie

    2013-11-05

    A composition of matter suitable for the generation of hydrogen from water is described, the positively charged cation of the composition including the moiety of the general formula. [(PY5Me.sub.2)CoL].sup.2+, where L can be H.sub.2O, OH.sup.-, a halide, alcohol, ether, amine, and the like. In embodiments of the invention, water, such as tap water or sea water can be subject to low electric potentials, with the result being, among other things, the generation of hydrogen.

  5. Pretreated Landfill Gas Conversion Process via a Catalytic Membrane Reactor for Renewable Combined Fuel Cell-Power Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoe Ziaka

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A new landfill gas-based reforming catalytic processing system for the conversion of gaseous hydrocarbons, such as incoming methane to hydrogen and carbon oxide mixtures, is described and analyzed. The exit synthesis gas (syn-gas is fed to power effectively high-temperature fuel cells such as SOFC types for combined efficient electricity generation. The current research work is also referred on the description and design aspects of permreactors (permeable reformers carrying the same type of landfill gas-reforming reactions. Membrane reactors is a new technology that can be applied efficiently in such systems. Membrane reactors seem to perform better than the nonmembrane traditional reactors. The aim of this research includes turnkey system and process development for the landfill-based power generation and fuel cell industries. Also, a discussion of the efficient utilization of landfill and waste type resources for combined green-type/renewable power generation with increased processing capacity and efficiency via fuel cell systems is taking place. Moreover, pollution reduction is an additional design consideration in the current catalytic processors fuel cell cycles.

  6. Development of a low cost, portable solar hydrogen generation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Kyle; Aggarwal, M. D.; Batra, Ashok; Wingo, Dennis

    2014-10-01

    Hydrogen is a clean energy source that is environmentally friendly and safe. It is well known that electrolysis is a common method used to produce hydrogen. Other high cost methods for hydrogen production can be countered by the development of this low cost pulse width modulated circuit, using direct current provided by naturally existing solar energy as a power source. Efforts are being made in the scientific community to produce a low cost, portable, solar hydrogen generating device for a number of clean energy applications such as fuel cells and energy storage. Proof of concept has already been tested in the laboratory and a small prototype system is being designed and fabricated in the workshop at Alabama A&M University. Our results of this study and details of the electronic circuit and the prototype are presented.

  7. Supercontinuum generation in hydrogenated amorphous silicon waveguides at telecommunication wavelengths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safioui, Jassem; Leo, François; Kuyken, Bart; Gorza, Simon-Pierre; Selvaraja, Shankar Kumar; Baets, Roel; Emplit, Philippe; Roelkens, Gunther; Massar, Serge

    2014-02-10

    We report supercontinuum (SC) generation centered on the telecommunication C-band (1550 nm) in CMOS compatible hydrogenated amorphous silicon waveguides. A broadening of more than 550 nm is obtained in 1cm long waveguides of different widths using as pump picosecond pulses with on chip peak power as low as 4 W.

  8. Hydrogenation-controlled phase transition on two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides and their unique physical and catalytic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Yuanju; Pan, Hui; Kwok, Chi Tat

    2016-09-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) have been widely used from nanodevices to energy harvesting/storage because of their tunable physical and chemical properties. In this work, we systematically investigate the effects of hydrogenation on the structural, electronic, magnetic, and catalytic properties of 33 TMDs based on first-principles calculations. We find that the stable phases of TMD monolayers can transit from 1T to 2H phase or vice versa upon the hydrogenation. We show that the hydrogenation can switch their magnetic and electronic states accompanying with the phase transition. The hydrogenation can tune the magnetic states of TMDs among non-, ferro, para-, and antiferro-magnetism and their electronic states among semiconductor, metal, and half-metal. We further show that, out of 33 TMD monolayers, 2H-TiS2 has impressive catalytic ability comparable to Pt in hydrogen evolution reaction in a wide range of hydrogen coverages. Our findings would shed the light on the multi-functional applications of TMDs.

  9. Efficiency of nuclear energy generation by hydrogen burning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitalas, R.

    1989-03-01

    An explicit formula for the efficiency of the PP chain energy generation in terms of the branching fractions to the three PP chains is derived and the variation of the efficiency with temperature and hydrogen abundance is illustrated. The PP chain efficiency is shown to have a minimum as a function of Y/X. The combined efficiency of simultaneous nuclear energy generation by the PP chain and the equilibrium CN cycle is then presented. 6 refs.

  10. Hydrogen generation from decomposition of hydrous hydrazine over Ni-Ir/CeO2 catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongbin Dai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of highly active and selective catalysts is the central issue in the development of hydrous hydrazine (N2H4·H2O as a viable hydrogen carrier. Herein, we report the synthesis of bimetallic Ni-Ir nanocatalyts supported on CeO2 using a one-pot coprecipitation method. A combination of XRD, HRTEM and XPS analyses indicate that the Ni-Ir/CeO2 catalyst is composed of tiny Ni-Ir alloy nanoparticles with an average size of around 4 nm and crystalline CeO2 matrix. The Ni-Ir/CeO2 catalyst exhibits high catalytic activity and excellent selectivity towards hydrogen generation from N2H4·H2O at mild temperatures. Furthermore, in contrast to previously reported Ni-Pt catalysts, the Ni-Ir/CeO2 catalyst shows an alleviated requirement on alkali promoter to achieve its optimal catalytic performance.

  11. A planar microfabricated electrolyzer for hydrogen and oxygen generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, L.; Myer, B.; Tellefsen, K.; Pau, S.

    We present the design, fabrication and testing of a microfabricated planar reactor for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) using thin film Pt electrodes and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fluidic chamber. The reactor is designed to separate gases by flow dynamics and reactor flow is analyzed by three-dimensional finite element analysis. The planar geometry is scalable, compact and stackable. Using KOH 28 wt% electrolyte, we have achieved a hydrogen generation density of 0.23 kg h -1 m -3 and an efficiency of 48% with a flow rate of 10 ml min -1 and cell voltage of 3 V.

  12. Graphene Porous Foam Loaded with Molybdenum Carbide Nanoparticulate Electrocatalyst for Effective Hydrogen Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Xia, Han; Peng, Zhen; Lv, Cuncai; Jin, Lihuang; Zhao, Yaoxing; Huang, Zhipeng; Zhang, Chi

    2016-04-21

    A facile method is developed for the synthesis of graphene porous foam (Gr PF) loaded with dispersed molybdenum carbide (Mo2 C) nanoparticles; the material exhibits effective catalytic activity in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Mo2 C/Gr PF is synthesized by the carbonization of glucose and the carbothermal reduction of hexaammonium molybdate in a confined space defined by the intervals between sodium chloride nanoparticles. The synthesis in the confined space results in thin Gr PF (≈8 nm) loaded with aggregation-free small Mo2 C nanoparticles [(13±2) nm]. The overpotential required for a current density of 20 mA cm(-2) in the electrochemical hydrogen generation is as small as 199 mV in acidic solution and 380 mV in basic solution. The performance is superior to that of a Mo2 C/C composite and compares favorably to those reported for Mo2 C nanostructures. The Mo2 C/Gr PF affords stable water electrolysis in both acidic and basic solution and exhibits nearly 100 % faradaic efficiency. The prominent performance, long-term stability, and high faradic efficiency make Mo2 C/Gr PF a promising HER catalyst for practical hydrogen generation from water electrolysis.

  13. Catalytic stepwise nitrate hydrogenation in batch-recycle fixed-bed reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pintar, Albin; Batista, Jurka

    2007-10-22

    Pd (1.0 wt.%)-Cu (0.3 wt.%) bimetallic and Pd (1.0 wt.%) monometallic catalysts were synthesized by means of incipient-wetness impregnation technique and deposited on alumina spheres (dp=1.7 mm). The prepared catalysts were tested at T=298 K and p(H2)=1.0 bar in the integrated process of catalytic liquid-phase hydrogenation of aqueous nitrate solutions, in which the denitration step was carried out consecutively in separate, single-flow fixed-bed reactor units operating in a batch-recycle mode. In the first reactor packed with a Pd-Cu bimetallic catalyst, nitrate ions were transformed to nitrites at pH 12.5 with a selectivity as high as 93%; the rest was found in the form of ammonium ions. Liquid-phase nitrite hydrogenation to nitrogen in the second reactor unit packed with a Pd monometallic catalyst was conducted at low pH values of 3.7 and 4.5, respectively. Although these values are well below the pHpzc of examined catalyst (6.1), which assured that the nitrite reduction was carried out over a positively charged catalyst surface, up to 15% (23% in the presence of 5.0 g/l NaCl in the solution) of initial nitrite content was converted to undesired ammonium ions. Since a negligible amount of these species (below 0.5mg/l) was produced at identical operating conditions over a powdered Pd/gamma-Al2O3 catalyst, it is believed that the enhanced production of ammonium ions observed in the second fixed-bed reactor is due to the build-up of pH gradients in liquid-filled pores of spherical catalyst particles. Both Pd-Cu bimetallic and Pd monometallic catalysts were chemically resistant in the investigated range of pH values.

  14. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF A SILICA-SUPPORTED CARBOXYMETHYLCELLULOSE PLATINUM COMPLEX AND ITS CATALYTIC BEHAVIORS FOR HYDROGENATION OF AROMATICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Liming; HUANG Meiyu; JIANG Yingyan

    1996-01-01

    A silica-supported carboxymethylcellulose platinum complex (abbreviated as SiO2-CMC-Pt) has been prepared and characterized by XPS. Its catalytic properties for hydrogenation of aromatic compounds were studied. The results showed that this catalyst could catalyze the hydrogenation of phenol, anisol, p-cresol, benzene and toluene to cyclohexanol, cyclohexyl methyl ether, p-methyl cyclohexanol, cyclohexane and methylcyclohexane, respectively in 100% yield at 30℃ and 1 atm. In the hydrogenation of phenol,COO/Pt ratio in SiO2-CMC-Pt has much influence on the initial hydrogenation rate and the selectivity for the intermediate product, cyclohexanone. The highest initial rate and the highest yield of cyclohexanone both occur at COO/Pt ratio of 6. The complex is stable during the reaction and can be used repeatedly.

  15. APPRECIATION AND UTILIZATION OF LACTIC SUB-PRODUCTS: PROTEIN EXTRACTION AND CATALYTIC HYDROGENATION OF THE LACTOSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Enrique Jeronimo

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The cheese-producing industry has in its production cycle to generate a product very rich in protein and lactose, called cheese whey. The waste currently has some food applications, but that does not add value to the real nutritional content and economical product that leverages. In order, therefore, a greater appreciation of cheese whey, studies were conducted for the recovery of proteins and the catalytic conversion of lactose into a polyol of high economic value, called lactitol. The results showed high removal efficiency of proteins in the order of 93% and the conversion of commercial lactose around 90% in 150 minutes of reaction. The applicability of whey, however, requires further testing to remove the chloride ions present in serum.

  16. Autotrophic denitrification using hydrogen generated from metallic iron corrosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunger, Neha; Bose, Purnendu

    2009-09-01

    Hydrogenotrophic denitrification was demonstrated using hydrogen generated from anoxic corrosion of metallic iron. For this purpose, a mixture of hydrogenated water and nitrate solution was used as reactor feed. A semi-batch reactor with nitrate loading of 2000 mg m(-3) d(-1) and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 50 days produced effluent with nitrate concentration of 0.27 mg N L(-1) (99% nitrate removal). A continuous flow reactor with nitrate loading of 28.9 mg m(-3) d(-1) and HRT of 15.6 days produced effluent with nitrate concentration of approximately 0.025 mg N L(-1) (95% nitrate removal). In both cases, the concentration of nitrate degradation by-products, viz., ammonia and nitrite, were below detection limits. The rate of denitrification in the reactors was controlled by hydrogen availability, and hence to operate such reactors at higher nitrate loading rates and/or lower HRT than reported in the present study, hydrogen concentration in the hydrogenated water must be significantly increased.

  17. Superior catalytic effect of nickel ferrite nanoparticles in improving hydrogen storage properties of MgH2

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Qi; Ping LI; Shan, Jiawei; Zhai, Fuqiang; Li, Ziliang; Qu, Xuanhui

    2015-01-01

    The catalysis of NiFe2O4 nanoparticles on the hydrogen storage performances of magnesium hydride synthesized by high-energy ball milling was studied for the first time. The H-2 storage performances and catalytic mechanism were studied by pressurecompositiontemperature (PCT), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The nonisothermal d...

  18. Solar powered hydrogen generating facility and hydrogen powered vehicle fleet. Final technical report, August 11, 1994--January 6, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Provenzano, J.J.

    1997-04-01

    This final report describes activities carried out in support of a demonstration of a hydrogen powered vehicle fleet and construction of a solar powered hydrogen generation system. The hydrogen generation system was permitted for construction, constructed, and permitted for operation. It is not connected to the utility grid, either for electrolytic generation of hydrogen or for compression of the gas. Operation results from ideal and cloudy days are presented. The report also describes the achievement of licensing permits for their hydrogen powered trucks in California, safety assessments of the trucks, performance data, and information on emissions measurements which demonstrate performance better than the Ultra-Low Emission Vehicle levels.

  19. Catalytic Ammonia Decomposition over High-Performance Ru/Graphene Nanocomposites for Efficient COx-Free Hydrogen Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly-dispersed Ru nanoparticles were grown on graphene nanosheets by simultaneously reducing graphene oxide and Ru ions using ethylene glycol (EG, and the resultant Ru/graphene nanocomposites were applied as a catalyst to ammonia decomposition for COx-free hydrogen production. Tuning the microstructures of Ru/graphene nanocomposites was easily accomplished in terms of Ru particle size, morphology, and loading by adjusting the preparation conditions. This was the key to excellent catalytic activity, because ammonia decomposition over Ru catalysts is structure-sensitive. Our results demonstrated that Ru/graphene prepared using water as a co-solvent greatly enhanced the catalytic performance for ammonia decomposition, due to the significantly improved nano architectures of the composites. The long-term stability of Ru/graphene catalysts was evaluated for COx-free hydrogen production from ammonia at high temperatures, and the structural evolution of the catalysts was investigated during the catalytic reactions. Although there were no obvious changes in the catalytic activities at 450 °C over a duration of 80 h, an aggregation of the Ru nanoparticles was still observed in the nanocomposites, which was ascribed mainly to a sintering effect. However, the performance of the Ru/graphene catalyst was decreased gradually at 500 °C within 20 h, which was ascribed mainly to both the effect of the methanation of the graphene nanosheet under a H2 atmosphere and to enhanced sintering under high temperatures.

  20. Generator cooling hydrogen purity improvement system using hydrogen absorbing alloy; Suiso kyuzo gokin riyo hatsudenkinai suiso jundo kojo system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, H.; Kabutomori, T.; Wakisaka, Y. [Japan Steel Works, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Nishimura, Y.; Kogi, T.; Sato, J.; Haruki, N. [Kansai Electric Power Co. Inc., Osaka (Japan); Fujita, T. [Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-09-15

    Described herein is a system which uses a hydrogen-absorbing alloy to purify a hydrogen gas stream used as a coolant for power generator. Hydrogen in the stream containing impurities such as nitrogen can be selectively absorbed by sufficiently cooled hydrogen-absorbing alloy. Impurity gases concentrated in the alloy pores are released, and then the alloy is heated to release hydrogen. This purifies hydrogen to at least 99.99%. This system essentially consists of an hydrogen-absorbing unit, hot water production/supply system which circulates hot water of 80 to 90degC to release hydrogen out of the alloy, pretreatment unit, and temperature and pressure sensors. It is confirmed, by the test in which the system is connected to a commercial power generator of 600MW, that the system can be continuously operated to purify hydrogen to at least 99.9% for an extended period. 4 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  1. High removal rate of cross-linked SU-8 resist using hydrogen radicals generated by tungsten hot-wire catalyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kono, Akihiko, E-mail: a.kono@neptune.kanazawa-it.ac.jp [Kanazawa Institute of Technology, 7-1 Ougigaoka, Nonoichi, Ishikawa 921-8501 (Japan); Arai, Yu; Maruoka, Takeshi; Yamamoto, Masashi; Goto, Yousuke; Takahashi, Seiji; Nishiyama, Takashi [Kanazawa Institute of Technology, 7-1 Ougigaoka, Nonoichi, Ishikawa 921-8501 (Japan); Horibe, Hideo [Osaka City University, Sugimoto, Sumiyoshiku, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    This paper discusses the removal of chemically amplified negative-tone i-line resist SU-8 using hydrogen radicals generated by the catalytic decomposition of H{sub 2} molecules in H{sub 2}/N{sub 2} mixed gas (H{sub 2}:N{sub 2} = 10:90 vol.%) using a tungsten hot-wire catalyzer. SU-8 resists with exposure doses from 7 to 280 mJ/cm{sup 2} were removed by hydrogen radicals, although the SU-8 removal rate was independent of the exposure dose. The SU-8 removal rate increased with both substrate and catalyzer temperature, in addition to a decrease in the distance between the catalyzer and substrate. A high removal rate for cross-linked SU-8 with an exposure dose of 14 mJ/cm{sup 2} of approximately 4 μm/min was achieved with a catalyzer to substrate distance of 20 mm, and catalyzer and initial substrate temperatures of 2400 and 165 °C, respectively. - Highlights: • Chemically amplified negative-tone i-line resist SU-8 removed by hydrogen radicals • Hydrogen radicals generated by catalytic H{sub 2} decomposition using hot-wire catalyzer • The cross-linked SU-8 resist was removed at a rate of approximately 4 μm/min.

  2. Hydricity of an Fe-H Species and Catalytic CO2 Hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Henry; Peters, Jonas C

    2015-06-01

    Despite renewed interest in carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction chemistry, examples of homogeneous iron catalysts that hydrogenate CO2 are limited compared to their noble-metal counterparts. Knowledge of the thermodynamic properties of iron hydride complexes, including M-H hydricities (ΔGH(-)), could aid in the development of new iron-based catalysts. Here we present the experimentally determined hydricity of an iron hydride complex: (SiP(iPr)3)Fe(H2)(H), ΔGH(-) = 54.3 ± 0.9 kcal/mol [SiP(iPr)3 = [Si(o-C6H4PiPr2)3](-)]. We also explore the CO2 hydrogenation chemistry of a series of triphosphinoiron complexes, each with a distinct apical unit on the ligand chelate (Si(-), C(-), PhB(-), N, B). The silyliron (SiP(R)3)Fe (R = iPr and Ph) and boratoiron (PhBP(iPr)3)Fe (PhBP(iPr)3 = [PhB(CH2PiPr2)3](-)) systems, as well as the recently reported (CP(iPr)3)Fe (CP(iPr)3 = [C(o-C6H4PiPr2)3](-)), are also catalysts for CO2 hydrogenation in methanol and in the presence of triethylamine, generating methylformate and triethylammonium formate at up to 200 TON using (SiP(Ph)3)FeCl as the precatalyst. Under stoichiometric conditions, the iron hydride complexes of this series react with CO2 to give formate complexes. Finally, the proposed mechanism of the (SiP(iPr)3)-Fe system proceeds through a monohydride intermediate (SiP(iPr)3)Fe(H2)(H), in contrast to that of the known and highly active tetraphosphinoiron, (tetraphos)Fe (tetraphos = P(o-C6H4PPh2)3), CO2 hydrogenation catalyst.

  3. Generation of hydrogen from photocatalytic cleavage of water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallinson, R.G.; Resasco, D.E.; Lobban, L.L.; Nicholas, K.M. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    1998-08-01

    This paper describes the objectives, methods and early results on the US Department of Energy sponsored project to generate hydrogen from splitting of water using photocatalysts. The approach uses organometallic photosensitizers adsorbed onto platinated titania. Platinized titania is a photocatalyst for water splitting, but does not absorb sunlight in the visible range, where most of the sun`s energy is contained. Organometallic photosensitizers are synthesized, attached to platinized titania and characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, action spectra and hydrogen generation ability. Thus far, Copper, Iron and Ruthenium catalyst systems have been produced and characterized in this manner. Suitable sensitized systems that have the desirable properties have not yet been found.

  4. Enhanced wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation performances based on CuS nanocrystals/reduced graphene oxide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jing; Wang, Kun; Guan, Qingmeng; Li, Henan; Xu, Hui; Liu, Qian; Liu, Wei; Qiu, Baijing

    2014-01-01

    CuS nanocrystals/reduced graphene oxide (CuS NCs/rGO) composites were prepared by a facile one-pot solvothermal reaction. In this solvothermal system, thioacetamide was found to perform the dual roles of sulphide source and reducing agent, resulting in the formation of CuS NCs and simultaneous reduction of graphene oxide (GO) sheets to rGO sheets. In addition, CuS NCs/rGO composites were further used as heterogeneous catalysts in the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation process, with methylene blue as a model organic dye. The introduction of rGO to CuS NCs could effectively enhance the catalytic activity of CuS NCs, and the resultant CuS NCs/rGO composites with a starting GO amount of 5 wt% showed the highest catalytic activity. Furthermore, the CuS NCs/rGO composites showed high catalytic activity over a broad pH operation range from 3.0 to 11.0 under ambient conditions, and still retained 90% of the original catalytic activity after reuse in five cycles.

  5. Modelling studies to proper size a hydrogen generator for fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maggio, G.; Recupero, V.; Di Leonardo, R.; Lagana, M. [Istituto CNR-TAE, Lucia, Messina (Italy)

    1996-12-31

    Based upon an extensive survey of literature a mathematical model has been developed to study the temperature profile along the catalytic bed of a reactor for the methane partial oxidation. The model allowed a preliminary design of a 5 Nm{sup 3} syngas/h prototype to be integrated with second generation fuel cells as hydrogen generator (in the framework of the EC-JOU2 contract). This design was based on some target features, including the choice of a GHSV (gas hour space velocity) equal to 80000 h{sup -1}, a catalyst particle size of 1/8inches, a molar air/methane ratio of 2.7 (i.e. O{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}=0.53), a linear velocity in the catalytic bed of about 2 m/sec, and an inert/catalyst ratio 3:1. Starting from this data, the work has been concerned with the identification of the controlling regime (kinetic or diffusional), and then with the estimation of the gas composition and temperature profiles along the reactor. A comparison between experimental and model results has also been accomplished.

  6. Development of catalytic systems for selective hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis based on statistical planning methods coupled with kinetic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhorov, Yu.M.; Morozova, E.V.; Panchenkov, G.M.

    1979-01-01

    An efficient catalyst design methodology is described, which was used in developing an active and stable mixed oxide catalytic composition for selective hydrogenation of m-bonds under conditions excluding hydrogenolysis of C-C bonds. Catalysts of optimum composition, i.e., 40-50Vertical Bar3< CuO/25-30Vertical Bar3< NiO/20-35Vertical Bar3< SiO/sub 2/, and structure (20-30 A. average pore radius) can be prepared by coprecipitation of copper and nickel salts with silica gel powder in a sodium silicate solution at 90/sup 0/C. By using these catalysts, crotonaldehyde (CA) was hydrogenated to n-butanol in one stage with over 99Vertical Bar3< yields at 180/sup 0/C. The same catalyst was efficient in selective hydrogenation of acetylene (contained in relatively high concentrations in pyrolysis gases) to ethylene at 130/sup 0/C, hydrogenation of piperylene (a by-product in isoprene manufacture) to n-pentenes at 160/sup 0/C, with almost 100Vertical Bar3< selectivity, and in hydrogenolysis of C-S and C-N bonds at 290/sup 0/-370/sup 0/C. Catalytic hydrorefining of a gasoline fraction (105/sup 0/-180/sup 0/C bp) at 350/sup 0/C and 40 atm, reduced its sulfur content from 0.03Vertical Bar3< to 0.00001Vertical Bar3<, and completely removed nitrogen.

  7. Energy Efficient Catalytic Activation of Hydrogen peroxide for Green Chemical Processes: Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Terrence J.; Horwitz, Colin

    2004-11-12

    A new, highly energy efficient approach for using catalytic oxidation chemistry in multiple fields of technology has been pursued. The new catalysts, called TAML® activators, catalyze the reactions of hydrogen peroxide and other oxidants for the exceptionally rapid decontamination of noninfectious simulants (B. atrophaeus) of anthrax spores, for the energy efficient decontamination of thiophosphate pesticides, for the facile, low temperature removal of color and organochlorines from pulp and paper mill effluent, for the bleaching of dyes from textile mill effluents, and for the removal of recalcitrant dibenzothiophene compounds from diesel and gasoline fuels. Highlights include the following: 1) A 7-log kill of Bacillus atrophaeus spores has been achieved unambiguously in water under ambient conditions within 15 minutes. 2) The rapid total degradation under ambient conditions of four thiophosphate pesticides and phosphonate degradation intermediates has been achieved on treatment with TAML/peroxide, opening up potential applications of the decontamination system for phosphonate structured chemical warfare agents, for inexpensive, easy to perform degradation of stored and aged pesticide stocks (especially in Africa and Asia), for remediation of polluted sites and water bodies, and for the destruction of chemical warfare agent stockpiles. 3) A mill trial conducted in a Pennsylvanian bleached kraft pulp mill has established that TAML catalyst injected into an alkaline peroxide bleach tower can significantly lower color from the effluent stream promising a new, more cost effective, energy-saving approach for color remediation adding further evidence of the value and diverse engineering capacity of the approach to other field trials conducted on effluent streams as they exit the bleach plant. 4) Dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), including 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene, the most recalcitrant sulfur compounds in diesel and gasoline, can be completely removed from model gasoline

  8. HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

    2003-06-01

    OAK B202 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER. Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from

  9. Fluid-Bed Testing of Greatpoint Energy's Direct Oxygen Injection Catalytic Gasification Process for Synthetic Natural Gas and Hydrogen Coproduction Year 6 - Activity 1.14 - Development of a National Center for Hydrogen Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swanson, Michael; Henderson, Ann

    2012-04-01

    The GreatPoint Energy (GPE) concept for producing synthetic natural gas and hydrogen from coal involves the catalytic gasification of coal and carbon. GPE’s technology “refines” coal by employing a novel catalyst to “crack” the carbon bonds and transform the coal into cleanburning methane (natural gas) and hydrogen. The GPE mild “catalytic” gasifier design and operating conditions result in reactor components that are less expensive and produce pipeline-grade methane and relatively high purity hydrogen. The system operates extremely efficiently on very low cost carbon sources such as lignites, subbituminous coals, tar sands, petcoke, and petroleum residual oil. In addition, GPE’s catalytic coal gasification process eliminates troublesome ash removal and slagging problems, reduces maintenance requirements, and increases thermal efficiency, significantly reducing the size of the air separation plant (a system that alone accounts for 20% of the capital cost of most gasification systems) in the catalytic gasification process. Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) pilot-scale gasification facilities were used to demonstrate how coal and catalyst are fed into a fluid-bed reactor with pressurized steam and a small amount of oxygen to “fluidize” the mixture and ensure constant contact between the catalyst and the carbon particles. In this environment, the catalyst facilitates multiple chemical reactions between the carbon and the steam on the surface of the coal. These reactions generate a mixture of predominantly methane, hydrogen, and carbon dioxide. Product gases from the process are sent to a gas-cleaning system where CO{sub 2} and other contaminants are removed. In a full-scale system, catalyst would be recovered from the bottom of the gasifier and recycled back into the fluid-bed reactor. The by-products (such as sulfur, nitrogen, and CO{sub 2}) would be captured and could be sold to the chemicals and petroleum industries, resulting in

  10. A review of recent advances on the effects of microstructural refinement and nano-catalytic additives on the hydrogen storage properties of metal and complex hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varin, R. A.; Zbroniec, L. [University of Waterloo, Department of Mechanical and Mechatronics Engineering, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Polanski, M.; Bystrzycki, J. [Faculty of Advanced Technology and Chemistry, Military University of Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-07-01

    The recent advances on the effects of microstructural refinement and various nano-catalytic additives on the hydrogen storage properties of metal and complex hydrides obtained in the last few years in the allied laboratories at the University of Waterloo (Canada) and Military University of Technology (Warsaw, Poland) are critically reviewed in this paper. The research results indicate that microstructural refinement (particle and grain size) induced by ball milling influences quite modestly the hydrogen storage properties of simple metal and complex metal hydrides. On the other hand, the addition of nanometric elemental metals acting as potent catalysts and/or metal halide catalytic precursors brings about profound improvements in the hydrogen absorption/desorption kinetics for simple metal and complex metal hydrides alike. In general, catalytic precursors react with the hydride matrix forming a metal salt and free nanometric or amorphous elemental metals/intermetallics which, in turn, act catalytically. However, these catalysts change only kinetic properties i.e. the hydrogen absorption/desorption rate but they do not change thermodynamics (e.g., enthalpy change of hydrogen sorption reactions). It is shown that a complex metal hydride, LiAlH{sub 4}, after high energy ball milling with a nanometric Ni metal catalyst and/or MnCl{sub 2} catalytic precursor, is able to desorb relatively large quantities of hydrogen at room temperature, 40 and 80 {sup o}C. This kind of behavior is very encouraging for the future development of solid state hydrogen systems. (authors)

  11. A Review of Recent Advances on the Effects of Microstructural Refinement and Nano-Catalytic Additives on the Hydrogen Storage Properties of Metal and Complex Hydrides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Bystrzycki

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The recent advances on the effects of microstructural refinement and various nano-catalytic additives on the hydrogen storage properties of metal and complex hydrides obtained in the last few years in the allied laboratories at the University of Waterloo (Canada and Military University of Technology (Warsaw, Poland are critically reviewed in this paper. The research results indicate that microstructural refinement (particle and grain size induced by ball milling influences quite modestly the hydrogen storage properties of simple metal and complex metal hydrides. On the other hand, the addition of nanometric elemental metals acting as potent catalysts and/or metal halide catalytic precursors brings about profound improvements in the hydrogen absorption/desorption kinetics for simple metal and complex metal hydrides alike. In general, catalytic precursors react with the hydride matrix forming a metal salt and free nanometric or amorphous elemental metals/intermetallics which, in turn, act catalytically. However, these catalysts change only kinetic properties i.e. the hydrogen absorption/desorption rate but they do not change thermodynamics (e.g., enthalpy change of hydrogen sorption reactions. It is shown that a complex metal hydride, LiAlH4, after high energy ball milling with a nanometric Ni metal catalyst and/or MnCl2 catalytic precursor, is able to desorb relatively large quantities of hydrogen at RT, 40 and 80 °C. This kind of behavior is very encouraging for the future development of solid state hydrogen systems.

  12. Role of the chemically non-innocent ligand in the catalytic formation of hydrogen and carbon dioxide from methanol and water with the metal as the spectator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haixia; Hall, Michael B

    2015-09-30

    The catalytic mechanism for the production of H2 and CO2 from CH3OH and H2O by [K(dme)2][Ru(H) (trop2dad)] (K(dme)2.1_exp) was investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Since the reaction occurs under mild conditions and at reasonable rates, it could be considered an ideal way to use methanol to store hydrogen. The predicted mechanism begins with the dehydrogenation of methanol to formaldehyde through a new ligand-ligand bifunctional mechanism, where two hydrogen atoms of CH3OH eliminate to the ligand's N and C atoms, a mechanism that is more favorable than the previously known mechanisms, β-H elimination, or the metal-ligand bifunctional. The key initiator of this first step is formed by migration of the hydride in 1 from the ruthenium to the meta-carbon atom, which generates 1″ with a frustrated Lewis pair in the ring between N and C. Hydroxide, formed when 1″ cleaves H2O, reacts rapidly with CH2O to give H2C(OH)O(-), which subsequently donates a hydride to 6 to generate HCOOH and 5. HCOOH then protonates 5 to give formate and a neutral complex, 4, with a fully hydrogenated ligand. The hydride of formate transfers to 6, releasing CO2. The fully hydrogenated complex, 4, is first deprotonated by OH(-) to form 5, which then releases hydrogen to regenerate the catalyst, 1″. In this mechanism, which explains the experimental observations, the whole reaction occurs on the chemically non-innocent ligand with the ruthenium atom appearing as a spectator.

  13. Experimental research on catalysts and their catalytic mechanism for hydrogen production by gasification of peanut shell in supercritical water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI Aixia; GUO Liejin; JIN Hui

    2007-01-01

    Peanut shell,mixed with sodium carboxymethylcellulose,was gasified at a temperature of 450℃ and a pressure range from 24 to 27 MPa with the presence of different catalysts,including K2CO3,ZnCl2 and Raney-Ni.The experimental results show that different catalysts have greatly different effects on the reaction.Gasification efficiency (GE),hydrogen gasification efficiency (GHE),carbon gasification efficiency (GCE),yield of hydrogen production (YH2) and potential yield of hydrogen production (YPH2) are applied to describe the catalytic efficiency.From the result of gaseous components,ZnCl2 has the highest hydrogen selectivity,K2CO3 is lower,and Raney-Ni is the lowest,but Raney-Ni is the most favorable to gasify biomass among the three catalysts,and its GE,GHE,GcE reach 126.84%,185.71%,94.24%,respectively.As expected,hydrogen selectivity increased and CH4 reduced rapidly when the mixture of ZnCl2 and Raney-Ni is used under the same condition.The optimization mixture appeared when 0.2 g of ZnCl2 was added to 1 g of Raney-Ni,43.56 g·kg-1 of hydrogen production was obtained.In addition,the catalytic mechanisms of different catalysts were analyzed,and the possible reaction pathway was brought forward,which helped to explain the experiment phenomena and results correctly.

  14. Effect of Co crystallinity on Co/CNT catalytic activity in CO/CO{sub 2} hydrogenation and CO disproportionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernyak, Sergei A., E-mail: chernyak.msu@gmail.com [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry, Leninskiye Gory 1-3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Department of Physical Chemistry, Leninsky Avenue 31, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Suslova, Evgeniya V.; Egorov, Alexander V.; Maslakov, Konstantin I. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry, Leninskiye Gory 1-3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Savilov, Serguei V.; Lunin, Valery V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry, Leninskiye Gory 1-3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Department of Physical Chemistry, Leninsky Avenue 31, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-30

    Highlights: • Amorphous and crystalline Co supported on CNTs were obtained by tuning of CNT surface. • CO and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation does not occur on amorphous Co particles. • Thermal activation of amorphous Co led to crystallization of metal. • Amorphous Co promotes CO disproportionation. • Carbon shells around the amorphous metal particles after the CO hydrogenation. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with different degree of surface oxidation were used as supports for 5 wt.% Co catalysts. CNTs and Co/CNT catalysts were analyzed by XPS, nitrogen adsorption, TEM and electron diffraction to reveal their structure. High oxidation degree of CNT surface (8.6 at.% of O) and low Co loading led to predominantly amorphous Co species. This resulted in the absence of catalytic activity in both CO and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation in opposite to the catalyst supported on less oxidized CNTs (5.4 at.% of O) where Co species were found to be crystalline. Thermal treatment of inactive catalyst in H{sub 2} and He led to the formation of Co crystal phase which was active in catalysis. Co particle size in catalyst supported on strongly oxidized CNTs was unchanged during CO hydrogenation in opposite to Co supported on less oxidized CNTs. Carbon shell formation on the surface of amorphous Co particles during CO hydrogenation was revealed, which testified CO disproportionation. Qualitative mechanism of CO hydrogenation on small Co particles was proposed.

  15. Molecular metal-Oxo catalysts for generating hydrogen from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jeffrey R; Chang, Christopher J; Karunadasa, Hemamala I

    2015-02-24

    A composition of matter suitable for the generation of hydrogen from water is described, the positively charged cation of the composition having the general formula [(PY5W.sub.2)MO].sup.2+, wherein PY5W.sub.2 is (NC.sub.5XYZ)(NC.sub.5H.sub.4).sub.4C.sub.2W.sub.2, M is a transition metal, and W, X, Y, and Z can be H, R, a halide, CF.sub.3, or SiR.sub.3, where R can be an alkyl or aryl group. The two accompanying counter anions, in one embodiment, can be selected from the following Cl.sup.-, I.sup.-, PF.sub.6.sup.-, and CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-. In embodiments of the invention, water, such as tap water containing electrolyte or straight sea water can be subject to an electric potential of between 1.0 V and 1.4 V relative to the standard hydrogen electrode, which at pH 7 corresponds to an overpotential of 0.6 to 1.0 V, with the result being, among other things, the generation of hydrogen with an optimal turnover frequency of ca. 1.5 million mol H.sub.2/mol catalyst per h.

  16. Sum Frequency Generation Studies of Hydrogenation Reactions on Platinum Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krier, James M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-08-31

    Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy is used to characterize intermediate species of hydrogenation reactions on the surface of platinum nanoparticle catalysts. In contrast to other spectroscopy techniques which operate in ultra-high vacuum or probe surface species after reaction, SFG collects information under normal conditions as the reaction is taking place. Several systems have been studied previously using SFG on single crystals, notably alkene hydrogenation on Pt(111). In this thesis, many aspects of SFG experiments on colloidal nanoparticles are explored for the first time. To address spectral interference by the capping agent (PVP), three procedures are proposed: UV cleaning, H2 induced disordering and calcination (core-shell nanoparticles). UV cleaning and calcination physically destroy organic capping while disordering reduces SFG signal through a reversible structural change by PVP.

  17. A New Method for Generating Hydrogen from Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MENG Qing-Bo; LI Ke-Xin; LI Hong; FAN Yu-Zun; YU Zhe-Xun; LI Dong-Mei; LUO Yan-Hong; CHEN Li-Quan

    2008-01-01

    A new method for generating hydrogen by the reaction of A1 powder with water using iodine as additive is developed. 12 can penetrate through the surface oxide layer on atuminium to form AlI3. High solubility of AlI3 in water is benefited to activate Al surface. It is found that the production of hydrogen becomes significant above 60℃ and obeys a logarithm rule. The pH value varies from 5 to 3 then back to 4.5 during the reaction,which is determined mainly by the kinetics of hydration reaction of AlI3 and the reaction of Al and HI produced spontaneously.

  18. Molecular hydrogen and catalytic combustion in the production of hyperpolarized 83Kr and 129Xe MRI contrast agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Nicola J.; Hill-Casey, Fraser; Stupic, Karl F.; Six, Joseph S.; Lesbats, Clémentine; Rigby, Sean P.; Fraissard, Jacques; Pavlovskaya, Galina E.; Meersmann, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    Hyperpolarized (hp) 83Kr is a promising MRI contrast agent for the diagnosis of pulmonary diseases affecting the surface of the respiratory zone. However, the distinct physical properties of 83Kr that enable unique MRI contrast also complicate the production of hp 83Kr. This work presents a previously unexplored approach in the generation of hp 83Kr that can likewise be used for the production of hp 129Xe. Molecular nitrogen, typically used as buffer gas in spin-exchange optical pumping (SEOP), was replaced by molecular hydrogen without penalty for the achievable hyperpolarization. In this particular study, the highest obtained nuclear spin polarizations were P = 29% for 83Kr and P = 63% for 129Xe. The results were reproduced over many SEOP cycles despite the laser-induced on-resonance formation of rubidium hydride (RbH). Following SEOP, the H2 was reactively removed via catalytic combustion without measurable losses in hyperpolarized spin state of either 83Kr or 129Xe. Highly spin-polarized 83Kr can now be purified for the first time, to our knowledge, to provide high signal intensity for the advancement of in vivo hp 83Kr MRI. More generally, a chemical reaction appears as a viable alternative to the cryogenic separation process, the primary purification method of hp 129Xe for the past 2 1/2 decades. The inherent simplicity of the combustion process will facilitate hp 129Xe production and should allow for on-demand continuous flow of purified and highly spin-polarized 129Xe.

  19. DWPF Hydrogen Generation Study-Form of Noble Metal SRAT Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannochie, C

    2005-09-01

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility, DWPF, has requested that the Savannah River National Laboratory, SRNL, investigate the factors that contribute to hydrogen generation to determine if current conservatism in setting the DWPF processing window can be reduced. A phased program has been undertaken to increase understanding of the factors that influence hydrogen generation in the DWPF Chemical Process Cell, CPC. The hydrogen generation in the CPC is primarily due to noble metal catalyzed decomposition of formic acid with a minor contribution from radiolytic processes. Noble metals have historically been added as trim chemicals to process simulations. The present study investigated the potential conservatism that might be present from adding the catalytic species as trim chemicals to the final sludge simulant versus co-precipitating the noble metals into the insoluble sludge solids matrix. Two sludge simulants were obtained, one with co-precipitated noble metals and one without noble metals. Co-precipitated noble metals were expected to better match real waste behavior than using trimmed noble metals during CPC simulations. Portions of both sludge simulants were held at 97 C for about eight hours to qualitatively simulate the effects of long term storage on particle morphology and speciation. The two original and two heat-treated sludge simulants were then used as feeds to Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank, SRAT, process simulations. Testing was done at relatively high acid stoichiometries, {approx}175%, and without mercury in order to ensure significant hydrogen generation. Hydrogen generation rates were monitored during processing to assess the impact of the form of noble metals. The following observations were made on the data: (1) Co-precipitated noble metal simulant processed similarly to trimmed noble metal simulant in most respects, such as nitrite to nitrate conversion, formate destruction, and pH, but differently with respect to hydrogen generation: (A

  20. A molecular copper catalyst for electrochemical water reduction with a large hydrogen-generation rate constant in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Peili; Wang, Mei; Yang, Yong; Yao, Tianyi; Sun, Licheng

    2014-12-08

    The copper complex [(bztpen)Cu](BF4)2 (bztpen=N-benzyl-N,N',N'-tris(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)ethylenediamine) displays high catalytic activity for electrochemical proton reduction in acidic aqueous solutions, with a calculated hydrogen-generation rate constant (k(obs)) of over 10000 s(-1). A turnover frequency (TOF) of 7000 h(-1) cm(-2) and a Faradaic efficiency of 96% were obtained from a controlled potential electrolysis (CPE) experiment with [(bztpen)Cu](2+) in pH 2.5 buffer solution at -0.90 V versus the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) over two hours using a glassy carbon electrode. A mechanism involving two proton-coupled reduction steps was proposed for the dihydrogen generation reaction catalyzed by [(bztpen)Cu](2+).

  1. Pd/C synthesized with citric acid: an efficient catalyst for hydrogen generation from formic acid/sodium formate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Li; Yan, Jun-Min; Wang, Hong-Li; Ping, Yun; Jiang, Qing

    2012-01-01

    A highly efficient hydrogen generation from formic acid/sodium formate aqueous solution catalyzed by in situ synthesized Pd/C with citric acid has been successfully achieved at room temperature. Interestingly, the presence of citric acid during the formation and growth of the Pd nanoparticles on carbon can drastically enhance the catalytic property of the resulted Pd/C, on which the conversion and turnover frequency for decomposition of formic acid/sodium formate system can reach the highest values ever reported of 85% within 160 min and 64 mol H(2) mol(-1) catalyst h(-1), respectively, at room temperature. The present simple, low cost, but highly efficient CO-free hydrogen generation system at room temperature is believed to greatly promote the practical application of formic acid system on fuel cells.

  2. Selective catalytic methanation of CO in hydrogen-rich gases over Ni/ZrO2 catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qihai Liu; Xinfa Dong; Xinman Mo; Weiming Lin

    2008-01-01

    Ni/ZrO2 catalysts were prepared by the incipient-wetness impregnation method and were investigated in activity and selectivity for the selective catalytic methanation of CO in hydrogen-rich gases with more than 20 vol%CO2.The result showed that Ni loadings significantly influenced the performance of Ni/ZrO2 catalyst.The 1.6 wt%Ni loading catalyst exhibited the highest catalytic activity among all the catalysts in the selective methanation of CO in hydrogen-rich gas.The outlet concentration of CO was less than 20 ppm with the hydrogen consumption below 7%.at a gas-hourly-space velocity as high as 10000 h-1 and a temperature range of 260℃ to 280℃.The X-ray diffraction(XRD)and temperature programmed reduction (TPR)measurements showed that NiO was dispersed thoroughly on the surface of ZrO2 support if Ni loading was under 1.6 wt%.When N-10ading was increased to 3 wt%or above.the free bulk NiO species began to assemble,which was not favorable to increase the selectivity of the catalyst.

  3. Selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides from industrial gases by hydrogen or methane; Reduction catalytique selective des oxydes d'azote (NO{sub x}) provenant d'effluents gazeux industriels par l'hydrogene ou le methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelmann Pirez, M

    2004-12-15

    This work deals with the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), contained in the effluents of industrial plants, by hydrogen or methane. The aim is to replace ammonia, used as reducing agent, in the conventional process. The use of others reducing agents such as hydrogen or methane is interesting for different reasons: practical, economical and ecological. The catalyst has to convert selectively NO into N{sub 2}, in presence of an excess of oxygen, steam and sulfur dioxide. The developed catalyst is constituted by a support such as perovskites, particularly LaCoO{sub 3}, on which are dispersed noble metals (palladium, platinum). The interaction between the noble metal and the support, generated during the activation of the catalyst, allows to minimize the water and sulfur dioxide inhibitor phenomena on the catalytic performances, particularly in the reduction of NO by hydrogen. (O.M.)

  4. Cellular graphene aerogel combines ultralow weight and high mechanical strength: A highly efficient reactor for catalytic hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bingxing; Zhang, Jianling; Sang, Xinxin; Liu, Chengcheng; Luo, Tian; Peng, Li; Han, Buxing; Tan, Xiuniang; Ma, Xue; Wang, Dong; Zhao, Ning

    2016-05-12

    The construction of three-dimensional graphene aerogels (GAs) is of great importance owing to their outstanding properties for various applications. Up to now, the combination of ultralow weight and super mechanical strength for GA remains a great challenge. Here we demonstrate the fabrication of cellular GAs by a facile, easily controlled and versatile route, i.e. the chemical reduction of graphene oxide assemblies at oil-water interface under a mild condition (70 °C). The GA is ultralight (with density <3 mg cm(-3)) yet mechanically resilient because the walls of the cell closely pack in a highly ordered manner to maximize mechanical strength. The GA has been utilized as an appealing reactor for catalytic hydrogenation, which exhibited great advantages such as large oil absorption capability, exceptional catalytic activity, ease of product separation and high stability.

  5. A Renewably Powered Hydrogen Generation and Fueling Station Community Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Valerie J.; Sekura, Linda S.; Prokopius, Paul; Theirl, Susan

    2009-01-01

    The proposed project goal is to encourage the use of renewable energy and clean fuel technologies for transportation and other applications while generating economic development. This can be done by creating an incubator for collaborators, and creating a manufacturing hub for the energy economy of the future by training both white- and blue-collar workers for the new energy economy. Hydrogen electrolyzer fueling stations could be mass-produced, shipped and installed in collaboration with renewable energy power stations, or installed connected to the grid with renewable power added later.

  6. Optimized hydrogen generation in a semicontinuous sodium borohydride hydrolysis reactor for a 60 W-scale fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzac, G. M.; Fernández, A.; Justo, A.; Sarmiento, B.; Jiménez, M. A.; Jiménez, M. M.

    Catalyzed hydrolysis of sodium borohydride (SBH) is a promising method for the hydrogen supply of fuel cells. In this study a system for controlled production of hydrogen from aqueous sodium borohydride (SBH) solutions has been designed and built. This simple and low cost system operates under controlled addition of stabilized SBH solutions (fuel solutions) to a supported CoB catalyst. The system works at constant temperature delivering hydrogen at 1 L min -1 constant rate to match a 60-W polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). For optimization of the system, several experimental conditions were changed and their effect was investigated. A simple model based only on thermodynamic considerations was proposed to optimize system parameters at constant temperature and hydrogen evolution rate. It was found that, for a given SBH concentration, the use of the adequate fuel addition rate can maximize the total conversion and therefore the gravimetric storage capacity. The hydrogen storage capacity was as high as 3.5 wt% for 19 wt% SBH solution at 90% fuel conversion and an operation temperature of 60 °C. It has been demonstrated that these optimized values can also be achieved for a wide range of hydrogen generation rates. Studies on the durability of the catalyst showed that a regeneration step is needed to restore the catalytic activity before reusing.

