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Sample records for catalytic core domain

  1. Contribution of the C-terminal region within the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 integrase to yeast lethality, chromatin binding and viral replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zaikun; Zheng, Yingfeng; Ao, Zhujun; Clement, Martin; Mouland, Andrew J; Kalpana, Ganjam V; Belhumeur, Pierre; Cohen, Eric A; Yao, Xiaojian

    2008-11-14

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is a key viral enzymatic molecule required for the integration of the viral cDNA into the genome. Additionally, HIV-1 IN has been shown to play important roles in several other steps during the viral life cycle, including reverse transcription, nuclear import and chromatin targeting. Interestingly, previous studies have demonstrated that the expression of HIV-1 IN induces the lethal phenotype in some strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we performed mutagenic analyses of the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN in order to delineate the critical amino acid(s) and/or motif(s) required for the induction of the lethal phenotype in the yeast strain HP16, and to further elucidate the molecular mechanism which causes this phenotype. Our study identified three HIV-1 IN mutants, V165A, A179P and KR186,7AA, located in the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of IN that do not induce the lethal phenotype in yeast. Chromatin binding assays in yeast and mammalian cells demonstrated that these IN mutants were impaired for the ability to bind chromatin. Additionally, we determined that while these IN mutants failed to interact with LEDGF/p75, they retained the ability to bind Integrase interactor 1. Furthermore, we observed that VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 containing these IN mutants was unable to replicate in the C8166 T cell line and this defect was partially rescued by complementation with the catalytically inactive D64E IN mutant. Overall, this study demonstrates that three mutations located in the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN inhibit the IN-induced lethal phenotype in yeast by inhibiting the binding of IN to the host chromatin. These results demonstrate that the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN is important for binding to host chromatin and is crucial for both viral replication and the promotion of the IN-induced lethal phenotype in yeast.

  2. Contribution of the C-terminal region within the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 integrase to yeast lethality, chromatin binding and viral replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belhumeur Pierre

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-1 integrase (IN is a key viral enzymatic molecule required for the integration of the viral cDNA into the genome. Additionally, HIV-1 IN has been shown to play important roles in several other steps during the viral life cycle, including reverse transcription, nuclear import and chromatin targeting. Interestingly, previous studies have demonstrated that the expression of HIV-1 IN induces the lethal phenotype in some strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we performed mutagenic analyses of the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN in order to delineate the critical amino acid(s and/or motif(s required for the induction of the lethal phenotype in the yeast strain HP16, and to further elucidate the molecular mechanism which causes this phenotype. Results Our study identified three HIV-1 IN mutants, V165A, A179P and KR186,7AA, located in the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of IN that do not induce the lethal phenotype in yeast. Chromatin binding assays in yeast and mammalian cells demonstrated that these IN mutants were impaired for the ability to bind chromatin. Additionally, we determined that while these IN mutants failed to interact with LEDGF/p75, they retained the ability to bind Integrase interactor 1. Furthermore, we observed that VSV-G-pseudotyped HIV-1 containing these IN mutants was unable to replicate in the C8166 T cell line and this defect was partially rescued by complementation with the catalytically inactive D64E IN mutant. Conclusion Overall, this study demonstrates that three mutations located in the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN inhibit the IN-induced lethal phenotype in yeast by inhibiting the binding of IN to the host chromatin. These results demonstrate that the C-terminal region of the catalytic core domain of HIV-1 IN is important for binding to host chromatin and is crucial for both viral replication and the promotion of

  3. Crystal structure of the catalytic core domain of the family 6 cellobiohydrolase II, Cel6A, from Humicola insolens, at 1.92 A resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varrot, A; Hastrup, S; Schülein, M; Davies, G J

    1999-01-15

    The three-dimensional structure of the catalytic core of the family 6 cellobiohydrolase II, Cel6A (CBH II), from Humicola insolens has been determined by X-ray crystallography at a resolution of 1.92 A. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using the homologous Trichoderma reesei CBH II as a search model. The H. insolens enzyme displays a high degree of structural similarity with its T. reesei equivalent. The structure features both O- (alpha-linked mannose) and N-linked glycosylation and a hexa-co-ordinate Mg2+ ion. The active-site residues are located within the enclosed tunnel that is typical for cellobiohydrolase enzymes and which may permit a processive hydrolysis of the cellulose substrate. The close structural similarity between the two enzymes implies that kinetics and chain-end specificity experiments performed on the H. insolens enzyme are likely to be applicable to the homologous T. reesei enzyme. These cast doubt on the description of cellobiohydrolases as exo-enzymes since they demonstrated that Cel6A (CBH II) shows no requirement for non-reducing chain-ends, as had been presumed. There is no crystallographic evidence in the present structure to support a mechanism involving loop opening, yet preliminary modelling experiments suggest that the active-site tunnel of Cel6A (CBH II) is too narrow to permit entry of a fluorescenyl-derivatized substrate, known to be a viable substrate for this enzyme.

  4. One Health Core Competency Domains

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    Rebekah Frankson

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of complex global challenges at the convergence of human, animal, and environmental health has catalyzed a movement supporting ‘One Health’ approaches. Despite recognition of the importance of One Health approaches to address these complex challenges, little effort has been directed at identifying the seminal knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for individuals to successfully contribute to One Health efforts. Between 2008 and 2011, three groups independently embarked on separate initiatives to identify core competencies for professionals involved with One Health approaches. Core competencies were considered critically important for guiding curriculum development and continuing professional education as they describe the knowledge, skills and attitudes required to be effective. A workshop was convened in 2012 to synthesize the various strands of work on One Health competencies. Despite having different mandates, participants, and approaches, all of these initiatives identified similar core competency domains: management; communication and informatics; values and ethics; leadership; teams and collaboration; roles and responsibilities; and systems thinking. These core competency domains have been used to develop new continuing professional education programs for One Health professionals and help university curricula prepare new graduates to be able to contribute more effectively to One Health approaches.

  5. Docking and Molecular Dynamics Calculations of Some Previously Studied and newly Designed Ligands to Catalytic Core Domain of HIV-1 Integrase and an Investigation to Effects of Conformational Changes of Protein on Docking Results

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    Selami Ercan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, AIDS still remains as a worldwide pandemic and continues to cause many death which arise from HIV-1 virus. For nearly 35 years, drugs that target various steps of virus life cycle have been developed. HIV-1 integrase is the one of these steps which is essential for virus life cycle. Computer aided drug design is being used in many drug design studies as also used in development of the first HIV-1 integrase inhibitor Raltegravir. In this study 3 ligands which are used as HIV-1 integrase inhibitors and 4 newly designed ligands were docked to catalytic core domain of HIV-1 integrase. Each of ligands docked to three different conformations of protein. Prepared complexes (21 item were carried out by 50 ns MD simulations and results were analyzed. Finally, the binding free energies of ligands were calculated. Hereunder, it was determined that designed ligands L01 and L03 gave favorable results. The questions about the ligands which have low docking scores in a conformation of protein could give better scores in another conformation of protein and if the MD simulations carry the different oriented and different localized ligands in same position at the end of simulation were answered.

  6. Catalytic properties of ADAM12 and its domain deletion mutants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jonas; Visse, Robert; Sørensen, Hans Peter

    2008-01-01

    of pro, catalytic, disintegrin, cysteine-rich, and EGF domains. Here we present a novel activity of recombinant ADAM12-S and its domain deletion mutants on S-carboxymethylated transferrin (Cm-Tf). Cleavage of Cm-Tf occurred at multiple sites, and N-terminal sequencing showed that the enzyme exhibits...

  7. Rice Cellulose SynthaseA8 Plant-Conserved Region Is a Coiled-Coil at the Catalytic Core Entrance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rushton, Phillip S.; Olek, Anna T.; Makowski, Lee; Badger, John; Steussy, C. Nicklaus; Carpita, Nicholas C.; Stauffacher, Cynthia V. (NEU); (Purdue)

    2016-11-22

    The crystallographic structure of a rice (Oryza sativa) cellulose synthase, OsCesA8, plant-conserved region (P-CR), one of two unique domains in the catalytic domain of plant CesAs, was solved to 2.4 Å resolution. Two antiparallel α-helices form a coiled-coil domain linked by a large extended connector loop containing a conserved trio of aromatic residues. The P-CR structure was fit into a molecular envelope for the P-CR domain derived from small-angle X-ray scattering data. The P-CR structure and molecular envelope, combined with a homology-based chain trace of the CesA8 catalytic core, were modeled into a previously determined CesA8 small-angle X-ray scattering molecular envelope to produce a detailed topological model of the CesA8 catalytic domain. The predicted position for the P-CR domain from the molecular docking models places the P-CR connector loop into a hydrophobic pocket of the catalytic core, with the coiled-coil aligned near the entrance of the substrate UDP-glucose into the active site. In this configuration, the P-CR coiled-coil alone is unlikely to regulate substrate access to the active site, but it could interact with other domains of CesA, accessory proteins, or other CesA catalytic domains to control substrate delivery.

  8. Porous Core-Shell Nanostructures for Catalytic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers, Trevor David

    Porous core-shell nanostructures have recently received much attention for their enhanced thermal stability. They show great potential in the field of catalysis, as reactant gases can diffuse in and out of the porous shell while the core particle is protected from sintering, a process in which particles coalesce to form larger particles. Sintering is a large problem in industry and is the primary cause of irreversible deactivation. Despite the obvious advantages of high thermal stability, porous core-shell nanoparticles can be developed to have additional interactive properties from the combination of the core and shell together, rather than just the core particle alone. This dissertation focuses on developing new porous core-shell systems in which both the core and shell take part in catalysis. Two types of systems are explored; (1) yolk-shell nanostructures with reducible oxide shells formed using the Kirkendall effect and (2) ceramic-based porous oxide shells formed using sol-gel chemistry. Of the Kirkendall-based systems, Au FexOy and Cu CoO were synthesized and studied for catalytic applications. Additionally, ZnO was explored as a potential shelling material. Sol-gel work focused on optimizing synthetic methods to allow for coating of small gold particles, which remains a challenge today. Mixed metal oxides were explored as a shelling material to make dual catalysts in which the product of a reaction on the core particle becomes a reactant within the shell.

  9. Differential catalytic promiscuity of the alkaline phosphatase superfamily bimetallo core reveals mechanistic features underlying enzyme evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunden, Fanny; AlSadhan, Ishraq; Lyubimov, Artem; Doukov, Tzanko; Swan, Jeffrey; Herschlag, Daniel

    2017-12-22

    Members of enzyme superfamilies specialize in different reactions but often exhibit catalytic promiscuity for one another's reactions, consistent with catalytic promiscuity as an important driver in the evolution of new enzymes. Wanting to understand how catalytic promiscuity and other factors may influence evolution across a superfamily, we turned to the well-studied alkaline phosphatase (AP) superfamily, comparing three of its members, two evolutionarily distinct phosphatases and a phosphodiesterase. We mutated distinguishing active-site residues to generate enzymes that had a common Zn 2+ bimetallo core but little sequence similarity and different auxiliary domains. We then tested the catalytic capabilities of these pruned enzymes with a series of substrates. A substantial rate enhancement of ∼10 11 -fold for both phosphate mono- and diester hydrolysis by each enzyme indicated that the Zn 2+ bimetallo core is an effective mono/di-esterase generalist and that the bimetallo cores were not evolutionarily tuned to prefer their cognate reactions. In contrast, our pruned enzymes were ineffective sulfatases, and this limited promiscuity may have provided a driving force for founding the distinct one-metal-ion branch that contains all known AP superfamily sulfatases. Finally, our pruned enzymes exhibited 10 7 -10 8 -fold phosphotriesterase rate enhancements, despite absence of such enzymes within the AP superfamily. We speculate that the superfamily active-site architecture involved in nucleophile positioning prevents accommodation of the additional triester substituent. Overall, we suggest that catalytic promiscuity, and the ease or difficulty of remodeling and building onto existing protein scaffolds, have greatly influenced the course of enzyme evolution. Uncovering principles and properties of enzyme function, promiscuity, and repurposing provides lessons for engineering new enzymes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. The catalytic domain of acanthamoeba myosin I heavy chain kinase. II. Expression of active catalytic domain and sequence homology to p21-activated kinase (PAK).

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    Brzeska, H; Szczepanowska, J; Hoey, J; Korn, E D

    1996-10-25

    Acanthamoeba myosin I heavy chain (MIHC) kinase is a monomeric 97-kDa protein that is activated by binding to acidic phospholipids or by autophosphorylation. Activation by phospholipids is inhibited by Ca2+-calmodulin. In the accompanying paper (Brzeska, H., Martin, B., and Korn, E. D. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 27049-27055), we identified the catalytic domain as the COOH-terminal 35 kDa produced by trypsin digestion of phosphorylated MIHC kinase. In this paper, we report the cloning and sequencing of the corresponding cDNA and expression of fully active catalytic domain. The expressed catalytic domain has substrate specificity similar to that of native kinase and resistance to trypsin similar to that of fully phosphorylated MIHC kinase. MIHC kinase catalytic domain has only 25% sequence identity to the catalytic domain of protein kinase A and similarly low sequence identity to the catalytic domains of protein kinase C- and calmodulin-dependent kinases, but 50% sequence identity and 70% similarity to the p21-activated kinase (PAK) and STE20 family of kinases. This suggests that MIHC kinase is (at least) evolutionarily related to the PAK family, whose activities are regulated by small GTP-binding proteins. The homology includes the presence of a potential MIHC kinase autophosphorylation site as well as conserved Tyr and Ser/Thr residues in the region corresponding to the P+1 loop of protein kinase A. A synthetic peptide corresponding to this region of MIHC kinase is phosphorylated by both the expressed catalytic domain and native MIHC kinase.

  11. Updating the Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Core Domain Set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orbai, Ana-Maria; de Wit, Maarten; Mease, Philip J

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To include the patient perspective in accordance with the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Filter 2.0 in the updated Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Core Domain Set for randomized controlled trials (RCT) and longitudinal observational studies (LOS). METHODS: At OMERACT 2016, research...... conducted to update the PsA Core Domain Set was presented and discussed in breakout groups. The updated PsA Core Domain Set was voted on and endorsed by OMERACT participants. RESULTS: We conducted a systematic literature review of domains measured in PsA RCT and LOS, and identified 24 domains. We conducted...... and breakout groups at OMERACT 2016 in which findings were presented and discussed. The updated PsA Core Domain Set endorsed with 90% agreement by OMERACT 2016 participants included musculoskeletal disease activity, skin disease activity, fatigue, pain, patient's global assessment, physical function, health...

  12. Evolutionary cores of domain co-occurrence networks.

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    Wuchty, Stefan; Almaas, Eivind

    2005-03-23

    The modeling of complex systems, as disparate as the World Wide Web and the cellular metabolism, as networks has recently uncovered a set of generic organizing principles: Most of these systems are scale-free while at the same time modular, resulting in a hierarchical architecture. The structure of the protein domain network, where individual domains correspond to nodes and their co-occurrences in a protein are interpreted as links, also falls into this category, suggesting that domains involved in the maintenance of increasingly developed, multicellular organisms accumulate links. Here, we take the next step by studying link based properties of the protein domain co-occurrence networks of the eukaryotes S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, D. melanogaster, M. musculus and H. sapiens. We construct the protein domain co-occurrence networks from the PFAM database and analyze them by applying a k-core decomposition method that isolates the globally central (highly connected domains in the central cores) from the locally central (highly connected domains in the peripheral cores) protein domains through an iterative peeling process. Furthermore, we compare the subnetworks thus obtained to the physical domain interaction network of S. cerevisiae. We find that the innermost cores of the domain co-occurrence networks gradually grow with increasing degree of evolutionary development in going from single cellular to multicellular eukaryotes. The comparison of the cores across all the organisms under consideration uncovers patterns of domain combinations that are predominately involved in protein functions such as cell-cell contacts and signal transduction. Analyzing a weighted interaction network of PFAM domains of yeast, we find that domains having only a few partners frequently interact with these, while the converse is true for domains with a multitude of partners. Combining domain co-occurrence and interaction information, we observe that the co-occurrence of domains in the

  13. Evolutionary cores of domain co-occurrence networks

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    Almaas Eivind

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The modeling of complex systems, as disparate as the World Wide Web and the cellular metabolism, as networks has recently uncovered a set of generic organizing principles: Most of these systems are scale-free while at the same time modular, resulting in a hierarchical architecture. The structure of the protein domain network, where individual domains correspond to nodes and their co-occurrences in a protein are interpreted as links, also falls into this category, suggesting that domains involved in the maintenance of increasingly developed, multicellular organisms accumulate links. Here, we take the next step by studying link based properties of the protein domain co-occurrence networks of the eukaryotes S. cerevisiae, C. elegans, D. melanogaster, M. musculus and H. sapiens. Results We construct the protein domain co-occurrence networks from the PFAM database and analyze them by applying a k-core decomposition method that isolates the globally central (highly connected domains in the central cores from the locally central (highly connected domains in the peripheral cores protein domains through an iterative peeling process. Furthermore, we compare the subnetworks thus obtained to the physical domain interaction network of S. cerevisiae. We find that the innermost cores of the domain co-occurrence networks gradually grow with increasing degree of evolutionary development in going from single cellular to multicellular eukaryotes. The comparison of the cores across all the organisms under consideration uncovers patterns of domain combinations that are predominately involved in protein functions such as cell-cell contacts and signal transduction. Analyzing a weighted interaction network of PFAM domains of Yeast, we find that domains having only a few partners frequently interact with these, while the converse is true for domains with a multitude of partners. Combining domain co-occurrence and interaction information, we observe

  14. Modulation of catalytic activity in multi-domain protein tyrosine phosphatases.

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    Lalima L Madan

    Full Text Available Signaling mechanisms involving protein tyrosine phosphatases govern several cellular and developmental processes. These enzymes are regulated by several mechanisms which include variation in the catalytic turnover rate based on redox stimuli, subcellular localization or protein-protein interactions. In the case of Receptor Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases (RPTPs containing two PTP domains, phosphatase activity is localized in their membrane-proximal (D1 domains, while the membrane-distal (D2 domain is believed to play a modulatory role. Here we report our analysis of the influence of the D2 domain on the catalytic activity and substrate specificity of the D1 domain using two Drosophila melanogaster RPTPs as a model system. Biochemical studies reveal contrasting roles for the D2 domain of Drosophila Leukocyte antigen Related (DLAR and Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase on Drosophila chromosome band 99A (PTP99A. While D2 lowers the catalytic activity of the D1 domain in DLAR, the D2 domain of PTP99A leads to an increase in the catalytic activity of its D1 domain. Substrate specificity, on the other hand, is cumulative, whereby the individual specificities of the D1 and D2 domains contribute to the substrate specificity of these two-domain enzymes. Molecular dynamics simulations on structural models of DLAR and PTP99A reveal a conformational rationale for the experimental observations. These studies reveal that concerted structural changes mediate inter-domain communication resulting in either inhibitory or activating effects of the membrane distal PTP domain on the catalytic activity of the membrane proximal PTP domain.

  15. Structural determinants of APOBEC3B non-catalytic domain for molecular assembly and catalytic regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xiao; Yang, Hanjing; Arutiunian, Vagan; Fang, Yao; Besse, Guillaume; Morimoto, Cherie; Zirkle, Brett; Chen, Xiaojiang S. (USC)

    2017-05-30

    The catalytic activity of human cytidine deaminase APOBEC3B (A3B) has been correlated with kataegic mutational patterns within multiple cancer types. The molecular basis of how the N-terminal non-catalytic CD1 regulates the catalytic activity and consequently, biological function of A3B remains relatively unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of a soluble human A3B-CD1 variant and delineate several structural elements of CD1 involved in molecular assembly, nucleic acid interactions and catalytic regulation of A3B. We show that (i) A3B expressed in human cells exists in hypoactive high-molecular-weight (HMW) complexes, which can be activated without apparent dissociation into low-molecular-weight (LMW) species after RNase A treatment. (ii) Multiple surface hydrophobic residues of CD1 mediate the HMW complex assembly and affect the catalytic activity, including one tryptophan residue W127 that likely acts through regulating nucleic acid binding. (iii) One of the highly positively charged surfaces on CD1 is involved in RNA-dependent attenuation of A3B catalysis. (iv) Surface hydrophobic residues of CD1 are involved in heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs) binding to A3B. The structural and biochemical insights described here suggest that unique structural features on CD1 regulate the molecular assembly and catalytic activity of A3B through distinct mechanisms.

  16. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of the RecQ helicase catalytic core from Deinococcus radiodurans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Sheng-Chia; Huang, Chi-Hung; Yang, Chia-Shin; Chang, Chi-Huang; Kuan, Shu-Min; Chan, Nei-Li; Chen, Yeh

    2012-01-01

    The DrRecQ helicase catalytic core has been crystallized to a resolution of 2.9 Å. The determination of its structure will lead to structural and functional insight into the DNA repair mechanism. The RecQ proteins are a highly conserved group of DNA helicases which play crucial roles in the maintenance of genome stability. DrRecQ from the radioresistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is a special member of the RecQ family because it contains three Helicase-and-RNase-D-C-terminal (HRDC) domains at the C-terminus. The helicase catalytic core is essential for ATPase and DNA-unwinding activities. In this work, the helicase catalytic core of DrRecQ was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Crystals were obtained using the sitting-drop vapour diffusion method and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.9 Å resolution. The crystals belong to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 84.75, b = 95.61, c = 183.83 Å

  17. The NMR structure of the inhibited catalytic domain of human stromelysin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooley, P R; O'Connell, J F; Marcy, A I; Cuca, G C; Salowe, S P; Bush, B L; Hermes, J D; Esser, C K; Hagmann, W K; Springer, J P

    1994-02-01

    The three-dimensional structure of the catalytic domain of stromelysin-1 complexed with an N-carboxyl alkyl inhibitor has been determined by NMR methods. The global fold consists of three helices, a five stranded beta-sheet and a methionine located in a turn near the catalytic histidines, classifying stromelysin-1 as a metzincin. Stromelysin-1 is unique in having two independent zinc binding sites: a catalytic site and a structural site. The inhibitor binds in an extended conformation. The S1' subsite is a deep hydrophobic pocket, whereas S2' appears shallow and S3' open.

  18. Establishing a core domain set to measure rheumatoid arthritis flares

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bykerk, Vivian P; Lie, Elisabeth; Bartlett, Susan J

    2014-01-01

    to measure RA flare. METHODS: Patient and healthcare professional (HCP) qualitative studies, focus groups, and literature review, followed by patient and HCP Delphi exercises including combined Delphi consensus at Outcome Measures in Rheumatology 10 (OMERACT 10), identified potential domains to measure flare...... Filter 2.0 methodology. RESULTS: A pre-meeting combined Delphi exercise for defining flare identified 9 domains as important (>70% consensus from patients or HCP). Four new patient-reported domains beyond those included in the RA disease activity core set were proposed for inclusion (fatigue...

  19. Crystal structure of the human dual specificity phosphatase 1 catalytic domain.

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    Gumpena, Rajesh; Lountos, George T; Raran-Kurussi, Sreejith; Tropea, Joseph E; Cherry, Scott; Waugh, David S

    2018-02-01

    The dual specificity phosphatase DUSP1 was the first mitogen activated protein kinase phosphatase (MKP) to be identified. It dephosphorylates conserved tyrosine and threonine residues in the activation loops of mitogen activated protein kinases ERK2, JNK1 and p38-alpha. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human DUSP1 catalytic domain at 2.49 Å resolution. Uniquely, the protein was crystallized as an MBP fusion protein in complex with a monobody that binds to MBP. Sulfate ions occupy the phosphotyrosine and putative phosphothreonine binding sites in the DUSP1 catalytic domain. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  20. Crystal Structure of the Catalytic Domain of a Serine Threonine Protein Phosphatase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinglel, Mark; Honkanel, Richard; Ciszak, Ewa

    2003-01-01

    Reversible phosphorylation of serine and threonine residues is a well-recognized mechanism in eukaryotic cells for the regulation of cell-cycle progression, cell growth and metabolism. Human serine/threonine phosphatases can be placed into two major families, PPP and PPM. To date the structure on one PPP family member (PPl) has been determined. Here we present the structure of a 323-residue catalytic domain of a second phosphatase belonging to the PPP family of enzyme. catalytic domain of the enzyme has been determined to 1.60Angstrom resolution and refined to R=17.5 and Rfree = 20.8%. The catalytic domain possesses a unique fold consisting of a largely monolithic structure, divisible into closely-associated helical and sheet regions. The catalytic site contains two manganese ions that are involved in substrate binding and catalysis. The enzyme crystallizes as a dimer that completely buries catalytic surfaces of both monomers, Also, the structure shows evidence of some flexibility around the active site cleft that may be related to substrate specificity of this enzyme.

  1. Open Core Protocol (OCP) Clock Domain Crossing Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herlev, Mathias; Poulsen, Christian Keis; Sparsø, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The open core protocol (OCP) is an openly licensed configurable and scalable interface protocol for on-chip subsystem communications. The protocol defines read and write transactions from a master towards a slave across a point-to-point connection and the protocol assumes a single common clock....... This paper presents the design of two OCP clock domain crossing interface modules that can be used to construct systems with multiple clock domains. An OCP interface typically has control signals related to both the master issuing a read or write request and the slave producing a response. If all...

  2. Domain motions of Argonaute, the catalytic engine of RNA interference

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    Wall Michael E

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Argonaute protein is the core component of the RNA-induced silencing complex, playing the central role of cleaving the mRNA target. Visual inspection of static crystal structures already has enabled researchers to suggest conformational changes of Argonaute that might occur during RNA interference. We have taken the next step by performing an all-atom normal mode analysis of the Pyrococcus furiosus and Aquifex aeolicus Argonaute crystal structures, allowing us to quantitatively assess the feasibility of these conformational changes. To perform the analysis, we begin with the energy-minimized X-ray structures. Normal modes are then calculated using an all-atom molecular mechanics force field. Results The analysis reveals low-frequency vibrations that facilitate the accommodation of RNA duplexes – an essential step in target recognition. The Pyrococcus furiosus and Aquifex aeolicus Argonaute proteins both exhibit low-frequency torsion and hinge motions; however, differences in the overall architecture of the proteins cause the detailed dynamics to be significantly different. Conclusion Overall, low-frequency vibrations of Argonaute are consistent with mechanisms within the current reaction cycle model for RNA interference.

  3. (Gold core) at (ceria shell) nanostructures for plasmon-enhanced catalytic reactions under visible light

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jianfang

    2014-08-26

    Driving catalytic reactions with sunlight is an excellent example of sustainable chemistry. A prerequisite of solar-driven catalytic reactions is the development of photocatalysts with high solar-harvesting efficiencies and catalytic activities. Herein, we describe a general approach for uniformly coating ceria on monometallic and bimetallic nanocrystals through heterogeneous nucleation and growth. The method allows for control of the shape, size, and type of the metal core as well as the thickness of the ceria shell. The plasmon shifts of the Au@CeO2 nanostructures resulting from the switching between Ce(IV) and Ce(III) are observed. The selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde, one of the fundamental reactions for organic synthesis, performed under both broad-band and monochromatic light, demonstrates the visible-light-driven catalytic activity and reveals the synergistic effect on the enhanced catalysis of the Au@CeO2 nanostructures. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  4. The non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin regulate its abundance and microtubule-disassembly activity.

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    Kyle D Grode

    Full Text Available Microtubule severing is a biochemical reaction that generates an internal break in a microtubule and regulation of microtubule severing is critical for cellular processes such as ciliogenesis, morphogenesis, and meiosis and mitosis. Katanin is a conserved heterodimeric ATPase that severs and disassembles microtubules, but the molecular determinants for regulation of microtubule severing by katanin remain poorly defined. Here we show that the non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin regulate its abundance and activity in living cells. Our data indicate that the microtubule-interacting and trafficking (MIT domain and adjacent linker region of the Drosophila katanin catalytic subunit Kat60 cooperate to regulate microtubule severing in two distinct ways. First, the MIT domain and linker region of Kat60 decrease its abundance by enhancing its proteasome-dependent degradation. The Drosophila katanin regulatory subunit Kat80, which is required to stabilize Kat60 in cells, conversely reduces the proteasome-dependent degradation of Kat60. Second, the MIT domain and linker region of Kat60 augment its microtubule-disassembly activity by enhancing its association with microtubules. On the basis of our data, we propose that the non-catalytic domains of Drosophila katanin serve as the principal sites of integration of regulatory inputs, thereby controlling its ability to sever and disassemble microtubules.

  5. Effective Domain Partitioning for Multi-Clock Domain IP Core Wrapper Design under Power Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Thomas Edison; Yoneda, Tomokazu; Zhao, Danella; Fujiwara, Hideo

    The rapid advancement of VLSI technology has made it possible for chip designers and manufacturers to embed the components of a whole system onto a single chip, called System-on-Chip or SoC. SoCs make use of pre-designed modules, called IP-cores, which provide faster design time and quicker time-to-market. Furthermore, SoCs that operate at multiple clock domains and very low power requirements are being utilized in the latest communications, networking and signal processing devices. As a result, the testing of SoCs and multi-clock domain embedded cores under power constraints has been rapidly gaining importance. In this research, a novel method for designing power-aware test wrappers for embedded cores with multiple clock domains is presented. By effectively partitioning the various clock domains, we are able to increase the solution space of possible test schedules for the core. Since previous methods were limited to concurrently testing all the clock domains, we effectively remove this limitation by making use of bandwidth conversion, multiple shift frequencies and properly gating the clock signals to control the shift activity of various core logic elements. The combination of the above techniques gains us greater flexibility when determining an optimal test schedule under very tight power constraints. Furthermore, since it is computationally intensive to search the entire expanded solution space for the possible test schedules, we propose a heuristic 3-D bin packing algorithm to determine the optimal wrapper architecture and test schedule while minimizing the test time under power and bandwidth constraints.

  6. Core-shell nanospheres Pt@SiO2 for catalytic hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yujuan; Wang, Yuqing; Lu, Zhang-Hui; Chen, Xiangshu; Xiong, Lihua

    2015-06-01

    Ultrafine platinum nanoparticles (NPs) embedded in silica nanospheres (Pt@SiO2) have been synthesized in a NP-5/cyclohexane reversed-micelle system followed by NaBH4 reduction. The as-synthesized core-shell nanocatalysts Pt@SiO2 were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopes, X-ray powder diffraction analysis, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer and nitrogen adsorption-desorption investigations. Interestingly, the as-synthesized core-shell nanocatalysts Pt@SiO2 showed an excellent catalytic performance in hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of ammonia borane (BH3NH3, AB) at room temperature. Especially, the catalytic performance of the Pt@SiO2 remained almost unchanged after the five recycles and even after the heat treatment (673 K), because the silica shells inhibit aggregation or deformation of the metal cores. Besides, the kinetic studies showed that the catalytic hydrolysis of AB was first order with respect to the catalyst concentration and zero order with respect to the substrate concentration, respectively. The excellent catalytic activity and stability of Pt@SiO2 can make it have a bright future in the practical application.

  7. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic studies of the Pasteurella multocida toxin catalytic domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyazawa, Masayuki [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamada-oka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kitadokoro, Kengo [Research Center for Low Temperature and Materials Sciences, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kamitani, Shigeki; Shime, Hiroaki; Horiguchi, Yasuhiko, E-mail: horiguti@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, 3-1 Yamada-oka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2006-09-01

    The C-terminal catalytic domain of P. multocida toxin, which is the virulence factor of the organism in P. multocida, has been expressed, purified and subsequently crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique. The C-terminal catalytic domain of Pasteurella multocida toxin, which is the virulence factor of the organism in P. multocida, has been expressed, purified and subsequently crystallized using the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion technique. Native diffraction data to 1.9 Å resolution were obtained at the BL44XU beamline of SPring-8 from a flash-frozen crystal at 100 K. The crystals belong to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 111.0, b = 150.4, c = 77.1 Å, β = 105.5°, and are likely to contain one C-PMT (726 residues) per asymmetric unit.

  8. Interactions of a Pop5/Rpp1 heterodimer with the catalytic domain of RNase MRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perederina, Anna; Khanova, Elena; Quan, Chao; Berezin, Igor; Esakova, Olga; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2011-10-01

    Ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a multicomponent ribonucleoprotein complex closely related to RNase P. RNase MRP and eukaryotic RNase P share most of their protein components, as well as multiple features of their catalytic RNA moieties, but have distinct substrate specificities. While RNase P is practically universally found in all three domains of life, RNase MRP is essential in eukaryotes. The structural organizations of eukaryotic RNase P and RNase MRP are poorly understood. Here, we show that Pop5 and Rpp1, protein components found in both RNase P and RNase MRP, form a heterodimer that binds directly to the conserved area of the putative catalytic domain of RNase MRP RNA. The Pop5/Rpp1 binding site corresponds to the protein binding site in bacterial RNase P RNA. Structural and evolutionary roles of the Pop5/Rpp1 heterodimer in RNases P and MRP are discussed.

  9. Structural stability of human protein tyrosine phosphatase ρ catalytic domain: effect of point mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Pasquo

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase ρ (PTPρ belongs to the classical receptor type IIB family of protein tyrosine phosphatase, the most frequently mutated tyrosine phosphatase in human cancer. There are evidences to suggest that PTPρ may act as a tumor suppressor gene and dysregulation of Tyr phosphorylation can be observed in diverse diseases, such as diabetes, immune deficiencies and cancer. PTPρ variants in the catalytic domain have been identified in cancer tissues. These natural variants are nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms, variations of a single nucleotide occurring in the coding region and leading to amino acid substitutions. In this study we investigated the effect of amino acid substitution on the structural stability and on the activity of the membrane-proximal catalytic domain of PTPρ. We expressed and purified as soluble recombinant proteins some of the mutants of the membrane-proximal catalytic domain of PTPρ identified in colorectal cancer and in the single nucleotide polymorphisms database. The mutants show a decreased thermal and thermodynamic stability and decreased activation energy relative to phosphatase activity, when compared to wild- type. All the variants show three-state equilibrium unfolding transitions similar to that of the wild- type, with the accumulation of a folding intermediate populated at ~4.0 M urea.

  10. IRBIT Interacts with the Catalytic Core of Phosphatidylinositol Phosphate Kinase Type Iα and IIα through Conserved Catalytic Aspartate Residues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Ando

    Full Text Available Phosphatidylinositol phosphate kinases (PIPKs are lipid kinases that generate phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PI(4,5P2, a critical lipid signaling molecule that regulates diverse cellular functions, including the activities of membrane channels and transporters. IRBIT (IP3R-binding protein released with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate is a multifunctional protein that regulates diverse target proteins. Here, we report that IRBIT forms signaling complexes with members of the PIPK family. IRBIT bound to all PIPK isoforms in heterologous expression systems and specifically interacted with PIPK type Iα (PIPKIα and type IIα (PIPKIIα in mouse cerebellum. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that two conserved catalytic aspartate residues of PIPKIα and PIPKIIα are involved in the interaction with IRBIT. Furthermore, phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate, Mg2+, and/or ATP interfered with the interaction, suggesting that IRBIT interacts with catalytic cores of PIPKs. Mutations of phosphorylation sites in the serine-rich region of IRBIT affected the selectivity of its interaction with PIPKIα and PIPKIIα. The structural flexibility of the serine-rich region, located in the intrinsically disordered protein region, is assumed to underlie the mechanism of this interaction. Furthermore, in vitro binding experiments and immunocytochemistry suggest that IRBIT and PIPKIα interact with the Na+/HCO3- cotransporter NBCe1-B. These results suggest that IRBIT forms signaling complexes with PIPKIα and NBCe1-B, whose activity is regulated by PI(4,5P2.

  11. Fluorescent fusion proteins of soluble guanylyl cyclase indicate proximity of the heme nitric oxide domain and catalytic domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Haase

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To examine the structural organisation of heterodimeric soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET was measured between fluorescent proteins fused to the amino- and carboxy-terminal ends of the sGC beta1 and alpha subunits. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cyan fluorescent protein (CFP was used as FRET donor and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP as FRET acceptor. After generation of recombinant baculovirus, fluorescent-tagged sGC subunits were co-expressed in Sf9 cells. Fluorescent variants of sGC were analyzed in vitro in cytosolic fractions by sensitized emission FRET. Co-expression of the amino-terminally tagged alpha subunits with the carboxy-terminally tagged beta1 subunit resulted in an enzyme complex that showed a FRET efficiency of 10% similar to fluorescent proteins separated by a helix of only 48 amino acids. Because these findings indicated that the amino-terminus of the alpha subunits is close to the carboxy-terminus of the beta1 subunit we constructed fusion proteins where both subunits are connected by a fluorescent protein. The resulting constructs were not only fluorescent, they also showed preserved enzyme activity and regulation by NO. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on the ability of an amino-terminal fragment of the beta1 subunit to inhibit activity of an heterodimer consisting only of the catalytic domains (alphacatbetacat, Winger and Marletta (Biochemistry 2005, 44:4083-90 have proposed a direct interaction of the amino-terminal region of beta1 with the catalytic domains. In support of such a concept of "trans" regulation of sGC activity by the H-NOX domains our results indicate that the domains within sGC are organized in a way that allows for direct interaction of the amino-terminal regulatory domains with the carboxy-terminal catalytic region. In addition, we constructed "fluorescent-conjoined" sGC's by fusion of the alpha amino-terminus to the beta1 carboxy-terminus leading to a

  12. K-core decomposition of a protein domain co-occurrence network reveals lower cancer mutation rates for interior cores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Arnold I; Andrews, Simeon; Ahmed, Ikhlak; Azis, Thasni Ka; Malek, Joel A

    2015-01-01

    Network biology currently focuses primarily on metabolic pathways, gene regulatory, and protein-protein interaction networks. While these approaches have yielded critical information, alternative methods to network analysis will offer new perspectives on biological information. A little explored area is the interactions between domains that can be captured using domain co-occurrence networks (DCN). A DCN can be used to study the function and interaction of proteins by representing protein domains and their co-existence in genes and by mapping cancer mutations to the individual protein domains to identify signals. The domain co-occurrence network was constructed for the human proteome based on PFAM domains in proteins. Highly connected domains in the central cores were identified using the k-core decomposition technique. Here we show that these domains were found to be more evolutionarily conserved than the peripheral domains. The somatic mutations for ovarian, breast and prostate cancer diseases were obtained from the TCGA database. We mapped the somatic mutations to the individual protein domains and the local false discovery rate was used to identify significantly mutated domains in each cancer type. Significantly mutated domains were found to be enriched in cancer disease pathways. However, we found that the inner cores of the DCN did not contain any of the significantly mutated domains. We observed that the inner core protein domains are highly conserved and these domains co-exist in large numbers with other protein domains. Mutations and domain co-occurrence networks provide a framework for understanding hierarchal designs in protein function from a network perspective. This study provides evidence that a majority of protein domains in the inner core of the DCN have a lower mutation frequency and that protein domains present in the peripheral regions of the k-core contribute more heavily to the disease. These findings may contribute further to drug development.

  13. Endolysin of bacteriophage BFK20: evidence of a catalytic and a cell wall binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerova, Martina; Halgasova, Nora; Ugorcakova, Jana; Bukovska, Gabriela

    2011-08-01

    A gene product of ORF24' was identified on the genome of corynephage BFK20 as a putative phage endolysin. The protein of endolysin BFK20 (gp24') has a modular structure consisting of an N-terminal amidase_2 domain (gp24CD) and a C-terminal cell wall binding domain (gp24BD). The C-terminal domain is unrelated to any of the known cell wall binding domains of phage endolysins. The whole endolysin gene and the sequences of its N-terminal and C-terminal domains were cloned; proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The lytic activities of endolysin and its catalytic domain were demonstrated on corynebacteria and bacillus substrates. The binding activity of cell wall binding domain alone and in fusion with green fluorescent protein (gp24BD-GFP) were shown by specific binding assays to the cell surface of BFK20 host Brevibacterium flavum CCM 251 as well as those of other corynebacteria. 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Comprehensive Characterization of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Catalytic Domain by Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Deyang; Peng, Ying; Ayaz-Guner, Serife; Gregorich, Zachery R.; Ge, Ying

    2016-02-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is essential in regulating energy metabolism in all eukaryotic cells. It is a heterotrimeric protein complex composed of a catalytic subunit (α) and two regulatory subunits (β and γ). C-terminal truncation of AMPKα at residue 312 yielded a protein that is active upon phosphorylation of Thr172 in the absence of β and γ subunits, which is refered to as the AMPK catalytic domain and commonly used to substitute for the AMPK heterotrimeric complex in in vitro kinase assays. However, a comprehensive characterization of the AMPK catalytic domain is lacking. Herein, we expressed a His-tagged human AMPK catalytic domin (denoted as AMPKΔ) in E. coli, comprehensively characterized AMPKΔ in its basal state and after in vitro phosphorylation using top-down mass spectrometry (MS), and assessed how phosphorylation of AMPKΔ affects its activity. Unexpectedly, we found that bacterially-expressed AMPKΔ was basally phosphorylated and localized the phosphorylation site to the His-tag. We found that AMPKΔ had noticeable basal activity and was capable of phosphorylating itself and its substrates without activating phosphorylation at Thr172. Moreover, our data suggested that Thr172 is the only site phosphorylated by its upstream kinase, liver kinase B1, and that this phosphorylation dramatically increases the kinase activity of AMPKΔ. Importantly, we demonstrated that top-down MS in conjunction with in vitro phosphorylation assay is a powerful approach for monitoring phosphorylation reaction and determining sequential order of phosphorylation events in kinase-substrate systems.

  15. Structure of the HHARI catalytic domain shows glimpses of a HECT E3 ligase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald E Spratt

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin-signaling pathway utilizes E1 activating, E2 conjugating, and E3 ligase enzymes to sequentially transfer the small modifier protein ubiquitin to a substrate protein. During the last step of this cascade different types of E3 ligases either act as scaffolds to recruit an E2 enzyme and substrate (RING, or form an ubiquitin-thioester intermediate prior to transferring ubiquitin to a substrate (HECT. The RING-inBetweenRING-RING (RBR proteins constitute a unique group of E3 ubiquitin ligases that includes the Human Homologue of Drosophila Ariadne (HHARI. These E3 ligases are proposed to use a hybrid RING/HECT mechanism whereby the enzyme uses facets of both the RING and HECT enzymes to transfer ubiquitin to a substrate. We now present the solution structure of the HHARI RING2 domain, the key portion of this E3 ligase required for the RING/HECT hybrid mechanism. The structure shows the domain possesses two Zn²⁺-binding sites and a single exposed cysteine used for ubiquitin catalysis. A structural comparison of the RING2 domain with the HECT E3 ligase NEDD4 reveals a near mirror image of the cysteine and histidine residues in the catalytic site. Further, a tandem pair of aromatic residues exists near the C-terminus of the HHARI RING2 domain that is conserved in other RBR E3 ligases. One of these aromatic residues is remotely located from the catalytic site that is reminiscent of the location found in HECT E3 enzymes where it is used for ubiquitin catalysis. These observations provide an initial structural rationale for the RING/HECT hybrid mechanism for ubiquitination used by the RBR E3 ligases.

  16. Crystal structure of catalytic domain of the initiation factor 2B epsilon subunit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Thomas; Mohammad, Sarah S.; Pavitt, Graham D.

    , surface exposed acidic patch which might interact with the lysine boxes of eIF2β. Interestingly, Tryptophan 699 was found to be solvent exposed and involved in crystal packing. This residue could possibly be important for the specific interaction with eIF2β. Furthermore, the structure shows the location......CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF CATALYTIC DOMAIN OF THE INITIATION FACTOR 2B EPSILON SUBUNIT Thomas Boesen1,Sarah S. Mohammad2, Graham Pavitt2, and Gregers R. Andersen1* 1Department of Molecular Biology, University of Aarhus, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, DK-8000 Århus C, Denmark 2Department of Biomolecular Sciences......, UMIST, PO Box 88, Manchester, M60 1QD, UK Eukaryotic initiation factor 2B (eIF2B) is the exchange factor of initiation factor 2 (eIF2) and catalyses the reaction where GDP bound to eIF2 is exchanged for GTP, a crucial step in translation. The crystal structure of the C-terminal catalytic domain of the e...

  17. Non-Catalytic Participation of the Pin1 Peptidyl-Prolyl Isomerase Domain in Target Binding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan Tooke Innes

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Pin1 is a phosphorylation-dependent peptidyl-prolyl isomerase that has the potential to add an additional level of regulation within protein kinase mediated signaling pathways. Furthermore, there is a mounting body of evidence implicating Pin1 in the emergence of pathological phenotypes in neurodegeneration and cancer through the isomerization of a wide variety of substrates at peptidyl-prolyl bonds where the residue preceding proline is a phosphorylated serine or threonine residue (ie. pS/T-P motifs. A key step in this regulatory process is the interaction of Pin-1 with its substrates. This is a complex process since Pin1 is composed of two domains, the catalytic PPIase domain, and a type IV WW domain, both of which recognize pS/T-P motifs. The observation that the WW domain exhibits considerably higher binding affinity for pS/T-P motifs has led to predictions that the two domains may have distinct roles in mediating the actions of Pin1 on its substrates. To evaluate the participation of its individual domains in target binding, we performed GST pulldowns to monitor interactions between various forms of Pin1 and mitotic phospho-proteins that revealed two classes of Pin-1 interacting proteins, differing in their requirement for residues within the PPIase domain. From these observations, we consider models for Pin1-substrate interactions and the potential functions of the different classes of Pin1 interacting proteins. We also compare sequences that are recognized by Pin1 within its individual interaction partners to investigate the underlying basis for its different types of interactions.

  18. The Arabidopsis thaliana proteome harbors undiscovered multi-domain molecules with functional guanylyl cyclase catalytic centers

    KAUST Repository

    Wong, Aloysius Tze

    2013-07-08

    Background: Second messengers link external cues to complex physiological responses. One such messenger, 3\\',5\\'-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), has been shown to play a key role in many physiological responses in plants. However, in higher plants, guanylyl cyclases (GCs), enzymes that generate cGMP from guanosine-5\\'-triphosphate (GTP) have remained elusive until recently. GC search motifs constructed from the alignment of known GCs catalytic centers form vertebrates and lower eukaryotes have led to the identification of a number of plant GCs that have been characterized in vitro and in vivo.Presentation of the hypothesis.Recently characterized GCs in Arabidopsis thaliana contributed to the development of search parameters that can identify novel candidate GCs in plants. We hypothesize that there are still a substantial number (> 40) of multi-domain molecules with potentially functional GC catalytic centers in plants that remain to be discovered and characterized. Testing the hypothesis. The hypothesis can be tested, firstly, by computational methods constructing 3D models of selected GC candidates using available crystal structures as templates. Homology modeling must include substrate docking that can provide support for the structural feasibility of the GC catalytic centers in those candidates. Secondly, recombinant peptides containing the GC domain need to be tested in in vitro GC assays such as the enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay (ELISA) and/or in mass spectrometry based cGMP assays. In addition, quantification of in vivo cGMP transients with fluorescent cGMP-reporter assays in wild-type or selected mutants will help to elucidate the biological role of novel GCs.Implications of the hypothesis.If it turns out that plants do harbor a large number of functional GC domains as part of multi-domain enzymes, then major new insights will be gained into the complex signal transduction pathways that link cGMP to fundamental processes such as ion transport

  19. Structures and kinetics for plant nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases support a domain motion catalytic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Emma L; Cumming, Mathew H; Oulavallickal, Tifany; Roberts, Nicholas J; Arcus, Vickery L

    2017-08-01

    Extracellular nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (NTPDases) are enzymes that hydrolyze extracellular nucleotides to the respective monophosphate nucleotides. In the past 20 years, NTPDases belonging to mammalian, parasitic and prokaryotic domains of life have been discovered, cloned and characterized. We reveal the first structures of NTPDases from the legume plant species Trifolium repens (7WC) and Vigna unguiculata subsp. cylindrica (DbLNP). Four crystal structures of 7WC and DbLNP were determined at resolutions between 1.9 and 2.6 Å. For 7WC, structures were determined for an -apo form (1.89 Å) and with the product AMP (2.15 Å) and adenine and phosphate (1.76 Å) bound. For DbLNP, a structure was solved with phosphate and manganese bound (2.60 Å). Thorough kinetic data and analysis is presented. The structure of 7WC and DbLNP reveals that these NTPDases can adopt two conformations depending on the molecule and co-factor bound in the active site. A central hinge region creates a "butterfly-like" motion of the domains that reduces the width of the inter-domain active site cleft upon molecule binding. This phenomenon has been previously described in Rattus norvegicus and Legionella pneumophila NTPDaseI and Toxoplasma gondii NTPDaseIII suggesting a common catalytic mechanism across the domains of life. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  20. Core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles with enhanced catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction via core-shell Au@Ag/Pd constructions

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Dong; Li, Chengyin; Liu, Hui; Ye, Feng; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Core-shell nanoparticles often exhibit improved catalytic properties due to the lattice strain created in these core-shell particles. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles from their core-shell Au@Ag/Pd parents. This strategy begins with the preparation of core-shell Au@Ag nanoparticles in an organic solvent. Then, the pure Ag shells are converted into the shells made of Ag/Pd alloy by galvanic replacement reaction between the Ag shells and Pd2+ precursors. Su...

  1. Catalytic and substrate promiscuity: distinct multiple chemistries catalysed by the phosphatase domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Bharath; Marks, Hanna; Mitra, Sreyoshi; Smalley, David M; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2016-07-15

    The presence of latent activities in enzymes is posited to underlie the natural evolution of new catalytic functions. However, the prevalence and extent of such substrate and catalytic ambiguity in evolved enzymes is difficult to address experimentally given the order-of-magnitude difference in the activities for native and, sometimes, promiscuous substrate/s. Further, such latent functions are of special interest when the activities concerned do not fall into the domain of substrate promiscuity. In the present study, we show a special case of such latent enzyme activity by demonstrating the presence of two mechanistically distinct reactions catalysed by the catalytic domain of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase isoform δ (PTPRδ). The primary catalytic activity involves the hydrolysis of a phosphomonoester bond (C─O─P) with high catalytic efficiency, whereas the secondary activity is the hydrolysis of a glycosidic bond (C─O─C) with poorer catalytic efficiency. This enzyme also displays substrate promiscuity by hydrolysing diester bonds while being highly discriminative for its monoester substrates. To confirm these activities, we also demonstrated their presence on the catalytic domain of protein tyrosine phosphatase Ω (PTPRΩ), a homologue of PTPRδ. Studies on the rate, metal-ion dependence, pH dependence and inhibition of the respective activities showed that they are markedly different. This is the first study that demonstrates a novel sugar hydrolase and diesterase activity for the phosphatase domain (PD) of PTPRδ and PTPRΩ. This work has significant implications for both understanding the evolution of enzymatic activity and the possible physiological role of this new chemistry. Our findings suggest that the genome might harbour a wealth of such alternative latent enzyme activities in the same protein domain that renders our knowledge of metabolic networks incomplete. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the

  2. Catalytic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Hanafi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of dealuminated Y-zeolites impregnated by 0.5 wt% Pt catalysts promoted by different amounts of Ni, Pd or Cr (0.3 and 0.6 wt% were prepared and characterized as hydrocracking catalysts. The physicochemical and structural characterization of the solid catalysts were investigated and reported through N2 physisorption, XRD, TGA-DSC, FT-IR and TEM techniques. Solid catalysts surface acidities were investigated through FT-IR spectroscopy aided by pyridine adsorption. The solid catalytic activities were evaluated through hydroconversion of n-hexane and n-heptane employing micro-catalytic pulse technique directly connected to a gas chromatograph analyzer. The thermal stability of the solids was also investigated up to 800 °C. Crystallinity studies using the XRD technique of all modified samples proved analogous to the parent Y-zeolite, exhibiting nearly an amorphous and microcrystalline character of the second metal oxides. Disclosure of bimetallic catalysts crystalline characterization, through XRD, was not viable. The nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms for all samples concluded type I adsorption isotherms, without any hysteresis loop, indicating that the entire pore system is composed of micropores. TEM micrographs of the solid catalysts demonstrate well-dispersed Pt, Ni and Cr nanoparticles having sizes of 2–4 nm and 7–8 nm, respectively. The catalytic activity results indicate that the bimetallic (0.5Pt–0.3Cr/D18H–Y catalyst is the most active towards n-hexane and n-heptane isomerization while (0.5Pt–0.6Ni/D18H–Y catalyst can be designed as most suitable as a cracking catalyst.

  3. In Situ Synthesis of Catalytic Active Au Nanoparticles onto Gibbsite-Polydopamine Core-Shell Nanoplates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jie; Mei, Shilin; Jia, He; Ott, Andreas; Ballauff, Matthias; Lu, Yan

    2015-09-01

    We report a facile method to synthesize anisotropic platelike gibbsite-polymer core-shell particles. Dopamine is self-polymerized on the surface of gibbsite nanoplates and forms a homogeneous layer on it. Transmission electron microscopy characterization of the resulting latexes demonstrates the formation of well-defined platelike core-shell particles. Reaction time and ultrasonification are found to be important factors to control the thickness of the polymer shell and avoid aggregation. Good control over the platelike morphology and 100% encapsulation efficiency have been achieved via this novel route. The resulting well-defined gibbsite-polydamine (G-PDA) core-shell nanoplates show excellent colloidal stability and can form opal-like columnar crystal with iridescent Bragg reflection after modest centrifugation. In addition, G-PDA core-shell nanoplates can serve both as reductant and stabilizer for the generation of Au nanoparticles (NPs) in situ. Au NPs with tunable size have been formed on the G-PDA particle surface, which show efficient catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol and Rhodamine B (RhB) in the presence of borohydride. Such nanocatalysts can be easily deposited on silicon substrate by spin-coating due to the large contact area of platelike G-PDA particles and the strong adhesive behavior of the PDA layer. The substrate-deposited nanocatalyst can be easily recycled which show excellent reusability for the reduction of RhB.

  4. NMR Structure and Dynamics of the Resuscitation Promoting Factor RpfC Catalytic Domain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Maione

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis latent infection is maintained for years with no clinical symptoms and no adverse effects for the host. The mechanism through which dormant M. tuberculosis resuscitates and enters the cell cycle leading to tuberculosis is attracting much interest. The RPF family of proteins has been found to be responsible for bacteria resuscitation and normal proliferation. This family of proteins in M. tuberculosis is composed by five homologues (named RpfA-E and understanding their conformational, structural and functional peculiarities is crucial to the design of therapeutic strategies.Therefore, we report the structural and dynamics characterization of the catalytic domain of RpfC from M. tubercolosis by combining Nuclear Magnetic Resonance, Circular Dichroism and Molecular Dynamics data. We also show how the formation of a disulfide bridge, highly conserved among the homologues, is likely to modulate the shape of the RpfC hydrophobic catalytic cleft. This might result in a protein function regulation via a "conformational editing" through a disulfide bond formation.

  5. Two optical bistability domains in composites of metal nanoparticles with nonlinear dielectric core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shewamare, Sisay; Mal'nev, V.N.

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that the local field in metal spherical particles with a dielectric core in an external varying electric field has two maxima at two different frequencies. The second maximum becomes more important with an increment in the metal fraction. Due to the nonlinear dielectric function of the core, the composite of these inclusions may have two optically induced bistability domains at different frequencies. At rather high metal fraction, two bistability domains merge and form one entire bistability domain. The parameters of these domains are studied numerically. The paper focuses on the second bistability domain, which has not been discussed in the literature so far. This domain exists in a comparatively narrow frequency range and its onset fields are lower than those of the first bistability domain. The lowest bistability onset fields are obtained in the entire domain. This peculiarity of the optical induced bistability in the metal composite with small dielectric cores can be attractive for possible applications.

  6. Direct binding of syndecan-4 cytoplasmic domain to the catalytic domain of protein kinase C alpha (PKC alpha) increases focal adhesion localization of PKC alpha

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, Ssang-Taek; Longley, Robert L; Couchman, John R

    2003-01-01

    alpha. Full-length PKC alpha weakly interacted with 4V by yeast two-hybrid assays, but PKC alpha constructs that lack the pseudosubstrate region or constructs of the whole catalytic domain interacted more strongly. A mutated 4V sequence (4V(YF): LGKKPIFKK) did not interact with PKC alpha, indicating...

  7. Pt@Ag and Pd@Ag core/shell nanoparticles for catalytic degradation of Congo red in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Mohamed A; Bakr, Eman A; El-Attar, Heba G

    2018-01-05

    Platinum/silver (Pt@Ag) and palladium/silver (Pd@Ag) core/shell NPs have been synthesized in two steps reaction using the citrate method. The progress of nanoparticle formation was followed by the UV/Vis spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy revealed spherical shaped core/shell nanoparticles with average particle diameter 32.17nm for Pt@Ag and 8.8nm for Pd@Ag. The core/shell NPs were further characterized by FT-IR and XRD. Reductive degradation of the Congo red dye was chosen to demonstrate the excellent catalytic activity of these core/shell nanostructures. The nanocatalysts act as electron mediators for the transfer of electrons from the reducing agent (NaBH 4 ) to the dye molecules. Effect of reaction parameters such as nanocatalyst dose, dye and NaBH 4 concentrations on the dye degradation was investigated. A comparison between the catalytic activities of both nanocatalysts was made to realize which of them the best in catalytic performance. Pd@Ag was the higher in catalytic activity over Pt@Ag. Such greater activity is originated from the smaller particle size and larger surface area. Pd@Ag nanocatalyst was catalytically stable through four subsequent reaction runs under the utilized reaction conditions. These findings can thus be considered as possible economical alternative for environmental safety against water pollution by dyes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Pt@Ag and Pd@Ag core/shell nanoparticles for catalytic degradation of Congo red in aqueous solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Mohamed A.; Bakr, Eman A.; El-Attar, Heba G.

    2018-01-01

    Platinum/silver (Pt@Ag) and palladium/silver (Pd@Ag) core/shell NPs have been synthesized in two steps reaction using the citrate method. The progress of nanoparticle formation was followed by the UV/Vis spectroscopy. Transmission electron microscopy revealed spherical shaped core/shell nanoparticles with average particle diameter 32.17 nm for Pt@Ag and 8.8 nm for Pd@Ag. The core/shell NPs were further characterized by FT-IR and XRD. Reductive degradation of the Congo red dye was chosen to demonstrate the excellent catalytic activity of these core/shell nanostructures. The nanocatalysts act as electron mediators for the transfer of electrons from the reducing agent (NaBH4) to the dye molecules. Effect of reaction parameters such as nanocatalyst dose, dye and NaBH4 concentrations on the dye degradation was investigated. A comparison between the catalytic activities of both nanocatalysts was made to realize which of them the best in catalytic performance. Pd@Ag was the higher in catalytic activity over Pt@Ag. Such greater activity is originated from the smaller particle size and larger surface area. Pd@Ag nanocatalyst was catalytically stable through four subsequent reaction runs under the utilized reaction conditions. These findings can thus be considered as possible economical alternative for environmental safety against water pollution by dyes.

  9. Functional Properties of the Catalytic Domain of Mouse Acidic Mammalian Chitinase Expressed in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashimura, Akinori; Kimura, Masahiro; Okawa, Kazuaki; Suzuki, Hirotaka; Ukita, Atsushi; Wakita, Satoshi; Okazaki, Kana; Ohno, Misa; Bauer, Peter O.; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Sugahara, Yasusato; Oyama, Fumitaka

    2015-01-01

    Mouse acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) plays important physiological roles in defense and nutrition. AMCase is composed of an N-terminal catalytic domain (CatD) and a C-terminal chitin-binding domain (CBD). We expressed CatD of mouse AMCase as a recombinant fusion protein with Protein A and V5-His in Escherichia coli (Protein A-CatD-V5-His), evaluated its functional properties and compared them to the full-length AMCase (Protein A-AMCase-V5-His). Under our experimental conditions, the chitinolytic activity of both proteins against 4-nitrophenyl N,N'-diacetyl-β-d-chitobioside was equivalent with regard to their specific enzymatic activities, optimal pH and temperature as well as to the pH and temperature stability. CatD bound to chitin beads and cleaved the N-acetylglucosamine hexamer, colloidal and crystalline chitin as well as the shrimp shell, and released primarily N,N'-diacetylchitobiose fragments at pH 2.0. These results indicate that the primary structure of CatD is sufficient to form a proper tertiary structure required for chitinolytic activity, recognize chitin substrates and degrade them in the absence of a CBD. Our recombinant proteins can be used for further studies evaluating pathophysiological roles of AMCase in different diseases. PMID:25689423

  10. Functional Properties of the Catalytic Domain of Mouse Acidic Mammalian Chitinase Expressed in Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Kashimura

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mouse acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase plays important physiological roles in defense and nutrition. AMCase is composed of an N-terminal catalytic domain (CatD and a C-terminal chitin-binding domain (CBD. We expressed CatD of mouse AMCase as a recombinant fusion protein with Protein A and V5-His in Escherichia coli (Protein A-CatD-V5-His, evaluated its functional properties and compared them to the full-length AMCase (Protein A-AMCase-V5-His. Under our experimental conditions, the chitinolytic activity of both proteins against 4-nitrophenyl N,N'-diacetyl-β-d-chitobioside was equivalent with regard to their specific enzymatic activities, optimal pH and temperature as well as to the pH and temperature stability. CatD bound to chitin beads and cleaved the N-acetylglucosamine hexamer, colloidal and crystalline chitin as well as the shrimp shell, and released primarily N,N'-diacetylchitobiose fragments at pH 2.0. These results indicate that the primary structure of CatD is sufficient to form a proper tertiary structure required for chitinolytic activity, recognize chitin substrates and degrade them in the absence of a CBD. Our recombinant proteins can be used for further studies evaluating pathophysiological roles of AMCase in different diseases.

  11. Functional properties of the catalytic domain of mouse acidic mammalian chitinase expressed in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashimura, Akinori; Kimura, Masahiro; Okawa, Kazuaki; Suzuki, Hirotaka; Ukita, Atsushi; Wakita, Satoshi; Okazaki, Kana; Ohno, Misa; Bauer, Peter O; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Sugahara, Yasusato; Oyama, Fumitaka

    2015-02-13

    Mouse acidic mammalian chitinase (AMCase) plays important physiological roles in defense and nutrition. AMCase is composed of an N-terminal catalytic domain (CatD) and a C-terminal chitin-binding domain (CBD). We expressed CatD of mouse AMCase as a recombinant fusion protein with Protein A and V5-His in Escherichia coli (Protein A-CatD-V5-His), evaluated its functional properties and compared them to the full-length AMCase (Protein A-AMCase-V5-His). Under our experimental conditions, the chitinolytic activity of both proteins against 4-nitrophenyl N,N'-diacetyl-β-D-chitobioside was equivalent with regard to their specific enzymatic activities, optimal pH and temperature as well as to the pH and temperature stability. CatD bound to chitin beads and cleaved the N-acetylglucosamine hexamer, colloidal and crystalline chitin as well as the shrimp shell, and released primarily N,N'-diacetylchitobiose fragments at pH 2.0. These results indicate that the primary structure of CatD is sufficient to form a proper tertiary structure required for chitinolytic activity, recognize chitin substrates and degrade them in the absence of a CBD. Our recombinant proteins can be used for further studies evaluating pathophysiological roles of AMCase in different diseases.

