WorldWideScience

Sample records for catalytic effects

  1. Chemical and catalytic effects of ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, G.K.

    1982-01-01

    Energetic particles are used for inducing chemical reactions as well as for modifying the properties of materials with regard to their bulk and surface chemical behavior. The effects are partly caused by radiation damage or phase intermixing, partly by the chemical properties of the individual bombarding particles. In this contribution a survey of relevant applications of these techniques is presented: (1) Chemical reactions of implanted and recoil atoms and their use for syntheses, doping and labeling of compounds. (2) The formation of thin films by decomposing chemical compounds with ion beams. 3) Catalytic effects on substrates treated by sputtering or ion implantation. Recent results with nonmetallic substrates are reviewed. Mainly hydrogenation reactions at a solid/gas interface or redox reactions at an electrified solid/liquid interface are mentioned. The present status and future prospects of these kinds of investigations will be discussed. (author)

  2. Effect of support on the catalytic activity of manganese oxide catalyts for toluene combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozan, Gulin Selda

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► α-Al 2 O 3 , obtained from Bohmite, as a support for enhancing of the activity. ► The support material for catalytic oxidation. ► The manganese state and oxygen species effect on the catalytic combustion reaction. - Abstract: The aim of this work was to study combustion of toluene (1000 ppm) over MnO 2 modified with different supports. α-Al 2 O 3 and γ-Al 2 O 3 obtained from Boehmite, γ-Al 2 O 3 (commercial), SiO 2 , TiO 2 and ZrO 2 were used as commercial support materials. In view of potential interest of this process, the influence of support material on the catalytic performance was discussed. The deposition of 9.5MnO 2 was performed by impregnation over support. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), temperature programmed reduction and oxidation (TPR/TPO) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The catalytic tests were carried out at atmospheric pressure in a fixed-bed flow reactor. 9.5MnO 2 /α-Al 2 O 3 (B) (synthesized from Boehmite) catalyst exhibits the highest catalytic activity, over which the toluene conversion was up to 90% at a temperature of 289 °C. Considering all the characterization and reaction data reported in this study, it was concluded that the manganese state and oxygen species played an important role in the catalytic activity.

  3. Effect of radioactive radiation on catalytic properties of solid materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sokol' skii, D V; Kuzembaev, K K; Kel' man, I V [AN Kazakhskoj SSR, Alma-Ata. Inst. Organicheskogo Kataliza i Ehlektrokhimii

    1977-05-01

    General survey is made of the problem of radiation modification of the action of solid catalysts with respect to the various types of heterogeneous catalytic reactions. Consideration is given to the key mechanisms responsible for radiation damage in the interaction of high-energy radiation with a solid body. The effect of ionizing radiation on the adsorption capacity and catalytic activity of solid bodies is discussed.

  4. Catalytic and inhibitory effects of thechnetium on reduction processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grases, F.; Genestar, C.; March, J.G.; March, P.

    1986-01-01

    Interactions between technetium and some anthraquinones and tartrazin in the presence of tin(II) are described. It was found that whereas the reductive process between Sn(II) and 1-amino-4-hydroxyanthraquinone is catalyzed by technetium, the reduction of tartrazin is inhibited by this element. Study of such process seems to indicate that the catalytic effect of technetium on the reduction processes is due to Tc(V) action whereas the inhibitory effect is due to the Tc(IV) species. (author)

  5. Effect of inlet cone pipe angle in catalytic converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amira Zainal, Nurul; Farhain Azmi, Ezzatul; Arifin Samad, Mohd

    2018-03-01

    The catalytic converter shows significant consequence to improve the performance of the vehicle start from it launched into production. Nowadays, the geometric design of the catalytic converter has become critical to avoid the behavior of backpressure in the exhaust system. The backpressure essentially reduced the performance of vehicles and increased the fuel consumption gradually. Consequently, this study aims to design various models of catalytic converter and optimize the volume of fluid flow inside the catalytic converter by changing the inlet cone pipe angles. Three different geometry angles of the inlet cone pipe of the catalytic converter were assessed. The model is simulated in Solidworks software to determine the optimum geometric design of the catalytic converter. The result showed that by decreasing the divergence angle of inlet cone pipe will upsurge the performance of the catalytic converter.

  6. Effect of support on the catalytic activity of manganese oxide catalyts for toluene combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozan, Gulin Selda

    2012-06-30

    The aim of this work was to study combustion of toluene (1000ppm) over MnO(2) modified with different supports. α-Al(2)O(3) and γ-Al(2)O(3) obtained from Boehmite, γ-Al(2)O(3) (commercial), SiO(2), TiO(2) and ZrO(2) were used as commercial support materials. In view of potential interest of this process, the influence of support material on the catalytic performance was discussed. The deposition of 9.5MnO(2) was performed by impregnation over support. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), temperature programmed reduction and oxidation (TPR/TPO) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The catalytic tests were carried out at atmospheric pressure in a fixed-bed flow reactor. 9.5MnO(2)/α-Al(2)O(3)(B) (synthesized from Boehmite) catalyst exhibits the highest catalytic activity, over which the toluene conversion was up to 90% at a temperature of 289°C. Considering all the characterization and reaction data reported in this study, it was concluded that the manganese state and oxygen species played an important role in the catalytic activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Catalytic effect of halide additives ball milled with magnesium hydride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malka, I.E.; Bystrzycki, J. [Department of Advanced Materials and Technologies, Military University of Technology, Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Czujko, T. [Department of Advanced Materials and Technologies, Military University of Technology, Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); CanmetENERGY, Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Transportation Energy, Natural Resources (Canada)

    2010-02-15

    The influence of various halide additives milled with magnesium hydride (MgH{sub 2}) on its decomposition temperature was studied. The optimum amount of halide additive and milling conditions were evaluated. The MgH{sub 2} decomposition temperature and energy of activation reduction were measured by temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The difference in catalytic efficiency between chlorides and fluorides of the various metals studied is presented. The effects of oxidation state, valence and position in the periodic table for selected halides on MgH{sub 2} decomposition temperature were also studied. The best catalysts, from the halides studied, for magnesium hydride decomposition were ZrF{sub 4}, TaF{sub 5}, NbF{sub 5}, VCl{sub 3} and TiCl{sub 3}. (author)

  8. Fluidized bed catalytic cracking regenerator model: grid effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Errazu, A.F. (Universidad Nacional del Sur, Conicet, Argentina); De Lasa, H.I.; Sarti, F.

    1979-04-01

    A grid model including thermal effects is proposed. The aim is the simulation of a fluidized catalytic cracking regenerator similar to the industrial unit of Destileria La Palta, YPF, Argentina. It is demonstrated that a simple C.S.T.R. model without bypass of gas feed entering the bed provides a good approach for representing the fluidized bed including the grid region. In addition, by means of the C.S.T.R. model, it is shown that there exist two characteristic operating regions: a zone where (C/sub 0//sup 0/ to C/sub c/) depends on the initial coke concentration and a zone where (C/sub c//sub 0/ to C/sub c/) is controlled by oxygen supply. 40 references, 6 figures, 5 tables.

  9. Ionic Liquids: The Synergistic Catalytic Effect in the Synthesis of Cyclic Carbonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flora T.T. Ng

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This review presents the synergistic effect in the catalytic system of ionic liquids (ILs for the synthesis of cyclic carbonate from carbon dioxide and epoxide. The emphasis of this review is on three aspects: the catalytic system of metal-based ionic liquids, the catalytic system of hydrogen bond-promoted ionic liquids and supported ionic liquids. Metal and ionic liquids show a synergistic effect on the cycloaddition reactions of epoxides. The cations and anions of ionic liquids show a synergistic effect on the cycloaddition reactions. The functional groups in cations or supports combined with the anions have a synergistic effect on the cycloaddition reactions. Synergistic catalytic effects of ILs play an important role of promoting the cycloaddition reactions of epoxides. The design of catalytic system of ionic liquids will be possible if the synergistic effect on a molecular level is understood.

  10. Catalytic effect of light illumination on bioleaching of chalcopyrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shuang; Gan, Min; Zhu, Jianyu; Li, Qian; Jie, Shiqi; Yang, Baojun; Liu, Xueduan

    2015-04-01

    The influence of visible light exposure on chalcopyrite bioleaching was investigated using Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans. The results indicated, in both shake-flasks and aerated reactors with 8500-lux light, the dissolved Cu was 91.80% and 23.71% higher, respectively, than that in the controls without light. The catalytic effect was found to increase bioleaching to a certain limit, then plateaued as the initial chalcopyrite concentration increased from 2% to 4.5%. Thus a balanced mineral concentration is highly amenable to bioleaching via offering increased available active sites for light adsorption while eschewing mineral aggregation and screening effects. Using semiconducting chalcopyrite, the light facilitated the reduction of Fe(3+) to Fe(2+) as metabolic substrates for A.ferrooxidans, leading to better biomass, lower pH and redox potential, which are conducive to chalcopyrite leaching. The light exposure on iron redox cycling was further confirmed by chemical leaching tests using Fe(3+), which exhibited higher Fe(2+) levels in the light-induced system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effect of Catalytic Layer Thickness on Diameter of Vertically Aligned Individual Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Kyung Jung

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of catalytic thin film thickness on the diameter control of individual carbon nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition was investigated. Individual carbon nanotubes were grown on catalytic nanodot arrays, which were fabricated by e-beam lithography and e-beam evaporation. During e-beam evaporation of the nanodot pattern, more catalytic metal was deposited at the edge of the nanodots than the desired catalyst thickness. Because of this phenomenon, carbon atoms diffused faster near the center of the dots than at the edge of the dots. The carbon atoms, which were gathered at the interface between the catalytic nanodot and the diffusion barrier, accumulated near the center of the dot and lifted the catalyst off. From the experiments, an individual carbon nanotube with the same diameter as that of the catalytic nanodot was obtained from a 5 nm thick catalytic nanodot; however, an individual carbon nanotube with a smaller diameter (~40% reduction was obtained from a 50 nm thick nanodot. We found that the thicker the catalytic layer, the greater the reduction in diameter of the carbon nanotubes. The diameter-controlled carbon nanotubes could have applications in bio- and nanomaterial scanning and as a contrast medium for magnetic resonance imaging.

  12. Preparation, characterization and catalytic effects of copper oxalate nanocrystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Gurdip; Kapoor, Inder Pal Singh; Dubey, Reena; Srivastava, Pratibha

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Prepared copper oxalate nanocrystals were characterized by FE-SEM and bright field TEM micrographs. Its catalytic activity was evaluated on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate using TG and TG-DSC techniques. Highlights: ► Preparation of nanocrystals (∼9.0 nm) of copper oxalate using Cu(NO 3 ) 2 ·2H 2 O, oxalic acid and acetone under thermal conditions. ► Method is simple and novel. ► Characterization using XRD, SEM, TEM, HRTEM and ED pattern. ► Catalytic activity of copper oxalate nanocrystals on AP thermal decomposition using thermal techniques (TG, TG-DSC and ignition delay). ► Kinetics of thermal decomposition of AP + CONs using isoconversional and model fitting kinetic approaches. - Abstract: Recent work has described the preparation and characterization of copper oxalate nanocrystals (CONs). It was characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and electron diffraction pattern (ED). The catalytic activity of CONs on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) and composite solid propellants (CSPs) has been done by thermogravimetry (TG), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and ignition delay measurements. Burning rate of CSPs was also found to be enhanced in presence of copper oxalate nanocrystals. Kinetics of thermal decomposition of AP with and without CONs has also been investigated. The model free (isoconversional) and model-fitting kinetic approaches have been applied to data for isothermal TG decomposition.

  13. Optical manipulation and catalytic activity enhanced by surface plasmon effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ningmu; Min, Jiang; Jiao, Wenxiang; Wang, Guanghui

    2017-02-01

    For optical manipulation, a nano-optical conveyor belt consisting of an array of gold plasmonic non-concentric nano-rings (PNNRs) is demonstrated for the realization of trapping and unidirectional transportation of nanoparticles by polarization rotation of excitation beam. These hot spots of an asymmetric plasmonic nanostructure are polarization dependent, therefore, one can use the incident polarization state to manipulate the trapped targets. Trapped particles could be transferred between adjacent PNNRs in a given direction just by rotating the polarization of incident beam due to unbalanced potential. The angular dependent distribution of electric field around PNNR has been solved using the three- dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique. For optical enhanced catalytic activity, the spectral properties of dimers of Au nanorod-Au nanorod nanostructures under the excitation of 532nm photons have been investigated. With a super-resolution catalytic mapping technique, we identified the existence of "hot spot" in terms of catalytic reactivity at the gap region within the twined plasmonic nanostructure. Also, FDTD calculation has revealed an intrinsic correlation between hot electron transfer.

  14. Effect of High-Pressure Treatment on Catalytic and Physicochemical Properties of Pepsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianan; Bai, Tenghui; Ma, Yaping; Ma, Hanjun

    2017-10-11

    For a long time, high-pressure treatment has been used to destroy the compact structures of natural proteins in order to promote subsequent enzymatic hydrolysis. However, there are few reports evaluating the feasibility of directly improving the catalytic capability of proteases by using high-pressure treatments. In this study, the effects of high-pressure treatment on the catalytic capacity and structure of pepsin were investigated, and the relationship between its catalytic properties and changes in its physicochemical properties was explored. It was found that high-pressure treatment could lead to changes of the sulfhydryl group/disulfide bond content, hydrophobicity, hydrodynamic radius, intrinsic viscosity, and subunit composition of pepsin, and the conformational change of pepsin resulted in improvement to its enzymatic activity and hydrolysis efficiency, which had an obvious relationship with the high-pressure treatment conditions.

  15. The effect of barrier layer-mediated catalytic deactivation in vertically aligned carbon nanotube growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patole, S P; Yu, Seong-Man; Shin, Dong-Wook; Yoo, Ji-Beom; Kim, Ha-Jin; Han, In-Taek; Kwon, Kee-Won

    2010-01-01

    The effect of Al-barrier layer-mediated Fe-catalytic deactivation in vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) growth was studied. The substrate surface morphology, catalytic diffusion and barrier layer oxidation were found to be dependent on the annealing temperature of the barrier layer, which ultimately affects CNT growth. The annealed barrier layer without complete oxidation was found to be suitable for top to bottom super aligned CNT arrays. The highest average CNT growth rate of up to 3.88 μm s -1 was observed using this simple approach. Details of the analysis are also presented.

  16. Catalytic activity of metallic nanoisland coatings. The influence of size effects on the recombination properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomilina, O A; Berzhansky, V N; Shaposhnikov, A N; Tomilin, S V

    2016-01-01

    The results of investigations of the quantum-size effects influence on selective properties of heterogeneous nanocatalysts are presents. As etalon exothermic reaction was used the reaction of atomic hydrogen recombination. The nanostructured Pd and Pt films on Teflon substrate were used as a samples of heterogeneous nanocatalysts. It was shown that for nanoparticles with various sizes the catalytic activity has the periodic dependence. It has been found that for certain sizes of nanoparticles their catalytic activity is less than that of Teflon substrate. (paper)

  17. Upgrading Fast Pyrolysis Oil via Hydrodeoxygenation and Thermal Treatment: Effects of Catalytic Glycerol Pretreatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reyhanitash, Ehsan; Tymchyshyn, M.; Yuan, Zhongshun; Albion, K.; van Rossum, G.; Xu, C.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of stabilizing fast pyrolysis oil (PO) with glycerol via catalytic glycerol pretreatment on upgrading via hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) or thermal treatment (TT) were studied. Nonstabilized (original) fast pyrolysis oil was also upgraded via HDO or TT to obtain benchmarks. Generally, HDO

  18. The effect of Ce ion substituted OMS-2 nanostructure in catalytic activity for benzene oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jingtao; Li, Yuanzhi; Mao, Mingyang; Zhao, Xiujian; Yue, Yuanzheng

    2014-11-01

    The nanostructure of Ce doped OMS-2 plays a very important role in its catalytic property. We demonstrate by density functional theory (DFT) calculations that the unique nanostructure of the Ce ion substituted OMS-2 with Mn vacancy in the framework is beneficial for the improvement of catalytic activity, while the nanostructure of the Ce ion substituted OMS-2 without defects are detrimental to the catalytic activity. We establish a novel and facile strategy of synthesizing these unique Ce ion substituted OMS-2 nanostructure with Mn vacancies in the framework by hydrothermal redox reaction between Ce(NO3)3 and KMnO4 with KMnO4/Ce(NO3)3 at a molar ratio of 3 : 1 at 120 °C. Compared to pure OMS-2, the produced catalyst of Ce ion substituted OMS-2 ultrathin nanorods exhibits an enormous enhancement in the catalytic activity for benzene oxidation, which is evidenced by a significant decrease (ΔT50 = 100 °C, ΔT90 = 129 °C) in the reaction temperature of T50 and T90 (corresponding to the benzene conversion = 50% and 90%), which is considerably more efficient than the expensive supported noble metal catalyst (Pt/Al2O3). We combine both theoretical and experimental evidence to provide a new physical insight into the significant effect due to the defects induced by the Ce ion substitution on the catalytic activity of OMS-2. The formation of unique Ce ion substituted OMS-2 nanostructure with Mn vacancies in the framework leads to a significant enhancement of the lattice oxygen activity, thus tremendously increasing the catalytic activity.The nanostructure of Ce doped OMS-2 plays a very important role in its catalytic property. We demonstrate by density functional theory (DFT) calculations that the unique nanostructure of the Ce ion substituted OMS-2 with Mn vacancy in the framework is beneficial for the improvement of catalytic activity, while the nanostructure of the Ce ion substituted OMS-2 without defects are detrimental to the catalytic activity. We establish a novel

  19. Catalytic fast pyrolysis of durian rind using silica-alumina catalyst: Effects of pyrolysis parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Y L; Abdullah, A Z; Hameed, B H

    2018-05-18

    Silica-alumina catalyst was prepared and used in the catalytic fast pyrolysis of durian rind in a drop-type two-stage reactor. The effects of catalytic temperature (400 °C-600 °C) and catalyst-to-durian rind ratio (1:30-3:30) were evaluated. Bio-oil yield was increased with increased catalytic temperature due to considerable dehydration process, but it was reduced with high catalyst loading due to the overcracking of organics into light gases. Silica-alumina catalyst possessed good selectivity and the products changed according to the temperature. The major components in bio-oil were hydrocarbons, furan derivatives, and aromatic compounds at 400 °C, 500 °C, and 600 °C, respectively. The hydrogen and carbon contents of bio-oil were reduced with high catalyst loading due to the overcracking of organics, and the deoxygenation process became unfavorable. The silica-alumina catalyst worked well in catalytic fast pyrolysis of durian rind, and the condition may be adjusted based on the desired products. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Particle size effects in the catalytic electroreduction of CO₂ on Cu nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reske, Rulle; Mistry, Hemma; Behafarid, Farzad; Roldan Cuenya, Beatriz; Strasser, Peter

    2014-05-14

    A study of particle size effects during the catalytic CO2 electroreduction on size-controlled Cu nanoparticles (NPs) is presented. Cu NP catalysts in the 2-15 nm mean size range were prepared, and their catalytic activity and selectivity during CO2 electroreduction were analyzed and compared to a bulk Cu electrode. A dramatic increase in the catalytic activity and selectivity for H2 and CO was observed with decreasing Cu particle size, in particular, for NPs below 5 nm. Hydrocarbon (methane and ethylene) selectivity was increasingly suppressed for nanoscale Cu surfaces. The size dependence of the surface atomic coordination of model spherical Cu particles was used to rationalize the experimental results. Changes in the population of low-coordinated surface sites and their stronger chemisorption were linked to surging H2 and CO selectivities, higher catalytic activity, and smaller hydrocarbon selectivity. The presented activity-selectivity-size relations provide novel insights in the CO2 electroreduction reaction on nanoscale surfaces. Our smallest nanoparticles (~2 nm) enter the ab initio computationally accessible size regime, and therefore, the results obtained lend themselves well to density functional theory (DFT) evaluation and reaction mechanism verification.

  1. Catalytic effect of lignite ash on steam gasification of oil sand coke

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furimsky, E.; Palmer, A.

    1986-06-16

    Steam gasification of Suncor and Syncrude cokes was carried out in the presence of ash obtained after burning Onakawana lignite. Catalytic effects of the ash were evident at 930 C whereas at 830 C little effect was observed. These observations were attributed to the combined actions of Ca- and Fe-containing species in the ash, in which the former neutralized the sulfur in the cokes to prevent poisoning of Fe oxides. 5 tabs., 5 figs., 15 refs.

  2. The Effect of Synthesis Parameters on the Catalytic Synthesis of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    NJD

    , diameter and purity of the CNTs were ... tion of the size of the nanoparticles that are used as catalysts in ... that is readily available. .... Characterization of Catalysts and CNTs .... The effect of catalyst particle size on CNT production is now.

  3. Effects of electric current upon catalytic steam reforming of biomass gasification tar model compounds to syngas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao, Jun; Lu, Qiang; Dong, Changqing; Du, Xiaoze; Dahlquist, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • ECR technique was proposed to convert biomass gasification tar model compounds. • Electric current enhanced the reforming efficiency remarkably. • The highest toluene conversion reached 99.9%. • Ni–CeO 2 /γ-Al 2 O 3 exhibited good stability during the ECR performance. - Abstract: Electrochemical catalytic reforming (ECR) technique, known as electric current enhanced catalytic reforming technique, was proposed to convert the biomass gasification tar into syngas. In this study, Ni–CeO 2 /γ-Al 2 O 3 catalyst was prepared, and toluene was employed as the major feedstock for ECR experiments using a fixed-bed lab-scale setup where thermal electrons could be generated and provided to the catalyst. Several factors, including the electric current intensity, reaction temperature and steam/carbon (S/C) ratio, were investigated to reveal their effects on the conversion of toluene as well as the composition of the gas products. Moreover, toluene, two other tar model compounds (benzene and 1-methylnaphthalene) and real tar (tar-containing wastewater) were subjected to the long period catalytic stability tests. All the used catalysts were analyzed to determine their carbon contents. The results indicated that the presence of electric current enhanced the catalytic performance remarkably. The toluene conversion reached 99.9% under the electric current of 4 A, catalytic temperature of 800 °C and S/C ratio of 3. Stable conversion performances of benzene, 1-methylnaphthalene and tar-containing wastewater were also observed in the ECR process. H 2 and CO were the major gas products, while CO 2 and CH 4 were the minor ones. Due to the promising capability, the ECR technique deserves further investigation and application for efficient tar conversion

  4. Effects of metal ions on the catalytic degradation of dicofol by cellulase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Zihan; Yang, Ting; Zhang, Boya; Zhang, Jianbo

    2015-07-01

    A new technique whereby cellulase immobilized on aminated silica was applied to catalyze the degradation of dicofol, an organochlorine pesticide. In order to evaluate the performance of free and immobilized cellulase, experiments were carried out to measure the degradation efficiency. The Michaelis constant, Km, of the reaction catalyzed by immobilized cellulase was 9.16 mg/L, and the maximum reaction rate, Vmax, was 0.40 mg/L/min, while that of free cellulase was Km=8.18 mg/L, and Vmax=0.79 mg/L/min, respectively. The kinetic constants of catalytic degradation were calculated to estimate substrate affinity. Considering that metal ions may affect enzyme activity, the effects of different metal ions on the catalytic degradation efficiency were explored. The results showed that the substrate affinity decreased after immobilization. Monovalent metal ions had no effect on the reaction, while divalent metal ions had either positive or inhibitory effects, including activation by Mn2+, reversible competition with Cd2+, and irreversible inhibition by Pb2+. Ca2+ promoted the catalytic degradation of dicofol at low concentrations, but inhibited it at high concentrations. Compared with free cellulase, immobilized cellulase was affected less by metal ions. This work provided a basis for further studies on the co-occurrence of endocrine-disrupting chemicals and heavy metal ions in the environment. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Hydrogen assisted catalytic biomass pyrolysis. Effect of temperature and pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stummann, M.Z.; Høj, M.; Schandel, C. B.

    2018-01-01

    fraction of 17 and 22% daf, corresponding to an energy recovery of between 40 and 53% in the organic product. The yield of the non-condensable gases varied between a mass fraction of 24 and 32% daf and the char yield varied between 9.6 and 18% daf. The condensed organics contained a mass fraction of 42....... The effect of varying the temperature (365–511 °C) and hydrogen pressure (1.6–3.6 MPa) on the product yield and organic composition was studied. The mass balance closed by a mass fraction between 90 and 101% dry ash free basis (daf). The yield of the combined condensed organics and C4+ varied between a mass......–75% aromatics, based on GC × GC-FID chromatographic peak area, and the remainder was primarily naphthenes with minor amounts of paraffins. The condensed organics were essentially oxygen free (mass fraction below 0.001%) when both reactors were used. Bypassing the HDO reactor increased the oxygen concentration...

  6. Catalytic and atmospheric effects on microwave pyrolysis of corn stover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Fong; Kuan, Wen-Hui; Chang, Chi-Cheng; Tzou, Yu-Min

    2013-03-01

    Corn stover, which is one of the most abundant agricultural residues around the world, could be converted into valuable biofuels and bio based products by means of microwave pyrolysis. After the reaction at the microwave power level of 500W for the processing time of 30min, the reaction performance under N2 atmosphere was generally better than under CO2 atmosphere. This may be due to the better heat absorbability of CO2 molecules to reduce the heat for stover pyrolysis. Most of the metal-oxide catalysts effectively increased the maximum temperature and mass reduction ratio but lowered the calorific values of solid residues. The gas most produced was CO under N2 atmosphere but CO2 under CO2 atmosphere. Catalyst addition lowered the formation of PAHs and thus made liquid products less toxic. More liquid products and less gas products were generated when using the catalysts possibly due to the existence of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of temperature on the catalytic conversion of Kraft lignin using near-critical water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Thi Dieu Huyen; Maschietti, Marco; Åmand, Lars-Erik

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic conversion of suspended LignoBoost Kraft lignin was performed in near-critical water using ZrO2/K2CO3 as the catalytic system and phenol as the co-solvent and char suppressing agent. The reaction temperature was varied from 290 to 370 C and its effect on the process was investigated...... in a continuous flow (1 kg/h). The yields of water-soluble organics (WSO), bio-oil and char (dry lignin basis) were in the ranges of 5–11%, 69–87% and 16–22%, respectively. The bio-oil, being partially deoxygenated, exhibited higher carbon content and heat value, but lower sulphur content than lignin. The main 1...

  8. Effect of preparation conditions on physicochemical, surface and catalytic properties of cobalt ferrite prepared by coprecipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Shobaky, G.A., E-mail: elshobaky@yahoo.co [Physical Chemistry Department, National Research Center, Dokki, Cairo (Egypt); Turky, A.M.; Mostafa, N.Y.; Mohamed, S.K. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Suez Canal University, Ismailia 41522 (Egypt)

    2010-03-18

    Cobalt ferrite nanoparticles were prepared via thermal treatment of cobalt-iron mixed hydroxides at 400-600 {sup o}C. The mixed hydroxides were coprecipitated from their nitrates solutions using NaOH as precipitating agent. The effects of pH and temperature of coprecipitation and calcination temperature on the physicochemical, surface and catalytic properties of the prepared ferrites were studied. The prepared systems were characterized using TG, DTG, DTA, chemical analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) as well as surface and texture properties based on nitrogen adsorption-desorption isotherms. The prepared cobalt ferrites were found to be mesoporous materials that have crystallite size ranges between 8 and 45 nm. The surface and catalytic properties of the produced ferrite phase were strongly dependent on coprecipitation conditions of the mixed hydroxides and on their calcination temperature.

  9. Effect of Ni-Co Ternary Molten Salt Catalysts on Coal Catalytic Pyrolysis Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xin; Qi, Cong; Li, Liang; Li, Yimin; Li, Song

    2017-08-01

    In order to facilitate efficient and clean utilization of coal, a series of Ni-Co ternary molten salt crystals are explored and the catalytic pyrolysis mechanism of Datong coal is investigated. The reaction mechanisms of coal are achieved by thermal gravimetric analyzer (TGA), and a reactive kinetic model is constructed. The microcosmic structure and macerals are observed by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The catalytic effects of ternary molten salt crystals at different stages of pyrolysis are analyzed. The experimental results show that Ni-Co ternary molten salt catalysts have the capability to bring down activation energy required by pyrolytic reactions at its initial phase. Also, the catalysts exert a preferable catalytic action on macromolecular structure decomposition and free radical polycondensation reactions. Furthermore, the high-temperature condensation polymerization is driven to decompose further with a faster reaction rate by the additions of Ni-Co ternary molten salt crystal catalysts. According to pyrolysis kinetic research, the addition of catalysts can effectively decrease the activation energy needed in each phase of pyrolysis reaction.

  10. Radiation catalytical effects in the pre-irradiated and thermally treated catalyst BASF K-3-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Motl, A.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of different heat treatment methods on radiation catalysis, induced by pre-irradiation of the BASF K-3-10 catalyst by γ- or β-radiation or by fast neutrons were investigated. It was found that calcination of the irradiated non-reduced catalyst resulted in a strong decrease in or even a total disappearance of the final radiation catalytical effects; however, at the same time the catalytical activity of the unirradiated catalyst was found to increase. The calcination of the catalyst in a nitrogen atmosphere after reduction also led to a substantial decrease in the resulting positive radiation catalytical effects and the exceedance of a certain calcination temperature also resulted in a decrease in the unirradiated catalyst activity. It could be concluded that calcination in nitrogen of the reduced irradiated samples decreased the radiation catalytical effects to a lesser degree than the calcination in the air of the non-reduced irradiated samples. In both cases, a different thermal stability of effects induced by different types of ionizing radiation was observed and it was found that it increased in the sequence beta radiation - gamma radiation - fast neutrons. The investigation of the γ radiation dose dependence of the radiation catalytical effect on the catalyst calcined before irradiation in the presence of air showed that the final radiation catalytical effects were lower than those observed in case of similarly irradiated but non-calcined samples. The dose dependence of the effect had the same character in both cases. (author). 3 tabs., 8 refs

  11. Effect of protein S-nitrosylation on autolysis and catalytic ability of μ-calpain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rui; Li, Yupin; Wang, Mengqin; Zhou, Guanghong; Zhang, Wangang

    2016-12-15

    The effect of S-nitrosylation on the autolysis and catalytic ability of μ-calpain in vitro in the presence of 50μM Ca(2 +) was investigated. μ-Calpain was incubated with different concentrations of nitric oxide donor S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and subsequently reacted with purified myofibrils. Results showed that the amount of 80kDa μ-calpain subunit significantly decreased as GSNO increased from 0 to 300μM, but increases of GSNO to 300, 500 and 1000μM did not result in further inhibition. The catalytic ability of nitrosylated μ-calpain to degrade titin, nebulin, troponin-T and desmin was significantly reduced when the GSNO concentration was higher than 300μM. The cysteine residues of μ-calpain at positions 49, 351, 384, and 592 in the catalytic subunit and at 142 in small subunit were S-nitrosylated, which could be responsible for decreased μ-calpain activity. Thus, S-nitrosylation can negatively regulate the activation of μ-calpain resulting in decreased proteolytic ability on myofibrils. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Structural stability of human protein tyrosine phosphatase ρ catalytic domain: effect of point mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Pasquo

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase ρ (PTPρ belongs to the classical receptor type IIB family of protein tyrosine phosphatase, the most frequently mutated tyrosine phosphatase in human cancer. There are evidences to suggest that PTPρ may act as a tumor suppressor gene and dysregulation of Tyr phosphorylation can be observed in diverse diseases, such as diabetes, immune deficiencies and cancer. PTPρ variants in the catalytic domain have been identified in cancer tissues. These natural variants are nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms, variations of a single nucleotide occurring in the coding region and leading to amino acid substitutions. In this study we investigated the effect of amino acid substitution on the structural stability and on the activity of the membrane-proximal catalytic domain of PTPρ. We expressed and purified as soluble recombinant proteins some of the mutants of the membrane-proximal catalytic domain of PTPρ identified in colorectal cancer and in the single nucleotide polymorphisms database. The mutants show a decreased thermal and thermodynamic stability and decreased activation energy relative to phosphatase activity, when compared to wild- type. All the variants show three-state equilibrium unfolding transitions similar to that of the wild- type, with the accumulation of a folding intermediate populated at ~4.0 M urea.

  13. Effects of a catalytic volatile particle remover (VPR) on the particulate matter emissions from a direct injection spark ignition engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Fan; Chen, Longfei; Stone, Richard

    2011-10-15

    Emissions of fine particles have been shown to have a large impact on the atmospheric environment and human health. Researchers have shown that gasoline engines, especially direct injection spark ignition (DISI) engines, tend to emit large amounts of small size particles compared to diesel engines fitted with diesel particulate filters (DPFs). As a result, the particle number emissions of DISI engines will be restricted by the forthcoming EU6 legislation. The particulate emission level of DISI engines means that they could face some challenges in meeting the EU6 requirement. This paper is an experimental study on the size-resolved particle number emissions from a spray guided DISI engine and the performance of a catalytic volatile particle remover (VPR), as the EU legislation seeks to exclude volatile particles. The performance of the catalytic VPR was evaluated by varying its temperature and the exhaust residence time. The effect of the catalytic VPR acting as an oxidation catalyst on particle emissions was also tested. The results show that the catalytic VPR led to a marked reduction in the number of particles, especially the smaller size (nucleation mode) particles. The catalytic VPR is essentially an oxidation catalyst, and when post three-way catalyst (TWC) exhaust was introduced to the catalytic VPR, the performance of the catalytic VPR was not affected much by the use of additional air, i.e., no significant oxidation of the PM was observed.

  14. Effect of reaction time on the characteristics of catalytically grown boron nitride nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, Norani Muti, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com, E-mail: shuaib-penang@yahoo.com, E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my; Ahmad, Pervaiz, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com, E-mail: shuaib-penang@yahoo.com, E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my; Saheed, Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com, E-mail: shuaib-penang@yahoo.com, E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my; Burhanudin, Zainal Arif, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: pervaiz-pas@yahoo.com, E-mail: shuaib-penang@yahoo.com, E-mail: zainabh@petronas.com.my [Center of Innovative Nanostructures and Nanodevices (COINN), Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750, Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24

    The paper reports on the growth of boron nitride nanotube (BNNTs) on Si substrate by catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique and the effect of reaction time and temperature on the size and purity were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy image revealed the bamboo-like BNNTs of multiwalled type with interlayer spacing of 0.34 nm. EDX analysis described the presence of a small percentage of Mg in the sample, indicating the combination of base-tip growth model for the sample synthesized at 1200°C. The reaction time has an effect of extending the length of the BNNTs until the catalyst is oxidized or covered by growth precursor.

  15. Morphological effects on the selectivity of intramolecular versus intermolecular catalytic reaction on Au nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Sun, Yuanmiao; Sun, Yinghui; Huang, Jing; Liang, Zhiqiang; Li, Shuzhou; Jiang, Lin

    2017-06-14

    It is hard for metal nanoparticle catalysts to control the selectivity of a catalytic reaction in a simple process. In this work, we obtain active Au nanoparticle catalysts with high selectivity for the hydrogenation reaction of aromatic nitro compounds, by simply employing spine-like Au nanoparticles. The density functional theory (DFT) calculations further elucidate that the morphological effect on thermal selectivity control is an internal key parameter to modulate the nitro hydrogenation process on the surface of Au spines. These results show that controlled morphological effects may play an important role in catalysis reactions of noble metal NPs with high selectivity.

  16. Effect of reaction time on the characteristics of catalytically grown boron nitride nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, Norani Muti; Ahmad, Pervaiz; Saheed, Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed; Burhanudin, Zainal Arif

    2014-01-01

    The paper reports on the growth of boron nitride nanotube (BNNTs) on Si substrate by catalytic chemical vapor deposition technique and the effect of reaction time and temperature on the size and purity were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy image revealed the bamboo-like BNNTs of multiwalled type with interlayer spacing of 0.34 nm. EDX analysis described the presence of a small percentage of Mg in the sample, indicating the combination of base-tip growth model for the sample synthesized at 1200°C. The reaction time has an effect of extending the length of the BNNTs until the catalyst is oxidized or covered by growth precursor

  17. Catalytic effect in opening the coordination sphere of an organo-f-complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrea, T.; Wang, J.; Gourevich, I.; Eisen, M.S.

    2002-01-01

    Organo-f-complexes have been studied in the last decade showing unique stoichiometric and catalytic properties, which are deeply influenced by the nature of the x ancillary ligands. Opening of the metal center coordination sphere is obtained by replacing the pentamethylcyclopentadienyl ligation in Cp* 2 MR 2 (Cp* = C 5 Me 5 , M = f-element metal, R = a-bonded ligand) by the bridged ancillary ligation Anna-Me 2 SiCp 2MR 2 (Cp* = C 5 Me 4 ). For organolanthanides, this change allows an increase (10-100 fold) in rates for the olefin insertion into the M-R bond [1] and in organoactinides; this modification has been shown to cause an increase (103 fold) in their catalytic activity for the hydrogenation of 1-hexene [2]. Recently, we have shown that organoactinides of the type Cp* 2 MR 2 (Cp* = C 5 Me 5 ; M = Th, U; R = CH 3 ) are active catalysts for both the oligomerization and hydrosilylation of terminal alkynes [3J. Thus, a conceptual question arises regarding the use of an open organoactinide such as Me 2 SiCp* 2 U n Bu 2 as compared to Cp* 2 UR 2 . This opening in the coordination sphere at the metal center should be unique in such a way that it is reasonable expected the increase of the reactivity towards product formation in the hydrosilylation and metathesis catalytic processes of terminal alkynes. In this poster we report, and quantitatively compare, the effects of the ansa-organouranium complex (Me 2 SiCp'' 2 U n Bu) 2 O The synthesis of the complex was achieved as described in equations 1 and 2

  18. Effect of plasma-induced surface charging on catalytic processes: application to CO2 activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Kristof M.; Huygh, Stijn; Bogaerts, Annemie; Neyts, Erik C.

    2018-02-01

    Understanding the nature and effect of the multitude of plasma-surface interactions in plasma catalysis is a crucial requirement for further process development and improvement. A particularly intriguing and rather unique property of a plasma-catalytic setup is the ability of the plasma to modify the electronic structure, and hence chemical properties, of the catalyst through charging, i.e. the absorption of excess electrons. In this work, we develop a quantum chemical model based on density functional theory to study excess negative surface charges in a heterogeneous catalyst exposed to a plasma. This method is specifically applied to investigate plasma-catalytic CO2 activation on supported M/Al2O3 (M = Ti, Ni, Cu) single atom catalysts. We find that (1) the presence of a negative surface charge dramatically improves the reductive power of the catalyst, strongly promoting the splitting of CO2 to CO and oxygen, and (2) the relative activity of the investigated transition metals is also changed upon charging, suggesting that controlled surface charging is a powerful additional parameter to tune catalyst activity and selectivity. These results strongly point to plasma-induced surface charging of the catalyst as an important factor contributing to the plasma-catalyst synergistic effects frequently reported for plasma catalysis.

  19. Investigations on the heterogenous catalytic hydrogenation using isotope effect and gamma- and neutron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kudlacek, R; Cabicar, J [Ceske Vysoke Uceni Technicke, Prague (Czechoslovakia). Katedra Jaderne Chemie

    1976-01-01

    The kinetic and solvent isotope effects during the maleic acid heterogeneous catalytic hydrogenation and deuteration in light and heavy water have been studied. Also the effect of the gamma and neutron irradiation on the Ni-ZnO catalysts (with various ratios of components) on the reaction kinetics and mechanism has been measured, as well as the effect of pH on the adsorption behaviour of maleic acid and the temperature dependence of the reaction rate. Existence of different adsorption centers for hydrogen and maleic acid could be deduced from these experiments. A reaction mechanism based on the two-dimensional diffusion of components in the surface is proposed. The catalyst is formed from Ni and ZnO-microspheres. Hydrogen is bound to nickel and maleic acid is adsorbed on the ZnO-microspheres. The reaction takes place on the boundary layers of these microspheres.

  20. Analysis of Catalytic Material Effect on the Photovoltaic Properties of Monolithic Dye-sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalita Maulani Nursam

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC are widely developed due to their attractive appearance and simple fabrication processes. One of the challenges that arise in the DSSC fabrication involves high material cost associated with the cost of conductive substrate. DSSC with monolithic configuration was then developed on the basis of this motivation. In this contribution, titanium dioxide-based monolithic type DSSCs were fabricated on a single fluorine-doped transparent oxide coated glass using porous ZrO2 as spacer. Herein, the catalytic material for the counter-electrode was varied using carbon composite and platinum in order to analyze their effect on the solar cell efficiency. Four-point probe measurement revealed that the carbon composite exhibited slightly higher conductivity with a sheet resistance of 9.8 Ω/sq and 10.9 Ω/sq for carbon and platinum, respectively. Likewise, the photoconversion efficiency of the monolithic cells with carbon counter-electrode almost doubled the efficiency of the cells with platinum counter-electrode. Our results demonstrate that carbon could outperform the performance of platinum as catalytic material in monolithic DSSC.

  1. The effect of oxygen storage capacity on the dynamic characteristics of an automotive catalytic converter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shamim, Tariq

    2008-01-01

    Automotive catalytic converters, which are employed to reduce engine exhaust emissions, are subjected to highly transient conditions during a typical driving cycle. These transient conditions arise from changes in driving mode, the hysteresis and flow lags of the feedback control system, and result in fluctuations of air-fuel ratio, exhaust gas flow rates and temperatures. The catalyst performance is also strongly influenced by the oxygen storage capacity. This paper presents a computational investigation of the effect of oxygen storage capacity on the dynamic behavior of an automotive catalytic converter subjected to modulations in exhaust gases. The modulations are generated by forcing the temporal variations in exhaust gases air-fuel ratio, gas flow rates and temperatures. The study employs a single-channel based, one-dimensional, non-adiabatic model. The results show that the imposed modulations cause a significant departure in the catalyst behavior from its steady behavior, and the oxygen storage capacity plays an important role in determining the catalyst's response to the imposed modulations. Modulations and oxygen storage capacity are found to have relatively greater influence on the catalyst's performance near stoichiometric conditions

  2. The effect of oxygen storage capacity on the dynamic characteristics of an automotive catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamim, Tariq [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Michigan-Dearborn, Dearborn, MI 48128-2406 (United States)

    2008-11-15

    Automotive catalytic converters, which are employed to reduce engine exhaust emissions, are subjected to highly transient conditions during a typical driving cycle. These transient conditions arise from changes in driving mode, the hysteresis and flow lags of the feedback control system, and result in fluctuations of air-fuel ratio, exhaust gas flow rates and temperatures. The catalyst performance is also strongly influenced by the oxygen storage capacity. This paper presents a computational investigation of the effect of oxygen storage capacity on the dynamic behavior of an automotive catalytic converter subjected to modulations in exhaust gases. The modulations are generated by forcing the temporal variations in exhaust gases air-fuel ratio, gas flow rates and temperatures. The study employs a single-channel based, one-dimensional, non-adiabatic model. The results show that the imposed modulations cause a significant departure in the catalyst behavior from its steady behavior, and the oxygen storage capacity plays an important role in determining the catalyst's response to the imposed modulations. Modulations and oxygen storage capacity are found to have relatively greater influence on the catalyst's performance near stoichiometric conditions. (author)

  3. Fabrication of Sesame Sticks-like Silver Nanoparticles/Polystyrene Hybridnanotubes and Their Catalytic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Fang; Wang, Qi; Shi, Rongjia; Wang, Zeyi; You, Xin; Liu, Yuhong; Wang, Fenghe; Gao, Jay; Mao, Chun

    2016-12-21

    A novel and efficient catalyst is one of the goals in the material field, and the involvement of nanoscience and technology has brought new vigor to the development of catalyst. This research aimed to develop a simple two-step route to fabricate Fe 3 O 4 @PS/PDA-Ag hybridnanotubes with size-controllable and highly dispersed silver nanoparticles (NPs). First, Fe 3 O 4 @PS nanotubes of a sound mechanical property were prepared using polystyrene (PS)/toluene solution containing highly dispersed oleic acid modified Fe 3 O 4 particles in a commercial AAO template. Next, the facile technique was used to form in situ silver NPs on the surface of magnetic PS (Fe 3 O 4 @PS) nanotubes through dopamine coating. The catalytic effects of the prepared Fe 3 O 4 @PS/PDA-Ag hybridnanotubes with highly dispersed AgNPs were characterized using a range of analytical methods, including transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, UV-Visible spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction. It was found that such prepared Fe 3 O 4 @PS/PDA-Ag hybridnanotubes had a large specific surface area. They possessed excellent activities in catalyzing the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) by NaBH 4 in the aqueous phase. Furthermore, they were readily separated from fluid and retrieved by an external magnet. Their catalyst activity and recyclability demonstrated that this approach we proposed had the potential to become a new idea and route for catalytic platform.

  4. Effect of dose and dose rate of gamma radiation on catalytic activity of catalase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaclav Cuba; Tereza Pavelkova; Viliam Mucka

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic activity of gamma irradiated catalase from bovine liver was studied for hydrogen peroxide decomposition at constant temperature and pressure. The measurement was performed at temperatures 27, 32, 37, 42 and 47 deg C. Solutions containing 1 and 0.01 g dm -3 of catalase in phosphate buffer were used for the study. Repeatability of both sample preparation and kinetics measurement was experimentally verified. Rate constants of the reaction were determined for all temperatures and the activation energy was evaluated from Arrhenius plot. Gamma irradiation was performed using 60 Co radionuclide source Gammacell 220 at two different dose rates 5.5 and 70 Gy h -1 , with doses ranging from 10 to 1000 Gy. The observed reaction of irradiated and non-irradiated catalase with hydrogen peroxide is of the first order. Irradiation significantly decreases catalytic activity of catalase, but the activation energy does not depend markedly on the dose. The effect of irradiation is more significant at higher dose rate. (author)

  5. Study of catalytic effects of mineral matter level on coal reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazzocco, Nestor J.; Klunder, Edgar B.; Krastman, Donald

    1981-03-01

    Coal liquefaction experiments using a 400-lb/day bubble-column reactor tested the catalytic effects of added mineral matter level on coal conversion, desulfurization, and distillate yields in continuous operation under recycle conditions, with specific emphasis on the use of a disposable pyrite catalyst indigenous to the feed coal. Western Kentucky No. 11 run-of-mine (ROM) and washed coals were used as feedstocks to determine the effects of levels of mineral matter, specifically iron compounds. Liquefaction reactivity as characterized by total distillate yield was lower for washed coal, which contained less mineral matter. Liquefaction reactivity was regained when pyrite concentrate was added as a disposable catalyst to the washed coal feed in sufficient quantity to match the feed iron concentration of the run-of-mine coal liquefaction test run.

  6. Effect of phase interaction on catalytic CO oxidation over the SnO_2/Al_2O_3 model catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chai, Shujing; Bai, Xueqin; Li, Jing; Liu, Cheng; Ding, Tong; Tian, Ye; Liu, Chang; Xian, Hui; Mi, Wenbo; Li, Xingang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Activity for CO oxidation is greatly enhanced by interaction between SnO_2 and Al_2O_3. • Interaction between SnO_2 and Al_2O_3 phases can generate oxygen vacancies. • Oxygen vacancies play an import role for catalytic CO oxidation. • Sn"4"+ cations are the effective sites for catalytic CO oxidation. • Langmuir-Hinshelwood model is preferred for catalytic CO oxidation. - Abstract: We investigated the catalytic CO oxidation over the SnO_2/Al_2O_3 model catalysts. Our results show that interaction between the Al_2O_3 and SnO_2 phases results in the significantly improved catalytic activity because of the formation of the oxygen vacancies. The oxygen storage capacity of the SnO_2/Al_2O_3 catalyst prepared by the physically mixed method is nearly two times higher than that of the SnO_2, which probably results from the change of electron concentration on the interface of the SnO_2 and Al_2O_3 phases. Introducing water vapor to the feeding gas would a little decrease the activity of the catalysts, but the reaction rate could completely recover after removal of water vapor. The kinetics results suggest that the surface Sn"4"+ cations are effective CO adsorptive sites, and the surface adsorbed oxygen plays an important role upon CO oxidation. The reaction pathways upon the SnO_2-based catalysts for CO oxidation follow the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model.

  7. Effect of the dispersants on Pd species and catalytic activity of supported palladium catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Yue [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Process of Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmacy, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Wuhan 430205 (China); Yang, Xiaojun, E-mail: 10100201@wit.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Process of Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmacy, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Wuhan 430205 (China); Cao, Shuo, E-mail: cao23@email.sc.edu [North America R& D Center, Clariant BU Catalysts, Louisville, 40209, KY (United States); Zhou, Jie [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Process of Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmacy, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Wuhan 430205 (China); Wu, Yuanxin [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Process of Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmacy, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Wuhan 430205 (China); School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Han, Jinyu [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Yan, Zhiguo [Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Process of Ministry of Education, School of Chemical Engineering and Pharmacy, Wuhan Institute of Technology, Wuhan 430205 (China); Zheng, Mingming [Oil Crops Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Hubei Key Laboratory of Oilcrops Lipid Chemistry and Nutrition, Wuhan 430062 (China)

    2017-04-01

    Highlights: • Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) inhibited the sintering and reduction of Pd nanoparticles. • Activity was improved for supported Pd catalysts with PVA modified method. • PVA modified method minimized the catalyst deactivation. • This work provides an insight of the regeneration strategies for Pd catalysts. - Abstract: A series of supported palladium catalysts has been prepared through the precipitation method and the reduction method, using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as dispersants. The effects of the dispersants on the properties of catalysts were evaluated and the catalytic performance of the new materials was investigated for the oxidative carbonylation of phenol to diphenyl carbonate (DPC). The catalysts as prepared were also characterized by the X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Brunner-Emmet-Teller (BET) measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) techniques. The results show that the addition of the dispersants had no effect on the crystal phase of the catalysts. However, the dispersion of Pd particles was improved when the dispersants were used. Moreover, the particle sizes of Pd nanoparticles modified by PVA were smaller than those modified by PVP. The catalysts prepared using the dispersants gave better yields of DPC than the catalysts prepared without the dispersants. The highest yield of DPC was 17.9% with the PVA-Red catalyst. The characterization results for the used catalysts showed that the Pd species in the PVA-Red catalyst remained mostly divalent and the lattice oxygen species were consumed during the reaction, which could lead to the higher catalytic activity of the PVA-Red catalyst. The experimental results confirm that PVA effectively inhibited the sintering and reduction of active Pd species in the oxidative carbonylation of phenol.

  8. Effect of citrate on Aspergillus niger phytase adsorption and catalytic activity in soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezeli, Malika; Menezes-Blackburn, Daniel; Zhang, Hao; Giles, Courtney; George, Timothy; Shand, Charlie; Lumsdon, David; Cooper, Patricia; Wendler, Renate; Brown, Lawrie; Stutter, Marc; Blackwell, Martin; Darch, Tegan; Wearing, Catherine; Haygarth, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Current developments in cropping systems that promote mobilisation of phytate in agricultural soils, by exploiting plant-root exudation of phytase and organic acids, offer potential for developments in sustainable phosphorus use. However, phytase adsorption to soil particles and phytate complexion has been shown to inhibit phytate dephosphorylation, thereby inhibiting plant P uptake, increasing the risk of this pool contributing to diffuse pollution and reducing the potential benefits of biotechnologies and management strategies aimed to utilise this abundant reserve of 'legacy' phosphorus. Citrate has been seen to increase phytase catalytic efficiency towards complexed forms of phytate, but the mechanisms by which citrate promotes phytase remains poorly understood. In this study, we evaluated phytase (from Aspergillus niger) inactivation, and change in catalytic properties upon addition to soil and the effect citrate had on adsorption of phytase and hydrolysis towards free, precipitated and adsorbed phytate. A Langmuir model was fitted to phytase adsorption isotherms showing a maximum adsorption of 0.23 nKat g-1 (19 mg protein g-1) and affinity constant of 435 nKat gˉ1 (8.5 mg protein g-1 ), demonstrating that phytase from A.niger showed a relatively low affinity for our test soil (Tayport). Phytases were partially inhibited upon adsorption and the specific activity was of 40.44 nKat mgˉ1 protein for the free enzyme and 25.35 nKat mgˉ1 protein when immobilised. The kinetics of adsorption detailed that most of the adsorption occurred within the first 20 min upon addition to soil. Citrate had no effect on the rate or total amount of phytase adsorption or loss of activity, within the studied citrate concentrations (0-4mM). Free phytases in soil solution and phytase immobilised on soil particles showed optimum activity (>80%) at pH 4.5-5.5. Immobilised phytase showed greater loss of activity at pH levels over 5.5 and lower activities at the secondary peak at pH 2

  9. Catalytic effects of inorganic acids on the decomposition of ammonium nitrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jinhua; Sun, Zhanhui; Wang, Qingsong; Ding, Hui; Wang, Tong; Jiang, Chuansheng

    2005-12-09

    In order to evaluate the catalytic effects of inorganic acids on the decomposition of ammonium nitrate (AN), the heat releases of decomposition or reaction of pure AN and its mixtures with inorganic acids were analyzed by a heat flux calorimeter C80. Through the experiments, the different reaction mechanisms of AN and its mixtures were analyzed. The chemical reaction kinetic parameters such as reaction order, activation energy and frequency factor were calculated with the C80 experimental results for different samples. Based on these parameters and the thermal runaway models (Semenov and Frank-Kamenestkii model), the self-accelerating decomposition temperatures (SADTs) of AN and its mixtures were calculated and compared. The results show that the mixtures of AN with acid are more unsteady than pure AN. The AN decomposition reaction is catalyzed by acid. The calculated SADTs of AN mixtures with acid are much lower than that of pure AN.

  10. Catalytic recruitment in the inactivation of acetylcholinesterase by soman: temperature dependence of the solvent isotope effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovach, I.M.; Huber, J.H.A.; Schowen, R.L.

    1988-01-01

    3,3-Dimethyl-2-butyl methylphosphonofluoridate (soman) recruits at least 60-70% of the catalytic power of acetylcholinesterase during phosphonylation of the active-site serine, as compared with the acetylation by acetylcholine. The solvent isotope effect is 1.34 +/- 0.11 and is temperature independent within experimental error between 5 and 45 0 C. This observation is quite similar to what has been found for the reactions of aryl acetates and anilides. Average activation parameters for the same temperature range are ΔH* = 7.3 +/- 0.6 kcal/mol and ΔS* = -4 +/- 2 eu (H 2 O) and ΔH* = 7.1 +/- 0.4 kcal/mol and ΔS* = -6 +/- 1 eu (D 2 O). A rate-limiting process with 50% contribution of an induced-fit conformational change is supported by the data

  11. Effects of Mn- and K-addition on catalytic activity of calcium oxide for methane activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Sik; Kong, Jang Il; Lee, Sung Han; Jun, Jong Ho

    1998-01-01

    Pure CaO, Mn-doped CaO, Mn/CaO, and K/CaO catalysts were prepared and tested as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of methane in the temperature range of 600 to 800 .deg. C to investigate the effects of Mn- and K-addition on the catalytic activity of calcium oxide. To characterize the catalysts, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), XPS, SEM, DSC, and TG analyses were performed. The catalytic reaction was carried out in a single-pass flow reactor using on-line gas chromatography system. Normalized reaction conditions were generally p(CH 4 )/p(O 2 )=250 Torr/50 Torr, total feed flow rate=30 mL/min, and 1 atm of total pressure with He being used as diluent gas. Among the catalysts tested, 6.3 mol% Mn-doped CaO catalyst showed the best C 2 yield of 8.0% with a selectivity of 43.2% at 775 .deg. C. The C 2 selectivity increased on lightly doped CaO catalysts, while decreased on heavily doped CaO((Mn)>6.3 mol%)catalysts. 6 wt.% Mn/CaO and 6 wt.% K/CaO catalysts showed the C 2 selectivities of 13.2% and 30.9%, respectively, for the reaction. Electrical conductivities of CaO and Mn-doped CaO were measured in the temperature range of 500 to 1000 .deg. C at Po2's of 10 -3 to 10 -1 atm. The electrical conductivity was decreased with Mn-doping and increased with increasing Po 2 in the range of 10 -3 to 10 -1 atm, indicating the specimens to be p-type semiconductors. It was suggested that the interstitial oxygen ions formed near the surface can activate methane and the formation of interstitial oxygen ions was discussed on the basis of solid-state chemistry

  12. Size effects in electronic and catalytic properties of unsupported palladium nanoparticles in electrooxidation of formic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wei Ping; Lewera, Adam; Larsen, Robert; Masel, Rich I; Bagus, Paul S; Wieckowski, Andrzej

    2006-07-13

    We report a combined X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and chronoamperometry (CA) study of formic acid electrooxidation on unsupported palladium nanoparticle catalysts in the particle size range from 9 to 40 nm. The CV and CA measurements show that the most active catalyst is made of the smallest (9 and 11 nm) Pd nanoparticles. Besides the high reactivity, XPS data show that such nanoparticles display the highest core-level binding energy (BE) shift and the highest valence band (VB) center downshift with respect to the Fermi level. We believe therefore that we found a correlation between formic acid oxidation current and BE and VB center shifts, which, in turn, can directly be related to the electronic structure of palladium nanoparticles of different particle sizes. Clearly, such a trend using unsupported catalysts has never been reported. According to the density functional theory of heterogeneous catalysis, and mechanistic considerations, the observed shifts are caused by a weakening of the bond strength of the COOH intermediate adsorption on the catalyst surface. This, in turn, results in the increase in the formic acid oxidation rate to CO2 (and in the associated oxidation current). Overall, our measurements demonstrate the particle size effect on the electronic properties of palladium that yields different catalytic activity in the HCOOH oxidation reaction. Our work highlights the significance of the core-level binding energy and center of the d-band shifts in electrocatalysis and underlines the value of the theory that connects the center of the d-band shifts to catalytic reactivity.

  13. Effect of catalyst contact mode and gas atmosphere during catalytic pyrolysis of waste plastics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue, Yuan; Johnston, Patrick; Bai, Xianglan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • PE, PP, PS and PET were catalytically pyrolyzed in a tandem micro-pyrolyzer. • Product distribution and composition were varied at in-situ and ex-situ pyrolysis. • Hydrogen carrier gas suppressed coke formation and reduced polyaromatic content. • Positive synergies between PE and PS, or PE and PET were found. - Abstract: In the present study, polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) were pyrolyzed using HZSM-5 zeolite in a tandem micro-pyrolyzer to investigate the effects of plastic type, catalyst and feedstock contact mode, as well as the type of carrier gas on product distribution. Among the four plastics, PS produced highest aromatic yields up to 85% whereas PE and PP mainly produced aliphatic hydrocarbons. In comparison to ex-situ pyrolysis, in-situ pyrolysis of the plastics produced more solid residue but also promoted the formation of aromatic hydrocarbons, except PS. For PS, ex-situ pyrolysis produced a higher yield of aromatics than in-situ pyrolysis, mostly contributed by high styrene yield. During in-situ pyrolysis, the catalyst reduced the decomposition temperatures of the plastics in the order of PE, PP, PS and PET from high to low. Hydrogen carrier gas reduced solid residue and also increased the selectivity of single ring aromatics in comparison to inert pyrolysis. Hydrogen was more beneficial to PS and PET than PE and PP in terms of reducing coke yield and increasing hydrocarbon yield. The present study also showed that catalytically co-pyrolyzing PS and PE, or PET and PE increases the yield of aromatics and reduces the yield of solid residue due to hydrogen transfer from PE to PS or PET and alkylation reactions among the plastic-derivatives.

  14. The effect of oxygen storage capacity on the dynamic characteristics of an automotive catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamim, T. [Michigan-Dearborn Univ., Dearborn, MI (United states). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2007-07-01

    Automotive catalytic converters that reduce engine exhaust emissions are subject to transient conditions during a typical driving cycle. These conditions arise from changes in driving mode, the hysteresis and flow lags of the feedback control system, and result in fluctuations of air-fuel, exhaust gas flow rates and temperatures. The catalyst performance is also highly influenced by the oxygen storage capacity (OSC). This paper examined the influence of OSC on the catalyst dynamic behavior. The transient conditions were simulated by considering the catalyst subjected to temporal modulation in air-fuel ratio, exhaust gas composition and temperature. The paper presented the mathematical formulation including the development of governing equations. The governing equations were developed by considering the conservation of mass, energy and chemical species. It also presented the results and discussed the effect of sinusoidal modulation in the air-fuel ratio as well as the effect of sinusoidal modulation in exhaust composition. It was concluded that the presence of the OSC sensitivity influenced its response to the imposed modulation. The specific effect was dependent on the operating conditions and the type of the imposed modulations. 10 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  15. Catalytic effect of additional metallic phases on the hydrogen absorption behavior of a Zr-Based alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz, F; Peretti, H; Castro, E; Real, S; Visitin, A; Triaca, W

    2005-01-01

    The electrochemical hydrogen absorption of electrodes containing Zr 0 .9Ti 0 .1(Ni 0 .5Mn 0 .25Cr 0 .20V 0 .05) 2 is studied in alkaline media by monitoring the activation and discharge capacity along charge-discharge cycling.The considered alloy is tested in both as melted and annealed condition in order to investigate the catalytic effect of small amounts of micro segregated secondary phases of the Zr-Ni system. Since these catalytic phases are only present in the as melted alloys, tests are also carried out using a composite material elaborated from powders of the annealed alloy with the addition of 18 wt.% of the suspected catalytic phases, melted separately.The hydrogen absorption-desorption behavior for the different cases is discussed and correlated with the metallurgical characterization of the materials.The catalytic effects are studied employing cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance techniques. The results are analyzed in terms of a developed physicochemical model

  16. Synergetic Effects of Alcohol/Water Mixing on the Catalytic Reductive Fractionation of Poplar Wood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renders, Tom; Van den Bosch, Sander; Vangeel, Thijs; Ennaert, Thijs; Koelewijn, Steven-Friso; Van den Bossche, Gil; Courtin, Christophe M.; Schutyser, Wouter; Sels, Bert F.

    2016-12-05

    One of the foremost challenges in lignocellulose conversion encompasses the integration of effective lignin valorization in current carbohydrate-oriented biorefinery schemes. Catalytic reductive fractionation (CRF) of lignocellulose offers a technology to simultaneously produce lignin-derived platform chemicals and a carbohydrate-enriched pulp via the combined action of lignin solvolysis and metal-catalyzed hydrogenolysis. Herein, the solvent (composition) plays a crucial role. In this contribution, we study the influence of alcohol/water mixtures by processing poplar sawdust in varying MeOH/water and EtOH/water blends. The results show particular effects that strongly depend on the applied water concentration. Low water concentrations enhance the removal of lignin from the biomass, while the majority of the carbohydrates are left untouched (scenario A). Contrarily, high water concentrations favor the solubilization of both hemicellulose and lignin, resulting in a more pure cellulosic residue (scenario B). For both scenarios, an evaluation was made to determine the most optimal solvent composition, based on two earlier introduced empirical efficiency descriptors (denoted LFDE and LFFE). According to these measures, 30 (A) and 70 vol % water (B) showed to be the optimal balance for both MeOH/water and EtOH/water mixtures. This successful implementation of alcohol/water mixtures allows operation under milder processing conditions in comparison to pure alcohol solvents, which is advantageous from an industrial point of view.

  17. Effect of Operating Conditions on Catalytic Gasification of Bamboo in a Fluidized Bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanasit Wongsiriamnuay

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic gasification of bamboo in a laboratory-scale, fluidized bed reactor was investigated. Experiments were performed to determine the effects of reactor temperature (400, 500, and 600°C, gasifying medium (air and air/steam, and catalyst to biomass ratio (0 : 1, 1 : 1, and 1.5 : 1 on product gas composition, H2/CO ratio, carbon conversion efficiency, heating value, and tar conversion. From the results obtained, it was shown that at 400°C with air/steam gasification, maximum hydrogen content of 16.5% v/v, carbon conversion efficiency of 98.5%, and tar conversion of 80% were obtained. The presence of catalyst was found to promote the tar reforming reaction and resulted in improvement of heating value, carbon conversion efficiency, and gas yield due to increases in H2, CO, and CH4. The presence of steam and dolomite had an effect on the increasing of tar conversion.

  18. Catalytic decomposition of nitrous oxide from nitric acid production tail gases. Investigation of inhibition effects. Executive summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mul, G.; Perez-Ramirez, J.; Xu, Xiaoding; Oonk, H.; Yakovlev, A.

    2001-06-01

    Nitric acid production is an important source of nitrous oxide, one of the green-house gases. Catalytic decomposition of N2O in nitric acid tail-gases might be a possibility for emission reduction, but technology is not yet available. As a part of development of suitable catalytic systems, research was performed, aiming at: gaining an improved understanding of catalytic decomposition of N2O and the inhibiting effects of NO, NO2, H2O and O2; and preparing a 'go-no go' decision whether or not to proceed with subsequent re-search and development and if yes, to indicate what technology further development should aim for. Due to the presence of NOx and water in the nitric acid tail gases, catalytic decomposition proves not to be feasible at temperatures below 350C. At higher temperatures possibilities do exist and a number of promising catalysts are identified. These are active (80 - 100 % conversion) in the temperature range of 400 - 500C and under simulated tail gas conditions. Considering process conditions only (temperatures and composition of the tail-gases), the catalysts studied (pref. the Rh/Al2O3 types) could be in principle applied successfully in all Dutch nitric acid plants

  19. Evaluating the effectiveness of various biochars as porous media for biodiesel synthesis via pseudo-catalytic transesterification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jechan; Jung, Jong-Min; Oh, Jeong-Ik; Ok, Yong Sik; Lee, Sang-Ryong; Kwon, Eilhann E

    2017-05-01

    This study focuses on investigating the optimized chemical composition of biochar used as porous material for biodiesel synthesis via pseudo-catalytic transesterification. To this end, six biochars from different sources were prepared and biodiesel yield obtained from pseudo-catalytic transesterification of waste cooking oil using six biochars were measured. Biodiesel yield and optimal reaction temperature for pseudo-catalytic transesterification were strongly dependent on the raw material of biochar. For example, biochar generated from maize residue exhibited the best performance, which yield was reached ∼90% at 300°C; however, the maximum biodiesel yield with pine cone biochar was 43% at 380°C. The maximum achievable yield of biodiesel was sensitive to the lignin content of biomass source of biochar but not sensitive to the cellulose and hemicellulose content. This study provides an insight for screening the most effective biochar as pseudo-catalytic porous material, thereby helping develop more sustainable and economically viable biodiesel synthesis process. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Catalytic effect of different reactor materials under subcritical water conditions: decarboxylation of cysteic acid into taurine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, M.

    2018-03-01

    In order to understand the influence of reactor materials on the catalytic effect for a particular reaction, the decomposition of cysteic acid from Ni/Fe-based alloy reactors under subcritical water conditions was examined. Experiments were carried out in three batch reactors made of Inconel 625, Hastelloy C-22 and SUS 316 over temperatures of 200 to 300 °C. The highest amount of eluted metals was found for SUS 316. The results demonstrated that reactor materials contribute to the resulting product. Under the tested conditions, cysteic acid decomposes readily with SUS 316. However, the Ni-based materials (Inconel 625 and Hastelloy C-22) show better resistance to metal elution. It was found that among the materials used in this work, SUS 316 gave the highest reaction rate constant of 0.1934 s‑1. The same results were obtained at temperatures of 260 and 300 °C. Investigation of the Arrhenius activation energy revealed that the highest activation energy was for Hastelloy C-22 (109 kJ/mol), followed by Inconel 625 (90 kJ/mol) and SUS 316 (70 kJ/mol). The decomposition rate of cysteic acid was found to follow the results for the trend of the eluted metals. Therefore, it can be concluded that the decomposition of cysteic acid was catalyzed by the elution of heavy metals from the surface of the reactor. The highest amount of taurine from the decarboxylation of cysteic acid was obtained from SUS 316.

  1. Effective treatment of oily scum via catalytic wet persulfate oxidation process activated by Fe2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xingzhong; Guan, Renpeng; Wu, Zhibin; Jiang, Longbo; Li, Yifu; Chen, Xiaohong; Zeng, Guangming

    2018-04-05

    Oily scum, a hazardous by-product of petroleum industry, need to be deposed urgently to reduce environmental risks. This paper introduces catalytic wet persulfate oxidation (CWPO) process in the treatment of oily scum to realize risk relief. Under the activation of heat and Fe 2+ , persulfate (PS) was decomposed into sulfate radicals and hydroxyl radicals, which played a major role on the degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons. The effects of wet air oxidation (WAO) and CWPO process on the degradation of oily scum were compared. In CWPO process, the total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPHs) content of oily scum was decreased from 92.63% to 16.75%, which was still up to 70.19% in WAO process. The degradation rate of TPHs in CWPO process was about 3.38 times higher than that in WAO process. The great performance of CWPO process was also confirmed by elemental analysis, which indicated that the C and H contents of oily scum were reduced significantly by CWPO process. These results indicated that CWPO process has high potential on the degradation of oily scum for environmental protection. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of inlet temperature on the performance of a catalytic reactor. [air pollution control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, D. N.

