WorldWideScience

Sample records for catalytic domain regulate

  1. Structural determinants of APOBEC3B non-catalytic domain for molecular assembly and catalytic regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xiao; Yang, Hanjing; Arutiunian, Vagan; Fang, Yao; Besse, Guillaume; Morimoto, Cherie; Zirkle, Brett; Chen, Xiaojiang S. (USC)

    2017-05-30

    The catalytic activity of human cytidine deaminase APOBEC3B (A3B) has been correlated with kataegic mutational patterns within multiple cancer types. The molecular basis of how the N-terminal non-catalytic CD1 regulates the catalytic activity and consequently, biological function of A3B remains relatively unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of a soluble human A3B-CD1 variant and delineate several structural elements of CD1 involved in molecular assembly, nucleic acid interactions and catalytic regulation of A3B. We show that (i) A3B expressed in human cells exists in hypoactive high-molecular-weight (HMW) complexes, which can be activated without apparent dissociation into low-molecular-weight (LMW) species after RNase A treatment. (ii) Multiple surface hydrophobic residues of CD1 mediate the HMW complex assembly and affect the catalytic activity, including one tryptophan residue W127 that likely acts through regulating nucleic acid binding. (iii) One of the highly positively charged surfaces on CD1 is involved in RNA-dependent attenuation of A3B catalysis. (iv) Surface hydrophobic residues of CD1 are involved in heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) binding to A3B. The structural and biochemical insights described here suggest that unique structural features on CD1 regulate the molecular assembly and catalytic activity of A3B through distinct mechanisms.

  2. The non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin regulate its abundance and microtubule-disassembly activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle D Grode

    Full Text Available Microtubule severing is a biochemical reaction that generates an internal break in a microtubule and regulation of microtubule severing is critical for cellular processes such as ciliogenesis, morphogenesis, and meiosis and mitosis. Katanin is a conserved heterodimeric ATPase that severs and disassembles microtubules, but the molecular determinants for regulation of microtubule severing by katanin remain poorly defined. Here we show that the non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin regulate its abundance and activity in living cells. Our data indicate that the microtubule-interacting and trafficking (MIT domain and adjacent linker region of the Drosophila katanin catalytic subunit Kat60 cooperate to regulate microtubule severing in two distinct ways. First, the MIT domain and linker region of Kat60 decrease its abundance by enhancing its proteasome-dependent degradation. The Drosophila katanin regulatory subunit Kat80, which is required to stabilize Kat60 in cells, conversely reduces the proteasome-dependent degradation of Kat60. Second, the MIT domain and linker region of Kat60 augment its microtubule-disassembly activity by enhancing its association with microtubules. On the basis of our data, we propose that the non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin serve as the principal sites of integration of regulatory inputs, thereby controlling its ability to sever and disassemble microtubules.

  3. Catalytic properties of ADAM12 and its domain deletion mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jonas; Visse, Robert; Sørensen, Hans Peter

    2008-01-01

    restricted specificity but a consensus sequence could not be defined as its subsite requirements are promiscuous. Kinetic analysis revealed that the noncatalytic C-terminal domains are important regulators of Cm-Tf activity and that ADAM12-PC consisting of the pro domain and catalytic domain is the most...

  4. Mutational analysis of a ras catalytic domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, B M; Papageorge, A G; Kung, H F

    1986-01-01

    transformation of NIH 3T3 cells with approximately the same efficiency as the wild-type v-rasH gene to those that failed to induce any detectable morphologic changes. Correlation of transforming activity with the location of the mutations enabled us to identify three nonoverlapping segments within the catalytic......We used linker insertion-deletion mutagenesis to study the catalytic domain of the Harvey murine sarcoma virus v-rasH transforming protein, which is closely related to the cellular rasH protein. The mutants displayed a wide range of in vitro biological activity, from those that induced focal...... localization. We speculate that this latter region interacts with the putative cellular target of ras. The results suggest that transforming ras proteins require membrane localization, guanosine nucleotide binding, and an additional undefined function that may represent interaction with their target....

  5. Modulation of catalytic activity in multi-domain protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalima L Madan

    Full Text Available Signaling mechanisms involving protein tyrosine phosphatases govern several cellular and developmental processes. These enzymes are regulated by several mechanisms which include variation in the catalytic turnover rate based on redox stimuli, subcellular localization or protein-protein interactions. In the case of Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases (RPTPs containing two PTP domains, phosphatase activity is localized in their membrane-proximal (D1 domains, while the membrane-distal (D2 domain is believed to play a modulatory role. Here we report our analysis of the influence of the D2 domain on the catalytic activity and substrate specificity of the D1 domain using two Drosophila melanogaster RPTPs as a model system. Biochemical studies reveal contrasting roles for the D2 domain of Drosophila Leukocyte antigen Related (DLAR and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase on Drosophila chromosome band 99A (PTP99A. While D2 lowers the catalytic activity of the D1 domain in DLAR, the D2 domain of PTP99A leads to an increase in the catalytic activity of its D1 domain. Substrate specificity, on the other hand, is cumulative, whereby the individual specificities of the D1 and D2 domains contribute to the substrate specificity of these two-domain enzymes. Molecular dynamics simulations on structural models of DLAR and PTP99A reveal a conformational rationale for the experimental observations. These studies reveal that concerted structural changes mediate inter-domain communication resulting in either inhibitory or activating effects of the membrane distal PTP domain on the catalytic activity of the membrane proximal PTP domain.

  6. Structural and biochemical characterization of the Clostridium perfringens autolysin catalytic domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, Eiji; Sekiya, Hiroshi; Goda, Eri; Makihata, Nahomi; Maki, Jun; Yoshida, Hiromi; Kamitori, Shigehiro

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial autolysins can partially hydrolyze cell wall peptidoglycans into small sections to regulate cell separation/division and the growth phase. Clostridium perfringens autolysin (Acp) has an N-terminal cell wall-binding domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain with glucosaminidase activity that belongs to the glycoside hydrolase 73 family. Here, we determined the X-ray structure of the Acp catalytic domain (AcpCD) at 1.76 Å resolution. AcpCD has a unique crescent-shaped structure, forming a deep groove for substrate-binding at the center of the protein. The modeling study of the enzyme/substrate complex demonstrated that the length of the substrate-binding groove is closely related to the glucosaminidase activity. Mutagenesis analysis showed that AcpCD likely adopts a neighboring-group mechanism for the catalytic reaction. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  7. The second catalytic domain of protein tyrosine phosphatase delta (PTP delta) binds to and inhibits the first catalytic domain of PTP sigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, M J; Fladd, C; Batt, J; Rotin, D

    1998-05-01

    The LAR family protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), including LAR, PTP delta, and PTP sigma, are transmembrane proteins composed of a cell adhesion molecule-like ectodomain and two cytoplasmic catalytic domains: active D1 and inactive D2. We performed a yeast two-hybrid screen with the first catalytic domain of PTP sigma (PTP sigma-D1) as bait to identify interacting regulatory proteins. Using this screen, we identified the second catalytic domain of PTP delta (PTP delta-D2) as an interactor of PTP sigma-D1. Both yeast two-hybrid binding assays and coprecipitation from mammalian cells revealed strong binding between PTP sigma-D1 and PTP delta-D2, an association which required the presence of the wedge sequence in PTP sigma-D1, a sequence recently shown to mediate D1-D1 homodimerization in the phosphatase RPTP alpha. This interaction was not reciprocal, as PTP delta-D1 did not bind PTP sigma-D2. Addition of a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-PTP delta-D2 fusion protein (but not GST alone) to GST-PTP sigma-D1 led to approximately 50% inhibition of the catalytic activity of PTP sigma-D1, as determined by an in vitro phosphatase assay against p-nitrophenylphosphate. A similar inhibition of PTP sigma-D1 activity was obtained with coimmunoprecipitated PTP delta-D2. Interestingly, the second catalytic domains of LAR (LAR-D2) and PTP sigma (PTP sigma-D2), very similar in sequence to PTP delta-D2, bound poorly to PTP sigma-D1. PTP delta-D1 and LAR-D1 were also able to bind PTP delta-D2, but more weakly than PTP sigma-D1, with a binding hierarchy of PTP sigma-D1 > PTP delta-D1 > LAR-D1. These results suggest that association between PTP sigma-D1 and PTP delta-D2, possibly via receptor heterodimerization, provides a negative regulatory function and that the second catalytic domains of this and likely other receptor PTPs, which are often inactive, may function instead to regulate the activity of the first catalytic domains.

  8. Crystal Structure of the Catalytic Domain of a Serine Threonine Protein Phosphatase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinglel, Mark; Honkanel, Richard; Ciszak, Ewa

    2003-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues is a well-recognized mechanism in eukaryotic cells for the regulation of cell-cycle progression, cell growth and metabolism. Human serine/threonine phosphatases can be placed into two major families, PPP and PPM. To date the structure on one PPP family member (PPl) has been determined. Here we present the structure of a 323-residue catalytic domain of a second phosphatase belonging to the PPP family of enzyme. catalytic domain of the enzyme has been determined to 1.60Angstrom resolution and refined to R=17.5 and Rfree = 20.8%. The catalytic domain possesses a unique fold consisting of a largely monolithic structure, divisible into closely-associated helical and sheet regions. The catalytic site contains two manganese ions that are involved in substrate binding and catalysis. The enzyme crystallizes as a dimer that completely buries catalytic surfaces of both monomers, Also, the structure shows evidence of some flexibility around the active site cleft that may be related to substrate specificity of this enzyme.

  9. A computational model for predicting integrase catalytic domain of retrovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Sijia; Han, Jiuqiang; Zhang, Xinman; Zhong, Dexing; Liu, Ruiling

    2017-06-21

    Integrase catalytic domain (ICD) is an essential part in the retrovirus for integration reaction, which enables its newly synthesized DNA to be incorporated into the DNA of infected cells. Owing to the crucial role of ICD for the retroviral replication and the absence of an equivalent of integrase in host cells, it is comprehensible that ICD is a promising drug target for therapeutic intervention. However, annotated ICDs in UniProtKB database have still been insufficient for a good understanding of their statistical characteristics so far. Accordingly, it is of great importance to put forward a computational ICD model in this work to annotate these domains in the retroviruses. The proposed model then discovered 11,660 new putative ICDs after scanning sequences without ICD annotations. Subsequently in order to provide much confidence in ICD prediction, it was tested under different cross-validation methods, compared with other database search tools, and verified on independent datasets. Furthermore, an evolutionary analysis performed on the annotated ICDs of retroviruses revealed a tight connection between ICD and retroviral classification. All the datasets involved in this paper and the application software tool of this model can be available for free download at https://sourceforge.net/projects/icdtool/files/?source=navbar. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Fluorescent fusion proteins of soluble guanylyl cyclase indicate proximity of the heme nitric oxide domain and catalytic domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Haase

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To examine the structural organisation of heterodimeric soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET was measured between fluorescent proteins fused to the amino- and carboxy-terminal ends of the sGC beta1 and alpha subunits. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cyan fluorescent protein (CFP was used as FRET donor and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP as FRET acceptor. After generation of recombinant baculovirus, fluorescent-tagged sGC subunits were co-expressed in Sf9 cells. Fluorescent variants of sGC were analyzed in vitro in cytosolic fractions by sensitized emission FRET. Co-expression of the amino-terminally tagged alpha subunits with the carboxy-terminally tagged beta1 subunit resulted in an enzyme complex that showed a FRET efficiency of 10% similar to fluorescent proteins separated by a helix of only 48 amino acids. Because these findings indicated that the amino-terminus of the alpha subunits is close to the carboxy-terminus of the beta1 subunit we constructed fusion proteins where both subunits are connected by a fluorescent protein. The resulting constructs were not only fluorescent, they also showed preserved enzyme activity and regulation by NO. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on the ability of an amino-terminal fragment of the beta1 subunit to inhibit activity of an heterodimer consisting only of the catalytic domains (alphacatbetacat, Winger and Marletta (Biochemistry 2005, 44:4083-90 have proposed a direct interaction of the amino-terminal region of beta1 with the catalytic domains. In support of such a concept of "trans" regulation of sGC activity by the H-NOX domains our results indicate that the domains within sGC are organized in a way that allows for direct interaction of the amino-terminal regulatory domains with the carboxy-terminal catalytic region. In addition, we constructed "fluorescent-conjoined" sGC's by fusion of the alpha amino-terminus to the beta1 carboxy-terminus leading to a

  11. Comprehensive Characterization of AMP-activated Protein Kinase Catalytic Domain by Top-down Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Deyang; Peng, Ying; Ayaz-Guner, Serife; Gregorich, Zachery R.; Ge, Ying

    2015-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is essential in regulating energy metabolism in all eukaryotic cells. It is a heterotrimeric protein complex composed of a catalytic subunit (α) and two regulatory subunits (β and γ. C-terminal truncation of AMPKα at residue 312 yielded a protein that is active upon phosphorylation of Thr172 in the absence of β and γ subunits, which is refered to as the AMPK catalytic domain and commonly used to substitute for the AMPK heterotrimeric complex in in vitro kinase assays. However, a comprehensive characterization of the AMPK catalytic domain is lacking. Herein, we expressed a His-tagged human AMPK catalytic domin (denoted as AMPKΔ) in E. coli, comprehensively characterized AMPKΔ in its basal state and after in vitro phosphorylation using top-down mass spectrometry (MS), and assessed how phosphorylation of AMPKΔ affects its activity. Unexpectedly, we found that bacterially-expressed AMPKΔ was basally phosphorylated and localized the phosphorylation site to the His-tag. We found that AMPKΔ has noticeable basal activity and was capable of phosphorylating itself and its substrates without activating phosphorylation at Thr172. Moreover, our data suggested that Thr172 is the only site phosphorylated by its upstream kinase, liver kinase B1, and that this phosphorylation dramatically increases the kinase activity of AMPKΔ. Importantly, we demonstrated that top-down MS in conjunction with in vitro phosphorylation assay is a powerful approach for monitoring phosphorylation reaction and determining sequential order of phosphorylation events in kinase-substrate systems. PMID:26489410

  12. The NMR structure of the inhibited catalytic domain of human stromelysin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooley, P R; O'Connell, J F; Marcy, A I; Cuca, G C; Salowe, S P; Bush, B L; Hermes, J D; Esser, C K; Hagmann, W K; Springer, J P

    1994-02-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the catalytic domain of stromelysin-1 complexed with an N-carboxyl alkyl inhibitor has been determined by NMR methods. The global fold consists of three helices, a five stranded beta-sheet and a methionine located in a turn near the catalytic histidines, classifying stromelysin-1 as a metzincin. Stromelysin-1 is unique in having two independent zinc binding sites: a catalytic site and a structural site. The inhibitor binds in an extended conformation. The S1' subsite is a deep hydrophobic pocket, whereas S2' appears shallow and S3' open.

  13. Effects of domains modification on the catalytic potential of chitinase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lin; Chen, Junpeng; Kumar, Ashok; Liu, Ziduo

    2015-07-01

    Chitinase, an important enzyme in chitin-degrading, have extensive biophysiological functions and immense potential applications. Here, a chitinase gene pachi was cloned from Pseudomonas aeruginosa and overexpressed in E. coli (DE3). The structural analysis showed that chitinase pachi consists of catalytic domain (CHC), chitin binding domain (CBD) and both of these are linked by connective domain (FN3). In this study, Pachi displayed optimal activity at temperature 65 °C and pH 6.5. To understand the structural and functional relationship of chitin-binding domain with catalytic domain, two mutants, CHA (without CBD) and CBD+FN3-pachi with additional CBD have been constructed. Though the results showed that the two mutants have similar characteristics with Pachi, it is interesting to note that the deficiency of CBD caused an increase in expression level as well as solubility of the CHA. Moreover, the catalytic efficiency of CHA was increased 1.26-fold and substrate affinity in the absence of CBD was decreased 1.85-fold. Thus, the improved solubility and activity of CHA by domain deficiency is an interesting pathway to study the relationship of structure and function of chitinase and support its potential use in commercial applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the Pasteurella multocida toxin catalytic domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazawa, Masayuki [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamada-oka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kitadokoro, Kengo [Research Center for Low Temperature and Materials Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kamitani, Shigeki; Shime, Hiroaki; Horiguchi, Yasuhiko, E-mail: horiguti@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamada-oka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2006-09-01

    The C-terminal catalytic domain of P. multocida toxin, which is the virulence factor of the organism in P. multocida, has been expressed, purified and subsequently crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique. The C-terminal catalytic domain of Pasteurella multocida toxin, which is the virulence factor of the organism in P. multocida, has been expressed, purified and subsequently crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique. Native diffraction data to 1.9 Å resolution were obtained at the BL44XU beamline of SPring-8 from a flash-frozen crystal at 100 K. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 111.0, b = 150.4, c = 77.1 Å, β = 105.5°, and are likely to contain one C-PMT (726 residues) per asymmetric unit.

  15. Interactions of a Pop5/Rpp1 heterodimer with the catalytic domain of RNase MRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perederina, Anna; Khanova, Elena; Quan, Chao; Berezin, Igor; Esakova, Olga; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2011-10-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a multicomponent ribonucleoprotein complex closely related to RNase P. RNase MRP and eukaryotic RNase P share most of their protein components, as well as multiple features of their catalytic RNA moieties, but have distinct substrate specificities. While RNase P is practically universally found in all three domains of life, RNase MRP is essential in eukaryotes. The structural organizations of eukaryotic RNase P and RNase MRP are poorly understood. Here, we show that Pop5 and Rpp1, protein components found in both RNase P and RNase MRP, form a heterodimer that binds directly to the conserved area of the putative catalytic domain of RNase MRP RNA. The Pop5/Rpp1 binding site corresponds to the protein binding site in bacterial RNase P RNA. Structural and evolutionary roles of the Pop5/Rpp1 heterodimer in RNases P and MRP are discussed.

  16. Crystal structure of catalytic domain of the initiation factor 2B epsilon subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Thomas; Mohammad, Sarah S.; Pavitt, Graham D.

    , UMIST, PO Box 88, Manchester, M60 1QD, UK Eukaryotic initiation factor 2B (eIF2B) is the exchange factor of initiation factor 2 (eIF2) and catalyses the reaction where GDP bound to eIF2 is exchanged for GTP, a crucial step in translation. The crystal structure of the C-terminal catalytic domain of the e...

  17. Conformational flexibility of the complete catalytic domain of Cdc25B phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayegh, Raphael S R; Tamaki, Fabio K; Marana, Sandro R; Salinas, Roberto K; Arantes, Guilherme M

    2016-11-01

    Cdc25B phosphatases are involved in cell cycle checkpoints and have become a possible target for developing new anticancer drugs. A more rational design of Cdc25B ligands would benefit from detailed knowledge of its tertiary structure. The conformational flexibility of the C-terminal region of the Cdc25B catalytic domain has been debated recently and suggested to play an important structural role. Here, a combination of experimental NMR measurements and molecular dynamics simulations for the complete catalytic domain of the Cdc25B phosphatase is presented. The stability of the C-terminal α-helix is confirmed, but the last 20 residues in the complete catalytic domain are very flexible, partially occlude the active site and may establish transient contacts with the protein core. This flexibility in the C-terminal tail may modulate the molecular recognition of natural substrates and competitive inhibitors by Cdc25B. Proteins 2016; 84:1567-1575. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Endolysin of bacteriophage BFK20: evidence of a catalytic and a cell wall binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerova, Martina; Halgasova, Nora; Ugorcakova, Jana; Bukovska, Gabriela

    2011-08-01

    A gene product of ORF24' was identified on the genome of corynephage BFK20 as a putative phage endolysin. The protein of endolysin BFK20 (gp24') has a modular structure consisting of an N-terminal amidase_2 domain (gp24CD) and a C-terminal cell wall binding domain (gp24BD). The C-terminal domain is unrelated to any of the known cell wall binding domains of phage endolysins. The whole endolysin gene and the sequences of its N-terminal and C-terminal domains were cloned; proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The lytic activities of endolysin and its catalytic domain were demonstrated on corynebacteria and bacillus substrates. The binding activity of cell wall binding domain alone and in fusion with green fluorescent protein (gp24BD-GFP) were shown by specific binding assays to the cell surface of BFK20 host Brevibacterium flavum CCM 251 as well as those of other corynebacteria. 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Crystal Structure of Deinococcus radiodurans RecQ Helicase Catalytic Core Domain: The Interdomain Flexibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Chia Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available RecQ DNA helicases are key enzymes in the maintenance of genome integrity, and they have functions in DNA replication, recombination, and repair. In contrast to most RecQs, RecQ from Deinococcus radiodurans (DrRecQ possesses an unusual domain architecture that is crucial for its remarkable ability to repair DNA. Here, we determined the crystal structures of the DrRecQ helicase catalytic core and its ADP-bound form, revealing interdomain flexibility in its first RecA-like and winged-helix (WH domains. Additionally, the WH domain of DrRecQ is positioned in a different orientation from that of the E. coli RecQ (EcRecQ. These results suggest that the orientation of the protein during DNA-binding is significantly different when comparing DrRecQ and EcRecQ.

  20. GTP binding to the ROC domain of DAP-kinase regulates its function through intramolecular signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlessi, Rodrigo; Levin-Salomon, Vered; Ciprut, Sara; Bialik, Shani; Berissi, Hanna; Albeck, Shira; Peleg, Yoav; Kimchi, Adi

    2011-01-01

    Death-associated protein kinase (DAPk) was recently suggested by sequence homology to be a member of the ROCO family of proteins. Here, we show that DAPk has a functional ROC (Ras of complex proteins) domain that mediates homo-oligomerization and GTP binding through a defined P-loop motif. Upon binding to GTP, the ROC domain negatively regulates the catalytic activity of DAPk and its cellular effects. Mechanistically, GTP binding enhances an inhibitory autophosphorylation at a distal site that suppresses kinase activity. This study presents a new mechanism of intramolecular signal transduction, by which GTP binding operates in cis to affect the catalytic activity of a distal domain in the protein. PMID:21738225

  1. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the Pasteurella multocida toxin catalytic domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazawa, Masayuki; Kitadokoro, Kengo; Kamitani, Shigeki; Shime, Hiroaki; Horiguchi, Yasuhiko

    2006-09-01

    The C-terminal catalytic domain of Pasteurella multocida toxin, which is the virulence factor of the organism in P. multocida, has been expressed, purified and subsequently crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique. Native diffraction data to 1.9 A resolution were obtained at the BL44XU beamline of SPring-8 from a flash-frozen crystal at 100 K. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 111.0, b = 150.4, c = 77.1 A, beta = 105.5 degrees, and are likely to contain one C-PMT (726 residues) per asymmetric unit.

  2. Expression, purification and enzymatic characterization of the catalytic domains of human tryptophan hydroxylase isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windahl, Michael Skovbo; Boesen, Jane; Karlsen, Pernille Efferbach

    2009-01-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase exists in two isoforms: Isoform 1 catalyses the first and rate-limiting step in the synthesis of serotonin in the peripheral parts of the body while isoform 2 catalyses this step in the brain. The catalytic domains of human tryptophan hydroxylase 1 and 2 have been expressed......, purified and the kinetic properties have been studied and are compared. Substrate inhibition by tryptophan is observed for isoform 1 but not for isoform 2. Large differences are observed in the K m,tetrahydrobiopterin values for the two isoforms, being >10 times larger for isoform 1 compared to isoform 2....

  3. SH2-catalytic domain linker heterogeneity influences allosteric coupling across the SFK family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Register, A C; Leonard, Stephen E; Maly, Dustin J

    2014-11-11

    Src-family kinases (SFKs) make up a family of nine homologous multidomain tyrosine kinases whose misregulation is responsible for human disease (cancer, diabetes, inflammation, etc.). Despite overall sequence homology and identical domain architecture, differences in SH3 and SH2 regulatory domain accessibility and ability to allosterically autoinhibit the ATP-binding site have been observed for the prototypical SFKs Src and Hck. Biochemical and structural studies indicate that the SH2-catalytic domain (SH2-CD) linker, the intramolecular binding epitope for SFK SH3 domains, is responsible for allosterically coupling SH3 domain engagement to autoinhibition of the ATP-binding site through the conformation of the αC helix. As a relatively unconserved region between SFK family members, SH2-CD linker sequence variability across the SFK family is likely a source of nonredundant cellular functions between individual SFKs via its effect on the availability of SH3 and SH2 domains for intermolecular interactions and post-translational modification. Using a combination of SFKs engineered with enhanced or weakened regulatory domain intramolecular interactions and conformation-selective inhibitors that report αC helix conformation, this study explores how SH2-CD sequence heterogeneity affects allosteric coupling across the SFK family by examining Lyn, Fyn1, and Fyn2. Analyses of Fyn1 and Fyn2, isoforms that are identical but for a 50-residue sequence spanning the SH2-CD linker, demonstrate that SH2-CD linker sequence differences can have profound effects on allosteric coupling between otherwise identical kinases. Most notably, a dampened allosteric connection between the SH3 domain and αC helix leads to greater autoinhibitory phosphorylation by Csk, illustrating the complex effects of SH2-CD linker sequence on cellular function.

  4. Distribution and prediction of catalytic domains in 2-oxoglutarate dependent dioxygenases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kundu Siddhartha

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 2-oxoglutarate dependent superfamily is a diverse group of non-haem dioxygenases, and is present in prokaryotes, eukaryotes, and archaea. The enzymes differ in substrate preference and reaction chemistry, a factor that precludes their classification by homology studies and electronic annotation schemes alone. In this work, I propose and explore the rationale of using substrates to classify structurally similar alpha-ketoglutarate dependent enzymes. Findings Differential catalysis in phylogenetic clades of 2-OG dependent enzymes, is determined by the interactions of a subset of active-site amino acids. Identifying these with existing computational methods is challenging and not feasible for all proteins. A clustering protocol based on validated mechanisms of catalysis of known molecules, in tandem with group specific hidden markov model profiles is able to differentiate and sequester these enzymes. Access to this repository is by a web server that compares user defined unknown sequences to these pre-defined profiles and outputs a list of predicted catalytic domains. The server is free and is accessible at the following URL (http://comp-biol.theacms.in/H2OGpred.html. Conclusions The proposed stratification is a novel attempt at classifying and predicting 2-oxoglutarate dependent function. In addition, the server will provide researchers with a tool to compare their data to a comprehensive list of HMM profiles of catalytic domains. This work, will aid efforts by investigators to screen and characterize putative 2-OG dependent sequences. The profile database will be updated at regular intervals.

  5. Identification of residues in the heme domain of soluble guanylyl cyclase that are important for basal and stimulated catalytic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmamalini Baskaran

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide signals through activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC, a heme-containing heterodimer. NO binds to the heme domain located in the N-terminal part of the β subunit of sGC resulting in increased production of cGMP in the catalytic domain located at the C-terminal part of sGC. Little is known about the mechanism by which the NO signaling is propagated from the receptor domain (heme domain to the effector domain (catalytic domain, in particular events subsequent to the breakage of the bond between the heme iron and Histidine 105 (H105 of the β subunit. Our modeling of the heme-binding domain as well as previous homologous heme domain structures in different states point to two regions that could be critical for propagation of the NO activation signal. Structure-based mutational analysis of these regions revealed that residues T110 and R116 in the αF helix-β1 strand, and residues I41 and R40 in the αB-αC loop mediate propagation of activation between the heme domain and the catalytic domain. Biochemical analysis of these heme mutants allows refinement of the map of the residues that are critical for heme stability and propagation of the NO/YC-1 activation signal in sGC.

  6. Visualizing Dealumination of a Single Zeolite Domain in a Real-Life Catalytic Cracking Particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalirai, Sam; Paalanen, Pasi P; Wang, Jian; Meirer, Florian; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2016-09-05

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts play a central role in the chemical conversion of crude oil fractions. Using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) we investigate the chemistry of one fresh and two industrially deactivated (ECAT) FCC catalysts at the single zeolite domain level. Spectro-microscopic data at the Fe L3 , La M5 , and Al K X-ray absorption edges reveal differing levels of deposited Fe on the ECAT catalysts corresponding with an overall loss in tetrahedral Al within the zeolite domains. Using La as a localization marker, we have developed a novel methodology to map the changing Al distribution of single zeolite domains within real-life FCC catalysts. It was found that significant changes in the zeolite domain size distributions as well as the loss of Al from the zeolite framework occur. Furthermore, inter- and intraparticle heterogeneities in the dealumination process were observed, revealing the complex interplay between metal-mediated pore accessibility loss and zeolite dealumination. © 2016 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  7. The Arabidopsis thaliana proteome harbors undiscovered multi-domain molecules with functional guanylyl cyclase catalytic centers

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2013-07-08

    Background: Second messengers link external cues to complex physiological responses. One such messenger, 3\\',5\\'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), has been shown to play a key role in many physiological responses in plants. However, in higher plants, guanylyl cyclases (GCs), enzymes that generate cGMP from guanosine-5\\'-triphosphate (GTP) have remained elusive until recently. GC search motifs constructed from the alignment of known GCs catalytic centers form vertebrates and lower eukaryotes have led to the identification of a number of plant GCs that have been characterized in vitro and in vivo.Presentation of the hypothesis.Recently characterized GCs in Arabidopsis thaliana contributed to the development of search parameters that can identify novel candidate GCs in plants. We hypothesize that there are still a substantial number (> 40) of multi-domain molecules with potentially functional GC catalytic centers in plants that remain to be discovered and characterized. Testing the hypothesis. The hypothesis can be tested, firstly, by computational methods constructing 3D models of selected GC candidates using available crystal structures as templates. Homology modeling must include substrate docking that can provide support for the structural feasibility of the GC catalytic centers in those candidates. Secondly, recombinant peptides containing the GC domain need to be tested in in vitro GC assays such as the enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA) and/or in mass spectrometry based cGMP assays. In addition, quantification of in vivo cGMP transients with fluorescent cGMP-reporter assays in wild-type or selected mutants will help to elucidate the biological role of novel GCs.Implications of the hypothesis.If it turns out that plants do harbor a large number of functional GC domains as part of multi-domain enzymes, then major new insights will be gained into the complex signal transduction pathways that link cGMP to fundamental processes such as ion transport

  8. Catalytic and substrate promiscuity: distinct multiple chemistries catalysed by the phosphatase domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Bharath; Marks, Hanna; Mitra, Sreyoshi; Smalley, David M; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-07-15

    The presence of latent activities in enzymes is posited to underlie the natural evolution of new catalytic functions. However, the prevalence and extent of such substrate and catalytic ambiguity in evolved enzymes is difficult to address experimentally given the order-of-magnitude difference in the activities for native and, sometimes, promiscuous substrate/s. Further, such latent functions are of special interest when the activities concerned do not fall into the domain of substrate promiscuity. In the present study, we show a special case of such latent enzyme activity by demonstrating the presence of two mechanistically distinct reactions catalysed by the catalytic domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase isoform δ (PTPRδ). The primary catalytic activity involves the hydrolysis of a phosphomonoester bond (C─O─P) with high catalytic efficiency, whereas the secondary activity is the hydrolysis of a glycosidic bond (C─O─C) with poorer catalytic efficiency. This enzyme also displays substrate promiscuity by hydrolysing diester bonds while being highly discriminative for its monoester substrates. To confirm these activities, we also demonstrated their presence on the catalytic domain of protein tyrosine phosphatase Ω (PTPRΩ), a homologue of PTPRδ. Studies on the rate, metal-ion dependence, pH dependence and inhibition of the respective activities showed that they are markedly different. This is the first study that demonstrates a novel sugar hydrolase and diesterase activity for the phosphatase domain (PD) of PTPRδ and PTPRΩ. This work has significant implications for both understanding the evolution of enzymatic activity and the possible physiological role of this new chemistry. Our findings suggest that the genome might harbour a wealth of such alternative latent enzyme activities in the same protein domain that renders our knowledge of metabolic networks incomplete. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the

  9. Catalytic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Hanafi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of dealuminated Y-zeolites impregnated by 0.5 wt% Pt catalysts promoted by different amounts of Ni, Pd or Cr (0.3 and 0.6 wt% were prepared and characterized as hydrocracking catalysts. The physicochemical and structural characterization of the solid catalysts were investigated and reported through N2 physisorption, XRD, TGA-DSC, FT-IR and TEM techniques. Solid catalysts surface acidities were investigated through FT-IR spectroscopy aided by pyridine adsorption. The solid catalytic activities were evaluated through hydroconversion of n-hexane and n-heptane employing micro-catalytic pulse technique directly connected to a gas chromatograph analyzer. The thermal stability of the solids was also investigated up to 800 °C. Crystallinity studies using the XRD technique of all modified samples proved analogous to the parent Y-zeolite, exhibiting nearly an amorphous and microcrystalline character of the second metal oxides. Disclosure of bimetallic catalysts crystalline characterization, through XRD, was not viable. The nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms for all samples concluded type I adsorption isotherms, without any hysteresis loop, indicating that the entire pore system is composed of micropores. TEM micrographs of the solid catalysts demonstrate well-dispersed Pt, Ni and Cr nanoparticles having sizes of 2–4 nm and 7–8 nm, respectively. The catalytic activity results indicate that the bimetallic (0.5Pt–0.3Cr/D18H–Y catalyst is the most active towards n-hexane and n-heptane isomerization while (0.5Pt–0.6Ni/D18H–Y catalyst can be designed as most suitable as a cracking catalyst.

  10. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the initiation factor 2B epsilon subunit from saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Thomas; Pavitt, Graham D.; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    Crystal Structure of Catalytic Domain of the Initiation Factor 2B Epsilon Subunit from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Thomas Boesen1, Graham Pavitt2, and Gregers Rom Andersen1* 1Department of Molecular Biology, University of Aarhus, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, DK-8000 Århus C, Denmark 2Department...... Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been determined to 2.3 Å resolution by the multiple wavelength anomalous dispersion technique using selenomethionine substituted protein. The structure consists of two four helix bundles. The N-terminal four helix bundle contain the catalytic part of the domain, whereas the C...... of Biomolecular Sciences, UMIST, PO Box 88, Manchester, M60 1QD UK *To whom correspondence should be addressed: grand@imsb.au.dk, Tel: (+45) 8942 5024. Fax: (+45) 8612 3178 Abstract The crystal structure of the C-terminal catalytic domain of the initiation factor 2B epsilon subunit, residues 544-704, from...

  11. Catalytic and functional roles of conserved amino acids in the SET domain of the S. cerevisiae lysine methyltransferase Set1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Williamson

    Full Text Available In S. cerevisiae, the lysine methyltransferase Set1 is a member of the multiprotein complex COMPASS. Set1 catalyzes mono-, di- and trimethylation of the fourth residue, lysine 4, of histone H3 using methyl groups from S-adenosylmethionine, and requires a subset of COMPASS proteins for this activity. The methylation activity of COMPASS regulates gene expression and chromosome segregation in vivo. To improve understanding of the catalytic mechanism of Set1, single amino acid substitutions were made within the SET domain. These Set1 mutants were evaluated in vivo by determining the levels of K4-methylated H3, assaying the strength of gene silencing at the rDNA and using a genetic assessment of kinetochore function as a proxy for defects in Dam1 methylation. The findings indicate that no single conserved active site base is required for H3K4 methylation by Set1. Instead, our data suggest that a number of aromatic residues in the SET domain contribute to the formation of an active site that facilitates substrate binding and dictates product specificity. Further, the results suggest that the attributes of Set1 required for trimethylation of histone H3 are those required for Pol II gene silencing at the rDNA and kinetochore function.

  12. Classification of topological domains based on gene expression and regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jingjing; Shi, Hongbo; Ahituv, Nadav

    2013-07-01

    Tissue-specific gene expression is thought to be one of the major forces shaping mammalian gene order. A recent study that used whole-genome chromosome conformation assays has shown that the mammalian genome is divided into specific topological domains that are shared between different tissues and organisms. Here, we wanted to assess whether gene expression and regulation are involved in shaping these domains and can be used to classify them. We analyzed gene expression and regulation levels in these domains by using RNA-seq and enhancer-associated ChIP-seq datasets for 17 different mouse tissues. We found 162 domains that are active (high gene expression and regulation) in all 17 tissues. These domains are significantly shorter, contain less repeats, and have more housekeeping genes. In contrast, we found 29 domains that are inactive (low gene expression and regulation) in all analyzed tissues and are significantly longer, have more repeats, and gene deserts. Tissue-specific active domains showed some correlation with tissue-type and gene ontology. Domain temporal gene regulation and expression differences also displayed some gene ontology terms fitting their temporal function. Combined, our results provide a catalog of shared and tissue-specific topological domains and suggest that gene expression and regulation could have a role in shaping them.

  13. Direct binding of syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain to the catalytic domain of protein kinase C alpha (PKC alpha) increases focal adhesion localization of PKC alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, Ssang-Taek; Longley, Robert L; Couchman, John R

    2003-01-01

    alpha. Full-length PKC alpha weakly interacted with 4V by yeast two-hybrid assays, but PKC alpha constructs that lack the pseudosubstrate region or constructs of the whole catalytic domain interacted more strongly. A mutated 4V sequence (4V(YF): LGKKPIFKK) did not interact with PKC alpha, indicating...

  14. Dynamic interplay between catalytic and lectin domains of GalNAc-transferases modulates protein O-glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lira-Navarrete, Erandi; de Las Rivas, Matilde; Compañón, Ismael

    2015-01-01

    Protein O-glycosylation is controlled by polypeptide GalNAc-transferases (GalNAc-Ts) that uniquely feature both a catalytic and lectin domain. The underlying molecular basis of how the lectin domains of GalNAc-Ts contribute to glycopeptide specificity and catalysis remains unclear. Here we present...... the first crystal structures of complexes of GalNAc-T2 with glycopeptides that together with enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate a cooperative mechanism by which the lectin domain enables free acceptor sites binding of glycopeptides into the catalytic domain. Atomic force microscopy...... and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments further reveal a dynamic conformational landscape of GalNAc-T2 and a prominent role of compact structures that are both required for efficient catalysis. Our model indicates that the activity profile of GalNAc-T2 is dictated by conformational heterogeneity...

  15. Subdomain organization and catalytic residues of the F factor TraI relaxase domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Street, Lara M; Harley, Matthew J; Stern, Jennifer C; Larkin, Chris; Williams, Sarah L; Miller, Dana L; Dohm, Julie A; Rodgers, Michael E; Schildbach, Joel F

    2003-03-21

    TraI from conjugative plasmid F factor is both a "relaxase" that sequence-specifically binds and cleaves single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and a helicase that unwinds the plasmid during transfer. Using limited proteolysis of a TraI fragment, we generated a 36-kDa fragment (TraI36) retaining TraI ssDNA binding specificity and relaxase activity but lacking the ssDNA-dependent ATPase activity of the helicase. Further proteolytic digestion of TraI36 generates stable N-terminal 26-kDa (TraI26) and C-terminal 7-kDa fragments. Both TraI36 and TraI26 are stably folded and unfold in a highly cooperative manner, but TraI26 lacks affinity for ssDNA. Mutational analysis of TraI36 indicates that N-terminal residues Tyr(16) and Tyr(17) are required for efficient ssDNA cleavage but not for high-affinity ssDNA binding. Although the TraI36 N-terminus provides the relaxase catalytic residues, both N- and C-terminal structural domains participate in binding, suggesting that both domains combine to form the TraI relaxase active site.

  16. Catalytic properties of two Rhizopus oryzae 99-880 glucoamylase enzymes without starch binding domains expressed in Pichia pastoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalytic properties of the two glucoamylases, AmyC and AmyD, without starch binding domains from Rhizopus oryzae strain 99-880 were heterologously expressed and purified to homogeneity. AmyC and AmyD demonstrate pH optima of 5.5 and 6.0, respectively, nearly 1 unit higher than most fungal glucoamy...

  17. Catalytic and glycan-binding abilities of ppGalNAc-T2 are regulated by acetylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zlocowski, Natacha; Sendra, Victor G; Lorenz, Virginia

    2011-01-01

    transmembrane proteins having a Golgi lumenal region that contains a catalytic domain with glycosyltransferase activity, and a C-terminal R-type ("ricin-like") lectin domain. We investigated the effect of acetylation on catalytic activity of glycosyltransferase, and on fine carbohydrate-binding specificity...

  18. Crystal Structure of the Catalytic Domain of Drosophila [beta]1,4-Galactosyltransferase-7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Boopathy; Qasba, Pradman K. (NIH)

    2010-11-03

    The {beta}1,4-galactosyltransferase-7 ({beta}4Gal-T7) enzyme, one of seven members of the {beta}4Gal-T family, transfers in the presence of manganese Gal from UDP-Gal to an acceptor sugar (xylose) that is attached to a side chain hydroxyl group of Ser/Thr residues of proteoglycan proteins. It exhibits the least protein sequence similarity with the other family members, including the well studied family member {beta}4Gal-T1, which, in the presence of manganese, transfers Gal from UDP-Gal to GlcNAc. We report here the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of {beta}4Gal-T7 from Drosophila in the presence of manganese and UDP at 1.81 {angstrom} resolution. In the crystal structure, a new manganese ion-binding motif (HXH) has been observed. Superposition of the crystal structures of {beta}4Gal-T7 and {beta}4Gal-T1 shows that the catalytic pocket and the substrate-binding sites in these proteins are similar. Compared with GlcNAc, xylose has a hydroxyl group (instead of an N-acetyl group) at C2 and lacks the CH{sub 2}OH group at C5; thus, these protein structures show significant differences in their acceptor-binding site. Modeling of xylose in the acceptor-binding site of the {beta}4Gal-T7 crystal structure shows that the aromatic side chain of Tyr{sup 177} interacts strongly with the C5 atom of xylose, causing steric hindrance to any additional group at C5. Because Drosophila Cd7 has a 73% protein sequence similarity to human Cd7, the present crystal structure offers a structure-based explanation for the mutations in human Cd7 that have been linked to Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

  19. Structures of the human poly (ADP-ribose glycohydrolase catalytic domain confirm catalytic mechanism and explain inhibition by ADP-HPD derivatives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Tucker

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase (PARG is the only enzyme known to catalyse hydrolysis of the O-glycosidic linkages of ADP-ribose polymers, thereby reversing the effects of poly(ADP-ribose polymerases. PARG deficiency leads to cell death whilst PARG depletion causes sensitisation to certain DNA damaging agents, implicating PARG as a potential therapeutic target in several disease areas. Efforts to develop small molecule inhibitors of PARG activity have until recently been hampered by a lack of structural information on PARG. We have used a combination of bio-informatic and experimental approaches to engineer a crystallisable, catalytically active fragment of human PARG (hPARG. Here, we present high-resolution structures of the catalytic domain of hPARG in unliganded form and in complex with three inhibitors: ADP-ribose (ADPR, adenosine 5'-diphosphate (hydroxymethylpyrrolidinediol (ADP-HPD and 8-n-octyl-amino-ADP-HPD. Our structures confirm conservation of overall fold amongst mammalian PARG glycohydrolase domains, whilst revealing additional flexible regions in the catalytic site. These new structures rationalise a body of published mutational data and the reported structure-activity relationship for ADP-HPD based PARG inhibitors. In addition, we have developed and used biochemical, isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance assays to characterise the binding of inhibitors to our PARG protein, thus providing a starting point for the design of new inhibitors.

  20. A role for chromatin topology in imprinted domain regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, William A; Sachani, Saqib S; White, Carlee R; Mann, Mellissa R W

    2016-02-01

    Recently, many advancements in genome-wide chromatin topology and nuclear architecture have unveiled the complex and hidden world of the nucleus, where chromatin is organized into discrete neighbourhoods with coordinated gene expression. This includes the active and inactive X chromosomes. Using X chromosome inactivation as a working model, we utilized publicly available datasets together with a literature review to gain insight into topologically associated domains, lamin-associated domains, nucleolar-associating domains, scaffold/matrix attachment regions, and nucleoporin-associated chromatin and their role in regulating monoallelic expression. Furthermore, we comprehensively review for the first time the role of chromatin topology and nuclear architecture in the regulation of genomic imprinting. We propose that chromatin topology and nuclear architecture are important regulatory mechanisms for directing gene expression within imprinted domains. Furthermore, we predict that dynamic changes in chromatin topology and nuclear architecture play roles in tissue-specific imprint domain regulation during early development and differentiation.

  1. Dynamic interplay between catalytic and lectin domains of GalNAc-transferases modulates protein O-glycosylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira-Navarrete, Erandi; de las Rivas, Matilde; Compañón, Ismael; Pallarés, María Carmen; Kong, Yun; Iglesias-Fernández, Javier; Bernardes, Gonçalo J. L.; Peregrina, Jesús M.; Rovira, Carme; Bernadó, Pau; Bruscolini, Pierpaolo; Clausen, Henrik; Lostao, Anabel; Corzana, Francisco; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Protein O-glycosylation is controlled by polypeptide GalNAc-transferases (GalNAc-Ts) that uniquely feature both a catalytic and lectin domain. The underlying molecular basis of how the lectin domains of GalNAc-Ts contribute to glycopeptide specificity and catalysis remains unclear. Here we present the first crystal structures of complexes of GalNAc-T2 with glycopeptides that together with enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations demonstrate a cooperative mechanism by which the lectin domain enables free acceptor sites binding of glycopeptides into the catalytic domain. Atomic force microscopy and small-angle X-ray scattering experiments further reveal a dynamic conformational landscape of GalNAc-T2 and a prominent role of compact structures that are both required for efficient catalysis. Our model indicates that the activity profile of GalNAc-T2 is dictated by conformational heterogeneity and relies on a flexible linker located between the catalytic and the lectin domains. Our results also shed light on how GalNAc-Ts generate dense decoration of proteins with O-glycans. PMID:25939779

  2. The pseudokinase domain of JAK2 is a dual-specificity protein kinase that negatively regulates cytokine signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ungureanu, Daniela; Wu, Jinhua; Pekkala, Tuija

    2011-01-01

    Human JAK2 tyrosine kinase mediates signaling through numerous cytokine receptors. The JAK2 JH2 domain functions as a negative regulator and is presumed to be a catalytically inactive pseudokinase, but the mechanism(s) for its inhibition of JAK2 remains unknown. Mutations in JH2 lead to increased...... JAK2 activity, contributing to myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). Here we show that JH2 is a dual-specificity protein kinase that phosphorylates two negative regulatory sites in JAK2: Ser523 and Tyr570. Inactivation of JH2 catalytic activity increased JAK2 basal activity and downstream signaling...... mechanism to control basal activity and signaling of JAK2....

  3. Crystallization and X-ray diffraction analysis of a catalytic domain of hyperthermophilic chitinase from Pyrococcus furiosus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mine, Shouhei; Nakamura, Tsutomu [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Hirata, Kunio [RIKEN/SPring-8, Kouto 1-1-1, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Hagihara, Yoshihisa; Uegaki, Koichi, E-mail: k-uegaki@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan)

    2006-08-01

    The expression, purification and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a catalytic domain of a chitinase from P. furiosus is reported. The crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of a catalytic domain of chitinase (PF1233 gene) from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus is reported. The recombinant protein, prepared using an Escherichia coli expression system, was crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. An X-ray diffraction data set was collected at the undulator beamline BL44XU at SPring-8 to a resolution of 1.50 Å. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 90.0, b = 92.8, c = 107.2 Å.

  4. Regulation of Ack1 localization and activity by the amino-terminal SAM domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown Deborah A

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms that regulate the activity of the nonreceptor tyrosine kinase Ack1 (activated Cdc42-associated kinase are poorly understood. The amino-terminal region of Ack1 is predicted to contain a sterile alpha motif (SAM domain. SAM domains share a common fold and mediate protein-protein interactions in a wide variety of proteins. Here, we addressed the importance of the Ack1 SAM domain in kinase activity. Results We used immunofluorescence and Western blotting to show that Ack1 deletion mutants lacking the N-terminus displayed significantly reduced autophosphorylation in cells. A minimal construct comprising the N-terminus and kinase domain (NKD was autophosphorylated, while the kinase domain alone (KD was not. When expressed in mammalian cells, NKD localized to the plasma membrane, while KD showed a more diffuse cytosolic localization. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed a stronger interaction between full length Ack1 and NKD than between full length Ack1 and KD, indicating that the N-terminus was important for Ack1 dimerization. Increasing the local concentration of purified Ack1 kinase domain at the surface of lipid vesicles stimulated autophosphorylation and catalytic activity, consistent with a requirement for dimerization and trans-phosphorylation for activity. Conclusions Collectively, the data suggest that the N-terminus of Ack1 promotes membrane localization and dimerization to allow for autophosphorylation.

  5. The acidic domain of the endothelial membrane protein GPIHBP1 stabilizes lipoprotein lipase activity by preventing unfolding of its catalytic domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mysling, Simon; Kristensen, Kristian Kølby; Larsson, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    GPIHBP1 is a glycolipid-anchored membrane protein of capillary endothelial cells that binds lipoprotein lipase (LPL) within the interstitial space and shuttles it to the capillary lumen. The LPL•GPIHBP1 complex is responsible for margination of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins along capillaries...... domains: (1) an intrinsically disordered acidic N-terminal domain; and (2) a folded C-terminal domain that tethers GPIHBP1 to the cell membrane by glycosylphosphatidylinositol. We demonstrate that these domains serve different roles in regulating the kinetics of LPL binding. Importantly, the acidic domain...

  6. Evolutionary divergence in the catalytic activity of the CAM-1, ROR1 and ROR2 kinase domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis W Bainbridge

    Full Text Available Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptors (ROR 1 and 2 are atypical members of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK family and have been associated with several human diseases. The vertebrate RORs contain an ATP binding domain that deviates from the consensus amino acid sequence, although the impact of this deviation on catalytic activity is not known and the kinase function of these receptors remains controversial. Recently, ROR2 was shown to signal through a Wnt responsive, β-catenin independent pathway and suppress a canonical Wnt/β-catenin signal. In this work we demonstrate that both ROR1 and ROR2 kinase domains are catalytically deficient while CAM-1, the C. elegans homolog of ROR, has an active tyrosine kinase domain, suggesting a divergence in the signaling processes of the ROR family during evolution. In addition, we show that substitution of the non-consensus residues from ROR1 or ROR2 into CAM-1 and MuSK markedly reduce kinase activity, while restoration of the consensus residues in ROR does not restore robust kinase function. We further demonstrate that the membrane-bound extracellular domain alone of either ROR1 or ROR2 is sufficient for suppression of canonical Wnt3a signaling, and that this domain can also enhance Wnt5a suppression of Wnt3a signaling. Based on these data, we conclude that human ROR1 and ROR2 are RTK-like pseudokinases.

  7. Quantum Mechanics and Molecular Mechanics Study of the Catalytic Mechanism of Human AMSH-LP Domain Deubiquitinating Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenyou; Liu, Yongjun; Ling, Baoping

    2015-08-25

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) catalyze the cleavage of the isopeptide bond in polyubiquitin chains to control and regulate the deubiquitination process in all known eukaryotic cells. The human AMSH-LP DUB domain specifically cleaves the isopeptide bonds in the Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains. In this article, the catalytic mechanism of AMSH-LP has been studied using a combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics method. Two possible hydrolysis processes (Path 1 and Path 2) have been considered. Our calculation results reveal that the activation of Zn(2+)-coordinated water molecule is the essential step for the hydrolysis of isopeptide bond. In Path 1, the generated hydroxyl first attacks the carbonyl group of Gly76, and then the amino group of Lys63 is protonated, which is calculated to be the rate limiting step with an energy barrier of 13.1 kcal/mol. The energy barrier of the rate limiting step and the structures of intermediate and product are in agreement with the experimental results. In Path 2, the protonation of amino group of Lys63 is prior to the nucleophilic attack of activated hydroxyl. The two proton transfer processes in Path 2 correspond to comparable overall barriers (33.4 and 36.1 kcal/mol), which are very high for an enzymatic reaction. Thus, Path 2 can be ruled out. During the reaction, Glu292 acts as a proton transfer mediator, and Ser357 mainly plays a role in stabilizing the negative charge of Gly76. Besides acting as a Lewis acid, Zn(2+) also influences the reaction by coordinating to the reaction substrates (W1 and Gly76).

  8. Regulation and Function of the Peg3 Imprinted Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhi He

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A subset of mammalian genes differ functionally between two alleles due to genomic imprinting, and seven such genes (Peg3, Usp29, APeg3, Zfp264, Zim1, Zim2, Zim3 are localized within the 500-kb genomic interval of the human and mouse genomes, constituting the Peg3 imprinted domain. This Peg3 domain shares several features with the other imprinted domains, including an evolutionarily conserved domain structure, along with transcriptional co-regulation through shared cis regulatory elements, as well as functional roles in controlling fetal growth rates and maternal-caring behaviors. The Peg3 domain also displays some unique features, including YY1-mediated regulation of transcription and imprinting; conversion and adaptation of several protein-coding members as ncRNA genes during evolution; and its close connection to human cancers through the potential tumor suppressor functions of Peg3 and Usp29. In this review, we summarize and discuss these features of the Peg3 domain.

  9. A smallest 6 kda metalloprotease, mini-matrilysin, in living world: a revolutionary conserved zinc-dependent proteolytic domain- helix-loop-helix catalytic zinc binding domain (ZBD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wei-Hsuan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Aim of this study is to study the minimum zinc dependent metalloprotease catalytic folding motif, helix B Met loop-helix C, with proteolytic catalytic activities in metzincin super family. The metzincin super family share a catalytic domain consisting of a twisted five-stranded β sheet and three long α helices (A, B and C. The catalytic zinc is at the bottom of the cleft and is ligated by three His residues in the consensus sequence motif, HEXXHXXGXXH, which is located in helix B and part of the adjacent Met turn region. An interesting question is - what is the minimum portion of the enzyme that still possesses catalytic and inhibitor recognition?” Methods We have expressed a 60-residue truncated form of matrilysin which retains only the helix B-Met turn-helix C region and deletes helix A and the five-stranded β sheet which form the upper portion of the active cleft. This is only 1/4 of the full catalytic domain. The E. coli derived 6 kDa MMP-7 ZBD fragments were purified and refolded. The proteolytic activities were analyzed by Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay and CM-transferrin zymography analysis. SC44463, BB94 and Phosphoramidon were computationally docked into the 3day structure of the human MMP7 ZBD and TAD and thermolysin using the docking program GOLD. Results This minimal 6 kDa matrilysin has been refolded and shown to have proteolytic activity in the Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay. Triton X-100 and heparin are important factors in the refolding environment for this mini-enzyme matrilysin. This minienzyme has the proteolytic activity towards peptide substrate, but the hexamer and octamer of the mini MMP-7 complex demonstrates the CM-transferrin proteolytic activities in zymographic analysis. Peptide digestion is inhibited by SC44463, specific MMP7 inhibitors, but not phosphorimadon. Interestingly, the mini MMP-7 can be processed by autolysis and producing ~ 6

  10. Colorimetric Logic Gate for Pyrophosphate and Pyrophosphatase via Regulating the Catalytic Capability of Horseradish Peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuanxia; Zhao, Dan; Sun, Jian; Yang, Xiurong

    2016-11-02

    By regulating the catalytic capability of horseradish peroxidase (HRP), an artful colorimetric assay platform for pyrophosphate (PPi) and pyrophosphatase (PPase) was unprecedentedly designed. In this work, Cu(I), generated by reducing Cu(II) in the presence of ascorbate, could inhibit HRP's catalytic capability of transforming colorless 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) into blue oxidized TMB (oxTMB). The robust coordination between PPi and Cu(II) is able to discourage the reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I) effectively, thus restoring the original catalytic capability of HRP and regenerating blue-colored oxTMB. Upon PPase introduction, PPi would be hydrolyzed into orthophosphate, which could release Cu(II) free from the Cu(II)-PPi complex, and thus in turn allows the catalytic capability of HRP to be inhibited by Cu(I). HRP was activated or deactivated to different degrees depending on PPi or PPase levels, which could be indicated by using HRP-triggered catalytic system as a signal amplifier, thus paving a way for PPi and PPase sensing. Based on the colorimetric sensor for PPi and PPase, an "INH" logic gate was rationally constructed. With the merits of high sensitivity and selectivity, cost-effectiveness, and simplification, our proposed analytical system has also been verified to have potential to be utilized for enzyme inhibitor screening and diagnosis of PPase-related diseases.

  11. Truncation of the Catalytic Domain of the Cylindromatosis Tumor Suppressor Impairs Lung Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eirini Trompouki

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cyld encodes a 956-amino acid deubiquitinating enzyme (CYLD, which is a negative regulator of nuclear factor κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Mutations that truncate and inactivate the carboxyl-terminal deubiquitinating domain of CYLD underlie the development of skin appendage tumors in humans, whereas down-regulation of Cyld expression has been associated with the development of various types of human malignancies including lung cancer. To establish an animal model of human CYLD inactivation and characterize the biological role of CYLD in vivo, we generated mice carrying a homozygous deletion of Cyld exon 9 (CyldΔ9/Δ9 mice using a conditional approach. Deletion of exon 9 would cause a carboxyl-terminal truncation of CYLD and inactivation of its deubiquitinating activity. In accordance with previous studies, fibroblasts from CyldΔ9/Δ9 embryos had hyperactive nuclear factor κB and c-Jun kinase pathways compared with control fibroblasts. CyldΔ9/Δ9 newborn mice were smaller than wild-type littermates with a short and kinky tail and nomajor developmental defects. However, CyldΔ9/Δ9 mice died shortly after birth from apparent respiratory dysfunction. Histological examination of E18.5 CyldΔ9/Δ9 lungs demonstrated an immature phenotype characterized by hyperplasic mesenchyme but apparently normal epithelial, smooth muscle. and endothelial structures. Our study identifies an important role of CYLD in lung maturation, which may underlie the development of many cases of lung cancer.

  12. Structure of the catalytic domain of the Tannerella forsythia matrix metallopeptidase karilysin in complex with a tetrapeptidic inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guevara, Tibisay; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Skottrup, Peter Durand

    2013-01-01

    Karilysin is the only metallopeptidase identified as a virulence factor in the odontopathogen Tannerella forsythia owing to its deleterious effect on the host immune response during bacterial infection. The very close structural and sequence-based similarity of its catalytic domain (Kly18......) to matrix metalloproteinases suggests that karilysin was acquired by horizontal gene transfer from an animal host. Previous studies by phage display identified peptides with the consensus sequence XWFPXXXGGG (single-letter amino-acid codes; X represents any residue) as karilysin inhibitors with low...

  13. The Translocation Domain of Botulinum Neurotoxin A Moderates the Propensity of the Catalytic Domain to Interact with Membranes at Acidic pH.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Araye

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A is composed of three domains: a catalytic domain (LC, a translocation domain (HN and a receptor-binding domain (HC. Like most bacterial toxins BoNT/A is an amphitropic protein, produced in a soluble form that is able to interact, penetrate and/or cross a membrane to achieve its toxic function. During intoxication BoNT/A is internalized by the cell by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Then, LC crosses the membrane of the endocytic compartment and reaches the cytosol. This translocation is initiated by the low pH found in this compartment. It has been suggested that LC passes in an unfolded state through a transmembrane passage formed by HN. We report here that acidification induces no major conformational change in either secondary or tertiary structures of LC and HN of BoNT/A in solution. GdnHCl-induced denaturation experiments showed that the stability of LC and HN increases as pH drops, and that HN further stabilizes LC. Unexpectedly we found that LC has a high propensity to interact with and permeabilize anionic lipid bilayers upon acidification without the help of HN. This property is downplayed when LC is linked to HN. HN thus acts as a chaperone for LC by enhancing its stability but also as a moderator of the membrane interaction of LC.

  14. Novel stand-alone RAM domain protein-mediated catalytic control of anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase in tryptophan biosynthesis in Thermus thermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubota, Tetsuo; Matsushita, Hajime; Tomita, Takeo; Kosono, Saori; Yoshida, Minoru; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Nishiyama, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    Regulation of amino acid metabolism (RAM) domains are widely distributed among prokaryotes. In most cases, a RAM domain fuses with a DNA-binding domain to act as a transcriptional regulator. The extremely thermophilic bacterium, Thermus thermophilus, only carries a single gene encoding a RAM domain-containing protein on its genome. This protein is a stand-alone RAM domain protein (SraA) lacking a DNA-binding domain. Therefore, we hypothesized that SraA, which senses amino acids through its RAM domain, may interact with other proteins to modify its functions. In the present study, we identified anthranilate phosphoribosyltransferase (AnPRT), the second enzyme in the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway, as a partner protein that interacted with SraA in T. thermophilus. In the presence of tryptophan, SraA was assembled to a decamer and exhibited the ability to form a stable hetero-complex with AnPRT. An enzyme assay revealed that AnPRT was only inhibited by tryptophan in the presence of SraA. This result suggests a novel feedback control mechanism for tryptophan biosynthesis through an inter-RAM domain interaction in bacteria.

  15. Catalytic domain of PDC-E2 contains epitopes recognized by antimitochondrial antibodies in primary biliary cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Sandra; Berg, Christoph; Buck, Sandra; Gregor, Michael; Klein, Reinhild

    2010-02-28

    To search for further immunodominant peptides of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex E2-component (PDC-E2) recognized by antimitochondrial antibodies (AMA) in primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). Sera from 95 patients with PBC were tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay against 33 synthetic overlapping peptides (25 amino acids; aa) covering the entire length of the E2-subunit of PDC-E2. Furthermore, the inner lipoyl peptide 167-184 was used in an unlipoylated and a lipoylated form as well as coupled to ovalbumin. Sera from 11 AMA negative/ANA positive PBC patients, 63 patients with other liver disorders and 22 healthy blood donors served as controls. Of the 95 PBC-sera, 74% reacted with the peptide 475-499 and 58% with the peptide 407-431 located within the catalytic domain of PDC-E2. Patients with other disorders or healthy controls were positive in only up to 18%. Antibodies to the unlipoylated and lipoylated peptide 167-184 within the inner lipoyl domain were found in only 5% and 11% of the PBC sera, respectively; using ovalbumin-coupled peptides, the incidence increased up to 57% (unlipoylated form). Peptides within the catalytic site of PDC-E2 rather than the previously reported lipoyl binding peptide 167-184 may represent major immunodominant epitopes recognized by AMA in PBC.

  16. The UBA-UIM domains of the USP25 regulate the enzyme ubiquitination state and modulate substrate recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Denuc

    Full Text Available USP25m is the muscle isoform of the deubiquitinating (DUB enzyme USP25. Similarly to most DUBs, data on USP25 regulation and substrate recognition is scarce. In silico analysis predicted three ubiquitin binding domains (UBDs at the N-terminus: one ubiquitin-associated domain (UBA and two ubiquitin-interacting motifs (UIMs, whereas no clear structural homology at the extended C-terminal region outside the catalytic domains were detected. In order to asses the contribution of the UBDs and the C-terminus to the regulation of USP25m catalytic activity, ubiquitination state and substrate interaction, serial and combinatorial deletions were generated. Our results showed that USP25m catalytic activity did not strictly depend on the UBDs, but required a coiled-coil stretch between amino acids 679 to 769. USP25 oligomerized but this interaction did not require either the UBDs or the C-terminus. Besides, USP25 was monoubiquitinated and able to autodeubiquitinate in a possible loop of autoregulation. UBDs favored the monoubiquitination of USP25m at the preferential site lysine 99 (K99. This residue had been previously shown to be a target for SUMO and this modification inhibited USP25 activity. We showed that mutation of K99 clearly diminished USP25-dependent rescue of the specific substrate MyBPC1 from proteasome degradation, thereby supporting a new mechanistic model, in which USP25m is regulated through alternative conjugation of ubiquitin (activating or SUMO (inhibiting to the same lysine residue (K99, which may promote the interaction with distinct intramolecular regulatory domains.

  17. Site-Selective Artificial Ribonucleases: Oligonucleotide Conjugates Containing Multiple Imidazole Residues in the Catalytic Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia G. Beloglazova

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Design of site-selective artificial ribonucleases (aRNases is one of the most challenging tasks in RNA targeting. Here, we designed and studied oligonucleotide-based aRNases containing multiple imidazole residues in the catalytic part and systematically varied structure of cleaving constructs. We demonstrated that the ribonuclease activity of the conjugates is strongly affected by the number of imidazole residues in the catalytic part, the length of a linker between the catalytic imidazole groups of the construct and the oligonucleotide, and the type of anchor group, connecting linker structure and the oligonucleotide. Molecular modeling of the most active aRNases showed that preferable orientation(s of cleaving constructs strongly depend on the structure of the anchor group and length of the linker. The inclusion of deoxyribothymidine anchor group significantly reduced the probability of cleaving groups to locate near the cleavage site, presumably due to a stacking interaction with the neighbouring nucleotide residue. Altogether the obtained results show that dynamics factors play an important role in site-specific RNA cleavage. Remarkably high cleavage activity was displayed by the conjugates with the most flexible and extended cleaving construct, which presumably provides a better opportunity for imidazole residues to be correctly positioned in the vicinity of scissile phosphodiester bond.

  18. Regulating Water-Reduction Kinetics in Cobalt Phosphide for Enhancing HER Catalytic Activity in Alkaline Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun; Ding, Hui; Zhang, Mengxing; Chen, Min; Hao, Zikai; Zhang, Lidong; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2017-07-01

    Electrochemical water splitting to produce hydrogen renders a promising pathway for renewable energy storage. Considering limited electrocatalysts have good oxygen-evolution reaction (OER) catalytic activity in acid solution while numerous economical materials show excellent OER catalytic performance in alkaline solution, developing new strategies that enhance the alkaline hydrogen-evolution reaction (HER) catalytic activity of cost-effective catalysts is highly desirable for achieving highly efficient overall water splitting. Herein, it is demonstrated that synergistic regulation of water dissociation and optimization of hydrogen adsorption free energy on electrocatalysts can significantly promote alkaline HER catalysis. Using oxygen-incorporated Co 2 P as an example, the synergistic effect brings about 15-fold enhancement of alkaline HER activity. Theory calculations confirm that the water dissociation free energy of Co 2 P decreases significantly after oxygen incorporation, and the hydrogen adsorption free energy can also be optimized simultaneously. The finding suggests the powerful effectiveness of synergetic regulation of water dissociation and optimization of hydrogen adsorption free energy on electrocatalysts for alkaline HER catalysis. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Prolyl hydroxylase domain enzymes: important regulators of cancer metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang M

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ming Yang,1 Huizhong Su,1 Tomoyoshi Soga,2 Kamil R Kranc,3 Patrick J Pollard1 1Cancer Biology and Metabolism Group, Institute of Genetics and Molecular Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK; 2Institute for Advanced Biosciences, Keio University, Mizukami, Tsuruoka, Yamagata, Japan; 3MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK Abstract: The hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF prolyl hydroxylase domain enzymes (PHDs regulate the stability of HIF protein by post-translational hydroxylation of two conserved prolyl residues in its α subunit in an oxygen-dependent manner. Trans-4-prolyl hydroxylation of HIFα under normal oxygen (O2 availability enables its association with the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL tumor suppressor pVHL E3 ligase complex, leading to the degradation of HIFα via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Due to the obligatory requirement of molecular O2 as a co-substrate, the activity of PHDs is inhibited under hypoxic conditions, resulting in stabilized HIFα, which dimerizes with HIFβ and, together with transcriptional co-activators CBP/p300, activates the transcription of its target genes. As a key molecular regulator of adaptive response to hypoxia, HIF plays important roles in multiple cellular processes and its overexpression has been detected in various cancers. The HIF1α isoform in particular has a strong impact on cellular metabolism, most notably by promoting anaerobic, whilst inhibiting O2-dependent, metabolism of glucose. The PHD enzymes also seem to have HIF-independent functions and are subject to regulation by factors other than O2, such as by metabolic status, oxidative stress, and abnormal levels of endogenous metabolites (oncometabolites that have been observed in some types of cancers. In this review, we aim to summarize current understandings of the function and regulation of PHDs in cancer with an emphasis on their roles in metabolism. Keywords: prolyl hydroxylase domain (PHD

  20. Ribonuclease H: molecular diversities, substrate binding domains, and catalytic mechanism of the prokaryotic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadokoro, Takashi; Kanaya, Shigenori

    2009-03-01

    The prokaryotic genomes, for which complete nucleotide sequences are available, always contain at least one RNase H gene, indicating that RNase H is ubiquitous in all prokaryotic cells. Coupled with its unique substrate specificity, the enzyme has been expected to play crucial roles in the biochemical processes associated with DNA replication, gene expression and DNA repair. The physiological role of prokaryotic RNases H, especially of type 1 RNases H, has been extensively studied using Escherichia coli strains that are defective in RNase HI activity or overproduce RNase HI. However, it is not fully understood yet. By contrast, significant progress has been made in this decade in identifying novel RNases H with respect to their biochemical properties and structures, and elucidating catalytic mechanism and substrate recognition mechanism of RNase H. We review the results of these studies.

  1. Solubility of the catalytic domains of Botulinum neurotoxin serotype E subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; Barbieri, Joseph T

    2016-02-01

    The Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most potent protein toxins known to humans. There are seven serotypes of the BoNTs (A-G), among which serotypes A, B, E and F are known to cause natural human intoxication. To date, eleven subtypes of LC/E, termed E1∼E11, have been identified. The LCs of BoNT/E were insoluble, prohibiting studies towards understanding the mechanisms of toxin action and substrate recognition. In this work, the molecular basis of insolubility of the recombinant LCs of two representative subtypes of BoNT/E, E1(Beluga) and E3 (Alaska), was determined. Hydrophobicity profile and structural modeling predicted a C-terminal candidate region responsible for the insolubility of LC/Es. Deletion of C-terminal 19 residues of LC/E(1-400) resulted in enhanced solubility, from 2 to ∼50% for LC/EAlaska and from 16 to ∼95% for LC/EBeluga. In addition, resides 230-236 were found to contribute to a different solubility level of LC/EAlaska when compared to LC/EBeluga. Substituting residues (230)TCI(232) in LC/EAlaska to the corresponding residues of (230)KYT(232) in LC/EBeluga enhanced the solubility of LC/EAlaska to a level approaching that of LC/EBeluga. Among these LC/Es and their derivatives, LC/EBeluga 1-400 was the most soluble and stable protein. Each LC/E derivative possessed similar catalytic activity, suggesting that the C-terminal region of LC/Es contributed to protein solubility, but not catalytic activity. In conclusion, this study generated a soluble and stable recombinant LC/E and provided insight into the structural components that govern the solubility and stability of the LCs of other BoNT serotypes and Tetanus toxin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A simple two step procedure for purification of the catalytic domain of chicken tryptophan hydroxylase 1 in a form suitable for crystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windahl, Michael Skovbo; Petersen, Charlotte R.; Munch, Astrid

    2008-01-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) [EC 1.14.16.4] catalyzes the conversion of tryptophan to 5-hydroxytryptophan, which is the first and rate-determining step in the biosynthesis of the neurotransmitter serotonin. We have expressed the catalytic domain of chicken (Gallus gallus) TPH isoform 1 in Escheri......Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) [EC 1.14.16.4] catalyzes the conversion of tryptophan to 5-hydroxytryptophan, which is the first and rate-determining step in the biosynthesis of the neurotransmitter serotonin. We have expressed the catalytic domain of chicken (Gallus gallus) TPH isoform 1...

  3. Transforming p21 ras protein: flexibility in the major variable region linking the catalytic and membrane-anchoring domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willumsen, B M; Papageorge, A G; Hubbert, N

    1985-01-01

    or increasing it to 50 amino acids has relatively little effect on the capacity of the gene to induce morphological transformation of NIH 3T3 cells. Assays of GTP binding, GTPase and autophosphorylating activities of such mutant v-rasH-encoded proteins synthesized in bacteria indicated that the sequences...... that is required for post-translational processing, membrane localization and transforming activity of the proteins. We have now used the viral oncogene (v-rasH) of Harvey sarcoma virus to study the major variable region by deleting or duplicating parts of the gene. Reducing this region to five amino acids...... that encode these biochemical activities are located upstream from the major variable region. In the context of transformation, we propose that the region of sequence heterogeneity serves principally to connect the N-terminal catalytic domain with amino acids at the C terminus that are required to anchor...

  4. Crystal Structure of 12-Lipoxygenase Catalytic-Domain-Inhibitor Complex Identifies a Substrate-Binding Channel for Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shu; Mueser, Timothy C.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Funk, Jr., Max O. (Toledo); (Vanderbilt)

    2014-10-02

    Lipoxygenases are critical enzymes in the biosynthesis of families of bioactive lipids including compounds with important roles in the initiation and resolution of inflammation and in associated diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Crystals diffracting to high resolution (1.9 {angstrom}) were obtained for a complex between the catalytic domain of leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase and the isoform-specific inhibitor, 4-(2-oxapentadeca-4-yne)phenylpropanoic acid (OPP). In the three-dimensional structure of the complex, the inhibitor occupied a new U-shaped channel open at one end to the surface of the protein and extending past the redox-active iron site that is essential for catalysis. In models, the channel accommodated arachidonic acid, defining the binding site for the substrate of the catalyzed reaction. There was a void adjacent to the OPP binding site connecting to the surface of the enzyme and providing a plausible access channel for the other substrate, oxygen.

