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Sample records for catalytic ammonia decomposition

  1. Catalytic Ammonia Decomposition Over Ruthenium Nanoparticles Supported on Nano-Titanates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klerke, Asbjørn; Klitgaard, Søren Kegnæs; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2009-01-01

    Nanosized Na2Ti3O7, K2Ti6O13 and Cs2Ti6O13 materials were prepared and used as supports of ruthenium nanoparticles for catalytic ammonia decomposition. It is shown that these catalysts exhibit higher catalytic activity than ruthenium supported on TiO2 nanoparticles promoted with cesium. The diffe...

  2. COMPARISON OF CATALYTIC ACTIVITIES BOTH FOR SELECTIVE OXIDATION AND DECOMPOSITION OF AMMONIA OVER Fe/HZβ CATALYST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YELİZ ÇETİN

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia is one of the syngas contaminants that must be removed before using the syngas downstream applications. The most promising hot-gas clean-up techniques of ammonia are selective catalytic oxidation (SCO and catalytic decomposition. In this study, the catalytic activities over Zeolite Hβ supported iron catalyst (Fe/HZβ were compared both for the two catalytic routes. For SCO experiments; temperature (300-550 °C, O2 (2000-6000 ppmv and (0-10% H2 concentrations were investigated with the presence of 800 ppm NH3 in each of the final gas mixture. In the second route, catalytic ammonia decomposition experiments were carried out with H2 in balance N2 (0-30% containing 800 ppm NH3 at 700°C and 800°C. In the SCO, NH3 conversions were increased with increasing reaction temperatures with the absence of H2 in the reaction mixture. With 10% H2, it was shown that NH3 conversions increased with decreasing the reaction temperature. This was interpreted as the competing H2 and NH3 oxidations over the catalyst. On the other hand, in the catalytic decomposition, thermodynamic equilibrium conversion of almost 100% was attained at both 700 and 800 °C. Upon H2 addition, all conversions decreased. The decrease in conversion seemed to be linear with inlet hydrogen concentration. Hydrogen was seen to inhibit ammonia decomposition reaction. It was shown that Fe/HZβ catalyst is better to use for catalytic decomposition of NH3 in syngas rather than SCO of NH3 in spite of higher reaction temperatures needed in the decomposition reaction.

  3. Catalytic Ammonia Decomposition over High-Performance Ru/Graphene Nanocomposites for Efficient COx-Free Hydrogen Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Highly-dispersed Ru nanoparticles were grown on graphene nanosheets by simultaneously reducing graphene oxide and Ru ions using ethylene glycol (EG, and the resultant Ru/graphene nanocomposites were applied as a catalyst to ammonia decomposition for COx-free hydrogen production. Tuning the microstructures of Ru/graphene nanocomposites was easily accomplished in terms of Ru particle size, morphology, and loading by adjusting the preparation conditions. This was the key to excellent catalytic activity, because ammonia decomposition over Ru catalysts is structure-sensitive. Our results demonstrated that Ru/graphene prepared using water as a co-solvent greatly enhanced the catalytic performance for ammonia decomposition, due to the significantly improved nano architectures of the composites. The long-term stability of Ru/graphene catalysts was evaluated for COx-free hydrogen production from ammonia at high temperatures, and the structural evolution of the catalysts was investigated during the catalytic reactions. Although there were no obvious changes in the catalytic activities at 450 °C over a duration of 80 h, an aggregation of the Ru nanoparticles was still observed in the nanocomposites, which was ascribed mainly to a sintering effect. However, the performance of the Ru/graphene catalyst was decreased gradually at 500 °C within 20 h, which was ascribed mainly to both the effect of the methanation of the graphene nanosheet under a H2 atmosphere and to enhanced sintering under high temperatures.

  4. Production of ammonia from plasma-catalytic decomposition of urea: Effects of carrier gas composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Xing; Li, Jian; Qiu, Danqi; Zhu, Tianle

    2018-04-01

    Effects of carrier gas composition (N 2 /air) on NH 3 production, energy efficiency regarding NH 3 production and byproducts formation from plasma-catalytic decomposition of urea were systematically investigated using an Al 2 O 3 -packed dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor at room temperature. Results show that the presence of O 2 in the carrier gas accelerates the conversion of urea but leads to less generation of NH 3 . The final yield of NH 3 in the gas phase decreased from 70.5%, 78.7%, 66.6% and 67.2% to 54.1%, 51.7%, 49.6% and 53.4% for applied voltages of 17, 19, 21 and 23kV, respectively when air was used as the carrier gas instead of N 2 . From the viewpoint of energy savings, however, air carrier gas is better than N 2 due to reduced energy consumption and increased energy efficiency for decomposition of a fixed amount of urea. Carrier gas composition has little influence on the major decomposition pathways of urea under the synergetic effects of plasma and Al 2 O 3 catalyst to give NH 3 and CO 2 as the main products. Compared to a small amount of N 2 O formed with N 2 as the carrier gas, however, more byproducts including N 2 O and NO 2 in the gas phase and NH 4 NO 3 in solid deposits were produced with air as the carrier gas, probably due to the unproductive consumption of NH 3 , the possible intermediate HNCO and even urea by the abundant active oxygen species and nitrogen oxides generated in air-DBD plasma. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Synthesis of Ru nanoparticles confined in magnesium oxide-modified mesoporous alumina and their enhanced catalytic performance during ammonia decomposition

    KAUST Repository

    Tan, Hua

    2012-09-01

    In this work, Ru nanoparticles confined in the channels of ordered mesoporous alumina (MA) and magnesium oxide-modified ordered MA are prepared for the first time via a two-solvent technique, combined with the amorphous citrate route. Structural characterizations reveal that uniform 2-3 nm Ru nanoparticles are highly dispersed in the blockage-free channels of mesoporous supports. The Ru nanoparticles confined in MA modified with 20% molar ratio magnesium oxide exhibited a high catalytic activity and stability during ammonia decomposition due to the optimized particle size, basic support, lack of chlorine, and confined space provided by the channels of the mesoporous supports. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A Langmuir-Hinshelwood approach to the kinetic modelling of catalytic ammonia decomposition in an integral reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenise, S; García-Bordejé, E; Valverde, J L; Romeo, E; Monzón, A

    2013-08-07

    The increasing interest in ammonia decomposition is due to the fact that this compound can be used advantageously as a hydrogen carrier, allowing the development of single-step hydrogen generation systems. With the aim of developing efficient reactors for ammonia decomposition, e.g. for fuel cell applications, it is imperative to investigate the kinetics and reaction mechanism in depth. The main goal of this work is to develop reliable kinetic models that are able to predict the performance obtained using integral reactors, e.g. monoliths. In this case, an almost complete NH3 conversion is obtained, with a high H2 concentration at the exit of the reactor. The operating conditions, mainly the gas composition, are very different along the reactor. In addition, the temperatures needed to attain such large conversions are usually high. The kinetic models developed in this contribution are based on the Langmuir isotherm, considering that all the adsorbed species can be kinetically relevant, that the slow step or steps can be partially reversible, and that the surface can be considered as energetically uniform, i.e. ideal. Among other conclusions, the results obtained indicate that the variable kinetic orders and apparent activation energies frequently reported in the literature can be direct consequences of the data analysis and can therefore also be explained without considering any change in the controlling step with the reaction temperature or in the hydrogen or ammonia concentration.

  7. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  8. Molybdenum-based additives to mixed-metal oxides for use in hot gas cleanup sorbents for the catalytic decomposition of ammonia in coal gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Raul E.

    1993-01-01

    This invention relates to additives to mixed-metal oxides that act simultaneously as sorbents and catalysts in cleanup systems for hot coal gases. Such additives of this type, generally, act as a sorbent to remove sulfur from the coal gases while substantially simultaneously, catalytically decomposing appreciable amounts of ammonia from the coal gases.

  9. Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael T.; Harper, Lynn D. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the development of a Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction (VPCAR) teststand and the results of an experimental program designed to evaluate the potential of the technology as a water purification process. In the experimental program the technology is evaluated based upon product water purity, water recovery rate, and power consumption. The experimental work demonstrates that the technology produces high purity product water and attains high water recovery rates at a relatively high specific power consumption. The experimental program was conducted in 3 phases. In phase I an Igepon(TM) soap and water mixture was used to evaluate the performance of an innovative Wiped-Film Rotating-Disk evaporator and associated demister. In phase II a phenol-water solution was used to evaluate the performance of the high temperature catalytic oxidation reactor. In phase III a urine analog was used to evaluate the performance of the combined distillation/oxidation functions of the processor.

  10. Hydrogen peroxide catalytic decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide in a gaseous stream is converted to nitrogen dioxide using oxidizing species generated through the use of concentrated hydrogen peroxide fed as a monopropellant into a catalyzed thruster assembly. The hydrogen peroxide is preferably stored at stable concentration levels, i.e., approximately 50%-70% by volume, and may be increased in concentration in a continuous process preceding decomposition in the thruster assembly. The exhaust of the thruster assembly, rich in hydroxyl and/or hydroperoxy radicals, may be fed into a stream containing oxidizable components, such as nitric oxide, to facilitate their oxidation.

  11. Modeling and simulation of ammonia removal from purge gases of ammonia plants using a catalytic Pd-Ag membrane reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahimpour, M.R.; Asgari, A.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, the removal of ammonia from synthesis purge gas of an ammonia plant has been investigated. Since the ammonia decomposition is thermodynamically limited, a membrane reactor is used for complete decomposition. A double pipe catalytic membrane reactor is used to remove ammonia from purge gas. The purge gas is flowing in the reaction side and is converted to hydrogen and nitrogen over nickel-alumina catalyst. The hydrogen is transferred through the Pd-Ag membrane of tube side to the shell side. A mathematical model including conservation of mass in the tube and shell side of reactor is proposed. The proposed model was solved numerically and the effects of different parameters on the rector performance were investigated. The effects of pressure, temperature, flow rate (sweep ratio), membrane thickness and reactor diameter have been investigated in the present study. Increasing ammonia conversion was observed by raising the temperature, sweep ratio and reducing membrane thickness. When the pressure increases, the decomposition is gone toward completion but, at low pressure the ammonia conversion in the outset of reactor is higher than other pressures, but complete destruction of the ammonia cannot be achieved. The proposed model can be used for design of an industrial catalytic membrane reactor for removal of ammonia from ammonia plant and reducing NO x emissions

  12. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  13. Effect of H{sub 2}S on the catalytic decomposition of tar and ammonia with dolomite and sintered iron ore in synthetic gasification gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hepola, J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    The toluene-decomposing activity of calcined dolomite was not affected by the H{sub 2}S content of synthetic gasification gas. Iron was active with respect to toluene and ammonia at metallic state. The increase of the H{sub 2}S content of synthetic gasification gas (0 - 500 ppmv) decreased the tar-decomposing activity but not the ammonia- decomposing activity of sintered iron ore. (author) (12 refs.)

  14. Electro Decomposition of Ammonia into Hydrogen for Fuel Cell Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    400 million gallon per day (MGD). Currently, wastewater treatment solutions for ammonia ( biological and chemical treatments) consume a significant...of the catalytic and inhibition mechanisms of urease. Journal of Biological Inorganic Chemistry. 6(3):300-314. National Research Council (NRC) and...electrodes for urea oxidation (Talk) Denitrification of wastewater through ammonia electrolysis (Talk) Journal publicationsg Daramola, Damilola A

  15. Catalytic synthesis of ammonia using vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Billing, Gert D.

    1992-01-01

    The dissociation of nitrogen is the rate-limiting step in the catalytic synthesis of ammonia. Theoretical calculations have shown that the dissociative sticking probability of molecular nitrogen on catalytic active metal surfaces is enhanced by orders of magnitude when the molecules...

  16. Uranium sesqui nitride synthesis and its use as catalyst for the thermo decomposition of ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, Soraya Maria Rizzo da

    1996-01-01

    The preoccupation to have a secure destination for metallic uranium scraps and wastes and to search new non-nuclear uses for the huge amount of depleted metal uranium accumulated at the nuclear industry encouraged the study of the uranium sesqui nitride synthesis and its use. The use of uranium sesqui nitride as a catalyst for the thermo decomposition of ammonia for the hydrogen production has enormous significance. One of the most important nuclear cycle step is the reduction of the higher uranium oxides for the production of uranium dioxide and its conversion to uranium tetrafluoride. The reduction of the UO 3 and U 3 O 8 oxides is accomplished by the gas-solid reaction with elementary hydrogen. For economical purposes and for the safety concern the nuclear industry prefers to manufacture the hydrogen gas at the local and at the moment of use, exploring the catalytic decomposition of ammonia vapor. Using metallic uranium scraps as the raw material the obtention of its nitride was achieved by the reaction with ammonia. The results of the chemical and physical characterization of the prepared uranium sesqui nitride and its behavior as a catalyst for the cracking of ammonia are commented. A lower ammonia cracking temperature (550 deg C) using the uranium sesqui nitride compared with recommended industrial catalysts iron nitride (650 deg C) and manganese nitride (700 deg C) sounds reliable and economically advantageous. (author)

  17. Catalytic synthesis of ammonia using vibrationally excited nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Billing, Gert D.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    1992-01-01

    In a previous study we have considered the catalytic synthesis of ammonia in the presence of vibrationally excited nitrogen. The distribution over vibrational states was assumed to be maintained during the reaction, and it was shown that the yield of ammonia increased considerably compared...... to that from conventional synthesis. In the present study the nitrogen molecules are only excited at the inlet of a plug flow reactor, and the importance of vibrational relaxation is investigated. We show that vibrational excitation can give an enhanced yield of ammonia also in the situation where vibrational...

  18. Neutron diffraction and gravimetric study of the iron nitriding reaction under ammonia decomposition conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Thomas J; Makepeace, Joshua W; David, William I F

    2017-10-18

    Ammonia decomposition over iron catalysts is known to be affected by whether the iron exists in elemental form or as a nitride. In situ neutron diffraction studies with simultaneous gravimetric analysis were performed on the nitriding and denitriding reactions of iron under ammonia decomposition conditions. The gravimetric analysis agrees well with the Rietveld analysis of the neutron diffraction data, both of which confirm that the form of the iron catalyst is strongly dependent on ammonia decomposition conditions. Use of ammonia with natural isotopic abundance as the nitriding agent means that the incoherent neutron scattering of any hydrogen within the gases present is able to be correlated to how much ammonia had decomposed. This novel analysis reveals that the nitriding of the iron occurred at exactly the same temperature as ammonia decomposition started. The iron nitriding and denitriding reactions are shown to be related to steps that take place during ammonia decomposition and the optimum conditions for ammonia decomposition over iron catalysts are discussed.

  19. Assessing the reliability of calculated catalytic ammonia synthesis rates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Medford, Andrew James; Wellendorff, Jess; Vojvodic, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    We introduce a general method for estimating the uncertainty in calculated materials properties based on density functional theory calculations. We illustrate the approach for a calculation of the catalytic rate of ammonia synthesis over a range of transition-metal catalysts. The correlation...

  20. Plasma-catalytic decomposition of TCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandenbroucke, A.; Morent, R.; De Geyter, N.; Leys, C. [Ghent Univ., Ghent (Belgium). Dept. of Applied Physics; Tuan, N.D.M.; Giraudon, J.M.; Lamonier, J.F. [Univ. des Sciences et Technologies de Lille, Villeneuve (France). Dept. de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide

    2010-07-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are gaseous pollutants that pose an environmental hazard due to their high volatility and their possible toxicity. Conventional technologies to reduce the emission of VOCs have their advantages, but they become cost-inefficient when low concentrations have to be treated. In the past 2 decades, non-thermal plasma technology has received growing attention as an alternative and promising remediation method. Non-thermal plasmas are effective because they produce a series of strong oxidizers such as ozone, oxygen radicals and hydroxyl radicals that provide a reactive chemical environment in which VOCs are completely oxidized. This study investigated whether the combination of NTP and catalysis could improve the energy efficiency and the selectivity towards carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). Trichloroethylene (TCE) was decomposed by non-thermal plasma generated in a DC-excited atmospheric pressure glow discharge. The production of by-products was qualitatively investigated through FT-IR spectrometry. The results were compared with those from a catalytic reactor. The removal rate of TCE reached a maximum of 78 percent at the highest input energy. The by-products of TCE decomposition were CO{sub 2}, carbon monoxide (CO) hydrochloric acid (HCl) and dichloroacetylchloride. Combining the plasma system with a catalyst located in an oven downstream resulted in a maximum removal of 80 percent, at an energy density of 300 J/L, a catalyst temperature of 373 K and a total air flow rate of 2 slm. 14 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Ultra-clean hydrogen production by ammonia decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.E.E. Abashar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A rigorous heterogeneous mathematical model is used to simulate a cascade of multi-stage fixed bed membrane reactors (MSFBMR with inter-stage heating and fresh sweep gas for the decomposition of ammonia to produce high purity hydrogen suitable for the PEM fuel cells. Different reactor configurations are compared. The comparison between a single fixed bed reactor (FBR and a single fixed bed membrane reactor (FBMR shows that the FBMR is superior to the FBR and gives 60.48% ammonia conversion higher than the FBR. However, 20.91% exit ammonia conversion obtained by the FBMR is considered to be poor. The FBMR is limited by the kinetics at low temperatures. The numerical results show that the MSFBMR of four beds achieve 100.0% ammonia conversion. It was found that the membrane plays the prime role in the displacement of the thermodynamic equilibrium. The results also show that, a linear relationship exists between the number of beds and the feed temperature and a correlation has been developed. A critical point for an effective hydrogen permeation zone has been identified. It is observed that the diffusion limitation is confined to a slim region at the entrance of the reactor. It is also observed that the heat load assumes a maximum inflection point and explanations offered. The results show that the multi-stage configuration has a promising potential to be applied successfully on-site for ultra-clean hydrogen production.

  2. Trends in catalytic NO decomposition over transition metal surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falsig, Hanne; Bligaard, Thomas; Rass-Hansen, Jeppe

    2007-01-01

    The formation of NOx from combustion of fossil and renewable fuels continues to be a dominant environmental issue. We take one step towards rationalizing trends in catalytic activity of transition metal catalysts for NO decomposition by combining microkinetic modelling with density functional...... theory calculations. We show specifically why the key problem in using transition metal surfaces to catalyze direct NO decomposition is their significant relative overbinding of atomic oxygen compared to atomic nitrogen....

  3. Catalytic activity of metal borides in the reaction of decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labodi, I.; Korablev, L.I.; Tavadyan, L.A.; Blyumberg, Eh.A.

    1982-01-01

    Catalytic effect of CoB, MoB 2 , ZrB 2 and NbB 2 , prepared by the method of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis, on decomposition of tertiary butyl hydroperoxide has been studied. A technigue of determination of action mechanism of heterogeneous catalysts in liquid-phase process is suggested. It is established that CoB in contrast to other metal borides catalyzes only hydroperoxide decomposition into radicals

  4. Neutron diffraction and gravimetric study of the manganese nitriding reaction under ammonia decomposition conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Thomas J; Makepeace, Joshua W; David, William I F

    2018-03-28

    Manganese and its nitrides have recently been shown to co-catalyse the ammonia decomposition reaction. The nitriding reaction of manganese under ammonia decomposition conditions is studied in situ simultaneously by thermogravimetric analysis and neutron diffraction. Combining these complementary measurements has yielded information on the rate of manganese nitriding as well as the elucidation of a gamut of different manganese nitride phases. The neutron diffraction background was shown to be related to the extent of the ammonia decomposition and therefore the gas composition. From this and the sample mass, implications about the rate-limiting steps for nitriding by ammonia and nitriding by nitrogen are discussed.

  5. Using first principles to predict bimetallic catalysts for the ammonia decomposition reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansgen, Danielle A; Vlachos, Dionisios G; Chen, Jingguang G

    2010-06-01

    The facile decomposition of ammonia to produce hydrogen is critical to its use as a hydrogen storage medium in a hydrogen economy, and although ruthenium shows good activity for catalysing this process, its expense and scarcity are prohibitive to large-scale commercialization. The need to develop alternative catalysts has been addressed here, using microkinetic modelling combined with density functional studies to identify suitable monolayer bimetallic (surface or subsurface) catalysts based on nitrogen binding energies. The Ni-Pt-Pt(111) surface, with one monolayer of Ni atoms residing on a Pt(111) substrate, was predicted to be a catalytically active surface. This was verified using temperature-programmed desorption and high-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy experiments. The results reported here provide a framework for complex catalyst discovery. They also demonstrate the critical importance of combining theoretical and experimental approaches for identifying desirable monolayer bimetallic systems when the surface properties are not a linear function of the parent metals.

  6. Ammonia synthesis and decomposition on a Ru-based catalyst modeled by first-principles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellman, A.; Honkala, Johanna Karoliina; Remediakis, Ioannis

    2009-01-01

    A recently published first-principles model for the ammonia synthesis on an unpromoted Ru-based catalyst is extended to also describe ammonia decomposition. In addition, further analysis concerning trends in ammonia productivity, surface conditions during the reaction, and macro......-properties, such as apparent activation energies and reaction orders are provided. All observed trends in activity are captured by the model and the absolute value of ammonia synthesis/decomposition productivity is predicted to within a factor of 1-100 depending on the experimental conditions. Moreover it is shown: (i...

  7. KINETIC ANALYSIS OF THE CATALYTIC DECOMPOSITION OF HYDRAZINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.E. de MEDEIROS

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available The bond-order conservation method was used to study the catalytic decomposition of N2H4. Variation in the activation energy, E, of the most relevant steps was calculated as a function of the enthalpy of adsorption of N, QN, between 0 and 1250 kJmol-1. Results suggest that below QN = 520 kJmol-1 the catalytic decomposition of N2H4 produces mostly N2 and H2. Above QN = 520 kJmol-1, NH3 and N2 are the main products. Near QN = 520 kJmol-1 N2, H2 and NH3 are obtained, in agreement with experimental results on different metals.