  7. Catalytic activity of mono and bimetallic Zn/Cu/MWCNTs catalysts for the thermocatalyzed conversion of methane to hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdelyi, B.; Oriňak, A.; Oriňaková, R.; Lorinčík, J.; Jerigová, M.; Velič, D.; Mičušík, M.; Omastová, M.; Smith, R. M.; Girman, V.

    2017-02-01

    Mono and bimetallic multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) fortified with Cu and Zn metal particles were studied to improve the efficiency of the thermocatalytic conversion of methane to hydrogen. The surface of the catalyst and the dispersion of the metal particles were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) and with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). It was confirmed that the metal particles were successfully dispersed on the MWCNT surface and XPS analysis showed that the Zn was oxidised to ZnO at high temperatures. The conversion of methane to hydrogen during the catalytic pyrolysis was studied by pyrolysis gas chromatography using different amounts of catalyst. The best yields of hydrogen were obtained using pyrolysis conditions of 900 °C and 1.2 mg of Zn/Cu/MWCNT catalyst for 1.5 mL of methane.The initial conversion of methane to hydrogen obtained with Zn/Cu/MWCNTs was 49%, which represent a good conversion rate of methane to hydrogen for a non-noble metal catalyst.

  8. Thermo-Catalytic Methane Decomposition for Hydrogen Production: Effect of Palladium Promoter on Ni-based Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Lock Sow Mei

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen production from the direct thermo-catalytic decomposition of methane is a promising alternative for clean fuel production. However, thermal decomposition of methane can hardly be of any practical and empirical interest in the industry unless highly efficient and effective catalysts, in terms of both catalytic activity and operational lifetime have been developed. In this study, the effect of palladium (Pd as a promoter onto Ni supported on alumina catalyst has been investigated by using co-precipitation technique. The introduction of Pd promotes better catalytic activity, operational lifetime and thermal stability of the catalyst. As expected, highest methane conversion was achieved at reaction temperature of 800 °C while the bimetallic catalyst (1 wt.% Ni -1wt.% Pd/Al2O3 gave the highest methane conversion of 70% over 15 min of time-on-stream (TOS. Interestingly, the introduction of Pd as promoter onto Ni-based catalyst also has a positive effect on the operational lifetime and thermal stability of the catalyst as the methane conversion has improved significantly over 240 min of TOS. Copyright © 2016 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 21st January 2016; Revised: 6th February 2016; Accepted: 6th March 2016 How to Cite: Mei, I.L.S., Lock, S.S.M., Vo, D.V.N., Abdullah, B. (2016. Thermo-Catalytic Methane Decomposition for Hydrogen Production: Effect of Palladium Promoter on Ni-based Catalysts. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (2: 191-199 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.2.550.191-199 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.2.550.191-199

  9. The catalytic reactions in the Cu-Li-Mg-H high capacity hydrogen storage system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, M H; El-Azab, A

    2014-11-14

    A family of hydrides, including the high capacity MgH2 and LiH, is reported. The disadvantages these hydrides normally display (high absorption/desorption temperatures and poor kinetics) are mitigated by Cu-hydride catalysis. This paper reports on the synthesis of novel CuLi0.08Mg1.42H4 and CuLi0.08Mg1.92H5 hydrides, which are structurally and thermodynamically characterized for the first time. The CuLi0.08Mg1.42H4 hydride structure in nanotubes is able to hold molecular H2, increasing the gravimetric and volumetric capacity of this compound. The catalytic effect these compounds show on hydride formation and decomposition of CuMg2 and Cu2Mg/MgH2, Li and LiH, Mg and MgH2 is analyzed. The Gibbs energy, decomposition temperature, and gravimetric capacity of the reactions occurring within the Cu-Li-Mg-H system are presented for the first time. First principles and phonon calculations are compared with experiments, including neutron spectroscopy. It is demonstrated that the most advantageous sample contains CuLi0.08Mg1.92 and (Li) ∼ Li2Mg3; it desorbs/absorbs hydrogen according to the reaction, 2CuLi0.08Mg1.42H4 + 2Li + 4MgH2 ↔ 2CuLi0.08Mg1.92 + Li2Mg3 + 8H2 at 114 °C (5.0 wt%) - 1 atm, falling within the proton exchange membrane fuel cell applications window. Finally the reaction 2CuLi0.08Mg1.42H4 + MgH2 ↔ 2CuLi0.08Mg1.92 + 5H2 at 15 °C (4.4 wt%) - 1 atm is found to be the main reaction of the samples containing CuLi0.08Mg1.92 that were analyzed in this study.

  10. In situ generated hypoiodous acid in an efficient and heterogeneous catalytic system for the homo-oxidative coupling of thiols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghorbani-Choghamarani Arash

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Supported hydrogen peroxide on polyvinylpolypyrrolidone (PVPH2O2, silica sulfuric acid (SiO2-OSO3H and catalytic amounts of potassium iodide (KI has been developed as a heterogeneous medium for the rapid oxidative coupling of thiols into symmetrical homodisulfides. This oxidizing system proceeds under extremely mild conditions and gives no other oxidized side products.

  11. Catalytic Glycerol Hydrodeoxygenation under Inert Atmosphere: Ethanol as a Hydrogen Donor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efterpi S. Vasiliadou

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Glycerol hydrodeoxygenation to 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PDO is a reaction of high interest. However, the need for hydrogen supply is a main drawback of the process. According to the concept investigated here, 1,2-propanediol is efficiently formed using bio-glycerol feedstock with H2 formed in situ via ethanol aqueous phase reforming. Ethanol is thought to be a promising H2 source, as it is alcohol that can be used instead of methanol for transesterification of oils and fats. The H2 generated is consumed in the tandem reaction of glycerol hydrodeoxygenation. The reaction cycle proceeds in liquid phase at 220–250 °C and 1.5–3.5 MPa initial N2 pressure for a 2 and 4-h reaction time. Pt-, Ni- and Cu-based catalysts have been synthesized, characterized and evaluated in the reaction. Among the materials tested, Pt/Fe2O3-Al2O3 exhibited the most promising performance in terms of 1,2-propanediol productivity, while reusability tests showed a stable behavior. Structural integrity and no formation of carbonaceous deposits were verified via Temperature Programmed Desorption of hydrogen (TPD-H2 and thermogravimetric analysis of the fresh and used Pt/FeAl catalyst. A study on the effect of various operating conditions (reaction time, temperature and pressure indicated that in order to maximize 1,2-propanediol productivity and yield, milder reaction conditions should be applied. The highest 1,2-propanediol yield, 53% (1.1 g1,2-PDO gcat−1·h−1, was achieved at a lower reaction temperature of 220 °C.

  12. Removal of SU-8 resists using hydrogen radicals generated by tungsten hot-wire catalyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kono, Akihiko; Arai, Yu; Goto, Yousuke; Horibe, Hideo

    2012-03-01

    We investigated removal of chemically amplified negative-tone i-line resist SU-8 using hydrogen radicals, which was generated by the catalytic decomposition of H2/N2 mixed gas (H2:N2 = 10:90vol.%) using tungsten hot-wire catalyzer. SU-8 with exposure dose from 7 (Dg100×0.5) to 280mJ/cm2 (Dg100×20) were removed by hydrogen radicals without a residual layer. When the distance between the catalyzer and the substrate was 100mm, the catalyzer temperature was 2400°C, and the initial substrate temperature was 50°C, removal rate of SU-8 was 0.17μm/min independent of exposure dose to the SU-8. Finally, we obtained high removal rate for SU-8 (exposure dose = 14mJ/cm2 (Dg100)) of approximately 4μm/min when the distance between the catalyzer and the substrate was 20mm, the catalyzer temperature was 2400°C, and the initial substrate temperature was 165°C.

  13. An integrated MEMS infrastructure for fuel processing: hydrogen generation and separation for portable power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varady, M. J.; McLeod, L.; Meacham, J. M.; Degertekin, F. L.; Fedorov, A. G.

    2007-09-01

    Portable fuel cells are an enabling technology for high efficiency and ultra-high density distributed power generation, which is essential for many terrestrial and aerospace applications. A key element of fuel cell power sources is the fuel processor, which should have the capability to efficiently reform liquid fuels and produce high purity hydrogen that is consumed by the fuel cells. To this end, we are reporting on the development of two novel MEMS hydrogen generators with improved functionality achieved through an innovative process organization and system integration approach that exploits the advantages of transport and catalysis on the micro/nano scale. One fuel processor design utilizes transient, reverse-flow operation of an autothermal MEMS microreactor with an intimately integrated, micromachined ultrasonic fuel atomizer and a Pd/Ag membrane for in situ hydrogen separation from the product stream. The other design features a simpler, more compact planar structure with the atomized fuel ejected directly onto the catalyst layer, which is coupled to an integrated hydrogen selective membrane.

  14. A compact process for the treatment of olive mill wastewater by combining wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation and biological techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azabou, Samia; Najjar, Wahiba; Bouaziz, Mohamed; Ghorbel, Abdelhamid; Sayadi, Sami

    2010-11-15

    A system based on combined actions of catalytic wet oxidation and microbial technologies for the treatment of highly polluted OMW containing polyphenols was studied. The wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) process has been investigated in the semi-batch mode at atmospheric pressure, using aluminium-iron-pillared inter layer clay ((Al-Fe)PILC), under two different catalytic processes: ((Al-Fe)PILC/H(2)O(2)/ultraviolet radiations) at 25°C and ((Al-Fe)PILC/H(2)O(2)) at 50°C. The results show that raw OMW was resistant to the photocatalytic process. However ((Al-Fe)PILC/H(2)O(2)), system operating at 50°C reduced considerably the COD, colour and total phenolic contents, and thus decreased the inhibition of the marine photobacteria Vibrio fischeri luminescence by 70%. This study also examined the feasibility of coupling WHPCO and anaerobic digestion treatment. Biomethanisation experiments performed with raw OMW or pre-treated OMW proved that pre-treatments with ((Al-Fe)PILC/H(2)O(2)) system, for more than 2 h, resulted in higher methane production. Both untreated OMW as well as 2-h pre-treated OMW revealed as toxic to anaerobic bacteria.

  15. HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM ELECTROLYSIS - REVISED FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    IBRAHIM, SAMIR; STICHTER, MICHAEL

    2008-07-31

    DOE GO13028-0001 DESCRIPTION/ABSTRACT This report is a summary of the work performed by Teledyne Energy Systems to understand high pressure electrolysis mechanisms, investigate and address safety concerns related to high pressure electrolysis, develop methods to test components and systems of a high pressure electrolyzer, and produce design specifications for a low cost high pressure electrolysis system using lessons learned throughout the project. Included in this report are data on separator materials, electrode materials, structural cell design, and dissolved gas tests. Also included are the results of trade studies for active area, component design analysis, high pressure hydrogen/oxygen reactions, and control systems design. Several key pieces of a high pressure electrolysis system were investigated in this project and the results will be useful in further attempts at high pressure and/or low cost hydrogen generator projects. An important portion of the testing and research performed in this study are the safety issues that are present in a high pressure electrolyzer system and that they can not easily be simplified to a level where units can be manufactured at the cost goals specified, or operated by other than trained personnel in a well safeguarded environment. The two key objectives of the program were to develop a system to supply hydrogen at a rate of at least 10,000 scf/day at a pressure of 5000psi, and to meet cost goals of $600/ kW in production quantities of 10,000/year. On these two points TESI was not successful. The project was halted due to concerns over safety of high pressure gas electrolysis and the associated costs of a system which reduced the safety concerns.

  16. The generation of electricity by gas turbines using the catalytic combustion of low-Btu gases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, O.P.; Qvale, Einar Bjørn

    1989-01-01

    Various systems for the generation of electricity by gas turbines using catalytic combustion of low-Btu gases have been investigated. Parametric studies of three configurations that are deemed to be practically feasible have been completed. It is shown that thermodynamic efficiency of these systems...... may be quite high. The system design has been made to comply with generally accepted limitations on the operation of the compressors, turbines and heat exchangers. The heat catalyst has been investigated experimentally in order to establish design information. The system design has been carried out...... on the basis of these experiments and of commonly accepted limits on the operation of the compressors, turbines, and heat exchangers...

  17. Enhanced photocatalytic hydrogen generation from barium tantalate composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschall, Roland; Soldat, Julia; Busser, G Wilma; Wark, Michael

    2013-04-01

    (111)-layered Ba5Ta4O15 photocatalysts were synthesised by a solid state reaction route and a citrate synthesis route, and their structural and electronic properties were investigated. After citrate route preparation, the presence of a second phase, namely Ba3Ta5O15, was determined by X-ray powder diffraction and absorption spectroscopy. The existence of this phase had a profound effect on the photocatalytic activity of this Ba5Ta4O15/Ba3Ta5O15 composite in comparison to the pure Ba5Ta4O15 materials. The photocatalytic performance of the barium tantalates was evaluated by investigating the capability in ˙OH radical formation and hydrogen generation. Strongly increased hydrogen evolution rates for the Ba5Ta4O15/Ba3Ta5O15 composite, up to 160% higher than for the pure Ba5Ta4O15, were determined, and only very small amounts of Rh co-catalyst, deposited on the photocatalysts by stepwise reductive photo-deposition, were needed to achieve these results.

  18. Effect of Pt promotion on Ni/Al2O3 for the selective catalytic reduction of NO with hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihet, Maria; Lazar, Mihaela D.; Borodi, G.; Almasan, V.

    2013-11-01

    Ni/Al2O3 (10 wt.% Ni) and Ni-Pt/Al2O3 (10 wt.% Ni, 0.5 wt.% Pt) were comparatively tested in the hydrogen selective catalytic reduction process (H2-SCR), at reaction temperatures below 350°C. Catalytic activity tests consisted in temperature programmed reactions (TPRea) under plug flow conditions from 50 to 350°C, with a temperature rate of 5°C/min, using a feed stream with a reactant ratio NO:H2 = 1:1.3 and a GHSV of 4500 h-1. Promotion with Pt increases the catalytic performances of the Ni based catalyst, in respect to NO conversion, N2 selectivity and N2 yield. The reaction temperatures for NO conversion above 95% decrease significantly due to Pt addition, from 250°C for Ni/Al2O3 to 125°C for Ni-Pt/Al2O3. Characterization of catalysts was performed by: X ray powder diffraction (XRD) for the estimation of Ni crystallite size, temperature programmed reduction (TPR) for the catalyst reducibility, temperature programmed desorption of hydrogen (H2-TPD) for the investigation of active sites and metal dispersion on the support, N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms at -196°C for the determination of total specific surface area and pore size distribution, and H/D isotopic exchange on the catalyst surface. At the request of the Proceedings Editor, and all authors of the paper, an updated version of this article was published on 14 January 2014. Data presented in Table 1 of the original paper contained errors which have been corrected in the updated and re-published article. The Corrigendum attached to the corrected article PDF file explains the errors in more detail.

  19. Photo-catalytic hydrogen production over Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudjemaa, A. [Technical and Scientific Research Centre of Physico-chemistry Analysis (CRAPC), BP 248, RP 16004, Algiers (Algeria); Laboratory of Chemistry of Natural Gas, Faculty of Chemistry (USTHB) BP 32, 16111 Algiers (Algeria); Trari, M. [Laboratory of Storage and Valorization of Renewable Energies, Faculty of Chemistry (USTHB) BP 32, 16111 Algiers (Algeria)

    2010-08-15

    The hydrogen photo-evolution was successfully achieved in aqueous (Fe{sub 1-x}Cr{sub x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} suspensions (0 {<=} x {<=} 1). The solid solution has been prepared by incipient wetness impregnation and characterized by X-ray diffraction, BET, transport properties and photo-electrochemistry. The oxides crystallize in the corundum structure, they exhibit n-type conductivity with activation energy of {proportional_to}0.1 eV and the conduction occurs via adiabatic polaron hops. The characterization of the band edges has been studied by the Mott Schottky plots. The onset potential of the photo-current is {proportional_to}0.2 V cathodic with respect to the flat band potential, implying a small existence of surface states within the gap region. The absorption of visible light promotes electrons into (Fe{sub 1-x}Cr{sub x}){sub 2}O{sub 3}-CB with a potential ({proportional_to}-0.5 V{sub SCE}) sufficient to reduce water into hydrogen. As expected, the quantum yield increases with decreasing the electro affinity through the substitution of iron by the more electropositive chromium which increases the band bending at the interface and favours the charge separation. The generated photo-voltage was sufficient to promote simultaneously H{sub 2}O reduction and SO{sub 3}{sup 2-} oxidation in the energetically downhill reaction (H{sub 2}O + SO{sub 3}{sup 2-} {yields} H{sub 2} + SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, {delta}G = -17.68 kJ mol{sup -1}). The best activity occurs over Fe{sub 1.2}Cr{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} in SO{sub 3}{sup 2-} (0.1 M) solution with H{sub 2} liberation rate of 21.7 {mu}mol g{sup -1} min{sup -1} and a quantum yield 0.06% under polychromatic light. Over time, a pronounced deceleration occurs, due to the competitive reduction of the end product S{sub 2}O{sub 6}{sup 2-}. (author)

  20. Broad Spectrum Photoelectrochemical Diodes for Solar Hydrogen Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimes, Craig A.

    2014-11-26

    Under program auspices we have investigated material chemistries suitable for the solar generation of hydrogen by water photoelectrolysis. We have built upon, and extended, our knowledge base on the synthesis and application of TiO2 nanotube arrays, a material architecture that appears ideal for water photoelectrolysis. To date we have optimized, refined, and greatly extended synthesis techniques suitable for achieving highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays of given length, wall thickness, pore diameter, and tube-to-tube spacing for use in water photoelectrolysis. We have built upon this knowledge based to achieve visible light responsive, photocorrosion stable n-type and p-type ternary oxide nanotube arrays for use in photoelectrochemical diodes.

  1. Investigation of products of low-temperature catalytic hydrogenization of Donbas coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osipov, A.M.; Osipov, K.D.; Chernyshova, M.I.; Petrik, G.K.

    1980-11-01

    The relationship of the composition and properties of primary products of low-temperature hydrogenation is presented in relation to the nature of the coal, of catalysts, and of the conditions of hydrogenation. Temperature, the nature of the catalysts and of the type of coal used were directly related to the content of methane, ethane, propane, and CO/sub 2/, and of hydrogen sulphide in the case of brown gaseous coals, as well as the dissolving of hydrogenates and asphaltene content. The structural composition of components dissolved in methylene chloride was determined by proton magnetic resonance. Results of the experiments indicated that lead chloride was the most promising catalyst for low-temperature hydrogenation.

  2. Pyrolysis of de-oiled seed cake of Jatropha Curcas and catalytic steam reforming of pyrolytic bio-oil to hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renny, Andrew; Santhosh, Viswanathan; Somkuwar, Nitin; Gokak, D T; Sharma, Pankaj; Bhargava, Sanjay

    2016-11-01

    The aim of this work was to study the pyrolysis of de-oiled seed cake of Jatropha Curcas and catalytic steam reforming of pyrolytic bio-oil to hydrogen. As per literature, presence of heavy nitrogenous and oxygenated compounds leads to catalyst deactivation. Here, an attempt has been made to tune pyrolytic reactions to optimize the N and O content of the pyrolytic bio-oil. Bio-oil conversion and hydrogen yield decreased as reaction progressed, which attributes to temporary loss of catalytic activity by blockage of catalyst pores by carbon deposition. Further, retention of steam reforming activity after repetitive steam activation suggests long-term catalyst usage.

  3. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Methanol-Containing Eflfuent from Epoxidation of Propylene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Ke

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the hydrogenation of impurities in the methanol-containing eflfuent from the propylene epoxidation process with hydrogen peroxide. The effects of reaction temperature, pressure, weight hourly space velocity (WHSV) and H2/methanol ratio on the concentration of various impurities in methanol solvent were investigated. It was found out that the aldehyde, hydrogen peroxide and nitro compounds in the methanol solvent could be completely hydroge-nated over the Ni catalyst under proper reaction conditions. 90%of acetone and up to 50%of acetals (ketals) existing in the methanol solvent could be hydrogenated. No signiifcant change was observed for the rest of the impurities that were present in the methanol solvent (i. e., 1-methoxy-2-propanol, 2-methoxy-1-propanol and 1,2-propanediol). The H2O2 decomposition reaction was enhanced using Ni catalyst, through the formation of NioOH, but no oxygen was found in the off-gas of hy-drogenation reaction since NioH could react on NioOH formed via dissociative adsorption of hydrogen peroxide, or on NioO formed via adsorption of oxygen.

  4. Selective Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrogen Sulfide to Elemental Sulfur from Coal-Derived Fuel Gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, Todd H.; Berry, David A.; Lyons, K. David; Beer, Stephen K.; Monahan, Michael J.

    2001-11-06

    The development of low cost, highly efficient, desulfurization technology with integrated sulfur recovery remains a principle barrier issue for Vision 21 integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power generation plants. In this plan, the U. S. Department of Energy will construct ultra-clean, modular, co-production IGCC power plants each with chemical products tailored to meet the demands of specific regional markets. The catalysts employed in these co-production modules, for example water-gas-shift and Fischer-Tropsch catalysts, are readily poisoned by hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S), a sulfur contaminant, present in the coal-derived fuel gases. To prevent poisoning of these catalysts, the removal of H{sub 2}S down to the parts-per-billion level is necessary. Historically, research into the purification of coal-derived fuel gases has focused on dry technologies that offer the prospect of higher combined cycle efficiencies as well as improved thermal integration with co-production modules. Primarily, these concepts rely on a highly selective process separation step to remove low concentrations of H{sub 2}S present in the fuel gases and produce a concentrated stream of sulfur bearing effluent. This effluent must then undergo further processing to be converted to its final form, usually elemental sulfur. Ultimately, desulfurization of coal-derived fuel gases may cost as much as 15% of the total fixed capital investment (Chen et al., 1992). It is, therefore, desirable to develop new technology that can accomplish H{sub 2}S separation and direct conversion to elemental sulfur more efficiently and with a lower initial fixed capital investment.

  5. Development of a new hydrogen purification system by using hydrogen absorbing alloy for generator cooling; Suiso kyuzo gokin riyo hatsudenkinai suiso jundo kojo system no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haruki, N.; Sato, J.; Kogi, T.; Nishimura, Y. [Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., Osaka (Japan); Takeda, H. [Japan Steel works Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)] Fujita, T. [Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-20

    Hydrogen absorbing alloys have a number of useful functions, such as energy conversion, hydrogen storage and purification. As an application to separation and purification of hydrogen, we have developed a new hydrogen purification system by using a hydrogen absorbing alloy for generator cooling. For demonstration testing with an actual machine, a hydrogen recovery and purification device using 120kg of alloy was manufactured and installed on No.5 turbine-synchronous generator at Himeji No.2 power station. This device is designed to improve the purity of the hydrogen gas in generator containing impurities such as nitrogen and oxygen. The test results tell that the purity of the hydrogen gas in the generator can be enhanced from 98% to 99.9% and maintained at this level under continuous operation. An application of the hydrogen purification system is expected to decrease the generator`s windage loss, resulting higher generator efficiency. 2 refs., 18 figs.

  6. Systems and methods for generation of hydrogen peroxide vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Adam H; Eckels, Joel Del; Vu, Alexander K; Alcaraz, Armando; Reynolds, John G

    2014-12-02

    A system according to one embodiment includes a moisture trap for drying air; at least one of a first container and a second container; and a mechanism for at least one of: bubbling dried air from the moisture trap through a hydrogen peroxide solution in the first container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above a hydrogen peroxide solution in the second container for producing a hydrogen peroxide vapor. A method according one embodiment includes at least one of bubbling dried air through a hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a first hydrogen peroxide vapor, and passing dried air from the moisture trap into a headspace above the hydrogen peroxide solution in a container for producing a second hydrogen peroxide vapor. Additional systems and methods are also presented.

  7. Spark Discharge Generated Nanoparticles for Hydrogen Storage Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vons, V.A.

    2010-01-01

    One of the largest obstacles to the large scale application of hydrogen powered fuel cell vehicles is the absence of hydrogen storage methods suitable for application on-board of these vehicles. Metal hydrides are materials in which hydrogen is reversibly absorbed by one or more metals or combinatio

  8. Computational design of materials for solar hydrogen generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umezawa, Naoto

    Photocatalysis has a great potential for the production of hydrogen from aquerous solution under solar light. In this talk, two different approaches toward the computational materials desing for solar hydrogen generation will be presented. Tin (Sn), which has two major oxidation states, Sn2+ and Sn4+, is abundant on the earth's crust. Recently, visible-light responsive photocatalytc H2 evolution reaction was identified over a mixed valence tin oxide Sn3O4. We have carried out crystal structure prediction for mixed valence tin oxides in different atomic compositions under ambient pressure condition using advanced computational methods based on the evolutionary crystal-structure search and density-functional theory. The predicted novel crystal structures realize the desirable band gaps and band edge positions for H2 evolution under visible light irradiation. It is concluded that multivalent tin oxides have a great potential as an abundant, cheap and environmentally-benign solar-energy conversion photofunctional materials. Transition metal doping is effective for sensitizing SrTiO3 under visible light. We have theoretically investigated the roles of the doped Cr in STO based on hybrid density-functional calculations. Cr atoms are preferably substituting for Ti under any equilibrium growth conditions. The lower oxidation state Cr3+, which is stabilized under an n-type condition of STO, is found to be advantageous for the photocatalytic performance. It is firther predicted that lanthanum is the best codopant for stabilizing the favorable oxidation state, Cr3+. The prediction was validated by our experiments that La and Cr co-doped STO shows the best performance among examined samples. This work was supported by the Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST) Precursory Research for Embryonic Science and Technology (PRESTO) and International Research Fellow program of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) through project P14207.

  9. Progress in Catalytic Membrane Reactors for High Purity Hydrogen Production%膜催化反应器及其制氢技术的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    闫云飞; 张力; 李丽仙; 唐强

    2011-01-01

    As a kind of ideal fuel for fuel cell, hydrogen must be satisfied with the enough high purity. To produce high purity hydrogen at a low cost and large scale method has become a key research focus in the industrialization of fuel-cell technology. The membrane catalytic technology with catalysis and separation dual functions has been developed in recent years, which is a good method to produce high purity hydrogen. Based on the latest developments in the membrane catalytic reaction fields, the advantages, composition and type of membrane catalytic reactor are summarized. The preparation techniques, advantages and classification of inorganic membrane materials are described. Especially, the progress and application for high purity hydrogen production are reviewed in three kinds of catalytic membrane reactors, including oxygen-permeable membrane reactor, hydrogen-permeation membrane reactor and double-membranes reactor. The existing problems of catalytic membrane and membrane catalytic reactor in the industrialization process of hydrogen production using the membrane catalytic technology are also discussed. Additionally, the prospects of membrane catalytic reactors for hydrogen production is proposed.%燃料电池对其理想燃料氢气的纯度要求极高,如何低成本、大规模制取高纯氢气己成为燃料电池技术实现工业化的一个关键问题和研究热点.近年发展起来的兼具催化与分离双重功能的膜催化反应技术是实现制取高纯氢气的一个有效途径.本文结合膜催化反应领域的最新进展,综述了膜催化反应器的优点、组成、类型;介绍了无机膜材料的优点、分类及制备技术;详细综述了透氧膜催化反应器、透氢膜催化反应器及双膜催化反应器在制氢过程中的研究进展和应用,指出了膜催化反应制氢技术在工业化发展过程中存在的问题及应用前景.

  10. Investigation of a catalytic gas generator for the Space Shuttle APU. [hydrazine Auxiliary Propulsion Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, D. L.; Huxtable, D. D.; Blevins, D. R.

    1974-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to establish the capability of a monopropellant hydrazine catalytic gas generator to meet the requirements specified for the Space Shuttle APU. Detailed analytical and experimental studies were conducted on potential problem areas including long-term nitriding effects on materials, design variables affecting catalyst life, vehicle vibration effects, and catalyst oxidation/contamination. A full-scale gas generator, designed to operate at a chamber pressure of 750 psia and a flow rate of 0.36 lbm/sec, was fabricated and subjected to three separate life test series. The objective of the first test series was to demonstrate the capability of the gas generator to successfully complete 20 simulated Space Shuttle missions in steady-state operation. The gas generator was then refurbished and subjected to a second series of tests to demonstrate the pulse-mode capability of the gas generator during 20 simulated missions. The third series of tests was conducted with a refurbished reactor to further demonstrate pulse-mode capability with a modified catalyst bed.

  11. Controllable hydrogen generation performance from Al/NaBH4 composite activated by La metal and CoCl2 salt in pure water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Jianbo; FEI Yong; PAN Hua; FAN Meiqiang; WANG Liangliang; YAO Jun

    2012-01-01

    A novel composition of Al/NaBH4 mixture activated by La and CoCl2 in water for hydrogen generation was investigated.The composition had good stability at 298 K with high La content and low CoCl2 content,but presented good hydrogen generation performance with increasing global temperature.For example,The Al-15 wt.%La-5 wr.%CoCl2/NaBH4 mixture (mass ratio of 1∶1)yielded 1664 ml hydrogen/1 g mixture with 100% efficiency within 60 min at 333 K.The hydrogen generation rate and amount could be regulated by changing composition design,hydrolytic condition,etc.There existed a synergistic effect of La and CoCl2.Increasing La content was helpful to decrease crystal size of the mixture,but its hydrolysis byproduct La(OH)3 deposited on Al surface and had side effect on Al hydrolysis.Increased CoCl2 content was attributed to the producing of more actively catalytic sites Co2B/Al(OH)3 formed in the hydrolytic process.Co2B had dual catalytic effect on Al/NaBH4 hydrolysis.It deposited on Al surface and acted as a cathode of a micro galvanic cell.Co2B/Al(OH)3 was also a good promoter to NaBH4 hydrolysis.Therefore,the Al/NaBH4 mixture activated by La and CoCl2 may be applied as hydrogen generation material and the experimental data lays a foundation for designing practical hydrogen generators.

  12. Synergic catalytic effect of Ti hydride and Nb nanoparticles for improving hydrogenation and dehydrogenation kinetics of Mg-based nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiujuan Ma

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Mg-9.3 wt% (TiH1.971-TiH−0.7 wt% Nb nanocomposite has been synthesized by hydrogen plasma-metal reaction (HPMR approach to enhance the hydrogen sorption kinetics of Mg at moderate temperatures by providing nanosizing effect of increasing H “diffusion channels” and adding transition metallic catalysts. The Mg nanoparticles (NPs were in hexagonal shape range from 50 to 350 nm and the average size of the NPs was 177 nm. The small spherical TiH1.971, TiH and Nb NPs of about 25 nm uniformly decorated on the surface of the big Mg NPs. The Mg-TiH1.971-TiH-Nb nanocomposite could quickly absorb 5.6 wt% H2 within 5 min at 573 K and 4.5 wt% H2 within 5 min at 523 K, whereas the pure Mg prepared by HPMR could only absorb 4 and 1.5 wt% H2 at the same temperatures. TiH1.971, TiH and Nb NPs transformed into TiH2 and NbH during hydrogenation and recovered after dehydrogenation process. The apparent activation energies of the nanocomposite for hydrogenation and dehydrogenation were 45.0 and 50.7 kJ mol−1, which are much smaller than those of pure Mg NPs, 123.8 and 127.7 kJ mol−1. The improved sorption kinetics of the Mg-based nanocomposite at moderate temperatures and the small activation energy can be interpreted by the nanostructure of Mg and the synergic catalytic effects of Ti hydrides and Nb NPs.

  13. Size Control of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Using Reverse Microemulsion Method: Morphology, Reduction, and Catalytic Activity in CO Hydrogenation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Housaindokht

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Iron oxide nanoparticles were prepared by microemulsion method and evaluated in Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The precipitation process was performed in a single-phase microemulsion operating region. Different HLB values of surfactant were prepared by mixing of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS and Triton X-100. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, surface area, pore volume, average pore diameter, pore size distribution, and XRD patterns were used to analyze size distribution, shape, and structure of precipitated hematite nanoparticles. Furthermore, temperature programmed reduction (TPR and catalytic activity in CO hydrogenation were implemented to assess the performance of the samples. It was found that methane and CO2 selectivity and also the syngas conversion increased as the HLB value of surfactant decreased. In addition, the selectivity to heavy hydrocarbons and chain growth probability (α decreased by decreasing the catalyst crystal size.

  14. Hydrogen production by catalytic decomposition of methane using a Fe-based catalyst in a fluidized bed reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    D.Torres; S.de Llobet; J.L.Pinilla; M.J.Lázaro; I.Suelves; R.Moliner

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic decomposition of methane using a Fe-based catalyst for hydrogen production has been studied in this work.A Fe/Al2O3 catalyst previously developed by our research group has been tested in a fluidized bed reactor (FBR).A parametric study of the effects of some process variables,including reaction temperature and space velocity,is undertaken.The operating conditions strongly affect the catalyst performance.Methane conversion was increased by increasing the temperature and lowering the space velocity.Using temperatures between 700 and 900 ℃ and space velocities between 3 and 6 LN/(gcat·h),a methane conversion in the range of 25%-40% for the gas exiting the reactor could be obtained during a 6 h run.In addition,carbon was deposited in the form of nanofilaments (chain like nanofibers and multiwall nanotubes) with similar properties to those obtained in a fixed bed reactor.

  15. Synthesis and Catalytic Performance of Ni/SiO2 for Hydrogenation of 2-Methylfuran to 2-Methyltetrahydrofuran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Ding

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of Ni/SiO2 catalysts with different Ni content were prepared by sol-gel method for application in the synthesis of 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MTHF by hydrogenation of 2-methylfuran (2-MF. The catalyst structure was investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, and temperature programmed reduction (TPR. It is found that structures and catalytic performance of the catalysts were highly affected by the Ni content. The catalyst with a 25% Ni content had an appropriate size of the Ni species and larger BET surface area and produced a higher 2-MF conversion with enhanced selectivity in 2-MTHF.

  16. Preparation and Characterization of A New Dinuclear Ruthenium Complex with BDPX Ligand and Its Catalytic Hydrogenation Reactions for Cinnamaldehyde

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG,Yuan-You(唐元友); LI,Rui-Xiang(李瑞祥); LI,Xian-Jun(李贤均); WONG,Ning-Bew(黄宁表); TIN,Kim-Chung(田金忠); ZHANG,Zhe-Ying(张哲英); MAK,Thomas C.W.(麦松威)

    2004-01-01

    A new anionic dinuclear ruthenium complex bearing 1,2-bis(diphenylphosphinomethyl)benzene (BDPX)[NH2Et2][{RuCl (BDPX)}2(μ-Cl)3] (1) was synthesized and its structure was determined by an X-ray crystallographic analysis. This result indicated that complex 1 consisted of an anion dinuclear BDPX-Ru and a cationic diethylammonium. The crystal belonged to monoclinic system, C2/c space group with a=3.3552(7) nm, b= 1.8448(4)nm, c=2.4265(5) nm, β= 101.89(3)° and Z=8. The catalytic hydrogenation activities and selectivities of complex 1 for cinnamaldehyde were investigated.

  17. Generation 9 polyamidoamine dendrimer encapsulated platinum nanoparticle mimics catalase size, shape, and catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xinyu; Zhang, Yincong; Li, Tianfu; Tian, Wende; Zhang, Qiang; Cheng, Yiyun

    2013-04-30

    Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) encapsulated platinum nanoparticles were synthesized and used as catalase mimics. Acetylated generation 9 (Ac-G9) PAMAM dendrimer with a molecular size around 10 nm was used as a template to synthesize platinum nanoparticles. The feeding molar ratio of Pt(4+) and Ac-G9 is 2048, and the synthesized platinum nanoparticle (Ac-G9/Pt NP) has an average size of 3.3 nm. Ac-G9/Pt NP has a similar molecular size and globular shape with catalase (~11 nm). The catalytic activity of Ac-G9/Pt NP on the decomposition of H2O2 is approaching that of catalase at 37 °C. Ac-G9/Pt NP shows differential response to the changes of pH and temperature compared with catalase, which can be explained by different catalytic mechanisms of Ac-G9/Pt NP and catalase. Ac-G9/Pt NP also shows horseradish peroxidase activity and is able to scavenge free radicals such as di(phenyl)-(2,4,6-trinitrophenyl)iminoazanium (DPPH). Furthermore, Ac-G9/Pt NP shows excellent biocompatibility on different cell lines and can down-regulate H2O2-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in these cells. These results suggest that dendrimers are promising mimics of proteins with different sizes and Ac-G9/Pt NP can be used as an alternative candidate of catalase to decrease oxidation stress in cells.

  18. Catalytic activity of Pd-doped Cu nanoparticles for hydrogenation as a single-atom-alloy catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xinrui; Fu, Qiang; Luo, Yi

    2014-05-14

    The single atom alloy of extended surfaces is known to provide remarkably enhanced catalytic performance toward heterogeneous hydrogenation. Here we demonstrate from first principles calculations that this approach can be extended to nanostructures, such as bimetallic nanoparticles. The catalytic properties of the single-Pd-doped Cu55 nanoparticles have been systemically examined for H2 dissociation as well as H atom adsorption and diffusion, following the concept of single atom alloy. It is found that doping a single Pd atom at the edge site of the Cu55 shell can considerably reduce the activation energy of H2 dissociation, while the single Pd atom doped at the top site or in the inner layers is much less effective. The H atom adsorption on Cu55 is slightly stronger than that on the Cu(111) surface; however, a larger nanoparticle that contains 147 atoms could effectively recover the weak binding of the H atoms. We have also investigated the H atom diffusion on the 55-atom nanoparticle and found that spillover of the produced H atoms could be a feasible process due to the low diffusion barriers. Our results have demonstrated that facile H2 dissociation and weak H atom adsorption could be combined at the nanoscale. Moreover, the effects of doping one more Pd atom on the H2 dissociation and H atom adsorption have also been investigated. We have found that both the doping Pd atoms in the most stable configuration could independently exhibit their catalytic activity, behaving as two single-atom-alloy catalysts.

  19. Wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation of phenol with FeAC (iron-embedded activated carbon) catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, Rey-May; Chen, Shih-Hsiung; Huang, Cheng-Hsien; Hung, Mu-Ya; Chang, Jing-Song; Lai, Cheng-Lee

    2010-01-01

    This investigation aims at exploring the catalytic oxidation activity of iron-embedded activated carbon (FeAC) and the application for the degradation of phenol in the wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO). FeAC catalysts were prepared by pre-impregnating iron in coconut shell with various iron loadings in the range of 27.5 to 46.5% before they were activated. The FeAC catalysts were characterised by measuring their surface area, pore distribution, functional groups on the surface, and X-ray diffraction patterns. The effects of iron loading strongly inhibited the pore development of the catalyst but benefited the oxidation activity in WHPCO. It was found that the complete conversion of phenol was observed with all FeAC catalysts in oxidation. High level of chemical oxygen demand (COD) abatement can be achieved within the first 30 minutes of oxidation. The iron embedded in the activated carbon showed good performance in the degradation and mineralisation of phenol during the oxidation due to the active sites as iron oxides formed on the surface of the activated carbon. It was found that the embedding irons were presented in gamma-Fe(2)O(3), alpha-Fe(2)O(3), and alpha-FeCOOH forms on the activated carbon. The aging tests on FeAC catalysts showed less activity loss, and less iron leaching was found after four oxidation runs.

  20. Modeling and Simulation of the Hydrogenation of α-Methylstyrene on Catalytically Active Metal Foams as Tubular Reactor Packing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Lali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a one-dimensional reactor model for a tubular reactor packed with a catalytically active foam packing with a pore density of 30 PPI in cocurrent upward flow in the example of hydrogenation reaction of α-methylstyrene to cumene. This model includes material, enthalpy, and momentum balances as well as continuity equations. The model was solved within the parameter space applied for experimental studies under assumption of a bubbly flow. The method of orthogonal collocation on finite elements was applied. For isothermal and polytropic processes and steady state conditions, axial profiles for concentration, temperature, fluid velocities, pressure, and liquid holdup were computed and the conversions for various gas and liquid flow rates were validated with experimental results. The obtained results were also compared in terms of space time yield and catalytic activity with experimental results and stirred tank and also with random packed bed reactor. The comparison shows that the application of solid foams as reactor packing is advantageous compared to the monolithic honeycombs and random packed beds.

  1. Improvement of hydrogen isotope exchange reactions on Li4SiO4 ceramic pebble by catalytic metals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Jian Xiao; Chun Mei Kang; Xiao Jun Chen; Xiao Ling Gao; Yang Ming Luo; Sheng Hu; Xiao Lin Wang

    2012-01-01

    Li4SiO4 ceramic pebble is considered as a candidate tritium breeding material of Chinese Helium Cooled Solid Breeder Test Blanket Module (CH HCSB TBM) for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER).In this paper,Li4SiO4 ceramic pebbles deposited with catalytic metals,including Pt,Pd,Ru and Ir,were prepared by wet impregnation method.The metal particles on Li4SiO4 pebble exhibit a good promotion of hydrogen isotope exchange reactions in H2-DzO gas system,with conversion equilibrium temperature reduction of 200-300 ℃.The out-of-pile tritium release experiments were performed using 1.0 wt% Pt/Li4SiO4 and Li4SiO4 pebbles irradiated in a thermal neutron reactor.The thermal desorption spectroscopy shows that Pt was effective to increase the tritium release rate at lower temperatures,and the ratio of tritium molecule (HT) to tritiated water (HTO) of 1.0 wt% Pt/Li4SiO4 was much more than that of Li4SiO4,which released mainly as HTO.Thus,catalytic metals deposited on Li4SiO4 pebble may help to accelerate the recovery of bred tritium particularly in low temperature region,and increase the tritium molecule form released from the tritium breeding materials.

  2. Molybdatophosphoric acid as an efficient catalyst for the catalytic and chemoselective oxidation of sulfides to sulfoxides using urea hydrogen peroxide as a commercially available oxidant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ALIREZA HASANINEJAD

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available An efficient procedure for the chemoselective oxidation of alkyl (aryl sulfides to the corresponding sulfoxides using urea hydrogen peroxide (UHP in the presence of a catalytic amount of molybdatophosphoric acid at room temperature is described. The advantages of described method are: generality, high yield and chemoselectivity, short reaction time, low cost and compliment with green chemistry protocols.

  3. Catalytic reduction of nitrate and nitrite ions by hydrogen : investigation of the reaction mechanism over Pd and Pd-Cu catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilinitch, OM; Nosova, LV; Gorodetskii, VV; Ivanov, VP; Trukhan, SN; Gribov, EN; Bogdanov, SV; Cuperus, FP

    2000-01-01

    The catalytic behavior of mono- and bimetallic catalysts with Pd and/or Cu supported over gamma-Al2O3 in the reduction of aqueous nitrate and nitrite ions by hydrogen was investigated. The composition of the supported metal catalysts was analysed using secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and X-ra

  4. Thermo catalytic decomposition of methane over Pd/AC and Pd/CB catalysts for hydrogen production and carbon nanofibers formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Srilatha

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen production studies have been carried using Thermo Catalytic Decomposition (TCD Unit. Thermo catalytic decomposition of methane is an attractive route for COx free production of hydrogen required in fuel cells. Although metal based catalysts produce hydrogen at low temperatures, carbon formed during methane decomposition reaction rapidly deactivates the catalyst. The present work compares the results of 10 wt% Pd supported on commercially available activated carbon and carbon black catalysts (samples coded as Pd10/AC and Pd10/CB respectively for methane decomposition reaction. Hydrogen has been produced by thermo catalytic decomposition of methane at 1123K and Volume Hourly Space Velocity (VHSV of 1.62 L/h g on the activity of both the catalysts has been studied. XRD of the above catalysts revealed, moderately crystalline peaks of Pd which may be responsible for the increase in catalytic life and formation of carbon fibers. Also during life studies (850°C and 54 sccm of methane it has been observed that the activity of carbon black is sustainable for a longer time compared to that of activated carbon.

  5. Catalytic enantioselective addition of hydrogen cyanide to benzaldehyde and p-methoxybenzaldehyde using cyclo-His-(αMe)Phe as catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulst, Ron; Broxterman, Quirinus B.; Kamphuis, Johan; Formaggio, Fernando; Crisma, Marco; Toniolo, Claudio; Kellogg, Richard M.

    1997-01-01

    Two cyclo-dipeptides based on His and the unnatural (αMe)Phe have been examined as catalysts in the enantioselective addition of hydrogen cyanide to benzaldehyde and p-methoxy-benzaldehyde. The synthesis, catalytic activity and NMR study towards the mechanism of this reaction are presented.

  6. Catalytic enantioselective addition of hydrogen cyanide to benzaldehyde and p-methoxybenzaldehyde using cyclo-His-(alpha-Me)Phe as catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hulst, R; Broxterman, QB; Kamphuis, J; Formaggio, F; Crisma, M; Toniolo, C; Kellogg, RM

    1997-01-01

    Two cyclo-dipeptides based on His and the unnatural (alpha Me)Phe have been examined as catalysts in the enantioselective addition of hydrogen cyanide to benzaldehyde and p-methoxy-benzaldehyde. The synthesis, catalytic activity and NMR study towards the mechanism of this reaction are presented. (C)

  7. Graphene-based materials: fabrication, characterization and application for the decontamination of wastewater and wastegas and hydrogen storage/generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hou; Yuan, Xingzhong; Wu, Yan; Huang, Huajun; Peng, Xin; Zeng, Guangming; Zhong, Hua; Liang, Jie; Ren, Miaomiao

    2013-07-01

    Graphene, as an ideal two-dimensional material and single-atom layer of graphite, has attracted exploding interests in multidisciplinary research because of its unique structure and exceptional physicochemical properties. Especially, graphene-based materials offer a wide range of potentialities for environmental remediation and energy applications. This review shows an extensive overview of the main principles and the recent synthetic technologies about designing and fabricating various innovative graphene-based materials. Furthermore, an extensive list of graphene-based sorbents and catalysts from vast literature has been compiled. The adsorptive and catalytic properties of graphene-based materials for the removal of various pollutants and hydrogen storage/production as available in the literature are presented. Tremendous adsorption capacity, excellent catalytic performance and abundant availability are the significant factors making these materials suitable alternatives for environmental pollutant control and energy-related system, especially in terms of the removal of pollutants in water, gas cleanup and purification, and hydrogen generation and storage. Meanwhile, a brief discussion is also included on the influence of graphene materials on the environment, and its toxicological effects. Lastly, some unsolved subjects together with major challenges in this germinating area of research are highlighted and discussed. Conclusively, the expanding of graphene-based materials in the field of adsorption and catalysis science represents a viable and powerful tool, resulting in the superior improvement of environmental pollution control and energy development.