  12. Networked Pd (core) @ polyaniline (shell) composite: Highly electro-catalytic ability and unique selectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Youyi; Liu, Ning; Sun, Ling; Xu, Hao; Gao, Hong; Lu, Taofeng

    2018-01-01

    A networked composite (Pd@PANI), which is self-assemblied freely from Pd (core) @polyaniline (shell) nanoparticles, has been prepared successfully by a facilely one-step approach. Owing to the conductive environment and acid-doped behavior provided by PANI, the composite exhibits highly catalytic ability in the reaction involving acidic reactants. For instance, in the HCOOH electro-oxidation, 9.16 times of specific activity (comparing with that when using commercial Pd/C catalyst) is observed. Meanwhile, the as-prepared product is unable to catalyze some other systems like the electro-oxidation of C2H5OH, showing novel and unique selectivity. Those would open up new routes for synthesizing high-performance Pd-based catalysts, and could also shed some light on synthesizing new types of selective catalysts.

  13. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments of the new lysostaphin family endopeptidase catalytic domain from Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raulinaitis, Vytas; Tossavainen, Helena; Aitio, Olli; Seppala, Raili; Permi, Perttu

    2017-04-01

    Lysostaphin family endopeptidases, produced by Staphylococcus genus, are zinc-dependent enzymes that cleave pentaglycine bridges of cell wall peptidoglycan. They act as autolysins to maintain cell wall metabolism or as toxins and weapons against competing strains. Consequently, these enzymes are compelling targets for new drugs as well as are potential antimicrobial agents themselves against Staphylococcus pathogens, which depend on cell wall to retain their immunity against antibiotics. The rapid spread of methicillin and vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains draws demand for new therapeutic approaches. S. aureus gene sa0205 was found to be implicated in resistance to vancomycin and synthesis of the bacteria cell wall. The gene encodes for a catalytic domain of a lysostaphin-type endopeptidase. We aim to obtain the structure of the Sa0205 catalytic domain, the first solution structure of the catalytic domain of the lysostaphin family enzymes. In addition, we are to investigate the apparent binding of the second zinc ion, which has not been previously reported for the enzyme group. Herein, we present the backbone and side chain resonance assignments of Sa0205 endopeptidase catalytic domain in its one and two zinc-bound forms.

  14. Catalytic properties of two Rhizopus oryzae 99-880 glucoamylase enzymes without starch binding domains expressed in Pichia pastoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalytic properties of the two glucoamylases, AmyC and AmyD, without starch binding domains from Rhizopus oryzae strain 99-880 were heterologously expressed and purified to homogeneity. AmyC and AmyD demonstrate pH optima of 5.5 and 6.0, respectively, nearly 1 unit higher than most fungal glucoamy...

  15. Crystal Structure of the Catalytic Domain of Drosophila [beta]1,4-Galactosyltransferase-7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishnan, Boopathy; Qasba, Pradman K. (NIH)

    2010-11-03

    The {beta}1,4-galactosyltransferase-7 ({beta}4Gal-T7) enzyme, one of seven members of the {beta}4Gal-T family, transfers in the presence of manganese Gal from UDP-Gal to an acceptor sugar (xylose) that is attached to a side chain hydroxyl group of Ser/Thr residues of proteoglycan proteins. It exhibits the least protein sequence similarity with the other family members, including the well studied family member {beta}4Gal-T1, which, in the presence of manganese, transfers Gal from UDP-Gal to GlcNAc. We report here the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of {beta}4Gal-T7 from Drosophila in the presence of manganese and UDP at 1.81 {angstrom} resolution. In the crystal structure, a new manganese ion-binding motif (HXH) has been observed. Superposition of the crystal structures of {beta}4Gal-T7 and {beta}4Gal-T1 shows that the catalytic pocket and the substrate-binding sites in these proteins are similar. Compared with GlcNAc, xylose has a hydroxyl group (instead of an N-acetyl group) at C2 and lacks the CH{sub 2}OH group at C5; thus, these protein structures show significant differences in their acceptor-binding site. Modeling of xylose in the acceptor-binding site of the {beta}4Gal-T7 crystal structure shows that the aromatic side chain of Tyr{sup 177} interacts strongly with the C5 atom of xylose, causing steric hindrance to any additional group at C5. Because Drosophila Cd7 has a 73% protein sequence similarity to human Cd7, the present crystal structure offers a structure-based explanation for the mutations in human Cd7 that have been linked to Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

  16. A novel bifunctional pectinase from Penicillium oxalicum SX6 with separate pectin methylesterase and polygalacturonase catalytic domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Tao; Bai, Yingguo; Luo, Huiying; Ma, Rui; Wang, Yaru; Shi, Pengjun; Yang, Peilong; Meng, Kun; Yao, Bin

    2014-06-01

    A multimodular pectinase of glycoside hydrolase family 28, S6A, was identified in Penicillium oxalicum SX6 that consists of an N-terminal catalytic domain of pectin methylesterase, a Thr/Ser-rich linker region, and a C-terminal catalytic domain of polygalacturonase. Recombinant S6A and its two derivatives, S6PE (the catalytic domain of pectin methylesterase) and S6PG (the catalytic domain of polygalacturonase), were produced in Pichia pastoris. S6A was a bifunctional protein and had both pectin methylesterase and polygalacturonase activities. Three enzymes showed similar biochemical properties, such as optimal pH and temperature (pH 5.0 and 50 °C) and excellent stability at pH 3.5-6.0 and 40 °C. Most metal ions tested (Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), Li(+), Co(2+), Cr(3+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Mn(2+),Mg(2+), Fe(3+), Zn(2+), and Pb(2+)) enhanced the pectin methylesterase activities of S6PE and S6A, but had little or inhibitory effects on the polygalacturonase activities of S6A and S6PG. In comparison with most fungal pectin methylesterases, S6A had higher specific activity (271.1 U/mg) towards 70 % DM citrus pectin. When S6PE and S6PG were combined at the activity ratio of 1:4, the most significant synergistic effect was observed in citrus pectin degradation and degumming of sisal fiber, which is comparable with the performance of S6A (95 v.s. 100 % and 16.9 v.s. 17.2 %, respectively). To the best of our knowledge, this work represents the first report of gene cloning, heterologous expression, and biochemical characterization of a bifunctional pectinase with separate catalytic domains.

  17. Structures of the human poly (ADP-ribose glycohydrolase catalytic domain confirm catalytic mechanism and explain inhibition by ADP-HPD derivatives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A Tucker

    Full Text Available Poly(ADP-ribose glycohydrolase (PARG is the only enzyme known to catalyse hydrolysis of the O-glycosidic linkages of ADP-ribose polymers, thereby reversing the effects of poly(ADP-ribose polymerases. PARG deficiency leads to cell death whilst PARG depletion causes sensitisation to certain DNA damaging agents, implicating PARG as a potential therapeutic target in several disease areas. Efforts to develop small molecule inhibitors of PARG activity have until recently been hampered by a lack of structural information on PARG. We have used a combination of bio-informatic and experimental approaches to engineer a crystallisable, catalytically active fragment of human PARG (hPARG. Here, we present high-resolution structures of the catalytic domain of hPARG in unliganded form and in complex with three inhibitors: ADP-ribose (ADPR, adenosine 5'-diphosphate (hydroxymethylpyrrolidinediol (ADP-HPD and 8-n-octyl-amino-ADP-HPD. Our structures confirm conservation of overall fold amongst mammalian PARG glycohydrolase domains, whilst revealing additional flexible regions in the catalytic site. These new structures rationalise a body of published mutational data and the reported structure-activity relationship for ADP-HPD based PARG inhibitors. In addition, we have developed and used biochemical, isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance assays to characterise the binding of inhibitors to our PARG protein, thus providing a starting point for the design of new inhibitors.

  18. Mobile sequences in the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, the E2 component, the catalytic domain and the 2-oxogluturate dehydrogenase complex of Azotobacter vinelandii, as detected by 600 MHz 1H-NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanemaaijer, R.; Vervoort, J.; Westphal, A.H.; Kok, A. de.; Veeger, C.

    1988-01-01

    600 MHz 1 H-NMR spectroscopy demonstrates that the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex of Azotobacter vinelandii contains regions of the polypeptide chain with intramolecular mobility. This mobility is located in the E 2 component and can probably be ascribed to alanine-proline-rich regions that link the lipoyl sibdiomains to each other as well as to the E 1 and E 3 binding domain. In the catalytic domain of E 2 which is thought to form a compact, rigid core, also conformational flexibility is observed. It is conceivable that the N-terminal region of the catalytic domain, which contains many alanine residues, is responsible for the observed mobility. In the low-field region of the 1 H-NMR spectrum of E 2 specific resonances are found, which can be ascribed to mobile phenylalanine, histidine and/or tyrosine residues which are located in the E 1 and E 3 binding domain that links the lipoyl domain to the catalytic domain. In the 1 H-NMR spectrum of the intact complex, these resonances cannot be observed, indicating a decreased mobility of the E 1 and E 3 binding domain. (author). 24 refs.; 2 figs

  19. Role of net charge on catalytic domain and influence of cell wall binding domain on bactericidal activity, specificity, and host range of phage lysins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Lieh Yoon; Yang, Chen; Perego, Marta; Osterman, Andrei; Liddington, Robert

    2011-09-30

    The recombinant lysins of lytic phages, when applied externally to Gram-positive bacteria, can be efficient bactericidal agents, typically retaining high specificity. Their development as novel antibacterial agents offers many potential advantages over conventional antibiotics. Protein engineering could exploit this potential further by generating novel lysins fit for distinct target populations and environments. However, access to the peptidoglycan layer is controlled by a variety of secondary cell wall polymers, chemical modifications, and (in some cases) S-layers and capsules. Classical lysins require a cell wall-binding domain (CBD) that targets the catalytic domain to the peptidoglycan layer via binding to a secondary cell wall polymer component. The cell walls of Gram-positive bacteria generally have a negative charge, and we noticed a correlation between (positive) charge on the catalytic domain and bacteriolytic activity in the absence of the CBD (nonclassical behavior). We investigated a physical basis for this correlation by comparing the structures and activities of pairs of lysins where the lytic activity of one of each pair was CBD-independent. We found that by engineering a reversal of sign of the net charge of the catalytic domain, we could either eliminate or create CBD dependence. We also provide evidence that the S-layer of Bacillus anthracis acts as a molecular sieve that is chiefly size-dependent, favoring catalytic domains over full-length lysins. Our work suggests a number of facile approaches for fine-tuning lysin activity, either to enhance or reduce specificity/host range and/or bactericidal potential, as required.

  20. Modeling of the catalytic core of Arabidopsis thaliana Dicer-like 4 protein and its complex with double-stranded RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickiewicz, Agnieszka; Sarzyńska, Joanna; Miłostan, Maciej; Kurzyńska-Kokorniak, Anna; Rybarczyk, Agnieszka; Łukasiak, Piotr; Kuliński, Tadeusz; Figlerowicz, Marek; Błażewicz, Jacek

    2017-02-01

    Plant Dicer-like proteins (DCLs) belong to the Ribonuclease III (RNase III) enzyme family. They are involved in the regulation of gene expression and antiviral defense through RNA interference pathways. A model plant, Arabidopsis thaliana encodes four DCL proteins (AtDCL1-4) that produce different classes of small regulatory RNAs. Our studies focus on AtDCL4 that processes double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) into 21 nucleotide trans-acting small interfering RNAs. So far, little is known about the structures of plant DCLs and the complexes they form with dsRNA. In this work, we present models of the catalytic core of AtDCL4 and AtDCL4-dsRNA complex constructed by computational methods. We built a homology model of the catalytic core of AtDCL4 comprising Platform, PAZ, Connector helix and two RNase III domains. To assemble the AtDCL4-dsRNA complex two modeling approaches were used. In the first method, to establish conformations that allow building a consistent model of the complex, we used Normal Mode Analysis for both dsRNA and AtDCL4. The second strategy involved template-based approach for positioning of the PAZ domain and manual arrangement of the Connector helix. Our results suggest that the spatial orientation of the Connector helix, Platform and PAZ relative to the RNase III domains is crucial for measuring dsRNA of defined length. The modeled complexes provide information about interactions that may contribute to the relative orientations of these domains and to dsRNA binding. All these information can be helpful for understanding the mechanism of AtDCL4-mediated dsRNA recognition and binding, to produce small RNA of specific size. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Crystal Structure of the DNA Deaminase APOBEC3B Catalytic Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ke; Carpenter, Michael A; Kurahashi, Kayo; Harris, Reuben S; Aihara, Hideki

    2015-11-20

    Functional and deep sequencing studies have combined to demonstrate the involvement of APOBEC3B in cancer mutagenesis. APOBEC3B is a single-stranded DNA cytosine deaminase that functions normally as a nuclear-localized restriction factor of DNA-based pathogens. However, it is overexpressed in cancer cells and elicits an intrinsic preference for 5'-TC motifs in single-stranded DNA, which is the most frequently mutated dinucleotide in breast, head/neck, lung, bladder, cervical, and several other tumor types. In many cases, APOBEC3B mutagenesis accounts for the majority of both dispersed and clustered (kataegis) cytosine mutations. Here, we report the first structures of the APOBEC3B catalytic domain in multiple crystal forms. These structures reveal a tightly closed active site conformation and suggest that substrate accessibility is regulated by adjacent flexible loops. Residues important for catalysis are identified by mutation analyses, and the results provide insights into the mechanism of target site selection. We also report a nucleotide (dCMP)-bound crystal structure that informs a multistep model for binding single-stranded DNA. Overall, these high resolution crystal structures provide a framework for further mechanistic studies and the development of novel anti-cancer drugs to inhibit this enzyme, dampen tumor evolution, and minimize adverse outcomes such as drug resistance and metastasis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. Structure of the Catalytic Domain of the Class I Polyhydroxybutyrate Synthase from Cupriavidus necator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenborn, Elizabeth C; Jost, Marco; Wei, Yifeng; Stubbe, JoAnne; Drennan, Catherine L

    2016-11-25

    Polyhydroxybutyrate synthase (PhaC) catalyzes the polymerization of 3-(R)-hydroxybutyryl-coenzyme A as a means of carbon storage in many bacteria. The resulting polymers can be used to make biodegradable materials with properties similar to those of thermoplastics and are an environmentally friendly alternative to traditional petroleum-based plastics. A full biochemical and mechanistic understanding of this process has been hindered in part by a lack of structural information on PhaC. Here we present the first structure of the catalytic domain (residues 201-589) of the class I PhaC from Cupriavidus necator (formerly Ralstonia eutropha) to 1.80 Å resolution. We observe a symmetrical dimeric architecture in which the active site of each monomer is separated from the other by ∼33 Å across an extensive dimer interface, suggesting a mechanism in which polyhydroxybutyrate biosynthesis occurs at a single active site. The structure additionally highlights key side chain interactions within the active site that play likely roles in facilitating catalysis, leading to the proposal of a modified mechanistic scheme involving two distinct roles for the active site histidine. We also identify putative substrate entrance and product egress routes within the enzyme, which are discussed in the context of previously reported biochemical observations. Our structure lays a foundation for further biochemical and structural characterization of PhaC, which could assist in engineering efforts for the production of eco-friendly materials. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Structure of the Catalytic Domain of the Class I Polyhydroxybutyrate Synthase from Cupriavidus necator*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenborn, Elizabeth C.; Jost, Marco; Wei, Yifeng; Stubbe, JoAnne; Drennan, Catherine L.

    2016-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate synthase (PhaC) catalyzes the polymerization of 3-(R)-hydroxybutyryl-coenzyme A as a means of carbon storage in many bacteria. The resulting polymers can be used to make biodegradable materials with properties similar to those of thermoplastics and are an environmentally friendly alternative to traditional petroleum-based plastics. A full biochemical and mechanistic understanding of this process has been hindered in part by a lack of structural information on PhaC. Here we present the first structure of the catalytic domain (residues 201–589) of the class I PhaC from Cupriavidus necator (formerly Ralstonia eutropha) to 1.80 Å resolution. We observe a symmetrical dimeric architecture in which the active site of each monomer is separated from the other by ∼33 Å across an extensive dimer interface, suggesting a mechanism in which polyhydroxybutyrate biosynthesis occurs at a single active site. The structure additionally highlights key side chain interactions within the active site that play likely roles in facilitating catalysis, leading to the proposal of a modified mechanistic scheme involving two distinct roles for the active site histidine. We also identify putative substrate entrance and product egress routes within the enzyme, which are discussed in the context of previously reported biochemical observations. Our structure lays a foundation for further biochemical and structural characterization of PhaC, which could assist in engineering efforts for the production of eco-friendly materials. PMID:27742839

  4. Conserved threonine 1505 in the catalytic domain stabilizes mouse DNA methyltransferase 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanada, Kensaku; Takeshita, Kohei; Suetake, Isao; Tajima, Shoji; Nakagawa, Atsushi

    2017-10-01

    In mammals, DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) is responsible for propagating the DNA methylation pattern into the next generation through selective methylation of hemi-methylated CpG that emerges just after replication, a process known as maintenance methylation. The T1505, which is conserved among DNMT1s of vertebrates, in the catalytic domain of mouse DNMT1 forms the hydrogen bond with the W1512, which is also conserved among vertebrates and one of the essential residues in recognition of the 5-methylcytosine in hemi-methylated CpGs. However, importance of the hydrogen bond between T1505 and W1512 is unknown. In this study, we determined the crystal structure of mouse DNMT1(291-1620) that replaced T1505 with alanine (DNMT1(291-1620)T1505A) and examined its DNA methylation activity in vitro. Although the mutation lost the hydrogen bond between T1505 and W1512, the overall structure of DNMT1(291-1620)T1505A remained almost identical with that of the wild type. Structural stability and DNA methylation activity of DNMT1(291-1620)T1505A under physiological temperature were lower than those of DNMT1(291-1620). T1505 is crucial on the DNA methylation activity of DNMT1 through stabilizing its structure during ongoing round of DNA methylation. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  5. Core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles with enhanced catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction via core-shell Au@Ag/Pd constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Li, Chengyin; Liu, Hui; Ye, Feng; Yang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Core-shell nanoparticles often exhibit improved catalytic properties due to the lattice strain created in these core-shell particles. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles from their core-shell Au@Ag/Pd parents. This strategy begins with the preparation of core-shell Au@Ag nanoparticles in an organic solvent. Then, the pure Ag shells are converted into the shells made of Ag/Pd alloy by galvanic replacement reaction between the Ag shells and Pd2+ precursors. Subsequently, the Ag component is removed from the alloy shell using saturated NaCl solution to form core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles with an Au core and a Pd shell. In comparison with the core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles upon directly depositing Pd shell on the Au seeds and commercial Pd/C catalysts, the core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles via their core-shell Au@Ag/Pd templates display superior activity and durability in catalyzing oxygen reduction reaction, mainly due to the larger lattice tensile effect in Pd shell induced by the Au core and Ag removal. PMID:26144550

  6. Core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles with enhanced catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction via core-shell Au@Ag/Pd constructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Li, Chengyin; Liu, Hui; Ye, Feng; Yang, Jun

    2015-07-01

    Core-shell nanoparticles often exhibit improved catalytic properties due to the lattice strain created in these core-shell particles. Herein, we demonstrate the synthesis of core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles from their core-shell Au@Ag/Pd parents. This strategy begins with the preparation of core-shell Au@Ag nanoparticles in an organic solvent. Then, the pure Ag shells are converted into the shells made of Ag/Pd alloy by galvanic replacement reaction between the Ag shells and Pd2+ precursors. Subsequently, the Ag component is removed from the alloy shell using saturated NaCl solution to form core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles with an Au core and a Pd shell. In comparison with the core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles upon directly depositing Pd shell on the Au seeds and commercial Pd/C catalysts, the core-shell Au@Pd nanoparticles via their core-shell Au@Ag/Pd templates display superior activity and durability in catalyzing oxygen reduction reaction, mainly due to the larger lattice tensile effect in Pd shell induced by the Au core and Ag removal.

  7. Identifying core domains to assess flare in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartlett, Susan J; Hewlett, Sarah; Bingham, Clifton O

    2012-01-01

    For rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there is no consensus on how to define and assess flare. Variability in flare definitions impairs understanding of findings across studies and limits ability to pool results. The OMERACT RA Flare Group sought to identify domains to define RA flares from patient...

  8. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the initiation factor 2B epsilon subunit from saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Thomas; Pavitt, Graham D.; Andersen, Gregers Rom

    residues in the motifs form a surface exposed acidic patch which might interact with the lysine boxes of initiation factor 2 β. Interestingly, tryptophan 699 was found to be solvent exposed and involved in crystal packing. This residue could possibly be important for the specific interaction......Crystal Structure of Catalytic Domain of the Initiation Factor 2B Epsilon Subunit from Saccharomyces cerevisiae by Thomas Boesen1, Graham Pavitt2, and Gregers Rom Andersen1* 1Department of Molecular Biology, University of Aarhus, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, DK-8000 Århus C, Denmark 2Department...... of Biomolecular Sciences, UMIST, PO Box 88, Manchester, M60 1QD UK *To whom correspondence should be addressed: grand@imsb.au.dk, Tel: (+45) 8942 5024. Fax: (+45) 8612 3178 Abstract The crystal structure of the C-terminal catalytic domain of the initiation factor 2B epsilon subunit, residues 544-704, from...

  9. MMP-12 catalytic domain recognizes and cleaves at multiple sites in human skin collagen type I and type III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taddese, Samuel; Jung, Michael C; Ihling, Christian

    2010-01-01

    . The catalytic domain of MMP-12 binds to the triple helix and cleaves the typical sites -Gly(775)-Leu(776)- in alpha-2 type I collagen and -Gly(775)-Ile(776)- in alpha-1 type I and type III collagens and at multiple other sites in both collagen types. Moreover, it was observed that the region around...... metalloproteinases (MMPs) are required to initiate further degradation by other enzymes. Several MMPs are known to degrade collagens, but the action of MMP-12 has not yet been studied in detail. In this work, the potential of MMP-12 in recognizing sites in human skin collagen types I and III has been investigated...... on the collagenolysis process. Taken together, the results of the present work confirm that the catalytic domain of MMP-12 alone binds and degrades collagens I and III....

  10. Structure of the catalytic domain of the Tannerella forsythia matrix metallopeptidase karilysin in complex with a tetrapeptidic inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guevara, Tibisay; Ksiazek, Miroslaw; Skottrup, Peter Durand

    2013-01-01

    Karilysin is the only metallopeptidase identified as a virulence factor in the odontopathogen Tannerella forsythia owing to its deleterious effect on the host immune response during bacterial infection. The very close structural and sequence-based similarity of its catalytic domain (Kly18) to mat...... determinants of inhibition of karilysin and open the field for the design of novel inhibitory strategies aimed at the treatment of human periodontal disease based on a peptidic hit molecule....

  11. Fabrication of ammonium perchlorate/copper-chromium oxides core-shell nanocomposites for catalytic thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslami, Abbas, E-mail: eslami@umz.ac.ir [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Mazandaran, P.O.Box 47416-95447, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Juibari, Nafise Modanlou [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Mazandaran, P.O.Box 47416-95447, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini, Seyed Ghorban [Department of Chemistry, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, P.O. Box 16765-3454, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The ammonium perchlorate/Cu(II)-Cr(III)-oxides(AP/Cu-Cr-O) core-shell nanocomposites were in-situ prepared by deposition of copper and chromium oxides on suspended ammonium perchlorate particles in ethyl acetate as solvent. The results of differential scanning calorimetery (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) experiments showed that the nanocomposites have excellent catalytic effect on the thermal decomposition of AP, so that the released heat increases up to about 3-fold over initial values, changing from 450 J/g for pure AP to 1510 J/g for most appropriate mixture. For better comparison, single metal oxide/AP core-shell nanocomposite have also been prepared and the results showed that they have less catalytic effect respect to mixed metal oxides system. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results revealed homogenous deposition of nanoparticles on the surface of AP and fabrication of core-shell structures. The kinetic parameters of thermal decomposition of both pure AP and AP/Cu-Cr-O samples have been calculated by Kissinger method and the results showed that the values of pre-exponential factor and activation energy are higher for AP/Cu-Cr-O nanocomposite. The better catalytic effect of Cu-Cr-O nanocomposites is probably attributed to the synergistic effect between Cu{sup 2+} and Cr{sup 3+} in the nanocomposites, smaller particle size and more crystal defect. - Highlights: • The Cu-Cr-O nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical liquid deposition method. • Then, the AP/Cu-Cr-O core-shell nanocomposites were prepared. • The core-shell samples showed high catalytic activity for AP decomposition. • Thermal decomposition of samples occurs at lower temperature range.

  12. Fabrication of ammonium perchlorate/copper-chromium oxides core-shell nanocomposites for catalytic thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eslami, Abbas; Juibari, Nafise Modanlou; Hosseini, Seyed Ghorban

    2016-01-01

    The ammonium perchlorate/Cu(II)-Cr(III)-oxides(AP/Cu-Cr-O) core-shell nanocomposites were in-situ prepared by deposition of copper and chromium oxides on suspended ammonium perchlorate particles in ethyl acetate as solvent. The results of differential scanning calorimetery (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) experiments showed that the nanocomposites have excellent catalytic effect on the thermal decomposition of AP, so that the released heat increases up to about 3-fold over initial values, changing from 450 J/g for pure AP to 1510 J/g for most appropriate mixture. For better comparison, single metal oxide/AP core-shell nanocomposite have also been prepared and the results showed that they have less catalytic effect respect to mixed metal oxides system. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results revealed homogenous deposition of nanoparticles on the surface of AP and fabrication of core-shell structures. The kinetic parameters of thermal decomposition of both pure AP and AP/Cu-Cr-O samples have been calculated by Kissinger method and the results showed that the values of pre-exponential factor and activation energy are higher for AP/Cu-Cr-O nanocomposite. The better catalytic effect of Cu-Cr-O nanocomposites is probably attributed to the synergistic effect between Cu 2+ and Cr 3+ in the nanocomposites, smaller particle size and more crystal defect. - Highlights: • The Cu-Cr-O nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical liquid deposition method. • Then, the AP/Cu-Cr-O core-shell nanocomposites were prepared. • The core-shell samples showed high catalytic activity for AP decomposition. • Thermal decomposition of samples occurs at lower temperature range.

  13. Targeted DNA demethylation of the Arabidopsis genome using the human TET1 catalytic domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallego-Bartolomé, Javier; Gardiner, Jason; Liu, Wanlu; Papikian, Ashot; Ghoshal, Basudev; Kuo, Hsuan Yu; Zhao, Jenny Miao-Chi; Jacobsen, Steven E.

    2018-01-01

    DNA methylation is an important epigenetic modification involved in gene regulation and transposable element silencing. Changes in DNA methylation can be heritable and, thus, can lead to the formation of stable epialleles. A well-characterized example of a stable epiallele in plants is fwa, which consists of the loss of DNA cytosine methylation (5mC) in the promoter of the FLOWERING WAGENINGEN (FWA) gene, causing up-regulation of FWA and a heritable late-flowering phenotype. Here we demonstrate that a fusion between the catalytic domain of the human demethylase TEN-ELEVEN TRANSLOCATION1 (TET1cd) and an artificial zinc finger (ZF) designed to target the FWA promoter can cause highly efficient targeted demethylation, FWA up-regulation, and a heritable late-flowering phenotype. Additional ZF–TET1cd fusions designed to target methylated regions of the CACTA1 transposon also caused targeted demethylation and changes in expression. Finally, we have developed a CRISPR/dCas9-based targeted demethylation system using the TET1cd and a modified SunTag system. Similar to the ZF–TET1cd fusions, the SunTag–TET1cd system is able to target demethylation and activate gene expression when directed to the FWA or CACTA1 loci. Our study provides tools for targeted removal of 5mC at specific loci in the genome with high specificity and minimal off-target effects. These tools provide the opportunity to develop new epialleles for traits of interest, and to reactivate expression of previously silenced genes, transgenes, or transposons. PMID:29444862

  14. Mutational analyses of the core domain of Avian Leukemia and Sarcoma Viruses integrase: critical residues for concerted integration and multimerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, Karen; Faure, Claudine; Violot, Sebastien; Gouet, Patrice; Verdier, Gerard; Ronfort, Corinne

    2004-01-01

    During replicative cycle of retroviruses, the reverse-transcribed viral DNA is integrated into the cell DNA by the viral integrase (IN) enzyme. The central core domain of IN contains the catalytic site of the enzyme and is involved in binding viral ends and cell DNA as well as dimerization. We previously performed single amino acid substitutions in the core domain of an Avian Leukemia and Sarcoma Virus (ALSV) IN [Arch. Virol. 147 (2002) 1761]. Here, we modeled the resulting IN mutants and analyzed the ability of these mutants to mediate concerted DNA integration in an in vitro assay, and to form dimers by protein-protein cross-linking and size exclusion chromatography. The N197C mutation resulted in the inability of the mutant to perform concerted integration that was concomitant with a loss of IN dimerization. Surprisingly, mutations Q102G and A106V at the dimer interface resulted in mutants with higher efficiencies than the wild-type IN in performing two-ended concerted integration of viral DNA ends. The G139D and A195V mutants had a trend to perform one-ended DNA integration of viral ends instead of two-ended integration. More drastically, the I88L and L135G mutants preferentially mediated nonconcerted DNA integration although the proteins form dimers. Therefore, these mutations may alter the formation of IN complexes of higher molecular size than a dimer that would be required for concerted integration. This study points to the important role of core domain residues in the concerted integration of viral DNA ends as well as in the oligomerization of the enzyme

  15. Evolutionary Divergence in the Catalytic Activity of the CAM-1, ROR1 and ROR2 Kinase Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izrael-Tomasevic, Anita; Chalouni, Cécile; Pan, Borlan; Goldsmith, Joshua; Schoen, Alia P.; Quiñones, Gabriel A.; Kelly, Ryan; Lill, Jennie R.; Sandoval, Wendy; Costa, Mike; Polakis, Paul; Arnott, David; Rubinfeld, Bonnee; Ernst, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptors (ROR) 1 and 2 are atypical members of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) family and have been associated with several human diseases. The vertebrate RORs contain an ATP binding domain that deviates from the consensus amino acid sequence, although the impact of this deviation on catalytic activity is not known and the kinase function of these receptors remains controversial. Recently, ROR2 was shown to signal through a Wnt responsive, β-catenin independent pathway and suppress a canonical Wnt/β-catenin signal. In this work we demonstrate that both ROR1 and ROR2 kinase domains are catalytically deficient while CAM-1, the C. elegans homolog of ROR, has an active tyrosine kinase domain, suggesting a divergence in the signaling processes of the ROR family during evolution. In addition, we show that substitution of the non-consensus residues from ROR1 or ROR2 into CAM-1 and MuSK markedly reduce kinase activity, while restoration of the consensus residues in ROR does not restore robust kinase function. We further demonstrate that the membrane-bound extracellular domain alone of either ROR1 or ROR2 is sufficient for suppression of canonical Wnt3a signaling, and that this domain can also enhance Wnt5a suppression of Wnt3a signaling. Based on these data, we conclude that human ROR1 and ROR2 are RTK-like pseudokinases. PMID:25029443

  16. Evolutionary divergence in the catalytic activity of the CAM-1, ROR1 and ROR2 kinase domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis W Bainbridge

    Full Text Available Receptor tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptors (ROR 1 and 2 are atypical members of the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK family and have been associated with several human diseases. The vertebrate RORs contain an ATP binding domain that deviates from the consensus amino acid sequence, although the impact of this deviation on catalytic activity is not known and the kinase function of these receptors remains controversial. Recently, ROR2 was shown to signal through a Wnt responsive, β-catenin independent pathway and suppress a canonical Wnt/β-catenin signal. In this work we demonstrate that both ROR1 and ROR2 kinase domains are catalytically deficient while CAM-1, the C. elegans homolog of ROR, has an active tyrosine kinase domain, suggesting a divergence in the signaling processes of the ROR family during evolution. In addition, we show that substitution of the non-consensus residues from ROR1 or ROR2 into CAM-1 and MuSK markedly reduce kinase activity, while restoration of the consensus residues in ROR does not restore robust kinase function. We further demonstrate that the membrane-bound extracellular domain alone of either ROR1 or ROR2 is sufficient for suppression of canonical Wnt3a signaling, and that this domain can also enhance Wnt5a suppression of Wnt3a signaling. Based on these data, we conclude that human ROR1 and ROR2 are RTK-like pseudokinases.

  17. Cooperation between catalytic and DNA binding domains enhances thermostability and supports DNA synthesis at higher temperatures by thermostable DNA polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Andrey R; Pavlova, Nadejda V; Kozyavkin, Sergei A; Slesarev, Alexei I

    2012-03-13

    We have previously introduced a general kinetic approach for comparative study of processivity, thermostability, and resistance to inhibitors of DNA polymerases [Pavlov, A. R., et al. (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.99, 13510-13515]. The proposed method was successfully applied to characterize hybrid DNA polymerases created by fusing catalytic DNA polymerase domains with various sequence-nonspecific DNA binding domains. Here we use the developed kinetic analysis to assess basic parameters of DNA elongation by DNA polymerases and to further study the interdomain interactions in both previously constructed and new chimeric DNA polymerases. We show that connecting helix-hairpin-helix (HhH) domains to catalytic polymerase domains can increase thermostability, not only of DNA polymerases from extremely thermophilic species but also of the enzyme from a faculatative thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus. We also demonstrate that addition of Topo V HhH domains extends efficient DNA synthesis by chimerical polymerases up to 105 °C by maintaining processivity of DNA synthesis at high temperatures. We found that reversible high-temperature structural transitions in DNA polymerases decrease the rates of binding of these enzymes to the templates. Furthermore, activation energies and pre-exponential factors of the Arrhenius equation suggest that the mechanism of electrostatic enhancement of diffusion-controlled association plays a minor role in binding of templates to DNA polymerases.

  18. A smallest 6 kda metalloprotease, mini-matrilysin, in living world: a revolutionary conserved zinc-dependent proteolytic domain- helix-loop-helix catalytic zinc binding domain (ZBD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei-Hsuan; Huang, Po-Tsang; Lou, Kuo-Long; Yu, Shuan-Su C; Lin, Chen

    2012-05-29

    The Aim of this study is to study the minimum zinc dependent metalloprotease catalytic folding motif, helix B Met loop-helix C, with proteolytic catalytic activities in metzincin super family. The metzincin super family share a catalytic domain consisting of a twisted five-stranded β sheet and three long α helices (A, B and C). The catalytic zinc is at the bottom of the cleft and is ligated by three His residues in the consensus sequence motif, HEXXHXXGXXH, which is located in helix B and part of the adjacent Met turn region. An interesting question is - what is the minimum portion of the enzyme that still possesses catalytic and inhibitor recognition?" We have expressed a 60-residue truncated form of matrilysin which retains only the helix B-Met turn-helix C region and deletes helix A and the five-stranded β sheet which form the upper portion of the active cleft. This is only 1/4 of the full catalytic domain. The E. coli derived 6 kDa MMP-7 ZBD fragments were purified and refolded. The proteolytic activities were analyzed by Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay and CM-transferrin zymography analysis. SC44463, BB94 and Phosphoramidon were computationally docked into the 3 day structure of the human MMP7 ZBD and TAD and thermolysin using the docking program GOLD. This minimal 6 kDa matrilysin has been refolded and shown to have proteolytic activity in the Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay. Triton X-100 and heparin are important factors in the refolding environment for this mini-enzyme matrilysin. This minienzyme has the proteolytic activity towards peptide substrate, but the hexamer and octamer of the mini MMP-7 complex demonstrates the CM-transferrin proteolytic activities in zymographic analysis. Peptide digestion is inhibited by SC44463, specific MMP7 inhibitors, but not phosphorimadon. Interestingly, the mini MMP-7 can be processed by autolysis and producing ~ 6 ~ 7 kDa fragments. Thus, many of the functions of the enzyme are

  19. An unusual helix turn helix motif in the catalytic core of HIV-1 integrase binds viral DNA and LEDGF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayate Merad

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Integrase (IN of the type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 catalyzes the integration of viral DNA into host cellular DNA. We identified a bi-helix motif (residues 149-186 in the crystal structure of the catalytic core (CC of the IN-Phe185Lys variant that consists of the alpha(4 and alpha(5 helices connected by a 3 to 5-residue turn. The motif is embedded in a large array of interactions that stabilize the monomer and the dimer. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We describe the conformational and binding properties of the corresponding synthetic peptide. This displays features of the protein motif structure thanks to the mutual intramolecular interactions of the alpha(4 and alpha(5 helices that maintain the fold. The main properties are the binding to: 1- the processing-attachment site at the LTR (long terminal repeat ends of virus DNA with a K(d (dissociation constant in the sub-micromolar range; 2- the whole IN enzyme; and 3- the IN binding domain (IBD but not the IBD-Asp366Asn variant of LEDGF (lens epidermal derived growth factor lacking the essential Asp366 residue. In our motif, in contrast to the conventional HTH (helix-turn-helix, it is the N terminal helix (alpha(4 which has the role of DNA recognition helix, while the C terminal helix (alpha(5 would rather contribute to the motif stabilization by interactions with the alpha(4 helix. CONCLUSION: The motif, termed HTHi (i, for inverted emerges as a central piece of the IN structure and function. It could therefore represent an attractive target in the search for inhibitors working at the DNA-IN, IN-IN and IN-LEDGF interfaces.

  20. The phospholipase PNPLA7 functions as a lysophosphatidylcholine hydrolase and interacts with lipid droplets through its catalytic domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heier, Christoph; Kien, Benedikt; Huang, Feifei; Eichmann, Thomas O; Xie, Hao; Zechner, Rudolf; Chang, Ping-An

    2017-11-17

    Mammalian patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing proteins (PNPLAs) are lipid-metabolizing enzymes with essential roles in energy metabolism, skin barrier development, and brain function. A detailed annotation of enzymatic activities and structure-function relationships remains an important prerequisite to understand PNPLA functions in (patho-)physiology, for example, in disorders such as neutral lipid storage disease, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and neurodegenerative syndromes. In this study, we characterized the structural features controlling the subcellular localization and enzymatic activity of PNPLA7, a poorly annotated phospholipase linked to insulin signaling and energy metabolism. We show that PNPLA7 is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) transmembrane protein that specifically promotes hydrolysis of lysophosphatidylcholine in mammalian cells. We found that transmembrane and regulatory domains in the PNPLA7 N-terminal region cooperate to regulate ER targeting but are dispensable for substrate hydrolysis. Enzymatic activity is instead mediated by the C-terminal domain, which maintains full catalytic competence even in the absence of N-terminal regions. Upon elevated fatty acid flux, the catalytic domain targets cellular lipid droplets and promotes interactions of PNPLA7 with these organelles in response to increased cAMP levels. We conclude that PNPLA7 acts as an ER-anchored lysophosphatidylcholine hydrolase that is composed of specific functional domains mediating catalytic activity, subcellular positioning, and interactions with cellular organelles. Our study provides critical structural insights into an evolutionarily conserved class of phospholipid-metabolizing enzymes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Explicit identification and implicit recognition of facial emotions: II. Core domains and relationships with general cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathersul, Danielle; Palmer, Donna M; Gur, Ruben C; Gur, Raquel E; Cooper, Nick; Gordon, Evian; Williams, Leanne M

    2009-04-01

    Both general and social cognition are important in providing endophenotypic markers and predicting real-world functional outcomes of clinical psychiatric disorders. However, to date, focus has been on general cognition, rather than on core domains of social/emotional cognition. This study sought to determine core domains of emotion processing for both explicit identification and implicit recognition and their relationships with core domains of general cognition. Age effects and sex differences were also investigated. A sample of 1,000 healthy individuals (6 to 91 years, 53.5% female) undertook the WebNeuro tests of emotion identification and recognition and tests of general cognitive function. Factor analysis revealed seven core domains of emotion processing: speed of explicit emotion identification, speed of implicit emotion recognition, implicit emotion recognition accuracy, "threat" processing, sadness-disgust identification, "positive emotion" processing, and general "face perception." Seven corresponding core domains of general cognition were identified: information-processing speed, executive function, sustained attention/vigilance, verbal memory, working-memory capacity, inhibition/impulsivity, and sensorimotor function. Factors of emotion processing generally showed positive associations with those of general cognitive function, suggesting commonality in processing speed in particular. Moreover, age had a consistent nonlinear impact on both emotion processing and general cognitive factors, while sex differences were more specific. These findings contribute to a normative and standardized structure for assessment of emotional and general cognition in clinical groups.

  2. A smallest 6 kda metalloprotease, mini-matrilysin, in living world: a revolutionary conserved zinc-dependent proteolytic domain- helix-loop-helix catalytic zinc binding domain (ZBD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wei-Hsuan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Aim of this study is to study the minimum zinc dependent metalloprotease catalytic folding motif, helix B Met loop-helix C, with proteolytic catalytic activities in metzincin super family. The metzincin super family share a catalytic domain consisting of a twisted five-stranded β sheet and three long α helices (A, B and C. The catalytic zinc is at the bottom of the cleft and is ligated by three His residues in the consensus sequence motif, HEXXHXXGXXH, which is located in helix B and part of the adjacent Met turn region. An interesting question is - what is the minimum portion of the enzyme that still possesses catalytic and inhibitor recognition?” Methods We have expressed a 60-residue truncated form of matrilysin which retains only the helix B-Met turn-helix C region and deletes helix A and the five-stranded β sheet which form the upper portion of the active cleft. This is only 1/4 of the full catalytic domain. The E. coli derived 6 kDa MMP-7 ZBD fragments were purified and refolded. The proteolytic activities were analyzed by Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay and CM-transferrin zymography analysis. SC44463, BB94 and Phosphoramidon were computationally docked into the 3day structure of the human MMP7 ZBD and TAD and thermolysin using the docking program GOLD. Results This minimal 6 kDa matrilysin has been refolded and shown to have proteolytic activity in the Mca-Pro-Leu-Gly-Leu-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH2 peptide assay. Triton X-100 and heparin are important factors in the refolding environment for this mini-enzyme matrilysin. This minienzyme has the proteolytic activity towards peptide substrate, but the hexamer and octamer of the mini MMP-7 complex demonstrates the CM-transferrin proteolytic activities in zymographic analysis. Peptide digestion is inhibited by SC44463, specific MMP7 inhibitors, but not phosphorimadon. Interestingly, the mini MMP-7 can be processed by autolysis and producing ~ 6

  3. Identifying a core set of outcome domains to measure in clinical trials for shoulder disorders: a modified Delphi study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Matthew J; Huang, Hsiaomin; Verhagen, Arianne P; Buchbinder, Rachelle; Gagnier, Joel J

    2016-01-01

    To achieve consensus on the most important outcome domains to measure across all clinical trials for shoulder disorders. We performed an online modified Delphi study with an international, multidisciplinary and multistakeholder panel. A literature review and the OMERACT Filter 2.0 framework was used to generate a list of potential core domains, which were presented to patients, clinicians and researchers in two Delphi rounds. Participants were asked to judge the importance of each potential core domain and provide a rationale for their response. A core domain was defined a priori as a domain that at least 67% of participants considered core. In both rounds, 335 individuals were invited to participate (268 clinicians/researchers and 67 patients); response rates were 27% (n=91) and 29% (n=96), respectively. From a list of 41 potential core domains, four domains met our criteria for inclusion: 'pain', 'physical functioning', 'global assessment of treatment success' and 'health-related quality of life'. Two additional domains, 'sleep functioning' and 'psychological functioning', met the criteria for inclusion by some, but not all stakeholder groups. There was consensus that 'number of deaths' was not a core domain, but insufficient agreement on whether or not several other domains, including 'range of motion' and 'muscle strength', were core domains. Based on international consensus from patients, clinicians and researchers, 'pain', 'physical functioning', 'global assessment of treatment success' and 'health-related quality of life' were considered core outcome domains for shoulder disorder trials. The value of several other domains needs further consideration.

  4. Core Domains for Clinical Research in Acute Respiratory Failure Survivors: An International Modified Delphi Consensus Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Alison E; Sepulveda, Kristin A; Dinglas, Victor D; Chessare, Caroline M; Bingham, Clifton O; Needham, Dale M

    2017-06-01

    To identify the "core domains" (i.e., patient outcomes, health-related conditions, or aspects of health) that relevant stakeholders agree are essential to assess in all clinical research studies evaluating the outcomes of acute respiratory failure survivors after hospital discharge. A two-round consensus process, using a modified Delphi methodology, with participants from 16 countries, including patient and caregiver representatives. Prior to voting, participants were asked to review 1) results from surveys of clinical researchers, acute respiratory failure survivors, and caregivers that rated the importance of 19 preliminary outcome domains and 2) results from a qualitative study of acute respiratory failure survivors' outcomes after hospital discharge, as related to the 19 preliminary outcome domains. Participants also were asked to suggest any additional potential domains for evaluation in the first Delphi survey. Web-based surveys of participants representing four stakeholder groups relevant to clinical research evaluating postdischarge outcomes of acute respiratory failure survivors: clinical researchers, clinicians, patients and caregivers, and U.S. federal research funding organizations. None. None. Survey response rates were 97% and 99% in round 1 and round 2, respectively. There were seven domains that met the a priori consensus criteria to be designated as core domains: physical function, cognition, mental health, survival, pulmonary function, pain, and muscle and/or nerve function. This study generated a consensus-based list of core domains that should be assessed in all clinical research studies evaluating acute respiratory failure survivors after hospital discharge. Identifying appropriate measurement instruments to assess these core domains is an important next step toward developing a set of core outcome measures for this field of research.

  5. Aqueous phase synthesis of Au-Ag core-shell nanocrystals with tunable shapes and their optical and catalytic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Yu-Chi; Rej, Sourav; Chiu, Chun-Ya; Huang, Michael H

    2014-01-08

    In this study, rhombic dodecahedral gold nanocrystals were used as cores for the generation of Au-Ag core-shell nanocrystals with cubic, truncated cubic, cuboctahedral, truncated octahedral, and octahedral structures. Gold nanocrystals were added to an aqueous mixture of cetyltrimethylammonium chloride (CTAC) surfactant, AgNO3, ascorbic acid, and NaOH to form the core-shell nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are highly uniform in size and shape, and can readily self-assemble into ordered packing structures on substrates. Results from observation of solution color changes and variation in the reaction temperature suggest octahedra are produced at a higher growth rate, while slower growth favors cube formation. The major localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) band positions for these nanocrystals are red-shifted compared to those for pristine silver particles with similar dimensions due to the LSPR effect from the gold cores. By increasing the concentrations of reagents, Au-Ag core-shell cubes and octahedra with tunable sizes were obtained. Au-Ag cubes with body diagonals of 130, 144, and 161 nm and octahedra with body diagonals of 113, 126, and 143 nm have been prepared, allowing the investigation of size effect on their optical properties. Au-Ag octahedra with thinner Ag shells (12-16.5 nm) exhibit a blue-shifted major LSPR band relative to the LSPR band at 538 nm for the gold cores. For Au-Ag octahedra and cubes with thicker shells (22.5-37 nm), the major LSPR band is progressively red-shifted from that of the gold cores with increasing shell thickness and particle size. The Au-Ag octahedra show higher catalytic activity than cubes toward reduction of 2-amino-5-nitrophenol by NaBH4 at 30 °C, but both particle shapes display significantly enhanced catalytic efficiency at 40 °C.

  6. A Preliminary Core Domain Set for Clinical Trials of Shoulder Disorders: A Report from the OMERACT 2016 Shoulder Core Outcome Set Special Interest Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchbinder, Rachelle; Page, Matthew J; Huang, Hsiaomin; Verhagen, Arianne P; Beaton, Dorcas; Kopkow, Christian; Lenza, Mario; Jain, Nitin B; Richards, Bethan; Richards, Pamela; Voshaar, Marieke; van der Windt, Danielle; Gagnier, Joel J

    2017-12-01

    The Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Shoulder Core Outcome Set Special Interest Group (SIG) was established to develop a core outcome set (COS) for clinical trials of shoulder disorders. In preparation for OMERACT 2016, we systematically examined all outcome domains and measurement instruments reported in 409 randomized trials of interventions for shoulder disorders published between 1954 and 2015. Informed by these data, we conducted an international Delphi consensus study including shoulder trial experts, clinicians, and patients to identify key domains that should be included in a shoulder disorder COS. Findings were discussed at a stakeholder premeeting of OMERACT. At OMERACT 2016, we sought consensus on a preliminary core domain set and input into next steps. There were 13 and 15 participants at the premeeting and the OMERACT 2016 SIG meeting, respectively (9 attended both meetings). Consensus was reached on a preliminary core domain set consisting of an inner core of 4 domains: pain, physical function/activity, global perceived effect, and adverse events including death. A middle core consisted of 3 domains: emotional well-being, sleep, and participation (recreation and work). An outer core of research required to inform the final COS was also formulated. Our next steps are to (1) analyze whether participation (recreation and work) should be in the inner core, (2) conduct a third Delphi round to finalize definitions and wording of domains and reach final endorsement for the domains, and (3) determine which instruments fulfill the OMERACT criteria for measuring each domain.

  7. Feasibility and Domain Validation of Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) Flare Core Domain Set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartlett, Susan J; Bykerk, Vivian P; Cooksey, Roxanne

    2015-01-01

    , and stiffness scores averaged ≥ 2 times higher (2 of 11 points) in flaring individuals. Correlations between flare domains and corresponding legacy instruments were obtained: r = 0.46 to 0.93. A combined definition (patient report of flare and 28-joint Disease Activity Score increase) was evaluated in 2 other...... provided input for stiffness, self-management, contextual factors, and measurement considerations. RESULTS: Flare data from 501 patients in an observational study indicated 39% were in flare, with mean (SD) severity of 6.0 (2.6) and 55% lasting > 14 days. Pain, physical function, fatigue, participation...

  8. Harmonic Domain Modelling of Transformer Core Nonlinearities Using the DIgSILENT PowerFactory Software

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Claus Leth; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte; Wiechowski, Wojciech

    2008-01-01

    the DIgSILENT Programming Language (DPL) as an external script in the harmonic domain calculations of a power system analysis tool PowerFactory [10]. The algorithm is verified by harmonic measurements on a single-phase power transformer. A theoretical analysis of the core nonlinearities phenomena...

  9. Full-length RNA structure prediction of the HIV-1 genome reveals a conserved core domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe Sloth; Seemann, Ernst Stefan

    2015-01-01

    of the HIV-1 genome is highly variable in most regions, with a limited number of stable and conserved RNA secondary structures. Most interesting, a set of long distance interactions form a core organizing structure (COS) that organize the genome into three major structural domains. Despite overlapping...

  10. The redefinition of Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide O-antigen and core-oligosaccharide domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debowski, Aleksandra W.; Nilsson, Hans-Olof; Fulurija, Alma; Dell, Anne; Stubbs, Keith A.; Marshall, Barry J.

    2017-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori lipopolysaccharide promotes chronic gastric colonisation through O-antigen host mimicry and resistance to mucosal antimicrobial peptides mediated primarily by modifications of the lipid A. The structural organisation of the core and O-antigen domains of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide remains unclear, as the O-antigen attachment site has still to be identified experimentally. Here, structural investigations of lipopolysaccharides purified from two wild-type strains and the O-antigen ligase mutant revealed that the H. pylori core-oligosaccharide domain is a short conserved hexasaccharide (Glc-Gal-DD-Hep-LD-Hep-LD-Hep-KDO) decorated with the O-antigen domain encompassing a conserved trisaccharide (-DD-Hep-Fuc-GlcNAc-) and variable glucan, heptan and Lewis antigens. Furthermore, the putative heptosyltransferase HP1284 was found to be required for the transfer of the third heptose residue to the core-oligosaccharide. Interestingly, mutation of HP1284 did not affect the ligation of the O-antigen and resulted in the attachment of the O-antigen onto an incomplete core-oligosaccharide missing the third heptose and the adjoining Glc-Gal residues. Mutants deficient in either HP1284 or O-antigen ligase displayed a moderate increase in susceptibility to polymyxin B but were unable to colonise the mouse gastric mucosa. Finally, mapping mutagenesis and colonisation data of previous studies onto the redefined organisation of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide revealed that only the conserved motifs were essential for colonisation. In conclusion, H. pylori lipopolysaccharide is missing the canonical inner and outer core organisation. Instead it displays a short core and a longer O-antigen encompassing residues previously assigned as the outer core domain. The redefinition of H. pylori lipopolysaccharide domains warrants future studies to dissect the role of each domain in host-pathogen interactions. Also enzymes involved in the assembly of the conserved core structure

  11. Crystal Structure of the Protease-Resistant Core Domain of Yersinia Pestis Virulence Factor Yopr

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schubot,F.; Cherry, S.; Austin, B.; Tropea, J.; Waugh, D.

    2005-01-01

    Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of the plague, employs a type III secretion system (T3SS) to secrete and translocate virulence factors into the cytoplasm of mammalian host cells. One of the secreted virulence factors is YopR. Little is known about the function of YopR other than that it is secreted into the extracellular milieu during the early stages of infection and that it contributes to virulence. Hoping to gain some insight into the function of YopR, we determined the crystal structure of its protease-resistant core domain, which consists of residues 38--149 out of 165 amino acids. The core domain is composed of five {alpha}-helices that display unexpected structural similarity with one domain of YopN, a central regulator of type III secretion in Y. pestis. This finding raises the possibility that YopR may play a role in the regulation of type III secretion.

  12. The core domain as the force sensor of the yeast mechanosensitive TRP channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhenwei; Anishkin, Andriy; Kung, Ching; Saimi, Yoshiro

    2011-12-01

    Stretch-activated conductances are commonly encountered in careful electric recordings. Those of known proteins (TRP, MscL, MscS, K(2p), Kv, etc.) all share a core, which houses the ion pathway and the gate, but no recognizable force-sensing domain. Like animal TRPs, the yeast TRPY1 is polymodal, activated by stretch force, Ca(2+), etc. To test whether its S5-S6 core senses the stretch force, we tried to uncouple it from the peripheral domains by strategic peptide insertions to block the covalent core-periphery interactions. Insertion of long unstructured peptides should distort, if not disrupt, protein structures that transmit force. Such insertions between S6 and the C-terminal tail largely removed Ca(2+) activation, showing their effectiveness. However, such insertions as well as those between S5 and the N-terminal region, which includes S1-S4, did not significantly alter mechanosensitivity. Even insertions at both locations flanking the S5-S6 core did not much alter mechanosensitivity. Tryptophan scanning mutations in S5 were also constructed to perturb possible noncovalent core-periphery contacts. The testable tryptophan mutations also have little or no effects on mechanosensitivity. Boltzmann fits of the wild-type force-response curves agree with a structural homology model for a stretch-induced core expansion of ~2 nm(2) upon opening. We hypothesize that membrane tension pulls on S5-S6, expanding the core and opening the TRPY1 gate. The core being the major force sensor offers the simplest, though not the only, explanation of why so many channels of disparate designs are mechanically sensitive. Compared with the bacterial MscL, TRPY1 is much less sensitive to force, befitting a polymodal channel that relies on multiple stimuli.

  13. Dynamic coupling between the LID and NMP domain motions in the catalytic conversion of ATP and AMP to ADP by adenylate kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Biman; Adkar, Bharat V; Biswas, Rajib; Bagchi, Biman

    2011-01-21

    The catalytic conversion of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) by adenylate kinase (ADK) involves large amplitude, ligand induced domain motions, involving the opening and the closing of ATP binding domain (LID) and AMP binding domain (NMP) domains, during the repeated catalytic cycle. We discover and analyze an interesting dynamical coupling between the motion of the two domains during the opening, using large scale atomistic molecular dynamics trajectory analysis, covariance analysis, and multidimensional free energy calculations with explicit water. Initially, the LID domain must open by a certain amount before the NMP domain can begin to open. Dynamical correlation map shows interesting cross-peak between LID and NMP domain which suggests the presence of correlated motion between them. This is also reflected in our calculated two-dimensional free energy surface contour diagram which has an interesting elliptic shape, revealing a strong correlation between the opening of the LID domain and that of the NMP domain. Our free energy surface of the LID domain motion is rugged due to interaction with water and the signature of ruggedness is evident in the observed root mean square deviation variation and its fluctuation time correlation functions. We develop a correlated dynamical disorder-type theoretical model to explain the observed dynamic coupling between the motion of the two domains in ADK. Our model correctly reproduces several features of the cross-correlation observed in simulations.

  14. Solubility of the catalytic domains of Botulinum neurotoxin serotype E subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng; Barbieri, Joseph T

    2016-02-01

    The Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most potent protein toxins known to humans. There are seven serotypes of the BoNTs (A-G), among which serotypes A, B, E and F are known to cause natural human intoxication. To date, eleven subtypes of LC/E, termed E1∼E11, have been identified. The LCs of BoNT/E were insoluble, prohibiting studies towards understanding the mechanisms of toxin action and substrate recognition. In this work, the molecular basis of insolubility of the recombinant LCs of two representative subtypes of BoNT/E, E1(Beluga) and E3 (Alaska), was determined. Hydrophobicity profile and structural modeling predicted a C-terminal candidate region responsible for the insolubility of LC/Es. Deletion of C-terminal 19 residues of LC/E(1-400) resulted in enhanced solubility, from 2 to ∼50% for LC/EAlaska and from 16 to ∼95% for LC/EBeluga. In addition, resides 230-236 were found to contribute to a different solubility level of LC/EAlaska when compared to LC/EBeluga. Substituting residues (230)TCI(232) in LC/EAlaska to the corresponding residues of (230)KYT(232) in LC/EBeluga enhanced the solubility of LC/EAlaska to a level approaching that of LC/EBeluga. Among these LC/Es and their derivatives, LC/EBeluga 1-400 was the most soluble and stable protein. Each LC/E derivative possessed similar catalytic activity, suggesting that the C-terminal region of LC/Es contributed to protein solubility, but not catalytic activity. In conclusion, this study generated a soluble and stable recombinant LC/E and provided insight into the structural components that govern the solubility and stability of the LCs of other BoNT serotypes and Tetanus toxin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. A simple two step procedure for purification of the catalytic domain of chicken tryptophan hydroxylase 1 in a form suitable for crystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windahl, Michael Skovbo; Petersen, Charlotte R.; Munch, Astrid

    2008-01-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) [EC 1.14.16.4] catalyzes the conversion of tryptophan to 5-hydroxytryptophan, which is the first and rate-determining step in the biosynthesis of the neurotransmitter serotonin. We have expressed the catalytic domain of chicken (Gallus gallus) TPH isoform 1 in Escheri......Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) [EC 1.14.16.4] catalyzes the conversion of tryptophan to 5-hydroxytryptophan, which is the first and rate-determining step in the biosynthesis of the neurotransmitter serotonin. We have expressed the catalytic domain of chicken (Gallus gallus) TPH isoform 1...

  16. Crystal Structure of 12-Lipoxygenase Catalytic-Domain-Inhibitor Complex Identifies a Substrate-Binding Channel for Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Shu; Mueser, Timothy C.; Marnett, Lawrence J.; Funk, Jr., Max O. (Toledo); (Vanderbilt)

    2014-10-02

    Lipoxygenases are critical enzymes in the biosynthesis of families of bioactive lipids including compounds with important roles in the initiation and resolution of inflammation and in associated diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Crystals diffracting to high resolution (1.9 {angstrom}) were obtained for a complex between the catalytic domain of leukocyte 12-lipoxygenase and the isoform-specific inhibitor, 4-(2-oxapentadeca-4-yne)phenylpropanoic acid (OPP). In the three-dimensional structure of the complex, the inhibitor occupied a new U-shaped channel open at one end to the surface of the protein and extending past the redox-active iron site that is essential for catalysis. In models, the channel accommodated arachidonic acid, defining the binding site for the substrate of the catalyzed reaction. There was a void adjacent to the OPP binding site connecting to the surface of the enzyme and providing a plausible access channel for the other substrate, oxygen.

  17. THE CATALYTIC DOMAIN OF A BACTERIAL LYTIC TRANSGLYCOSYLASE DEFINES A NOVEL CLASS OF LYSOZYMES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thunnissen, Andy-Mark W.H.; Isaacs, Neil W.; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    The 70-kDa soluble lytic transglycosylase (SLT70) from Escherichia coli is a bacterial exo-muramidase that cleaves the cell wall peptidoglycan, producing 1,6-anhydro-muropeptides. The X-ray structure of SLT70 showed that one of its domains is structurally related to lysozyme, although there is no

  18. Lateral etching of core-shell Au@Metal nanorods to metal-tipped au nanorods with improved catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xia; Zhang, Qiao; Sun, Yanghui; Zhao, Qing; Yang, Jian

    2012-02-28

    Selective growth/etching of hybrid materials is very important for the rational synthesis of hierarchical structures and precise modulation of their physical properties. Here, the lateral etching of the core-shell Au@Ag nanorods is achieved by FeCl(3) at room temperature, producing a number of dumbbell-like Ag-tipped Au nanorods. This selective etching at the side of the core-shell nanorods is attributed to the increased reactivity of the side facets, due to less surface passivation of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide. The similar synthetic strategy has also been demonstrated to be successful for the Pd-tipped Au nanorods that have not been reported before, indicating the great potential of this selective etching. The Ag-tipped Au nanorods are examined as a catalyst for the reduction of p-nitrophenol at room temperature. The Ag-tipped Au nanorods exhibit a higher catalytic activity than Au nanorods and core-shell Au@Ag nanorods, which could be attributed to the electronic effect and the unique structure in the Ag-tipped Au nanorods.