    1978-01-01

    A 12 cm diameter by 15 cm long catalytic reactor was tested with No. 2 diesel fuel in a combustion test rig at inlet temperatures of 700, 800, 900, and 1000 K. Other test conditions included pressures of 3 and 6 x 10 to the 5th power Pa, reference velocities of 10, 15, and 20 m/s, and adiabatic combustion temperatures in the range 1100 to 1400 K. The combustion efficiency was calculated from measurements of carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbon emissions. Nitrogen oxide emissions and reactor pressure drop were also measured. At a reference velocity of 10 m/s, the CO and unburned hydrocarbons emissions, and, therefore, the combustion efficiency, were independent of inlet temperature. At an inlet temperature of 1000 K, they were independent of reference velocity. Nitrogen oxides emissions resulted from conversion of the small amount (135 ppm) of fuel-bound nitrogen in the fuel. Up to 90 percent conversion was observed with no apparent effect of any of the test variables. For typical gas turbine operating conditions, all three pollutants were below levels which would permit the most stringent proposed automotive emissions standards to be met.

  3. Spectrophotometric determination of nitrite by its catalytic effect on the oxidation of congo red with bromate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenovia Moldovan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A novel simple, sensitive and rapid kinetic-spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace amounts of nitrite is proposed. The method is based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of congo red (CR by potassium bromate in acidic solution. The oxidation reaction is monitored spectrophotometrically by measuring the decrease in the absorbance of CR at a suitable λmax = 570 nm for the first 10–40 s from the start of the reaction. Under the optimum experimental conditions (sulfuric acid, 0.3 M; CR, 0.75Χ10-4 M; potassium bromate, 5Χ10-4 M and 25 oC, nitrite can be determined in the range of 0.015–0.75 µg mL−1 with the detection limit of 0.006 µg mL−1. The relative standard deviation of five replicate determination of 0.25 µg mL−1 nitrite was 2.5%. The proposed method was applied satisfactorily to the determination of nitrite in spiked drinking water samples.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/bcse.v26i2.1

  4. Precursor effect on the property and catalytic behavior of Fe-TS-1 in butadiene epoxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mei; Zhao, Huahua; Yang, Jian; Zhao, Jun; Song, Huanling; Chou, Lingjun

    2017-11-01

    The effect of iron precursor on the property and catalytic behavior of iron modified titanium silicalite molecular sieve (Fe-TS-1) catalysts in butadiene selective epoxidation has been studied. Three Fe-TS-1 catalysts were prepared, using iron nitrate, iron chloride and iron sulfate as precursors, which played an important role in adjusting the textural properties and chemical states of TS-1. Of the prepared Fe-TS-1 catalysts, those modified by iron nitrate (FN-TS-1) exhibited a significant enhanced performance in butadiene selective epoxidation compared to those derived from iron sulfate (FS-TS-1) or iron chloride (FC-TS-1) precursors. To obtain a deep understanding of their structure-performance relationship, X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Temperature programmed desorption of NH3 (NH3-TPD), Diffuse reflectance UV-Vis spectra (DR UV-Vis), Fourier transformed infrared spectra (FT-IR) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were conducted to characterize Fe-TS-1 catalysts. Experimental results indicated that textural structures and acid sites of modified catalysts as well as the type of Fe species influenced by the precursors were all responsible for the activity and product distribution.

  5. Electronic states of carbon alloy catalysts and nitrogen substituent effects on catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Tomoyuki; Ushiyama, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Koichi

    2013-03-01

    In recent years, Carbon Alloy Catalysts (CACs) are attracting attention as a candidate for non-platinum-based cathode catalysts in fuel cells. Oxygen reduction reactions at the cathode are divided into two elementary processes, electron transfer and oxygen adsorption. The electron transfer reaction is the rate-determining, and by comparison of energy levels, catalytic activity can be evaluated quantitatively. On the other hand, to begin with, adsorption mechanism is obscure. The purpose of this study is to understand the effect of nitrogen substitution and oxygen adsorption mechanism, by first-principle electronic structure calculations for nitrogen substituted models. To reproduce the elementary processes of oxygen adsorption, we assumed that the initial structures are formed based on the Pauling model, a CACs model and nitrogen substituted CACs models in which various points are replaced with nitrogen. When we try to focus only on the DOS peaks of oxygen, in some substituted model that has high adsorption activity, a characteristic partial occupancy state was found. We conclude that this state will affect the adsorption activity, and discuss on why partially occupied states appear with simplification by using an orbital correlation diagram.

  6. Volatilisation and catalytic effects of alkali and alkaline earth metallic species during the pyrolysis and gasification of Victorian brown coal. Part IV. Catalytic effects of NaCl and ion-exchangeable Na in coal on char reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimple Mody Quyn; Hongwei Wu; Jun-ichiro Hayashi; Chun-Zhu Li, [Monash University, Monash, Vic. (Australia). CRC for Clean Power from Lignite, Department of Chemical Engineering

    2003-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the catalytic effects of Na as NaCl or as sodium carboxylates ( COONa) in Victorian brown coal on the char reactivity. A Na-exchanged coal and a set of NaCl-loaded coal samples prepared from a Loy Yang brown coal were pyrolysed in a fluidised-bed/fixed-bed reactor and in a thermogravimetric analyser (TGA). The reactivities of the chars were measured in air at 400{sup o}C using the TGA. The experimental data indicate that the Na in coal as NaCl and as sodium carboxylates ( COONa) had very different catalytic effects on the char reactivity. It is the chemical form and dispersion of Na in char, not in coal, that govern the catalytic effects of Na. For the Na-form (Na-exchanged) coal, the char reactivity increased with increasing pyrolysis temperature from 500 to 700{sup o}C and then decreased with pyrolysis temperature from 700 to 900{sup o}C. The increase in reactivity with pyrolysis temperature (500 700{sup o}C) is mainly due to the changes in the relative distribution of Na in the char matrix and on the pore surface. For the NaCl-loaded coals, when Cl was released during pyrolysis or gasification, the Na originally present in coal as NaCl showed good catalytic effects for the char gasification. Otherwise, Cl would combine with Na in the char to form NaCl during gasification, preventing Na from becoming an active catalyst. Controlling the pyrolysis conditions to favour the release of Cl can be a promising way to transform NaCl in coal into an active catalyst for char gasification. 38 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Effect of UV on De-NOx performance and microbial community of a hybrid catalytic membrane biofilm reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhouyang; Huang, Zhensha; He, Yiming; Xiao, Xiaoliang; Wei, Zaishan

    2018-02-01

    The hybrid membrane catalytic biofilm reactor provides a new way of flue gas denitration. However, the effects of UV on denitrification performance, microbial community and microbial nitrogen metabolism are still unknown. In this study, the effects of UV on deNO x performance, nitrification and denitrification, microbial community and microbial nitrogen metabolism of a bench scale N-TiO2/PSF hybrid catalytic membrane biofilm reactor (HCMBR) were evaluated. The change from nature light to UV in the HCMBR leads to the fall of NO removal efficiency of HCMBR from 92.8% to 81.8%. UV affected the microbial community structure, but did not change microbial nitrogen metabolism, as shown by metagenomics sequencing method. Some dominant phyla, such as Gammaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Firmicutes, Actinobacteria, and Alphaproteobacteria, increased in abundance, whereas others, such as Proteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria, decreased. There were nitrification, denitrification, nitrogen fixation, and organic nitrogen metabolism in the HCMBR.

  8. Production of ammonia from plasma-catalytic decomposition of urea: Effects of carrier gas composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xing; Li, Jian; Qiu, Danqi; Zhu, Tianle

    2018-04-01

    Effects of carrier gas composition (N 2 /air) on NH 3 production, energy efficiency regarding NH 3 production and byproducts formation from plasma-catalytic decomposition of urea were systematically investigated using an Al 2 O 3 -packed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor at room temperature. Results show that the presence of O 2 in the carrier gas accelerates the conversion of urea but leads to less generation of NH 3 . The final yield of NH 3 in the gas phase decreased from 70.5%, 78.7%, 66.6% and 67.2% to 54.1%, 51.7%, 49.6% and 53.4% for applied voltages of 17, 19, 21 and 23kV, respectively when air was used as the carrier gas instead of N 2 . From the viewpoint of energy savings, however, air carrier gas is better than N 2 due to reduced energy consumption and increased energy efficiency for decomposition of a fixed amount of urea. Carrier gas composition has little influence on the major decomposition pathways of urea under the synergetic effects of plasma and Al 2 O 3 catalyst to give NH 3 and CO 2 as the main products. Compared to a small amount of N 2 O formed with N 2 as the carrier gas, however, more byproducts including N 2 O and NO 2 in the gas phase and NH 4 NO 3 in solid deposits were produced with air as the carrier gas, probably due to the unproductive consumption of NH 3 , the possible intermediate HNCO and even urea by the abundant active oxygen species and nitrogen oxides generated in air-DBD plasma. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Effects of γ-irradiation and ageing on surface and catalytic properties of nano-sized Cu O/Mg O system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Molla, S. A.; Ismail, S. A.; Ibrahim, M. M.

    2011-01-01

    0.2 Cu O/Mg O system prepared by impregnation method was calcined at 350 and 450 C. The effects of γ-rays (0.2-1.6 MGy) on its structure, surface and catalytic properties were investigated by using XRD, N 2 -adsorption at -196 C and catalytic conversion of isopropanol at 150-275 C using a flow technique. The results revealed that the investigated solids consisted of nano-sized Mg O as a major phase besides Cu O and trace amount of Cu 2 O. γ-Irradiation of the solids investigated exerted measurable changes in their surface and catalytic properties dependent on the calcination temperature and dose of irradiation. The catalysts investigated acted as active dehydrogenation solids. The five years-ageing of different solids showed limited changes of their surface and catalytic properties indicating a good catalytic stability of the irradiated prepared solids. (Author)

  10. Effects of {gamma}-irradiation and ageing on surface and catalytic properties of nano-sized Cu O/Mg O system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Molla, S. A. [Ain Shams University, Faculty of Education, Chemistry Deparment, Roxy, Heliopolis, 11757 Cairo (Egypt); Ismail, S. A.; Ibrahim, M. M., E-mail: saharelmolla@yahoo.com [National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, Nasr City, P.O. Box 29, 11731 Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-07-01

    0.2 Cu O/Mg O system prepared by impregnation method was calcined at 350 and 450 C. The effects of {gamma}-rays (0.2-1.6 MGy) on its structure, surface and catalytic properties were investigated by using XRD, N{sub 2}-adsorption at -196 C and catalytic conversion of isopropanol at 150-275 C using a flow technique. The results revealed that the investigated solids consisted of nano-sized Mg O as a major phase besides Cu O and trace amount of Cu{sub 2}O. {gamma}-Irradiation of the solids investigated exerted measurable changes in their surface and catalytic properties dependent on the calcination temperature and dose of irradiation. The catalysts investigated acted as active dehydrogenation solids. The five years-ageing of different solids showed limited changes of their surface and catalytic properties indicating a good catalytic stability of the irradiated prepared solids. (Author)

  11. Effect of NO2 and water on the catalytic oxidation of soot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jakob Munkholt; Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2017-01-01

    The influence of adding NO2 to 10 vol% O2/N2 on non-catalytic soot oxidation and soot oxidation in intimate or loose contact with a catalyst has been investigated. In non-catalytic soot oxidation the oxidation rate is increased significantly at lower temperatures by NO2. For soot oxidation in tig...... exhibited a volcano-curve dependence on the heat of oxygen chemisorption, and among the tested pure metals and oxides Cr2O3 was the most active catalyst. Further improvements were achieved with a FeaCrbOx binary oxide catalyst....

  12. [Synergetic effects of silicon carbide and molecular sieve loaded catalyst on microwave assisted catalytic oxidation of toluene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Hui; Bo, Long-Li; Liu, Hai-Nan; Zhang, Hao; Sun, Jian-Yu; Yang, Li; Cai, Li-Dong

    2013-06-01

    Molecular sieve loaded catalyst was prepared by impregnation method, microwave-absorbing material silicon carbide and the catalyst were investigated for catalytic oxidation of toluene by microwave irradiation. Research work examined effects of silicon carbide and molecular sieve loading Cu-V catalyst's mixture ratio as well as mixed approach changes on degradation of toluene, and characteristics of catalyst were measured through scanning electron microscope, specific surface area test and X-ray diffraction analysis. The result showed that the fixed bed reactor had advantages of both thermal storage property and low-temperature catalytic oxidation when 20% silicon carbide was filled at the bottom of the reactor, and this could effectively improve the utilization of microwave energy as well as catalytic oxidation efficiency of toluene. Under microwave power of 75 W and 47 W, complete-combustion temperatures of molecular sieve loaded Cu-V catalyst and Cu-V-Ce catalyst to toluene were 325 degrees C and 160 degrees C, respectively. Characteristics of the catalysts showed that mixture of rare-earth element Ce increased the dispersion of active components in the surface of catalyst, micropore structure of catalyst effectively guaranteed high adsorption capacity for toluene, while amorphous phase of Cu and V oxides increased the activity of catalyst greatly.

  13. Catalytic treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bindley, W T.R.

    1931-04-18

    An apparatus is described for the catalytic treatment of liquids, semi-liquids, and gases comprising a vessel into which the liquid, semi-liquid, or gas to be treated is introduced through a common inlet to a chamber within the vessel whence it passes to contact with a catalyst through radially arranged channels or passages to a common outlet chamber.

  14. Investigation of Catalytic effect sewage sludge combustion ash in the formation of HAPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullana, A.; Sidhu, S.; Font, R.; Conesa, A.

    2002-07-01

    Incineration is a very important technique in the treatment of sewage sludge. In 1998 approximately 1,5 million and 2,5 million dry tons of sewage sludge were incinerated in the United States and European Union (EU), respectively. In 1985, only 10% of EU sludge was incinerated, but by 2005 approximately 40% of EU sludge is expected to be incinerated. Use of sewage sludge as agricultural fertilizer was considered the best application for sludge until it was discovered that the presence of heavy metals in sludge could contaminate farmland. The limitations facing landfills and recycling plants and the planned ban on sea disposal has led to the expectation that the role of incineration will increase in the future. The expected increase in sludge incineration has also led to increased scrutiny of the main drawback to the incineration of sewage sludge: the formation of hazard air pollutants (HAP). Sewage sludge incineration has been identified as a very important source of HAPs such as chloro benzenes, chloro phenols, and PCDD/Fs. One of the more important characteristics of sewage sludge incineration is the formation of large amounts of ash, which is rich in known HAP formation catalysts such as Cu and Fe. Thus, the sludge incineration ash is expected to play an important role in the formation of HAPs in the post-combustion zone of a sludge incinerator. in this paper, we present results of our investigation of the catalytic effect of sewage sludge ash on the formation of chloro benzenes and chloro phenols. In this study, pyrolytic gas from sewage sludge was used as reaction gas instead of the synthetic organic mix that has been used in most previous HAPs formation studies. (Author) 4 refs.

  15. The catalytic effect of honey on formation of reducing sugars during sucrose hydrolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanović Mirjana N.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In commercial apiculture, beekepers usually remove honey from hives and replenish food reserves with sugar syrup. When honeybees use sugar syrup (sucrose solution, they break down sucrose into glucose and fructose. These processes exhaust and weaken bees. In order to prevent bee exhaustion resulting from this processing, bees should preferably be supplied with ready made food before winter, i.e., with syrup in which sucrose has already been inverted. Feeding with inverted syrups is the most popular way of honeybee feeding. Beekeepers usually prepare inverted syrups by adding a weak organic acid (citric, oxalic, acetic or lactic acid to sucrose solution at elevated temperatures. Inverted syrup production under uncontrolled pH, temperature and time conditions can cause the formation of 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde (HMF, a compound harmful to bees. High quality inverted syrup can be obtained through the hydrolytic decomposition of sucrose by the enzyme invertase. Due to its invertase content, honey can be used as a biocatalyst for sucrose inversion. Invertase activity depends on the type, method and time of honey storage. This study evaluates the catalytic effect of acacia honey on formation of reducing sugars during hydrolysis of 50 wt.% sucrose solution. The ratio of reducing sugars and sucrose at 40°C, after 5 days of hydrolysis at a concentration of honey and 10 wt.% was 0.30 g reducing sugars/g of sucrose. The highest content of reducing sugars was achieved at a temperature of 35°C, after 48 h of invertion. In all samples of hydrolysates obtained at different temperatures (35–65°C, HMF was detected at concentrations of less than 4.32 mg kg–1. A high degree of negative correlation (coefficient of linearity –0.94 was established between parameters of volumetric and polarimetric measurements during the hydrolysis of sucrose. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. III 46010

  16. Effect of pretreatment temperature on catalytic performance of the catalysts derived from cobalt carbonyl cluster in Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byambasuren O

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The monometallic cobalt-based catalysts were prepared by pretreating the catalysts derived from carbonyl cluster precursor (CO6Co2CC(COOH2 supported on γ-Al2O3 with hydrogen at 180, 220, and 260°C respectively. The temperature effect of the pretreatments on the structure evolution of cluster precursors and the catalytic performance of the Fischer-Tropsch (F-T synthesis was investigated. The pretreated catalyst at 220°C with unique phase structure exhibited best catalytic activity and selectivity among three pretreated catalysts. Moreover, the catalysts exhibited high dispersion due to the formation of hydrogen bonds between the cluster precursor and γ-Al2O3 support.

  17. Electronic factors in catalysis: the volcano curve and the effect of promotion in catalytic ammonia synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Søren; Logadottir, Ashildur; Jacobsen, C.J.H.

    2001-01-01

    The activity and selectivity of heterogeneous catalysts are determined by their electronic and structural properties. In many cases, the electronic properties are determined by the choice of both the catalytically active transition metal and promoter elements. Density functional theory is used...

  18. Electrochemical characterization of praseodymia doped zircon. Catalytic effect on the electrochemical reduction of molecular oxygen in polar organic solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domenech, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.domenech@uv.es [Departament de Quimica Analitica, Universitat de Valencia, Dr. Moliner, 50, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Montoya, Noemi; Alarcon, Javier [Departament de Quimica Inorganica, Universitat de Valencia, Dr. Moliner, 50, 46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain)

    2011-08-01

    Highlights: > Electrochemical characterization of Pr centers in praseodymia-doped zircon. > Study of the catalytic effect on the reduction of peroxide radical anion in nonaqueous solvents. > Assessment of non-uniform distribution of Pr centers in the zircon grains. - Abstract: The voltammetry of microparticles and scanning electrochemical microscopy methodologies are applied to characterize praseodymium centers in praseodymia-doped zircon (Pr{sub x}Zr{sub (1-y)}Si{sub (1-z)}O{sub 4}; y + z = x; 0.02 < x < 0.10) specimens prepared via sol-gel synthetic routes. In contact with aqueous electrolytes, two overlapping Pr-centered cathodic processes, attributable to the Pr (IV) to Pr (III) reduction of Pr centers in different sites are obtained. In water-containing, air-saturated acetone and DMSO solutions as solvent, Pr{sub x}Zr{sub (1-y)}Si{sub (1-z)}O{sub 4} materials produce a significant catalytic effect on the electrochemical reduction of peroxide radical anion electrochemically generated. These electrochemical features denote that most of the Pr centers are originally in its 4+ oxidation state in the parent Pr{sub x}Zr{sub (1-y)}Si{sub (1-z)}O{sub 4} specimens. The variation of the catalytic performance of such specimens with potential scan rate, water concentration and Pr loading suggests that Pr is not uniformly distributed within the zircon grains, being concentrated in the outer region of such grains.

  19. Effect of ratio of calcium and rare earth cations in Y zeolites on their catalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortikov, E S; Leont' ev, A S; Masloboev, A A; Mirzabekova, N V; Kononov, N F; Minachev, Kh M [AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Organicheskoj Khimii

    1976-03-01

    Optimum ratios between Ca/sup 2 +/ and rare earth elements (REE) in zeolite were studied. Five samples of the catalyst with different Ca/REE ratios were prepared from granulated zeolite NaJ with the ratio SiO/sub 2/:Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ = 4.7, formed from Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/. The initial REE solution was a mixture of Ce, La, Pr and Nd chlorides with the same catalytic properties. The catalyst activity was established by ethyl benzene (EB) yield. The work has resulted in information on catalytic properties of J zeolites with different contents of Ca and REE cations in the process of benzene alkylating with ethylene.

  20. On the effect of atomic structure on the deactivation of catalytic gold nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walsh, M J; Gai, P L; Boyes, E D

    2012-01-01

    Here we present atomic scale studies into the nature of both the internal structure and external surfaces of catalytic Au nanoparticles using aberration corrected in-situ electron microscopy. The activity of catalytic nanoparticles is thought to be highly sensitive to the particles' structure, meaning typical local atomic rearrangements are likely to significantly affect the overall performance of the catalyst. As-deposited Au nanoparticles are found to exhibit a variety of morphologies, with many being internally strained or highly stepped at the surface. Upon heating, surface atoms are observed to minimise the particles' surface energy by restructuring towards planar (111) facets, resulting in the removal of low co-ordinated sites thought to be crucial in catalysis by Au nanoparticles. These results suggest the process of surface energy minimisation made possible by heating may lead to a loss of active sites and consequently contribute to the deactivation of the catalyst.

  1. Determination of molybdenum (VI) by its catalytic effect on the oxidation of nile blue by hydrogen peroxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensafi, Ali A.; Sadeghie, Majid M.; Alaie-Yazdie, F.

    1998-01-01

    A spectrophotometric reaction rate method for the determination of molybdenum is described, based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of nile blue by hydrogen peroxide. The decrease in absorbance of nile blue with time from 0.5 to 4 min at 590 nm is proportional to the concentration of Mo(VI) over the range 0.022-1000 μg/ml. The limit of detection of molybdenum(VI) is 0.008 μg/ml. The precision and the effect of more than forty ions are reported. The procedure has been successfully applied for the determination of molybdenum (VI) in plant materials and steel samples. (author)

  2. Effect of hierarchical porosity and phosphorus modification on the catalytic properties of zeolite Y

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Wenlin; Zheng, Jinyu; Luo, Yibin; Da, Zhijian, E-mail: dazhijian.ripp@sinopec.com

    2016-09-30

    Highlights: • Hierarchical zeolite Y was prepared by citric acid treatment and alkaline treatment with NaOH&TBPH. • The addition of TBPH during desilication process transferred the bridge bonded OH− to the terminal P−OH group. • Moderate Brønsted acid sites could be created with phosphorus modification. • Zeolite with hierarchical porosity and appropriated acidities favored high conversion of 1,3,5-TIPB. - Abstract: The zeolite Y is considered as a leading catalyst for FCC industry. The acidity and porosity modification play important roles in determining the final catalytic properties of zeolite Y. The alkaline treatment of zeolite Y by dealumination and alkaline treatment with NaOH and NaOH&TBPH was investigated. The zeolites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, low-temperature adsorption of nitrogen, transmission electron microscope, NMR, NH{sub 3}-TPD and IR study of acidity. Accordingly, the hierarchical porosity and acidity property were discussed systematically. Finally, the catalytic performance of the zeolites Y was evaluated in the cracking of 1,3,5-TIPB. It was found that desilication with NaOH&TBPH ensured the more uniform intracrystalline mesoporosity with higher microporosity, while preserving higher B/L ratio and moderate Brønsted acidities resulting in catalysts with the most appropriated acidity and then with better catalytic performance.

  3. Photo catalytic BiFeO3 Nano fibrous Mats for Effective Water Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaibani, P.M.; Prashanthi, K.; Sohrabi, A.; Thundat, Th.

    2013-01-01

    One-dimensional BiFeO 3 (BFO) nano fibers fabricated by electro spinning of a solution of Nylon 6 /BFO followed by calcination were used for photo catalytic degradation of contaminants in water. The BFO fibers were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The SEM images of the as-spun samples demonstrated the successful production of nano fibers and the SEM images of the samples after calcination confirmed the integrity of the continuous BFO nano fibers. XRD analysis indicated the dominant presence of BFO phase throughout the calcinated nano fibers. Photo catalytic activity of the nano fibers and their application in water purification were investigated against 4-chloro phenol (4CP) as a model water contaminant. The results of the UV-Vis spectroscopy show the degradation of the 4CP by means of the photo catalytic activity of the BFO nano fibers. The kinetics of the photodegradation of 4CP is believed to be governed by a pseudo-first-order kinetics model.

  4. Effect of Dopant Loading on the Structural and Catalytic Properties of Mn-Doped SrTiO3 Catalysts for Catalytic Soot Combustion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Iván Suárez-Vázquez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Soot particles have been associated with respiratory diseases and cancer. To decrease these emissions, perovskite-mixed oxides have been proposed due to their thermal stability and redox surface properties. In this work, SrTiO3 doped with different amounts of Mn were synthesized by the hydrothermal method and tested for soot combustion. Results show that at low Mn content, structural distortion, and higher Oads/Olat ratio were observed which was attributed to the high content of Mn3+ in Ti sites. On the other hand, increasing the Mn content led to surface segregation of manganese oxide. All synthesized catalysts showed mesopores in the range of 32–47 nm. In the catalytic combustion of soot, the samples synthesized in this work lowered the combustion temperature by more than 100 °C compared with the uncatalyzed reaction. The sample doped with 1 wt % of Mn showed the best catalytic activity. The activation energy of these samples was also calculated, and the order of decreasing activation energy is as follows: uncatalyzed > Mn0 > Mn8 > Mn4 > Mn1. The best catalytic activity for Mn1 was attributed to its physicochemical properties and the mobility of the oxygen from the bulk to the surface at temperatures higher than 500 °C.

  5. Using of catalytic effect of Mo(VI) on mutual metamorphosis o 2-ketoses and 2-C-(hydroxymethyl)aldoses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hricoviniova, Z.; Petrus, L.

    1999-01-01

    Influence of catalytic effect of the Mo(VI) was studied after mutual metamorphosis of two groups of saccharides: 2-ketoses and 2-C-(hydroxymethyl)aldoses. Metamorphosis is connected with change of configuration at the atom neighbouring with the carbonyl group of the saccharide. The mechanism of stereospecific transformation of 2-ketoses on 2-C-(hydroxymethyl)aldose was studied with 13 C-isotopic substituted 2-ketoses.It was confirmed that it is intramolecular process. This reaction was studied on pentuloses, hexuloses, heptuloses as well as on responsive 2-C-(hydroxymethyl)aldoses

  6. Understanding Trends in Catalytic Activity: The Effect of Adsorbate-Adsorbate Interactions for CO Oxidation Over Transition Metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grabow, Lars; Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2010-01-01

    Using high temperature CO oxidation as the example, trends in the reactivity of transition metals are discussed on the basis of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Volcano type relations between the catalytic rate and adsorption energies of important intermediates are introduced...... and the effect of adsorbate-adsorbate interaction on the trends is discussed. We find that adsorbate-adsorbate interactions significantly increase the activity of strong binding metals (left side of the volcano) but the interactions do not change the relative activity of different metals and have a very small...... influence on the position of the top of the volcano, that is, on which metal is the best catalyst....

  7. Polyvinylpyrrolidone adsorption effects on the morphologies of synthesized platinum particles and its catalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ooi, Mahayatun Dayana Johan [Nano - Optoelectronic Research and Technology Laboratory, School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800, Minden, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Aziz, Azlan Abdul [Nano - Optoelectronic Research and Technology Laboratory, School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800, Minden, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia); Nanobiotechnology Research and Innovation (NanoBRI), INFORMM, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800, Minden, Pulau Pinang (Malaysia)

    2015-04-24

    Flower-like Platinum micro-structures were synthesized from different concentration of the PVP using solvothermal method. At 5.0×10{sup −3} mmol of PVP, well-defined flower-like pattern consists of triangular petals radiating from the centre were produced whereas larger flower network developed at higher PVP concentration. High degree of crystallinity was obtained upon each increment of PVP. The well defined flower like pattern synthesized using 5.0×10{sup −3} mmol PVP exhibit the highest catalytic activity and stability towards electro-oxidation of formic acid.

  8. Effect of surface structure on catalytic reactions: A sum frequency generation surface vibrational spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCrea, Keith R.

    2001-01-01

    In the results discussed above, it is clear that Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) is a unique tool that allows the detection of vibrational spectra of adsorbed molecules present on single crystal surfaces under catalytic reaction conditions. Not only is it possible to detect active surface intermediates, it is also possible to detect spectator species which are not responsible for the measured turnover rates. By correlating high-pressure SFG spectra under reaction conditions and gas chromatography (GC) kinetic data, it is possible to determine which species are important under reaction intermediates. Because of the flexibility of this technique for studying surface intermediates, it is possible to determine how the structures of single crystal surfaces affect the observed rates of catalytic reactions. As an example of a structure insensitive reaction, ethylene hydrogenation was explored on both Pt(111) and Pt(100). The rates were determined to be essentially the same. It was observed that both ethylidyne and di-(sigma) bonded ethylene were present on the surface under reaction conditions on both crystals, although in different concentrations. This result shows that these two species are not responsible for the measured turnover rate, as it would be expected that one of the two crystals would be more active than the other, since the concentration of the surface intermediate would be different on the two crystals. The most likely active intermediates are weakly adsorbed molecules such as(pi)-bonded ethylene and ethyl. These species are not easily detected because their concentration lies at the detection limit of SFG. The SFG spectra and GC data essentially show that ethylene hydrogenation is structure insensitive for Pt(111) and Pt(100). SFG has proven to be a unique and excellent technique for studying adsorbed species on single crystal surfaces under high-pressure catalytic reactions. Coupled with kinetic data obtained from gas chromatography measurements, it can

  9. Remarkable promotion effect of trace sulfation on OMS-2 nanorod catalysts for the catalytic combustion of ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Changbin; He, Hong

    2015-09-01

    OMS-2 nanorod catalysts were synthesized by a hydrothermal redox reaction method using MnSO4 (OMS-2-SO4) and Mn(CH3COO)2 (OMS-2-AC) as precursors. SO4(2-)-doped OMS-2-AC catalysts with different SO4(2-) concentrations were prepared next by adding (NH4)2SO4 solution into OMS-2-AC samples to investigate the effect of the anion SO4(2-) on the OMS-2-AC catalyst. All catalysts were then tested for the catalytic oxidation of ethanol. The OMS-2-SO4 catalyst synthesized demonstrated much better activity than OMS-2-AC. The SO4(2-) doping greatly influenced the activity of the OMS-2-AC catalyst, with a dramatic promotion of activity for suitable concentration of SO4(2-) (SO4/catalyst=0.5% W/W). The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES), NH3-TPD and H2-TPR techniques. The results showed that the presence of a suitable amount of SO4(2-) species in the OMS-2-AC catalyst could decrease the Mn-O bond strength and also enhance the lattice oxygen and acid site concentrations, which then effectively promoted the catalytic activity of OMS-2-AC toward ethanol oxidation. Thus it was confirmed that the better catalytic performance of OMS-2-SO4 compared to OMS-2-AC is due to the presence of some residual SO4(2-) species in OMS-2-SO4 samples. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Investigating the effect of gas flow rate, inlet ozone concentration and relative humidity on the efficacy of catalytic ozonation process in the removal of xylene from waste airstream

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.R. MokaramI

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and aimsThe catalytic ozonation is an efficient process for the degradation of volatile organic compounds from contaminated air stream. This study was aimed at investigating the efficacy of catalytic ozonation process in removal of xylene from the polluted air stream andthe influence of retention time (gas flow rate, inlet ozone dose and relative humidity on this performanceMethodsthe catalytic ozonation of xylene was conducted using a bench scale set-up consisted of a syringe pump,an air pump, an ozone generator, and a glass reactor packed with activated carbon. Several experimental run was defined to investigate the influence of the selectedoperational variables.ResultsThe results indicated that the efficiency of catalytic ozonation was greater than that of single adsorption in removal of xylene under similar inlet concentration and relative humidity. We found a significant catalytic effect for activated carbon when used in combination with ozonation process, leading to improvement of xylene removal percentage. In addition, the elimination capacity of the system improved with the increase of inlet ozone dose as well as gas flow rate. The relative humidity showed a positive effect of the xylene removal at the range of 5 to 50%, while the higher humidity (more than 50% resulted in reduction of the performance.ConclusionThe findings of the present work revealed that the catalytic ozonation process can be an efficient technique for treating the air streams containing industrial concentrations of xylene. Furthermore, there is a practical potential to retrofit the present adsorption systems intothe catalytic ozonation simply by coupling them with the ozonation system. the catalytic ozonation of xylene was conducted using a bench scale set-up consisted of a syringe pump,an air pump, an ozone generator, and a glass reactor packed with activated carbon. Several experimental run was defined to investigate the influence of the selected

  11. Crystal Structural Effect of AuCu Alloy Nanoparticles on Catalytic CO Oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhan, Wangcheng; Wang, Jinglin; Wang, Haifeng; Zhang, Jinshui; Liu, Xiaofei

    2017-01-01

    Controlling the physical and chemical properties of alloy nanoparticles (NPs) is an important approach to optimize NP catalysis. Unlike other tuning knobs, such as size, shape, and composition, crystal structure has received limited attention and not been well understood for its role in catalysis. This deficiency is mainly due to the difficulty in synthesis and fine-tuning of the NPs’ crystal structure. Here, Exemplifying by AuCu alloy NPs with face centered cubic (fcc) and face centered tetragonal (fct) structure, we demonstrate a remarkable difference in phase segregation and catalytic performance depending on the crystal structure. During the thermal treatment in air, the Cu component in fcc-AuCu alloy NPs segregates more easily onto the alloy surface as compared to that in fct-AuCu alloy NPs. As a result, after annealing at 250 °C in air for 1 h, the fcc- and fct-AuCu alloy NPs are phase transferred into Au/CuO and AuCu/CuO core/shell structures, respectively. More importantly, this variation in heterostructures introduces a significant difference in CO adsorption on two catalysts, leading to a largely enhanced catalytic activity of AuCu/CuO NP catalyst for CO oxidation. Furthermore, the same concept can be extended to other alloy NPs, making it possible to fine-tune NP catalysis for many different chemical reactions.

  12. Crystal Structural Effect of AuCu Alloy Nanoparticles on Catalytic CO Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhan, Wangcheng [East China Univ. of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Wang, Jinglin [East China Univ. of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Wang, Haifeng [East China Univ. of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Jinshui [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Liu, Xiaofei [East China Univ. of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Zhang, Pengfei [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Chi, Miaofang [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Guo, Yanglong [East China Univ. of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Guo, Yun [East China Univ. of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Lu, Guanzhong [East China Univ. of Science and Technology, Shanghai (China); Sun, Shouheng [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Dai, Sheng [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Zhu, Huiyuan [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-06-07

    Controlling the physical and chemical properties of alloy nanoparticles (NPs) is an important approach to optimize NP catalysis. Unlike other tuning knobs, such as size, shape, and composition, crystal structure has received limited attention and not been well understood for its role in catalysis. This deficiency is mainly due to the difficulty in synthesis and fine-tuning of the NPs’ crystal structure. Here, Exemplifying by AuCu alloy NPs with face centered cubic (fcc) and face centered tetragonal (fct) structure, we demonstrate a remarkable difference in phase segregation and catalytic performance depending on the crystal structure. During the thermal treatment in air, the Cu component in fcc-AuCu alloy NPs segregates more easily onto the alloy surface as compared to that in fct-AuCu alloy NPs. As a result, after annealing at 250 °C in air for 1 h, the fcc- and fct-AuCu alloy NPs are phase transferred into Au/CuO and AuCu/CuO core/shell structures, respectively. More importantly, this variation in heterostructures introduces a significant difference in CO adsorption on two catalysts, leading to a largely enhanced catalytic activity of AuCu/CuO NP catalyst for CO oxidation. Furthermore, the same concept can be extended to other alloy NPs, making it possible to fine-tune NP catalysis for many different chemical reactions.

  13. Halogen poisoning effect of Pt-TiO{sub 2} for formaldehyde catalytic oxidation performance at room temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Xiaofeng; Cheng, Bei [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Material Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Luoshi Road 122#, Wuhan 430070 (China); Yu, Jiaguo, E-mail: jiaguoyu@yahoo.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Technology for Material Synthesis and Processing, Wuhan University of Technology, Luoshi Road 122#, Wuhan 430070 (China); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Ho, Wingkei, E-mail: keithho@ied.edu.hk [Department of Science and Environmental Studies and Centre for Education in Environmental Sustainability, The Hong Kong Institute of Education, Tai Po, N.T. Hong Kong (China)

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The Pt-TiO{sub 2} catalyst is deactivated by adsorption of halogen ions. • The halogen poison is mainly attributed to the active site blocking of the Pt surface. • Halogen ions and Pt form Pt−X coordination bonds. • Large halogen diameter exhibits severe poisoning effect. - Abstract: Catalytic decomposition of formaldehyde (HCHO) at room temperature is an important method for HCHO removal. Pt-based catalysts are the optimal catalyst for HCHO decomposition at room temperature. However, the stability of this catalyst remains unexplored. In this study, Pt-TiO{sub 2} (Pt-P25) catalysts with and without adsorbed halogen ions (including F{sup −}, Cl{sup −}, Br{sup −}, and I{sup −}) were prepared through impregnation and ion modification. Pt-TiO{sub 2} samples with adsorbed halogen ions exhibited reduced catalytic activity for formaldehyde decomposition at room temperature compared with the Pt-TiO{sub 2} sample; the catalytic activity followed the order of F-Pt-P25, Cl-Pt-P25, Br-Pt-P25, and I-Pt-P25. Characterization results (including XRD, TEM, HRTEM, BET, XPS, and metal dispersion) showed that the adsorbed halogen ions can poison Pt nanoparticles (NPs), thereby reducing the HCHO oxidation activity of Pt-TiO{sub 2}. The poison mechanism is due to the strong adsorption of halogen ions on the surface of Pt NPs. The adsorbed ions form coordination bonds with surface Pt atoms by transferring surplus electrons into the unoccupied 5d orbit of the Pt atom, thereby inhibiting oxygen adsorption and activation of the Pt NP surface. Moreover, deactivation rate increases with increasing diameter of halogen ions. This study provides new insights into the fabrication of high-performance Pt-based catalysts for indoor air purification.

  14. The variation of cationic microstructure in Mn-doped spinel ferrite during calcination and its effect on formaldehyde catalytic oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Xiaoliang [CAS Key Laboratory of Mineralogy and Metallogeny, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Mineral Physics and Materials, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Liu, Peng [CAS Key Laboratory of Mineralogy and Metallogeny, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Mineral Physics and Materials, Guangzhou 510640 (China); He, Hongping, E-mail: hehp@gig.ac.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Mineralogy and Metallogeny, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Mineral Physics and Materials, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Wei, Gaoling [Guangdong Institute of Eco-Environmental and Soil Sciences, Guangzhou 510650 (China); Chen, Tianhu [School of Resources and Environmental Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Tan, Wei; Tan, Fuding [CAS Key Laboratory of Mineralogy and Metallogeny, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Mineral Physics and Materials, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhu, Jianxi; Zhu, Runliang [CAS Key Laboratory of Mineralogy and Metallogeny, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Mineral Physics and Materials, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2016-04-05

    Highlights: • Calcination causes the activity variation of Mn-doped ferrites for HCHO oxidation. • The variation of catalytic activity of ferrites by calcination is non-linear. • Mn enriches on the calcinated ferrite surface in the valence of +3 and +4. • The reduction temperature of surface Mn{sup 4+} species is well correlated to T50. - Abstract: In this study, a series of Mn substituted spinel ferrites calcinated at different temperatures were used as catalysts for the oxidation of formaldehyde (HCHO). X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and H{sub 2} temperature-programmed reduction were conducted to characterize the structure and physico-chemical properties of catalysts, which were affected by calcination in the range of 200–600 °C. Results show that all the ferrites were with spinel structure, and those calcinated in the range of 300–600 °C were in the phase of maghemite. The calcination changed the valence and distribution of Mn and Fe on the ferrite surface, and accordingly the reducibility of ferrites. The HCHO catalytic oxidation test showed that with the increase of calcination temperature, the activity was initially improved until 400 °C, but then decreased. The variation of HCHO conversion performance was well positively correlated to the variation of reduction temperature of surface Mn{sup 4+} species. The remarkable effect of calcination on the catalytic activity of Mn-doped spinel ferrites for HCHO oxidation was discussed in view of reaction mechanism and variations in cationic microstructure of Mn-doped ferrites.

  15. The variation of cationic microstructure in Mn-doped spinel ferrite during calcination and its effect on formaldehyde catalytic oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Xiaoliang; Liu, Peng; He, Hongping; Wei, Gaoling; Chen, Tianhu; Tan, Wei; Tan, Fuding; Zhu, Jianxi; Zhu, Runliang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Calcination causes the activity variation of Mn-doped ferrites for HCHO oxidation. • The variation of catalytic activity of ferrites by calcination is non-linear. • Mn enriches on the calcinated ferrite surface in the valence of +3 and +4. • The reduction temperature of surface Mn"4"+ species is well correlated to T50. - Abstract: In this study, a series of Mn substituted spinel ferrites calcinated at different temperatures were used as catalysts for the oxidation of formaldehyde (HCHO). X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and H_2 temperature-programmed reduction were conducted to characterize the structure and physico-chemical properties of catalysts, which were affected by calcination in the range of 200–600 °C. Results show that all the ferrites were with spinel structure, and those calcinated in the range of 300–600 °C were in the phase of maghemite. The calcination changed the valence and distribution of Mn and Fe on the ferrite surface, and accordingly the reducibility of ferrites. The HCHO catalytic oxidation test showed that with the increase of calcination temperature, the activity was initially improved until 400 °C, but then decreased. The variation of HCHO conversion performance was well positively correlated to the variation of reduction temperature of surface Mn"4"+ species. The remarkable effect of calcination on the catalytic activity of Mn-doped spinel ferrites for HCHO oxidation was discussed in view of reaction mechanism and variations in cationic microstructure of Mn-doped ferrites.

  16. Spectrophotometric determination of nitrite based on its catalytic effect on the reaction of nuclear fast red and potassium bromate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HASSAN ZAVVAR MOUSAVI

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A highly selective and sensitive catalytic spectrophotometric method was developed for the determination of nitrite in water samples. The method is based on its catalytic effect on the nuclear fast red–potassium bromate redox reaction in acidic medium. The reaction was followed spectrophotometrically by measuring the change in the absorbance at 518 nm of nuclear fast red 5 min after initiation of the reaction. In this study, the experimental parameters were optimized and the effects of other cations and anions on the determination of nitrite were examined. The calibration graph was linear in the range 2.0–45 µg mL-1 of nitrite. The relative standard deviations for the determination of 15 and 30 µg mL-1 of nitrite were 3.1 and 1.75 %, respectively (n = 8. The detection limit calculated from three times the standard deviation of the blank 3Sb was 0.7 µg mL-1. The method was successfully applied to the determination of nitrite in spiked tap, natural and wastewater samples.

  17. Effect of mesoporous g-C3N4 substrate on catalytic oxidation of CO over Co3O4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Heng; Lv, Kangle; Zhu, Junjiang; Li, Qin; Tang, Dingguo; Ho, Wingkei; Li, Mei; Carabineiro, Sónia A. C.

    2017-04-01

    Mesoporous graphitic carbon nitride (mpg-CN) was synthesized using Triton X-100, a surfactant containing a hydrophilic polyethylene oxide group and a tert-octyl-phenyl hydrophobic moiety, as a soft template. The obtained mpg-CN was used as a support for Co3O4, and this supported catalyst was used for CO oxidation. The effects of the amount of Triton X-100, weight ratio of Co3O4 to mpg-CN and calcination temperature on the catalytic performances for CO oxidation of Co3O4/mpg-CN composites were systematically studied. It was found that the presence of Triton X-100 not only retarded the polymerization of dicyandiamide, but also affected the microstructure of Co3O4. Bubbles formed because of the hydrophobic group of the surfactant Triton X-100 can be act as a soft template for the synthesis of mesoporous g-C3N4. The enhanced catalytic activity of Co3O4/mpg-CN was attributed to a synergistic effect, enlarged BET surface areas, increased Co3+ and lattice oxygen contents, and the porous structure of mpg-CN support. The high stability of 12.5% Co3O4/mpg-CN(1.0) makes it a promising catalyst for practical applications.

  18. Effects of particle composition and environmental parameters on catalytic hydrodechlorination of trichloroethylene by nanoscale bimetallic Ni-Fe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Jianjun; Qian, Yajing; Liu, Wenjuan; Wang, Lutao; Ge, Yijie; Zhang, Jianghao; Yu, Jiang; Ma, Xingmao

    2014-05-01

    Catalytic nickel was successfully incorporated into nanoscale iron to enhance its dechlorination efficiency for trichloroethylene (TCE), one of the most commonly detected chlorinated organic compounds in groundwater. Ethane was the predominant product. The greatest dechlorination efficiency was achieved at 22 molar percent of nickel. This nanoscale Ni-Fe is poorly ordered and inhomogeneous; iron dissolution occurred whereas nickel was relatively stable during the 24-hr reaction. The morphological characterization provided significant new insights on the mechanism of catalytic hydrodechlorination by bimetallic nanoparticles. TCE degradation and ethane production rates were greatly affected by environmental parameters such as solution pH, temperature and common groundwater ions. Both rate constants decreased and then increased over the pH range of 6.5 to 8.0, with the minimum value occurring at pH 7.5. TCE degradation rate constant showed an increasing trend over the temperature range of 10 to 25°C. However, ethane production rate constant increased and then decreased over the range, with the maximum value occurring at 20°C. Most salts in the solution appeared to enhance the reaction in the first half hour but overall they displayed an inhibitory effect. Combined ions showed a similar effect as individual salts. Copyright © 2014 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. High-energy coordination polymers (CPs) exhibiting good catalytic effect on the thermal decomposition of ammonium dinitramide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Han, Jing; Zhang, Sheng; Zhai, Lianjie; Wang, Bozhou; Yang, Qi; Wei, Qing; Xie, Gang; Chen, Sanping; Gao, Shengli

    2017-09-01

    High-energy coordination polymers (CPs) not only exhibit good energetic performances but also have a good catalytic effect on the thermal decomposition of energetic materials. In this contribution, two high-energy CPs Cu2(DNBT)2(CH3OH)(H2O)3·3H2O (1) and [Cu3(DDT)2(H2O)2]n (2) (H2DNBT = 3,3‧-dinitro-5,5‧-bis(1H-1,2,4-triazole and H3DDT = 4,5-bis(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)-2H-1,2,3-triazole) were synthesized and structurally characterized. Furthermore, 1 was thermos-dehydrated to produce Cu2(DNBT)2(CH3OH)(H2O)3 (1a). The thermal decomposition kinetics of 1, 1a and 2 were studied by Kissinger's method and Ozawa's method. Thermal analyses and sensitivity tests show that all compounds exhibit high thermal stability and low sensitivity for external stimuli. Meanwhile, all compounds have large positive enthalpy of formation, which are calculated as being (1067.67 ± 2.62) kJ mol-1 (1), (1464.12 ± 3.12) kJ mol-1 (1a) and (3877.82 ± 2.75) kJ mol-1 (2), respectively. The catalytic effects of 1a and 2 on the thermal decomposition of ammonium dinitramide (ADN) were also investigated.

  20. Support effects on adsorption and catalytic activation of O2 in single atom iron catalysts with graphene-based substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zheng-Yang; Yang, Wei-Jie; Ding, Xun-Lei; Lv, Gang; Yan, Wei-Ping

    2018-03-07

    The adsorption and catalytic activation of O 2 on single atom iron catalysts with graphene-based substrates were investigated systematically by density functional theory calculation. It is found that the support effects of graphene-based substrates have a significant influence on the stability of the single atom catalysts, the adsorption configuration, the electron transfer mechanism, the adsorption energy and the energy barrier. The differences in the stable adsorption configuration of O 2 on single atom iron catalysts with different graphene-based substrates can be well understood by the symmetrical matching principle based on frontier molecular orbital analysis. There are two different mechanisms of electron transfer, in which the Fe atom acts as the electron donor in single vacancy graphene-based substrates while the Fe atom mainly acts as the bridge for electron transfer in double vacancy graphene-based substrates. The Fermi softness and work function are good descriptors of the adsorption energy and they can well reveal the relationship between electronic structure and adsorption energy. This single atom iron catalyst with single vacancy graphene modified by three nitrogen atoms is a promising non-noble metal single atom catalyst in the adsorption and catalytic oxidation of O 2 . Furthermore, the findings can lay the foundation for the further study of graphene-based support effects and provide a guideline for the development and design of new non-noble-metal single atom catalysts.

  1. New potential nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs with antileukotrienic effects: influence on model proteins with catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Netopilová, Miloslava; Drsata, Jaroslav; Beránek, Martin; Palicka, Vladimír

    2002-01-01

    Unspecific and side effects caused by interaction with proteins belong to common problems of many structures synthesized as potential medicaments. Possible in vitro interactions with proteins of a group of phenylsulfonyl benzoic acid derivatives (VUFB 19363, 19369, 19370, 19371, and 19760) as new potential anti-inflammatory compounds with anti-leukotrienic activities were studied in the present work. Three purified enzymes were used as model proteins with catalytic activities: Pig heart aspartate aminotransferase (AST, EC 2.6.1.1), alanine aminotransferase (ALT, EC 2.6.1.2), and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD, EC 4.1.1.15) from E. coli. Catalytic activities during incubation of individual compounds (6 x 10(-5) M solution to 5 x 10(-2) M suspension) at 37 degrees C with enzymes served as criteria of stability and function of the proteins. No immediate influence of any compound studied on enzyme activities was found. Aminotransferase activities were not affected even during incubation up to 20 d. In the case of GAD, the compounds VUFB 19369, 19370, 19371, and 19760 had stabilizing influence on GAD activity during incubation at enzyme concentrations of 11.25 and 5.62 mg prot/l. The lack of an immediate effect of compounds and the stability of enzymes during incubation them are favorable and support the prospective of the compounds as potential drugs.

  2. Catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vail' eva, N A; Buyanov, R A

    1979-01-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of petroleum fractions (undecane) was performed with the object of clarifying such questions as the mechanism of action of the catalyst, the concepts of activity and selectivity of the catalyst, the role of transport processes, the temperature ranges and limitations of the catalytic process, the effect of the catalyst on secondary processes, and others. Catalysts such as quartz, MgO, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, were used. Analysis of the experimental findings and the fact that the distribution of products is independent of the nature of the surface, demonstrate that the pyrolysis of hydrocarbons in the presence of catalysts is based on the heterogeneous-homogeneous radical-chain mechanism of action, and that the role of the catalysts reduces to increasing the concentration of free radicals. The concept of selectivity cannot be applied to catalysts here, since they do not affect the mechanism of the unfolding of the process of pyrolysis and their role consists solely in initiating the process. In catalytic pyrolysis the concepts of kinetic and diffusive domains of unfolding of the catalytic reaction do not apply, and only the outer surface of the catalyst is engaged, whereas the inner surface merely promotes deletorious secondary processes reducing the selectivity of the process and the activity of the catalyst. 6 references, 2 figures.

  3. Effect of apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing catalytic polypeptide-like protein-3G in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yanhua; Leng, Junhong; Xue, Fang; Dong, Ruiqian

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common gynecologic cancers. The role of apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing catalytic polypeptide-like protein-3G (APCBEC-3G) in cervical cancer has yet to be elucidated. This study intends to explore the effect of APCBEC-3G on cervical cancer cell proliferation and invasion. In vitro, the cervical cancer cell line Hela was transfected by APCBEC-3G plasmid. The mRNA and protein expression levels of APCBEC-3G were detected by Real-time PCR and Western blot, respectively. Cervical cancer cell proliferation was determined by MTT. Transwell assay was applied to measure the effect of APCBEC-3G on cell invasion. APCBEC-3G mRNA and protein increased significantly after transfection (P3G serves as a suppressor of cervical cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Our research provides theoretical basis for further investigation APOBEC-3G effect in cervical cancer occurrence and development.

  4. Effect of Catalytic Cylinders on Autothermal Reforming of Methane for Hydrogen Production in a Microchamber Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfei Yan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new multicylinder microchamber reactor is designed on autothermal reforming of methane for hydrogen production, and its performance and thermal behavior, that is, based on the reaction mechanism, is numerically investigated by varying the cylinder radius, cylinder spacing, and cylinder layout. The results show that larger cylinder radius can promote reforming reaction; the mass fraction of methane decreased from 26% to 21% with cylinder radius from 0.25 mm to 0.75 mm; compact cylinder spacing corresponds to more catalytic surface and the time to steady state is decreased from 40 s to 20 s; alteration of staggered and aligned cylinder layout at constant inlet flow rates does not result in significant difference in reactor performance and it can be neglected. The results provide an indication and optimize performance of reactor; it achieves higher conversion compared with other reforming reactors.

  5. Effect of catalytic cylinders on autothermal reforming of methane for hydrogen production in a microchamber reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yunfei; Guo, Hongliang; Zhang, Li; Zhu, Junchen; Yang, Zhongqing; Tang, Qiang; Ji, Xin

    2014-01-01

    A new multicylinder microchamber reactor is designed on autothermal reforming of methane for hydrogen production, and its performance and thermal behavior, that is, based on the reaction mechanism, is numerically investigated by varying the cylinder radius, cylinder spacing, and cylinder layout. The results show that larger cylinder radius can promote reforming reaction; the mass fraction of methane decreased from 26% to 21% with cylinder radius from 0.25 mm to 0.75 mm; compact cylinder spacing corresponds to more catalytic surface and the time to steady state is decreased from 40 s to 20 s; alteration of staggered and aligned cylinder layout at constant inlet flow rates does not result in significant difference in reactor performance and it can be neglected. The results provide an indication and optimize performance of reactor; it achieves higher conversion compared with other reforming reactors.

  6. Highly effective catalytic peroxymonosulfate activation on N-doped mesoporous carbon for o-phenylphenol degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jifei; Yang, Shasha; Wan, Haiqin; Fu, Heyun; Qu, Xiaolei; Xu, Zhaoyi; Zheng, Shourong

    2018-04-01

    As a broad-spectrum preservative, toxic o-phenylphenol (OPP) was frequently detected in aquatic environments. In this study, N-doped mesoporous carbon was prepared by a hard template method using different nitrogen precursors and carbonization temperatures (i.e., 700, 850 and 1000 °C), and was used to activate peroxymonosulfate (PMS) for OPP degradation. For comparison, mesoporous carbon (CMK-3) was also prepared. Characterization results showed that the N-doped mesoporous carbon samples prepared under different conditions were perfect replica of their template. In comparison with ethylenediamine (EDA) and dicyandiamide (DCDA) as the precursors, N-doped mesoporous carbon prepared using EDA and carbon tetrachloride as the precursors displayed a higher catalytic activity for OPP degradation. Increasing carbonization temperature of N-doped mesoporous carbon led to decreased N content and increased graphitic N content at the expense of pyridinic and pyrrolic N. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analysis showed that PMS activation on N-doped mesoporous carbon resulted in highly active species and singlet oxygen, and catalytic PMS activation for OPP degradation followed a combined radical and nonradical reaction mechanism. Increasing PMS concentration enhanced OPP degradation, while OPP degradation rate was independent on initial OPP concentration. Furthermore, the dependency of OPP degradation on PMS concentration followed the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model, reflecting that the activation of adsorbed PMS was the rate controlling step. Based on the analysis by time-of-flight mass spectrometry, the degradation pathway of OPP was proposed. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  8. Prefunctionalized Porous Organic Polymers: Effective Supports of Surface Palladium Nanoparticles for the Enhancement of Catalytic Performances in Dehalogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hong; Liu, Caiping; Zhou, Hanghui; Wang, Yangxin; Wang, Ruihu

    2016-08-22

    Three porous organic polymers (POPs) containing H, COOMe, and COO(-) groups at 2,6-bis(1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)pyridyl (BTP) units (i.e., POP-1, POP-2, and POP-3, respectively) were prepared for the immobilization of metal nanoparticles (NPs). The ultrafine palladium NPs are uniformly encapsulated in the interior pores of POP-1, whereas uniform- and dual-distributed palladium NPs are located on the external surface of POP-2 and POP-3, respectively. The presence of carboxylate groups not only endows POP-3 an outstanding dispersibility in H2 O/EtOH, but also enables the palladium NPs at the surface to show the highest catalytic activity, stability, and recyclability in dehalogenation reactions of chlorobenzene at 25 °C. The palladium NPs on the external surface are effectively stabilized by the functionalized POPs containing BTP units and carboxylate groups, which provides a new insight for highly efficient catalytic systems based on surface metal NPs of porous materials. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. The effect of preparation parameters i thermal decomposition of ruthenium dioxide electrodes on chlorine elctro-catalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luu, Tran Le; Kim, Choon Soo; Kim, Ji Ye; Kim, Seong Hwan; Yoon, Je Yong

    2015-01-01

    When fabricating a RuO_2 electrode, the high electro-catalytic activity in chlorine evolution is considered as one of the most important factors. Thermal decomposition method carried out under various fabrication conditions including the types of solvents, precursors, and calcination times have led to the enhancement electro-catalytic activity of RuO_2 electrode in chlorine evolution. Nevertheless, it has not been fully investigated how these parameters directly affect to the chlorine evolution efficiency in the RuO_2 electrode. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect on the chlorine evolution in RuO_2 electrodes, depending upon the preparation parameters including solvents, precursors, and calcination times. As major results, the chlorine evolution efficiency was dominantly affected by these three major preparation parameters. The RuO_2 electrode fabricated with ethanol as the solvent showed highest chlorine evolution efficiency. The choice of Ru(AcAc)_3 as precursor and the increase of the calcination time up to 3 h are also the good choices for increasing chlorine electrocatalytic activities. The chlorine evolution efficiency was not significantly related to the total voltammetric charge but to the outer voltammetric charge, which is affected by the morphology of the RuO_2 electrode surface. The size and number of cracks on the electrode surfaces or the outer voltammetric charges increased with easily evaporated solvents, decomposed precursors, and tensile stress from longer thermal treatments

  10. Effect of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) on fine particle emission from two coal-fired power plants in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Jiang, Jingkun; Ma, Zizhen; Wang, Shuxiao; Duan, Lei

    2015-11-01

    Nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission abatement of coal-fired power plants (CFPPs) requires large-scaled installation of selective catalytic reduction (SCR), which would reduce secondary fine particulate matter (PM2.5) (by reducing nitrate aerosol) in the atmosphere. However, our field measurement of two CFPPs equipped with SCR indicates a significant increase of SO42- and NH4+ emission in primary PM2.5, due to catalytic enhancement of SO2 oxidation to SO3 and introducing of NH3 as reducing agent. The subsequent formation of (NH4)2SO4 or NH4HSO4 aerosol is commonly concentrated in sub-micrometer particulate matter (PM1) with a bimodal pattern. The measurement at the inlet of stack also showed doubled primary PM2.5 emission by SCR operation. This effect should therefore be considered when updating emission inventory of CFPPs. By rough estimation, the enhanced primary PM2.5 emission from CFPPs by SCR operation would offset 12% of the ambient PM2.5 concentration reduction in cities as the benefit of national NOx emission abatement, which should draw attention of policy-makers for air pollution control.

  11. The effect of preparation parameters i thermal decomposition of ruthenium dioxide electrodes on chlorine elctro-catalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luu, Tran Le; Kim, Choon Soo; Kim, Ji Ye; Kim, Seong Hwan; Yoon, Je Yong [Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering, Institute of Chemical Process, Seoul National University,Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    When fabricating a RuO{sub 2} electrode, the high electro-catalytic activity in chlorine evolution is considered as one of the most important factors. Thermal decomposition method carried out under various fabrication conditions including the types of solvents, precursors, and calcination times have led to the enhancement electro-catalytic activity of RuO{sub 2} electrode in chlorine evolution. Nevertheless, it has not been fully investigated how these parameters directly affect to the chlorine evolution efficiency in the RuO{sub 2} electrode. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect on the chlorine evolution in RuO{sub 2} electrodes, depending upon the preparation parameters including solvents, precursors, and calcination times. As major results, the chlorine evolution efficiency was dominantly affected by these three major preparation parameters. The RuO{sub 2} electrode fabricated with ethanol as the solvent showed highest chlorine evolution efficiency. The choice of Ru(AcAc){sub 3} as precursor and the increase of the calcination time up to 3 h are also the good choices for increasing chlorine electrocatalytic activities. The chlorine evolution efficiency was not significantly related to the total voltammetric charge but to the outer voltammetric charge, which is affected by the morphology of the RuO{sub 2} electrode surface. The size and number of cracks on the electrode surfaces or the outer voltammetric charges increased with easily evaporated solvents, decomposed precursors, and tensile stress from longer thermal treatments.

  12. Promoting Effect of CeO2 Addition on Activity and Catalytic Stability in Steam Reforming of Methane over Ni/Al2O3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakib, A.; Gennequin, C.; Ringot, S.; Aboukais, A.; Abi-Aad, E.; Dhainaut, T.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen production by steam reforming of methane was studied over Ni catalysts supported on CeO 2 , Al 2 O 3 and CeO 2 -Al 2 O 3 . These catalysts were prepared using the impregnation method and characterized by XRD. The effect of CeO2 promoter on the catalytic performance of Ni/Al 2 O 3 catalyst for methane steam reforming reaction was investigated. In fact, CeO 2 had a positive effect on the catalytic activity in this reaction. Experimental results demonstrated that Ni/CeO 2 -Al 2 O 3 catalyst showed excellent catalytic activity and high reaction performance. In addition, the effects of reaction temperature and metal content on the conversion of CH 4 and H 2 /CO ratio were also investigated. Results indicated that CH4 conversion increased significantly with the increase of the reaction temperature and metal content. (author)

  13. Effects of a TiC substrate on the catalytic activity of Pt for NO reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xingli; Fu, Zhaoming; Li, Shasha; Zhang, Xilin; Yang, Zongxian

    2016-05-11

    Density functional theory calculations are used to elucidate the catalytic properties of a Pt monolayer supported on a TiC(001) substrate (Pt/TiC) toward NO reduction. It is found that the compound system of Pt/TiC has a good stability due to the strong Pt-TiC interaction. The diverse dissociation paths (namely the direct dissociation mechanism and the dimeric mechanism) are investigated. The transition state searching calculations suggest that NO has strong diffusion ability and small activation energy for dissociation on the Pt/TiC. For NO reduction on the Pt/TiC surface, we have found that the direct dissociation mechanisms (NO + N + O → NO2 + N and NO + N + O → N2 + O + O) are easier with a smaller dissociation barrier than those on the Pt(111) surface; and the dimeric process (NO + NO → (NO)2 → N2O + O → N2 + O + O) is considered to be dominant or significant with even a lower energy barrier than that of the direct dissociation. The results show that Pt/TiC can serve as an efficient catalyst for NO reduction.

  14. A review on the performance of glycerol carbonate production via catalytic transesterification: Effects of influencing parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teng, Wai Keng; Ngoh, Gek Cheng; Yusoff, Rozita; Aroua, Mohamed Kheireddine

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Utilization of glycerol to synthesize glycerol carbonate through various routes. • Different types of carbonates and catalysts used for glycerol carbonate production via transesterification are elucidated. • Important factors influencing glycerol carbonate production performances are detailed. • Future research needs of glycerol carbonate production are proposed. - Abstract: Driven by high energy demand and environmental concerns, biodiesel as a substitute for fossil fuels is recognized to be promising renewable and clean energy. The increase in the biodiesel plant dramatically leads to the oversupply of its by-product glycerol in the biodiesel industries. Developing new industrial uses for glycerol is essential to increase the net energy and sustainability of biodiesel. Moreover, glycerol has great potential to be converted into marketable and valuable chemicals. The conversion of glycerol to glycerol carbonate (GC) has been extensively studied and transesterification of glycerol to GC has been proven to be the most promising route. Aimed to reveal the underlying mechanism of this successful conversion path, this paper reviews the chemo- and biocatalytic transesterification of glycerol with different carbonates sources. Also, a detail elucidation of the influence of the catalysts and operating conditions on the GC yield is included to provide an insight into the process. In addition, the future direction of glycerol carbonate production via catalytic transesterification is provided in this review

  15. Effect of heat and mass transfer coefficients on the performance of automotive catalytic converters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamim, T. [Michigan Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Dearborn, MI (United States)

    2003-06-01

    This paper numerically investigates the role of heat and mass transfer coefficients on the performance of automotive catalytic converters, which are employed to reduce engine exhaust emissions. The pollutant conversion performance of a converter is influenced by a number of physical and chemical processes that take place in gaseous and solid phases as the exhaust gases flow through the catalyst. A quantitative predictive understanding of these complex catalyst processes involving flow dynamics, heterogeneous surface reactions and heat and mass transport mechanisms is important in improving the converter design. The role of convective transport phenomena becomes important at high temperature when the mass transfer becomes rate-limiting to an increasing extent. The objective of the present study is to elucidate the influence of convective heat and mass transfer coefficients (mechanisms). The mathematical model considers the conservation of mass, momentum and energy in both gaseous and solid phases. In addition to the heterogeneous surface reactions, the model also takes into account the adsorption/desorption of oxygen in the catalyst during non-stoichiometric composition of air/fuel mixtures. The governing equations are solved by an implicit scheme using a successive line under a relaxation method. The converter performance under the transient conditions as simulated by the US Federal Test Procedure (US-FTP) is analysed. (Author)

  16. Production of natural antioxidants from vegetable oil deodorizer distillates: effect of catalytic hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagani, María Ayelén; Baltanás, Miguel A

    2010-02-01

    Natural tocopherols are one of the main types of antioxidants found in living creatures, but they also have other critical biological functions. The biopotency of natural (+)-alpha-tocopherol (RRR) is 36% higher than that of the synthetic racemic mixture and 300% higher than the SRR stereoisomer. Vegetable oil deodorizer distillates (DD) are an excellent source of natural tocopherols. Catalytic hydrogenation of DD preconcentrates has been suggested as a feasible route for recovery of tocopherols in high yield. However, it is important to know whether the hydrogenation operation, as applied to these tocopherol-rich mixtures, is capable of preserving the chiral (RRR) character, which is critical to its biopotency. Fortified (i.e., (+)-alpha-tocopherol enriched) sunflower oil and methyl stearate, as well as sunflower oil DD, were fully hydrogenated using commercial Ni and Pd catalysts (120-180 degrees C; 20-60 psig). Products were analyzed by chiral HPLC. Results show that the desired chiral configuration (RRR) is fully retained. Thus, the hydrogenation route can be safely considered as a valid alternative for increasing the efficiency of tocopherol recovery processes from DDs while preserving their natural characteristics.

  17. Kinetic-quantum chemical model for catalytic cycles: the Haber-Bosch process and the effect of reagent concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozuch, Sebastian; Shaik, Sason

    2008-07-03

    A combined kinetic-quantum chemical model is developed with the goal of estimating in a straightforward way the turnover frequency (TOF) of catalytic cycles, based on the state energies obtained by quantum chemical calculations. We describe how the apparent activation energy of the whole cycle, so-called energetic span (delta E), is influenced by the energy levels of two species: the TOF determining transition state (TDTS) and the TOF determining intermediate (TDI). Because these key species need not be adjoining states, we conclude that for catalysis there are no rate-determining steps, only rate determining states. In addition, we add here the influence of reactants concentrations. And, finally, the model is applied to the Haber-Bosch process of ammonia synthesis, for which we show how to calculate which catalyst will be the most effective under specific reagents conditions.

  18. Thermodynamics, kinetics, and catalytic effect of dehydrogenation from MgH2 stepped surfaces and nanocluster: a DFT study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Jason; Wang, Linlin; Johnson, Duane

    2013-03-01

    We detail the results of a Density Functional Theory (DFT) based study of hydrogen desorption, including thermodynamics and kinetics with(out) catalytic dopants, on stepped (110) rutile and nanocluster MgH2. We investigate competing configurations (optimal surface and nanoparticle configurations) using simulated annealing with additional converged results at 0 K, necessary for finding the low-energy, doped MgH2 nanostructures. Thermodynamics of hydrogen desorption from unique dopant sites will be shown, as well as activation energies using the Nudged Elastic Band algorithm. To compare to experiment, both stepped structures and nanoclusters are required to understanding and predict the effects of ball milling. We demonstrate how these model systems relate to the intermediary sized structures typically seen in ball milling experiments.

