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Sample records for catalytic dna biosensors

  1. Dendritic structure DNA for specific metal ion biosensor based on catalytic hairpin assembly and a sensitive synergistic amplification strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jianmin; Jing, Pei; Xue, Shuyan; Xu, Wenju

    2017-01-15

    In this work, a sensitive electrochemical biosensing to Pb(2+) was proposed based on the high specificity of DNAzymes to Pb(2+). The response signal was efficiently amplified by the catalytic hairpin assembly induced by strand replacement reaction and the formation of dendritic structure DNA (DSDNA) by layer-by-layer assembly. Firstly, in the presence of Pb(2+), the substrate strand (S1) of the Pb(2+)-specific DNAzymes was specifically cleaved by Pb(2+). Secondly, one of the two fragments (rS1) introduced into the electrode surface was hybridized with a hairpin DNA (H1) and further replaced by another hairpin DNA (H2) by the hybridization reaction of H1 with H2. The released rS1 then induced the next hybridization with H1. After repeated cycles, the catalytic recycling assembly of H2 with H1 was completed. Thirdly, two bioconjugates of Pt@Pd nanocages (Pt@PdNCs) labeled with DNA S3/S4 and electroactive toluidine blue (Tb) (Tb-S3-Pt@PdNCs and Tb-S4-Pt@PdNCs) were captured onto the resultant electrode surface through the hybridization of S3 and H2, S3 and S4, resulting in the formation of DSDNA triggered by layer-by-layer assembly. This formed DSDNA greatly facilitated the immobilization of manganese(III) meso-tetrakis (4-N-methylpyridiniumyl)-porphyrin (MnTMPyP) as mimicking enzyme. Under the synergistic catalysis of Pt@PdNCs and MnTMPyP to H2O2 reduction, the effective signal amplification of the developed Pb(2+) biosensor was achieved. As a result, the sensitive detection of the proposed electrochemical strategy for Pb(2+) was greatly improved in the range of 0.1pM-200nM with a detection limit of 0.033pM. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Recent Advances in DNA Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA based biosensors have recently gained much importance for detection of target genes responsible for diseases, in food industry, environment and in agriculture. This article describes different types of DNA based biosensors, their advantages and basic principle of operating system. The DNA biosensors provide fast, simple, economical, sensitive and selective detection of target genes by hybridization with specific probe. Various new strategies for DNA based biosensors have described along with recent trends and challenges in development of technology. Electrochemical biosensor has more advantages due to electrochemical behaviour of the labels towards the hybridization reaction on electrode surface or in solution in the presence of redox indicators. PCR free DNA biochip is emerging new tools in the field of diagnosis.

  3. DNA nanotechnology-enabled biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Jie; Zhu, Dan; Zhang, Yinan; Wang, Lianhui; Fan, Chunhai

    2016-02-15

    Biosensors employ biological molecules to recognize the target and utilize output elements which can translate the biorecognition event into electrical, optical or mass-sensitive signals to determine the quantities of the target. DNA-based biosensors, as a sub-field to biosensor, utilize DNA strands with short oligonucleotides as probes for target recognition. Although DNA-based biosensors have offered a promising alternative for fast, simple and cheap detection of target molecules, there still exist key challenges including poor stability and reproducibility that hinder their competition with the current gold standard for DNA assays. By exploiting the self-recognition properties of DNA molecules, researchers have dedicated to make versatile DNA nanostructures in a highly rigid, controllable and functionalized manner, which offers unprecedented opportunities for developing DNA-based biosensors. In this review, we will briefly introduce the recent advances on design and fabrication of static and dynamic DNA nanostructures, and summarize their applications for fabrication and functionalization of DNA-based biosensors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Biosensors for DNA sequence detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vercoutere, Wenonah; Akeson, Mark

    2002-01-01

    DNA biosensors are being developed as alternatives to conventional DNA microarrays. These devices couple signal transduction directly to sequence recognition. Some of the most sensitive and functional technologies use fibre optics or electrochemical sensors in combination with DNA hybridization. In a shift from sequence recognition by hybridization, two emerging single-molecule techniques read sequence composition using zero-mode waveguides or electrical impedance in nanoscale pores.

  5. Disposable electrochemical DNA biosensor for environmental ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A simple procedure for the voltammetric detection of the DNA damage using a disposable electrochemical DNA biosensor is reported. The DNA biosensor is assembled by immobilizing the double stranded calf thymus DNA (dsDNA) on the surface of a disposable carbon screen-printed electrode. The interaction of ...

  6. Recent development of nano-materials used in DNA biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kai; Huang, Junran; Ye, Zunzhong; Ying, Yibin; Li, Yanbin

    2009-01-01

    As knowledge of the structure and function of nucleic acid molecules has increased, sequence-specific DNA detection has gained increased importance. DNA biosensors based on nucleic acid hybridization have been actively developed because of their specificity, speed, portability, and low cost. Recently, there has been considerable interest in using nano-materials for DNA biosensors. Because of their high surface-to-volume ratios and excellent biological compatibilities, nano-materials could be used to increase the amount of DNA immobilization; moreover, DNA bound to nano-materials can maintain its biological activity. Alternatively, signal amplification by labeling a targeted analyte with nano-materials has also been reported for DNA biosensors in many papers. This review summarizes the applications of various nano-materials for DNA biosensors during past five years. We found that nano-materials of small sizes were advantageous as substrates for DNA attachment or as labels for signal amplification; and use of two or more types of nano-materials in the biosensors could improve their overall quality and to overcome the deficiencies of the individual nano-components. Most current DNA biosensors require the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in their protocols. However, further development of nano-materials with smaller size and/or with improved biological and chemical properties would substantially enhance the accuracy, selectivity and sensitivity of DNA biosensors. Thus, DNA biosensors without PCR amplification may become a reality in the foreseeable future.

  7. Recent Development of Nano-Materials Used in DNA Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yibin Ying

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available As knowledge of the structure and function of nucleic acid molecules has increased, sequence-specific DNA detection has gained increased importance. DNA biosensors based on nucleic acid hybridization have been actively developed because of their specificity, speed, portability, and low cost. Recently, there has been considerable interest in using nano-materials for DNA biosensors. Because of their high surface-to-volume ratios and excellent biological compatibilities, nano-materials could be used to increase the amount of DNA immobilization; moreover, DNA bound to nano-materials can maintain its biological activity. Alternatively, signal amplification by labeling a targeted analyte with nano-materials has also been reported for DNA biosensors in many papers. This review summarizes the applications of various nano-materials for DNA biosensors during past five years. We found that nano-materials of small sizes were advantageous as substrates for DNA attachment or as labels for signal amplification; and use of two or more types of nano-materials in the biosensors could improve their overall quality and to overcome the deficiencies of the individual nano-components. Most current DNA biosensors require the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR in their protocols. However, further development of nano-materials with smaller size and/or with improved biological and chemical properties would substantially enhance the accuracy, selectivity and sensitivity of DNA biosensors. Thus, DNA biosensors without PCR amplification may become a reality in the foreseeable future.

  8. [Progress of the study on DNA electrochemical biosensor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yanzhen; Zhang, Haiyan; Wu, Xiaoli; Liu, Zhongming; Wang, Jie

    2013-02-01

    With its rapid development, the electrochemical biosensor has recently been widely used in gene diagnosis, environmental monitoring, and medical sciences. More and more attention has been focused on how to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of biosensor. In this review, the principle and composition of DNA electrochemical biosensor is simply introduced, the preparation of biological membrane, the application of indicator are specially emphasized, and the future prospect for the development in this field is given.

  9. Visual optical biosensors based on DNA-functionalized polyacrylamide hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khimji, Imran; Kelly, Erin Y; Helwa, Youssef; Hoang, Michael; Liu, Juewen

    2013-12-15

    Biosensors are devices that can provide quantitative or semi-quantitative analytical information about target molecules, where molecular recognition is based on biomolecular interactions. In recent years, DNA has emerged as a useful molecule for biosensor development since DNA can not only recognize its complementary strand, but also metal ions, small molecules, proteins and cells utilizing DNA aptamer technology. Converting DNA binding events into useful biosensors often require sensor immobilization. Among the various materials for sensor immobilization, hydrogels are particularly attractive. Hydrogels are crosslinked hydrophilic polymer networks that undergo swelling in water. In a gel, DNA immobilization can take place in 3D, allowing for high DNA loading capacity. Hydrogels are transparent, offering low optical background. The gel volume is affected by many environmental parameters such as temperature, pH, ionic strength, and solvent composition. In this paper, we present a concise summary of recent developments in DNA-functionalized hydrogel biosensors for visual detection. Detailed methods for immobilizing DNA biosensors in monolithic polyacrylamide gels and gel microparticles are supplied. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Toward a catalytic site in DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Ulla; Rohr, Katja; Vogel, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    A number of functionalized polyaza crown ether building blocks have been incorporated into DNA-conjugates as catalytic Cu(2+) binding sites. The effect of the DNA-conjugate catalyst on the stereochemical outcome of a Cu(2+)-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction will be presented.......A number of functionalized polyaza crown ether building blocks have been incorporated into DNA-conjugates as catalytic Cu(2+) binding sites. The effect of the DNA-conjugate catalyst on the stereochemical outcome of a Cu(2+)-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction will be presented....

  11. An Evolution Based Biosensor Receptor DNA Sequence Generation Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yupeng Zang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A biosensor is composed of a bioreceptor, an associated recognition molecule, and a signal transducer that can selectively detect target substances for analysis. DNA based biosensors utilize receptor molecules that allow hybridization with the target analyte. However, most DNA biosensor research uses oligonucleotides as the target analytes and does not address the potential problems of real samples. The identification of recognition molecules suitable for real target analyte samples is an important step towards further development of DNA biosensors. This study examines the characteristics of DNA used as bioreceptors and proposes a hybrid evolution-based DNA sequence generating algorithm, based on DNA computing, to identify suitable DNA bioreceptor recognition molecules for stable hybridization with real target substances. The Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP approach is applied in the proposed algorithm to evaluate the safety and fitness of the generated DNA sequences. This approach improves efficiency and stability for enhanced and variable-length DNA sequence generation and allows extension to generation of variable-length DNA sequences with diverse receptor recognition requirements.

  12. An evolution based biosensor receptor DNA sequence generation algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eungyeong; Lee, Malrey; Gatton, Thomas M; Lee, Jaewan; Zang, Yupeng

    2010-01-01

    A biosensor is composed of a bioreceptor, an associated recognition molecule, and a signal transducer that can selectively detect target substances for analysis. DNA based biosensors utilize receptor molecules that allow hybridization with the target analyte. However, most DNA biosensor research uses oligonucleotides as the target analytes and does not address the potential problems of real samples. The identification of recognition molecules suitable for real target analyte samples is an important step towards further development of DNA biosensors. This study examines the characteristics of DNA used as bioreceptors and proposes a hybrid evolution-based DNA sequence generating algorithm, based on DNA computing, to identify suitable DNA bioreceptor recognition molecules for stable hybridization with real target substances. The Traveling Salesman Problem (TSP) approach is applied in the proposed algorithm to evaluate the safety and fitness of the generated DNA sequences. This approach improves efficiency and stability for enhanced and variable-length DNA sequence generation and allows extension to generation of variable-length DNA sequences with diverse receptor recognition requirements.

  13. Development of an electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An electrochemical DNA biosensor was developed by avidin-biotin interaction of a biotinylated probe and avidin-attached, poly(L-glutamic) acid coated pencil graphite electrode (PGA/PGE) for detection of specific Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA sequence. The discrimination of fully complementary hybridization and ...

  14. Electrochemical detection of benzo(a)pyrene and related DNA damage using DNA/hemin/nafion–graphene biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Yongnian, E-mail: ynni@ncu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China); Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Wang, Pingping; Song, Haiyan [Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Lin, Xiaoyun [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330047 (China); Department of Chemistry, Nanchang University, Nanchang 330031 (China); Kokot, Serge, E-mail: s.kokot@qut.edu.au [School of Chemistry, Physics and Mechanical Engineering, Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane 4001 (Australia)

    2014-04-01

    Graphical abstract: A novel electrochemical biosensor, DNA/hemin/nafion–graphene/GCE, was constructed to quantitatively study the DNA damage induced by the metabolite of benzo(a)pyrene in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. - Highlights: • Construction of a novel DNA/hemin/nafion-graphene/GCE biosensor. • DNA damage induced by the benzo(a)pyrene metabolite was detected. • DPV analysis of benzo(a)pyrene provided a quantitative estimate of DNA damage. • Hemin/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} system could mimic the cytochrome P450 to metabolize benzo(a)pyrene. - Abstract: A novel electrochemical biosensor, DNA/hemin/nafion–graphene/GCE, was constructed for the analysis of the benzo(a)pyrene PAH, which can produce DNA damage induced by a benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) enzyme-catalytic product. This biosensor was assembled layer-by-layer, and was characterized with the use of cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and atomic force microscopy. Ultimately, it was demonstrated that the hemin/nafion–graphene/GCE was a viable platform for the immobilization of DNA. This DNA biosensor was treated separately in benzo(a)pyrene, hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and in their mixture, respectively, and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) analysis showed that an oxidation peak was apparent after the electrode was immersed in H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Such experiments indicated that in the presence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, hemin could mimic cytochrome P450 to metabolize benzo(a)pyrene, and a voltammogram of its metabolite was recorded. The DNA damage induced by this metabolite was also detected by electrochemical impedance and ultraviolet spectroscopy. Finally, a novel, indirect DPV analytical method for BaP in aqueous solution was developed based on the linear metabolite versus BaP concentration plot; this method provided a new, indirect, quantitative estimate of DNA damage.

  15. Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechnitz, Garry A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes theory and principles behind biosensors that incorporate biological components as part of a sensor or probe. Projects major applications in medicine and veterinary medicine, biotechnology, food and agriculture, environmental studies, and the military. Surveys current use of biosensors. (ML)

  16. Fluorescent DNA Stabilized Silver Nanoclusters as Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Latorre

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA stabilized fluorescent silver nanoclusters are promising materials, of which fluorescent properties can be exploited to develop sensors. Particularly, the presence of a DNA strand in the structure has promoted the development of gene sensors where one part of the sensor is able to recognize the target gene sequence. Moreover, since oligonucleotides can be designed to have binding properties (aptamers a variety of sensors for proteins and cells have been developed using silver nanoclusters. In this review the applications of this material as sensors of different biomolecules are summarized.

  17. Application of Gold Nanoparticles for Electrochemical DNA Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mishaal Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An electrochemical DNA biosensor was successfully fabricated by using (3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES as a linker molecule combined with the gold nanoparticles (GNPs on thermally oxidized SiO2 thin films. The SiO2 thin films surface was chemically modified with a mixture of APTES and GNPs for DNA detection in different time periods of 30 min, 1 hour, 2 hours, and 4 hours, respectively. The DNA immobilization and hybridization were conducted by measuring the differences of the capacitance value within the frequency range of 1 Hz to 1 MHz. The capacitance values for DNA immobilization were 160 μF, 77.8 μF, 70 μF, and 64.6 μF, respectively, with the period of time from 30 min to 4 hours. Meanwhile the capacitance values for DNA hybridization were 44 μF, 54 μF, 55 μF, and 61.5 μF, respectively. The capacitance value of bare SiO2 thin film was 0.42 μF, which was set as a base line for a reference in DNA detection. The differences of the capacitance value between the DNA immobilization and hybridization revealed that the modified SiO2 thin films using APTES and GNPs were successfully developed for DNA detection.

  18. Photonic Crystal Biosensor with In-Situ Synthesized DNA Probes for Enhanced Sensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Shuren [Vanderbilt University, Nashville; Zhao, Y. [Vanderbilt University, Nashville; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Kravchenko, Ivan I [ORNL; Weiss, Sharon [Vanderbilt University, Nashville

    2013-01-01

    We report on a nearly 8-fold increase in multi-hole defect photonic crystal biosensor response by incorporating in-situ synthesis of DNA probes, as compared to the conventional functionalization method employing pre-synthesized DNA probe immobilization.

  19. DNA biosensor/biochip for multiplex blood group genotyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccoz, S A; Blum, L J; Marquette, C A

    2013-12-15

    At present, 33 blood groups representing over 300 antigens are listed by the International Society of Blood Transfusion (ISBT). Most of them result from a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the corresponding DNA sequence, i.e. approx. 200 SNPs. In immunohematology laboratories, blood group determination is classically carried out by serological tests, but these have some limitations, mostly in term of multiplexing and throughput. Yet, there is a growing need of extended blood group typing to prevent alloimmunization in transfused patients and transfusion accidents. The knowledge of the molecular bases of blood groups allows the use of molecular biology methods within immunohematology laboratories. Numerous assays focused on blood group genotyping were developed and described during the last 10 years. Some of them were real biochips or biosensors while others were more characterized by the particular molecular biology techniques they used, but all were intending to produce multiplex analysis. PCR techniques are most of the time used followed by an analytical step involving a DNA biosensor, biochip or analysis system (capillary electrophoresis, mass spectrometry). According to the method used, the test can then be classified as low-, medium- or high-throughput. There are several companies which developed platforms dedicated to blood group genotyping able to analyze simultaneously various SNPs or variants associated with blood group systems. This review summarizes the characteristics of each molecular biology method and medium-/high-throughput platforms dedicated to the blood group genotyping. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Nanomaterial-Assisted Signal Enhancement of Hybridization for DNA Biosensors: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minqiang Li

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Detection of DNA sequences has received broad attention due to its potential applications in a variety of fields. As sensitivity of DNA biosensors is determined by signal variation of hybridization events, the signal enhancement is of great significance for improving the sensitivity in DNA detection, which still remains a great challenge. Nanomaterials, which possess some unique chemical and physical properties caused by nanoscale effects, provide a new opportunity for developing novel nanomaterial-based signal-enhancers for DNA biosensors. In this review, recent progress concerning this field, including some newly-developed signal enhancement approaches using quantum-dots, carbon nanotubes and their composites reported by our group and other researchers are comprehensively summarized. Reports on signal enhancement of DNA biosensors by non-nanomaterials, such as enzymes and polymer reagents, are also reviewed for comparison. Furthermore, the prospects for developing DNA biosensors using nanomaterials as signal-enhancers in future are also indicated.

  1. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle-based lateral flow biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takalkar, Sunitha; Baryeh, Kwaku; Liu, Guodong

    2017-12-15

    We report a fluorescent carbon nanoparticle (FCN)-based lateral flow biosensor for ultrasensitive detection of DNA. Fluorescent carbon nanoparticle with a diameter of around 15nm was used as a tag to label a detection DNA probe, which was complementary with the part of target DNA. A capture DNA probe was immobilized on the test zone of the lateral flow biosensor. Sandwich-type hybridization reactions among the FCN-labeled DNA probe, target DNA and capture DNA probe were performed on the lateral flow biosensor. In the presence of target DNA, FCNs were captured on the test zone of the biosensor and the fluorescent intensity of the captured FCNs was measured with a portable fluorescent reader. After systematic optimizations of experimental parameters (the components of running buffers, the concentration of detection DNA probe used in the preparation of FCN-DNA conjugates, the amount of FCN-DNA dispensed on the conjugate pad and the dispensing cycles of the capture DNA probes on the test-zone), the biosensor could detect a minimum concentration of 0.4 fM DNA. This study provides a rapid and low-cost approach for DNA detection with high sensitivity, showing great promise for clinical application and biomedical diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Electrochemical DNA biosensor based on grafting-to mode of terminal deoxynucleoside transferase-mediated extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jinyuan; Liu, Zhoujie; Peng, Huaping; Zheng, Yanjie; Lin, Zhen; Liu, Ailin; Chen, Wei; Lin, Xinhua

    2017-12-15

    Previously reported electrochemical DNA biosensors based on in-situ polymerization approach reveal that terminal deoxynucleoside transferase (TdTase) has good amplifying performance and promising application in the design of electrochemical DNA biosensor. However, this method, in which the background is significantly affected by the amount of TdTase, suffers from being easy to produce false positive result and poor stability. Herein, we firstly present a novel electrochemical DNA biosensor based on grafting-to mode of TdTase-mediated extension, in which DNA targets are polymerized in homogeneous solution and then hybridized with DNA probes on BSA-based DNA carrier platform. It is surprising to find that the background in the grafting-to mode of TdTase-based electrochemical DNA biosensor have little interference from the employed TdTase. Most importantly, the proposed electrochemical DNA biosensor shows greatly improved detection performance over the in-situ polymerization approach-based electrochemical DNA biosensor. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A novel GMO biosensor for rapid ultrasensitive and simultaneous detection of multiple DNA components in GMO products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lin; Zheng, Lei; Chen, Yinji; Xue, Feng; Cheng, Lin; Adeloju, Samuel B; Chen, Wei

    2015-04-15

    Since the introduction of genetically modified organisms (GMOs), there has been on-going and continuous concern and debates on the commercialization of products derived from GMOs. There is an urgent need for development of highly efficient analytical methods for rapid and high throughput screening of GMOs components, as required for appropriate labeling of GMO-derived foods, as well as for on-site inspection and import/export quarantine. In this study, we describe, for the first time, a multi-labeling based electrochemical biosensor for simultaneous detection of multiple DNA components of GMO products on the same sensing interface. Two-round signal amplification was applied by using both an exonuclease enzyme catalytic reaction and gold nanoparticle-based bio-barcode related strategies, respectively. Simultaneous multiple detections of different DNA components of GMOs were successfully achieved with satisfied sensitivity using this electrochemical biosensor. Furthermore, the robustness and effectiveness of the proposed approach was successfully demonstrated by application to various GMO products, including locally obtained and confirmed commercial GMO seeds and transgenetic plants. The proposed electrochemical biosensor demonstrated unique merits that promise to gain more interest in its use for rapid and on-site simultaneous multiple screening of different components of GMO products. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Nanostructured ZnO-based biosensor: DNA immobilization and hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mishaal Mohammed

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available An electrochemical DNA biosensor was successfully fabricated by using (3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES with zinc oxide (ZnO nanorods synthesized using microwave-assisted chemical bath deposition method on thermally oxidized SiO2 thin films. The structural quality and morphology of the ZnO nanorods were determined by employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD, which show a hexagonal wurtzite structure with a preferred orientation along the (101 direction. The surface of the SiO2 thin films was chemically modified with ZnO. Label-free detection DNA immobilization and hybridization were performed using potassium hexacyanoferrate with cyclic voltammetry (CV measurements. The capacitance, permittivity, and conductivity profiles of the fabricated sensor clearly indicate DNA immobilization and hybridization. Results show that the capacitance values of bare, ZnO- modified surface immobilization, and target DNA hybridization were 46 × 10−12 F, 47 × 10−8 F, 27 μF, and 17 μF, respectively, at 1 Hz. The permittivity measurement increased from 3.94 × 103 to 251 × 103 and 165 × 103 at the frequency range of approximately 200 to 1 Hz for bare and DNA immobilization and hybridization, respectively. The measured conductivity values for the bare, ZnO, immobilized, and hybridization device were 2.4 × 10−9, 10 × 10−8, 1.6 × 10−7, and 1.3 × 10−7 S cm−1, respectively.

  5. Preparation of DNA biosensor application from fuel oil waste by functionalization and characterization of MWCNT

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Mishaal Mohammed; Ismail K. Al-Khateeb; Adawiya J. Haider; Ruslinda A. Rahim; U. Hashim

    2017-01-01

    The potential of using a multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) synthesized from a fuel oil waste of power plants has discovered for the first time for DNA biosensors application. The MWCNT surface morphologies were examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The thickness of the MWCNT was found 203nm and confirmed by FESEM. The electrochemical DNA biosensor was successfully developed using a MWCNT modified on SiO2 thin films. The capacitanc...

  6. A "turn-on" fluorescent copper biosensor based on DNA cleavage-dependent graphene-quenched DNAzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng; Zhao, Huimin; Chen, Shuo; Yu, Hongtao; Zhang, Yaobin; Quan, Xie

    2011-06-15

    A novel and promising "turn-on" fluorescent Cu(2+) biosensor is designed based on graphene-DNAzyme catalytic beacon. Due to the essential surface and quenching properties of two-dimensional graphene, it can function as both "scaffold" and "quencher" of the Cu(2+)-dependent DNAzyme, facilitating the formation of self-assembled graphene-quenched DNAzyme complex. However, Cu(2+)-induced catalytic reaction disturbs the graphene-DNAzyme conformation, which will produce internal DNA cleavage-dependent effect. In this case, the quenched fluorescence in graphene-DNAzyme is quickly recovered to a large extent in 15 min. Compared with common DNAzyme-based sensors, the presented graphene-based catalytic beacon greatly improves the signal-to-background ratio, hence increasing the sensitivity (LOD=0.365 nM). Furthermore, the controllable DNA cleavage reaction provides an original and alternative internal method to regulate the interaction between graphene and DNA relative to the previous external sequence-specific hybridization-dependent regulation, which will open new opportunities for nucleic studies and sensing applications in the future. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A Graphene-Based Biosensing Platform Based on Regulated Release of an Aptameric DNA Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Mao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available A novel biosensing platform was developed by integrating an aptamer-based DNA biosensor with graphene oxide (GO for rapid and facile detection of adenosine triphosphate (ATP, as a model target. The DNA biosensor, which is locked by GO, is designed to contain two sensing modules that include recognition site for ATP and self-replication track that yields the nicking domain for Nt.BbvCI. By taking advantage of the different binding affinity of single-stranded DNA, double-stranded DNA and aptamer-target complex toward GO, the DNA biosensor could be efficiently released from GO in the presence of target with the help of a complementary DNA strand (CPDNA that partially hybridizes to the DNA biosensor. Then, the polymerization/nicking enzyme synergetic isothermal amplification could be triggered, leading to the synthesis of massive DNA amplicons, thus achieving an enhanced sensitivity with a wide linear dynamic response range of four orders of magnitude and good selectivity. This biosensing strategy expands the applications of GO-DNA nanobiointerfaces in biological sensing, showing great potential in fundamental research and biomedical diagnosis.

  8. Hall effect biosensors with ultraclean graphene film for improved sensitivity of label-free DNA detection

    KAUST Repository

    Loan, Phan Thi Kim

    2017-07-19

    The quality of graphene strongly affects the performance of graphene-based biosensors which are highly demanded for the sensitive and selective detection of biomolecules, such as DNA. This work reported a novel transfer process for preparing a residue-free graphene film using a thin gold supporting layer. A Hall effect device made of this gold-transferred graphene was demonstrated to significantly enhance the sensitivity (≈ 5 times) for hybridization detection, with a linear detection range of 1 pM – 100nM for DNA target. Our findings provide an efficient method to boost the sensitivity of graphene-based biosensors for DNA recognition.

  9. Electrochemical behavior of antioxidants: Part 3. Electrochemical studies of caffeic Acid–DNA interaction and DNA/carbon nanotube biosensor for DNA damage and protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Refat Abdel-Hamid

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Multi-walled carbon nanotubes-modified glassy carbon electrode biosensor was used for electrochemical studies of caffeic acid–dsDNA interaction in phosphate buffer solution at pH 2.12. Caffeic acid, CAF, shows a well-defined cyclic voltammetric wave. Its anodic peak current decreases and the peak potential shifts positively on the addition of dsDNA. This behavior was ascribed to an interaction of CAF with dsDNA giving CAF–dsDNA complex by intercalative binding mode. The apparent binding constant of CAF–dsDNA complex was determined using amperometric titrations. The oxidative damage caused to DNA was detected using the biosensor. The damage caused by the reactive oxygen species, hydroxyl radical (·−OH generated by the Fenton system on the DNA-biosensor was detected. It was found that CAF has the capability of scavenging the hydroxide radical and protecting the DNA immobilized on the GCE surface.

  10. Implementing a two-layer feed-forward catalytic DNA circuit for enzyme-free and colorimetric detection of nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravan, Hadi

    2016-03-03

    In the present study, a highly sensitive and specific bio-sensing platform for enzyme-free and colorimetric detection of nucleic acids has been developed. The biosensor is composed of two DNA nanostructures and two fuel strands that construct the foundation of a feed-forward catalytic DNA circuit. Upon binding the target strand to a specific DNA nanostructure, the circuit is run in order that at the end a hemin-binding aptamer, with the ability to convert a colorless substrate into a colored substance is released. Based on this strategy, 4 pM of the target DNA can be easily detected in serum samples by naked eyes after only a two-hour incubation with the circuit; meanwhile, if the incubation time is extended to 3 h, the biosensor can detect 1 pM of the target DNA. Besides the elevated sensitivity, the circuit can truly discriminate a spurious target containing one nucleotide mismatch with high specificity. Overall, the enzyme-free catalytic DNA circuit can be used as a sensitive alternative method to enzyme-based biosensors for the specific and cost-effective detection of nucleic acids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. QCM DNA biosensor for the diagnosis of a fish pathogenic virus VHSV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Sung-Rok; Jeong, Hyun-Do; Hong, Suhee

    2010-08-15

    Viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) is one of the most serious viral diseases damaging both fresh and marine fish species. VHS caused by VHSV and diagnosis of VHSV has been dependent on the conventional methods, such as cell culture and RT-PCR, which takes a few days or several hours. This study demonstrates a rapid and sensitive QCM biosensor for diagnosis of VHSV infection in fish. The QCM biosensor was developed to detect a main viral RNA encoding G protein in VHSV using the specific DNA probe. To maximize the sensitivity of the biosensor, we prepared three different DNA probes which modified 3' end of DNA by thiol, amine, or biotin and compared three different immobilisation methods on quartz surface coated with gold: immobilisation of thiol labelled probe DNA on naked gold surface, immobilisation of amino labelled probe DNA on gold surface prepared as carboxyl chip using MPA followed by EDC/NHS activation, and immobilisation of biotin labelled probe DNA on gold surface after immobilising avidin on carboxyl chip prior to biotin. As a result, immobilisation method using avidin-biotin interaction was most efficient to immobilise probe DNA and to detect target DNA. The QCM biosensor system using biotinylated probe DNA was stable enough to withstand 32 times of repeated regenerations and the detection limit was 0.0016muM. Diagnosis using the QCM biosensor system was more sensitive and much faster than a conventional RT-PCR analysis in detecting the viral RNA. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. On the Role of DNA in DNA-based Catalytic Enantioselective Conjugate Addition Reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, Ewold W.; Boersma, Arnold J.; Roelfes, Gerard; Feringa, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    A kinetic study of DNA-based catalytic enantioselective Friedel–Crafts alkylation and Michael addition reactions showed that DNA affects the rate of these reactions significantly. Whereas in the presence of DNA, a large acceleration was found for the Friedel–Crafts alkylation and a modest

  13. A novel self-powered and sensitive label-free DNA biosensor in microbial fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghary, Maryam; Raoof, Jahan Bakhsh; Rahimnejad, Mostafa; Ojani, Reza

    2016-08-15

    In this work, a novel self-powered, sensitive, low-cost, and label-free DNA biosensor is reported by applying a two-chambered microbial fuel cell (MFC) as a power supply. A graphite electrode and an Au nanoparticles modified graphite electrode (AuNP/graphite electrode) were used as anode and cathode in the MFC system, respectively. The active biocatalyst in the anodic chamber was a mixed culture of microorganisms. The sensing element of the biosensor was fabricated by the well-known Au-thiol binding the ssDNA probe on the surface of an AuNP/graphite cathode. Electrons produced by microorganisms were transported from the anode to the cathode through an external circuit, which could be detected by the terminal multi-meter detector. The difference between power densities of the ssDNA probe modified cathode in the absence and presence of complementary sequence served as the detection signal of the DNA hybridization with detection limit of 3.1nM. Thereafter, this biosensor was employed for diagnosis and determination of complementary sequence in a human serum sample. The hybridization specificity studies further revealed that the developed DNA biosensor could distinguish fully complementary sequences from one-base mismatched and non-complementary sequences. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Application of graphene–pyrenebutyric acid nanocomposite as probe oligonucleotide immobilization platform in a DNA biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xuan; Gao, Feng; Cai, Xili; Zheng, Meixia [Department of Chemistry and Environment Science, Fujian Province University Key Laboratory of Analytical Science, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Gao, Fei, E-mail: fgao@fjzs.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry and Environment Science, Fujian Province University Key Laboratory of Analytical Science, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Jiang, Shulian [Zhangzhou Product Quality Supervision and Inspection Institute, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Wang, Qingxiang, E-mail: axiang236@126.com [Department of Chemistry and Environment Science, Fujian Province University Key Laboratory of Analytical Science, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China)

    2013-10-15

    A stable and uniform organic–inorganic nanocomposite that consists of graphene (GR) and pyrenebutyric acid (PBA) was obtained by ultrasonication, which was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and UV–vis absorption spectra. The dispersion was dropped onto a gold electrode surface to obtain GR–PBA modified electrode (GR–PBA/Au). Electrochemical behaviors of the modified electrode were characterized by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy using [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3−/4−} as the electroactive probe. A novel DNA biosensor was constructed based on the covalent coupling of amino modified oligonucleotides with the carboxylic group on PBA. By using methylene blue (MB) as a redox-active hybridization indicator, the biosensor was applied to electrochemically detect the complementary sequence, and the results suggested that the peak currents of MB showed a good linear relationship with the logarithm values of target DNA concentrations in the range from 1.0 × 10{sup −15} to 5.0 × 10{sup −12} M with a detection limit of 3.8 × 10{sup −16} M. The selectivity experiment also showed that the biosensor can well distinguish the target DNA from the non-complementary sequences. - Highlights: • A nanocomposite containing graphene and pyrenebutyric acid was prepared. • The nanocomposite was applied as a function platform for DNA immobilization platform. • The developed biosensor shows excellent selectivity and sensitivity for target DNA detection.

  15. Recent advances in DNA-based electrochemical biosensors for heavy metal ion detection: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidur, M R; Aziz, A R Abdul; Basirun, W J

    2017-04-15

    The presence of heavy metal in food chains due to the rapid industrialization poses a serious threat on the environment. Therefore, detection and monitoring of heavy metals contamination are gaining more attention nowadays. However, the current analytical methods (based on spectroscopy) for the detection of heavy metal contamination are often very expensive, tedious and can only be handled by trained personnel. DNA biosensors, which are based on electrochemical transduction, is a sensitive but inexpensive method of detection. The principles, sensitivity, selectivity and challenges of electrochemical biosensors are discussed in this review. This review also highlights the major advances of DNA-based electrochemical biosensors for the detection of heavy metal ions such as Hg 2+ , Ag + , Cu 2+ and Pb 2+ . Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Simultaneous Profiling of DNA Mutation and Methylation by Melting Analysis Using Magnetoresistive Biosensor Array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rizzi, Giovanni; Lee, Jung-Rok; Dahl, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications, in particular DNA methylation, are gaining increasing interest as complementary information to DNA mutations for cancer diagnostics and prognostics. We introduce a method to simultaneously profile DNA mutation and methylation events for an array of sites with single site...... specificity. Genomic (mutation) or bisulphite-treated (methylation) DNA is amplified using nondiscriminatory primers, and the amplicons are then hybridized to a giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor array followed by melting curve measurements. The GMR biosensor platform offers scalable multiplexed detection...... of DNA hybridization, which is insensitive to temperature variation. The melting curve approach further enhances the assay specificity and tolerance to variations in probe length. We demonstrate the utility of this method by simultaneously profiling five mutation and four methylation sites in human...

  17. Preparation of DNA biosensor application from fuel oil waste by functionalization and characterization of MWCNT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Mishaal Mohammed

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The potential of using a multi-wall carbon nanotube (MWCNT synthesized from a fuel oil waste of power plants has discovered for the first time for DNA biosensors application. The MWCNT surface morphologies were examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. The thickness of the MWCNT was found 203nm and confirmed by FESEM. The electrochemical DNA biosensor was successfully developed using a MWCNT modified on SiO2 thin films. The capacitance measurements were performed to detect the sensitivity of DNA detection. The change in capacitance before and after immobilization of the DNA was measured in the frequency range of 1Hz to 1MHz. The results indicate that bare device exhibited the lowest capacitance value, which was 32.7μF. The capacitance value of the DNA immobilization increase to 52μF. The permittivity and conductivity also were examined to study the effect of the DNA immobilization toward the MWCNT modified surface. This present demonstrated that the MWCNT modified SiO2 a thin film was successfully fabricated for DNA biosensor detection. Keywords: Carbon nanotubes, Sensors, Thin films, Electrochemical DNA

  18. Nanoparticle-enhanced electrochemical biosensor with DNA immobilization and hybridization of Trichoderma harzianum gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafiquzzaman Siddiquee

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The genus Trichoderma is a soil-borne fungi which in numerous reports has been successfully used as a biological control agent against various plant pathogens. The identification of Trichoderma species worldwide is currently deduced from micro-morphological descriptions which are tedious and prone to error. Electrochemical approaches are currently being developed for the detection and analysis of DNA. In the present study, an electrochemical DNA biosensor was successfully developed based on ionic liquid (e.g., 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate ([EMIM][Otf], ZnO nanoparticles and a chitosan (CHIT nanocomposite membrane on a modified gold electrode (AuE. A single-stranded DNA probe was immobilized on this electrode. Methylene blue (MB was used as the hybridization indicator to monitor the hybridization reaction of the target DNA. Under optimal conditions using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV, the target DNA sequences were detectable at concentration ranges of 1.0 × 10−18–1.82 × 10−4 mol L−1, and the detectable limit was 1.0 × 10−19 mol L−1. The developed DNA biosensor enables the study of hybridization with crude DNA fragments and the results of this study confirm that this DNA biosensor provides a fast, sensitive and convenient way for the species level identification of Trichoderma harzianum.

  19. Integrated electrochemical DNA biosensors for lab-on-a-chip devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, Mònica; Homs, Antoni; Samitier, Josep

    2009-10-01

    Analytical devices able to perform accurate and fast automatic DNA detection or sequencing procedures have many potential benefits in the biomedical and environmental fields. The conversion of biological or biochemical responses into quantifiable optical, mechanical or electronic signals is achieved by means of biosensors. Most of these transducing elements can be miniaturized and incorporated into lab-on-a-chip devices, also known as Micro Total Analysis Systems. The use of multiple DNA biosensors integrated in these miniaturized laboratories, which perform several analytical operations at the microscale, has many cost and efficiency advantages. Tiny amounts of reagents and samples are needed and highly sensitive, fast and parallel assays can be done at low cost. A particular type of DNA biosensors are the ones used based on electrochemical principles. These sensors offer several advantages over the popular fluorescence-based detection schemes. The resulting signal is electrical and can be processed by conventional electronics in a very cheap and fast manner. Furthermore, the integration and miniaturization of electrochemical transducers in a microsystem makes easier its fabrication in front of the most common currently used detection method. In this review, different electrochemical DNA biosensors integrated in analytical microfluidic devices are discussed and some early stage commercial products based on this strategy are presented.

  20. Studies on sildenafil citrate (Viagra) interaction with DNA using electrochemical DNA biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauf, Sakandar; Nawaz, Haq; Akhtar, Kalsoom; Ghauri, Muhammad A; Khalid, Ahmad M

    2007-05-15

    The interaction of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) with DNA was studied by using an electrochemical DNA biosensor. The binding mechanism of sildenafil citrate was elucidated by using constant current potentiometry and differential pulse voltammetry at DNA-modified glassy carbon electrode. The decrease in the guanine oxidation peak area or peak current was used as an indicator for the interaction in 0.2M acetate buffer (pH 5). The binding constant (K) values obtained were 2.01+/-0.05 x 10(5) and 1.97+/-0.01 x 10(5)M(-1) with constant current potentiometry and differential pulse voltammetry, respectively. A linear dependence of the guanine peak area or peak current was observed within the range of 1-40 microM sildenafil citrate with slope=-2.74 x 10(-4)s/microM, r=0.989 and slope=-2.78 x 10(-3)microA/microM, r=0.995 by using constant current potentiometry and differential pulse voltammetry, respectively. Additionally, binding constant values for sildenafil citrate-DNA interaction were determined for the pH range of 4-8 and in biological fluids (serum and urine) at pH 5. The influence of sodium and calcium ions was also studied to elucidate the mechanism of sildenafil citrate-DNA interaction under different solution conditions. The present study may prove to be helpful in extending our understanding of the anticancer activity of sildenafil citrate from cellular to DNA level.

  1. Nanogravimetric and voltammetric DNA-hybridization biosensors for studies of DNA damage by common toxicants and pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowicka, Anna M; Kowalczyk, Agata; Stojek, Zbigniew; Hepel, Maria

    2010-01-01

    Electrochemical and nanogravimetric DNA-hybridization biosensors have been developed for sensing single mismatches in the probe-target ssDNA sequences. The voltammetric transduction was achieved by coupling ferrocene moiety to streptavidin linked to biotinylated tDNA. The mass-related frequency transduction was implemented by immobilizing the sensory pDNA on a gold-coated quartz crystal piezoresonators oscillating in the 10MHz band. The high sensitivity of these sensors enabled us to study DNA damage caused by representative toxicants and environmental pollutants, including Cr(VI) species, common pesticides and herbicides. We have found that the sensor responds rapidly to any damage caused by Cr(VI) species, with more severe DNA damage observed for Cr(2)O(7)(2-) and for CrO(4)(2-) in the presence of H(2)O(2) as compared to CrO(4)(2-) alone. All herbicides and pesticides examined caused DNA damage or structural alterations leading to the double-helix unwinding. Among these compounds, paraoxon-ethyl and atrazine caused the fastest and most severe damage to DNA. The physico-chemical mechanism of damaging interactions between toxicants and DNA has been proposed. The methodology of testing voltammetric and nanogravimetric DNA-hybridization biosensors developed in this work can be employed as a simple protocol to obtain rapid comparative data concerning DNA damage caused by herbicide, pesticides and other toxic pollutants. The DNA-hybridization biosensor can, therefore, be utilized as a rapid screening device for classifying environmental pollutants and to evaluate DNA damage induced by these compounds.

  2. The effect of pH and DNA concentration on organic thin-film transistor biosensors

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Hadayat Ullah

    2012-03-01

    Organic electronics are beginning to attract more interest for biosensor technology as they provide an amenable interface between biology and electronics. Stable biosensor based on electronic detection platform would represent a significant advancement in technology as costs and analysis time would decrease immensely. Organic materials provide a route toward that goal due to their compatibility with electronic applications and biological molecules. In this report, we detail the effects of experimental parameters, such as pH and concentration, toward the selective detection of DNA via surface-bound peptide nucleic acid (PNA) sequences on organic transistor biosensors. The OTFT biosensors are fabricated with thin-films of the organic semiconductor, 5,5′-bis-(7-dodecyl-9H-fluoren-2-yl)-2,2′-bithiophene (DDFTTF), in which they exhibit a stable mobility of 0.2 cm 2 V -1 s -1 in buffer solutions (phosphate-buffer saline, pH 7.4 or sodium acetate, pH 7). Device performance were optimized to minimize the deleterious effects of pH on gate-bias stress such that the sensitivity toward DNA detection can be improved. In titration experiments, the surface-bound PNA probes were saturated with 50 nM of complementary target DNA, which required a 10-fold increase in concentration of single-base mismatched target DNA to achieve a similar surface saturation. The binding constant of DNA on the surface-bound PNA probes was determined from the concentration-dependent response (titration measurements) of our organic transistor biosensors. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Ultrasensitive Biosensor for the Detection of Vibrio cholerae DNA with Polystyrene-co-acrylic Acid Composite Nanospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mahbubur; Heng, Lee Yook; Futra, Dedi; Ling, Tan Ling

    2017-08-01

    An ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor for the determination of pathogenic Vibrio cholerae ( V. cholerae) DNA was developed based on polystyrene-co-acrylic acid (PSA) latex nanospheres-gold nanoparticles composite (PSA-AuNPs) DNA carrier matrix. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) using an electroactive anthraquninone oligonucleotide label was used for measuring the biosensor response. Loading of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the DNA-latex particle electrode has significantly amplified the faradaic current of DNA hybridisation. Together with the use of a reported probe, the biosensor has demonstrated high sensitivity. The DNA biosensor yielded a reproducible and wide linear response range to target DNA from 1.0 × 10-21 to 1.0 × 10-8 M (relative standard deviation, RSD = 4.5%, n = 5) with a limit of detection (LOD) of 1.0 × 10-21 M ( R 2 = 0.99). The biosensor obtained satisfactory recovery values between 91 and 109% ( n = 3) for the detection of V. cholerae DNA in spiked samples and could be reused for six consecutive DNA assays with a repeatability RSD value of 5% ( n = 5). The electrochemical biosensor response was stable and maintainable at 95% of its original response up to 58 days of storage period.

  4. A sensitive DNA biosensor based on a facile sulfamide coupling reaction for capture probe immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qingxiang, E-mail: axiang236@126.com [Department of Chemistry and Environment Science, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Ding, Yingtao; Gao, Feng [Department of Chemistry and Environment Science, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Jiang, Shulian [Zhangzhou Product Quality Supervision and Inspection Institute, Zhangzhou 363000 (China); Zhang, Bin; Ni, Jiancong; Gao, Fei [Department of Chemistry and Environment Science, Zhangzhou Normal University, Zhangzhou 363000 (China)

    2013-07-25

    Graphical abstract: A novel DNA biosensor was fabricated through a facile sulfamide coupling reaction between probe DNA and the sulfonic dye of 1-amino-2-naphthol-4-sulfonic acid that electrodeposited on a glassy carbon electrode. -- Highlights: •A versatile sulfonic dye of ANS was electrodeposited on a GCE. •A DNA biosensor was fabricated based on a facile sulfamide coupling reaction. •High probe DNA density of 3.18 × 10{sup 13} strands cm{sup −2} was determined. •A wide linear range and a low detection limit were obtained. -- Abstract: A novel DNA biosensor was fabricated through a facile sulfamide coupling reaction. First, the versatile sulfonic dye molecule of 1-amino-2-naphthol-4-sulfonate (AN-SO{sub 3}{sup −}) was electrodeposited on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) to form a steady and ordered AN-SO{sub 3}{sup −} layer. Then the amino-terminated capture probe was covalently grafted to the surface of SO{sub 3}{sup −}-AN deposited GCE through the sulfamide coupling reaction between the amino groups in the probe DNA and the sulfonic groups in the AN-SO{sub 3}{sup −}. The step-by-step modification process was characterized by electrochemistry and attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. Using Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}{sup 3+} as probe, the probe density and the hybridization efficiency of the biosensor were determined to be 3.18 × 10{sup 13} strands cm{sup −2} and 86.5%, respectively. The hybridization performance of the biosensor was examined by differential pulse voltammetry using Co(phen){sub 3}{sup 3+/2+} (phen = 1,10-phenanthroline) as the indicator. The selectivity experiments showed that the biosensor presented distinguishable response after hybridization with the three-base mismatched, non-complementary and complementary sequences. Under the optimal conditions, the oxidation peak currents of Co(phen){sub 3}{sup 3+/2+} increased linearly with the logarithm values of the concentration

  5. A novel bio-sensor based on DNA strand displacement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolong Shi

    Full Text Available DNA strand displacement technology performs well in sensing and programming DNA segments. In this work, we construct DNA molecular systems based on DNA strand displacement performing computation of logic gates. Specifically, a class of so-called "DNA neurons" are achieved, in which a "smart" way inspired by biological neurons encoding information is developed to encode and deliver information using DNA molecules. The "DNA neuron" is bistable, that is, it can sense DNA molecules as input signals, and release "negative" or "positive" signals DNA molecules. We design intelligent DNA molecular systems that are constructed by cascading some particularly organized "DNA neurons", which could perform logic computation, including AND, OR, XOR logic gates, automatically. Both simulation results using visual DSD (DNA strand displacement software and experimental results are obtained, which shows that the proposed systems can detect DNA signals with high sensitivity and accretion; moreover, the systems can process input signals automatically with complex nonlinear logic. The method proposed in this work may provide a new way to construct a sensitive molecular signal detection system with neurons spiking behavior in vitro, and can be used to develop intelligent molecular processing systems in vivo.

  6. Fabrication of Ultrasensitive Field-Effect Transistor DNA Biosensors by a Directional Transfer Technique Based on CVD-Grown Graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chao; Huang, Le; Zhang, Hong; Sun, Zhongyue; Zhang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Guo-Jun

    2015-08-12

    Most graphene field-effect transistor (G-FET) biosensors are fabricated through a routine process, in which graphene is transferred onto a Si/SiO2 substrate and then devices are subsequently produced by micromanufacture processes. However, such a fabrication approach can introduce contamination onto the graphene surface during the lithographic process, resulting in interference for the subsequent biosensing. In this work, we have developed a novel directional transfer technique to fabricate G-FET biosensors based on chemical-vapor-deposition- (CVD-) grown single-layer graphene (SLG) and applied this biosensor for the sensitive detection of DNA. A FET device with six individual array sensors was first fabricated, and SLG obtained by the CVD-growth method was transferred onto the sensor surface in a directional manner. Afterward, peptide nucleic acid (PNA) was covalently immobilized on the graphene surface, and DNA detection was realized by applying specific target DNA to the PNA-functionalized G-FET biosensor. The developed G-FET biosensor was able to detect target DNA at concentrations as low as 10 fM, which is 1 order of magnitude lower than those reported in a previous work. In addition, the biosensor was capable of distinguishing the complementary DNA from one-base-mismatched DNA and noncomplementary DNA. The directional transfer technique for the fabrication of G-FET biosensors is simple, and the as-constructed G-FET DNA biosensor shows ultrasensitivity and high specificity, indicating its potential application in disease diagnostics as a point-of-care tool.

  7. Fabrication of an electrochemical DNA-based biosensor for Bacillus cereus detection in milk and infant formula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izadi, Zahra; Sheikh-Zeinoddin, Mahmoud; Ensafi, Ali A; Soleimanian-Zad, Sabihe

    2016-06-15

    This paper describes fabrication of a DNA-based Au-nanoparticle modified pencil graphite electrode (PGE) biosensor for detection of Bacillus cereus, causative agent of two types of food-borne disease, i.e., emetic and diarrheal syndrome. The sensing element of the biosensor was comprised of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) self-assembled with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) of nheA gene immobilized with thiol linker on the GNPs modified PGE. The size, shape and dispersion of the GNPs were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). Detection of B. cereus was carried out based on an increase in the charge transfer resistance (Rct) of the biosensor due to hybridization of the ss-DNA with target DNA. An Atomic force microscope (AFM) was used to confirm the hybridization. The biosensor sensitivity in pure cultures of B. cereus was found to be 10(0) colony forming units per milliliter (CFU/mL) with a detection limit of 9.4 × 10(-12) mol L(-1). The biosensor could distinguish complementary from mismatch DNA sequence. The proposed biosensor exhibited a rapid detection, low cost, high sensitivity to bacterial contamination and could exclusively and specifically detect the target DNA sequence of B. cereus from other bacteria that can be found in dairy products. Moreover, the DNA biosensor exhibited high reproducibility and stability, thus it may be used as a suitable biosensor to detect B. cereus and to become a portable system for food quality control. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Electrical DNA biosensor using aluminium interdigitated electrode for E.Coli O157:H7 detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natasha, N. Z.; Rajapaksha, R. D. A. A.; Uda, M. N. A.; Hashim, U.

    2017-09-01

    Escherichia Coli (E.Coli) O157:H7 is the one of the most dangerous foodborne pathogens based diseases that presence in our daily life that causes illness and death increase every year. Aluminum Interdigitated Electrode (Al IDE) biosensor was introduced to detect E.Coli O157:H7 in earlier stage. In this paper we investigated ssDNA of E.Coli O157:H7 bacteria detection through electrical behavior of Al IDE sensor. The physical properties of Al IDE biosensor has been characterized using Low Power Microscope (LPM), High Power Microscope (HPM), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and 3D Nano Profiler. The bare Al IDE was electrical characterized by using I-V measurement. The surface modification was accomplished by salinization using APTES and immobilization using Carboxylic Probe E.Coli which was the first step in preparing Al IDE biosensor. Geared up prepared biosensor was hybridized with complementary, non-complementary and single based mismatch ssDNA to confirmed specificity detection of E Coli O157:H7 ssDNA target. The Current - Voltage was performed for each step such as bare Al IDE, surface modification, immobilization and hybridization. Sensitivity measurement was accomplished using different concentration of complementary ssDNA target from 1 fM - 10 µM. Selectivity measurements was achieved using same concentration which was 10 µM concentration for complement, non-complement and mismatch E.Coli O157:H7 ssDNA target. It's totally proved that the Al IDE able to detect specific and small current down to Femtomolar concentration.

  9. Self-Assembled DNA Tetrahedral Scaffolds for the Construction of Electrochemiluminescence Biosensor with Programmable DNA Cyclic Amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qiu-Mei; Guo, Yue-Hua; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2017-05-24

    A novel DNA tetrahedron-structured electrochemiluminescence (ECL) platform for bioanalysis with programmable DNA cyclic amplification was developed. In this work, glucose oxidase (GOD) was labeled to a DNA sequence (S) as functional conjugation (GOD-S), which could hybridize with other DNA sequences (L and P) to form GOD-S:L:P probe. In the presence of target DNA and a help DNA (A), the programmable DNA cyclic amplification was activated and released GOD-S via toehold-mediated strand displacement. Then, the obtained GOD-S was further immobilized on the DNA tetrahedral scaffolds with a pendant capture DNA and Ru(bpy)32+-conjugated silica nanoparticles (RuSi NPs) decorated on the electrode surface. Thus, the amount of GOD-S assembled on the electrode surface depended on the concentration of target DNA and GOD could catalyze glucose to generate H2O2 in situ. The ECL signal of Ru(bpy)32+-TPrA system was quenched by the presence of H2O2. By integrating the programmable DNA cyclic amplification and in situ generating H2O2 as Ru(bpy)32+ ECL quencher, a sensitive DNA tetrahedron-structured ECL sensing platform was proposed for DNA detection. Under optimized conditions, this biosensor showed a wide linear range from 100 aM to 10 pM with a detection limit of 40 aM, indicating a promising application in DNA analysis. Furthermore, by labeling GOD to different recognition elements, the proposed strategy could be used for the detection of various targets. Thus, this programmable cascade amplification strategy not only retains the high selectivity and good capturing efficiency of tetrahedral-decorated electrode surface but also provides potential applications in the construction of ECL biosensor.

  10. A Highly Sensitive Electrochemical DNA Biosensor from Acrylic-Gold Nano-composite for the Determination of Arowana Fish Gender

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Mahbubur; Heng, Lee Yook; Futra, Dedi; Chiang, Chew Poh; Rashid, Zulkafli A.; Ling, Tan Ling

    2017-08-01

    The present research describes a simple method for the identification of the gender of arowana fish ( Scleropages formosus). The DNA biosensor was able to detect specific DNA sequence at extremely low level down to atto M regimes. An electrochemical DNA biosensor based on acrylic microsphere-gold nanoparticle (AcMP-AuNP) hybrid composite was fabricated. Hydrophobic poly(n-butylacrylate-N-acryloxysuccinimide) microspheres were synthesised with a facile and well-established one-step photopolymerization procedure and physically adsorbed on the AuNPs at the surface of a carbon screen printed electrode (SPE). The DNA biosensor was constructed simply by grafting an aminated DNA probe on the succinimide functionalised AcMPs via a strong covalent attachment. DNA hybridisation response was determined by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) technique using anthraquinone monosulphonic acid redox probe as an electroactive oligonucleotide label (Table 1). A low detection limit at 1.0 × 10-18 M with a wide linear calibration range of 1.0 × 10-18 to 1.0 × 10-8 M ( R 2 = 0.99) can be achieved by the proposed DNA biosensor under optimal conditions. Electrochemical detection of arowana DNA can be completed within 1 hour. Due to its small size and light weight, the developed DNA biosensor holds high promise for the development of functional kit for fish culture usage.

  11. Development of Piezoelectric DNA-Based Biosensor for Direct Detection of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis in Clinical Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thongchai KAEWPHINIT

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was focused on establishment of piezoelectric biosensor for direct detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB in clinical specimens. The quartz crystal immobilized via 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA/avidin/DNA biotinylated probe on gold surface and hybridization of the DNA target to DNA biotinylated probe. The optimal concentration of MPA, avidin and 5’-biotinylated DNA probe for immobilization of specific DNA probe on gold surface were 15 mM, 0.1 mg/ml and 1.5 μM, respectively. The detection of genomic DNA digestion in the range from 0.5 to 30 μg/ml. The fabricated biosensor was evaluated through an examination of 200 samples. No cross hybridization were observed against M. avium complex (MAC and other microorganism. This target DNA preparation without amplification will reduce time consuming, costs, and the tedious step of amplification. This study can be extended to develop the new method which is high sensitivity, specificity, cheap, easy to use, and rapid for detection of MTB in many fields.

  12. An ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor based on a copper oxide nanowires/single-walled carbon nanotubes nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Mei [Key Laboratory of Biorheology Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Hou, Changjun, E-mail: houcj@cqu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Biorheology Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Key Laboratory of Fundamental Science of Micro/Nano-Device and System Technology, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Huo, Danqun [Key Laboratory of Biorheology Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); National Key Laboratory of Fundamental Science of Micro/Nano-Device and System Technology, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Yang, Mei [Key Laboratory of Biorheology Science and Technology, Ministry of Education, College of Bioengineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Fa, Huanbao [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2016-02-28

    Graphical abstract: A novel and sensitive electrochemical biosensor based on hybrid nanocomposite consisting of copper oxide nanowires (CuO NWs) and carboxyl-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs-COOH) was first developed for the detection of the specific-sequence target DNA. This schematic represents the fabrication procedure of our DNA biosensor. - Highlights: • An ultrasensitive DNA electrochemical biosensor was developed. • CuO NWs entangled with the SWCNTs formed a mesh structure with good conductivity. • It is the first time use of CuONWs-SWCNTs hybrid nanocomposite for DNA detection. • The biosensor is simple, selective, stable, and sensitive. • The biosensor has great potential for use in analysis of real samples. - Abstract: Here, we developed a novel and sensitive electrochemical biosensor to detect specific-sequence target DNA. The biosensor was based on a hybrid nanocomposite consisting of copper oxide nanowires (CuO NWs) and carboxyl-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs-COOH). The resulting CuO NWs/SWCNTs layers exhibited a good differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) current response for the target DNA sequences, which we attributed to the properties of CuO NWs and SWCNTs. CuO NWs and SWCNTs hybrid composites with highly conductive and biocompatible nanostructure were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and cyclic voltammetry (CV). Immobilization of the probe DNA on the electrode surface was largely improved due to the unique synergetic effect of CuO NWs and SWCNTs. DPV was applied to monitor the DNA hybridization event, using adriamycin as an electrochemical indicator. Under optimal conditions, the peak currents of adriamycin were linear with the logarithm of target DNA concentrations (ranging from 1.0 × 10{sup −14} to 1.0 × 10{sup −8} M), with a detection limit of 3.5 × 10{sup −15} M (signal/noise ratio of 3). The biosensor also showed high

  13. Electrochemical DNA biosensor for bovine papillomavirus detection using polymeric film on screen-printed electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, Gustavo A; Souza, Elaine V M; Campos-Ferreira, Danielly S; Arruda, Mariana S; Castelletti, Carlos H M; Wanderley, Marcela S O; Ekert, Marek H F; Bruneska, Danyelly; Lima-Filho, José L

    2012-01-01

    A new electrochemical DNA biosensor for bovine papillomavirus (BPV) detection that was based on screen-printed electrodes was comprehensively studied by electrochemical methods of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). A BPV probe was immobilised on a working electrode (gold) modified with a polymeric film of poly-L-lysine (PLL) and chitosan. The experimental design was carried out to evaluate the influence of polymers, probe concentration (BPV probe) and immobilisation time on the electrochemical reduction of methylene blue (MB). The polymer poly-L-lysine (PLL), a probe concentration of 1 μM and an immobilisation time of 60 min showed the best result for the BPV probe immobilisation. With the hybridisation of a complementary target sequence (BPV target), the electrochemical signal decreased compared to a BPV probe immobilised on the modified PLL-gold electrode. Viral DNA that was extracted from cattle with papillomatosis also showed a decrease in the MB electrochemical reduction, which suggested that the decreased electrochemical signal corresponded to a bovine papillomavirus infection. The hybridisation specificity experiments further indicated that the biosensor could discriminate the complementary sequence from the non-complementary sequence. Thus, the results showed that the development of analytical devices, such as a biosensor, could assist in the rapid and efficient detection of bovine papillomavirus DNA and help in the prevention and treatment of papillomatosis in cattle. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Examination of bacterial inhibition using a catalytic DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Qu

    Full Text Available Determination of accurate dosage of existing antibiotics and discovery of new antimicrobials or probiotics entail simple but effective methods that can conveniently track bacteria growth and inhibition. Here we explore the application of a previously reported fluorogenic E. coli-specific DNAzyme (catalytic DNA, RFD-EC1, as a molecular probe for monitoring bacterial inhibition exerted by antibiotics and for studying bacterial competition as a result of cohabitation. Because the DNAzyme method provides a convenient way to monitor the growth of E. coli, it is capable of determining the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of antibiotics much faster than the conventional optical density (OD method. In addition, since the target for RFD-EC1 is an extracellular protein molecule from E. coli, RFD-EC1 is able to identify pore-forming antibiotics or compounds that can cause membrane leakage. Finally, RFD-EC1 can be used to analyse the competition of cohabitating bacteria, specifically the inhibition of growth of E. coli by Bacillus subtilis. The current work represents the first exploration of a catalytic DNA for microbiological applications and showcases the utility of bacteria-sensing fluorogenic DNAzymes as simple molecular probes to facilitate antibiotic and probiotic research.

  15. Identification of Chinese Herbs Using a Sequencing-Free Nanostructured Electrochemical DNA Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Lei

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to the nearly identical phenotypes and chemical constituents, it is often very challenging to accurately differentiate diverse species of a Chinese herbal genus. Although technologies including DNA barcoding have been introduced to help address this problem, they are generally time-consuming and require expensive sequencing. Herein, we present a simple sequencing-free electrochemical biosensor, which enables easy differentiation between two closely related Fritillaria species. To improve its differentiation capability using trace amounts of DNA sample available from herbal extracts, a stepwise electrochemical deposition of reduced graphene oxide (RGO and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs was adopted to engineer a synergistic nanostructured sensing interface. By using such a nanofeatured electrochemical DNA (E-DNA biosensor, two Chinese herbal species of Fritillaria (F. thunbergii and F. cirrhosa were successfully discriminated at the DNA level, because a fragment of 16-mer sequence at the spacer region of the 5S-rRNA only exists in F. thunbergii. This E-DNA sensor was capable of identifying the target sequence in the range from 100 fM to 10 nM, and a detection limit as low as 11.7 fM (S/N = 3 was obtained. Importantly, this sensor was applied to detect the unique fragment of the PCR products amplified from F. thunbergii and F. cirrhosa, respectively. We anticipate that such a direct, sequencing-free sensing mode will ultimately pave the way towards a new generation of herb-identification strategies.

  16. Conducting polymer based DNA biosensor for the detection of the Bacillus cereus group species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velusamy, Vijayalakshmi; Arshak, Khalil; Korostynska, Olga; Oliwa, Kamila; Adley, Catherine

    2009-05-01

    Biosensor designs are emerging at a significant rate and play an increasingly important role in foodborne pathogen detection. Conducting polymers are excellent tools for the fabrication of biosensors and polypyrrole has been used in the detection of biomolecules due to its unique properties. The prime intention of this paper was to pioneer the design and fabrication of a single-strand (ss) DNA biosensor for the detection of the Bacillus cereus (B.cereus) group species. Growth of B. cereus, results in production of several highly active toxins. Therefore, consumption of food containing >106 bacteria/gm may results in emetic and diarrhoeal syndromes. The most common source of this bacterium is found in liquid food products, milk powder, mixed food products and is of particular concern in the baby formula industry. The electrochemical deposition technique, such as cyclic voltammetry, was used to develop and test a model DNA-based biosensor on a gold electrode electropolymerized with polypyrrole. The electrically conducting polymer, polypyrrole is used as a platform for immobilizing DNA (1μg) on the gold electrode surface, since it can be more easily deposited from neutral pH aqueous solutions of pyrrolemonomers. The average current peak during the electrodeposition event is 288μA. There is a clear change in the current after hybridization of the complementary oligonucleotide (6.35μA) and for the noncomplementary oligonucleotide (5.77μA). The drop in current after each event was clearly noticeable and it proved to be effective.

  17. A novel electrochemical biosensor for sensitive detection of telomerase activity based on structure-switching DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Zi; Wang, Hai-Bo; Chen, Ke; Gao, Qing; Tang, Hao; Yu, Ru-Qin; Chu, Xia

    2014-03-15

    Telomerase has been considered to be an important tumor biomarker for early cancer diagnostics and a valuable target for therapy treatment. A novel electrochemical biosensor based on structure-switching DNA probe with ferrocene (Fc) as the electroactive reporter to detect telomerase activity was developed. The developed approach displayed desirable dynamic range from 10(2) to 6 × 10(4) Hela cells mL(-1) with a detection limit of 100 Hela cells mL(-1). This biosensor afforded good reproducibility, stability and simple operations. It provided a useful platform for practical use in quantitative telomerase activity assay for clinical applications. Telomerase inhibitor performance was also investigated and the results indicated the approach was suitable for telomerase inhibitor screening research. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Integrated biochip for PCR-based DNA amplification and detection on capacitive biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschou, D.; Vourdas, N.; Filippidou, M. K.; Tsouti, V.; Kokkoris, G.; Tsekenis, G.; Zergioti, I.; Chatzandroulis, S.; Tserepi, A.