  8. Integrated photoelectrochemical energy storage: solar hydrogen generation and supercapacitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Xinhui; Luo, Jingshan; Zeng, Zhiyuan; Guan, Cao; Zhang, Yongqi; Tu, Jiangping; Zhang, Hua; Fan, Hong Jin

    2012-01-01

    Current solar energy harvest and storage are so far realized by independent technologies (such as solar cell and batteries), by which only a fraction of solar energy is utilized. It is highly desirable to improve the utilization efficiency of solar energy. Here, we construct an integrated photoelectrochemical device with simultaneous supercapacitor and hydrogen evolution functions based on TiO(2)/transition metal hydroxides/oxides core/shell nanorod arrays. The feasibility of solar-driven pseudocapacitance is clearly demonstrated, and the charge/discharge is indicated by reversible color changes (photochromism). In such an integrated device, the photogenerated electrons are utilized for H(2) generation and holes for pseudocapacitive charging, so that both the reductive and oxidative energies are captured and converted. Specific capacitances of 482 F g(-1) at 0.5 A g(-1) and 287 F g(-1) at 1 A g(-1) are obtained with TiO(2)/Ni(OH)(2) nanorod arrays. This study provides a new research strategy for integrated pseudocapacitor and solar energy application.

  9. Durable pd-based alloy and hydrogen generation membrane thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benn, Raymond C.; Opalka, Susanne M.; Vanderspurt, Thomas Henry

    2010-02-02

    A durable Pd-based alloy is used for a H.sub.2-selective membrane in a hydrogen generator, as in the fuel processor of a fuel cell plant. The Pd-based alloy includes Cu as a binary element, and further includes "X", where "X" comprises at least one metal from group "M" that is BCC and acts to stabilize the .beta. BCC phase for stability during operating temperatures. The metal from group "M" is selected from the group consisting of Fe, Cr, Nb, Ta, V, Mo, and W, with Nb and Ta being most preferred. "X" may further comprise at least one metal from a group "N" that is non-BCC, preferably FCC, that enhances other properties of the membrane, such as ductility. The metal from group "N" is selected from the group consisting of Ag, Au, Re, Ru, Rh, Y, Ce, Ni, Ir, Pt, Co, La and In. The at. % of Pd in the binary Pd--Cu alloy ranges from about 35 at. % to about 55 at. %, and the at. % of "X" in the higher order alloy, based on said binary alloy, is in the range of about 1 at. % to about 15 at. %. The metals are selected according to a novel process.

  10. Hydrogen Plasma Generation with 200 MHz RF Ion Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jeongtae; Park, Kwangmook; Seo, Dong Hyuk; Kim, Han-Sung; Kwon, Hyeok-Jung; Cho, Yong-Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The ion source for the system is required to be rugged with 2000 hours maintenance free operation time because it is installed in the vessel filled with SF6 gas at the pressure of 10 bar. A 200 MHz RF ion source is considered as an ion source. It is a simple construction and provides long life operation. The specifications of the ion source are 5 kV extraction voltage and 1 mA beam current referenced to the proton. RF ion source has been developed and undergone a performance test. Results of the test are presented. 200 MHz RF ion source is designated and manufactured. First of all test stand test of ion source are set up for a performance test of ion source. It includes a RF ion source, a 200-MHz RF system, beam extraction system, vacuum system, beam extraction system, and beam diagnostic system. At pressure of 1.2E-5 torr, hydrogen plasma is generated with net RF power 70 W. Pyrex tube surrounded by an inductive coil takes the role of vessel and discharge is enhanced with field of permanent magnets.

  11. Catalytic Ring Hydrogenation of Benzoic Acid with Supported Transition Metal Catalysts in scCO2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengyu Zhao

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available The ring hydrogenation of benzoic acid to cyclohexanecarboxylic acid overcharcoal-supported transition metal catalysts in supercritical CO2 medium has been studiedin the present work. The cyclohexanecarboxylic acid can be produced efficiently insupercritical CO2 at the low reaction temperature of 323 K. The presence of CO2 increasesthe reaction rate and several parameters have been discussed.

  12. Catalytic Ring Hydrogenation of Benzoic Acid with Supported Transition Metal Catalysts in scCO2

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    The ring hydrogenation of benzoic acid to cyclohexanecarboxylic acid over charcoal-supported transition metal catalysts in supercritical CO2 medium has been studied in the present work. The cyclohexanecarboxylic acid can be produced efficiently in supercritical CO2 at the low reaction temperature of 323 K. The presence of CO2 increases the reaction rate and several parameters have been discussed.

  13. Catalytic activity of in situ synthesized MoWNi sulfides in hydrogenation of aromatic hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topolyuk, Yu. A.; Maksimov, A. L.; Kolyagin, Yu. G.

    2017-02-01

    MoWNi-sulfide catalysts were obtained in situ by thermal decomposition of metal-polymer precursors based on the copolymers of polymaleic anhydride in a hydrocarbon raw material. The activity of the synthesized catalysts in hydrogenation of bicyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was studied, and the composition and structure of active phase nanoparticles were determined.

  14. The remarkable effect of oxygen on the N2 selectivity of water catalytic denitrification by hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Costas L; Costa, Costas N; Efstathiou, Angelos M

    2007-02-01

    The selective catalytic reduction of nitrates (NO3-) in pure water toward N2 formation by the use of gaseous H2 and in the presence of O2 (air) at 1 atm total pressure and 25 degrees C has been investigated over Pd-Cu supported on various mixed metal oxides, x wt % MO(x(/gamma-Al2O3 (MO(x) = CeO2, SrO, Mn2O3, Cr2O3, Y2O3, and TiO2). It is demonstrated for the firsttime that a remarkable improvement in N2 reaction selectivity (by 80 percentage units) can be achieved when oxygen is present in the reducing feed gas stream. In particular, significantly lower reaction selectivities toward NH4+ and NO2- can be obtained, whereas the rate of NO3- conversion is not significantly affected. Moreover, it was shown thatthe same effect is obtained over the Pd-Cu-supported catalysts irrespective to the chemical composition of support and the initial concentration of nitrates in water used. The Pd-Cu clusters supported on 4.8 wt%TiO2/gamma-Al2O3 resulted in a solid with the best catalytic behavior compared with the rest of supports examined, both in the presence and in the absence of oxygen in the reducing feed gas stream. DRIFTS studies performed following catalytic reduction by H2 of NO3- in water revealed that the presence of TiO2 in the Pd-Cu/TiO2-Al2O3 system enhanced the reactivity of adsorbed bidentate nitrate species toward H2. Nitrosyl species adsorbed on the alumina and titania support surfaces are considered as active intermediate species of the selective catalytic reduction of NO3- by H2 in water. Pd-Cu/TiO2-Al2O3 appears to be the most selective catalyst ever reported in the literature for the reduction of nitrates present in pure water into N2 by a reducing gas mixture of H2/air.

  15. Hydrogen generation by the hydrolysis reaction of ball-milled aluminium-lithium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingyu; Zhao, Zhongwei; Liu, Xuheng; Hao, Mingming; Chen, Ailiang; Tang, Zhongyang

    2014-05-01

    The addition of Li can prevent an inert alumina film from forming on the surface of Al alloy particles, allowing the rapid hydrogen generation of Al alloys to be achieved. However, because the Li content is less than 10%, the hydrogen generation rate and hydrogen yield of Al-Li alloys are significantly decreased. In this work, NaCl is introduced to prepare Al-Li alloys with low Li contents by ball milling. The research results show that by increasing the amount of NaCl added, the ball milling time and Li content can effectively improve the hydrogen generation of the alloys. Under optimal preparation conditions, the ultimate hydrogen yield of Al-Li alloys can reach 100%. The initial water temperature has almost no effect on the generation of hydrogen, even at 0 °C. Ca2+ and Mg2+ can combine with OH- to form the insoluble compounds Ca(OH)2 and Mg(OH)2, which can prevent hydrogen generation. NO3- reacts with Al to form ammonia and reduce the hydrogen yield of the alloys. Therefore, Al-Li alloys should be prevented from reacting with water containing Ca2+, Mg2+ and NO3-. Al-Li alloys must be stored in isolation from air to maintain good hydrogen-generation performances.

  16. Electroless Plated Co-Ni-P-B/Ni Foam Catalyst for Hydrogen Generation from Sodium Borohydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Daeil; Kim, Taegyu

    2016-02-01

    Co-Ni-P-B catalyst supported on Ni foam was prepared using electroless plating for hydrogen generation from an alkaline NaBH4 solution. Co-B, Co-P-B, and Co-Ni-B were prepared for comparison. Surface morphology of catalyst/Ni foams were observed using SEM analysis. The Co- Ni-P-B/Ni foam catalyst showed the superior performance on hydrogen generation rate due to the uniform formation of catalyst particles on the surface of Ni foam. Characteristics of hydrogen generation rate on the Co-N-P-B/Ni foam catalyst were investigated at the variety of NaBH4 and NaOH concentrations. The hydrogen generation rate increased with decreasing NaBH4 concentration, while increasing NaOH concentration. Durability test was performed, resulting in the stable hydrogen generation for 6 hours.

  17. Commercializing larger PEM-based hydrogen generators for energy and industrial applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moulthrop, L.; Anderson, E.; Chow, O.; Friedland, R.; Porter, S. [Distributed Energy Systems, Wallingford, CT (United States)

    2007-07-01

    As economic, security and environmental drivers converge, there is a demand for larger and better on-site hydrogen generators. This paper outlined the measures needed to scale-up a commercial 12 kg/day proton exchange membrane (PEM) hydrogen generator to a 100 to 500 kg hydrogen per day capacity range. The commercial hydrogen generators using PEM water electrolysis are well proven and currently serve industrial applications worldwide in more than 50 countries. However, North American liquid hydrogen shortages, increasing trucking costs, developing economies with no liquid infrastructure, utilities, and forklift fuel cell fueling applications are all working to increase market demand for commercial on-site hydrogen generation. Water electrolysis was recently identified as the hydrogen technology that will enable solar renewable energy to fill the 17 TW carbon free energy gap projected worldwide by 2050. The scale-up must consider fixed cost as well as operating costs of the electrolyzer and power conditioning, compression and storage ancillaries. It was noted that although commercial applications may be well-satisfied with a 100 kg hydrogen/day PEM hydrogen generator module for the next five years, after that, the 500 kg hydrogen/day module will be required for hydrogen vehicle fueling stations, utility load-leveling, and renewables to hydrogen generation. It was suggested that a paced development effort can be synchronized with evolving fuel cell markets and market price points. The projection of future market price points can be generated using market data and specific cases of the H2A model developed by the United States Department of Energy for electrolysis based fueling. H2A modeling and system analysis identify the components and subsystem development priorities, requirements, and challenges. Codes and standards are maturing to help manufacturers and certification authorities make safe and compliant equipment. It was noted that this development effort is

  18. Sub-10 nm Platinum Nanocrystals with Size and Shape Control: Catalytic Study for Ethylene and Pyrrole Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsung, Chia-Kuang; Kuhn, John N.; Huang, Wenyu; Aliaga, Cesar; Hung, Ling-I; Somorjai, Gabor A.; Yang, Peidong

    2009-03-02

    Platinum nanocubes and nanopolyhedra with tunable size from 5 to 9 nm were synthesized by controlling the reducing rate of metal precursor ions in a one-pot polyol synthesis. A two-stage process is proposed for the simultaneous control of size and shape. In the first stage, the oxidation state of the metal ion precursors determined the nucleation rate and consequently the number of nuclei. The reaction temperature controlled the shape in the second stage by regulation of the growth kinetics. These well-defined nanocrystals were loaded into MCF-17 mesoporous silica for examination of catalytic properties. Pt loadings and dispersions of the supported catalysts were determined by elemental analysis (ICP-MS) and H2 chemisorption isotherms, respectively. Ethylene hydrogenation rates over the Pt nanocrystals were independent of both size and shape and comparable to Pt single crystals. For pyrrole hydrogenation, the nanocubes enhanced ring-opening ability and thus showed a higher selectivity to n-butylamine as compared to nanopolyhedra.

  19. Experimental studies on catalytic hydrogen recombiners for light water reactors; Experimentelle Untersuchungen zu katalytischen Wasserstoffkombinatoren fuer Leichtwasserreaktoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drinovac, P.

    2006-06-19

    In the course of core melt accidents in nuclear power plants a large amount of hydrogen can be produced and form an explosive or even detonative gas mixture with aerial oxygen in the reactor building. In the containment atmosphere of pressurized water reactors hydrogen combines a phlogistically with the oxygen present to form water vapor even at room temperature. In the past, experimental work conducted at various facilities has contributed little or nothing to an understanding of the operating principles of catalytic recombiners. Hence, the purpose of the present study was to conduct detailed investigations on a section of a recombiner essentially in order to deepen the understanding of reaction kinetics and heat transport processes. The results of the experiments presented in this dissertation form a large data base of measurements which provides an insight into the processes taking place in recombiners. The reaction-kinetic interpretation of the measured data confirms and deepens the diffusion theory - proposed in an earlier study. Thus it is now possible to validate detailed numeric models representing the processes in recombiners. Consequently the present study serves to broaden and corroborate competence in this significant area of reactor technology. In addition, the empirical knowledge thus gained may be used for a critical reassessment of previous numeric model calculations. (orig.)

  20. Catalytic decomposition of methane to COx-free hydrogen and carbon nanotubes over Co–W/MgO catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed E. Awadallah

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bimetallic catalysts containing a series of Co/W at 40/10, 30/20, 20/30 and 10/40 wt% supported on MgO with a total metal content of 50 wt% were prepared and used for the catalytic decomposition of methane to COx-free hydrogen and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs. The solid fresh and exhausted catalysts were characterized structurally and chemically through XRD, TPR, BET, TGA, TEM and Raman spectroscopy. The 40%Co–10%W/MgO catalyst exhibited the highest activity for the production of both hydrogen and MWCNTs. The formation of a large amount of non-interacted Co3O4 species is considered as the main reason for the catalyst superiority in its activity. On the contrary, catalysts formulations of 20%Co–30%W and 10%Co–40%W demonstrated the formation of a large amount of hardly reducible CoWO4 and MgWO4 particles causing lower activity of these catalysts toward methane decomposition as evidenced through the XRD and TPR results.

  1. Catalytic conversion of biomass-derived feedstocks into olefins and aromatics with ZSM-5: the hydrogen to carbon effective ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Huiyan; Cheng, Yu-Ting; Vispute, Tushar; Xiao, R; Huber, George W.

    2011-01-01

    Catalytic conversion of ten biomass-derived feedstocks, i.e.glucose, sorbitol, glycerol, tetrahydrofuran, methanol and different hydrogenated bio-oil fractions, with different hydrogen to carbon effective (H/C{sub eff}) ratios was conducted in a gas-phase flow fixed-bed reactor with a ZSM-5 catalyst. The aromatic + olefin yield increases and the coke yield decreases with increasing H/C{sub eff} ratio of the feed. There is an inflection point at a H/C{sub eff} ratio = 1.2, where the aromatic + olefin yield does not increase as rapidly as it does prior to this point. The ratio of olefins to aromatics also increases with increasing H/C{sub eff} ratio. CO and CO₂ yields go through a maximum with increasing H/C{sub eff} ratio. The deactivation rate of the catalyst decreases significantly with increasing H/C{sub eff} ratio. Coke was formed from both homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) for the ten feedstocks showed that the formation of coke from homogeneous reactions decreases with increasing H/C{sub eff} ratio. Feedstocks with a H/C{sub eff} ratio less than 0.15 produce large amounts of undesired coke (more than 12 wt%) from homogeneous decomposition reactions. This paper shows that the conversion of biomass-derived feedstocks into aromatics and olefins using zeolite catalysts can be explained by the H/C{sub eff} ratio of the feed.

  2. Selective Electrochemical Generation of Hydrogen Peroxide from Water Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine Anton; Nørskov, Jens K.

    2015-01-01

    device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen......Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. The present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized...... evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e(-) water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e(-) oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates...

  3. Catalytic enantioselective amination of alcohols by the use of borrowing hydrogen methodology: cooperative catalysis by iridium and a chiral phosphoric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yao; Lim, Ching-Si; Sim, Derek Sui Boon; Pan, Hui-Jie; Zhao, Yu

    2014-01-27

    The catalytic asymmetric reduction of ketimines has been explored extensively for the synthesis of chiral amines, with reductants ranging from Hantzsch esters, silanes, and formic acid to H2 gas. Alternatively, the amination of alcohols by the use of borrowing hydrogen methodology has proven a highly atom economical and green method for the production of amines without an external reductant, as the alcohol substrate serves as the H2 donor. A catalytic enantioselective variant of this process for the synthesis of chiral amines, however, was not known. We have examined various transition-metal complexes supported by chiral ligands known for asymmetric hydrogenation reactions, in combination with chiral Brønsted acids, which proved essential for the formation of the imine intermediate and the transfer-hydrogenation step. Our studies led to an asymmetric amination of alcohols to provide access to a wide range of chiral amines with good to excellent enantioselectivity.

  4. Study on the Hydrogen Generation Rules of Coal Oxidation at Low Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shao He

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Based on a hydrogen desorption experiment and a comparative experiment of low-temperature coal oxidation performed prior to and after hydrogen desorption, this paper demonstrates the occurrence of hydrogen adsorption in coal at room temperature and reveals that the hydrogen generated in the process of coal oxidation originates from coal oxidation and desorption. The results show that the hydrogen accumulation generated only by coal oxidation and the hydrogen accumulation generated solely by desorption both exhibit a LangmuirEXT1 function equation relationship with temperature. The result of the present research can provide a theoretical basis for the accurate prediction of spontaneous coal combustion and is of great significance to the prevention and control of coal spontaneous combustion in coal mines, industrial coal storage and transportation.

  5. Surface features and catalytic performance of platinum/alumina catalysts in slurry-phase hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gutierrez-Ortiz, M.A.; Gonzalez-Marcos, M.P.; Arnaiz-Aguilar, S.; Gonzalez-Marcos, J.A.; Gonzalez-Velasco, J.R. (Univ. del Pais Vasco/Euskal Hirrika Unibertsitatea, Bilbao (Spain). Dept. de Ingenierlla Quimica)

    1993-11-01

    Several platinum catalysts supported on three commercial [gamma]-aluminas were prepared by impregnation and anionic exchange using aqueous solutions of H[sub 2]PtCl[sub 6]. A number of methods were used to characterize the precursors as well as the final catalysts, including TGA, TPR, and hydrogen chemisorption at 298 K. TPR measurements showed two reduction peaks for the catalysts: the first one corresponding to reduction of the metal precursor to platinum and the second one associated to formation of a surface complex, Pt-Al[sub 2]O[sub 3[minus]x], With partial reduction of the support. The activity of the different catalysts was tested in the slurry-phase hydrogenation of benzene. The results obtained in the activity measurements have been correlated to the characteristics of the catalysts.

  6. High Intrinsic Catalytic Activity of Two-Dimensional Boron Monolayers for Hydrogen Evolution Reaction

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, Li; Ouyang, Yixin; Wang, Jinlan

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) boron monolayers have been successfully synthesized on silver substrate very recently. Their potential application is thus of great significance. In this work, we explore the possibility of boron monolayers (BMs) as electrocatalysts for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) by first-principle method. Our calculations show that the BMs are active catalysts for HER with nearly zero free energy of hydrogen adsorption, metallic conductivity and plenty of active sites in the basal plane. The effect of the substrate on the HER activity is further assessed. It is found that the substrate has a positive effect on the HER performance caused by the competitive effect of mismatch strain and charge transfer. The indepth understanding of the structure dependent HER activity is also provided.

  7. Low-Energy Catalytic Electrolysis for Simultaneous Hydrogen Evolution and Lignin Depolymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xu; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Zhe; Mulyadi, Arie; Brittain, Alex; Gong, Jian; Deng, Yulin

    2017-01-19

    Here, a new proton-exchange-membrane electrolysis is presented, in which lignin was used as the hydrogen source at the anode for hydrogen production. Either polyoxometalate (POM) or FeCl3 was used as the catalyst and charge-transfer agent at the anode. Over 90 % Faraday efficiency was achieved. In a thermal-insulation reactor, the heat energy could be maintained at a very low level for continuous operation. Compared to the best alkaline-water electrolysis reported in literature, the electrical-energy consumption could be 40 % lower with lignin electrolysis. At the anode, the Kraft lignin (KL) was oxidized to aromatic chemicals by POM or FeCl3 , and reduced POM or Fe ions were regenerated during the electrolysis. Structure analysis of the residual KL indicated a reduction of the amount of hydroxyl groups and the cleavage of ether bonds. The results suggest that POM- or FeCl3 -mediated electrolysis can significantly reduce the electrolysis energy consumption in hydrogen production and, simultaneously, depolymerize lignin to low-molecular-weight value-added aromatic chemicals.

  8. Catalytic hydrogen/oxygen reaction assisted the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) startup at subzero temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shucheng; Yu, Hongmei; Hou, Junbo; Shao, Zhigang; Yi, Baolian; Ming, Pingwen; Hou, Zhongjun

    Fuel cells for automobile application need to operate in a wide temperature range including freezing temperature. However, the rapid startup of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) at subfreezing temperature, e.g., -20 °C, is very difficult. A cold-start procedure was developed, which made hydrogen and oxygen react to heat the fuel cell considering that the FC flow channel was the characteristic of microchannel reactor. The effect of hydrogen and oxygen reaction on fuel cell performance at ambient temperature was also investigated. The electrochemical characterizations such as I- V plot and cyclic voltammetry (CV) were performed. The heat generated rate for either the single cell or the stack was calculated. The results showed that the heat generated rate was proportional to the gas flow rate when H 2 concentration and the active area were constant. The fuel cell temperature rose rapidly and steadily by controlling gas flow rate.

  9. H2CAP - Hydrogen assisted catalytic biomass pyrolysis for green fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arndal, Trine Marie Hartmann; Høj, Martin; Jensen, Peter Arendt

    2014-01-01

    that can be used to upgrade the crude bio-oil to fuel-grade oil. The development of the HDO process is challenged by rapid catalyst deactivation, instability of the pyrolysis oil, poorly investigated reaction conditions and a high complexity and variability of the input oil composition. However, continuous...... catalytic hydropyrolysis coupled with downstream HDO of the pyrolysis vapors before condensation shows promise (Figure 1). A bench scale experimental setup will be constructed for the continuous conversion of solid biomass (100g /h) to low oxygen, fuel-grade bio-oil. The aim is to provide a proof......-of-concept for the proposed process(Figure 1), to understand the reaction mechanisms of HDO, to develop highly active and durable catalysts for hydropyrolysis and HDO and to optimize the operating conditions; all in order to develop a sustainable production of green transportation fuels from biomass.To support the process...

  10. Biomedical and Forensic Applications of Combined Catalytic Hydrogenation-Stable Isotope Ratio Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A. Sephton

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies of biological molecules such as fatty acids and the steroid hormones have the potential to benefit enormously from stable carbon isotope ratio measurements of individual molecules. In their natural form, however, the body’s molecules interact too readily with laboratory equipment designed to separate them for accurate measurements to be made.Some methods overcome this problem by adding carbon to the target molecule, but this can irreversibly overprint the carbon source ‘signal’. Hydropyrolysis is a newly-applied catalytic technique that delicately strips molecules of their functional groups but retains their carbon skeletons and stereochemistries intact, allowing precise determination of the carbon source. By solving analytical problems, the new technique is increasing the ability of scientists to pinpoint molecular indicators of disease, elucidate metabolic pathways and recognise administered substances in forensic investigations.

  11. NaBH4 generator integrated with energy conversion device based on hydrogen combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netskina, O. V.; Fursenko, R. V.; Komova, O. V.; Odintsov, E. S.; Simagina, V. I.

    2015-01-01

    A thermoelectric energy conversion device operating on the heat generated by a hydrogen diffusion microflame has been developed. For the first time, a NaBH4 hydrogen generator has been employed as a source of fuel for such type of power generator. A 1%Ru-3%Co/Sibunit catalyst ensures hydrogen generation at a rate of 3 cm3 s-1 during 3 h. Power and efficiency characteristics of the integrated system consisting of a hydrogen generator and an energy converter based on combustion technologies have been studied experimentally. The total efficiency and the generated power of the system were measured to achieve values of up to 1.23% and 0.25 W, respectively. Ways to further improve the system's power output and efficiency characteristics have been discussed.

  12. Hydrogen Generator by Methane Pyrolysis with Carbon Capture Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop, fabricate, and test a system to provide 99.999% hydrogen by efficiently performing methane pyrolysis. The system has three unique...

  13. Selective electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide from water oxidation

    CERN Document Server

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Nørskov, Jens K

    2015-01-01

    Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet, over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. Present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH$^*$ can be used as a descriptor to screen for selectivity trends between the 2e$^-$ water oxidation to H$_2$O$_2$ and the 4e$^-$ oxidation to O$_2$. We show that materials that bind oxygen intermediates sufficiently weakly, such as SnO$_2$, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. We present a rati...

  14. Selective Electrochemical Generation of Hydrogen Peroxide from Water Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Venkatasubramanian; Hansen, Heine A; Nørskov, Jens K

    2015-11-01

    Water is a life-giving source, fundamental to human existence, yet over a billion people lack access to clean drinking water. The present techniques for water treatment such as piped, treated water rely on time and resource intensive centralized solutions. In this work, we propose a decentralized device concept that can utilize sunlight to split water into hydrogen and hydrogen peroxide. The hydrogen peroxide can oxidize organics while the hydrogen bubbles out. In enabling this device, we require an electrocatalyst that can oxidize water while suppressing the thermodynamically favored oxygen evolution and form hydrogen peroxide. Using density functional theory calculations, we show that the free energy of adsorbed OH* can be used to determine selectivity trends between the 2e(-) water oxidation to H2O2 and the 4e(-) oxidation to O2. We show that materials which bind oxygen intermediates sufficiently weakly, such as SnO2, can activate hydrogen peroxide evolution. We present a rational design principle for the selectivity in electrochemical water oxidation and identify new material candidates that could perform H2O2 evolution selectively.

  15. Construction and biofunctional evaluation of electrospun vascular graft loaded with selenocystamine for in situ catalytic generation of nitric oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Siyuan; An, Jun; Weng, Lei [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials for Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Li, Yandong [Institute of Polymer Chemistry, College of Chemistry, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Xu, Han; Wang, Yaping; Ding, Dan; Kong, Deling [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials for Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Wang, Shufang, E-mail: wangshufang@nankai.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Medicinal Chemical Biology, Key Laboratory of Bioactive Materials for Ministry of Education, College of Life Sciences, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2014-12-01

    Construction and biofunctional evaluation of a novel vascular graft with in situ catalytic generation of nitric oxide were described in this paper. Poly α-lysine and poly (γ-glutamic acid) were deposited alternately onto the surface of an electrospun poly ε-caprolactone matrix via electrostatic layer-by-layer self-assembly, and then selenocystamine was loaded as a catalyst. Measurement of in vitro catalytic generation of nitric oxide demonstrated that this catalyst-loaded material could considerably accelerate the release of nitric oxide from S-nitrosoglutathione. A fibroblast proliferation assay showed that the material possessed satisfactory cellular compatibility. The catalyst-loaded material could inhibit the spread of smooth muscle cells in the presence of nitric oxide donors. In arteriovenous-shunt experiment, the catalyst-loaded graft exhibited good anti-thrombotic property where it could prevent acute thrombosis by decreasing the adhesion and activation of platelets and other blood cells. These data suggest a new method of building vascular grafts with improved hemocompatibility and biological functions. - Highlights: • A porous small-diameter vascular graft was prepared by electrospinning. • Selenocystamine was loaded for in situ catalytic and sustained NO generation. • There was a significant catalytic NO generation on the catalyst-loaded sample. • The spread of smooth muscle cells was inhibited on the catalyst-loaded sample. • The catalyst-loaded sample showed anti-thrombotic property in AV-shunt experiment.

  16. Effect of water injection on hydrogen generation during severe accident in PWR

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAO Jun; CAO Xuewu

    2009-01-01

    Effect of water injection on hydrogen generation during severe accident in a 1000 MWe pressurized water reactor was studied.The analyses were carried out with different water injection rates at different core damage stages.The core can be quenched and accident progression can be terminated by water injection at the time before cohesive core debris is formed at lower core region.Hydrogen generation rate decreases with water injection into the core at the peak core temperature of 1700 K,because the core is quenched and reflooded quickly.The water injection at the peak core temperature of 1900 K,the hydrogen generation rate increases at low injection rates of the water,as the core is quenched slowly and the core remains in uncovered condition at high temperatures for a longer time than the situation of high injection rate.At peak core temperature of 2100-2300 K,the Hydrogen generation rate increases by water injection because of the steam serving to the high temperature steam-starved core.Hydrogen generation rate increases significantly after water injection into the core at peak core temperature of 2500 K because of the steam serving to the relocating Zr-U-O mixture.Almost no hydrogen generation can be seen in base case after formation of the molten pool at the lower core region.However,hydrogen is generated if water is injected into the molten pool,because steam serves to the crust supporting the molten pool.Reactor coolant system (RCS) depressurization by opening power operated relief valves has important effect on hydrogen generation.Special attention should be paid to hydrogen generation enhancement caused by RCS depressurization.

  17. Photocatalytic hydrogen generation using glycerol wastewater over Pt/TiO2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min LI; Yuexiang LI; Shaoqin PENG; Gongxuan LU; Shuben LI

    2009-01-01

    Using glycerol as electron donor, photocataly-tic hydrogen generation over Pt/TiO2 was investigated.The results show that glycerol can not only improve the efficiency of photocatalytic hydrogen generation but can also be decomposed effectively. The factors which affect photocatalytic hydrogen generation, such as irradiation time, initial concentration of the glycerol solution, pH-value of the suspensions and the coexisting substances were studied. The final oxidation products of glycerol were H2O and CO2. Glyceraldhyde, glycoladehyde, glycolic acid and formaldehyde were identified as the intermedi-ates. A possible reaction mechanism was discussed.

  18. Catalytic performance of Fe modified K/Mo2C catalyst for CO hydrogenation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minglin Xiang; Dudu Wu; Juan Zou; Debao Li; Yuhan Sun; Xichun She

    2011-01-01

    Fe modified and un-modified K/Mo2C were prepared and investigated as catalysts for CO hydrogenation reaction.Compared with K/Mo2C catalyst,the addition of Fe increased the production of alcohols,especially the C2+OH.Meanwhile,considerable amounts of C5+ hydrocarbons and C=2-C=4 were formed,whereas methane selectivity greatly decreased.Also,the activity and selectivity of the catalyst were readily affected by the reaction pressure and temperature employed.According to the XPS results,Mo4+ might be responsible for the production of alcohols,whereas the low valence state of Mo species such as Moo and/or Mo2+ might be account for the high activity and selectivity toward hydrocarbons.

  19. Cathodic electrocatalyst layer for electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Christopher P. (Inventor); Tennakoon, Charles L. K. (Inventor); Singh, Waheguru Pal (Inventor); Anderson, Kelvin C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cathodic gas diffusion electrode for the electrochemical production of aqueous hydrogen peroxide solutions. The cathodic gas diffusion electrode comprises an electrically conductive gas diffusion substrate and a cathodic electrocatalyst layer supported on the gas diffusion substrate. A novel cathodic electrocatalyst layer comprises a cathodic electrocatalyst, a substantially water-insoluble quaternary ammonium compound, a fluorocarbon polymer hydrophobic agent and binder, and a perfluoronated sulphonic acid polymer. An electrochemical cell using the novel cathodic electrocatalyst layer has been shown to produce an aqueous solution having between 8 and 14 weight percent hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, such electrochemical cells have shown stable production of hydrogen peroxide solutions over 1000 hours of operation including numerous system shutdowns.

  20. Investment in hydrogen tri-generation for wastewater treatment plants under uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharieh, Kaveh; Jafari, Mohsen A.; Guo, Qizhong

    2015-11-01

    In this article, we present a compound real option model for investment in hydrogen tri-generation and onsite hydrogen dispensing systems for a wastewater treatment plant under price and market uncertainties. The ultimate objective is to determine optimal timing and investment thresholds to exercise initial and subsequent options such that the total savings are maximized. Initial option includes investment in a 1.4 (MW) Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) fed by mixture of waste biogas from anaerobic digestion and natural gas, along with auxiliary equipment. Produced hydrogen in MCFC via internal reforming, is recovered from the exhaust gas stream using Pressure Swing Adsorption (PSA) purification technology. Therefore the expansion option includes investment in hydrogen compression, storage and dispensing (CSD) systems which creates additional revenue by selling hydrogen onsite in retail price. This work extends current state of investment modeling within the context of hydrogen tri-generation by considering: (i) Modular investment plan for hydrogen tri-generation and dispensing systems, (ii) Multiple sources of uncertainties along with more realistic probability distributions, (iii) Optimal operation of hydrogen tri-generation is considered, which results in realistic saving estimation.

  1. Carbon-based catalysts:Opening new scenario to develop next-generation nano-engineered catalytic materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Claudio Ampelli; Siglinda Perathoner; Gabriele Centi

    2014-01-01

    This essay analyses some of the recent development in nanocarbons (carbon materials having a defined and controlled nano-scale dimension and functional properties which strongly depend on their nano-scale features and architecture), with reference to their use as advanced catalytic materials. It is remarked how their features open new possibilities for catalysis and that they represent a new class of catalytic materials. Although carbon is used from long time in catalysis as support and electrocatalytic applications, nanocarbons offer unconventional ways for their utilization and to address some of the new challenges deriving from moving to a more sustainable future. This essay comments how nanocarbons are a key element to develop next-generation catalytic materials, but remarking that this goal requires overcoming some of the actual limits in current research. Some aspects are discussed to give a glimpse on new directions and needs for R&D to progress in this direction.

  2. Toxicological analysis of 17 autopsy cases of hydrogen sulfide poisoning resulting from the inhalation of intentionally generated hydrogen sulfide gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maebashi, Kyoko; Iwadate, Kimiharu; Sakai, Kentaro; Takatsu, Akihiro; Fukui, Kenji; Aoyagi, Miwako; Ochiai, Eriko; Nagai, Tomonori

    2011-04-15

    Although many cases of fatal hydrogen sulfide poisoning have been reported, in most of these cases, it resulted from the accidental inhalation of hydrogen sulfide gas. In recent years, we experienced 17 autopsy cases of fatal hydrogen sulfide poisoning due to the inhalation of intentionally generated hydrogen sulfide gas. In this study, the concentrations of sulfide and thiosulfate in blood, urine, cerebrospinal fluid and pleural effusion were examined using GC/MS. The sulfide concentrations were blood: 0.11-31.84, urine: 0.01-1.28, cerebrospinal fluid: 0.02-1.59 and pleural effusion: 2.00-8.59 (μg/ml), while the thiosulfate concentrations were blood: 0-0.648, urine: 0-2.669, cerebrospinal fluid: 0.004-0.314 and pleural effusion: 0.019-0.140 (μmol/ml). In previous reports, the blood concentration of thiosulfate was said to be higher than that of sulfide in hydrogen sulfide poisoning cases, although the latter was higher than the former in 8 of the 14 cases examined in this study. These results are believed to be strongly influenced by the atmospheric concentration of hydrogen sulfide the victims were exposed to and the time interval between exposure and death.

  3. Autothermal hydrogen generation from methanol in a ceramic microchannel network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Angela M.; Wilhite, Benjamin A.

    In this paper, the authors present the first demonstration of a new class of integrated ceramic microchannel reactors for all-in-one reforming of hydrocarbon fuels. The reactor concept employs precision-machined metal distributors capable of realizing complex flow distribution patterns with extruded ceramic microchannel networks for cost-effective thermal integration of multiple chemical processes. The presently reported reactor is comprised of five methanol steam reforming channels packed with CuO/γ-Al 2O 3, interspersed with four methanol combustion channels washcoated with Pt/γ-Al 2O 3, for autothermal hydrogen production (i.e., without external heating). Results demonstrate the capability of this new device for integrating combustion and steam reforming of methanol for autothermal production of hydrogen, owing to the axially self-insulating nature of distributor-packaged ceramic microchannels. In the absence of any external insulation, stable reforming of methanol to hydrogen at conversions >90% and hydrogen yields >70% was achieved at a maximum reactor temperature of 400 °C, while simultaneously maintaining a packaging temperature <50 °C.

  4. Enzymatic generation of hydrogen peroxide shows promising antifouling effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, J.B.; Olsen, Stefan Møller; Laursen, B.S.;

    2010-01-01

    The antifouling (AF) potential of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced enzymatically in a coating containing starch, glucoamylase, and hexose oxidase was evaluated in a series of laboratory tests and in-sea field trials. Dissolved H2O2 inhibited bacterial biofilm formation by eight of nine marine...

  5. Solar-hydrogen generation and solar concentration (Conference Presentation)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chinello, Enrico; Modestino, Miquel A.; Schüttauf, Jan-Willem; Lambelet, David; Delfino, Antonio; Domine, Didier; Faes, Antonin; Despeisse, Matthieu; Bailat, Julien; Psaltis, Demetri; Fernandez Rivas, David; Ballif, Christophe; Moser, Christophe; Sulima, Oleg V.; Conibeer, Gavin

    2016-01-01

    We successfully demonstrated and reported the highest solar-to-hydrogen efficiency with crystalline silicon cells and Earth-abundant electrocatalysts under unconcentrated solar radiation. The combination of hetero-junction silicon cells and a 3D printed Platinum/Iridium-Oxide electrolyzer has been p

  6. Catalytically activated palladium@platinum nanowires for accelerated hydrogen gas detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaowei; Liu, Yu; Hemminger, John C; Penner, Reginald M

    2015-03-24

    Platinum (Pt)-modified palladium (Pd) nanowires (or Pd@Pt nanowires) are prepared with controlled Pt coverage. These Pd@Pt nanowires are used as resistive gas sensors for the detection of hydrogen gas in air, and the influence of the Pt surface layer is assessed. Pd nanowires with dimensions of 40 nm (h) × 100 nm (w) × 50 μm (l) are first prepared using lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition. A thin Pt surface layer is electrodeposited conformally onto a Pd nanowire at coverages, θPt, of 0.10 monolayer (ML), 1.0 ML, and 10 ML. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy coupled with scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical measurements is consistent with a layer-by-layer deposition mode for Pt on the Pd nanowire surface. The resistance of a single Pd@Pt nanowire is measured during the exposure of these nanowires to pulses of hydrogen gas in air at concentrations ranging from 0.05 to 5.0 vol %. Both Pd nanowires and Pd@Pt nanowires show a prompt and reversible increase in resistance upon exposure to H2 in air, caused by the conversion of Pd to more resistive PdHx. Relative to a pure Pd nanowire, the addition of 1.0 ML of Pt to the Pd surface alters the H2 detection properties of Pd@Pt nanowires in two ways. First, the amplitude of the relative resistance change, ΔR/R0, measured at each H2 concentration is reduced at low temperatures (T = 294 and 303 K) and is unaffected at higher temperatures (T = 316, 344, and 376 K). Second, response and recovery rates are both faster at all temperatures in this range and for all H2 concentrations. For higher θPt = 10 ML, sensitivity to H2 is dramatically reduced. For lower θPt = 0.1 ML, no significant influence on sensitivity or the speed of response/recovery is observed.

  7. HOGEN{trademark} proton exchange membrane hydrogen generators: Commercialization of PEM electrolyzers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, W.F.; Molter, T.M. [Proton Energy Systems, Inc., Rocky Hill, CT (United States)

    1997-12-31

    PROTON Energy Systems` new HOGEN series hydrogen generators are Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) based water electrolyzers designed to generate 300 to 1000 Standard Cubic Feet Per Hour (SCFH) of high purity hydrogen at pressures up to 400 psi without the use of mechanical compressors. This paper will describe technology evolution leading to the HOGEN, identify system design performance parameters and describe the physical packaging and interfaces of HOGEN systems. PEM electrolyzers have served US and UK Navy and NASA needs for many years in a variety of diverse programs including oxygen generators for life support applications. In the late 1970`s these systems were advocated for bulk hydrogen generation through a series of DOE sponsored program activities. During the military buildup of the 1980`s commercial deployment of PEM hydrogen generators was de-emphasized as priority was given to new Navy and NASA PEM electrolysis systems. PROTON Energy Systems was founded in 1996 with the primary corporate mission of commercializing PEM hydrogen generators. These systems are specifically designed and priced to meet the needs of commercial markets and produced through manufacturing processes tailored to these applications. The HOGEN series generators are the first step along the path to full commercial deployment of PEM electrolyzer products for both industrial and consumer uses. The 300/1000 series are sized to meet the needs of the industrial gases market today and provide a design base that can transition to serve the needs of a decentralized hydrogen infrastructure tomorrow.

  8. Rh nanoparticles supported on ultrathin carbon nanosheets for high-performance oxygen reduction reaction and catalytic hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chong; Wu, Guanghao; Li, Huiqin; Geng, Yanmin; Xie, Gang; Yang, Jianhui; Liu, Bin; Jin, Jian

    2017-02-02

    We reported a facile and scalable salt-templated approach to produce monodisperse Rh nanoparticles (NPs) on ultrathin carbon nanosheets with the assistance of calcination under inert gas. More importantly, in spite of the essentially poor ORR activity of Rh/C, the acquired Rh/C hybrid nanosheets display a comparable ORR activity to the optimal commercial Pt/C catalyst, which may be due to the extra-small size of Rh NPs and the 2D defect-rich amorphous carbon nanosheets that can facilitate the charge transfer and reactive surface exposure. Moreover, Rh/C nanosheets present the optimal current density and best durability with the minimum decline during the entire test, so that ∼93% activity after 20 000 s is achieved, indicating a good lifetime for ORR. In contrast, commercial Pt/C and commercial Rh/C exhibited worse durability, so that ∼74% and ∼85% activities after 20 000 s are maintained. What's more, in the model system of reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP), the kinetic constant k for Rh/C nanosheets is 3.1 × 10(-3), which is 4.5 times than that of the commercial Rh/C catalyst, revealing that our Rh/C hybrid nanosheets can be potentially applied in industrial catalytic hydrogenation. This work opens a novel and facile way for the rest of the precious metal NPs to be supported on ultrathin carbon nanosheets for heterogeneous catalysis.

  9. Phase- and morphology-controlled synthesis of cobalt sulfide nanocrystals and comparison of their catalytic activities for hydrogen evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yuan; Liu, Yunqi; Liu, Chenguang

    2015-12-01

    Colalt sulfide nanocrystals (NCs), including dandelion-like Co9S8 and sphere-like Co3S4, have been synthesized via a thermal decomposition approach using cobalt acetylacetonate as the cobalt source, 1-dodecanethiol as the sulfur source and oleic acid or oleylamine as the high boiling organic solvent. It is found that the molar ratio of the Co:S precursor and the species of solvent play an important role in the control of phase and morphology of cobalt sulfide nanostructures. The phase structure and morphology of the as-synthesized nickel sulfide NCs are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive spectrum (EDS) mapping, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and N2 adsorption-desorption. Then we further compare the electrocatalytic activity and stability of as-synthesized cobalt sulfide NCs for hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The results show that sphere-like Co3S4 exhibits better electrocatalytic activity than the dandelion-like Co9S8 NCs for HER, which can be attributed to the difference of phase structure and morphology. The sphere-like Co3S4 NCs have large surface area and high electrical conductivity, both are beneficial to enhance the catalytic activity. This study indicates that the crystalline phase structure and morphology of cobalt sulfide NCs are important for designing HER electrocatalysts with high efficiency and good stability.

  10. Influence of rare-earth metal doping on the catalytic performance of CuO-CeO2 for the preferential oxidation of CO in excess hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigang Liu; Renxian Zhou; Xiaoming Zheng

    2008-01-01

    Doping of different rare-earth metals(Pr,Nd,Y and La)had an evident influence on the catalytic performance of CuO-CeO2 for the preferential oxidation(PROX)Of CO in excess hydrogen.As for Pr,the doping enhanced the catalytic activity of CuO-CeO2 for PROX.For example,the CO conversion over the above catalyst for PROX was higher than 99%at 120℃.Especially.the doping of Pr widened the temperature window by 20℃ over CuO-CeO2 with 99%CO conversion.For Nd,Y and La,the doping depressed the catalytic activity of CuO-CeO2 for PROX.However,the doping of transition metals markedly improved the selectivity of CuO-CeO2 for PROX.

  11. Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Hydrogenation Activity of New N-Acyl-Benzotriazole Rh(I and Ru(III Complexes in [bmim][BF4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Ünver

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The hydrogenation activity of new N-acyl-benzotriazole Rh(I and Ru(III complexes in ionic liquid media is reported in this study. Both complexes were completely soluble in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate, [bmim][BF4], and they were able to catalyze the hydrogenation of styrene and 1-octene. While ethylbenzene conversion in styrene hydrogenation reached 84% when the Ru complex was used, 100% conversion was obtained with the Rh complex at 393 K in 6 h. Additionally, total conversion in 1-octene hydrogenation reached 100% with the Rh complex in [bmim][BF4] media. The hydrogenation of styrene and 1-octene in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO and toluene was also studied to compare the solvent effect on catalytic system. The effect of some catalytic parameters such as temperature, H2 (g pressure, and catalyst amount on the conversion was examined, and it was found that the conversion increased parallel to the increasing temperature and H2 pressure. The recyclability of catalysts was also investigated, and it was revealed that the Rh complex in particular maintained the activity for at least 10 cycles.

  12. Preparation and Catalytic Activity of a Novel Nanocrystalline ZrO2 @C Composite for Hydrogen Storage in NaAlH4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xin; Wu, Ruyan; Wang, Zeyi; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge; Liu, Yongfeng

    2016-12-19

    Sodium alanate (NaAlH4 ) has attracted intense interest as a prototypical high-density hydrogen-storage material. However, poor reversibility and slow kinetics limit its practical applications. Herein, a nanocrystalline ZrO2 @C catalyst was synthesized by using Uio-66(Zr) as a precursor and furfuryl alcohol (FA) as a carbon source. The as-synthesized ZrO2 @C exhibits good catalytic activity for the dehydrogenation and hydrogenation of NaAlH4 . The NaAlH4 -7 wt % ZrO2 @C sample released hydrogen starting from 126 °C and reabsorbed it starting from 54 °C, and these temperatures are lower by 71 and 36 °C, respectively, relative to pristine NaAlH4 . At 160 °C, approximately 5.0 wt % of hydrogen was released from the NaAlH4 -7 wt % ZrO2 @C sample within 250 min, and the dehydrogenation product reabsorbed approximately 4.9 wt % within 35 min at 140 °C and 100 bar of hydrogen. The catalytic function of the Zr-based active species is believed to contribute to the significantly reduced operating temperatures and enhanced kinetics.

  13. Superior catalytic activity derived from a two-dimensional Ti3C2 precursor towards the hydrogen storage reaction of magnesium hydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongfeng; Du, Hufei; Zhang, Xin; Yang, Yaxiong; Gao, Mingxia; Pan, Hongge

    2016-01-14

    The superior catalytic effects derived from a 2D Ti3C2 (MXene), synthesized by the exfoliation of Ti3AlC2 powders, towards the hydrogen storage reaction of MgH2 were demonstrated. The 5 wt% Ti3C2-containing MgH2 releases 6.2 wt% H2 within 1 min at 300 °C and absorbs 6.1 wt% H2 within 30 s at 150 °C, exhibiting excellent dehydrogenation/hydrogenation kinetics.

  14. Next Generation Hydrogen Station Composite Data Products: Retail Stations, Data Through Quarter 3 of 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprik, Sam [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kurtz, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Ainscough, Chris [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saur, Genevieve [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Peters, Michael [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Jeffers, Matthew [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-03-07

    This publication includes 80 composite data products (CDPs) produced in Spring 2016 for next generation hydrogen stations, with data through the third quarter of 2016. These CDPs include data from retail stations only.