  19. Synergistic effect of Nitrogen-doped hierarchical porous carbon/graphene with enhanced catalytic performance for oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Dewang; Yuan, Wenjing; Li, Cun; Song, Jiming; Xie, Anjian, E-mail: anjx@163.com; Shen, Yuhua, E-mail: s_yuhua@163.com

    2017-01-30

    Graphical abstract: This work demonstrates an example for turning rubbish into valuable products and addresses the disposal issue of waste biomass simultaneously for environment clean. And the typical sample exhibits excellent catalytic performance toward ORR, which is similar to that of commercial Pt/C. - Highlights: • This work demonstrates an example for turning rubbish into valuable products and addresses the disposal issue of waste biomass. • The HPC/RGO composite not only prevents the aggregation of RGO, but also takes advantage of the synergy between them. • This method was accessible, without using any activator, which is an effective strategy for the large scale application of FCs. - Abstract: Developing efficient and economical catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is important to promote the commercialization of fuel cells. Here, we report a simple and environmentally friendly method to prepare nitrogen (N) –doped hierarchical porous carbon (HPC)/reduced graphene oxide (RGO) composites by reusing waste biomass (pomelo peel) coupled with graphene oxide (GO). This method is green, low-cost and without using any acid or alkali activator. The typical sample (N-HPC/RGO-1) contains 5.96 at.% nitrogen and larger BET surface area (1194 m{sup 2}/g). Electrochemical measurements show that N-HPC/RGO-1 exhibits not only a relatively positive onset potential and high current density, but also considerable methanol tolerance and long-term durability in alkaline media as well as in acidic media. The electron transfer number is close to 4, which means that it is mostly via a four-electron pathway toward ORR. The excellent catalytic performance of N-HPC/RGO-1 is due to the synergistic effect of the inherent interwoven network structure of HPC, the good electrical conductivity of RGO, and the heteroatom doping for the composite. More importantly, this work demonstrates a good example for turning discarded rubbish into valuable functional products and

  20. Effect of the preparation method on the structural and catalytic properties of spinel cobalt-iron oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammiche-Bellal, Yasmina, E-mail: yasminahammiche@gmail.com [Laboratoire des Matériaux Catalytiques et Catalyse en Chimie Organique, Faculté de Chimie, USTHB, BP32 El Alia, Bab Ezzouar, 16111, Alger (Algeria); Djadoun, Amar [Laboratoire de Géophysique, FSTGAT, USTHB, BP32 El Alia, Bab Ezzouar, 16111, Alger (Algeria); Meddour-Boukhobza, Laaldja; Benadda, Amel [Laboratoire des Matériaux Catalytiques et Catalyse en Chimie Organique, Faculté de Chimie, USTHB, BP32 El Alia, Bab Ezzouar, 16111, Alger (Algeria); Auroux, Aline [Université Lyon 1, CNRS, UMR 5256, IRCELYON, Institut de Recherches sur la Catalyse et l' Environnement de Lyon, 2 Avenue Albert Einstein, F-69626, Villeurbanne (France); Berger, Marie-Hélène [Centre des Matériaux PIERRE-MARIE Fourt, UMR 7633, Paris (France); Mernache, Fateh [UDEC-CRND, COMENA, BP 43 Draria, 16050, Alger (Algeria)

    2016-07-01

    Spinel cobalt-iron oxide was synthesized by co-precipitation and hydrothermal routes. The effect of the co-precipitation experimental conditions, the calcination temperature and the hydrothermal synthesis time and temperature on the properties of the solids was studied. The prepared powders were evaluated as catalysts in the ethanol combustion reaction, and were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM/EDX), nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms (BET, BJH) and temperature programmed reduction (TPR) techniques. Using chloride salts as starting materials and sodium hydroxide as precipitating agent, the CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} prepared powders displayed a mesoporous structure with a pore distribution strongly dependent on the experimental conditions. A monophasic spinel phase in the case of the calcined solids was obtained while the hydrothermal process led to the formation of a mixture of single oxides in addition to the spinel phase. The variation of the crystallite size and the lattice parameter as a function of calcination temperature was similar, whereas this variation found to be irregular when the synthesis residence time in autoclave was increased. The hydrothermally treated solids show the best catalytic performance in the total oxidation of ethanol. The catalytic behavior was correlated with the crystallite size and the reduction temperature of cobalt species determined by the TPR analysis. - Highlights: • Pure CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} phase is obtained by co-precipitation method at calcination temperatures 500–900 °C. • The temperature of co-precipitation procedure influences strongly the growth of the solids during the calcination step. • The hydrothermal synthesis gives a mixture of oxides; CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} is the predominant phase. • The CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel showed a good catalytic reactivity in the ethanol combustion reaction. • The catalysts prepared by hydrothermal process are more reactive and

  1. Synthesis and characterization of amoxicillin derived silver nanoparticles: Its catalytic effect on degradation of some pharmaceutical antibiotics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junejo, Y. [National Center of Excellence in Analytical Chemistry, University of Sindh Jamshoro, Jamshoro 76080 (Pakistan); Department of Chemistry, Fatih University, Buyukcekmece, 34500 Istanbul (Turkey); Güner, A., E-mail: aguner@fatih.edu.tr [Department of Biology, Fatih University, Buyukcekmece, 34500 Istanbul (Turkey); Baykal, A. [Department of Chemistry, Fatih University, Buyukcekmece, 34500 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2014-10-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Amp-Ag (0) NPs were prepared by simple one-pot chemical reduction method. • Ampicillin as an antibiotic was used as both reducing and capping agents in this study. • Amp-Ag (0) NPs have proved as the remarkably efficient catalysts with enhanced rate of reduction for cefdinir, cefditoren, cefixime, ceftriaxone sodium and doxycycline. • Amp-Ag (0) NPs were showed excellent catalytic activity as catalyst for the 100% reduction of these antibiotics. - Abstract: We synthesized novel amoxicillin derived silver nanoparticles (Amp-Ag (0) NPs) in aqueous solution by one-pot simple synthetic method by reducing silver nitrate by the help of amoxicillin antibiotic as a reducing/capping agent and NaOH as the catalyst for reaction enhancement. The formation of the Amp-Ag (0) NPs was monitored using UV–Vis absorption spectroscopy which confirmed the formation of Amp-Ag (0) NPs by exciting the typical surface plasmon absorption maxima at 404 nm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed the spherical morphology and monodispersed Amp-Ag (0) NPs with particle size 6.87 ± 2.2 nm. The antibacterial activities of the antibiotics were evaluated against Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Salmonella enteritidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Gram-positive bacteria Streptococcus pneumonia, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus by the disk diffusion method. Whereas standard antibiotics showed normal zone of inhibition, the reduced ones with Amp-Ag (0) NPs showed no inhibition zone. The antimicrobial results therefore reveal that newly synthesized Amp-Ag (0) NPs had an excellent catalytic activity as catalyst for the 100% reduction of antibiotics i.e. cefdinir, cefditoren, cefiximee, ceftriaxone sodium and doxycycline, which was carried out in just 2–5 min. They were recovered easily from reaction medium and reused with enhanced catalytic potential five times. Based upon these results it has been concluded that Amp-Ag (0) NPs

  2. Synthesis and characterization of amoxicillin derived silver nanoparticles: Its catalytic effect on degradation of some pharmaceutical antibiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Junejo, Y.; Güner, A.; Baykal, A.

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Amp-Ag (0) NPs were prepared by simple one-pot chemical reduction method. • Ampicillin as an antibiotic was used as both reducing and capping agents in this study. • Amp-Ag (0) NPs have proved as the remarkably efficient catalysts with enhanced rate of reduction for cefdinir, cefditoren, cefixime, ceftriaxone sodium and doxycycline. • Amp-Ag (0) NPs were showed excellent catalytic activity as catalyst for the 100% reduction of these antibiotics. - Abstract: We synthesized novel amoxicillin derived silver nanoparticles (Amp-Ag (0) NPs) in aqueous solution by one-pot simple synthetic method by reducing silver nitrate by the help of amoxicillin antibiotic as a reducing/capping agent and NaOH as the catalyst for reaction enhancement. The formation of the Amp-Ag (0) NPs was monitored using UV–Vis absorption spectroscopy which confirmed the formation of Amp-Ag (0) NPs by exciting the typical surface plasmon absorption maxima at 404 nm. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed the spherical morphology and monodispersed Amp-Ag (0) NPs with particle size 6.87 ± 2.2 nm. The antibacterial activities of the antibiotics were evaluated against Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Salmonella enteritidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Gram-positive bacteria Streptococcus pneumonia, Streptococcus pyogenes, Staphylococcus aureus by the disk diffusion method. Whereas standard antibiotics showed normal zone of inhibition, the reduced ones with Amp-Ag (0) NPs showed no inhibition zone. The antimicrobial results therefore reveal that newly synthesized Amp-Ag (0) NPs had an excellent catalytic activity as catalyst for the 100% reduction of antibiotics i.e. cefdinir, cefditoren, cefiximee, ceftriaxone sodium and doxycycline, which was carried out in just 2–5 min. They were recovered easily from reaction medium and reused with enhanced catalytic potential five times. Based upon these results it has been concluded that Amp-Ag (0) NPs

  3. VUV photo-oxidation of gaseous benzene combined with ozone-assisted catalytic oxidation: Effect on transition metal catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Haibao; Lu, Haoxian; Zhan, Yujie; Liu, Gaoyuan; Feng, Qiuyu; Huang, Huiling; Wu, Muyan; Ye, Xinguo

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Mn nanoparticles are highly dispersed on ZSM-5 and most efficient in benzene degradation in the VUV-OZCO process. - Highlights: • Vacuum UV irradiation is well combined with O_3 catalytic oxidation. • O_3 byproducts was used to enhance catalytic oxidation of VOCs. • Mn/ZSM-5 achieved the best catalytic activity for benzene degradation. - Abstract: Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) cause the major air pollution concern. In this study, a series of ZSM-5 supported transition metals were prepared by impregnation method. They were combined with vacuum UV (VUV) photo-oxidation in a continuous-flow packed-bed reactor and used for the degradation of benzene, a typical toxic VOCs. Compared with VUV photo-oxidation alone, the introduction of catalysts can greatly enhance benzene oxidation under the help of O_3, the by-products from VUV irradiation, via ozone-assisted catalytic oxidation (OZCO). The catalytic activity of transition metals towards benzene oxidation followed the order: Mn > Co > Cu > Ni > Fe. Mn achieved the best catalytic activity due to the strongest capability for O_3 catalytic decomposition and utilization. Benzene and O_3 removal efficiency reached as high as 97% and 100% after 360 min, respectively. O_3 was catalytically decomposed, generating highly reactive oxidants such as ·OH and ·O for benzene oxidation.

  4. Fluidized bed catalytic pyrolysis of eucalyptus over hzsm-5: effect of acid density and gallium modification on catalyst deactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalytic fast pyrolysis of eucalyptus wood was performed on a continuous laboratory scale fluidized bed fast pyrolysis system. Catalytic activity was monitored from use of fresh catalyst up to a cumulative biomass to catalyst ratio (B/C) of 4/1 over extruded pellets of three different ZSM-5 catalys...

  5. VUV photo-oxidation of gaseous benzene combined with ozone-assisted catalytic oxidation: Effect on transition metal catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Haibao, E-mail: seabao8@gmail.com [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Environmental Pollution Control and Remediation Technology (Sun Yat-sen University) (China); Lu, Haoxian; Zhan, Yujie; Liu, Gaoyuan; Feng, Qiuyu; Huang, Huiling; Wu, Muyan; Ye, Xinguo [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University (China)

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Mn nanoparticles are highly dispersed on ZSM-5 and most efficient in benzene degradation in the VUV-OZCO process. - Highlights: • Vacuum UV irradiation is well combined with O{sub 3} catalytic oxidation. • O{sub 3} byproducts was used to enhance catalytic oxidation of VOCs. • Mn/ZSM-5 achieved the best catalytic activity for benzene degradation. - Abstract: Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) cause the major air pollution concern. In this study, a series of ZSM-5 supported transition metals were prepared by impregnation method. They were combined with vacuum UV (VUV) photo-oxidation in a continuous-flow packed-bed reactor and used for the degradation of benzene, a typical toxic VOCs. Compared with VUV photo-oxidation alone, the introduction of catalysts can greatly enhance benzene oxidation under the help of O{sub 3}, the by-products from VUV irradiation, via ozone-assisted catalytic oxidation (OZCO). The catalytic activity of transition metals towards benzene oxidation followed the order: Mn > Co > Cu > Ni > Fe. Mn achieved the best catalytic activity due to the strongest capability for O{sub 3} catalytic decomposition and utilization. Benzene and O{sub 3} removal efficiency reached as high as 97% and 100% after 360 min, respectively. O{sub 3} was catalytically decomposed, generating highly reactive oxidants such as ·OH and ·O for benzene oxidation.

  6. Effect of Co3O4 and Co3O4/CeO2 infiltration on the catalytic and electro-catalytic activity of LSM15/CGO10 porous cells stacks for oxidation of propene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ippolito, Davide; Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the effect of Co3O4 and Co3O4/CeO2 infiltration on the propene oxidation catalytic activity of a La0.85Sr0.15MnO3/Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 electrochemical porous cell stack (11 layers, 5 single cells in series). The effect of the infiltration of Co3O4 and Co3O4/CeO2...... on the electrochemical properties of the porous cell stack was also investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Co3O4 and Co3O4/CeO2 exhibited high catalytic activity for propene oxidation. The increase of propene oxidation rate with +4 V (0.8 V/cell) polarization reached 10% for the Co3O4 infiltrated...... reactor and 48% of efficiency at 300 °C. The Co3O4/CeO2 co-infiltration decreased the reactor polarization resistance, while Co3O4 infiltration had negligible effect on reactor electrochemical performance. The beneficial effect of CeO2 on the electrode activity was attributed to the increased...

  7. Effective modeling of hydrogen mixing and catalytic recombination in containment atmosphere with an Eulerian Containment Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bott, E.; Frepoli, C.; Monti, R.; Notini, V.; Carcassi, M.; Fineschi, F.; Heitsch, M.

    1999-01-01

    Large amounts of hydrogen can be generated in the containment of a nuclear power plant following a postulated accident with significant fuel damage. Different strategies have been proposed and implemented to prevent violent hydrogen combustion. An attractive one aims to eliminate hydrogen without burning processes; it is based on the use of catalytic hydrogen recombiners. This paper describes a simulation methodology which is being developed by Ansaldo, to support the application of the above strategy, in the frame of two projects sponsored by the Commission of the European Communities within the IV Framework Program on Reactor Safety. Involved organizations also include the DCMN of Pisa University (Italy), Battelle Institute and GRS (Germany), Politechnical University of Madrid (Spain). The aims to make available a simulation approach, suitable for use for containment design at industrial level (i.e. with reasonable computer running time) and capable to correctly capture the relevant phenomenologies (e.g. multiflow convective flow patterns, hydrogen, air and steam distribution in the containment atmosphere as determined by containment structures and geometries as well as by heat and mass sources and sinks). Eulerian algorithms provide the capability of three dimensional modelling with a fairly accurate prediction, however lower than CFD codes with a full Navier Stokes formulation. Open linking of an Eulerian code as GOTHIC to a full Navier Stokes CFD code as CFX 4.1 allows to dynamically tune the solving strategies of the Eulerian code itself. The effort in progress is an application of this innovative methodology to detailed hydrogen recombination simulation and a validation of the approach itself by reproducing experimental data. (author)

  8. VUV photo-oxidation of gaseous benzene combined with ozone-assisted catalytic oxidation: Effect on transition metal catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haibao; Lu, Haoxian; Zhan, Yujie; Liu, Gaoyuan; Feng, Qiuyu; Huang, Huiling; Wu, Muyan; Ye, Xinguo

    2017-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) cause the major air pollution concern. In this study, a series of ZSM-5 supported transition metals were prepared by impregnation method. They were combined with vacuum UV (VUV) photo-oxidation in a continuous-flow packed-bed reactor and used for the degradation of benzene, a typical toxic VOCs. Compared with VUV photo-oxidation alone, the introduction of catalysts can greatly enhance benzene oxidation under the help of O3, the by-products from VUV irradiation, via ozone-assisted catalytic oxidation (OZCO). The catalytic activity of transition metals towards benzene oxidation followed the order: Mn > Co > Cu > Ni > Fe. Mn achieved the best catalytic activity due to the strongest capability for O3 catalytic decomposition and utilization. Benzene and O3 removal efficiency reached as high as 97% and 100% after 360 min, respectively. O3 was catalytically decomposed, generating highly reactive oxidants such as rad OH and rad O for benzene oxidation.

  9. Kinetic effects of sulfur oxidation on catalytic nitrile hydration: nitrile hydratase insights from bioinspired ruthenium(II) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Davinder; Nguyen, Tho N; Grapperhaus, Craig A

    2014-12-01

    Kinetic investigations inspired by the metalloenzyme nitrile hydratase were performed on a series of ruthenium(II) complexes to determine the effect of sulfur oxidation on catalytic nitrile hydration. The rate of benzonitrile hydration was quantified as a function of catalyst, nitrile, and water concentrations. Precatalysts L(n)RuPPh3 (n = 1-3; L(1) = 4,7-bis(2'-methyl-2'-mercapto-propyl)-1-thia-4,7-diazacyclononane; L(2) = 4-(2'-methyl-2'-sulfinatopropyl)-7-(2'-methyl-2'-mercapto-propyl)-1-thia-4,7-diazacyclononane; L(3) = 4-(2'-methyl-2'-sulfinatopropyl)-7-(2'-methyl-2'-sulfenato-propyl)-1-thia-4,7-diazacyclononane) were activated by substitution of triphenylphosphine with substrate in hot dimethylformamide solution. Rate measurements are consistent with a dynamic equilibrium between inactive aqua (L(n)Ru-OH2) and active nitrile (L(n)Ru-NCR) derivatives with K = 21 ± 1, 9 ± 0.9, and 23 ± 3 for L(1) to L(3), respectively. Subsequent hydration of the L(n)Ru-NCR intermediate yields the amide product with measured hydration rate constants (k's) of 0.37 ± 0.01, 0.82 ± 0.07, and 1.59 ± 0.12 M(-1) h(-1) for L(1) to L(3), respectively. Temperature dependent studies reveal that sulfur oxidation lowers the enthalpic barrier by 27 kJ/mol, but increases the entropic barrier by 65 J/(mol K). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations (B3LYP/LanL2DZ (Ru); 6-31G(d) (all other atoms)) support a nitrile bound catalytic cycle with lowering of the reaction barrier as a consequence of sulfur oxidation through enhanced nitrile binding and attack of the water nucleophile through a highly organized transition state.

  10. Effect of Drying Conditions on the Catalytic Performance, Structure, and Reaction Rates over the Fe-Co-Mn/MgO Catalyst for Production of Light Olefins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Abdouss

    2018-01-01

    How to Cite: Abdouss, M., Arsalanfar, M., Mirzaei, N., Zamani, Y. (2018. Effect of Drying Conditions on the Catalytic Performance, Structure, and Reaction Rates over the Fe-Co-Mn/MgO Catalyst for Production of Light Olefins. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 13 (1: 97-112 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.13.1.1222.97-112

  11. Negative Effect of Calcination to Catalytic Performance of Coal Char-loaded TiO2 Catalyst in Styrene Oxidation with Hydrogen Peroxide as Oxidant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukhamad Nurhadi

    2018-01-01

    How to Cite: Nurhadi, M., Kusumawardani, R., Nur, H. (2018. Negative Effect of Calcination to Catalytic Performance of Coal Char-loaded TiO2 Catalyst in Styrene Oxidation with Hydrogen Peroxide as Oxidant. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 13 (1: 113-118 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.13.1.1171.113-118

  12. Evaluating the Catalytic Effects of Carbon Materials on the Photocatalytic Reduction and Oxidation Reactions of TiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Gulzar; Kim, Young Kwang; Choi, Sung Kyu; Han, Dong Suk; Abdelwahab, Ahmed; Park, Hyunwoong

    2013-01-01

    TiO 2 composites with seven different carbon materials (activated carbons, graphite, carbon fibers, single-walled carbon nanotubes, multi-walled carbon nanotubes, graphene oxides, and reduced graphene oxides) that are virgin or treated with nitric acid are prepared through an evaporation method. The photocatalytic activities of the as-prepared samples are evaluated in terms of H 2 production from aqueous methanol solution (photo-catalytic reduction: PCR) and degradation of aqueous pollutants (phenol, methylene blue, and rhodamine B) (photocatalytic oxidation: PCO) under AM 1.5-light irradiation. Despite varying effects depending on the kinds of carbon materials and their surface treatment, composites typically show enhanced PCR activity with maximum 50 times higher H 2 production as compared to bare TiO 2 . Conversely, the carbon-induced synergy effects on PCO activities are insignificant for all three substrates. Colorimetric quantification of hydroxyl radicals supports the absence of carbon effects. However, platinum deposition on the binary composites displays the enhanced effect on both PCR and PCO reactions. These differing effects of carbon materials on PCR and PCO reactions of TiO 2 are discussed in terms of physicochemical properties of carbon materials, coupling states of TiO 2 /carbon composites, interfacial charge transfers. Various surface characterizations of composites (UV-Vis diffuse reflectance, SEM, FTIR, surface area, electrical conductivity, and photoluminescence) are performed to gain insight on their photocatalytic redox behaviors

  13. Catalytic exhaust control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, H

    1973-09-01

    Recent achievements and problems in the development of exhaust control devices in the USA are reviewed. To meet the 1976 emission standards, catalytic systems for the oxidation of carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons and for the reduction of nitrogen oxides to nitrogen and water are needed. While oxidizing catalysts using platinum, palladium, copper, vanadium, and chromium appplied on alumina or ceramic materials are more or less effective in emission control, there are no catalytic devices for the reduction of nitrogen oxides with the required useful life of 25,000 to 50,000 miles as yet available. In the case of platinum catalysts on monolithic supports, the operating temperature of 650 to 750/sup 0/C as required for the oxidation process may cause inactivation of the catalysts and fusion of the support material. The oxidation of CO and hydrocarbons is inhibited by high concentrations of CO, nitric oxide, and hydrocarbons. The use of catalytic converters requires the use of lead-free or low-lead gasoline. The nitrogen oxides conversion efficiency is considerably influenced by the oxygen-to-CO ratio of the exhaust gas, which makes limitation of this ratio necessary.

  14. Effect of process parameters and injector position on the efficiency of NOx reduction by selective non catalytic reduction technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamid, A.; Mehmood, M.A.; Irfan, N.; Javed, M.T.; Waheed, K.

    2009-01-01

    An experimental investigation has been performed to study the effect of atomizer pressure dilution of the reducing reagent and the injector position on the efficiency or the NOx reduction by a selective non-catalytic reduction technique using urea as a reducing agent. Experiments were performed with a flow reactor in which flue gas was generated by the combustion of methane in air at stoichiometric amount of oxygen and the desired levels of initial NOx (400-450 ppm) were achieved by doping the flame with ammonia. The work was directed to investigate the effect of atomizer pressure, dilution of urea reagent and the injector position. The atomizer pressure was varied from 1 to 3bar and 20-25% increase in efficiency was observed by decreasing the pressure. Effect of dilution of urea solution was investigated by varying the strength of the solution from the 8 to 32% and 40-45% increase in the efficiency was observed. Effects of injector position was investigated by injecting the urea solution both in co current and counter current direction of the flue gases and 20-25% increase in the efficiency was observed in counter current direction. (author)

  15. Non-Equilibrium Thermodynamic Analysis of Double Diffusive, Nanofluid Forced Convection in Catalytic Microreactors with Radiation Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Govone

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a theoretical investigation of the second law performance of double diffusive forced convection in microreactors with the inclusion of nanofluid and radiation effects. The investigated microreactors consist of a single microchannel, fully filled by a porous medium. The transport of heat and mass are analysed by including the thick walls and a first order, catalytic chemical reaction on the internal surfaces of the microchannel. Two sets of thermal boundary conditions are considered on the external surfaces of the microchannel; (1 constant temperature and (2 constant heat flux boundary condition on the lower wall and convective boundary condition on the upper wall. The local thermal non-equilibrium approach is taken to thermally analyse the porous section of the system. The mass dispersion equation is coupled with the transport of heat in the nanofluid flow through consideration of Soret effect. The problem is analytically solved and illustrations of the temperature fields, Nusselt number, total entropy generation rate and performance evaluation criterion (PEC are provided. It is shown that the radiation effect tends to modify the thermal behaviour within the porous section of the system. The radiation parameter also reduces the overall temperature of the system. It is further demonstrated that, expectedly, the nanoparticles reduce the temperature of the system and increase the Nusselt number. The total entropy generation rate and consequently PEC shows a strong relation with radiation parameter and volumetric concentration of nanoparticles.

  16. Effect of pH value and delayed-action time on catalytic activity of tartrate niobium(5) complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseeva, I.I.; Chernysheva, L.M.; Bobkova, M.V.; Solomonov, V.A.

    1987-01-01

    Results of thermokinetic study of catalytic activity of niobium (5) tartrate solutions in the oxidation of ascorbic acid with hydrogen peroxide are presented. Addition of tartrate-ions to a concentration of 1x10 -2 M and higher in niobium (5) diluted solution enhances the catalytic activity of Nb(5). Alkaline tartrate solutions of niobium (5) may be used as standard solutions in determination of niobium microquantities by kinetic method

  17. Effect of phase interaction on catalytic CO oxidation over the SnO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} model catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, Shujing [Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science & Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin Key Laboratory of Applied Catalysis Science & Technology, School of Chemical Engineering & Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300354 (China); The Institute of Seawater Desalination and Miltipurpose Utilization, State Oceanic Administration, Tianjin 300192 (China); Bai, Xueqin; Li, Jing; Liu, Cheng; Ding, Tong; Tian, Ye; Liu, Chang [Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science & Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin Key Laboratory of Applied Catalysis Science & Technology, School of Chemical Engineering & Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300354 (China); Xian, Hui [Tianjin Polytechnic University, School of Computer Science & Software Engineering, Tianjin 300387 (China); Mi, Wenbo [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Low Dimensional Materials Physics and Preparation Technology, Faculty of Science, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300354 (China); Li, Xingang, E-mail: xingang_li@tju.edu.cn [Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science & Engineering (Tianjin), Tianjin Key Laboratory of Applied Catalysis Science & Technology, School of Chemical Engineering & Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300354 (China)

    2017-04-30

    Highlights: • Activity for CO oxidation is greatly enhanced by interaction between SnO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • Interaction between SnO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phases can generate oxygen vacancies. • Oxygen vacancies play an import role for catalytic CO oxidation. • Sn{sup 4+} cations are the effective sites for catalytic CO oxidation. • Langmuir-Hinshelwood model is preferred for catalytic CO oxidation. - Abstract: We investigated the catalytic CO oxidation over the SnO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} model catalysts. Our results show that interaction between the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SnO{sub 2} phases results in the significantly improved catalytic activity because of the formation of the oxygen vacancies. The oxygen storage capacity of the SnO{sub 2}/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst prepared by the physically mixed method is nearly two times higher than that of the SnO{sub 2}, which probably results from the change of electron concentration on the interface of the SnO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phases. Introducing water vapor to the feeding gas would a little decrease the activity of the catalysts, but the reaction rate could completely recover after removal of water vapor. The kinetics results suggest that the surface Sn{sup 4+} cations are effective CO adsorptive sites, and the surface adsorbed oxygen plays an important role upon CO oxidation. The reaction pathways upon the SnO{sub 2}-based catalysts for CO oxidation follow the Langmuir-Hinshelwood model.

  18. Cooperative effect by monopodal silica-supported niobium com-plexes pairs enhancing catalytic cyclic carbonate production

    KAUST Repository

    D'Elia, Valerio

    2015-05-07

    Recent discoveries highlighted the activity and the intriguing mechanistic features of NbCl5 as a molecular catalyst for the cycloaddition of CO2 and epoxides under ambient conditions. This has inspired the preparation of novel silica supported Nb-species by reacting a molecular niobium precursor [NbCl5•OEt2] with silica dehydroxylated at 700 °C (SiO2-700) or at 200 oC (SiO2-200) to generate diverse surface complexes. The product of the reaction between SiO2-700 and [NbCl5•OEt2] was identified as a monopodal supported surface species [≡SiONbCl4•OEt2] (1a). The reactions of SiO2-200 with the niobium precursor, according to two different protocols, generated surface complexes 2a and 3a presenting significant, but different, populations of the monopodal surface complex along with bipodal [(≡SiO)2NbCl3•OEt2]. 93Nb SSNMR spectra of 1a-3a and 31P SSNMR on their PMe3 derivatives (1b-3b) led to the unambiguous assignment of 1a as a single site, monopodal Nb-species while 2a and 3a were found to present two distinct surface-supported components, with 2a being mostly monopodal [≡SiONbCl4•OEt2] and 3a being mostly bipodal [≡S ONbCl3•OEt2]. Double-quantum/single-quantum 31P NMR correlation experiment carried out on 2b supported the existence of vicinal Nb centers on the silica surface for this species. 1a-3a were active heterogeneous catalysts for the synthesis of propylene carbonate from CO2 and propylene oxide under mild catalytic conditions; the performance of 2a was found to significantly surpass that of 1a and 3a. With the support of a systematic DFT study carried out on model silica surfaces, the observed differences in catalytic efficiency were correlated with an unprece-dented cooperative effect between two neighboring Nb centers on the surface of 2a. This is in an excellent agreement with our previous discoveries regarding the mechanism of the NbCl5 catalyzed cycloaddition in the homogeneous phase.

  19. Cooperative effect by monopodal silica-supported niobium com-plexes pairs enhancing catalytic cyclic carbonate production

    KAUST Repository

    D'Elia, Valerio; Dong, Hailin; Rossini, Aaron J; Widdifield, Cory M.; Vummaleti, Sai V. C.; Minenkov, Yury; Poater, Albert; Abou-Hamad, Edy; Pelletier, Jeremie D. A.; Cavallo, Luigi; Emsley, Lyndon; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Recent discoveries highlighted the activity and the intriguing mechanistic features of NbCl5 as a molecular catalyst for the cycloaddition of CO2 and epoxides under ambient conditions. This has inspired the preparation of novel silica supported Nb-species by reacting a molecular niobium precursor [NbCl5•OEt2] with silica dehydroxylated at 700 °C (SiO2-700) or at 200 oC (SiO2-200) to generate diverse surface complexes. The product of the reaction between SiO2-700 and [NbCl5•OEt2] was identified as a monopodal supported surface species [≡SiONbCl4•OEt2] (1a). The reactions of SiO2-200 with the niobium precursor, according to two different protocols, generated surface complexes 2a and 3a presenting significant, but different, populations of the monopodal surface complex along with bipodal [(≡SiO)2NbCl3•OEt2]. 93Nb SSNMR spectra of 1a-3a and 31P SSNMR on their PMe3 derivatives (1b-3b) led to the unambiguous assignment of 1a as a single site, monopodal Nb-species while 2a and 3a were found to present two distinct surface-supported components, with 2a being mostly monopodal [≡SiONbCl4•OEt2] and 3a being mostly bipodal [≡S ONbCl3•OEt2]. Double-quantum/single-quantum 31P NMR correlation experiment carried out on 2b supported the existence of vicinal Nb centers on the silica surface for this species. 1a-3a were active heterogeneous catalysts for the synthesis of propylene carbonate from CO2 and propylene oxide under mild catalytic conditions; the performance of 2a was found to significantly surpass that of 1a and 3a. With the support of a systematic DFT study carried out on model silica surfaces, the observed differences in catalytic efficiency were correlated with an unprece-dented cooperative effect between two neighboring Nb centers on the surface of 2a. This is in an excellent agreement with our previous discoveries regarding the mechanism of the NbCl5 catalyzed cycloaddition in the homogeneous phase.

  20. Catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Clausen, Bjerne

    2007-01-01

    Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change with par......Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change...... with particle size. We find that the fraction of low-coordinated Au atoms scales approximately with the catalytic activity, suggesting that atoms on the corners and edges of Au nanoparticles are the active sites. This effect is explained using density functional calculations....

  1. Interdisciplinary study of the influence on effectiveness of catalytic hydrogen recombiners of operating conditions in the reactor containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelm, S.; Reinecke, E.A.; Schoppe, L.; Dornseiffer, J.; Leistner, F.; Juehe, S.

    2008-01-01

    At the Emsland nuclear power station, a total of 58 autocatalytic hydrogen recombiners were backfitted in 1999 as an additional measure of risk reduction in connection with major hydrogen releases after events going beyond the design basis. Annual in-service inspections after 2002 revealed that some of the catalyst sheets developed startup delays and marked evolutions of smoke and smell. Recombiners not meeting the inspection criterion were completely regenerated as a measure of precaution. A preventive study was conducted jointly with institutes of the Juelich Research Center and the Aachen Technical University to analyze the composition of the deposits, which was then compared with the chemical characteristics of potential sources in the reactor containment. At the same time, the influence on effectiveness of the catalyst sheets was examined. On the basis of a random evaluation of the in-service inspection logs of the past few years, representative samples were taken whose startup behavior and operating characteristics were studied in a test rig alongside chemical analyses so as to allow a correlation to be established between the analytical findings and the catalytic activity of the samples. The findings made allowed internal sources of the catalyst deposits to be excluded. The impurities are introduced with the outside air. As a consequence, the air ducts in the vicinity of the respective recombiners were inspected and optimization steps were taken in connection with in-service inspections and regeneration procedures. (orig.)

  2. On the Catalytic Effect of Water in the Intramolecular Diels–Alder Reaction of Quinone Systems: A Theoretical Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Contreras

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism of the intramolecular Diels–Alder (IMDA reaction of benzoquinone 1, in the absence and in the presence of three water molecules, 1w, has been studied by means of density functional theory (DFT methods, using the M05-2X and B3LYP functionals for exploration of the potential energy surface (PES. The energy and geometrical results obtained are complemented with a population analysis using the NBO method, and an analysis based on the global, local and group electrophilicity and nucleophilicity indices. Both implicit and explicit solvation emphasize the increase of the polarity of the reaction and the reduction of activation free energies associated with the transition states (TSs of this IMDA process. These results are reinforced by the analysis of the reactivity indices derived from the conceptual DFT, which show that the increase of the electrophilicity of the quinone framework by the hydrogen-bond formation correctly explains the high polar character of this intramolecular process. Large polarization at the TSs promoted by hydrogen-bonds and implicit solvation by water together with a high electrophilicity-nucleophilicity difference consistently explains the catalytic effects of water molecules.

  3. Effects of temperature and feed composition on catalytic dehydration of methanol to dimethyl ether over {gamma}-alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freshteh Raoof; Majid Taghizadeh; Ali Eliassi; Fereydoon Yaripour [Babol University of Technology, Babol (Iran). Chemical Engineering Department

    2008-10-15

    Catalytic dehydration of methanol to dimethyl ether (DME) is performed in an adiabatic fixed bed heterogeneous reactor by using acidic {gamma}-alumina. By changing the mean average temperature of the catalyst bed (or operating temperature of the reactor) from 233 up to 303{sup o}C, changes in methanol conversion were monitored. The results showed that the conversion of methanol strongly depended on the reactor operating temperature. Also, conversion of pure methanol and mixture of methanol and water versus time were studied and the effect of water on deactivation of the catalyst was investigated. The results revealed that when pure methanol was used as the process feed, the catalyst deactivation occurred very slowly. But, by adding water to the feed methanol, the deactivation of the {gamma}-alumina was increased very rapidly; so much that, by increasing water content to 20 weight percent by weight, the catalyst lost its activity by about 12.5-fold more than in the process with pure methanol. Finally, a temperature dependent model developed to predict pure methanol conversion to DME correlates reasonably well with experimental data. 11 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Kinetic spectrophotometric determination of Bi(III based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of phenylfluorone by hydrogen peroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SOFIJA M. RANČIĆ

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available A new reaction was suggested and a new kinetic method was elaborated for determination of Bi(III in solution, based on its catalytic effect on the oxidation of phenyl-fluorone (PF by hydrogen peroxide in ammonia buffer. By application of spectrophotometric technique, a limit of quantification (LQ of 128 ng cm-3 was reached, and the limit of detection (LD of 37 ng cm-3 was obtained, where LQ was defined as the ratio signal:noise = 10:1 and LD was defined as signal 3:1 against the blank. The RSD value was found to be in the range 2.8–4.8 % for the investigated concentration range of Bi(III. The influence of some ions upon the reaction rate was tested. The method was confirmed by determining Bi(III in a stomach ulcer drug (“Bicit HP”, Hemofarm A.D.. The obtained results were compared to those obtained by AAS and good agreement of results was obtained.

  5. Effect of the relationship between particle size, inter-particle distance, and metal loading of carbon supported fuel cell catalysts on their catalytic activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gon Corradini, Patricia; Pires, Felipe I.; Paganin, Valdecir A.; Perez, Joelma, E-mail: jperez@iqsc.usp.br [Instituto de Quimica de Sao Carlos, USP (Brazil); Antolini, Ermete [Scuola di Scienza dei Materiali (Italy)

    2012-09-15

    The effect of the relationship between particle size (d), inter-particle distance (x{sub i}), and metal loading (y) of carbon supported fuel cell Pt or PtRu catalysts on their catalytic activity, based on the optimum d (2.5-3 nm) and x{sub i}/d (>5) values, was evaluated. It was found that for y < 30 wt%, the optimum values of both d and x{sub i}/d can be always obtained. For y {>=} 30 wt%, instead, the positive effect of a thinner catalyst layer of the fuel cell electrode than that using catalysts with y < 30 wt% is concomitant to a decrease of the effective catalyst surface area due to an increase of d and/or a decrease of x{sub i}/d compared to their optimum values, with in turns gives rise to a decrease in the catalytic activity. The effect of the x{sub i}/d ratio has been successfully verified by experimental results on ethanol oxidation on PtRu/C catalysts with same particle size and same degree of alloying but different metal loading. Tests in direct ethanol fuel cells showed that, compared to 20 wt% PtRu/C, the negative effect of the lower x{sub i}/d on the catalytic activity of 30 and 40 wt% PtRu/C catalysts was superior to the positive effect of the thinner catalyst layer.

  6. Effect of the relationship between particle size, inter-particle distance, and metal loading of carbon supported fuel cell catalysts on their catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corradini, Patricia Gon; Pires, Felipe I.; Paganin, Valdecir A.; Perez, Joelma; Antolini, Ermete

    2012-09-01

    The effect of the relationship between particle size ( d), inter-particle distance ( x i ), and metal loading ( y) of carbon supported fuel cell Pt or PtRu catalysts on their catalytic activity, based on the optimum d (2.5-3 nm) and x i / d (>5) values, was evaluated. It was found that for y fuel cell electrode than that using catalysts with y ethanol oxidation on PtRu/C catalysts with same particle size and same degree of alloying but different metal loading. Tests in direct ethanol fuel cells showed that, compared to 20 wt% PtRu/C, the negative effect of the lower x i / d on the catalytic activity of 30 and 40 wt% PtRu/C catalysts was superior to the positive effect of the thinner catalyst layer.

  7. Effect of Phosphine Doping and the Surface Metal State of Ni on the Catalytic Performance of Ni/Al2O3 Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoru Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Ni-based catalysts as replacement for noble metal catalysts are of particular interest in the catalytic conversion of biomass due to their cheap and satisfactory catalytic activity. The Ni/SiO2 catalyst has been studied for the hydrogenolysis of glycerol, and doping with phosphorus (P found to improve the catalytic performance significantly because of the formation of Ni2P alloys. However, in the present work we disclose a different catalytic phenomenon for the P-doped Ni/Al2O3 catalyst. We found that doping with P has a significant effect on the state of the active Ni species, and thus improves the selectivity to 1,2-propanediol (1,2-PDO significantly in the hydrogenolysis of glycerol, although Ni-P alloys were not observed in our catalytic system. The structure and selectivity correlations were determined from the experimental data, combining the results of X-ray diffraction (XRD, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, hydrogen temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR and ammonia temperature-programmed desorption (NH3-TPD. The presence of NiO species, formed from P-doped Ni/Al2O3 catalyst, was shown to benefit the formation of 1,2-PDO. This was supported by the results of the Ni/Al2O3 catalyst containing NiO species with incomplete reduction. Furthermore, the role the NiO species played in the reaction and the potential reaction mechanism over the P-doped Ni/Al2O3 catalyst is discussed. The new findings in the present work open a new vision for Ni catalysis and will benefit researchers in designing Ni-based catalysts.

  8. Effect of the relationship between particle size, inter-particle distance, and metal loading of carbon supported fuel cell catalysts on their catalytic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gon Corradini, Patricia; Pires, Felipe I.; Paganin, Valdecir A.; Perez, Joelma; Antolini, Ermete

    2012-01-01

    The effect of the relationship between particle size (d), inter-particle distance (x i ), and metal loading (y) of carbon supported fuel cell Pt or PtRu catalysts on their catalytic activity, based on the optimum d (2.5–3 nm) and x i /d (>5) values, was evaluated. It was found that for y i /d can be always obtained. For y ≥ 30 wt%, instead, the positive effect of a thinner catalyst layer of the fuel cell electrode than that using catalysts with y i /d compared to their optimum values, with in turns gives rise to a decrease in the catalytic activity. The effect of the x i /d ratio has been successfully verified by experimental results on ethanol oxidation on PtRu/C catalysts with same particle size and same degree of alloying but different metal loading. Tests in direct ethanol fuel cells showed that, compared to 20 wt% PtRu/C, the negative effect of the lower x i /d on the catalytic activity of 30 and 40 wt% PtRu/C catalysts was superior to the positive effect of the thinner catalyst layer.

  9. Effects of complexation of oppositely charged water-soluble cobaltphthalocyanines on catalytic mercaptoethanol autoxidation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, E.T.W.M.; Heuts, J.P.A.; Piet, P.; Beelen, T.P.M.; German, A.L.

    1994-01-01

    In order to elucidate the different promoting effects polycations have on cobalt(II) phthalocyanine-catalyzed autoxidn. of 2-mercaptoethanol, the properties of mixts. of oppositely charged water-sol. cobalt(II) phthalocyanines were studied. The contribution of polycation-induced dimerization of the

  10. Selective catalytic reduction converter design: The effect of ammonia nonuniformity at inlet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paramadayalan, Thiyagarajan; Pant, Atul

    2013-01-01

    A three-dimensional CFD model of SCR converter with detailed chemistry is developed. The model is used to study the effects of radial variation in inlet ammonia profile on SCR emission performance at different temperatures. The model shows that radial variation in inlet ammonia concentration affects the SCR performance in the operating range of 200-400 .deg. C. In automotive SCR systems, ammonia is non-uniformly distributed due to evaporation/reaction of injected urea, and using a 1D model or a 3D model with flat ammonia profile at inlet for these conditions can result in erroneous emission prediction. The 3D SCR model is also used to study the effect of converter design parameters like inlet cone angle and monolith cell density on the SCR performance for a non-uniform ammonia concentration profile at the inlet. The performance of SCR is evaluated using DeNO x efficiency and ammonia slip

  11. Effective Diffusivities and Pore-Transport Characteristics of Washcoated Ceramic Monolith for Automotive Catalytic Converter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Starý, T.; Šolcová, Olga; Schneider, Petr; Marek, M.

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 18 (2006), s. 5934-5943 ISSN 0009-2509 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA104/05/2616; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4072404 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : effective diffusivity * monolith catalyst * chromatography Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.629, year: 2006

  12. Study on Pt-structured anodic alumina catalysts for catalytic combustion of toluene: Effects of competitive adsorbents and competitive impregnation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Luan, Hongjuan; Li, Tao; Wu, Yongqiang; Ni, Yanhui

    2016-01-01

    Novel competitive impregnation methods were used to prepare high dispersion Pt-structured anodic alumina catalysts. It is found that competitive adsorbents owning different acidity result in different Pt loading amount and also exert great effects on Pt distribution, particle size and redox ability. The suitable adsorption ability of lactic acid led to its best activity for catalytic combustion of toluene. Co-competitive and pre-competitive impregnation methods were also compared and the mechanisms of two competitive methods were proposed. Co-competitive impregnation made Pt distribute more uniformly through pore channels and resulted in better catalytic activity, because of the weaker spatial constraint effect of lactic acid. Furthermore, the optimized Pt-structured anodic alumina catalyst also showed a good chlorine-resistance under moisture atmosphere, because water could promote the reaction of dichloromethane (DCM) transformation and clean chloride by-products to release more active sites.

  13. Radiochemical methods and spectroscopical analyses for investigating the catalytic effects of 2-methyltetrahydro-anthraquinone and phenanthraquinone in wood pulp production using the soda additive method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besser, R. v.

    1982-01-01

    The studies were to show whether 2-methyltetrahydroanthraquinone or phenanthraquinone, two additives obtainable at low cost, will have a suitable catalytic effect on the delignification using the soda additive pulping method. For this purpose, soda cookings have been made in a 7 l rotary autoclave. The results have shown that 2-MeTHAQ is by far the better catalytic agent. Further experiments have been made to investigate the mode of action of the redox additives, intended to reveal further characteristics which can be correlated with the knowledge obtained from the preceding soda cookings. The analysis shows that there is a connection between the analytical lignin characteristics and the effectiveness of quinoid additives. (orig./PW) [de

  14. The effect of catalytic reaction conditions on the incorporation of tritium in unsaturated compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shevchenko, V P; Nagayev, I Yu; Myasoedov, N F [AN SSSR, Moscow (USSR). Inst. Molekulyarnoj Genetiki

    1989-10-01

    We have obtained multiple-tritium-labelled 5-{alpha}-androstan-3-one, dihydropicrotoxin, dimethyl-propyl-3-chloro-butyl-ammonium chloride, 2,2-di(trifluoromethyl)-3,3-dicyanobicyclohept(2,2,1)ane, dihydroalprenolol, undecanoic acid, dihydro-m,m'-di-tert.-butyl-p-coumaric acid and dihydrofusicoccin. By varying the conditions for the hydrogenation of terminal double bonds, one can considerably increase the molar radioactivity of such compounds through isotopic exchange. We discuss some tentative explanations of the effect of the labelling reaction conditions upon the synthesis of compounds with desired properties. (author).

  15. The effect of catalytic reaction conditions on the incorporation of tritium in unsaturated compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shevchenko, V.P.; Nagayev, I.Yu.; Myasoedov, N.F.

    1989-01-01

    We have obtained multiple-tritium-labelled 5-α-androstan-3-one, dihydropicrotoxin, dimethyl-propyl-3-chloro-butyl-ammonium chloride, 2,2-di(trifluoromethyl)-3,3-dicyanobicyclohept[2,2,1]ane, dihydroalprenolol, undecanoic acid, dihydro-m,m'-di-tert.-butyl-p-coumaric acid and dihydrofusicoccin. By varying the conditions for the hydrogenation of terminal double bonds, one can considerably increase the molar radioactivity of such compounds through isotopic exchange. We discuss some tentative explanations of the effect of the labelling reaction conditions upon the synthesis of compounds with desired properties. (author)

  16. Effect of Pretreatment with Sulfuric Acid on Catalytic Hydrocracking of Fe/AC Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiyu Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Activated carbon (AC was modified by H2SO4 and used as a support for catalyst. The Fe2S3/AC-T catalyst was prepared by deposition-precipitation method and used to catalyze hydrocracking of coal-related model compound, di(1-naphthylmethane (DNM. The properties of catalyst were studied by N2 adsorption-desorption, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The result showed that ferric sulfate and acidic centers had synergetic effect on hydrocracking of DNM when using Fe2S3/AC-T as catalyst, the optimal loading of Fe is 9 wt.%. Hydroconversion of the extraction residue from Guizhou bituminous coal was also studied using Fe2S3/AC-T as the catalyst. The reaction was conducted in cyclohexane under 0.8 Mpa of initial hydrogen pressure at 310°C. The reaction mixture was extracted with petroleum ether and analyzed by GC/MS. Amounts of organic compounds which fall into the categories of homologues of benzene and naphthalene were detected. It suggested that the catalyst could effectively catalyze the cleavage of C-C-bridged bonds.

  17. Determination of trace vanadium using its catalytic effect on the oxidation of gallic acid by bromate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamane, Takeshi; Fukasawa, Tsutomu

    1976-01-01

    The oxidation of gallic acid by bromate with trace vanadium as catalyst was followed spectrophotometrically by measurements of absorbance change at 420 nm. The reaction rate was obtained graphically from the absorbance vs. time curve in the range of about 15 to 40 min. reaction time. The reaction rate was proportional to the concentration of vanadium(V) in the range 0--120 ng (under the conditions of 5.3x10 -3 M gallic acid, 6.0x10 -3 M potassium bromate, pH 3.8) and 0--30 ng (1.1x10 -2 M gallic acid, 2.7x10 -2 M potassium bromate, pH 3.8). Using this relationship, the concentration of vanadium as low as 0.1 ng/ml can be determined. The relative standard deviations at 50 ng and 20 ng of vanadium were 3.5% (n=14) and 4.0% (n=10), respectively. Iron(III) interfered seriously even when present in 20 times the amounts of vanadium. Up to 60 times, W(VI), Mo(VI) and iodide did not interfere. Many of the other ions examined were found to have no effect or slight effect even when present in 1000 times the amounts of vanadium. Other factors affecting the reaction rate were also studied. (auth.)

  18. Effects of Particle Filters and Selective Catalytic Reduction on In-Use Heavy-Duty Diesel Truck Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preble, C.; Cados, T.; Harley, R.; Kirchstetter, T.

    2016-12-01

    Heavy-duty diesel trucks (HDDT) are a major source of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and black carbon (BC) in urban environments, contributing to persistent ozone and particulate matter air quality problems. Diesel particle filters (DPFs) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems that target PM and NOx emissions, respectively, have recently become standard equipment on new HDDT. DPFs can also be installed on older engines as a retrofit device. Previous work has shown that DPF and SCR systems can reduce NOx and BC emissions by up to 70% and 90%, respectively, compared to modern trucks without these after-treatment controls (Preble et al., ES&T 2015). DPFs can have the undesirable side-effect of increasing ultrafine particle (UFP) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) emissions. While SCR systems can partially mitigate DPF-related NO2 increases, these systems can emit nitrous oxide (N2O), a potent greenhouse gas. We report new results from a study of HDDT emissions conducted in fall 2015 at the Port of Oakland and Caldecott Tunnel in California's San Francisco Bay Area. We report pollutant emission factors (g kg-1) for emitted NOx, NO2, BC, PM2.5, UFP, and N2O on a truck-by-truck basis. Using a roadside license plate recognition system, we categorize each truck by its engine model year and installed after-treatment controls. From this, we develop emissions profiles for trucks with and without DPF and SCR. We evaluate the effectiveness of these devices as a function of their age to determine whether degradation is an issue. We also compare the emission profiles of trucks traveling at low speeds along a level, arterial road en route to the port and at high speeds up a 4% grade highway approaching the tunnel. Given the climate impacts of BC and N2O, we also examine the global warming potential of emissions from trucks with and without DPF and SCR.

  19. Effect of the method for rhenium neptasulfide preparation on its catalytic properties in hydrogenation of nitrobenzene and m-nitrobenzoic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal'chevskaya, T.A.; Bogutskaya, L.V.; Belousov, V.M.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of conditions of rhenium heptasulfide synthesis by thiosulfate method on its physicochemical and catalytic properties during hydrogenation of nitrobenzene and m-nitrobenzoic acid has been studied. It is shown that the maximum yield of m-aminobenzoic acid can be attained on insoluble sulfide rhenium contacts, containing excessive amount of sulfur (3.5 %). Under certain conditions of catalyst synthesis particles of Re 2 S 7 soluble in dimethylformamide are formed, which possess selectivity towards amine

  20. Effect of Au Precursor and Support on the Catalytic Activity of the Nano-Au-Catalysts for Propane Complete Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshid M. Ali

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic activity of nano-Au-catalyst(s for the complete propane oxidation was investigated. The results showed that the nature of both Au precursor and support strongly influences catalytic activity of the Au-catalyst(s for the propane oxidation. Oxidation state, size, and dispersion of Au nanoparticles in the Au-catalysts, surface area, crystallinity, phase structure, and redox property of the support are the key aspects for the complete propane oxidation. Among the studied Au-catalysts, the AuHAuCl4-Ce catalyst is found to be the most active catalyst.

  1. Synergistic Effect of Copper and Cobalt in Cu-Co-O Composite Nanocatalyst for Catalytic Ozonation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, Yuming; Wu, Lina; Wang, Guangli; Zhao, Hui; Jiang, Pingping; Feng, Cuiyun

    2013-01-01

    A novel Cu-Co-O composite nanocatalyst was designed and prepared for the ozonation of phenol. A synergistic effect of copper and cobalt was observed over the Cu-Co-O composite nanocatalyst, which showed higher activity than either copper or cobalt oxide alone. In addition, the Cu-Co-O composite revealed good activity in a wide initial pH range (4.11-8.05) of water. The fine dispersion of cobalt on the surface of copper oxide boosted the interaction between catalyst and ozone, and the surface Lewis acid sites on the Cu-Co-O composite were determined as the active sites. The Raman spectroscopy also proved that the Cu-Co-O composite was quite sensitive to the ozone. The trivalent cobalt in the Cu-Co-O composite was proposed as the valid state

  2. Effect of metal ions doping (M = Ti4+, Sn4+) on the catalytic performance of MnOx/CeO2 catalyst for low temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yan; Tang, Changjin; Dong, Lin

    2015-04-01

    Key Laboratory of Mesoscopic Chemistry of MOE, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, PR China The abatement of nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission from exhaust gases of diesel and stationary sources is a significant challenge for economic and social development. Ceria-based solid solutions were synthesized and used as supports to prepare MnOx/Ce0.8Ti0.2O2 and MnOx/Ce0.8Sn0.2O2 catalysts (Mn/CeTi and Mn/CeSn) for low temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3 (NH3-SCR). The effects of Ti or Sn doping on the catalytic performance of MnOx/CeO2 catalyst were investigated. Experimental results show that doping of Ti or Sn increases the NO removal efficiency of MnOx/CeO2. The NO conversion of Mn/CeTi catalyst is more than 90 % at temperature window of 175 ~ 300 °C under a gas hour space velocity of 60,000 mL.g-1.h-1. Modified catalysts are also found to exhibit greatly improved resistance to sulfur-poisoning. NH3-TPD results suggest that NH3 desorption on the catalysts is observed over a wide temperature range, due to the variability of adsorbed NH3 species with different thermal stabilities. Doping of Ti and Sn into Mn/CeO2 greatly increased the NH3 adsorption ability of the composites which could promote the SCR reaction. Characterization results also indicate that doping of Ti or Sn brings about catalysts with higher BET surface area, enhanced oxygen storage capacity and increased surface acidity.

  3. Effectiveness of replacing catalytic converters in LPG-fueled vehicles in Hong Kong

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Lyu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Many taxis and public buses are powered by liquefied petroleum gas (LPG in Hong Kong. With more vehicles using LPG, they have become the major contributor to ambient volatile organic compounds (VOCs in Hong Kong. An intervention program which aimed to reduce the emissions of VOCs and nitrogen oxides (NOx from LPG-fueled vehicles was implemented by the Hong Kong government in September 2013. Long-term real-time measurements indicated that the program was remarkably effective in reducing LPG-related VOCs, NOx and nitric oxide (NO in the atmosphere. Receptor modeling results further revealed that propane, propene, i-butane, n-butane and NO in LPG-fueled vehicle exhaust emissions decreased by 40.8 ± 0.1, 45.7 ± 0.2, 35.7 ± 0.1, 47.8 ± 0.1 and 88.6 ± 0.7 %, respectively, during the implementation of the program. In contrast, despite the reduction of VOCs and NOx, O3 following the program increased by 0.40 ± 0.03 ppbv (∼  5.6 %. The LPG-fueled vehicle exhaust was generally destructive to OH and HO2. However, the destruction effect weakened for OH and it even turned to positive contribution to HO2 during the program. These changes led to the increases of OH, HO2 and HO2 ∕ OH ratio, which might explain the positive O3 increment. Analysis of O3–VOCs–NOx sensitivity in ambient air indicated VOC-limited regimes in the O3 formation before and during the program. Moreover, a maximum reduction percentage of NOx (i.e., 69 % and the lowest reduction ratio of VOCs ∕ NOx (i.e., 1.1 in LPG-fueled vehicle exhaust were determined to give a zero O3 increment. The findings are of great help to future formulation and implementation of control strategies on vehicle emissions in Hong Kong, and could be extended to other regions in China and around the world.

  4. Crystal-plane effects of MFI zeolite in catalytic conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Ning

    2018-02-15

    We report the direct characterization of coke information in the clearly resolved (0 1 0) and (1 0 0) planes of various anisotropic MFI zeolites using EELS techniques, in a model reaction of methanol to hydrocarbons. For the first time, we found that the main coke species varied between different planes and depended on the crystal structure. The coke species was graphite carbon and polyaromatic hydrocarbon over MFI nanosheets and MFI with b-axis length 60 nm, respectively. The diffusion of aromatics out of conventional MFI zeolites was found only through the straight channels, while small molecules randomly diffused through both channels, resulting in different coke deposition on the (0 1 0) plane and the (1 0 0) plane from different precursors. As all product molecules diffused only through the straight channels, the MFI nanosheet showed a distinct crystal-plane selective effect of coke deposition, in contrast to nearly uniform coke distribution throughout the entire external surface for conventional zeolites. This anisotropic diffusion behavior influenced the gaseous and liquid products significantly, providing deep insight into the MFI catalyst for the selective control of products via crystal structure.

  5. The effect of deep eutectic solvents on catalytic function and structure of bovine liver catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harifi-Mood, Ali Reza; Ghobadi, Roohollah; Divsalar, Adeleh

    2017-02-01

    Aqueous solutions of reline and glyceline, the most common deep eutectic solvents, were used as a medium for Catalase reaction. By some spectroscopic methods such as UV-vis, fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) function and structure of Catalase were investigated in aqueous solutions of reline and glyceline. These studies showed that the binding affinity of the substrate to the enzyme increased in the presence of 100mM glyceline solution, which contrasts with reline solution that probably relates to instructive changes in secondary structure of protein. Meanwhile, enzyme remained nearly 70% and 80% active in this concentration of glyceline and reline solutions respectively. In the high concentration of DES solutions, enzyme became mainly inactive but surprisingly stayed in nearly 40% active in choline chloride solution, which is the common ion species in reline and glyceline solvents. It is proposed that the chaotropic nature of choline cation might stop the reducing trend of activity in concentrated choline chloride solutions but this instructive effect is lost in aqueous deep eutectic solvents. In this regard, the presence of various concentrations of deep eutectic solvents in the aqueous media of human cells would be an activity adjuster for this important enzyme in its different operation conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Visible light activated catalytic effect of iron containing soda-lime silicate glass characterized by 57Fe-Moessbauer spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiro Kubuki; Jun Iwanuma; Yusuke Takahashi; Kazuhiko Akiyama; Ernoe Kuzmann; Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest; Tetsuaki Nishida

    2014-01-01

    A relationship between local structure and visible light activated catalytic effect of iron containing soda lime silicate glass with the composition of 15Na 2 O·15CaO·xFe 2 O 3 ·(70-x)SiO 2 , x = 5-50 mass %, abbreviated as NCFSx was investigated by means of 57 Fe-Moessbauer spectroscopy, X-ray diffractometry (XRD), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and ultraviolet-visible light absorption spectroscopy (UV-Vis). Moessbauer spectra of NCFSx glass with 'x' being equal to or larger than 30 after isothermal annealing at 1,000 deg C for 100 min consisted of a paramagnetic doublet and a magnetic sextet. The former had isomer shift (δ) of 0.24 mm s -1 and quadrupole splitting (Δ) of 0.99 mm s -1 due to distorted Fe III O 4 tetrahedra, and the latter had δ of 0.36 mm s -1 and internal magnetic field (H int ) of 51.8 T due to hematite (α-Fe 2 O 3 ). The absorption area (A) of α-Fe 2 O 3 varied from 47.2 to 75.9, 93.1, 64.8 and 47.9 % with 'x' from 30 to 35, 40, 45 and 50, indicating that the amount of precipitated α-Fe 2 O 3 varied with the Fe 2 O 3 content of NCFSx glass. The precipitation of α-Fe 2 O 3 was also confirmed by XRD study of annealed NCFS glass with 'x' larger than 30. A relaxed sexted with δ, H int and Γ of 0.34 mm s -1 and 37.9 T and 1.32 mm s -1 was observed from the Moessbauer spectra of annealed NCFSx glass with 'x' of 45 and 50, implying that the precipitation of non-stoichiometric iron hydroxide oxide with the composition of Fe 1.833 (OH) 0.5 O 2.5 having the similar structure of α-Fe 2 O 3 and α-FeOOH. A remarkable decrease in the concentration of methylene blue (MB) from 10 to 0.0 μmol L -1 with the first-order rate constant (k) of 2.87 × 10 -2 h -1 was observed for 10-day leaching test using annealed NCFS50 glass under visible light irradiation. ESI-MS study indicated that existence of fragments with m/z value of 129, 117 and 207 etc. originating from MB having m/z of 284. This

  7. The Effect of Deposit Temperature on the Catalytic SO2-to-SO3 Conversion in a Copper Flash Smelting Heat Recovery Boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmusto, Juho; Vainio, Emil; Laurén, Tor; Lindgren, Mari

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the work was to study the catalytic role of copper flash smelter deposit in the SO2-to-SO3 conversion. In addition, the effect of process gas temperature at 548 K to 1173 K (275 °C to 900 °C) on the amount of SO3 formed was addressed both in the absence and presence of genuine copper flash smelter deposit. The SO3 conversion rate changed as a function of process gas temperature, peaking at 1023 K (750 °C). A dramatic increase in the SO2-to-SO3 conversion was observed when process dust was present, clearly indicating that process dust catalyzes the SO2-to-SO3 conversion. Based on these results, the catalytic ability of the deposit may lead to sulfuric acid dew point corrosion.

  8. Effects of Preparation Method on the Structure and Catalytic Activity of Ag–Fe2O3 Catalysts Derived from MOFs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodong Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, Ag–Fe2O3 catalysts were successfully prepared using several different methods. Our main intention was to investigate the effect of the preparation methods on the catalysts’ structure and their catalytic performance for CO oxidation. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, N2 adsorption–desorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, H2-temperature program reduction (H2-TPR and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES. Ag–Fe catalysts prepared by impregnating Ag into MIL-100 (Fe presented the best catalytic activity, over which CO could be completely oxidized at 160 °C. Based on the characterization, it was found that more metallic Ag species and porosity existed on Ag–Fe catalysts, which could efficiently absorb atmospheric oxygen and, thus, enhance the CO oxidation.

  9. Mutations in the catalytic core or the C-terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) integrase disrupt virion infectivity and exert diverse effects on reverse transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinrigl, Adolf; Nosek, Dagmara; Ertl, Reinhard; Guenzburg, Walter H.; Salmons, Brian; Klein, Dieter

    2007-01-01

    Understanding of the structures and functions of the retroviral integrase (IN), a key enzyme in the viral replication cycle, is essential for developing antiretroviral treatments and facilitating the development of safer gene therapy vehicles. Thus, four MLV IN-mutants were constructed in the context of a retroviral vector system, harbouring either a substitution in the catalytic centre, deletions in the C-terminus, or combinations of both modifications. IN-mutants were tested for their performance in different stages of the viral replication cycle: RNA-packaging; RT-activity; transient and stable infection efficiency; dynamics of reverse transcription and nuclear entry. All mutant vectors packaged viral RNA with wild-type efficiencies and displayed only slight reductions in RT-activity. Deletion of either the IN C-terminus alone, or in addition to part of the catalytic domain exerted contrasting effects on intracellular viral DNA levels, implying that IN influences reverse transcription in more than one direction

  10. Effect of Potassium in Calcined Co-Mn-Al Layered Double Hydroxide on the Catalytic Decomposition of N2O

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Obalová, L.; Karásková, K.; Jirátová, Květa; Kovanda, F.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 90, 1-2 (2009), s. 132-140 ISSN 0926-3373 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : nitrous oxide * catalytic decomposition * potassium promoter Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.252, year: 2009

  11. Effect of Mo-Doped Mesoporous Al-SSP Catalysts for the Catalytic Dehydration of Ethanol to Ethylene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titinan Chanchuey

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic dehydration of ethanol to ethylene over the mesoporous Al-SSP and Mo-doped Al-SSP catalysts was investigated. The Al-SSP catalyst was first synthesized by the modified sol-gel method and then doped with Mo by impregnation to obtain 1% Mo/Al-SSP and 5% Mo/Al-SSP catalysts (1 and 5 wt% of Mo. The final catalysts were characterized using various techniques such as XRD, N2 physisorption, SEM/EDX, TEM, and NH3-TPD. The catalytic activity for all catalysts in gas-phase ethanol dehydration reaction was determined at temperature range of 200°C to 400°C. It was found that the most crucial factor influencing the catalytic activities appears to be the acidity. The acid property of catalysts depended on the amount of Mo loading. Increased Mo loading in Al-SSP resulted in increased weak acid sites, which enhanced the catalytic activity. Besides acidity, the high concentration of Al at surface of catalyst is also essential to obtain high activity. Based on the results, the most suitable catalyst in this study is 1% Mo/Al-SSP catalyst, which can produce ethylene yield of ca. 90% at 300°C with slight amounts of diethyl ether (DEE and acetaldehyde.

  12. Effect of Calcination Temperatures and Mo Modification on Nanocrystalline (γ-χ-Al2O3 Catalysts for Catalytic Ethanol Dehydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tharmmanoon Inmanee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The mixed gamma and chi crystalline phase alumina (M-Al catalysts prepared by the solvothermal method were investigated for catalytic ethanol dehydration. The effects of calcination temperatures and Mo modification were elucidated. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, N2 physisorption, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and NH3-temperature programmed desorption (NH3-TPD. The catalytic activity was tested for ethylene production by dehydration reaction of ethanol in gas phase at atmospheric pressure and temperature between 200°C and 400°C. It was found that the calcination temperatures and Mo modification have effects on acidity of the catalysts. The increase in calcination temperature resulted in decreased acidity, while the Mo modification on the mixed phase alumina catalyst yielded increased acidity, especially in medium to strong acids. In this study, the catalytic activity of ethanol dehydration to ethylene apparently depends on the medium to strong acid. The mixed phase alumina catalyst calcined at 600°C (M-Al-600 exhibits the complete ethanol conversion having ethylene yield of 98.8% (at 350°C and the Mo-modified catalysts promoted dehydrogenation reaction to acetaldehyde. This can be attributed to the enhancement of medium to strong acid with metal sites of catalyst.

  13. The Poisoning Effect of Na Doping over Mn-Ce/TiO2 Catalyst for Low-Temperature Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by NH3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Sodium carbonate (Na2CO3, sodium nitrate (NaNO3, and sodium chloride (NaCl were chosen as the precursors to prepare the Na salts deposited Mn-Ce/TiO2 catalysts through an impregnation method. The influence of Na on the performance of the Mn-Ce/TiO2 catalyst for low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of NOx by NH3 was investigated. Experimental results showed that Na salts had negative effects on the activity of Mn-Ce/TiO2 and the precursors of Na salts also affected the catalytic activity. The precursor Na2CO3 had a greater impact on the catalytic activity, while NaNO3 had minimal effect. The characterization results indicated that the significant changes in physical and chemical properties of Mn-Ce/TiO2 were observed after Na was doped on the catalysts. The significant decreases in surface areas and NH3 adsorption amounts were observed after Na was doped on the catalysts, which could be considered as the main reasons for the deactivation of Na deposited Mn-Ce/TiO2.

  14. Anodically-grown TiO_2 nanotubes: Effect of the crystallization on the catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sacco, Adriano; Garino, Nadia; Lamberti, Andrea; Pirri, Candido Fabrizio; Quaglio, Marzia

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Anodically-grown TiO_2 nanotubes as catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. • Amorphous NTs compared to thermal- and vapor-treated crystalline nanostructures. • The selection of the crystallization conditions leads to performance similar to Pt. - Abstract: In this work we investigated the behavior of TiO_2 nanotube (NT) arrays, grown by anodic oxidation of Ti foil, as catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline water solution. In particular, as-grown amorphous NTs were compared to crystalline anatase nanostructures, obtained following two different procedures, namely thermal and vapor-induced crystallizations. The catalytic activity of these materials toward the ORR was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry measurements. ORR polarization curves, combined with the rotating disk technique, indicated a predominant four-electrons reduction path, especially for crystalline samples. The effect of the structural characteristics of the investigated materials on the catalytic activity was analyzed in details by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The catalytic performance of the crystalline NTs is only slightly lower with respect to the reference material for fuel cell applications, namely platinum, but is in line with other cost-effective catalysts recently proposed in the literature. However, if compared to the larger part of these low-cost catalysts, anodically-grown TiO_2 NTs are characterized by a synthesis route which is highly reproducible and easily up-scalable.