  8. Catalytic Methane Decomposition over Fe-Al2O3

    KAUST Repository

    Zhou, Lu

    2016-05-09

    The presence of a Fe-FeAl2O4 structure over an Fe-Al2O3 catalysts is demonstrated to be vital for the catalytic methane decomposition (CMD) activity. After H2 reduction at 750°C, Fe-Al2O3 prepared by means of a fusion method, containing 86.5wt% FeAl2O4 and 13.5wt% Fe0, showed a stable CMD activity at 750°C for as long as 10h. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Influence of the phase composition on the catalytic properties of ammonia synthesis catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peev, T.M.; Bojinova, A.I.; Krylova, A.V.

    1981-01-01

    The phase composition of CA-1-type catalysts for ammonia synthesis was investigated by means of Moessbauer spectroscopy. A correlation was found between the catalytic activity of the samples and their wuestite content. (author)

  10. Catalytic Mechanisms and Biocatalytic Applications of Aspartate and Methylaspartate Ammonia Lyases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Villiers, Marianne; Veetil, Vinod Puthan; Raj, Hans; de Villiers, Jandre; Poelarends, Gerrit J.

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia lyases catalyze the formation of alpha-beta-unsaturated bonds by the elimination of ammonia from their substrates. This conceptually straightforward reaction has been the emphasis of many studies, with the main focus on the catalytic mechanism of these enzymes and/or the use of these enzymes

  11. Ammonia synthesis and decomposition on a Ru-based catalyst modeled by first-principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, A.; Honkala, K.; Remediakis, I. N.; Logadóttir, Á.; Carlsson, A.; Dahl, S.; Christensen, C. H.; Nørskov, J. K.

    2009-06-01

    A recently published first-principles model for the ammonia synthesis on an unpromoted Ru-based catalyst is extended to also describe ammonia decomposition. In addition, further analysis concerning trends in ammonia productivity, surface conditions during the reaction, and macro-properties, such as apparent activation energies and reaction orders are provided. All observed trends in activity are captured by the model and the absolute value of ammonia synthesis/decomposition productivity is predicted to within a factor of 1-100 depending on the experimental conditions. Moreover it is shown: (i) that small changes in the relative adsorption potential energies are sufficient to get a quantitative agreement between theory and experiment ( Appendix A) and (ii) that it is possible to reproduce results from the first-principles model by a simple micro-kinetic model ( Appendix B).

  12. Modification of Ammonia Decomposition Activity of Ruthenium Nanoparticles by N-Doping of CNT Supports

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Tamsin; Zhan, G; Wu, Kejun; Torrente Murciano, Laura

    2017-01-01

    The use of ammonia as a hydrogen vector has the potential to unlock the hydrogen economy. In this context, this paper presents novel insights into improving the ammonia decomposition activity of ruthenium nanoparticles supported on carbon nanotubes (CNT) by nitrogen doping. Our results can be applied to develop more active systems capable of delivering hydrogen on demand, with a view to move towards the low temperature target of less than 150 °C. Herein we demonstrate that nitrogen doping of ...

  13. H$_2$ Production via Ammonia Decomposition Using Non-Noble Metal Catalysts: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, Tamsin; Torrente-Murciano, L

    2016-01-01

    The wide-spread implementation of the so-called hydrogen economy is currently partially limited by an economically feasible way of storing hydrogen. In this context, ammonia has been commonly presented as a viable option for chemical storage due its high hydrogen content (17.6 wt%). However, its use as an energy carrier requires the development of catalytic systems capable of releasing hydrogen at adequate rates and conditions. At the moment, the most active catalytic systems for the decompos...

  14. New insight in the microscopic mechanism of the catalytic synthesis of ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Billing, Gert D.

    1995-01-01

    Theoretical quantum calculations and molecular beam experiments of the dissociative chemisorption of N-2 molecules on catalytic active metal surfaces have given new insight in the fundamental process of the ammonia synthesis. This new approach to the study of catalytic process supplements...... to dissociation. Our analysis of the dissociation process suggests that it is not possible to define, in some well specified way, a precursor state at typical temperatures in the technical ammonia synthesis. The kinetic scheme for the complete ammonia synthesis without the precursor state can still account...... for the observed conversion to ammonia. We have constructed an empirical potential energy surface for N-2/Fe(111) which has barriers to dissociation even larger than for the previously studied N-2/Re system. It is shown that the presence of barriers is consistent with the observation that the activation energy...

  15. Oblate hemispheroidal Large Ruthenium Particles Supported on Calcium Amide as Efficient Catalysts for Ammonia Decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishida, Kazuhisa; Kitano, Masaaki; Inoue, Yasunori; Sasase, Masato; Nakao, Takuya; Tada, Tomofumi; Abe, Hitoshi; Niwa, Yasuhiro; Yokoyama, Toshiharu; Hara, Michikazu; Hosono, Hideo

    2018-03-30

    Ammonia decomposition is positioned as an important technology for abstracting hydrogen from ammonia toward the realization of a hydrogen economy. Here, we report that oblate hemispheroidal large Ru particles on Ca(NH₂)₂ function as efficient catalysts for ammonia decomposition. The turnover frequency (TOF) of Ru/Ca(NH₂)₂ increased by two orders of magnitude as the Ru particle size was increased from 1.5 to 8.4 nm. More than 90% ammonia decomposition was achieved over Ru/Ca(NH₂)₂ with oblate hemispheroidal large Ru particles at 360 ºC, which is comparable to that of alkali-promoted Ru catalysts with small Ru particle sizes. XAFS analyses revealed that Ru particles are immobilized on Ca(NH₂)₂ by Ru-N bonding formed at the metal-support interface, which leads to oblate hemispheroidal Ru particles. Such a strong metal-support interaction in the Ru/Ca(NH₂)₂ is also substantiated by density functional theory calculations. The high activity of Ru/Ca(NH₂)₂ with large Ru particles primarily originates from the shape and appropriate size of Ru particles with a high density of active sites rather than the electron-donating ability of Ca(NH₂)₂. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Catalytic synthesis of ammonia using vibrationally excited nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Billing, Gert D.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    1992-01-01

    to that from conventional synthesis. In the present study the nitrogen molecules are only excited at the inlet of a plug flow reactor, and the importance of vibrational relaxation is investigated. We show that vibrational excitation can give an enhanced yield of ammonia also in the situation where vibrational...

  17. Catalytic non-thermal plasma reactor for the decomposition of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The decomposition of mixture of selected volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has been studied in a catalytic non-thermal plasma dielectric barrier discharge reactor. The VOCs mixture consisting n-hexane, cyclo-hexane and -xylene was chosen for the present study. The decomposition characteristics of mixture of VOCs ...

  18. GaN CVD Reactions: Hydrogen and Ammonia Decomposition and the Desorption of Gallium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartram, Michael E.; Creighton, J. Randall

    1999-01-01

    Isotopic labeling experiments have revealed correlations between hydrogen reactions, Ga desorption, and ammonia decomposition in GaN CVD. Low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD) were used to demonstrate that hydrogen atoms are available on the surface for reaction after exposing GaN(0001) to deuterium at elevated temperatures. Hydrogen reactions also lowered the temperature for Ga desorption significantly. Ammonia did not decompose on the surface before hydrogen exposure. However, after hydrogen reactions altered the surface, N 15 H 3 did undergo both reversible and irreversible decomposition. This also resulted in the desorption of N 2 of mixed isotopes below the onset of GaN sublimation, This suggests that the driving force of the high nitrogen-nitrogen bond strength (226 kcal/mol) can lead to the removal of nitrogen from the substrate when the surface is nitrogen rich. Overall, these findings indicate that hydrogen can influence G-aN CVD significantly, being a common factor in the reactivity of the surface, the desorption of Ga, and the decomposition of ammonia

  19. Purge gas recovery of ammonia synthesis plant by integrated configuration of catalytic hydrogen-permselective membrane reactor and solid oxide fuel cell as a novel technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siavashi, Fakhteh; Saidi, Majid; Rahimpour, Mohammad Reza

    2014-12-01

    The purge gas emission of ammonia synthesis plant which contains hazardous components is one of the major sources of environmental pollution. Using integrated configuration of catalytic hydrogen-permselective membrane reactor and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system is a new approach which has a great impact to reduce the pollutant emission. By application of this method, not only emission of ammonia and methane in the atmosphere is prevented, hydrogen is produced through the methane steam reforming and ammonia decomposition reactions that take place simultaneously in a catalytic membrane reactor. The pure generated hydrogen by recovery of the purge gas in the Pd-Ag membrane reactor is used as a feed of SOFC. Since water is the only byproduct of the electrochemical reaction in the SOFC, it is recycled to the reactor for providing the required water of the reforming reaction. Performance investigation of the reactor represents that the rate of hydrogen permeation increases with enhancing the reactor temperature and pressure. Also modeling results indicate that the SOFC performance improves with increasing the temperature and fuel utilization ratio. The generated power by recovery of the purging gas stream of ammonia synthesis plant in the Razi petrochemical complex is about 8 MW.

  20. Reduction of nitrogen oxides with catalytic acid resistant aluminosilicate molecular sieves and ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pence, Dallas T.; Thomas, Thomas R.

    1980-01-01

    Noxious nitrogen oxides in a waste gas stream such as the stack gas from a fossil-fuel-fired power generation plant or other industrial plant off-gas stream is catalytically reduced to elemental nitrogen and/or innocuous nitrogen oxides employing ammonia as reductant in the presence of a zeolite catalyst in the hydrogen or sodium form having pore openings of about 3 to 10 A.

  1. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes by catalytic vapor decomposition ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and chemical vapor decomposition [18]. Among them, the pulsed laser vaporiza- tion of a hot carbon target containing a Ni/Co catalyst and electric-arc technique using a Ni/Y catalyst have been known to give good quality and high yield CNTs. However, these methods are not economically viable as these require a huge ...

  2. Energy Diagram for the Catalytic Decomposition of Hydrogen Peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatsuoka, Tomoyuki; Koga, Nobuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Drawing a schematic energy diagram for the decomposition of H[subscript 2]O[subscript 2] catalyzed by MnO[subscript 2] through a simple thermometric measurement outlined in this study is intended to integrate students' understanding of thermochemistry and kinetics of chemical reactions. The reaction enthalpy, delta[subscript r]H, is…

  3. Metal exchanged zeolites for catalytic decomposition of N2O

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lebhsetwar, N.; Dhakad, M.; Biniwale, R.; Mitsuhasi, T.; Haneda, H.; Reddy, P.S.S.; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Šubrt, Jan; Kumar, S.; Kumar, V.; Saiprasad, P.; Rayalu, S.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 141, 1-2 (2009), s. 205-210 ISSN 0920-5861. [18th National Symposium and Indo-US seminar on Catalysis. Dehradun, 16.04.2007-18.04.2007] Grant - others:CSIR(IN) SIP-16 (1,3) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : N2O decomposition * catalyst * zeolite Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.526, year: 2009

  4. Catalytic non-thermal plasma reactor for the decomposition of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Among the catalytic study, MnOx/SMF (manganese oxide on sintered metal fibres electrode) shows better performance, probably due to the formation of active oxygen species by in situ decomposition of ozone on the catalyst surface. Water vapour further enhanced the performance due to the in situ ...

  5. The Sabatier Principle Illustrated by Catalytic H2O2 Decomposition on Metal Surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Anders Bo; Man, Isabela Costinela; Trinhammer, Ole

    2011-01-01

    -known heterogeneous H2O2 catalytic decomposition reaction on various metal foils. The activity per catalyst surface area versus the computationally calculated binding energy of OH groups on the catalysts is plotted. The OH group is identified as the only surface intermediate in an intuitive reaction mechanism...

  6. N2O Catalytic Decomposition – from Laboratory Experiment to Industry Reactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Obalová, L.; Jirátová, Květa; Karásková, K.; Chromčáková, Ž.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 191, č. 1 (2012), s. 116-120 ISSN 0920-5861 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01020336 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : N2O * catalytic decomposition * fixed bed reactor Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.980, year: 2012

  7. Macrophyte decomposition in a surface-flow ammonia-dominated constructed wetland: Rates associated with environmental and biotic variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thullen, J.S.; Nelson, S.M.; Cade, B.S.; Sartoris, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    Decomposition of senesced culm material of two bulrush species was studied in a surface-flow ammonia-dominated treatment wetland in southern California. Decomposition of the submerged culm material during summer months was relatively rapid (k = 0.037 day-1), but slowed under extended submergence (up to 245 days) and during fall and spring sampling periods (k = 0.009-0.014 day-1). Stepwise regression of seasonal data indicated that final water temperature and abundance of the culm-mining midge, Glyptotendipes, were significantly associated with culm decomposition. Glyptotendipes abundance, in turn, was correlated with water quality parameters such as conductivity and dissolved oxygen and ammonia concentrations. No differences were detected in decomposition rates between the bulrush species, Schoenoplectus californicus and Schoenoplectus acutus.

  8. An Assessment of the Technical Readiness of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal Process (VPCAR) Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael

    2000-01-01

    This poster provides an assessment of the technical readiness of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal Process (VPCAR). The VPCAR technology is a fully regenerative water recycling technology designed specifically for applications such as a near term Mars exploration mission. The VPCAR technology is a highly integrated distillation/catalytic oxidation based water processor. It is designed to accept a combined wastewater stream (urine, condensate, and hygiene) and produces potable water in a single process step which requires -no regularly scheduled re-supply or maintenance for a 3 year mission. The technology is designed to be modular and to fit into a volume comparable to a single International Space Station Rack (when sized for a crew of 6). This poster provides a description of the VPCAR technology and a summary of the current performance of the technology. Also provided are the results of two separate NASA sponsored system trade studies which investigated the potential payback of further development of the VPCAR technology.

  9. Electrochemical and catalytic properties of Ni/BaCe0.75Y0.25O3-δ anode for direct ammonia-fueled solid oxide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jun; Molouk, Ahmed Fathi Salem; Okanishi, Takeou; Muroyama, Hiroki; Matsui, Toshiaki; Eguchi, Koichi

    2015-04-08

    In this study, Ni/BaCe0.75Y0.25O3-δ (Ni/BCY25) was investigated as an anode for direct ammonia-fueled solid oxide fuel cells. The catalytic activity of Ni/BCY25 for ammonia decomposition was found to be remarkably higher than Ni/8 mol % Y2O3-ZrO2 and Ni/Ce0.90Gd0.10O1.95. The poisoning effect of water and hydrogen on ammonia decomposition reaction over Ni/BCY25 was evaluated. In addition, an electrolyte-supported SOFC employing BaCe0.90Y0.10O3-δ (BCY10) electrolyte and Ni/BCY25 anode was fabricated, and its electrochemical performance was investigated at 550-650 °C with supply of ammonia and hydrogen fuel gases. The effect of water content in anode gas on the cell performance was also studied. Based on these results, it was concluded that Ni/BCY25 was a promising anode for direct ammonia-fueled SOFCs. An anode-supported single cell denoted as Ni/BCY25|BCY10|Sm0.5Sr0.5CoO3-δ was also fabricated, and maximum powder density of 216 and 165 mW cm(-2) was achieved at 650 and 600 °C, for ammonia fuel, respectively.

  10. A study on the reaction characteristics of vanadium-impregnated natural manganese oxide in ammonia selective catalytic reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sung Su; Lee, Sang Moon; Park, Kwang Hee; Kwon, Dong Wook; Hong, Sung Chang

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated the effect of adding vanadium (V) to natural manganese oxide (NMO) in ammonia (NH3) selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The addition of V to NMO decreased the catalytic activity at low temperatures by blocking the active site. However, the enhancement of catalytic activity was achieved by controlling NH3 oxidation at high temperatures. From the NH3 temperature programmed desorption and oxygen on/off test, it was confirmed that the amount of Lewis acid site and active lattice oxygen of the catalyst affects the catalytic performance at low temperature.

  11. INVESTIGATION OF AMMONIA ADSORPTION ON FLY ASH DUE TO INSTALLATION OF SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.F. Brendel; J.E. Bonetti; R.F. Rathbone; R.N. Frey Jr.

    2000-11-01

    This report summarizes an investigation of the potential impacts associated with the utilization of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems at coal-fired power plants. The study was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy Emission Control By-Products Consortium, Dominion Generation, the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research and GAI Consultants, Inc. SCR systems are effective in reducing nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions as required by the Clean Air Act (CAA) Amendments. However, there may be potential consequences associated with ammonia contamination of stack emissions and combustion by-products from these systems. Costs for air quality, landfill and pond environmental compliance may increase significantly and the marketability of ash may be seriously reduced, which, in turn, may also lead to increased disposal costs. The potential impacts to air, surface water, groundwater, ash disposal, ash utilization, health and safety, and environmental compliance can not be easily quantified based on the information presently available. The investigation included: (1) a review of information and data available from published and unpublished sources; (2) baseline ash characterization testing of ash samples produced from several central Appalachian high-volatile bituminous coals from plants that do not currently employ SCR systems in order to characterize the ash prior to ammonia exposure; (3) an investigation of ammonia release from fly ash, including leaching and thermal studies; and (4) an evaluation of the potential impacts on plant equipment, air quality, water quality, ash disposal operations, and ash marketing.

  12. Decomposition kinetics of ammonia in gaseous stream by a nanoscale copper-cerium bimetallic catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2008-01-15

    This study performance is to examine the kinetics over nanoscale copper-cerium bimetallic catalyst under selective catalytic oxidation (SCO) of ammonia to N(2) in a tubular fixed-bed reactor (TFBR) at temperatures from 150 to 400 degrees C in the presence of oxygen. The nanoscale copper-cerium bimetallic catalyst was prepared by co-precipitation with Cu(NO(3))(2) and Ce(NO(3))(3) at molar ratio of 6:4. Experimental results showed that the catalyst with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that copper and cerium are well dispersed and catalyst in the form of nanometer-sized particles. Moreover, the kinetic behavior of NH(3) oxidation with catalysis can be accounted by using the rate expression of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood type kinetic model. Kinetic parameters are also developed on the basis of the differential reactor data. Also, experimental results are compared with those of the model predicted.

  13. Catalytic ozonation of ammonia using biomass char and wood fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, James R; Miller, Joby; Kolar, Praveen; Das, K C

    2009-05-01

    Catalytic ozonation of gaseous ammonia was investigated at room temperature using wood fly ash (WFA) and biomass char as catalysts. WFA gave the best results, removing ammonia (11 ppmv NH(3), 45% conversion) at 23 degrees C at a residence time of 0.34 s, using 5 g of catalyst or ash at the lowest ozone concentration (62 ppmv). Assuming pseudo zero order kinetics in ozone, a power rate law of -r(NH3) = 7.2 x 10(-8) C(NH3)(0.25) (r, mol g(-1)s(-1), C(NH3)molL(-1)) was determined at 510 ppmv O(3) and 23 degrees C for WFA. Water vapor approximately doubled the oxidation rate using WFA and catalytic ozonation activity was not measured for the char without humidifying the air stream. Overall oxidation rates using the crude catalysts were lower than commercial catalysts, but the catalytic ozonation process operated at significantly lower temperatures (23 vs. 300 degrees C). Nitric oxide was not detected and the percentage of NO(2) formed from NH(3) oxidation ranged from 0.3% to 3% (v/v), with WFA resulting in the lowest NO(2) level (at low O(3) levels). However, we could not verify that N(2)O was not formed, so further research is needed to determine if N(2) is the primary end-product. Additional research is required to develop techniques to enhance the oxidation activity and industrial application of the crude, but potentially inexpensive catalysts.

  14. Solar production of catalytic filamentous carbon by thermal decomposition of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirillov, V.A.; Kuvshinov, G.G.; Mogilnykh, Yu.I. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Reller, A. [University of Hamburg (Germany); Steinfeld, A.; Weidenkaff, A.; Meier, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    Concentrated solar radiation was used as the clean source of process heat for the production of Catalytic Filamentous Carbon (CFC) by thermal decomposition of gaseous hydrocarbons and by CO disproportionation in the presence of small metal catalyst particles. Depending on the catalyst, two different types of CFC, namely nano tubes and nano fibers, were obtained in solar experiments at the PSI solar furnace. (author) 2 figs., 1 tab., 7 refs.

  15. Ruthenium-catalysed decomposition of formic acid: Fuel cell and catalytic applications

    KAUST Repository

    Piola, Lorenzo

    2017-08-08

    The decomposition of formic acid into H2 and CO2 was successfully performed using a ruthenium hydride catalyst, without any concomitant CO evolution. The reaction mechanism is investigated by means of density functional theory calculations (DFT). The generated H2 was further exploited in a fuel cell to produce electricity. The catalytic hydrogenation of conjugated olefins, using this dihydrogen generation procedure, is also reported.

  16. Catalytic decomposition of N2O on ordered crystalline metal oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Zhen; Ren, Yu; Lu, Yanbin; Bruce, Peter G

    2013-07-01

    The synthesis of mesoporous metal oxides using mesoporous silicas or carbons as hard templates has attracted growing interest recently, but the catalytic application of mesoporous metal oxides has not been studied sufficiently. In addition, few publications have compared the catalytic performance of a series of mesoporous metal oxides in the same reaction, and little is known about the influence of preparation details of mesoporous metal oxides on catalytic activity. Herein, ordered crystalline mesoporous metal oxides (i.e., CeO2, Co3O4, Cr2O3, CuO, alpha-Fe2O3, beta-MnO2, Mn2O3, Mn3O4, NiO) prepared using mesoporous SiO2 (KIT-6) as a hard template were tested in the decomposition of N2O, an environmental pollutant, and the catalytic performance was compared with that of commercial metal oxides with low surface areas. In particular, mesoporous Co3O4, beta-MnO2, and NiO showed high N2O conversions at 350 degrees C. The influence of preparation parameters of mesoporous Co3O4 on catalytic activity was then studied in more detail. Mesoporous Co3O4 samples with different pore sizes and wall thicknesses were prepared using KIT-6 synthesized under different hydrothermal or calcination temperatures. Interestingly, the catalytic activities of different mesoporous Co3O4 samples were found to be influenced by these preparation details.