  5. A modular esterase from Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa contains a non-catalytic cellulose-binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, L M; Wood, T M; Williamson, G; Faulds, C; Hazlewood, G P; Black, G W; Gilbert, H J

    1993-09-01

    The 5' regions of genes xynB and xynC, coding for a xylanase and arabinofuranosidase respectively, are identical and are reiterated four times within the Pseudomonas fluorescens subsp. cellulosa genome. To isolate further copies of the reiterated xynB/C 5' region, a genomic library of Ps. fluorescens subsp. cellulosa DNA was screened with a probe constructed from the conserved region of xynB. DNA from one phage which hybridized to the probe, but not to sequences upstream or downstream of the reiterated xynB/C locus, was subcloned into pMTL22p to construct pFG1. The recombinant plasmid expressed a protein in Escherichia coli, designated esterase XYLD, of M(r) 58,500 which bound to cellulose but not to xylan. XYLD hydrolysed aryl esters, released acetate groups from acetylxylan and liberated 4-hydroxy-3-methoxycinnamic acid from destarched wheat bran. The nucleotide sequence of the XYLD-encoding gene, xynD, revealed an open reading frame of 1752 bp which directed the synthesis of a protein of M(r) 60,589. The 5' 817 bp of xynD and the amino acid sequence between residues 37 and 311 of XYLD were almost identical with the corresponding regions of xynB and xynC and their encoded proteins XYLB and XYLC. Truncated derivatives of XYLD lacking the N-terminal conserved sequence retained the capacity to hydrolyse ester linkages, but did not bind cellulose. Expression of truncated derivatives of xynD, comprising the 5' 817 bp sequence, encoded a non-catalytic polypeptide that bound cellulose. These data indicate that XYLD has a modular structure comprising of a N-terminal cellulose-binding domain and a C-terminal catalytic domain.

  6. Mechanism of Diphtheria Toxin Catalytic Domain Delivery to the Eukaryotic Cell Cytosol and the Cellular Factors that Directly Participate in the Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Research on diphtheria and anthrax toxins over the past three decades has culminated in a detailed understanding of their structure function relationships (e.g., catalytic (C), transmembrane (T), and receptor binding (R) domains), as well as the identification of their eukaryotic cell surface receptor, an understanding of the molecular events leading to the receptor-mediated internalization of the toxin into an endosomal compartment, and the pH triggered conformational changes required for pore formation in the vesicle membrane. Recently, a major research effort has been focused on the development of a detailed understanding of the molecular interactions between each of these toxins and eukaryotic cell factors that play an essential role in the efficient translocation of their respective catalytic domains through the trans-endosomal vesicle membrane pore and delivery into the cell cytosol. In this review, I shall focus on recent findings that have led to a more detailed understanding of the mechanism by which the diphtheria toxin catalytic domain is delivered to the eukaryotic cell cytosol. While much work remains, it is becoming increasingly clear that the entry process is facilitated by specific interactions with a number of cellular factors in an ordered sequential fashion. In addition, since diphtheria, anthrax lethal factor and anthrax edema factor all carry multiple coatomer I complex binding motifs and COPI complex has been shown to play an essential role in entry process, it is likely that the initial steps in catalytic domain entry of these divergent toxins follow a common mechanism. PMID:22069710

  7. A WHEP Domain Regulates the Dynamic Structure and Activity of Caenorhabditis elegans Glycyl-tRNA Synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Yao; Chien, Chin-I; Chang, Chia-Pei; Lin, Bo-Chun; Wang, Chien-Chia

    2016-08-05

    WHEP domains exist in certain eukaryotic aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and play roles in tRNA or protein binding. We present evidence herein that cytoplasmic and mitochondrial forms of Caenorhabditis elegans glycyl-tRNA synthetase (CeGlyRS) are encoded by the same gene (CeGRS1) through alternative initiation of translation. The cytoplasmic form possessed an N-terminal WHEP domain, whereas its mitochondrial isoform possessed an extra N-terminal sequence consisting of an mitochondrial targeting signal and an appended domain. Cross-species complementation assays showed that CeGRS1 effectively rescued the cytoplasmic and mitochondrial defects of a yeast GRS1 knock-out strain. Although both forms of CeGlyRS efficiently charged the cytoplasmic tRNAs(Gly) of C. elegans, the mitochondrial form was much more efficient than its cytoplasmic counterpart in charging the mitochondrial tRNA(Gly) isoacceptor, which carries a defective TψC hairpin. Despite the WHEP domain per se lacking tRNA binding activity, deletion of this domain reduced the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme. Most interestingly, the deletion mutant possessed a higher thermal stability and a somewhat lower structural flexibility. Our study suggests a role for the WHEP domain as a regulator of the dynamic structure and activity of the enzyme. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. The C Terminus of the Catalytic Domain of Type A Botulinum Neurotoxin May Facilitate Product Release from the Active Site*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizanur, Rahman M.; Frasca, Verna; Swaminathan, Subramanyam; Bavari, Sina; Webb, Robert; Smith, Leonard A.; Ahmed, S. Ashraf

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins are the most toxic of all compounds. The toxicity is related to a poor zinc endopeptidase activity located in a 50-kDa domain known as light chain (Lc) of the toxin. The C-terminal tail of Lc is not visible in any of the currently available x-ray structures, and it has no known function but undergoes autocatalytic truncations during purification and storage. By synthesizing C-terminal peptides of various lengths, in this study, we have shown that these peptides competitively inhibit the normal catalytic activity of Lc of serotype A (LcA) and have defined the length of the mature LcA to consist of the first 444 residues. Two catalytically inactive mutants also inhibited LcA activity. Our results suggested that the C terminus of LcA might interact at or near its own active site. By using synthetic C-terminal peptides from LcB, LcC1, LcD, LcE, and LcF and their respective substrate peptides, we have shown that the inhibition of activity is specific only for LcA. Although a potent inhibitor with a Ki of 4.5 μm, the largest of our LcA C-terminal peptides stimulated LcA activity when added at near-stoichiometric concentration to three versions of LcA differing in their C-terminal lengths. The result suggested a product removal role of the LcA C terminus. This suggestion is supported by a weak but specific interaction determined by isothermal titration calorimetry between an LcA C-terminal peptide and N-terminal product from a peptide substrate of LcA. Our results also underscore the importance of using a mature LcA as an inhibitor screening target. PMID:23779108

  9. CUB and Sushi multiple domains 3 regulates dendrite development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Tomoharu; Kohno, Takao; Hattori, Mitsuharu

    2016-09-01

    CUB and Sushi multiple domains 3 (CSMD3) is a large protein expressed in fetal and adult brain. Recently, mutations of the CSMD3 gene were identified in schizophrenia and autism patients. However, biochemical properties and functions of the CSMD3 protein remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that CSMD3 is an oligomeric type I transmembrane protein localized in the apical dendrites of hippocampal pyramidal neurons in the postnatal brain. In cultured hippocampal neurons, CSMD3 is expressed only after 7 days in vitro. Overexpression of CSMD3 induced dendritic branching in hippocampal neurons. Regulation of dendritic morphology by CSMD3 depended on the presence of its extracellular region, while CSMD3 intracellular region was dispensable for this activity. These results suggest that CSMD3 acts as a co-receptor of an unidentified membrane protein to regulate dendrite development. Therefore, malfunctions of CSMD3 may be one of the factors in the pathogenesis of psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd and Japan Neuroscience Society. All rights reserved.

  10. Structure of the C-Terminal Half of UvrC Reveals an RNase H Endonuclease Domain with an Argonaute-like Catalytic Triad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karakas,E.; Truglio, J.; Croteau, D.; Rhau, B.; Wang, L.; Van Houten, B.; Kisker, C.

    2007-01-01

    Removal and repair of DNA damage by the nucleotide excision repair pathway requires two sequential incision reactions, which are achieved by the endonuclease UvrC in eubacteria. Here, we describe the crystal structure of the C-terminal half of UvrC, which contains the catalytic domain responsible for 5' incision and a helix-hairpin-helix-domain that is implicated in DNA binding. Surprisingly, the 5' catalytic domain shares structural homology with RNase H despite the lack of sequence homology and contains an uncommon DDH triad. The structure also reveals two highly conserved patches on the surface of the protein, which are not related to the active site. Mutations of residues in one of these patches led to the inability of the enzyme to bind DNA and severely compromised both incision reactions. Based on our results, we suggest a model of how UvrC forms a productive protein-DNA complex to excise the damage from DNA.

  11. Crystal structures of wild-type Trichoderma reesei Cel7A catalytic domain in open and closed states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodenheimer, Annette M. [Molecular and Structural Biochemistry Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh NC USA; Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN USA; Meilleur, Flora [Molecular and Structural Biochemistry Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh NC USA; Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN USA

    2016-11-07

    Trichoderma reesei Cel7A efficiently hydrolyses cellulose. We report here the crystallographic structures of the wild-type TrCel7A catalytic domain (CD) in an open state and, for the first time, in a closed state. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that the loops along the CD tunnel move in concerted motions. Together, the crystallographic and MD data suggest that the CD cycles between the tense and relaxed forms that are characteristic of work producing enzymes. Analysis of the interactions formed by R251 provides a structural rationale for the concurrent decrease in product inhibition and catalytic efficiency measured for product-binding site mutants.

  12. Dynamics of the metal binding domains and regulation of the human copper transporters ATP7B and ATP7A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Corey H; Dolgova, Natalia V; Dmitriev, Oleg Y

    2017-04-01

    Copper transporters ATP7A and ATP7B regulate copper levels in the human cells and deliver copper to the biosynthetic pathways. ATP7A and ATP7B belong to the P-type ATPases and share much of the domain architecture and the mechanism of ATP hydrolysis with the other, well-studied, enzymes of this type. A unique structural feature of the copper ATPases is the chain of six cytosolic metal-binding domains (MBDs), which are believed to be involved in copper-dependent regulation of the activity and intracellular localization of these enzymes. Although the structures of all the MBDs have been solved, the mechanism of copper-dependent regulation of ATP7B and ATP7A, the roles of individual MBDs, and the relationship between the regulatory and catalytic copper binding are still unknown. We describe the structure and dynamics of the MBDs, review the current knowledge about their functional roles and propose a mechanism of regulation of ATP7B by copper-dependent changes in the dynamics and conformation of the MBD chain. Transient interactions between the MBDs, rather than transitions between distinct static conformations are likely to form the structural basis of regulation of the ATP-dependent copper transporters in human cells. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 69(4):226-235, 2017. © 2017 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  13. Regulation of Exocytotic Fusion Pores by SNARE Protein Transmembrane Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyong Wu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Calcium-triggered exocytotic release of neurotransmitters and hormones from neurons and neuroendocrine cells underlies neuronal communication, motor activity and endocrine functions. The core of the neuronal exocytotic machinery is composed of soluble N-ethyl maleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs. Formation of complexes between vesicle-attached v- and plasma-membrane anchored t-SNAREs in a highly regulated fashion brings the membranes into close apposition. Small, soluble proteins called Complexins (Cpx and calcium-sensing Synaptotagmins cooperate to block fusion at low resting calcium concentrations, but trigger release upon calcium increase. A growing body of evidence suggests that the transmembrane domains (TMDs of SNARE proteins play important roles in regulating the processes of fusion and release, but the mechanisms involved are only starting to be uncovered. Here we review recent evidence that SNARE TMDs exert influence by regulating the dynamics of the fusion pore, the initial aqueous connection between the vesicular lumen and the extracellular space. Even after the fusion pore is established, hormone release by neuroendocrine cells is tightly controlled, and the same may be true of neurotransmitter release by neurons. The dynamics of the fusion pore can regulate the kinetics of cargo release and the net amount released, and can determine the mode of vesicle recycling. Manipulations of SNARE TMDs were found to affect fusion pore properties profoundly, both during exocytosis and in biochemical reconstitutions. To explain these effects, TMD flexibility, and interactions among TMDs or between TMDs and lipids have been invoked. Exocytosis has provided the best setting in which to unravel the underlying mechanisms, being unique among membrane fusion reactions in that single fusion pores can be probed using high-resolution methods. An important role will likely be played by methods that can probe single fusion pores

  14. Regulating the spatial distribution of metal nanoparticles within metal-organic frameworks to enhance catalytic efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiu; Liu, Wenxian; Wang, Bingqing; Zhang, Weina; Zeng, Xiaoqiao; Zhang, Cong; Qin, Yongji; Sun, Xiaoming; Wu, Tianpin; Liu, Junfeng; Huo, Fengwei; Lu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Composites incorporating metal nanoparticles (MNPs) within metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have broad applications in many fields. However, the controlled spatial distribution of the MNPs within MOFs remains a challenge for addressing key issues in catalysis, for example, the efficiency of catalysts due to the limitation of molecular diffusion within MOF channels. Here we report a facile strategy that enables MNPs to be encapsulated into MOFs with controllable spatial localization by using metal oxide both as support to load MNPs and as a sacrificial template to grow MOFs. This strategy is versatile to a variety of MNPs and MOF crystals. By localizing the encapsulated MNPs closer to the surface of MOFs, the resultant MNPs@MOF composites not only exhibit effective selectivity derived from MOF cavities, but also enhanced catalytic activity due to the spatial regulation of MNPs as close as possible to the MOF surface. PMID:28195131

  15. Regulation of abiotic stress signalling by Arabidopsis C-terminal domain phosphatase-like 1 requires interaction with a k-homology domain-containing protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Sil Jeong

    Full Text Available Arabidopsis thaliana CARBOXYL-TERMINAL DOMAIN (CTD PHOSPHATASE-LIKE 1 (CPL1 regulates plant transcriptional responses to diverse stress signals. Unlike typical CTD phosphatases, CPL1 contains two double-stranded (ds RNA binding motifs (dsRBMs at its C-terminus. Some dsRBMs can bind to dsRNA and/or other proteins, but the function of the CPL1 dsRBMs has remained obscure. Here, we report identification of REGULATOR OF CBF GENE EXPRESSION 3 (RCF3 as a CPL1-interacting protein. RCF3 co-purified with tandem-affinity-tagged CPL1 from cultured Arabidopsis cells and contains multiple K-homology (KH domains, which were predicted to be important for binding to single-stranded DNA/RNA. Yeast two-hybrid, luciferase complementation imaging, and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analyses established that CPL1 and RCF3 strongly associate in vivo, an interaction mediated by the dsRBM1 of CPL1 and the KH3/KH4 domains of RCF3. Mapping of functional regions of CPL1 indicated that CPL1 in vivo function requires the dsRBM1, catalytic activity, and nuclear targeting of CPL1. Gene expression profiles of rcf3 and cpl1 mutants were similar during iron deficiency, but were distinct during the cold response. These results suggest that tethering CPL1 to RCF3 via dsRBM1 is part of the mechanism that confers specificity to CPL1-mediated transcriptional regulation.

  16. Chemical shift assignments for the apo-form of the catalytic domain, the linker region, and the carbohydrate-binding domain of the cellulose-active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase ScLPMO10C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtade, Gaston; Forsberg, Zarah; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Aachmann, Finn L

    2017-10-01

    The apo-form of the 21.4 kDa catalytic domain and the 10.7 kDa carbohydrate binding domain of the AA10 family lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase ScLPMO10C from Streptomyces coelicolor have been isotopically labeled and recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli. In this paper, we report the 1H, 13C, and 15N chemical shift assignments of each individual domain as well as an ensemble of the assignment for the full-length protein, including its approximately 30-amino acid long linker.

  17. Human Δ³,Δ²-enoyl-CoA isomerase, type 2: a structural enzymology study on the catalytic role of its ACBP domain and helix-10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onwukwe, Goodluck U; Kursula, Petri; Koski, M Kristian; Schmitz, Werner; Wierenga, Rik K

    2015-02-01

    The catalytic domain of the trimeric human Δ(3),Δ(2)-enoyl-CoA isomerase, type 2 (HsECI2), has the typical crotonase fold. In the active site of this fold two main chain NH groups form an oxyanion hole for binding the thioester oxygen of the 3E- or 3Z-enoyl-CoA substrate molecules. A catalytic glutamate is essential for the proton transfer between the substrate C2 and C4 atoms for forming the product 2E-enoyl-CoA, which is a key intermediate in the β-oxidation pathway. The active site is covered by the C-terminal helix-10. In HsECI2, the isomerase domain is extended at its N terminus by an acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) domain. Small angle X-ray scattering analysis of HsECI2 shows that the ACBP domain protrudes out of the central isomerase trimer. X-ray crystallography of the isomerase domain trimer identifies the active site geometry. A tunnel, shaped by loop-2 and extending from the catalytic site to bulk solvent, suggests a likely mode of binding of the fatty acyl chains. Calorimetry data show that the separately expressed ACBP and isomerase domains bind tightly to fatty acyl-CoA molecules. The truncated isomerase variant (without ACBP domain) has significant enoyl-CoA isomerase activity; however, the full-length isomerase is more efficient. Structural enzymological studies of helix-10 variants show the importance of this helix for efficient catalysis. Its hydrophobic side chains, together with residues from loop-2 and loop-4, complete a hydrophobic cluster that covers the active site, thereby fixing the thioester moiety in a mode of binding competent for efficient catalysis. © 2014 FEBS.

  18. Specificity and versatility of substrate binding sites in four catalytic domains of human N-terminal acetyltransferases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cédric Grauffel

    Full Text Available Nt-acetylation is among the most common protein modifications in eukaryotes. Although thought for a long time to protect proteins from degradation, the role of Nt-acetylation is still debated. It is catalyzed by enzymes called N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs. In eukaryotes, several NATs, composed of at least one catalytic domain, target different substrates based on their N-terminal sequences. In order to better understand the substrate specificity of human NATs, we investigated in silico the enzyme-substrate interactions in four catalytic subunits of human NATs (Naa10p, Naa20p, Naa30p and Naa50p. To date hNaa50p is the only human subunit for which X-ray structures are available. We used the structure of the ternary hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG complex and a structural model of hNaa10p as a starting point for multiple molecular dynamics simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/substrate (substrate=MLG, EEE, MKG, hNaa10p/AcCoA/substrate (substrate=MLG, EEE. Nine alanine point-mutants of the hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG complex were also simulated. Homology models of hNaa20p and hNaa30p were built and compared to hNaa50p and hNaa10p. The simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG reproduce the interactions revealed by the X-ray data. We observed strong hydrogen bonds between MLG and tyrosines 31, 138 and 139. Yet the tyrosines interacting with the substrate's backbone suggest that their role in specificity is limited. This is confirmed by the simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/EEE and hNaa10p/AcCoA/MLG, where these hydrogen bonds are still observed. Moreover these tyrosines are all conserved in hNaa20p and hNaa30p. Other amino acids tune the specificity of the S1' sites that is different for hNaa10p (acidic, hNaa20p (hydrophobic/basic, hNaa30p (basic and hNaa50p (hydrophobic. We also observe dynamic correlation between the ligand binding site and helix [Formula: see text] that tightens under substrate binding. Finally, by comparing the four structures we propose maps of the peptide

  19. Direct interaction of eag domains and cyclic nucleotide–binding homology domains regulate deactivation gating in hERG channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianulis, Elena C.; Liu, Qiangni

    2013-01-01

    Human ether-á-go-go (eag)-related gene (hERG) potassium channels play a critical role in cardiac repolarization and are characterized by unusually slow closing (deactivation) kinetics. The N-terminal “eag” domain and a C-terminal C-linker/cyclic nucleotide–binding homology domain (CNBHD) are required for regulation of slow deactivation. The region between the S4 and S5 transmembrane domains (S4–S5 linker) is also implicated in this process, but the mechanism for regulation of slow deactivation is unclear. Here, using an eag domain–deleted channel (hERG Δeag) fused to Citrine fluorescent protein, we found that most channels bearing individual alanine mutations in the S4–S5 linker were directly regulated by recombinant eag domains fused to a cyan fluorescent protein (N-eag-CFP) and had robust Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Additionally, a channel bearing a group of eight alanine residues in the S4–S5 linker was not measurably regulated by N-eag-CFP domains, but robust FRET was measured. These findings demonstrate that the eag domain associated with all of the S4–S5 linker mutant channels. In contrast, channels that also lacked the CNBHD (hERG Δeag ΔCNBHD-Citrine) were not measurably regulated by N-eag-CFP nor was FRET detected, suggesting that the C-linker/CNBHD was required for eag domains to directly associate with the channel. In a FRET hybridization assay, N-eag-CFP had robust FRET with a C-linker/CNBHD-Citrine, suggesting a direct and specific interaction between the eag domain and the C-linker/CNBHD. Lastly, coexpression of a hERG subunit lacking the CNBHD and the distal C-terminal region (hERG ΔpCT-Citrine) with hERG Δeag-CFP subunits had FRET and partial restoration of slow deactivation. Collectively, these findings reveal that the C-linker/CNBHD, but not the S4–S5 linker, was necessary for the eag domain to associate with the channel, that the eag domain and the C-linker/CNBHD were sufficient for a direct interaction, and

  20. Critical lysine residues within the overlooked N-terminal domain of human APE1 regulate its biological functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantini, Damiano; Vascotto, Carlo; Marasco, Daniela; D'Ambrosio, Chiara; Romanello, Milena; Vitagliano, Luigi; Pedone, Carlo; Poletto, Mattia; Cesaratto, Laura; Quadrifoglio, Franco; Scaloni, Andrea; Radicella, J Pablo; Tell, Gianluca

    2010-12-01

    Apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1), an essential protein in mammals, is involved in base excision DNA repair (BER) and in regulation of gene expression, acting as a redox co-activator of several transcription factors. Recent findings highlight a novel role for APE1 in RNA metabolism, which is modulated by nucleophosmin (NPM1). The results reported in this article show that five lysine residues (K24, K25, K27, K31 and K32), located in the APE1 N-terminal unstructured domain, are involved in the interaction of APE1 with both RNA and NPM1, thus supporting a competitive binding mechanism. Data from kinetic experiments demonstrate that the APE1 N-terminal domain also serves as a device for fine regulation of protein catalytic activity on abasic DNA. Interestingly, some of these critical lysine residues undergo acetylation in vivo. These results suggest that protein-protein interactions and/or post-translational modifications involving APE1 N-terminal domain may play important in vivo roles, in better coordinating and fine-tuning protein BER activity and function on RNA metabolism.

  1. Contribution of the CR domain to P-selectin lectin domain allostery by regulating the orientation of the EGF domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouqin Lü

    Full Text Available The allostery of P-selectin has been studied extensively with a focus on the Lec and EGF domains, whereas the contribution of the CR domain remains unclear. Here, molecular dynamics simulations (MDS combined with homology modeling were preformed to investigate the impact of the CR domain on P-selectin allostery. The results indicated that the CR domain plays a role in the allosteric dynamics of P-selectin in two ways. First, the CR1 domain tends to stabilize the low affinity of P-selectin during the equilibration processes with the transition inhibition from the S1 to S1' state by restraining the extension of the bent EGF orientation, or with the relaxation acceleration of the S2 state by promoting the bending of the extended EGF orientation. Second, the existence of CR domain increases intramolecular extension prior to complex separation, increasing the time available for the allosteric shift during forced dissociation with a prolonged bond duration. These findings further our understanding of the structure-function relationship of P-selectin with the enriched micro-structural bases of the CR domain.

  2. Affinity between TBC1D4 (AS160 phosphotyrosine-binding domain and insulin-regulated aminopeptidase cytoplasmic domain measured by isothermal titration calorimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SangYoun Park*, Keon Young Kim, Sunmin Kim & Young Seok Yu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Uptake of circulating glucose into the cells happens via the insulin-mediated signalling pathway, which translocates the glucosetransporter 4 (GLUT4 vesicles from the intracellular compartmentto the plasma membrane. RabㆍGTPases are involvedin this vesicle trafficking, where RabㆍGTPase-activatingproteins (RabGAP enhance the GTP to GDP hydrolysis.TBC1D4 (AS160 and TBC1D1 are functional RabGAPs in theadipocytes and the skeletonal myocytes, respectively. Theseproteins contain two phosphotyrosine-binding domains (PTBsat the amino-terminus of the catalytic RabGAP domain. Thesecond PTB has been shown to interact with the cytoplasmicregion of the insulin-regulated aminopeptidase (IRAP of theGLUT4 vesicle. In this study, we quantitatively measured the∼μM affinity (KD between TBC1D4 PTB and IRAP using isothermaltitration calorimetry, and further showed that IRAP residues1-49 are the major region mediating this interaction. Wealso demonstrated that the IRAP residues 1-15 are necessarybut not sufficient for the PTB interaction.

  3. Phospholipase C-related catalytically inactive protein can regulate obesity, a state of peripheral inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke Yamawaki

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is defined as abnormal or excessive fat accumulation. Chronic inflammation in fat influences the development of obesity-related diseases. Many reports state that obesity increases the risk of morbidity in many diseases, including hypertension, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, sleep apnea, and breast, prostate and colon cancers, leading to increased mortality. Obesity is also associated with chronic neuropathologic conditions such as depression and Alzheimer's disease. However, there is strong evidence that weight loss reduces these risks, by limiting blood pressure and improving levels of serum triglycerides, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein (LDL-cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein (HDL-cholesterol. Prevention and control of obesity is complex, and requires a multifaceted approach. The elucidation of molecular mechanisms driving fat metabolism (adipogenesis and lipolysis aims at developing clinical treatments to control obesity. We recently reported a new regulatory mechanism in fat metabolism: a protein phosphatase binding protein, phospholipase C-related catalytically inactive protein (PRIP, regulates lipolysis in white adipocytes and heat production in brown adipocytes via phosphoregulation. Deficiency of PRIP in mice led to reduced fat accumulation and increased energy expenditure, resulting in a lean phenotype. Here, we evaluate PRIP as a new therapeutic target for the control of obesity.

  4. Contribution of the C-terminal region within the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 integrase to yeast lethality, chromatin binding and viral replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belhumeur Pierre

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 integrase (IN is a key viral enzymatic molecule required for the integration of the viral cDNA into the genome. Additionally, HIV-1 IN has been shown to play important roles in several other steps during the viral life cycle, including reverse transcription, nuclear import and chromatin targeting. Interestingly, previous studies have demonstrated that the expression of HIV-1 IN induces the lethal phenotype in some strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we performed mutagenic analyses of the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN in order to delineate the critical amino acid(s and/or motif(s required for the induction of the lethal phenotype in the yeast strain HP16, and to further elucidate the molecular mechanism which causes this phenotype. Results Our study identified three HIV-1 IN mutants, V165A, A179P and KR186,7AA, located in the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of IN that do not induce the lethal phenotype in yeast. Chromatin binding assays in yeast and mammalian cells demonstrated that these IN mutants were impaired for the ability to bind chromatin. Additionally, we determined that while these IN mutants failed to interact with LEDGF/p75, they retained the ability to bind Integrase interactor 1. Furthermore, we observed that VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 containing these IN mutants was unable to replicate in the C8166 T cell line and this defect was partially rescued by complementation with the catalytically inactive D64E IN mutant. Conclusion Overall, this study demonstrates that three mutations located in the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN inhibit the IN-induced lethal phenotype in yeast by inhibiting the binding of IN to the host chromatin. These results demonstrate that the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN is important for binding to host chromatin and is crucial for both viral replication and the promotion of

  5. Legal Challenges Related to the Regulation of a Domain Name System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Kalinauskas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—to review and analyse the problematic aspects related to domain name allocation and further usage processes, highlighting legal regulation of a domain name system.Design/methodology/approach—based on the comparison analysis of scientific literature, authors discuss problematic issues related to the legal regulation of domain name allocation and usage processes, analyse practical approaches and collision cases in the context of a domain name system. The authors examine the positive and negative aspects of a domain naming system and conflicting regulatory specifics. This paper describes the development of institutional bodies responsible for DNS management, supervision approaches and inner functionality policies.Findings—the authors examine domain naming system models and dispute resolution mechanisms, their evolution in the context of Internet development and the structural changes of the Internet governance institutions. The authors analyse tendencies related to DNS regulation and the possible effect of new regulation models in practice, while reflecting interests of stakeholders in the subject field.Research limitations/implications—agreements on the registration of domain names are based on self-regulation principles. A number of different interests may collide when speaking about domain name registration or usage and this issue becomes a major challenge to scientists and lawyers who are seeking an optimal domain-naming regulatory mechanism. The article does not address trademark conflicts within domain names in this respect. This should be considered as an object for separate study, which requires deeper analysis.Practical implications—the authors review key aspects of the domain name system and describe tendencies for the regulatory models.Value—the article emphasizes potential domain naming conflicts and disputes concerning the usage of common terms and phrases in order to manipulate information for illicit purposes. The

  6. Legal Challenges Related to the Regulation of a Domain Name System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Kalinauskas

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose—to review and analyse the problematic aspects related to domain name allocation and further usage processes, highlighting legal regulation of a domain name system. Design/methodology/approach—based on the comparison analysis of scientific literature, authors discuss problematic issues related to the legal regulation of domain name allocation and usage processes, analyse practical approaches and collision cases in the context of a domain name system. The authors examine the positive and negative aspects of a domain naming system and conflicting regulatory specifics. This paper describes the development of institutional bodies responsible for DNS management, supervision approaches and inner functionality policies. Findings—the authors examine domain naming system models and dispute resolution mechanisms, their evolution in the context of Internet development and the structural changes of the Internet governance institutions. The authors analyse tendencies related to DNS regulation and the possible effect of new regulation models in practice, while reflecting interests of stakeholders in the subject field. Research limitations/implications—agreements on the registration of domain names are based on self-regulation principles. A number of different interests may collide when speaking about domain name registration or usage and this issue becomes a major challenge to scientists and lawyers who are seeking an optimal domain-naming regulatory mechanism. The article does not address trademark conflicts within domain names in this respect. This should be considered as an object for separate study, which requires deeper analysis. Practical implications—the authors review key aspects of the domain name system and describe tendencies for the regulatory models. Value—the article emphasizes potential domain naming conflicts and disputes concerning the usage of common terms and phrases in order to manipulate information for illicit purposes

  7. ATP binding to p97/VCP D1 domain regulates selective recruitment of adaptors to its proximal N-domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sheng Chia

    Full Text Available p97/Valosin-containing protein (VCP is a member of the AAA-ATPase family involved in many cellular processes including cell division, intracellular trafficking and extraction of misfolded proteins in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD. It is a homohexamer with each subunit containing two tandem D1 and D2 ATPase domains and N- and C-terminal regions that function as adaptor protein binding domains. p97/VCP is directed to its many different functional pathways by associating with various adaptor proteins. The regulation of the recruitment of the adaptor proteins remains unclear. Two adaptor proteins, Ufd1/Npl4 and p47, which bind exclusively to the p97/VCP N-domain and direct p97/VCP to either ERAD-related processes or homotypic fusion of Golgi fragments, were studied here. Surface plasmon resonance biosensor-based assays allowed the study of binding kinetics in real time. In competition experiments, it was observed that in the presence of ATP, Ufd1/Npl4 was able to compete more effectively with p47 for binding to p97/VCP. By using non-hydrolysable ATP analogues and the hexameric truncated p97/N-D1 fragment, it was shown that binding rather than hydrolysis of ATP to the proximal D1 domain strengthened the Ufd1/Npl4 association with the N-domain, thus regulating the recruitment of either Ufd1/Npl4 or p47. This novel role of ATP and an assigned function to the D1 AAA-ATPase domain link the multiple functions of p97/VCP to the metabolic status of the cell.

  8. Dynamics of chromatin accessibility and gene regulation by MADS-domain transcription factorsin flower development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pajoro, A.; Madrigal, P.; Muiño, J.M.; Tomas Matus, J.; Jin, J.; Mecchia, M.A.; Debernardi, J.M.; Palatnik, J.F.; Balazadeh, S.; Arif, M.; Ó’Maoiléidigh, D.S.; Wellmer, F.; Krajewski, P.; Riechmann, J.L.; Angenent, G.C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Development of eukaryotic organisms is controlled by transcription factors that trigger specific and global changes in gene expression programs. In plants, MADS-domain transcription factors act as master regulators of developmental switches and organ specification. However, the

  9. Stand-Alone EAL Domain Proteins Form a Distinct Subclass of EAL Proteins Involved in Regulation of Cell Motility and Biofilm Formation in Enterobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Mouali, Youssef; Kim, Hyunhee; Ahmad, Irfan; Brauner, Annelie; Liu, Ying; Skurnik, Mikael; Galperin, Michael Y; Römling, Ute

    2017-09-15

    that in FlhDC-harboring beta- and gammaproteobacteria, some EAL-only proteins evolved to become catalytically inactive and regulate motility and biofilm formation by interacting with FlhDC.IMPORTANCE The EAL domain superfamily consists mainly of proteins with cyclic dimeric GMP-specific phosphodiesterase activity, but individual domains have been classified in three classes according to their functions and conserved amino acid signatures. Proteins that consist solely of stand-alone EAL domains cannot rely on other domains to form catalytically active dimers, and most of them fall into one of two distinct classes: catalytically active phosphodiesterases with well-conserved residues of the active site and the dimerization loop, and catalytically inactive YdiV/CdgR-like proteins that regulate bacterial motility by binding to the flagellar master regulator, FlhDC, and are found primarily in enterobacteria. The presence of apparently inactive EAL-only proteins in the bacteria that do not express FlhD suggests the existence of additional EAL interaction partners. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Three dimensional model of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus helicase ATPase catalytic domain and molecular design of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus helicase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Marcin; Eitner, Krystian; von Grotthuss, Marcin; Rychlewski, Leszek; Banachowicz, Ewa; Grabarkiewicz, Tomasz; Szkoda, Tomasz; Kolinski, Andrzej

    2006-05-01

    The modeling of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus helicase ATPase catalytic domain was performed using the protein structure prediction Meta Server and the 3D Jury method for model selection, which resulted in the identification of 1JPR, 1UAA and 1W36 PDB structures as suitable templates for creating a full atom 3D model. This model was further utilized to design small molecules that are expected to block an ATPase catalytic pocket thus inhibit the enzymatic activity. Binding sites for various functional groups were identified in a series of molecular dynamics calculation. Their positions in the catalytic pocket were used as constraints in the Cambridge structural database search for molecules having the pharmacophores that interacted most strongly with the enzyme in a desired position. The subsequent MD simulations followed by calculations of binding energies of the designed molecules were compared to ATP identifying the most successful candidates, for likely inhibitors—molecules possessing two phosphonic acid moieties at distal ends of the molecule.

  11. An Insight into the Interaction Mode Between CheB and Chemoreceptor from Two Crystal Structures of CheB Methylesterase Catalytic Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K Cho; B Crane; S Park

    2011-12-31

    We have determined 2.2 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima CheB methylesterase domain to provide insight into the interaction mode between CheB and chemoreceptors. T. maritima CheB methylesterase domain has identical topology of a modified doubly-wound {alpha}/{beta} fold that was observed from the previously reported Salmonella typhimurium counterpart, but the analysis of the electrostatic potential surface near the catalytic triad indicated considerable charge distribution difference. As the CheB demethylation consensus sites of the chemoreceptors, the CheB substrate, are not uniquely conserved between T. maritima and S. typhimurium, such surfaces with differing electrostatic properties may reflect CheB regions that mediate protein-protein interaction. Via the computational docking of the two T. maritima and S. typhimurium CheB structures to the respective T. maritima and Escherichia coli chemoreceptors, we propose a CheB:chemoreceptor interaction mode.

  12. Structure of the chloroplast ribosome: novel domains for translation regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea L Manuell

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression in chloroplasts is controlled primarily through the regulation of translation. This regulation allows coordinate expression between the plastid and nuclear genomes, and is responsive to environmental conditions. Despite common ancestry with bacterial translation, chloroplast translation is more complex and involves positive regulatory mRNA elements and a host of requisite protein translation factors that do not have counterparts in bacteria. Previous proteomic analyses of the chloroplast ribosome identified a significant number of chloroplast-unique ribosomal proteins that expand upon a basic bacterial 70S-like composition. In this study, cryo-electron microscopy and single-particle reconstruction were used to calculate the structure of the chloroplast ribosome to a resolution of 15.5 A. Chloroplast-unique proteins are visualized as novel structural additions to a basic bacterial ribosome core. These structures are located at optimal positions on the chloroplast ribosome for interaction with mRNAs during translation initiation. Visualization of these chloroplast-unique structures on the ribosome, combined with mRNA cross-linking, allows us to propose a model for translation initiation in chloroplasts in which chloroplast-unique ribosomal proteins interact with plastid-specific translation factors and RNA elements to facilitate regulated translation of chloroplast mRNAs.

  13. Characterization of the N-Terminal Catalytic Domain of Lytµ1/6, an Endolysin from Streptomyces aureofaciens Phage µ1/6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkašovská, Jarmila; Godány, Andrej

    2016-10-01

    Previous characterization of Lytµ1/6, an endolysin from Streptomyces aureofaciens phage µ1/6, suggested that the N-terminal domain is responsible for the catalytic activity of Lytµ1/6. Mutational analyses (deletions and site-directed mutagenesis) demonstrated that lytic activity of Lytµ1/6 relies on the N-terminal part of about 200 amino acid residues. Various C-terminally truncated versions of Lytµ1/6 failed to cause lysis, indicating the necessity of the CBD for full enzyme activity. Functional analysis of the point mutants suggested that the residues K27, H31, E109, H176, and D184 were essential for lytic activity of the µ1/6 endolysin. Further characterization of the purified Lytµ1/6 revealed that this endolysin is an N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase which seems to be unrelated to any of the known conserved catalytic domains of phage endolysins or bacterial autolysins.

  14. Metal bridges between the PhoQ sensor domain and the membrane regulate transmembrane signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Uhn Soo; Bader, Martin W; Amaya, Maria F; Daley, Margaret E; Klevit, Rachel E; Miller, Samuel I; Xu, Wenqing

    2006-03-10

    Bacterial histidine kinases respond to environmental stimuli by transducing a signal from an extracytosolic sensor domain to a cytosolic catalytic domain. Among them, PhoQ promotes bacterial virulence and is tightly repressed by the divalent cations such as calcium and magnesium. We have determined the crystal structure of the PhoQ sensor domain from Salmonella typhimurium in the Ca2+-bound state, which reveals a highly negatively charged surface that is in close proximity to the inner membrane. This acidic surface binds at least three Ca2+, which mediate the PhoQ-membrane interaction. Mutagenesis analysis indicates that structural integrity at the membrane proximal region of the PhoQ sensor domain promotes metal-mediated repression. We propose that depletion or displacement of divalent cations leads to charge repulsion between PhoQ and the membrane, which initiates transmembrane signaling through a change in orientation between the PhoQ sensor domain and membrane. Therefore, both PhoQ and the membrane are required for extracytosolic sensing and transmembrane signaling.

  15. Regulation of catalytic behaviour of hydrolases through interactions with functionalized carbon-based nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlidis, Ioannis V.; Vorhaben, Torge; Gournis, Dimitrios; Papadopoulos, George K.; Bornscheuer, Uwe T.; Stamatis, Haralambos

    2012-05-01

    The interaction of enzymes with carbon-based nanomaterials (CBNs) is crucial for the function of biomolecules and therefore for the design and development of effective nanobiocatalytic systems. In this study, the effect of functionalized CBNs, such as graphene oxide (GO) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs), on the catalytic behaviour of various hydrolases of biotechnological interest was monitored and the interactions between CBNs and proteins were investigated. The enzyme-nanomaterial interactions significantly affect the catalytic behaviour of enzymes, resulting in an increase up to 60 % of the catalytic efficiency of lipases and a decrease up to 30 % of the esterase. Moreover, the use of CNTs and GO derivatives, especially those that are amine-functionalized, led to increased thermal stability of most the hydrolases tested. Fluorescence and circular dichroism studies indicated that the altered catalytic behaviour of enzymes in the presence of CBNs arises from specific enzyme-nanomaterial interactions, which can lead to significant conformational changes. In the case of lipases, the conformational changes led to a more active and rigid structure, while in the case of esterases this led to destabilization and unfolding. Kinetic and spectroscopic studies indicated that the extent of the interactions between CBNs and hydrolases can be mainly controlled by the functionalization of nanomaterials than by their geometry.

  16. The eag domain regulates hERG channel inactivation gating via a direct interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustina, Ahleah S.

    2013-01-01

    Human ether-á-go-go (eag)-related gene (hERG) potassium channel kinetics are characterized by rapid inactivation upon depolarization, along with rapid recovery from inactivation and very slow closing (deactivation) upon repolarization. These factors combine to create a resurgent hERG current, where the current amplitude is paradoxically larger with repolarization than with depolarization. Previous data showed that the hERG N-terminal eag domain regulated deactivation kinetics by making a direct interaction with the C-terminal region of the channel. A primary mechanism for fast inactivation depends on residues in the channel pore; however, inactivation was also shown to be slower after deletion of a large N-terminal region. The mechanism for N-terminal region regulation of inactivation is unclear. Here, we investigated the contributions of the large N-terminal domains (amino acids 1–354), including the eag domain (amino acids 1–135), to hERG channel inactivation kinetics and steady-state inactivation properties. We found that N-deleted channels lacking just the eag domain (Δ2–135) or both the eag domain and the adjacent proximal domain (Δ2–354) had less rectifying current–voltage (I-V) relationships, slower inactivation, faster recovery from inactivation, and lessened steady-state inactivation. We coexpressed genetically encoded N-terminal fragments for the eag domain (N1–135) or the eag domain plus the proximal domain (N1–354) with N-deleted hERG Δ2–135 or hERG Δ2–354 channels and found that the resulting channels had more rectifying I-V relationships, faster inactivation, slower recovery from inactivation, and increased steady-state inactivation, similar to those properties measured for wild-type (WT) hERG. We also found that the eag domain–containing fragments regulated the time to peak and the voltage at the peak of a resurgent current elicited with a ramp voltage protocol. The eag domain–containing fragments effectively converted N

  17. Crystal Structure of the SPOC Domain of the Arabidopsis Flowering Regulator FPA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yinglu Zhang

    Full Text Available The Arabidopsis protein FPA controls flowering time by regulating the alternative 3'-end processing of the FLOWERING LOCUS (FLC antisense RNA. FPA belongs to the split ends (SPEN family of proteins, which contain N-terminal RNA recognition motifs (RRMs and a SPEN paralog and ortholog C-terminal (SPOC domain. The SPOC domain is highly conserved among FPA homologs in plants, but the conservation with the domain in other SPEN proteins is much lower. We have determined the crystal structure of Arabidopsis thaliana FPA SPOC domain at 2.7 Å resolution. The overall structure is similar to that of the SPOC domain in human SMRT/HDAC1 Associated Repressor Protein (SHARP, although there are also substantial conformational differences between them. Structural and sequence analyses identify a surface patch that is conserved among plant FPA homologs. Mutations of two residues in this surface patch did not disrupt FPA functions, suggesting that either the SPOC domain is not required for the role of FPA in regulating RNA 3'-end formation or the functions of the FPA SPOC domain cannot be disrupted by the combination of mutations, in contrast to observations with the SHARP SPOC domain.

  18. Proteins with GGDEF and EAL domains regulate Pseudomonas putida biofilm formation and dispersal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjermansen, Morten; Ragas, Paula Cornelia; Tolker-Nielsen, Tim

    2006-01-01

    Microbial biofilm formation often causes problems in medical and industrial settings, and knowledge about the factors that are involved in biofilm development and dispersion is useful for creating strategies to control the processes. In this report, we present evidence that proteins with GGDEF...... and EAL domains are involved in the regulation of biofilm formation and biofilm dispersion in Pseudomonas putida. Overexpression in P. putida of the Escherichia coli YedQ protein, which contains a GGDEF domain, resulted in increased biofilm formation. Overexpression in P. putida of the E. coli Yhj......H protein, which contains an EAL domain, strongly inhibited biofilm formation. Induction of YhjH expression in P. putida cells situated in established biofilms led to rapid dispersion of the biofilms. These results support the emerging theme that GGDEF-domain and EAL-domain proteins are involved...

  19. Improving the reversibility of thermal denaturation and catalytic efficiency of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase through stabilizing a long loop in domain B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhu; Duan, Xuguo; Chen, Sheng; Wu, Jing

    2017-01-01

    The reversibility of thermal denaturation and catalytic efficiency of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase were improved through site-directed mutagenesis. By using multiple sequence alignment and PoPMuSiC algorithm, Ser187 and Asn188, which located within a long loop in Domain B of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase, were selected for mutation. In addition, Ala269, which is adjacent to Ser187 and Asn188, was also investigated. Seven mutants carrying the mutations S187D, N188T, N188S, A269K, A269K/S187D, S187D/N188T, and A269K/S187D/N188T were generated and characterized. The most thermostable mutant, A269K/S187D/N188T, exhibited a 9-fold improvement in half-life at 95°C and pH 5.5, compared with that of the wild-type enzyme. Mutant A269K/S187D/N188T also exhibited improved catalytic efficiency. The catalytic efficiency of mutant A269K/S187D/N188T reached 5.87×103±0.17 g·L-1·s-1 at pH 5.5, which is 1.84-fold larger than the corresponding value determined for the wild-type enzyme. Furthermore, the structure analysis showed that immobilization of the loop containing Ser187 and Asn188 plays a significant role in developing the properties of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase. PMID:28253342

  20. Signaling domain of Sonic Hedgehog as cannibalistic calcium-regulated zinc-peptidase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Rebollido-Rios

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Sonic Hedgehog (Shh is a representative of the evolutionary closely related class of Hedgehog proteins that have essential signaling functions in animal development. The N-terminal domain (ShhN is also assigned to the group of LAS proteins (LAS = Lysostaphin type enzymes, D-Ala-D-Ala metalloproteases, Sonic Hedgehog, of which all members harbor a structurally well-defined Zn2+ center; however, it is remarkable that ShhN so far is the only LAS member without proven peptidase activity. Another unique feature of ShhN in the LAS group is a double-Ca2+ center close to the zinc. We have studied the effect of these calcium ions on ShhN structure, dynamics, and interactions. We find that the presence of calcium has a marked impact on ShhN properties, with the two calcium ions having different effects. The more strongly bound calcium ion significantly stabilizes the overall structure. Surprisingly, the binding of the second calcium ion switches the putative catalytic center from a state similar to LAS enzymes to a state that probably is catalytically inactive. We describe in detail the mechanics of the switch, including the effect on substrate co-ordinating residues and on the putative catalytic water molecule. The properties of the putative substrate binding site suggest that ShhN could degrade other ShhN molecules, e.g. by cleavage at highly conserved glycines in ShhN. To test experimentally the stability of ShhN against autodegradation, we compare two ShhN mutants in vitro: (1 a ShhN mutant unable to bind calcium but with putative catalytic center intact, and thus, according to our hypothesis, a constitutively active peptidase, and (2 a mutant carrying additionally mutation E177A, i.e., with the putative catalytically active residue knocked out. The in vitro results are consistent with ShhN being a cannibalistic zinc-peptidase. These experiments also reveal that the peptidase activity depends on pH.

  1. CARF and WYL domains: ligand-binding regulators of prokaryotic defense systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira eMakarova

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available CRISPR-Cas adaptive immunity systems of bacteria and archaea insert fragments of virus or plasmid DNA as spacer sequences into CRISPR repeat loci. Processed transcripts encompassing these spacers guide the cleavage of the cognate foreign DNA or RNA. Most CRISPR-Cas loci, in addition to recognized cas genes, also include genes that are not directly implicated in spacer acquisition, CRISPR transcript processing or interference. Here we comprehensively analyze sequences, structures and genomic neighborhoods of one of the most widespread groups of such genes that encode proteins containing a predicted nucleotide-binding domain with a Rossmann-like fold, which we denote CARF (CRISPR-associated Rossmann fold. Several CARF protein structures have been determined but functional characterization of these proteins is lacking. The CARF domain is most frequently combined with a C-terminal winged helix-turn-helix DNA-binding domain and effector domains most of which are predicted to possess DNase or RNase activity. Divergent CARF domains are also found in RtcR proteins, sigma-54 dependent regulators of the rtc RNA repair operon. CARF genes frequently co-occur with those coding for proteins containing the WYL domain with the Sm-like SH3 β-barrel fold, which is also predicted to bind ligands. CRISPR-Cas and possibly other defense systems are predicted to be transcriptionally regulated by multiple ligand-binding proteins containing WYL and CARF domains which sense modified nucleotides and nucleotide derivatives generated during virus infection. We hypothesize that CARF domains also transmit the signal from the bound ligand to the fused effector domains which attack either alien or self nucleic acids, resulting, respectively, in immunity complementing the CRISPR-Cas action or in dormancy/programmed cell death.

  2. The Caenorhabditis elegans iodotyrosine deiodinase ortholog SUP-18 functions through a conserved channel SC-box to regulate the muscle two-pore domain potassium channel SUP-9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Perez de la Cruz

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Loss-of-function mutations in the Caenorhabditis elegans gene sup-18 suppress the defects in muscle contraction conferred by a gain-of-function mutation in SUP-10, a presumptive regulatory subunit of the SUP-9 two-pore domain K(+ channel associated with muscle membranes. We cloned sup-18 and found that it encodes the C. elegans ortholog of mammalian iodotyrosine deiodinase (IYD, an NADH oxidase/flavin reductase that functions in iodine recycling and is important for the biosynthesis of thyroid hormones that regulate metabolism. The FMN-binding site of mammalian IYD is conserved in SUP-18, which appears to require catalytic activity to function. Genetic analyses suggest that SUP-10 can function with SUP-18 to activate SUP-9 through a pathway that is independent of the presumptive SUP-9 regulatory subunit UNC-93. We identified a novel evolutionarily conserved serine-cysteine-rich region in the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain of SUP-9 required for its specific activation by SUP-10 and SUP-18 but not by UNC-93. Since two-pore domain K(+ channels regulate the resting membrane potentials of numerous cell types, we suggest that the SUP-18 IYD regulates the activity of the SUP-9 channel using NADH as a coenzyme and thus couples the metabolic state of muscle cells to muscle membrane excitability.

  3. Neurofilament subunit (NFL) head domain phosphorylation regulates axonal transport of neurofilaments.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Yates, Darran M

    2009-04-01

    Neurofilaments are the intermediate filaments of neurons and are synthesised in neuronal cell bodies and then transported through axons. Neurofilament light chain (NFL) is a principal component of neurofilaments, and phosphorylation of NFL head domain is believed to regulate the assembly of neurofilaments. However, the role that NFL phosphorylation has on transport of neurofilaments is poorly understood. To address this issue, we monitored axonal transport of phosphorylation mutants of NFL. We mutated four known phosphorylation sites in NFL head domain to either preclude phosphorylation, or mimic permanent phosphorylation. Mutation to preclude phosphorylation had no effect on transport but mutation of three sites to mimic permanent phosphorylation inhibited transport. Mutation of all four sites together to mimic permanent phosphorylation proved especially potent at inhibiting transport and also disrupted neurofilament assembly. Our results suggest that NFL head domain phosphorylation is a regulator of neurofilament axonal transport.

  4. Carbon Domains on MoS2/TiO2 System via Catalytic Acetylene Oligomerization: Synthesis, Structure, and Surface Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Cravanzola

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon domains have been obtained at the surface of a MoS2/TiO2 (Evonik, P25 system via oligomerization and cyclotrimerization reactions involved in the interaction of the photoactive material with acetylene. Firstly, MoS2 nanosheets have been synthesized at the surface of TiO2, via sulfidation of a molybdenum oxide precursor with H2S (bottom-up method. Secondly, the morphology and the structure, the optical and the vibrational properties of the obtained materials, for each step of the synthesis procedure, have been investigated by microscopy and spectroscopy methods. In particular, transmission electron microscopy images provide a simple tool to highlight the effectiveness of the sulfidation process, thus showing 1L, 2L, and stacked MoS2 nanosheets anchored to the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles. Lastly, in-situ FTIR spectroscopy investigation gives insights into the nature of the oligomerized species, showing that the formation of both polyenic and aromatic systems can be taken into account, being their formation promoted by both Ti and Mo catalytic sites. This finding gives an opportunity for the assembly of extended polyenic, polyaromatic, or mixed domains firmly attached at the surface of photoactive materials. The presented approach, somehow different from the carbon adding or doping processes of TiO2, is of potential interest for the advanced green chemistry and energy conversion/transport applications.

  5. Regulation of the catalytic behavior of pullulanases chelated onto nickel (II)-modified magnetic nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianfeng; Liu, Zhongmei; Zhou, Zhemin

    2017-06-01

    Chelating of pullulanases onto nickel (II)-modified magnetic nanoparticles results in one-step purification and immobilization of pullulanase, and facilitates the commercial application of pullulanase in industrial scale. To improve the catalytic behavior, especially the operational stability, of the nanocatalyst in consecutive batch reactions, we prepared various iminodiacetic acid-modified magnetic nanoparticles differed in surface polarity and spacer length, on which the His6-tagged pullulanases were chelated via nickel ions, and then studied the correlation between the MNPs surface property and the corresponding catalyst behavior. When pullulanases were chelated onto the surface-modified MNPs, the thermostability of all pullulanase derivatives were lower than that of free counterpart, being not relevant to the protein orientation guided by the locality of the His6-tag, but related to the MNPs basal surface polarity and the grafted spacer length. After chelating of pullulanases onto MNPs, there were changes observed in the pH-activity profile and the apparent Michaelis constant toward pullulan. The changing tendencies were mainly dependent on the His6-tagged pullulanase orientation, and the changing extents were tuned by the spacer length. The reusability of pullulanase immobilized by N-terminal His6-tag was higher than that of pullulanase immobilized by C-terminal His6-tag. Moreover, the reusability of the immobilized pullulanase tested increased till grafting polyether amine-400 as spacer-arm, therefore the N-terminal His6-tagged pullulanase chelating MNPs grafted polyether amine-400 gave the best reusability, which retained 60% of initial activity after 18 consecutive cycles with a total reaction time of 9h. Additionally, the correlation analysis of the catalyst behaviors indicated that the reusability was independent from other catalytic properties such as thermostability and substrate affinity. All the results revealed that the catalyst behavior can be

  6. The physical size of transcription factors is key to transcriptional regulation in chromatin domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeshima, Kazuhiro; Kaizu, Kazunari; Tamura, Sachiko; Nozaki, Tadasu; Kokubo, Tetsuro; Takahashi, Koichi

    2015-02-01

    Genetic information, which is stored in the long strand of genomic DNA as chromatin, must be scanned and read out by various transcription factors. First, gene-specific transcription factors, which are relatively small (˜50 kDa), scan the genome and bind regulatory elements. Such factors then recruit general transcription factors, Mediators, RNA polymerases, nucleosome remodellers, and histone modifiers, most of which are large protein complexes of 1-3 MDa in size. Here, we propose a new model for the functional significance of the size of transcription factors (or complexes) for gene regulation of chromatin domains. Recent findings suggest that chromatin consists of irregularly folded nucleosome fibres (10 nm fibres) and forms numerous condensed domains (e.g., topologically associating domains). Although the flexibility and dynamics of chromatin allow repositioning of genes within the condensed domains, the size exclusion effect of the domain may limit accessibility of DNA sequences by transcription factors. We used Monte Carlo computer simulations to determine the physical size limit of transcription factors that can enter condensed chromatin domains. Small gene-specific transcription factors can penetrate into the chromatin domains and search their target sequences, whereas large transcription complexes cannot enter the domain. Due to this property, once a large complex binds its target site via gene-specific factors it can act as a ‘buoy’ to keep the target region on the surface of the condensed domain and maintain transcriptional competency. This size-dependent specialization of target-scanning and surface-tethering functions could provide novel insight into the mechanisms of various DNA transactions, such as DNA replication and repair/recombination.

  7. Inhibition of Melanization by a Parasitoid Serine Protease Homolog Venom Protein Requires Both the Clip and the Non-Catalytic Protease-Like Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sassan Asgari

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Endoparasitoid wasps inject a variety of components into their host hemocoel at oviposition to facilitate successful development of their progeny. Among these are venom proteins which have been shown to play crucial roles in host regulation. A serine protease homolog (SPH-like venom protein from Cotesia rubecula was previously shown to inhibit melanization in the host hemolymph by blocking activation of prophenoloxidase to phenoloxidase, a key enzyme in melanin formation. Similar to other SPHs, Vn50 consists of a clip and a protease-like (SPL domain. Protein modeling demonstrated that Vn50 has a very similar structure to known SPHs and functional analysis of Vn50 domains expressed in insect cells indicated that neither of the domains on its own has an inhibitory effect on melanization.

  8. Catalytic domain of restriction endonuclease BmrI as a cleavage module for engineering endonucleases with novel substrate specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Siu-hong; Bao, Yongming; Ciszak, Ewa; Laget, Sophie; Xu, Shuang-yong

    2007-01-01

    Creating endonucleases with novel sequence specificities provides more possibilities to manipulate DNA. We have created a chimeric endonuclease (CH-endonuclease) consisting of the DNA cleavage domain of BmrI restriction endonuclease and C.BclI, a controller protein of the BclI restriction-modification system. The purified chimeric endonuclease, BmrI198-C.BclI, cleaves DNA at specific sites in the vicinity of the recognition sequence of C.BclI. Double-strand (ds) breaks were observed at two sites: 8 bp upstream and 18 bp within the C-box sequence. Using DNA substrates with deletions of C-box sequence, we show that the chimeric endonuclease requires the 5' half of the C box only for specific cleavage. A schematic model is proposed for the mode of protein-DNA binding and DNA cleavage. The present study demonstrates that the BmrI cleavage domain can be used to create combinatorial endonucleases that cleave DNA at specific sequences dictated by the DNA-binding partner. The resulting endonucleases will be useful in vitro and in vivo to create ds breaks at specific sites and generate deletions.

  9. THE CATALYTIC DOMAIN OF THE DIHYDROLIPOYL TRANSACETYLASE COMPONENT OF THE PYRUVATE-DEHYDROGENASE COMPLEX FROM AZOTOBACTER-VINELANDII AND ESCHERICHIA-COLI - EXPRESSION, PURIFICATION, PROPERTIES AND PRELIMINARY-X-RAY ANALYSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHULZE, E; WESTPHAL, AH; OBMOLOVA, G; MATTEVI, A; HOL, WGJ; DEKOK, A

    1991-01-01

    Partial sequences of the dihydrolipoyl transacetylase component (E2p) of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Azotobacter vinelandii and Escherichia coli, containing the catalytic domain, were cloned in pUC plasmids and over-expressed in E. coli TG2. A high expression of a homogeneous protein was

  10. MPN+, a putative catalytic motif found in a subset of MPN domain proteins from eukaryotes and prokaryotes, is critical for Rpn11 function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hofmann Kay

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Three macromolecular assemblages, the lid complex of the proteasome, the COP9-Signalosome (CSN and the eIF3 complex, all consist of multiple proteins harboring MPN and PCI domains. Up to now, no specific function for any of these proteins has been defined, nor has the importance of these motifs been elucidated. In particular Rpn11, a lid subunit, serves as the paradigm for MPN-containing proteins as it is highly conserved and important for proteasome function. Results We have identified a sequence motif, termed the MPN+ motif, which is highly conserved in a subset of MPN domain proteins such as Rpn11 and Csn5/Jab1, but is not present outside of this subfamily. The MPN+ motif consists of five polar residues that resemble the active site residues of hydrolytic enzyme classes, particularly that of metalloproteases. By using site-directed mutagenesis, we show that the MPN+ residues are important for the function of Rpn11, while a highly conserved Cys residue outside of the MPN+ motif is not essential. Single amino acid substitutions in MPN+ residues all show similar phenotypes, including slow growth, sensitivity to temperature and amino acid analogs, and general proteasome-dependent proteolysis defects. Conclusions The MPN+ motif is abundant in certain MPN-domain proteins, including newly identified proteins of eukaryotes, bacteria and archaea thought to act outside of the traditional large PCI/MPN complexes. The putative catalytic nature of the MPN+ motif makes it a good candidate for a pivotal enzymatic function, possibly a proteasome-associated deubiquitinating activity and a CSN-associated Nedd8/Rub1-removing activity.

  11. LIM domains regulate protein kinase C activity: a novel molecular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturana, Andrés D; Nakagawa, Noritaka; Yoshimoto, Nobuo; Tatematsu, Kenji; Hoshijima, Masahiko; Tanizawa, Katsuyuki; Kuroda, Shun'ichi

    2011-05-01

    Enigma homolog protein 1 (ENH1) acts as a scaffold that selectively associates protein kinases and transcription factors with cytoskeletal elements. ENH1 comprises an N-terminal PDZ domain and three C-terminal LIM domains. Through the LIM domains ENH1 interacts with the N-terminal region of protein kinase C βI (PKCβI). Here, we show that when ENH1 is co-expressed, PKCβI is translocated from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane in the absence of any other stimulation. Moreover expression of ENH1 markedly increases PKCβI activity in the absence of PKC activators. A similar activation of PKCβI was observed with co-expression of Cypher1 or Enigma, but not other LIM proteins. The region including the three LIM domains of ENH1 (residues 415-591) appears to be sufficient for this PKCβI activation. Finally, interaction with ENH1 also increases the activity of PKCα and PKCγ, whereas it reduces PKCζ activity. These findings provide strong evidence that ENH1 activates conventional PKCs by directly binding through its LIM domains. Thus, LIM domains have a novel molecular function: the regulation of PKC activities in a PKC isoform-specific manner. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Symptomatic type 1 protein C deficiency caused by a de novo Ser270Leu mutation in the catalytic domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, B; Koefoed, P; Thorsen, S

    2001-01-01

    the plasma protein C deficiency and are consistent with a disease mechanism that involves synthesis of mutant protein followed by intracellular degradation before its secretion into the extracellular space. The mutation was not present in the parents of the proband, suggesting a de novo mutation. Non......Heterozygosity for a C8524T transition in the protein C gene converting Ser270(TCG) to Leu(TTG) in the protease domain was identified in a family with venous thrombosis. The mutation was associated with parallel reduction in plasma levels of protein C anticoagulant activity and protein C antigen......, which is consistent with a type 1 deficiency. Transient expression of mutant protein C cDNA in human kidney 293 cells and analysis of protein C antigen in culture media and cell lysates showed that the secretion of mutant protein compared with wild-type protein was reduced by at least 97% while...

  13. Stabilization of a nucleotide-binding domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator yields insight into disease-causing mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernon, Robert M; Chong, P Andrew; Lin, Hong; Yang, Zhengrong; Zhou, Qingxian; Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Dawson, Jennifer E; Riordan, John R; Brouillette, Christie G; Thibodeau, Patrick H; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2017-08-25

    Characterization of the second nucleotide-binding domain (NBD2) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) has lagged behind research into the NBD1 domain, in part because NBD1 contains the F508del mutation, which is the dominant cause of cystic fibrosis. Research on NBD2 has also been hampered by the overall instability of the domain and the difficulty of producing reagents. Nonetheless, multiple disease-causing mutations reside in NBD2, and the domain is critical for CFTR function, because channel gating involves NBD1/NBD2 dimerization, and NBD2 contains the catalytically active ATPase site in CFTR. Recognizing the paucity of structural and biophysical data on NBD2, here we have defined a bioinformatics-based method for manually identifying stabilizing substitutions in NBD2, and we used an iterative process of screening single substitutions against thermal melting points to both produce minimally mutated stable constructs and individually characterize mutations. We present a range of stable constructs with minimal mutations to help inform further research on NBD2. We have used this stabilized background to study the effects of NBD2 mutations identified in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, demonstrating that mutants such as N1303K and G1349D are characterized by lower stability, as shown previously for some NBD1 mutations, suggesting a potential role for NBD2 instability in the pathology of CF. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Factor H C-Terminal Domains Are Critical for Regulation of Platelet/Granulocyte Aggregate Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Z. Blatt

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Platelet/granulocyte aggregates (PGAs increase thromboinflammation in the vasculature, and PGA formation is tightly controlled by the complement alternative pathway (AP negative regulator, Factor H (FH. Mutations in FH are associated with the prothrombotic disease atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS, yet it is unknown whether increased PGA formation contributes to the thrombosis seen in patients with aHUS. Here, flow cytometry assays were used to evaluate the effects of aHUS-related mutations on FH regulation of PGA formation and characterize the mechanism. Utilizing recombinant fragments of FH spanning the entire length of the protein, we mapped the regions of FH most critical for limiting AP activity on the surface of isolated human platelets and neutrophils, as well as the regions most critical for regulating PGA formation in human whole blood stimulated with thrombin receptor-activating peptide (TRAP. FH domains 19–20 were the most critical for limiting AP activity on platelets, neutrophils, and at the platelet/granulocyte interface. The role of FH in PGA formation was attributed to its ability to regulate AP-mediated C5a generation. AHUS-related mutations in domains 19–20 caused differential effects on control of PGA formation and AP activity on platelets and neutrophils. Our data indicate FH C-terminal domains are key for regulating PGA formation, thus increased FH protection may have a beneficial impact on diseases characterized by increased PGA formation, such as cardiovascular disease. Additionally, aHUS-related mutations in domains 19–20 have varying effects on control of TRAP-mediated PGA formation, suggesting that some, but not all, aHUS-related mutations may cause increased PGA formation that contributes to excessive thrombosis in patients with aHUS.

  15. A conserved inter-domain communication mechanism regulates the ATPase activity of the AAA-protein Drg1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prattes, M.; Loibl, M.; Zisser, G.; Luschnig, D.; Kappel, L.; Rossler, I.; Grassegger, M.; Hromic, A.; Krieger, E.; Gruber, K.; Pertschy, B.; Bergler, H.

    2017-01-01

    AAA-ATPases fulfil essential roles in different cellular pathways and often act in form of hexameric complexes. Interaction with pathway-specific substrate and adaptor proteins recruits them to their targets and modulates their catalytic activity. This substrate dependent regulation of ATP

  16. Unique biological properties of catalytic domain directed human anti-CAIX antibodies discovered through phage-display technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xu

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX, gene G250/MN-encoded transmembrane protein is highly expressed in various human epithelial tumors such as renal clear cell carcinoma (RCC, but absent from the corresponding normal tissues. Besides the CA signal transduction activity, CAIX may serve as a biomarker in early stages of oncogenesis and also as a reliable marker of hypoxia, which is associated with tumor resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Although results from preclinical and clinical studies have shown CAIX as a promising target for detection and therapy for RCC, only a limited number of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs and one humanized mAb are available for clinical testing and development. In this study, paramagnetic proteoliposomes of CAIX (CAIX-PMPLs were constructed and used for anti-CAIX antibody selection from our 27 billion human single-chain antibody (scFv phage display libraries. A panel of thirteen human scFvs that specifically recognize CAIX expressed on cell surface was identified, epitope mapped primarily to the CA domain, and affinity-binding constants (KD determined. These human anti-CAIX mAbs are diverse in their functions including induction of surface CAIX internalization into endosomes and inhibition of the carbonic anhydrase activity, the latter being a unique feature that has not been previously reported for anti-CAIX antibodies. These human anti-CAIX antibodies are important reagents for development of new immunotherapies and diagnostic tools for RCC treatment as well as extending our knowledge on the basic structure-function relationships of the CAIX molecule.

  17. Acetylation regulates WRN catalytic activities and affects base excision DNA repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muftuoglu, Meltem; Kusumoto, Rika; Speina, Elzbieta

    2008-01-01

    The Werner protein (WRN), defective in the premature aging disorder Werner syndrome, participates in a number of DNA metabolic processes, and we have been interested in the possible regulation of its function in DNA repair by post-translational modifications. Acetylation mediated by histone...

  18. Dynamics of chromatin accessibility and gene regulation by MADS-domain transcription factors in flower development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajoro, Alice; Madrigal, Pedro; Muiño, Jose M; Matus, José Tomás; Jin, Jian; Mecchia, Martin A; Debernardi, Juan M; Palatnik, Javier F; Balazadeh, Salma; Arif, Muhammad; Ó'Maoiléidigh, Diarmuid S; Wellmer, Frank; Krajewski, Pawel; Riechmann, José-Luis; Angenent, Gerco C; Kaufmann, Kerstin

    2014-03-03

    Development of eukaryotic organisms is controlled by transcription factors that trigger specific and global changes in gene expression programs. In plants, MADS-domain transcription factors act as master regulators of developmental switches and organ specification. However, the mechanisms by which these factors dynamically regulate the expression of their target genes at different developmental stages are still poorly understood. We characterized the relationship of chromatin accessibility, gene expression, and DNA binding of two MADS-domain proteins at different stages of Arabidopsis flower development. Dynamic changes in APETALA1 and SEPALLATA3 DNA binding correlated with changes in gene expression, and many of the target genes could be associated with the developmental stage in which they are transcriptionally controlled. We also observe dynamic changes in chromatin accessibility during flower development. Remarkably, DNA binding of APETALA1 and SEPALLATA3 is largely independent of the accessibility status of their binding regions and it can precede increases in DNA accessibility. These results suggest that APETALA1 and SEPALLATA3 may modulate chromatin accessibility, thereby facilitating access of other transcriptional regulators to their target genes. Our findings indicate that different homeotic factors regulate partly overlapping, yet also distinctive sets of target genes in a partly stage-specific fashion. By combining the information from DNA-binding and gene expression data, we are able to propose models of stage-specific regulatory interactions, thereby addressing dynamics of regulatory networks throughout flower development. Furthermore, MADS-domain TFs may regulate gene expression by alternative strategies, one of which is modulation of chromatin accessibility.

  19. The phage lytic proteins from the Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA88 display multiple active catalytic domains and do not trigger staphylococcal resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Rodríguez-Rubio

    Full Text Available The increase in antibiotic resistance world-wide revitalized the interest in the use of phage lysins to combat pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we analyzed the specific cleavage sites on the staphylococcal peptidoglycan produced by three phage lytic proteins. The investigated cell wall lytic enzymes were the endolysin LysH5 derived from the S. aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phi-IPLA88 (phi-IPLA88 and two fusion proteins between lysostaphin and the virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolase HydH5 (HydH5SH3b and HydH5Lyso. We determined that all catalytic domains present in these proteins were active. Additionally, we tested for the emergence of resistant Staphylococcus aureus to any of the three phage lytic proteins constructs. Resistant S. aureus could not be identified after 10 cycles of bacterial exposure to phage lytic proteins either in liquid or plate cultures. However, a quick increase in lysostaphin resistance (up to 1000-fold in liquid culture was observed. The lack of resistant development supports the use of phage lytic proteins as future therapeutics to treat staphylococcal infections.

  20. CDKL5 gene status in female patients with epilepsy and Rett-like features: two new mutations in the catalytic domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maortua Hiart

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5 located in the Xp22 region have been shown to cause a subset of atypical Rett syndrome with infantile spasms or early seizures starting in the first postnatal months. Methods We performed mutation screening of CDKL5 in 60 female patients who had been identified as negative for the methyl CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2 mutations, but who had current or past epilepsy, regardless of the age of onset, type, and severity. All the exons in the CDKL5 gene and their neighbouring sequences were examined, and CDKL5 rearrangements were studied by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. Results Six previously unidentified DNA changes were detected, two of which were disease-causing mutations in the catalytic domain: a frameshift mutation (c.509_510insGT; p.Glu170GlyfsX36 and a complete deletion of exon 10. Both were found in patients with seizures that started in the first month of life. Conclusions This study demonstrated the importance of CDKL5 mutations as etiological factors in neurodevelopmental disorders, and indicated that a thorough analysis of the CDKL5 gene sequence and its rearrangements should be considered in females with Rett syndrome-like phenotypes, severe encephalopathy and epilepsy with onset before 5 months of age. This study also confirmed the usefulness of MLPA as a diagnostic screening method for use in clinical practice.

  1. Domain movements during CCA-addition: a new function for motif C in the catalytic core of the human tRNA nucleotidyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Felix G M; Rickert, Christian; Bluschke, Alexander; Betat, Heike; Steinhoff, Heinz-Jürgen; Mörl, Mario

    2015-01-01

    CCA-adding enzymes are highly specific RNA polymerases that synthesize and maintain the sequence CCA at the tRNA 3'-end. This nucleotide triplet is a prerequisite for tRNAs to be aminoacylated and to participate in protein biosynthesis. During CCA-addition, a set of highly conserved motifs in the catalytic core of these enzymes is responsible for accurate sequential nucleotide incorporation. In the nucleotide binding pocket, three amino acid residues form Watson-Crick-like base pairs to the incoming CTP and ATP. A reorientation of these templating amino acids switches the enzyme's specificity from CTP to ATP recognition. However, the mechanism underlying this essential structural rearrangement is not understood. Here, we show that motif C, whose actual function has not been identified yet, contributes to the switch in nucleotide specificity during polymerization. Biochemical characterization as well as EPR spectroscopy measurements of the human enzyme reveal that mutating the highly conserved amino acid position D139 in this motif interferes with AMP incorporation and affects interdomain movements in the enzyme. We propose a model of action, where motif C forms a flexible spring element modulating the relative orientation of the enzyme's head and body domains to accommodate the growing 3'-end of the tRNA. Furthermore, these conformational transitions initiate the rearranging of the templating amino acids to switch the specificity of the nucleotide binding pocket from CTP to ATP during CCA-synthesis.

  2. The C-terminal domain of human grp94 protects the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2 (CK2alpha) against thermal aggregation. Role of disulfide bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roher, N; Miró, F; Boldyreff, B

    2001-01-01

    The C-terminal domain (residues 518-803) of the 94 kDa glucose regulated protein (grp94) was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with a His6-N-terminal tag (grp94-CT). This truncated form of grp94 formed dimers and oligomers that could be dissociated into monomers by treatment...... ratios of 4 : 1. The presence of dithiothreitol markedly reduced the anti-aggregation effects of grp94-CT on CK2alpha without altering the solubility of the chaperone. It is concluded that the chaperone activity of the C-terminal domain of human grp94 requires the maintenance of its quaternary structure...... (dimers and oligomers), which seems to be stabilised by disulphide bonds....