  15. A Novel Magnetically Recoverable Ni-CeO2-x/Pd Nanocatalyst with Superior Catalytic Performance for Hydrogenation of Styrene and 4-Nitrophenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yi-Fan; Yuan, Cheng-Zong; Xie, Xiao; Zhou, Xiao; Jiang, Nan; Wang, Xin; Imran, Muhammad; Xu, An-Wu

    2017-02-28

    Metal/support nanocatalysts consisting of various metals and metal oxides not only retain the basic properties of each component, but also exhibit higher catalytic activity due to their synergistic effects. Herein, we report the creation of a highly efficient, long-lasting and magnetic recyclable catalyst, composed of magnetic nickel (Ni) nanoparticles (NPs), active Pd NPs and oxygen deficient CeO2-x support. These hybrid nanostructures composed of oxygen deficient CeO2-x and active metal nanoparticles could effectively facilitate diffusion of reactant molecules and active site exposure that can dramatically accelerate the reaction rate. Impressively, the rate constant k and k/m of 4-nitrophenol reduction over 61 wt%Ni-CeO2-x/0.1 wt%Pd catalyst are respectively 0.0479 s-1 and 2.1×104 min-1 g-1, and the reaction conversion shows negligible decline even after 20 cycles. Meanwhile, the optimal 61 wt%Ni-CeO2-x/3 wt%Pd catalyst manifests remarkable catalytic activity towards styrene hydrogenation with a high TOF of 6827 molstyrene molPd-1 h-1 and a selective conversion of 100% to ethylbenzene even after eight cycles. The strong metal-support interaction (SMSI) between Ni NPs, Pd NPs and oxygen deficient CeO2-x support is beneficial for superior catalytic efficiency and stability toward hydrogenation of styrene and 4-nitrophenol. Moreover, Ni species could boost the catalytic activity of Pd due to their synergistic effect and strengthen the interaction between reactant and catalyst, which seems responsible for the great enhancement of catalytic activity. Our findings provide a new perspective to develop other high-performance and magnetically recoverable nanocatalysts, which would be widely applied to a variety of catalytic reactions.

  16. Modification of Coal Char-loaded TiO2 by Sulfonation and Alkylsilylation to Enhance Catalytic Activity in Styrene Oxidation with Hydrogen Peroxide as Oxidant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhamad Nurhadi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The modified coal char from low-rank coal by sulfonation, titanium impregnation and followed by alkyl silylation possesses high catalytic activity in styrene oxidation. The surface of coal char was undergone several steps as such: modification using concentrated sulfuric acid in the sulfonation process, impregnation of 500 mmol titanium(IV isopropoxide and followed by alkyl silylation of n-octadecyltriclorosilane (OTS. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, IR spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption, and hydrophobicity. The catalytic activity of the catalysts has been examined in the liquid phase styrene oxidation by using aqueous hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. The catalytic study showed the alkyl silylation could enhance the catalytic activity of Ti-SO3H/CC-600(2.0. High catalytic activity and reusability of the o-Ti-SO3H/CC-600(2.0 were related to the modification of local environment of titanium active sites and the enhancement the hydrophobicity of catalyst particle by alkyl silylation. Copyright © 2017 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 24th May 2016; Revised: 11st October 2016; Accepted: 18th October 2016 How to Cite: Nurhadi, M. (2017. Modification of Coal Char-loaded TiO2 by Sulfonation and Alkylsilylation to Enhance Catalytic Activity in Styrene Oxidation with Hydrogen Peroxide as Oxidant. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (1: 55-61 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.1.501.55-61 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.12.1.501.55-61

  17. Synthesis of palladium nanoparticles over graphite oxide and carbon nanotubes by reduction in ethylene glycol and their catalytic performance on the chemoselective hydrogenation of para-chloronitrobenzene

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Pd nanoparticles have been synthesized over carbon nanotubes (CNT) and graphite oxide (GO) by reduction with ethylene glycol and by conventional impregnation method. The catalysts were tested on the chemoselective hydrogenation of p-chloronitrobenzene and the effect of the synthesis method and surface chemistry on their catalytic performance was evaluated. The catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms at 77 K, TEM, powder X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry, infrared ...

  18. Catalytic Hydrogenation of the Sweet Principles of Stevia rebaudiana, Rebaudioside B, Rebaudioside C, and Rebaudioside D and Sensory Evaluation of Their Reduced Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Mary Campbell; Indra Prakash; Venkata Sai Prakash Chaturvedula

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic hydrogenation of rebaudioside B, rebaudioside C, and rebaudioside D; the three ent-kaurane diterpene glycosides isolated from Stevia rebaudiana was carried out using Pd(OH)2. Reduction of steviol glycosides was performed using straightforward synthetic chemistry with the catalyst Pd(OH)2 and structures of the corresponding dihydro derivatives were characterized on the basis of 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral data indicating that all are novel compounds being repo...

  19. Experimental and modelling evaluation of an ammonia-fuelled microchannel reactor for hydrogen generation / Steven Chiuta

    OpenAIRE

    Chiuta, Steven

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, ammonia (NH3) decomposition was assessed as a fuel processing technology for producing on-demand hydrogen (H2) for portable and distributed fuel cell applications. This study was motivated by the present lack of infrastructure to generate H2 for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. An overview of past and recent worldwide research activities in the development of reactor technologies for portable and distributed hydrogen generation via NH3 decomposition wa...

  20. Continuous/Batch Mg/MgH2/H2O-Based Hydrogen Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Andrew; Huang, Yuhong

    2010-01-01

    A proposed apparatus for generating hydrogen by means of chemical reactions of magnesium and magnesium hydride with steam would exploit the same basic principles as those discussed in the immediately preceding article, but would be designed to implement a hybrid continuous/batch mode of operation. The design concept would simplify the problem of optimizing thermal management and would help to minimize the size and weight necessary for generating a given amount of hydrogen.

  1. Green diesel production via catalytic hydrogenation/decarboxylation of triglycerides and fatty acids of vegetable oil and brown grease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Elvan

    than activated carbon itself for both decarboxylation of oleic acid and hydrogenation of alkenes. In an additional effort to reduce Pd amount in the catalyst, Pd2Co/C catalysts with various Pd content were prepared and the catalytic activity study showed that 0.5 wt% Pd2Co/C catalyst performs even better than a 5 wt% Pd/C catalyst. Pd and Co alloys were very well dispersed and formed fine clusters, which led to a higher active metal surface area and hence favored the decarboxylation of oleic acid. This study showed that an alloy of Pd on carbon with a significantly low Pd content is much more active and selective to diesel hydrocarbons production from an unsaturated fatty acid in super-critical water and may be regarded as a prospective feasible decarboxylation catalyst for the removal of oxygen from vegetable oil/animal fat without the need of additional hydrogen.

  2. Generation of Hydrogen from Photolysis of Organic Acids by Photosynthetic Bacteria

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Photodecomposition of ten kinds of organic acids by Rhodopseudomonas palustris for producing hydrogen has been investigated. By using acetate as hydrogen donor, dynamics of hydrogen production and cell growth has been determined; the influences of acetate concentration, temperature, light intensity and the effects of the interaction among metal ions (Fe3+, Ni2+), acetate and glutamate in aqueous solution on hydrogen production have been examined for optimizing the conditions of H2 generation. The results show that H2 production is partially correlated with cell growth; Ni2+ inhibits hydrogen production, but enhances cell growth; Fe3+ promotes hydrogen production evidently. The highest rate of H2 production is 22.1 mL L-1 h-1 under the conditions of 35 ~ 37℃, 6000 ~ 8000 lx, 30 mmolL-1 of acetate, 9 mmolL-1 of glutamate, and 50 (molL-1 of Fe3+.

  3. Solar-hydrogen generation and solar concentration (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinello, Enrico; Modestino, Miguel A.; Schüttauf, Jan-Willem; Lambelet, David; Delfino, Antonio; Dominé, Didier; Faes, Antonin; Despeisse, Matthieu; Bailat, Julien; Psaltis, Demetri; Fernandez Rivas, David; Ballif, Christophe; Moser, Christophe

    2016-09-01

    We successfully demonstrated and reported the highest solar-to-hydrogen efficiency with crystalline silicon cells and Earth-abundant electrocatalysts under unconcentrated solar radiation. The combination of hetero-junction silicon cells and a 3D printed Platinum/Iridium-Oxide electrolyzer has been proven to work continuously for more than 24 hours in neutral environment, with a stable 13.5% solar-to-fuel efficiency. Since the hydrogen economy is expected to expand to a global scale, we demonstrated the same efficiency with an Earth-abundant electrolyzer based on Nickel in a basic medium. In both cases, electrolyzer and photovoltaic cells have been specifically sized for their characteristic curves to intersect at a stable operating point. This is foreseen to guarantee constant operation over the device lifetime without performance degradation. The next step is to lower the production cost of hydrogen by making use of medium range solar concentration. It permits to limit the photoabsorbing area, shown to be the cost-driver component. We have recently modeled a self-tracking solar concentrator, able to capture sunlight within the acceptance angle range +/-45°, implementing 3 custom lenses. The design allows a fully static device, avoiding the external tracker that was necessary in a previously demonstrated +/-16° angular range concentrator. We will show two self-tracking methods. The first one relies on thermal expansion whereas the second method relies on microfluidics.

  4. Cyanogel-derived N-doped C nanosheets immobilizing Pd-P nanoparticles: One-pot synthesis and enhanced hydrogenation catalytic performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Yan, Xiaohong; Huang, Yundi; Zhang, Mengru; Tang, Yawen; Sun, Dongmei; Xu, Lin; Wei, Shaohua

    2017-02-01

    For Pd-based nanocatalysts, stabilization of Pd nanoparticles on carbon support could not only effectively avoid particle aggregation and maintain catalytic stability during catalytic processes, but also facilitate enhancing the catalytic activity due to the synergy between Pd nanoparticles and carbon support. Furthermore, the incorporation of non-metal of phosphorus (P) into Pd could effectively modulate the electronic structure of Pd and thus help to boost the catalytic properties. However, one-pot synthesis of such nanohybrids remains a great challenge due to the distinct physiochemical properties of Pd, P and C components. Herein, we demonstrate a one-pot and scalable synthesis of highly dispersed PdP alloy nanoparticle-immobilized on N-doped graphitic carbon nanosheets (abbreviated as Pd-P@N-C nanosheets) by using inorganic-organic hybrid cyanogel as a reaction precursor. In virtue of both compositional and structural advantages, the as-synthesized Pd-P@N-C nanosheets manifest a superior catalytic activity and stability toward the hydrogenation of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP). We believe that the present work will provide a feasible and versatile strategy for the development of efficient catalysts for environmental remediation and can also be extendable to other carbon-based nanohybrids with desirable functionalities.

  5. Development of generator-cooling hydrogen purity improvement system using hydrogen absorbing alloy; Suiso kyuzo gokin ni yoru hatsudenkinai suiso jundo kojo system no kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Y.; Sato, J.; Haruki, N.; Kogi, T.; Okuno, Y. [The Kansai Electric Power Co. Inc., Osaka (Japan); Takeda, H.; Wakisaka, Y. [The Japan Steel Works, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Fujita, T. [Mitsubishi Electric Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-01-31

    A generator-cooling hydrogen purity improvement system was developed by utilizing hydrogen absorbing and discharging functions of hydrogen storage alloy. For demonstration test with an actual machine, four elements, Ca, Ni, Mm and Al, were used as hydrogen storage alloys. To treat hydrogen gas with a wide range of purity and reduce hydrogen gas feed, flow operation for hydrogen purity improvement, batch operation, and recycle operation for maintaining the hydrogen purity were performed. As a result of the generator-cooling hydrogen purity improvement demonstration test, it was found that the hydrogen purity can be enhanced from 97.69% before operation to 99.9% after operation for 104 hours and to 99.95% after operation for 140 hours. The hydrogen recovery rates during flow test and batch test were between 92 and 95%. For the hydrogen purity maintaining test, it was confirmed that the high hydrogen purity of 99.9% has been continuously maintained for 140 days, and that the hydrogen recovery rate was over 99%. 2 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Autothermal hydrogen storage and delivery systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pez, Guido Peter; Cooper, Alan Charles; Scott, Aaron Raymond

    2011-08-23

    Processes are provided for the storage and release of hydrogen by means of dehydrogenation of hydrogen carrier compositions where at least part of the heat of dehydrogenation is provided by a hydrogen-reversible selective oxidation of the carrier. Autothermal generation of hydrogen is achieved wherein sufficient heat is provided to sustain the at least partial endothermic dehydrogenation of the carrier at reaction temperature. The at least partially dehydrogenated and at least partially selectively oxidized liquid carrier is regenerated in a catalytic hydrogenation process where apart from an incidental employment of process heat, gaseous hydrogen is the primary source of reversibly contained hydrogen and the necessary reaction energy.

  7. Solar Photo Catalytic Hydrogen Production from water using a dual bed photosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Florida Solar Energy Center

    2003-03-30

    A body of work was performed in which the feasibility of photocatalytically decomposing water into its constituent elements using a dual bed, or modular photosystem, under solar radiation was investigated. The system envisioned consists of two modules, each consisting of a shallow, flat, sealed container, in which microscopic photocatalytic particles are immobilized. The photocatalysts absorb light, generating free electrons and lattice vacancy holes, which are capable of performing reductive and oxidative chemistry, respectively. The photocatalysts would be chosen as to whether they specifically promote H{sub 2} or O{sub 2} evolution in their respective containers. An aqueous solution containing a redox mediator is pumped between the two chambers in order to transfer electron equivalents from one reaction to the other.

  8. Effect of the Sequence of the Thermoelectric Generator and the Three-Way Catalytic Converter on Exhaust Gas Conversion Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Chuqi; Tong, Naiqiang; Xu, Yuman; Chen, Shan; Liu, Xun

    2013-07-01

    The potential for thermoelectric exhaust heat recovery in vehicles has increased with recent improvements in the efficiency of thermoelectric generators (TEGs). The problem with using thermoelectric generators for vehicle applications is whether the device is compatible with the original vehicle exhaust system, which determines the quality of the exhaust gas treatment and the realization of energy conservation and emission reduction. Based on ANSYS CFX simulation analysis of the impact of two positional relationships between the TEG and three-way catalytic converter in the exhaust system on the working efficiency of both elements, it is concluded that the layout with the front three-way catalytic converter has an advantage over the other layout mode under current conditions. New ideas for an improvement program are proposed to provide the basis for further research.

  9. pH dependent catalytic activities of platinum nanoparticles with respect to the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide and scavenging of superoxide and singlet oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi; Wu, Haohao; Li, Meng; Yin, Jun-Jie; Nie, Zhihong

    2014-09-01

    Recently, platinum (Pt) nanoparticles (NPs) have received increasing attention in the field of catalysis and medicine due to their excellent catalytic activity. To rationally design Pt NPs for these applications, it is crucial to understand the mechanisms underlying their catalytic and biological activities. This article describes a systematic study on the Pt NP-catalyzed decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and scavenging of superoxide (O2&z.rad;-) and singlet oxygen (1O2) over a physiologically relevant pH range of 1.12-10.96. We demonstrated that the catalytic activities of Pt NPs can be modulated by the pH value of the environment. Our results suggest that Pt NPs possess peroxidase-like activity of decomposing H2O2 into &z.rad;OH under acidic conditions, but catalase-like activity of producing H2O and O2 under neutral and alkaline conditions. In addition, Pt NPs exhibit significant superoxide dismutase-like activity of scavenging O2&z.rad;- under neutral conditions, but not under acidic conditions. The 1O2 scavenging ability of Pt NPs increases with the increase in the pH of the environment. The study will provide useful guidance for designing Pt NPs with desired catalytic and biological properties.Recently, platinum (Pt) nanoparticles (NPs) have received increasing attention in the field of catalysis and medicine due to their excellent catalytic activity. To rationally design Pt NPs for these applications, it is crucial to understand the mechanisms underlying their catalytic and biological activities. This article describes a systematic study on the Pt NP-catalyzed decomposition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and scavenging of superoxide (O2&z.rad;-) and singlet oxygen (1O2) over a physiologically relevant pH range of 1.12-10.96. We demonstrated that the catalytic activities of Pt NPs can be modulated by the pH value of the environment. Our results suggest that Pt NPs possess peroxidase-like activity of decomposing H2O2 into &z.rad;OH under acidic conditions

  10. Hydrogen production by steam reforming of bio-alcohols. The use of conventional and membrane-assisted catalytic reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seelam, P. K.

    2013-11-01

    The energy consumption around the globe is on the rise due to the exponential population growth and urbanization. There is a need for alternative and non-conventional energy sources, which are CO{sub 2}-neutral, and a need to produce less or no environmental pollutants and to have high energy efficiency. One of the alternative approaches is hydrogen economy with the fuel cell (FC) technology which is forecasted to lead to a sustainable society. Hydrogen (H{sub 2}) is recognized as a potential fuel and clean energy carrier being at the same time a carbon-free element. Moreover, H{sub 2} is utilized in many processes in chemical, food, metallurgical, and pharmaceutical industry and it is also a valuable chemical in many reactions (e.g. refineries). Non-renewable resources have been the major feedstock for H{sub 2} production for many years. At present, {approx}50% of H{sub 2} is produced via catalytic steam reforming of natural gas followed by various down-stream purification steps to produce {approx}99.99% H{sub 2}, the process being highly energy intensive. Henceforth, bio-fuels like biomass derived alcohols (e.g. bio-ethanol and bio-glycerol), can be viable raw materials for the H{sub 2} production. In a membrane based reactor, the reaction and selective separation of H{sub 2} occur simultaneously in one unit, thus improving the overall reactor efficiency. The main motivation of this work is to produce H{sub 2} more efficiently and in an environmentally friendly way from bio-alcohols with a high H{sub 2} selectivity, purity and yield. In this thesis, the work was divided into two research areas, the first being the catalytic studies using metal decorated carbon nanotube (CNT) based catalysts in steam reforming of ethanol (SRE) at low temperatures (<450 deg C). The second part was the study of steam reforming (SR) and the water-gas-shift (WGS) reactions in a membrane reactor (MR) using dense and composite Pd-based membranes to produce high purity H{sub 2}. CNTs

  11. Catalytic activity of iron hexacyanoosmate(II) towards hydrogen peroxide and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and its use in amperometric biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotzian, Petr; Janku, Tereza [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Pardubice, Nam. Cs. Legii 565, CZ-532 10 Pardubice (Czech Republic); Kalcher, Kurt [Institute of Chemistry - Analytical Chemistry, Karl-Franzens University, Universitaetsplatz 1, A-8010 Graz (Austria); Vytras, Karel [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Pardubice, Nam. Cs. Legii 565, CZ-532 10 Pardubice (Czech Republic)], E-mail: karel.vytras@upce.cz

    2007-09-19

    Hydrogen peroxide and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) may be determined amperometrically using screen-printed electrodes chemically modified with iron(III) hexacyanoosmate(II) (Osmium purple) in flow injection analysis (FIA). The determination is based on the exploitation of catalytic currents resulting from the oxidation/reduction of the modifier. The performance of the sensor was characterized and optimized by controlling several operational parameters (applied potential, pH and flow rate of the phosphate buffer). Comparison has been made with analogous complexes of ruthenium (Ruthenium purple) and iron (Prussian blue). Taking into account the sensitivity and stability of corresponding sensors, the best results were obtained with the use of Osmium purple. The sensor exhibited a linear increase of the amperometric signal with the concentration of hydrogen peroxide in the range of 0.1-100 mg L{sup -1} with a detection limit (evaluated as 3{sigma}) of 0.024 mg L{sup -1} with a R.S.D. 1.5% for 10 mg L{sup -1} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} under optimized flow rate of 0.4 mL min{sup -1} in 0.1 M phosphate buffer carrier (pH 6) and a working potential of +0.15 V versus Ag/AgCl. Afterwards, a biological recognition element - either glucose oxidase or ethanol dehydrogenase - was incorporated to achieve a sensor facilitating the determination of glucose or ethanol, respectively. The glucose sensor gave linearity between current and concentration in the range from 1 to 250 mg L{sup -1} with a R.S.D. 2.4% for 100 mg L{sup -1} glucose, detection limit 0.02 mg L{sup -1} (3{sigma}) and retained its original activity after 3 weeks when stored at 6 deg. C. Optimal parameters in the determination of ethanol were selected as: applied potential +0.45 V versus Ag/AgCl, flow rate 0.2 mL min{sup -1} in 0.1 M phosphate buffer carrier (pH 7). Different structural designs of the ethanol sensor were tested and linearity obtained was up to 1000 mg L{sup -1} with a maximum R.S.D. of 5

  12. Control of microbially generated hydrogen sulfide in produced waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burger, E.D.; Vance, I.; Gammack, G.F.; Duncan, S.E.

    1995-12-31

    Production of hydrogen sulfide in produced waters due to the activity of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) is a potentially serious problem. The hydrogen sulfide is not only a safety and environmental concern, it also contributes to corrosion, solids formation, a reduction in produced oil and gas values, and limitations on water discharge. Waters produced from seawater-flooded reservoirs typically contain all of the nutrients required to support SRB metabolism. Surface processing facilities provide a favorable environment in which SRB flourish, converting water-borne nutrients into biomass and H{sub 2}S. This paper will present results from a field trial in which a new technology for the biochemical control of SRB metabolism was successfully applied. A slip stream of water downstream of separators on a produced water handling facility was routed through a bioreactor in a side-steam device where microbial growth was allowed to develop fully. This slip stream was then treated with slug doses of two forms of a proprietary, nonbiocidal metabolic modifier. Results indicated that H{sub 2}S production was halted almost immediately and that the residual effect of the treatment lasted for well over one week.

  13. A conserved hydrogen-bond network in the catalytic centre of animal glutaminyl cyclases is critical for catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kai-Fa; Wang, Yu-Ruei; Chang, En-Cheng; Chou, Tsung-Lin; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2008-04-01

    QCs (glutaminyl cyclases; glutaminyl-peptide cyclotransferases, EC 2.3.2.5) catalyse N-terminal pyroglutamate formation in numerous bioactive peptides and proteins. The enzymes were reported to be involved in several pathological conditions such as amyloidotic disease, osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis and melanoma. The crystal structure of human QC revealed an unusual H-bond (hydrogen-bond) network in the active site, formed by several highly conserved residues (Ser(160), Glu(201), Asp(248), Asp(305) and His(319)), within which Glu(201) and Asp(248) were found to bind to substrate. In the present study we combined steady-state enzyme kinetic and X-ray structural analyses of 11 single-mutation human QCs to investigate the roles of the H-bond network in catalysis. Our results showed that disrupting one or both of the central H-bonds, i.e., Glu(201)...Asp(305) and Asp(248)...Asp(305), reduced the steady-state catalysis dramatically. The roles of these two COOH...COOH bonds on catalysis could be partly replaced by COOH...water bonds, but not by COOH...CONH(2) bonds, reminiscent of the low-barrier Asp...Asp H-bond in the active site of pepsin-like aspartic peptidases. Mutations on Asp(305), a residue located at the centre of the H-bond network, raised the K(m) value of the enzyme by 4.4-19-fold, but decreased the k(cat) value by 79-2842-fold, indicating that Asp(305) primarily plays a catalytic role. In addition, results from mutational studies on Ser(160) and His(319) suggest that these two residues might help to stabilize the conformations of Asp(248) and Asp(305) respectively. These data allow us to propose an essential proton transfer between Glu(201), Asp(305) and Asp(248) during the catalysis by animal QCs.

  14. Hydrogen production from catalytic decomposition of methane; Produccion de hidrogeno a partir de la descomposicion termica catalitica del biogas de digestion anaerobia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belsue Echevarria, M.; Etxebeste Juarez, O.; Perez Gil, S.

    2002-07-01

    The need of substitution of part of the energy obtained from fossil fuels instead of energy from renewable sources, together with the minimal emissions of CO{sub ''} and CO that are expected with these technologies, make renewable sources a very attractive predecessor for the production of hydrogen. In this situation, a usable source for hydrogen production is the biogas achieved by means of technologies like the anaerobic digestion of different kinds of biomass (MSW, sewage sludge, stc.). In this article we suggest the Thermal Catalytic Decomposition of the methane contained in this biogas, after separation of pollutants like CO{sub ''}, H{sub 2}S. steam. This technology will give hydrogen, usable in fuel cells, and nanoestructured carbon as products. (Author) 7 refs.

  15. DESIGN, SYNTHESIS AND STUDY OF MULTI-COMPONENT AND INTEGRATED SYSTEMS FOR LIGHT-DRIVEN HYDROGEN GENERATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Professor Richard Eisenberg

    2012-07-18

    The research focussed on fundamental problems in the conversion of light to stored chemical energy. Specifically, work was completed on the design, synthesis and study of multi-component super- and supramolecular systems for photoinduced charge separation, one of the key steps in artificial photosynthesis, and on the use of these and related systems for the photochemical generation of H2 from water. At the center of these systems are chromophores comprised of square planar coordinated Pt(II) ions with arylacetylide and either diimine or terpyridyl ligands. Previous work had shown that the chromophores are photoluminescent in fluid solution with long-lived metal-to-ligand charge transfer (3MLCT) excited states that are necessarily directional. An advance which set the stage for a number of proposed studies was the light-driven production of hydrogen from water using a Pt(terpyridyl)(arylacetylide)+ chromophore and a sacrificial electron donor. The reaction is catalytic and appears to rival previously reported ruthenium bipyridyl systems in terms of H2 production. Variation of system components and mechanistic studies were conducted to understand better the individual steps in the overall process and how to improve its efficiency. Success with light driven H2 generation was employed as a key probe as new systems were constructed consisting of triads for photoinduced charge separation placed in close proximity to the H2 generating catalyst - a Pt colloid - through direct linkage or supramolecular interactions with the polymer used to stabilize the colloid. In order to prepare new donor-chromophore-acceptor (D-C-A) triads and associated D-C and C-A dyads, new ligands were synthesized having functional groups for different coupling reactions such as simple amide formation and Pd-catalyzed coupling. In these systems, the donor was attached to the arylacetylide ligands and the acceptor was linked to the diimine or terpyridyl chelate. Research under the contract proved

  16. Hydrogen generation from steam reforming of ethanol in dielectric barrier discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Baowei Wang; Yijun Lü; Xu Zhang; Shuanghui Hu

    2011-01-01

    Dielectric barrier discharge(DBD)was used for the generation of hydrogen from ethanol reforming.Effects of reaction conditions,such as vaporization temperature,ethanol flow rate,water/ethanol ratio,and addition of oxygen,on the ethanol conversion and hydrogen yield,were studied.The results showed that the increase of ethanol flow rate decreased ethanol conversion and hydrogen yield,and high water/ethanol ratio and addition of oxygen were advantageous.Ethanol conversion and hydrogen yield increased with the vaporization room temperature up to the maximum at first,and then decreased slightly.The maximum hydrogen yield of 31.8% was obtained at an ethanol conversion of 88.4% under the optimum operation conditions of vaporization room temperature of 120℃,ethanol flux of 0.18 mL/min,water/ethanol ratio of 7.7 and oxygen volume concentration of 13.3%.

  17. Electrodeposited synthesis of self-supported Ni-P cathode for efficient electrocatalytic hydrogen generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruixian Wu; Yuming Dong n; Pingping Jiang; Guangli Wang; Yanmei Chen; Xiuming Wu

    2016-01-01

    One of the key challenges for electrochemical water splitting is the development of low-cost and efficient hydrogen evolution cathode. In this work, a self-supported Ni-P cathode was synthesized by a facile electrodeposition method. The composition and morphology were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The Ni-P cathode performed low onset over-potential, good catalytic activity and long-term stability under neutral and alkaline conditions. The mechanism of Ni-P electrode for hydrogen production was discussed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The excellent performance of Ni-P cathode was mainly attributed to the synergistic effect of phosphate anions and the self-supported feature.

  18. Electrodeposited synthesis of self-supported Ni-P cathode for efficient electrocatalytic hydrogen generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruixian Wu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the key challenges for electrochemical water splitting is the development of low-cost and efficient hydrogen evolution cathode. In this work, a self-supported Ni-P cathode was synthesized by a facile electrodeposition method. The composition and morphology were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The Ni-P cathode performed low onset over-potential, good catalytic activity and long-term stability under neutral and alkaline conditions. The mechanism of Ni-P electrode for hydrogen production was discussed by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The excellent performance of Ni-P cathode was mainly attributed to the synergistic effect of phosphate anions and the self-supported feature.

  19. Enviro-Friendly Hydrogen Generation from Steel Mill-Scale via Metal-Steam Reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Abdul-Majeed; Kesavan, Sathees

    2006-01-01

    An economically viable and environmental friendly method of generating hydrogen for fuel cells is by the reaction of certain metals with steam, called metal-steam reforming (MSR). This technique does not generate any toxic by-products nor contributes to the undesirable greenhouse effect. From the standpoint of favorable thermodynamics, total…

  20. CHALLENGES IN GENERATING HYDROGEN BY HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS USING SOLID OXIDE CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. S. Sohal; J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; M. G. McKellar; J. S. Herring; E. A. Harvego

    2008-03-01

    Idaho National Laboratory’s (INL) high temperature electrolysis research to generate hydrogen using solid oxide electrolysis cells is presented in this paper. The research results reported here have been obtained in a laboratory-scale apparatus. These results and common scale-up issues also indicate that for the technology to be successful in a large industrial setting, several technical, economical, and manufacturing issues have to be resolved. Some of the issues related to solid oxide cells are stack design and performance optimization, identification and evaluation of cell performance degradation parameters and processes, integrity and reliability of the solid oxide electrolysis (SOEC) stacks, life-time prediction and extension of the SOEC stack, and cost reduction and economic manufacturing of the SOEC stacks. Besides the solid oxide cells, balance of the hydrogen generating plant also needs significant development. These issues are process and ohmic heat source needed for maintaining the reaction temperature (~830°C), high temperature heat exchangers and recuperators, equal distribution of the reactants into each cell, system analysis of hydrogen and associated energy generating plant, and cost optimization. An economic analysis of this plant was performed using the standardized H2A Analysis Methodology developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) Hydrogen Program, and using realistic financial and cost estimating assumptions. The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a cost of $3.23/kg of hydrogen assuming an internal rate of return of 10%. These issues need interdisciplinary research effort of federal laboratories, solid oxide cell manufacturers, hydrogen consumers, and other such stakeholders. This paper discusses research and development accomplished by INL on such issues and highlights associated challenges that need to

  1. Near-Monodisperse Ni-Cu Bimetallic Nanocrystals of Variable Composition: Controlled Synthesis and Catalytic Activity for H2 Generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yawen; Huang, Wenyu; Habas, Susan E.; Kuhn, John N.; Grass, Michael E.; Yamada, Yusuke; Yang, Peidong; Somorjai, Gabor A.

    2008-07-22

    Near-monodisperse Ni{sub 1-x}Cu{sub x} (x = 0.2-0.8) bimetallic nanocrystals were synthesized by a one-pot thermolysis approach in oleylamine/1-octadecene, using metal acetylacetonates as precursors. The nanocrystals form large-area 2D superlattices, and display a catalytic synergistic effect in the hydrolysis of NaBH{sub 4} to generate H{sub 2} at x = 0.5 in a strongly basic medium. The Ni{sub 0.5}Cu{sub 0.5} nanocrystals show the lowest activation energy, and also exhibit the highest H{sub 2} generation rate at 298 K.

  2. Energy efficient production of hydrogen and syngas from biomass: development of low-temperature catalytic process for cellulose gasification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadullah, Mohammad; Ito, Shin-ichi; Kunimori, Kimio; Yamada, Muneyoshi; Tomishige, Keiichi

    2002-10-15

    The Rh/CeO2/M (M = SiO2, Al2O3, and ZrO2) type catalysts with various compositions have been prepared and investigated in the gasification of cellulose, a model compound of biomass, in a fluidized bed reactor at 500-700 degrees C. The conventional nickel and dolomite catalysts have also been investigated. Among the catalysts, Rh/CeO2/SiO2 with 35% CeO2 has been found to be the best catalyst with respect to the carbon conversion to gas and product distribution. The steam addition contributed to the complete conversion of cellulose to gas even at 600 degrees C. Lower steam supply gave the syngas and higher steam supply gave the hydrogen as the major product. Hydrogen and syngas from cellulose or cellulosic biomass gasification are environmentally super clean gaseous fuels for power generation. Moreover, the syngas derived liquid fuels such as methanol, dimethyl ether, and synthetic diesels are also super clean transportation fuels. However, the use of cellulose or cellulosic biomass for energy source through the gasification is challenging because of the formation of tar and char during the gasification process. It is interesting that no tar or char was finally formed in the effluent gas at as low as 500-600 degrees C using Rh/CeO2/SiO2(35) catalyst in this process.

  3. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Analysis: Lessons Learned from Stationary Power Generation Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott E. Grasman; John W. Sheffield; Fatih Dogan; Sunggyu Lee; Umit O. Koylu; Angie Rolufs

    2010-04-30

    This study considered opportunities for hydrogen in stationary applications in order to make recommendations related to RD&D strategies that incorporate lessons learned and best practices from relevant national and international stationary power efforts, as well as cost and environmental modeling of pathways. The study analyzed the different strategies utilized in power generation systems and identified the different challenges and opportunities for producing and using hydrogen as an energy carrier. Specific objectives included both a synopsis/critical analysis of lessons learned from previous stationary power programs and recommendations for a strategy for hydrogen infrastructure deployment. This strategy incorporates all hydrogen pathways and a combination of distributed power generating stations, and provides an overview of stationary power markets, benefits of hydrogen-based stationary power systems, and competitive and technological challenges. The motivation for this project was to identify the lessons learned from prior stationary power programs, including the most significant obstacles, how these obstacles have been approached, outcomes of the programs, and how this information can be used by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program to meet program objectives primarily related to hydrogen pathway technologies (production, storage, and delivery) and implementation of fuel cell technologies for distributed stationary power. In addition, the lessons learned address environmental and safety concerns, including codes and standards, and education of key stakeholders.

  4. Minimising hydrogen sulphide generation during steam assisted production of heavy oil

    OpenAIRE

    Wren Montgomery; Sephton, Mark A.; Watson, Jonathan S.; Huang Zeng; Andrew C. Rees

    2015-01-01

    The majority of global petroleum is in the form of highly viscous heavy oil. Traditionally heavy oil in sands at shallow depths is accessed by large scale mining activities. Recently steam has been used to allow heavy oil extraction with greatly reduced surface disturbance. However, in situ thermal recovery processes can generate hydrogen sulphide, high levels of which are toxic to humans and corrosive to equipment. Avoiding hydrogen sulphide production is the best possible mitigation strateg...

  5. Efficiency and economics of large scale hydrogen liquefaction. [for future generation aircraft requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, C. R.

    1975-01-01

    Liquid hydrogen is being considered as a substitute for conventional hydrocarbon-based fuels for future generations of commercial jet aircraft. Its acceptance will depend, in part, upon the technology and cost of liquefaction. The process and economic requirements for providing a sufficient quantity of liquid hydrogen to service a major airport are described. The design is supported by thermodynamic studies which determine the effect of process arrangement and operating parameters on the process efficiency and work of liquefaction.

  6. Carbon Dioxide-Free Hydrogen Production with Integrated Hydrogen Separation and Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dürr, Stefan; Müller, Michael; Jorschick, Holger; Helmin, Marta; Bösmann, Andreas; Palkovits, Regina; Wasserscheid, Peter

    2017-01-10

    An integration of CO2 -free hydrogen generation through methane decomposition coupled with hydrogen/methane separation and chemical hydrogen storage through liquid organic hydrogen carrier (LOHC) systems is demonstrated. A potential, very interesting application is the upgrading of stranded gas, for example, gas from a remote gas field or associated gas from off-shore oil drilling. Stranded gas can be effectively converted in a catalytic process by methane decomposition into solid carbon and a hydrogen/methane mixture that can be directly fed to a hydrogenation unit to load a LOHC with hydrogen. This allows for a straight-forward separation of hydrogen from CH4 and conversion of hydrogen to a hydrogen-rich LOHC material. Both, the hydrogen-rich LOHC material and the generated carbon on metal can easily be transported to destinations of further industrial use by established transport systems, like ships or trucks.

  7. High Performance, Low Cost Hydrogen Generation from Renewable Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayers, Katherine [Proton OnSite; Dalton, Luke [Proton OnSite; Roemer, Andy [Proton OnSite; Carter, Blake [Proton OnSite; Niedzwiecki, Mike [Proton OnSite; Manco, Judith [Proton OnSite; Anderson, Everett [Proton OnSite; Capuano, Chris [Proton OnSite; Wang, Chao-Yang [Penn State University; Zhao, Wei [Penn State University

    2014-02-05

    Renewable hydrogen from proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis is gaining strong interest in Europe, especially in Germany where wind penetration is already at critical levels for grid stability. For this application as well as biogas conversion and vehicle fueling, megawatt (MW) scale electrolysis is required. Proton has established a technology roadmap to achieve the necessary cost reductions and manufacturing scale up to maintain U.S. competitiveness in these markets. This project represents a highly successful example of the potential for cost reduction in PEM electrolysis, and provides the initial stack design and manufacturing development for Proton’s MW scale product launch. The majority of the program focused on the bipolar assembly, from electrochemical modeling to subscale stack development through prototyping and manufacturing qualification for a large active area cell platform. Feasibility for an advanced membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with 50% reduction in catalyst loading was also demonstrated. Based on the progress in this program and other parallel efforts, H2A analysis shows the status of PEM electrolysis technology dropping below $3.50/kg production costs, exceeding the 2015 target.

  8. A comparative parametric study of a catalytic plate methane reformer coated with segmented and continuous layers of combustion catalyst for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhwa, Mayur; Parmar, Rajesh D.; Thurgood, Christopher P.

    2017-03-01

    A parametric comparison study is carried out between segmented and conventional continuous layer configurations of the coated combustion-catalyst to investigate their influence on the performance of methane steam reforming (MSR) for hydrogen production in a catalytic plate reactor (CPR). MSR is simulated on one side of a thin plate over a continuous layer of nickel-alumina catalyst by implementing an experimentally validated surface microkinetic model. Required thermal energy for the MSR reaction is supplied by simulating catalytic methane combustion (CMC) on the opposite side of the plate over segmented and continuous layer of a platinum-alumina catalyst by implementing power law rate model. The simulation results of both coating configurations of the combustion-catalyst are compared using the following parameters: (1) co-flow and counter-flow modes between CMC and MSR, (2) gas hourly space velocity and (3) reforming-catalyst thickness. The study explains why CPR designed with the segmented combustion-catalyst and co-flow mode shows superior performance not only in terms of high hydrogen production but also in terms of minimizing the maximum reactor plate temperature and thermal hot-spots. The study shows that the segmented coating requires 7% to 8% less combustion-side feed flow and 70% less combustion-catalyst to produce the required flow of hydrogen (29.80 mol/h) on the reforming-side to feed a 1 kW fuel-cell compared to the conventional continuous coating of the combustion-catalyst.

  9. Carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition and generation pathway of biogenic gas in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Ping; WANG Xiaofeng; XU Yin; SHI Baoguang; XU Yongchang

    2009-01-01

    The carbon and hydrogen isotopic composition of biogenic gas is of great importance for the study of its generation pathway and reservoiring characteristics. In this paper, the formation pathways and reservoiring characteristics of biogenic gas reservoirs in China are described in terms of the carbon and hydrogen isotopic compositions of 31 gas samples from 10 biogenic gas reservoirs. The study shows that the hydrogen isotopic compositions of these biogenic gas reservoirs can be divided into three intervals:δDCH4>-200‰,-250‰<δDCH4<-200‰ and δDCH4<-250‰. The forerunners believed that the main generation pathway of biogenic gas under the condition of continental fresh water is acetic fermentation. Our research results showed that the generation pathway of biogenic gas under the condition of marine facies is typical CO2- reduction, the biogenic gas has heavy hydrogen isotopic composition: its δDCH4 values are higher than -200‰; that the biogenic gas under the condition of continental facies also was generated by the same way, but its hydrogen isotopic composition is lighter than that of biogenetic gas generated under typical marine facies condition: -250‰<δDCH4<-200‰, the δDCH4 values may be related to the salinity of the water medium in ancient lakes. From the relevant data of the Qaidam Basin, it can be seen that the hydrogen isotopic composition of biogenic methane has the same variation trend with increasing salinity of water medium. There are biogenic gas reservoirs formed in transitional regions under the condition of continental facies. These gas reservoirs resulted from both CO2- reduction and acetic fermentation, the formation of which may be related to the non-variant salinity of ancient water medium and the relatively high geothermal gradient, as is the case encountered in the Baoshan Basin. The biogenic gas generating in these regions has light hydrogen isotopic composition: δDCH4<-250‰, and relatively heavy carbon isotopic

  10. Catalytic hydrogenation of aromatic nitro compounds by functionalized ionic liquids-stabilized nickel nanoparticles in aqueous phase:The influence of anions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Two kinds of nickel nanoparticles (NPs) well-dispersed in aqueous phase have been conveniently prepared by reducing nickel(II) salt with hydrazine in the presence of amino group (-NH2) functionalized ionic liquids:1-(3-aminopropyl)-2,3-dimethylimidazolium bromide ([AMMIM][Br]) and 1-(3-aminopropyl)-2,3-dimethylimidazolium acetate ([AMMIM][AcO]).The Ni(0) particles are composed of smaller ones which assemble in a blackberry-like shape.The Ni nanoparticles stabilized with [AMMIM][AcO] are much larger than those stabilized with [AMMIM][Br],and the former unexpectedly give much higher activity in the selective hydrogenation of citral and nitrobenzene (NB) in aqueous phase.The Ni(0) nanocatalysts dispersed in aqueous phase are stable enough to be reused at least five times without significant loss of catalytic activity and selectivity during the catalytic recycles.

  11. Negative catalytic effect of water on the reactivity of hydrogen abstraction from the C-H bond of dimethyl ether by deuterium atoms through tunneling at low temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Naoki; Kouchi, Akira

    2016-10-01

    We report an experimental study on the catalytic effect of solid water on the reactivity of hydrogen abstraction (H-abstraction) from dimethyl ether (DME) in the low-temperature solid DME-H2O complex. When DME reacted with deuterium atoms on a surface at 15-25 K, it was efficiently deuterated via successive tunneling H-abstraction and deuterium (D)-addition reactions. The 'effective' rate constant for DME-H2O + D was found to be about 20 times smaller than that of pure DME + D. This provides the first evidence that the presence of solid water has a negative catalytic effect on tunneling H-abstraction reactions.

  12. Minimising hydrogen sulphide generation during steam assisted production of heavy oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Wren; Sephton, Mark A.; Watson, Jonathan S.; Zeng, Huang; Rees, Andrew C.

    2015-02-01

    The majority of global petroleum is in the form of highly viscous heavy oil. Traditionally heavy oil in sands at shallow depths is accessed by large scale mining activities. Recently steam has been used to allow heavy oil extraction with greatly reduced surface disturbance. However, in situ thermal recovery processes can generate hydrogen sulphide, high levels of which are toxic to humans and corrosive to equipment. Avoiding hydrogen sulphide production is the best possible mitigation strategy. Here we use laboratory aquathermolysis to reproduce conditions that may be experienced during thermal extraction. The results indicate that hydrogen sulphide generation occurs within a specific temperature and pressure window and corresponds to chemical and physical changes in the oil. Asphaltenes are identified as the major source of sulphur. Our findings reveal that for high sulphur heavy oils, the generation of hydrogen sulphide during steam assisted thermal recovery is minimal if temperature and pressure are maintained within specific criteria. This strict pressure and temperature dependence of hydrogen sulphide release can allow access to the world's most voluminous oil deposits without generating excessive amounts of this unwanted gas product.

  13. Catalytic effect of nanoparticle 3d-transition metals on hydrogen storage properties in magnesium hydride MgH2 prepared by mechanical milling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanada, Nobuko; Ichikawa, Takayuki; Fujii, Hironobu

    2005-04-21

    We examined the catalytic effect of nanoparticle 3d-transition metals on hydrogen desorption (HD) properties of MgH(2) prepared by mechanical ball milling method. All the MgH(2) composites prepared by adding a small amount of nanoparticle Fe(nano), Co(nano), Ni(nano), and Cu(nano) metals and by ball milling for 2 h showed much better HD properties than the pure ball-milled MgH(2) itself. In particular, the 2 mol % Ni(nano)-doped MgH(2) composite prepared by soft milling for a short milling time of 15 min under a slow milling revolution speed of 200 rpm shows the most superior hydrogen storage properties: A large amount of hydrogen ( approximately 6.5 wt %) is desorbed in the temperature range from 150 to 250 degrees C at a heating rate of 5 degrees C/min under He gas flow with no partial pressure of hydrogen. The EDX micrographs corresponding to Mg and Ni elemental profiles indicated that nanoparticle Ni metals as catalyst homogeneously dispersed on the surface of MgH(2). In addition, it was confirmed that the product revealed good reversible hydriding/dehydriding cycles even at 150 degrees C. The hydrogen desorption kinetics of catalyzed and noncatalyzed MgH(2) could be understood by a modified first-order reaction model, in which the surface condition was taken into account.

  14. Determination of Selenium by Catalytic Kinetic Spectrophotometry in Hydrogen Peroxide-PAN System%Guangzhou Chemical Industry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严进

    2016-01-01

    在盐酸介质中, Se(IV)对1-(2-吡啶偶氮)-2-萘酚(PAN)褪色反应有灵敏的催化作用,建立了测定Se (IV)的动力学新方法。线性范围在0~0.9μg/50 mL时符合比耳定律,检出限为2.2×10-10 g·mL-1。催化反应为动力学零级反应,表现活化能为111.28 kJ/mol,反应速率常数为7.15×10-4 s-1。考察了20多种共存离子的影响,表明本方法具有较好选择性。方法用于茶叶样品中痕量硒的测定,相对标准偏差小于3.9%,回收率在96.2%~105.5%之间。%A new kinetic spectrophotometric method for determination of trace Se(IV) was proposed. Se(IV) can sensitively catalyze the discoloration reaction of 1- (2-pyridylazo) -2-naphthol by hydrogen peroxide in HCl medium. The line arrange for determination of Se( IV) was 0~0. 9 μg/50 mL with the detection limit of 2. 2 ×10-10 g·mL-1 . The resalts from the studies suggested that the catalytic reaction was zero-order and the apparent activationenergy of this reaction was 111. 28 kJ·mol-1,and the apparent rate constant was 7. 15×10-4 s-1. The interferences of foreign ions werealso studied. The procedure was used to determine Se( IV) in tea samples, with the relative standard deviation of below 3. 9% and the average recovery of 96. 2% ~105. 5%.

  15. Generating hydrogen for mobile devices; Wasserstofferzeugung fuer die mobile Anwendung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuetz, W. [Vodafone Pilotentwicklung GmbH, Muenchen (Germany)

    2001-10-01

    In future vehicles, more and more functions will be powered by electricity. These are for example ''steer by wire'', ''break by wire'', air conditioning and infotainment. This growing demand for electricity is a new challenge for the automotive industry. The so called APU (auxilliary power unit) is a convincing solution. This power generating unit based on fuel cell technology will provide electrical power in all operation situations. The article deals with the main focus of P{sup 21}-power for the 21st century, the Mannesmann Fuel Cell Product Center of the Vodafone Pilotentwicklung. (orig.)

  16. Electrochemical generation of oxygen. 1: The effects of anions and cations on hydrogen chemisorption and anodic oxide film formation on platinum electrode. 2: The effects of anions and cations on oxygen generation on platinum electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C. J.; Yeager, E.; Ogrady, W. E.