  15. Anodically-grown TiO{sub 2} nanotubes: Effect of the crystallization on the catalytic activity toward the oxygen reduction reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacco, Adriano, E-mail: adriano.sacco@iit.it [Center for Sustainable Future Technologies @Polito, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Corso Trento 21, 10129, Torino (Italy); Garino, Nadia [Center for Sustainable Future Technologies @Polito, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Corso Trento 21, 10129, Torino (Italy); Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129, Torino (Italy); Lamberti, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.lamberti@polito.it [Center for Sustainable Future Technologies @Polito, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Corso Trento 21, 10129, Torino (Italy); Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129, Torino (Italy); Pirri, Candido Fabrizio [Center for Sustainable Future Technologies @Polito, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Corso Trento 21, 10129, Torino (Italy); Applied Science and Technology Department, Politecnico di Torino, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129, Torino (Italy); Quaglio, Marzia [Center for Sustainable Future Technologies @Polito, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Corso Trento 21, 10129, Torino (Italy)

    2017-08-01

    Highlights: • Anodically-grown TiO{sub 2} nanotubes as catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction. • Amorphous NTs compared to thermal- and vapor-treated crystalline nanostructures. • The selection of the crystallization conditions leads to performance similar to Pt. - Abstract: In this work we investigated the behavior of TiO{sub 2} nanotube (NT) arrays, grown by anodic oxidation of Ti foil, as catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in alkaline water solution. In particular, as-grown amorphous NTs were compared to crystalline anatase nanostructures, obtained following two different procedures, namely thermal and vapor-induced crystallizations. The catalytic activity of these materials toward the ORR was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry measurements. ORR polarization curves, combined with the rotating disk technique, indicated a predominant four-electrons reduction path, especially for crystalline samples. The effect of the structural characteristics of the investigated materials on the catalytic activity was analyzed in details by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The catalytic performance of the crystalline NTs is only slightly lower with respect to the reference material for fuel cell applications, namely platinum, but is in line with other cost-effective catalysts recently proposed in the literature. However, if compared to the larger part of these low-cost catalysts, anodically-grown TiO{sub 2} NTs are characterized by a synthesis route which is highly reproducible and easily up-scalable.

  16. Effects of Weight Hourly Space Velocity and Catalyst Diameter on Performance of Hybrid Catalytic-Plasma Reactor for Biodiesel Synthesis over Sulphated Zinc Oxide Acid Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luqman Buchori

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Biodiesel synthesis through transesterification of soybean oil with methanol on hybrid catalytic-plasma reactor over sulphated zinc oxide (SO42-/ZnO active acid catalyst was investigated. This research was aimed to study effects of Weight Hourly Space Velocity (WHSV and the catalyst diameter on performance of the hybrid catalytic-plasma reactor for biodiesel synthesis. The amount (20.2 g of active sulphated zinc oxide solid acid catalysts was loaded into discharge zone of the reactor. The WHSV and the catalyst diameter were varied between 0.89 to 1.55 min-1 and 3, 5, and 7 mm, respectively. The molar ratio of methanol to oil as reactants of 15:1 is fed to the reactor, while operating condition of the reactor was kept at reaction temperature of 65 oC and ambient pressure. The fatty acid methyl ester (FAME component in biodiesel product was identified by Gas Chromatography - Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS. The results showed that the FAME yield decreases with increasing WHSV. It was found that the optimum FAME yield was achieved of 56.91 % at WHSV of 0.89 min-1 and catalyst diameter of 5 mm and reaction time of 1.25 min. It can be concluded that the biodiesel synthesis using the hybrid catalytic-plasma reactor system exhibited promising the FAME yield. Copyright © 2017 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 15th November 2016; Revised: 24th December 2016; Accepted: 16th February 2017 How to Cite: Buchori, L., Istadi, I., Purwanto, P. (2017. Effects of Weight Hourly Space Velocity and Catalyst Diameter on Performance of Hybrid Catalytic-Plasma Reactor for Biodiesel Synthesis over Sulphated Zinc Oxide Acid Catalyst. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 12 (2: 227-234 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.12.2.775.227-234 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.12.2.775.227-234

  17. The effect of antimony-tin and indium-tin oxide supports on the catalytic activity of Pt nanoparticles for ammonia electro-oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Júlio César M. [Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering, Centre for Catalysis Research and Innovation (CCRI), University of Ottawa, 161 Louis-Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada); Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN-SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242 Cidade Universitária, CEP 05508-900, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Piasentin, Ricardo M.; Spinacé, Estevam V.; Neto, Almir O. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energéticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN-SP, Av. Prof. Lineu Prestes, 2242 Cidade Universitária, CEP 05508-900, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Baranova, Elena A., E-mail: elena.baranova@uottawa.ca [Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering, Centre for Catalysis Research and Innovation (CCRI), University of Ottawa, 161 Louis-Pasteur, Ottawa, ON K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2016-09-01

    Platinum nanoparticles supported on carbon (Pt/C) and carbon with addition of ITO (Pt/C-ITO (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 9}·(SnO{sub 2}){sub 1}) and ATO (Pt/C-ATO (SnO{sub 2}){sub 9}·(Sb{sub 2}O{sub 5}){sub 1}) oxides were prepared by sodium borohydride reduction method and used for ammonia electro-oxidation reaction (AmER) in alkaline media. The effect of the supports on the catalytic activity of Pt for AmER was investigated using electrochemical (cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry) and direct ammonia fuel cell (DAFC) experiments. X-ray diffraction (XRD) showed Pt peaks attributed to the face-centered cubic (fcc) structure, as well as peaks characteristic of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} in ITO support and cassiterite SnO{sub 2} phase of ATO support. According to transmission electron micrographs the mean particles sizes of Pt over carbon were 5.4, 4.9 and 4.7 nm for Pt/C, Pt/C-ATO and Pt/C-ITO, respectively. Pt/C-ITO catalysts showed the highest catalytic activity for ammonia electrooxidation in both electrochemical and fuel cell experiments. We attributed this to the presence of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} phase in ITO, which provides oxygenated or hydroxide species at lower potentials resulting in the removal of poisonous intermediate, i.e., atomic nitrogen (N{sub ads}) and promotion of ammonia electro-oxidation. - Highlights: • Oxide support effect on the catalytic activity of Pt towards ammonia electro-oxidation. • Direct ammonia fuel cell (DAFC) performance using Pt over different supports as anode. • Pt/C-ITO shows better catalytic activity for ammonia oxidation than Pt/C and Pt/C-ATO.

  18. Catalytic role of Au-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite on enhanced degradation of an azo-dye by electrochemically active biofilms: a quantized charging effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalathil, Shafeer; Lee, Jintae; Cho, Moo Hwan, E-mail: mhcho@ynu.ac.kr [Yeungnam University, School of Chemical Engineering (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    A green and sustainable approach to azo dye degradation by an electrochemically active biofilm (EAB) with Au-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite assistance (average size of Au {approx}8 nm) has been developed with high efficiency and mineralization of toxic intermediates. The EAB-Au-TiO{sub 2} system degraded the dye more rapidly than the EAB without the nanocomposite, which indicated the catalytic role of the Au-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite on the dye degradation. Toxicity measurements showed that the dye wastewater treated by the EAB-Au-TiO{sub 2} system was almost non-toxic while the dye wastewater treated by the EAB without the nanocomposite showed a high toxicity compared to the parent dye. Quantized charging and Fermi level equilibration within the Au-TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite may be attributed to the excellent catalytic activity of the nanocomposite on the dye degradation. A mechanism of the catalytic activity is also proposed. Redox behavior and quantized charging of the nanocomposite were confirmed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV), respectively. The proposed protocol can be effectively utilized in wastewater treatment applications.

  19. Oxidative destruction of biomolecules by gasoline engine exhaust products and detoxifying effects of the three-way catalytic converter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaurock, B; Hippeli, S; Metz, N; Elstner, E F

    1992-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of engine exhaust condensation products were derived from cars powered by diesel or four-stroke gasoline engines (with and without three-way catalytic converter). The cars were operated on a static test platform. Samples of the different exhaust solutions accumulated in a Grimmer-type distillation trap (VDI 3872) during standard test programs (Federal Test Procedure) were incubated with important biomolecules. As indicators of reactive oxygen species or oxidative destruction, ascorbic acid, cysteine, glutathione, serum albumin, the enzymes glycerinaldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase and xanthine oxidase, and the oxygen free-radical indicator keto-methylthiobutyrate were used. During and after the incubations, oxygen activation (consumption) and oxidative destruction were determined. Comparison of the oxidative activities of the different types of exhaust condensates clearly showed that the exhaust condensate derived from the four-stroke car equipped with a three-way catalytic converter exhibited by far the lowest oxidative and destructive power.

  20. Effect of Composition and Mass Ratio on the Catalytic Wet Air Oxidation Catalyst Cu–Fe–La/FSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Chao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO technology is used for the treatment of the simulated printing and dyeing wastewater and also for investigating the catalyst performance indicators such as catalyst activity and stability. The catalyst activity is mainly reflected from the water decolorization and CODCr removal rates, and the stability of the catalyst is mainly reflected by the quantity of metal dissolution. The experimental results showed that the prepared Cu–Fe–La/FSC catalyst with a 1:1:2 ratio of Cu–Fe–La by the impregnation method exhibited good activity for the treatment of the simulated printing and dyeing wastewater by the CWAO method, and the decolorization and CODCr removal rates using this catalyst were 98.7% and 78.6%, respectively, with a higher catalytic activity, lower concentration of metal dissolution, and good stability.

  1. Effect of Ti content in the photo catalytic behavior of Fe/TiO2-SiO2 systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon C, A.; Portillo V, N.; Hernandez P, I.; May L, M.; Gonzalez R, L.; Luna P, R.; Suarez P, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this work we report the synthesis of Fe/TiO 2 -SiO 2 systems with different concentrations of TiO 2 in order to determine the influence of titanium content on the structural, textural, optical properties and their photo catalytic behavior. The materials were synthesized by the sol-gel method and their modification was carried out by incipient impregnation. All samples were characterized be means of X-ray diffraction, N 2 physisorption (Bet method), Dr-UV-Vis and Raman spectroscopy. The modifications of the structural and optical properties are discussed on the basis of long-range order reduction, suggesting the formation of highly dispersed TiO 2 species. On the other hand, it was observed that the energy of the optical band gap decreases by introducing Fe. On the basis of these phenomena, the photo catalytic activity was measured, employing the degradation of orange II azo dye as a model reaction. (Author)

  2. N2O Catalytic Decomposition - Effect of Pelleting Pressure on Activity of Co-Mn-Al Mixed Oxide Catalyst

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Galejová, K.; Obalová, L.; Jirátová, Květa; Pacultová, K.; Kovanda, F.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 2 (2009), s. 172-179 ISSN 0366-6352. [International Conference of the Slovak-Society-of-Chemical-Engineering /35./. Tatranske Matliare, 26.05.2008-30.05.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/07/1400 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : pelleting pressure * nitrous oxide * catalytic decomposition Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.791, year: 2009

  3. Photo catalytic reduction of benzophenone on TiO2: Effect of preparation method and reaction conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albiter E, E.; Valenzuela Z, M. A.; Alfaro H, S.; Flores V, S. O.; Rios B, O.; Gonzalez A, V. J.; Cordova R, I.

    2010-01-01

    The photo catalytic reduction of benzophenone was studied focussing on improving the yield to benzhydrol. TiO 2 was synthesized by means of a hydrothermal technique. TiO 2 (Degussa TiO 2 -P25) was used as a reference. Catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction and nitrogen physisorption. The photo catalytic reduction was carried out in a batch reactor at 25 C under nitrogen atmosphere, acetonitrile as solvent and isopropanol as electron donor. A 200 W Xe-Hg lamp (λ= 360 nm) was employed as irradiation source. The chemical composition of the reaction system was determined by HPLC. Structural and textural properties of the synthesized TiO 2 depended on the type of acid used during sol formation step. Using HCl, a higher specific surface area and narrower pore size distribution of TiO 2 was obtained in comparison with acetic acid. As expected, the photochemical reduction of benzophenone yielded benzopinacol as main product, whereas, benzhydrol is only produced in presence of TiO 2 (i.e. photo catalytic route). In general, the hydrothermally synthesized catalysts were less active and with a lower yield to benzhydrol. The optimal reaction conditions to highest values of benzhydrol yield (70-80%) were found at 2 g/L (catalyst loading) and 0.5 m M of initial concentration of benzophenone, using commercial TiO 2 -P25. (Author)

  4. A phosphate-dependent shift in redox state of cerium oxide nanoparticles and its effects on catalytic properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sanjay; Dosani, Talib; Karakoti, Ajay S.; Kumar, Amit; Seal, Sudipta; Self, William

    2011-10-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeNPs) have shown promise as catalytic antioxidants in cell culture and animal models as both superoxide dismutase and catalase mimetics. The reactivity of the cerium (Ce) atoms at the surface of its oxide particle is critical to such therapeutic properties, yet little is known about the potential for a protein or small molecule corona to form on these materials in vivo. Moreover Ce atoms in these active sites have the potential to interact with small molecule anions, peptides, or sugars when administered in culture or animal models. Several nanomaterials have been shown to alter or aggregate under these conditions, rendering them less useful for biomedical applications. In this work we have studied the change in catalytic properties of CeNPs when exposed to various biologically relevant conditions in vitro. We have found that CeNPs are resistant to broad changes in pH and also not altered by incubation in cell culture medium. However to our surprise phosphate anions significantly altered the characteristics of these nanomaterials and shifted the catalytic behavior due to the binding of phosphate anions to cerium. Given the abundance of phosphate in biological systems in an inorganic form, it is likely that the action of CeNPs as a catalyst may be strongly influenced by the local concentration of phosphate in the cells and/or tissues in which it has been introduced.

  5. Photo catalytic reduction of benzophenone on TiO{sub 2}: Effect of preparation method and reaction conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albiter E, E.; Valenzuela Z, M. A.; Alfaro H, S.; Flores V, S. O.; Rios B, O.; Gonzalez A, V. J.; Cordova R, I., E-mail: mavalenz@ipn.m [IPN, Escuela Superior de Ingenieria Quimica e Industrias Extractivas, Laboratorio de Catalisis y Materiales, Zacatenco, 07738 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    The photo catalytic reduction of benzophenone was studied focussing on improving the yield to benzhydrol. TiO{sub 2} was synthesized by means of a hydrothermal technique. TiO{sub 2} (Degussa TiO{sub 2}-P25) was used as a reference. Catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction and nitrogen physisorption. The photo catalytic reduction was carried out in a batch reactor at 25 C under nitrogen atmosphere, acetonitrile as solvent and isopropanol as electron donor. A 200 W Xe-Hg lamp ({lambda}= 360 nm) was employed as irradiation source. The chemical composition of the reaction system was determined by HPLC. Structural and textural properties of the synthesized TiO{sub 2} depended on the type of acid used during sol formation step. Using HCl, a higher specific surface area and narrower pore size distribution of TiO{sub 2} was obtained in comparison with acetic acid. As expected, the photochemical reduction of benzophenone yielded benzopinacol as main product, whereas, benzhydrol is only produced in presence of TiO{sub 2} (i.e. photo catalytic route). In general, the hydrothermally synthesized catalysts were less active and with a lower yield to benzhydrol. The optimal reaction conditions to highest values of benzhydrol yield (70-80%) were found at 2 g/L (catalyst loading) and 0.5 m M of initial concentration of benzophenone, using commercial TiO{sub 2}-P25. (Author)

  6. Superior catalytic effect of TiF{sub 3} over TiCl{sub 3} in improving the hydrogen sorption kinetics of MgH{sub 2}: Catalytic role of fluorine anion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, L.-P.; Kang, X.-D.; Dai, H.-B.; Liang, Y.; Fang, Z.-Z.; Wang, P.-J. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, P. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)], E-mail: pingwang@imr.ac.cn; Cheng, H.-M. [Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2009-04-15

    TiF{sub 3} shows a superior catalytic effect over TiCl{sub 3} in improving the hydrogen sorption kinetics of MgH{sub 2}. Combined phase analysis and microstructure characterization suggest that both titanium halide additives react with host MgH{sub 2} in a similar way. However, systematic X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies reveal that the incorporated fluorine (F) differs significantly from its analog chlorine (Cl) in terms of bonding state. The asymmetry of F 1s spectra and the sputtering-induced peak shift suggest that, in addition to the Mg-F bond, a new Ti-F-Mg bonding is formed in the TiF{sub 3}-doped MgH{sub 2}. In contrast, only one stable binding state of Cl is identified in the form of MgCl{sub 2} for the TiCl{sub 3}-doped MgH{sub 2}. In combination with the designed experiments, these findings suggest that the generation of active F-containing species may be responsible for the advantage of TiF{sub 3} over TiCl{sub 3} in improving both the absorption and desorption kinetics of MgH{sub 2}. Fundamentally, it emphasizes the functionality of F anion in tuning the activity of compound catalyst.

  7. Superior catalytic effect of TiF3 over TiCl3 in improving the hydrogen sorption kinetics of MgH2: Catalytic role of fluorine anion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, L.-P.; Kang, X.-D.; Dai, H.-B.; Liang, Y.; Fang, Z.-Z.; Wang, P.-J.; Wang, P.; Cheng, H.-M.

    2009-01-01

    TiF 3 shows a superior catalytic effect over TiCl 3 in improving the hydrogen sorption kinetics of MgH 2 . Combined phase analysis and microstructure characterization suggest that both titanium halide additives react with host MgH 2 in a similar way. However, systematic X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies reveal that the incorporated fluorine (F) differs significantly from its analog chlorine (Cl) in terms of bonding state. The asymmetry of F 1s spectra and the sputtering-induced peak shift suggest that, in addition to the Mg-F bond, a new Ti-F-Mg bonding is formed in the TiF 3 -doped MgH 2 . In contrast, only one stable binding state of Cl is identified in the form of MgCl 2 for the TiCl 3 -doped MgH 2 . In combination with the designed experiments, these findings suggest that the generation of active F-containing species may be responsible for the advantage of TiF 3 over TiCl 3 in improving both the absorption and desorption kinetics of MgH 2 . Fundamentally, it emphasizes the functionality of F anion in tuning the activity of compound catalyst

  8. Catalytic effect of KF-846 on the reforming of the primary intermediates from the co-pyrolysis of pubescens and LDPE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Wen-wu; Hu, Chang-wei; Tong, Dong-mei; Yang, Yu; Li, Gui-ying; Zhu, Liang-fang; Tang, Jin-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Reforming reactions were inhibited by H 2 , decrease of acidity and low temperature. • There was a synergistic effect on producing hydrogen between Ni and Mo. • The lattice oxygen over catalyst employed might transfer into the intermediates. • Co-pyrolysis, low temperature and N 2 could restrain oxygen transfer to some extent. - Abstract: Co-pyrolysis is regarded as an effective approach to upgrade the quality of pyrolysis products. In this work the activity of KF-846 was evaluated by co-pyrolysis of pubescens and low density polyethylene under different experimental conditions including catalytic mode, pyrolytic atmosphere and temperature, etc. The results showed that the fresh KF-846 exerted strong effects of cyclization, aromatization, hydrogen transfer and vapor-catalytic reforming reactions on the primary intermediates from the co-pyrolysis. The hydrogen-rich gases indicated a synergistic effect between Ni and Mo over KF-846 on producing hydrogen. More importantly, the reforming reactions might be inhibited to some extent by H 2 atmosphere, the low temperature and the decrease of acidity over catalyst. Furthermore, it was deduced that the oxygen over the lattice of catalyst or some intermediates might transfer into other intermediates, possibly resulting in more products with high oxygen content, but it was presumed that the low temperature, co-pyrolysis process and N 2 atmosphere could repress the trend to a certain degree. The mass and energy balance of co-pyrolysis were analyzed, and the main reaction pathways were also proposed. The interference in pyrolysis by regulating the catalytic mode, pyrolytic atmosphere and temperature, acidity over catalyst might posses a certain guiding significance for the pyrolytic technology and the design/selection of catalysts employed

  9. Efeito do cromo nas propriedades catalíticas da MCM-41 The effect of chromium on the catalytic properties of MCM-41

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alcineia Conceição Oliveira

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of chromium on the catalytic properties of MCM-41 was evaluated in order to develop new catalysts for the trimethylbenzene transalkylation with benzene to produce ethylbenzene, a high-value aromatic in the industry. It was found that chromium decreases the specific surface area but increases the acidity, turning MCM-41 into an active and selective catalyst for ethylbenzene and toluene production. The coke produced on the catalyst is hydrogenated and mainly located outside the pores and thus can be easily removed. The catalyst is more active and selective than mordenite, a commercial catalyst, and thus more promising for commercial applications.

  10. The effect of defects on the catalytic activity of single Au atom supported carbon nanotubes and reaction mechanism for CO oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sajjad; Fu Liu, Tian; Lian, Zan; Li, Bo; Sheng Su, Dang

    2017-08-23

    The mechanism of CO oxidation by O 2 on a single Au atom supported on pristine, mono atom vacancy (m), di atom vacancy (di) and the Stone Wales defect (SW) on single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) surface is systematically investigated theoretically using density functional theory. We determine that single Au atoms can be trapped effectively by the defects on SWCNTs. The defects on SWCNTs can enhance both the binding strength and catalytic activity of the supported single Au atom. Fundamental aspects such as adsorption energy and charge transfer are elucidated to analyze the adsorption properties of CO and O 2 and co-adsorption of CO and O 2 molecules. It is found that CO binds stronger than O 2 on Au supported SWCNT. We clearly demonstrate that the defected SWCNT surface promotes electron transfer from the supported single Au atom to O 2 molecules. On the other hand, this effect is weaker for pristine SWCNTs. It is observed that the high density of spin-polarized states are localized in the region of the Fermi level due to the strong interactions between Au (5d orbital) and the adjacent carbon (2p orbital) atoms, which influence the catalytic performance. In addition, we elucidate both the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) and Eley-Rideal (ER) mechanisms of CO oxidation by O 2 . For the LH pathway, the barriers of the rate-limiting step are calculated to be 0.02 eV and 0.05 eV for Au/m-SWCNT and Au/di-SWCNT, respectively. To regenerate the active sites, an ER-like reaction occurs to form a second CO 2 molecule. The ER pathway is observed on Au/m-SWCNT, Au/SW-SWCNT and Au/SWCNT in which the Au/m-SWCNT has a smaller barrier. The comparison with a previous study (Lu et al., J. Phys. Chem. C, 2009, 113, 20156-20160.) indicates that the curvature effect of SWCNTs is important for the catalytic property of the supported single Au. Overall, Au/m-SWCNT is identified as the most active catalyst for CO oxidation compared to pristine SWCNT, SW-SWCNT and di-SWCNT. Our findings give a

  11. Transition state analogue imprinted polymers as artificial amidases for amino acid p-nitroanilides: morphological effects of polymer network on catalytic efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Divya; Thomas, Benny; Devaky, K S

    2017-11-13

    The morphology of the polymer network - porous/less porous - plays predominant role in the amidase activities of the polymer catalysts in the hydrolytic reactions of amino acid p-nitroanilides. Polymers with the imprints of stable phosphonate analogue of the intermediate of hydrolytic reactions were synthesized as enzyme mimics. Molecular imprinting was carried out in thermodynamically stable porogen dimethyl sulphoxide and unstable porogen chloroform, to investigate the morphological effects of polymers on catalytic amidolysis. It was found that the medium of polymerization has vital influence in the amidase activities of the enzyme mimics. The morphological studies of the polymer catalysts were carried out by scanning electron microscopy and Bruner-Emmett-Teller analysis. The morphology of the polymer catalysts and their amidase activities are found to be dependent on the composition of reaction medium. The polymer catalyst prepared in dimethyl sulphoxide is observed to be efficient in 1:9 acetonitrile (ACN)-Tris HCl buffer and that prepared in chloroform is noticed to be stereo specifically and shape-selectively effective in 9:1 ACN-Tris HCl buffer. The solvent memory effect in catalytic amidolysis was investigated using the polymer prepared in acetonitrile.

  12. Catalytic activity and effect of modifiers on Ni-based catalysts for the dry reforming of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barroso-Quiroga, Maria Martha; Castro-Luna, Adolfo Eduardo [Facultad de Ingenieria y Ciencias Economico-Sociales INTEQUI-CONICET-UNSL, Av. 25 de Mayo 384 (5730) Villa Mercedes (S.L.) (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    Ni catalysts supported on different ceramic oxides (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CeO{sub 2}, La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, ZrO{sub 2}) were prepared by wet impregnation. The catalytic behavior toward hydrogen production through the dry reforming of methane using a fixed-bed reactor was evaluated under certain experimental conditions, and the catalyst supported on ZrO{sub 2} showed the highest stable activity during the period of time studied. The catalyst supported on CeO{sub 2} has a relatively good activity, but shows signs of deactivation after a certain time during the reaction. This catalyst was chosen to be studied after the addition of 0.5 wt% Li and K as activity modifiers. The introduction of the alkaline metals produces a reduction of the catalytic activity but a better stability over the reactant conversion time. The reverse water-gas shift reaction influences the global system of reactions, and as the results indicate, should be considered near equilibrium. (author)

  13. The effect of CNTs on structures and catalytic properties of AuPd clusters for H2O2 synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hua-feng; Xie, Peng-yang; Yu, Hui-you; Li, Xiao-nian; Wang, Jian-guo

    2012-12-28

    The structures and catalytic properties of AuPd clusters supported on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for H(2)O(2) synthesis have been investigated by means of density functional theory calculations. Firstly, the structures of AuPd clusters are strongly influenced by CNTs, in which the bottom layers are mainly composed of Pd and the top layers are a mix of Au and Pd due to the stronger binding of Pd than Au on CNTs. Especially, it is found that O(2) adsorption on the Pd/CNTs interfacial sites is much weaker than that on the only Pd sites, which is in contrast to transition metal oxide (for example TiO(2), Al(2)O(3), CeO(2)) supported metal clusters. Furthermore, Pd ensembles on the interfacial sites have far superior catalytic properties for H(2)O(2) formation than those away from CNT supports due to the changes in electronic structures caused by the CNTs. Therefore, our study provides a physical insight into the enhanced role of carbon supports in H(2)O(2) synthesis over supported AuPd catalysts.

  14. SHORT COMMUNICATION CATALYTIC KINETIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IV) catalyzes the discoloring reaction of DBS-arsenazo oxidized by potassium bromate, a new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace titanium (IV) was developed. The linear range of the determination of ...

  15. Catalytic distillation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  16. Catalytic distillation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  17. Effects of Reduced Sulfur Compounds on Pd-catalytic Hydrodechlorination of TCE in Groundwater by Cathodic H2 under Electrochemically-induced Oxidizing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Songhu; Chen, Mingjie; Mao, Xuhui; Alshawabkeh, Akram N.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced sulfur compounds (RSCs) poison Pd catalysts for catalytic hydrodechlorination of contaminants in anoxic groundwater. This study investigates the effects of RSCs on Pd-catalytic hydrodechlorination of trichloroethylene (TCE) in oxic groundwater. Water electrolysis in an undivided electrolytic cell is used to produce H2 for TCE hydrodechlorination under oxidizing conditions. TCE is efficiently hydrodechlorinated to ethane, with significant accumulation of H2O2 under acidic conditions. Presence of sulfide at concentrations less than 93.8 μM moderately inhibits TCE hydrodechlorination and H2O2 production. Presence of sulfite at low concentrations (≤ 1 mM) significantly enhances TCE decay, while at high concentration (3 mM) inhibits initially and enhances afterwards when sulfite concentration declines to less than 1 mM. Using radical scavenging experiments and electron spin resonance assay, SO3•− which is generated from sulfite under oxidizing conditions is validated as the new reactive species contributing to the enhancement. This study reveals a distinct mechanism of effect of sulfite on TCE hydrodechlorination by Pd and H2 in oxic groundwater and presents an alternative approach to increasing resistance of Pd to RSCs poisoning. PMID:23962132

  18. Comparison of Elemental Mercury Oxidation Across Vanadium and Cerium Based Catalysts in Coal Combustion Flue Gas: Catalytic Performances and Particulate Matter Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Qi; Yao, Qiang; Duan, Lei; Li, Xinghua; Zhang, Lei; Hao, Jiming

    2018-03-06

    This paper discussed the field test results of mercury oxidation activities over vanadium and cerium based catalysts in both coal-fired circulating fluidized bed boiler (CFBB) and chain grate boiler (CGB) flue gases. The characterizations of the catalysts and effects of flue gas components, specifically the particulate matter (PM) species, were also discussed. The catalytic performance results indicated that both catalysts exhibited mercury oxidation preference in CGB flue gas rather than in CFBB flue gas. Flue gas component studies before and after dust removal equipment implied that the mercury oxidation was well related to PM, together with gaseous components such as NO, SO 2 , and NH 3 . Further investigations demonstrated a negative PM concentration-induced effect on the mercury oxidation activity in the flue gases before the dust removal, which was attributed to the surface coverage by the large amount of PM. In addition, the PM concentrations in the flue gases after the dust removal failed in determining the mercury oxidation efficiency, wherein the presence of different chemical species in PM, such as elemental carbon (EC), organic carbon (OC) and alkali (earth) metals (Na, Mg, K, and Ca) in the flue gases dominated the catalytic oxidation of mercury.

  19. EFFECT OF IMPREGNATION PROCEDURE OF Pt/γ-Al2O3 CATALYSTS UPON CATALYTIC OXIDATION OF CO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Triyono Triyono

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation of carbon monoxide by oxygen using two catalysts prepared by two different methods has been investigated. In the first method, catalyst prepared by immersing γ-Al2O3 into the hexa-chloroplatinic acid solution at 80oC for 4 h, resulted Pt/γ-Al2O3 catalyst having platinum highly dispersed on the support. While that of immersing γ-Al2O3 in the hexa-chloroplatinic acid solution at room temperature for 12 h, produced Pt/ γ-Al2O3 catalyst where platinum dispersion was much lower. Catalytic activity test showed that platinum well dispersed on the support enhanced the activity of oxidation of carbon monoxide. The platinum impregnated at room temperature resulted in the poor activity.   Keyword: Catalyst, CO Oxidation, Platinum.

  20. The effect of noble metals on catalytic methanation reaction over supported Mn/Ni oxide based catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Azelee Wan Abu Bakar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide (CO2 in sour natural gas can be removed using green technology via catalytic methanation reaction by converting CO2 to methane (CH4 gas. Using waste to wealth concept, production of CH4 would increase as well as creating environmental friendly approach for the purification of natural gas. In this research, a series of alumina supported manganese–nickel oxide based catalysts doped with noble metals such as ruthenium and palladium were prepared by wetness impregnation method. The prepared catalysts were run catalytic screening process using in-house built micro reactor coupled with Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR spectroscopy to study the percentage CO2 conversion and CH4 formation analyzed by GC. Ru/Mn/Ni(5:35:60/Al2O3 calcined at 1000 °C was found to be the potential catalyst which gave 99.74% of CO2 conversion and 72.36% of CH4 formation at 400 °C reaction temperature. XRD diffractogram illustrated that the supported catalyst was in polycrystalline with some amorphous state at 1000 °C calcination temperature with the presence of NiO as active site. According to FESEM micrographs, both fresh and used catalysts displayed spherical shape with small particle sizes in agglomerated and aggregated mixture. Nitrogen Adsorption analysis revealed that both catalysts were in mesoporous structures with BET surface area in the range of 46–60 m2/g. All the impurities have been removed at 1000 °C calcination temperature as presented by FTIR, TGA–DTA and EDX data.

  1. Study of the effect of different mixed supports on the catalytic activity and the structure of Bi2MoxW1-xO6 catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangel, R.; Cervantes L, J. L.; Espino, J.; Nunez G, R.; Bartolo P, P.; Gomez C, A.; Diaz, G.

    2014-01-01

    A series of Bi 2 Mo x W 1-x O 6 catalysts supported on Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 , SiO 2 -TiO 2 and activated carbon were synthesized. The aim was to compare the different supports and calcination temperature of catalysts, studying their efficiency and activation temperature in the CO oxidation reaction. The catalysts active phase, Bi 2 Mo x W 1-x O 6 was made by means of chemical precipitation procedure starting from high purity (NH 4 ) 6 Mo 7 O 24 ·4H 2 O, (NH 4 ) 6 W 12 O 6 ·H 2 O, Bi(NO 3 ) 2 ·5H 2 O compounds, which afterwards, were supported on Al 2 O 3 -SiO 2 , SiO 2 -TiO 2 and activated carbon through impregnation. The catalysts characterization was carried out by means of X-ray diffraction analysis, scanning electron microscopy and surface area determination (Bet method). Regarding the catalytic activity the Bi 2 Mo x W 1-x O 6 /carbon activated compound synthesized at 500 grades C was the best catalyst being activated at 125 grades C reaching 90% conversion. It is concludes that was observed an effect of calcination temperature and the support on the different values reached for the catalytic activity. (Author)

  2. Microwave Catalytic Oxidation of Hydrocarbons in Aqueous Solutions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cha, Chang

    2003-01-01

    .... A sufficient amount of experimental work has been completed evaluating the performance of the microwave catalytic oxidation process and determining the effect of different operating parameters...

  3. Turning goals into results: the power of catalytic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, J

    1999-01-01

    Most executives have a big, hairy, audacious goal. They write vision statements, formalize procedures, and develop complicated incentive programs--all in pursuit of that goal. In other words, with the best of intentions, they install layers of stultifying bureaucracy. But it doesn't have to be that way. In this article, Jim Collins introduces the catalytic mechanism, a simple yet powerful managerial tool that helps translate lofty aspirations into concrete reality. Catalytic mechanisms are the crucial link between objectives and performance; they are a galvanizing, nonbureaucratic means to turn one into the other. What's the difference between catalytic mechanisms and most traditional managerial controls? Catalytic mechanisms share five characteristics. First, they produce desired results in unpredictable ways. Second, they distribute power for the benefit of the overall system, often to the discomfort of those who traditionally hold power. Third, catalytic mechanisms have teeth. Fourth, they eject "viruses"--those people who don't share the company's core values. Finally, they produce an ongoing effect. Catalytic mechanisms are just as effective for reaching individual goals as they are for corporate ones. To illustrate how catalytic mechanisms work, the author draws on examples of individuals and organizations that have relied on such mechanisms to achieve their goals. The same catalytic mechanism that works in one organization, however, will not necessarily work in another. Catalytic mechanisms must be tailored to specific goals and situations. To help readers get started, the author offers some general principles that support the process of building catalytic mechanisms effectively.

  4. Catalytic nanoporous membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellin, Michael J; Hryn, John N; Elam, Jeffrey W

    2013-08-27

    A nanoporous catalytic membrane which displays several unique features Including pores which can go through the entire thickness of the membrane. The membrane has a higher catalytic and product selectivity than conventional catalysts. Anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes serve as the catalyst substrate. This substrate is then subjected to Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD), which allows the controlled narrowing of the pores from 40 nm to 10 nm in the substrate by deposition of a preparatory material. Subsequent deposition of a catalytic layer on the inner surfaces of the pores reduces pore sizes to less than 10 nm and allows for a higher degree of reaction selectivity. The small pore sizes allow control over which molecules enter the pores, and the flow-through feature can allow for partial oxidation of reactant species as opposed to complete oxidation. A nanoporous separation membrane, produced by ALD is also provided for use in gaseous and liquid separations. The membrane has a high flow rate of material with 100% selectivity. Also provided is a method for producing a catalytic membrane having flow-through pores and discreet catalytic clusters adhering to the inside surfaces of the pores.

  5. Effect of Feed Composition Changing at Naphtha Catalytic Reforming Unit Due to Involvement of Gasoline Fraction Obtained by Diesel Fuels Hydrodewaxing into the Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Belinskaya, Natalia Sergeevna; Ivanchina, Emilia Dmitrievna; Ivashkina, Elena Nikolaevna; Frantsina, Evgeniya Vladimirovna; Silko, Galina Yurievna

    2014-01-01

    One of the primary products of hydrodewaxing process is stable gasoline, which is characterized by low octane number on the one hand. On the other hand, it contains a significant amount of iso-paraffins (on average 45% wt.) and naphthenes (on average 25% wt.), which are reagents in the naphtha catalytic reforming process primary reactions. Feasibility of stable gasoline obtained by means of diesel fuel catalytic hydrodewaxing process involving into the processing at the naphtha catalytic refo...

  6. Catalytic behavior and synergistic effect of nanostructured mesoporous CuO-MnO{sub x}-CeO{sub 2} catalysts for chlorobenzene destruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Chi, E-mail: chi_he@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China); Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, School of Energy and Power Engineering, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049 (China); Yu, Yanke [Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China); Shen, Qun [Research Center for Greenhouse Gases and Environmental Engineering, Shanghai Advanced Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201210 (China); Chen, Jinsheng, E-mail: jschen@iue.ac.cn [Key Lab of Urban Environment and Health, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen 361021 (China); Qiao, Nanli [Department of Environmental Nano-materials, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)

    2014-04-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Mesoporous CuO-MnO{sub x}-CeO{sub 2} oxides with enhanced reducibility and oxygen mobility. • Incorporation of Cu and Mn ions causes abundant crystal defects and oxygen vacancies. • Surface oxygen concentration and active oxygen mobility determine the catalytic efficiency. • Catalysts with conspicuous chlorobenzene low-temperature removal activity and durability. - Abstract: Mesoporous CuO-MnO{sub x}-CeO{sub 2} composite metal oxides with different copper and manganese loadings were prepared by a urea-assistant hydrothermal method, and were further adopted for the complete catalytic combustion of chlorobenzene. The effects of reaction conditions such as inlet reagent concentration and water feed concentration on chlorobenzene combustion were also studied. The structure and textural properties of the synthesized catalysts were characterized via the XRD, N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption, FE-SEM, TEM, H{sub 2}-TPR, O{sub 2}-TPD, and XPS techniques. The characterization results reveal that the presence of a small amount of Mn species can facilitate the incorporation of Cu and Mn ions into ceria lattice to form Cu-Mn-Ce-O solid solution. The synergistic effect of Cu and Mn species can reduce the redox potential of the composite catalysts, and produce large amounts of oxygen vacancies in the interface of CuO{sub x}, MnO{sub x}, and CeO{sub 2} oxides. The catalyst with Cu/Mn atomic ratio of 1/1 exhibits the best chlorobenzene elimination capability, oxidizing about 95% of the inlet chlorobenzene at 264 °C with CO{sub 2} selectivity higher than 99.5%. The concentration and mobility of the chemically adsorbed oxygen are vital for the effective removal of surface Cl species, which inhibits the dissociation of oxygen molecules and decreases the reducibility of the copper and manganese species. It can be rationally concluded that the superior catalytic performance and durability of the mesoporous CuO-MnO{sub x}-CeO{sub 2} composite

  7. Synergy Effects of the Mixture of Bismuth Molybdate Catalysts with SnO2/ZrO2/MgO in Selective Propene Oxidation and the Connection between Conductivity and Catalytic Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, Minh Thang; Do, Van Hung; Truong, Duc Duc

    2016-01-01

    Bismuth molybdate catalysts have been used for partial oxidation and ammoxidation of light hydrocarbons since the 1950s. In particular, there is the synergy effect (the enhancement of the catalytic activity in the catalysts mixed from different components) in different phases of bismuth molybdate...... catalysts which has been observed and studied since the 1980s; however, despite it being interpreted differently by different research groups, there is still no decisive conclusion on the origin of the synergy effect that has been obtained. The starting idea of this work is to find an answer......, impregnation, and sol-gel methods. The mixtures were characterized by XRD, BET, XPS, and EDX techniques to determine the phase composition and surface properties. The conductivities of these samples were recorded at the catalytic reaction temperature (300-450 degrees C). Comparison of the catalytic activities...

  8. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  9. Preparation of mesoporous alumina films by anodization: Effect of pretreatments on the aluminum surface and MTBE catalytic oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vazquez, A.L.; Carrera, R.; Arce, E.; Castillo, N.; Castillo, S.; Moran-Pineda, M.

    2009-01-01

    Mesoporous materials are both scientifically and technologically important because of the presence of voids of controllable dimensions at atomic, molecular, and nanometric scales. Over the last decade, there has been both an increasing interest and research effort in the synthesis and characterization of these types of materials. The purposes of this work are to study the physical and chemical changes in the properties of mesoporous alumina films produced by anodization in sulphuric acid by different pretreatments on the aluminium surface such as mechanical polishing [MP] and electropolishing [EP]; and to compare their properties such as morphology, structure and catalytic activity with those present in commercial alumina. The morphologic and physical characterizations of the alumina film samples were carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The chemical evaluations were performed by the oxidation of methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE) at 400 deg. C under O 2 /He oxidizing conditions (Praxair, 2.0% O 2 /He balance). According to the results, the samples that presented higher activities than those in Al 2 O 3 /Al [MP] and commercial alumina in the MTBE oxidation (69%), were those prepared by Al 2 O 3 /Al [EP]. The average mesoporous diameter was 17 nm, and the morphological shape was equiaxial; thus, that pore distribution was the smallest of all with a homogeneous distribution.

  10. Preparation of mesoporous alumina films by anodization: Effect of pretreatments on the aluminum surface and MTBE catalytic oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vazquez, A.L., E-mail: avazquezd@ipn.m [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, ESIQIE-IPN, AP 75-876, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Lazaro Cardenas 152, C.P. 07730, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Carrera, R. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, ESIQIE-IPN, AP 75-876, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Lazaro Cardenas 152, C.P. 07730, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Arce, E. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, ESIQIE-IPN, AP 75-876, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Castillo, N. [CINVESTAV, Departamento de Fisica. Av. IPN 2508, 07360, Mexico, D.F (Mexico); Castillo, S. [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica, ESIQIE-IPN, AP 75-876, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Lazaro Cardenas 152, C.P. 07730, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Moran-Pineda, M. [Programa de Ingenieria Molecular, Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Lazaro Cardenas 152, C.P. 07730, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2009-08-26

    Mesoporous materials are both scientifically and technologically important because of the presence of voids of controllable dimensions at atomic, molecular, and nanometric scales. Over the last decade, there has been both an increasing interest and research effort in the synthesis and characterization of these types of materials. The purposes of this work are to study the physical and chemical changes in the properties of mesoporous alumina films produced by anodization in sulphuric acid by different pretreatments on the aluminium surface such as mechanical polishing [MP] and electropolishing [EP]; and to compare their properties such as morphology, structure and catalytic activity with those present in commercial alumina. The morphologic and physical characterizations of the alumina film samples were carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The chemical evaluations were performed by the oxidation of methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE) at 400 deg. C under O{sub 2}/He oxidizing conditions (Praxair, 2.0% O{sub 2}/He balance). According to the results, the samples that presented higher activities than those in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al [MP] and commercial alumina in the MTBE oxidation (69%), were those prepared by Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Al [EP]. The average mesoporous diameter was 17 nm, and the morphological shape was equiaxial; thus, that pore distribution was the smallest of all with a homogeneous distribution.

  11. A novel hydrolysis method to synthesize chromium hydroxide nanoparticles and its catalytic effect in the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Ping; Zhou, Zhen; Xu, Hongbin; Zhang, Yi

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Synthesis of Cr(OH) 3 nanoparticles in Cr 3+ –F − aqueous solution. ► The F − ion tailors coagulated materials, Cr(OH) 3 nanoparticles are obtained. ► Adding nanosized Cr(OH) 3 , AP thermal decomposition temperature decreases to 200 °C. ► The nanosized Cr(OH) 3 catalyzes NH 3 oxidation, accelerating AP thermal decomposition. - Abstract: A procedure for the preparation of spherical Cr(OH) 3 nanoparticles was developed based on the aging of chromium nitrate aqueous solutions in the presence of sodium fluoride, urea, and polyvinylpyrrolidone. Using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy, the morphological characteristics of Cr(OH) 3 were controlled by altering the molar ratio of fluoride ion to chromium ion, as well as the initial pH and chromium ion concentration. The prepared nanosized Cr(OH) 3 decreased the temperature required to decompose ammonium perchlorate from 450 °C to about 250 °C as the catalyst. The possible catalytic mechanism of the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate was also discussed.

  12. Effect of Co crystallinity on Co/CNT catalytic activity in CO/CO{sub 2} hydrogenation and CO disproportionation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chernyak, Sergei A., E-mail: chernyak.msu@gmail.com [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry, Leninskiye Gory 1-3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Department of Physical Chemistry, Leninsky Avenue 31, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Suslova, Evgeniya V.; Egorov, Alexander V.; Maslakov, Konstantin I. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry, Leninskiye Gory 1-3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Savilov, Serguei V.; Lunin, Valery V. [Lomonosov Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry, Leninskiye Gory 1-3, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Department of Physical Chemistry, Leninsky Avenue 31, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2016-05-30

    Highlights: • Amorphous and crystalline Co supported on CNTs were obtained by tuning of CNT surface. • CO and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation does not occur on amorphous Co particles. • Thermal activation of amorphous Co led to crystallization of metal. • Amorphous Co promotes CO disproportionation. • Carbon shells around the amorphous metal particles after the CO hydrogenation. - Abstract: Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with different degree of surface oxidation were used as supports for 5 wt.% Co catalysts. CNTs and Co/CNT catalysts were analyzed by XPS, nitrogen adsorption, TEM and electron diffraction to reveal their structure. High oxidation degree of CNT surface (8.6 at.% of O) and low Co loading led to predominantly amorphous Co species. This resulted in the absence of catalytic activity in both CO and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation in opposite to the catalyst supported on less oxidized CNTs (5.4 at.% of O) where Co species were found to be crystalline. Thermal treatment of inactive catalyst in H{sub 2} and He led to the formation of Co crystal phase which was active in catalysis. Co particle size in catalyst supported on strongly oxidized CNTs was unchanged during CO hydrogenation in opposite to Co supported on less oxidized CNTs. Carbon shell formation on the surface of amorphous Co particles during CO hydrogenation was revealed, which testified CO disproportionation. Qualitative mechanism of CO hydrogenation on small Co particles was proposed.

  13. A molecularly imprinted electrochemiluminescence sensor based on the mimetic enzyme catalytic effect for ultra-trace Ni2+ determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bin; Li, Jianping; Zhang, Lianming; Xu, Guobao

    2016-10-21

    A novel molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) electrochemiluminescence (MIP-ECL) sensor was developed for the highly sensitive and selective determination of ultra-trace levels of Ni 2+ . The complex Ni 2+ -dimethylglyoxime (Ni-DMG) was chosen as the template molecule to construct the MIP and then acted as a mimetic enzyme to catalyse the oxidisation of luminol to enhance the ECL signal. When the imprinted cavities were occupied by Ni-DMG in the rebinding process, the ECL intensities produced by the luminol-H 2 O 2 ECL system on the MIP-modified electrode surface increased with increased concentration of the Ni-DMG complex. The highly sensitive determination of Ni 2+ was achieved through a catalytic reaction. This technique could be used for the quantitative analysis of Ni 2+ with concentrations from 3.0 × 10 -12 mol L -1 to 6.0 × 10 -9 mol L -1 . The detection limit was 1.01 × 10 -12 mol L -1 , which is much lower than that reported previously. In addition, the allowable amounts of interference ions in the MIP-ECL sensor were higher than that in other common molecularly imprinted sensors because of its excellent recognition of 3D cavity-to-complex molecules and ligand-to-metal ions. This method was successfully used to determine Ni 2+ in real samples, such as apples, carrots and grapes, and has been proven feasible for practical applications.

  14. Stability of cracked naphthas from thermal and catalytic processes and their additive response. Part II. Composition and effect of olefinic structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagpal, J.M.; Joshi, G.C.; Rastogi, S.N. [Indian Institute of Petroleum, Dehradun (India)

    1995-05-01

    Olefinic concentrates were separated from two naphthas, one from fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) and one thermal crackate, using column chromatography. The composition and structure of the olefins were determined by a combination of analytical techniques. FCC naphthas contain relatively higher levels of conjugated dienes. The monoolefins are highly branched. The thermal crackates have higher levels of {alpha}-olefins and abound in mono-, di-, tri- and conjugated cyclic olefins. Stability tests on these olefinic concentrates blended in low-S,N straight-run naphtha showed that cyclic olefins are very active gum formers. Representative commercial antioxidants (hindered phenols and phenylenediamines) both gave good responses to different olefin concentrate test blends. Hindered phenols had a marginally better effect. 14 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. The selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH3 over a novel Ce-Sn-Ti mixed oxides catalyst: Promotional effect of SnO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ming'e.; Li, Caiting; Zeng, Guangming; Zhou, Yang; Zhang, Xunan; Xie, Yin'e.

    2015-07-01

    A series of novel catalysts (CexSny) for the selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3 were prepared by the inverse co-precipitation method. The aim of this novel design was to improve the NO removal efficiency of CeTi by the introduction of SnO2. It was found that the Ce-Sn-Ti catalyst was much more active than Ce-Ti and the best Ce:Sn molar ratio was 2:1. Ce2Sn1 possessed a satisfied NO removal efficiency at low temperature (160-280 °C), while over 90% NO removal efficiency maintained in the temperature range of 280-400 °C at the gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) of 50,000 h-1. Besides, Ce2Sn1 kept a stable NO removal efficiency within a wide range of GHSV and a long period of reacting time. Meanwhile, Ce2Sn1 exhibited remarkable resistance to both respectively and simultaneously H2O and SO2 poisoning due to the introduction of SnO2. The promotional effect of SnO2 was studied by N2 adsorption-desorption, X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectra, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and H2 temperature programmed reduction (H2-TPR) for detail information. The characterization results revealed that the excellent catalytic performance of Ce2Sn1 was associated with the higher specific surface area, larger pore volume and poorer crystallization. Besides, the introduction of SnO2 could result in not only greater conversion of Ce4+ to Ce3+ but also the increase amount of chemisorbed oxygen, which are beneficial to improve the SCR activity. More importantly, a novel peak appearing at lower temperatures through the new redox equilibrium of 2Ce4+ + Sn2+ ↔ 2Ce3+ + Sn4+ and higher total H2 consumption can be obtained by the addition of SnO2. Finally, the possible reaction mechanism of the selective catalytic reduction over Ce2Sn1 was also proposed.

  16. Catalytic Conversion of Biofuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Betina

    This thesis describes the catalytic conversion of bioethanol into higher value chemicals. The motivation has been the unavoidable coming depletion of the fossil resources. The thesis is focused on two ways of utilising ethanol; the steam reforming of ethanol to form hydrogen and the partial oxida...

  17. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    acetylchlorophosphonazo(CPApA) by hydrogen peroxide in 0.10 M phosphoric acid. A novel catalytic kinetic-spectrophotometric method is proposed for the determination of copper based on this principle. Copper(II) can be determined spectrophotometrically ...

  18. Catalytic methanol dissociation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcinikov, Y.; Fainberg, V.; Garbar, A.; Gutman, M.; Hetsroni, G.; Shindler, Y.; Tatrtakovsky, L.; Zvirin, Y.

    1998-01-01

    Results of the methanol dissociation study on copper/potassium catalyst with alumina support at various temperatures are presented. The following gaseous and liquid products at. The catalytic methanol dissociation is obtained: hydrogen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, methane, and dimethyl ether. Formation rates of these products are discussed. Activation energies of corresponding reactions are calculated

  19. Including lateral interactions into microkinetic models of catalytic reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellman, Anders; Honkala, Johanna Karoliina

    2007-01-01

    In many catalytic reactions lateral interactions between adsorbates are believed to have a strong influence on the reaction rates. We apply a microkinetic model to explore the effect of lateral interactions and how to efficiently take them into account in a simple catalytic reaction. Three differ...... different approximations are investigated: site, mean-field, and quasichemical approximations. The obtained results are compared to accurate Monte Carlo numbers. In the end, we apply the approximations to a real catalytic reaction, namely, ammonia synthesis....

  20. A Au/Cu2O-TiO2 system for photo-catalytic hydrogen production. A pn-junction effect or a simple case of in situ reduction?

    KAUST Repository

    Sinatra, Lutfan; LaGrow, Alec P.; Peng, Wei; Kirmani, Ahmad R.; Amassian, Aram; Idriss, Hicham; Bakr, Osman

    2015-01-01

    Photo-catalytic H2 production from water has been studied over Au-Cu2O nanoparticle deposited on TiO2 (anatase) in order to probe into both the plasmon resonance effect (Au nanoparticles) and the pn-junction at the Cu2O-TiO2 interface. The Au-Cu2O

  1. Ensemble averaged structure–function relationship for nanocrystals: effective superparamagnetic Fe clusters with catalytically active Pt skin [Ensemble averaged structure-function relationship for composite nanocrystals: magnetic bcc Fe clusters with catalytically active fcc Pt skin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petkov, Valeri [Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI (United States); Prasai, Binay [Central Michigan University, Mt. Pleasant, MI (United States); Shastri, Sarvjit [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). X-ray Science Division; Park, Hyun-Uk [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea). Department of Chemistry; Kwon, Young-Uk [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea). Department of Chemistry; Skumryev, Vassil [Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avançats (ICREA), Barcelona (Spain); Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (Spain). Department of Physics

    2017-09-12

    Practical applications require the production and usage of metallic nanocrystals (NCs) in large ensembles. Besides, due to their cluster-bulk solid duality, metallic NCs exhibit a large degree of structural diversity. This poses the question as to what atomic-scale basis is to be used when the structure–function relationship for metallic NCs is to be quantified precisely. In this paper, we address the question by studying bi-functional Fe core-Pt skin type NCs optimized for practical applications. In particular, the cluster-like Fe core and skin-like Pt surface of the NCs exhibit superparamagnetic properties and a superb catalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction, respectively. We determine the atomic-scale structure of the NCs by non-traditional resonant high-energy X-ray diffraction coupled to atomic pair distribution function analysis. Using the experimental structure data we explain the observed magnetic and catalytic behavior of the NCs in a quantitative manner. Lastly, we demonstrate that NC ensemble-averaged 3D positions of atoms obtained by advanced X-ray scattering techniques are a very proper basis for not only establishing but also quantifying the structure–function relationship for the increasingly complex metallic NCs explored for practical applications.

  2. Effect of the L499M mutation of the ascomycetous Botrytis aclada laccase on redox potential and catalytic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osipov, Evgeny; Polyakov, Konstantin; Kittl, Roman; Shleev, Sergey; Dorovatovsky, Pavel; Tikhonova, Tamara; Hann, Stephan; Ludwig, Roland; Popov, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    The structures of the ascomycetous B. aclada laccase and its L499M T1-site mutant have been solved at 1.7 Å resolution. The mutant enzyme shows a 140 mV lower redox potential of the type 1 copper and altered kinetic behaviour. The wild type and the mutant have very similar structures, which makes it possible to relate the changes in the redox potential to the L499M mutation Laccases are members of a large family of multicopper oxidases that catalyze the oxidation of a wide range of organic and inorganic substrates accompanied by the reduction of dioxygen to water. These enzymes contain four Cu atoms per molecule organized into three sites: T1, T2 and T3. In all laccases, the T1 copper ion is coordinated by two histidines and one cysteine in the equatorial plane and is covered by the side chains of hydrophobic residues in the axial positions. The redox potential of the T1 copper ion influences the enzymatic reaction and is determined by the nature of the axial ligands and the structure of the second coordination sphere. In this work, the laccase from the ascomycete Botrytis aclada was studied, which contains conserved Ile491 and nonconserved Leu499 residues in the axial positions. The three-dimensional structures of the wild-type enzyme and the L499M mutant were determined by X-ray crystallography at 1.7 Å resolution. Crystals suitable for X-ray analysis could only be grown after deglycosylation. Both structures did not contain the T2 copper ion. The catalytic properties of the enzyme were characterized and the redox potentials of both enzyme forms were determined: E 0 = 720 and 580 mV for the wild-type enzyme and the mutant, respectively. Since the structures of the wild-type and mutant forms are very similar, the change in the redox potential can be related to the L499M mutation in the T1 site of the enzyme

  3. Catalytically favorable surface patterns in Pt-Au nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental demonstrations of novel PtAu nanoparticles with highly enhanced catalytic properties, we present a systematic theoretical study that explores principal catalytic indicators as a function of the particle size and composition. We find that Pt electronic states in the vicinity of the Fermi level combined with a modified electron distribution in the nanoparticle due to Pt-to-Au charge transfer are the origin of the outstanding catalytic properties. From our model we deduce the catalytically favorable surface patterns that induce ensemble and ligand effects. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.

  4. Atomically Precise Metal Nanoclusters for Catalytic Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Rongchao [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-11-18

    The central goal of this project is to explore the catalytic application of atomically precise gold nanoclusters. By solving the total structures of ligand-protected nanoclusters, we aim to correlate the catalytic properties of metal nanoclusters with their atomic/electronic structures. Such correlation unravel some fundamental aspects of nanocatalysis, such as the nature of particle size effect, origin of catalytic selectivity, particle-support interactions, the identification of catalytically active centers, etc. The well-defined nanocluster catalysts mediate the knowledge gap between single crystal model catalysts and real-world conventional nanocatalysts. These nanoclusters also hold great promise in catalyzing certain types of reactions with extraordinarily high selectivity. These aims are in line with the overall goals of the catalytic science and technology of DOE and advance the BES mission “to support fundamental research to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the level of electrons, atoms, and molecules”. Our group has successfully prepared different sized, robust gold nanoclusters protected by thiolates, such as Au25(SR)18, Au28(SR)20, Au38(SR)24, Au99(SR)42, Au144(SR)60, etc. Some of these nanoclusters have been crystallographically characterized through X-ray crystallography. These ultrasmall nanoclusters (< 2 nm diameter) exhibit discrete electronic structures due to quantum size effect, as opposed to quasicontinuous band structure of conventional metal nanoparticles or bulk metals. The available atomic structures (metal core plus surface ligands) of nanoclusters serve as the basis for structure-property correlations. We have investigated the unique catalytic properties of nanoclusters (i.e. not observed in conventional nanogold catalysts) and revealed the structure-selectivity relationships. Highlights of our

  5. Concentric catalytic combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruck, Gerald J [Oviedo, FL; Laster, Walter R [Oviedo, FL

    2009-03-24

    A catalytic combustor (28) includes a tubular pressure boundary element (90) having a longitudinal flow axis (e.g., 56) separating a first portion (94) of a first fluid flow (e.g., 24) from a second portion (95) of the first fluid flow. The pressure boundary element includes a wall (96) having a plurality of separate longitudinally oriented flow paths (98) annularly disposed within the wall and conducting respective portions (100, 101) of a second fluid flow (e.g., 26) therethrough. A catalytic material (32) is disposed on a surface (e.g., 102, 103) of the pressure boundary element exposed to at least one of the first and second portions of the first fluid flow.

  6. Pd-bound functionalized mesoporous silica as active catalyst for Suzuki coupling reaction: Effect of OAcˉ, PPh3 and Clˉ ligands on catalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Trisha; Uyama, Hiroshi; Nandi, Mahasweta

    2018-04-01

    Three new palladium catalysts, PdCat-I, PdCat-II and PdCat-III, immobilized over heterogeneous silica support have been synthesized using different ligands attached to the palladium precursor. The ligands that have been used in this study are acetate, triphenylphosphine and chloride in PdCat-I, PdCat-II and PdCat-III, respectively. The ligands have different effect on stability of the compounds and impart different oxidation states to the metal center. The materials have been characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption-desorption studies, transmission electron microscopy, thermal analysis, and different spectroscopic techniques. The Pd-content of the samples have been determined by ICP-AES analysis. The materials have been used as catalysts for Suzuki coupling reaction of aryl halides with phenylboronic acid under mild conditions. A comparative study has been carried out to ascertain the effect of the nature of different ligands on the outcome of the catalytic reactions. Products have been identified and estimated by 1H NMR and gas chromatography. The results show that the best yields are obtained with the catalyst containing triphenylphosphine as the ligand in methanol. Such type of work to study the effect of ligand on Suzuki coupling reaction over functionalized mesoporous silica heterogeneous catalysts have not been carried out so far.

  7. Catalytic Oxidation of CO and Soot over Ce-Zr-Pr Mixed Oxides Synthesized in a Multi-Inlet Vortex Reactor: Effect of Structural Defects on the Catalytic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensaid, Samir; Piumetti, Marco; Novara, Chiara; Giorgis, Fabrizio; Chiodoni, Angelica; Russo, Nunzio; Fino, Debora

    2016-12-01

    In the present work, ceria, ceria-zirconia (Ce = 80 at.%, Zr = 20 at.%), ceria praseodymia (Ce = 80 at.%, Pr = 20 at.%) and ceria-zirconia-praseodymia catalysts (Ce = 80 at.%, Zr = 10 at.% and Pr = 10 at.%) have been prepared by the multi-inlet vortex reactor (MIVR). For each set of samples, two inlet flow rates have been used during the synthesis (namely, 2 ml min -1 , and 20 ml min -1 ) in order to obtain different particle sizes. Catalytic activity of the prepared materials has been investigated for CO and soot oxidation reactions. As a result, when the catalysts exhibit similar crystallite sizes (in the 7.7-8.8 nm range), it is possible to observe a direct correlation between the O v /F 2g vibrational band intensity ratios and the catalytic performance for the CO oxidation. This means that structural (superficial) defects play a key role for this process. The incorporation of Zr and Pr species into the ceria lattice increases the population of structural defects, as measured by Raman spectroscopy, according to the order: CeO 2  oxidation activity for these catalysts, in contrast with nanostructured ones (e.g., Ce-Zr-O nanopolyhedra, Ce-Pr-O nanocubes) described elsewhere (Andana et al. Appl. Catal. B 197: 125-137, 2016; Piumetti et al., Appl Catal B 180: 271-282, 2016).

  8. Effect of temperature for synthesizing single-walled carbon nanotubes by catalytic chemical vapor deposition over Mo-Co-MgO catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu Zhiqiang; Fang Yan

    2008-01-01

    The influence of temperature on synthesizing single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by catalytic chemical vapor deposition of methane over Mo-Co-MgO catalyst was studied by Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and Raman scattering. The Mo-Co-MgO bimetallic catalyst was prepared by decomposing the mixture of magnesium nitrate, ammonium molybdate, citric acid, and cobalt nitrate. The results show that Mo-Co-MgO bimetallic catalyst is effective to synthesize SWCNTs. By using Mo-Co-MgO bimetallic catalyst, generation of SWCNTs even at 940 K was demonstrated. The optimum temperature of synthesizing SWCNTs over Mo-Co-MgO bimetallic catalyst may be about 1123 K. At 1123 K, the diameters of SWCNTs are in the range of 0.75-1.65 nm. The content of SWCNTs is increased with the increase of temperature below 1123 K and the carbon yield rate is also increased with the increase of synthesis temperature. Therefore, the amount of SWCNTs increases with the increase of temperature below 1123 K. However, above 1123 K, the content of SWCNTs is decreased with the increase of temperature; therefore, it is not effective to increase the amount of SWCNTs through increasing synthesis temperature above 1123 K

  9. Effect of alginate microencapsulation on the catalytic efficiency and in vitro enzyme-prodrug therapeutic efficacy of cytosine deaminase and of recombinant E. coli expressing cytosine deaminase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funaro, Michael G; Nemani, Krishnamurthy V; Chen, Zhihang; Bhujwalla, Zaver M; Griswold, Karl E; Gimi, Barjor

    2016-02-01

    Cytosine deaminase (CD) catalyses the enzymatic conversion of the non-toxic prodrug 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) to the potent chemotherapeutic form, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Intratumoral delivery of CD localises chemotherapy dose while reducing systemic toxicity. Encapsulation in biocompatible microcapsules immunoisolates CD and protects it from degradation. We report on the effect of alginate encapsulation on the catalytic and functional activity of isolated CD and recombinant E. coli engineered to express CD (E. coli(CD)). Alginate microcapsules containing either CD or Escherichia coli(CD) were prepared using ionotropic gelation. Conversion of 5-FC to 5-FU was quantitated in unencapsulated and encapsulated CD/E. coli(CD) using spectrophotometry, with a slower rate of conversion observed following encapsulation. Both encapsulated CD/5-FC and E. coli(CD)/5-FC resulted in cell kill and reduced proliferation of 9 L rat glioma cells, which was comparable to direct 5-FU treatment. Our results show that encapsulation preserves the therapeutic potential of CD and E. coli(CD) is equally effective for enzyme-prodrug therapy.

  10. The effect of soot on ammonium nitrate species and NO2 selective catalytic reduction over Cu-zeolite catalyst-coated particulate filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, Oana; Tamm, Stefanie; Stenfeldt, Marie; Olsson, Louise

    2016-02-28

    A selective catalytic reduction (SCR)-coated particulate filter was evaluated by means of dynamic tests performed using NH3, NO2, O2 and H2O. The reactions were examined both prior to and after soot removal in order to study the effect of soot on ammonium nitrate formation and decomposition, ammonia storage and NO2 SCR. A slightly larger ammonia storage capacity was observed when soot was present in the sample, which indicated that small amounts of ammonia can adsorb on the soot. Feeding of NO2 and NH3 in the presence of O2 and H2O at low temperature (150, 175 and 200°C) leads to a large formation of ammonium nitrate species and during the subsequent temperature ramp using H2O and argon, a production of nitrous oxides was observed. The N2O formation is often related to ammonium nitrate decomposition, and our results showed that the N2O formation was clearly decreased by the presence of soot. We therefore propose that in the presence of soot, there are fewer ammonium nitrate species on the surface due to the interactions with the soot. Indeed, we do observe CO2 production during the reaction conditions also at 150°C, which shows that there is a reaction with these species and soot. In addition, the conversion of NOx due to NO2 SCR was significantly enhanced in the presence of soot; we attribute this to the smaller amount of ammonium nitrate species present in the experiments where soot is available since it is well known that ammonium nitrate formation is a major problem at low temperature due to the blocking of the catalytic sites. Further, a scanning electron microscopy analysis of the soot particles shows that they are about 30-40 nm and are therefore too large to enter the pores of the zeolites. There are likely CuxOy or other copper species available on the outside of the zeolite crystallites, which could have been enhanced due to the hydrothermal treatment at 850°C of the SCR-coated filter prior to the soot loading. We therefore propose that soot is

  11. Toward a catalytic site in DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Ulla; Rohr, Katja; Vogel, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    A number of functionalized polyaza crown ether building blocks have been incorporated into DNA-conjugates as catalytic Cu(2+) binding sites. The effect of the DNA-conjugate catalyst on the stereochemical outcome of a Cu(2+)-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction will be presented....

  12. CATALYTIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION OF Mn(II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    method is based on the catalytic effect of Mn(II) with the oxidation of Celestine blue .... water samples were filtered through a 0.45 μm pore size membrane filter to remove suspended .... slope of the calibration graph as the optimization criterion. ..... In presence of Phen as stability enhancement agent in indicator system. ( ) +.

  13. Treatment of ammonia by catalytic wet oxidation process over platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst in a trickle-bed reactor: effect of pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang-Mao; Lin, Wei-Bang; Ho, Ching-Lin; Shen, Yun-Hwei; Hsia, Shao-Yi

    2010-08-01

    This work adopted aqueous solutions of ammonia for use in catalytic liquid-phase reduction in a trickle-bed reactor with a platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst, prepared by the co-precipitation of chloroplatinic acid (H2PtCl6) and rhodium nitrate [Rh(NO3)3]. The experimental results demonstrated that a minimal amount of ammonia was removed from the solution by wet oxidation in the absence of any catalyst, while approximately 97.0% of the ammonia was removed by wet oxidation over the platinum-rhodium bimetallic catalyst at 230 degrees C with an oxygen partial pressure of 2.0 MPa. The oxidation of ammonia has been studied as a function of pH, and the main reaction products were determined. A synergistic effect is manifest in the platinum-rhodium bimetallic structure, in which the material has the greatest capacity to reduce ammonia. The reaction pathway linked the oxidizing ammonia to nitric oxide, nitrogen, and water.

  14. Effect of Mesoporous Chitosan Action and Coordination on the Catalytic Activity of Mesoporous Chitosan-Grafted Cobalt Tetrakis(p-SulfophenylPorphyrin for Ethylbenzene Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Huang

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available To simulate the active site cavity structure function and axial coordination of cytochrome P-450 enzymes, mesoporous chitosan(mesp-CTS was used as a scaffold for a meso-sized cavity to immobilize cobalt tetrakis(p-sulphophenylporphyrin chloride(Co TPPS. Immobilization was achieved via an acid–base reaction and axial coordination of the H2N-C group to the Co ion in Co TPPS, thus forming the biomimetic catalyst Co TPPS/mesp-CTS. Several approaches, including scanning electron microscopy (SEM, the Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BETtechnique, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, were used to characterize the grafted catalyst. The catalytic performance of Co TPPS/mesp-CTS in ethylbenzene oxidation without any solvents and additives was investigated. The results showed that only 0.96 × 10 mol of Co TPPS grafted onto mesp-CTS could be recycled three times for 200 mL of ethylbenzene oxidation, with an average yield of 44.6% and selectivity of 68.8%. The highly efficient catalysis can be attributed to promotion by mesp-CTS, including the effect of the mesoporous structure and the axial coordination to the Co ion in Co TPPS. This biomimetic methodology provides a method for clean production of acetophenone via ethylbenzene oxidation.

  15. Catalytic oxidation of 1,2-DCBz over V2O5/TiO2-CNTs: effect of CNT diameter and surface functional groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Cuicui; Wang, Qiulin; Peng, Yaqi; Lu, Shengyong; Ji, Longjie; Ni, Mingjiang

    2017-02-01

    A series of V 2 O 5 /TiO 2 -carbon nanotube (CNT) catalysts were prepared and tested to decompose gaseous 1,2-dichlorobenzene (1,2-DCBz). Several physicochemical methods, including nitrogen adsorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and H 2 temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) were employed to characterise their physicochemical properties. To better understand the effect of CNT properties on the reactivity of V 2 O 5 /TiO 2 -CNT catalysts, the 1,2-DCBz residue remaining in the off-gas and on the catalyst surface were both collected and analysed. The results indicate that the outer diameter and the surface functional groups (hydroxide radical and carboxyl) of CNTs significantly influence upon the catalytic activity of CNT-containing V 2 O 5 /TiO 2 catalysts: the CNT outer diameter mainly affects the aggregation of CNTs and the π-π interaction between the benzene ring and CNTs, while the introduction of -OH and -COOH groups by acid treatment can further enlarge specific surface area (SSA) and contribute to a higher average oxidation state of vanadium (V aos ) and supplemental surface chemisorbed oxygen (O ads ). In addition, the enhanced mobility of lattice oxygen (O latt) also improves the oxidation ability of the catalysts.