  17. Utilization of porous dolomite pellets for the catalytic decomposition of acetic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Yelian; Xue, Jun; Xia, Fajun [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Life Science and Pharmaceutical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, NO. 5 Xinmofan Road, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China); Yin, Xiuli; Wu, Chuangzhi [The Renewable Energy and Gas Hydrate Key Laboratory of CAS, Guangzhou Institute of Energy Conversion, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Catalytic decomposition of tar is a novel technology to clean the gas produced by biomass gasification. The purpose of the present research work was to develop strong and porous pellets of dolomite catalyst for tar decomposition. Porous dolomite pellets of 3 mm in diameter and 4 mm in height were prepared with dolomite, carboxyl methyl cellulose (CMC) and clay. The mechanical strength, the pore rate and the catalytic effect of porous dolomite pellets on decomposition of acetic acid were investigated. When the clay/dolomite mass ratio was 0.4 and the CMC/dolomite mass ratio was 0.2, the porous dolomite pellets had a mechanical strength of 15 N and a pore rate of 0.75 cm{sup 3} g{sup -1}. The pore size had approximately a normal distribution in the range of 0.06-200 {mu}m. Under the condition of gas residence time at 7.5 s and bed temperature at 800 C, 99.7 wt% of acetic acid was decomposed over the porous dolomite pellets, but only 36.5 wt% of acetic acid was decomposed with natural dolomite particles. It was indicated that the porous dolomite pellets were much more effective than the natural dolomite particles for catalyzing the decomposition of tar to gas. (author)

  18. The role of oxygen and water on molybdenum nanoclusters for electro catalytic ammonia production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howalt, Jakob Geelmuyden; Vegge, Tejs

    2014-01-01

    The presence of water often gives rise to oxygen adsorption on catalyst surfaces through decomposition of water and the adsorbed oxygen or hydroxide species often occupy important surfaces sites, resulting in a decrease or a total hindrance of other chemical reactions taking place at that site...... are -0.72 V or lower for all oxygen coverages studied, and it is thus possible to (re)activate (partially) oxidized nanoclusters for electrochemical ammonia production, e.g., using a dry proton conductor or an aqueous electrolyte. At lower oxygen coverages, nitrogen molecules can adsorb to the surface....... In this study, we present theoretical investigations of the influence of oxygen adsorption and reduction on pure and nitrogen covered molybdenum nanocluster electro catalysts for electrochemical reduction of N2 to NH3 with the purpose of understanding oxygen and water poisoning of the catalyst. Density...

  19. Ammonia for hydrogen storage: challenges and opportunities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klerke, Asbjørn; Christensen, Claus H.; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2008-01-01

    The possibility of using ammonia as a hydrogen carrier is discussed. Compared to other hydrogen storage materials, ammonia has the advantages of a high hydrogen density, a well-developed technology for synthesis and distribution, and easy catalytic decomposition. Compared to hydrocarbons...... and alcohols, it has the advantage that there is no CO2 emission at the end user. The drawbacks are mainly the toxicity of liquid ammonia and the problems related to trace amounts of ammonia in the hydrogen after decomposition. Storage of ammonia in metal ammine salts is discussed, and it is shown...... that this maintains the high volumetric hydrogen density while alleviating the problems of handling the ammonia. Some of the remaining challenges for research in ammonia as a hydrogen carrier are outlined....

  20. Formation and metastable decomposition of unprotonated ammonia cluster ions upon femtosecond ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzza, S.A.; Wei, S.; Purnell, J.; Castleman, A.W. Jr.

    1995-01-01

    The formation and metastable dissociation mechanism of unprotonated ammonia cluster ions, (NH 3 ) + n , produced by multiphoton ionization (MPI) at 624 nm and a nominal pulse width of 350 fs, are investigated through a reflectron time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometric technique. Detection of the unprotonated ions after femtosecond and nanosecond multiphoton ionization under various intensity conditions is explained. The role of the energy of the ionizing photons, and the observation of these ions after femtosecond MPI is examined. The formation of the unprotonated series is found to be a function of intensity in the case of ionization on the nanosecond time scale, but not so for the femtosecond time domain. The results can be explained in terms of ionization mechanisms and ionizing pulse durations. The findings of the present study suggest that the unprotonated ions are trapped behind the barrier to intracluster proton transfer and/or concomitant NH 2 loss. The studies of metastable decomposition also reveal that the unprotonated ammonia cluster ions dissociate in the field-free region of the TOF by losing an NH 2 radical rather than via the evaporative loss of NH 3 as occurs for protonated clusters. Additionally, isotopic investigations of the unimolecular decay reveal a strong dependence on the conditions of cluster formation. The cluster formation condition dependence of the unimolecular decay is further investigated by altering formation temperatures and observing the consequences reflected by changes in the spontaneous metastable decay rate constant. This is a unique example of a cluster system whose metastable dissociation does not obey an evaporative ensemble model

  1. Degradation of the ammonia wastewater in aqueous medium with ozone in combination with mesoporous TiO2 catalytic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhiwu; Qiu, Jianping; Zheng, Chaocan; Li, Liqing

    2017-03-01

    TiO2 mesoporous nanomaterials are now widely used in catalytic ozone technology. In this paper, the market P25 as precursor hydrothermal method to prepare TiO2 mesoporous materials, ozone catalyst material characterization by transmission electron microscopy, surface area analyzers, and X-ray diffraction technique and found that nanotubes, nanosheets, nanorods through characterization results, nano-particles of different morphology and anatase and rutile proportion of the ozone catalytic material can be controlled by the calcination temperature and the temperature of hot water to give, and with the hot water temperature and calcination temperature, the catalyst becomes small aperture size larger catalyst crystalline phase from anatase to rutile gradually shift. Catalytic materials have been prepared by the Joint ozone degradation of ammonia wastewater to evaluate mesoporous TiO2 nanomaterials ozone catalytic performance, the results showed that: ammonia wastewater removal efficiency of various catalytic materials relatively separate ozone and markets P25 effects are significantly improved, and TiO2 nanotubes cooperate with ozone degradation ammonia wastewater highest efficiency, in addition, rutile TiO2 catalysts, the more the better the performance of their ozone catalysis.

  2. Hydrazine as efficient fuel for low-temperature SOFC through ex-situ catalytic decomposition with high selectivity toward hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Jia; Ran, Ran; Shao, Zongping [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, No. 5 Xin Mofan Road, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2010-08-15

    Hydrazine is a promising fuel for portable fuel cells because it is a liquid, it is carbon free and it has a high energy density. In this work, hydrazine was investigated as an efficient fuel for low temperature solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) with a traditional nickel anode. A catalytic system with high selectivity toward hydrogen was developed using Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} (BSCF) as the main catalyst and potassium hydroxide as the promoter. The result of compositional analysis of the products showed that the hydrazine can be decomposed into hydrogen and nitrogen with 100% selectivity when an appropriate amount of KOH promoter is used. Acceptable power densities were achieved for a thin-film samaria-doped ceria (SDC) electrolyte cell operating on hydrazine decomposition products and hydrogen over a complete operation temperature range of 650-450 C. In addition, a similar cell with ammonia as the fuel displayed a much lower performance. (author)

  3. Catalytic on-board hydrogen production from methanol and ammonia for mobile application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerijanto, H.

    2008-08-15

    unfavourable for energetic and economic reasons, it is reasonable to investigate another reaction system, which is free of carbon. At the last part of this study the catalytic production of hydrogen from ammonia cracking was investigated. Ammonia is an interesting alternative: it has a high hydrogen density, it is available and cheap. Since the Pt electrode is sensitive to reactive substances, it must be ensured, that for example no hydrazine is produced during the ammonia cracking. A new type of ammonia cracking catalyst was investigated in this study, which unlike the conventional catalyst is not based on metal. Four different zirconium oxynitrides: ss' ZrON, ss'' ZrON, Zr{sub 2}ON{sub 2} and Zr{sub 0.88}Y{sub 0.12}O{sub 1.72}N{sub 0.15} (Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} doped ZrON) were prepared by various methods and subsequently tested for their activity in ammonia cracking. A long-term study was carried out on the best catalyst and no hydrazine was detected. On the basis of the data from the accomplished investigations a reaction mechanism is proposed. The result provides a basis for the further improvement of the catalyst. (orig.)

  4. Detailed study of the plasma-activated catalytic generation of ammonia in N2-H2 plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Helden, J. H.; Wagemans, W.; Yagci, G.; Zijlmans, R. A. B.; Schram, D. C.; Engeln, R.; Lombardi, G.; Stancu, G. D.; Röpcke, J.

    2007-02-01

    We investigated the efficiency and formation mechanism of ammonia generation in recombining plasmas generated from mixtures of N2 and H2 under various plasma conditions. In contrast to the Haber-Bosch process, in which the molecules are dissociated on a catalytic surface, under these plasma conditions the precursor molecules, N2 and H2, are already dissociated in the gas phase. Surfaces are thus exposed to large fluxes of atomic N and H radicals. The ammonia production turns out to be strongly dependent on the fluxes of atomic N and H radicals to the surface. By optimizing the atomic N and H fluxes to the surface using an atomic nitrogen and hydrogen source ammonia can be formed efficiently, i.e., more than 10% of the total background pressure is measured to be ammonia. The results obtained show a strong similarity with results reported in literature, which were explained by the production of ammonia at the surface by stepwise addition reactions between adsorbed nitrogen and hydrogen containing radicals at the surface and incoming N and H containing radicals. Furthermore, our results indicate that the ammonia production is independent of wall material. The high fluxes of N and H radicals in our experiments result in a passivated surface, and the actual chemistry, leading to the formation of ammonia, takes place in an additional layer on top of this passivated surface.

  5. Investigation of the degradation mechanism of catalytic wires during oxidation of ammonia process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pura, Jarosław, E-mail: jaroslawpura@gmail.com [Faculty of Material Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Wieciński, Piotr; Kwaśniak, Piotr; Zwolińska, Marta; Garbacz, Halina; Zdunek, Joanna [Faculty of Material Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, Wołoska 141, 02-507 Warsaw (Poland); Laskowski, Zbigniew; Gierej, Maciej [Precious Metal Mint, Weteranów 95, 05-250 Radzymin (Poland)

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • Degradation mechanisms of precious metal catalytic gauzes is proposed. • Significant change of gauzes morphology and chemical composition was observed. • Samples were analyzed using SEM, EDS and micro-XCT techniques. - Abstract: The most common catalysts for the ammonia oxidation process are 80 μm diameter platinum-rhodium wires knitted or woven into the form of a gauze. In an aggressive environment and under extreme conditions (temperature 800–900 °C, intensive gas flow, high pressure) precious elements are drained from the surface of the wires. Part of this separated material quickly decomposes on the surface in the form of characteristic “cauliflower-shape protrusions”. The rest of the platinum is captured by palladium-nickel catalytic-capture gauzes located beneath. In our investigation we focused on the effects of the degradation of gauzes from one industrial catalytic system. The aim of the study was to compare the degree and the mechanism of degradation of gauzes from a different part of the reactor. The study covered PtRh7 catalytic and PdNi5 catalytic-capture gauzes. X-ray computer microtomography investigation revealed that despite strong differences in morphology, each Pt-Rh wire has a similar specific surface area. This indicates that the oxidation process and morphological changes of the wires occur in a self-regulating balance, resulting in the value of the specific surface area of the catalyst. Microtomography analysis of Pd-Ni wires revealed strong redevelopment of the wires’ surface, which is related to the platinum capture phenomenon. Scanning electron microscope observations also revealed the nanostructure in the cauliflower-shape protrusions and large grains in the wires’ preserved cores. The high temperature in the reactor and the long-term nature of the process do not favor the occurrence of the nanostructure in this type of material. Further and detailed analysis of this phenomena will provide a better

  6. Promoted Ru on high-surface area graphite for efficient miniaturized production of hydrogen from ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rasmus Zink; Klerke, Asbjørn; Quaade, Ulrich

    2006-01-01

    Promoted Ru/C catalysts for decomposition of ammonia are incorporated into micro-fabricated reactors for the first time. With the reported preparation technique, the performance is increased more than two orders of magnitude compared to previously known micro-fabricated reactors for ammonia decom...... studies of both ammonia synthesis and decomposition, and it is shown how proper promotion can facilitate ammonia decomposition at temperatures below 500 K.......Promoted Ru/C catalysts for decomposition of ammonia are incorporated into micro-fabricated reactors for the first time. With the reported preparation technique, the performance is increased more than two orders of magnitude compared to previously known micro-fabricated reactors for ammonia...... decomposition. The catalytic activities for production of hydrogen from ammonia are determined for different promoters and promoter levels on graphite supported ruthenium catalysts. The reactivity trends of the Ru/C catalysts promoted with Cs and Ba are in excellent agreement with those known from earlier...

  7. A study on the photo catalytic decomposition reactions of organics dissolved in water (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, K.W.; Na, J. W.; Cho, Y. H.; Chung, H. H.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments on aqueous TiO 2 photo catalytic reaction of nitrogen containing organic compounds such as ethylamine, phenylhydrazine, pyridine, urea and EDTA were carried out. Based on the values calculated for the distribution of ionic species and atomic charge, the characteristics of their photo catalytic decomposition were estimated. It was shown that the decomposition characteristics was linearly proportional to nitrogen atomic charge value. On the other hand, the effects of aqueous pH, oxygen content and concentration on the TiO 2 photo catalytic characteristics of EDTA, EDTA-Cu(II) and EDTA-Fe(III) were experimentally investigated. All EDTA systems were decomposed better in the pH range of 2.5-3.0 and with more dissolved oxygen. These results could be applied to construction of a process for removal of organic impurities dissolved in a source of system water, or for treatment of EDTA-containing liquid waste produced by a chemical cleaning in the domestic NPPs. (author)

  8. A study on the photo catalytic decomposition reactions of organics dissolved in water (II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, K.W.; Na, J. W.; Cho, Y. H.; Chung, H. H

    2000-01-01

    Experiments on aqueous TiO{sub 2} photo catalytic reaction of nitrogen containing organic compounds such as ethylamine, phenylhydrazine, pyridine, urea and EDTA were carried out. Based on the values calculated for the distribution of ionic species and atomic charge, the characteristics of their photo catalytic decomposition were estimated. It was shown that the decomposition characteristics was linearly proportional to nitrogen atomic charge value. On the other hand, the effects of aqueous pH, oxygen content and concentration on the TiO{sub 2} photo catalytic characteristics of EDTA, EDTA-Cu(II) and EDTA-Fe(III) were experimentally investigated. All EDTA systems were decomposed better in the pH range of 2.5-3.0 and with more dissolved oxygen. These results could be applied to construction of a process for removal of organic impurities dissolved in a source of system water, or for treatment of EDTA-containing liquid waste produced by a chemical cleaning in the domestic NPPs. (author)

  9. System and method for controlling an engine based on ammonia storage in multiple selective catalytic reduction catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, MIn; Perry, Kevin L.

    2015-11-20

    A system according to the principles of the present disclosure includes a storage estimation module and an air/fuel ratio control module. The storage estimation module estimates a first amount of ammonia stored in a first selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst and estimates a second amount of ammonia stored in a second SCR catalyst. The air/fuel ratio control module controls an air/fuel ratio of an engine based on the first amount, the second amount, and a temperature of a substrate disposed in the second SCR catalyst.

  10. An Evaluation of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Removal Process for Use in a Mars Transit Vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Michael; Borchers, Bruce

    1998-01-01

    An experimental program has been developed to evaluate the potential of the Vapor Phase Catalytic Ammonia Reduction (VPCAR) technology for use as a Mars Transit Vehicle water purification system. Design modifications which will be required to ensure proper operation of the VPCAR system in reduced gravity are also evaluated. The VPCAR system is an integrated wastewater treatment technology that combines a distillation process with high temperature catalytic oxidation. The distillation portion of the system utilizes a vapor compression distillation process to provide an energy efficient phase change separation. This portion of the system removes any inorganic salts and large molecular weight, organic contaminates, i.e., non-volatile, from the product water stream and concentrates these contaminates into a byproduct stream. To oxidize the volatile organic compounds and ammonia, a vapor phase, high temperature catalytic oxidizer is used. This catalytic system converts these compounds along with the aqueous product into CO2, H2O, and N2O. A secondary catalytic bed can then be used to reduce the N2O to nitrogen and oxygen (although not evaluated in this study). This paper describes the design specification of the VPCAR process, the relative benefits of its utilization in a Mars Transit Vehicle, and the design modification which will be required to ensure its proper operation in reduced gravity. In addition, the results of an experimental evaluation of the processors is presented. This evaluation presents the processors performance based upon product water purity, water recovery rates, and power.

  11. Solid-oxide fuel cell operated on in situ catalytic decomposition products of liquid hydrazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Hongxia; Ran, Ran; Zhou, Wei; Shao, Zongping; Jin, Wanqin; Xu, Nanping; Ahn, Jeongmin

    Hydrazine was examined as a fuel for a solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) that employed a typical nickel-based anode. An in situ catalytic decomposition of hydrazine at liquid state under room temperature and ambient pressure before introducing to the fuel cell was developed by applying a Ba 0.5Sr 0.5Co 0.8Fe 0.2O 3- δ (BSCF) oxide catalyst. Catalytic testing demonstrated that liquid N 2H 4 can be decomposed to gaseous NH 3 and H 2 at a favorable rate and at a temperature as low as 20 °C and H 2 selectivity reaching values as high as 10% at 60 °C. Comparable fuel cell performance was observed using either the in situ decomposition products of hydrazine or pure hydrogen as fuel. A peak power density of ∼850 mW cm -2 at 900 °C was obtained with a typical fuel cell composed of scandia-stabilized zirconia and La 0.8Sr 0.2MnO 3 cathode. The high energy and power density, easy storage and simplicity in fuel delivery make it highly attractive for portable applications.

  12. Multifaceted characterization of cell wall decomposition products formed during ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) and dilute acid based pretreatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chundawat, Shishir P S; Vismeh, Ramin; Sharma, Lekh N; Humpula, James F; da Costa Sousa, Leonardo; Chambliss, C Kevin; Jones, A Daniel; Balan, Venkatesh; Dale, Bruce E

    2010-11-01

    Decomposition products formed/released during ammonia fiber expansion (AFEX) and dilute acid (DA) pretreatment of corn stover (CS) were quantified using robust mass spectrometry based analytical platforms. Ammonolytic cleavage of cell wall ester linkages during AFEX resulted in the formation of acetamide (25mg/g AFEX CS) and various phenolic amides (15mg/g AFEX CS) that are effective nutrients for downstream fermentation. After ammonolysis, Maillard reactions with carbonyl-containing intermediates represent the second largest sink for ammonia during AFEX. On the other hand, several carboxylic acids were formed (e.g. 35mg acetic acid/g DA CS) during DA pretreatment. Formation of furans was 36-fold lower for AFEX compared to DA treatment; while carboxylic acids (e.g. lactic and succinic acids) yield was 100-1000-fold lower during AFEX compared to previous reports using sodium hydroxide as pretreatment reagent. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Understanding Catalytic Activity Trends for NO Decomposition and CO Oxidation using Density Functional Theory and Microkinetic Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falsig, Hanne

    towards rationalizing trends in catalytic activity of transition metal catalysts for NO decomposition by combining microkinetic modelling with density functional theory calculations. We establish the full potential energy diagram for the direct NO decomposition reaction over stepped transition...... and Pt are the best direct NO decomposition catalysts among the 3d, 4d, and 5d metals. We analyze the NO decomposition reaction in terms of the Sabatier analysis and a Sabatier–Gibbs-type analysis and obtain an activity trend in agreement with experimental results. We show specifically why the key...... problem in using transition metal surfaces to catalyze direct NO decomposition is their significant relative overbinding of atomic oxygen compared to atomic nitrogen. We calculate adsorption and transition state energies for the full CO oxidation reaction pathway by the use of DFT for a number...

  14. Catalytic decomposition of trichloroethylene over Pt-/Ni-catalyst under microwave heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takashima, Hideaki; Karches, Martin; Kanno, Yoshinori

    2008-01-01

    Microwave (MW)-activated catalytic reactor system was studied and the results were compared with that of a conventional system based on the thermal activation method. Trichloroethylene (TCE) was decomposed under various MW-powers supply. Results showed that there is an optimum film thickness that was loaded on supports in MW heating system. The threshold may be within 1-3 μm. Lower temperature cannot activate the catalyst, while higher temperature results in carbon deposition and catalyst deactivation. This means that the dechlorination reaction needs to fix an optimum film MW-power supply in order to avoid the deposition of carbon on the surface of the active phase. MW-activated system is also worth compensating the conventional system in VOCs decomposition reaction.

  15. Selective catalytic reduction converter design: The effect of ammonia nonuniformity at inlet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paramadayalan, Thiyagarajan; Pant, Atul

    2013-01-01

    A three-dimensional CFD model of SCR converter with detailed chemistry is developed. The model is used to study the effects of radial variation in inlet ammonia profile on SCR emission performance at different temperatures. The model shows that radial variation in inlet ammonia concentration affects the SCR performance in the operating range of 200-400 .deg. C. In automotive SCR systems, ammonia is non-uniformly distributed due to evaporation/reaction of injected urea, and using a 1D model or a 3D model with flat ammonia profile at inlet for these conditions can result in erroneous emission prediction. The 3D SCR model is also used to study the effect of converter design parameters like inlet cone angle and monolith cell density on the SCR performance for a non-uniform ammonia concentration profile at the inlet. The performance of SCR is evaluated using DeNO x efficiency and ammonia slip

  16. Effect of Potassium in Calcined Co-Mn-Al Layered Double Hydroxide on the Catalytic Decomposition of N2O

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Obalová, L.; Karásková, K.; Jirátová, Květa; Kovanda, F.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 90, 1-2 (2009), s. 132-140 ISSN 0926-3373 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : nitrous oxide * catalytic decomposition * potassium promoter Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.252, year: 2009

  17. Catalytic decomposition of N2O over CeO2 supported Co3O4 catalysts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    128, No. 11, November 2016, pp. 1795–1804. c Indian Academy of Sciences. DOI 10.1007/s12039-016-1180-3. Catalytic decomposition of N2O over CeO2 supported Co3O4 catalysts. S K MAHAMMADUNNISA, T AKANKSHA, K KRUSHNAMURTY and. CH SUBRAHMANYAM. ∗. Energy and Environmental Research Lab, ...