    1975-01-01

    The effects were studied of anions and cations on hydrogen chemisorption and anodic oxide film formation on Pt by linear sweep voltammetry, and on oxygen generation on Pt by potentiostatic overpotential measurement. The hydrogen chemisorption and anodic oxide film formation regions are greatly influenced by anion adsorption. In acids, the strongly bound hydrogen occurs at more cathodic potential when chloride and sulfate are present. Sulfate affects the initial phase of oxide film formation by produced fine structure while chloride retards the oxide-film formation. In alkaline solutions, both strongly and weakly bound hydrogen are influenced by iodide, cyanide, and barium and calcium cations. These ions also influence the oxide film formation. Factors considered to explain these effects are discussed. The Tafel slope for oxygen generation was found to be independent on the oxide thickness and the presence of cations or anions. The catalytic activity indicated by the exchange current density was observed decreasing with increasing oxide layer thickness, only a minor dependence on the addition of certain cations and anions was found.

  17. Hydrogen generation in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells using a heat-regenerated salt solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Joo-Youn; Cusick, Roland D; Kim, Younggy; Logan, Bruce E

    2012-05-01

    Hydrogen gas can be electrochemically produced in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells (MRECs) using current derived from organic matter and salinity-gradient energy such as river water and seawater solutions. Here, it is shown that ammonium bicarbonate salts, which can be regenerated using low-temperature waste heat, can also produce sufficient voltage for hydrogen gas generation in an MREC. The maximum hydrogen production rate was 1.6 m(3) H(2)/m(3)·d, with a hydrogen yield of 3.4 mol H(2)/mol acetate at a salinity ratio of infinite. Energy recovery was 10% based on total energy applied with an energy efficiency of 22% based on the consumed energy in the reactor. The cathode overpotential was dependent on the catholyte (sodium bicarbonate) concentration, but not the salinity ratio, indicating high catholyte conductivity was essential for maximizing hydrogen production rates. The direction of the HC and LC flows (co- or counter-current) did not affect performance in terms of hydrogen gas volume, production rates, or stack voltages. These results show that the MREC can be successfully operated using ammonium bicarbonate salts that can be regenerated using conventional distillation technologies and waste heat making the MREC a useful method for hydrogen gas production from wastes.

  18. Hydrogen Generation in Microbial Reverse-Electrodialysis Electrolysis Cells Using a Heat-Regenerated Salt Solution

    KAUST Repository

    Nam, Joo-Youn

    2012-05-01

    Hydrogen gas can be electrochemically produced in microbial reverse-electrodialysis electrolysis cells (MRECs) using current derived from organic matter and salinity-gradient energy such as river water and seawater solutions. Here, it is shown that ammonium bicarbonate salts, which can be regenerated using low-temperature waste heat, can also produce sufficient voltage for hydrogen gas generation in an MREC. The maximum hydrogen production rate was 1.6 m3 H2/m3·d, with a hydrogen yield of 3.4 mol H2/mol acetate at a salinity ratio of infinite. Energy recovery was 10% based on total energy applied with an energy efficiency of 22% based on the consumed energy in the reactor. The cathode overpotential was dependent on the catholyte (sodium bicarbonate) concentration, but not the salinity ratio, indicating high catholyte conductivity was essential for maximizing hydrogen production rates. The direction of the HC and LC flows (co- or counter-current) did not affect performance in terms of hydrogen gas volume, production rates, or stack voltages. These results show that the MREC can be successfully operated using ammonium bicarbonate salts that can be regenerated using conventional distillation technologies and waste heat making the MREC a useful method for hydrogen gas production from wastes. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  19. Optimization and field demonstration of hybrid hydrogen generator/high efficiency furnace system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Entchev, E.; Coyle, I.; Szadkowski, F. [CANMET Energy Technology Centre, 1 Haanel Dr., Ottawa, Ontario K1A-1M1 (Canada); Manning, M.; Swinton, M. [National Research Council Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Graydon, J.; Kirk, D. [University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    Hydrogen is seen as an energy carrier of the future and significant research on hydrogen generation, storage and utilization is accomplished around the world. However, an appropriate intermediate step before wide hydrogen introduction will be blending conventional fuels such as natural gas, oil or diesel with hydrogen and follow up combustion through conventional means. Due to changes in the combustion and flame characteristics of the system additional research is needed to access the limits and the impact of the fuel mix on the combustion systems performance. The hybrid system consists of a 5 kW{sub el} electrolyzer and a residential 15 kW{sub th} high efficiency gas fired furnace. The electrolyzer was integrated with the furnace gas supply and setup to replace 5-25% of the furnace natural gas flow with hydrogen. A mean for proper mixing of hydrogen with natural gas was provided and a control system for safe system operation was developed. Prior to the start of the field trial the hybrid system was investigated in laboratory environment. It was subjected to a variety of steady state and cycling conditions and a detailed performance and optimization analysis was performed with a range of hydrogen/natural gas mixtures. The optimized system was then installed at the Canadian Centre for Housing Technologies (CCHT) Experimental research house. The energy performance of the hybrid system was compared to the energy performance of an identical high efficiency furnace in the Control research house next door. (author)

  20. Hydrogen generation from small-scale wind-powered electrolysis system in different power matching modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goekcek, Murat [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Nigde University, Campus, 51100 Nigde (Turkey)

    2010-10-15

    This study presents a techno-economic evaluation on hydrogen generation from a small-scale wind-powered electrolysis system in different power matching modes. For the analysis, wind speed data, which measured as hourly time series in Kirklareli, Turkey, were used to predict the electrical energy and hydrogen produced by the wind-hydrogen energy system and their variation according to the height of the wind turbine. The system considered in this study is primarily consisted of a 6 kW wind-energy conversion system and a 2 kW PEM electrolyzer. The calculation of energy production was made by means of the levelized cost method by considering two different systems that are the grid-independent system and the grid-integrated system. Annual production of electrical energy and hydrogen was calculated as 15,148.26 kWh/year and 102.37 kg/year, respectively. The highest hydrogen production is obtained in January. The analyses showed that both electrical energy and hydrogen production depend strongly on the hub height of wind turbine in addition to the economic indicators. In the grid-integrated system, the calculated levelized cost of hydrogen changes in the range of 0.3485-4.4849 US$/kg for 36 m hub height related to the specific turbine cost. The grid-integrated system can be considered as profitable when the excess electrical energy delivered by system sold to the grid. (author)

  1. Flight Hydrogen Sensor for use in the ISS Oxygen Generation Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    MSadoques, George, Jr.; Makel, Darby B.

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a description of the hydrogen sensor Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU) used on the Oxygen Generation Assembly (OGA), to be operated on the International Space Station (ISS). The hydrogen sensor ORU is being provided by Makel Engineering, Inc. (MEI) to monitor the oxygen outlet for the presence of hydrogen. The hydrogen sensor ORU is a triple redundant design where each sensor converts raw measurements to actual hydrogen partial pressure that is reported to the OGA system controller. The signal outputs are utilized for system shutdown in the event that the hydrogen concentration in the oxygen outlet line exceeds the specified shutdown limit. Improvements have been made to the Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) based sensing element, screening, and calibration process to meet OGA operating requirements. Two flight hydrogen sensor ORUs have successfully completed the acceptance test phase. This paper also describes the sensor s performance during acceptance testing, additional tests planned to extend the operational performance calibration cycle, and integration with the OGA system.

  2. Catalytic Hydrogenation of the Sweet Principles of Stevia rebaudiana, Rebaudioside B, Rebaudioside C, and Rebaudioside D and Sensory Evaluation of Their Reduced Derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Campbell

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic hydrogenation of rebaudioside B, rebaudioside C, and rebaudioside D; the three ent-kaurane diterpene glycosides isolated from Stevia rebaudiana was carried out using Pd(OH2. Reduction of steviol glycosides was performed using straightforward synthetic chemistry with the catalyst Pd(OH2 and structures of the corresponding dihydro derivatives were characterized on the basis of 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectral data indicating that all are novel compounds being reported for the first time. Also, the taste properties of all reduced compounds were evaluated against their corresponding original steviol glycosides and sucrose.

  3. Catalytic hydrogenation of the sweet principles of Stevia rebaudiana, Rebaudioside B, Rebaudioside C, and Rebaudioside D and sensory evaluation of their reduced derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Indra; Campbell, Mary; Chaturvedula, Venkata Sai Prakash

    2012-11-16

    Catalytic hydrogenation of rebaudioside B, rebaudioside C, and rebaudioside D; the three ent-kaurane diterpene glycosides isolated from Stevia rebaudiana was carried out using Pd(OH)(2). Reduction of steviol glycosides was performed using straightforward synthetic chemistry with the catalyst Pd(OH)(2) and structures of the corresponding dihydro derivatives were characterized on the basis of 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral data indicating that all are novel compounds being reported for the first time. Also, the taste properties of all reduced compounds were evaluated against their corresponding original steviol glycosides and sucrose.

  4. Catalytic Hydrogenation of the Sweet Principles of Stevia rebaudiana, Rebaudioside B, Rebaudioside C, and Rebaudioside D and Sensory Evaluation of Their Reduced Derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Indra; Campbell, Mary; Chaturvedula, Venkata Sai Prakash

    2012-01-01

    Catalytic hydrogenation of rebaudioside B, rebaudioside C, and rebaudioside D; the three ent-kaurane diterpene glycosides isolated from Stevia rebaudiana was carried out using Pd(OH)2. Reduction of steviol glycosides was performed using straightforward synthetic chemistry with the catalyst Pd(OH)2 and structures of the corresponding dihydro derivatives were characterized on the basis of 1D and 2D nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectral data indicating that all are novel compounds being reported for the first time. Also, the taste properties of all reduced compounds were evaluated against their corresponding original steviol glycosides and sucrose. PMID:23203115

  5. Coupling a PEM fuel cell and the hydrogen generation from aluminum waste cans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Susana Silva; Albanil Sanchez, Loyda; Alvarez Gallegos, Alberto A. [Centro de Investigacion en Ingenieria y Ciencias Aplicadas, Av. Universidad 1001, Col. Chamilpa, Cuernavaca, Mor. CP 62210 (Mexico); Sebastian, P.J. [Centro de Investigacion en Energia-UNAM, 62580 Temixco, Morelos (Mexico); Cuerpo Academico de Energia y Sustentabilidad, UPCH, Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas (Mexico)

    2007-10-15

    High purity hydrogen was generated from the chemical reaction of aluminum and sodium hydroxide. The aluminum used in this study was obtained from empty soft drink cans and treated with concentrated sulfuric acid to remove the paint and plastic film. One gram of aluminum was reacted with a solution of 2moldm{sup -3} of sodium hydroxide to produce hydrogen. The hydrogen produced from aluminum cans and oxygen obtained from a proton exchange membrane electrolyzer or air, was fed to a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell to produce electricity. Yields of 44 mmol of hydrogen contained in a volume of 1.760dm{sup 3} were produced from one gram of aluminum in a time period of 20 min. (author)

  6. WTP Waste Feed Qualification: Hydrogen Generation Rate Measurement Apparatus Testing Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, M. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Newell, J. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Smith, T. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pareizs, J. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-06-01

    The generation rate of hydrogen gas in the Hanford tank waste will be measured during the qualification of the staged tank waste for processing in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. Based on a review of past practices in measurement of the hydrogen generation, an apparatus to perform this measurement has been designed and tested for use during waste feed qualification. The hydrogen generation rate measurement apparatus described in this document and shown in Figure 0-1 utilized a 100 milliliter sample in a continuously-purged, continuously-stirred vessel, with measurement of hydrogen concentration in the vent gas. The vessel and lid had a combined 220 milliliters of headspace. The vent gas system included a small condenser to prevent excessive evaporative losses from the sample during the test, as well as a demister and filter to prevent particle migration from the sample to the gas chromatography system. The gas chromatograph was an on line automated instrument with a large-volume sample-injection system to allow measurement of very low hydrogen concentrations. This instrument automatically sampled the vent gas from the hydrogen generation rate measurement apparatus every five minutes and performed data regression in real time. The fabrication of the hydrogen generation rate measurement apparatus was in accordance with twenty three (23) design requirements documented in the conceptual design package, as well as seven (7) required developmental activities documented in the task plan associated with this work scope. The HGRMA was initially tested for proof of concept with physical simulants and a remote demonstration of the system was performed in the Savannah River National Laboratory Shielded Cells Mockup Facility. Final verification testing was performed using non-radioactive simulants of the Hanford tank waste. Three different simulants were tested to bound the expected rheological properties expected during waste feed qualification

  7. WTP Waste Feed Qualification: Hydrogen Generation Rate Measurement Apparatus Testing Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, M. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Newell, J. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Smith, T. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Pareizs, J. M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-06-01

    The generation rate of hydrogen gas in the Hanford tank waste will be measured during the qualification of the staged tank waste for processing in the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant. Based on a review of past practices in measurement of the hydrogen generation, an apparatus to perform this measurement has been designed and tested for use during waste feed qualification. The hydrogen generation rate measurement apparatus (HGRMA) described in this document utilized a 100 milliliter sample in a continuously-purged, continuously-stirred vessel, with measurement of hydrogen concentration in the vent gas. The vessel and lid had a combined 220 milliliters of headspace. The vent gas system included a small condenser to prevent excessive evaporative losses from the sample during the test, as well as a demister and filter to prevent particle migration from the sample to the gas chromatography system. The gas chromatograph was an on line automated instrument with a large-volume sample-injection system to allow measurement of very low hydrogen concentrations. This instrument automatically sampled the vent gas from the hydrogen generation rate measurement apparatus every five minutes and performed data regression in real time. The fabrication of the hydrogen generation rate measurement apparatus was in accordance with twenty three (23) design requirements documented in the conceptual design package, as well as seven (7) required developmental activities documented in the task plan associated with this work scope. The HGRMA was initially tested for proof of concept with physical simulants, and a remote demonstration of the system was performed in the Savannah River National Laboratory Shielded Cells Mockup Facility. Final verification testing was performed using non-radioactive simulants of the Hanford tank waste. Three different simulants were tested to bound the expected rheological properties expected during waste feed qualification testing. These

  8. Hot-Wire generated atomic hydrogen and its impact on thermal ALD in $TiCl_4/NH_3$ system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Bui, H.; Kovalgin, A.Y.; Aarnink, A.A.I.; Wolters, R.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    We present the generation of atomic hydrogen made by the dissociation of molecular hydrogen upon collision with a tungsten (W) filament kept at a high temperature (T ≈ 1600–1900◦C). We demonstrate the ability to create atomic hydrogen and to introduce it in short pulses in experiments on etching of

  9. Influence of chirality on catalytic generation of nitric oxide and platelet behavior on selenocystine immobilized TiO2 films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Yonghong; Pan, Xiaxin; Wang, Ke; Wu, Sisi; Han, Honghong; Yang, Ping; Luo, Rifang; Wang, Hong; Huang, Nan; Tan, Wei; Weng, Yajun

    2016-09-01

    As nitric oxide (NO) plays vital roles in the cardiovascular system, incorporating this molecule into cardiovascular stents is considered as an effective method. In the present study, selenocystine with different chirality (i.e., l- and d-selenocystine) was used as the catalytic molecule immobilized on TiO2 films for decomposing endogenous NO donor. The influences of surface chirality on NO release and platelet behavior were evaluated. Results show that although the amount of immobilized l-selenocystine on the surface was nearly the same as that of immobilized d-selenocystine, in vitro catalytic NO release tests showed that l-selenocystine immobilized surfaces were more capable of catalyzing the decomposition of S-nitrosoglutathione and thus generating more NO. Accordingly, l-selenocystine immobilized surfaces demonstrated significantly increased inhibiting effects on the platelet adhesion and activation, when compared to d-selenocystine immobilized ones. Measurement of the cGMP concentration of platelets further confirmed that surface chirality played an important role in regulating NO generation and platelet behaviors. Additionally, using bovine serum albumin and fibrinogen as model proteins, the protein adsorption determined with quartz crystal microbalance showed that the l-selenocystine immobilized surface enhanced protein adsorption. In conclusion, surface chirality significantly influences protein adsorption and NO release, which may have significant implications in the design of NO-generating cardiovascular stents.

  10. Chemiluminescence assay for catechin based on generation of hydrogen peroxide in basic solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arakawa, Hidetoshi; Kanemitsu, Mahina; Tajima, Noriko; Maeda, Masako

    2002-11-20

    We have determined that the catechin group in basic solution efficiently produces hydrogen peroxide; moreover, a highly sensitive analysis methodology was developed to measure catechin employing a peroxalate chemiluminescence detection system. Identification of hydrogen peroxide generated by catechin was determined by ESR as well as peroxalate chemiluminescence using catalase and SOD. As a result, catechin-generated superoxide by electron reduction to dissolved oxygen in basic solution, followed by production of hydrogen peroxide through dismutation reaction. This method could measure several tea catechins, (+)-catechin (CC), (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCg), (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate (ECG) and gallic acid, with measurement range from 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -3} mol/l and sensitivity of 10{sup -8} mol/l. This method was also applied to the determination of total catechin levels in green tea, black tea and roasted green tea.

  11. High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August, 2000 - July 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.C.

    2002-11-01

    OAK B188 High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels using Nuclear Power Annual Report August 2000 - July 2001. Currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process is available for commercialization nor has such a process been identified. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. The benefits of this work will include the generation of a low-polluting transportable energy feedstock in an efficient method that has little or no implication for greenhouse gas emissions from a primary energy source whose availability and sources are domestically controlled. This will help to ensure energy for a future transportation/energy infrastructure that is not influenced/controlled by foreign governments. This report describes work accomplished during the second year (Phase 2) of a three year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first year (Phase 1) was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water, in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most, three) for further detailed consideration. Phase 1 met its goals and did select one process, the sulfur-iodine process, for investigation in Phases 2 and 3. The combined goals of Phases 2 and 3 were to select the advanced nuclear reactor best

  12. Modeling the reaction kinetics of a hydrogen generator onboard a fuel cell -- Electric hybrid motorcycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesh, Karthik

    Owing to the perceived decline of the fossil fuel reserves in the world and environmental issues like pollution, conventional fuels may be replaced by cleaner alternative fuels. The potential of hydrogen as a fuel in vehicular applications is being explored. Hydrogen as an energy carrier potentially finds applications in internal combustion engines and fuel cells because it is considered a clean fuel and has high specific energy. However, at 6 to 8 per kilogram, not only is hydrogen produced from conventional methods like steam reforming expensive, but also there are storage and handling issues, safety concerns and lack of hydrogen refilling stations across the country. The purpose of this research is to suggest a cheap and viable system that generates hydrogen on demand through a chemical reaction between an aluminum-water slurry and an aqueous sodium hydroxide solution to power a 2 kW fuel cell on a fuel cell hybrid motorcycle. This reaction is essentially an aluminum-water reaction where sodium hydroxide acts as a reaction promoter or catalyst. The Horizon 2000 fuel cell used for this purpose has a maximum hydrogen intake rate of 28 lpm. The study focuses on studying the exothermic reaction between the reactants and proposes a rate law that best describes the rate of generation of hydrogen in connection to the surface area of aluminum available for the certain reaction and the concentration of the sodium hydroxide solution. Further, the proposed rate law is used in the simulation model of the chemical reactor onboard the hybrid motorcycle to determine the hydrogen flow rate to the fuel cell with time. Based on the simulated rate of production of hydrogen from the chemical system, its feasibility of use on different drive cycles is analyzed. The rate of production of hydrogen with a higher concentration of sodium hydroxide and smaller aluminum powder size was found to enable the installation of the chemical reactor on urban cycles with frequent stops and starts

  13. Low-level hydrogen peroxide generation by unbleached cotton nonwovens: implications for wound healing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greige cotton is an intact plant fiber. The cuticle and primary cell wall near the outer surface of the cotton fiber contains pectin, peroxidases, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and trace metals, which are associated with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation during cotton fiber development. The compon...

  14. High performance photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation and solar cells with a double type II heterojunction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lai, Lai-Hung; Gomulya, Widianta; Protesescu, Loredana; Kovalenko, Maksym V.; Loi, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of CdSe quantum dot (QD) sensitized electrodes by direct adsorption of colloidal QDs on mesoporous TiO2 followed by 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) ligand exchange. High efficiency photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation is demonstrated by means of these electrodes. The

  15. The Effects of CO2 Addition on the Partial Oxidation of Heptane for Hydrogen Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ran RAN; Guo Xing XIONG; Shi Shan SHENG; Wei Shen YANG

    2004-01-01

    The effects of CO2 on the partial oxidation of heptane for hydrogen generation have been studied. Based on the experimental results and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations, the validity of CO2 addition to weaken the hot spots, and the feasibility of the autothermal operation are discussed.

  16. Early-time photodynamics of ruthenium-based photocatalysts for light-induced hydrogen generation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pan, Qing

    2016-01-01

    This thesis aims to provide a fundamental understanding of the early-time photodynamics of a series of Ru/M (M = Pd or Pt) bimetallic photocatalysts for light-induced hydrogen generation. This class of complexes adopts a general structure involving a Ru(II) center coordinated to two peripheral ligan

  17. Biomass & Natural Gas Based Hydrogen Fuel For Gas Turbine (Power Generation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant progress has been made by major power generation equipment manufacturers in the development of market applications for hydrogen fuel use in gas turbines in recent years. Development of a new application using gas turbines for significant reduction of power plant CO2 e...

  18. Experimental and numerical investigation of the catalytic partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas for power generation applications[Dissertation 17183

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, A.

    2007-07-01

    The present work addresses the catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) of methane to synthesis gas, with particular emphasis on power generation applications. A combined experimental and numerical investigation of methane partial oxidation to synthesis gas (H{sub 2}, CO) over rhodium-based catalysts has been carried out at pressures of up to 10 bar. The reactivity of the produced hydrogen and the suitably-low light-off temperatures of the CPO reactor, greatly facilitate operation of power generation gas turbines with reduced NO{sub x} emissions, stable operation with low calorific value fuels, and new combustion strategies for efficient CO{sub 2} capture. Those strategies utilize CPO of methane with oxygen (separated from air) and large exhaust gas recycle (H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}). An optically accessible catalytic channel-flow reactor was used to carry out Raman spectroscopy of major gas-phase species and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) of formaldehyde, in order to gain fundamental information on the catalytic and gas-phase chemical pathways. Transverse concentration profiles measured by the spontaneous Raman scattering technique determined the catalytic reactivity, while the LIF provided flame shapes and anchoring positions that, in turn, characterized the gaseous reactivity. Comparison between measurements and 2-D CFD computations, led to the validation of detailed catalytic and gas-phase reaction mechanisms. Experiments in a subscale gas-turbine honeycomb catalytic reactor have shown that the foregoing reaction mechanisms were also appropriate under gas-turbine relevant conditions with short reactant residence times. The light-off behavior of the subscale honeycomb reactor was reproduced by transient 2-D CFD computations. Ignition and extinction in CPO was studied. It was shown that, despite the chemical impact of the H{sub 2}O diluent during the transient catalytic ignition event, the light-off times themselves were largely unaffected by the exhaust gas dilution

  19. Selective heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation of ketone (C═O) to alcohol (OH) by magnetite nanoparticles following Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Muhammad Tariq; Balouch, Aamna; Rajar, Kausar; Sirajuddin; Brohi, Imdad Ali; Umar, Akrajas Ali

    2015-04-01

    Magnetite nanoparticles were successfully synthesized and effectively employed as heterogeneous catalyst for hydrogenation of ketone moiety to alcohol moiety by NaBH4 under the microwave radiation process. The improvement was achieved in percent recovery of isopropyl alcohol by varying and optimizing reaction time, power of microwave radiations and amount of catalyst. The catalytic study revealed that acetone would be converted into isopropyl alcohol (IPA) with 99.5% yield in short period of reaction time, using 10 μg of magnetite NPs (Fe3O4). It was observed that the catalytic hydrogenation reaction, followed second-order of reaction and the Langmuir-Hinshelwood kinetic mechanism, which elucidated that both reactants get adsorb onto the surface of silica coated magnetite nanocatalyst to react. Consequently, the rate-determining step was the surface reaction of acetone and sodium borohydride. The current study revealed an environment friendly conversion of acetone to IPA on the basis of its fast, efficient, and highly economical method of utilization of microwave irradiation process and easy catalyst recovery.

  20. Research Progress in Catalytic Hydrogenation of CO2 to Ethanol%CO2催化加氢制乙醇研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王慧敏; 杨绪壮; 张兵兵; 苏海全

    2012-01-01

    燃料乙醇是可再生的清洁燃料,具有替代汽油的应用前景.以CO2气体为碳源并通过催化加氢制燃料乙醇具有环境保护和节约能源的现实意义.主要介绍了CO2催化加氢的反应机理以及催化剂活性组分、前驱物、助剂及载体对催化活性、产物选择性的影响,同时介绍了反应条件对催化过程的影响.%Fuel ethanol is often regarded as a potential renewable clean alternative fuel to gasoline. It has practical significance of environmental protection and energy conservation to synthesize fuel ethanol by the hydrogenation of CO2. The reaction mechanism of catalytic hydrogenation of CO2 to ethanol as well as the effects of active sites,precursors,promoters and supports on the catalytic activity and product selectivity are reviewed. Moreover,the effects of reaction conditions on the catalysis are also introduced.

  1. Agro-industrial waste-mediated synthesis and characterization of gold and silver nanoparticles and their catalytic activity for 4-nitroaniline hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauthal, Preeti; Mukhopadhyay, Mausumi [S.V. National Institute of Technology, Surat (India)

    2015-05-15

    The biosynthesis of gold (Au-NPs) and silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) using agro-industrial waste Citrus aurantifolia peel extract as a bio-reducing agent is reported. Catalytic activity of nanoparticles (NPs) was evaluated for hydrogenation of anthropogenic pollutant 4-nitroaniline (4-NA). Both synthesized NPs were nearly spherical and distributed in size range of 6-46 and 10-32 nm for Au-NPs and Ag-NPs, respectively. XRD analysis revealed face centered cubic (fcc) structure of both NPs. ζ potential value obtained from colloidal solution of Au-NPs and Ag-NPs was −28.0 and −26.1mV, respectively, indicating the stability of the NPs in colloidal solution. FTIR spectra supported the role of citric and ascorbic acids of peel extract for biosynthesis and stabilization of NPs. The biosynthesized NPs exhibited excellent catalytic activity for hydrogenation of 4-NA in the presence of NaBH{sub 4}.

  2. A polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack for stationary power generation from hydrogen fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottesfeld, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The fuel cell is the most efficient device for the conversion of hydrogen fuel to electric power. As such, the fuel cell represents a key element in efforts to demonstrate and implement hydrogen fuel utilization for electric power generation. The low temperature, polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has recently been identified as an attractive option for stationary power generation, based on the relatively simple and benign materials employed, the zero-emission character of the device, and the expected high power density, high reliability and low cost. However, a PEMFC stack fueled by hydrogen with the combined properties of low cost, high performance and high reliability has not yet been demonstrated. Demonstration of such a stack will remove a significant barrier to implementation of this advanced technology for electric power generation from hydrogen. Work done in the past at LANL on the development of components and materials, particularly on advanced membrane/electrode assemblies (MEAs), has contributed significantly to the capability to demonstrate in the foreseeable future a PEMFC stack with the combined characteristics described above. A joint effort between LANL and an industrial stack manufacturer will result in the demonstration of such a fuel cell stack for stationary power generation. The stack could operate on hydrogen fuel derived from either natural gas or from renewable sources. The technical plan includes collaboration with a stack manufacturer (CRADA). It stresses the special requirements from a PEMFC in stationary power generation, particularly maximization of the energy conversion efficiency, extension of useful life to the 10 hours time scale and tolerance to impurities from the reforming of natural gas.

  3. Performance of new generation TWC catalytic systems working under different conditions in order to reduce the emission of a global warming gas: N{sub 2}O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac-Beath, I.; Castillo, S.; Camposeco, R.; Moran-Pineda, M. [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico). Programa de Ingenieria Molecular

    2010-07-01

    In this work, three-way catalytic systems (TWC-K, TWC-M and TWC-P) were prepared and tested experimentally in order to analyze N{sub 2}O emissions. Various types and quantities of precious metals (Pt-Pd-Rh), and different mixed oxides (CexBayLazMgwO{sub 2}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) to prepare the supports were used. The catalytic tests were carried out by using common exhaust gases from a gasoline engine under different oxidizing conditions. The TWC catalytic compositions were based on catalytic converters used in retrofitting programs in the Metropolitan Area in Mexico City. Fresh and aged TWC catalytic samples were tested; in both conditions, the catalytic compositions were characterized by BET, TEM-EDS and XRD in order to analyze the efficiency of the catalytic behavior. Due to the fact that the 4{sup th} TWC generation (Pd-Only TWC) has Pd as main active metal, the tested TWC catalytic samples were synthesized by having Pd in a higher proportion with regard to Pt and Rh used as complements with some differences in support composition. (orig.)

  4. A third-generation dispersion and third-generation hydrogen bonding corrected PM6 method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, Jimmy Charnley; Christensen, Anders Steen; Svendsen, Casper Steinmann;

    2014-01-01

    We present new dispersion and hydrogen bond corrections to the PM6 method, PM6-D3H+, and its implementation in the GAMESS program. The method combines the DFT-D3 dispersion correction by Grimme et al. with a modified version of the H+ hydrogen bond correction by Korth. Overall, the interaction en...... vibrational free energies. While the GAMESS implementation is up to 10 times slower for geometry optimizations of proteins in bulk solvent, compared to MOPAC, it is sufficiently fast to make geometry optimizations of small proteins practically feasible....... energy of PM6-D3H+ is very similar to PM6-DH2 and PM6-DH+, with RMSD and MAD values within 0.02 kcal/mol of one another. The main difference is that the geometry optimizations of 88 complexes result in 82, 6, 0, and 0 geometries with 0, 1, 2, and 3 or more imaginary frequencies using PM6-D3H+ implemented...

  5. Effect of torrefaction pretreatment and catalytic pyrolysis on the pyrolysis poly-generation of pine wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dengyu; Li, Yanjun; Deng, Minsi; Wang, Jiayang; Chen, Miao; Yan, Bei; Yuan, Qiqiang

    2016-08-01

    Torrefaction of pine wood was performed in a tube furnace at three temperatures (220, 250, and 280°C) for 30min. Then catalytic pyrolysis of raw and torrefied pine wood was performed using HZSM-5 catalyst in a fixed-bed pyrolysis reactor at 550°C for 15min. Torrefaction pretreatment and catalytic pyrolysis have an very important effect on the yield, property, and energy distribution of pyrolysis products. The results showed that the yield of biochar rapidly increased, while that of bio-oil decreased with increasing torrefaction temperature. The oxy-compound content of bio-oil, such as acids and aldehydes, sharply decreased. However, the aromatic hydrocarbon content not only increased but also further promoted by HZSM-5 catalyst. With highest mass yields and energy yields, biochar was also the very important product of pyrolysis. The oxygen content in biomass was mainly removed in the form of CO2 and H2O, leading to increasing CO2 content in non-condensable gas.

  6. Cu2ZnSnS4/MoS2-Reduced Graphene Oxide Heterostructure: Nanoscale Interfacial Contact and Enhanced Photocatalytic Hydrogen Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Enna; Liu, Wei; Wang, Luyang; Man, Ho-Wing; Hu, Liangsheng; Tsang, Shik Chi Edman; Chan, Chris Tsz-Leung; Kwok, Wai-Ming; Lee, Lawrence Yoon Suk; Wong, Kwok-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Hydrogen generation from water using noble metal-free photocatalysts presents a promising platform for renewable and sustainable energy. Copper-based chalcogenides of earth-abundant elements, especially Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS), have recently arisen as a low-cost and environment-friendly material for photovoltaics and photocatalysis. Herein, we report a new heterostructure consisting of CZTS nanoparticles anchored onto a MoS2-reduced graphene oxide (rGO) hybrid. Using a facile two-step method, CZTS nanoparticles were in situ grown on the surface of MoS2-rGO hybrid, which generated high density of nanoscale interfacial contact between CZTS and MoS2-rGO hybrid. The photoexcited electrons of CZTS can be readily transported to MoS2 through rGO backbone, reducing the electron-hole pair recombination. In photocatalytic hydrogen generation under visible light irradiation, the presence of MoS2-rGO hybrids enhanced the hydrogen production rate of CZTS by 320%, which can be attributed to the synergetic effect of increased charge separation by rGO and more catalytically active sites from MoS2. Furthermore, this CZTS/MoS2-rGO heterostructure showed much higher photocatalytic activity than both Au and Pt nanoparticle-decorated CZTS (Au/CZTS and Pt/CZTS) photocatalysts, indicating the MoS2-rGO hybrid is a better co-catalyst for photocatalytic hydrogen generation than the precious metal. The CZTS/MoS2-rGO system also demonstrated stable photocatalytic activity for a continuous 20 h reaction.

  7. Helium-3 Generation from the Interaction of Deuterium Plasma inside a Hydrogenated Lattice: Red Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal-Quiros, Edbertho; Leal-Escalante, David A.

    2015-03-01

    Helium-3 has been created in a nuclear fusion reaction by fusing deuterium ions from deuterium plasma with hydrogen ions in a “RED” (the Spanish word for net) or crystal lattice, a method we called red fusion ("Fusion en la red cristalina"), because is a new method to make nuclear fusion reaction. In this paper, it will be show the experimental results where the helium-3 has been generated for the first time in this kind of new method to confine deuterium and hydrogen inside the RED or lattice of the hydrogenated crystal and that confinement inside the RED facilitated overcoming the Coulomb barrier between them and helium-3 and phonons are produced in this fusion reaction. The results of a long time research in which helium-3, has been created in a fusion reaction inside the lattice or RED of the crystal that contained hydrogen after adequate interaction of deuterium plasma at appropriate high temperature and magnetic confinement of the Mirror/Cusp Plasma Machine at Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico, designed by the authors. Several mass spectra and visible light spectrum where the presence of helium-3 was detected are shown. The experiment was repeated more than 200 times showing always the generation of helium-3. In this experiment no gamma rays were detected. For this experiment several diagnostic instruments were used. The data collection with these control instrumentation are shown. Thus, it is an important new way to generate Helium-3. reserved.

  8. Brewery wastewaters in photobiological hydrogen generation in presence of Rhodobacter sphaeroides O.U. 001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seifert, K.; Waligorska, M.; Laniecki, M. [Faculty of Chemistry, A. Mickiewicz University, Grunwaldzka 6, 60-780 Poznan (Poland)

    2010-05-15

    Rhodobacter sphaeroides O.U. 001 (concentration of inoculum-0.36 g dry wt/l) and brewery wastewaters were applied in photobiogeneration of hydrogen under illumination of 116 W/m{sup 2}. The best results were obtained with filtered wastewaters sterilized at 120 C for 20 min and maximal concentration of waste in medium equal 10% v/v. The main product in generated biogas was hydrogen (90%). After sterilization the amount of generated hydrogen was tripled (from 0.76 to 2.2 l H{sub 2}/l medium), whereas waste concentration of 10% v/v resulted in the best substrate yield (0.22 l H{sub 2}/l of waste). Under these conditions the amount of generated hydrogen was 2.24 l H{sub 2}/l medium and light conversion efficiency reached value of 1.7%. The modified Gompertz equations served in modeling of the kinetics of the studied process. (author)

  9. Ultrastable nitrogen-doped carbon encapsulating molybdenum phosphide nanoparticles as highly efficient electrocatalyst for hydrogen generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Zonghua; Amiinu, Ibrahim Saana; Liu, Xiaobo; Wang, Min; Mu, Shichun

    2016-10-06

    There is a crucial demand for cost-effective hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) catalysts towards future renewable energy systems, and the development of such catalysts operating under all pH conditions still remains a challenging task. In this work, a one-step facile approach to synthesizing nitrogen-doped carbon encapsulating molybdenum phosphide nanoparticles (MoP NPs@NC) is introduced by using ammonium molybdate, ammonium dihydrogen phosphate and melamine as precursor. Benefitting from structural advantages, including ultrasmall nanoparticles, large exposed surface area and fast charge transfer, MoP NPs@NC exhibits excellent HER catalytic activities with small overpotentials at all pH values (j = 10 mA cm(-2) at η = 115, 136 and 80 mV in 0.5 M H2SO4, 1.0 M phosphate buffer solution and 1.0 M KOH, respectively.). Meanwhile, the high catalytic activities of MoP NPs@NC under both neutral and basic conditions have never been achieved before for molybdenum phosphide-based catalysts. Additionally, the encapsulation by N-doped carbon effectively prevents the MoP NPs from corrosion, exhibiting nearly unfading stability after 100 h testing in 0.5 M H2SO4. Thus, our work could pave a new avenue for unprecedented design and fabrication of novel low-cost metal phosphide electrocatalysts encapsulated by N-doped carbon.

  10. High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Solar Thermochemical Splitting of Water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heske, Clemens; Moujaes, Samir; Weimer, Alan; Wong, Bunsen; Siegal, Nathan; McFarland, Eric; Miller, Eric; Lewis, Michele; Bingham, Carl; Roth, Kurth; Sabacky, Bruce; Steinfeld, Aldo

    2011-09-29

    The objective of this work is to identify economically feasible concepts for the production of hydrogen from water using solar energy. The ultimate project objective was to select one or more competitive concepts for pilot-scale demonstration using concentrated solar energy. Results of pilot scale plant performance would be used as foundation for seeking public and private resources for full-scale plant development and testing. Economical success in this venture would afford the public with a renewable and limitless source of energy carrier for use in electric power load-leveling and as a carbon-free transportation fuel. The Solar Hydrogen Generation Research (SHGR) project embraces technologies relevant to hydrogen research under the Office of Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technology (HFCIT) as well as concentrated solar power under the Office of Solar Energy Technologies (SET). Although the photoelectrochemical work is aligned with HFCIT, some of the technologies in this effort are also consistent with the skills and technologies found in concentrated solar power and photovoltaic technology under the Office of Solar Energy Technologies (SET). Hydrogen production by thermo-chemical water-splitting is a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or a combination of heat and electrolysis instead of pure electrolysis and meets the goals for hydrogen production using only water and renewable solar energy as feed-stocks. Photoelectrochemical hydrogen production also meets these goals by implementing photo-electrolysis at the surface of a semiconductor in contact with an electrolyte with bias provided by a photovoltaic source. Here, water splitting is a photo-electrolytic process in which hydrogen is produced using only solar photons and water as feed-stocks. The thermochemical hydrogen task engendered formal collaborations among two universities, three national laboratories and two private sector

  11. Refinements in an Mg/MgH2/H2O-Based Hydrogen Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindler, Andrew; Huang, Yuhong

    2010-01-01

    Some refinements have been conceived for a proposed apparatus that would generate hydrogen (for use in a fuel cell) by means of chemical reactions among magnesium, magnesium hydride, and steam. The refinements lie in tailoring spatial and temporal distributions of steam and liquid water so as to obtain greater overall energy-storage or energy-generation efficiency than would otherwise be possible. A description of the prior art is prerequisite to a meaningful description of the present refinements. The hydrogen-generating apparatus in question is one of two versions of what was called the "advanced hydrogen generator" in "Fuel-Cell Power Systems Incorporating Mg-Based H2 Generators" (NPO-43554), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 33, No. 1 (January 2009), page 52. To recapitulate: The apparatus would include a reactor vessel that would be initially charged with magnesium hydride. The apparatus would exploit two reactions: The endothermic decomposition reaction MgH2-->Mg + H2, which occurs at a temperature greater than or equal to 300 C, and The exothermic oxidation reaction MgH2 + H2O MgO + 2H2, which occurs at a temperature greater than or equal to 330 C.

  12. Alkali free hydrolysis of sodium borohydride for hydrogen generation under pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, M.J.F.; Pinto, A.M.F.R. [Centro de Estudos de Fenomenos de Transporte, Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Rua Dr. Roberto Frias s/n, 4200-465 Porto (Portugal); Gales, L. [Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 823, 4150-180 Porto and Instituto de Ciencias Biomedicas Abel Salazar, Largo Prof. Abel Salazar 2, 4099-003 Porto (Portugal); Fernandes, V.R.; Rangel, C.M. [Laboratorio Nacional de Energia e Geologia - LNEG, Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Unit Estrada do Paco do Lumiar 22, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2010-09-15

    The present study is related with the production of hydrogen gas (H{sub 2}), at elevated pressures and with high gravimetric storage density, to supply a PEM fuel cell on-demand. To achieve this goal, solid sodium borohydride (NaBH{sub 4}) was mixed with a proper amount of a powder reused nickel-ruthenium based catalyst (Ni-Ru based/NaBH{sub 4}: 0.2 and 0.4 g/g; {approx}150 times reused) inside the bottom of a batch reactor. Then, a stoichiometric amount of pure liquid water (H{sub 2}O/NaBH{sub 4}: 2-8 mol/mol) was added and the catalyzed NaBH{sub 4} hydrolysis evolved, in the absence of an alkali inhibitor. In this way, this research work is designated alkali free hydrolysis of NaBH{sub 4} for H{sub 2} generation. This type of hydrolysis is excellent from an environmental point of view because it does not involve strongly caustic solutions. Experiments were performed in three batch reactors with internal volumes 646, 369 and 229 cm{sup 3}, and having different bottom geometries (flat and conical shapes). The H{sub 2} generated was a function of the added water and completion was achieved with H{sub 2}O/NaBH{sub 4} = 8 mol/mol. The results show that hydrogen yields and rates increase remarkably increasing both system temperature and pressure. Reactor bottom shape influences deeply H{sub 2} generation: the conical bottom shape greatly enhances the rate and practically eliminates the reaction induction time. Our system of compressed hydrogen generation up to 1.26 MPa shows 6.3 wt% and 70 kg m{sup -3}, respectively, for gravimetric and volumetric hydrogen storage capacities (materials-only basis) and therefore is a viable hydrogen storage candidate for portable applications. (author)

  13. Lens Endogenous Peptide αA66-80 Generates Hydrogen Peroxide and Induces Cell Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raju, Murugesan; Santhoshkumar, Puttur; Sharma, K Krishna

    2017-02-01

    In previous studies, we reported the presence of a large number of low-molecular-weight (LMW) peptides in aged and cataract human lens tissues. Among the LMW peptides, a peptide derived from αA-crystallin, αA66-80, was found in higher concentration in aged and cataract lenses. Additional characterization of the αA66-80 peptide showed beta sheet signature, and it formed well-defined unbranched fibrils. Further experimental data showed that αA66-80 peptide binds α-crystallin, impairs its chaperone function, and attracts additional crystallin proteins to the peptide α-crystallin complex, leading to the formation of larger light scattering aggregates. It is well established that Aβ peptide exhibits cell toxicity by the generation of hydrogen peroxide. The αA66-80 peptide shares the principal properties of Aβ peptide. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to determine whether the fibril-forming peptide αA66-80 has the ability to generate hydrogen peroxide. The results show that the αA66-80 peptide generates hydrogen peroxide, in the amount of 1.2 nM H2O2 per µg of αA66-80 peptide by incubation at 37°C for 4h. We also observed cytotoxicity and apoptotic cell death in αA66-80 peptide-transduced Cos7 cells. As evident, we found more TUNEL-positive cells in αA66-80 peptide transduced Cos7 cells than in control cells, suggesting peptide-mediated cell apoptosis. Additional immunohistochemistry analysis showed the active form of caspase-3, suggesting activation of the caspase-dependent pathway during peptide-induced cell apoptosis. These results confirm that the αA66-80 peptide generates hydrogen peroxide and promotes hydrogen peroxide-mediated cell apoptosis.

  14. Liquid Phase Hydrogenation of Benzalacetophenone:Effect of Solvent,Catalyst Support,Catalytic Metal and Reaction Conditions%Liquid Phase Hydrogenation of Benzalacetophenone: Effect of Solvent, Catalyst Support, Catalytic Metal and Reaction Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Achim STOLLE; Christine SCHMOGER; Bernd ONDRUSCHKA; Werner BONRATH; Thomas F. KELLER; Klaus D. JANDT

    2011-01-01

    Innovative catalysts based on a “porous glass” support material were developed and investigated for the reduction of benzalacetophenone.The easy preparation conditions and possibility to use different metals (e.g.Pd,Pt,Rh) for impregnation gave a broad variety of these catalysts.Hydrogenation experiments with these supported catalysts were carried out under different hydrogen pressures and temperatures.Porous glass catalysts with Pd as the active component gave chemoselective hydrogenation of benzalacetophenone,while Pt- and Rh-catalysts tended to further reduce the carbonyl group,especially at elevated hydrogen pressures and temperatures.Kinetic analysis of the reactions revealed these had zero order kinetics,which was independent of the type of porous glass support and solvent used.

  15. Novel developments in hydrogen storage, hydrogen activation and ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doroodian, Amir

    2010-12-03

    This dissertation is divided into three chapters. Recently, metal-free hydrogen activation using phosphorous compounds has been reported in science magazine. We have investigated the interaction between hydrogen and phosphorous compounds in presence of strong Lewis acids (chapter one). A new generation of metal-free hydrogen activation, using amines and strong Lewis acids with sterically demanding nature, was already developed in our group. Shortage of high storage capacity using large substitution to improve sterical effect led us to explore the amine borane derivatives, which are explained in chapter two. Due to the high storage capacity of hydrogen in aminoborane derivatives, we have explored these materials to extend hydrogen release. These compounds store hydrogen as proton and hydride on adjacent atoms or ions. These investigations resulted in developing hydrogen storage based on ionic liquids containing methyl guanidinium cation. Then we have continued to develop ionic liquids based on methyl guanidinium cation with different anions, such as tetrafluoro borate (chapter three). We have replaced these anions with transition metal anions to investigate hydrogen bonding and catalytic activity of ionic liquids. This chapter illustrates the world of ionic liquid as a green solvent for organic, inorganic and catalytic reactions and combines the concept of catalysts and solvents based on ionic liquids. The catalytic activity is investigated particularly with respect to the interaction with CO{sub 2}. (orig.)

  16. Experimental and numerical investigation of the catalytic partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas for power generation applications[Dissertation 17183

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, A.

    2007-07-01

    The present work addresses the catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) of methane to synthesis gas, with particular emphasis on power generation applications. A combined experimental and numerical investigation of methane partial oxidation to synthesis gas (H{sub 2}, CO) over rhodium-based catalysts has been carried out at pressures of up to 10 bar. The reactivity of the produced hydrogen and the suitably-low light-off temperatures of the CPO reactor, greatly facilitate operation of power generation gas turbines with reduced NO{sub x} emissions, stable operation with low calorific value fuels, and new combustion strategies for efficient CO{sub 2} capture. Those strategies utilize CPO of methane with oxygen (separated from air) and large exhaust gas recycle (H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}). An optically accessible catalytic channel-flow reactor was used to carry out Raman spectroscopy of major gas-phase species and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) of formaldehyde, in order to gain fundamental information on the catalytic and gas-phase chemical pathways. Transverse concentration profiles measured by the spontaneous Raman scattering technique determined the catalytic reactivity, while the LIF provided flame shapes and anchoring positions that, in turn, characterized the gaseous reactivity. Comparison between measurements and 2-D CFD computations, led to the validation of detailed catalytic and gas-phase reaction mechanisms. Experiments in a subscale gas-turbine honeycomb catalytic reactor have shown that the foregoing reaction mechanisms were also appropriate under gas-turbine relevant conditions with short reactant residence times. The light-off behavior of the subscale honeycomb reactor was reproduced by transient 2-D CFD computations. Ignition and extinction in CPO was studied. It was shown that, despite the chemical impact of the H{sub 2}O diluent during the transient catalytic ignition event, the light-off times themselves were largely unaffected by the exhaust gas dilution

  17. Hydrogen and methoxy coadsorption in the computation of the catalytic conversion of methanol on the ceria (111) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beste, Ariana; Overbury, Steven H.