  16. Effect of CO{sub 2}-admixture on the catalytic performance of Ni-Nb-M-O catalysts in oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane to ethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiao, A.; Kalevaru, V.N.; Martin, A. [Rostock Univ. (Germany). Leibniz-Institut fuer Katalyse e.V.; Hari Kumar, A. Sri; Lingaiah, N.; Prasad, P.S. Sai [Indian Institute of Chemical Technology, Hyderabad (India). Inorganic and Physical Chemistry Div.

    2012-07-01

    In this work, we report the synthesis, characterization and application of Ni-Nb-M-O catalysts with different promoters (M = Cr, Mo, W) for the oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of ethane to ethylene. Ni:Nb:M ratio was kept at 1:0.176:0.1 (atomic ratio). The catalysts were calcined at 450 C/5h/air. Catalytic tests were carried out in a fixed bed quartz reactor in the temperature range from 300 to 450 C, with a fixed W/F (1.02 g/cm{sup 3} . s{sup -1}) but with changing mole ratios of C{sub 2}H{sub 6}:O{sub 2}:CO{sub 2}:N{sub 2} (1:0-1.4:1.4-0:2). The product analysis was made off-line using GC equipped with FID. It is evident that the CO{sub 2}-admixture to the reactant feed caused a slight decrease in the conversion of ethane but considerably improved the selectivity of ethylene. Among the three promoters of the same group applied, Cr exhibited superior performance compared to other two. This means increase in d-character of transition metal (i.e. from 3d to 5d) has shown an adverse effect on the conversion of ethane and selectivity of ethylene. (orig.)

  17. Catalytic biomass pyrolysis process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayton, David C.; Gupta, Raghubir P.; Turk, Brian S.; Kataria, Atish; Shen, Jian-Ping

    2018-04-17

    Described herein are processes for converting a biomass starting material (such as lignocellulosic materials) into a low oxygen containing, stable liquid intermediate that can be refined to make liquid hydrocarbon fuels. More specifically, the process can be a catalytic biomass pyrolysis process wherein an oxygen removing catalyst is employed in the reactor while the biomass is subjected to pyrolysis conditions. The stream exiting the pyrolysis reactor comprises bio-oil having a low oxygen content, and such stream may be subjected to further steps, such as separation and/or condensation to isolate the bio-oil.

  18. Catalytic reforming methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  19. Effect of hydrogen on passivation quality of SiNx/Si-rich SiNx stacked layers deposited by catalytic chemical vapor deposition on c-Si wafers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thi, Trinh Cham; Koyama, Koichi; Ohdaira, Keisuke; Matsumura, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the role of hydrogen content and fixed charges of catalytic chemical vapor deposited (Cat-CVD) SiN x /Si-rich SiN x stacked layers on the quality of crystalline silicon (c-Si) surface passivation. Calculated density of fixed charges is on the order of 10 12 cm −2 , which is high enough for effective field effect passivation. Hydrogen content in the films is also found to contribute significantly to improvement in passivation quality of the stacked layers. Furthermore, Si-rich SiN x films deposited with H 2 dilution show better passivation quality of SiN x /Si-rich SiN x stacked layers than those prepared without H 2 dilution. Effective minority carrier lifetime (τ eff ) in c-Si passivated by SiN x /Si-rich SiN x stacked layers is as high as 5.1 ms when H 2 is added during Si-rich SiN x deposition, which is much higher than the case of using Si-rich SiN x films prepared without H 2 dilution showing τ eff of 3.3 ms. - Highlights: • Passivation mechanism of Si-rich SiN x /SiN x stacked layers is investigated. • H atoms play important role in passivation quality of the stacked layer. • Addition of H 2 gas during Si-rich SiN x film deposition greatly enhances effective minority carrier lifetime (τ eff ). • For a Si-rich SiN x film with refractive index of 2.92, τ eff improves from 3.3 to 5.1 ms by H 2 addition

  20. Catalytic burners in larger boiler appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silversand, Fredrik; Persson, Mikael (Catator AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-02-15

    This project focuses on the scale up of a Catator's catalytic burner technology to enable retrofit installation in existing boilers and the design of new innovative combinations of catalytic burners and boilers. Different design approaches are discussed and evaluated in the report and suggestions are made concerning scale-up. Preliminary test data, extracted from a large boiler installation are discussed together with an accurate analysis of technical possibilities following an optimization of the boiler design to benefit from the advantages of catalytic combustion. The experimental work was conducted in close collaboration with ICI Caldaie (ICI), located in Verona, Italy. ICI is a leading European boiler manufacturer in the effect segment ranging from about 20 kWt to several MWt. The study shows that it is possibly to scale up the burner technology and to maintain low emissions. The boilers used in the study were designed around conventional combustion and were consequently not optimized for implementation of catalytic burners. From previous experiences it stands clear that the furnace volume can be dramatically decreased when applying catalytic combustion. In flame combustion, this volume is normally dimensioned to avoid flame impingement on cold surfaces and to facilitate completion of the gas-phase reactions. The emissions of nitrogen oxides can be reduced by decreasing the residence time in the furnace. Even with the over-dimensioned furnace used in this study, we easily reached emission values close to 35 mg/kWh. The emissions of carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons were negligible (less than 5 ppmv). It is possible to decrease the emissions of nitrogen oxides further by designing the furnace/boiler around the catalytic burner, as suggested in the report. Simultaneously, the size of the boiler installation can be reduced greatly, which also will result in material savings, i.e. the production cost can be reduced. It is suggested to optimize the

  1. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  2. In vitro effects of brominated flame retardants and metabolites on CYP17 catalytic activity: A novel mechanism of action?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canton, Rocio F.; Sanderson, J. Thomas; Nijmeijer, Sandra; Bergman, Ake; Letcher, Robert J.; Berg, Martin van den

    2006-01-01

    Fire incidents have decreased significantly over the last 20 years due, in part, to regulations requiring addition of flame retardants (FRs) to consumer products. Five major classes of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are hexabromocyclododecane isomers (HBCDs), tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA) and three commercial mixtures of penta-, octa- and deca-polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners, which are used extensively as commercial FR additives. Furthermore, concentrations of PBDEs have been rapidly increasing during the 1999s in human breast milk and a number of endocrine effects have been reported. We used the H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line to assess possible effects of some of these BFRs (PBDEs and several of their hydroxylated (OH) and methoxylated (CH 3 O) metabolites or analogues), TBBPA and brominated phenols (BPs) on the combined 17α-hydroxylase and 17,20-lyase activities of CYP17. CYP17 enzyme catalyzes an important step in sex steroidogenesis and is responsible for the biosynthesis of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and androstenedione in the adrenals. In order to study possible interactions with BFRs, a novel enzymatic method was developed. The precursor substrate of CYP17, pregnenolone, was added to control and exposed H295R cells, and enzymatic production of DHEA was measured using a radioimmunoassay. In order to avoid pregnenolone metabolism via different pathways, specific chemical inhibitor compounds were used. None of the parent/precursor BFRs had a significant effect (P 3 O group eliminated this cytotoxic effect, but CYP17 activity measured as DHEA production was still significantly inhibited. Other OH- or CH 3 O-PBDE analogues were used to elucidate possible structural properties behind this CYP17 inhibition and associated cytotoxicity, but no distinct structure activity relationship could be determined. These in vitro results indicate that OH and CH 3 O-PBDEs have potential to interfere with CYP17 activity for which the in vivo

  3. Investigation on CO catalytic oxidation reaction kinetics of faceted perovskite nanostructures loaded with Pt

    KAUST Repository

    Yin, S. M.

    2017-01-18

    Perovskite lead titanate nanostructures with specific {111}, {100} and {001} facets exposed, have been employed as supports to investigate the crystal facet effect on the growth and CO catalytic activity of Pt nanoparticles. The size, distribution and surface chemical states of Pt on the perovskite supports have been significantly modified, leading to a tailored conversion temperature and catalytic kinetics towards CO catalytic oxidation.

  4. Investigation on CO catalytic oxidation reaction kinetics of faceted perovskite nanostructures loaded with Pt

    KAUST Repository

    Yin, S. M.; Duanmu, J. J.; Zhu, Yihan; Yuan, Y. F.; Guo, S. Y.; Yang, J. L.; Ren, Z. H.; Han, G. R.

    2017-01-01

    Perovskite lead titanate nanostructures with specific {111}, {100} and {001} facets exposed, have been employed as supports to investigate the crystal facet effect on the growth and CO catalytic activity of Pt nanoparticles. The size, distribution and surface chemical states of Pt on the perovskite supports have been significantly modified, leading to a tailored conversion temperature and catalytic kinetics towards CO catalytic oxidation.

  5. Co-catalytic effect of nickel in Pt-Ru/C and Pt-Sn/C electrocatalysts for ethanol electrooxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Ribadeneira, R. E.; Hoyos, B. A.

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the effect of adding nickel to Pt-Ru and Pt-Sn catalysts for ethanol electrooxidation. The alcohol-reduction process with ethylene glycol was used to prepare ten electrocatalysts. These were microchemically and physically characterized by EDX and XRD analysis. The electrocatalysts were evaluated at mini-electrodes with cyclic voltammetry at 25 and 50 °C in sulfuric acid and ethanol solutions, and as anodes in fuel cell tests. Nickel addition to Pt-Ru mixtures...

  6. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wayland, B.B.

    1993-12-01

    Focus of this project is on developing new approaches for hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. The strategies to accomplish CO reduction are based on favorable thermodynamics manifested by rhodium macrocycles for producing a series of intermediates implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Metalloformyl complexes from reactions of H 2 and CO, and CO reductive coupling to form metallo α-diketone species provide alternate routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics are promising candidates for future development

  7. Catalytic Chemical Vapor Deposition of Methane to Carbon Nanotubes: Copper Promoted Effect of Ni/MgO Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Ni/MgO and Ni-Cu/MgO catalysts were prepared by sol-gel method and used as the catalysts for synthesis of carbon nanotubes by thermal chemical vapor deposition. The effect of Cu on the carbon yield and structure was investigated, and the effects of calcination temperature and reaction temperature were also investigated. The catalysts and synthesized carbon materials were characterized by temperature programmed reduction (TPR, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Results showed that the addition of Cu promoted the reduction of nickel species, subsequently improving the growth and yield of CNTs. Meanwhile, CNTs were synthesized by the Ni/MgO and Ni-Cu/MgO catalysts with various calcination temperatures and reaction temperatures, and results suggested that the obtained CNTs on Ni-Cu/MgO catalyst with the calcination temperature of 500°C and the reaction temperature of 650°C were of the greatest yield and quantity of 927%.

  8. Reaction mechanisms and evaluation of effective process operation for catalytic oxidation and coagulation by ferrous solution and hydrogen peroxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S.H.; Moon, H.J.; Kim, Y.M. [Dept. of Environmental Engineering, Sangmyung Univ., Cheonan (Korea); Bae, W.K. [Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Hanyang Univ., Ansan, Kyounggi (Korea)

    2003-07-01

    This research was carried out to evaluate the removal efficiencies of COD{sub cr} and colour for the dyeing wastewater by ferrous solution and the different dosage of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in Fenton process. In the case of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} divided dosage, 7:3 was more effective than 3:7 to remove COD{sub cr} and colour. The results showed that COD was mainly removed by Fenton coagulation, where the ferric ions are formed in the initial step of Fenton reaction. On the other hand colour was removed by Fenton oxidation rather than Fenton coagulation. This paper also aims at pursuing to investigate the effective removal mechanisms using ferrous ion coagulation, ferric ion coagulation and Fenton oxidation process. The removal mechanism of COD{sub cr} and colour was mainly coagulation by ferrous ion, ferric ion and Fenton oxidation. The removal efficiencies were dependent on the ferric ion amount at the beginning of the reaction. However the final removal efficiency of COD and colour was in the order of Fenton oxidation, ferric ion coagulation and ferrous ion coagulation. The reason of the highest removal efficiency by Fenton oxidation can be explained by the chain reactions with ferrous solution, ferric ion and hydrogen peroxide. (orig.)

  9. Performance and Mechanism of Piezo-Catalytic Degradation of 4-Chlorophenol: Finding of Effective Piezo-Dechlorination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Shenyu; Feng, Jinxi; Xiong, Ya; Tian, Shuanghong; Liu, Shengwei; Kong, Lingjun

    2017-06-06

    Piezo-catalysis was first used to degrade a nondye pollutant, 4-chlorophenol (4-CP). In this process, hydrothermally synthesized tetragonal BaTiO 3 nano/micrometer-sized particles were used as the piezo-catalyst, and the ultrasonic irradiation with low frequency was selected as the vibration energy to cause the deformation of tetragonal BaTiO 3 . It was found that the piezoelectric potential from the deformation could not only successfully degrade 4-chlorophenol but also effectively dechlorinate it at the same time, and five kinds of dechlorinated intermediates, hydroquinone, benzoquinone, phenol, cyclohexanone, and cyclohexanol, were determined. This is the first sample of piezo-dechlorination. Although various active species, including h + , e - , •H, •OH, •O 2 - , 1 O 2 , and H 2 O 2 , were generated in the piezoelectric process, it was confirmed by ESR, scavenger studies, and LC-MS that the degradation and dechlorination were mainly attributed to •OH radicals. These •OH radicals were chiefly derived from the electron reduction of O 2 , partly from the hole oxidation of H 2 O. These results indicated that the piezo-catalysis was an emerging and effective advanced oxidation technology for degradation and dechlorination of organic pollutants.

  10. Catalytic Effect of Activated Carbon and Activated Carbon Fiber in Non-Equilibrium Plasma-Based Water Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanzong; Zheng, Jingtang; Qu, Xianfeng; Yu, Weizhao; Chen, Honggang

    2008-06-01

    Catalysis and regeneration efficiency of granular activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fiber (ACF) were investigated in a non-equilibrium plasma water treatment reactor with a combination of pulsed streamer discharge and GAC or ACF. The experimental results show that the degradation efficiency of methyl orange (MO) by the combined treatment can increase 22% (for GAC) and 24% (for ACF) respectively compared to pulsed discharge treatment alone, indicating that the combined treatment has a synergetic effect. The MO degradation efficiency by the combined treatment with pulsed discharge and saturated GAC or ACF can increase 12% and 17% respectively compared to pulsed discharge treatment alone. Both GAC and ACF show catalysis and the catalysis of ACF is prominent. Meanwhile, the regeneration of GAC and ACF are realized in this process. When H2O2 is introduced into the system, the utilization efficiency of ozone and ultraviolet light is improved and the regeneration efficiency of GAC and ACF is also increased.

  11. Catalytic Effect of Activated Carbon and Activated Carbon Fiber in Non-Equilibrium Plasma-Based Water Treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yanzong; Zheng Jingtang; Qu Xianfeng; Yu Weizhao; Chen Honggang

    2008-01-01

    Catalysis and regeneration efficiency of granular activated carbon (GAC) and activated carbon fiber (ACF) were investigated in a non-equilibrium plasma water treatment reactor with a combination of pulsed streamer discharge and GAC or ACF. The experimental results show that the degradation efficiency of methyl orange (MO) by the combined treatment can increase 22% (for GAC) and 24% (for ACF) respectively compared to pulsed discharge treatment alone, indicating that the combined treatment has a synergetic effect. The MO degradation efficiency by the combined treatment with pulsed discharge and saturated GAC or ACF can increase 12% and 17% respectively compared to pulsed discharge treatment alone. Both GAC and ACF show catalysis and the catalysis of ACF is prominent. Meanwhile, the regeneration of GAC and ACF are realized in this process. When H 2 O 2 is introduced into the system, the utilization efficiency of ozone and ultraviolet light is improved and the regeneration efficiency of GAC and ACF is also increased.

  12. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Extensive studies have been conducted to establish sound basis for design and engineering of reactors for practising such catalytic reactions and for realizing improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so recent) developments in engineering reactors for catalytic reactions is ...

  13. Flow injection determination of hydrogen peroxide using catalytic effect of cobalt(II) ion on a dye formation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, Makoto; Muramatsu, Miyuki; Yamada, Mari; Kitamura, Naoya

    2012-07-15

    A novel flow injection photometric method was developed for the determination of hydrogen peroxide in rainwater. This method is based on a cobalt(II)-catalyzed oxidative coupling of 3-methyl-2-benzothiazolinone hydrazone (MBTH) with N-ethyl-N-(2-hydroxy-3-sulfopropyl)-3,5-dimethoxyaniline (DAOS) as a modified Trinder's reagent to produce intensely colored dye (λ(max)=530nm) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide at pH 8.4. In this method, 1,2-dihydroxy-3,5-benzenedisulfonic acid (Tiron) acted as an activator for the cobalt(II)-catalyzed reaction and effectively increased the peak height for hydrogen peroxide. The linear calibration graphs were obtained in the hydrogen peroxide concentration range 5×10(-8) to 2.2×10(-6)mol dm(-3) at a sampling rate of 20h(-1). The relative standard deviations for ten determinations of 2.2×10(-6) and 2×10(-7)mol dm(-3) hydrogen peroxide were 1.1% and 3.7%, respectively. The proposed method was successfully applied to the determination of hydrogen peroxide in rainwater samples and the analytical results agreed fairly well with the results obtained by different two reference methods; peroxidase method and hydrogen peroxide electrode method. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Catalytic detritiation of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, M.L.; Lamberger, P.H.; Ellis, R.E.; Mills, T.K.

    1977-01-01

    A pilot-scale system has been used at Mound Laboratory to investigate the catalytic detritiation of water. A hydrophobic, precious metal catalyst is used to promote the exchange of tritium between liquid water and gaseous hydrogen at 60 0 C. Two columns are used, each 7.5 m long by 2.5 cm ID and packed with catalyst. Water flow is 5-10 cm 3 /min and countercurrent hydrogen flow is 9,000-12,000 cm 3 /min. The equipment, except for the columns, is housed in an inert atmosphere glovebox and is computer controlled. The hydrogen is obtained by electrolysis of a portion of the water stream. Enriched gaseous tritium is withdrawn for further enrichment. A description of the system is included along with an outline of its operation. Recent experimental data are discussed

  15. Designed hybrid nanostructure with catalytic effect: beyond the theoretical capacity of SnO2 anode material for lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; Huang, Zhi Xiang; Shi, Yumeng; Wong, Jen It; Ding, Meng; Yang, Hui Ying

    2015-03-17

    Transition metal cobalt (Co) nanoparticle was designed as catalyst to promote the conversion reaction of Sn to SnO2 during the delithiation process which is deemed as an irreversible reaction. The designed nanocomposite, named as SnO2/Co3O4/reduced-graphene-oxide (rGO), was synthesized by a simple two-step method composed of hydrothermal (1(st) step) and solvothermal (2(nd) step) synthesis processes. Compared to the pristine SnO2/rGO and SnO2/Co3O4 electrodes, SnO2/Co3O4/rGO nanocomposites exhibit significantly enhanced electrochemical performance as the anode material of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). The SnO2/Co3O4/rGO nanocomposites can deliver high specific capacities of 1038 and 712 mAh g(-1) at the current densities of 100 and 1000 mA g(-1), respectively. In addition, the SnO2/Co3O4/rGO nanocomposites also exhibit 641 mAh g(-1) at a high current density of 1000 mA g(-1) after 900 cycles, indicating an ultra-long cycling stability under high current density. Through ex-situ TEM analysis, the excellent electrochemical performance was attributed to the catalytic effect of Co nanoparticles to promote the conversion of Sn to SnO2 and the decomposition of Li2O during the delithiation process. Based on the results, herein we propose a new method in employing the catalyst to increase the capacity of alloying-dealloying type anode material to beyond its theoretical value and enhance the electrochemical performance.

  16. Designed hybrid nanostructure with catalytic effect: beyond the theoretical capacity of SnO2 anode material for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; Huang, Zhi Xiang; Shi, Yumeng; Wong, Jen It; Ding, Meng; Yang, Hui Ying

    2015-01-01

    Transition metal cobalt (Co) nanoparticle was designed as catalyst to promote the conversion reaction of Sn to SnO2 during the delithiation process which is deemed as an irreversible reaction. The designed nanocomposite, named as SnO2/Co3O4/reduced-graphene-oxide (rGO), was synthesized by a simple two-step method composed of hydrothermal (1st step) and solvothermal (2nd step) synthesis processes. Compared to the pristine SnO2/rGO and SnO2/Co3O4 electrodes, SnO2/Co3O4/rGO nanocomposites exhibit significantly enhanced electrochemical performance as the anode material of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). The SnO2/Co3O4/rGO nanocomposites can deliver high specific capacities of 1038 and 712 mAh g−1 at the current densities of 100 and 1000 mA g−1, respectively. In addition, the SnO2/Co3O4/rGO nanocomposites also exhibit 641 mAh g−1 at a high current density of 1000 mA g−1 after 900 cycles, indicating an ultra-long cycling stability under high current density. Through ex-situ TEM analysis, the excellent electrochemical performance was attributed to the catalytic effect of Co nanoparticles to promote the conversion of Sn to SnO2 and the decomposition of Li2O during the delithiation process. Based on the results, herein we propose a new method in employing the catalyst to increase the capacity of alloying-dealloying type anode material to beyond its theoretical value and enhance the electrochemical performance. PMID:25776280

  17. Could microwave induced catalytic oxidation (MICO) process over CoFe2O4 effectively eliminate brilliant green in aqueous solution?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Yongming; Wang, Xiaoyan; Qiao, Junqin; Li, Guohua; Wu, You; Li, Yuan; Zhang, Xiuyu; Xu, Zhencheng; Qi, Jianying; Fang, Jiande; Dionysiou, Dionysios D.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • The elimination of BG over CoFe 2 O 4 (CP) was mainly due to the residue of NaOH. • Salicylic acid failed to capture hydroxyl radicals within MICO process. • This study indicated dim prospects for the MICO-based elimination of contaminants. -- Abstract: In this study, we adopted the chemical co-precipitation (CP) method and sol–gel method followed by calcination at temperatures of 100–900 °C for 12 h to synthesize CoFe 2 O 4 materials, which were further characterized by TEM, XRD and XPS techniques. The properties of CoFe 2 O 4 materials were evaluated in a microwave (MW) induced catalytic oxidation (MICO) process for the elimination of brilliant green (BG). The results showed that: (1) the removal rates of BG gradually decreased over a series of CoFe 2 O 4 materials prepared by CP method and calcinated with 100–700 °C (except 900 °C) for 12 h within three reuse cycles; for comparison, no removal of BG was obtained over CoFe 2 O 4 synthesized by sol–gel method and CoFe 2 O 4 -900 (CP); (2) no hydroxyl radicals were captured with salicylic acid used as molecular probe in the MICO process; (3) MW irradiation enhanced the release of residual NaOH within the microstructure of CoFe 2 O 4 and further discolored BG, because BG is sensitive to pH; (4) granular activated carbon (GAC), an excellent MW-absorbing material possessing higher dielectric loss tangent compared to that of a series of CoFe 2 O 4 materials, could not remove BG in suspensions at a higher efficiency, even if the loading amount was 20 g L −1 . Accordingly, MICO process over CoFe 2 O 4 materials and GAC could not effectively eliminate BG in suspensions

  18. Could microwave induced catalytic oxidation (MICO) process over CoFe2O4 effectively eliminate brilliant green in aqueous solution?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Yongming; Wang, Xiaoyan; Qiao, Junqin; Li, Guohua; Wu, You; Li, Yuan; Zhang, Xiuyu; Xu, Zhencheng; Qi, Jianying; Fang, Jiande; Dionysiou, Dionysios D

    2013-12-15

    In this study, we adopted the chemical co-precipitation (CP) method and sol-gel method followed by calcination at temperatures of 100-900°C for 12h to synthesize CoFe2O4 materials, which were further characterized by TEM, XRD and XPS techniques. The properties of CoFe2O4 materials were evaluated in a microwave (MW) induced catalytic oxidation (MICO) process for the elimination of brilliant green (BG). The results showed that: (1) the removal rates of BG gradually decreased over a series of CoFe2O4 materials prepared by CP method and calcinated with 100-700°C (except 900°C) for 12h within three reuse cycles; for comparison, no removal of BG was obtained over CoFe2O4 synthesized by sol-gel method and CoFe2O4-900 (CP); (2) no hydroxyl radicals were captured with salicylic acid used as molecular probe in the MICO process; (3) MW irradiation enhanced the release of residual NaOH within the microstructure of CoFe2O4 and further discolored BG, because BG is sensitive to pH; (4) granular activated carbon (GAC), an excellent MW-absorbing material possessing higher dielectric loss tangent compared to that of a series of CoFe2O4 materials, could not remove BG in suspensions at a higher efficiency, even if the loading amount was 20 g L(-1). Accordingly, MICO process over CoFe2O4 materials and GAC could not effectively eliminate BG in suspensions. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The evolution of catalytic function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurel, Marie-Christine; Ricard, Jacques

    2006-03-01

    It is very likely that the main driving force of enzyme evolution is the requirement to improve catalytic and regulatory efficiency which results from the intrinsic performance as well as from the spatial and functional organization of enzymes in living cells. Kinetic co-operativity may occur in simple monomeric proteins if they display “slow” conformational transitions, at the cost of catalytic efficiency. Oligomeric enzymes on the other hand can be both efficient and co-operative. We speculate that the main reason for the emergence of co-operative oligomeric enzymes is the need for catalysts that are both cooperative and efficient. As it is not useful for an enzyme to respond to a change of substrate concentration in a complex kinetic way, the emergence of symmetry has its probable origin in a requirement for “functional simplicity”. In a living cell, enzyme are associated with other macromolecules and membranes. The fine tuning of their activity may also be reached through mutations of the microenvironment. Our hypothesis is that these mutations are related to the vectorial transport of molecules, to achieve the hysteresis loops of enzyme reactions generated by the coupling of reaction and diffusion, through the co-operativity brought about by electric interactions between a charged substrate and a membrane, and last but not least, through oscillations. As the physical origins of these effects are very simple and do not require complex molecular devices, it is very likely that the functional advantage generated by the spatial and functional organization of enzyme molecules within the cell have appeared in prebiotic catalysis or very early during the primeval stages of biological evolution. We shall began this paper by presenting the nature of the probable earliest catalysts in the RNA world.

  20. Catalytic Hydrogenation of CO2 to Methanol: Study of Synergistic Effect on Adsorption Properties of CO2 and H2 in CuO/ZnO/ZrO2 System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunjie Huang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A series of CuO/ZnO/ZrO2 (CZZ catalysts with different CuO/ZnO weight ratios have been synthesized by citrate method and tested in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO2 to methanol. Experimental results showed that the catalyst with the lowest CuO/ZnO weight ratio of 2/7 exhibited the best catalytic performance with a CO2 conversion of 32.9%, 45.8% methanol selectivity, and a process delivery of 193.9 gMeOH·kgcat−1·h−1. A synergetic effect is found by systematic temperature-programmed-desorption (TPD studies. Comparing with single and di-component systems, the interaction via different components in a CZZ system provides additional active sites to adsorb more H2 and CO2 in the low temperature range, resulting in higher weight time yield (WTY of methanol.

  1. Understanding the effect of post-synthesis ammonium treatment on the catalytic activity of Au/Ti-SBA-15 catalysts for the oxidation of propene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sacaliuc-Parvulescu, E.; Friedrich, H.; Palkovits, R.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Nijhuis, T.A.

    2008-01-01

    Postsynthesis ammonium treatment induces a substantial increase in the catalytic activity of Au/Ti- SBA-15 catalysts for the direct vapor-phase epoxidation of propylene using hydrogen and oxygen. The PO formation rate of a calcined Au/Ti-SBA-15 catalyst prepared by this method increased from 4.3

  2. Understanding the effect of postsynthesis ammonium treatment on the catalytic activity of Au/TI-SBA-15 catalysts for the oxidation of propene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sacaliuc, E.; Friedrich, H.; Palkovits, R.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Nijhuis, T.A.

    2008-01-01

    Postsynthesis ammonium treatment induces a substantial increase in the catalytic activity of Au/Ti-SBA-15 catalysts for the direct vapor-phase epoxidation of propylene using hydrogen and oxygen. The PO formation rate of a calcined Au/Ti-SBA-15 catalyst prepared by this method increased from 4.3 mgPO

  3. Numerical simulation of effect of catalyst wire-mesh pressure drop characteristics on flow distribution in catalytic parallel plate steam reformer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdsson, Haftor Örn; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    Steam reforming of hydrocarbons using a catalytic plate-type-heat-exchanger (CPHE) reformer is an attractive method of producing hydrogen for a fuel cell-based micro combined-heat-and-power system. In this study the flow distribution in a CPHE reformer, which uses a coated wire-mesh catalyst...

  4. Co and Fe-catalysts supported on sepiolite: effects of preparation conditions on their catalytic behaviors in high temperature gas flow treatment of dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiangfeng; Fang, Jian; Chen, Menglin; Huang, Zhi; Su, Chengyuan

    2016-08-01

    An efficient adsorbent/catalyst Co and Fe-catalysts loaded on sepiolite (Co-Fe/sepiolite) was successfully prepared for high temperature gas flow catalytic reaction by a simple impregnation method. The impact of preparation conditions (such as pH value of impregnation solution, impregnation time, calcination temperature, and time) on catalytic activity was studied. We found that the catalytic activity of Co-Fe/sepiolite was strongly influenced by all the investigated parameters. The regeneration efficiency (RE) was used to evaluate the catalytic activity. The RE is more noticeable at pH 5.0 of impregnation solution, impregnation time 18 h, calcination temperature 650 °C, and calcination time 3 h. This Co-Fe/sepiolite has great adsorption capacity in absorbing dye. It is used for an adsorbent to adsorb dye from wastewater solution under dynamic adsorption and saturated with dye, then regenerated with high temperature gas flow for adsorption/oxidation cycles. The Co-Fe/sepiolite acts as a catalyst to degrade the dye during regeneration under high temperature gas flow. Hence, the Co-Fe/sepiolite is not only an adsorbent but also a catalyst. The Co-Fe/sepiolite is more stable than sepiolite when applied in the treatment of plant's wastewater. The Co-Fe/sepiolite can be reused in adsorption-regeneration cycle. The results indicate the usability of the proposed combined process, dye adsorption on Co-Fe/sepiolite followed by the catalytic oxidation in high temperature gas flow.

  5. Partial substitution of manganese with cerium in SrMnO_3 nano-perovskite catalyst. Effect of the modification on the catalytic combustion of dilute acetone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rezlescu, Nicolae; Rezlescu, Elena; Popa, Paul Dorin; Doroftei, Corneliu; Ignat, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Ultrafine SrMn_1_−_xCe_xO_3 (x = 0, 02) perovskites were prepared by self-combustion method and heat treatment at 1000 °C for 4 h. The structure and surface properties were investigated by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), EDX spectroscopy, and BET analysis. The catalyst properties of the perovskite nanopowders were tested in the catalytic combustion of dilute acetone at atmospheric pressure. The results revealed that the partial substitution of Mn by Ce ions (x = 0.2) in perovskite structure of SrMnO_3 had significantly improved catalytic activity of the perovskite. The SrMn_0_._8Ce_0_,_2O_3 perovskite composition can be a good candidate for catalytic combustion of low concentration acetone (1–2‰ in air) at low temperatures. The acetone conversion over this catalyst exceeds 90% at 200 °C, whereas over SrMnO_3 it is only 50%. Compared with SrMnO_3, T_5_0 is decreased by 75 °C and T_9_0 is decreased by 70 °C. The enhancement of the catalytic activity at a Ce doping of 0.2 may be ascribed to smaller crystallite sizes, larger specific surface area and the presence of Ce and Mn cations with variable valence in the perovskite structure. - Highlights: • A non-conventional method was used to make nanostructured perovskite samples. • XRD study confirms perovskite structure and nanosize of crystallites. • EDX analyses confirm homogeneity and purity of the samples. • The catalytic testing was carried out in the flameless combustion of dilute acetone. • SrMn_0_._8Ce_0_._2O_3 perovskite can be a promising catalyst for acetone combustion at low temperature.

  6. Partial substitution of manganese with cerium in SrMnO{sub 3} nano-perovskite catalyst. Effect of the modification on the catalytic combustion of dilute acetone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezlescu, Nicolae, E-mail: nicolae.rezlescu@gmail.com [National Institute of Research and Development for Technical Physics, Iasi (Romania); Rezlescu, Elena; Popa, Paul Dorin; Doroftei, Corneliu [National Institute of Research and Development for Technical Physics, Iasi (Romania); Ignat, Maria [“Al. I. Cuza” University, Faculty of Chemistry, Iasi (Romania)

    2016-10-01

    Ultrafine SrMn{sub 1−x}Ce{sub x}O{sub 3} (x = 0, 02) perovskites were prepared by self-combustion method and heat treatment at 1000 °C for 4 h. The structure and surface properties were investigated by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), EDX spectroscopy, and BET analysis. The catalyst properties of the perovskite nanopowders were tested in the catalytic combustion of dilute acetone at atmospheric pressure. The results revealed that the partial substitution of Mn by Ce ions (x = 0.2) in perovskite structure of SrMnO{sub 3} had significantly improved catalytic activity of the perovskite. The SrMn{sub 0.8}Ce{sub 0,2}O{sub 3} perovskite composition can be a good candidate for catalytic combustion of low concentration acetone (1–2‰ in air) at low temperatures. The acetone conversion over this catalyst exceeds 90% at 200 °C, whereas over SrMnO{sub 3} it is only 50%. Compared with SrMnO{sub 3}, T{sub 50} is decreased by 75 °C and T{sub 90} is decreased by 70 °C. The enhancement of the catalytic activity at a Ce doping of 0.2 may be ascribed to smaller crystallite sizes, larger specific surface area and the presence of Ce and Mn cations with variable valence in the perovskite structure. - Highlights: • A non-conventional method was used to make nanostructured perovskite samples. • XRD study confirms perovskite structure and nanosize of crystallites. • EDX analyses confirm homogeneity and purity of the samples. • The catalytic testing was carried out in the flameless combustion of dilute acetone. • SrMn{sub 0.8}Ce{sub 0.2}O{sub 3} perovskite can be a promising catalyst for acetone combustion at low temperature.

  7. Catalytic Transformation of Ethylbenzene over Y-Zeolite-based Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Khattaf, Sulaiman

    2008-01-01

    Catalytic transformation of ethylbenzene (EB) has been investigated over ultrastable Y (USY)-zeolite-based catalysts in a novel riser simulator at different operating conditions. The effect of reaction conditions on EB conversion is reported

  8. Heterogeneous catalytic materials solid state chemistry, surface chemistry and catalytic behaviour

    CERN Document Server

    Busca, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous Catalytic Materials discusses experimental methods and the latest developments in three areas of research: heterogeneous catalysis; surface chemistry; and the chemistry of catalysts. Catalytic materials are those solids that allow the chemical reaction to occur efficiently and cost-effectively. This book provides you with all necessary information to synthesize, characterize, and relate the properties of a catalyst to its behavior, enabling you to select the appropriate catalyst for the process and reactor system. Oxides (used both as catalysts and as supports for cata

  9. Hydrocarbon conversion with an attenuated superactive multimetallic catalytic composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antos, G.J.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrocarbons are converted by contacting them at hydrocarbon conversion conditions with a novel attenuated superactive multimetallic catalytic composite comprising a combination of a catalytically effective amount of a pyrolyzed rhenium carbonyl component with a porous carrier material containing a uniform dispersion of catalytically effective amounts of a platinum group component, which is maintained in the elemental metallic state during the incorporation and pyrolysis of the rhenium carbonyl component, and of an iron component. In a highly preferred embodiment, this novel catalytic composite also contains a catalytically effective amount of a halogen component. The platinum group component, pyrolyzed rhenium carbonyl component, iron component and optional halogen component are preferably present in the multimetallic catalytic composite in amounts, calculated on an elemental basis, corresponding to about 0.01 to about 2 wt. % platinum group metal, about 0.01 to about 5 wt. % rhenium, about 0.005 to about 4 wt. % iron and about 0.1 to about 5 wt. % halogen. A key feature associated with the preparation of the subject catalytic composite is reaction of a rhenium carbonyl complex with a porous carrier material containing a uniform dispersion of an iron component and of a platinum group component maintained in the elemental state, whereby the interaction of the rhenium moiety with the platinum group moiety is maximized due to the platinophilic (i.e., platinum-seeking) propensities of the carbon monoxide ligands associated with the rhenium reagent. A specific example of the type of hydrocarbon conversion process disclosed herein is a process for the catalytic reforming of a low octane gasoline fraction wherein the gasoline fraction and a hydrogen stream are contacted with the attenuated superactive multimetallic catalytic composite at reforming conditions

  10. Catalytic production of biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theilgaard Madsen, A.

    2011-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the catalytic production of diesel from biomass, especially emphasising catalytic conversion of waste vegetable oils and fats. In chapter 1 an introduction to biofuels and a review on different catalytic methods for diesel production from biomass is given. Two of these methods have been used industrially for a number of years already, namely the transesterification (and esterification) of oils and fats with methanol to form fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), and the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of fats and oils to form straight-chain alkanes. Other possible routes to diesel include upgrading and deoxygenation of pyrolysis oils or aqueous sludge wastes, condensations and reductions of sugars in aqueous phase (aqueous-phase reforming, APR) for monofunctional hydrocarbons, and gasification of any type of biomass followed by Fischer-Tropsch-synthesis for alkane biofuels. These methods have not yet been industrialised, but may be more promising due to the larger abundance of their potential feedstocks, especially waste feedstocks. Chapter 2 deals with formation of FAME from waste fats and oils. A range of acidic catalysts were tested in a model fat mixture of methanol, lauric acid and trioctanoin. Sulphonic acid-functionalised ionic liquids showed extremely fast convertion of lauric acid to methyl laurate, and trioctanoate was converted to methyl octanoate within 24 h. A catalyst based on a sulphonated carbon-matrix made by pyrolysing (or carbonising) carbohydrates, so-called sulphonated pyrolysed sucrose (SPS), was optimised further. No systematic dependency on pyrolysis and sulphonation conditions could be obtained, however, with respect to esterification activity, but high activity was obtained in the model fat mixture. SPS impregnated on opel-cell Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and microporous SiO{sub 2} (ISPS) was much less active in the esterification than the original SPS powder due to low loading and thereby low number of strongly acidic sites on the

  11. Effect of Number of Various-Type Acid Sites Located on 20 % Co/ZrO2 • SiO2 Sample Surface on Parameters of Catalytic Process in Synthesis of High-Octane Motor Fuel Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Nesenchouk

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers an effect of ZrO2 content in 20%Co/xZrO2∙(100 – xSiO2 (x = 0, 10, 15, 25, 30, 40 and 100 mass percent catalyst carriers on their catalytic properties. Temperature programmed desorption of NH3 has made it possible to determine relations between their acid and catalytic properties. The paper reveals the TPD spectrum is the result of 4 overlapping peaks originating during NH3 desorption from the respective groups of acid sites. Total acidity of samples and contribution of separate acid site groups into the given acidity have been have been determined in the paper. The paper contains graphical dependences of a various-type acid site number on  content of zirconium oxide in the carrier. Correlations between change in various-type acid site number and catalytic process parameters (CO conversion, C5+ hydrocarbon output and  C5+ isoparaffin output have been found in the paper. The paper shows that the highest values of CO conversion and C5+ hydrocarbon output correspond to maximum number of acid sites, and that number accounts for a peak of desorbed ammonia at Tmax = 122 °C, while the lowest isoparaffin output corresponds to minimum number of acid sites, which characterizes a peak of desorbed ammonia at Tmax = 224–257 °C. 

  12. Effect of calcination temperature on the structure and performance of CeO{sub x}–MnO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles for the catalytic combustion of chlorobenzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Fei; Chen, Yong; Zhao, Pei; Liu, Shantang, E-mail: anliu123@hotmail.com [Wuhan Institute of Technology, Key Laboratory for Green Chemical Process of Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environmental Engineering (China)

    2016-05-15

    In this study, MnO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}, CeO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2}, and CeO{sub x}–MnO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2} catalysts were prepared by the homogeneous precipitation method. The effect of calcination temperature on the structure and catalytic performance of CeO{sub x}–MnO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2} mixed oxide catalyst in the catalytic combustion of chlorobenzene was investigated. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, nitrogen adsorption–desorption, transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectra, hydrogen temperature-programmed reduction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results indicate that calcination significantly affect the activity of the prepared catalysts. When calcined at a low temperature such as 400 °C, Ce, and Mn species form a solid solution of MnCeO{sub x} in the catalyst, thus locating the O atoms in a perturbed chemical surrounding in the catalysts. This increases the mobility of the O atoms during the reaction, probably contributing to the highest catalytic activity of CeO{sub x}–MnO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2} among all the tested catalysts. However, a further increase in the calcination temperature decreased the performance of the catalyst for the catalytic combustion of chlorobenzene. This is probably because of a reduction in surface chemisorbed oxygen concentration, a decrease in the interface area between metal oxides and MnCeO{sub x} caused by the isolation of MnO{sub x} or CeO{sub 2} from MnCeO{sub x}, and a decrease in the specific surface area of CeO{sub x}–MnO{sub x}/TiO{sub 2} catalyst due to the sintering of catalyst.Graphical Abstract.

  13. Catalytic cracking of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.; Nowak, S.; Naegler, T.; Zimmermann, J. [Hochschule Merseburg (Germany); Welscher, J.; Schwieger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany); Hahn, T. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    A most important factor for the chemical industry is the availability of cheap raw materials. As the oil price of crude oil is rising alternative feedstocks like coal are coming into focus. This work, the catalytic cracking of lignite is part of the alliance ibi (innovative Braunkohlenintegration) to use lignite as a raw material to produce chemicals. With this new one step process without an input of external hydrogen, mostly propylene, butenes and aromatics and char are formed. The product yield depends on manifold process parameters. The use of acid catalysts (zeolites like MFI) shows the highest amount of the desired products. Hydrogen rich lignites with a molar H/C ratio of > 1 are to be favoured. Due to primary cracking and secondary reactions the ratio between catalyst and lignite, temperature and residence time are the most important parameter to control the product distribution. Experiments at 500 C in a discontinuous rotary kiln reactor show yields up to 32 wt-% of hydrocarbons per lignite (maf - moisture and ash free) and 43 wt-% char, which can be gasified. Particularly, the yields of propylene and butenes as main products can be enhanced four times to about 8 wt-% by the use of catalysts while the tar yield decreases. In order to develop this innovative process catalyst systems fixed on beads were developed for an easy separation and regeneration of the used catalyst from the formed char. (orig.)

  14. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    126, No. 2, March 2014, pp. 341–351. c Indian Academy of Sciences. ... enhancement was realized by catalyst design, appropriate choice of reactor, better injection and .... Gas–liquid and liquid–solid transport processes in catalytic reactors.5.

  15. Structural and catalytic effects of an invariant purine substitution in the hammerhead ribozyme: implications for the mechanism of acid–base catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Eric P.; Vasquez, Ernesto E.; Scott, William G.

    2014-01-01

    The hammerhead ribozyme catalyzes RNA cleavage via acid–base catalysis. Whether it does so by general acid–base catalysis, in which the RNA itself donates and abstracts protons in the transition state, as is typically assumed, or by specific acid–base catalysis, in which the RNA plays a structural role and proton transfer is mediated by active-site water molecules, is unknown. Previous biochemical and crystallographic experiments implicate an invariant purine in the active site, G12, as the general base. However, G12 may play a structural role consistent with specific base catalysis. To better understand the role of G12 in the mechanism of hammerhead catalysis, a 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a hammerhead ribozyme from Schistosoma mansoni with a purine substituted for G12 in the active site of the ribozyme was obtained. Comparison of this structure (PDB entry 3zd4), in which A12 is substituted for G, with three previously determined structures that now serve as important experimental controls, allows the identification of structural perturbations that are owing to the purine substitution itself. Kinetic measurements for G12 purine-substituted schistosomal hammerheads confirm a previously observed dependence of rate on the pK a of the substituted purine; in both cases inosine, which is similar to G in pK a and hydrogen-bonding properties, is unexpectedly inactive. Structural comparisons indicate that this may primarily be owing to the lack of the exocyclic 2-amino group in the G12A and G12I substitutions and its structural effect upon both the nucleotide base and phosphate of A9. The latter involves the perturbation of a previously identified and well characterized metal ion-binding site known to be catalytically important in both minimal and full-length hammerhead ribozyme sequences. The results permit it to be suggested that G12 plays an important role in stabilizing the active-site structure. This result, although not inconsistent with the

  16. Structural and catalytic effects of an invariant purine substitution in the hammerhead ribozyme: implications for the mechanism of acid-base catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Eric P; Vasquez, Ernesto E; Scott, William G

    2014-09-01

    The hammerhead ribozyme catalyzes RNA cleavage via acid-base catalysis. Whether it does so by general acid-base catalysis, in which the RNA itself donates and abstracts protons in the transition state, as is typically assumed, or by specific acid-base catalysis, in which the RNA plays a structural role and proton transfer is mediated by active-site water molecules, is unknown. Previous biochemical and crystallographic experiments implicate an invariant purine in the active site, G12, as the general base. However, G12 may play a structural role consistent with specific base catalysis. To better understand the role of G12 in the mechanism of hammerhead catalysis, a 2.2 Å resolution crystal structure of a hammerhead ribozyme from Schistosoma mansoni with a purine substituted for G12 in the active site of the ribozyme was obtained. Comparison of this structure (PDB entry 3zd4), in which A12 is substituted for G, with three previously determined structures that now serve as important experimental controls, allows the identification of structural perturbations that are owing to the purine substitution itself. Kinetic measurements for G12 purine-substituted schistosomal hammerheads confirm a previously observed dependence of rate on the pK(a) of the substituted purine; in both cases inosine, which is similar to G in pK(a) and hydrogen-bonding properties, is unexpectedly inactive. Structural comparisons indicate that this may primarily be owing to the lack of the exocyclic 2-amino group in the G12A and G12I substitutions and its structural effect upon both the nucleotide base and phosphate of A9. The latter involves the perturbation of a previously identified and well characterized metal ion-binding site known to be catalytically important in both minimal and full-length hammerhead ribozyme sequences. The results permit it to be suggested that G12 plays an important role in stabilizing the active-site structure. This result, although not inconsistent with the potential

  17. Could microwave induced catalytic oxidation (MICO) process over CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} effectively eliminate brilliant green in aqueous solution?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Yongming, E-mail: juyongming@scies.org [South China Institute of Environmental Science, Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP), Guangzhou 510655 (China); Wang, Xiaoyan [South China Institute of Environmental Science, Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP), Guangzhou 510655 (China); Qiao, Junqin [Center of Material Analysis, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, Jiangsu Province (China); Li, Guohua [South China Institute of Environmental Science, Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP), Guangzhou 510655 (China); Wu, You [Department of Urology, The Affiliated Hospital to Nantong University, Nantong University, Nantong 226001, Jiangsu Province (China); Li, Yuan, E-mail: liyuan@scies.org [South China Institute of Environmental Science, Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP), Guangzhou 510655 (China); Zhang, Xiuyu; Xu, Zhencheng; Qi, Jianying; Fang, Jiande [South China Institute of Environmental Science, Ministry of Environmental Protection (MEP), Guangzhou 510655 (China); Dionysiou, Dionysios D., E-mail: dionysios.d.dionysiou@uc.edu [Environmental Engineering and Science Program, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221-0012 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    Highlights: • The elimination of BG over CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}(CP) was mainly due to the residue of NaOH. • Salicylic acid failed to capture hydroxyl radicals within MICO process. • This study indicated dim prospects for the MICO-based elimination of contaminants. -- Abstract: In this study, we adopted the chemical co-precipitation (CP) method and sol–gel method followed by calcination at temperatures of 100–900 °C for 12 h to synthesize CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} materials, which were further characterized by TEM, XRD and XPS techniques. The properties of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} materials were evaluated in a microwave (MW) induced catalytic oxidation (MICO) process for the elimination of brilliant green (BG). The results showed that: (1) the removal rates of BG gradually decreased over a series of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} materials prepared by CP method and calcinated with 100–700 °C (except 900 °C) for 12 h within three reuse cycles; for comparison, no removal of BG was obtained over CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} synthesized by sol–gel method and CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-900 (CP); (2) no hydroxyl radicals were captured with salicylic acid used as molecular probe in the MICO process; (3) MW irradiation enhanced the release of residual NaOH within the microstructure of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} and further discolored BG, because BG is sensitive to pH; (4) granular activated carbon (GAC), an excellent MW-absorbing material possessing higher dielectric loss tangent compared to that of a series of CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} materials, could not remove BG in suspensions at a higher efficiency, even if the loading amount was 20 g L{sup −1}. Accordingly, MICO process over CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} materials and GAC could not effectively eliminate BG in suspensions.

  18. Dissociation kinetics of open-chain and macrocyclic gadolinium(III)-aminopolycarboxylate complexes related to magnetic resonance imaging: catalytic effect of endogenous ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranyai, Zsolt; Pálinkás, Zoltán; Uggeri, Fulvio; Maiocchi, Alessandro; Aime, Silvio; Brücher, Ernő

    2012-12-14

    The kinetics of the metal exchange reactions between open-chain Gd(DTPA)(2-) and Gd(DTPA-BMA), macrocyclic Gd(DOTA)(-) and Gd(HP-DO3A) complexes, and Cu(2+)  ions were investigated in the presence of endogenous citrate, phosphate, carbonate and histidinate ligands in the pH range 6-8 in NaCl (0.15 M) at 25 °C. The rates of the exchange reactions of Gd(DTPA)(2-) and Gd(DTPA-BMA) are independent of the Cu(2+) concentration in the presence of citrate and the reactions occur via the dissociation of Gd(3+)  complexes catalyzed by the citrate ions. The HCO(3)(-)/CO(3)(2-) and H(2)PO(4)(-) ions also catalyze the dissociation of complexes. The rates of the dissociation of Gd(DTPA-BMA), catalyzed by the endogenous ligands, are about two orders of magnitude higher than those of the Gd(DTPA)(2-). In fact near to physiological conditions the bicarbonate and carbonate ions show the largest catalytic effect, that significantly increase the dissociation rate of Gd(DTPA-BMA) and make the higher pH values (when the carbonate ion concentration is higher) a risk-factor for the dissociation of complexes in body fluids. The exchange reactions of Gd(DOTA)(-) and Gd(HP-DO3A) with Cu(2+) occur through the proton assisted dissociation of complexes in the pH range 3.5-5 and the endogenous ligands do not affect the dissociation rates of complexes. More insights into the interaction scheme between Gd(DTPA-BMA) and Gd(DTPA)(2-) and endogenous ligands have been obtained by acquiring the (13)C NMR spectra of the corresponding diamagnetic Y(III)-complexes, indicating the increase of the rates of the intramolecular rearrangements in the presence of carbonate and citrate ions. The herein reported results may have implications in the understanding of the etiology of nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, a rare disease that has been associated to the administration of Gd-containing agents to patients with impaired renal function. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. The effect of gallium supported on mesoporous silica and its catalytic activity for oxidation of benzene, toluene and o-xylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwanke, A.J.; Pergher, S.; Probst, L.F.D. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), RN (Brazil); Balzer, R. [Universidade Federal do Parana (UFPR), PR (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: Benzene, toluene and xylene (BTX) are a particular class of volatile organic compounds, which are highly toxic pollutants. In this study, samples of gallium-containing mesoporous silica (MS-Ga7% and MS-Ga11%) were synthesized and their catalytic activity in the oxidation of BTX was investigated. The physicochemical characterization by XRD, XPS, XRF, nitrogen adsorption and desorption isotherms at 77K, FTIR, SEM and TEM shows that the inclusion of gallium in the mesoporous silica structure leads to an increase in the number of oxygen vacancies in the structure of the MS-Ga system, which can result in an increase in the total and surface oxygen mobility. The results show the highest conversion for benzene (65%), with >40% for toluene and >28% for o-xylene. The high catalytic activity observed was attributed to a combination of several factors including a higher number of active sites (gallium and gallium oxide) being exposed, with a greater mobility of the active oxygen species on the surface of the catalyst promoting the catalytic activity. (author)

  20. Effect of A-site deficiency in LaMn_0_._9Co_0_._1O_3 perovskites on their catalytic performance for soot combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinamarca, Robinson; Garcia, Ximena; Jimenez, Romel; Fierro, J.L.G.; Pecchi, Gina

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A-site defective perovskites increases the oxidation state of the B-cation. • Not always non-stoichiometric perovskites exhibit higher catalytic activity in soot combustion. • The highly symmetric cubic crystalline structure diminishes the redox properties of perovskites. - Abstract: The influence of lanthanum stoichiometry in Ag-doped (La_1_-_xAg_xMn_0_._9Co_0_._1O_3) and A-site deficient (La_1_-_xMn_0_._9Co_0_._1O_3_-_δ) perovskites with x equal to 10, 20 and 30 at.% has been investigated in catalysts for soot combustion. The catalysts were prepared by the amorphous citrate method and characterized by XRD, nitrogen adsorption, XPS, O_2-TPD and TPR. The formation of a rhombohedral excess-oxygen perovskite for Ag-doped and a cubic perovskite structure for an A-site deficient series is confirmed. The efficient catalytic performance of the larger Ag-doped perovskite structure is attributed to the rhombohedral crystalline structure, Ag_2O segregated phases and the redox pair Mn"4"+/Mn"3"+. A poor catalytic activity for soot combustion was observed with A-site deficient perovskites, despite the increase in the redox pair Mn"4"+/Mn"3"+, which is attributed to the cubic crystalline structure.

  1. Bimetallic Nanoparticles in Alternative Solvents for Catalytic Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trung Dang-Bao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bimetallic nanoparticles represent attractive catalytic systems thanks to the synergy between both partners at the atomic level, mainly induced by electronic effects which in turn are associated with the corresponding structures (alloy, core-shell, hetero-dimer. This type of engineered material can trigger changes in the kinetics of catalyzed processes by variations on the electrophilicity/nucleophilicity of the metal centers involved and also promote cooperative effects to foster organic transformations, including multi-component and multi-step processes. Solvents become a crucial factor in the conception of catalytic processes, not only due to their environmental impact, but also because they can preserve the bimetallic structure during the catalytic reaction and therefore increase the catalyst life-time. In this frame, the present review focuses on the recent works described in the literature concerning the synthesis of bimetallic nanoparticles in non-conventional solvents, i.e., other than common volatile compounds, for catalytic applications.

  2. Advanced Catalytic Converter in Gasoline Enginer Emission Control: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Leman A.M.; Jajuli Afiqah; Feriyanto Dafit; Rahman Fakhrurrazi; Zakaria Supaat

    2017-01-01

    Exhaust emission from automobile source has become a major contributor to the air pollution and environmental problem. Catalytic converter is found to be one of the most effective tools to reduce the overwhelming exhaust pollutants in our environment. The development of sustainable catalytic converter still remains a critical issue due to the stringent exhaust emission regulations. Another issue such as price and availability of the precious metal were also forced the automotive industry to i...

  3. Effect of heat treatment on the electrochemical behaviour and catalytic activity of metal-glass of an Fe76.1Cu1.0Nb3.0Si13.8B6.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhdanova, L.I.; Sharipova, E.Kh.; Lad'yanov, V.I.; Volkov, V.A.

    1999-01-01

    Effect of the different degree of the initial surface crystallization of Fe 76.1 Cu 1.0 Nb 3.0 Si 13.8 B 6.1 metal glasses on the electrochemical behaviour and catalytic activity of the alloy during thermal treatment of tapes was studied. Growth of amorphous-nanocrystalline structure during annealing is shown to improve protective properties of fast-hardened tapes. The highest corrosion resistance of the material is manifested when in nanocrystalline state subsequent to annealing under 550 deg C [ru

  4. Non-isothermal synergetic catalytic effect of TiF{sub 3} and Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} on dehydrogenation high-energy ball milled MgH{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Tiebang, E-mail: tiebangzhang@nwpu.edu.cn; Hou, Xiaojiang; Hu, Rui; Kou, Hongchao; Li, Jinshan

    2016-11-01

    MgH{sub 2}-M (M = TiF{sub 3} or Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} or both of them) composites prepared by high-energy ball milling are used in this work to illustrate the dehydrogenation behavior of MgH{sub 2} with the addition of catalysts. The phase compositions, microstructures, particle morphologies and distributions of MgH{sub 2} with catalysts have been evaluated. The non-isothermal synergetic catalytic-dehydrogenation effect of TiF{sub 3} and Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} evaluated by differential scanning calorimetry gives the evidences that the addition of catalysts is an effective strategy to destabilize MgH{sub 2} and reduce hydrogen desorption temperatures and activation energies. Depending on additives, the desorption peak temperatures of catalyzed MgH{sub 2} reduce from 417 °C to 341 °C for TiF{sub 3} and from 417 °C to 336 °C for Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}, respectively. The desorption peak temperature reaches as low as 310 °C for MgH{sub 2} catalyzed by TiF{sub 3} coupling with Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5}. The non-isothermal synergetic catalytic effect of TiF{sub 3} and Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} is mainly attributed to electronic exchange reactions with hydrogen molecules, which improve the recombination of hydrogen atoms during dehydrogenation process of MgH{sub 2}. - Highlights: • Catalytic surface for MgH{sub 2} is achieved by high-energy ball milling. • Non-isothermal dehydrogenation behavior of MgH{sub 2} with TiF{sub 3} and/or Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} is illustrated. • Dehydrogenation activation energies of synergetic catalyzed MgH{sub 2} are obtained. • Synergetic catalytic-dehydrogenation mechanism of TiF{sub 3} and Nb{sub 2}O{sub 5} is proposed.

  5. Catalytic bioreactors and methods of using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, Robert Mark; Liu, Yangmu Chloe

    2017-07-25

    Various embodiments provide a bioreactor for producing a bioproduct comprising one or more catalytically active zones located in a housing and adapted to keep two incompatible gaseous reactants separated when in a gas phase, wherein each of the one or more catalytically active zones may comprise a catalytic component retainer and a catalytic component retained within and/or thereon. Each of the catalytically active zones may additionally or alternatively comprise a liquid medium located on either side of the catalytic component retainer. Catalytic component may include a microbial cell culture located within and/or on the catalytic component retainer, a suspended catalytic component suspended in the liquid medium, or a combination thereof. Methods of using various embodiments of the bioreactor to produce a bioproduct, such as isobutanol, are also provided.

  6. Effect of Ti content in the photo catalytic behavior of Fe/TiO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon C, A.; Portillo V, N.; Hernandez P, I.; May L, M.; Gonzalez R, L.; Luna P, R. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Azcapotzalco, Departamento de Ciencias Basicas, Av. San Pablo No. 180, Col. Reynosa Tamaulipas, 02200 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Suarez P, R., E-mail: ihp@correo.azc.uam.mx [UNAM, Centro de Investigacion en Energia, 62580 Temixco, Morelos (Mexico)

    2013-10-01

    In this work we report the synthesis of Fe/TiO{sub 2}-SiO{sub 2} systems with different concentrations of TiO{sub 2} in order to determine the influence of titanium content on the structural, textural, optical properties and their photo catalytic behavior. The materials were synthesized by the sol-gel method and their modification was carried out by incipient impregnation. All samples were characterized be means of X-ray diffraction, N{sub 2} physisorption (Bet method), Dr-UV-Vis and Raman spectroscopy. The modifications of the structural and optical properties are discussed on the basis of long-range order reduction, suggesting the formation of highly dispersed TiO{sub 2} species. On the other hand, it was observed that the energy of the optical band gap decreases by introducing Fe. On the basis of these phenomena, the photo catalytic activity was measured, employing the degradation of orange II azo dye as a model reaction. (Author)

  7. Effect of Catalyst Pellet-Diameter and Basicity on Transesterification of Soybean Oil into Biodiesel using K2O/CaO-ZnO Catalyst over Hybrid Catalytic-Plasma Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istadi I.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed to study the effect of catalyst pellet-diameter and catalyst basicity on the transesterification process of soybean oil into biodiesel over a hybrid catalytic-plasma reactor. Various catalyst diameters (3, 5, and 7 mm were tested in this reaction system. Catalyst basicity was also examined by comparing fresh and used catalyst as well as with and without K2O promoter. All catalysts testing were performed in a hybrid plasma-catalytic reactor (dielectric barrier discharge – DBD type. From the results, the synergistic effects roles of the catalyst and the plasma in the transesterification process are important, in which the energetic electrons within plasma assist the reaction on the catalyst surface by an exciting bonded electron. The catalyst basicity was influenced by the composition of CaO on the catalyst as well as roles of the alkaline K2O promoter. Catalyst basicity is important in producing biodiesel with high performance. Yield of fatty acid alkyl ester (FAAE or biodiesel is slightly influenced by the catalyst diameter within the range of diameter studied.

  8. Catalytic hydrogenation of carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayland, B.B.

    1992-12-01

    This project is focused on developing strategies to accomplish the reduction and hydrogenation of carbon monoxide to produce organic oxygenates at mild conditions. Our approaches to this issue are based on the recognition that rhodium macrocycles have unusually favorable thermodynamic values for producing a series of intermediate implicated in the catalytic hydrogenation of CO. Observations of metalloformyl complexes produced by reactions of H{sub 2} and CO, and reductive coupling of CO to form metallo {alpha}-diketone species have suggested a multiplicity of routes to organic oxygenates that utilize these species as intermediates. Thermodynamic and kinetic-mechanistic studies are used in constructing energy profiles for a variety of potential pathways, and these schemes are used in guiding the design of new metallospecies to improve the thermodynamic and kinetic factors for individual steps in the overall process. Variation of the electronic and steric effects associated with the ligand arrays along with the influences of the reaction medium provide the chemical tools for tuning these factors. Emerging knowledge of the factors that contribute to M-H, M-C and M-O bond enthalpies is directing the search for ligand arrays that will expand the range of metal species that have favorable thermodynamic parameters to produce the primary intermediates for CO hydrogenation. Studies of rhodium complexes are being extended to non-macrocyclic ligand complexes that emulate the favorable thermodynamic features associated with rhodium macrocycles, but that also manifest improved reaction kinetics. Multifunctional catalyst systems designed to couple the ability of rhodium complexes to produce formyl and diketone intermediates with a second catalyst that hydrogenates these imtermediates are promising approaches to accomplish CO hydrogenation at mild conditions.

  9. Simulation on Toxic Gases in Vehicle Exhaust Equipped with Modified Catalytic Converter : A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leman A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Air pollution and global warming is a major issue nowadays. One of the main contributors to be the emission of harmful gases produced by vehicle exhausts lines. The harmful gases like NOx, CO, unburned HC and particulate matter increases the global warming, so catalytic converter plays a vital role in reducing harmful gases. Catalytic converters are used on most vehicles on the road today. This research deals with the gas emission flow in the catalytic converter involving the heat transfer, velocity flow, back pressure and others chemical reaction in the modified catalytic converter by using FeCrAl as a substrate that is treated using the ultrasonic bath and electroplating techniques. The objective of this study is to obtain a quantitative description of the gas emission in the catalytic converter system of automobile exhaust gas using ANSYS Software. The description of the gas emission in the catalytic converter system of automobile exhaust gas using ANSYS Software was simulated in this research in order to provide better efficiency and ease the reusability of the catalytic converter by comparing experimental data with software analysing data. The result will be expected to demonstrate a good approximation of gas emission in the modified catalytic converter simulation data compared to experimental data in order to verify the effectiveness of modified catalytic converter. Therefore studies on simulation of flow through the modified catalytic converter are very important to increase the accuracy of the obtained emission result.

  10. Catalytic properties of niobium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, K.; Iizuka, T.

    1983-04-01

    The catalytic activity and selectivity of niobium compounds including oxides, salts, organometallic compounds and others are outlined. The application of these compounds as catalysts to diversified reactions is reported. The nature and action of niobium catalysts are characteristic and sometimes anomalous, suggesting the necessity of basic research and the potential use as catalysts for important processes in the chemical industry. (Author) [pt

  11. Catalytic Decoupling of Quantum Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majenz, Christian; Berta, Mario; Dupuis, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    The decoupling technique is a fundamental tool in quantum information theory with applications ranging from quantum thermodynamics to quantum many body physics to the study of black hole radiation. In this work we introduce the notion of catalytic decoupling, that is, decoupling in the presence...... and quantum state merging, and leads to a resource theory of decoupling....

  12. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and catalytic oxidation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    were characterized by infrared, electronic, electron paramagnetic resonance ... The catalytic oxidation property of ruthenium(III) complexes were also ... cies at room temperature. ..... aldehyde part of Schiff base ligands, catalytic activ- ity of new ...

  13. Remarkable promoting effect of rhodium on the catalytic performance of Ag/Al2O3 for the selective reduction of NO with decane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Kazuhito; Yoshinari, Tomohiro; Kintaichi, Yoshiaki; Haneda, Masaaki; Hamada, Hideaki

    2003-01-01

    The addition of small amounts of rhodium enhanced the activity of Ag/Al 2 O 3 catalyst for the selective reduction of NO with decane at low temperatures. The Rh-promoted Ag/Al 2 O 3 showed its high performance even in the presence of low concentrations of SO 2 . Based on the catalytic activity for elementary reactions, it was suggested that the role of added rhodium is to enhance the reaction between NO x and decane-derived species, leading to NO reduction. Catalyst characterization by UV-Vis spectroscopy indicated that the major silver species on Rh-promoted Ag/Al 2 O 3 is Ag nn δ+ clusters, which would be responsible for the high activity. FT-IR measurements revealed that the formation rate of isocyanate species, which is a major reaction intermediate, is higher on Rh-promoted Ag/Al 2 O 3

  14. Effect of hydrogen on the growth and morphology of single wall carbon nanotubes synthesized on a Fe-Mo/MgO catalytic system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biris, Alexandru R. [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Cluj Napoca, RO-3400 (Romania)], E-mail: biris@oc1.itim-cj.ro; Li Zhongrui; Dervishi, Enkeleda [Applied Science Department, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 S. University Ave, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States); Nanotechnology Center, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 S. University Ave, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States); Lupu, Dan [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, Cluj Napoca, RO-3400 (Romania); Xu Yang; Saini, Viney [Applied Science Department, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 S. University Ave, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States); Nanotechnology Center, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 S. University Ave, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States); Watanabe, Fumiya [Nanotechnology Center, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 S. University Ave, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States); Biris, Alexandru S. [Applied Science Department, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 S. University Ave, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States); Nanotechnology Center, University of Arkansas at Little Rock, 2801 S. University Ave, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States)], E-mail: asbiris@ualr.edu

    2008-04-21

    Single wall carbon nanotubes were synthesized from thermal pyrolysis of methane on a Fe-Mo/MgO catalyst by radio frequency catalytic chemical vapor deposition (RF-CVD) using argon as a carrier gas. Controlled amounts of hydrogen (H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}=0-1 v/v) were introduced in separate experiments along with the carbon source. The properties and morphology of the synthesized single wall carbon nanotubes were monitored by transmission electron microscopy, Raman scattering, and thermogravimetric analysis. The nanotubes with the highest crystallinity were obtained with H{sub 2}/CH{sub 4}=0.6. By monitoring the Radial Breathing Modes present in the Raman spectra of the single-wall carbon nanotube samples, the variation of the structural and morphological properties of the carbon nanotubes with the flow level of hydrogen, reflect changes of the catalyst systems induced by the presence of hydrogen.

  15. Effect of Copper Nanoparticles Dispersion on Catalytic Performance of Cu/SiO2 Catalyst for Hydrogenation of Dimethyl Oxalate to Ethylene Glycol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yajing Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cu/SiO2 catalysts, for the synthesis of ethylene glycol (EG from hydrogenation of dimethyl oxalate (DMO, were prepared by ammonia-evaporation and sol-gel methods, respectively. The structure, size of copper nanoparticles, copper dispersion, and the surface chemical states were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and N2 adsorption. It is found the structures and catalytic performances of the catalysts were highly affected by the preparation method. The catalyst prepared by sol-gel method had smaller average size of copper nanoparticles (about 3-4 nm, better copper dispersion, higher Cu+/C0 ratio and larger BET surface area, and higher DMO conversion and EG selectivity under the optimized reaction conditions.