  3. ALOG domains: provenance of plant homeotic and developmental regulators from the DNA-binding domain of a novel class of DIRS1-type retroposons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyer Lakshminarayan M

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Members of the Arabidopsis LSH1 and Oryza G1 (ALOG family of proteins have been shown to function as key developmental regulators in land plants. However, their precise mode of action remains unclear. Using sensitive sequence and structure analysis, we show that the ALOG domains are a distinct version of the N-terminal DNA-binding domain shared by the XerC/D-like, protelomerase, topoisomerase-IA, and Flp tyrosine recombinases. ALOG domains are distinguished by the insertion of an additional zinc ribbon into this DNA-binding domain. In particular, we show that the ALOG domain is derived from the XerC/D-like recombinases of a novel class of DIRS-1-like retroposons. Copies of this element, which have been recently inactivated, are present in several marine metazoan lineages, whereas the stramenopile Ectocarpus, retains an active copy of the same. Thus, we predict that ALOG domains help establish organ identity and differentiation by binding specific DNA sequences and acting as transcription factors or recruiters of repressive chromatin. They are also found in certain plant defense proteins, where they are predicted to function as DNA sensors. The evolutionary history of the ALOG domain represents a unique instance of a domain, otherwise exclusively found in retroelements, being recruited as a specific transcription factor in the streptophyte lineage of plants. Hence, they add to the growing evidence for derivation of DNA-binding domains of eukaryotic specific TFs from mobile and selfish elements.

  4. The Eag domain regulates the voltage-dependent inactivation of rat Eag1 K+ channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting-Feng Lin

    Full Text Available Eag (Kv10 and Erg (Kv11 belong to two distinct subfamilies of the ether-à-go-go K+ channel family (KCNH. While Erg channels are characterized by an inward-rectifying current-voltage relationship that results from a C-type inactivation, mammalian Eag channels display little or no voltage-dependent inactivation. Although the amino (N-terminal region such as the eag domain is not required for the C-type inactivation of Erg channels, an N-terminal deletion in mouse Eag1 has been shown to produce a voltage-dependent inactivation. To further discern the role of the eag domain in the inactivation of Eag1 channels, we generated N-terminal chimeras between rat Eag (rEag1 and human Erg (hERG1 channels that involved swapping the eag domain alone or the complete cytoplasmic N-terminal region. Functional analyses indicated that introduction of the homologous hERG1 eag domain led to both a fast phase and a slow phase of channel inactivation in the rEag1 chimeras. By contrast, the inactivation features were retained in the reverse hERG1 chimeras. Furthermore, an eag domain-lacking rEag1 deletion mutant also showed the fast phase of inactivation that was notably attenuated upon co-expression with the rEag1 eag domain fragment, but not with the hERG1 eag domain fragment. Additionally, we have identified a point mutation in the S4-S5 linker region of rEag1 that resulted in a similar inactivation phenotype. Biophysical analyses of these mutant constructs suggested that the inactivation gating of rEag1 was distinctly different from that of hERG1. Overall, our findings are consistent with the notion that the eag domain plays a critical role in regulating the inactivation gating of rEag1. We propose that the eag domain may destabilize or mask an inherent voltage-dependent inactivation of rEag1 K+ channels.

  5. Basic residues in the 74-83 and 191-198 segments of protein kinase CK2 catalytic subunit are implicated in negative but not in positive regulation by the beta-subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarno, S; Vaglio, P; Marin, O

    1997-01-01

    by the beta-subunit many fold more than that of alpha wild type, while extrastimulation by beta mutant D55L56E57A, observable with alpha wild type, is abolished with these mutants. These data support the conclusion that down regulation by the acidic residues clustered in the N-terminal moiety of beta......Protein kinase CK2 is a ubiquitous pleiotropic serine/threonine protein kinase whose holoenzyme is comprised of two catalytic (alpha and/or alpha') and two non-catalytic, beta-subunits. The beta-subunit possesses antagonist functions that can be physically dissected by generating synthetic...... fragments encompassing its N-terminal and C-terminal domains. Here we show that by mutating basic residues in the 74-77 and in the 191-198 regions of the alpha-subunit, the negative regulation by the beta-subunit and by its N-terminal synthetic fragment CK2beta-(1-77), which is observable using calmodulin...

  6. The catalytically inactive tyrosine phosphatase HD-PTP/PTPN23 is a novel regulator of SMN complex localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husedzinovic, Alma; Neumann, Beate; Reymann, Jürgen; Draeger-Meurer, Stefanie; Chari, Ashwin; Erfle, Holger; Fischer, Utz; Gruss, Oliver J

    2015-01-15

    The survival motor neuron (SMN) complex fulfils essential functions in the assembly of snRNPs, which are key components in the splicing of pre-mRNAs. Little is known about the regulation of SMN complex activity by posttranslational modification despite its complicated phosphorylation pattern. Several phosphatases had been implicated in the regulation of SMN, including the nuclear phosphatases PPM1G and PP1γ. Here we systematically screened all human phosphatase gene products for a regulatory role in the SMN complex. We used the accumulation of SMN in Cajal bodies of intact proliferating cells, which actively assemble snRNPs, as a readout for unperturbed SMN complex function. Knockdown of 29 protein phosphatases interfered with SMN accumulation in Cajal bodies, suggesting impaired SMN complex function, among those the catalytically inactive, non-receptor-type tyrosine phosphatase PTPN23/HD-PTP. Knockdown of PTPN23 also led to changes in the phosphorylation pattern of SMN without affecting the assembly of the SMN complex. We further show interaction between SMN and PTPN23 and document that PTPN23, like SMN, shuttles between nucleus and cytoplasm. Our data provide the first comprehensive screen for SMN complex regulators and establish a novel regulatory function of PTPN23 in maintaining a highly phosphorylated state of SMN, which is important for its proper function in snRNP assembly. © 2015 Husedzinovic et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  7. Nono, a Bivalent Domain Factor, Regulates Erk Signaling and Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Pluripotency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Ma

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nono is a component of the para-speckle, which stores and processes RNA. Mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs lack para-speckles, leaving the function of Nono in mESCs unclear. Here, we find that Nono functions as a chromatin regulator cooperating with Erk to regulate mESC pluripotency. We report that Nono loss results in robust self-renewing mESCs with epigenomic and transcriptomic features resembling the 2i (GSK and Erk inhibitors-induced “ground state.” Erk interacts with and is required for Nono localization to a subset of bivalent genes that have high levels of poised RNA polymerase. Nono loss compromises Erk activation and RNA polymerase poising at its target bivalent genes in undifferentiated mESCs, thus disrupting target gene activation and differentiation. These findings argue that Nono collaborates with Erk signaling to regulate the integrity of bivalent domains and mESC pluripotency.

  8. The PH Domain of PDK1 Exhibits a Novel, Phospho-Regulated Monomer-Dimer Equilibrium With Important Implications for Kinase Domain Activation: Single Molecule and Ensemble Studies†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Brian P.; Pilling, Carissa; Calleja, Véronique; Larijani, Banafshé; Falke, Joseph J.

    2013-01-01

    Phosphoinositide-Dependent Kinase-1 (PDK1) is an essential master kinase recruited to the plasma membrane by the binding of its C-terminal PH domain to the signaling lipid phosphatidylinositol-3,4-5-trisphosphate (PIP3). Membrane binding leads to PDK1 phospho-activation, but despite the central role of PDK1 in signaling and cancer biology this activation mechanism remains poorly understood. PDK1 has been shown to exist as a dimer in cells, and one crystal structure of its isolated PH domain exhibits a putative dimer interface. It has been proposed that phosphorylation of PH domain residue T513 (or the phospho-mimetic T513E mutation) may regulate a novel PH domain dimer-monomer equilibrium, thereby converting an inactive PDK1 dimer to an active monomer. However, the oligomeric state(s) of the PH domain on the membrane have not yet been determined, nor whether a negative charge at position 513 is sufficient to regulate its oligomeric state. The present study investigates the binding of purified WT and T513E PDK1 PH domains to lipid bilayers containing the PIP3 target lipid, using both single molecule and ensemble measurements. Single molecule analysis of the brightness of fluorescent PH domain shows that the PIP3-bound WT PH domain on membranes is predominantly dimeric, while the PIP3-bound T513E PH domain is monomeric, demonstrating that negative charge at the T513 position is sufficient to dissociate the PH domain dimer and is thus likely to play a central role in PDK1 monomerization and activation. Single molecule analysis of 2-D diffusion of PH domain-PIP3 complexes reveals that the dimeric WT PH domain diffuses at the same rate a single lipid molecule, indicating that only one of its two PIP3 binding sites is occupied and there is little protein penetration into the bilayer as observed for other PH domains. The 2-D diffusion of T513E PH domain is slower, suggesting the negative charge disrupts local structure in a way that enables greater protein insertion into

  9. Structural characterization of CAS SH3 domain selectivity and regulation reveals new CAS interaction partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemperle, Jakub; Hexnerová, Rozálie; Lepšík, Martin; Tesina, Petr; Dibus, Michal; Novotný, Marian; Brábek, Jan; Veverka, Václav; Rosel, Daniel

    2017-08-14

    CAS is a docking protein downstream of the proto-oncogene Src with a role in invasion and metastasis of cancer cells. The CAS SH3 domain is indispensable for CAS-mediated signaling, but structural aspects of CAS SH3 ligand binding and regulation are not well understood. Here, we identified the consensus CAS SH3 binding motif and structurally characterized the CAS SH3 domain in complex with ligand. We revealed the requirement for an uncommon centrally localized lysine residue at position +2 of CAS SH3 ligands and two rather dissimilar optional anchoring residues, leucine and arginine, at position +5. We further expanded the knowledge of CAS SH3 ligand binding regulation by manipulating tyrosine 12 phosphorylation and confirmed the negative role of this phosphorylation on CAS SH3 ligand binding. Finally, by exploiting the newly identified binding requirements of the CAS SH3 domain, we predicted and experimentally verified two novel CAS SH3 binding partners, DOK7 and GLIS2.

  10. Structural Basis for Regulation of GPR56/ADGRG1 by Its Alternatively Spliced Extracellular Domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzman, Gabriel S; Ackerman, Sarah D; Ding, Chen; Koide, Akiko; Leon, Katherine; Luo, Rong; Stoveken, Hannah M; Fernandez, Celia G; Tall, Gregory G; Piao, Xianhua; Monk, Kelly R; Koide, Shohei; Araç, Demet

    2016-09-21

    Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs) play critical roles in diverse neurobiological processes including brain development, synaptogenesis, and myelination. aGPCRs have large alternatively spliced extracellular regions (ECRs) that likely mediate intercellular signaling; however, the precise roles of ECRs remain unclear. The aGPCR GPR56/ADGRG1 regulates both oligodendrocyte and cortical development. Accordingly, human GPR56 mutations cause myelination defects and brain malformations. Here, we determined the crystal structure of the GPR56 ECR, the first structure of any complete aGPCR ECR, in complex with an inverse-agonist monobody, revealing a GPCR-Autoproteolysis-Inducing domain and a previously unidentified domain that we term Pentraxin/Laminin/neurexin/sex-hormone-binding-globulin-Like (PLL). Strikingly, PLL domain deletion caused increased signaling and characterizes a GPR56 splice variant. Finally, we show that an evolutionarily conserved residue in the PLL domain is critical for oligodendrocyte development in vivo. Thus, our results suggest that the GPR56 ECR has unique and multifaceted regulatory functions, providing novel insights into aGPCR roles in neurobiology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Enzymatic regulation of pattern: BMP4 binds CUB domains of Tolloids and inhibits proteinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hojoon X; Mendes, Fabio A; Plouhinec, Jean-Louis; De Robertis, Edward M

    2009-11-01

    In Xenopus embryos, a dorsal-ventral patterning gradient is generated by diffusing Chordin/bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) complexes cleaved by BMP1/Tolloid metalloproteinases in the ventral side. We developed a new BMP1/Tolloid assay using a fluorogenic Chordin peptide substrate and identified an unexpected negative feedback loop for BMP4, in which BMP4 inhibits Tolloid enzyme activity noncompetitively. BMP4 binds directly to the CUB (Complement 1r/s, Uegf [a sea urchin embryonic protein] and BMP1) domains of BMP1 and Drosophila Tolloid with high affinity. Binding to CUB domains inhibits BMP4 signaling. These findings provide a molecular explanation for a long-standing genetical puzzle in which antimorphic Drosophila tolloid mutant alleles displayed anti-BMP effects. The extensive Drosophila genetics available supports the relevance of the interaction described here at endogenous physiological levels. Many extracellular proteins contain CUB domains; the binding of CUB domains to BMP4 suggests a possible general function in binding transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) superfamily members. Mathematical modeling indicates that feedback inhibition by BMP ligands acts on the ventral side, while on the dorsal side the main regulator of BMP1/Tolloid enzymatic activity is the binding to its substrate, Chordin.

  12. Multivalent Chromatin Engagement and Inter-domain Crosstalk Regulate MORC3 ATPase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Forest H. Andrews

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available MORC3 is linked to inflammatory myopathies and cancer; however, the precise role of MORC3 in normal cell physiology and disease remains poorly understood. Here, we present detailed genetic, biochemical, and structural analyses of MORC3. We demonstrate that MORC3 is significantly upregulated in Down syndrome and that genetic abnormalities in MORC3 are associated with cancer. The CW domain of MORC3 binds to the methylated histone H3K4 tail, and this interaction is essential for recruitment of MORC3 to chromatin and accumulation in nuclear bodies. We show that MORC3 possesses intrinsic ATPase activity that requires DNA, but it is negatively regulated by the CW domain, which interacts with the ATPase domain. Natively linked CW impedes binding of the ATPase domain to DNA, resulting in a decrease in the DNA-stimulated enzymatic activity. Collectively, our studies provide a molecular framework detailing MORC3 functions and suggest that its modulation may contribute to human disease.

  13. Phosphorylation of Ser-204 and Tyr-405 in human malonyl-CoA decarboxylase expressed in silkworm Bombyx mori regulates catalytic decarboxylase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, In-Wook; Makishima, Yu; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Sungjo; Terzic, Andre; Chung, Shin-Kyo; Park, Enoch Y

    2015-11-01

    Decarboxylation of malonyl-CoA to acetyl-CoA by malonyl-CoA decarboxylase (MCD; EC 4.1.1.9) is a vital catalytic reaction of lipid metabolism. While it is established that phosphorylation of MCD modulates the enzymatic activity, the specific phosphorylation sites associated with the catalytic function have not been documented due to lack of sufficient production of MCD with proper post-translational modifications. Here, we used the silkworm-based Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) bacmid system to express human MCD (hMCD) and mapped phosphorylation effects on enzymatic function. Purified MCD from silkworm displayed post-translational phosphorylation and demonstrated coherent enzymatic activity with high yield (-200 μg/silkworm). Point mutations in putative phosphorylation sites, Ser-204 or Tyr-405 of hMCD, identified by bioinformatics and proteomics analyses reduced the catalytic activity, underscoring the functional significance of phosphorylation in modulating decarboxylase-based catalysis. Identified phosphorylated residues are distinct from the decarboxylation catalytic site, implicating a phosphorylation-induced global conformational change of MCD as responsible in altering catalytic function. We conclude that phosphorylation of Ser-204 and Tyr-405 regulates the decarboxylase function of hMCD leveraging the silkworm-based BmNPV bacmid expression system that offers a fail-safe eukaryotic production platform implementing proper post-translational modification such as phosphorylation.

  14. Catalytic promiscuity and heme-dependent redox regulation of H2S synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Ruma

    2017-04-01

    The view of enzymes as punctilious catalysts has been shifting as examples of their promiscuous behavior increase. However, unlike a number of cases where the physiological relevance of breached substrate specificity is questionable, the very synthesis of H 2 S relies on substrate and reaction promiscuity, which presents the enzymes with a multitude of substrate and reaction choices. The transsulfuration pathway, a major source of H 2 S, is inherently substrate-ambiguous. A heme-regulated switch embedded in the first enzyme in the pathway can help avert the stochastic production of cysteine versus H 2 S and control switching between metabolic tracks to meet cellular needs. This review discusses the dominant role of enzyme promiscuity in pathways that double as sulfur catabolic and H 2 S synthetic tracks. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Blau syndrome polymorphisms in NOD2 identify nucleotide hydrolysis and helical domain 1 as signalling regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhouse, Rhiannon; Boyle, Joseph P; Monie, Tom P

    2014-09-17

    Understanding how single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) lead to disease at a molecular level provides a starting point for improved therapeutic intervention. SNPs in the innate immune receptor nucleotide oligomerisation domain 2 (NOD2) can cause the inflammatory disorders Blau Syndrome (BS) and early onset sarcoidosis (EOS) through receptor hyperactivation. Here, we show that these polymorphisms cluster into two primary locations: the ATP/Mg(2+)-binding site and helical domain 1. Polymorphisms in these two locations may consequently dysregulate ATP hydrolysis and NOD2 autoinhibition, respectively. Complementary mutations in NOD1 did not mirror the NOD2 phenotype, which indicates that NOD1 and NOD2 are activated and regulated by distinct methods. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Structural transitions in conserved, ordered Beclin 1 domains essential to regulating autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glover, Karen; Li, Yue; Mukhopadhyay, Shreya; Leuthner, Zoe; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Colbert, Christopher L.; Sinha, Sangita C. (NDSU); (IIT)

    2017-08-10

    Beclin 1 (BECN1) is a key regulator of autophagy, a critical catabolic homeostasis pathway that involves sequestration of selected cytoplasmic components by multilayered vesicles called autophagosomes, followed by lysosomal fusion and degradation. BECN1 is a core component of class III phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase complexes responsible for autophagosome nucleation. Without heterologous binding partners, BECN1 forms an antiparallel homodimer via its coiled-coil domain (CCD). However, the last 16 CCD residues, composing an “overlap helix” (OH), have been crystallized in two mutually exclusive states: either as part of the CCD or packed against the C-terminal β-α repeated, autophagy-specific domain (BARAD). Here, using CD spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, and small-angle X-ray scattering, we show that in the homodimeric state, the OH transitions between these two different packing states, with the predominant state comprising the OH packed against the BARAD, contrary to expectations based on known BECN1 interactions with heterologous partners. We confirmed this observation by comparing the impact of mutating four residues that mediate packing of the OH against both the CCD and BARAD on structure and stability of the CCD, the OH+BARAD, and the two-domain CCD–BARAD. Last, we used cellular assays to demonstrate that mutation of these OH-interface residues abrogates starvation-induced up-regulation of autophagy but does not affect basal autophagy. In summary, we have identified a BECN1 helical region that transitions between packing as part of either one of two conserved domains (i.e. the CCD or the BARAD). Our findings have important implications for the relative stability of autophagy-inactive and autophagy-active BECN1 complexes.

  17. What regulates the catalytic activities in AGE catalysis? An answer from quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yulai; Zhang, Hongxing; Zheng, Qingchuan

    2017-11-23

    The AGE superfamily (AGEs) is made up of kinds of isomerase which are very important both physiologically and industrially. One of the most intriguing aspects of AGEs has to do with the mechanism that regulates their activities in single conserved active pocket. In order to clarify the relationship among single conserved active pocket and two activities in AGEs, results for the epimerization activity catalyzed by RaCE and the isomerization activity catalyzed by SeYihS were obtained by using QM/MM umbrella sampling simulations and 2D-FES calculations. Our results show that both of them have similar enzyme-substrate combination mode for inner pyranose ring in single conserved active pocket even though they have different substrate specificity. This means that the pathways of ring opening catalyzed by them are similar. However, one non-conserved residue (Leu183 in RaCE, Met175 in SeYihS) in the active site, which has different steric hindrance, causes a small but effective change in the direction of ring opening in stage 1. And then this change will induce a fundamentally different catalytic activity for RaCE and SeYihS in stage 2. Our results give a novel viewpoint about the regulatory mechanism between CE and YihS in AGEs, and may be helpful for further experiments of rational enzyme design based on the (α/α)6-barrel basic scaffold.

  18. Ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase: a catalytically active dithiol group links photoreduced ferredoxin to thioredoxin functional in photosynthetic enzyme regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Droux, M.; Miginiac-Maslow, M.; Jacquot, J.P.; Gadal, P.; Crawford, N.A.; Kosower, N.S.; Buchanan, B.B.

    1987-07-01

    The mechanism by which the ferredoxin-thioredoxin system activates the target enzyme, NADP-malate dehydrogenase, was investigated by analyzing the sulfhydryl status of individual protein components with (/sup 14/C)iodoacetate and monobromobimane. The data indicate that ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR)--an iron-sulfur enzyme present in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms--is the first member of a thiol chain that links light to enzyme regulation. FTR possesses a catalytically active dithiol group localized on the 13 kDa (similar) subunit, that occurs in all species investigated and accepts reducing equivalents from photoreduced ferredoxin and transfers them stoichiometrically to the disulfide form of thioredoxin m. The reduced thioredoxin m, in turn, reduces NADP-malate dehydrogenase, thereby converting it from an inactive (S-S) to an active (SH) form. The means by which FTR is able to combine electrons (from photoreduced ferredoxin) with protons (from the medium) to reduce its active disulfide group remains to be determined.

  19. Directed evolution of Mycobacterium tuberculosis β-lactamase reveals gatekeeper residue that regulates antibiotic resistance and catalytic efficiency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Feiler

    Full Text Available Directed evolution can be a powerful tool for revealing the mutational pathways that lead to more resistant bacterial strains. In this study, we focused on the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which is resistant to members of the β-lactam class of antibiotics and thus continues to pose a major public health threat. Resistance of this organism is the result of a chromosomally encoded, extended spectrum class A β-lactamase, BlaC, that is constitutively produced. Here, combinatorial enzyme libraries were selected on ampicillin to identify mutations that increased resistance of bacteria to β-lactams. After just a single round of mutagenesis and selection, BlaC mutants were evolved that conferred 5-fold greater antibiotic resistance to cells and enhanced the catalytic efficiency of BlaC by 3-fold compared to the wild-type enzyme. All isolated mutants carried a mutation at position 105 (e.g., I105F that appears to widen access to the active site by 3.6 Å while also stabilizing the reorganized topology. In light of these findings, we propose that I105 is a 'gatekeeper' residue of the active site that regulates substrate hydrolysis by BlaC. Moreover, our results suggest that directed evolution can provide insight into the development of highly drug resistant microorganisms.

  20. The regulation and catalytic mechanism of the NADP-malic enzyme from tobacco leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VERONIKA DOUBNEROVÁ

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The non-photosynthetic NADP-malic enzyme EC 1.1.1.40 (NADP-ME, which catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of L-malate and NADP+ to produce pyruvate and NADPH, respectively, and which could be involved in plant defense responses, was isolated from Nicotiana tabacum L. leaves. The mechanism of the enzyme reaction was studied by the initial rate method and was found to be an ordered sequential one. Regulation possibilities of purified cytosolic NADP-ME by cell metabolites were tested. Intermediates of the citric acid cycle (a-ketoglutarate, succinate, fumarate, metabolites of glycolysis (pyruvate, phosphoenolpyruvate, glucose-6-phosphate, compounds connected with lipogenesis (coenzyme A, acetyl-CoA, palmitoyl-CoA and some amino acids (glutamate, glutamine, aspartate did not significantly affect the NADP-ME activity from tobacco leaves. In contrast, macroergic compounds (GTP, ATP and ADP were strong inhibitors of NADP-ME; the type of inhibition and the inhibition constants were determined in the presence of the most effective cofactors (Mn2+ or Mg2+, required by NADP-ME. Predominantly non-competitive type of inhibitions of NADP-ME with respect to NADP+ and mixed type to L-malate were found.

  1. Protein domain analysis of genomic sequence data reveals regulation of LRR related domains in plant transpiration in Ficus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Tiange; Yin, Kangquan; Liu, Jinyu; Cao, Kunfang; Cannon, Charles H; Du, Fang K

    2014-01-01

    Predicting protein domains is essential for understanding a protein's function at the molecular level. However, up till now, there has been no direct and straightforward method for predicting protein domains in species without a reference genome sequence. In this study, we developed a functionality with a set of programs that can predict protein domains directly from genomic sequence data without a reference genome. Using whole genome sequence data, the programming functionality mainly comprised DNA assembly in combination with next-generation sequencing (NGS) assembly methods and traditional methods, peptide prediction and protein domain prediction. The proposed new functionality avoids problems associated with de novo assembly due to micro reads and small single repeats. Furthermore, we applied our functionality for the prediction of leucine rich repeat (LRR) domains in four species of Ficus with no reference genome, based on NGS genomic data. We found that the LRRNT_2 and LRR_8 domains are related to plant transpiration efficiency, as indicated by the stomata index, in the four species of Ficus. The programming functionality established in this study provides new insights for protein domain prediction, which is particularly timely in the current age of NGS data expansion.

  2. Domain-confined catalytic soot combustion over Co3O4 anchored on a TiO2 nanotube array catalyst prepared by mercaptoacetic acid induced surface-grafting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jiale; Yu, Yifu; Dai, Fangfang; Meng, Ming; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Lirong; Hu, Tiandou

    2013-12-21

    Herein, we introduce a specially designed domain-confined macroporous catalyst, namely, the Co3O4 nanocrystals anchored on a TiO2 nanotube array catalyst, which was synthesized by using the mercaptoacetic acid induced surface-grafting method. This catalyst exhibits much better performance for catalytic soot combustion than the conventional TiO2 powder supported one in gravitational contact mode (GMC).

  3. Lamin B receptor (LBR) regulates the growth and maturation of myeloid progenitors via its sterol reductase domain: Implications for cholesterol biosynthesis in regulating myelopoiesis

    OpenAIRE

    Subramanian, Gayathri; Chaudhury, Pulkit; Malu, Krishnakumar; Fowler, Samantha; Manmode, Rahul; Gotur, Deepali; Zwerger, Monika; Ryan, David; Roberti, Rita; Gaines, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Lamin B receptor (LBR) is a bifunctional nuclear membrane protein with N-terminal lamin B and chromatin binding domains plus a C-terminal sterol Δ14 reductase domain. LBR expression increases during neutrophil differentiation and deficient expression disrupts neutrophil nuclear lobulation characteristic of Pelger-Huët anomaly. Thus LBR plays a critical role in regulating myeloid differentiation, but how the two functional domains of LBR support this role is currently unclear. We previously id...

  4. Regulation of expression and catalytic activity of Escherichia coli RsmG methyltransferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez-Páez, Alfonso; Villarroya, Magda; Armengod, M.-Eugenia

    2012-01-01

    RsmG is an AdoMet-dependent methyltransferase responsible for the synthesis of m7G527 in the 530 loop of bacterial 16S rRNA. This loop is universally conserved, plays a key role in ribosomal accuracy, and is a target for streptomycin binding. Loss of the m7G527 modification confers low-level streptomycin resistance and may affect ribosomal functioning. Here, we explore the mechanisms controlling RsmG expression and activity, which may somehow respond to the demand set by the amount of rRNA. We confirm that rsmG is the second member in a bicistronic operon and demonstrate that rsmG also has its own promoter, which appears, in actively growing cells, as a control device to offset both the relatively low stability of RsmG and inhibition of the operon promoter. RsmG levels decrease under conditions that down-regulate rRNA synthesis. However, coordination between rRNA and RsmG expression does not seem to occur at the level of transcription initiation. Instead, it might depend on the activity of an inverted repeated region, located between the rsmG promoter and ribosome binding site, which we show to work as a weak transcriptional terminator. To gain insights into the enzymatic mechanism of RsmG, highly conserved residues were mutated and the abilities of the resulting proteins to confer streptomycin resistance, to modify rRNA, and to bind AdoMet were explored. Our data demonstrate for the first time the critical importance of some residues located in the active site of Escherichia coli RsmG for the m7G modification process and suggest a role for them in rRNA binding and catalysis. PMID:22337945

  5. A crystal structure of the catalytic core domain of an avian sarcoma and leukemia virus integrase suggests an alternate dimeric assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballandras, Allison; Moreau, Karen; Robert, Xavier; Confort, Marie-Pierre; Merceron, Romain; Haser, Richard; Ronfort, Corinne; Gouet, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    Integrase (IN) is an important therapeutic target in the search for anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) inhibitors. This enzyme is composed of three domains and is hard to crystallize in its full form. First structural results on IN were obtained on the catalytic core domain (CCD) of the avian Rous and Sarcoma Virus strain Schmidt-Ruppin A (RSV-A) and on the CCD of HIV-1 IN. A ribonuclease-H like motif was revealed as well as a dimeric interface stabilized by two pairs of α-helices (α1/α5, α5/α1). These structural features have been validated in other structures of IN CCDs. We have determined the crystal structure of the Rous-associated virus type-1 (RAV-1) IN CCD to 1.8 Å resolution. RAV-1 IN shows a standard activity for integration and its CCD differs in sequence from that of RSV-A by a single accessible residue in position 182 (substitution A182T). Surprisingly, the CCD of RAV-1 IN associates itself with an unexpected dimeric interface characterized by three pairs of α-helices (α3/α5, α1/α1, α5/α3). A182 is not involved in this novel interface, which results from a rigid body rearrangement of the protein at its α1, α3, α5 surface. A new basic groove that is suitable for single-stranded nucleic acid binding is observed at the surface of the dimer. We have subsequently determined the structure of the mutant A182T of RAV-1 IN CCD and obtained a RSV-A IN CCD-like structure with two pairs of buried α-helices at the interface. Our results suggest that the CCD of avian INs can dimerize in more than one state. Such flexibility can further explain the multifunctionality of retroviral INs, which beside integration of dsDNA are implicated in different steps of the retroviral cycle in presence of viral ssRNA.

  6. A crystal structure of the catalytic core domain of an avian sarcoma and leukemia virus integrase suggests an alternate dimeric assembly.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Ballandras

    Full Text Available Integrase (IN is an important therapeutic target in the search for anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV inhibitors. This enzyme is composed of three domains and is hard to crystallize in its full form. First structural results on IN were obtained on the catalytic core domain (CCD of the avian Rous and Sarcoma Virus strain Schmidt-Ruppin A (RSV-A and on the CCD of HIV-1 IN. A ribonuclease-H like motif was revealed as well as a dimeric interface stabilized by two pairs of α-helices (α1/α5, α5/α1. These structural features have been validated in other structures of IN CCDs. We have determined the crystal structure of the Rous-associated virus type-1 (RAV-1 IN CCD to 1.8 Å resolution. RAV-1 IN shows a standard activity for integration and its CCD differs in sequence from that of RSV-A by a single accessible residue in position 182 (substitution A182T. Surprisingly, the CCD of RAV-1 IN associates itself with an unexpected dimeric interface characterized by three pairs of α-helices (α3/α5, α1/α1, α5/α3. A182 is not involved in this novel interface, which results from a rigid body rearrangement of the protein at its α1, α3, α5 surface. A new basic groove that is suitable for single-stranded nucleic acid binding is observed at the surface of the dimer. We have subsequently determined the structure of the mutant A182T of RAV-1 IN CCD and obtained a RSV-A IN CCD-like structure with two pairs of buried α-helices at the interface. Our results suggest that the CCD of avian INs can dimerize in more than one state. Such flexibility can further explain the multifunctionality of retroviral INs, which beside integration of dsDNA are implicated in different steps of the retroviral cycle in presence of viral ssRNA.

  7. A measure of the promiscuity of proteins and characteristics of residues in the vicinity of the catalytic site that regulate promiscuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Sandeep; Rao, Basuthkar J

    2012-01-01

    Promiscuity, the basis for the evolution of new functions through 'tinkering' of residues in the vicinity of the catalytic site, is yet to be quantitatively defined. We present a computational method Promiscuity Indices Estimator (PROMISE)--based on signatures derived from the spatial and electrostatic properties of the catalytic residues, to estimate the promiscuity (PromIndex) of proteins with known active site residues and 3D structure. PromIndex reflects the number of different active site signatures that have congruent matches in close proximity of its native catalytic site, the quality of the matches and difference in the enzymatic activity. Promiscuity in proteins is observed to follow a lognormal distribution (μ = 0.28, σ = 1.1 reduced chi-square = 3.0E-5). The PROMISE predicted promiscuous functions in any protein can serve as the starting point for directed evolution experiments. PROMISE ranks carboxypeptidase A and ribonuclease A amongst the more promiscuous proteins. We have also investigated the properties of the residues in the vicinity of the catalytic site that regulates its promiscuity. Linear regression establishes a weak correlation (R(2)∼0.1) between certain properties of the residues (charge, polar, etc) in the neighborhood of the catalytic residues and PromIndex. A stronger relationship states that most proteins with high promiscuity have high percentages of charged and polar residues within a radius of 3 Å of the catalytic site, which is validated using one-tailed hypothesis tests (P-values∼0.05). Since it is known that these characteristics are key factors in catalysis, their relationship with the promiscuity index cross validates the methodology of PROMISE.

  8. Independent regulation of reovirus membrane penetration and apoptosis by the mu1 phi domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranav Danthi

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis plays an important role in the pathogenesis of reovirus encephalitis. Reovirus outer-capsid protein mu1, which functions to penetrate host cell membranes during viral entry, is the primary regulator of apoptosis following reovirus infection. Ectopic expression of full-length and truncated forms of mu1 indicates that the mu1 phi domain is sufficient to elicit a cell death response. To evaluate the contribution of the mu1 phi domain to the induction of apoptosis following reovirus infection, phi mutant viruses were generated by reverse genetics and analyzed for the capacity to penetrate cell membranes and elicit apoptosis. We found that mutations in phi diminish reovirus membrane penetration efficiency by preventing conformational changes that lead to generation of key reovirus entry intermediates. Independent of effects on membrane penetration, amino acid substitutions in phi affect the apoptotic potential of reovirus, suggesting that phi initiates apoptosis subsequent to cytosolic delivery. In comparison to wild-type virus, apoptosis-defective phi mutant viruses display diminished neurovirulence following intracranial inoculation of newborn mice. These results indicate that the phi domain of mu1 plays an important regulatory role in reovirus-induced apoptosis and disease.

  9. The Cytoplasmic Domain of Varicella-Zoster Virus Glycoprotein H Regulates Syncytia Formation and Skin Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Edward

    2014-01-01

    The conserved herpesvirus fusion complex consists of glycoproteins gB, gH, and gL which is critical for virion envelope fusion with the cell membrane during entry. For Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV), the complex is necessary for cell-cell fusion and presumed to mediate entry. VZV causes syncytia formation via cell-cell fusion in skin and in sensory ganglia during VZV reactivation, leading to neuronal damage, a potential contributory factor for the debilitating condition of postherpetic neuralgia. The gH cytoplasmic domain (gHcyt) is linked to the regulation of gB/gH-gL-mediated cell fusion as demonstrated by increased cell fusion in vitro by an eight amino acid (aa834-841) truncation of the gHcyt. The gHcyt regulation was identified to be dependent on the physical presence of the domain, and not of specific motifs or biochemical properties as substitution of aa834-841 with V5, cMyc, and hydrophobic or hydrophilic sequences did not affect fusion. The importance of the gHcyt length was corroborated by stepwise deletions of aa834-841 causing incremental increases in cell fusion, independent of gH surface expression and endocytosis. Consistent with the fusion assay, truncating the gHcyt in the viral genome caused exaggerated syncytia formation and significant reduction in viral titers. Importantly, infection of human skin xenografts in SCID mice was severely impaired by the truncation while maintaining the gHcyt length with the V5 substitution preserved typical replication in vitro and in skin. A role for the gHcyt in modulating the functions of the gB cytoplasmic domain (gBcyt) is proposed as the gHcyt truncation substantially enhanced cell fusion in the presence of the gB[Y881F] mutation. The significant reduction in skin infection caused by hyperfusogenic mutations in either the gHcyt or gBcyt demonstrates that both domains are critical for regulating syncytia formation and failure to control cell fusion, rather than enhancing viral spread, is severely detrimental to

  10. Caveolar domain organization and trafficking is regulated by Abl kinases and mDia1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echarri, Asier; Muriel, Olivia; Pavón, Dácil M; Azegrouz, Hind; Escolar, Fernando; Terrón, María C; Sanchez-Cabo, Fátima; Martínez, Fernando; Montoya, María C; Llorca, Oscar; Del Pozo, Miguel A

    2012-07-01

    The biology of caveolin-1 (Cav1)/caveolae is intimately linked to actin dynamics and adhesion receptors. Caveolar domains are organized in hierarchical levels of complexity from curved or flattened caveolae to large, higher-order caveolar rosettes. We report that stress fibers controlled by Abl kinases and mDia1 determine the level of caveolar domain organization, which conditions the subsequent inward trafficking of caveolar domains induced upon loss of cell adhesion from the extracellular matrix. Abl-deficient cells have fewer stress fibers, a smaller pool of stress-fiber co-aligned Cav1 and increased clustering of Cav1/caveolae at the cell surface. Defective caveolar linkage to stress fibers prevents the formation of big caveolar rosettes upon loss of cell adhesion, correlating with a lack of inward trafficking. Live imaging of stress fibers and Cav1 showed that the actin-linked Cav1 pool loses its spatial organization in the absence of actin polymerization and is dragged and clustered by depolymerizing filaments. We identified mDia1 as the actin polymerization regulator downstream of Abl kinases that controls the stress-fiber-linked Cav1 pool. mDia1 knockdown results in Cav1/caveolae clustering and defective inward trafficking upon loss of cell adhesion. By contrast, cell elongation imposed by the excess of stress fibers induced by active mDia1 flattens caveolae. Furthermore, active mDia1 rescues the actin co-aligned Cav1 pool and Cav1 inward trafficking upon loss of adhesion in Abl-deficient cells. Thus, caveolar domain organization and trafficking are tightly coupled to adhesive and stress fiber regulatory pathways.

  11. Conservation of functional domain structure in bicarbonate-regulated “soluble” adenylyl cyclases in bacteria and eukaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Mime; Buck, Jochen; Levin, Lonny R.

    2013-01-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is an evolutionarily conserved bicarbonate sensor. In mammals, it is responsible for bicarbonate-induced, cAMP-dependent processes in sperm required for fertilization and postulated to be involved in other bicarbonate- and carbon dioxide-dependent functions throughout the body. Among eukaryotes, sAC-like cyclases have been detected in mammals and in the fungi Dictyostelium; these enzymes display extensive similarity extending through two cyclase catalytic domains and a long carboxy terminal extension. sAC-like cyclases are also found in a number of bacterial phyla (Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Proteobacteria), but these enzymes generally possess only a single catalytic domain and little, if any, homology with the remainder of the mammalian protein. Database mining through a number of recently sequenced genomes identified sAC orthologues in additional metazoan phyla (Arthropoda and Chordata) and additional bacterial phyla (Chloroflexi). Interestingly, the Chloroflexi sAC-like cyclases, a family of three enzymes from the thermophilic eubacterium, Chloroflexus aurantiacus, are more similar to eukaryotic sAC-like cyclases (i.e., mammalian sAC and Dictyostelium SgcA) than they are to other bacterial adenylyl cyclases (ACs) (i.e., from Cyanobacteria). The Chloroflexus sAC-like cyclases each possess two cyclase catalytic domains and extensive similarity with mammalian enzymes through their carboxy termini. We cloned one of the Chloroflexus sAC-like cyclases and confirmed it to be stimulated by bicarbonate. These data extend the family of organisms possessing bicarbonate-responsive ACs to numerous phyla within the bacterial and eukaryotic kingdoms. PMID:15322879

  12. An insulator embedded in the chicken α-globin locus regulates chromatin domain configuration and differential gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan-Magaril, Mayra; Rebollar, Eria; Guerrero, Georgina; Fernández, Almudena; Moltó, Eduardo; González-Buendía, Edgar; Cantero, Marta; Montoliu, Lluís; Recillas-Targa, Félix

    2011-01-01

    Genome organization into transcriptionally active domains denotes one of the first levels of gene expression regulation. Although the chromatin domain concept is generally accepted, only little is known on how domain organization impacts the regulation of differential gene expression. Insulators might hold answers to address this issue as they delimit and organize chromatin domains. We have previously identified a CTCF-dependent insulator with enhancer-blocking activity embedded in the 5′ non-coding region of the chicken α-globin domain. Here, we demonstrate that this element, called the αEHS-1.4 insulator, protects a transgene against chromosomal position effects in stably transfected cell lines and transgenic mice. We found that this insulator can create a regulated chromatin environment that coincides with the onset of adult α-globin gene expression. Furthermore, such activity is in part dependent on the in vivo regulated occupancy of CTCF at the αEHS-1.4 element. Insulator function is also regulated by CTCF poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Our results suggest that the αEHS-1.4 insulator contributes in organizing the chromatin structure of the α-globin gene domain and prevents activation of adult α-globin gene expression at the erythroblast stage via CTCF. PMID:20813760

  13. The C-Terminal SynMuv/DdDUF926 Domain Regulates the Function of the N-Terminal Domain of DdNKAP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhagyashri D Burgute

    Full Text Available NKAP (NF-κB activating protein is a highly conserved SR (serine/arginine-rich protein involved in transcriptional control and splicing in mammals. We identified DdNKAP, the Dictyostelium discoideum ortholog of mammalian NKAP, as interacting partner of the nuclear envelope protein SUN-1. DdNKAP harbors a number of basic RDR/RDRS repeats in its N-terminal domain and the SynMuv/DUF926 domain at its C-terminus. We describe a novel and direct interaction between DdNKAP and Prp19 (Pre mRNA processing factor 19 which might be relevant for the observed DdNKAP ubiquitination. Genome wide analysis using cross-linking immunoprecipitation-high-throughput sequencing (CLIP-seq revealed DdNKAP association with intergenic regions, exons, introns and non-coding RNAs. Ectopic expression of DdNKAP and its domains affects several developmental aspects like stream formation, aggregation, and chemotaxis. We conclude that DdNKAP is a multifunctional protein, which might influence Dictyostelium development through its interaction with RNA and RNA binding proteins. Mutants overexpressing full length DdNKAP and the N-terminal domain alone (DdN-NKAP showed opposite phenotypes in development and opposite expression profiles of several genes and rRNAs. The observed interaction between DdN-NKAP and the DdDUF926 domain indicates that the DdDUF926 domain acts as negative regulator of the N-terminus.

  14. Human formyl peptide receptor ligand binding domain(s). Studies using an improved mutagenesis/expression vector reveal a novel mechanism for the regulation of receptor occupancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, H D; Vilander, L; Andrews, W H; Holmes, R

    1994-09-09

    Recently, we reported the domain requirements for the binding of formyl peptide to its specific receptor. Based on experiments using receptor chimeras, we also postulated an importance for the amino-terminal domain of the receptor in ligand binding (Perez, H. D., Holmes, R., Vilander, L., Adams, R., Manzana, W., Jolley, D., and Andrews, W. H. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 2292-2295). We have begun to perform a detailed analysis of the regions within the formyl peptide receptor involved in ligand binding. To address the importance of the receptor amino-terminal domain, we substituted (or inserted) hydrophilic sequences within the amino-terminal domain, expressed the receptors, and determined their ability to bind ligand. A stretch of nine amino acids next to the initial methionine was identified as crucial for receptor occupancy. A peptide containing such a sequence specifically completed binding of the ligand to the receptor. Alanine screen mutagenesis of the second extracellular domain also identified amino acids involved in ligand binding as well as a disulfide bond (Cys98 to Cys176) crucial for maintaining the binding pocket. These studies provide evidence for a novel mechanism involved in regulation of receptor occupancy. Binding of the ligand induces conformational changes in the receptor that result in the apposition of the amino-terminal domain over the ligand, providing a lid to the binding pocket.

  15. Alternative Splicing of the RAGE Cytoplasmic Domain Regulates Cell Signaling and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jules, Joel; Maiguel, Dony; Hudson, Barry I.

    2013-01-01

    The Receptor for Advanced Glycation End-products (RAGE) is a multi-ligand receptor present on most cell types. Upregulation of RAGE is seen in a number of pathological states including, inflammatory and vascular disease, dementia, diabetes and various cancers. We previously demonstrated that alternative splicing of the RAGE gene is an important mechanism which regulates RAGE signaling through the production of soluble ligand decoy isoforms. However, no studies have identified any alternative splice variants within the intracellular region of RAGE, a region critical for RAGE signaling. Herein, we have cloned and characterized a novel splice variant of RAGE that has a truncated intracellular domain (RAGEΔICD). RAGEΔICD is prevalent in both human and mouse tissues including lung, brain, heart and kidney. Expression of RAGEΔICD in C6 glioma cells impaired RAGE-ligand induced signaling through various MAP kinase pathways including ERK1/2, p38 and SAPK/JNK. Moreover, RAGEΔICD significantly affected tumor cell properties through altering cell migration, invasion, adhesion and viability in C6 glioma cells. Furthermore, C6 glioma cells expressing RAGEΔICD exhibited drastic inhibition on tumorigenesis in soft agar assays. Taken together, these data indicate that RAGEΔICD represents a novel endogenous mechanism to regulate RAGE signaling. Significantly, RAGEΔICD could play an important role in RAGE related disease states through down regulation of RAGE signaling. PMID:24260107

  16. Functional Domains of Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) Modulate INS-VNTR Transcription in Human Thymic Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Avis E; Chen, Chiachen; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S

    2016-05-20

    INS-VNTR (insulin-variable number of tandem repeats) and AIRE (autoimmune regulator) have been associated with the modulation of insulin gene expression in thymus, which is essential to induce either insulin tolerance or the development of insulin autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes. We sought to analyze whether each functional domain of AIRE is critical for the activation of INS-VNTR in human thymic epithelial cells. Twelve missense or nonsense mutations in AIRE and two chimeric AIRE constructs were generated. A luciferase reporter assay and a pulldown assay using biotinylated INS-class I VNTR probe were performed to examine the transactivation and binding activities of WT, mutant, and chimeric AIREs on the INS-VNTR promoter. Confocal microscopy analysis was performed for WT or mutant AIRE cellular localization. We found that all of the AIRE mutations resulted in loss of transcriptional activation of INS-VNTR except mutant P252L. Using WT/mutant AIRE heterozygous forms to modulate the INS-VNTR target revealed five mutations (R257X, G228W, C311fsX376, L397fsX478, and R433fsX502) that functioned in a dominant negative fashion. The LXXLL-3 motif is identified for the first time to be essential for DNA binding to INS-VNTR, whereas the intact PHD1, PHD2, LXXLL-3, and LXXLL-4 motifs were important for successful transcriptional activation. AIRE nuclear localization in the human thymic epithelial cell line was disrupted by mutations in the homogenously staining region domain and the R257X mutation in the PHD1 domain. This study supports the notion that AIRE mutation could specifically affect human insulin gene expression in thymic epithelial cells through INS-VNTR and subsequently induce either insulin tolerance or autoimmunity. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  17. Functional Domains of Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) Modulate INS-VNTR Transcription in Human Thymic Epithelial Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Avis E.; Chen, Chiachen; Breslin, Mary B.; Lan, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    INS-VNTR (insulin-variable number of tandem repeats) and AIRE (autoimmune regulator) have been associated with the modulation of insulin gene expression in thymus, which is essential to induce either insulin tolerance or the development of insulin autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes. We sought to analyze whether each functional domain of AIRE is critical for the activation of INS-VNTR in human thymic epithelial cells. Twelve missense or nonsense mutations in AIRE and two chimeric AIRE constructs were generated. A luciferase reporter assay and a pulldown assay using biotinylated INS-class I VNTR probe were performed to examine the transactivation and binding activities of WT, mutant, and chimeric AIREs on the INS-VNTR promoter. Confocal microscopy analysis was performed for WT or mutant AIRE cellular localization. We found that all of the AIRE mutations resulted in loss of transcriptional activation of INS-VNTR except mutant P252L. Using WT/mutant AIRE heterozygous forms to modulate the INS-VNTR target revealed five mutations (R257X, G228W, C311fsX376, L397fsX478, and R433fsX502) that functioned in a dominant negative fashion. The LXXLL-3 motif is identified for the first time to be essential for DNA binding to INS-VNTR, whereas the intact PHD1, PHD2, LXXLL-3, and LXXLL-4 motifs were important for successful transcriptional activation. AIRE nuclear localization in the human thymic epithelial cell line was disrupted by mutations in the homogenously staining region domain and the R257X mutation in the PHD1 domain. This study supports the notion that AIRE mutation could specifically affect human insulin gene expression in thymic epithelial cells through INS-VNTR and subsequently induce either insulin tolerance or autoimmunity. PMID:27048654

  18. The Metabolic Core and Catalytic Switches Are Fundamental Elements in the Self-Regulation of the Systemic Metabolic Structure of Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Fuente, Ildefonso M.; Cortes, Jesus M.; Perez-Pinilla, Martin B.; Ruiz-Rodriguez, Vicente; Veguillas, Juan

    2011-01-01

    Background Experimental observations and numerical studies with dissipative metabolic networks have shown that cellular enzymatic activity self-organizes spontaneously leading to the emergence of a metabolic core formed by a set of enzymatic reactions which are always active under all environmental conditions, while the rest of catalytic processes are only intermittently active. The reactions of the metabolic core are essential for biomass formation and to assure optimal metabolic performance. The on-off catalytic reactions and the metabolic core are essential elements of a Systemic Metabolic Structure which seems to be a key feature common to all cellular organisms. Methodology/Principal Findings In order to investigate the functional importance of the metabolic core we have studied different catalytic patterns of a dissipative metabolic network under different external conditions. The emerging biochemical data have been analysed using information-based dynamic tools, such as Pearson's correlation and Transfer Entropy (which measures effective functionality). Our results show that a functional structure of effective connectivity emerges which is dynamical and characterized by significant variations of bio-molecular information flows. Conclusions/Significance We have quantified essential aspects of the metabolic core functionality. The always active enzymatic reactions form a hub –with a high degree of effective connectivity- exhibiting a wide range of functional information values being able to act either as a source or as a sink of bio-molecular causal interactions. Likewise, we have found that the metabolic core is an essential part of an emergent functional structure characterized by catalytic modules and metabolic switches which allow critical transitions in enzymatic activity. Both, the metabolic core and the catalytic switches in which also intermittently-active enzymes are involved seem to be fundamental elements in the self-regulation of the Systemic

  19. The metabolic core and catalytic switches are fundamental elements in the self-regulation of the systemic metabolic structure of cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildefonso M De la Fuente

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Experimental observations and numerical studies with dissipative metabolic networks have shown that cellular enzymatic activity self-organizes spontaneously leading to the emergence of a metabolic core formed by a set of enzymatic reactions which are always active under all environmental conditions, while the rest of catalytic processes are only intermittently active. The reactions of the metabolic core are essential for biomass formation and to assure optimal metabolic performance. The on-off catalytic reactions and the metabolic core are essential elements of a Systemic Metabolic Structure which seems to be a key feature common to all cellular organisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In order to investigate the functional importance of the metabolic core we have studied different catalytic patterns of a dissipative metabolic network under different external conditions. The emerging biochemical data have been analysed using information-based dynamic tools, such as Pearson's correlation and Transfer Entropy (which measures effective functionality. Our results show that a functional structure of effective connectivity emerges which is dynamical and characterized by significant variations of bio-molecular information flows. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We have quantified essential aspects of the metabolic core functionality. The always active enzymatic reactions form a hub--with a high degree of effective connectivity--exhibiting a wide range of functional information values being able to act either as a source or as a sink of bio-molecular causal interactions. Likewise, we have found that the metabolic core is an essential part of an emergent functional structure characterized by catalytic modules and metabolic switches which allow critical transitions in enzymatic activity. Both, the metabolic core and the catalytic switches in which also intermittently-active enzymes are involved seem to be fundamental elements in the self-regulation

  20. Herp regulates Hrd1-mediated ubiquitylation in a ubiquitin-like domain-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kny, Melanie; Standera, Sybille; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    Accumulation of aberrant proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) triggers the unfolded protein response pathway that helps the cell to survive under these stress conditions. Herp is a mammalian ubiquitin domain protein, which is strongly induced by the unfolded protein response. It is involved...... found that upon exposure of cells to ER stress, elevation of Herp steady state levels is accompanied by an enhanced association of Herp with pre-existing Hrd1. Hrd1-associated Herp is rapidly degraded and substituted by de novo synthesized Herp, suggesting a continuous turnover of the protein at Hrd1...... necessary for NHK degradation. In summary, we propose that binding of Herp to Hrd1-containing ERAD complexes positively regulates the ubiquitylation activity of these complexes, thus permitting survival of the cell during ER stress....

  1. Discoidin domain receptor 2 is a critical regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Logan A.; Nawshad, Ali; Medici, Damian

    2011-01-01

    Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a collagen receptor that is expressed during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), a cellular transformation that mediates many stages of embryonic development and disease. However, the functional significance of this receptor in EMT is unknown. Here we show that Transforming Growth Factor-beta1 (TGF-β1), a common stimulator of EMT, promotes increased expression of type I collagen and DDR2. Inhibiting expression of COL1A1 or DDR2 with siRNA is sufficient to perturb activity of the NF-βB and LEF-1 transcription factors and to inhibit EMT and cell migration induced by TGF-β1. Furthermore, knockdown of DDR2 expression with siRNA inhibits EMT directly induced by type I collagen. These data establish a critical role for type I collagen-dependent DDR2 signaling in the regulation of EMT. PMID:21477649

  2. Engineering FKBP-Based Destabilizing Domains to Build Sophisticated Protein Regulation Systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenlin An

    Full Text Available Targeting protein stability with small molecules has emerged as an effective tool to control protein abundance in a fast, scalable and reversible manner. The technique involves tagging a protein of interest (POI with a destabilizing domain (DD specifically controlled by a small molecule. The successful construction of such fusion proteins may, however, be limited by functional interference of the DD epitope with electrostatic interactions required for full biological function of proteins. Another drawback of this approach is the remaining endogenous protein. Here, we combined the Cre-LoxP system with an advanced DD and generated a protein regulation system in which the loss of an endogenous protein, in our case the tumor suppressor PTEN, can be coupled directly with a conditionally fine-tunable DD-PTEN. This new system will consolidate and extend the use of DD-technology to control protein function precisely in living cells and animal models.

  3. The SRC-associated protein CUB Domain-Containing Protein-1 regulates adhesion and motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benes, C H; Poulogiannis, G; Cantley, L C; Soltoff, S P

    2012-02-02

    Multiple SRC-family kinases (SFKs) are commonly activated in carcinoma and appear to have a role in metastasis through incompletely understood mechanisms. Recent studies have shown that CDCP1 (CUB (complement C1r/C1s, Uegf, Bmp1) Domain-Containing Protein-1) is a transmembrane protein and an SRC substrate potentially involved in metastasis. Here we show that increased SFK and CDCP1 tyrosine phosphorylation is, surprisingly, associated with a decrease in FAK phosphorylation. This appears to be true in human tumors as shown by our correlation analysis of a mass spectrometric data set of affinity-purified phosphotyrosine peptides obtained from normal and cancer lung tissue samples. Induction of tyrosine phosphorylation of CDCP1 in cell culture, including by a mAb that binds to its extracellular domain, promoted changes in SFK and FAK tyrosine phosphorylation, as well as in PKC(TM), a protein known to associate with CDCP1, and these changes are accompanied by increases in adhesion and motility. Thus, signaling events that accompany the CDCP1 tyrosine phosphorylation observed in cell lines and human lung tumors may explain how the CDCP1/SFK complex regulates motility and adhesion.

  4. Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) regulates proliferation of endochondral cells in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawai, Ikuma; Hisaki, Tomoka; Sugiura, Koji; Naito, Kunihiko [Laboratory of Applied Genetics, Graduate School of Agricultural and Life Science, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8657 (Japan); Kano, Kiyoshi, E-mail: kanokiyo@yamaguchi-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Developmental Biology, Joint Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi 753-8515, Japan. (Japan); Biomedical Science Center for Translational Research (BSCTR), The United Graduate School of Veterinary Science, Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi 753-8515 (Japan)

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DDR2 regulates cell proliferation, cell adhesion, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We produced in vitro and in vivo model to better understand the role of DDR2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DDR2 might play an inhibitory role in the proliferation of chondrocyte. -- Abstract: Discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that is activated by fibrillar collagens. DDR2 regulates cell proliferation, cell adhesion, migration, and extracellular matrix remodeling. The decrement of endogenous DDR2 represses osteoblastic marker gene expression and osteogenic differentiation in murine preosteoblastic cells, but the functions of DDR2 in chondrogenic cellular proliferation remain unclear. To better understand the role of DDR2 signaling in cellular proliferation in endochondral ossification, we inhibited Ddr2 expression via the inhibitory effect of miRNA on Ddr2 mRNA (miDdr2) and analyzed the cellular proliferation and differentiation in the prechondrocyte ATDC5 cell lines. To investigate DDR2's molecular role in endochondral cellular proliferation in vivo, we also produced transgenic mice in which the expression of truncated, kinase dead (KD) DDR2 protein is induced, and evaluated the DDR2 function in cellular proliferation in chondrocytes. Although the miDdr2-transfected ATDC5 cell lines retained normal differentiation ability, DDR2 reduction finally promoted cellular proliferation in proportion to the decreasing ratio of Ddr2 expression, and it also promoted earlier differentiation to cartilage cells by insulin induction. The layer of hypertrophic chondrocytes in KD Ddr2 transgenic mice was not significantly thicker than that of normal littermates, but the layer of proliferative chondrocytes in KD-Ddr2 transgenic mice was significantly thicker than that of normal littermates

  5. Structural organization of the regulatory domain of human 5-lipoxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, John B; Brock, Thomas G

    2005-04-01

    The enzyme 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) initiates the synthesis of leukotrienes. For this reason, 5-LO activity is important for immune defense, whereas improper regulation contributes to pathogenesis, including chronic inflammation, asthma and atherosclerosis. Like all lipoxygenases, the 5-LO protein consists of two domains, a regulatory domain and a catalytic domain. Naturally, the regulatory domain determines catalytic activity and controls leukotriene synthesis. This domain shares features with classical C2 domains in that it has a beta-sandwich structure and binds calcium, nucleotides and phospholipids. However, important structural features place this domain in a distinct family, the PLATs (for Polycystin-1, Lipoxygenase, alpha-Toxin). In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the three dimensional organization of this important component of the 5-LO molecule. In addition, we point to findings from structural analyses of related proteins to suggest further details relating 5-LO structure to function.

  6. The prophage-encoded hyaluronate lyase has broad substrate specificity and is regulated by the N-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sudhir Kumar; Bharati, Akhilendra Pratap; Singh, Neha; Pandey, Praveen; Joshi, Pankaj; Singh, Kavita; Mitra, Kalyan; Gayen, Jiaur R; Sarkar, Jayanta; Akhtar, Md Sohail

    2014-12-19

    Streptococcus equi is the causative agent of the highly contagious disease "strangles" in equines and zoonotic meningitis in human. Spreading of infection in host tissues is thought to be facilitated by the bacterial gene encoded extracellular hyaluronate lyase (HL), which degrades hyaluronan (HA), chondroitin 6-sulfate, and dermatan sulfate of the extracellular matrix). The clinical strain S. equi 4047 however, lacks a functional extracellular HL. The prophages of S. equi and other streptococci encode intracellular HLs which are reported to partially degrade HA and do not cleave any other glycosaminoglycans. The phage HLs are thus thought to play a role limited to the penetration of streptococcal HA capsules, facilitating bacterial lysogenization and not in the bacterial pathogenesis. Here we systematically looked into the structure-function relationship of S. equi 4047 phage HL. Although HA is the preferred substrate, this HL has weak activity toward chondroitin 6-sulfate and dermatan sulfate and can completely degrade all of them. Even though the catalytic triple-stranded β-helix domain of phage HL is functionally independent, its catalytic efficiency and specificity is influenced by the N-terminal domain. The phage HL also interacts with human transmembrane glycoprotein CD44. The above results suggest that the streptococci can use phage HLs to degrade glycosaminoglycans of the extracellular matrix for spreading virulence factors and toxins while utilizing the disaccharides as a nutrient source for proliferation at the site of infection. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. The Prophage-encoded Hyaluronate Lyase Has Broad Substrate Specificity and Is Regulated by the N-terminal Domain*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sudhir Kumar; Bharati, Akhilendra Pratap; Singh, Neha; Pandey, Praveen; Joshi, Pankaj; Singh, Kavita; Mitra, Kalyan; Gayen, Jiaur R.; Sarkar, Jayanta; Akhtar, Md. Sohail

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus equi is the causative agent of the highly contagious disease “strangles” in equines and zoonotic meningitis in human. Spreading of infection in host tissues is thought to be facilitated by the bacterial gene encoded extracellular hyaluronate lyase (HL), which degrades hyaluronan (HA), chondroitin 6-sulfate, and dermatan sulfate of the extracellular matrix). The clinical strain S. equi 4047 however, lacks a functional extracellular HL. The prophages of S. equi and other streptococci encode intracellular HLs which are reported to partially degrade HA and do not cleave any other glycosaminoglycans. The phage HLs are thus thought to play a role limited to the penetration of streptococcal HA capsules, facilitating bacterial lysogenization and not in the bacterial pathogenesis. Here we systematically looked into the structure-function relationship of S. equi 4047 phage HL. Although HA is the preferred substrate, this HL has weak activity toward chondroitin 6-sulfate and dermatan sulfate and can completely degrade all of them. Even though the catalytic triple-stranded β-helix domain of phage HL is functionally independent, its catalytic efficiency and specificity is influenced by the N-terminal domain. The phage HL also interacts with human transmembrane glycoprotein CD44. The above results suggest that the streptococci can use phage HLs to degrade glycosaminoglycans of the extracellular matrix for spreading virulence factors and toxins while utilizing the disaccharides as a nutrient source for proliferation at the site of infection. PMID:25378402

  8. Conformational change-induced repeat domain expansion regulates Rap phosphatase quorum-sensing signal receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Parashar

    Full Text Available The large family of Gram-positive quorum-sensing receptors known as the RNPP proteins consists of receptors homologous to the Rap, NprR, PlcR, and PrgX proteins that are regulated by imported oligopeptide autoinducers. Rap proteins are phosphatases and transcriptional anti-activators, and NprR, PlcR, and PrgX proteins are DNA binding transcription factors. Despite their obvious importance, the mechanistic basis of oligopeptide receptor regulation is largely unknown. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structure of the Bacillus subtilis quorum-sensing receptor RapJ in complex with the centrally important oligopeptide autoinducer competence and sporulation factor (CSF, also termed PhrC, a member of the Phr family of quorum-sensing signals. Furthermore, we present the crystal structure of RapI. Comparison of the RapJ-PhrC, RapI, RapH-Spo0F, and RapF-ComA(C crystal structures reveals the mechanistic basis of Phr activity. More specifically, when complexed with target proteins, Rap proteins consist of a C-terminal tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR domain connected by a flexible helix-containing linker to an N-terminal 3-helix bundle. In the absence of a target protein or regulatory peptide, the Rap protein 3-helix bundle adopts different conformations. However, in the peptide-bound conformation, the Rap protein N-terminal 3-helix bundle and linker undergo a radical conformational change, form TPR-like folds, and merge with the existing C-terminal TPR domain. To our knowledge, this is the first example of conformational change-induced repeat domain expansion. Furthermore, upon Phr binding, the entire Rap protein is compressed along the TPR superhelical axis, generating new intramolecular contacts that lock the Rap protein in an inactive state. The fact that Rap proteins are conformationally flexible is surprising considering that it is accepted dogma that TPR proteins do not undergo large conformational changes. Repeat proteins are widely used as scaffolds

  9. NLRP3 inflammasome assembly is regulated by phosphorylation of the pyrin domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolbe, Carl-Christian; Franklin, Bernardo S.; Brinkschulte, Rebecca; Geyer, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    NLRP3 is a cytosolic pattern recognition receptor that senses microbes and endogenous danger signals. Upon activation, NLRP3 forms an inflammasome with the adapter ASC, resulting in caspase-1 activation, release of proinflammatory cytokines and cell death. How NLRP3 activation is regulated by transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms to prevent aberrant activation remains incompletely understood. Here, we identify three conserved phosphorylation sites in NLRP3 and demonstrate that NLRP3 activation is controlled by phosphorylation of its pyrin domain (PYD). Phosphomimetic residues in NLRP3 PYD abrogate inflammasome activation and structural modeling indicates that phosphorylation of the PYD regulates charge–charge interaction between two PYDs that are essential for NLRP3 activation. Phosphatase 2A (PP2A) inhibition or knock-down drastically reduces NLRP3 activation, showing that PP2A can license inflammasome assembly via dephosphorylating NLRP3 PYD. These results propose that the balance between kinases and phosphatases acting on the NLRP3 PYD is critical for NLRP3 activation. PMID:28465465

  10. Interdependent phosphorylation within the kinase domain T-loop Regulates CHK2 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xin; Ward, Michael D; Tiedebohl, Jessica B; Oden, Yvonne M; Nyalwidhe, Julius O; Semmes, O John

    2010-10-22

    Chk2 is a critical regulator of the cellular DNA damage repair response. Activation of Chk2 in response to IR-induced damage is initiated by phosphorylation of the Chk2 SQ/TQ cluster domain at Ser(19), Ser(33), Ser(35), and Thr(68). This precedes autophosphorylation of Thr(383)/Thr(387) in the T-loop region of the kinase domain an event that is a prerequisite for efficient kinase activity. We conducted an in-depth analysis of phosphorylation within the T-loop region (residues 366-406). We report four novel phosphorylation sites at Ser(372), Thr(378), Thr(389), and Tyr(390). Substitution mutation Y390F was defective for kinase function. The substitution mutation T378A ablated the IR induction of kinase activity. Interestingly, the substitution mutation T389A demonstrated a 6-fold increase in kinase activity when compared with wild-type Chk2. In addition, phosphorylation at Thr(389) was a prerequisite to phosphorylation at Thr(387) but not at Thr(383). Quantitative mass spectrometry analysis revealed IR-induced phosphorylation and subcellular distribution of Chk2 phosphorylated species. We observed IR-induced increase in phosphorylation at Ser(379), Thr(389), and Thr(383)/Thr(389). Phosphorylation at Tyr(390) was dramatically reduced following IR. Exposure to IR was also associated with changes in the ratio of chromatin/nuclear localization. IR-induced increase in chromatin localization was associated with phosphorylation at Thr(372), Thr(379), Thr(383), Thr(389), Thr(383)/Thr(387), and Thr(383)/Thr(389). Chk2 hyper-phosphorylated species at Thr(383)/Thr(387)/Thr(389) and Thr(383)/Thr(387)/Thr(389)/Tyr(390) relocalized from almost exclusively chromatin to predominately nuclear expression, suggesting a role for phosphorylation in regulation of chromatin targeting and egress. The differential impact of T-loop phosphorylation on Chk2 ubiquitylation suggests a co-dependence of these modifications. The results demonstrate that a complex interdependent network of

  11. The Vesicle Priming Factor CAPS Functions as a Homodimer via C2 Domain Interactions to Promote Regulated Vesicle Exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrie, Matt; Esquibel, Joseph; Kabachinski, Greg; Maciuba, Stephanie; Takahashi, Hirohide; Edwardson, J Michael; Martin, Thomas F J

    2016-09-30

    Neurotransmitters and peptide hormones are secreted by regulated vesicle exocytosis. CAPS (also known as CADPS) is a 145-kDa cytosolic and peripheral membrane protein required for vesicle docking and priming steps that precede Ca 2+ -triggered vesicle exocytosis. CAPS binds phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P 2 ) and SNARE proteins and is proposed to promote SNARE protein complex assembly for vesicle docking and priming. We characterized purified soluble CAPS as mainly monomer in equilibrium with small amounts of dimer. However, the active form of CAPS bound to PC12 cell membranes or to liposomes containing PI(4,5)P 2 and Q-SNARE proteins was mainly dimer. CAPS dimer formation required its C2 domain based on mutation or deletion studies. Moreover, C2 domain mutations or deletions resulted in a loss of CAPS function in regulated vesicle exocytosis, indicating that dimerization is essential for CAPS function. Comparison of the CAPS C2 domain to a structurally defined Munc13-1 C2A domain dimer revealed conserved residues involved in CAPS dimerization. We conclude that CAPS functions as a C2 domain-mediated dimer in regulated vesicle exocytosis. The unique tandem C2-PH domain of CAPS may serve as a PI(4,5)P 2 -triggered switch for dimerization. CAPS dimerization may be coupled to oligomeric SNARE complex assembly for vesicle docking and priming. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. The MARVEL domain protein Nce102 regulates actin organization and invasive growth of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Lois M; Wang, Hong X; Konopka, James B

    2013-11-26

    Invasive growth of the fungal pathogen Candida albicans into tissues promotes disseminated infections in humans. The plasma membrane is essential for pathogenesis because this important barrier mediates morphogenesis and invasive growth, as well as secretion of virulence factors, cell wall synthesis, nutrient import, and other processes. Previous studies showed that the Sur7 tetraspan protein that localizes to MCC (membrane compartment occupied by Can1)/eisosome subdomains of the plasma membrane regulates a broad range of key functions, including cell wall synthesis, morphogenesis, and resistance to copper. Therefore, a distinct tetraspan protein found in MCC/eisosomes, Nce102, was investigated. Nce102 belongs to the MARVEL domain protein family, which is implicated in regulating membrane structure and function. Deletion of NCE102 did not cause the broad defects seen in sur7Δ cells. Instead, the nce102Δ mutant displayed a unique phenotype in that it was defective in forming hyphae and invading low concentrations of agar but could invade well in higher agar concentrations. This phenotype was likely due to a defect in actin organization that was observed by phalloidin staining. In support of this, the invasive growth defect of a bni1Δ mutant that mislocalizes actin due to lack of the Bni1 formin was also reversed at high agar concentrations. This suggests that a denser matrix provides a signal that compensates for the actin defects. The nce102Δ mutant displayed decreased virulence and formed abnormal hyphae in mice. These studies identify novel ways that Nce102 and the physical environment surrounding C. albicans regulate morphogenesis and pathogenesis. The plasma membrane promotes virulence of the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans by acting as a protective barrier around the cell and mediating dynamic activities, such as morphogenesis, cell wall synthesis, secretion of virulence factors, and nutrient uptake. To better understand how the plasma membrane

  13. Human protein-disulfide isomerase is a redox-regulated chaperone activated by oxidation of domain a'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Yu, Jiang; Huo, Lin; Wang, Lei; Feng, Wei; Wang, Chih-chen

    2012-01-06

    Protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI), with domains arranged as abb'xa'c, is a key enzyme and chaperone localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) catalyzing oxidative folding and preventing misfolding/aggregation of proteins. It has been controversial whether the chaperone activity of PDI is redox-regulated, and the molecular basis is unclear. Here, we show that both the chaperone activity and the overall conformation of human PDI are redox-regulated. We further demonstrate that the conformational changes are triggered by the active site of domain a', and the minimum redox-regulated cassette is located in b'xa'. The structure of the reduced bb'xa' reveals for the first time that domain a' packs tightly with both domain b' and linker x to form one compact structural module. Oxidation of domain a' releases the compact conformation and exposes the shielded hydrophobic areas to facilitate its high chaperone activity. Thus, the study unequivocally provides mechanistic insights into the redox-regulated chaperone activity of human PDI.

  14. Human Protein-disulfide Isomerase Is a Redox-regulated Chaperone Activated by Oxidation of Domain a′*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chao; Yu, Jiang; Huo, Lin; Wang, Lei; Feng, Wei; Wang, Chih-chen

    2012-01-01

    Protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI), with domains arranged as abb′xa′c, is a key enzyme and chaperone localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) catalyzing oxidative folding and preventing misfolding/aggregation of proteins. It has been controversial whether the chaperone activity of PDI is redox-regulated, and the molecular basis is unclear. Here, we show that both the chaperone activity and the overall conformation of human PDI are redox-regulated. We further demonstrate that the conformational changes are triggered by the active site of domain a′, and the minimum redox-regulated cassette is located in b′xa′. The structure of the reduced bb′xa′ reveals for the first time that domain a′ packs tightly with both domain b′ and linker x to form one compact structural module. Oxidation of domain a′ releases the compact conformation and exposes the shielded hydrophobic areas to facilitate its high chaperone activity. Thus, the study unequivocally provides mechanistic insights into the redox-regulated chaperone activity of human PDI. PMID:22090031

  15. Regulation and Function of the Nucleotide Binding Domain Leucine-Rich Repeat-Containing Receptor, Pyrin Domain-Containing-3 Inflammasome in Lung Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seonmin; Suh, Gee-Young; Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine M K

    2016-02-01

    Inflammasomes are specialized inflammatory signaling platforms that govern the maturation and secretion of proinflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β and IL-18, through the regulation of caspase-1-dependent proteolytic processing. Several nucleotide binding domain leucine-rich repeat-containing receptor (NLR) family members (i.e., NLR family, pyrin domain containing [NLRP] 1, NLRP3, and NLR family, caspase recruitment domain containing-4 [NLRC4]) as well as the pyrin and hemopoietic expression, interferon-inducibility, nuclear localization domain-containing family member, absent in melanoma 2, can form inflammasome complexes in human cells. In particular, the NLRP3 inflammasome is activated in response to cellular stresses through a two-component pathway, involving Toll-like receptor 4-ligand interaction (priming) followed by a second signal, such as ATP-dependent P2X purinoreceptor 7 receptor activation. Emerging studies suggest that the NLRP3 inflammasome can exert pleiotropic effects in human diseases with potentially both pro- and antipathogenic sequelae. Whereas NLRP3 inflammasome activation can serve as a vital component of host defense against invading bacteria and pathogens, excessive activation of the inflammasome can lead to inflammation-associated tissue injury in the setting of chronic disease. In addition, pyroptosis, an inflammasome-associated mode of cell death, contributes to host defense. Recent research has described the regulation and function of the NLRP3 inflammasome in various pulmonary diseases, including acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome, sepsis, respiratory infections, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, asthma, pulmonary hypertension, cystic fibrosis, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The NLRP3 and related inflammasomes, and their regulated cytokines or receptors, may represent novel diagnostic or therapeutic targets in pulmonary diseases and other diseases in which inflammation contributes to pathogenesis.