    2013-05-01

    Responding to an increasing demand for LoC devices to perform bioanalytical protocols for disease diagnostics, the development of an integrated LoC device consisting of a μPCR module integrated with resistive microheaters and a biosensor array for disease diagnostics is presented. The LoC is built on a Printed Circuit Board (PCB) platform, implementing both the amplification of DNA samples and DNA detection/identification on-chip. The resistive microheaters for PCR and the wirings for the sensor read-out are fabricated by means of standard PCB technology. The microfluidic network is continuous-flow, designed to perform 30 PCR cycles with heated zones at constant temperatures, and is built onto the PCB utilizing commercial photopatternable polyimide layers. Following DNA amplification, the product is driven in a chamber where a Si-based biosensor array is placed for DNA detection through hybridization. The sensor array is tested for the detection of mutations of the KRAS gene, responsible for colon cancer.

  19. Greatly extended storage stability of electrochemical DNA biosensors using ternary thiolated self-assembled monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuralay, Filiz; Campuzano, Susana; Wang, Joseph

    2012-09-15

    While high storage stability of sequence-selective DNA biosensors is crucial towards their routine applications, commonly used electrochemical hybridization biosensors are characterized with limited storage stability. In this article we demonstrate that recently developed ternary thiolated monolayers impart dramatic improvement in the storage stability of DNA electrochemical biosensors. In particular, highly stable multicomponent interfaces are prepared by co-immobilizing the thiolated capture probe (SHCP) with 1,6-hexanedithiol (HDT) on gold substrates, followed by the incorporation of 6-mercapto-1-hexanol (MCH) diluent. The resulting (SHCP/HDT+MCH) DNA hybridization recognition platform offers substantially higher storage stability compared to conventional binary (SHCP+MCH) monolayers. The (SHCP/HDT+MCH) ternary monolayers maintain their initial signal (S)-to-noise (N) ratio (S/N) over a prolonged 3 months period upon storage at 4 °C, compared to the rapid sensitivity loss observed using the common binary interfaces. This attractive stability performance promises the convenient usage of pre-prepared electrodes after prolonged time storage without any treatment. Such dramatic improvements in the storage stability have been achieved through a rational optimization of the concentration ratio of the SHCP and the other components of the ternary SAM. The improved storage stability of SHCP/HDT+MCH interfaces observed at higher concentrations of SHCP is attributed to a hindered displacement of SHCP by MCH in the resulting compact layers. The ability to design highly stable nucleic acid interfaces using common chemicals obviates the need of using specialized expensive reagents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Application of DNA Hybridization Biosensor as a Screening Method for the Detection of Genetically Modified Food Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Filipiak

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available An electrochemical biosensor for the detection of genetically modified food components is presented. The biosensor was based on 21-mer single-stranded oligonucleotide (ssDNA probe specific to either 35S promoter or nos terminator, which are frequently present in transgenic DNA cassettes. ssDNA probe was covalently attached by 5’-phosphate end to amino group of cysteamine self-assembled monolayer (SAM on gold electrode surface with the use of activating reagents – water soluble 1-ethyl-3(3’- dimethylaminopropyl-carbodiimide (EDC and N-hydroxy-sulfosuccinimide (NHS. The hybridization reaction on the electrode surface was detected via methylene blue (MB presenting higher affinity to ssDNA probe than to DNA duplex. The electrode modification procedure was optimized using 19-mer oligoG and oligoC nucleotides. The biosensor enabled distinction between DNA samples isolated from soybean RoundupReady® (RR soybean and non-genetically modified soybean. The frequent introduction of investigated DNA sequences in other genetically modified organisms (GMOs give a broad perspectives for analytical application of the biosensor.

  1. Electrochemical biosensor modified with dsDNA monolayer for restriction enzyme activity determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajda, Joanna; Górski, Łukasz; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2016-06-01

    A simple and cost effective method for the determination of restriction endonuclease activity is presented. dsDNA immobilized at a gold electrode surface is used as the enzymatic substrate, and an external cationic redox probe is employed in voltammetric measurements for analytical signal generation. The assessment of enzyme activity is based on a decrease of a current signal derived from reduction of methylene blue which is present in the sample solution. For this reason, the covalent attachment of the label molecule is not required which significantly reduces costs of the analysis and simplifies the entire determination procedure. The influence of buffer components on utilized dsDNA/MCH monolayer stability and integrity is also verified. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements reveal that due to pinhole formation during enzyme activity measurement the presence of any surfactants should be avoided. Additionally, it is shown that the sensitivity of the electrochemical biosensor can be tuned by changing the restriction site location along the DNA length. Under optimal conditions the proposed biosensor exhibits a linear response toward PvuII activity within a range from 0.25 to 1.50 U/μL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of swine-specific DNA markers for biosensor-based halal authentication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M E; Hashim, U; Kashif, M; Mustafa, S; Che Man, Y B; Abd Hamid, S B

    2012-06-29

    The pig (Sus scrofa) mitochondrial genome was targeted to design short (15-30 nucleotides) DNA markers that would be suitable for biosensor-based hybridization detection of target DNA. Short DNA markers are reported to survive harsh conditions in which longer ones are degraded into smaller fragments. The whole swine mitochondrial-genome was in silico digested with AluI restriction enzyme. Among 66 AluI fragments, five were selected as potential markers because of their convenient lengths, high degree of interspecies polymorphism and intraspecies conservatism. These were confirmed by NCBI blast analysis and ClustalW alignment analysis with 11 different meat-providing animal and fish species. Finally, we integrated a tetramethyl rhodamine-labeled 18-nucleotide AluI fragment into a 3-nm diameter citrate-tannate coated gold nanoparticle to develop a swine-specific hybrid nanobioprobe for the determination of pork adulteration in 2.5-h autoclaved pork-beef binary mixtures. This hybrid probe detected as low as 1% pork in deliberately contaminated autoclaved pork-beef binary mixtures and no cross-species detection was recorded, demonstrating the feasibility of this type of probe for biosensor-based detection of pork adulteration of halal and kosher foods.

  3. Proximity hybridization-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assembly for electrochemical immunoassay based on in situ DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Fuyi [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical College, 221004, Xuzhou (China); Yao, Yao; Luo, Jianjun; Zhang, Xing; Zhang, Yu; Yin, Dengyang [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical College, 221004, Xuzhou (China); Gao, Fenglei, E-mail: jsxzgfl@sina.com [Jiangsu Key Laboratory of New Drug Research and Clinical Pharmacy, Department of Pharmaceutical Analysis, School of Pharmacy, Xuzhou Medical College, 221004, Xuzhou (China); Wang, Po, E-mail: wangpo@jsnu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Jiangsu Normal University, Xuzhou 221116 (China)

    2017-05-29

    Novel hybridization proximity-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assembly strategy has been proposed for electrochemical immunoassay based on in situ DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles as signal label. The DNA template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles were characterized with atomic force microscopic and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The highly efficient electrocatalysis by DNA template synthesized Pd nanoparticles for NaBH{sub 4} oxidation produced an intense detection signal. The label-free electrochemical method achieved the detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) with a linear range from 10{sup −15} to 10{sup −11} g mL{sup −1} and a detection limit of 0.43 × 10{sup −15} g mL{sup −1}. Through introducing a supersandwich reaction to increase the DNA length, the electrochemical signal was further amplified, leading to a detection limit of 0.52 × 10{sup −16} g mL{sup −1}. And it rendered satisfactory analytical performance for the determination of CEA in serum samples. Furthermore, it exhibited good reproducibility and stability; meanwhile, it also showed excellent specificity due to the specific recognition of antigen by antibody. Therefore, the DNA template synthesized Pd nanoparticles based signal amplification approach has great potential in clinical applications and is also suitable for quantification of biomarkers at ultralow level. - Graphical abstract: A novel label-free and enzyme-free electrochemical immunoassay based on proximity hybridization-regulated catalytic DNA hairpin assemblies for recycling of the CEA. - Highlights: • A novel enzyme-free electrochemical immunosensor was developed for detection of CEA. • The signal amplification was based on catalytic DNA hairpin assembly and DNA-template-synthesized Pd nanoparticles. • The biosensor could detect CEA down to 0.52 × 10{sup −16} g mL{sup −1} level with a dynamic range spanning 5 orders of magnitude.

  4. Gold nanoparticles modified electrode via simple electrografting of in situ generated mercaptophenyl diazonium cations for development of DNA electrochemical biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Feng, Yan; Dong, Pingjun; Yang, Limin; Tang, Bo

    2011-01-15

    A novel protocol for development of DNA electrochemical biosensor based on gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was proposed, which was carried out by the self-assembly of AuNPs on the mercaptophenyl film (MPF) via simple electrografting of in situ generated mercaptophenyl diazonium cations. The resulting MPF was covalently immobilized on GCE surface via C-C bond with high stability, which was desirable in fabrication of excellent performance biosensors. Probe DNA was self-assembled on AuNPs through the well-known Au-thiol binding. The recognition of fabricated DNA electrochemical biosensor toward complementary single-stranded DNA was determined by differential pulse voltammetry with the use of Co(phen)(3)(3+) as the electrochemical indicator. Taking advantage of amplification effects of AuNPs and stability of MPF, the developed biosensor could detect target DNA with the detection limit of 7.2×10(-11) M, which also exhibits good selectivity, stability and regeneration ability for DNA detection. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. DNA Hybridization Detection Based on Resonance Frequency Readout in Graphene on Au SPR Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Biplob Hossain

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper demonstrates a numerical modeling of surface plasmon resonance (SPR biosensor for detecting DNA hybridization by recording the resonance frequency characteristics (RFC. The proposed sensor is designed based on graphene material as biomolecular recognition elements (BRE and the sharp SPR curve of gold (Au. Numerical analysis shows that the variation of RFC for mismatched DNA strands is quiet negligible whereas that for complementary DNA strands is considerably countable. Here, graphene is used to perform faster immobilization between target DNA and probe DNA. The usage of graphene also changes the RFC that ensure hybridization of DNA event by utilizing its optochemical property. In addition, proposed sensor successfully distinguishes between hybridization and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP by observing the variation level of RFC and maximum transmittance. Therefore, the proposed frequency readout based SPR sensor could potentially open a new window of detection for biomolecular interactions. We also highlight the advantage of using graphene sublayer by performing the sensitivity analysis. Sandwiching of each graphene sublayer enhances 95% sensitivity comparing with conventional SPR sensor.

  6. Piezoelectric Cantilever Biosensors for Label-free, Real-time Detection of DNA and RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haring, Alexander P; Cesewski, Ellen; Johnson, Blake N

    2017-01-01

    This chapter reviews the design, fabrication, characterization, and application of piezoelectric-excited millimeter-sized cantilever (PEMC) sensors. The sensor transduction mechanism, sensing principle, and mode of operation are discussed. Bio-recognition strategies and surface functionalization methods for detection of DNA and RNA are discussed with a focus on self-assembly-based approaches. Methods for the verification of biosensor response via secondary binding assays, reversible binding assays, and the integration of complementary transduction mechanisms are presented. Sensing applications for medical diagnostics, food safety, and environmental monitoring are provided. PEMC sensor technology provides a robust platform for the real-time, label-free detection of DNA and RNA in complex matrices over nanomolar (nM) to attomolar (aM) concentration ranges.

  7. The field effect transistor DNA biosensor based on ITO nanowires in label-free hepatitis B virus detecting compatible with CMOS technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariati, Mohsen

    2018-05-15

    In this paper the field-effect transistor DNA biosensor for detecting hepatitis B virus (HBV) based on indium tin oxide nanowires (ITO NWs) in label free approach has been fabricated. Because of ITO nanowires intensive conductance and functional modified surface, the probe immobilization and target hybridization were increased strongly. The high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) measurement showed that ITO nanowires were crystalline and less than 50nm in diameter. The single-stranded hepatitis B virus DNA (SS-DNA) was immobilized as probe on the Au-modified nanowires. The DNA targets were measured in a linear concentration range from 1fM to 10µM. The detection limit of the DNA biosensor was about 1fM. The time of the hybridization process for defined single strand was 90min. The switching ratio of the biosensor between "on" and "off" state was ~ 1.1 × 10 5 . For sensing the specificity of the biosensor, non-complementary, mismatch and complementary DNA oligonucleotide sequences were clearly discriminated. The HBV biosensor confirmed the highly satisfied specificity for differentiating complementary sequences from non-complementary and the mismatch oligonucleotides. The response time of the DNA sensor was 37s with a high reproducibility. The stability and repeatability of the DNA biosensor showed that the peak current of the biosensor retained 98% and 96% of its initial response for measurements after three and five weeks, respectively. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Colorimetric biosensor based on a DNAzyme primer and its application in logic gate operations for DNA screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenguang; Cheng, Nan; Zhu, Longjiao; Xu, Yuancong; Huang, Kunlun; Zhu, Pengyu; Zhu, Shuifang; Fu, Wei; Xu, Wentao

    2017-09-22

    A colorimetric biosensor for DNA screening was designed based on the conformational changes of the horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-mimicking DNAzyme. The scheme of DNA biosensing was designed based on the base pairing of DNAzyme sequence to inhibit the formation of HRP-mimicking hemin/G-quadruplex structures in the process of amplification. DNA could be amplified via the universal primer multiplex polymerase chain reaction (UP-M-PCR) and innovatively detected as color disappear in the reaction visible to the naked eye. The input of key factors and the output of optical characteristics in the reaction inspired the development of an OR logic gate operation for DNA detection. This biosensor overcomes self-inhibition and amplification disparity with the help of UP-M-PCR, thereby exhibiting high specificity and high-throughput without the requirement of gel analysis work. This biosensing system also presented 1% sensitivity and approximately 180 copy numbers in triplicate. The biosensor was used to screen elements from genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and covered more than 90% of all globally authorized events in the world. The designed colorimetric biosensor is a rapid, portable and versatile tool for nucleic acids detection and diagnosis in the field. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. A label-free electrochemical biosensor based on a DNA aptamer against codeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liangliang; Yang, Xiaojuan; Qi, Cui; Niu, Xiaofang; Zhao, Chunling; Zhao, Xiaohui; Shangguan, Dihua; Yang, Yunhui

    2013-07-17

    In order to develop a sensor for opium alkaloid codeine detection, DNA aptamers against codeine were generated by SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) technique. An aptamer HL7-14, which is a 37-mer sequence with Kd values of 0.91 μM, was optimized by the truncation-mutation assay. The specificity investigation shows that HL7-14 exhibits high specificity to codeine over morphine, and almost cannot bind to other small molecule. With this new selected aptamer, a novel electrochemical label-free codeine aptamer biosensor based on Au-mesoporous silica nanoparticles (Au-MSN) as immobilized substrate has been proposed using [Fe(CN)6](3-/4-) as electroactive redox probe. The linear range covered from 10 pM to 100 nM with correlation coefficient of 0.9979 and the detection limit was 3 pM. Our study demonstrates that the biosensor has good specificity, stability and well regeneration. It can be used to detect codeine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Towards HIV detection: Novel Poly(propylene imine) Dendrimer-Streptavidin platform for electrochemical DNA and gp120 aptamer biosensors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    John, SV

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available (2014) 5425 - 5437 International Journal of ELECTROCHEMICAL SCIENCE www.electrochemsci.org Towards HIV Detection: Novel Poly(propylene imine) Dendrimer-Streptavidin Platform for Electrochemical DNA and gp120 Aptamer Biosensors Suru V.... Gray, M. C. Madiga, N. Tumba, K. B. Alexandre, T. Khoza, C. K. Wibmer, P. L. Moore, L. Morris and M. M. Khati, Journal of Virology, 86 (2012) 1 15. G. Li, X. Li, J. Wan and S. Zhang, Biosensors and Bioelectronics, 24 (2009) 3281 16. A. K. H. Cheng...

  11. Development of a Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET-Based DNA Biosensor for Detection of Synthetic Oligonucleotide of Ganoderma boninense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noremylia Mohd Bakhori

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available An optical DNA biosensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET utilizing synthesized quantum dot (QD has been developed for the detection of specific-sequence of DNA for Ganoderma boninense, an oil palm pathogen. Modified QD that contained carboxylic groups was conjugated with a single-stranded DNA probe (ssDNA via amide-linkage. Hybridization of the target DNA with conjugated QD-ssDNA and reporter probe labeled with Cy5 allows for the detection of related synthetic DNA sequence of Ganoderma boninense gene based on FRET signals. Detection of FRET emission before and after hybridization was confirmed through the capability of the system to produce FRET at 680 nm for hybridized sandwich with complementary target DNA. No FRET emission was observed for non-complementary system. Hybridization time, temperature and effect of different concentration of target DNA were studied in order to optimize the developed system. The developed biosensor has shown high sensitivity with detection limit of 3.55 × 10−9 M. TEM results show that the particle size of QD varies in the range between 5 to 8 nm after ligand modification and conjugation with ssDNA. This approach is capable of providing a simple, rapid and sensitive method for detection of related synthetic DNA sequence of Ganoderma boninense.

  12. Carbon nanotube-based lateral flow biosensor for sensitive and rapid detection of DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wanwei; Xu, Hui; Takalkar, Sunitha; Gurung, Anant S; Liu, Bin; Zheng, Yafeng; Guo, Zebin; Baloda, Meenu; Baryeh, Kwaku; Liu, Guodong

    2015-02-15

    In this article, we describe a carbon nanotube (CNT)-based lateral flow biosensor (LFB) for rapid and sensitive detection of DNA sequence. Amine-modified DNA detection probe was covalently immobilized on the shortened multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) via diimide-activated amidation between the carboxyl groups on the CNT surface and amine groups on the detection DNA probes. Sandwich-type DNA hybridization reactions were performed on the LFB and the captured MWCNTs on test zone and control zone of LFB produced the characteristic black bands, enabling visual detection of DNA sequences. Combining the advantages of lateral flow chromatographic separation with unique physical properties of MWCNT (large surface area), the optimized LFB was capable of detecting of 0.1 nM target DNA without instrumentation. Quantitative detection could be realized by recording the intensity of the test line with the Image J software, and the detection limit of 40 pM was obtained. This detection limit is 12.5 times lower than that of gold nanoparticle (GNP)-based LFB (0.5 nM, Mao et al. Anal. Chem. 2009, 81, 1660-1668). Another important feature is that the preparation of MWCNT-DNA conjugates was robust and the use of MWCNT labels avoided the aggregation of conjugates and tedious preparation time, which were often met in the traditional GNP-based nucleic acid LFB. The applications of MWCNT-based LFB can be extended to visually detect protein biomarkers using MWCNT-antibody conjugates. The MWCNT-based LFB thus open a new door to prepare a new generation of LFB, and shows great promise for in-field and point-of-care diagnosis of genetic diseases and for the detection of infectious agents. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Fluorescence Regulation of Copper Nanoclusters via DNA Template Manipulation toward Design of a High Signal-to-Noise Ratio Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junyao; Fu, Wenxin; Bao, Jianchun; Wang, Zhaoyin; Dai, Zhihui

    2018-02-28

    Because of bioaccumulation of food chain and disability of biodegradation, concentration of toxic mercury ions (Hg 2+ ) in the environment dramatically varies from picomolar to micromolar, indicating the importance of well-performed Hg 2+ analytical methods. Herein, reticular DNA is constructed by introducing thymine (T)-Hg 2+ -T nodes in poly(T) DNA, and copper nanoclusters (CuNCs) with aggregate morphology are prepared using this reticular DNA as a template. Intriguingly, the prepared CuNCs exhibit enhanced fluorescence. Meanwhile, the reticular DNA reveals evident resistance to enzyme digestion, further clarifying the fluorescence enhancement of CuNCs. Relying on the dual function of DNA manipulation, a high signal-to-noise ratio biosensor is designed. This analytical approach can quantify Hg 2+ in a very wide range (50 pM to 500 μM) with an ultralow detection limit (16 pM). Besides, depending on the specific interaction between Hg 2+ and reduced l-glutathione (GSH), this biosensor is able to evaluate the inhibition of GSH toward Hg 2+ . In addition, pollution of Hg 2+ in three lakes is tested using this method, and the obtained results are in accord with those from inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. In general, this work provides an alternative way to regulate the properties of DNA-templated nanomaterials and indicates the applicability of this way by fabricating an advanced biosensor.

  14. A Rapid and Sensitive Diagnosis of Typhoid Fever Based On Nested PCR-Voltammetric DNA Biosensor Using Flagellin Gene Fragment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeni Wahyuni Hartati

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Typhoid fever caused by Salmonella typhi is an important issue for public health in the world. Laboratory methods for rapid and sensitive diagnosis are very important for disease management. The purpose of this study was to determine the performance of nested PCR–voltammetric DNA biosensor using flagellin gene (fla of S. typhi as a marker. The differential pulse voltammetry using pencil graphite electrode was applied to measure the guanine oxidation signal of probes vs synthetic target stDNA and probes vs fla PCR product hybridizations. The probe DNA selectivity was examined by hybridized probes vs non-complementary sequence. The result showed that the first round nested PCR product can not be visualized by agarose electrophoresis, whereas using the voltammetric biosensor methods can be detected both for the first or second round nested PCR product. The average peak current of hybridized probe vs first and second round of PCR product was 2.32 and 1.47 μA respectively, at 0.9 V. Detection of the DNA sequences of the infectious diseases from PCR amplified real sample was also carried out using this voltammetric DNA biosensor methods.

  15. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle-Based Interdigitated Electrodes: A Novel Current to Voltage DNA Biosensor Recognizes E. coli O157:H7

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nadzirah, Sh; Azizah, N; Hashim, Uda; Gopinath, Subash C B; Kashif, Mohd

    2015-01-01

    .... In the present study, we have generated and examined the potential of titanium dioxide (TiO2) crystalline nanoparticles with aluminium interdigitated electrode biosensor to specifically detect single-stranded E.coli O157:H7 DNA...

  16. Real-time detection of TDP1 activity using a fluorophore-quencher coupled DNA-biosensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pia Wrensted; Falconi, Mattia; Kristoffersen, Emil Laust

    2013-01-01

    Real-time detection of enzyme activities may present the easiest and most reliable way of obtaining quantitative analyses in biological samples. We present a new DNA-biosensor capable of detecting the activity of the potential anticancer drug target tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase 1 (TDP1) in a very...... such as biopsies. TDP1 removes covalent 3′DNA adducts in DNA single-strand break repair. This enzymatic activity forms the basis of the design of the TDP1-biosensor, which consists of a short hairpin-forming oligonucleotide having a 5′fluorophore and a 3′quencher brought in close proximity by the secondary...... activity in pure enzyme fractions as well as in crude cell extracts. In the present study we demonstrate the specificity of the biosensor, its ability to quantitatively detect up- or down-regulated TDP1 activity, and that it may be used for measuring and for analyzing the mechanism of TDP1 inhibition....

  17. Biosensors and their applications – A review

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrotra, Parikha

    2016-01-01

    The various types of biosensors such as enzyme-based, tissue-based, immunosensors, DNA biosensors, thermal and piezoelectric biosensors have been deliberated here to highlight their indispensable applications in multitudinous fields.

  18. Studies on the Interaction Mechanism of 1,10-Phenanthroline Cobalt(II Complex with DNA and Preparation of Electrochemical DNA Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiying Wang

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluorescence spectroscopy and ultraviolet (UV spectroscopy techniques coupled with cyclic voltammetry (CV were used to study the interaction between salmon sperm DNA and 1,10-Phenanthroline cobalt(II complex, [Co(phen2(Cl(H2O]Cl·H2O, where phen = 1,10-phenanthroline. The interaction between [Co(phen2(Cl(H2O]+ and double-strand DNA (dsDNA was identified to be intercalative mode. An electrochemical DNA biosensor was developed by covalent immobilization of probe single-strand DNA (ssDNA related to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV on the activated glassy carbon electrode (GCE. With [Co(phen2(Cl(H2O]+ being the novel electrochemical hybridization indicator, the selectivity of ssDNA-modified electrode was investigated and selective detection of complementary ssDNA was achieved using differential pulse voltammetry (DPV.

  19. SiPM as miniaturised optical biosensor for DNA-microarray applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.F. Santangelo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A miniaturized optical biosensor for low-level fluorescence emitted by DNA strands labelled with CY5 is showed. Aim of this work is to demonstrate that a Si-based photodetector, having a low noise and a high sensitivity, can replace traditional detection systems in DNA-microarray applications. The photodetector used is a photomultiplier (SiPM, with 25 pixels. It exhibits a higher sensitivity than commercial optical readers and we experimentally found a detection limit for spotted dried samples of ∼1 nM. We measured the fluorescence signal in different operating conditions (angle of analysis, fluorophores concentrations, solution volumes and support. Once fixed the angle of analysis, for samples spotted on Al-TEOS slide dried, the system is proportional to the concentration of the analyte in the sample and is linear in the range 1 nM–1 μM. For solutions, the range of linearity ranges from 100 fM to 10 nM. The system potentialities and the device low costs suggest it as basic component for the design and fabrication of a cheap, easy and portable optical system.

  20. An enzyme-free catalytic DNA circuit for amplified detection of aflatoxin B1 using gold nanoparticles as colorimetric indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junhua; Wen, Junlin; Zhuang, Li; Zhou, Shungui

    2016-05-01

    An enzyme-free biosensor for the amplified detection of aflatoxin B1 has been constructed based on a catalytic DNA circuit. Three biotinylated hairpin DNA probes (H1, H2, and H3) were designed as the assembly components to construct the sensing system (triplex H1-H2-H3 product). Cascaded signal amplification capability was obtained through toehold-mediated strand displacement reactions to open the hairpins and recycle the trigger DNA. By the use of streptavidin-functionalized gold nanoparticles as the signal indicators, the colorimetric readout can be observed by the naked eye. In the presence of a target, the individual nanoparticles (red) aggregate into a cross-linked network of nanoparticles (blue) via biotin-streptavidin coupling. The colorimetric assay is ultrasensitive, enabling the visual detection of trace levels of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) as low as 10 pM without instrumentation. The calculated limit of detection (LOD) is 2 pM in terms of 3 times standard deviation over the blank response. The sensor is robust and works even when challenged with complex sample matrices such as rice samples. Our sensing platform is simple and convenient in operation, requiring only the mixing of several solutions at room temperature to achieve visible and intuitive results, and holds great promise for the point-of-use monitoring of AFB1 in environmental and food samples.An enzyme-free biosensor for the amplified detection of aflatoxin B1 has been constructed based on a catalytic DNA circuit. Three biotinylated hairpin DNA probes (H1, H2, and H3) were designed as the assembly components to construct the sensing system (triplex H1-H2-H3 product). Cascaded signal amplification capability was obtained through toehold-mediated strand displacement reactions to open the hairpins and recycle the trigger DNA. By the use of streptavidin-functionalized gold nanoparticles as the signal indicators, the colorimetric readout can be observed by the naked eye. In the presence of a target, the

  1. A chemiluminescence biosensor based on the adsorption recognition function between Fe3O4@SiO2@GO polymers and DNA for ultrasensitive detection of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuanling; Li, Jianbo; Wang, Yanhui; Ding, Chaofan; Lin, Yanna; Sun, Weiyan; Luo, Chuannan

    2017-05-01

    In this work, a chemiluminescence (CL) biosensor was prepared for ultrasensitive determination of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) based on the adsorption recognition function between core-shell Fe3O4@SiO2 - graphene oxide (Fe3O4@SiO2@GO) polymers and DNA. The Fe3O4@SiO2@GO polymers were composed by GO and magnetite nanoparticles. And the core-shell polymers were confirmed by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR). Then Fe3O4@SiO2@GO was modified by DNA. Based on the principle of complementary base, Fe3O4@SiO2@GO-DNA was introduced to the CL system and the selectivity, sensitivity of DNA detection was significantly improved. The adsorption properties of Fe3O4@SiO2@GO to DNA were researched through the adsorption equilibrium, adsorption kinetic and thermodynamics. Under optimized CL conditions, DNA could be assayed with the linear concentration range of 5.0 × 10- 12-2.5 × 10- 11 mol/L. The detection limit was 1.7 × 10- 12 mol/L (3δ) and the relative standard deviation (RSD) was 3.1%. The biosensor was finally used for the determination of DNA in laboratory samples and recoveries ranged from 99% to 103%. The satisfactory results revealed the potential application of Fe3O4@SiO2@GO-DNA-CL biosensor in the diagnosis and the treatment of human genetic diseases.

  2. DNA/RNA hybrid substrates modulate the catalytic activity of purified AID.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdouni, Hala S; King, Justin J; Ghorbani, Atefeh; Fifield, Heather; Berghuis, Lesley; Larijani, Mani

    2018-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) converts cytidine to uridine at Immunoglobulin (Ig) loci, initiating somatic hypermutation and class switching of antibodies. In vitro, AID acts on single stranded DNA (ssDNA), but neither double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) oligonucleotides nor RNA, and it is believed that transcription is the in vivo generator of ssDNA targeted by AID. It is also known that the Ig loci, particularly the switch (S) regions targeted by AID are rich in transcription-generated DNA/RNA hybrids. Here, we examined the binding and catalytic behavior of purified AID on DNA/RNA hybrid substrates bearing either random sequences or GC-rich sequences simulating Ig S regions. If substrates were made up of a random sequence, AID preferred substrates composed entirely of DNA over DNA/RNA hybrids. In contrast, if substrates were composed of S region sequences, AID preferred to mutate DNA/RNA hybrids over substrates composed entirely of DNA. Accordingly, AID exhibited a significantly higher affinity for binding DNA/RNA hybrid substrates composed specifically of S region sequences, than any other substrates composed of DNA. Thus, in the absence of any other cellular processes or factors, AID itself favors binding and mutating DNA/RNA hybrids composed of S region sequences. AID:DNA/RNA complex formation and supporting mutational analyses suggest that recognition of DNA/RNA hybrids is an inherent structural property of AID. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparison of impedimetric detection of DNA hybridization on the various biosensors based on modified glassy carbon electrodes with PANHS and nanomaterials of RGO and MWCNTs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvidi, Ali; Tezerjani, Marzieh Dehghan; Jahanbani, Shahriar; Mazloum Ardakani, Mohammad; Moshtaghioun, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-01-15

    In this research, we have developed lable free DNA biosensors based on modified glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) with reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for detection of DNA sequences. This paper compares the detection of BRCA1 5382insC mutation using independent glassy carbon electrodes (GCE) modified with RGO and MWCNTs. A probe (BRCA1 5382insC mutation detection (ssDNA)) was then immobilized on the modified electrodes for a specific time. The immobilization of the probe and its hybridization with the target DNA (Complementary DNA) were performed under optimum conditions using different electrochemical techniques such as cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The proposed biosensors were used for determination of complementary DNA sequences. The non-modified DNA biosensor (1-pyrenebutyric acid-N- hydroxysuccinimide ester (PANHS)/GCE), revealed a linear relationship between ∆Rct and logarithm of the complementary target DNA concentration ranging from 1.0×10(-16)molL(-1) to 1.0×10(-10)mol L(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.992, for DNA biosensors modified with multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and reduced graphene oxide (RGO) wider linear range and lower detection limit were obtained. For ssDNA/PANHS/MWCNTs/GCE a linear range 1.0×10(-17)mol L(-1)-1.0×10(-10)mol L(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.993 and for ssDNA/PANHS/RGO/GCE a linear range from 1.0×10(-18)mol L(-1) to 1.0×10(-10)mol L(-1) with a correlation coefficient of 0.985 were obtained. In addition, the mentioned biosensors were satisfactorily applied for discriminating of complementary sequences from noncomplementary sequences, so the mentioned biosensors can be used for the detection of BRCA1-associated breast cancer. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Detection of Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence using a biosensor design based on Ceria nanoparticles decorated reduced graphene oxide and Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafari, Safiye [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Faridbod, Farnoush, E-mail: faridbodf@khayam.ut.ac.ir [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biosensor Research Center, Endocrinology & Metabolism Molecular and Cellular Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Norouzi, Parviz [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biosensor Research Center, Endocrinology & Metabolism Molecular and Cellular Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Dezfuli, Amin Shiralizadeh [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ajloo, Davood [School of Chemistry, Damghan University, Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mohammadipanah, Fatemeh [Department of Microbial Biotechnology, School of Biology and Center of Excellence in Phylogeny of Living Organisms, College of Science, University of Tehran, 14155-6455 Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ganjali, Mohammad Reza [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Biosensor Research Center, Endocrinology & Metabolism Molecular and Cellular Research Institute, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-10-01

    A new strategy was introduced for ssDNA immobilization on a modified glassy carbon electrode. The electrode surface was modified using polyaniline and chemically reduced graphene oxide decorated cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO{sub 2}NPs-RGO). A single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) probe was immobilized on the modified electrode surface. Fast Fourier transform square wave voltammetry (FFT-SWV) was applied as detection technique and [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+/3+} redox signal was used as electrochemical marker. The hybridization of ssDNA with its complementary target caused a dramatic decrease in [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+/3+} FFT-SW signal. The proposed electrochemical biosensor was able to detect Aeromonas hydrophila DNA oligonucleotide sequence encoding aerolysin protein. Under optimal conditions, the biosensor showed excellent selectivity toward complementary sequence in comparison with noncomplementary and two-base mismatch sequences. The dynamic linear range of this electrochemical DNA biosensor for detecting 20-mer oligonucleotide sequence of A. hydrophila was from 1 × 10{sup −15} to 1 × 10{sup −8} mol L{sup −1}. The proposed biosensor was successfully applied for the detection of DNA extracted from A. hydrophila in fish pond water up to 0.01 μg mL{sup −1} with RSD of 5%. Besides, molecular docking was applied to consider the [Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+/3+} interaction with ssDNA before and after hybridization. - Highlights: • New DNA biosensor is designed for sub-femtomolar detection of Aeromonas hydrophila DNA sequence. • Reduced graphene oxide decorated Ceria nanoparticles was used as a new immobilization platform. • Biosensor was successfully used to detect A. hydrophila DNA sequence in fish pond water.

  5. Specific DNA duplex formation at an artificial lipid bilayer: towards a new DNA biosensor technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werz, Emma; Korneev, Sergei; Montilla-Martinez, Malayko; Wagner, Richard; Hemmler, Roland; Walter, Claudius; Eisfeld, Jörg; Gall, Karsten; Rosemeyer, Helmut

    2012-02-01

    A novel technique is described which comprises a base-specific DNA duplex formation at a lipid bilayer-H(2) O-phase boundary layer. Two different probes of oligonucleotides both carrying a double-tailed lipid at the 5'-terminus were incorporated into stable artificial lipid bilayers separating two compartments (cis/trans-channel) of an optically transparent microfluidic sample carrier with perfusion capabilities. Both the cis- and trans-channels are filled with saline buffer. Injection of a cyanine-5-labeled target DNA sequence, which is complementary to only one of the oligonucleotide probes, into the cis-channel, followed by a thorough perfusion, leads to an immobilization of the labeled complementary oligonucleotide on the membrane as detected by single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy. In the case of fluorescent but non-complementary DNA sequences, no immobilized fluorescent oligonucleotide duplex could be detected on the membrane. This clearly verifies a specific duplex formation at the membrane interface. Copyright © 2012 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  6. Enhanced sensing of dengue virus DNA detection using O{sub 2} plasma treated-silicon nanowire based electrical biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahman, S.F.A., E-mail: siti_fatimah0410@yahoo.com [Institute of Advanced Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, UPM, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Yusof, N.A., E-mail: azahy@upm.edu.my [Institute of Advanced Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, UPM, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, UPM, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Hashim, U. [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Hushiarian, R. [La Trobe Institute for Molecular Science, La Trobe University, Victoria, 3086 (Australia); Nuzaihan, M.N.M. [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Hamidon, M.N. [Institute of Advanced Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, UPM, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Zawawi, R.M. [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, UPM, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Fathil, M.F.M. [Institute of Nano Electronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 01000, Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia)

    2016-10-26

    Dengue Virus (DENV) has become one of the most serious arthropod-borne viral diseases, causing death globally. The existing methods for DENV detection suffer from the late stage treatment due to antibodies-based detection which is feasible only after five days following the onset of the illness. Here, we demonstrated the highly effective molecular electronic based detection utilizing silicon nanowire (SiNW) integrated with standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) process as a sensing device for detecting deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) related to DENV in an early stage diagnosis. To transform the fabricated devices as a functional sensing element, three-step procedure consist of SiNW surface modification, DNA immobilization and DNA hybridization were employed. The detection principle works by detecting the changes in current of SiNW which bridge the source and drain terminal to sense the immobilization of probe DNA and their hybridization with target DNA. The oxygen (O{sub 2}) plasma was proposed as an effective strategy for increasing the binding amounts of target DNA by modified the SiNW surface. It was found that the detection limit of the optimized O{sub 2} plasma treated-SiNW device could be reduced to 1.985 × 10{sup −14} M with a linear detection range of the sequence-specific DNA from 1.0 × 10{sup −9} M to 1.0 × 10{sup −13} M. In addition, the developed biosensor device was able to discriminate between complementary, single mismatch and non-complementary DNA sequences. This highly sensitive assay was then applied to the detection of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) product of DENV-DNA, making it as a potential method for disease diagnosis through electrical biosensor. - Highlights: • Molecular electronic detection of Dengue Virus (DENV) DNA using SiNW biosensor is presented. • Oxygen plasma surface treatment as an enhancer technique for device sensitivity is highlighted. • The limit of detection (Lo

  7. Catalytic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Hanafi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of dealuminated Y-zeolites impregnated by 0.5 wt% Pt catalysts promoted by different amounts of Ni, Pd or Cr (0.3 and 0.6 wt% were prepared and characterized as hydrocracking catalysts. The physicochemical and structural characterization of the solid catalysts were investigated and reported through N2 physisorption, XRD, TGA-DSC, FT-IR and TEM techniques. Solid catalysts surface acidities were investigated through FT-IR spectroscopy aided by pyridine adsorption. The solid catalytic activities were evaluated through hydroconversion of n-hexane and n-heptane employing micro-catalytic pulse technique directly connected to a gas chromatograph analyzer. The thermal stability of the solids was also investigated up to 800 °C. Crystallinity studies using the XRD technique of all modified samples proved analogous to the parent Y-zeolite, exhibiting nearly an amorphous and microcrystalline character of the second metal oxides. Disclosure of bimetallic catalysts crystalline characterization, through XRD, was not viable. The nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms for all samples concluded type I adsorption isotherms, without any hysteresis loop, indicating that the entire pore system is composed of micropores. TEM micrographs of the solid catalysts demonstrate well-dispersed Pt, Ni and Cr nanoparticles having sizes of 2–4 nm and 7–8 nm, respectively. The catalytic activity results indicate that the bimetallic (0.5Pt–0.3Cr/D18H–Y catalyst is the most active towards n-hexane and n-heptane isomerization while (0.5Pt–0.6Ni/D18H–Y catalyst can be designed as most suitable as a cracking catalyst.

  8. Molecular diversity and catalytic activity of Thermus DNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Moreland D; Reeves, Rosalind A; Mandelman, David; Mi, Qingli; Lee, Jun; Bergquist, Peter L

    2009-09-01

    Thermus aquaticus DNA polymerase (Taq polymerase) made the polymerase chain reaction feasible and led to a paradigm shift in genomic analysis. Other Thermus polymerases were reported to have comparable performance in PCR and there was an analysis of their properties in the 1990s. We re-evaluated our earlier phylogeny of Thermus species on the basis of 16S rDNA sequences and concluded that the genus could be divided into eight clades. We examined 22 representative isolates and isolated their DNA polymerase I genes. The eight most diverse polymerase genes were selected to represent the eight clades and cloned into an expression vector coding for a His-tag. Six of the eight polymerases were expressed so that there was sufficient protein for purification. The proteins were purified to homogeneity and examination of the biochemical characteristics showed that although they were competent to perform PCR, none was as thermostable as commercially available Taq polymerase; all had similar error-frequencies to Taq polymerase and all showed the expected 5'-3' exonuclease activity. We conclude that the initial selection of T. aquaticus for DNA polymerase purification was a far-reaching and fortuitous choice but simple mutagenesis procedures on other Thermus-derived polymerases should provide comparable thermostability for the PCR reaction.

  9. A Sensitive and Selective Label-Free Electrochemical DNA Biosensor for the Detection of Specific Dengue Virus Serotype 3 Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natália Oliveira

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Dengue fever is the most prevalent vector-borne disease in the world, with nearly 100 million people infected every year. Early diagnosis and identification of the pathogen are crucial steps for the treatment and for prevention of the disease, mainly in areas where the co-circulation of different serotypes is common, increasing the outcome of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF and dengue shock syndrome (DSS. Due to the lack of fast and inexpensive methods available for the identification of dengue serotypes, herein we report the development of an electrochemical DNA biosensor for the detection of sequences of dengue virus serotype 3 (DENV-3. DENV-3 probe was designed using bioinformatics software and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV was used for electrochemical analysis. The results showed that a 22-m sequence was the best DNA probe for the identification of DENV-3. The optimum concentration of the DNA probe immobilized onto the electrode surface is 500 nM and a low detection limit of the system (3.09 nM. Moreover, this system allows selective detection of DENV-3 sequences in buffer and human serum solutions. Therefore, the application of DNA biosensors for diagnostics at the molecular level may contribute to future advances in the implementation of specific, effective and rapid detection methods for the diagnosis dengue viruses.

  10. Metallization of DNA hydrogel: application of soft matter host for preparation and nesting of catalytic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinchenko, Anatoly; Che, Yuxin; Taniguchi, Shota; Lopatina, Larisa I.; G. Sergeyev, Vladimir; Murata, Shizuaki

    2016-07-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) of Au, Ag, Pt, Pd, Cu and Ni of 2-3 nm average-size and narrow-size distributions were synthesized in DNA cross-linked hydrogels by reducing corresponding metal precursors by sodium borohydride. DNA hydrogel plays a role of a universal reactor in which the reduction of metal precursor results in the formation of 2-3 nm ultrafine metal NPs regardless of metal used. Hydrogels metallized with various metals showed catalytic activity in the reduction of nitroaromatic compounds, and the catalytic activity of metallized hydrogels changed as follows: Pd > Ag ≈ Au ≈ Cu > Ni > Pt. DNA hydrogel-based "soft catalysts" elaborated in this study are promising for green organic synthesis in aqueous media as well as for biomedical in vivo applications.

  11. Metallization of DNA hydrogel: application of soft matter host for preparation and nesting of catalytic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinchenko, Anatoly, E-mail: zinchenko@urban.env.nagoya-u.ac.jp; Che, Yuxin; Taniguchi, Shota [Nagoya University, Graduate School of Environmental Studies (Japan); Lopatina, Larisa I.; Sergeyev, Vladimir G. [Moscow State University, Department of Chemistry (Russian Federation); Murata, Shizuaki [Nagoya University, Graduate School of Environmental Studies (Japan)

    2016-07-15

    Nanoparticles (NPs) of Au, Ag, Pt, Pd, Cu and Ni of 2–3 nm average-size and narrow-size distributions were synthesized in DNA cross-linked hydrogels by reducing corresponding metal precursors by sodium borohydride. DNA hydrogel plays a role of a universal reactor in which the reduction of metal precursor results in the formation of 2–3 nm ultrafine metal NPs regardless of metal used. Hydrogels metallized with various metals showed catalytic activity in the reduction of nitroaromatic compounds, and the catalytic activity of metallized hydrogels changed as follows: Pd > Ag ≈ Au ≈ Cu > Ni > Pt. DNA hydrogel-based “soft catalysts” elaborated in this study are promising for green organic synthesis in aqueous media as well as for biomedical in vivo applications.Graphical Abstract.

  12. Ultrasensitive electrochemical DNA biosensor based on functionalized gold clusters/graphene nanohybrids coupling with exonuclease III-aided cascade target recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Bao, Ting; Zeng, Xi; Xiong, Huayu; Wen, Wei; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2017-05-15

    In this work, a novel and ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor was constructed for DNA detection based on functionalized gold clusters/graphene nanohybrids (AuNCs/GR nanobybrids) and exonuclease III (Exo III)-aided cascade target recycling. By utilizing the capacity of GR as universal template, different metal nanoclusters including AuNCs/GR nanobybrids and PtNCs/GR nanohybrids were synthesized through convenient ultrasonic method. Exo III-aided cascade recycling was initiated by target DNA, generating the final cleavage product (S2), which acted as a linkage between capture probe and the functionalized metal nanoclusters/GR conjugates in the construction of the biosensor. The AuNCs/GR-DNA-enzyme conjugates acted as interfaces of enzyme-catalyzed silver deposition reaction, achieving DNA detection ranging from 0.02 fM to 20 pM with a detection limit of 0.057 fM. In addition, PtNCs/GR-DNA conjugates presented peroxidase-like activity and the functionalized PtNCs/GR nanohybrids-based electrochemical biosensor also realized DNA detection by catalyzing the 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine-hydrogen peroxide (TMB-H2O2) system to produce electrochemical signal. This metal clusters/GR-based multiple-amplified electrochemical biosensor provided an universal method for DNA detection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Catalytic Antibodies and DNA Site-Specific Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-01

    addition to the substrate HS, as illustrated in Figure 5. These bands will be purified, and their sizes confirmed, on a DNA sequencing gel ( Ausubel et al...1 OD 280= 0.8mg/ml, Harlow and Lane, 1988b) or by the Bradford method in reference to BSA as described ( Ausubel et al. 1987c). Results and Discussion...Evidence for a Second Conserved Arginine Residue in the Integrase Family of Recombination Proteins. Protein Eng. 5:87-9 1; Ausubel , F.M., R. Brent, R.E

  14. A novel graphene coated surface plasmon resonance biosensor with tungsten disulfide (WS2) for sensing DNA hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. Saifur; Hasan, Md. Rabiul; Rikta, Khaleda Akter; Anower, M. S.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a rigorous configuration of graphene coated surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor with Tungsten Disulfide (WS2) for sensing DNA hybridization. The present configuration is consisted of prism (SF10 glass), Gold (Au), WS2- graphene and sensing medium. We perform the performance parameters of the proposed sensor in terms of sensitivity, detection accuracy and quality factor. Here we report a dramatic enhancement of the overall performance. Addition of graphene layers increase the sensitivity but decrease the other performance parameters. To increase the all performance parameters we add WS2 between metal and graphene layer. Furthermore in this paper, the thickness effect of Gold (Au) is also analyzed. Numerical analysis shows that the variation of SPR angle for mismatched DNA strands is quiet negligible whereas that for complementary DNA strands is considerably countable. Therefore, the proposed biosensor opens a new window towards detection for biomolecular interactions.

  15. Fabrication of layer-by-layer deposited multilayer films containing DNA and gold nanoparticle for norepinephrine biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu Liping; Wang Shuqing; Lin Xiangqin

    2004-08-16

    The present work describes the preparation and characterization of an electrodeposited DNA membrane doped with gold nanoparticles for the design of biosensors. The gold nanoparticles were deposited on the surface of DNA layer to build a hybrid device of nanoscale electrode array. The gold nanoparticles-doped DNA composite electrode was characterized by atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscope, and electrochemistry involving electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. This electrode was successfully used for selective determination of norepinephrine (NE) in the presence of ascorbic acid (AA). The reversibility of the electrode oxidation reaction of NE is significantly improved in result of 200 mV negative shift of the voltammetric peak potential on the electrode, and a large increase in the peak current. A detection limit of 5 nM NE is obtained by using DPV in static solutions. The co-existence of a large excess of AA does not interfere with the detection. This electrode shows excellent sensitivity, good selectivity and antifouling properties.

  16. Combination of cascade chemical reactions with graphene-DNA interaction to develop new strategy for biosensor fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaoli; Sun, Liya; Chen, Yangyang; Ye, Zonghuang; Shen, Zhongming; Li, Genxi

    2013-09-15

    Graphene, a single atom thick and two dimensional carbon nano-material, has been proven to possess many unique properties, one of which is the recent discovery that it can interact with single-stranded DNA through noncovalent π-π stacking. In this work, we demonstrate that a new strategy to fabricate many kinds of biosensors can be developed by combining this property with cascade chemical reactions. Taking the fabrication of glucose sensor as an example, while the detection target, glucose, may regulate the graphene-DNA interaction through three cascade chemical reactions, electrochemical techniques are employed to detect the target-regulated graphene-DNA interaction. Experimental results show that in a range from 5μM to 20mM, the glucose concentration is in a natural logarithm with the logarithm of the amperometric response, suggesting a best detection limit and detection range. The proposed biosensor also shows favorable selectivity, and it has the advantage of no need for labeling. What is more, by controlling the cascade chemical reactions, detection of a variety of other targets may be achieved, thus the strategy proposed in this work may have a wide application potential in the future. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. DNA requirements for interaction of the C-terminal region of Ku80 with the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Sarvan Kumar; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2017-09-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is the major pathway for the repair of ionizing radiation induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in human cells. Critical to NHEJ is the DNA-dependent interaction of the Ku70/80 heterodimer with the DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) to form the DNA-PK holoenzyme. However, precisely how Ku recruits DNA-PKcs to DSBs ends to enhance its kinase activity has remained enigmatic, with contradictory findings reported in the literature. Here we address the role of the Ku80 C-terminal region (CTR) in the DNA-dependent interaction of Ku70/80 with DNA-PKcs using purified components and defined DNA structures. Our results show that the Ku80 CTR is required for interaction with DNA-PKcs on short segments of blunt ended 25bp dsDNA or 25bp dsDNA with a 15-base poly dA single stranded (ss) DNA extension, but this requirement is less stringent on longer dsDNA molecules (35bp blunt ended dsDNA) or 25bp duplex DNA with either a 15-base poly dT or poly dC ssDNA extension. Moreover, the DNA-PKcs-Ku complex preferentially forms on 25 bp DNA with a poly-pyrimidine ssDNA extension.Our work clarifies the role of the Ku80 CTR and dsDNA ends on the interaction of DNA-PKcs with Ku and provides key information to guide assembly and biology of NHEJ complexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs as a novel target of bisphenol A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Ito

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA forms the backbone of plastics and epoxy resins used to produce packaging for various foods and beverages. BPA is also an estrogenic disruptor, interacting with human estrogen receptors (ER and other related nuclear receptors. Nevertheless, the effects of BPA on human health remain unclear. The present study identified DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs as a novel BPA-binding protein. DNA-PKcs, in association with the Ku heterodimer (Ku70/80, is a critical enzyme involved in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Low levels of DNA-PK activity are previously reported to be associated with an increased risk of certain types of cancer. Although the Kd for the interaction between BPA and a drug-binding mutant of DNA-PKcs was comparatively low (137 nM, high doses of BPA were required before cellular effects were observed (100-300 μM. The results of an in vitro kinase assay showed that BPA inhibited DNA-PK kinase activity in a concentration-dependent manner. In M059K cells, BPA inhibited the phosphorylation of DNA-PKcs at Ser2056 and H2AX at Ser139 in response to ionizing radiation (IR-irradiation. BPA also disrupted DNA-PKcs binding to Ku70/80 and increased the radiosensitivity of M059K cells, but not M059J cells (which are DNA-PKcs-deficient. Taken together, these results provide new evidence of the effects of BPA on DNA repair in mammalian cells, which are mediated via inhibition of DNA-PK activity. This study may warrant the consideration of the possible carcinogenic effects of high doses of BPA, which are mediated through its action on DNA-PK.

  19. A DNA biosensor based on gold nanoparticle decorated on carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes for gender determination of Arowana fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedfar, Kasra; Heng, Lee Yook; Chiang, Chew Poh

    2017-12-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were modified to design a new DNA biosensor. Functionalized MWCNTs were equipped with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) (~15nm) (GNP-MWCNTCOOH) to construct DNA biosensors based on carbon-paste screen-printed (SPE) electrodes. GNP attachment onto functionalized MWCNTs was carried out by microwave irradiation and was confirmed by spectroscopic studies and surface analysis. DNA biosensors based on differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) were constructed by immobilizing thiolated single-stranded DNA probes onto GNP-MWCNTCOOH. Ruthenium (III) chloride hexaammoniate [Ru(NH 3 ) 6 ,2Cl - ] (RuHex) was used as hybridization redox indicator. RuHex and MWCNT interaction was low in compared to other organic redox hybridization indicators. The linear response range for DNA determination was 1×10 -21 to 1×10 -9 M with a lower detection limit of 1.55×10 -21 M. Thus, the attachment of GNPs onto functionalized MWCNTs yielded sensitive DNA biosensor with low detection limit and stability more than 30days. Constructed electrode was used to determine gender of arowana fish. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of porcine oligonucleotides using ruthenium(II) complex as intercalator label redox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halid, Nurul Izni Abdullah; Hasbullah, Siti Aishah; Heng, Lee Yook; Karim, Nurul Huda Abd [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Ahmad, Haslina; Harun, Siti Norain [Chemistry Department, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400, Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03

    A DNA biosensor detection of oligonucleotides via the interactions of porcine DNA with redox active complex based on the electrochemical transduction is described. A ruthenium(II) complex, [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+}, (bpy = 2,2′bipyridine, PIP = 2-phenylimidazo[4,5-f[[1,10-phenanthroline]) as DNA label has been synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR and mass spectra. The study was carried out by covalent bonding immobilization of porcine aminated DNA probes sequences on screen printed electrode (SPE) modified with succinimide-acrylic microspheres and [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+} was used as electrochemical redox intercalator label to detect DNA hybridization event. Electrochemical detection was performed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) over the potential range where the ruthenium (II) complex was active. The results indicate that the interaction of [Ru(bpy){sub 2}(PIP)]{sup 2+} with hybridization complementary DNA has higher response compared to single-stranded and mismatch complementary DNA.

  1. Specific and Sensitive Isothermal Electrochemical Biosensor for Plant Pathogen DNA Detection with Colloidal Gold Nanoparticles as Probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Han Yih; Wu, Haoqi; Wee, Eugene J. H.; Trau, Matt; Wang, Yuling; Botella, Jose R.

    2017-01-01

    Developing quick and sensitive molecular diagnostics for plant pathogen detection is challenging. Herein, a nanoparticle based electrochemical biosensor was developed for rapid and sensitive detection of plant pathogen DNA on disposable screen-printed carbon electrodes. This 60 min assay relied on the rapid isothermal amplification of target pathogen DNA sequences by recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) followed by gold nanoparticle-based electrochemical assessment with differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Our method was 10,000 times more sensitive than conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR)/gel electrophoresis and could readily identify P. syringae infected plant samples even before the disease symptoms were visible. On the basis of the speed, sensitivity, simplicity and portability of the approach, we believe the method has potential as a rapid disease management solution for applications in agriculture diagnostics.

  2. Investigation of cleaning and regeneration methods for reliable construction of DNA cantilever biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quan, Xueling; Yi, Sun; Heiskanen, Arto

    to clean and regenerate the sensing surface of cantilever biosensors. Perchloric acid potential sweep, potassium hydroxide-hydrogen peroxide, and piranha cleaning are investigated here. Peak-current potential differences from cyclic voltammetry, X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy and fluorescence detection...

  3. Fiber optofluidic biosensor for the label-free detection of DNA hybridization and methylation based on an in-line tunable mode coupler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ran; Lu, Dan-Feng; Cheng, Jin; Jiang, Yi; Jiang, Lan; Xu, Jian-Dong; Qi, Zhi-Mei

    2016-12-15

    An optical fiber optofluidic biosensor for the detection of DNA hybridization and methylation has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated. An in-line fiber Michelson interferometer was formed in the photonic crystal fiber. A micrhole in the collapsed region, which combined the tunable mode coupler and optofluidic channel, was fabricated by using femtosecond laser micromachining. The mode field diameter of the guided light is changed with the refractive index in the optofluidic channel, which results in the tunable coupling ratio. Label-free detections of the DNA hybridization and methylation have been experimentally demonstrated. The probe single stranded DNA (ssDNA) was bound with the surface of the optofluidic channel through the Poly-l-lysine layer, and the hybridization between a short 22-mer probe ssDNA and a complementary target ssDNA was carried out and detected by interrogating the fringe visibility of the reflection spectrum. Then, the DNA methylation was also detected through the binding between the methylated DNA and the 5-methylcytosine (5-mC) monoclonal antibody. The experiments results demonstrate that the limit of detection of 5nM is achieved, establishing the tunable mode coupler as a sensitive and versatile biosensor. The sensitive optical fiber optofluidic biosensor possesses high specificity and low temperature cross-sensitivity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cadmium(II) inhibition of human uracil-DNA glycosylase by catalytic water supplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokey, Trevor; Hang, Bo; Guliaev, Anton B.

    2016-12-01

    Toxic metals are known to inhibit DNA repair but the underlying mechanisms of inhibition are still not fully understood. DNA repair enzymes such as human uracil-DNA glycosylase (hUNG) perform the initial step in the base excision repair (BER) pathway. In this work, we showed that cadmium [Cd(II)], a known human carcinogen, inhibited all activity of hUNG at 100 μM. Computational analyses based on 2 μs equilibrium, 1.6 μs steered molecular dynamics (SMD), and QM/MM MD determined that Cd(II) ions entered the enzyme active site and formed close contacts with both D145 and H148, effectively replacing the catalytic water normally found in this position. Geometry refinement by density functional theory (DFT) calculations showed that Cd(II) formed a tetrahedral structure with D145, P146, H148, and one water molecule. This work for the first time reports Cd(II) inhibition of hUNG which was due to replacement of the catalytic water by binding the active site D145 and H148 residues. Comparison of the proposed metal binding site to existing structural data showed that D145:H148 followed a general metal binding motif favored by Cd(II). The identified motif offered structural insights into metal inhibition of other DNA repair enzymes and glycosylases.

  5. A sandwich-type DNA biosensor based on electrochemical co-reduction synthesis of graphene-three dimensional nanostructure gold nanocomposite films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ai-Lin; Zhong, Guang-Xian; Chen, Jin-Yuan; Weng, Shao-Huang; Huang, Hong-Nan; Chen, Wei; Lin, Li-Qing; Lei, Yun; Fu, Fei-Huan; Sun, Zhou-liang; Lin, Xin-Hua; Lin, Jian-Hua; Yang, Shu-Yu

    2013-03-12

    A novel electrochemical DNA biosensor based on graphene-three dimensional nanostructure gold nanocomposite modified glassy carbon electrode (G-3D Au/GCE) was fabricated for detection of survivin gene which was correlated with osteosarcoma. The G-3D Au film was prepared with one-step electrochemical coreduction with graphite oxide and HAuCl4 at cathodic potentials. The active surface area of G-3D Au/GCE was 2.629cm(2), which was about 3.8 times compared to that of a Au-coated GCE under the same experimental conditions, and 8.8 times compared to a planar gold electrode with a similar geometric area. The resultant nanocomposites with high conductivity, electrocatalysis and biocompatibility were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). A "sandwich-type" detection strategy was employed in this electrochemical DNA biosensor and the response of this DNA biosensor was measured by CV and amperometric current-time curve detection. Under optimum conditions, there was a good linear relationship between the current signal and the logarithmic function of complementary DNA concentration in a range of 50-5000fM with a detection limit of 3.4fM. This new biosensor exhibited a fast amperometric response, high sensitivity and selectivity and has been used in a polymerase chain reaction assay of real-life sample with a satisfactory result. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Control of a catalytic activity of gold nanoparticles embedded in DNA hydrogel by swelling/shrinking the hydrogel's matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che, Yuxin; Zinchenko, Anatoly; Murata, Shizuaki

    2015-05-01

    By incorporating catalytically active nanoparticles into polymeric hydrogel one can tune the catalytic activity of such a hybrid material by affecting the state of polymer matrix. Herein, hybrid hydrogel was prepared by metallization of DNA cross-liked hydrogel via absorption of gold precursor and reduction by NaBH4, and its catalytic activity under various swelling ratio was studied spectroscopically. Catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles in hydrogel was shown to depend drastically on a swelling degree of hydrogel easily controlled by a change in an ionic strength of solution. Increase of the catalytic reaction rate was proportional to the volume of hybrid hydrogel indicating that diffusion of reactants toward catalytic centers inside hydrogel is crucial for the efficient catalysis by soft-matter-based hybrid material. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Does quantum entanglement in DNA synchronize the catalytic centers of type II restriction endonucleases?

    CERN Document Server

    Kurian, P; Lindesay, J

    2014-01-01

    Several living systems have been examined for their apparent optimization of structure and function for quantum behavior at biological length scales. Orthodox type II endonucleases, the largest class of restriction enzymes, recognize four-to-eight base pair sequences of palindromic DNA, cut both strands symmetrically, and act without an external metabolite such as ATP. While it is known that these enzymes induce strand breaks by attacking phosphodiester bonds, what remains unclear is the mechanism by which cutting occurs in concert at the catalytic centers. Previous studies indicate the primacy of intimate DNA contacts made by the specifically bound enzyme in coordinating the two synchronized cuts. We propose that collective electronic behavior in the DNA helix generates coherent oscillations, quantized through boundary conditions imposed by the endonuclease, that provide the energy required to break two phosphodiester bonds. Such quanta may be preserved in the presence of thermal noise and electromagnetic in...

  8. Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticle-Based Interdigitated Electrodes: A Novel Current to Voltage DNA Biosensor Recognizes E. coli O157:H7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh Nadzirah

    Full Text Available Nanoparticle-mediated bio-sensing promoted the development of novel sensors in the front of medical diagnosis. In the present study, we have generated and examined the potential of titanium dioxide (TiO2 crystalline nanoparticles with aluminium interdigitated electrode biosensor to specifically detect single-stranded E.coli O157:H7 DNA. The performance of this novel DNA biosensor was measured the electrical current response using a picoammeter. The sensor surface was chemically functionalized with (3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES to provide contact between the organic and inorganic surfaces of a single-stranded DNA probe and TiO2 nanoparticles while maintaining the sensing system's physical characteristics. The complement of the target DNA of E. coli O157:H7 to the carboxylate-probe DNA could be translated into electrical signals and confirmed by the increased conductivity in the current-to-voltage curves. The specificity experiments indicate that the biosensor can discriminate between the complementary sequences from the base-mismatched and the non-complementary sequences. After duplex formation, the complementary target sequence can be quantified over a wide range with a detection limit of 1.0 x 10(-13M. With target DNA from the lysed E. coli O157:H7, we could attain similar sensitivity. Stability of DNA immobilized surface was calculated with the relative standard deviation (4.6%, displayed the retaining with 99% of its original response current until 6 months. This high-performance interdigitated DNA biosensor with high sensitivity, stability and non-fouling on a novel sensing platform is suitable for a wide range of biomolecular interactive analyses.

  9. Real-time detection of α-thrombin binding to single-strand DNA aptamers by a highly sensitive Si-based waveguide SPR biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chi-Chieh; Hsu, Hsin-Feng; Chen, Sz-Hau; Tsai, Kun-Yu; Huang, Yang-Tung; Lin, Chih-Sheng; Hsu, Shih-Hsin

    2012-02-01

    αIn this paper, real-time characterization of α-thrombin binding to single-strand DNA (ssDNA) aptamers by novel Si-based waveguide SPR biosensors has been investigated. The gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) modified with anti-thrombin antibodies were employed to bind with α-thrombin via strong antibody/antigen affinity for SPR signal amplification. The detection limit of 1 pM for -thrombin detection was achieved.

  10. Development of a Fish Cell Biosensor System for Genotoxicity Detection Based on DNA Damage-Induced Trans-Activation of p21 Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Huarong Guo; Zhixia Zhang; Deyu Geng

    2012-01-01

    p21 CIP1/WAF1 is a p53-target gene in response to cellular DNA damage. Here we report the development of a fish cell biosensor system for high throughput genotoxicity detection of new drugs, by stably integrating two reporter plasmids of pGL3-p21-luc (human p21 promoter linked to firefly luciferase) and pRL-CMV-luc (CMV promoter linked to Renilla luciferase) into marine flatfish flounder gill (FG) cells, referred to as p21FGLuc. Initial validation of this genotoxicity biosensor system showed ...

  11. Real-time reliable determination of binding kinetics of DNA hybridization using a multi-channel graphene biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shicai; Zhan, Jian; Man, Baoyuan; Jiang, Shouzhen; Yue, Weiwei; Gao, Shoubao; Guo, Chengang; Liu, Hanping; Li, Zhenhua; Wang, Jihua; Zhou, Yaoqi

    2017-03-01

    Reliable determination of binding kinetics and affinity of DNA hybridization and single-base mismatches plays an essential role in systems biology, personalized and precision medicine. The standard tools are optical-based sensors that are difficult to operate in low cost and to miniaturize for high-throughput measurement. Biosensors based on nanowire field-effect transistors have been developed, but reliable and cost-effective fabrication remains a challenge. Here, we demonstrate that a graphene single-crystal domain patterned into multiple channels can measure time- and concentration-dependent DNA hybridization kinetics and affinity reliably and sensitively, with a detection limit of 10 pM for DNA. It can distinguish single-base mutations quantitatively in real time. An analytical model is developed to estimate probe density, efficiency of hybridization and the maximum sensor response. The results suggest a promising future for cost-effective, high-throughput screening of drug candidates, genetic variations and disease biomarkers by using an integrated, miniaturized, all-electrical multiplexed, graphene-based DNA array.

  12. Protection of tobacco cells from oxidative copper toxicity by catalytically active metal-binding DNA oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Junichiro; Furukawa, Hiroka; Hiramatsu, Takuya; Bouteau, François; Mancuso, Stefano; Tanaka, Kenichiro; Okazaki, Toshihiko; Kawano, Tomonori

    2014-03-01

    The impact of copper ions on the oxidative and calcium signal transductions, leading to cell death in plant cells, have been documented. Copper induces a series of biological and chemical reactions in plant cells including the oxidative burst reflecting the production of reactive oxygen species and the stimulation of calcium channel opening allowing a transient increase in cytosolic calcium concentrations. These early events, completed within a few minutes after the contact with copper, are known to trigger the development of cell death. The effects of DNA fragments with copper-binding motifs as novel plant cell-protecting agents were assessed using cell suspension cultures of transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L., cell line BY-2) expressing the aequorin gene. The addition of GC-rich double-stranded DNA fragments, prior to the addition of copper ions, effectively blocked both the copper-induced calcium influx and cell death. In addition, the DNA-Cu complex examined was shown to possess superoxide-scavenging catalytic activity, suggesting that DNA-mediated protection of the cells from copper toxicity is due to the removal of superoxide. Lastly, a possible mechanism of DNA-Cu interaction and future applications of these DNA fragments in the protection of plant roots from metal toxicity or in aid of phyto-remediation processes are discussed.