  18. Application of microscopy technology in thermo-catalytic methane decomposition to hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Irene Lock Sow, E-mail: irene.sowmei@gmail.com; Lock, S. S. M., E-mail: serenelock168@gmail.com; Abdullah, Bawadi, E-mail: bawadi-abdullah@petronas.com.my [Chemical Engineering Department, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Sri Iskandar, 31750, Perak (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    Hydrogen production from the direct thermo-catalytic decomposition of methane is a promising alternative for clean fuel production because it produces pure hydrogen without any CO{sub x} emissions. However, thermal decomposition of methane can hardly be of any practical and empirical interest in the industry unless highly efficient and effective catalysts, in terms of both specific activity and operational lifetime have been developed. In this work, bimetallic Ni-Pd on gamma alumina support have been developed for methane cracking process by using co-precipitation and incipient wetness impregnation method. The calcined catalysts were characterized to determine their morphologies and physico-chemical properties by using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller method, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Thermogravimetric Analysis. The results suggested that that the catalyst which is prepared by the co-precipitation method exhibits homogeneous morphology, higher surface area, have uniform nickel and palladium dispersion and higher thermal stability as compared to the catalyst which is prepared by wet impregnation method. This characteristics are significant to avoid deactivation of the catalysts due to sintering and carbon deposition during methane cracking process.

  19. Preparation of Modified Red Mud-Supported Fe Catalysts for Hydrogen Production by Catalytic Methane Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quanrun Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A modified red mud- (MRM- supported Fe catalyst (xFe/MRM was prepared using the homogeneous precipitation method and applied to methane decomposition to produce hydrogen. The TEM and SEM-EDX results suggested that the particle sizes of the xFe/MRM catalysts were much smaller than that of raw red mud (RM, and the active metal Fe was evenly distributed over the catalyst structure. Moreover, BET results indicated that the surface areas and pore volumes of the catalysts were significantly improved, and the pore sizes of xFe/MRM were distributed from 5 to 12 nm, which is typical for a mesoporous material. The activities of those catalysts for the catalytic decomposition of methane were studied at atmospheric pressure at a moderate temperature of 650°C; the results showed that the xFe/MRM catalysts were more active than RM and MRM. The methane conversion curves of xFe/MRM catalysts exhibited similar variation tendencies (three-step during the reaction despite different Fe contents, and the loading amount of Fe clearly affected the activity of the catalysts.

  20. Synthesis of CNTs/CuO and its catalytic performance on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Cui

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Copper oxide (CuO nanoparticles were successfully deposited on carbon nanotubes’ (CNTs surface via complex-precipitation method, the nanocomposite was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS, X-ray powder diffraction (XRD, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET. The catalytic performance of CNTs/CuO on ammonium perchlorate (AP decomposition was analyzed by differential thermal analyzer (DTA, the DTA results showed its excellent catalytic effect on AP decomposition, as 8 wt.% CNTs/CuO was added in AP, the second exothermic peak temperature decreased by 158 °C. Such composite may be a promising candidate for catalyzing the AP thermal decomposition.

  1. Catalytic hydrolysis of ammonia borane for hydrogen generation using cobalt nanocluster catalyst supported on polydopamine functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arthur, Ernest Evans; Li, Fang; Momade, Francis W.Y.; Kim, Hern

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen was generated from ammonia borane complex by hydrolysis using cobalt nanocluster catalyst supported on polydopamine functionalized MWCNTs (multi-walled carbon nanotubes). The impregnation-chemical reduction method was used for the preparation of the supported catalyst. The nanocluster catalyst support was formed by in-situ oxidative polymerization of dopamine on the MWCNTs in alkaline solution at room temperature. The structural and physical–chemical properties of the nanocluster catalyst were characterized by FT-IR (Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy), EDX (energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), SEM (scanning electron microscope), XRD (X-ray diffraction) and TEM (transmission electron microscopy). The nanocluster catalyst showed good catalytic activity for the hydrogen generation from aqueous ammonia borane complex. A reusability test to determine the practical usage of the catalyst was also investigated. The result revealed that the catalyst maintained an appreciable catalytic performance and stability in terms of its reusability after three cycle of reuse for the hydrolysis reaction. Also, the activation energy for the hydrolysis of ammonia borane complex was estimated to be 50.41 kJmol −1 , which is lower than the values of some of the reported catalyst. The catalyst can be considered as a promising candidate in developing highly efficient portable hydrogen generation systems such as PEMFC (proton exchange membrane fuel cells). - Highlights: • Co/Pdop-o-MWCNT (Pdop functionalized MWCNT supported cobalt nanocluster) catalyst was synthesized for hydrogen generation. • It is an active catalyst for hydrogen generation via hydrolysis of ammonia borane. • It showed good stability in terms of reusability for the hydrogen generation

  2. Electronic factors in catalysis: the volcano curve and the effect of promotion in catalytic ammonia synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Søren; Logadottir, Ashildur; Jacobsen, C.J.H.

    2001-01-01

    to calculate how these two factors affect the energies of the intermediates and transition states in the ammonia synthesis reaction. We show that a linear relationship exists between the activation energy for N-2 dissociation and the binding energy of adsorbed nitrogen. The ammonia synthesis activity under...... promoted transition metals. We conclude that promotion is most effective for the best non-promoted catalysts and that promotion will always be essential for obtaining an optimal ammonia synthesis catalyst. Analysis of the micro-kinetic model show that the best catalysts are those with the lowest apparent...

  3. Catalytic Hydrolysis of Ammonia Borane by Cobalt Nickel Nanoparticles Supported on Reduced Graphene Oxide for Hydrogen Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwen Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Well dispersed magnetically recyclable bimetallic CoNi nanoparticles (NPs supported on the reduced graphene oxide (RGO were synthesized by one-step in situ coreduction of aqueous solution of cobalt(II chloride, nickel (II chloride, and graphite oxide (GO with ammonia borane (AB as the reducing agent under ambient condition. The CoNi/RGO NPs exhibits excellent catalytic activity with a total turnover frequency (TOF value of 19.54 mol H2 mol catalyst−1 min−1 and a low activation energy value of 39.89 kJ mol−1 at room temperature. Additionally, the RGO supported CoNi NPs exhibit much higher catalytic activity than the monometallic and RGO-free CoNi counterparts. Moreover, the as-prepared catalysts exert satisfying durable stability and magnetically recyclability for the hydrolytic dehydrogenation of AB, which make the practical reusing application of the catalysts more convenient. The usage of the low-cost, easy-getting catalyst to realize the production of hydrogen under mild condition gives more confidence for the application of ammonia borane as a hydrogen storage material. Hence, this general method indicates that AB can be used as both a potential hydrogen storage material and an efficient reducing agent, and can be easily extended to facile preparation of other RGO-based metallic systems.

  4. Synthesis and characterization of Fe–Ni/ɣ-Al2O3 egg-shell catalyst for H2 generation by ammonia decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Silva, Hugo José Lopes; Nielsen, Morten Godtfred; Fiordaliso, Elisabetta Maria

    2015-01-01

    The Fe–Ni alloyed nanoparticles are a promising alternative to expensive ruthenium-based catalysts for a real-scale application of hydrogen generation by ammonia decomposition. In practical applications, millimeter-sized extrudates are used as catalyst supports, where the spatial distribution...

  5. Fabrication of ammonium perchlorate/copper-chromium oxides core-shell nanocomposites for catalytic thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslami, Abbas, E-mail: eslami@umz.ac.ir [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Mazandaran, P.O.Box 47416-95447, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Juibari, Nafise Modanlou [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Mazandaran, P.O.Box 47416-95447, Babolsar (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseini, Seyed Ghorban [Department of Chemistry, Malek Ashtar University of Technology, P.O. Box 16765-3454, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    The ammonium perchlorate/Cu(II)-Cr(III)-oxides(AP/Cu-Cr-O) core-shell nanocomposites were in-situ prepared by deposition of copper and chromium oxides on suspended ammonium perchlorate particles in ethyl acetate as solvent. The results of differential scanning calorimetery (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) experiments showed that the nanocomposites have excellent catalytic effect on the thermal decomposition of AP, so that the released heat increases up to about 3-fold over initial values, changing from 450 J/g for pure AP to 1510 J/g for most appropriate mixture. For better comparison, single metal oxide/AP core-shell nanocomposite have also been prepared and the results showed that they have less catalytic effect respect to mixed metal oxides system. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results revealed homogenous deposition of nanoparticles on the surface of AP and fabrication of core-shell structures. The kinetic parameters of thermal decomposition of both pure AP and AP/Cu-Cr-O samples have been calculated by Kissinger method and the results showed that the values of pre-exponential factor and activation energy are higher for AP/Cu-Cr-O nanocomposite. The better catalytic effect of Cu-Cr-O nanocomposites is probably attributed to the synergistic effect between Cu{sup 2+} and Cr{sup 3+} in the nanocomposites, smaller particle size and more crystal defect. - Highlights: • The Cu-Cr-O nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical liquid deposition method. • Then, the AP/Cu-Cr-O core-shell nanocomposites were prepared. • The core-shell samples showed high catalytic activity for AP decomposition. • Thermal decomposition of samples occurs at lower temperature range.

  6. Fabrication of ammonium perchlorate/copper-chromium oxides core-shell nanocomposites for catalytic thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eslami, Abbas; Juibari, Nafise Modanlou; Hosseini, Seyed Ghorban

    2016-01-01

    The ammonium perchlorate/Cu(II)-Cr(III)-oxides(AP/Cu-Cr-O) core-shell nanocomposites were in-situ prepared by deposition of copper and chromium oxides on suspended ammonium perchlorate particles in ethyl acetate as solvent. The results of differential scanning calorimetery (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) experiments showed that the nanocomposites have excellent catalytic effect on the thermal decomposition of AP, so that the released heat increases up to about 3-fold over initial values, changing from 450 J/g for pure AP to 1510 J/g for most appropriate mixture. For better comparison, single metal oxide/AP core-shell nanocomposite have also been prepared and the results showed that they have less catalytic effect respect to mixed metal oxides system. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results revealed homogenous deposition of nanoparticles on the surface of AP and fabrication of core-shell structures. The kinetic parameters of thermal decomposition of both pure AP and AP/Cu-Cr-O samples have been calculated by Kissinger method and the results showed that the values of pre-exponential factor and activation energy are higher for AP/Cu-Cr-O nanocomposite. The better catalytic effect of Cu-Cr-O nanocomposites is probably attributed to the synergistic effect between Cu 2+ and Cr 3+ in the nanocomposites, smaller particle size and more crystal defect. - Highlights: • The Cu-Cr-O nanoparticles were synthesized by chemical liquid deposition method. • Then, the AP/Cu-Cr-O core-shell nanocomposites were prepared. • The core-shell samples showed high catalytic activity for AP decomposition. • Thermal decomposition of samples occurs at lower temperature range.

  7. N2O Catalytic Decomposition - Effect of Pelleting Pressure on Activity of Co-Mn-Al Mixed Oxide Catalyst

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Galejová, K.; Obalová, L.; Jirátová, Květa; Pacultová, K.; Kovanda, F.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 2 (2009), s. 172-179 ISSN 0366-6352. [International Conference of the Slovak-Society-of-Chemical-Engineering /35./. Tatranske Matliare, 26.05.2008-30.05.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/07/1400 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : pelleting pressure * nitrous oxide * catalytic decomposition Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.791, year: 2009

  8. System and method for controlling ammonia levels in a selective catalytic reduction catalyst using a nitrogen oxide sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    None

    2017-07-25

    A system according to the principles of the present disclosure includes an air/fuel ratio determination module and an emission level determination module. The air/fuel ratio determination module determines an air/fuel ratio based on input from an air/fuel ratio sensor positioned downstream from a three-way catalyst that is positioned upstream from a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst. The emission level determination module selects one of a predetermined value and an input based on the air/fuel ratio. The input is received from a nitrogen oxide sensor positioned downstream from the three-way catalyst. The emission level determination module determines an ammonia level based on the one of the predetermined value and the input received from the nitrogen oxide sensor.

  9. Preparation and catalytic activities for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition of Rh/Au bimetallic nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Haijun, E-mail: zhanghaijun@wust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Integrated Exploitation of Bayan Obo Multi-Metal Resources, Inner Mongolia University of Science and Technology, Baotou 014010 (China); The State Key Laboratory of Refractory and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China); Deng, Xiangong; Jiao, Chengpeng; Lu, Lilin; Zhang, Shaowei [The State Key Laboratory of Refractory and Metallurgy, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430081 (China)

    2016-07-15

    Graphical abstract: PVP-protected Rh/Au bimetallic nanoparticles (BNPs) were prepared by using hydrogen sacrificial reduction method, the activity of Rh80Au20 BNPs were about 3.6 times higher than that of Rh NPs. - Highlights: • Rh/Au bimetallic nanoparticles (BNPs) of 3∼5 nm in diameter were prepared. • Activity for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition of BNPs is 3.6 times higher than that of Rh NPs. • The high activity of BNPs was caused by the existence of charged Rh atoms. • The apparent activation energy for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition over the BNPs was calculated. - Abstract: PVP-protected Rh/Au bimetallic nanoparticles (BNPs) were prepared by using hydrogen sacrificial reduction method and characterized by UV–vis, XRD, FT-IR, XPS, TEM, HR-TEM and DF-STEM, the effects of composition on their particle sizes and catalytic activities for H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition were also studied. The as-prepared Rh/Au BNPs possessed a high catalytic activity for the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decomposition, and the activity of the Rh{sub 80}Au{sub 20} BNPs with average size of 2.7 nm were about 3.6 times higher than that of Rh monometallic nanoparticles (MNPs) even the Rh MNPs possess a smaller particle size of 1.7 nm. In contrast, Au MNPs with size of 2.7 nm show no any activity. Density functional theory (DFT) calculation as well as XPS results showed that charged Rh and Au atoms formed via electronic charge transfer effects could be responsible for the high catalytic activity of the BNPs.

  10. Thermo-Catalytic Methane Decomposition for Hydrogen Production: Effect of Palladium Promoter on Ni-based Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Lock Sow Mei

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen production from the direct thermo-catalytic decomposition of methane is a promising alternative for clean fuel production. However, thermal decomposition of methane can hardly be of any practical and empirical interest in the industry unless highly efficient and effective catalysts, in terms of both catalytic activity and operational lifetime have been developed. In this study, the effect of palladium (Pd as a promoter onto Ni supported on alumina catalyst has been investigated by using co-precipitation technique. The introduction of Pd promotes better catalytic activity, operational lifetime and thermal stability of the catalyst. As expected, highest methane conversion was achieved at reaction temperature of 800 °C while the bimetallic catalyst (1 wt.% Ni -1wt.% Pd/Al2O3 gave the highest methane conversion of 70% over 15 min of time-on-stream (TOS. Interestingly, the introduction of Pd as promoter onto Ni-based catalyst also has a positive effect on the operational lifetime and thermal stability of the catalyst as the methane conversion has improved significantly over 240 min of TOS. Copyright © 2016 BCREC GROUP. All rights reserved Received: 21st January 2016; Revised: 6th February 2016; Accepted: 6th March 2016 How to Cite: Mei, I.L.S., Lock, S.S.M., Vo, D.V.N., Abdullah, B. (2016. Thermo-Catalytic Methane Decomposition for Hydrogen Production: Effect of Palladium Promoter on Ni-based Catalysts. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 11 (2: 191-199 (doi:10.9767/bcrec.11.2.550.191-199 Permalink/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.11.2.550.191-199

  11. An investigation of alumina-supported catalysts for the selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia in biomass gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darvell, L.I.; Jones, J.M.; Ross, A.B.; Williams, A. [Department of Fuel and Energy, SPEME, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Heiskanen, K.; Simell, P. [VTT Processes, P.O. Box 1601, FIN-02044 VTT (Finland)

    2003-07-01

    Alumina-supported catalysts containing different transition metals (Ni, Cu, Cr, Mn, Fe and Co) were prepared and tested for their activity in the selective oxidation of ammonia reaction at high temperatures (between 700 and 900C) using a synthetic gasification gas mixture. The catalysts were also characterised for their acidic properties by infrared studies of pyridine and ammonia adsorption and reaction/desorption. The Ni/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Cr/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst displayed the highest selective catalytic oxidation (SCO) activity in that temperature range with excellent N{sub 2} selectivities. FT-IR studies of adsorbed pyridine and NH{sub 3} indicate that Lewis acid sites dominate and that NH{sub 3} adsorption on these sites is likely to be the first step in the SCO reaction. FT-IR studies on less active catalysts, particularly on Cu/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} allowed the detection of oxidation intermediates, amide (NH{sub 2}), and possibly hydrazine and imido and nitroxyl species. The amide and hydrazine intermediate gives credence to a proposed SCO mechanism involving a hydrazine intermediate, while the proposed imide, =N-H, and/or nitroxyl, HNO species could be intermediates in incomplete oxidation of NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2}O.

  12. High-energy coordination polymers (CPs) exhibiting good catalytic effect on the thermal decomposition of ammonium dinitramide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Han, Jing; Zhang, Sheng; Zhai, Lianjie; Wang, Bozhou; Yang, Qi; Wei, Qing; Xie, Gang; Chen, Sanping; Gao, Shengli

    2017-09-01

    High-energy coordination polymers (CPs) not only exhibit good energetic performances but also have a good catalytic effect on the thermal decomposition of energetic materials. In this contribution, two high-energy CPs Cu2(DNBT)2(CH3OH)(H2O)3·3H2O (1) and [Cu3(DDT)2(H2O)2]n (2) (H2DNBT = 3,3‧-dinitro-5,5‧-bis(1H-1,2,4-triazole and H3DDT = 4,5-bis(1H-tetrazol-5-yl)-2H-1,2,3-triazole) were synthesized and structurally characterized. Furthermore, 1 was thermos-dehydrated to produce Cu2(DNBT)2(CH3OH)(H2O)3 (1a). The thermal decomposition kinetics of 1, 1a and 2 were studied by Kissinger's method and Ozawa's method. Thermal analyses and sensitivity tests show that all compounds exhibit high thermal stability and low sensitivity for external stimuli. Meanwhile, all compounds have large positive enthalpy of formation, which are calculated as being (1067.67 ± 2.62) kJ mol-1 (1), (1464.12 ± 3.12) kJ mol-1 (1a) and (3877.82 ± 2.75) kJ mol-1 (2), respectively. The catalytic effects of 1a and 2 on the thermal decomposition of ammonium dinitramide (ADN) were also investigated.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of branched fcc/hcp ruthenium nanostructures and their catalytic activity in ammonia borane hydrolysis

    KAUST Repository

    AlYami, Noktan

    2018-01-30

    Several systems have shown the ability to stabilize uncommon crystal structures during the synthesis of metallic nanoparticles. By tailoring the nanoparticle crystal structure, the physical and chemical properties of the particles can also be controlled. Herein, we first synthesized branched nanoparticles of mixed hcp/fcc ruthenium, which were formed using tungsten carbonyl [W(CO)6] as both a reducing agent and a source of carbon monoxide. The branched particles were formed from multiple particulates off a central core. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) clearly showed that the branched structures consisted of aligned hcp crystal domains, a mixture of fcc and hcp crystal domains with several defects and misalignments, and particles that contained multiple cores and branches. Branched particles were also formed with molybdenum carbonyl [Mo(CO)6], and faceted particles of hcp and fcc particles were formed with Re2(CO)10 as a carbon monoxide source. Without metal carbonyls, small particles of spherical hcp ruthenium were produced, and their size could be controlled by the selection of the precursor. The ruthenium nanoparticles were tested for ammonia borane hydrolysis; the branched nanoparticles were more reactive for catalytic hydrogen evolution than the faceted hcp/fcc nanoparticles or the spherical hcp nanoparticles. This work showcases the potential of crystal phase engineering of transition metal nanoparticles by different carbon monoxide precursors for tailoring their catalytic reactivity.

  14. Low-temperature conversion of ammonia to nitrogen in water with ozone over composite metal oxide catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunnen; Wu, Ye; Liu, Chen; Guo, Lin; Nie, Jinxia; Chen, Yu; Qiu, Tingsheng

    2018-04-01

    As one of the most important water pollutants, ammonia nitrogen emissions have increased year by year, which has attracted people's attention. Catalytic ozonation technology, which involves production of ·OH radical with strong oxidation ability, is widely used in the treatment of organic-containing wastewater. In this work, MgO-Co 3 O 4 composite metal oxide catalysts prepared with different fabrication conditions have been systematically evaluated and compared in the catalytic ozonation of ammonia (50mg/L) in water. In terms of high catalytic activity in ammonia decomposition and high selectivity for gaseous nitrogen, the catalyst with MgO-Co 3 O 4 molar ratio 8:2, calcined at 500°C for 3hr, was the best one among the catalysts we tested, with an ammonia nitrogen removal rate of 85.2% and gaseous nitrogen selectivity of 44.8%. In addition, the reaction mechanism of ozonation oxidative decomposition of ammonia nitrogen in water with the metal oxide catalysts was discussed. Moreover, the effect of coexisting anions on the degradation of ammonia was studied, finding that SO 4 2- and HCO 3 - could inhibit the catalytic activity while CO 3 2- and Br - could promote it. The presence of coexisting cations had very little effect on the catalytic ozonation of ammonia nitrogen. After five successive reuses, the catalyst remained stable in the catalytic ozonation of ammonia. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. A consistent reaction scheme for the selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides with ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janssens, Ton V.W.; Falsig, Hanne; Lundegaard, Lars Fahl

    2015-01-01

    For the first time, the standard and fast selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3 are described in a complete catalytic cycle, that is able to produce the correct stoichiometry, while only allowing adsorption and desorption of stable molecules. The standard SCR reaction is a coupling of the ac...... for standard SCR. Finally, the role of a nitrate/nitrite equilibrium and the possible in uence of Cu dimers and Brønsted sites are discussed, and an explanation is offered as to how a catalyst can be effective for SCR, while being a poor catalyst for NO oxidation to NO2....... spectroscopy (FTIR). A consequence of the reaction scheme is that all intermediates in fast SCR are also part of the standard SCR cycle. The calculated activation energy by density functional theory (DFT) indicates that the oxidation of an NO molecule by O2 to a bidentate nitrate ligand is rate determining...