    2016-06-01

    Methanol decomposition to formaldehyde catalyzed by the ceria (111) surface was investigated using the DFT + U method. Our results rationalize experimental temperature programmed desorption experiments on the fully oxidized surface. Particular attention was paid to the effect of coadsorption of methoxy and hydrogen on various aspects of the conversion process. This issue had been raised by the experimental observation of water desorption at low temperature removing hydrogen from the system. Within this context, we also investigated hydrogen diffusion on the ceria surface. The hydrogen/methoxy interaction on ceria was shown to be ionic regardless of separation distance. The barrier for dehydrogenation of methoxy using the ionic model system, where hydrogen is coadsorbed, is above 1 eV. This barrier becomes negligible if an incorrect neutral model without coadsorbed hydrogen is employed. While water formation from isolated surface hydrogen is unlikely at low temperature, the presence of coadsorbed methoxy reduces the reaction energy for water formation considerably. For the dehydrated surface, we observed that the preference of the electron to locate at the methoxy oxygen instead of the cerium atom results in a surface that does not contain Ce3 + ions, despite the existence of a vacancy.

  18. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Levulinic Acid in Water into g-Valerolactone over Bulk Structure of Inexpensive Intermetallic Ni-Sn Alloy Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodiansono Rodiansono

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A bulk structure of inexpensive intermetallic nickel-tin (Ni-Sn alloys catalysts demonstrated highly selective in the hydrogenation of levulinic acid in water into g-valerolactone. The intermetallic Ni-Sn catalysts were synthesized via a very simple thermochemical method from non-organometallic precursor at low temperature followed by hydrogen treatment at 673 K for 90 min. The molar ratio of nickel salt and tin salt was varied to obtain the corresponding Ni/Sn ratio of 4.0, 3.0, 2.0, 1.5, and 0.75. The formation of Ni-Sn alloy species was mainly depended on the composition and temperature of H2 treatment. Intermetallics Ni-Sn that contain Ni3Sn, Ni3Sn2, and Ni3Sn4 alloy phases are known to be effective heterogeneous catalysts for levulinic acid hydrogenation giving very excellence g-valerolactone yield of >99% at 433 K, initial H2 pressure of 4.0 MPa within 6 h. The effective hydrogenation was obtained in H2O without the formation of by-product. Intermetallic Ni-Sn(1.5 that contains Ni3Sn2 alloy species demonstrated very stable and reusable catalyst without any significant loss of its selectivity. © 2015 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved. Received: 26th February 2015; Revised: 16th April 2015; Accepted: 22nd April 2015  How to Cite: Rodiansono, R., Astuti, M.D., Ghofur, A., Sembiring, K.C. (2015. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Levulinic Acid in Water into g-Valerolactone over Bulk Structure of Inexpensive Intermetallic Ni-Sn Alloy Catalysts. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 10 (2: 192-200. (doi:10.9767/bcrec.10.2.8284.192-200Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.10.2.8284.192-200  

  19. Hydrogenation of nitriles on a well-characterized nickel surface: From surface science studies to liquid phase catalytic activity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardin, D.E.

    1993-12-01

    Nitrile hydrogenation is the most commonly used method for preparing diverse amines. This thesis is aimed at the mechanism and factors affecting the performance of Ni-based catalysts in nitrile hydrogenations. Surface science techniques are used to study bonding of nitriles and amines to a Ni(111) surface and to identify surface intermediates. Liquid-phase hydrogenations of cyclohexene and 1-hexene on a Pt foil were carried out successfully. Finally, knowledge about the surface structure, surface chemical bond, dynamics of surface atoms (diffusion, growth), and reactivity of metal surfaces from solid-gas interface studies, is discussed.

  20. Adsorption-parallel catalytic waves of cinnamic acid in hydrogen peroxide-tetra-n-butylammonium bromide-acetate system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The mechanism of the adsorption-parallel catalytic wave of cinnamic acid (C6H5-CH == CH-COOH) in acetate buffer (pH = 4.0)-H2O2-tetra-n-butylammonium bromide (Bu4N.Br) solution was studied by the linear-sweep polarography, cyclic voltammetry and digital simulation approach. Experimental results indicate that the reduction mechanism of cinnamic acid is ECdimE'process, in which the C == C double bond of cinnamic acid first undergoes 1e, 1H+ reduction to produce an intermediate free radical C6H5-C.H-CH2-COOH(E'), then the further reduction of the free radical in 1e,1H+ addition (E') occurs simultaneously with a dimerization reaction between two free radicals (Cdim). Bu4N.Br enhances the polarographic current of cinnamic acid and shifts the peak potential to positive direction. The enhancement action of Bu4N.Br is due to the adsorption of cinnamic acid induced by Bu4N+ species. In addition, H2O2 causes the parallel catalytic wave of cinnamic acid. The mechanism of the catalytic wave is EC'process because H2O2 oxidizes the free radical of cinnamic acid to regenerate the original C == C bond(C'), preventing both the further reduction and the dimerization of the free radicals. The apparent rate constant kf of the oxidation reaction is 1.35×102 mol.L-1.s-1. A new class of catalytic waves for organic compounds, the adsorption-parallel catalytic waves upon the dual enhancement action of both the surfactant and oxidant, has been presented.

  1. Photocatalytic hydrogen generation from water under visible light using core/shell nano-catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X; Shih, K; Li, X Y

    2010-01-01

    A microemulsion technique was employed to synthesize nano-sized photocatalysts with a core (CdS)/shell (ZnS) structure. The primary particles of the photocatalysts were around 10 nm, and the mean size of the catalyst clusters in water was about 100 nm. The band gaps of the catalysts ranged from 2.25 to 2.46 eV. The experiments of photocatalytic H(2) generation showed that the catalysts (CdS)(x)/(ZnS)(1-x) with x ranging from 0.1 to 1 were able to produce hydrogen from water photolysis under visible light. The catalyst with x=0.9 had the highest rate of hydrogen production. The catalyst loading density also influenced the photo-hydrogen production rate, and the best catalyst concentration in water was 1 g L(-1). The stability of the nano-catalysts in terms of size, morphology and activity was satisfactory during an extended test period for a specific hydrogen production rate of 2.38 mmol g(-1) L(-1) h(-1) and a quantum yield of 16.1% under visible light (165 W Xe lamp, lambda>420 nm). The results demonstrate that the (CdS)/(ZnS) core/shell nano-particles are a novel photo-catalyst for renewable hydrogen generation from water under visible light. This is attributable to the large band-gap ZnS shell that separates the electron/hole pairs generated by the CdS core and hence reduces their recombinations.

  2. Aqueous-phase catalytic hydrogenation of furfural to cyclopentanol over Cu-Mg-Al hydrotalcites derived catalysts:Model reaction for upgrading of bio-oil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minghao; Zhou; Zuo; Zeng; Hongyan; Zhu; Guomin; Xiao; Rui; Xiao

    2014-01-01

    A series of Cu-Mg-Al hydrotalcites derived oxides with a(Cu+Mg)/Al mole ratio of 3 and varied Cu/Mg mole ratio(from 0.07 to 0.30) were prepared by co-precipitation and calcination methods, then they were introduced to the hydrogenation of furfural in aqueous-phase. Effects of Cu/Mg mole ratio, reaction temperature, initial hydrogen pressure, reaction time and catalyst amount on the conversion rate of furfural as well as the selectivity toward desired product cyclopentanol were systematically investigated. The conversion of furfural over calcined hydrotalcite catalyst with a Cu/Mg mole ratio of 0.2 was up to 98.5% when the reaction was carried out under 140 ?C and the initial hydrogen pressure of 4 MPa for 10 h, while the selectivity toward cyclopentanol was up to 94.8%. The catalysts were characterized by XRD and SEM. XRD diffraction of all the samples showed characteristic pattern of hydrotalcite with varied peak intensity as a result of different Cu content. The catalytic activity was improved gradually with the increase of Cu component in the hydrotalcite.

  3. On the role of metal particle size and surface coverage for photo-catalytic hydrogen production; a case study of the Au/CdS system

    KAUST Repository

    Majeed, I.

    2015-09-25

    Photo-catalytic hydrogen production has been studied on Au supported CdS catalysts under visible light irradiation in order to understand the effect of Au particle size as well as the reaction medium properties. Au nanoparticles of size about 2-5 nm were deposited over hexagonal CdS particles using a new simple method involving reduction of Au3+ ions with iodide ions. Within the investigated range of Au (between 1 and 5 wt. %) fresh particles with mean size of 4 nm and XPS Au4f/Cd3d surface ratio of 0.07 showed the highest performance (ca. 1 molecule of H2 / Auatom s−1) under visible light irradiation (>420 nm and a flux of 35 mW/cm2). The highest hydrogen production rate was obtained from water (92%)-ethanol (8%) in an electrolyte medium (Na2S-Na2SO3). TEM studies of fresh and used catalysts showed that Au particle size increases (almost 5 fold) with increasing photo-irradiation time due to photo-agglomeration effect yet no sign of deactivation was observed. A mechanism for hydrogen production from ethanol-water electrolyte mixture is presented and discussed.

  4. An efficient route for catalytic activity promotion via hybrid electro-depositional modification on commercial nickel foam for hydrogen evolution reaction in alkaline water electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Guanshui; He, Yongwei; Wang, Mei; Zhu, Fuchun; Tang, Bin [Research Institute of Surface Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Yingze West Road 79, Taiyuan 030024 (China); Wang, Xiaoguang, E-mail: wangxiaog1982@163.com [Research Institute of Surface Engineering, Taiyuan University of Technology, Yingze West Road 79, Taiyuan 030024 (China); International Iberian Nanotechnology Laboratory (INL), 4715-330 Braga (Portugal)

    2014-09-15

    Highlights: • Mono-Cu surface modification depress the HER activity of Ni-foam. • Hybrid Ni-foam/Cu0.01/Co0.05 exhibits superior HER performance. • Layer-by-layer structure may contribute to a synergistic promoting effect. - Abstract: In this paper, the single- and hybrid-layered Cu, Ni and Co thin films were electrochemically deposited onto the three-dimensional nickel foam as composite cathode catalyst for hydrogen evolution reaction in alkaline water electrolysis. The morphology, structure and chemical composition of the electrodeposited composite catalysts were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX). Electrochemical measurement depicted that, for the case of the monometallic layered samples, the general activity for hydrogen evolution reaction followed the sequence: Ni-foam/Ni > Ni-foam/Co > bare Ni-foam > Ni-foam/Cu. It is noteworthy that, the hybrid-layered Ni-foam/Cu0.01/Co0.05 exhibited the highest catalytic activity towards hydrogen evolution reaction with the current density as high as 2.82 times that of the bare Ni-foam. Moreover, both excellent electrochemical and physical stabilities can also be acquired on the Ni-foam/Cu0.01/Co0.05, making this hybrid-layered composite structure as a promising HER electro-catalyst.

  5. Rapid hydrogen gas generation using reactive thermal decomposition of uranium hydride.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanouff, Michael P.; Van Blarigan, Peter; Robinson, David B.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Buffleben, George M.; James, Scott Carlton; Mills, Bernice E.

    2011-09-01

    Oxygen gas injection has been studied as one method for rapidly generating hydrogen gas from a uranium hydride storage system. Small scale reactors, 2.9 g UH{sub 3}, were used to study the process experimentally. Complimentary numerical simulations were used to better characterize and understand the strongly coupled chemical and thermal transport processes controlling hydrogen gas liberation. The results indicate that UH{sub 3} and O{sub 2} are sufficiently reactive to enable a well designed system to release gram quantities of hydrogen in {approx} 2 seconds over a broad temperature range. The major system-design challenge appears to be heat management. In addition to the oxidation tests, H/D isotope exchange experiments were performed. The rate limiting step in the overall gas-to-particle exchange process was found to be hydrogen diffusion in the {approx}0.5 {mu}m hydride particles. The experiments generated a set of high quality experimental data; from which effective intra-particle diffusion coefficients can be inferred.

  6. A polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack for stationary power generation from hydrogen fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zawodzinski, C.; Wilson, M.; Gottesfeld, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The fuel cell is the most efficient device for the conversion of hydrogen fuel to electric power. As such, the fuel cell represents a key element in efforts to demonstrate and implement hydrogen fuel utilization for electric power generation. A central objective of a LANL/Industry collaborative effort supported by the Hydrogen Program is to integrate PEM fuel cell and novel stack designs at LANL with stack technology of H-Power Corporation (H-Power) in order to develop a manufacturable, low-cost/high-performance hydrogen/air fuel cell stack for stationary generation of electric power. A LANL/H-Power CRADA includes Tasks ranging from exchange, testing and optimization of membrane-electrode assemblies of large areas, development and demonstration of manufacturable flow field, backing and bipolar plate components, and testing of stacks at the 3-5 cell level and, finally, at the 4-5 kW level. The stack should demonstrate the basic features of manufacturability, overall low cost and high energy conversion efficiency. Plans for future work are to continue the CRADA work along the time line defined in a two-year program, to continue the LANL activities of developing and testing stainless steel hardware for longer term stability including testing in a stack, and to further enhance air cathode performance to achieve higher energy conversion efficiencies as required for stationary power application.

  7. Hydrogen generation from deliquescence of ammonia borane using Ni-Co/r-GO catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Chang-Chen; Chen, Bing-Hung

    2015-10-01

    Hydrogen generation from the catalyzed deliquescence/hydrolysis of ammonia borane (AB) using the Ni-Co catalyst supported on the graphene oxide (Ni-Co/r-GO catalyst) under the conditions of limited water supply was studied with the molar feed ratio of water to ammonia borane (denoted as H2O/AB) at 2.02, 3.97 and 5.93, respectively. The conversion efficiency of ammonia borane to hydrogen was estimated both from the cumulative volume of the hydrogen gas generated and the conversion of boron chemistry in the hydrolysates analyzed by the solid-state 11B NMR. The conversion efficiency of ammonia borane could reach nearly 100% under excess water dosage, that is, H2O/AB = 3.97 and 5.93. Notably, the hydrogen storage capacity could reach as high as 6.5 wt.% in the case with H2O/AB = 2.02. The hydrolysates of ammonia borane in the presence of Ni-Co/r-GO catalyst were mainly the mixture of boric acid and metaborate according to XRD, FT-IR and solid-state 11B NMR analyses.

  8. Oxygen dependency of one-electron reactions generating ascorbate radicals and hydrogen peroxide from ascorbic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boatright, William L

    2016-04-01

    The effect of oxygen on the two separate one-electron reactions involved in the oxidation of ascorbic acid was investigated. The rate of ascorbate radical (Asc(-)) formation (and stability) was strongly dependent on the presence of oxygen. A product of ascorbic acid oxidation was measurable levels of hydrogen peroxide, as high as 32.5 μM from 100 μM ascorbic acid. Evidence for a feedback mechanism where hydrogen peroxide generated during the oxidation of ascorbic acid accelerates further oxidation of ascorbic acid is also presented. The second one-electron oxidation reaction of ascorbic acid leading to the disappearance of Asc(-) was also strongly inhibited in samples flushed with argon. In the range of 0.05-1.2 mM ascorbic acid, maximum levels of measurable hydrogen peroxide were achieved with an initial concentration of 0.2 mM ascorbic acid. Hydrogen peroxide generation was greatly diminished at ascorbic acid levels of 0.8 mM or above.

  9. Calpain-Mediated Processing of Adenylate Cyclase Toxin Generates a Cytosolic Soluble Catalytically Active N-Terminal Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kepa B Uribe

    Full Text Available Bordetella pertussis, the whooping cough pathogen, secretes several virulence factors among which adenylate cyclase toxin (ACT is essential for establishment of the disease in the respiratory tract. ACT weakens host defenses by suppressing important bactericidal activities of the phagocytic cells. Up to now, it was believed that cell intoxication by ACT was a consequence of the accumulation of abnormally high levels of cAMP, generated exclusively beneath the host plasma membrane by the toxin N-terminal catalytic adenylate cyclase (AC domain, upon its direct translocation across the lipid bilayer. Here we show that host calpain, a calcium-dependent Cys-protease, is activated into the phagocytes by a toxin-triggered calcium rise, resulting in the proteolytic cleavage of the toxin N-terminal domain that releases a catalytically active "soluble AC". The calpain-mediated ACT processing allows trafficking of the "soluble AC" domain into subcellular organella. At least two strategic advantages arise from this singular toxin cleavage, enhancing the specificity of action, and simultaneously preventing an indiscriminate activation of cAMP effectors throughout the cell. The present study provides novel insights into the toxin mechanism of action, as the calpain-mediated toxin processing would confer ACT the capacity for a space- and time-coordinated production of different cAMP "pools", which would play different roles in the cell pathophysiology.

  10. Research on Integration of an Automotive Exhaust-Based Thermoelectric Generator and a Three-Way Catalytic Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Y. D.; Chen, Y. L.; Chen, S.; Xianyu, W. D.; Su, C. Q.

    2015-06-01

    A key research topic related to thermoelectric generators (TEGs) for automotive applications is to improve their compatibility with the original vehicle exhaust system, which determines the quality of the exhaust gas treatment and the realization of energy conservation and emission reduction. A new TEG integrated with a three-way catalytic converter (CTEG) by reshaping the converter as the heat exchanger is proposed. A heat-flux coupling simulation model of the integrated TEG is established at the light-off stage of the original three-way catalytic converter (TWC). Temperature distribution maps of the integrated heat exchanger, thermoelectric modules, and cooling-water tank are obtained to present the process of energy flow among the parts of the CTEG. Based on the simulation results, the output power of the CTEG is calculated by a mathematical model. A minimum output power of 31.93 W can be obtained by conversion when the TWC starts working at steady conditions. Theoretically, this case study demonstrates the great potential for use of CTEGs in vehicles.

  11. High-purity hydrogen generation by ultraviolet illumination with the membrane composed of titanium dioxide nanotube array and Pd layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Masashi; Noda, Kei; Matsushige, Kazumi

    2011-09-01

    High-purity hydrogen generation was observed by using a membrane composed of a bilayer of an anodized titanium dioxide nanotube array (TNA) and a hydrogen permeable metal. This membrane was fabricated by transferring a TNA embedded in a titanium foil onto a sputtered 10-μm-thick palladium film. Alcohols are reformed photocatalytically and concurrently generated hydrogen is purified through the Pd layer. H2 with a purity of more than 99% was obtained from liquid alcohols under ultraviolet illumination onto the membrane. Thus, we demonstrated the integration of photocatalytic hydrogen production and purification within a single membrane.

  12. On-board hydrogen generation for transport applications: the HotSpot™ methanol processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Neil; Ellis, Suzanne R.; Frost, Jonathan C.; Golunski, Stanislaw E.; van Keulen, Arjan N. J.; Lindewald, Nicklas G.; Reinkingh, Jessica G.

    In the absence of a hydrogen infrastructure, development of effective on-board fuel processors is likely to be critical to the commercialisation of fuel-cell cars. The HotSpot™ reactor converts methanol, water and air in a single compact catalyst bed into a reformate containing mainly CO2 and hydrogen (and unreacted nitrogen). The process occurs by a combination of exothermic partial oxidation and endothermic steam reforming of methanol, to produce 750 l of hydrogen per hour from a 245-cm3 reactor. The relative contribution of each reaction can be tuned to match the system requirements at a given time. Scale-up is achieved by the parallel combination of the required number of individual HotSpot reactors, which are fed from a central manifold. Using this modular design, the start-up and transient characteristics of a large fuel-processor are identical to that of a single reactor. When vaporised liquid feed and air are introduced into cold reactors, 100% output is achieved in 50 s; subsequent changes in throughput result in instantaneous changes in output. Surplus energy within the fuel-cell powertrain can be directed to the manifold, where it can be used to vaporise the liquid feeds and so promote steam reforming, resulting in high system efficiency. The small amount of CO that is produced by the HotSpot reactions is attenuated to <10 ppm by a catalytic clean-up unit. The HotSpot concept and CO clean-up strategy are not limited to the processing of methanol, but are being applied to other organic fuels.

  13. Photoassisted electrolysis of water for hydrogen generation with TiO{sub 2} aggregate film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao Guanying [Research Institute of Photonics, Dalian Polytechnic University, Dalian, 116034 (China); Zhang Qifeng; Liu Dawei; Xi Junting; Cao Guozhong, E-mail: gzcao@uw.edu, E-mail: gycao@dlpu.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, 98195 (United States)

    2011-02-01

    In this paper, the nanocrystallite aggregates of TiO{sub 2} were synthesized and characterized by X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET). The aggregates are of submicron size, formed by nano-sized crystallites and able to offer both a large specific surface area and desirable size comparable to the wavelength of visible light. Therefore, the TiO{sub 2} aggregates were also studied as photoelectrode in photoelectrochemical cell for hydrogen generation. The results show that the hydrogen generation rates are 0.47 ml/h*cm{sup 2} and 0.27 ml/h*cm{sup 2} during the first test with and without illumination, respectively. The current density also presented continually increasing during the light-on period. This was attributed to the photogenerated current, which benefited from the TiO{sub 2} aggregates and may significantly enhance the electrolysis rate of water.

  14. Radcalc for Windows 2.0 transportation packaging software to determine hydrogen generation and transportation classification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, J.R.

    1996-10-21

    Radclac for Windows is a user friendly menu-driven Windows compatible software program with applications in the transportation of radioactive materials. It calculates the radiolytic generation of hydrogen gas in the matrix of low-level and high-level radioactive wastes. It also calculates pressure buildup due to hydrogen and the decay heat generated in a package at seal time. It computes the quantity of a radionuclide and its associated products for a given period of time. In addition, the code categorizes shipment quantities as reportable quantity (RQ), radioactive Type A or Type B, limited quality (LQ), low specific activity (LSA), highway road controlled quality (HRCQ), and fissile excepted using US Department of Transportation (DOT) definitions and methodologies.

  15. Towards numerical simulation of turbulent hydrogen combustion based on flamelet generated manifolds in OpenFOAM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fancello, A.; Bastiaans, R. J. M.; de Goey, L. P. H.

    2013-10-01

    This work proposes an application of the Flamelet-Generated Manifolds (FGM) technique in the OpenFOAM environment. FGM is a chemical reduced method for combustion modeling. This technique treats the combustion process as the solution of a small amount of controlling variables. Regarding laminar simulation, a progress variable and enthalpy evolution can describe satisfactorily the problem. From a turbulent point of view, FGM can be applied to LES and RANS simulations, where the subgrid chemical terms are described with a β - PDF approach. These approaches apply satisfactorily in relatively simple gases, nevertheless for hydrogen are not more valid, due to preferential diffusion effects and instability of the flame structure. The overall aim of this research is to find technical solution for hydrogen gas turbines design in the next generation of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants.

  16. Oxidation of diesel-generated volatile organic compounds in the selective catalytic reduction process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koebel, M.; Elsener, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland). Combustion Research

    1998-10-01

    The main part of the VOCs (volatile organic compounds) contained in diesel exhaust ({approx}80%) is oxidized to CO and CO{sub 2} over an SCR (selective catalytic reduction) catalyst. CO is the major product of this oxidation, representing about 50--70% of the formed products (CO + CO{sub 2}). This preferential formation of CO leads to a pronounced increase of CO emissions when an SCR process is added to a diesel engine. A small fraction of the VOCs is selectively oxidized to carboxylic acids over the SCR catalyst. This selectivity is due to the acidic properties of the catalyst causing the preferential desorption at the oxidation state of the acid. The main products of these oxidation reactions are the lower monocarboxylic acids and some dicarboxylic acids forming stable anhydrides, especially maleic and phthalic acid. The highest emissions of these acids are found at low temperatures; they decrease at higher temperatures. Formic acid is preferentially decomposed into carbon monoxide and water. It must therefore be assumed that the strong increase of CO mentioned above is due to a mechanism involving the thermal decomposition of formic acid formed from various primary VOCs.

  17. Easy synthesis of bismuth iron oxide nanoparticles as photocatalyst for solar hydrogen generation from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Jinyi

    In this study, high purity bismuth iron oxide (BiFeO3/BFO) nanoparticles of size 50-80 nm have been successfully synthesized by a simple sol-gel method using urea and polyvinyl alcohol at low temperature. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurement is used to optimize the synthetic process to get highly crystalline and pure phase material. Diffuse reflectance ultraviolet-visible (DRUV-Vis) spectrum indicates that the absorption cut-off wavelength of the nanoparticles is about 620 nm, corresponding to an energy band gap of 2.1 eV. Compared to BaTiO3, BFO has a better degradation of methyl orange under light radiation. Also, photocatalytic tests prove this material to be efficient towards water splitting under simulated solar light to generate hydrogen. The simple synthetic methodology adopted in this paper will be useful in developing low-cost semiconductor materials as effective photocatalysts for hydrogen generation. Photocatalytic tests followed by gas chromatography (GC) analyses show that BiFeO3 generates three times more hydrogen than commercial titania P25 catalyst under the same experimental conditions.

  18. Hydrogen generation by photoelectrochemical effect of the Cu-doped TiO2 photoanode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Ngoc Tai; Hoa Dao, Thi; Hoang To, Le Hong; Vu, Dinh Lam; Le, Van Hong

    2014-09-01

    TiO2 film photoanodes with a size of 1 × 1 cm2 were fabricated by a spin coating method. Cu-doped TiO2 powder with various Cu concentrations (0.2, 0.4, 0.6 and 0.8 at%) and surfactant were used as starting materials in coating Cu-doped TiO2 thin films onto FTO/glass substrate. Crystalline structure of TiO2 material, microstructure of the photoanode films and their thickness were identified by x-ray diffraction and Raman scattering. Hydrogen generation from water by photoelectrochemical effect in the visible light was observed by recording I/V characteristics of the photoanode in dark and light regimes. The obtained results have shown that the hydrogen generation efficiency of photoanode nonlinearly depends on Cu concentration. The nonlinear dependence of the hydrogen generation efficiency may be due to a change of resistivity of the film photoanode that is related with the random distribution of the hetero-junction between interfaces of TiO2 and CuO nanoparticles.

  19. Adsorption-parallel catalytic waves of cinnamic acid in hydrogen peroxide-tetra-n-butylammonium bromide-acetate system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    亢晓峰; 过玮; 赵川; 宋俊峰

    2000-01-01

    The mechanism of the adsorption-parallel catalytic wave of cinnamic acid (C6H5—CH = CH—COOH) in acetate buffer (pH = 4.0)-H2O2-tetra-n-butylammonium bromide (Bu4N · Br) solution was studied by the linear-sweep polarography, cyclic voltammetry and digital simulation approach. Experimental results indicate that the reduction mechanism of cinnamic acid is ECdimE’ process, in which the C = C double bond of cinnamic acid first undergoes 1 e, 1H+ reduction to produce an intermediate free radical C6H5—CH—CH2—COOH(E), then the further reduction of the free radical in 1e,1H+ addition (E’) occurs simultaneously with a dimerization reaction between two free radicals (Cdim). Bu4N · Br enhances the polarographic current of cinnamic acid and shifts the peak potential to positive direction. The enhancement action of Bu4N · Br is due to the adsorption of cinnamic acid induced by Bu4N+ species. In addition, H2O2 causes the parallel catalytic wave of cinnamic acid. The mechanism of the catalytic wave is EC’ proce

  20. The mechanism of the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide *1: III. An electron spin resonance study of the sulfur catalyzed oxidation of hydrogen sulfide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steijns, M.; Koopman, P.; Nieuwenhuijse, B.; Mars, P.

    1976-01-01

    ESR experiments on the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide were performed in the temperature range 20–150 °C. Alumina, active carbon and molecular sieve zeolite 13X were investigated as catalysts. For zeolite 13X it was demonstrated that the reaction is autocatalytic and that sulfur radicals are the activ

  1. Mixed Ionic and Electonic Conductors for Hydrogen Generation and Separation: A New Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srikanth Gopalan

    2006-12-31

    Composite mixed conductors comprising one electronic conducting phase, and one ionic conducting phase (MIECs) have been developed in this work. Such MIECs have applications in generating and separating hydrogen from hydrocarbon fuels at high process rates and high purities. The ionic conducting phase comprises of rare-earth doped ceria and the electronic conducting phase of rare-earth doped strontium titanate. These compositions are ideally suited for the hydrogen separation application. In the process studied in this project, steam at high temperatures is fed to one side of the MIEC membrane and hydrocarbon fuel or reformed hydrocarbon fuel to the other side of the membrane. Oxygen is transported from the steam side to the fuel side down the electrochemical potential gradient thereby enriching the steam side flow in hydrogen. The remnant water vapor can then be condensed to obtain high purity hydrogen. In this work we have shown that two-phase MIECs comprising rare-earth ceria as the ionic conductor and doped-strontium titanate as the electronic conductor are stable in the operating environment of the MIEC. Further, no adverse reaction products are formed when these phases are in contact at elevated temperatures. The composite MIECs have been characterized using a transient electrical conductivity relaxation technique to measure the oxygen chemical diffusivity and the surface exchange coefficient. Oxygen permeation and hydrogen generation rates have been measured under a range of process conditions and the results have been fit to a model which incorporates the oxygen chemical diffusivity and the surface exchange coefficient from the transient measurements.

  2. Hydrocarbon reforming catalysts and new reactor designs for compact hydrogen generators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, A.; Schwab, E.; Urtel, H. [BASF SE, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Farrauto, R. [BASF Catalysts LLC, Iselin, NJ (United States)

    2010-12-30

    A hydrogen based future energy scenario will use fuel cells for the conversion of chemically stored energy into electricity. Depending upon the type of fuel cell, different specifications will apply for the feedstock which is converted in the cell, ranging from very clean hydrogen for PEM-FC's to desulfurized methane for SOFC and MCFC technology. For the foreseeable future, hydrogen will be supplied by conventional reforming, however operated in compact and dynamic reformer designs. This requires that known catalyst formulations are offered in specific geometries, giving flexibility for novel reactor design options. These specific geometries can be special tablet shapes as well as monolith structures. Finally, also nonhydrocarbon feedstock might be used in special applications, e.g. bio-based methanol and ethanol. BASF offers catalysts for the full process chain starting from feedstock desulfurization via reforming, high temperature shift, low temperature shift to CO fine polishing either via selective oxidation or selective methanation. Depending upon the customer's design, most stages can be served either with precious metal based monolith solutions or base metal tablet solutions. For the former, we have taken the automobile catalyst monolith support and extended its application to the fuel cell hydrogen generation. Washcoats of precious metal supported catalysts can for example be deposited on ceramic monoliths and/or metal heat exchangers for efficient generation of hydrogen. Major advantages are high through puts due to more efficient heat transfer for catalysts on metal heat exchangers, lower pressure drop with greater catalyst mechanical and thermal stability compared to particulate catalysts. Base metal tablet catalysts on the other hand can have intrinsic cost advantages, larger fractions of the reactor can be filled with active mass, and if produced in unconventional shape, again novel reactor designs are made possible. Finally, if it comes to

  3. Effect of Copper Nanoparticles Dispersion on Catalytic Performance of Cu/SiO2 Catalyst for Hydrogenation of Dimethyl Oxalate to Ethylene Glycol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajing Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cu/SiO2 catalysts, for the synthesis of ethylene glycol (EG from hydrogenation of dimethyl oxalate (DMO, were prepared by ammonia-evaporation and sol-gel methods, respectively. The structure, size of copper nanoparticles, copper dispersion, and the surface chemical states were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and N2 adsorption. It is found the structures and catalytic performances of the catalysts were highly affected by the preparation method. The catalyst prepared by sol-gel method had smaller average size of copper nanoparticles (about 3-4 nm, better copper dispersion, higher Cu+/C0 ratio and larger BET surface area, and higher DMO conversion and EG selectivity under the optimized reaction conditions.

  4. Preparation, structural characterization and catalytic properties of Co/CeO2 catalysts for the steam reforming of ethanol and hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovón, Adriana S. P.; Lovón-Quintana, Juan J.; Almerindo, Gizelle I.; Valença, Gustavo P.; Bernardi, Maria I. B.; Araújo, Vinícius D.; Rodrigues, Thenner S.; Robles-Dutenhefner, Patrícia A.; Fajardo, Humberto V.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper, Co/CeO2 catalysts, with different cobalt contents were prepared by the polymeric precursor method and were evaluated for the steam reforming of ethanol. The catalysts were characterized by N2 physisorption (BET method), X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-visible diffuse reflectance, temperature programmed reduction analysis (TPR) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FEG-SEM). It was observed that the catalytic behavior could be influenced by the experimental conditions and the nature of the catalyst employed. Physical-chemical characterizations revealed that the cobalt content of the catalyst influences the metal-support interaction which results in distinct catalyst performances. The catalyst with the highest cobalt content showed the best performance among the catalysts tested, exhibiting complete ethanol conversion, hydrogen selectivity close to 66% and good stability at a reaction temperature of 600 °C.

  5. Transition metal (Co, Ni) nanoparticles wrapped with carbon and their superior catalytic activities for the reversible hydrogen storage of magnesium hydride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xu; Xiao, Xuezhang; Zhang, Wei; Fan, Xiulin; Zhang, Liuting; Cheng, Changjun; Li, Shouquan; Ge, Hongwei; Wang, Qidong; Chen, Lixin

    2017-02-01

    Magnesium hydride (MgH2) exhibits long-term stability and has recently been developed as a safe alternative to store hydrogen in the solid state, due to its high capacity of 7.6 wt% H2 and low cost compared to other metal hydrides. However, the high activation energy and poor kinetics of MgH2 lead to inadequate hydrogen storage properties, resulting in low energy efficiency. Nano-catalysis is deemed to be the most effective strategy in improving the kinetics performance of hydrogen storage materials. In this work, robust and efficient architectures of carbon-wrapped transition metal (Co/C, Ni/C) nanoparticles (8-16 nm) were prepared and used as catalysts in the MgH2 system via ball milling to improve its de/rehydrogenation kinetics. Between the two kinds of nano-catalysts, the Ni/C nanoparticles exhibit a better catalytic efficiency. MgH2 doped with 6% Ni/C (MgH2-6%Ni/C) exhibits a peak dehydrogenation temperature of 275.7 °C, which is 142.7, 54.2 and 32.5 °C lower than that of commercial MgH2, milled MgH2 and MgH2 doped with 6% Co/C (MgH2-6%Co/C), respectively. MgH2 doped with 6% Ni/C can release about 6.1 wt% H2 at 250 °C. More importantly, the dehydrogenated MgH2-6%Ni/C is even able to uptake 5.0 wt% H2 at 100 °C within 20 s. Moreover, a cycling test of MgH2 doped with 8% Ni/C demonstrates its excellent hydrogen absorption/desorption stability with respect to both capacity (up to 6.5 wt%) and kinetics (within 8 min at 275 °C for dehydrogenation and within 10 s at 200 °C for rehydrogenation). Mechanistic research reveals that the in situ formed Mg2Ni and Mg2NiH4 nanoparticles can be regarded as advanced catalytically active species in the MgH2-Ni/C system. Meanwhile, the carbon attached around the surface of transition metal nanoparticles can successfully inhibit the aggregation of the catalysts and achieve the steadily, prompting de/rehydrogenation during the subsequent cycling process. The intrinsic catalytic effects and the uniform distributions of Mg2Ni

  6. Multi-Generation Concentrating Solar-Hydrogen Power System for Sustainable Rural Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krothapalli, A.; Greska, B.

    2007-07-01

    This paper describes an energy system that is designed to meet the demands of rural populations that currently have no access to grid-connected electricity. Besides electricity, it is well recognized that rural populations need at least a centralized refrigeration system for storage of medicines and other emergency supplies, as well as safe drinking water. Here we propose a district system that will employ a multi-generation concentrated solar power (CSP) system that will generate electricity and supply the heat needed for both absorption refrigeration and membrane distillation (MD) water purification. The electricity will be used to generate hydrogen through highly efficient water electrolysis and individual households can use the hydrogen for generating electricity, via affordable proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, and as a fuel for cooking. The multi-generation system is being developed such that its components will be easy to manufacture and maintain. As a result, these components will be less efficient than their typical counterparts but their low cost-to-efficiency ratio will allow for us to meet our installation cost goal of $1/Watt for the entire system. The objective of this paper is to introduce the system concept and discuss the system components that are currently under development. (auth)

  7. The effect of plutonium dioxide water surface coverage on the generation of hydrogen and oxygen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veirs, Douglas K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Berg, John M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Crowder, Mark L. [Savannah River National Laboratory

    2012-06-20

    The conditions for the production of oxygen during radiolysis of water adsorbed onto plutonium dioxide powder are discussed. Studies in the literature investigating the radiolysis of water show that both oxygen and hydrogen can be generated from water adsorbed on high-purity plutonium dioxide powder. These studies indicate that there is a threshold in the amount of water below which oxygen is not generated. The threshold is associated with the number of monolayers of adsorbed water and is shown to occur at approximately two monolayers of molecularly adsorbed water. Material in equilibrium with 50% relative humidity (RH) will be at the threshold for oxygen generation. Using two monolayers of molecularly adsorbed water as the threshold for oxygen production, the total pressure under various conditions is calculated assuming stoichiometric production of hydrogen and oxygen. The specific surface area of the oxide has a strong effect on the final partial pressure. The specific surface areas resulting in the highest pressures within a 3013 container are evaluated. The potential for oxygen generation is mitigated by reduced relative humidity, and hence moisture adsorption, at the oxide surface which occurs if the oxide is warmer than the ambient air. The potential for oxygen generation approaches zero as the temperature difference between the ambient air and the material approaches 6 C.

  8. Sewage-sludge-derived carbonaceous materials for catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation of m-cresol in batch and continuous reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Wei, Huangzhao; Yu, Li; Wang, Wei; Zhao, Ying; Gu, Bin; Sun, Chenglin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, four sewage-sludge-derived carbonaceous materials (SWs) were evaluated for their catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation (CWPO) performance of m-cresol in batch reactor and continuous reactor, respectively. The SWs were produced by carbonization (SW); carbonization with the addition of CaO (CaO-SW); HNO3 pretreatment (HNO3-SW) and steam activation (Activated-SW). The properties of SW catalysts were assessed by thermogravimetric analysis, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy, X-ray Fluorescence, Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis and zeta potential. The results showed that SW treated by HNO3 (HNO3-SW) had a high conversion of m-cresol in batch reactor and continuous reactor, respectively. Under the conditions of batch reaction (Cm-cresol = 100 mg L(-1), CH2O2 = 15.7 mmol L(-1), initial pH=7.0, 0.5 g L(-1) catalyst, 80°C, 180 min adsorption and 210 min oxidation), the conversion of m-cresol reached 100% and total organic carbon removal was 67.1%. It had a high catalytic activity and stability on the treatment of m-cresol in CWPO for more than 1100 h. Furthermore, a possible reaction mechanism for the oxidation of m-cresol to 2-methyl-p-benzoquinone by CWPO was proposed.

  9. Synthesis and Catalytic Performance of Graphene Modified CuO-ZnO-Al2O3 for CO2 Hydrogenation to Methanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-juan Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available CuO-ZnO-Al2O3 and graphene nanosheet (GNS were synthesized by coprecipitation route and reduction of exfoliated graphite oxides method, respectively. GNS modified CuO-ZnO-Al2O3 nanocomposites were synthesized by high energy ball milling method. The structure, morphology, and character of the synthesized materials were studied by BET, XRD, TEM, and H2-TPR. It was found that by high energy ball milling method the CuO-ZnO-Al2O3 nanoparticles were uniformly dispersed on GNS surfaces. The catalytic performance for the methanol synthesis from CO2 hydrogenation was also tested. It was shown experimentally that appropriate incorporation of GNS into the CuO-ZnO-Al2O3 could significantly increase the catalyst activity for methanol synthesis. The 10 wt.% GNS modified CuO-ZnO-Al2O3 catalyst gave a methanol space time yield (STY of 92.5% higher than that on the CuO-ZnO-Al2O3 catalyst without GNS. The improved catalytic performance was attributed to the excellent promotion of GNS to dispersion of CuO and ZnO particles.

  10. Nickel-based xerogel catalysts: Synthesis via fast sol-gel method and application in catalytic hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Jin; Wang, Qiang; Fan, Dongliang; Ma, Lirong; Jiang, Deli; Xie, Jimin; Zhu, Jianjun

    2016-09-01

    In order to investigate the roles of three-dimensional network structure and calcium on Ni catalysts, the Ni, Ni-Al2O3, Ni-Ca-Al2O3 xerogel catalysts were successfully synthesized via the fast sol-gel process and chemical reduction method. The crystal structure of three different catalysts was observed with X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nitrogen adsorption-desorption were employed to investigate the role of network structure of xerogel catalysts and the size distribution of Ni nanoparticles. The catalyst composition was determined by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) measurement and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) experiments were carried out to investigate the reducibility of nickel species and the interaction between nickel species and alumina. The catalytic hydrogenation of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol was investigated over the prepared nickel-based xerogel catalysts. The conversion of p-nitrophenol was monitored by UV spectrophotometry and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The results show that the catalysts are highly selective for the conversion of p-nitrophenol to p-aminophenol and the order of catalytic activities of the catalysts is Ni < Ni-Al2O3 < Ni-Ca-Al2O3. The catalysts were recycled and were used to evaluate the reutilization.

  11. Enhancement of reaction rates for catalytic benzaldehyde hydrogenation and sorbitol dehydration in water solvent by addition of carbon dioxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Masayuki Shirai; Osamu Sato; Norihito Hiyoshi; Aritomo Yamaguchi

    2014-03-01

    The effect of pressured carbon dioxide on heterogeneous hydrogenation of benzaldehyde and homogeneous dehydration of sorbitol in water solvent was studied. Initial hydrogenation rates of benzaldehyde over a charcoal-supported palladium catalyst in water at 313 K were enhanced by the addition of carbon dioxide. The initial rate increased with an increase in carbon dioxide pressure and became a maximum at 5 MPa. Dehydration of sorbitol proceeded in water phase at 500 K and initial dehydration rates were enhanced by addition of 30 MPa of carbon dioxide.

  12. White-light emission from solid carbon in aqueous solution during hydrogen generation induced by nanosecond laser pulse irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, Ikuko; Yamamoto, Shota; Maeda, Kosuke

    2016-07-01

    We previously discovered a novel method of hydrogen generation from high-grade charcoal in an aqueous solution using nanosecond laser pulse irradiation. In this paper, white-light emission during this reaction is reported: A broad spectrum over the visible range is observed above a threshold excitation energy density. The white-light emission is a simultaneous product of the hydrogen generation reaction and is attributed to blackbody radiation in accordance with Planck's Law at a temperature above 3800 K. Consequently, we propose that hydrogen generation induced by laser irradiation proceeds similarly to classical coal gasification, which features reactions at high pressure and high temperature.

  13. Hydrogen Generation Through Renewable Energy Sources at the NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colozza, Anthony; Prokopius, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    An evaluation of the potential for generating high pressure, high purity hydrogen at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) was performed. This evaluation was based on producing hydrogen utilizing a prototype Hamilton Standard electrolyzer that is capable of producing hydrogen at 3000 psi. The present state of the electrolyzer system was determined to identify the refurbishment requirements. The power for operating the electrolyzer would be produced through renewable power sources. Both wind and solar were considered in the analysis. The solar power production capability was based on the existing solar array field located at NASA GRC. The refurbishment and upgrade potential of the array field was determined and the array output was analyzed with various levels of upgrades throughout the year. The total available monthly and yearly energy from the array was determined. A wind turbine was also sized for operation. This sizing evaluated the wind potential at the site and produced an operational design point for the wind turbine. Commercially available wind turbines were evaluated to determine their applicability to this site. The system installation and power integration were also addressed. This included items such as housing the electrolyzer, power management, water supply, gas storage, cooling and hydrogen dispensing.

  14. The ZECOMIX experimental facility for hydrogen and power generation from coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Calabro; P. Deiana; P. Fiorini; S. Stendardo; G. Girardi [ENEA - Italian Agency for New Technologies, Rome (Italy). Energy and Environment Energy and Plants Division

    2006-07-01

    The Zecomix project, conceived by ENEA in the framework of Italian National Hydrogen Project, is aimed at studying an integrated process that produces both hydrogen and electricity from coal, with zero emissions and very high efficiency. The Zero Emission Coal Mixed technology concept combines two different systems: the Zero Emission Coal gasification and the Zero Emission Combustion Technology based on Hydrogen-fuelled internal combustion turbine cycle. The key element is the integration of a gasification process, characterized by coal hydrogasification technology and carbon dioxide sequestration, with the power island, where an oxy-combustion occurs. The experimental facility will be realized at the ENEA Research Centre of Casaccia at about thirty kilometres from the centre of Rome. It consists of a very flexible plant, in which more components can be tested separately or connected together. The plant is provided with an atmospheric fixed bed gasifier coal and a carbonator/calcinator reactor; moreover a pressurized hydrogasifier reactor and a 100 kWe microturbine test bench are present. Other auxiliary components are a gas mixing system, for hydrogen-based syngas production, and a 200 kW steam generator. 5 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Simultaneous Hydrogen Generation and Waste Acid Neutralization in a Reverse Electrodialysis System

    KAUST Repository

    Hatzell, Marta C.

    2014-09-02

    Waste acid streams produced at industrial sites are often co-located with large sources of waste heat (e.g., industrial exhaust gases, cooling water, and heated equipment). Reverse electrodialysis (RED) systems can be used to generate electrical power and hydrogen gas using waste heat-derived solutions, but high electrode overpotentials limit system performance. We show here that an ammonium bicarbonate (AmB) RED system can achieve simultaneous waste acid neutralization and in situ hydrogen production, while capturing energy from excess waste heat. The rate of acid neutralization was dependent on stack flow rate and increased 50× (from 0.06 ± 0.04 to 3.0 ± 0.32 pH units min -1 m-2 membrane), as the flow rate increased 6× (from 100 to 600 mL min-1). Acid neutralization primarily took place due to ammonium electromigration (37 ± 4%) and proton diffusion (60 ± 5%). The use of a synthetic waste acid stream as a catholyte (pH ≈ 2) also increased hydrogen production rates by 65% (from 5.3 ± 0.5 to 8.7 ± 0.1 m3 H2 m-3 catholyte day -1) compared to an AmB electrolyte (pH ≈ 8.5). These findings highlight the potential use of dissimilar electrolytes (e.g., basic anolyte and acidic catholyte) for enhanced power and hydrogen production in RED stacks. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  16. New tricks by very old dogs: predicting the catalytic hydrogenation of HMF derivatives using Slater-type orbitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ras, E.-J.; Louwerse, M.J.; Rothenberg, G.