  16. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Interacts with Multiple Immunoglobulin Domains of Filamin A*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Playford, Martin P.; Nurminen, Elisa; Pentikäinen, Olli T.; Milgram, Sharon L.; Hartwig, John H.; Stossel, Thomas P.; Nakamura, Fumihiko

    2010-01-01

    Mutations of the chloride channel cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) that impair its apical localization and function cause cystic fibrosis. A previous report has shown that filamin A (FLNa), an actin-cross-linking and -scaffolding protein, interacts directly with the cytoplasmic N terminus of CFTR and that this interaction is necessary for stability and confinement of the channel to apical membranes. Here, we report that the CFTR N terminus has sequence similarity to known FLNa-binding partner-binding sites. FLNa has 24 Ig (IgFLNa) repeats, and a CFTR peptide pulled down repeats 9, 12, 17, 19, 21, and 23, which share sequence similarity yet differ from the other FLNa Ig domains. Using known structures of IgFLNa·partner complexes as templates, we generated in silico models of IgFLNa·CFTR peptide complexes. Point and deletion mutants of IgFLNa and CFTR informed by the models, including disease-causing mutations L15P and W19C, disrupted the binding interaction. The model predicted that a P5L CFTR mutation should not affect binding, but a synthetic P5L mutant peptide had reduced solubility, suggesting a different disease-causing mechanism. Taken together with the fact that FLNa dimers are elongated (∼160 nm) strands, whereas CFTR is compact (6∼8 nm), we propose that a single FLNa molecule can scaffold multiple CFTR partners. Unlike previously defined dimeric FLNa·partner complexes, the FLNa-monomeric CFTR interaction is relatively weak, presumptively facilitating dynamic clustering of CFTR at cell membranes. Finally, we show that deletion of all CFTR interacting domains from FLNa suppresses the surface expression of CFTR on baby hamster kidney cells. PMID:20351098

  17. The roles of the catalytic and noncatalytic activities of Rpd3L and Rpd3S in the regulation of gene transcription in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniella Yeheskely-Hayon

    Full Text Available In budding yeasts, the histone deacetylase Rpd3 resides in two different complexes called Rpd3L (large and Rpd3S (small that exert opposing effects on the transcription of meiosis-specific genes. By introducing mutations that disrupt the integrity and function of either Rpd3L or Rpd3S, we show here that Rpd3 function is determined by its association with either of these complexes. Specifically, the catalytic activity of Rpd3S activates the transcription of the two major positive regulators of meiosis, IME1 and IME2, under all growth conditions and activates the transcription of NDT80 only during vegetative growth. In contrast, the effects of Rpd3L depends on nutrients; it represses or activates transcription in the presence or absence of a nitrogen source, respectively. Further, we show that transcriptional activation does not correlate with histone H4 deacetylation, suggesting an effect on a nonhistone protein. Comparison of rpd3-null and catalytic-site point mutants revealed an inhibitory activity that is independent of either the catalytic activity of Rpd3 or the integrity of Rpd3L and Rpd3S.

  18. A Toll/IL-1R/resistance domain-containing thioredoxin regulates phagocytosis in Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancilla-Herrera, Ismael; Méndez-Tenorio, Alfonso; Wong-Baeza, Isabel; Jiménez-Uribe, Alexis P; Alcántara-Hernández, Marcela; Ocadiz-Ruiz, Ramon; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario A; Arriaga-Pizano, Lourdes A; López-Macías, Constantino; González-y-Merchand, Jorge; Isibasi, Armando

    2012-10-08

    Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan parasite that infects humans and causes amebiasis affecting developing countries. Phagocytosis of epithelial cells, erythrocytes, leucocytes, and commensal microbiota bacteria is a major pathogenic mechanism used by this parasite. A Toll/IL-1R/Resistance (TIR) domain-containing protein is required in phagocytosis in the social ameba Dictyostelium discoideum, an ameba closely related to Entamoeba histolytica in phylogeny. In insects and vertebrates, TIR domain-containing proteins regulate phagocytic and cell activation. Therefore, we investigated whether E. histolytica expresses TIR domain-containing molecules that may be involved in the phagocytosis of erythrocytes and bacteria. Using in silico analysis we explored in Entamoeba histolytica databases for TIR domain containing sequences. After silencing TIR domain containing sequences in trophozoites by siRNA we evaluated phagocytosis of erythrocytes and bacteria. We identified an E. histolytica thioredoxin containing a TIR-like domain. The secondary and tertiary structure of this sequence exhibited structural similarity to TIR domain family. Thioredoxin transcripts silenced in E. histolytica trophozoites decreased erythrocytes and E. coli phagocytosis. TIR domain-containing thioredoxin of E. histolytica could be an important element in erythrocytes and bacteria phagocytosis.

  19. A Toll/IL-1R/resistance domain-containing thioredoxin regulates phagocytosis in Entamoeba histolytica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mancilla-Herrera Ismael

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan parasite that infects humans and causes amebiasis affecting developing countries. Phagocytosis of epithelial cells, erythrocytes, leucocytes, and commensal microbiota bacteria is a major pathogenic mechanism used by this parasite. A Toll/IL-1R/Resistance (TIR domain-containing protein is required in phagocytosis in the social ameba Dictyostelium discoideum, an ameba closely related to Entamoeba histolytica in phylogeny. In insects and vertebrates, TIR domain-containing proteins regulate phagocytic and cell activation. Therefore, we investigated whether E. histolytica expresses TIR domain-containing molecules that may be involved in the phagocytosis of erythrocytes and bacteria. Methods Using in silico analysis we explored in Entamoeba histolytica databases for TIR domain containing sequences. After silencing TIR domain containing sequences in trophozoites by siRNA we evaluated phagocytosis of erythrocytes and bacteria. Results We identified an E. histolytica thioredoxin containing a TIR-like domain. The secondary and tertiary structure of this sequence exhibited structural similarity to TIR domain family. Thioredoxin transcripts silenced in E. histolytica trophozoites decreased erythrocytes and E. coli phagocytosis. Conclusion TIR domain-containing thioredoxin of E. histolytica could be an important element in erythrocytes and bacteria phagocytosis.

  20. Structural and evolutionary aspects of two families of non-catalytic domains present in starch and glycogen binding proteins from microbes, plants and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janeček, Štefan; Svensson, Birte; MacGregor, E Ann

    2011-10-10

    Starch-binding domains (SBDs) comprise distinct protein modules that bind starch, glycogen or related carbohydrates and have been classified into different families of carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). The present review focuses on SBDs of CBM20 and CBM48 found in amylolytic enzymes from several glycoside hydrolase (GH) families GH13, GH14, GH15, GH31, GH57 and GH77, as well as in a number of regulatory enzymes, e.g., phosphoglucan, water dikinase-3, genethonin-1, laforin, starch-excess protein-4, the β-subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase and its homologues from sucrose non-fermenting-1 protein kinase SNF1 complex, and an adaptor-regulator related to the SNF1/AMPK family, AKINβγ. CBM20s and CBM48s of amylolytic enzymes occur predominantly in the microbial world, whereas the non-amylolytic proteins containing these modules are mostly of plant and animal origin. Comparison of amino acid sequences and tertiary structures of CBM20 and CBM48 reveals the close relatedness of these SBDs and, in some cases, glycogen-binding domains (GBDs). The families CBM20 and CBM48 share both an ancestral form and the mode of starch/glycogen binding at one or two binding sites. Phylogenetic analyses demonstrate that they exhibit independent behaviour, i.e. each family forms its own part in an evolutionary tree, with enzyme specificity (protein function) being well represented within each family. The distinction between CBM20 and CBM48 families is not sharp since there are representatives in both CBM families that possess an intermediate character. These are, for example, CBM20s from hypothetical GH57 amylopullulanase (probably lacking the starch-binding site 2) and CBM48s from the GH13 pullulanase subfamily (probably lacking the starch/glycogen-binding site 1). The knowledge gained concerning the occurrence of these SBDs and GBDs through the range of taxonomy will support future experimental research. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cellular prion protein expression is not regulated by the Alzheimer's amyloid precursor protein intracellular domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Lewis

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence of molecular and cellular links between Alzheimer's disease (AD and prion diseases. The cellular prion protein, PrP(C, modulates the post-translational processing of the AD amyloid precursor protein (APP, through its inhibition of the β-secretase BACE1, and oligomers of amyloid-β bind to PrP(C which may mediate amyloid-β neurotoxicity. In addition, the APP intracellular domain (AICD, which acts as a transcriptional regulator, has been reported to control the expression of PrP(C. Through the use of transgenic mice, cell culture models and manipulation of APP expression and processing, this study aimed to clarify the role of AICD in regulating PrP(C. Over-expression of the three major isoforms of human APP (APP(695, APP(751 and APP(770 in cultured neuronal and non-neuronal cells had no effect on the level of endogenous PrP(C. Furthermore, analysis of brain tissue from transgenic mice over-expressing either wild type or familial AD associated mutant human APP revealed unaltered PrP(C levels. Knockdown of endogenous APP expression in cells by siRNA or inhibition of γ-secretase activity also had no effect on PrP(C levels. Overall, we did not detect any significant difference in the expression of PrP(C in any of the cell or animal-based paradigms considered, indicating that the control of cellular PrP(C levels by AICD is not as straightforward as previously suggested.

  2. Functional processing of nuclear Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP-N): evidence for a critical role of proteolytic processing in the regulation of its catalytic activity, subcellular localization and substrate targeting in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sueyoshi, Noriyuki; Nimura, Takaki; Onouchi, Takashi; Baba, Hiromi; Takenaka, Shinobu; Ishida, Atsuhiko; Kameshita, Isamu

    2012-01-01

    Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase phosphatase (CaMKP) and its nuclear homolog CaMKP-N are Ser/Thr protein phosphatases that belong to the PPM family. These phosphatases are highly specific for multifunctional CaM kinases and negatively regulate their activities. CaMKP-N is only expressed in the brain and specifically localized in the nucleus. In this study, we found that zebrafish CaMKP-N (zCaMKP-N) underwent proteolytic processing in both the zebrafish brain and Neuro2a cells. In Neuro2a cells, the proteolytic processing was effectively inhibited by the proteasome inhibitors MG-132, Epoxomicin, and Lactacystin, suggesting that the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway was involved in this processing. Using MG-132, we found that the proteolytic processing changed the subcellular localization of zCaMKP-N from the nucleus to the cytosol. Accompanying this change, the cellular targets of zCaMKP-N in Neuro2a cells were significantly altered. Furthermore, we obtained evidence that the zCaMKP-N activity was markedly activated when the C-terminal domain was removed by the processing. Thus, the proteolytic processing of zCaMKP-N at the C-terminal region regulates its catalytic activity, subcellular localization and substrate targeting in vivo. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ras-association domain of sorting Nexin 27 is critical for regulating expression of GIRK potassium channels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Balana

    Full Text Available G protein-gated inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK channels play an important role in regulating neuronal excitability. Sorting nexin 27b (SNX27b, which reduces surface expression of GIRK channels through a PDZ domain interaction, contains a putative Ras-association (RA domain with unknown function. Deleting the RA domain in SNX27b (SNX27b-ΔRA prevents the down-regulation of GIRK2c/GIRK3 channels. Similarly, a point mutation (K305A in the RA domain disrupts regulation of GIRK2c/GIRK3 channels and reduces H-Ras binding in vitro. Finally, the dominant-negative H-Ras (S17N occludes the SNX27b-dependent decrease in surface expression of GIRK2c/GIRK3 channels. Thus, the presence of a functional RA domain and the interaction with Ras-like G proteins comprise a novel mechanism for modulating SNX27b control of GIRK channel surface expression and cellular excitability.

  4. Analysis of uromodulin polymerization provides new insights into the mechanisms regulating ZP domain-mediated protein assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Céline; Santambrogio, Sara; Perucca, Simone; Casari, Giorgio; Rampoldi, Luca

    2009-01-01

    Uromodulin is the most abundant protein secreted in urine, in which it is found as a high-molecular-weight polymer. Polymerization occurs via its zona pellucida (ZP) domain, a conserved module shared by many extracellular eukaryotic proteins that are able to assemble into matrices. In this work, we identified two motifs in uromodulin, mapping in the linker region of the ZP domain and in between protein cleavage and glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchoring sites, which regulate its polymerization. Indeed, mutations in either module led to premature intracellular polymerization of a soluble uromodulin isoform, demonstrating the inhibitory role of these motifs for ZP domain-mediated protein assembly. Proteolytic cleavage separating the external motif from the mature monomer is necessary to release the inhibitory function and allow protein polymerization. Moreover, we report absent or abnormal assembly into filaments of GPI-anchored uromodulin mutated in either the internal or the external motif. This effect is due to altered processing on the plasma membrane, demonstrating that the presence of the two modules has not only an inhibitory function but also can positively regulate protein polymerization. Our data expand previous knowledge on the control of ZP domain function and suggest a common mechanism regulating polymerization of ZP domain proteins.

  5. Rice Cellulose SynthaseA8 Plant-Conserved Region Is a Coiled-Coil at the Catalytic Core Entrance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rushton, Phillip S.; Olek, Anna T.; Makowski, Lee; Badger, John; Steussy, C. Nicklaus; Carpita, Nicholas C.; Stauffacher, Cynthia V. (NEU); (Purdue)

    2016-11-22

    The crystallographic structure of a rice (Oryza sativa) cellulose synthase, OsCesA8, plant-conserved region (P-CR), one of two unique domains in the catalytic domain of plant CesAs, was solved to 2.4 Å resolution. Two antiparallel α-helices form a coiled-coil domain linked by a large extended connector loop containing a conserved trio of aromatic residues. The P-CR structure was fit into a molecular envelope for the P-CR domain derived from small-angle X-ray scattering data. The P-CR structure and molecular envelope, combined with a homology-based chain trace of the CesA8 catalytic core, were modeled into a previously determined CesA8 small-angle X-ray scattering molecular envelope to produce a detailed topological model of the CesA8 catalytic domain. The predicted position for the P-CR domain from the molecular docking models places the P-CR connector loop into a hydrophobic pocket of the catalytic core, with the coiled-coil aligned near the entrance of the substrate UDP-glucose into the active site. In this configuration, the P-CR coiled-coil alone is unlikely to regulate substrate access to the active site, but it could interact with other domains of CesA, accessory proteins, or other CesA catalytic domains to control substrate delivery.

  6. Impact of the [delta]F508 Mutation in First Nucleotide-binding Domain of Human Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator on Domain Folding and Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Hal A.; Zhao, Xun; Wang, Chi; Sauder, J. Michael; Rooney, Isabelle; Noland, Brian W.; Lorimer, Don; Kearins, Margaret C.; Conners, Kris; Condon, Brad; Maloney, Peter C.; Guggino, William B.; Hunt, John F.; Emtage, Spencer (SG); (Columbia); (JHU)

    2010-07-19

    Cystic fibrosis is caused by defects in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), commonly the deletion of residue Phe-508 (DeltaF508) in the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1), which results in a severe reduction in the population of functional channels at the epithelial cell surface. Previous studies employing incomplete NBD1 domains have attributed this to aberrant folding of DeltaF508 NBD1. We report structural and biophysical studies on complete human NBD1 domains, which fail to demonstrate significant changes of in vitro stability or folding kinetics in the presence or absence of the DeltaF508 mutation. Crystal structures show minimal changes in protein conformation but substantial changes in local surface topography at the site of the mutation, which is located in the region of NBD1 believed to interact with the first membrane spanning domain of CFTR. These results raise the possibility that the primary effect of DeltaF508 is a disruption of proper interdomain interactions at this site in CFTR rather than interference with the folding of NBD1. Interestingly, increases in the stability of NBD1 constructs are observed upon introduction of second-site mutations that suppress the trafficking defect caused by the DeltaF508 mutation, suggesting that these suppressors might function indirectly by improving the folding efficiency of NBD1 in the context of the full-length protein. The human NBD1 structures also solidify the understanding of CFTR regulation by showing that its two protein segments that can be phosphorylated both adopt multiple conformations that modulate access to the ATPase active site and functional interdomain interfaces.

  7. DMPD: Critical role of toll-like receptors and nucleotide oligomerisation domain inthe regulation of health and disease. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available and nucleotide oligomerisation domain inthe regulation of health and disease. Pu...bmedID 17535871 Title Critical role of toll-like receptors and nucleotide oligomerisation domain inthe regulation of health...17535871 Critical role of toll-like receptors and nucleotide oligomerisation domain inthe regulation of heal...th and disease. Mitchell JA, Paul-Clark MJ, Clarke GW, McMaster SK, Cartwright N. J

  8. Lrp4 domains differentially regulate limb/brain development and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohlkamp, Theresa; Durakoglugil, Murat; Lane-Donovan, Courtney; Xian, Xunde; Johnson, Eric B; Hammer, Robert E; Herz, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotype is the strongest predictor of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) risk. ApoE is a cholesterol transport protein that binds to members of the Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL) Receptor family, which includes LDL Receptor Related Protein 4 (Lrp4). Lrp4, together with one of its ligands Agrin and its co-receptors Muscle Specific Kinase (MuSK) and Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP), regulates neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation. All four proteins are also expressed in the adult brain, and APP, MuSK, and Agrin are required for normal synapse function in the CNS. Here, we show that Lrp4 is also required for normal hippocampal plasticity. In contrast to the closely related Lrp8/Apoer2, the intracellular domain of Lrp4 does not appear to be necessary for normal expression and maintenance of long-term potentiation at central synapses or for the formation and maintenance of peripheral NMJs. However, it does play a role in limb development.

  9. Lrp4 domains differentially regulate limb/brain development and synaptic plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Pohlkamp

    Full Text Available Apolipoprotein E (ApoE genotype is the strongest predictor of Alzheimer's Disease (AD risk. ApoE is a cholesterol transport protein that binds to members of the Low-Density Lipoprotein (LDL Receptor family, which includes LDL Receptor Related Protein 4 (Lrp4. Lrp4, together with one of its ligands Agrin and its co-receptors Muscle Specific Kinase (MuSK and Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP, regulates neuromuscular junction (NMJ formation. All four proteins are also expressed in the adult brain, and APP, MuSK, and Agrin are required for normal synapse function in the CNS. Here, we show that Lrp4 is also required for normal hippocampal plasticity. In contrast to the closely related Lrp8/Apoer2, the intracellular domain of Lrp4 does not appear to be necessary for normal expression and maintenance of long-term potentiation at central synapses or for the formation and maintenance of peripheral NMJs. However, it does play a role in limb development.

  10. Interactions between the discoidin domain receptor 1 and β1 integrin regulate attachment to collagen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A. Staudinger

    2013-09-01

    Collagen degradation by phagocytosis is essential for physiological collagen turnover and connective tissue homeostasis. The rate limiting step of phagocytosis is the binding of specific adhesion receptors, which include the integrins and discoidin domain receptors (DDR, to fibrillar collagen. While previous data suggest that these two receptors interact, the functional nature of these interactions is not defined. In mouse and human fibroblasts we examined the effects of DDR1 knockdown and over-expression on β1 integrin subunit function. DDR1 expression levels were positively associated with enhanced contraction of floating and attached collagen gels, increased collagen binding and increased collagen remodeling. In DDR1 over-expressing cells compared with control cells, there were increased numbers, area and length of focal adhesions immunostained for talin, paxillin, vinculin and activated β1 integrin. After treatment with the integrin-cleaving protease jararhagin, in comparison to controls, DDR1 over-expressing cells exhibited increased β1 integrin cleavage at the cell membrane, indicating that DDR1 over-expression affected the access and susceptibility of cell-surface β1 integrin to the protease. DDR1 over-expression was associated with increased glycosylation of the β1 integrin subunit, which when blocked by deoxymannojirimycin, reduced collagen binding. Collectively these data indicate that DDR1 regulates β1 integrin interactions with fibrillar collagen, which positively impacts the binding step of collagen phagocytosis and collagen remodeling.

  11. Regulation of EGF receptor signaling by the MARVEL domain-containing protein CKLFSF8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Caining; Ding, Peiguo; Wang, Ying; Ma, Dalong

    2005-11-21

    It is known that chemokine-like factor superfamily 8 (CKLFSF8), a member of the CKLF superfamily, has four putative transmembrane regions and a MARVEL domain. Its structure is similar to TM4SF11 (plasmolipin) and widely distributed in normal tissue. However, its function is not yet known. We show here that CKLFSF8 is associated with the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and that ectopic expression of CKLFSF8 in several cell lines suppresses EGF-induced cell proliferation, whereas knockdown of CKLFSF8 by siRNA promotes cell proliferation. In cells overexpressing CKLFSF8, the initial activation of EGFR was not affected, but subsequent desensitization of EGF-induced signaling occurred rapidly. This attenuation was correlated with an increased rate of receptor endocytosis. In contrast, knockdown of CKLFSF8 by siCKLFSF8 delayed EGFR endocytosis. These results identify CKLFSF8 as a novel regulator of EGF-induced signaling and indicate that the association of EGFR with four transmembrane proteins is critical for EGFR desensitization.

  12. First crystal structure of an endo-inulinase, INU2, from Aspergillus ficuum: discovery of an extra-pocket in the catalytic domain responsible for its endo-activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouyez, Jenny; Mayard, Aurélie; Vandamme, Anne-Michèle; Roussel, Guillaume; Perpète, Eric A; Wouters, Johan; Housen, Isabelle; Michaux, Catherine

    2012-11-01

    Endo-inulinase is a member of glycosidase hydrolase family 32 (GH32) degrading fructans of the inulin type with an endo-cleavage mode and is an important class of industrial enzyme. In the present study, we report the first crystal structure of an endo-inulinase, INU2, from Aspergillus ficuum at 1.5 Å. It was solved by molecular replacement with the structure of exo-inulinase as search model. The 3D structure presents a bimodular arrangement common to other GH32 enzymes: a N-terminal 5-fold β-propeller catalytic domain with four β-sheets and a C-terminal β-sandwich domain organized in two β-sheets with five β-strands. The structural analysis and comparison with other GH32 enzymes reveal the presence of an extra pocket in the INU2 catalytic site, formed by two loops and the conserved motif W-M(I)-N-D(E)-P-N-G. This cavity would explain the endo-activity of the enzyme, the critical role of Trp40 and particularly the cleavage at the third unit of the inulin(-like) substrates. Crystal structure at 2.1 Å of INU2 complexed with fructosyl molecules, experimental digestion data and molecular modelling studies support these hypotheses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. PH Domain-Arf G Protein Interactions Localize the Arf-GEF Steppke for Cleavage Furrow Regulation in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donghoon M Lee

    Full Text Available The recruitment of GDP/GTP exchange factors (GEFs to specific subcellular sites dictates where they activate small G proteins for the regulation of various cellular processes. Cytohesins are a conserved family of plasma membrane GEFs for Arf small G proteins that regulate endocytosis. Analyses of mammalian cytohesins have identified a number of recruitment mechanisms for these multi-domain proteins, but the conservation and developmental roles for these mechanisms are unclear. Here, we report how the pleckstrin homology (PH domain of the Drosophila cytohesin Steppke affects its localization and activity at cleavage furrows of the early embryo. We found that the PH domain is necessary for Steppke furrow localization, and for it to regulate furrow structure. However, the PH domain was not sufficient for the localization. Next, we examined the role of conserved PH domain amino acid residues that are required for mammalian cytohesins to bind PIP3 or GTP-bound Arf G proteins. We confirmed that the Steppke PH domain preferentially binds PIP3 in vitro through a conserved mechanism. However, disruption of residues for PIP3 binding had no apparent effect on GFP-Steppke localization and effects. Rather, residues for binding to GTP-bound Arf G proteins made major contributions to this Steppke localization and activity. By analyzing GFP-tagged Arf and Arf-like small G proteins, we found that Arf1-GFP, Arf6-GFP and Arl4-GFP, but not Arf4-GFP, localized to furrows. However, analyses of embryos depleted of Arf1, Arf6 or Arl4 revealed either earlier defects than occur in embryos depleted of Steppke, or no detectable furrow defects, possibly because of redundancies, and thus it was difficult to assess how individual Arf small G proteins affect Steppke. Nonetheless, our data show that the Steppke PH domain and its conserved residues for binding to GTP-bound Arf G proteins have substantial effects on Steppke localization and activity in early Drosophila embryos.

  14. The PAS Domain-Containing Protein HeuR Regulates Heme Uptake in Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeremiah G; Gaddy, Jennifer A; DiRita, Victor J

    2016-11-15

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of bacterially derived gastroenteritis. A previous mutant screen demonstrated that the heme uptake system (Chu) is required for full colonization of the chicken gastrointestinal tract. Subsequent work identified a PAS domain-containing regulator, termed HeuR, as being required for chicken colonization. Here we confirm that both the heme uptake system and HeuR are required for full chicken gastrointestinal tract colonization, with the heuR mutant being particularly affected during competition with wild-type C. jejuni Transcriptomic analysis identified the chu genes-and those encoding other iron uptake systems-as regulatory targets of HeuR. Purified HeuR bound the chuZA promoter region in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Consistent with a role for HeuR in chu expression, heuR mutants were unable to efficiently use heme as a source of iron under iron-limiting conditions, and mutants exhibited decreased levels of cell-associated iron by mass spectrometry. Finally, we demonstrate that an heuR mutant of C. jejuni is resistant to hydrogen peroxide and that this resistance correlates to elevated levels of catalase activity. These results indicate that HeuR directly and positively regulates iron acquisition from heme and negatively impacts catalase activity by an as yet unidentified mechanism in C. jejuni IMPORTANCE: Annually, Campylobacter jejuni causes millions of gastrointestinal infections in the United States, due primarily to its ability to reside within the gastrointestinal tracts of poultry, where it can be released during processing and contaminate meat. In the developing world, humans are often infected by consuming contaminated water or by direct contact with livestock. Following consumption of contaminated food or water, humans develop disease that is characterized by mild to severe diarrhea. There is a need to understand both colonization of chickens, to make food safer, and colonization of humans, to better

  15. Structural basis for substrate activation and regulation by cystathionine beta-synthase (CBS) domains in cystathionine [beta]-synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koutmos, Markos; Kabil, Omer; Smith, Janet L.; Banerjee, Ruma (Michigan-Med)

    2011-08-17

    The catalytic potential for H{sub 2}S biogenesis and homocysteine clearance converge at the active site of cystathionine {beta}-synthase (CBS), a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzyme. CBS catalyzes {beta}-replacement reactions of either serine or cysteine by homocysteine to give cystathionine and water or H{sub 2}S, respectively. In this study, high-resolution structures of the full-length enzyme from Drosophila in which a carbanion (1.70 {angstrom}) and an aminoacrylate intermediate (1.55 {angstrom}) have been captured are reported. Electrostatic stabilization of the zwitterionic carbanion intermediate is afforded by the close positioning of an active site lysine residue that is initially used for Schiff base formation in the internal aldimine and later as a general base. Additional stabilizing interactions between active site residues and the catalytic intermediates are observed. Furthermore, the structure of the regulatory 'energy-sensing' CBS domains, named after this protein, suggests a mechanism for allosteric activation by S-adenosylmethionine.

  16. Regulation of the interaction between the neuronal BIN1 isoform 1 and Tau proteins - role of the SH3 domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malki, Idir; Cantrelle, François-Xavier; Sottejeau, Yoann; Lippens, Guy; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Landrieu, Isabelle

    2017-10-01

    Bridging integrator 1 (bin1) gene is a genetic determinant of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and has been reported to modulate Alzheimer's pathogenesis through pathway(s) involving Tau. The functional impact of Tau/BIN1 interaction as well as the molecular details of this interaction are still not fully resolved. As a consequence, how BIN1 through its interaction with Tau affects AD risk is also still not determined. To progress in this understanding, interaction of Tau with two BIN1 isoforms was investigated using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. 1 H, 15 N spectra showed that the C-terminal SH3 domain of BIN1 isoform 1 (BIN1Iso1) is not mobile in solution but locked with the core of the protein. In contrast, the SH3 domain of BIN1 isoform 9 (BIN1Iso9) behaves as an independent mobile domain. This reveals an equilibrium between close and open conformations for the SH3 domain. Interestingly, a 334-376 peptide from the clathrin and AP-2-binding domain (CLAP) domain of BIN1Iso1, which contains a SH3-binding site, is able to compete with BIN1-SH3 intramolecular interaction. For both BIN1 isoforms, the SH3 domain can interact with Tau(210-240) sequence. Tau(210-240) peptide can indeed displace the intramolecular interaction of the BIN1-SH3 of BIN1Iso1 and form a complex with the released domain. The measured Kd were in agreement with a stronger affinity of Tau peptide. Both CLAP and Tau peptides occupied the same surface on the BIN1-SH3 domain, showing that their interaction is mutually exclusive. These results emphasize an additional level of complexity in the regulation of the interaction between BIN1 and Tau dependent of the BIN1 isoforms. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  17. Eag Domains Regulate LQT Mutant hERG Channels in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiang-Ni; Trudeau, Matthew C

    2015-01-01

    Human Ether á go-go Related Gene potassium channels form the rapid component of the delayed-rectifier (IKr) current in the heart. The N-terminal 'eag' domain, which is composed of a Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) domain and a short PAS-cap region, is a critical regulator of hERG channel function. In previous studies, we showed that isolated eag (i-eag) domains rescued the dysfunction of long QT type-2 associated mutant hERG R56Q channels, by substituting for defective eag domains, when the channels were expressed in Xenopus oocytes or HEK 293 cells.Here, our goal was to determine whether the rescue of hERG R56Q channels by i-eag domains could be translated into the environment of cardiac myocytes. We expressed hERG R56Q channels in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs) and measured electrical properties of the cells with whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. We found that, like in non-myocyte cells, hERG R56Q had defective, fast closing (deactivation) kinetics when expressed in hiPSC-CMs. We report here that i-eag domains slowed the deactivation kinetics of hERG R56Q channels in hiPSC-CMs. hERG R56Q channels prolonged the AP of hiPSCs, and the AP was shortened by co-expression of i-eag domains and hERG R56Q channels. We measured robust Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) between i-eag domains tagged with Cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and hERG R56Q channels tagged with Citrine fluorescent proteins (Citrine), indicating their close proximity at the cell membrane in live iPSC-CMs. Together, functional regulation and FRET spectroscopy measurements indicated that i-eag domains interacted directly with hERG R56Q channels in hiPSC-CMs. These results mean that the regulatory role of i-eag domains is conserved in the cellular environment of human cardiomyocytes, indicating that i-eag domains may be useful as a biological therapeutic.

  18. Eag Domains Regulate LQT Mutant hERG Channels in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang-Ni Liu

    Full Text Available Human Ether á go-go Related Gene potassium channels form the rapid component of the delayed-rectifier (IKr current in the heart. The N-terminal 'eag' domain, which is composed of a Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS domain and a short PAS-cap region, is a critical regulator of hERG channel function. In previous studies, we showed that isolated eag (i-eag domains rescued the dysfunction of long QT type-2 associated mutant hERG R56Q channels, by substituting for defective eag domains, when the channels were expressed in Xenopus oocytes or HEK 293 cells.Here, our goal was to determine whether the rescue of hERG R56Q channels by i-eag domains could be translated into the environment of cardiac myocytes. We expressed hERG R56Q channels in human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs and measured electrical properties of the cells with whole-cell patch-clamp recordings. We found that, like in non-myocyte cells, hERG R56Q had defective, fast closing (deactivation kinetics when expressed in hiPSC-CMs. We report here that i-eag domains slowed the deactivation kinetics of hERG R56Q channels in hiPSC-CMs. hERG R56Q channels prolonged the AP of hiPSCs, and the AP was shortened by co-expression of i-eag domains and hERG R56Q channels. We measured robust Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET between i-eag domains tagged with Cyan fluorescent protein (CFP and hERG R56Q channels tagged with Citrine fluorescent proteins (Citrine, indicating their close proximity at the cell membrane in live iPSC-CMs. Together, functional regulation and FRET spectroscopy measurements indicated that i-eag domains interacted directly with hERG R56Q channels in hiPSC-CMs. These results mean that the regulatory role of i-eag domains is conserved in the cellular environment of human cardiomyocytes, indicating that i-eag domains may be useful as a biological therapeutic.

  19. Phospholemman regulates cardiac Na+/Ca2+ exchanger by interacting with the exchanger's proximal linker domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue-Qian; Wang, Jufang; Carl, Lois L; Song, Jianliang; Ahlers, Belinda A; Cheung, Joseph Y

    2009-04-01

    Phospholemman (PLM) belongs to the FXYD family of small ion transport regulators. When phosphorylated at Ser(68), PLM inhibits cardiac Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX1). We previously demonstrated that the cytoplasmic tail of PLM interacts with the proximal intracellular loop (residues 218-358), but not the transmembrane (residues 1-217 and 765-938) or Ca(2+)-binding (residues 371-508) domains, of NCX1. In this study, we used intact Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger with various deletions in the intracellular loop to map the interaction sites with PLM. We first demonstrated by Western blotting and confocal immunofluorescence microscopy that wild-type (WT) NCX1 and its deletion mutants were expressed in transfected HEK-293 cells. Cotransfection with PLM and NCX1 (or its deletion mutants) in HEK-293 cells did not decrease expression of NCX1 (or its deletion mutants). Coexpression of PLM with WT NCX1 inhibited NCX1 current (I(NaCa)). Deletion of residues 240-679, 265-373, 250-300, or 300-373 from WT NCX1 resulted in loss of inhibition of I(NaCa) by PLM. Inhibition of I(NaCa) by PLM was preserved when residues 229-237, 270-300, 328-330, or 330-373 were deleted from the intracellular loop of NCX1. These results suggest that PLM mediated inhibition of I(NaCa) by interacting with two distinct regions (residues 238-270 and 300-328) of NCX1. Indeed, I(NaCa) measured in mutants lacking residues 238-270, 300-328, or 238-270 + 300-328 was not affected by PLM. Glutathione S-transferase pull-down assays confirmed that PLM bound to fragments corresponding to residues 218-371, 218-320, 218-270, 238-371, and 300-373, but not to fragments encompassing residues 250-300 and 371-508 of NCX1, indicating that residues 218-270 and 300-373 physically associated with PLM. Finally, acute regulation of I(NaCa) by PLM phosphorylation observed with WT NCX1 was absent in 250-300 deletion mutant but preserved in 229-237 deletion mutant. We conclude that PLM mediates its inhibition of NCX1 by interacting with

  20. Estrogen-dependent sushi domain containing 3 regulates cytoskeleton organization and migration in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, I; Todorović, V; Dubash, A D; Coon, J S; Parker, J B; Buranapramest, M; Huang, C C; Zhao, H; Green, K J; Bulun, S E

    2015-01-15

    Aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are the standard endocrine therapy for postmenopausal breast cancer; however, currently used biomarkers, such as, estrogen receptor-alpha/progesterone receptor (ERα/PR), predict only slightly more than half of the potential responders to AI treatment. To identify novel markers of AI responsiveness, a genome-wide microarray analysis was performed using primary breast tumor samples from 50 postmenopausal women who later developed metastatic breast cancer. Sushi domain containing 3 (SUSD3) is a significantly differentially expressed gene, with 3.38-fold higher mRNA levels in AI-responsive breast tumors vs non-responders (Pbreast tumors and treatment with estradiol increased SUSD3 expression in ERα-positive breast cancer cells. Treatment with an antiestrogen or ERα knockdown abolished basal and estradiol-dependent SUSD3 expression. Recruitment of ERα upstream of the transcription start site of SUSD3 was demonstrated by chromatin immunoprecipitation-PCR. Flow cytometric analysis of SUSD3-knockdown cells revealed blunted estradiol effects on progression into S and M phases. SUSD3 was localized to the plasma membrane of breast cancer cells. SUSD3 knockdown decreased the appearance of actin-rich protrusions, stress fibers and large basal focal adhesions, while increasing the presence of cortical actin concomitant with a decrease in Rho and focal adhesion kinase activity. SUSD3-deficient cells demonstrated diminished cell spreading, cell-cell adhesion and motility. In conclusion, SUSD3 is a novel promoter of estrogen-dependent cell proliferation and regulator of cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions and migration in breast cancer. It may serve as a novel predictor of response to endocrine therapy and potential therapeutic target.

  1. The metal chaperone Atox1 regulates the activity of the human copper transporter ATP7B by modulating domain dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Corey H; Yang, Nan; Bothe, Jameson; Tonelli, Marco; Nokhrin, Sergiy; Dolgova, Natalia V; Braiterman, Lelita; Lutsenko, Svetlana; Dmitriev, Oleg Y

    2017-11-03

    The human transporter ATP7B delivers copper to the biosynthetic pathways and maintains copper homeostasis in the liver. Mutations in ATP7B cause the potentially fatal hepatoneurological disorder Wilson disease. The activity and intracellular localization of ATP7B are regulated by copper, but the molecular mechanism of this regulation is largely unknown. We show that the copper chaperone Atox1, which delivers copper to ATP7B, and the group of the first three metal-binding domains (MBD1-3) are central to the activity regulation of ATP7B. Atox1-Cu binding to ATP7B changes domain dynamics and interactions within the MBD1-3 group and activates ATP hydrolysis. To understand the mechanism linking Atox1-MBD interactions and enzyme activity, we have determined the MBD1-3 conformational space using small angle X-ray scattering and identified changes in MBD dynamics caused by apo-Atox1 and Atox1-Cu by solution NMR. The results show that copper transfer from Atox1 decreases domain interactions within the MBD1-3 group and increases the mobility of the individual domains. The N-terminal segment of MBD1-3 was found to interact with the nucleotide-binding domain of ATP7B, thus physically coupling the domains involved in copper binding and those involved in ATP hydrolysis. Taken together, the data suggest a regulatory mechanism in which Atox1-mediated copper transfer activates ATP7B by releasing inhibitory constraints through increased freedom of MBD1-3 motions. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. JFK, a Kelch domain-containing F-box protein, links the SCF complex to p53 regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Luyang; Shi, Lei; Li, Wenqian; Yu, Wenhua; LIANG, Jing; Zhang, Hua; Yang, Xiaohan; Wang, Yan; Li, Ruifang; Yao, Xingrong; Yi, Xia; Shang, Yongfeng

    2009-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor plays a central role in integrating cellular responses to various stresses. Tight regulation of p53 is thus essential for the maintenance of genome integrity and normal cell proliferation. Currently, several ubiquitin ligases, including the single-subunit RING-finger types—MDM2, Pirh2, and COP1—and the HECT-domain type—ARF-BP1—have been reported to target p53 for degradation. Here, we report the identification of a human Kelch domain-containing F-box protein, JFK. We ...

  3. Tight intramolecular regulation of the human Upf1 helicase by its N- and C-terminal domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Francesca; Boudvillain, Marc; Le Hir, Hervé

    2013-02-01

    The RNA helicase Upf1 is a multifaceted eukaryotic enzyme involved in DNA replication, telomere metabolism and several mRNA degradation pathways. Upf1 plays a central role in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), a surveillance process in which it links premature translation termination to mRNA degradation with its conserved partners Upf2 and Upf3. In human, both the ATP-dependent RNA helicase activity and the phosphorylation of Upf1 are essential for NMD. Upf1 activation occurs when Upf2 binds its N-terminal domain, switching the enzyme to the active form. Here, we uncovered that the C-terminal domain of Upf1, conserved in higher eukaryotes and containing several essential phosphorylation sites, also inhibits the flanking helicase domain. With different biochemical approaches we show that this domain, named SQ, directly interacts with the helicase domain to impede ATP hydrolysis and RNA unwinding. The phosphorylation sites in the distal half of the SQ domain are not directly involved in this inhibition. Therefore, in the absence of multiple binding partners, Upf1 is securely maintained in an inactive state by two intramolecular inhibition mechanisms. This study underlines the tight and intricate regulation pathways required to activate multifunctional RNA helicases like Upf1.

  4. Domain-Specific Identity, Epistemic Regulation, and Intellectual Ability as Predictors of Belief-Biased Reasoning: A Dual-Process Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaczynski, Paul A.; Lavallee, Kristen L.

    2005-01-01

    To explore the hypothesis that domain-specific identity development predicts reasoning biases, adolescents and young adults completed measures of domain-general and domain-specific identity, epistemic regulation, and intellectual ability and evaluated arguments that either supported or threatened their occupational goals. Biases were defined as…

  5. Structures of the NLRP14 pyrin domain reveal a conformational switch mechanism regulating its molecular interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eibl, Clarissa; Hessenberger, Manuel; Wenger, Julia; Brandstetter, Hans, E-mail: hans.brandstetter@sbg.ac.at [University of Salzburg, Billrothstrasse 11, 5020 Salzburg (Austria)

    2014-07-01

    Pyrin domains (PYDs) recruit downstream effector molecules in NLR signalling. A specific charge-relay system suggests a the formation of a signalling complex involving a PYD dimer. The cytosolic tripartite NLR receptors serve as important signalling platforms in innate immunity. While the C-terminal domains act as sensor and activation modules, the N-terminal death-like domain, e.g. the CARD or pyrin domain, is thought to recruit downstream effector molecules by homotypic interactions. Such homotypic complexes have been determined for all members of the death-domain superfamily except for pyrin domains. Here, crystal structures of human NLRP14 pyrin-domain variants are reported. The wild-type protein as well as the clinical D86V mutant reveal an unexpected rearrangement of the C-terminal helix α6, resulting in an extended α5/6 stem-helix. This reordering mediates a novel symmetric pyrin-domain dimerization mode. The conformational switching is controlled by a charge-relay system with a drastic impact on protein stability. How the identified charge relay allows classification of NLRP receptors with respect to distinct recruitment mechanisms is discussed.

  6. Membrane Restructuring by Phospholipase A2 Is Regulated by the Presence of Lipid Domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leidy, Chad; Ocampo, Jackson; Duelund, Lars

    2011-01-01

    . Differential scanning calorimetry results show that this preferential hydrolysis in the presence of lipid domains leads to a membrane system with a higher-temperature melting profile due to enrichment in DSPC. Together, these results show that the presence of lipid domains can induce specificity......Secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) catalyzes the hydrolysis of glycerophospholipids. This enzyme is sensitive to membrane structure, and its activity has been shown to increase in the presence of liquid-crystalline/gel (Lα/Lβ) lipid domains. In this work, we explore whether lipid domains can also...... direct the activity of the enzyme by inducing hydrolysis of certain lipid components due to preferential activity of the enzyme toward lipid domains susceptible to sPLA(2). Specifically, we show that the presence of Lα/Lβ and Lα/Lβ, phase coexistence in a 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-PhosPhocholine (DMPC...

  7. Interaction of the phosphorylated DNA-binding domain in nuclear receptor CAR with its ligand-binding domain regulates CAR activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shizu, Ryota; Min, Jungki; Sobhany, Mack; Pedersen, Lars C; Mutoh, Shingo; Negishi, Masahiko

    2018-01-05

    The nuclear protein constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR or NR1I3) regulates several liver functions such as drug and energy metabolism and cell growth or death, which are often involved in the development of diseases such as diabetes and hepatocellular carcinoma. CAR undergoes a conversion from inactive homodimers to active heterodimers with retinoid X receptor α (RXRα), and phosphorylation of the DNA-binding domain (DBD) at Thr-38 in CAR regulates this conversion. Here, we uncovered the molecular mechanism by which this phosphorylation regulates the intramolecular interaction between CAR's DBD and ligand-binding domain (LBD), enabling the homodimer-heterodimer conversion. Phosphomimetic substitution of Thr-38 with Asp increased co-immunoprecipitation of the CAR DBD with CAR LBD in Huh-7 cells. Isothermal titration calorimetry assays also revealed that recombinant CAR DBD-T38D, but not nonphosphorylated CAR DBD, bound the CAR LBD peptide. This DBD-LBD interaction masked CAR's dimer interface, preventing CAR homodimer formation. Of note, EGF signaling weakened the interaction of CAR DBD T38D with CAR LBD, converting CAR to the homodimer form. The DBD-T38D-LBD interaction also prevented CAR from forming a heterodimer with RXRα. However, this interaction opened up a CAR surface, allowing interaction with protein phosphatase 2A. Thr-38 dephosphorylation then dissociated the DBD-LBD interaction, allowing CAR heterodimer formation with RXRα. We conclude that the intramolecular interaction of phosphorylated DBD with the LBD enables CAR to adapt a transient monomer configuration that can be converted to either the inactive homodimer or the active heterodimer.

  8. A Novel Regulator of Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase/APOBECs in Immunity and Cancer: Schrödinger’s CATalytic Pocket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mani Larijani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID and its relative APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases boost immune response by mutating immune or viral genes. Because of their genome-mutating activities, AID/APOBECs are also drivers of tumorigenesis. Due to highly charged surfaces, extensive non-specific protein–protein/nucleic acid interactions, formation of polydisperse oligomers, and general insolubility, structure elucidation of these proteins by X-ray crystallography and NMR has been challenging. Hence, almost all available AID/APOBEC structures are of mutated and/or truncated versions. In 2015, we reported a functional structure for AID using a combined computational–biochemical approach. In so doing, we described a new regulatory mechanism that is a first for human DNA/RNA-editing enzymes. This mechanism involves dynamic closure of the catalytic pocket. Subsequent X-ray and NMR studies confirmed our discovery by showing that other APOBEC3s also close their catalytic pockets. Here, we highlight catalytic pocket closure as an emerging and important regulatory mechanism of AID/APOBEC3s. We focus on three sub-topics: first, we propose that variable pocket closure rates across AID/APOBEC3s underlie differential activity in immunity and cancer and review supporting evidence. Second, we discuss dynamic pocket closure as an ever-present internal regulator, in contrast to other proposed regulatory mechanisms that involve extrinsic binding partners. Third, we compare the merits of classical approaches of X-ray and NMR, with that of emerging computational–biochemical approaches, for structural elucidation specifically for AID/APOBEC3s.

  9. Y flowering? Regulation and activity of CONSTANS and CCT-domain proteins in Arabidopsis and crop species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brambilla, Vittoria; Fornara, Fabio

    2017-05-01

    Changes in day length regulate the proper timing of flowering in several plant species. The genetic architecture of this process is based on CCT-domain proteins, many of which interact with NF-Y subunits to regulate transcription of target genes. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, the CONSTANS CCT-domain protein is a central photoperiodic sensor. We will discuss how the diurnal rhythms of its transcription and protein accumulation are generated, and how the protein engages into multiple complexes to control production of a systemic flowering signal. Regulatory parallels will be drawn between Arabidopsis and major crops that indicate conservation of some CCT/NF-Y modules during plant evolution. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Nuclear Factor Y in Development and Disease, edited by Prof. Roberto Mantovani. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Graph-Theoretic Models of Mutations in the Nucleotide Binding Domain 1 of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra J. Knisley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis is one of the most common inherited diseases and is caused by a mutation in a membrane protein, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. This protein serves as a chloride channel and regulates the viscosity of mucus lining the ducts of a number of organs. Although much has been learned about the consequences of mutations on the energy landscape and the resulting disrupted folding pathway of CFTR, a level of understanding needed to correct the misfolding has not been achieved. The most common mutations of CFTR are located in one of two nucleotide binding domains, namely, the nucleotide binding domain 1 (NBD1. We model NBD1 using a nested graph model. The vertices in the lowest layer each represent an atom in the structure of an amino acid residue, while the vertices in the mid layer each represent the residue. The vertices in the top layer each represent a subdomain of the nucleotide binding domain. We use this model to quantify the effects of a single point mutation on the protein domain. We compare the wildtype structure with eight of the most common mutations. The graph-theoretic model provides insight into how a single point mutation can have such profound structural consequences.

  11. Serum-regulated transcription by serum response factor (SRF): a novel role for the DNA binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, C S; Wynne, J; Treisman, R

    1994-01-01

    The transcription factors Serum Response Factor (SRF) and Ternary Complex Factor (TCF) form a ternary complex at the c-fos Serum Response Element (SRE). We show that in NIH3T3 cells TCF binding is required for regulated transcription in response to stimulation by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), but not by whole serum. We constructed a novel transcriptionally inactive SRE variant whose serum-regulated activity can be partially restored by overexpression of SRF in the absence of bound TCF. Activation by SRF does not require the SRF N-terminal phosphorylation sites, but is potentiated 2- to 3-fold by the SRF C-terminal activation domain. Mutations in the SRF DNA binding domain, which do not affect the ability of SRF to bind DNA, abolish its ability to mediate TCF-independent serum-regulated activation and reduce activation by the SRF/TCF(Elk-1) ternary complex. Efficient activation requires that SRF be targeted to DNA via its own DNA binding domain. Images PMID:7957108

  12. Regulation of c-Fes Tyrosine Kinase and Biological Activities by N-Terminal Coiled-Coil Oligomerization Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Haiyun; Rogers, Jim A.; Dunham, Nancy A.; Smithgall, Thomas E.

    1999-01-01

    The cytoplasmic protein-tyrosine kinase Fes has been implicated in cytokine signal transduction, hematopoiesis, and embryonic development. Previous work from our laboratory has shown that active Fes exists as a large oligomeric complex in vitro. However, when Fes is expressed in mammalian cells, its kinase activity is tightly repressed. The Fes unique N-terminal sequence has two regions with strong homology to coiled-coil-forming domains often found in oligomeric proteins. Here we show that disruption or deletion of the first coiled-coil domain upregulates Fes tyrosine kinase and transforming activities in Rat-2 fibroblasts and enhances Fes differentiation-inducing activity in myeloid leukemia cells. Conversely, expression of a Fes truncation mutant consisting only of the unique N-terminal domain interfered with Rat-2 fibroblast transformation by an activated Fes mutant, suggesting that oligomerization is essential for Fes activation in vivo. Coexpression with the Fes N-terminal region did not affect the transforming activity of v-Src in Rat-2 cells, arguing against a nonspecific suppressive effect. Taken together, these findings suggest a model in which Fes activation may involve coiled-coil-mediated interconversion of monomeric and oligomeric forms of the kinase. Mutation of the first coiled-coil domain may activate Fes by disturbing intramolecular coiled-coil interaction, allowing for oligomerization via the second coiled-coil domain. Deletion of the second coiled-coil domain blocks fibroblast transformation by an activated form of c-Fes, consistent with this model. These results provide the first evidence for regulation of a nonreceptor protein-tyrosine kinase by coiled-coil domains. PMID:10567558

  13. Chediak-Higashi syndrome: Lysosomal trafficking regulator domains regulate exocytosis of lytic granules but not cytokine secretion by natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Krzewska, Aleksandra; Wood, Stephanie M; Murakami, Yousuke; Nguyen, Victoria; Chiang, Samuel C C; Cullinane, Andrew R; Peruzzi, Giovanna; Gahl, William A; Coligan, John E; Introne, Wendy J; Bryceson, Yenan T; Krzewski, Konrad

    2016-04-01

    Mutations in lysosomal trafficking regulator (LYST) cause Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS), a rare immunodeficiency with impaired cytotoxic lymphocyte function, mainly that of natural killer (NK) cells. Our understanding of NK cell function deficiency in patients with CHS and how LYST regulates lytic granule exocytosis is very limited. We sought to delineate cellular defects associated with LYST mutations responsible for the impaired NK cell function seen in patients with CHS. We analyzed NK cells from patients with CHS with missense mutations in the LYST ARM/HEAT (armadillo/huntingtin, elongation factor 3, protein phosphatase 2A, and the yeast kinase TOR1) or BEACH (beige and Chediak-Higashi) domains. NK cells from patients with CHS displayed severely reduced cytotoxicity. Mutations in the ARM/HEAT domain led to a reduced number of perforin-containing granules, which were significantly increased in size but able to polarize to the immunologic synapse; however, they were unable to properly fuse with the plasma membrane. Mutations in the BEACH domain resulted in formation of normal or slightly enlarged granules that had markedly impaired polarization to the IS but could be exocytosed on reaching the immunologic synapse. Perforin-containing granules in NK cells from patients with CHS did not acquire certain lysosomal markers (lysosome-associated membrane protein 1/2) but were positive for markers of transport vesicles (cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor), late endosomes (Ras-associated binding protein 27a), and, to some extent, early endosomes (early endosome antigen 1), indicating a lack of integrity in the endolysosomal compartments. NK cells from patients with CHS had normal cytokine compartments and cytokine secretion. LYST is involved in regulation of multiple aspects of NK cell lytic activity, ranging from governance of lytic granule size to control of their polarization and exocytosis, as well as regulation of endolysosomal compartment identity

  14. Proximity hybridization-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assembly for electrochemical immunoassay based on in situ DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Fuyi [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical College, 221004, Xuzhou (China); Yao, Yao; Luo, Jianjun; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Dengyang [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical College, 221004, Xuzhou (China); Gao, Fenglei, E-mail: jsxzgfl@sina.com [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical College, 221004, Xuzhou (China); Wang, Po, E-mail: wangpo@jsnu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China)

    2017-05-29

    Novel hybridization proximity-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assembly strategy has been proposed for electrochemical immunoassay based on in situ DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles as signal label. The DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles were characterized with atomic force microscopic and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The highly efficient electrocatalysis by DNA template synthesized Pd nanoparticles for NaBH{sub 4} oxidation produced an intense detection signal. The label-free electrochemical method achieved the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) with a linear range from 10{sup −15} to 10{sup −11} g mL{sup −1} and a detection limit of 0.43 × 10{sup −15} g mL{sup −1}. Through introducing a supersandwich reaction to increase the DNA length, the electrochemical signal was further amplified, leading to a detection limit of 0.52 × 10{sup −16} g mL{sup −1}. And it rendered satisfactory analytical performance for the determination of CEA in serum samples. Furthermore, it exhibited good reproducibility and stability; meanwhile, it also showed excellent specificity due to the specific recognition of antigen by antibody. Therefore, the DNA template synthesized Pd nanoparticles based signal amplification approach has great potential in clinical applications and is also suitable for quantification of biomarkers at ultralow level. - Graphical abstract: A novel label-free and enzyme-free electrochemical immunoassay based on proximity hybridization-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assemblies for recycling of the CEA. - Highlights: • A novel enzyme-free electrochemical immunosensor was developed for detection of CEA. • The signal amplification was based on catalytic DNA hairpin assembly and DNA-template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles. • The biosensor could detect CEA down to 0.52 × 10{sup −16} g mL{sup −1} level with a dynamic range spanning 5 orders of magnitude.

  15. Identification of TSG101 functional domains and p21 loci required for TSG101-mediated p21 gene regulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Shiuan Lin

    Full Text Available TSG101 (tumor susceptibility gene 101 is a multi-domain protein known to act in the cell nucleus, cytoplasm, and periplasmic membrane. Remarkably, TSG101, whose location within cells varies with the stage of the cell cycle, affects biological events as diverse as cell growth and proliferation, gene expression, cytokinesis, and endosomal trafficking. The functions of TSG101 additionally are recruited for viral and microvesicle budding and for intracellular survival of invading bacteria. Here we report that the TSG101 protein also interacts with and down-regulates the promoter of the p21 (CIP1/WAF1 tumor suppressor gene, and identify a p21 locus and TSG101 domains that mediate this interaction. TSG101 deficiency in Saos-2 human osteosarcoma cells was accompanied by an increased abundance of p21 mRNA and protein and the retardation of cell proliferation. A cis-acting element in the p21 promoter that interacts with TSG101 and is required for promoter repression was located using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP analysis and p21-driven luciferase reporter gene expression, respectively. Additional analysis of TSG101 deletion mutants lacking specific domains established the role of the central TSG101 domains in binding to the p21 promoter and demonstrated the additional essentiality of the TSG101 C-terminal steadiness box (SB in the repression of p21 promoter activity. Neither binding of TSG101 to the p21 promoter nor repression of this promoter required the TSG101 N-terminal UEV domain, which mediates the ubiquitin-recognition functions of TSG101 and its actions as a member of ESCRT endocytic trafficking complexes, indicating that regulation of the p21 promoter by TSG101 is independent of its role in such trafficking.

  16. Catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liber, B.

    1991-08-22

    A catalytic converter is provided which is economical to manufacture and is not readily poisoned by contaminants in a gas stream such as would be encountered in the operation of an internal combustion engine, whereby an improved life expectancy of the unit can be achieved. The converter of the invention comprises a sintered porous body including molybdenum or a molybdenum-containing compound or a molybdenum complex. A method of forming a catlytic converter unit comprises forming a slurry including molybdenum or a molybdenum compound, forming the slurry into a sintered body member, and hardening or curing the same to form a self-sustaining body member. A method for treating an exhaust gas using the above catalytic converter is also disclosed. A preferred embodiment for an internal combustion engine is described. Examples of different catalytic compositions are included. 13 figs.

  17. The helicase and RNaseIIIa domains of Arabidopsis Dicer-Like1 modulate catalytic parameters during MicroRNA biogenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Chenggang

    2012-04-03

    Dicer-Like1 (DCL1), an RNaseIII endonuclease, and Hyponastic Leaves1 (HYL1), a double-stranded RNA-binding protein, are core components of the plant microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis machinery. hyl1 mutants accumulate low levels of miRNAs and display pleiotropic developmental phenotypes. We report the identification of five new hyl1 suppressor mutants, all of which are alleles of DCL1. These new alleles affect either the helicase or the RNaseIIIa domains of DCL1, highlighting the critical functions of these domains. Biochemical analysis of the DCL1 suppressor variants reveals that they process the primary transcript (pri-miRNA) more efficiently than wild-type DCL1, with both higher Kcat and lower Km values. The DCL1 variants largely rescue wild-type miRNA accumulation levels in vivo, but do not rescue the MIRNA processing precision defects of the hyl1 mutant. In vitro, the helicase domain confers ATP dependence on DCL1-catalyzed MIRNA processing, attenuates DCL1 cleavage activity, and is required for precise MIRNA processing of some substrates. © 2012 American Society of Plant Biologists.

  18. Lamin B receptor regulates the growth and maturation of myeloid progenitors via its sterol reductase domain: implications for cholesterol biosynthesis in regulating myelopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Gayathri; Chaudhury, Pulkit; Malu, Krishnakumar; Fowler, Samantha; Manmode, Rahul; Gotur, Deepali; Zwerger, Monika; Ryan, David; Roberti, Rita; Gaines, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Lamin B receptor (LBR) is a bifunctional nuclear membrane protein with N-terminal lamin B and chromatin-binding domains plus a C-terminal sterol Δ(14) reductase domain. LBR expression increases during neutrophil differentiation, and deficient expression disrupts neutrophil nuclear lobulation characteristic of Pelger-Huët anomaly. Thus, LBR plays a critical role in regulating myeloid differentiation, but how the two functional domains of LBR support this role is currently unclear. We previously identified abnormal proliferation and deficient functional maturation of promyelocytes (erythroid, myeloid, and lymphoid [EML]-derived promyelocytes) derived from EML-ic/ic cells, a myeloid model of ichthyosis (ic) bone marrow that lacks Lbr expression. In this study, we provide new evidence that cholesterol biosynthesis is important to myeloid cell growth and is supported by the sterol reductase domain of Lbr. Cholesterol biosynthesis inhibitors caused growth inhibition of EML cells that increased in EML-derived promyelocytes, whereas cells lacking Lbr exhibited complete growth arrest at both stages. Lipid production increased during wild-type neutrophil maturation, but ic/ic cells exhibited deficient levels of lipid and cholesterol production. Ectopic expression of a full-length Lbr in EML-ic/ic cells rescued both nuclear lobulation and growth arrest in cholesterol starvation conditions. Lipid production also was rescued, and a deficient respiratory burst was corrected. Expression of just the C-terminal sterol reductase domain of Lbr in ic/ic cells also improved each of these phenotypes. Our data support the conclusion that the sterol Δ(14) reductase domain of LBR plays a critical role in cholesterol biosynthesis and that this process is essential to both myeloid cell growth and functional maturation.

  19. ITC-derived binding affinity may be biased due to titrant (nano-aggregation. Binding of halogenated benzotriazoles to the catalytic domain of human protein kinase CK2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Winiewska

    Full Text Available The binding of four bromobenzotriazoles to the catalytic subunit of human protein kinase CK2 was assessed by two complementary methods: Microscale Thermophoresis (MST and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC. New algorithm proposed for the global analysis of MST pseudo-titration data enabled reliable determination of binding affinities for two distinct sites, a relatively strong one with the Kd of the order of 100 nM and a substantially weaker one (Kd > 1 μM. The affinities for the strong binding site determined for the same protein-ligand systems using ITC were in most cases approximately 10-fold underestimated. The discrepancy was assigned directly to the kinetics of ligand nano-aggregates decay occurring upon injection of the concentrated ligand solution to the protein sample. The binding affinities determined in the reverse ITC experiment, in which ligands were titrated with a concentrated protein solution, agreed with the MST-derived data. Our analysis suggests that some ITC-derived Kd values, routinely reported together with PDB structures of protein-ligand complexes, may be biased due to the uncontrolled ligand (nano-aggregation, which may occur even substantially below the solubility limit.

  20. ITC-derived binding affinity may be biased due to titrant (nano)-aggregation. Binding of halogenated benzotriazoles to the catalytic domain of human protein kinase CK2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiewska, Maria; Bugajska, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    The binding of four bromobenzotriazoles to the catalytic subunit of human protein kinase CK2 was assessed by two complementary methods: Microscale Thermophoresis (MST) and Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). New algorithm proposed for the global analysis of MST pseudo-titration data enabled reliable determination of binding affinities for two distinct sites, a relatively strong one with the Kd of the order of 100 nM and a substantially weaker one (Kd > 1 μM). The affinities for the strong binding site determined for the same protein-ligand systems using ITC were in most cases approximately 10-fold underestimated. The discrepancy was assigned directly to the kinetics of ligand nano-aggregates decay occurring upon injection of the concentrated ligand solution to the protein sample. The binding affinities determined in the reverse ITC experiment, in which ligands were titrated with a concentrated protein solution, agreed with the MST-derived data. Our analysis suggests that some ITC-derived Kd values, routinely reported together with PDB structures of protein-ligand complexes, may be biased due to the uncontrolled ligand (nano)-aggregation, which may occur even substantially below the solubility limit. PMID:28273138

  1. LIM domains target actin regulators paxillin and zyxin to sites of stress fiber strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Smith

    Full Text Available Contractile actomyosin stress fibers are critical for maintaining the force balance between the interior of the cell and its environment. Consequently, the actin cytoskeleton undergoes dynamic mechanical loading. This results in spontaneous, stochastic, highly localized strain events, characterized by thinning and elongation within a discrete region of stress fiber. Previous work showed the LIM-domain adaptor protein, zyxin, is essential for repair and stabilization of these sites. Using live imaging, we show paxillin, another LIM-domain adaptor protein, is also recruited to stress fiber strain sites. Paxillin recruitment to stress fiber strain sites precedes zyxin recruitment. Zyxin and paxillin are each recruited independently of the other. In cells lacking paxillin, actin recovery is abrogated, resulting in slowed actin recovery and increased incidence of catastrophic stress fiber breaks. For both paxillin and zyxin, the LIM domains are necessary and sufficient for recruitment. This work provides further evidence of the critical role of LIM-domain proteins in responding to mechanical stress in the actin cytoskeleton.

  2. Evolutionarily conserved roles of the dicer helicase domain in regulating RNA interference processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidwell, Mary Anne; Chan, Jessica M; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2014-10-10

    The enzyme Dicer generates 21-25 nucleotide RNAs that target specific mRNAs for silencing during RNA interference and related pathways. Although their active sites and RNA binding regions are functionally conserved, the helicase domains have distinct activities in the context of different Dicer enzymes. To examine the evolutionary origins of Dicer helicase functions, we investigated two related Dicer enzymes from the thermophilic fungus Sporotrichum thermophile. RNA cleavage assays showed that S. thermophile Dicer-1 (StDicer-1) can process hairpin precursor microRNAs, whereas StDicer-2 can only cleave linear double-stranded RNAs. Furthermore, only StDicer-2 possesses robust ATP hydrolytic activity in the presence of double-stranded RNA. Deletion of the StDicer-2 helicase domain increases both StDicer-2 cleavage activity and affinity for hairpin RNA. Notably, both StDicer-1 and StDicer-2 could complement the distantly related yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe lacking its endogenous Dicer gene but only in their full-length forms, underscoring the importance of the helicase domain. These results suggest an in vivo regulatory function for the helicase domain that may be conserved from fungi to humans. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. The N-terminal domains of TRF1 and TRF2 regulate their ability to condense telomeric DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulet, Anaïs; Pisano, Sabrina; Faivre-Moskalenko, Cendrine; Pei, Bei; Tauran, Yannick; Haftek-Terreau, Zofia; Brunet, Frédéric; Le Bihan, Yann-Vaï; Ledu, Marie-Hélène; Montel, Fabien; Hugo, Nicolas; Amiard, Simon; Argoul, Françoise; Chaboud, Annie; Gilson, Eric; Giraud-Panis, Marie-Josèphe

    2012-03-01

    TRF1 and TRF2 are key proteins in human telomeres, which, despite their similarities, have different behaviors upon DNA binding. Previous work has shown that unlike TRF1, TRF2 condenses telomeric, thus creating consequential negative torsion on the adjacent DNA, a property that is thought to lead to the stimulation of single-strand invasion and was proposed to favor telomeric DNA looping. In this report, we show that these activities, originating from the central TRFH domain of TRF2, are also displayed by the TRFH domain of TRF1 but are repressed in the full-length protein by the presence of an acidic domain at the N-terminus. Strikingly, a similar repression is observed on TRF2 through the binding of a TERRA-like RNA molecule to the N-terminus of TRF2. Phylogenetic and biochemical studies suggest that the N-terminal domains of TRF proteins originate from a gradual extension of the coding sequences of a duplicated ancestral gene with a consequential progressive alteration of the biochemical properties of these proteins. Overall, these data suggest that the N-termini of TRF1 and TRF2 have evolved to finely regulate their ability to condense DNA.

  4. On-road measurement of regulated pollutants from diesel and CNG buses with urea selective catalytic reduction systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiadong; Ge, Yunshan; Hao, Lijun; Tan, Jianwei; Li, Jiaqiang; Feng, Xiangyu

    2014-12-01

    In this study, emissions from 13 buses operated in Beijing, including two Euro-III diesel buses, four Euro-IV diesel buses, three Euro-V diesel buses and four Euro-V CNG buses, were characterized in real world conditions. All of the buses tested were fitted with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems except for the Euro-III diesel buses. A SEMTECH-DS was used for testing the gaseous pollutants, and an electric low pressure impactor (ELPI) was used for measuring of particle numbers and size distributions. A comparison was made based on emission performance of these buses by employing the VSP approach and fuel- based emissions factors. Diesel buses emitted less CO and THC but more NOx and PM pollutants than CNG buses. The NOx reduction efficiencies of the SCR systems for CNG buses were higher because of the high exhaust temperature and high NO2/NOx ratio, whereas the efficiencies for diesel buses were lower. This resulted in extremely low NOx emissions from CNG buses, but the high NO2/NOx ratio needs further study. Failures of urea injection in the SCR systems were detected in this research, which resulted in very high NOx emissions. The CNG buses also emitted smaller numbers of particles and less particle mass with the presence of oxidation catalysts. Diesel buses satisfying the Euro-V standard performed better than Euro-IV and Euro-III diesel buses in terms of emission performance, except for more nuclei mode particles. Most of time, the Euro-IV diesel buses show no advantages in CO and NOx emissions compared with the Euro-III diesel buses.

  5. A fully active catalytic domain of bovine aspartyl (asparaginyl) beta-hydroxylase expressed in Escherichia coli: characterization and evidence for the identification of an active-site region in vertebrate alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, S; McGinnis, K; VanDusen, W J; Burke, C J; Kuo, A; Griffin, P R; Sardana, M K; Elliston, K O; Stern, A M; Friedman, P A

    1994-07-19

    The alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase aspartyl (asparaginyl) beta-hydroxylase (EC 1.14.11.16) specifically hydroxylates one aspartic or asparagine residue in certain epidermal growth factor-like domains of a number of proteins. The expression in Escherichia coli, purification, characterization of a fully active catalytic domain, and evidence for the identification of an active-site region of this enzyme are described. Sequence alignment analyses among the vertebrate alpha-ketoglutarate-dependent dioxygenases and chemical modification studies were undertaken aimed at locating specific regions of 52-kDa recombinant aspartyl (asparaginyl) beta-hydroxylase involved in substrate binding and/or catalysis. Based upon these studies, an alignment of the C-terminal regions of prolyl and lysyl hydroxylase and of aspartyl (asparaginyl) beta-hydroxylase is proposed. When histidine-675, an invariant residue located in a region of homology within this alignment, was mutated to an alanine residue in aspartyl (asparaginyl) beta-hydroxylase (H675A), no enzymatic activity was detected. Chemical modification studies show that the wild-type protein is protected from iodo[14C]acetamide labeling by Fe2+/alpha-ketoglutarate whereas the H675A mutant protein is not, suggesting that this mutant does not bind Fe2+/alpha-ketoglutarate.

  6. Mutations in Mtr4 Structural Domains Reveal Their Important Role in Regulating tRNAiMet Turnover in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Mtr4p Enzymatic Activities In Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    Full Text Available RNA processing and turnover play important roles in the maturation, metabolism and quality control of a large variety of RNAs thereby contributing to gene expression and cellular health. The TRAMP complex, composed of Air2p, Trf4p and Mtr4p, stimulates nuclear exosome-dependent RNA processing and degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Mtr4 protein structure is composed of a helicase core and a novel so-called arch domain, which protrudes from the core. The helicase core contains highly conserved helicase domains RecA-1 and 2, and two structural domains of unclear functions, winged helix domain (WH and ratchet domain. How the structural domains (arch, WH and ratchet domain coordinate with the helicase domains and what roles they are playing in regulating Mtr4p helicase activity are unknown. We created a library of Mtr4p structural domain mutants for the first time and screened for those defective in the turnover of TRAMP and exosome substrate, hypomodified tRNAiMet. We found these domains regulate Mtr4p enzymatic activities differently through characterizing the arch domain mutants K700N and P731S, WH mutant K904N, and ratchet domain mutant R1030G. Arch domain mutants greatly reduced Mtr4p RNA binding, which surprisingly did not lead to significant defects on either in vivo tRNAiMet turnover, or in vitro unwinding activities. WH mutant K904N and Ratchet domain mutant R1030G showed decreased tRNAiMet turnover in vivo, as well as reduced RNA binding, ATPase and unwinding activities of Mtr4p in vitro. Particularly, K904 was found to be very important for steady protein levels in vivo. Overall, we conclude that arch domain plays a role in RNA binding but is largely dispensable for Mtr4p enzymatic activities, however the structural domains in the helicase core significantly contribute to Mtr4p ATPase and unwinding activities.

  7. The N-terminal region of an endoglucanase from Pseudomonas fluorescens subspecies cellulosa constitutes a cellulose-binding domain that is distinct from the catalytic centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, H J; Hall, J; Hazlewood, G P; Ferreira, L M

    1990-05-01

    The substrate specificity of an endoglucanase (EGB) from Pseudomonas fluorescens subspecies cellulosa was determined. The enzyme was most active against barley beta-glucan, but showed significant activity against amorphous and crystalline cellulose. EGB was purified to homogeneity by affinity chromatography with crystalline cellulose (Avicel). The Mr of the purified enzyme was 50,000, which is in good agreement with the size of EGB deduced from the nucleotide sequence of the celB gene, coding for EGB. The N-terminal region of the mature form of EGB showed strong homology to another endoglucanase and to a xylanase expressed by the same organism; homologous sequences included highly conserved serine-rich regions. Truncated forms of celB, in which the gene sequence encoding the conserved domain had been deleted, directed the synthesis of a functional endoglucanase that did not bind to crystalline cellulose. This indicates that the conserved region of endoglucanases and xylanases expressed by P. fluorescens subsp. cellulosa constitutes a cellulose-binding domain, which is distinct from the active centre. The possible role of this substrate-binding region is discussed.

  8. JFK, a Kelch domain-containing F-box protein, links the SCF complex to p53 regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Luyang; Shi, Lei; Li, Wenqian; Yu, Wenhua; Liang, Jing; Zhang, Hua; Yang, Xiaohan; Wang, Yan; Li, Ruifang; Yao, Xingrong; Yi, Xia; Shang, Yongfeng

    2009-06-23

    The p53 tumor suppressor plays a central role in integrating cellular responses to various stresses. Tight regulation of p53 is thus essential for the maintenance of genome integrity and normal cell proliferation. Currently, several ubiquitin ligases, including the single-subunit RING-finger types--MDM2, Pirh2, and COP1--and the HECT-domain type--ARF-BP1--have been reported to target p53 for degradation. Here, we report the identification of a human Kelch domain-containing F-box protein, JFK. We showed that JFK promotes ubiquitination and degradation of p53. But unlike MDM2, Pirh2, COP1, and ARF-BP1, all of which possess an intrinsic ubiquitin ligase activity, JFK destabilizes p53 through the assembly of a Skp1-Cul1-F-box complex. Significantly, JFK inhibits p53-dependent transcription, and depletion of JFK stabilizes p53, promotes cell apoptosis, arrests cells in the G(1) phase, and sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation-induced cell death. These data indicate that JFK is a critical negative regulator of p53 and represents a pathway for the maintenance of p53 levels in unstressed cells. Our experiments link the Skp1-Cul1-F-box system to p53 regulation.