  13. Biosensors Incorporating Bimetallic Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Rick

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a review of electrochemical bio-sensing for target analytes based on the use of electrocatalytic bimetallic nanoparticles (NPs, which can improve both the sensitivity and selectivity of biosensors. The review moves quickly from an introduction to the field of bio-sensing, to the importance of biosensors in today’s society, the nature of the electrochemical methods employed and the attendant problems encountered. The role of electrocatalysts is introduced with reference to the three generations of biosensors. The contributions made by previous workers using bimetallic constructs, grouped by target analyte, are then examined in detail; following which, the synthesis and characterization of the catalytic particles is examined prior to a summary of the current state of endeavor. Finally, some perspectives for the future of bimetallic NPs in biosensors are given.

  14. Production and characterization of titanium (Ti), platinum (Pt) and tantalum (Ta) thin films for native DNA biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genç, Eminegül; Kepceoǧlu, Abdullah; Gezgin, Serap Yiǧit; Kars, Meltem Demirel; Kılıç, Hamdi Şükür

    2017-02-01

    The use of the femtosecond (fs) laser pulses for ablation applications have several advantageous and Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) is an ablation-driven transfer process. The use of fs laser pulses for LIFT is gaining a great attraction nowadays. The most of the Direct Writing (DW) methods are laser based techniques and the LIFT technique is the one of them. This spectacular technique allows high resolution without lithographic processes. In this study, we have grown Ti, Pt and Ta thin films on the microscope slides by Pulse Laser Deposition (PLD) technique using Nd:YAG laser in the high vacuum condition. As a result, thin films produced in this work is a good candidate to produce native DNA biosensors based on LIFT technique.

  15. Ultrasensitive label-free detection of DNA hybridization by sapphire-based graphene field-effect transistor biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shicai; Jiang, Shouzhen; Zhang, Chao; Yue, Weiwei; Zou, Yan; Wang, Guiying; Liu, Huilan; Zhang, Xiumei; Li, Mingzhen; Zhu, Zhanshou; Wang, Jihua

    2018-01-01

    Graphene has attracted much attention in biosensing applications for its unique properties. Because of one-atom layer structure, every atom of graphene is exposed to the environment, making the electronic properties of graphene are very sensitive to charged analytes. Therefore, graphene is an ideal material for transistors in high-performance sensors. Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method has been demonstrated the most successful method for fabricating large area graphene. However, the conventional CVD methods can only grow graphene on metallic substrate and the graphene has to be transferred to the insulating substrate for further device fabrication. The transfer process creates wrinkles, cracks, or tears on the graphene, which severely degrade electrical properties of graphene. These factors severely degrade the sensing performance of graphene. Here, we directly fabricated graphene on sapphire substrate by high temperature CVD without the use of metal catalysts. The sapphire-based graphene was patterned and make into a DNA biosensor in the configuration of field-effect transistor. The sensors show high performance and achieve the DNA detection sensitivity as low as 100 fM (10-13 M), which is at least 10 times lower than prior transferred CVD G-FET DNA sensors. The use of the sapphire-based G-FETs suggests a promising future for biosensing applications.

  16. DNA biosensors based on gold nanoparticles-modified graphene oxide for the detection of breast cancer biomarkers for early diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Ayman Ali; Sánchez, Josep Lluís Acero; O'Sullivan, Ciara K; Abbas, Mohammed Nooredeen

    2017-12-01

    Two different DNA (ERBB2c and CD24c) modified gold nanoparticles and graphene oxide loaded on glassy carbon electrodes were prepared for early detection of breast cancer markers by electrochemical detection of HER2. Comparative study of ERBB2c and CD24c for the detection was carried out. A "sandwich-type" detection strategy was employed in this electrochemical DNA biosensor and its response was measured by amperometric detection. The electrochemical signal enhancement achieved via gold nanoparticles and grapheme oxide system allowed for sensitive detection of the breast cancer biomarker ERBB2 and the control marker CD24. The modified graphene oxide was characterised using Raman spectroscopy, UV-visible spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The various steps involved in the modification of a glassy carbon electrode with graphene oxide, gold nanoparticles and DNA probes, target and reporter probe were electrochemically characterised using cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Using amperometric detection of a horse radish peroxidase label, detection limits of 0.16nM and 0.23nM were obtained with sensitivity 378nA/nM and 219nA/nM for ERBB2 andCD24 respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Electrochemical DNA sandwich biosensor based on enzyme amplified microRNA-21 detection and gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandli, Jihane; Mohammadi, Hasna; Amine, Aziz

    2017-08-01

    In this work, a novel electrochemical biosensor for miRNA-21 determination, involving a sandwich hybridization assay onto gold nanoparticles modified pencil graphite electrode (PGE) and enzyme signal amplification was reported. The thiol terminated capture probe 1 (SH-P1) was immobilized on the electrode through AuS interaction. In the presence of target miRNA-21, SH-P1 hybridized with the first part of the target, however, the second part hybridizes with a biotinylated probe P2 (B-P2). Then, a streptavidin-conjugated alkaline phosphatase was immobilized by a specific binding of avidin-B-P2. The enzyme catalyzed the electro-inactive α-naphtyl phosphate to an electro-active α-naphtol. The miRNA-21 detection was achieved through the changes of α-naphtol oxidation signals observed at +0.12V vs Ag/AgCl with Differential Pulse Voltammetry. Under the optimal detection conditions, the biosensor exhibited selective and sensitive detection with a linear range from 200pM to 388nM and the detection limit was 100pM (10fmol in 100μL). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. An electrochemical biosensor to simultaneously detect VEGF and PSA for early prostate cancer diagnosis based on graphene oxide/ssDNA/PLLA nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Lung-Hsuan; Kuo, Shin-Hung; Lin, Tzu-Yang; Lin, Chih-Wen; Fang, Po-Yu; Yang, Hung-Wei

    2017-03-15

    Early diagnosis of prostate cancer (PCa) is critical for the prevention of metastasis and for early treatment; therefore, a simple and accurate device must be developed for this purpose. In this study, we reported a novel fabrication method for producing a dual-modality biosensor that can simultaneously detect vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in human serum for early diagnosis of PCa. This biosensor was constructed by coating graphene oxide/ssDNA (GO-ssDNA) on an Au-electrode for VEGF detection, and incorporated with poly-L-lactide nanoparticles (PLLA NPs) for signal amplification and PSA detection. The results showed that this biosensor has wide liner detection ranges (0.05-100ng/mL for VEGF and 1-100ng/mL for PSA), as well as high levels of sensitivity and selectivity (i.e., resisting interference from external factors, such as glucose, ascorbic acid human serum protein, immunoglobulin G, and immunoglobulin M), and demonstrated a high correlation with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for sample detection in patients. Therefore, this biosensor could be utilized for early clinical diagnosis of PCa in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Gold nanoparticle-based lateral flow biosensor for rapid visual detection of Leishmania-specific DNA amplification products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toubanaki, Dimitra K; Athanasiou, Evita; Karagouni, Evdokia

    2016-08-01

    Leishmaniasis is a disease, caused by Leishmania parasites, which infect humans and animals, posing a major social and economic burden worldwide. The need for accurate and sensitive disease diagnosis led to the widespread adoption of PCR amplification. Detection of the amplification products (i.e. gel electrophoresis) require time-consuming protocols performed by trained personnel, with high cost. Aim of the present study was the simplification of PCR product detection, using a nucleic acid lateral flow, combined with functionalized gold nanoparticles. Amplification reactions targeting kinetoplastid DNA of Leishmania spp were performed on canine blood samples and a positive signal was formed as a red test zone. The visual detection was completed in 20min. Extensive optimization enabled the detection of 100fmol of target DNA. Clinical samples of infected dog blood were analyzed with high specificity. Overall, the proposed lateral flow biosensor can be considered an appealing alternative platform for Leishmania-specific amplification products detection with low cost and attractive simplicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Microfluidics and nanoparticles based amperometric biosensor for the detection of cyanobacteria (Planktothrix agardhii NIVA-CYA 116) DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ölcer, Zehra; Esen, Elif; Ersoy, Aylin; Budak, Sinan; Sever Kaya, Dilek; Yağmur Gök, Mehmet; Barut, Serkan; Üstek, Duran; Uludag, Yildiz

    2015-08-15

    Some of the cyanobacteria produce protease inhibitor oligopeptides such as cyanopeptolins and cause drinking water contamination; hence, their detection has great importance to monitor the well-being of water sources that is used for human consumption. In the current study, a fast and sensitive nucleic acid biosensor assay has been described where cyanopeptolin coding region of one of the cyanobacteria (Planktothrix agardhii NIVA-CYA 116) genome has been used as target for monitoring of the fresh water resources. A biochip that has two sets of Au electrode arrays, each consist of shared reference/counter electrodes and 3 working electrodes has been used for the assay. The biochip has been integrated to a microfluidics system and all steps of the assay have been performed during the reagent flow to achieve fast and sensitive DNA detection. On-line hybridization of the target on to the capture probe immobilized surface resulted in a very short assay duration with respect to the conventional static assays. The binding of the avidin and enzyme modified Au nanoparticles to the biotinylated detection probe and the subsequent injection of the substrate enabled a real-time amperometric measurement with a detection limit of 6×10(-12) M target DNA (calibration curve r(2)=0.98). The developed assay enables fast and sensitive detection of cyanopeptolin producing cyanobacteria from freshwater samples and hence shows a promising technology for toxic microorganism detection from environmental samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A Novel Supramolecular Assembly Film of Porphyrin Bound DNA: Characterization and Catalytic Behaviors Towards Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osamu Ikeda

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available A stable Fe(4-TMPyP-DNA-PADDA (FePyDP film was characterized onpyrolytic graphite electrode (PGE or an indium-tin oxide (ITO electrode through thesupramolecular interaction between water-soluble iron porphyrin (Fe(4-TMPyP and DNAtemplate, where PADDA (poly(acrylamide-co-diallyldimethylammonium chloride isemployed as a co-immobilizing polymer. Cyclic voltammetry of FePyDP film showed a pairof reversible FeIII/FeII redox peaks and an irreversible FeIV/FeIII peak at –0.13 V and 0.89vs. Ag|AgCl in pH 7.4 PBS, respectively. An excellent catalytic reduction of NO wasdisplayed at –0.61 V vs. Ag|AgCl at a FePyDP film modified electrode.Chronoamperometric experiments demonstrated a rapid response to the reduction of NOwith a linear range from 0.1 to 90 μM and a detection limit of 30 nM at a signal-to-noiseratio of 3. On the other hand, it is the first time to apply high-valent iron porphyrin ascatalyst at modified electrode for NO catalytic oxidation at 0.89 vs. Ag|AgCl. The sensorshows a high selectivity of some endogenous electroactive substances in biological systems.The mechanism of response of the sensors to NO is preliminary studied.

  2. Effective immobilization of DNA for development of polypyrrole nanowires based biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tran, Thi Luyen; Chu, Thi Xuan, E-mail: xuan@itims.edu.vn; Huynh, Dang Chinh; Pham, Duc Thanh; Luu, Thi Hoai Thuong; Mai, Anh Tuan, E-mail: tuan.maianh@hust.edu.vn

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • Effective technique to immobilize probe DNA to the conducting polymer Polypyrrole nanowires (PPy NWs). • The PPy-NWs were electrochemically synthesized on the surface of the Pt electrodes using gelatin as the soft mold. • The DNA probe sequences were immobilized easily on the PPy NWs/Pt electrode using the adsorption method. • The DNA sensor has a low detection limit. - Abstract: This paper reports an easy technique for immobilization of the DNA to the conducting polymer polypyrrole nanowires (PPy NWs). The nanowires were electrochemically synthesized on the surface of working electrode in the presence of gelatin as a soft mold. The structure of obtained PPy NWs was investigated by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). The DNA strands were directly immobilized on the PPy NWs. The amino groups at the up-end of the PPy nanowires facilitate the linkage with the phosphate groups of the probe DNA. The DNA immobilization and hybridization were characterized by Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS). The initial results show that the sensor responses to 10 pM of DNA sequence in the solution.

  3. Development of a Fish Cell Biosensor System for Genotoxicity Detection Based on DNA Damage-Induced Trans-Activation of p21 Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huarong Guo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available p21CIP1/WAF1 is a p53-target gene in response to cellular DNA damage. Here we report the development of a fish cell biosensor system for high throughput genotoxicity detection of new drugs, by stably integrating two reporter plasmids of pGL3-p21-luc (human p21 promoter linked to firefly luciferase and pRL-CMV-luc (CMV promoter linked to Renilla luciferase into marine flatfish flounder gill (FG cells, referred to as p21FGLuc. Initial validation of this genotoxicity biosensor system showed that p21FGLuc cells had a wild-type p53 signaling pathway and responded positively to the challenge of both directly acting genotoxic agents (bleomycin and mitomycin C and indirectly acting genotoxic agents (cyclophosphamide with metabolic activation, but negatively to cyclophosphamide without metabolic activation and the non-genotoxic agents ethanol and D-mannitol, thus confirming a high specificity and sensitivity, fast and stable response to genotoxic agents for this easily maintained fish cell biosensor system. This system was especially useful in the genotoxicity detection of Di(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP, a rodent carcinogen, but negatively reported in most non-mammalian in vitro mutation assays, by providing a strong indication of genotoxicity for DEHP. A limitation for this biosensor system was that it might give false positive results in response to sodium butyrate and any other agents, which can trans-activate the p21 gene in a p53-independent manner.

  4. Ruthenium(II) complexes containing quinone based ligands: Synthesis, characterization, catalytic applications and DNA interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anitha, P.; Manikandan, R.; Endo, A.; Hashimoto, T.; Viswanathamurthi, P.

    2012-12-01

    1,2-Naphthaquinone reacts with amines such as semicarbazide, isonicotinylhydrazide and thiosemicarbazide in high yield procedure with the formation of tridentate ligands HLn (n = 1-3). By reaction of ruthenium(II) starting complexes and quinone based ligands HLn (n = 1-3), a series of ruthenium complexes were synthesized and characterized by elemental and spectroscopic methods (FT-IR, electronic, 1H, 13C, 31P NMR and ESI-MS). The ligands were coordinated to ruthenium through quinone oxygen, imine nitrogen and enolate oxygen/thiolato sulfur. On the basis of spectral studies an octahedral geometry may be assigned for all the complexes. Further, the catalytic oxidation of primary, secondary alcohol and transfer hydrogenation of ketone was carried out. The DNA cleavage efficiency of new complexes has also been tested.

  5. Effect of different concentration of HPV DNA probe immobilization for cervical cancer detection based IDE biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshila, M. L.; Hashim, U.; Azizah, N.; Nadzirah, Sh.; Arshad, M. K. Md; Ruslinda, A. R.; Gopinath, Subash C. B.

    2017-03-01

    This paper principally delineates to the detection process of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA test. HPV is an extremely common virus infection that infected to human by the progressions cell in the cervix cell. The types of HPV that give a most exceedingly awful infected with cervical cancer is 16 and 18 other than 31 and 45. The HPV DNA probe is immobilized with a different concentration to stabilize the sensitivity. A technique of rapid and sensitive for the HPV identification was proposed by coordinating basic DNA extraction with a quality of DNA. The extraction of the quality of DNA will make a proficiency of the discovery procedure. It will rely on the sequence of the capture probes and the way to support their attached. The fabrication, surface modification, immobilization and hybridization procedures are described by current-voltage (I-V) estimation by utilizing KEITHLEY 6487. This procedure will play out a decent affectability and selectivity of HPV discovery.

  6. Gold-based optical biosensor for single-mismatched DNA detection using salt-induced hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhan, Zongrui; Ma, Xingyi; Cao, Cuong

    2011-01-01

    DNA while Au-NPs modified with oligonucleotide detection sequences played a role in recognition and signal production. Due to the much lower stability of mismatched DNA strands caused by unstable duplex structures in solutions of relatively low salt concentration, hybridization efficiency...... in the presence of different buffers was well investigated, and thus, the optimized salt concentration allowed for discrimination of single-mismatched DNA (MMT) from perfectly matched DNA (PMT). Therefore, quantitative information concerning the target analyte was translated into a colorimetric signal, which...... could easily and quantitatively measured by low-cost UV–vis spectrophotometric analysis. The results indicated this to be a very simple and economic strategy for detection of single-mismatched DNA strands....

  7. DNA biosensor for detection of Salmonella typhi from blood sample of typhoid fever patient using gold electrode modified by self-assembled monolayers of thiols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryapratiwi, Windha Novita; Paat, Vlagia Indira; Gaffar, Shabarni; Hartati, Yeni Wahyuni

    2017-05-01

    Electrochemical biosensors are currently being developed in order to handle various clinical problems in diagnosing infectious diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria, or viruses. On this research, voltammetric DNA biosensor using gold electrode modified by thiols with self-assembled monolayers had been developed to detect a certain sequence of Salmonella typhi DNA from blood sample of typhoid fever patient. Thiol groups of cysteamines (Cys) and aldehyde groups from glutaraldehydes (Glu) were used as a link to increase the performance of gold electrode in detecting guanine oxidation signal of hybridized S. typhi DNA and ssDNA probe. Standard calibration method was used to determine analytical parameters from the measurements. The result shown that, the detection of S. typhi DNA from blood sample of typhoid fever patient can be carried out by voltammetry using gold electrode modified by self-assembled monolayers of thiols. A characteristic oxidation potential of guanine using Au/Cys/Gluwas obtained at +0.17 until +0.20 V. Limit of detection and limit of quantification from this measurements were 1.91μg mL-1 and 6.35 μg mL-1. The concentration of complement DNA from sample was 6.96 μg mL-1.

  8. The effect of microscopic attractive interactions on piezoelectric coefficients of nanoscale DNA films and its resultant mirocantilever-based biosensor signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jun-Zheng; Zhou, Mei-Hong; Zhang, Neng-Hui

    2017-10-01

    The adsorption of charged biomolecules on a substrate will trigger a self-induced electric potential field that could deflect microcantilever biosensors in the nanometer regime. The paper is devoted to a multiscale characterization of the piezoelectric coefficient of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) films with microscopic attractive interactions in multivalence salt solutions, which has a close relationship with biosensor signals. First, two different analytical models of cantilever deflections based on macroscopic piezoelectric theories or mesoscopic liquid crystal theories were combined in the sense of equivalent deformation in order to bridge the relation between the macroscopic piezoelectric coefficient of an adsorbate film and the sensitivity of its microstructure to surrounding conditions. Second, two interaction potentials of the free energy for repulsion-dominated DNA films in NaCl solution or attraction-repulsion-coexisted DNA films in multivalent salt solutions were used to compare the piezoelectric effect and the resultant cantilever deformation at various packing conditions, such as different packing density, various nucleotide numbers and two packing technologies, i.e. nano-grafting or self-assembling technology. The variational tendency of microcantilever deflections predicted by the present multiscale analytical model agrees well with the related DNA-mirocantilever experiments. Negative piezoelectric coefficient of dsDNA film exists in multivalent salt solutions, and its distinctive size effect with different packing densities and nucleotide numbers provides us with an opportunity to obtain a more sensitive microcantilever sensor by careful control of packing conditions.

  9. Rapid and label-free electrochemical DNA biosensor for detecting hepatitis A virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzano, Marisa; Viezzi, Sara; Mazerat, Sandra; Marks, Robert S; Vidic, Jasmina

    2018-02-15

    Diagnostic systems that can deliver highly specific and sensitive detection of hepatitis A virus (HAV) in food and water are of particular interest in many fields including food safety, biosecurity and control of outbreaks. Our aim was the development of an electrochemical method based on DNA hybridization to detect HAV. A ssDNA probe specific for HAV (capture probe) was designed and tested on DNAs from various viral and bacterial samples using Nested-Reverse Transcription Polymerase Chain Reaction (nRT-PCR). To develop the electrochemical device, a disposable gold electrode was functionalized with the specific capture probe and tested on complementary ssDNA and on HAV cDNA. The DNA hybridization on the electrode was measured through the monitoring of the oxidative peak potential of the indicator tripropylamine by cyclic voltammetry. To prevent non-specific binding the gold surface was treated with 3% BSA before detection. High resolution atomic force microscopy (AFM) confirmed the efficiency of electrode functionalization and on-electrode hybridization. The proposed device showed a limit of detection of 0.65pM for the complementary ssDNA and 6.94fg/µL for viral cDNA. For a comparison, nRT-PCR quantified the target HAV cDNA with a limit of detection of 6.4fg/µL. The DNA-sensor developed can be adapted to a portable format to be adopted as an easy-to- use and low cost method for screening HAV in contaminated food and water. In addition, it can be useful for rapid control of HAV infections as it takes only a few minutes to provide the results. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Study of concentration of HPV DNA probe immobilization for cervical cancer detection based IDE biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshila, M. L.; Hashim, U.; Azizah, N.

    2016-07-01

    This paper mainly illustrates regarding the detection process of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA probe. HPV is the most common virus that infected to human by a sexually transmitted virus. The most common high-risk HPV are 16 and 18. Interdigitated electrode (IDE) device used as based of Titanium Dioxide (TiO2) acts as inorganic surface, where by using APTES as a linker between inorganic surface and organic surface. A strategy of rapid and sensitive for the HPV detection was proposed by integrating simple DNA extraction with a gene of DNA. The extraction of the gene of DNA will make an efficiency of the detection process. It will depend on the sequence of the capture probes and the way to support their attached. The fabrication, surface modification, immobilization and hybridization processes are characterized by current voltage (I-V) measurement by using KEITHLEY 6487. This strategy will perform a good sensitivity of HPV detection.

  11. Optical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damborský, Pavel; Švitel, Juraj; Katrlík, Jaroslav

    2016-06-30

    Optical biosensors represent the most common type of biosensor. Here we provide a brief classification, a description of underlying principles of operation and their bioanalytical applications. The main focus is placed on the most widely used optical biosensors which are surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based biosensors including SPR imaging and localized SPR. In addition, other optical biosensor systems are described, such as evanescent wave fluorescence and bioluminescent optical fibre biosensors, as well as interferometric, ellipsometric and reflectometric interference spectroscopy and surface-enhanced Raman scattering biosensors. The optical biosensors discussed here allow the sensitive and selective detection of a wide range of analytes including viruses, toxins, drugs, antibodies, tumour biomarkers and tumour cells. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  12. Dual-probe electrochemical DNA biosensor based on the "Y" junction structure and restriction endonuclease assisted cyclic enzymatic amplification for detection of double-strand DNA of PML/RARα related fusion gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kun; Lei, Yun; Zhong, Guang-Xian; Zheng, Yan-Jie; Sun, Zhou-Liang; Peng, Hua-Ping; Chen, Wei; Liu, Ai-Lin; Chen, Yuan-Zhong; Lin, Xin-Hua

    2015-09-15

    Taking advantage of "Y" junction structure and restriction endonuclease assisted cyclic enzymatic amplification, a dual-probe electrochemical DNA (DE-DNA) biosensor was designed to detect double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) related gene. Two groups of detection probes were designed, and each group was composed of a biotinylated capture probe and an assisted probe. They were separately complementary with two strands of target dsDNA in order to prevent the reannealing of the two separate strands from target dsDNA. First, thiol functionalized capture probes (C1 and C2) were severally assembled onto two different gold electrodes, followed by hybridizing with target dsDNA (S1a-S1b) and assistant probes to form two Y-junction-structure ternary complexes. Subsequently, restriction sites on the ternary complexes were digested by Rsa I, which can release S1a, S1b and biotins from the electrode surfaces. Meanwhile, the released S1a and S1b can further hybridize with the unhybridized corresponding detection probes and then initiate another new hybridization-cleavage-separation cycle. Finally, the current signals were produced by the enzyme-catalyzed reaction of streptavidin-horse reddish peroxidase (streptavidin-HRP). The distinct difference in current signals between different sequences allowed detection of target dsDNA down to a low detection limit of 47 fM and presented excellent specificity with discriminating only a single-base mismatched dsDNA sequence. Moreover, this biosensor was also used for assay of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) samples with satisfactory results. According to the results, the power of the DE-DNA biosensor as a promising tool for the detection of APL and other diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A novel electrochemiluminescence biosensor for the detection of microRNAs based on a DNA functionalized nitrogen doped carbon quantum dots as signal enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qiao; Ma, Cheng; Liu, Xing-Pei; Wei, Yu-Pin; Mao, Chang-Jie; Zhu, Jun-Jie

    2017-06-15

    An ultrasensitive electrochemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor for the detection of microRNA was developed based on nicking enzymes Nb.BbvCI mediated signal amplification (NESA). First, the hairpin probe1-N-CQDs with assistant probe and microRNA (miRNA) formed Y junction structure which was cleaved with the addition of nicking enzymes Nb.BbvCI to release miRNA and assistant probe. Subsequently, the released miRNA and assistant probe can initiate the next recycling process. The generation of numerous intermediate sequences nitrogen doped carbon quantum dots-DNA (N-CQDs-DNA) can further hybridize with hairpin probe2 immobilized on GO/Au composite modified electrode surface, the initial ECL intensity was enhanced. The ECL intensity would increase with increasing concentration of the target miRNA, and the sensitivity of biosensor would be promoted because of the efficient signal amplification of the target induced cycling reaction. The novel designed biosensor provided a highly sensitive and selective detection of miRNA-21 from 10 aM to10(4) fM with a relatively low detection limit of 10 aM. Thus, our strategy has a potential application in the clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Pd-Au@carbon dots nanocomposite: Facile synthesis and application as an ultrasensitive electrochemical biosensor for determination of colitoxin DNA in human serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qitong; Lin, Xiaofeng; Zhu, Jie-Ji; Tong, Qing-Xiao

    2017-08-15

    In this study, a green and fast method was developed to synthesize high-yield carbon dots (CDs) via one-pot microwave treatment of banana peels without using any other surface passivation agents. Then the as-prepared CDs was used as the reducing agent and stabilizer to synthesize a Pd-Au@CDs nanocomposite by a simple sequential reduction strategy. Finally, Pd-Au@CDs nanocomposite modified glassy carbon electrode (Pd-Au@CDs/GCE) was obtained as a biosensor for target DNA after being immobilized a single-stranded probe DNA by a carboxyl ammonia condensation reaction. Under the optimal conditions, the sensor could detect target DNA concentrations in the range from 5.0×10-16 to 1.0×10-1°molL-1. The detection limit (LD) was estimated to be 1.82×10-17molL-1, which showed higher sensitivity than other electrochemical biosensors reported. In addition, the DNA sensor was also successfully applied to detect colitoxin DNA in human serum. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A SERS-based lateral flow assay biosensor for highly sensitive detection of HIV-1 DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiuli; Cheng, Ziyi; Yu, Jimin; Choo, Priscilla; Chen, Lingxin; Choo, Jaebum

    2016-04-15

    User-friendly lateral flow (LF) strips have been extensively used for point-of-care (POC) self-diagnostics, but they have some limitations in their detection sensitivity and quantitative analysis because they only identify the high cut-off value of a biomarker by utilizing color changes that are detected with the naked eye. To resolve these problems associated with LF strips, we developed a novel surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based LF assay for the quantitative analysis of a specific biomarker in the low concentration range. Herein, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA was chosen as the specific biomarker. Raman reporter-labeled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) were employed as SERS nano tags for targeting and detecting the HIV-1 DNA marker, as opposed to using bare AuNPs in LF strips. It was possible to quantitatively analyze HIV-1 DNA with high sensitivity by monitoring the characteristic Raman peak intensity of the DNA-conjugated AuNPs. Under optimized conditions, the detection limit of our SERS-based lateral flow assay was 0.24 pg/mL, which was at least 1000 times more sensitive compared to colorimetric or fluorescent detection methods. These results demonstrate the potential feasibility of the proposed SERS-based lateral flow assay to quantitatively detect a broad range of genetic diseases with high sensitivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Single-Molecule Confocal FRET Microscopy to Dissect Conformational Changes in the Catalytic Cycle of DNA Topoisomerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, S; Weidlich, D; Klostermeier, D

    2016-01-01

    Molecular machines undergo large-scale conformational changes during their catalytic cycles that are linked to their biological functions. DNA topoisomerases are molecular machines that interconvert different DNA topoisomers and resolve torsional stress that is introduced during cellular processes that involve local DNA unwinding. DNA gyrase catalyzes the introduction of negative supercoils into DNA in an ATP-dependent reaction. During its catalytic cycle, gyrase undergoes large-scale conformational changes that drive the supercoiling reaction. These conformational changes can be followed by single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Here, we use DNA gyrase from Bacillus subtilis as an illustrative example to present strategies for the investigation of conformational dynamics of multisubunit complexes. We provide a brief introduction into single-molecule FRET and confocal microscopy, with a focus on practical considerations in sample preparation and data analysis. Different strategies in the preparation of donor-acceptor-labeled molecules suitable for single-molecule FRET experiments are outlined. The insight into the mechanism of DNA supercoiling by gyrase gained from single-molecule FRET experiment is summarized. The general strategies described here can also be applied to investigate conformational changes and their link to biological function of other multisubunit molecular machines. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) and protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) regulate DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) phosphorylation in mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Pauline; Ye, Ruiqiong; Trinkle-Mulcahy, Laura; Neal, Jessica A; De Wever, Veerle; Morrice, Nick A; Meek, Katheryn; Lees-Miller, Susan P

    2014-06-25

    The protein kinase activity of the DNA-PKcs (DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit) and its autophosphorylation are critical for DBS (DNA double-strand break) repair via NHEJ (non-homologous end-joining). Recent studies have shown that depletion or inactivation of DNA-PKcs kinase activity also results in mitotic defects. DNA-PKcs is autophosphorylated on Ser2056, Thr2647 and Thr2609 in mitosis and phosphorylated DNA-PKcs localize to centrosomes, mitotic spindles and the midbody. DNA-PKcs also interacts with PP6 (protein phosphatase 6), and PP6 has been shown to dephosphorylate Aurora A kinase in mitosis. Here we report that DNA-PKcs is phosphorylated on Ser3205 and Thr3950 in mitosis. Phosphorylation of Thr3950 is DNA-PK-dependent, whereas phosphorylation of Ser3205 requires PLK1 (polo-like kinase 1). Moreover, PLK1 phosphorylates DNA-PKcs on Ser3205 in vitro and interacts with DNA-PKcs in mitosis. In addition, PP6 dephosphorylates DNA-PKcs at Ser3205 in mitosis and after IR (ionizing radiation). DNA-PKcs also phosphorylates Chk2 on Thr68 in mitosis and both phosphorylation of Chk2 and autophosphorylation of DNA-PKcs in mitosis occur in the apparent absence of Ku and DNA damage. Our findings provide mechanistic insight into the roles of DNA-PKcs and PP6 in mitosis and suggest that DNA-PKcs' role in mitosis may be mechanistically distinct from its well-established role in NHEJ.

  18. Development of a Fieldable, Rapid, Accurate and Sensitive Bio-Electronic, DNA Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-12-01

    single molecule of DNA or RNA and therefore does not require the use of PCR. The sensor chip can be engineered with an array of hundreds of independent test sites, which allows for confirmatory tests leading to a high level of specificity, the ability to screen for multiple threat agents simultaneously, and the capability to detect genetically engineered organisms. Biological agents continue to pose a major threat to U.S. troops as well as U.S. civilians both domestically and overseas. Rapid, accurate and sensitive detection and identification of biological agents is

  19. A three-line lateral flow biosensor for logic detection of microRNA based on Y-shaped junction DNA and target recycling amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yan; Wang, Wenqian; Wu, Tingting; Xu, Li-Ping; Wen, Yongqiang; Zhang, Xueji

    2016-11-01

    A rapid, sensitive, and accurate detection strategy for microRNA 16 (miR-16) was developed, which combined the convenience of lateral flow biosensors (LFBs), the design flexibility of Y-shaped junction DNA probe, and the enhancement ability of endonuclease-assisted target recycling amplification. The system is composed of a molecular beacon (MB) probe, an assistant probe, and endonuclease Nt.BbvCI, which plays the role of signal translation and amplification. In the presence of the target microRNAs (miRNAs), three chains of nucleic acid could hybridize with each other to form a Y-shaped junction structure, which could be recognized by the endonuclease Nt.BbvCI. The MB probe was efficiently cleaved by endonuclease and produced two new DNA fragments, while the regenerated assistant probe and target were hybridized to another MB probe and entered into the next cycle of the amplification. In this way, the detection of the readily biodegradable miRNA was turned into the detection of two DNA fragments in the LFB. Meanwhile, the detection of two different DNAs would improve the accuracy and effectively avoid false results. The amplified products containing DNA fragments were then applied to the lateral flow nucleic acid biosensor (LFNAB) with two test zones, on which specific DNA probes were designed. The formed DNA-DNA/gold nanoparticle (GNP) conjugates were captured and accumulated to produce two red bands in two test zones. The logic judgment of the two test zones provided more accurate and convincing results. Under optimal conditions, the visual detection limit of miR-16 in aqueous solutions was 0.1 pM, which is 100-1000 times lower than that of visual or colorimetric methods in the literature. It could be used for on-field and point-of-care testing and meet the urgent demand of sensitive and selective miRNA detection in remote rural areas without costly equipment. The system displayed good universality, compatibility, high specificity, and stability of mi

  20. G-quadruplex DNA biosensor for sensitive visible detection of genetically modified food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Huimin; Wu, Jun; Yang, Xiang; Shao, Jingwei; Lu, Yujing; Qiu, Bin; Lin, Zhenyu; Chen, Guonan

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a novel label-free G-quadruplex DNAzyme sensor has been proposed for colorimetric identification of GMO using CaMV 35S promoter sequence as the target. The binary probes can fold into G-quadruplex structure in the presence of DNA-T (Target DNA) and then combine with hemin to form a DNAzyme resembling horseradish peroxidase. The detection system consists of two G-rich probes with 2:2 split mode by using the absorbance and color of ABTS(2-) as signal reporter. Upon the addition of a target sequence, two probes both hybridize with target and then their G-rich sequences combine to form a G-quadruplex DNAzyme, and the DNAzyme can catalyze the reaction of ABTS(2-) with H2O2. Then the linear range is from 0.05 to 0.5 μM while detection limit is 5nM. These results demonstrate that the proposed G-quadruplex DNAzyme method could be used as a simple, sensitive and cost-effective approach for assays of GMO. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A reusable ratiometric electrochemical biosensor on the basis of the binding of methylene blue to DNA with alternating AT base sequence for sensitive detection of adenosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Lin; Lu, Mengfei; Li, Ying; Tang, Bo; Zhang, Chun-Yang

    2018-04-15

    We develop a reusable ratiometric electrochemical biosensor on the basis of the binding of methylene blue (MB) to DNA with alternating AT base sequence for sensitive detection of adenosine. We design a strand 1 with MB-modified thymine (T) base in the proximal 3' termini as the capture probe for its immobilization on the gold electrode and a 3' termini ferrocene (Fc)-modified aptamer for the recognition of adenosine. The hybridization of strand 1 with the aptamer leads to the formation of a double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and consequently the away of MB from the electrode surface and the close of Fc to the electrode surface, generating a small value of IMB/IFc (IMB and IFc are the peak currents of MB and Fc, respectively). In the presence of adenosine, its binding with the aptamer induces the release of Fc from the electrode surface and the close of MB to the electrode surface, generating a large value of IMB/IFc. As a result, adenosine may be accurately quantified by the measurement of ratiometric signal (IMB/IFc). This ratiometric electrochemical biosensor can be simply fabricated and exhibits high sensitivity with a limit of detection of as low as 90.8pM and a large dynamic range from 0.1nM to 100μM. Moreover, this biosensor demonstrates good performance with excellent selectivity, regeneration capability, high reliability and good reproducibility, and may become a universal platform for the detection of various biomolecules which can be recognized by aptamers, holding great potential for further applications in biomedical research and clinical diagnosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A FRET-Based DNA Biosensor Tracks OmpR-Dependent Acidification of Salmonella during Macrophage Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Smarajit; Mizusaki, Hideaki; Kenney, Linda J.

    2015-01-01

    In bacteria, one paradigm for signal transduction is the two-component regulatory system, consisting of a sensor kinase (usually a membrane protein) and a response regulator (usually a DNA binding protein). The EnvZ/OmpR two-component system responds to osmotic stress and regulates expression of outer membrane proteins. In Salmonella, EnvZ/OmpR also controls expression of another two-component system SsrA/B, which is located on Salmonella Pathogenicity Island (SPI) 2. SPI-2 encodes a type III secretion system, which functions as a nanomachine to inject bacterial effector proteins into eukaryotic cells. During the intracellular phase of infection, Salmonella switches from assembling type III secretion system structural components to secreting effectors into the macrophage cytoplasm, enabling Salmonella to replicate in the phagocytic vacuole. Major questions remain regarding how bacteria survive the acidified vacuole and how acidification affects bacterial secretion. We previously reported that EnvZ sensed cytoplasmic signals rather than extracellular ones, as intracellular osmolytes altered the dynamics of a 17-amino-acid region flanking the phosphorylated histidine. We reasoned that the Salmonella cytoplasm might acidify in the macrophage vacuole to activate OmpR-dependent transcription of SPI-2 genes. To address these questions, we employed a DNA-based FRET biosensor (“I-switch”) to measure bacterial cytoplasmic pH and immunofluorescence to monitor effector secretion during infection. Surprisingly, we observed a rapid drop in bacterial cytoplasmic pH upon phagocytosis that was not predicted by current models. Cytoplasmic acidification was completely dependent on the OmpR response regulator, but did not require known OmpR-regulated genes such as ompC, ompF, or ssaC (SPI-2). Microarray analysis highlighted the cadC/BA operon, and additional experiments confirmed that it was repressed by OmpR. Acidification was blocked in the ompR null background in a Cad

  3. alpha,beta-unsaturated 2-acyl imidazoles as a practical class of dienophiles for the DNA-Based catalytic asymmetric diels-alder reaction in water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, A.J.; Feringa, B.L.; Roelfes, G.

    2007-01-01

    alpha,beta-Unsaturated 2-acyl imidazoles are a novel and practical class of dienophiles for the DNA-based catalytic asymmetric Diels-Alder reaction in water. The Diels-Alder products are obtained with very high diastereoselectivities and enantioselectivities in the range of 83-98%. The catalytic

  4. Ultrasensitive nucleic acid biosensor based on enzyme-gold nanoparticle dual label and lateral flow strip biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuqing; Zhang, Sanquan; Zhang, Xibao; Baloda, Meenu; Gurung, Anant S; Xu, Hui; Zhang, Xueji; Liu, Guodong

    2011-01-15

    In this article, we describe an ultrasensitive nucleic acid biosensor (NAB) based on horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-gold nanoparticle (Au-NP) dual labels and lateral flow strip biosensor (LFSB). The results presented here expand on prior work (Mao et al., 2009a) by optimizing the preparation of HRP-Au-NP-DNA conjugates. It was found that sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and the immobilization sequence of thiolated DNA and HRP on the Au-NP surface played very important roles to improve the sensitivity of the assay. After systematic optimization, the detection limit of current approach is 1000 times lower than that in prior work. Deposition of insoluble enzymatic catalytic product (red colored chromogen) on the captured Au-NPs at the test zone of LFSB offers a dramatic visual enhancement. Combining enzyme catalytic amplification with unique optical properties of Au-NPs, the NAB was capable of detecting of 0.01-pM target DNA without instrumentation. The NAB thus provides a rapid, sensitive, low-cost tool for the detection of nucleic acid samples. It shows great promise for in-field and point-of-care diagnosis of genetic diseases and for the detection of infectious agents. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Determination of atropine sulfate using a novel sensitive DNA-biosensor based on its interaction on a modified pencil graphite electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensafi, Ali A; Nasr-Esfahani, Parisa; Heydari-Bafrooei, Esmaeil; Rezaei, B

    2015-01-01

    A novel, selective, rapid and simple electrochemical method is developed for the determination of atropine sulfate. UV-Vis and differential pulse voltammetry are used to study the interaction of atropine sulfate with salmon sperm ds-DNA on the surface of salmon sperm ds-DNA modified-pencil graphite electrode (PGE). For this purpose, a pencil graphite electrode (PGE) modified with multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2NPs), and poly-dialyldimethylammonium chloride (PDDA) decorated with ds-DNA is tested for the determination of atropine sulfate. The electrochemical oxidation peak current of adenine and guanine bonded on the surface of ds-DNA/PDDA-TiO2NPs-MWCNTs/PGE is used to obtain the analytical signal. Decreases in the intensities of guanine and adenine oxidation signals after their interaction with atropine sulfate are used as indicator signals for the sensitive determination of atropine sulfate. Using ds-DNA/PDDA-TiO2NPs-MWCNTs/PGE and based on the guanine signal, linear calibration curves were obtained in the range of 0.6 to 30.0 μmol L(-1) and 30.0 to 600.0 μmol L(-1) atropine sulfate with low detection limits of 30.0 nmol L(-1). The biosensor shows a good selectivity for the determination of atropine sulfate. Finally, the applicability of the biosensor is evaluated by measuring atropine sulfate in real samples with good accuracy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Replication stalling by catalytically impaired Twinkle induces mitochondrial DNA rearrangements in cultured cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pohjoismaki, J.L.; Goffart, S.; Spelbrink, J.N.

    2011-01-01

    Pathological mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) rearrangements have been proposed to result from repair of double-strand breaks caused by blockage of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication. As mtDNA deletions are seen only in post-mitotic tissues, it has been suggested that they are selected out in actively

  7. A novel optical DNA biosensor for detection of trace amounts of mercuric ions using gold nanoparticles introduced onto modified glass surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashhadizadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Talemi, Rasoul Pourtaghavi

    2014-11-11

    In this work we report a DNA spectrophotometric biosensor for detection of Hg2+ ions in which a pair of oligonucleotides with four thymine-thymine (T-T) mismatched bases was immobilized onto modified glass surface. Firstly, glass surface modified with 3-(mercaptopropyl) trimethoxysilane (MSPT) and gold nano-particles respectively and then one oligonucleotide (P1) modified with hexanthiol at 5-terminal was immobilized on gold nano-particles via self-assembly and inserted in methylene blue. Methylene blue can intercalate on single strand DNA (ss-DNA) and its absorption peak can measure spectrophotometrically. Then the other oligonucleotide was able to hybridize with P1 by forming thymine-Hg2+-thymine (T-Hg2+-T) complexes in the presence of Hg2+, and absorption signal of methylene blue reduced upon Hg2+ increasing concentration because inaccessibility of guanine base in DNA duplex. However, when Hg2+ was absent, the two oligonucleotides could not hybridize due to the T-T mismatched bases, and P2 could not be fixed on the modified glass surface and any change in absorption peak of methylene blue takes place. The UV-Vis spectrum showed a linear correlation between the absorption peak of methylene blue and the concentration of Hg2+ over the range from 10 nM to 10 μM (R2=0.9985) with a detection limit of 6 nM. This spectrophotometric biosensor could be widely used for selective detection of Hg2+. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. DNA impedance biosensor for detection of cancer, TP53 gene mutation, based on gold nanoparticles/aligned carbon nanotubes modified electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayazfar, H; Afshar, A; Dolati, M; Dolati, A

    2014-07-11

    For the first time, a new platform based on electrochemical growth of Au nanoparticles on aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (A-MWCNT) was developed for sensitive lable-free DNA detection of the TP53 gene mutation, one of the most popular genes in cancer research. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to monitor the sequence-specific DNA hybridization events related to TP53 gene. Compared to the bare Ta or MWCNT/Ta electrodes, the synergistic interactions of vertically aligned MWCNT array and gold nanoparticles at modified electrode could improve the density of the probe DNA attachment and resulting the sensitivity of the DNA sensor greatly. Using EIS, over the extended DNA concentration range, the change of charge transfer resistance was found to have a linear relationship in respect to the logarithm of the complementary oligonucleotides sequence concentrations in the wide range of 1.0×10(-15)-1.0×10(-7)M, with a detection limit of 1.0×10(-17)M (S/N=3). The prepared sensor also showed good stability (14 days), reproducibility (RSD=2.1%) and could be conveniently regenerated via dehybridization in hot water. The significant improvement in sensitivity illustrates that combining gold nanoparticles with the on-site fabricated aligned MWCNT array represents a promising platform for achieving sensitive biosensor for fast mutation screening related to most human cancer types. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. A label-free and enzyme-free ultra-sensitive transcription factors biosensor using DNA-templated copper nanoparticles as fluorescent indicator and hairpin DNA cascade reaction as signal amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sha, Liang; Zhang, Xiaojun; Wang, Guangfeng

    2016-08-15

    Detection and quantification of specific protein with ultralow concentration play a crucial role in biotechnological applications and biomedical diagnostics. In this paper, a label-free and enzyme-free amplified fluorescent biosensor has been developed for transcription factors detection based on AT-rich double-stranded DNA-templated copper nanoparticles (ds DNA/Cu NPs) and hairpin DNA cascade reaction. This strategy was demonstrated by using nuclear factor-kappa B p50 (NF-κB p50) and specific recognition sequences as a model case. In this assay, a triplex consists of double-stranded DNA containing NF-κB p50 specifically binding sequences and a special design single-stranded DNA (Trigger) which is able to activate the hairpin DNA cascade amplifier (HDCA). In the presence of NF-κB p50, the triplex became unstable since the target bound to the recognition sequences with strong affinity. The selective binding event confirmed that the Trigger was successfully released from the triplex and initiated HDCA to yield the product which could effectively template the formation of fluorescent Cu NPs. The experimental results revealed that the advanced strategy was ultra-sensitive for detecting NF-κB p50 in the concentration range from 0.1 to 1000 pM with a detection limit of 0.096 pM. In addition, the relative standard deviation was 4.08% in 3 repetitive assays of 500 pM NF-κB p50, which indicated that the reproducibility of this strategy was acceptable. Besides desirable sensitivity, the developed biosensor also showed high selectivity, cost-effective, and simplified operations. In addition, the proposed biosensing platform is versatile. By conjugating with various specific recognition units, it could hold considerable potential to sensitive and selective detect various DNA-binding proteins and might find wide applications in biomedical fields. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Functional intersection of ATM and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit in coding end joining during V(D)J recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Baeck-Seung; Gapud, Eric J; Zhang, Shichuan

    2013-01-01

    V(D)J recombination is initiated by the RAG endonuclease, which introduces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) at the border between two recombining gene segments, generating two hairpin-sealed coding ends and two blunt signal ends. ATM and DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA......-PKcs. Mutation of these threonine residues to alanine (DNA-PKcs(3A)) renders DNA-PKcs dependent on its intrinsic kinase activity during coding end joining, at a step downstream of opening hairpin-sealed coding ends. Thus, DNA-PKcs has critical functions in coding end joining beyond promoting Artemis endonuclease...

  11. Plasmonic nanoparticles: Towards the fabrication of biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Hui

    2015-07-01

    Au and Ag nanoparticles are mainly employed in the fabrication of biosensors owing to their unique optical properties compared to other noble metal nanoparticles. Many biosensors are fabricated for the rapid detection of different analytes such as organic and inorganic molecules, biomolecules like DNA, proteins, biotoxins and pathogens. In this mini review we mainly discuss on the usage of Au and Ag nanoparticles for the fabrication of colorimetric, SERS and two photon based photoluminescence biosensors.

  12. Biosensors in clinical chemistry - 2011 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Orazio, Paul

    2011-09-18

    Research activity and applications of biosensors for measurement of analytes of clinical interest over the last eight years are reviewed. Nanotechnology has been applied to improve performance of biosensors using electrochemical, optical, mechanical and physical modes of transduction, and to allow arrays of biosensors to be constructed for parallel sensing. Biosensors have been proposed for measurement of cancer biomarkers, cardiac biomarkers as well as biomarkers for autoimmune disease, infectious disease and for DNA analysis. Novel applications of biosensors include measurements in alternate sample types, such as saliva. Biosensors based on immobilized whole cells have found new applications, for example to detect the presence of cancer and to monitor the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutic agents. The number of research reports describing new biosensors for analytes of clinical interest continues to increase; however, movement of biosensors from the research laboratory to the clinical laboratory has been slow. The greatest impact of biosensors will be felt at point-of-care testing locations without laboratory support. Integration of biosensors into reliable, easy-to-use and rugged instrumentation will be required to assure success of biosensor-based systems at the point-of-care. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs)-SIN1 association mediates ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation and skin cell survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Ying; Ji, Chao; Yang, Bo; Yang, Zhi; Gu, Hua; Lu, Chun-Cheng; Wang, Rong; Su, Zhong-Lan; Chen, Bin; Sun, Wei-Ling; Xia, Ji-Ping; Bi, Zhi-Gang; He, Li

    2013-12-24

    The exposure of skin keratinocytes to Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation leads to Akt phosphorylation at Ser-473, which is important for the carcinogenic effects of excessive sun exposure. The present study investigated the underlying mechanism of Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation by UVB radiation. We found that DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 2 (mTORC2) were both required for UVB-induced Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation in keratinocytes. Inhibition of DNA-PKcs activity via its inhibitor NU7026, a dominant-negative kinase-dead mutation, RNA interference (RNAi) or gene depletion led to the attenuation of UVB-induced Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation. Meanwhile, siRNA silencing or gene depletion of SIN1, a key component of mTORC2, abolished Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation by UVB. Significantly, we discovered that DNA-PKcs was associated with SIN1 in cytosol upon UVB radiation, and this complexation appeared required for Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation. Meanwhile, this DNA-PKcs-SIN1 complexation by UVB was dependent on epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation, and was disrupted by an EGFR inhibitor (AG1478) or by EGFR depletion. UVB-induced complexation between DNA-PKcs and mTORC2 components was also abolished by NU7026 and DNA-PKcs mutation. Finally, we found that both DNA-PKcs and SIN1 were associated with apoptosis resistance of UVB radiation, and inhibition of them by NU7026 or genetic depletion significantly enhanced UVB-induced cell death and apoptosis. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that DNA-PKcs-mTORC2 association is required for UVB-induced Akt Ser-473 phosphorylation and cell survival, and might be important for tumor cell transformation.

  14. Catalytic enantioselective syn hydration of enones in water using a DNA-based catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boersma, Arnold J.; Coquière, David; Geerdink, Danny; Rosati, Fiora; Roelfes, Gerard; Feringa, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The enantioselective addition of water to olefins in an aqueous environment is a common transformation in biological systems, but was beyond the ability of synthetic chemists. Here, we present the first examples of a non-enzymatic catalytic enantioselective hydration of enones, for which we used a

  15. Gold nanoparticles immobilized on metal-organic frameworks with enhanced catalytic performance for DNA detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ya Li; Fu, Wen Liang; Li, Chun Mei; Huang, Cheng Zhi; Li, Yuan Fang

    2015-02-25

    In this work, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) assembled on the surface of iron based metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), Fe-MIL-88, are facilely prepared through electrostatic interactions using polyethyleneimine (PEI) molecules as linker. The resulting hybrid materials possess synergetic peroxidase-like activity. Because iron based metal-organic frameworks, Fe-MIL-88, exhibits highly peroxidase-like activity, and AuNPs has the distinct adsorption property to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). The peroxidase-like activity of Au@Fe-MIL-88 exhibit excellent switchable in response to specific DNA, ssDNA is easily adsorbed on the surface of the Au@Fe-MIL-88 hybrids, resulting in the reduce of the peroxidase-like activity of the hybrids. While it is recovered by the addition of target DNA, and the recovery degree is proportional to the target DNA concentration over the range of 30-150 nM with a detection limit of 11.4 nM. Based on these unique properties, we develop a label-free colorimetric method for DNA hybridization detection. In control experiment, base-mismatched DNA cannot induce recovery of the peroxidase-like activity. This detection method is simple, cheap, rapid and colorimetric. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Metal Ion Binding at the Catalytic Site Induces Widely Distributed Changes in a Sequence Specific Protein-DNA Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Kaustubh; Sangani, Sahil S; Kehr, Andrew D; Rule, Gordon S; Jen-Jacobson, Linda

    2016-11-08

    Metal ion cofactors can alter the energetics and specificity of sequence specific protein-DNA interactions, but it is unknown if the underlying effects on structure and dynamics are local or dispersed throughout the protein-DNA complex. This work uses EcoRV endonuclease as a model, and catalytically inactive lanthanide ions, which replace the Mg 2+ cofactor. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) titrations indicate that four Lu 3+ or two La 3+ cations bind, and two new crystal structures confirm that Lu 3+ binding is confined to the active sites. NMR spectra show that the metal-free EcoRV complex with cognate (GATATC) DNA is structurally distinct from the nonspecific complex, and that metal ion binding sites are not assembled in the nonspecific complex. NMR chemical shift perturbations were determined for 1 H- 15 N amide resonances, for 1 H- 13 C Ile-δ-CH 3 resonances, and for stereospecifically assigned Leu-δ-CH 3 and Val-γ-CH 3 resonances. Many chemical shifts throughout the cognate complex are unperturbed, so metal binding does not induce major conformational changes. However, some large perturbations of amide and side chain methyl resonances occur as far as 34 Å from the metal ions. Concerted changes in specific residues imply that local effects of metal binding are propagated via a β-sheet and an α-helix. Both amide and methyl resonance perturbations indicate changes in the interface between subunits of the EcoRV homodimer. Bound metal ions also affect amide hydrogen exchange rates for distant residues, including a distant subdomain that contacts DNA phosphates and promotes DNA bending, showing that metal ions in the active sites, which relieve electrostatic repulsion between protein and DNA, cause changes in slow dynamics throughout the complex.

  17. Metal Ion Binding at the Catalytic Site Induces Widely Distributed Changes in a Sequence Specific Protein–DNA Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Metal ion cofactors can alter the energetics and specificity of sequence specific protein–DNA interactions, but it is unknown if the underlying effects on structure and dynamics are local or dispersed throughout the protein–DNA complex. This work uses EcoRV endonuclease as a model, and catalytically inactive lanthanide ions, which replace the Mg2+ cofactor. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) titrations indicate that four Lu3+ or two La3+ cations bind, and two new crystal structures confirm that Lu3+ binding is confined to the active sites. NMR spectra show that the metal-free EcoRV complex with cognate (GATATC) DNA is structurally distinct from the nonspecific complex, and that metal ion binding sites are not assembled in the nonspecific complex. NMR chemical shift perturbations were determined for 1H–15N amide resonances, for 1H–13C Ile-δ-CH3 resonances, and for stereospecifically assigned Leu-δ-CH3 and Val-γ-CH3 resonances. Many chemical shifts throughout the cognate complex are unperturbed, so metal binding does not induce major conformational changes. However, some large perturbations of amide and side chain methyl resonances occur as far as 34 Å from the metal ions. Concerted changes in specific residues imply that local effects of metal binding are propagated via a β-sheet and an α-helix. Both amide and methyl resonance perturbations indicate changes in the interface between subunits of the EcoRV homodimer. Bound metal ions also affect amide hydrogen exchange rates for distant residues, including a distant subdomain that contacts DNA phosphates and promotes DNA bending, showing that metal ions in the active sites, which relieve electrostatic repulsion between protein and DNA, cause changes in slow dynamics throughout the complex. PMID:27786446

  18. Multi-step surface functionalization of polyimide based evanescent wave photonic biosensors and application for DNA hybridization by Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melnik, Eva [Health and Environment Department, Nano Systems, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Donau-City-Strasse 1, 1220 Vienna (Austria); Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 38, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Bruck, Roman [Health and Environment Department, Nano Systems, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Donau-City-Strasse 1, 1220 Vienna (Austria); Hainberger, Rainer, E-mail: rainer.hainberger@ait.ac.at [Health and Environment Department, Nano Systems, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Donau-City-Strasse 1, 1220 Vienna (Austria); Laemmerhofer, Michael, E-mail: michael.laemmerhofer@univie.ac.at [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringer Strasse 38, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} We realize a biosensing platform for polyimide evanescent photonic wave sensors. {yields} We show that the surface functionalization via silanisation and biotinylation followed by streptavidin immobilization do not destroy or damage the thin polyimide film. {yields} A highly dense streptavidin layer enables the immobilisation of biotinylated ligands such as biotinylated ssDNA for the selective measurement of DNA hybridization. - Abstract: The process of surface functionalization involving silanization, biotinylation and streptavidin bonding as platform for biospecific ligand immobilization was optimized for thin film polyimide spin-coated silicon wafers, of which the polyimide film serves as a wave guiding layer in evanescent wave photonic biosensors. This type of optical sensors make great demands on the materials involved as well as on the layer properties, such as the optical quality, the layer thickness and the surface roughness. In this work we realized the binding of a 3-mercaptopropyl trimethoxysilane on an oxygen plasma activated polyimide surface followed by subsequent derivatization of the reactive thiol groups with maleimide-PEG{sub 2}-biotin and immobilization of streptavidin. The progress of the functionalization was monitored by using different fluorescence labels for optimization of the chemical derivatization steps. Further, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were utilized for the characterization of the modified surface. These established analytical methods allowed to derive information like chemical composition of the surface, surface coverage with immobilized streptavidin, as well as parameters of the surface roughness. The proposed functionalization protocol furnished a surface density of 144 fmol mm{sup -2} streptavidin with good reproducibility (13.9% RSD, n = 10) and without inflicted damage to the surface. This surface modification was applied to polyimide based Mach-Zehnder interferometer

  19. Acetylation regulates WRN catalytic activities and affects base excision DNA repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muftuoglu, Meltem; Kusumoto, Rika; Speina, Elzbieta

    2008-01-01

    The Werner protein (WRN), defective in the premature aging disorder Werner syndrome, participates in a number of DNA metabolic processes, and we have been interested in the possible regulation of its function in DNA repair by post-translational modifications. Acetylation mediated by histone...

  20. Quantitative characterization of conformational-specific protein-DNA binding using a dual-spectral interferometric imaging biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xirui; Daaboul, George G.; Spuhler, Philipp S.; Dröge, Peter; Ünlü, M. Selim

    2016-03-01

    DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are not fully understood. Recently, it was discovered that DNA-binding proteins recognize specific binding sites to carry out their functions through an indirect readout mechanism by recognizing and capturing DNA conformational flexibility and deformation. High-throughput DNA microarray-based methods that provide large-scale protein-DNA binding information have shown effective and comprehensive analysis of protein-DNA binding affinities, but do not provide information of DNA conformational changes in specific protein-DNA complexes. Building on the high-throughput capability of DNA microarrays, we demonstrate a quantitative approach that simultaneously measures the amount of protein binding to DNA and nanometer-scale DNA conformational change induced by protein binding in a microarray format. Both measurements rely on spectral interferometry on a layered substrate using a single optical instrument in two distinct modalities. In the first modality, we quantitate the amount of binding of protein to surface-immobilized DNA in each DNA spot using a label-free spectral reflectivity technique that accurately measures the surface densities of protein and DNA accumulated on the substrate. In the second modality, for each DNA spot, we simultaneously measure DNA conformational change using a fluorescence vertical sectioning technique that determines average axial height of fluorophores tagged to specific nucleotides of the surface-immobilized DNA. The approach presented in this paper, when combined with current high-throughput DNA microarray-based technologies, has the potential to serve as a rapid and simple method for quantitative and large-scale characterization of conformational specific protein-DNA interactions.DNA-binding proteins play crucial roles in the maintenance and functions of the genome and yet, their specific binding mechanisms are

  1. Real-time monitoring of mycobacterium genomic DNA with target-primed rolling circle amplification by a Au nanoparticle-embedded SPR biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yang; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Huang, Qing; Zheng, Junsong; Fu, Weiling

    2015-04-15

    In this study, we developed a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) DNA biosensor array based on target-primed rolling circle amplification (RCA) for isothermal and rapid detection of two pathogenic mycobacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) and Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC).The species-specific padlock probe (PLP) was designed to target the sequence in 16S-23S rRNA gene internal transcribed spacer (ITS). After ligation, the circularized PLP could be primed by the target sequence to initial RCA. The RCA performed simultaneously with the cleavage reaction to produce small fragments of single strand DNA which immediately hybridized with the probe immobilized on the sensor chip without denaturation. This process caused SPR angle changes on the chip surface, which made the detection for analysis from the solution achievable, and dynamic real-time RCA monitoring of mycobacterium possible. Besides, Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) were directly assembled onto the surface of the sensor chip via hexanedithiol (HDT) for the enhancement of sensitivity as a label-free detection system. Experimental results show that the signal enhancement by the target-primed RCA together with AuNPs-embedded surface caused at least10-fold increased sensitivity as compared with conventional RCA on bare SPR chip method. Within 40min amplification duration as low as 20amol of synthetic targets and 10(4)CFUmL(-1) of genomic DNA from clinical samples can be detected. The proposed method not only provides a simple design idea for liquid-phase amplification monitoring, but also apply it in clinical pathogen detection, which holds great promise in ultrasensitive bioassay in the future. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Catalytic Activities of Ribozymes and DNAzymes in Water and Mixed Aqueous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-ichi Nakano

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic nucleic acids are regarded as potential therapeutic agents and biosensors. The catalytic activities of nucleic acid enzymes are usually investigated in dilute aqueous solutions, although the physical properties of the reaction environment inside living cells and that in the area proximal to the surface of biosensors in which they operate are quite different from those of pure water. The effect of the molecular environment is also an important focus of research aimed at improving and expanding nucleic acid function by addition of organic solvents to aqueous solutions. In this study, the catalytic activities of RNA and DNA enzymes (hammerhead ribozyme, 17E DNAzyme, R3C ribozyme, and 9DB1 DNAzyme were investigated using 21 different mixed aqueous solutions comprising organic compounds. Kinetic measurements indicated that these enzymes can display enhanced catalytic activity in mixed solutions with respect to the solution containing no organic additives. Correlation analyses revealed that the turnover rate of the reaction catalyzed by hammerhead ribozyme increased in a medium with a lower dielectric constant than water, and the turnover rate of the reaction catalyzed by 17E DNAzyme increased in conditions that increased the strength of DNA interactions. On the other hand, R3C ribozyme and 9DB1 DNAzyme displayed no significant turnover activity, but their single-turnover rates increased in many mixed solutions. Our data provide insight into the activity of catalytic nucleic acids under various conditions that are applicable to the medical and technology fields, such as in living cells and in biosensors.

  3. Simple fluorescent sensors engineered with catalytic DNA 'MgZ' based on a non-classic allosteric design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Chiuman

    Full Text Available Most NAE (nucleic acid enzyme sensors are composed of an RNA-cleaving catalytic motif and an aptameric receptor. They operate by activating or repressing the catalytic activity of a relevant NAE through the conformational change in the aptamer upon target binding. To transduce a molecular recognition event to a fluorescence signal, a fluorophore-quencher pair is attached to opposite ends of the RNA substrate such that when the NAE cleaves the substrate, an increased level of fluorescence can be generated. However, almost all NAE sensors to date harbor either NAEs that cannot accommodate a fluorophore-quencher pair near the cleavage site or those that can accept such a modification but require divalent transition metal ions for catalysis. Therefore, the signaling magnitude and the versatility of current NAE sensors might not suffice for analytical and biological applications. Here we report an RNA-cleaving DNA enzyme, termed 'MgZ', which depends on Mg(2+ for its activity and can accommodate bulky dye moieties next to the cleavage site. MgZ was created by in vitro selection. The selection scheme entailed acidic buffering and ethanol-based reaction stoppage to remove selfish DNAs. Characterization of MgZ revealed a three-way junction structure, a cleavage rate of 1 min(-1, and 26-fold fluorescence enhancement. Two ligand-responsive NAE sensors were rationally designed by linking an aptamer sequence to the substrate of MgZ. In the absence of the target, the aptamer-linked substrate is locked into a conformation that prohibits MgZ from accessing the substrate. In the presence of the target, the aptamer releases the substrate, which induces MgZ-mediated RNA cleavage. The discovery of MgZ and the introduction of the above NAE sensor design strategy should facilitate future efforts in sensor engineering.

  4. Development of an electrochemical DNA biosensor for the detection of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin at a carbon paste modified electrode with a manganese(II complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Dimitropoulou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A simple, fast, sensitive and selective electrochemical detection of vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin has been developed using a DNA electrochemical biosensor and a modified carbon paste electrode. Carbon paste electrode was modified with electrochemically produced polymer of [Mn(thiophenyl-2-carboxylic acid2(triethylonamine] using cyclic voltammetry with a scan rate of 0.01 V/s and three number of scans. Vitamin B12 was immobilized onto the modified electrode. Measurements were carried out using adsorptive transfer square wave voltammetry. Detection was achieved from 3.667 μg/L to 236.0 μg/L, presenting sufficiently low detection (i.e. 1.210 μg/L and quantification (i.e. 3.667 μg/L limits. The precision was tested showing excellent results (i.e. from 5.50 % and 5.35 %. The selectivity towards certain interferences was also investigated and revealed that none of them had significant effect on the detection of vitamin B12. The electrode has been applied in the determination of Vitamin B12 in human urine sample.

  5. Potential of cross-priming amplification and DNA-based lateral-flow strip biosensor for rapid on-site GMO screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Zhai, Congcong; You, Qimin; Chen, Hongjun

    2014-07-01

    The requirement to monitor the presence of genetically modified organisms (GMO) in a variety of marked products has generated an increasing demand for reliable, rapid, and time and cost-effective analytical methods. Here we report an on-site method for rapid detection of cauliflower mosaic virus promoter (CaMV 35S), a common element present in most GMO, using cross-priming amplification (CPA) technology. Detection was achieved using a DNA-based contamination-proof strip biosensor. The limit of detection was 30 copies for the pBI121 plasmid containing the CaMV 35S gene. The certified reference sample of GM maize line MON810 was detectable even at the low relative mass concentration of 0.05%. The developed CPA method had high specificity for the CaMV 35S gene, as compared with other GM lines not containing this gene and non-GM products. The method was further validated using nine real-world samples, and the results were confirmed by real-time PCR analysis. Because of its simplicity, rapidity, and high sensitivity, this method of detecting the CaMV 35S gene has great commercial prospects for rapid GMO screening of high-consumption food and agriculture products.