    2012-01-01

    We report new experimental results on the hydrogenation of 5-ethoxymethylfurfural, an important intermediate in the conversion of sugars to industrial chemicals, using eight different M/Al2O3 catalysts (M = Au, Cu, Ni, Ir, Pd, Pt, Rh, and Ru) under various conditions. These data are then compared wi

  17. Autothermal catalytic pyrolysis of methane as a new route to hydrogen production with reduced CO{sub 2} emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradov, Nazim; Smith, Franklyn; Huang, Cunping; T-Raissi, Ali [Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida, Cocoa, FL 32922 (United States)

    2006-08-15

    Hydrogen production plants are among major sources of CO{sub 2} emissions into the atmosphere. The objective of this paper is to explore new routes to hydrogen production from natural gas (or methane) with drastically reduced CO{sub 2} emissions. One approach analyzed in this paper is based on thermocatalytic decomposition (or pyrolysis) of methane into hydrogen gas and elemental carbon over carbon-based catalysts. Several heat input options to the endothermic process are discussed in the paper. The authors conduct thermodynamic analysis of methane decomposition in the presence of small amounts of oxygen in an autothermal (or thermo-neutral) regime using AspenPlus(TM) chemical process simulator. Methane conversion, products yield, effluent gas composition, process enthalpy flows as a function of temperature, pressure and O{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} ratio has been determined. CO{sub 2} emissions (per m{sup 3} of H{sub 2} produced) from the process could potentially be a factor of 3-5 less than from conventional hydrogen production processes. Oxygen-assisted decomposition of methane over activated carbon (AC) and AC-supported iron catalysts over wide range of temperatures and O{sub 2}/CH{sub 4} ratios was experimentally verified. Problems associated with the catalyst deactivation and the effect of iron doping on the catalyst stability are discussed. (author)

  18. Ni(0-CMC-Na Nickel Colloids in Sodium Carboxymethyl-Cellulose: Catalytic Evaluation in Hydrogenation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdallah Karim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A recyclable catalyst, Ni(0-CMC-Na, composed of nickel colloids dispersed in a water soluble bioorganic polymer, sodium carboxymethylcellulose (CMC-Na, was synthesized by a simple procedure from readily available reagents. The catalyst thus obtained is stable and highly active in alkene hydrogenations.

  19. Generation Performance of a Fuel Cell Using Hydrogen and Di-methyl-ether (DME) Mixed Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haraguchi, Tadao; Watanabe, Takashi; Yamashita, Masahiro; Tsutsumi, Yasuyuki; Yamashita, Susumu

    Di-methyl-ether (DME), an oxygenated hydrocarbon, can facilitate hydrogen manufacture by steam reforming reaction at low temperature. Methanol and DME steam reforming at 250-300°C, reforming DME into hydrogen, can be performed easily with small-scale and simple equipment. Whether the hydrogen output from the reformer for supply to the fuel cell includes DME, and how this affects the generation performance has yet to be confirmed. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the supply of a fuel cell with mixtures of DME and H2 in varying proportions and to clarify the effect on generation performance. Conclusions are as follows: (1) For a supply of DME and H2 mixed gas, DME is consumed after the H2 is consumed. By comparing the experimental values with theoretical values of consumption of pure H2, a mixture of DME and H2, and pure DME, it proved to be possible to roughly predict the experimental values by calculation. (2) The voltage value moved to near the DME voltage after the H2 was consumed, the current density increased after the H2 was consumed. (3) During continuous running the voltage load was observed to fluctuate.

  20. Study of hydrogen generation plant coupled to high temperature gas cooled reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nicholas Robert

    Hydrogen generation using a high temperature nuclear reactor as a thermal driving vector is a promising future option for energy carrier production. In this scheme, the heat from the nuclear reactor drives an endothermic water-splitting plant, via coupling, through an intermediate heat exchanger. While both high temperature nuclear reactors and hydrogen generation plants have high individual degrees of development, study of the coupled plant is lacking. Particularly absent are considerations of the transient behavior of the coupled plant, as well as studies of the safety of the overall plant. The aim of this document is to contribute knowledge to the effort of nuclear hydrogen generation. In particular, this study regards identification of safety issues in the coupled plant and the transient modeling of some leading candidates for implementation in the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). The Sulfur Iodine (SI) and Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) cycles are considered as candidate hydrogen generation schemes. Several thermodynamically derived chemical reaction chamber models are coupled to a well-known reference design of a high temperature nuclear reactor. These chemical reaction chamber models have several dimensions of validation, including detailed steady state flowsheets, integrated loop test data, and bench scale chemical kinetics. Eight unique case studies are performed based on a thorough literature review of possible events. The case studies are: (1) feed flow failure from one section of the chemical plant to another, (2) product flow failure (recycle) within the chemical plant, (3) rupture or explosion within the chemical plant, (4) nuclear reactor helium inlet overcooling due to a process holding tank failure, (5) helium inlet overcooling as an anticipated transient without SCRAM, (6) total failure of the chemical plant, (7) parametric study of the temperature in an individual reaction chamber, and (8) control rod insertion in the nuclear reactor. Various parametric

  1. Catalytic hydrotreating process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karr, Jr., Clarence; McCaskill, Kenneth B.

    1978-01-01

    Carbonaceous liquids boiling above about 300.degree. C such as tars, petroleum residuals, shale oils and coal-derived liquids are catalytically hydrotreated by introducing the carbonaceous liquid into a reaction zone at a temperature in the range of 300.degree. to 450.degree. C and a pressure in the range of 300 to 4000 psig for effecting contact between the carbonaceous liquid and a catalytic transition metal sulfide in the reaction zone as a layer on a hydrogen permeable transition metal substrate and then introducing hydrogen into the reaction zone by diffusing the hydrogen through the substrate to effect the hydrogenation of the carbonaceous liquid in the presence of the catalytic sulfide layer.

  2. Co-generation of acetylene and hydrogen for a carbide-based fuel system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carreiro, Louis G.; Burke, A. Alan [Naval Undersea Warfare Center Division Newport, Code 8231, 1176 Howell Street, Newport, RI 02841 (United States); Dubois, Lily [Stonehill College, Department of Chemistry, 320 Washington Street, Easton, MA 02357 (United States)

    2010-09-15

    The co-generation of acetylene and hydrogen from the hydrolysis of calcium carbide and calcium hydride was investigated as part of a unique carbide-based fuel system intended for high-temperature fuel cells. To gain better control of this highly energetic reaction, glycerin was used to coat the reactant particles to form slurry prior to their reaction with water. This process was shown to moderate the rate of gas production, as well as to provide a means for preparing slurry that could be pumped into the reactor vessel. It was also observed that the presence of calcium hydroxide, a by-product of hydrolysis, lowered the solubility of acetylene resulting in a higher initial flow rate due to less acetylene being dissolved in solution. However, the buildup of calcium hydroxide with time inhibited the hydrolysis of both calcium carbide and calcium hydride causing the acetylene and hydrogen flow rates to decrease. (author)

  3. Molecular molybdenum persulfide and related catalysts for generating hydrogen from water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Jeffrey R.; Chang, Christopher J.; Karunadasa, Hemamala I.; Majda, Marcin

    2016-11-22

    New metal persulfido compositions of matter are described. In one embodiment the metal is molybdenum and the metal persulfido complex mimics the structure and function of the triangular active edge site fragments of MoS.sub.2, a material that is the current industry standard for petroleum hydro desulfurization, as well as a promising low-cost alternative to platinum for electrocatalytic hydrogen production. This molecular [(PY5W.sub.2)MoS.sub.2].sup.x+ containing catalyst is capable of generating hydrogen from acidic-buffered water or even seawater at very low overpotentials at a turnover frequency rate in excess of 500 moles H.sub.2 per mole catalyst per second, with a turnover number (over a 20 hour period) of at least 19,000,000 moles H.sub.2 per mole of catalyst.

  4. Carbon quantum dots coated BiVO{sub 4} inverse opals for enhanced photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nan, Feng; Shen, Mingrong; Fang, Liang, E-mail: zhkang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: lfang@suda.edu.cn [College of Physics, Optoelectronics and Energy and Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Thin Films, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Kang, Zhenhui, E-mail: zhkang@suda.edu.cn, E-mail: lfang@suda.edu.cn [Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-based Functional Materials and Devices, and Collaborative Innovation Center of Suzhou Nano Science and Technology, Soochow University, Suzhou 215006 (China); Wang, Junling [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2015-04-13

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) coated BiVO{sub 4} inverse opal (io-BiVO{sub 4}) structure that shows dramatic improvement of photoelectrochemical hydrogen generation has been fabricated using electrodeposition with a template. The io-BiVO{sub 4} maximizes photon trapping through slow light effect, while maintaining adequate surface area for effective redox reactions. CQDs are then incorporated to the io-BiVO{sub 4} to further improve the photoconversion efficiency. Due to the strong visible light absorption property of CQDs and enhanced separation of the photoexcited electrons, the CQDs coated io-BiVO{sub 4} exhibit a maximum photo-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 0.35%, which is 6 times higher than that of the pure BiVO{sub 4} thin films. This work is a good example of designing composite photoelectrode by combining quantum dots and photonic crystal.

  5. Molecular molybdenum persulfide and related catalysts for generating hydrogen from water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Jeffrey R.; Chang, Christopher J.; Karunadasa, Hemamala I.; Majda, Marcin

    2016-04-19

    New metal persulfido compositions of matter are described. In one embodiment the metal is molybdenum and the metal persulfido complex mimics the structure and function of the triangular active edge site fragments of MoS.sub.2, a material that is the current industry standard for petroleum hydro desulfurization, as well as a promising low-cost alternative to platinum for electrocatalytic hydrogen production. This molecular [(PY5W.sub.2)MoS.sub.2].sup.x+ containing catalyst is capable of generating hydrogen from acidic-buffered water or even seawater at very low overpotentials at a turnover frequency rate in excess of 500 moles H.sub.2 per mole catalyst per second, with a turnover number (over a 20 hour period) of at least 19,000,000 moles H.sub.2 per mole of catalyst.

  6. Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2010-01-29

    Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen

  7. Experimental Study of Plasma Under-liquid Electrolysis in Hydrogen Generation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    严宗诚; 陈砺; 王红林

    2006-01-01

    The application and characteristics of relatively big volume plasma produced with cathodic glow discharges taking place across a gaseous envelope over the cathode which was dipped into electrolyte in hydrogen generation were studied. A critical investigation of the influence of methanol concentration and voltage across the circuit on the composition and power consumption per cubic meter of cathode liberating gas was carried out. The course of plasma under-liquid electrolysis has the typical characteristics of glow discharge electrolysis. The cathode liberating gas was in substantial excess of the Faraday law value. When the voltage across the circuit was equal to 550 V, the volume of cathodic gas with sodium carbonate solution was equal to 16.97 times the Faraday law value. The study showed that methanol molecules are more active than water molecules.The methanol molecules were decomposed at the plasma-catholyte interface by the radicals coming out the plasma mantle.Energy consumption per cubic meter of cathodic gases (WV) decreased while methanol concentration of the electrolytes increased. When methanol concentration equaled 5% (ψ), WV was 10.381×103 kJ/m3, less than the corresponding theoretic value of conventional water electrolysis method. The cathodic liberating gas was a mixture of hydrogen, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide with over 95% hydrogen, if methanol concentration was more than 15% (ψ). The present research work revealed an innovative application of glow discharge and a new highly efficient hydrogen generation method, which depleted less resource and energy than normal electrolysis and is environmentally friendly.

  8. [Russian oxygen generation system "Elektron-VM": hydrogen content in electrolytically produced oxygen for breathing by International Space Station crews].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proshkin, V Yu; Kurmazenko, E A

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the particulars of hydrogen content in electrolysis oxygen produced aboard the ISS Russian segment by oxygen generator "Elektron-VM" (SGK) for crew breathing. Hydrogen content was estimated as in the course of SGK operation in the ISS RS, so during the ground life tests. According to the investigation of hydrogen sources, the primary path of H2 appearance in oxygen is its diffusion through the porous diaphragm separating the electrolytic-cell cathode and anode chambers. Effectiveness of hydrogen oxidation in the SGK reheating unit was evaluated.

  9. 四氯化碳液相催化加氢反应动力学的研究%KINETIC STUDIES ON THE CATALYTIC HYDROGENATION OF CARBON TETRACHLORIDE TO CHLOROFORM IN LIQUID PHASE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛建新; 蒋晓原; 陆维敏; 郑小明

    2001-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride is an ozone-depleting chemical, while chloroform is not. Therefore it is important for the catalytic hydrodechlorination of CCl4 to CHCl3. In this paper, kinetics on the catalytic hydrogenation of carbon tetrachloride to chloroform in liquid phase was studied. A reaction mechanism was proposed. Hydrogen molecular was activated on the surface of catalyst, the activated hydrogen atom then reacted with CCl4 in the solution and produced CHCl3. A definite kinetic equation could be deduced from the reaction mechanism. The reaction rate constant is concerned with the intial concentration of CCl4 in the solution, pressure, reaction temperature and the concentration of active center. All these factors were investigated over Pt-Pd/C catalyst and fit in with the kinetic equation. The activation energy of the reaction is 86?KJ/mol according to the experimental results.

  10. Final Technical Report "Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation" Grant number : DE-FG02-86ER13615

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayland, B.B.

    2009-08-31

    Title: Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide and Olefin Oxidation Grant No. DE-FG02-86ER13615 PI: Wayland, B. B. (wayland@sas.upenn.edu) Abstract Development of new mechanistic strategies and catalyst materials for activation of CO, H2, CH4, C2H4, O2, and related substrates relevant to the conversion of carbon monoxide, alkanes, and alkenes to organic oxygenates are central objectives encompassed by this program. Design and synthesis of metal complexes that manifest reactivity patterns associated with potential pathways for the hydrogenation of carbon monoxide through metallo-formyl (M-CHO), dimetal ketone (M-C(O)-M), and dimetal dionyl (M-C(O)-C(O)-M) species is one major focus. Hydrocarbon oxidation using molecular oxygen is a central goal for methane activation and functionalization as well as regioselective oxidation of olefins. Discovery of new reactivity patterns and control of selectivity are pursued through designing new metal complexes and adjusting reaction conditions. Variation of reaction media promotes distinct reaction pathways that control both reaction rates and selectivities. Dimetalloradical diporphyrin complexes preorganize transition states for substrate reactions that involve two metal centers and manifest large rate increases over mono-metalloradical reactions of hydrogen, methane, and other small molecule substrates. Another broad goal and recurring theme of this program is to contribute to the thermodynamic database for a wide scope of organo-metal transformations in a range of reaction media. One of the most complete descriptions of equilibrium thermodynamics for organometallic reactions in water and methanol is emerging from the study of rhodium porphyrin substrate reactions in aqueous and alcoholic media. Water soluble group nine metalloporphyrins manifest remarkably versatile substrate reactivity in aqueous and alcoholic media which includes producing rhodium formyl (Rh-CHO) and hydroxy methyl (Rh-CH2OH) species. Exploratory

  11. Classical Dynamics of Harmonic Generation of the Hydrogen Molecular Ion Interacting with Ultrashort Intense Laser Pulses

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Chao-Hong; DUAN Yi-Wu; Wing-Ki Liu; Jian-Min Yuan

    2001-01-01

    Within Born-Oppenheimer approximation, by using the classical trajectory theory, a description for the high order harmonic generation of the hydrogen molecular ion interacting with ultrashort laser pulses has been pre sented. The Coulomb singularities have been remedied by the regularization. The action-angle variables have been used to generate the initial inversion symmetry microcanonical distribution. Within a proper intensity range, a harmonic plateau with only odd harmonics appears. For a larger intensity, because of the existence of chaos, the harmonic spectra become noisier. For a large enough intensity, the ionization takes place and the harmonics disappear. So the chaos causes the noises, the ionization suppresses the harmonic generation, and the onset of the ionization follows the onset of chaos.

  12. Preparation of Dendritic Carbosilane-supported Palladium Catalyst and Its Catalytic Activity in Hydrogenation of Organic Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The preparation of palladium complex from PdCl2·2H2O and earbosilane dendrimers with peripheral aminopropyl groups was described. The compound obtained was characterized by IR, 1H NMR, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometric (ICP-AES) spectroscopy respectively. The metal complex was employed as catalyst in hydrogenation of organic compounds. The high activity of the complex was probably due to the formation of the eoordinatively unsaturated palladium.

  13. Hydrogenation of unactivated enamines to tertiary amines: rhodium complexes of fluorinated phosphines give marked improvements in catalytic activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Tin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In the hydrogenation of sluggish unactivated enamine substrates, Rh complexes of electron-deficient phosphines are demonstrated to be far more reactive catalysts than those derived from triphenylphosphine. These operate at low catalyst loadings (down to 0.01 mol % and are able to reduce tetrasubstituted enamines. The use of the sustainable and environmentally benign solvent (R-limonene for the reaction is also reported with the amine isolated by acid extraction.

  14. Improvement of the efficiency of a space oxygen-hydrogen electrochemical generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glukhikh, I. N.; Shcherbakov, A. N.; Chelyaev, V. F.

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes the method used for cooling of an on-board oxygen-hydrogen electrochemical generator (ECG). Apart from electric power, such a unit produces water of reaction and heat; the latter is an additional load on the thermal control system of a space vehicle. This load is undesirable in long-duration space flights, when specific energy characteristics of on-board systems are the determining factors. It is suggested to partially compensate the energy consumption by the thermal control system of a space vehicle required for cooling of the electrochemical generator through evaporation of water of reaction from the generator into a vacuum (or through ice sublimation if the pressure in the ambient space is lower than that in the triple point of water.) Such method of cooling of an electrochemical generator improves specific energy parameters of an on-board electric power supply system, and, due to the presence of the negative feedback, it makes the operation of this system more stable. Estimates suggest that it is possible to compensate approximately one half of heat released from the generator through evaporation of its water of reaction at the electrical efficiency of the electrochemical generator equal to 60%. In this case, even minor increase in the efficiency of the generator would result in a considerable increase in the efficiency of the evaporative system intended for its cooling.

  15. Endogenous generation of hydrogen sulfide and its regulation in Shewanella oneidensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genfu eWu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide (H2S has been recognized as a physiological mediator with a variety of functions across all domains of life. In this study, mechanisms of endogenous H2S generation in Shewanella oneidensis were investigated. As a research model with highly diverse anaerobic respiratory pathways, the microorganism is able to produce H2S by respiring on a variety of sulfur-containing compounds with SirACD and PsrABC enzymatic complexes, as well as through cysteine degradation with three enzymes, MdeA, SO_1095, and SseA. We showed that the SirACD and PsrABC complexes, which are predominantly, if not exclusively, responsible for H2S generation via respiration of sulfur species, do not interplay with each other. Strikingly, a screen for regulators controlling endogenous H2S generation by transposon mutagenesis identified global regulator Crp to be essential to all H2S-generating processes. In contrast, Fnr and Arc, two other global regulators that have a role in respiration, are dispensable in regulating H2S generation via respiration of sulfur species. Interestingly, Arc is involved in the H2S generation through cysteine degradation by repressing expression of the mdeA gene. We further showed that expression of the sirA and psrABC operons is subjected to direct regulation of Crp, but the mechanisms underlying the requirement of Crp for H2S generation through cysteine degradation remain elusive.

  16. Ultrathin Co(Ni)-doped MoS2 nanosheets as catalytic promoters enabling efficient solar hydrogen production

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoyan Ma; Jinquan Li; Changhua An; Juan Feng; Yuhua Chi; Junxue Liu; Jun Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The design of efficient artificial photosynthetic systems that harvest solar energy to drive the hydrogen evolution reaction via water reduction is of great importance from both the theoretical and practical viewpoints.Integrating appropriate co-catalyst promoters with strong light absorbing materials represents an ideal strategy to enhance the conversion efficiency of solar energy in hydrogen production.Herein,we report,for the first time,the synthesis of a class of unique hybrid structures consisting of ultrathin Co(Ni)-doped MoS2 nanosheets (co-catalyst promoter) intimately grown on semiconductor CdS nanorods (light absorber).The as-synthesized one-dimensional CdS@doped-MoS2 heterostructures exhibited very high photocatalytic activity (with a quantum yield of 17.3%) and stability towards H2 evolution from the photoreduction of water.Theoretical calculations revealed that Ni doping can increase the number of uncoordinated atoms at the edge sites of MoS2 nanosheets to promote electron transfer across the CdS/MoS2 interfaces as well as hydrogen reduction,leading to an efficient H2 evolution reaction.

  17. Catalytically Enhanced Hydrogen Sorption in Mg-MgH2 by Coupling Vanadium-Based Catalyst and Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atikah Kadri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Mg (MgH2-based composites, using carbon nanotubes (CNTs and pre-synthesized vanadium-based complex (VCat as the catalysts, were prepared by high-energy ball milling technique. The synergistic effect of coupling CNTs and VCat in MgH2 was observed for an ultra-fast absorption rate of 6.50 wt. % of hydrogen per minute and 6.50 wt. % of hydrogen release in 10 min at 200 °C and 300 °C, respectively. The temperature programmed desorption (TPD results reveal that coupling VCat and CNTs reduces both peak and onset temperatures by more than 60 °C and 114 °C, respectively. In addition, the presence of both VCat and CNTs reduces the enthalpy and entropy of desorption of about 7 kJ/mol H2 and 11 J/mol H2·K, respectively, as compared to those of the commercial MgH2, which ascribe to the decrease of desorption temperature. From the study of the effect of CNTs milling time, it is shown that partially destroyed CNTs (shorter milling time are better to enhance the hydrogen sorption performance.

  18. Hydrogen generation through indirect biophotolysis in batch cultures of the nonheterocystous nitrogen-fixing cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huesemann, Michael H; Hausmann, Tom S; Carter, Blaine M; Gerschler, Jared J; Benemann, John R

    2010-09-01

    The nitrogen-fixing nonheterocystous cyanobacterium Plectonema boryanum was used as a model organism to study hydrogen generation by indirect biophotolysis in nitrogen-limited batch cultures that were continuously illuminated and sparged with argon/CO(2) to maintain anaerobiosis. The highest hydrogen-production rate (i.e., 0.18 mL/mg day or 7.3 micromol/mg day) was observed in cultures with an initial medium nitrate concentration of 1 mM at a light intensity of 100 micromol/m(2) s. The addition of photosystem II (PSII) inhibitor 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU) did not reduce hydrogen-production rates relative to unchallenged controls for 50 to 150 h, and intracellular glycogen concentrations decreased significantly during the hydrogen generation period. The insensitivity of the hydrogen-production process to DCMU is indicative of the fact that hydrogen was not derived from water splitting at PSII (i.e., direct biophotolysis) but rather from electrons provided by intracellular glycogen reserves (i.e., indirect biophotolysis). It was shown that hydrogen generation could be sustained for long time periods by subjecting the cultures to alternating cycles of aerobic, nitrogen-limited growth and anaerobic hydrogen production.

  19. Comparison of hydrogen production and electrical power generation for energy capture in closed-loop ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis systems

    KAUST Repository

    Hatzell, Marta C.

    2014-01-01

    Currently, there is an enormous amount of energy available from salinity gradients, which could be used for clean hydrogen production. Through the use of a favorable oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) cathode, the projected electrical energy generated by a single pass ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis (RED) system approached 78 W h m-3. However, if RED is operated with the less favorable (higher overpotential) hydrogen evolution electrode and hydrogen gas is harvested, the energy recovered increases by as much ∼1.5× to 118 W h m-3. Indirect hydrogen production through coupling an RED stack with an external electrolysis system was only projected to achieve 35 W h m-3 or ∼1/3 of that produced through direct hydrogen generation.

  20. Comparison of hydrogen production and electrical power generation for energy capture in closed-loop ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzell, Marta C; Ivanov, Ivan; Cusick, Roland D; Zhu, Xiuping; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-01-28

    Currently, there is an enormous amount of energy available from salinity gradients, which could be used for clean hydrogen production. Through the use of a favorable oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) cathode, the projected electrical energy generated by a single pass ammonium bicarbonate reverse electrodialysis (RED) system approached 78 W h m(-3). However, if RED is operated with the less favorable (higher overpotential) hydrogen evolution electrode and hydrogen gas is harvested, the energy recovered increases by as much ~1.5× to 118 W h m(-3). Indirect hydrogen production through coupling an RED stack with an external electrolysis system was only projected to achieve 35 W h m(-3) or ~1/3 of that produced through direct hydrogen generation.

  1. Integration of direct carbon and hydrogen fuel cells for highly efficient power generation from hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradov, Nazim; Choi, Pyoungho; Smith, Franklyn; Bokerman, Gary [Florida Solar Energy Center, University of Central Florida, 1679 Clearlake Road, Cocoa, FL 32922-5703 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    In view of impending depletion of hydrocarbon fuel resources and their negative environmental impact, it is imperative to significantly increase the energy conversion efficiency of hydrocarbon-based power generation systems. The combination of a hydrocarbon decomposition reactor with a direct carbon and hydrogen fuel cells (FC) as a means for a significant increase in chemical-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency is discussed in this paper. The data on development and operation of a thermocatalytic hydrocarbon decomposition reactor and its coupling with a proton exchange membrane FC are presented. The analysis of the integrated power generating system including a hydrocarbon decomposition reactor, direct carbon and hydrogen FC using natural gas and propane as fuels is conducted. It was estimated that overall chemical-to-electrical energy conversion efficiency of the integrated system varied in the range of 49.4-82.5%, depending on the type of fuel and FC used, and CO{sub 2} emission per kW{sub el}h produced is less than half of that from conventional power generation sources. (author)

  2. Final Technical Report for GO15056 Millennium Cell: Development of an Advanced Chemical Hydrogen Storage and Generation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Oscar [Millennium Cell Inc., Eatontown, NJ (United States)

    2017-02-22

    The objectives of this project are to increase system storage capacity by improving hydrogen generation from concentrated sodium borohydride, with emphasis on reactor and system engineering; to complete a conceptual system design based on sodium borohydride that will include key technology improvements to enable a hydrogen fuel system that will meet the systembased storage capacity of 1.2 kWh/L (36 g H2/L) and 1.5 kWh/kg (45 g H2/kg), by the end of FY 2007; and to utilize engineering expertise to guide Center research in both off-board chemical hydride regeneration and on-board hydrogen generation systems.

  3. [Isolation of a high hydrogen-producing mutant TB34 generated by transposon insertion and analysis of hydrogen production].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong-Yan; Wang, Guang-Ce; Shi, Liu-Yang; Zhu, Da-Ling

    2012-07-01

    To increase the hydrogen-producing capacity of Pantoea agglomerans BH18, isolated from mangrove sludge, we constructed a stable transposon mutagenesis library of this strain. A Tn7-based transposon was randomly inserted into the genomic DNA. Mutants were screened by kanamycin resistance and identified by amplification of the inserted transposon sequences. A mutant strain TB34 was isolated, whose hydrogen production capacity was significantly improved compared to the wild type strain. In seawater-containing medium supplemented with 10 g x L(-1) glucose and had an initial pH of 7.0, the hydrogen yield (H2/glucose) of the mutant strain was (2.04 +/- 0.04) mol x mol(-1), which was 43% higher than that of the wild type strain. The mutant TB34 showed steady hydrogen production capacity for five consecutive passages. Different carbon sources were tested in the hydrogen production by the mutant TB34 and the results showed that both the mutant strain TB34 and the wild type strain BH18 were able to produce hydrogen on sucrose, glucose and fructose. However, different from the wild type strain, the mutant strain TB34 was also able to produce hydrogen using xylose as substrate, with a hydrogen yield (H2/xylose) of (1.34 +/- 0.09) mol x mol(-1), indicating a broader substrate spectrum in the mutant.

  4. Effective regimes of runaway electron beam generation in helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasenko, V. F.; Baksht, E. Kh.; Burachenko, A. G.; Lomaev, M. I.; Sorokin, D. A.; Shut'ko, Yu. V.

    2010-04-01

    Runaway electron beam parameters and current-voltage characteristics of discharge in helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen at pressures in the range of several Torr to several hundred Torr have been studied. It is found that the maximum amplitudes of supershort avalanche electron beams (SAEBs) with a pulse full width at half maximum (FWHM) of ˜100 ps are achieved in helium, hydrogen, and nitrogen at a pressure of ˜60, ˜30, and ˜10 Torr, respectively. It is shown that, as the gas pressure is increased in the indicated range, the breakdown voltage of the gas-filled gap decreases, which leads to a decrease in the SAEB current amplitude. At pressures of helium within 20-60 Torr, hydrogen within 10-30 Torr, and nitrogen within 3-10 Torr, the regime of the runaway electron beam generation changes and, by varying the pressure in the gas-filled diode in the indicated intervals, it is possible to smoothly control the current pulse duration (FWHM) from ˜100 to ˜500 ps, while the beam current amplitude increases by a factor of 1.5-3.

  5. Role of hydrogen generation by Klebsiella pneumoniae in the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanazuru, Tomoko; Sato, Eisuke F; Nagata, Kumiko; Matsui, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Kunihiko; Kasahara, Emiko; Jikumaru, Mika; Inoue, June; Inoue, Masayasu

    2010-12-01

    Some gastrointestinal bacteria synthesize hydrogen (H(2)) by fermentation. Despite the presence of bactericidal factors in human saliva, a large number of bacteria also live in the oral cavity. It has never been shown that oral bacteria also produce H(2) or what role H(2) might play in the oral cavity. It was found that a significant amount of H(2) is synthesized in the oral cavity of healthy human subjects, and that its generation is enhanced by the presence of glucose but inhibited by either teeth brushing or sterilization with povidone iodine. These observations suggest the presence of H(2)-generating bacteria in the oral cavity. The screening of commensal bacteria in the oral cavity revealed that a variety of anaerobic bacteria generate H(2). Among them, Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) generated significantly large amounts of H(2) in the presence of glucose. Biochemical analysis revealed that various proteins in K. pneumoniae are carbonylated under standard culture conditions, and that oxidative stress induced by the presence of Fe(++) and H(2)O(2) increases the number of carbonylated proteins, particularly when their hydrogenase activity is inhibited by KCN. Inhibition of H(2) generation markedly suppresses the growth of K. pneumoniae. These observations suggest that H(2) generation and/or the reduction of oxidative stress is important for the survival and growth of K. pneumoniae in the oral cavity.

  6. Pd/Graphene catalytic hydrogenation of benzoquinone to hydroquinone%钯/石墨烯催化苯醌加氢制备氢醌

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨敬贺; 郁清涛; 毛立群

    2015-01-01

    采用微波辅助加热还原法合成了钯/石墨烯(Pd/G)、钯/活性炭(Pd/AC)、钯/石墨(Pd/Graphite)和钯/二氧化硅(Pd/SiO2),并使用透射电子显微镜观测了钯的形貌及在载体上的分散性。将负载型钯催化剂用于苯醌加氢反应,结果显示,Pd/G催化剂的活性最高,苯醌的转化率达到99%,氢醌的选择性为100%,并且循环7次后催化剂仍保持着较高的转化率和选择性。结构表征表明,石墨烯担载的钯纳米粒子的粒径约为5 nm ,无明显团聚。实验进一步考察了反应溶剂(甲醇、乙醇、丙酮、正丙醇、异丙醇、正丁醇)对 Pd/G催化苯醌加氢反应的影响,结果表明该反应对溶剂较为敏感,其中甲醇和丙酮较适宜作为反应溶剂。当以甲醇作为溶剂时,苯醌的转化率为98%,氢醌选择性为99%;以丙酮为溶剂时,苯醌转化率为98%,氢醌选择性为90%。研究工作表明,作为载体,石墨烯对钯催化剂的催化效果起着稳定和增强作用。%In the present study ,we exploited G as a support for palladium nanoparticles by mi‐crowave assisted reduction of palladium acetate with graphene under hydrogen atmosphere .In the same method ,we also employed graphite ,active carbon and silica as carrier for synthesis palladium graphite (Pd/Graphite) ,palladium active carbon (Pd/AC) and palladium silica (Pd/SiO2 ) .The hydrogenation of benzoquinone reaction has been selected as model reaction for e‐valuating G -based palladium catalysts (Pd/G) ,and the morphology and dispersion of palla‐dium on the carrier were observed by TEM .We utilized the supported palladium catalysts for benzoquinone hydrogenation reaction .The results imply that the Pd/G catalyst shows the high‐est activity .T he conversion of benzoquinone reached 99% and the selectivity to hydroquinone was 100% .In addtion ,the catalytic performance of Pd/G catalyst remained

  7. Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John O’M. Bockris

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The idea of a “Hydrogen Economy” is that carbon containing fuels should be replaced by hydrogen, thus eliminating air pollution and growth of CO2 in the atmosphere. However, storage of a gas, its transport and reconversion to electricity doubles the cost of H2 from the electrolyzer. Methanol made with CO2 from the atmosphere is a zero carbon fuel created from inexhaustible components from the atmosphere. Extensive work on the splitting of water by bacteria shows that if wastes are used as the origin of feed for certain bacteria, the cost for hydrogen becomes lower than any yet known. The first creation of hydrogen and electricity from light was carried out in 1976 by Ohashi et al. at Flinders University in Australia. Improvements in knowledge of the structure of the semiconductor-solution system used in a solar breakdown of water has led to the discovery of surface states which take part in giving rise to hydrogen (Khan. Photoelectrocatalysis made a ten times increase in the efficiency of the photo production of hydrogen from water. The use of two electrode cells; p and n semiconductors respectively, was first introduced by Uosaki in 1978. Most photoanodes decompose during the photoelectrolysis. To avoid this, it has been necessary to create a transparent shield between the semiconductor and its electronic properties and the solution. In this way, 8.5% at 25 °C and 9.5% at 50 °C has been reached in the photo dissociation of water (GaP and InAs by Kainthla and Barbara Zeleney in 1989. A large consortium has been funded by the US government at the California Institute of Technology under the direction of Nathan Lewis. The decomposition of water by light is the main aim of this group. Whether light will be the origin of the post fossil fuel supply of energy may be questionable, but the maximum program in this direction is likely to come from Cal. Tech.

  8. Hydrogen Generation from Biomass-Derived Surgar Alcohols via the Aqueous-Phase Carbohydrate Reforming (ACR) Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randy Cortright

    2006-06-30

    This project involved the investigation and development of catalysts and reactor systems that will be cost-effective to generate hydrogen from potential sorbitol streams. The intention was to identify the required catalysts and reactors systems as well as the design, construction, and operation of a 300 grams per hour hydrogen system. Virent was able to accomplish this objective with a system that generates 2.2 kgs an hour of gas containing both hydrogen and alkanes that relied directly on the work performed under this grant. This system, funded in part by the local Madison utility, Madison, Gas & Electric (MGE), is described further in the report. The design and development of this system should provide the necessary scale-up information for the generation of hydrogen from corn-derived sorbitol.

  9. Porous media for catalytic renewable energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotz, Nico

    2012-05-01

    A novel flow-based method is presented to place catalytic nanoparticles into a reactor by sol-gelation of a porous ceramic consisting of copper-based nanoparticles, silica sand, ceramic binder, and a gelation agent. This method allows for the placement of a liquid precursor containing the catalyst into the final reactor geometry without the need of impregnating or coating of a substrate with the catalytic material. The so generated foam-like porous ceramic shows properties highly appropriate for use as catalytic reactor material, e.g., reasonable pressure drop due to its porosity, high thermal and catalytic stability, and excellent catalytic behavior. The catalytic activity of micro-reactors containing this foam-like ceramic is tested in terms of their ability to convert alcoholic biofuel (e.g. methanol) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture with low concentrations of carbon monoxide (up to 75% hydrogen content and less than 0.2% CO, for the case of methanol). This gas mixture is subsequently used in a low-temperature fuel cell, converting the hydrogen directly to electricity. A low concentration of CO is crucial to avoid poisoning of the fuel cell catalyst. Since conventional Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells require CO concentrations far below 100 ppm and since most methods to reduce the mole fraction of CO (such as Preferential Oxidation or PROX) have CO conversions of up to 99%, the alcohol fuel reformer has to achieve initial CO mole fractions significantly below 1%. The catalyst and the porous ceramic reactor of the present study can successfully fulfill this requirement.

  10. Hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jia, Quanxi; Cao, Wenqing

    2010-11-23

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  11. Options for nitriles removal from C{sub 4}-C{sub 5} cuts. 3. Catalytic hydrogenation using the swing reactive removal process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramirez-Corredores, M.M.; Hernandez, Z.; Guerra, J.; Alvarez, R.; Medina, J. [PDVSA Intevep, Refinacion y Petroquimica, Aptdo. 76343, Caracas 1070A (Venezuela)

    2003-05-15

    C{sub 4} and C{sub 5} cuts from FCC units can be useful in the preparation of oxygenates such as MTBE, ETBE, and TAME. However, these feedstocks typically contain nitriles and diolefins which poison the etherification catalyst. Albeit, in USA, strong concerns on oxygenate uses have given rise to prohibition within certain states, those concerns have not derived into such drastic decisions in Europe. Still, removing nitriles from reactive feedstocks or converting them into value-added products might be of interest. PDVSA Intevep has developed several methods for removing nitriles present in those feedstocks, which include one based on adsorption [M.M. Ramirez-Corredores, Z. Hernandez, J. Guerra, J. Medina, R. Alvarez. Submitted to Adsorption.], and two based on catalytic conversion. In the first part of this work [M.M. Ramirez-Corredores, Z. Hernandez, J. Guerra, J. Medina, R. Alvarez. Submitted to Adsorption.], both the adsorbent and the adsorption process were described. The details of the catalytic system for the simultaneous hydrogenation of nitriles and diolefins were given in the second part [M.M. Ramirez-Corredores, T. Romero, D. Djaouadi, Z. Hernandez, J. Guerra. Submitted to Ind. Eng. Chem. Res.]. The main features of the catalyst include its nitrile adsorption capabilities, the specific oxidation state of the metal active phase, and the strong early deactivation. In this work, we discuss the convenience of converting the nitriles and diolefins by using a swing mode of reaction between two (or more) reacting zones in order to overcome the drawbacks of the observed deactivation.

  12. Catalytic hydrothermal gasification of algae for hydrogen production: composition of reaction products and potential for nutrient recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwudili, Jude A; Lea-Langton, Amanda R; Ross, Andrew B; Williams, Paul T

    2013-01-01

    Chlorella vulgaris, Spirulina platensis and Saccharina latissima were processed under supercritical water gasification conditions at 500 °C, 36 MPa in an Inconel batch reactor for 30 min in the presence/absence of NaOH and/or Ni-Al(2)O(3). Hydrogen gas yields were more than two times higher in the presence of NaOH than in its absence and tar yields were reduced by up to 71%. Saccharina, a carbohydrate-rich macro-alga, gave the highest hydrogen gas yields of 15.1 mol/kg. The tars from all three algae contained aromatic compounds, including phenols, alkyl benzenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons as well as heterocyclic nitrogen compounds. Tars from Chlorella and Spirulina contained high yields of pyridines, pyrroles, indoles and pyrimidines. Up to 97% TOC removal were achieved in the process waters from the gasification of the algae. Analyses for specific nutrients in the process waters indicated that the process waters from Saccharina could potentially be used for microalgae cultivation.

  13. Synthesis and Characterization of K-Ta Mixed Oxides for Hydrogen Generation in Photocatalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Zielińska

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available K-Ta mixed oxides photocatalysts have been prepared by impregnation followed by calcination. The influence of the reaction temperature (450°C–900°C on the phase formation, crystal morphology, and photocatalytic activity in hydrogen generation of the produced materials was investigated. The detailed analysis has revealed that all products exhibit high crystallinity and irregular structure. Moreover, two different crystal structures of potassium tantalates such as KTaO3 and K2Ta4O11 were obtained. It was also found that the sample composed of KTaO3 and traces of unreacted Ta2O5 (annealed at 600°C exhibits the highest activity in the reaction of photocatalytic hydrogen generation. The crystallographic phases, optical and vibronic properties were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD and diffuse reflectance (DR UV-vis and resonance Raman spectroscopic methods, respectively. Morphology and chemical composition of the produced samples were studied using a high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM and an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDX as its mode.

  14. Determination of the positions of aluminum atoms introduced into SSZ-35 and the catalytic properties of the generated Brønsted acid sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyaji, Akimitsu; Kimura, Nobuhiro; Shiga, Akinobu; Hayashi, Yoshihiro; Nishitoba, Toshiki; Motokura, Ken; Baba, Toshihide

    2017-03-01

    The positions of aluminum (Al) atoms in SSZ-35 together with the characteristics of the generated protons were investigated by (27)Al multiple quantum magic-angle spinning (MQ-MAS), (29)Si MAS, and (1)H MAS NMR data analyses accompanied by a variable temperature (1)H MAS NMR analysis. The origin of the acidic -OH groups (Brønsted acid sites) generated by introducing Al atoms into the T sites was investigated and the T sites introduced into the Al atoms were revealed. To further determine the catalytic properties of the acidic protons generated in SSZ-35, the influence of the concentration of the Al atoms on the catalytic activity and selectivity during the transformation of toluene was examined.

  15. Valorization of Waste Lipids through Hydrothermal Catalytic Conversion to Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuels with in Situ Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dongwook; Vardon, Derek R.; Murali, Dheeptha; Sharma, Brajendra K.; Strathmann, Timothy J.

    2016-03-07

    We demonstrate hydrothermal (300 degrees C, 10 MPa) catalytic conversion of real waste lipids (e.g., waste vegetable oil, sewer trap grease) to liquid hydrocarbon fuels without net need for external chemical inputs (e.g., H2 gas, methanol). A supported bimetallic catalyst (Pt-Re/C; 5 wt % of each metal) previously shown to catalyze both aqueous phase reforming of glycerol (a triacylglyceride lipid hydrolysis coproduct) to H2 gas and conversion of oleic and stearic acid, model unsaturated and saturated fatty acids, to linear alkanes was applied to process real waste lipid feedstocks in water. For reactions conducted with an initially inert headspace gas (N2), waste vegetable oil (WVO) was fully converted into linear hydrocarbons (C15-C17) and other hydrolyzed byproducts within 4.5 h, and H2 gas production was observed. Addition of H2 to the initial reactor headspace accelerated conversion, but net H2 production was still observed, in agreement with results obtained for aqueous mixtures containing model fatty acids and glycerol. Conversion to liquid hydrocarbons with net H2 production was also observed for a range of other waste lipid feedstocks (animal fat residuals, sewer trap grease, dry distiller's grain oil, coffee oil residual). These findings demonstrate potential for valorization of waste lipids through conversion to hydrocarbons that are more compatible with current petroleum-based liquid fuels than the biodiesel and biogas products of conventional waste lipid processing technologies.

  16. Ultrasound promoted catalytic liquid-phase dehydrogenation of isopropanol for Isopropanol-Acetone-Hydrogen chemical heat pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Min; Xin, Fang; Li, Xunfeng; Huai, Xiulan; Liu, Hui

    2015-03-01

    The apparent kinetic of the ultrasound assisted liquid-phase dehydrogenation of isopropanol over Raney nickel catalyst was determined in the temperature range of 346-353 K. Comparison of the effects of ultrasound and mechanical agitation on the isopropanol dehydrogenation was investigated. The ultrasound assisted dehydrogenation rate was significantly improved when relatively high power density was used. Moreover, the Isopropanol-Acetone-Hydrogen chemical heat pump (IAH-CHP) with ultrasound irradiation, in which the endothermic reaction is exposure to ultrasound, was proposed. A mathematical model was established to evaluate its energy performance in term of the coefficient of performance (COP) and the exergy efficiency, into which the apparent kinetic obtained in this work was incorporated. The operating performances between IAH-CHP with ultrasound and mechanical agitation were compared. The results indicated that the superiority of the IAH-CHP system with ultrasound was present even if more than 50% of the power of the ultrasound equipment was lost.

  17. Simulation Studies of the Hydrogen Production from Methanol Partial Oxidation Steam Reforming by a Tubular Packed-bed Catalytic Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogen production by partial oxidation steam reforming of methanol over a Cu/ZnO/Al2 O3 cata lyst has been paid more and more attention. The chemical equilibria involved in the methanol partial oxidation steam reforming reaction network such as methanol partial oxidation, methanol steam reforming, decomposition of methanol and water-gas shift reaction have been examined over the ranges of temperature 473-1073 K under normal pressure. Based on the detailed kinetics of these reactions over a Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst, and from the basic concept of the effectiveness factor, the intraparticle diffusion limitations were taken into account. The effec tiveness factors for each reaction along the bed length were calculated. Then important results were offered for the simulation of this reaction process.

  18. Simulation Studies of the Hydrogen Production from Methanol Partial Oxidation Steam Reforming by a Tubular Packed-bed Catalytic Reactor*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋元力; 林美淑; 金东显

    2001-01-01

    Hydrogen production by partial oxidation steam reforming of methanol over a Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 cata-lyst has been paid more and more attention. The chemical equilibria involved in the methanol pvxtial oxidation steam reforming reaction network such as methanol partial oxidation, methanol steam reforming, decomposition of methanol and water-gas shift reaction have been examined over the ranges of temperature 473---1073 K under normal pressure. Based on the detailed kinetics of these reactions over a Cu/ZnO/Al2O3 catalyst, and from the basic concept of the effectiveness factor, the intraparticle diffusion limitations were taken into account. The effectiveness factors for each reaction along the bed length were calculated. Then important results were offered for the simulation of this reaction process.

  19. Ultrathin Coating of Confined Pt Nanocatalysts by Atomic Layer Deposition for Enhanced Catalytic Performance in Hydrogenation Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meihua; Gao, Zhe; Zhang, Bin; Yang, Huimin; Qiao, Yan; Chen, Shuai; Ge, Huibin; Zhang, Jiankang; Qin, Yong

    2016-06-13

    Metal-support interfaces play a prominent role in heterogeneous catalysis. However, tailoring the metal-support interfaces to realize full utilization remains a major challenge. In this work, we propose a graceful strategy to maximize the metal-oxide interfaces by coating confined nanoparticles with an ultrathin oxide layer. This is achieved by sequential deposition of ultrathin Al2 O3 coats, Pt, and a thick Al2 O3 layer on carbon nanocoils templates by atomic layer deposition (ALD), followed by removal of the templates. Compared with the Pt catalysts confined in Al2 O3 nanotubes without the ultrathin coats, the ultrathin coated samples have larger Pt-Al2 O3 interfaces. The maximized interfaces significantly improve the activity and the protecting Al2 O3 nanotubes retain the stability for hydrogenation reactions of 4-nitrophenol. We believe that applying ALD ultrathin coats on confined catalysts is a promising way to achieve enhanced performance for other catalysts.

  20. Hydrogen Effect on Coke Removal and Catalytic Performance in Pre-Carburization and Methane Dehydro-Aromatization Reaction on Mo/HZSM-5

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongtao Ma; Ryoichi Kojima; Satoshi Kikuchi; Masaru Ichikawa

    2005-01-01

    In this study,the effects of pre-carburization of catalyst,hydrogen addition to methane feed and the space velocity of methane on the catalytic performance in methane to benzene (MTB) reaction were discussed in detail over Mo/HZSM-5 catalyst at 1023 K and 0.3 MPa. Compared with the non-precarburized catalyst,the Mo catalyst pre-carburized under the flow of CH4+4H2 at 973 K was found to have the higher activity and better stability. Further 6% H2 addition to the methane feed suppressed the aromatic type of coke formation effectively,and improved the stability of catalyst markedly,moreover gave a much longer reaction life of catalyst (53 h at 1023 K and 5400 ml/(g·h)) and much more formation amounts of benzene and hydrogen. With increase of methane space velocity,both the naphthalene formation selectivity and the coke formation selectivity were decreased by the shortened contact time;the benzene formation selectivity and total formation amount before the complete deactivation of catalyst were increased ly,while the total naphthalene and coke formation amounts did not change much.At high methane space velocity (≥5400 ml/(g·h)),a new middle temperature coke derived from the high temperature aromatic coke was formed on the catalyst; all the coke formed could be burnt off at lower temperature in oxygen,compared with those obtained at low space velocity. Considering the benzene formation amount and catalyst stability together,5400 ml/(g·h) was proved to be the most efficient methane space velocity for benzene production.