  9. A20 Functional Domains Regulate Subcellular Localization and NF-Kappa B Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    these knock-outs can be alleviated by the administration of antibiotics which clear endogenous flora . These results clearly demonstrated that A20...leads to inflammation and death resulting from normal flora (4). This has also been demonstrated in the work of Maelfait and co-workers who...dextran sodium sulfate they display increased levels of intestinal inflammation indicating the both domains are critical for restricting inflammation

  10. Domain-specific regulation of foxP2 CNS expression by lef1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bonkowsky, Joshua L; Wang, Xu; Fujimoto, Esther; Lee, Ji Eun; Chien, Chi-Bin; Dorsky, Richard I

    2008-01-01

    FOXP2 is a forkhead transcription factor critical for normal development of language in humans, but little is known of its broader function and regulation during central nervous system (CNS) development...

  11. Structure and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-Receptor 12 Provide Insights into the Catalytic Mechanism of the Enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Dong; Francesco Zonta; Shanshan Wang; Ke Song; Xin He; Miaomiao He; Yan Nie; Sheng Li

    2017-01-01

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 12 (PTPN12) is an important protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in regulating cell adhesion and migration as well as tumorigenesis. Here, we solved a crystal structure of the native PTPN12 catalytic domain with the catalytic cysteine (residue 231) in dual conformation (phosphorylated and unphosphorylated). Combined with molecular dynamics simulation data, we concluded that those two conformations represent different states of the protein which are r...

  12. Functional roles of the non-catalytic calcium-binding sites in the N-terminal domain of human peptidylarginine deiminase 4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Liang Liu

    Full Text Available This study investigated the functional roles of the N-terminal Ca(2+ ion-binding sites, in terms of enzyme catalysis and stability, of peptidylarginine deiminase 4 (PAD4. Amino acid residues located in the N-terminal Ca(2+-binding site of PAD4 were mutated to disrupt the binding of Ca(2+ ions. Kinetic data suggest that Asp155, Asp157 and Asp179, which directly coordinate Ca3 and Ca4, are essential for catalysis in PAD4. For D155A, D157A and D179A, the k(cat/K(m,BAEE values were 0.02, 0.63 and 0.01 s(-1mM(-1 (20.8 s(-1mM(-1 for WT, respectively. Asn153 and Asp176 are directly coordinated with Ca3 and indirectly coordinated with Ca5 via a water molecule. However, N153A displayed low enzymatic activity with a k(cat value of 0.3 s(-1 (13.3 s(-1 for wild-type, whereas D176A retained some catalytic power with a k(cat of 9.7 s(-1. Asp168 is the direct ligand for Ca5, and Ca5 coordination by Glu252 is mediated by two water molecules. However, mutation of these two residues to Ala did not cause a reduction in the k(cat/K(m,BAEE values, which indicates that the binding of Ca5 may not be required for PAD4 enzymatic activity. The possible conformational changes of these PAD4 mutants were examined. Thermal stability analysis of the PAD4 mutants in the absence or presence of Ca(2+ indicated that the conformational stability of the enzyme is highly dependent on Ca(2+ ions. In addition, the results of urea-induced denaturation for the N153, D155, D157 and D179 series mutants further suggest that the binding of Ca(2+ ions in the N-terminal Ca(2+-binding site stabilizes the overall conformational stability of PAD4. Therefore, our data strongly suggest that the N-terminal Ca(2+ ions play critical roles in the full activation of the PAD4 enzyme.

  13. Structural and evolutionary aspects of two families of non-catalytic domains present in starch and glycogen binding proteins from microbes, plants and animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janeček, Štefan; Svensson, Birte; MacGregor, E. Ann

    2011-01-01

    that they exhibit independent behaviour, i.e. each family forms its own part in an evolutionary tree, with enzyme specificity (protein function) being well represented within each family. The distinction between CBM20 and CBM48 families is not sharp since there are representatives in both CBM families that possess......Starch-binding domains (SBDs) comprise distinct protein modules that bind starch, glycogen or related carbohydrates and have been classified into different families of carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). The present review focuses on SBDs of CBM20 and CBM48 found in amylolytic enzymes from several...... glycoside hydrolase (GH) families GH13, GH14, GH15, GH31, GH57 and GH77, as well as in a number of regulatory enzymes, e.g., phosphoglucan, water dikinase-3, genethonin-1, laforin, starch-excess protein-4, the β-subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase and its homologues from sucrose non-fermenting-1 protein...

  14. HD-GYP domain proteins regulate biofilm formation and virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryan, Robert P.; Lucey, Jean; O'Donovan, Karen

    2009-01-01

    residues (YN-GYP). Here we have investigated the role of these proteins in biofilm formation, virulence factor synthesis and virulence of P. aeruginosa. Mutation of PA4108 and PA4781 led to an increase in the level of cyclic-di-GMP in P. aeruginosa, consistent with the predicted activity of the encoded......2572 had a negative influence on swarming that was cryptic and was revealed only after removal of an uncharacterized C-terminal domain. Mutation of PA4108, PA4781 and PA2572 had distinct effects on biofilm formation and architecture of P. aeruginosa. All three proteins contributed to virulence of P...

  15. Catalytic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ming; Zhang, Xiang

    2018-01-23

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to catalytic devices. In one aspect, a device includes a substrate, an electrically insulating layer disposed on the substrate, a layer of material disposed on the electrically insulating layer, and a catalyst disposed on the layer of material. The substrate comprises an electrically conductive material. The substrate and the layer of material are electrically coupled to one another and configured to have a voltage applied across them.

  16. Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 1 Could Improve Glucose Regulation and Insulin Sensitivity Through Its RGD Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haywood, Natalie J; Cordell, Paul A; Tang, Kar Yeun; Makova, Natallia; Yuldasheva, Nadira Y; Imrie, Helen; Viswambharan, Hema; Bruns, Alexander F; Cubbon, Richard M; Kearney, Mark T; Wheatcroft, Stephen B

    2017-02-01

    Low circulating levels of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP-1) are associated with insulin resistance and predict the development of type 2 diabetes. IGFBP-1 can affect cellular functions independently of IGF binding through an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) integrin-binding motif. Whether causal mechanisms underlie the favorable association of high IGFBP-1 levels with insulin sensitivity and whether these could be exploited therapeutically remain unexplored. We used recombinant IGFBP-1 and a synthetic RGD-containing hexapeptide in complementary in vitro signaling assays and in vivo metabolic profiling in obese mice to investigate the effects of IGFBP-1 and its RGD domain on insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and whole-body glucose regulation. The RGD integrin-binding domain of IGFBP-1, through integrin engagement, focal adhesion kinase, and integrin-linked kinase, enhanced insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion in C2C12 myotubes and INS-1 832/13 pancreatic β-cells. Both acute administration and chronic infusion of an RGD synthetic peptide to obese C57BL/6 mice improved glucose clearance and insulin sensitivity. These favorable effects on metabolic homeostasis suggest that the RGD integrin-binding domain of IGFBP-1 may be a promising candidate for therapeutic development in the field of insulin resistance. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  17. The extracellular domain of Smoothened regulates ciliary localization and is required for high-level Hh signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aanstad, Pia; Santos, Nicole; Corbit, Kevin C; Scherz, Paul J; Trinh, Le A; Salvenmoser, Willi; Huisken, Jan; Reiter, Jeremy F; Stainier, Didier Y R

    2009-06-23

    Members of the Hedgehog (Hh) family of secreted proteins function as morphogens to pattern developing tissues and control cell proliferation. The seven-transmembrane domain (7TM) protein Smoothened (Smo) is essential for the activation of all levels of Hh signaling. However, the mechanisms by which Smo differentially activates low- or high-level Hh signaling are not known. Here we show that a newly identified mutation in the extracellular domain (ECD) of zebrafish Smo attenuates Smo signaling. The Smo agonist purmorphamine induces the stabilization, ciliary translocation, and high-level signaling of wild-type Smo. In contrast, purmorphamine induces the stabilization but not the ciliary translocation or high-level signaling of the Smo ECD mutant protein. Surprisingly, a truncated form of Smo that lacks the cysteine-rich domain of the ECD localizes to the cilium but is unable to activate high-level Hh signaling. We also present evidence that cilia may be required for Hh signaling in early zebrafish embryos. These data indicate that the ECD, previously thought to be dispensable for vertebrate Smo function, both regulates Smo ciliary localization and is essential for high-level Hh signaling.

  18. Differential regulation of six novel MYB-domain genes defines two distinct expression patterns in allotetraploid cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loguerico, L L; Zhang, J Q; Wilkins, T A

    1999-06-01

    A PCR-based strategy was employed to identify myb-related genes potentially involved in the differentiation and development of cotton seed trichomes. cDNA clones representing six newly identified cotton myb-domain genes (GhMYB) of the R2R3-MYB family were characterized in the allotetraploid species Gossypium hirsutum L. (2n = 4x = 52; AADD). Several interesting motifs and domains in the transregulatory region (TRR) were identified as potential candidates for modulating GhMYB activity. One such structural feature is a basic 40-amino acid stretch (TRR1) located immediately downstream of the DNA-binding domain (DBD) in five of the GhMYBs. Furthermore, the conserved motif GIDxxH identified in a subset of plant MYBs is also present in the same position in the TRR1 domains of GhMYB1 and GhMYB6, exactly 12 amino acid residues downstream of the last tryptophan in the R3 repeat of the DBD. At least two of the GhMYBs (GhMYB4 and GhMYB5) contain unidentified ORFS in the 5' leader sequence (5'-uORFs) that may serve to regulate the synthesis of these particular GhMYB proteins at the translational level. Multiple alignment of DBD sequences indicated that GhMYBs show structural similarity to plant R2R3-MYB factors implicated in phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. GhMYB5 is the most distantly related cotton R2R3-MYB and is found in an isolated cluster that includes the drought-inducible AtMYB2. Sequence comparisons of DBD and TRR domains from GhMYBs, MIXTA (AmMYBMx) and G11 (AtMYBG11) did not reveal any striking similarity beyond conserved motifs. However, based on earlier phylogenetic analysis, GhMYB2, GhMYB3, and GHMYB4 are members of a cluster that contains GLABROUS1, while GhMYB1 and GhMYB6 belong to a closely related cluster. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed two discrete patterns of GhMYB gene expression. Type I cotton MYB (GhMYB-1, -2, and -3) transcripts were found in all tissue-types examined and were relatively more abundant than those derived from type II GhMYB genes

  19. Multiple Domain Associations within the Arabidopsis Immune Receptor RPP1 Regulate the Activation of Programmed Cell Death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karl J Schreiber

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Upon recognition of pathogen virulence effectors, plant nucleotide-binding leucine-rich repeat (NLR proteins induce defense responses including localized host cell death. In an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms leading to this response, we examined the Arabidopsis thaliana NLR protein RECOGNITION OF PERONOSPORA PARASITICA1 (RPP1, which recognizes the Hyaloperonospora arabidopsidis effector ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA RECOGNIZED1 (ATR1. Expression of the N-terminus of RPP1, including the Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR domain ("N-TIR", elicited an effector-independent cell death response, and we used allelic variation in TIR domain sequences to define the key residues that contribute to this phenotype. Further biochemical characterization indicated that cell death induction was correlated with N-TIR domain self-association. In addition, we demonstrated that the nucleotide-binding (NB-ARC1 region of RPP1 self-associates and plays a critical role in cell death activation, likely by facilitating TIR:TIR interactions. Structural homology modeling of the NB subdomain allowed us to identify a putative oligomerization interface that was shown to influence NB-ARC1 self-association. Significantly, full-length RPP1 exhibited effector-dependent oligomerization and, although mutations at the NB-ARC1 oligomerization interface eliminated cell death induction, RPP1 self-association was unaffected, suggesting that additional regions contribute to oligomerization. Indeed, the leucine-rich repeat domain of RPP1 also self-associates, indicating that multiple interaction interfaces exist within activated RPP1 oligomers. Finally, we observed numerous intramolecular interactions that likely function to negatively regulate RPP1, and present a model describing the transition to an active NLR protein.

  20. Regulation of β2-adrenergic receptor function by conformationally selective single-domain intrabodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staus, Dean P; Wingler, Laura M; Strachan, Ryan T

    2014-01-01

    to selectively bind agonist- or antagonist-occupied receptors. When expressed as intrabodies, they inhibited G protein activation (cyclic AMP accumulation), G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK)-mediated receptor phosphorylation, β-arrestin recruitment, and receptor internalization to varying extents......The biologic activity induced by ligand binding to orthosteric or allosteric sites on a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) is mediated by stabilization of specific receptor conformations. In the case of the β2 adrenergic receptor, these ligands are generally small-molecule agonists or antagonists....... However, a monomeric single-domain antibody (nanobody) from the Camelid family was recently found to allosterically bind and stabilize an active conformation of the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR). Here, we set out to study the functional interaction of 18 related nanobodies with the β2AR to investigate...

  1. Protein Phosphatase 2A Catalytic Subunit α Plays a MyD88-Dependent, Central Role in the Gene-Specific Regulation of Endotoxin Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Xie

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available MyD88, the intracellular adaptor of most TLRs, mediates either proinflammatory or immunosuppressive signaling that contributes to chronic inflammation-associated diseases. Although gene-specific chromatin modifications regulate inflammation, the role of MyD88 signaling in establishing such epigenetic landscapes under different inflammatory states remains elusive. Using quantitative proteomics to enumerate the inflammation-phenotypic constituents of the MyD88 interactome, we found that in endotoxin-tolerant macrophages, protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit α (PP2Ac enhances its association with MyD88 and is constitutively activated. Knockdown of PP2Ac prevents suppression of proinflammatory genes and resistance to apoptosis. Through site-specific dephosphorylation, constitutively active PP2Ac disrupts the signal-promoting TLR4-MyD88 complex and broadly suppresses the activities of multiple proinflammatory/proapoptotic pathways as well, shifting proinflammatory MyD88 signaling to a prosurvival mode. Constitutively active PP2Ac translocated with MyD88 into the nuclei of tolerant macrophages establishes the immunosuppressive pattern of chromatin modifications and represses chromatin remodeling to selectively silence proinflammatory genes, coordinating the MyD88-dependent inflammation control at both signaling and epigenetic levels under endotoxin-tolerant conditions.

  2. Cooperative activities of hematopoietic regulators recruit RNA polymerase II to a tissue-specific chromatin domain

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Kirby D.; Grass, Jeffrey A.; Boyer, Meghan E; Kiekhaefer, Carol M.; Blobel, Gerd A.; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2002-01-01

    The hematopoietic transcription factor GATA-1 regulates erythropoiesis and β-globin expression. Although consensus GATA-1 binding sites exist throughout the murine β-globin locus, we found that GATA-1 discriminates among these sites in vivo. Conditional expression of GATA-1 in GATA-1-null cells recapitulated the occupancy pattern. GATA-1 induced RNA polymerase II (pol II) recruitment to subregions of the locus control region and to the β-globin promoters. The hematopoietic factor NF-E2 cooper...

  3. Structural basis for regulation of GPR56/ADGRG1 by its alternatively spliced extracellular domains

    OpenAIRE

    Salzman, Gabriel S.; Ackerman, Sarah D.; Ding, Chen; Koide, Akiko; Leon, Katherine; Luo, Rong; Stoveken, Hannah M.; Fernandez, Celia G.; Tall, Gregory G.; Piao, Xianhua; Monk, Kelly R.; Koide, Shohei; Araç, Demet

    2016-01-01

    Adhesion G-protein-coupled receptors (aGPCRs) play critical roles in diverse neurobiological processes including brain development, synaptogenesis, and myelination. aGPCRs have large alternatively spliced extracellular regions (ECRs) that likely mediate intercellular signaling; however, the precise roles of ECRs remain unclear. The aGPCR GPR56/ADGRG1 regulates both oligodendrocyte and cortical development. Accordingly, human GPR56 mutations cause myelination defects and brain malformations. H...

  4. Jak2 FERM Domain Interaction with the Erythropoietin Receptor Regulates Jak2 Kinase Activity▿

    OpenAIRE

    Funakoshi-Tago, Megumi; Pelletier, Stéphane; Moritake, Hiroshi; Parganas, Evan; Ihle, James N.

    2007-01-01

    Janus kinases are essential for signal transduction by a variety of cytokine receptors and when inappropriately activated can cause hematopoietic disorders and oncogenesis. Consequently, it can be predicted that the interaction of the kinases with receptors and the events required for activation are highly controlled. In a screen to identify phosphorylation events regulating Jak2 activity in EpoR signaling, we identified a mutant (Jak2-Y613E) which has the property of being constitutively act...

  5. Domain-specific identity, epistemic regulation, and intellectual ability as predictors of belief-biased reasoning: a dual-process perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klaczynski, Paul A; Lavallee, Kristen L

    2005-09-01

    To explore the hypothesis that domain-specific identity development predicts reasoning biases, adolescents and young adults completed measures of domain-general and domain-specific identity, epistemic regulation, and intellectual ability and evaluated arguments that either supported or threatened their occupational goals. Biases were defined as the use of sophisticated reasoning to reject goal-threatening arguments and the use of cursory reasoning to accept goal-supportive arguments. Across two measures of bias, hierarchical regression analyses showed that domain-specific vocational identity and epistemic regulation best predicted reasoning biases. Neither age nor intellectual ability predicted significant variance in biases after vocational identity and epistemic regulation scores were entered into the regression equations. The results support the thesis that biases in specific domains can be explained both by domain-specific personality attributes and by domain-general metacognitive dispositions to monitor reasoning and decontextualize problem structure from superficial contents. A dual-process framework is proposed to explain the relationships among identity, epistemic regulation, age, intellectual ability, and reasoning biases.

  6. The adherens junction-associated LIM domain protein Smallish regulates epithelial morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beati, Hamze; Peek, Irina; Hordowska, Paulina; Honemann-Capito, Mona; Glashauser, Jade; Renschler, Fabian A; Kakanj, Parisa; Ramrath, Andreas; Leptin, Maria; Luschnig, Stefan; Wiesner, Silke; Wodarz, Andreas

    2018-01-22

    In epithelia, cells adhere to each other in a dynamic fashion, allowing the cells to change their shape and move along each other during morphogenesis. The regulation of adhesion occurs at the belt-shaped adherens junction, the zonula adherens (ZA). Formation of the ZA depends on components of the Par-atypical PKC (Par-aPKC) complex of polarity regulators. We have identified the Lin11, Isl-1, Mec-3 (LIM) protein Smallish (Smash), the orthologue of vertebrate LMO7, as a binding partner of Bazooka/Par-3 (Baz), a core component of the Par-aPKC complex. Smash also binds to Canoe/Afadin and the tyrosine kinase Src42A and localizes to the ZA in a planar polarized fashion. Animals lacking Smash show loss of planar cell polarity (PCP) in the embryonic epidermis and reduced cell bond tension, leading to severe defects during embryonic morphogenesis of epithelial tissues and organs. Overexpression of Smash causes apical constriction of epithelial cells. We propose that Smash is a key regulator of morphogenesis coordinating PCP and actomyosin contractility at the ZA. © 2018 Beati et al.

  7. The PH domain of phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 exhibits a novel, phospho-regulated monomer-dimer equilibrium with important implications for kinase domain activation: single-molecule and ensemble studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Brian P; Pilling, Carissa; Calleja, Véronique; Larijani, Banafshé; Falke, Joseph J

    2013-07-16

    Phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1) is an essential master kinase recruited to the plasma membrane by the binding of its C-terminal PH domain to the signaling lipid phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate (PIP3). Membrane binding leads to PDK1 phospho-activation, but despite the central role of PDK1 in signaling and cancer biology, this activation mechanism remains poorly understood. PDK1 has been shown to exist as a dimer in cells, and one crystal structure of its isolated PH domain exhibits a putative dimer interface. It has been proposed that phosphorylation of PH domain residue T513 (or the phospho-mimetic T513E mutation) may regulate a novel PH domain dimer-monomer equilibrium, thereby converting an inactive PDK1 dimer to an active monomer. However, the oligomeric states of the PH domain on the membrane have not yet been determined, nor whether a negative charge at position 513 is sufficient to regulate its oligomeric state. This study investigates the binding of purified wild-type (WT) and T513E PDK1 PH domains to lipid bilayers containing the PIP3 target lipid, using both single-molecule and ensemble measurements. Single-molecule analysis of the brightness of the fluorescent PH domain shows that the PIP3-bound WT PH domain on membranes is predominantly dimeric while the PIP3-bound T513E PH domain is monomeric, demonstrating that negative charge at the T513 position is sufficient to dissociate the PH domain dimer and is thus likely to play a central role in PDK1 monomerization and activation. Single-molecule analysis of two-dimensional (2D) diffusion of PH domain-PIP3 complexes reveals that the dimeric WT PH domain diffuses at the same rate as a single lipid molecule, indicating that only one of its two PIP3 binding sites is occupied and there is little penetration of the protein into the bilayer as observed for other PH domains. The 2D diffusion of T513E PH domain is slower, suggesting the negative charge disrupts local structure in a way that allows

  8. The interplay between tissue plasminogen activator domains and fibrin structures in the regulation of fibrinolysis: kinetic and microscopic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelwell, Craig; Williams, Stella C.; Silva, Marta M. C. G.; Szabó, László; Kolev, Krasimir

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) depends on fibrin binding and fibrin structure. tPA structure/function relationships were investigated in fibrin formed by high or low thrombin concentrations to produce a fine mesh and small pores, or thick fibers and coarse structure, respectively. Kinetics studies were performed to investigate plasminogen activation and fibrinolysis in the 2 types of fibrin, using wild-type tPA (F-G-K1-K2-P, F and K2 binding), K1K1-tPA (F-G-K1-K1-P, F binding), and delF-tPA (G-K1-K2-P, K2 binding). There was a trend of enzyme potency of tPA > K1K1-tPA > delF-tPA, highlighting the importance of the finger domain in regulating activity, but the differences were less apparent in fine fibrin. Fine fibrin was a better surface for plasminogen activation but more resistant to lysis. Scanning electron and confocal microscopy using orange fluorescent fibrin with green fluorescent protein-labeled tPA variants showed that tPA was strongly associated with agglomerates in coarse but not in fine fibrin. In later lytic stages, delF-tPA-green fluorescent protein diffused more rapidly through fibrin in contrast to full-length tPA, highlighting the importance of finger domain-agglomerate interactions. Thus, the regulation of fibrinolysis depends on the starting nature of fibrin fibers and complex dynamic interaction between tPA and fibrin structures that vary over time. PMID:20966169

  9. Docking and Molecular Dynamics Calculations of Some Previously Studied and newly Designed Ligands to Catalytic Core Domain of HIV-1 Integrase and an Investigation to Effects of Conformational Changes of Protein on Docking Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selami Ercan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, AIDS still remains as a worldwide pandemic and continues to cause many death which arise from HIV-1 virus. For nearly 35 years, drugs that target various steps of virus life cycle have been developed. HIV-1 integrase is the one of these steps which is essential for virus life cycle. Computer aided drug design is being used in many drug design studies as also used in development of the first HIV-1 integrase inhibitor Raltegravir. In this study 3 ligands which are used as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors and 4 newly designed ligands were docked to catalytic core domain of HIV-1 integrase. Each of ligands docked to three different conformations of protein. Prepared complexes (21 item were carried out by 50 ns MD simulations and results were analyzed. Finally, the binding free energies of ligands were calculated. Hereunder, it was determined that designed ligands L01 and L03 gave favorable results. The questions about the ligands which have low docking scores in a conformation of protein could give better scores in another conformation of protein and if the MD simulations carry the different oriented and different localized ligands in same position at the end of simulation were answered.

  10. The Interplay of the N- and C-Terminal Domains of MCAK Control Microtubule Depolymerization Activity and Spindle Assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Ems-McClung, Stephanie C.; Hertzer, Kathleen M.; Zhang, Xin; Miller, Mill W.; Walczak, Claire E.

    2007-01-01

    Spindle assembly and accurate chromosome segregation require the proper regulation of microtubule dynamics. MCAK, a Kinesin-13, catalytically depolymerizes microtubules, regulates physiological microtubule dynamics, and is the major catastrophe factor in egg extracts. Purified GFP-tagged MCAK domain mutants were assayed to address how the different MCAK domains contribute to in vitro microtubule depolymerization activity and physiological spindle assembly activity in egg extracts. Our biochem...

  11. Simple Expression Domains Are Regulated by Discrete CRMs During Drosophila Oogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revaitis, Nicole T.; Marmion, Robert A.; Farhat, Maira; Ekiz, Vesile; Wang, Wei; Yakoby, Nir

    2017-01-01

    Eggshell patterning has been extensively studied in Drosophila melanogaster. However, the cis-regulatory modules (CRMs), which control spatiotemporal expression of these patterns, are vastly unexplored. The FlyLight collection contains >7000 intergenic and intronic DNA fragments that, if containing CRMs, can drive the transcription factor GAL4. We cross-listed the 84 genes known to be expressed during D. melanogaster oogenesis with the ∼1200 listed genes of the FlyLight collection, and found 22 common genes that are represented by 281 FlyLight fly lines. Of these lines, 54 show expression patterns during oogenesis when crossed to an UAS-GFP reporter. Of the 54 lines, 16 recapitulate the full or partial pattern of the associated gene pattern. Interestingly, while the average DNA fragment size is ∼3 kb in length, the vast majority of fragments show one type of spatiotemporal pattern in oogenesis. Mapping the distribution of all 54 lines, we found a significant enrichment of CRMs in the first intron of the associated genes’ model. In addition, we demonstrate the use of different anteriorly active FlyLight lines as tools to disrupt eggshell patterning in a targeted manner. Our screen provides further evidence that complex gene patterns are assembled combinatorially by different CRMs controlling the expression of genes in simple domains. PMID:28634244

  12. Structure and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-Receptor 12 Provide Insights into the Catalytic Mechanism of the Enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hui; Zonta, Francesco; Wang, Shanshan; Song, Ke; He, Xin; He, Miaomiao; Nie, Yan; Li, Sheng

    2017-12-26

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 12 (PTPN12) is an important protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in regulating cell adhesion and migration as well as tumorigenesis. Here, we solved a crystal structure of the native PTPN12 catalytic domain with the catalytic cysteine (residue 231) in dual conformation (phosphorylated and unphosphorylated). Combined with molecular dynamics simulation data, we concluded that those two conformations represent different states of the protein which are realized during the dephosphorylation reaction. Together with docking and mutagenesis data, our results provide a molecular basis for understanding the catalytic mechanism of PTPN12 and its role in tumorigenesis.

  13. Structure and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-Receptor 12 Provide Insights into the Catalytic Mechanism of the Enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Dong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 12 (PTPN12 is an important protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in regulating cell adhesion and migration as well as tumorigenesis. Here, we solved a crystal structure of the native PTPN12 catalytic domain with the catalytic cysteine (residue 231 in dual conformation (phosphorylated and unphosphorylated. Combined with molecular dynamics simulation data, we concluded that those two conformations represent different states of the protein which are realized during the dephosphorylation reaction. Together with docking and mutagenesis data, our results provide a molecular basis for understanding the catalytic mechanism of PTPN12 and its role in tumorigenesis.

  14. Conserved Lysine Acetylation within the Microtubule-Binding Domain Regulates MAP2/Tau Family Members.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew W Hwang

    Full Text Available Lysine acetylation has emerged as a dominant post-translational modification (PTM regulating tau proteins in Alzheimer's disease (AD and related tauopathies. Mass spectrometry studies indicate that tau acetylation sites cluster within the microtubule-binding region (MTBR, a region that is highly conserved among tau, MAP2, and MAP4 family members, implying that acetylation could represent a conserved regulatory mechanism for MAPs beyond tau. Here, we combined mass spectrometry, biochemical assays, and cell-based approaches to demonstrate that the tau family members MAP2 and MAP4 are also subject to reversible acetylation. We identify a cluster of lysines in the MAP2 and MAP4 MTBR that undergo CBP-catalyzed acetylation, many of which are conserved in tau. Similar to tau, MAP2 acetylation can occur in a cysteine-dependent auto-regulatory manner in the presence of acetyl-CoA. Furthermore, tubulin reduced MAP2 acetylation, suggesting tubulin binding dictates MAP acetylation status. Taken together, these results uncover a striking conservation of MAP2/Tau family post-translational modifications that could expand our understanding of the dynamic mechanisms regulating microtubules.

  15. Nuclear domain 10 components upregulated via interferon during human cytomegalovirus infection potently regulate viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Caroline L; Glass, Mandy S; Abendroth, Allison; McSharry, Brian P; Slobedman, Barry

    2017-07-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous betaherpesvirus that causes life-threatening disease in immunocompromised and immunonaïve individuals. Type I interferons (IFNs) are crucial molecules in the innate immune response to HCMV and are also known to upregulate several components of the interchromosomal multiprotein aggregates collectively referred to as nuclear domain 10 (ND10). In the context of herpesvirus infection, ND10 components are known to restrict gene expression. This raises the question as to whether key ND10 components (PML, Sp100 and hDaxx) act as anti-viral IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) during HCMV infection. In this study, analysis of ND10 component transcription during HCMV infection demonstrated that PML and Sp100 were significantly upregulated whilst hDaxx expression remained unchanged. In cells engineered to block the production of, or response to, type I IFNs, upregulation of PML and Sp100 was not detected during HCMV infection. Furthermore, pre-treatment with an IFN-β neutralizing antibody inhibited upregulation of PML and Sp100 during both infection and treatment with HCMV-infected cell supernatant. The significance of ND10 components functioning as anti-viral ISGs during HCMV infection was determined through knockdown of PML, Sp100 and hDaxx. ND10 knockdown cells were significantly more permissive to HCMV infection, as previously described but, in contrast to control cells, could support HCMV plaque formation following IFN-β pre-treatment. This ability of HCMV to overcome the potently anti-viral effects of IFN-β in ND10 expression deficient cells provides evidence that ND10 component upregulation is a key mediator of the anti-viral activity of IFN-β.

  16. Cooperative activities of hematopoietic regulators recruit RNA polymerase II to a tissue-specific chromatin domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kirby D.; Grass, Jeffrey A.; Boyer, Meghan E.; Kiekhaefer, Carol M.; Blobel, Gerd A.; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2002-01-01

    The hematopoietic transcription factor GATA-1 regulates erythropoiesis and β-globin expression. Although consensus GATA-1 binding sites exist throughout the murine β-globin locus, we found that GATA-1 discriminates among these sites in vivo. Conditional expression of GATA-1 in GATA-1-null cells recapitulated the occupancy pattern. GATA-1 induced RNA polymerase II (pol II) recruitment to subregions of the locus control region and to the β-globin promoters. The hematopoietic factor NF-E2 cooperated with GATA-1 to recruit pol II to the promoters. We propose that only when GATA-1 attracts pol II to the locus control region can pol II access the promoter in a NF-E2-dependent manner. PMID:12193659

  17. Members of the LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN transcription factor family are involved in the regulation of secondary growth in Populus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yordanov, Yordan S; Regan, Sharon; Busov, Victor

    2010-11-01

    Regulation of secondary (woody) growth is of substantial economic and environmental interest but is poorly understood. We identified and subsequently characterized an activation-tagged poplar (Populus tremula × Populus alba) mutant with enhanced woody growth and changes in bark texture caused primarily by increased secondary phloem production. Molecular characterization of the mutation through positioning of the tag and retransformation experiments shows that the phenotype is conditioned by activation of an uncharacterized gene that encodes a novel member of the LATERAL ORGAN BOUNDARIES DOMAIN (LBD) family of transcription factors. Homology analysis showed highest similarity to an uncharacterized LBD1 gene from Arabidopsis thaliana, and we consequently named it Populus tremula × Populus alba (Pta) LBD1. Dominant-negative suppression of Pta LBD1 via translational fusion with the repressor SRDX domain caused decreased diameter growth and suppressed and highly irregular phloem development. In wild-type plants, LBD1 was most highly expressed in the phloem and cambial zone. Two key Class I KNOTTED1-like homeobox genes that promote meristem identity in the cambium were downregulated, while an Altered Phloem Development gene that is known to promote phloem differentiation was upregulated in the mutant. A set of four LBD genes, including the LBD1 gene, was predominantly expressed in wood-forming tissues, suggesting a broader regulatory role of these transcription factors during secondary woody growth in poplar.

  18. Regulation of Active DNA Demethylation by a Methyl-CpG-Binding Domain Protein in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Li

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Active DNA demethylation plays crucial roles in the regulation of gene expression in both plants and animals. In Arabidopsis thaliana, active DNA demethylation is initiated by the ROS1 subfamily of 5-methylcytosine-specific DNA glycosylases via a base excision repair mechanism. Recently, IDM1 and IDM2 were shown to be required for the recruitment of ROS1 to some of its target loci. However, the mechanism(s by which IDM1 is targeted to specific genomic loci remains to be determined. Affinity purification of IDM1- and IDM2- associating proteins demonstrated that IDM1 and IDM2 copurify together with two novel components, methyl-CpG-binding domain protein 7 (MBD7 and IDM2-like protein 1 (IDL1. IDL1 encodes an α-crystallin domain protein that shows high sequence similarity with IDM2. MBD7 interacts with IDM2 and IDL1 in vitro and in vivo and they form a protein complex associating with IDM1 in vivo. MBD7 directly binds to the target loci and is required for the H3K18 and H3K23 acetylation in planta. MBD7 dysfunction causes DNA hypermethylation and silencing of reporter genes and a subset of endogenous genes. Our results suggest that a histone acetyltransferase complex functions in active DNA demethylation and in suppression of gene silencing at some loci in Arabidopsis.

  19. Differential gene regulation by selective association of transcriptional coactivators and bZIP DNA-binding domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotto, Benoit; Struhl, Kevin

    2006-08-01

    bZIP DNA-binding domains are targets for viral and cellular proteins that function as transcriptional coactivators. Here, we show that MBF1 and the related Chameau and HBO1 histone acetylases interact with distinct subgroups of bZIP proteins, whereas pX does not discriminate. Selectivity of Chameau and MBF1 for bZIP proteins is mediated by residues in the basic region that lie on the opposite surface from residues that contact DNA. Chameau functions as a specific coactivator for the AP-1 class of bZIP proteins via two arginine residues. A conserved glutamic acid/glutamine in the linker region underlies MBF1 specificity for a subgroup of bZIP factors. Chameau and MBF1 cannot synergistically coactivate transcription due to competitive interactions with the basic region, but either protein can synergistically coactivate with pX. Analysis of Jun derivatives that selectively interact with these coactivators reveals that MBF1 is crucial for the response to oxidative stress, whereas Chameau is important for the response to chemical and osmotic stress. Thus, the bZIP domain mediates selective interactions with coactivators and hence differential regulation of gene expression.

  20. Role of a novel PH-kinase domain interface in PKB/Akt regulation: structural mechanism for allosteric inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Calleja

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinase B (PKB/Akt belongs to the AGC superfamily of related serine/threonine protein kinases. It is a key regulator downstream of various growth factors and hormones and is involved in malignant transformation and chemo-resistance. Full-length PKB protein has not been crystallised, thus studying the molecular mechanisms that are involved in its regulation in relation to its structure have not been simple. Recently, the dynamics between the inactive and active conformer at the molecular level have been described. The maintenance of PKB's inactive state via the interaction of the PH and kinase domains prevents its activation loop to be phosphorylated by its upstream activator, phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase-1 (PDK1. By using a multidisciplinary approach including molecular modelling, classical biochemical assays, and Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET/two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM, a detailed model depicting the interaction between the different domains of PKB in its inactive conformation was demonstrated. These findings in turn clarified the molecular mechanism of PKB inhibition by AKT inhibitor VIII (a specific allosteric inhibitor and illustrated at the molecular level its selectivity towards different PKB isoforms. Furthermore, these findings allude to the possible function of the C-terminus in sustaining the inactive conformer of PKB. This study presents essential insights into the quaternary structure of PKB in its inactive conformation. An understanding of PKB structure in relation to its function is critical for elucidating its mode of activation and discovering how to modulate its activity. The molecular mechanism of inhibition of PKB activation by the specific drug AKT inhibitor VIII has critical implications for determining the mechanism of inhibition of other allosteric inhibitors and for opening up opportunities for the design of new generations of modulator drugs.

  1. Protein phosphatase 2a (PP2A binds within the oligomerization domain of striatin and regulates the phosphorylation and activation of the mammalian Ste20-Like kinase Mst3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jones Candace A

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Striatin, a putative protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A B-type regulatory subunit, is a multi-domain scaffolding protein that has recently been linked to several diseases including cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM, which causes symptoms ranging from headaches to stroke. Striatin association with the PP2A A/C (structural subunit/catalytic subunit heterodimer alters PP2A substrate specificity, but targets and roles of striatin-associated PP2A are not known. In addition to binding the PP2A A/C heterodimer to form a PP2A holoenzyme, striatin associates with cerebral cavernous malformation 3 (CCM3 protein, the mammalian Mps one binder (MOB homolog, Mob3/phocein, the mammalian sterile 20-like (Mst kinases, Mst3, Mst4 and STK25, and several other proteins to form a large signaling complex. Little is known about the molecular architecture of the striatin complex and the regulation of these sterile 20-like kinases. Results To help define the molecular organization of striatin complexes and to determine whether Mst3 might be negatively regulated by striatin-associated PP2A, a structure-function analysis of striatin was performed. Two distinct regions of striatin are capable of stably binding directly or indirectly to Mob3--one N-terminal, including the coiled-coil domain, and another more C-terminal, including the WD-repeat domain. In addition, striatin residues 191-344 contain determinants necessary for efficient association of Mst3, Mst4, and CCM3. PP2A associates with the coiled-coil domain of striatin, but unlike Mob3 and Mst3, its binding appears to require striatin oligomerization. Deletion of the caveolin-binding domain on striatin abolishes striatin family oligomerization and PP2A binding. Point mutations in striatin that disrupt PP2A association cause hyperphosphorylation and activation of striatin-associated Mst3. Conclusions Striatin orchestrates the regulation of Mst3 by PP2A. It binds Mst3 likely as a dimer with CCM3 via

  2. Extrinsic functions of lectin domains in O-N-acetylgalactosamine glycan biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, Virginia; Ditamo, Yanina; Cejas, Romina B

    2016-01-01

    Glycan biosynthesis occurs mainly in Golgi. Molecular organization and functional regulation of this process are not well understood. We evaluated the extrinsic effect of lectin domains (β-trefoil fold) of polypeptide GalNAc-transferases (ppGalNAc-Ts) on catalytic activity of glycosyltransferases...... during O-GalNAc glycan biosynthesis. The presence of lectin domain T3lec or T4lec during ppGalNAc-T2 and ppGalNAc-T3 catalytic reaction had a clear inhibitory effect on GalNAc-T activity. Interaction of T3lec or T4lec with ppGalNAc-T2 catalytic domain was not mediated by carbohydrate. T3lec, but not T2...

  3. Phospholipase C-related catalytically inactive protein (PRIP regulates lipolysis in adipose tissue by modulating the phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiya Okumura

    Full Text Available Phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL and perilipin by protein kinase A (PKA promotes the hydrolysis of lipids in adipocytes. Although activation of lipolysis by PKA has been well studied, inactivation via protein phosphatases is poorly understood. Here, we investigated whether phospholipase C-related catalytically inactive protein (PRIP, a binding partner for protein phosphatase 1 and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, is involved in lipolysis by regulating phosphatase activity. PRIP knockout (PRIP-KO mice displayed reduced body-fat mass as compared with wild-type mice fed with standard chow ad libitum. Most other organs appeared normal, suggesting that mutant mice had aberrant fat metabolism in adipocytes. HSL in PRIP-KO adipose tissue was highly phosphorylated compared to that in wild-type mice. Starvation of wild-type mice or stimulation of adipose tissue explants with the catabolic hormone, adrenaline, translocated both PRIP and PP2A from the cytosol to lipid droplets, but the translocation of PP2A was significantly reduced in PRIP-KO adipocytes. Consistently, the phosphatase activity associated with lipid droplet fraction in PRIP-KO adipocytes was significantly reduced and was independent of adrenaline stimulation. Lipolysis activity, as assessed by measurement of non-esterified fatty acids and glycerol, was higher in PRIP-KO adipocytes. When wild-type adipocytes were treated with a phosphatase inhibitor, they showed a high lipolysis activity at the similar level to PRIP-KO adipocytes. Collectively, these results suggest that PRIP promotes the translocation of phosphatases to lipid droplets to trigger the dephosphorylation of HSL and perilipin A, thus reducing PKA-mediated lipolysis.

  4. The isoform-specific region of the Na,K-ATPase catalytic subunit: role in enzyme kinetics and regulation by protein kinase C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran, Marie-Josée; Pierre, Sandrine V; Carr, Deborah L; Pressley, Thomas A

    2004-12-28

    Comparisons of the primary structures of the Na,K-ATPase alpha-isoforms reveal the existence of regions of structural divergence, suggesting that they are involved in unique functions. One of these regions is the isoform-specific region (ISR), located near the ATP binding site in the major cytoplasmic loop. To evaluate its importance, we constructed mutants of the rodent wild-type alpha1 and alpha3 isoforms in which the ISR was replaced with irrelevant sequences, i.e., the analogous region from the rat gastric H,K-ATPase catalytic subunit or a region from the human c-myc oncogene. Opossum kidney (OK) cells were transfected with wild-type rat alpha1, alpha3, or their corresponding chimeras and selected in ouabain. Introduction of either mutant produced ouabain-resistant colonies, consistent with functional expression of the chimeric protein and indicating that the ISR is not essential for overall Na,K-ATPase function. The introduced chimeras were then characterized enzymatically by measuring the relative rate of K(+) and Li(+) deocclusions. Results showed that exchanges of both alpha1 and alpha3 ISRs significantly modified the sensitivity for the enzyme to either K(+) or Li(+). Subsequent treatment of the cells with phorbol esters revealed an altered Na,K-ATPase transport in response to protein kinase C activation for the alpha1 chimeras. No changes were observed for the alpha3 isoform, suggesting that it is not sensitive to PKC regulation. These results demonstrated that the ISR plays an important role in ion deocclusion and in the response to PKC (only for the alpha1 isoform).

  5. Crystal structure of the Escherichia coli regulator of sigma70, Rsd, in complex with sigma70 domain 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patikoglou, Georgia A; Westblade, Lars F; Campbell, Elizabeth A; Lamour, Valérie; Lane, William J; Darst, Seth A

    2007-09-21

    The Escherichia coli Rsd protein binds tightly and specifically to the RNA polymerase (RNAP) sigma(70) factor. Rsd plays a role in alternative sigma factor-dependent transcription by biasing the competition between sigma(70) and alternative sigma factors for the available core RNAP. Here, we determined the 2.6 A-resolution X-ray crystal structure of Rsd bound to sigma(70) domain 4 (sigma(70)(4)), the primary determinant for Rsd binding within sigma(70). The structure reveals that Rsd binding interferes with the two primary functions of sigma(70)(4), core RNAP binding and promoter -35 element binding. Interestingly, the most highly conserved Rsd residues form a network of interactions through the middle of the Rsd structure that connect the sigma(70)(4)-binding surface with three cavities exposed on distant surfaces of Rsd, suggesting functional coupling between sigma(70)(4) binding and other binding surfaces of Rsd, either for other proteins or for as yet unknown small molecule effectors. These results provide a structural basis for understanding the role of Rsd, as well as its ortholog, AlgQ, a positive regulator of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence, in transcription regulation.

  6. Crystal structure of the Escherichia coli regulator of σ70, Rsd, in complex with σ70 domain 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patikoglou, Georgia A.; Westblade, Lars F.; Campbell, Elizabeth A.; Lamour, Valérie; Lane, William J.; Darst, Seth A.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The Escherichia coli Rsd protein binds tightly and specifically to the RNA polymerase (RNAP) σ70 factor. Rsd plays a role in alternative σ factor-dependent transcription by biasing the competition between σ70 and alternative σ factors for the available core RNAP. Here, we determined the 2.6 Å-resolution X-ray crystal structure of Rsd bound to σ70 domain 4 (σ704), the primary determinant for Rsd binding within σ70. The structure reveals that Rsd binding interferes with the two primary functions of σ704, core RNAP binding and promoter –35 element binding. Interestingly, the most highly conserved Rsd residues form a network of interactions through the middle of the Rsd structure that connect the σ704-binding surface with three cavities exposed on distant surfaces of Rsd, suggesting functional coupling between σ704 binding and other binding surfaces of Rsd, either for other proteins or for as yet unknown small molecule effectors. These results provide a structural basis for understanding the role of Rsd, as well as its ortholog, AlgQ, a positive regulator of Pseudomonas aeruginosa virulence, in transcription regulation. PMID:17681541

  7. MicroRNA-185 regulates chemotherapeutic sensitivity in gastric cancer by targeting apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Q; Wang, J-X; He, Y-Q; Feng, C; Zhang, X-J; Sheng, J-Q; Li, P-F

    2014-04-24

    Gastric cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Resistance to chemotherapy is a significant barrier for effective cancer treatment. Here, we identified miR-185 to be a contributor to chemosensitivity in gastric cancer. We observed low levels of miR-185 in gastric cancer cell lines and clinical tissues, compared with gastric epithelium cell line and noncancerous tissues. Furthermore, enforced expression of miR-185 increased the sensitivity of gastric cancer cells to low-dose chemotherapeutic agents, which alone cannot trigger significant apoptosis. Conversely, knockdown of endogenous miR-185 prevented high-dose chemotherapy-induced apoptosis. In elucidating the molecular mechanism by which miR-185 participated in the regulation of chemosensitivity in gastric cancer, we discovered that apoptosis repressor with caspase recruitment domain (ARC) is a direct target of miR-185. The role of miR-185 was confirmed in gastric tumor xenograft model. The growth of established tumors was suppressed by a combination therapy using enforced miR-185 expression and a low dose of anticancer drugs. Finally, we found that RUNX3 (Runt-related transcription factor) was involved in the activation of miR-185 at the transcriptional level. Taken together, our results reveal that RUNX3, miR-185 and ARC regulate the sensitivity of gastric cancer cells to chemotherapy.

  8. Interaction of the interferon-induced PKR protein kinase with inhibitory proteins P58IPK and vaccinia virus K3L is mediated by unique domains: implications for kinase regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, M; Tan, S L; Wambach, M; Katze, M G

    1996-08-01

    Expression of the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) is induced by interferons, with PKR activity playing a pivotal role in establishing the interferon-induced antiviral and antiproliferative states. PKR is directly regulated by physical association with the specific inhibitor, P58IPK, a cellular protein of the tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) family, and K3L, the product of the corresponding vaccinia virus gene. P58IPK and K3L repress PKR activation and activity. To investigate the mechanism of P58IPK- and K3L-mediated PKR inhibition, we have used a combination of in vitro and in vivo binding assays to identify the interactive regions of these proteins. The P58IPK-interacting site of PKR was mapped to a 52-amino-acid aa segment (aa 244 to 296) spanning the ATP-binding region of the protein kinase catalytic domain. The interaction with PKR did not require the C-terminal DNA-J homology region of P58IPK but was dependent on the presence of the eukaryotic initiation factor 2-alpha homology region, mapping to the 34 aa within the sixth P58IPK TPR motif. Consistent with other TPR proteins, P58IPK formed multimers in vivo: the N-terminal 166 aa were both necessary and sufficient for complex formation. A parallel in vivo analysis to map the K3L-binding region of PKR revealed that like P58IPK , K3L interacted exclusively with the PKR protein kinase catalytic domain. In contrast, however, the K3L-binding region of PKR was localized to within aa 367 to 551, demonstrating that each inhibitor bound PKR in unique, nonoverlapping domains. These data, taken together, suggest that P58IPK and K3L may mediate PKR inhibition by distinct mechanisms. Finally, we will propose a model of PKR inhibition in which P58IPK or a P58IPK complex binds PKR and interferes with nucleotide binding and autoregulation, while formation of a PKR-K3L complex interferes with active-site function and/or substrate association.

  9. Selective peptide inhibitors of bifunctional thymidylate synthase-dihydrofolate reductase from Toxoplasma gondii provide insights into domain-domain communication and allosteric regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Mark J; Sharma, Hitesh; Anderson, Karen S

    2013-09-01

    The bifunctional enzyme thymidylate synthase-dihydrofolate reductase (TS-DHFR) plays an essential role in DNA synthesis and is unique to several species of pathogenic protozoans, including the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. Infection by T. gondii causes the prevalent disease toxoplasmosis, for which TS-DHFR is a major therapeutic target. Here, we design peptides that target the dimer interface between the TS domains of bifunctional T. gondii TS-DHFR by mimicking β-strands at the interface, revealing a previously unknown allosteric target. The current study shows that these β-strand mimetic peptides bind to the apo-enzyme in a species-selective manner to inhibit both the TS and distal DHFR. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to monitor conformational switching of the TS domain and demonstrate that these peptides induce a conformational change in the enzyme. Using structure-guided mutagenesis, nonconserved residues in the linker between TS and DHFR were identified that play a key role in domain-domain communication and in peptide inhibition of the DHFR domain. These studies validate allosteric inhibition of apo-TS, specifically at the TS-TS interface, as a potential target for novel, species-specific therapeutics for treating T. gondii parasitic infections and overcoming drug resistance. © 2013 The Protein Society.

  10. The two endocytic pathways mediated by the carbohydrate recognition domain and regulated by the collagen-like domain of galectin-3 in vascular endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoge Gao

    Full Text Available Galectin-3 plays an important role in endothelial morphogenesis and angiogenesis. We investigated the endocytosis of galectin-3 in human vascular endothelial cells and showed that galectin-3 could associate with and internalized into the cells in a carbohydrate-dependent manner. Our work also revealed that galectin-3 was transported to the early/recycling endosomes and then partitioned into two routes - recycling back to the plasma membrane or targeting to the late endosomes/lysosomes. Various N- and C-terminal truncated forms of galectin-3 were constructed and compared with the full-length protein. These comparisons showed that the carbohydrate-recognition domain of galectin-3 was required for galectin-3 binding and endocytosis. The N-terminal half of the protein, which comprises the N-terminal leader domain and the collagen-like internal repeating domain, could not mediate binding and endocytosis alone. The collagen-like domain, although it was largely irrelevant to galectin-3 trafficking to the early/recycling endosomes, was required for targeting galectin-3 to the late endosomes/lysosomes. In contrast, the leader domain was irrelevant to both binding and intracellular trafficking. The data presented in this study correlate well with different cellular behaviors induced by the full-length and the truncated galectin-3 and provide an alternative way of understanding its angiogenic mechanisms.

  11. Regulation and function of the two-pore-domain (K2P) potassium channel Trek-1 in alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwingshackl, Andreas; Teng, Bin; Ghosh, Manik; West, Alina Nico; Makena, Patrudu; Gorantla, Vijay; Sinclair, Scott E; Waters, Christopher M

    2012-01-01

    Hyperoxia can lead to a myriad of deleterious effects in the lung including epithelial damage and diffuse inflammation. The specific mechanisms by which hyperoxia promotes these pathological changes are not completely understood. Activation of ion channels has been proposed as one of the mechanisms required for cell activation and mediator secretion. The two-pore-domain K(+) channel (K2P) Trek-1 has recently been described in lung epithelial cells, but its function remains elusive. In this study we hypothesized that hyperoxia affects expression of Trek-1 in alveolar epithelial cells and that Trek-1 is involved in regulation of cell proliferation and cytokine secretion. We found gene expression of several K2P channels in mouse alveolar epithelial cells (MLE-12), and expression of Trek-1 was significantly downregulated in cultured cells and lungs of mice exposed to hyperoxia. Similarly, proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) and Cyclin D1 expression were downregulated by exposure to hyperoxia. We developed an MLE-12 cell line deficient in Trek-1 expression using shRNA and found that Trek-1 deficiency resulted in increased cell proliferation and upregulation of PCNA but not Cyclin D1. Furthermore, IL-6 and regulated on activation normal T-expressed and presumably secreted (RANTES) secretion was decreased in Trek-1-deficient cells, whereas release of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 was increased. Release of KC/IL-8 was not affected by Trek-1 deficiency. Overall, deficiency of Trek-1 had a more pronounced effect on mediator secretion than exposure to hyperoxia. This is the first report suggesting that the K(+) channel Trek-1 could be involved in regulation of alveolar epithelial cell proliferation and cytokine secretion, but a direct association with hyperoxia-induced changes in Trek-1 levels remains elusive.

  12. Impact of the Motor and Tail Domains of Class III Myosins on Regulating the Formation and Elongation of Actin Protrusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Manmeet H; Quintero, Omar A; Weck, Meredith L; Unrath, William C; Gallagher, James W; Cui, Runjia; Kachar, Bechara; Tyska, Matthew J; Yengo, Christopher M

    2016-10-21

    Class III myosins (MYO3A and MYO3B) are proposed to function as transporters as well as length and ultrastructure regulators within stable actin-based protrusions such as stereocilia and calycal processes. MYO3A differs from MYO3B in that it contains an extended tail domain with an additional actin-binding motif. We examined how the properties of the motor and tail domains of human class III myosins impact their ability to enhance the formation and elongation of actin protrusions. Direct examination of the motor and enzymatic properties of human MYO3A and MYO3B revealed that MYO3A is a 2-fold faster motor with enhanced ATPase activity and actin affinity. A chimera in which the MYO3A tail was fused to the MYO3B motor demonstrated that motor activity correlates with formation and elongation of actin protrusions. We demonstrate that removal of individual exons (30-34) in the MYO3A tail does not prevent filopodia tip localization but abolishes the ability to enhance actin protrusion formation and elongation in COS7 cells. Interestingly, our results demonstrate that MYO3A slows filopodia dynamics and enhances filopodia lifetime in COS7 cells. We also demonstrate that MYO3A is more efficient than MYO3B at increasing formation and elongation of stable microvilli on the surface of cultured epithelial cells. We propose that the unique features of MYO3A, enhanced motor activity, and an extended tail with tail actin-binding motif, allow it to play an important role in stable actin protrusion length and ultrastructure maintenance. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1, a fission yeast MAPK target RNA binding protein, and implication for its RNA recognition and regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Ayaho; Kanaba, Teppei [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Satoh, Ryosuke [Institute of Microbial Chemistry, 3-14-23 Kamiosaki, Shinagawa-ku 141-0021, Tokyo (Japan); Fujiwara, Toshinobu [Institute of Microbial Chemistry, 3-14-23 Kamiosaki, Shinagawa-ku 141-0021, Tokyo (Japan); Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 3-1 Tanabe-dori, Mizuho-ku,Nagoya 467-8603 (Japan); Ito, Yutaka [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan); Sugiura, Reiko [Laboratory of Molecular Pharmacogenomics, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Higashi-Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Mishima, Masaki, E-mail: mishima-masaki@tmu.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, Minamiosawa 1-1, Hachioji 192-0397 (Japan)

    2013-07-19

    Highlights: •Solution structure of the second RRM of Nrd1 was determined. •RNA binding site of the second RRM was estimated. •Regulatory mechanism of RNA binding by phosphorylation is discussed. -- Abstract: Negative regulator of differentiation 1 (Nrd1) is known as a negative regulator of sexual differentiation in fission yeast. Recently, it has been revealed that Nrd1 also regulates cytokinesis, in which physical separation of the cell is achieved by a contractile ring comprising many proteins including actin and myosin. Cdc4, a myosin II light chain, is known to be required for cytokinesis. Nrd1 binds and stabilizes Cdc4 mRNA, and thereby suppressing the cytokinesis defects of the cdc4 mutants. Interestingly, Pmk1 MAPK phosphorylates Nrd1, resulting in markedly reduced RNA binding activity. Furthermore, Nrd1 localizes to stress granules in response to various stresses, and Pmk1 phosphorylation enhances the localization. Nrd1 consists of four RRM domains, although the mechanism by which Pmk1 regulates the RNA binding activity of Nrd1 is unknown. In an effort to delineate the relationship between Nrd1 structure and function, we prepared each RNA binding domain of Nrd1 and examined RNA binding to chemically synthesized oligo RNA using NMR. The structure of the second RRM domain of Nrd1 was determined and the RNA binding site on the second RRM domain was mapped by NMR. A plausible mechanism pertaining to the regulation of RNA binding activity by phosphorylation is also discussed.

  14. Dynamic Responsive Systems for Catalytic Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlatković, Matea; Collins, Beatrice S L; Feringa, Ben L

    2016-11-21

    Responsive systems have recently gained much interest in the scientific community in attempts to mimic dynamic functions in biological systems. One of the fascinating potential applications of responsive systems lies in catalysis. Inspired by nature, novel responsive catalytic systems have been built that show analogy with allosteric regulation of enzymes. The design of responsive catalytic systems allows control of catalytic activity and selectivity. In this Review, advances in the field over the last four decades are discussed and a comparison is made amongst the dynamic responsive systems based on the principles underlying their catalytic mechanisms. The catalyst systems are sorted according to the triggers used to achieve control of the catalytic activity and the distinct catalytic reactions illustrated. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. KeaA, a Dictyostelium kelch-domain protein that regulates the response to stress and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Souza Glaucia M

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The protein kinase YakA is responsible for the growth arrest and induction of developmental processes that occur upon starvation of Dictyostelium cells. yakA- cells are aggregation deficient, have a faster cell cycle and are hypersensitive to oxidative and nitrosoative stress. With the aim of isolating members of the YakA pathway, suppressors of the death induced by nitrosoative stress in the yakA- cells were identified. One of the suppressor mutations occurred in keaA, a gene identical to DG1106 and similar to Keap1 from mice and the Kelch protein from Drosophila, among others that contain Kelch domains. Results A mutation in keaA suppresses the hypersensitivity to oxidative and nitrosoative stresses but not the faster growth phenotype of yakA- cells. The growth profile of keaA deficient cells indicates that this gene is necessary for growth. keaA deficient cells are more resistant to nitrosoative and oxidative stress and keaA is necessary for the production and detection of cAMP. A morphological analysis of keaA deficient cells during multicellular development indicated that, although the mutant is not absolutely deficient in aggregation, cells do not efficiently participate in the process. Gene expression analysis using cDNA microarrays of wild-type and keaA deficient cells indicated a role for KeaA in the regulation of the cell cycle and pre-starvation responses. Conclusions KeaA is required for cAMP signaling following stress. Our studies indicate a role for kelch proteins in the signaling that regulates the cell cycle and development in response to changes in the environmental conditions.

  16. Regulation of interleukin-6 secretion by the two-pore-domain potassium channel Trek-1 in alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwingshackl, Andreas; Teng, Bin; Ghosh, Manik; Lim, Keng Gat; Tigyi, Gabor; Narayanan, Damodaran; Jaggar, Jonathan H; Waters, Christopher M

    2013-02-15

    We recently proposed a role for the two-pore-domain K(+) (K2P) channel Trek-1 in the regulation of cytokine release from mouse alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) by demonstrating decreased interleukin-6 (IL-6) secretion from Trek-1-deficient cells, but the underlying mechanisms remained unknown. This study was designed to investigate the mechanisms by which Trek-1 decreases IL-6 secretion. We hypothesized that Trek-1 regulates tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)-induced IL-6 release via NF-κB-, p38-, and PKC-dependent pathways. We found that Trek-1 deficiency decreased IL-6 secretion from mouse and human AECs at both transcriptional and translational levels. While NF-κB/p65 phosphorylation was unchanged, p38 phosphorylation was decreased in Trek-1-deficient cells, and pharmacological inhibition of p38 decreased IL-6 secretion in control but not Trek-1-deficient cells. Similarly, pharmacological inhibition of PKC also decreased IL-6 release, and we found decreased phosphorylation of the isoforms PKC/PKDμ (Ser(744/748)), PKCθ, PKCδ, PKCα/βII, and PKCζ/λ, but not PKC/PKDμ (Ser(916)) in Trek-1-deficient AECs. Phosphorylation of PKCθ, a Ca(2+)-independent isoform, was intact in control cells but impaired in Trek-1-deficient cells. Furthermore, TNF-α did not elevate the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in control or Trek-1-deficient cells, and removal of extracellular Ca(2+) did not impair IL-6 release. In summary, we report the expression of Trek-1 in human AECs and propose that Trek-1 deficiency may alter both IL-6 translation and transcription in AECs without affecting Ca(2+) signaling. The results of this study identify Trek-1 as a new potential target for the development of novel treatment strategies against acute lung injury.

  17. The 2-pore domain potassium channel TREK-1 regulates stretch-induced detachment of alveolar epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Roan

    Full Text Available Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome remains challenging partially because the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. While inflammation and loss of barrier function are associated with disease progression, our understanding of the biophysical mechanisms associated with ventilator-associated lung injury is incomplete. In this line of thinking, we recently showed that changes in the F-actin content and deformability of AECs lead to cell detachment with mechanical stretch. Elsewhere, we discovered that cytokine secretion and proliferation were regulated in part by the stretch-activated 2-pore domain K(+ (K2P channel TREK-1 in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs. As such, the aim of the current study was to determine whether TREK-1 regulated the mechanobiology of AECs through cytoskeletal remodeling and cell detachment. Using a TREK-1-deficient human AEC line (A549, we examined the cytoskeleton by confocal microscopy and quantified differences in the F-actin content. We used nano-indentation with an atomic force microscope to measure the deformability of cells and detachment assays to quantify the level of injury in our monolayers. We found a decrease in F-actin and an increase in deformability in TREK-1 deficient cells compared to control cells. Although total vinculin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK levels remained unchanged, focal adhesions appeared to be less prominent and phosphorylation of FAK at the Tyr(925 residue was greater in TREK-1 deficient cells. TREK-1 deficient cells have less F-actin and are more deformable making them more resistant to stretch-induced injury.

  18. The 2-pore domain potassium channel TREK-1 regulates stretch-induced detachment of alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roan, Esra; Waters, Christopher M; Teng, Bin; Ghosh, Manik; Schwingshackl, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome remains challenging partially because the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. While inflammation and loss of barrier function are associated with disease progression, our understanding of the biophysical mechanisms associated with ventilator-associated lung injury is incomplete. In this line of thinking, we recently showed that changes in the F-actin content and deformability of AECs lead to cell detachment with mechanical stretch. Elsewhere, we discovered that cytokine secretion and proliferation were regulated in part by the stretch-activated 2-pore domain K(+) (K2P) channel TREK-1 in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs). As such, the aim of the current study was to determine whether TREK-1 regulated the mechanobiology of AECs through cytoskeletal remodeling and cell detachment. Using a TREK-1-deficient human AEC line (A549), we examined the cytoskeleton by confocal microscopy and quantified differences in the F-actin content. We used nano-indentation with an atomic force microscope to measure the deformability of cells and detachment assays to quantify the level of injury in our monolayers. We found a decrease in F-actin and an increase in deformability in TREK-1 deficient cells compared to control cells. Although total vinculin and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) levels remained unchanged, focal adhesions appeared to be less prominent and phosphorylation of FAK at the Tyr(925) residue was greater in TREK-1 deficient cells. TREK-1 deficient cells have less F-actin and are more deformable making them more resistant to stretch-induced injury.

  19. Overexpression of RING domain E3 ligase ZmXerico1 confers drought tolerance through regulation of ABA homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugiere, Norbert; Zhang, Wenjing; Xu, John; Scolaro, Eric J; Lu, Cheng; Kahsay, Robel Y; Kise, Rie; Trecker, Libby; Williams, Robert W; Hakimi, Salim; Niu, Xiping; Lafitte, Renee; Habben, Jeffrey E

    2017-09-12

    Drought stress is one of the main environmental problems encountered by crop growers. Reduction in arable land area and reduced water availability make it paramount to identify and develop strategies to allow crops to be more resilient in water limiting environments. The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays an important role in the plants' response to drought stress through its control of stomatal aperture and water transpiration; and transgenic modulation of ABA levels therefore represents an attractive avenue to improve the drought tolerance of crops. Several steps in the ABA signaling pathway are controlled by ubiquitination involving RING domain containing proteins. We characterized the maize RING protein family and identified two novel RING-H2 genes called ZmXerico1 and ZmXerico2. Expression of ZmXerico genes is induced by drought stress and we show that overexpression of ZmXerico1 and ZmXerico2 in Arabidopsis and maize confers ABA hypersensitivity and improved water use efficiency which can lead to enhanced maize yield performance in a controlled drought stress environment. Overexpression of ZmXerico1 and ZmXerico2 in maize results in increased ABA levels and decreased levels of ABA degradation products diphaseic acid and phaseic acid. We show that ZmXerico1 is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, where ABA 8'-hydroxylases have been shown to be localized, and that it functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. We demonstrate that ZmXerico1 plays a role in the control of ABA homeostasis through regulation of ABA 8'-hydroxylase protein stability, representing a novel control point in the regulation of the ABA pathway. {copyright, serif} 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All rights reserved.

  20. Negative regulation of prophenoloxidase (proPO) activation by a clip-domain serine proteinase homolog (SPH) from endoparasitoid venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangmei; Lu, Zhi-Qiang; Jiang, Haobo; Asgari, Sassan

    2004-05-01

    Most parasitic wasps inject maternal factors into the host hemocoel to suppress the host immune system and ensure successful development of their progeny. Melanization is one of the insect defence mechanisms against intruding pathogens or parasites. We previously isolated from the venom of Cotesia rubecula a 50 kDa protein that blocked melanization in the hemolymph of its host, Pieris rapae [Insect Biochem. Mol. Biol. 33 (2003) 1017]. This protein, designated Vn50, is a serine proteinase homolog (SPH) containing an amino-terminal clip domain. In this work, we demonstrated that recombinant Vn50 bound P. rapae hemolymph components that were recognized by antisera to Tenebrio molitor prophenoloxidase (proPO) and Manduca sexta proPO-activating proteinase (PAP). Vn50 is stable in the host hemolymph-it remained intact for at least 72 h after parasitization. Using M. sexta as a model system, we found that Vn50 efficiently down-regulated proPO activation mediated by M. sexta PAP-1, SPH-1, and SPH-2. Vn50 did not inhibit active phenoloxidase (PO) or PAP-1, but it significantly reduced the proteolysis of proPO. If recombinant Vn50 binds P. rapae proPO and PAP (as suggested by the antibody reactions), it is likely that the molecular interactions among M. sexta proPO, PAP-1, and SPHs were impaired by this venom protein. A similar strategy might be employed by C. rubecula to negatively impact the proPO activation reaction in its natural host.

  1. Crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human SIRT7 reveals a three-helical domain architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyanka, Anu; Solanki, Vipul; Parkesh, Raman; Thakur, Krishan Gopal

    2016-10-01

    Human SIRT7 is an NAD(+) dependent deacetylase, which belongs to sirtuin family of proteins. SIRT7, like other sirtuins has conserved catalytic domain and is flanked by N- and C-terminal domains reported to play vital functional roles. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human SIRT7 (SIRT7(NTD) ) at 2.3 Å resolution as MBP-SIRT7(NTD) fusion protein. SIRT7(NTD) adopts three-helical domain architecture and comparative structural analyses suggest similarities to some DNA binding motifs and transcription regulators. We also report here the importance of N- and C-terminal domains in soluble expression of SIRT7. Proteins 2016; 84:1558-1563. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Ribosomal L1 domain and lysine-rich region are essential for CSIG/ RSL1D1 to regulate proliferation and senescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Liwei; Zhao, Wenting; Zheng, Quanhui; Chen, Tianda; Qi, Ji; Li, Guodong; Tong, Tanjun, E-mail: tztong@bjmu.edu.cn

    2016-01-15

    The expression change of cellular senescence-associated genes is underlying the genetic foundation of cellular senescence. Using a suppressive subtractive hybridization system, we identified CSIG (cellular senescence-inhibited gene protein; RSL1D1) as a novel senescence-associated gene. CSIG is implicated in various process including cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and tumor metastasis. We previously showed that CSIG plays an important role in regulating cell proliferation and cellular senescence progression through inhibiting PTEN, however, which domain or region of CSIG contributes to this function? To clarify this question, we investigated the functional importance of ribosomal L1 domain and lysine (Lys) -rich region of CSIG. The data showed that expression of CSIG potently reduced PTEN expression, increased cell proliferation rates, and reduced the senescent phenotype (lower SA-β-gal activity). By contrast, neither the expression of CSIG N- terminal (NT) fragment containing the ribosomal L1 domain nor C-terminal (CT) fragment containing Lys-rich region could significantly altered the levels of PTEN; instead of promoting cell proliferation and delaying cellular senescence, expression of CSIG-NT or CSIG-CT inhibited cell proliferation and accelerated cell senescence (increased SA-β-gal activity) compared to either CSIG over-expressing or control (empty vector transfected) cells. The further immunofluorescence analysis showed that CSIG-CT and CSIG-NT truncated proteins exhibited different subcellular distribution with that of wild-type CSIG. Conclusively, both ribosomal L1 domain and Lys-rich region of CSIG are critical for CSIG to act as a regulator of cell proliferation and cellular senescence. - Highlights: • The ribosomal L1 domain and lysine-rich region of CSIG were expressed. • They are critical for CSIG to regulate proliferation and senescence. • CSIG and its domains exhibit different subcellular distribution.

  3. Intramolecular Crosstalk between Catalytic Activities of Receptor Kinases

    KAUST Repository

    Kwezi, Lusisizwe

    2018-01-22

    Signal modulation is important for the growth and development of plants and this process is mediated by a number of factors including physiological growth regulators and their associated signal transduction pathways. Protein kinases play a central role in signaling, including those involving pathogen response mechanisms. We previously demonstrated an active guanylate cyclase (GC) catalytic center in the brassinosteroid insensitive receptor (AtBRI1) within an active intracellular kinase domain resulting in dual enzymatic activity. Here we propose a novel type of receptor architecture that is characterized by a functional GC catalytic center nested in the cytosolic kinase domain enabling intramolecular crosstalk. This may be through a cGMP-AtBRI1 complex forming that may induce a negative feedback mechanism leading to desensitisation of the receptor, regulated through the cGMP production pathway. We further argue that the comparatively low but highly localized cGMP generated by the GC in response to a ligand is sufficient to modulate the kinase activity. This type of receptor therefore provides a molecular switch that directly and/or indirectly affects ligand dependent phosphorylation of downstream signaling cascades and suggests that subsequent signal transduction and modulation works in conjunction with the kinase in downstream signaling.

  4. The LOTUS domain is a conserved DEAD-box RNA helicase regulator essential for the recruitment of Vasa to the germ plasm and nuage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeske, Mandy; Müller, Christoph W; Ephrussi, Anne

    2017-05-01

    DEAD-box RNA helicases play important roles in a wide range of metabolic processes. Regulatory proteins can stimulate or block the activity of DEAD-box helicases. Here, we show that LOTUS (Limkain, Oskar, and Tudor containing proteins 5 and 7) domains present in the germline proteins Oskar, TDRD5 (Tudor domain-containing 5), and TDRD7 bind and stimulate the germline-specific DEAD-box RNA helicase Vasa. Our crystal structure of the LOTUS domain of Oskar in complex with the C-terminal RecA-like domain of Vasa reveals that the LOTUS domain occupies a surface on a DEAD-box helicase not implicated previously in the regulation of the enzyme's activity. We show that, in vivo, the localization of Drosophila Vasa to the nuage and germ plasm depends on its interaction with LOTUS domain proteins. The binding and stimulation of Vasa DEAD-box helicases by LOTUS domains are widely conserved. © 2017 Jeske et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  5. Human I-mfa domain proteins specifically interact with KSHV LANA and affect its regulation of Wnt signaling-dependent transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusano, Shuichi, E-mail: skusano@m2.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Division of Persistent and Oncogenic Viruses, Center for Chronic Viral Diseases, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Eizuru, Yoshito [Division of Persistent and Oncogenic Viruses, Center for Chronic Viral Diseases, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)

    2010-06-04

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV)-encoded latency-associated nuclear antigen (LANA) protein has been reported to interact with glycogen synthase kinase 3{beta} (GSK-3{beta}) and to negatively regulate its activity, leading to stimulation of GSK-3{beta}-dependent {beta}-catenin degradation. We show here that the I-mfa domain proteins, HIC (human I-mfa domain-containing protein) and I-mfa (inhibitor of MyoD family a), interacted in vivo with LANA through their C-terminal I-mfa domains. This interaction affected the intracellular localization of HIC, inhibited the LANA-dependent transactivation of a {beta}-catenin-regulated reporter construct, and decreased the level of the LANA.GSK-3{beta} complex. These data reveal for the first time that I-mfa domain proteins interact with LANA and negatively regulate LANA-mediated activation of Wnt signaling-dependent transcription by inhibiting the formation of the LANA.GSK-3{beta} complex.