  6. A review on impedimetric biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadır, Elif Burcu; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is a sensitive technique for the analysis of the interfacial properties related to biorecognition events such as reactions catalyzed by enzymes, biomolecular recognition events of specific binding proteins, lectins, receptors, nucleic acids, whole cells, antibodies or antibody-related substances, occurring at the modified surface. Many studies on impedimetric biosensors are focused on immunosensors and aptasensors. In impedimetric immunosensors, antibodies and antigens are bound each other and thus immunocomplex is formed and the electrode is coated with a blocking layer. As a result of that electron transfer resistance increases. In impedimetric aptasensors, impedance changes following the binding of target sequences, conformational changes, or DNA damages. Impedimetric biosensors allow direct detection of biomolecular recognition events without using enzyme labels. In this paper, impedimetric biosensors are reviewed and the most interesting ones are discussed.

  7. Label-free DNA biosensor based on a peptide nucleic acid-functionalized microstructured optical fiber-Bragg grating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candiani, Alessandro; Bertucci, Alessandro; Giannetti, Sara; Konstantaki, Maria; Manicardi, Alex; Pissadakis, Stavros; Cucinotta, Annamaria; Corradini, Roberto; Selleri, Stefano

    2013-05-01

    We describe a novel sensing approach based on a functionalized microstructured optical fiber-Bragg grating for specific DNA target sequences detection. The inner surface of a microstructured fiber, where a Bragg grating was previously inscribed, has been functionalized by covalent linking of a peptide nucleic acid probe targeting a DNA sequence bearing a single point mutation implicated in cystic fibrosis (CF) disease. A solution of an oligonucleotide (ON) corresponding to a tract of the CF gene containing the mutated DNA has been infiltrated inside the fiber capillaries and allowed to hybridize to the fiber surface according to the Watson-Crick pairing. In order to achieve signal amplification, ON-functionalized gold nanoparticles were then infiltrated and used in a sandwich-like assay. Experimental measurements show a clear shift of the reflected high order mode of a Bragg grating for a 100 nM DNA solution, and fluorescence measurements have confirmed the successful hybridization. Several experiments have been carried out on the same fiber using the identical concentration, showing the same modulation trend, suggesting the possibility of the reuse of the sensor. Measurements have also been made using a 100 nM mismatched DNA solution, containing a single nucleotide mutation and corresponding to the wild-type gene, and the results demonstrate the high selectivity of the sensor.

  8. Detecting and identifying DNA via the THz backbone frequency using a metamaterial-based label-free biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaei, Sahar; Green, Nicolas G.; Rotaru, Mihai; Pu, Suan Hui

    2017-02-01

    In genetic diagnostics, laboratory-based equipment generally uses analytical techniques requiring complicated and expensive fluorescent labelling of target DNA molecules. Intense research effort into, and commercial development of, Point-of-Care diagnostics and Personalized Healthcare are driving the development of simple, fast and cost-effective detection methods. One potential label-free DNA detection method uses Terahertz (THz) spectroscopy of the natural responses of DNA in metamaterial structures, which are engineered to have properties that are impossible to obtain in natural materials. This paper presents a study of the development of metamaterials based on asymmetric X-shaped resonator inclusions as a functional sensor for DNA. Gold X-shaped resonator structures with dimensions of 90/85 μm were demonstrated to produce trapped mode resonant frequency in the correct range for DNA detection. Realistic substrate materials in the form of 375 μm thick quartz were investigated, demonstrating that the non-transparent nature of the material resulted in the production of standing waves, affecting the system response, as well as requiring a reduction in scale of the resonator of 85%. As a result, the effect of introducing etched windows in the substrate material were investigated, demonstrating that increased window size significantly reduces the effect of the substrate on the system response. The device design showed a good selectivity when RNA samples were introduced to the model, demonstrating the potential for this design of device in the development of sensors capable of performing cheap and simple genetic analysis of DNA, giving label-free detection at high sensitivity.

  9. Catalytic Hairpin Assembly Actuated DNA Nanotweezer for Logic Gate Building and Sensitive Enzyme-Free Biosensing of MicroRNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dandan; Cheng, Wei; Li, Yujian; Xu, YongJie; Li, Xinmin; Yin, Yibing; Ju, Huangxian; Ding, Shijia

    2016-08-02

    A target-switched DNA nanotweezer is designed for AND logic gate operation and enzyme-free detection of microRNAs (miRNAs) by catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) and proximity-dependent DNAzyme formation. The double crossover motif-based nanotweezer consists of an arched structure as the set strand for target inputs and two split G-rich DNAs at the termini of two arms for signal output. Upon a CHA, a small amount of binary target inputs can switch numerous open nanotweezers to a closed state, which leads to the formation of proximity-dependent DNAzyme in the presence of hemin to produce a highly sensitive biosensing system. The binary target inputs can be used for successful building of AND logic gate, which is validated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, surface plasmon resonance and the biosensing signal. The developed biosensing system shows a linear response of the output chemiluminescence signal to input binary miRNAs with a detection limit of 30 fM. It can be used for miRNAs analysis in complex sample matrix. This system provides a simple and reusable platform for logic gate operation and enzyme-free, highly sensitive, and specific multianalysis of miRNAs.

  10. Application of electrochemical biosensors in clinical diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monošík, Rastislav; Stred'anský, Miroslav; Šturdík, Ernest

    2012-01-01

    Analyses in the clinical area need quick and reliable analytical methods and devices. For this purpose, biosensors can be a suitable option, whereas they are constructed to be simple for use, specific for the target analyte, capable of continuous monitoring and giving quick results, potentially low-costing and portable. In this article, we describe electrochemical biosensors developed for clinical diagnosis, namely for glucose, lactate, cholesterol, urea, creatinine, DNA, antigens, antibodies, and cancer markers assays. Chosen biosensors showed desirable sensitivity, selectivity, and potential for application on real samples. They are often designed to avoid interference with undesired components present in the monitored systems. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. In-Channel-Grown Polypyrrole Nanowire for the Detection of DNA Hybridization in an Electrochemical Microfluidic Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi Luyen Tran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A triple electrode setup with a Pt pseudo-reference electrode integrated in a polydimethylsiloxane- (PDMS- based microchamber was designed and fabricated. The integrated electrodes were deposited onto SiO2/Si substrate by sputtering. The PDMS microchamber was patterned using an SU-8 mold and sealed with electrodes in oxygen plasma. Polypyrrole nanowires (PPy NWs were electrochemically grown in situ at an accurate position of the working electrode in the sealed microchamber instead of in an open system. The DNA probe sequences were simply introduced into the channel to form bonds with the nanowires. A detection limit of 20 pM was achieved using a lock-in amplifier. The electrochemical characteristics produced by the hybridization of DNA strands in the microchamber showed a good signal/noise ratio and high sensitivity. Measurement of the DNA sensor in narrow space also required much less volume of the analytical sample compared with that in an open measuring cell. Results showed that this simple system can potentially fabricate nanostructures and detect bio/chemical molecules in a sealed system.

  12. Biosensors: the new wave in cancer diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Bohunicky

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Brian Bohunicky1, Shaker A Mousa1,21The Pharmaceutical Research Institute at Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Rensselaer, NY, USA; 2College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaAbstract: The earlier cancer can be detected, the better the chance of a cure. Currently, many cancers are diagnosed only after they have metastasized throughout the body. Effective, accurate methods of cancer detection and clinical diagnosis are urgently needed. Biosensors are devices that are designed to detect a specific biological analyte by essentially converting a biological entity (ie, protein, DNA, RNA into an electrical signal that can be detected and analyzed. The use of biosensors in cancer detection and monitoring holds vast potential. Biosensors can be designed to detect emerging cancer biomarkers and to determine drug effectiveness at various target sites. Biosensor technology has the potential to provide fast and accurate detection, reliable imaging of cancer cells, and monitoring of angiogenesis and cancer metastasis, and the ability to determine the effectiveness of anticancer chemotherapy agents. This review will briefly summarize the current obstacles to early detection of cancer and the expanding use of biosensors as a diagnostic tool, as well as some future applications of biosensor technology.Keywords: biosensor, oncogene, nanotechnology, biotechnology, cancer detection, diagnosis, point-of-care

  13. DNA biosensor combining single-wavelength colorimetry and a digital lock-in amplifier within a smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Tzu-Heng; Chang, Chia-Chen; Vaillant, Julien; Bruyant, Aurélien; Lin, Chii-Wann

    2016-11-15

    Smartphone camera based gold nanoparticle colorimetry (SCB-AuNP colorimetry) has shown good potential for point-of-care applications. However, due to the use of a camera as a photo-detector, there are major limitations to this technique such as a low bit resolution (∼8 bits mainstream) and a low data acquisition rate. These issues have limited the ultimate sensitivity of smartphone based colorimetry as well as the possibility to integrate efficiently a more sensitive approach such as detection based on a lock-in amplifier (LIA). In this paper, we improve the metrological performance of the smartphone to overcome existing issues by adding the LIA capability to AuNP sensing. In this work, instead of using the camera as a photo-detector, the audio jack is used as a photo-detector reader and function generator for driving a laser diode in order to achieve a smartphone based digital lock-in amplifier AuNP colorimetric (SBLIA-AuNP colorimetry) system. A full investigation on the SBLIA design, parameters and performance is comprehensively provided. It is found that the SBLIA can reduce most of the noise and provides a detection noise-to-signal ratio down to -63 dB, which is much better than the -49 dB of the state-of-the-art SCB based method. A DNA detection experiment is demonstrated to reveal the efficacy of the proposed metrological method. The results are compared to UV-visible spectrometry, which is the gold standard for colorimetric measurement. Based on our results, the SBLIA-AuNP colorimetric system has a detection limit of 0.77 nM on short strand DNA detection, which is 5.7 times better than the 4.36 nM limit of a commercial UV-visible spectrometer. Judging from the results, we believe that the sensitive SBLIA would be further extended to other optical diagnostic tools in the near future.

  14. Biosensors: applications for dairy food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, E R

    1993-10-01

    Biosensors are defined as indicators of biological compounds that can be as simple as temperature-sensitive paint or as complex as DNA-RNA probes. Food microbiologists are constantly seeking rapid and reliable automated systems for the detection of biological activity. Biosensors provide sensitive, miniaturized systems that can be used to detect unwanted microbial activity or the presence of a biologically active compound, such as glucose or a pesticide. Immunodiagnostics and enzyme biosensors are two of the leading technologies that have had the greatest impact on the food industry. The use of these two systems has reduced the time for detection of pathogens such as Salmonella to 24 h and has provided detection of biological compounds such as cholesterol or chymotrypsin. The continued development of biosensor technology will soon make available "on-line quality control" of food production, which will not only reduce cost of food production but will also provide greater safety and increased food quality.

  15. PHOTONIC CRYSTAL WAVEGUIDE BIOSENSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. ZANISHEVSKAYA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The hollow core photonic crystal waveguide biosensor is designed and described. The biosensor was tested in experiments for artificial sweetener identification in drinks. The photonic crystal waveguide biosensor has a high sensitivity to the optical properties of liquids filling up the hollow core. The compactness, good integration ability to different optical systems and compatibility for use in industrial settings make such biosensor very promising for various biomedical applications.

  16. Endostatin sensitizes p53-deficient non-small-cell lung cancer to genotoxic chemotherapy by targeting DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Lin; Lu, Xin-An; Liu, Guanghua; Wang, Shan; Xu, Min; Tian, Yang; Zhang, Shaosen; Fu, Yan; Luo, Yongzhang

    2017-10-01

    Endostatin was discovered as an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor with broad-spectrum antitumour activities. Although clinical efficacy was observed when endostatin was combined with standard chemotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as other cancer types, the specific mechanisms underlying the benefit of endostatin are not completely understood. Extensive investigations suggest that endostatin is a multifunctional protein possessing more than anti-angiogenic activity. Here, we found that endostatin exerts a direct chemosensitizing effect on p53-deficient tumour cells. Concomitant treatment with endostatin and genotoxic drugs resulted in therapeutic synergy in both cellular and animal models of p53-deficient NSCLC. Mechanistically, endostatin specifically interacts with DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) in tumour cells and suppresses its DNA repair activity. Using isogenic NSCLC cells with different p53 statuses, we discovered that p53-deficient tumour cells show chemoresistance to genotoxic drugs, creating a synthetic dependence on DNA-PKcs-mediated DNA repair. In this setting, endostatin exerted inhibitory effects on DNA-PKcs activity, leading to accumulation of DNA lesions and promotion of the therapeutic effect of genotoxic chemotherapy. In contrast, p53-proficient tumour cells were more sensitive to genotoxic drugs so that DNA-PKcs could be cleaved by drug-activated caspase-3, making DNA-PKcs inhibition less effective during this ongoing apoptotic process. Therefore, our data demonstrate a novel mechanism for endostatin as a DNA-PKcs suppressor, and indicate that combination therapy of endostatin with genotoxic drugs could be a promising treatment strategy for cancer patients with p53-deficient tumours. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Development of an RNA-based theophylline-specific microarray biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Katherine M.

    We are developing an extremely sensitive and compact biosensor that is adaptable to a variety of target analytes. Hammerhead ribozymes have been engineered such that they rearrange from a catalytically inactive to an active conformation upon binding to a target molecule. A donor-acceptor fluorophore pair is coupled to the substrate RNA of such an aptamer, to form a complex referred to as an aptazyme, to monitor real-time cleavage activity in a fluid environment. The fluorophores interact by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) until binding of the target molecule, when the FRET signal breaks down as the substrate is cleaved and the products dissociate. FRET assays with immobilized aptazymes and using total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy on the single-molecule scale are presented showing an enhancement of substrate cleavage in the presence of theophylline over background. The aptazyme is hybridized onto a DNA microarray and incorporated into a chip specifically designed to allow for measurement in a controlled fluid environment. The use of these microarrays allows for either one spot, or a series of spots, to be addressed independently within the biosensor. This allows for multiple analytes to be tested simultaneously. An enhancement in the substrate cleavage is again observed in the presence of theophylline. Results are presented toward the characterization of a theophylline-specific aptamer-based biosensor using this RNA microarray platform and analogous measurement techniques.

  18. Electronic Biosensors Based on III-Nitride Semiconductors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirste, Ronny; Rohrbaugh, Nathaniel; Bryan, Isaac; Bryan, Zachary; Collazo, Ramon; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2015-01-01

    We review recent advances of AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT)-based electronic biosensors. We discuss properties and fabrication of III-nitride-based biosensors. Because of their superior biocompatibility and aqueous stability, GaN-based devices are ready to be implemented as next-generation biosensors. We review surface properties, cleaning, and passivation as well as different pathways toward functionalization, and critically analyze III-nitride-based biosensors demonstrated in the literature, including those detecting DNA, bacteria, cancer antibodies, and toxins. We also discuss the high potential of these biosensors for monitoring living cardiac, fibroblast, and nerve cells. Finally, we report on current developments of covalent chemical functionalization of III-nitride devices. Our review concludes with a short outlook on future challenges and projected implementation directions of GaN-based HEMT biosensors.

  19. Electronic Biosensors Based on III-Nitride Semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirste, Ronny; Rohrbaugh, Nathaniel; Bryan, Isaac; Bryan, Zachary; Collazo, Ramon; Ivanisevic, Albena

    2015-07-01

    We review recent advances of AlGaN/GaN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT)-based electronic biosensors. We discuss properties and fabrication of III-nitride-based biosensors. Because of their superior biocompatibility and aqueous stability, GaN-based devices are ready to be implemented as next-generation biosensors. We review surface properties, cleaning, and passivation as well as different pathways toward functionalization, and critically analyze III-nitride-based biosensors demonstrated in the literature, including those detecting DNA, bacteria, cancer antibodies, and toxins. We also discuss the high potential of these biosensors for monitoring living cardiac, fibroblast, and nerve cells. Finally, we report on current developments of covalent chemical functionalization of III-nitride devices. Our review concludes with a short outlook on future challenges and projected implementation directions of GaN-based HEMT biosensors.

  20. Biosensors of bacterial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlage, Robert S; Tillmann, Joshua

    2017-07-01

    Biosensors are devices which utilize both an electrical component (transducer) and a biological component to study an environment. They are typically used to examine biological structures, organisms and processes. The field of biosensors has now become so large and varied that the technology can often seem impenetrable. Yet the principles which underlie the technology are uncomplicated, even if the details of the mechanisms are elusive. In this review we confine our analysis to relatively current advancements in biosensors for the detection of whole bacterial cells. This includes biosensors which rely on an added labeled component and biosensors which do not have a labeled component and instead detect the binding event or bound structure on the transducer. Methods to concentrate the bacteria prior to biosensor analysis are also described. The variety of biosensor types and their actual and potential uses are described. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Biosensors in clinical chemistry: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathish Babu Murugaiyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors are small devices that employ biological/biochemical reactions for detecting target analytes. Basically, the device consists of a biocatalyst and a transducer. The biocatalyst may be a cell, tissue, enzyme or even an oligonucleotide. The transducers are mainly amperometric, potentiometric or optical. The classification of biosensors is based on (a the nature of the recognition event or (b the intimacy between the biocatalyst and the transducer. Bioaffinity and biocatalytic devices are examples for the former and the first, whereas second and third generation instruments are examples for the latter. Cell-based biosensors utilizing immobilized cells, tissues as also enzyme immunosensors and DNA biosensors find variegated uses in diagnostics. Enzyme nanoparticle-based biosensors make use of small particles in the nanometer scale and are currently making a mark in laboratory medicine. Nanotechnology can help in optimizing the diagnostic biochips, which would facilitate sensitive, rapid, accurate and precise bedside monitoring. Biosensors render themselves as capable diagnostic tools as they meet most of the above-mentioned criteria.

  2. Toward the design of a catalytic metallodrug: selective cleavage of G-quadruplex telomeric DNA by an anticancer copper-acridine-ATCUN complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhen; Han, Menglu; Cowan, James A

    2015-02-02

    Telomeric DNA represents a novel target for the development of anticancer drugs. By application of a catalytic metallodrug strategy, a copper-acridine-ATCUN complex (CuGGHK-Acr) has been designed that targets G-quadruplex telomeric DNA. Both fluorescence solution assays and gel sequencing demonstrate the CuGGHK-Acr catalyst to selectively bind and cleave the G-quadruplex telomere sequence. The cleavage pathway has been mapped by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) experiments. CuGGHK-Acr promotes significant inhibition of cancer cell proliferation and shortening of telomere length. Both senescence and apoptosis are induced in the breast cancer cell line MCF7. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Traceless splicing enabled by substrate-induced activation of the Nostoc punctiforme Npu DnaE intein after mutation of a catalytic cysteine to serine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheriyan, Manoj; Chan, Siu-Hong; Perler, Francine

    2014-12-12

    Inteins self-catalytically cleave out of precursor proteins while ligating the surrounding extein fragments with a native peptide bond. Much attention has been lavished on these molecular marvels with the hope of understanding and harnessing their chemistry for novel biochemical transformations including coupling peptides from synthetic or biological origins and controlling protein function. Despite an abundance of powerful applications, the use of inteins is still hampered by limitations in our understanding of their specificity (defined as flanking sequences that permit splicing) and the challenge of inserting inteins into target proteins. We examined the frequently used Nostoc punctiforme Npu DnaE intein after the C-extein cysteine nucleophile (Cys+1) was mutated to serine or threonine. Previous studies demonstrated reduced rates and/or splicing yields with the Npu DnaE intein after mutation of Cys+1 to Ser+1. In this study, genetic selection identified extein sequences with Ser+1 that enabled the Npu DnaE intein to splice with only a 5-fold reduction in rate compared to the wild-type Cys+1 intein and without mutation of the intein itself to activate Ser+1 as a nucleophile. Three different proteins spliced efficiently after insertion of the intein flanked by the selected sequences. We then used this selected specificity to achieve traceless splicing in a targeted enzyme at a location predicted by primary sequence similarity to only the selected C-extein sequence. This study highlights the latent catalytic potential of the Npu DnaE intein to splice with an alternative nucleophile and enables broader intein utility by increasing insertion site choices. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Biosensors and bioelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Karunakaran, Chandran; Benjamin, Robson

    2015-01-01

    Biosensors and Bioelectronics presents the rapidly evolving methodologies that are relevant to biosensors and bioelectronics fabrication and characterization. The book provides a comprehensive understanding of biosensor functionality, and is an interdisciplinary reference that includes a range of interwoven contributing subjects, including electrochemistry, nanoparticles, and conducting polymers. Authored by a team of bioinstrumentation experts, this book serves as a blueprint for performing advanced fabrication and characterization of sensor systems-arming readers with an application-based re

  5. Fiber Optic Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Biosensor Technique: Fabrication, Advancement, and Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Gaoling; Luo, Zewei; Liu, Kunping; Wang, Yimin; Dai, Jianxiong; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-05-03

    Fiber optic-based biosensors with surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology are advanced label-free optical biosensing methods. They have brought tremendous progress in the sensing of various chemical and biological species. This review summarizes four sensing configurations (prism, grating, waveguide, and fiber optic) with two ways, attenuated total reflection (ATR) and diffraction, to excite the surface plasmons. Meanwhile, the designs of different probes (U-bent, tapered, and other probes) are also described. Finally, four major types of biosensors, immunosensor, DNA biosensor, enzyme biosensor, and living cell biosensor, are discussed in detail for their sensing principles and applications. Future prospects of fiber optic-based SPR sensor technology are discussed.

  6. Cloning and sequence analysis of a full-length cDNA of SmPP1cb encoding turbot protein phosphatase 1 beta catalytic subunit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Fei; Guo, Huarong; Wang, Jian

    2008-02-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation, catalyzed by protein kinases and phosphatases, is an important and versatile mechanism by which eukaryotic cells regulate almost all the signaling processes. Protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) is the first and well-characterized member of the protein serine/threonine phosphatase family. In the present study, a full-length cDNA encoding the beta isoform of the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1(PP1cb), was for the first time isolated and sequenced from the skin tissue of flatfish turbot Scophthalmus maximus, designated SmPP1cb, by the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique. The cDNA sequence of SmPP1cb we obtained contains a 984 bp open reading frame (ORF), flanked by a complete 39 bp 5' untranslated region and 462 bp 3' untranslated region. The ORF encodes a putative 327 amino acid protein, and the N-terminal section of this protein is highly acidic, Met-Ala-Glu-Gly-Glu-Leu-Asp-Val-Asp, a common feature for PP1 catalytic subunit but absent in protein phosphatase 2B (PP2B). And its calculated molecular mass is 37 193 Da and pI 5.8. Sequence analysis indicated that, SmPP1cb is extremely conserved in both amino acid and nucleotide acid levels compared with the PP1cb of other vertebrates and invertebrates, and its Kozak motif contained in the 5'UTR around ATG start codon is GXXAXXGXX ATGG, which is different from mammalian in two positions A-6 and G-3, indicating the possibility of different initiation of translation in turbot, and also the 3'UTR of SmPP1cb is highly diverse in the sequence similarity and length compared with other animals, especially zebrafish. The cloning and sequencing of SmPP1cb gene lays a good foundation for the future work on the biological functions of PP1 in the flatfish turbot.

  7. Introduction to biosensors from electric circuits to immunosensors

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2016-01-01

    This book equips students with a thorough understanding of various types of sensors and biosensors that can be used for chemical, biological, and biomedical applications, including but not limited to temperature sensors, strain sensor, light sensors, spectrophotometric sensors, pulse oximeter, optical fiber probes, fluorescence sensors, pH sensor, ion-selective electrodes, piezoelectric sensors, glucose sensors, DNA and immunosensors, lab-on-a-chip biosensors, paper-based lab-on-a-chip biosensors, and microcontroller-based sensors. The author treats the study of biosensors with an applications-based approach, including over 15 extensive, hands-on labs given at the end of each chapter. The material is presented using a building-block approach, beginning with the fundamentals of sensor design and temperature sensors, and ending with more complicated biosensors. New to this second edition are sections on op-amp filters, pulse oximetry, meat quality monitoring, advanced fluorescent dyes, autofluorescence, various...

  8. Introduction to Biosensors From Electric Circuits to Immunosensors

    CERN Document Server

    Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2013-01-01

    Introduction to Biosensors: From Electric Circuits to Immunosensors discusses underlying circuitry of sensors for biomedical and biological engineers as well as biomedical sensing modalities for electrical engineers while providing an applications-based approach to the study of biosensors with over 13 extensive, hands-on labs. The material is presented using a building-block approach, beginning with the fundamentals of sensor design and temperature sensors and ending with more complicated biosensors. This book also: Provides electrical engineers with the specific knowledge they need to understand biological sensing modalities Provides biomedical engineers with a solid background in circuits and systems Includes complete coverage of temperature sensors, electrochemical sensors, DNA and immunosensors, piezoelectric sensors and immunosensing in a micofluidic device Introduction to Biosensors: From Electric Circuits to Immunosensors aims to provide an interdisciplinary approach to biosensors that will be apprecia...

  9. Applications of Nanomaterials in Electrochemical Enzyme Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodi Yang

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A biosensor is defined as a kind of analytical device incorporating a biological material, a biologically derived material or a biomimic intimately associated with or integrated within a physicochemical transducer or transducing microsystem. Electrochemical biosensors incorporating enzymes with nanomaterials, which combine the recognition and catalytic properties of enzymes with the electronic properties of various nanomaterials, are new materials with synergistic properties originating from the components of the hybrid composites. Therefore, these systems have excellent prospects for interfacing biological recognition events through electronic signal transduction so as to design a new generation of bioelectronic devices with high sensitivity and stability. In this review, we describe approaches that involve nanomaterials in direct electrochemistry of redox proteins, especially our work on biosensor design immobilizing glucose oxidase (GOD, horseradish peroxidase (HRP, cytochrome P450 (CYP2B6, hemoglobin (Hb, glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH. The topics of the present review are the different functions of nanomaterials based on modification of electrode materials, as well as applications of electrochemical enzyme biosensors.

  10. The Over-expression of the β2 Catalytic Subunit of the Proteasome Decreases Homologous Recombination and Impairs DNA Double-Strand Break Repair in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Collavoli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available By a human cDNA library screening, we have previously identified two sequences coding two different catalytic subunits of the proteasome which increase homologous recombination (HR when overexpressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we investigated the effect of proteasome on spontaneous HR and DNA repair in human cells. To determine if the proteasome has a role in the occurrence of spontaneous HR in human cells, we overexpressed the β2 subunit of the proteasome in HeLa cells and determined the effect on intrachromosomal HR. Results showed that the overexpression of β2 subunit decreased HR in human cells without altering the cell proteasome activity and the Rad51p level. Moreover, exposure to MG132 that inhibits the proteasome activity reduced HR in human cells. We also found that the expression of the β2 subunit increases the sensitivity to the camptothecin that induces DNA double-strand break (DSB. This suggests that the β2 subunit has an active role in HR and DSB repair but does not alter the intracellular level of the Rad51p.

  11. Biosensors for Cell Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qing; Son, Kyungjin; Liu, Ying; Revzin, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Biosensors first appeared several decades ago to address the need for monitoring physiological parameters such as oxygen or glucose in biological fluids such as blood. More recently, a new wave of biosensors has emerged in order to provide more nuanced and granular information about the composition and function of living cells. Such biosensors exist at the confluence of technology and medicine and often strive to connect cell phenotype or function to physiological or pathophysiological processes. Our review aims to describe some of the key technological aspects of biosensors being developed for cell analysis. The technological aspects covered in our review include biorecognition elements used for biosensor construction, methods for integrating cells with biosensors, approaches to single-cell analysis, and the use of nanostructured biosensors for cell analysis. Our hope is that the spectrum of possibilities for cell analysis described in this review may pique the interest of biomedical scientists and engineers and may spur new collaborations in the area of using biosensors for cell analysis.

  12. Impedimetric Biosensors and Immunosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamas I. Prodromidis

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The development of methods targeting the direct monitoring of antibody-antigen interactions is particularly attractive. The design of label-free affinity-based probing concepts is the objective of much current research, at both academic and industrial levels, towards establishing alternative methods to the already existing ELISA-based immunoassays. Among these, Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS represents one of the most powerful methods, due to the ability of EIS-based sensors to be more easily integrated into multi-array or microprocessor- controlled diagnostic tools. During the last decade, EIS and the concept of biochemical capacitors have been widely used for probing various types of biomolecular interactions (immunosensors, DNA hybridization, protein-protein interactions. So far, impedimetric or capacitive immunosensors have been successfully applied at the academic level. However, no prototypes have been released into the market, since major fundamental issues still exist. Even though this fact has brought the reliability of impedimetric immunosensors into question, features associated with electrochemical approaches, namely the ability to be miniaturized, remote control of implanted sensors, low cost of electrode mass production, and cost effective instrumentation (without need of high-energy sources keep impedimetric sensors particularly attractive as compared to other approaches based on microbalances, surface plasmon resonance or ellipsometry. This lecture outlines the theoretical background of impedimetric immunosensors and presents different types of impedimetric biosensors as well as the instrumental approaches that have been so far proposed in the literature.

  13. Conformational biosensor for diagnosis of prion diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcherkasskaya, Olga; Davidson, Eugene A; Schmerr, Mary Jo; Orser, Cindy S

    2005-05-01

    A fluorescence technology to monitor the proliferation of amyloidogenic neurological disorders is proposed. A crude brain homogenate (0.01%) from animals infected with a transmissible spongiform encephalopathy is employed as a catalytic medium initiating conformational changes in 520 nM polypeptide biosensors (Tris/trifluoroethanol 50% mixture at pH 7). The fluorescence methods utilize pyrene residues covalently attached to the peptide ends. The coil-to-beta-strand transitions in biosensor molecules cause elevation of a distinct fluorescence band of the pyrene aggregates (i.e. excimers). This approach enables the detection of infectious prion proteins at fmol, does not require antibody binding or protease treatment. Technology might be adopted for diagnosing a large variety of conformational disorders as well as for generic high-throughput screening of the amyloidogenic potential in plasma.

  14. A Ligand Structure-Activity Study of DNA-Based Catalytic Asymmetric Hydration and Diels-Alder Reactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rosati, F.; Roelfes, J.G.

    A structure-activity relationship study of the first generation ligands for the DNA-based asymmetric hydration of enones and Diels-Alder reaction in water is reported. The design of the ligand was optimized resulting in a maximum ee of 83% in the hydration reaction and 75% in the Diels-Alder

  15. Introduction to biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Nikhil; Jolly, Pawan; Formisano, Nello

    2016-01-01

    Biosensors are nowadays ubiquitous in biomedical diagnosis as well as a wide range of other areas such as point-of-care monitoring of treatment and disease progression, environmental monitoring, food control, drug discovery, forensics and biomedical research. A wide range of techniques can be used for the development of biosensors. Their coupling with high-affinity biomolecules allows the sensitive and selective detection of a range of analytes. We give a general introduction to biosensors and biosensing technologies, including a brief historical overview, introducing key developments in the field and illustrating the breadth of biomolecular sensing strategies and the expansion of nanotechnological approaches that are now available. PMID:27365030

  16. Evolutionary connection between the catalytic subunits of DNA-dependent RNA polymerases and eukaryotic RNA-dependent RNA polymerases and the origin of RNA polymerases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aravind L

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The eukaryotic RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDRP is involved in the amplification of regulatory microRNAs during post-transcriptional gene silencing. This enzyme is highly conserved in most eukaryotes but is missing in archaea and bacteria. No evolutionary relationship between RDRP and other polymerases has been reported so far, hence the origin of this eukaryote-specific polymerase remains a mystery. Results Using extensive sequence profile searches, we identified bacteriophage homologs of the eukaryotic RDRP. The comparison of the eukaryotic RDRP and their homologs from bacteriophages led to the delineation of the conserved portion of these enzymes, which is predicted to harbor the catalytic site. Further, detailed sequence comparison, aided by examination of the crystal structure of the DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (DDRP, showed that the RDRP and the β' subunit of DDRP (and its orthologs in archaea and eukaryotes contain a conserved double-psi β-barrel (DPBB domain. This DPBB domain contains the signature motif DbDGD (b is a bulky residue, which is conserved in all RDRPs and DDRPs and contributes to catalysis via a coordinated divalent cation. Apart from the DPBB domain, no similarity was detected between RDRP and DDRP, which leaves open two scenarios for the origin of RDRP: i RDRP evolved at the onset of the evolution of eukaryotes via a duplication of the DDRP β' subunit followed by dramatic divergence that obliterated the sequence similarity outside the core catalytic domain and ii the primordial RDRP, which consisted primarily of the DPBB domain, evolved from a common ancestor with the DDRP at a very early stage of evolution, during the RNA world era. The latter hypothesis implies that RDRP had been subsequently eliminated from cellular life forms and might have been reintroduced into the eukaryotic genomes through a bacteriophage. Sequence and structure analysis of the DDRP led to further insights into the

  17. Development of an immunoFET biosensor for the detection of biotinylated PCR product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wannaporn Muangsuwan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available ImmunoFET (IMFET biosensor is a simple platform for the detection of biotinylated products of polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Construction of the IMFET biosensor started with adsorption of 1.5 mg/mL of protein A (PA onto the insulated gate surface of ISFET for 90 min. Next, the immobilized 1/500 dilution of anti-biotin antibody was adsorbed onto the PA layer for 60 min. The IMFET biosensor was subsequently ready for detection of the biotinylated amplicon. The IMFET biosensor showed highly specific binding to the biotinylated PCR product of the phaE gene of Haloquadratum walsbyi DSM 16854. The phaE gene is a biomarker of polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA producers that contain PHA synthase class III. The lowest amount of DNA template of H. walsbyi DSM 16854 that the IMFET biosensor could detect was 125 fg. The IMFET biosensor has a lower amount of detection compared with a DNA lateral flow biosensor from our previous study. The degree of linearity of the biosensor signal was influenced by the concentration of the biotinylated amplicon. The IMFET biosensor also has a short response time (approximately 30 times to detect the phaE amplicon compared to an agarose gel electrophoresis. The IMFET biosensor is a promising tool for the detection of the biotinylated PCR product, and it can be integrated into a micro total analysis system (μTAS.

  18. BIOSENSORS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL APPLICATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A review, with 19 references, is given on challenges and possible opportunities for the development of biosensors for environmental monitoring applications. The high cost and slow turnaround times typically associated with the measurement of regulated pollutants clearly indicates...

  19. Fast and quantitative differentiation of single-base mismatched DNA by initial reaction rate of catalytic hairpin assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenxi; Li, Yixin; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Xinyi; Chen, Yang; Yang, Xiaoda; Liu, Feng; Li, Na

    2014-10-15

    The widely used catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) amplification strategy generally needs several hours to accomplish one measurement based on the prevailingly used maximum intensity detection mode, making it less practical for assays where high throughput or speed is desired. To make the best use of the kinetic specificity of toehold domain for circuit reaction initiation, we developed a mathematical model and proposed an initial reaction rate detection mode to quantitatively differentiate the single-base mismatch. Using the kinetic mode, assay time can be reduced substantially to 10 min for one measurement with the comparable sensitivity and single-base mismatch differentiating ability as were obtained by the maximum intensity detection mode. This initial reaction rate based approach not only provided a fast and quantitative differentiation of single-base mismatch, but also helped in-depth understanding of the CHA system, which will be beneficial to the design of highly sensitive and specific toehold-mediated hybridization reactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Engineering the bioelectrochemical interface using functional nanomaterials and microchip technique toward sensitive and portable electrochemical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Xiaofang; Dong, Shaojun; Wang, Erkang

    2016-02-15

    Electrochemical biosensors have played active roles at the forefront of bioanalysis because they have the potential to achieve sensitive, specific and low-cost detection of biomolecules and many others. Engineering the electrochemical sensing interface with functional nanomaterials leads to novel electrochemical biosensors with improved performances in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, stability and simplicity. Functional nanomaterials possess good conductivity, catalytic activity, biocompatibility and high surface area. Coupled with bio-recognition elements, these features can amplify signal transduction and biorecognition events, resulting in highly sensitive biosensing. Additionally, microfluidic electrochemical biosensors have attracted considerable attention on account of their miniature, portable and low-cost systems as well as high fabrication throughput and ease of scaleup. For example, electrochemical enzymetic biosensors and aptamer biosensors (aptasensors) based on the integrated microchip can be used for portable point-of-care diagnostics and environmental monitoring. This review is a summary of our recent progress in the field of electrochemical biosensors, including aptasensors, cytosensors, enzymatic biosensors and self-powered biosensors based on biofuel cells. We presented the advantages that functional nanomaterials and microfluidic chip technology bring to the electrochemical biosensors, together with future prospects and possible challenges. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular Approaches to Optical Biosensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fierke, Carol

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this proposal was to develop methodologies for the optimization of field-deployable optical biosensors, in general, and, in particular, to optimize a carbonic anhydrase-based fiber optic zinc biosensor...

  2. Construction and characterization of novel stress-responsive Deinococcal biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe, Min Ho; Lim, Sang Youg

    2012-01-15

    In this research, we constructed a recombinant whole-cell biosensor to detect mutagens (H2O2, mitomycin C, MNNG, bleomycin) using Deinococcus radiodurans and evaluated its possibility for actual application. We performed DNA microarray analysis and selected 10 candidate genes for biosensor recombinant plasmid construction. The expression of ddrA, ddrB, DR{sub 0}161, DR{sub 0}589, and pprA was highly increased after treatment of the target mutagens. Putative promoter region of the genes were used for LacZ-based biosensor plasmid construction by replacing groESL promoter of pRADZ3. Pormoter activity and specificity of the five recombinant LacZ-based biosensor strains harboring the recombinant plasmids was measured. The result indicated that the promoter region of ddrA is the most suitable promoter for the biosensor development. Red pigment-based biosensor plasmid was constructed by displacing lacZ with crtI. The sensor strain was constructed by transforming the sensor plasmid into crtI deleted mutant D. radiodurans strain. Finally, macroscopic detection of the target mutagens by the biosensor strain was evaluated. The strength of red pigment biosynthesis by this recombinant strain in response to the target mutagens was weaker than our expectation. Continuous damage to the sensor strain by the mutagens in the medium might be the main reason for this low red-pigment biosynthesis. Therefore, we propose that the LacZ-based biosensor is more effective than the biosensor using red pigment as indicator for the mutagen detection.

  3. EARLY IN SHORT DAYS 7 (ESD7) encodes the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase epsilon and is required for flowering repression through a mechanism involving epigenetic gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Olmo, Iván; López-González, Leticia; Martín-Trillo, Maria M; Martínez-Zapater, José M; Piñeiro, Manuel; Jarillo, Jose A

    2010-02-01

    We have characterized a mutation affecting the Arabidopsis EARLY IN SHORT DAYS 7 (ESD7) gene encoding the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase epsilon (epsilon), AtPOL2a. The esd7-1 mutation causes early flowering independently of photoperiod, shortened inflorescence internodes and altered leaf and root development. esd7-1 is a hypomorphic allele whereas knockout alleles displayed an embryo-lethal phenotype. The esd7 early flowering phenotype requires functional FT and SOC1 proteins and might also be related to the misregulation of AG and AG-like gene expression found in esd7. Genes involved in the modulation of chromatin structural dynamics, such as LHP1/TFL2 and EBS, which negatively regulate FT expression, were found to interact genetically with ESD7. In fact a molecular interaction between the carboxy terminus of ESD7 and TFL2 was demonstrated in vitro. Besides, fas2 mutations suppressed the esd7 early flowering phenotype and ICU2 was found to interact with ESD7. Discrete regions of the chromatin of FT and AG loci were enriched in activating epigenetic marks in the esd7-1 mutant. We concluded that ESD7 might be participating in processes involved in chromatin-mediated cellular memory.

  4. Target-triggered catalytic hairpin assembly and TdT-catalyzed DNA polymerization for amplified electronic detection of thrombin in human serums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Kai; Dou, Baoting; Yang, Jianmei; Yuan, Ruo; Xiang, Yun

    2017-01-15

    Specific and sensitive detection of protein biomarkers is of great importance in biomedical and bioanalytical applications. In this work, a dual amplified signal enhancement approach based on the integration of catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated in situ DNA polymerization has been developed for highly sensitive and label-free electrochemical detection of thrombin in human serums. The presence of the target thrombin leads to the unfolding and capture of a significant number of hairpin signal probes with free 3'-OH termini on the sensor electrode. Subsequently, TdT can catalyze the elongation of the signal probes and formation of many G-quadruplex sequence replicates with the presence of dGTP and dATP at a molar ratio of 6:4. These G-quadruplex sequences bind hemin and generate drastically amplified current response for sensitive detection of thrombin in a completely label-free fashion. The sensor shows a linear range of 0.5pM-10.0nM and a detection limit of 0.12pM for thrombin. Moreover, the developed sensor can selectively discriminate the target thrombin against other non-target proteins and can be employed to monitor thrombin in human serum samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Photoelectrochemical enzymatic biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei-Wei; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2017-06-15

    Enzymatic biosensors have been valuable bioanalytical devices for analysis of diverse targets in disease diagnosis, biological and biomedical research, etc. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) bioanalysis is a recently emerged method that promptly becoming a subject of new research interests due to its attractive potential for future bioanalysis with high sensitivity and specificity. PEC enzymatic biosensors integrate the inherent sensitivities of PEC bioanalysis and the selectivity of enzymes and thus share their both advantages. Currently, PEC enzymatic biosensors have become a hot topic of significant research and the recent impetus has grown rapidly as demonstrated by increased research papers. Given the pace of advances in this area, this review will make a thorough discussion and survey on the fundamentals, sensing strategies, applications and the state of the art in PEC enzymatic biosensors, followed by future prospects based on our own opinions. We hope this work could provide an accessible introduction to PEC enzymatic biosensors for any scientist. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Development of mercury (II) ion biosensors based on mercury-specific oligonucleotide probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lanying; Wen, Yanli; Xu, Li; Xu, Qin; Song, Shiping; Zuo, Xiaolei; Yan, Juan; Zhang, Weijia; Liu, Gang

    2016-01-15

    Mercury (II) ion (Hg(2+)) contamination can be accumulated along the food chain and cause serious threat to the public health. Plenty of research effort thus has been devoted to the development of fast, sensitive and selective biosensors for monitoring Hg(2+). Thymine was demonstrated to specifically combine with Hg(2+) and form a thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine (T-Hg(2+)-T) structure, with binding constant even higher than T-A Watson-Crick pair in DNA duplex. Recently, various novel Hg(2+) biosensors have been developed based on T-rich Mercury-Specific Oligonucleotide (MSO) probes, and exhibited advanced selectivity and excellent sensitivity for Hg(2+) detection. In this review, we explained recent development of MSO-based Hg(2+) biosensors mainly in 3 groups: fluorescent biosensors, colorimetric biosensors and electrochemical biosensors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Enzyme-free fluorescent biosensor for the detection of DNA based on core-shell Fe3O4 polydopamine nanoparticles and hybridization chain reaction amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na; Hao, Xia; Kang, Bei Hua; Xu, Zhen; Shi, Yan; Li, Nian Bing; Luo, Hong Qun

    2016-03-15

    A novel, highly sensitive assay for quantitative determination of DNA is developed based on hybridization chain reaction (HCR) amplification and the separation via core-shell Fe3O4 polydopamine nanoparticles (Fe3O4@PDA NPs). In this assay, two hairpin probes are designed, one of which is labeled with a 6-carboxyfluorescein (FAM). Without target DNA, auxiliary hairpin probes are stable in solution. However, when target DNA is present, the HCR between the two hairpins is triggered. The HCR products have sticky ends of 24 nt, which are much longer than the length of sticky ends of auxiliary hairpins (6 nt) and make the adsorption much easier by Fe3O4@PDA NPs. With the addition of Fe3O4@PDA NPs, HCR products could be adsorbed because of the strong interaction between their sticky ends and Fe3O4@PDA NPs. As a result, supernatant of the solution with target DNA emits weak fluorescence after separation by magnet, which is much lower than that of the blank solution. The detection limit of the proposed method is as low as 0.05 nM. And the sensing method exhibits high selectivity for the determination between perfectly complementary sequence and target with single base-pair mismatch. Importantly, the application of the sensor for DNA detection in human serum shows that the proposed method works well for biological samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. A photoelectrochemical biosensor for o-aminophenol based on assembling of CdSe and DNA on TiO2 film electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Kai; Wang, Rui; Zhang, Jingdong

    2014-03-15

    A novel photoelectrochemical (PEC) biosensing platform was constructed by assembling CdSe quantum dots (QDs) and DNA on liquid phase deposited TiO2 (DNA-CdSe/TiO2) film electrode. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis indicated that CdSe QDs were homogeneously assembled on TiO2 film. The UV-visible diffuse reflectance spectra (DRS) showed that CdSe and DNA could effectively enhance the absorption of TiO2 film to visible light. The obtained electrode showed a sensitive PEC response to o-aminophenol (OAP) under visible light irradiation. Due to the interaction between DNA and OAP, the response of OAP was improved by DNA immobilized on the sensing film. Under optimized conditions, the photocurrent was linearly proportional to OAP in the concentration range from 4.0 × 10(-7) to 2.7 × 10(-5) mol L(-1), with a detection limit (3S/N) of 8.0 × 10(-8) mol L(-1). The novel strategy could provide a fast and sensitive method for OAP determination. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Ultrasensitive colorimetric detection of circulating tumor DNA using hybridization chain reaction and the pivot of triplex DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruimin; Zou, Li; Luo, Yanwei; Zhang, Manjun; Ling, Liansheng

    2017-03-01

    This work presents an amplified colorimetric biosensor for circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA), which associates the hybridization chain reaction (HCR) amplification with G-Quadruplex DNAzymes activity through triplex DNA formation. In the presence of ctDNA, HCR occurs. The resulting HCR products are specially recognized by one sequence to include one GGG repeat and the other containing three GGG repeats, through the synergetic effect of triplex DNA and asymmetrically split G-Quadruplex forming. Such design takes advantage of the amplification property of HCR and the high peroxidase-like catalytic activity of asymmetrically split G-Quadruplex DNAzymes by means of triplex DNA formation, which produces color signals in the presence of ctDNA. Nevertheless, in the absence of ctDNA, no HCR happens. Thus, no triplex DNA and G-Quadruplex structure is formed, producing a negligible background. The colorimetric sensing platform is successfully applied in complex biological environments such as human blood plasma for ctDNA detection, with a detection limit corresponding to 0.1 pM. This study unambiguously uses triplex DNA forming as the pivot to integrate nucleic acid amplification and DNAzymes for producing a highly sensitive signal with low background.

  10. Introduction to biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Nikhil; Jolly, Pawan; Formisano, Nello; Estrela, Pedro

    2016-06-30

    Biosensors are nowadays ubiquitous in biomedical diagnosis as well as a wide range of other areas such as point-of-care monitoring of treatment and disease progression, environmental monitoring, food control, drug discovery, forensics and biomedical research. A wide range of techniques can be used for the development of biosensors. Their coupling with high-affinity biomolecules allows the sensitive and selective detection of a range of analytes. We give a general introduction to biosensors and biosensing technologies, including a brief historical overview, introducing key developments in the field and illustrating the breadth of biomolecular sensing strategies and the expansion of nanotechnological approaches that are now available. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  11. Biosensors in forensic sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederickx, C.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A biosensor is a device that uses biological materials to detect and monitor the presence of specific chemicals in an area. Traditional methods of volatile detection used by law enforcement agencies and rescue teams typically consist of reliance on canine olfaction. This concept of using dogs to detect specific substances is quite old. However, dogs have some limitations such as cost of training and time of conditioning. Thus, the possibility of using other organisms as biosensors including rats, dolphins, honeybees, and parasitic wasps for detecting explosives, narcotics and cadavers has been developed. Insects have several advantages unshared by mammals. Insects are sensitive, cheap to produce and can be conditioned with impressive speed for a specific chemical-detection task. Moreover, insects might be a preferred sensing method in scenarios that are deemed too dangerous to use mammals. The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the biosensors used in forensic sciences.

  12. Future of biosensors: a personal view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheller, Frieder W; Yarman, Aysu; Bachmann, Till; Hirsch, Thomas; Kubick, Stefan; Renneberg, Reinhard; Schumacher, Soeren; Wollenberger, Ulla; Teller, Carsten; Bier, Frank F

    2014-01-01

    Biosensors representing the technological counterpart of living senses have found routine application in amperometric enzyme electrodes for decentralized blood glucose measurement, interaction analysis by surface plasmon resonance in drug development, and to some extent DNA chips for expression analysis and enzyme polymorphisms. These technologies have already reached a highly advanced level and need minor improvement at most. The dream of the "100-dollar" personal genome may come true in the next few years provided that the technological hurdles of nanopore technology or of polymerase-based single molecule sequencing can be overcome. Tailor-made recognition elements for biosensors including membrane-bound enzymes and receptors will be prepared by cell-free protein synthesis. As alternatives for biological recognition elements, molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) have been created. They have the potential to substitute antibodies in biosensors and biochips for the measurement of low-molecular-weight substances, proteins, viruses, and living cells. They are more stable than proteins and can be produced in large amounts by chemical synthesis. Integration of nanomaterials, especially of graphene, could lead to new miniaturized biosensors with high sensitivity and ultrafast response. In the future individual therapy will include genetic profiling of isoenzymes and polymorphic forms of drug-metabolizing enzymes especially of the cytochrome P450 family. For defining the pharmacokinetics including the clearance of a given genotype enzyme electrodes will be a useful tool. For decentralized online patient control or the integration into everyday "consumables" such as drinking water, foods, hygienic articles, clothing, or for control of air conditioners in buildings and cars and swimming pools, a new generation of "autonomous" biosensors will emerge.

  13. Electrochemical biosensors for hormone analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadır, Elif Burcu; Sezgintürk, Mustafa Kemal

    2015-06-15

    Electrochemical biosensors have a unique place in determination of hormones due to simplicity, sensitivity, portability and ease of operation. Unlike chromatographic techniques, electrochemical techniques used do not require pre-treatment. Electrochemical biosensors are based on amperometric, potentiometric, impedimetric, and conductometric principle. Amperometric technique is a commonly used one. Although electrochemical biosensors offer a great selectivity and sensitivity for early clinical analysis, the poor reproducible results, difficult regeneration steps remain primary challenges to the commercialization of these biosensors. This review summarizes electrochemical (amperometric, potentiometric, impedimetric and conductometric) biosensors for hormone detection for the first time in the literature. After a brief description of the hormones, the immobilization steps and analytical performance of these biosensors are summarized. Linear ranges, LODs, reproducibilities, regenerations of developed biosensors are compared. Future outlooks in this area are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Surface stress-based biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Shengbo; Zhao, Yuan; Zhang, Wendong; Li, Pengwei; Hu, Jie; Li, Gang

    2014-01-15

    Surface stress-based biosensors, as one kind of label-free biosensors, have attracted lots of attention in the process of information gathering and measurement for the biological, chemical and medical application with the development of technology and society. This kind of biosensors offers many advantages such as short response time (less than milliseconds) and a typical sensitivity at nanogram, picoliter, femtojoule and attomolar level. Furthermore, it simplifies sample preparation and testing procedures. In this work, progress made towards the use of surface stress-based biosensors for achieving better performance is critically reviewed, including our recent achievement, the optimally circular membrane-based biosensors and biosensor array. The further scientific and technological challenges in this field are also summarized. Critical remark and future steps towards the ultimate surface stress-based biosensors are addressed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Selective Amplification of SPR Biosensor Signal for Recognition of rpoB Gene Fragments by Use of Gold Nanoparticles Modified by Thiolated DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsishin, M.; Rachkov, A.; Lopatynskyi, A.; Chegel, V.; Soldatkin, A.; El'skaya, A.

    2017-04-01

    An experimental approach for improving the sensitivity of the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) DNA hybridization sensor using gold nanoparticles (GNPs), modified by specific oligonucleotides, was elaborated. An influence of the ionic strength on the aggregation stability of unmodified GNPs and GNPs modified by the thiolated oligonucleotides was investigated by monitoring a value of light extinction at 520 nm that can be considered as a measure of a quantity of the non-aggregated GNPs. While the unmodified GNPs started to aggregate in 0.2 × saline-sodium citrate (SSC), GNPs modified by the negatively charged oligonucleotides were more stable at increasing ionic strength up to 0.5 × SSC. A bioselective element of the SPR DNA hybridization sensor was formed by immobilization on the gold sensor surface of the thiolated oligonucleotides P2, the sequence of which is a fragment of the rpoB gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The injections into the measuring flow cell of the SPR spectrometer of various concentrations of GNPs modified by the complementary oligonucleotides T2-18m caused the pronounced concentration-dependent sequence-specific sensor responses. The magnitude of the sensor responses was much higher than in the case of the free standing complementary oligonucleotides. According to the obtained experimental data, the usage of GNPs modified by specific oligonucleotides can amplify the sensor response of the SPR DNA hybridization sensor in 1200 times.

  16. Implantable enzyme amperometric biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotanen, Christian N; Moussy, Francis Gabriel; Carrara, Sandro; Guiseppi-Elie, Anthony

    2012-05-15

    The implantable enzyme amperometric biosensor continues as the dominant in vivo format for the detection, monitoring and reporting of biochemical analytes related to a wide range of pathologies. Widely used in animal studies, there is increasing emphasis on their use in diabetes care and management, the management of trauma-associated hemorrhage and in critical care monitoring by intensivists in the ICU. These frontier opportunities demand continuous indwelling performance for up to several years, well in excess of the currently approved seven days. This review outlines the many challenges to successful deployment of chronically implantable amperometric enzyme biosensors and emphasizes the emerging technological approaches in their continued development. The foreign body response plays a prominent role in implantable biotransducer failure. Topics considering the approaches to mitigate the inflammatory response, use of biomimetic chemistries, nanostructured topographies, drug eluting constructs, and tissue-to-device interface modulus matching are reviewed. Similarly, factors that influence biotransducer performance such as enzyme stability, substrate interference, mediator selection and calibration are reviewed. For the biosensor system, the opportunities and challenges of integration, guided by footprint requirements, the limitations of mixed signal electronics, and power requirements, has produced three systems approaches. The potential is great. However, integration along the multiple length scales needed to address fundamental issues and integration across the diverse disciplines needed to achieve success of these highly integrated systems, continues to be a challenge in the development and deployment of implantable amperometric enzyme biosensor systems. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liber, B.

    1991-08-22

    A catalytic converter is provided which is economical to manufacture and is not readily poisoned by contaminants in a gas stream such as would be encountered in the operation of an internal combustion engine, whereby an improved life expectancy of the unit can be achieved. The converter of the invention comprises a sintered porous body including molybdenum or a molybdenum-containing compound or a molybdenum complex. A method of forming a catlytic converter unit comprises forming a slurry including molybdenum or a molybdenum compound, forming the slurry into a sintered body member, and hardening or curing the same to form a self-sustaining body member. A method for treating an exhaust gas using the above catalytic converter is also disclosed. A preferred embodiment for an internal combustion engine is described. Examples of different catalytic compositions are included. 13 figs.

  18. Catalytic promiscuity in biomimetic systems: catecholase-like activity, phosphatase-like activity, and hydrolytic DNA cleavage promoted by a new dicopper(II) hydroxo-bridged complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Nicolás A; Neves, Ademir; Bortoluzzi, Adailton J; Pich, Claus T; Terenzi, Hernán

    2007-01-22

    Presented in this Communication are the structure, physicochemical properties, and catalytic promiscuity of a new dinuclear CuII(mu-OH)CuII complex containing a novel N,O-donor symmetric dinucleating ligand.

  19. Biosensor for organoarsenical herbicides and growth promoters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Sun, Samio; Li, Chen-Zhong; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Rosen, Barry P

    2014-01-21

    The toxic metalloid arsenic is widely distributed in food, water, and soil. While inorganic arsenic enters the environment primarily from geochemical sources, methylarsenicals either result from microbial biotransformation of inorganic arsenic or are introduced anthropogenically. Methylarsenicals such as monosodium methylarsonic acid (MSMA) have been extensively utilized as herbicides, and aromatic arsenicals such as roxarsone (Rox) are used as growth promoters for poultry and swine. Organoarsenicals are degraded to inorganic arsenic. The toxicological effects of arsenicals depend on their oxidation state, chemical composition, and bioavailability. Here we report that the active forms are the trivalent arsenic-containing species. We constructed a whole-cell biosensor utilizing a modified ArsR repressor that is highly selective toward trivalent methyl and aromatic arsenicals, with essentially no response to inorganic arsenic. The biosensor was adapted for in vitro detection of organoarsenicals using fluorescence anisotropy of ArsR-DNA interactions. It detects bacterial biomethylation of inorganic arsenite both in vivo and in vitro with detection limits of 10(-7) M and linearity to 10(-6) M for phenylarsenite and 5 × 10(-6) M for methylarsenite. The biosensor detects reduced forms of MSMA and roxarsone and offers a practical, low cost method for detecting activate forms and breakdown products of organoarsenical herbicides and growth promoters.

  20. A glucose biosensor based on Prussian blue/chitosan hybrid film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xueying; Gu, Haifang; Yin, Fan; Tu, Yifeng

    2009-01-01

    Based on electrodeposition of Prussian blue (PB) and chitosan (CS) directly on gold electrode, a hybrid film of PB/CS has been prepared. PB in this film shows a good stability compared with pure PB film when it worked in neutral and weak alkalescent solution and can act as redox mediator. It provides the potential application of such film in biosensor fabrication. A glucose biosensor was fabricated by electrodepositing glucose oxidase (GOD)/CS film on this PB/CS modified electrode. The optimum experimental conditions of biosensor for the detection of glucose have been studied in detail. Under the optimal conditions, a linear dependence of the catalytic current upon glucose concentration was obtained in the range of 2x10(-6) to 4x10(-4)M with a detection limit of 3.97x10(-7)M. The resulting biosensor could be applied to detect the blood sugar in real samples without any pretreatment.

  1. A FRET biosensor reveals spatiotemporal activation and functions of aurora kinase A in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolin, Giulia; Sizaire, Florian; Herbomel, Gaëtan; Reboutier, David; Prigent, Claude; Tramier, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of AURKA is a major hallmark of epithelial cancers. It encodes the multifunctional serine/threonine kinase aurora A, which is activated at metaphase and is required for cell cycle progression; assessing its activation in living cells is mandatory for next-generation drug design. We describe here a Förster's resonance energy transfer (FRET) biosensor detecting the conformational changes of aurora kinase A induced by its autophosphorylation on Thr288. The biosensor functionally replaces the endogenous kinase in cells and allows the activation of the kinase to be followed throughout the cell cycle. Inhibiting the catalytic activity of the kinase prevents the conformational changes of the biosensor. Using this approach, we discover that aurora kinase A activates during G1 to regulate the stability of microtubules in cooperation with TPX2 and CEP192. These results demonstrate that the aurora kinase A biosensor is a powerful tool to identify new regulatory pathways controlling aurora kinase A activation. PMID:27624869

  2. New Trends in the Design of Enzyme-based Biosensors for Medical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchetti, Ilaria

    2016-01-01

    A biosensor is a self-contained integrated device, which is capable of providing specific quantitative or semiquantitative analytical information using a biological (or biomimetic) recognition element, which is retained in direct spatial contact with an electrochemical transduction element. One of the main features of biosensors is the remarkable selectivity that their biological components confer on them. Enzymes are the most common and well-developed recognition system of the family known as catalytic biosensors. This mini-review is focused on enzyme-based biosensors for medical applications. In particular, the new trends for the technology are described. A special emphasis is devoted to the non-invasive and painless monitoring of body metabolites, such as glucose.

  3. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  4. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May

    2015-10-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  5. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen-Mihaela eTilmaciu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  6. Functionalized nanopipettes: toward label-free, single cell biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Actis, Paolo; Mak, Andy C; Pourmand, Nader

    2010-08-01

    Nanopipette technology has been proven to be a label-free biosensor capable of identifying DNA and proteins. The nanopipette can include specific recognition elements for analyte discrimination based on size, shape, and charge density. The fully electrical read-out and the ease and low-cost fabrication are unique features that give this technology an enormous potential. Unlike other biosensing platforms, nanopipettes can be precisely manipulated with submicron accuracy and used to study single cell dynamics. This review is focused on creative applications of nanopipette technology for biosensing. We highlight the potential of this technology with a particular attention to integration of this biosensor with single cell manipulation platforms.

  7. Nanoplasmonic biosensors: current perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherji, Soumyo; Shukla,Gauri

    2015-01-01

    Gauri M Shukla, Soumyo MukherjiDepartment of Bioscience and Bioengineering, IIT Bombay, Mumbai, Maharashtra, IndiaAbstract: Recent advances in nanotechnology and nanofabrication have helped develop a wide variety of nanostructured platforms for use as nanoplasmonic biosensors. These can either be in solution phase or be confined on a substrate in the form of metallic nanofilms or periodic arrays. Plasmonic properties of these nanostructures depend on the size, shape, position, orientation, et...

  8. Towards optoelectronic urea biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Pokrzywnicka, Marta; Koncki, Robert; Tymecki, ?ukasz

    2015-01-01

    Integration of immobilized enzymes with light-emitting diodes (LEDs) leads to the development of optoelectronic enzyme-based biosensors. In this work, urease, used as a model enzyme, immobilized in the form of?an open-tubular microbioreactor or biosensing membrane that has been integrated with two red LEDs. It forms complete, fiberless, miniaturized, and extremely economic biooptoelectronic devices useful for nonstationary measurements under flow analysis conditions. Both enzyme-based biodevi...

  9. BioSentinel: Mission Development of a Radiation Biosensor to Gauge DNA Damage and Repair Beyond Low Earth Orbit on a 6U Nanosatellite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Brian; Hanel, Robert; Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Ricco, Antonion J.; Agasid, Elwood; Reiss-Bubenheim, Debra; Straume, Tore; Parra, Macerena; Boone, Travis; Santa Maria, Sergio; hide

    2015-01-01

    We are designing and developing a "6U" (10 x 22 x 34 cm; 14 kg) nanosatellite as a secondary payload to fly aboard NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) Exploration Mission (EM) 1, scheduled for launch in late 2017. For the first time in over forty years, direct experimental data from biological studies beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) will be obtained during BioSentinel's 12- to 18- month mission. BioSentinel will measure the damage and repair of DNA in a biological organism and allow us to compare that to information from onboard physical radiation sensors. In order to understand the relative contributions of the space environment's two dominant biological perturbations, reduced gravity and ionizing radiation, results from deep space will be directly compared to data obtained in LEO (on ISS) and on Earth. These data points will be available for validation of existing biological radiation damage and repair models, and for extrapolation to humans, to assist in mitigating risks during future long-term exploration missions beyond LEO. The BioSentinel Payload occupies 4U of the spacecraft and will utilize the monocellular eukaryotic organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast) to report DNA double-strand-break (DSB) events that result from ambient space radiation. DSB repair exhibits striking conservation of repair proteins from yeast to humans. Yeast was selected because of 1) its similarity to cells in higher organisms, 2) the well-established history of strains engineered to measure DSB repair, 3) its spaceflight heritage, and 4) the wealth of available ground and flight reference data. The S. cerevisiae flight strain will include engineered genetic defects to prevent growth and division until a radiation-induced DSB activates the yeast's DNA repair mechanisms. The triggered culture growth and metabolic activity directly indicate a DSB and its successful repair. The yeast will be carried in the dry state within the 1-atm P/L container in 18 separate fluidics cards with each

  10. Silencing expression of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase by small interfering RNA sensitizes human cells for radiation-induced chromosome damage, cell killing, and mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yuanlin; Zhang, Qinming; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Liber, Howard L.; Bedford, Joel S.

    2002-01-01

    Targeted gene silencing in mammalian cells by RNA interference (RNAi) using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) was recently described by Elbashir et al. (S. M. Elbashir et al., Nature (Lond.), 411: 494-498, 2001). We have used this methodology in several human cell strains to reduce expression of the Prkdc (DNA-PKcs) gene coding for the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) that is involved in the nonhomologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks. We have also demonstrated a radiosensitization for several phenotypic endpoints of radiation damage. In low-passage normal human fibroblasts, siRNA knock-down of DNA-PKcs resulted in a reduced capacity for restitution of radiation-induced interphase chromosome breaks as measured by premature chromosome condensation, an increased yield of acentric chromosome fragments at the first postirradiation mitosis, and an increased radiosensitivity for cell killing. For three strains of related human lymphoblasts, DNA-PKcs-targeted siRNA transfection resulted in little or no increase in radiosensitivity with respect to cell killing, a 1.5-fold decrease in induced mutant yield in TK6- and p53-null NH32 cells, but about a 2-fold increase in induced mutant yield in p53-mutant WTK1 cells at both the hypoxanthine quanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) and the thymidine kinase loci.

  11. Platforms Formed from a Three-Dimensional Cu-Based Zwitterionic Metal-Organic Framework and Probe ss-DNA: Selective Fluorescent Biosensors for Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 ds-DNA and Sudan Virus RNA Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shui-Ping; Chen, Shao-Rui; Liu, Shu-Wen; Tang, Xiao-Yan; Qin, Liang; Qiu, Gui-Hua; Chen, Jin-Xiang; Chen, Wen-Hua

    2015-12-15

    We herein report a water-stable three-dimensional Cu-based metal-organic framework (MOF) 1 supported by a tritopic quaternized carboxylate and 4,4'-dipyridyl sulfide as an ancillary ligand. This MOF exhibits unique pore shapes with aromatic rings, positively charged pyridinium and unsaturated Cu(II) cation centers, free carboxylates, tessellating H2O, and coordinating SO4(2-) on the pore surface. Compound 1 can interact with two carboxyfluorescein (FAM)-labeled single-stranded DNA sequences (probe ss-DNA, delineated as P-DNA) through electrostatic, π-stacking, and/or hydrogen-bonding interactions to form two P-DNA@1 systems, and thus quench the fluorescence of FAM via a photoinduced electron-transfer process. These P-DNA@1 systems can be used as effective fluorescent sensors for human immunodeficiency virus 1 double-stranded DNA and Sudan virus RNA sequences, respectively, with detection limits of 196 and 73 pM, respectively.