  19. Academic family health teams: Part 1: patient perceptions of core primary care domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, June C; Talbot, Yves; Permaul, Joanne; Tobin, Anastasia; Moineddin, Rahim; Blaine, Sean; Bloom, Jeff; Butt, Debra; Kay, Kelly; Telner, Deanna

    2016-01-01

    To explore patients' perceptions of primary care (PC) in the early development of academic family health teams (aFHTs)--interprofessional PC teams delivering care where family medicine and other health professional learners are trained--focusing on the 4 core domains of PC. Self-administered survey using the Primary Care Assessment Tool Adult Expanded Version (PCAT), which addresses 4 core domains of PC (first contact, continuity, comprehensiveness, and coordination). The PCAT uses a 4-point Likert scale (from definitely not to definitely) to capture patients' responses about the occurrence of components of care. Six aFHTs in Ontario. Adult patients attending appointments and administrators at each of the aFHTs. Mean PCAT domain scores, with a score of 3 chosen as the minimum expected level of care. Multivariate log binomial regression models were used to estimate the adjusted relative risks of PCAT score levels as functions of patient- and clinic-level characteristics. The response rate was 47.3% (1026 of 2167). The mean age of respondents was 49.6 years, and most respondents were female (71.6%). The overall PC score (2.92) was just below the minimum expected care level. Scores for first contact (2.28 [accessibility]), coordination of information systems (2.67), and comprehensiveness of care (2.83 [service available] and 2.36 [service provided]) were below the minimum. Findings suggest some patient groups might not be optimally served by aFHTs, particularly recent immigrants. Characteristics of aFHTs, including a large number of physicians, were not associated with high performance on PC domains. Distributed practices across multiple sites were negatively associated with high performance for some domains. The presence of electronic medical records was not associated with improved performance on coordination of information systems. Patients of these aFHTs rated several core domains of PC highly, but results indicate room for improvement in several domains

  20. Isolation of a hexanuclear chromium cluster with a tetrahedral hydridic core and its catalytic behavior for ethylene oligomerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alzamly, Ahmed; Gambarotta, Sandro; Korobkov, Ilia; Murugesu, Muralee; Le Roy, Jennifer J H; Budzelaar, Peter H M

    2014-06-16

    A chromium complex [2-(NHCH2PPh2)C5H4N]CrCl3·THF2 (1) of the ligand PyNHCH2PPh2 has been synthesized, characterized, and examined for its catalytic behavior toward ethylene oligomerization. When complex 1 was treated with (i-Bu)3Al, an unprecedented divalent polyhydride chromium cluster μ,κ(1),κ(2),κ(3)-N,N,P-{[2-(NCH2PPh2)C5H4N]Cr(μ-H)}4[(μ-Cl)Cr(μ-Cl)Al(i-Bu)2Cl]2 (2) was obtained. The complex contains a Cr4H4 core, which is expected to be diamagnetic, and which remains coordinated to two additional divalent high-spin Cr atoms via bridging interactions. Two aluminate residues remain bonded to the peripheral chromium atoms. The structure, magnetism, and electronic configuration are herein discussed.

  1. Catalytic and functional roles of conserved amino acids in the SET domain of the S. cerevisiae lysine methyltransferase Set1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Williamson

    Full Text Available In S. cerevisiae, the lysine methyltransferase Set1 is a member of the multiprotein complex COMPASS. Set1 catalyzes mono-, di- and trimethylation of the fourth residue, lysine 4, of histone H3 using methyl groups from S-adenosylmethionine, and requires a subset of COMPASS proteins for this activity. The methylation activity of COMPASS regulates gene expression and chromosome segregation in vivo. To improve understanding of the catalytic mechanism of Set1, single amino acid substitutions were made within the SET domain. These Set1 mutants were evaluated in vivo by determining the levels of K4-methylated H3, assaying the strength of gene silencing at the rDNA and using a genetic assessment of kinetochore function as a proxy for defects in Dam1 methylation. The findings indicate that no single conserved active site base is required for H3K4 methylation by Set1. Instead, our data suggest that a number of aromatic residues in the SET domain contribute to the formation of an active site that facilitates substrate binding and dictates product specificity. Further, the results suggest that the attributes of Set1 required for trimethylation of histone H3 are those required for Pol II gene silencing at the rDNA and kinetochore function.

  2. The crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the Ser/Thr kinase PknA from M. tuberculosis shows an Src-like autoinhibited conformation

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner , Tristan; Alexandre , Matthieu; Duran , Rosario; Barilone , Nathalie; Wehenkel , Annemarie; Alzari , Pedro M.; Bellinzoni , Marco

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Signal transduction mediated by Ser/Thr phosphorylation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis has been intensively studied in the last years, as its genome harbors eleven genes coding for eukaryotic-like Ser/Thr kinases. Here we describe the crystal structure and the autophosphorylation sites of the catalytic domain of PknA, one of two protein kinases essential for pathogen’s survival. The structure of the ligand-free kinase domain shows an auto-inhibited conformation similar ...

  3. Mechanism of Diphtheria Toxin Catalytic Domain Delivery to the Eukaryotic Cell Cytosol and the Cellular Factors that Directly Participate in the Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Research on diphtheria and anthrax toxins over the past three decades has culminated in a detailed understanding of their structure function relationships (e.g., catalytic (C), transmembrane (T), and receptor binding (R) domains), as well as the identification of their eukaryotic cell surface receptor, an understanding of the molecular events leading to the receptor-mediated internalization of the toxin into an endosomal compartment, and the pH triggered conformational changes required for pore formation in the vesicle membrane. Recently, a major research effort has been focused on the development of a detailed understanding of the molecular interactions between each of these toxins and eukaryotic cell factors that play an essential role in the efficient translocation of their respective catalytic domains through the trans-endosomal vesicle membrane pore and delivery into the cell cytosol. In this review, I shall focus on recent findings that have led to a more detailed understanding of the mechanism by which the diphtheria toxin catalytic domain is delivered to the eukaryotic cell cytosol. While much work remains, it is becoming increasingly clear that the entry process is facilitated by specific interactions with a number of cellular factors in an ordered sequential fashion. In addition, since diphtheria, anthrax lethal factor and anthrax edema factor all carry multiple coatomer I complex binding motifs and COPI complex has been shown to play an essential role in entry process, it is likely that the initial steps in catalytic domain entry of these divergent toxins follow a common mechanism. PMID:22069710

  4. Atomic interaction networks in the core of protein domains and their native folds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundararajan, Venkataramanan; Raman, Rahul; Raguram, S; Sasisekharan, V; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2010-02-23

    Vastly divergent sequences populate a majority of protein folds. In the quest to identify features that are conserved within protein domains belonging to the same fold, we set out to examine the entire protein universe on a fold-by-fold basis. We report that the atomic interaction network in the solvent-unexposed core of protein domains are fold-conserved, extraordinary sequence divergence notwithstanding. Further, we find that this feature, termed protein core atomic interaction network (or PCAIN) is significantly distinguishable across different folds, thus appearing to be "signature" of a domain's native fold. As part of this study, we computed the PCAINs for 8698 representative protein domains from families across the 1018 known protein folds to construct our seed database and an automated framework was developed for PCAIN-based characterization of the protein fold universe. A test set of randomly selected domains that are not in the seed database was classified with over 97% accuracy, independent of sequence divergence. As an application of this novel fold signature, a PCAIN-based scoring scheme was developed for comparative (homology-based) structure prediction, with 1-2 angstroms (mean 1.61A) C(alpha) RMSD generally observed between computed structures and reference crystal structures. Our results are consistent across the full spectrum of test domains including those from recent CASP experiments and most notably in the 'twilight' and 'midnight' zones wherein <30% and <10% target-template sequence identity prevails (mean twilight RMSD of 1.69A). We further demonstrate the utility of the PCAIN protocol to derive biological insight into protein structure-function relationships, by modeling the structure of the YopM effector novel E3 ligase (NEL) domain from plague-causative bacterium Yersinia Pestis and discussing its implications for host adaptive and innate immune modulation by the pathogen. Considering the several high-throughput, sequence

  5. Crystal structures of wild-type Trichoderma reesei Cel7A catalytic domain in open and closed states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodenheimer, Annette M. [Molecular and Structural Biochemistry Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh NC USA; Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN USA; Meilleur, Flora [Molecular and Structural Biochemistry Department, North Carolina State University, Raleigh NC USA; Neutron Sciences Directorate, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN USA

    2016-11-07

    Trichoderma reesei Cel7A efficiently hydrolyses cellulose. We report here the crystallographic structures of the wild-type TrCel7A catalytic domain (CD) in an open state and, for the first time, in a closed state. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations indicate that the loops along the CD tunnel move in concerted motions. Together, the crystallographic and MD data suggest that the CD cycles between the tense and relaxed forms that are characteristic of work producing enzymes. Analysis of the interactions formed by R251 provides a structural rationale for the concurrent decrease in product inhibition and catalytic efficiency measured for product-binding site mutants.

  6. Full-length RNA structure prediction of the HIV-1 genome reveals a conserved core domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sükösd, Zsuzsanna; Andersen, Ebbe S; Seemann, Stefan E; Jensen, Mads Krogh; Hansen, Mathias; Gorodkin, Jan; Kjems, Jørgen

    2015-12-02

    A distance constrained secondary structural model of the ≈10 kb RNA genome of the HIV-1 has been predicted but higher-order structures, involving long distance interactions, are currently unknown. We present the first global RNA secondary structure model for the HIV-1 genome, which integrates both comparative structure analysis and information from experimental data in a full-length prediction without distance constraints. Besides recovering known structural elements, we predict several novel structural elements that are conserved in HIV-1 evolution. Our results also indicate that the structure of the HIV-1 genome is highly variable in most regions, with a limited number of stable and conserved RNA secondary structures. Most interesting, a set of long distance interactions form a core organizing structure (COS) that organize the genome into three major structural domains. Despite overlapping protein-coding regions the COS is supported by a particular high frequency of compensatory base changes, suggesting functional importance for this element. This new structural element potentially organizes the whole genome into three major domains protruding from a conserved core structure with potential roles in replication and evolution for the virus. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  7. Ethics in Knowledge Organization: Two Conferences Point to a New Core in the Domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P. Smiraglia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1518-2924.2015v20nesp1p1 Two conferences called "Ethics in Information Organization (EIO," held in 2009 and 2013, brought together practitioners and scholars in knowledge organization (KO to discuss ethical decision-making for the organization of knowledge. Traditionally the notion of ethics as a component of knowledge organization has occupied a sort of background position. Concepts of cultural warrant clash with concepts of literary warrant to produce harmful knowledge organization systems. Here tools of domain analytical visualization are applied to the two EIO conferences to demonstrate the potential intension of ethics for KO. Co-word analysis helps to visualize the thematic core in the most frequently used terms: user, ethical, knowledge, national, description, and access. There clearly is a meta-level trajectory incorporating ethics and the user, while the intension includes all applied approaches to KO as well as strong recognition of national, regional, and social cultural identities. Another approach to domain analysis is to examine the social semantics (by analyzing the public record of discourse through citation patterns. Author co-citation analysis shows work anchored in the basic theoretical premises of KO, but also bringing ideas from outside the domain to bear on the problems of objective violence. A network visualization shows how the work on ethics in KO is based on the core principles of KO, but relies also on evidence from librarianship and philosophical guidance to bring forward the issues surrounding objective violence in KOS. The authors contributing to this small pair of conferences have laid out a pathway for expanding understanding of the role of ethics in KO.

  8. Toward the Development of a Core Set of Outcome Domains to Assess Shared Decision-making Interventions in Rheumatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toupin-April, Karine; Barton, Jennifer; Fraenkel, Liana

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Working Group was to determine the core set of outcome domains and subdomains for measuring the effectiveness of shared decision-making (SDM) interventions in rheumatology clinical trials. METHODS: Following the OMERACT Filter 2.......0, and based on a previous literature review of SDM outcome domains and a nominal group process at OMERACT 2014, (1) an online Delphi survey was conducted to gather feedback on the draft core set and refine its domains and subdomains, and (2) a workshop was held at the OMERACT 2016 meeting to gain consensus...... the limited understanding of SDM and its outcomes among OMERACT participants....

  9. Chemical shift assignments for the apo-form of the catalytic domain, the linker region, and the carbohydrate-binding domain of the cellulose-active lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase ScLPMO10C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtade, Gaston; Forsberg, Zarah; Vaaje-Kolstad, Gustav; Eijsink, Vincent G H; Aachmann, Finn L

    2017-10-01

    The apo-form of the 21.4 kDa catalytic domain and the 10.7 kDa carbohydrate binding domain of the AA10 family lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase ScLPMO10C from Streptomyces coelicolor have been isotopically labeled and recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli. In this paper, we report the 1 H, 13 C, and 15 N chemical shift assignments of each individual domain as well as an ensemble of the assignment for the full-length protein, including its approximately 30-amino acid long linker.

  10. Solution NMR structure of the NlpC/P60 domain of lipoprotein Spr from Escherichia coli: structural evidence for a novel cysteine peptidase catalytic triad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramini, James M; Rossi, Paolo; Huang, Yuanpeng J; Zhao, Li; Jiang, Mei; Maglaqui, Melissa; Xiao, Rong; Locke, Jessica; Nair, Rajesh; Rost, Burkhard; Acton, Thomas B; Inouye, Masayori; Montelione, Gaetano T

    2008-09-16

    Escherichia coli Spr is a membrane-anchored cell wall hydrolase. The solution NMR structure of the C-terminal NlpC/P60 domain of E. coli Spr described here reveals that the protein adopts a papain-like alpha+beta fold and identifies a substrate-binding cleft featuring several highly conserved residues. The active site features a novel Cys-His-His catalytic triad that appears to be a unique structural signature of this cysteine peptidase family. Moreover, the relative orientation of these catalytic residues is similar to that observed in the analogous Ser-His-His triad, a variant of the classic Ser-His-Asp charge relay system, suggesting the convergent evolution of a catalytic mechanism in quite distinct peptidase families.

  11. Highly catalytic hollow palladium nanoparticles derived from silver@silver-palladium core-shell nanostructures for the oxidation of formic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Cui, Penglei; He, Hongyan; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2014-12-01

    Hollow Palladium (hPd) nanoparticles (NPs) are prepared via a simple and mild successive method. Firstly, core-shell NPs with silver (Ag) cores and silver-palladium (Ag-Pd) alloy shells are synthesized in aqueous phase by galvanic replacement reaction (GRR) between Ag NPs and Pd2+ ion precursors. Saturated aqueous sodium chloride (NaCl) solution was then employed to remove the Ag component from the core and shell regions of core-shell Ag@Ag-Pd NPs, resulting in the formation of hPd NPs with shrunk sizes in comparison with their core-shell parents. Specifically, the hPd NPs exhibit superior catalytic activity and durability for catalyzing the oxidation of formic acid, compared with the Pd NPs reduced by NaBH4 in aqueous solution and commercial Pd/C catalyst from Johnson Matthey, mainly due to the large electrochemically active surface areas of the hollow particles. In addition, The Ag component in core-shell Ag@Ag-Pd NPs has an unfavorable influence on catalytic activity of NPs for formic acid oxidation. However, the durability could be improved due to the electron donating effect from Ag to Pd atoms in the core-shell NPs.

  12. Non-catalytic site HIV-1 integrase inhibitors disrupt core maturation and induce a reverse transcription block in target cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Mini; Yant, Stephen R; Tsai, Luong; O'Sullivan, Christopher; Bam, Rujuta A; Tsai, Angela; Niedziela-Majka, Anita; Stray, Kirsten M; Sakowicz, Roman; Cihlar, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    HIV-1 integrase (IN) is the target for two classes of antiretrovirals: i) the integrase strand-transfer inhibitors (INSTIs) and ii) the non-catalytic site integrase inhibitors (NCINIs). NCINIs bind at the IN dimer interface and are thought to interfere primarily with viral DNA (vDNA) integration in the target cell by blocking IN-vDNA assembly as well as the IN-LEDGF/p75 interaction. Herein we show that treatment of virus-producing cells, but not of mature virions or target cells, drives NCINI antiviral potency. NCINIs target an essential late-stage event in HIV replication that is insensitive to LEDGF levels in the producer cells. Virus particles produced in the presence of NCINIs displayed normal Gag-Pol processing and endogenous reverse transcriptase activity, but were defective at initiating vDNA synthesis following entry into the target cell. NCINI-resistant virus carrying a T174I mutation in the IN dimer interface was less sensitive to the compound-induced late-stage effects, including the reverse transcription block. Wild-type, but not T174I virus, produced in the presence of NCINIs exhibited striking defects in core morphology and an increased level of IN oligomers that was not observed upon treatment of mature cell-free particles. Collectively, these results reveal that NCINIs act through a novel mechanism that is unrelated to the previously observed inhibition of IN activity or IN-LEDGF interaction, and instead involves the disruption of an IN function during HIV-1 core maturation and assembly.

  13. Systematic domain swaps of iterative, nonreducing polyketide synthases provide a mechanistic understanding and rationale for catalytic reprogramming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Adam G; Vagstad, Anna L; Storm, Philip A; Townsend, Craig A

    2014-05-21

    Iterative, nonreducing polyketide synthases (NR-PKSs) are multidomain enzymes responsible for the construction of the core architecture of aromatic polyketide natural products in fungi. Engineering these enzymes for the production of non-native metabolites has been a long-standing goal. We conducted a systematic survey of in vitro "domain swapped" NR-PKSs using an enzyme deconstruction approach. The NR-PKSs were dissected into mono- to multidomain fragments and recombined as noncognate pairs in vitro, reconstituting enzymatic activity. The enzymes used in this study produce aromatic polyketides that are representative of the four main chemical features set by the individual NR-PKS: starter unit selection, chain-length control, cyclization register control, and product release mechanism. We found that boundary conditions limit successful chemistry, which are dependent on a set of underlying enzymatic mechanisms. Crucial for successful redirection of catalysis, the rate of productive chemistry must outpace the rate of spontaneous derailment and thioesterase-mediated editing. Additionally, all of the domains in a noncognate system must interact efficiently if chemical redirection is to proceed. These observations refine and further substantiate current understanding of the mechanisms governing NR-PKS catalysis.

  14. Data for ion and seed dependent fibril assembly of a spidroin core domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Humenik

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This data article includes size exclusion chromatography data of soluble eADF4(C16, an engineered spider silk variant based on the core domain sequence of the natural dragline silk protein ADF4 of Araneus diadematus, in combination with light scattering; the protein is monomeric before assembly. The assembled mature fibrils were visualized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM and atomic force microscopy (AFM. Sonicated fibrils were used as seeds to by-pass the nucleation lag phase in eADF4(C16 assembly. We also provide data on the sedimentation kinetics of spider silk in the presence of different NaCl concentrations revealing very slow protein aggregation in comparison to the fast assembly triggered by phosphate ions published previously [1]. Experiments in the Data article represent supporting material for our work published recently [1], which described the assembly mechanism of recombinant eADF4(C16 fibrils.

  15. Quantum Mechanics and Molecular Mechanics Study of the Catalytic Mechanism of Human AMSH-LP Domain Deubiquitinating Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenyou; Liu, Yongjun; Ling, Baoping

    2015-08-25

    Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) catalyze the cleavage of the isopeptide bond in polyubiquitin chains to control and regulate the deubiquitination process in all known eukaryotic cells. The human AMSH-LP DUB domain specifically cleaves the isopeptide bonds in the Lys63-linked polyubiquitin chains. In this article, the catalytic mechanism of AMSH-LP has been studied using a combined quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics method. Two possible hydrolysis processes (Path 1 and Path 2) have been considered. Our calculation results reveal that the activation of Zn(2+)-coordinated water molecule is the essential step for the hydrolysis of isopeptide bond. In Path 1, the generated hydroxyl first attacks the carbonyl group of Gly76, and then the amino group of Lys63 is protonated, which is calculated to be the rate limiting step with an energy barrier of 13.1 kcal/mol. The energy barrier of the rate limiting step and the structures of intermediate and product are in agreement with the experimental results. In Path 2, the protonation of amino group of Lys63 is prior to the nucleophilic attack of activated hydroxyl. The two proton transfer processes in Path 2 correspond to comparable overall barriers (33.4 and 36.1 kcal/mol), which are very high for an enzymatic reaction. Thus, Path 2 can be ruled out. During the reaction, Glu292 acts as a proton transfer mediator, and Ser357 mainly plays a role in stabilizing the negative charge of Gly76. Besides acting as a Lewis acid, Zn(2+) also influences the reaction by coordinating to the reaction substrates (W1 and Gly76).

  16. Domain Decomposition strategy for pin-wise full-core Monte Carlo depletion calculation with the reactor Monte Carlo Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Jingang; Wang, Kan; Qiu, Yishu [Dept. of Engineering Physics, LiuQing Building, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Chai, Xiao Ming; Qiang, Sheng Long [Science and Technology on Reactor System Design Technology Laboratory, Nuclear Power Institute of China, Chengdu (China)

    2016-06-15

    Because of prohibitive data storage requirements in large-scale simulations, the memory problem is an obstacle for Monte Carlo (MC) codes in accomplishing pin-wise three-dimensional (3D) full-core calculations, particularly for whole-core depletion analyses. Various kinds of data are evaluated and quantificational total memory requirements are analyzed based on the Reactor Monte Carlo (RMC) code, showing that tally data, material data, and isotope densities in depletion are three major parts of memory storage. The domain decomposition method is investigated as a means of saving memory, by dividing spatial geometry into domains that are simulated separately by parallel processors. For the validity of particle tracking during transport simulations, particles need to be communicated between domains. In consideration of efficiency, an asynchronous particle communication algorithm is designed and implemented. Furthermore, we couple the domain decomposition method with MC burnup process, under a strategy of utilizing consistent domain partition in both transport and depletion modules. A numerical test of 3D full-core burnup calculations is carried out, indicating that the RMC code, with the domain decomposition method, is capable of pin-wise full-core burnup calculations with millions of depletion regions.

  17. Quanty for core level spectroscopy - excitons, resonances and band excitations in time and frequency domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haverkort, Maurits W.

    2016-01-01

    Depending on the material and edge under consideration, core level spectra manifest themselves as local excitons with multiplets, edge singularities, resonances, or the local projected density of states. Both extremes, i.e., local excitons and non-interacting delocalized excitations are theoretically well under control. Describing the intermediate regime, where local many body interactions and band-formation are equally important is a challenge. Here we discuss how Quanty , a versatile quantum many body script language, can be used to calculate a variety of different core level spectroscopy types on solids and molecules, both in the frequency as well as the time domain. The flexible nature of Quanty allows one to choose different approximations for different edges and materials. For example, using a newly developed method merging ideas from density renormalization group and quantum chemistry [1-3], Quanty can calculate excitons, resonances and band-excitations in x-ray absorption, photoemission, x-ray emission, fluorescence yield, non-resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering and many more spectroscopy types. Quanty can be obtained from: http://www.quanty.org. (paper)

  18. Cooperation between Catalytic and DNA-binding Domains Enhances Thermostability and Supports DNA Synthesis at Higher Temperatures by Thermostable DNA Polymerases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Andrey R.; Pavlova, Nadejda V.; Kozyavkin, Sergei A.; Slesarev, Alexei I.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously introduced a general kinetic approach for comparative study of processivity, thermostability, and resistance to inhibitors of DNA polymerases (Pavlov et. al., (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99, 13510–13515). The proposed method was successfully applied to characterize hybrid DNA polymerases created by fusing catalytic DNA polymerase domains with various non-specific DNA binding domains. Here we use the developed kinetic analysis to assess basic parameters of DNA elongation by DNA polymerases and to further study the interdomain interactions in both previously constructed and new chimeric DNA polymerases. We show that connecting Helix-hairpin-Helix (HhH) domains to catalytic polymerase domains can increase thermostability, not only of DNA polymerases from extremely thermophilic species, but also of the enzyme from a faculatative thermophilic bacterium Bacillus stearothermophilus. We also demonstrate that addition of TopoV HhH domains extends efficient DNA synthesis by chimerical polymerases up to 105°C by maintaining processivity of DNA synthesis at high temperatures. We also found that reversible high-temperature structural transitions in DNA polymerases decrease the rates of binding of these enzymes to the templates. Furthermore, activation energies and pre-exponential factors of the Arrhenius equation suggest that the mechanism of electrostatic enhancement of diffusion-controlled association plays a minor role in binding templates to DNA polymerases. PMID:22320201

  19. The de novo cytosine methyltransferase DRM2 requires intact UBA domains and a catalytically mutated paralog DRM3 during RNA-directed DNA methylation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian R Henderson

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic DNA cytosine methylation can be used to transcriptionally silence repetitive sequences, including transposons and retroviruses. This silencing is stable between cell generations as cytosine methylation is maintained epigenetically through DNA replication. The Arabidopsis thaliana Dnmt3 cytosine methyltransferase ortholog DOMAINS rearranged methyltransferase2 (DRM2 is required for establishment of small interfering RNA (siRNA directed DNA methylation. In mammals PIWI proteins and piRNA act in a convergently evolved RNA-directed DNA methylation system that is required to repress transposon expression in the germ line. De novo methylation may also be independent of RNA interference and small RNAs, as in Neurospora crassa. Here we identify a clade of catalytically mutated DRM2 paralogs in flowering plant genomes, which in A.thaliana we term domains rearranged methyltransferase3 (DRM3. Despite being catalytically mutated, DRM3 is required for normal maintenance of non-CG DNA methylation, establishment of RNA-directed DNA methylation triggered by repeat sequences and accumulation of repeat-associated small RNAs. Although the mammalian catalytically inactive Dnmt3L paralogs act in an analogous manner, phylogenetic analysis indicates that the DRM and Dnmt3 protein families diverged independently in plants and animals. We also show by site-directed mutagenesis that both the DRM2 N-terminal UBA domains and C-terminal methyltransferase domain are required for normal RNA-directed DNA methylation, supporting an essential targeting function for the UBA domains. These results suggest that plant and mammalian RNA-directed DNA methylation systems consist of a combination of ancestral and convergent features.

  20. Modeling of absorption and scattering properties of core -shell nanoparticles for application as nanoantenna in optical domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devi, Jutika; Datta, Pranayee; Saikia, Rashmi

    2016-01-01

    The present paper describes the study of core-shell nanoparticles for application as nanoantenna in the optical domain. To obtain the absorption and extinction efficiencies as well as the angular distribution of the far field radiation pattern and the resonance wavelengths for these metal-dielectric, dielectric-metal and metal-metal core-shell nanoparticles in optical domain, we have used Finite Element Method based COMSOL Multiphysics Software and Mie Theory. From the comparative study of the extinction efficiencies of core-shell nanoparticles of different materials, it is found that for silica - gold core - shell nanoparticles, the resonant wavelength is greater than that of the gold - silver, silver-gold and gold-silica core - shell nanoparticles and also the radiation pattern of the silica-gold core-shell nanoparticle is the most suitable one from the point of view of directivity. The dielectric functions of the core and shell material as well as of the embedded matrix are extremely important and plays a very major role to tune the directivity and resonance wavelength. Such highly controllable parameters of the dielectric - metal core - shell nanoparticles make them suitable for efficient coupling of optical radiation into nanoscale structures for a broad range of applications in the field of communications. (paper)

  1. One-Pot Synthesis of Monodisperse Noble Metal @ Resorcinol-Formaldehyde (M@RF) and M@Carbon Core-Shell Nanostructure and Their Catalytic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Peipei; Xu, Yong; Chen, Lei; Wang, Xuchun; Zhang, Qiao

    2015-10-27

    We demonstrate that noble metal @ RF core-shell nanostructures can be obtained through a facile one-pot synthesis approach in the absence of any additional surfactants. Monodisperse metal@RF core-shell nanostructures can be produced within 1 h on a large scale. Both the core size and shell thickness can be readily tuned by altering the reaction parameters. Systematic studies reveal that resorcinol could have several functions: it could act as a reactant to form RF resin, and it also could passivate the surface of metallic nanoparticles to prevent them from aggregating. Additionally, for the first time, our results suggest that resorcinol may act as a reducing agent that can reduce metal salts to form metal nanoparticles. The core-shell nanoparticles can be carbonized into M@carbon nanostructures, which have shown great performance in the catalytic hydrogenation of chlorobenzene. This work not only will help to achieve the controllable synthesis of noble metal@RF resin and M@carbon core-shell nanostructures but also will promote research into other RF-based nanostructures and their catalytic applications.

  2. Core outcome domains and measures for pediatric acute and chronic/recurrent pain clinical trials : PedIMMPACT recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McGrath, Patrick J.; Walco, Gary A.; Turk, Dennis C.; Dworkin, Robert H.; Brown, Mark T.; Davidson, Karina; Eccleston, Christopher; Finley, G. Allen; Goldschneider, Kenneth; Haverkos, Lynne; Hertz, Sharon H.; Ljungman, Gustaf; Palermo, Tonya; Rappaport, Bob A.; Rhodes, Thomas; Schechter, Neil; Scott, Jane; Sethna, Navil; Svensson, Ola K.; Stinson, Jennifer; von Baeyer, Carl L.; Walker, Lynn; Weisman, Steven; White, Richard E.; Zajicek, Anne; Zeltzer, Lonnie

    Under the auspices of the Initiative on Methods, Measurement, and Pain Assessment in Clinical Trials (IMMPACT), 26 professionals from academia, governmental agencies, and the pharmaceutical industry participated in a 2-stage Delphi poll and a consensus meeting that identified core outcome domains

  3. Fabrication of Core-Shell Structural SiO2@H3[PM12O40] Material and Its Catalytic Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Through a natural tree grain template and sol-gel technology, the heterogeneous catalytic materials based on polyoxometalate compounds H3[PM12O40] encapsulating SiO2: SiO2@H3[PM12O40] (SiO2@PM12, M = W, Mo with core-shell structure had been prepared. The structure and morphology of the core-shell microspheres were characterized by the XRD, IR spectroscopy, UV-Vis absorbance, and SEM. These microsphere materials can be used as heterogeneous catalysts with high activity and stability for catalytic wet air oxidation of pollutant dyes safranine T (ST at room condition. The results show that the catalysts have excellent catalytic activity in treatment of wastewater containing 10 mg/L ST, and 94% of color can be removed within 60 min. Under different cycling runs, it is shown that the catalysts are stable under such operating conditions and the leaching tests show negligible leaching effect owing to the lesser dissolution.

  4. Studies on the photo-catalytic activity of semiconductor nanostructures and their gold core-shell on the photodegradation of malathion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamdouh Fouad, Dina; Bakr Mohamed, Mona

    2011-11-01

    This work is devoted to the synthesis of different semiconductor nanoparticles and their metal core-shell nanocomposites such as TiO2, Au/TiO2, ZnO, and Au/ZnO. The morphology and crystal structures of the developed nanomaterials were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). These materials were used as catalysts for the photodegradation of malathion, which is one of the most commonly used pesticides in developing countries. The degradation of 10 ppm malathion under ultraviolet (UV) and visible light in the presence of different synthesized nanocomposites was analyzed using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and UV-visible spectra. A comprehensive study was carried out for the catalytic efficiency of the prepared nanoparticles. Moreover, the effects of different factors that could influence catalytic photodegradation, such as different light sources, surface coverage and the nature of the organic contaminants, were investigated. The results indicate that the core-shell nanocomposite of semiconductor-gold serves as a better catalytic system than the semiconductor nanoparticles themselves.

  5. Synthesis of Hβ (core)/SAPO-11 (shell) Composite Molecular Sieve and its Catalytic Performances in the Methylation of Naphthalene with Methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaoxiao; Zhao, Liangfu; Guo, Shaoqing

    2013-01-01

    Hβ (core)/SAPO-11 (shell) composite molecular sieve was synthesized by the hydrothermal method in order to combine the advantages of Hβ and SAPO-11 for the methylation of naphthalene with methanol. For comparison, the mechanical mixture was prepared through the blending of Hβ and SAPO-11. The physicochemical properties of Hβ, SAPO-11, the composite and the mechanical mixture were characterized by various characterization methods. The characterization results indicated that Hβ/SAPO-11 composite molecular sieve exhibited a core-shell structure, with the Hβ phase as the core and the SAPO-11 phase as the shell. The pore diameter of the composite was between that of Hβ and SAPO-11. The composite had fewer acid sites than Hβ and mechanical mixture while more acid sites than SAPO-11. The experimental results indicated that the composite exhibited high catalytic performances for the methylation of naphthalene with methanol

  6. GTP Binding and Oncogenic Mutations May Attenuate Hypervariable Region (HVR)-Catalytic Domain Interactions in Small GTPase K-Ras4B, Exposing the Effector Binding Site*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shaoyong; Banerjee, Avik; Jang, Hyunbum; Zhang, Jian; Gaponenko, Vadim; Nussinov, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    K-Ras4B, a frequently mutated oncogene in cancer, plays an essential role in cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Its C-terminal membrane-associated hypervariable region (HVR) is required for full biological activity. In the active GTP-bound state, the HVR interacts with acidic plasma membrane (PM) headgroups, whereas the farnesyl anchors in the membrane; in the inactive GDP-bound state, the HVR may interact with both the PM and the catalytic domain at the effector binding region, obstructing signaling and nucleotide exchange. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and NMR, we aim to figure out the effects of nucleotides (GTP and GDP) and frequent (G12C, G12D, G12V, G13D, and Q61H) and infrequent (E37K and R164Q) oncogenic mutations on full-length K-Ras4B. The mutations are away from or directly at the HVR switch I/effector binding site. Our results suggest that full-length wild-type GDP-bound K-Ras4B (K-Ras4BWT-GDP) is in an intrinsically autoinhibited state via tight HVR-catalytic domain interactions. The looser association in K-Ras4BWT-GTP may release the HVR. Some of the oncogenic mutations weaken the HVR-catalytic domain association in the K-Ras4B-GDP/-GTP bound states, which may facilitate the HVR disassociation in a nucleotide-independent manner, thereby up-regulating oncogenic Ras signaling. Thus, our results suggest that mutations can exert their effects in more than one way, abolishing GTP hydrolysis and facilitating effector binding. PMID:26453300

  7. GTP Binding and Oncogenic Mutations May Attenuate Hypervariable Region (HVR)-Catalytic Domain Interactions in Small GTPase K-Ras4B, Exposing the Effector Binding Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shaoyong; Banerjee, Avik; Jang, Hyunbum; Zhang, Jian; Gaponenko, Vadim; Nussinov, Ruth

    2015-11-27

    K-Ras4B, a frequently mutated oncogene in cancer, plays an essential role in cell growth, differentiation, and survival. Its C-terminal membrane-associated hypervariable region (HVR) is required for full biological activity. In the active GTP-bound state, the HVR interacts with acidic plasma membrane (PM) headgroups, whereas the farnesyl anchors in the membrane; in the inactive GDP-bound state, the HVR may interact with both the PM and the catalytic domain at the effector binding region, obstructing signaling and nucleotide exchange. Here, using molecular dynamics simulations and NMR, we aim to figure out the effects of nucleotides (GTP and GDP) and frequent (G12C, G12D, G12V, G13D, and Q61H) and infrequent (E37K and R164Q) oncogenic mutations on full-length K-Ras4B. The mutations are away from or directly at the HVR switch I/effector binding site. Our results suggest that full-length wild-type GDP-bound K-Ras4B (K-Ras4B(WT)-GDP) is in an intrinsically autoinhibited state via tight HVR-catalytic domain interactions. The looser association in K-Ras4B(WT)-GTP may release the HVR. Some of the oncogenic mutations weaken the HVR-catalytic domain association in the K-Ras4B-GDP/-GTP bound states, which may facilitate the HVR disassociation in a nucleotide-independent manner, thereby up-regulating oncogenic Ras signaling. Thus, our results suggest that mutations can exert their effects in more than one way, abolishing GTP hydrolysis and facilitating effector binding. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Crystal structure of the human Polϵ B-subunit in complex with the C-terminal domain of the catalytic subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranovskiy, Andrey G; Gu, Jianyou; Babayeva, Nigar D; Kurinov, Igor; Pavlov, Youri I; Tahirov, Tahir H

    2017-09-22

    The eukaryotic B-family DNA polymerases include four members: Polα, Polδ, Polϵ, and Polζ, which share common architectural features, such as the exonuclease/polymerase and C-terminal domains (CTDs) of catalytic subunits bound to indispensable B-subunits, which serve as scaffolds that mediate interactions with other components of the replication machinery. Crystal structures for the B-subunits of Polα and Polδ/Polζ have been reported: the former within the primosome and separately with CTD and the latter with the N-terminal domain of the C-subunit. Here we present the crystal structure of the human Polϵ B-subunit (p59) in complex with CTD of the catalytic subunit (p261 C ). The structure revealed a well defined electron density for p261 C and the phosphodiesterase and oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domains of p59. However, electron density was missing for the p59 N-terminal domain and for the linker connecting it to the phosphodiesterase domain. Similar to Polα, p261 C of Polϵ contains a three-helix bundle in the middle and zinc-binding modules on each side. Intersubunit interactions involving 11 hydrogen bonds and numerous hydrophobic contacts account for stable complex formation with a buried surface area of 3094 Å 2 Comparative structural analysis of p59-p261 C with the corresponding Polα complex revealed significant differences between the B-subunits and CTDs, as well as their interaction interfaces. The B-subunit of Polδ/Polζ also substantially differs from B-subunits of either Polα or Polϵ. This work provides a structural basis to explain biochemical and genetic data on the importance of B-subunit integrity in replisome function in vivo . © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  9. The C-terminal domain of human grp94 protects the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2 (CK2alpha) against thermal aggregation. Role of disulfide bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roher, N; Miró, F; Boldyreff, B

    2001-01-01

    The C-terminal domain (residues 518-803) of the 94 kDa glucose regulated protein (grp94) was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with a His6-N-terminal tag (grp94-CT). This truncated form of grp94 formed dimers and oligomers that could be dissociated into monomers by treatment...... with dithiothreitol. Grp94-CT conferred protection against aggregation on the catalytic subunit of protein kinase CK2 (CK2alpha), although it did not protect against thermal inactivation. This anti-aggregation effect of grp94-CT was concentration dependent, with full protection achieved at grp94-CT/CK2alpha molar...

  10. Mutations in the catalytic core or the C-terminus of murine leukemia virus (MLV) integrase disrupt virion infectivity and exert diverse effects on reverse transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinrigl, Adolf; Nosek, Dagmara; Ertl, Reinhard; Guenzburg, Walter H.; Salmons, Brian; Klein, Dieter

    2007-01-01

    Understanding of the structures and functions of the retroviral integrase (IN), a key enzyme in the viral replication cycle, is essential for developing antiretroviral treatments and facilitating the development of safer gene therapy vehicles. Thus, four MLV IN-mutants were constructed in the context of a retroviral vector system, harbouring either a substitution in the catalytic centre, deletions in the C-terminus, or combinations of both modifications. IN-mutants were tested for their performance in different stages of the viral replication cycle: RNA-packaging; RT-activity; transient and stable infection efficiency; dynamics of reverse transcription and nuclear entry. All mutant vectors packaged viral RNA with wild-type efficiencies and displayed only slight reductions in RT-activity. Deletion of either the IN C-terminus alone, or in addition to part of the catalytic domain exerted contrasting effects on intracellular viral DNA levels, implying that IN influences reverse transcription in more than one direction

  11. Core Outcome Domains for Clinical Trials on Somatic Symptom Disorder, Bodily Distress Disorder, and Functional Somatic Syndromes : European Network on Somatic Symptom Disorders Recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rief, Winfried; Burton, Chris; Frostholm, Lisbeth; Henningsen, Peter; Kleinstaeuber, Maria; Kop, Willem J.; Loewe, Bernd; Martin, Alexandra; Malt, Ulrik; Rosmalen, Judith; Schroder, Andreas; Shedden-Mora, Meike; Toussaint, Anne; van der Feltz-Cornelis, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The harmonization of core outcome domains in clinical trials facilitates comparison and pooling of data, and simplifies the preparation and review of research projects and comparison of risks and benefits of treatments. Therefore, we provide recommendations for the core outcome domains

  12. An Insight into the Interaction Mode Between CheB and Chemoreceptor from Two Crystal Structures of CheB Methylesterase Catalytic Domain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K Cho; B Crane; S Park

    2011-12-31

    We have determined 2.2 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of Thermotoga maritima CheB methylesterase domain to provide insight into the interaction mode between CheB and chemoreceptors. T. maritima CheB methylesterase domain has identical topology of a modified doubly-wound {alpha}/{beta} fold that was observed from the previously reported Salmonella typhimurium counterpart, but the analysis of the electrostatic potential surface near the catalytic triad indicated considerable charge distribution difference. As the CheB demethylation consensus sites of the chemoreceptors, the CheB substrate, are not uniquely conserved between T. maritima and S. typhimurium, such surfaces with differing electrostatic properties may reflect CheB regions that mediate protein-protein interaction. Via the computational docking of the two T. maritima and S. typhimurium CheB structures to the respective T. maritima and Escherichia coli chemoreceptors, we propose a CheB:chemoreceptor interaction mode.

  13. Evidence of the crucial role of the linker domain on the catalytic activity of human topoisomerase I by experimental and simulative characterization of the Lys681Ala mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorani, Paola; Tesauro, Cinzia; Mancini, Giordano; Chillemi, Giovanni; D'A;nnessa, Ilda; Graziani, Grazia; Tentori, Lucio; Muzi, Alessia; Desideri, Alessandro

    2009-01-01

    The functional and structural-dynamical properties of the Lys681Ala mutation in the human topoisomerase IB linker domain have been investigated by catalytic assays and molecular dynamics simulation. The mutant is characterized by a comparable cleavage and a strongly reduced religation rate when compared to the wild type protein. The mutant also displays perturbed linker dynamics, as shown by analysis of the principal components of the motion, and a reduced electrostatic interaction with DNA. Inspection of the inter atomic distances in proximity of the active site shows that in the mutant the distance between the amino group of Lys532 side chain and the 5′ OH of the scissile phosphate is longer than the wild type enzyme, providing an atomic explanation for the reduced religation rate of the mutant. Taken together these results indicate the existence of a long range communication between the linker domain and the active site region and points out the crucial role of the linker in the modulation of the catalytic activity. PMID:19767617

  14. Characterization of the N-Terminal Catalytic Domain of Lytµ1/6, an Endolysin from Streptomyces aureofaciens Phage µ1/6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farkašovská, Jarmila; Godány, Andrej

    2016-10-01

    Previous characterization of Lytµ1/6, an endolysin from Streptomyces aureofaciens phage µ1/6, suggested that the N-terminal domain is responsible for the catalytic activity of Lytµ1/6. Mutational analyses (deletions and site-directed mutagenesis) demonstrated that lytic activity of Lytµ1/6 relies on the N-terminal part of about 200 amino acid residues. Various C-terminally truncated versions of Lytµ1/6 failed to cause lysis, indicating the necessity of the CBD for full enzyme activity. Functional analysis of the point mutants suggested that the residues K27, H31, E109, H176, and D184 were essential for lytic activity of the µ1/6 endolysin. Further characterization of the purified Lytµ1/6 revealed that this endolysin is an N-acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine amidase which seems to be unrelated to any of the known conserved catalytic domains of phage endolysins or bacterial autolysins.

  15. Occurrence of dead core in catalytic particles containing immobilized enzymes: analysis for the Michaelis-Menten kinetics and assessment of numerical methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Félix Monteiro; Oliveira, Samuel Conceição

    2016-11-01

    In this article, the occurrence of dead core in catalytic particles containing immobilized enzymes is analyzed for the Michaelis-Menten kinetics. An assessment of numerical methods is performed to solve the boundary value problem generated by the mathematical modeling of diffusion and reaction processes under steady state and isothermal conditions. Two classes of numerical methods were employed: shooting and collocation. The shooting method used the ode function from Scilab software. The collocation methods included: that implemented by the bvode function of Scilab, the orthogonal collocation, and the orthogonal collocation on finite elements. The methods were validated for simplified forms of the Michaelis-Menten equation (zero-order and first-order kinetics), for which analytical solutions are available. Among the methods covered in this article, the orthogonal collocation on finite elements proved to be the most robust and efficient method to solve the boundary value problem concerning Michaelis-Menten kinetics. For this enzyme kinetics, it was found that the dead core can occur when verified certain conditions of diffusion-reaction within the catalytic particle. The application of the concepts and methods presented in this study will allow for a more generalized analysis and more accurate designs of heterogeneous enzymatic reactors.

  16. One-step synthesis of metal@titania core-shell materials for visible-light photocatalysis and catalytic reduction reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Zhigang; Zhang, Luhong; Zhao, Xiu Song

    2014-11-03

    Metal@TiO2 composites with a core-shell structure possess multifunctional properties. The demonstrated protocols for synthesizing such materials involve multiple steps, requiring precise control over the particle uniformity of the core and shell thickness, as well as complex surface modification. A simple approach to synthesizing metal@TiO2 hybrid nanostructures remains a great challenge. Herein, we report on a one-step method for the preparation of metal@TiO2 core-shell nanospheres, which exhibited excellent performance in photocatalytic degradation of recalcitrant organic pollutants under visible light irradiation, and in catalytic reduction of nitrophenol in water. The simple method described here represents a sustainable approach to preparing core-shell materials at low cost, involving fewer chemicals, and requiring less energy, which will make a significant contribution toward large-scale synthesis of high-performance hybrid materials for photocatalytic applications. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Crystal Structure of the Human Pol α B Subunit in Complex with the C-terminal Domain of the Catalytic Subunit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwa, Yoshiaki; Gu, Jianyou; Baranovskiy, Andrey G; Babayeva, Nigar D; Pavlov, Youri I; Tahirov, Tahir H

    2015-06-05

    In eukaryotic DNA replication, short RNA-DNA hybrid primers synthesized by primase-DNA polymerase α (Prim-Pol α) are needed to start DNA replication by the replicative DNA polymerases, Pol δ and Pol ϵ. The C terminus of the Pol α catalytic subunit (p180C) in complex with the B subunit (p70) regulates the RNA priming and DNA polymerizing activities of Prim-Pol α. It tethers Pol α and primase, facilitating RNA primer handover from primase to Pol α. To understand these regulatory mechanisms and to reveal the details of human Pol α organization, we determined the crystal structure of p70 in complex with p180C. The structured portion of p70 includes a phosphodiesterase (PDE) domain and an oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding (OB) domain. The N-terminal domain and the linker connecting it to the PDE domain are disordered in the reported crystal structure. The p180C adopts an elongated asymmetric saddle shape, with a three-helix bundle in the middle and zinc-binding modules (Zn1 and Zn2) on each side. The extensive p180C-p70 interactions involve 20 hydrogen bonds and a number of hydrophobic interactions resulting in an extended buried surface of 4080 Å(2). Importantly, in the structure of the p180C-p70 complex with full-length p70, the residues from the N-terminal to the OB domain contribute to interactions with p180C. The comparative structural analysis revealed both the conserved features and the differences between the human and yeast Pol α complexes. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. The catalytic domain of Acanthamoeba myosin I heavy chain kinase. I. Identification and characterization following tryptic cleavage of the native enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzeska, H; Martin, B M; Korn, E D

    1996-10-25

    The actin-activated Mg2+-ATPase activities of the myosin I isoenzymes from Acanthamoeba castellanii are greatly increased by phosphorylation catalyzed by myosin I heavy chain kinase (MIHC kinase), a monomeric 97-kDa protein whose activity is greatly enhanced by acidic phospholipids and by autophosphorylation of multiple sites. In this paper, we show that the 35-kDa COOH-terminal fragment obtained by trypsin cleavage of maximally activated, autophosphorylated kinase retains the full activity and two to three of the autophosphorylation sites of the native enzyme. Other autophosphorylation sites occur in the middle third of the native enzyme. A trypsin cleavage site within the 35-kDa region is protected in phosphorylated kinase but is readily cleaved in unphosphorylated kinase producing catalytically inactive 25- and 11-kDa fragments from the NH2- and COOH-terminal ends, respectively, of the 35-kDa peptide. This implies that the conformation around the "25/11" cleavage site changes upon phosphorylation of the native enzyme. The position of this site corresponds to the activation loop of protein kinase A (see the accompanying paper: Brzeska, H., Szczepanowska, J., Hoey, J., and Korn, E. D. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 27056-27062). Exogenously added MIHC kinase phosphorylates the 11-kDa fragment, but not the 25-kDa fragment, indicating that the phosphorylation sites of the 35-kDa catalytic fragment are located within the COOH-terminal 11 kDa. The accompanying paper describes the cloning, sequencing, and expression of a fully active 35-kDa catalytic domain.

  19. Improving the reversibility of thermal denaturation and catalytic efficiency of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase through stabilizing a long loop in domain B.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Li

    Full Text Available The reversibility of thermal denaturation and catalytic efficiency of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase were improved through site-directed mutagenesis. By using multiple sequence alignment and PoPMuSiC algorithm, Ser187 and Asn188, which located within a long loop in Domain B of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase, were selected for mutation. In addition, Ala269, which is adjacent to Ser187 and Asn188, was also investigated. Seven mutants carrying the mutations S187D, N188T, N188S, A269K, A269K/S187D, S187D/N188T, and A269K/S187D/N188T were generated and characterized. The most thermostable mutant, A269K/S187D/N188T, exhibited a 9-fold improvement in half-life at 95°C and pH 5.5, compared with that of the wild-type enzyme. Mutant A269K/S187D/N188T also exhibited improved catalytic efficiency. The catalytic efficiency of mutant A269K/S187D/N188T reached 5.87×103±0.17 g·L-1·s-1 at pH 5.5, which is 1.84-fold larger than the corresponding value determined for the wild-type enzyme. Furthermore, the structure analysis showed that immobilization of the loop containing Ser187 and Asn188 plays a significant role in developing the properties of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase.

  20. Improving the reversibility of thermal denaturation and catalytic efficiency of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase through stabilizing a long loop in domain B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhu; Duan, Xuguo; Chen, Sheng; Wu, Jing

    2017-01-01

    The reversibility of thermal denaturation and catalytic efficiency of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase were improved through site-directed mutagenesis. By using multiple sequence alignment and PoPMuSiC algorithm, Ser187 and Asn188, which located within a long loop in Domain B of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase, were selected for mutation. In addition, Ala269, which is adjacent to Ser187 and Asn188, was also investigated. Seven mutants carrying the mutations S187D, N188T, N188S, A269K, A269K/S187D, S187D/N188T, and A269K/S187D/N188T were generated and characterized. The most thermostable mutant, A269K/S187D/N188T, exhibited a 9-fold improvement in half-life at 95°C and pH 5.5, compared with that of the wild-type enzyme. Mutant A269K/S187D/N188T also exhibited improved catalytic efficiency. The catalytic efficiency of mutant A269K/S187D/N188T reached 5.87×103±0.17 g·L-1·s-1 at pH 5.5, which is 1.84-fold larger than the corresponding value determined for the wild-type enzyme. Furthermore, the structure analysis showed that immobilization of the loop containing Ser187 and Asn188 plays a significant role in developing the properties of Bacillus licheniformis α-amylase.

  1. Steady state temperature distribution in a circular corrugated domain with heat generation in the inner core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laura, P.A.A.; Bergmann, A.; Cortinez, V.H.

    1988-01-01

    The title problem is solved using two independent techniques: an approximate analytical solution based on conformal mapping of the thermally composite domain, a finite element formulation. Good agreement is found between the results predicted by both approaches. (orig.)

  2. Efficient multiscale magnetic-domain analysis of iron-core material under mechanical stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikubo, Atsushi; Ito, Shumpei; Mifune, Takeshi; Matsuo, Tetsuji; Kaido, Chikara; Takahashi, Yasuhito; Fujiwara, Koji

    2018-05-01

    For an efficient analysis of magnetization, a partial-implicit solution method is improved using an assembled domain structure model with six-domain mesoscopic particles exhibiting pinning-type hysteresis. The quantitative analysis of non-oriented silicon steel succeeds in predicting the stress dependence of hysteresis loss with computation times greatly reduced by using the improved partial-implicit method. The effect of cell division along the thickness direction is also evaluated.

  3. Hepatitis B Virus Core Protein Phosphorylation Sites Affect Capsid Stability and Transient Exposure of the C-terminal Domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selzer, Lisa; Kant, Ravi; Wang, Joseph C-Y; Bothner, Brian; Zlotnick, Adam

    2015-11-20

    Hepatitis B virus core protein has 183 amino acids divided into an assembly domain and an arginine-rich C-terminal domain (CTD) that regulates essential functions including genome packaging, reverse transcription, and intracellular trafficking. Here, we investigated the CTD in empty hepatitis B virus (HBV) T=4 capsids. We examined wild-type core protein (Cp183-WT) and a mutant core protein (Cp183-EEE), in which three CTD serines are replaced with glutamate to mimic phosphorylated protein. We found that Cp183-WT capsids were less stable than Cp183-EEE capsids. When we tested CTD sensitivity to trypsin, we detected two different populations of CTDs differentiated by their rate of trypsin cleavage. Interestingly, CTDs from Cp183-EEE capsids exhibited a much slower rate of proteolytic cleavage when compared with CTDs of Cp183-WT capsids. Cryo-electron microscopy studies of trypsin-digested capsids show that CTDs at five-fold symmetry vertices are most protected. We hypothesize that electrostatic interactions between glutamates and arginines in Cp183-EEE, particularly at five-fold, increase capsid stability and reduce CTD exposure. Our studies show that quasi-equivalent CTDs exhibit different rates of exposure and thus might perform distinct functions during the hepatitis B virus lifecycle. Our results demonstrate a structural role for CTD phosphorylation and indicate crosstalk between CTDs within a capsid particle. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Sequence-specific backbone 1H, 13C and 15N assignments of the catalytic domain of the Escherichia coli protein tyrosine kinase, Wzc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temel, Deniz B.; Dutta, Kaushik; Ghose, Ranajeet

    2012-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases in bacteria are structurally and functionally distinct from their eukaryotic counterparts. The largest family of bacterial tyrosine kinases, the BY-kinase family, is highly conserved in Gram-negative and Gram-positive species, and plays a central role in biofilm and capsule formation. In E. coli the BY-kinase, Wzc, is a critical component of the machinery responsible for the synthesis and export of the exo-polysaccharide colanic acid, a key constituent of biofilms. Here we present the main-chain 1HN, 15N, 13C′ and 13Cα, side-chain 13Cβ resonance assignments for a construct that encodes the entire 274-residue cytosolic catalytic domain of Wzc. PMID:23225198

  5. Scanning microscopy of magnetic domains using the Fe 3p core level transverse magneto-optical Kerr effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, J.; Rozhko, I.; Voss, J.; Hillebrecht, F. U.; Kisker, E.; Wedemeier, V.

    1999-04-01

    We demonstrate the feasibility of the vacuum ultraviolet analog to visible-light magneto-optical imaging of magnetic structures using the resonantly enhanced transverse magneto-optical Kerr effect at core level thresholds with incident p-polarized radiation. The advantages are element specificity and a variable information depth. We used the scanning x-ray microscope at HASYLAB capable of obtaining about 1 μm resolution by means of its focusing ellipsoidal ring mirror. The p-polarized component of the reflected light was selected using multilayer reflection at an additional plane mirror downstream to the sample. Micrographs of the optical reflectivity were taken in the vicinity of the Fe 3p core level threshold at 53.7 and 56.5 eV photon energy where the magneto-optical effect is of opposite sign. Magnetic domains are visible in the difference of both recorded images.

  6. Residues in the membrane-spanning domain core modulate conformation and fusogenicity of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang Liang; Hunter, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The membrane-spanning domain (MSD) of human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) envelope glycoprotein (Env) is critical for its biological activity. Initial studies have defined an almost invariant 'core' structure in the MSD and demonstrated that it is crucial for anchoring Env in the membrane and virus entry. We show here that amino acid substitutions in the MSD 'core' do not influence specific virus-cell attachment, nor CD4 receptor and CXCR4 coreceptor recognition by Env. However, substitutions within the MSD 'core' delayed the kinetics and reduced the efficiency of cell-cell fusion mediated by Env. Although we observed no evidence that membrane fusion mediated by the MSD core mutants was arrested at a hemifusion stage, impaired Env fusogenicity was correlated with minor conformational changes in the V2, C1, and C5 regions in gp120 and the immunodominant loop in gp41. These changes could delay initiation of the conformational changes required in the fusion process.

  7. Distribution of Complex and Core Lipids within New Hyperthermophilic Members of the Archaea Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Trincone, A.; Nicolaus, B.; Palmieri, G.; de Rosa, M.; Huber, Robert; Huber, Gertrud; Stetter, Karl Otto; Gambacorta, A.

    1992-01-01

    Core and complex lipids of several new hyperthermophilic archaeal isolates were analyzed. The organisms belong to the Sulfolobales,Archaeoglobus, Pyrobaculum, and Methanococcus. A detailed structural investigation of complex lipids of Pyrobaculum species is reported. The different lipid structures are of help for a rapid and simple phylogenetic classification of the new isolates. They are in agreement with the classification based on other features.

  8. Green synthesis of core-shell gold-palladium@palladium nanocrystals dispersed on graphene with enhanced catalytic activity toward oxygen reduction and methanol oxidation in alkaline media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jie-Ning; Li, Shan-Shan; Ma, Xiaohong; Chen, Fang-Yi; Wang, Ai-Jun; Chen, Jian-Rong; Feng, Jiu-Ju

    2014-09-01

    Well-defined core-shell gold-palladium@palladium nanocrystals (AuPd@Pd) are facilely prepared by a simple and green wet-chemical method at 25 °C. A Good's buffer, 2-[4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazinyl] ethanesulfonic acid (HEPES), is used as a reducing agent and a shape-directing agent, while there is no template, seed, organic solvent, or surfactant involved. The AuPd@Pd nanocrystals are uniformly dispersed on graphene nanosheets by ultrasonication, resulting in the formation of graphene supported AuPd@Pd (G-AuPd@Pd). The as-prepared nanocomposites exhibit the improved catalytic activity, good tolerance, and better stability for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) in alkaline media, compared with the G-Pd and commercial Pd black catalysts. The as-developed method may provide a promising pathway for large-scale fabrication of AuPd-based catalysts.

  9. Sonochemical synthesis of Fe3O4@NH2-mesoporous silica@Polypyrrole/Pd: A core/double shell nanocomposite for catalytic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoussi, Youssef; Bastide, Stéphane; Abderrabba, Manef; Chehimi, Mohamed M

    2018-03-01

    There is a growing interest in sonochemistry for either the controlled design of nanostructured materials or for the synthesis of polymers and polymer composites. It is fast and highly efficient method that provides materials with exceptional and enhanced structural and chemical properties. Herein, we take advantage of the versatile sonochemical process in order to design core/double layered shell nanocomposite denoted by Fe 3 O 4 @NH 2 -mesoporous silica@ PPy/Pd. This magnetic, multicomponent material was designed in a three-step sono-process: (i) synthesis of magnetic core, (ii) cure of mesoporous silica, and (iii) sonochemical deposition of PPy/Pd. This last step was achieved within 1 h, a much shorter duration compared to conventional routes which usually take several hours to few days. The final nanocomposite can be recovered with a simple magnetic stick. X-ray diffraction patterns highlighted the presence of zerovalent palladium on the surface of the magnetic nanocomposite. The catalytic activity of the solid support was investigated by the study of the p-nitrophenol (p-NP) reduction and the Methyl Orange (MO) degradation in aqueous media. Results showed a very high catalytic efficiency, a high conversion yield of p-NP into 4-aminophenol (more than 94%) and an almost entire degradation of MO (99%) with a fast kinetics fitting to the first order model. This work demonstrates conclusively the benefits of sonochemistry in the design of metal nanoparticle-decorated inorganic/polymer hybrid system with outstanding performances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Carbon Domains on MoS2/TiO2 System via Catalytic Acetylene Oligomerization: Synthesis, Structure, and Surface Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Cravanzola

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon domains have been obtained at the surface of a MoS2/TiO2 (Evonik, P25 system via oligomerization and cyclotrimerization reactions involved in the interaction of the photoactive material with acetylene. Firstly, MoS2 nanosheets have been synthesized at the surface of TiO2, via sulfidation of a molybdenum oxide precursor with H2S (bottom-up method. Secondly, the morphology and the structure, the optical and the vibrational properties of the obtained materials, for each step of the synthesis procedure, have been investigated by microscopy and spectroscopy methods. In particular, transmission electron microscopy images provide a simple tool to highlight the effectiveness of the sulfidation process, thus showing 1L, 2L, and stacked MoS2 nanosheets anchored to the surface of TiO2 nanoparticles. Lastly, in-situ FTIR spectroscopy investigation gives insights into the nature of the oligomerized species, showing that the formation of both polyenic and aromatic systems can be taken into account, being their formation promoted by both Ti and Mo catalytic sites. This finding gives an opportunity for the assembly of extended polyenic, polyaromatic, or mixed domains firmly attached at the surface of photoactive materials. The presented approach, somehow different from the carbon adding or doping processes of TiO2, is of potential interest for the advanced green chemistry and energy conversion/transport applications.

  11. Report from the OMERACT Hand Osteoarthritis Working Group: Set of Core Domains and Preliminary Set of Instruments for Use in Clinical Trials and Observational Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloppenburg, Margreet; Bøyesen, Pernille; Visser, A. Willemien; Haugen, Ida K.; Boers, Maarten; Boonen, Annelies; Conaghan, Philip G.; Hawker, Gillian A.; Kvien, Tore K.; Landewé, Robert; Uhlig, Till; Smeets, Wilma; Greibrokk, Elsie; van der Heijde, Désirée M.

    2015-01-01

    During OMERACT 12, a workshop was held with the aim to endorse a core set of domains for 3 settings: clinical trials of symptom and structure modification and observational studies. Additional goals were to endorse a core set of contextual factors for these settings, and to define preliminary

  12. Catalytic domain of restriction endonuclease BmrI as a cleavage module for engineering endonucleases with novel substrate specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Siu-hong; Bao, Yongming; Ciszak, Ewa; Laget, Sophie; Xu, Shuang-yong

    2007-01-01

    Creating endonucleases with novel sequence specificities provides more possibilities to manipulate DNA. We have created a chimeric endonuclease (CH-endonuclease) consisting of the DNA cleavage domain of BmrI restriction endonuclease and C.BclI, a controller protein of the BclI restriction-modification system. The purified chimeric endonuclease, BmrI198-C.BclI, cleaves DNA at specific sites in the vicinity of the recognition sequence of C.BclI. Double-strand (ds) breaks were observed at two sites: 8 bp upstream and 18 bp within the C-box sequence. Using DNA substrates with deletions of C-box sequence, we show that the chimeric endonuclease requires the 5' half of the C box only for specific cleavage. A schematic model is proposed for the mode of protein-DNA binding and DNA cleavage. The present study demonstrates that the BmrI cleavage domain can be used to create combinatorial endonucleases that cleave DNA at specific sequences dictated by the DNA-binding partner. The resulting endonucleases will be useful in vitro and in vivo to create ds breaks at specific sites and generate deletions.