  16. Effects of pH value on composition structure and catalytic activity of Pt-SnO{sub x}/C prepared by ethylene glycol method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y.H. [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, 100081 Beijing (China); Wu, F.; Wu, C. [School of Chemical Engineering and Environment, Beijing Institute of Technology, 100081 Beijing (China); National Development Center for High Technology Green Materials, 100081 Beijing (China)

    2012-06-15

    Pt-SnO{sub x} nanoparticles were synthesized by the ethylene glycol (EG) method in solution of H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6} and SnCl{sub 2}, with the same concentrations of Pt and Sn, but different pH values. The pH value after the end of platinum reduction reaction was not changed any more, except that a certain amount of water was added to deposit the Pt-SnO{sub x} nanoparticles on the carbon support. The pre-nanocatalysts were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to investigate the contents of Pt and Sn, and their catalytic activities for ethanol electrooxidation were tested by cyclic voltammetry (CV). The result was that the Sn contents were increasing as the Pt/Sn atomic ratios of 2.2, 2.6, 5.1, 7.4, 8.7, with the decreasing end pH values of 4.5, 5.0, 5.5, 6.5, 7.5, and the Pt contents became less than the addition in the preparation solution while the end pH values were <5.5, but the catalytic activities for ethanol electrooxidation were not so much regularly changed. Besides, from the end pH value of 5.5 to the increasing 9.0, all the platinum nanoparticles could be completely deposited on the carbon support, under the condition that only a certain amount of water was added. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Catalytic process for tritium exchange reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansoo Lee; Kang, H.S.; Paek, S.W.; Hongsuk Chung; Yang Geun Chung; Sook Kyung Lee

    2001-01-01

    The catalytic activities for a hydrogen isotope exchange were measured through the reaction of a vapor and gas mixture. The catalytic activity showed to be comparable with the published data. Since the gas velocity is relatively low, the deactivation was not found clearly during the 5-hour experiment. Hydrogen isotope transfer experiments were also conducted through the liquid phase catalytic exchange reaction column that consisted of a catalytic bed and a hydrophilic bed. The efficiencies of both the catalytic and hydrophilic beds were higher than 0.9, implying that the column performance was excellent. (author)

  18. Catalytic hot gas cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simell, P [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    Gasification gas that contains particulates can be purified from tars and ammonia by using nickel monolith catalysts. Temperatures over 900 deg C are required at 20 bar pressure to avoid deactivation by H{sub 2}S and carbon. Dolomites and limestones are effective tar decomposing catalysts only when calcined. Tar decomposition in gasification conditions can take place by steam or dry (CO{sub 2}) reforming reactions. These reactions follow apparent first order kinetics with respect to hydrocarbons in gasification conditions. (author) (16 refs.)

  19. Catalytic hot gas cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simell, P. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Gasification gas that contains particulates can be purified from tars and ammonia by using nickel monolith catalysts. Temperatures over 900 deg C are required at 20 bar pressure to avoid deactivation by H{sub 2}S and carbon. Dolomites and limestones are effective tar decomposing catalysts only when calcined. Tar decomposition in gasification conditions can take place by steam or dry (CO{sub 2}) reforming reactions. These reactions follow apparent first order kinetics with respect to hydrocarbons in gasification conditions. (author) (16 refs.)

  20. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Dickerson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic pyrolysis is a promising thermochemical conversion route for lignocellulosic biomass that produces chemicals and fuels compatible with current, petrochemical infrastructure. Catalytic modifications to pyrolysis bio-oils are geared towards the elimination and substitution of oxygen and oxygen-containing functionalities in addition to increasing the hydrogen to carbon ratio of the final products. Recent progress has focused on both hydrodeoxygenation and hydrogenation of bio-oil using a variety of metal catalysts and the production of aromatics from bio-oil using cracking zeolites. Research is currently focused on developing multi-functional catalysts used in situ that benefit from the advantages of both hydrodeoxygenation and zeolite cracking. Development of robust, highly selective catalysts will help achieve the goal of producing drop-in fuels and petrochemical commodities from wood and other lignocellulosic biomass streams. The current paper will examine these developments by means of a review of existing literature.

  1. Protein structure based prediction of catalytic residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, J Eduardo; Fiser, Andras

    2013-02-22

    Worldwide structural genomics projects continue to release new protein structures at an unprecedented pace, so far nearly 6000, but only about 60% of these proteins have any sort of functional annotation. We explored a range of features that can be used for the prediction of functional residues given a known three-dimensional structure. These features include various centrality measures of nodes in graphs of interacting residues: closeness, betweenness and page-rank centrality. We also analyzed the distance of functional amino acids to the general center of mass (GCM) of the structure, relative solvent accessibility (RSA), and the use of relative entropy as a measure of sequence conservation. From the selected features, neural networks were trained to identify catalytic residues. We found that using distance to the GCM together with amino acid type provide a good discriminant function, when combined independently with sequence conservation. Using an independent test set of 29 annotated protein structures, the method returned 411 of the initial 9262 residues as the most likely to be involved in function. The output 411 residues contain 70 of the annotated 111 catalytic residues. This represents an approximately 14-fold enrichment of catalytic residues on the entire input set (corresponding to a sensitivity of 63% and a precision of 17%), a performance competitive with that of other state-of-the-art methods. We found that several of the graph based measures utilize the same underlying feature of protein structures, which can be simply and more effectively captured with the distance to GCM definition. This also has the added the advantage of simplicity and easy implementation. Meanwhile sequence conservation remains by far the most influential feature in identifying functional residues. We also found that due the rapid changes in size and composition of sequence databases, conservation calculations must be recalibrated for specific reference databases.

  2. Catalytic processes for cleaner fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catani, R.; Marchionna, M.; Rossini, S.

    1999-01-01

    More stringent limitations on vehicle emissions require different measurement: fuel reformulation is one of the most important and is calling for a noticeable impact on refinery assets. Composition rangers of the future fuels have been defined on a time scale. In this scenario the evolution of catalytic technologies becomes a fundamental tool for allowing refinery to reach the fixed-by-law targets. In this paper, the refinery process options to meet each specific requirements of reformulated fuels are surveyed [it

  3. The Effect of Time dealumination and Solvent Concentration in Synthesis of Zeolite Catalyst and Catalytic Test for DiEthyl Ether Production Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Widayat; Roesyadi, A.; Rachimoellah, M.

    2009-01-01

    Ethanol is an alternative energy, but its has three distinct disadvantages as a transportation fuel. Its availability is currently limited, and it has a lower volumetric heating value and a lower Reid vapour pressure (RVP) than gasoline. This paper focuses for this disadvantages and to solve this problem can do with converts ethanol to DiEthyl Ether product. This research produced DiEthyl Ether by ethanol dehydration process with zeolite as catalyst. The catalyst synthesis from natural material from District Gunung Kidul, Indonesia. The catalyst produced with dealumination, neutralization, drying and calcination processes. The zeolite catalyst was analysed of Si/Al, X-ray Diffraction and specific surface area. The catalyst product then used for ethanol dehydration to produce DiEthyl Ether. The results shown the biggest surface area is 184,52 m 2 /gram at catalyst production at 10 hours for time dealumination. The crystallite of catalyst product is similar like shown at diffractogram of XRD analysis. The ratio Si/Al biggest is 313.7 that obtaining at catalyst production with 7 hours for time dealumination. The catalytic test use fixed bed reactor with 1 inci diameter and ethanol fermentation both as feed. The operation condition is 150 deg. C at temperature and atmosphere pressure. The compounds product in liquid phase are diethyl ether, methanol and water.

  4. Carbon-based catalytic briquettes for the reduction of NO: Effect of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and HNO{sub 3} carbon support treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Boyano; M.E. Galvez; R. Moliner; M.J. Lazaro [Instituto de Carboquimica CSIC, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2008-08-15

    The influence of treating carbon with sulphuric and nitric acids on the activity of a carbon-based briquette catalyst for NO reduction with NH{sub 3} was examined in a fixed-bed reactor at low temperature (150{sup o}C). The briquette catalysts were prepared from a low-rank coal and a commercial tar pitch. The active phase was impregnated from a suspension of ashes of petroleum coke by means of an equilibrium adsorption method. The catalytic behaviour of NO reduction over acid treated briquettes was found to vary with the surface characteristics of the carbon support. This suggests that the number of oxygen-containing sites as well as vanadium load and dispersion affect the reaction activity. In the presence of oxygen, the SCR activity is enhanced with a nitric acid treatment, activity is promoted by the presence of acidic surface groups such as carboxyl and lactone, which can help not only to create a reservoir of reactants on the catalysts surface but also to improve the dispersion or even increase the amount of vanadium loading. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that the formation of acidic sites on the surface is an important step for NO reduction with NH{sub 3} over carbon-based catalysts. Additional techniques such as XPS and TPD to characterize the oxygen surface and those such as N{sub 2} adsorption to characterize the textural properties were also used in this study. 46 refs., 6 figs., 5 tabs.

  5. Effect of SiO2/Al2O3 Ratio on Micro-Mesopore Formation for Pt/Beta-MCM-41 via NaOH Treatment and the Catalytic Performance in N-heptane Hydro isomerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li; Shi, Zhiyuan; Liu, Yingming; Zhao, Yuanshou; Liu, Qinghua; Xu, Chengguo; Bai, Peng; Yan, Zifeng

    2018-01-01

    Micro-mesoporous composite material Beta-MCM-41(BM) were hydrothermally synthesized by treating parent beta with molar SiO2/Al2O3 ratios of 12.5, 20 and 30 as precursors. The influence of SiO2/Al2O3 ratio of zeolite beta on effective micro-mesoporous composite formation was studied by investigating the crystallinity, morphology, chemical composition, acidity and textural property of Beta-MCM-41 through XRD, nitrogen adsorption, SEM, TEM, NH3-TPD, FTIR and Pyridine-FTIR. The catalytic performance was evaluated in terms of n-heptane hydro isomerization. The results demonstrated that Beta-MCM-41 supported Pt catalysts showed higher selectivity to isoheptanes than Pt/Beta. It was attributed to the superiorities of the pore structure and mesoporous accelerated the diffusion of larger molecules of isoheptanes.

  6. Progress in catalytic naphtha reforming process: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimpour, Mohammad Reza; Jafari, Mitra; Iranshahi, Davood

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic naphtha reforming process is a vital process for refineries due to the production of high-octane components, which is intensely demanded in our modern life. The significance of this industrial process induced researchers to investigate different aspects of catalytic naphtha reforming process intensively. Some of the investigators try to improve this process by representing more effective catalysts, while others try to elucidate its kinetic and deactivation mechanisms and design more efficient reactor setups. The amount of these established papers is so much that may confuse some of the researchers who want to find collective information about catalytic naphtha reforming process. In the present paper, the published studies from 1949 until now are categorized into three main groups including finding suitable catalyst, revealing appropriate kinetic and deactivation model, and suggesting efficient reactor configuration and mode of operation. These studies are reviewed separately, and a suitable reference is provided for those who want to have access to generalized information about catalytic naphtha reforming process. Finally, various suggestions for revamping the catalytic naphtha reforming process have been proposed as a guideline for further investigations

  7. Poisoning of bubble propelled catalytic micromotors: the chemical environment matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guanjia; Sanchez, Samuel; Schmidt, Oliver G; Pumera, Martin

    2013-04-07

    Self-propelled catalytic microjets have attracted considerable attention in recent years and these devices have exhibited the ability to move in complex media. The mechanism of propulsion is via the Pt catalysed decomposition of H2O2 and it is understood that the Pt surface is highly susceptible to poisoning by sulphur-containing molecules. Here, we show that important extracellular thiols as well as basic organic molecules can significantly hamper the motion of catalytic microjet engines. This is due to two different mechanisms: (i) molecules such as dimethyl sulfoxide can quench the hydroxyl radicals produced at Pt surfaces and reduce the amount of oxygen gas generated and (ii) molecules containing -SH, -SSR, and -SCH3 moieties can poison the catalytically active platinum surface, inhibiting the motion of the jet engines. It is essential that the presence of such molecules in the environment be taken into consideration for future design and operation of catalytic microjet engines. We show this effect on catalytic micromotors prepared by both rolled-up and electrodeposition approaches, demonstrating that such poisoning is universal for Pt catalyzed micromotors. We believe that our findings will contribute significantly to this field to develop alternative systems or catalysts for self-propulsion when practical applications in the real environment are considered.

  8. Random catalytic reaction networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Peter F.; Fontana, Walter; Miller, John H.

    1993-03-01

    We study networks that are a generalization of replicator (or Lotka-Volterra) equations. They model the dynamics of a population of object types whose binary interactions determine the specific type of interaction product. Such a system always reduces its dimension to a subset that contains production pathways for all of its members. The network equation can be rewritten at a level of collectives in terms of two basic interaction patterns: replicator sets and cyclic transformation pathways among sets. Although the system contains well-known cases that exhibit very complicated dynamics, the generic behavior of randomly generated systems is found (numerically) to be extremely robust: convergence to a globally stable rest point. It is easy to tailor networks that display replicator interactions where the replicators are entire self-sustaining subsystems, rather than structureless units. A numerical scan of random systems highlights the special properties of elementary replicators: they reduce the effective interconnectedness of the system, resulting in enhanced competition, and strong correlations between the concentrations.

  9. Overexpression of the catalytically impaired Taspase1 T234V or Taspase1 D233A variants does not have a dominant negative effect in T(4;11 leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Bier

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The chromosomal translocation t(4;11(q21;q23 is associated with high-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia of infants. The resulting AF4•MLL oncoprotein becomes activated by Taspase1 hydrolysis and is considered to promote oncogenic transcriptional activation. Hence, Taspase1's proteolytic activity is a critical step in AF4•MLL pathophysiology. The Taspase1 proenzyme is autoproteolytically processed in its subunits and is assumed to assemble into an αββα-heterodimer, the active protease. Therefore, we investigated here whether overexpression of catalytically inactive Taspase1 variants are able to interfere with the proteolytic activity of the wild type enzyme in AF4•MLL model systems. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: The consequences of overexpressing the catalytically dead Taspase1 mutant, Taspase1(T234V, or the highly attenuated variant, Taspase1(D233A, on Taspase1's processing of AF4•MLL and of other Taspase1 targets was analyzed in living cancer cells employing an optimized cell-based assay. Notably, even a nine-fold overexpression of the respective Taspase1 mutants neither inhibited Taspase1's cis- nor trans-cleavage activity in vivo. Likewise, enforced expression of the α- or β-subunits showed no trans-dominant effect against the ectopically or endogenously expressed enzyme. Notably, co-expression of the individual α- and β-subunits did not result in their assembly into an enzymatically active protease complex. Probing Taspase1 multimerization in living cells by a translocation-based protein interaction assay as well as by biochemical methods indicated that the inactive Taspase1 failed to assemble into stable heterocomplexes with the wild type enzyme. CONCLUSIONS: Collectively, our results demonstrate that inefficient heterodimerization appears to be the mechanism by which inactive Taspase1 variants fail to inhibit wild type Taspase1's activity in trans. Our work favours strategies targeting Taspase1's catalytic activity

  10. Effects of Coke Deposits on the Catalytic Performance of Large Zeolite H-ZSM-5 Crystals during Alcohol-to-Hydrocarbon Reactions as Investigated by a Combination of Optical Spectroscopy and Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nordvang, Emily C.; Borodina, Elena; Ruiz-Martinez, Javier; Fehrmann, Rasmus; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic activity of large zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals in methanol (MTO) and ethanol-to-olefins (ETO) conversions was investigated and, using operando UV/Vis measurements, the catalytic activity and deactivation was correlated with the formation of coke. These findings were related to in situ

  11. Heterogeneous-catalytic redox reactions in nitrate - formate systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ananiev, A.V.; Shilov, V.P.; Tananaev, I.G.; Brossard, Ph.; Broudic, J.Ch.

    2000-01-01

    It was found that an intensive destruction of various organic and mineral substances - usual components of aqueous waste solutions (oxalic acid, complexones, urea, hydrazine, ammonium nitrate, etc.) takes place under the conditions of catalytic denitration. Kinetics and mechanisms of urea and ammonium nitrate decomposition in the system HNO 3 - HCOOH - Pt/SiO 2 are comprehensively investigated. The behaviour of uranium, neptunium and plutonium under the conditions of catalytic denitration is studied. It is shown, that under the certain conditions the formic acid is an effective reducer of the uranium (VI), neptunium (VI, V) and plutonium (VI, IV) ions. Kinetics of heterogeneous-catalytic red-ox reactions of uranium (VI), neptunium (VI, V) and plutonium (VI, IV) with formic acid are investigated. The mechanisms of the appropriate reactions are evaluated. (authors)

  12. Catalytic Synthesis of Nitriles in Continuous Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordvang, Emily Catherine

    The objective of this thesis is to report the development of a new, alternative process for the flexible production of nitrile compounds in continuous flow. Nitriles are an important class of compounds that find applications as solvents, chemical intermediates and pharmaceutical compounds......, alternative path to acetonitrile from ethanol via the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylamine. The catalytic activity and product ratios of the batch and continuous flow reactions are compared and the effect of reaction conditions on the reaction is investigated. The effects of ammonia in the reaction...... dehydrogenation of ethylamine and post-reaction purging.Chapter 4 outlines the application of RuO2/Al2O3 catalysts to the oxidative dehydrogenation of benzylamine in air, utilizing a new reaction setup. Again, batch and continuous flow reactions are compared and the effects of reaction conditions, ammonia...

  13. Catalytic Oxidation of Allylic Alcohols to Methyl Esters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallas-Hulin, Agata; Kotni, Rama Krishna; Nielsen, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Aerobic oxidation of allylic alcohols to methyl esters using gold nanoparticles supported on different metal oxide carriers has been performed successfully under mild conditions (room temperature, 0.1 MPa O2) without significant loss of catalytic activity. The effects of different reaction...... parameters are studied to find the suitable reaction conditions. All catalysts are characterised by XRD, XRF and TEM. Among these catalysts, Au/TiO2 showed the most efficient catalytic activity towards the selective oxidation of allylic alcohols to the corresponding esters. Moreover, the same Au/TiO2...... to synthesize methyl esters from allylic alcohols....

  14. Kinetic and catalytic performance of a BI-porous composite material in catalytic cracking and isomerisation reactions

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Khattaf, S.

    2012-01-10

    Catalytic behaviour of pure zeolite ZSM-5 and a bi-porous composite material (BCM) were investigated in transformation of m-xylene, while zeolite HY and the bi-porous composite were used in the cracking of 1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene (TIPB). The micro/mesoporous material was used to understand the effect of the presence of mesopores on these reactions. Various characterisation techniques, that is, XRD, SEM, TGA, FT-IR and nitrogen sorption measurements were applied for complete characterisation of the catalysts. Catalytic tests using CREC riser simulator showed that the micro/mesoporous composite catalyst exhibited higher catalytic activity as compared with the conventional microporous ZSM-5 and HY zeolite for transformation of m-xylene and for the catalytic cracking of TIPB, respectively. The outstanding catalytic reactivity of m-xylene and TIPB molecules were mainly attributed to the easier access of active sites provided by the mesopores. Apparent activation energies for the disappearance of m-xylene and TIPB over all catalysts were found to decrease in the order: EBCM>EZSM-5 and EBCM>EHY, respectively. © 2012 Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering.

  15. Abatement of phenolic mixtures by catalytic wet oxidation enhanced by Fenton's pretreatment: Effect of H2O2 dosage and temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, A.; Yustos, P.; Rodriguez, S.; Simon, E.; Garcia-Ochoa, F.

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) of a phenolic mixture containing phenol, o-cresol and p-cresol (500 mg/L on each pollutant) has been carried out using a commercial activated carbon (AC) as catalyst, placed in a continuous three-phase reactor. Total pressure was 16 bar and temperature was 127 deg. C. Pollutant conversion, mineralization, intermediate distribution, and toxicity were measured at the reactor outlet. Under these conditions no detoxification of the inlet effluent was found even at the highest catalyst weight (W) to liquid flow rate (Q L ) ratio used. On the other hand, some Fenton Runs (FR) have been carried out in a batch way using the same phenolic aqueous mixture previously cited. The concentration of Fe 2+ was set to 10 mg/L. The influence of the H 2 O 2 amount (between 10 and 100% of the stoichiometric dose) and temperature (30, 50, and 70 deg. C) on phenols conversion, mineralization, and detoxification have been analyzed. Phenols conversion was near unity at low hydrogen peroxide dosage but mineralization and detoxification achieved an asymptotic value at each temperature conditions. The integration of Fenton reagent as pretreatment of the CWO process remarkably improves the efficiency of the CWO reactor and allows to obtain detoxified effluents at mild temperature conditions and relatively low W/Q L values. For a given phenolic mixture a temperature range of 30-50 deg. C in the Fenton pretreatment with a H 2 O 2 dosage between 20 and 40% of the stoichiometric amount required can be proposed

  16. Co-catalytic effect of Ni in the methanol electro-oxidation on Pt-Ru/C catalyst for direct methanol fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.B.; Yin, G.P.; Zhang, J.; Sun, Y.C.; Shi, P.F.

    2006-01-01

    This research is aimed to improve the utilization and activity of anodic catalysts, thus to lower the contents of noble metals loading in anodes for methanol electro-oxidation. The direct methanol fuel cell anodic catalysts, Pt-Ru-Ni/C and Pt-Ru/C, were prepared by chemical reduction method. Their performances were tested by using a glassy carbon working electrode through cyclic voltammetric curves, chronoamperometric curves and half-cell measurement in a solution of 0.5 mol/L CH 3 OH and 0.5 mol/L H 2 SO 4 . The composition of the Pt-Ru-Ni and Pt-Ru surface particles were determined by EDAX analysis. The particle size and lattice parameter of the catalysts were determined by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD). XRD analysis showed that both of the catalysts exhibited face-centered cubic structures and had smaller lattice parameters than Pt-alone catalyst. Their sizes are small, about 4.5 nm. No significant differences in the methanol electro-oxidation on both electrodes were found by using cyclic voltammetry, especially regarding the onset potential for methanol electro-oxidation. The electrochemically active-specific areas of the Pt-Ru-Ni/C and Pt-Ru/C catalysts are almost the same. But, the catalytic activity of the Pt-Ru-Ni/C catalyst is higher for methanol electro-oxidation than that of the Pt-Ru/C catalyst. Its tolerance performance to CO formed as one of the intermediates of methanol electro-oxidation is better than that of the Pt-Ru/C catalyst

  17. Study of catalytic phenomena in radiation chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dran, J.C.

    1965-01-01

    Two phenomena have been studied: the action of γ rays from radio-cobalt on the adsorption and catalytic properties of ZnO and NiO in. relationship with the heterogeneous oxidation of CO, and the homogeneous catalysis by OsO 4 of the oxidation of various aqueous phase solutes by the same radiation. The prior irradiation of ZnO and of NiO does not modify their catalytic activity but generally increases the adsorption energy of -the gases CO and O 2 . The influence of the radiations appears to be connected with the presence of traces of water on ZnO and of an excess of oxygen on NiO. Osmium tetroxide which is not degraded by irradiation in acid solution, accelerates the radiolytic oxidation of certain compounds (Te IV , Pt 11 , As 111 ) in the presence of oxygen, as a result of its sensitizing effect on the oxidation by H 2 O 2 . In the case of phosphites on the other hand, OsO 4 has a protecting action under certain conditions of acidity and may suppress entirely the chain reaction which characterizes the oxidation of this solute byγ rays. A general mechanism is proposed for these phenomena. The rate constant for the OsO 4 + HO 2 reaction is calculated to be 5.7 x 10 5 l.mol -1 . sec -1 . (author) [fr

  18. Catalytic combustion in gas stoves - Phase II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hjelm, Anna-Karin [CATATOR AB, Lund (Sweden)

    2003-06-01

    Several independent studies show that gas stoves to some degree contribute to the indoor emissions of NO{sub x} especially in situations were the ventilation flow is poor. The peak-NO{sub x} concentrations can reach several hundred ppb but the integral concentration seldom exceeds about 20 - 50 ppb, which corresponds to an indoor-outdoor ratio of about 1 - 2.5. Epidemiological studies indicate increasing problems with respiratory symptoms in sensitive people at concentrations as low as 15 ppb of NO{sub 2}. Consequently, the NO{sub x}-concentration in homes where gas stoves are used is high enough to cause health effects. However, in situations where the ventilation flow is high (utilisation of ventilation hoods) the NO{sub x}-emissions are not likely to cause any health problems. This study has been aimed at investigating the possibilities to reduce the NO{sub x} emissions from gas stoves by replacing the conventional flame combustion with catalytic combustion. The investigation is requested by Swedish Gas Center, and is a following-up work of an earlier conducted feasibility study presented in April-2002. The present investigation reports on the possibility to use cheap and simple retro-fit catalytic design suggestions for traditional gas stoves. Experiments have been conducted with both natural and town gas, and parameters such as emissions of NO{sub x}, CO and unburned fuel gas and thermal efficiency, etc, have been examined and are discussed. The results show that it is possible to reduce the NO{sub x} emissions up to 80% by a simple retro-fit installation, without decreasing the thermal efficiency of the cooking plate. The measured source strengths correspond to indoor NO{sub x} concentrations that are below or equal to the average outdoor concentration, implying that no additional detrimental health effects are probable. The drawback of the suggested installations is that the concentration of CO and in some cases also CH{sub 4} are increased in the flue gases

  19. Demonstration of a Catalytic Converter Using a Lawn Mower Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic conversion is an important tool in environmental-remediation strategies and source removal of pollutants. Because a catalyst is regenerated, the chemistry can be extremely effective for conversion of undesirable pollutant species to less harmful products in situations where the pollutants have accumulated or are being continuously…

  20. Catalytic Ketone Hydrodeoxygenation Mediated by Highly Electrophilic Phosphonium Cations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Meera; Holthausen, Michael H; Mallov, Ian; Pérez, Manuel; Qu, Zheng-Wang; Grimme, Stefan; Stephan, Douglas W

    2015-07-06

    Ketones are efficiently deoxygenated in the presence of silane using highly electrophilic phosphonium cation (EPC) salts as catalysts, thus affording the corresponding alkane and siloxane. The influence of distinct substitution patterns on the catalytic effectiveness of several EPCs was evaluated. The deoxygenation mechanism was probed by DFT methods. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. The catalytic cracking mechanism of lignite pyrolysis char on tar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lei, Z.; Huibin, H.; Xiangling, S.; Zhenhua, M.; Lei, Z.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of different pyrolysis conditions for tar catalytic cracking will be analyzed according to the lignite pyrolysis char as catalyst on pyrolytic tar in this paper. The pyrolysis char what is the by-product of the cracking of coal has an abundant of pore structure and it has good catalytic activity. On this basis, making the modified catalyst when the pyrolysis char is activation and loads Fe by impregnation method. The cracking mechanism of lignite pyrolytic tar is explored by applying gas chromatograph to analyze splitting products of tar. The experimental results showed that: (1) The effect of tar cracking as the pyrolysis temperature, the heating rate, the volatilization of pyrolysis char and particle size increasing is better and better. The effect of the catalytic and cracking of lignite pyrolysis char in tar is best when the heating rate, the pyrolysis temperature, the volatiles of pyrolysis char, particle size is in specific conditions.(2) The activation of pyrolysis char can improve the catalytic effect of pyrolysis char on the tar cracking. But it reduces the effect of the tar cracking when the pyrolysis char is activation loading Fe. (author)

  2. Kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Boudart, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book is a critical account of the principles of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions in the light of recent developments in surface science and catalysis science. Originally published in 1984. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase acc

  3. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  4. Catalytic cracking of hydrocarbon oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1940-09-12

    A process is described for the vapor phase catalytic cracking of hydrocarbon oils boiling substantially in the gas oil range. The reaction takes place in the presence of a solid catalyst between 700 to 900/sup 0/F under pressure between atmospheric and 400 psi. A gas containing between 20 and 90 mol % of free hydrogen is used. The reaction is allowed to proceed until consumption of the free begins. The reaction is discontinued at that point and the catalyst is regenerated for further use.

  5. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen, is divided into two tasks. Task 1 centers on the activation of dihydrogen by molecular basic reagents such as hydroxide ion to convert it into a reactive adduct (OH{center_dot}H{sub 2}){sup {minus}} that can reduce organic molecules. Such species should be robust withstanding severe conditions and chemical poisons. Task 2 is focused on an entirely different approach that exploits molecular catalysts, derived from organometallic compounds that are capable of reducing monocyclic aromatic compounds under very mild conditions. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  6. Catalytic enantioselective Reformatsky reaction with ketones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez-Ibanez, M. Angeles; Macia, Beatriz; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2008-01-01

    Chiral tertiary alcohols were obtained with good yields and enantioselectivities via a catalytic Reformatsky reaction with ketones, including the challenging diaryl ketones, using chiral BINOL derivatives.

  7. Advanced Catalytic Converter in Gasoline Enginer Emission Control: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leman A.M.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exhaust emission from automobile source has become a major contributor to the air pollution and environmental problem. Catalytic converter is found to be one of the most effective tools to reduce the overwhelming exhaust pollutants in our environment. The development of sustainable catalytic converter still remains a critical issue due to the stringent exhaust emission regulations. Another issue such as price and availability of the precious metal were also forced the automotive industry to investigate the alternatives for producing a better replacement for the material used in catalytic converter. This paper aims at reviewing the present development and improvement on the catalytic converter used on the reduction of exhaust emission in order to meet the regulations and market demand. The use of new catalyst such as to replace the noble metal material of Platinum (Pt, Palladium (Pd and Rhodium (Rh has been reviewed. Material such as zeolite, nickel oxide and metal oxide has been found to effectively reduce the emission than the commercial converter. The preparation method of the catalyst has also evolved through the years as it is to ensure a good characteristic of a good monolith catalyst. Ultrasonic treatment with combination of electroplating technique, citrate method and Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation (PEO has been found as the latest novel preparation method on producing an effective catalyst in reducing the exhaust emission.

  8. Structured materials for catalytic and sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokenek, Selma

    been synthesized and characterized to establish the effects of nanoparticle size on catalytic activity in methanol decomposition. The physicochemical properties of the synthesized palladium-nickel nanoparticles will be discussed, as a function of the synthesis parameters. The optical characteristics of the Ag and Pd nanoparticles will be determined, with a view toward tuning the response of the nanoparticles for incorporation in sensors. Analysis of the monometallic palladium particles revealed a dependence of syngas production on nanoparticle size. The peak and steady state TOFs increased roughly linearly with the average nanoparticle diameter. The amount of coke deposited on the particle surfaces was found to be independent on the size of the nanoparticles. Shape control of the nickel-palladium nanoparticles with a high selectivity for (100) and (110) facets (≤ 80%) has been demonstrated. The resulting alloy nanoparticles were found to have homogeneous composition throughout their volume and maintain FCC crystal structure. Substitution of Ni atoms in the Pd lattice at a 1:3 molar ratio was found to induce lattice strains of ~1%. The Ag nanocubes synthesized exhibited behavior very similar to literature values, when taken on their own, exhibiting a pair of distinct absorbance peaks at 350 nm and 455 nm. In physical mixtures with the Pd nanoparticles synthesized, their behavior showed that the peak position of the Ag nanocubes' absorbance in UV-Vis could be tuned based on the relative proportions of the Ag and Pd nanoparticles present in the suspension analysed. The Ag polyhedra synthesized for comparison showed a broad doublet peak throughout the majority of the visible range before testing as a component in a physical mixture with the Pd nanoparticles. The addition of Pd nanoparticles to form a physical mixture resulted in some damping of the doublet peak observed as well as a corresponding shift in the baseline absorbance proportional to the amount of Pd added to

  9. Petrochemical promoters in catalytic cracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez, Maria; Vargas, Clemencia; Lizcano, Javier

    2010-01-01

    This study is based on the current scheme followed by a refinery with available Catalytic Cracking capacity to process new feedstocks such as Straight Run Naphtha and Naphthas from FCC. These feedstocks are of petrochemical interest to produce Ethane, Ethylene, Propylene, i-Butane, Toluene and Xylene. To evaluate the potential of these new streams versus the Cracking-charged Residues, it was performed a detailed chemical analysis on the structural groups in carbons [C1-C12] at the reactor product obtained in pilot plant. A catalyst with and without Propylene Promoter Additive was used. This study analyzes the differences in the chemical composition of the feedstocks, relating them to the yield of each petrochemical product. Straight Run Naphthas with a high content of Naphthenes, and Paraffines n[C5-C12] and i[C7-C12] are selective to the production of i-Butane and Propane, while Naphthas from FCC with a high content of n[C5-C12]Olefins, i-Olefins, and Aromatics are more selective to Propylene, Toluene, and Xylene. Concerning Catalytic Cracking of Naphthas, the Additive has similar selectivity for all the petrochemical products, their yields increase by about one point with 4%wt of Additive, while in cracking of Residues, the Additive increases in three points Propylene yield, corresponding to a selectivity of 50% (?C3= / ?LPG).

  10. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  11. Catalytic converters in the fireplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouki, J.

    1995-01-01

    In addition to selecting the appropriate means of heating and using dry fuel, the amount of harmful emissions contained by flue gases produced by fireplaces can be reduced by technical means. One such option is to use an oxidising catalytic converter. Tests at TTS Institute's Heating Studies Experimental Station have focused on two such converters (dense and coarse) mounted in light-weight iron heating stoves. The ability of the dense catalytic converter to oxidise carbon monoxide gases proved to be good. The concentration of carbon monoxide in the flue gases was reduced by as much as 90 %. Measurements conducted by VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland) showed that the conversion of other gases, e.g. of methane, was good. The exhaust resistance caused by the dense converter was so great as to necessitate the mounting of a fluegas evacuation fan in the chimney for the purpose of creating sufficient draught. When relying on natural draught, the dense converter requires a chimney of at least 7 metres and a by-pass connection while the fire is being lit. In addition, the converter will have to be constructed to be less dense and this will mean that it's capability to oxidise non-combusted gases will be reduced. The coarse converter did not impair the draught but it's oxidising property was insufficient. With the tests over, the converter was not observed to have become blocked up by impurities

  12. Measuring the effects of platinum from catalytic converter equipped vehicles by means of plant indicators (food and fodder plants); Wirkungsmessungen von Platin aus katalysatorbetriebenen Kraftfahrzeugen mit pflanzlichen Bioindikatoren (Nahrungs- und Futterpflanzen)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier-Reiter, W; Sommer, B [TUEV Energie und Umwelt GmbH, Filderstadt (Germany). Niederlassung Stuttgart

    1998-12-31

    The essential aim of the present R and D project, titled ``Measuring the effects of platinum from catalytic converter equipped vehicles by means of plant indicators - food and fodder plants (VPT 02)``, was to obtain first orienting results on the potential effects of platinum pollution on plants by means of short-time, high-dose exposure experiments. The most important effect criterion in assessing potential hazards to humans and animals via the food chain, beside any outwardly visible changes (reaction), was the analytical detection of platinum accumulation in the plants. The project was also intended as a first contribution to the ecotoxicology of platinum, in particular the behaviour of metallic platinum and water-soluble platinum compounds in the soil-plant system. [Deutsch] Die wesentliche Zielsetzung des F and E-Vorhabens `Wirkungsmessungen von Platin und Platinverbindungen mit pflanzlichen Bioindikatoren - Nahrungs- und Futterpflanzen (VPT 02)` war es, im Rahmen von Kurzzeit-Belastungsexperimenten im hohen Dosisbereich erste orientierende Ergebnisse zu den moeglichen Auswirkungen von Platin-Belastungen auf Pflanzen abzuleiten. Neben aeusserlich sichtbaren Veraenderungen der Pflanzen (Reaktion) wurde als Wirkungskriterium insbesondere die chemisch-analytisch erfassbare Platin-Anreicherung in den Pflanzen (Akkumulation) betrachtet, die eine Abschaetzung moeglicher Gefaehrdungen von Mensch und Tier ueber die Nahrungskette ermoeglicht. Zudem sollte ein erster Beitrag zur Oekotoxikologie des Platins, insbesondere zum Verhalten von metallischem Platin und wasserloeslichen Platinverbindungen im System Boden-Pflanzen, erarbeitet werden. (orig.)

  13. Measuring the effects of platinum from catalytic converter equipped vehicles by means of plant indicators (food and fodder plants); Wirkungsmessungen von Platin aus katalysatorbetriebenen Kraftfahrzeugen mit pflanzlichen Bioindikatoren (Nahrungs- und Futterpflanzen)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maier-Reiter, W.; Sommer, B. [TUEV Energie und Umwelt GmbH, Filderstadt (Germany). Niederlassung Stuttgart

    1997-12-31

    The essential aim of the present R and D project, titled ``Measuring the effects of platinum from catalytic converter equipped vehicles by means of plant indicators - food and fodder plants (VPT 02)``, was to obtain first orienting results on the potential effects of platinum pollution on plants by means of short-time, high-dose exposure experiments. The most important effect criterion in assessing potential hazards to humans and animals via the food chain, beside any outwardly visible changes (reaction), was the analytical detection of platinum accumulation in the plants. The project was also intended as a first contribution to the ecotoxicology of platinum, in particular the behaviour of metallic platinum and water-soluble platinum compounds in the soil-plant system. [Deutsch] Die wesentliche Zielsetzung des F and E-Vorhabens `Wirkungsmessungen von Platin und Platinverbindungen mit pflanzlichen Bioindikatoren - Nahrungs- und Futterpflanzen (VPT 02)` war es, im Rahmen von Kurzzeit-Belastungsexperimenten im hohen Dosisbereich erste orientierende Ergebnisse zu den moeglichen Auswirkungen von Platin-Belastungen auf Pflanzen abzuleiten. Neben aeusserlich sichtbaren Veraenderungen der Pflanzen (Reaktion) wurde als Wirkungskriterium insbesondere die chemisch-analytisch erfassbare Platin-Anreicherung in den Pflanzen (Akkumulation) betrachtet, die eine Abschaetzung moeglicher Gefaehrdungen von Mensch und Tier ueber die Nahrungskette ermoeglicht. Zudem sollte ein erster Beitrag zur Oekotoxikologie des Platins, insbesondere zum Verhalten von metallischem Platin und wasserloeslichen Platinverbindungen im System Boden-Pflanzen, erarbeitet werden. (orig.)

  14. Experimental Investigation of Flow Resistance in a Coal Mine Ventilation Air Methane Preheated Catalytic Oxidation Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the results of experimental investigation of flow resistance in a coal mine ventilation air methane preheated catalytic oxidation reactor. The experimental system was installed at the Energy Research Institute of Shandong University of Technology. The system has been used to investigate the effects of flow rate (200 Nm3/h to 1000 Nm3/h and catalytic oxidation bed average temperature (20°C to 560°C within the preheated catalytic oxidation reactor. The pressure drop and resistance proportion of catalytic oxidation bed, the heat exchanger preheating section, and the heat exchanger flue gas section were measured. In addition, based on a large number of experimental data, the empirical equations of flow resistance are obtained by the least square method. It can also be used in deriving much needed data for preheated catalytic oxidation designs when employed in industry.

  15. Soluble organic nanotubes for catalytic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Linfeng; Yang, Kunran; Zhang, Hui; Liao, Xiaojuan; Huang, Kun

    2016-03-18

    In this paper, we report a novel method for constructing a soluble organic nanotube supported catalyst system based on single-molecule templating of core–shell bottlebrush copolymers. Various organic or metal catalysts, such as sodium prop-2-yne-1-sulfonate (SPS), 1-(2-(prop-2-yn-1-yloxy)ethyl)-1H-imidazole (PEI) and Pd(OAc)2 were anchored onto the tube walls to functionalize the organic nanotubes via copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction. Depending on the 'confined effect' and the accessible cavity microenvironments of tubular structures, the organic nanotube catalysts showed high catalytic efficiency and site-isolation features. We believe that the soluble organic nanotubes will be very useful for the development of high performance catalyst systems due to their high stability of support, facile functionalization and attractive textural properties.

  16. The poisoning effect of PbO on Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2} catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NO with NH{sub 3} at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Lingling [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Li, Caiting, E-mail: ctli@hnu.edu.cn [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China); Zhao, Lingkui; Zeng, Guangming; Gao, Lei; Wang, Yan; Yu, Ming’e [College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Environmental Biology and Pollution Control (Hunan University), Ministry of Education, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • The poisoning effects of PbO-doped Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2} catalysts for low temperature NH{sub 3}-SCR were investigated. • Low concentration of Mn{sup 4+} and chemisorbed oxygen (O{sub b}) were not favorable for the generation of intermediates. • The decreased Ce{sup 3+} and less reducible of manganese oxides hindered the redox cycle (Mn{sup 3+} + Ce{sup 4+} ↔ Mn{sup 4+} + Ce{sup 3+}). • The doping of PbO not only altered acid sites but also inhibited ammonia adsorption as well as activation. • The poisoning of PbO resulted in the decrease of ad-NO{sub x} species (only a spot of bidentate nitrates remained). - Abstract: Lead oxide (PbO) as one of the typical heavy metals in flue gas from power plants has strong accumulation as well as poisoning effects on SCR catalysts. In this paper, a series of PbO-doped Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2} catalysts were synthesized by impregnation method. The poisoning effects of PbO over Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2} samples for selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH{sub 3} were investigated based on catalytic activity test and characterizations. The NO conversion of Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2} was greatly decreased after the addition of PbO. It was obvious that the NO conversion efficiency of Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2} catalyst declined from 96.75% to about 40% at 200 °C when Pb:Mn molar ratio reached 0.5. Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Hydrogen temperature programmed reduction (H{sub 2}-TPR), Ammonia temperature programmed desorption (NH{sub 3}-TPD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) were carried out to study the deactivation reasons of PbO poisoned catalysts. Manganese oxides’ crystallization, less reducible of manganese and cerium oxides, the decreasing of surface area, Mn{sup 4+} as well as Ce{sup 3+} concentration and chemisorbed oxygen (O{sub b}) after the introduction of PbO, all of these resulted in a poor SCR performance

  17. Heterogeneous catalytic degradation of polyacrylamide solution | Hu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Modified with trace metal elements, the catalytic activity of Fe2O3/Al2O3 could be changed greatly. Among various trace metal elements, Fe2O3/Al2O3 catalysts modified with Co and Cu showed great increase on catalytic activity. International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology, Vol. 2, No. 7, 2010, pp. 110- ...

  18. XPS-UPS, ISS characterization studies and the effect of Pt and K addition on the catalytic properties of MoO2-x(OH)y deposited on TiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Kandari, H.; Mohamed, A.M.; Al-Kharafi, F.; Katrib, A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Surface electronic structure-catalytic activity correlation is presented in this research work. → In situ characterization by XPS-UPS and ISS techniques were employed at the same experimental conditions applied for catalytic reactions. → Catalytic reactions of Mo deposited on titanium oxide for the isomerization and hydrogenation reactions using 1-hexene and n-hexane were studied. → The bifunctional properties of the molybdenum dioxide phase were modified by the addition of potassium. - Abstract: Characterization by XPS-UPS, ISS surface techniques of MoO 3 /TiO 2 catalysts before and after addition of Pt (PtMo) 2.5% by weight of MoO 3 and potassium (KMo) enabled to identify different chemical species present on the outermost surface layer at different reduction temperatures. Catalytic activities of these systems using 1-hexene and n-hexane reactants were studied. Correlation between catalytic activity and surface electronic structure enabled us to identify the chemical species, active site(s), responsible for specific catalytic reaction(s).

  19. XPS-UPS, ISS characterization studies and the effect of Pt and K addition on the catalytic properties of MoO{sub 2-x}(OH){sub y} deposited on TiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Kandari, H. [Public Authority of Applied Education and Training (Kuwait); Mohamed, A.M.; Al-Kharafi, F. [Kuwait University, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060 (Kuwait); Katrib, A., E-mail: ali.katrib@ku.edu.kw [Kuwait University, Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 5969, Safat 13060 (Kuwait)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Surface electronic structure-catalytic activity correlation is presented in this research work. {yields} In situ characterization by XPS-UPS and ISS techniques were employed at the same experimental conditions applied for catalytic reactions. {yields} Catalytic reactions of Mo deposited on titanium oxide for the isomerization and hydrogenation reactions using 1-hexene and n-hexane were studied. {yields} The bifunctional properties of the molybdenum dioxide phase were modified by the addition of potassium. - Abstract: Characterization by XPS-UPS, ISS surface techniques of MoO{sub 3}/TiO{sub 2} catalysts before and after addition of Pt (PtMo) 2.5% by weight of MoO{sub 3} and potassium (KMo) enabled to identify different chemical species present on the outermost surface layer at different reduction temperatures. Catalytic activities of these systems using 1-hexene and n-hexane reactants were studied. Correlation between catalytic activity and surface electronic structure enabled us to identify the chemical species, active site(s), responsible for specific catalytic reaction(s).

  20. Development of a new paper based nano-biosensor using the co-catalytic effect of tyrosinase from banana peel tissue (Musa Cavendish) and functionalized silica nanoparticles for voltammetric determination of l-tyrosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi-Mohseni, Mohadeseh; Raoof, Jahan Bakhsh; Ojani, Reza; Aghajanzadeh, Tahereh A; Bagheri Hashkavayi, Ayemeh

    2018-07-01

    In this paper, a new and facile method for the electrochemical determination of l-tyrosine was designed. First, 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane-functionalized silica nanoparticles were added to a paper disc. Then, the banana peel tissue and the mediator potassium hexacyanoferrate were dropped onto the paper, respectively. The modified paper disc was placed on the top of the graphite screen printed electrode and electrochemical characterization of this biosensor was studied by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy methods. The effective parameters like pH, banana peel tissue percentage, and the amount of mediator loading were optimized. l-tyrosine measurements were done by differential pulse voltammetry with a little sample (3 μL) for analysis. The biosensor showed a linear response for l-tyrosine in the wide concentration range of 0.05-600 μM and a low detection limit about 0.02 μM because of the co-catalytic effect of enzyme and nanoparticles. The stability of the biosensor and its selectivity were evaluated. This biosensor was applied for the voltammetric determination of l-tyrosine in the blood plasma sample. The results of the practical application study were comparable with the standard method (HPLC). In conclusion, a simple, inexpensive, rapid, sensitive and selective technique was successfully applied to the l-tyrosine analysis of the little samples. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Method of fabricating a catalytic structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollins, Harry W [Idaho Falls, ID; Petkovic, Lucia M [Idaho Falls, ID; Ginosar, Daniel M [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-22

    A precursor to a catalytic structure comprising zinc oxide and copper oxide. The zinc oxide has a sheet-like morphology or a spherical morphology and the copper oxide comprises particles of copper oxide. The copper oxide is reduced to copper, producing the catalytic structure. The catalytic structure is fabricated by a hydrothermal process. A reaction mixture comprising a zinc salt, a copper salt, a hydroxyl ion source, and a structure-directing agent is formed. The reaction mixture is heated under confined volume conditions to produce the precursor. The copper oxide in the precursor is reduced to copper. A method of hydrogenating a carbon oxide using the catalytic structure is also disclosed, as is a system that includes the catalytic structure.

  2. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J; Koljonen, T [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  3. Non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.; Kurek, Harry

    2015-12-22

    A non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot flue gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is embedded in the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot flue gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, extended surfaces of metal material such as stainless steel or metal alloy that are high in nickel content are included within at least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path.

  4. Studies of Catalytic Model Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holse, Christian

    The overall topic of this thesis is within the field of catalysis, were model systems of different complexity have been studied utilizing a multipurpose Ultra High Vacuum chamber (UHV). The thesis falls in two different parts. First a simple model system in the form of a ruthenium single crystal...... of the Cu/ZnO nanoparticles is highly relevant to industrial methanol synthesis for which the direct interaction of Cu and ZnO nanocrystals synergistically boost the catalytic activity. The dynamical behavior of the nanoparticles under reducing and oxidizing environments were studied by means of ex situ X......-ray Photoelectron Electron Spectroscopy (XPS) and in situ Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The surface composition of the nanoparticles changes reversibly as the nanoparticles exposed to cycles of high-pressure oxidation and reduction (200 mbar). Furthermore, the presence of metallic Zn is observed by XPS...

  5. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  6. Oxyfuel combustion using a catalytic ceramic membrane reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Xiaoyao; Li, K. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Imperial College London, University of London, South Kensington, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Thursfield, A.; Metcalfe, I.S. [School of Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2008-02-29

    Membrane catalytic combustion (MCC) is an environmentally friendly technique for heat and power generation from methane. This work demonstrates the performances of a MCC perovskite hollow fibre membrane reactor for the catalytic combustion of methane. The ionic-electronic La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{alpha}} (LSCF6428) mixed conductor, in the form of an oxygen-permeable hollow fibre membrane, has been prepared successfully by means of a phase-inversion spinning/sintering technique. For this process polyethersulfone (PESf) was used as a binder, N-methyl-2-pyrrollidone (NMP) as solvent and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP, K16-18) as an additive. With the prepared LSCF6428 hollow fibre membranes packed with catalyst, hollow fibre membrane reactors (HFMRs) have been assembled to perform the catalytic combustion of methane. A simple mathematical model that combines the local oxygen permeation rate with approximate catalytic reaction kinetics has been developed and can be used to predict the performance of the HFMRs for methane combustion. The effects of operating temperature and methane and air feed flow rates on the performance of the HFMR have been investigated both experimentally and theoretically. Both the methane conversion and oxygen permeation rate can be improved by means of coating platinum on the air side of the hollow fibre membranes. (author)

  7. Dimension meditated optic and catalytic performance over vanadium pentoxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Dezhi; Zhao, Yongjie; Zhang, Ruibo; Ning, Mingqiang; Zhao, Yuzhen; Zhou, Heping; Li, Jingbo; Jin, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • V_2O_5 with diverse dimensional morphologies were synthesized. • The optic properties of diverse dimensional V_2O_5 were investigated in detail. • The catalytic properties of diverse dimensional V_2O_5 on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate were analyzed. - Abstract: Morphologies and sizes of V_2O_5 had crucial effect on their optic and catalytic performance. Diverse dimensional V_2O_5 were successfully synthesized by the combination of a hydrothermal and post heat treatment method. The as-obtained samples were characterized by X-ray power diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectra. Moreover, the optic properties of diverse dimensional V_2O_5 were examined by Fourier transform imaging spectrometer and UV–vis-spectrophotometer. It showed that the IR transmittance of nanowire (at 1019 cm"−"1 is 85%) and UV absorbance of microflowers (at 480 nm) were high. Furthermore, the catalytic properties of diverse dimensional V_2O_5 on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate were evaluated and compared by Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis and Differential Scanning Calorimetry. Moreover, the best catalytic performance was obtained with the morphology of nanowire. It showed the thermal decomposition temperatures of AP with nanowire, microflowers and microsphere were reduced to 373 °C, 382 °C and 376 °C (decreased by 52 °C, 43 °C and 49 °C).

  8. Enhanced catalytic behavior of Ni alloys in steam methane reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Yeongpil; Kim, Hanmi; Lee, Jaichan

    2017-08-01

    The dissociation process of methane on Ni and Ni alloys are investigated by density functional theory (DFT) in terms of catalytic efficiency and carbon deposition. Examining the dissociation to CH3, CH2, CH, C, and H is not sufficient to properly predict the catalytic efficiency and carbon deposition, and further investigation of the CO gas-evolving reaction is required to completely understand methane dissociation in steam. The location of alloying element in Ni alloy needed be addressed from the results of ab-inito molecular dynamics (MD). The reaction pathway of methane dissociation associated with CO gas evolution is traced by performing first-principles calculations of the adsorption and activation energies of each dissociation step. During the dissociation process, two alternative reaction steps producing adsorbed C and H or adsorbed CO are critically important in determining coking inhibition as well as H2 gas evolution (i.e., the catalytic efficiency). The theoretical calculations presented here suggest that alloying Ni with Ru is an effective way to reduce carbon deposition and enhance the catalytic efficiency of H2 fueling in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs).

  9. Catalytic destruction of tar in biomass derived producer gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Ruiqin; Brown, Robert C.; Suby, Andrew; Cummer, Keith

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate catalytic destruction of tar formed during gasification of biomass, with the goal of improving the quality of the producer gas. This work focuses on nickel based catalysts treated with alkali in an effort to promote steam gasification of the coke that deposits on catalyst surfaces. A tar conversion system consisting of a guard bed and catalytic reactor was designed to treat the producer gas from an air blown, fluidized bed biomass gasifier. The guard bed used dolomite to crack the heavy tars. The catalytic reactor was used to evaluate three commercial steam reforming catalysts. These were the ICI46-1 catalyst from Imperial Chemical Industry and Z409 and RZ409 catalysts from Qilu Petrochemical Corp. in China. A 0.5-3 l/min slipstream from a 5 tpd biomass gasifier was used to test the tar conversion system. Gas and tar were sampled before and after the tar conversion system to evaluate the effectiveness of the system. Changes in gas composition as functions of catalytic bed temperature, space velocity and steam/TOC (total organic carbon) ratio are presented. Structural changes in the catalysts during the tests are also described

  10. Heterogeneous kinetic modeling of the catalytic conversion of cycloparaffins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Sabawi, Mustafa N.

    catalytic conversions respectively, are reported. Using these data, heterogeneous kinetic models accounting for intracrystallite molecular transport, adsorption and thermal and catalytic cracking of both cycloparaffin reactants are established. Results show that undesirable hydrogen transfer reactions are more pronounced and selectively favoured against other reactions at lower reaction temperatures, while the desirable ring-opening and cracking reactions predominate at the higher reaction temperatures. Moreover, results of the present work show that while crystallite size may have an effect on the overall conversion in some situations, there is a definite effect on the selectivity of products obtained during the cracking of MCH and decalin and the cracking of MCH in a mixture with co-reactants such as 1,3,5-triisopropylbenzene. Keywords. cycloparaffins, naphthenes, fluid catalytic cracking, kinetic modeling, Y-zeolites, diffusion, adsorption, ring-opening, hydrogen transfer, catalyst selectivity.

  11. Catalytic combustion in small wood burning appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oravainen, H. [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    There is over a million hand fired small heating appliances in Finland where about 5,4 million cubic meters of wood fuel is used. Combustion in such heating appliances is a batch-type process. In early stages of combustion when volatiles are burned, the formation of carbon monoxide (CO) and other combustible gases are difficult to avoid when using fuels that have high volatile matter content. Harmful emissions are formed mostly after each fuel adding but also during char burnout period. When the CO-content in flue gases is, say over 0.5 %, also other harmful emissions will be formed. Methane (CH{sub 4}) and other hydrocarbons are released and the amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)-compounds can be remarkable. Some PAH-compounds are very carcinogenic. It has been estimated that in Finland even more than 90 % of hydrocarbon and PAH emissions are due to small scale wood combustion. Emissions from transportation is excluded from these figures. That is why wood combustion has a net effect on greenhouse gas phenomena. For example carbon monoxide emissions from small scale wood combustion are two fold compared to that of energy production in power plants. Methane emission is of the same order as emission from transportation and seven fold compared with those of energy production. Emissions from small heating appliances can be reduced by developing the combustion techniques, but also by using other means, for example catalytic converters. In certain stages of the batch combustion, temperature is not high enough, gas mixing is not good enough and residence time is too short for complete combustion. When placed to a suitable place inside a heating appliance, a catalytic converter can oxidize unburned gases in the flue gas into compounds that are not harmful to the environment. (3 refs.)

  12. Catalytic combustion in small wood burning appliances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oravainen, H [VTT Energy, Jyvaeskylae (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    There is over a million hand fired small heating appliances in Finland where about 5,4 million cubic meters of wood fuel is used. Combustion in such heating appliances is a batch-type process. In early stages of combustion when volatiles are burned, the formation of carbon monoxide (CO) and other combustible gases are difficult to avoid when using fuels that have high volatile matter content. Harmful emissions are formed mostly after each fuel adding but also during char burnout period. When the CO-content in flue gases is, say over 0.5 %, also other harmful emissions will be formed. Methane (CH{sub 4}) and other hydrocarbons are released and the amount of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)-compounds can be remarkable. Some PAH-compounds are very carcinogenic. It has been estimated that in Finland even more than 90 % of hydrocarbon and PAH emissions are due to small scale wood combustion. Emissions from transportation is excluded from these figures. That is why wood combustion has a net effect on greenhouse gas phenomena. For example carbon monoxide emissions from small scale wood combustion are two fold compared to that of energy production in power plants. Methane emission is of the same order as emission from transportation and seven fold compared with those of energy production. Emissions from small heating appliances can be reduced by developing the combustion techniques, but also by using other means, for example catalytic converters. In certain stages of the batch combustion, temperature is not high enough, gas mixing is not good enough and residence time is too short for complete combustion. When placed to a suitable place inside a heating appliance, a catalytic converter can oxidize unburned gases in the flue gas into compounds that are not harmful to the environment. (3 refs.)

  13. Electrochemical promotion of sulfur dioxide catalytic oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrushina, Irina; Bandur, Viktor; Cappeln, Frederik Vilhelm

    2000-01-01

    investigation was to study a possible non-Faradaic electrochemical promotion of the liquid-phase catalytic reaction. It has been shown that there are two negative potential promotion areas with maximum effects at approximately -0.1 and -0.2 V, and one positive potential promotion area with the maximum effect...... between 0.1 and 0.3 V. There were no Faradaic reactions in the negative polarization region, and there was an anodic current which was less than 16% of the theoretical value for an exclusively Faradaic SO2 oxidation. Therefore the promotion effects at negative polarization are completely non-Faradaic. All...... the promotion effects have been explained as mainly due to charging of the electric double layer at the gold electrode. The effect at -0.2 V also depends on the V2O5 concentration and is more pronounced at higher V2O5 concentrations. This has been ascribed to a destruction of the vanadium polymeric chains...

  14. Catalytic Flash Pyrolysis of Biomass Using Different Types of Zeolite and Online Vapor Fractionation

    KAUST Repository

    Imran, Ali; Bramer, Eddy; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Brem, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    -staged condensation of the pyrolysis vapor. Zeolite-based catalysts are investigated to study the effect of varying acidities of faujasite Y zeolites, zeolite structures (ZSM5), different catalyst to biomass ratios and different catalytic pyrolysis temperatures. Low

  15. Catalytic hot gas cleaning of gasification gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simell, P. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1997-12-31

    The aim of this work was to study the catalytic cleaning of gasification gas from tars and ammonia. In addition, factors influencing catalytic activity in industrial applications were studied, as well as the effects of different operation conditions and limits. Also the catalytic reactions of tar and ammonia with gasification gas components were studied. The activities of different catalyst materials were measured with laboratory-scale reactors fed by slip streams taken from updraft and fluid bed gasifiers. Carbonate rocks and nickel catalysts proved to be active tar decomposing catalysts. Ammonia decomposition was in turn facilitated by nickel catalysts and iron materials like iron sinter and iron dolomite. Temperatures over 850 deg C were required at 2000{sup -1} space velocity at ambient pressure to achieve almost complete conversions. During catalytic reactions H{sub 2} and CO were formed and H{sub 2}O was consumed in addition to decomposing hydrocarbons and ammonia. Equilibrium gas composition was almost achieved with nickel catalysts at 900 deg C. No deactivation by H{sub 2}S or carbon took place in these conditions. Catalyst blocking by particulates was avoided by using a monolith type of catalyst. The apparent first order kinetic parameters were determined for the most active materials. The activities of dolomite, nickel catalyst and reference materials were measured in different gas atmospheres using laboratory apparatus. This consisted of nitrogen carrier, toluene as tar model compound, ammonia and one of the components H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}+H{sub 2}O or CO+CO{sub 2}. Also synthetic gasification gas was used. With the dolomite and nickel catalyst the highest toluene decomposition rates were measured with CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. In gasification gas, however, the rate was retarded due to inhibition by reaction products (CO, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}). Tar decomposition over dolomite was modelled by benzene reactions with CO{sub 2}, H

  16. The effect of mixed HCl–KCl competitive adsorbate on Pt adsorption and catalytic properties of Pt–Sn/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts in propane dehydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zangeneh, Farnaz Tahriri, E-mail: tahriri_zangeneh@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 14155-4933, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Catalyst Research Group, Petrochemical Research and Technology Company, National Petrochemical Company, P.O. Box 14358-84711, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Taeb, Abbas [Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, P.O. Box 14155-4933, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Gholivand, Khodayar [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, P.O. Box 14115-175, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sahebdelfar, Saeed [Catalyst Research Group, Petrochemical Research and Technology Company, National Petrochemical Company, P.O. Box 14358-84711, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-12-01

    Highlights: • Impregnation is a critical step in preparation of Pt-based dehydrogenation catalysts. • A competitor ion could strongly influence the impregnation of Pt on alumina support. • The competitor type is much more effective than pH of impregnation solution. • HCl competitor can be partially replaced by KCl reducing acidic attack on support. • Adsorption parameters can be estimated by a simple equilibrium-based model. - Abstract: The effect of competitive adsorbate concentration and combination on the adsorption of H{sub 2}PtCl{sub 6} onto γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the preparation and performance of PtSnK/γ-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst for propane dehydrogenation was investigated. The catalysts were prepared by sequential impregnation of Sn and Pt precursors. The effect of competitor concentration on Pt adsorption was studied by using hydrochloric acid (0.1–0.3 M) and the effect of pH was studied by using KCl/HCl mixtures at constant (0.1 M) total chloride ion concentration. The catalysts were characterized by nitrogen adsorption/desorption, XRD, XRF, SEM and CO chemisorption. The catalytic performance tests were carried out in a fixed-bed quartz reactor under kinetic controlled condition for proper catalyst screening. It was found that the corrosive competitor HCl could be partially substituted with KCl without appreciable impact on catalyst performance with the advantage of lower acid attack on the support and reduced leaching of the deposited tin. A model based on initial concentration and uptake of the adsorbates was developed to obtain the adsorption parameters. Values of 890 μmol/g and 600 lit/mol were obtained for adsorption site concentration of the tin-impregnated support and equilibrium constant for Pt adsorption, respectively, for HCl concentration range of 0.1–0.3 M.

  17. Catalytic modification of cellulose and hemicellulose - Sugarefine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repo, T. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland),Laboratory of Inorganic Chemistry], email: timo.repo@helsinki.fi

    2012-07-01

    The main goal of the project is to develop catalytic methods for the modification of lignocellulose-based saccharides in the biorefineries. The products of these reactions could be used for example as biofuel components, raw materials for the chemical industry, solvents and precursors for biopolymers. The catalyst development aims at creating efficient, selective and green catalytic methods for profitable use in biorefineries. The project is divided in three work packages: In WP1 (Catalytic dehydration of cellulose) the aim is at developing non-toxic, efficient methods for the catalytic dehydration of cellulose the target molecule being here 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (5-HMF). 5-HMF is an interesting platform chemical for the production of fuel additives, solvents and polymers. In WP2 (Catalytic reduction), the objective of the catalytic reduction studies is to produce commercially interesting monofunctional chemicals, such as 1-butanol or 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MeTHF). In WP3 (Catalytic oxidation), the research focuses on developing a green and efficient oxidation method for producing acids. Whereas acetic and formic acids are bulk chemicals, diacids such as glucaric and xylaric acids are valuable specialty chemicals for detergent, polymer and food production.

  18. Mechanisms of catalytic activity in heavily coated hydrocracking catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millan, M.; Adell, C.; Hinojosa, C.; Herod, A.A.; Kandiyoti, R. [University of London Imperial College Science Technology & Medicine, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2008-01-15

    Catalyst deactivation by coke deposition has a direct impact on the economic viability of heavy hydrocarbon upgrading processes, such as coal liquefaction and oil residue hydroprocessing. Coke deposition is responsible for rapid loss of catalytic activity and it mostly takes place in the early stages of hydrocracking. The effect of carbonaceous deposition on the catalytic activity of a chromium pillared montmorillonite has been studied in the present work. Its catalytic activity in hydrocracking a coal extract was evaluated based on the boiling point distributions of feed and products obtained by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and their characterisation by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and UV-Fluorescence spectroscopy (UV-F). A large deposition on the catalyst was observed after two successive 2-hour long runs in which the catalyst recovered from the first run was reused in the second. The pillared clay retained its activity even though it showed high carbon loading, a large drop in surface area and complete apparent pore blockage. Some observations may contribute to explain this persistent catalytic activity. First, there is evidence suggesting the dynamic nature of the carbonaceous deposits, which continuously exchange material with the liquid, allowing catalytic activity to continue. Secondly, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) on the used Cr montmorillonite has shown preferential deposition on some regions of the catalyst, which leaves a fraction of the surface relatively exposed. Finally, evidence from SEM coupled to X-ray microanalysis also suggest that deposits are thinner in areas where the active phase of the catalyst is present in higher concentrations. Hydrogenation on the active sites would make the deposits more soluble in the liquid cleaning of surrounding area from deposits.

  19. Catalytic Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqi Lao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This review surveys the literature regarding the development of catalytic versions of the Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions. The first section summarizes how arsenic and tellurium-based catalytic Wittig-type reaction systems were developed first due to the relatively easy reduction of the oxides involved. This is followed by a presentation of the current state of the art regarding phosphine-catalyzed Wittig reactions. The second section covers the field of related catalytic aza-Wittig reactions that are catalyzed by both phosphine oxides and phosphines.

  20. Catalytic models developed through social work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    of adolescents placed in out-of-home care and is characterised using three situated cases as empirical data. Afterwards the concept of catalytic processes is briefly presented and then applied in an analysis of pedagogical treatment in the three cases. The result is a different conceptualisation of the social......The article develops the concept of catalytic processes in relation to social work with adolescents in an attempt to both reach a more nuanced understanding of social work and at the same time to develop the concept of catalytic processes in psychology. The social work is pedagogical treatment...

  1. Efficient catalytic combustion in integrated micropellistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bársony, I; Ádám, M; Fürjes, P; Dücső, Cs; Lucklum, R; Hirschfelder, M; Kulinyi, S

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyses two of the key issues of the development of catalytic combustion-type sensors: the selection and production of active catalytic particles on the micropellistor surface as well as the realization of a reliable thermal conduction between heater element and catalytic surface, for the sensing of temperature increase produced by the combustion. The report also demonstrates that chemical sensor product development by a MEMS process is a continuous struggle for elimination of all uncertainties influencing reliability and sensitivity of the final product

  2. Catalytic effects of various catalysts in hydroprocessing of Cold Lake vacuum bottom. Cold Lake zansayu no hydroprocessing ni okeru kakushu shokubai no koka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, S.; Yamamoto, M.; Maekawa, Y.; Kotanigawa, T. (Government Industrial Development Laboratory, Hokkaido, Sapporo (Japan))

    1991-11-07

    The effects of various types of catalysts were studied on hydroprocessing of Cold Lake vacuum bottom (CLVB). FeS2 [Py] of an analytical reagent grade was used as sulfide catalyst, Fe2O3(SO4)[sup 2[minus

  3. Experimental Investigation of Flow Resistance in a Coal Mine Ventilation Air Methane Preheated Catalytic Oxidation Reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Bin; Liu, Yongqi; Liu, Ruixiang; Meng, Jian; Mao, Mingming

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports the results of experimental investigation of flow resistance in a coal mine ventilation air methane preheated catalytic oxidation reactor. The experimental system was installed at the Energy Research Institute of Shandong University of Technology. The system has been used to investigate the effects of flow rate (200 Nm3/h to 1000 Nm3/h) and catalytic oxidation bed average temperature (20°C to 560°C) within the preheated catalytic oxidation reactor. The pressure drop and res...

  4. Catalytic pyrolysis of Laminaria japonica over nanoporous catalysts using Py-GC/MS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeon Jong-Ki

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The catalytic pyrolysis of Laminaria japonica was carried out over a hierarchical meso-MFI zeolite (Meso-MFI and nanoporous Al-MCM-48 using pyrolysis gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS. The effect of the catalyst type on the product distribution and chemical composition of the bio-oil was examined using Py-GC/MS. The Meso-MFI exhibited a higher activity in deoxygenation and aromatization during the catalytic pyrolysis of L. japonica. Meanwhile, the catalytic activity of Al-MCM-48 was lower than that of Meso-MFI due to its weak acidity.

  5. Green Chemicals from d-glucose : Systematic Studies on Catalytic Effects of Inorganic Salts on the Chemo-Selectivity and Yield in Aqueous Solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rasrendra, C. B.; Makertihartha, I. G. B. N.; Adisasmito, S.; Heeres, H. J.

    The use of inorganic salts as catalysts for the reactions of d-glucose in aqueous solutions in a batch reactor is reported. The type of salt and effect of reaction time were examined in detail at a fixed salt (5 mM) and d-glucose concentration (0.1 M) and at a temperature of 140 A degrees C. Al(III)

  6. Piezo-Catalytic Effect on the Enhancement of the Ultra-High Degradation Activity in the Dark by Single- and Few-Layers MoS2 Nanoflowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jyh Ming; Chang, Wei En; Chang, Yu Ting; Chang, Chih-Kai

    2016-05-01

    Single- and few-layer MoS2 nanoflowers are first discovered to have a piezo-catalyst effect, exhibiting an ultra-high degradation activity in the dark by introducing external mechanical strains. The degradation ratio of the Rhodamine-B dye solution reaches 93% within 60 s under ultrasonic-wave assistance in the dark. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. PARAMETRIC EVALUATION OF VOC CONVERSION VIA CATALYTIC INCINERATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaskantzis Neto G.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract - A pilot-scale catalytic incineration system was used to investigate the effectiveness of catalytic incineration as a means of reducing volatile organic compound (VOC air pollutants. The objectives of the study were: 1 to investigate the effects of operating and design variables on the reduction efficiency of VOCs; and 2 to evaluate reduction efficiencies for specific compounds in different chemical classes. The study results verified that the following factors affect the catalyst performance: inlet temperature, space velocity, compound type, and compound inlet concentration. Tests showed that reduction efficiencies exceeding 98% were possible, given sufficiently high inlet gas temperatures for the following classes of compounds: alcohols, acetates, ketones, hydrocarbons, and aromatics

  8. Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, David K.