  6. Differential splicing of the apoptosis-associated speck like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC regulates inflammasomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojanasakul Yon

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The apoptotic speck-like protein containing a caspase recruitment domain (ASC is the essential adaptor protein for caspase 1 mediated interleukin (IL-1β and IL-18 processing in inflammasomes. It bridges activated Nod like receptors (NLRs, which are a family of cytosolic pattern recognition receptors of the innate immune system, with caspase 1, resulting in caspase 1 activation and subsequent processing of caspase 1 substrates. Hence, macrophages from ASC deficient mice are impaired in their ability to produce bioactive IL-1β. Furthermore, we recently showed that ASC translocates from the nucleus to the cytosol in response to inflammatory stimulation in order to promote an inflammasome response, which triggers IL-1β processing and secretion. However, the precise regulation of inflammasomes at the level of ASC is still not completely understood. In this study we identified and characterized three novel ASC isoforms for their ability to function as an inflammasome adaptor. Methods To establish the ability of ASC and ASC isoforms as functional inflammasome adaptors, IL-1β processing and secretion was investigated by ELISA in inflammasome reconstitution assays, stable expression in THP-1 and J774A1 cells, and by restoring the lack of endogenous ASC in mouse RAW264.7 macrophages. In addition, the localization of ASC and ASC isoforms was determined by immunofluorescence staining. Results The three novel ASC isoforms, ASC-b, ASC-c and ASC-d display unique and distinct capabilities to each other and to full length ASC in respect to their function as an inflammasome adaptor, with one of the isoforms even showing an inhibitory effect. Consistently, only the activating isoforms of ASC, ASC and ASC-b, co-localized with NLRP3 and caspase 1, while the inhibitory isoform ASC-c, co-localized only with caspase 1, but not with NLRP3. ASC-d did not co-localize with NLRP3 or with caspase 1 and consistently lacked the ability to function as an

  7. Seminal plasma proteins regulate the association of lipids and proteins within detergent-resistant membrane domains of bovine spermatozoa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girouard, Julie; Frenette, Gilles; Sullivan, Robert

    2008-05-01

    Maturing spermatozoa acquire full fertilization competence by undergoing major changes in membrane fluidity and protein composition and localization. In epididymal spermatozoa, several proteins are associated with cholesterol- and sphingolipid-enriched detergent-resistant membrane (DRM) domains. These proteins dissociate from DRM in capacitated sperm cells, suggesting that DRM may play a role in the redistribution of integral and peripheral proteins in response to cholesterol removal. Since seminal plasma regulates sperm cell membrane fluidity, we hypothesized that seminal plasma factors could be involved in DRM disruption and redistribution of DRM-associated proteins. Our results indicate that: 1) the sperm-associated proteins, P25b and adenylate kinase 1, are linked to DRM of epididymal spermatozoa, but were exclusively associated with detergent-soluble material in ejaculated spermatozoa; 2) seminal plasma treatment of cauda epididymal spermatozoa significantly lowered the content of cholesterol and the ganglioside, GM1, in DRM; and 3), seminal plasma dissociates P25b from DRM in epididymal spermatozoa. We found that the seminal plasma protein, Niemann-Pick C2 protein, is involved in cholesterol and GM1 depletion within DRM, then leading to membrane redistribution of P25b that occurs in a very rapid and capacitation-independent manner. Together, these data suggest that DRM of ejaculated spermatozoa are reorganized by specific seminal plasma proteins, which induce lipid efflux as well as dissociation of DRM-anchored proteins. This process could be physiologically relevant in vivo to allow sperm survival and attachment within the female reproductive tract and to potentiate recognition, binding, and penetration of the oocyte.

  8. RIPK3/Fas-Associated Death Domain Axis Regulates Pulmonary Immunopathology to Cryptococcal Infection Independent of Necroptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenzong Fa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Fas-associated death domain (FADD and receptor interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3 are multifunctional regulators of cell death and immune response. Using a mouse model of cryptococcal infection, the roles of FADD and RIPK3 in anti-cryptococcal defense were investigated. Deletion of RIPK3 alone led to increased inflammatory cytokine production in the Cryptococcus neoformans-infected lungs, but in combination with FADD deletion, it led to a robust Th1-biased response with M1-biased macrophage activation. Rather than being protective, these responses led to paradoxical C. neoformans expansion and rapid clinical deterioration in Ripk3−/− and Ripk3−/−Fadd−/− mice. The increased mortality of Ripk3−/− and even more accelerated mortality in Ripk3−/−Fadd−/− mice was attributed to profound pulmonary damage due to neutrophil-dominant infiltration with prominent upregulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines. This phenomenon was partially associated with selective alterations in the apoptotic frequency of some leukocyte subsets, such as eosinophils and neutrophils, in infected Ripk3−/−Fadd−/− mice. In conclusion, our study shows that RIPK3 in concert with FADD serve as physiological “brakes,” preventing the development of excessive inflammation and Th1 bias, which in turn contributes to pulmonary damage and defective fungal clearance. This novel link between the protective effect of FADD and RIPK3 in antifungal defense and sustenance of immune homeostasis may be important for the development of novel immunomodulatory therapies against invasive fungal infections.

  9. An essential role for the VASt domain of the Arabidopsis VAD1 protein in the regulation of defense and cell death in response to pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Khafif

    Full Text Available Several regulators of programmed cell death (PCD have been identified in plants which encode proteins with putative lipid-binding domains. Among them, VAD1 (Vascular Associated Death contains a novel protein domain called VASt (VAD1 analog StAR-related lipid transfer still uncharacterized. The Arabidopsis mutant vad1-1 has been shown to exhibit a lesion mimic phenotype with light-conditional appearance of propagative hypersensitive response-like lesions along the vascular system, associated with defense gene expression and increased resistance to Pseudomonas strains. To test the potential of ectopic expression of VAD1 to influence HR cell death and to elucidate the role of the VASt domain in this function, we performed a structure-function analysis of VAD1 by transient over-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana and by complementation of the mutant vad1-1. We found that (i overexpression of VAD1 controls negatively the HR cell death and defense expression either transiently in Nicotiana benthamania or in Arabidopsis plants in response to avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae, (ii VAD1 is expressed in multiple subcellular compartments, including the nucleus, and (iii while the GRAM domain does not modify neither the subcellular localization of VAD1 nor its immunorepressor activity, the domain VASt plays an essential role in both processes. In conclusion, VAD1 acts as a negative regulator of cell death associated with the plant immune response and the VASt domain of this unknown protein plays an essential role in this function, opening the way for the functional analysis of VASt-containing proteins and the characterization of novel mechanisms regulating PCD.

  10. Structure of Thermotoga maritima TM0439: implications for the mechanism of bacterial GntR transcription regulators with Zn{sup 2+}-binding FCD domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Meiying; Cooper, David R. [Integrated Center for Structure-Function Innovation, Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0736 (United States); Grossoehme, Nickolas E. [Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405-7102 (United States); Yu, Minmin [Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS4R0230, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hung, Li-Wei [Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, MS4R0230, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Physics Division, MS D454, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Cieslik, Marcin; Derewenda, Urszula [Integrated Center for Structure-Function Innovation, Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0736 (United States); Lesley, Scott A. [The Scripps Research Institute, North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Genomics Institute of the Novartis Research Foundation, 10675 John Jay Hopkins Drive, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States); Wilson, Ian A. [The Scripps Research Institute, North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Giedroc, David P. [Department of Chemistry, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405-7102 (United States); Derewenda, Zygmunt S., E-mail: zsd4n@virginia.edu [Integrated Center for Structure-Function Innovation, Department of Molecular Physiology and Biological Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22908-0736 (United States)

    2009-04-01

    Here, the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain found in the Thermotoga maritima genome, is described. The GntR superfamily of dimeric transcription factors, with more than 6200 members encoded in bacterial genomes, are characterized by N-terminal winged-helix DNA-binding domains and diverse C-terminal regulatory domains which provide a basis for the classification of the constituent families. The largest of these families, FadR, contains nearly 3000 proteins with all-α-helical regulatory domains classified into two related Pfam families: FadR-C and FCD. Only two crystal structures of FadR-family members, those of Escherichia coli FadR protein and LldR from Corynebacterium glutamicum, have been described to date in the literature. Here, the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain found in the Thermotoga maritima genome, is described. The FCD domain is similar to that of the LldR regulator and contains a buried metal-binding site. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy and Trp fluorescence, it is shown that the recombinant protein contains bound Ni{sup 2+} ions but that it is able to bind Zn{sup 2+} with K{sub d} < 70 nM. It is concluded that Zn{sup 2+} is the likely physiological metal and that it may perform either structural or regulatory roles or both. Finally, the TM0439 structure is compared with two other FadR-family structures recently deposited by structural genomics consortia. The results call for a revision in the classification of the FadR family of transcription factors.

  11. Munc13 C[subscript 2]B domain is an activity-dependent Ca[superscript 2+] regulator of synaptic exocytosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ok-Ho; Lu, Jun; Rhee, Jeong-Seop; Tomchick, Diana R.; Pang, Zhiping P.; Wojcik, Sonja M.; Camacho-Perez, Marcial; Brose, Nils; Machius, Mischa; Rizo, Josep; Rosenmund, Christian; Südhof, Thomas C. (Baylor); (MXPL-B); (MXPL); (UTSMC)

    2010-04-26

    Munc13 is a multidomain protein present in presynaptic active zones that mediates the priming and plasticity of synaptic vesicle exocytosis, but the mechanisms involved remain unclear. Here we use biophysical, biochemical and electrophysiological approaches to show that the central C{sub 2}B domain of Munc13 functions as a Ca{sup 2+} regulator of short-term synaptic plasticity. The crystal structure of the C{sub 2}B domain revealed an unusual Ca{sup 2+}-binding site with an amphipathic {alpha}-helix. This configuration confers onto the C{sub 2}B domain unique Ca{sup 2+}-dependent phospholipid-binding properties that favor phosphatidylinositolphosphates. A mutation that inactivated Ca{sup 2+}-dependent phospholipid binding to the C{sub 2}B domain did not alter neurotransmitter release evoked by isolated action potentials, but it did depress release evoked by action-potential trains. In contrast, a mutation that increased Ca{sup 2+}-dependent phosphatidylinositolbisphosphate binding to the C{sub 2}B domain enhanced release evoked by isolated action potentials and by action-potential trains. Our data suggest that, during repeated action potentials, Ca{sup 2+} and phosphatidylinositolphosphate binding to the Munc13 C{sub 2}B domain potentiate synaptic vesicle exocytosis, thereby offsetting synaptic depression induced by vesicle depletion.

  12. Heparan sulfate regulates ADAM12 through a molecular switch mechanism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hans P; Vives, Romain R; Manetopoulos, Christina

    2008-01-01

    The disintegrin and metalloproteases (ADAMs) are emerging as therapeutic targets in human disease, but specific drug design is hampered by potential redundancy. Unlike other metzincins, ADAM pro domains remain bound to the mature enzyme to regulate activity. Here ADAM12, a protease that promotes....... These data present a novel concept that might allow targeting of ADAM12 and suggest that other ADAMs may have specific regulatory activity embedded in their pro and catalytic domain structures....

  13. New Advances In Multiphase Flow Numerical Modelling Using A General Domain Decomposition and Non-orthogonal Collocated Finite Volume Algorithm: Application To Industrial Fluid Catalytical Cracking Process and Large Scale Geophysical Fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R.; Gonzalez Ortiz, A.

    momentum exchange forces and the interphase heat exchanges are 1 treated implicitly to ensure stability. In order to reduce one more time the computa- tional cost, a decomposition of the global domain in N subdomains is introduced and all the previous algorithms applied to one block is performed in each block. At the in- terface between subdomains, an overlapping procedure is used. Another advantage is that different sets of equations can be solved in each block like fluid/structure interac- tions for instance. We show here the hydrodynamics of a two-phase flow in a vertical conduct as in industrial plants of fluid catalytical cracking processes with a complex geometry. With an initial Richardson number of 0.16 slightly higher than the critical Richardson number of 0.1, particles and water vapor are injected at the bottom of the riser. Countercurrents appear near the walls and gravity effects begin to dominate in- ducing an increase of particulate volumic fractions near the walls. We show here the hydrodynamics for 13s. 2

  14. Voltage-dependent motion of the catalytic region of voltage-sensing phosphatase monitored by a fluorescent amino acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, Souhei; Jinno, Yuka; Kawanabe, Akira; Okamura, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The cytoplasmic region of voltage-sensing phosphatase (VSP) derives the voltage dependence of its catalytic activity from coupling to a voltage sensor homologous to that of voltage-gated ion channels. To assess the conformational changes in the cytoplasmic region upon activation of the voltage sensor, we genetically incorporated a fluorescent unnatural amino acid, 3-(6-acetylnaphthalen-2-ylamino)-2-aminopropanoic acid (Anap), into the catalytic region of Ciona intestinalis VSP (Ci-VSP). Measurements of Anap fluorescence under voltage clamp in Xenopus oocytes revealed that the catalytic region assumes distinct conformations dependent on the degree of voltage-sensor activation. FRET analysis showed that the catalytic region remains situated beneath the plasma membrane, irrespective of the voltage level. Moreover, Anap fluorescence from a membrane-facing loop in the C2 domain showed a pattern reflecting substrate turnover. These results indicate that the voltage sensor regulates Ci-VSP catalytic activity by causing conformational changes in the entire catalytic region, without changing their distance from the plasma membrane. PMID:27330112

  15. Identification of flgZ as a flagellar gene encoding a PilZ domain protein that regulates swimming motility and biofilm formation in Pseudomonas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Martínez-Granero

    Full Text Available Diguanylate cyclase and phosphodiesterase enzymatic activities control c-di-GMP levels modulating planktonic versus sessile lifestyle behavior in bacteria. The PilZ domain is described as a sensor of c-di-GMP intracellular levels and the proteins containing a PilZ domain represent the best studied class of c-di-GMP receptors forming part of the c-di-GMP signaling cascade. In P. fluorescens F113 we have found two diguanylate cyclases (WspR, SadC and one phosphodiesterase (BifA implicated in regulation of swimming motility and biofilm formation. Here we identify a flgZ gene located in a flagellar operon encoding a protein that contains a PilZ domain. Moreover, we show that FlgZ subcellular localization depends on the c-di-GMP intracellular levels. The overexpression analysis of flgZ in P. fluorescens F113 and P. putida KT2440 backgrounds reveal a participation of FlgZ in Pseudomonas swimming motility regulation. Besides, the epistasis of flgZ over wspR and bifA clearly shows that c-di-GMP intracellular levels produced by the enzymatic activity of the diguanylate cyclase WspR and the phosphodiesterase BifA regulates biofilm formation through FlgZ.

  16. Analysis of the Staphylococcus aureus DgkB structure reveals a common catalytic mechanism for the soluble diacylglycerol kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Darcie J; Jerga, Agoston; Rock, Charles O; White, Stephen W

    2008-07-01

    Soluble diacylglycerol (DAG) kinases function as regulators of diacylglycerol metabolism in cell signaling and intermediary metabolism. We report the structure of a DAG kinase, DgkB from Staphylococcus aureus, both as the free enzyme and in complex with ADP. The molecule is a tight homodimer, and each monomer comprises two domains with the catalytic center located within the interdomain cleft. Two distinctive features of DkgB are a structural Mg2+ site and an associated Asp*water*Mg2+ network that extends toward the active site locale. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that these features play important roles in the catalytic mechanism. The key active site residues and the components of the Asp*water*Mg2+ network are conserved in the catalytic cores of the mammalian signaling DAG kinases, indicating that these enzymes use the same mechanism and have similar structures as DgkB.

  17. Analysis of the Staphylococcus aureus DgkB Structure Reveals a Common Catalytic Mechanism for the Soluble Diacylglycerol Kinases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Darcie J.; Jerga, Agoston; Rock, Charles O.; White, Stephen W. (SJCH)

    2008-08-11

    Soluble diacylglycerol (DAG) kinases function as regulators of diacylglycerol metabolism in cell signaling and intermediary metabolism. We report the structure of a DAG kinase, DgkB from Staphylococcus aureus, both as the free enzyme and in complex with ADP. The molecule is a tight homodimer, and each monomer comprises two domains with the catalytic center located within the interdomain cleft. Two distinctive features of DkgB are a structural Mg{sup 2+} site and an associated Asp{center_dot}water{center_dot}Mg{sup 2+} network that extends toward the active site locale. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that these features play important roles in the catalytic mechanism. The key active site residues and the components of the Asp{center_dot}water{center_dot}Mg{sup 2+} network are conserved in the catalytic cores of the mammalian signaling DAG kinases, indicating that these enzymes use the same mechanism and have similar structures as DgkB.

  18. MT2-MMP-dependent release of collagen IV NC1 domains regulates submandibular gland branching morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebustini, Ivan T.; Myers, Christopher; Lassiter, Keyonica S.; Surmak, Andrew; Szabova, Ludmila; Holmbeck, Kenn; Pedchenko, Vadim; Hudson, Billy G.; Hoffman, Matthew P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Proteolysis is essential during branching morphogenesis, but the roles of MT-MMPs and their proteolytic products are not clearly understood. Here we discover that decreasing MT-MMP activity during submandibular gland branching morphogenesis decreases proliferation and increases collagen IV and MT-MMP expression. Importantly, reducing epithelial MT2-MMP profoundly decreases proliferation and morphogenesis, increases Col4a2 and intracellular accumulation of collagen IV, and decreases the proteolytic release of collagen IV NC1 domains. Importantly, we demonstrate the presence of collagen IV NC1 domains in developing tissue. Furthermore, recombinant collagen IV NC1 domains rescue branching morphogenesis after MT2-siRNA-treatment, increasing MT-MMP and pro-proliferative gene expression via β1 integrin and PI3K-AKT signaling. Additionally, HBEGF also rescues MT2-siRNA-treatment, increasing NC1 domain release, proliferation, and MT2-MMP and Hbegf expression. Our studies provide mechanistic insight into how MT2-MMP-dependent release of bioactive NC1 domains from collagen IV is critical for integrating collagen IV synthesis and proteolysis with epithelial proliferation during branching morphogenesis. PMID:19853562

  19. The VTLISFG motif in the BH1 domain plays a significant role in regulating the degradation of Mcl-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Kang; Chen, Pengxuan; Chang, Donald Choy

    2014-01-01

    Mcl-1 is a member of the Bcl-2 family protein; its degradation is required for the initiation of apoptosis. The mechanism, however, is not yet clearly known. Previously, it was reported that Mcl-1 is degraded through the ubiquitination-mediated pathway and the PEST domain is the motif responsible for promoting this degradation. We found evidence that this may not be true. We generated several Mcl-1 deletion mutants and examined their effects on protein stability. Deletion of the PEST domain did not prevent the degradation of Mcl-1 during apoptosis. The BH1 domain, but not the PEST, BH3 or BH2 domain, exhibited a short half-life. A peptide named "F3" (VTLISFG) in the C-terminus of the BH1 domain appears to be critical for the rapid turnover of Mcl-1. Deletion of F3 from GFP-Mcl-1-ΔPEST retarded the degradation of this mutant. F3 appeared to be the minimum functional sequence of the degradation motif, since deletion of a single residue was sufficient to abrogate its short half-life. Fusion of F3 with p32 resulted in the degradation of p32 during UV-induced apoptosis, while wild type p32 was not affected. Taken together, these findings suggest that F3 (VTLISFG), instead of PEST, is the major motif responsible for the degradation of Mcl-1 during apoptosis.

  20. Crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima TM0439: implications for the mechanism of bacterial GntR transcription regulators with Zn2+-binding FCD domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Meiying; Cooper, David; Grossoehmerb, Nickolas; Yu, Minmin; Hung, Li-Wei; Cieslik, Murcin; Derewendaro, Urszula; Lesley, Scott; Wilson, Ian; Giedrocb, David; Derewenda, Zygmunt

    2009-06-06

    The GntR superfamily of dimeric transcription factors, with more than 6200 members encoded in bacterial genomes, are characterized by N-terminal winged helix (WH) DNA-binding domains and diverse C-terminal, regulatory domains, which provide a basis for the classification of the constituent families. The largest of these families, FadR, contains nearly 3000 proteins with all a-helical regulatory domains classified into two related Pfam families: FadR{_}C and FCD. Only two crystal structures of the FadR family members, i.e. the E. coli FadR protein and the LldR from C. glutamicum, have been described to date in literature. Here we describe the crystal structure of TM0439, a GntR regulator with an FCD domain, found in the Thermotoga maritima genome. The FCD domain is similar to that of the LldR regulator, and contains a buried metal binding site. Using atomic absorption spectroscopy and Trp fluorescence, we show that the recombinant protein contains bound Ni{sup 2+} ions, but it is able to bind Zn{sup 2+} with K{sub D} < 70 nM . We conclude that Zn{sup 2+} is the likely physiological metal, where it may perform either or both structural and regulatory roles. Finally, we compare the TM0439 structure to two other FadR family structures recently deposited by Structural Genomics consortia. The results call for a revision in the classification of the FadR family of transcription factors.

  1. Virulence regulation with Venus flytrap domains: structure and function of the periplasmic moiety of the sensor-kinase BvgS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elian Dupré

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Two-component systems (TCS represent major signal-transduction pathways for adaptation to environmental conditions, and regulate many aspects of bacterial physiology. In the whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis, the TCS BvgAS controls the virulence regulon, and is therefore critical for pathogenicity. BvgS is a prototypical TCS sensor-kinase with tandem periplasmic Venus flytrap (VFT domains. VFT are bi-lobed domains that typically close around specific ligands using clamshell motions. We report the X-ray structure of the periplasmic moiety of BvgS, an intricate homodimer with a novel architecture. By combining site-directed mutagenesis, functional analyses and molecular modeling, we show that the conformation of the periplasmic moiety determines the state of BvgS activity. The intertwined structure of the periplasmic portion and the different conformation and dynamics of its mobile, membrane-distal VFT1 domains, and closed, membrane-proximal VFT2 domains, exert a conformational strain onto the transmembrane helices, which sets the cytoplasmic moiety in a kinase-on state by default corresponding to the virulent phase of the bacterium. Signaling the presence of negative signals perceived by the periplasmic domains implies a shift of BvgS to a distinct state of conformation and activity, corresponding to the avirulent phase. The response to negative modulation depends on the integrity of the periplasmic dimer, indicating that the shift to the kinase-off state implies a concerted conformational transition. This work lays the bases to understand virulence regulation in Bordetella. As homologous sensor-kinases control virulence features of diverse bacterial pathogens, the BvgS structure and mechanism may pave the way for new modes of targeted therapeutic interventions.

  2. Virulence regulation with Venus flytrap domains: structure and function of the periplasmic moiety of the sensor-kinase BvgS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupré, Elian; Herrou, Julien; Lensink, Marc F; Wintjens, René; Vagin, Alexey; Lebedev, Andrey; Crosson, Sean; Villeret, Vincent; Locht, Camille; Antoine, Rudy; Jacob-Dubuisson, Françoise

    2015-03-01

    Two-component systems (TCS) represent major signal-transduction pathways for adaptation to environmental conditions, and regulate many aspects of bacterial physiology. In the whooping cough agent Bordetella pertussis, the TCS BvgAS controls the virulence regulon, and is therefore critical for pathogenicity. BvgS is a prototypical TCS sensor-kinase with tandem periplasmic Venus flytrap (VFT) domains. VFT are bi-lobed domains that typically close around specific ligands using clamshell motions. We report the X-ray structure of the periplasmic moiety of BvgS, an intricate homodimer with a novel architecture. By combining site-directed mutagenesis, functional analyses and molecular modeling, we show that the conformation of the periplasmic moiety determines the state of BvgS activity. The intertwined structure of the periplasmic portion and the different conformation and dynamics of its mobile, membrane-distal VFT1 domains, and closed, membrane-proximal VFT2 domains, exert a conformational strain onto the transmembrane helices, which sets the cytoplasmic moiety in a kinase-on state by default corresponding to the virulent phase of the bacterium. Signaling the presence of negative signals perceived by the periplasmic domains implies a shift of BvgS to a distinct state of conformation and activity, corresponding to the avirulent phase. The response to negative modulation depends on the integrity of the periplasmic dimer, indicating that the shift to the kinase-off state implies a concerted conformational transition. This work lays the bases to understand virulence regulation in Bordetella. As homologous sensor-kinases control virulence features of diverse bacterial pathogens, the BvgS structure and mechanism may pave the way for new modes of targeted therapeutic interventions.

  3. The BEACH Domain Protein SPIRRIG Is Essential for Arabidopsis Salt Stress Tolerance and Functions as a Regulator of Transcript Stabilization and Localization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Steffens

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Members of the highly conserved class of BEACH domain containing proteins (BDCPs have been established as broad facilitators of protein-protein interactions and membrane dynamics in the context of human diseases like albinism, bleeding diathesis, impaired cellular immunity, cancer predisposition, and neurological dysfunctions. Also, the Arabidopsis thaliana BDCP SPIRRIG (SPI is important for membrane integrity, as spi mutants exhibit split vacuoles. In this work, we report a novel molecular function of the BDCP SPI in ribonucleoprotein particle formation. We show that SPI interacts with the P-body core component DECAPPING PROTEIN 1 (DCP1, associates to mRNA processing bodies (P-bodies, and regulates their assembly upon salt stress. The finding that spi mutants exhibit salt hypersensitivity suggests that the local function of SPI at P-bodies is of biological relevance. Transcriptome-wide analysis revealed qualitative differences in the salt stress-regulated transcriptional response of Col-0 and spi. We show that SPI regulates the salt stress-dependent post-transcriptional stabilization, cytoplasmic agglomeration, and localization to P-bodies of a subset of salt stress-regulated mRNAs. Finally, we show that the PH-BEACH domains of SPI and its human homolog FAN (Factor Associated with Neutral sphingomyelinase activation interact with DCP1 isoforms from plants, mammals, and yeast, suggesting the evolutionary conservation of an association of BDCPs and P-bodies.

  4. Allosteric regulation of Csx1, a type IIIB-associated CARF domain ribonuclease by RNAs carrying a tetraadenylate tail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wenyuan; Pan, Saifu; López-Méndez, Blanca; Montoya, Guillermo; She, Qunxin

    2017-10-13

    CRISPR-Cas systems protect prokaryotes against invading viruses and plasmids. The system is associated with a large number of Cas accessory proteins among which many contain a CARF (CRISPR-associated Rossmann fold) domain implicated in ligand binding and a HEPN (higher eukaryotes and prokaryotes nucleotide-binding) nuclease domain. Here, such a dual domain protein, i.e. the Sulfolobus islandicus Csx1 (SisCsx1) was characterized. The enzyme exhibited metal-independent single-strand specific ribonuclease activity. In fact, SisCsx1 showed a basal RNase activity in the absence of ligand; upon the binding of an RNA ligand carrying four continuous adenosines at the 3'-end (3'-tetra-rA), the activated SisCsx1 degraded RNA substrate with a much higher turnover rate. Amino acid substitution mutants of SisCsx1 were obtained, and characterization of these mutant proteins showed that the CARF domain of the enzyme is responsible for binding to 3'-tetra-rA and the ligand binding strongly activates RNA cleavage by the HEPN domain. Since RNA polyadenylation is an important step in RNA decay in prokaryotes, and poly(A) RNAs can activate CARF domain proteins, the poly(A) RNA may function as an important signal in the cellular responses to viral infection and environmental stimuli, leading to degradation of both viral and host transcripts and eventually to cell dormancy or cell death. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. A Central Small Amino Acid in the VAMP2 Transmembrane Domain Regulates the Fusion Pore in Exocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Hastoy, B; Scotti, PA; Milochau, A; Fezoua-Boubegtiten, Z; Rodas, J; Megret, R; Desbat, B.; Laguerre, M; Castano, S; Perrais, D.; Rorsman, P.; Oda, R; Lang, J.

    2017-01-01

    Exocytosis depends on cytosolic domains of SNARE proteins but the function of the transmembrane domains (TMDs) in membrane fusion remains controversial. The TMD of the SNARE protein synaptobrevin2/VAMP2 contains two highly conserved small amino acids, G100 and C103, in its central portion. Substituting G100 and/or C103 with the β-branched amino acid valine impairs the structural flexibility of the TMD in terms of α-helix/β-sheet transitions in model membranes (measured by infrared reflection-...

  6. Involvement of BH4 domain in the regulation of HIF-1-mediated VEGF expression in hypoxic tumor cells

    OpenAIRE

    Del Bufalo, Donatella; Trisciuoglio, Daniela; Gabellini, Chiara; Desideri, Marianna; RAGAZZONI, YLENIA; De Luca, Teresa; Ziparo, Elio

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In addition to act as an antiapoptotic protein, bcl-2 can also promote tumor angiogenesis. In this context, we have previously demonstrated that under hypoxia bcl-2 promotes hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) -mediated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in melanoma and breast carcinoma. Here, we report on the role of the BH4 domain in bcl-2 functions, by showing that removal of or mutations at the BH4 domain abrogates the ability of bcl-2 to induce VEGF p...

  7. The transmembrane domains of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL receptors 1 and 2 co-regulate apoptotic signaling capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Neumann

    Full Text Available TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF ligand family that exerts its apoptotic activity in human cells by binding to two transmembrane receptors, TRAILR1 and TRAILR2. In cells co-expressing both receptors the particular contribution of either protein to the overall cellular response is not well defined. Here we have investigated whether differences in the signaling capacities of TRAILR1 and TRAILR2 can be attributed to certain functional molecular subdomains. We generated and characterized various chimeric receptors comprising TRAIL receptor domains fused with parts from other members of the TNF death receptor family. This allowed us to compare the contribution of particular domains of the two TRAIL receptors to the overall apoptotic response and to identify elements that regulate apoptotic signaling. Our results show that the TRAIL receptor death domains are weak apoptosis inducers compared to those of CD95/Fas, because TRAILR-derived constructs containing the CD95/Fas death domain possessed strongly enhanced apoptotic capabilities. Importantly, major differences in the signaling strengths of the two TRAIL receptors were linked to their transmembrane domains in combination with the adjacent extracellular stalk regions. This was evident from receptor chimeras comprising the extracellular part of TNFR1 and the intracellular signaling part of CD95/Fas. Both receptor chimeras showed comparable ligand binding affinities and internalization kinetics. However, the respective TRAILR2-derived molecule more efficiently induced apoptosis. It also activated caspase-8 and caspase-3 more strongly and more quickly, albeit being expressed at lower levels. These results suggest that the transmembrane domains together with their adjacent stalk regions can play a major role in control of death receptor activation thereby contributing to cell type specific differences in TRAILR1 and TRAILR2 signaling.

  8. The transmembrane domains of TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) receptors 1 and 2 co-regulate apoptotic signaling capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Simon; Bidon, Tobias; Branschädel, Marcus; Krippner-Heidenreich, Anja; Scheurich, Peter; Doszczak, Malgorzata

    2012-01-01

    TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) ligand family that exerts its apoptotic activity in human cells by binding to two transmembrane receptors, TRAILR1 and TRAILR2. In cells co-expressing both receptors the particular contribution of either protein to the overall cellular response is not well defined. Here we have investigated whether differences in the signaling capacities of TRAILR1 and TRAILR2 can be attributed to certain functional molecular subdomains. We generated and characterized various chimeric receptors comprising TRAIL receptor domains fused with parts from other members of the TNF death receptor family. This allowed us to compare the contribution of particular domains of the two TRAIL receptors to the overall apoptotic response and to identify elements that regulate apoptotic signaling. Our results show that the TRAIL receptor death domains are weak apoptosis inducers compared to those of CD95/Fas, because TRAILR-derived constructs containing the CD95/Fas death domain possessed strongly enhanced apoptotic capabilities. Importantly, major differences in the signaling strengths of the two TRAIL receptors were linked to their transmembrane domains in combination with the adjacent extracellular stalk regions. This was evident from receptor chimeras comprising the extracellular part of TNFR1 and the intracellular signaling part of CD95/Fas. Both receptor chimeras showed comparable ligand binding affinities and internalization kinetics. However, the respective TRAILR2-derived molecule more efficiently induced apoptosis. It also activated caspase-8 and caspase-3 more strongly and more quickly, albeit being expressed at lower levels. These results suggest that the transmembrane domains together with their adjacent stalk regions can play a major role in control of death receptor activation thereby contributing to cell type specific differences in TRAILR1 and TRAILR2 signaling.

  9. A pivotal role for pro-335 in balancing the dual functions of Munc18-1 domain-3a in regulated exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Gayoung Anna; Park, Seungmee; Bin, Na-Ryum; Jung, Chang Hun; Kim, Byungjin; Chandrasegaram, Prashanth; Matsuda, Maiko; Riadi, Indira; Han, Liping; Sugita, Shuzo

    2014-11-28

    Munc18-1 plays essential dual roles in exocytosis: (i) stabilizing and trafficking the central SNARE protein, syntaxin-1 (i.e. chaperoning function), by its domain-1; and (ii) priming/stimulating exocytosis by its domain-3a. Here, we examine whether or not domain-3a also plays a significant role in the chaperoning of syntaxin-1 and, if so, how these dual functions of domain-3a are regulated. We demonstrate that introduction of quintuple mutations (K332E/K333E/P335A/Q336A/Y337L) in domain-3a of Munc18-1 abolishes its ability to bind syntaxin-1 and fails to rescue the level and trafficking of syntaxin-1 as well as to restore exocytosis in Munc18-1/2 double knockdown cells. By contrast, a quadruple mutant (K332E/K333E/Q336A/Y337L) sparing the Pro-335 residue retains all of these capabilities. A single point mutant of P335A reduces the ability to bind syntaxin-1 and rescue syntaxin-1 levels. Nonetheless, it surprisingly outperforms the wild type in the rescue of exocytosis. However, when additional mutations in the neighboring residues are combined with P335A mutation (K332E/K333E/P335A, P335A/Q336A/Y337L), the ability of the Munc18-1 variants to chaperone syntaxin-1 and to rescue exocytosis is strongly impaired. Our results indicate that residues from Lys-332 to Tyr-337 of domain-3a are intimately tied to the chaperoning function of Munc18-1. We also propose that Pro-335 plays a pivotal role in regulating the balance between the dual functions of domain-3a. The hinged conformation of the α-helix containing Pro-335 promotes the syntaxin-1 chaperoning function, whereas the P335A mutation promotes its priming function by facilitating the α-helix to adopt an extended conformation. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Reconstituted IMPDH polymers accommodate both catalytically active and inactive conformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Sajitha A; Burrell, Anika L; Johnson, Matthew C; Duong-Ly, Krisna C; Kuo, Yin-Ming; Simonet, Jacqueline C; Michener, Peter; Andrews, Andrew; Kollman, Justin M; Peterson, Jeffrey R

    2017-08-09

    Several metabolic enzymes undergo reversible polymerization into macromolecular assemblies. The function of these assemblies is often unclear but in some cases they regulate enzyme activity and metabolic homeostasis. The guanine nucleotide biosynthetic enzyme inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) forms octamers that polymerize into helical chains. In mammalian cells, IMPDH filaments can associate into micron-length assemblies. Polymerization and enzyme activity are regulated in part by binding of purine nucleotides to an allosteric regulatory domain. ATP promotes octamer polymerization, whereas GTP promotes a compact, inactive conformation whose ability to polymerize is unknown. Also unclear is whether polymerization directly alters IMPDH catalytic activity. To address this, we identified point mutants of human IMPDH2 that either prevent or promote polymerization. Unexpectedly, we found that polymerized and non-assembled forms of recombinant IMPDH have comparable catalytic activity, substrate affinity, and GTP sensitivity and validated this finding in cells. Electron microscopy revealed that substrates and allosteric nucleotides shift the equilibrium between active and inactive conformations in both the octamer and the filament. Unlike other metabolic filaments, which selectively stabilize active or inactive conformations, recombinant IMPDH filaments accommodate multiple states. These conformational states are finely tuned by substrate availability and purine balance, while polymerization may allow cooperative transitions between states. © 2017 by The American Society for Cell Biology.

  11. Allosteric regulation of Csx1, a type IIIB-associated CARF domain ribonuclease by RNAs carrying a tetraadenylate tail

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Wenyuan; Pan, Saifu; López-Méndez, Blanca

    2017-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas systems protect prokaryotes against invading viruses and plasmids. The system is associated with a large number of Cas accessory proteins among which many contain a CARF (CRISPR-associated Rossmann fold) domain implicated in ligand binding and a HEPN (higher eukaryotes and prokaryotes ...

  12. Cleavage of the SUN-domain protein Mps3 at its N-terminus regulates centrosome disjunction in budding yeast meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ping; Jin, Hui; Koch, Bailey A; Abblett, Rebecca L; Han, Xuemei; Yates, John R; Yu, Hong-Guo

    2017-06-01

    Centrosomes organize microtubules and are essential for spindle formation and chromosome segregation during cell division. Duplicated centrosomes are physically linked, but how this linkage is dissolved remains unclear. Yeast centrosomes are tethered by a nuclear-envelope-attached structure called the half-bridge, whose components have mammalian homologues. We report here that cleavage of the half-bridge protein Mps3 promotes accurate centrosome disjunction in budding yeast. Mps3 is a single-pass SUN-domain protein anchored at the inner nuclear membrane and concentrated at the nuclear side of the half-bridge. Using the unique feature in yeast meiosis that centrosomes are linked for hours before their separation, we have revealed that Mps3 is cleaved at its nucleus-localized N-terminal domain, the process of which is regulated by its phosphorylation at serine 70. Cleavage of Mps3 takes place at the yeast centrosome and requires proteasome activity. We show that noncleavable Mps3 (Mps3-nc) inhibits centrosome separation during yeast meiosis. In addition, overexpression of mps3-nc in vegetative yeast cells also inhibits centrosome separation and is lethal. Our findings provide a genetic mechanism for the regulation of SUN-domain protein-mediated activities, including centrosome separation, by irreversible protein cleavage at the nuclear periphery.

  13. Cleavage of the SUN-domain protein Mps3 at its N-terminus regulates centrosome disjunction in budding yeast meiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Bailey A.; Han, Xuemei

    2017-01-01

    Centrosomes organize microtubules and are essential for spindle formation and chromosome segregation during cell division. Duplicated centrosomes are physically linked, but how this linkage is dissolved remains unclear. Yeast centrosomes are tethered by a nuclear-envelope-attached structure called the half-bridge, whose components have mammalian homologues. We report here that cleavage of the half-bridge protein Mps3 promotes accurate centrosome disjunction in budding yeast. Mps3 is a single-pass SUN-domain protein anchored at the inner nuclear membrane and concentrated at the nuclear side of the half-bridge. Using the unique feature in yeast meiosis that centrosomes are linked for hours before their separation, we have revealed that Mps3 is cleaved at its nucleus-localized N-terminal domain, the process of which is regulated by its phosphorylation at serine 70. Cleavage of Mps3 takes place at the yeast centrosome and requires proteasome activity. We show that noncleavable Mps3 (Mps3-nc) inhibits centrosome separation during yeast meiosis. In addition, overexpression of mps3-nc in vegetative yeast cells also inhibits centrosome separation and is lethal. Our findings provide a genetic mechanism for the regulation of SUN-domain protein-mediated activities, including centrosome separation, by irreversible protein cleavage at the nuclear periphery. PMID:28609436

  14. Cleavage of the SUN-domain protein Mps3 at its N-terminus regulates centrosome disjunction in budding yeast meiosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Centrosomes organize microtubules and are essential for spindle formation and chromosome segregation during cell division. Duplicated centrosomes are physically linked, but how this linkage is dissolved remains unclear. Yeast centrosomes are tethered by a nuclear-envelope-attached structure called the half-bridge, whose components have mammalian homologues. We report here that cleavage of the half-bridge protein Mps3 promotes accurate centrosome disjunction in budding yeast. Mps3 is a single-pass SUN-domain protein anchored at the inner nuclear membrane and concentrated at the nuclear side of the half-bridge. Using the unique feature in yeast meiosis that centrosomes are linked for hours before their separation, we have revealed that Mps3 is cleaved at its nucleus-localized N-terminal domain, the process of which is regulated by its phosphorylation at serine 70. Cleavage of Mps3 takes place at the yeast centrosome and requires proteasome activity. We show that noncleavable Mps3 (Mps3-nc inhibits centrosome separation during yeast meiosis. In addition, overexpression of mps3-nc in vegetative yeast cells also inhibits centrosome separation and is lethal. Our findings provide a genetic mechanism for the regulation of SUN-domain protein-mediated activities, including centrosome separation, by irreversible protein cleavage at the nuclear periphery.

  15. Rich catalytic injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veninger, Albert [Coventry, CT

    2008-12-30

    A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

  16. ArHsp40, a type 1 J-domain protein, is developmentally regulated and stress inducible in post-diapause Artemia franciscana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guojian; Rowarth, Nathan M; Panchakshari, Sheethal; MacRae, Thomas H

    2016-11-01

    Upon diapause termination and exposure to favorable environmental conditions, cysts of the crustacean Artemia franciscana reinitiate development, a process dependent on the resumption of metabolic activity and the maintenance of protein homeostasis. The objective of the work described herein was to characterize molecular chaperones during post-diapause growth of A. franciscana. An Hsp40 complementary DNA (cDNA) termed ArHsp40 was cloned and shown to encode a protein with an amino-terminal J-domain containing a conserved histidine, proline, and aspartic acid (HPD) motif. Following the J-domain was a Gly/Phe (G/F) rich domain, a zinc-binding domain which contained a modified CXXCXGXG motif, and the carboxyl-terminal substrate binding region, all characteristics of type I Hsp40. Multiple alignment and protein modeling showed that ArHsp40 is comparable to Hsp40s from other eukaryotes and likely to be functionally similar. qRT-PCR revealed that during post-diapause development, ArHsp40 messenger RNA (mRNA) varied slightly until the E2/E3 stage and decreased significantly upon hatching. The immunoprobing of Western blots demonstrated that ArHsp40 was also relatively constant until E2/E3 and then declined dramatically. The drop in ArHsp40 when metabolism and protein synthesis were increasing was unexpected and demonstrated developmental regulation. The reduction in ArHsp40 at such an active life history stage indicates, as one possibility, that A. franciscana possesses additional Hsp40s, one or more of which replaces ArHsp40 as development progresses. Increased synthesis upon heat shock established that in addition to being developmentally regulated, ArHsp40 is stress inducible and, because it is found in mature cysts, ArHsp40 has the potential to contribute to stress tolerance during diapause.

  17. Differential regulation of disheveled in a novel vegetal cortical domain in sea urchin eggs and embryos: implications for the localized activation of canonical Wnt signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, ChiehFu Jeff; Wikramanayake, Athula H

    2013-01-01

    Pattern formation along the animal-vegetal (AV) axis in sea urchin embryos is initiated when canonical Wnt (cWnt) signaling is activated in vegetal blastomeres. The mechanisms that restrict cWnt signaling to vegetal blastomeres are not well understood, but there is increasing evidence that the egg's vegetal cortex plays a critical role in this process by mediating localized "activation" of Disheveled (Dsh). To investigate how Dsh activity is regulated along the AV axis, sea urchin-specific Dsh antibodies were used to examine expression, subcellular localization, and post-translational modification of Dsh during development. Dsh is broadly expressed during early sea urchin development, but immunolocalization studies revealed that this protein is enriched in a punctate pattern in a novel vegetal cortical domain (VCD) in the egg. Vegetal blastomeres inherit this VCD during embryogenesis, and at the 60-cell stage Dsh puncta are seen in all cells that display nuclear β-catenin. Analysis of Dsh post-translational modification using two-dimensional Western blot analysis revealed that compared to Dsh pools in the bulk cytoplasm, this protein is differentially modified in the VCD and in the 16-cell stage micromeres that partially inherit this domain. Dsh localization to the VCD is not directly affected by disruption of microfilaments and microtubules, but unexpectedly, microfilament disruption led to degradation of all the Dsh pools in unfertilized eggs over a period of incubation suggesting that microfilament integrity is required for maintaining Dsh stability. These results demonstrate that a pool of differentially modified Dsh in the VCD is selectively inherited by the vegetal blastomeres that activate cWnt signaling in early embryos, and suggests that this domain functions as a scaffold for localized Dsh activation. Localized cWnt activation regulates AV axis patterning in many metazoan embryos. Hence, it is possible that the VCD is an evolutionarily conserved

  18. Differential Regulation of Disheveled in a Novel Vegetal Cortical Domain in Sea Urchin Eggs and Embryos: Implications for the Localized Activation of Canonical Wnt Signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, ChiehFu Jeff; Wikramanayake, Athula H.

    2013-01-01

    Pattern formation along the animal-vegetal (AV) axis in sea urchin embryos is initiated when canonical Wnt (cWnt) signaling is activated in vegetal blastomeres. The mechanisms that restrict cWnt signaling to vegetal blastomeres are not well understood, but there is increasing evidence that the egg’s vegetal cortex plays a critical role in this process by mediating localized “activation” of Disheveled (Dsh). To investigate how Dsh activity is regulated along the AV axis, sea urchin-specific Dsh antibodies were used to examine expression, subcellular localization, and post-translational modification of Dsh during development. Dsh is broadly expressed during early sea urchin development, but immunolocalization studies revealed that this protein is enriched in a punctate pattern in a novel vegetal cortical domain (VCD) in the egg. Vegetal blastomeres inherit this VCD during embryogenesis, and at the 60-cell stage Dsh puncta are seen in all cells that display nuclear β-catenin. Analysis of Dsh post-translational modification using two-dimensional Western blot analysis revealed that compared to Dsh pools in the bulk cytoplasm, this protein is differentially modified in the VCD and in the 16-cell stage micromeres that partially inherit this domain. Dsh localization to the VCD is not directly affected by disruption of microfilaments and microtubules, but unexpectedly, microfilament disruption led to degradation of all the Dsh pools in unfertilized eggs over a period of incubation suggesting that microfilament integrity is required for maintaining Dsh stability. These results demonstrate that a pool of differentially modified Dsh in the VCD is selectively inherited by the vegetal blastomeres that activate cWnt signaling in early embryos, and suggests that this domain functions as a scaffold for localized Dsh activation. Localized cWnt activation regulates AV axis patterning in many metazoan embryos. Hence, it is possible that the VCD is an evolutionarily conserved

  19. Distinct domains in Bub1 localize RZZ and BubR1 to kinetochores to regulate the checkpoint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Gang; Lischetti, Tiziana; Hayward, Daniel G

    2015-01-01

    The spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) ensures proper chromosome segregation by delaying anaphase onset in response to unattached kinetochores. Checkpoint signalling requires the kinetochore localization of the Mad1-Mad2 complex that in more complex eukaryotes depends on the Rod-Zwilch-ZW10 (RZZ......) complex. The kinetochore protein Zwint has been proposed to be the kinetochore receptor for RZZ, but here we show that Bub1 and not Zwint is required for RZZ recruitment. We find that the middle region of Bub1 encompassing a domain essential for SAC signalling contributes to RZZ localization. In addition......, we show that a distinct region in Bub1 mediates kinetochore localization of BubR1 through direct binding, but surprisingly removal of this region increases checkpoint strength. Our work thus uncovers how Bub1 coordinates checkpoint signalling by distinct domains for RZZ and BubR1 recruitment...

  20. SPG20 protein spartin associates with cardiolipin via its plant-related senescence domain and regulates mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh C Joshi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs are a group of neurological disorders characterized clinically by spasticity of lower limbs and pathologically by degeneration of the corticospinal tract. Troyer syndrome is an autosomal recessive HSP caused by a frameshift mutation in the spartin (SPG20 gene. Previously, we established that this mutation results in a lack of expression of the truncated mutant spartin protein. Spartin is involved in many cellular processes and associates with several intracellular organelles, including mitochondria. Spartin contains a conserved plant-related senescence domain at its C-terminus. However, neither the function of this domain nor the roles of spartin in mitochondrial physiology are currently known. In this study, we determined that the plant-related senescence domain of spartin interacts with cardiolipin but not with two other major mitochondrial phospholipids, phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. We also found that knockdown of spartin by small interfering RNA in a human neuroblastoma cell line resulted in depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane. In addition, depletion of spartin resulted in a significant decrease in both mitochondrial calcium uptake and mitochondrial membrane potential in cells treated with thapsigargin. Our results suggest that impairment of mitochondrial calcium uptake might contribute to the neurodegeneration of long corticospinal axons and the pathophysiology of Troyer syndrome.

  1. The structure-function relationship of WspR, a Pseudomonas fluorescens response regulator with a GGDEF output domain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Malone, J. G; Williams, R; Christen, M; Jenal, U; Spiers, A. J; Rainey, P. B

    2007-01-01

    ...{at}auckland.ac.nz The GGDEF response regulator WspR couples the chemosensory Wsp pathway to the overproduction of acetylated cellulose and cell attachment in the Pseudomonas fluorescens SBW25 wrinkly spreader (WS) genotype...

  2. Phosphorylation of clustered serine residues in the N-terminus of BPS domain negatively regulates formation of the complex between human Grb14 and insulin receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Junichi; Kida, Yutaka; Inatomi, Kohei; Komatsu, Hideyuki; Higashimoto, Yuichiro; Sakamoto, Hiroshi

    2017-08-01

    Growth factor receptor-bound protein 14 (Grb14) is a negative regulator of insulin receptor (IR) and is involved in a negative feedback mechanism of insulin signaling. Grb14 associates with IR and inhibits its tyrosine kinase activity through the between pleckstrin homology and Src homology-2 (BPS) domain. We previously reported that the pharmacological inhibition and knockdown of glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) facilitates the insulin-induced complex formation of human Grb14 (hGrb14) and IR, suggesting that GSK-3 suppresses hGrb14 recruitment to IR. This study further investigated a functional phosphorylation of the serine residues in hGrb14 BPS domain, identified as putative GSK-3 targets to verify an effect of GSK-3 on the hGrb14-IR complex formation. In vitro kinase assay using the motif-derived peptides showed that the serine residues located in N-terminal (Ser358, Ser362 and Ser366) and C-terminal (Ser419 and Ser423) regions of the BPS domain were phosphorylated by GSK-3. Co-immunoprecipitation and yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) experiments suggested that the negative charges genetically introduced on the Ser358, Ser362 and Ser366 suppressed the association of hGrb14 to IR. Surface plasmon resonance experiment gave Kd values of 8 nM for recombinant hGrb14 with respect to the interaction with IR β-subunit, and this affinity was lost after the replacements of the Ser358, Ser362 and Ser366 with glutamic acid residues. Y2H experiment with the BPS domain alone; however, did not show any difference owing to the same mutations. It is therefore evident that the N-terminus of the BPS domain plays an important role in the regulation of hGrb14-IR complex formation through phosphorylation, in addition to other domains. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Serum-regulated transcription by serum response factor (SRF): a novel role for the DNA binding domain.

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, C.S.; Wynne, J; Treisman, R

    1994-01-01

    The transcription factors Serum Response Factor (SRF) and Ternary Complex Factor (TCF) form a ternary complex at the c-fos Serum Response Element (SRE). We show that in NIH3T3 cells TCF binding is required for regulated transcription in response to stimulation by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), but not by whole serum. We constructed a novel transcriptionally inactive SRE variant whose serum-regulated activity can be partially restored by overexpression of SRF in the absence of bound TCF. Act...

  4. Human sterile alpha motif domain 9, a novel gene identified as down-regulated in aggressive fibromatosis, is absent in the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bell Sherilyn

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neoplasia can be driven by mutations resulting in dysregulation of transcription. In the mesenchymal neoplasm, aggressive fibromatosis, subtractive hybridization identified sterile alpha motif domain 9 (SAMD9 as a substantially down regulated gene in neoplasia. SAMD9 was recently found to be mutated in normophosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis. In this study, we studied the gene structure and function of SAMD9, and its paralogous gene, SAMD9L, and examined these in a variety of species. Results SAMD9 is located on human chromosome 7q21.2 with a paralogous gene sterile alpha motif domain 9 like (SAMD9L in the head-to-tail orientation. Although both genes are present in a variety of species, the orthologue for SAMD9 is lost in the mouse lineage due to a unique genomic rearrangement. Both SAMD9 and SAMD9L are ubiquitously expressed in human tissues. SAMD9 is expressed at a lower level in a variety of neoplasms associated with β-catenin stabilization, such as aggressive fibromatosis, breast, and colon cancers. SAMD9 and SAMD9L contain an amino-terminal SAM domain, but the remainder of the predicted protein structure does not exhibit substantial homology to other known protein motifs. The putative protein product of SAMD9 localizes to the cytoplasm. In vitro data shows that SAMD9 negatively regulates cell proliferation. Over expression of SAMD9 in the colon cancer cell line, SW480, reduces the volume of tumors formed when transplanted into immune-deficient mice. Conclusion SAMD9 and SAMD9L are a novel family of genes, which play a role regulating cell proliferation and suppressing the neoplastic phenotype. This is the first report as far as we know about a human gene that exists in rat, but is lost in mouse, due to a mouse specific rearrangement, resulting in the loss of the SAMD9 gene.

  5. A plasma membrane-targeted cytosolic domain of STIM1 selectively activates ARC channels, an arachidonate-regulated store-independent Orai channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jill L; Shuttleworth, Trevor J

    2012-01-01

    The Orai family of calcium channels includes the store-operated CRAC channels and store-independent, arachidonic acid (AA)-regulated ARC channels. Both depend on STIM1 for their activation but, whereas CRAC channel activation involves sensing the depletion of intracellular calcium stores via a luminal N terminal EF-hand of STIM1 in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane, ARC channels are exclusively activated by the pool of STIM1 that constitutively resides in the plasma membrane (PM). Here, the EF-hand is extracellular and unlikely to ever lose its bound calcium, suggesting that STIM1-dependent activation of ARC channels is very different from that of CRAC channels. We now show that attachment of the cytosolic portion of STIM1 to the inner face of the PM via an N terminal Lck-domain sequence is sufficient to enable normal AA-dependent activation of ARC channels, while failing to allow activation of store-operated CRAC channels. Introduction of a point mutation within the Lck-domain resulted in the loss of both PM localization and ARC channel activation. Reversing the orientation of the PM-anchored STIM1 C terminus via a C-terminal CAAX-box fails to support either CRAC or ARC channel activation. Finally, the Lck-anchored STIM1 C-terminal domain also enabled the exclusive activation of the ARC channels following physiological agonist addition. These data demonstrate that simple tethering of the cytosolic C-terminal domain of STIM1 to the inner face of the PM is sufficient to allow the full, normal and exclusive activation of ARC channels, and that the N-terminal regions of STIM1 (including the EF-hand domain) play no significant role in this activation.

  6. Heterogeneous Catalysis "On Demand": Mechanically Controlled Catalytic Activity of a Metal Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Tomasz; Lach, Slawomir; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2017-12-27

    A metal surface passivated with a tightly packed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) can be made catalytically active upon the metal's mechanical deformation. This deformation renders the SAM sparser and exposes additional catalytic sites on the metal's surface. If the deformation is elastic, return of the metal to the original shape "heals" the SAM and nearly extinguishes the catalytic activity. Kelvin probe force microscopy and theoretical considerations both indicate that the catalytic domains "opening up" in the deformed SAM are of nanoscopic dimensions.

  7. Domains and domain loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haberland, Hartmut

    2005-01-01

    The domain concept, originally suggested by Schmidt-Rohr in the 1930’s (as credited in Fishman’s writings in the 1970s), was an attempt to sort out different areas of language use in multilingual societies, which are relevant for language choice. In Fishman’s version, domains were considered...... as theoretical constructs that can explain language choice which were supposed to be a more powerful explanatory tool than more obvious (and observable) parameters like topic, place (setting) and interlocutor. In the meantime, at least in Scandinavia, the term ‘domain’ has been taken up in the debate among...... politicians and in the media, especially in the discussion whether some languages undergo ‘domain loss’ vis-à-vis powerful international languages like English. An objection that has been raised here is that domains, as originally conceived, are parameters of language choice and not properties of languages...

  8. Crystal structure of the Escherichia coli regulator of σ70, Rsd, in complex with σ70 domain 4

    OpenAIRE

    Patikoglou, Georgia A; Westblade, Lars F.; Campbell, Elizabeth A.; Lamour, Valérie; Lane, William J; Darst, Seth A

    2007-01-01

    The Escherichia coli Rsd protein binds tightly and specifically to the RNA polymerase (RNAP) σ70 factor. Rsd plays a role in alternative σ factor-dependent transcription by biasing the competition between σ70 and alternative σ factors for the available core RNAP. Here, we determined the 2.6 Å-resolution X-ray crystal structure of Rsd bound to σ70 domain 4 (σ704), the primary determinant for Rsd binding within σ70. The structure reveals that Rsd binding interferes with the two primary function...

  9. Essential role of TEA domain transcription factors in the negative regulation of the MYH 7 gene by thyroid hormone and its receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Iwaki

    Full Text Available MYH7 (also referred to as cardiac myosin heavy chain β gene expression is known to be repressed by thyroid hormone (T3. However, the molecular mechanism by which T3 inhibits the transcription of its target genes (negative regulation remains to be clarified, whereas those of transcriptional activation by T3 (positive regulation have been elucidated in detail. Two MCAT (muscle C, A, and T sites and an A/T-rich region in the MYH7 gene have been shown to play a critical role in the expression of this gene and are known to be recognized by the TEAD/TEF family of transcription factors (TEADs. Using a reconstitution system with CV-1 cells, which has been utilized in the analysis of positive as well as negative regulation, we demonstrate that both T3 receptor (TR β1 and α1 inhibit TEAD-dependent activation of the MYH7 promoter in a T3 dose-dependent manner. TRβ1 bound with GC-1, a TRβ-selective T3 analog, also repressed TEAD-induced activity. Although T3-dependent inhibition required the DNA-binding domain (DBD of TRβ1, it remained after the putative negative T3-responsive elements were mutated. A co-immunoprecipitation study demonstrated the in vivo association of TRβ1 with TEAD-1, and the interaction surfaces were mapped to the DBD of the TRβ1 and TEA domains of TEAD-1, both of which are highly conserved among TRs and TEADs, respectively. The importance of TEADs in MYH7 expression was also validated with RNA interference using rat embryonic cardiomyocyte H9c2 cells. These results indicate that T3-bound TRs interfere with transactivation by TEADs via protein-protein interactions, resulting in the negative regulation of MYH7 promoter activity.

  10. Essential role of TEA domain transcription factors in the negative regulation of the MYH 7 gene by thyroid hormone and its receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwaki, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Shigekazu; Matsushita, Akio; Ohba, Kenji; Matsunaga, Hideyuki; Misawa, Hiroko; Oki, Yutaka; Ishizuka, Keiko; Nakamura, Hirotoshi; Suda, Takafumi

    2014-01-01

    MYH7 (also referred to as cardiac myosin heavy chain β) gene expression is known to be repressed by thyroid hormone (T3). However, the molecular mechanism by which T3 inhibits the transcription of its target genes (negative regulation) remains to be clarified, whereas those of transcriptional activation by T3 (positive regulation) have been elucidated in detail. Two MCAT (muscle C, A, and T) sites and an A/T-rich region in the MYH7 gene have been shown to play a critical role in the expression of this gene and are known to be recognized by the TEAD/TEF family of transcription factors (TEADs). Using a reconstitution system with CV-1 cells, which has been utilized in the analysis of positive as well as negative regulation, we demonstrate that both T3 receptor (TR) β1 and α1 inhibit TEAD-dependent activation of the MYH7 promoter in a T3 dose-dependent manner. TRβ1 bound with GC-1, a TRβ-selective T3 analog, also repressed TEAD-induced activity. Although T3-dependent inhibition required the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of TRβ1, it remained after the putative negative T3-responsive elements were mutated. A co-immunoprecipitation study demonstrated the in vivo association of TRβ1 with TEAD-1, and the interaction surfaces were mapped to the DBD of the TRβ1 and TEA domains of TEAD-1, both of which are highly conserved among TRs and TEADs, respectively. The importance of TEADs in MYH7 expression was also validated with RNA interference using rat embryonic cardiomyocyte H9c2 cells. These results indicate that T3-bound TRs interfere with transactivation by TEADs via protein-protein interactions, resulting in the negative regulation of MYH7 promoter activity.

  11. The NHERF1 PDZ2 domain regulates PKA-RhoA-p38-mediated NHE1 activation and invasion in breast tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardone, Rosa A; Bellizzi, Antonia; Busco, Giovanni; Weinman, Edward J; Dell'Aquila, Maria E; Casavola, Valeria; Azzariti, Amalia; Mangia, Anita; Paradiso, Angelo; Reshkin, Stephan J

    2007-05-01

    Understanding the signal transduction systems governing invasion is fundamental for the design of therapeutic strategies against metastasis. Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF1) is a postsynaptic density 95/disc-large/zona occludens (PDZ) domain-containing protein that recruits membrane receptors/transporters and cytoplasmic signaling proteins into functional complexes. NHERF1 expression is altered in breast cancer, but its effective role in mammary carcinogenesis remains undefined. We report here that NHERF1 overexpression in human breast tumor biopsies is associated with metastatic progression, poor prognosis, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1alpha expression. In cultured tumor cells, hypoxia and serum deprivation increase NHERF1 expression, promote the formation of leading-edge pseudopodia, and redistribute NHERF1 to these pseudopodia. This pseudopodial localization of NHERF1 was verified in breast biopsies and in three-dimensional Matrigel culture. Furthermore, serum deprivation and hypoxia stimulate the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger, invasion, and activate a protein kinase A (PKA)-gated RhoA/p38 invasion signal module. Significantly, NHERF1 overexpression was sufficient to induce these morphological and functional changes, and it potentiated their induction by serum deprivation. Functional experiments with truncated and binding groove-mutated PDZ domain constructs demonstrated that NHERF1 regulates these processes through its PDZ2 domain. We conclude that NHERF1 overexpression enhances the invasive phenotype in breast cancer cells, both alone and in synergy with exposure to the tumor microenvironment, via the coordination of PKA-gated RhoA/p38 signaling.

  12. Porcine bocavirus NP1 negatively regulates interferon signaling pathway by targeting the DNA-binding domain of IRF9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ruoxi [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); The Cooperative Innovation Center for Sustainable Pig Production, Wuhan 430070 (China); Fang, Liurong, E-mail: fanglr@mail.hzau.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); The Cooperative Innovation Center for Sustainable Pig Production, Wuhan 430070 (China); Wang, Dang; Cai, Kaimei; Zhang, Huan [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); The Cooperative Innovation Center for Sustainable Pig Production, Wuhan 430070 (China); Xie, Lilan; Li, Yi [College of Life Science and Technology, Wuhan Institute of Bioengineering, Wuhan 430415 (China); Chen, Huanchun; Xiao, Shaobo [State Key Laboratory of Agricultural Microbiology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Huazhong Agricultural University, Wuhan 430070 (China); The Cooperative Innovation Center for Sustainable Pig Production, Wuhan 430070 (China)

    2015-11-15

    To subvert host antiviral immune responses, many viruses have evolved countermeasures to inhibit IFN signaling pathway. Porcine bocavirus (PBoV), a newly identified porcine parvovirus, has received attention because it shows clinically high co-infection prevalence with other pathogens in post-weaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PWMS) and diarrheic piglets. In this study, we screened the structural and non-structural proteins encoded by PBoV and found that the non-structural protein NP1 significantly suppressed IFN-stimulated response element (ISRE) activity and subsequent IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression. However, NP1 affected neither the activation and translocation of STAT1/STAT2, nor the formation of the heterotrimeric transcription factor complex ISGF3 (STAT1/STAT2/IRF9). Detailed analysis demonstrated that PBoV NP1 blocked the ISGF3 DNA-binding activity by combining with the DNA-binding domain (DBD) of IRF9. In summary, these results indicate that PBoV NP1 interferes with type I IFN signaling pathway by blocking DNA binding of ISGF3 to attenuate innate immune responses. - Highlights: • Porcine bocavirus (PBoV) NP1 interferes with the IFN α/β signaling pathway. • PBoV NP1 does not prevent STAT1/STAT2 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. • PBoV NP1 inhibits the DNA-binding activity of ISGF3. • PBoV NP1 interacts with the DNA-binding domain of IRF9.

  13. A Central Small Amino Acid in the VAMP2 Transmembrane Domain Regulates the Fusion Pore in Exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastoy, Benoît; Scotti, Pier A; Milochau, Alexandra; Fezoua-Boubegtiten, Zahia; Rodas, Jorge; Megret, Rémi; Desbat, Bernard; Laguerre, Michel; Castano, Sabine; Perrais, David; Rorsman, Patrik; Oda, Reiko; Lang, Jochen

    2017-06-06

    Exocytosis depends on cytosolic domains of SNARE proteins but the function of the transmembrane domains (TMDs) in membrane fusion remains controversial. The TMD of the SNARE protein synaptobrevin2/VAMP2 contains two highly conserved small amino acids, G100 and C103, in its central portion. Substituting G100 and/or C103 with the β-branched amino acid valine impairs the structural flexibility of the TMD in terms of α-helix/β-sheet transitions in model membranes (measured by infrared reflection-absorption or evanescent wave spectroscopy) during increase in protein/lipid ratios, a parameter expected to be altered by recruitment of SNAREs at fusion sites. This structural change is accompanied by reduced membrane fluidity (measured by infrared ellipsometry). The G100V/C103V mutation nearly abolishes depolarization-evoked exocytosis (measured by membrane capacitance) and hormone secretion (measured biochemically). Single-vesicle optical (by TIRF microscopy) and biophysical measurements of ATP release indicate that G100V/C103V retards initial fusion-pore opening, hinders its expansion and leads to premature closure in most instances. We conclude that the TMD of VAMP2 plays a critical role in membrane fusion and that the structural mobility provided by the central small amino acids is crucial for exocytosis by influencing the molecular re-arrangements of the lipid membrane that are necessary for fusion pore opening and expansion.

  14. All-encomPASsing regulation of β-cells: PAS domain proteins in β-cell dysfunction and diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabatini, Paul V; Lynn, Francis C

    2015-01-01

    As a sensory micro-organ, pancreatic β-cells continually respond to nutritional signals and neuroendocrine input from other glucoregulatory organs. This sensory ability is essential for normal β-cell function and systemic glucose homeostasis. Period circadian protein (Per)-aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator protein (Arnt)-single-minded protein (Sim) (PAS) domain proteins have a conserved role as sensory proteins, critical in adaptation to changes in voltage, oxygen potential, and xenobiotics. Within β-cells, PAS domain proteins such as hypoxia inducible factor 1α (Hif1α), Arnt, PAS kinase, Bmal1, and Clock respond to disparate stimuli, but act in concert to maintain proper β-cell function. Elucidating the function of these factors in islets offers a unique insight into the sensing capacity of β-cells, the consequences of impaired sensory function, and the potential to develop novel therapeutic targets for preserving β-cell function in diabetes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Photodynamics of blue-light-regulated phosphodiesterase BlrP1 protein from Klebsiella pneumoniae and its photoreceptor BLUF domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tyagi, A. [Institut II - Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany); Penzkofer, A. [Institut II - Experimentelle und Angewandte Physik, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetstrasse 31, D-93053 Regensburg (Germany)], E-mail: alfons.penzkofer@physik.uni-regensburg.de; Griese, J.; Schlichting, I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer medizinische Forschung, Abteilung Biomolekulare Mechanismen, Jahnstrasse 29, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Kirienko, Natalia V.; Gomelsky, Mark [Department of Molecular Biology, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 82071 (United States)

    2008-12-10

    The BlrP1 protein from the enteric bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae consists of a BLUF and an EAL domain and may activate c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase by blue-light. The full-length protein, BlrP1, and its BLUF domain, BlrP1{sub B}LUF, are characterized by optical absorption and emission spectroscopy. The cofactor FAD in its oxidized redox state (FAD{sub ox}) is brought from the dark-adapted receptor state to the 10-nm red-shifted putative signalling state by violet light exposure. The recovery to the receptor state occurs with a time constant of about 1 min. The quantum yield of signalling state formation is about 0.17 for BlrP1{sub B}LUF and about 0.08 for BlrP1. The fluorescence efficiency of the FAD{sub ox} cofactor is small due to photo-induced reductive electron transfer. Prolonged light exposure converts FAD{sub ox} in the signalling state to the fully reduced hydroquinone form FAD{sub red}H{sup -} and causes low-efficient chromophore release with subsequent photo-degradation. The photo-cycle and photo-reduction dynamics in the receptor state and in the signalling state are discussed.

  16. Photodynamics of blue-light-regulated phosphodiesterase BlrP1 protein from Klebsiella pneumoniae and its photoreceptor BLUF domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyagi, A.; Penzkofer, A.; Griese, J.; Schlichting, I.; Kirienko, Natalia V.; Gomelsky, Mark

    2008-12-01

    The BlrP1 protein from the enteric bacterium Klebsiella pneumoniae consists of a BLUF and an EAL domain and may activate c-di-GMP phosphodiesterase by blue-light. The full-length protein, BlrP1, and its BLUF domain, BlrP1_BLUF, are characterized by optical absorption and emission spectroscopy. The cofactor FAD in its oxidized redox state (FAD ox) is brought from the dark-adapted receptor state to the 10-nm red-shifted putative signalling state by violet light exposure. The recovery to the receptor state occurs with a time constant of about 1 min. The quantum yield of signalling state formation is about 0.17 for BlrP1_BLUF and about 0.08 for BlrP1. The fluorescence efficiency of the FAD ox cofactor is small due to photo-induced reductive electron transfer. Prolonged light exposure converts FAD ox in the signalling state to the fully reduced hydroquinone form FAD redH - and causes low-efficient chromophore release with subsequent photo-degradation. The photo-cycle and photo-reduction dynamics in the receptor state and in the signalling state are discussed.

  17. Interaction Between the Biotin Carboxyl Carrier Domain and the Biotin Carboxylase Domain in Pyruvate Carboxylase from Rhizobium etli†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietzan, Adam D.; Menefee, Ann L.; Zeczycki, Tonya N.; Kumar, Sudhanshu; Attwood, Paul V.; Wallace, John C.; Cleland, W. Wallace; Maurice, Martin St.

    2011-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) catalyzes the ATP-dependent carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, an important anaplerotic reaction in mammalian tissues. To effect catalysis, the tethered biotin of PC must gain access to active sites in both the biotin carboxylase domain and the carboxyl transferase domain. Previous studies have demonstrated that a mutation of threonine 882 to alanine in PC from Rhizobium etli renders the carboxyl transferase domain inactive and favors the positioning of biotin in the biotin carboxylase domain. We report the 2.4 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of the Rhizobium etli PC T882A mutant which reveals the first high-resolution description of the domain interaction between the biotin carboxyl carrier protein domain and the biotin carboxylase domain. The overall quaternary arrangement of Rhizobium etli PC remains highly asymmetrical and is independent of the presence of allosteric activator. While biotin is observed in the biotin carboxylase domain, its access to the active site is precluded by the interaction between Arg353 and Glu248, revealing a mechanism for regulating carboxybiotin access to the BC domain active site. The binding location for the biotin carboxyl carrier protein domain demonstrates that tethered biotin cannot bind in the biotin carboxylase domain active site in the same orientation as free biotin, helping to explain the difference in catalysis observed between tethered biotin and free biotin substrates in biotin carboxylase enzymes. Electron density located in the biotin carboxylase domain active site is assigned to phosphonoacetate, offering a probable location for the putative carboxyphosphate intermediate formed during biotin carboxylation. The insights gained from the T882A Rhizobium etli PC crystal structure provide a new series of catalytic snapshots in PC and offer a revised perspective on catalysis in the biotin-dependent enzyme family. PMID:21958016

  18. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) and protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) regulate DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) phosphorylation in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pauline; Ye, Ruiqiong; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Neal, Jessica A; De Wever, Veerle; Morrice, Nick A; Meek, Katheryn; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2014-06-25

    The protein kinase activity of the DNA-PKcs (DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit) and its autophosphorylation are critical for DBS (DNA double-strand break) repair via NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining). Recent studies have shown that depletion or inactivation of DNA-PKcs kinase activity also results in mitotic defects. DNA-PKcs is autophosphorylated on Ser2056, Thr2647 and Thr2609 in mitosis and phosphorylated DNA-PKcs localize to centrosomes, mitotic spindles and the midbody. DNA-PKcs also interacts with PP6 (protein phosphatase 6), and PP6 has been shown to dephosphorylate Aurora A kinase in mitosis. Here we report that DNA-PKcs is phosphorylated on Ser3205 and Thr3950 in mitosis. Phosphorylation of Thr3950 is DNA-PK-dependent, whereas phosphorylation of Ser3205 requires PLK1 (polo-like kinase 1). Moreover, PLK1 phosphorylates DNA-PKcs on Ser3205 in vitro and interacts with DNA-PKcs in mitosis. In addition, PP6 dephosphorylates DNA-PKcs at Ser3205 in mitosis and after IR (ionizing radiation). DNA-PKcs also phosphorylates Chk2 on Thr68 in mitosis and both phosphorylation of Chk2 and autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs in mitosis occur in the apparent absence of Ku and DNA damage. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into the roles of DNA-PKcs and PP6 in mitosis and suggest that DNA-PKcs' role in mitosis may be mechanistically distinct from its well-established role in NHEJ.

  19. Syndecan-4 proteoglycan cytoplasmic domain and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate coordinately regulate protein kinase C activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oh, E S; Woods, A; Lim, S T

    1998-01-01

    Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) is involved in the organization of the actin cytoskeleton by regulating actin-associated proteins. The transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan syndecan-4 also plays a critical role in protein kinase C (PKC) signaling in the formation of focal...

  20. Npas4, a novel helix-loop-helix PAS domain protein, is regulated in response to cerebral ischemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shamloo, Mehrdad; Soriano, Liza; von Schack, David

    2006-01-01

    expression characterized with in situ hybridization and Northern blotting. The Npas4 mRNA is specifically expressed in the brain and is highly up-regulated in ischemic tissues following both focal and global cerebral ischemic insults. Immunohistochemistry revealed a strong expression in the limbic system...