  13. THE CATALYTIC DOMAIN OF THE DIHYDROLIPOYL TRANSACETYLASE COMPONENT OF THE PYRUVATE-DEHYDROGENASE COMPLEX FROM AZOTOBACTER-VINELANDII AND ESCHERICHIA-COLI - EXPRESSION, PURIFICATION, PROPERTIES AND PRELIMINARY-X-RAY ANALYSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SCHULZE, E; WESTPHAL, AH; OBMOLOVA, G; MATTEVI, A; HOL, WGJ; DEKOK, A

    1991-01-01

    Partial sequences of the dihydrolipoyl transacetylase component (E2p) of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from Azotobacter vinelandii and Escherichia coli, containing the catalytic domain, were cloned in pUC plasmids and over-expressed in E. coli TG2. A high expression of a homogeneous protein was

  14. Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteasomal ATPase Mpa has a β-grasp domain that hinders docking with the proteasome core protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yujie; Hu, Kuan; Li, Defeng; Bai, Lin; Yang, Shaoqing; Jastrab, Jordan B; Xiao, Shuhao; Hu, Yonglin; Zhang, Susan; Darwin, K Heran; Wang, Tao; Li, Huilin

    2017-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) has a proteasome system that is essential for its ability to cause lethal infections in mice. A key component of the system is the proteasomal adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) Mpa, which captures, unfolds, and translocates protein substrates into the Mtb proteasome core particle for degradation. Here, we report the crystal structures of near full-length hexameric Mtb Mpa in apo and ADP-bound forms. Surprisingly, the structures revealed a ubiquitin-like β-grasp domain that precedes the proteasome-activating carboxyl terminus. This domain, which was only found in bacterial proteasomal ATPases, buries the carboxyl terminus of each protomer in the central channel of the hexamer and hinders the interaction of Mpa with the proteasome core protease. Thus, our work reveals the structure of a bacterial proteasomal ATPase in the hexameric form, and the structure finally explains why Mpa is unable to stimulate robust protein degradation in vitro in the absence of other, yet-to-be-identified co-factors. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A three-dimensional FRET analysis to construct an atomic model of the actin-tropomyosin-troponin core domain complex on a muscle thin filament.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miki, Masao; Makimura, Satoshi; Sugahara, Yasuyuki; Yamada, Ryuta; Bunya, Masashi; Saitoh, Takahiro; Tobita, Hidetaka

    2012-06-29

    It is essential to know the detailed structure of the thin filament to understand the regulation mechanism of striated muscle contraction. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) was used to construct an atomic model of the actin-tropomyosin (Tm)-troponin (Tn) core domain complex. We generated single-cysteine mutants in the 167-195 region of Tm and in TnC, TnI, and the β-TnT 25-kDa fragment, and each was attached with an energy donor probe. An energy acceptor probe was located at actin Gln41, actin Cys374, or the actin nucleotide-binding site. From these donor-acceptor pairs, FRET efficiencies were determined with and without Ca(2+). Using the atomic coordinates for F-actin, Tm, and the Tn core domain, we searched all possible arrangements for Tm or the Tn core domain on F-actin to calculate the FRET efficiency for each donor-acceptor pair in each arrangement. By minimizing the squared sum of deviations for the calculated FRET efficiencies from the observed FRET efficiencies, we determined the location of Tm segment 167-195 and the Tn core domain on F-actin with and without Ca(2+). The bulk of the Tn core domain is located near actin subdomains 3 and 4. The central helix of TnC is nearly perpendicular to the F-actin axis, directing the N-terminal domain of TnC toward the actin outer domain. The C-terminal region in the I-T arm forms a four-helix-bundle structure with the Tm 175-185 region. After Ca(2+) release, the Tn core domain moves toward the actin outer domain and closer to the center of the F-actin axis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The thumb domain is not essential for the catalytic action of HoLaMa DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatius, Angela Gala Morena; Piaz, Fabrizio Dal; Hochkoeppler, Alejandro

    2017-12-01

    A structural and kinetic characterization of a fragment of the HoLaMa DNA polymerase is presented here. In particular, a truncated form of HoLaMa, devoid of a consistent portion of the thumb domain, was isolated and purified. This HoLaMa fragment, denoted as ΔNter-HoLaMa, is surprisingly competent in catalyzing DNA extension, albeit featuring a k cat one order of magnitude lower than the corresponding kinetic constant of its full-length counterpart. The conformational rearrangements, if any, of enzyme tryptophanes triggered by DNA binding or extension were assayed under pre-steady-state conditions. The fluorescence of HoLaMa tryptophanes was found to significantly change upon DNA binding and extension. On the contrary, no fluorescence changes of ΔNter-HoLaMa tryptophanes were detected under the same conditions, suggesting that major conformational transitions are not required for DNA binding or extension by this truncated DNA polymerase.

  17. Societal and individual burden of illness among fibromyalgia patients in France: Association between disease severity and OMERACT core domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perrot Serge

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with fibromyalgia (FM report widespread pain, fatigue, and other functional limitations. This study aimed to provide an assessment of the burden of illness associated with FM in France and its association with disease severity and core domains as defined by Outcome Measures in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT for FM. Methods This cross-sectional, observational study recruited patients with a prior diagnosis of FM from 18 community-based physician offices in France. Patients completed questions about FM impact (Fibromyalgia-Impact Questionnaire [FIQ], core symptoms (defined by OMERACT, health-related quality of life (EQ-5D, current overall health status (rated on a scale from 0 to 100, productivity, treatment satisfaction, and out-of-pocket expenses related to FM. Site staff recorded patients' treatment and health resource use based on medical record review. Costs were extrapolated from 4-week patient-reported data and 3-month clinical case report form data and calculated in 2008 Euros using a societal perspective. Tests of significance used the Kruskal-Wallis test or Fisher's Exact test where P Results Eighty-eight patients (mean 55.2 y; female:male 74:14 were recruited. The majority of patients (84.1% were prescribed medications for FM. Patients mainly described medications as a little/not at all effective (40.0% or somewhat effective (52.9%. Current Overall Health rating was 52.9 (± 17.8 and FIQ total score was 54.8 (± 17.3. FIQ total score was used to define FM severity, and 17 patients scored 0- Conclusions In a sample of 88 patients with FM from France, we found that FM poses a substantial economic and human burden on patients and society. FM severity level was significantly associated with patients' health status and core symptom domains.

  18. Comparison of diagnostic classification systems for delirium with new research criteria that incorporate the three core domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trzepacz, Paula T; Meagher, David J; Franco, José G

    2016-05-01

    Diagnostic classification systems do not incorporate phenomenological research findings about the three core symptom domains of delirium (Attentional/Cognitive, Circadian, Higher Level Thinking). We evaluated classification performances of novel Trzepacz, Meagher, and Franco research diagnostic criteria (TMF) that incorporate those domains and ICD-10, DSM-III-R, DSM-IV, and DSM-5. Primary data analysis of 641 patients with mixed neuropsychiatric profiles. Delirium (n=429) and nondelirium (n=212) reference standard groups were identified using cluster analysis of symptoms assessed using the Delirium Rating Scale-Revised-98. Accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV), and likelihood ratios (LR+, LR-) are reported. TMF criteria had high sensitivity and specificity (87.4% and 89.2%), more balanced than DSM-III-R (100% and 31.6%), DSM-IV (97.7% and 74.1%), DSM-5 (97.7% and 72.6%), and ICD-10 (66.2% and 100%). PPV of DSM-III-R, DSM-IV, and DSM-5 were 90%. ICD-10 had the lowest NPV (59.4%). TMF had the highest LR+ (8.06) and DSM-III-R the lowest LR- (0.0). Overall, values for DSM-IV and DSM-5 were similar, whereas for ICD-10 and DSM-III-R were inverse of each other. In the pre-existing cognitive impairment/dementia subsample (n=128), TMF retained its highest LR+ though specificity (58.3%) became less well balanced with sensitivity (87.9%), which still exceeded that of DSM. TMF research diagnostic criteria performed well, with more balanced sensitivity and specificity and the highest likelihood ratio for delirium identification. Reflecting the three core domains of delirium, TMF criteria may have advantages in biological research where delineation of this syndrome is important. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. New experimental treatments of core social domain in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto eCanitano

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Current therapeutics in Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD only treat the associated symptoms, without addressing core social dysfunctions. A paradigm shift in research of the pathogenesis of ASD, its synaptic abnormalities and altered signaling in multiple dynamic systems, have led to new experimental treatments for treating the core social abnormalities of ASD. NMDA antagonists, especially memantine, have been introduced in clinical trials addressing glutamatergic transmission in children and adolescents with ASD. GABAergic signaling has been targeted in trials using the GABAB receptor agonist arbaclofen for ASD patients with promising results. Oxytocin has been recognized as implicated in social development and affiliative behaviours. Preliminary findings from clinical trials using oxytocin in children with ASD show encouraging improvements in social cognition, but larger studies are needed. In two of the single gene disorders associated with ASD, Insulin Growth Factor (IGF-1 is a new treatment that has been tested in Rett Syndrome and Phelan-McDermid Syndrome (Chromosome 22 deletion syndrome. IGF-1 has been demonstrated to reverse the reduction in the number of excitatory synapses and the density of neurons that characterize these conditions in animal studies and it is being introduced as an experimental treatment..As a novel approach to verify treatment efficacy,neural processing modifications were recently evaluated by fMRI after a Pivotal Response Training (PRT intervention. Another study of neural changes in response to treatment examined variations in EEG signaling in patientsafter an Early Start Denver Model (ESDM intervention.

  20. Updating the Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Core Domain Set: A Report from the PsA Workshop at OMERACT 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orbai, Ana-Maria; de Wit, Maarten; Mease, Philip J; Callis Duffin, Kristina; Elmamoun, Musaab; Tillett, William; Campbell, Willemina; FitzGerald, Oliver; Gladman, Dafna D; Goel, Niti; Gossec, Laure; Hoejgaard, Pil; Leung, Ying Ying; Lindsay, Chris; Strand, Vibeke; van der Heijde, Désirée M; Shea, Bev; Christensen, Robin; Coates, Laura; Eder, Lihi; McHugh, Neil; Kalyoncu, Umut; Steinkoenig, Ingrid; Ogdie, Alexis

    2017-10-01

    To include the patient perspective in accordance with the Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Filter 2.0 in the updated Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Core Domain Set for randomized controlled trials (RCT) and longitudinal observational studies (LOS). At OMERACT 2016, research conducted to update the PsA Core Domain Set was presented and discussed in breakout groups. The updated PsA Core Domain Set was voted on and endorsed by OMERACT participants. We conducted a systematic literature review of domains measured in PsA RCT and LOS, and identified 24 domains. We conducted 24 focus groups with 130 patients from 7 countries representing 5 continents to identify patient domains. We achieved consensus through 2 rounds of separate surveys with 50 patients and 75 physicians, and a nominal group technique meeting with 12 patients and 12 physicians. We conducted a workshop and breakout groups at OMERACT 2016 in which findings were presented and discussed. The updated PsA Core Domain Set endorsed with 90% agreement by OMERACT 2016 participants included musculoskeletal disease activity, skin disease activity, fatigue, pain, patient's global assessment, physical function, health-related quality of life, and systemic inflammation, which were recommended for all RCT and LOS. These were important, but not required in all RCT and LOS: economic cost, emotional well-being, participation, and structural damage. Independence, sleep, stiffness, and treatment burden were on the research agenda. The updated PsA Core Domain Set was endorsed at OMERACT 2016. Next steps for the PsA working group include evaluation of PsA outcome measures and development of a PsA Core Outcome Measurement Set.

  1. The helicase and RNaseIIIa domains of Arabidopsis Dicer-Like1 modulate catalytic parameters during MicroRNA biogenesis

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Chenggang

    2012-04-03

    Dicer-Like1 (DCL1), an RNaseIII endonuclease, and Hyponastic Leaves1 (HYL1), a double-stranded RNA-binding protein, are core components of the plant microRNA (miRNA) biogenesis machinery. hyl1 mutants accumulate low levels of miRNAs and display pleiotropic developmental phenotypes. We report the identification of five new hyl1 suppressor mutants, all of which are alleles of DCL1. These new alleles affect either the helicase or the RNaseIIIa domains of DCL1, highlighting the critical functions of these domains. Biochemical analysis of the DCL1 suppressor variants reveals that they process the primary transcript (pri-miRNA) more efficiently than wild-type DCL1, with both higher Kcat and lower Km values. The DCL1 variants largely rescue wild-type miRNA accumulation levels in vivo, but do not rescue the MIRNA processing precision defects of the hyl1 mutant. In vitro, the helicase domain confers ATP dependence on DCL1-catalyzed MIRNA processing, attenuates DCL1 cleavage activity, and is required for precise MIRNA processing of some substrates. © 2012 American Society of Plant Biologists.

  2. Time Is Not Space: Core Computations and Domain-Specific Networks for Mental Travels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Baptiste; van Wassenhove, Virginie

    2016-11-23

    Humans can consciously project themselves in the future and imagine themselves at different places. Do mental time travel and mental space navigation abilities share common cognitive and neural mechanisms? To test this, we recorded fMRI while participants mentally projected themselves in time or in space (e.g., 9 years ago, in Paris) and ordered historical events from their mental perspective. Behavioral patterns were comparable for mental time and space and shaped by self-projection and by the distance of historical events to the mental position of the self, suggesting the existence of egocentric mapping in both dimensions. Nonetheless, self-projection in space engaged the medial and lateral parietal cortices, whereas self-projection in time engaged a widespread parietofrontal network. Moreover, while a large distributed network was found for spatial distances, temporal distances specifically engaged the right inferior parietal cortex and the anterior insula. Across these networks, a robust overlap was only found in a small region of the inferior parietal lobe, adding evidence for its role in domain-general egocentric mapping. Our findings suggest that mental travel in time or space capitalizes on egocentric remapping and on distance computation, which are implemented in distinct dimension-specific cortical networks converging in inferior parietal lobe. As humans, we can consciously imagine ourselves at a different time (mental time travel) or at a different place (mental space navigation). Are such abilities domain-general, or are the temporal and spatial dimensions of our conscious experience separable? Here, we tested the hypothesis that mental time travel and mental space navigation required the egocentric remapping of events, including the estimation of their distances to the self. We report that, although both remapping and distance computation are foundational for the processing of the temporal and spatial dimensions of our conscious experience, their

  3. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of human ribosomal protein L10 core domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Mitsuhiro; Kaminishi, Tatsuya; Kawazoe, Masahito; Shirouzu, Mikako; Takemoto, Chie; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Tanaka, Akiko; Sugano, Sumio; Yoshida, Takuya; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Kobayashi, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    A truncated variant of human ribosomal protien L10 was prepared and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.5 Å resolution. Eukaryotic ribosomal protein L10 is an essential component of the large ribosomal subunit, which organizes the architecture of the aminoacyl-tRNA binding site. The human L10 protein is also called the QM protein and consists of 214 amino-acid residues. For crystallization, the L10 core domain (L10CD, Phe34–Glu182) was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. A hexagonal crystal of L10CD was obtained by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The L10CD crystal diffracted to 2.5 Å resolution and belongs to space group P3 1 21 or P3 2 21

  4. The phage lytic proteins from the Staphylococcus aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phiIPLA88 display multiple active catalytic domains and do not trigger staphylococcal resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena Rodríguez-Rubio

    Full Text Available The increase in antibiotic resistance world-wide revitalized the interest in the use of phage lysins to combat pathogenic bacteria. In this work, we analyzed the specific cleavage sites on the staphylococcal peptidoglycan produced by three phage lytic proteins. The investigated cell wall lytic enzymes were the endolysin LysH5 derived from the S. aureus bacteriophage vB_SauS-phi-IPLA88 (phi-IPLA88 and two fusion proteins between lysostaphin and the virion-associated peptidoglycan hydrolase HydH5 (HydH5SH3b and HydH5Lyso. We determined that all catalytic domains present in these proteins were active. Additionally, we tested for the emergence of resistant Staphylococcus aureus to any of the three phage lytic proteins constructs. Resistant S. aureus could not be identified after 10 cycles of bacterial exposure to phage lytic proteins either in liquid or plate cultures. However, a quick increase in lysostaphin resistance (up to 1000-fold in liquid culture was observed. The lack of resistant development supports the use of phage lytic proteins as future therapeutics to treat staphylococcal infections.

  5. CDKL5 gene status in female patients with epilepsy and Rett-like features: two new mutations in the catalytic domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maortua Hiart

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 gene (CDKL5 located in the Xp22 region have been shown to cause a subset of atypical Rett syndrome with infantile spasms or early seizures starting in the first postnatal months. Methods We performed mutation screening of CDKL5 in 60 female patients who had been identified as negative for the methyl CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2 mutations, but who had current or past epilepsy, regardless of the age of onset, type, and severity. All the exons in the CDKL5 gene and their neighbouring sequences were examined, and CDKL5 rearrangements were studied by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. Results Six previously unidentified DNA changes were detected, two of which were disease-causing mutations in the catalytic domain: a frameshift mutation (c.509_510insGT; p.Glu170GlyfsX36 and a complete deletion of exon 10. Both were found in patients with seizures that started in the first month of life. Conclusions This study demonstrated the importance of CDKL5 mutations as etiological factors in neurodevelopmental disorders, and indicated that a thorough analysis of the CDKL5 gene sequence and its rearrangements should be considered in females with Rett syndrome-like phenotypes, severe encephalopathy and epilepsy with onset before 5 months of age. This study also confirmed the usefulness of MLPA as a diagnostic screening method for use in clinical practice.

  6. Evidence for Updating the Core Domain Set of Outcome Measures for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Report from a Special Interest Group at OMERACT 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Esi M; Riebschleger, Meredith P; Horonjeff, Jennifer; Consolaro, Alessandro; Munro, Jane E; Thornhill, Susan; Beukelman, Timothy; Brunner, Hermine I; Creek, Emily L; Harris, Julia G; Horton, Daniel B; Lovell, Daniel J; Mannion, Melissa L; Olson, Judyann C; Rahimi, Homaira; Gallo, Maria Chiara; Calandra, Serena; Ravelli, Angelo; Ringold, Sarah; Shenoi, Susan; Stinson, Jennifer; Toupin-April, Karine; Strand, Vibeke; Bingham, Clifton O

    2017-12-01

    The current Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) Core Set was developed in 1997 to identify the outcome measures to be used in JIA clinical trials using statistical and consensus-based techniques, but without patient involvement. The importance of patient/parent input into the research process has increasingly been recognized over the years. An Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) JIA Core Set Working Group was formed to determine whether the outcome domains of the current core set are relevant to those involved or whether the core set domains should be revised. Twenty-four people from the United States, Canada, Australia, and Europe, including patient partners, formed the working group. Guided by the OMERACT Filter 2.0 process, we performed (1) a systematic literature review of outcome domains, (2) a Web-based survey (142 patients, 343 parents), (3) an idea-generation study (120 parents), (4) 4 online discussion boards (24 patients, 20 parents), and (5) a Special Interest Group (SIG) activity at the OMERACT 13 (2016) meeting. A MEDLINE search of outcome domains used in studies of JIA yielded 5956 citations, of which 729 citations underwent full-text review, and identified additional domains to those included in the current JIA Core Set. Qualitative studies on the effect of JIA identified multiple additional domains, including pain and participation. Twenty-one participants in the SIG achieved consensus on the need to revise the entire JIA Core Set. The results of qualitative studies and literature review support the need to expand the JIA Core Set, considering, among other things, additional patient/parent-centered outcomes, clinical data, and imaging data.

  7. Domain Decomposition Strategy for Pin-wise Full-Core Monte Carlo Depletion Calculation with the Reactor Monte Carlo Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingang Liang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Because of prohibitive data storage requirements in large-scale simulations, the memory problem is an obstacle for Monte Carlo (MC codes in accomplishing pin-wise three-dimensional (3D full-core calculations, particularly for whole-core depletion analyses. Various kinds of data are evaluated and quantificational total memory requirements are analyzed based on the Reactor Monte Carlo (RMC code, showing that tally data, material data, and isotope densities in depletion are three major parts of memory storage. The domain decomposition method is investigated as a means of saving memory, by dividing spatial geometry into domains that are simulated separately by parallel processors. For the validity of particle tracking during transport simulations, particles need to be communicated between domains. In consideration of efficiency, an asynchronous particle communication algorithm is designed and implemented. Furthermore, we couple the domain decomposition method with MC burnup process, under a strategy of utilizing consistent domain partition in both transport and depletion modules. A numerical test of 3D full-core burnup calculations is carried out, indicating that the RMC code, with the domain decomposition method, is capable of pin-wise full-core burnup calculations with millions of depletion regions.

  8. CORE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krigslund, Jeppe; Hansen, Jonas; Hundebøll, Martin

    2013-01-01

    State-of-the-art in network coding for wireless, meshed networks typically considers two problems separately. First, the problem of providing reliability for a single session. Second, the problem of opportunistic combination of flows by using minimalistic coding, i.e., by XORing packets from...... different flows. Instead of maintaining these approaches separate, we propose a protocol (CORE) that brings together these coding mechanisms. Our protocol uses random linear network coding (RLNC) for intra- session coding but allows nodes in the network to setup inter- session coding regions where flows...

  9. An amphioxus RAG1-like DNA fragment encodes a functional central domain of vertebrate core RAG1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanni; Xu, Ke; Deng, Anqi; Fu, Xing; Xu, Anlong; Liu, Xiaolong

    2014-01-07

    The highly diversified repertoire of antigen receptors in the vertebrate immune system is generated via proteins encoded by the recombination activating genes (RAGs) RAG1 and RAG2 by a process known as variable, diversity, and joining [V(D)J] gene recombination. Based on the study of vertebrate RAG proteins, many hypotheses have been proposed regarding the origin and evolution of RAG. This issue remains unresolved, leaving a significant gap in our understanding of the evolution of adaptive immunity. Here, we show that the amphioxus genome contains an ancient RAG1-like DNA fragment (bfRAG1L) that encodes a virus-related protein that is much shorter than vertebrate RAG1 and harbors a region homologous to the central domain of core RAG1 (cRAG1). bfRAG1L also contains an unexpected retroviral type II nuclease active site motif, DXN(D/E)XK, and is capable of degrading both DNA and RNA. Moreover, bfRAG1L shares important functional properties with the central domain of cRAG1, including interaction with RAG2 and localization to the nucleus. Remarkably, the reconstitution of bfRAG1L into a cRAG1-like protein yielded an enzyme capable of recognizing recombination signal sequences and performing V(D)J recombination in the presence of mouse RAG2. Moreover, this reconstituted cRAG1-like protein could mediate the assembly of antigen receptor genes in RAG1-deficient mice. Together, our results demonstrate that amphioxus bfRAG1L encodes a protein that is functionally equivalent to the central domain of cRAG1 and is well prepared for further evolution to mediate V(D)J recombination. Thus, our findings provide unique insights into the evolutionary origin of RAG1.

  10. Bushy sphere dendrites with husk-shaped branches axially spreading out from the core for photo-catalytic oxidation/remediation of toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenashen, Mohamed A; Kawada, Satoshi; Selim, Mahmoud M; Morsy, Wafaa M; Yamaguchi, Hitoshi; Alhamid, Abdulaziz A; Ohashi, Naoki; Ichinose, Izumi; El-Safty, Sherif A

    2017-06-14

    This work describes densely interlinked bushy "tree-like chains" characterized by neatly branched sphere dendrites (bushy sphere dendrites, BSD) with long fan-like, husk-shaped branching paths that extend longitudinally from the core axis of the {110}-exposed plane. We confirmed that the hierarchical dendrite surfaces created bowls of swirled caves along the tree-tube in the mat-like branches. These surfaces had high-index catalytic site facets associated with the formation of ridges/defects on the dominant {110}-top-cover surface. These swirled caves along the branches were completely filled with 50-100 nm poly-CN nano-sphere-fossils with orb-like appearance. Such structural features are key issues of the inherent surface reactivity of a powerful catalyst/trapper, enabling photocatalytic oxidation and trapping of extremely toxic arsenite (AsO 3 3- ) species and photo-induced recovery of arsenate (AsO 4 3- ) products from catalyst surfaces. The light-induced release of produced AsO 4 3- from BSD indicates (i) highly controlled waste collection/management (i.e., recovery), (ii) low cost and ecofriendly photo-adsorbent, (iii) selective trapping of real sample water to produce water-free arsenite species; (iv) multiple reuse cycles of catalysts (i.e., reduced waste volume). Matrixed dendrites, covered with 3D microscopic sphere cores that capture solar-light, trap toxins, and are triggered by light, were designed. These dendrites can withstand indoor and outdoor recovery of toxins from water sources.

  11. Assignments and structure determination of the catalytic domain of human fibroblast collagenase using 3D double and triple resonance NMR spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, Mark A.; Dellwo, Martin J.; Schneider, Diane M.; Banks, Tracey M.; Falvo, Joseph [Sterling Winthrop Pharmaceuticals Research Division (United States); Vavra, Karen J.; Mathiowetz, Alan M. [Eastman Kodak Company (United States); Qoronfleh, M. Walid; Ciccarelli, Richard; Cook, Ewell R. [Sterling Winthrop Pharmaceuticals Research Division (United States); Pulvino, Tricia A. [Eastman Kodak Company (United States); Wahl, Robert C.; Wang Hsin [Sterling Winthrop Pharmaceuticals Research Division (United States)

    1997-01-15

    We report here the backbone 1HN, 15N, 13C{alpha}, 13CO, and 1H{alpha} NMR assignments for the catalytic domain of human fibroblast collagenase (HFC). Three independent assignment pathways (matching 1H, 13C{alpha}, and 13CO resonances) were used to establish sequential connections. The connections using 13C{alpha} resonances were obtained from HNCOCA and HNCA experiments; 13CO connections were obtained from HNCO and HNCACO experiments. The sequential proton assignment pathway was established from a 3D(1H/15N) NOESY-HSQC experiment. Amino acid typing was accomplished using 13C and 15N chemical shifts, specific labeling of 15N-Leu, and spin pattern recognition from DQF-COSY. The secondary structure was determined by analyzing the 3D (1H/15N) NOESY-HSQC. A preliminary NMR structure calculation of HFC was found to be in agreement with recent X-ray structures of human fibroblast collagenase and human neutrophil collagenase as well as similar to recent NMR structures of a highly homologous protein, stromelysin. All three helices were located; a five-stranded {beta}-sheet (four parallel strands, one antiparallel strand) was also determined. {beta}-Sheet regions were identified by cross-strand d{alpha}N and dNN connections and by strong intraresidue d{alpha}N correlations, and were corroborated by observing slow amide proton exchange. Chemical shift changes in a selectively 15N-labeled sample suggest that substantial structural changes occur in the active site cleft on the binding of an inhibitor.

  12. Assignments and structure determination of the catalytic domain of human fibroblast collagenase using 3D double and triple resonance NMR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCoy, Mark A.; Dellwo, Martin J.; Schneider, Diane M.; Banks, Tracey M.; Falvo, Joseph; Vavra, Karen J.; Mathiowetz, Alan M.; Qoronfleh, M. Walid; Ciccarelli, Richard; Cook, Ewell R.; Pulvino, Tricia A.; Wahl, Robert C.; Wang Hsin

    1997-01-01

    We report here the backbone 1HN, 15N, 13Cα, 13CO, and 1Hα NMR assignments for the catalytic domain of human fibroblast collagenase (HFC). Three independent assignment pathways (matching 1H, 13Cα, and 13CO resonances) were used to establish sequential connections. The connections using 13Cα resonances were obtained from HNCOCA and HNCA experiments; 13CO connections were obtained from HNCO and HNCACO experiments. The sequential proton assignment pathway was established from a 3D(1H/15N) NOESY-HSQC experiment. Amino acid typing was accomplished using 13C and 15N chemical shifts, specific labeling of 15N-Leu, and spin pattern recognition from DQF-COSY. The secondary structure was determined by analyzing the 3D (1H/15N) NOESY-HSQC. A preliminary NMR structure calculation of HFC was found to be in agreement with recent X-ray structures of human fibroblast collagenase and human neutrophil collagenase as well as similar to recent NMR structures of a highly homologous protein, stromelysin. All three helices were located; a five-stranded β-sheet (four parallel strands, one antiparallel strand) was also determined. β-Sheet regions were identified by cross-strand dαN and dNN connections and by strong intraresidue dαN correlations, and were corroborated by observing slow amide proton exchange. Chemical shift changes in a selectively 15N-labeled sample suggest that substantial structural changes occur in the active site cleft on the binding of an inhibitor

  13. Mapping of the catalytic and epitopic sites of human CD38/NAD+ glycohydrolase to a functional domain in the carboxyl terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoshino, S; Kukimoto, I; Kontani, K; Inoue, S; Kanda, Y; Malavasi, F; Katada, T

    1997-01-15

    We reported that 1) ecto-NAD+ glycohydrolase (NADase) activity induced upon differentiation of HL-60 cells is localized on the extracellular carboxyl-terminal side of CD38 and that 2) CD38 ligation by specific mAbs is followed by protein tyrosine phosphorylation in the cells. The strategy selected for identifying the relevant catalytic domains of the molecule relies upon the production in COS-7 cells of carboxyl-terminal deletion mutants of CD38. The mutants with fewer than 15 amino acids deleted at the carboxyl terminus of the 300-amino acid wild-type molecule maintained NADase activity, whereas those with more than 27 amino acids deleted did not. The general inference is that the carboxyl-terminal 273-285 sequence bears the site of enzyme activity. Introduction of site-directed mutation of a conserved cysteine residue (Cys275), located in the 273-285 sequence, completely abolished NADase activity. The second issue resolved in this work is the definition of an epitope of the agonistic anti-CD38 mAbs. To this aim, a panel of selected anti-CD38 mAbs was tested using these mutants and various CD38 fragments as the target in immunoblot analyses. All of the epitopes recognized by mAbs inducing protein tyrosine phosphorylation were mapped on an identical site containing the carboxyl-terminal sequence of 273-285. The conclusion is that the discrete carboxyl-terminal sequence identified in the present study not only plays a key role in its ecto-NADase activity, but actually constitutes the epitopes exploited by the agonistic anti-CD38 mAbs for transmembrane signaling.

  14. Insight into the Unfolding Properties of Chd64, a Small, Single Domain Protein with a Globular Core and Disordered Tails.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Tarczewska

    Full Text Available Two major lipophilic hormones, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E and juvenile hormone (JH, govern insect development and growth. While the mode of action of 20E is well understood, some understanding of JH-dependent signalling has been attained only in the past few years, and the crosstalk of the two hormonal pathways remains unknown. Two proteins, the calponin-like Chd64 and immunophilin FKBP39 proteins, have recently been found to play pivotal roles in the formation of dynamic, multiprotein complex that cross-links these two signalling pathways. However, the molecular mechanism of the interaction remains unexplored. The aim of this work was to determine structural elements of Chd64 to provide an understanding of molecular basis of multiple interactions. We analysed Chd64 in two unrelated insect species, Drosophila melanogaster (DmChd64 and Tribolium castaneum (TcChd64. Using hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS, we showed that both Chd64 proteins have disordered tails that outflank the globular core. The folds of the globular cores of both Chd64 resemble the calponin homology (CH domain previously resolved by crystallography. Monitoring the unfolding of DmChd64 and TcChd64 by far-ultraviolet (UV circular dichroism (CD spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC revealed a highly complex process. Chd64 unfolds and forms of a molten globule (MG-like intermediate state. Furthermore, our data indicate that in some conditions, Chd64 may exists in discrete structural forms, indicating that the protein is pliable and capable of easily acquiring different conformations. The plasticity of Chd64 and the existence of terminal intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs may be crucial for multiple interactions with many partners.

  15. Chimeric Hepatitis B core antigen virus-like particles displaying the envelope domain III of dengue virus type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Upasana; Tyagi, Poornima; Swaminathan, Sathyamangalam; Khanna, Navin

    2012-07-13

    Dengue is a global public health problem for which no drug or vaccine is available. Currently, there is increasing interest in developing non-replicating dengue vaccines based on a discrete antigenic domain of the major structural protein of dengue viruses (DENVs), known as envelope domain III (EDIII). The use of bio-nanoparticles consisting of recombinant viral structural polypeptides, better known as virus-like particles (VLPs), has emerged as a potential platform technology for vaccine development. This work explores the feasibility of developing nanoparticles based on E. coli-expressed recombinant Hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBcAg) designed to display EDIII moiety of DENV on the surface. We designed a synthetic gene construct encoding HBcAg containing an EDIII insert in its c/e1 loop. The fusion antigen HBcAg-EDIII-2 was expressed in E. coli, purified to near homogeneity using Ni+2 affinity chromatography and demonstrated to assemble into discrete 35-40 nm VLPs by electron microscopy. Competitive ELISA analyses showed that the EDIII-2 moieties of the VLPs are accessible to anti-EDIII-2-specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, suggesting that they are surface-displayed. The VLPs were highly immunogenic eliciting high titer anti-EDIII-2 antibodies that were able to recognize, bind and neutralize infectious DENV based on ELISA, immunofluorescence and virus-neutralization assays. This work demonstrates that HBcAg-derived nanoparticles can serve as a useful platform for the display of DENV EDIII. The EDIII-displaying nanoparticles may have potential applications in diagnostics/vaccines for dengue.

  16. Chimeric Hepatitis B core antigen virus-like particles displaying the envelope domain III of dengue virus type 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arora Upasana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue is a global public health problem for which no drug or vaccine is available. Currently, there is increasing interest in developing non-replicating dengue vaccines based on a discrete antigenic domain of the major structural protein of dengue viruses (DENVs, known as envelope domain III (EDIII. The use of bio-nanoparticles consisting of recombinant viral structural polypeptides, better known as virus-like particles (VLPs, has emerged as a potential platform technology for vaccine development. This work explores the feasibility of developing nanoparticles based on E. coli-expressed recombinant Hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBcAg designed to display EDIII moiety of DENV on the surface. Findings We designed a synthetic gene construct encoding HBcAg containing an EDIII insert in its c/e1 loop. The fusion antigen HBcAg-EDIII-2 was expressed in E. coli, purified to near homogeneity using Ni+2 affinity chromatography and demonstrated to assemble into discrete 35–40 nm VLPs by electron microscopy. Competitive ELISA analyses showed that the EDIII-2 moieties of the VLPs are accessible to anti-EDIII-2-specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, suggesting that they are surface-displayed. The VLPs were highly immunogenic eliciting high titer anti-EDIII-2 antibodies that were able to recognize, bind and neutralize infectious DENV based on ELISA, immunofluorescence and virus-neutralization assays. Conclusion This work demonstrates that HBcAg-derived nanoparticles can serve as a useful platform for the display of DENV EDIII. The EDIII-displaying nanoparticles may have potential applications in diagnostics/vaccines for dengue.

  17. Common Core State Standards in the Middle Grades: What's New in the Geometry Domain and How Can Teachers Support Student Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teuscher, Dawn; Tran, Dung; Reys, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    The Common Core State Standards for Mathematics (CCSSM) is a primary focus of attention for many stakeholders' (e.g., teachers, district mathematics leaders, and curriculum developers) intent on improving mathematics education. This article reports on specific content shifts related to the geometry domain in the middle grades (6-8)…

  18. Molecular dynamics simulations and structure-guided mutagenesis provide insight into the architecture of the catalytic core of the ectoine hydroxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widderich, Nils; Pittelkow, Marco; Höppner, Astrid; Mulnaes, Daniel; Buckel, Wolfgang; Gohlke, Holger; Smits, Sander H J; Bremer, Erhard

    2014-02-06

    Many bacteria amass compatible solutes to fend-off the detrimental effects of high osmolarity on cellular physiology and water content. These solutes also function as stabilizers of macromolecules, a property for which they are referred to as chemical chaperones. The tetrahydropyrimidine ectoine is such a compatible solute and is widely synthesized by members of the Bacteria. Many ectoine producers also synthesize the stress protectant 5-hydroxyectoine from the precursor ectoine, a process that is catalyzed by the ectoine hydroxylase (EctD). The EctD enzyme is a member of the non-heme-containing iron(II) and 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase superfamily. A crystal structure of the EctD protein from the moderate halophile Virgibacillus salexigens has previously been reported and revealed the coordination of the iron catalyst, but it lacked the substrate ectoine and the co-substrate 2-oxoglutarate. Here we used this crystal structure as a template to assess the likely positioning of the ectoine and 2-oxoglutarate ligands within the active site by structural comparison, molecular dynamics simulations, and site-directed mutagenesis. Collectively, these approaches suggest the positioning of the iron, ectoine, and 2-oxoglutarate ligands in close proximity to each other and with a spatial orientation that will allow the region-selective and stereo-specific hydroxylation of (4S)-ectoine to (4S,5S)-5-hydroxyectoine. Our study thus provides a view into the catalytic core of the ectoine hydroxylase and suggests an intricate network of interactions between the three ligands and evolutionarily highly conserved residues in members of the EctD protein family. © 2013.

  19. High-temperature catalytic reforming of n-hexane over supported and core-shell Pt nanoparticle catalysts: role of oxide-metal interface and thermal stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Kwangjin; Zhang, Qiao; Alayoglu, Selim; Musselwhite, Nathan; Shin, Jae-Youn; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2014-08-13

    Designing catalysts with high thermal stability and resistance to deactivation while simultaneously maintaining their catalytic activity and selectivity is of key importance in high-temperature reforming reactions. We prepared Pt nanoparticle catalysts supported on either mesoporous SiO2 or TiO2. Sandwich-type Pt core@shell catalysts (SiO2@Pt@SiO2 and SiO2@Pt@TiO2) were also synthesized from Pt nanoparticles deposited on SiO2 spheres, which were encapsulated by either mesoporous SiO2 or TiO2 shells. n-Hexane reforming was carried out over these four catalysts at 240-500 °C with a hexane/H2 ratio of 1:5 to investigate thermal stability and the role of the support. For the production of high-octane gasoline, branched C6 isomers are more highly desired than other cyclic, aromatic, and cracking products. Over Pt/TiO2 catalyst, production of 2-methylpentane and 3-methylpentane via isomerization was increased selectively up to 420 °C by charge transfer at Pt-TiO2 interfaces, as compared to Pt/SiO2. When thermal stability was compared between supported catalysts and sandwich-type core@shell catalysts, the Pt/SiO2 catalyst suffered sintering above 400 °C, whereas the SiO2@Pt@SiO2 catalyst preserved the Pt nanoparticle size and shape up to 500 °C. The SiO2@Pt@TiO2 catalyst led to Pt nanoparticle sintering due to incomplete protection of the TiO2 shells during the reaction at 500 °C. Interestingly, over the Pt/TiO2 catalyst, the average size of Pt nanoparticles was maintained even after 500 °C without sintering. In situ ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy demonstrated that the Pt/TiO2 catalyst did not exhibit TiO2 overgrowth on the Pt surface or deactivation by Pt sintering up to 600 °C. The extraordinarily high stability of the Pt/TiO2 catalyst promoted high reaction rates (2.0 μmol · g(-1) · s(-1)), which was 8 times greater than other catalysts and high isomer selectivity (53.0% of C6 isomers at 440 °C). By the strong metal-support interaction

  20. Characterizing Mobile/Less-Mobile Porosity and Solute Exchange in Dual-Domain Media Using Tracer Experiments and Electrical Measurements in a Hassler-Type Core Holder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzone, S.; Slater, L. D.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Parker, B. L.; Keating, K.; Robinson, J.

    2017-12-01

    Mass transfer is the process by which solute is retained in less-mobile porosity domains, and later released into the mobile porosity domain. This process is often responsible for the slow arrival and gradual release of contaminants and solute tracers. Recent studies have outlined methods using dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) models for characterizing this phenomenon. These models use the non-linear relationship of bulk (σb) and fluid (σf) conductivity, collected from electrical methods during tracer experiments, to characterize the less-mobile/mobile porosity ratio (β) and the mass-transfer rate coefficient (α). DDMT models use the hysteretic σb-σf relationship observed while solute tracers are injected and then flushed from a sample media. Due to limitations in observing the hysteretic σb-σf relationship, this method has not been used to characterize low permeability samples. We have developed an experimental method for testing porous rock cores that allows us to develop a fundamental understanding of contaminant storage and release in consolidated rock. We test the approach on cores from sedimentary rock sites where mass transfer is expected to occur between hydraulically connected fractures and the adjacent low permeability rock matrix. Our method uses a Hassler-type core holder, designed to apply confining pressure around the outside of a sample core, which hydraulically isolates the sample core, allowing water to be injected into it at increased pressures. The experimental apparatus was also designed to measure σb with spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements, and σf from a sampling port located at the center of the core. Cores were initially saturated with a solution with high electrical conductivity ( 80000 μS/cm). DI water was then injected into the cores at elevated pressures (>60 psi) and the saturating solution was flushed from the cores, in order to generate flow rates fast enough to capture the non-linear σb-σf relationship

  1. cDNA cloning of the basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan core protein, bamacan: a five domain structure including coiled-coil motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, R R; Couchman, J R

    1997-01-01

    obtained cDNA clones encoding the entire bamacan core protein of Mr = 138 kD, which reveal a five domain, head-rod-tail configuration. The head and tail are potentially globular, while the central large rod probably forms coiled-coil structures, with one large central and several very short interruptions....... The protein sequence has low overall homology, apart from very small NH2- and COOH-terminal motifs. At the junctions between the distal globular domains and the coiled-coil regions lie glycosylation sites, with up to three N-linked oligosaccharides and probably three chondroitin chains. Three other Ser...

  2. Large-scale production and purification of recombinant protein from an insect cell/baculovirus system in Erlenmeyer flasks: application to the chicken poly(ADP-ribose polymerase catalytic domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miranda E.A.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and inexpensive shaker/Erlenmeyer flask system for large-scale cultivation of insect cells is described and compared to a commercial spinner system. On the basis of maximum cell density, average population doubling time and overproduction of recombinant protein, a better result was obtained with a simpler and less expensive bioreactor consisting of Erlenmeyer flasks and an ordinary shaker waterbath. Routinely, about 90 mg of pure poly(ADP-ribose polymerase catalytic domain was obtained for a total of 3 x 109 infected cells in three liters of culture

  3. Identification of a novel antimicrobial peptide from human hepatitis B virus core protein arginine-rich domain (ARD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng-Li Chen

    Full Text Available The rise of multidrug-resistant (MDR pathogens causes an increasing challenge to public health. Antimicrobial peptides are considered a possible solution to this problem. HBV core protein (HBc contains an arginine-rich domain (ARD at its C-terminus, which consists of 16 arginine residues separated into four clusters (ARD I to IV. In this study, we demonstrated that the peptide containing the full-length ARD I-IV (HBc147-183 has a broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity at micro-molar concentrations, including some MDR and colistin (polymyxin E-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Furthermore, confocal fluorescence microscopy and SYTOX Green uptake assay indicated that this peptide killed Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria by membrane permeabilization or DNA binding. In addition, peptide ARD II-IV (HBc153-176 and ARD I-III (HBc147-167 were found to be necessary and sufficient for the activity against P. aeruginosa and K. peumoniae. The antimicrobial activity of HBc ARD peptides can be attenuated by the addition of LPS. HBc ARD peptide was shown to be capable of direct binding to the Lipid A of lipopolysaccharide (LPS in several in vitro binding assays. Peptide ARD I-IV (HBc147-183 had no detectable cytotoxicity in various tissue culture systems and a mouse animal model. In the mouse model by intraperitoneal (i.p. inoculation with Staphylococcus aureus, timely treatment by i.p. injection with ARD peptide resulted in 100-fold reduction of bacteria load in blood, liver and spleen, as well as 100% protection of inoculated animals from death. If peptide was injected when bacterial load in the blood reached its peak, the protection rate dropped to 40%. Similar results were observed in K. peumoniae using an IVIS imaging system. The finding of anti-microbial HBc ARD is discussed in the context of commensal gut microbiota, development of intrahepatic anti-viral immunity and establishment of chronic infection with HBV. Our current results suggested that

  4. Quantitative determination of vortex core dimensions in head‑to‑head domain walls using off‑axis electron holography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Junginger, F; Klaui, M; Backes, D

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we present a complete three-dimensional characterization of vortex core spin structures, which is important for future magnetic data storage based on vortex cores in disks and in wires. Using electron holography to examine vortices in patterned Permalloy devices we have quantitativ...

  5. Hepatitis B virus DNA-negative dane particles lack core protein but contain a 22-kDa precore protein without C-terminal arginine-rich domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Tatsuji; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Terada, Nobuo; Rokuhara, Akinori; Matsumoto, Akihiro; Yagi, Shintaro; Tanaka, Eiji; Kiyosawa, Kendo; Ohno, Shinichi; Maki, Noboru

    2005-06-10

    DNA-negative Dane particles have been observed in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-infected sera. The capsids of the empty particles are thought to be composed of core protein but have not been studied in detail. In the present study, the protein composition of the particles was examined using new enzyme immunoassays for the HBV core antigen (HBcAg) and for the HBV precore/core proteins (core-related antigens, HBcrAg). HBcrAg were abundant in fractions slightly less dense than HBcAg and HBV DNA. Three times more Dane-like particles were observed in the HBcrAg-rich fraction than in the HBV DNA-rich fraction by electron microscopy. Western blots and mass spectrometry identified the HBcrAg as a 22-kDa precore protein (p22cr) containing the uncleaved signal peptide and lacking the arginine-rich domain that is involved in binding the RNA pregenome or the DNA genome. In sera from 30 HBV-infected patients, HBcAg represented only a median 10.5% of the precore/core proteins in enveloped particles. These data suggest that most of the Dane particles lack viral DNA and core capsid but contain p22cr. This study provides a model for the formation of the DNA-negative Dane particles. The precore proteins, which lack the arginine-rich nucleotide-binding domain, form viral RNA/DNA-negative capsid-like particles and are enveloped and released as empty particles.

  6. Catalytic oxidation of olefins and sulfides in the presence of hydrazone-oxidovanadium(V) complex containing VOCl.sub.2./sub..sup.+./sup. core

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bikas, R.; Ghorbanloo, M.; Jafari, S.; Eigner, Václav; Dušek, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 453, Nov (2016), s. 78-85 ISSN 0020-1693 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-03276S; GA MŠk LO1603 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : oxidovanadium(V) * catalytic oxidation * hydrazone ligand * crystal structure * VOCl 2 + Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.002, year: 2016

  7. Examining the similarities and differences of OMERACT core sets using the ICF: first step towards an improved domain specification and development of an item pool to measure functioning and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escorpizo, Reuben; Boers, Maarten; Stucki, Gerold; Boonen, Annelies

    2011-08-01

    To contribute to the discussion on a common approach for domain selection in the Outcomes in Rheumatology Clinical Trials (OMERACT) process. First, this article reports on the consistency in the selection and names of the domains of the current OMERACT core set, and next on the comparability of the specifications of concepts that are relevant within the domains. For this purpose, a convenience sample of 4 OMERACT core sets was used: rheumatoid arthritis (RA), psoriatic arthritis (PsA), longitudinal observational studies (LOS) in rheumatology, and ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Domains from the different core sets were compared directly. To be able to compare the specific content of the domains, the concepts contained in the questionnaires that were considered or proposed to measure the domains were identified and linked to the category of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) that best fit that construct. Large differences in the domains, and lack of domain definitions, were noted among the 4 OMERACT core sets. When comparing the concepts in the questionnaires that represent the domains, core sets differed also in the number and type of constructs that were addressed within each of the domains. Especially for the specification of the concepts within the domains Discomfort and Disability, the ICF proved to be useful as external reference to classify the different constructs. Our exercise suggests that the OMERACT process could benefit from a standardized approach to select, define, and specify domains, and demonstrated that the ICF is useful for further classification of the more specific concepts of "what to measure" within the domains. A clear definition and classification of domains and their specification can be useful as a starting point to build a pool of items that could then be used to develop new instruments to assess functioning and health for rheumatological conditions.

  8. Core domain and outcome measurement sets for shoulder pain trials are needed: Systematic review of physical therapy trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.J. Page (Matthew J.); J.E. McKenzie (Joanne E.); S.E. Green (Sally E.); D.E. Beaton (Dorcas E.); N.B. Jain (Nitin B.); M. Lenza (Mario); A.P. Verhagen (Arianne); S. Surace (Stephen); J. Deitch (Jessica); R. Buchbinder (Rachelle)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives To explore the outcome domains and measurement instruments reported in published randomized controlled trials of physical therapy interventions for shoulder pain (rotator cuff disease, adhesive capsulitis, or nonspecific shoulder pain). Study Design and Setting We included

  9. Synthesis of Superparamagnetic Core-Shell Structure Supported Pd Nanocatalysts for Catalytic Nitrite Reduction with Enhanced Activity, No Detection of Undesirable Product of Ammonium, and Easy Magnetic Separation Capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wuzhu; Yang, Weiyi; Xu, Zhengchao; Li, Qi; Shang, Jian Ku

    2016-01-27

    Superparamagnetic nanocatalysts could minimize both the external and internal mass transport limitations and neutralize OH(-) produced in the reaction more effectively to enhance the catalytic nitrite reduction efficiency with the depressed product selectivity to undesirable ammonium, while possess an easy magnetic separation capability. However, commonly used qusi-monodispersed superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanosphere is not suitable as catalyst support for nitrite reduction because it could reduce the catalytic reaction efficiency and the product selectivity to N2, and the iron leakage could bring secondary contamination to the treated water. In this study, protective shells of SiO2, polymethylacrylic acid, and carbon were introduced to synthesize Fe3O4@SiO2/Pd, Fe3O4@PMAA/Pd, and Fe3O4@C/Pd catalysts for catalytic nitrite reduction. It was found that SiO2 shell could provide the complete protection to Fe3O4 nanosphere core among these shells. Because of its good dispersion, dense structure, and complete protection to Fe3O4, the Fe3O4@SiO2/Pd catalyst demonstrated the highest catalytic nitrite reduction activity without the detection of NH4(+) produced. Due to this unique structure, the activity of Fe3O4@SiO2/Pd catalysts for nitrite reduction was found to be independent of the Pd nanoparticle size or shape, and their product selectivity was independent of the Pd nanoparticle size, shape, and content. Furthermore, their superparamagnetic nature and high saturation magnetization allowed their easy magnetic separation from treated water, and they also demonstrated a good stability during the subsequent recycling experiment.

  10. Establishing Core Outcome Domains in Hemodialysis: Report of the Standardized Outcomes in Nephrology-Hemodialysis (SONG-HD) Consensus Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Allison; Manns, Braden; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Wheeler, David C; Evangelidis, Nicole; Tugwell, Peter; Crowe, Sally; Van Biesen, Wim; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C; O'Donoghue, Donal; Tam-Tham, Helen; Shen, Jenny I; Pinter, Jule; Larkins, Nicholas; Youssouf, Sajeda; Mandayam, Sreedhar; Ju, Angela; Craig, Jonathan C

    2017-01-01

    Evidence-informed decision making in clinical care and policy in nephrology is undermined by trials that selectively report a large number of heterogeneous outcomes, many of which are not patient centered. The Standardized Outcomes in Nephrology-Hemodialysis (SONG-HD) Initiative convened an international consensus workshop on November 7, 2015, to discuss the identification and implementation of a potential core outcome set for all trials in hemodialysis. The purpose of this article is to report qualitative analyses of the workshop discussions, describing the key aspects to consider when establishing core outcomes in trials involving patients on hemodialysis therapy. Key stakeholders including 8 patients/caregivers and 47 health professionals (nephrologists, policymakers, industry, and researchers) attended the workshop. Attendees suggested that identifying core outcomes required equitable stakeholder engagement to ensure relevance across patient populations, flexibility to consider evolving priorities over time, deconstruction of language and meaning for conceptual consistency and clarity, understanding of potential overlap and associations between outcomes, and an assessment of applicability to the range of interventions in hemodialysis. For implementation, they proposed that core outcomes must have simple, inexpensive, and validated outcome measures that could be used in clinical care (quality indicators) and trials (including pragmatic trials) and endorsement by regulatory agencies. Integrating these recommendations may foster acceptance and optimize the uptake and translation of core outcomes in hemodialysis, leading to more informative research, for better treatment and improved patient outcomes. Copyright © 2016 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. ITER Plasma at Electron Cyclotron Frequency Domain: Tokamak Core Plasma Diagnostics Based on the Synergy of Stimulated Raman and Brillouin Scatterings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2012-10-01

    A novel plasma diagnostic method is proposed based on the synergy of stimulated Raman and Brillouin scatterings. A nonlinear plasma mode is excited in a 4-wave coupling,footnotetextV. Alexander STEFAN, Nonlinear Electromagnetic Radiation Plasma Interactions, (S-U-Press, 2008). leading to the appearance of suprathermal electrons and accelerated ions at the plasma edgefootnotetextV. Alexander Stefan, Abstract: D1.00018 : ITER Plasma at Electron Cyclotron Frequency Domain: Stimulated Raman Scattering off Gould-Trivelpiece Modes and Generation of Suprathermal Electrons and Energetic Ions; Bulletin of the American Physical Society APS April Meeting 2011 Volume 56, Number 4. with the parameters directly dependent on the plasma parameters in the core of tokamak. Accordingly, plasma diagnostic in the core region, (ion temperature), can be performed by the diagnostics of suprathermal electrons and accelerated ions at the edge plasma.

  12. cDNA cloning of the basement membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan core protein, bamacan: a five domain structure including coiled-coil motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, R R; Couchman, J R

    1997-01-01

    obtained cDNA clones encoding the entire bamacan core protein of Mr = 138 kD, which reveal a five domain, head-rod-tail configuration. The head and tail are potentially globular, while the central large rod probably forms coiled-coil structures, with one large central and several very short interruptions....../translation product from a full-length bamacan cDNA. The unusual structure of this proteoglycan is indicative of specific functional roles in basement membrane physiology, commensurate with its distinct expression in development and changes in disease models....

  13. Characterization of the roles of the catalytic domains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis ligase D in Ku-dependent error-prone DNA end joining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Douglas; DeBeaux, Austin; Shi, Runhua; Doherty, Aidan J; Harrison, Lynn

    2010-09-01

    We previously established an Escherichia coli strain capable of re-circularizing linear plasmid DNA by expressing the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ku (Mt-Ku) and Mycobacterium tuberculosis ligase D (Mt-LigD) proteins from the E.coli chromosome. Repair was predominately mutagenic due to deletions at the termini. We hypothesized that these deletions could be due to a nuclease activity of Mt-LigD that was previously detected in vitro. Mt-LigD has three domains: an N-terminal polymerase domain (PolDom), a central domain with 3'-phosphoesterase and nuclease activity and a C-terminal ligase domain (LigDom). We generated bacterial strains expressing Mt-Ku and mutant versions of Mt-LigD. Plasmid re-circularization experiments in bacteria showed that the PolDom alone had no re-circularization activity. However, an increase in the total and accurate repair was found when the central domain was deleted. This provides further evidence that this central domain does have nuclease activity that can generate deletions during repair. Deletion of only the PolDom of Mt-LigD resulted in a complete loss of accurate repair and a significant reduction in total repair. This is in agreement with published in vitro work indicating that the PolDom is the major Mt-Ku-binding site. Interestingly, the LigDom alone was able to re-circularize plasmid DNA but only in an Mt-Ku-dependent manner, suggesting a potential second site for Ku-LigD interaction. This work has increased our understanding of the mutagenic repair by Mt-Ku and Mt-LigD and has extended the in vitro biochemical experiments by examining the importance of the Mt-LigD domains during repair in bacteria.

  14. Using the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health to identify outcome domains for a core outcome set for aphasia: a comparison of stakeholder perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Sarah J; Worrall, Linda; Rose, Tanya; Le Dorze, Guylaine

    2017-11-12

    This study synthesised the findings of three separate consensus processes exploring the perspectives of key stakeholder groups about important aphasia treatment outcomes. This process was conducted to generate recommendations for outcome domains to be included in a core outcome set for aphasia treatment trials. International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health codes were examined to identify where the groups of: (1) people with aphasia, (2) family members, (3) aphasia researchers, and (4) aphasia clinicians/managers, demonstrated congruence in their perspectives regarding important treatment outcomes. Codes were contextualized using qualitative data. Congruence across three or more stakeholder groups was evident for ICF chapters: Mental functions; Communication; and Services, systems, and policies. Quality of life was explicitly identified by clinicians/managers and researchers, while people with aphasia and their families identified outcomes known to be determinants of quality of life. Core aphasia outcomes include: language, emotional wellbeing, communication, patient-reported satisfaction with treatment and impact of treatment, and quality of life. International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health coding can be used to compare stakeholder perspectives and identify domains for core outcome sets. Pairing coding with qualitative data may ensure important nuances of meaning are retained. Implications for rehabilitation The outcomes measured in treatment research should be relevant to stakeholders and support health care decision making. Core outcome sets (agreed, minimum set of outcomes, and outcome measures) are increasingly being used to ensure the relevancy and consistency of the outcomes measured in treatment studies. Important aphasia treatment outcomes span all components of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health. Stakeholders demonstrated congruence in the identification of important

  15. Dense SDM (12-core × 3-mode) transmission over 527 km with 33.2-ns mode-dispersion employing low-complexity parallel MIMO frequency-domain equalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shibahara, K.; Mizuno, T.; Takara, H.

    We demonstrate 12-core × 3-mode dense SDM transmission over 527 km graded-index multi-core few-mode fiber without mode-dispersion management. Employing low baud rate multi-carrier signal and frequency-domain equalization enables 33.2-ns DMD compensation with low computational complexity. © 2015 OSA...

  16. Identification and Analysis of the SET-Domain Family in Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailong Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As an important economic insect, Bombyx mori is also a useful model organism for lepidopteran insect. SET-domain-containing proteins belong to a group of enzymes named after a common domain that utilizes the cofactor S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM to achieve methylation of its substrates. Many SET-domain-containing proteins have been shown to display catalytic activity towards particular lysine residues on histones, but emerging evidence also indicates that various nonhistone proteins are specifically targeted by this clade of enzymes. To explore their diverse functions of SET-domain superfamily in insect, we identified, cloned, and analyzed the SET-domains proteins in silkworm, Bombyx mori. Firstly, 24 genes containing SET domain from silkworm genome were characterized and 17 of them belonged to six subfamilies of SUV39, SET1, SET2, SUV4-20, EZ, and SMYD. Secondly, SET domains of silkworm SET-domain family were intraspecifically and interspecifically conserved, especially for the catalytic core “NHSC” motif, substrate binding site, and catalytic site in the SET domain. Lastly, further analyses indicated that silkworm SET-domain gene BmSu(var3-9 owned different characterization and expression profiles compared to other invertebrates. Overall, our results provide a new insight into the functional and evolutionary features of SET-domain family.

  17. Core domain and outcome measurement sets for shoulder pain trials are needed: Systematic review of physical therapy trials

    OpenAIRE

    Page, Matthew J.; McKenzie, Joanne E.; Green, Sally E.; Beaton, Dorcas E.; Jain, Nitin B.; Lenza, Mario; Verhagen, Arianne; Surace, Stephen; Deitch, Jessica; Buchbinder, Rachelle

    2015-01-01

    textabstractObjectives To explore the outcome domains and measurement instruments reported in published randomized controlled trials of physical therapy interventions for shoulder pain (rotator cuff disease, adhesive capsulitis, or nonspecific shoulder pain). Study Design and Setting We included trials comparing physical therapy to any other intervention for shoulder pain, indexed up to March 2015 in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, or CINAHL Plus. Two authors independently selected trials for inclu...

  18. Sequence-specific backbone ¹H, ¹³C and ¹⁵N assignments of the catalytic domain of the Escherichia coli protein tyrosine kinase, Wzc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temel, Deniz B; Dutta, Kaushik; Ghose, Ranajeet

    2014-04-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases in bacteria are structurally and functionally distinct from their eukaryotic counterparts. The largest family of bacterial tyrosine kinases, the BY-kinase family, is highly conserved in Gram-negative and Gram-positive species, and plays a central role in biofilm and capsule formation. In Escherichia coli the BY-kinase, Wzc, is a critical component of the machinery responsible for the synthesis and export of the exo-polysaccharide colanic acid, a key constituent of biofilms. Here we present the main-chain (1)H(N), (15)N, (13)C' and (13)Cα, side-chain (13)Cβ resonance assignments for a construct that encodes the entire 274-residue cytosolic catalytic domain of Wzc.

  19. Fibril polymorphism affects immobilized non-amyloid flanking domains of huntingtin exon1 rather than its polyglutamine core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hsiang-Kai; Boatz, Jennifer C.; Krabbendam, Inge E.; Kodali, Ravindra; Hou, Zhipeng; Wetzel, Ronald; Dolga, Amalia M.; Poirier, Michelle A.; van der Wel, Patrick C. A.

    2017-05-01

    Polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin protein is the primary genetic cause of Huntington's disease (HD). Fragments coinciding with mutant huntingtin exon1 aggregate in vivo and induce HD-like pathology in mouse models. The resulting aggregates can have different structures that affect their biochemical behaviour and cytotoxic activity. Here we report our studies of the structure and functional characteristics of multiple mutant htt exon1 fibrils by complementary techniques, including infrared and solid-state NMR spectroscopies. Magic-angle-spinning NMR reveals that fibrillar exon1 has a partly mobile α-helix in its aggregation-accelerating N terminus, and semi-rigid polyproline II helices in the proline-rich flanking domain (PRD). The polyglutamine-proximal portions of these domains are immobilized and clustered, limiting access to aggregation-modulating antibodies. The polymorphic fibrils differ in their flanking domains rather than the polyglutamine amyloid structure. They are effective at seeding polyglutamine aggregation and exhibit cytotoxic effects when applied to neuronal cells.

  20. Proline residues in the HIV-1 NH2-terminal capsid domain: structure determinants for proper core assembly and subsequent steps of early replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzon, T; Leschonsky, B; Bieler, K; Paulus, C; Schröder, J; Wolf, H; Wagner, R

    2000-03-15

    Recent analyses suggest that the p24 capsid (p24(CA)) domain of the HIV-1 group-specific antigen (Gag) may be divided into two structurally and functionally distinct moieties: (i) an amino-terminal portion, previously shown to bind the cellular chaperone cyclophilin A, and (ii) a carboxy-terminal domain, known to contribute to the interaction of the Gag and Gag-Pol precursors during the early assembly process. In order to gain deeper insight into the role of the amino-terminal domain of the p24(CA) protein during viral replication, eight highly conserved proline residues known to promote turns and to terminate alpha-helices within the p24 tertiary structure were replaced by a leucine residue (P-position-L). Following transfection of the proviral constructs in COS7 cells, the majority of the mutants resembled wild-type viruses with respect to the assembly and release of virions. However, although the released particles contained wild-type levels of genomic viral RNA, the mature products of the Gag and Gag-Pol polyproteins as well as the Env glycoproteins-all of them, except mutant P225L-were either noninfectious or severely affected in their replicative capacity. Entry assays monitoring the process of viral DNA synthesis led to the classification of selected provirus mutants into four different phenotypes: (i) mutant P225L was infectious and allowed complete reverse transcription including formation of 2-LTR circles; (ii) mutants P149L, P170L, and P217L failed to form 2-LTR circles; (iii) mutant P222L displayed a severe defect in binding and incorporating cyclophilin A into virions, was delayed with respect to DNA polymerization, and failed to form a 2-LTR replication intermediate; and (iv) mutant P133L was unable even to synthesize a first-strand cDNA product. All replication-defective mutants were characterized by severe alterations in the stability of virion cores, which were in two cases reflected by visible changes in the core morphology. These results suggest

  1. C-Terminal Substitution of HBV Core Proteins with Those from DHBV Reveals That Arginine-Rich 167RRRSQSPRR175 Domain Is Critical for HBV Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeyeung; Shin, Bo-Hye; Park, Gil-Soon; Park, Sun; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Shin, Ho-Joon; Kim, Kyongmin

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the contributions of carboxyl-terminal nucleic acid binding domain of HBV core (C) protein for hepatitis B virus (HBV) replication, chimeric HBV C proteins were generated by substituting varying lengths of the carboxyl-terminus of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) C protein for the corresponding regions of HBV C protein. All chimeric C proteins formed core particles. A chimeric C protein with 221–262 amino acids of DHBV C protein, in place of 146–185 amino acids of the HBV C protein, supported HBV pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) encapsidation and DNA synthesis: 40% amino acid sequence identity or 45% homology in the nucleic-acid binding domain of HBV C protein was sufficient for pgRNA encapsidation and DNA synthesis, although we predominantly detected spliced DNA. A chimeric C protein with 221–241 and 251–262 amino acids of DHBV C, in place of HBV C 146–166 and 176–185 amino acids, respectively, could rescue full-length DNA synthesis. However, a reciprocal C chimera with 242–250 of DHBV C (242RAGSPLPRS 250) introduced in place of 167–175 of HBV C (167RRRSQSPRR 175) significantly decreased pgRNA encapsidation and DNA synthesis, and full-length DNA was not detected, demonstrating that the arginine-rich 167RRRSQSPRR175 domain may be critical for efficient viral replication. Five amino acids differing between viral species (underlined above) were tested for replication rescue; R169 and R175 were found to be important. PMID:22911745

  2. The Rho Termination Factor of Clostridium botulinum contains a Prion-Like Domain with a highly Amyloidogenic Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irantzu ePallares

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Prion-like proteins can switch between a soluble intrinsically disordered conformation and a highly ordered amyloid assembly. This conformational promiscuity is encoded in specific sequence regions, known as prion domains (PrDs. Prions are best known as the causative factors of neurological diseases in mammals. However, bioinformatics analyses reveal that proteins bearing PrDs are present in all kingdoms of life, including bacteria, thus supporting the idea that they serve conserved beneficial cellular functions. Despite the proportion of predicted prion-like proteins in bacterial proteomes is generally low, pathogenic species seem to have a higher prionic load, suggesting that these malleable proteins may favor pathogenic traits. In the present work, we performed a stringent computational analysis of the Clostridium botulinum pathogen proteome in the search for prion-like proteins. A total of 54 candidates were predicted for this anaerobic bacterium, including the transcription termination Rho factor. This RNA-binding protein has been shown to play a crucial role in bacterial adaptation to changing environments. We show here that the predicted disordered PrD domain of this RNA-binding protein contains an inner, highly polar, asparagine-rich short sequence able to spontaneously self-assemble into amyloid-like structures, bearing thus the potential to induce a Rho factor conformational switch that might rewire gene expression in response to environmental conditions.