  16. Selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide by ammonia over Cu-exchanged Cuban natural zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno-Tost, Ramon; Santamaria-Gonzalez, Jose; Rodriguez-Castellon, Enrique; Jimenez-Lopez, Antonio [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Cristalografia y Mineralogia, Facultad de Ciencias, Unidad Asociada del Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica, CSIC, Universidad de Malaga, Campus de Teatinos, 29071 Malaga (Spain); Autie, Miguel A.; Glacial, Marisol Carreras [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas, Ciudad de la Habana, La Habana (Cuba); Gonzalez, Edel [Instituto Superior Pedagogico ' Enrique Jose Varona' , La Habana (Cuba); Pozas, Carlos De las [Centro de Gerencia de Programas y Proyectos Priorizados, La Habana (Cuba)

    2004-07-15

    The catalytic selective reduction of NO over Cu-exchanged natural zeolites (mordenite (MP) and clinoptilolite (HC)) from Cuba using NH{sub 3} as reducing agent and in the presence of excess oxygen was studied. Cu(II)-exchanged zeolites are very active catalysts, with conversions of NO of 95%, a high selectivity to N{sub 2} at low temperatures, and exhibiting good water tolerance. The chemical state of the Cu(II) in exchanged zeolites was characterized by H{sub 2}-TPR and XPS. Cu(II)-exchanged clinoptilolite underwent a severe deactivation in the presence of SO{sub 2}. However, Cu(II)-exchanged mordenite not only maintained its catalytic activity, but even showed a slight improvement after 20h of reaction in the presence of 100ppm of SO{sub 2}.

  17. Selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxide by ammonia over Cu-exchanged Cuban natural zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno-Tost, Ramon; Santamaria-Gonzalez, Jose; Rodriguez-Castellon, Enrique; Jimenez-Lopez, Antonio; Autie, Miguel A.; Glacial, Marisol Carreras; Gonzalez, Edel; Pozas, Carlos De las

    2004-01-01

    The catalytic selective reduction of NO over Cu-exchanged natural zeolites (mordenite (MP) and clinoptilolite (HC)) from Cuba using NH 3 as reducing agent and in the presence of excess oxygen was studied. Cu(II)-exchanged zeolites are very active catalysts, with conversions of NO of 95%, a high selectivity to N 2 at low temperatures, and exhibiting good water tolerance. The chemical state of the Cu(II) in exchanged zeolites was characterized by H 2 -TPR and XPS. Cu(II)-exchanged clinoptilolite underwent a severe deactivation in the presence of SO 2 . However, Cu(II)-exchanged mordenite not only maintained its catalytic activity, but even showed a slight improvement after 20h of reaction in the presence of 100ppm of SO 2

  18. Session 4: Combinatorial research of methane catalytic decomposition on supported nitride catalysts for CO-free hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jianghan, Shen; Hua, Wang; Zhongmin, Liu; Hongchao, Liu [Natural Gas Utilization and Applied Catalysis Lab., Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian P. R. (China)

    2004-07-01

    CO-free Hydrogen production is needed for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMs) because CO strongly poisons the anode-electrocatalysts. Methane directly catalytic decomposition is an attractive way to produce CO-free hydrogen for the large abundance of methane and its high H/C ratio. It is more effective to employ high-throughput screening (HTS) technology in heterogeneous catalysis. In this paper, a combinatorial multi-stream reaction system with online multi-stream mass spectrometer screening (MSMSS) detection technique was applied to study the decomposition of methane over supported MoN{sub x}O{sub y} catalysts (supports = Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiO{sub 2}, SBA-15, ZSM-5,13X, and NaY), which is a catalyst system seldom reported recently. (authors)

  19. Catalytic Decomposition of Hydroxylammonium Nitrate Ionic Liquid: Enhancement of NO Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-24

    9 any NO formation was attributed to its possible formation from decomposition of HNO2 or HNO3. The addition of acetate anion retarded HAN...Boatz, J. A.; Vaghjiani, G. L.; Koh, C.; Kostko, O.; Golan, A.; Leone, S. R. Thermal Decomposition of 1- Ethyl -3-methylimidazolium Bromide Ionic Liquid

  20. Catalytic hydrogen peroxide decomposition La1-xSrxCoO3-δ perovskite oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dam, T.V.A.; Olthuis, Wouter; Bergveld, Piet; van den Berg, Albert

    2005-01-01

    Lanthanide perovskite oxides are mentioned as material for hydrogen peroxide sensor because they can catalytically decompose hydrogen peroxide in an aqueous medium. The catalytic properties of these perovskite oxides to hydrogen peroxide are suggested due to their oxygen vacancies influenced by the

  1. Catalyst for Ammonia Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation, a method for producing a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation and a method for tuning the catalytic activity of a transition metal. By depositing an overlayer of less catalytic active metal onto a more catalytic...

  2. Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Beth A.

    2014-01-01

    A cornerstone of ecosystem ecology, decomposition was recognized as a fundamental process driving the exchange of energy in ecosystems by early ecologists such as Lindeman 1942 and Odum 1960). In the history of ecology, studies of decomposition were incorporated into the International Biological Program in the 1960s to compare the nature of organic matter breakdown in various ecosystem types. Such studies still have an important role in ecological studies of today. More recent refinements have brought debates on the relative role microbes, invertebrates and environment in the breakdown and release of carbon into the atmosphere, as well as how nutrient cycling, production and other ecosystem processes regulated by decomposition may shift with climate change. Therefore, this bibliography examines the primary literature related to organic matter breakdown, but it also explores topics in which decomposition plays a key supporting role including vegetation composition, latitudinal gradients, altered ecosystems, anthropogenic impacts, carbon storage, and climate change models. Knowledge of these topics is relevant to both the study of ecosystem ecology as well projections of future conditions for human societies.

  3. Preparation and catalytic activities of LaFeO3 and Fe2O3 for HMX thermal decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Zhi-Xian; Xu, Yan-Qing; Liu, Hai-Yan; Hu, Chang-Wen

    2009-06-15

    Perovskite-type LaFeO(3) and alpha-Fe(2)O(3) with high specific surface areas were directly prepared with appropriate stearic acid-nitrates ratios by a novel stearic acid solution combustion method. The obtained powders were characterized by XRD, FT-IR and XPS techniques. The catalytic activities of perovskite-type LaFeO(3) and alpha-Fe(2)O(3) for the thermal decomposition of octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX) were investigated by TG and TG-EGA techniques. The experimental results show that the catalytic activity of perovskite-type LaFeO(3) was much higher than that of alpha-Fe(2)O(3) because of higher concentration of surface-adsorbed oxygen (O(ad)) and hydroxyl of LaFeO(3). The study points out a potential way to develop new and more active perovskite-type catalysts for the HMX thermal decomposition.

  4. Catalytic Decomposition of 2,3-Dihydrobenzofuran to Monocyclic Compounds Over Palladium Catalysts Supported on Sulfonated Ordered Mesoporous Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Kwon; Park, Hai Woong; Hong, Ung Gi; Lee, Yoon Jae; Song, In Kyu

    2015-11-01

    Ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) was sulfonated at different temperature (OMC-SO3H-X, X = 125, 150, 175, 200, and 225 degrees C) in order to provide acid sites to OMC. Palladium catalysts were then supported on OMC-SO3H-X by an incipient wetness impregnation method for use in the catalytic decomposition of 2,3-dihydrobenzofuran to monocyclic compounds. 2,3-Dihydrobenzofuran was used as a lignin model compound for representing β-5 linkage of lignin. In the catalytic decomposition of 2,3-dihydrobenzofuran over Pd/OMC-SO3H-X, ethylcyclohexane and 2-ethlyphenol were mainly produced. Conversion of 2,3-dihydrobenzofuran and total yield for main products (ethylcyclohexane and 2-ethylphenol) were closely related to the acidity of the catalysts. Conversion of 2,3-dihydrobenzofuran and total. yield for main products increased with increasing acidity of Pd/OMC-SO3H-X catalysts. Among the catalysts tested, Pd/OMC-SO3H-150 with the largest acidity showed the highest conversion of 2,3-dihydrobenzofuran and the highest total yield for main products.

  5. Bimetallic Rh-Fe catalysts for N2O decomposition: effects of surface structures on catalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Lu, Qinghua; Yi, Chunhai; Yang, Bolun; Qi, Suitao

    2018-02-14

    Well-homogenized RhFe alloy nanoparticles and core-shell structured Fe@Rh nanoparticles were highly dispersed on SBA-15 and then applied to N 2 O catalytic conversion. Compared to RhFe/SBA-15, Fe@Rh/SBA-15 showed a higher catalytic activity for N 2 O decomposition. This is because the Rh layers covering the Fe core were able to protect against oxidization and so Fe@Rh/SBA-15 was prevented from deactivating. DFT calculations were performed to study the reaction mechanism of N 2 O decomposition. The rate-determining step, which was found to be the formation of O 2 from adsorbed oxygen atoms on the surfaces of RhFe and Fe@Rh, revealed that O atoms prefer to be adsorbed on exposed Fe atoms on the surface of RhFe rather than that of Fe@Rh. The calculation results indicate that the exposed Fe atoms tend to be oxidized on the surface of RhFe, resulting in the deactivation of RhFe/SBA-15 during the experiment.

  6. Solid state green synthesis and catalytic activity of CuO nanorods in thermal decomposition of potassium periodate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vinay Kumar; Bhattacharya, Shantanu

    2017-09-01

    The present study reports a facile solid state green synthesis process using the leaf extracts of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis to synthesize CuO nanorods with average diameters of 15-20 nm and lengths up to 100 nm. The as-synthesized CuO nanorods were characterized by x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. The formation mechanism of CuO nanorods has been explained by involving the individual role of amide I (amino groups) and carboxylate groups under excess hydroxyl ions released from NaOH. The catalytic activity of CuO nanorods in thermal decomposition of potassium periodate microparticles (µ-KIO4) microparticles was studied by thermo gravimetric analysis measurement. The original size (~100 µm) of commercially procured potassium periodate was reduced to microscale length scale to about one-tenth by PEG200 assisted emulsion process. The CuO nanorods prepared by solid state green route were found to catalyze the thermal decomposition of µ-KIO4 with a reduction of 18 °C in the final thermal decomposition temperature of potassium periodate.

  7. Catalytic non-thermal plasma reactor for the decomposition of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    better performance, probably due to the formation of active oxygen species by in situ decomposition of ozone on the catalyst surface. Water vapour further enhanced the performance due to the in situ formation of OH radicals. Keywords. ..... and Industrial Research (CSIR), India for the financial support. References. 1. Monks ...

  8. Fabrication, characterization and electrochemical performance of single strand carbon fiber prepared by catalytic chemical vapor decomposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Vrushali S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007, Maharashtra (India); Gokhale, Suresh P.; Patil, Kashinath R. [Physical and Material Chemistry Division, National Chemical Laboratory, Pune (India); Haram, Santosh K., E-mail: haram@chem.unipune.ernet.i [Department of Chemistry, University of Pune, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007, Maharashtra (India)

    2010-02-15

    Preparation, fabrication and voltammetric characterizations of a single strand of carbon fiber (SSCF) electrode and their potential applications for biosensor are presented. SSCFs of diameter ca. 10 +- 2 mum and few millimeters in length are prepared by catalytic chemical vapor decomposition (CCVD) method. Voltammetry with potassium ferricyanide, alpha-methylferrocene methanol and hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride on SSCF electrode are used as bench marks to validate the electrode properties. Quasi-steady state voltammograms obtained were fitted into a cylindrical diffusion model. From which, the standard rate constant (k{sup 0}) and electron transfer coefficient (alpha) are obtained. The use of SSCF electrode is demonstrated for the voltammetric detection of the micromolar quantity of dopamine in the presence of large excess (ca. 200 times) of ascorbic acid, without any fouling of electrode surface. The kinetics of electron transfer are investigated.

  9. Fabrication, characterization and electrochemical performance of single strand carbon fiber prepared by catalytic chemical vapor decomposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, Vrushali S.; Gokhale, Suresh P.; Patil, Kashinath R.; Haram, Santosh K.

    2010-01-01

    Preparation, fabrication and voltammetric characterizations of a single strand of carbon fiber (SSCF) electrode and their potential applications for biosensor are presented. SSCFs of diameter ca. 10 ± 2 μm and few millimeters in length are prepared by catalytic chemical vapor decomposition (CCVD) method. Voltammetry with potassium ferricyanide, α-methylferrocene methanol and hexaammineruthenium(III) chloride on SSCF electrode are used as bench marks to validate the electrode properties. Quasi-steady state voltammograms obtained were fitted into a cylindrical diffusion model. From which, the standard rate constant (k 0 ) and electron transfer coefficient (α) are obtained. The use of SSCF electrode is demonstrated for the voltammetric detection of the micromolar quantity of dopamine in the presence of large excess (ca. 200 times) of ascorbic acid, without any fouling of electrode surface. The kinetics of electron transfer are investigated.

  10. Controllable pneumatic generator based on the catalytic decomposition of hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Rok; Kim, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Soohyun

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a novel compact and controllable pneumatic generator that uses hydrogen peroxide decomposition. A fuel micro-injector using a piston-pump mechanism is devised and tested to control the chemical decomposition rate. By controlling the injection rate, the feedback controller maintains the pressure of the gas reservoir at a desired pressure level. Thermodynamic analysis and experiments are performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed pneumatic generator. Using a prototype of the pneumatic generator, it takes 6 s to reach 3.5 bars with a reservoir volume of 200 ml at the room temperature, which is sufficiently rapid and effective to maintain the repetitive lifting of a 1 kg mass.

  11. Preparation of magnetic Ni-P amorphous alloy microspheres and their catalytic performance towards thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yi; Yang, Yuanyi; Ge, Liya; Yang, Weizhong; Xie, Kenan

    2017-12-01

    In this work, a series of amorphous Ni-P alloys with diverse microspheric structures and magnetic properties were successfully prepared through a facile aqueous solution reduction using sodium hypophosphite as reducing agent with the assistance of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and laser particle size analysis were used to investigate the structure of Ni-P alloy particles, which demonstrated that the as-prepared alloys possessed spherical morphologies and tunable compositions. We investigated the effects of the synthesis conditions including reaction temperature, initial Ni2+ concentration, pH value, and surfactant type on the morphologies and chemical constitutes of Ni-P alloy particles. Compared with other microsphere counterparts (ferromagnetism), the spherical Ni-P alloy powders with diameter of about 500 nm exhibited apparent paramagnetism. In addition, the catalytic performance of the products on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) was further investigated via thermogravimetric analysis (TG) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). These Ni-P noncrystalline alloy particles with different magnetic properties and good catalytic activities would broaden the technological and industrial applications of Ni-P alloys in petrochemical reaction, soft magnetic devices, and burning rate catalysts.

  12. A study of the effect of gamma radiation and doping on the catalytic activity of some oxides in the decomposition of hydrogen per-oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousa, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The rates of hydrogen peroxide decomposition on pure, doped and gamma-irradiated oxides Chromium oxide, Cobalt oxide, Magnesium oxide Nickel oxide, Ferric oxide, Magnesium ferri oxide were measured in a temperature range of 25-40 degree centigrade. It was found that lattice defect induced by doping and gamma-irradiation affect the catalytic properties of the oxides, either by activation or deactivation. The correlation between the catalytic activity for the hydrogen peroxide decomposition and the electronic defects produced by doping and by gamma-irradiation in the oxides is dicussed. Generally, it was found that the p-type semiconductor oxides are more active towards hydrogen peroxide decomposition than the n-type semiconductor oxides. (orig./A.B.)

  13. SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION (SCR OF NO BY AMMONIA OVER V2O5/TiO2 CATALYST IN A CATALYTIC FILTER MEDIUM AND HONEYCOMB REACTOR: A KINETIC MODELING STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nahavandi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The present study addresses a numerical modeling and simulation based on the available knowledge of SCR kinetics for prediction of NO conversion over a V2O3/TiO3 catalyst through a catalytic filter medium and honeycomb reactor. After introducing the NH3-SCR system with specific operational criteria, a reactor model was developed to evaluate the effect of various operating parameters such as flue gas temperature, velocity, NH3/NO molar ratio, etc., on the SCR process. Computational investigations were performed based on the proposed model and optimum operational conditions were identified. Simulation results indicate that SCR performance is substantially under the effects of reactant concentration and operating temperature, so that the concentration of unreacted ammonia emitted from reactor discharge (ammonia slip increases significantly at NH3/NO ratios of more than 1.14 and operating temperatures less than 360 ºC and 300 ºC, respectively, in the catalytic filter medium and honeycomb reactor. The results also show that there are three sections in NO conversion variation versus changing temperature and the required conversion with a maximum of almost 87% and low level of ammonia slip can be achieved at the NH3/NO ratio of 1 and temperature range of 240–360 ºC in both reactors.

  14. COx Free Hydrogen Production by Catalytic Decomposition of Methane Over Porous Ni/Al2O3 Catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makvandi, S.; Alavi, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    The prepared meso porous spherical alumina with high-surface area was employed as a support for nickel catalysts in methane decomposition reaction. It was observed that, the catalytic activity of Ni/Al 2 O 3 catalysts was high at the initial times of reaction and decreased with time on stream, and finally reached a constant value. The deactivation rate of catalysts is dependent on the catalyst characteristics and the operating conditions. The activity results indicate that, the yield of hydrogen and the structure of deposited carbon are strongly dependent on the loading amount of Ni. The Scanning Electron Microscopy results showed that carbon formed on the catalysts in the form of filamentous carbon. Concerning hydrogen production, the 10% Ni/ Al 2 O 3 catalyst leads to a higher yield, due to the higher amount of active phases which can catalyze further the number of methane molecules, while lesser amounts of filamentous carbon were observed on this catalyst than for 5 and 7.5% Ni/ Al 2 O 3 catalysts at the same operating condition. The yield of hydrogen and structure of filamentous carbon also significantly depend on the reaction temperatures and residence time of gas in the reactor, as the 10% Ni/ Al 2 O 3 catalyst showed a remarkable stability with a decrease of about 14% at 800 d egree C and 25 ml/min after 240 min of reaction. The obtained results showed that the prepared Ni/ Al 2 O 3 catalysts had a good activity in methane decomposition reaction, which is one of the highest activities among those for low nickel loaded catalysts reported up until now.

  15. Supported rhodium catalysts for ammonia-borane hydrolysis. Dependence of the catalytic activity on the highest occupied state of the single rhodium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Liangbing; Li, Hongliang; Zhang, Wenbo; Zhao, Xiao; Qiu, Jianxiang; Li, Aowen; Zheng, Xusheng; Zeng, Jie [Hefei National Lab. for Physical Sciences at the Microscale, Key Lab. of Strongly-Coupled Quantum Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui(China); Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui (China); Hu, Zhenpeng [School of Physics, Nankai University, Tianjin (China); Si, Rui [Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2017-04-18

    Supported metal nanocrystals have exhibited remarkable catalytic performance in hydrogen generation reactions, which is influenced and even determined by their supports. Accordingly, it is of fundamental importance to determine the direct relationship between catalytic performance and metal-support interactions. Herein, we provide a quantitative profile for exploring metal-support interactions by considering the highest occupied state in single-atom catalysts. The catalyst studied consisted of isolated Rh atoms dispersed on the surface of VO{sub 2} nanorods. It was observed that the activation energy of ammonia-borane hydrolysis changed when the substrate underwent a phase transition. Mechanistic studies indicate that the catalytic performance depended directly on the highest occupied state of the single Rh atoms, which was determined by the band structure of the substrates. Other metal catalysts, even with non-noble metals, that exhibited significant catalytic activity towards NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} hydrolysis were rationally designed by adjusting their highest occupied states. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Conformity of macroscopic behavior to local properties in the catalytic ammonia synthesis and oscillatory reactions on metal surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Cholach, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Unique catalytic potential of metal surfaces has encouraged a great number of basic and applied studies. The manuscript highlights the general regularities in a field on the grounds of strong interrelation between catalytic, kinetic and thermodynamic behaviour of the reaction system. The trials of the catalytic NH3 synthesis and the oscillatory NO+H2 reaction have revealed that the thermodynamics of the local structure determines the properties and multiplicity of the reaction intermediates e...

  17. Catalytic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Hanafi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A series of dealuminated Y-zeolites impregnated by 0.5 wt% Pt catalysts promoted by different amounts of Ni, Pd or Cr (0.3 and 0.6 wt% were prepared and characterized as hydrocracking catalysts. The physicochemical and structural characterization of the solid catalysts were investigated and reported through N2 physisorption, XRD, TGA-DSC, FT-IR and TEM techniques. Solid catalysts surface acidities were investigated through FT-IR spectroscopy aided by pyridine adsorption. The solid catalytic activities were evaluated through hydroconversion of n-hexane and n-heptane employing micro-catalytic pulse technique directly connected to a gas chromatograph analyzer. The thermal stability of the solids was also investigated up to 800 °C. Crystallinity studies using the XRD technique of all modified samples proved analogous to the parent Y-zeolite, exhibiting nearly an amorphous and microcrystalline character of the second metal oxides. Disclosure of bimetallic catalysts crystalline characterization, through XRD, was not viable. The nitrogen adsorption–desorption isotherms for all samples concluded type I adsorption isotherms, without any hysteresis loop, indicating that the entire pore system is composed of micropores. TEM micrographs of the solid catalysts demonstrate well-dispersed Pt, Ni and Cr nanoparticles having sizes of 2–4 nm and 7–8 nm, respectively. The catalytic activity results indicate that the bimetallic (0.5Pt–0.3Cr/D18H–Y catalyst is the most active towards n-hexane and n-heptane isomerization while (0.5Pt–0.6Ni/D18H–Y catalyst can be designed as most suitable as a cracking catalyst.