  12. Biosensors, antibiotics and food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virolainen, Nina; Karp, Matti

    2014-01-01

    Antibiotics are medicine's leading asset for fighting microbial infection, which is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. However, the misuse of antibiotics has led to the rapid spread of antibiotic resistance among bacteria and the development of multiple resistant pathogens. Therefore, antibiotics are rapidly losing their antimicrobial value. The use of antibiotics in food production animals is strictly controlled by the European Union (EU). Veterinary use is regulated to prevent the spread of resistance. EU legislation establishes maximum residue limits for veterinary medicinal products in foodstuffs of animal origin and enforces the establishment and execution of national monitoring plans. Among samples selected for monitoring, suspected noncompliant samples are screened and then subjected to confirmatory analysis to establish the identity and concentration of the contaminant. Screening methods for antibiotic residues are typically based on microbiological growth inhibition, whereas physico-chemical methods are used for confirmatory analysis. This chapter discusses biosensors, especially whole-cell based biosensors, as emerging screening methods for antibiotic residues. Whole-cell biosensors can offer highly sensitive and specific detection of residues. Applications demonstrating quantitative analysis and specific analyte identification further improve their potential as screening methods.

  13. Recent advances in electrochemical biosensors based on graphene two-dimensional nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Luo, Yanan; Zhu, Chengzhou; Li, He; Du, Dan; Lin, Yuehe

    2016-02-15

    Graphene as a star among two-dimensional nanomaterials has attracted tremendous research interest in the field of electrochemistry due to their intrinsic properties, including the electronic, optical, and mechanical properties associated with their planar structure. The marriage of graphene and electrochemical biosensors has created many ingenious biosensing strategies for applications in the areas of clinical diagnosis and food safety. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the recent advances in the development of graphene based electrochemical biosensors. Special attention is paid to graphene-based enzyme biosensors, immunosensors, and DNA biosensors. Future perspectives on high-performance graphene-based electrochemical biosensors are also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Catalytic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ming; Zhang, Xiang

    2018-01-23

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to catalytic devices. In one aspect, a device includes a substrate, an electrically insulating layer disposed on the substrate, a layer of material disposed on the electrically insulating layer, and a catalyst disposed on the layer of material. The substrate comprises an electrically conductive material. The substrate and the layer of material are electrically coupled to one another and configured to have a voltage applied across them.

  15. Protein Detection with Aptamer Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Stoltenburg

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Aptamers have been developed for different applications. Their use as new biological recognition elements in biosensors promises progress for fast and easy detection of proteins. This new generation of biosensor (aptasensors will be more stable and well adapted to the conditions of real samples because of the specific properties of aptamers.

  16. Affinity biosensors: techniques and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rogers, Kim R; Mulchandani, Ashok

    1998-01-01

    ..., and government to begin or expand their biosensors research. This volume, Methods in Biotechnology vol. 7: Affinity Biosensors: Techniques and Protocols, describes a variety of classical and emerging transduction technologies that have been interfaced to bioaffinity elements (e.g., antibodies and receptors). Some of the reas...

  17. Design and Development of Biosensors for the Detection of Heavy Metal Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziella L. Turdean

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many compounds (including heavy metals, HMs used in different fields of industry and/or agriculture act as inhibitors of enzymes, which, as consequence, are unable to bind the substrate. Even if it is not so sensitive, the method for detecting heavy metal traces using biosensors has a dynamic trend and is largely applied for improving the “life quality”, because of biosensor's sensitivity, selectivity, and simplicity. In the last years, they also become more and more a synergetic combination between biotechnology and microelectronics. Dedicated biosensors were developed for offline and online analysis, and also, their extent and diversity could be called a real “biosensor revolution”. A panel of examples of biosensors: enzyme-, DNA-, imuno-, whole-cell-based biosensors were systematised depending on the reaction type, transduction signal, or analytical performances. The mechanism of enzyme-based biosensor and the kinetic of detection process are described and compared. In this context, is explainable why bioelectronics, nanotechnology, miniaturization, and bioengineering will compete for developing sensitive and selective biosensors able to determine multiple analytes simultaneously and/or integrated in wireless communications systems.

  18. A portable microfluidic Aptamer-Tethered Enzyme Capture (APTEC) biosensor for malaria diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Lewis A; Kinghorn, Andrew B; Dirkzwager, Roderick M; Liang, Shaolin; Cheung, Yee-Wai; Lim, Bryce; Shiu, Simon Chi-Chin; Tang, Marco S L; Andrew, Dean; Manitta, Joseph; Richards, Jack S; Tanner, Julian A

    2018-02-15

    There is a critical need for better biosensors for the detection and diagnosis of malaria. We previously developed a DNA aptamer that recognises the Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase (PfLDH) enzyme with high sensitivity and specificity. The aptamer was integrated into an Aptamer-Tethered Enzyme Capture (APTEC) assay as a laboratory-based diagnostic approach. However, a portable equipment-free point-of-care aptamer-mediated biosensor could have a significant impact on malaria diagnosis in endemic regions. Here, we present a new concept for a malaria biosensor whereby aptamers are coated onto magnetic microbeads for magnet-guided capture, wash and detection of the biomarker. A biosensor incorporating three separate microfluidic chambers was designed to enable such magnet-guided equipment-free colorimetric detection of PfLDH. A series of microfluidic biosensor prototypes were optimised to lower rates of inter-chamber diffusion, increase sensitivity, and provide a method for point-of-care sample testing. The biosensor showed high sensitivity and specificity when detecting PfLDH using both in vitro cultured parasite samples and using clinical samples from malaria patients. The high performance of the biosensor provides a proof-of-principle for a portable biosensor that could be adaptable for a variety of aptamer-mediated diagnostic scenarios. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Engineering Modular Biosensors to Confer Metabolite-Responsive Regulation of Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, Andrew K D; Dalvie, Neil C; Rottinghaus, Austin G; Leonard, Joshua N

    2017-02-17

    Efforts to engineer microbial factories have benefitted from mining biological diversity and high throughput synthesis of novel enzymatic pathways, yet screening and optimizing metabolic pathways remain rate-limiting steps. Metabolite-responsive biosensors may help to address these persistent challenges by enabling the monitoring of metabolite levels in individual cells and metabolite-responsive feedback control. We are currently limited to naturally evolved biosensors, which are insufficient for monitoring many metabolites of interest. Thus, a method for engineering novel biosensors would be powerful, yet we lack a generalizable approach that enables the construction of a wide range of biosensors. As a step toward this goal, we here explore several strategies for converting a metabolite-binding protein into a metabolite-responsive transcriptional regulator. By pairing a modular protein design approach with a library of synthetic promoters and applying robust statistical analyses, we identified strategies for engineering biosensor-regulated bacterial promoters and for achieving design-driven improvements of biosensor performance. We demonstrated the feasibility of this strategy by fusing a programmable DNA binding motif (zinc finger module) with a model ligand binding protein (maltose binding protein), to generate a novel biosensor conferring maltose-regulated gene expression. This systematic investigation provides insights that may guide the development of additional novel biosensors for diverse synthetic biology applications.

  20. Nanomaterials-based enzyme electrochemical biosensors operating through inhibition for biosensing applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbanoglu, Sevinc; Ozkan, Sibel A; Merkoçi, Arben

    2017-03-15

    In recent years great progress has been made in applying nanomaterials to design novel biosensors. Use of nanomaterials offers to biosensing platforms exceptional optical, electronic and magnetic properties. Nanomaterials can increase the surface of the transducing area of the sensors that in turn bring an increase in catalytic behaviors. They have large surface-to-volume ratio, controlled morphology and structure that also favor miniaturization, an interesting advantage when the sample volume is a critical issue. Biosensors have great potential for achieving detect-to-protect devices: devices that can be used in detections of pollutants and other treating compounds/analytes (drugs) protecting citizens' life. After a long term focused scientific and financial efforts/supports biosensors are expected now to fulfill their promise such as being able to perform sampling and analysis of complex samples with interest for clinical or environment fields. Among all types of biosensors, enzymatic biosensors, the most explored biosensing devices, have an interesting property, the inherent inhibition phenomena given the enzyme-substrate complex formation. The exploration of such phenomena is making remarkably important their application as research and applied tools in diagnostics. Different inhibition biosensor systems based on nanomaterials modification has been proposed and applied. The role of nanomaterials in inhibition-based biosensors for the analyses of different groups of drugs as well as contaminants such as pesticides, phenolic compounds and others, are discussed in this review. This deep analysis of inhibition-based biosensors that employ nanomaterials will serve researchers as a guideline for further improvements and approaching of these devices to real sample applications so as to reach society needs and such biosensor market demands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Microbial biosensors for environmental monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David VOGRINC

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial biosensors are analytical devices capable of sensing substances in the environment due to the specific biological reaction of the microorganism or its parts. Construction of a microbial biosensor requires knowledge of microbial response to the specific analyte. Linking this response with the quantitative data, using a transducer, is the crucial step in the construction of a biosensor. Regarding the transducer type, biosensors are divided into electrochemical, optical biosensors and microbial fuel cells. The use of the proper configuration depends on the selection of the biosensing element. With the use of transgenic E. coli strains, bioluminescence or fluorescence based biosensors were developed. Microbial fuel cells enable the use of the heterogeneous microbial populations, isolated from wastewater. Different microorganisms are used for different pollutants – pesticides, heavy metals, phenolic compounds, organic waste, etc. Biosensing enables measurement of their concentration and their toxic or genotoxic effects on the microbes. Increasing environmental awareness has contributed to the increase of interest for biomonitoring. Although technologies, such as bioinformatics and genetic engineering, allow us to design complex and efficient microbial biosensors for environmental pollutants, the transfer of the laboratory work to the field still remains a problem to solve.

  2. A rapid biosensor for viable B. anthracis spores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeumner, Antje J; Leonard, Barbara; McElwee, John; Montagna, Richard A

    2004-09-01

    A simple membrane-strip-based biosensor assay has been combined with a nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) reaction for rapid (4 h) detection of a small number (ten) of viable B. anthracis spores. The biosensor is based on identification of a unique mRNA sequence from one of the anthrax toxin genes, the protective antigen ( pag), encoded on the toxin plasmid, pXO1, and thus provides high specificity toward B. anthracis. Previously, the anthrax toxins activator ( atxA) mRNA had been used in our laboratory for the development of a biosensor for the detection of a single B. anthracis spore within 12 h. Changing the target sequence to the pag mRNA provided the ability to shorten the overall assay time significantly. The vaccine strain of B. anthracis (Sterne strain) was used in all experiments. A 500-microL sample containing as few as ten spores was mixed with 500 microL growth medium and incubated for 30 min for spore germination and mRNA production. Thus, only spores that are viable were detected. Subsequently, RNA was extracted from lysed cells, selectively amplified using NASBA, and rapidly identified by the biosensor. While the biosensor assay requires only 15 min assay time, the overall process takes 4 h for detection of ten viable B. anthracis spores, and is shortened significantly if more spores are present. The biosensor is based on an oligonucleotide sandwich-hybridization assay format. It uses a membrane flow-through system with an immobilized DNA probe that hybridizes with the target sequence. Signal amplification is provided when the target sequence hybridizes to a second DNA probe that has been coupled to liposomes encapsulating the dye sulforhodamine B. The amount of liposomes captured in the detection zone can be read visually or quantified with a hand-held reflectometer. The biosensor can detect as little as 1 fmol target mRNA (1 nmol L(-1)). Specificity analysis revealed no cross-reactivity with 11 organisms tested, among them closely

  3. Guided-Wave Optical Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passaro, Vittorio M. N.; Dell'Olio, Francesco; Casamassima, Biagio; De Leonardis, Francesco

    2007-01-01

    Guided-wave optical biosensors are reviewed in this paper. Advantages related to optical technologies are presented and integrated architectures are investigated in detail. Main classes of bio receptors and the most attractive optical transduction mechanisms are discussed. The possibility to use Mach-Zehnder and Young interferometers, microdisk and microring resonators, surface plasmon resonance, hollow and antiresonant waveguides, and Bragg gratings to realize very sensitive and selective, ultra-compact and fast biosensors is discussed. Finally, CMOS-compatible technologies are proved to be the most attractive for fabrication of guided-wave photonic biosensors.

  4. Guided-Wave Optical Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco De Leonardis

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Guided-wave optical biosensors are reviewed in this paper. Advantages related to optical technologies are presented and integrated architectures are investigated in detail. Main classes of bio receptors and the most attractive optical transduction mechanisms are discussed. The possibility to use Mach-Zehnder and Young interferometers, microdisk and microring resonators, surface plasmon resonance, hollow and antiresonant waveguides, and Bragg gratings to realize very sensitive and selective, ultra-compact and fast biosensors is discussed. Finally, CMOS-compatible technologies are proved to be the most attractive for fabrication of guided-wave photonic biosensors.

  5. Optical biosensor with dispersion compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, W; Thirstrup, C; Sørensen, M H; Pedersen, H C

    2005-05-15

    Dispersion limits performance in many optical systems. In surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors, the sensing area is an optical element in which the dispersion depends on the effective refractive index of the biochemical compounds to be measured. We report a method of compensating for wavelength dispersion in SPR biosensors employing two integrated diffractive optical coupling elements in a polymer substrate. The dispersion compensation is achieved over the whole dynamic measurement range and provides a biosensor more robust to wavelength fluctuations than prism-coupler SPR systems. The concept can readily be employed in other types of sensor measuring refractive-index changes.

  6. Development of solution-gated graphene transistor model for biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Hediyeh; Yusof, Rubiyah; Rahmani, Rasoul; Hosseinpour, Hoda; Ahmadi, Mohammad T.

    2014-02-01

    The distinctive properties of graphene, characterized by its high carrier mobility and biocompatibility, have stimulated extreme scientific interest as a promising nanomaterial for future nanoelectronic applications. In particular, graphene-based transistors have been developed rapidly and are considered as an option for DNA sensing applications. Recent findings in the field of DNA biosensors have led to a renewed interest in the identification of genetic risk factors associated with complex human diseases for diagnosis of cancers or hereditary diseases. In this paper, an analytical model of graphene-based solution gated field effect transistors (SGFET) is proposed to constitute an important step towards development of DNA biosensors with high sensitivity and selectivity. Inspired by this fact, a novel strategy for a DNA sensor model with capability of single-nucleotide polymorphism detection is proposed and extensively explained. First of all, graphene-based DNA sensor model is optimized using particle swarm optimization algorithm. Based on the sensing mechanism of DNA sensors, detective parameters ( I ds and V gmin) are suggested to facilitate the decision making process. Finally, the behaviour of graphene-based SGFET is predicted in the presence of single-nucleotide polymorphism with an accuracy of more than 98% which guarantees the reliability of the optimized model for any application of the graphene-based DNA sensor. It is expected to achieve the rapid, quick and economical detection of DNA hybridization which could speed up the realization of the next generation of the homecare sensor system.

  7. Nanomaterials towards fabrication of cholesterol biosensors: Key roles and design approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Urmila; Das, Asim Bikas

    2016-01-15

    Importance of cholesterol biosensors is already recognized in the clinical diagnosis of cardiac and brain vascular diseases as discernible from the enormous amount of research in this field. Nevertheless, the practical application of a majority of the fabricated cholesterol biosensors is ordinarily limited by their inadequate performance in terms of one or more analytical parameters including stability, sensitivity and detection limit. Nanoscale materials offer distinctive size tunable electronic, catalytic and optical properties which opened new opportunities for designing highly efficient biosensor devices. Incorporation of nanomaterials in biosensing devices has found to improve the electroactive surface, electronic conductivity and biocompatibility of the electrode surfaces which then improves the analytical performance of the biosensors. Here we have reviewed recent advances in nanomaterial-based cholesterol biosensors. Foremost, the diverse roles of nanomaterials in these sensor systems have been discussed. Later, we have exhaustively explored the strategies used for engineering cholesterol biosensors with nanotubes, nanoparticles and nanocomposites. Finally, this review concludes with future outlook signifying some challenges of these nanoengineered cholesterol sensors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Palladium nanoparticles entrapped in a self-supporting nanoporous gold wire as sensitive dopamine biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xin; Wu, Yuxuan; Tan, Guoxin; Yu, Peng; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Zhengnan; Chen, Junqi; Wang, Zhengao; Pang, Jinshan; Ning, Chengyun

    2017-08-11

    Traced dopamine (DA) detection is critical for the early diagnosis and prevention of some diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer and schizophrenia. In this research, a novel self-supporting three dimensional (3D) bicontinuous nanoporous electrochemical biosensor was developed for the detection of dopamine by Differential Pulse Voltammetry (DPV). This biosensor was fabricated by electrodepositing palladium nanoparticles (Pd) onto self-supporting nanoporous gold (NPG) wire. Because of the synergistic effects of the excellent catalytic activity of Pd and novel structure of NPG wire, the palladium nanoparticles decorated NPG (Pd/NPG) biosensor possess tremendous superiority in the detection of DA. The Pd/NPG wire biosensor exhibited high sensitivity of 1.19 μA μΜ-1, broad detection range of 1-220 μM and low detection limit up to 1 μM. Besides, the proposed dopamine biosensor possessed good stability, reproducibility, reusability and selectivity. The response currents of detection in the fetal bovine serum were also close to the standard solutions. Therefore the Pd/NPG wire biosensor is promising to been used in clinic.

  9. Disposable electrochemical DNA biosensor for environmental ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    trophic chain and can be bioaccumulated in organ- isms. These facts have created serious concerns regard- ing their adverse effects on the ecosystem and public health.20. For example, several toxicity procedures are currently used for a rapid wastewater toxicity assessment. Numerous biological techniques have been.

  10. Engineering Biosensors with Dual Programmable Dynamic Ranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Benmei; Zhang, Juntao; Ou, Xiaowen; Lou, Xiaoding; Xia, Fan; Vallée-Bélisle, Alexis

    2018-01-10

    Although extensively used in all fields of chemistry, molecular recognition still suffers from a significant limitation: host-guest binding displays a fixed, hyperbolic dose-response curve, which limits its usefulness in many applications. Here we take advantage of the high programmability of DNA chemistry and propose a universal strategy to engineer biorecognition-based sensors with dual programmable dynamic ranges. Using DNA aptamers as our model recognition element and electrochemistry as our readout signal, we first designed a dual signaling "signal-on" and "signal-off" adenosine triphosphate (ATP) sensor composed of a ferrocene-labeled ATP aptamer in complex to a complementary, electrode-bound, methylene-blue labeled DNA. Using this simple "dimeric" sensor, we show that we can easily (1) tune the dynamic range of this dual-signaling sensor through base mutations on the electrode-bound DNA, (2) extend the dynamic range of this sensor by 2 orders of magnitude by using a combination of electrode-bound strands with varying affinity for the aptamers, (3) create an ultrasensitive dual signaling sensor by employing a sequestration strategy in which a nonsignaling, high affinity "depletant" DNA aptamer is added to the sensor surface, and (4) engineer a sensor that simultaneously provides extended and ultrasensitive readouts. These strategies, applicable to a wide range of biosensors and chemical systems, should broaden the application of molecular recognition in various fields of chemistry.

  11. Detection Limits for Nanoscale Biosensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sheehan, Paul E; Whitman, Lloyd J

    2005-01-01

    We examine through analytical calculations and finite element simulations how the detection efficiency of disk and wire-like biosensors in unmixed fluids varies with size from the micrometer to nanometer scales...

  12. Functionalized Xenon as a Biosensor

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Megan M. Spence; Seth M. Rubin; Ivan E. Dimitrov; E. Janette Ruiz; David E. Wemmer; Alexander Pines; Shao Qin Yao; Feng Tian; Peter G. Schultz

    2001-01-01

    .... We have developed an NMR-based xenon biosensor that capitalizes on the enhanced signal-to-noise, spectral simplicity, and chemical-shift sensitivity of laser-polarized xenon to detect specific...

  13. Nanobioengineering and Characterization of a Novel Estrogen Receptor Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfrid Boireau

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available We constructed an original supramolecular assembly on a surface of sensor composed of an innovative combination of an engineered cytochrome b5 and a modified nucleic acid bound to a synthetic lipid hemimembrane. The protein/DNA block, called (PDNA 2, was synthesized and purified before its immobilization onto a hybrid bilayer reconstituted on a gold surface. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR and atomic force microscopy (AFM were engaged in parallel on the same substrates in order to better understand dynamic events that occur at the surface of the biosensor. Good correlations were obtained in terms of specificity and reversibility. These findings allow us to present a first application of such biosensor in the study of the interaction processes between nuclear receptor and DNA.

  14. Facile fabrication of gold nanoparticle on zein ultrafine fibers and their application for catechol biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiaodong; Li, Dawei; Li, Guohui; Luo, Lei; Ullah, Naseeb; Wei, Qufu, E-mail: qfwei@jiangnan.edu.cn; Huang, Fenglin, E-mail: flhuang@jiangnan.edu.cn

    2015-02-15

    ) facilitated by Au NPs and high catalytic ability obtained from laccase. In addition, the proposed biosensor exhibited good reproducibility, stability and selectivity.

  15. Novel trends in affinity biosensors: current challenges and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arugula, Mary A.; Simonian, Aleksandr

    2014-03-01

    Molecular biorecognition processes facilitate physical and biochemical interactions between molecules in all crucial metabolic pathways. Perhaps the target analyte and the biorecognition element interactions have the most impactful use in biosensing applications. Traditional analytical sensing systems offer excellent biorecognition elements with the ability to detect and determine the presence of analytes. High affinity antibodies and DNA play an important role in the development of affinity biosensors based on electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive approaches. Advancements in this area routinely employ labels, label free, nanoparticles, multifunctional matrices, carbon nanotubes and other methods to meet the requirements of its own application. However, despite increasing affinity ceilings for conventional biosensors, the field draws back in meeting specifically important demands, such as long-term stability, ultrasensitivity, rapid detection, extreme selectivity, strong biological base, calibration, in vivo measurements, regeneration, satisfactory performance and ease of production. Nevertheless, recent efforts through this line have produced novel high-tech nanosensing systems such as ‘aptamers’ and ‘phages’ which exhibit high-throughput sensing. Aptamers and phages are powerful tools that excel over antibodies in sensibility, stability, multi-detection, in vivo measurements and regeneration. Phages are superior in stability, screening for affinity-based target molecules ranging from small to proteins and even cells, and easy production. In this review, we focus mainly on recent developments in affinity-based biosensors such as immunosensors, DNA sensors, emphasizing aptasensors and phage-based biosensors basing on novel electrochemical, optical and mass sensitive detection techniques. We also address enzyme inhibition-based biosensors and the current problems associated with the above sensors and their future perspectives.

  16. Functionalized nanopipettes: toward label-free, single cell biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Actis, Paolo; Mak, Andy C.; Pourmand, Nader

    2010-01-01

    Nanopipette technology has been proven to be a label-free biosensor capable of identifying DNA and proteins. The nanopipette can include specific recognition elements for analyte discrimination based on size, shape, and charge density. The fully electrical read-out and the ease and low-cost fabrication are unique features that give this technology an enormous potential. Unlike other biosensing platforms, nanopipettes can be precisely manipulated with submicron accuracy and used to study singl...

  17. Recent advances in transition-metal dichalcogenides based electrochemical biosensors: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Han; Huang, Ke-Jing; Wu, Xu

    2017-11-15

    Layered transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) comprise a category of two-dimensional (2D) materials that offer exciting properties, including large surface area, metallic and semi-conducting electrical capabilities, and intercalatable morphologies. Biosensors employ biological molecules to recognize the target and utilize output elements which can translate the biorecognition event into electrical, optical or mass-sensitive signals to determine the quantities of the target. TMDCs nanomaterials have been widely applied in various electrochemical biosensors with high sensitivity and selectivity. The marriage of TMDCs and electrochemical biosensors has created many productive sensing strategies for applications in the areas of clinical diagnosis, environmental monitoring and food safety. In recent years, an increasing number of TMDCs-based electrochemical biosensors are reported, suggesting TMDCs offers new possibilities of improving the performance of electrochemical biosensors. This review summarizes recent advances in electrochemical biosensors based on TMDCs for detection of various inorganic and organic analytes in the last five years, including glucose, proteins, DNA, heavy metal, etc. In addition, we also point out the challenges and future perspectives related to the material design and development of TMDCs-based electrochemical biosensors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. An enzyme-amplified lateral flow strip biosensor for visual detection of microRNA-224.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuefei; Xu, Li-Ping; Wu, Tingting; Wen, Yongqiang; Ma, Xinlei; Zhang, Xueji

    2016-01-01

    An enzyme-based dual-labeled nanoprobe is designed to fabricate a sensitive enzyme-amplified lateral flow biosensor for visual detection of mircoRNA-224 (miRNA-224). The recognition DNA probe (detection probe) and signal amplification enzyme (Horseradish peroxidase, HRP) are immobilized on gold nanoparticle (GNPs) surface, simultaneously. The capture DNA probes are immobilized on the test zone of the lateral flow biosensor. When miRNA-224 is present, the enzyme-based dual-labeled nanoprobes will be captured by forming the "sandwich structure" on the test zone of the lateral flow biosensor, enabling the visual detection for miRNA-224. Sensitivity is amplified by applying the 3,3,5,5-tetramethylbenzidine enzymatic substrate (TMB/H2O2 enzymatic substrate) onto the test zone. The enzymatic reactions between the HRP and the TMB/H2O2 enzymatic substrate will produce blue products, which deposit on the nanoprobe surface to enhance the visual effect and the corresponding response intensities of the test zone. This enzyme-amplified lateral flow biosensor shows a low limit of detection (LOD) (7.5 pM) toward miRNA-224 in the buffer solution, which is improved by 10-fold than that of the single-labeled lateral flow biosensor. This biosensor has been successfully used for the detection of the target miRNA-224 detection in A549 cell lysate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The enzyme thermistor--a realistic biosensor concept. A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovleva, Maria; Bhand, Sunil; Danielsson, Bengt

    2013-03-05

    This review describes principles and features of thermal biosensors and microbiosensors in flow injection analysis. Examples are given that illustrate the great versatility and excellent operational stability offered by thermal biosensors. The examples are mostly from work with the original type of enzyme thermistor operating with an enzyme column, but there will also be work described involving miniaturised devices including thermal lab-on-chip constructions and other types of sensing materials, such as MIPs (molecularly imprinted polymers) for both affinity and catalytic reactions. Several recently presented thermal biosensor concepts are reviewed including a thermal-electrochemical hybrid sensor for lactose based on immobilised cellobiose dehydrogenase. Another recent method is the determination of fructose using a fructose-6-phosphate kinase column. Operation with complex sample matrices such as blood, plasma and milk and how to avoid non-specific temperature effects are considered. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. NANOSCALE BIOSENSORS IN ECOSYSTEM EXPOSURE RESEARCH

    Science.gov (United States)

    This powerpoint presentation presented information on nanoscale biosensors in ecosystem exposure research. The outline of the presentation is as follows: nanomaterials environmental exposure research; US agencies involved in nanosensor research; nanoscale LEDs in biosensors; nano...

  1. Recent research trends of radio-frequency biosensors for biomolecular detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee-Jo; Yook, Jong-Gwan

    2014-11-15

    This article reviews radio-frequency (RF) biosensors based on passive and/or active devices and circuits. In particular, we focus on RF biosensors designed for detection of various biomolecules such as biotin-streptavidin, DNA hybridization, IgG, and glucose. The performance of these biosensors has been enhanced by the introduction of various sensing schemes with diverse nanomaterials (e.g., carbon nanotubes, graphene oxide, magnetic and gold nanoparticles, etc.). In addition, the RF biosensing platforms that can be associated with an RF active system are discussed. Finally, the challenges of RF biosensors are presented and suggestions are made for their future direction and prospects. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Development of aptamers for in vivo and in vitro biosensor applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Lasse Holm

    is generating new and faster ways of screening and optimizing using biosensors. In this thesis we develop new functional biological recognition modules for biosensors. These DNA- and RNA-based recognition modules are called aptamers and are developed to interact with targets of choice. Aptamers are developed...... through a laborious process; which suffers from high error-rates and, therefore, the process has undergone significant improvements. Here we present two new versions of aptamer development schemes that have been used to identify aptamers against snake venom toxin (with a possible pharmaceutical......-throughput allpolymeric biosensor device at DTU Nanotech and also resulted in extended funding of 3M DKK from the Danish National Innovation Foundation, Biosyntia and The Technical University of Denmark to advance the use of aptamers and biosensors in cell-factory development....

  3. The anticancer thiosemicarbazones Dp44mT and triapine lack inhibitory effects as catalytic inhibitors or poisons of DNA topoisomerase IIα

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalowich, Jack C.; Wu, Xing; Zhang, Rui; Kanagasabai, Ragu; Hornbaker, Marissa; Hasinoff, Brian B.

    2012-01-01

    The thiosemicarbazones Dp44mT (di-2-pyridylketone-4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone) and triapine have potent antiproliferative activity and have been evaluated as anticancer agents. While these compounds strongly bind iron and copper, their mechanism(s) of action are incompletely understood. A recent report (Rao et al., Cancer Research 69:948-957, 2009) suggested that Dp44mT may, in part, exert its cytotoxicity through poisoning of DNA topoisomerase IIα. In the present report, a variety of assays were used to determine whether Dp44mT and triapine target topoisomerase IIα. Neither compound inhibited topoisomerase IIα decatenation or induced cleavage of pBR322 DNA in the presence of enzyme. In cells, Dp44mT did not stabilize topoisomerase IIα covalent binding to DNA using an immunoblot band depletion assay, an ICE (immunodetection of complexes of enzyme-to-DNA) assay, and a protein-DNA covalent complex forming assay. Dp44mT did not display cross resistance to etoposide resistant K562 cells containing reduced topoisomerase IIα levels. Synchronized Dp44mT-treated CHO cells did not display a G2/M cell cycle block expected of a topoisomerase II inhibitor. A COMPARE analysis of Dp44mT using the NCI 60-cell line data indicated that inhibition of cell growth was poorly correlated with DNA topoisomerase IIα mRNA levels. In summary, we found no support for the conclusion that Dp44mT inhibits cell growth through the targeting of topoisomerase IIα. Since clinical trials of triapine are underway, it will be important to better understand the intracellular targeting and mechanisms of action of the thiosemicarbazones to support forward development of these agents and newer analogs. PMID:22503743

  4. Multiple roles of Rev3, the catalytic subunit of polzeta in maintaining genome stability in vertebrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Sonoda (Eiichiro); S. Takeda (Shiunichi); T. Okada (Takashi); G.Y. Zhao (Guang); S. Tateishi (Satoshi); K. Araki (Kasumi); M. Yamaizumi (Masaru); T. Yagi (Takashi); N.S. Verkaik (Nicole); D.C. van Gent (Dik); M. Takata (Minoru)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractTranslesion DNA synthesis (TLS) and homologous DNA recombination (HR) are two major postreplicational repair (PRR) pathways. The REV3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes the catalytic subunit of DNA polymerase zeta, which is involved in mutagenic TLS. To

  5. Fluorescence-based biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strianese, Maria; Staiano, Maria; Ruggiero, Giuseppe; Labella, Tullio; Pellecchia, Claudio; D'Auria, Sabato

    2012-01-01

    The field of optical sensors has been a growing research area over the last three decades. A wide range of books and review articles has been published by experts in the field who have highlighted the advantages of optical sensing over other transduction methods. Fluorescence is by far the method most often applied and comes in a variety of schemes. Nowadays, one of the most common approaches in the field of optical biosensors is to combine the high sensitivity of fluorescence detection in combination with the high selectivity provided by ligand-binding proteins. In this chapter we deal with reviewing our recent results on the implementation of fluorescence-based sensors for monitoring environmentally hazardous gas molecules (e.g. nitric oxide, hydrogen sulfide). Reflectivity-based sensors, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy-based (FCS) systems, and sensors relying on the enhanced fluorescence emission on silver island films (SIFs) coupled to the total internal reflection fluorescence mode (TIRF) for the detection of gliadin and other prolamines considered toxic for celiac patients are also discussed herein.

  6. Gold Nanoparticle Coated Silica Nanorods for Sensitive Visual Detection of microRNA on a Lateral Flow Strip Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takalkar, Sunitha; Xu, Hui; Chen, Jiao; Baryeh, Kwaku; Qiu, Wanwei; Zhao, Julia X; Liu, And Guodong

    2016-01-01

    We present a rapid and highly sensitive approach for visual detection of microRNA (miRNA) using a gold nanoparticles coated silica nanorod label and lateral flow strip biosensor. Gold nanoparticles were decorated on the silica nanorod surface by a seeding and growth procedure. A single strand DNA probe was immobilized on the gold nanoparticles-silica nanorod surface by a self-assembling process, and the formed DNA-gold nanoparticles-silica nanorod conjugate was used to construct the lateral flow nucleic acid biosensor for detecting miRNA. The captured gold nanoparticles-silica nanorods by sandwich-type hybridization reactions (DNA-RNA-DNA) on the test zone of the lateral flow nucleic acid biosensor produced the characteristic color bands, enabling visual detection of miRNA. After systematic optimization, the new lateral flow nucleic acid biosensor was capable of detecting 10 pM of the miRNA target without instrumentation, which is six times lower than that obtained with the gold nanoparticle-based lateral flow nucleic acid biosensor. The gold nanoparticles coated silica nanorod thus provides a new and sensitive nanolabel for visual detection of biological molecules on the lateral flow biosensor.

  7. A mutation in the catalytic subunit of yeast telomerase alters primer-template alignment while promoting processivity and protein-DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bairley, Robin C B; Guillaume, Gina; Vega, Leticia R; Friedman, Katherine L

    2011-12-15

    Telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein complex that is required for maintenance of linear chromosome ends (telomeres). In yeast, the Est2 protein reverse transcribes a short template region of the TLC1 RNA using the chromosome terminus to prime replication. Yeast telomeres contain heterogeneous G(1-3)T sequences that arise from incomplete reverse transcription of the TLC1 template and alignment of the DNA primer at multiple sites within the template region. We have previously described mutations in the essential N-terminal TEN domain of Est2p that alter telomere sequences. Here, we demonstrate that one of these mutants, glutamic acid 76 to lysine (est2-LT(E76K)), restricts possible alignments between the DNA primer and the TLC1 template. In addition, this mutant exhibits increased processivity in vivo. Within the context of the telomerase enzyme, the Est2p TEN domain is thought to contribute to enzyme processivity by mediating an anchor-site interaction with the DNA primer. We show that binding of the purified TEN domain (residues 1-161) to telomeric DNA is enhanced by the E76K mutation. These results support the idea that the anchor-site interaction contributes to telomerase processivity and suggest a role for the anchor site of yeast telomerase in mediating primer-template alignment within the active site.

  8. Rapid amplification/detection of nucleic acid targets utilizing a HDA/thin film biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenison, Robert; Jaeckel, Heidi; Klonoski, Joshua; Latorra, David; Wiens, Jacinta

    2014-08-07

    Thin film biosensors exploit a flat, optically coated silicon-based surface whereupon formation of nucleic acid hybrids are enzymatically transduced in a molecular thin film that can be detected by the unaided human eye under white light. While the limit of sensitivity for detection of nucleic acid targets is at sub-attomole levels (60 000 copies) many clinical specimens containing bacterial pathogens have much lower levels of analyte present. Herein, we describe a platform, termed HDA/thin film biosensor, which performs helicase-dependant nucleic acid amplification on a thin film biosensor surface to improve the limit of sensitivity to 10 copies of the mecA gene present in methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus. As double-stranded DNA is unwound by helicase it was either bound by solution-phase DNA primers to be copied by DNA polymerase or hybridized to surface immobilized probe on the thin film biosensor surface to be detected. Herein, we show that amplification reactions on the thin film biosensor are equivalent to in standard thin wall tubes, with detection at the limit of sensitivity of the assay occurring after 30 minutes of incubation time. Further we validate the approach by detecting the presence of the mecA gene in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from positive blood culture aliquots with high specificity (signal/noise ratio of 105).

  9. Nanomaterial-based biosensors using dual transducing elements for solution phase detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Su, Xiaodi; Lu, Yi

    2015-05-07

    Biosensors incorporating nanomaterials have demonstrated superior performance compared to their conventional counterparts. Most reported sensors use nanomaterials as a single transducer of signals, while biosensor designs using dual transducing elements have emerged as new approaches to further improve overall sensing performance. This review focuses on recent developments in nanomaterial-based biosensors using dual transducing elements for solution phase detection. The review begins with a brief introduction of the commonly used nanomaterial transducers suitable for designing dual element sensors, including quantum dots, metal nanoparticles, upconversion nanoparticles, graphene, graphene oxide, carbon nanotubes, and carbon nanodots. This is followed by the presentation of the four basic design principles, namely Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET), Amplified Fluorescence Polarization (AFP), Bio-barcode Assay (BCA) and Chemiluminescence (CL), involving either two kinds of nanomaterials, or one nanomaterial and an organic luminescent agent (e.g. organic dyes, luminescent polymers) as dual transducers. Biomolecular and chemical analytes or biological interactions are detected by their control of the assembly and disassembly of the two transducing elements that change the distance between them, the size of the fluorophore-containing composite, or the catalytic properties of the nanomaterial transducers, among other property changes. Comparative discussions on their respective design rules and overall performances are presented afterwards. Compared with the single transducer biosensor design, such a dual-transducer configuration exhibits much enhanced flexibility and design versatility, allowing biosensors to be more specifically devised for various purposes. The review ends by highlighting some of the further development opportunities in this field.

  10. Natural polyhydroxyalkanoate–gold nanocomposite based biosensor for detection of antimalarial drug artemisinin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phukon, Pinkee [Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784028, Assam (India); Radhapyari, Keisham [Analytical Chemistry Division, CSIR-North East Institute of Science and Technology, Jorhat 785006, Assam (India); Konwar, Bolin Kumar [Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Tezpur University, Tezpur 784028, Assam (India); Nagaland University (Central), Lumami, Zunheboto, Nagaland 798627 (India); Khan, Raju, E-mail: khan.raju@gmail.com [Analytical Chemistry Division, CSIR-North East Institute of Science and Technology, Jorhat 785006, Assam (India)

    2014-04-01

    The worrisome trend of antimalarial resistance has already highlighted the importance of artemisinin as a potent antimalarial agent. The current investigation aimed at fabricating a biosensor based on natural polymer polyhydroxyalkanoate–gold nanoparticle composite mounting on an indium-tin oxide glass plate for the analysis of artemisinin. The biosensor was fabricated using an adsorbing horse-radish peroxidase enzyme on the electrode surface for which cyclic voltammetry was used to monitor the electro-catalytic reduction of artemisinin under diffusion controlled conditions. Electrochemical interfacial properties and immobilization of enzyme onto a polyhydroxyalkanoate–gold nanoparticle film were evaluated, and confirmed by cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The differential pulse voltammetric peak current for artemisinin was increased linearly (concentration range of 0.01–0.08 μg mL{sup −1}) with sensitivity of 0.26 μA μg mL{sup −1}. The greater sensitivity of the fabricated biosensor to artemisinin (optimum limits of detection were 0.0035 μg mL{sup −1} and 0.0036 μg mL{sup −1} in bulk and spiked human serum, respectively) could be of much aid in medical diagnosis. - Highlights: • Extraction of PHA from indigenously isolated Pseudomonas aeruginosa BPC2 • Developed PHA/AuNPs/HRP/ITO based biosensor without the use of chemical cross linker • Detection of antimalarial drug artemisinin using the nanocomposite based biosensor.

  11. Nanotechnology-Enhanced No-Wash Biosensors for in Vitro Diagnostics of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaolin; Liu, Yijing; Yung, Bryant; Xiong, Yonghua; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2017-06-27

    In vitro biosensors have been an integral component for early diagnosis of cancer in the clinic. Among them, no-wash biosensors, which only depend on the simple mixing of the signal generating probes and the sample solution without additional washing and separation steps, have been found to be particularly attractive. The outstanding advantages of facile, convenient, and rapid response of no-wash biosensors are especially suitable for point-of-care testing (POCT). One fast-growing field of no-wash biosensor design involves the usage of nanomaterials as signal amplification carriers or direct signal generating elements. The analytical capacity of no-wash biosensors with respect to sensitivity or limit of detection, specificity, stability, and multiplexing detection capacity is largely improved because of their large surface area, excellent optical, electrical, catalytic, and magnetic properties. This review provides a comprehensive overview of various nanomaterial-enhanced no-wash biosensing technologies and focuses on the analysis of the underlying mechanism of these technologies applied for the early detection of cancer biomarkers ranging from small molecules to proteins, and even whole cancerous cells. Representative examples are selected to demonstrate the proof-of-concept with promising applications for in vitro diagnostics of cancer. Finally, a brief discussion of common unresolved issues and a perspective outlook on the field are provided.

  12. Protein adsorption onto nanomaterials for the development of biosensors and analytical devices: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Samir A; Evans, Elizabeth; Benavidez, Tomás E; Garcia, Carlos D

    2015-05-04

    An important consideration for the development of biosensors is the adsorption of the biorecognition element to the surface of a substrate. As the first step in the immobilization process, adsorption affects most immobilization routes and much attention is given into the research of this process to maximize the overall activity of the biosensor. The use of nanomaterials, specifically nanoparticles and nanostructured films, offers advantageous properties that can be fine-tuned to maximize interactions with specific proteins to maximize activity, minimize structural changes, and enhance the catalytic step. In the biosensor field, protein-nanomaterial interactions are an emerging trend that span across many disciplines. This review addresses recent publications about the proteins most frequently used, their most relevant characteristics, and the conditions required to adsorb them to nanomaterials. When relevant and available, subsequent analytical figures of merits are discussed for selected biosensors. The general trend amongst the research papers allows concluding that the use of nanomaterials has already provided significant improvements in the analytical performance of many biosensors and that this research field will continue to grow. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. ENZYME CONDUCTOMETRIC BIOSENSOR FOR FRUCTOSE DETERMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Y. Dudchenko

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The conductometric biosensor for fructose determination based on fructose dehydrogenase and potassium ferricyanide mediator as electron acceptor has been developed. The enzyme was immobilized on a surface of the conductometric transducer together with bovine serum albumin using crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. Working conditions of the discribed fructose biosensor were optimized. The results concerning influence of the buffer solution concentration and potassium ferricyanide concentration on the biosensor performance are given. The fructose biosensor is characterized by high signal reproducibility and selectivity to fructose. The developed conductometric biosensor can be successfully used for fructose monitoring in the procedures of food and clinical diagnostic.

  14. A Large Response Range Reflectometric Urea Biosensor Made from Silica-Gel Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muawia Alqasaimeh

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A new silica-gel nanospheres (SiO2NPs composition was formulated, followed by biochemical surface functionalization to examine its potential in urea biosensor development. The SiO2NPs were basically synthesized based on sol–gel chemistry using a modified Stober method. The SiO2NPs surfaces were modified with amine (-NH2 functional groups for urease immobilization in the presence of glutaric acid (GA cross-linker. The chromoionophore pH-sensitive dye ETH 5294 was physically adsorbed on the functionalized SiO2NPs as pH transducer. The immobilized urease determined urea concentration reflectometrically based on the colour change of the immobilized chromoionophore as a result of the enzymatic hydrolysis of urea. The pH changes on the biosensor due to the catalytic enzyme reaction of immobilized urease were found to correlate with the urea concentrations over a linear response range of 50–500 mM (R2 = 0.96 with a detection limit of 10 mM urea. The biosensor response time was 9 min with reproducibility of less than 10% relative standard deviation (RSD. This optical urea biosensor did not show interferences by Na+, K+, Mg2+ and NH4+ ions. The biosensor performance has been validated using urine samples in comparison with a non-enzymatic method based on the use of p-dimethylaminobenzaldehyde (DMAB reagent and demonstrated a good correlation between the two different methods (R2 = 0.996 and regression slope of 1.0307. The SiO2NPs-based reflectometric urea biosensor showed improved dynamic linear response range when compared to other nanoparticle-based optical urea biosensors.

  15. Aptamer-based electrochemical biosensor for interferon gamma detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Tuleouva, Nazgul; Ramanculov, Erlan; Revzin, Alexander

    2010-10-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of an electrochemical DNA aptamer-based biosensor for detection of interferon (IFN)-γ. A DNA hairpin containing IFN-γ-binding aptamer was thiolated, conjugated with methylene blue (MB) redox tag, and immobilized on a gold electrode by self-assembly. Binding of IFN-γ caused the aptamer hairpin to unfold, pushing MB redox molecules away from the electrode and decreasing electron-transfer efficiency. The change in redox current was quantified using square wave voltammetry (SWV) and was found to be highly sensitive to IFN-γ concentration. The limit of detection for optimized biosensor was 0.06 nM with linear response extending to 10 nM. This aptasensor was specific to IFN-γ in the presence of overabundant serum proteins. Importantly, the same aptasensor could be regenerated by disrupting aptamer-IFN-γ complex in urea buffer and reused multiple times. Unlike standard sandwich immunoassays, the aptasensor described here allowed one to detect IFN-γ binding directly without the need for multiple washing steps and reagents. An electrochemical biosensor for simple and sensitive detection of IFN-γ demonstrated in this paper will have future applications in immunology, cancer research, and infectious disease monitoring.

  16. Emerging applications of label-free optical biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanchetta, Giuliano; Lanfranco, Roberta; Giavazzi, Fabio; Bellini, Tommaso; Buscaglia, Marco

    2017-01-01

    Innovative technical solutions to realize optical biosensors with improved performance are continuously proposed. Progress in material fabrication enables developing novel substrates with enhanced optical responses. At the same time, the increased spectrum of available biomolecular tools, ranging from highly specific receptors to engineered bioconjugated polymers, facilitates the preparation of sensing surfaces with controlled functionality. What remains often unclear is to which extent this continuous innovation provides effective breakthroughs for specific applications. In this review, we address this challenging question for the class of label-free optical biosensors, which can provide a direct signal upon molecular binding without using secondary probes. Label-free biosensors have become a consolidated approach for the characterization and screening of molecular interactions in research laboratories. However, in the last decade, several examples of other applications with high potential impact have been proposed. We review the recent advances in label-free optical biosensing technology by focusing on the potential competitive advantage provided in selected emerging applications, grouped on the basis of the target type. In particular, direct and real-time detection allows the development of simpler, compact, and rapid analytical methods for different kinds of targets, from proteins to DNA and viruses. The lack of secondary interactions facilitates the binding of small-molecule targets and minimizes the perturbation in single-molecule detection. Moreover, the intrinsic versatility of label-free sensing makes it an ideal platform to be integrated with biomolecular machinery with innovative functionality, as in case of the molecular tools provided by DNA nanotechnology.

  17. Micro-and nanoelectromechanical biosensors

    CERN Document Server

    Nicu, Liviu

    2014-01-01

    Most books dedicated to the issues of bio-sensing are organized by the well-known scheme of a biosensor. In this book, the authors have deliberately decided to break away from the conventional way of treating biosensing research by uniquely addressing biomolecule immobilization methods on a solid surface, fluidics issues and biosensing-related transduction techniques, rather than focusing simply on the biosensor. The aim is to provide a contemporary snapshot of the biosensing landscape without neglecting the seminal references or products where needed, following the downscaling (from the micr

  18. Microbial biosensors for organophosphate pesticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulchandani, Ashok; Rajesh

    2011-09-01

    Organophosphates, amongst the most toxic substance known, are used widely in agriculture around the world. Their extensive use, however, has resulted in their occurrence in the water and food supply threatening humans and animals. Therefore, there is a need for determination of these neurotoxic compounds sensitively, selectively, and rapidly in the field. The present work is a brief review on the recent advancements in amperometric, potentiometric, and optical biosensors using genetically engineered microorganisms expressing organophosphate hydrolyzing enzyme intracellularly or anchored on the cell surface for the detection of organophosphate pesticides. The benefits and limitations associated with such microbial biosensors are delineated.

  19. A luminescent nisin biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Immonen, Nina; Karp, Matti

    2006-02-01

    Nisin is a lantibiotic, an antibacterial peptide produced by certain Lactococcus lactis strains that kills or inhibits the growth of other bacteria. Nisin is widely used as a food preservative, and its long-time use suggests that it can be generally regarded as safe. We have developed a method for determining the amount of nisin in food samples that is based on luminescent biosensor bacteria. Bacterial luciferase operon luxABCDE was inserted into plasmid pNZ8048, and the construct was transformed by electroporation into Lc. lactis strain NZ9800, whose ability to produce nisin has been erased by deletion of the gene nisA. The operon luxABCDE has been modified to be functional in gram-positive bacteria to confer a bioluminescent phenotype without the requirement of adding an exogenous substrate. In the plasmid pNZ8048, the operon was placed under control of the nisin-inducible nisA promoter. The chromosomal nisRK genes of Lc. lactis NZ9800 allow it to sense nisin in the environment and relay this signal via signal transduction proteins NisK and NisR to initiate transcription from nisA promoter. In the case of our sensor bacteria, this leads to production of luciferase and, thus, luminescence that can be directly measured from living bacteria. Luminescence can be detected as early as within minutes of induction. The nisin assay described here provides a detection limit in the sub-picogram level per ml, and a linear area between 1 - 1000 pg/ml. The sensitivity of this assay exceeds the performance of all previously published methods.

  20. THE POTENTIOMETRIC UREA BIOSENSOR USING CHITOSAN MEMBRANE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ani Mulyasuryani

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Potentiometric urea biosensor development is based on urea hydrolysis by urease resulted CO2. The biosensor is used chitosan membrane and the H3O+ electrode as a transducer. The research was studied of effecting pH and membrane thickness to the biosensor performance. The best biosensor performance resulted at pH = 7.3 and 0.2 mm of membrane thickness. The biosensor has a Nerntian factor 28.47 mV/decade; the concentration range is 0.1 up to 6.00 ppm; and the limit of detection is 0.073 ppm. The response time of this biosensor is 280 seconds, efficiency 32 samples and accuracy 94% up to 99%.   Keywords: biosensor, potentiometry, urea, chitosan membrane

  1. Enzyme conductometric biosensor for maltose determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzyadevych S. V.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To develop enzyme conductometric biosensor for maltose determination. Methods. A conductometric transducer consisting of two gold pairs of electrodes was applied. Three-enzyme membrane (glucose oxidase, mutarotase, -glucosidase immobilized on the surface of the conductometric transducer was used as a bioselective element. Results. A linear range of maltose conductometric biosensor was from 0,002 mM to 1 mM for glucose and maltose detection. The time of maltose analysis in solution was 1–2 minutes. The dependence of biosensor responses to substrate on pH, ionic strength, and buffer capacity of work solution was studied. The data of biosensor selectivity are presented. The developed conductometric biosensor is characterized by high operational stability and signal reproducibility. Conclusion. The enzyme conductometric biosensor for maltose determination has been developed. The analytical characteristics of the maltose biosensor were investigated. The proposed method could be used in food industry to control and optimize production.

  2. Biosensors in Clinical Practice: Focus on Oncohematology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Cortelezzi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Biosensors are devices that are capable of detecting specific biological analytes and converting their presence or concentration into some electrical, thermal, optical or other signal that can be easily analysed. The first biosensor was designed by Clark and Lyons in 1962 as a means of measuring glucose. Since then, much progress has been made and the applications of biosensors are today potentially boundless. This review is limited to their clinical applications, particularly in the field of oncohematology. Biosensors have recently been developed in order to improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients affected by hematological malignancies, such as the biosensor for assessing the in vitro pre-treatment efficacy of cytarabine in acute myeloid leukemia, and the fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensor for assessing the efficacy of imatinib in chronic myeloid leukemia. The review also considers the challenges and future perspectives of biosensors in clinical practice.

  3. Antibody Immobilization on Conductive Polymer Coated Nonwoven Fibers for Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon K. MCGRAW

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This work is being performed to develop rapid and novel electrochemical biosensors for foodborne pathogen detection. This research focuses on electrotextile platforms to perform both capture and sensing functions in a single component. The biosensor uses nonwoven fiber membranes coated with conductive polymer and functionalized with antibodies for biological capture. This study examines three methods for antibody immobilization: passive adsorption, glutaraldehyde cross-linking, and EDC/Sulfo-NHS cross-linking. Antibodies are immobilized onto the conductive fiber surfaces for the specific capture of a target pathogen. The immobilization and capture capabilities of each method are analyzed through the use of two different fluorescent reporters: FITC and PicoGreen DNA stain. Fluorescence is measured using a fluorescent plate reader and then imaged using a fluorescent microscope. The effect of a blocking agent on specificity is also evaluated. It is found that glutaraldehyde with blocking is the best immobilization method with PicoGreen being the best fluorescent reporter.

  4. Electrochemical Biosensors Based on Nanostructured Carbon Black: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiago Almeida Silva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon black (CB is a nanostructured material widely used in several industrial processes. This nanomaterial features a set of remarkable properties including high surface area, high thermal and electrical conductivity, and very low cost. Several studies have explored the applicability of CB in electrochemical fields. Recent data showed that modified electrodes based on CB present fast charge transfer and high electroactive surface area, comparable to carbon nanotubes and graphene. These characteristics make CB a promising candidate for the design of electrochemical sensors and biosensors. In this review, we highlight recent advances in the use of CB as a template for biosensing. As will be seen, we discuss the main biosensing strategies adopted for enzymatic catalysis for several target analytes, such as glucose, hydrogen peroxide, and environmental contaminants. Recent applications of CB on DNA-based biosensors are also described. Finally, future challenges and trends of CB use in bioanalytical chemistry are discussed.

  5. Silaffin peptides as a novel signal enhancer for gravimetric biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Dong Hyun; Lee, Jeong-O; Sang, Byoung-In; Won, Keehoon; Kim, Yong Hwan

    2013-05-01

    Application of biomimetic silica formation to gravimetric biosensors has been conducted for the first time. As a model system, silaffin peptides fused with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were immobilized on a gold quartz crystal resonator for quartz crystal microbalances using a self-assembled monolayer. When a solution of silicic acid was supplied, silica particles were successfully deposited on the Au surface, resulting in a significant change in resonance frequency (i.e., signal enhancement) with the silaffin-GFP. However, frequency was not altered when bare GFP was used as a control. The novel peptide enhancer is advantageous because it can be readily and quantitatively conjugated with sensing proteins using recombinant DNA technology. As a proof of concept, this study shows that the silaffin domains can be employed as a novel and efficient biomolecular signal enhancer for gravimetric biosensors.

  6. DNA-binding, catalytic oxidation, C—C coupling reactions and antibacterial activities of binuclear Ru(II thiosemicarbazone complexes: Synthesis and spectral characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arumugam Manimaran

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available New hexa-coordinated binuclear Ru(II thiosemicarbazone complexes of the type {[(B(EPh3(COClRu]2L} (where, E = P or As; B = PPh3 or AsPh3 or pyridine; L = mononucleating NS donor of N-substituted thiosemicarbazones have been synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis, FT-IR, UV–vis and 31P{1H} NMR cyclic voltammetric studies. The DNA-binding studies of Ru(II complexes with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA were investigated by UV–vis, viscosity measurements, gel-electrophoresis and fluorescence spectroscopy. The new complexes have been used as catalysts in C—C coupling reaction and in the oxidation of alcohols to their corresponding carbonyl compounds by using NMO as co-oxidant and molecular oxygen (O2 atmosphere at ambient temperature. Further, the new binucleating thiosemicarbazone ligands and their Ru(II complexes were also screened for their antibacterial activity against Klebsiella pneumoniae, Shigella sp., Micrococcus luteus, Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhi. From this study, it was found out that the activity of the complexes almost reaches the effectiveness of the conventional bacteriocide.

  7. A Lateral Flow Biosensor for the Detection of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lingwen; Xiao, Zhuo

    2017-01-01

    A lateral flow biosensor (LFB) is introduced for the detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The assay is composed of two steps: circular strand displacement reaction and lateral flow biosensor detection. In step 1, the nucleotide at SNP site is recognized by T4 DNA ligase and the signal is amplified by strand displacement DNA polymerase, which can be accomplished at a constant temperature. In step 2, the reaction product of step 1 is detected by a lateral flow biosensor, which is a rapid and cost effective tool for nuclei acid detection. Comparing with conventional methods, it requires no complicated machines. It is suitable for the use of point of care diagnostics. Therefore, this simple, cost effective, robust, and promising LFB detection method of SNP has great potential for the detection of genetic diseases, personalized medicine, cancer related mutations, and drug-resistant mutations of infectious agents.

  8. Improved Ion-Channel Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Jay; White, Victor; Dougherty, Dennis; Maurer, Joshua

    2004-01-01

    An effort is underway to develop improved biosensors of a type based on ion channels in biomimetic membranes. These sensors are microfabricated from silicon and other materials compatible with silicon. As described, these sensors offer a number of advantages over prior sensors of this type.

  9. Biosensors and multiple mycotoxin analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaag, B. van der; Spath, S.; Dietrich, H.; Stigter, E.; Boonzaaijer, G.; Osenbruggen, T. van; Koopal, K.

    2003-01-01

    An immunochemical biosensor assay for the detection of multiple mycotoxins in a sample is described.The inhibition assay is designed to measure four different mycotoxins in a single measurement, following extraction, sample clean-up and incubation with an appropriate cocktail of anti-mycotoxin

  10. Label-free aptamer biosensor for selective detection of thrombin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Weidan; Liu, Xiaotong; Wang, Lei; Su, Xingguang, E-mail: suxg@jlu.edu.cn

    2015-10-29

    We fabricated a novel fluorescence biosensor for the selective detection of thrombin by using bovine serum albumin-capped CdS quantum dots (BSA-CdS QDs). Two kinds of designed DNA (DNA1 and DNA2) could bind to CdS QDs through the electrostatic interaction between DNA and Cd{sup 2+} on the surface of CdS QDs. The obtained DNA/BSA-CdS QDs kept stable in the solution with the fluorescence intensity obviously enhanced. Hairpin structure of DNA1contained two domains, one is the aptamer sequence of thrombin and the other is the complementary sequence of DNA2. When thrombin was added, it would bind to DNA1 and induce the hairpin structure of DNA1 changed into G-quadplex structure. Meanwhile, DNA2 would transfer from the surface of CdS QDs to DNA1 via hybridization, which resulted in the removal of DNA1 and DNA2 from the surface of CdS QDs, and led to the fluorescence intensity of CdS QDs reduced. Thus, the determination of thrombin could be achieved by monitoring the change of the fluorescence intensity of CdS QDs. The present method is simple and fast, and exhibits good selectivity for thrombin over other proteins. We have successfully detected thrombin in human serum samples with satisfactory results. - Highlights: • A novel strategy for the detection of thrombin was established based on BSA-CdS QDs. • DNA could serve as the co-ligands to stabilize CdS QDs and enhance the fluorescence intensity. • Thrombin could change the structure of DNA1 and quench the fluorescence of CdS QDs. • Thrombin in real sample was detected with satisfactory results.

  11. Printable Electrochemical Biosensors: A Focus on Screen-Printed Electrodes and Their Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keiichiro Yamanaka

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this review we present electrochemical biosensor developments, focusing on screen-printed electrodes (SPEs and their applications. In particular, we discuss how SPEs enable simple integration, and the portability needed for on-field applications. First, we briefly discuss the general concept of biosensors and quickly move on to electrochemical biosensors. Drawing from research undertaken in this area, we cover the development of electrochemical DNA biosensors in great detail. Through specific examples, we describe the fabrication and surface modification of printed electrodes for sensitive and selective detection of targeted DNA sequences, as well as integration with reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. For a more rounded approach, we also touch on electrochemical immunosensors and enzyme-based biosensors. Last, we present some electrochemical devices specifically developed for use with SPEs, including USB-powered compact mini potentiostat. The coupling demonstrates the practical use of printable electrode technologies for application at point-of-use. Although tremendous advances have indeed been made in this area, a few challenges remain. One of the main challenges is application of these technologies for on-field analysis, which involves complicated sample matrices.

  12. Visual detection of microRNA with lateral flow nucleic acid biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuefei; Xu, Hui; Baloda, Meenu; Gurung, Anant S; Xu, Li-Ping; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Xueji; Liu, Guodong

    2014-04-15

    We report a DNA-gold nanoparticle (DNA-GNP) based lateral flow nucleic acid biosensor for visual detection of microRNA (miRNA)-215 in aqueous solutions and biological samples with low-cost and short analysis time. Sandwich-type hybridization reactions among GNP-labeled DNA probe, miRNA-215 and biotin-modified DNA probes were performed on the lateral flow device. The accumulation of GNPs on the test zone of the biosensor enables the visual detection of miRNA-215. After systematic optimization, the biosensor was able to detect a minimum concentration of 60 pM miRNA-215. The biosensor was applied to detect miRNA-215 from A549 cell lysate directly without complex sample treatment, and the detection limit of 0.148 million cells was obtained. This study provides a simple, rapid, specific and low-cost approach for miRNA detection in aqueous solutions and biological samples, showing great promise for clinical application and biomedical diagnosis in some malignant diseases. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Highly sensitive electrochemical biosensor for streptavidin detection based on CdSe quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yu-Ping; Liu, Xing-Pei; Mao, Chang-Jie; Niu, He-Lin; Song, Ji-Ming; Jin, Bao-Kang

    2018-04-30

    An electrochemical biosensor was developed based on a steric hindrance hybridization assay to allow the highly sensitive detection of streptavidin. In the steric hindrance hybridization assay, the signaling strand DNA (sig-DNA) was labeled at the 3' end with CdSe quantum dots (QDs) and at the 5' end with biotin, and capturing strand DNA (the complementary strand of sig-DNA) was labeled at the 5' end with thiol. The steric hindrance effect generated by streptavidin which was bound with the signaling DNA strand. The streptavidin limited the ability of the sig-DNA to hybridize with the cap-DNA, which were linked on the surface of a gold electrode. Therefore, the concentration of streptavidin was detected indirectly based on the concentration of CdSe QDs on the electrode surface. The concentration of CdSe QDs on the electrode surface was detected by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry. Under optimal conditions, the streptavidin detection range using the as-prepared biosensor was 1.96pg/mL to 1.96µg/mL and the detection limit was 0.65pg/mL. The experimental results showed that the electrochemical biosensor could detect streptavidin rapidly and accurately. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Capacitive Biosensors and Molecularly Imprinted Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertürk, Gizem; Mattiasson, Bo

    2017-02-17

    Capacitive biosensors belong to the group of affinity biosensors that operate by registering direct binding between the sensor surface and the target molecule. This type of biosensors measures the changes in dielectric properties and/or thickness of the dielectric layer at the electrolyte/electrode interface. Capacitive biosensors have so far been successfully used for detection of proteins, nucleotides, heavy metals, saccharides, small organic molecules and microbial cells. In recent years, the microcontact imprinting method has been used to create very sensitive and selective biorecognition cavities on surfaces of capacitive electrodes. This chapter summarizes the principle and different applications of capacitive biosensors with an emphasis on microcontact imprinting method with its recent capacitive biosensor applications.

  15. Development of a Diagnostic Tool to Detect DNA Methylation Biomarkers for Early-Stage Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Biosensor and Bioelectronics , 58:333 (2014)) and one conference Fig. 3: DNA binding gel showing (A) the DNA recognition domain binds specifically to...engineered methyl- probe, Biosensor and Bioelectronics , 58:333 (2014)). Two more publications are being planned in the near future. Books or other non

  16. Biosensors based on nanomaterials and nanodevices

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Biosensors Based on Nanomaterials and Nanodevices links interdisciplinary research from leading experts to provide graduate students, academics, researchers, and industry professionals alike with a comprehensive source for key advancements and future trends in nanostructured biosensor development. It describes the concepts, principles, materials, device fabrications, functions, system integrations, and applications of various types of biosensors based on signal transduction mechanisms, including fluorescence, photonic crystal, surface-enhanced Raman scattering, electrochemistry, electro-lumine

  17. Non-antibody protein-based biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrigno, Paul?Ko

    2016-01-01

    Biosensors that depend on a physical or chemical measurement can be adversely affected by non-specific interactions. For example, a biosensor designed to measure specifically the levels of a rare analyte can give false positive results if there is even a small amount of interaction with a highly abundant but irrelevant molecule. To overcome this limitation, the biosensor community has frequently turned to antibody molecules as recognition elements because they are renowned for their exquisite...

  18. Recent Development in Optical Fiber Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalina Bosch Ojeda

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Remarkable developments can be seen in the field of optical fibre biosensors in the last decade. More sensors for specific analytes have been reported, novel sensing chemistries or transduction principles have been introduced, and applications in various analytical fields have been realised. This review consists of papers mainly reported in the last decade and presents about applications of optical fiber biosensors. Discussions on the trends in optical fiber biosensor applications in real samples are enumerated.