  3. The C Terminus of the Core β-Ladder Domain in Japanese Encephalitis Virus Nonstructural Protein 1 Is Flexible for Accommodation of Heterologous Epitope Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Li-Chen; Liao, Jia-Teh; Lee, Hwei-Jen; Chou, Wei-Yuan; Chen, Chun-Wei; Lin, Yi-Ling; Liao, Ching-Len

    2016-02-01

    NS1 is the only nonstructural protein that enters the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), where NS1 is glycosylated, forms a dimer, and is subsequently secreted during flavivirus replication as dimers or hexamers, which appear to be highly immunogenic to the infected host, as protective immunity can be elicited against homologous flavivirus infections. Here, by using a trans-complementation assay, we identified the C-terminal end of NS1 derived from Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), which was more flexible than other regions in terms of housing foreign epitopes without a significant impact on virus replication. This mapped flexible region is located in the conserved tip of the core β-ladder domain of the multimeric NS1 structure and is also known to contain certain linear epitopes, readily triggering specific antibody responses from the host. Despite becoming attenuated, recombinant JEV with insertion of a neutralizing epitope derived from enterovirus 71 (EV71) into the C-terminal end of NS1 not only could be normally released from infected cells, but also induced dual protective immunity for the host to counteract lethal challenge with either JEV or EV71 in neonatal mice. These results indicated that the secreted multimeric NS1 of flaviviruses may serve as a natural protein carrier to render epitopes of interest more immunogenic in the C terminus of the core β-ladder domain. The positive-sense RNA genomes of mosquito-borne flaviviruses appear to be flexible in terms of accommodating extra insertions of short heterologous antigens into their virus genes. Here, we illustrate that the newly identified C terminus of the core β-ladder domain in NS1 could be readily inserted into entities such as EV71 epitopes, and the resulting NS1-epitope fusion proteins appeared to maintain normal virus replication, secretion ability, and multimeric formation from infected cells. Nonetheless, such an insertion attenuated the recombinant JEV in mice, despite having retained

  4. Amperometric glucose sensor based on enhanced catalytic reduction of oxygen using glucose oxidase adsorbed onto core-shell Fe3O4-silica-Au magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Aijun; Li Yongfang; Li Zhonghua; Feng Jiuju; Sun Yanli; Chen Jianrong

    2012-01-01

    Monodisperse Fe 3 O 4 magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared under facile solvothermal conditions and successively functionalized with silica and Au to form core/shell Fe 3 O 4 -silica-Au NPs. Furthermore, the samples were used as matrix to construct a glucose sensor based on glucose oxidase (GOD). The immobilized GOD retained its bioactivity with high protein load of 3.92 × 10 −9 mol·cm −2 , and exhibited a surface-controlled quasi-reversible redox reaction, with a fast heterogeneous electron transfer rate of 7.98 ± 0.6 s −1 . The glucose biosensor showed a broad linear range up to 3.97 mM with high sensitivity of 62.45 μA·mM −1 cm −2 and fast response (less than 5 s). - Graphical abstract: Core-shell structured Fe 3 O 4 -silica-Au nanoparticles were prepared and used as matrix to construct an amperometric glucose sensor based on glucose oxidase, which showed broad linear range, high sensitivity, and fast response. Highlights: ► Synthesis of monodispersed Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles. ► Fabrication of core/shell Fe 3 O 4 -silica-Au nanoparticles. ► Construction of a novel glucose sensor with wide linear range, high sensitivity and fast response.

  5. Catalytic roles of lysines (K9, K27, K31) in the N-terminal domain in human adenylate kinase by random site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayabe, T; Park, S K; Takenaka, H; Sumida, M; Uesugi, S; Takenaka, O; Hamada, M

    1996-11-01

    To elucidate lysine residues in the N-terminal domain of human cytosolic adenylate kinase (hAK1, EC 2.7.4.3), random site-directed mutagenesis of K9, K27, and K31 residues was performed, and six mutants were analyzed by steady-state kinetics. K9 residue may play an important role in catalysis by interacting with AMP2-. K27 and K31 residues appear to play a functional role in catalysis by interacting with MgATP2-. In human AK, the epsilon-amino group in the side chain of these lysine residues would be essential for phosphoryl transfer between MgATP2- and AMP2- during transition state.

  6. Evidence for Posttranslational Protein Flavinylation in the Syphilis Spirochete Treponema pallidum: Structural and Biochemical Insights from the Catalytic Core of a Periplasmic Flavin-Trafficking Protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Ranjit K; Brautigam, Chad A; Liu, Wei Z; Tomchick, Diana R; Norgard, Michael V

    2015-05-05

    The syphilis spirochete Treponema pallidum is an important human pathogen but a highly enigmatic bacterium that cannot be cultivated in vitro. T. pallidum lacks many biosynthetic pathways and therefore has evolved the capability to exploit host-derived metabolites via its periplasmic lipoprotein repertoire. We recently reported a flavin-trafficking protein in T. pallidum (Ftp_Tp; TP0796) as the first bacterial metal-dependent flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) pyrophosphatase that hydrolyzes FAD into AMP and flavin mononucleotide (FMN) in the spirochete's periplasm. However, orthologs of Ftp_Tp from other bacteria appear to lack this hydrolytic activity; rather, they bind and flavinylate subunits of a cytoplasmic membrane redox system (Nqr/Rnf). To further explore this dichotomy, biochemical analyses, protein crystallography, and structure-based mutagenesis were used to show that a single amino acid change (N55Y) in Ftp_Tp converts it from an Mg(2+)-dependent FAD pyrophosphatase to an FAD-binding protein. We also demonstrated that Ftp_Tp has a second enzymatic activity (Mg(2+)-FMN transferase); it flavinylates protein(s) covalently with FMN on a threonine side chain of an appropriate sequence motif using FAD as the substrate. Moreover, mutation of a metal-binding residue (D284A) eliminates Ftp_Tp's dual activities, thereby underscoring the role of Mg(2+) in the enzyme-catalyzed reactions. The posttranslational flavinylation activity that can target a periplasmic lipoprotein (TP0171) has not previously been described. The observed activities reveal the catalytic flexibility of a treponemal protein to perform multiple functions. Together, these findings imply mechanisms by which a dynamic pool of flavin cofactor is maintained and how flavoproteins are generated by Ftp_Tp locally in the T. pallidum periplasm. Treponema pallidum, the syphilis spirochete, exploits its periplasmic lipoproteins for a number of essential physiologic processes. One of these, flavin

  7. Catalytic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ming; Zhang, Xiang

    2018-01-23

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to catalytic devices. In one aspect, a device includes a substrate, an electrically insulating layer disposed on the substrate, a layer of material disposed on the electrically insulating layer, and a catalyst disposed on the layer of material. The substrate comprises an electrically conductive material. The substrate and the layer of material are electrically coupled to one another and configured to have a voltage applied across them.

  8. The FA Core Complex Contains a Homo-dimeric Catalytic Module for the Symmetric Mono-ubiquitination of FANCI-FANCD2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Swuec

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation of the main DNA interstrand crosslink repair pathway in higher eukaryotes requires mono-ubiquitination of FANCI and FANCD2 by FANCL, the E3 ligase subunit of the Fanconi anemia core complex. FANCI and FANCD2 form a stable complex; however, the molecular basis of their ubiquitination is ill defined. FANCD2 mono-ubiquitination by FANCL is stimulated by the presence of the FANCB and FAAP100 core complex components, through an unknown mechanism. How FANCI mono-ubiquitination is achieved remains unclear. Here, we use structural electron microscopy, combined with crosslink-coupled mass spectrometry, to find that FANCB, FANCL, and FAAP100 form a dimer of trimers, containing two FANCL molecules that are ideally poised to target both FANCI and FANCD2 for mono-ubiquitination. The FANCC-FANCE-FANCF subunits bridge between FANCB-FANCL-FAAP100 and the FANCI-FANCD2 substrate. A transient interaction with FANCC-FANCE-FANCF alters the FANCI-FANCD2 configuration, stabilizing the dimerization interface. Our data provide a model to explain how equivalent mono-ubiquitination of FANCI and FANCD2 occurs.

  9. Vanadium complexes having [VO]2+, [VO]3+ and [VO2]+ cores with hydrazones of 2,6-diformyl-4-methylphenol: synthesis, characterization, reactivity, and catalytic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Mannar R; Haldar, Chanchal; Kumar, Amit; Kuznetsov, Maxim L; Avecilla, Fernando; Costa Pessoa, João

    2013-09-07

    The Schiff bases H3dfmp(L)2 obtained by the condensation of 2,6-diformyl-4-methylphenol and hydrazones [L = isonicotinoylhydrazide (inh), nicotinoylhydrazide (nah) and benzoylhydrazide (bhz)] are prepared and characterized. By reaction of [V(IV)O(acac)2] and the H3dfmp(L)2 in methanol the V(IV)O-complexes [V(IV)O{Hdfmp(inh)2}(H2O)] (1), [V(IV)O{Hdfmp(nah)2}(H2O)] (2) and [V(IV)O{Hdfmp(bhz)2}(H2O)] (3) were obtained. Upon their aerial oxidation in methanol [V(V)O(OMe)(MeOH){Hdfmp(inh)2}] (4), [V(V)O(OMe)(MeOH){Hdfmp(nah)2}] (5) and [V(V)O(OMe)(MeOH){Hdfmp(bhz)2}] (6) were isolated. In the presence of KOH, oxidation of 1-3 results in the formation of [V(V)O2{H2dfmp(inh)2}]n·5H2O (7), K[V(V)O2{Hdfmp(nah)2}] (8) and K[V(V)O2{Hdfmp(bhz)2}] (9). All compounds are characterized in the solid state and in solution, namely by spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV-Vis, EPR, (1)H, (13)C and (51)V NMR), and DFT is also used to calculate the V(IV) hyperfine coupling constants of V(IV)-compounds and (51)V NMR chemical shifts of several V(V)-species and assign them to those formed in solution. Single crystal X-ray analysis of [V(V)O(OMe)(MeOH){Hdfmp(bhz)2}] (6) and [V(V)O2{H2dfmp(inh)2}]n·5H2O (7) confirm the coordination of the ligand in the dianionic (ONO(2-)) enolate tautomeric form, one of the hydrazide moieties remaining non-coordinated. In the case of 7 the free N(pyridine) atom of the inh moiety coordinates to the other vanadium center yielding a polynuclear complex in the solid state. It is also demonstrated that the V(V)O2-complexes are catalyst precursors in the oxidative bromination of styrene by H2O2, therefore acting as functional models of vanadium dependent haloperoxidases. Plausible intermediates involved in the catalytic process are established by UV-Vis, (51)V NMR and DFT studies.

  10. Modularized Functions of the Fanconi Anemia Core Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaling Huang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Fanconi anemia (FA core complex provides the essential E3 ligase function for spatially defined FANCD2 ubiquitination and FA pathway activation. Of the seven FA gene products forming the core complex, FANCL possesses a RING domain with demonstrated E3 ligase activity. The other six components do not have clearly defined roles. Through epistasis analyses, we identify three functional modules in the FA core complex: a catalytic module consisting of FANCL, FANCB, and FAAP100 is absolutely required for the E3 ligase function, and the FANCA-FANCG-FAAP20 and the FANCC-FANCE-FANCF modules provide nonredundant and ancillary functions that help the catalytic module bind chromatin or sites of DNA damage. Disruption of the catalytic module causes complete loss of the core complex function, whereas loss of any ancillary module component does not. Our work reveals the roles of several FA gene products with previously undefined functions and a modularized assembly of the FA core complex.

  11. Full domain closure of the ligand-binding core of the ionotropic glutamate receptor iGluR5 induced by the high affinity agonist dysiherbaine and the functional antagonist 8,9-dideoxyneodysiherbaine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frydenvang, Karla Andrea; Lash, L Leanne; Naur, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The prevailing structural model for ligand activation of ionotropic glutamate receptors posits that agonist efficacy arises from the stability and magnitude of induced domain closure in the ligand-binding core structure. Here we describe an exception to the correlation between ligand efficacy and...

  12. Plasmid DNA binds to the core oligosaccharide domain of LPS molecules of E. coli cell surface in the CaCl2-mediated transformation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panja, Subrata; Aich, Pulakesh; Jana, Bimal; Basu, Tarakdas

    2008-09-01

    In the standard procedure for artificial transformation of E. coli by plasmid DNA, cellular competence for DNA uptake is developed by suspending the cells in ice-cold CaCl2 (50-100 mM). It is believed that CaCl2 helps DNA adsorption to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) molecules on E. coli cell surface; however, the binding mechanism is mostly obscure. In this report, we present our findings of an in-depth study on in vitro interaction between plasmid DNA and E. coli LPS, using different techniques like absorption and circular dichroism spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry, electron and atomic force microscopy, and so on. The results suggest that the Ca(II) ions, forming coordination complexes with the phosphates of DNA and LPS, facilitate the binding between them. The binding interaction appears to be cooperative, reversible, exothermic, and enthalpy-driven in nature. Binding of LPS causes a partial transition of DNA from B- to A-form. Finer study with the hydrolyzed products of LPS shows that only the core oligosaccharide domain of LPS is responsible for the interaction with DNA. Moreover, the biological significance of this interaction becomes evident from the observation that E. coli cells, from which the LPS have been leached out considerably, show higher efficiency of transformation, when transformed with plasmid-LPS complex rather than plasmid DNA alone.

  13. Prediction of inter domain interactions in modular polyketide synthases by docking and correlated mutation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Gitanjali; Anand, Swadha; Mohanty, Debasisa

    2013-01-01

    Polyketide synthases (PKSs) are huge multi-enzymatic protein complexes involved in the biosynthesis of one of the largest families of bioactive natural products, namely polyketides. The specificity of interactions between various catalytic domains of these megasynthases is one of the pivotal factors which control the precise order in which the extender units are joined during the biosynthetic process. Hence, understanding the molecular details of protein-protein interactions in the PKS megasynthases would be crucial for rational design of novel polyketides by domain swapping experiments involving engineered combinations of PKS catalytic domains. We have developed a computational method for exploring the binding interface between two proteins, and used it to identify the interacting residue pairs, which govern the specificity of recognition between acyl carrier protein (ACP) domain and two core catalytic domains, namely the ketosynthase (KS) and acyl transferase (AT). Both of these domain interactions i.e. the KS-ACP and the AT-ACP, are likely to play a major role in channelling of substrates and control of specificity during polyketide biosynthesis. The method, called interface scan, uses a combination of geometric docking and evolutionary information for the identification of the most appropriate mode of association between two proteins. The parameters of interface scan have been standardized based on analysis of contacts in the crystal structure of ACP in complex with ACP synthase (AcpS). Many of the contacts predicted for PKS domains are in agreement with available experiments.

  14. Mechanism of Catalytic Microtubule Depolymerization via KIF2-Tubulin Transitional Conformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadayuki Ogawa

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Microtubules (MTs are dynamic structures that are fundamental for cell morphogenesis and motility. MT-associated motors work efficiently to perform their functions. Unlike other motile kinesins, KIF2 catalytically depolymerizes MTs from the peeled protofilament end during ATP hydrolysis. However, the detailed mechanism by which KIF2 drives processive MT depolymerization remains unknown. To elucidate the catalytic mechanism, the transitional KIF2-tubulin complex during MT depolymerization was analyzed through multiple methods, including atomic force microscopy, size-exclusion chromatography, multi-angle light scattering, small-angle X-ray scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation, and mass spectrometry. The analyses outlined the conformation in which one KIF2core domain binds tightly to two tubulin dimers in the middle pre-hydrolysis state during ATP hydrolysis, a process critical for catalytic MT depolymerization. The X-ray crystallographic structure of the KIF2core domain displays the activated conformation that sustains the large KIF2-tubulin 1:2 complex.

  15. The RST and PARP-like domain containing SRO protein family: analysis of protein structure, function and conservation in land plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salojärvi Jarkko

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SROs (SIMILAR TO RCD-ONE are a group of plant-specific proteins which have important functions in stress adaptation and development. They contain the catalytic core of the poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP domain and a C-terminal RST (RCD-SRO-TAF4 domain. In addition to these domains, several, but not all, SROs contain an N-terminal WWE domain. Results SROs are present in all analyzed land plants and sequence analysis differentiates between two structurally distinct groups; cryptogams and monocots possess only group I SROs whereas eudicots also contain group II. Group I SROs possess an N-terminal WWE domain (PS50918 but the WWE domain is lacking in group II SROs. Group I domain structure is widely represented in organisms as distant as humans (for example, HsPARP11. We propose a unified nomenclature for the SRO family. The SROs are able to interact with transcription factors through the C-terminal RST domain but themselves are generally not regulated at the transcriptional level. The most conserved feature of the SROs is the catalytic core of the poly(ADP-ribose polymerase (PS51059 domain. However, bioinformatic analysis of the SRO PARP domain fold-structure and biochemical assays of AtRCD1 suggested that SROs do not possess ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. Conclusions The SROs are a highly conserved family of plant specific proteins. Sequence analysis of the RST domain implicates a highly preserved protein structure in that region. This might have implications for functional conservation. We suggest that, despite the presence of the catalytic core of the PARP domain, the SROs do not possess ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. Nevertheless, the function of SROs is critical for plants and might be related to transcription factor regulation and complex formation.

  16. Functional interactions of the AF-2 activation domain core region of the human androgen receptor with the amino-terminal domain and with the transcriptional coactivator TIF2 (transcriptional intermediary factor2)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.A. Berrevoets (Cor); P. Doesburg (Paul); K. Steketee (Karine); J. Trapman (Jan); A.O. Brinkmann (Albert)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractPrevious studies in yeast and mammalian cells showed a functional interaction between the amino-terminal domain and the carboxy-terminal, ligand-binding domain (LBD) of the human androgen receptor (AR). In the present study, the AR subdomains involved in

  17. Priming Th1 immunity to viral core particles is facilitated by trace amounts of RNA bound to its arginine-rich domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, Petra; Stober, Detlef; Oehninger, Claude; Melber, Karl; Reimann, Jörg; Schirmbeck, Reinhold

    2002-05-15

    Particulate hepatitis B core Ag (C protein) (HBcAg) and soluble hepatitis B precore Ag (E protein) (HBeAg) of the hepatitis B virus share >70% of their amino acid sequence and most T and B cell-defined epitopes. When injected at low doses into mice, HBcAg particles prime Th1 immunity while HBeAg protein primes Th2 immunity. HBcAg contains 5-20 ng RNA/microg protein while nucleotide binding to HBeAg is not detectable. Deletion of the C-terminal arginine-rich domain of HBcAg generates HBcAg-144 or HBcAg-149 particles (in which >98% of RNA binding is lost) that prime Th2-biased immunity. HBcAg particles, but not truncated HBcAg-144 or -149 particles stimulate IL-12 p70 release by dendritic cells and IFN-gamma release by nonimmune spleen cells. The injection of HBeAg protein or HBcAg-149 particles into mice primes Th1 immunity only when high doses of RNA (i.e., 20-100 microg/mouse) are codelivered with the Ag. Particle-incorporated RNA has thus a 1000-fold higher potency as a Th1-inducing adjuvant than free RNA mixed to a protein Ag. Disrupting the particulate structure of HBcAg releases RNA and abolishes its Th1 immunity inducing potency. Using DNA vaccines delivered intradermally with the gene gun, inoculation of 1 microg HBcAg-encoding pCI/C plasmid DNA primes Th1 immunity while inoculation of 1 microg HBeAg-encoding pCI/E plasmid DNA or HBcAg-149-encoding pCI/C-149 plasmid DNA primes Th2 immunity. Expression data show eukaryotic RNA associated with HBcAg, but not HBeAg, expressed by the DNA vaccine. Hence, codelivery of an efficient, intrinsic adjuvant (i.e., nanogram amounts of prokaryotic or eukaryotic RNA bound to arginine-rich sequences) by HBcAg nucleocapsids facilitates priming of anti-viral Th1 immunity.

  18. Structures of three members of Pfam PF02663 (FmdE) implicated in microbial methanogenesis reveal a conserved α+β core domain and an auxiliary C-terminal treble-clef zinc finger

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Axelrod, Herbert L.; Das, Debanu; Abdubek, Polat; Astakhova, Tamara; Bakolitsa, Constantina; Carlton, Dennis; Chen, Connie; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Clayton, Thomas; Deller, Marc C.; Duan, Lian; Ellrott, Kyle; Farr, Carol L.; Feuerhelm, Julie; Grant, Joanna C.; Grzechnik, Anna; Han, Gye Won; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Jin, Kevin K.; Klock, Heath E.; Knuth, Mark W.; Kozbial, Piotr; Krishna, S. Sri; Kumar, Abhinav; Lam, Winnie W.; Marciano, David; McMullan, Daniel; Miller, Mitchell D.; Morse, Andrew T.; Nigoghossian, Edward; Nopakun, Amanda; Okach, Linda; Puckett, Christina; Reyes, Ron; Sefcovic, Natasha; Tien, Henry J.; Trame, Christine B.; Bedem, Henry van den; Weekes, Dana; Wooten, Tiffany; Xu, Qingping; Hodgson, Keith O.; Wooley, John; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2010-01-01

    The first structures from the FmdE Pfam family (PF02663) reveal that some members of this family form tightly intertwined dimers consisting of two domains (N-terminal α+β core and C-terminal zinc-finger domains), whereas others contain only the core domain. The presence of the zinc-finger domain suggests that some members of this family may perform functions associated with transcriptional regulation, protein–protein interaction, RNA binding or metal-ion sensing. Examination of the genomic context for members of the FmdE Pfam family (PF02663), such as the protein encoded by the fmdE gene from the methanogenic archaeon Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum, indicates that 13 of them are co-transcribed with genes encoding subunits of molybdenum formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.99.5), an enzyme that is involved in microbial methane production. Here, the first crystal structures from PF02663 are described, representing two bacterial and one archaeal species: B8FYU2-DESHY from the anaerobic dehalogenating bacterium Desulfitobacterium hafniense DCB-2, Q2LQ23-SYNAS from the syntrophic bacterium Syntrophus aciditrophicus SB and Q9HJ63-THEAC from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum. Two of these proteins, Q9HJ63-THEAC and Q2LQ23-SYNAS, contain two domains: an N-terminal thioredoxin-like α+β core domain (NTD) consisting of a five-stranded, mixed β-sheet flanked by several α-helices and a C-terminal zinc-finger domain (CTD). B8FYU2-DESHY, on the other hand, is composed solely of the NTD. The CTD of Q9HJ63-THEAC and Q2LQ23-SYNAS is best characterized as a treble-clef zinc finger. Two significant structural differences between Q9HJ63-THEAC and Q2LQ23-SYNAS involve their metal binding. First, zinc is bound to the putative active site on the NTD of Q9HJ63-THEAC, but is absent from the NTD of Q2LQ23-SYNAS. Second, whereas the structure of the CTD of Q2LQ23-SYNAS shows four Cys side chains within coordination distance of the Zn atom, the structure

  19. Tyr702 is an important determinant of agonist binding and domain closure of the ligand-binding core of GluR2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Anne; Pickering, Darryl S.; Vestergaard, Bente

    2005-01-01

    )GluR2(Q)i than at wild-type GluR2(Q)i. Whereas an excellent correlation exists between domain closure and efficacy of a range of agonists at full-length GluR2 determined by electrophysiology in Xenopus laevis oocytes, a direct correlation between agonist induced domain closure of (Y702F)GluR2-S1S2J...

  20. Molecular determinants of interactions between the N-terminal domain and the transmembrane core that modulate hERG K+ channel gating.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Fernández-Trillo

    Full Text Available A conserved eag domain in the cytoplasmic amino terminus of the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (hERG potassium channel is critical for its slow deactivation gating. Introduction of gene fragments encoding the eag domain are able to restore normal deactivation properties of channels from which most of the amino terminus has been deleted, and also those lacking exclusively the eag domain or carrying a single point mutation in the initial residues of the N-terminus. Deactivation slowing in the presence of the recombinant domain is not observed with channels carrying a specific Y542C point mutation in the S4-S5 linker. On the other hand, mutations in some initial positions of the recombinant fragment also impair its ability to restore normal deactivation. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET analysis of fluorophore-tagged proteins under total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF conditions revealed a substantial level of FRET between the introduced N-terminal eag fragments and the eag domain-deleted channels expressed at the membrane, but not between the recombinant eag domain and full-length channels with an intact amino terminus. The FRET signals were also minimized when the recombinant eag fragments carried single point mutations in the initial portion of their amino end, and when Y542C mutated channels were used. These data suggest that the restoration of normal deactivation gating by the N-terminal recombinant eag fragment is an intrinsic effect of this domain directed by the interaction of its N-terminal segment with the gating machinery, likely at the level of the S4-S5 linker.

  1. Domains and domain loss

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haberland, Hartmut

    2005-01-01

    politicians and in the media, especially in the discussion whether some languages undergo ‘domain loss’ vis-à-vis powerful international languages like English. An objection that has been raised here is that domains, as originally conceived, are parameters of language choice and not properties of languages...... not described in terms of domains, and recent research e.g. about the multilingual communities in the Danish-German border area seems to confirm this....

  2. A structural role for the PHP domain in E. coli DNA polymerase III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, Tiago; Guenther, Joel; Kelch, Brian; Anaya, Jordan; Prabhakar, Arjun; O'Donnell, Mike; Kuriyan, John; Lamers, Meindert H

    2013-05-14

    In addition to the core catalytic machinery, bacterial replicative DNA polymerases contain a Polymerase and Histidinol Phosphatase (PHP) domain whose function is not entirely understood. The PHP domains of some bacterial replicases are active metal-dependent nucleases that may play a role in proofreading. In E. coli DNA polymerase III, however, the PHP domain has lost several metal-coordinating residues and is likely to be catalytically inactive. Genomic searches show that the loss of metal-coordinating residues in polymerase PHP domains is likely to have coevolved with the presence of a separate proofreading exonuclease that works with the polymerase. Although the E. coli Pol III PHP domain has lost metal-coordinating residues, the structure of the domain has been conserved to a remarkable degree when compared to that of metal-binding PHP domains. This is demonstrated by our ability to restore metal binding with only three point mutations, as confirmed by the metal-bound crystal structure of this mutant determined at 2.9 Å resolution. We also show that Pol III, a large multi-domain protein, unfolds cooperatively and that mutations in the degenerate metal-binding site of the PHP domain decrease the overall stability of Pol III and reduce its activity. While the presence of a PHP domain in replicative bacterial polymerases is strictly conserved, its ability to coordinate metals and to perform proofreading exonuclease activity is not, suggesting additional non-enzymatic roles for the domain. Our results show that the PHP domain is a major structural element in Pol III and its integrity modulates both the stability and activity of the polymerase.

  3. A Study on Dielectric Properties of Cadmium Sulfide-Zinc Sulfide Core-Shell Nanocomposites for Application as Nanoelectronic Filter Component in the Microwave Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devi, Jutika; Datta, Pranayee

    2018-03-01

    Complex permittivities of cadmium sulfide (CdS), zinc sulfide (ZnS), and of cadmium sulfide-zinc sulfide (CdS/ZnS) core-shell nanoparticles embedded in a polyvinyl alcohol matrix (PVA) were measured in liquid phase using a VectorNetwork Analyzer in the frequency range of 500 MHz-10 GHz. These nanocomposites are modeled as an embedded capacitor, and their electric field distribution and polarization have been studied using COMSOL Multiphysics software. By varying the thickness of the shell and the number of inclusions, the capacitance values were estimated. It was observed that CdS, ZnS and CdS/ZnS core-shell nanoparticles embedded in a polyvinyl alcohol matrix show capacitive behavior. There is a strong influence of the dielectric properties in the capacitive behavior of the embedded nanocapacitor. The capping matrix, position and filling factors of nanoinclusions all affect the capacitive behavior of the tested nanocomposites. Application of the CdS, ZnS and CdS/ZnS core-shell nanocomposite as the passive low-pass filter circuit has also been investigated. From the present study, it has been found that CdS/ZnS core-shell nanoparticles embedded in PVA matrix are potential structures for application as nanoelectronic filter components in different areas of communication.

  4. Human small cell lung cancer NYH cells selected for resistance to the bisdioxopiperazine topoisomerase II catalytic inhibitor ICRF-187 demonstrate a functional R162Q mutation in the Walker A consensus ATP binding domain of the alpha isoform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessel, I; Jensen, L H; Jensen, P B

    1999-01-01

    -AMSA), which act by stabilizing enzyme-DNA-drug complexes at a stage in which the DNA gate strand is cleaved and the protein is covalently attached to DNA. Human small cell lung cancer NYH cells selected for resistance to ICRF-187 (NYH/187) showed a 25% increase in topoisomerase IIalpha level and no change......-clamp state in the enzyme's catalytic cycle caused by a decreased ATP binding by the mutated enzyme that is responsible for bisdioxopiperazine resistance....... demonstrated that R162Q conferred resistance to the bisdioxopiperazines ICRF-187 and -193 but not to etoposide or m-AMSA. Both etoposide and m-AMSA induced more DNA cleavage with purified R162Q enzyme than with the wt. The R162Q enzyme has a 20-25% decreased catalytic capacity compared to the wt and was almost...

  5. Contribution to the development of methods for nuclear reactor core calculations with APOLLO3 code: domain decomposition in transport theory with nonlinear diffusion acceleration for 2D and 3D geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenain, Roland

    2015-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the implementation of a domain decomposition method applied to the neutron transport equation. The objective of this work is to access high-fidelity deterministic solutions to properly handle heterogeneities located in nuclear reactor cores, for problems' size ranging from color-sets of assemblies to large reactor cores configurations in 2D and 3D. The innovative algorithm developed during the thesis intends to optimize the use of parallelism and memory. The approach also aims to minimize the influence of the parallel implementation on the performances. These goals match the needs of APOLLO3 project, developed at CEA and supported by EDF and AREVA, which must be a portable code (no optimization on a specific architecture) in order to achieve best estimate modeling with resources ranging from personal computer to compute cluster available for engineers analyses. The proposed algorithm is a Parallel Multigroup-Block Jacobi one. Each sub-domain is considered as a multi-group fixed-source problem with volume-sources (fission) and surface-sources (interface flux between the sub-domains). The multi-group problem is solved in each sub-domain and a single communication of the interface flux is required at each power iteration. The spectral radius of the resolution algorithm is made similar to the one of a classical resolution algorithm with a nonlinear diffusion acceleration method: the well-known Coarse Mesh Finite Difference. In this way an ideal scalability is achievable when the calculation is parallelized. The memory organization, taking advantage of shared memory parallelism, optimizes the resources by avoiding redundant copies of the data shared between the sub-domains. Distributed memory architectures are made available by a hybrid parallel method that combines both paradigms of shared memory parallelism and distributed memory parallelism. For large problems, these architectures provide a greater number of processors and the amount of

  6. Bonding Quandary in the [Cu3S2](3+) Core: Insights from the Analysis of Domain Averaged Fermi Holes and the Local Spin

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ponec, Robert; Ramos-Córdoba, E.; Salvador, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 9 (2013), s. 1975-1982 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/0118 Grant - others:SMCT(ES) MAT2008-04834; SMCT(ES) CTQ2011-23441/BQU; SFPU(ES) AP2008-01231 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : Cu3S2 core * dafh analysis * bonding quandary Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.775, year: 2013

  7. Effects of Lateral and Terminal Chains of X-Shaped Bolapolyphiles with Oligo(phenylene ethynylene Cores on Self-Assembly Behavior. Part 2: Domain Formation by Self-Assembly in Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Werner

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Supramolecular self-assembly of membrane constituents within a phospholipid bilayer creates complex functional platforms in biological cells that operate in intracellular signaling, trafficking and membrane remodeling. Synthetic polyphilic compounds of macromolecular or small size can be incorporated into artificial phospholipid bilayers. Featuring three or four moieties of different philicities, they reach beyond ordinary amphiphilicity and open up avenues to new functions and interaction concepts. Here, we have incorporated a series of X-shaped bolapolyphiles into DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayers of giant unilamellar vesicles. The bolapolyphiles consist of a rod-like oligo(phenylene ethynylene (OPE core, hydrophilic glycerol-based headgroups with or without oligo(ethylene oxide expansions at both ends and two lateral alkyl chains attached near the center of the OPE core. In the absence of DPPC and water, the compounds showed thermotropic liquid-crystalline behavior with a transition between polyphilic and amphiphilic assembly (see part 1 in this issue. In DPPC membranes, various trends in the domain morphologies were observed upon structure variations, which entailed branched alkyl chains of various sizes, alkyl chain semiperfluorination and size expansion of the headgroups. Observed effects on domain morphology are interpreted in the context of the bulk behavior (part 1 and of a model that was previously developed based on spectroscopic and physicochemical data.

  8. Catalytic Oligopeptide Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zijian; Noda, Hidetoshi; Shibasaki, Masakatsu; Kumagai, Naoya

    2018-02-02

    Waste-free catalytic assembly of α-amino acids is fueled by a multiboron catalyst that features a characteristic B 3 NO 2 heterocycle, providing a versatile catalytic protocol wherein functionalized natural α-amino acid units are accommodated and commonly used protecting groups are tolerated. The facile dehydrative conditions eliminate the use of engineered peptide coupling reagents, exemplifying a greener catalytic alternative for peptide coupling. The catalysis is sufficiently robust to enable pentapeptide synthesis, constructing all four amide bond linkages in a catalytic fashion.

  9. 1H, 13C, and 15N resonance assignments of an enzymatically active domain from the catalytic component (CDTa, residues 216-420) of a binary toxin from Clostridium difficile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Braden M; Godoy-Ruiz, Raquel; Varney, Kristen M; Rustandi, Richard R; Weber, David J

    2016-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is a bacterial pathogen and is the most commonly reported source of nosocomial infection in industrialized nations. Symptoms of C. difficile infection (CDI) include antibiotic-associated diarrhea, pseudomembranous colitis, sepsis and death. Over the last decade, rates and severity of hospital infections in North America and Europe have increased dramatically and correlate with the emergence of a hypervirulent strain of C. difficile characterized by the presence of a binary toxin, CDT (C. difficile toxin). The binary toxin consists of an enzymatic component (CDTa) and a cellular binding component (CDTb) that together form the active binary toxin complex. CDTa harbors a pair of structurally similar but functionally distinct domains, an N-terminal domain (residues 1-215; (1-215)CDTa) that interacts with CDTb and a C-terminal domain (residues 216-420; (216-420)CDTa) that harbors the intact ADP-ribosyltransferase (ART) active site. Reported here are the (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N backbone resonance assignments of the 23 kDa, 205 amino acid C-terminal enzymatic domain of CDTa, termed (216-420)CDTa. These NMR resonance assignments for (216-420)CDTa represent the first for a family of ART binary toxins and provide the framework for detailed characterization of the solution-state protein structure determination, dynamic studies of this domain, as well as NMR-based drug discovery efforts.

  10. A novel approach for multi-domain and multi-gene family identification provides insights into evolutionary dynamics of disease resistance genes in core eudicot plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofberger, Johannes A; Zhou, Beifei; Tang, Haibao; Jones, Jonathan D G; Schranz, M Eric

    2014-11-08

    Recent advances in DNA sequencing techniques resulted in more than forty sequenced plant genomes representing a diverse set of taxa of agricultural, energy, medicinal and ecological importance. However, gene family curation is often only inferred from DNA sequence homology and lacks insights into evolutionary processes contributing to gene family dynamics. In a comparative genomics framework, we integrated multiple lines of evidence provided by gene synteny, sequence homology and protein-based Hidden Markov Modelling to extract homologous super-clusters composed of multi-domain resistance (R)-proteins of the NB-LRR type (for NUCLEOTIDE BINDING/LEUCINE-RICH REPEATS), that are involved in plant innate immunity. To assess the diversity of R-proteins within and between species, we screened twelve eudicot plant genomes including six major crops and found a total of 2,363 NB-LRR genes. Our curated R-proteins set shows a 50% average for tandem duplicates and a 22% fraction of gene copies retained from ancient polyploidy events (ohnologs). We provide evidence for strong positive selection and show significant differences in molecular evolution rates (Ka/Ks-ratio) among tandem- (mean = 1.59), ohnolog (mean = 1.36) and singleton (mean = 1.22) R-gene duplicates. To foster the process of gene-edited plant breeding, we report species-specific presence/absence of all 140 NB-LRR genes present in the model plant Arabidopsis and describe four distinct clusters of NB-LRR "gatekeeper" loci sharing syntenic orthologs across all analyzed genomes. By curating a near-complete set of multi-domain R-protein clusters in an eudicot-wide scale, our analysis offers significant insight into evolutionary dynamics underlying diversification of the plant innate immune system. Furthermore, our methods provide a blueprint for future efforts to identify and more rapidly clone functional NB-LRR genes from any plant species.

  11. Human small cell lung cancer NYH cells selected for resistance to the bisdioxopiperazine topoisomerase II catalytic inhibitor ICRF-187 demonstrate a functional R162Q mutation in the Walker A consensus ATP binding domain of the alpha isoform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessel, I; Jensen, L H; Jensen, P B

    1999-01-01

    Bisdioxopiperazine drugs such as ICRF-187 are catalytic inhibitors of DNA topoisomerase II, with at least two effects on the enzyme: namely, locking it in a closed-clamp form and inhibiting its ATPase activity. This is in contrast to topoisomerase II poisons as etoposide and amsacrine (m...... inactive at enzyme at 1 mM ATP was not resistant to ICRF-187 compared to wt, whereas it was clearly less sensitive than wt to ICRF-187 at low ATP concentrations. This suggests that it is a shift in the equilibrium to an open......-AMSA), which act by stabilizing enzyme-DNA-drug complexes at a stage in which the DNA gate strand is cleaved and the protein is covalently attached to DNA. Human small cell lung cancer NYH cells selected for resistance to ICRF-187 (NYH/187) showed a 25% increase in topoisomerase IIalpha level and no change...

  12. The N-terminal pleckstrin, coiled-coil, and IQ domains of the exchange factor Ras-GRF act cooperatively to facilitate activation by calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchsbaum, R; Telliez, J B; Goonesekera, S; Feig, L A

    1996-09-01

    We have recently shown that the neuronal exchange factor p140 Ras-GRF becomes activated in vivo in response to elevated calcium levels [C. L. Farnsworth, N. W. Freshney, L. B. Rosen, A. Ghosh, M. E. Greenberg, and L. A. Feig, Nature (London) 376:524-527, 1995]. Activation is mediated by calcium-induced calmodulin binding to an IQ domain near the N terminus of Ras-GRF. Here we show that the adjacent N-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH), coiled-coil, and IQ domains function cooperatively to allow Ras-GRF activation. Deletion of the N-terminal PH domain redistributes a large percentage of Ras-GRF from the particulate to the cytosolic fraction of cells and renders the protein insensitive to calcium stimulation. A similar cellular distribution and biological activity are observed when only the core catalytic domain is expressed. Although the PH domain is necessary for particulate association of Ras-GRF, it is not sufficient for targeting the core catalytic domain to this cellular location. This requires the PH domain and the adjacent coiled-coil and IQ sequences. Remarkably, this form of Ras-GRF is constitutively activated. The PH and coiled-coil domains must also perform an additional function, since targeting to the particulate fraction of cells is not sufficient to allow Ras-GRF activation by calcium. A Ras-GRF mutant containing the PH domain from Ras-GTPase-activating protein in place of its own N-terminal PH domain localizes to the particulate fraction of cells but does not respond to calcium. Similar phenotypes are seen with mutant Ras-GRFs containing point mutations in either the PH or coiled-coil domain. These findings argue that the N-terminal PH, coiled-coil, and IQ domains of Ras-GRF function together to connect Ras-GRF to multiple components in the particulate fractions of cells that are required for responsiveness of the protein to calcium signaling.

  13. ¹H, ¹³C, and ¹⁵N backbone resonance assignments of the 37 kDa voltage-gated Ca²⁺ channel β4 subunit core SH3-GK domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xingfu; Horne, William A

    2014-04-01

    The β subunit of the voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (α1, α2δ, and β subunits) is a member of the MAGUK family of proteins and plays an essential role in regulating Ca(2+) channel trafficking and gating. It also serves as a central interaction partner for various Ca(2+) channel regulatory proteins. We report here the nearly complete (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N backbone resonance assignments of the 37 kDa core SH3-GK domains of the β4 subunit. This is the first report of solution assignments for β subunits, and as such will lay the foundation for future investigations of interaction site mapping, functional dynamics, and protein complex structure determination.

  14. Epistemology and ontology in core ontologies: FOLaw and LRI-Core, two core ontologies for law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breukers, J.A.P.J.; Hoekstra, R.J.

    2004-01-01

    For more than a decade constructing ontologies for legal domains, we, at the Leibniz Center for Law, felt really the need to develop a core ontology for law that would enable us to re-use the common denominator of the various legal domains. In this paper we present two core ontologies for law. The

  15. Solution structure of domain 1.1 of the σAfactor fromBacillus subtilisis preformed for binding to the RNA polymerase core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachrdla, Milan; Padrta, Petr; Rabatinová, Alžbeta; Šanderová, Hana; Barvík, Ivan; Krásný, Libor; Žídek, Lukáš

    2017-07-14

    Bacterial RNA polymerase (RNAP) requires σ factors to recognize promoter sequences. Domain 1.1 of primary σ factors (σ1.1) prevents their binding to promoter DNA in the absence of RNAP, and when in complex with RNAP, it occupies the DNA-binding channel of RNAP. Currently, two 3D structures of σ1.1 are available: from Escherichia coli in complex with RNAP and from T. maritima solved free in solution. However, these two structures significantly differ, and it is unclear whether this difference is due to an altered conformation upon RNAP binding or to differences in intrinsic properties between the proteins from these two distantly related species. Here, we report the solution structure of σ1.1 from the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis We found that B. subtilis σ1.1 is highly compact because of additional stabilization not present in σ1.1 from the other two species and that it is more similar to E. coli σ1.1. Moreover, modeling studies suggested that B. subtilis σ1.1 requires minimal conformational changes for accommodating RNAP in the DNA channel, whereas T. maritima σ1.1 must be rearranged to fit therein. Thus, the mesophilic species B. subtilis and E. coli share the same σ1.1 fold, whereas the fold of σ1.1 from the thermophile T. maritima is distinctly different. Finally, we describe an intriguing similarity between σ1.1 and δ, an RNAP-associated protein in B. subtilis , bearing implications for the so-far unknown binding site of δ on RNAP. In conclusion, our results shed light on the conformational changes of σ1.1 required for its accommodation within bacterial RNAP. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. 1HN, 13C, and 15N Resonance Assignments of the CDTb-Interacting Domain (CDTaBID) from the Clostridium difficile Binary Toxin Catalytic Component (CDTa, residues 1–221)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Braden M.; Varney, Kristen M.; Rustandi, Richard R.; Weber, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Once considered a relatively harmless bacterium, Clostridium difficile has become a major concern for healthcare facilities, now the most commonly reported hospital-acquired pathogen. C. difficile infection (CDI) is usually contracted when the normal gut microbiome is compromised by antibiotic therapy, allowing the opportunistic pathogen to grow and produce its toxins. The severity of infection ranges from watery diarrhea and abdominal cramping to pseudomembranous colitis, sepsis, or death. The past decade has seen a marked increase in the frequency and severity of CDI among industrialized nations owing directly to the emergence of a highly virulent C. difficile strain, NAP1. Along with the large Clostridial toxins expressed by non-epidemic strains, C. difficile NAP1 produces a binary toxin, CDT (C. difficile transferase). As the name suggests, CDT is a two-component toxin comprised of an ADP-ribosyltransferase (ART) component (CDTa) and a cell-binding/translocation component (CDTb) that function to destabilize the host cytoskeleton by covalent modification of actin monomers. Central to the mechanism of binary toxin-induced pathogenicity is the formation of CDTa/CDTb complexes at the cell surface. From the perspective of CDTa, this interaction is mediated by the N-terminal domain (residues 1–215) and is spatially and functionally independent of ART activity, which is located in the C-terminal domain (residues 216–420). Here we report the 1HN, 13C, and 15N backbone resonance assignments of a 212 amino acid, ~23 kDa N-terminal CDTb-interacting domain (CDTaBID) construct by heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. These NMR assignments represent the first component coordination domain for a family of Clostridium or Bacillus species harboring ART activity. Our assignments lay the foundation for detailed solution state characterization of structure-function relationships, toxin complex formation, and NMR-based drug discovery efforts. PMID:27351891

  17. Catalytic distillation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  18. Catalytic Functions of Standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Blind (Knut)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe three different areas and the examples have illustrated several catalytic functions of standards for innovation. First, the standardisation process reduces the time to market of inventions, research results and innovative technologies. Second, standards themselves promote the

  19. Catalytic distillation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  20. Core Outcome Domains for early phase clinical trials of sound-, psychology-, and pharmacology-based interventions to manage chronic subjective tinnitus in adults: the COMIT'ID study protocol for using a Delphi process and face-to-face meetings to establish consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fackrell, Kathryn; Smith, Harriet; Colley, Veronica; Thacker, Brian; Horobin, Adele; Haider, Haúla F; Londero, Alain; Mazurek, Birgit; Hall, Deborah A

    2017-08-23

    The reporting of outcomes in clinical trials of subjective tinnitus indicates that many different tinnitus-related complaints are of interest to investigators, from perceptual attributes of the sound (e.g. loudness) to psychosocial impacts (e.g. quality of life). Even when considering one type of intervention strategy for subjective tinnitus, there is no agreement about what is critically important for deciding whether a treatment is effective. The main purpose of this observational study is, therefore to, develop Core Outcome Domain Sets for the three different intervention strategies (sound, psychological, and pharmacological) for adults with chronic subjective tinnitus that should be measured and reported in every clinical trial of these interventions. Secondary objectives are to identify the strengths and limitations of our study design for recruiting and reducing attrition of participants, and to explore uptake of the core outcomes. The 'Core Outcome Measures in Tinnitus: International Delphi' (COMIT'ID) study will use a mixed-methods approach that incorporates input from health care users at the pre-Delphi stage, a modified three-round Delphi survey and final consensus meetings (one for each intervention). The meetings will generate recommendations by stakeholder representatives on agreed Core Outcome Domain Sets specific to each intervention. A subsequent step will establish a common cross-cutting Core Outcome Domain Set by identifying the common outcome domains included in all three intervention-specific Core Outcome Domain Sets. To address the secondary objectives, we will gather feedback from participants about their experience of taking part in the Delphi process. We aspire to conduct an observational cohort study to evaluate uptake of the core outcomes in published studies at 7 years following Core Outcome Set publication. The COMIT'ID study aims to develop a Core Outcome Domain Set that is agreed as critically important for deciding whether a

  1. 1H, 13C and 15N resonance assignments of a C-terminal domain of human CHD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanty, Biswaranjan; Silva, Ana P G; Mackay, Joel P; Ryan, Daniel P

    2016-04-01

    Chromatin remodelling proteins are an essential family of eukaryotic proteins. They harness the energy from ATP hydrolysis and apply it to alter chromatin structure in order to regulate all aspects of genome biology. Chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 1 (CHD1) is one such remodelling protein that has specialised nucleosome organising abilities and is conserved across eukaryotes. CHD1 possesses a pair of tandem chromodomains that directly precede the core catalytic Snf2 helicase-like domain, and a C-terminal SANT-SLIDE DNA-binding domain. We have identified an additional conserved domain in the C-terminal region of CHD1. Here, we report the backbone and side chain resonance assignments for this domain from human CHD1 at pH 6.5 and 25 °C (BMRB No. 25638).

  2. Synthesis and characterization of branched fcc/hcp ruthenium nanostructures and their catalytic activity in ammonia borane hydrolysis

    KAUST Repository

    AlYami, Noktan

    2018-01-30

    Several systems have shown the ability to stabilize uncommon crystal structures during the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles. By tailoring the nanoparticle crystal structure, the physical and chemical properties of the particles can also be controlled. Herein, we first synthesized branched nanoparticles of mixed hcp/fcc ruthenium, which were formed using tungsten carbonyl [W(CO)6] as both a reducing agent and a source of carbon monoxide. The branched particles were formed from multiple particulates off a central core. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) clearly showed that the branched structures consisted of aligned hcp crystal domains, a mixture of fcc and hcp crystal domains with several defects and misalignments, and particles that contained multiple cores and branches. Branched particles were also formed with molybdenum carbonyl [Mo(CO)6], and faceted particles of hcp and fcc particles were formed with Re2(CO)10 as a carbon monoxide source. Without metal carbonyls, small particles of spherical hcp ruthenium were produced, and their size could be controlled by the selection of the precursor. The ruthenium nanoparticles were tested for ammonia borane hydrolysis; the branched nanoparticles were more reactive for catalytic hydrogen evolution than the faceted hcp/fcc nanoparticles or the spherical hcp nanoparticles. This work showcases the potential of crystal phase engineering of transition metal nanoparticles by different carbon monoxide precursors for tailoring their catalytic reactivity.

  3. Characterization of DNA polymerase X from Thermus thermophilus HB8 reveals the POLXc and PHP domains are both required for 3'-5' exonuclease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakane, Shuhei; Nakagawa, Noriko; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Masui, Ryoji

    2009-04-01

    The X-family DNA polymerases (PolXs) comprise a highly conserved DNA polymerase family found in all kingdoms. Mammalian PolXs are known to be involved in several DNA-processing pathways including repair, but the cellular functions of bacterial PolXs are less known. Many bacterial PolXs have a polymerase and histidinol phosphatase (PHP) domain at their C-termini in addition to a PolX core (POLXc) domain, and possess 3'-5' exonuclease activity. Although both domains are highly conserved in bacteria, their molecular functions, especially for a PHP domain, are unknown. We found Thermus thermophilus HB8 PolX (ttPolX) has Mg(2+)/Mn(2+)-dependent DNA/RNA polymerase, Mn(2+)-dependent 3'-5' exonuclease and DNA-binding activities. We identified the domains of ttPolX by limited proteolysis and characterized their biochemical activities. The POLXc domain was responsible for the polymerase and DNA-binding activities but exonuclease activity was not detected for either domain. However, the POLXc and PHP domains interacted with each other and a mixture of the two domains had Mn(2+)-dependent 3'-5' exonuclease activity. Moreover, site-directed mutagenesis revealed catalytically important residues in the PHP domain for the 3'-5' exonuclease activity. Our findings provide a molecular insight into the functional domain organization of bacterial PolXs, especially the requirement of the PHP domain for 3'-5' exonuclease activity.

  4. Atomically Precise Metal Nanoclusters for Catalytic Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Rongchao [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-11-18

    The central goal of this project is to explore the catalytic application of atomically precise gold nanoclusters. By solving the total structures of ligand-protected nanoclusters, we aim to correlate the catalytic properties of metal nanoclusters with their atomic/electronic structures. Such correlation unravel some fundamental aspects of nanocatalysis, such as the nature of particle size effect, origin of catalytic selectivity, particle-support interactions, the identification of catalytically active centers, etc. The well-defined nanocluster catalysts mediate the knowledge gap between single crystal model catalysts and real-world conventional nanocatalysts. These nanoclusters also hold great promise in catalyzing certain types of reactions with extraordinarily high selectivity. These aims are in line with the overall goals of the catalytic science and technology of DOE and advance the BES mission “to support fundamental research to understand, predict, and ultimately control matter and energy at the level of electrons, atoms, and molecules”. Our group has successfully prepared different sized, robust gold nanoclusters protected by thiolates, such as Au25(SR)18, Au28(SR)20, Au38(SR)24, Au99(SR)42, Au144(SR)60, etc. Some of these nanoclusters have been crystallographically characterized through X-ray crystallography. These ultrasmall nanoclusters (< 2 nm diameter) exhibit discrete electronic structures due to quantum size effect, as opposed to quasicontinuous band structure of conventional metal nanoparticles or bulk metals. The available atomic structures (metal core plus surface ligands) of nanoclusters serve as the basis for structure-property correlations. We have investigated the unique catalytic properties of nanoclusters (i.e. not observed in conventional nanogold catalysts) and revealed the structure-selectivity relationships. Highlights of our

  5. Structural Evidence of a Major Conformational Change Triggered by Substrate Binding in DapE Enzymes: Impact on the Catalytic Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocek, Boguslaw; Reidl, Cory; Starus, Anna; Heath, Tahirah; Bienvenue, David; Osipiuk, Jerzy; Jedrzejczak, Robert; Joachimiak, Andrzej; Becker, Daniel P; Holz, Richard C

    2018-02-06

    The X-ray crystal structure of the dapE-encoded N-succinyl-l,l-diaminopimelic acid desuccinylase from Haemophilus influenzae (HiDapE) bound by the products of hydrolysis, succinic acid and l,l-DAP, was determined at 1.95 Å. Surprisingly, the structure bound to the products revealed that HiDapE undergoes a significant conformational change in which the catalytic domain rotates ∼50° and shifts ∼10.1 Å (as measured at the position of the Zn atoms) relative to the dimerization domain. This heretofore unobserved closed conformation revealed significant movements within the catalytic domain compared to that of wild-type HiDapE, which results in effectively closing off access to the dinuclear Zn(II) active site with the succinate carboxylate moiety bridging the dinculear Zn(II) cluster in a μ-1,3 fashion forming a bis(μ-carboxylato)dizinc(II) core with a Zn-Zn distance of 3.8 Å. Surprisingly, His194.B, which is located on the dimerization domain of the opposing chain ∼10.1 Å from the dinuclear Zn(II) active site, forms a hydrogen bond (2.9 Å) with the oxygen atom of succinic acid bound to Zn2, forming an oxyanion hole. As the closed structure forms upon substrate binding, the movement of His194.B by more than ∼10 Å is critical, based on site-directed mutagenesis data, for activation of the scissile carbonyl carbon of the substrate for nucleophilic attack by a hydroxide nucleophile. Employing the HiDapE product-bound structure as the starting point, a reverse engineering approach called product-based transition-state modeling provided structural models for each major catalytic step. These data provide insight into the catalytic reaction mechanism and also the future design of new, potent inhibitors of DapE enzymes.

  6. Transmission of Stability Information through the N-domain of Tropomyosin Is Interrupted by a Stabilizing Mutation (A109L) in the Hydrophobic Core of the Stability Control Region (Residues 97–118)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, J. Paul; Hodges, Robert S.

    2014-01-01

    Tropomyosin (Tm) is an actin-binding, thin filament, two-stranded α-helical coiled-coil critical for muscle contraction and cytoskeletal function. We made the first identification of a stability control region (SCR), residues 97–118, in the Tm sequence that controls overall protein stability but is not required for folding. We also showed that the individual α-helical strands of the coiled-coil are stabilized by Leu-110, whereas the hydrophobic core is destabilized in the SCR by Ala residues at three consecutive d positions. Our hypothesis is that the stabilization of the individual α-helices provides an optimum stability and allows functionally beneficial dynamic motion between the α-helices that is critical for the transmission of stabilizing information along the coiled-coil from the SCR. We prepared three recombinant (rat) Tm(1–131) proteins, including the wild type sequence, a destabilizing mutation L110A, and a stabilizing mutation A109L. These proteins were evaluated by circular dichroism (CD) and differential scanning calorimetry. The single mutation L110A destabilizes the entire Tm(1–131) molecule, showing that the effect of this mutation is transmitted 165 Å along the coiled-coil in the N-terminal direction. The single mutation A109L prevents the SCR from transmitting stabilizing information and separates the coiled-coil into two domains, one that is ∼9 °C more stable than wild type and one that is ∼16 °C less stable. We know of no other example of the substitution of a stabilizing Leu residue in a coiled-coil hydrophobic core position d that causes this dramatic effect. We demonstrate the importance of the SCR in controlling and transmitting the stability signal along this rodlike molecule. PMID:24362038

  7. Transmission of stability information through the N-domain of tropomyosin is interrupted by a stabilizing mutation (A109L) in the hydrophobic core of the stability control region (residues 97-118).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirwan, J Paul; Hodges, Robert S

    2014-02-14

    Tropomyosin (Tm) is an actin-binding, thin filament, two-stranded α-helical coiled-coil critical for muscle contraction and cytoskeletal function. We made the first identification of a stability control region (SCR), residues 97-118, in the Tm sequence that controls overall protein stability but is not required for folding. We also showed that the individual α-helical strands of the coiled-coil are stabilized by Leu-110, whereas the hydrophobic core is destabilized in the SCR by Ala residues at three consecutive d positions. Our hypothesis is that the stabilization of the individual α-helices provides an optimum stability and allows functionally beneficial dynamic motion between the α-helices that is critical for the transmission of stabilizing information along the coiled-coil from the SCR. We prepared three recombinant (rat) Tm(1-131) proteins, including the wild type sequence, a destabilizing mutation L110A, and a stabilizing mutation A109L. These proteins were evaluated by circular dichroism (CD) and differential scanning calorimetry. The single mutation L110A destabilizes the entire Tm(1-131) molecule, showing that the effect of this mutation is transmitted 165 Å along the coiled-coil in the N-terminal direction. The single mutation A109L prevents the SCR from transmitting stabilizing information and separates the coiled-coil into two domains, one that is ∼9 °C more stable than wild type and one that is ∼16 °C less stable. We know of no other example of the substitution of a stabilizing Leu residue in a coiled-coil hydrophobic core position d that causes this dramatic effect. We demonstrate the importance of the SCR in controlling and transmitting the stability signal along this rodlike molecule.

  8. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  9. Crystal structure of YwpF from Staphylococcus aureus reveals its architecture comprised of a β-barrel core domain resembling type VI secretion system proteins and a two-helix pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang Jae; Lee, Kyu-Yeon; Lee, Ki-Young; Kim, Dong-Gyun; Kim, Soon-Jong; Lee, Bong-Jin

    2015-04-01

    The ywpF gene (SAV2097) of the Staphylococcus aureus strain Mu50 encodes the YwpF protein, which may play a role in antibiotic resistance. Here, we report the first crystal structure of the YwpF superfamily from S. aureus at 2.5-Å resolution. The YwpF structure consists of two regions: an N-terminal core β-barrel domain that shows structural similarity to type VI secretion system (T6SS) proteins (e.g., Hcp1, Hcp3, and EvpC) and a C-terminal two-helix pair. Although the monomer structure of S. aureus YwpF resembles those of T6SS proteins, the dimer/tetramer model of S. aureus YwpF is distinct from the functionally important hexameric ring of T6SS proteins. We therefore suggest that the S. aureus YwpF may have a different function compared to T6SS proteins. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Conserved and variable domains of RNase MRP RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dávila López, Marcela; Rosenblad, Magnus Alm; Samuelsson, Tore

    2009-01-01

    Ribonuclease MRP is a eukaryotic ribonucleoprotein complex consisting of one RNA molecule and 7-10 protein subunits. One important function of MRP is to catalyze an endonucleolytic cleavage during processing of rRNA precursors. RNase MRP is evolutionary related to RNase P which is critical for tRNA processing. A large number of MRP RNA sequences that now are available have been used to identify conserved primary and secondary structure features of the molecule. MRP RNA has structural features in common with P RNA such as a conserved catalytic core, but it also has unique features and is characterized by a domain highly variable between species. Information regarding primary and secondary structure features is of interest not only in basic studies of the function of MRP RNA, but also because mutations in the RNA give rise to human genetic diseases such as cartilage-hair hypoplasia.

  11. Membrane Guanylate Cyclase catalytic Subdomain: Structure and Linkage with Calcium Sensors and Bicarbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarangan Ravichandran

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Membrane guanylate cyclase (MGC is a ubiquitous multi-switching cyclic GMP generating signaling machine linked with countless physiological processes. In mammals it is encoded by seven distinct homologous genes. It is a single transmembrane spanning multi-modular protein; composed of integrated blocks and existing in homo-dimeric form. Its core catalytic domain (CCD module is a common transduction center where all incoming signals are translated into the production of cyclic GMP, a cellular signal second messenger. Crystal structure of the MGC’s CCD does not exist and its precise identity is ill-defined. Here, we define it at a sub-molecular level for the phototransduction-linked MGC, the rod outer segment guanylate cyclase type 1, ROS-GC1. (1 The CCD is a conserved 145-residue structural unit, represented by the segment V820-P964. (2 It exists as a homo-dimer and contains seven conserved catalytic elements (CEs wedged into seven conserved motifs. (3 It also contains a conserved 21-residue neurocalcin δ-modulated structural domain, V836-L857. (4 Site-directed mutagenesis documents that each of the seven CEs governs the cyclase’s catalytic activity. (5 In contrast to the soluble and the bacterium MGC which use Mn2+-GTP substrate for catalysis, MGC CCD uses the natural Mg2+-GTP substrate. (6 Strikingly, the MGC CCD requires anchoring by the Transmembrane Domain (TMD to exhibit its major (∼92% catalytic activity; in isolated form the activity is only marginal. This feature is not linked with any unique sequence of the TMD; there is minimal conservation in TMD. Finally, (7 the seven CEs control each of four phototransduction pathways- -two Ca2+-sensor GCAPs-, one Ca2+-sensor, S100B-, and one bicarbonate-modulated. The findings disclose that the CCD of ROS-GC1 has built-in regulatory elements that control its signal translational activity. Due to conservation of these regulatory elements, it is proposed that these elements also control the

  12. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    acetylchlorophosphonazo(CPApA) by hydrogen peroxide in 0.10 M phosphoric acid. A novel catalytic kinetic-spectrophotometric method is proposed for the determination of copper based on this principle. Copper(II) can be determined spectrophotometrically ...