  18. Carbon-free H2production from ammonia triggered at room temperature with an acidic RuO2/γ-Al2O3catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Katsutoshi; Eboshi, Takaaki; Takeishi, Yuma; Tasaki, Ryo; Honda, Kyoko; Imamura, Kazuya; Sato, Katsutoshi

    2017-04-01

    Ammonia has been suggested as a carbon-free hydrogen source, but a convenient method for producing hydrogen from ammonia with rapid initiation has not been developed. Ideally, this method would require no external energy input. We demonstrate hydrogen production by exposing ammonia and O 2 at room temperature to an acidic RuO 2 /γ-Al 2 O 3 catalyst. Because adsorption of ammonia onto the catalyst is exothermic, the catalyst bed is rapidly heated to the catalytic ammonia autoignition temperature, and subsequent oxidative decomposition of ammonia produces hydrogen. A differential calorimeter combined with a volumetric gas adsorption analyzer revealed a large quantity of heat evolved both with chemisorption of ammonia onto RuO 2 and acidic sites on the γ-Al 2 O 3 and with physisorption of multiple ammonia molecules.

  19. In situ formed catalytically active ruthenium nanocatalyst in room temperature dehydrogenation/dehydrocoupling of ammonia-borane from Ru(cod)(cot) precatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahmakiran, Mehmet; Ayvalı, Tuğçe; Philippot, Karine

    2012-03-20

    The development of simply prepared and effective catalytic materials for dehydrocoupling/dehydrogenation of ammonia-borane (AB; NH(3)BH(3)) under mild conditions remains a challenge in the field of hydrogen economy and material science. Reported herein is the discovery of in situ generated ruthenium nanocatalyst as a new catalytic system for this important reaction. They are formed in situ during the dehydrogenation of AB in THF at 25 °C in the absence of any stabilizing agent starting with homogeneous Ru(cod)(cot) precatalyst (cod = 1,5-η(2)-cyclooctadiene; cot = 1,3,5-η(3)-cyclooctatriene). The preliminary characterization of the reaction solutions and the products was done by using ICP-OES, ATR-IR, TEM, XPS, ZC-TEM, GC, EA, and (11)B, (15)N, and (1)H NMR, which reveal that ruthenium nanocatalyst is generated in situ during the dehydrogenation of AB from homogeneous Ru(cod)(cot) precatalyst and B-N polymers formed at the initial stage of the catalytic reaction take part in the stabilization of this ruthenium nanocatalyst. Moreover, following the recently updated approach (Bayram, E.; et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc.2011, 133, 18889) by performing Hg(0), CS(2) poisoning experiments, nanofiltration, time-dependent TEM analyses, and kinetic investigation of active catalyst formation to distinguish single metal or in the present case subnanometer Ru(n) cluster-based catalysis from polymetallic Ru(0)(n) nanoparticle catalysis reveals that in situ formed Ru(n) clusters (not Ru(0)(n) nanoparticles) are kinetically dominant catalytically active species in our catalytic system. The resulting ruthenium catalyst provides 120 total turnovers over 5 h with an initial turnover frequency (TOF) value of 35 h(-1) at room temperature with the generation of more than 1.0 equiv H(2) at the complete conversion of AB to polyaminoborane (PAB; [NH(2)BH(2)](n)) and polyborazylene (PB; [NHBH](n)) units.

  20. Spectroscopic study of nitrogen distribution in N-doped carbon nanotubes and nanofibers synthesized by catalytic ethylene-ammonia decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svintsitskiy, Dmitry A.; Kibis, Lidiya S.; Smirnov, Dmitry A.; Suboch, Arina N.; Stonkus, Olga A.; Podyacheva, Olga Yu.; Boronin, Andrei I.; Ismagilov, Zinfer R.

    2018-03-01

    Carbon and nitrogen species on the surface of carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) and nanofibers (N-CNFs) were studied by X-ray absorption (XAS) and photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) including the analysis of nitrogen distribution over the depth of materials. The study was performed with a series of bamboo-like carbon nanotubes and nanofibers having the platelet-like and herringbone-like morphology. It was shown that the main nitrogen species in the composition of the studied materials are pyridine, pyrrole (and/or amino groups), graphite-like and oxidized states of nitrogen. In distinction to nanofibers, the bamboo-like nanotubes additionally contain molecular nitrogen encapsulated in the internal hollows. Spectral data for different depths of analysis were obtained by varying the energy of incident radiation. Such an approach revealed that N-CNTs are characterized by non-uniform distribution of chemically bound nitrogen species. Thus, nitrogen enrichment was observed on the external surface and in the internal arches of carbon nanotubes. Nitrogen enrichment in the subsurface region was found for N-CNFs, whereas the full depth analysis of N-distribution was limited by a large diameter of nanofibers.

  1. Preparation of CoFeO Nanocrystallites by Solvothermal Process and Its Catalytic Activity on the Thermal Decomposition of Ammonium Perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shusen Zhao

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanometer cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4 was synthesized by polyol-medium solvothermal method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and selected area electron diffraction (SAED. Further, the catalytic activity and kinetic parameters of CoFe2O4 nanocrystallites on the thermal decomposition behavior of ammonium perchlorate (AP have been investigated by thermogravimetry and differential scanning calorimetry analysis (TG-DSC. The results imply that the catalytic performance of CoFe2O4 nanocrystallites is significant and the decrease in the activation energy and the increase in the rate constant for AP further confirm the enhancement in catalytic activity of CoFe2O4 nanocrystallites. A mechanism based on an proton transfer process has also been proposed for AP in the presence of CoFe2O4 nanocrystallites.

  2. The decomposition of mixed oxide Ag2Cu2O3: Structural features and the catalytic properties in CO and C2H4 oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svintsitskiy, Dmitry A.; Kardash, Tatyana Yu.; Slavinskaya, Elena M.; Stonkus, Olga A.; Koscheev, Sergei V.; Boronin, Andrei I.

    2018-01-01

    The mixed silver-copper oxide Ag2Cu2O3 with a paramelaconite crystal structure is a promising material for catalytic applications. The as-prepared sample of Ag2Cu2O3 consisted of brick-like particles extended along the [001] direction. A combination of physicochemical techniques such as TEM, XPS and XRD was applied to investigate the structural features of this mixed silver-copper oxide. The thermal stability of Ag2Cu2O3 was investigated using in situ XRD under different reaction conditions, including a catalytic CO + O2 mixture. The first step of Ag2Cu2O3 decomposition was accompanied by the appearance of ensembles consisting of silver nanoparticles with sizes of 5-15 nm. Silver nanoparticles were strongly oriented to each other and to the surface of the initial Ag2Cu2O3 bricks. Based on the XRD data, it was shown that the release of silver occurred along the a and b axes of the paramelaconite structure. Partial decomposition of Ag2Cu2O3 accompanied by the formation of silver nanoparticles was observed during prolonged air storage under ambient conditions. The high reactivity is discussed as a reason for spontaneous decomposition during Ag2Cu2O3 storage. The full decomposition of the mixed oxide into metallic silver and copper (II) oxide took place at temperatures higher than 300 °C regardless of the nature of the reaction medium (helium, air, CO + O2). Catalytic properties of partially and fully decomposed samples of mixed silver-copper oxide were measured in low-temperature CO oxidation and C2H4 epoxidation reactions.

  3. Influence of preparation conditions of hollow silica–nickel composite spheres on their catalytic activity for hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umegaki, Tetsuo, E-mail: umegaki.tetsuo@nihon-u.ac.jp [Department of Materials and Applied Chemistry, College of Science and Engineering, Nihon University, 1-8-14, Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-Ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Seki, Ayano [Department of Materials and Applied Chemistry, College of Science and Engineering, Nihon University, 1-8-14, Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-Ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Xu, Qiang [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-8-31 Midorigaoka, Ikeda, Osaka 563-8577 (Japan); Kojima, Yoshiyuki [Department of Materials and Applied Chemistry, College of Science and Engineering, Nihon University, 1-8-14, Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-Ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan)

    2014-03-05

    Highlights: • We study influence of preparation conditions on activity of hollow silica–nickel composite spheres. • The activity for hydrolytic dehydrogenation of NH{sub 3}BH{sub 3} increases with increase of Si+Ni content. • The particle size distribution affects the activity and reducibility of active nickel species. • The amount of PS residue in the hollow spheres decreases by treatment of as-prepared sample in toluene. -- Abstract: In this paper, we investigated influence of preparation conditions of hollow silica–nickel composite spheres on their morphology and catalytic activity for hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane. In the preparation method of this study, when silica–nickel composite shells were coated on polystyrene templates by the sol–gel method using L(+)-arginine as the promoter for the reaction to form silica–nickel composite shell, the polystyrene templates were dissolved subsequently, even synchronously, in the same medium to form hollow spheres. The as-prepared silica–nickel composite spheres were characterized by transmission electron microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The effects of Si+Ni content on the morphology were systematically evaluated. All the as-prepared hollow silica–nickel composite spheres have the similar morphology as identified by SEM and TEM measurement. Homogeneity of the hollow silica–nickel composite spheres increases with the increase in the Si+Ni content as shown by the laser diffraction particle size analysis. The catalytic activities of the hollow silica–nickel composite spheres for hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane prepared with different Si+Ni contents were compared. The catalytic activity for the hydrogen evolution in the presence of the hollow spheres increases with the increase of Si+Ni content. The results of FTIR spectra of the hollow silica–nickel composite spheres indicate that a certain amount of residual PS templates exists in hollow silica

  4. Macrodynamic study and catalytic reduction of NO by ammonia under mild conditions over Pt-La-Ce-O/Al2O3 catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Yanhui; Zhu, Jingli; Ma, Runyu

    2007-01-01

    Catalytic reduction of NO using ammonia upon series prepared catalysts under 423-573 K in a fixed bed reactor was investigated. Results showed that the performance of supported platinum catalyst could be improved by addition of La and Ce to it. Experimental studies indicated that the suitable molar ratio of Pt:La:Ce would be 1.0:3.78:3.56, Pt-La-Ce (c). Results also found Pt-La-Ce (c) catalyst had good stability and tolerance to certain amounts of sulfur compounds under the used experimental conditions. Characterization for the fresh and used catalysts showed the Pt-La-Ce (c) catalyst had a stable structure. In addition, based on experimental data and using a nonlinear regression algorithm method, an empirical macrodynamic equation was obtained in this study

  5. Experimental investigation of the catalytic decomposition and combustion characteristics of a non-toxic ammonium dinitramide (ADN)-based monopropellant thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Li, Guoxiu; Zhang, Tao; Wang, Meng; Yu, Yusong

    2016-12-01

    Low toxicity ammonium dinitramide (ADN)-based aerospace propulsion systems currently show promise with regard to applications such as controlling satellite attitude. In the present work, the decomposition and combustion processes of an ADN-based monopropellant thruster were systematically studied, using a thermally stable catalyst to promote the decomposition reaction. The performance of the ADN propulsion system was investigated using a ground test system under vacuum, and the physical properties of the ADN-based propellant were also examined. Using this system, the effects of the preheating temperature and feed pressure on the combustion characteristics and thruster performance during steady state operation were observed. The results indicate that the propellant and catalyst employed during this work, as well as the design and manufacture of the thruster, met performance requirements. Moreover, the 1 N ADN thruster generated a specific impulse of 223 s, demonstrating the efficacy of the new catalyst. The thruster operational parameters (specifically, the preheating temperature and feed pressure) were found to have a significant effect on the decomposition and combustion processes within the thruster, and the performance of the thruster was demonstrated to improve at higher feed pressures and elevated preheating temperatures. A lower temperature of 140 °C was determined to activate the catalytic decomposition and combustion processes more effectively compared with the results obtained using other conditions. The data obtained in this study should be beneficial to future systematic and in-depth investigations of the combustion mechanism and characteristics within an ADN thruster.

  6. Catalytic Hydrogenation of Carbon Dioxide with Ammonia-Borane by Pincer-type Phosphorus Compound: A Theoretical Prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Guixiang; Maeda, Satoshi; Taketsugu, Tetsuya; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi

    2016-10-01

    Theoretically designed pincer-type phosphorus compound is found to be active for the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) with ammonia-borane. DFT, ONIOM(CCSD(T):MP2), and CCSD(T) computational results demonstrated that the reaction occurs through the phosphorus-ligand cooperative catalysis function, which provides an unprecedented protocol for metal-free CO 2 conversion. The phosphorus compounds with the NNN ligand are more active than those with the ONO ligand. The conjugate and planar ligand considerably improves the efficiency of the catalyst.

  7. Catalytic decomposition of N2O over CeO2 supported Co3O4 catalysts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. This work was aimed to design efficient catalysts for N2O decomposition at low temperatures. Cobalt oxide (Co3O4) was prepared by hydrothermal, precipitation and combustion methods and tested for. N2O decomposition. It was found that the catalysts prepared by solution combustion synthesis were most active.

  8. Advantages of Stainless Steel Sieves as Support for Catalytic N2O Decomposition over K-doped Co3O4.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klyushina, A.; Pacultová, K.; Krejčová, S.; Slowik, G.; Jirátová, Květa; Kovanda, F.; Ryczkowski, J.; Obalová, L.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 257, Part 1 (2015), s. 2-10 ISSN 0920-5861. [AWPAC2014 - International Symposium on Air & Water Pollution Abatement Catalysis. Krakow, 01.09.2014-05.09.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-13750S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : N2O catalytic decomposition * Co3O4 * stainless steel support * potassium promoter * TiO2 support Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 4.312, year: 2015

  9. Design and assembly of a catalyst bed gas generator for the catalytic decomposition of high concentration hydrogen peroxide propellants and the catalytic combustion of hydrocarbon/air mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohner, Kevin A. (Inventor); Mays, Jeffrey A. (Inventor); Sevener, Kathleen M. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method for designing and assembling a high performance catalyst bed gas generator for use in decomposing propellants, particularly hydrogen peroxide propellants, for use in target, space, and on-orbit propulsion systems and low-emission terrestrial power and gas generation. The gas generator utilizes a sectioned catalyst bed system, and incorporates a robust, high temperature mixed metal oxide catalyst. The gas generator requires no special preheat apparatus or special sequencing to meet start-up requirements, enabling a fast overall response time. The high performance catalyst bed gas generator system has consistently demonstrated high decomposition efficiency, extremely low decomposition roughness, and long operating life on multiple test articles.

  10. MOF-derived hollow NiO-ZnO composite micropolyhedra and their application in catalytic thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ji-Min

    2017-07-01

    Ni(II)-doped Zn-based coordination polymer particles (Ni(II)-doped Zn-CPPs) with controllable shape and size were successfully synthesized by solvothermal method, which further transformed to porous ZnO-NiO composite micropolyhedra without significant alterations in shape by calcination in air. Those products were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and gas adsorption measurements. The catalytic activity of ZnO-NiO composites for the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP) was investigated. The result shows that all ZnO-NiO composites efficiently catalyzed the thermal decomposition of AP, and NiO-ZnO composite hollow octahedrons have the highest catalytic efficiency compared with that of most materials reported to now, indicating that porous ZnO-NiO composite micropolyhedra could be a promising candidate material for application in AP-based propellant.

  11. Ammonia generators for GD-KAT (advanced SCR) systems; Ammoniakgeneratoren fuer GD-KAT-Systeme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, E. [MAN Nutzfahrzeuge AG, Nuernberg (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Catalyzed thermal decomposition of aqueous solution of urea (AdBlue) or solid urea is the preferred way to generate the reducing agent ammonia, NH{sub 3}, for selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO{sub x} in the diesel engine exhaust gas. Various types of decomposition reactors, called ammonia generators, are possible which differ in their effectiveness to produce ammonia from urea. For reasons of simplicity, the decomposition is usually performed by atomizing AdBlue directly into the hot exhaust. However, this technique suffers from high space velocities (SV), leading to incomplete vaporization of water and only slight decomposition into NH{sub 3} and HNCO and causing a significant performance loss of the SCR catalyst. The catalyzed thermohydrolysis out of the main exhaust stream allows much decreased SV for the urea decomposition. A catalytic reactor utilizing a partial or an auxilliary (for solid urea only) stream of the exhaust gas seems particularly promising, leading to NH{sub 3} practically free from HNCO. (orig.)

  12. Oxygen vacancies enabled enhancement of catalytic property of Al reduced anatase TiO{sub 2} in the decomposition of high concentration ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yanhua; Zhang, Xiaolei [Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 200235 (China); Chen, Li [East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Wang, Xiaorui [Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 200235 (China); Zhang, Na, E-mail: nzhang@sit.edu.cn [Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 200235 (China); Liu, Yufeng [Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 200235 (China); Fang, Yongzheng, E-mail: fyz1003@sina.com [Shanghai Institute of Technology, Shanghai 200235 (China)

    2017-06-15

    The catalytic decomposition of gaseous ozone (O{sub 3}) is investigated using anatase TiO{sub 2} (A-TiO{sub 2}) and Aluminum-reduced A-TiO{sub 2} (ARA-TiO{sub 2}) at high concentration and high relative humidity (RH) without light illumination. Compared with the pristine A-TiO{sub 2}, the ARA-TiO{sub 2} sample possesses a unique crystalline core-amorphous shell structure. It is proved to be an excellent solar energy “capture” for solar thermal collectors due to lots of oxygen vacancies. The results indicate that the overall decomposition efficiency of O{sub 3} without any light irradiation has been greatly improved from 4.8% on A-TiO{sub 2} to 100% on ARA-TiO{sub 2} under the RH=100% condition. The ozone conversion over T500/ARA-TiO{sub 2} catalyst is still maintained at 95% after a 72 h test under the reaction condition of 18.5 g/m{sup 3} ozone initial concentration, and RH=90%. The results can be explained that T500/ARA-TiO{sub 2} possesses the largest amorphous contour, the lowest crystallinity, the most surface-active Ti{sup 3+}/T{sup i4+}couples, and the most oxygen vacancies. This result opens a new door to widen the application of TiO{sub 2} in the thermal-catalytic field. - Graphical abstract: The anatase-TiO{sub 2} with various oxidation states and oxygen vacancies have been obtained by aluminum-reduction, and the decomposition efficiency of O{sub 3} has been greatly improved from 4.8% to 100% without irradiation under the RH=100% condition. - Highlights: • The decomposition of gaseous ozone over Al reduced TiO2 (ARA-TiO{sub 2}) is firstly reported. • The decomposition efficiency is up to 100% without any light irradiation on ARA-TiO{sub 2} under RH=100% condition. • The ozone conversion is maintained at 95% after a 72 h test, when C{sub inlet}=18.5 g/m{sup 3} and RH=90%.

  13. Fabrication of porous MgCo2O4 with rod-like morphology and its superb catalytic activity towards ammonium perchlorate thermal decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Liu, Xiaoli; Bai, Weiyang

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, porous MgCo2O4 with rod-like morphology was successfully synthesized through the thermal treatment of metal oxalates precursor originated by the reaction of metal sulfates and oxalic acid, without the addition of other additives. The porous rod-like MgCo2O4, with a diameter of several hundred nanometers and a length of several micrometers, was formed through the agglomeration of numerous crystalline grains sized in 10–25 nm. Its catalytic effect on ammonium perchlorate (AP) thermal decomposition was evaluated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) techniques. It was found that the pyrolysis temperature of AP reduced by 129 °C and the heat release increased more than 3.19-fold with a 2 wt% addition of MgCo2O4. Meanwhile, the addition of MgCo2O4 resulted in an AP decomposition activation energy reduction from 216 kJ mol‑1 to 155 kJ mol‑1, calculated using the Kissinger correlation. This study provides new insights into the design and development of high performance catalysts for AP thermal decomposition.

  14. Synthesis and kinetics investigation of meso-microporous Cu-SAPO-34 catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of NO with ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jixing; Yu, Fuhong; Liu, Jian; Cui, Lifeng; Zhao, Zhen; Wei, Yuechang; Sun, Qianyao

    2016-10-01

    A series of meso-microporous Cu-SAPO-34 catalysts were successfully synthesized by a one-pot hydrothermal crystallization method, and these catalysts exhibited excellent NH 3 -SCR performance at low temperature. Their structure and physic chemical properties were characterized by means of X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N 2 sorption-desorption, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission spectrometer (ICP-AES), X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XPS), Temperature-programmed desorption of ammonia (NH 3 -TPD), Ultraviolet visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-Vis DRS) and Temperature programmed reduction (TPR). The analysis results indicate that the high activities of Cu-SAPO-34 catalysts could be attributed to the enhancement of redox property, the formation of mesopores and the more acid sites. Furthermore, the kinetic results verify that the formation of mesopores remarkably reduces diffusion resistance and then improves the accessibility of reactants to catalytically active sites. The 1.0-Cu-SAPO-34 catalyst exhibited the high NO conversion (>90%) among the wide activity temperature window in the range of 150-425°C. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Effect of L-arginine on the catalytic activity and stability of nickel nanoparticles for hydrolytic dehydrogenation of ammonia borane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umegaki, Tetsuo; Xu, Qiang; Kojima, Yoshiyuki

    2012-10-01

    Amorphous nickel catalysts were synthesized by reducing the nickel(II) species in an aqueous NaBH4/NH3BH3 solution with and without L-arginine. The nickel catalyst with L-arginine maintains relatively high activity for hydrolysis of NH3BH3 to generate a stoichiometric amount of hydrogen with the cycle number up to 11 (827 mL s-1 (mol-Ni)-1 at the 11th cycle with L-arginine = 35 mg), while the reaction rate in the presence of the bare nickel catalyst was relatively low through the cycle number up to 11 (232 mL s-1 (mol-Ni)-1 at the 11th cycle). After catalytic reaction, the nickel catalyst with L-arginine possesses the high dispersion (diameters of nickel nanoparticles L-arginine maintains the dispersion of nickel nanoparticles (diameters of nickel nanoparticles <10 nm), leading to higher activity against cycle tests than the bare nickel catalyst.