  1. Regulation of DU145 prostate cancer cell growth by Scm-like with four mbt domains 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kwanghyun; Na, Wonho; Maeng, Je-Heon; Wu, Hongjin; Ju, Bong-Gun

    2013-03-01

    Mammalian SFMBTs have been considered to be polycomb group repressors. However, molecular mechanisms underlying mammalian SFMBTs-mediated gene regulation and their biological function have not been characterized. In the present study, we identified YY1 and methylated histones as interacting proteins of human SFMBT2. We also found that human SFMBT2 binds preferentially to methylated histone H3 and H4 that are associated with transcriptional repression. Using DU145 prostate cancer cells as a model, we showed that SFMBT2 has a transcriptional repression activity on HOXB13 gene expression. In addition, occupancy of SFMBT2 coincided with enrichment of diand tri-methylated H3K9 and H4K20 as well as tri-methylated H3K27 at the HOXB13 gene promoter. When SFMBT2 was depleted by siRNA in DU145 prostate cancer cells, significant up-regulation of HOXB13 gene expression and decreased cell growth were observed. Collectively, our findings indicate that human SFMBT2 may regulate cell growth via epigenetic regulation of HOXB13 gene expression in DU145 prostate cancer cells.

  2. The RST and PARP-like domain containing SRO protein family: analysis of protein structure, function and conservation in land plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salojärvi Jarkko

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SROs (SIMILAR TO RCD-ONE are a group of plant-specific proteins which have important functions in stress adaptation and development. They contain the catalytic core of the poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP domain and a C-terminal RST (RCD-SRO-TAF4 domain. In addition to these domains, several, but not all, SROs contain an N-terminal WWE domain. Results SROs are present in all analyzed land plants and sequence analysis differentiates between two structurally distinct groups; cryptogams and monocots possess only group I SROs whereas eudicots also contain group II. Group I SROs possess an N-terminal WWE domain (PS50918 but the WWE domain is lacking in group II SROs. Group I domain structure is widely represented in organisms as distant as humans (for example, HsPARP11. We propose a unified nomenclature for the SRO family. The SROs are able to interact with transcription factors through the C-terminal RST domain but themselves are generally not regulated at the transcriptional level. The most conserved feature of the SROs is the catalytic core of the poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PS51059 domain. However, bioinformatic analysis of the SRO PARP domain fold-structure and biochemical assays of AtRCD1 suggested that SROs do not possess ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. Conclusions The SROs are a highly conserved family of plant specific proteins. Sequence analysis of the RST domain implicates a highly preserved protein structure in that region. This might have implications for functional conservation. We suggest that, despite the presence of the catalytic core of the PARP domain, the SROs do not possess ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. Nevertheless, the function of SROs is critical for plants and might be related to transcription factor regulation and complex formation.

  3. The cyclic nucleotide monophosphate domain of Xanthomonas campestris global regulator Clp defines a new class of cyclic di-GMP effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Fei; He, Ya-Wen; Wu, Dong-Hui; Swarup, Sanjay; Zhang, Lian-Hui

    2010-02-01

    The widely conserved second messenger cyclic diguanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP) plays a key role in quorum-sensing (QS)-dependent production of virulence factors in Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris. The detection of QS diffusible signal factor (DSF) by the sensor RpfC leads to the activation of response regulator RpfG, which activates virulence gene expression by degrading c-di-GMP. Here, we show that a global regulator in the X. campestris pv. campestris QS regulatory pathway, Clp, is a c-di-GMP effector. c-di-GMP specifically binds to Clp with high affinity and induces allosteric conformational changes that abolish the interaction between Clp and its target gene promoter. Clp is similar to the cyclic AMP (cAMP) binding proteins Crp and Vfr and contains a conserved cyclic nucleotide monophosphate (cNMP) binding domain. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we found that the cNMP binding domain of Clp contains a glutamic acid residue (E99) that is essential for c-di-GMP binding. Substituting the residue with serine (E99S) resulted in decreased sensitivity to changes in the intracellular c-di-GMP level and attenuated bacterial virulence. These data establish the direct role of Clp in the response to fluctuating c-di-GMP levels and depict a novel mechanism by which QS links the second messenger with the X. campestris pv. campestris virulence regulon.

  4. A conserved serine residue regulates the stability of Drosophila Salvador and human WW domain-containing adaptor 45 through proteasomal degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Di, E-mail: DiWu@mail.nankai.edu.cn; Wu, Shian

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •Ser-17 is key for the stability of Drosophila Sav. •Ala mutation of Ser-17 promotes the proteasomal degradation of Sav. •Ser-17 residue is not the main target of Hpo-induced Sav stabilization. •Hpo-dependent and -independent mechanisms regulate Sav stability. •This mechanism is conserved in the homologue of Sav, human WW45. -- Abstract: The Hippo (Hpo) pathway is a conserved tumor suppressor pathway that controls organ size through the coordinated regulation of apoptosis and proliferation. Drosophila Salvador (Sav), which limits organ size, is a core component of the Hpo pathway. In this study, Ser-17 was shown to be important for the stability of Sav. Alanine mutation of Ser-17 promoted the proteasomal degradation of Sav. Destabilization and stabilization of the Sav protein mediated by alanine mutation of Ser-17 and by Hpo, respectively, were independent of each other. This implies that the stability of Sav is controlled by two mechanisms, one that is Ser-17-dependent and Hpo-independent, and another that is Ser-17-independent and Hpo-dependent. These dual mechanisms also regulated the human counterpart of Drosophila Sav, WW domain-containing adaptor 45 (WW45). The conservation of this regulation adds to its significance in normal physiology and tumorigenesis.

  5. The N-terminal domain of the thermo-regulated surface protein PrpA of Enterococcus faecium binds to fibrinogen, fibronectin and platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán Prieto, Ana M; Urbanus, Rolf T; Zhang, Xinglin; Bierschenk, Damien; Koekman, C Arnold; van Luit-Asbroek, Miranda; Ouwerkerk, Janneke P; Pape, Marieke; Paganelli, Fernanda L; Wobser, Dominique; Huebner, Johannes; Hendrickx, Antoni P A; Bonten, Marc J M; Willems, Rob J L; van Schaik, Willem

    2015-12-17

    Enterococcus faecium is a commensal of the mammalian gastrointestinal tract, but is also found in non-enteric environments where it can grow between 10 °C and 45 °C. E. faecium has recently emerged as a multi-drug resistant nosocomial pathogen. We hypothesized that genes involved in the colonization and infection of mammals exhibit temperature-regulated expression control and we therefore performed a transcriptome analysis of the clinical isolate E. faecium E1162, during mid-exponential growth at 25 °C and 37 °C. One of the genes that exhibited differential expression between 25 °C and 37 °C, was predicted to encode a peptidoglycan-anchored surface protein. The N-terminal domain of this protein is unique to E. faecium and closely related enterococci, while the C-terminal domain is homologous to the Streptococcus agalactiae surface protein BibA. This region of the protein contains proline-rich repeats, leading us to name the protein PrpA for proline-rich protein A. We found that PrpA is a surface-exposed protein which is most abundant during exponential growth at 37 °C in E. faecium E1162. The heterologously expressed and purified N-terminal domain of PrpA was able to bind to the extracellular matrix proteins fibrinogen and fibronectin. In addition, the N-terminal domain of PrpA interacted with both non-activated and activated platelets.

  6. Human small cell lung cancer NYH cells selected for resistance to the bisdioxopiperazine topoisomerase II catalytic inhibitor ICRF-187 demonstrate a functional R162Q mutation in the Walker A consensus ATP binding domain of the alpha isoform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessel, I; Jensen, L H; Jensen, P B

    1999-01-01

    Bisdioxopiperazine drugs such as ICRF-187 are catalytic inhibitors of DNA topoisomerase II, with at least two effects on the enzyme: namely, locking it in a closed-clamp form and inhibiting its ATPase activity. This is in contrast to topoisomerase II poisons as etoposide and amsacrine (m...... inactive at enzyme at 1 mM ATP was not resistant to ICRF-187 compared to wt, whereas it was clearly less sensitive than wt to ICRF-187 at low ATP concentrations. This suggests that it is a shift in the equilibrium to an open......-AMSA), which act by stabilizing enzyme-DNA-drug complexes at a stage in which the DNA gate strand is cleaved and the protein is covalently attached to DNA. Human small cell lung cancer NYH cells selected for resistance to ICRF-187 (NYH/187) showed a 25% increase in topoisomerase IIalpha level and no change...

  7. Inducible, tunable and multiplex human gene regulation using CRISPR-Cpf1-based transcription factors | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Targeted and inducible regulation of mammalian gene expression is a broadly important research capability that may also enable development of novel therapeutics for treating human diseases. Here we demonstrate that a catalytically inactive RNA-guided CRISPR-Cpf1 nuclease fused to transcriptional activation domains can up-regulate endogenous human gene expression. We engineered drug-inducible Cpf1-based activators and show how this system can be used to tune the regulation of endogenous gene transcription in human cells.

  8. Catalytic asymmetric fluorinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbio, Carla; Gouverneur, Véronique

    2006-06-07

    The appearance of structurally diverse fluorinating reagents displaying a large spectrum of reactivity has been critical to the development of the catalytic asymmetric fluorination processes known to date. In this article, we discuss how this area of research emerged and which strategies have allowed for the successful development of both nucleophilic and electrophilic catalytic enantioselective fluorinations. We also present the fundamental understanding of catalytic activity and enantioselectivity for the most efficient processes and highlight the first synthetic application with the preparation of a complex fluorinated target.

  9. Retraction statement: Dynamic complex formation between HD-GYP, GGDEF and PilZ domain proteins regulates motility in Xanthomonas campestris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    The following article from Molecular Microbiology (2012) 86(3), 557-567, 'Dynamic complex formation between HD-GYP, GGDEF and PilZ domain proteins regulates motility in Xanthomonas campestris' by Robert P. Ryan, Yvonne McCarthy, Patrick A. Kiely, Rosemary O'Connor, Chuck S. Farah, Judith P. Armitage and J. Maxwell Dow published online in Wiley Online Library (wileyonlinelibrary.com), has been retracted by agreement between the authors, the journal Editor-in-Chief, John D Helmann, and John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Since publication of the above article, it has been brought to our attention that there are several image duplications across Figures 3, 5 and 6 including duplication with another article in PNAS: 'Cell-cell signal-dependent dynamic interactions between HD-GYP and GGDEF domain proteins mediate virulence in Xanthomonas campestris', by Robert P. Ryan, Yvonne McCarthy, Maxuel Andrade, Chuck S. Farah, Judith P. Armitage, and J. Maxwell Dow; PNAS (2010) 107(13), 5989-5994. The authors apologise for the errors that arose due to poor labelling of the electronic images used in the construction of the figures and for not spotting the duplication during review, and, with agreement of all parties, the decision has been made to retract this article. We apologise for any inconvenience the publication of this work may have caused our readers. Ryan, R.P., McCarthy, Y., Andrade, M., Farah, C.S., Armitage, J.P., and Dow, J.M. (2010) Cell-cell signal-dependent dynamic interactions between HD-GYP and GGDEF domain proteins mediate virulence in Xanthomonas campestris. PNAS 107: 5989-5994. DOI: 10.1073/pnas.0912839107. Ryan, R.P., McCarthy, Y., Kiely, P.A., O'connor, R., Farah, C.S., Armitage, J.P., and Dow, J.M. (2012) Dynamic complex formation between HD-GYP, GGDEF and PilZ domain proteins regulates motility in Xanthomonas campestris. Mol Microbiol 86: 557-567. DOI: 10.1111/mmi.12000. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Bacillus subtilis Two-Component System Sensory Kinase DegS Is Regulated by Serine Phosphorylation in Its Input Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jers, Carsten; Kobir, Ahasanul; Søndergaard, Elsebeth Oline

    2011-01-01

    Bacillus subtilis two-component system DegS/U is well known for the complexity of its regulation. The cytosolic sensory kinase DegS does not receive a single predominant input signal like most two-component kinases, instead it integrates a wide array of metabolic inputs that modulate its activity......S phosphorylation can be carried out by at least two B. subtilis Hanks-type kinases in vitro, and this stimulates the phosphate transfer towards DegU. The consequences of this process were studied in vivo, using phosphomimetic (Ser76Asp) and non-phosphorylatable (Ser76Ala) mutants of DegS. In a number...

  11. Human NACHT, LRR, and PYD domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome activity is regulated by and potentially targetable through Bruton tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao; Pichulik, Tica; Wolz, Olaf-Oliver; Dang, Truong-Minh; Stutz, Andrea; Dillen, Carly; Delmiro Garcia, Magno; Kraus, Helene; Dickhöfer, Sabine; Daiber, Ellen; Münzenmayer, Lisa; Wahl, Silke; Rieber, Nikolaus; Kümmerle-Deschner, Jasmin; Yazdi, Amir; Franz-Wachtel, Mirita; Macek, Boris; Radsak, Markus; Vogel, Sebastian; Schulte, Berit; Walz, Juliane Sarah; Hartl, Dominik; Latz, Eicke; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Grimbacher, Bodo; Miller, Lloyd; Brunner, Cornelia; Wolz, Christiane; Weber, Alexander N R

    2017-10-01

    The Nod-like receptor NACHT, LRR, and PYD domain-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) and Bruton tyrosine kinase (BTK) are protagonists in innate and adaptive immunity, respectively. NLRP3 senses exogenous and endogenous insults, leading to inflammasome activation, which occurs spontaneously in patients with Muckle-Wells syndrome; BTK mutations cause the genetic immunodeficiency X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA). However, to date, few proteins that regulate NLRP3 inflammasome activity in human primary immune cells have been identified, and clinically promising pharmacologic targeting strategies remain elusive. We sought to identify novel regulators of the NLRP3 inflammasome in human cells with a view to exploring interference with inflammasome activity at the level of such regulators. After proteome-wide phosphoproteomics, the identified novel regulator BTK was studied in human and murine cells by using pharmacologic and genetic BTK ablation. Here we show that BTK is a critical regulator of NLRP3 inflammasome activation: pharmacologic (using the US Food and Drug Administration-approved inhibitor ibrutinib) and genetic (in patients with XLA and Btk knockout mice) BTK ablation in primary immune cells led to reduced IL-1β processing and secretion in response to nigericin and the Staphylococcus aureus toxin leukocidin AB (LukAB). BTK affected apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD (ASC) speck formation and caspase-1 cleavage and interacted with NLRP3 and ASC. S aureus infection control in vivo and IL-1β release from cells of patients with Muckle-Wells syndrome were impaired by ibrutinib. Notably, IL-1β processing and release from immune cells isolated from patients with cancer receiving ibrutinib therapy were reduced. Our data suggest that XLA might result in part from genetic inflammasome deficiency and that NLRP3 inflammasome-linked inflammation could potentially be targeted pharmacologically through BTK. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy

  12. Phosphotyrosine recognition domains: the typical, the atypical and the versatile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaneko Tomonori

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract SH2 domains are long known prominent players in the field of phosphotyrosine recognition within signaling protein networks. However, over the years they have been joined by an increasing number of other protein domain families that can, at least with some of their members, also recognise pTyr residues in a sequence-specific context. This superfamily of pTyr recognition modules, which includes substantial fractions of the PTB domains, as well as much smaller, or even single member fractions like the HYB domain, the PKCδ and PKCθ C2 domains and RKIP, represents a fascinating, medically relevant and hence intensely studied part of the cellular signaling architecture of metazoans. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation clearly serves a plethora of functions and pTyr recognition domains are used in a similarly wide range of interaction modes, which encompass, for example, partner protein switching, tandem recognition functionalities and the interaction with catalytically active protein domains. If looked upon closely enough, virtually no pTyr recognition and regulation event is an exact mirror image of another one in the same cell. Thus, the more we learn about the biology and ultrastructural details of pTyr recognition domains, the more does it become apparent that nature cleverly combines and varies a few basic principles to generate a sheer endless number of sophisticated and highly effective recognition/regulation events that are, under normal conditions, elegantly orchestrated in time and space. This knowledge is also valuable when exploring pTyr reader domains as diagnostic tools, drug targets or therapeutic reagents to combat human diseases.

  13. Elongator subunit 3 positively regulates plant immunity through its histone acetyltransferase and radical S-adenosylmethionine domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Pathogen infection triggers a large-scale transcriptional reprogramming in plants, and the speed of this reprogramming affects the outcome of the infection. Our understanding of this process has significantly benefited from mutants that display either delayed or accelerated defense gene induction. In our previous work we demonstrated that the Arabidopsis Elongator complex subunit 2 (AtELP2) plays an important role in both basal immunity and effector-triggered immunity (ETI), and more recently showed that AtELP2 is involved in dynamic changes in histone acetylation and DNA methylation at several defense genes. However, the function of other Elongator subunits in plant immunity has not been characterized. Results In the same genetic screen used to identify Atelp2, we found another Elongator mutant, Atelp3-10, which mimics Atelp2 in that it exhibits a delay in defense gene induction following salicylic acid treatment or pathogen infection. Similarly to AtELP2, AtELP3 is required for basal immunity and ETI, but not for systemic acquired resistance (SAR). Furthermore, we demonstrate that both the histone acetyltransferase and radical S-adenosylmethionine domains of AtELP3 are essential for its function in plant immunity. Conclusion Our results indicate that the entire Elongator complex is involved in basal immunity and ETI, but not in SAR, and support that Elongator may play a role in facilitating the transcriptional induction of defense genes through alterations to their chromatin. PMID:23856002

  14. αE-catenin actin-binding domain alters actin filament conformation and regulates binding of nucleation and disassembly factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Scott D; Kwiatkowski, Adam V; Ouyang, Chung-Yueh; Liu, Hongjun; Pokutta, Sabine; Watkins, Simon C; Volkmann, Niels; Hanein, Dorit; Weis, William I; Mullins, R Dyche; Nelson, W James

    2013-12-01

    The actin-binding protein αE-catenin may contribute to transitions between cell migration and cell-cell adhesion that depend on remodeling the actin cytoskeleton, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. We show that the αE-catenin actin-binding domain (ABD) binds cooperatively to individual actin filaments and that binding is accompanied by a conformational change in the actin protomer that affects filament structure. αE-catenin ABD binding limits barbed-end growth, especially in actin filament bundles. αE-catenin ABD inhibits actin filament branching by the Arp2/3 complex and severing by cofilin, both of which contact regions of the actin protomer that are structurally altered by αE-catenin ABD binding. In epithelial cells, there is little correlation between the distribution of αE-catenin and the Arp2/3 complex at developing cell-cell contacts. Our results indicate that αE-catenin binding to filamentous actin favors assembly of unbranched filament bundles that are protected from severing over more dynamic, branched filament arrays.

  15. SFMBT2 (Scm-like with four mbt domains 2) negatively regulates cell migration and invasion in prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwak, Jungsug; Shin, Jee Yoon; Lee, Kwanghyun; Hong, Soon Ki; Oh, Sangtaek; Goh, Sung-Ho; Kim, Won Sun; Ju, Bong Gun

    2016-07-26

    Metastatic prostate cancer is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in men. In this study, we found that expression level of SFMBT2 is altered during prostate cancer progression and has been associated with the migration and invasion of prostate cancer cells. The expression level of SFMBT2 is high in poorly metastatic prostate cancer cells compared to highly metastatic prostate cancer cells. We also found that SFMBT2 knockdown elevates MMP-2, MMP-3, MMP-9, and MMP-26 expression, leading to increased cell migration and invasion in LNCaP and VCaP cells. SFMBT2 interacts with YY1, RNF2, N-CoR and HDAC1/3, as well as repressive histone marks such as H3K9me2, H4K20me2, and H2AK119Ub which are associated with transcriptional repression. In addition, SFMBT2 knockdown decreased KAI1 gene expression through up-regulation of N-CoR gene expression. Expression of SFMBT2 in prostate cancer was strongly associated with clinicopathological features. Patients having higher Gleason score (≥ 8) had substantially lower SFMBT2 expression than patients with lower Gleason score. Moreover, tail vein or intraprostatic injection of SFMBT2 knockdown LNCaP cells induced metastasis. Taken together, our findings suggest that regulation of SFMBT2 may provide a new therapeutic strategy to control prostate cancer metastasis as well as being a potential biomarker of metastatic prostate cancer.

  16. Expression regulation by a methyl-CpG binding domain in an E. coli based, cell-free TX-TL system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenkelberger, M.; Shanak, S.; Finkler, M.; Worst, E. G.; Noireaux, V.; Helms, V.; Ott, A.

    2017-04-01

    Cytosine methylation plays an important role in the epigenetic regulation of eukaryotic gene expression. The methyl-CpG binding domain (MBD) is common to a family of eukaryotic transcriptional regulators. How MBD, a stretch of about 80 amino acids, recognizes CpGs in a methylation dependent manner, and as a function of sequence, is only partly understood. Here we show, using an Escherichia coli cell-free expression system, that MBD from the human transcriptional regulator MeCP2 performs as a specific, methylation-dependent repressor in conjunction with the BDNF (brain-derived neurotrophic factor) promoter sequence. Mutation of either base flanking the central CpG pair changes the expression level of the target gene. However, the relative degree of repression as a function of MBD concentration remains unaltered. Molecular dynamics simulations that address the DNA B fiber ratio and the handedness reveal cooperative transitions in the promoter DNA upon MBD binding that correlate well with our experimental observations. We suggest that not only steric hindrance, but also conformational changes of the BDNF promoter as a result of MBD binding are required for MBD to act as a specific inhibitory element. Our work demonstrates that the prokaryotic transcription machinery can reproduce features of epigenetic mammalian transcriptional regulatory elements.

  17. Catalytic distillation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  18. Catalytic distillation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  19. Function and regulation domains of a newly isolated putative β-actin promoter from pacific white shrimp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingli Shi

    Full Text Available Current development of transgenic shrimp research has been hampered due to the lack of the suitable promoters and efficient transfection methods for crustaceans. A 1642 bp sequence, containing 5'-upstream sequence, exon 1, intron 1 and partial exon 2, which is responsible for transcriptional initiation of the newly reported shrimp β-actin (actinT1, has been isolated from the Pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei and named as SbaP. To determine its function and potential application in marine biotechnology, the sequence and functional domains were examined by constitutive expression of the luciferase reporter gene. We have identified 5' regions that play a central role in the expression of the β-actin gene. The proximal promoter (-1642/-1325 contains two highly conserved transcriptional sites, CCAAT box and CArG motif. Two negative (-1140/-924, -222/-21 and one positive (-810/-425 regulatory elements have been identified in intron1. Transient transfection assay with a construct containing proximal promoter and enhancer (SbaPΔ-222/+1Δ-1325/-924 regions of the shrimp β-actin coupled with luciferase and EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein showed that the promoter was not only functional in sf21 cells, but promoter activity was more than 8-fold higher than a viral-origin promoter (ie1, white spot syndrome virus immediate early gene promoter. Furthermore, SbaPΔ-222/+1Δ-1325/-924 drove a successful expression of luciferase injection assay in vivo injection and also showed higher promoter activity than the ie1 promoter, suggesting that the expression vectors constructed with SbaPΔ-222/+1Δ-1325/-924 have important potential in gene transfer studies for shrimp and other crustacean species.

  20. Tight conformational coupling between the domains of the enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli fimbrial adhesin CfaE regulates binding state transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Esser, Lothar; Interlandi, Gianluca; Kisiela, Dagmara I; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Thomas, Wendy E; Sokurenko, Evgeni; Xia, Di; Savarino, Stephen J

    2013-04-05

    CfaE, the tip adhesin of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli colonization factor antigen I fimbriae, initiates binding of this enteropathogen to the small intestine. It comprises stacked β-sandwich adhesin (AD) and pilin (PD) domains, with the putative receptor-binding pocket at one pole and an equatorial interdomain interface. CfaE binding to erythrocytes is enhanced by application of moderate shear stress. A G168D replacement along the AD facing the CfaE interdomain region was previously shown to decrease the dependence on shear by increasing binding at lower shear forces. To elucidate the structural basis for this functional change, we studied the properties of CfaE G168D (with a self-complemented donor strand) and solved its crystal structure at 2.6 Å resolution. Compared with native CfaE, CfaE G168D showed a downward shift in peak erythrocyte binding under shear stress and greater binding under static conditions. The thermal melting transition of CfaE G168D occurred 10 °C below that of CfaE. Compared with CfaE, the atomic structure of CfaE G168D revealed a 36% reduction in the buried surface area at the interdomain interface. Despite the location of this single modification in the AD, CfaE G168D exhibited structural derangements only in the adjoining PD compared with CfaE. In molecular dynamics simulations, the G168D mutation was associated with weakened interdomain interactions under tensile force. Taken together, these findings indicate that the AD and PD of CfaE are conformationally tightly coupled and support the hypothesis that opening of the interface plays a critical modulatory role in the allosteric activation of CfaE.

  1. Jun activation domain-binding protein 1 negatively regulate p27 kip1 in non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuchan; Fei, Min; Cheng, Chun; Zhang, Dongmei; Lu, Jianxin; He, Song; Zhao, Yueming; Wang, You; Shen, Aiguo

    2008-03-01

    Recent evidences suggest that Jun activation domain-binding protein 1 (Jab1) specifically interacts with the Cdk inhibitor p27kip1 and induces nuclear export and subsequent degradation of p27kip1. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether Jab1 expression is correlated with p27kip1 level in Non-Hodgkin's Lymphomas(NHLs) and how it influenced the stability of p27kip1, as well as whether Jab1 expression is associated with clinicopathologic variables and prognosis of NHLs. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that Jab1 expression was negatively associated with p27kip1 level and significantly associated with unfavorable clinicopathologic variables. Overexpression Jab1 in lymphoma cell lines Jurkat resulted in decreased p27kip1 level and advanced progression from G(1) to S phase of the cell cycle. Subcellular fractionation confirmed Jab1 could lead to nuclear export of p27kip1. Phosphorylation of p27kip1 at Ser10 and Thr157 was significantly increased after Jab1 transient transfected, while Thr187 phosphorylation was decreased. Immunoprecipitation demonstrated that Jab1 overexpression facilitated p27kip1 to dissociate from Cdk2 and associated with Cdk4. Finally, Survival analysis revealed that Jab1 overexpression is significantly associated with overall survival (P = 0.000). When Jab1 and p27kip1 are combined, patients with Jab1(+)/p27kip1(-) revealed poorer overall survival (p = 0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that Jab1 protein is an independent prognostic indicator for overall survival. Immunohistochemical and/or Western blot analysis was done in 116 cases of NHLs and Jurkat cells. These findings suggest that Jab1 protein may contribute to the tumor progression through Jab1-mediated p27kip1 degradation and that control of Jab1 expression is a novel therapeutic target with NHLs.

  2. Single-stranded DNA binding by F TraI relaxase and helicase domains is coordinately regulated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dostál, Lubomír; Schildbach, Joel F

    2010-07-01

    Transfer of conjugative plasmids requires relaxases, proteins that cleave one plasmid strand sequence specifically. The F plasmid relaxase TraI (1,756 amino acids) is also a highly processive DNA helicase. The TraI relaxase activity is located within the N-terminal approximately 300 amino acids, while helicase motifs are located in the region comprising positions 990 to 1450. For efficient F transfer, the two activities must be physically linked. The two TraI activities are likely used in different stages of transfer; how the protein regulates the transition between activities is unknown. We examined TraI helicase single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) recognition to complement previous explorations of relaxase ssDNA binding. Here, we show that TraI helicase-associated ssDNA binding is independent of and located N-terminal to all helicase motifs. The helicase-associated site binds ssDNA oligonucleotides with nM-range equilibrium dissociation constants and some sequence specificity. Significantly, we observe an apparent strong negative cooperativity in ssDNA binding between relaxase and helicase-associated sites. We examined three TraI variants having 31-amino-acid insertions in or near the helicase-associated ssDNA binding site. B. A. Traxler and colleagues (J. Bacteriol. 188:6346-6353) showed that under certain conditions, these variants are released from a form of negative regulation, allowing them to facilitate transfer more efficiently than wild-type TraI. We find that these variants display both moderately reduced affinity for ssDNA by their helicase-associated binding sites and a significant reduction in the apparent negative cooperativity of binding, relative to wild-type TraI. These results suggest that the apparent negative cooperativity of binding to the two ssDNA binding sites of TraI serves a major regulatory function in F transfer.

  3. Dominant gain-of-function mutations in transmembrane domain III of ERS1 and ETR1 suggest a novel role for this domain in regulating the magnitude of ethylene response in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslauriers, Stephen D; Alvarez, Ashley A; Lacey, Randy F; Binder, Brad M; Larsen, Paul B

    2015-10-01

    Prior work resulted in identification of an Arabidopsis mutant, eer5-1, with extreme ethylene response in conjunction with failure to induce a subset of ethylene-responsive genes, including AtEBP. EER5, which is a TREX-2 homolog that is part of a nucleoporin complex, functions as part of a cryptic aspect of the ethylene signaling pathway that is required for regulating the magnitude of ethylene response. A suppressor mutagenesis screen was carried out to identify second site mutations that could restore the growth of ethylene-treated eer5-1 to wild-type levels. A dominant gain-of-function mutation in the ethylene receptor ETHYLENE RESPONSE SENSOR 1 (ERS1) was identified, with the ers1-4 mutation being located in transmembrane domain III at a point nearly equivalent to the previously described etr1-2 mutation in the other Arabidopsis subfamily I ethylene receptor, ETHYLENE RESPONSE 1 (ETR1). Although both ers1-4 and etr1-2 partially suppress the ethylene hypersensitivity of eer5-1 and are at least in part REVERSION TO ETHYLENE SENSITIVITY 1 (RTE1)-dependent, ers1-4 was additionally found to restore the expression of AtEBP in ers1-4;eer5-1 etiolated seedlings after ethylene treatment in an EIN3-dependent manner. Our work indicates that ERS1-regulated expression of a subset of ethylene-responsive genes is related to controlling the magnitude of ethylene response, with hyperinduction of these genes correlated with reduced ethylene-dependent growth inhibition. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Generation of an Rx-tTA: TetOp-Cre knock-in mouse line for doxycycline regulated Cre activity in the Rx expression domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy F Plageman

    Full Text Available Genetic deletion of mouse genes has played a crucial role in our understanding of embryonic eye development. Transgenic, tissue specific Cre recombinase expression in various eye structures has facilitated these experiments. However, an early expressing, temporally-regulated, optic vesicle-specific Cre line has not been available. In this report, we detail the generation and analysis of a knock-in, inducible Cre line designed to drive recombination specifically within the Rx expression domain. Crossing this line with a reporter line demonstrates that recombination can be mediated within the early optic vesicle and throughout retinal development. Recombination can also be mediated in the Rx-expressing, ventral diencephalon and future posterior pituitary gland. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that dietary doxycycline could effectively modulate Cre activity. This line has the potential to facilitate conditional knock-out experimentation to study early retina and/or posterior pituitary development.

  5. Nucleotide-Binding Oligomerization Domain 2 Contributes to Limiting Growth of Mycobacterium abscessus in the Lung of Mice by Regulating Cytokines and Nitric Oxide Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Young Lee

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium abscessus is a prominent cause of pulmonary infection in immunosuppressed patients and those with cystic fibrosis. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain (NOD 2 is a cytosolic receptor which senses a bacterial peptidoglycan component, muramyl dipeptide (MDP. Although nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2 contributes to protect host against various microbial infections, it is still unclear whether NOD2 is essential to regulate host immune responses against M. abscessus infection. In this study, we sought to clarify the role of NOD2 and the underlying mechanism in host defense against M. abscessus infection. Mice were infected intranasally with M. abscessus and sacrificed at indicated time points. Bacterial survival, cytokines production, and pathology in the lungs were determined. Bone marrow-derived macrophages were used to clarify cellular mechanism of NOD2-mediated immune response. Bacterial clearance was impaired, and pathology was more severe in the lungs of NOD2-deficient mice compared with the wild-type mice. In macrophages, NOD2-mediated activation of p38 and JNK were required for production of proinflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide (NO and expression of iNOS in response to M. abscessus. NO was critical for limiting intracellular growth of the pathogen. Intranasal administration of MDP reduced in vivo bacterial replication and thus improved lung pathology in M. abscessus-infected mice. This study offers important new insights into the potential roles of the NOD2 in initiating and potentiating innate immune response against M. abscessus pulmonary infection.

  6. A protein kinase binds the C-terminal domain of the readthrough protein of Turnip yellows virus and regulates virus accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Medina, Caren; Boissinot, Sylvaine [UMR 1131 SVQV INRA-UDS, 28 rue de Herrlisheim, 68021 Colmar (France); Chapuis, Sophie [Institut de Biologie Moléculaire des Plantes, Laboratoire propre du CNRS conventionné avec l’Université de Strasbourg, 12 rue du Général Zimmer, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Gereige, Dalya; Rastegar, Maryam; Erdinger, Monique [UMR 1131 SVQV INRA-UDS, 28 rue de Herrlisheim, 68021 Colmar (France); Revers, Frédéric [INRA, Université de Bordeaux, UMR 1332 de Biologie du Fruit et Pathologie, 33882 Villenave d’Ornon (France); Ziegler-Graff, Véronique [Institut de Biologie Moléculaire des Plantes, Laboratoire propre du CNRS conventionné avec l’Université de Strasbourg, 12 rue du Général Zimmer, 67084 Strasbourg (France); Brault, Véronique, E-mail: veronique.brault@colmar.inra.fr [UMR 1131 SVQV INRA-UDS, 28 rue de Herrlisheim, 68021 Colmar (France)

    2015-12-15

    Turnip yellows virus (TuYV), a phloem-limited virus, encodes a 74 kDa protein known as the readthrough protein (RT) involved in virus movement. We show here that a TuYV mutant deleted of the C-terminal part of the RT protein (TuYV-∆RT{sub Cter}) was affected in long-distance trafficking in a host-specific manner. By using the C-terminal domain of the RT protein as a bait in a yeast two-hybrid screen of a phloem cDNA library from Arabidopsis thaliana we identified the calcineurin B-like protein-interacting protein kinase-7 (AtCIPK7). Transient expression of a GFP:CIPK7 fusion protein in virus-inoculated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves led to local increase of wild-type TuYV accumulation, but not that of TuYV-∆RT{sub Cter}. Surprisingly, elevated virus titer in inoculated leaves did not result in higher TuYV accumulation in systemic leaves, which indicates that virus long-distance movement was not affected. Since GFP:CIPK7 was localized in or near plasmodesmata, CIPK7 could negatively regulate TuYV export from infected cells. - Highlights: • The C-terminal domain of TuYV-RT is required for long-distance movement. • CIPK7 from Arabidopsis interacts with RT{sub Cter} in yeast and in plants. • CIPK7 overexpression increases virus titer locally but not virus systemic movement. • CIPK7 localizes to plasmodesmata. • CIPK7 could be a defense protein regulating virus export.

  7. MAS promoter regulation: a role for Sry and tyrosine nitration of the KRAB domain of ZNF274 as a feedback mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokop, Jeremy W; Rauscher, Frank J; Peng, Hongzhuang; Liu, Yuanjie; Araujo, Fabiano C; Watanabe, Ingrid; Reis, Fernando M; Milsted, Amy

    2014-05-01

    The ACE2 (angiotensin-converting enzyme 2)/Ang-(1-7) [angiotensin-(1-7)]/MAS axis of the RAS (renin-angiotensin system) has emerged as a pathway of interest in treating both cardiovascular disorders and cancer. The MAS protein is known to bind to and be activated by Ang-(1-7); however, the mechanisms of this activation are just starting to be understood. Although there are strong biochemical data regarding the regulation and activation of the AT1R (angiotensin II type 1 receptor) and the AT2R (angiotensin II type 2 receptor), with models of how AngII (angiotensin II) binds each receptor, fewer studies have characterized MAS. In the present study, we characterize the MAS promoter and provide a potential feedback mechanism that could compensate for MAS degradation following activation by Ang-(1-7). Analysis of ENCODE data for the MAS promoter revealed potential epigenetic control by KRAB (Krüppel-associated box)/KAP-1 (KRAB-associated protein-1). A proximal promoter construct for the MAS gene was repressed by the SOX [SRY (sex-determining region on the Y chromosome) box] proteins SRY, SOX2, SOX3 and SOX14, of which SRY is known to interact with the KRAB domain. The KRAB-KAP-1 complex can be tyrosine-nitrated, causing the dissociation of the KAP-1 protein and thus a potential loss of epigenetic control. Activation of MAS can lead to an increase in nitric oxide, suggesting a feedback mechanism for MAS on its own promoter. The results of the present study provide a more complete view of MAS regulation and, for the first time, suggest biochemical outcomes for nitration of the KRAB domain.

  8. Yes-associated protein/TEA domain family member and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-alpha (HNF4α) repress reciprocally to regulate hepatocarcinogenesis in rats and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Wang-Yu; Lin, Ling-Yun; Hao, Han; Zhang, Sai-Man; Ma, Fei; Hong, Xin-Xin; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Qing-Feng; Ye, Guo-Dong; Sun, Guang-Bin; Liu, Yun-Jia; Li, Sheng-Nan; Xie, Yuan-Yuan; Cai, Jian-Chun; Li, Bo-An

    2017-04-01

    Great progress has been achieved in the study of Hippo signaling in regulating tumorigenesis; however, the downstream molecular events that mediate this process have not been completely defined. Moreover, regulation of Hippo signaling during tumorigenesis in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains largely unknown. In the present study, we systematically investigated the relationship between Yes-associated protein/TEA domain family member (YAP-TEAD) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4-alpha (HNF4α) in the hepatocarcinogenesis of HCC cells. Our results indicated that HNF4α expression was negatively regulated by YAP1 in HCC cells by a ubiquitin proteasome pathway. By contrast, HNF4α was found to directly associate with TEAD4 to compete with YAP1 for binding to TEAD4, thus inhibiting the transcriptional activity of YAP-TEAD and expression of their target genes. Moreover, overexpression of HNF4α was found to significantly compromise YAP-TEAD-induced HCC cell proliferation and stem cell expansion. Finally, we documented the regulatory mechanism between YAP-TEAD and HNF4α in rat and mouse tumor models, which confirmed our in vitro results. There is a double-negative feedback mechanism that controls TEAD-YAP and HNF4α expression in vitro and in vivo, thereby regulating cellular proliferation and differentiation. Given that YAP acts as a dominant oncogene in HCC and plays a crucial role in stem cell homeostasis and tissue regeneration, manipulating the interaction between YAP, TEADs, and HNF4α may provide a new approach for HCC treatment and regenerative medicine. (Hepatology 2017;65:1206-1221). © 2016 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  9. A jasmonate ZIM-domain protein NaJAZd regulates floral jasmonic acid levels and counteracts flower abscission in Nicotiana attenuata plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Youngjoo; Baldwin, Ian T; Galis, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Jasmonic acid is an important regulator of plant growth, development and defense. The jasmonate-ZIM domain (JAZ) proteins are key regulators in jasmonate signaling ubiquitously present in flowering plants but their functional annotation remains largely incomplete. Recently, we identified 12 putative JAZ proteins in native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata, and initiated systematic functional characterization of these proteins by reverse genetic approaches. In this report, Nicotiana attenuata plants silenced in the expression of NaJAZd (irJAZd) by RNA interference were used to characterize NaJAZd function. Although NaJAZd transcripts were strongly and transiently up-regulated in the rosette leaves by simulated herbivory treatment, we did not observe strong defense-related phenotypes, such as altered herbivore performance or the constitutive accumulation of defense-related secondary metabolites in irJAZd plants compared to wild type plants, both in the glasshouse and the native habitat of Nicotiana attenuata in the Great Basin Desert, Utah, USA. Interestingly, irJAZd plants produced fewer seed capsules than did wild type plants as a result of increased flower abscission in later stages of flower development. The early- and mid-developmental stages of irJAZd flowers had reduced levels of jasmonic acid and jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine, while fully open flowers had normal levels, but these were impaired in NaMYB305 transcript accumulations. Previously, NaMYB305-silenced plants were shown to have strong flower abscission phenotypes and contained lower NECTARIN 1 transcript levels, phenotypes which are copied in irJAZd plants. We propose that the NaJAZd protein is required to counteract flower abscission, possibly by regulating jasmonic acid and jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine levels and/or expression of NaMYB305 gene in Nicotiana attenuata flowers. This novel insight into the function of JAZ proteins in flower and seed development highlights the diversity of functions played by jasmonates

  10. A graphene-based smart catalytic system with superior catalytic performances and temperature responsive catalytic behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Junjie; Lv, Weipeng; Zhang, Guanghui; Li, Yang; Zhang, Guoliang; Zhang, Fengbao; Fan, Xiaobin

    2013-07-21

    We have successfully developed a unique graphene-based smart catalytic system which consists of the graphene supported Au-Pt bimetallic nanocatalyst with a well-defined core-shell structure and a dextran-based temperature-responsive polymer. The unique catalytic system possesses excellent catalytic performances and the catalytic activities could be readily switched on or off at different temperature windows.

  11. Co-regulation of NF-kappaB and inflammasome-mediated inflammatory responses by myxoma virus pyrin domain-containing protein M013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masmudur M Rahman

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available NF-kappaB and inflammasomes both play central roles in orchestrating anti-pathogen responses by rapidly inducing a variety of early-response cytokines and chemokines following infection. Myxoma virus (MYXV, a pathogenic poxvirus of rabbits, encodes a member of the cellular pyrin domain (PYD superfamily, called M013. The viral M013 protein was previously shown to bind host ASC-1 protein and inhibit the cellular inflammasome complex that regulates the activation and secretion of caspase 1-regulated cytokines such as IL-1beta and IL-18. Here, we report that human THP-1 monocytic cells infected with a MYXV construct deleted for the M013L gene (vMyxM013-KO, in stark contrast to the parental MYXV, rapidly induce high levels of secreted pro-inflammatory cytokines like TNF, IL-6, and MCP-1, all of which are regulated by NF-kappaB. The induction of these NF-kappaB regulated cytokines following infection with vMyxM013-KO was also confirmed in vivo using THP-1 derived xenografts in NOD-SCID mice. vMyxM013-KO virus infection specifically induced the rapid phosphorylation of IKK and degradation of IkappaBalpha, which was followed by nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB/p65. Even in the absence of virus infection, transiently expressed M013 protein alone inhibited cellular NF-kappaB-mediated reporter gene expression and nuclear translocation of NF-kappaB/p65. Using protein/protein interaction analysis, we show that M013 protein also binds directly with cellular NF-kappaB1, suggesting a direct physical and functional linkage between NF-kappaB1 and ASC-1. We further demonstrate that inhibition of the inflammasome with a caspase-1 inhibitor did not prevent the induction of NF-kappaB regulated cytokines following infection with vMyxM013-KO virus, but did block the activation of IL-1beta. Thus, the poxviral M013 inhibitor exerts a dual immuno-subversive role in the simultaneous co-regulation of both the cellular inflammasome complex and NF-kappaB-mediated pro

  12. Allosteric Communication in the Dynein Motor Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhabha, Gira; Cheng, Hui-Chun; Zhang, Nan; Moeller, Arne; Liao, Maofu; Speir, Jeffrey A.; Cheng, Yifan; Vale, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Dyneins power microtubule motility using ring-shaped, AAA-containing motor domains. Here, we report X-ray and electron microscopy (EM) structures of yeast dynein bound to different ATP analogs, which collectively provide insight into the roles of dynein’s two major ATPase sites, AAA1 and AAA3, in the conformational change mechanism. ATP binding to AAA1 triggers a cascade of conformational changes that propagate to all six AAA domains and cause a large movement of the “linker,” dynein’s mechanical element. In contrast to the role of AAA1 in driving motility, nucleotide transitions in AAA3 gate the transmission of conformational changes between AAA1 and the linker, suggesting that AAA3 acts as a regulatory switch. Further structural and mutational studies also uncover a role for the linker in regulating the catalytic cycle of AAA1. Together, these results reveal how dynein’s two major ATP-binding sites initiate and modulate conformational changes in the motor domain during motility. PMID:25417161

  13. Structure of the Francisella response regulator QseB receiver domain, and characterization of QseB inhibition by antibiofilm 2-aminoimidazole-based compounds: Inhibition of response regulator QseB by antibiofilm compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton, Morgan E.; Allen, C. Leigh; Feldmann, Erik A.; Bobay, Benjamin G.; Jung, David K.; Stephens, Matthew D.; Melander, Roberta J.; Theisen, Kelly E.; Zeng, Daina; Thompson, Richele J.; Melander, Christian; Cavanagh, John (NCSU)

    2017-08-16

    With antibiotic resistance increasing at alarming rates, targets for new antimicrobial therapies must be identified. A particularly promising target is the bacterial two-component system. Two-component systems allow bacteria to detect, evaluate and protect themselves against changes in the environment, such as exposure to antibiotics and also to trigger production of virulence factors. Drugs that target the response regulator portion of two-component systems represent a potent new approach so far unexploited. Here, we focus efforts on the highly virulent bacterium Francisella tularensis tularensis. Francisella contains only three response regulators, making it an ideal system to study. In this study, we initially present the structure of the N-terminal domain of QseB, the response regulator responsible for biofilm formation. Subsequently, using binding assays, computational docking and cellular studies, we show that QseB interacts with2-aminoimidazole based compounds that impede its function. This information will assist in tailoring compounds to act as adjuvants that will enhance the effect of antibiotics.

  14. α/β-Hydrolase domain-6 and saturated long chain monoacylglycerol regulate insulin secretion promoted by both fuel and non-fuel stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Shangang; Poursharifi, Pegah; Mugabo, Yves; Levens, Emily J; Vivot, Kevin; Attane, Camille; Iglesias, Jose; Peyot, Marie-Line; Joly, Erik; Madiraju, S R Murthy; Prentki, Marc

    2015-12-01

    α/β-Hydrolase domain-6 (ABHD6) is a newly identified monoacylglycerol (MAG) lipase. We recently reported that it negatively regulates glucose stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) in the β cells by hydrolyzing lipolysis-derived MAG that acts as a metabolic coupling factor and signaling molecule via exocytotic regulator Munc13-1. Whether ABHD6 and MAG play a role in response to all classes of insulin secretagogues, in particular various fuel and non-fuel stimuli, is unknown. Insulin secretion in response to various classes of secretagogues, exogenous MAG and pharmacological agents was measured in islets of mice deficient in ABHD6 specifically in the β cell (BKO). Islet perifusion experiments and determinations of glucose and fatty acid metabolism, cytosolic Ca(2+) and MAG species levels were carried out. Deletion of ABHD6 potentiated insulin secretion in response to the fuels glutamine plus leucine and α-ketoisocaproate and to the non-fuel stimuli glucagon-like peptide 1, carbamylcholine and elevated KCl. Fatty acids amplified GSIS in control and BKO mice to the same extent. Exogenous 1-MAG amplified insulin secretion in response to fuel and non-fuel stimuli. MAG hydrolysis activity was greatly reduced in BKO islets without changes in total diacylglycerol and triacylglycerol lipase activity. ABHD6 deletion induced insulin secretion independently from KATP channels and did not alter the glucose induced rise in intracellular Ca(2+). Perifusion studies showed elevated insulin secretion during second phase of GSIS in BKO islets that was not due to altered cytosolic Ca(2+) signaling or because of changes in glucose and fatty acid metabolism. Glucose increased islet saturated long chain 1-MAG species and ABHD6 deletion caused accumulation of these 1-MAG species at both low and elevated glucose. ABHD6 regulates insulin secretion in response to fuel stimuli at large and some non-fuel stimuli by controlling long chain saturated 1-MAG levels that synergize with other

  15. [Forkhead domain inhibitor-6 (FDI-6) increases apoptosis and inhibits invasion and migration of laryngeal carcinoma cells by down-regulating nuclear FoxM1].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanan; Zhu, Lin; Wen, Taoyu; Wan, Jie; Lei, Yue; Chen, Hongyan

    2017-05-01

    Objective To study the effects of new small molecular inhibitor, forkhead domain inhibitor-6 (FDI-6), on proliferation, apoptosis, invasion and migration in human laryngeal carcinoma Hep-2 cell line and the related mechanism. Methods MTT assay was used to test the proliferation rate of Hep-2 cells before and 12, 24 hours after treated with (5, 10, 20, 40, 80) μmol/L of FDI-6. Flow cytometry (FCM) and Transwell(TM) chamber assay were respectively carried out to detect the apoptosis rate, cell invasion and migration in Hep-2 cells after treated by 10, 20 μmol/L FDI-6 for 24 hours. Real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) and Western blotting were performed to determine the mRNA and protein levels of FoxM1, Bcl-2 and BAX, respectively. Results Cell proliferation rate was inhibited by FDI-6 in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Twenty-four hours after 10, 20 μmol/L FDI-6 treatment, the apoptosis rate in Hep-2 cells was elevated and the ability of cell invasion and migration was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. The qRT-PCR showed that there was no significant change in FoxM1 mRNA expression with or without FDI-6 treatment. Western blotting showed that the total protein level of FoxM1 was not obviously changed, but Bcl-2 was down-regulated, BAX was up-regulated. However, in the nuclear FoxM1 protein level decreased along with the ascent of FDI-6 concentration. Conclusion FDI-6 could induce cell apoptosis and inhibit cell proliferation, invasion and migration in Hep-2 cells. This may be related to the down-regulation of FoxM1 in the nucleus.

  16. Domain analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjørland, Birger

    2017-01-01

    The domain-analytic approach to knowledge organization (KO) (and to the broader field of library and information science, LIS) is outlined. The article reviews the discussions and proposals on the definition of domains, and provides an example of a domain-analytic study in the field of art studie....... Varieties of domain analysis as well as criticism and controversies are presented and discussed....

  17. Nanocarbons for Catalytic Desulfurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qingqing; Lin, Yangming; Heumann, Saskia; Su, Dangsheng

    2017-08-24

    Nanocarbon catalysts are green and sustainable alternatives to metal-based catalysts for numerous catalytic transformations. The application of nanocarbons for environmental catalysis is an emerging research discipline and has undergone rapid development in recent years. In this focus review, we provide a critical analysis of state-of-the-art nanocarbon catalysts for three different catalytic desulfurization processes. In particular, we focus on the advantages and limitations as well as the reaction mechanisms of the nanocarbon catalysts at the molecular level. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Mutational analysis of the multiple-antibiotic resistance regulator MarR reveals a ligand binding pocket at the interface between the dimerization and DNA binding domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Valérie; McMurry, Laura M; Foster, Kimberly; Head, James F; Levy, Stuart B

    2013-08-01

    The Escherichia coli regulator MarR represses the multiple-antibiotic resistance operon marRAB and responds to phenolic compounds, including sodium salicylate, which inhibit its activity. Crystals obtained in the presence of a high concentration of salicylate indicated two possible salicylate sites, SAL-A and SAL-B. However, it was unclear whether these sites were physiologically significant or were simply a result of the crystallization conditions. A study carried out on MarR homologue MTH313 suggested the presence of a salicylate binding site buried at the interface between the dimerization and the DNA-binding domains. Interestingly, the authors of the study indicated a similar pocket conserved in the MarR structure. Since no mutagenesis analysis had been performed to test which amino acids were essential in salicylate binding, we examined the role of residues that could potentially interact with salicylate. We demonstrated that mutations in residues shown as interacting with salicylate at SAL-A and SAL-B in the MarR-salicylate structure had no effect on salicylate binding, indicating that these sites were not the physiological regulatory sites. However, some of these residues (P57, R86, M74, and R77) were important for DNA binding. Furthermore, mutations in residues R16, D26, and K44 significantly reduced binding to both salicylate and 2,4-dinitrophenol, while a mutation in residue H19 impaired the binding to 2,4-dinitrophenol only. These findings indicate, as for MTH313, the presence of a ligand binding pocket located between the dimerization and DNA binding domains.

  19. Crystal structures reveal a thiol protease-like catalytic triad in the C-terminal region of Pasteurella multocida toxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitadokoro, Kengo; Kamitani, Shigeki; Miyazawa, Masayuki; Hanajima-Ozawa, Miyuki; Fukui, Aya; Miyake, Masami; Horiguchi, Yasuhiko

    2007-03-20

    Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT), one of the virulence factors produced by the bacteria, exerts its toxicity by up-regulating various signaling cascades downstream of the heterotrimeric GTPases Gq and G12/13 in an unknown fashion. Here, we present the crystal structure of the C-terminal region (residues 575-1,285) of PMT, which carries an intracellularly active moiety. The overall structure of C-terminal region of PMT displays a Trojan horse-like shape, composed of three domains with a "feet"-,"body"-, and "head"-type arrangement, which were designated C1, C2, and C3 from the N to the C terminus, respectively. The C1 domain, showing marked similarity in steric structure to the N-terminal domain of Clostridium difficile toxin B, was found to lead the toxin molecule to the plasma membrane. The C3 domain possesses the Cys-His-Asp catalytic triad that is organized only when the Cys is released from a disulfide bond. The steric alignment of the triad corresponded well to that of papain or other enzymes carrying Cys-His-Asp. PMT toxicities on target cells were completely abrogated when one of the amino acids constituting the triad was mutated. Our results indicate that PMT is an enzyme toxin carrying the cysteine protease-like catalytic triad dependent on the redox state and functions on the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane of target cells.

  20. The antiviral action of interferon is potentiated by removal of the conserved IRTAM domain of the IFNAR1 chain of the interferon alpha/beta receptor: effects on JAK-STAT activation and receptor down-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, L; Yang, C H; Murti, A; Garcia, J V; Croze, E; Constantinescu, S N; Mullersman, J E; Pfeffer, L M

    1998-03-01

    The first cloned chain (IFNAR1) of the human interferon-alpha (IFN alpha) receptor acts as a species-specific transducer for type 1 IFN action when transfected into heterologous mouse cells. Stably transfected mouse L929 cell lines expressing truncation mutants of the intracellular domain of the human IFNAR1 chain were tested for biological responses to human IFN alpha. Deletion of the intracellular domain resulted in a complete loss of sensitivity to the biological activity of human IFN but markedly increased IFNAR1 cell surface expression, demonstrating that the intracellular domain is required for biological function and contains a domain that negatively regulates its cell surface expression. Removal of the conserved membrane distal 16-amino-acid IRTAM (Interferon Receptor Tyrosine Activation Motif) sequence: (1) increased sensitivity to IFN alpha's antiviral activity, (2) increased the rapid IFN alpha-dependent formation of STAT-containing DNA-binding complexes, (3) prolonged tyrosine phosphorylation kinetics of the JAK-STAT pathway, and (4) blocked the IFN-dependent down-regulation of the IFNAR1 chain. These results indicate that the IRTAM negatively regulates signalling events required for the induction of IFN's biological actions via regulating receptor down-regulation.

  1. Guanine nucleotide binding to the Bateman domain mediates the allosteric inhibition of eukaryotic IMP dehydrogenases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buey, Rubén M.; Ledesma-Amaro, Rodrigo; Velázquez-Campoy, Adrián; Balsera, Mónica; Chagoyen, Mónica; de Pereda, José M.; Revuelta, José L.

    2015-11-01

    Inosine-5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH) plays key roles in purine nucleotide metabolism and cell proliferation. Although IMPDH is a widely studied therapeutic target, there is limited information about its physiological regulation. Using Ashbya gossypii as a model, we describe the molecular mechanism and the structural basis for the allosteric regulation of IMPDH by guanine nucleotides. We report that GTP and GDP bind to the regulatory Bateman domain, inducing octamers with compromised catalytic activity. Our data suggest that eukaryotic and prokaryotic IMPDHs might have developed different regulatory mechanisms, with GTP/GDP inhibiting only eukaryotic IMPDHs. Interestingly, mutations associated with human retinopathies map into the guanine nucleotide-binding sites including a previously undescribed non-canonical site and disrupt allosteric inhibition. Together, our results shed light on the mechanisms of the allosteric regulation of enzymes mediated by Bateman domains and provide a molecular basis for certain retinopathies, opening the door to new therapeutic approaches.

  2. Structural Studies of the SET Domain from RIZ1 Tumor Suppressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briknarova, Klara; Zhou, Xinliang; Satterthwait, Arnold C.; Hoyt, David W.; Ely, Kathryn R.; Huang, Shi

    2008-02-15

    Histone lysine methyltransferases (HKMTs) are involved in regulation of chromatin structure, and, as such, are important for longterm gene activation and repression that is associated with cell memory and establishment of cell-type specific transcriptional programs. Most HKMTs contain a SET domain, which is responsible for their catalytic activity. RIZ1 is a transcription regulator and tumor suppressor that catalyzes methylation of lysine 9 of histone H3 and contains a rather distinct SET domain. Similar SET domains, sometimes refererred to as PR (PRDI-BF1 and RIZ1 homology) domains, are also found in other proteins including Blimp-1/PRDI-BF1, MDS1-EVI1 and Meisetz. We determined the solution structure of the PR domain from RIZ1 and characterized its interaction with S-adenosyl homocysteine (SAH) and a peptide from histone H3. Despite low sequence identity with canonical SET domains, the PR domain displays a typical SET fold including a pseudo-knot at the C-terminus. The N-flanking sequence of RIZ1 PR domain adopts a novel conformation and interacts closely with the SET fold. The C-flanking sequence contains an α-helix that exhibits higher mobility than the SET fold and points away from the protein face that harbors active site in other SET domains. Residues that interact with the methylation cofactor in SET domains are not conserved in RIZ1 or other PR domains, and the SET fold of RIZ1 does not bind SAH. However, the PR domain of RIZ1 interacts specifically with a synthetic peptide comprising residues 1-20 of histone H3.

  3. Mechanism of TRIM25 Catalytic Activation in the Antiviral RIG-I Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacint G. Sanchez

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Antiviral response pathways induce interferon by higher-order assembly of signaling complexes called signalosomes. Assembly of the RIG-I signalosome is regulated by K63-linked polyubiquitin chains, which are synthesized by the E3 ubiquitin ligase, TRIM25. We have previously shown that the TRIM25 coiled-coil domain is a stable, antiparallel dimer that positions two catalytic RING domains on opposite ends of an elongated rod. We now show that the RING domain is a separate self-association motif that engages ubiquitin-conjugated E2 enzymes as a dimer. RING dimerization is required for catalysis, TRIM25-mediated RIG-I ubiquitination, interferon induction, and antiviral activity. We also provide evidence that RING dimerization and E3 ligase activity are promoted by binding of the TRIM25 SPRY domain to the RIG-I effector domain. These results indicate that TRIM25 actively participates in higher-order assembly of the RIG-I signalosome and helps to fine-tune the efficiency of the RIG-I-mediated antiviral response.

  4. p53 down-regulates SARS coronavirus replication and is targeted by the SARS-unique domain and PLpro via E3 ubiquitin ligase RCHY1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma-Lauer, Yue; Carbajo-Lozoya, Javier; Hein, Marco Y; Müller, Marcel A; Deng, Wen; Lei, Jian; Meyer, Benjamin; Kusov, Yuri; von Brunn, Brigitte; Bairad, Dev Raj; Hünten, Sabine; Drosten, Christian; Hermeking, Heiko; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Mann, Matthias; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; von Brunn, Albrecht

    2016-08-30

    Highly pathogenic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has developed strategies to inhibit host immune recognition. We identify cellular E3 ubiquitin ligase ring-finger and CHY zinc-finger domain-containing 1 (RCHY1) as an interacting partner of the viral SARS-unique domain (SUD) and papain-like protease (PL(pro)), and, as a consequence, the involvement of cellular p53 as antagonist of coronaviral replication. Residues 95-144 of RCHY1 and 389-652 of SUD (SUD-NM) subdomains are crucial for interaction. Association with SUD increases the stability of RCHY1 and augments RCHY1-mediated ubiquitination as well as degradation of p53. The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II delta (CAMK2D), which normally influences RCHY1 stability by phosphorylation, also binds to SUD. In vivo phosphorylation shows that SUD does not regulate phosphorylation of RCHY1 via CAMK2D. Similarly to SUD, the PL(pro)s from SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and HCoV-NL63 physically interact with and stabilize RCHY1, and thus trigger degradation of endogenous p53. The SARS-CoV papain-like protease is encoded next to SUD within nonstructural protein 3. A SUD-PL(pro) fusion interacts with RCHY1 more intensively and causes stronger p53 degradation than SARS-CoV PL(pro) alone. We show that p53 inhibits replication of infectious SARS-CoV as well as of replicons and human coronavirus NL63. Hence, human coronaviruses antagonize the viral inhibitor p53 via stabilizing RCHY1 and promoting RCHY1-mediated p53 degradation. SUD functions as an enhancer to strengthen interaction between RCHY1 and nonstructural protein 3, leading to a further increase in in p53 degradation. The significance of these findings is that down-regulation of p53 as a major player in antiviral innate immunity provides a long-sought explanation for delayed activities of respective genes.

  5. p53 down-regulates SARS coronavirus replication and is targeted by the SARS-unique domain and PLpro via E3 ubiquitin ligase RCHY1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma-Lauer, Yue; Carbajo-Lozoya, Javier; Müller, Marcel A.; Deng, Wen; Lei, Jian; Meyer, Benjamin; Kusov, Yuri; von Brunn, Brigitte; Bairad, Dev Raj; Hünten, Sabine; Drosten, Christian; Hermeking, Heiko; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Mann, Matthias; Hilgenfeld, Rolf; von Brunn, Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    Highly pathogenic severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) has developed strategies to inhibit host immune recognition. We identify cellular E3 ubiquitin ligase ring-finger and CHY zinc-finger domain-containing 1 (RCHY1) as an interacting partner of the viral SARS-unique domain (SUD) and papain-like protease (PLpro), and, as a consequence, the involvement of cellular p53 as antagonist of coronaviral replication. Residues 95–144 of RCHY1 and 389–652 of SUD (SUD-NM) subdomains are crucial for interaction. Association with SUD increases the stability of RCHY1 and augments RCHY1-mediated ubiquitination as well as degradation of p53. The calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II delta (CAMK2D), which normally influences RCHY1 stability by phosphorylation, also binds to SUD. In vivo phosphorylation shows that SUD does not regulate phosphorylation of RCHY1 via CAMK2D. Similarly to SUD, the PLpros from SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and HCoV-NL63 physically interact with and stabilize RCHY1, and thus trigger degradation of endogenous p53. The SARS-CoV papain-like protease is encoded next to SUD within nonstructural protein 3. A SUD–PLpro fusion interacts with RCHY1 more intensively and causes stronger p53 degradation than SARS-CoV PLpro alone. We show that p53 inhibits replication of infectious SARS-CoV as well as of replicons and human coronavirus NL63. Hence, human coronaviruses antagonize the viral inhibitor p53 via stabilizing RCHY1 and promoting RCHY1-mediated p53 degradation. SUD functions as an enhancer to strengthen interaction between RCHY1 and nonstructural protein 3, leading to a further increase in in p53 degradation. The significance of these findings is that down-regulation of p53 as a major player in antiviral innate immunity provides a long-sought explanation for delayed activities of respective genes. PMID:27519799

  6. Effects of FGFR2 kinase activation loop dynamics on catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Jerome M; Sparks, Samuel; Cowburn, David

    2017-02-01

    The structural mechanisms by which receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) regulate catalytic activity are diverse and often based on subtle changes in conformational dynamics. The regulatory mechanism of one such RTK, fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) kinase, is still unknown, as the numerous crystal structures of the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated forms of the kinase domains show no apparent structural change that could explain how phosphorylation could enable catalytic activity. In this study, we use several enhanced sampling molecular dynamics (MD) methods to elucidate the structural changes to the kinase's activation loop that occur upon phosphorylation. We show that phosphorylation favors inward motion of Arg664, while simultaneously favoring outward motion of Leu665 and Pro666. The latter structural change enables the substrate to bind leading to its resultant phosphorylation. Inward motion of Arg664 allows it to interact with the γ-phosphate of ATP as well as the substrate tyrosine. We show that this stabilizes the tyrosine and primes it for the catalytic phosphotransfer, and it may lower the activation barrier of the phosphotransfer reaction. Our work demonstrates the value of including dynamic information gleaned from computer simulation in deciphering RTK regulatory function.

  7. Effects of FGFR2 kinase activation loop dynamics on catalytic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome M Karp

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The structural mechanisms by which receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs regulate catalytic activity are diverse and often based on subtle changes in conformational dynamics. The regulatory mechanism of one such RTK, fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2 kinase, is still unknown, as the numerous crystal structures of the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated forms of the kinase domains show no apparent structural change that could explain how phosphorylation could enable catalytic activity. In this study, we use several enhanced sampling molecular dynamics (MD methods to elucidate the structural changes to the kinase's activation loop that occur upon phosphorylation. We show that phosphorylation favors inward motion of Arg664, while simultaneously favoring outward motion of Leu665 and Pro666. The latter structural change enables the substrate to bind leading to its resultant phosphorylation. Inward motion of Arg664 allows it to interact with the γ-phosphate of ATP as well as the substrate tyrosine. We show that this stabilizes the tyrosine and primes it for the catalytic phosphotransfer, and it may lower the activation barrier of the phosphotransfer reaction. Our work demonstrates the value of including dynamic information gleaned from computer simulation in deciphering RTK regulatory function.

  8. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on the property that in 0.12 M sulfuric acid medium titanium(IV) catalyzes the discoloring reaction of DBS-arsenazo oxidized by potassium bromate, a new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace titanium (IV) was developed. The linear range of the determination of titanium is

  9. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Research Center for Nanotechnology, Changchun University of Science and Technology,. Changchun 130022 ... Although catalytic kinetic spectrophotometry has been used in the determination of copper, the selectivity ... In this paper CPApA was used as the chromogenic agent, H2O2 as the oxidant, Cu(II) as the catalyst.

  10. A new type of plant chitinase containing LysM domains from a fern (Pteris ryukyuensis): Roles of LysM domains in chitin binding and antifungal activity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Onaga, Shoko; Taira, Toki

    2008-01-01

    .... The deduced amino acid sequence indicated that PrChi-A is composed of two N-terminal LysM domains and a C-terminal catalytic domain, belonging to the group of plant class IIIb chitinases, linked...

  11. The Glycoprotein B Cytoplasmic Domain Lysine Cluster Is Critical for Varicella-Zoster Virus Cell-Cell Fusion Regulation and Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Edward; Arvin, Ann M; Oliver, Stefan L

    2017-01-01

    The conserved glycoproteins gB and gH-gL are essential for herpesvirus entry and cell-cell fusion induced syncytium formation, a characteristic of varicella-zoster virus (VZV) pathology in skin and sensory ganglia. VZV syncytium formation, which has been implicated in the painful condition of postherpetic neuralgia, is regulated by the cytoplasmic domains of gB (gBcyt) via an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibition motif (ITIM) and gH (gHcyt). A lysine cluster (K894, K897, K898, and K900) in the VZV gBcyt was identified by sequence alignment to be conserved among alphaherpesviruses, suggesting a functional role. Alanine and arginine substitutions were used to determine if the positive charge and susceptibility to posttranslational modifications of these lysines contributed to gB/gH-gL cell-cell fusion. Critically, the positive charge of the lysine residues was necessary for fusion regulation, as alanine substitutions induced a 440% increase in fusion compared to that of the wild-type gBcyt while arginine substitutions had wild-type-like fusion levels in an in vitro gB/gH-gL cell fusion assay. Consistent with these results, the alanine substitutions in the viral genome caused exaggerated syncytium formation, reduced VZV titers (-1.5 log 10 ), and smaller plaques than with the parental Oka (pOka) strain. In contrast, arginine substitutions resulted in syncytia with only 2-fold more nuclei, a -0.5-log 10 reduction in titers, and pOka-like plaques. VZV mutants with both an ITIM mutation and either alanine or arginine substitutions had reduced titers and small plaques but differed in syncytium morphology. Thus, effective VZV propagation is dependent on cell-cell fusion regulation by the conserved gBcyt lysine cluster, in addition to the gBcyt ITIM and the gHcyt. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a ubiquitous pathogen that causes chickenpox and shingles. Individuals afflicted with shingles risk developing the painful condition of postherpetic neuralgia (PHN), which has

  12. Regulation of Monocyte Chemotactic Protein-1 secretion by the Two-Pore-Domain Potassium (K2P) channel TREK-1 in human alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwingshackl, Andreas; Teng, Bin; Ghosh, Manik; Waters, Christopher M

    2013-01-01

    We recently proposed a role for the 2-pore-domain K(+) (K2P) channel TREK-1 in the regulation of cytokine release from alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) by demonstrating decreased IL-6 secretion from TREK-1 deficient cells, but the effects of altered TREK-1 expression on other inflammatory mediators remain poorly understood. We now examined the role of TREK-1 in TNF-α-induced MCP-1 release from human A549 cells. We hypothesized that TREK-1 regulates TNF-α-induced MCP-1 secretion via c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK)- and protein kinase-C (PKC)-dependent pathways. In contrast to IL-6 secretion, we found that TREK-1 deficiency resulted in increased MCP-1 production and secretion, although baseline MCP-1 gene expression was unchanged in TREK-1 deficient cells. In contrast to TREK-1 deficient AECs, overexpression of MCP-1 had no effect on MCP-1 secretion. Phosphorylation of JNK1/2/3 was increased in TREK-1 deficient cells upon TNF-α stimulation, but pharmacological inhibition of JNK1/2/3 decreased MCP-1 release from both control and TREK-1 deficient cells. Similarly, pharmacological inhibition of PKC decreased MCP-1 secretion from control and TREK-1 deficient cells, suggesting that alterations in JNK and PKC signaling pathways were unlikely the cause for the increased MCP-1 secretion from TREK-1 deficient cells. Furthermore, MCP-1 secretion from control and TREK-1 deficient cells was independent of extracellular Ca(2+) but sensitive to inhibition of intracellular Ca(2+) reuptake mechanisms. In summary, we report for the first time that TREK-1 deficiency in human AECs resulted in increased MCP-1 production and secretion, and this effect appeared unrelated to alterations in JNK-, PKC- or Ca(2+)-mediated signaling pathways in TREK-1 deficient cells.

  13. Overexpression of RING Domain E3 Ligase ZmXerico1 Confers Drought Tolerance through Regulation of ABA Homeostasis[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjing; Xu, Qingzhang; Scolaro, Eric J.; Kahsay, Robel Y.; Kise, Rie; Hakimi, Salim; Niu, Xiping; Habben, Jeffrey E.

    2017-01-01

    Drought stress is one of the main environmental problems encountered by crop growers. Reduction in arable land area and reduced water availability make it paramount to identify and develop strategies to allow crops to be more resilient in water-limiting environments. The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays an important role in the plants’ response to drought stress through its control of stomatal aperture and water transpiration, and transgenic modulation of ABA levels therefore represents an attractive avenue to improve the drought tolerance of crops. Several steps in the ABA-signaling pathway are controlled by ubiquitination involving really interesting new genes (RING) domain-containing proteins. We characterized the maize (Zea mays) RING protein family and identified two novel RING-H2 genes called ZmXerico1 and ZmXerico2. Expression of ZmXerico genes is induced by drought stress, and we show that overexpression of ZmXerico1 and ZmXerico2 in Arabidopsis and maize confers ABA hypersensitivity and improved water use efficiency, which can lead to enhanced maize yield performance in a controlled drought-stress environment. Overexpression of ZmXerico1 and ZmXerico2 in maize results in increased ABA levels and decreased levels of ABA degradation products diphaseic acid and phaseic acid. We show that ZmXerico1 is localized in the endoplasmic reticulum, where ABA 8′-hydroxylases have been shown to be localized, and that it functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase. We demonstrate that ZmXerico1 plays a role in the control of ABA homeostasis through regulation of ABA 8′-hydroxylase protein stability, representing a novel control point in the regulation of the ABA pathway. PMID:28899960

  14. Involvement of an RNA binding protein containing Alba domain in the stage-specific regulation of beta-amastin expression in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Díaz, Leticia; Silva, Tais Caroline; Teixeira, Santuza M R

    2017-01-01

    Amastins are surface glycoproteins, first identified in amastigotes of T. cruzi but later found to be expressed in several Leishmania species, as well as in T. cruzi epimastigotes. Amastins are encoded by a diverse gene family that can be grouped into four subfamilies named α, β, γ, and δ amastins. Differential expression of amastin genes results from regulatory mechanisms involving changes in mRNA stability and/or translational control. Although distinct regulatory elements were identified in the 3' UTR of T. cruzi and Leishmania amastin mRNAs, RNA binding proteins involved with amastin gene regulation have only being characterized in L. infantum where an Alba-domain protein (LiAlba20) able to bind to the 3' UTR of a δ-amastin mRNA was identified. Here we investigated the role of TcAlba30, the LiAlba20 homologue in T. cruzi, in the post transcriptional regulation of amastin genes. TcAlba30 transcripts are present in all stages of the T. cruzi life cycle. RNA immunoprecipitation assays using a transfected cell line expressing a cMyc tagged TcAlba30 revealed that TcAlba30 can interact with β-amastin mRNA. In addition, over-expression of TcAlba30 in epimastigotes resulted in 50% decreased levels of β-amastin mRNAs compared to wild type parasites. Since luciferase assays indicated the presence of regulatory elements in the 3' UTR of β-amastin mRNA and reduced levels of luciferase mRNA were found in parasites over expressing TcAlba30, we conclude that TcAlba30 acts as a T. cruzi RNA binding protein involved in the negative control of β-amastin expression through interactions with its 3'UTR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Coordinated regulation by two VPS9 domain-containing guanine nucleotide exchange factors in small GTPase Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukamoto, Yuta [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Kagiwada, Satoshi [Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Nara Women' s University, Kitauoyanishi-machi, Nara 630-8506 (Japan); Shimazu, Sayuri [Center for Supports to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Takegawa, Kaoru [Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Bioresource and Bioenvironmental Sciences, Kyushu University, 6-10-1 Hakozaki, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Noguchi, Tetsuko [Department of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Nara Women' s University, Kitauoyanishi-machi, Nara 630-8506 (Japan); Miyamoto, Masaaki, E-mail: miya@kobe-u.ac.jp [Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Center for Supports to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2015-03-20

    The small GTPase Rab5 is reported to regulate various cellular functions, such as vesicular transport and endocytosis. VPS9 domain-containing proteins are thought to activate Rab5(s) by their guanine-nucleotide exchange activities. Numerous VPS9 proteins have been identified and are structurally conserved from yeast to mammalian cells. However, the functional relationships among VPS9 proteins in cells remain unclear. Only one Rab5 and two VPS9 proteins were identified in the Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome. Here, we examined the cellular function of two VPS9 proteins and the relationship between these proteins in cellular functions. Vps901-GFP and Vps902-GFP exhibited dotted signals in vegetative and differentiated cells. vps901 deletion mutant (Δvps901) cells exhibited a phenotype deficient in the mating process and responses to high concentrations of ions, such as calcium and metals, and Δvps901Δvps902 double mutant cells exhibited round cell shapes similar to ypt5-909 (Rab5 mutant allele) cells. Deletion of both vps901 and vps902 genes completely abolished the mating process and responses to various stresses. A lack of vacuole formation and aberrant inner cell membrane structures were also observed in Δvps901Δvps902 cells by electron microscopy. These data strongly suggest that Vps901 and Vps902 are cooperatively involved in the regulation of cellular functions, such as cell morphology, sexual development, response to ion stresses, and vacuole formation, via Rab5 signaling pathways in fission yeast cells. - Highlights: • Roles of Rab5 activator VPS9 proteins in cellular functions. • Cooperation between VPS9 proteins in Rab5 signaling pathway. • Roles of each VPS9 protein in Rab5 signaling pathway are discussed.