  19. Autonomous electrochemical biosensors: A new vision to direct methanol fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, M Goreti F; Brandão, Lúcia

    2017-12-15

    A new approach to biosensing devices is demonstrated aiming an easier and simpler application in routine health care systems. Our methodology considered a new concept for the biosensor transducing event that allows to obtain, simultaneously, an equipment-free, user-friendly, cheap electrical biosensor. The use of the anode triple-phase boundary (TPB) layer of a passive direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) as biosensor transducer is herein proposed. For that, the ionomer present in the anode catalytic layer of the DMFC is partially replaced by an ionomer with molecular recognition capability working as the biorecognition element of the biosensor. In this approach, fuel cell anode catalysts are modified with a molecularly imprinted polymer (plastic antibody) capable of protein recognition (ferritin is used as model protein), inserted in a suitable membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and tested, as initial proof-of-concept, in a non-passive fuel cell operation environment. The anchoring of the ionomer-based plastic antibody on the catalyst surface follows a simple one-step grafting from approach through radical polymerization. Such modification increases fuel cell performance due to the proton conductivity and macroporosity characteristics of the polymer on the TPB. Finally, the response and selectivity of the bioreceptor inside the fuel cell showed a clear and selective signal from the biosensor. Moreover, such pioneering transducing approach allowed amplification of the electrochemical response and increased biosensor sensitivity by 2 orders of magnitude when compared to a 3-electrodes configuration system. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Disposable nucleic acid biosensors based on gold nanoparticle probes and lateral flow strip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Xun; Ma, Yunqing; Zhang, Aiguo; Zhang, Lurong; Zeng, Lingwen; Liu, Guodong

    2009-02-15

    In this article, we describe a disposable nucleic acid biosensor (DNAB) for low-cost and sensitive detection of nucleic acid samples in 15 min. Combining the unique optical properties of gold nanoparticles (Au-NP) and the high efficiency of chromatographic separation, sandwich-type DNA hybridization reactions were realized on the lateral flow strips, which avoid multiple incubation, separation, and washing steps in the conventional nucleic acid biosensors. The captured Au-NP probes on the test zone and control zone of the biosensor produced the characteristic red bands, enabling visual detection of nucleic acid samples without instrumentation. The quantitative detection was performed by reading the intensities of the produced red bands with a portable strip reader. The parameters (e.g., the concentration of reporter probe, the size of Au-NP, the amount of Au-NP-DNA probe, lateral flow membranes, and the concentration of running buffer) that govern the sensitivity and reproducibility of the sensor were optimized. The response of the optimized device is highly linear over the range of 1-100 nM target DNA, and the limit of detection is estimated to be 0.5 nM in association with a 15 min assay time. The sensitivity of the biosensor was further enhanced by using horseradish peroxidase (HRP)-Au-NP dual labels which ensure a quite low detection limit of 50 pM. The DNAB has been applied for the detection of human genomic DNA directly with a detection limit of 2.5 microg/mL (1.25 fM) by adopting well-designed DNA probes. The new nucleic acid biosensor thus provides a rapid, sensitive, low cost, and quantitative tool for the detection of nucleic acid samples. It shows great promise for in-field and point-of-care diagnosis of genetic diseases and detection of infectious agents or warning against biowarfare agents.

  1. Printed Electrochemical Instruments for Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Beni, Valerio; Nilsson, D.; Arven, P.; Norberg, P.; Gustafsson, G.; Turner, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Mobile diagnostics for healthcare, food safety and environmental monitoring, demand a new generation of inexpensive sensing systems suitable for production in high volume. Herein we report on the development of a new disposable electrochemical instrument exploiting the latest advances in printed electronics and printed biosensors. The current system is manufactured under ambient conditions with all interconnections printed; electrochemical measurements and data elaboration are realized by the...

  2. Mutations in human DNA polymerase γ confer unique mechanisms of catalytic deficiency that mirror the disease severity in mitochondrial disorder patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohl, Christal D.; Kasiviswanathan, Rajesh; Copeland, William C.; Anderson, Karen S.

    2013-01-01

    Human mitochondrial DNA polymerase γ (pol γ) is solely responsible for the replication and repair of the mitochondrial genome. Unsurprisingly, alterations in pol γ activity have been associated with mitochondrial diseases such as Alpers syndrome and progressive external ophthalmoplegia. Thus far, predicting the severity of mitochondrial disease based the magnitude of deficiency in pol γ activity has been difficult. In order to understand the relationship between disease severity in patients and enzymatic defects in vitro, we characterized the molecular mechanisms of four pol γ mutations, A957P, A957S, R1096C and R1096H, which have been found in patients suffering from aggressive Alpers syndrome to mild progressive external ophthalmoplegia. The A957P mutant showed the most striking deficiencies in the incorporation efficiency of a correct deoxyribonucleotide triphosphate (dNTP) relative to wild-type pol γ, with less, but still significant incorporation efficiency defects seen in R1096H and R1096C, and only a small decrease in incorporation efficiency observed for A957S. Importantly, this trend matches the disease severity observed in patients very well (approximated as , from most severe disease to least severe). Further, the A957P mutation conferred a two orders of magnitude loss of fidelity relative to wild-type pol γ, indicating that a buildup of mitochondrial genomic mutations may contribute to the death in infancy seen with these patients. We conclude that characterizing the unique molecular mechanisms of pol γ deficiency for physiologically important mutant enzymes is important for understanding mitochondrial disease and for predicting disease severity. PMID:23208208

  3. Electrochemical paper-based peptide nucleic acid biosensor for detecting human papillomavirus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teengam, Prinjaporn [Program in Petrochemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Pathumwan, Bangkok, 10330 (Thailand); Siangproh, Weena [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok, 10110 (Thailand); Tuantranont, Adisorn [Nanoelectronics and MEMS Laboratory, National Electronics and Computer Technology Center, Pathumthani, 12120 (Thailand); Henry, Charles S. [Department of Chemistry, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, 80523 (United States); Vilaivan, Tirayut [Organic Synthesis Research Unit, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, Pathumwan, Bangkok, 10330 (Thailand); Chailapakul, Orawon, E-mail: corawon@chula.ac.th [Electrochemistry and Optical Spectroscopy Research Unit, Department of Chemistry, Chulalongkorn University, Pathumwan, Bangkok, 10330 (Thailand); Nanotec-CU Center of Excellence on Food and Agriculture, Bangkok, 10330 (Thailand)

    2017-02-01

    A novel paper-based electrochemical biosensor was developed using an anthraquinone-labeled pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (acpcPNA) probe (AQ-PNA) and graphene-polyaniline (G-PANI) modified electrode to detect human papillomavirus (HPV). An inkjet printing technique was employed to prepare the paper-based G-PANI-modified working electrode. The AQ-PNA probe baring a negatively charged amino acid at the N-terminus was immobilized onto the electrode surface through electrostatic attraction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to verify the AQ-PNA immobilization. The paper-based electrochemical DNA biosensor was used to detect a synthetic 14-base oligonucleotide target with a sequence corresponding to human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 DNA by measuring the electrochemical signal response of the AQ label using square-wave voltammetry before and after hybridization. It was determined that the current signal significantly decreased after the addition of target DNA. This phenomenon is explained by the rigidity of PNA-DNA duplexes, which obstructs the accessibility of electron transfer from the AQ label to the electrode surface. Under optimal conditions, the detection limit of HPV type 16 DNA was found to be 2.3 nM with a linear range of 10–200 nM. The performance of this biosensor on real DNA samples was tested with the detection of PCR-amplified DNA samples from the SiHa cell line. The new method employs an inexpensive and disposable device, which easily incinerated after use and is promising for the screening and monitoring of the amount of HPV-DNA type 16 to identify the primary stages of cervical cancer. - Highlights: • A paper-based DNA biosensor using AQ-PNA probe and G-PANI modified electrode was first developed. • This developed DNA biosensor was highly specific over the non-complementary DNA. • This sensor was successfully applied to detect the HPV-DNA type 16 obtained from cancer cell lines. • This sensor is inexpensive and

  4. Portable evanescent wave fiber biosensor for highly sensitive detection of Shigella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Rui; Rong, Zhen; Long, Feng; Liu, Qiqi

    2014-11-01

    A portable evanescent wave fiber biosensor was developed to achieve the rapid and highly sensitive detection of Shigella. In this study, a DNA probe was covalently immobilized onto fiber-optic biosensors that can hybridize with a fluorescently labeled complementary DNA. The sensitivity of detection for synthesized oligonucleotides can reach 10-10 M. The surface of the sensor can be regenerated with 0.5% sodium dodecyl sulfate solution (pH 1.9) for over 30 times without significant deterioration of performance. The total analysis time for a single sample, including the time for measurement and surface regeneration, was less than 6 min. We employed real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and compared the results of both methods to investigate the actual Shigella DNA detection capability of the fiber-optic biosensor. The fiber-optic biosensor could detect as low as 102 colony-forming unit/mL Shigella. This finding was comparable with that by real-time PCR, which suggests that this method is a potential alternative to existing detection methods.

  5. Rich catalytic injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veninger, Albert [Coventry, CT

    2008-12-30

    A gas turbine engine includes a compressor, a rich catalytic injector, a combustor, and a turbine. The rich catalytic injector includes a rich catalytic device, a mixing zone, and an injection assembly. The injection assembly provides an interface between the mixing zone and the combustor. The injection assembly can inject diffusion fuel into the combustor, provides flame aerodynamic stabilization in the combustor, and may include an ignition device.

  6. A novel signal-off electrochemiluminescence biosensor for the determination of glucose based on double nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Linlin; Ma, Qiang; Li, Yang; Liu, ZiPing; Su, Xingguang

    2015-01-15

    In this work, a novel facile signal-off electrochemiluminescence (ECL) biosensor has been developed for the determination of glucose based on the integration of chitosan (CHIT), CdTe quantum dots (CdTe QDs) and Au nanoparticles (Au NPs) on the glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Chitosan displays high water permeability, hydrophilic property, strong hydrogel ability and good adhesion to load the double nanoparticles to the glassy carbon electrode surfaces. Au NPs are efficient glucose oxidase (GOx)-mimickess to catalytically oxidize glucose, similar to the natural process. Upon the addition of glucose, the Au NPs catalyzed glucose to produce gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) based on the consumption of dissolved oxygen (O2), which resulted in a quenching effect on the ECL emission. Therefore, the determination of glucose could be achieved by monitoring the signal-off ECL biosensor. Under the optimum conditions, the ECL intensity of CdTe QDs and the concentration of glucose have a good linear relationship in the range of 0.01-10 mmol L(-1). The limit of detection for glucose was 5.28 μmol L(-1) (S/N=3). The biosensor showed good sensitivity, selectivity, reproducibility and stability. The proposed biosensor has been employed for the detection of glucose in human serum samples with satisfactory results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Protein Adsorption onto Nanomaterials for the Development of Biosensors and Analytical Devices: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhakta, Samir A.; Evans, Elizabeth; Benavidez, Tomás E.; Garcia, Carlos D.

    2014-01-01

    An important consideration for the development of biosensors is the adsorption of the bio recognition element to the surface of a substrate. As the first step in the immobilization process, adsorption affects most immobilization routes and much attention is given into the research of this process to maximize the overall activity of the bio sensor. The use of nanomaterials, specifically nanoparticles and nanostructured films, offers advantageous properties that can be fine-tuned for interaction with specific proteins to maximize activity, minimize structural changes, and enhance the catalytic step. In the biosensor field, protein-nanomaterial interactions are an emerging trend that span across many disciplines. This review addresses recent publications about the proteins most frequently used, their most relevant characteristics, and the conditions required to adsorb them to nanomaterials. When relevant and available, subsequent analytical figures of merits are discussed for selected biosensors. The general trend amongst the research papers allows concluding that the use of nanomaterials has already provided significant improvements in the analytical performance of many biosensors and that this research field will continue to grow. PMID:25892065

  8. Utilization of nanoparticle labels for signal amplification in ultrasensitive electrochemical affinity biosensors: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Liang; Bond, Alan M; Zhai, Jianping; Zhang, Jie

    2013-10-03

    Nanoparticles with desirable properties not exhibited by the bulk material can be readily synthesized because of rapid technological developments in the fields of materials science and nanotechnology. In particular their highly attractive electrochemical properties and electrocatalytic activity have facilitated achievement of the high level of signal amplification needed for the development of ultrasensitive electrochemical affinity biosensors for the detection of proteins and DNA. This review article explains the basic principles of nanoparticle based electrochemical biosensors, highlights the recent advances in the development of nanoparticle based signal amplification strategies, and provides a critical assessment of the likely drawbacks associated with each strategy. Finally, future perspectives for achieving advanced signal simplification in nanoparticles based biosensors are considered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. DNA-based Artificial Nanostructures: Fabrication, Properties, and Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Young; Kiang, Ching-Hwa

    2005-01-01

    Table of Content 1. Introduction 2. DNA fundamentals 3. Attachment of DNA to surface 4. Fabrication of nanostructures using DNA 4.1 Nanostructures of pure DNA 4.2 DNA-based assembly of metal nanoparticles 4.3 Construction of semiconductor particle arrays using DNA 4.4 DNA-directed nanowires 4.5 DNA-functionalized carbon nanotubes 4.6 Field-transistor based on DNA 4.7 Nanofabrication using artificial DNA 5. DNA-based nanostructures as biosensors 6. Properties of DNA-linked gold nanoparticles 6...

  10. Immobilization free electrochemical biosensor for folate receptor in cancer cells based on terminal protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Jiancong; Wang, Qingxiang; Yang, Weiqiang; Zhao, Mengmeng; Zhang, Ying; Guo, Longhua; Qiu, Bin; Lin, Zhenyu; Yang, Huang-Hao

    2016-12-15

    The determination of folate receptor (FR) that over expressed in vast quantity of cancerous cells frequently is significant for the clinical diagnosis and treatment of cancers. Many DNA-based electrochemical biosensors have been developed for FR detection with high selectivity and sensitivity, but most of them need complicated immobilization of DNA on the electrode surface firstly, which is tedious and therefore results in the poor reproducibility. In this study, a simple, sensitive, and selective electrochemical FR biosensor in cancer cells has been proposed, which combines the advantages of the convenient immobilization-free homogeneous indium tin oxide (ITO)-based electrochemical detection strategy and the high selectivity of the terminal protection of small molecule linked DNA. The small molecule of folic acid (FA) and an electroactive molecule of ferrocence (Fc) were tethered to 3'- and 5'-end of an arbitrary single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), respectively, forming the FA-ssDNA-Fc complex. In the absence of the target FR, the FA-ssDNA-Fc was degraded by exonuclease I (Exo I) from 3'-end and produced a free Fc, diffusing freely to the ITO electrode surface and resulting in strong electrochemical signal. When the target FR was present, the FA-ssDNA-Fc was bound to FR through specific interaction with FA anchored at the 3'-end, effectively protecting the ssDNA strand from hydrolysis by Exo I. The FR-FA-ssDNA-Fc could not diffuse easily to the negatively charged ITO electrode surface due to the electrostatic repulsion between the DNA strand and the negatively charged ITO electrode, so electrochemical signal reduced. The decreased electrochemical signal has a linear relationship with the logarithm of FR concentration in range of 10fM to 10nM with a detection limit of 3.8fM (S/N=3). The proposed biosensor has been applied to detect FR in HeLa cancer cells, and the decreased electrochemical signal has a linear relationship with the logarithm of cell concentration ranging

  11. A New Laccase Based Biosensor for Tartrazine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Zulaikha Mazlan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Laccase enzyme, a commonly used enzyme for the construction of biosensors for phenolic compounds was used for the first time to develop a new biosensor for the determination of the azo-dye tartrazine. The electrochemical biosensor was based on the immobilization of laccase on functionalized methacrylate-acrylate microspheres. The biosensor membrane is a composite of the laccase conjugated microspheres and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs coated on a carbon-paste screen-printed electrode. The reaction involving tartrazine can be catalyzed by laccase enzyme, where the current change was measured by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV at 1.1 V. The anodic peak current was linear within the tartrazine concentration range of 0.2 to 14 μM (R2 = 0.979 and the detection limit was 0.04 μM. Common food ingredients or additives such as glucose, sucrose, ascorbic acid, phenol and sunset yellow did not interfere with the biosensor response. Furthermore, the biosensor response was stable up to 30 days of storage period at 4 °C. Foods and beverage were used as real samples for the biosensor validation. The biosensor response to tartrazine showed no significant difference with a standard HPLC method for tartrazine analysis.

  12. Background reduction in a young interferometer biosensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, H. K P; Subramaniam, V.; Kanger, J. S.

    2014-01-01

    Integrated optical Young interferometer (IOYI) biosensors are among the most sensitive label-free biosensors. Detection limits are in the range of 20 fg/mm2. The applicability of these sensors is however strongly hampered by the large background that originates from both bulk refractive index

  13. Artificial DNA and surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agata, Roberta; Spoto, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    The combined use of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and modified or mimic oligonucleotides have expanded diagnostic capabilities of SPR-based biosensors and have allowed detailed studies of molecular recognition processes. This review summarizes the most significant advances made in this area over the past 15 years.   Functional and conformationally restricted DNA analogs (e.g., aptamers and PNAs) when used as components of SPR biosensors contribute to enhance the biosensor sensitivity and selectivity. At the same time, the SPR technology brings advantages that allows forbetter exploration of underlying properties of non-natural nucleic acid structures such us DNAzymes, LNA and HNA.

  14. MWCNTs based high sensitive lateral flow strip biosensor for rapid determination of aqueous mercury ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Li; Teng, Jun; Zhu, Mengya; Zheng, Lei; Zhong, Youhao; Liu, Guodong; Xue, Feng; Chen, Wei

    2016-11-15

    Here, we describe a disposable multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) labeled nucleic acid lateral flow strip biosensor for rapid and sensitive detection of aqueous mercury ions (Hg(2+)). Unlike the conventional colloidal gold nanoparticle based strip biosensors, the carboxylated MWCNTs were selected as the labeling substrate because of its high specific surface area for immobilization of recognition probes, improved stability and enhanced detection sensitivity of the strip biosensor. Combining the sandwich-type of T-Hg(2+)-T recognition mechanism with the optical properties of MWCNTs on lateral flow strip, optical black bands were observed on the lateral flow strips. Parameters (such as membrane category, the MWCNTs concentration, the amount of MWCNT-DNA probe, and the volume of the test probe) that govern the sensitivity and reproducibility of the sensor were optimized. The response of the optimized biosensor was highly linear over the range of 0.05-1ppb target Hg(2+), and the detection threshold was estimated at 0.05 ppb within a 15-min assay time. The sensitivity was 10-fold higher than the conventional colloidal gold based strip biosensor. More importantly, the stability of the sensor was also greatly improved with the usage of MWCNTs as the labeling. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Functionalized Palladium Nanoparticles for Hydrogen Peroxide Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Baccar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a comparison between two biosensors for hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 detection. The first biosensor was developed by the immobilization of Horseradish Peroxidase (HRP enzyme on thiol-modified gold electrode. The second biosensor was developed by the immobilization of cysteamine functionalizing palladium nanoparticles on modified gold surface. The amino groups can be activated with glutaraldehyde for horseradish peroxidase immobilization. The detection of hydrogen peroxide was successfully observed in PBS for both biosensors using the cyclic voltammetry and the chronoamperometry techniques. The results show that the limit detection depends on the large surface-to-volume ratio attained with palladium nanoparticles. The second biosensor presents a better detection limit of 7.5 μM in comparison with the first one which is equal to 75 μM.

  16. Emerging applications of label-free optical biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zanchetta Giuliano

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Innovative technical solutions to realize optical biosensors with improved performance are continuously proposed. Progress in material fabrication enables developing novel substrates with enhanced optical responses. At the same time, the increased spectrum of available biomolecular tools, ranging from highly specific receptors to engineered bioconjugated polymers, facilitates the preparation of sensing surfaces with controlled functionality. What remains often unclear is to which extent this continuous innovation provides effective breakthroughs for specific applications. In this review, we address this challenging question for the class of label-free optical biosensors, which can provide a direct signal upon molecular binding without using secondary probes. Label-free biosensors have become a consolidated approach for the characterization and screening of molecular interactions in research laboratories. However, in the last decade, several examples of other applications with high potential impact have been proposed. We review the recent advances in label-free optical biosensing technology by focusing on the potential competitive advantage provided in selected emerging applications, grouped on the basis of the target type. In particular, direct and real-time detection allows the development of simpler, compact, and rapid analytical methods for different kinds of targets, from proteins to DNA and viruses. The lack of secondary interactions facilitates the binding of small-molecule targets and minimizes the perturbation in single-molecule detection. Moreover, the intrinsic versatility of label-free sensing makes it an ideal platform to be integrated with biomolecular machinery with innovative functionality, as in case of the molecular tools provided by DNA nanotechnology.

  17. TIGER: the universal biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstadler, Steven A.; Sampath, Rangarajan; Blyn, Lawrence B.; Eshoo, Mark W.; Hall, Thomas A.; Jiang, Yun; Drader, Jared J.; Hannis, James C.; Sannes-Lowery, Kristin A.; Cummins, Lendell L.; Libby, Brian; Walcott, Demetrius J.; Schink, Amy; Massire, Christian; Ranken, Raymond; Gutierrez, Jose; Manalili, Sheri; Ivy, Cristina; Melton, Rachael; Levene, Harold; Barrett-Wilt, Greg; Li, Feng; Zapp, Vanessa; White, Neill; Samant, Vivek; McNeil, John A.; Knize, Duane; Robbins, David; Rudnick, Karl; Desai, Anjali; Moradi, Emily; Ecker, David J.

    2005-03-01

    In this work, we describe a strategy for the detection and characterization of microorganisms associated with a potential biological warfare attack or a natural outbreak of an emerging infectious disease. This approach, termed TIGER (Triangulation Identification for the Genetic Evaluation of Risks), relies on mass spectrometry-derived base composition signatures obtained from PCR amplification of broadly conserved regions of the microbial genome(s) in a sample. The sample can be derived from air filtration devices, clinical samples, or other sources. Core to this approach are "intelligent PCR primers" that target broadly conserved regions of microbial genomes that flank variable regions. This approach requires that high-performance mass measurements be made on PCR products in the 80-140 bp size range in a high-throughput, robust modality. As will be demonstrated, the concept is equally applicable to bacteria and viruses and could be further applied to fungi and protozoa. In addition to describing the fundamental strategy of this approach, several specific examples of TIGER are presented that illustrate the impact this approach could have on the way biological weapons attacks are detected and the way that the etiologies of infectious diseases are determined. The first example illustrates how any bacterial species might be identified, using Bacillus anthracis as the test agent. The second example demonstrates how DNA-genome viruses are identified using five members of Poxviridae family, whose members includes Variola virus, the agent responsible for smallpox. The third example demonstrates how RNA-genome viruses are identified using the Alphaviruses (VEE, WEE, and EEE) as representative examples. These examples illustrate how the TIGER technology can be applied to create a universal identification strategy for all pathogens, including those that infect humans, livestock, and plants.

  18. Biosensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes paste electrode modified with laccase for pirimicarb pesticide quantification

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Thiago M. B. F.; M. Fátima Barroso; Morais, Simone; Lima-Neto, Pedro de; Correia, Adriana N.; Maria B. P. P. Oliveira; Delerue-Matos, Cristina

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on the development of a sensitive enzymatic biosensor for the determination of pirimicarb pesticide based on the immobilization of laccase on composite carbon paste electrodes. Multi- walled carbon nanotubes(MWCNTs)paste electrode modified by dispersion of laccase(3%,w/w) within the optimum composite matrix(60:40%,w/w,MWCNTs and paraffin binder)showed the best performance, with excellent electron transfer kinetic and catalytic effects related to the redox proce...

  19. Highly sensitive amperometric biosensor based on electrochemically-reduced graphene oxide-chitosan/hemoglobin nanocomposite for nitromethane determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Yunping; Wen, Wei; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2016-05-15

    Nitromethane (CH3NO2) is an important organic chemical raw material with a wide variety of applications as well as one of the most common pollutants. Therefore it is pretty important to establish a simple and sensitive detection method for CH3NO2. In our study, a novel amperometric biosensor for nitromethane (CH3NO2) based on immobilization of electrochemically-reduced graphene oxide (rGO), chitosan (CS) and hemoglobin (Hb) on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was constructed. Scanning electron microscopy, infrared spectroscopy and electrochemical methods were used to characterize the Hb-CS/rGO-CS composite film. The effects of scan rate and pH of phosphate buffer on the biosensor have been studied in detail and optimized. Due to the graphene and chitosan nanocomposite, the developed biosensor demonstrating direct electrochemistry with faster electron-transfer rate (6.48s(-1)) and excellent catalytic activity towards CH3NO2. Under optimal conditions, the proposed biosensor exhibited fast amperometric response (<5s) to CH3NO2 with a wide linear range of 5 μM~1.46 mM (R=0.999) and a low detection limit of 1.5 μM (S/N=3). In addition, the biosensor had high selectivity, reproducibility and stability, providing the possibility for monitoring CH3NO2 in complex real samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Influences of Mg Doping on the Electrochemical Performance of TiO2 Nanodots Based Biosensor Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. H. Al-Furjan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical biosensors are essential for health monitors to help in diagnosis and detection of diseases. Enzyme adsorptions on biosensor electrodes and direct electron transfer between them have been recognized as key factors to affect biosensor performance. TiO2 has a good protein adsorption ability and facilitates having more enzyme adsorption and better electron transfer. In this work, Mg ions are introduced into TiO2 nanodots in order to further improve electrode performance because Mg ions are considered to have good affinity with proteins or enzymes. Mg doped TiO2 nanodots on Ti substrates were prepared by spin-coating and calcining. The effects of Mg doping on the nanodots morphology and performance of the electrodes were investigated. The density and size of TiO2 nanodots were obviously changed with Mg doping. The sensitivity of 2% Mg doped TiO2 nanodots based biosensor electrode increased to 1377.64 from 897.8 µA mM−1 cm−2 and its KMapp decreases to 0.83 from 1.27 mM, implying that the enzyme achieves higher catalytic efficiency due to better affinity of the enzyme with the Mg doped TiO2. The present work could provide an alternative to improve biosensor performances.

  1. Electrochemical biosensors in pharmaceutical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric de Souza Gil

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Given the increasing demand for practical and low-cost analytical techniques, biosensors have attracted attention for use in the quality analysis of drugs, medicines, and other analytes of interest in the pharmaceutical area. Biosensors allow quantification not only of the active component in pharmaceutical formulations, but also the analysis of degradation products and metabolites in biological fluids. Thus, this article presents a brief review of biosensor use in pharmaceutical analysis, focusing on enzymatic electrochemical sensors.Em virtude do aumento da demanda por técnicas analíticas simples e de baixo custo, os biossensores têm atraído a atenção para a análise de fármacos, medicamentos e outros analitos de interesse em controle de qualidade de medicamentos. Os biossensores permitem a quantificação não somente de princípio ativo em formulações farmacêuticas, mas também de produtos de degradação e metabólitos em fluídos biológicos, bem como análise de amostras de interesse clínico e industrial, além de possibilitar a determinação de enantiômeros. Desta forma, este artigo objetiva fazer uma breve revisão a respeito do emprego de biossensores em análise farmacêutica, com ênfase em sensores eletroquímicos enzimáticos.

  2. Biosentinel: Developing a Space Radiation Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa Maria, Sergio R.; Marina, Diana B.; Parra, Macarena P.; Boone, Travis D.; Tan, Ming; Ricco, Antonio J.; Straume, Tore N.; Lusby, Terry C.; Harkness, T.; Reiss-Bubenheim, Debra; hide

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation presents a major challenge to human exploration and long-term residence in space. The deep-space radiation spectrum includes highly energetic particles that generate double strand breaks (DSBs), deleterious DNA lesions that are usually repaired without errors via homologous recombination (HR), a conserved pathway in all eukaryotes. While progress identifying and characterizing biological radiation effects using Earth-based facilities has been significant, no terrestrial source duplicates the unique space radiation environment.We are developing a biosensor-based nanosatellite to fly aboard NASAs Space Launch System Exploration Mission 1, expected to launch in 2017 and reach a 1AU (astronomic unit) heliocentric orbit. Our biosensor (called BioSentinel) uses the yeast S. cerevisiae to measure DSBs in response to ambient space radiation. The BioSentinel strain contains engineered genetic defects that prevent growth until and unless a radiation-induced DSB near a reporter gene activates the yeasts HR repair mechanisms. Thus, culture growth and metabolic activity directly indicate a successful DSB-and-repair event. In parallel, HR-defective and wild type strains will provide survival data. Desiccated cells will be carried within independent culture microwells, built into 96-well microfluidic cards. Each microwell set will be activated by media addition at different time points over 18 months, and cell growth will be tracked continuously via optical density. One reserve set will be activated only in the occurrence of a solar particle event. Biological measurements will be compared to data provided by onboard physical dosimeters and to Earth-based experiments.BioSentinel will conduct the first study of biological response to space radiation outside Low Earth Orbit in over 40 years. BioSentinel will thus address strategic knowledge gaps related to the biological effects of space radiation and will provide an adaptable platform to perform human

  3. The role of DNA dependent protein kinase in synapsis of DNA ends

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.P.W.C. Weterings (Eric); N.S. Verkaik (Nicole); H.T. Brüggenwirth (Hennie); D.C. van Gent (Dik); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractDNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) plays a central role in the non-homologous end-joining pathway of DNA double strand break repair. Its catalytic subunit (DNA-PK(CS)) functions as a serine/threonine protein kinase. We show that DNA-PK forms a stable complex at DNA termini that blocks

  4. Characterization of Textile-Insulated Capacitive Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Charn Loong; Reaz, Mamun Bin Ibne

    2017-01-01

    Capacitive biosensors are an emerging technology revolutionizing wearable sensing systems and personal healthcare devices. They are capable of continuously measuring bioelectrical signals from the human body while utilizing textiles as an insulator. Different textile types have their own unique properties that alter skin-electrode capacitance and the performance of capacitive biosensors. This paper aims to identify the best textile insulator to be used with capacitive biosensors by analysing the characteristics of 6 types of common textile materials (cotton, linen, rayon, nylon, polyester, and PVC-textile) while evaluating their impact on the performance of a capacitive biosensor. A textile-insulated capacitive (TEX-C) biosensor was developed and validated on 3 subjects. Experimental results revealed that higher skin-electrode capacitance of a TEX-C biosensor yields a lower noise floor and better signal quality. Natural fabric such as cotton and linen were the two best insulating materials to integrate with a capacitive biosensor. They yielded the lowest noise floor of 2 mV and achieved consistent electromyography (EMG) signals measurements throughout the performance test. PMID:28287493

  5. Characterization of Textile-Insulated Capacitive Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Charn Loong; Reaz, Mamun Bin Ibne

    2017-03-12

    Capacitive biosensors are an emerging technology revolutionizing wearable sensing systems and personal healthcare devices. They are capable of continuously measuring bioelectrical signals from the human body while utilizing textiles as an insulator. Different textile types have their own unique properties that alter skin-electrode capacitance and the performance of capacitive biosensors. This paper aims to identify the best textile insulator to be used with capacitive biosensors by analysing the characteristics of 6 types of common textile materials (cotton, linen, rayon, nylon, polyester, and PVC-textile) while evaluating their impact on the performance of a capacitive biosensor. A textile-insulated capacitive (TEX-C) biosensor was developed and validated on 3 subjects. Experimental results revealed that higher skin-electrode capacitance of a TEX-C biosensor yields a lower noise floor and better signal quality. Natural fabric such as cotton and linen were the two best insulating materials to integrate with a capacitive biosensor. They yielded the lowest noise floor of 2 mV and achieved consistent electromyography (EMG) signals measurements throughout the performance test.

  6. Simulation of Biosensor using FEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeparamatti, B. G.; Hebbal, M. S.; Sheeparamatti, R. B.; Math, V. B.; Kadadevaramath, J. S.

    2006-04-01

    Bio-Micro Electro Mechanical Systems/Nano Electro Mechanical Systems include a wide variety of sensors, actuators, and complex micro/nano devices for biomedical applications. Recent advances in biosensors have shown that sensors based on bending of microfabricated cantilevers have potential advantages over earlier used detection methods. Thus, a simple cantilever beam can be used as a sensor for biomedical, chemical and environmental applications. Here, microfabricated multilayered cantilever beam is exposed to sensing environment. Lower layer being pure structural silicon or polymer and upper layer is of polymer with antigen/antibody immobilized in it. Obviously, it has an affinity towards its counterpart i.e. antibody/antigen. In the sensing environment, if counter elements exists, they get captured by this sensing beam head, and the cantilever beam deflects. This deflection can be sensed and the presence of counter elements in the environment can be predicted. In this work, a finite element model of a biosensor for sensing antibody/antigen reaction is developed and simulated using ANSYS/Multiphysics. The optimal dimensions of the microcantilever beam are selected based on permissible deflection range with the aid of MATLAB. In the model analysis, both weight and surface stress effects on the cantilever are considered. Approximate weights are taken into account because of counter elements, considering their molecular weight and possible number of elements required for sensing. The results obtained in terms of lateral deflection are presented.

  7. Catalytic asymmetric fluorinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobbio, Carla; Gouverneur, Véronique

    2006-06-07

    The appearance of structurally diverse fluorinating reagents displaying a large spectrum of reactivity has been critical to the development of the catalytic asymmetric fluorination processes known to date. In this article, we discuss how this area of research emerged and which strategies have allowed for the successful development of both nucleophilic and electrophilic catalytic enantioselective fluorinations. We also present the fundamental understanding of catalytic activity and enantioselectivity for the most efficient processes and highlight the first synthetic application with the preparation of a complex fluorinated target.

  8. Improved biosensor-based detection system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    Described is a new biosensor-based detection system for effector compounds, useful for in vivo applications in e.g. screening and selecting of cells which produce a small molecule effector compound or which take up a small molecule effector compound from its environment. The detection system...... comprises a protein or RNA-based biosensor for the effector compound which indirectly regulates the expression of a reporter gene via two hybrid proteins, providing for fewer false signals or less 'noise', tuning of sensitivity or other advantages over conventional systems where the biosensor directly...

  9. Design Strategies for Aptamer-Based Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kun; Liang, Zhiqiang; Zhou, Nandi

    2010-01-01

    Aptamers have been widely used as recognition elements for biosensor construction, especially in the detection of proteins or small molecule targets, and regarded as promising alternatives for antibodies in bioassay areas. In this review, we present an overview of reported design strategies for the fabrication of biosensors and classify them into four basic modes: target-induced structure switching mode, sandwich or sandwich-like mode, target-induced dissociation/displacement mode and competitive replacement mode. In view of the unprecedented advantages brought about by aptamers and smart design strategies, aptamer-based biosensors are expected to be one of the most promising devices in bioassay related applications. PMID:22399891

  10. Modeling amperometric biosensors based on allosteric enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liutauras Ričkus

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Computational modeling of a biosensor with allosteric enzyme layer was investigated in this study. The operation of the biosensor is modeled using non-stationary reaction-diffusion equations. The model involves three regions: the allosteric enzyme layer where the allosteric enzyme reactions as well as then mass transport by diffusion take place, the diffusion region where the mass transport by diffusion and non-enzymatic reactions take place and the convective region in which the analyte concentration is maintained constant. The biosensor response on dependency substrate concentration, cooperativity coefficient and the diffusion layer thickness on the same parameters have been studied.

  11. U-bent plastic optical fiber based plasmonic biosensor for nucleic acid detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gowri, A.; Sai, V. V. R.

    2017-05-01

    This study presents the development of low cost, rapid and highly sensitive plasmonic sandwich DNA biosensor using U-bent plastic optical fiber (POF) probes with high evanescent wave absorbance sensitivity and gold nanoparticles (AuNP) as labels. Plastic optical fiber (PMMA core and fluorinated polymer as cladding) offer ease in machinability and handling due to which optimum U-bent geometry (with fiber and bend diameter of 0.5 and 1.5 mm respectively) for high sensitivity could be achieved. A sensitive fiber optic DNA biosensor is realized by (i) modifying the PMMA surface using ethylenediamine (EDA) in order to maximize the immobilization of capture oligonucleotides (ONs) and (ii) conjugating probe ONs to AuNP labels of optimum size ( 35 nm) with high extinction coefficient and optimal ON surface density. The sandwich hybridization assay on U-bent POF probes results in increase in optical absorbance through the probe with increase in target ON concentration due to the presence of increased number of AuNPs. The absorbance of light passing through the U-bent probe due to the presence of AuNP labels on its surface as result of sandwich DNA hybridization is measured using a halogen lamp and a fiber optic spectrometer. A picomolar limit of detection of target ON (0.2 pM or 1 pg/ml or 5 attomol in 25 μL) is achieved with this biosensing scheme, indicating its potential for the development of a highly sensitive DNA biosensor.

  12. Catalytic distillation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  13. Catalytic distillation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  14. DNA Polymerase Gamma in Mitochondrial DNA Replication and Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William C. Copeland

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA are associated with aging, and they can cause tissue degeneration and neuromuscular pathologies known as mitochondrial diseases. Because DNA polymerase γ (pol γ is the enzyme responsible for replication and repair of mitochondrial DNA, the burden of faithful duplication of mitochondrial DNA, both in preventing spontaneous errors and in DNA repair synthesis, falls on pol γ. Investigating the biological functions of pol γ and its inhibitors aids our understanding of the sources of mtDNA mutations. In animal cells, pol γ is composed of two subunits, a larger catalytic subunit of 125–140 kDa and second subunit of 35–55 kDa. The catalytic subunit contains DNA polymerase activity, 3’-5’ exonuclease activity, and a 5’-dRP lyase activity. The accessory subunit is required for highly processive DNA synthesis and increases the affinity of pol gamma to the DNA.

  15. Electrochemical paper-based peptide nucleic acid biosensor for detecting human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teengam, Prinjaporn; Siangproh, Weena; Tuantranont, Adisorn; Henry, Charles S; Vilaivan, Tirayut; Chailapakul, Orawon

    2017-02-01

    A novel paper-based electrochemical biosensor was developed using an anthraquinone-labeled pyrrolidinyl peptide nucleic acid (acpcPNA) probe (AQ-PNA) and graphene-polyaniline (G-PANI) modified electrode to detect human papillomavirus (HPV). An inkjet printing technique was employed to prepare the paper-based G-PANI-modified working electrode. The AQ-PNA probe baring a negatively charged amino acid at the N-terminus was immobilized onto the electrode surface through electrostatic attraction. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used to verify the AQ-PNA immobilization. The paper-based electrochemical DNA biosensor was used to detect a synthetic 14-base oligonucleotide target with a sequence corresponding to human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 DNA by measuring the electrochemical signal response of the AQ label using square-wave voltammetry before and after hybridization. It was determined that the current signal significantly decreased after the addition of target DNA. This phenomenon is explained by the rigidity of PNA-DNA duplexes, which obstructs the accessibility of electron transfer from the AQ label to the electrode surface. Under optimal conditions, the detection limit of HPV type 16 DNA was found to be 2.3 nM with a linear range of 10-200 nM. The performance of this biosensor on real DNA samples was tested with the detection of PCR-amplified DNA samples from the SiHa cell line. The new method employs an inexpensive and disposable device, which easily incinerated after use and is promising for the screening and monitoring of the amount of HPV-DNA type 16 to identify the primary stages of cervical cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Biosensors in immunology: the story so far

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pathak, S.S.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.

    1997-01-01

    Optical biosensors are finding a range of applications in immunology. They enable biomolecular interactions to be characterized in real time without the need to label reactants, and, because individual binding steps can be visualized, are particularly suited to complex assays

  17. Point-of-care biosensor system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasan, Arvind Sai Sarathi; Mahadeo, Dinesh Michael; Doraiswami, Ravi; Huang, Yunhan; Pecht, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Point-of-care biosensor systems can potentially improve patient care through real-time and remote health monitoring. Over the past few decades, research has been conducted in the field of biosensors to detect patterns of biomarkers and provide information on their concentration in biological samples for robust diagnosis. In future point-of-care applications, requirements such as rapid label-free detection, miniaturized sensor size, and portability will limit the types of biosensors that can be used. This paper reviews label-free detection techniques using Biological MicroElectroMechanical Systems as a potential candidate for point-of-care biosensing applications. Furthermore, detailed surveys have been carried out on wireless networking schemes applicable for a point-of-care environment and on prognostic techniques that will enable decision-support services. This paper concludes by providing a list of challenges that must be resolved before realizing biosensor systems for next-generation point-of-care applications.

  18. Development of microbial biosensors for food analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukasiak, Justyna

    Microbial biosensors are analytical devices composed of a biological recognition element (microorganism) integrated to a signal transduction element (i.e. bioluminescence), converting a biochemical signal into quantifiable response. Due to their molecular properties they can be diversely designed......, optimize and characterize various reporter strains utilizing different signal transducers and targeting carbohydrate constituents of pectin and arabinoxylan. Addit onally, the objective was to assess the potential suitability of microbial biosensors for food ingredients analysis. Pectin is a plant...... and responded quantitatively in selected detection ranges. Verification of performance of arabinoxylan targeting reporter strains revealed 9-18% difference between the results obtained by biosensors and by High Performance Anion-Exchange Chromatography. Results of this research suggest that microbial biosensors...

  19. Recent Advances in Nanotechnology Applied to Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daxiang Cui

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been great progress the application of nanomaterials in biosensors. The importance of these to the fundamental development of biosensors has been recognized. In particular, nanomaterials such as gold nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, magnetic nanoparticles and quantum dots have been being actively investigated for their applications in biosensors, which have become a new interdisciplinary frontier between biological detection and material science. Here we review some of the main advances in this field over the past few years, explore the application prospects, and discuss the issues, approaches, and challenges, with the aim of stimulating a broader interest in developing nanomaterial-based biosensors and improving their applications in disease diagnosis and food safety examination.

  20. Intelligent Communication Module for Wireless Biosensor Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Naik, R.; Singh, J.; Le, H. P.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter presented a new paradigm of biosensors which have processing capability with an intelligent and adaptive wireless communication module. The adaptive communication module efficiently reconfigures its hardware components according to the changes in operating environment in order to reduce system power consumption and optimally utilise resources. The chapter presented several significant applications of wireless biosensor networks which hold enormous potential to benefit the communi...

  1. Nanostructured Metal Oxides Based Enzymatic Electrochemical Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari, Anees A.; Alhoshan, M.; Alsalhi, M.S.; Aldwayyan, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    The unique electrocatalytic properties of the metal oxides and the ease of metal oxide nanostructured fabrication make them extremely interesting materials for electrochemical enzymatic biosensor applications. The application of nanostructured metal oxides in such sensing devices has taken off rapidly and will surely continue to expand. This article provides a review on current research status of electrochemical enzymatic biosensors based on various new types of nanostructured metal oxides su...

  2. Biosensors for Inorganic and Organic Arsenicals

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jian; Rosen, Barry P.

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic is a natural environmental contaminant to which humans are routinely exposed and is strongly associated with human health problems, including cancer, cardiovascular and neurological diseases. To date, a number of biosensors for the detection of arsenic involving the coupling of biological engineering and electrochemical techniques has been developed. The properties of whole-cell bacterial or cell-free biosensors are summarized in the present review with emphasis on their sensitivity a...

  3. Developing trends in aptamer-based biosensor devices and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Scott; Wishart, David; Xing, James Z; Chen, Jie

    2014-02-01

    Aptamers are, in general, easier to produce, easier to store and are able to bind to a wider variety of targets than antibodies. For these reasons, aptamers are gaining increasing popularity in environmental monitoring as well as disease detection and disease management applications. This review article examines the research and design of RNA and DNA aptamer based biosensor systems and applications as well as their potential for integration in effective biosensor devices. As single stranded DNA or RNA molecules that can bind to specific targets, aptamers are well suited for biomolecular recognition and sensing applications. Beyond being able to be designed for a near endless number of specific targets, aptamers can also be made which change their conformation in a predictable and consistent way upon binding. This can lead to many unique and effective detection methods using a variety of optical and electrochemical means.

  4. Nanoparticles Modified ITO Based Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M. Z. H.

    2017-04-01

    Incorporation of nanomaterials with controlled molecular architecture shows great promise in improving electronic communication between biomolecules and the electrode substrate. In electrochemical applications metal nanoparticles (NPs) modified electrodes have been widely used and are emerging as candidates to develop highly sensitive electrochemical sensors. There has been a growing technological interest in modified indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes due to their prominent optoelectronic properties and their wide use as a transducing platform. The introduction of NPs into the transducing platform is commonly achieved by their adsorption onto conventional electrode surfaces in various forms, including that of a composite. The aim of this review is to discuss the role of metallic NPs for surface fabrication of ITO thin films leading to detection of specific biomolecules and applications as a biosensor platform.

  5. Yeast-based biosensors: design and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeniran, Adebola; Sherer, Michael; Tyo, Keith E J

    2015-02-01

    Yeast-based biosensing (YBB) is an exciting research area, as many studies have demonstrated the use of yeasts to accurately detect specific molecules. Biosensors incorporating various yeasts have been reported to detect an incredibly large range of molecules including but not limited to odorants, metals, intracellular metabolites, carcinogens, lactate, alcohols, and sugars. We review the detection strategies available for different types of analytes, as well as the wide range of output methods that have been incorporated with yeast biosensors. We group biosensors into two categories: those that are dependent upon transcription of a gene to report the detection of a desired molecule and those that are independent of this reporting mechanism. Transcription-dependent biosensors frequently depend on heterologous expression of sensing elements from non-yeast organisms, a strategy that has greatly expanded the range of molecules available for detection by YBBs. Transcription-independent biosensors circumvent the problem of sensing difficult-to-detect analytes by instead relying on yeast metabolism to generate easily detected molecules when the analyte is present. The use of yeast as the sensing element in biosensors has proven to be successful and continues to hold great promise for a variety of applications. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  6. Biosensors-on-chip: a topical review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sensen; Shamsi, Mohtashim H.

    2017-08-01

    This review will examine the integration of two fields that are currently at the forefront of science, i.e. biosensors and microfluidics. As a lab-on-a-chip (LOC) technology, microfluidics has been enriched by the integration of various detection tools for analyte detection and quantitation. The application of such microfluidic platforms is greatly increased in the area of biosensors geared towards point-of-care diagnostics. Together, the merger of microfluidics and biosensors has generated miniaturized devices for sample processing and sensitive detection with quantitation. We believe that microfluidic biosensors (biosensors-on-chip) are essential for developing robust and cost effective point-of-care diagnostics. This review is relevant to a variety of disciplines, such as medical science, clinical diagnostics, LOC technologies including MEMs/NEMs, and analytical science. Specifically, this review will appeal to scientists working in the two overlapping fields of biosensors and microfluidics, and will also help new scientists to find their directions in developing point-of-care devices.

  7. Opportunities for bioprocess monitoring using FRET biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantinou, Antony; Polizzi, Karen M

    2013-10-01

    Bioprocess monitoring is used to track the progress of a cell culture and ensure that the product quality is maintained. Current schemes for monitoring metabolism rely on offline measurements of samples of the extracellular medium. However, in the era of synthetic biology, it is now possible to design and implement biosensors that consist of biological macromolecules and are able to report on the intracellular environment of cells. The use of fluorescent reporter signals allows non-invasive, non-destructive and online monitoring of the culture, which reduces the delay between measurement and any necessary intervention. The present mini-review focuses on protein-based biosensors that utilize FRET as the signal transduction mechanism. The mechanism of FRET, which utilizes the ratio of emission intensity at two wavelengths, has an inherent advantage of being ratiometric, meaning that small differences in the experimental set-up or biosensor expression level can be normalized away. This allows for more reliable quantitative estimation of the concentration of the target molecule. Existing FRET biosensors that are of potential interest to bioprocess monitoring include those developed for primary metabolites, redox potential, pH and product formation. For target molecules where a biosensor has not yet been developed, some candidate binding domains can be identified from the existing biological databases. However, the remaining challenge is to make the process of developing a FRET biosensor faster and more efficient.

  8. A graphene-based smart catalytic system with superior catalytic performances and temperature responsive catalytic behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Junjie; Lv, Weipeng; Zhang, Guanghui; Li, Yang; Zhang, Guoliang; Zhang, Fengbao; Fan, Xiaobin

    2013-07-21

    We have successfully developed a unique graphene-based smart catalytic system which consists of the graphene supported Au-Pt bimetallic nanocatalyst with a well-defined core-shell structure and a dextran-based temperature-responsive polymer. The unique catalytic system possesses excellent catalytic performances and the catalytic activities could be readily switched on or off at different temperature windows.

  9. Biosensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    The invention relates to a biochemical assay for wide class of hydrophobic Coenzyme A esters wherein the analyte is caused to react with a specifically binding, modified protein, and thereby causing a detectable signal. A one step assay for hydrophobic carboxylic acid esters in whole blood, serum...

  10. Biosensors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Plant Pathology Labora- tory, National Botanical. Research ... enzymes from thermo- philic fungi. (center) B Singh is Head and Scientist, Plant. Pathology Division,. National Botanical. Research Institute,. Lucknow. He specializes in the field of biocontrol of ... (a) (top): Construction and mode of operation of a bio- sensor.

  11. Analysis of an optical biosensor based on elastic light scattering from diamond-, glass-, and sapphire microspheres

    OpenAIRE

    Murib, Mohammed Sharif; Tran, Anh Quang; De Ceuninck, Ward; Schöning, J.M.; Nesladek, Milos; SERPENGÜZEL, Ali; Wagner, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and protein recognition are now standard tools in biology. In addition, the special optical properties of microsphere resonators expressed by the high quality factor (Q-factor) of whispering gallery modes (WGMs) or morphology dependent resonances (MDRs) have attracted the attention of the biophotonic community. Microsphere-based biosensors are considered as powerful candidates to achieve label-free recognition of single molecules due to the high sensitivity of thei...

  12. Ultra-sensitive optical biosensor based on whispering gallery modes: The effect of buffer solutions refractive index on their sensitivity and performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadgaran, Hamid; Pourmand, Raheleh

    2013-01-01

    Background: Whispering gallery modes (WGM) biosensors are ultrasensitive systems that can measure amount of adsorbed layer onto the micro-cavity surface. They have many applications including protein, peptide growth, DNA and bacteria detection, molecular properties measurements and specific interaction and drug table recognitions due to their high sensitivity, compact size and label free sensing mechanism.     Objective: In this paper we investigate the effect of buffer solution on detection of specific biomolecules in WGM biosensors through its refractive index change. Methods: The propagation of electromagnetic waves in a dielectric microsphere is analyzed by solving Maxwell’s equations through proper boundary condition to find a concise relation for micro-cavity resonance shift. Results: Analysis of the buffer solution’s refractive index effects on detection of BSA by WGM biosensors are presented and it was shown that even a very small change in the refractive index of buffer solution can affect the biosensor wavelength shift and the sensitivity of biosensors. Conclusion: This study opens up a discussion in biosensor sensitivity based on true and reliable performance of the buffer solution through its accurate determination of refractive index and behavior. To avoid expensive methods of enhancing sensitivity, one can improve the sensitivity of WGM biosensor to some extent, by means of using proper buffer solution. PMID:25505748

  13. Prussian blue-Au nanocomposites actuated hemin/G-quadruplexes catalysis for amplified detection of DNA, Hg2+ and adenosine triphosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guangfeng; Chen, Ling; Zhu, Yanhong; He, Xiuping; Xu, Gang; Zhang, Xiaojun

    2014-10-21

    In this paper, horseradish peroxidase-mimicking DNAzyme (HRP-DNAzyme) and Prussian blue (PB)-gold (Au) nanocomposites were designed as versatile electrochemical sensing platforms for the amplified detection of DNA, Hg(2+) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP). By the conjugation of the target probe with the capture probe, a conformational change resulted in the formation of HRP-DNAzyme on the PB-Au modified electrode. The redox of HRP-DNAzyme (red) was efficiently carried out in the presence of H2O2, in which PB acted as a mediator stimulating the biocatalytic functions of HRP-DNAzyme and actuated a catalytic cycle bringing an amplified signal. Specific recognition of the target DNA, Hg(2+) and ATP allowed selective amperometric detection of the target molecule. The detection limits of DNA, Hg(2+) and ATP were 50 nM, 30 pM and 3 nM, respectively. The highlight of this work is that the catalytic cycle between PB-Au nanocomposites and HRP-DNAzyme was adequately utilized in the amplification platform for versatile sensing. The novel electrocatalytic biosensor involving only one-step incubation exhibited a wide linear range, low detection limit, and satisfactory selectivity and operational stability. The proposed approach provided an ease-of-use and universal reporting system with a simple design and easy operations.

  14. Nanostructured Tip-Shaped Biosensors: Application of Six Sigma Approach for Enhanced Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong-Joong Kahng

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured tip-shaped biosensors have drawn attention for biomolecule detection as they are promising for highly sensitive and specific detection of a target analyte. Using a nanostructured tip, the sensitivity is increased to identify individual molecules because of the high aspect ratio structure. Various detection methods, such as electrochemistry, fluorescence microcopy, and Raman spectroscopy, have been attempted to enhance the sensitivity and the specificity. Due to the confined path of electrons, electrochemical measurement using a nanotip enables the detection of single molecules. When an electric field is combined with capillary action and fluid flow, target molecules can be effectively concentrated onto a nanotip surface for detection. To enhance the concentration efficacy, a dendritic nanotip rather than a single tip could be used to detect target analytes, such as nanoparticles, cells, and DNA. However, reproducible fabrication with relation to specific detection remains a challenge due to the instability of a manufacturing method, resulting in inconsistent shape. In this paper, nanostructured biosensors are reviewed with our experimental results using dendritic nanotips for sequence specific detection of DNA. By the aid of the Six Sigma approach, the fabrication yield of dendritic nanotips increases from 20.0% to 86.6%. Using the nanotips, DNA is concentrated and detected in a sequence specific way with the detection limit equivalent to 1000 CFU/mL. The pros and cons of a nanotip biosensor are evaluated in conjunction with future prospects.

  15. Nanostructured Tip-Shaped Biosensors: Application of Six Sigma Approach for Enhanced Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahng, Seong-Joong; Kim, Jong-Hoon; Chung, Jae-Hyun

    2016-12-23

    Nanostructured tip-shaped biosensors have drawn attention for biomolecule detection as they are promising for highly sensitive and specific detection of a target analyte. Using a nanostructured tip, the sensitivity is increased to identify individual molecules because of the high aspect ratio structure. Various detection methods, such as electrochemistry, fluorescence microcopy, and Raman spectroscopy, have been attempted to enhance the sensitivity and the specificity. Due to the confined path of electrons, electrochemical measurement using a nanotip enables the detection of single molecules. When an electric field is combined with capillary action and fluid flow, target molecules can be effectively concentrated onto a nanotip surface for detection. To enhance the concentration efficacy, a dendritic nanotip rather than a single tip could be used to detect target analytes, such as nanoparticles, cells, and DNA. However, reproducible fabrication with relation to specific detection remains a challenge due to the instability of a manufacturing method, resulting in inconsistent shape. In this paper, nanostructured biosensors are reviewed with our experimental results using dendritic nanotips for sequence specific detection of DNA. By the aid of the Six Sigma approach, the fabrication yield of dendritic nanotips increases from 20.0% to 86.6%. Using the nanotips, DNA is concentrated and detected in a sequence specific way with the detection limit equivalent to 1000 CFU/mL. The pros and cons of a nanotip biosensor are evaluated in conjunction with future prospects.

  16. Direct electrochemical sensor for label-free DNA detection based on zero current potentiometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Nai-ying; Gao, Wei; He, Xu-lun; Chang, Zhu; Xu, Mao-tian

    2013-01-15

    A direct electrochemical DNA biosensor based on zero current potentiometry was fabricated by immobilization of ssDNA onto gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) coated pencil graphite electrode (PGE). One ssDNA/AuNPs/PGE was connected in series between clips of working and counter electrodes of a potentiostat, and then immersed into the solution together with a reference electrode, establishing a novel DNA biosensor for specific DNA detection. The variation of zero current potential difference (ΔE(zcp)) before and after hybridization of the self-assembled probe DNA with the target DNA was used as a signal to characterize and quantify the target DNA sequence. The whole DNA biosensor fabrication process was characterized by cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy with the use of ferricyanide as an electrochemical redox indicator. Under the optimized conditions, ΔE(zcp) was linear with the concentrations of the complementary target DNA in the range from 10nM to 1μM, with a detection limit of 6.9nM. The DNA biosensor showed a good reproducibility and selectivity. Prepared DNA biosensor is facile and sensitive, and it eliminates the need of using exogenous reagents to monitor the oligonucleotides hybridization. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Graphene, carbon nanotubes, zinc oxide and gold as elite nanomaterials for fabrication of biosensors for healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Ahlawat, Wandit; Kumar, Rajesh; Dilbaghi, Neeraj

    2015-08-15

    Technological advancements worldwide at rapid pace in the area of materials science and nanotechnology have made it possible to synthesize nanoparticles with desirable properties not exhibited by the bulk material. Among variety of available nanomaterials, graphene, carbon nanotubes, zinc oxide and gold nanopartilces proved to be elite and offered amazing electrochemical biosensing. This encourages us to write a review which highlights the recent achievements in the construction of genosensor, immunosensor and enzymatic biosensor based on the above nanomaterials. Carbon based nanomaterials offers a direct electron transfer between the functionalized nanomaterials and active site of bioreceptor without involvement of any mediator which not only amplifies the signal but also provide label free sensing. Gold shows affinity towards immunological molecules and is most routinely used for immunological sensing. Zinc oxide can easily immobilize proteins and hence offers a large group of enzyme based biosensor. Modification of the working electrode by introduction of these nanomaterials or combination of two/three of above nanomaterials together and forming a nanocomposite reflected the best results with excellent stability, reproducibility and enhanced sensitivity. Highly attractive electrochemical properties and electrocatalytic activity of these elite nanomaterials have facilitated achievement of enhanced signal amplification needed for the construction of ultrasensitive electrochemical affinity biosensors for detection of glucose, cholesterol, Escherichia coli, influenza virus, cancer, human papillomavirus, dopamine, glutamic acid, IgG, IgE, uric acid, ascorbic acid, acetlycholine, cortisol, cytosome, sequence specific DNA and amino acids. Recent researches for bedside biosensors are also discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of an acoustic wave based biosensor for vapor phase detection of small molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Desmond

    For centuries scientific ingenuity and innovation have been influenced by Mother Nature's perfect design. One of her more elusive designs is that of the sensory olfactory system, an array of highly sensitive receptors responsible for chemical vapor recognition. In the animal kingdom this ability is magnified among canines where ppt (parts per trillion) sensitivity values have been reported. Today, detection dogs are considered an essential part of the US drug and explosives detection schemes. However, growing concerns about their susceptibility to extraneous odors have inspired the development of highly sensitive analytical detection tools or biosensors known as "electronic noses". In general, biosensors are distinguished from chemical sensors in that they use an entity of biological origin (e.g. antibody, cell, enzyme) immobilized onto a surface as the chemically-sensitive film on the device. The colloquial view is that the term "biosensors" refers to devices which detect the presence of entities of biological origin, such as proteins or single-stranded DNA and that this detection must take place in a liquid. Our biosensor utilizes biomolecules, specifically IgG monoclonal antibodies, to achieve molecular recognition of relatively small molecules in the vapor phase.

  19. Nanopore biosensors for detection of proteins and nucleic acids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maglia, Giovanni; Soskine, Mikhael

    2014-01-01

    Described herein are nanopore biosensors based on a modified cytolysin protein. The nanopore biosensors accommodate macromoiecules including proteins and nucleic acids, and may additionally comprise ligands with selective binding properties.

  20. Optimization of Xenon Biosensors for Detection of ProteinInteractions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowery, Thomas J.; Garcia, Sandra; Chavez, Lana; Ruiz, E.Janette; Wu, Tom; Brotin, Thierry; Dutasta, Jean-Pierre; King, David S.; Schultz, Peter G.; Pines, Alex; Wemmer, David E..

    2005-08-03

    Hyperpolarized 129Xe NMR can detect the presence of specific low-concentration biomolecular analytes by means of the xenon biosensor, which consists of a water-soluble, targeted cryptophane-A cage that encapsulates xenon. In this work we use the prototypical biotinylated xenon biosensor to determine the relationship between the molecular composition of the xenon biosensor and the characteristics of protein-bound resonances. The effects of diastereomer overlap, dipole-dipole coupling, chemical shift anisotropy, xenon exchange, and biosensor conformational exchange on protein-bound biosensor signal were assessed. It was found that optimal protein-bound biosensor signal can be obtained by minimizing the number of biosensor diastereomers and using a flexible linker of appropriate length. Both the linewidth and sensitivity of chemical shift to protein binding of the xenon biosensor were found to be inversely proportional to linker length.

  1. Electronic transport in methylated fragments of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, M. L.; Oliveira, J. I. N.; Lima Neto, J. X.; Gomes, C. E. M.; Fulco, U. L.; Albuquerque, E. L.; Freire, V. N.; Caetano, E. W. S.; de Moura, F. A. B. F.; Lyra, M. L.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of methylated deoxyribonucleic-acid (DNA) strands, a biological system in which methyl groups are added to DNA (a major epigenetic modification in gene expression), sandwiched between two metallic platinum electrodes. Our theoretical simulations apply an effective Hamiltonian based on a tight-binding model to obtain current-voltage curves related to the non-methylated/methylated DNA strands. The results suggest potential applications in the development of novel biosensors for molecular diagnostics.

  2. Electronic transport in methylated fragments of DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, M. L. de; Oliveira, J. I. N.; Lima Neto, J. X.; Gomes, C. E. M.; Fulco, U. L., E-mail: umbertofulco@gmail.com; Albuquerque, E. L. [Departamento de Biofísica e Farmacologia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, 59072-970 Natal-RN (Brazil); Freire, V. N. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Ceará, 60455-760 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Caetano, E. W. S. [Instituto Federal de Educação, Ciência e Tecnologia do Ceará, 60040-531 Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Moura, F. A. B. F. de; Lyra, M. L. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal de Alagoas, 57072-900 Maceió-AL (Brazil)

    2015-11-16

    We investigate the electronic transport properties of methylated deoxyribonucleic-acid (DNA) strands, a biological system in which methyl groups are added to DNA (a major epigenetic modification in gene expression), sandwiched between two metallic platinum electrodes. Our theoretical simulations apply an effective Hamiltonian based on a tight-binding model to obtain current-voltage curves related to the non-methylated/methylated DNA strands. The results suggest potential applications in the development of novel biosensors for molecular diagnostics.

  3. Nanocarbons for Catalytic Desulfurization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Qingqing; Lin, Yangming; Heumann, Saskia; Su, Dangsheng

    2017-08-24

    Nanocarbon catalysts are green and sustainable alternatives to metal-based catalysts for numerous catalytic transformations. The application of nanocarbons for environmental catalysis is an emerging research discipline and has undergone rapid development in recent years. In this focus review, we provide a critical analysis of state-of-the-art nanocarbon catalysts for three different catalytic desulfurization processes. In particular, we focus on the advantages and limitations as well as the reaction mechanisms of the nanocarbon catalysts at the molecular level. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Graphene-based field-effect transistor biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen; , Junhong; Mao, Shun; Lu, Ganhua

    2017-06-14

    The disclosure provides a field-effect transistor (FET)-based biosensor and uses thereof. In particular, to FET-based biosensors using thermally reduced graphene-based sheets as a conducting channel decorated with nanoparticle-biomolecule conjugates. The present disclosure also relates to FET-based biosensors using metal nitride/graphene hybrid sheets. The disclosure provides a method for detecting a target biomolecule in a sample using the FET-based biosensor described herein.

  5. Detection of Waterborne and Airborne Formaldehyde: From Amperometric Chemosensing to a Visual Biosensor Based on Alcohol Oxidase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasi Sigawi

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A laboratory prototype of a microcomputer-based analyzer was developed for quantitative determination of formaldehyde in liquid samples, based on catalytic chemosensing elements. It was shown that selectivity for the target analyte could be increased by modulating the working electrode potential. Analytical parameters of three variants of the amperometric analyzer that differed in the chemical structure/configuration of the working electrode were studied. The constructed analyzer was tested on wastewater solutions that contained formaldehyde. A simple low-cost biosensor was developed for semi-quantitative detection of airborne formaldehyde in concentrations exceeding the threshold level. This biosensor is based on a change in the color of a solution that contains a mixture of alcohol oxidase from the yeast Hansenula polymorpha, horseradish peroxidase and a chromogen, following exposure to airborne formaldehyde. The solution is enclosed within a membrane device, which is permeable to formaldehyde vapors. The most efficient and sensitive biosensor for detecting formaldehyde was the one that contained alcohol oxidase with an activity of 1.2 U·mL−1. The biosensor requires no special instrumentation and enables rapid visual detection of airborne formaldehyde at concentrations, which are hazardous to human health.

  6. Potential diagnostic applications of biosensors: current and future directions

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Shiping; Xu, Hui; Fan, Chunhai

    2006-01-01

    This review describes recent advances in biosensors of potential clinical applications. Biosensors are becoming increasingly important and practical tools in pathogen detection, molecular diagnostics, environmental monitoring, food safety control as well as in homeland defense. Electrochemical biosensors are particularly promising toward these goals arising due to several combined advantages including low-cost, operation convenience, and miniaturized devices. We review the clinical applicatio...

  7. Recent Progress in Lectin-Based Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baozhen Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent progress in the development of lectin-based biosensors used for the determination of glucose, pathogenic bacteria and toxins, cancer cells, and lectins. Lectin proteins have been widely used for the construction of optical and electrochemical biosensors by exploiting the specific binding affinity to carbohydrates. Among lectin proteins, concanavalin A (Con A is most frequently used for this purpose as glucose- and mannose-selective lectin. Con A is useful for immobilizing enzymes including glucose oxidase (GOx and horseradish peroxidase (HRP on the surface of a solid support to construct glucose and hydrogen peroxide sensors, because these enzymes are covered with intrinsic hydrocarbon chains. Con A-modified electrodes can be used as biosensors sensitive to glucose, cancer cells, and pathogenic bacteria covered with hydrocarbon chains. The target substrates are selectively adsorbed to the surface of Con A-modified electrodes through strong affinity of Con A to hydrocarbon chains. A recent topic in the development of lectin-based biosensors is a successful use of nanomaterials, such as metal nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes, for amplifying output signals of the sensors. In addition, lectin-based biosensors are useful for studying glycan expression on living cells.