  16. Catalytic Activity of Cobalt Grafted on Ordered Mesoporous Silica Materials in N2O Decomposition and CO Oxidation.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kuboňová, L.; Peikertová, P.; Mamulová Kutláková, K.; Jirátová, Květa; Słowik, G.; Obalová, L.; Cool, P.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 437, AUG 2017 (2017), s. 57-72 ISSN 2468-8231 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-13750S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : mesoporous ordered silica * cobalt * N2O decomposition Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering OBOR OECD: Chemical process engineering

  17. Effect of Preparation Method on Catalytic Properties of Co-Mn-Al Mixed Oxides for N2O Decomposition.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klyushina, A.; Pacultová, K.; Karásková, K.; Jirátová, Květa; Ritz, M.; Fridrichová, D.; Volodorskaja, A.; Obalová, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 425, DEC 15 (2016), s. 237-247 ISSN 1381-1169 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-13750S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : Co-Mn-Al mixed oxide * N2O decomposition * preparation methods Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 4.211, year: 2016

  18. Proton-conducting fuel cells operating on hydrogen, ammonia and hydrazine at intermediate temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Ye; Ran, Ran; Guo, Youmin; Zhou, Wei; Cai, Rui; Wang, Jun; Shao, Zongping [State Key Laboratory of Materials-Oriented Chemical Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, No.5 Xin Mofan Road, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2010-04-15

    Anode-supported proton-conducting fuel cell with BaZr{sub 0.1}Ce{sub 0.7}Y{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} (BZCY) electrolyte and Ba{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3-{delta}} (BSCF) cathode was fabricated. Peak power densities of {proportional_to}420 and 135 mW/cm{sup 2} were achieved, respectively, at 700 and 450 C for a cell with 35 {mu}m thick electrolyte operating on hydrogen fuel. The endothermic nature of the ammonia decomposition reaction, however, resulted in cell temperature 30-65 C lower than the furnace when operating on ammonia. Accounting the cooling effect, comparable power density was achieved for the cell operating on ammonia and hydrogen at high temperature. At reduced temperature, the cell demonstrated worse performance when operating on ammonia than on hydrogen due to the poor activity of the anode towards NH{sub 3} catalytic decomposition. By applying on-line catalytic decomposition products of N{sub 2}H{sub 4} as the fuel, similar cell performance to that with NH{sub 3} fuel was also observed. (author)

  19. Catalytic Decomposition of Nitrous Oxide over Catalysts Prepared from Co/Mg-Mn/Al Hydrotalcite-like Compounds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Obalová, L.; Jirátová, Květa; Kovanda, F.; Pacultová, K.; Lacný, Z.; Mikulová, Zuzana

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 60, 3-4 (2005), s. 289-297 ISSN 0926-3373 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/05/0366; GA ČR(CZ) GA104/04/2116; GA ČR(CZ) GA106/02/0523 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : decomposition of nitrous oxide * hydrotalcite-like compounds Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.809, year: 2005

  20. Effect of Precursor Synthesis on Catalytic Activity of Co3O4 in N2O Decomposition.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chromčáková, Ž.; Obalová, L.; Kovanda, F.; Legut, D.; Titov, A.; Ritz, M.; Fridrichová, D.; Michalik, S.; Kustrowski, P.; Jirátová, Květa

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 257, Part 1 (2015), s. 18-25 ISSN 0920-5861. [AWPAC2014 - International Symposium on Air & Water Pollution Abatement Catalysis. Krakow, 01.09.2014-05.09.2014] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-13750S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : cobalt spinel * Co3O4 * N2O decomposition * precursor synthesis Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 4.312, year: 2015

  1. Basic research for nuclear energy : a study on photo-catalytic decomposition reactions of organics dissolved in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, K. W.; Na, J. W.; Cho, Y. H.; Kim, K. R.

    1999-01-01

    In an experiment on TiO 2 photo-catalysis of five nitrogen-containing organic compounds, the changes of pH and total carbon contents were measured, and the dependence of their photo-catalytic characteristic upon their chemical structures were investigated. -- calculation of the effect of ionic carbon species in an aqueous solution on thermodynamic equilibrium, pH and conductivity showed a small quantity of organics could lead conductivity increase and pH reduction. -- Based on the results of photo-catalytic experiment of ethylamine, phenylhydrazine, pyridine, urea or EDTA, irradiated for 180 minutes after adsorption onto titanium dioxide for 60 minutes, relationship between nitrogen atomic charge and the first-order rate constant was as the following: R (1st - order rate constant) = δ (ε - a ) 1/3 + b where, ε : atomic charge of nitrogen in a molecular, δ, a and b : corrective coefficients

  2. Basic research for nuclear energy : a study on photo-catalytic decomposition reactions of organics dissolved in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sung, K. W.; Na, J. W.; Cho, Y. H.; Kim, K. R

    1999-01-01

    In an experiment on TiO{sub 2} photo-catalysis of five nitrogen-containing organic compounds, the changes of pH and total carbon contents were measured, and the dependence of their photo-catalytic characteristic upon their chemical structures were investigated. -- calculation of the effect of ionic carbon species in an aqueous solution on thermodynamic equilibrium, pH and conductivity showed a small quantity of organics could lead conductivity increase and pH reduction. -- Based on the results of photo-catalytic experiment of ethylamine, phenylhydrazine, pyridine, urea or EDTA, irradiated for 180 minutes after adsorption onto titanium dioxide for 60 minutes, relationship between nitrogen atomic charge and the first-order rate constant was as the following: R (1st - order rate constant) = {delta} ({epsilon} - a ){sup 1/3} + b where, {epsilon} : atomic charge of nitrogen in a molecular, {delta}, a and b : corrective coefficients.

  3. Catalytic N2O decomposition and reduction by NH3 over Fe/Beta and Fe/SSZ-13 catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Aiyong; Wang, Yilin; Walter, Eric D.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Guo, Yanglong; Lu, Guanzhong; Weber, Robert S.; Wang, Yong; Peden, Charles H. F.; Gao, Feng

    2018-02-01

    Fe/zeolites are important N2O abatement catalysts, efficient in direct N2O decomposition and (selective) catalytic N2O reduction. In this study, Fe/Beta and Fe/SSZ-13 were synthesized via solution ion-exchange and used to catalyze these two reactions. Nature of the Fe species was probed with UV-vis, Mössbauer and EPR spectroscopies and H2-TPR. The characterizations collectively indicate that isolated and dinuclear Fe sites dominate in Fe/SSZ-13, whereas Fe/Beta contains higher concentrations of oligomeric FexOy species. H2-TPR results suggest that Fe-O interactions are weaker in Fe/SSZ-13, as evidenced by the lower reduction temperatures and higher extents of autoreduction during high-temperature pretreatments in inert gas. Kinetic measurements show that Fe/SSZ-13 has higher activity in catalytic N2O decomposition, thus demonstrating a positive correlation between activity and Fe-O binding, consistent with O2 desorption being rate-limiting for this reaction. However, Fe/Beta was found to be more active in catalyzing N2O reduction by NH3. This indicates that larger active ensembles (i.e., oligomers) are more active for this reaction, consistent with the fact that both N2O and NH3 need to be activated in this case. The authors from PNNL gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office for the support of this work. The research described in this paper was performed in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle. Aiyong Wang gratefully acknowledges the China Scholarship Council for the Joint-Training Scholarship Program with the Pacific

  4. Synthesis of ACNT on quartz substrate with catalytic decomposition reaction from Cinnamomum camphora by using FC-CVD method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulan, Praswasti P. D. K.; Silaen, Toni Partogi Johannes

    2017-05-01

    Camphor is a renewable carbon source that can be used as raw material for synthesizing Carbon Nanotube (CNT). Camphor is a substance that can be found on the Cinnamomum camphora tree. In this research, the method used to synthesize Aligned Carbon Nanotube (ACNT) from camphor is Floating Catalyst Chemical Vapor Deposition (FC-CVD) with Ferrocene as catalyst at temperature of 800°C, hydrogen gas as the co-reactant and argon gas as carrier gas. This method is the most popular method of synthesizing ACNT which oriented and have a high density. Camphor decomposes into benzene, toluene, and xylene at a temperature of 800°C. By using GC-FID for characterization test, the results showed decomposition at a temperature of 800°C camphor dominated by benzene with a concentration of 92.422 to 97.656%. The research was conducted by varying the flow rate of carrier gas such as argon at 40, 55, 70, 85 and 100 mL / min at a temperature of 800°C for 60 minutes of reaction time. Argon carrier gas flow rate of 70 mL / min producing CNT with the highest yield, but this is not followed by best quality of CNT. CNT with best quality is obtained at a flow rate of argon carrier gas at 55 mL / min based on test results characterization by using SEM, EDX, Mapping, and RAMAN Spectroscopy. This research have not obtained CNT with aligned structured.

  5. Photo-catalytic studies of transition metal doped titanium dioxide thin films processed by metalorganic decomposition (MOD) method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talagala, P.; Marko, X.; Padmanabhan, K. R.; Naik, R.; Rodak, D.; Cheng, Y. T.

    2006-03-01

    We have synthesized pure and transition element (Fe, Co and V) doped Titanium oxide thin films of thickness ˜ 350 nm on sapphire, Si, and stainless steel substrates by Metalorganic Decomposition (MOD) method. The films were subsequently annealed at appropriate temperatures ( 500-750C) to obtain either anatase or the rutile phase of TiO2. Analysis of the composition of the films were performed by energy dispersive X-ray(EDAX) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry(RBS). Ion channeling was used to identify possible epitaxial growth of the films on sapphire. Both XRD and Raman spectra of the films exhibit that the films annealed at 550C are of anatase phase, while those annealed at 700C seem to prefer a rutile structure. The water contact angle measurements of the films before and after photoactivation, demonstrate a significant reduction in the contact angle for the anatase phase. However, the variation in contact angle was observed for films exposed to UV (<10^o-30^o) and dark (25^o-50^o). Films doped with Fe show a trend towards lower contact angle than those doped with Co. Results with films doped with V will also be included.

  6. Carbon nanofibers: a versatile catalytic support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelize Maria de Almeida Coelho

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is present an overview of the promising results obtained while using carbon nanofibers based composites as catalyst support for different practical applications: hydrazine decomposition, styrene synthesis, direct oxidation of H2S into elementary sulfur and as fuel-cell electrodes. We have also discussed some prospects of the use of these new materials in total combustion of methane and in ammonia decomposition. The macroscopic carbon nanofibers based composites were prepared by the CVD method (Carbon Vapor Deposition employing a gaseous mixture of hydrogen and ethane. The results showed a high catalytic activity and selectivity in comparison to the traditional catalysts employed in these reactions. The fact was attributed, mainly, to the morphology and the high external surface of the catalyst support.

  7. High efficiency chemical energy conversion system based on a methane catalytic decomposition reaction and two fuel cells: Part I. Process modeling and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qinghua; Tian, Ye; Li, Hongjiao; Jia, Lijun; Xia, Chun; Thompson, Levi T.; Li, Yongdan

    A highly efficient integrated energy conversion system is built based on a methane catalytic decomposition reactor (MCDR) together with a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) and an internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell (IRSOFC). In the MCDR, methane is decomposed to pure carbon and hydrogen. Carbon is used as the fuel of DCFC to generate power and produce pure carbon dioxide. The hydrogen and unconverted methane are used as the fuel in the IRSOFC. A gas turbine cycle is also used to produce more power output from the thermal energy generated in the IRSOFC. The output performance and efficiency of both the DCFC and IRSOFC are investigated and compared by development of exact models of them. It is found that this system has a unique loading flexibility due to the good high-loading property of DCFC and the good low loading property of IRSOFC. The effects of temperature, pressure, current densities, and methane conversion on the performance of the fuel cells and the system are discussed. The CO 2 emission reduction is effective, up to 80%, can be reduced with the proposed system.

  8. In situ solid state 11B MAS-NMR studies of the thermal decomposition of ammonia borane: mechanistic studies of the hydrogen release pathways from a solid state hydrogen storage material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowe, Ashley C; Shaw, Wendy J; Linehan, John C; Schmid, Benjamin; Autrey, Tom

    2007-04-21

    The mechanism of hydrogen release from solid state ammonia borane (AB) has been investigated via in situ solid state (11)B and (11)B{(1)H} MAS-NMR techniques in external fields of 7.1 T and 18.8 T at a decomposition temperature of 88 degrees C, well below the reported melting point. The decomposition of AB is well described by an induction, nucleation and growth mechanistic pathway. During the induction period, little hydrogen is released from AB; however, a new species identified as a mobile phase of AB is observed in the (11)B NMR spectra. Subsequent to induction, at reaction times when hydrogen is initially being released, three additional species are observed: the diammoniate of diborane (DADB), [(NH(3))(2)BH(2)](+)[BH(4)](-), and two BH(2)N(2) species believed to be the linear (NH(3)BH(2)NH(2)BH(3)) and cyclic dimer (NH(2)BH(2))(2) of aminoborane. At longer reaction times the sharper features are replaced by broad, structureless peaks of a complex polymeric aminoborane (PAB) containing both BH(2)N(2) and BHN(3) species. The following mechanistic model for the induction, nucleation and growth for AB decomposition leading to formation of hydrogen is proposed: (i) an induction period that yields a mobile phase of AB caused by disruption of the dihydrogen bonds; (ii) nucleation that yields reactive DADB from the mobile AB; and (iii) growth that includes a bimolecular reaction between DADB and AB to release the stored hydrogen.

  9. Catalytic hot gas cleaning of gasification gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simell, P. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Production Technologies

    1997-12-31

    The aim of this work was to study the catalytic cleaning of gasification gas from tars and ammonia. In addition, factors influencing catalytic activity in industrial applications were studied, as well as the effects of different operation conditions and limits. Also the catalytic reactions of tar and ammonia with gasification gas components were studied. The activities of different catalyst materials were measured with laboratory-scale reactors fed by slip streams taken from updraft and fluid bed gasifiers. Carbonate rocks and nickel catalysts proved to be active tar decomposing catalysts. Ammonia decomposition was in turn facilitated by nickel catalysts and iron materials like iron sinter and iron dolomite. Temperatures over 850 deg C were required at 2000{sup -1} space velocity at ambient pressure to achieve almost complete conversions. During catalytic reactions H{sub 2} and CO were formed and H{sub 2}O was consumed in addition to decomposing hydrocarbons and ammonia. Equilibrium gas composition was almost achieved with nickel catalysts at 900 deg C. No deactivation by H{sub 2}S or carbon took place in these conditions. Catalyst blocking by particulates was avoided by using a monolith type of catalyst. The apparent first order kinetic parameters were determined for the most active materials. The activities of dolomite, nickel catalyst and reference materials were measured in different gas atmospheres using laboratory apparatus. This consisted of nitrogen carrier, toluene as tar model compound, ammonia and one of the components H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}+H{sub 2}O or CO+CO{sub 2}. Also synthetic gasification gas was used. With the dolomite and nickel catalyst the highest toluene decomposition rates were measured with CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. In gasification gas, however, the rate was retarded due to inhibition by reaction products (CO, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}). Tar decomposition over dolomite was modelled by benzene reactions with CO{sub 2}, H

  10. Ammonia synthesis at low temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rod, Thomas Holm; Logadottir, Ashildur; Nørskov, Jens Kehlet

    2000-01-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations of reaction paths and energies for the industrial and the biological catalytic ammonia synthesis processes are compared. The industrial catalyst is modeled by a ruthenium surface, while the active part of the enzyme is modeled by a MoFe6S9 complex...... have been carried out to evaluate its feasibility. The calculations suggest that it might be possible to catalytically produce ammonia from molecular nitrogen at low temperatures and pressures, in particular if energy is fed into the process electrochemically. (C) 2000 American Institute of Physics....

  11. Ammonia Concentrations in Different Aquaculture Holding Tanks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High unionized ammonia recorded in the collapsible and concrete ponds was from excretion of high protein rich feed, decomposition of uneaten feed, high stocking density, low water exchange rates, water source and the alkaline medium of the systems. Low unionized ammonia in earthen pond and natural pond was ...

  12. Ammonia intoxication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bessman, S.P.; Pal, N.

    1982-01-01

    Data is presented which shows that there is a relation between ammonia concentration in the blood and state of consciousness. The concentrations of GTP and ATP also relate both to the ammonia concentration in blood and the state of consciousness. The rate of protein synthesis in the brain as measured by the percent of intracellular counts that are incorporated into protein is also related to ammonia concentration. These findings of energy depletion and depressed synthesis resulting from energy depletion suggest that the primary lesion in ammonia intoxication involves the Krebs cycle. The greater effect of ammonia on GTP than on ATP metabolism supports the view that the primary site of action of ammonia is at the glutamate dehydrogenase-ketoglutarate reduction step - and is consistent with previous work on this subject. (H.K.)

  13. Haber Process for Ammonia Synthesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Before synthetic nitrogen fixation, wastes and manures of various types or their decomposition products, and ammonium sulfate, which is a by-product from the coking of coal, were the primary sources of agricultural nitrogen. Chilean saltpetre, saltpetre from hu- man and animal urine, and later ammonia recovered from coke.

  14. Ammonia Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Richard L. (Inventor); Akse, James R. (Inventor); Thompson, John O. (Inventor); Atwater, James E. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Ammonia monitor and method of use are disclosed. A continuous, real-time determination of the concentration of ammonia in an aqueous process stream is possible over a wide dynamic range of concentrations. No reagents are required because pH is controlled by an in-line solid-phase base. Ammonia is selectively transported across a membrane from the process stream to an analytical stream to an analytical stream under pH control. The specific electrical conductance of the analytical stream is measured and used to determine the concentration of ammonia.

  15. Selective catalytic reduction of NO by ammonia using mesoporous Fe-containing HZSM-5 and HZSM-12 zeolite catalysts: An option for automotive applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kustov, Arkadii; Hansen, T. W.; Kustova, Marina

    2007-01-01

    Mesoporous and conventional Fe-containing ZSM-5 and ZSM-12 catalysts (0.5–8 wt% Fe) were prepared using a simple impregnation method and tested in the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH3. It was found that for both Fe/HZSM-5 and Fe/HZSM-12 catalysts with similar Fe contents......, the activity of the mesoporous samples in NO SCR with NH3 is significantly higher than for conventional samples. Such a difference in the activity is probably related with the better diffusion of reactants and products in the mesopores and better dispersion of the iron particles in the mesoporous zeolite...

  16. Constructing Sheet-On-Sheet Structured Graphitic Carbon Nitride/Reduced Graphene Oxide/Layered MnO2 Ternary Nanocomposite with Outstanding Catalytic Properties on Thermal Decomposition of Ammonium Perchlorate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianhua; Li, Dongnan; Chen, Yu; Tan, Linghua; Kou, Bo; Wan, Fushun; Jiang, Wei; Li, Fengsheng

    2017-01-01

    We unprecedentedly report that layered MnO2 nanosheets were in situ formed onto the surface of covalently bonded graphitic carbon nitride/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite (g-C3N4/rGO), forming sheet-on-sheet structured two dimension (2D) graphitic carbon nitride/reduced graphene oxide/layered MnO2 ternary nanocomposite (g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2) with outstanding catalytic properties on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP). The covalently bonded g-C3N4/rGO was firstly prepared by the calcination of graphene oxide-guanidine hydrochloride precursor (GO-GndCl), following by its dispersion into the KMnO4 aqueous solution to construct the g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 ternary nanocomposite. FT-IR, XRD, Raman as well as the XPS results clearly demonstrated the chemical interaction between g-C3N4, rGO and MnO2. TEM and element mapping indicated that layered g-C3N4/rGO was covered with thin MnO2 nanosheets. Furthermore, the obtained g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 nanocomposite exhibited promising catalytic capacity on thermal decomposition of AP. Upon addition of 2 wt % g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 ternary nanocomposite as catalyst, the thermal decomposition temperature of AP was largely decreased up by 142.5 °C, which was higher than that of pure g-C3N4, g-C3N4/rGO and MnO2, respectively, demonstrating the synergistic catalysis of the as-prepared nanocomposite. PMID:29244721

  17. Constructing Sheet-On-Sheet Structured Graphitic Carbon Nitride/Reduced Graphene Oxide/Layered MnO2 Ternary Nanocomposite with Outstanding Catalytic Properties on Thermal Decomposition of Ammonium Perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Xu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available We unprecedentedly report that layered MnO2 nanosheets were in situ formed onto the surface of covalently bonded graphitic carbon nitride/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite (g-C3N4/rGO, forming sheet-on-sheet structured two dimension (2D graphitic carbon nitride/reduced graphene oxide/layered MnO2 ternary nanocomposite (g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 with outstanding catalytic properties on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP. The covalently bonded g-C3N4/rGO was firstly prepared by the calcination of graphene oxide-guanidine hydrochloride precursor (GO-GndCl, following by its dispersion into the KMnO4 aqueous solution to construct the g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 ternary nanocomposite. FT-IR, XRD, Raman as well as the XPS results clearly demonstrated the chemical interaction between g-C3N4, rGO and MnO2. TEM and element mapping indicated that layered g-C3N4/rGO was covered with thin MnO2 nanosheets. Furthermore, the obtained g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 nanocomposite exhibited promising catalytic capacity on thermal decomposition of AP. Upon addition of 2 wt % g-C3N4/rGO/MnO2 ternary nanocomposite as catalyst, the thermal decomposition temperature of AP was largely decreased up by 142.5 °C, which was higher than that of pure g-C3N4, g-C3N4/rGO and MnO2, respectively, demonstrating the synergistic catalysis of the as-prepared nanocomposite.