  13. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on the property that in 0.12 M sulfuric acid medium titanium(IV) catalyzes the discoloring reaction of DBS-arsenazo oxidized by potassium bromate, a new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace titanium (IV) was developed. The linear range of the determination of titanium is

  14. Proteomics Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Proteomics Core is the central resource for mass spectrometry based proteomics within the NHLBI. The Core staff help collaborators design proteomics experiments in a...

  15. Bimetallic Nanoparticles in Alternative Solvents for Catalytic Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trung Dang-Bao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Bimetallic nanoparticles represent attractive catalytic systems thanks to the synergy between both partners at the atomic level, mainly induced by electronic effects which in turn are associated with the corresponding structures (alloy, core-shell, hetero-dimer. This type of engineered material can trigger changes in the kinetics of catalyzed processes by variations on the electrophilicity/nucleophilicity of the metal centers involved and also promote cooperative effects to foster organic transformations, including multi-component and multi-step processes. Solvents become a crucial factor in the conception of catalytic processes, not only due to their environmental impact, but also because they can preserve the bimetallic structure during the catalytic reaction and therefore increase the catalyst life-time. In this frame, the present review focuses on the recent works described in the literature concerning the synthesis of bimetallic nanoparticles in non-conventional solvents, i.e., other than common volatile compounds, for catalytic applications.

  16. Complementation between HIV integrase proteins mutated in different domains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. van Gent (Dik); C. Vink (Cornelis); A.A. Groeneger; R.H. Plassterk

    1993-01-01

    textabstractHIV integrase (IN) cleaves two nucleotides off the 3' end of viral DNA and integrates viral DNA into target DNA. Previously, three functional domains in the HIV IN protein have been identified: (i) the central catalytic domain, (ii) the C-terminal DNA binding domain,

  17. Improved crystallization of Escherichia coli ATP synthase catalytic complex (F1) by introducing a phosphomimetic mutation in subunit ∊

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, Ankoor; Hutcheon, Marcus L.; Duncan, Thomas M.; Cingolani, Gino

    2012-01-01

    A phosphomimetic mutation in subunit ∊ dramatically increases reproducibility for crystallization of Escherichia coli ATP synthase catalytic complex (F 1 ) (subunit composition α 3 β 3 γ∊). Diffraction data were collected to ∼3.15 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The bacterial ATP synthase (F O F 1 ) of Escherichia coli has been the prominent model system for genetics, biochemical and more recently single-molecule studies on F-type ATP synthases. With 22 total polypeptide chains (total mass of ∼529 kDa), E. coli F O F 1 represents nature’s smallest rotary motor, composed of a membrane-embedded proton transporter (F O ) and a peripheral catalytic complex (F 1 ). The ATPase activity of isolated F 1 is fully expressed by the α 3 β 3 γ ‘core’, whereas single δ and ∊ subunits are required for structural and functional coupling of E. coli F 1 to F O . In contrast to mitochondrial F 1 -ATPases that have been determined to atomic resolution, the bacterial homologues have proven very difficult to crystallize. In this paper, we describe a biochemical strategy that led us to improve the crystallogenesis of the E. coli F 1 -ATPase catalytic core. Destabilizing the compact conformation of ∊’s C-terminal domain with a phosphomimetic mutation (∊S65D) dramatically increased crystallization success and reproducibility, yielding crystals of E. coli F 1 that diffract to ∼3.15 Å resolution

  18. Structural and catalytic properties of a novel vanadium containing ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 125; Issue 1. Structural and catalytic properties of a novel vanadium containing solid core mesoporous silica shell catalysts for gas phase oxidation reaction. N Venkatathri Vijayamohanan K Pillai A Rajini M Nooka Raju I A K Reddy. Volume 125 Issue 1 January 2013 ...

  19. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  20. Life and death of a single catalytic cracking particle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meirer, Florian; Kalirai, Samanbir; Morris, Darius; Soparawalla, Santosh; Liu, Yijin; Mesu, Gerbrand; Andrews, Joy C; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particles account for 40 to 45% of worldwide gasoline production. The hierarchical complex particle pore structure allows access of long-chain feedstock molecules into active catalyst domains where they are cracked into smaller, more valuable hydrocarbon products (for

  1. Enediyne polyketide synthases stereoselectively reduce the β-ketoacyl intermediates to β-D-hydroxyacyl intermediates in enediyne core biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Hui-Ming; Huang, Tingting; Rudolf, Jeffrey D; Lohman, Jeremy R; Huang, Sheng-Xiong; Guo, Xun; Shen, Ben

    2014-08-01

    PKSE biosynthesizes an enediyne core precursor from decarboxylative condensation of eight malonyl-CoAs. The KR domain of PKSE is responsible for iterative β-ketoreduction in each round of polyketide chain elongation. KRs from selected PKSEs were investigated in vitro with β-ketoacyl-SNACs as substrate mimics. Each of the KRs reduced the β-ketoacyl-SNACs stereoselectively, all affording the corresponding β-D-hydroxyacyl-SNACs, and the catalytic efficiencies (k(cat)/K(M)) of the KRs increased significantly as the chain length of the β-ketoacyl-SNAC substrate increases.

  2. Catalytic reforming methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  3. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  4. A Self-Switchable Polymer Reactor for Controlled Catalytic Chemistry Processes with a Hyperbranched Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Luo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available A self-switchable polymer reactor with a hyperbranched structure for controlled catalytic chemistry processes is reported. This polymer reactor was made of silver nanoparticles and a polymer carrier consisting of hyperbranched polyethylenimine and hydroxyethyl acrylate that behaved as thermally switchable domains. Below the transfer temperature, relatively strong catalytic reactivity was demonstrated due to the leading role of hydrophilic groups in the switchable domains, which opened access to the substrate for the packaged silver nanoparticles. In contrast, it showed weak catalysis at relatively high temperatures, reducing from the significantly increased hydrophobicity in the switchable domains. In this way, the polymer reactor displays controllable, tunable, catalytic activity based on this approach. This novel design opens up the opportunity to develop intelligent polymer reactors for controlled catalytic processes.

  5. Volcano-like behavior of Au-Pd core-shell nanoparticles in the selective oxidation of alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tiago A G; Teixeira-Neto, Erico; López, Núria; Rossi, Liane M

    2014-07-21

    Gold-palladium (AuPd) nanoparticles have shown significantly enhanced activity relative to monometallic Au and Pd catalysts. Knowledge of composition and metal domain distributions is crucial to understanding activity and selectivity, but these parameters are difficult to ascertain in catalytic experiments that have primarily been devoted to equimolar nanoparticles. Here, we report AuPd nanoparticles of varying Au:Pd molar ratios that were prepared by a seed growth method. The selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol was used as a model reaction to study catalytic activity and selectivity changes that occurred after varying the composition of Pd in bimetallic catalysts. We observed a remarkable increase in catalytic conversion when using a 10:1 Au:Pd molar ratio. This composition corresponds to the amount of Pd necessary to cover the existing Au cores with a monolayer of Pd as a full-shell cluster. The key to increased catalytic activity derives from the balance between the number of active sites and the ease of product desorption. According to density functional theory calculations, both parameters are extremely sensitive to the Pd content resulting in the volcano-like activity observed.

  6. Incompleteness in the finite domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pudlák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2017), s. 405-441 ISSN 1079-8986 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 339691 - FEALORA Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : finite domain Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.742, year: 2016 https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/bulletin-of-symbolic-logic/article/incompleteness-in-the-finite-domain/D239B1761A73DCA534A4805A76D81C76

  7. Incompleteness in the finite domain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pudlák, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 4 (2017), s. 405-441 ISSN 1079-8986 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 339691 - FEALORA Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : finite domain Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Pure mathematics Impact factor: 0.742, year: 2016 https://www.cambridge.org/core/ journals /bulletin-of-symbolic-logic/article/incompleteness-in-the-finite-domain/D239B1761A73DCA534A4805A76D81C76

  8. Catalytic Antibodies: Concept and Promise

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 11. Catalytic Antibodies: Concept and Promise. Desirazu N Rao Bharath Wootla. General Article Volume 12 Issue ... Keywords. Catalytic antibodies; abzymes; hybridome technology; Diels– Alder reaction; Michaelis– Menten kinetics; Factor VIII.

  9. Catalytic interface erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, H.; Cohen, E.G.D.

    1995-01-01

    We study interface erosion processes: catalytic erosions. We present two cases. (1) The erosion of a completely occupied lattice by one single moving particle starting from somewhere inside the lattice, considering deterministic as well as probabilistic erosion rules. In the latter case, the eroded regions appear to have interfaces with continuously tunable fractal dimensions. (2) The kinetic roughening of an initially flat surface, where ballistic or diffusion-limited particles, which remain intact themselves, erode the surface coming from the outside, using the same erosion rules as in (1). Many features resembling realistic interfaces, for example, islands and inlets, are generated. The dependence of the surface width on the system size is due to both the erosion mechanism and the way particles move before reaching the surface

  10. Catalytic detritiation of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, M.L.; Lamberger, P.H.; Ellis, R.E.; Mills, T.K.

    1977-01-01

    A pilot-scale system has been used at Mound Laboratory to investigate the catalytic detritiation of water. A hydrophobic, precious metal catalyst is used to promote the exchange of tritium between liquid water and gaseous hydrogen at 60 0 C. Two columns are used, each 7.5 m long by 2.5 cm ID and packed with catalyst. Water flow is 5-10 cm 3 /min and countercurrent hydrogen flow is 9,000-12,000 cm 3 /min. The equipment, except for the columns, is housed in an inert atmosphere glovebox and is computer controlled. The hydrogen is obtained by electrolysis of a portion of the water stream. Enriched gaseous tritium is withdrawn for further enrichment. A description of the system is included along with an outline of its operation. Recent experimental data are discussed

  11. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  12. Structural organization of the regulatory domain of human 5-lipoxygenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, John B; Brock, Thomas G

    2005-04-01

    The enzyme 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) initiates the synthesis of leukotrienes. For this reason, 5-LO activity is important for immune defense, whereas improper regulation contributes to pathogenesis, including chronic inflammation, asthma and atherosclerosis. Like all lipoxygenases, the 5-LO protein consists of two domains, a regulatory domain and a catalytic domain. Naturally, the regulatory domain determines catalytic activity and controls leukotriene synthesis. This domain shares features with classical C2 domains in that it has a beta-sandwich structure and binds calcium, nucleotides and phospholipids. However, important structural features place this domain in a distinct family, the PLATs (for Polycystin-1, Lipoxygenase, alpha-Toxin). In this review, we summarize our current understanding of the three dimensional organization of this important component of the 5-LO molecule. In addition, we point to findings from structural analyses of related proteins to suggest further details relating 5-LO structure to function.

  13. Role of the PB2 627 Domain in Influenza A Virus Polymerase Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Benjamin E; Te Velthuis, Aartjan J W; Fodor, Ervin

    2017-04-01

    The RNA genome of influenza A viruses is transcribed and replicated by the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, composed of the subunits PA, PB1, and PB2. High-resolution structural data revealed that the polymerase assembles into a central polymerase core and several auxiliary highly flexible, protruding domains. The auxiliary PB2 cap-binding and the PA endonuclease domains are both involved in cap snatching, but the role of the auxiliary PB2 627 domain, implicated in host range restriction of influenza A viruses, is still poorly understood. In this study, we used structure-guided truncations of the PB2 subunit to show that a PB2 subunit lacking the 627 domain accumulates in the cell nucleus and assembles into a heterotrimeric polymerase with PB1 and PA. Furthermore, we showed that a recombinant viral polymerase lacking the PB2 627 domain is able to carry out cap snatching, cap-dependent transcription initiation, and cap-independent ApG dinucleotide extension in vitro , indicating that the PB2 627 domain of the influenza virus RNA polymerase is not involved in core catalytic functions of the polymerase. However, in a cellular context, the 627 domain is essential for both transcription and replication. In particular, we showed that the PB2 627 domain is essential for the accumulation of the cRNA replicative intermediate in infected cells. Together, these results further our understanding of the role of the PB2 627 domain in transcription and replication of the influenza virus RNA genome. IMPORTANCE Influenza A viruses are a major global health threat, not only causing disease in both humans and birds but also placing significant strains on economies worldwide. Avian influenza A virus polymerases typically do not function efficiently in mammalian hosts and require adaptive mutations to restore polymerase activity. These adaptations include mutations in the 627 domain of the PB2 subunit of the viral polymerase, but it still remains to be established how these

  14. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2010-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  15. Transformer core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehendale, A.; Hagedoorn, Wouter; Lötters, Joost Conrad

    2008-01-01

    A transformer core includes a stack of a plurality of planar core plates of a magnetically permeable material, which plates each consist of a first and a second sub-part that together enclose at least one opening. The sub-parts can be fitted together via contact faces that are located on either side

  16. Catalytic production of biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theilgaard Madsen, A.

    2011-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the catalytic production of diesel from biomass, especially emphasising catalytic conversion of waste vegetable oils and fats. In chapter 1 an introduction to biofuels and a review on different catalytic methods for diesel production from biomass is given. Two of these methods have been used industrially for a number of years already, namely the transesterification (and esterification) of oils and fats with methanol to form fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), and the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of fats and oils to form straight-chain alkanes. Other possible routes to diesel include upgrading and deoxygenation of pyrolysis oils or aqueous sludge wastes, condensations and reductions of sugars in aqueous phase (aqueous-phase reforming, APR) for monofunctional hydrocarbons, and gasification of any type of biomass followed by Fischer-Tropsch-synthesis for alkane biofuels. These methods have not yet been industrialised, but may be more promising due to the larger abundance of their potential feedstocks, especially waste feedstocks. Chapter 2 deals with formation of FAME from waste fats and oils. A range of acidic catalysts were tested in a model fat mixture of methanol, lauric acid and trioctanoin. Sulphonic acid-functionalised ionic liquids showed extremely fast convertion of lauric acid to methyl laurate, and trioctanoate was converted to methyl octanoate within 24 h. A catalyst based on a sulphonated carbon-matrix made by pyrolysing (or carbonising) carbohydrates, so-called sulphonated pyrolysed sucrose (SPS), was optimised further. No systematic dependency on pyrolysis and sulphonation conditions could be obtained, however, with respect to esterification activity, but high activity was obtained in the model fat mixture. SPS impregnated on opel-cell Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and microporous SiO{sub 2} (ISPS) was much less active in the esterification than the original SPS powder due to low loading and thereby low number of strongly acidic sites on the

  17. Catalytic cracking with deasphalted oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaton, W.I.; Taylor, J.L.; Peck, L.B.; Mosby, J.F.

    1990-07-10

    This patent describes a catalytic cracking process. It comprises: hydrotreating resid; thereafter deasphalting the hydrotreated resid to produce substantially deasphalted oil; catalytically cracking the hydrotreated oil in a catalytic cracking unit in the presence of a cracking catalyst to produce upgraded oil leaving coked catalyst; and regenerating the coked catalyst in the presence of a combustion-supporting gas comprising excess molecular oxygen in an amount greater than the stoichiometric amount required for substantially completely combusting the coke on the catalyst to carbon dioxide.

  18. Domain crossing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schraefel, M. C.; Rouncefield, Mark; Kellogg, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    In CSCW, how much do we need to know about another domain/culture before we observe, intersect and intervene with designs. What optimally would that other culture need to know about us? Is this a “how long is a piece of string” question, or an inquiry where we can consider a variety of contexts a...

  19. RAG1 core and V(DJ recombination signal sequences were derived from Transib transposons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir V Kapitonov

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The V(DJ recombination reaction in jawed vertebrates is catalyzed by the RAG1 and RAG2 proteins, which are believed to have emerged approximately 500 million years ago from transposon-encoded proteins. Yet no transposase sequence similar to RAG1 or RAG2 has been found. Here we show that the approximately 600-amino acid "core" region of RAG1 required for its catalytic activity is significantly similar to the transposase encoded by DNA transposons that belong to the Transib superfamily. This superfamily was discovered recently based on computational analysis of the fruit fly and African malaria mosquito genomes. Transib transposons also are present in the genomes of sea urchin, yellow fever mosquito, silkworm, dog hookworm, hydra, and soybean rust. We demonstrate that recombination signal sequences (RSSs were derived from terminal inverted repeats of an ancient Transib transposon. Furthermore, the critical DDE catalytic triad of RAG1 is shared with the Transib transposase as part of conserved motifs. We also studied several divergent proteins encoded by the sea urchin and lancelet genomes that are 25%-30% identical to the RAG1 N-terminal domain and the RAG1 core. Our results provide the first direct evidence linking RAG1 and RSSs to a specific superfamily of DNA transposons and indicate that the V(DJ machinery evolved from transposons. We propose that only the RAG1 core was derived from the Transib transposase, whereas the N-terminal domain was assembled from separate proteins of unknown function that may still be active in sea urchin, lancelet, hydra, and starlet sea anemone. We also suggest that the RAG2 protein was not encoded by ancient Transib transposons but emerged in jawed vertebrates as a counterpart of RAG1 necessary for the V(DJ recombination reaction.

  20. Catalytic Membrane Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, T.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Gardner, T.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Sault, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    The proposed "catalytic membrane sensor" (CMS) was developed to generate a device which would selectively identify a specific reagent in a complex mixture of gases. This was to be accomplished by modifying an existing Hz sensor with a series of thin films. Through selectively sieving the desired component from a complex mixture and identifying it by decomposing it into Hz (and other by-products), a Hz sensor could then be used to detect the presence of the select component. The proposed "sandwich-type" modifications involved the deposition of a catalyst layered between two size selective sol-gel layers on a Pd/Ni resistive Hz sensor. The role of the catalyst was to convert organic materials to Hz and organic by-products. The role of the membraneo was to impart both chemical specificity by molecukir sieving of the analyte and converted product streams, as well as controlling access to the underlying Pd/Ni sensor. Ultimately, an array of these CMS elements encompassing different catalysts and membranes were to be developed which would enable improved selectivity and specificity from a compiex mixture of organic gases via pattern recognition methodologies. We have successfully generated a CMS device by a series of spin-coat deposited methods; however, it was determined that the high temperature required to activate the catalyst, destroys the sensor.

  1. Catalytic cracking of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.; Nowak, S.; Naegler, T.; Zimmermann, J. [Hochschule Merseburg (Germany); Welscher, J.; Schwieger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany); Hahn, T. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    A most important factor for the chemical industry is the availability of cheap raw materials. As the oil price of crude oil is rising alternative feedstocks like coal are coming into focus. This work, the catalytic cracking of lignite is part of the alliance ibi (innovative Braunkohlenintegration) to use lignite as a raw material to produce chemicals. With this new one step process without an input of external hydrogen, mostly propylene, butenes and aromatics and char are formed. The product yield depends on manifold process parameters. The use of acid catalysts (zeolites like MFI) shows the highest amount of the desired products. Hydrogen rich lignites with a molar H/C ratio of > 1 are to be favoured. Due to primary cracking and secondary reactions the ratio between catalyst and lignite, temperature and residence time are the most important parameter to control the product distribution. Experiments at 500 C in a discontinuous rotary kiln reactor show yields up to 32 wt-% of hydrocarbons per lignite (maf - moisture and ash free) and 43 wt-% char, which can be gasified. Particularly, the yields of propylene and butenes as main products can be enhanced four times to about 8 wt-% by the use of catalysts while the tar yield decreases. In order to develop this innovative process catalyst systems fixed on beads were developed for an easy separation and regeneration of the used catalyst from the formed char. (orig.)

  2. Catalytic pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Sa, Jacinto

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reports on the latest developments of biomass catalytic pyrolysis for the production of fuels. The primary focus is on the role of catalysts in the process, namely, their influence in the liquefaction of lignocellulosic biomass.

  3. Ice Cores

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past temperature, precipitation, atmospheric trace gases, and other aspects of climate and environment derived from ice cores drilled on glaciers and ice...

  4. Core BPEL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallwyl, Tim; Højsgaard, Espen

    extensions. Combined with the fact that the language definition does not provide a formal semantics, it is an arduous task to work formally with the language (e.g. to give an implementation). In this paper we identify a core subset of the language, called Core BPEL, which has fewer and simpler constructs......, does not allow omissions, and does not contain ignorable elements. We do so by identifying syntactic sugar, including default values, and ignorable elements in WS-BPEL. The analysis results in a translation from the full language to the core subset. Thus, we reduce the effort needed for working...... formally with WS-BPEL, as one, without loss of generality, need only consider the much simpler Core BPEL. This report may also be viewed as an addendum to the WS-BPEL standard specification, which clarifies the WS-BPEL syntax and presents the essential elements of the language in a more concise way...

  5. Trusted Domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Theis Solberg; Torbensen, Rune

    2012-01-01

    In the digital age of home automation and with the proliferation of mobile Internet access, the intelligent home and its devices should be accessible at any time from anywhere. There are many challenges such as security, privacy, ease of configuration, incompatible legacy devices, a wealth...... of wireless standards, limited resources of embedded systems, etc. Taking these challenges into account, we present a Trusted Domain home automation platform, which dynamically and securely connects heterogeneous networks of Short-Range Wireless devices via simple non-expert user. interactions, and allows...... remote access via IP-based devices such as smartphones. The Trusted Domain platform fits existing legacy technologies by managing their interoperability and access controls, and it seeks to avoid the security issues of relying on third-party servers outside the home. It is a distributed system...

  6. Dense SDM (12-Core × 3-Mode) Transmission Over 527 km With 33.2-ns Mode-Dispersion Employing Low-Complexity Parallel MIMO Frequency-Domain Equalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shibahara, Kohki; Lee, Doohwan; Kobayashi, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    We propose long-haul space-division-multiplexing (SDM) transmission systems employing parallel multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) frequency-domain equalization (FDE) and transmission fiber with low differential mode delay (DMD). We first discuss the advantages of parallel MIMO FDE technique in...

  7. Magnetic Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Harland, Derek; Palmer, Sam; Saemann, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Recently a Nahm transform has been discovered for magnetic bags, which are conjectured to arise in the large n limit of magnetic monopoles with charge n. We interpret these ideas using string theory and present some partial proofs of this conjecture. We then extend the notion of bags and their Nahm transform to higher gauge theories and arbitrary domains. Bags in four dimensions conjecturally describe the large n limit of n self-dual strings. We show that the corresponding Basu-Harvey equatio...

  8. MBD2 and multiple domains of CHD4 are required for transcriptional repression by Mi-2/NuRD complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Julita; Dege, Carissa; Kutateladze, Tatiana G; Hagman, James

    2012-12-01

    Mi-2/nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD) chromatin remodeling complexes are important regulators of chromatin structure and DNA accessibility. We examined requirements for individual domains of chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4 (CHD4), a core catalytic component of NuRD complexes, as well as the NuRD subunit methyl-binding domain protein 2 (MBD2) and methylated DNA, for NuRD function in the context of tissue-specific transcription. By itself, loss of NuRD activity is not sufficient for transcriptional activation. However, NuRD complexes greatly reduce activation of the B cell-specific mb-1 (Cd79a) gene by the transcription factors EBF1 and Pax5. Using our B cell model system, we determined that the two chromodomains and ATPase/helicase and C-terminal domains (CTD) of CHD4 are all necessary for repression of mb-1 promoters by NuRD. All of these domains except the CTD are required for efficient association of CHD4 with mb-1 promoter chromatin. Loss of MBD2 expression or of DNA methylation impaired association of CHD4 with mb-1 promoter chromatin and enhanced its transcription. We conclude that repressive functions of MBD2-containing NuRD complexes are dependent on cooperative interactions between the major domains of CHD4 with histones and DNA and on binding of methylated DNA by MBD2.

  9. Changes in the Factor VIII C2 domain upon membrane binding determined by hydrogen-deuterium exchange MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantazatos, Dionysios; Gessner, Christopher R; Woods, Virgil L; Gilbert, Gary E

    2014-08-01

    Factor VIII enhances the catalytic activity of Factor IXa in a membrane-bound enzyme complex and both proteins are necessary to prevent haemophilia. Tandem lectin-like C domains mediate the membrane binding of Factor VIII and membrane-interactive residues have been identified. However, the available data provide little insight into the dynamic changes that occur upon membrane binding. We used time-based hydrogen-deuterium exchange MS to evaluate the dynamics of FVIII-C2 (Factor VIII C2 domain) alone and when membrane bound. The results confirm the participation of previously identified membrane-interactive loops in the binding mechanism. In addition, they indicate that a long peptide segment, encompassing a membrane-interactive loop and strands of the β-barrel core, is remarkably dynamic prior to membrane binding. The flexibility is reduced following membrane binding. In addition, regions that interact with the A1 and C1 domains have reduced solvent exchange. Thus the isolated C2 domain has extensive flexibility that is subject to stabilization and could be related to interactions between domains as well as between Factor VIII and Factor IXa or Factor X. These results confirm that the proposed membrane-binding loops of the FVIII-C2 interact with the membrane in a manner that leads to protection from solvent exposure.

  10. The ATPase cross-bridge cycle of the Kar3 motor domain. Implications for single head motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Andrew T; Gilbert, Susan P

    2003-02-07

    Kar3 is a minus-end directed microtubule motor involved in meiosis and mitosis in Saccharomyces cerevisae. Unlike Drosophila Ncd, the other well characterized minus-end directed motor that is a homodimer, Kar3 is a heterodimer with a single motor domain and either the associated polypeptides Cik1 or Vik1. Our mechanistic studies with Ncd showed that both motor domains were required for ATP-dependent motor domain detachment from the microtubule. We have initiated a series of experiments to compare the mechanistic requirements for Kar3 motility in direct comparison to Ncd. The results presented here show that the single motor domain of Kar3 (Met(383)-Lys(729)) exhibits characteristics similar to monomeric Ncd. The microtubule-activated steady-state ATPase cycle of Kar3 (k(cat) = 0.5 s(-1)) is limited by ADP release (0.4 s(-1)). Like monomeric Ncd, Kar3 does not readily detach from the microtubule with the addition of MgATP. These results show that the single motor domain of Kar3 is not sufficient for ATP-dependent microtubule dissociation, suggesting that structural elements outside of the catalytic core are required for the cyclic interactions with the microtubule for force generation.

  11. The C-terminal domain of the adenine-DNA glycosylase MutY confers specificity for 8-oxoguanine.adenine mispairs and may have evolved from MutT, an 8-oxo-dGTPase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, D M; Gogos, A; Granek, J A; Clarke, N D

    1999-05-18

    MutY is an adenine-DNA glycosylase with specificity for mismatches involving 8-oxoguanine (oG.A) or guanine (G.A). In addition to a 25 kDa catalytic domain common to all members of its DNA glycosylase superfamily, MutY has a 14 kDa C-terminal domain. Sequence analyses suggest that this C-terminal domain is distantly related to MutT, a pyrophosphohydrolase specific for 2'-deoxy-8-oxoguanosine triphosphate (doGTP). Here we present biochemical evidence that the MutT-like domain of MutY is the principal determinant of oG specificity. First, MutY dissociates approximately 1500-fold more slowly from oG-containing product DNA than from G-containing product, but a truncated protein lacking the C-terminal domain dissociates as rapidly from oG-DNA as the full-length protein dissociates from G-DNA. Second, MutY removes adenine from oG.A mismatches almost 30-fold faster than from G.A mismatches in a pre-steady-state assay, but deletion of the C-terminal domain reduces this specificity for oG.A to less than 4-fold. The kinetic data are consistent with a model in which binding of oG to the C-terminal domain of MutY accelerates the pre-steady-state glycosylase reaction by facilitating adenine base flipping. The observation that oG specificity derives almost exclusively from the C-terminal domain of MutY adds credence to the sequence analyses and suggests that specificity for oG.A mismatches was acquired by fusion of a MutT-like protein onto the core catalytic domain of an adenine-DNA glycosylase.

  12. Coring apparatus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mount, W.W.

    1967-11-14

    This invention relates to coring equipment and has special reference to such as are intended to be driven or otherwise inserted into sand or other loose formations to obtain a true sample of the formation. The device includes a plurality of elongated angular members positioned to form an elongated core receptacle between them. A plurality of links are each pivotally mounted at each end on an adjacent member to hold the members in spaced-apart relation in one position. The receptable is driven into the sand, and the members are moved toward one another when they are longitudinally moved with respect to one another to close the receptable. (3 claims)

  13. Catalytic bioreactors and methods of using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, Robert Mark; Liu, Yangmu Chloe

    2017-07-25

    Various embodiments provide a bioreactor for producing a bioproduct comprising one or more catalytically active zones located in a housing and adapted to keep two incompatible gaseous reactants separated when in a gas phase, wherein each of the one or more catalytically active zones may comprise a catalytic component retainer and a catalytic component retained within and/or thereon. Each of the catalytically active zones may additionally or alternatively comprise a liquid medium located on either side of the catalytic component retainer. Catalytic component may include a microbial cell culture located within and/or on the catalytic component retainer, a suspended catalytic component suspended in the liquid medium, or a combination thereof. Methods of using various embodiments of the bioreactor to produce a bioproduct, such as isobutanol, are also provided.

  14. Cross Domain Analogies for Learning Domain Theories

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Klenk, Matthew; Forbus, Ken

    2007-01-01

    .... This work describes a method for learning new domain theories by analogy. We use analogies between pairs of problems and worked solutions to create a domain mapping between a familiar and a new domain...

  15. Catalytic Decoupling of Quantum Information

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majenz, Christian; Berta, Mario; Dupuis, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    The decoupling technique is a fundamental tool in quantum information theory with applications ranging from quantum thermodynamics to quantum many body physics to the study of black hole radiation. In this work we introduce the notion of catalytic decoupling, that is, decoupling in the presence...... of an uncorrelated ancilla system. This removes a restriction on the standard notion of decoupling, which becomes important for structureless resources, and yields a tight characterization in terms of the max-mutual information. Catalytic decoupling naturally unifies various tasks like the erasure of correlations...

  16. Catalytic activity of Au nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Britt Hvolbæk; Janssens, Ton V.W.; Clausen, Bjerne

    2007-01-01

    Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change with par......Au is usually viewed as an inert metal, but surprisingly it has been found that Au nanoparticles less than 3–5 nm in diameter are catalytically active for several chemical reactions. We discuss the origin of this effect, focusing on the way in which the chemical activity of Au may change...

  17. Mechanism of Ribonuclease III Catalytic Regulation by Serine Phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gone, Swapna; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Paudyal, Samridhdi; Nicholson, Allen W.

    2016-05-01

    Ribonuclease III (RNase III) is a conserved, gene-regulatory bacterial endonuclease that cleaves double-helical structures in diverse coding and noncoding RNAs. RNase III is subject to multiple levels of control, reflective of its global regulatory functions. Escherichia coli (Ec) RNase III catalytic activity is known to increase during bacteriophage T7 infection, reflecting the expression of the phage-encoded protein kinase, T7PK. However, the mechanism of catalytic enhancement is unknown. This study shows that Ec-RNase III is phosphorylated on serine in vitro by purified T7PK, and identifies the targets as Ser33 and Ser34 in the N-terminal catalytic domain. Kinetic experiments reveal a 5-fold increase in kcat and a 1.4-fold decrease in Km following phosphorylation, providing a 7.4-fold increase in catalytic efficiency. Phosphorylation does not change the rate of substrate cleavage under single-turnover conditions, indicating that phosphorylation enhances product release, which also is the rate-limiting step in the steady-state. Molecular dynamics simulations provide a mechanism for facilitated product release, in which the Ser33 phosphomonoester forms a salt bridge with the Arg95 guanidinium group, thereby weakening RNase III engagement of product. The simulations also show why glutamic acid substitution at either serine does not confer enhancement, thus underscoring the specific requirement for a phosphomonoester.

  18. Overexpression, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic analysis of the RNA polymerase domain of primase from Streptococcus mutans strain UA159

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Dong-Won; Kim, Tae-O; Jung, Ha Yun; Oh, Ji Eun; Lee, Se Jin; Heo, Yong-Seok

    2011-01-01

    The RNA polymerase domain of primase from S. mutans strain UA159 was cloned, overexpressed, purified and crystallized. X-ray diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 1.60 Å. Primase is the enzyme that synthesizes RNA primers on single-stranded DNA during normal DNA replication. In this study, the catalytic core domain of primase from Streptococcus mutans UA159 was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 1.60 Å resolution using a synchrotron-radiation source. The crystal belonged to space group P4 1 or P4 3 , with unit-cell parameters a = b = 52.63, c = 110.31 Å. The asymmetric unit is likely to contain one molecule, with a corresponding V M of 1.77 Å 3 Da −1 and a solvent content of 30.7%

  19. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so recent) developments in engineering reactors for catalytic reactions is discussed. Some examples where performance enhancement was realized by catalyst design, appropriate choice of reactor, better injection and dispersion strategies ...

  20. Catalytic properties of niobium compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, K.; Iizuka, T.

    1983-04-01

    The catalytic activity and selectivity of niobium compounds including oxides, salts, organometallic compounds and others are outlined. The application of these compounds as catalysts to diversified reactions is reported. The nature and action of niobium catalysts are characteristic and sometimes anomalous, suggesting the necessity of basic research and the potential use as catalysts for important processes in the chemical industry. (Author) [pt

  1. Catalytic carboxyester hydrolysis by diaminodiphenols

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Two diaminodiphenols, 1 and 2, have been examined as catalysts for the hydrolysis of 4- nitrophenyl acetate (NA) and 4-nitrophenylphosphate (NP) in aqueous-acetonitrile (25% acetonitrile v/v) media at 35ºC, I = 1·0 mol dm–3. The compound 1 enhances the hydrolysis rate of NA more than 105 times. Its catalytic efficiency ...

  2. Engineering reactors for catalytic reactions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    on selectivity can make substantial impact on process viability and economics. Extensive studies have been conducted to establish sound basis for design and engineering of reactors for practising such catalytic reactions and for realizing improvements in reactor performance. In this article, application of recent (and not so ...

  3. RNA topoisomerase is prevalent in all domains of life and associates with polyribosomes in animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Muzammil; Xue, Yutong; Lee, Seung Kyu; Martindale, Jennifer L.; Shen, Weiping; Li, Wen; Zou, Sige; Ciaramella, Maria; Debat, Hélène; Nadal, Marc; Leng, Fenfei; Zhang, Hongliang; Wang, Quan; Siaw, Grace Ee-Lu; Niu, Hengyao; Pommier, Yves; Gorospe, Myriam; Hsieh, Tao-Shih; Tse-Dinh, Yuk-Ching; Xu, Dongyi; Wang, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    DNA Topoisomerases are essential to resolve topological problems during DNA metabolism in all species. However, the prevalence and function of RNA topoisomerases remain uncertain. Here, we show that RNA topoisomerase activity is prevalent in Type IA topoisomerases from bacteria, archaea, and eukarya. Moreover, this activity always requires the conserved Type IA core domains and the same catalytic residue used in DNA topoisomerase reaction; however, it does not absolutely require the non-conserved carboxyl-terminal domain (CTD), which is necessary for relaxation reactions of supercoiled DNA. The RNA topoisomerase activity of human Top3β differs from that of Escherichia coli topoisomerase I in that the former but not the latter requires the CTD, indicating that topoisomerases have developed distinct mechanisms during evolution to catalyze RNA topoisomerase reactions. Notably, Top3β proteins from several animals associate with polyribosomes, which are units of mRNA translation, whereas the Top3 homologs from E. coli and yeast lack the association. The Top3β-polyribosome association requires TDRD3, which directly interacts with Top3β and is present in animals but not bacteria or yeast. We propose that RNA topoisomerases arose in the early RNA world, and that they are retained through all domains of DNA-based life, where they mediate mRNA translation as part of polyribosomes in animals. PMID:27257063

  4. .Gov Domains API

    Data.gov (United States)

    General Services Administration — This dataset offers the list of all .gov domains, including state, local, and tribal .gov domains. It does not include .mil domains, or other federal domains outside...

  5. The Catalytic Diversity of Multimodular Polyketide Synthases: Natural Product Biosynthesis Beyond Textbook Assembly Rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulder, Tobias A M; Freeman, Michael F; Piel, Jörn

    2011-03-01

    Bacterial multimodular polyketide synthases (PKSs) are responsible for the biosynthesis of a wide range of pharmacologically active natural products. These megaenzymes contain numerous catalytic and structural domains and act as biochemical templates to generate complex polyketides in an assembly line-like fashion. While the prototypical PKS is composed of only a few different domain types that are fused together in a combinatorial fashion, an increasing number of enzymes is being found that contain additional components. These domains can introduce remarkably diverse modifications into polyketides. This review discusses our current understanding of such noncanonical domains and their role in expanding the biosynthetic versatility of bacterial PKSs.

  6. Metal-Dependent Amyloid β-Degrading Catalytic Antibody Construct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Taguchi, Hiroaki; Hara, Mariko; Planque, Stephanie A.; Mitsuda, Yukie; Paul, Sudhir

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic antibodies (catabodies) that degrade target antigens rapidly are rare. We describe the metal-dependence of catabody construct 2E6, an engineered heterodimer of immunoglobulin light chain variable domains that hydrolyzes amyloid β peptides (Aβ) specifically. In addition to the electrophilic phosphonate inhibitor of serine proteases, the metal chelators ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and 1,10-phenanthroline completely inhibited the hydrolysis of Aβ by catabody 2E6. Formation of catabody-electrophilic phosphonate inhibitor adducts was unaffected by EDTA, suggesting that the metal exerts a favorable effect on a catalytic step after the initial catabody nucleophilic attack on Aβ. The EDTA inactivated catabody failed to disaggregate fibrillar Aβ, indicating the functional importance of the Aβ hydrolytic activity. Treating the EDTA-inactivated catabody with Zn2+ or Co2+ restored the Aβ hydrolytic activity, and Zn2+-induced catabody conformational transitions were evident by fluorescence emission spectroscopy. The studies reveal the absolute catabody dependence on a metal cofactor. PMID:24698848

  7. Biophysical investigation of type A PutAs reveals a conserved core oligomeric structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korasick, David A. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Singh, Harkewal [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Pemberton, Travis A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Luo, Min [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Dhatwalia, Richa [Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Tanner, John J. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA; Department of Chemistry, University of Missouri, Columbia MO USA

    2017-08-01

    Many enzymes form homooligomers, yet the functional significance of self-association is seldom obvious. Herein, we examine the connection between oligomerization and catalytic function for proline utilization A (PutA) enzymes. PutAs are bifunctional enzymes that catalyze both reactions of proline catabolism. Type A PutAs are the smallest members of the family, possessing a minimal domain architecture consisting of N-terminal proline dehydrogenase and C-terminal l-glutamate-γ-semialdehyde dehydrogenase modules. Type A PutAs form domain-swapped dimers, and in one case (Bradyrhizobium japonicum PutA), two of the dimers assemble into a ring-shaped tetramer. Whereas the dimer has a clear role in substrate channeling, the functional significance of the tetramer is unknown. To address this question, we performed structural studies of four-type A PutAs from two clades of the PutA tree. The crystal structure of Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus PutA covalently inactivated by N-propargylglycine revealed a fold and substrate-channeling tunnel similar to other PutAs. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and analytical ultracentrifugation indicated that Bdellovibrio PutA is dimeric in solution, in contrast to the prediction from crystal packing of a stable tetrameric assembly. SAXS studies of two other type A PutAs from separate clades also suggested that the dimer predominates in solution. To assess whether the tetramer of B. japonicum PutA is necessary for catalytic function, a hot spot disruption mutant that cleanly produces dimeric protein was generated. The dimeric variant exhibited kinetic parameters similar to the wild-type enzyme. These results implicate the domain-swapped dimer as the core structural and functional unit of type A PutAs.

  8. One-pot environmentally friendly approach toward highly catalytically active bimetal-nanoparticle-graphene hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-Hai; Chen, Xiao-Qi; Hu, Yong-Feng; Sham, Tsun-Kong; Sun, Qi-Jun; Chang, Jian-Bing; Gao, Xu; Sun, Xu-Hui; Wang, Sui-Dong

    2013-06-12

    A one-pot universal approach with simple metal sputtering onto room temperature ionic liquids has been developed to prepare bimetal-nanoparticle (NP)-graphene hybrids, and the process is environmentally friendly and completely free of additives and byproducts. The graphene-supported bimetallic NPs have an Ag-based core and an Au/Pd-rich shell, demonstrated by the scanning transmission electron microscopy. The X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation reveals the occurrence of charge redistribution at both the Ag@Au and Ag@Pd core-shell interfaces. The as-prepared Ag@Au and Ag@Pd bimetal-NP-graphene hybrids are highly catalytically active for reduction of 4-nitrophenol, whose catalytic activity is superior to the corresponding monometallic hybrids. The catalytic superiority is ascribed to the electronic structure modification and morphological irregularity of the graphene-supported bimetallic NPs.

  9. Enantioselective Synthesis of a PKC Inhibitor via Catalytic C-HBond Activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Rebecca M.; Thalji, Reema K.; Bergman, Robert G.; Ellman,Jonathan A.

    2006-02-26

    The syntheses of two biologically active molecules possessing dihydropyrroloindole cores (1 and 2) were completed using rhodium-catalyzed imine-directed C-H bond functionalization, with the second of these molecules containing a stereocenter that can be set with 90% ee during cyclization using chiral nonracemic phosphoramidite ligands. Catalytic decarbonylation and direct indole/maleimide coupling provide efficient access to 2.

  10. Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael T.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction (VPCAR) teststand and the results of an experimental program designed to evaluate the potential of the technology as a water purification process. In the experimental program the technology is evaluated based upon product water purity, water recovery rate, and power consumption. The experimental work demonstrates that the technology produces high purity product water and attains high water recovery rates at a relatively high specific power consumption. The experimental program was conducted in 3 phases. In phase I an Igepon(TM) soap and water mixture was used to evaluate the performance of an innovative Wiped-Film Rotating-Disk evaporator and associated demister. In phase II a phenol-water solution was used to evaluate the performance of the high temperature catalytic oxidation reactor. In phase III a urine analog was used to evaluate the performance of the combined distillation/oxidation functions of the processor.

  11. Inorganic membranes and catalytic reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Rangel, Maria do Carmo

    1997-01-01

    Membrane reactors are reviewed with emphasis in their applications in catalysis field. The basic principles of these systems are presented as well as a historical development. The several kinds of catalytic membranes and their preparations are discussed including the problems, needs and challenges to be solved in order to use these reactors in commercial processes. Some applications of inorganic membrane reactors are also shown. It was concluded that these systems have a great potential for i...

  12. Dispersion and Orientation of Zeolite ZSM-5 Crystallites within a Fluid Catalytic Cracking Catalyst Particle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprung, Christoph; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2014-01-01

    Confocal fluorescence microscopy was employed to selectively visualize the dispersion and orientation of zeolite ZSM-5 domains inside a single industrially applied fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalyst particle. Large ZSM-5 crystals served as a model system together with the acid-catalyzed

  13. Cage-bell Pt-Pd nanostructures with enhanced catalytic properties and superior methanol tolerance for oxygen reduction reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Dong Chen; Feng Ye; Hui Liu; Jun Yang

    2016-01-01

    Precisely tailoring the structure and fully making use of the components of nanoparticles are effective to enhance their catalytic performance for a given reaction. We herein demonstrate the design of cage-bell structured Pt-Pd nanoparticles, where a Pd shell is deliberately selected to enhance the catalytic property and methanol tolerance of Pt for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell Pt@Ag nanoparticles, followed by galvanic replacement reaction b...

  14. Domain III function of Mu transposase analysed by directed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    specific DNA binding and nuclease ... assembled by sharing structural/catalytic residues between domains II and III present on separate MuA monomers within the MuA ...... phosphorylation sites in proteins: construction of a phospho- rylatable human ...

  15. Multi-core Microprocessors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    core processors. Abstract. Multi-core microprocessor is an interconnected set of independentprocessors called cores integrated on a single siliconchip. These processing cores communicate and cooperatewith one another to execute one or more ...

  16. Insights into function of PSI domains from structure of the Met receptor PSI domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlov, Guennadi; Perreault, Audrey; Schrag, Joseph D.; Park, Morag; Cygler, Miroslaw; Gehring, Kalle; Ekiel, Irena

    2004-01-01

    PSI domains are cysteine-rich modules found in extracellular fragments of hundreds of signaling proteins, including plexins, semaphorins, integrins, and attractins. Here, we report the solution structure of the PSI domain from the human Met receptor, a receptor tyrosine kinase critical for proliferation, motility, and differentiation. The structure represents a cysteine knot with short regions of secondary structure including a three-stranded antiparallel β-sheet and two α-helices. All eight cysteines are involved in disulfide bonds with the pattern consistent with that for the PSI domain from Sema4D. Comparison with the Sema4D structure identifies a structurally conserved core comprising the N-terminal half of the PSI domain. Interestingly, this part links adjacent SEMA and immunoglobulin domains in the Sema4D structure, suggesting that the PSI domain serves as a wedge between propeller and immunoglobulin domains and is responsible for the correct positioning of the ligand-binding site of the receptor

  17. Molecular catalytic coal liquid conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stock, L.M.; Yang, Shiyong [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    This research, which is relevant to the development of new catalytic systems for the improvement of the quality of coal liquids by the addition of dihydrogen, is divided into two tasks. Task 1 centers on the activation of dihydrogen by molecular basic reagents such as hydroxide ion to convert it into a reactive adduct (OH{center_dot}H{sub 2}){sup {minus}} that can reduce organic molecules. Such species should be robust withstanding severe conditions and chemical poisons. Task 2 is focused on an entirely different approach that exploits molecular catalysts, derived from organometallic compounds that are capable of reducing monocyclic aromatic compounds under very mild conditions. Accomplishments and conclusions are discussed.

  18. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  19. Studies of Catalytic Model Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holse, Christian

    of the Cu/ZnO nanoparticles is highly relevant to industrial methanol synthesis for which the direct interaction of Cu and ZnO nanocrystals synergistically boost the catalytic activity. The dynamical behavior of the nanoparticles under reducing and oxidizing environments were studied by means of ex situ X...... as the nanoparticles are reduced. The Cu/ZnO nanoparticles are tested on a  µ-reactor platform and prove to be active towards methanol synthesis, making it an excellent model system for further investigations into activity depended morphology changes....

  20. Catalytic Combustion of Ethyl Acetate

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZÇELİK, Tuğba GÜRMEN; ATALAY, Süheyda; ALPAY, Erden

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic combustion of ethyl acetate over prepared metal oxide catalysts was investigated. CeO, Co2O3, Mn2O3, Cr2O3, and CeO-Co2O3 catalysts were prepared on monolith supports and they were tested. Before conducting the catalyst experiments, we searched for the homogeneous gas phase combustion reaction of ethyl acetate. According to the homogeneous phase experimental results, 45% of ethyl acetate was converted at the maximum reactor temperature tested (350 °C). All the prepare...

  1. Kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Boudart, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This book is a critical account of the principles of the kinetics of heterogeneous catalytic reactions in the light of recent developments in surface science and catalysis science. Originally published in 1984. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These paperback editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase acc

  2. Catalysis of iron core formation in Pyrococcus furiosus ferritin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ebrahimi, K.H.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Jongejan, J.A.; Hagen, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    The hollow sphere-shaped 24-meric ferritin can store large amounts of iron as a ferrihydrite-like mineral core. In all subunits of homomeric ferritins and in catalytically active subunits of heteromeric ferritins a diiron binding site is found that is commonly addressed as the ferroxidase center

  3. The human core exosome interacts with differentially localized processive RNases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tomecki, Rafal; Kristiansen, Maiken Søndergaard; Lykke-Andersen, Søren

    2010-01-01

    , identity and arrangements of its catalytic subunits in different vertebrates remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate the association of two different Dis3p homologs--hDIS3 and hDIS3L--with the human exosome core. Interestingly, these factors display markedly different intracellular localizations: hDIS3...

  4. Hydrogen mitigation by catalytic recombiners and ignition during severe accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohde, J.; Chakraborty, A.K.; Heitsch, M.; Klein-Hebling, W.

    1994-01-01

    A large amount of hydrogen is expected to be released within a large dry containment of a PWR shortly after the onset of a severe accident, leading to core melting. According to local gas concentrations, turbulence and structural configurations within the containment, the released hydrogen can reach the boundary of deflagration or under certain conditions cause local detonations threatening the containment integrity. During the last few years, several concepts of mitigation have been developed to limit the hydrogen concentrations and extensive efforts have been given to investigate the use of catalytic recombiners as well as the use of deliberate ignition within the contemplated framework of a 'Dual-concept'. Although the recent recommendation of the German Reactor Safety Commission (RSK) foresees the sole application of catalytic recombiners to remove hydrogen during severe accident, a review is planned within two years for the partial and directed additional application of early ignitions or post dilution of the atmosphere of the compartments in conjunction with the recombiners installed. This presentation will review the results of large number of experiments performed both in small scale and large scale to qualify the recombiners. It is also the subject of the presentation to address the requirements for proper and secure functioning of the catalyzers under the existing boundary conditions during the severe accidents. These requirements ask for measures, starting from the proper selection of catalysts, multi purposed catalytic devices and their protection against contamination during the standby condition as well as against aerosol deposition and surface poisoning during the propagation of an accident. A short review of the results to large scale experiments with the combined application of catalytic devices and igniters form also a part of this presentation. (author). 8 refs., 2 tabs., 7 figs

  5. Allosteric Inhibition Through Core Disruption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horn, James R.; Shoichet, Brian K. (NWU); (UCSF)

    2010-03-05

    Although inhibitors typically bind pre-formed sites on proteins, it is theoretically possible to inhibit by disrupting the folded structure of a protein or, in the limit, to bind preferentially to the unfolded state. Equilibria defining how such molecules act are well understood, but structural models for such binding are unknown. Two novel inhibitors of {beta}-lactamase were found to destabilize the enzyme at high temperatures, but at lower temperatures showed no preference for destabilized mutant enzymes versus stabilized mutants. X-ray crystal structures showed that both inhibitors bound to a cryptic site in {beta}-lactamase, which the inhibitors themselves created by forcing apart helixes 11 and 12. This opened up a portion of the hydrophobic core of the protein, into which these two inhibitors bind. Although this binding site is 16 {angstrom} from the center of the active site, the conformational changes were transmitted through a sequence of linked motions to a key catalytic residue, Arg244, which in the complex adopts conformations very different from those in catalytically competent enzyme conformations. These structures offer a detailed view of what has heretofore been a theoretical construct, and suggest the possibility for further design against this novel site.

  6. Catalytic enantioselective Reformatsky reaction with ketones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandez-Ibanez, M. Angeles; Macia, Beatriz; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2008-01-01

    Chiral tertiary alcohols were obtained with good yields and enantioselectivities via a catalytic Reformatsky reaction with ketones, including the challenging diaryl ketones, using chiral BINOL derivatives.

  7. Skyrmions from Instantons inside Domain Walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eto, Minoru; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke; Tong, David

    2005-01-01

    Some years ago, Atiyah and Manton described a method to construct approximate Skyrmion solutions from Yang-Mills instantons. Here we present a dynamical realization of this construction using domain walls in a five-dimensional gauge theory. The non-Abelian gauge symmetry is broken in each vacuum but restored in the core of the domain wall, allowing instantons to nestle inside the wall. We show that the world volume dynamics of the wall is given by the Skyrme model, including the four-derivative term, and the instantons appear as domain wall Skyrmions

  8. The starch-binding domain family CBM41 - an in silico analysis of evolutionary relationships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janeček, Štefan; Majzlová, Katarína; Svensson, Birte

    2017-01-01

    Within the CAZy database, there are 81 carbohydrate-binding module (CBM) families. A CBM represents a non-catalytic domain in a modular arrangement of glycoside hydrolases (GHs). The present in silico study has been focused on starch-binding domains from the family CBM41 that are usually part...

  9. Life and death of a single catalytic cracking particle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirer, Florian; Kalirai, Sam; Morris, Darius; Soparawalla, Santosh; Liu, Yijin; Mesu, Gerbrand; Andrews, Joy C.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2015-01-01

    Fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) particles account for 40 to 45% of worldwide gasoline production. The hierarchical complex particle pore structure allows access of long-chain feedstock molecules into active catalyst domains where they are cracked into smaller, more valuable hydrocarbon products (for example, gasoline). In this process, metal deposition and intrusion is a major cause for irreversible catalyst deactivation and shifts in product distribution. We used x-ray nanotomography of industrial FCC particles at differing degrees of deactivation to quantify changes in single-particle macroporosity and pore connectivity, correlated to iron and nickel deposition. Our study reveals that these metals are incorporated almost exclusively in near-surface regions, severely limiting macropore accessibility as metal concentrations increase. Because macropore channels are “highways” of the pore network, blocking them prevents feedstock molecules from reaching the catalytically active domains. Consequently, metal deposition reduces conversion with time on stream because the internal pore volume, although itself unobstructed, becomes largely inaccessible. PMID:26601160

  10. Intramolecular Crosstalk between Catalytic Activities of Receptor Kinases

    KAUST Repository

    Kwezi, Lusisizwe

    2018-01-22

    Signal modulation is important for the growth and development of plants and this process is mediated by a number of factors including physiological growth regulators and their associated signal transduction pathways. Protein kinases play a central role in signaling, including those involving pathogen response mechanisms. We previously demonstrated an active guanylate cyclase (GC) catalytic center in the brassinosteroid insensitive receptor (AtBRI1) within an active intracellular kinase domain resulting in dual enzymatic activity. Here we propose a novel type of receptor architecture that is characterized by a functional GC catalytic center nested in the cytosolic kinase domain enabling intramolecular crosstalk. This may be through a cGMP-AtBRI1 complex forming that may induce a negative feedback mechanism leading to desensitisation of the receptor, regulated through the cGMP production pathway. We further argue that the comparatively low but highly localized cGMP generated by the GC in response to a ligand is sufficient to modulate the kinase activity. This type of receptor therefore provides a molecular switch that directly and/or indirectly affects ligand dependent phosphorylation of downstream signaling cascades and suggests that subsequent signal transduction and modulation works in conjunction with the kinase in downstream signaling.

  11. Catalytic converters in the fireplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouki, J.

    1995-01-01

    In addition to selecting the appropriate means of heating and using dry fuel, the amount of harmful emissions contained by flue gases produced by fireplaces can be reduced by technical means. One such option is to use an oxidising catalytic converter. Tests at TTS Institute's Heating Studies Experimental Station have focused on two such converters (dense and coarse) mounted in light-weight iron heating stoves. The ability of the dense catalytic converter to oxidise carbon monoxide gases proved to be good. The concentration of carbon monoxide in the flue gases was reduced by as much as 90 %. Measurements conducted by VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland) showed that the conversion of other gases, e.g. of methane, was good. The exhaust resistance caused by the dense converter was so great as to necessitate the mounting of a fluegas evacuation fan in the chimney for the purpose of creating sufficient draught. When relying on natural draught, the dense converter requires a chimney of at least 7 metres and a by-pass connection while the fire is being lit. In addition, the converter will have to be constructed to be less dense and this will mean that it's capability to oxidise non-combusted gases will be reduced. The coarse converter did not impair the draught but it's oxidising property was insufficient. With the tests over, the converter was not observed to have become blocked up by impurities

  12. Catalytic conversion of light alkanes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyons, J.E.

    1992-06-30

    The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

  13. Core-shell fuel cell electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adzic, Radoslav; Bliznakov, Stoyan; Vukmirovic, Miomir

    2017-12-26

    Embodiments of the disclosure relate to membrane electrode assemblies. The membrane electrode assembly may include at least one gas-diffusion layer having a first side and a second side, and particle cores adhered to at least one of the first and second sides of the at least one gas-diffusion layer. The particle cores includes surfaces adhered to the at least one of the first and second sides of the at least one gas-diffusion layer and surfaces not in contact with the at least one gas-diffusion layer. Furthermore, a thin layer of catalytically atoms may be adhered to the surfaces of the particle cores not in contact with the at least one gas-diffusion layer.

  14. Core-shell fuel cell electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adzic, Radoslav; Bliznakov, Stoyan; Vukmirovic, Miomir

    2017-07-25

    Embodiments of the disclosure relate to electrocatalysts. The electrocatalyst may include at least one gas-diffusion layer having a first side and a second side, and particle cores adhered to at least one of the first and second sides of the at least one gas-diffusion layer. The particle cores includes surfaces adhered to the at least one of the first and second sides of the at least one gas-diffusion layer and surfaces not in contact with the at least one gas-diffusion layer. Furthermore, a thin layer of catalytically atoms may be adhered to the surfaces of the particle cores not in contact with the at least one gas-diffusion layer.

  15. Domain wall diffusion and domain wall softening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, W T; Salje, E K H; Bismayer, U

    2003-01-01

    A number of experimental and computational studies of materials have shown that transport rates in domain walls may significantly differ from those in the bulk. One possible explanation for enhanced transport in a domain wall is that the domain wall is elastically soft with respect to the bulk. We investigate the softening of a ferroelastic domain wall in a simple, generic model. We calculate saddle point energies of solute atoms in the bulk and domain wall, using a geometry such that variation in the saddle point energy cannot be attributed to the structural differences of the bulk and the wall, but must instead be attributed to softening of the wall. Our results show a reduction of the saddle point energy in the wall, thus indicating that, in this model at least, domain walls are elastically soft compared with the bulk. A simple analysis based on an Einstein model allows us to explain the observed softening of the wall

  16. Heterogeneous catalytic degradation of polyacrylamide solution | Hu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Modified with trace metal elements, the catalytic activity of Fe2O3/Al2O3 could be changed greatly. Among various trace metal elements, Fe2O3/Al2O3 catalysts modified with Co and Cu showed great increase on catalytic activity. International Journal of Engineering, Science and Technology, Vol. 2, No. 7, 2010, pp. 110- ...

  17. Catalytic gasification of dry and wet biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rossum, G.; Potic, B.; Kersten, Sascha R.A.; van Swaaij, Willibrordus Petrus Maria

    2009-01-01

    Catalytic gasification of dry biomass and of wet biomass streams in hot compressed water are reviewed and discussed as potential technologies for the production of synthesis gas, hydrogen- and methane-rich gas. Next to literature data also new experimental results from our laboratory on catalytic

  18. Modelling of procecces in catalytic recombiners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, J.

    2007-01-01

    In order to achieve a high degree of safety in nuclear power plants and prevent possible accident scenarios, their consequences are calculated and analysed with numeric codes. One of the most important part of nuclear safety research of hazardous incidents are development and validation of these numeric models, which are implemented into accident codes. The severe hydrogen release during a core meltdown is one of the considered scenario of performed accident analyses. One of the most important measure for the elimination of the hydrogen is catalytic recombiners. Converting the hydrogen with the atmospheric oxygen to water vapor in an exothermic reaction will prevent possible detonation of the hydrogen/air atmosphere. Within the dissertation the recombiner simulation REKO-DIREKT was developed and validated by an extensive experimental database. The performance of recombiners with regard to the conversion of the hydrogen and the temperature development is modelled. The REKO-DIREKT program is unique and has made significant revolution in research of hydrogen safety. For the first time it has been possible to show the performance of the recombiner so great in detail by using REKO-DIREKT. In the future engineers of nuclear power plants will have opportunity to have precise forecasts about the process of the possible accidents with hydrogen release. Also with presence of water vapor or with oxygen depletion which are included in the model. The major discussion of the hydrogen ignition at hot catalyst steel plates can be evaluated in the future with REKO-DIREKT more reliably than the existing used models. (orig.)

  19. Non-catalytic recuperative reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khinkis, Mark J.; Kozlov, Aleksandr P.; Kurek, Harry

    2015-12-22

    A non-catalytic recuperative reformer has a flue gas flow path for conducting hot flue gas from a thermal process and a reforming mixture flow path for conducting a reforming mixture. At least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path is embedded in the flue gas flow path to permit heat transfer from the hot flue gas to the reforming mixture. The reforming mixture flow path contains substantially no material commonly used as a catalyst for reforming hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., nickel oxide, platinum group elements or rhenium), but instead the reforming mixture is reformed into a higher calorific fuel via reactions due to the heat transfer and residence time. In a preferred embodiment, extended surfaces of metal material such as stainless steel or metal alloy that are high in nickel content are included within at least a portion of the reforming mixture flow path.

  20. Electrochemical promotion of catalytic reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imbihl, R.

    2010-05-01

    The electrochemical promotion of heterogeneously catalyzed reactions (EPOC) became feasible through the use of porous metal electrodes interfaced to a solid electrolyte. With the O 2- conducting yttrium stabilized zirconia (YSZ), the Na + conducting β″-Al 2O 3 (β-alumina), and several other types of solid electrolytes the EPOC effect has been demonstrated for about 100 reaction systems in studies conducted mainly in the mbar range. Surface science investigations showed that the physical basis for the EPOC effect lies in the electrochemically induced spillover of oxygen and alkali metal, respectively, onto the surface of the metal electrodes. For the catalytic promotion effect general concepts and mechanistic schemes were proposed but these concepts and schemes are largely speculative. Applying surface analytical tools to EPOC systems the proposed mechanistic schemes can be verified or invalidated. This report summarizes the progress which has been achieved in the mechanistic understanding of the EPOC effect.

  1. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  2. Diesel engine catalytic combustor system. [aircraft engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ream, L. W. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A low compression turbocharged diesel engine is provided in which the turbocharger can be operated independently of the engine to power auxiliary equipment. Fuel and air are burned in a catalytic combustor to drive the turbine wheel of turbine section which is initially caused to rotate by starter motor. By opening a flapper value, compressed air from the blower section is directed to catalytic combustor when it is heated and expanded, serving to drive the turbine wheel and also to heat the catalytic element. To start, engine valve is closed, combustion is terminated in catalytic combustor, and the valve is then opened to utilize air from the blower for the air driven motor. When the engine starts, the constituents in its exhaust gas react in the catalytic element and the heat generated provides additional energy for the turbine section.

  3. Revised domain structure of ulvan lyase and characterization of the first ulvan binding domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melcher, Rebecca L J; Neumann, Marten; Fuenzalida Werner, Juan Pablo; Gröhn, Franziska; Moerschbacher, Bruno M

    2017-03-22

    Biomass waste products from green algae have recently been given new life, as these polysaccharides have potential applications in industry, agriculture, and medicine. One such polysaccharide group called ulvans displays many different, potentially useful properties that arise from their structural versatility. Hence, performing structural analyses on ulvan is crucial for future applications. However, chemical reaction-based analysis methods cannot fully characterize ulvan and tend to alter its structure. Thus, better methods require well-characterized ulvan-degrading enzymes. Therefore, we analysed a previously sequenced ulvan lyase (Genebank TM reference number JN104480) and characterized its domains. We suggest that the enzyme consists of a shorter than previously described catalytic domain, a newly identified substrate binding domain, and a C-terminal type 9 secretion system signal peptide. By separately expressing the two domains in E. coli, we confirmed that the binding domain is ulvan specific, having higher affinity for ulvan than most lectins for their ligands (affinity constant: 10 5  M -1 ). To our knowledge, this is the first description of an ulvan-binding domain. Overall, identifying this new binding domain is one step towards engineering ulvan enzymes that can be used to characterize ulvan, e.g. through enzymatic/mass spectrometric fingerprinting analyses, and help unlock its full potential.