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

  9. Catalytic hydrotreatment of refinery waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-01-01

    The object of the project is to produce liquid hydrocarbons by the catalytic hydroprocessing of solid refinery wastes (hard pitches) in order to improve the profitability of deep conversion processes and reduce the excess production of heavy fuels. The project was mostly carried out on the ASVAHL demonstration platform site, at Solaize, and hard pitches were produced primarily by deasphalting of atmospheric or vacuum distillation residues. The project includes two experimental phases and an economic evaluation study phase. In phase 1, two granular catalysts were used to transform pitch into standard low sulphur fuel oil: a continuously moving bed, with demetallation and conversion catalyst; a fixed bed, with hydrorefining catalyst. In phase 2 of the project, it was proven that a hydrotreatment process using a finely dispersed catalyst in the feedstock, can, under realistic operating conditions, transform with goods yields hard pitch into distillates that can be refined through standard methods. In phase 3 of the project, it was shown that the economics of such processes are tightly linked to the price differential between white and black oil products, which is expected to increase in the future. Furthermore, the evolution of environmental constraints will impel the use of such methods, thus avoiding the coproduction of polluting solid residues.

  10. Initial Reduction of CO2 on Pd-, Ru-, and Cu-Doped CeO2(111) Surfaces: Effects of Surface Modification on Catalytic Activity and Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chen; Wei, Shuxian; Zhou, Sainan; Zhang, Tian; Wang, Zhaojie; Ng, Siu-Pang; Lu, Xiaoqing; Wu, Chi-Man Lawrence; Guo, Wenyue

    2017-08-09

    Surface modification by metal doping is an effective treatment technique for improving surface properties for CO 2 reduction. Herein, the effects of doped Pd, Ru, and Cu on the adsorption, activation, and reduction selectivity of CO 2 on CeO 2 (111) were investigated by periodic density functional theory. The doped metals distorted the configuration of a perfect CeO 2 (111) by weakening the adjacent Ce-O bond strength, and Pd doping was beneficial for generating a highly active O vacancy. The analyses of adsorption energy, charge density difference, and density of states confirmed that the doped metals were conducive for enhancing CO 2 adsorption, especially for Cu/CeO 2 (111). The initial reductive dissociation CO 2 → CO* + O* on metal-doped CeO 2 (111) followed the sequence of Cu- > perfect > Pd- > Ru-doped CeO 2 (111); the reductive hydrogenation CO 2 + H → COOH* followed the sequence of Cu- > perfect > Ru- > Pd-doped CeO 2 (111), in which the most competitive route on Cu/CeO 2 (111) was exothermic by 0.52 eV with an energy barrier of 0.16 eV; the reductive hydrogenation CO 2 + H → HCOO* followed the sequence of Ru- > perfect > Pd-doped CeO 2 (111). Energy barrier decomposition analyses were performed to identify the governing factors of bond activation and scission along the initial CO 2 reduction routes. Results of this study provided deep insights into the effect of surface modification on the initial reduction mechanisms of CO 2 on metal-doped CeO 2 (111) surfaces.

  11. Numerical study of effect of wall parameters on catalytic combustion characteristics of CH4/air in a heat recirculation micro-combustor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Yunfei; Wang, Haibo; Pan, Wenli; Zhang, Li; Li, Lixian; Yang, Zhongqing; Lin, Changhai

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Combustion in heat recuperation micro-combustors with different materials was studied. • Heat concentration is more obvious with thermal conductivity decreasing. • Combustor with copper baffles has uniform temperature distribution and best preheating effectiveness. • Influence of wall thermal conductivity is negligible on OH(s) coverage. • Methane conversion rate firstly increases and then decreases with h increasing. - Abstract: Premixed combustion of methane/air mixture in heat recuperation micro-combustors made of different materials (corundum, quartz glass, copper and ferrochrome) was investigated. The effects of wall parameters on the combustion characters of a CH 4 /air mixture under Rhodium catalyst as well as the influence of wall materials and convection heat transfer coefficients on the stable combustion limit, temperature field, and free radicals was explored using numerical analysis methodology. The results show that with a decrease of thermal conductivity of wall materials, the temperature of the reaction region increases and hot spots becomes more obvious. The combustor with copper baffles has uniform temperature distribution and best preheating effectiveness, but when inlet velocity is too small, the maximum temperature in the combustor with copper or ferrochrome baffles is well beyond the melting point of the materials. With an increase in thermal conductivity, the preheat zone for premixed gas increases, but the influence of thermal conductivity on OH(s) coverage is negligible. With an increase of the wall convection heat transfer coefficient, the methane conversion rate firstly increases, then decreases reaching a maximum value at h = 8.5 W/m 2 K, however, the average temperature of both the axis and exterior surface of the combustor decrease.

  12. Effect of K promoter on the structure and catalytic behavior of supported iron-based catalysts in fischer-tropsch synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. E. M Farias

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Effects of K addition on the performance of supported Fe catalysts for Fischer - Tropsch synthesis (FTS were studied in a slurry reactor at 240 to 270ºC, 2.0 to 4.0 MPa and syngas H2/CO = 1.0. The catalysts were characterized by N2 adsorption, H2 temperature programmed reduction, X - ray diffraction, X - ray fluorescence, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy and dispersive X - ray spectroscopy. A strong interaction was observed between Fe and K, which inhibited the reduction of Fe catalyst. Addition of potassium increased the production of heavy hydrocarbons (C20+.

  13. Characterization of chemically deposited low-cost 2-6 thin films solar cells : modifying effects with catalytic silicotungstic acid (STA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petuenju, E.N.; Savadogo, O. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Laboratoire de nouveaux materiaux pour l' energie et l' electrochimie

    2008-07-01

    This paper described some properties of cadmium sulphide (CdS) thin films that were chemically deposited on a silicon wafer for solar cell and optoelectronic applications. The as-deposited films were thermally annealed and characterized through structural, electrical, optical, and spectroscopic methods. The modifying effects of silicotungstic acid (STA) showed promising characteristics for various applications, including X- and gamma-ray detector devices. The films were characterized by X-rays Photoelectron Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray Diffraction, and Photoluminescence. Ellipsometry measurements were used to determine the thickness of the sample. The study showed that there is no significant effect of the addition of 10-4 M of STA on the thickness of the film. This might be due to the low concentration of STA. No significant difference was noted for samples deposited with and without STA. In both cases the crystallite size of the sample was estimated to be lower than 1.5 microns. The CdS/Si and CdS(STA)/Si samples were annealed at 360 degrees C for 12 hours. The samples prepared with and without STA had the same structure. CdS deposited without and STA exhibited a mixed hexagonal and cubic structure, most likely because the annealing temperature of the sample was very close to the transition temperature of the cubic structure to the hexagonal structure. 3 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs.

  14. A review of liquid-phase catalytic hydrodechlorination

    OpenAIRE

    Alba Nelly Ardila Arias; Consuelo Montes de Correa

    2007-01-01

    This survey was aimed at introducing the effect of light organochlorinated compound emissions on the envi-ronment, particularly on water, air, soil, biota and human beings. The characteristics and advantages of liquid phase catalytic hydrodechlorination as a technology for degrading these chlorinated compounds is also outlined and the main catalysts used in the hydrodechlorination process are described. Special emphasis is placed on palladium catalysts, their activity, the nature of active sp...

  15. Catalytic activity of metal borides in the reaction of decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labodi, I.; Korablev, L.I.; Tavadyan, L.A.; Blyumberg, Eh.A.

    1982-01-01

    Catalytic effect of CoB, MoB 2 , ZrB 2 and NbB 2 , prepared by the method of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis, on decomposition of tertiary butyl hydroperoxide has been studied. A technigue of determination of action mechanism of heterogeneous catalysts in liquid-phase process is suggested. It is established that CoB in contrast to other metal borides catalyzes only hydroperoxide decomposition into radicals

  16. Chemistry and engineering of catalytic hydrodesulfurization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuit, G.C.A.; Gates, B.C.

    1973-01-01

    A review with 74 refs. on catalytic hydrodesulfurization of pure compds. and petroleum feedstocks, with emphasis on reaction intermediates and structures of Al2O3-supported Ni-W and Co-Mo catalysts. [on SciFinder (R)

  17. Sonochemically preparation and characterization of bimetallic Ni-Co/Al2O3-ZrO2 nanocatalyst: Effects of ultrasound irradiation time and power on catalytic properties and activity in dry reforming of CH4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboob, Salar; Haghighi, Mohammad; Rahmani, Farhad

    2017-09-01

    The catalytic performance of nanostructured Ni-Co/Al 2 O 3 -ZrO 2 catalysts, prepared by ultrasound-assisted impregnation method was examined in the dry reforming of methane. The effect of irradiation power and irradiation time have been studied by changing time (0, 20, 80min) and power of the sonication (30, 60, 90W) during the synthesis which resulted in different physiochemical properties of the nanocatalyst. The nanocatalysts were characterized by XRD, FESEM, PSD, EDX, TEM, TPR-H 2 , BET, FTIR and TG analyses. Based on the characterization results, ultrasound treatment endowed the sample with more uniform and smaller nanoparticles; higher surface area, stronger metal-support interaction and more homogenous dispersion. Moreover, the analyses exhibited smaller particles with higher surface area and less population of particle aggregates at longer and highly irradiated nanocatalysts. The nanocatalyst irradiated at 90W for 80min (the longest irradiation time and the most intense power) showed a uniform morphology and a very narrow particles size distribution. More than 65% of particles of this nanocatalyst were in the range of 10-30nm. Activity tests demonstrated that employing ultrasound irradiation during impregnation improves feed conversion and products yield, reaching values close to equilibrium. Among sonicated nanocatalysts, with increasing power and time of irradiation, the nanocatalyst represents higher activity. The superior performance amongst the various bimetallic catalysts tested was observed over the catalyst with 90W and 80min ultrasonic irradiation which is stable in 24h time on stream test. The excellent anti-coking performance of this bimetallic catalyst, confirmed by TG and FESEM analyses of spent catalyst, is closely related to the promoting effect of sonication on the metal-support interaction, Ni dispersion and particle size; and probably, the synergy between metallic species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A Au/Cu2O-TiO2 system for photo-catalytic hydrogen production. A pn-junction effect or a simple case of in situ reduction?

    KAUST Repository

    Sinatra, Lutfan

    2015-02-01

    Photo-catalytic H2 production from water has been studied over Au-Cu2O nanoparticle deposited on TiO2 (anatase) in order to probe into both the plasmon resonance effect (Au nanoparticles) and the pn-junction at the Cu2O-TiO2 interface. The Au-Cu2O composite is in the form of ∼10 nm Au nanoparticles grown on ∼475 nm Cu2O octahedral nanocrystals with (111) facets by partial galvanic replacement. X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) Cu2p and Auger L3M4,5M4,5 lines indicate that the surface of Cu2O is mainly composed of Cu+. The rate for H2 production (from 95 water/5 ethylene glycol; vol.%) over 2 wt.% (Au/Cu2O)-TiO2 is found to be ∼10 times faster than that on 2 wt.% Au-TiO2 alone. Raman spectroscopy before and after reaction showed the disappearance of Cu+ lines (2Eu) at 220 cm-1. These observations coupled with the induction time observed for the reaction rate suggest that in situ reduction from Cu+ to Cu0 occurs upon photo-excitation. The reduction requires the presence of TiO2 (electron transfer). The prolonged activity of the reaction (with no signs of deactivation) despite the reduction to Cu0 indicates that the latter takes part in the reaction by providing additional sites for the reaction, most likely as recombination centers for hydrogen atoms to form molecular hydrogen. This phenomenon provides an additional route for enhancing the efficiency and lifetime of Cu2O-TiO2 photocatalytic systems, beyond the usually ascribed pn-junction effect.

  19. Effect of the method of introduction of Ca/sup 2 +/ and La/sup 3 +/ cations into the HNA''U'' zeolite on its catalytic properties in the reaction of isobutane alkylation with n-butenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Razali, B.; Kuznetsov, O.I.; Panchenkov, G.M.

    1981-11-01

    The catalytic activity, selectivity, and stability of the operation of zeolites, synthesized by different methods, in the indicated reaction is investigated. It is shown that the most effective catalysts are specimens synthesized by alternating the ion exchange of Na/sup +/ for La/sup 3+/ or jointly under hydrothermal conditions. It is found that a particular specimen is characterized by the highest efficiency and stability in operation.

  20. Catalytic Aminohalogenation of Alkenes and Alkynes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemler, Sherry R; Bovino, Michael T

    2013-06-07

    Catalytic aminohalogenation methods enable the regio- and stereoselective vicinal difunctionalization of alkynes, allenes and alkenes with amine and halogen moieties. A range of protocols and reaction mechanisms including organometallic, Lewis base, Lewis acid and Brønsted acid catalysis have been disclosed, enabling the regio- and stereoselective synthesis of halogen-functionalized acyclic amines and nitrogen heterocycles. Recent advances including aminofluorination and catalytic enantioselective aminohalogenation reactions are summarized in this review.

  1. Kinetic catalytic studies of scorpion's hemocyanin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Queinnec, E.; Vuillaume, M.; Gardes-Albert, M.; Ferradini, C.; Ducancel, F.

    1991-01-01

    Hemocyanins are copper proteins which function as oxygen carriers in the haemolymph of Molluscs and Arthropods. They possess enzymatic properties: peroxidatic and catalatic activities, although they have neither iron nor porphyrin ring at the active site. The kinetics of the catalytic reaction is described. The reaction of superoxide anion with hemocyanin has been studied using pulse radiolysis at pH 9. The catalytic rate constant is 3.5 X 10 7 mol -1 .l.s -1 [fr

  2. Cyanide Containing Wastewater Treatment by Ozone Enhanced Catalytic Oxidation over Diatomite Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Mingguo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyanide containing wastewater that discharged from gold mining process creates environmental problems due to the toxicity of cyanide. As one of the promising advanced oxidation process, catalytic oxidation with ozone is considered to be effective on the purification of cyanide. Diatomite, a natural mineral, was used as catalyst in this study. The effect of O3 dosage, salinity, initial cyanide concentration and initial pH condition were investigated. It was observed that the removal rate of cyanide was much higher in the catalytic oxidation with ozone process than the one in zone alone process. Alkaline condition was especially favorable for cyanide in catalytic oxidation with ozone. The ozone and catalytic oxidation with ozone were simulated by pseudo-first-order kinetics model. The apparent first-order rate constant contribution of the diatomite catalyst was 0.0757 min-1, and the contribution percentage was 65.77%.

  3. Catalytic Conversion of Cellulose to Levulinic Acid by Metal Chlorides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beixiao Zhang

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic performance of various metal chlorides in the conversion of cellulose to levulinic acid in liquid water at high temperatures was investigated. The effects of reaction parameters on the yield of levulinic acid were also explored. The results showed that alkali and alkaline earth metal chlorides were not effective in conversion of cellulose, while transition metal chlorides, especially CrCl3, FeCl3 and CuCl2 and a group IIIA metal chloride (AlCl3, exhibited high catalytic activity. The catalytic performance was correlated with the acidity of the reaction system due to the addition of the metal chlorides, but more dependent on the type of metal chloride. Among those metal chlorides, chromium chloride was found to be exceptionally effective for the conversion of cellulose to levulinic acid, affording an optimum yield of 67 mol % after a reaction time of 180 min, at 200 °C, with a catalyst dosage of 0.02 M and substrate concentration of 50 wt %. Chromium metal, most of which was present in its oxide form in the solid sample and only a small part in solution as Cr3+ ion, can be easily separated from the resulting product mixture and recycled. Finally, a plausible reaction scheme for the chromium chloride catalyzed conversion of cellulose in water was proposed.

  4. Effect of annealing temperature on the structure and coke-resistance of nickel–iron bimetallic catalytic layer for in situ methane steam reforming in SOFC operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xuehua; Zhang, Hanqing; Zhao, DanDan; Tang, Dian; Zhang, Teng, E-mail: teng_zhang@fzu.edu.cn

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • An intermediate FeNi{sub 3} phase forms in all N{sub i0.75}Fe{sub 0.25} catalysts in present work. • The catalyst annealed at 705 °C has smallest calculated surface energy. • The catalyst annealed at 705 °C also exhibits the best coke resistance in methane. • The cell with catalyst layer annealed at 705 °C has the best stability in methane. - Abstract: In this paper, the effect on coke formation of adding a Ni{sub 0.75}Fe{sub 0.25} catalyst layer to the anode side of a fuel cell running on methane is investigated. The formation of an intermediate FeNi{sub 3} phase can be observed in catalysts annealed at different temperatures. The catalyst annealed at 705 °C has the smallest calculated surface energy and grain size among all catalysts annealed at different temperatures. In addition, the O{sub 2}-TPO profiles and Raman spectra of spent anode material reveal that the catalyst annealed at 705 °C has the best coke resistance among all catalysts. Moreover, the cell with catalyst layer annealed at 705 °C, under a current density of 600 mA cm{sup −2} at 650 °C, experiences a decrease of 10% after operating in methane for 260 min, which is much more stable than that without catalyst layer (a decrease of 50%)

  5. Catalytic effects of silver plasmonic nanoparticles on the redox reaction leading to ABTS˙+ formation studied using UV-visible and Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Leis, A; Jancura, D; Antalik, M; Garcia-Ramos, J V; Sanchez-Cortes, S; Jurasekova, Z

    2016-09-29

    ABTS (2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid)) is a compound extensively employed to evaluate the free radical trapping capacity of antioxidant agents and complex mixtures such as biological fluids or foods. This evaluation is usually performed by using a colourimetric experiment, where preformed ABTS radical cation (ABTS˙ + ) molecules are reduced in the presence of an antioxidant causing an intensity decrease of the specific ABTS˙ + UV-visible absorption bands. In this work we report a strong effect of silver plasmonic nanoparticles (Ag NPs) on ABTS leading to the formation of ABTS˙ + . The reaction of ABTS with Ag NPs has been found to be dependent on the interfacial and plasmonic properties of NPs. Specifically, this reaction is pronounced in the presence of spherical nanoparticles prepared by the reduction of silver nitrate with hydroxylamine (AgH) and in the case of star-shaped silver nanoparticles (AgNS). On the other hand, spherical nanoparticles prepared by the reduction of silver nitrate with citrate apparently do not react with ABTS. Additionally, the formation of ABTS˙ + is investigated by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and the assignment of the most intense vibrational bands of this compound is performed. The SERS technique enables us to detect this radical cation at very low concentrations of ABTS (∼2 μM). Altogether, these findings allow us to suggest the use of ABTS/Ag NPs-systems as reliable and easy going substrates to test the antioxidant capacity of various compounds, even at concentrations much lower than those usually used in the spectrophotometric assays. Moreover, we have suggested that ABTS could be employed as a suitable agent to investigate the interfacial and plasmonic properties of the metal nanoparticles and, thus, to characterize the nanoparticle metal systems employed for various purposes.

  6. Methanol conversion to light olefins over nanostructured CeAPSO-34 catalyst: Thermodynamic analysis of overall reactions and effect of template type on catalytic properties and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghamohammadi, Sogand [Chemical Engineering Faculty, Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box 51335-1996, Sahand New Town, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Reactor and Catalysis Research Center (RCRC), Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box 51335-1996, Sahand New Town, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Haghighi, Mohammad, E-mail: haghighi@sut.ac.ir [Chemical Engineering Faculty, Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box 51335-1996, Sahand New Town, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Reactor and Catalysis Research Center (RCRC), Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box 51335-1996, Sahand New Town, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Charghand, Mojtaba [Chemical Engineering Faculty, Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box 51335-1996, Sahand New Town, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Reactor and Catalysis Research Center (RCRC), Sahand University of Technology, P.O. Box 51335-1996, Sahand New Town, Tabriz (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-02-01

    Graphical abstract: In this research nanostructured CeAPSO-34 was synthesized to explore the effect of TEAOH and morpholine on its physiochemical properties and MTO performance. Prepared catalysts were characterized with XRD, FESEM, BET, FTIR and NH3-TPD techniques. The results indicated that the nature of the template determines the physiochemical properties of CeAPSO-34 due to different rate of crystal growth. The catalyst obtained by using morpholine showed longer life time as well as sustaining light olefins selectivity at higher values. Furthermore, a comprehensive thermodynamic analysis of overall reactions network was carried out to address the major channels of methanol to olefins conversion. - Highlights: • Introduction of Ce into SAPO-34 framework. • Comparison of CeAPSO-34 synthesized using morpholine and TEAOH. • The nature of the template determines the physiochemical properties of CeAPSO-34. • Morpholine enhances catalyst lifetime in MTO process. • Presenting a complete reaction network for MTO process. - Abstract: TEAOH and morpholine were employed in synthesis of nanostructured CeAPSO-34 molecular sieve and used in methanol to olefins conversion. Prepared samples were characterized by XRD, FESEM, EDX, BET, FTIR and NH{sub 3}-TPD techniques. XRD patterns reflected the higher crystallinity of the catalyst synthesized with morpholine. The FESEM results indicated that the nature of the template determines the morphology of nanostructured CeAPSO-34 due to different rate of crystal growth. There was a meaningful difference in the strength of both strong and weak acid sites for CeAPSO-34 catalysts synthesized with TEAOH and morpholine templates. The catalyst synthesized with morpholine showed higher desorption temperature of both weak and strong acid sites evidenced by NH{sub 3}-TPD characterization. The catalyst obtained using morpholine template had the longer lifetime and sustained desired light olefins at higher values. A comprehensive

  7. Catalytic reforming of toluene as tar model compound: effect of Ce and Ce-Mg promoter using Ni/olivine catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiqin; Wang, Huajian; Hou, Xiaoxue

    2014-02-01

    Tar produced by biomass gasification as a route of renewable energy must be removed before the gas can be used. This study was undertaken using toluene as a model tar compound for evaluating its steam reforming conversion with three Ni-based catalysts, Ni/olivine, Ni-Ce/olivine and Ni-Ce-Mg/olivine. Effects of Ce and Mg promoters on the reaction activity and coke deposition were studied. Overall the performance of Ce and Mg promoted Ni/olivine catalysts is better than that of only Ce promoter and Ni/olivine alone. The experimental results indicate that Ni-Ce-Mg/olivine catalysts could improve the resistance to carbon deposition, enhance energy gases yield and resist 10ppm H2S poison at 100mLmin(-1) for up to 400min. Furthermore, the activity of catalysts was related to the steam/carbon (S/C) ratios; at S/C ratio=5, T=790°C, space velocity=782h(-1) and t=2h, the Ni-Ce-Mg/olivine system yielded 89% toluene conversion, 5.6Lh(-1) product gas rate, 62.6mol% H2 content and 10% (mol useful gas mol(-1) toluene) energy yield. Moreover, at low S/C ratio, it had higher reaction activity and better ability to prevent coking. There is a small amount of carbon deposition in the form of amorphous carbon after 7h. Various characterization techniques such as XRD, FTIR and thermogravimetric were performed to investigate the coke deposition of Ni/olivine, Ni-Ce/olivine and Ni-Ce-Mg/olivine. It is suggested that 3% Ni-1% Ce-1% Mg/olivine was the most promising catalyst due to its minimum coke amount and the lower activation energy of coke burning. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Methanol conversion to light olefins over nanostructured CeAPSO-34 catalyst: Thermodynamic analysis of overall reactions and effect of template type on catalytic properties and performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aghamohammadi, Sogand; Haghighi, Mohammad; Charghand, Mojtaba

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: In this research nanostructured CeAPSO-34 was synthesized to explore the effect of TEAOH and morpholine on its physiochemical properties and MTO performance. Prepared catalysts were characterized with XRD, FESEM, BET, FTIR and NH3-TPD techniques. The results indicated that the nature of the template determines the physiochemical properties of CeAPSO-34 due to different rate of crystal growth. The catalyst obtained by using morpholine showed longer life time as well as sustaining light olefins selectivity at higher values. Furthermore, a comprehensive thermodynamic analysis of overall reactions network was carried out to address the major channels of methanol to olefins conversion. - Highlights: • Introduction of Ce into SAPO-34 framework. • Comparison of CeAPSO-34 synthesized using morpholine and TEAOH. • The nature of the template determines the physiochemical properties of CeAPSO-34. • Morpholine enhances catalyst lifetime in MTO process. • Presenting a complete reaction network for MTO process. - Abstract: TEAOH and morpholine were employed in synthesis of nanostructured CeAPSO-34 molecular sieve and used in methanol to olefins conversion. Prepared samples were characterized by XRD, FESEM, EDX, BET, FTIR and NH 3 -TPD techniques. XRD patterns reflected the higher crystallinity of the catalyst synthesized with morpholine. The FESEM results indicated that the nature of the template determines the morphology of nanostructured CeAPSO-34 due to different rate of crystal growth. There was a meaningful difference in the strength of both strong and weak acid sites for CeAPSO-34 catalysts synthesized with TEAOH and morpholine templates. The catalyst synthesized with morpholine showed higher desorption temperature of both weak and strong acid sites evidenced by NH 3 -TPD characterization. The catalyst obtained using morpholine template had the longer lifetime and sustained desired light olefins at higher values. A comprehensive thermodynamic

  9. Photo-catalytic degradation of an oil-water emulsion using the photo-fenton treatment process: effects and statistical optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tony, Maha A; Purcell, P J; Zhao, Y Q; Tayeb, A M; El-Sherbiny, M F

    2009-02-01

    The application of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) to the treatment of an effluent contaminated with hydrocarbon oils was investigated. The AOPs conducted were Fe2+/H2O2 (Fenton's reagent), Fe2+/H2O2/UV (Photo-Fenton's reagent) and UV-photolysis. These technologies utilize the very strong oxidizing power of hydroxyl radicals to oxidize organic compounds to harmless end products such as CO2 and H2O. A synthetic wastewater generated by emulsifying diesel oil and water was used. This wastewater might simulate, for example, a waste resulting from a hydrocarbon oil spill, onto which detergent was sprayed. The experiments utilising the Photo-Fenton treatment method with an artificial UV source, coupled with Fenton's reagent, suggest that the hydrocarbon oil is readily degradable, but that the emulsifying agent is much more resistant to degradation. The results showed that the COD (chemical oxygen demand) removal rate was affected by the Photo-Fenton parameters (Fe2+, H2O2 concentrations and the initial pH) of the aqueous solution. In addition, the applicability of the treatment method to a 'real' wastewater contaminated with hydrocarbon oil is demonstrated. The 'real' wastewater was sourced at a nearby car-wash facility located at a petroleum filling station and the experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness of the treatment method in this case. A statistical analysis of the experimental data using the Statistical Analysis System (SAS) and the response surface methodology (RSM) based on the experimental design was applied to optimize the Photo-Fenton parameters (concentrations of Fe2+, H2O2 and initial pH) and to maximize the COD removal rate (more than 70%).

  10. A QM/MM–Based Computational Investigation on the Catalytic Mechanism of Saccharopine Reductase

    OpenAIRE

    Almasi, Joel N.; Bushnell, Eric A.C.; Gauld, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Saccharopine reductase from Magnaporthe grisea, an NADPH-containing enzyme in the α-aminoadipate pathway, catalyses the formation of saccharopine, a precursor to L-lysine, from the substrates glutamate and α-aminoadipate-δ-semialdehyde. Its catalytic mechanism has been investigated using quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) ONIOM-based approaches. In particular, the overall catalytic pathway has been elucidated and the effects of electron correlation and the anisotropic polar protein...

  11. Effect of hydrothermal treatment on catalytic activity of amorphous mesoporous Cr2O3–ZrO2 nanomaterials for ethanol oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, Hala R.

    2015-01-01

    Mesoporous 0.25Cr 2 O 3 –0.75ZrO 2 binary oxide catalysts (CZ-H) with high specific surface areas were successfully synthesized by hydrothermal treatment. The effect of synthesis conditions, such as hydrothermal temperature and time of CZ-H nanomaterials were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopic (EDS), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and N 2 adsorption–desorption measurements (BET). The XRD analysis indicated the formation of amorphous materials of binary oxides. The results showed that hydrothermal temperature and time of CZ-H nanomaterials had great influence on the average particle diameter and surface area. Under the optimum synthesis conditions, the best CZ-H nanomaterial synthesized at 210 °C for 3 h (i.e., CZ-H213), presented spherical structure with smallest average particle diameter found to be 1.5 nm and possessed highest surface area of 526.6 m 2 /g. Optical studies by UV–vis spectroscopy for the different CZ-H nanomaterials exhibit slightly blue shift from 3.20 to 3.33 eV due to quantum confined exciton absorption. Moreover, hydrothermal synthesis leads to catalysts with higher surface area and with better acid–base properties than conventional co-precipitation method. Compared to the other nanomaterials, the CZ-H213 catalyst appears to be the best candidate for further application in acid–base catalysis and reusability. - Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Mesoporous 25%Cr 2 O 3 –75%ZrO 2 catalysts (CZ-H) were prepared by hydrothermal method. • The hydrothermal temperature and time modified the properties of CZ-H nanomaterials. • The best CZ-H nanomaterial synthesized at 210 °C for 3 h (i.e., CZ-H213). • A CZ-H213 nanomaterial had the highest S BET and smallest average particle diameter. • A mesoporous CZ-H213 used as a reusable active catalyst in the ethanol conversion

  12. Significant Improvement of Catalytic Efficiencies in Ionic Liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Choong Eui; Yoon, Mi Young; Choi, Doo Seong

    2005-01-01

    The use of ionic liquids as reaction media can confer many advantages upon catalytic reactions over reactions in organic solvents. In ionic liquids, catalysts having polar or ionic character can easily be immobilized without additional structural modification and thus the ionic solutions containing the catalyst can easily be separated from the reagents and reaction products, and then, be reused. More interestingly, switching from an organic solvent to an ionic liquid often results in a significant improvement in catalytic performance (e.g., rate acceleration, (enantio)selectivity improvement and an increase in catalyst stability). In this review, some recent interesting results which can nicely demonstrate these positive 'ionic liquid effect' on catalysis are discussed

  13. Catalytic production of metal carbonyls from metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, Richard S.; Slegeir, William A.; Foran, Michael T.

    1984-01-01

    This invention relates to the formation of metal carbonyls from metal oxides and specially the formation of molybdenum carbonyl and iron carbonyl from their respective oxides. Copper is used here in admixed form or used in chemically combined form as copper molybdate. The copper/metal oxide combination or combined copper is utilized with a solvent, such as toluene and subjected to carbon monoxide pressure of 25 atmospheres or greater at about 150.degree.-260.degree. C. The reducing metal copper is employed in catalytic concentrations or combined concentrations as CuMoO.sub.4 and both hydrogen and water present serve as promoters. It has been found that the yields by this process have been salutary and that additionally the catalytic metal may be reused in the process to good effect.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of type silicoaluminophosphates catalytic support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leite, C.E.T.; Carvalho, M.W.N.C.; Pereira, K.R.O.

    2010-01-01

    The refining processes, the catalytic hydrocracking is the future of diesel oil in Brazil and the first units are already scheduled to be inaugurated. Among the catalysts used in this process, silicoaluminophosphates (SAPO's) have considerable potential for use as they have been effective in the isomerization of n-alkanes, the isomerization of olefins and alkylation of aromatics. Because of this, the objective is to develop catalysts that will be used in hydrocracking reactions. The media like SAPO-5 were synthesized with different ratios silicon/aluminum, which is used as a catalytic support and have the function of crack organic molecules, since it has acidic character. The materials were characterized by techniques: X-ray diffraction, chemical analysis and textural by BET. After summarizing the media found that they had agreements with the crystalline phases presented in the literature.(author)

  15. Adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles and methods of using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slowing, Igor Ivan; Kandel, Kapil

    2017-01-31

    The present invention provides an adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle including a mesoporous silica nanoparticle having at least one adsorbent functional group bound thereto. The adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle also includes at least one catalytic material. In various embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using and making the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles. In some examples, the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles can be used to selectively remove fatty acids from feedstocks for biodiesel, and to hydrotreat the separated fatty acids.

  16. Catalytic combustion of gasified waste - Experimental part. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaeraas, Sven; Kusar, Henrik [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Chemical Engineering and Technology

    2003-08-01

    This final report covers the work that has been performed within the project P 10547-2, 'Catalytic combustion of gasified waste - system analysis ORWARE'. This project is part of the research programme 'Energy from Waste' financed by the Swedish National Energy Administration. The project has been carried out at the division of Industrial Ecology and at the division of Chemical Technology at Royal Inst. of Technology. The aim of the project has been to study the potentials for catalytic combustion of gasified waste. The supposed end user of the technique is a smaller community in Sweden with 15,000-20,000 inhabitants. The project contains of two sub projects: an experimental part carried out at Chemical Technology and a system analysis carried out at Industrial Ecology. This report covers the experimental part of the project carried out at Chemical Technology. The aim for the experimental part has been to develop and test catalysts with long life-time and a high performance, to reduce the thermal-NO{sub x} below 5 ppm and to significantly reduce NO{sub x} formed from fuel-bound nitrogen. Different experimental studies have been carried out within the project: a set-up of catalytic materials have been tested over a synthetic mixture of the gasified waste, the influence of sulfur present in the gas stream, NO{sub x} formation from fuel bound nitrogen, kinetic studies of CO and H{sub 2} with and without the presence of water and the effects of adding a co-metal to palladium catalysts Furthermore a novel annular reactor design has been used to carry out experiments for kinetic measurements. Real gasification tests of waste pellets directly coupled to catalytic combustion have successfully been performed. The results obtained from the experiments, both the catalytic combustion and from the gasification, have been possible to use in the system analysis. The aim of the system analysis of catalytic combustion of gasified waste takes into consideration

  17. Three-Dimensional Structure and Catalytic Mechanism of Cytosine Deaminase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R Hall; A Fedorov; C Xu; E Fedorov; S Almo; F Raushel

    2011-12-31

    Cytosine deaminase (CDA) from E. coli is a member of the amidohydrolase superfamily. The structure of the zinc-activated enzyme was determined in the presence of phosphonocytosine, a mimic of the tetrahedral reaction intermediate. This compound inhibits the deamination of cytosine with a K{sub i} of 52 nM. The zinc- and iron-containing enzymes were characterized to determine the effect of the divalent cations on activation of the hydrolytic water. Fe-CDA loses activity at low pH with a kinetic pKa of 6.0, and Zn-CDA has a kinetic pKa of 7.3. Mutation of Gln-156 decreased the catalytic activity by more than 5 orders of magnitude, supporting its role in substrate binding. Mutation of Glu-217, Asp-313, and His-246 significantly decreased catalytic activity supporting the role of these three residues in activation of the hydrolytic water molecule and facilitation of proton transfer reactions. A library of potential substrates was used to probe the structural determinants responsible for catalytic activity. CDA was able to catalyze the deamination of isocytosine and the hydrolysis of 3-oxauracil. Large inverse solvent isotope effects were obtained on k{sub cat} and k{sub cat}/K{sub m}, consistent with the formation of a low-barrier hydrogen bond during the conversion of cytosine to uracil. A chemical mechanism for substrate deamination by CDA was proposed.

  18. Catalytic briquettes from low-rank coal for NO reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Boyano; M.E. Galvez; R. Moliner; M.J. Lazaro [Instituto de Carboquimica, CSIC, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    The briquetting is one of the most ancient and widespread techniques of coal agglomeration which is nowadays becoming useless for combustion home applications. However, the social increasing interest in environmental protection opens new applications to this technique, especially in developed countries. In this work, a series of catalytic briquettes were prepared from low-rank Spanish coal and commercial pitch by means of a pressure agglomeration method. After that, they were cured in air and doped by equilibrium impregnation with vanadium compounds. Preparation conditions (especially those of activation and oxidizing process) were changed to study their effects on catalytic behaviour. Catalytic briquettes showed a relative high NO conversion at low temperatures in all cases, however, a strong relation between the preparation process and the reached NO conversion was observed. Preparation procedure has an effect not only on the NO reduction efficiency but also on the mechanical strength of the briquettes as a consequence of the structural and chemical changes carried out during the activation and oxidation procedures. Generally speaking mechanical resistance is enhanced by an optimal porous volume and the creation of new carboxyl groups on surface. Just on the contrary, NO reduction is promoted by high microporous structures and higher amounts of surface oxygen groups. Both facts force to find an optimum point in the preparation produce which will depend on the application. 24 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Catalytic Ozonation of Phenolic Wastewater: Identification and Toxicity of Intermediates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Farzadkia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new strategy in catalytic ozonation removal method for degradation and detoxification of phenol from industrial wastewater was investigated. Magnetic carbon nanocomposite, as a novel catalyst, was synthesized and then used in the catalytic ozonation process (COP and the effects of operational conditions such as initial pH, reaction time, and initial concentration of phenol on the degradation efficiency and the toxicity assay have been investigated. The results showed that the highest catalytic potential was achieved at optimal neutral pH and the removal efficiency of phenol and COD is 98.5% and 69.8%, respectively. First-order modeling demonstrated that the reactions were dependent on the initial concentration of phenol, with kinetic constants varying from 0.038 min−1  ([phenol]o = 1500 mg/L to 1.273 min−1 ([phenol]o = 50 mg/L. Bioassay analysis showed that phenol was highly toxic to Daphnia magna (LC50 96 h=5.6 mg/L. Comparison of toxicity units (TU of row wastewater (36.01 and the treated effluent showed that TU value, after slightly increasing in the first steps of ozonation for construction of more toxic intermediates, severely reduced at the end of reaction (2.23. Thus, COP was able to effectively remove the toxicity of intermediates which were formed during the chemical oxidation of phenolic wastewaters.

  20. Catalytic pyrolysis using UZM-39 aluminosilicate zeolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas, Christpher P; Boldingh, Edwin P

    2013-12-17

    A new family of coherently grown composites of TUN and IMF zeotypes has been synthesized and show to be effective catalysts for catalytic pyrolysis of biomass. These zeolites are represented by the empirical formula. Na.sub.nM.sub.m.sup.n+R.sub.rQ.sub.qAl.sub1-xE.sub.xSi.sub.yO.s- ub.z where M represents zinc or a metal or metals from Group 1, Group 2, Group 3 or the lanthanide series of the periodic table, R is an A,.OMEGA.-dihalosubstituted paraffin such as 1,4-dibromobutane, Q is a neutral amine containing 5 or fewer carbon atoms such as 1-methylpyrrolidine and E is a framework element such as gallium. The process involves contacting a carbonaceous biomass feedstock with UZM-39 at pyrolysis conditions to produce pyrolysis gases comprising hydrocarbons. The catalyst catalyzes a deoxygenation reaction converting oxygenated hyrdocarbons into hydrocarbons removing the oxygen as carbon oxides and water. A portion of the pyrolysis gases is condensed to produce low oxygen biomass-derived pyrolysis oil.

  1. Plasma-catalytic decomposition of TCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenbroucke, A.; Morent, R.; De Geyter, N.; Leys, C. [Ghent Univ., Ghent (Belgium). Dept. of Applied Physics; Tuan, N.D.M.; Giraudon, J.M.; Lamonier, J.F. [Univ. des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, Villeneuve (France). Dept. de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide

    2010-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are gaseous pollutants that pose an environmental hazard due to their high volatility and their possible toxicity. Conventional technologies to reduce the emission of VOCs have their advantages, but they become cost-inefficient when low concentrations have to be treated. In the past 2 decades, non-thermal plasma technology has received growing attention as an alternative and promising remediation method. Non-thermal plasmas are effective because they produce a series of strong oxidizers such as ozone, oxygen radicals and hydroxyl radicals that provide a reactive chemical environment in which VOCs are completely oxidized. This study investigated whether the combination of NTP and catalysis could improve the energy efficiency and the selectivity towards carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Trichloroethylene (TCE) was decomposed by non-thermal plasma generated in a DC-excited atmospheric pressure glow discharge. The production of by-products was qualitatively investigated through FT-IR spectrometry. The results were compared with those from a catalytic reactor. The removal rate of TCE reached a maximum of 78 percent at the highest input energy. The by-products of TCE decomposition were CO{sub 2}, carbon monoxide (CO) hydrochloric acid (HCl) and dichloroacetylchloride. Combining the plasma system with a catalyst located in an oven downstream resulted in a maximum removal of 80 percent, at an energy density of 300 J/L, a catalyst temperature of 373 K and a total air flow rate of 2 slm. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  2. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    The contract was conceived to establish the commercial capability of Catalytic Extraction Processing (CEP) to treat contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory. In so doing, Molten Metal Technology, Inc. (MMT), pursued the following objectives: demonstration of the recycling of ferrous and non-ferrous metals--to establish that radioactively contaminated scrap metal can be converted to high-grade, ferrous and non-ferrous alloys which can be reused by DOE or reintroduced into commerce; immobilize radionuclides--that CEP will concentrate the radionuclides in a dense vitreous phase, minimize secondary waste generation and stabilize and reduce waste volume; destroy hazardous organics--that CEP will convert hazardous organics to valuable industrial gases, which can be used as feed gases for chemical synthesis or as an energy source; recovery volatile heavy metals--that CEP's off-gas treatment system will capture volatile heavy metals, such as mercury and lead; and establish that CEP is economical for processing contaminated scrap metal in the DOE inventory--that CEP is a more cost-effective and, complete treatment and recycling technology than competing technologies for processing contaminated scrap. The process and its performance are described

  3. (Gold core) at (ceria shell) nanostructures for plasmon-enhanced catalytic reactions under visible light

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jianfang; Li, Benxia; Gu, Ting; Ming, Tian; Wang, Junxin; Wang, Peng; Yu, Jimmy C.

    2014-01-01

    Driving catalytic reactions with sunlight is an excellent example of sustainable chemistry. A prerequisite of solar-driven catalytic reactions is the development of photocatalysts with high solar-harvesting efficiencies and catalytic activities. Herein, we describe a general approach for uniformly coating ceria on monometallic and bimetallic nanocrystals through heterogeneous nucleation and growth. The method allows for control of the shape, size, and type of the metal core as well as the thickness of the ceria shell. The plasmon shifts of the Au@CeO2 nanostructures resulting from the switching between Ce(IV) and Ce(III) are observed. The selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde, one of the fundamental reactions for organic synthesis, performed under both broad-band and monochromatic light, demonstrates the visible-light-driven catalytic activity and reveals the synergistic effect on the enhanced catalysis of the Au@CeO2 nanostructures. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  4. (Gold core) at (ceria shell) nanostructures for plasmon-enhanced catalytic reactions under visible light

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jianfang

    2014-08-26

    Driving catalytic reactions with sunlight is an excellent example of sustainable chemistry. A prerequisite of solar-driven catalytic reactions is the development of photocatalysts with high solar-harvesting efficiencies and catalytic activities. Herein, we describe a general approach for uniformly coating ceria on monometallic and bimetallic nanocrystals through heterogeneous nucleation and growth. The method allows for control of the shape, size, and type of the metal core as well as the thickness of the ceria shell. The plasmon shifts of the Au@CeO2 nanostructures resulting from the switching between Ce(IV) and Ce(III) are observed. The selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde, one of the fundamental reactions for organic synthesis, performed under both broad-band and monochromatic light, demonstrates the visible-light-driven catalytic activity and reveals the synergistic effect on the enhanced catalysis of the Au@CeO2 nanostructures. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  5. Towards the rationalization of catalytic activity values by means of local hyper-softness on the catalytic site: a criticism about the use of net electric charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignacio Martínez-Araya, Jorge; Grand, André; Glossman-Mitnik, Daniel

    2015-11-28

    By means of the Spin-Polarized Conceptual Density Functional Theory (SP-CDFT), three 2,6-bis(imino)pyridine catalysts based on iron(II), used for polymerization of ethylene, were studied. The catalysts differed by the substituent group, bearing either -H, -NO2 or -OCH3. To date, catalytic activity, a purely experimental parameter measuring the mass of polyethylene produced per millimole of iron per time and pressure unit at a fixed temperature, has not been explained in terms of local hyper-softness. The latter is a purely theoretical parameter designed for quantifying electronic effects; it is measured using the metal atom responsible for the coordination process with the monomer (ethylene). Because steric effects are not relevant in these kinds of catalysts and only electronic effects drive the catalytic process, an interesting link is found between catalytic activity and the local hyper-softness condensed on the iron atom by means of four functionals (B3LYP, BP86, B97D, and VSXC). This work demonstrates that the use of local hyper-softness, predicted by the SP-CDFT, is a suitable parameter for explaining order relationships among catalytic activity values, thus quantifying the electronic influence of the substituent group inducing this difference; the use of only net electric charges does not lead to clear conclusions. This finding can aid in estimating catalytic activities leading to a more rational design of new catalysts via computational chemistry.

  6. Contributions to the theory of catalytic titrations-III Neutralization catalytic titrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaál, F F; Abramović, B F

    1985-07-01

    Neutralization catalytic titrations of weak monoprotic adds and bases with both volumetric and coulometric addition of the titrant (strong base/acid) have been simulated by taking into account the equilibrium concentration of the catalyst during the titration. The influence of several factors on the shape of the simulated catalytic titration curve has been investigated and is discussed.

  7. Catalytic Conversion of Glucose into 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural by Hf(OTf4 Lewis Acid in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of Lewis acidic metal salts were used for glucose dehydration to 5-hydroymethylfurfural (HMF in water. Effect of valence state, ionic radii of Lewis acidic cation, and the type of anions on the catalytic performance have been studied systematically. The experimental results showed that the valence state played an important role in determining catalytic activity and selectivity. It was found that a higher glucose conversion rate and HMF selectivity could be obtained over high valent Lewis acid salts, where the ionic radii of these Lewis acidic metal salts are usually relatively small. Analysis on the effect of the anions of Lewis acid salts on the catalytic activity and the selectivity suggested that a higher glucose conversion and HMF selectivity could be readily obtained with Cl−. Furthermore, the recyclability of high valence state Lewis acid salt was also studied, however, inferior catalytic performance was observed. The deactivation mechanism was speculated to be the fact that high valence state Lewis acid salt was comparatively easier to undergo hydrolysis to yield complicated metal aqua ions with less catalytic activity. The Lewis acidic activity could be recovered by introducing a stoichiometric amount of hydrochloric acid (HCl to the catalytic before the reaction.

  8. Measurements of H-atom density by a catalytic probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesel, A.; Drenik, A.; Mozetic, M.

    2006-01-01

    One of the important plasma parameters in tokamaks is the density of neutral hydrogen atoms which can be measured by catalytic probes. The method is based on the catalytic recombination of H atoms on the metal surface. In order to prevent a substantial drain of atoms by the probe, it should be made as small as possible. But still this effect can not be neglected. Therefore a study of the influence of a catalytic probe on the H-atom density was performed. The source of neutral H-atoms was inductively coupled RF hydrogen plasma. The gas from the discharge vessel was leaked to an experimental chamber through a narrow tube with the diameter of 5 mm and the length of 6 cm. Charged particles created in the discharge vessel were recombined on the walls of the narrow tube, so that the gas entering the experimental chamber was a mixture of hydrogen atoms and molecules only. The density of H-atoms in the experimental chamber was measured with two nickel catalytic probes. One probe was at fixed position and the other one was made movable. A change in the probe signal of the fixed probe was measured versus the position of the movable probe. The measurements were performed at the pressures between 10 Pa and 200 Pa and at two different RF powers 200 W and 300 W. It was found that the density of neutral hydrogen atoms was reduced for about 20% due to the presence of the probe. This result was independent from the pressure in the experimental chamber. (author)

  9. Dimension meditated optic and catalytic performance over vanadium pentoxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Dezhi [Beijing Key Laboratory of Construction Tailorable Advanced Functional Materials and Green Applications, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhao, Yongjie, E-mail: zhaoyjpeace@gmail.com [Beijing Key Laboratory of Construction Tailorable Advanced Functional Materials and Green Applications, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang, Ruibo; Ning, Mingqiang [Beijing Key Laboratory of Construction Tailorable Advanced Functional Materials and Green Applications, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhao, Yuzhen; Zhou, Heping [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li, Jingbo; Jin, Haibo [Beijing Key Laboratory of Construction Tailorable Advanced Functional Materials and Green Applications, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • V{sub 2}O{sub 5} with diverse dimensional morphologies were synthesized. • The optic properties of diverse dimensional V{sub 2}O{sub 5} were investigated in detail. • The catalytic properties of diverse dimensional V{sub 2}O{sub 5} on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate were analyzed. - Abstract: Morphologies and sizes of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} had crucial effect on their optic and catalytic performance. Diverse dimensional V{sub 2}O{sub 5} were successfully synthesized by the combination of a hydrothermal and post heat treatment method. The as-obtained samples were characterized by X-ray power diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectra. Moreover, the optic properties of diverse dimensional V{sub 2}O{sub 5} were examined by Fourier transform imaging spectrometer and UV–vis-spectrophotometer. It showed that the IR transmittance of nanowire (at 1019 cm{sup −1} is 85%) and UV absorbance of microflowers (at 480 nm) were high. Furthermore, the catalytic properties of diverse dimensional V{sub 2}O{sub 5} on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate were evaluated and compared by Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis and Differential Scanning Calorimetry. Moreover, the best catalytic performance was obtained with the morphology of nanowire. It showed the thermal decomposition temperatures of AP with nanowire, microflowers and microsphere were reduced to 373 °C, 382 °C and 376 °C (decreased by 52 °C, 43 °C and 49 °C).

  10. Reactivity of organic compounds in catalytic synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minachev, Kh M; Bragin, O V

    1978-01-01

    A comprehensive review of 1976 Soviet research on catalysis delivered to the 1977 annual session of the USSR Academy of Science Council on Catalysis (Baku 6/16-20/77) covers hydrocarbon reactions, including hydrogenation and hydrogenolysis, dehydrogenation, olefin dimerization and disproportionation, and cyclization and dehydrocyclization (e.g., piperylene cyclization and ethylene cyclotrimerization); catalytic and physicochemical properties of zeolites, including cracking, dehydrogenation, and hydroisomerization catalytic syntheses and conversion of heterocyclic and functional hydrocarbon derivatives, including partial and total oxidation (e.g., of o-xylene to phthalic anhydride); syntheses of thiophenes from alkanes and hydrogen sulfide over certain dehydrogenation catalysts; catalytic syntheses involving carbon oxides ( e.g., the development of a new heterogeneous catalyst for hydroformylation of olefins), and of Co-MgO zeolitic catalysts for synthesis of aliphatic hydrocarbons from carbon dioxide and hydrogen, and fabrication of high-viscosity lubricating oils over bifunctional aluminosilicate catalysts.

  11. Catalytic Organic Transformations Mediated by Actinide Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabell S. R. Karmel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This review article presents the development of organoactinides and actinide coordination complexes as catalysts for homogeneous organic transformations. This chapter introduces the basic principles of actinide catalysis and deals with the historic development of actinide complexes in catalytic processes. The application of organoactinides in homogeneous catalysis is exemplified in the hydroelementation reactions, such as the hydroamination, hydrosilylation, hydroalkoxylation and hydrothiolation of alkynes. Additionally, the use of actinide coordination complexes for the catalytic polymerization of α-olefins and the ring opening polymerization of cyclic esters is presented. The last part of this review article highlights novel catalytic transformations mediated by actinide compounds and gives an outlook to the further potential of this field.

  12. Highly Dense Isolated Metal Atom Catalytic Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaxin; Kasama, Takeshi; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    -ray diffraction. A combination of electron microscopy images with X-ray absorption spectra demonstrated that the silver atoms were anchored on five-fold oxygen-terminated cavities on the surface of the support to form highly dense isolated metal active sites, leading to excellent reactivity in catalytic oxidation......Atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites are promising materials with which to maximise metal efficiency and to enhance catalytic performance; however, their fabrication remains challenging because metal atoms are prone to sintering, especially at a high metal...... loading. A dynamic process of formation of isolated metal atom catalytic sites on the surface of the support, which was achieved starting from silver nanoparticles by using a thermal surface-mediated diffusion method, was observed directly by using in situ electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron X...

  13. Modeling and simulation of heterogeneous catalytic processes

    CERN Document Server

    Dixon, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous catalysis and mathematical modeling are essential components of the continuing search for better utilization of raw materials and energy, with reduced impact on the environment. Numerical modeling of chemical systems has progressed rapidly due to increases in computer power, and is used extensively for analysis, design and development of catalytic reactors and processes. This book presents reviews of the state-of-the-art in modeling of heterogeneous catalytic reactors and processes. Reviews by leading authorities in the respective areas Up-to-date reviews of latest techniques in modeling of catalytic processes Mix of US and European authors, as well as academic/industrial/research institute perspectives Connections between computation and experimental methods in some of the chapters.

  14. The Effect of Acidic and Redox Properties of V2O5/CeO2-ZrO2 Catalysts in Selective Catalytic Reduction of NO by NH3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putluru, Siva Sankar Reddy; Riisager, Anders; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    V2O5 supported ZrO2 and CeO2–ZrO2 catalysts were prepared and characterized by N2 physisorption, XRPD, TPR, and NH3-TPD methods. The influence of calcination temperature from 400 to 600 °C on crystallinity, acidic and redox properties were studied and compared with the catalytic activity...... in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with ammonia. The surface area of the catalysts decreased gradually with increasing calcination temperature. The SCR activity of V2O5/ZrO2 catalysts was found to be related with the support crystallinity, whereas V2O5/CeO2–ZrO2 catalysts were also dependent...... on acidic and redox properties of the catalyst. The V2O5/CeO2–ZrO2 catalysts showed high activity and selectivity for reduction of NO with NH3....

  15. Effects of Coke Deposits on the Catalytic Performance of Large Zeolite H-ZSM-5 Crystals during Alcohol-to-Hydrocarbons Reactions as Investigated by a Combination of Optical Spectroscopy and Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordvang, Emily Catherine; Borodina, Elena; Ruiz-Martínez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic activity of large zeolite H-ZSM-5 crystals in methanol (MTO) and ethanol-to-olefins (ETO) conversions was investigated and, using operando UV/Vis measurements, the catalytic activity and deactivation was correlated with the formation of coke. These findings were related to in situ...... single crystal UV/Vis and confocal fluorescence micro-spectroscopy, allowing the observation of the spatiotemporal formation of intermediates and coke species during the MTO and ETO conversions. It was observed that rapid deactivation at elevated temperatures was due to the fast formation of aromatics...... at the periphery of the H-ZSM-5 crystals, which are transformed into more poly-aromatic coke species at the external surface, preventing the diffusion of reactants and products into and out of the H-ZSM-5 crystal. Furthermore, we were able to correlate the operando UV/Vis spectroscopy results observed during...

  16. Dimerization interface of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase tunes the formation of its catalytic intermediate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingzhi Xu

    Full Text Available 3-Hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HAD, EC 1.1.1.35 is a homodimeric enzyme localized in the mitochondrial matrix, which catalyzes the third step in fatty acid β-oxidation. The crystal structures of human HAD and subsequent complexes with cofactor/substrate enabled better understanding of HAD catalytic mechanism. However, numerous human diseases were found related to mutations at HAD dimerization interface that is away from the catalytic pocket. The role of HAD dimerization in its catalytic activity needs to be elucidated. Here, we solved the crystal structure of Caenorhabditis elegans HAD (cHAD that is highly conserved to human HAD. Even though the cHAD mutants (R204A, Y209A and R204A/Y209A with attenuated interactions on the dimerization interface still maintain a dimerization form, their enzymatic activities significantly decrease compared to that of the wild type. Such reduced activities are in consistency with the reduced ratios of the catalytic intermediate formation. Further molecular dynamics simulations results reveal that the alteration of the dimerization interface will increase the fluctuation of a distal region (a.a. 60-80 that plays an important role in the substrate binding. The increased fluctuation decreases the stability of the catalytic intermediate formation, and therefore the enzymatic activity is attenuated. Our study reveals the molecular mechanism about the essential role of the HAD dimerization interface in its catalytic activity via allosteric effects.

  17. A new approach to inertise the containments during catalytic removal of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakraborty, A.K.; Markandeya, S.G.

    1994-01-01

    Use of catalytic recombiners for the removal of hydrogen during a severe accident has been recommended by the German Reactor Safety Commission (RSK) due to numerous successful demonstrations of their performances. At the early stages of the accident, a huge quantity of hydrogen is expected to be released in some compartments requiring supplementary measures to ensure that the excess hydrogen concentration wouldn't pose a threat of deflagration /1/. In this presentation a new idea based on catalytic removal of hydrogen with simultaneous passive inertisation of the atmosphere is proposed for large dry containments particularly for those compartments where high H 2 -concentrations are expected. During the catalytic oxidation of hydrogen, the large exothermic heat of reaction causes strong heating of the catalytic plates as well as a continuous energy input in the containment. This can be limited if this large heat energy is efficiently used for heating some chemical compounds to release inert gases such as steam and/or CO 2 by dissociation at moderate temperatures. Such compounds can be arranged in the form of thin slabs in good thermal contact with the catalytic plates. Several such compounds have been identified which are capable of releasing steam and CO 2 equivalent to about 40 - 75% of their mass. Preliminary calculations have been carded out to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed concept for the case of two such selected chemicals placed adjacent to the catalytic plate type recombiners. The calculations performed show promising results. (author)

  18. A review of liquid-phase catalytic hydrodechlorination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alba Nelly Ardila Arias

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This survey was aimed at introducing the effect of light organochlorinated compound emissions on the envi-ronment, particularly on water, air, soil, biota and human beings. The characteristics and advantages of liquid phase catalytic hydrodechlorination as a technology for degrading these chlorinated compounds is also outlined and the main catalysts used in the hydrodechlorination process are described. Special emphasis is placed on palladium catalysts, their activity, the nature of active species and deactivation. The effect of several parameters is introduced, such as HCl, solvent, base addition and type of reducing agent used. The main results of kinetic studies, reactors used and the most important survey conclusions are presented.

  19. Catalytic Wastewater Treatment Using Pillared Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perathoner, Siglinda; Centi, Gabriele

    After introduction on the use of solid catalysts in wastewater treatment technologies, particularly advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), this review discussed the use of pillared clay (PILC) materials in three applications: (i) wet air catalytic oxidation (WACO), (ii) wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) on Cu-PILC and Fe-PILC, and (iii) behavior of Ti-PILC and Fe-PILC in the photocatalytic or photo-Fenton conversion of pollutants. Literature data are critically analyzed to evidence the main direction to further investigate, in particularly with reference to the possible practical application of these technologies to treat industrial, municipal, or agro-food production wastewater.

  20. Catalytic Kinetic Resolution of Biaryl Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Gaoyuan; Sibi, Mukund P

    2015-08-10

    Biaryl compounds with axial chirality are very common in synthetic chemistry, especially in catalysis. Axially chiral biaryls are important due to their biological activities and extensive applications in asymmetric catalysis. Thus the development of efficient enantioselective methods for their synthesis has attracted considerable attention. This Minireview discusses the progress made in catalytic kinetic resolution of biaryl compounds and chronicles significant advances made recently in catalytic kinetic resolution of biaryl scaffolds. © 2015 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Thermal and catalytic pyrolysis of plastic waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Almeida

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The amount of plastic waste is growing every year and with that comes an environmental concern regarding this problem. Pyrolysis as a tertiary recycling process is presented as a solution. Pyrolysis can be thermal or catalytical and can be performed under different experimental conditions. These conditions affect the type and amount of product obtained. With the pyrolysis process, products can be obtained with high added value, such as fuel oils and feedstock for new products. Zeolites can be used as catalysts in catalytic pyrolysis and influence the final products obtained.

  2. Janus droplet as a catalytic micromotor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shklyaev, Sergey

    2015-06-01

    Self-propulsion of a Janus droplet in a solution of surfactant, which reacts on a half of a drop surface, is studied theoretically. The droplet acts as a catalytic motor creating a concentration gradient, which generates its surface-tension-driven motion; the self-propulsion speed is rather high, 60 μ \\text{m/s} and more. This catalytic motor has several advantages over other micromotors: simple manufacturing, easily attained neutral buoyancy. In contrast to a single-fluid droplet, which demonstrates a self-propulsion as a result of symmetry breaking instability, for the Janus one no stability threshold exists; hence, the droplet radius can be scaled down to micrometers.

  3. Catalytic gasification of oil-shales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, A.; Avakyan, T. [I.M. Gubkin Russian State Univ. of Oil and Gas, Moscow (Russian Federation); Strizhakova, Yu. [Samara State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    Nowadays, the problem of complex usage of solid fossil fuels as raw materials for obtaining of motor fuels and chemical products is becoming increasingly important. A one of possible solutions of the problem is their gasification with further processing of gaseous and liquid products. In this work we have investigated the process of thermal and catalytic gasification of Baltic and Kashpir oil-shales. We have shown that, as compared with non-catalytic process, using of nickel catalyst in the reaction increases the yield of gas, as well as hydrogen content in it, and decreases the amount of liquid products. (orig.)

  4. Using electron beams to investigate catalytic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Bingsen; Su, Dang Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Transmission Electron microscopy (TEM) enables us, not only to reveal the morphology, but also to provide structural, chemical and electronic information about solid catalysts at the atomic level, providing a dramatic driving force for the development of heterogeneous catalysis. Almost all catalytic materials have been studied with TEM in order to obtain information about their structures, which can help us to establish the synthesis-structure-property relationships and to design catalysts with new structures and desired properties. Herein, several examples will be reviewed to illustrate the investigation of catalytic materials by using electron beams. (authors)

  5. PINGU: PredIction of eNzyme catalytic residues usinG seqUence information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyadarshini P Pai

    Full Text Available Identification of catalytic residues can help unveil interesting attributes of enzyme function for various therapeutic and industrial applications. Based on their biochemical roles, the number of catalytic residues and sequence lengths of enzymes vary. This article describes a prediction approach (PINGU for such a scenario. It uses models trained using physicochemical properties and evolutionary information of 650 non-redundant enzymes (2136 catalytic residues in a support vector machines architecture. Independent testing on 200 non-redundant enzymes (683 catalytic residues in predefined prediction settings, i.e., with non-catalytic per catalytic residue ranging from 1 to 30, suggested that the prediction approach was highly sensitive and specific, i.e., 80% or above, over the incremental challenges. To learn more about the discriminatory power of PINGU in real scenarios, where the prediction challenge is variable and susceptible to high false positives, the best model from independent testing was used on 60 diverse enzymes. Results suggested that PINGU was able to identify most catalytic residues and non-catalytic residues properly with 80% or above accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. The effect of false positives on precision was addressed in this study by application of predicted ligand-binding residue information as a post-processing filter. An overall improvement of 20% in F-measure and 0.138 in Correlation Coefficient with 16% enhanced precision could be achieved. On account of its encouraging performance, PINGU is hoped to have eventual applications in boosting enzyme engineering and novel drug discovery.

  6. Effect of A-site deficiency in LaMn{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.1}O{sub 3} perovskites on their catalytic performance for soot combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinamarca, Robinson [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Sciences, University of Concepción, Concepción (Chile); Garcia, Ximena; Jimenez, Romel [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Concepción, Concepción (Chile); Fierro, J.L.G. [Instituto de Catálisis y Petroleoquímica, CSIC, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Pecchi, Gina, E-mail: gpecchi@udec.cl [Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Chemical Sciences, University of Concepción, Concepción (Chile)

    2016-09-15

    Highlights: • A-site defective perovskites increases the oxidation state of the B-cation. • Not always non-stoichiometric perovskites exhibit higher catalytic activity in soot combustion. • The highly symmetric cubic crystalline structure diminishes the redox properties of perovskites. - Abstract: The influence of lanthanum stoichiometry in Ag-doped (La{sub 1-x}Ag{sub x}Mn{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.1}O{sub 3}) and A-site deficient (La{sub 1-x}Mn{sub 0.9}Co{sub 0.1}O{sub 3-δ}) perovskites with x equal to 10, 20 and 30 at.% has been investigated in catalysts for soot combustion. The catalysts were prepared by the amorphous citrate method and characterized by XRD, nitrogen adsorption, XPS, O{sub 2}-TPD and TPR. The formation of a rhombohedral excess-oxygen perovskite for Ag-doped and a cubic perovskite structure for an A-site deficient series is confirmed. The efficient catalytic performance of the larger Ag-doped perovskite structure is attributed to the rhombohedral crystalline structure, Ag{sub 2}O segregated phases and the redox pair Mn{sup 4+}/Mn{sup 3+}. A poor catalytic activity for soot combustion was observed with A-site deficient perovskites, despite the increase in the redox pair Mn{sup 4+}/Mn{sup 3+}, which is attributed to the cubic crystalline structure.

  7. Highly Selective Synthesis of Catalytically Active Monodisperse Rhodium Nanocubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.; Grass, M.E.; Kuhn, J.N.; Tao, F.; Habas, S.E.; Huang, W.; Yang, P.; Somorjai, G.A.

    2009-02-21

    Synthesis of monodisperse and shape-controlled colloidal inorganic nanocrystals (NCs) is of increasing scientific interest and technological significance. Recently, shape control of Pt, Pd, Ag, Au, and Rh NCs has been obtained by tuning growth kinetics in various solution-phase approaches, including modified polyol methods, seeded growth by polyol reduction, thermolysis of organometallics, and micelle techniques. Control of reduction kinetics of the noble metal precursors and regulation of the relative growth rates of low-index planes (i.e. {l_brace}100{r_brace} and {l_brace}111{r_brace}) via selective adsorption of selected chemical species are two keys for achieving shape modification of noble metal NCs. One application for noble metal NCs of well-defined shape is in understanding how NC faceting (determines which crystallographic planes are exposed) affects catalytic performance. Rh NCs are used in many catalytic reactions, including hydrogenation, hydroformylation, hydrocarbonylation, and combustion reactions. Shape manipulation of Rh NCs may be important in understanding how faceting on the nanoscale affects catalytic properties, but such control is challenging and there are fewer reports on the shape control of Rh NCs compared to other noble metals. Xia and coworkers obtained Rh multipods exhibiting interesting surface plasmonic properties by a polyol approach. The Somorjai and Tilley groups synthesized crystalline Rh multipods, cubes, horns and cuboctahedra, via polyol seeded growth. Son and colleagues prepared catalytically active monodisperse oleylamine-capped tetrahedral Rh NCs for the hydrogenation of arenes via an organometallic route. More recently, the Somorjai group synthesized sizetunable monodisperse Rh NCs using a one-step polyol technique. In this Communication, we report the highly selective synthesis of catalytically active, monodisperse Rh nanocubes of < 10 nm by a seedless polyol method. In this approach, Br{sup -} ions from trimethyl

  8. Fluid catalytic cracking : Feedstocks and reaction mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dupain, X.

    2006-01-01

    The Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) process is one of the key units in a modern refinery. Traditionally, its design is primarily aimed for the production of gasoline from heavy oil fractions, but as co-products also diesel blends and valuable gasses (e.g. propene and butenes) are formed in

  9. Kinetic equation of heterogeneous catalytic isotope exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trokhimets, A I [AN Belorusskoj SSR, Minsk. Inst. Fiziko-Organicheskoj Khimii

    1979-12-01

    A kinetic equation is derived for the bimolecular isotope exchange reaction between AXsub(n)sup(*) and BXsub(m)sup(o), all atoms of element X in each molecule being equivalent. The equation can be generalized for homogeneous and heterogeneous catalytic isotope exchange.

  10. Complementary structure sensitive and insensitive catalytic relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Santen, van R.A.

    2009-01-01

    The burgeoning field of nanoscience has stimulated an intense interest in properties that depend on particle size. For transition metal particles, one important property that depends on size is catalytic reactivity, in which bonds are broken or formed on the surface of the particles. Decreased

  11. Toward Facilitative Mentoring and Catalytic Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Melissa K.; Lewis, Marilyn

    2015-01-01

    In TESOL teacher mentoring, giving advice can be conceptualized as a continuum, ranging from directive to facilitative feedback. The goal, over time, is to lead toward the facilitative end of the continuum and specifically to catalytic interventions that encourage self-reflection and autonomous learning. This study begins by examining research on…

  12. Electrochemical Promotion of Catalytic Reactions Using

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrushina, Irina; Bjerrum, Niels; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on electrochemical promotion (EP) of catalytic reactions using Pt/C/polybenzimidazole(H3PO4)/Pt/C fuel cell performed by the Energy and Materials Science Group (Technical University of Denmark) during the last 6 years[1-4]. The development of our...... understanding of the nature of the electrochemical promotion is also presented....