  8. Study on different molecular weights of chitosan as an immobilization matrix for a glucose biosensor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Fung Ang

    Full Text Available Two chitosan samples (medium molecular weight (MMCHI and low molecular weight (LMCHI were investigated as an enzyme immobilization matrix for the fabrication of a glucose biosensor. Chitosan membranes prepared from acetic acid were flexible, transparent, smooth and quick-drying. The FTIR spectra showed the existence of intermolecular interactions between chitosan and glucose oxidase (GOD. Higher catalytic activities were observed on for GOD-MMCHI than GOD-LMCHI and for those crosslinked with glutaraldehyde than using the adsorption technique. Enzyme loading greater than 0.6 mg decreased the activity. Under optimum conditions (pH 6.0, 35°C and applied potential of 0.6 V response times of 85 s and 65 s were observed for medium molecular weight chitosan glucose biosensor (GOD-MMCHI/PT and low molecular weight chitosan glucose biosensor (GOD-LMCHI/PT, respectively. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant ([Formula: see text] was found to be 12.737 mM for GOD-MMCHI/PT and 17.692 mM for GOD-LMCHI/PT. This indicated that GOD-MMCHI/PT had greater affinity for the enzyme. Moreover, GOD-MMCHI/PT showed higher sensitivity (52.3666 nA/mM glucose when compared with GOD-LMCHI/PT (9.8579 nA/mM glucose at S/N>3. Better repeatability and reproducibility were achieved with GOD-MMCHI/PT than GOD-LMCHI/PT regarding glucose measurement. GOD-MMCHI/PT was found to give the highest enzymatic activity among the electrodes under investigation. The extent of interference encountered by GOD-MMCHI/PT and GOD-LMCHI/PT was not significantly different. Although the Nafion coated biosensor significantly reduced the signal due to the interferents under study, it also significantly reduced the response to glucose. The performance of the biosensors in the determination of glucose in rat serum was evaluated. Comparatively better accuracy and recovery results were obtained for GOD-MMCHI/PT. Hence, GOD-MMCHI/PT showed a better performance when compared with GOD-LMCHI/PT. In

  9. Study on Different Molecular Weights of Chitosan as an Immobilization Matrix for a Glucose Biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Lee Fung; Por, Lip Yee; Yam, Mun Fei

    2013-01-01

    Two chitosan samples (medium molecular weight (MMCHI) and low molecular weight (LMCHI)) were investigated as an enzyme immobilization matrix for the fabrication of a glucose biosensor. Chitosan membranes prepared from acetic acid were flexible, transparent, smooth and quick-drying. The FTIR spectra showed the existence of intermolecular interactions between chitosan and glucose oxidase (GOD). Higher catalytic activities were observed on for GOD-MMCHI than GOD-LMCHI and for those crosslinked with glutaraldehyde than using the adsorption technique. Enzyme loading greater than 0.6 mg decreased the activity. Under optimum conditions (pH 6.0, 35°C and applied potential of 0.6 V) response times of 85 s and 65 s were observed for medium molecular weight chitosan glucose biosensor (GOD-MMCHI/PT) and low molecular weight chitosan glucose biosensor (GOD-LMCHI/PT), respectively. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant () was found to be 12.737 mM for GOD-MMCHI/PT and 17.692 mM for GOD-LMCHI/PT. This indicated that GOD-MMCHI/PT had greater affinity for the enzyme. Moreover, GOD-MMCHI/PT showed higher sensitivity (52.3666 nA/mM glucose) when compared with GOD-LMCHI/PT (9.8579 nA/mM glucose) at S/N>3. Better repeatability and reproducibility were achieved with GOD-MMCHI/PT than GOD-LMCHI/PT regarding glucose measurement. GOD-MMCHI/PT was found to give the highest enzymatic activity among the electrodes under investigation. The extent of interference encountered by GOD-MMCHI/PT and GOD-LMCHI/PT was not significantly different. Although the Nafion coated biosensor significantly reduced the signal due to the interferents under study, it also significantly reduced the response to glucose. The performance of the biosensors in the determination of glucose in rat serum was evaluated. Comparatively better accuracy and recovery results were obtained for GOD-MMCHI/PT. Hence, GOD-MMCHI/PT showed a better performance when compared with GOD-LMCHI/PT. In conclusion, chitosan membranes shave

  10. Study on different molecular weights of chitosan as an immobilization matrix for a glucose biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ang, Lee Fung; Por, Lip Yee; Yam, Mun Fei

    2013-01-01

    Two chitosan samples (medium molecular weight (MMCHI) and low molecular weight (LMCHI)) were investigated as an enzyme immobilization matrix for the fabrication of a glucose biosensor. Chitosan membranes prepared from acetic acid were flexible, transparent, smooth and quick-drying. The FTIR spectra showed the existence of intermolecular interactions between chitosan and glucose oxidase (GOD). Higher catalytic activities were observed on for GOD-MMCHI than GOD-LMCHI and for those crosslinked with glutaraldehyde than using the adsorption technique. Enzyme loading greater than 0.6 mg decreased the activity. Under optimum conditions (pH 6.0, 35°C and applied potential of 0.6 V) response times of 85 s and 65 s were observed for medium molecular weight chitosan glucose biosensor (GOD-MMCHI/PT) and low molecular weight chitosan glucose biosensor (GOD-LMCHI/PT), respectively. The apparent Michaelis-Menten constant ([Formula: see text]) was found to be 12.737 mM for GOD-MMCHI/PT and 17.692 mM for GOD-LMCHI/PT. This indicated that GOD-MMCHI/PT had greater affinity for the enzyme. Moreover, GOD-MMCHI/PT showed higher sensitivity (52.3666 nA/mM glucose) when compared with GOD-LMCHI/PT (9.8579 nA/mM glucose) at S/N>3. Better repeatability and reproducibility were achieved with GOD-MMCHI/PT than GOD-LMCHI/PT regarding glucose measurement. GOD-MMCHI/PT was found to give the highest enzymatic activity among the electrodes under investigation. The extent of interference encountered by GOD-MMCHI/PT and GOD-LMCHI/PT was not significantly different. Although the Nafion coated biosensor significantly reduced the signal due to the interferents under study, it also significantly reduced the response to glucose. The performance of the biosensors in the determination of glucose in rat serum was evaluated. Comparatively better accuracy and recovery results were obtained for GOD-MMCHI/PT. Hence, GOD-MMCHI/PT showed a better performance when compared with GOD-LMCHI/PT. In conclusion

  11. Construction of effective disposable biosensors for point of care testing of nitrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, Tiago; Rodrigues, Patrícia R; Gonçalves, Ana Luisa; Moura, José J G; Jubete, Elena; Añorga, Larraitz; Piknova, Barbora; Schechter, Alan N; Silveira, Célia M; Almeida, M Gabriela

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we aim to demonstrate, as a proof-of-concept, the feasibility of the mass production of effective point of care tests for nitrite quantification in environmental, food and clinical samples. Following our previous work on the development of third generation electrochemical biosensors based on the ammonia forming nitrite reductase (ccNiR), herein we reduced the size of the electrodes' system to a miniaturized format, solved the problem of oxygen interference and performed simple quantification assays in real samples. In particular, carbon paste screen printed electrodes (SPE) were coated with a ccNiR/carbon ink composite homogenized in organic solvents and cured at low temperatures. The biocompatibility of these chemical and thermal treatments was evaluated by cyclic voltammetry showing that the catalytic performance was higher with the combination acetone and a 40°C curing temperature. The successful incorporation of the protein in the carbon ink/solvent composite, while remaining catalytically competent, attests for ccNiR's robustness and suitability for application in screen printed based biosensors. Because the direct electrochemical reduction of molecular oxygen occurs when electroanalytical measurements are performed at the negative potentials required to activate ccNiR (ca.-0.4V vs Ag/AgCl), an oxygen scavenging system based on the coupling of glucose oxidase and catalase activities was successfully used. This enabled the quantification of nitrite in different samples (milk, water, plasma and urine) in a straightforward way and with small error (1-6%). The sensitivity of the biosensor towards nitrite reduction under optimized conditions was 0.55 A M(-1) cm(-2) with a linear response range 0.7-370 μM. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of Si-based electrical biosensors: Simulations and first experimental results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Favetta

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we simulated and experimentally assessed the possibility to detect, through electrical transduction, hybridization of DNA molecules on MOS-like devices, having different dielectrics: SiO2, Si3N4 and SiO2/Si3N4/SiO2 (ONO. The electrical characterization was performed after the various functionalization steps, consisting of dielectric activation, silanization, DNA spotting and anchoring, and after the hybridization process, to test the devices effectiveness as DNA recognition biosensors. The experimental results were used to validate device simulations. The comparison shows the ability to determine a priori the DNA probe density needed to maximize the response. The results confirm that the structures analyzed are sensitive to the immobilization of DNA and its hybridization.

  13. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on the property that in 0.12 M sulfuric acid medium titanium(IV) catalyzes the discoloring reaction of DBS-arsenazo oxidized by potassium bromate, a new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace titanium (IV) was developed. The linear range of the determination of titanium is

  14. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Research Center for Nanotechnology, Changchun University of Science and Technology,. Changchun 130022 ... Although catalytic kinetic spectrophotometry has been used in the determination of copper, the selectivity ... In this paper CPApA was used as the chromogenic agent, H2O2 as the oxidant, Cu(II) as the catalyst.

  15. Functional design of electrolytic biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamage Preethichandra, D. M.; Mala Ekanayake, E. M. I.; Onoda, M.

    2017-11-01

    A novel amperometric biosensbased on conjugated polypyrrole (PPy) deposited on a Pt modified ITO (indium tin oxide) conductive glass substrate and their performances are described. We have presented a method of developing a highly sensitive and low-cost nano-biosensor for blood glucose measurements. The fabrication method proposed decreases the cost of production significantly as the amount of noble metals used is minimized. A nano-corrugated PPy substrate was developed through pulsed electrochemical deposition. The sensitivity achieved was 325 mA/(Mcm2) and the linear range of the developed sensor was 50-60 mmol/l. Then the application of the electrophoresis helps the glucose oxidase (GOx) on the PPy substrate. The main reason behind this high enzyme loading is the high electric field applied across the sensor surface (working electrode) and the counter electrode where that pushes the nano-scale enzyme particles floating in the phosphate buffer solution towards the substrate. The novel technique used has provided an extremely high sensitivities and very high linear ranges for enzyme (GOx) and therefore can be concluded that this is a very good technique to load enzyme onto the conducting polymer substrates.

  16. Magnetic impedance biosensor: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Zhou, Yong; Lei, Chong; Luo, Jun; Xie, Shaorong; Pu, Huayan

    2017-04-15

    Though the magnetoimpedance effect was discovered two decades ago, the biomedical applications of the magnetoimpedance sensor are still in their infancy. In this review, the authors summarized the magnetoimpedance effect in soft ferromagnetic wires, ribbons and thin films for biosensing applications. Recent progress and achievements of the magnetoimpedance-based biosensing applications including the detection of magnetic Ferrofluid, magnetic beads, magnetic nanoparticles, magnetically labeled bioanalytes and biomagnetic fields of living systems were reviewed. The modification effect of the biochemical liquids, agglomeration effect of the magnetic particles, and the effect of the stray magnetic field on magnetoimpedance were investigated in this review. Some constructive strategies were proposed for design of the high-performance magnetoimpedance biosensor, for quantitative and ultrasensitive detection of magnetically labeled biomolecules. The theoretical and experimental results suggest that the magnetoimpedance sensors are particularly suitable for highly sensitive detection of low-concentration biomolecules, and might be used for early diagnosis and screening of cancers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Magnetoresistive biosensors for quantitative proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiahan; Huang, Chih-Cheng; Hall, Drew A.

    2017-08-01

    Quantitative proteomics, as a developing method for study of proteins and identification of diseases, reveals more comprehensive and accurate information of an organism than traditional genomics. A variety of platforms, such as mass spectrometry, optical sensors, electrochemical sensors, magnetic sensors, etc., have been developed for detecting proteins quantitatively. The sandwich immunoassay is widely used as a labeled detection method due to its high specificity and flexibility allowing multiple different types of labels. While optical sensors use enzyme and fluorophore labels to detect proteins with high sensitivity, they often suffer from high background signal and challenges in miniaturization. Magnetic biosensors, including nuclear magnetic resonance sensors, oscillator-based sensors, Hall-effect sensors, and magnetoresistive sensors, use the specific binding events between magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and target proteins to measure the analyte concentration. Compared with other biosensing techniques, magnetic sensors take advantage of the intrinsic lack of magnetic signatures in biological samples to achieve high sensitivity and high specificity, and are compatible with semiconductor-based fabrication process to have low-cost and small-size for point-of-care (POC) applications. Although still in the development stage, magnetic biosensing is a promising technique for in-home testing and portable disease monitoring.

  18. Development of smart functional surfaces for biosensor applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokkalinga Balasubramanian, Shankar Ganesh

    Biosensing platforms and antimicrobial coatings were developed to combat problems associated with infectious diseases. Particularly, a lytic bacteriophage based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor was developed to detect food borne pathogen Staphylococcus aureus (S.aureus) in real-time with high specificity. Lytic bacteriophages are naturally developed molecular probes that infect bacteria. They are environmentally stable and inexpensive to produce compared to commercially available antibodies. The sensitivity of SPR biosensors were further improved specifically by poly-L-lysine grafted polyethylene glycol (PLL-g-PEG) polymer. This polymer reduces non-specific adsorption of S.aureus on SPR gold surface by ˜97%. When used as a blocking buffer in affinity sensing of model antigen, beta-galactosidase by filamentous bacteriophage, this polymer improved the detection sensitivity by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude. A facile approach was developed for sensor surface regeneration by controlling the immobilization and removal of antibodies from SPR gold surface. This was facilitated by the electro-reductive nature of alkanethiols. By combining SPR with electrochemical methods, the molecular assembly/disassembly processes were monitored in real-time with great control. Finally, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) biocomposites were prepared using DNA and lysozyme (LSZ) to develop mechanically strong antimicrobial coatings. Coulombic interactions between DNA and LSZ were exploited to fabricate multilayer antimicrobial coatings using a technique called layer-by-layer assembly. This produced large scale biomimetic coatings with significant antimicrobial activity, high Young's modulus and controlled morphology which combines the individual attributes of SWNTs and natural materials.

  19. Natural bacterial communities serve as quantitative geochemical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mark B; Rocha, Andrea M; Smillie, Chris S; Olesen, Scott W; Paradis, Charles; Wu, Liyou; Campbell, James H; Fortney, Julian L; Mehlhorn, Tonia L; Lowe, Kenneth A; Earles, Jennifer E; Phillips, Jana; Techtmann, Steve M; Joyner, Dominique C; Elias, Dwayne A; Bailey, Kathryn L; Hurt, Richard A; Preheim, Sarah P; Sanders, Matthew C; Yang, Joy; Mueller, Marcella A; Brooks, Scott; Watson, David B; Zhang, Ping; He, Zhili; Dubinsky, Eric A; Adams, Paul D; Arkin, Adam P; Fields, Matthew W; Zhou, Jizhong; Alm, Eric J; Hazen, Terry C

    2015-05-12

    Biological sensors can be engineered to measure a wide range of environmental conditions. Here we show that statistical analysis of DNA from natural microbial communities can be used to accurately identify environmental contaminants, including uranium and nitrate at a nuclear waste site. In addition to contamination, sequence data from the 16S rRNA gene alone can quantitatively predict a rich catalogue of 26 geochemical features collected from 93 wells with highly differing geochemistry characteristics. We extend this approach to identify sites contaminated with hydrocarbons from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, finding that altered bacterial communities encode a memory of prior contamination, even after the contaminants themselves have been fully degraded. We show that the bacterial strains that are most useful for detecting oil and uranium are known to interact with these substrates, indicating that this statistical approach uncovers ecologically meaningful interactions consistent with previous experimental observations. Future efforts should focus on evaluating the geographical generalizability of these associations. Taken as a whole, these results indicate that ubiquitous, natural bacterial communities can be used as in situ environmental sensors that respond to and capture perturbations caused by human impacts. These in situ biosensors rely on environmental selection rather than directed engineering, and so this approach could be rapidly deployed and scaled as sequencing technology continues to become faster, simpler, and less expensive. Here we show that DNA from natural bacterial communities can be used as a quantitative biosensor to accurately distinguish unpolluted sites from those contaminated with uranium, nitrate, or oil. These results indicate that bacterial communities can be used as environmental sensors that respond to and capture perturbations caused by human impacts. Copyright © 2015 Smith et al.

  20. Pen-on-paper strategy for point-of-care testing: Rapid prototyping of fully written microfluidic biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zedong; Li, Fei; Xing, Yue; Liu, Zhi; You, Minli; Li, Yingchun; Wen, Ting; Qu, Zhiguo; Ling Li, Xiao; Xu, Feng

    2017-12-15

    Paper-based microfluidic biosensors have recently attracted increasing attentions in point-of-care testing (POCT) territories benefiting from their affordable, accessible and eco-friendly features, where technologies for fabricating such biosensors are preferred to be equipment free, easy-to-operate and capable of rapid prototyping. In this work, we developed a pen-on-paper (PoP) strategy based on two custom-made pens, i.e., a wax pen and a conductive-ink pen, to fully write paper-based microfluidic biosensors through directly writing both microfluidic channels and electrodes. Particularly, the proposed wax pen is competent to realize one-step fabrication of wax channels on paper, as the melted wax penetrates into paper during writing process without any post-treatments. The practical applications of the fabricated paper-based microfluidic biosensors are demonstrated by both colorimetric detection of Salmonella typhimurium DNA with detection limit of 1nM and electrochemical measurement of glucose with detection limit of 1mM. The developed PoP strategy for making microfluidic biosensors on paper characterized by true simplicity, prominent portability and excellent capability for rapid prototyping shows promising prospect in POCT applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. BioSentinel: Biosensors for Deep-Space Radiation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lokugamage, Melissa P.; Santa Maria, Sergio R.; Marina, Diana B.; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2016-01-01

    The BioSentinel mission will be deployed on NASA's Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1) in 2018. We will use the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as a biosensor to study the effect of deep-space radiation on living cells. The BioSentinel mission will be the first investigation of a biological response to space radiation outside Low Earth Orbit (LEO) in over 40 years. Radiation can cause damage such as double stand breaks (DSBs) on DNA. The yeast cell was chosen for this mission because it is genetically controllable, shares homology with human cells in its DNA repair pathways, and can be stored in a desiccated state for long durations. Three yeast strains will be stored dry in multiple microfluidic cards: a wild type control strain, a mutant defective strain that cannot repair DSBs, and a biosensor strain that can only grow if it gets DSB-and-repair events occurring near a specific gene. Growth and metabolic activity of each strain will be measured by a 3-color LED optical detection system. Parallel experiments will be done on the International Space Station and on Earth so that we can compare the results to that of deep space. One of our main objectives is to characterize the microfluidic card activation sequence before the mission. To increase the sensitivity of yeast cells as biosensors, desiccated yeast in each card will be resuspended in a rehydration buffer. After several weeks, the rehydration buffer will be exchanged with a growth medium in order to measure yeast growth and metabolic activity. We are currently working on a time-course experiment to better understand the effects of the rehydration buffer on the response to ionizing radiation. We will resuspend the dried yeast in our rehydration medium over a period of time; then each week, we will measure the viability and ionizing radiation sensitivity of different yeast strains taken from this rehydration buffer. The data obtained in this study will be useful in finalizing the card activation sequence for

  2. Polymer Based Biosensors for Medical Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherré, Solène; Rozlosnik, Noemi

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this chapter is to give an overview about the newest developments in biosensors made of polymers for medical applications. Biosensors are devices that can recognize and detect a target with high selectivity. They are widely used in many fields such as medical diagnostic...... and be available for use by everybody. To fulfil these purposes, polymers represent very appropriate materials. Many nano- and microfabrication methods for polymers are available, allowing a fast and cheap production of devices. This chapter will present the general concept of a biosensor in a first part....... The second part will focus on conducting polymers, used as electrode material in devices based on electrochemical detection. A third part will describe the molecularly imprinted technology, where the target is replicated in 3D negative form into the polymer....

  3. Thin Hydrogel Films for Optical Biosensor Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateescu, Anca; Wang, Yi; Dostalek, Jakub; Jonas, Ulrich

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogel materials consisting of water-swollen polymer networks exhibit a large number of specific properties highly attractive for a variety of optical biosensor applications. This properties profile embraces the aqueous swelling medium as the basis of biocompatibility, non-fouling behavior, and being not cell toxic, while providing high optical quality and transparency. The present review focuses on some of the most interesting aspects of surface-attached hydrogel films as active binding matrices in optical biosensors based on surface plasmon resonance and optical waveguide mode spectroscopy. In particular, the chemical nature, specific properties, and applications of such hydrogel surface architectures for highly sensitive affinity biosensors based on evanescent wave optics are discussed. The specific class of responsive hydrogel systems, which can change their physical state in response to externally applied stimuli, have found large interest as sophisticated materials that provide a complex behavior to hydrogel-based sensing devices. PMID:24957962

  4. Antibody orientation on biosensor surfaces: a minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trilling, Anke K; Beekwilder, Jules; Zuilhof, Han

    2013-03-21

    Detection elements play a key role in analyte recognition in biosensors. Therefore, detection elements with high analyte specificity and binding strength are required. While antibodies (Abs) have been increasingly used as detection elements in biosensors, a key challenge remains - the immobilization on the biosensor surface. This minireview highlights recent approaches to immobilize and study Abs on surfaces. We first introduce Ab species used as detection elements, and discuss techniques recently used to elucidate Ab orientation by determination of layer thickness or surface topology. Then, several immobilization methods will be presented: non-covalent and covalent surface attachment, yielding oriented or random coupled Abs. Finally, protein modification methods applicable for oriented Ab immobilization are reviewed with an eye to future application.

  5. Design & fabrication of cantilever array biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boisen, Anja; Thundat, T

    2009-01-01

    Surface immobilization of functional receptors on microfabricated cantilever arrays offers a new paradigm for the development of biosensors based on nanomechanics. Microcantilever-based systems are capable of real-time, multiplexed detection of unlabeled disease markers in extremely small volumes......, electronic processing, and even local telemetry on a single chip have the potential of satisfying the need for highly sensitive and selective multiple-target detection in very small samples. Here we will review the design and fabrication process of cantilever-based biosensors.......Surface immobilization of functional receptors on microfabricated cantilever arrays offers a new paradigm for the development of biosensors based on nanomechanics. Microcantilever-based systems are capable of real-time, multiplexed detection of unlabeled disease markers in extremely small volumes...

  6. Development of a biosensor for caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, V R Sarath; Patra, S; Karanth, N G; Kumar, M A; Thakur, M S

    2007-01-23

    We have utilized a microbe, which can degrade caffeine to develop an Amperometric biosensor for determination of caffeine in solutions. Whole cells of Pseudomonas alcaligenes MTCC 5264 having the capability to degrade caffeine were immobilized on a cellophane membrane with a molecular weight cut off (MWCO) of 3000-6000 by covalent crosslinking method using glutaraledhyde as the bifunctional crosslinking agent and gelatin as the protein based stabilizing agent (PBSA). The biosensor system was able to detect caffeine in solution over a concentration range of 0.1 to 1 mg mL(-1). With read-times as short as 3 min, this caffeine biosensor acts as a rapid analysis system for caffeine in solutions. Interestingly, successful isolation and immobilization of caffeine degrading bacteria for the analysis of caffeine described here was enabled by a novel selection strategy that incorporated isolation of caffeine degrading bacteria capable of utilizing caffeine as the sole source of carbon and nitrogen from soils and induction of caffeine degrading capacity in bacteria for the development of the biosensor. This biosensor is highly specific for caffeine and response to interfering compounds such as theophylline, theobromine, paraxanthine, other methyl xanthines and sugars was found to be negligible. Although a few biosensing methods for caffeine are reported, they have limitations in application for commercial samples. The development and application of new caffeine detection methods remains an active area of investigation, particularly in food and clinical chemistry. The optimum pH and temperature of measurement were 6.8 and 30+/-2 degrees C, respectively. Interference in analysis of caffeine due to different substrates was observed but was not considerable. Caffeine content of commercial samples of instant tea and coffee was analyzed by the biosensor and the results compared well with HPLC analysis.

  7. A fluorescent graphitic carbon nitride nanosheet biosensor for highly sensitive, label-free detection of alkaline phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Mei-Hao; Liu, Jin-Wen; Li, Na; Tang, Hao; Yu, Ru-Qin; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2016-02-28

    Graphitic C3N4 (g-C3N4) nanosheets provide an attractive option for bioprobes and bioimaging applications. Utilizing highly fluorescent and water-dispersible ultrathin g-C3N4 nanosheets, a highly sensitive, selective and label-free biosensor has been developed for ALP detection for the first time. The developed approach utilizes a natural substrate of ALP in biological systems and thus affords very high catalytic efficiency. This novel biosensor is demonstrated to enable quantitative analysis of ALP in a wide range from 0.1 to 1000 U L(-1) with a low detection limit of 0.08 U L(-1), which is among the most sensitive assays for ALP. It is expected that the developed method may provide a low-cost, convenient, rapid and highly sensitive platform for ALP-based clinical diagnostics and biomedical applications.

  8. Label-free detection of sex determining region Y (SRY) via capacitive biosensor

    KAUST Repository

    Sivashankar, Shilpa

    2016-10-20

    In this work, we present for the first time, the use of a simple fractal capacitive biosensor for the quantification and detection of sex-determining region Y (SRY) genes. This section of genetic code, which is found on the Y chromosome, finds importance for study as it causes fetuses to develop characteristics of male sex-like gonads when a mutation occurs. It is also an important genetic code in men, and disorders involving the SRY gene can cause infertility and sexual malfunction that lead to a variety of gene mutational disorders. We have therefore designed silicon-based, label-free fractal capacitive biosensors to quantify various proteins and genes. We take advantage of a good dielectric material, Parylene C for enhancing the performance of the sensors. We have integrated these sensors with a simple microchannel for easy handling of fluids on the detection area. The read-out value of an Agilent LCR meter used to measure capacitance of the sensor at a frequency of 1 MHz determined gene specificity and gene quantification. These data revealed that the capacitance measurement of the capacitive biosensor for the SRY gene depended on both the target and the concentration of DNA. The experimental outcomes in the present study can be used to detect DNA and its variations in crucial fields that have a great impact on our daily lives, such as clinical and veterinary diagnostics, industrial and environmental testing and forensic sciences.

  9. Transcription factor-based biosensors enlightened by the analyte.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul eFernandez-Lopez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Whole cell biosensors (WCBs have multiple applications for environmental monitoring, detecting a wide range of pollutants. WCBs depend critically on the sensitivity and specificity of the transcription factor (TF used to detect the analyte. We describe the mechanism of regulation and the structural and biochemical properties of TF families that are used, or could be used, for the development of environmental WCBs. Focusing on the chemical nature of the analyte, we review TFs that respond to aromatic compounds (XylS-AraC, XylR-NtrC and LysR, metal ions (MerR, ArsR, DtxR, Fur and NikR or antibiotics (TetR and MarR. Analyzing the structural domains involved in DNA recognition, we highlight the similitudes in the DNA binding domains (DBDs of these TF families. Opposite to DBDs, the wide range of analytes detected by TFs results in a diversity of structures at the effector binding domain (EBD. The modular architecture of TFs opens the possibility of engineering TFs with hybrid DNA and effector specificities. Yet, the lack of a crisp correlation between structural domains and specific functions makes this a challenging task.

  10. Transcription factor-based biosensors enlightened by the analyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-López, Raul; Ruiz, Raul; de la Cruz, Fernando; Moncalián, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Whole cell biosensors (WCBs) have multiple applications for environmental monitoring, detecting a wide range of pollutants. WCBs depend critically on the sensitivity and specificity of the transcription factor (TF) used to detect the analyte. We describe the mechanism of regulation and the structural and biochemical properties of TF families that are used, or could be used, for the development of environmental WCBs. Focusing on the chemical nature of the analyte, we review TFs that respond to aromatic compounds (XylS-AraC, XylR-NtrC, and LysR), metal ions (MerR, ArsR, DtxR, Fur, and NikR) or antibiotics (TetR and MarR). Analyzing the structural domains involved in DNA recognition, we highlight the similitudes in the DNA binding domains (DBDs) of these TF families. Opposite to DBDs, the wide range of analytes detected by TFs results in a diversity of structures at the effector binding domain. The modular architecture of TFs opens the possibility of engineering TFs with hybrid DNA and effector specificities. Yet, the lack of a crisp correlation between structural domains and specific functions makes this a challenging task. PMID:26191047

  11. Applications of redox polymers in biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boguslavsky, L. (Moltech Corporation, Stony Brook, NY (United States)); Hale, P.D. (Moltech Corporation, Stony Brook, NY (United States)); Geng Lin (Moltech Corporation, Stony Brook, NY (United States)); Skotheim, T.A. (Moltech Corporation, Stony Brook, NY (United States)); Lee Hongsui (Dept. of Applied Science, Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1993-03-01

    Polymers containing covalently attached redox molecules can be highly effective electron transfer mediators for flavin adenine dinucleotide redox centers of many oxidases. Highly flexible siloxane and ethylene oxide polymers containing covalently attached ferrocene molecules are shown to be capable of mediating electron transfer between enzymes and an electrode. The construction and response of bienzyme cholesterol biosensor, acetylcholine and glucose biosensor are described and discussed. Our data showed that the flexibility, hydrophilicity of the polymer, the density of redox centers in the polymer matrices and the self-exchange reaction rate of the redox molecules control the efficiency of the electron transfer mediation. (orig.)

  12. Biosensor technology for pesticides--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Neelam; Bhardwaj, Atul

    2015-03-01

    Pesticides, due to their lucrative outcomes, are majorly implicated in agricultural fields for crop production enhancement. Due to their pest removal properties, pesticides of various classes have been designed to persist in the environment over a longer duration after their application to achieve maximum effectiveness. Apart from their recalcitrant structure and agricultural benefits, pesticides also impose acute toxicological effects onto the other various life forms. Their accumulation in the living system may prove to be detrimental if established in higher concentrations. Thus, their prompt and accurate analysis is a crucial matter of concern. Conventional techniques like chromatographic techniques (HPLC, GC, etc.) used for pesticides detection are associated with various limitations like stumpy sensitivity and efficiency, time consumption, laboriousity, requirement of expensive equipments and highly trained technicians, and many more. So there is a need to recruit the methods which can detect these neurotoxic compounds sensitively, selectively, rapidly, and easily in the field. Present work is a brief review of the pesticide effects, their current usage scenario, permissible limits in various food stuffs and 21st century advancements of biosensor technology for pesticide detection. Due to their exceptional performance capabilities, easiness in operation and on-site working, numerous biosensors have been developed for bio-monitoring of various environmental samples for pesticide evaluation immensely throughout the globe. Till date, based on sensing element (enzyme based, antibody based, etc.) and type of detection method used (Electrochemical, optical, and piezoelectric, etc.), a number of biosensors have been developed for pesticide detection. In present communication, authors have summarized 21st century's approaches of biosensor technology for pesticide detection such as enzyme-based biosensors, immunosensors, aptamers, molecularly imprinted polymers, and

  13. Biosensors for Inorganic and Organic Arsenicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Chen

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Arsenic is a natural environmental contaminant to which humans are routinely exposed and is strongly associated with human health problems, including cancer, cardiovascular and neurological diseases. To date, a number of biosensors for the detection of arsenic involving the coupling of biological engineering and electrochemical techniques has been developed. The properties of whole-cell bacterial or cell-free biosensors are summarized in the present review with emphasis on their sensitivity and selectivity. Their limitations and future challenges are highlighted.

  14. Enzyme Biosensor Based on an Electropolymerized Osmium Redox Polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Masaki; Maruyama, Kenichi; Mishima, Yuji; Motonaka, Junko

    Electrochemical polymerizations of metal complex as electron mediator in aqueous solution have been developed. The metal complexes as electron mediator of biosensor for practical application have a rapid electron transfer rate, a chemical stability, and an accessible manipulation. The electro-polymerized redox polymer relatively decreased the enzyme and catalytic activity, although these could be treated in organic solvent. In this work, the water-soluble osmium complex-modified pyrrole derivatives with long, flexible spacer chain were synthesized. The electro-polymerized redox polymer was generally produced by potential sweep copolymerization (-400 mV -/+1200 mV (vs. Ag|AgCl(sat.KCl))) of water-soluble osmium complex-modified pyrrole monomer and glucose oxidase (GOD) on the top of a Pt electrode in aqueous solution. With the electro-polymerized osmium redox polymer modified electrode, calibration graphs for measurements of glucose and the effect of concomitant compounds, dissolved oxygen and the lifetimes of the sensor were electrochemistry examined, respectively. Under optimal conditions, the response of the sensors was in the concentration ranges of 0.6 mM-100 mM for glucose.

  15. Biosensor Systems for Homeland Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2004-05-30

    The detection of biological agents is important to minimize the effects of pathogens that can harm people, livestock, or plants. In addition to pathogens distributed by man, there is a need to detect natural outbreaks. Recent outbreaks of SARS, mad cow disease, pathogenic E. coli and Salmonella, as well as the discovery of letters filled with anthrax spores have highlighted the need for biosensor systems to aid in prevention, early warning, response, and recovery. Rapid detection can be used to prevent exposure; and detection on a longer timescale can be used to minimize exposure, define treatment, and determine whether contaminated areas are clean enough for reuse. The common types of biological agents of concern include bacteria, spores, and viruses (Figure 1). From a chemist’s point of view, pathogens are essentially complex packages of chemicals that are assembled into organized packages with somewhat predictable physical characteristics such as size and shape. Pathogen detection methods can be divided into three general approaches: selective detection methods for specific identification such as nucleic acid analysis and structural recognition, semi-selective methods for broad-spectrum detection (e.g. physical properties, metabolites, lipids), and function-based methods (e.g. effect of the pathogen on organisms, tissues, or cells). The requirements for biodetection systems depend upon the application. While detect to warn sensors may require rapid detection on the order one minute, detection times of many minutes or hours may be suitable for determining appropriate treatments or for forensic analysis. Of course ideal sensor systems will meet the needs of many applications, and will be sensitive, selective, rapid, and simultaneously detect all agents of concern. They will also be reliable with essentially no false negatives or false positives, small, easy to use, and low cost with minimal consumables.

  16. Photonic crystal biosensors towards on-chip integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Threm, Daniela; Nazirizadeh, Yousef; Gerken, Martina

    2012-08-01

    Photonic crystal technology has attracted large interest in the last years. The possibility to generate highly sensitive sensor elements with photonic crystal structures is very promising for medical or environmental applications. The low-cost fabrication on the mass scale is as advantageous as the compactness and reliability of photonic crystal biosensors. The possibility to integrate microfluidic channels together with photonic crystal structures allows for highly compact devices. This article reviews different types of photonic crystal sensors including 1D photonic crystal biosensors, biosensors with photonic crystal slabs, photonic crystal waveguide biosensors and biosensors with photonic crystal microcavities. Their applications in biomolecular and pathogen detection are highlighted. The sensitivities and the detection limits of the different biosensors are compared. The focus is on the possibilities to integrate photonic crystal biosensors on-chip. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Mathematical Model of the Biosensors Acting in a Trigger Mode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feliksas Ivanauskas

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: A mathematical model of biosensors acting in a trigger mode has been developed. One type of the biosensors utilized a trigger enzymatic reaction followed by the cyclic enzymatic and electrochemical conversion of the product (CCE scheme. Other biosensors used the enzymatic trigger reaction followed by the electrochemical and enzymatic product cyclic conversion (CEC scheme. The models were based on diffusion equations containing a non-linear term related to Michaelis-Menten kinetics of the enzymatic reactions. The digital simulation was carried out using the finite difference technique. The influence of the substrate concentration, the maximal enzymatic rate as well as the membrane thickness on the biosensor response was investigated. The numerical experiments demonstrated a significant gain (up to dozens of times in biosensor sensitivity when the biosensor response was under diffusion control. In the case of significant signal amplification, the response time with triggering was up to several times longer than that of the biosensor without triggering.

  18. DNA Nanobiosensors: An Outlook on Signal Readout Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Richard Chandrasekaran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A suite of functionalities and structural versatility makes DNA an apt material for biosensing applications. DNA-based biosensors are cost-effective and sensitive and have the potential to be used as point-of-care diagnostic tools. Along with robustness and biocompatibility, these sensors also provide multiple readout strategies. Depending on the functionality of DNA-based biosensors, a variety of output strategies have been reported: fluorescence- and FRET-based readout, nanoparticle-based colorimetry, spectroscopy-based techniques, electrochemical signaling, gel electrophoresis, and atomic force microscopy.

  19. Eukaryotic DNA Replicases

    KAUST Repository

    Zaher, Manal S.

    2014-11-21

    The current model of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork includes three replicative DNA polymerases, polymerase α/primase complex (Pol α), polymerase δ (Pol δ), and polymerase ε (Pol ε). The primase synthesizes 8–12 nucleotide RNA primers that are extended by the DNA polymerization activity of Pol α into 30–35 nucleotide RNA-DNA primers. Replication factor C (RFC) opens the polymerase clamp-like processivity factor, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and loads it onto the primer-template. Pol δ utilizes PCNA to mediate highly processive DNA synthesis, while Pol ε has intrinsic high processivity that is modestly stimulated by PCNA. Pol ε replicates the leading strand and Pol δ replicates the lagging strand in a division of labor that is not strict. The three polymerases are comprised of multiple subunits and share unifying features in their large catalytic and B subunits. The remaining subunits are evolutionarily not related and perform diverse functions. The catalytic subunits are members of family B, which are distinguished by their larger sizes due to inserts in their N- and C-terminal regions. The sizes of these inserts vary among the three polymerases, and their functions remain largely unknown. Strikingly, the quaternary structures of Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ε are arranged similarly. The catalytic subunits adopt a globular structure that is linked via its conserved C-terminal region to the B subunit. The remaining subunits are linked to the catalytic and B subunits in a highly flexible manner.

  20. Thermoresponsive Magnetic Nano-Biosensors for Rapid Measurements of Inorganic Arsenic and Cadmium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isamu Maeda

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Green fluorescent protein-tagged sensor proteins, ArsR-GFP and CadC-GFP, have been produced as biosensors for simple and low-cost quantification of As(III or Cd(II. In this study, the sensor protein-promoter DNA complexes were reconstructed on the surfaces of magnetic particles of different sizes. After the surface modification all the particles could be attracted by magnets, and released different amounts of GFP-tagged protein, according to the metal concentrations within 5 min, which caused significant increases in fluorescence. A detection limit of 1 µg/L for As(III and Cd(II in purified water was obtained only with the nanoparticles exhibiting enough magnetization after heat treatment for 1 min. Therefore, thermoresponsive magnetic nano-biosensors offer great advantages of rapidity and sensitivity for the measurement of the toxic metals in drinking water.

  1. Biosensors for breast cancer diagnosis: A review of bioreceptors, biotransducers and signal amplification strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Sunil; Kaur, Hardeep; Gautam, Nandini; Mantha, Anil K

    2017-02-15

    Breast cancer is highly prevalent in females and accounts for second highest number of deaths, worldwide. Cumbersome, expensive and time consuming detection techniques presently available for detection of breast cancer potentiates the need for development of novel, specific and ultrasensitive devices. Biosensors are the promising and selective detection devices which hold immense potential as point of care (POC) tools. Present review comprehensively scrutinizes various breast cancer biosensors developed so far and their technical evaluation with respect to efficiency and potency of selected bioreceptors and biotransducers. Use of glycoproteins, DNA biomarkers, micro-RNA, circulatory tumor cells (CTC) and some potential biomarkers are introduced briefly. The review also discusses various strategies used in signal amplification such as nanomaterials, redox mediators, p19 protein, duplex specific nucleases (DSN) and redox cycling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. A novel firefly luciferase biosensor enhances the detection of apoptosis induced by ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Junwei; Zhang, Huan; Fang, Liurong; Xi, Yongqiang; Zhou, Yanrong; Luo, Rui; Wang, Dang, E-mail: wangdang511@126.com; Xiao, Shaobo; Chen, Huanchun

    2014-10-03

    Highlights: • We developed a novel firefly luciferase based biosensor to detect apoptosis. • The novel biosensor 233-DnaE-DEVDG was reliable, sensitive and convenient. • 233-DnaE-DEVDG faithfully indicated ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis induced apoptosis. • EsxA, esxT and esxL in ESAT-6 family proteins induced apoptosis. • Activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) participated in esxT-induced apoptosis. - Abstract: The activation of caspase-3 is a key surrogate marker for detecting apoptosis. To quantitate caspase-3 activity, we constructed a biosensor comprising a recombinant firefly luciferase containing a caspase-3 cleavage site. When apoptosis was induced, caspase-3 cleavage of the biosensor activated firefly luciferase by a factor greater than 25. The assay conveniently detected apoptosis in real time, indicating that it will facilitate drug discovery. We screened ESAT-6 family proteins of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and found that esxA, esxT and esxL induced apoptosis. Further, activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and the NF-κB-regulated genes encoding tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) participated in esxT-induced apoptosis. We conclude that this assay is useful for high-throughput screening to identify and characterize proteins and drugs that regulate apoptosis.

  3. Silicene nanoribbon as a new DNA sequencing device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alesheikh, Sara; Shahtahmassebi, Nasser; Roknabadi, Mahmood Rezaee; Pilevar Shahri, Raheleh

    2018-02-01

    The importance of applying DNA sequencing in different fields, results in looking for fast and cheap methods. Nanotechnology helps this development by introducing nanostructures used for DNA sequencing. In this work we study the interaction between zigzag silicene nanoribbon and DNA nucleobases using DFT and non equilibrium Green's function approach, to investigate the possibility of using zigzag silicene nanoribbons as a biosensor for DNA sequencing.

  4. Spreeta-based biosensor for endocrine disruptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marchesini, G.R.; Koopal, K.; Meulenberg, E.; Haasnoot, W.; Irth, H.

    2007-01-01

    The construction and performance of an automated low-cost Spreeta¿-based prototype biosensor system for the detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) is described. The system consists primarily of a Spreeta miniature liquid sensor incorporated into an aluminum flow cell holder, dedicated to

  5. Boar taint detection using parasitoid biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    To evaluate the potential for a non-stinging wasp to be used as a biosensor in the pig industry, we trained wasps to 3 individual chemicals associated with boar taint. Training consisted of presenting the odors to hungry wasps while they were feeding on sugar. This associates the chemical with a fo...

  6. Optical Biosensors to Explore Biological Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palanco, Marta Espina; Mogensen, Klaus Bo; Andersen, Nils H. Skovgaard

    2016-01-01

    their capability to work in biosensor devices. For example, Raman spectroscopy can be non-invasive and can provide 1 μm of spatial resolution in 1 second of collection time, well suited for sensing. Moreover, it may give information at the single cell and even approaching the single molecule scale. Here we present...

  7. Regenerative electronic biosensors using supramolecular approaches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duan, X.; Rajan, N.; Routenberg, D.; Huskens, Jurriaan; Reed, M.

    2013-01-01

    A supramolecular interface for Si nanowire FETs has been developed with the aim of creating regenerative electronic biosensors. The key to the approach is Si-NWs functionalized with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), to which receptor moieties can be attached with an orthogonal supramolecular linker. Here we

  8. Microbial Biosensors for Selective Detection of Disaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seven microbial strains were screened for their ability to detect disaccharides as components of Clark-type oxygen biosensors. Sensors responded to varying degrees to maltose, cellobiose, sucrose, and melibiose, but none responded strongly to lactose. Although microbial sensors are relatively nons...

  9. Methods for using redox liposome biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Quan; Stevens, Raymond C.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides methods and compositions for detecting the presence of biologically-important analytes by using redox liposome biosensors. In particular, the present invention provides liposome/sol-gel electrodes suitable for the detection of a wide variety of organic molecules, including but not limited to bacterial toxins.

  10. Biosensors for Whole-Cell Bacterial Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushworth, Jo V.; Hirst, Natalie A.; Millner, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Bacterial pathogens are important targets for detection and identification in medicine, food safety, public health, and security. Bacterial infection is a common cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In spite of the availability of antibiotics, these infections are often misdiagnosed or there is an unacceptable delay in diagnosis. Current methods of bacterial detection rely upon laboratory-based techniques such as cell culture, microscopic analysis, and biochemical assays. These procedures are time-consuming and costly and require specialist equipment and trained users. Portable stand-alone biosensors can facilitate rapid detection and diagnosis at the point of care. Biosensors will be particularly useful where a clear diagnosis informs treatment, in critical illness (e.g., meningitis) or to prevent further disease spread (e.g., in case of food-borne pathogens or sexually transmitted diseases). Detection of bacteria is also becoming increasingly important in antibioterrorism measures (e.g., anthrax detection). In this review, we discuss recent progress in the use of biosensors for the detection of whole bacterial cells for sensitive and earlier identification of bacteria without the need for sample processing. There is a particular focus on electrochemical biosensors, especially impedance-based systems, as these present key advantages in terms of ease of miniaturization, lack of reagents, sensitivity, and low cost. PMID:24982325

  11. Stability of Enzymatic Biosensors for Wearable Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonawane, Apurva; Manickam, Pandiaraj; Bhansali, Shekhar

    2017-05-19

    Technological evolution in wearable sensors is accounting for major growth and transformation in multitude of industries ranging from healthcare to computing & informatics to communication and biomedical sciences. The major driver for this transformation is the new-found ability to continuously monitor and analyze the patients' physiology in patients' natural setting. Numerous wearable sensors are already on the market and are summarized. Most of the current technologies have focused on electro-physiological, electro-mechanical or acoustic measurements. Wearable bio-chemical sensing devices are in their infancy. Traditional challenges in biochemical sensing such as reliability, repeatability, stability, and drift are amplified in wearable sensing systems due to variabilities in operating environment, sample/sensor handling and motion artifacts. Enzymatic sensing technologies, due to reduced fluidic challenges continue to be forerunners for translation into wearable sensors. This paper reviews the recent developments in wearable enzymatic sensors. The wearable sensors have been classified in three major groups based on sensor embodiment and placement relative to the human body: (i) On-body, (ii) Clothing/textile-based biosensors and (iii) Biosensor accessories. The sensors, which come in the forms of stickers, tattoos are categorized as on-body biosensors. The fabric-based biosensor comes in different models such as smart-shirts, socks, gloves and smart undergarments with printed sensors for continuous monitoring.

  12. Improved electrochemical nucleic acid biosensor based on polyaniline-polyvinyl sulphonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabhakar, Nirmal [Biomolecular Electronics and Conducting Polymer Research Group, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi-110012 (India); Centre for Biomedical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Hauz Khas, New Delhi-110016 (India); Sumana, G.; Arora, Kavita [Biomolecular Electronics and Conducting Polymer Research Group, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi-110012 (India); Singh, Harpal [Centre for Biomedical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Hauz Khas, New Delhi-110016 (India); Malhotra, B.D. [Biomolecular Electronics and Conducting Polymer Research Group, National Physical Laboratory, Dr. K.S. Krishnan Marg, New Delhi-110012 (India)], E-mail: bansi.malhotra@gmail.com

    2008-05-01

    DNA biosensor based on polyaniline (PANI)-polyvinyl sulphonate (PVS) has been fabricated using electrochemical entrapment technique for detection of organophosphorus pesticides (chlorpyrifos and malathion). These double stranded calf thymus DNA (dsCT-DNA) entrapped PANI-PVS/indium-tin-oxide (ITO) bioelectrodes have been characterized using square wave voltammetry (SWV), Fourier transform infra-red spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical impedance techniques, respectively. These dsCT-DNA entrapped PANI-PVS/ITO bioelectrodes have been found to have response time of 30 s, stability of about 6 months and detection limit for chlorpyrifos and malathion as 0.5 ppb and 0.01 ppm, respectively.

  13. Recent advances in biosensor technology for potential applications - An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    vigneshvar es

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Imperative utilization of biosensors has acquired paramount importance in the field of drug discovery, biomedicine, food safety standards, defence, security and environmental monitoring. This has led to the invention of precise and powerful analytical tools using biological sensing element as biosensor. Glucometers utilizing the strategy of electrochemical detection of oxygen or hydrogen peroxide using immobilized glucose oxidase electrode seeded the discovery of biosensors. Recent advances in biological techniques and instrumentation involving fluorescence tag to nanomaterials have increased the sensitive limit of biosensors. Use of aptamers or nucleotides, affibodies, peptide arrays and molecule imprinted polymers provide tools to develop innovative biosensors over classical methods. Integrated approaches provided a better perspective for developing specific and sensitive biosensors with high regenerative potentials. Variety of biosensors ranging from nanomaterials, polymers to microbes have wider potential applications. It is quite important to integrate multifaceted approaches to design biosensors that have the potential for diverse usage. In light of this, this review provides an overview of different types of biosensors being used ranging from electrochemical, fluorescence tagged, nanomaterials, silica or quartz and microbes for various biomedical and environmental applications with future outlook of biosensor technology.

  14. Recent Advances in Biosensor Technology for Potential Applications - An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigneshvar, S; Sudhakumari, C C; Senthilkumaran, Balasubramanian; Prakash, Hridayesh

    2016-01-01

    Imperative utilization of biosensors has acquired paramount importance in the field of drug discovery, biomedicine, food safety standards, defense, security, and environmental monitoring. This has led to the invention of precise and powerful analytical tools using biological sensing element as biosensor. Glucometers utilizing the strategy of electrochemical detection of oxygen or hydrogen peroxide using immobilized glucose oxidase electrode seeded the discovery of biosensors. Recent advances in biological techniques and instrumentation involving fluorescence tag to nanomaterials have increased the sensitive limit of biosensors. Use of aptamers or nucleotides, affibodies, peptide arrays, and molecule imprinted polymers provide tools to develop innovative biosensors over classical methods. Integrated approaches provided a better perspective for developing specific and sensitive biosensors with high regenerative potentials. Various biosensors ranging from nanomaterials, polymers to microbes have wider potential applications. It is quite important to integrate multifaceted approaches to design biosensors that have the potential for diverse usage. In light of this, this review provides an overview of different types of biosensors being used ranging from electrochemical, fluorescence tagged, nanomaterials, silica or quartz, and microbes for various biomedical and environmental applications with future outlook of biosensor technology.

  15. Development of an electrochemical DNA biosensor for detection of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    bBucak School of Health, Mehmet Akif Ersoy University, 15300, Bucak, Burdur, Turkey e-mail: merve.ysil@gmail.com; ... Introduction. Tuberculosis (TB) is a major health problem caused by. Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTb). ... good stability and rapid preparation.5 10 There are a few. ∗. For correspondence reports about ...

  16. Functional oligonucleotide recognition nanomodules for electrochemical DNA biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Campàs i Homs, Mònica

    2002-01-01

    El objetivo de esta tesis ha sido diseñar, caracterizar y optimizar un array de sensores de ADN electroquímico. Para el estudio de la inmovilización de las sondas de oligonucleótidos y la detección de la hibridación se realizaron experimentos preliminares con un sistema simplificado. Dicho sistema demostró que las monocapas auto-ensambladas (SAMs) en superficies de oro eran apropiadas como método de inmovilización. Debido al rápido desarrollo de los sensores de ADN hacia los arrays de ADN, se...

  17. Catalytic reforming methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  18. Fabrication of microfluidic integrated biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Tijjani; Dhahi, Th S.; Mohammed, Mohammed; Hashim, U.; Noriman, N. Z.; Dahham, Omar S.

    2017-09-01

    An event of miniaturizing for sensor systems to carry out biological diagnostics are gaining wade spread acceptance. The system may contain several different sensor units for the detection of specific analyte, the analyte to be detected might be any kind of biological molecules (DNA, mRNA or proteins) or chemical substances. In most cases, the detection is based on receptor-ligand binding like DNA hybridization or antibody-antigen interaction, achieving this on a nanostructure. DNA or protein must be attached to certain locations within the structure. Critical for this is to have a robust binding chemistry to the surface in the microstructure. Here we successfully designed and fabricated microfluidics element for passive fluid delivery into polysilicon Nanowire sensing domain, we further demonstrated a very simple and effective way of integrating the two devices to give full functionalities of laboratory on a single chip. The sensing element was successfully surface modified and tested on real biomedical clinical sample for evaluation and validation.

  19. Type I restriction endonucleases are true catalytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, Piero R; Xu, Cuiling; Chi, Min

    2009-06-01

    Type I restriction endonucleases are intriguing, multifunctional complexes that restrict DNA randomly, at sites distant from the target sequence. Restriction at distant sites is facilitated by ATP hydrolysis-dependent, translocation of double-stranded DNA towards the stationary enzyme bound at the recognition sequence. Following restriction, the enzymes are thought to remain associated with the DNA at the target site, hydrolyzing copious amounts of ATP. As a result, for the past 35 years type I restriction endonucleases could only be loosely classified as enzymes since they functioned stoichiometrically relative to DNA. To further understand enzyme mechanism, a detailed analysis of DNA cleavage by the EcoR124I holoenzyme was done. We demonstrate for the first time that type I restriction endonucleases are not stoichiometric but are instead catalytic with respect to DNA. Further, the mechanism involves formation of a dimer of holoenzymes, with each monomer bound to a target sequence and, following cleavage, each dissociates in an intact form to bind and restrict subsequent DNA molecules. Therefore, type I restriction endonucleases, like their type II counterparts, are true enzymes. The conclusion that type I restriction enzymes are catalytic relative to DNA has important implications for the in vivo function of these previously enigmatic enzymes.

  20. Urinary catalytic iron in obesity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Thethi, Tina K; Parsha, Kaushik; Rajapurkar, Mohan; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata; Shah, Sudhir; Yau, C Lillian; Japa, Shanker; Fonseca, Vivian

    2011-01-01

    ...), hypertension, and chronic kidney disease. Catalytic iron, which has been associated with these chronic diseases, may be one of the links between obesity and these multifactorial diverse disorders...

  1. Fundamental Design Principles for Transcription-Factor-Based Metabolite Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannan, Ahmad A; Liu, Di; Zhang, Fuzhong; Oyarzún, Diego A

    2017-10-20

    Metabolite biosensors are central to current efforts toward precision engineering of metabolism. Although most research has focused on building new biosensors, their tunability remains poorly understood and is fundamental for their broad applicability. Here we asked how genetic modifications shape the dose-response curve of biosensors based on metabolite-responsive transcription factors. Using the lac system in Escherichia coli as a model system, we built promoter libraries with variable operator sites that reveal interdependencies between biosensor dynamic range and response threshold. We developed a phenomenological theory to quantify such design constraints in biosensors with various architectures and tunable parameters. Our theory reveals a maximal achievable dynamic range and exposes tunable parameters for orthogonal control of dynamic range and response threshold. Our work sheds light on fundamental limits of synthetic biology designs and provides quantitative guidelines for biosensor design in applications such as dynamic pathway control, strain optimization, and real-time monitoring of metabolism.

  2. A general strategy to construct small molecule biosensors in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Justin; Jester, Benjamin W; Tinberg, Christine E; Mandell, Daniel J; Antunes, Mauricio S; Chari, Raj; Morey, Kevin J; Rios, Xavier; Medford, June I; Church, George M; Fields, Stanley; Baker, David

    2015-12-29

    Biosensors for small molecules can be used in applications that range from metabolic engineering to orthogonal control of transcription. Here, we produce biosensors based on a ligand-binding domain (LBD) by using a method that, in principle, can be applied to any target molecule. The LBD is fused to either a fluorescent protein or a transcriptional activator and is destabilized by mutation such that the fusion accumulates only in cells containing the target ligand. We illustrate the power of this method by developing biosensors for digoxin and progesterone. Addition of ligand to yeast, mammalian, or plant cells expressing a biosensor activates transcription with a dynamic range of up to ~100-fold. We use the biosensors to improve the biotransformation of pregnenolone to progesterone in yeast and to regulate CRISPR activity in mammalian cells. This work provides a general methodology to develop biosensors for a broad range of molecules in eukaryotes.

  3. Impedimetric biosensors for medical applications current progress and challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Rushworth, Jo V; Goode, Jack A; Pike, Douglas J; Ahmed, Asif; Millner, Paul

    2014-01-01

    In this monograph, the authors discuss the current progress in the medical application of impedimetric biosensors, along with the key challenges in the field. First, a general overview of biosensor development, structure and function is presented, followed by a detailed discussion of impedimetric biosensors and the principles of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Next, the current state-of-the art in terms of the science and technology underpinning impedance-based biosensors is reviewed in detail. The layer-by-layer construction of impedimetric sensors is described, including the design of electrodes, their nano-modification, transducer surface functionalization and the attachment of different bioreceptors. The current challenges of translating lab-based biosensor platforms into commercially-available devices that function with real patient samples at the POC are presented; this includes a consideration of systems integration, microfluidics and biosensor regeneration. The final section of this monograph ...

  4. Analytical Problems in Exposing Amperometric Enzyme Biosensors to Biological Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Rocchitta

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Enzyme-based chemical biosensors are based on biological recognition. In order to operate, the enzymes must be available to catalyze a specific biochemical reaction and be stable under the normal operating conditions of the biosensor. Design of biosensors is based on knowledge about the target analyte, as well as the complexity of the matrix in which the analyte has to be quantified. This article reviews the problems resulting from the interaction of enzyme-based amperometric biosensors with complex biological matrices containing the target analyte(s. One of the most challenging disadvantages of amperometric enzyme-based biosensor detection is signal reduction from fouling agents and interference from chemicals present in the sample matrix. This article, therefore, investigates the principles of functioning of enzymatic biosensors, their analytical performance over time and the strategies used to optimize their performance. Moreover, the composition of biological fluids as a function of their interaction with biosensing will be presented.

  5. Recent advances in biosensors based on enzyme inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amine, A; Arduini, F; Moscone, D; Palleschi, G

    2016-02-15

    Enzyme inhibitors like drugs and pollutants are closely correlated to human and environmental health, thus their monitoring is of paramount importance in analytical chemistry. Enzymatic biosensors represent cost-effective, miniaturized and easy to use devices; particularly biosensors based on enzyme inhibition are useful analytical tools for fast screening and monitoring of inhibitors. The present review will highlight the research carried out in the last 9 years (2006-2014) on biosensors based on enzyme inhibition. We underpin the recent advances focused on the investigation in new theoretical approachs and in the evaluation of biosensor performances for reversible and irreversible inhibitors. The use of nanomaterials and microfluidic systems as well as the applications of the various biosensors in real samples is critically reviewed, demonstrating that such biosensors allow the development of useful devices for a fast and reliable alarm system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Biosensors in the small scale: methods and technology trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senveli, Sukru U; Tigli, Onur

    2013-03-01

    This study presents a review on biosensors with an emphasis on recent developments in the field. A brief history accompanied by a detailed description of the biosensor concepts is followed by rising trends observed in contemporary micro- and nanoscale biosensors. Performance metrics to quantify and compare different detection mechanisms are presented. A comprehensive analysis on various types and subtypes of biosensors are given. The fields of interest within the scope of this review are label-free electrical, mechanical and optical biosensors as well as other emerging and popular technologies. Especially, the latter half of the last decade is reviewed for the types, methods and results of the most prominently researched detection mechanisms. Tables are provided for comparison of various competing technologies in the literature. The conclusion part summarises the noteworthy advantages and disadvantages of all biosensors reviewed in this study. Furthermore, future directions that the micro- and nanoscale biosensing technologies are expected to take are provided along with the immediate outlook.

  7. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  8. A novel gold nanoparticle-DNA aptamer-based plasmonic chip for rapid and sensitive detection of bacterial pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Yi; Phuoc Long, Truong; Wolff, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-based biosensors are emerging technologies for rapid detection of pathogens. However, it is very challenging to develop chip-based AuNP-biosensors for whole cells. This paper describes a novel AuNPs-DNA aptamer-based plasmonic assay which allows DNA aptamers to be detac......Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-based biosensors are emerging technologies for rapid detection of pathogens. However, it is very challenging to develop chip-based AuNP-biosensors for whole cells. This paper describes a novel AuNPs-DNA aptamer-based plasmonic assay which allows DNA aptamers...... to be detached from AuNPs when interacting with bacteria. The new strategy greatly increases the sensitivity and specificity of chip-based whole-cell biosensing....

  9. Non-invasive Optical Biosensor for Probing Cell Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Fang

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell signaling mediated through a cellular target is encoded by spatial andtemporal dynamics of downstream signaling networks. The coupling of temporal dynamicswith spatial gradients of signaling activities guides cellular responses upon stimulation.Monitoring the integration of cell signaling in real time, if realized, would provide a newdimension for understanding cell biology and physiology. Optical biosensors includingresonant waveguide grating (RWG biosensor manifest a physiologically relevant andintegrated cellular response related to dynamic redistribution of cellular matters, thusproviding a non-invasive means for cell signaling study. This paper reviews recentprogresses in biosensor instrumentation, and theoretical considerations and potentialapplications of optical biosensors for whole cell sensing.

  10. Catalytic and non-catalytic roles of the CtIP endonuclease in double-strand break end resection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makharashvili, Nodar; Tubbs, Anthony T.; Yang, Soo-Hyun; Wang, Hailong; Barton, Olivia; Zhou, Yi; Deshpande, Rajashree A.; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Lobrich, Markus; Sleckman, Barry P.; Wu, Xiaohua; Paull, Tanya T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary The CtIP protein is known to function in 5′ strand resection during homologous recombination similar to the budding yeast Sae2 protein, although its role in this process is unclear. Here we characterize recombinant human CtIP and find that it exhibits 5′ flap endonuclease activity on branched DNA structures, independent of the MRN complex. Phosphorylation of CtIP at known ATM-dependent sites and other sites is essential for its catalytic activity, although the S327 and T847 phosphorylation sites are dispensable. A catalytic mutant of CtIP that is deficient in endonuclease activity exhibits wild-type levels of homologous recombination at restriction enzyme-generated breaks but is deficient in processing topoisomerase adducts and radiation-induced breaks in human cells, suggesting that the nuclease activity of CtIP is specifically required for the removal of DNA adducts at sites of DNA breaks. PMID:24837676

  11. Loss of maintenance DNA methylation results in abnormal DNA origin firing during DNA replication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haruta, Mayumi [Department of Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Shimada, Midori, E-mail: midorism@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Nishiyama, Atsuya; Johmura, Yoshikazu [Department of Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan); Le Tallec, Benoît; Debatisse, Michelle [Institut Curie, Centre de Recherche, 26 rue d’Ulm, CNRS UMR 3244, 75248 ParisCedex 05 (France); Nakanishi, Makoto, E-mail: mkt-naka@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Department of Cell Biology, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya City University, 1 Kawasumi, Mizuho-cho, Mizuho-ku, Nagoya 467-8601 (Japan)

    2016-01-22

    The mammalian maintenance methyltransferase DNMT1 [DNA (cytosine-5-)-methyltransferase 1] mediates the inheritance of the DNA methylation pattern during replication. Previous studies have shown that depletion of DNMT1 causes a severe growth defect and apoptosis in differentiated cells. However, the detailed mechanisms behind this phenomenon remain poorly understood. Here we show that conditional ablation of Dnmt1 in murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) resulted in an aberrant DNA replication program showing an accumulation of late-S phase replication and causing severely defective growth. Furthermore, we found that the catalytic activity and replication focus targeting sequence of DNMT1 are required for a proper DNA replication program. Taken together, our findings suggest that the maintenance of DNA methylation by DNMT1 plays a critical role in proper regulation of DNA replication in mammalian cells. - Highlights: • DNMT1 depletion results in an abnormal DNA replication program. • Aberrant DNA replication is independent of the DNA damage checkpoint in DNMT1cKO. • DNMT1 catalytic activity and RFT domain are required for proper DNA replication. • DNMT1 catalytic activity and RFT domain are required for cell proliferation.

  12. The Anatomy of a Nonfaradaic Electrochemical Biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Hunter; Radha Shanmugam, Nandhinee; Paneer Selvam, Anjan; Prasad, Shalini

    2017-11-01

    Point-of-care (POC) testing has revolutionized diagnostic healthcare, bringing medical results directly and immediately to the patient. With faster diagnostics, more immediate clinical management decisions can be made. POC tests most often use a dipstick or swab format to detect the presence of a pathogen, disease, or other relevant biomarker. In these formats, the POC tests eliminate the need for complex lab equipment and trained personnel to collect, process, and analyze sample data for simple diagnostics. However, these tests cannot satisfy all clinical needs, because accurate quantitative results are needed. The present study serves as a template for designing a nonfaradaic electrochemical biosensor toward quantitative POC diagnostics. We focus on investigating the most important parameters when constructing a nonfaradaic biosensor through both mathematical modeling and electrochemical measurements. Furthermore, we demonstrate quantitative affinity biosensing of a model protein toward developing a POC device.

  13. Recent advances in biosensor based endotoxin detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, A P; Kumar, P S; Swain, S

    2014-01-15

    Endotoxins also referred to as pyrogens are chemically lipopolysaccharides habitually found in food, environment and clinical products of bacterial origin and are unavoidable ubiquitous microbiological contaminants. Pernicious issues of its contamination result in high mortality and severe morbidities. Standard traditional techniques are slow and cumbersome, highlighting the pressing need for evoking agile endotoxin detection system. The early and prompt detection of endotoxin assumes prime importance in health care, pharmacological and biomedical sectors. The unparalleled recognition abilities of LAL biosensors perched with remarkable sensitivity, high stability and reproducibility have bestowed it with persistent reliability and their possible fabrication for commercial applicability. This review paper entails an overview of various trends in current techniques available and other possible alternatives in biosensor based endotoxin detection together with its classification, epidemiological aspects, thrust areas demanding endotoxin control, commercially available detection sensors and a revolutionary unprecedented approach narrating the influence of omics for endotoxin detection. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Microbial fuel cells for biosensor applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Huijia; Zhou, Minghua; Liu, Mengmeng; Yang, Weilu; Gu, Tingyue

    2015-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) face major hurdles for real-world applications as power generators with the exception of powering small sensor devices. Despite tremendous improvements made in the last two decades, MFCs are still too expensive to build and operate and their power output is still too small. In view of this, in recently years, intensive researches have been carried out to expand the applications into other areas such as acid and alkali production, bioremediation of aquatic sediments, desalination and biosensors. Unlike power applications, MFC sensors have the immediate prospect to be practical. This review covers the latest developments in various proposed biosensor applications using MFCs including monitoring microbial activity, testing biochemical oxygen demand, detection of toxicants and detection of microbial biofilms that cause biocorrosion.