  1. Hydrogen production with short contact time. Catalytic partial oxidation of hydrocarbons and oxygenated compounds: Recent advances in pilot- and bench-scale testing and process design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guarinoni, A.; Ponzo, R.; Basini, L. [ENI Refining and Marketing Div., San Donato Milanese (Italy)

    2010-12-30

    ENI R and D has been active for fifteen years in the development of Short Contact Time - Catalytic Partial Oxidation (SCT-CPO) technologies for producing Hydrogen/Synthesis Gas. From the beginning the experimental work addressed either at defining the fundamental principles or the technical and economical potential of the technology. Good experimental responses, technical solutions' simplicity and flexibility, favourable techno-economical evaluations promoted the progressive widening of the field of the investigations. From Natural Gas (NG) the range of ''processable'' Hydrocarbons extended to Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG) and Gasoils, including those characterised by high levels of unsaturated and sulphurated molecules and, lately, to other compounds with biological origin. The extensive work led to the definition of different technological solutions, grouped as follows: Technology 1: Air Blown SCT-CPO of Gaseous Hydrocarbons and/or Light Compounds with biological origin Technology 2: Enriched Air/Oxygen Blown SCT-CPO of Gaseous Hydrocarbons and/or Light Compounds with biological origin Technology 3: Enriched Air/Oxygen Blown SCT-CPO of Liquid Hydrocarbons and/or Compounds with biological origin Recently, the licence rights on a non-exclusive basis for the commercialisation of SCT-CPO based processes for H{sub 2}/Synthesis gas production from light hydrocarbons with production capacity lower than 5,000 Nm{sup 3}/h of H{sub 2} or 7,500 Nm3/h of syngas have been assigned to two external companies. In parallel, development of medium- and large-scale plant solutions is progressing within the ENI group framework. These last activities are addressed to the utilisation of SCT-CPO for matching the variable Hydrogen demand in several contexts of oil refining operation. This paper will report on the current status of SCT-CPO with a focus on experimental results obtained, either at pilot- and bench- scale level. (orig.)

  2. Hydrogen production via catalytic steam reforming of fast pyrolysis bio-oil in a two-stage fixed bed reactor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, C.; Huang, Q.; Sui, M.; Yan, Y.; Wang, F. [Research Center for Biomass Energy, State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2008-12-15

    Hydrogen production was prepared via catalytic steam reforming of fast pyrolysis bio-oil in a two-stage fixed bed reactor system. Low-cost catalyst dolomite was chosen for the primary steam reforming of bio-oil in consideration of the unavoidable deactivation caused by direct contact of metal catalyst and bio-oil itself. Nickel-based catalyst Ni/MgO was used in the second stage to increase the purity and the yield of desirable gas product further. Influential parameters such as temperature, steam to carbon ratio (S/C, S/CH{sub 4}), and material space velocity (W{sub B}HSV, GHSV) both for the first and the second reaction stages on gas product yield, carbon selectivity of gas product, CH{sub 4} conversion as well as purity of desirable gas product were investigated. High temperature (> 850 C) and high S/C (> 12) are necessary for efficient conversion of bio-oil to desirable gas product in the first steam reforming stage. Low W{sub B}HSV favors the increase of any gas product yield at any selected temperature and the overall conversion of bio-oil to gas product increases accordingly. Nickel-based catalyst Ni/MgO is effective in purification stage and 100% conversion of CH{sub 4} can be obtained under the conditions of S/CH{sub 4} no less than 2 and temperature no less than 800 C. Low GHSV favors the CH{sub 4} conversion and the maximum CH{sub 4} conversion 100%, desirable gas product purity 100%, and potential hydrogen yield 81.1% can be obtained at 800 C provided that GHSV is no more than 3600 h{sup -} {sup 1}. Carbon deposition behaviors in one-stage reactor prove that the steam reforming of crude bio-oil in a two-stage fixed bed reaction system is necessary and significant. (author)

  3. Initial Screening of Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles for High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, L.C.; Funk, J.F.; Showalter, S.K.

    1999-12-15

    OAK B188 Initial Screening of Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycles for High Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Fuels Using Nuclear Power There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process, nor is such a process available for commercialization. Hydrogen is a promising energy carrier, which potentially could replace the fossil fuels used in the transportation sector of our economy. Fossil fuels are polluting and carbon dioxide emissions from their combustion are thought to be responsible for global warming. The purpose of this work is to determine the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen utilizing high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear power station. Almost 800 literature references were located which pertain to thermochemical production of hydrogen from water and over 100 thermochemical watersplitting cycles were examined. Using defined criteria and quantifiable metrics, 25 cycles have been selected for more detailed study.

  4. The use of renewable energy in the form of methane via electrolytic hydrogen generation using carbon dioxide as the feedstock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Kumagai, Naokazu; Izumiya, Koichi; Takano, Hiroyuki; Shinomiya, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Yusuke; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Kato, Zenta

    2016-12-01

    The history reveals the continuous increase in world energy consumption and carbon emissions. For prevention of intolerable global warming and complete exhaustion of fossil fuels we need complete conversion from fossil fuel consumption to renewable energy. We have been performing the research and development of global carbon dioxide recycling for more than 25 years to supply renewable energy to the world in the form of methane produced by the reaction of carbon dioxide captured from chimney with hydrogen generated electrolytically using electricity generated by renewable energy. We created the cathode and anode for electrolytic hydrogen generation and the catalyst for carbon dioxide methanation by the reaction with hydrogen. The methane formation from renewable energy will be the most convenient and efficient key technology for the use of renewable energy by storage of intermittent and fluctuating electricity generated from renewable energy and by regeneration of stable electricity. Domestic and international cooperation of companies for industrialization is in progress.

  5. Synthesis of three-dimensional reduced graphene oxide layer supported cobalt nanocrystals and their high catalytic activity in F-T CO2 hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fei; Niu, Na; Qu, Fengyu; Wei, Shuquan; Chen, Yujin; Gai, Shili; Gao, Peng; Wang, Yan; Yang, Piaoping

    2013-09-21

    The reduced graphene oxide (rGO) supported cobalt nanocrystals have been synthesized through an in situ crystal growth method using Co(acac)2 under solvothermal conditions by using DMF as the solvent. By carefully controlling the reaction temperature, the phase transition of the cobalt nanocrystals from the cubic phase to the hexagonal phase has been achieved. Moreover, the microscopic structure and morphology as well as the reduction process of the composite have been investigated in detail. It is found that oxygen-containing functional groups on the graphene oxide (GO) can greatly influence the formation process of the Co nanocrystals by binding the Co(2+) cations dissociated from the Co(acac)2 in the initial reaction solution at 220 °C, leading to the 3D reticular structure of the composite. Furthermore, this is the first attempt to use a Co/rGO composite as the catalyst in the F-T CO2 hydrogenation process. The catalysis testing results reveal that the as-synthesized 3D structured composite exhibits ideal catalytic activity and good stability, which may greatly extend the scope of applications for this kind of graphene-based metal hybrid material.

  6. Effects of potassium on Ni-K/Al2O3 catalysts in the synthesis of carbon nanofibers by catalytic hydrogenation of CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching S; Lin, Jarrn H; You, Jiann H; Yang, Kuo H

    2010-03-25

    Commercially available Ni/Al(2)O(3) samples containing various concentrations of potassium were used to achieve carbon deposition from CO(2) via catalytic hydrogenation. Experimental results show that K additives can induce the formation of carbon nanofibers or carbon deposition on Ni/Al(2)O(3) during the reverse water-gas shift reaction. This work proposes that the formation rate of carbon deposition depends closely on ensemble control, suggesting that the ensemble size necessary to form carbon may be approximately 0.5 potassium atoms. The results of CO(2) temperature-programmed desorption provide strong evidence that the new adsorption sites for CO(2) created on Ni-K/Al(2)O(3) closely depend upon the synthesis of carbon nanofibers. It is found that some potassium-related active phases obtained by calcination and reduction pretreatments can participate in the carbon deposition reaction. The formation pathway for carbon deposition suggests that the main source of carbon deposition is CO(2) and that the pathway is independent of the reaction products CO and CH(4) in the reverse water-gas shift reaction.

  7. Production of bio-hydrogenated diesel by catalytic hydrotreating of palm oil over NiMoS2/γ-Al2O3 catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srifa, Atthapon; Faungnawakij, Kajornsak; Itthibenchapong, Vorranutch; Viriya-Empikul, Nawin; Charinpanitkul, Tawatchai; Assabumrungrat, Suttichai

    2014-04-01

    Catalytic hydrotreating of palm oil (refined palm olein type) to produce bio-hydrogenated diesel (BHD) was carried out in a continuous-flow fixed-bed reactor over NiMoS2/γ-Al2O3 catalyst. Effects of dominant hydrotreating parameters: temperature: 270-420°C; H2 pressure: 15-80 bar; LHSV: 0.25-5.0 h(-1); and H2/oil ratio: 250-2000 N(cm(3)/cm(3)) on the conversion, product yield, and a contribution of hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) and decarbonylation/decarboxylation (DCO/DCO2) were investigated to find the optimal hydrotreating conditions. All calculations including product yield and the contribution of HDO and DCO/DCO2 were extremely estimated based on mole balance corresponding to the fatty acid composition in feed to fully understand deoxygenation behaviors at different conditions. These analyses demonstrated that HDO, DCO, and DCO2 reactions competitively occurred at each condition, and had different optimal and limiting conditions. The differences in the hydrotreating reactions, liquid product compositions, and gas product composition were also discussed.

  8. Influence of preparation method on supported Cu-Ni alloys and their catalytic properties in high pressure CO hydrogenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Qiongxiao; Eriksen, Winnie L.; Duchstein, Linus Daniel Leonhard

    2014-01-01

    to impregnation, the coprecipitation and deposition-coprecipitation methods are more efficient for preparation of small and homogeneous Cu-Ni alloy nanoparticles. In order to examine the stability of Cu-Ni alloys in high pressure synthesis gas conversion, they have been tested for high pressure CO hydrogenation......Silica supported Cu-Ni (20 wt% Cu + Ni on silica, molar ratio of Cu/Ni = 2) alloys are prepared via impregnation, coprecipitation, and deposition- coprecipitation methods. The approach to co-precipitate the SiO2 from Na2SiO3 together with metal precursors is found to be an efficient way to prepare...... high surface area silica supported catalysts (BET surface area up to 322 m2 g-1, and metal area calculated from X-ray diffraction particle size up to 29 m2 g-1). The formation of bimetallic Cu-Ni alloy nanoparticles has been studied during reduction using in situ X-ray diffraction. Compared...

  9. Study on the Performance and Commercial Application of New Generation DMMC-1 Type Catalyst for Deep Catalytic Cracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Long Jun; Tian Huiping; Liu Yujian; Xie Chaogang; Li Jibing

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decades SINOPEC has been uninterruptedly engaging in the development and upgrading of deep catalytic cracking(DCC)technology for manufacturing propylene from heavy oil.Recently SINOPEC after having made a lot of progress in the area of oil refining at the molecular level has developed a new generation DMMC-1 type catalyst designed for the DCC process.The laboratory evaluation tests have shown that compared to the existing MMC-2 type catalyst that features the best comprehensive performance,the DMMC-1 type catalyst has increased the propylene yield by 2.2% with the propylene selectivity increased by 10%.The saidcatalyst has improved its ability for heavy oil cracking and coke selectivity along with reduction of olefin content in gasoline to achieve a better product distribution and improve the product quality.The resuIts of application of the said catalyst in a 650-kt/a commercial DCC unit at SINOPEC Anqing Branch Company have revealed that the DMMC-1 catalyst demonstrated an enhanced capabilitv for heavy oil cracking and could increase the total liquid yield to 84.56 m%from 83.92 m%,the LPG vield to 38.90 m% from 34.60 m%,the propylene yield to 17.80 m% from 15.37 m% and the propylene concentration to 45.91 m% from 44.91 m%,and reduce the coke yield from 7.61 m% to 7.05 m% and the olefin content in gasoline from 42.3v% to 37.5 v%,resulting in an incremental profit amounting to 52.19 million RMB a year.This technology has further upgradedand developed the DCC technology which has been commanding a leading position among the industry peers.

  10. Efficiency Evaluation of a Photovoltaic System Simultaneously Generating Solar Electricity and Hydrogen for Energy Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abermann S.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The direct combination of a photovoltaic system with an energy storage component appears desirable since it produces and stores electrical energy simultaneously, enabling it to compensate power generation fluctuations and supply sufficient energy during low- or non-irradiation periods. A novel concept based on hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H triple-junction solar cells, as for example a-Si:H/a-SiGe:H/a-SiGe:H, and a solar water splitting system integrating a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM electrolyser is presented. The thin film layer-by-layer concept allows large-area module fabrication applicable to buildings, and exhibits strong cost-reduction potential as compared to similar concepts. The evaluation shows that it is possible to achieve a sufficient voltage of greater than 1.5 V for effective water splitting with the a-Si based solar cell. Nevertheless, in the case of grid-connection, the actual energy production cost for hydrogen storage by the proposed system is currently too high.

  11. Trehalose enhancing microbial electrolysis cell for hydrogen generation in low temperature (0 °C).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Linji; Liu, Wenzong; Wu, Yining; Lee, Poheng; Wang, Aijie; Li, Shuai

    2014-08-01

    This work explored the feasibility of a method combining physical (sonication and base) and biological (partial fermentation) processes for sludge treatment and the effects of trehalose on the hydrogen generation of microbial electrolysis cell at 0 °C. The results demonstrated that the above pretreatment method was favorable, which promoted organics decomposing into lower molecular weight matter. The promotion of trehalose for MEC efficiency was obvious and the optimal concentration of trehalose was 50 mmol/L. With this concentration, the highest hydrogen recovery rate was 0.25 m(3)-H₂/-m(3)-reactor per day. Coulomb efficiency and energy recovery efficiency were 46.4% and 203%, respectively. Further, the consumption order of mixed substances was VFAs>proteins>carbohydrates. For microorganism community, SEM photographs illustrated that the selectivity of environmental temperature for the species of anode bacteria was strong and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis indicated that Microbacterium and Proteobacteria were the two main species and Proteobacteria may be one of the species that produced electrons.

  12. Hydrogen generation from polyvinyl alcohol-contaminated wastewater by a process of supercritical water gasification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Gasification of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-contaminated wastewater in supercritical water (SCW) was investigated in a continuous flow reactor at 723-873 K, 20-36 MPa and residence time of 20-60 s. The gas and liquid products were analyzed by GC/TCD, TOC analyzer and GC/MS. The main gas products were H2, CH4, CO and CO2. Pressure change had no significant influence on gasification efficiency. Higher temperature and longer residence time enhanced gasification efficiency, and lower temperature favored the production of H2. The effects of KOH catalyst on gas product composition were studied, and gasification efficiency were analyzed. The TOC removal efficiency (TOCR), carbon gasification ratio (CGR) and hydrogen gasification ratio (HGR) were up to 96.00%, 95.92% and 126.40% at 873 K and 60 s, respectively, which suggests PVA can be completely gasified in SCW. The results indicate supercritical water gasification for hydrogen generation is a promising process for the treatment of PVA wastewater.

  13. Solar hydrogen production: renewable hydrogen production by dry fuel reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakos, Jamie; Miyamoto, Henry K.

    2006-09-01

    SHEC LABS - Solar Hydrogen Energy Corporation constructed a pilot-plant to demonstrate a Dry Fuel Reforming (DFR) system that is heated primarily by sunlight focusing-mirrors. The pilot-plant consists of: 1) a solar mirror array and solar concentrator and shutter system; and 2) two thermo-catalytic reactors to convert Methane, Carbon Dioxide, and Water into Hydrogen. Results from the pilot study show that solar Hydrogen generation is feasible and cost-competitive with traditional Hydrogen production. More than 95% of Hydrogen commercially produced today is by the Steam Methane Reformation (SMR) of natural gas, a process that liberates Carbon Dioxide to the atmosphere. The SMR process provides a net energy loss of 30 to 35% when converting from Methane to Hydrogen. Solar Hydrogen production provides a 14% net energy gain when converting Methane into Hydrogen since the energy used to drive the process is from the sun. The environmental benefits of generating Hydrogen using renewable energy include significant greenhouse gas and criteria air contaminant reductions.

  14. Generation of hydrogen peroxide from San Joaquin Valley particles in a cell-free solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Shen

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have shown a correlation between exposure to ambient particulate matter (PM and adverse health effects. One proposed mechanism of PM-mediated health effects is the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS – e.g., superoxide (•O2, hydrogen peroxide (HOOH, and hydroxyl radical (•OH – followed by oxidative stress. There are very few quantitative, specific measures of individual ROS generated from PM, but this information would help to more quantitatively address the link between ROS and the health effects of PM. To address this gap, we quantified the generation of HOOH by PM collected at an urban (Fresno and rural (Westside site in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV of California during summer and winter from 2006 to 2009. HOOH was quantified by HPLC after extracting the PM in a cell-free, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS solution with or without 50 μM ascorbate (Asc. Our results show that the urban PM generally generates much more HOOH than the rural PM but that there is no apparent seasonal difference in HOOH generation. In nearly all of the samples the addition of a physiologically relevant concentration of Asc greatly enhances HOOH formation, but a few of the coarse PM samples were able to generate a considerable amount of HOOH in the absence of added Asc, indicating the presence of unknown reductants. Normalized by air volume, the fine PM (PM2.5 generally makes more HOOH than the corresponding coarse PM (PMcf, i.e., 2.5 to 10 μm, primarily because the mass concentration of PM2.5 is much higher than that of PMcf. However, normalized by PM mass, the coarse PM typically generates more HOOH than the fine PM. The amount of HOOH produced by SJV PM is reduced on average by (78±15% when the transition metal chelator desferoxamine (DSF is added to the extraction solution, indicating that transition metals play a dominant role in HOOH generation. By

  15. Photocatalytic hydrogen generation over lanthanum doped TiO2 under UV light irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y; Xie, L; Li, Y; Qu, J L; Zheng, J; Li, X G

    2009-02-01

    TiO2 nanoparticles doped with different amount of lanthanum were obtained by sol-gel approach and followed annealing at different temperature. The crystal size of TiO2 doped with lanthanum was smaller than that of pure TiO2. Photocatalytic activity of TiO2 doped with lanthanum for water splitting into H2 was investigated. The photocatalytic activity of TiO2 doped with lanthanum for water splitting into H2 is higher than that of pure TiO2. It was found that the optimal photocatalyst was TiO2 doped with 2 wt% lanthanum and calcined at 600 degrees C for 4 h which had hydrogen generation rate 700.6 micromol h(-1).

  16. An Innovative Test Platform for Hydrogen Production and Zero Emission Power Generation from Coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calabro A; Deiana P; Fiorini P; Stendardo S; Girardi G [ENEA - Italian Agency for New Technologies, Energy and Environment Energy and Plants Division - Via Anguillarese - 301 00060 S Maria di Galeria - Rome (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    The ZECOMIX project, conceived by ENEA in the framework of Italian National Hydrogen Project, is aimed at studying an integrated process that produces both hydrogen and electricity from coal, with zero emissions and very high efficiency. The key element is the integration of a gasification process, characterized by coal hydro-gasification technology and carbon dioxide sequestration, with the power island, where an oxy-combustion occurs. Many optimization analysis and simulations have been carried out demonstrating the possibility to achieve very high net efficiencies (higher than 50% LHV) and very low (quasi-zero) emissions. The project schedule consists of the design, already started, the construction and the operation of an experimental facility finalized to demonstrate the feasibility of the described reference process. The facility will be realized in the ENEA Research Center of Casaccia, near Rome. It consists of a very flexible plant, in which more components can be tested separately or connected together. The plant is provided with a 50 kg/h coal atmospheric fluid bed gasifier, a fluid bed decarbonator/calcinator reactor filled with calcium oxide pellets, a pressurized hydro-gasifier reactor characterized by a pressure variable from 30 to 100 bar, a 100 kWe micro-turbine test bench, with the combustor chamber modified because of de-carbonized syngas fuelling and finally an oxygen/hydrogen combustor test bench, for experimental activities about the definition of stability limits, operative conditions (dilution, temperature pattern, chemicals) and combustion control. Other auxiliary components are mixing station for hydrogen-based syngas production, and an ordinary steam generator. The first part of the research project is aimed at testing the single component, in particular the main preliminary design criteria adopted for hydro-gasification reactor and carbonator reactor are presented in this paper. The second part of the Project is focused on the integration

  17. A novel power generation system based on combination of hydrogen and direct carbon fuel cells for decentralized applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muradov, Nazim; Smith, Franklyn; Choi, Pyoungho; Bokerman, Gary [Central Florida Univ., FL (United States)

    2010-07-01

    Fuel cell (FC) based power generation systems are characterized by highest chemical-toelectrical (CTE) energy conversion efficiency compared to conventional power generators (e.g., internal combustion and diesel engines, turbines). Most efforts in this area relate to hydrogen-FC coupled with hydrocarbon fuel reformers (HFR). However, the overall CTE efficiency of the combined HFR-FC systems is relatively low (about 30-35%). The objective of this work is to develop a highly-efficient power generation system integrating a hydrocarbon decomposition reactor (HDR) with both hydrogen and direct-carbon FC. A unique feature of direct carbon FC is that its theoretical CTE efficiency is close to 100% and the practical efficiency could rich 80-90%. The concept of the integrated hydrogen and direct carbon FC system is discussed and the experimental data on the performance testing of a HDR coupled with PEM FC are presented in this paper. (orig.)

  18. Evaluation Of Methods To Measure Hydrogen Generation Rate In A Shielded Cell Environment And A Method Recommendation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stone, M. E.

    2012-11-07

    The purpose of this document is to describe the current state of the art for determination of hydrogen generation rates of radioactive slurries and solutions to provide a basis for design, fabrication, testing, and implementation of a measurement method for Hydrogen Generation Rate (HGR) during qualification of waste feeds for the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). The HGR measurement will be performed on samples of the Low Activity Waste (LAW) and High Level Waste (HLW) staged waste feeds for the WTP as well as on samples from selected unit operations testing during the qualification program. SRNL has performed a review of techniques utilized to measure HGR of high level radioactive waste slurries, evaluated the Hanford 222-S Laboratory method for measurement of hydrogen, and reviewed the hydrogen generation rate models for Hanford waste.Based on the literature review, method evaluation, and SRNL experience with measuring hydrogen generation rate, SRNL recommends that a continuous flow system with online gas analysis be used as the HGR measurement method during waste qualification.

  19. Hydrogen peroxide generation and photocatalytic degradation of estrone by microstructural controlled ZnO nanorod arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yangsi; Han Jie; Qiu Wei [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand); Gao Wei, E-mail: w.gao@auckland.ac.nz [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland 1142 (New Zealand)

    2012-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated by ZnO nanorod arrays during UV irradiation was detected. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ZnO nanorod arrays were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal technique. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The microstructure can be controlled by varying reactants' concentration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Photocatalytic degradation of estrone by ZnO nanorod arrays was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructures' effect on photocatalysis and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generation was discussed. - Abstract: The strong oxidant, hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), generated by ZnO nanorod arrays under UV light irradiation was monitored by fluorescence analysis. The ZnO nanorod arrays were synthesized via a low temperature hydrothermal method and their dimensions, i.e., diameter and height, can be controlled by adjusting the concentration of zinc nitrate (Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O) and hexamethylenetetramine (HMT). The morphology, nanostructure, surface roughness and optical property were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmittance spectra, respectively. The ZnO nanorod arrays were applied in the degradation of estrone, which is an emerging steroid estrogen contaminant. The results revealed that the ZnO nanorod array produced from 25 mM Zn{sup 2+} and HMT had the highest aspect ratio, the largest surface roughness and the lowest band gap energy, which was beneficial to the efficiency of UV light utilization, photocatalytic degradation of estrone and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generation.

  20. Monopropellant engine investigation for space shuttle reaction control. Volume 2: Design, fabrication, and demonstration test of a catalytic gas generator for the space shuttle APU

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The capability of a catalytic gas generator to meet the requirement specified for the space shuttle APU is established. A full-scale gas generator, designed to operate at a chamber pressure of 750 psia and a flow rate of 0.36 lbm/sec, was fabricated and subjected to three separate life test series. The nickel foam metal used for catalyst retention was investigated. Inspection of the foam metal following the first life test revealed significant degradation. Consequently an investigation was conducted to determine the mechanism of degradation and to provide an improved foam metal.

  1. Development of sensors for hydrogen safety on fuel cell vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitanoya, S.; Furusaki, K.; Inoue, R.; Watanabe, M.; Matsuno, T.; Ichikawa, D. [NGK Spark Plug Co. Ltd, Aichi (Japan)

    2007-07-01

    When combusted, hydrogen fuel used in fuel cell vehicles (FCV) generates water only. Although this technology can help protect against global warming, the safety of hydrogen fuel must be resolved before widespread use of hydrogen-based FCVs can be realized. Hydrogen gas has a broad flammability range and will ignite when mixed with air in the ranges from 4 to 75 per cent. The primary technical requirement for FCV safety is to detect hydrogen leaks and shut off the hydrogen gas. Hydrogen sensors that detect hydrogen leaks are an important part of the safety issue. This paper presented 2 newly developed hydrogen sensors in which micro-electromechanical system (MEMS) technology was used to build a micro-heater with very small heat capacity. Both sensors have different detection principles. One is placed above the hydrogen tank and fuel cells. This combustion type sensor uses catalytic combustion of the hydrogen on the micro-heater. It features quick start-up and high accuracy. The other type of hydrogen sensor can be place in a hydrogen gas purging pipe. This thermal conduction-type sensor can detect the change in thermal conductivity of the gas. The catalytic combustion sensor is based on the detection of the voltage difference between the detection heater and reference heater. 6 refs., 3 tabs., 24 figs.

  2. Modulation of Na+/K+ ATPase Activity by Hydrogen Peroxide Generated through Heme in L. amazonensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathália Rocco-Machado

    Full Text Available Leishmania amazonensis is a protozoan parasite that occurs in many areas of Brazil and causes skin lesions. Using this parasite, our group showed the activation of Na+/K+ ATPase through a signaling cascade that involves the presence of heme and protein kinase C (PKC activity. Heme is an important biomolecule that has pro-oxidant activity and signaling capacity. Reactive oxygen species (ROS can act as second messengers, which are required in various signaling cascades. Our goal in this work is to investigate the role of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 generated in the presence of heme in the Na+/K+ ATPase activity of L. amazonensis. Our results show that increasing concentrations of heme stimulates the production of H2O2 in a dose-dependent manner until a concentration of 2.5 μM heme. To confirm that the effect of heme on the Na+/K+ ATPase is through the generation of H2O2, we measured enzyme activity using increasing concentrations of H2O2 and, as expected, the activity increased in a dose-dependent manner until a concentration of 0.1 μM H2O2. To investigate the role of PKC in this signaling pathway, we observed the production of H2O2 in the presence of its activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA and its inhibitor calphostin C. Both showed no effect on the generation of H2O2. Furthermore, we found that PKC activity is increased in the presence of H2O2, and that in the presence of calphostin C, H2O2 is unable to activate the Na+/K+ ATPase. 100 μM of Mito-TEMPO was capable of abolishing the stimulatory effect of heme on Na+/K+ ATPase activity, indicating that mitochondria might be the source of the hydrogen peroxide production induced by heme. The modulation of L. amazonensis Na+/K+ ATPase by H2O2 opens new possibilities for understanding the signaling pathways of this parasite.

  3. Carbon Monoxide-induced Stomatal Closure Involves Generation of Hydrogen Peroxide in Vicia faba Guard Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Ping She; Xi-Gui Song

    2008-01-01

    Here the regulatory role of CO during stomatal movement In Vicla faba L. was surveyed. Results Indicated that, like hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), CO donor Hematin induced stomatal closure in dose- and time-dependent manners. These responses were also proven by the addition of gaseous CO aqueous solution with different concentrations, showing the first time that CO and H2O2 exhibit the similar regulation role in the atomatal movement. Moreover, our data showed that ascorbic acid (ASA, an important reducing substrate for H2O2 removal) and diphenylene iodonium (DPI, an inhibitor of the H2O2-generating enzyme NADPH oxidase) not only reversed stomatal closure by CO, but also suppressed the H2O2 fluorescence induced by CO, implying that CO induced-atomatal closure probably involves H2O2 signal. Additionally, the CO/NO scavenger hemoglobin (Hb) and CO specific synthetic inhibitor ZnPPIX, ASA and DPI reversed the darkness-induced stomatal closure and H2O2 fluorescence. These results show that, perhaps like H2O2, the levels of CO in guard cells of V. faba are higher In the dark than in light, HO-1 and NADPH oxidase are the enzyme systems responsible for generating endogenous CO and H2O2 in darkness respectively, and that CO is involved in darkness-induced H2O2 synthesis in V. faba guard cells.

  4. Generation of Hydrogen, Lignin and Sodium Hydroxide from Pulping Black Liquor by Electrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangzai Nong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Black liquor is generated in Kraft pulping of wood or non-wood raw material in pulp mills, and regarded as a renewable resource. The objective of this paper was to develop an effective means to remove the water pollutants by recovery of both lignin and sodium hydroxide from black liquor, based on electrolysis. The treatment of a 1000 mL of black liquor (122 g/L solid contents consumed 345.6 kJ of electric energy, and led to the generation of 30.7 g of sodium hydroxide, 0.82 g of hydrogen gas and 52.1 g of biomass solids. Therefore, the recovery ratios of elemental sodium and biomass solids are 80.4% and 76%, respectively. Treating black liquor by electrolysis is an environmentally friendly technology that can, in particular, be an alternative process in addressing the environmental issues of pulping waste liquor to the small-scale mills without black liquor recovery.

  5. Investigation of advanced nanostructured multijunction photoanodes for enhanced solar hydrogen generation via water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishihara, Hidetaka

    As the worldwide demand for fossil-based fuel increases every day and the fossil reserve continues to be depleted, the need for alternative/renewable energy sources has gained momentum. Electric, hybrid, and hydrogen cars have been at the center of discussion lately among consumers, automobile manufacturers, and politicians, alike. The development of a fuel-cell based engine using hydrogen has been an ambitious research area over the last few decades-ever since Fujishima showed that hydrogen can be generated via the solar-energy driven photo-electrolytic splitting of water. Such solar cells are known as Photo-Electro-Chemical (PEC) solar cells. In order to commercialize this technology, various challenges associated with photo-conversion efficiency, chemical corrosion resistance, and longevity need to be overcome. In general, metal oxide semiconductors such as titanium dioxide (TiO 2, titania) are excellent candidates for PEC solar cells. Titania nanotubes have several advantages, including biocompatibility and higher chemical stability. Nevertheless, they can absorb only 5-7% of the solar spectrum which makes it difficult to achieve the higher photo-conversion efficiency required for successful commercial applications. A two-prong approach was employed to enhance photo-conversion efficiency: 1) surface modification of titania nanotubes using plasma treatment and 2) nano-capping of the titania nanotubes using titanium disilicide. The plasma surface treatment with N2 was found to improve the photo-current efficiency of titania nanotubes by 55%. Similarly, a facile, novel approach of nano-capping titania nanotubes to enhance their photocurrent response was also investigated. Electrochemically anodized titania nanotubes were capped by coating a 25 nm layer of titanium disilicide using RF magnetron sputtering technique. The optical properties of titania nanotubes were not found to change due to the capping; however, a considerable increase (40%) in the photocurrent

  6. Understanding and Enhancing the Photostability of Nanoporous Metal Oxide Thin Films for Solar Hydrogen Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitrada, Kalyan Chakravarthi

    Solar water splitting is an environmentally benign process which has received wide attention in the recent years as an alternate method for a clean and safe production of hydrogen. This process employs a semiconductor based photocatalyst, water, and sunlight to produce hydrogen. Metal-oxide based semiconductors are considered to be ideal photocatalytic materials because of their stability against photo-corrosion combined with relatively narrow energy band-gap, appropriately placed band edge positions with reference to oxygen and hydrogen energy levels, less scattering of charges due to wider valence band, high dielectric constant, natural abundance, and non-toxicity. In this dissertation, two metal oxide based semiconductors viz., iron (III) oxide and bismuth (III) oxide were investigated to understand and enhance their photo activity as photoanodes for solar water splitting application. Iron (III) oxide has a well suited band gap to capture solar spectrum but it suffers from inappropriately positioned band edges, recombination losses due to low electron mobility, and a small minority carrier diffusion length. However, it was hypothesized that the Iron (III) oxide might show interesting photoelectrochemical properties by alloying with 4f elements and shifting the conduction band minimum of the iron oxide favorably to more negative potentials. In the present study, a nanoporous iron oxide layer incorporated with Nd3+ and B3+ was synthesized by electrochemical anodization of a FeNdB alloy. The photoelectrochemical behavior of this oxide was compared with thermally oxidized FeNdB alloy and the iron oxides obtained by anodization and thermal oxidation of pure iron foil. Incorporation of Nd3+ and B3+ in the iron oxide showed a direct bandgap of 2.05 eV, an indirect bandgap of 1.9 eV and shifted the flatband potentials to --0.8 VAg/AgCl in 1 M KOH solution. The FeNdB oxide showed marginally better catalytic activity for the oxygen evolution reaction than pure iron oxide

  7. Catalytic Oxidation with a Non-Heme Iron Complex That Generates a Low-Spin FeIIIOOH Intermediate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelfes, Gerard; Lubben, Marcel; Hage, Ronald; Que, Jr.; Feringa, Bernard

    2000-01-01

    The antitumor drug bleomycin (BLM) is proposed to act via a low-spin iron(III) hydroperoxide intermediate called “activated bleomycin”. To gain more insight into the mechanistic aspects of catalytic oxidation by these intermediates we have studied the reactivity of [(N4Py)Fe(CH3CN)](ClO4)2 (1) (N4Py

  8. Generation of core–shell nanoparticles Al@Ti by laser ablation in liquid for hydrogen storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serkov, A.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); The Federal State Educational Institution of Higher Professional Education, “Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University)”, 9, Institutsky lane, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow (Russian Federation); Barmina, E.V.; Simakin, A.V. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuzmin, P.G., E-mail: qzzzma@gmail.com [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Voronov, V.V. [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Shafeev, G.A. [Wave Research Center of A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 38, Vavilov street, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), 31, Kashirskoye highway, 115409 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-01

    Highlights: • Core–shell Al@Ti NPs are generated by laser ablation in isopropanol. • Isopropanol was saturated with molecular hydrogen. • The composite metallic Al-Ti target was used. • HR TEM characterization shows that Ti core is covered by epitaxial Al shell. • Al@Ti NPs are promising for hydrogen storage. - Abstract: Core–shell Al@Ti nanoparticles are generated by ablation of a composite Ti–Al target in liquid isopropanol saturated with molecular hydrogen using a Nd:YAG laser with pulse duration of 10 ps and repetition rate of 200 kHz. The target is made of two plates of corresponding metals stacked together and placed into a flowing cell reactor. Transmission Electron Microscopy analysis of generated NPs reveals their core–shell structure with Ti core and Al shell. Average size of NPs determined by means of measuring disk centrifuge is around 40 nm. Saturation of NPs by hydrogen is due to sharp dependence of its solubility in these metals on temperature. XRD studies of generated NPs show the peaks of both metallic Ti and Al with some amount of TiO{sub 2}. No peaks of Ti–Al alloys are observed.

  9. Hydrogen Generation from Ammonia Borane and Water Through the Combustion Reactions with Mechanically Alloyed Al/Mg Powder

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-11

    synthesis of ammonia -A ‘‘never ending story? " Angewandte...34 # && , (/ -%(/ &$’$) ) ! -( ( !( &" # ( %’ !&% # ’)( (% (" %’% (" ( & *%" # ’)( *! % + 3 HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM AMMONIA BORANE AND WATER THROUGH THE...FROM AMMONIA BORANE AND WATER THROUGH THE COMBUSTION REACTIONS WITH MECHANICALLY ALLOYED AL/MG POWDER by DANIEL RODRIGUEZ THESIS Presented to

  10. Thermodynamic analysis of SCW NPP cycles with thermo-chemical co-generation of hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidin, N.; Mokry, S.; Monichan, R.; Chophla, K.; Pioro, I. [Faculty of Energy Systems and Nuclear Science, Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: Maria.Naidin@mycampus.uoit.ca, Sarah.Mokry@mycampus.uoit.ca, Romson.Monichan@uoit.ca, Karan.Chophla@mycampus.uoit.ca, Igor.Pioro@uoit.ca; Naterer, G.; Gabriel, K. [Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science, Univ. of Ontario Inst. of Technology, Oshawa, Ontario (Canada)], E-mail: Greg.Naterer@uoit.ca, Kamiel.Gabriel@uoit.ca

    2009-07-01

    Research activities are currently conducted worldwide to develop Generation IV nuclear reactor concepts with the objective of improving thermal efficiency and increasing economic competitiveness of Generation IV Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) compared to modern thermal power plants. The Super-Critical Water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) concept is one of the six Generation IV options chosen for further investigation and development in several countries including Canada and Russia. Water-cooled reactors operating at subcritical pressures (10 - 16 MPa) have provided a significant amount of electricity production for the past 50 years. However, the thermal efficiency of the current NPPs is not very high (30 - 35%). As such, more competitive designs, with higher thermal efficiencies, which will be close to that of modern thermal power plants (45 - 50%), need to be developed and implemented. Super-Critical Water (SCW) NPPs will have much higher operating parameters compared to current NPPs (i.e., steam pressures of about 25 MPa and steam outlet temperatures up to 625{sup o}C). Furthermore, SCWRs operating at higher temperatures can facilitate an economical co-generation of hydrogen through thermochemical cycles (particularly, the copper-chlorine cycle) or direct high-temperature electrolysis. The two SCW NPP cycles proposed by this paper are based on direct, regenerative, no-reheat and single-reheat configurations. As such, the main parameters and performance in terms of thermal efficiency of the SCW NPP concepts mentioned above are being analyzed. The cycles are generally comprised of: an SCWR, a SC turbine, one deaerator, ten feedwater heaters, and pumps. The SC turbine of the no-reheat cycle consists of one High-Pressure (HP) cylinder and two Low-Pressure (LP) cylinders. Alternatively, the SC turbine for the single-reheat cycle is comprised of one High-Pressure (HP) cylinder, one Intermediate-Pressure (IP) cylinder and two Low-Pressure (LP) cylinders. Since the single

  11. Catalytic Activity of Nanosized CuO-ZnO Supported on Titanium Chips in Hydrogenation of Carbon Dioxide to Methyl Alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ho-Geun; Lee, Hwan-Gyu; Chung, Min-Chul; Park, Kwon-Pil; Kim, Ki-Joong; Kang, Byeong-Mo; Jeong, Woon-Jo; Jung, Sang-Chul; Lee, Do-Jin

    2016-02-01

    In this study, titanium chips (TC) generated from industrial facilities was utilized as TiO2 support for hydrogenation of carbon dioxide (CO2) to methyl alcohol (CH3OH) over Cu-based catalysts. Nano-sized CuO and ZnO catalysts were deposited on TiO2 support using a co-precipitation (CP) method (CuO-ZnO/TiO2), where the thermal treatment of TC and the particle size of TiC2 are optimized on CO2 conversion under different reaction temperature and contact time. Direct hydrogenation of CO2 to CH3OH over CuO-ZnO/TiO2 catalysts was achieved and the maximum selectivity (22%) and yield (18.2%) of CH3OH were obtained in the range of reaction temperature 210-240 degrees C under the 30 bar. The selectivity was readily increased by increasing the flow rate, which does not affect much to the CO2 conversion and CH3OH yield.

  12. Catalytic therapy of cancer by ascorbic acid involves redox cycling of exogenous/endogenous copper ions and generation of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, S M; Ullah, M F; Shamim, U; Bhatt, S H; Azmi, A S

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic therapy is a cancer treatment modality based on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through administration of ascorbate/medicinal herbal extracts and copper. It is known that antioxidants such as ascorbate also exhibit prooxidant activity in the presence of transition metals such as copper. Based on our work and that in the literature, in this review we propose a mechanism for the cytotoxic action of ascorbate against cancer cells. It involves redox cycling of exogenous/endogenous copper ions and the consequent generation of ROS leading to oxidative DNA breakage. Using human peripheral lymphocytes and the Comet assay, we have shown that ascorbic acid is able to cause oxidative breakage in cellular DNA. Such DNA degradation is inhibited by neocuproine (a Cu(I) sequestering agent) and scavengers of ROS indicating that the cellular DNA breakage involves the generation of Cu(I) and formation of ROS. Similar results are also obtained with plant polyphenol antioxidants that are important constituents of medicinal herbal extracts. Copper is an essential component of chromatin and can take part in redox reactions. It is well established that tissue, cellular and serum copper levels are considerably elevated in various malignancies. Therefore, cancer cells may be more subject to electron transfer between copper ions and ascorbate/plant polyphenols to generate ROS. In this review we cite evidence to indicate that in catalytic therapy cytotoxic action against cancer cells involves redox cycling of exogenous/endogenous copper ions.

  13. Hydrogen Peroxide as a Sustainable Energy Carrier: Electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen Peroxide and the Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D.

    2012-01-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O2-reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal-oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O2, which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells. PMID:23457415

  14. Hydrogen Peroxide as a Sustainable Energy Carrier: Electrocatalytic Production of Hydrogen Peroxide and the Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Yamada, Yusuke; Karlin, Kenneth D

    2012-11-01

    This review describes homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic reduction of dioxygen with metal complexes focusing on the catalytic two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide. Whether two-electron reduction of dioxygen to produce hydrogen peroxide or four-electron O2-reduction to produce water occurs depends on the types of metals and ligands that are utilized. Those factors controlling the two processes are discussed in terms of metal-oxygen intermediates involved in the catalysis. Metal complexes acting as catalysts for selective two-electron reduction of oxygen can be utilized as metal complex-modified electrodes in the electrocatalytic reduction to produce hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide thus produced can be used as a fuel in a hydrogen peroxide fuel cell. A hydrogen peroxide fuel cell can be operated with a one-compartment structure without a membrane, which is certainly more promising for the development of low-cost fuel cells as compared with two compartment hydrogen fuel cells that require membranes. Hydrogen peroxide is regarded as an environmentally benign energy carrier because it can be produced by the electrocatalytic two-electron reduction of O2, which is abundant in air, using solar cells; the hydrogen peroxide thus produced could then be readily stored and then used as needed to generate electricity through the use of hydrogen peroxide fuel cells.

  15. Effects of low-temperature catalytic pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. Final technical report, Volume 2 - hydrogenative and hydrothermal pretreatments and spectroscopic characterization using pyrolysis-GC-MS, CPMAS {sup 13}C NMR and FT-IR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chunshan Song; Hatcher, P.G.; Saini, A.K.; Wenzel, K.A.

    1998-01-01

    It has been indicated by DOE COLIRN panel that low-temperature catalytic pretreatment is a promising approach to the development of an improved liquefaction process. This work is a fundamental study on effects of pretreatments on coal structure and reactivity in liquefaction. The main objectives of this project are to study the coal structural changes induced by low-temperature catalytic and thermal pretreatments by using spectroscopic techniques; and to clarify the pretreatment-induced changes in reactivity or convertibility of coals. As the second volume of the final report, here we summarize our work on spectroscopic characterization of four raw coals including two subbituminous coals and two bituminous coals, tetrahydrofuran (THF)-extracted but unreacted coals, the coals (THF-insoluble parts) that have been thermally pretreated. in the absence of any solvents and in the presence of either a hydrogen-donor solvent or a non-donor solvent, and the coals (THF-insoluble parts) that have been catalytically pretreated in the presence of a dispersed Mo sulfide catalyst in the absence of any solvents and in the presence of either a hydrogen-donor solvent or a non-donor solvent.

  16. Influence of reduction energy match among CuO species in CuO-CeO2 catalysts on the catalytic performance for CO preferential oxidation in excess hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhigang Liu; Yunlong Xie; Wensheng Li; Renxian Zhou; Xiaoming Zheng

    2011-01-01

    In the present study,we have investigated the reducibility of CuO species on CuO-CeO2 catalysts and the influence of CuO species on the catalytic performance for CO preferential oxidation(CO PROX)in excess hydrogen.It is revealed that the smaller the difference of reduction temperature(denoted as △T)for two adjacent CuO species is,the higher the catalytic activity of CuO-CeO2 for the PROX in excess hydrogen may be obtained.It means that if the reduction energy of CuO-CU2+pairs matched better,the reduction-oxidation recycle of CuO-Cu2+pairs would go on more easily,then the transferring energy of CuO-Cu2+pairs would be lesser.Therefore,the CuO-CeO2 catalysts will be largely improved in their catalytic performance if the different CuO species on the catalysts have matched the reduction energy,which would allows them to cooperate effectively.

  17. Converting Chemical Energy to Electricity through a Three-Jaw Mini-Generator Driven by the Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Meng; Wang, Lei; Ji, Fanqin; Shi, Feng

    2016-05-11

    Energy conversion from a mechanical form to electricity is one of the most important research advancements to come from the horizontal locomotion of small objects. Until now, the Marangoni effect has been the only propulsion method to produce the horizontal locomotion to induce an electromotive force, which is limited to a short duration because of the specific property of surfactants. To solve this issue, in this article we utilized the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to provide the propulsion for a sustainable energy conversion from a mechanical form to electricity. We fabricated a mini-generator consisting of three parts: a superhydrophobic rotator with three jaws, three motors to produce a jet of oxygen bubbles to propel the rotation of the rotator, and three magnets integrated into the upper surface of the rotator to produce the magnet flux. Once the mini-generator was placed on the solution surface, the motor catalyzed the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. This generated a large amount of oxygen bubbles that caused the generator and integrated magnets to rotate at the air/water interface. Thus, the magnets passed under the coil area and induced a change in the magnet flux, thus generating electromotive forces. We also investigated experimental factors, that is, the concentration of hydrogen peroxide and the turns of the solenoid coil, and found that the mini-generator gave the highest output in a hydrogen peroxide solution with a concentration of 10 wt % and under a coil with 9000 turns. Through combining the stable superhydrophobicity and catalyst, we realized electricity generation for a long duration, which could last for 26 000 s after adding H2O2 only once. We believe this work provides a simple process for the development of horizontal motion and provides a new path for energy reutilization.

  18. Investigation of Iron Oxide Morphology in a Cyclic Redox Water Splitting Process for Hydrogen Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael M. Bobek

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A solar fuels generation research program is focused on hydrogen production by means of reactive metal water splitting in a cyclic iron-based redox process. Iron-based oxides are explored as an intermediary reactive material to dissociate water molecules at significantly reduced thermal energies. With a goal of studying the resulting oxide chemistry and morphology, chemical assistance via CO is used to complete the redox cycle. In order to exploit the unique characteristics of highly reactive materials at the solar reactor scale, a monolithic laboratory scale reactor has been designed to explore the redox cycle at temperatures ranging from 675 to 875 K. Using high resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM and electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, the oxide morphology and the oxide state are quantified, including spatial distributions. These images show the change of the oxide layers directly after oxidation and after reduction. The findings show a significant non-stoichiometric O/Fe gradient in the atomic ratio following oxidation, which is consistent with a previous kinetics model, and a relatively constant, non-stoichiometric O/Fe atomic ratio following reduction.

  19. Minimum Entropy Generation Theorem Investigation and Optimization of Metal Hydride Alloy Hydrogen Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Chang Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this paper is to carry out numerical simulation of the hydrogen storage on exothermic reaction of metal hydride LaNi5 alloy container. In addition to accelerating the reaction speed of the internal metal hydride by internal control tube water-cooled mode, analyze via the application of second law of thermodynamics the principle of entropy generation. Use COMSOL Mutilphysics 4.3 a to engage in finite element method value simulation on two-dimensional axisymmetric model. Also on the premise that the internal control tube parameters the radius ri, the flow rate U meet the metal hydride saturation time, observe the reaction process of two parameters on the tank, entropy distribution and the results of the accumulated entro