  16. CMTM3 (CKLF-Like Marvel Transmembrane Domain 3) Mediates Angiogenesis by Regulating Cell Surface Availability of VE-Cadherin in Endothelial Adherens Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrifi, Ihsan; Louzao-Martinez, Laura; Brandt, Maarten; van Dijk, Christian G M; Burgisser, Petra; Zhu, Changbin; Kros, Johan M; Duncker, Dirk J; Cheng, Caroline

    2017-06-01

    Decrease in VE-cadherin adherens junctions reduces vascular stability, whereas disruption of adherens junctions is a requirement for neovessel sprouting during angiogenesis. Endocytosis plays a key role in regulating junctional strength by altering bioavailability of cell surface proteins, including VE-cadherin. Identification of new mediators of endothelial endocytosis could enhance our understanding of angiogenesis. Here, we assessed the function of CMTM3 (CKLF-like MARVEL transmembrane domain 3), which we have previously identified as highly expressed in Flk1+ endothelial progenitor cells during embryonic development. Using a 3-dimensional coculture of human umbilical vein endothelial cells-GFP (green fluorescent protein) and pericytes-RFP (red fluorescent protein), we demonstrated that siRNA-mediated CMTM3 silencing in human umbilical vein endothelial cells impairs angiogenesis. In vivo CMTM3 inhibition by morpholino injection in developing zebrafish larvae confirmed that CMTM3 expression is required for vascular sprouting. CMTM3 knockdown in human umbilical vein endothelial cells does not affect proliferation or migration. Intracellular staining demonstrated that CMTM3 colocalizes with early endosome markers EEA1 (early endosome marker 1) and Clathrin+ vesicles and with cytosolic VE-cadherin in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Adenovirus-mediated CMTM3 overexpression enhances endothelial endocytosis, shown by an increase in Clathrin+, EEA1+, Rab11+, Rab5+, and Rab7+ vesicles. CMTM3 overexpression enhances, whereas CMTM3 knockdown decreases internalization of cell surface VE-cadherin in vitro. CMTM3 promotes loss of endothelial barrier function in thrombin-induced responses, shown by transendothelial electric resistance measurements in vitro. In this study, we have identified a new regulatory function for CMTM3 in angiogenesis. CMTM3 is involved in VE-cadherin turnover and is a regulator of the cell surface pool of VE-cadherin. Therefore, CMTM3 mediates

  17. Domain Mapping of Heat Shock Protein 70 Reveals That Glutamic Acid 446 and Arginine 447 Are Critical for Regulating Superoxide Dismutase 2 Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afolayan, Adeleye J; Alexander, Maxwell; Holme, Rebecca L; Michalkiewicz, Teresa; Rana, Ujala; Teng, Ru-Jeng; Zemanovic, Sara; Sahoo, Daisy; Pritchard, Kirkwood A; Konduri, Girija G

    2017-02-10

    Stress-inducible heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) interacts with superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) in the cytosol after synthesis to transfer the enzyme to the mitochondria for subsequent activation. However, the structural basis for this interaction remains to be defined. To map the SOD2-binding site in hsp70, mutants of hsp70 were made and tested for their ability to bind SOD2. These studies showed that SOD2 binds in the amino acid 393-537 region of the chaperone. To map the hsp70-binding site in SOD2, we used a series of pulldown assays and showed that hsp70 binds to the amino-terminal domain of SOD2. To better define the binding site, we used a series of decoy peptides derived from the primary amino acid sequence in the SOD2-binding site in hsp70. This study shows that SOD2 specifically binds to hsp70 at 445GERAMT450 Small peptides containing GERAMT inhibited the transfer of SOD2 to the mitochondria and decreased SOD2 activity in vitro and in vivo To determine the amino acid residues in hsp70 that are critical for SOD2 interactions, we substituted each amino acid residue for alanine or more conservative residues, glutamine or asparagine, in the GERAMT-binding site. Substitutions of E446A/Q and R447A/Q inhibited the ability of the GERAMT peptide to bind SOD2 and preserved SOD2 function more than other substitutions. Together, these findings indicate that the GERAMT sequence is critical for hsp70-mediated regulation of SOD2 and that Glu446 and Arg447 cooperate with other amino acid residues in the GERAMT-binding site for proper chaperone-dependent regulation of SOD2 antioxidant function. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Catalytic site interactions in yeast OMP synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Barr, Eric W.; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    2014-01-01

    The enigmatic kinetics, half-of-the-sites binding, and structural asymmetry of the homodimeric microbial OMP synthases (orotate phosphoribosyltransferase, EC 2.4.2.10) have been proposed to result from an alternating site mechanism in these domain-swapped enzymes [R.W. McClard et al., Biochemistry...... and ablated ability to bind PRPP, complemented to produce a heterodimer with a single fully functional active site showing intersecting initial velocity plots. Equilibrium binding of PRPP and orotidine 5'-monophosphate showed a single class of two binding sites per dimer in WT and K106S enzymes. Evidence here...... shows that the enzyme does not follow half-of-the-sites cooperativity; that interplay between catalytic sites is not an essential feature of the catalytic mechanism; and that parallel lines in steady-state kinetics probably arise from tight substrate binding....

  19. Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-2 (NOD2) regulates type-1 cytokine responses to Mycobacterium avium but is not required for host control of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Natália B; Oliveira, Fernanda S; Marinho, Fábio A V; de Almeida, Leonardo A; Fahel, Júlia S; Báfica, André; Rothfuchs, Antonio G; Zamboni, Dario S; Caliari, Marcelo V; Oliveira, Sérgio C

    2015-05-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-2 (NOD2) is an innate immune receptor that recognizes peptidoglycan-derived muramyl dipeptide from intracellular bacteria and triggers proinflammatory signals. In this study, we sought to evaluate the role played by this receptor during early and late stages of infection with Mycobacterium avium in mice. We demonstrated that NOD2 knockout (KO) animals were able to control M. avium infection similarly to wild-type mice at all time points studied, even though IL-12 and TNF-α production was impaired in NOD2-deficient macrophages. At 100 days following infection with this bacterium, but not at 30 days post-infection, NOD2-deficient mice showed significantly diminished production of IFN-γ, as confirmed by reduced accumulation of IFN-γ and IL-12 mRNA in the spleens of KO mice. Additionally, a reduction in the size and in the number of lymphocytes/granulocytes of hepatic granulomas from NOD2 KO animals was observed only during late time points of M. avium infection. Taken together, these data demonstrate that NOD2 regulates type-1 cytokine responses to M. avium but is not required for the control of infection with this bacterium in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Novel functional residues in the core domain of histone H2B regulate yeast gene expression and silencing and affect the response to DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriss, McKenna N M; Jin, Yi; Gallegos, Isaura J; Sanford, James A; Wyrick, John J

    2010-07-01

    Previous studies have identified novel modifications in the core fold domain of histone H2B, but relatively little is known about the function of these putative histone modification sites. We have mutated core modifiable residues that are conserved in Saccharomyces cerevisiae histone H2B and characterized the effects of the mutants on yeast silencing, gene expression, and the DNA damage response. We identified three histone H2B core modifiable residues as functionally important. We find that mutating H2B K49 in yeast confers a UV sensitivity phenotype, and we confirm that the homologous residue in human histone H2B is acetylated and methylated in human cells. Our results also indicate that mutating H2B K111 impairs the response to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced DNA lesions and disrupts telomeric silencing and Sir4 binding. In contrast, mutating H2B R102 enhances silencing at yeast telomeres and the HML silent mating loci and increases Sir4 binding to these regions. The H2B R102A mutant also represses the expression of endogenous genes adjacent to yeast telomeres, which is likely due to the ectopic spreading of the Sir complex in this mutant strain. We propose a structural model by which H2B R102 and K111 regulate the binding of the Sir complex to the nucleosome.

  1. The Arabidopsis Cupin Domain Protein AtPirin1 Interacts with the G Protein α-Subunit GPA1 and Regulates Seed Germination and Early Seedling Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapik, Yevgeniya R.; Kaufman, Lon S.

    2003-01-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are implicated in diverse signaling processes in plants, but the molecular mechanisms of their function are largely unknown. Finding G protein effectors and regulatory proteins can help in understanding the roles of these signal transduction proteins in plants. A yeast two-hybrid screen was performed to search for proteins that interact with Arabidopsis G protein α-subunit (GPA1). One of the identified GPA1-interacting proteins is the cupin-domain protein AtPirin1. Pirin is a recently defined protein found because of its ability to interact with a CCAAT box binding transcription factor. The GPA1–AtPirin1 interaction was confirmed in an in vitro binding assay. We characterized two atpirin1 T-DNA insertional mutants and established that they display a set of phenotypes similar to those of gpa1 mutants, including reduced germination levels in the absence of stratification and an abscisic acid–imposed delay in germination and early seedling development. These data indicate that AtPirin1 likely functions immediately downstream of GPA1 in regulating seed germination and early seedling development. PMID:12837948

  2. The Arabidopsis cupin domain protein AtPirin1 interacts with the G protein alpha-subunit GPA1 and regulates seed germination and early seedling development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapik, Yevgeniya R; Kaufman, Lon S

    2003-07-01

    Heterotrimeric G proteins are implicated in diverse signaling processes in plants, but the molecular mechanisms of their function are largely unknown. Finding G protein effectors and regulatory proteins can help in understanding the roles of these signal transduction proteins in plants. A yeast two-hybrid screen was performed to search for proteins that interact with Arabidopsis G protein alpha-subunit (GPA1). One of the identified GPA1-interacting proteins is the cupin-domain protein AtPirin1. Pirin is a recently defined protein found because of its ability to interact with a CCAAT box binding transcription factor. The GPA1-AtPirin1 interaction was confirmed in an in vitro binding assay. We characterized two atpirin1 T-DNA insertional mutants and established that they display a set of phenotypes similar to those of gpa1 mutants, including reduced germination levels in the absence of stratification and an abscisic acid-imposed delay in germination and early seedling development. These data indicate that AtPirin1 likely functions immediately downstream of GPA1 in regulating seed germination and early seedling development.

  3. VHL loss in renal cell carcinoma leads to up-regulation of CUB domain-containing protein 1 to stimulate PKC{delta}-driven migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razorenova, Olga V; Finger, Elizabeth C; Colavitti, Renata; Chernikova, Sophia B; Boiko, Alexander D; Chan, Charles K F; Krieg, Adam; Bedogni, Barbara; LaGory, Edward; Weissman, Irving L; Broome-Powell, Marianne; Giaccia, Amato J

    2011-02-01

    A common genetic mutation found in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CC-RCC) is the loss of the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene, which results in stabilization of hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs), and contributes to cancer progression and metastasis. CUB-domain-containing protein 1 (CDCP1) was shown to promote metastasis in scirrhous and lung adenocarcinomas as well as in prostate cancer. In this study, we established a molecular mechanism linking VHL loss to induction of the CDCP1 gene through the HIF-1/2 pathway in renal cancer. Also, we report that Fyn, which forms a complex with CDCP1 and mediates its signaling to PKCδ, is a HIF-1 target gene. Mechanistically, we found that CDCP1 specifically regulates phosphorylation of PKCδ, but not of focal adhesion kinase or Crk-associated substrate. Signal transduction from CDCP1 to PKCδ leads to its activation, increasing migration of CC-RCC. Furthermore, patient survival can be stratified by CDCP1 expression at the cell surface of the tumor. Taken together, our data indicates that CDCP1 protein might serve as a therapeutic target for CC-RCC.

  4. The tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 associates with CUB domain-containing protein-1 (CDCP1), regulating its expression at the cell surface in a phosphorylation-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandji, Leslie Yewakon; Proust, Richard; Larue, Lionel; Gesbert, Franck

    2015-01-01

    CUB domain-containing protein-1 (CDCP1) is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is phosphorylated by SRC family kinases (SFK) before recruiting and activating PKCδ. CDCP1 is overproduced in many cancers. It promotes metastasis and resistance to anoïkis. The robust production of CDCP1 would be associated with stemness and has been proposed as a novel prognosis marker. The natural transmembrane location of CDCP1 makes it an ideal therapeutic target and treatments based on the use of appropriate antibodies are currently being evaluated. However, we still know very little about the molecular fate of CDCP1 and its downstream signaling events. Improvements in our understanding of the molecular events occurring downstream of CDCP1 are required to make use of changes of CDCP1 production or functions for therapeutic purposes. By the mean of co-immunoprecipitation and affinity precipitation we show here, for the first time, that CDCP1 interacts directly, with the cytosolic tyrosine phosphatase SHP2. Point mutants of CDCP1 show that residues Y734 and Y743 are responsible for its interaction with SHP2. It may therefore compete with SFK. We also demonstrate that a shRNA-mediated down regulation of SHP2 is associated with a stronger CDCP1 phosphorylation and an impairment of antibody-mediated CDCP1 internalization.

  5. The tyrosine phosphatase SHP2 associates with CUB domain-containing protein-1 (CDCP1, regulating its expression at the cell surface in a phosphorylation-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leslie Yewakon Gandji

    Full Text Available CUB domain-containing protein-1 (CDCP1 is a transmembrane glycoprotein that is phosphorylated by SRC family kinases (SFK before recruiting and activating PKCδ. CDCP1 is overproduced in many cancers. It promotes metastasis and resistance to anoïkis. The robust production of CDCP1 would be associated with stemness and has been proposed as a novel prognosis marker. The natural transmembrane location of CDCP1 makes it an ideal therapeutic target and treatments based on the use of appropriate antibodies are currently being evaluated. However, we still know very little about the molecular fate of CDCP1 and its downstream signaling events. Improvements in our understanding of the molecular events occurring downstream of CDCP1 are required to make use of changes of CDCP1 production or functions for therapeutic purposes. By the mean of co-immunoprecipitation and affinity precipitation we show here, for the first time, that CDCP1 interacts directly, with the cytosolic tyrosine phosphatase SHP2. Point mutants of CDCP1 show that residues Y734 and Y743 are responsible for its interaction with SHP2. It may therefore compete with SFK. We also demonstrate that a shRNA-mediated down regulation of SHP2 is associated with a stronger CDCP1 phosphorylation and an impairment of antibody-mediated CDCP1 internalization.

  6. Novel Functional Residues in the Core Domain of Histone H2B Regulate Yeast Gene Expression and Silencing and Affect the Response to DNA Damage ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyriss, McKenna N. M.; Jin, Yi; Gallegos, Isaura J.; Sanford, James A.; Wyrick, John J.

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have identified novel modifications in the core fold domain of histone H2B, but relatively little is known about the function of these putative histone modification sites. We have mutated core modifiable residues that are conserved in Saccharomyces cerevisiae histone H2B and characterized the effects of the mutants on yeast silencing, gene expression, and the DNA damage response. We identified three histone H2B core modifiable residues as functionally important. We find that mutating H2B K49 in yeast confers a UV sensitivity phenotype, and we confirm that the homologous residue in human histone H2B is acetylated and methylated in human cells. Our results also indicate that mutating H2B K111 impairs the response to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS)-induced DNA lesions and disrupts telomeric silencing and Sir4 binding. In contrast, mutating H2B R102 enhances silencing at yeast telomeres and the HML silent mating loci and increases Sir4 binding to these regions. The H2B R102A mutant also represses the expression of endogenous genes adjacent to yeast telomeres, which is likely due to the ectopic spreading of the Sir complex in this mutant strain. We propose a structural model by which H2B R102 and K111 regulate the binding of the Sir complex to the nucleosome. PMID:20479120

  7. Regulation of hERG and hEAG channels by Src and by SHP-1 tyrosine phosphatase via an ITIM region in the cyclic nucleotide binding domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyanne C Schlichter

    Full Text Available Members of the EAG K(+ channel superfamily (EAG/Kv10.x, ERG/Kv11.x, ELK/Kv12.x subfamilies are expressed in many cells and tissues. In particular, two prototypes, EAG1/Kv10.1/KCNH1 and ERG1/Kv11.1/KCNH2 contribute to both normal and pathological functions. Proliferation of numerous cancer cells depends on hEAG1, and in some cases, hERG. hERG is best known for contributing to the cardiac action potential, and for numerous channel mutations that underlie 'long-QT syndrome'. Many cells, particularly cancer cells, express Src-family tyrosine kinases and SHP tyrosine phosphatases; and an imbalance in tyrosine phosphorylation can lead to malignancies, autoimmune diseases, and inflammatory disorders. Ion channel contributions to cell functions are governed, to a large degree, by post-translational modulation, especially phosphorylation. However, almost nothing is known about roles of specific tyrosine kinases and phosphatases in regulating K(+ channels in the EAG superfamily. First, we show that tyrosine kinase inhibitor, PP1, and the selective Src inhibitory peptide, Src40-58, reduce the hERG current amplitude, without altering its voltage dependence or kinetics. PP1 similarly reduces the hEAG1 current. Surprisingly, an 'immuno-receptor tyrosine inhibitory motif' (ITIM is present within the cyclic nucleotide binding domain of all EAG-superfamily members, and is conserved in the human, rat and mouse sequences. When tyrosine phosphorylated, this ITIM directly bound to and activated SHP-1 tyrosine phosphatase (PTP-1C/PTPN6/HCP; the first report that a portion of an ion channel is a binding site and activator of a tyrosine phosphatase. Both hERG and hEAG1 currents were decreased by applying active recombinant SHP-1, and increased by the inhibitory substrate-trapping SHP-1 mutant. Thus, hERG and hEAG1 currents are regulated by activated SHP-1, in a manner opposite to their regulation by Src. Given the widespread distribution of these channels, Src and SHP

  8. Complementation between HIV integrase proteins mutated in different domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. van Gent (Dik); C. Vink (Cornelis); A.A. Groeneger; R.H. Plassterk

    1993-01-01

    textabstractHIV integrase (IN) cleaves two nucleotides off the 3' end of viral DNA and integrates viral DNA into target DNA. Previously, three functional domains in the HIV IN protein have been identified: (i) the central catalytic domain, (ii) the C-terminal DNA binding domain,

  9. Structure, signaling mechanism and regulation of the natriuretic peptide receptor guanylate cyclase.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misono, K. S.; Philo, J. S.; Arakawa, T.; Ogata, C. M.; Qiu, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Young, H. S. (Biosciences Division); (Univ. of Nevada); (Alliance Protein Labs.)

    2011-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and the homologous B-type natriuretic peptide are cardiac hormones that dilate blood vessels and stimulate natriuresis and diuresis, thereby lowering blood pressure and blood volume. ANP and B-type natriuretic peptide counterbalance the actions of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and neurohormonal systems, and play a central role in cardiovascular regulation. These activities are mediated by natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA), a single transmembrane segment, guanylyl cyclase (GC)-linked receptor that occurs as a homodimer. Here, we present an overview of the structure, possible chloride-mediated regulation and signaling mechanism of NPRA and other receptor GCs. Earlier, we determined the crystal structures of the NPRA extracellular domain with and without bound ANP. Their structural comparison has revealed a novel ANP-induced rotation mechanism occurring in the juxtamembrane region that apparently triggers transmembrane signal transduction. More recently, the crystal structures of the dimerized catalytic domain of green algae GC Cyg12 and that of cyanobacterium GC Cya2 have been reported. These structures closely resemble that of the adenylyl cyclase catalytic domain, consisting of a C1 and C2 subdomain heterodimer. Adenylyl cyclase is activated by binding of G{sub s}{alpha} to C2 and the ensuing 7{sup o} rotation of C1 around an axis parallel to the central cleft, thereby inducing the heterodimer to adopt a catalytically active conformation. We speculate that, in NPRA, the ANP-induced rotation of the juxtamembrane domains, transmitted across the transmembrane helices, may induce a similar rotation in each of the dimerized GC catalytic domains, leading to the stimulation of the GC catalytic activity.

  10. Advanced Catalytic Converter in Gasoline Enginer Emission Control: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Leman A.M.; Jajuli Afiqah; Feriyanto Dafit; Rahman Fakhrurrazi; Zakaria Supaat

    2017-01-01

    Exhaust emission from automobile source has become a major contributor to the air pollution and environmental problem. Catalytic converter is found to be one of the most effective tools to reduce the overwhelming exhaust pollutants in our environment. The development of sustainable catalytic converter still remains a critical issue due to the stringent exhaust emission regulations. Another issue such as price and availability of the precious metal were also forced the automotive industry to i...

  11. Life and death of a single catalytic cracking particle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meirer, Florian; Kalirai, Samanbir; Morris, Darius; Soparawalla, Santosh; Liu, Yijin; Mesu, Gerbrand; Andrews, Joy C; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particles account for 40 to 45% of worldwide gasoline production. The hierarchical complex particle pore structure allows access of long-chain feedstock molecules into active catalyst domains where they are cracked into smaller, more valuable hydrocarbon products (for

  12. Characterization of the catalytic center of the Ebola virus L polymerase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Luisa Schmidt

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV causes a severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and non-human primates. While no licensed therapeutics are available, recently there has been tremendous progress in developing antivirals. Targeting the ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP proteins, which facilitate genome replication and transcription, and particularly the polymerase L, is a promising antiviral approach since these processes are essential for the virus life cycle. However, until now little is known about L in terms of its structure and function, and in particular the catalytic center of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp of L, which is one of the most promising molecular targets, has never been experimentally characterized.Using multiple sequence alignments with other negative sense single-stranded RNA viruses we identified the putative catalytic center of the EBOV RdRp. An L protein with mutations in this center was then generated and characterized using various life cycle modelling systems. These systems are based on minigenomes, i.e. miniature versions of the viral genome, in which the viral genes are exchanged against a reporter gene. When such minigenomes are coexpressed with RNP proteins in mammalian cells, the RNP proteins recognize them as authentic templates for replication and transcription, resulting in reporter activity reflecting these processes. Replication-competent minigenome systems indicated that our L catalytic domain mutant was impaired in genome replication and/or transcription, and by using replication-deficient minigenome systems, as well as a novel RT-qPCR-based genome replication assay, we showed that it indeed no longer supported either of these processes. However, it still showed similar expression to wild-type L, and retained its ability to be incorporated into inclusion bodies, which are the sites of EBOV genome replication.We have experimentally defined the catalytic center of the EBOV RdRp, and thus a promising antiviral target

  13. Nuclear localization of lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) and its role in regulating LIM domain only 2 (Lmo2) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkitachalam, Srividya; Chueh, Fu-Yu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, H. M. Bligh Cancer Research Laboratories, Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL 60064 (United States); Yu, Chao-Lan, E-mail: chaolan.yu@rosalindfranklin.edu [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, H. M. Bligh Cancer Research Laboratories, Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, North Chicago, IL 60064 (United States)

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lmo2 expression is elevated in Lck-transformed cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both endogenous and exogenous Lck localize in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nuclear Lck is active in Lck-transformed cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lck binds to the promoter region of Lmo2 gene in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In contrast to JAK2, Lck does not increase histone H3 phosphorylation on Tyr 41. -- Abstract: LIM domain only protein 2 (Lmo2) is a transcription factor that plays a critical role in the development of T-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). A previous report established a link between Lmo2 expression and the nuclear presence of oncogenic Janus kinase 2 (JAK2), a non-receptor protein tyrosine kinase. The oncogenic JAK2 kinase phosphorylates histone H3 on Tyr 41 that leads to the relief of Lmo2 promoter repression and subsequent gene expression. Similar to JAK2, constitutive activation of lymphocyte-specific protein tyrosine kinase (Lck) has been implicated in lymphoid malignancies. However, it is not known whether oncogenic Lck regulates Lmo2 expression through a similar mechanism. We show here that Lmo2 expression is significantly elevated in T cell leukemia LSTRA overexpressing active Lck kinase and in HEK 293 cells expressing oncogenic Y505FLck kinase. Nuclear localization of active Lck kinase was confirmed in both Lck-transformed cells by subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence microscopy. More importantly, in contrast to oncogenic JAK2, oncogenic Lck kinase does not result in significant increase in histone H3 phosphorylation on Tyr 41. Instead, chromatin immunoprecipitation experiment shows that oncogenic Y505FLck kinase binds to the Lmo2 promoter in vivo. This result raises the possibility that oncogenic Lck may activate Lmo2 promoter through direct interaction.

  14. A cupin domain-containing protein with a quercetinase activity (VdQase) regulates Verticillium dahliae's pathogenicity and contributes to counteracting host defenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hadrami, Abdelbasset; Islam, Md Rashidul; Adam, Lorne R; Daayf, Fouad

    2015-01-01

    We previously identified rutin as part of potato root responses to its pathogen Verticillium dahliae. Rutin was directly toxic to the pathogen at doses greater than 160 μM, a threshold below which many V. dahliae pathogenicity-related genes were up-regulated. We identified and characterized a cupin domain-containing protein (VdQase) with a dioxygenase activity and a potential role in V. dahliae-potato interactions. The pathogenicity of VdQase knock-out mutants generated through Agrobacterium tumefasciens-mediated transformation was significantly reduced on susceptible potato cultivar Kennebec compared to wild type isolates. Fluorescence microscopy revealed a higher accumulation of flavonols in the stems of infected potatoes and a higher concentration of rutin in the leaves in response to the VdQase mutants as compared to wild type isolates. This, along with the HPLC characterization of high residual and non-utilized quercetin in presence of the knockout mutants, indicates the involvement of VdQase in the catabolism of quercetin and possibly other flavonols in planta. Quantification of Salicylic and Jasmonic Acids (SA, JA) in response to the mutants vs. wild type isolates revealed involvement of VdQase in the interference with signaling, suggesting a role in pathogenicity. It is hypothesized that the by-product of dioxygenation 2-protocatechuoylphloroglucinolcarboxylic acid, after dissociating into phloroglucinol and protocatechuoyl moieties, becomes a starting point for benzoic acid and SA, thereby interfering with the JA pathway and affecting the interaction outcome. These events may be key factors for V. dahliae in countering potato defenses and becoming notorious in the rhizosphere.

  15. Conserved allosteric hot spots in the transmembrane domains of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels and multidrug resistance protein (MRP) pumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Chauvet, Sylvain; Guo, Jingyu; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2014-07-18

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are an ancient family of transmembrane proteins that utilize ATPase activity to move substrates across cell membranes. The ABCC subfamily of the ABC transporters includes active drug exporters (the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs)) and a unique ATP-gated ion channel (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)). The CFTR channel shares gating principles with conventional ligand-gated ion channels, but the allosteric network that couples ATP binding at its nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) with conformational changes in its transmembrane helices (TMs) is poorly defined. It is also unclear whether the mechanisms that govern CFTR gating are conserved with the thermodynamically distinct MRPs. Here we report a new class of gain of function (GOF) mutation of a conserved proline at the base of the pore-lining TM6. Multiple substitutions of this proline promoted ATP-free CFTR activity and activation by the weak agonist, 5'-adenylyl-β,γ-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). TM6 proline mutations exhibited additive GOF effects when combined with a previously reported GOF mutation located in an outer collar of TMs that surrounds the pore-lining TMs. Each TM substitution allosterically rescued the ATP sensitivity of CFTR gating when introduced into an NBD mutant with defective ATP binding. Both classes of GOF mutations also rescued defective drug export by a yeast MRP (Yor1p) with ATP binding defects in its NBDs. We conclude that the conserved TM6 proline helps set the energy barrier to both CFTR channel opening and MRP-mediated drug efflux and that CFTR channels and MRP pumps utilize similar allosteric mechanisms for coupling conformational changes in their translocation pathways to ATP binding at their NBDs. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. A cupin domain-containing protein with a quercetinase activity (VdQase regulates Verticillium dahliae’s pathogenicity and contributes to counteracting host defenses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel eElHadrami

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We previously identified rutin as part of potato root responses to its pathogen Verticillium dahliae. Rutin was directly toxic to the pathogen at doses greater than 160 μM, a threshold below which many V. dahliae pathogenicity-related genes were up-regulated. We identified and characterized a cupin domain-containing protein (VdQase with a dioxygenase activity and a potential role in V. dahliae-potato interactions. The pathogenicity of VdQase knock-out mutants generated through Agrobacterium tumefasciens-mediated transformation was significantly reduced on susceptible potato cultivar Kennebec compared to wild type isolates. Fluorescence microscopy revealed a higher accumulation of flavonols in the stems of infected potatoes and a higher concentration of rutin in the leaves in response to the VdQase mutants as compared to wild type isolates. This, along with the HPLC characterization of high residual and non-utilized quercetin in presence of the knockout mutants, indicates the involvement of VdQase in the catabolism of quercetin and possibly other flavonols in planta. Quantification of Salicylic and Jasmonic Acids (SA, JA in response to the mutants versus wild type isolates revealed involvement of VdQase in the interference with signaling, suggesting a role in pathogenicity. It is hypothesized that the by-product of dioxygenation 2-protocatechuoylphloroglucinolcarboxylic acid, after dissociating into phloroglucinol and protocatechuoyl moieties, becomes a starting point for benzoic acid and SA, thereby interfering with the JA pathway and affecting the interaction outcome. These events may be key factors for V. dahliae in countering potato defenses and becoming notorious in the rhizosphere.

  17. The basic amino acids in the coiled-coil domain of CIN85 regulate its interaction with c-Cbl and phosphatidic acid during epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiudan; Zhang, Jing; Liao, Kan

    2014-07-08

    During EGFR internalization CIN85 bridges EGFR-Cbl complex, endocytic machinery and fusible membrane through the interactions of CIN85 with c-Cbl, endophilins and phosphatidic acid. These protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions are mediated or regulated by the positively charged C-terminal coiled-coil domain of CIN85. However, the details of CIN85-lipid interaction remain unknown. The present study suggested a possible electric interaction between the negative charge of phosphatidic acid and the positive charge of basic amino acids in coiled-coil domain. Mutations of the basic amino acids in the coiled-coil domain, especially K645, K646, R648 and R650, into neutral amino acid alanine completely blocked the interaction of CIN85 with c-Cbl or phosphatidic acid. However, they did not affect CIN85-endophilin interaction. In addition, CIN85 was found to associate with the internalized EGFR endosomes. It interacted with several ESCRT (Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport) component proteins for ESCRT assembly on endosomal membrane. Mutations in the coiled-coil domain (deletion of the coiled-coil domain or point mutations of the basic amino acids) dissociated CIN85 from endosomes. These mutants bound the ESCRT components in cytoplasm to prevent them from assembly on endosomal membrane and inhibited EGFR sorting for degradation. As an adaptor protein, CIN85 interacts with variety of partners through several domains. The positive charges of basic amino acids in the coiled-coil domain are not only involved in the interaction with phosphatidic acid, but also regulate the interaction of CIN85 with c-Cbl. CIN85 also interacts with ESCRT components for protein sorting in endosomes. These CIN85-protein and CIN85-lipid interactions enable CIN85 to link EGFR-Cbl endocytic complex with fusible membrane during EGFR endocytosis and subsequently to facilitate ESCRT formation on endosomal membrane for EGFR sorting and degradation.

  18. Relief of autoinhibition by conformational switch explains enzyme activation by a catalytically dead paralog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkov, Oleg A.; Kinch, Lisa; Ariagno, Carson; Deng, Xiaoyi; Zhong, Shihua; Grishin, Nick; Tomchick, Diana R.; Chen, Zhe; Phillips, Margaret A.

    2016-12-15

    Catalytically inactive enzyme paralogs occur in many genomes. Some regulate their active counterparts but the structural principles of this regulation remain largely unknown. We report X-ray structures ofTrypanosoma brucei S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase alone and in functional complex with its catalytically dead paralogous partner, prozyme. We show monomericTbAdoMetDC is inactive because of autoinhibition by its N-terminal sequence. Heterodimerization with prozyme displaces this sequence from the active site through a complex mechanism involving acis-to-transproline isomerization, reorganization of a β-sheet, and insertion of the N-terminal α-helix into the heterodimer interface, leading to enzyme activation. We propose that the evolution of this intricate regulatory mechanism was facilitated by the acquisition of the dimerization domain, a single step that can in principle account for the divergence of regulatory schemes in the AdoMetDC enzyme family. These studies elucidate an allosteric mechanism in an enzyme and a plausible scheme by which such complex cooperativity evolved.

  19. A Domain-Specific Account of Self-Regulated Learning: The Cognitive and Metacognitive Activities Involved in Learning through Historical Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poitras, Eric G.; Lajoie, Susanne P.

    2013-01-01

    Educational researchers have recently begun to conceptualize theoretical constructs and mechanisms of metacognitive activities in terms of the features that are specific to particular academic domains and subject matter. In this paper, we propose a framework of domain-specific metacognition in relation to learning through historical inquiry. The…

  20. Serine 77 in the PDZ domain of PICK1 is a protein kinase Cα phosphorylation site regulated by lipid membrane binding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Thorsen, Thor Seneca; Gether, Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1) contains an N-terminal protein binding PDZ domain and a C-terminal lipid binding BAR domain. PICK1 plays a key role in several physiological processes, including synaptic plasticity. However, little is known about the cellular mechanisms governing...... the activity of PICK1 itself. Here we show that PICK1 is a substrate in vitro both for PKCα (protein kinase Cα), as previously shown, and for CaMKIIα (Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα). By mutation of predicted phosphorylation sites, we identify Ser77 in the PDZ domain as a major phosphorylation...... for optimal phosphorylation. Binding of PKCα to the PICK1 PDZ domain was not required for phosphorylation, but a PDZ domain peptide ligand reduced the overall level of phosphorylation ~30%. The phosphomimic S77D reduced the extent of cytosolic clustering of eYFP-PICK1 in COS7 cells and thereby conceivably its...

  1. Catalytic reforming methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  2. Genome wide expression analysis of CBS domain containing proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana (L. Heynh and Oryza sativa L. reveals their developmental and stress regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sopory Sudhir K

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Arabidopsis thaliana (L. Heynh and Oryza sativa L., a large number of genes encode proteins of unknown functions, whose characterization still remains one of the major challenges. With an aim to characterize these unknown proteins having defined features (PDFs in plants, we have chosen to work on proteins having a cystathionine β-synthase (CBS domain. CBS domain as such has no defined function(s but plays a regulatory role for many enzymes and thus helps in maintaining the intracellular redox balance. Its function as sensor of cellular energy has also been widely suggested. Results Our analysis has identified 34 CBS domain containing proteins (CDCPs in Arabidopsis and 59 in Oryza. In most of these proteins, CBS domain coexists with other functional domain(s, which may indicate towards their probable functions. In order to investigate the role(s of these CDCPs, we have carried out their detailed analysis in whole genomes of Arabidopsis and Oryza, including their classification, nomenclature, sequence analysis, domain analysis, chromosomal locations, phylogenetic relationships and their expression patterns using public databases (MPSS database and microarray data. We have found that the transcript levels of some members of this family are altered in response to various stresses such as salinity, drought, cold, high temperature, UV, wounding and genotoxic stress, in both root and shoot tissues. This data would be helpful in exploring the so far obscure functions of CBS domain and CBS domain-containing proteins in plant stress responses. Conclusion We have identified, classified and suggested the nomenclature of CDCPs in Arabidopsis and Oryza. A comprehensive analysis of expression patterns for CDCPs using the already existing transcriptome profiles and MPSS database reveals that a few CDCPs may have an important role in stress response/tolerance and development in plants, which needs to be validated further through

  3. Urinary catalytic iron in obesity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thethi, Tina K; Parsha, Kaushik; Rajapurkar, Mohan; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata; Shah, Sudhir; Yau, C Lillian; Japa, Shanker; Fonseca, Vivian

    2011-01-01

    ...), hypertension, and chronic kidney disease. Catalytic iron, which has been associated with these chronic diseases, may be one of the links between obesity and these multifactorial diverse disorders...

  4. Comparative kinomics of human and chimpanzee reveal unique kinship and functional diversity generated by new domain combinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Juliette

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphorylation by protein kinases is a common event in many cellular processes. Further, many kinases perform specialized roles and are regulated by non-kinase domains tethered to kinase domain. Perturbation in the regulation of kinases leads to malignancy. We have identified and analysed putative protein kinases encoded in the genome of chimpanzee which is a close evolutionary relative of human. Result The shared core biology between chimpanzee and human is characterized by many orthologous protein kinases which are involved in conserved pathways. Domain architectures specific to chimp/human kinases have been observed. Chimp kinases with unique domain architectures are characterized by deletion of one or more non-kinase domains in the human kinases. Interestingly, counterparts of some of the multi-domain human kinases in chimp are characterized by identical domain architectures but with kinase-like non-kinase domain. Remarkably, out of 587 chimpanzee kinases no human orthologue with greater than 95% sequence identity could be identified for 160 kinases. Variations in chimpanzee kinases compared to human kinases are brought about also by differences in functions of domains tethered to the catalytic kinase domain. For example, the heterodimer forming PB1 domain related to the fold of ubiquitin/Ras-binding domain is seen uniquely tethered to PKC-like chimpanzee kinase. Conclusion Though the chimpanzee and human are evolutionary very close, there are chimpanzee kinases with no close counterpart in the human suggesting differences in their functions. This analysis provides a direction for experimental analysis of human and chimpanzee protein kinases in order to enhance our understanding on their specific biological roles.

  5. Modulation of MICAL Monooxygenase Activity by its Calponin Homology Domain: Structural and Mechanistic Insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqassim, Saif S; Urquiza, Mauricio; Borgnia, Eitan; Nagib, Marc; Amzel, L Mario; Bianchet, Mario A

    2016-03-03

    MICALs (Molecule Interacting with CasL) are conserved multidomain enzymes essential for cytoskeletal reorganization in nerve development, endocytosis, and apoptosis. In these enzymes, a type-2 calponin homology (CH) domain always follows an N-terminal monooxygenase (MO) domain. Although the CH domain is required for MICAL-1 cellular localization and actin-associated function, its contribution to the modulation of MICAL activity towards actin remains unclear. Here, we present the structure of a fragment of MICAL-1 containing the MO and the CH domains-determined by X-ray crystallography and small angle scattering-as well as kinetics experiments designed to probe the contribution of the CH domain to the actin-modification activity. Our results suggest that the CH domain, which is loosely connected to the MO domain by a flexible linker and is far away from the catalytic site, couples F-actin to the enhancement of redox activity of MICALMO-CH by a cooperative mechanism involving a trans interaction between adjacently bound molecules. Binding cooperativity is also observed in other proteins regulating actin assembly/disassembly dynamics, such as ADF/Cofilins.

  6. Domain motions of Argonaute, the catalytic engine of RNA interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wall Michael E

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Argonaute protein is the core component of the RNA-induced silencing complex, playing the central role of cleaving the mRNA target. Visual inspection of static crystal structures already has enabled researchers to suggest conformational changes of Argonaute that might occur during RNA interference. We have taken the next step by performing an all-atom normal mode analysis of the Pyrococcus furiosus and Aquifex aeolicus Argonaute crystal structures, allowing us to quantitatively assess the feasibility of these conformational changes. To perform the analysis, we begin with the energy-minimized X-ray structures. Normal modes are then calculated using an all-atom molecular mechanics force field. Results The analysis reveals low-frequency vibrations that facilitate the accommodation of RNA duplexes – an essential step in target recognition. The Pyrococcus furiosus and Aquifex aeolicus Argonaute proteins both exhibit low-frequency torsion and hinge motions; however, differences in the overall architecture of the proteins cause the detailed dynamics to be significantly different. Conclusion Overall, low-frequency vibrations of Argonaute are consistent with mechanisms within the current reaction cycle model for RNA interference.

  7. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  8. Structural Insight into the Critical Role of the N-Terminal Region in the Catalytic Activity of Dual-Specificity Phosphatase 26.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun-Young Won

    Full Text Available Human dual-specificity phosphatase 26 (DUSP26 is a novel target for anticancer therapy because its dephosphorylation of the p53 tumor suppressor regulates the apoptosis of cancer cells. DUSP26 inhibition results in neuroblastoma cell cytotoxicity through p53-mediated apoptosis. Despite the previous structural studies of DUSP26 catalytic domain (residues 61-211, DUSP26-C, the high-resolution structure of its catalytically active form has not been resolved. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of a catalytically active form of DUSP26 (residues 39-211, DUSP26-N with an additional N-terminal region at 2.0 Å resolution. Unlike the C-terminal domain-swapped dimeric structure of DUSP26-C, the DUSP26-N (C152S monomer adopts a fold-back conformation of the C-terminal α8-helix and has an additional α1-helix in the N-terminal region. Consistent with the canonically active conformation of its protein tyrosine phosphate-binding loop (PTP loop observed in the structure, the phosphatase assay results demonstrated that DUSP26-N has significantly higher catalytic activity than DUSP26-C. Furthermore, size exclusion chromatography-multiangle laser scattering (SEC-MALS measurements showed that DUSP26-N (C152S exists as a monomer in solution. Notably, the crystal structure of DUSP26-N (C152S revealed that the N-terminal region of DUSP26-N (C152S serves a scaffolding role by positioning the surrounding α7-α8 loop for interaction with the PTP-loop through formation of an extensive hydrogen bond network, which seems to be critical in making the PTP-loop conformation competent for phosphatase activity. Our study provides the first high-resolution structure of a catalytically active form of DUSP26, which will contribute to the structure-based rational design of novel DUSP26-targeting anticancer therapeutics.

  9. Response of the human detrusor to stretch is regulated by TREK-1, a two-pore-domain (K2P) mechano-gated potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Qi; Pan, Xiao-Qing; Chang, Shaohua; Malkowicz, S Bruce; Guzzo, Thomas J; Malykhina, Anna P

    2014-07-15

    The mechanisms of mechanosensitivity underlying the response of the human bladder to stretch are poorly understood. Animal data suggest that stretch-activated two-pore-domain (K2P) K(+) channels play a critical role in bladder relaxation during the filling phase. The objective of this study was to characterize the expression and function of stretch-activated K2P channels in the human bladder and to clarify their physiological role in bladder mechanosensitivity. Gene and protein analysis of the K2P channels TREK-1, TREK-2 and TRAAK in the human bladder revealed that TREK-1 is the predominantly expressed member of the mechano-gated subfamily of K2P channels. Immunohistochemical labelling of bladder wall identified higher levels of expression of TREK-1 in detrusor smooth muscle cells in comparison to bladder mucosa. Functional characterization and biophysical properties of the predominantly expressed member of the K2P family, the TREK-1 channel, were evaluated by in vitro organ bath studies and the patch-clamp technique. Electrophysiological recordings from single smooth muscle cells confirmed direct activation of TREK-1 channels by mechanical stretch and negative pressure applied to the cell membrane. Inhibition of TREK-1 channels in the human detrusor significantly delayed relaxation of the stretched bladder smooth muscle strips and triggered small-amplitude spontaneous contractions. Application of negative pressure to cell-attached patches (-20 mmHg) caused a 19-fold increase in the open probability (NPo) of human TREK-1 channels. l-Methionine (1 mm), a specific TREK-1 inhibitor, dramatically decreased the NPo of TREK-1 channels from 0.045 ± 0.003 to 0.008 ± 0.001 (n = 8, P ≤ 0.01). Subsequent addition of arachidonic acid (10 μm), a channel opener, increased the open probability of methionine-inhibited unitary currents up to 0.43 ± 0.05 at 0 mV (n = 9, P ≤ 0.05). The results of our study provide direct evidence that the response of the human detrusor to

  10. D120 and K152 within the PH Domain of T Cell Adapter SKAP55 Regulate Plasma Membrane Targeting of SKAP55 and LFA-1 Affinity Modulation in Human T Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Amelie; Meineke, Bernhard; Sticht, Jana; Philipsen, Lars; Kuropka, Benno; Müller, Andreas J; Freund, Christian; Schraven, Burkhart; Kliche, Stefanie

    2017-04-01

    The β2-integrin lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) is needed for the T cell receptor (TCR)-induced activation of LFA-1 to promote T cell adhesion and interaction with antigen-presenting cells (APCs). LFA-1-mediated cell-cell interactions are critical for proper T cell differentiation and proliferation. The Src kinase-associated phosphoprotein of 55 kDa (SKAP55) is a key regulator of TCR-mediated LFA-1 signaling (inside-out/outside-in signaling). To gain an understanding of how SKAP55 controls TCR-mediated LFA-1 activation, we assessed the functional role of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. We identified two critical amino acid residues within the PH domain of SKAP55, aspartic acid 120 (D120) and lysine 152 (K152). D120 facilitates the retention of SKAP55 in the cytoplasm of nonstimulated T cells, while K152 promotes SKAP55 membrane recruitment via actin binding upon TCR triggering. Importantly, the K152-dependent interaction of the PH domain with actin promotes the binding of talin to LFA-1, thus facilitating LFA-1 activation. These data suggest that K152 and D120 within the PH domain of SKAP55 regulate plasma membrane targeting and TCR-mediated activation of LFA-1. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Molecular and structural characterisation of the human sodium/iodide symporter (h N.I.S.) C-terminus and the implication of this domain in the transporter regulation; Caracterisation moleculaire et structurale de l'extremite C-Terminale du co-transporteur sodium/iode humain (h N.I.S.): Implication de ce domaine dans la regulation du transporteur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huc, S

    2007-12-15

    The human natrium iodide symporter (h N.I.S.) is an intrinsic membrane protein expressed in thyroid cells where it allows iodide uptake and accumulation. It is composed of thirteen transmembrane helices and its ninety- three amino acids long cytosolic C-terminus presents many potential post-translational regulatory sites. A first part of the PhD work has been dedicated to the expression in a bacterial system and to the purification of the cytosolic C-terminal fragment. Biochemical and structural characterisation have revealed that this C-terminus is very flexible but prone to dimerization. The fragment has also been used as a bait to test the interactions with PDZ domain proteins spotted on a membrane. Several proteins interacting with the (natrium/iodide symporter) N.I.S. C-terminus have thus been identified and the study of their implication in the protein regulation has been initiated. A second part of the work has underlined the existence of a N.I.S. fragment co-purified with the entire protein. This fragment has been found in cells in culture stably expressing N.I.S. and also in human thyroid extracts and in rodent thyroid cells. We observed that this fragment is spontaneously associated with the entire protein. It is composed of the last 131 amino acid of the protein and so comprises the last transmembrane domain and the C-terminal extremity. The expression of a truncated form of h N.I.S., lacking the last 131 amino acids, shows that this protein is not correctly addressed to the cell membrane and cells expressing this mutated symporter cannot accumulate iodide. However, our results show that the co-expression of the two N.I.S. parts, the truncated form lacking the last 131 amino acid, and the complementary C-terminal fragment, leads to cells presenting 10 % of the activity of cells expressing the whole N.I.S.. (author)

  12. Assembly of catalytic subunits of aspartate transcarbamoylase from Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burns, D.L.; Schachman, H.K.

    1980-10-01

    Although extensive studies have been conducted on the assembly of the allosteric enzyme, aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase) from isolate, intact catalytic (C) and regulatory (R) subunits, there has been little research on the formation of these subunits from individual catalytic (c) and regulatory (r) polypeptide chains. Such studies would be useful for evaluating the strengths of the interchain bonding domains within the subunits just as earlier experiments provided valuable data regarding interactions between the subunits in ATCase. The intact enzyme comprising two C trimers and three R dimers is designated as C/sub 2/R/sub 3/ or c/sub 6/r/sub 6/.

  13. A Self-Switchable Polymer Reactor for Controlled Catalytic Chemistry Processes with a Hyperbranched Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Luo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A self-switchable polymer reactor with a hyperbranched structure for controlled catalytic chemistry processes is reported. This polymer reactor was made of silver nanoparticles and a polymer carrier consisting of hyperbranched polyethylenimine and hydroxyethyl acrylate that behaved as thermally switchable domains. Below the transfer temperature, relatively strong catalytic reactivity was demonstrated due to the leading role of hydrophilic groups in the switchable domains, which opened access to the substrate for the packaged silver nanoparticles. In contrast, it showed weak catalysis at relatively high temperatures, reducing from the significantly increased hydrophobicity in the switchable domains. In this way, the polymer reactor displays controllable, tunable, catalytic activity based on this approach. This novel design opens up the opportunity to develop intelligent polymer reactors for controlled catalytic processes.

  14. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Extensive studies have been conducted to establish sound basis for design and engineering of reactors for practising such catalytic reactions and for realizing improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so recent) developments in engineering reactors for catalytic reactions is ...

  15. HA117 endows HL60 cells with a stem-like signature by inhibiting the degradation of DNMT1 via its ability to down-regulate expression of the GGL domain of RGS6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuangshuang Li

    Full Text Available All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA induces complete remission in almost all patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL via its ability to induce the in vivo differentiation of APL blasts. However, prolonged ATRA treatment can result in drug resistance. In previous studies, we generated a multi-drug-resistant HL60/ATRA cell line and found it to contain a new drug resistance-related gene segment, HA117. In this study, we demonstrate that ATRA induces multi-drug-resistant subpopulations of HL60 cells with a putative stem-like signature by up-regulating the expression of the new gene segment HA117. Western blot analysis and quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that HA117 causes alternative splicing of regulator of G-protein signaling 6 (RGS6 and down-regulation of the expression of the GGL domain of RGS6, which plays an important role in DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1 degradation. Moreover, DNMT1 expression was increased in multi-drug resistance HL60/ATRA cells. Knockdown of HA117 restored expression of the GGL domain and blocked DNMT1 expression. Moreover, resistant cells displayed a putative stem-like signature with increased expression of cancer steam cell markers CD133 and CD123. The stem cell marker, Nanog, was significantly up-regulated. In conclusion, our study shows that HA117 potentially promotes the stem-like signature of the HL60/ATRA cell line by inhibiting by the ubiquitination and degradation of DNMT1 and by down-regulating the expression of the GGL domain of RGS6. These results throw light on the cellular events associated with the ATRA-induced multi-drug resistance phenotype in acute leukemia.

  16. Evolution of random catalytic networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, S.M. [Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States); Reidys, C.M. [Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States)]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-06-01

    In this paper the authors investigate the evolution of populations of sequences on a random catalytic network. Sequences are mapped into structures, between which are catalytic interactions that determine their instantaneous fitness. The catalytic network is constructed as a random directed graph. They prove that at certain parameter values, the probability of some relevant subgraphs of this graph, for example cycles without outgoing edges, is maximized. Populations evolving under point mutations realize a comparatively small induced subgraph of the complete catalytic network. They present results which show that populations reliably discover and persist on directed cycles in the catalytic graph, though these may be lost because of stochastic effects, and study the effect of population size on this behavior.

  17. Suppressed N2O formation during NH3 selective catalytic reduction using vanadium on zeolitic microporous TiO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Gwan; Lee, Hyun Jeong; Song, Inhak; Youn, Seunghee; Kim, Do Heui; Cho, Sung June

    2015-01-01

    Emission of N2O from mobile and off-road engine is now being currently regulated because of its high impact compared to that of CO2, thereby implying that N2O formation from the exhaust gas after-treatment system should be suppressed. Selective catalytic reduction using vanadium supported TiO2 catalyst in mobile and off-road engine has been considered to be major source for N2O emission in the system. Here we have demonstrated that vanadium catalyst supported on zeolitic microporous TiO2 obtained from the hydrothermal reaction of bulk TiO2 at 400 K in the presence of LiOH suppresses significantly the N2O emission compared to conventional VOx/TiO2 catalyst, while maintaining the excellent NOx reduction, which was ascribed to the location of VOx domain in the micropore of TiO2, resulting in the strong metal support interaction. The use of zeolitic microporous TiO2 provides a new way of preparing SCR catalyst with a high thermal stability and superior catalytic performance. It can be also extended further to the other catalytic system employing TiO2-based substrate. PMID:26235671

  18. Olfactory receptor signaling is regulated by the post-synaptic density 95, Drosophila discs large, zona-occludens 1 (PDZ) scaffold multi-PDZ domain protein 1.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dooley, Ruth

    2009-12-01

    The unique ability of mammals to detect and discriminate between thousands of different odorant molecules is governed by the diverse array of olfactory receptors expressed by olfactory sensory neurons in the nasal epithelium. Olfactory receptors consist of seven transmembrane domain G protein-coupled receptors and comprise the largest gene superfamily in the mammalian genome. We found that approximately 30% of olfactory receptors possess a classical post-synaptic density 95, Drosophila discs large, zona-occludens 1 (PDZ) domain binding motif in their C-termini. PDZ domains have been established as sites for protein-protein interaction and play a central role in organizing diverse cell signaling assemblies. In the present study, we show that multi-PDZ domain protein 1 (MUPP1) is expressed in the apical compartment of olfactory sensory neurons. Furthermore, on heterologous co-expression with olfactory sensory neurons, MUPP1 was shown to translocate to the plasma membrane. We found direct interaction of PDZ domains 1 + 2 of MUPP1 with the C-terminus of olfactory receptors in vitro. Moreover, the odorant-elicited calcium response of OR2AG1 showed a prolonged decay in MUPP1 small interfering RNA-treated cells. We have therefore elucidated the first building blocks of the putative \\'olfactosome\\

  19. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  20. INDETERMINATE DOMAIN PROTEIN binding sequences in the 5'-untranslated region and promoter of the SCARECROW gene play crucial and distinct roles in regulating SCARECROW expression in roots and leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Atsushi; Miura, Satoshi; Kozaki, Akiko

    2017-05-01

    SCARECROW (SCR) and SHORT-ROOT (SHR), which belong to the GRAS transcription factor family, are key regulators of root and leaf growth and development. Despite the importance of SCR expression for proper plant development, the mechanism of SCR regulation has not been clarified. A previous study showed that an INDETERMINATE DOMAIN transcription factor, JACKDAW (JKD), is essential for the expression of SCR in combination with SCR and SHR. In this study, we characterized possible binding sequences of INDETERMINATE DOMAIN PROTEIN in the 1.5 kb upstream region of SCR. Mutation in a binding sequence 340 bp upstream of the ATG increased transcriptional activation by JKD in transient assays using Arabidopsis cultured cells. However, the activity was not enhanced by SCR/SHR. Histochemical analysis of promoter activity in transgenic Arabidopsis plants carrying a fusion of the promoter and the β-glucronidase reporter gene showed that mutation of the -340 bp sequence eliminated most of the promoter activity, indicating that this sequence was indispensable for SCR expression. Promoter deletion of downstream sequences from -280 bp lost the enhanced activity by SCR/SHR in transient assays and activity in root tips and the bundle sheath (BS) in plants. Conversely, mutation at -480 bp did not significantly influence transcriptional activity in transient assays. However, most of SCR expression was lost except for the root tip in plants. The sequences around -1 kb appeared to regulate SCR expression negatively in plants. Together, these INDETERMINATE DOMAIN PROTEIN binding sequences have crucial and distinct functions in regulating SCR expression.

  1. Catalytic production of biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theilgaard Madsen, A.

    2011-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the catalytic production of diesel from biomass, especially emphasising catalytic conversion of waste vegetable oils and fats. In chapter 1 an introduction to biofuels and a review on different catalytic methods for diesel production from biomass is given. Two of these methods have been used industrially for a number of years already, namely the transesterification (and esterification) of oils and fats with methanol to form fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), and the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of fats and oils to form straight-chain alkanes. Other possible routes to diesel include upgrading and deoxygenation of pyrolysis oils or aqueous sludge wastes, condensations and reductions of sugars in aqueous phase (aqueous-phase reforming, APR) for monofunctional hydrocarbons, and gasification of any type of biomass followed by Fischer-Tropsch-synthesis for alkane biofuels. These methods have not yet been industrialised, but may be more promising due to the larger abundance of their potential feedstocks, especially waste feedstocks. Chapter 2 deals with formation of FAME from waste fats and oils. A range of acidic catalysts were tested in a model fat mixture of methanol, lauric acid and trioctanoin. Sulphonic acid-functionalised ionic liquids showed extremely fast convertion of lauric acid to methyl laurate, and trioctanoate was converted to methyl octanoate within 24 h. A catalyst based on a sulphonated carbon-matrix made by pyrolysing (or carbonising) carbohydrates, so-called sulphonated pyrolysed sucrose (SPS), was optimised further. No systematic dependency on pyrolysis and sulphonation conditions could be obtained, however, with respect to esterification activity, but high activity was obtained in the model fat mixture. SPS impregnated on opel-cell Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and microporous SiO{sub 2} (ISPS) was much less active in the esterification than the original SPS powder due to low loading and thereby low number of strongly acidic sites on the

  2. The two-pore domain potassium channel, TWIK-1, has a role in the regulation of heart rate and atrial size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Alex Hørby; Chatelain, Franck C; Huttner, Inken G

    2016-01-01

    The two-pore domain potassium (K(+)) channel TWIK-1 (or K2P1.1) contributes to background K(+) conductance in diverse cell types. TWIK-1, encoded by the KCNK1 gene, is present in the human heart with robust expression in the atria, however its physiological significance is unknown. To evaluate th...

  3. IAPs contain an evolutionarily conserved ubiquitin-binding domain that regulates NF-kappaB as well as cell survival and oncogenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Darding, Maurice; Miasari, Maria

    2008-01-01

    in cancer and their expression level is implicated in contributing to tumorigenesis, chemoresistance, disease progression and poor patient-survival. Here, we have identified an evolutionarily conserved ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domain in IAPs, which enables them to bind to Lys 63-linked polyubiquitin. We...

  4. Self-Esteem Is Relatively Stable Late in Life: The Role of Resources in the Health, Self-Regulation, and Social Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Jenny; Hoppmann, Christiane; Ram, Nilam; Gerstorf, Denis

    2015-01-01

    A large body of research has documented changes in self-esteem across adulthood and individual-difference correlates thereof. However, little is known about whether people maintain their self-esteem until the end of life and what role key risk factors in the health, cognitive, self-regulatory, and social domains play. To examine these questions,…

  5. The ARM Domain of ARMADILLO-REPEAT KINESIN 1 is Not Required for Microtubule Catastrophe But Can Negatively Regulate NIMA-RELATED KINASE 6 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eng, Ryan C; Halat, Laryssa S; Livingston, Samuel J; Sakai, Tatsuya; Motose, Hiroyasu; Wasteneys, Geoffrey O

    2017-08-01

    Microtubules are dynamic filaments, the assembly and disassembly of which are under precise control of various associated proteins, including motor proteins and regulatory enzymes. In Arabidopsis thaliana, two such proteins are the ARMADILLO-REPEAT KINESIN 1 (ARK1), which promotes microtubule disassembly, and the NIMA-RELATED KINASE 6 (NEK6), which has a role in organizing microtubule arrays. Previous yeast two-hybrid and in vitro pull-down assays determined that NEK6 can interact with ARK1 through the latter protein's Armadillo-repeat (ARM) cargo domain. To explore the function of the ARM domain, we generated fluorescent reporter fusion proteins to ARK1 lacking the ARM domain (ARK1ΔARM-GFP) and to the ARM domain alone (ARM-GFP). Both of these constructs strongly associated with the growing plus ends of microtubules, but only ARK1ΔARM-GFP was capable of inducing microtubule catastrophe and rescuing the ark1-1 root hair phenotype. These results indicate that neither the ARM domain nor NEK6's putative interaction with it is required for ARK1 to induce microtubule catastrophe. In further exploration of the ARK1-NEK6 relationship, we demonstrated that, despite evidence that NEK6 can phosphorylate ARK1 in vitro, the in vivo distribution and function of ARK1 were not affected by the loss of NEK6, and vice versa. Moreover, NEK6 and ARK1 were found to have overlapping but non-identical distribution on microtubules, and hormone treatments known to affect NEK6 activity did not stimulate interaction. These findings suggest that ARK1 and NEK6 function independently in microtubule dynamics and cell morphogenesis. Despite the results of this functional analysis, we found that overexpression of the ARM domain led to complete loss of NEK6 transcription, suggesting that the ARM domain might have a regulatory role in NEK6 expression. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions

  6. Active site structure and catalytic mechanism of phosphodiesterase for degradation of intracellular second messengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Chang-Guo

    2002-03-01

    Phosphodiesterases are clinical targets for a variety of biological disorders, because this superfamily of enzymes regulate intracellular concentration of cyclic nucleotides that serve as the second messengers playing a critical role in a variety of physiological processes. Understanding structure and mechanism of a phosphodiesterase will provide a solid basis for rational design of the more efficient therapeutics. Although a three-dimensional X-ray crystal structure of the catalytic domain of human phosphodiesterase 4B2B was recently reported, it was uncertain whether a critical bridging ligand in the active site is a water molecule or a hydroxide ion. The identity of this bridging ligand has been determined by performing first-principles quantum chemical calculations on models of the active site. All the results obtained indicate that this critical bridging ligand in the active site of the reported X-ray crystal structure is a hydroxide ion, rather than a water molecule, expected to serve as the nucleophile to initialize the catalytic degradation of the intracellular second messengers.

  7. Catalytic cracking with deasphalted oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaton, W.I.; Taylor, J.L.; Peck, L.B.; Mosby, J.F.

    1990-07-10

    This patent describes a catalytic cracking process. It comprises: hydrotreating resid; thereafter deasphalting the hydrotreated resid to produce substantially deasphalted oil; catalytically cracking the hydrotreated oil in a catalytic cracking unit in the presence of a cracking catalyst to produce upgraded oil leaving coked catalyst; and regenerating the coked catalyst in the presence of a combustion-supporting gas comprising excess molecular oxygen in an amount greater than the stoichiometric amount required for substantially completely combusting the coke on the catalyst to carbon dioxide.

  8. Phosphorylation of the dimeric cytoplasmic domain of the phytosulfokine receptor, PSKR1

    KAUST Repository

    Muleya, V.

    2016-08-04

    Phytosulfokines (PSKs) are plant peptide hormones that co-regulate plant growth, differentiation and defense responses. PSKs signal through a plasma membrane localized leucine-rich repeat receptor-like kinase (phytosulfokine receptor 1, PSKR1) that also contains a functional cytosolic guanylate cyclase with its cyclase catalytic center embedded within the kinase domain. To functionally characterize this novel type of overlapping dual catalytic function, we investigated the phosphorylation of PSKR1 in vitro Tandem mass spectrometry of the cytoplasmic domain of PSKR1 (PSKR1cd) revealed at least 11 phosphorylation sites (8 serines, 2 threonines and 1 tyrosine) within the PSKR1cd. Phosphomimetic mutations of three serine residues (Ser686, Ser696 and Ser698) in tandem at the juxta-membrane position resulted in enhanced kinase activity in the on-mutant that was suppressed in the off-mutant, but both mutations reduced guanylate cyclase activity. Both the on and off phosphomimetic mutations of the phosphotyrosine (Tyr888) residue in the activation loop suppressed kinase activity, while neither mutation affected guanylate cyclase activity. Size exclusion and analytical ultracentrifugation analysis of the PSKR1cd suggest that it is reversibly dimeric in solution, which was further confirmed by biflourescence complementation. Taken together, these data suggest that in this novel type of receptor domain architecture, specific phosphorylation and dimerization are possibly essential mechanisms for ligand-mediated catalysis and signaling.

  9. Catalytic cracking of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.; Nowak, S.; Naegler, T.; Zimmermann, J. [Hochschule Merseburg (Germany); Welscher, J.; Schwieger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany); Hahn, T. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    A most important factor for the chemical industry is the availability of cheap raw materials. As the oil price of crude oil is rising alternative feedstocks like coal are coming into focus. This work, the catalytic cracking of lignite is part of the alliance ibi (innovative Braunkohlenintegration) to use lignite as a raw material to produce chemicals. With this new one step process without an input of external hydrogen, mostly propylene, butenes and aromatics and char are formed. The product yield depends on manifold process parameters. The use of acid catalysts (zeolites like MFI) shows the highest amount of the desired products. Hydrogen rich lignites with a molar H/C ratio of > 1 are to be favoured. Due to primary cracking and secondary reactions the ratio between catalyst and lignite, temperature and residence time are the most important parameter to control the product distribution. Experiments at 500 C in a discontinuous rotary kiln reactor show yields up to 32 wt-% of hydrocarbons per lignite (maf - moisture and ash free) and 43 wt-% char, which can be gasified. Particularly, the yields of propylene and butenes as main products can be enhanced four times to about 8 wt-% by the use of catalysts while the tar yield decreases. In order to develop this innovative process catalyst systems fixed on beads were developed for an easy separation and regeneration of the used catalyst from the formed char. (orig.)

  10. Life and death of a single catalytic cracking particle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirer, Florian; Kalirai, Sam; Morris, Darius; Soparawalla, Santosh; Liu, Yijin; Mesu, Gerbrand; Andrews, Joy C; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2015-04-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particles account for 40 to 45% of worldwide gasoline production. The hierarchical complex particle pore structure allows access of long-chain feedstock molecules into active catalyst domains where they are cracked into smaller, more valuable hydrocarbon products (for example, gasoline). In this process, metal deposition and intrusion is a major cause for irreversible catalyst deactivation and shifts in product distribution. We used x-ray nanotomography of industrial FCC particles at differing degrees of deactivation to quantify changes in single-particle macroporosity and pore connectivity, correlated to iron and nickel deposition. Our study reveals that these metals are incorporated almost exclusively in near-surface regions, severely limiting macropore accessibility as metal concentrations increase. Because macropore channels are "highways" of the pore network, blocking them prevents feedstock molecules from reaching the catalytically active domains. Consequently, metal deposition reduces conversion with time on stream because the internal pore volume, although itself unobstructed, becomes largely inaccessible.

  11. Coupling of downstream RNA polymerase-promoter interactions with formation of catalytically competent transcription initiation complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekler, Vladimir; Minakhin, Leonid; Borukhov, Sergei; Mustaev, Arkady; Severinov, Konstantin

    2014-12-12

    Bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) makes extensive contacts with duplex DNA downstream of the transcription bubble in initiation and elongation complexes. We investigated the role of downstream interactions in formation of catalytically competent transcription initiation complex by measuring initiation activity of stable RNAP complexes with model promoter DNA fragments whose downstream ends extend from +3 to +21 relative to the transcription start site at +1. We found that DNA downstream of position +6 does not play a significant role in transcription initiation when RNAP-promoter interactions upstream of the transcription start site are strong and promoter melting region is AT rich. Further shortening of downstream DNA dramatically reduces efficiency of transcription initiation. The boundary of minimal downstream DNA duplex needed for efficient transcription initiation shifted further away from the catalytic center upon increasing the GC content of promoter melting region or in the presence of bacterial stringent response regulators DksA and ppGpp. These results indicate that the strength of RNAP-downstream DNA interactions has to reach a certain threshold to retain the catalytically competent conformation of the initiation complex and that establishment of contacts between RNAP and downstream DNA can be coupled with promoter melting. The data further suggest that RNAP interactions with DNA immediately downstream of the transcription bubble are particularly important for initiation of transcription. We hypothesize that these active center-proximal contacts stabilize the DNA template strand in the active center cleft and/or position the RNAP clamp domain to allow RNA synthesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Domain crossing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schraefel, M. C.; Rouncefield, Mark; Kellogg, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    In CSCW, how much do we need to know about another domain/culture before we observe, intersect and intervene with designs. What optimally would that other culture need to know about us? Is this a “how long is a piece of string” question, or an inquiry where we can consider a variety of contexts...

  13. Sorting Nexin 27 Protein Regulates Trafficking of a p21-activated Kinase (PAK) Interacting Exchange Factor (β-Pix)-G Protein-coupled Receptor Kinase Interacting Protein (GIT) Complex via a PDZ Domain Interaction*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdes, Julie L.; Tang, Jingrong; McDermott, Mark I.; Kuo, Jean-Cheng; Zimmerman, Seth P.; Wincovitch, Stephen M.; Waterman, Clare M.; Milgram, Sharon L.; Playford, Martin P.

    2011-01-01

    Sorting nexin 27 (SNX27) is a 62-kDa protein localized to early endosomes and known to regulate the intracellular trafficking of ion channels and receptors. In addition to a PX domain, SNX27 is the only sorting family member that contains a PDZ domain. To identify novel SNX27-PDZ binding partners, we performed a proteomic screen in mouse principal kidney cortical collecting duct cells using a GST-SNX27 fusion construct as bait. We found that β-Pix (p21-activated kinase-interactive exchange factor), a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for the Rho family of small GTPases known to regulate cell motility directly interacted with SNX27. The association of β-Pix and SNX27 is specific for β-Pix isoforms terminating in the type-1 PDZ binding motif (ETNL). In the same screen we also identified Git1/2 as a potential SNX27 interacting protein. The interaction between SNX27 and Git1/2 is indirect and mediated by β-Pix. Furthermore, we show recruitment of the β-Pix·Git complex to endosomal sites in a SNX27-dependent manner. Finally, migration assays revealed that depletion of SNX27 from HeLa and mouse principal kidney cortical collecting duct cells significantly decreases cell motility. We propose a model by which SNX27 regulates trafficking of β-Pix to focal adhesions and thereby influences cell motility. PMID:21926430

  14. Catalytic pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Sa, Jacinto

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reports on the latest developments of biomass catalytic pyrolysis for the production of fuels. The primary focus is on the role of catalysts in the process, namely, their influence in the liquefaction of lignocellulosic biomass.

  15. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chemical Engineering and Process Development Division, CSIR - National Chemical Laboratory,. Pune 411 008, India ... Abstract. Catalytic reactions are ubiquitous in chemical and allied industries. ... strategies and recent advances in process intensification/ multifunctional reactors are discussed to illustrate the approach.

  16. Regulation of the heavy metal pump AtHMA4 by a metal-binding autoinhibitory domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, Lone; Roed, Maria Dalgaard; Zhang, Yang

    tolerance of transformed yeast cells. To test whether this effect could be caused by chelation of Zn ions we performed in vitro assays for Zn binding to the AtHMA4 C-terminus. These demonstrated that the C-terminal domain is indeed a high-affinity Zn chelator. Full-length AtHMA4 was not able to contribute...... to yeast Zn tolerance. Much lower expression level of the full-length pump compared to the C-terminus alone was a possible explanation for this result. Alternatively, the C-terminal Zn-binding domain might serve other roles than just chelating cytoplasmic Zn. To reveal the importance of the different MBDs...

  17. Regulation Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bouvet, F.

    2015-06-15

    This paper reviews the design of regulation loops for power converters. Power converter control being a vast domain, it does not aim to be exhaustive. The objective is to give a rapid overview of the main synthesis methods in both continuous- and discrete-time domains.

  18. Regulation of cell signaling by the cytoplasmic domains of the heat-stable enterotoxin receptor: identification of autoinhibitory and activating motifs.

    OpenAIRE

    Rudner, X L; Mandal, K K; de Sauvage, F J; Kindman, L A; Almenoff, J S

    1995-01-01

    Infection with enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli is a leading cause of traveler's diarrhea. Many enterotoxigenic E. coli strains produce heat-stable enterotoxin (ST), a peptide that binds to the intestinal receptor guanylyl cyclase C known as STaR. The toxin-receptor interaction elevates intracellular cGMP, which then activates apical chloride secretion, resulting in secretory diarrhea. In this report, we examine how the intracellular domains of STaR participate in the propagation and regulati...

  19. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Theodore Dickerson; Juan Soria

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis is a promising thermochemical conversion route for lignocellulosic biomass that produces chemicals and fuels compatible with current, petrochemical infrastructure. Catalytic modifications to pyrolysis bio-oils are geared towards the elimination and substitution of oxygen and oxygen-containing functionalities in addition to increasing the hydrogen to carbon ratio of the final products. Recent progress has focused on both hydrodeoxygenation and hydrogenation of bio-oil using...

  20. Fuel-Rich Catalytic Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabbs, Theodore A.; Olson, Sandra L.

    1987-01-01

    Two-stage combustion system reduces particulate emissions. Program on catalytic oxidation of iso-octane demonstrates feasibility of two-stage combustion system for reducing particulate emissions. With fuel-rich (fuel/air equivalence ratios of 4.8 to 7.8) catalytic-combustion preburner as first stage, combustion process free of soot at reactor-outlet temperatures of 1,200 K or less.