  13. Novel Metal Nanomaterials and Their Catalytic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqing Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the rapidly developing areas of nanotechnology, nano-scale materials as heterogeneous catalysts in the synthesis of organic molecules have gotten more and more attention. In this review, we will summarize the synthesis of several new types of noble metal nanostructures (FePt@Cu nanowires, Pt@Fe2O3 nanowires and bimetallic Pt@Ir nanocomplexes; Pt-Au heterostructures, Au-Pt bimetallic nanocomplexes and Pt/Pd bimetallic nanodendrites; Au nanowires, CuO@Ag nanowires and a series of Pd nanocatalysts and their new catalytic applications in our group, to establish heterogeneous catalytic system in “green” environments. Further study shows that these materials have a higher catalytic activity and selectivity than previously reported nanocrystal catalysts in organic reactions, or show a superior electro-catalytic activity for the oxidation of methanol. The whole process might have a great impact to resolve the energy crisis and the environmental crisis that were caused by traditional chemical engineering. Furthermore, we hope that this article will provide a reference point for the noble metal nanomaterials’ development that leads to new opportunities in nanocatalysis.

  14. Catalytic asymmetric synthesis of the alkaloid (+)-myrtine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pizzuti, Maria Gabriefla; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2008-01-01

    A new protocol for the asymmetric synthesis of trans-2,6-disubstituted-4-piperidones has been developed using a catalytic enantioselective conjugate addition reaction in combination with a diastereoselective lithiation-substitution sequence; an efficient synthesis of (+)-myrtine has been achieved

  15. Catalytic oxidation of cyclohexane to cyclohexanone

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... a precursor and characterized by chemical analysis using the ICP–AES method, XRD, TEM, FTIR and BET surface area determination. The oxidation reaction was carried out at 70°C under atmospheric pressure. The results showed the catalytic performance of Pt/Al2O3 as being very high in terms of turnover frequency.

  16. Catalytic site interactions in yeast OMP synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Barr, Eric W.; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    2014-01-01

    45 (2006) 5330-5342]. This behavior was investigated in the yeast enzyme by mutations in the conserved catalytic loop and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-diphosphate (PRPP) binding motif. Although the reaction is mechanistically sequential, the wild-type (WT) enzyme shows parallel lines in double reciprocal...

  17. Flame assisted synthesis of catalytic ceramic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Johnny; Mosleh, Majid; Johannessen, Tue

    2004-01-01

    technology it is possible to make supported catalysts, composite metal oxides, catalytically active surfaces, and porous ceramic membranes. Membrane layers can be formed by using a porous substrate tube (or surface) as a nano-particle filter. The aerosol gas from the flame is led through a porous substrate...

  18. Sintering of Catalytic Nanoparticles: Particle Migration or Ostwald Ripening?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; DeLaRiva, Andrew T.; Challa, Sivakumar R.

    2013-01-01

    deactivation, is an important mechanism for the loss of catalyst activity. This is especially true for high temperature catalytic processes, such as steam reforming, automotive exhaust treatment, or catalytic combustion. With dwindling supplies of precious metals and increasing demand, fundamental...

  19. Catalytic characterization of bi-functional catalysts derived from Pd ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    1995; Lyubovsky and Pfefferle 1999; Sales et al 1999;. Hill et al 2000). ... For a catalytic system, whose activity ... catalytic systems containing Pd, supported on various acid- ..... Further studies are needed to optimize a balance between.

  20. Catalytically favorable surface patterns in Pt-Au nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb; Schwingenschlö gl, Udo

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental demonstrations of novel PtAu nanoparticles with highly enhanced catalytic properties, we present a systematic theoretical study that explores principal catalytic indicators as a function of the particle size

  1. Catalytic site identification—a web server to identify catalytic site structural matches throughout PDB

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshner, Daniel A.; Nilmeier, Jerome P.; Lightstone, Felice C.

    2013-01-01

    The catalytic site identification web server provides the innovative capability to find structural matches to a user-specified catalytic site among all Protein Data Bank proteins rapidly (in less than a minute). The server also can examine a user-specified protein structure or model to identify structural matches to a library of catalytic sites. Finally, the server provides a database of pre-calculated matches between all Protein Data Bank proteins and the library of catalytic sites. The database has been used to derive a set of hypothesized novel enzymatic function annotations. In all cases, matches and putative binding sites (protein structure and surfaces) can be visualized interactively online. The website can be accessed at http://catsid.llnl.gov. PMID:23680785

  2. Investigation of combustion and thermodynamic performance of a lean burn catalytic combustion gas turbine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yin Juan; Weng Yiwu

    2011-01-01

    The goals of this research were to investigate the combustion and thermodynamic performance of a lean burn catalytic combustion gas turbine. The characteristics of lean burn catalytic combustion were investigated by utilising 1D heterogeneous plug flow model which was validated by experiments. The effects of operating parameters on catalytic combustion were numerically analysed. The system models were built in ASPEN Plus and three independent design variables, i.e. compressor pressure ratio (PR), regenerator effectiveness (RE) and turbine inlet temperature (TIT) were selected to analyse the thermodynamic performance of the thermal cycle. The main results show that: simulations from 1D heterogeneous plug flow model can capture the trend of catalytic combustion and describe the behavior of the catalytic monolith in detail. Inlet temperature is the most significant parameter that impacts operation of the catalytic combustor. When TIT and RE are constant, the increase of PR results in lowering the inlet temperature of the catalytic combustor, which results in decreasing methane conversion. The peak thermal efficiency and the optimal PR at a constant TIT increase with the increase of TIT; and at the constant PR, the thermal efficiency increases with the increase of TIT. However, with lower TIT conditions, the optimal PR and the peak efficiency at a constant TIT of the LBCCGT cycle are relative low to that of the conventional cycle. When TIT and PR are constant, the decrease of RE may result in lower methane conversion. The influences of RE on the methane conversion and the thermal efficiency are more significant at higher PRs. The higher thermal efficiency for the lower RE is achieved at lower PR.

  3. Investigations for the implementation of catalytic recombiners in large dry containments in Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohde, J.; Tiltmann, M.; Froehmel, T.

    1997-01-01

    During the past few years, several concepts of mitigation have been developed and tested to limit the hydrogen concentrations in the containment atmosphere during the course of a severe accident. Extensive efforts have been given, especially in Germany and Canada, to investigate the use of catalytic recombiners. Based on the outcome of these research efforts in Germany it was recommended by the Reactor Safety Commission (RSK) in June 1994 to implement a hydrogen mitigation system, based on catalytic recombiners in large dry containments of PWR plants. Investigations are carried out at GRS, sponsored by the German Ministry of Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), to develop basic requirements for the implementation of a catalytic recombiner system in large dry containments. Severe accidents scenarios were calculated with the system code MELCOR to determine the mass- and energy release rates from the primary system into the containment, necessary to prepare the input data for the containment code calculations. A detailed nodalisation of the containment system of a German PWR plant (Konvoi-type) was developed for the code RA-LOC MOD4 to investigate the effectiveness of a catalytic recombiner system which consists of 53 of such devices, being distributed in the complex room arrangement. The effectiveness of such a system is demonstrated by comparing a representative severe accident sequence without and with the catalytic recombination of hydrogen. The results showed, that only in some limited areas in the containment combustible gas mixtures were formed for a limited time span and that at the end of the first day after the onset of the accident the catalytic reaction is limited due to oxygen depletion. The work is still in progress while additional severe accident sequences have to be analyzed to develop some generic guidelines for the implementation of a catalytic recombiner system in large dry containments. (author)

  4. Catalytic/non-catalytic combination process for nitrogen oxides reduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luftglass, B.K.; Sun, W.H.; Hofmann, J.E.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a process for the reduction of nitrogen oxides in the effluent from the combustion of a carbonaceous fuel. It comprises introducing a nitrogenous treatment agent comprising urea, one or more of the hydrolysis products of urea, ammonia, compounds which produce ammonia as a by-product, ammonium salts of organic acids, 5- or 6-membered heterocyclic hydrocarbons having at least one cyclic nitrogen, hydroxy amino hydrocarbons, or mixtures thereof into the effluent at an effluent temperature between about 1200 degrees F and about 2100 degrees F; and contacting the treated effluent under conditions effective to reduce the nitrogen oxides in the effluent with a catalyst effective for the reduction of nitrogen oxides in the presence of ammonia

  5. The tritium labelling of organic molecules by heterogeneous catalytic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angoso, M.; Kaiser, F.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of the temperature at 65degC and 120degC on the labelling of three organic molecules with tritium was studied. The compounds were: benzoic acid, diphenyl glioxal and 2,3-tetramethylene-4-phenylthien-7-oxodiacetin. The method employed was the heterogeneous catalytic exchange between tritiaded water and the organic compound. The purification was made by thin-layer chromatography and the concentration, purity and specific activity of the products were determined by counting and ultraviolet techniques. The thermal stability and the radiolitic effects on labelled benzoic acid were also considered. (author) [es

  6. The tritium labelling of organic molecules by heterogeneous catalytic exchange

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angoso Marina, M.; Kaiser Ruiz del Olmo, F.

    1977-01-01

    The influence of the temperature at 65 degree centigree and 120 degree centigree on the labelling of three organic molecules with tritium was studied. The compounds were: benzoic acid, de phenyl glyoxal and 2,3-tetramethylene-4-pantothenyl-7-oxo diacetin.The method employed was the heterogeneous catalytic exchange between tritiated water and the organic compound. The purification was made by thin-layer chromatography and the concentration, purity and specific activity of the products were determined by counting and ultraviolet techniques. The thermal stability and the radiolytic effects on labelled benzoic acid were also considered. (Author) 9 refs

  7. Catalytic activity of lanthanum oxide for the reduction of cyclohexanone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugunan, S.; Sherly, K.B.

    1994-01-01

    Lanthanum oxides, La 2 O 3 has been found to be an effective catalyst for the liquid phase reduction of cyclohexanone. The catalytic activities of La 2 O 3 activated at 300, 500 and 800 degC and its mixed oxides with alumina for the reduction of cylcohexanone with 2-propanol have been determined and the data parallel that of the electron donating properties of the catalysts. The electron donating properties of the catalysts have been determined from the adsorption of electron acceptors of different electron affinities on the surface of these oxides. (author). 15 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  8. Investigation of polypyrrole/polyvinyl alcohol–titanium dioxide composite films for photo-catalytic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Shaoqiang; Zhang, Hongyang; Song, Yuanqing; Zhang, Jianling; Yang, Haigang; Jiang, Long, E-mail: jianglong@scu.edu.cn; Dan, Yi, E-mail: danyichenweiwei@163.com

    2015-07-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The study provides an easy and convenient method to fabricate films, which will give guidance for the preparation of three-dimensional materials. • The PPy/PVA–TiO{sub 2} films can keep better photo-catalytic activities both under UV and visible light irradiation when compared with TiO{sub 2} film. • There exist electron transfers between PPy/PVA and TiO{sub 2}. - Abstract: Polypyrrole/polyvinyl alcohol–titanium dioxide (PPy/PVA–TiO{sub 2}) composite films used as photo-catalysts were fabricated by combining TiO{sub 2} sol with PPy/PVA solution in which PPy was synthesized by in situ polymerization of pyrrole (Py) in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) matrix and loaded on glass. The prepared photo-catalysts were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), ultraviolet–visible diffuse reflection spectroscopy (UV–vis DRS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra and photoluminescence (PL). The results indicate that the composites have same crystal structure as the TiO{sub 2} and extend the optic absorption from UV region to visible light region. By detecting the variation ratio, detected by ultraviolet–vis spectroscopy, of model pollutant rhodamine B (RhB) solution in the presence of the composite films under both UV and visible light irradiation, the photo-catalytic performance of the composite films was investigated. The results show that the PPy/PVA–TiO{sub 2} composite films show better photo-catalytic properties than TiO{sub 2} film both under UV and visible light irradiation, and the photo-catalytic degradation of RhB follows the first-order kinetics. The effects of the composition of composite films and the concentration of RhB on the photo-catalytic performance, as well as the possible photo-catalytic mechanism, were also discussed. By photo-catalytic recycle experiments, the structure stability of the PPy/PVA–TiO{sub 2} composite film was investigated and the results show that

  9. Solar photo catalytic treatment of simulated dyestuff effluents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kositzi, M.; Antoniadis, A.; Poulios, I.; Kiridies, I.; Malato, S.

    2003-07-01

    The photo catalytic organic content reduction of two selected synthetic wastewater from the textile dyeing industry, by the use heterogeneous and homogeneous photo catalytic methods under solar irradiation, has been studied at a pilot plant scale at the Plataforma Solar de Almeria. the effect of two different TiO{sub 2} modifications with oxidants such as H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8}, on the decolorisation and the organic content reduction (DOC) of the wastewater was examined. the TiO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system seems to be more efficient in comparison to the synergetic action which appears when using persulfate and TiO{sub 2} in these specific wastewaters. By an accumulation energy of 50 KJ L''-1 the synergetic effect of TiO{sub 2} P-25 with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and Na{sub 2}S{sub 2}O{sub 8} leads to a 70% and 57% DOC reduction, respectively, in the case of cotton synthetic wastewater, while the decolorisation was almost complete. The photo catalytic decolorisation, as well as the DOC reduction in the case of naylon simulated wastewater is a slower process and by an accumulation energy of 50 KJ L''-1 leads to 54% mineralization in both cases. The Photo-Fenton process in both cases was more efficient for this type of wastewater in comparison to the TiO{sub 2}/oxidant system. An accumulation of energy of 50 KJ L''-1 leads to 90% reduction of the organic content. (Author) 13 refs.

  10. Reductive Catalytic Fractionation of Corn Stover Lignin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Eric M.; Katahira, Rui; Reed, Michelle; Resch, Michael G.; Karp, Eric M.; Beckham, Gregg T.; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2016-12-05

    Reductive catalytic fractionation (RCF) has emerged as an effective biomass pretreatment strategy to depolymerize lignin into tractable fragments in high yields. We investigate the RCF of corn stover, a highly abundant herbaceous feedstock, using carbon-supported Ru and Ni catalysts at 200 and 250 degrees C in methanol and, in the presence or absence of an acid cocatalyst (H3PO4 or an acidified carbon support). Three key performance variables were studied: (1) the effectiveness of lignin extraction as measured by the yield of lignin oil, (2) the yield of monomers in the lignin oil, and (3) the carbohydrate retention in the residual solids after RCF. The monomers included methyl coumarate/ferulate, propyl guaiacol/syringol, and ethyl guaiacol/syringol. The Ru and Ni catalysts performed similarly in terms of product distribution and monomer yields. The monomer yields increased monotonically as a function of time for both temperatures. At 6 h, monomer yields of 27.2 and 28.3% were obtained at 250 and 200 degrees C, respectively, with Ni/C. The addition of an acid cocatalysts to the Ni/C system increased monomer yields to 32% for acidified carbon and 38% for phosphoric acid at 200 degrees C. The monomer product distribution was dominated by methyl coumarate regardless of the use of the acid cocatalysts. The use of phosphoric acid at 200 degrees C or the high temperature condition without acid resulted in complete lignin extraction and partial sugar solubilization (up to 50%) thereby generating lignin oil yields that exceeded the theoretical limit. In contrast, using either Ni/C or Ni on acidified carbon at 200 degrees C resulted in moderate lignin oil yields of ca. 55%, with sugar retention values >90%. Notably, these sugars were amenable to enzymatic digestion, reaching conversions >90% at 96 h. Characterization studies on the lignin oils using two-dimensional heteronuclear single quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance and gel permeation chromatrography revealed

  11. Tritium removal from air streams by catalytic oxidation and water adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sherwood, A.E.

    1976-06-01

    An effective method of capturing tritium from air streams is by catalytic oxidation followed by water adsorption on a microporous solid adsorbent. Performance of a burner/dryer combination is illustrated by overall mass balance equations. Engineering design methods for packed bed reactors and adsorbers are reviewed, emphasizing the experimental data needed for design and the effect of operating conditions on system performance

  12. On the Structural Context and Identification of Enzyme Catalytic Residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tung Chien

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Enzymes play important roles in most of the biological processes. Although only a small fraction of residues are directly involved in catalytic reactions, these catalytic residues are the most crucial parts in enzymes. The study of the fundamental and unique features of catalytic residues benefits the understanding of enzyme functions and catalytic mechanisms. In this work, we analyze the structural context of catalytic residues based on theoretical and experimental structure flexibility. The results show that catalytic residues have distinct structural features and context. Their neighboring residues, whether sequence or structure neighbors within specific range, are usually structurally more rigid than those of noncatalytic residues. The structural context feature is combined with support vector machine to identify catalytic residues from enzyme structure. The prediction results are better or comparable to those of recent structure-based prediction methods.

  13. Reactivity and Catalytic Activity of Hydrogen Atom Chemisorbed Silver Clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoor, Dar; Pal, Sourav

    2015-06-18

    Metal clusters of silver have attracted recent interest of researchers as a result of their potential in different catalytic applications and low cost. However, due to the completely filled d orbital and very high first ionization potential of the silver atom, the silver-based catalysts interact very weakly with the reacting molecules. In the current work, density functional theory calculations were carried out to investigate the effect of hydrogen atom chemisorption on the reactivity and catalytic properties of inert silver clusters. Our results affirm that the hydrogen atom chemisorption leads to enhancement in the binding energy of the adsorbed O2 molecule on the inert silver clusters. The increase in the binding energy is also characterized by the decrease in the Ag-O and increase in the O-O bond lengths in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Pertinent to the increase in the O-O bond length, a significant red shift in the O-O stretching frequency is also noted in the case of the AgnH silver clusters. Moreover, the hydrogen atom chemisorbed silver clusters show low reaction barriers and high heat of formation of the final products for the environmentally important CO oxidation reaction as compared to the parent catalytically inactive clusters. The obtained results were compared with those of the corresponding gold and hydrogen atom chemisorbed gold clusters obtained at the same level of theory. It is expected the current computational study will provide key insights for future advances in the design of efficient nanosilver-based catalysts through the adsorption of a small atom or a ligand.

  14. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2018-04-10

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  15. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2016-02-09

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  16. Enantioselective catalytic fluorinative aza-semipinacol rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov-Michailidis, Fedor; Pupier, Marion; Besnard, Céline; Bürgi, Thomas; Alexakis, Alexandre

    2014-10-03

    An efficient and highly stereoselective fluorinative aza-semipinacol rearrangement is described. The catalytic reaction requires use of Selectfluor in combination with the chiral, enantiopure phosphate anion derived from acid L3. Under optimized conditions, cyclopropylamines A were transformed into β-fluoro cyclobutylimines B in good yields and high levels of diastereo- and enantiocontrol. Furthermore, the optically active cyclobutylimines were reduced diastereoselectively with L-Selectride in the corresponding fluorinated amines C, compounds of significant interest in the pharmacological industry.

  17. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alochols to hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2017-01-03

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  18. Materials for High-Temperature Catalytic Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersson, Anders

    2003-04-01

    Catalytic combustion is an environmentally friendly technique to combust fuels in e.g. gas turbines. Introducing a catalyst into the combustion chamber of a gas turbine allows combustion outside the normal flammability limits. Hence, the adiabatic flame temperature may be lowered below the threshold temperature for thermal NO{sub X} formation while maintaining a stable combustion. However, several challenges are connected to the application of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The first part of this thesis reviews the use of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The influence of the fuel has been studied and compared over different catalyst materials. The material section is divided into two parts. The first concerns bimetallic palladium catalysts. These catalysts showed a more stable activity compared to their pure palladium counterparts for methane combustion. This was verified both by using an annular reactor at ambient pressure and a pilot-scale reactor at elevated pressures and flows closely resembling the ones found in a gas turbine combustor. The second part concerns high-temperature materials, which may be used either as active or washcoat materials. A novel group of materials for catalysis, i.e. garnets, has been synthesised and tested in combustion of methane, a low-heating value gas and diesel fuel. The garnets showed some interesting abilities especially for combustion of low-heating value, LHV, gas. Two other materials were also studied, i.e. spinels and hexa aluminates, both showed very promising thermal stability and the substituted hexa aluminates also showed a good catalytic activity. Finally, deactivation of the catalyst materials was studied. In this part the sulphur poisoning of palladium, platinum and the above-mentioned complex metal oxides has been studied for combustion of a LHV gas. Platinum and surprisingly the garnet were least deactivated. Palladium was severely affected for methane combustion while the other washcoat materials were

  19. Catalytic extraction processing of contaminated scrap metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, T.P.; Johnston, J.E.; Payea, B.M.; Zeitoon, B.M.

    1995-01-01

    Molten Metal Technology was awarded a contract to demonstrate the applicability of the Catalytic Extraction Process, a proprietary process that could be applied to US DOE's inventory of low level mixed waste. This paper is a description of that technology, and included within this document are discussions of: (1) Program objectives, (2) Overall technology review, (3) Organic feed conversion to synthetic gas, (4) Metal, halogen, and transuranic recovery, (5) Demonstrations, (6) Design of the prototype facility, and (7) Results

  20. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2017-12-19

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  1. Free-standing hierarchical α-MnO2@CuO membrane for catalytic filtration degradation of organic pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xinsheng; Liang, Heng; Qu, Fangshu; Ding, An; Cheng, Xiaoxiang; Tang, Chuyang Y; Li, Guibai

    2018-06-01

    Catalytic membrane, due to its compact reactor assembling, high catalytic performance as well as low energy consumption, has proved to be more attractive for wastewater treatment. In this work, a free-standing α-MnO 2 @CuO membrane with hierarchical nanostructures was prepared and evaluated as the catalytic membrane to generate radicals from peroxymonosulfate (PMS) for the oxidative degradation of organic dyes in aqueous solution. Benefiting from the high mass transport efficiency and the hierarchical nanostructures, a superior catalytic activity of the membrane was observed for organic dyes degradation. As a typical organic dye, more than 99% of methylene blue (MB) was degraded within 0.23 s using dead-end filtration cell. The effects of flow rate, PMS concentration and buffer solution on MB degradation were further investigated. Besides MB, the catalytic membrane also showed excellent performance for the removal of other dyes, such as congo red, methyl orange, rhodamine B, acid chrome blue K and malachite green. Moreover, the mechanism study indicated that OH and SO 4 - generated from the interaction between PMS and Mn/Cu species with different oxidation states mainly accounted for the dyes degradation. The catalytic filtration process using α-MnO 2 @CuO catalytic membrane could provide a novel method for wastewater purification with high efficiency and low energy consumption. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Catalytic hydrogen recombination for nuclear containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koroll, G.W.; Lau, D.W.P.; Dewit, W.A.; Graham, W.R.C.

    1994-01-01

    Catalytic recombiners appear to be a credible option for hydrogen mitigation in nuclear containments. The passive operation, versatility and ease of back fitting are appealing for existing stations and new designs. Recently, a generation of wet-proofed catalyst materials have been developed at AECL which are highly specific to H 2 -O 2 , are active at ambient temperatures and are being evaluated for containment applications. Two types of catalytic recombiners were evaluated for hydrogen removal in containments based on the AECL catalyst. The first is a catalytic combustor for application in existing air streams such as provided by fans or ventilation systems. The second is an autocatalytic recombiner which uses the enthalpy of reaction to produce natural convective flow over the catalyst elements. Intermediate-scale results obtained in 6 m 3 and 10 m 3 spherical and cylindrical vessels are given to demonstrate self-starting limits, operating limits, removal capacity, scaling parameters, flow resistance, mixing behaviour in the vicinity of an operating recombiner and sensitivity to poisoning, fouling and radiation. (author). 13 refs., 10 figs

  3. Electrochemical catalytic treatment of phenol wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Hongzhu; Zhang Xinhai; Ma Qingliang; Wang Bo

    2009-01-01

    The slurry bed catalytic treatment of contaminated water appears to be a promising alternative for the oxidation of aqueous organic pollutants. In this paper, the electrochemical oxidation of phenol in synthetic wastewater catalyzed by ferric sulfate and potassium permanganate adsorbed onto active bentonite in slurry bed electrolytic reactor with graphite electrode has been investigated. In order to determine the optimum operating condition, the orthogonal experiments were devised and the results revealed that the system of ferric sulfate, potassium permanganate and active bentonite showed a high catalytic efficiency on the process of electrochemical oxidation phenol in initial pH 5. When the initial concentration of phenol was 0.52 g/L (the initial COD 1214 mg/L), up to 99% chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was obtained in 40 min. According to the experimental results, a possible mechanism of catalytic degradation of phenol was proposed. Environmental estimation was also done and the results showed that the treated wastewater have little impact on plant growth and could totally be applied to irrigation.

  4. Catalytic applications of bio-inspired nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacardo, Dennis Kien Balaong

    The biomimetic synthesis of Pd nanoparticles was presented using the Pd4 peptide, TSNAVHPTLRHL, isolated from combinatorial phage display library. Using this approach, nearly monodisperse and spherical Pd nanoparticles were generated with an average diameter of 1.9 +/- 0.4 nm. The peptide-based nanocatalyst were employed in the Stille coupling reaction under energy-efficient and environmentally friendly reaction conditions of aqueous solvent, room temperature and very low catalyst loading. To this end, the Pd nanocatalyst generated high turnover frequency (TOF) value and quantitative yields using ≥ 0.005 mol% Pd as well as catalytic activities with different aryl halides containing electron-withdrawing and electron-donating groups. The Pd4-capped Pd nanoparticles followed the atom-leaching mechanism and were found to be selective with respect to substrate identity. On the other hand, the naturally-occurring R5 peptide (SSKKSGSYSGSKGSKRRIL) was employed in the synthesis of biotemplated Pd nanomaterials which showed morphological changes as a function of Pd:peptide ratio. TOF analysis for hydrogenation of olefinic alcohols showed similar catalytic activity regardless of nanomorphology. Determination of catalytic properties of these bio-inspired nanomaterials are important as they serve as model system for alternative green catalyst with applications in industrially important transformations.

  5. Vapor-Driven Propulsion of Catalytic Micromotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Renfeng; Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Ezhilan, Barath; Xu, Tailin; Christianson, Caleb; Gao, Wei; Saintillan, David; Ren, Biye; Wang, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    Chemically-powered micromotors offer exciting opportunities in diverse fields, including therapeutic delivery, environmental remediation, and nanoscale manufacturing. However, these nanovehicles require direct addition of high concentration of chemical fuel to the motor solution for their propulsion. We report the efficient vapor-powered propulsion of catalytic micromotors without direct addition of fuel to the micromotor solution. Diffusion of hydrazine vapor from the surrounding atmosphere into the sample solution is instead used to trigger rapid movement of iridium-gold Janus microsphere motors. Such operation creates a new type of remotely-triggered and powered catalytic micro/nanomotors that are responsive to their surrounding environment. This new propulsion mechanism is accompanied by unique phenomena, such as the distinct off-on response to the presence of fuel in the surrounding atmosphere, and spatio-temporal dependence of the motor speed borne out of the concentration gradient evolution within the motor solution. The relationship between the motor speed and the variables affecting the fuel concentration distribution is examined using a theoretical model for hydrazine transport, which is in turn used to explain the observed phenomena. The vapor-powered catalytic micro/nanomotors offer new opportunities in gas sensing, threat detection, and environmental monitoring, and open the door for a new class of environmentally-triggered micromotors.

  6. Catalytic pyrolysis of olive mill wastewater sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellaoui, Hamza

    From 2008 to 2013, an average of 2,821.4 kilotons/year of olive oil were produced around the world. The waste product of the olive mill industry consists of solid residue (pomace) and wastewater (OMW). Annually, around 30 million m3 of OMW are produced in the Mediterranean area, 700,000 m3 year?1 in Tunisia alone. OMW is an aqueous effluent characterized by an offensive smell and high organic matter content, including high molecular weight phenolic compounds and long-chain fatty acids. These compounds are highly toxic to micro-organisms and plants, which makes the OMW a serious threat to the environment if not managed properly. The OMW is disposed of in open air evaporation ponds. After evaporation of most of the water, OMWS is left in the bottom of the ponds. In this thesis, the effort has been made to evaluate the catalytic pyrolysis process as a technology to valorize the OMWS. The first section of this research showed that 41.12 wt. % of the OMWS is mostly lipids, which are a good source of energy. The second section proved that catalytic pyrolysis of the OMWS over red mud and HZSM-5 can produce green diesel, and 450 °C is the optimal reaction temperature to maximize the organic yields. The last section revealed that the HSF was behind the good fuel-like properties of the OMWS catalytic oils, whereas the SR hindered the bio-oil yields and quality.

  7. Antibody proteases: induction of catalytic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabibov, A G; Friboulet, A; Thomas, D; Demin, A V; Ponomarenko, N A; Vorobiev, I I; Pillet, D; Paon, M; Alexandrova, E S; Telegin, G B; Reshetnyak, A V; Grigorieva, O V; Gnuchev, N V; Malishkin, K A; Genkin, D D

    2002-10-01

    Most of the data accumulated throughout the years on investigation of catalytic antibodies indicate that their production increases on the background of autoimmune abnormalities. The different approaches to induction of catalytic response toward recombinant gp120 HIV-1 surface protein in mice with various autoimmune pathologies are described. The peptidylphosphonate conjugate containing structural part of gp120 molecule is used for reactive immunization of NZB/NZW F1, MRL, and SJL mice. The specific modification of heavy and light chains of mouse autoantibodies with Val-Ala-Glu-Glu-Glu-Val-PO(OPh)2 reactive peptide was demonstrated. Increased proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies in SJL mice encouraged us to investigate the production of antigen-specific catalytic antibodies on the background of induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The immunization of autoimmune-prone mice with the engineered fusions containing the fragments of gp120 and encephalitogenic epitope of myelin basic protein (MBP(89-104)) was made. The proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies isolated from the sera of autoimmune mice immunized by the described antigen was shown. Specific immune response of SJL mice to these antigens was characterized. Polyclonal antibodies purified from sera of the immunized animals revealed proteolytic activity. The antiidiotypic approach to raise the specific proteolytic antibody as an "internal image" of protease is described. The "second order" monoclonal antibodies toward subtilisin Carlsberg revealed pronounced proteolytic activity.

  8. Electrochemical catalytic treatment of phenol wastewater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Hongzhu, E-mail: hzmachem@snnu.edu.cn [Institute of Energy Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Zhang Xinhai [Institute of Energy Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Ma Qingliang [Department of Applied Physics, College of Sciences, Taiyuan University of Technology, 030024 Taiyuan (China); Wang Bo [Institute of Energy Chemistry, School of Chemistry and Materials Science, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China)

    2009-06-15

    The slurry bed catalytic treatment of contaminated water appears to be a promising alternative for the oxidation of aqueous organic pollutants. In this paper, the electrochemical oxidation of phenol in synthetic wastewater catalyzed by ferric sulfate and potassium permanganate adsorbed onto active bentonite in slurry bed electrolytic reactor with graphite electrode has been investigated. In order to determine the optimum operating condition, the orthogonal experiments were devised and the results revealed that the system of ferric sulfate, potassium permanganate and active bentonite showed a high catalytic efficiency on the process of electrochemical oxidation phenol in initial pH 5. When the initial concentration of phenol was 0.52 g/L (the initial COD 1214 mg/L), up to 99% chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was obtained in 40 min. According to the experimental results, a possible mechanism of catalytic degradation of phenol was proposed. Environmental estimation was also done and the results showed that the treated wastewater have little impact on plant growth and could totally be applied to irrigation.

  9. Characterization of gallium-containing zeolites for catalytic applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Sanchez, M.

    2003-12-08

    The present study considers the synthesis, characterization, and catalytic evaluation of extra-framework gallium-containing zeolites. We focus on modification of zeolites by chemical vapor deposition of trimethylgallium on HZSM-5 and Mordenite zeolites. Chapter 2 is dedicated to the chemisorption and stability of TMG on HZSM-5 and HMOR zeolites. The effect of silylation is also addressed. Some theoretical calculations are also shown in this study to support part of the experimental results. In Chapter 3, the effect of oxidation and reduction treatments on these catalysts is investigated by FTIR, ICP and multinuclei NMR. In Chapter 4, the oxidation state and Ga coordination obtained during and after thermal treatment with H2 and O2 is analysed by X-ray adsorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS) and IR analysis of CO adsorption. These results allow a better understanding of the catalytic behaviour of Ga-containing zeolites catalyst. Chapter 5 consists of two parts: one discusses the H2 activation over Ga/HZSM5 and Ga/MOR catalysts by H2/D2 isotopic exchange reaction, and the second part deals with the aromatization of n-heptane over the same catalysts.

  10. Reaction Current Phenomenon in Bifunctional Catalytic Metal-Semiconductor Nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemian, Mohammad Amin

    Pt/TiO2(por) transducers were unusual in many regards. Addition of various H2 amounts to the initial 160 Torr O2 atmosphere over the sample led to well repeatable chemicurrents of both transient and steady-state characters, depending on a specific H2 addition procedure. It is suggested that adsorption of hydrogen on Pt/TiO2 structures leads to dissociation of hydrogen molecules on Pt surface followed by "spillover" of hydrogen atoms from Pt toward TiO2 support. In contrast to oxygen, hydrogen manifests donor properties by giving electrons to the TiO2 conductance band and adsorbing as H+ ions. This effect is well illustrated with the I-V curves, showing highly conductive Ohmic characteristics of the samples in H2 atmosphere. Two versions of the spillover process leading eventually to H+ ion adsorption on TiO2 will be considered: H-atom and proton (pre-ionized H-atom) spillover. This research work is a pioneering effort to challenge the direct utility of the non-adiabatic electronic processes in catalytic nanomaterial systems, paving the road toward novel energy conversion devices, solid-state chemical sensors and signal transducers.

  11. Synthesis, crystal structure and catalytic effect on thermal decomposition of RDX and AP: An energetic coordination polymer [Pb{sub 2}(C{sub 5}H{sub 3}N{sub 5}O{sub 5}){sub 2}(NMP)·NMP]{sub n}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jin-jian [School of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Yancheng Teachers College, Yancheng 224002 (China); Liu, Zu-Liang, E-mail: liuzl@mail.njust.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Cheng, Jian [School of Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Science and Technology, Nanjing 210094 (China); Yancheng Teachers College, Yancheng 224002 (China); Fang, Dong, E-mail: fangdong106@163.com [Yancheng Teachers College, Yancheng 224002 (China)

    2013-04-15

    An energetic lead(II) coordination polymer based on the ligand ANPyO has been synthesized and its crystal structure has been got. The polymer was characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, elemental analysis, DSC and TG-DTG technologies. Thermal analysis shows that there are one endothermic process and two exothermic decomposition stages in the temperature range of 50–600 °C with final residues 57.09%. The non-isothermal kinetic has also been studied on the main exothermic decomposition using the Kissinger's and Ozawa–Doyle's methods, the apparent activation energy is calculated as 195.2 KJ/mol. Furthermore, DSC measurements show that the polymer has significant catalytic effect on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate. - Graphical abstract: An energetic lead(II) coordination polymer of ANPyO has been synthesized, structurally characterized and properties tested. Highlights: ► We have synthesized and characterized an energetic lead(II) coordination polymer. ► We have measured its molecular structure and thermal decomposition. ► It has significant catalytic effect on thermal decomposition of AP.

  12. I.C. Engine emission reduction by copper oxide catalytic converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, S. P.; Shubham Uday, Desai; Karan Hemant, Borana; Rajarshi Kushwanth Goud, Kagita; Lakshmana Kumar, G.; Pavan Kumar, K.

    2017-05-01

    The toxic gases emitted from diesel engines are more than petrol engines. Predicting the use of diesel engines, even more in future, this system is developed and can be used to minimize the harmful gases. Toxic gases include NOX, CO, HC and Smoke which are harmful to the atmosphere as well as to the human beings. The main aim of this work is to fabricate system, where the level of intensity of toxic gases is controlled through chemical reaction to more agreeable level. This system acts itself as an exhaust system; hence there is no needs to fit separate the silencer. The whole assembly is fitted in the exhaust pipe from engine. In this work, catalytic converter with copper oxide as a catalyst, by replacing noble catalysts such as platinum, palladium and rhodium is fabricated and fitted in the engine exhaust. With and without catalytic converter, the experimentations are carried out at different loads such as 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% of maximum rated load. From the experimental results it is found that the maximum reduction is 32%, 61% and 21% for HC, NOx and CO respectively at 100% of maximum rated load when compared to that of without catalytic converter. This catalytic converter system is cash effective and more economical than the existing catalytic converter.

  13. Preparation, Characterization, and Catalytic Activity of MoCo/USY Catalyst on Hydrodeoxygenation Reaction of Anisole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugrahaningtyas, K. D.; Suharbiansah, R. S. R.; Rahmawati, F.

    2018-03-01

    This research aims to prepare, characterize, and study the catalytic activity of Molybdenum (Mo) and Cobalt (Co) metal with supporting material Ultra Stable Y-Zeolite (USY), to produce catalysts with activity in hydrotreatment reaction and in order to eliminate impurities compounds that containing unwanted groups heteroatoms. The bimetallic catalysts MoCo/USY were prepared by wet impregnation method with weight variation of Co metal 0%, 2%, 4%, 6%, 8%, and Mo metal 8% (w/w), respectively. Activation method of the catalyst included calcination, oxidation, reduction and the crystallinity was characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), the acidity of the catalyst was analyzed using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and gravimetry method, minerals present in the catalyst was analyzed using X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), and surface of the catalyst was analyzed using Surface Area Analyzer (SAA). Catalytic activity test (benzene yield product) of MoCo/USY on hydrodeoxigenation reaction of anisole aimed to determine the effect of Mo-Co/USY for catalytic activity in the reaction hydrodeoxigenation (HDO) anisole. Based on characterization and test of catalytic activity, it is known that catalytic of MoCo/USY 2% (catalyst B) shows best activities with acidity of 10.209 mmol/g, specific area of catalyst of 426.295 m2/g, pore average of 14.135 Å, total pore volume 0.318 cc/g, and total yield of HDO products 6.06%.

  14. Long-Range Electrostatics-Induced Two-Proton Transfer Captured by Neutron Crystallography in an Enzyme Catalytic Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlits, Oksana; Wymore, Troy; Das, Amit; Shen, Chen-Hsiang; Parks, Jerry M; Smith, Jeremy C; Weiss, Kevin L; Keen, David A; Blakeley, Matthew P; Louis, John M; Langan, Paul; Weber, Irene T; Kovalevsky, Andrey

    2016-04-11

    Neutron crystallography was used to directly locate two protons before and after a pH-induced two-proton transfer between catalytic aspartic acid residues and the hydroxy group of the bound clinical drug darunavir, located in the catalytic site of enzyme HIV-1 protease. The two-proton transfer is triggered by electrostatic effects arising from protonation state changes of surface residues far from the active site. The mechanism and pH effect are supported by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) calculations. The low-pH proton configuration in the catalytic site is deemed critical for the catalytic action of this enzyme and may apply more generally to other aspartic proteases. Neutrons therefore represent a superb probe to obtain structural details for proton transfer reactions in biological systems at a truly atomic level. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Catalytic Reforming of Lignin-Derived Bio-Oil Over a Nanoporous Molecular Sieve Silicoaluminophosphate-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Y K; Kang, Hyeon Koo; Jang, Hansaem; Suh, Dong Jin; Park, Sung Hoon

    2016-05-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of lignin, a major constituent of biomass, was performed. A nanoporous molecular sieve silicoaluminophosphate-11 (SAPO-11) was selected as catalyst. Thermogravimetric analysis showed that 500 degrees C was the optimal pyrolysis temperature. Pyrolyzer-gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy was used to investigate the pyrolysis product distribution. Production of phenolics, the dominant product from the pyrolysis of lignin, was promoted by the increase in the catalyst dose. In particular, low-molecular-mass phenolics were produced more over SAPO-11, while high-molecular-mass phenolics and double-bond-containing phenolics were produced less. The fraction of aromatic compounds, including benzene, toluene, xylene, and ethylbenzene, was also increased by catalytic reforming. The catalytic effects were more pronounced when the catalyst/biomass ratio was increased. The enhanced production of aromatic compounds by an acidic catalyst obtained in this study is in good agreement with the results of previous studies.

  16. Catalytic micromotor generating self-propelled regular motion through random fluctuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Daigo; Mukai, Atsushi; Okita, Naoaki; Yoshikawa, Kenichi; Shioi, Akihisa

    2013-07-01

    Most of the current studies on nano/microscale motors to generate regular motion have adapted the strategy to fabricate a composite with different materials. In this paper, we report that a simple object solely made of platinum generates regular motion driven by a catalytic chemical reaction with hydrogen peroxide. Depending on the morphological symmetry of the catalytic particles, a rich variety of random and regular motions are observed. The experimental trend is well reproduced by a simple theoretical model by taking into account of the anisotropic viscous effect on the self-propelled active Brownian fluctuation.

  17. Statistical evaluation of mature landfill leachate treatment by homogeneous catalytic ozonation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. C. Peixoto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the results of a mature landfill leachate treated by a homogeneous catalytic ozonation process with ions Fe2+ and Fe3+ at acidic pH. Quality assessments were performed using Taguchi's method (L8 design. Strong synergism was observed statistically between molecular ozone and ferric ions, pointing to their catalytic effect on •OH generation. The achievement of better organic matter depollution rates requires an ozone flow of 5 L h-1 (590 mg h-1 O3 and a ferric ion concentration of 5 mg L-1.

  18. Combined effects Na and SO{sub 2} in flue gas on Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2} catalyst for low temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH{sub 3} simulated by Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} doping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Aiyi [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Materials Cycling and Pollution Control, Nanjing 210023 (China); Yu, Danqing [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Yang, Liu [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Materials Cycling and Pollution Control, Nanjing 210023 (China); Sheng, Zhongyi, E-mail: 09377@njnu.edu.cn [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210023 (China); Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Materials Cycling and Pollution Control, Nanjing 210023 (China)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) was deposited on Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2} catalyst to simulate the co-existing of sodium and SO{sub 2} in the flue gas. • Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} had strong and fluctuant influence on Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2} catalyst’s performance in SCR of NOx with NH{sub 3}, due to the combined effect of the deactivation of sodium salts and the enhanced performance of ceria with surface sulfation. • The changes of the surface chemical species and acid sites on the Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} deposited catalysts could be considered as the main reasons for the fluctuation changes with the catalytic activity. - Abstract: A series of Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2} catalysts were synthesized through an impregnation method and used for low temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with ammonia (NH{sub 3}). Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was added into the catalyst to simulate the combined effects of alkali metal and SO{sub 2} in the flue gas. Experimental results showed that Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} had strong and fluctuant influence on the activity of Mn-Ce/TiO{sub 2}, because the effect of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} included pore occlusion and sulfation effect simultaneously. When Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} loading content increased from 0 to 1 wt.%, the SCR activities of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-doped catalysts decreased greatly. With further increasing amount of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}, however, the catalytic activity increased gradually. XRD results showed that Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} doping could induce the crystallization of MnOx phases, which were also confirmed by TEM and SEM results. BET results showed that the surface areas decreased and a new bimodal mesoporous structure formed gradually with the increasing amount of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. XPS results indicated that part of Ce{sup 4+} and Mn{sup 3+} were transferred to Ce{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 4+} due to the sulfation after Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} deposition on the surface of the catalysts. When the doped amounts of Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} increased, NH{sub 3

  19. Ni-doped (CeO{sub 2−δ})–YSZ mesoarchitectured with nanocrystalline framework: the effect of thermal treatment on structure, surface chemistry and catalytic properties in the partial oxidation of methane (CPOM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somacescu, Simona, E-mail: ssimona@icf.ro [Romanian Academy, “Ilie Murgulescu” Institute of Physical Chemistry (Romania); Florea, Mihaela [University of Bucharest, Department of Organic Chemistry, Biochemistry and Catalysis, Faculty of Chemistry (Romania); Osiceanu, Petre; Calderon-Moreno, Jose Maria [Romanian Academy, “Ilie Murgulescu” Institute of Physical Chemistry (Romania); Ghica, Corneliu [National Institute of Materials Physics (Romania); Serra, Jose Manuel [Universidad Politécnica de Valencia - Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Instituto de Tecnología Química (Spain)

    2015-11-15

    Ni-doped (CeO{sub 2−δ})–YSZ (5 mol% Ni oxide, 10 mol% ceria) mesoarchitectures (MA) with nanocrystalline framework have been synthesized by an original, facile and cheap approach based on Triton X100 nonionic surfactant as template and water as solvent at a strong basic pH value. Following the hydrothermal treatment under autogenous pressure (∼18 bars), Ni, Ce, Y, and Zr were well ordered as MA with nanocrystalline framework, assuring thermal stability. A comprehensive investigation of structure, texture, morphology, and surface chemistry was performed by means of a variety of complementary techniques (X-Ray Diffraction, XRD; Raman Spectroscopy, RS; Brunauer—Emmett—Teller, BET; Temperature—Programmed Reduction, TPR; Transmission Electron Microscopy, TEM and DF-STEM; X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, XPS; Catalytic activity and selectivity). N{sub 2} sorption measurements highlighted that the mesoporous structure is formed at 600 °C and remains stable at 800 °C. At 900 °C, the MA collapses, favoring the formation of macropores. The XRD and Raman Spectroscopy of all samples showed the presence of a pure, single phase with fluorite-type structure. At 900 °C, an increased tetragonal distortion of the cubic lattice was observed. The surface chemistry probed by XPS exhibits a mixture of oxidation states (Ce{sup 3+} + Ce{sup 4+}) with high percentage of Ce{sup 3+} valence state ∼35 % and (Ni{sup 3+} and Ni{sup 2+}) oxidation states induced by the thermal treatment. These nanoparticles assembled into MA show high stability and selectivity over time in catalytic partial oxidation of methane (CPOM). These promising performances suggest an interesting prospect for introduction as anode within IT-SOFC assemblies.Graphical Abstract.

  20. Ni-doped (CeO2−δ)–YSZ mesoarchitectured with nanocrystalline framework: the effect of thermal treatment on structure, surface chemistry and catalytic properties in the partial oxidation of methane (CPOM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somacescu, Simona; Florea, Mihaela; Osiceanu, Petre; Calderon-Moreno, Jose Maria; Ghica, Corneliu; Serra, Jose Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Ni-doped (CeO 2−δ )–YSZ (5 mol% Ni oxide, 10 mol% ceria) mesoarchitectures (MA) with nanocrystalline framework have been synthesized by an original, facile and cheap approach based on Triton X100 nonionic surfactant as template and water as solvent at a strong basic pH value. Following the hydrothermal treatment under autogenous pressure (∼18 bars), Ni, Ce, Y, and Zr were well ordered as MA with nanocrystalline framework, assuring thermal stability. A comprehensive investigation of structure, texture, morphology, and surface chemistry was performed by means of a variety of complementary techniques (X-Ray Diffraction, XRD; Raman Spectroscopy, RS; Brunauer—Emmett—Teller, BET; Temperature—Programmed Reduction, TPR; Transmission Electron Microscopy, TEM and DF-STEM; X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, XPS; Catalytic activity and selectivity). N 2 sorption measurements highlighted that the mesoporous structure is formed at 600 °C and remains stable at 800 °C. At 900 °C, the MA collapses, favoring the formation of macropores. The XRD and Raman Spectroscopy of all samples showed the presence of a pure, single phase with fluorite-type structure. At 900 °C, an increased tetragonal distortion of the cubic lattice was observed. The surface chemistry probed by XPS exhibits a mixture of oxidation states (Ce 3+  + Ce 4+ ) with high percentage of Ce 3+ valence state ∼35 % and (Ni 3+ and Ni 2+ ) oxidation states induced by the thermal treatment. These nanoparticles assembled into MA show high stability and selectivity over time in catalytic partial oxidation of methane (CPOM). These promising performances suggest an interesting prospect for introduction as anode within IT-SOFC assemblies.Graphical Abstract

  1. Catalytic Reduction of NO and NOx Content in Tobacco Smoke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetkovic N

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to reduce the nitric oxide (NO and nitrogen oxides (NO content in mainstream tobacco smoke, a new class of catalyst based on Cu-ZSM-5 zeolite has been synthesized. The effectiveness of the new catalyst (degree of reduction and specific catalytic ability was tested both by adding Cu-ZSM-5 zeolite directly to the tobacco blend and by addition to the filter. We have determined that adding the catalyst to the tobacco blend does not cause any changes in the physical, chemical or organoleptic properties of the cigarette blend. But, the addition reduces the yield of nitrogen oxides while having no influence on nicotine and “tar” content in the tobacco smoke of the modified blend. The catalyst addition increases the static burning rate (SBR. The changes in the quantity of NO and NOmay be explained by changes in burning conditions due to the increase of Oobtained from catalytic degradation of NO and NO, and adsorptive and diffusive properties of the catalyst. The changes in mainstream smoke analytes are also given on a puff-by-puff basis.

  2. Catalytic Cracking of Palm Oil Over Zeolite Catalysts: Statistical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. A. Twaiq and S. Bhatia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic cracking of palm oil was conducted in a fixed bed micro-reactor over HZSM-5, zeolite ? and ultrastable Y (USY zeolite catalysts. The objective of the present investigation was to study the effect of cracking reaction variables such as temperature, weight hourly space velocity, catalyst pore size and type of palm oil feed of different molecular weight on the conversion, yield of hydrocarbons in gasoline boiling range and BTX aromatics in the organic liquid product.  Statistical Design of Experiment (DOE with 24 full factorial design was used in experimentation at the first stage.  The nonlinear model and Response Surface Methodology (RSM were utilized in the second stage of experimentation to obtain the optimum values of the variables for maximum yields of hydrocarbons in gasoline boiling range and aromatics.  The HZSM-5 showed the best performance amongst the three catalysts tested.  At 623 K and WHSV of 1 h-1, the highest experimental yields of gasoline and aromatics were 28.3 wt.% and 27 wt.%, respectively over the HZSM-5 catalyst.  For the same catalyst, the statistical model predicted that the optimum yield of gasoline was 28.1 wt.% at WHSV of 1.75 h-1 and 623 K.  The predicted optimum yield of gasoline was 25.5 wt.% at 623 K and WHSV of 1 h-1.KEY WORDS: Catalytic Cracking, Palm Oil, Zeolite, Design Of Experiment, Response Surface Methodology.

  3. Enhancing charge transfer kinetics by nanoscale catalytic cermet interlayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Jihwan; Kim, Young-Beom; Gür, Turgut M; Prinz, Fritz B

    2012-12-01

    Enhancing the density of catalytic sites is crucial for improving the performance of energy conversion devices. This work demonstrates the kinetic role of 2 nm thin YSZ/Pt cermet layers on enhancing the oxygen reduction kinetics for low temperature solid oxide fuel cells. Cermet layers were deposited between the porous Pt cathode and the dense YSZ electrolyte wafer using atomic layer deposition (ALD). Not only the catalytic role of the cermet layer itself but the mixing effect in the cermet was explored. For cells with unmixed and fully mixed cermet interlayers, the maximum power density was enhanced by a factor of 1.5 and 1.8 at 400 °C, and by 2.3 and 2.7 at 450 °C, respectively, when compared to control cells with no cermet interlayer. The observed enhancement in cell performance is believed to be due to the increased triple phase boundary (TPB) density in the cermet interlayer. We also believe that the sustained kinetics for the fully mixed cermet layer sample stems from better thermal stability of Pt islands separated by the ALD YSZ matrix, which helped to maintain the high-density TPBs even at elevated temperature.

  4. The use of Phoenics in the design of catalytic converters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luoma, M. [Kemira Metalkat Oy, Oulu (Finland); Smith, A.G. [S and C Thermofluids Ltd, Bath (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    Manufacturers of automotive catalytic converters are constrained to design a system which is mechanically reliable, puts low back pressure on the engine, has adequate conversion performance, is low cost and of minimum size. In recent years, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been widely examined as a means of predicting the performance of catalytic converters to aid with the design process. Kemira Metalkat and S and C Thermofluids have put together and developed a number of existing CFD techniques in order to create a tool which is integrated within the design process. PHOENICS is used in the heart of the system in order to produce predictions of transient (light-off) and steady state catalyst performance. Grid generation tools have been provided to allow simplified and rapid geometry definition with suitable integration (via FEMGEN) within other parts of the catalyst design process. Simplified input techniques have been provided along with associated translators to create specification of the model for PHOENICS. Post-processing software has been provided through FEMVIEW to allow visualisation of catalyst monolith variables and transient performance animation. The whole system is controlled via a menu. The system have been use to study the effects of the catalyst design parameters on the converter performance. The results obtained using the system have so far been more qualitative than quantitative. However, validation studies have been carried out to check pressure drop prediction. A new model for the pressure drop over a metallic monolith has been developed. (author)

  5. Examination of bacterial inhibition using a catalytic DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Qu

    Full Text Available Determination of accurate dosage of existing antibiotics and discovery of new antimicrobials or probiotics entail simple but effective methods that can conveniently track bacteria growth and inhibition. Here we explore the application of a previously reported fluorogenic E. coli-specific DNAzyme (catalytic DNA, RFD-EC1, as a molecular probe for monitoring bacterial inhibition exerted by antibiotics and for studying bacterial competition as a result of cohabitation. Because the DNAzyme method provides a convenient way to monitor the growth of E. coli, it is capable of determining the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of antibiotics much faster than the conventional optical density (OD method. In addition, since the target for RFD-EC1 is an extracellular protein molecule from E. coli, RFD-EC1 is able to identify pore-forming antibiotics or compounds that can cause membrane leakage. Finally, RFD-EC1 can be used to analyse the competition of cohabitating bacteria, specifically the inhibition of growth of E. coli by Bacillus subtilis. The current work represents the first exploration of a catalytic DNA for microbiological applications and showcases the utility of bacteria-sensing fluorogenic DNAzymes as simple molecular probes to facilitate antibiotic and probiotic research.

  6. Catalytical degradation of relevant pollutants from waters using magnetic nanocatalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadejde, C.; Neamtu, M.; Schneider, R. J.; Hodoroaba, V.-D.; Ababei, G.; Panne, U.

    2015-10-01

    The catalytic efficiency of two magnetically responsive nanocatalysts was evaluated for the degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and Reactive Yellow 84 (RY84) azo dyes using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant under very mild conditions (atmospheric pressure, room temperature). In order to obtain the nanocatalysts, the surface of magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles, prepared by a co-precipitation method, was further modified with ferrous oxalate, a highly sensitive non-hazardous reducing agent. The sensitized nanomaterials were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry, and used in the catalytic wet hydrogen peroxide oxidation (CWHPO) of RB5 and RY84, in laboratory-scale experiments. The effect of important variables such as catalyst dosage, H2O2 concentration, and contact time was studied in the dye degradation kinetics. The results showed that it was possible to remove up to 99.7% dye in the presence of 20 mM H2O2 after 240 min of oxidation for a catalyst concentration of 10 g L-1 at 25 °C and initial pH value of 9.0. CWHPO of reactive dyes using sensitized magnetic nanocatalysts can be a suitable pre-treatment method for complete decolorization of effluents from textile dyeing and finishing processes, once the optimum operating conditions are established.

  7. The use of Phoenics in the design of catalytic converters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luoma, M [Kemira Metalkat Oy, Oulu (Finland); Smith, A G [S and C Thermofluids Ltd, Bath (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    Manufacturers of automotive catalytic converters are constrained to design a system which is mechanically reliable, puts low back pressure on the engine, has adequate conversion performance, is low cost and of minimum size. In recent years, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been widely examined as a means of predicting the performance of catalytic converters to aid with the design process. Kemira Metalkat and S and C Thermofluids have put together and developed a number of existing CFD techniques in order to create a tool which is integrated within the design process. PHOENICS is used in the heart of the system in order to produce predictions of transient (light-off) and steady state catalyst performance. Grid generation tools have been provided to allow simplified and rapid geometry definition with suitable integration (via FEMGEN) within other parts of the catalyst design process. Simplified input techniques have been provided along with associated translators to create specification of the model for PHOENICS. Post-processing software has been provided through FEMVIEW to allow visualisation of catalyst monolith variables and transient performance animation. The whole system is controlled via a menu. The system have been use to study the effects of the catalyst design parameters on the converter performance. The results obtained using the system have so far been more qualitative than quantitative. However, validation studies have been carried out to check pressure drop prediction. A new model for the pressure drop over a metallic monolith has been developed. (author)

  8. Catalytic properties and biomedical applications of cerium oxide nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Walkey, Carl D.; Das, Soumen C.; Seal, Sudipta; Erlichman, Joseph S.; Heckman, Karin L.; Ghibelli, Lina; Traversa, Enrico; McGinnis, James F.; Self, William Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) have shown promise as catalytic antioxidants in the test tube, cell culture models and animal models of disease. However given the reactivity that is well established at the surface of these nanoparticles, the biological utilization of nanoceria as a therapeutic still poses many challenges. Moreover the form that these particles take in a biological environment, such as the changes that can occur due to a protein corona, are not well established. This review aims to summarize the existing literature on biological use of nanoceria, and to raise questions about what further study is needed to apply this interesting catalytic material to biomedical applications. These questions include: 1) How does preparation, exposure dose, route and experimental model influence the reported effects of nanoceria in animal studies? 2) What are the considerations to develop nanoceria as a therapeutic agent in regards to these parameters? 3) What biological targets of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are relevant to this targeting, and how do these properties also influence the safety of these nanomaterials?

  9. Catalytic properties and biomedical applications of cerium oxide nanoparticles

    KAUST Repository

    Walkey, Carl D.

    2014-11-10

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) have shown promise as catalytic antioxidants in the test tube, cell culture models and animal models of disease. However given the reactivity that is well established at the surface of these nanoparticles, the biological utilization of nanoceria as a therapeutic still poses many challenges. Moreover the form that these particles take in a biological environment, such as the changes that can occur due to a protein corona, are not well established. This review aims to summarize the existing literature on biological use of nanoceria, and to raise questions about what further study is needed to apply this interesting catalytic material to biomedical applications. These questions include: 1) How does preparation, exposure dose, route and experimental model influence the reported effects of nanoceria in animal studies? 2) What are the considerations to develop nanoceria as a therapeutic agent in regards to these parameters? 3) What biological targets of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are relevant to this targeting, and how do these properties also influence the safety of these nanomaterials?

  10. Multi-stage selective catalytic reduction of NOx in lean burn engine exhaust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penetrante, B.M.; Hsaio, M.C.; Merritt, B.T.; Vogtlin, G.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Many studies suggest that the conversion of NO to NO{sub 2} is an important intermediate step in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} to N{sub 2}. Some effort has been devoted to separating the oxidative and reductive functions of the catalyst in a multi-stage system. This method works fine for systems that require hydrocarbon addition. The hydrocarbon has to be injected between the NO oxidation catalyst and the NO{sub 2} reduction catalyst; otherwise, the first-stage oxidation catalyst will also oxidize the hydrocarbon and decrease its effectiveness as a reductant. The multi-stage catalytic scheme is appropriate for diesel engine exhausts since they contain insufficient hydrocarbons for SCR, and the hydrocarbons can be added at the desired location. For lean-burn gasoline engine exhausts, the hydrocarbons already present in the exhausts will make it necessary to find an oxidation catalyst that can oxidize NO to NO{sub 2} but not oxidize the hydrocarbon. A plasma can also be used to oxidize NO to NO{sub 2}. Plasma oxidation has several advantages over catalytic oxidation. Plasma-assisted catalysis can work well for both diesel engine and lean-burn gasoline engine exhausts. This is because the plasma can oxidize NO in the presence of hydrocarbons without degrading the effectiveness of the hydrocarbon as a reductant for SCR. In the plasma, the hydrocarbon enhances the oxidation of NO, minimizes the electrical energy requirement, and prevents the oxidation of SO{sub 2}. This paper discusses the use of multi-stage systems for selective catalytic reduction of NO{sub x}. The multi-stage catalytic scheme is compared to the plasma-assisted catalytic scheme.

  11. FY 1999 R and D project on the global environmental industry technology. Report on the results of the R and D on the catalytic hydrogenation use CO2 fixation/effective utilization technology; 1999 nendo sesshoku suisoka hanno riyo nisanka tanso seika hokokusho. Koteika yuko riyo gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    For the purpose of reducing CO2 emitting together with the consumption of fossil fuels, study was conducted on the use of CO2 by converting it to chemical substances such as methanol, etc., and the FY 1999 results were outlined. In the development of the CO2 separation membrane technology, data were obtained on effects of scaling-up by module with a membrane area of 4.9m{sup 2} and on design conditions. Further, in the experiment using mock exhaust gas, it was confirmed that the performance had been kept up for 3,000 hours or more. In the development of catalytic hydrogenation technology, the basic data for enlargement were accumulated. Moreover, the activity stabilized about 18,000 hours was confirmed, and the catalytic life was estimated at more than 3 years. In the development of large quantity hydrogen production/supply technology, assembly/operation of 7,500cm{sup 2} x 6 electrolytic cells were conducted, and it was confirmed that the hydrogen production capacity per cell was 3Nm{sup 3}/h. The final target for enlargement was achieved. In the study of the total system, the conceptual design was made for 'high concentration CO2 containing natural gas use CO2 recovery utilization system,' and 'biomass resource use methanol synthesis system.' (NEDO)

  12. FY 1999 R and D project on the global environmental industry technology. Report on the results of the R and D on the catalytic hydrogenation use CO2 fixation/effective utilization technology; 1999 nendo sesshoku suisoka hanno riyo nisanka tanso seika hokokusho. Koteika yuko riyo gijutsu kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    For the purpose of reducing CO2 emitting together with the consumption of fossil fuels, study was conducted on the use of CO2 by converting it to chemical substances such as methanol, etc., and the FY 1999 results were outlined. In the development of the CO2 separation membrane technology, data were obtained on effects of scaling-up by module with a membrane area of 4.9m{sup 2} and on design conditions. Further, in the experiment using mock exhaust gas, it was confirmed that the performance had been kept up for 3,000 hours or more. In the development of catalytic hydrogenation technology, the basic data for enlargement were accumulated. Moreover, the activity stabilized about 18,000 hours was confirmed, and the catalytic life was estimated at more than 3 years. In the development of large quantity hydrogen production/supply technology, assembly/operation of 7,500cm{sup 2} x 6 electrolytic cells were conducted, and it was confirmed that the hydrogen production capacity per cell was 3Nm{sup 3}/h. The final target for enlargement was achieved. In the study of the total system, the conceptual design was made for 'high concentration CO2 containing natural gas use CO2 recovery utilization system,' and 'biomass resource use methanol synthesis system.' (NEDO)

  13. Enhanced catalytic activity without the use of an external light source using microwave-synthesized CuO nanopetals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govinda Lakhotiya

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available We report enhanced catalytic activity of CuO nanopetals synthesized by microwave-assisted wet chemical synthesis. The catalytic reaction of CuO nanopetals and H2O2 was studied with the application of external light source and also under dark conditions for the degradation of the hazardous dye methylene blue. The CuO nanopetals showed significant catalytic activity for the fast degradation of methylene blue and rhodamine B (RhB under dark conditions, without the application of an external light source. This increased catalytic activity was attributed to the co-operative role of H2O2 and the large specific surface area (≈40 m2·g−1 of the nanopetals. We propose a detail mechanism for this fast degradation. A separate study of the effect of different H2O2 concentrations for the degradation of methylene blue under dark conditions is also illustrated.

  14. The Catalytic Activity of Modified Zeolite Lanthanum on the Catalytic Cracking of Al-Duara Atmospheric Distillation Residue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Khalifa Esgair

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric residue fluid catalytic cracking was selected as a probe reaction to test the catalytic performance of modified NaY zeolites and prepared NaY zeolites. Modified NaY zeolites have been synthesized by simple ion exchange methods. Three samples of modified zeolite Y have been obtained by replacing the sodium ions in the original sample with lanthanum and the weight percent added are 0.28, 0.53, and 1.02 respectively. The effects of addition of lanthanum to zeolite Y in different weight percent on the cracking catalysts were investigated using an experimental laboratory plant scale of fluidized bed reactor. The experiments have been performed with weight hourly space velocity (WHSV range of 6 to 24 h-1, and the range of temperature from 450 to 510 oC. The activity of the catalyst with 1.02 wt% lanthanum has been shown to be much greater than that of the sample parent NaY. Also it was observed that the addition of the lanthanum causes an increase in the thermal stability of the zeolite.

  15. Engineering Metallic Nanoparticles for Enhancing and Probing Catalytic Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Gillian; Holmes, Justin D

    2016-07-01

    Recent developments in tailoring the structural and chemical properties of colloidal metal nanoparticles (NPs) have led to significant enhancements in catalyst performance. Controllable colloidal synthesis has also allowed tailor-made NPs to serve as mechanistic probes for catalytic processes. The innovative use of colloidal NPs to gain fundamental insights into catalytic function will be highlighted across a variety of catalytic and electrocatalytic applications. The engineering of future heterogenous catalysts is also moving beyond size, shape and composition considerations. Advancements in understanding structure-property relationships have enabled incorporation of complex features such as tuning surface strain to influence the behavior of catalytic NPs. Exploiting plasmonic properties and altering colloidal surface chemistry through functionalization are also emerging as important areas for rational design of catalytic NPs. This news article will highlight the key developments and challenges to the future design of catalytic NPs. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Catalytic cracking models developed for predictive control purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dag Ljungqvist

    1993-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with state-space modeling issues in the context of model-predictive control, with application to catalytic cracking. Emphasis is placed on model establishment, verification and online adjustment. Both the Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC and the Residual Catalytic Cracking (RCC units are discussed. Catalytic cracking units involve complex interactive processes which are difficult to operate and control in an economically optimal way. The strong nonlinearities of the FCC process mean that the control calculation should be based on a nonlinear model with the relevant constraints included. However, the model can be simple compared to the complexity of the catalytic cracking plant. Model validity is ensured by a robust online model adjustment strategy. Model-predictive control schemes based on linear convolution models have been successfully applied to the supervisory dynamic control of catalytic cracking units, and the control can be further improved by the SSPC scheme.

  17. Catalytic oxidation of soot over alkaline niobates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecchi, G.; Cabrera, B.; Buljan, A.; Delgado, E.J.; Gordon, A.L.; Jimenez, R.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► No previous reported studies about alkaline niobates as catalysts for soot oxidation. ► NaNbO 3 and KNbO 3 perovskite-type oxides show lower activation energy than other lanthanoid perovskite-type oxides. ► The alkaline niobate does not show deactivation by metal loss. - Abstract: The lack of studies in the current literature about the assessment of alkaline niobates as catalysts for soot oxidation has motivated this research. In this study, the synthesis, characterization and assessment of alkaline metal niobates as catalysts for soot combustion are reported. The solids MNbO 3 (M = Li, Na, K, Rb) are synthesized by a citrate method, calcined at 450 °C, 550 °C, 650 °C, 750 °C, and characterized by AAS, N 2 adsorption, XRD, O 2 -TPD, FTIR and SEM. All the alkaline niobates show catalytic activity for soot combustion, and the activity depends basically on the nature of the alkaline metal and the calcination temperature. The highest catalytic activity, expressed as the temperature at which combustion of carbon black occurs at the maximum rate, is shown by KNbO 3 calcined at 650 °C. At this calcination temperature, the catalytic activity follows an order dependent on the atomic number, namely: KNbO 3 > NaNbO 3 > LiNbO 3 . The RbNbO 3 solid do not follow this trend presumably due to the perovskite structure was not reached. The highest catalytic activity shown by of KNbO 3 , despite the lower apparent activation energy of NaNbO 3 , stress the importance of the metal nature and suggests the hypothesis that K + ions are the active sites for soot combustion. It must be pointed out that alkaline niobate subjected to consecutive soot combustion cycles does not show deactivation by metal loss, due to the stabilization of the alkaline metal inside the perovskite structure.

  18. Tritium stripping by a catalytic exchange stripper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heung, L.K.; Gibson, G.W.; Ortman, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    A catalytic exchange process for stripping elemental tritium from gas streams has been demonstrated. The process uses a catalyzed isotopic exchange reaction between tritium in the gas phase and protium or deuterium in the solid phase on alumina. The reaction is catalyzed by platinum deposited on the alumina. The process has been tested with both tritium and deuterium. Decontamination factors (ration of inlet and outlet tritium concentrations) as high as 1000 have been achieved, depending on inlet concentration. The test results and some demonstrated applications are presented

  19. Plasma-catalytic reforming of liquid hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedybaliuk, O.A.; Chernyak, V.Ya; Kolgan, V.V.; Iukhymenko, V.V.; Solomenko, O.V.; Fedirchyk, I.I.; Martysh, E.V.; Demchina, V.P.; Klochok, N.V.; Dragnev, S.V.

    2015-01-01

    The series of experiments studying the plasma-catalytic reforming of liquid hydrocarbons was carried out. The dynamic plasma-liquid system based on a low-power rotating gliding arc with solid electrodes was used for the investigation of liquid hydrocarbons reforming process. Conversion was done via partial oxidation. A part of oxidant flow was activated by the discharge. Synthesis-gas composition was analysed by means of mass-spectrometry and gas-chromatography. A standard boiler, which operates on natural gas and LPG, was used for the burning of synthesis-gas

  20. Methane combustion in catalytic premixed burners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerri, I.; Saracco, G.; Specchia, V.

    1999-01-01

    Catalytic premixed burners for domestic boiler applications were developed with the aim of achieving a power modularity from 10 to 100% and pollutant emissions limited to NO x 2 , where the combustion took place entirely inside the burner heating it to incandescence and allowing a decrease in the flame temperature and NO x emissions. Such results were confirmed through further tests carried out in a commercial industrial-scale boiler equipped with the conical panels. All the results, by varying the excess air and the heat power employed, are presented and discussed [it