  4. The evolution of catalytic function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurel, Marie-Christine; Ricard, Jacques

    2006-03-01

    It is very likely that the main driving force of enzyme evolution is the requirement to improve catalytic and regulatory efficiency which results from the intrinsic performance as well as from the spatial and functional organization of enzymes in living cells. Kinetic co-operativity may occur in simple monomeric proteins if they display “slow” conformational transitions, at the cost of catalytic efficiency. Oligomeric enzymes on the other hand can be both efficient and co-operative. We speculate that the main reason for the emergence of co-operative oligomeric enzymes is the need for catalysts that are both cooperative and efficient. As it is not useful for an enzyme to respond to a change of substrate concentration in a complex kinetic way, the emergence of symmetry has its probable origin in a requirement for “functional simplicity”. In a living cell, enzyme are associated with other macromolecules and membranes. The fine tuning of their activity may also be reached through mutations of the microenvironment. Our hypothesis is that these mutations are related to the vectorial transport of molecules, to achieve the hysteresis loops of enzyme reactions generated by the coupling of reaction and diffusion, through the co-operativity brought about by electric interactions between a charged substrate and a membrane, and last but not least, through oscillations. As the physical origins of these effects are very simple and do not require complex molecular devices, it is very likely that the functional advantage generated by the spatial and functional organization of enzyme molecules within the cell have appeared in prebiotic catalysis or very early during the primeval stages of biological evolution. We shall began this paper by presenting the nature of the probable earliest catalysts in the RNA world.

  5. Structural and Histone Binding Ability Characterizations of Human PWWP Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hong; Zeng, Hong; Lam, Robert; Tempel, Wolfram; Amaya, Maria F.; Xu, Chao; Dombrovski, Ludmila; Qiu, Wei; Wang, Yanming; Min, Jinrong (Toronto); (Penn)

    2013-09-25

    The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently. The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3. PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical {beta}-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third {beta}-strands and a C-terminal {alpha}-helix bundle. Both the canonical {beta}-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones.

  6. The EFR project: core and fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Francillon, E.; Barnes, D.W.; Pay, A.; Wehmann, U.

    1991-01-01

    The draft studies on EFR has beginning, in March 1988. The first part of the summary draft has consisted in the core and fuel domains to harmonize the different approaches used in national projects (SPX2-SNR2-CDFR). Rapidly, the core First Consistent Design has been defined with references to the anterior conceptions. Since this definition, studies have been engaged on the management (mean burnup amelioration) and on the conception (breeding gain, sodium void coefficient reduction). After a presentation of the basis options and on the general conception of the fuel assemblies we make a point on the core and the interfaces with the fuel cycle [fr

  7. The domain architecture of large guanine nucleotide exchange factors for the small GTP-binding protein Arf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geldner Niko

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Small G proteins, which are essential regulators of multiple cellular functions, are activated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs that stimulate the exchange of the tightly bound GDP nucleotide by GTP. The catalytic domain responsible for nucleotide exchange is in general associated with non-catalytic domains that define the spatio-temporal conditions of activation. In the case of small G proteins of the Arf subfamily, which are major regulators of membrane trafficking, GEFs form a heterogeneous family whose only common characteristic is the well-characterized Sec7 catalytic domain. In contrast, the function of non-catalytic domains and how they regulate/cooperate with the catalytic domain is essentially unknown. Results Based on Sec7-containing sequences from fully-annotated eukaryotic genomes, including our annotation of these sequences from Paramecium, we have investigated the domain architecture of large ArfGEFs of the BIG and GBF subfamilies, which are involved in Golgi traffic. Multiple sequence alignments combined with the analysis of predicted secondary structures, non-structured regions and splicing patterns, identifies five novel non-catalytic structural domains which are common to both subfamilies, revealing that they share a conserved modular organization. We also report a novel ArfGEF subfamily with a domain organization so far unique to alveolates, which we name TBS (TBC-Sec7. Conclusion Our analysis unifies the BIG and GBF subfamilies into a higher order subfamily, which, together with their being the only subfamilies common to all eukaryotes, suggests that they descend from a common ancestor from which species-specific ArfGEFs have subsequently evolved. Our identification of a conserved modular architecture provides a background for future functional investigation of non-catalytic domains.

  8. Animal MRI Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Animal Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) Core develops and optimizes MRI methods for cardiovascular imaging of mice and rats. The Core provides imaging expertise,...

  9. Measuring and Reporting Leadership and Core Competency Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-04

    COS·A’RWAOCU.:GO:   PME INFORt.’.\\ATION     PLSTHCO NC:Nf;;Se.lOSNCS   "’’’.,".".   PROJECTED TRAINING OS · A t’.X:NN.A.’:a·STA=<=OCU.:GO: J ONT (SS...alcohol or drug offenses, incidents of domestic or child abuse, financial problems, letters of reprimand, courts martial, eviction notices

  10. Structural domain walls in polar hexagonal manganites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumagai, Yu

    2014-03-01

    The domain structure in the multiferroic hexagonal manganites is currently intensely investigated, motivated by the observation of intriguing sixfold topological defects at their meeting points [Choi, T. et al,. Nature Mater. 9, 253 (2010).] and nanoscale electrical conductivity at the domain walls [Wu, W. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 077203 (2012).; Meier, D. et al., Nature Mater. 11, 284 (2012).], as well as reports of coupling between ferroelectricity, magnetism and structural antiphase domains [Geng, Y. et al., Nano Lett. 12, 6055 (2012).]. The detailed structure of the domain walls, as well as the origin of such couplings, however, was previously not fully understood. In the present study, we have used first-principles density functional theory to calculate the structure and properties of the low-energy structural domain walls in the hexagonal manganites [Kumagai, Y. and Spaldin, N. A., Nature Commun. 4, 1540 (2013).]. We find that the lowest energy domain walls are atomically sharp, with {210}orientation, explaining the orientation of recently observed stripe domains and suggesting their topological protection [Chae, S. C. et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 167603 (2012).]. We also explain why ferroelectric domain walls are always simultaneously antiphase walls, propose a mechanism for ferroelectric switching through domain-wall motion, and suggest an atomistic structure for the cores of the sixfold topological defects. This work was supported by ETH Zurich, the European Research Council FP7 Advanced Grants program me (grant number 291151), the JSPS Postdoctoral Fellowships for Research Abroad, and the MEXT Elements Strategy Initiative to Form Core Research Center TIES.

  11. Monte Carlo simulation of magnetic multi-core nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaller, Vincent; Wahnstroem, Goeran; Sanz-Velasco, Anke; Enoksson, Peter; Johansson, Christer

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a Monte Carlo simulation is carried out to evaluate the equilibrium magnetization of magnetic multi-core nanoparticles in a liquid and subjected to a static magnetic field. The particles contain a magnetic multi-core consisting of a cluster of magnetic single-domains of magnetite. We show that the magnetization of multi-core nanoparticles cannot be fully described by a Langevin model. Inter-domain dipolar interactions and domain magnetic anisotropy contribute to decrease the magnetization of the particles, whereas the single-domain size distribution yields an increase in magnetization. Also, we show that the interactions affect the effective magnetic moment of the multi-core nanoparticles.

  12. Crystal structure of an active two-domain derivative of Rous sarcoma virus integrase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z N; Mueser, T C; Bushman, F D; Hyde, C C

    2000-02-18

    Integration of retroviral cDNA is a necessary step in viral replication. The virally encoded integrase protein and DNA sequences at the ends of the linear viral cDNA are required for this reaction. Previous studies revealed that truncated forms of Rous sarcoma virus integrase containing two of the three protein domains can carry out integration reactions in vitro. Here, we describe the crystal structure at 2.5 A resolution of a fragment of the integrase of Rous sarcoma virus (residues 49-286) containing both the conserved catalytic domain and a modulatory DNA-binding domain (C domain). The catalytic domains form a symmetric dimer, but the C domains associate asymmetrically with each other and together adopt a canted conformation relative to the catalytic domains. A binding path for the viral cDNA is evident spanning both domain surfaces, allowing modeling of the larger integration complexes that are known to be active in vivo. The modeling suggests that formation of an integrase tetramer (a dimer of dimers) is necessary and sufficient for joining both viral cDNA ends at neighboring sites in the target DNA. The observed asymmetric arrangement of C domains suggests that they could form a rotationally symmetric tetramer that may be important for bridging integrase complexes at each cDNA end.

  13. NMR assignments and ligand-binding studies on a two-domain family GH19 chitinase allergen from Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Tomoya; Ohnuma, Takayuki; Fukamizo, Tamo

    2017-04-01

    A two-domain family GH19 chitinase from Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica) pollen, CJP-4, which consists of an N-terminal CBM18 domain and a GH19 catalytic domain, is known to be an important allergen, that causes pollinosis. We report here the resonance assignments of the NMR spectrum of CJP-4. The backbone resonances were almost completely assigned, and the secondary structure was estimated based on the chemical shift values. The addition of a chitin dimer to the enzyme solution perturbed the chemical shifts of the resonances of amino acid residues forming a long extended binding site spanning from the CBM18 domain to the GH19 catalytic domain.

  14. Crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human SIRT7 reveals a three-helical domain architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priyanka, Anu; Solanki, Vipul; Parkesh, Raman; Thakur, Krishan Gopal

    2016-10-01

    Human SIRT7 is an NAD(+) dependent deacetylase, which belongs to sirtuin family of proteins. SIRT7, like other sirtuins has conserved catalytic domain and is flanked by N- and C-terminal domains reported to play vital functional roles. Here, we report the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of human SIRT7 (SIRT7(NTD) ) at 2.3 Å resolution as MBP-SIRT7(NTD) fusion protein. SIRT7(NTD) adopts three-helical domain architecture and comparative structural analyses suggest similarities to some DNA binding motifs and transcription regulators. We also report here the importance of N- and C-terminal domains in soluble expression of SIRT7. Proteins 2016; 84:1558-1563. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Catalytic Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqi Lao

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This review surveys the literature regarding the development of catalytic versions of the Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions. The first section summarizes how arsenic and tellurium-based catalytic Wittig-type reaction systems were developed first due to the relatively easy reduction of the oxides involved. This is followed by a presentation of the current state of the art regarding phosphine-catalyzed Wittig reactions. The second section covers the field of related catalytic aza-Wittig reactions that are catalyzed by both phosphine oxides and phosphines.

  16. Catalytic Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lao, Zhiqi; Toy, Patrick H

    2016-01-01

    This review surveys the literature regarding the development of catalytic versions of the Wittig and aza-Wittig reactions. The first section summarizes how arsenic and tellurium-based catalytic Wittig-type reaction systems were developed first due to the relatively easy reduction of the oxides involved. This is followed by a presentation of the current state of the art regarding phosphine-catalyzed Wittig reactions. The second section covers the field of related catalytic aza-Wittig reactions that are catalyzed by both phosphine oxides and phosphines.

  17. Enantioselective synthesis of a PKC inhibitor via catalytic C-H bond activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rebecca M; Thalji, Reema K; Bergman, Robert G; Ellman, Jonathan A

    2006-04-13

    [reaction: see text] The syntheses of two biologically active molecules possessing dihydropyrroloindole cores (1 and 2) were completed using rhodium-catalyzed imine-directed C-H bond functionalization, with the second of these molecules containing a stereocenter that can be set with 90% ee during cyclization using chiral nonracemic phosphoramidite ligands. Catalytic decarbonylation and direct indole/maleimide coupling provide efficient access to 2.

  18. Functional interchangeability of late domains, late domain cofactors and ubiquitin in viral budding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Zhadina

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The membrane scission event that separates nascent enveloped virions from host cell membranes often requires the ESCRT pathway, which can be engaged through the action of peptide motifs, termed late (L- domains, in viral proteins. Viral PTAP and YPDL-like L-domains bind directly to the ESCRT-I and ALIX components of the ESCRT pathway, while PPxY motifs bind Nedd4-like, HECT-domain containing, ubiquitin ligases (e.g. WWP1. It has been unclear precisely how ubiquitin ligase recruitment ultimately leads to particle release. Here, using a lysine-free viral Gag protein derived from the prototypic foamy virus (PFV, where attachment of ubiquitin to Gag can be controlled, we show that several different HECT domains can replace the WWP1 HECT domain in chimeric ubiquitin ligases and drive budding. Moreover, artificial recruitment of isolated HECT domains to Gag is sufficient to stimulate budding. Conversely, the HECT domain becomes dispensable if the other domains of WWP1 are directly fused to an ESCRT-1 protein. In each case where budding is driven by a HECT domain, its catalytic activity is essential, but Gag ubiquitination is dispensable, suggesting that ubiquitin ligation to trans-acting proteins drives budding. Paradoxically, however, we also demonstrate that direct fusion of a ubiquitin moiety to the C-terminus of PFV Gag can also promote budding, suggesting that ubiquitination of Gag can substitute for ubiquitination of trans-acting proteins. Depletion of Tsg101 and ALIX inhibits budding that is dependent on ubiquitin that is fused to Gag, or ligated to trans-acting proteins through the action of a PPxY motif. These studies underscore the flexibility in the ways that the ESCRT pathway can be engaged, and suggest a model in which the identity of the protein to which ubiquitin is attached is not critical for subsequent recruitment of ubiquitin-binding components of the ESCRT pathway and viral budding to proceed.

  19. Extrinsic functions of lectin domains in O-N-acetylgalactosamine glycan biosynthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, Virginia; Ditamo, Yanina; Cejas, Romina B

    2016-01-01

    Glycan biosynthesis occurs mainly in Golgi. Molecular organization and functional regulation of this process are not well understood. We evaluated the extrinsic effect of lectin domains (β-trefoil fold) of polypeptide GalNAc-transferases (ppGalNAc-Ts) on catalytic activity of glycosyltransferases...... during O-GalNAc glycan biosynthesis. The presence of lectin domain T3lec or T4lec during ppGalNAc-T2 and ppGalNAc-T3 catalytic reaction had a clear inhibitory effect on GalNAc-T activity. Interaction of T3lec or T4lec with ppGalNAc-T2 catalytic domain was not mediated by carbohydrate. T3lec, but not T2...

  20. MOBILE COMPLEX FOR CATALYTIC THERMAL WASTE TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedi V.E.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The design and purpose of the basic units of the mobile waste processing complex “MPK” are described. Experimental data of catalytic purification of exhaust gases are presented. Experimental data on catalytic clearing of final gases of a designed mobile incinerator plant are shown. It is defined, that concentrating of parasitic bridging in waste gases of the complex are considerably smaller, rather than allowed by normative documents.

  1. Cytochromes P450: History, Classes, Catalytic Mechanism, and Industrial Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, D J; Finnigan, J D; Cook, K; Black, G W; Charnock, S J

    Cytochromes P450, a family of heme-containing monooxygenases that catalyze a diverse range of oxidative reactions, are so-called due to their maximum absorbance at 450nm, ie, "Pigment-450nm," when bound to carbon monoxide. They have appeal both academically and commercially due to their high degree of regio- and stereoselectivity, for example, in the area of active pharmaceutical ingredient synthesis. Despite this potential, they often exhibit poor stability, low turnover numbers and typically require electron transport protein(s) for catalysis. P450 systems exist in a variety of functional domain architectures, organized into 10 classes. P450s are also divided into families, each of which is based solely on amino acid sequence homology. Their catalytic mechanism employs a very complex, multistep catalytic cycle involving a range of transient intermediates. Mutagenesis is a powerful tool for the development of improved biocatalysts and has been used extensively with the archetypal Class VIII P450, BM3, from Bacillus megaterium, but with the increasing scale of genomic sequencing, a huge resource is now available for the discovery of novel P450s. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. k -core covers and the core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Rodriguez, E.; Borm, P.; Estevez Fernandez, M.A.; Fiestras-Janeiro, M.G.; Mosquera, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper extends the notion of individual minimal rights for a transferable utility game (TU-game) to coalitional minimal rights using minimal balanced families of a specific type, thus defining a corresponding minimal rights game. It is shown that the core of a TU-game coincides with the core of

  3. k-core covers and the core

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanchez-Rodriguez, E.; Borm, Peter; Estevez-Fernandez, A.; Fiestras-Janeiro, G.; Mosquera, M.A.

    This paper extends the notion of individual minimal rights for a transferable utility game (TU-game) to coalitional minimal rights using minimal balanced families of a specific type, thus defining a corresponding minimal rights game. It is shown that the core of a TU-game coincides with the core of

  4. Clojure for domain-specific languages

    CERN Document Server

    Kelker, Ryan D

    2013-01-01

    An example-oriented approach to develop custom domain-specific languages.If you've already developed a few Clojure applications and wish to expand your knowledge on Clojure or domain-specific languages in general, then this book is for you. If you're an absolute Clojure beginner, then you may only find the detailed examples of the core Clojure components of value. If you've developed DSLs in other languages, this Lisp and Java-based book might surprise you with the power of Clojure.

  5. Adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles and methods of using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slowing, Igor Ivan; Kandel, Kapil

    2017-01-31

    The present invention provides an adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle including a mesoporous silica nanoparticle having at least one adsorbent functional group bound thereto. The adsorbent catalytic nanoparticle also includes at least one catalytic material. In various embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using and making the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles. In some examples, the adsorbent catalytic nanoparticles can be used to selectively remove fatty acids from feedstocks for biodiesel, and to hydrotreat the separated fatty acids.

  6. Cage-bell Pt-Pd nanostructures with enhanced catalytic properties and superior methanol tolerance for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dong; Ye, Feng; Liu, Hui; Yang, Jun

    2016-04-01

    Precisely tailoring the structure and fully making use of the components of nanoparticles are effective to enhance their catalytic performance for a given reaction. We herein demonstrate the design of cage-bell structured Pt-Pd nanoparticles, where a Pd shell is deliberately selected to enhance the catalytic property and methanol tolerance of Pt for oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy starts with the synthesis of core-shell Pt@Ag nanoparticles, followed by galvanic replacement reaction between the Ag shell and Pd2+ ions to form core-shell-shell Pt@Ag@Ag-Pd nanoparticles with a Pt core and double shells composed of Ag at inner and alloy Ag-Pd at outer, respectively. Then, the core-shell-shell templates are agitated with saturated NaCl solution to eliminate the Ag component from the double shells, leading to the formation of bimetallic Pt-Pd nanoparticles with a cage-bell structure, defined as a movable Pt core enclosed by a porous Pd shell, which show enhanced catalytic activity for oxygen reduction compared with that of the Pt seeds due to the additional catalysis from Pd shell. In addition, owing to the different diffusion behavior of methanol and oxygen molecules in the porous Pd shell, the Pt-Pd cage-bell nanostructures also exhibit superior methanol tolerant property in catalyzing the oxygen reduction.

  7. Structure and Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-Receptor 12 Provide Insights into the Catalytic Mechanism of the Enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Dong

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor 12 (PTPN12 is an important protein tyrosine phosphatase involved in regulating cell adhesion and migration as well as tumorigenesis. Here, we solved a crystal structure of the native PTPN12 catalytic domain with the catalytic cysteine (residue 231 in dual conformation (phosphorylated and unphosphorylated. Combined with molecular dynamics simulation data, we concluded that those two conformations represent different states of the protein which are realized during the dephosphorylation reaction. Together with docking and mutagenesis data, our results provide a molecular basis for understanding the catalytic mechanism of PTPN12 and its role in tumorigenesis.

  8. Histone demethylase KDM5A is regulated by its reader domain through a positive-feedback mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Torres, Idelisse Ortiz; Kuchenbecker, Kristopher M.; Nnadi, Chimno I.; Fletterick, Robert J.; Kelly, Mark J.S.; Fujimori, Danica Galonić

    2015-01-01

    The retinoblastoma binding protein KDM5A removes methyl marks from lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4). Misregulation of KDM5A contributes to the pathogenesis of lung and gastric cancers. In addition to its catalytic jumonji C domain, KDM5A contains three PHD reader domains, commonly recognized as chromatin recruitment modules. It is unknown whether any of these domains in KDM5A have functions beyond recruitment and whether they regulate the catalytic activity of the demethylase. Here using biochem...

  9. Sub-nanometer dimensions control of core/shell nanoparticles prepared by atomic layer deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, M J; Verheijen, M A; Bol, A A; Kessels, W M M

    2015-03-06

    Bimetallic core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) are the subject of intense research due to their unique electronic, optical and catalytic properties. Accurate and independent control over the dimensions of both core and shell would allow for unprecedented catalytic performance. Here, we demonstrate that both core and shell dimensions of Pd/Pt core/shell nanoparticles (NPs) supported on Al2O3 substrates can be controlled at the sub-nanometer level by using a novel strategy based on atomic layer deposition (ALD). From the results it is derived that the main conditions for accurate dimension control of these core/shell NPs are: (i) a difference in surface energy between the deposited core metal and the substrate to obtain island growth; (ii) a process yielding linear growth of the NP cores with ALD cycles to obtain monodispersed NPs with a narrow size distribution; (iii) a selective ALD process for the shell metal yielding a linearly increasing thickness to obtain controllable shell growth exclusively on the cores. For Pd/Pt core/shell NPs it is found that a minimum core diameter of 1 nm exists above which the NP cores are able to catalytically dissociate the precursor molecules for shell growth. In addition, initial studies on the stability of these core/shell NPs have been carried out, and it has been demonstrated that core/shell NPs can be deposited by ALD on high aspect ratio substrates such as nanowire arrays. These achievements show therefore that ALD has significant potential for the preparation of tuneable heterogeneous catalyst systems.

  10. Domain Theory for Concurrency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Mikkel

    Concurrent computation can be given an abstract mathematical treatment very similar to that provided for sequential computation by domain theory and denotational semantics of Scott and Strachey. A simple domain theory for concurrency is presented. Based on a categorical model of linear logic and ...... towards more expressive languages than HOPLA and Affine HOPLA—in particular concerning extensions to cover independence models. The thesis concludes with a discussion of related work towards a fully fledged domain theory for concurrency....

  11. Structure of the kinase domain of Gilgamesh from Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ni; Chen, CuiCui; Shi, Zhubing; Cheng, Dianlin

    2014-04-01

    The CK1 family kinases regulate multiple cellular aspects and play important roles in Wnt/Wingless and Hedgehog signalling. The kinase domain of Drosophila Gilgamesh isoform I (Gilgamesh-I), a homologue of human CK1-γ, was purified and crystallized. Crystals of methylated Gilgamesh-I kinase domain with a D210A mutation diffracted to 2.85 Å resolution and belonged to space group P43212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 52.025, c = 291.727 Å. The structure of Gilgamesh-I kinase domain, which was determined by molecular replacement, has conserved catalytic elements and an active conformation. Structural comparison indicates that an extended loop between the α1 helix and the β4 strand exists in the Gilgamesh-I kinase domain. This extended loop may regulate the activity and function of Gilgamesh-I.

  12. Reactor core fuel management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silvennoinen, P.

    1976-01-01

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: concepts of reactor physics; neutron diffusion; core heat transfer; reactivity; reactor operation; variables of core management; computer code modules; alternative reactor concepts; methods of optimization; general system aspects. (U.K.)

  13. Nuclear reactor core catcher

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    A nuclear reactor core catcher is described for containing debris resulting from an accident causing core meltdown and which incorporates a method of cooling the debris by the circulation of a liquid coolant. (U.K.)

  14. Contributions to the theory of catalytic titrations-III Neutralization catalytic titrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaál, F F; Abramović, B F

    1985-07-01

    Neutralization catalytic titrations of weak monoprotic adds and bases with both volumetric and coulometric addition of the titrant (strong base/acid) have been simulated by taking into account the equilibrium concentration of the catalyst during the titration. The influence of several factors on the shape of the simulated catalytic titration curve has been investigated and is discussed.

  15. Learning and Domain Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Yishay

    Domain adaptation is a fundamental learning problem where one wishes to use labeled data from one or several source domains to learn a hypothesis performing well on a different, yet related, domain for which no labeled data is available. This generalization across domains is a very significant challenge for many machine learning applications and arises in a variety of natural settings, including NLP tasks (document classification, sentiment analysis, etc.), speech recognition (speakers and noise or environment adaptation) and face recognition (different lighting conditions, different population composition).

  16. Core Competence and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Gary; Hooper, Nick

    2000-01-01

    Outlines the concept of core competence and applies it to postcompulsory education in the United Kingdom. Adopts an educational perspective that suggests accreditation as the core competence of universities. This economic approach suggests that the market trend toward lifetime learning might best be met by institutions developing a core competence…

  17. Domain analysis and modeling to improve comparability of health statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, M; Hashimoto, H; Ohida, T

    2001-01-01

    Health statistics is an essential element to improve the ability of managers of health institutions, healthcare researchers, policy makers, and health professionals to formulate appropriate course of reactions and to make decisions based on evidence. To ensure adequate health statistics, standards are of critical importance. A study on healthcare statistics domain analysis is underway in an effort to improve usability and comparability of health statistics. The ongoing study focuses on structuring the domain knowledge and making the knowledge explicit with a data element dictionary being the core. Supplemental to the dictionary are a domain term list, a terminology dictionary, and a data model to help organize the concepts constituting the health statistics domain.

  18. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. R. Laster; E. Anoshkina

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1 - Implementation Plan, Phase 2 - Validation Testing and Phase 3 - Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  19. Catalytic Combustor for Fuel-Flexible Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laster, W. R.; Anoshkina, E.

    2008-01-31

    Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse has conducted a three-year program to develop an ultra low NOx, fuel flexible catalytic combustor for gas turbine application in IGCC. The program is defined in three phases: Phase 1- Implementation Plan, Phase 2- Validation Testing and Phase 3 – Field Testing. Both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the program have been completed. In IGCC power plants, the gas turbine must be capable of operating on syngas as a primary fuel and an available back-up fuel such as natural gas. In this program the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCLTM) technology is being developed as an ultra low NOx combustor. In this concept, ultra low NOx is achieved by stabilizing a lean premix combustion process by using a catalytic reactor to oxidize a portion of the fuel, increasing the temperature of fuel/air mixture prior to the main combustion zone. In Phase 1, the feasibility of the catalytic concept for syngas application has been evaluated and the key technology issues identified. In Phase II the technology necessary for the application of the catalytic concept to IGCC fuels was developed through detailed design and subscale testing. Phase III (currently not funded) will consist of full-scale combustor basket testing on natural gas and syngas.

  20. Crystal structure of an EAL domain in complex with reaction product 5'-pGpG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert-Paganin, Julien; Nonin-Lecomte, Sylvie; Réty, Stéphane

    2012-01-01

    FimX is a large multidomain protein containing an EAL domain and involved in twitching motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We present here two crystallographic structures of the EAL domain of FimX (residues 438-686): one of the apo form and the other of a complex with 5'-pGpG, the reaction product of the hydrolysis of c-di-GMP. In both crystal forms, the EAL domains form a dimer delimiting a large cavity encompassing the catalytic pockets. The ligand is trapped in this cavity by its sugar phosphate moiety. We confirmed by NMR that the guanine bases are not involved in the interaction in solution. We solved here the first structure of an EAL domain bound to the reaction product 5'-pGpG. Though isolated FimX EAL domain has a very low catalytic activity, which would not be significant compared to other catalytic EAL domains, the structure with the product of the reaction can provides some hints in the mechanism of hydrolysis of the c-di-GMP by EAL domains.

  1. Crystal structure of an EAL domain in complex with reaction product 5'-pGpG.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Robert-Paganin

    Full Text Available FimX is a large multidomain protein containing an EAL domain and involved in twitching motility in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We present here two crystallographic structures of the EAL domain of FimX (residues 438-686: one of the apo form and the other of a complex with 5'-pGpG, the reaction product of the hydrolysis of c-di-GMP. In both crystal forms, the EAL domains form a dimer delimiting a large cavity encompassing the catalytic pockets. The ligand is trapped in this cavity by its sugar phosphate moiety. We confirmed by NMR that the guanine bases are not involved in the interaction in solution. We solved here the first structure of an EAL domain bound to the reaction product 5'-pGpG. Though isolated FimX EAL domain has a very low catalytic activity, which would not be significant compared to other catalytic EAL domains, the structure with the product of the reaction can provides some hints in the mechanism of hydrolysis of the c-di-GMP by EAL domains.

  2. Domain-General Factors Influencing Numerical and Arithmetic Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Knops

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This special issue contains 18 articles that address the question how numerical processes interact with domain-general factors. We start the editorial with a discussion of how to define domain-general versus domain-specific factors and then discuss the contributions to this special issue grouped into two core numerical domains that are subject to domain-general influences (see Figure 1. The first group of contributions addresses the question how numbers interact with spatial factors. The second group of contributions is concerned with factors that determine and predict arithmetic understanding, performance and development. This special issue shows that domain-general (Table 1a as well as domain-specific (Table 1b abilities influence numerical and arithmetic performance virtually at all levels and make it clear that for the field of numerical cognition a sole focus on one or several domain-specific factors like the approximate number system or spatial-numerical associations is not sufficient. Vice versa, in most studies that included domain-general and domain-specific variables, domain-specific numerical variables predicted arithmetic performance above and beyond domain-general variables. Therefore, a sole focus on domain-general aspects such as, for example, working memory, to explain, predict and foster arithmetic learning is also not sufficient. Based on the articles in this special issue we conclude that both domain-general and domain-specific factors contribute to numerical cognition. But the how, why and when of their contribution still needs to be better understood. We hope that this special issue may be helpful to readers in constraining future theory and model building about the interplay of domain-specific and domain-general factors.

  3. Supersymmetric domain walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Kleinschmidt, Axel; Riccioni, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    We classify the half-supersymmetric "domain walls," i.e., branes of codimension one, in toroidally compactified IIA/IIB string theory and show to which gauged supergravity theory each of these domain walls belong. We use as input the requirement of supersymmetric Wess-Zumino terms, the properties of

  4. Quantum Bounded Symmetric Domains

    OpenAIRE

    Vaksman, L. L.

    2008-01-01

    This is Leonid Vaksman's monograph "Quantum bounded symmetric domains" (in Russian), preceded with an English translation of the table of contents and (a part) of the introduction. Quantum bounded symmetric domains are interesting from several points of view. In particular, they provide interesting examples for noncommutative complex analysis (i.e., the theory of subalgebras of C^*-algebars) initiated by W. Arveson.

  5. Electro Catalytic Oxidation (ECO) Operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan Jones

    2011-03-31

    The power industry in the United States is faced with meeting many new regulations to reduce a number of air pollutants including sulfur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, fine particulate matter, and mercury. With over 1,000 power plants in the US, this is a daunting task. In some cases, traditional pollution control technologies such as wet scrubbers and SCRs are not feasible. Powerspan's Electro-Catalytic Oxidation, or ECO{reg_sign} process combines four pollution control devices into a single integrated system that can be installed after a power plant's particulate control device. Besides achieving major reductions in emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), nitrogen oxides (NOx), fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and mercury (Hg), ECO produces a highly marketable fertilizer, which can help offset the operating costs of the process system. Powerspan has been operating a 50-MW ECO commercial demonstration unit (CDU) at FirstEnergy Corp.'s R.E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio, since February 2004. In addition to the CDU, a test loop has been constructed beside the CDU to demonstrate higher NOx removal rates and test various scrubber packing types and wet ESP configurations. Furthermore, Powerspan has developed the ECO{reg_sign}{sub 2} technology, a regenerative process that uses a proprietary solvent to capture CO{sub 2} from flue gas. The CO{sub 2} capture takes place after the capture of NOx, SO{sub 2}, mercury, and fine particulate matter. Once the CO{sub 2} is captured, the proprietary solution is regenerated to release CO{sub 2} in a form that is ready for geological storage or beneficial use. Pilot scale testing of ECO{sub 2} began in early 2009 at FirstEnergy's Burger Plant. The ECO{sub 2} pilot unit is designed to process a 1-MW flue gas stream and produce 20 tons of CO{sub 2} per day, achieving a 90% CO{sub 2} capture rate. The ECO{sub 2} pilot program provided the opportunity to confirm process design and cost estimates, and prepare for large

  6. Modular endolysin of Burkholderia AP3 phage has the largest lysozyme-like catalytic subunit discovered to date and no catalytic aspartate residue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciejewska, Barbara; Źrubek, Karol; Espaillat, Akbar; Wiśniewska, Magdalena; Rembacz, Krzysztof P; Cava, Felipe; Dubin, Grzegorz; Drulis-Kawa, Zuzanna

    2017-11-06

    Endolysins are peptidoglycan-degrading enzymes utilized by bacteriophages to release the progeny from bacterial cells. The lytic properties of phage endolysins make them potential antibacterial agents for medical and industrial applications. Here, we present a comprehensive characterization of phage AP3 modular endolysin (AP3gp15) containing cell wall binding domain and an enzymatic domain (DUF3380 by BLASTP), both widespread and conservative. Our structural analysis demonstrates the low similarity of an enzymatic domain to known lysozymes and an unusual catalytic centre characterized by only a single glutamic acid residue and no aspartic acid. Thus, our findings suggest distinguishing a novel class of muralytic enzymes having the activity and catalytic centre organization of DUF3380. The lack of amino acid sequence homology between AP3gp15 and other known muralytic enzymes may reflect the evolutionary convergence of analogous glycosidases. Moreover, the broad antibacterial spectrum, lack of cytotoxic effect on human cells and the stability characteristics of AP3 endolysin advocate for its future application development.

  7. Cholesterol Domains Enhance Transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betker, Jamie L.; Kullberg, Max; Gomez, Joe; Anchordoquy, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    The formation of cholesterol domains in lipoplexes has been associated with enhanced serum stability and transfection rates both in cell culture and in vivo. This study utilizes the ability of saturated phosphatidylcholines to promote the formation of cholesterol domains at much lower cholesterol contents than have been utilized in previous work. The results show that lipoplexes with identical cholesterol and cationic lipid contents exhibit significantly improved transfection efficiencies when a domain is present, consistent with previous work. In addition, studies assessing transfection rates in the absence of serum demonstrate that the ability of domains to enhance transfection is not dependent on interactions with serum proteins. Consistent with this hypothesis, characterization of the adsorbed proteins composing the corona of these lipoplex formulations did not reveal a correlation between transfection and the adsorption of a specific protein. Finally, we show that the interaction with serum proteins can promote domain formation in some formulations, and thereby result in enhanced transfection only after serum exposure. PMID:23557286

  8. Highly Dense Isolated Metal Atom Catalytic Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaxin; Kasama, Takeshi; Huang, Zhiwei

    2015-01-01

    -ray diffraction. A combination of electron microscopy images with X-ray absorption spectra demonstrated that the silver atoms were anchored on five-fold oxygen-terminated cavities on the surface of the support to form highly dense isolated metal active sites, leading to excellent reactivity in catalytic oxidation......Atomically dispersed noble-metal catalysts with highly dense active sites are promising materials with which to maximise metal efficiency and to enhance catalytic performance; however, their fabrication remains challenging because metal atoms are prone to sintering, especially at a high metal...... loading. A dynamic process of formation of isolated metal atom catalytic sites on the surface of the support, which was achieved starting from silver nanoparticles by using a thermal surface-mediated diffusion method, was observed directly by using in situ electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron X...

  9. Catalytic Organic Transformations Mediated by Actinide Complexes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabell S. R. Karmel

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This review article presents the development of organoactinides and actinide coordination complexes as catalysts for homogeneous organic transformations. This chapter introduces the basic principles of actinide catalysis and deals with the historic development of actinide complexes in catalytic processes. The application of organoactinides in homogeneous catalysis is exemplified in the hydroelementation reactions, such as the hydroamination, hydrosilylation, hydroalkoxylation and hydrothiolation of alkynes. Additionally, the use of actinide coordination complexes for the catalytic polymerization of α-olefins and the ring opening polymerization of cyclic esters is presented. The last part of this review article highlights novel catalytic transformations mediated by actinide compounds and gives an outlook to the further potential of this field.

  10. Core stability exercise principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akuthota, Venu; Ferreiro, Andrea; Moore, Tamara; Fredericson, Michael

    2008-02-01

    Core stability is essential for proper load balance within the spine, pelvis, and kinetic chain. The so-called core is the group of trunk muscles that surround the spine and abdominal viscera. Abdominal, gluteal, hip girdle, paraspinal, and other muscles work in concert to provide spinal stability. Core stability and its motor control have been shown to be imperative for initiation of functional limb movements, as needed in athletics. Sports medicine practitioners use core strengthening techniques to improve performance and prevent injury. Core strengthening, often called lumbar stabilization, also has been used as a therapeutic exercise treatment regimen for low back pain conditions. This article summarizes the anatomy of the core, the progression of core strengthening, the available evidence for its theoretical construct, and its efficacy in musculoskeletal conditions.

  11. Porous media for catalytic renewable energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hotz, Nico

    2012-05-01

    A novel flow-based method is presented to place catalytic nanoparticles into a reactor by sol-gelation of a porous ceramic consisting of copper-based nanoparticles, silica sand, ceramic binder, and a gelation agent. This method allows for the placement of a liquid precursor containing the catalyst into the final reactor geometry without the need of impregnating or coating of a substrate with the catalytic material. The so generated foam-like porous ceramic shows properties highly appropriate for use as catalytic reactor material, e.g., reasonable pressure drop due to its porosity, high thermal and catalytic stability, and excellent catalytic behavior. The catalytic activity of micro-reactors containing this foam-like ceramic is tested in terms of their ability to convert alcoholic biofuel (e.g. methanol) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture with low concentrations of carbon monoxide (up to 75% hydrogen content and less than 0.2% CO, for the case of methanol). This gas mixture is subsequently used in a low-temperature fuel cell, converting the hydrogen directly to electricity. A low concentration of CO is crucial to avoid poisoning of the fuel cell catalyst. Since conventional Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells require CO concentrations far below 100 ppm and since most methods to reduce the mole fraction of CO (such as Preferential Oxidation or PROX) have CO conversions of up to 99%, the alcohol fuel reformer has to achieve initial CO mole fractions significantly below 1%. The catalyst and the porous ceramic reactor of the present study can successfully fulfill this requirement.

  12. Interaction Between the Biotin Carboxyl Carrier Domain and the Biotin Carboxylase Domain in Pyruvate Carboxylase from Rhizobium etli†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lietzan, Adam D.; Menefee, Ann L.; Zeczycki, Tonya N.; Kumar, Sudhanshu; Attwood, Paul V.; Wallace, John C.; Cleland, W. Wallace; Maurice, Martin St.

    2011-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) catalyzes the ATP-dependent carboxylation of pyruvate to oxaloacetate, an important anaplerotic reaction in mammalian tissues. To effect catalysis, the tethered biotin of PC must gain access to active sites in both the biotin carboxylase domain and the carboxyl transferase domain. Previous studies have demonstrated that a mutation of threonine 882 to alanine in PC from Rhizobium etli renders the carboxyl transferase domain inactive and favors the positioning of biotin in the biotin carboxylase domain. We report the 2.4 Å resolution X-ray crystal structure of the Rhizobium etli PC T882A mutant which reveals the first high-resolution description of the domain interaction between the biotin carboxyl carrier protein domain and the biotin carboxylase domain. The overall quaternary arrangement of Rhizobium etli PC remains highly asymmetrical and is independent of the presence of allosteric activator. While biotin is observed in the biotin carboxylase domain, its access to the active site is precluded by the interaction between Arg353 and Glu248, revealing a mechanism for regulating carboxybiotin access to the BC domain active site. The binding location for the biotin carboxyl carrier protein domain demonstrates that tethered biotin cannot bind in the biotin carboxylase domain active site in the same orientation as free biotin, helping to explain the difference in catalysis observed between tethered biotin and free biotin substrates in biotin carboxylase enzymes. Electron density located in the biotin carboxylase domain active site is assigned to phosphonoacetate, offering a probable location for the putative carboxyphosphate intermediate formed during biotin carboxylation. The insights gained from the T882A Rhizobium etli PC crystal structure provide a new series of catalytic snapshots in PC and offer a revised perspective on catalysis in the biotin-dependent enzyme family. PMID:21958016

  13. Photo-catalytic properties of doped or substituted polyaniline-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Song, Weijie; Zhao, Zongshan; Cheng, Yang

    2014-10-01

    In this work, doped and substituted polyaniline (PANI)-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles were synthesized. The diameter of Fe3O4 core was 430 nm, and the thickness of PANI shell was 20 nm. Their photo-catalytic properties for methyl orange were investigated under natural light illumination. The photo-catalytic activity sequence of three doped PANI/Fe3O4 nanoparticles is as follows: iodine doping > without doping > graphite powder doping. This should be due to the difference of structure, conductivity, and band gap resulting from the dopants. The photo-catalytic activity of five substituted PANI/Fe3O4 nanoparticles followed the order of poly(1,2-diaminobenzene) > poly( o-toluidine) > poly(1,3-diaminobenzene) > PANI > polydiphenylamine. The effects of steric hindrance, activated ability, and conjugation of the substituents on the photo-catalytic properties were discussed. The ESR results suggested that O2 and H2O2 dissolved in the solutions were important factors on the photo-degradation, and the ·OH generated via h+-mediated pathway was the key oxidizing substance.

  14. Toward a catalytic site in DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Ulla; Rohr, Katja; Vogel, Stefan

    2007-01-01

    A number of functionalized polyaza crown ether building blocks have been incorporated into DNA-conjugates as catalytic Cu(2+) binding sites. The effect of the DNA-conjugate catalyst on the stereochemical outcome of a Cu(2+)-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction will be presented.......A number of functionalized polyaza crown ether building blocks have been incorporated into DNA-conjugates as catalytic Cu(2+) binding sites. The effect of the DNA-conjugate catalyst on the stereochemical outcome of a Cu(2+)-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction will be presented....

  15. Thermal and catalytic pyrolysis of plastic waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Almeida

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The amount of plastic waste is growing every year and with that comes an environmental concern regarding this problem. Pyrolysis as a tertiary recycling process is presented as a solution. Pyrolysis can be thermal or catalytical and can be performed under different experimental conditions. These conditions affect the type and amount of product obtained. With the pyrolysis process, products can be obtained with high added value, such as fuel oils and feedstock for new products. Zeolites can be used as catalysts in catalytic pyrolysis and influence the final products obtained.

  16. Catalytic Wastewater Treatment Using Pillared Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perathoner, Siglinda; Centi, Gabriele

    After introduction on the use of solid catalysts in wastewater treatment technologies, particularly advanced oxidation processes (AOPs), this review discussed the use of pillared clay (PILC) materials in three applications: (i) wet air catalytic oxidation (WACO), (ii) wet hydrogen peroxide catalytic oxidation (WHPCO) on Cu-PILC and Fe-PILC, and (iii) behavior of Ti-PILC and Fe-PILC in the photocatalytic or photo-Fenton conversion of pollutants. Literature data are critically analyzed to evidence the main direction to further investigate, in particularly with reference to the possible practical application of these technologies to treat industrial, municipal, or agro-food production wastewater.

  17. Catalytic gasification of oil-shales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, A.; Avakyan, T. [I.M. Gubkin Russian State Univ. of Oil and Gas, Moscow (Russian Federation); Strizhakova, Yu. [Samara State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    2012-07-01

    Nowadays, the problem of complex usage of solid fossil fuels as raw materials for obtaining of motor fuels and chemical products is becoming increasingly important. A one of possible solutions of the problem is their gasification with further processing of gaseous and liquid products. In this work we have investigated the process of thermal and catalytic gasification of Baltic and Kashpir oil-shales. We have shown that, as compared with non-catalytic process, using of nickel catalyst in the reaction increases the yield of gas, as well as hydrogen content in it, and decreases the amount of liquid products. (orig.)

  18. The Crystal Structures of the Open and Catalytically Competent Closed Conformation of Escherichia coli Glycogen Synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Fang; Jia, Xiaofei; Yep, Alejandra; Preiss, Jack; Geiger, James H.; (MSU)

    2009-07-06

    Escherichia coli glycogen synthase (EcGS, EC 2.4.1.21) is a retaining glycosyltransferase (GT) that transfers glucose from adenosine diphosphate glucose to a glucan chain acceptor with retention of configuration at the anomeric carbon. EcGS belongs to the GT-B structural superfamily. Here we report several EcGS x-ray structures that together shed considerable light on the structure and function of these enzymes. The structure of the wild-type enzyme bound to ADP and glucose revealed a 15.2 degrees overall domain-domain closure and provided for the first time the structure of the catalytically active, closed conformation of a glycogen synthase. The main chain carbonyl group of His-161, Arg-300, and Lys-305 are suggested by the structure to act as critical catalytic residues in the transglycosylation. Glu-377, previously thought to be catalytic is found on the alpha-face of the glucose and plays an electrostatic role in the active site and as a glucose ring locator. This is also consistent with the structure of the EcGS(E377A)-ADP-HEPPSO complex where the glucose moiety is either absent or disordered in the active site

  19. Heterogeneous Catalytic Oligomerization of Ethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Oliver Dennis

    increased with temperature, with 17 wt.% observed at 190ºC. Higher reaction temperatures led to the formation of odd-numbered oligomers primarily due to acid-catalyzed cracking reactions. In the range of space velocities tested, a moderate WHSV of 2.0 hr-1 resulted in a local maximum of 10.6 wt.% of liquid hydrocarbon yield. A moderate nickel loading of 3.4 wt.% also resulted in the highest liquid yield out of the three loadings tested (10.6 wt.%). The variation in nickel loading revealed the importance of having a synergistic balance of nickel and acid sites on the catalyst to maximize ethylene conversion and maintain high liquid hydrocarbon yield. Lastly, we used supercritical ethylene as both a solvent and as a reactant for ethylene oligomerization over two silica-alumina type catalysts: Ni-Hbeta and Ni-Al-SBA-15. Specifically, the effect of pressure and temperature on the overall conversion and product selectivity were evaluated in the range from 0 to 65 bar and 30 to 120ºC. At subcritical conditions, the ethylene conversion reached a plateau of around 50%. By increasing the pressure past the critical point of ethylene, the conversion drastically increased to 71%. The increased conversion can be attributed to the solubility of certain oligomers, namely butene, in supercritical ethylene that promotes desorption from catalytic active site before further oligomerization. We also tested a mesoporous catalyst, Ni-Al-SBA-15 and observed conversion trends analogous to that of Ni-Hbeta. At supercritical conditions, ethylene oligomerization over Ni-Al-SBA-15 was more selective towards the butene product, with nearly 74 wt.% butenes observed. The catalyst activity increased with temperature from 30ºC to 120ºC. The experiment conducted at 30ºC showed very little activity and ethylene conversion, however it effectively heavy molecular weight species from the catalyst. This condition, albeit being not effective for ethylene oligomerization, could be implemented as an in

  20. WW or WoW: the WW domains in a union of bliss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudol, Marius; Recinos, Claudia C; Abraczinskas, Jennifer; Humbert, Jasper; Farooq, Amjad

    2005-12-01

    WW domains are small protein modules that recognize proline-rich peptide motifs or phosphorylated-serine/threonine proline sites in cognate proteins. Within host proteins these modules are joined to other protein domains or to a variety of catalytic domains acting together as adaptors or targeting anchors of enzymes. An important aspect of signaling by WW domains is their ability to recognize their cognate ligands in tandem. Tandem WW domains not only act in a synergistic manner but also appear to chaperone the function of each other. In this review, we focus on structure, function, and mechanism of the tandem WW domains co-operativity as well as independent actions. We emphasize here the implications of tandem arrangement and cooperative function of the domains for signaling pathways.

  1. Domain Organization in Clostridium botulinum Neurotoxin Type E is Unique: Its Implication in Faster Translocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaran, D.; Eswaramoorthy, S; Furey, W; Navaza, J; Sax, M; Swaminathan, S

    2009-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum produces seven antigenically distinct neurotoxins [C. botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) A-G] sharing a significant sequence homology. Based on sequence and functional similarity, it was believed that their three-dimensional structures will also be similar. Indeed, the crystal structures of BoNTs A and B exhibit similar fold and domain association where the translocation domain is flanked on either side by binding and catalytic domains. Here, we report the crystal structure of BoNT E holotoxin and show that the domain association is different and unique, although the individual domains are similar to those of BoNTs A and B. In BoNT E, both the binding domain and the catalytic domain are on the same side of the translocation domain, and all three have mutual interfaces. This unique association may have an effect on the rate of translocation, with the molecule strategically positioned in the vesicle for quick entry into cytosol. Botulism, the disease caused by BoNT E, sets in faster than any other serotype because of its speedy internalization and translocation, and the present structure offers a credible explanation. We propose that the translocation domain in other BoNTs follows a two-step process to attain translocation-competent conformation as in BoNT E. We also suggest that this translocation-competent conformation in BoNT E is a probable reason for its faster toxic rate compared to BoNT A. However, this needs further experimental elucidation.

  2. Spherical core-shell magnetic particles constructed by main-chain palladium N-heterocyclic carbenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huaixia; Li, Liuyi; Wang, Jinyun; Wang, Ruihu

    2015-02-01

    The encapsulation of the functional species on magnetic core is a facile approach for the synthesis of core-shell magnetic materials, and surface encapsulating matrices play crucial roles in regulating their properties and applications. In this study, two core-shell palladium N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) particles (Fe3O4@PNP1 and Fe3O4@PNP2) were prepared by a one-pot reaction of semi-rigid tripodal imidazolium salts and palladium acetate in the presence of magnetite nanoparticles. The magnetite nanoparticles are encapsulated inside the main-chain palladium, which act as cores. The conjugated effects of triphenyltriazine and triphenylbenzene in the imidazolium salts have important influence on their physical properties and catalytic performances. Fe3O4@PNP2 shows better recyclability than Fe3O4@PNP1. Unexpectedly, Pd(ii) is well maintained after six consecutive catalytic runs in Fe3O4@PNP2, and Pd(0) and Pd(ii) coexist in Fe3O4@PNP1 under the same conditions; moreover, the morphologies of these spherical core-shell particles show no significant variation after six consecutive catalytic runs.The encapsulation of the functional species on magnetic core is a facile approach for the synthesis of core-shell magnetic materials, and surface encapsulating matrices play crucial roles in regulating their properties and applications. In this study, two core-shell palladium N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) particles (Fe3O4@PNP1 and Fe3O4@PNP2) were prepared by a one-pot reaction of semi-rigid tripodal imidazolium salts and palladium acetate in the presence of magnetite nanoparticles. The magnetite nanoparticles are encapsulated inside the main-chain palladium, which act as cores. The conjugated effects of triphenyltriazine and triphenylbenzene in the imidazolium salts have important influence on their physical properties and catalytic performances. Fe3O4@PNP2 shows better recyclability than Fe3O4@PNP1. Unexpectedly, Pd(ii) is well maintained after six consecutive catalytic runs in

  3. CATALYTIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION OF Mn(II ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    The aim of the present study was to develop a new precise and accurate catalytic spectrophotometric ... manganese sulfate monohydrate (Merck, Darmstadt, Germany) in water and diluted to 250 mL. The working .... and potassium hydrogen phthalate-HCl buffer solutions, the slope of calibration graph was unsatisfactory.

  4. Catalytic enantioselective conjugate addition with Grignard reagents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez, Fernando; Minnaard, Adriaan J.; Feringa, Ben L.

    In this Account, recent advances in catalytic asymmetric conjugate addition of Grignard reagents are discussed. Synthetic methodology to perform highly enantioselective Cu-catalyzed conjugate addition of Grignard reagents to cyclic enones with ee's up to 96% was reported in 2004 from our

  5. Catalytic models developed through social work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    of adolescents placed in out-of-home care and is characterised using three situated cases as empirical data. Afterwards the concept of catalytic processes is briefly presented and then applied in an analysis of pedagogical treatment in the three cases. The result is a different conceptualisation of the social...

  6. Fluid catalytic cracking : Feedstocks and reaction mechanism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dupain, X.

    2006-01-01

    The Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) process is one of the key units in a modern refinery. Traditionally, its design is primarily aimed for the production of gasoline from heavy oil fractions, but as co-products also diesel blends and valuable gasses (e.g. propene and butenes) are formed in

  7. Catalytic dehydrogenations of ethylbenzene to styrene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nederlof, C.

    2012-01-01

    This research work on the catalytic dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene (EB) to styrene (ST) had a primary goal of developing improved catalysts for dehydrogenation processes both in CO2 as well as with O2 that can compete with the conventional dehydrogenation process in steam. In order to achieve this

  8. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and catalytic oxidation ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 123; Issue 3. Synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and catalytic oxidation properties of ONO/ONS donor Schiff base ruthenium(III) complexes containing PPh3/AsPh3. Priyarega M Muthu Tamizh R Karvembu R Prabhakaran K Natarajan. Volume 123 Issue 3 May ...

  9. DEALUMINATION OF MORDENITE ZEOLITE AND ITS CATALYTIC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The xylene mixtures result from the catalytic reforming of petroleum NAFTA and the isomers of xylenes are usually obtained from this mixture by separation. After separation of o-isomers and p-isomers, the remainder richer in m-xylene, needs to be subjected to isomerization [2]. Xylene isomerization has received growing ...

  10. Novel Metal Nanomaterials and Their Catalytic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqing Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the rapidly developing areas of nanotechnology, nano-scale materials as heterogeneous catalysts in the synthesis of organic molecules have gotten more and more attention. In this review, we will summarize the synthesis of several new types of noble metal nanostructures (FePt@Cu nanowires, Pt@Fe2O3 nanowires and bimetallic Pt@Ir nanocomplexes; Pt-Au heterostructures, Au-Pt bimetallic nanocomplexes and Pt/Pd bimetallic nanodendrites; Au nanowires, CuO@Ag nanowires and a series of Pd nanocatalysts and their new catalytic applications in our group, to establish heterogeneous catalytic system in “green” environments. Further study shows that these materials have a higher catalytic activity and selectivity than previously reported nanocrystal catalysts in organic reactions, or show a superior electro-catalytic activity for the oxidation of methanol. The whole process might have a great impact to resolve the energy crisis and the environmental crisis that were caused by traditional chemical engineering. Furthermore, we hope that this article will provide a reference point for the noble metal nanomaterials’ development that leads to new opportunities in nanocatalysis.

  11. Catalytic site interactions in yeast OMP synthase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Riis; Barr, Eric W.; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    2014-01-01

    45 (2006) 5330-5342]. This behavior was investigated in the yeast enzyme by mutations in the conserved catalytic loop and 5-phosphoribosyl-1-diphosphate (PRPP) binding motif. Although the reaction is mechanistically sequential, the wild-type (WT) enzyme shows parallel lines in double reciprocal...

  12. THEORETICAL STUDY OF CATALYTIC HYDROGENATION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    Catalytic hydrotreating process is a technique of purification of the crude oil with the aim of the improvement of the quality and the stability of fuels and lubricants. This is performed by the destruction of heterocyclic compounds and by the saturation of unsaturated hydrocarbons under the effect of the hydrogen pressure in ...

  13. Catalytic Converters Maintain Air Quality in Mines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    At Langley Research Center, engineers developed a tin-oxide based washcoat to prevent oxygen buildup in carbon dioxide lasers used to detect wind shears. Airflow Catalyst Systems Inc. of Rochester, New York, licensed the technology and then adapted the washcoat for use as a catalytic converter to treat the exhaust from diesel mining equipment.

  14. Electrochemical Promotion of Catalytic Reactions Using

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petrushina, Irina; Bjerrum, Niels; Cleemann, Lars Nilausen

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a study on electrochemical promotion (EP) of catalytic reactions using Pt/C/polybenzimidazole(H3PO4)/Pt/C fuel cell performed by the Energy and Materials Science Group (Technical University of Denmark) during the last 6 years[1-4]. The development of our...

  15. Antibody mapping and tissue localization of globular and cysteine-rich regions of perlecan domain III

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Ljubimov, A V; Sthanam, M

    1995-01-01

    Perlecan is the best-characterized basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan. It has a large (approximately 400 KD) core protein consisting of five distinct domains. Domain III, a centrally located domain, contains three globular domains separated by cysteine-rich epidermal growth factor (EGF......)-like repeats. Domain III has overall homology with the N-terminus of the laminin alpha 1-chain. The aim of this study was to map a library of nine rat monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against murine perlecan core protein, using recombinant whole Domain III and defined subdomains of Domain III. ELISA and Western...... blotting showed that six of the nine MAbs recognized Domain III of perlecan, three of them mapping to globular Subdomain IIIc, and the other three recognized epitopes within the cysteine-rich regions. All six MAbs stained every basement membrane of several mouse organs as well as some connective tissues...

  16. Nuclear reactor core flow baffling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berringer, R.T.

    1979-01-01

    A flow baffling arrangement is disclosed for the core of a nuclear reactor. A plurality of core formers are aligned with the grids of the core fuel assemblies such that the high pressure drop areas in the core are at the same elevations as the high pressure drop areas about the core periphery. The arrangement minimizes core bypass flow, maintains cooling of the structure surrounding the core, and allows the utilization of alternative beneficial components such as neutron reflectors positioned near the core

  17. Conserved Domain Database (CDD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — CDD is a protein annotation resource that consists of a collection of well-annotated multiple sequence alignment models for ancient domains and full-length proteins.

  18. Sintering of Catalytic Nanoparticles: Particle Migration or Ostwald Ripening?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; DeLaRiva, Andrew T.; Challa, Sivakumar R.

    2013-01-01

    deactivation, is an important mechanism for the loss of catalyst activity. This is especially true for high temperature catalytic processes, such as steam reforming, automotive exhaust treatment, or catalytic combustion. With dwindling supplies of precious metals and increasing demand, fundamental...

  19. Sediment Core Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides instrumentation and expertise for physical and geoacoustic characterization of marine sediments.DESCRIPTION: The multisensor core logger measures...

  20. Catalytic metal ions and enzymatic processing of DNA and RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palermo, Giulia; Cavalli, Andrea; Klein, Michael L; Alfonso-Prieto, Mercedes; Dal Peraro, Matteo; De Vivo, Marco

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Two-metal-ion-dependent nucleases cleave the phosphodiester bonds of nucleic acids via the two-metal-ion (2M) mechanism. Several high-resolution X-ray structures portraying the two-metal-aided catalytic site, together with mutagenesis and kinetics studies, have demonstrated a functional role of the ions for catalysis in numerous metallonucleases. Overall, the experimental data confirm the general mechanistic hypothesis for 2M-aided phosphoryl transfer originally reported by Steitz and Steitz ( Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 1993 , 90 ( 14 ), 6498 - 6502 ). This seminal paper proposed that one metal ion favors the formation of the nucleophile, while the nearby second metal ion facilitates leaving group departure during RNA hydrolysis. Both metals were suggested to stabilize the enzymatic transition state. Nevertheless, static X-ray structures alone cannot exhaustively unravel how the two ions execute their functional role along the enzymatic reaction during processing of DNA or RNA strands when moving from reactants to products, passing through metastable intermediates and high-energy transition states. In this Account, we discuss the role of multiscale molecular simulations in further disclosing mechanistic insights of 2M-aided catalysis for two prototypical enzymatic targets for drug discovery, namely, ribonuclease H (RNase H) and type II topoisomerase (topoII). In both examples, first-principles molecular simulations, integrated with structural data, emphasize a cooperative motion of the bimetal motif during catalysis. The coordinated motion of both ions is crucial for maintaining a flexible metal-centered structural architecture exquisitely tailored to accommodate the DNA or RNA sugar-phosphate backbone during phosphodiester bond cleavage. Furthermore, our analysis of RNase H and the N-terminal domain (PAN) of influenza polymerase shows that classical molecular dynamics simulations coupled with enhanced sampling techniques have contributed to describe

  1. Structural and histone binding ability characterizations of human PWWP domains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wu

    Full Text Available The PWWP domain was first identified as a structural motif of 100-130 amino acids in the WHSC1 protein and predicted to be a protein-protein interaction domain. It belongs to the Tudor domain 'Royal Family', which consists of Tudor, chromodomain, MBT and PWWP domains. While Tudor, chromodomain and MBT domains have long been known to bind methylated histones, PWWP was shown to exhibit histone binding ability only until recently.The PWWP domain has been shown to be a DNA binding domain, but sequence analysis and previous structural studies show that the PWWP domain exhibits significant similarity to other 'Royal Family' members, implying that the PWWP domain has the potential to bind histones. In order to further explore the function of the PWWP domain, we used the protein family approach to determine the crystal structures of the PWWP domains from seven different human proteins. Our fluorescence polarization binding studies show that PWWP domains have weak histone binding ability, which is also confirmed by our NMR titration experiments. Furthermore, we determined the crystal structures of the BRPF1 PWWP domain in complex with H3K36me3, and HDGF2 PWWP domain in complex with H3K79me3 and H4K20me3.PWWP proteins constitute a new family of methyl lysine histone binders. The PWWP domain consists of three motifs: a canonical β-barrel core, an insertion motif between the second and third β-strands and a C-terminal α-helix bundle. Both the canonical β-barrel core and the insertion motif are directly involved in histone binding. The PWWP domain has been previously shown to be a DNA binding domain. Therefore, the PWWP domain exhibits dual functions: binding both DNA and methyllysine histones.This article can also be viewed as an enhanced version in which the text of the article is integrated with interactive 3D representations and animated transitions. Please note that a web plugin is required to access this enhanced functionality. Instructions for the

  2. Can Psychiatric Rehabilitation Be Core to CORE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olney, Marjorie F.; Gill, Kenneth J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In this article, we seek to determine whether psychiatric rehabilitation principles and practices have been more fully incorporated into the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) standards, the extent to which they are covered in four rehabilitation counseling "foundations" textbooks, and how they are reflected in the…

  3. Structure of the ATP Synthase Catalytic Complex (F1) from Escherichia coli in an Autoinhibited conformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G Cingolani; T Duncan

    2011-12-31

    ATP synthase is a membrane-bound rotary motor enzyme that is critical for cellular energy metabolism in all kingdoms of life. Despite conservation of its basic structure and function, autoinhibition by one of its rotary stalk subunits occurs in bacteria and chloroplasts but not in mitochondria. The crystal structure of the ATP synthase catalytic complex (F{sub 1}) from Escherichia coli described here reveals the structural basis for this inhibition. The C-terminal domain of subunit {var_epsilon} adopts a heretofore unknown, highly extended conformation that inserts deeply into the central cavity of the enzyme and engages both rotor and stator subunits in extensive contacts that are incompatible with functional rotation. As a result, the three catalytic subunits are stabilized in a set of conformations and rotational positions distinct from previous F{sub 1} structures.

  4. Active Component Migration and Catalytic Properties of Nitrogen Modified Composite Catalytic Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miaomiao Li

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available During the catalytic combustion reaction of methane, the migration of the active species on surface facilitates the catalytic reaction, and the element doping can improve the redox performance of the catalyst. Nitrogen-modified perovskite type composite catalysts were prepared by hydrothermal method and then characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET, temperature-programmed reductions (TPR, and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS. The results revealed that nitrogen sources (urea, biuret, melamine, carbohydrazide, and semicarbazide hydrochloride and nitrogen source addition changed the catalytic performance in physical and chemical properties, the migration of reactive species and the catalytic performance. When the addition amount of semicarbazide hydrochloride was three times that of LaCoO3, the composite catalysts had high Co3+/Co2+ (1.39 and Oads/Olat (15.18 and showed the best catalytic performance: the temperatures that are required for achieving methane conversion of 50% and 90% were 277 and 360 °C, which are more effective than noble metal oxides. Moreover, the in situ diffuse reflectance infrared fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS were applied to elucidate the efficient for CH4 removal and also can further explain the surface reaction mechanism of the composite catalyst during the methane catalytic combustion.