  15. FET-biosensor for cardiac troponin biomarker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Arshad Mohd Khairuddin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute myocardial infarction or myocardial infarction (MI is a major health problem, due to diminished flow of blood to the heart, leads to higher rates of mortality and morbidity. The most specific markers for cardiac injury are cardiac troponin I (cTnI and cardiac troponin T (cTnT which have been considered as ‘gold standard’. Due to higher specificity, determination of the level of cardiac troponins became a predominant indicator for MI. Currently, field-effect transistor (FET-based biosensors have been main interest to be implemented in portable sensors with the ultimate application in point-of-care testing (POCT. In this paper, we review on the FET-based biosensor based on its principle of operation, integration with nanomaterial, surface functionalization as well as immobilization, and the introduction of additional gate (for ambipolar conduction on the device architecture for the detection of cardiac troponin I (cTnI biomarker.

  16. Biosensors for security and bioterrorism applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nikoleli, Georgia-Paraskevi

    2016-01-01

    This book offers comprehensive coverage of biomarker/biosensor interactions for the rapid detection of weapons of bioterrorism, as well as current research trends and future developments and applications. It will be useful to researchers in this field who are interested in new developments in the early detection of such. The authors have collected very valuable and, in some aspects indispensable experience in the area i.e. in the development and application of portable biosensors for the detection of potential hazards. Most efforts are centered on the development of immunochemical assays including flow-lateral systems and engineered antibodies and their fragments. In addition, new approaches to the detection of enzyme inhibitors, direct enzymatic and microbial detection of metabolites and nutrients are elaborated. Some realized prototypes and concept devices applicable for the further use as a basis for the cooperation programs are also discussed. There is a particular focus on electrochemical and optical det...

  17. Modelling Carbon Nanotubes-Based Mediatorless Biosensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julija Razumiene

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a mathematical model of carbon nanotubes-based mediatorless biosensor. The developed model is based on nonlinear non-stationary reaction-diffusion equations. The model involves four layers (compartments: a layer of enzyme solution entrapped on a terylene membrane, a layer of the single walled carbon nanotubes deposited on a perforated membrane, and an outer diffusion layer. The biosensor response and sensitivity are investigated by changing the model parameters with a special emphasis on the mediatorless transfer of the electrons in the layer of the enzyme-loaded carbon nanotubes. The numerical simulation at transient and steady state conditions was carried out using the finite difference technique. The mathematical model and the numerical solution were validated by experimental data. The obtained agreement between the simulation results and the experimental data was admissible at different concentrations of the substrate.

  18. FET-biosensor for cardiac troponin biomarker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Mohd Khairuddin Md; Faris Mohamad Fathil, Mohamad; Hashim, Uda

    2017-11-01

    Acute myocardial infarction or myocardial infarction (MI) is a major health problem, due to diminished flow of blood to the heart, leads to higher rates of mortality and morbidity. The most specific markers for cardiac injury are cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and cardiac troponin T (cTnT) which have been considered as `gold standard'. Due to higher specificity, determination of the level of cardiac troponins became a predominant indicator for MI. Currently, field-effect transistor (FET)-based biosensors have been main interest to be implemented in portable sensors with the ultimate application in point-of-care testing (POCT). In this paper, we review on the FET-based biosensor based on its principle of operation, integration with nanomaterial, surface functionalization as well as immobilization, and the introduction of additional gate (for ambipolar conduction) on the device architecture for the detection of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) biomarker.

  19. Bioapplications of Electrochemical Sensors and Biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Eduard; Andreescu, Silvana

    2017-01-01

    Recent progress in the electrochemical field enabled development of miniaturized sensing devices that can be used in biological settings to obtain fundamental and practical biochemically relevant information on physiology, metabolism, and disease states in living systems. Electrochemical sensors and biosensors have demonstrated potential for rapid, real-time measurements of biologically relevant molecules. This chapter provides an overview of the most recent advances in the development of miniaturized sensors for biological investigations in living systems, with focus on the detection of neurotransmitters and oxidative stress markers. The design of electrochemical (bio)sensors, including their detection mechanism and functionality in biological systems, is described as well as their advantages and limitations. Application of these sensors to studies in live cells, embryonic development, and rodent models is discussed. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Porous nanosheet-based ZnO microspheres for the construction of direct electrochemical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xianbo; Zhang, Haijun; Ni, Yuwen; Zhang, Qing; Chen, Jiping

    2008-09-15

    Nanosheet-based ZnO microsphere with porous nanostructures was synthesized by a facile chemical bath deposition method followed by thermal treatment, which was explored for the construction of electrochemical biosensors. Spectroscopic and electrochemical researches revealed the ZnO-based composite was a biocompatible immobilization matrix for enzymes with good enzymatic stability and bioactivity. With advantages of nanostructured inorganic-organic hybrid materials, a pair of stable and well-defined quasi-reversible redox peaks of hemoglobin was obtained with a formal potential of -0.345 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) in pH 7.0 buffer. Facilitated direct electron transfer of the metalloenzymes with an apparent heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant (k(s)) of 3.2s(-1) was achieved on the ZnO-based enzyme electrode. Comparative studies demonstrated the nanosheet-based ZnO microspheres were more effective in facilitating the electron transfer of immobilized enzyme than solid ZnO microspheres, which may result from the unique nanostructures and larger surface area of the porous ZnO. The prepared biosensor displayed good performance for the detection of H(2)O(2) and NaNO(2) with a wide linear range of 1-410 and 10-2700 microM, respectively. The entrapped hemoglobin exhibits high peroxidase-like activity for the catalytic reduction of H(2)O(2) with an apparent Michaelis-Menten constant (K(M)(app)) of 143 microM. The nanosheet-based ZnO could be a promising matrix for the fabrication of direct electrochemical biosensors, and may find wide potential applications in biomedical detection and environmental analysis.

  1. Biosensor based on laccase immobilized on plasma polymerized allylamine/carbon electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardhaoui, Malika, E-mail: malika.ardhaoui@ucd.ie [Laboratoire de Génie des Procédés Plasma et Traitements de Surface, Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Chimie ParisTech, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris (France); Laboratoire Charles Friedel, CNRS UMR 7223, Chimie ParisTech, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Surface Engineering Research Group, School of Electrical, Electronic and Mechanical Engineering, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Bhatt, Sudhir [Laboratoire de Génie des Procédés Plasma et Traitements de Surface, Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Chimie ParisTech, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris (France); Zheng, Meihui [Laboratoire Charles Friedel, CNRS UMR 7223, Chimie ParisTech, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Dowling, Denis [Surface Engineering Research Group, School of Electrical, Electronic and Mechanical Engineering, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Jolivalt, Claude [Laboratoire Charles Friedel, CNRS UMR 7223, Chimie ParisTech, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Khonsari, Farzaneh Arefi [Laboratoire de Génie des Procédés Plasma et Traitements de Surface, Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Chimie ParisTech, 11 rue Pierre et Marie Curie, 75231 Paris (France)

    2013-08-01

    In this work, a simple and rapid method was used to functionalize carbon electrode in order to efficiently immobilize laccase for biosensor application. A stable allylamine coating was deposited using a low pressure inductively excited RF tubular plasma reactor under mild plasma conditions (low plasma power (10 W), few minutes) to generate high density amine groups (N/C ratio up to 0.18) on rough carbon surface electrodes. The longer was the allylamine plasma deposition time; the better was the surface coverage. Laccase from Trametes versicolor was physisorbed and covalently bound to these allylamine modified carbon surfaces. The laccase activities and current outputs measured in the presence of 2,2′-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazole-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) showed that the best efficiency was obtained for electrode plasma coated during 30 min. They showed also that for all the tested electrodes, the activities and current outputs of the covalently immobilized laccases were twice higher than the physically adsorbed ones. The sensitivity of these biocompatible bioelectrodes was evaluated by measuring their catalytic efficiency for oxygen reduction in the presence of ABTS as non-phenolic redox substrate and 2,6-dimethoxyphenol (DMP) as phenolic one. Sensitivities of around 4.8 μA mg{sup −1} L and 2.7 μA mg{sup −1} L were attained for ABTS and DMP respectively. An excellent stability of this laccase biosensor was observed for over 6 months. - Highlights: • Low pressure plasma was used to generate stable allylamine coating. • Laccase from Trametes versicolor was physisorbed and covalently immobilized. • Best biosensor efficiency obtained for the covalently immobilized laccases • Sensitivities of 4.8 μA mg{sup −1} L and 2.7 μA mg{sup −1} L for ABTS and DMP respectively.

  2. Dual-mode acoustic wave biosensors microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auner, Gregory W.; Shreve, Gina; Ying, Hao; Newaz, Golam; Hughes, Chantelle; Xu, Jianzeng

    2003-04-01

    We have develop highly sensitive and selective acoustic wave biosensor arrays with signal analysis systems to provide a fingerprint for the real-time identification and quantification of a wide array of bacterial pathogens and environmental health hazards. We have developed an unique highly sensitive dual mode acoustic wave platform prototype that, when combined with phage based selective detection elements, form a durable bacteria sensor. Arrays of these new real-time biosensors are integrated to form a biosensor array on a chip. This research and development program optimizes advanced piezoelectric aluminum nitride wide bandgap semiconductors, novel micromachining processes, advanced device structures, selective phage displays development and immobilization techniques, and system integration and signal analysis technology to develop the biosensor arrays. The dual sensor platform can be programmed to sense in a gas, vapor or liquid environment by switching between acoustic wave resonate modes. Such a dual mode sensor has tremendous implications for applications involving monitoring of pathogenic microorganisms in the clinical setting due to their ability to detect airborne pathogens. This provides a number of applications including hospital settings such as intensive care or other in-patient wards for the reduction of nosocomial infections and maintenance of sterile environments in surgical suites. Monitoring for airborn pathogen transmission in public transportation areas such as airplanes may be useful for implementation of strategies for redution of airborn transmission routes. The ability to use the same sensor in the liquid sensing mode is important for tracing the source of airborn pathogens to local liquid sources. Sensing of pathogens in saliva will be useful for sensing oral pathogens and support of decision-making strategies regarding prevention of transmission and support of treatment strategies.

  3. Nanophotonic biosensor for space exploration (PBSA instrument)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoja, S.; Parro, V.; Nestler, J.; Geidel, S.; Martins, R.; Cuesta, F.; Elvira, J. G.; Sousa, A.

    2017-11-01

    One of the biggest challenges of Astrobiology is the search for clear signs of present or past life on other planetary bodies. Thus, this poster will describe the project "Photonic Biosensor for Space Application" (PBSA, www.pbsa-fp7.eu) founded by the Directorate-General for Enterprise and Industry (DG ENTR) within the European Commission and managed by the Unit S2 (Space Research) of the Research European Agency (REA).

  4. An interference-free glucose biosensor based on an anionic redox polymer-mediated enzymatic oxidation of glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Huimin; Shen, Wei; Gao, Zhiqiang

    2013-07-22

    Herein a novel strategy for the construction of an amperometric biosensor for highly sensitive and selective determination of glucose is described. The biosensor is made of a biocomposite membrane of glucose oxidase (GOx) and an Os(bpy)2 (bpy=2,2'-bipyridine)-based anionic redox polymer (Os-RP) mediator. The biosensor is fabricated through the co-immobilization of GOx and the Os-RP on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode by a simple one-step chemical crosslinking process. The crosslinked Os-RP/GOx composite membrane shows excellent catalytic activity toward the oxidation of glucose. Under optimal experimental conditions, a linear correlation between the oxidation current of glucose in amperometry at 0.25 V (vs. Ag/AgCl) and glucose concentration up to 10 mM with a sensitivity of 16.5 μA mM(-1) cm(-2) and a response time glucose in the presence of ascorbic acid and uric acid. The low hydrophobicity of the composite membrane also effectively retards the transport of molecular oxygen within the membrane. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Extensive studies have been conducted to establish sound basis for design and engineering of reactors for practising such catalytic reactions and for realizing improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so recent) developments in engineering reactors for catalytic reactions is ...

  6. Optoelectronic biosensor for remote monitoring of toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, George K.; Bassi, Amarjeet S.; Singh, Shikha; Fiorilli, Mina; Jauda, Lilana

    2001-02-01

    12 A biosensor telemetry system for the on-line remote monitoring of toxic sites is described in this paper. The device is a self-contained field measurement system that employs immobilized luminescent. Vibrio fisheri bacteria to detect airborne contaminants. The presence of toxic chemicals in the air will lead to a measurable decrease in the intensity of light produced by the bacteria population. Both cellular and environmental factors control the level of bioluminescence exhibited by the bacteria. The biological sensing element is placed inside a miniature airflow chamber that houses a light-to-frequency transducer, power supply, and Radio-Frequency (RF) transmitter to convert the intensity of bioluminescence exhibited by the bacteria population into a radio signal that is picked up by a RF receiver at a safe location. The miniature biosensor can be transported to the investigated on either a terrestrial or airborne robotic vehicle. Furthermore, numerous spatially distributed biosensors can be used to both map the extent and the rate-of-change in the dispersion of the hazardous contaminants over a large geographical area.

  7. Biosensor for remote monitoring of airborne toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopf, George K.; Bassi, Amarjeet S.; Singh, Shikha; Macleod, Roslyn

    1999-12-01

    The rapid detection of toxic contaminants released into the air by chemical processing facilities is a high priority for many manufacturers. This paper describes a novel biosensor for the remote monitoring of toxic sites. The proposed biosensor is a measurement system that employs immobilized luminescent Vibrio fisheri bacteria to detect airborne contaminants. The presence of toxic chemicals will lead to a detectable decrease in the intensity of light produced by the bacteria. Both cellular and environmental factors control the bioluminescence of these bacteria. Important design factors are the appropriate cell growth media, environmental toxicity, oxygen and cell concentrations. The luminescent bacteria are immobilized on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) gels and placed inside a specially constructed, miniature flow cell which houses a transducer, power source, and transmitter to convert the light signal information into radio frequencies that are picked up by a receiver at a remote location. The biosensor prototype is designed to function either as a single unit mounted on an exploratory robot or numerous units spatially distributed throughout a contaminated environment for remote sensing applications.

  8. Porous photonic crystal external cavity laser biosensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qinglan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Peh, Jessie; Hergenrother, Paul J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Cunningham, Brian T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    We report the design, fabrication, and testing of a photonic crystal (PC) biosensor structure that incorporates a porous high refractive index TiO{sub 2} dielectric film that enables immobilization of capture proteins within an enhanced surface-area volume that spatially overlaps with the regions of resonant electromagnetic fields where biomolecular binding can produce the greatest shifts in photonic crystal resonant wavelength. Despite the nanoscale porosity of the sensor structure, the PC slab exhibits narrowband and high efficiency resonant reflection, enabling the structure to serve as a wavelength-tunable element of an external cavity laser. In the context of sensing small molecule interactions with much larger immobilized proteins, we demonstrate that the porous structure provides 3.7× larger biosensor signals than an equivalent nonporous structure, while the external cavity laser (ECL) detection method provides capability for sensing picometer-scale shifts in the PC resonant wavelength caused by small molecule binding. The porous ECL achieves a record high figure of merit for label-free optical biosensors.

  9. From chemosensing in microorganisms to practical biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Surya K; Kundu, Tapanendu; Sain, Anirban

    2012-11-01

    Microorganisms like bacteria can sense concentrations of chemoattractants in their medium very accurately. They achieve this through interaction between the receptors on their cell surfaces and chemoattractant molecules (like sugar). Physical processes like diffusion set some limits on the accuracy of detection, which was discussed by Berg and Purcell in the late seventies. We re-examine their work in order to assess what insight it may offer for making efficient, practical biosensors. We model the functioning of a typical biosensor as a reaction-diffusion process in a confined geometry. Using available data first we characterize the system by estimating the kinetic constants for the binding and unbinding reactions between the chemoattractants and the receptors. Then we compute the binding flux for this system, which Berg and Purcell had discussed. Unlike in microorganisms where the interval between successive measurements determines the efficiency of the nutrient searching process, it turns out that biosensors depend on long time properties like signal saturation time, which we study in detail. We also develop a mean field description of the kinetics of the system.

  10. Sensitive-cell-based fish chromatophore biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Thomas K.; Chaplen, Frank W.; Jovanovic, Goran; Kolodziej, Wojtek; Trempy, Janine E.; Willard, Corwin; Liburdy, James A.; Pence, Deborah V.; Paul, Brian K.

    2004-07-01

    A sensitive biosensor (cytosensor) has been developed based on color changes in the toxin-sensitive colored living cells of fish. These chromatophores are highly sensitive to the presence of many known and unknown toxins produced by microbial pathogens and undergo visible color changes in a dose-dependent manner. The chromatophores are immobilized and maintained in a viable state while potential pathogens multiply and fish cell-microbe interactions are monitored. Low power LED lighting is used to illuminate the chromatophores which are magnified using standard optical lenses and imaged onto a CCD array. Reaction to toxins is detected by observing changes is the total area of color in the cells. These fish chromatophores are quite sensitive to cholera toxin, Staphococcus alpha toxin, and Bordatella pertussis toxin. Numerous other toxic chemical and biological agents besides bacterial toxins also cause readily detectable color effects in chromatophores. The ability of the chromatophore cell-based biosensor to distinguish between different bacterial pathogens was examined. Toxin producing strains of Salmonella enteritis, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Bacillus cereus induced movement of pigmented organelles in the chromatophore cells and this movement was measured by changes in the optical density over time. Each bacterial pathogen elicited this measurable response in a distinctive and signature fashion. These results suggest a chromatophore cell-based biosensor assay may be applicable for the detection and identification of virulence activities associated with certain air-, food-, and water-borne bacterial pathogens.

  11. L-arginine biosensors: A comprehensive review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Verma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Arginine has been considered as the most potent nutraceutics discovered ever, due to its powerful healing property, and it's been known to scientists as the Miracle Molecule. Arginine detection in fermented food products is necessary because, high level of arginine in foods forms ethyl carbamate (EC during the fermentation process. Therefore, L-arginine detection in fermented food products is very important as a control measure for quality of fermented foods, food supplements and beverages including wine. In clinical analysis arginine detection is important due to their enormous inherent versatility in various metabolic pathways, topmost in the synthesis of Nitric oxide (NO and tumor growth. A number of methods are being used for arginine detection, but biosensors technique holds prime position due to rapid response, high sensitivity and high specificity. However, there are many problems still to be addressed, including selectivity, real time analysis and interference of urea presence in the sample. In the present review we aim to emphasize the significant role of arginine in human physiology and foods. A small attempt has been made to discuss the various techniques used for development of arginine biosensor and how these techniques affect their performance. The choice of transducers for arginine biosensor ranges from optical, pH sensing, ammonia gas sensing, ammonium ion-selective, conductometric and amperometric electrodes because ammonia is formed as a final product.

  12. Solution-phase vs surface-phase aptamer-protein affinity from a label-free kinetic biosensor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camille Daniel

    Full Text Available Aptamers are selected DNA ligands that target biomolecules such as proteins. In recent years, they are showing an increasing interest as potential therapeutic agents or recognition elements in biosensor applications. In both cases, the need for characterizing the mating between the target and the aptamer either in solution or immobilized on a surface, is pressing. In this context, we have developed a kinetic biosensor made of micro-arrayed anti-thrombin aptamers to assess the kinetic parameters of this interaction. The binding of label-free thrombin on the biosensor was monitored in real-time by Surface Plasmon Resonance imaging. Remarkable performances were obtained for the quantification of thrombin without amplification (sub-nanomolar limit of detection and linear range of quantification to two orders of magnitude. The independent determinations of both the solution- and surface-phase affinities, respectively KD(Sol and KD(Surf, revealed distinct values illustrating the importance of probes, targets or surface interactions in biosensors. Interestingly, KD(Surf values depend on the aptamer grafting density and linearly extrapolate towards KD(Sol for highly diluted probes. This suggests a lesser impact of the surface compared to the probe or target cooperativity interactions since the latter decrease with a reduced grafting density.

  13. Water-soluble fluorescent conjugated polymers and their interactions with biomacromolecules for sensitive biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xuli; Liu, Libing; Wang, Shu; Zhu, Daoben

    2010-07-01

    Over the past decades, water-soluble conjugated polymers (CPs) have gained increasing attention as optical platforms for sensitive detection of biomacromolecules (DNA, protein and cell) due to the amplification of fluorescent signals. To meet the requirement for high throughput assays, chip and microarray techniques based on CPs have also been developed. Very recently, fluorescence imaging in vivo and at the cellular level have also been successfully accomplished using these water-soluble CPs. In this tutorial review, we provide a brief review of the synthesis and optical properties of CPs, focusing especially on their applications in biosensors and cell imaging.

  14. Evolution of random catalytic networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraser, S.M. [Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States); Reidys, C.M. [Santa Fe Inst., NM (United States)]|[Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1997-06-01

    In this paper the authors investigate the evolution of populations of sequences on a random catalytic network. Sequences are mapped into structures, between which are catalytic interactions that determine their instantaneous fitness. The catalytic network is constructed as a random directed graph. They prove that at certain parameter values, the probability of some relevant subgraphs of this graph, for example cycles without outgoing edges, is maximized. Populations evolving under point mutations realize a comparatively small induced subgraph of the complete catalytic network. They present results which show that populations reliably discover and persist on directed cycles in the catalytic graph, though these may be lost because of stochastic effects, and study the effect of population size on this behavior.

  15. Recent Advances in Silicon Nanowire Biosensors: Synthesis Methods, Properties, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namdari, Pooria; Daraee, Hadis; Eatemadi, Ali

    2016-09-01

    The application of silicon nanowire (SiNW) biosensor as a subtle, label-free, and electrical tool has been extensively demonstrated by several researchers over the past few decades. Human ability to delicately fabricate and control its chemical configuration, morphology, and arrangement either separately or in combination with other materials as lead to the development of a nanomaterial with specific and efficient electronic and catalytic properties useful in the fields of biological sciences and renewable energy. This review illuminates on the various synthetic methods of SiNW, with its optical and electrical properties that make them one of the most applicable nanomaterials in the field of biomolecule sensing, photoelectrochemical conversion, and diseases diagnostics.

  16. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  17. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  18. Biosensors for plant pathogen detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khater, Mohga; de la Escosura-Muñiz, Alfredo; Merkoçi, Arben

    2017-07-15

    Infectious plant diseases are caused by pathogenic microorganisms such as fungi, bacteria, viruses, viroids, phytoplasma and nematodes. Worldwide, plant pathogen infections are among main factors limiting crop productivity and increasing economic losses. Plant pathogen detection is important as first step to manage a plant disease in greenhouses, field conditions and at the country boarders. Current immunological techniques used to detect pathogens in plant include enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and direct tissue blot immunoassays (DTBIA). DNA-based techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), real time PCR (RT-PCR) and dot blot hybridization have also been proposed for pathogen identification and detection. However these methodologies are time-consuming and require complex instruments, being not suitable for in-situ analysis. Consequently, there is strong interest for developing new biosensing systems for early detection of plant diseases with high sensitivity and specificity at the point-of-care. In this context, we revise here the recent advancement in the development of advantageous biosensing systems for plant pathogen detection based on both antibody and DNA receptors. The use of different nanomaterials such as nanochannels and metallic nanoparticles for the development of innovative and sensitive biosensing systems for the detection of pathogens (i.e. bacteria and viruses) at the point-of-care is also shown. Plastic and paper-based platforms have been used for this purpose, offering cheap and easy-to-use really integrated sensing systems for rapid on-site detection. Beside devices developed at research and development level a brief revision of commercially available kits is also included in this review. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Reagent-Less and Robust Biosensor for Direct Determination of Lactate in Food Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iria Bravo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lactic acid is a relevant analyte in the food industry, since it affects the flavor, freshness, and storage quality of several products, such as milk and dairy products, juices, or wines. It is the product of lactose or malo-lactic fermentation. In this work, we developed a lactate biosensor based on the immobilization of lactate oxidase (LOx onto N,N′-Bis(3,4-dihydroxybenzylidene -1,2-diaminobenzene Schiff base tetradentate ligand-modified gold nanoparticles (3,4DHS–AuNPs deposited onto screen-printed carbon electrodes, which exhibit a potent electrocatalytic effect towards hydrogen peroxide oxidation/reduction. 3,4DHS–AuNPs were synthesized within a unique reaction step, in which 3,4DHS acts as reducing/capping/modifier agent for the generation of stable colloidal suspensions of Schiff base ligand–AuNPs assemblies of controlled size. The ligand—in addition to its reduction action—provides a robust coating to gold nanoparticles and a catalytic function. Lactate oxidase (LOx catalyzes the conversion of l-lactate to pyruvate in the presence of oxygen, producing hydrogen peroxide, which is catalytically oxidized at 3,4DHS–AuNPs modified screen-printed carbon electrodes at +0.2 V. The measured electrocatalytic current is directly proportional to the concentration of peroxide, which is related to the amount of lactate present in the sample. The developed biosensor shows a detection limit of 2.6 μM lactate and a sensitivity of 5.1 ± 0.1 μA·mM−1. The utility of the device has been demonstrated by the determination of the lactate content in different matrixes (white wine, beer, and yogurt. The obtained results compare well to those obtained using a standard enzymatic-spectrophotometric assay kit.

  20. Mechanisms of initiation and termination reactions in conjugative DNA processing. Independence of tight substrate binding and catalytic activity of relaxase (TraI) of IncPalpha plasmid RP4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pansegrau, W; Lanka, E

    1996-05-31

    The relaxase (TraI) of plasmid RP4 (IncPalpha) plays a key role in initiation and termination of transfer DNA replication during conjugative transmission of the plasmid. TraI functions as a DNA strand transferase that cleaves a unique phosphodiester bond at nic of the transfer origin. The cleavage reaction consists in a reversible transesterification that leads to transfer of the 5' phosphoryl at nic to the hydroxyl group of TraI Tyr-22. Hence, cleavage results in the covalent attachment of TraI to the 5' terminus of the plasmid strand destined for transfer. To investigate the protein's ability to function in a "second cleavage" reaction proposed to terminate rolling circle mode transfer DNA replication, single-stranded oligonucleotides containing the nic region were immobilized at their 3' ends on magnetic beads and cleaved by TraI. The resulting covalent TraI-oligonucleotide adducts were active in the joining reaction but unable to cleave oligonucleotides containing an intact nic region, indicating that second cleavage probably requires a TraI dimer, since a monomer is insufficient. The covalently attached oligonucleotide determines the affinity of the relaxase for the 3' terminus of the T-strand. To further the biochemical characterization of TraI-catalyzed reactions, we used specific TraI mutants, showing that amino acid residues in each relaxase motif are involved in substrate binding. To uncouple substrate binding and cleaving-joining, we applied partially biotinylated TraI mutant proteins that were immobilized to magnetic beads. Using this approach we could demonstrate that tight DNA substrate binding and cleaving-joining are independent processes. Enhanced topoisomerase activity of some TraI mutants was correlated with low specific substrate binding affinity in conjunction with high cleaving-joining activity.

  1. Electrowetting on dielectric digital microfluidic platform with nanostructured biosensor interface for enhanced two-dimensional surface plasmon resonance imaging detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malic, Lidija

    The sensitive and specific detection of biomolecular interactions is at the heart of many routine analyses in fundamental research, medical diagnosis and environmental monitoring. In contrast to laborious and costly multiwell plate assays, recent years have witnessed a significant progress in miniaturized and integrated biosensors, such as surface plasmon resonance (SPR), tailored to these applications. While the design of various SPR biosensors has been described in literature, a robust, multichannel, low-cost and highly sensitive solution has not yet been presented. Specifically, an integrated system that can allow surface functionalization in array format, low-volume multichannel fluidic interfacing, and increased sensitivity is sought. This thesis describes a novel electro-wetting-on-dielectric (EWOD) digital microfluidic device with integrated nanostructured biosensor interface that addresses the aforementioned issues for enhanced surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) detection. We have taken the opportunity of the most recent advances in microfabrication, nanotechnology and SPR technique to develop this integrated platform. EWOD device is employed for the dynamic immobilization of bioreceptors on SPRi biosensor surface in an array fashion from sub-muL volume solutions. Programmable EWOD electric interface allows the application of an electric field at the biosensor surface for active control of the immobilized probe density and orientation, enhancing SPRi detection. Two-dimensional SPRi detection is achieved by coupling the EWOD device to SPRi instrumentation. Parallel manipulation of individual droplets allows more efficient exploitation of the biosensor surface by separating different samples for simultaneous and selective SPRi detection. Periodic gold structures (nanoposts, nanogratings and nanogrooves) residing on a surface of glass and plastic substrates are investigated to improve the SPRi sensitivity. The corresponding electromagnetic field

  2. A SERS biosensor with magnetic substrate CoFe2O4@Ag for sensitive detection of Hg2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xia; He, Yi; Wang, Xueling; Yuan, Ruo

    2017-09-01

    Mercuric ion (Hg2+) is one toxic metal ion existed in aquatic ecosystems which would seriously damage human central nervous system and other organs. So developing an approach to sensitively detect Hg2+ in our living environment is urgent and important. In this work, a novel surface enhancement Raman spectrum(SERS) sensor is fabricated for high selective and ultrasensitive detection of Hg2+ in aqueous solution, based on a stable thymine-Hg2+-thymine (T-Hg2+-T) structure and the π-π interaction between single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Herein, SWCNTs act as Raman labels to produce characteristic Raman peaks which can be a beacon to quantitative detect Hg2+. In the presence of Hg2+, the ssDNA can capture Hg2+ forming T-Hg2+-T structure, which makes SWCNTs leave the hot spots of the SERS-based biosensor. With this design, the Raman intensity of SWCNTs decreased with the increasing concentration of Hg2+. At the same time, CoFe2O4@Ag as active SERS substrates can effectively enhance sensitivity and uniformity of the biosensor through aggregation by magnet. Under optimal conditions, this proposed biosensor can detect Hg2+ at a range from 1 pM to 100 nM with a detection limit of 0.84 pM. With the advantages of good sensitivity, selectivity, simplicity and rapidity, the biosensor is potentially suitable for monitoring of Hg2+ in environmental applications.

  3. Biosensor based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes paste electrode modified with laccase for pirimicarb pesticide quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Thiago M B F; Fátima Barroso, M; Morais, Simone; de Lima-Neto, Pedro; Correia, Adriana N; Oliveira, Maria B P P; Delerue-Matos, Cristina

    2013-03-15

    This study focused on the development of a sensitive enzymatic biosensor for the determination of pirimicarb pesticide based on the immobilization of laccase on composite carbon paste electrodes. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) paste electrode modified by dispersion of laccase (3%, w/w) within the optimum composite matrix (60:40%, w/w, MWCNTs and paraffin binder) showed the best performance, with excellent electron transfer kinetic and catalytic effects related to the redox process of the substrate 4-aminophenol. No metal or anti-interference membrane was added. Based on the inhibition of laccase activity, pirimicarb can be determined in the range 9.90 × 10(-7) to 1.15 × 10(-5) mol L(-1) using 4-aminophenol as substrate at the optimum pH of 5.0, with acceptable repeatability and reproducibility (relative standard deviations lower than 5%). The limit of detection obtained was 1.8 × 10(-7) mol L(-1) (0.04 mg kg(-1) on a fresh weight vegetable basis). The high activity and catalytic properties of the laccase-based biosensor are retained during ca. one month. The optimized electroanalytical protocol coupled to the QuEChERS methodology were applied to tomato and lettuce samples spiked at three levels; recoveries ranging from 91.0 ± 0.1% to 101.0 ± 0.3% were attained. No significant effects in the pirimicarb electroanalysis were observed by the presence of pro-vitamin A, vitamins B1 and C, and glucose in the vegetable extracts. The proposed biosensor-based pesticide residue methodology fulfills all requisites to be used in implementation of food safety programs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Catalytic production of biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theilgaard Madsen, A.

    2011-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the catalytic production of diesel from biomass, especially emphasising catalytic conversion of waste vegetable oils and fats. In chapter 1 an introduction to biofuels and a review on different catalytic methods for diesel production from biomass is given. Two of these methods have been used industrially for a number of years already, namely the transesterification (and esterification) of oils and fats with methanol to form fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), and the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of fats and oils to form straight-chain alkanes. Other possible routes to diesel include upgrading and deoxygenation of pyrolysis oils or aqueous sludge wastes, condensations and reductions of sugars in aqueous phase (aqueous-phase reforming, APR) for monofunctional hydrocarbons, and gasification of any type of biomass followed by Fischer-Tropsch-synthesis for alkane biofuels. These methods have not yet been industrialised, but may be more promising due to the larger abundance of their potential feedstocks, especially waste feedstocks. Chapter 2 deals with formation of FAME from waste fats and oils. A range of acidic catalysts were tested in a model fat mixture of methanol, lauric acid and trioctanoin. Sulphonic acid-functionalised ionic liquids showed extremely fast convertion of lauric acid to methyl laurate, and trioctanoate was converted to methyl octanoate within 24 h. A catalyst based on a sulphonated carbon-matrix made by pyrolysing (or carbonising) carbohydrates, so-called sulphonated pyrolysed sucrose (SPS), was optimised further. No systematic dependency on pyrolysis and sulphonation conditions could be obtained, however, with respect to esterification activity, but high activity was obtained in the model fat mixture. SPS impregnated on opel-cell Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and microporous SiO{sub 2} (ISPS) was much less active in the esterification than the original SPS powder due to low loading and thereby low number of strongly acidic sites on the

  5. An intimately bonded titanate nanotube–polyaniline–gold nanoparticle ternary composite as a scaffold for electrochemical enzyme biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xiaoqiang, E-mail: liuxiaoqiang@henu.edu.cn [Institute of Environmental and Analytical Sciences, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan University, Kaifeng, Henan Province, 475004 (China); Zhu, Jie; Huo, Xiaohe; Yan, Rui [Institute of Environmental and Analytical Sciences, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Henan University, Kaifeng, Henan Province, 475004 (China); Wong, Danny K.Y., E-mail: Danny.Wong@mq.edu.au [Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, NSW 2109 (Australia)

    2016-03-10

    In this work, titanate nanotubes (TNTs), polyaniline (PANI) and gold nanoparticles (GNPs) were assembled to form a ternary composite, which was then applied on an electrode as a scaffold of an electrochemical enzyme biosensor. The scaffold was constructed by oxidatively polymerising aniline to produce an emeraldine salt of PANI on TNTs, followed by gold nanoparticle deposition. A novel aspect of this scaffold lies in the use of the emeraldine salt of PANI as a molecular wire between TNTs and GNPs. Using horseradish peroxidase (HRP) as a model enzyme, voltammetric results demonstrated that direct electron transfer of HRP was achieved at both TNT-PANI and TNT-PANI-GNP-modified electrodes. More significantly, the catalytic reduction current of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} by HRP was ∼75% enhanced at the TNT-PANI-GNP-modified electrode, compared to that at the TNT-PANI-modified electrode. The heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant of HRP was found to be ∼3 times larger at the TNT-PANI-GNP-modified electrode than that at the TNT-PANI-modified electrode. Based on chronoamperometric detection of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, a linear range from 1 to 1200 μM, a sensitivity of 22.7 μA mM{sup −1} and a detection limit of 0.13 μM were obtained at the TNT-PANI-GNP-modified electrode. The performance of the biosensor can be ascribed to the superior synergistic properties of the ternary composite. - Highlights: • A ternary TiO{sub 2} nanotube–polyaniline–gold nanoparticle composite was developed. • New synthetic route for ternary composite with a polyaniline molecular wire between TiO{sub 2} nanotubes and gold nanoparticles. • An electrochemical biosensor with ternary composite as a scaffold. • Ternary composite facilitated improved analytical performance of electrochemical biosensor.

  6. Highly ordered mesoporous carbons as electrode material for the construction of electrochemical dehydrogenase- and oxidase-based biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ming; Shang, Li; Li, Bingling; Huang, Lijian; Dong, Shaojun

    2008-11-15

    In this work, the excellent catalytic activity of highly ordered mesoporous carbons (OMCs) to the electrooxidation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) was described for the construction of electrochemical alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and glucose oxidase (GOD)-based biosensors. The high density of edge-plane-like defective sites and high specific surface area of OMCs could be responsible for the electrocatalytic behavior at OMCs modified glassy carbon electrode (OMCs/GE), which induced a substantial decrease in the overpotential of NADH and H(2)O(2) oxidation reaction compared to carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode (CNTs/GE). Such ability of OMCs permits effective low-potential amperometric biosensing of ethanol and glucose, respectively, at Nafion/ADH-OMCs/GE and Nafion/GOD-OMCs/GE. Especially, as an amperometric glucose biosensor, Nafion/GOD-OMCs/GE showed large determination range (500-15,000 micromoll(-1)), high sensitivity (0.053 nA micromol(-1)), fast (9+/-1s) and stable response (amperometric response retained 90% of the initial activity after 10h stirring of 2 mmoll(-1) glucose solution) to glucose as well as the effective discrimination to the possible interferences, which may make it to readily satisfy the need for the routine clinical diagnosis of diabetes. By comparing the electrochemical performance of OMCs with that of CNTs as electrode material for the construction of ADH- and GOD-biosensors in this work, we reveal that OMCs could be a favorable and promising carbon electrode material for constructing other electrochemical dehydrogenase- and oxidase-based biosensors, which may have wide potential applications in biocatalysis, bioelectronics and biofuel cells.

  7. Biosensors engineered from conditionally stable ligand-binding domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, George M.; Feng, Justin; Mandell, Daniel J.; Baker, David; Fields, Stanley; Jester, Benjamin Ward; Tinberg, Christine Elaine

    2017-09-19

    Disclosed is a biosensor engineered to conditionally respond to the presence of specific small molecules, the biosensors including conditionally stable ligand-binding domains (LBDs) which respond to the presence of specific small molecules, wherein readout of binding is provided by reporter genes or transcription factors (TFs) fused to the LBDs.

  8. Preparation and electrochemical application of a new biosensor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Banana tissue containing polyphenol oxidase was incorporated into polypyrrole matrix to make a biosensor for the analysis of acetaminophen (ACT). The electrocatalytic behaviour of oxidized acetaminophen was studied at the surface of the biosensor, using various electrochemical methods. The advantages of ...

  9. Development of a Transcription Factor-Based Lactam Biosensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jingwei; Barajas, Jesus F.; Burdu, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    a chemoinformatic approach inspired by small molecule drug discovery. We define this approach as analogue generation toward catabolizable chemicals or AGTC. We discovered a lactam biosensor based on the ChnR/Pb transcription factor-promoter pair. The microbial biosensor is capable of sensing ε-caprolactam, Î...

  10. Oriented antibodies as versatile detection element in biosensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trilling, A.K.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this thesis is to explore orientation of detection elements on biosensor surfaces. To this end, different strategies were combined such as surface chemistry and protein functionalization, with the aim to generate a platform for oriented immobilization of antibodies in biosensors.

  11. [Microbial biosensors for detection of biological oxygen demand (a review)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponamoreva, O N; Arliapov, V A; Alferov, V A; Reshetilov, A N

    2011-01-01

    The review briefs recent advances in application of biosensors for determining biological oxygen demand (BOD) in water. Special attention is focused on the principles of operation of microbial BOD sensors; the information about biorecognition elements in such systems and the methods used for immobilization of biological components in film biosensors is summarized. Characteristics of some BOD sensor models are considered in detail.

  12. In Vitro Evaluation of Fluorescence Glucose Biosensor Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamdouh Aloraefy

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Rapid, accurate, and minimally-invasive glucose biosensors based on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET for glucose measurement have the potential to enhance diabetes control. However, a standard set of in vitro approaches for evaluating optical glucose biosensor response under controlled conditions would facilitate technological innovation and clinical translation. Towards this end, we have identified key characteristics and response test methods, fabricated FRET-based glucose biosensors, and characterized biosensor performance using these test methods. The biosensors were based on competitive binding between dextran and glucose to concanavalin A and incorporated long-wavelength fluorescence dye pairs. Testing characteristics included spectral response, linearity, sensitivity, limit of detection, kinetic response, reversibility, stability, precision, and accuracy. The biosensor demonstrated a fluorescence change of 45% in the presence of 400 mg/dL glucose, a mean absolute relative difference of less than 11%, a limit of detection of 25 mg/dL, a response time of 15 min, and a decay in fluorescence intensity of 72% over 30 days. The battery of tests presented here for objective, quantitative in vitro evaluation of FRET glucose biosensors performance have the potential to form the basis of future consensus standards. By implementing these test methods for a long-visible-wavelength biosensor, we were able to demonstrate strengths and weaknesses with a new level of thoroughness and rigor.

  13. A global benchmark study using affinity-based biosensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rich, Rebecca L; Papalia, Giuseppe A; Flynn, Peter J

    2009-01-01

    To explore the variability in biosensor studies, 150 participants from 20 countries were given the same protein samples and asked to determine kinetic rate constants for the interaction. We chose a protein system that was amenable to analysis using different biosensor platforms as well as by user...

  14. Silicon-on-Insulator Nanowire Based Optical Waveguide Biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingyu; Liu, Yong; Chen, Yangqing; He, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Optical waveguide biosensors based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) nanowire have been developed for label free molecular detection. This paper reviews our work on the design, fabrication and measurement of SOI nanowire based high-sensitivity biosensors employing Vernier effect. Biosensing experiments using cascaded double-ring sensor and Mach-Zehnder- ring sensor integrated with microfluidic channels are demonstrated

  15. A global benchmark study using affinity-based biosensors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rich, Rebecca L.; Papalia, Giusseppe A.; Krishnamoorthy, G.; Beusink, J.B.; Pak, Brian J.; Myszka, David G.; more, more

    2009-01-01

    To explore the variability in biosensor studies, 150 participants from 20 countries were given the same protein samples and asked to determine kinetic rate constants for the interaction. We chose a protein system that was amenable to analysis using different biosensor platforms as well as by users

  16. A Biosensor for the Determination of Cyanide in Cassava | Jasper ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A simple biosensor for the determination of total cyanide in cassava is demonstrated. The biosensor was developed based on the use of a cyanide ion selective electrode made from AgI and Ag2S and the enzyme linamarase which was isolated from cassava root cortex. Results are reported on a sensing system which ...

  17. Catalytic cracking with deasphalted oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaton, W.I.; Taylor, J.L.; Peck, L.B.; Mosby, J.F.

    1990-07-10

    This patent describes a catalytic cracking process. It comprises: hydrotreating resid; thereafter deasphalting the hydrotreated resid to produce substantially deasphalted oil; catalytically cracking the hydrotreated oil in a catalytic cracking unit in the presence of a cracking catalyst to produce upgraded oil leaving coked catalyst; and regenerating the coked catalyst in the presence of a combustion-supporting gas comprising excess molecular oxygen in an amount greater than the stoichiometric amount required for substantially completely combusting the coke on the catalyst to carbon dioxide.

  18. Biosensor method and system based on feature vector extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Elias [Knoxville, TN; Rodriguez, Jr., Miguel; Qi, Hairong [Knoxville, TN; Wang, Xiaoling [San Jose, CA

    2012-04-17

    A method of biosensor-based detection of toxins comprises the steps of providing at least one time-dependent control signal generated by a biosensor in a gas or liquid medium, and obtaining a time-dependent biosensor signal from the biosensor in the gas or liquid medium to be monitored or analyzed for the presence of one or more toxins selected from chemical, biological or radiological agents. The time-dependent biosensor signal is processed to obtain a plurality of feature vectors using at least one of amplitude statistics and a time-frequency analysis. At least one parameter relating to toxicity of the gas or liquid medium is then determined from the feature vectors based on reference to the control signal.

  19. Silicon Photonic Biosensors for Lab-on-a-Chip Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirill Zinoviev

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last two decades, we have witnessed a remarkable progress in the development of biosensor devices and their application in areas such as environmental monitoring, biotechnology, medical diagnostics, drug screening, food safety, and security, among others. The technology of optical biosensors has reached a high degree of maturity and several commercial products are on the market. But problems of stability, sensitivity, and size have prevented the general use of optical biosensors for real field applications. Integrated photonic biosensors based on silicon technology could solve such drawbacks, offering early diagnostic tools with better sensitivity, specificity, and reliability, which could improve the effectiveness of in-vivo and in-vitro diagnostics. Our last developments in silicon photonic biosensors will be showed, mainly related to the development of portable and highly sensitive integrated photonic sensing platforms.

  20. Review of micro/nanotechnologies for microbial biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Ji Won; Ha, Dogyeong; Lee, Jongwan; Lee, Sung Kuk; Kim, Taesung

    2015-01-01

    A microbial biosensor is an analytical device with a biologically integrated transducer that generates a measurable signal indicating the analyte concentration. This method is ideally suited for the analysis of extracellular chemicals and the environment, and for metabolic sensory regulation. Although microbial biosensors show promise for application in various detection fields, some limitations still remain such as poor selectivity, low sensitivity, and impractical portability. To overcome such limitations, microbial biosensors have been integrated with many recently developed micro/nanotechnologies and applied to a wide range of detection purposes. This review article discusses micro/nanotechnologies that have been integrated with microbial biosensors and summarizes recent advances and the applications achieved through such novel integration. Future perspectives on the combination of micro/nanotechnologies and microbial biosensors will be discussed, and the necessary developments and improvements will be strategically deliberated.

  1. Disease-Related Detection with Electrochemical Biosensors: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Huang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Rapid diagnosis of diseases at their initial stage is critical for effective clinical outcomes and promotes general public health. Classical in vitro diagnostics require centralized laboratories, tedious work and large, expensive devices. In recent years, numerous electrochemical biosensors have been developed and proposed for detection of various diseases based on specific biomarkers taking advantage of their features, including sensitivity, selectivity, low cost and rapid response. This article reviews research trends in disease-related detection with electrochemical biosensors. Focus has been placed on the immobilization mechanism of electrochemical biosensors, and the techniques and materials used for the fabrication of biosensors are introduced in details. Various biomolecules used for different diseases have been listed. Besides, the advances and challenges of using electrochemical biosensors for disease-related applications are discussed.

  2. Survey of the year 2005 commercial optical biosensor literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Rebecca L; Myszka, David G

    2006-01-01

    We identified 1113 articles (103 reviews, 1010 primary research articles) published in 2005 that describe experiments performed using commercially available optical biosensors. While this number of publications is impressive, we find that the quality of the biosensor work in these articles is often pretty poor. It is a little disappointing that there appears to be only a small set of researchers who know how to properly perform, analyze, and present biosensor data. To help focus the field, we spotlight work published by 10 research groups that exemplify the quality of data one should expect to see from a biosensor experiment. Also, in an effort to raise awareness of the common problems in the biosensor field, we provide side-by-side examples of good and bad data sets from the 2005 literature. Copyright (c) 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Regenerating silicon biosensors through thermal ablation with a hot plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane Leahy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Biosensor development is time-consuming and expensive because it requires a great deal of prototyping and specialized experimental testing using, in many cases, one-time use chips. Several biosensor regeneration techniques have been proposed so that chips may be reused, but these techniques are not convenient for rapid prototyping and experimental testing. A convenient biosensor regeneration technique using thermal ablation with a hot plate is presented. Bound biological material is removed from a Poly-L-Lysine-functionalized silicon biosensor used for testing Escherichia coli by heating the biosensor to 370 °C for 10 min. Images and resonant frequency shifts indicate that regeneration is about 82% effective. This regeneration technique may be further improved by using a higher heating rate and a higher temperature.

  4. Current Trends in Nanomaterial-Based Amperometric Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhtar Hayat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The last decade has witnessed an intensive research effort in the field of electrochemical sensors, with a particular focus on the design of amperometric biosensors for diverse analytical applications. In this context, nanomaterial integration in the construction of amperometric biosensors may constitute one of the most exciting approaches. The attractive properties of nanomaterials have paved the way for the design of a wide variety of biosensors based on various electrochemical detection methods to enhance the analytical characteristics. However, most of these nanostructured materials are not explored in the design of amperometric biosensors. This review aims to provide insight into the diverse properties of nanomaterials that can be possibly explored in the construction of amperometric biosensors.

  5. Genetically-encoded biosensors for monitoring cellular stress in bioprocessing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polizzi, Karen M; Kontoravdi, Cleo

    2015-02-01

    With the current wealth of transcriptomic data, it is possible to design genetically-encoded biosensors for the detection of stress responses and apply these to high-throughput bioprocess development and monitoring of cellular health. Such biosensors can sense extrinsic factors such as nutrient or oxygen deprivation and shear stress, as well as intrinsic stress factors like oxidative damage and unfolded protein accumulation. Alongside, there have been developments in biosensing hardware and software applicable to the field of genetically-encoded biosensors in the near future. This review discusses the current state-of-the-art in biosensors for monitoring cultures during biological manufacturing and the future challenges for the field. Connecting the individual achievements into a coherent whole will enable the application of genetically-encoded biosensors in industry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Android integrated urea biosensor for public health awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pranali P. Naik

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Integration of a biosensor with a wireless network on the Android 4.2.1 (Jelly Bean platform has been demonstrated. The present study reports an android integrated user friendly Flow injection analysis-Enzyme thermistor (FIA-ET urea biosensor system. This android-integrated biosensor system will facilitate enhanced consumer health and awareness alongside abridging the gap between the food testing laboratory and the concerned higher authorities. Data received from a flow injection mode urea biosensor has been exploited as an integration point among the analyst, the food consumer and the responsible higher authorities. Using the urea biosensor as an example, an alarm system has also been demonstrated both graphically and through text message on a mobile handset. The presented sensor integrated android system will also facilitate decision making support system in various fields of food quality monitoring and clinical analysis.

  7. Biosensors for environmental monitoring of endocrine disruptors: a review article

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Mozaz, Sara; Lopez de Alda, Maria J.; Barcelo, Damia [Department of Environmental Chemistry, IIQAB-CSIC, C/ Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034, Barcelona (Spain); Marco, Maria-Pilar [Department of Biological Organic Chemistry, IIQAB-CSIC, C/ Jordi Girona 18-26, 08034, Barcelona (Spain)

    2004-02-01

    This article provides an overview of the applications of biosensors in analysis and monitoring of endocrine-disrupting compounds (EDCs) in the environment. Special attention is devoted to the various types of physical-chemical signal transduction elements, biological mechanisms employed as sensing elements and techniques used for immobilisation of the bioreceptor molecules on the transducer surface. Two different classes of biosensors for EDCs are considered: biosensors that measure endocrine-disrupting effects, and biosensors that respond to the presence of a specific substance (or group of substances) based on the specific recognition of a biomolecule. Several examples of them are presented to illustrate the power of the biosensor technology for environmental applications. Future trends in the development of new, more advanced devices are also outlined. (orig.)

  8. Catalytic cracking of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.; Nowak, S.; Naegler, T.; Zimmermann, J. [Hochschule Merseburg (Germany); Welscher, J.; Schwieger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany); Hahn, T. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    A most important factor for the chemical industry is the availability of cheap raw materials. As the oil price of crude oil is rising alternative feedstocks like coal are coming into focus. This work, the catalytic cracking of lignite is part of the alliance ibi (innovative Braunkohlenintegration) to use lignite as a raw material to produce chemicals. With this new one step process without an input of external hydrogen, mostly propylene, butenes and aromatics and char are formed. The product yield depends on manifold process parameters. The use of acid catalysts (zeolites like MFI) shows the highest amount of the desired products. Hydrogen rich lignites with a molar H/C ratio of > 1 are to be favoured. Due to primary cracking and secondary reactions the ratio between catalyst and lignite, temperature and residence time are the most important parameter to control the product distribution. Experiments at 500 C in a discontinuous rotary kiln reactor show yields up to 32 wt-% of hydrocarbons per lignite (maf - moisture and ash free) and 43 wt-% char, which can be gasified. Particularly, the yields of propylene and butenes as main products can be enhanced four times to about 8 wt-% by the use of catalysts while the tar yield decreases. In order to develop this innovative process catalyst systems fixed on beads were developed for an easy separation and regeneration of the used catalyst from the formed char. (orig.)

  9. A biosensor assay for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in fecal samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumanan, Vijayarani; Nugen, Sam R; Baeumner, Antje J; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2009-03-01

    A simple, membrane-strip-based lateral-flow (LF) biosensor assay and a high-throughput microtiter plate assay have been combined with a reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the detection of a small number (ten) of viable Mycobacterium (M.) avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) cells in fecal samples. The assays are based on the identification of the RNA of the IS900 element of MAP. For the assay, RNA was extracted from fecal samples spiked with a known quantity of (10(1) to 10(6)) MAP cells and amplified using RT-PCR and identified by the LF biosensor and the microtiter plate assay. While the LF biosensor assay requires only 30 min of assay time, the overall process took 10 h for the detection of 10 viable cells. The assays are based on an oligonucleotide sandwich hybridization assay format and use either a membrane flow through system with an immobilized DNA probe that hybridizes with the target sequence or a microtiter plate well. Signal amplification is provided when the target sequence hybridizes to a second DNA probe that has been coupled to liposomes encapsulating the dye, sulforhodamine B. The dye in the liposomes provides a signal that can be read visually, quantified with a hand-held reflectometer, or with a fluorescence reader. Specificity analysis of the assays revealed no cross reactivity with other mycobacteria, such as M. avium complex, M. ulcerans, M. marium, M. kansasii, M. abscessus, M. asiaticum, M. phlei, M. fortutitum, M. scrofalaceum, M. intracellular, M. smegmatis, and M. bovis. The overall assay for the detection of live MAP organisms is comparatively less expensive and quick, especially in comparison to standard MAP detection using a culture method requiring 6-8 weeks of incubation time, and is significantly less expensive than real-time PCR.

  10. Fabrication LSPR sensor chip of Ag NPs and their biosensor application based on interparticle coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghodselahi, T., E-mail: t_ghodselahi@yahoo.com [Nano Mabna Iranian Inc., PO Box 1676664116, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences, PO Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Neishaboorynejad, T. [School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences, PO Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Central Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Arsalani, S. [School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences, PO Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Medicine, Bam University of Medical Sciences, Bam (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensor of silver nanoparticles on hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin film were synthetized by co-deposition of RF-sputtering and RF-PECVD. • Samples were characterized by XRD, XPS, AFM, and UV visible. • DNA primer at fM concentration was detected based on breaking of inter-particles coupling. • Dipolar plasmon of isolated Ag NPs, coupled Ag NPs plasmons, in-plane and out-plane coupling, and quadrupole plasmon modes were considered to explain biosensor properties. • The initial response, wavelength shift sensitivity, and response time of LSPR sensors were compared by morphology. - Abstract: We introduce a simple method to synthesize localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensor chip of Ag NPs on the hydrogenated amorphous carbon by co-deposition of RF-Sputtering and RF-PECVD. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed the content of Ag and C atoms. X-ray diffraction profile and atomic force microscopy indicate that the Ag NPs have fcc crystal structure and spherical shape and by increasing deposition time, particle sizes do not vary and only Ag NPs aggregation occurs, resulting in LSPR wavelength shift. Firstly, by increasing Ag NPs content, in-plan interparticles coupling is dominant and causes redshift in LSPR. At the early stage of agglomeration, out-plane coupling occurs and in-plane coupling is reduced, resulting a blueshift in the LSPR. By further increasing of Ag NPs content, agglomeration is completed on the substrate and in-plan coupling rises, resulting significant redshift in the LSPR. Results were used to implement biosensor application of chips. Detection of DNA primer at fM concentration was achieved based on breaking interparticles coupling of Ag NPs. A significant wavelength shift sensitivity of 30 nm and a short response time of 30 min were obtained, where both of these are prerequisite for biosensor applications.

  11. Studies on visual detection and surface modification testing of glass microfiber filter paper based biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiguzel, Yekbun; Kulah, Haluk

    2014-04-15

    Glass microfibers are commonly used as biomolecule adsorption media, as structural or disposable components of the optical biosensors. While any improvement in these components are appreciated, utilizing basic tools of traditional approaches may lead to original sensor opportunities as simple, functional designs that can be easily disseminated. Following this pursuit, surface modification of glass microfiber paper surface was performed by 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) and resulting improvement in the cell entrapment capacity could be observed visually, only after Gram staining. Gram staining offered rapid validation of enhanced binding on the glass surface. The same APTES-modified samples were also tested for binding of complementary DNA sequences and the results were less straightforward due to the necessity of DNA visualization by using a fluorescent stain, YOYO-1. Accordingly, when there were no surface modification, DNA and YOYO-1 adsorbed readily on the glass microfiber filter paper, and prolonged the interaction between DNA and YOYO-1. YOYO-1 adsorption on glass could be recognized from the color profile of YOYO-1 emission. This phenomenon can be used to examine suitability of APTES coverage on glass surfaces since YOYO-1 emission can be distinguished by its glass adsorbed versus DNA-bound forms. Aptness of surface coverage is vital to biosensor studies in the sense that it is preceding the forthcoming surface modifications and its precision is imperative for attaining the anticipated interaction kinetics of the surface-immobilized species. The proposed testing scheme offered in this study secures the work, which is aimed to be carried out utilizing such sensing systems and device components. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Visual detection of nucleic acids based on lateral flow biosensor and hybridization chain reaction amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Na; Ju, Chuanjing; Li, Zhongyi; Liu, Wensen; Wan, Jiayu

    2017-03-01

    In this study, a new lateral flow nucleic acid biosensor (LFNAB) using hybridization chain reaction (HCR) for signal amplification was developed for visual detection of nucleic acids with high sensitivity and low cost. A "sandwich-type" detection strategy was employed in our design. The sandwich system of capture probe (CP)/target DNA/reporter probe (RP)-HCR complexes was fabricated as the sensing platform. As the initiator strand, reporter probe propagated a chain reaction of hybridization events between the two hairpin probes modified with biotin, and determined whether long nicked DNA polymers were formed. The biotin-labeled double-strand DNA polymers then introduced numerous Streptavidin (SA)-labeled gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the lateral flow device. The CP/target DNA/RP-HCR complexes were captured on the test zone by the specific reaction between anti-Fam monoclonal antibody (anti-Fam mAb) on the test zone and Fam of the complexes. The accumulation of AuNPs on the test zone of the biosensor enabled the visual detection of specific sequences. The detection limit of specific DNA was as low as 1.76pM, which was about 2 orders lower than that of the LFNAB without HCR amplification. And the detection limit of Salmonella was 3×10 3 cfumL -1 . In conclusion, this visual detection system, HCR-LFNAB, is suitable for non-specialist personnel and point-of-care (POC) diagnosis in low-resource settings. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. An integrated paper-based sample-to-answer biosensor for nucleic acid testing at the point of care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jane Ru; Hu, Jie; Tang, Ruihua; Gong, Yan; Feng, Shangsheng; Ren, Hui; Wen, Ting; Li, XiuJun; Wan Abas, Wan Abu Bakar; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Xu, Feng

    2016-02-07

    With advances in point-of-care testing (POCT), lateral flow assays (LFAs) have been explored for nucleic acid detection. However, biological samples generally contain complex compositions and low amounts of target nucleic acids, and currently require laborious off-chip nucleic acid extraction and amplification processes (e.g., tube-based extraction and polymerase chain reaction (PCR)) prior to detection. To the best of our knowledge, even though the integration of DNA extraction and amplification into a paper-based biosensor has been reported, a combination of LFA with the aforementioned steps for simple colorimetric readout has not yet been demonstrated. Here, we demonstrate for the first time an integrated paper-based biosensor incorporating nucleic acid extraction, amplification and visual detection or quantification using a smartphone. A handheld battery-powered heating device was specially developed for nucleic acid amplification in POC settings, which is coupled with this simple assay for rapid target detection. The biosensor can successfully detect Escherichia coli (as a model analyte) in spiked drinking water, milk, blood, and spinach with a detection limit of as low as 10-1000 CFU mL(-1), and Streptococcus pneumonia in clinical blood samples, highlighting its potential use in medical diagnostics, food safety analysis and environmental monitoring. As compared to the lengthy conventional assay, which requires more than 5 hours for the entire sample-to-answer process, it takes about 1 hour for our integrated biosensor. The integrated biosensor holds great potential for detection of various target analytes for wide applications in the near future.

  14. Amperometric determination of H2O2 at nano-TiO2/DNA/thionin nanocomposite modified electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Po-Hsun; Kumar, S Ashok; Chen, Shen-Ming

    2008-10-15

    We report electrochemical preparation and characterization of a new biosensor made of nanostructured titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) particles and deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Thionin (TN) redox mediator was electrochemically deposited onto DNA/nano-TiO2 modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The X-ray diffraction analysis, atomic force microscope (AFM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) were used for surface analysis of TN/DNA/nano-TiO2 film. In neutral buffer solution, TN/DNA/nano-TiO2/GCE biosensor exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the reduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and oxygen (O2). The biosensor shows excellent analytical performance for amperometric determination of H2O2, at reduced overpotential (-0.2V). The detection limit and liner calibration range were found to be 0.05 mM (S/N=3) and 0.05-22.3 mM, respectively. In addition, determination of H2O2 in real samples was carried out using the new biosensor with satisfactory results. The TN/DNA/nano-TiO2/GCE showed stable and reproducible analytical performance towards the reduction of H2O2. This biosensor can be used as an amperometric biosensor for the determination of H2O2 in real samples.

  15. Catalytic pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Sa, Jacinto

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reports on the latest developments of biomass catalytic pyrolysis for the production of fuels. The primary focus is on the role of catalysts in the process, namely, their influence in the liquefaction of lignocellulosic biomass.

  16. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chemical Engineering and Process Development Division, CSIR - National Chemical Laboratory,. Pune 411 008, India ... Abstract. Catalytic reactions are ubiquitous in chemical and allied industries. ... strategies and recent advances in process intensification/ multifunctional reactors are discussed to illustrate the approach.

  17. Pure shear horizontal SAW biosensor on langasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkenpas, Eric; Bitla, Shivashanker; Millard, Paul; da Cunha, Mauricio Pereira

    2004-11-01

    The undetected introduction of pathogens into food or water supplies can produce grave consequences in terms of economic loss and human suffering. Sensitive and selective sensors capable of quickly detecting microbial pathogens are urgently needed to limit the effects of bioterrorist incidents, accidents, or pollution. Shear horizontal surface acoustic wave (SH SAW) devices provide an attractive platform for the design of microbial biosensors that function in liquid media, where Rayleigh-type modes are rapidly attenuated. This paper reports on an exploratory SH SAW delay line designed and fabricated on langasite, La3Ga5SiO14 (LGS), along the novel Euler propagation direction (0 degrees, 22 degrees, 90 degrees). A liquid chamber was fabricated and attached to the top surface, and the device was submitted to liquid and biochemical tests. Moderate (6 dB) additional attenuation of the transmission coefficient, /S21/, was consistently observed when the SH SAW delay line was assembled in the test fixture and submitted to the liquid tests, indicating that LGS is an attractive candidate for liquid sensing. Sensor selectivity can be achieved by integrating the LGS SH SAW delay line with a biochemical recognition layer. A test setup was implemented for the characterization of LGS SH SAW-based biosensors. The delay line response to biomolecule binding was shown by detection of sequential binding of proteins to the SH SAW device delay path. The biotinylated sensor was exposed sequentially to biotin-binding deglycosylated avidin, biotin-modified rabbit IgG, and goat anti-rabbit IgG antibody. As each protein was bound to the sensing surface, marked changes in the delay-line phase were recorded. The reported results demonstrate the capability of these devices to act as biochemical detectors in aqueous solutions, and this work represents the first effort using the novel material LGS in SAW-based biosensor technology.

  18. Engineering Pseudomonas stutzeri as a biogeochemical biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynton, L.; Cheng, H. Y.; Del Valle, I.; Masiello, C. A.; Silberg, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    Biogeochemical cycles are being drastically altered as a result of anthropogenic activities, such as the burning of fossil fuels and the industrial production of ammonia. We know microbes play a major part in these cycles, but the extent of their biogeochemical roles remains largely uncharacterized due to inadequacies with culturing and measurement. While metagenomics and other -omics methods offer ways to reconstruct microbial communities, these approaches can only give an indication of the functional roles of microbes in a community. These -omics approaches are rapidly being expanded to the point of outpacing our knowledge of functional genes, which highlights an inherent need for analytical methods that non-invasively monitor Earth's processes in real time. Here we aim to exploit synthetic biology methods in order to engineer a ubiquitous denitrifying microbe, Pseudomonas stutzeri that can act as a biosensor in soil and marine environments. By using an easily cultivated microbe that is also common in many environments, we hope to develop a tool that allows us to zoom in on specific aspects of the nitrogen cycle. In order to monitor processes occurring at the genetic level in environments that cannot be resolved with fluorescence-based methods, such as soils, we have developed a system that instead relies on gas production by engineered microbial biosensors. P. stutzeri has been successfully engineered to release a gas, methyl bromide, which can continuously and non-invasively be measured by GC-MS. Similar to using Green Fluorescent Protein, GFP, in the biological sciences, the gene controlling gas production can be linked to those involved in denitrification, thereby creating a quantifiable gas signal that is correlated with microbial activity in the soil. Synthetically engineered microbial biosensors could reveal key aspects of metabolism in soil systems and offer a tool for characterizing the scope and degree of microbial impact on major biogeochemical cycles.

  19. Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Theodore Dickerson; Juan Soria

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis is a promising thermochemical conversion route for lignocellulosic biomass that produces chemicals and fuels compatible with current, petrochemical infrastructure. Catalytic modifications to pyrolysis bio-oils are geared towards the elimination and substitution of oxygen and oxygen-containing functionalities in addition to increasing the hydrogen to carbon ratio of the final products. Recent progress has focused on both hydrodeoxygenation and hydrogenation of bio-oil using...

  20. Fuel-Rich Catalytic Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brabbs, Theodore A.; Olson, Sandra L.

    1987-01-01

    Two-stage combustion system reduces particulate emissions. Program on catalytic oxidation of iso-octane demonstrates feasibility of two-stage combustion system for reducing particulate emissions. With fuel-rich (fuel/air equivalence ratios of 4.8 to 7.8) catalytic-combustion preburner as first stage, combustion process free of soot at reactor-outlet temperatures of 1,200 K or less.