  5. Structures of SRP54 and SRP19, the two proteins that organize the ribonucleic core of the signal recognition particle from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Pascal F; Napetschnig, Johanna; Walter, Peter; Stroud, Robert M

    2008-01-01

    In all organisms the Signal Recognition Particle (SRP), binds to signal sequences of proteins destined for secretion or membrane insertion as they emerge from translating ribosomes. In Archaea and Eucarya, the conserved ribonucleoproteic core is composed of two proteins, the accessory protein SRP19, the essential GTPase SRP54, and an evolutionarily conserved and essential SRP RNA. Through the GTP-dependent interaction between the SRP and its cognate receptor SR, ribosomes harboring nascent polypeptidic chains destined for secretion are dynamically transferred to the protein translocation apparatus at the membrane. We present here high-resolution X-ray structures of SRP54 and SRP19, the two RNA binding components forming the core of the signal recognition particle from the hyper-thermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu). The 2.5 A resolution structure of free Pfu-SRP54 is the first showing the complete domain organization of a GDP bound full-length SRP54 subunit. In its ras-like GTPase domain, GDP is found tightly associated with the protein. The flexible linker that separates the GTPase core from the hydrophobic signal sequence binding M domain, adopts a purely alpha-helical structure and acts as an articulated arm allowing the M domain to explore multiple regions as it scans for signal peptides as they emerge from the ribosomal tunnel. This linker is structurally coupled to the GTPase catalytic site and likely to propagate conformational changes occurring in the M domain through the SRP RNA upon signal sequence binding. Two different 1.8 A resolution crystal structures of free Pfu-SRP19 reveal a compact, rigid and well-folded protein even in absence of its obligate SRP RNA partner. Comparison with other SRP19*SRP RNA structures suggests the rearrangement of a disordered loop upon binding with the RNA through a reciprocal induced-fit mechanism and supports the idea that SRP19 acts as a molecular scaffold and a chaperone, assisting the SRP RNA in adopting the

  6. Structures of SRP54 and SRP19, the two proteins that organize the ribonucleic core of the signal recognition particle from Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal F Egea

    Full Text Available In all organisms the Signal Recognition Particle (SRP, binds to signal sequences of proteins destined for secretion or membrane insertion as they emerge from translating ribosomes. In Archaea and Eucarya, the conserved ribonucleoproteic core is composed of two proteins, the accessory protein SRP19, the essential GTPase SRP54, and an evolutionarily conserved and essential SRP RNA. Through the GTP-dependent interaction between the SRP and its cognate receptor SR, ribosomes harboring nascent polypeptidic chains destined for secretion are dynamically transferred to the protein translocation apparatus at the membrane. We present here high-resolution X-ray structures of SRP54 and SRP19, the two RNA binding components forming the core of the signal recognition particle from the hyper-thermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus (Pfu. The 2.5 A resolution structure of free Pfu-SRP54 is the first showing the complete domain organization of a GDP bound full-length SRP54 subunit. In its ras-like GTPase domain, GDP is found tightly associated with the protein. The flexible linker that separates the GTPase core from the hydrophobic signal sequence binding M domain, adopts a purely alpha-helical structure and acts as an articulated arm allowing the M domain to explore multiple regions as it scans for signal peptides as they emerge from the ribosomal tunnel. This linker is structurally coupled to the GTPase catalytic site and likely to propagate conformational changes occurring in the M domain through the SRP RNA upon signal sequence binding. Two different 1.8 A resolution crystal structures of free Pfu-SRP19 reveal a compact, rigid and well-folded protein even in absence of its obligate SRP RNA partner. Comparison with other SRP19*SRP RNA structures suggests the rearrangement of a disordered loop upon binding with the RNA through a reciprocal induced-fit mechanism and supports the idea that SRP19 acts as a molecular scaffold and a chaperone, assisting the SRP

  7. Aziridine- and Azetidine-Pd Catalytic Combinations. Synthesis and Evaluation of the Ligand Ring Size Impact on Suzuki-Miyaura Reaction Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Boufroura

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The synthesis of new vicinal diamines based on aziridine and azetidine cores as well as the comparison of their catalytic activities as ligand in the Suzuki-Miyaura coupling reaction are described in this communication. The synthesis of three- and four-membered ring heterocycles substituted by a methylamine pendant arm is detailed from the parent nitrile derivatives. Complexation to palladium under various conditions has been examined affording vicinal diamines or amine-imidate complexes. The efficiency of four new catalytic systems is compared in the preparation of variously substituted biaryls. Aziridine- and azetidine-based catalytic systems allowed Suzuki-Miyaura reactions from aryl halides including chlorides with catalytic loadings until 0.001% at temperatures ranging from 100 °C to r.t. The evolution of the Pd-metallacycle ring strain moving from azetidine to aziridine in combination with a methylamine or an imidate pendant arm impacted the Suzuki-Miyaura reaction issue.

  8. Making an Ice Core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopaska-Merkel, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Explains an activity in which students construct a simulated ice core. Materials required include only a freezer, food coloring, a bottle, and water. This hands-on exercise demonstrates how a glacier is formed, how ice cores are studied, and the nature of precision and accuracy in measurement. Suitable for grades three through eight. (Author/PVD)

  9. Multi-core Microprocessors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Design cost of multi-core processors is lower than the cost of designing very complex single processors. This is because in a multi-core pro- cessor a simple processor is designed and replicated. The idea of using several independent processors to work simul- taneously and cooperate to execute a single program is quite ...

  10. PWR core design calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkov, A.; Ravnik, M.; Zeleznik, N.

    1992-01-01

    Functional description of the programme package Cord-2 for PWR core design calculations is presented. Programme package is briefly described. Use of the package and calculational procedures for typical core design problems are treated. Comparison of main results with experimental values is presented as part of the verification process. (author) [sl

  11. Multi-core Microprocessors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    using these transistors and resultant improvement in the process-. Keywords. Moore's law, evolution of multi- core processors, programming multi-core processors. ing speed. Packing more transistors in a chip also enabled de- signers to improve the architecture of microprocessors in many. RESONANCE | December 2017.

  12. Distant relationships amongst protein domains

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ncbs

    3. Small domains. The 'pleckstrin homology' (PH) domain is a domain of about 100 residues that occurs in a wide range of proteins involved in intracellular signaling or as constituents of the cytoskeleton.

  13. Ubuntu Core Snaps for Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyngaard, J.

    2017-12-01

    A key challenge in the burgeoning sector of IoT (Internet of Things) is ensuring device and communication security. Ubuntu Core's approach to this is the use of 'snaps'. Along side this growth, scientists are increasingly utilising the many new low cost sensors now available. This work prototypes the use of snaps as a possible avenue to reducing the barrier to entry for scientific use of these low cost sensors while also ensuring proper meta-data is captured. Snaps are contained applications that have been signed. This means that a snap application is unable to read or write to any area of the system beyond its assigned reach, thereby significantly limiting the possible impact of any break in security higher up the stack. Further, application and system updates are automatically verified as authentic before being applied. Additionally, on an embedded system running Ubuntu Core the hardware interface (Gadget), kernel, and OS (Core) are all also snaps and therefore also have acquired these same gains. The result is an architecture that enables: (1) Secure, robust, remote automatic updates of both the OS and applications. (2) A user friendly deployment mechanism.(3) A easy to maintain means of supporting multiple platforms. The above is primarily targeted at non-academic domains, however, it is proposed that the Scientific community can benefit from it too. This work therefore prototypes a snap for sensors on board a small Unmanned Aircraft System (sUAS). For demonstration purposes this snap specifically targets connecting a popular low cost CO2 meter to a Raspberry Pi3 and the popular open source sUAS autopilot Arducopter.

  14. Effective particle magnetic moment of multi-core particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahrentorp, Fredrik; Astalan, Andrea; Blomgren, Jakob; Jonasson, Christian [Acreo Swedish ICT AB, Arvid Hedvalls backe 4, SE-411 33 Göteborg (Sweden); Wetterskog, Erik; Svedlindh, Peter [Department of Engineering Sciences, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Lak, Aidin; Ludwig, Frank [Institute of Electrical Measurement and Fundamental Electrical Engineering, TU Braunschweig, D‐38106 Braunschweig Germany (Germany); IJzendoorn, Leo J. van [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Westphal, Fritz; Grüttner, Cordula [Micromod Partikeltechnologie GmbH, D ‐18119 Rostock (Germany); Gehrke, Nicole [nanoPET Pharma GmbH, D ‐10115 Berlin Germany (Germany); Gustafsson, Stefan; Olsson, Eva [Department of Applied Physics, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Göteborg (Sweden); Johansson, Christer, E-mail: christer.johansson@acreo.se [Acreo Swedish ICT AB, Arvid Hedvalls backe 4, SE-411 33 Göteborg (Sweden)

    2015-04-15

    In this study we investigate the magnetic behavior of magnetic multi-core particles and the differences in the magnetic properties of multi-core and single-core nanoparticles and correlate the results with the nanostructure of the different particles as determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We also investigate how the effective particle magnetic moment is coupled to the individual moments of the single-domain nanocrystals by using different measurement techniques: DC magnetometry, AC susceptometry, dynamic light scattering and TEM. We have studied two magnetic multi-core particle systems – BNF Starch from Micromod with a median particle diameter of 100 nm and FeraSpin R from nanoPET with a median particle diameter of 70 nm – and one single-core particle system – SHP25 from Ocean NanoTech with a median particle core diameter of 25 nm.

  15. Effective particle magnetic moment of multi-core particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahrentorp, Fredrik; Astalan, Andrea; Blomgren, Jakob; Jonasson, Christian; Wetterskog, Erik; Svedlindh, Peter; Lak, Aidin; Ludwig, Frank; IJzendoorn, Leo J. van; Westphal, Fritz; Grüttner, Cordula; Gehrke, Nicole; Gustafsson, Stefan; Olsson, Eva; Johansson, Christer

    2015-01-01

    In this study we investigate the magnetic behavior of magnetic multi-core particles and the differences in the magnetic properties of multi-core and single-core nanoparticles and correlate the results with the nanostructure of the different particles as determined from transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We also investigate how the effective particle magnetic moment is coupled to the individual moments of the single-domain nanocrystals by using different measurement techniques: DC magnetometry, AC susceptometry, dynamic light scattering and TEM. We have studied two magnetic multi-core particle systems – BNF Starch from Micromod with a median particle diameter of 100 nm and FeraSpin R from nanoPET with a median particle diameter of 70 nm – and one single-core particle system – SHP25 from Ocean NanoTech with a median particle core diameter of 25 nm

  16. High thermal stability of core-shell structures dominated by negative interface energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yong-Fu; Zhao, Ning; Jin, Bo; Zhao, Ming; Jiang, Qing

    2017-03-29

    Nanoscale core/shell structures are of interest in catalysis due to their superior catalytic properties. Here we investigated the thermal stability of the coherent core-shell structures in a thermodynamic way by considering the impact from the core with the bulk melting point T m (∞) lower or higher than the shell. When a low-T m (∞) core is adopted, core-shell melting induced by the melting depression of the core does not occur upon heating because of the superheating, although the melting depression of the core can be triggered ultimately by the preferential melting of the high-T m (∞) shell for small cores. The superheating of the core is contributed by the negative solid-solid interface energy, while the depression is originated from the positive solid-liquid interface energy. Owing to the presence of the negative interface energy, moreover, the low-T m (∞)-core structure possesses a low difference in thermal expansion between the core and the shell, high activation energy of outward atomic diffusion from the core to shell, and low heat capacity. This result is beneficial for the core-shell structure design for its application in catalysis.

  17. Mars' core and magnetism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, D J

    2001-07-12

    The detection of strongly magnetized ancient crust on Mars is one of the most surprising outcomes of recent Mars exploration, and provides important insight about the history and nature of the martian core. The iron-rich core probably formed during the hot accretion of Mars approximately 4.5 billion years ago and subsequently cooled at a rate dictated by the overlying mantle. A core dynamo operated much like Earth's current dynamo, but was probably limited in duration to several hundred million years. The early demise of the dynamo could have arisen through a change in the cooling rate of the mantle, or even a switch in convective style that led to mantle heating. Presently, Mars probably has a liquid, conductive outer core and might have a solid inner core like Earth.

  18. Lunar Core and Tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. G.; Boggs, D. H.; Ratcliff, J. T.

    2004-01-01

    Variations in rotation and orientation of the Moon are sensitive to solid-body tidal dissipation, dissipation due to relative motion at the fluid-core/solid-mantle boundary, and tidal Love number k2 [1,2]. There is weaker sensitivity to flattening of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) [2,3,4] and fluid core moment of inertia [1]. Accurate Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR) measurements of the distance from observatories on the Earth to four retroreflector arrays on the Moon are sensitive to lunar rotation and orientation variations and tidal displacements. Past solutions using the LLR data have given results for dissipation due to solid-body tides and fluid core [1] plus Love number [1-5]. Detection of CMB flattening, which in the past has been marginal but improving [3,4,5], now seems significant. Direct detection of the core moment has not yet been achieved.

  19. Analysis of the Sequences, Structures, and Functions of Product-Releasing Enzyme Domains in Fungal Polyketide Synthases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Product-releasing enzyme (PRE domains in fungal non-reducing polyketide synthases (NR-PKSs play a crucial role in catalysis and editing during polyketide biosynthesis, especially accelerating final biosynthetic reactions accompanied with product offloading. However, up to date, the systematic knowledge about PRE domains is deficient. In the present study, the relationships between sequences, structures, and functions of PRE domains were analyzed with 574 NR-PKSs of eight groups (I–VIII. It was found that the PRE domains in NR-PKSs could be mainly classified into three types, thioesterase (TE, reductase (R, and metallo-β-lactamase-type TE (MβL-TE. The widely distributed TE or TE-like domains were involved in NR-PKSs of groups I–IV, VI, and VIII. The R domains appeared in NR-PKSs of groups IV and VII, while the physically discrete MβL-TE domains were employed by most NR-PKSs of group V. The changes of catalytic sites and structural characteristics resulted in PRE functional differentiations. The phylogeny revealed that the evolution of TE domains was accompanied by complex functional divergence. The diverse sequence lengths of TE lid-loops affected substrate specificity with different chain lengths. The volume diversification of TE catalytic pockets contributed to catalytic mechanisms with functional differentiations. The above findings may help to understand the crucial catalysis of fungal aromatic polyketide biosyntheses and govern recombination of NR-PKSs to obtain unnatural target products.

  20. Structures of the N-terminal modules imply large domain motions during catalysis by methionine synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, John C; Huddler, Donald P; Hilgers, Mark T; Romanchuk, Gail; Matthews, Rowena G; Ludwig, Martha L

    2004-03-16

    B(12)-dependent methionine synthase (MetH) is a large modular enzyme that utilizes the cobalamin cofactor as a methyl donor or acceptor in three separate reactions. Each methyl transfer occurs at a different substrate-binding domain and requires a different arrangement of modules. In the catalytic cycle, the cobalamin-binding domain carries methylcobalamin to the homocysteine (Hcy) domain to form methionine and returns cob(I)alamin to the folate (Fol) domain for remethylation by methyltetrahydrofolate (CH(3)-H(4)folate). Here, we describe crystal structures of a fragment of MetH from Thermotoga maritima comprising the domains that bind Hcy and CH(3)-H(4)folate. These substrate-binding domains are (beta alpha)(8) barrels packed tightly against one another with their barrel axes perpendicular. The properties of the domain interface suggest that the two barrels remain associated during catalysis. The Hcy and CH(3)-H(4)folate substrates are bound at the C termini of their respective barrels in orientations that position them for reaction with cobalamin, but the two active sites are separated by approximately 50 A. To complete the catalytic cycle, the cobalamin-binding domain must travel back and forth between these distant active sites.

  1. Localization of catalytic active sites in the large cytoplasmic domain of Na+/K+-ATPase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krumscheid, R.; Sušánková, Klára; Ettrich, R.; Teisinger, Jan; Amler, Evžen; Schoner, W.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 986, - (2003), s. 242-244 ISSN 0077-8923 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/02/1479; GA ČR GA204/01/0254; GA ČR GA204/01/1001 Grant - others:CZ-DE(CZ) TSR-088-97; CZ-DE(CZ) CZE 00/033 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : H4H5 loop * TNP-ATP phosphotase activity Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 1.892, year: 2003

  2. Domain-Specific Multimodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hessellund, Anders

    Enterprise systems are complex artifacts. They are hard to build, manage, understand, and evolve. Existing software development paradigms fail to properly address challenges such as system size, domain complexity, and software evolution when development is scaled to enterprise systems. We propose...... domain-specific multimodeling as a development paradigm to tackle these challenges in a language-oriented manner. The different concerns of a system are conceptually separated and made explicit as independent domain-specific languages. This approach increases productivity and quality by raising...... this coordination problem. By systematically identifying language interactions, we can specify a coordination model for the system. Specifically, we explicitly identify name bindings and references across language boundaries. We argue that such a coordination model facilitates consistency, navigation, and guidance...

  3. Dependence of Core and Extended Flux on Core Dominance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... Based on two extragalactic radio source samples, the core dominance parameter is calculated, and the correlations between the core/extended flux density and core dominance parameter are investigated. When the core dominance parameter is lower than unity, it is linearly correlated with the core flux ...

  4. Earth's inner core: Innermost inner core or hemispherical variations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lythgoe, K. H.; Deuss, A.; Rudge, J. F.; Neufeld, J. A.

    2014-01-01

    The structure of Earth's deep inner core has important implications for core evolution, since it is thought to be related to the early stages of core formation. Previous studies have suggested that there exists an innermost inner core with distinct anisotropy relative to the rest of the inner core.

  5. Dependence of Core and Extended Flux on Core Dominance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Based on two extragalactic radio source samples, the core dominance parameter is calculated, and the correlations between the core/extended flux density and core dominance parameter are investi- gated. When the core dominance parameter is lower than unity, it is linearly correlated with the core flux density, ...

  6. Catalytic Y-tailed amphiphilic homopolymers – aqueous nanoreactors for high activity, low loading SCS pincer catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, Joseph P.; Cotanda, Pepa; Kelley, Elizabeth G.; Moughton, Adam O.; Lu, Annhelen; Epps, Thomas H.; O’Reilly, Rachel K.

    2013-01-01

    A new amphiphilic homopolymer bearing an SCS pincer palladium complex has been synthesized by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The amphiphile has been shown to form spherical and worm-like micelles in water by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy and small angle neutron scattering. Segregation of reactive components within the palladium containing core results in increased catalytic activity of the pincer compound compared to small molecule analogues. Thi...

  7. Nanoscale switch for vortex polarization mediated by Bloch core formation in magnetic hybrid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlhüter, Phillip; Bryan, Matthew Thomas; Warnicke, Peter; Gliga, Sebastian; Stevenson, Stephanie Elizabeth; Heldt, Georg; Saharan, Lalita; Suszka, Anna Kinga; Moutafis, Christoforos; Chopdekar, Rajesh Vilas; Raabe, Jörg; Thomson, Thomas; Hrkac, Gino; Heyderman, Laura Jane

    2015-01-01

    Vortices are fundamental magnetic topological structures characterized by a curling magnetization around a highly stable nanometric core. The control of the polarization of this core and its gyration is key to the utilization of vortices in technological applications. So far polarization control has been achieved in single-material structures using magnetic fields, spin-polarized currents or spin waves. Here we demonstrate local control of the vortex core orientation in hybrid structures where the vortex in an in-plane Permalloy film coexists with out-of-plane maze domains in a Co/Pd multilayer. The vortex core reverses its polarization on crossing a maze domain boundary. This reversal is mediated by a pair of magnetic singularities, known as Bloch points, and leads to the transient formation of a three-dimensional magnetization structure: a Bloch core. The interaction between vortex and domain wall thus acts as a nanoscale switch for the vortex core polarization. PMID:26238042

  8. Effect of inlet cone pipe angle in catalytic converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amira Zainal, Nurul; Farhain Azmi, Ezzatul; Arifin Samad, Mohd

    2018-03-01

    The catalytic converter shows significant consequence to improve the performance of the vehicle start from it launched into production. Nowadays, the geometric design of the catalytic converter has become critical to avoid the behavior of backpressure in the exhaust system. The backpressure essentially reduced the performance of vehicles and increased the fuel consumption gradually. Consequently, this study aims to design various models of catalytic converter and optimize the volume of fluid flow inside the catalytic converter by changing the inlet cone pipe angles. Three different geometry angles of the inlet cone pipe of the catalytic converter were assessed. The model is simulated in Solidworks software to determine the optimum geometric design of the catalytic converter. The result showed that by decreasing the divergence angle of inlet cone pipe will upsurge the performance of the catalytic converter.

  9. On the Structural Context and Identification of Enzyme Catalytic Residues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yu-Tung; Huang, Shao-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Enzymes play important roles in most of the biological processes. Although only a small fraction of residues are directly involved in catalytic reactions, these catalytic residues are the most crucial parts in enzymes. The study of the fundamental and unique features of catalytic residues benefits the understanding of enzyme functions and catalytic mechanisms. In this work, we analyze the structural context of catalytic residues based on theoretical and experimental structure flexibility. The results show that catalytic residues have distinct structural features and context. Their neighboring residues, whether sequence or structure neighbors within specific range, are usually structurally more rigid than those of noncatalytic residues. The structural context feature is combined with support vector machine to identify catalytic residues from enzyme structure. The prediction results are better or comparable to those of recent structure-based prediction methods. PMID:23484160

  10. The activity of barley alpha-amylase on starch granules is enhanced by fusion of a starch binding domain from Aspergillus niger glucoamylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juge, N.; Nøhr, J.; Le Gal-Coëffet, M.-F.

    2006-01-01

    High affinity for starch granules of certain amylolytic enzymes is mediated by a separate starch binding domain (SBD). In Aspergillus niger glucoamylase (GA-I), a 70 amino acid O-glycosylated peptide linker connects SBD with the catalytic domain. A gene was constructed to encode barley alpha-amylase...

  11. Synthesis and catalytic properties of ferrocenophane phosphines

    OpenAIRE

    Škoch, Karel

    2014-01-01

    6 Title: Sythesis and catalytic properties of ferrocenophane phosphines Author: Karel Škoch Institution: Faculty of Science, Charles University in Prague, Department of Inorganic Chemistry Supervisor: prof. RNDr. Petr Štěpnička, Ph.D. Keywords: ferrocene, ferrocenophane, phosphine ligands, palladium, asymetric catalysis, aza- Morita-Baylis-Hillman reaction, asymetric allylic alkylation Abstract: This Thesis describes the preparation of five sterically and electronically different ferrocene ph...

  12. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2017-12-19

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  13. Materials for High-Temperature Catalytic Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ersson, Anders

    2003-04-01

    Catalytic combustion is an environmentally friendly technique to combust fuels in e.g. gas turbines. Introducing a catalyst into the combustion chamber of a gas turbine allows combustion outside the normal flammability limits. Hence, the adiabatic flame temperature may be lowered below the threshold temperature for thermal NO{sub X} formation while maintaining a stable combustion. However, several challenges are connected to the application of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The first part of this thesis reviews the use of catalytic combustion in gas turbines. The influence of the fuel has been studied and compared over different catalyst materials. The material section is divided into two parts. The first concerns bimetallic palladium catalysts. These catalysts showed a more stable activity compared to their pure palladium counterparts for methane combustion. This was verified both by using an annular reactor at ambient pressure and a pilot-scale reactor at elevated pressures and flows closely resembling the ones found in a gas turbine combustor. The second part concerns high-temperature materials, which may be used either as active or washcoat materials. A novel group of materials for catalysis, i.e. garnets, has been synthesised and tested in combustion of methane, a low-heating value gas and diesel fuel. The garnets showed some interesting abilities especially for combustion of low-heating value, LHV, gas. Two other materials were also studied, i.e. spinels and hexa aluminates, both showed very promising thermal stability and the substituted hexa aluminates also showed a good catalytic activity. Finally, deactivation of the catalyst materials was studied. In this part the sulphur poisoning of palladium, platinum and the above-mentioned complex metal oxides has been studied for combustion of a LHV gas. Platinum and surprisingly the garnet were least deactivated. Palladium was severely affected for methane combustion while the other washcoat materials were

  14. Enantioselective catalytic fluorinative aza-semipinacol rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov-Michailidis, Fedor; Pupier, Marion; Besnard, Céline; Bürgi, Thomas; Alexakis, Alexandre

    2014-10-03

    An efficient and highly stereoselective fluorinative aza-semipinacol rearrangement is described. The catalytic reaction requires use of Selectfluor in combination with the chiral, enantiopure phosphate anion derived from acid L3. Under optimized conditions, cyclopropylamines A were transformed into β-fluoro cyclobutylimines B in good yields and high levels of diastereo- and enantiocontrol. Furthermore, the optically active cyclobutylimines were reduced diastereoselectively with L-Selectride in the corresponding fluorinated amines C, compounds of significant interest in the pharmacological industry.

  15. Method to produce catalytically active nanocomposite coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemir, Ali; Eryilmaz, Osman Levent; Urgen, Mustafa; Kazmanli, Kursat

    2016-02-09

    A nanocomposite coating and method of making and using the coating. The nanocomposite coating is disposed on a base material, such as a metal or ceramic; and the nanocomposite consists essentially of a matrix of an alloy selected from the group of Cu, Ni, Pd, Pt and Re which are catalytically active for cracking of carbon bonds in oils and greases and a grain structure selected from the group of borides, carbides and nitrides.

  16. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2018-04-10

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  17. Zeolitic catalytic conversion of alochols to hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2017-01-03

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon, the method comprising contacting said alcohol with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst at a temperature of at least 100.degree. C. and up to 550.degree. C., wherein said alcohol can be produced by a fermentation process, said metal is a positively-charged metal ion, and said metal-loaded zeolite catalyst is catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon.

  18. Evidence that the C-terminal domain of a type B PutA protein contributes to aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and substrate channeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Min; Christgen, Shelbi; Sanyal, Nikhilesh; Arentson, Benjamin W; Becker, Donald F; Tanner, John J

    2014-09-09

    Proline utilization A (PutA) is a bifunctional enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of proline to glutamate. Structures of type A PutAs have revealed the catalytic core consisting of proline dehydrogenase (PRODH) and Δ(1)-pyrroline-5-carboxylate dehydrogenase (P5CDH) modules connected by a substrate-channeling tunnel. Type B PutAs also have a C-terminal domain of unknown function (CTDUF) that is absent in type A PutAs. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), mutagenesis, and kinetics are used to determine the contributions of this domain to PutA structure and function. The 1127-residue Rhodobacter capsulatus PutA (RcPutA) is used as a representative CTDUF-containing type B PutA. The reaction progress curve for the coupled PRODH-P5CDH activity of RcPutA does not exhibit a time lag, implying a substrate channeling mechanism. RcPutA is monomeric in solution, which is unprecedented for PutAs. SAXS rigid body modeling with target-decoy validation is used to build a model of RcPutA. On the basis of homology to aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs), the CTDUF is predicted to consist of a β-hairpin fused to a noncatalytic Rossmann fold domain. The predicted tertiary structural interactions of the CTDUF resemble the quaternary structural interactions in the type A PutA dimer interface. The model is tested by mutagenesis of the dimerization hairpin of a type A PutA and the CTDUF hairpin of RcPutA. Similar functional phenotypes are observed in the two sets of variants, supporting the hypothesis that the CTDUF mimics the type A PutA dimer interface. These results suggest annotation of the CTDUF as an ALDH superfamily domain that facilitates P5CDH activity and substrate channeling by stabilizing the aldehyde-binding site and sealing the substrate-channeling tunnel from the bulk medium.

  19. Catalytic Y-tailed amphiphilic homopolymers - aqueous nanoreactors for high activity, low loading SCS pincer catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Joseph P; Cotanda, Pepa; Kelley, Elizabeth G; Moughton, Adam O; Lu, Annhelen; Epps, Thomas H; O'Reilly, Rachel K

    2013-01-01

    A new amphiphilic homopolymer bearing an SCS pincer palladium complex has been synthesized by reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The amphiphile has been shown to form spherical and worm-like micelles in water by cryogenic transmission electron microscopy and small angle neutron scattering. Segregation of reactive components within the palladium containing core results in increased catalytic activity of the pincer compound compared to small molecule analogues. This allows carbon-carbon bond forming reactions to be performed in water with reduced catalyst loadings and enhanced activity.

  20. Cage-like Fe,Na-Germsesquioxanes: Structure, Magnetism, and Catalytic Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilyachenko, Alexey N; Levitsky, Mikhail M; Yalymov, Alexey I; Korlyukov, Alexander A; Khrustalev, Viktor N; Vologzhanina, Anna V; Shul'pina, Lidia S; Ikonnikov, Nikolay S; Trigub, Alexander E; Dorovatovskii, Pavel V; Bantreil, Xavier; Lamaty, Frédéric; Long, Jérôme; Larionova, Joulia; Golub, Igor E; Shubina, Elena S; Shul'pin, Georgiy B

    2016-12-05

    A series of four unprecedented heterometallic metallagermsesquioxanes were synthesized. Their cage-like architectures have a unique type of molecular topology consisting of the hexairon oxo {Fe 6 O 19 } core surrounded in a triangular manner by three cyclic germoxanolates [PhGe(O)O] 5 . This structural organization induces antiferromagnetic interactions between the Fe III ions through the oxygen atoms. Evaluated for this first time in catalysis, these compounds showed a high catalytic activity in the oxidation of alkanes and the oxidative formation of benzamides from alcohols. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Antibody proteases: induction of catalytic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabibov, A G; Friboulet, A; Thomas, D; Demin, A V; Ponomarenko, N A; Vorobiev, I I; Pillet, D; Paon, M; Alexandrova, E S; Telegin, G B; Reshetnyak, A V; Grigorieva, O V; Gnuchev, N V; Malishkin, K A; Genkin, D D

    2002-10-01

    Most of the data accumulated throughout the years on investigation of catalytic antibodies indicate that their production increases on the background of autoimmune abnormalities. The different approaches to induction of catalytic response toward recombinant gp120 HIV-1 surface protein in mice with various autoimmune pathologies are described. The peptidylphosphonate conjugate containing structural part of gp120 molecule is used for reactive immunization of NZB/NZW F1, MRL, and SJL mice. The specific modification of heavy and light chains of mouse autoantibodies with Val-Ala-Glu-Glu-Glu-Val-PO(OPh)2 reactive peptide was demonstrated. Increased proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies in SJL mice encouraged us to investigate the production of antigen-specific catalytic antibodies on the background of induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The immunization of autoimmune-prone mice with the engineered fusions containing the fragments of gp120 and encephalitogenic epitope of myelin basic protein (MBP(89-104)) was made. The proteolytic activity of polyclonal antibodies isolated from the sera of autoimmune mice immunized by the described antigen was shown. Specific immune response of SJL mice to these antigens was characterized. Polyclonal antibodies purified from sera of the immunized animals revealed proteolytic activity. The antiidiotypic approach to raise the specific proteolytic antibody as an "internal image" of protease is described. The "second order" monoclonal antibodies toward subtilisin Carlsberg revealed pronounced proteolytic activity.

  2. Catalytic pyrolysis of olive mill wastewater sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdellaoui, Hamza

    From 2008 to 2013, an average of 2,821.4 kilotons/year of olive oil were produced around the world. The waste product of the olive mill industry consists of solid residue (pomace) and wastewater (OMW). Annually, around 30 million m3 of OMW are produced in the Mediterranean area, 700,000 m3 year?1 in Tunisia alone. OMW is an aqueous effluent characterized by an offensive smell and high organic matter content, including high molecular weight phenolic compounds and long-chain fatty acids. These compounds are highly toxic to micro-organisms and plants, which makes the OMW a serious threat to the environment if not managed properly. The OMW is disposed of in open air evaporation ponds. After evaporation of most of the water, OMWS is left in the bottom of the ponds. In this thesis, the effort has been made to evaluate the catalytic pyrolysis process as a technology to valorize the OMWS. The first section of this research showed that 41.12 wt. % of the OMWS is mostly lipids, which are a good source of energy. The second section proved that catalytic pyrolysis of the OMWS over red mud and HZSM-5 can produce green diesel, and 450 °C is the optimal reaction temperature to maximize the organic yields. The last section revealed that the HSF was behind the good fuel-like properties of the OMWS catalytic oils, whereas the SR hindered the bio-oil yields and quality.

  3. Catalytic hydrogen recombination for nuclear containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koroll, G.W.; Lau, D.W.P.; Dewit, W.A.; Graham, W.R.C.

    1994-01-01

    Catalytic recombiners appear to be a credible option for hydrogen mitigation in nuclear containments. The passive operation, versatility and ease of back fitting are appealing for existing stations and new designs. Recently, a generation of wet-proofed catalyst materials have been developed at AECL which are highly specific to H 2 -O 2 , are active at ambient temperatures and are being evaluated for containment applications. Two types of catalytic recombiners were evaluated for hydrogen removal in containments based on the AECL catalyst. The first is a catalytic combustor for application in existing air streams such as provided by fans or ventilation systems. The second is an autocatalytic recombiner which uses the enthalpy of reaction to produce natural convective flow over the catalyst elements. Intermediate-scale results obtained in 6 m 3 and 10 m 3 spherical and cylindrical vessels are given to demonstrate self-starting limits, operating limits, removal capacity, scaling parameters, flow resistance, mixing behaviour in the vicinity of an operating recombiner and sensitivity to poisoning, fouling and radiation. (author). 13 refs., 10 figs

  4. Electrochemical catalytic treatment of phenol wastewater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Hongzhu; Zhang Xinhai; Ma Qingliang; Wang Bo

    2009-01-01

    The slurry bed catalytic treatment of contaminated water appears to be a promising alternative for the oxidation of aqueous organic pollutants. In this paper, the electrochemical oxidation of phenol in synthetic wastewater catalyzed by ferric sulfate and potassium permanganate adsorbed onto active bentonite in slurry bed electrolytic reactor with graphite electrode has been investigated. In order to determine the optimum operating condition, the orthogonal experiments were devised and the results revealed that the system of ferric sulfate, potassium permanganate and active bentonite showed a high catalytic efficiency on the process of electrochemical oxidation phenol in initial pH 5. When the initial concentration of phenol was 0.52 g/L (the initial COD 1214 mg/L), up to 99% chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was obtained in 40 min. According to the experimental results, a possible mechanism of catalytic degradation of phenol was proposed. Environmental estimation was also done and the results showed that the treated wastewater have little impact on plant growth and could totally be applied to irrigation.

  5. Core shroud corner joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilmore, Charles B.; Forsyth, David R.

    2013-09-10

    A core shroud is provided, which includes a number of planar members, a number of unitary corners, and a number of subassemblies each comprising a combination of the planar members and the unitary corners. Each unitary corner comprises a unitary extrusion including a first planar portion and a second planar portion disposed perpendicularly with respect to the first planar portion. At least one of the subassemblies comprises a plurality of the unitary corners disposed side-by-side in an alternating opposing relationship. A plurality of the subassemblies can be combined to form a quarter perimeter segment of the core shroud. Four quarter perimeter segments join together to form the core shroud.

  6. Core stability and bicycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplund, Chad; Ross, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Bicycling is a popular fitness activity in the United States and around the world. Because of the nature of the bicycling position, the neck and back are at risk for injury. One method to prevent these injuries is to ensure that the body's "core" is strong and stable. A strong and stable core also provides a platform to maximize power transfer, improving performance. Core exercises also may enhance recovery from intense bicycling efforts. Simple stability exercises can improve performance and may prevent injuries in bicyclists.

  7. IGCSE core mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Wall, Terry

    2013-01-01

    Give your core level students the support and framework they require to get their best grades with this book dedicated to the core level content of the revised syllabus and written specifically to ensure a more appropriate pace. This title has been written for Core content of the revised Cambridge IGCSE Mathematics (0580) syllabus for first teaching from 2013. ? Gives students the practice they require to deepen their understanding through plenty of practice questions. ? Consolidates learning with unique digital resources on the CD, included free with every book. We are working with Cambridge

  8. Domain decomposition methods for the neutron diffusion problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerin, P.; Baudron, A. M.; Lautard, J. J.

    2010-01-01

    The neutronic simulation of a nuclear reactor core is performed using the neutron transport equation, and leads to an eigenvalue problem in the steady-state case. Among the deterministic resolution methods, simplified transport (SPN) or diffusion approximations are often used. The MINOS solver developed at CEA Saclay uses a mixed dual finite element method for the resolution of these problems. and has shown his efficiency. In order to take into account the heterogeneities of the geometry, a very fine mesh is generally required, and leads to expensive calculations for industrial applications. In order to take advantage of parallel computers, and to reduce the computing time and the local memory requirement, we propose here two domain decomposition methods based on the MINOS solver. The first approach is a component mode synthesis method on overlapping sub-domains: several Eigenmodes solutions of a local problem on each sub-domain are taken as basis functions used for the resolution of the global problem on the whole domain. The second approach is an iterative method based on a non-overlapping domain decomposition with Robin interface conditions. At each iteration, we solve the problem on each sub-domain with the interface conditions given by the solutions on the adjacent sub-domains estimated at the previous iteration. Numerical results on parallel computers are presented for the diffusion model on realistic 2D and 3D cores. (authors)

  9. GTP binding to the ROC domain of DAP-kinase regulates its function through intramolecular signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlessi, Rodrigo; Levin-Salomon, Vered; Ciprut, Sara; Bialik, Shani; Berissi, Hanna; Albeck, Shira; Peleg, Yoav; Kimchi, Adi

    2011-01-01

    Death-associated protein kinase (DAPk) was recently suggested by sequence homology to be a member of the ROCO family of proteins. Here, we show that DAPk has a functional ROC (Ras of complex proteins) domain that mediates homo-oligomerization and GTP binding through a defined P-loop motif. Upon binding to GTP, the ROC domain negatively regulates the catalytic activity of DAPk and its cellular effects. Mechanistically, GTP binding enhances an inhibitory autophosphorylation at a distal site that suppresses kinase activity. This study presents a new mechanism of intramolecular signal transduction, by which GTP binding operates in cis to affect the catalytic activity of a distal domain in the protein. PMID:21738225

  10. ROSA full-core and DNBR capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibcus, H.P.M.; Verhagen, F.C.M.; Wakker, P.H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the latest developments of the ROSA (Reloading Optimization by Simulated Annealing) code system with an emphasis on the first full-core version and the minimum DNBR (Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio) as a new optimization parameter. Designing the core loading pattern of nuclear power plants is becoming a more and more complex task. This task becomes even more complicated if asymmetries in the core loading pattern arise, for instance due to damaged fuel assemblies. For over almost two decades ROSA, NRG's (Nuclear Research and consultancy Group) loading pattern optimization code system for PWRs, has proven to be a valuable tool to reactor operators in accomplishing this task. To improve the use of ROSA for designing asymmetric loading patterns, NRG has developed a full-core version of ROSA besides the original quarter-core version which requires rotational symmetry in the computational domain. The extension of ROSA with DNBR as an optimization parameter is part of ROSA's continuous development. (orig.)

  11. Core Exercises: Why You Should Strengthen Your Core Muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healthy Lifestyle Fitness You know core exercises are good for you — but do you include core exercises in your fitness routine? Here's why you should. By Mayo Clinic Staff Core exercises are an important part of a ...

  12. Domain: Labour market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oude Mulders, J.; Wadensjö, E.; Hasselhorn, H.M.; Apt, W.

    This domain chapter is dedicated to summarize research on the effects of labour market contextual factors on labour market participation of older workers (aged 50+) and identify research gaps. While employment participation and the timing of (early) retirement is often modelled as an individual

  13. Normed Domains of Holomorphy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven G. Krantz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We treat the classical concept of domain of holomorphy in ℂn when the holomorphic functions considered are restricted to lie in some Banach space. Positive and negative results are presented. A new view of the case n=1 is considered.

  14. Core Health Outcomes In Childhood Epilepsy (CHOICE): protocol for the selection of a core outcome set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Christopher; Dunkley, Colin; Gibbon, Frances M; Currier, Janet; Roberts, Deborah; Rogers, Morwenna; Crudgington, Holly; Bray, Lucy; Carter, Bernie; Hughes, Dyfrig; Tudur Smith, Catrin; Williamson, Paula R; Gringras, Paul; Pal, Deb K

    2017-11-28

    There is increasing recognition that establishing a core set of outcomes to be evaluated and reported in trials of interventions for particular conditions will improve the usefulness of health research. There is no established core outcome set for childhood epilepsy. The aim of this work is to select a core outcome set to be used in evaluative research of interventions for children with rolandic epilepsy, as an exemplar of common childhood epilepsy syndromes. First we will identify what outcomes should be measured; then we will decide how to measure those outcomes. We will engage relevant UK charities and health professional societies as partners, and convene advisory panels for young people with epilepsy and parents of children with epilepsy. We will identify candidate outcomes from a search for trials of interventions for childhood epilepsy, statutory guidance and consultation with our advisory panels. Families, charities and health, education and neuropsychology professionals will be invited to participate in a Delphi survey following recommended practices in the development of core outcome sets. Participants will be able to recommend additional outcome domains. Over three rounds of Delphi survey participants will rate the importance of candidate outcome domains and state the rationale for their decisions. Over the three rounds we will seek consensus across and between families and health professionals on the more important outcomes. A face-to-face meeting will be convened to ratify the core outcome set. We will then review and recommend ways to measure the shortlisted outcomes using clinical assessment and/or patient-reported outcome measures. Our methodology is a proportionate and pragmatic approach to expediently produce a core outcome set for evaluative research of interventions aiming to improve the health of children with epilepsy. A number of decisions have to be made when designing a study to develop a core outcome set including defining the scope

  15. Experimental studies on catalytic hydrogen recombiners for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drinovac, P.

    2006-01-01

    In the course of core melt accidents in nuclear power plants a large amount of hydrogen can be produced and form an explosive or even detonative gas mixture with aerial oxygen in the reactor building. In the containment atmosphere of pressurized water reactors hydrogen combines a phlogistically with the oxygen present to form water vapor even at room temperature. In the past, experimental work conducted at various facilities has contributed little or nothing to an understanding of the operating principles of catalytic recombiners. Hence, the purpose of the present study was to conduct detailed investigations on a section of a recombiner essentially in order to deepen the understanding of reaction kinetics and heat transport processes. The results of the experiments presented in this dissertation form a large data base of measurements which provides an insight into the processes taking place in recombiners. The reaction-kinetic interpretation of the measured data confirms and deepens the diffusion theory - proposed in an earlier study. Thus it is now possible to validate detailed numeric models representing the processes in recombiners. Consequently the present study serves to broaden and corroborate competence in this significant area of reactor technology. In addition, the empirical knowledge thus gained may be used for a critical reassessment of previous numeric model calculations. (orig.)

  16. Big Data analytics in the Geo-Spatial Domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Goncalves (Romulo); M.G. Ivanova (Milena); M.L. Kersten (Martin); H. Scholten; S. Zlatanova; F. Alvanaki (Foteini); P. Nourian (Pirouz); E. Dias

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractBig data collections in many scientific domains have inherently rich spatial and geo-spatial features. Spatial location is among the core aspects of data in Earth observation sciences, astronomy, and seismology to name a few. The goal of our project is to design an efficient data

  17. Core outcome sets in dermatology: report from the second meeting of the International Cochrane Skin Group Core Outcome Set Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottner, J; Jacobi, L; Hahnel, E; Alam, M; Balzer, K; Beeckman, D; Busard, C; Chalmers, J; Deckert, S; Eleftheriadou, V; Furlan, K; Horbach, S E R; Kirkham, J; Nast, A; Spuls, P; Thiboutot, D; Thorlacius, L; Weller, K; Williams, H C; Schmitt, J

    2018-02-14

    Results of clinical trials are the most important information source for generating external clinical evidence. The use of different outcomes across trials, which investigate similar interventions for similar patient groups, significantly limits the interpretation, comparability and clinical application of trial results. Core outcome sets (COSs) aim to overcome this limitation. A COS is an agreed standardized collection of outcomes that should be measured and reported in all clinical trials for a specific clinical condition. The Core Outcome Set Initiative within the Cochrane Skin Group (CSG-COUSIN) supports the development of core outcomes in dermatology. In the second CSG-COUSIN meeting held in 2017, 11 COS development groups working on skin diseases presented their current work. The presentations and discussions identified the following overarching methodological challenges for COS development in dermatology: it is not always easy to define the disease focus of a COS; the optimal method for outcome domain identification and level of detail needed to specify such domains is challenging to many; decision rules within Delphi surveys need to be improved; appropriate ways of patient involvement are not always clear. In addition, there appear to be outcome domains that may be relevant as potential core outcome domains for the majority of skin diseases. The close collaboration between methodologists in the Core Outcome Set Initiative and the international Cochrane Skin Group has major advantages for trialists, systematic reviewers and COS developers. © 2018 British Association of Dermatologists.

  18. Restraint system for core elements of a reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Class, G.

    1975-01-01

    In a nuclear reactor, a core element bundle formed of a plurality of side-by-side arranged core elements is surrounded by restraining elements that exert a radially inwardly directed restraining force generating friction forces between the core elements in a restraining plane that is transverse to the core element axes. The adjoining core elements are in rolling contact with one another in the restraining plane by virtue of rolling-type bearing elements supported in the core elements

  19. INTEGRAL core programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrels, N.; Schoenfelder, V.; Ubertini, P.; Winkler, C.

    1997-01-01

    The International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) mission is described with emphasis on the INTEGRAL core program. The progress made in the planning activities for the core program is reported on. The INTEGRAL mission has a nominal lifetime of two years with a five year extension option. The observing time will be divided between the core program (between 30 and 35 percent during the first two years) and general observations. The core program consists of three main elements: the deep survey of the Galactic plane in the central radian of the Galaxy; frequent scans of the Galactic plane in the search for transient sources, and pointed observations of several selected sources. The allocation of the observation time is detailed and the sensitivities of the observations are outlined.

  20. Core Flight Software

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The AES Core Flight Software (CFS) project purpose is to analyze applicability, and evolve and extend the reusability of the CFS system originally developed by...

  1. PWR degraded core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittus, J.H.

    1982-04-01

    A review is presented of the various phenomena involved in degraded core accidents and the ensuing transport of fission products from the fuel to the primary circuit and the containment. The dominant accident sequences found in the PWR risk studies published to date are briefly described. Then chapters deal with the following topics: the condition and behaviour of water reactor fuel during normal operation and at the commencement of degraded core accidents; the generation of hydrogen from the Zircaloy-steam and the steel-steam reactions; the way in which the core deforms and finally melts following loss of coolant; debris relocation analysis; containment integrity; fission product behaviour during a degraded core accident. (U.K.)

  2. Organizing Core Tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boll, Karen

    Civil servants conduct the work which makes welfare states functions on an everyday bases: Police men police, school teachers teach, and tax inspectors inspect. Focus in this paper is on the core tasks of tax inspectors. The paper argues that their core task of securing the collection of revenue...... projects influence the organization of core tasks within the tax administration. The paper shows that the organizational transformations based on the use of these devices have had consequences both for the overall collection of revenue and for the employees’ feeling of “making a difference”. All in all...... has remained much the same within the last 10 years. However, how the core task has been organized has changed considerable under the influence of various “organizing devices”. The paper focusses on how organizing devices such as risk assessment, output-focus, effect orientation, and treatment...

  3. iPSC Core

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSC) Core was created in 2011 to accelerate stem cell research in the NHLBI by providing investigators consultation, technical...

  4. LMFBR core materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.T.A

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses initial fuel and core designs that are conservative, emphasizing high reliability at the expense of breeding ration and doubling time. The progression in design improvements to better doubling time, plutonium inventory requirements, and power density are shown. The recent progress in advanced oxide fuel, cladding, and duct development is reported. Breeding ratios and compound system doubling times are computed for both the conventional homogeneous and alternative heterogeneous core configurations. Results are summarized and it is shown that both carbide and metal cores can achieve breeding ratios in the range of 1.5 to 1.6 versus 1.45 for oxide; the carbide and metal cores can achieve 10 year doubling times, which translate into millions of dollars savings in fuel cycle costs. Carbide fuel development is being continued at a modest level to provide backup to the mixed oxide design

  5. The Core Knowledge System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Strat, Thomas M; Smith, Grahame B

    1987-01-01

    This document contains an in-depth description of the Core Knowledge System (CKS)-an integrative environment for the many functions that must be performed by sensor-based autonomous and semi-autonomous systems...

  6. Histone demethylase KDM5A is regulated by its reader domain through a positive-feedback mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Idelisse Ortiz; Kuchenbecker, Kristopher M.; Nnadi, Chimno I.; Fletterick, Robert J.; Kelly, Mark J. S.; Fujimori, Danica Galonić

    2015-02-01

    The retinoblastoma binding protein KDM5A removes methyl marks from lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4). Misregulation of KDM5A contributes to the pathogenesis of lung and gastric cancers. In addition to its catalytic jumonji C domain, KDM5A contains three PHD reader domains, commonly recognized as chromatin recruitment modules. It is unknown whether any of these domains in KDM5A have functions beyond recruitment and whether they regulate the catalytic activity of the demethylase. Here using biochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based structural studies, we show that the PHD1 preferentially recognizes unmethylated H3K4 histone tail, product of KDM5A-mediated demethylation of tri-methylated H3K4 (H3K4me3). Binding of unmodified H3 peptide to the PHD1 stimulates catalytic domain-mediated removal of methyl marks from H3K4me3 peptide and nucleosome substrates. This positive-feedback mechanism—enabled by the functional coupling between a reader and a catalytic domain in KDM5A—suggests a model for the spread of demethylation on chromatin.

  7. Assessing Core Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, M.

    2004-12-01

    Catherine Palomba and Trudy Banta offer the following definition of assessment, adapted from one provided by Marches in 1987. Assessment in the systematic collection, review, and use of information about educational programs undertaken for the purpose of improving student learning and development. (Palomba and Banta 1999). It is widely recognized that sophisticated computing technologies are becoming a key element in today's classroom instructional techniques. Regardless, the Professor must be held responsible for creating an instructional environment in which the technology actually supplements learning outcomes of the students. Almost all academic disciplines have found a niche for computer-based instruction in their respective professional domain. In many cases, it is viewed as an essential and integral part of the educational process. Educational institutions are committing substantial resources to the establishment of dedicated technology-based laboratories, so that they will be able to accommodate and fulfill students' desire to master certain of these specific skills. This type of technology-based instruction may raise some fundamental questions about the core competencies of the student learner. Some of the most important questions are : 1. Is the utilization of these fast high-powered computers and user-friendly software programs creating a totally non-challenging instructional environment for the student learner ? 2. Can technology itself all too easily overshadow the learning outcomes intended ? 3. Are the educational institutions simply training students how to use technology rather than educating them in the appropriate field ? 4. Are we still teaching content-driven courses and analysis oriented subject matter ? 5. Are these sophisticated modern era technologies contributing to a decline in the Critical Thinking Capabilities of the 21st century technology-savvy students ? The author tries to focus on technology as a tool and not on the technology

  8. Emergency core cooling system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Masaru.

    1981-01-01

    Purpose: To enable quick cooling of a core by efficiently utilizing coolant supplied in an emergency. Constitution: A feedwater nozzle and a water level detector are disposed in the gap between a partition plate for supporting the top of a fuel assembly and a lattice plate for supporting the bottom of the fuel assembly. At the time of a loss of coolant accident, coolant is injected from a sprinkling nozzle toward the reactor core, and is also injected from a feedwater nozzle. When the coolant reaches a prescribed level in the reactor core, the water level is detected by the detector, the coolant is fed by a pump to the lower plenum, and the submerging speed of the reactor core is thereby accelerated. When the water level again becomes lower than the prescribed level, the coolant is again filled from the feedwater nozzle, and similar operation is thereafter repeated. Accordingly, the coolant filled in the reactor core can be efficiently utilized to cool the reactor core. (Kamimura, M.)

  9. Identification and characterization of a core fucosidase from the bacteriumElizabethkingia meningoseptica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tiansheng; Li, Mengjie; Hou, Linlin; Guo, Yameng; Wang, Lei; Sun, Guiqin; Chen, Li

    2018-01-26

    All reported α-l-fucosidases catalyze the removal of nonreducing terminal l-fucoses from oligosaccharides or their conjugates, while having no capacity to hydrolyze core fucoses in glycoproteins directly. Here, we identified an α-fucosidase from the bacterium Elizabethkingia meningoseptica with catalytic activity against core α-1,3-fucosylated substrates, and we named it core fucosidase I (cFase I). Using site-specific mutational analysis, we found that three acidic residues (Asp-242, Glu-302, and Glu-315) in the predicted active pocket are critical for cFase I activity, with Asp-242 and Glu-315 acting as a pair of classic nucleophile and acid/base residues and Glu-302 acting in an as yet undefined role. These findings suggest a catalytic mechanism for cFase I that is different from known α-fucosidase catalytic models. In summary, cFase I exhibits glycosidase activity that removes core α-1,3-fucoses from substrates, suggesting cFase I as a new tool for glycobiology, especially for studies of proteins with core fucosylation. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of mesoporous ZSM-5 core-shell particles for improved catalytic properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kustova, Marina; Holm, Martin Spangsberg; Christensen, Claus H.

    2008-01-01

    HZSM-5 is a unique catalyst for the conversion of methanol, dimethyl ether and other oxygenates into gasoline. During this process, catalyst deactivation by coking requires frequent regeneration and the improvement of catalyst life time is one of the challenges in catalyst development. In this st......HZSM-5 is a unique catalyst for the conversion of methanol, dimethyl ether and other oxygenates into gasoline. During this process, catalyst deactivation by coking requires frequent regeneration and the improvement of catalyst life time is one of the challenges in catalyst development...

  11. Effect of support on the catalytic activity of manganese oxide catalyts for toluene combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozan, Gulin Selda, E-mail: gpozan@istanbul.edu.tr [Istanbul University, Faculty of Engineering, Chemical Engineering Department, Avcilar 34320, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2012-06-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, obtained from Bohmite, as a support for enhancing of the activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The support material for catalytic oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The manganese state and oxygen species effect on the catalytic combustion reaction. - Abstract: The aim of this work was to study combustion of toluene (1000 ppm) over MnO{sub 2} modified with different supports. {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} obtained from Boehmite, {gamma}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (commercial), SiO{sub 2}, TiO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2} were used as commercial support materials. In view of potential interest of this process, the influence of support material on the catalytic performance was discussed. The deposition of 9.5MnO{sub 2} was performed by impregnation over support. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), temperature programmed reduction and oxidation (TPR/TPO) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The catalytic tests were carried out at atmospheric pressure in a fixed-bed flow reactor. 9.5MnO{sub 2}/{alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(B) (synthesized from Boehmite) catalyst exhibits the highest catalytic activity, over which the toluene conversion was up to 90% at a temperature of 289 Degree-Sign C. Considering all the characterization and reaction data reported in this study, it was concluded that the manganese state and oxygen species played an important role in the catalytic activity.

  12. Effect of support on the catalytic activity of manganese oxide catalyts for toluene combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozan, Gulin Selda

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► α-Al 2 O 3 , obtained from Bohmite, as a support for enhancing of the activity. ► The support material for catalytic oxidation. ► The manganese state and oxygen species effect on the catalytic combustion reaction. - Abstract: The aim of this work was to study combustion of toluene (1000 ppm) over MnO 2 modified with different supports. α-Al 2 O 3 and γ-Al 2 O 3 obtained from Boehmite, γ-Al 2 O 3 (commercial), SiO 2 , TiO 2 and ZrO 2 were used as commercial support materials. In view of potential interest of this process, the influence of support material on the catalytic performance was discussed. The deposition of 9.5MnO 2 was performed by impregnation over support. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), temperature programmed reduction and oxidation (TPR/TPO) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The catalytic tests were carried out at atmospheric pressure in a fixed-bed flow reactor. 9.5MnO 2 /α-Al 2 O 3 (B) (synthesized from Boehmite) catalyst exhibits the highest catalytic activity, over which the toluene conversion was up to 90% at a temperature of 289 °C. Considering all the characterization and reaction data reported in this study, it was concluded that the manganese state and oxygen species played an important role in the catalytic activity.

  13. Fabricating highly catalytically active block copolymer/metal nanoparticle microstructures at the liquid/liquid interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, Qi; Li, Xiaoyang; Diao, Mengxiao; Lee, Yong-Ill; Liu, Hong-Guo

    2018-03-22

    Our previous studies have shown that the metal nanoparticle/polymer composite structures fabricated at the liquid/liquid interface have good reusability but lower catalytic activity for heterogeneous reactions in aqueous solutions. This should be attributed to the poor water wettability and more compact structure of the polymer matrices. Therefore, it should be possible to improve the catalytic activity through designing and fabricating a porous composite structure with good water wettability. A modified liquid/liquid interface adsorption and fabrication method was used. An aqueous solution of copper acetate and a chloroform/DMF mixed solution of PS-b-PAA acted as the two phases. Through spontaneous emulsification, self-assembly of the polymer molecules with Cu 2+ ions in the droplets, and adsorption of the formed spherical micelles and nanofibers to the planar liquid/liquid interface, a porous composite microstructure was formed. This structure consisted of nanofiber-connected nanospheres which have a PS core and a PAA corona. Tiny and well-dispersed Cu nanoparticles were embedded in the hydrophilic corona and were adsorbed on the nanofibers surface as well. After physical cross-linking with 1,6-diaminohexane, the composite material exhibited high catalytic activity and good reusability for the reactions in aqueous solutions. For example, the rate constant for the reduction of p-nitroaniline reached 1965 s -1  g -1 . Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Heterogeneous catalytic materials solid state chemistry, surface chemistry and catalytic behaviour

    CERN Document Server

    Busca, Guido

    2014-01-01

    Heterogeneous Catalytic Materials discusses experimental methods and the latest developments in three areas of research: heterogeneous catalysis; surface chemistry; and the chemistry of catalysts. Catalytic materials are those solids that allow the chemical reaction to occur efficiently and cost-effectively. This book provides you with all necessary information to synthesize, characterize, and relate the properties of a catalyst to its behavior, enabling you to select the appropriate catalyst for the process and reactor system. Oxides (used both as catalysts and as supports for cata

  15. Effects of FGFR2 kinase activation loop dynamics on catalytic activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerome M Karp

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The structural mechanisms by which receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs regulate catalytic activity are diverse and often based on subtle changes in conformational dynamics. The regulatory mechanism of one such RTK, fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2 kinase, is still unknown, as the numerous crystal structures of the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated forms of the kinase domains show no apparent structural change that could explain how phosphorylation could enable catalytic activity. In this study, we use several enhanced sampling molecular dynamics (MD methods to elucidate the structural changes to the kinase's activation loop that occur upon phosphorylation. We show that phosphorylation favors inward motion of Arg664, while simultaneously favoring outward motion of Leu665 and Pro666. The latter structural change enables the substrate to bind leading to its resultant phosphorylation. Inward motion of Arg664 allows it to interact with the γ-phosphate of ATP as well as the substrate tyrosine. We show that this stabilizes the tyrosine and primes it for the catalytic phosphotransfer, and it may lower the activation barrier of the phosphotransfer reaction. Our work demonstrates the value of including dynamic information gleaned from computer simulation in deciphering RTK regulatory function.

  16. Crystal structure of the catalytic trimer of Methanococcus jannaschii aspartate transcarbamoylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitali, Jacqueline; Colaneri, Michael J; Kantrowitz, Evan

    2008-05-15

    The catalytic trimer of Methanococcus jannaschii aspartate transcarbamoylase is extremely heat stable, maintaining 75% of its activity after heat treatment for 60 min at 75 degrees C. We undertook its structural analysis in order to understand the molecular basis of its thermostability and gain insight on how its catalytic function adapts to high temperature. Several structural elements potentially contributing to thermostability were identified. These include: (i) changes in the amino acid composition such as a decrease in the thermolabile residues Gln and Asn, an increase in the charged residues Lys and Glu, an increase in Tyr and a decrease in Ala residues; (ii) a larger number of salt bridges, in particular, the improvement of ion-pair networks; (iii) shortening of the N-terminus and shortening of three loops. An interesting feature of the crystal structure is the association of two crystallographically independent catalytic subunits into a staggered complex with an intertrimer distance of 33.8 A. The active site appears similar to Escherichia coli. Upon substrate binding, smaller changes in the global orientation of domains and larger conformational changes of the active site residues are expected as compared to E. coli. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Studi Literatur Perubahan Antara CISSP 10 Domain Dengan 8 Domain

    OpenAIRE

    Perkasa, Michael; Noertjahyana, Agustinus; Rostianingsih, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Degree is one that is being achieved by most people in their work, in order to influence the potential possessed by an employee or the employee. So with the development of technology, people increasingly need a degree or certification in order to hone and enhance its capabilities.With the changes under discussion on the differences of the 10 CISSP domains domain into 8 domains in each domain has the characteristics of each and their respective utility functions. CISSP 8 domain is a new domain...

  18. Bifurcations of Baker domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauber, Arnd

    2007-07-01

    We consider the family of transcendental entire functions given by \\{f_c:{\\mathbb C} \\rightarrow {\\mathbb C}:z-c+e^z, c \\in {\\mathbb C} \\} . If Re c > 0, then fc features a Baker domain as the only component of the Fatou set, while the functions fc show a different dynamical behaviour if c \\in \\rmi{\\mathbb R} . We describe the dynamical planes of these functions and show that the Julia sets converge in the limit process f_{c_1+\\rmi c_2} \\rightarrow f_{\\rmi c_2} with respect to the Hausdorff metric, where c_1 \\in {\\mathbb R}^+ and c_2 \\in {\\mathbb R} . We use this to show that Baker domains of any type (concerning a classification of König) are not necessarily stable under perturbation.

  19. Time Domain Induced Polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiandaca, Gianluca; Auken, Esben; Christiansen, Anders Vest

    2012-01-01

    Time-domain-induced polarization has significantly broadened its field of reference during the last decade, from mineral exploration to environmental geophysics, e.g., for clay and peat identification and landfill characterization. Though, insufficient modeling tools have hitherto limited the use...... of time-domaininduced polarization for wider purposes. For these reasons, a new forward code and inversion algorithm have been developed using the full-time decay of the induced polarization response, together with an accurate description of the transmitter waveform and of the receiver transfer function......%. Furthermore, the presence of low-pass filters in time-domain-induced polarization instruments affects the early times of the acquired decays (typically up to 100 ms) and has to be modeled in the forward response to avoid significant loss of resolution. The developed forward code has been implemented in a 1D...

  20. TENCompetence Domain Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2006-01-01

    This is the version 1.1 of the TENCompetence Domain Model (version 1.0 released at 19-6-2006; version 1.1 at 9-11-2008). It contains several files: a) a pdf with the model description, b) three jpg files with class models (also in the pdf), c) a MagicDraw zip file with the model itself, d) a release