  18. Constructing Sheet-On-Sheet Structured Graphitic Carbon Nitride/Reduced Graphene Oxide/Layered MnO₂ Ternary Nanocomposite with Outstanding Catalytic Properties on Thermal Decomposition of Ammonium Perchlorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianhua; Li, Dongnan; Chen, Yu; Tan, Linghua; Kou, Bo; Wan, Fushun; Jiang, Wei; Li, Fengsheng

    2017-12-15

    We unprecedentedly report that layered MnO₂ nanosheets were in situ formed onto the surface of covalently bonded graphitic carbon nitride/reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite (g-C₃N₄/rGO), forming sheet-on-sheet structured two dimension (2D) graphitic carbon nitride/reduced graphene oxide/layered MnO₂ ternary nanocomposite (g-C₃N₄/rGO/MnO₂) with outstanding catalytic properties on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP). The covalently bonded g-C₃N₄/rGO was firstly prepared by the calcination of graphene oxide-guanidine hydrochloride precursor (GO-GndCl), following by its dispersion into the KMnO₄ aqueous solution to construct the g-C₃N₄/rGO/MnO₂ ternary nanocomposite. FT-IR, XRD, Raman as well as the XPS results clearly demonstrated the chemical interaction between g-C₃N₄, rGO and MnO₂. TEM and element mapping indicated that layered g-C₃N₄/rGO was covered with thin MnO₂ nanosheets. Furthermore, the obtained g-C₃N₄/rGO/MnO₂ nanocomposite exhibited promising catalytic capacity on thermal decomposition of AP. Upon addition of 2 wt % g-C₃N₄/rGO/MnO₂ ternary nanocomposite as catalyst, the thermal decomposition temperature of AP was largely decreased up by 142.5 °C, which was higher than that of pure g-C₃N₄, g-C₃N₄/rGO and MnO₂, respectively, demonstrating the synergistic catalysis of the as-prepared nanocomposite.

  19. SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION (SCR) OF NO BY AMMONIA OVER V2O5/TiO2 CATALYST IN A CATALYTIC FILTER MEDIUM AND HONEYCOMB REACTOR: A KINETIC MODELING STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    M. Nahavandi

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The present study addresses a numerical modeling and simulation based on the available knowledge of SCR kinetics for prediction of NO conversion over a V2O3/TiO3 catalyst through a catalytic filter medium and honeycomb reactor. After introducing the NH3-SCR system with specific operational criteria, a reactor model was developed to evaluate the effect of various operating parameters such as flue gas temperature, velocity, NH3/NO molar ratio, etc., on the SCR process. Computational in...

  20. Study of conversion of ammonia from urea water solution droplets using CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jyothis, K.; Vikas, R.

    2017-09-01

    This paper deals with the numerical analysis of the spray behaviour of urea water solution (UWS) droplets used in Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) process. The study uses the ANSYS-Fluent-14 as a basic framework for numerical simulations. The evaporation modelling is based on multi-component droplet evaporation approach along with the consideration of Stefan flow. The urea decomposition treated as direct thermolysis approach, where the modelling is based on the single kinetic rate approach by the proper fitting of pre-exponent. This developed model was used for spray simulation of UWS droplet evaporation to determine the urea to ammonia conversion efficiency. The obtained spray simulation results were compared with the available experimental data. The comparison shows the pre-exponent developed in the study is suitable for direct thermolysis approach to get promising results in determining the ammonia conversion efficiency.

  1. Phosgene-free synthesis of hexamethylene-1,6-diisocyanate by the catalytic decomposition of dimethylhexane-1,6-dicarbamate over zinc-incorporated berlinite (ZnAlPO{sub 4})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Da-Lei [Department of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Luo, Jun-Yin; Wen, Ru-Yu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Light Industry, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Deng, Jian-Ru [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China); Chao, Zi-Sheng, E-mail: zschao@yahoo.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, State Key Laboratory of Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis of HDI via HDU decomposition over ZnAlPO{sub 4} heterogeneous catalyst. • Employment of self-designed reliable fixed bed reactor for HDU decomposition to HDI. • As high as 89.4% yield of HDI over ZnAlPO{sub 4} catalyst. • High stability and large ability for repeating usage of ZnAlPO{sub 4} catalyst. -- Abstract: The phosgene-free synthesis of hexamethylene-1,6-diisocyanate (HDI) by the decomposition of dimethylhexane-1,6-dicarbamate (HDU) was carried out on a self-designed fixed-bed catalytic reactor, using zinc-incorporated berlinite (ZnAlPO{sub 4}) as catalyst, dioctyl phthalate (DOP) as solvent and N{sub 2} as carrier gas. Factors influencing the yield of HDI, including the Zn/Al molar ratio, HDU concentration and liquid space velocity (LHSV), were investigated. Under the optimized reaction conditions, i.e., 4.8 wt.% concentration of HDU in DOP, 100 ml/min N{sub 2} flow rate, 0.09 MPa vacuum, 623 K reaction temperature, 1.2 h{sup −1} LHSV and catalyst usage 2.0 g, a 89.4% yield of HDI had been achieved over the ZnAlPO{sub 4} (molar ratio Zn/Al = 0.04) catalyst. The ZnAlPO{sub 4} catalyst was found to exhibit a considerable large on-stream stability and could be repeatedly used in the decomposition of HDU to HDI, after its regeneration.

  2. Ammonia blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003506.htm Ammonia blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... Encephalopathy - ammonia; Cirrhosis - ammonia; Liver failure - ammonia Images Blood test References Chernecky CC, Berger BJ. Ammonia (NH3) - blood ...

  3. Catalytic N 2O decomposition on Pr 0.8Ba 0.2MnO 3 type perovskite catalyst for industrial emission control

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kumar, S.; Vinu, A.; Šubrt, Jan; Bakardjieva, Snejana; Rayalu, S.; Teraoka, Y.; Labhsetwar, N.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 198, 1-SI (2012), s. 125-132 ISSN 0920-5861 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC523 Institutional support: RVO:61388980 Keywords : Ba substituted perovskite * catalyst * honeycomb * N 2O decomposition * perovskite * praseodymium manganate Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.980, year: 2012

  4. Promotional effect of tungsten-doped CeO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} for selective catalytic reduction of NOx with ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Dong Wook; Hong, Sung Chang, E-mail: schong@kgu.ac.kr

    2015-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Catalysts were prepared by adding various metals to Ce/Ti to improve the activity. • The Ce{sup 3+} ratio of 10Ce/Me/Ti was proportional to the SCR activity of the catalyst. • When tungsten was added to 10Ce/Ti, an excellent SO{sub 2} resistance was displayed. - Abstract: We examined the effects that the physicochemical properties of Ce/Me/Ti catalysts had on the selective catalytic reduction (SCR) activity after various metals (W, Mo, and La) were added to non-vanadium-based catalysts in order to improve NH{sub 3}–SCR activity. We studied the properties of the catalysts through the use of physiochemical techniques, including Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) surface area analysis, X-ray diffraction (XRD), H{sub 2} temperature-programmed reduction (H{sub 2}-TPR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) transmission infrared spectroscopy (IR), and inductively coupled plasma optic emission spectroscopy (ICP). The catalytic activity tests of the Ce/Ti catalysts with various ceria loadings revealed that the Ce/Ti with 10 wt.% ceria (10Ce/Ti) exhibited excellent activity. Thus, various metals were added to the 10Ce/Ti. The tungsten-doped 10Ce/Ti catalyst exhibited the highest activity (10Ce/W/Ti: Ce was deposited after tungsten had been deposited on TiO{sub 2}). We investigated the correlation between the catalyst's Ce valence state and its activity. Different Ce{sup 3+} ratios were observed when various metals were added to Ce/Ti. The highest Ce{sup 3+} ratio was observed in 10Ce/W/Ti at 0.3027, and the catalyst efficiency had a positive correlation with higher Ce{sup 3+} ratios. The SCR activity was found to increase as the Ce{sup 3+} ratio increased when tungsten was added to 10Ce/W/Ti. Furthermore, in the case of 10Ce/W/Ti, it seemed that the Brønsted acid sites were more abundant relative to those on 10Ce/Ti. Upon the injection of SO{sub 2} in the SCR reaction, 10Ce/Ti was rapidly deactivated. However, the 10Ce

  5. An operando optical fiber UV–vis spectroscopic study of the catalytic decomposition of NO and N2O over Cu-ZSM-5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Groothaert, M.H.; Lievens, K.; Leeman, H.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    2003-01-01

    The role of the bis(μ-oxo)dicopper core, i.e., [Cu2(μ-O)2]2+, in the decomposition of NO and N2O by the Cu-ZSM-5 zeolite has been studied with combined operando UV–vis monitoring of the catalyst and on-line GC analysis. An optical fiber was mounted on the outer surface of the quartz wall of the

  6. Decomposição catalítica de óxidos de nitrogênio Catalytic decomposition of nitrogen oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia María Díaz Cónsul

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Contaminant gases in the atmosphere constitute an important problem to be solved in the world. The NOx gases produced as a consequence of engine high temperatures are deleterious to environment and human health, as they promote acid rain and can act in the same way as freons in the destruction of the ozone layer in the stratosphere. In this review, three way and selective reduction catalysts for decomposition of these contaminant gases are described. Details about conditions and problems, such as catalyst poisoning, and the search for new catalysts are shown.

  7. Characterization and catalytic behavior of MoO3/V2O5/Nb2 O5 systems in isopropanol decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. de Paiva Jr

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The influence of molybdenum oxide as a promoter on the V2O5/Nb2O5 system was investigated. A series of MoO3/V2O5/Nb2 O5 catalysts, with MoO3 loading ranging from 1 to 3 wt% MoO3 and fixed V2O5 content (21 wt%, were prepared by impregnation of the Nb2O5 support with an aqueous solution of ammonium metavanadate and ammonium molybdate. The acid-base properties of the catalysts were investigated to determine of the selectivity of the isopropanol decomposition reaction. The X-ray diffraction results showed the presence of the beta-(Nb,V2O5 phase. The temperature-programmed reduction profiles showed that the reducibility of vanadium was affected by the presence of molybdenum oxide. Activity results for isopropanol decomposition revealed that the acid-base properties of V2O5/Nb2O5 catalysts are affected upon incorporation of MoO3, specifically for loadings of 3 wt %. For this catalyst composition both propylene and acetone formation rates decreased.

  8. Studies of Catalytic Properties of Inorganic Rock Matrices in Redox Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolay M. Dobrynkin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsic catalytic properties of mineral matrices of various kinds (basalts, clays, sandstones were studied, which are of interest for in-situ heavy oil upgrading (i.e., underground to create advanced technologies for enhanced oil recovery. The elemental, surface and phase composition and matrix particle morphology, surface and acidic properties were studied using elemental analysis, X-ray diffraction, adsorption and desorption of nitrogen and ammonia. The data on the catalytic activity of inorganic matrices in ammonium nitrate decomposition (reaction with a large gassing, oxidation of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide, and hydrocracking of asphaltenes into maltenes (the conversion of heavy hydrocarbons into more valuable light hydrocarbons were discussed. In order to check their applicability for the asphaltenes hydrocracking catalytic systems development, basalt and clay matrices were used as supports for iron/basalt, nickel/basalt and iron/clay catalysts. The catalytic activity of the matrices in the reactions of the decomposition of ammonium nitrate, oxidation of hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide, and hydrocracking of asphaltens was observed for the first time.

  9. Synthesis of ammonia using sodium melt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Fumio; Taniguchi, Takashi

    2017-09-14

    Research into inexpensive ammonia synthesis has increased recently because ammonia can be used as a hydrogen carrier or as a next generation fuel which does not emit CO 2 . Furthermore, improving the efficiency of ammonia synthesis is necessary, because current synthesis methods emit significant amounts of CO 2 . To achieve these goals, catalysts that can effectively reduce the synthesis temperature and pressure, relative to those required in the Haber-Bosch process, are required. Although several catalysts and novel ammonia synthesis methods have been developed previously, expensive materials or low conversion efficiency have prevented the displacement of the Haber-Bosch process. Herein, we present novel ammonia synthesis route using a Na-melt as a catalyst. Using this route, ammonia can be synthesized using a simple process in which H 2 -N 2 mixed gas passes through the Na-melt at 500-590 °C under atmospheric pressure. Nitrogen molecules dissociated by reaction with sodium then react with hydrogen, resulting in the formation of ammonia. Because of the high catalytic efficiency and low-cost of this molten-Na catalyst, it provides new opportunities for the inexpensive synthesis of ammonia and the utilization of ammonia as an energy carrier and next generation fuel.

  10. Removal of nitrogen compounds from gasification gas by selective catalytic or non-catalytic oxidation; Typpiyhdisteiden poisto kaasutuskaasusta selektiivisellae katalyyttisellae ja ei-katalyyttisellae hapetuksella

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-01

    In gasification reactive nitrogenous compounds are formed from fuel nitrogen, which may form nitrogen oxides in gas combustion. In fluidized bed gasification the most important nitrogenous compound is ammonia (NH{sub 3}). If ammonia could be decomposed to N{sub 2} already before combustion, the emissions if nitrogen oxides could be reduced significantly. One way of increasing the decomposition rate of NH{sub 3} could be the addition of suitable reactants to the gas, which would react with NH{sub 3} and produce N{sub 2}. The aim of this research is to create basic information, which can be used to develop a new method for removal of nitrogen compounds from gasification gas. The reactions of nitrogen compounds and added reactants are studied in reductive atmosphere in order to find conditions, in which nitrogen compounds can be oxidized selectively to N{sub 2}. The project consists of following subtasks: (1) Selective non-catalytic oxidation (SNCO): Reactions of nitrogen compounds and oxidizers in the gas phase, (2) Selective catalytic oxidation (SCO): Reactions of nitrogen compounds and oxidizers on catalytically active surfaces, (3) Kinetic modelling of experimental results in co-operation with the Combustion Chemistry Research Group of Aabo Akademi University. The most important finding has been that NH{sub 3} can be made to react selectively with the oxidizers even in the presence of large amounts of CO and H{sub 2}. Aluminium oxides were found to be the most effective materials promoting selectivity. (author)

  11. 7α-alkylation and 7,7-bis-alkylation of 20-hydroxyecdysone with propargyl bromide in a lithium-ammonia solution and catalytic reductive spirocyclization of 7,7-bis(2-propyn-1-yl)-14-deoxy-Δ(8(14))-20-hydroxyecdysone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galyautdinov, Ilgiz V; Khairullina, Zarema R; Sametov, Valery P; Muslimov, Zabir S; Khalilov, Leonard M; Odinokov, Victor N

    2016-03-01

    7α-Alkylation and 7,7-bis-alkylation of 20-hydroxyecdysone with propargyl bromide in a lithium-ammonia solution resulted in the formation of 7α-(2-propyn-1-yl)- and 7,7-bis(2-propyn-1-yl)-14-deoxy-Δ(8(14))-20-hydroxyecdysone in 92% and 75% yield respectively. Upon catalytic hydrogenation (10% Pd-C) of 7,7-bis(2-propyn-1-yl) derivative spirocyclization occurs by geminal 2-propyn-1-yl groups. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Study of ammonia synthesis over uranium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitsyn, V.I.; Erofeev, B.V.; Mikhajlenko, I.E.; Gorelkin, I.I.; Ivanov, L.S.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of induced radiactivity and chemical composition of uranium catalysts on their catalytic activity in the ammonia synthesis reaction has been studied. The catalyst samples comprise pieces of metal uranium and chip irradiated in nuclear reactor by the 4.3x10 16 n/cm 2 integral flux of slow neutrons. Studies of catalytic activity was carried out at 1 atm and 340-510 deg C when stoichiometric nitrogen-hydrogen mixture passed through the following installation. At different temperatures uranium nitrides of different composition are shown to be formed. Uranium nitrides with the composition close to UN 2 are the samples with the highest catalYtic activity. The reduction of catalytic activity of uranium catalysts with the increased temperature of their formation above 400 deg C is explained by low catalytic activity of forming UNsub(1.7) in comparison with UN 2 . Catalytic properties of irradiated and nonirradiated samples do not differ from one another

  13. Ammonia - Did it have a role in chemical evolution. [abiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, J. P.; Nicodem, D. E.

    1974-01-01

    The significance of ammonia in the chemical evolution related to the origin of life is evaluated. A computer program was employed to calculate the time needed for the decomposition of ammonia by means of a photochemical reaction. Various possible protection mechanisms for ammonia are discussed, giving attention to hydrogen sulfide, hydrogen, ozone, and CO. It is concluded that in the absence of a sufficiently high pressure of hydrogen, any ammonia present in the primitive atmosphere would have been decomposed by photolysis in a million years.

  14. Ozone Decomposition on the Surface of Metal Oxide Catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Batakliev Todor Todorov

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic decomposition of ozone to molecular oxygen over catalytic mixture containing manganese, copper and nickel oxides was investigated in the present work. The catalytic activity was evaluated on the basis of the decomposition coefficient which is proportional to ozone decomposition rate, and it has been already used in other studies for catalytic activity estimation. The reaction was studied in the presence of thermally modified catalytic samples operating at different temperatures and ozone flow rates. The catalyst changes were followed by kinetic methods, surface measurements, temperature programmed reduction and IR-spectroscopy. The phase composition of the metal oxide catalyst was determined by X-ray diffraction. The catalyst mixture has shown high activity in ozone decomposition at wet and dry O3/O2 gas mixtures. The mechanism of catalytic ozone degradation was suggested.

  15. Thermal decomposition of dinitratobis(carbamido) uranyl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobets, L.V.; Kostyukov, N.N.; Umrejko, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    Thermal stability of dinitratobis (carbamido) uranyl was investigated by the methods of DTA, TG and isothermal heatings at different temperatures. It was revealed that urea as a whole was not removed from the complex. Urea loses ammonia simultaneously with substance melting (498K); biuret and cyanuric acid form at that. Ammonia removal to gaseous phase decelerates in 573-593 K range due to its binding with formation of amination products. Decomposition of nitrate groups begins at temperatures above 570 K. Heating products were studied by the methods of vibrational spectroscopy, chemical and X-ray phase analyses. Ideas about mechanism of decomposition were considered

  16. Trends in air pollution in Ireland : A decomposition analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tol, Richard S.J.

    2016-01-01

    Trends in the emissions to air of sulphur dioxide, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, volatile organic compounds and ammonia in Ireland are analysed with a logarithmic mean Divisia index decomposition for the period of 1990-2009. Emissions fell for four of the five pollutants, with ammonia being

  17. Catalytic hot gas cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simell, P. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Gasification gas that contains particulates can be purified from tars and ammonia by using nickel monolith catalysts. Temperatures over 900 deg C are required at 20 bar pressure to avoid deactivation by H{sub 2}S and carbon. Dolomites and limestones are effective tar decomposing catalysts only when calcined. Tar decomposition in gasification conditions can take place by steam or dry (CO{sub 2}) reforming reactions. These reactions follow apparent first order kinetics with respect to hydrocarbons in gasification conditions. (author) (16 refs.)

  18. Graph Decompositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merker, Martin

    The topic of this PhD thesis is graph decompositions. While there exist various kinds of decompositions, this thesis focuses on three problems concerning edgedecompositions. Given a family of graphs H we ask the following question: When can the edge-set of a graph be partitioned so that each part...... k(T)-edge-connected graph whose size is divisible by the size of T admits a T-decomposition. This proves a conjecture by Barát and Thomassen from 2006. Moreover, we introduce a new arboricity notion where we restrict the diameter of the trees in a decomposition into forests. We conjecture......-connected planar graph contains two edge-disjoint 18/19 -thin spanning trees. Finally, we make progress on a conjecture by Baudon, Bensmail, Przybyło, and Wozniak stating that if a graph can be decomposed into locally irregular graphs, then there exists such a decomposition with at most 3 parts. We show...

  19. Ammonia in London: is it increasing and what is the relevance of urban ammonia for air quality impacts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braban, Christine; Tang, Sim; Poskitt, Janet; Van Dijk, Netty; Leeson, Sarah; Dragosits, Ulli; Hutchings, Torben; Twigg, Marsailidh; Di Marco, Chiara; Langford, Ben; Tremper, Anja; Nemitz, Eiko; Sutton, Mark

    2017-04-01

    Emissions of ammonia affect both rural and urban air quality primarily via reaction of ammonia in the atmosphere forming secondary ammonium salts in particulate matter (PM). Urban ammonia emissions come from a variety of sources including biological decomposition, human waste, industrial processes and combustion engines. In the UK, the only long-term urban ammonia measurement is a UK National Ammonia Monitoring Network site at London Cromwell Road, recording monthly average concentrations. Short term measurements have also been made in the past decade at Marylebone Road, North Kensington and on the BT Tower. Cromwell Road is a kerbside site operational since 1999. The Cromwell Road data indicates that ammonia concentrations may be increasing since 2010-2012 after a long period of decreasing. Data from the National Atmospheric Emissions Inventory indicates ammonia emissions from diesel fleet exhausts increasing over this time period but an overall net decrease in ammonia emissions. With changes in engine and exhaust technology to minimise pollutant emissions and the importance of ammonia as a precursor gas for secondary PM, there is a challenge to understand urban ammonia concentrations and subsequent impacts on urban air quality. In this paper the long term measurements are assessed in conjunction with the short-term measurements.The challenges to assess the relative importance of local versus long range ammonia emission are discussed.

  20. Development of catalytic gas cleaning in gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simell, P.; Kurkela, E.; Staahlberg, P.; Hepola, J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Gasification gas containing dust can be efficiently purified from tars and ammonia with a nickel monolith catalyst. Temperatures of >900 deg C and a residence time of about 1 s (SV 2 500 1/h) were needed at 5 bar pressure to achieve complete tar decomposition and 80 % ammonia conversion. Catalyst deactivation was not observed during test runs of 100 h. At lower pressures dolomites and limestones can also be applied for tar removal at about 900 deg C temperatures. (orig.) 12 refs.

  1. Study of ammonia synthesis using technetium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitsyn, V.I.; Mikhajlenko, I.E.; Pokrovskaya, O.V.

    1982-01-01

    A study was made on catalytic properties of technetium in ammonia synthesis reaction. The preparation of technetium catalysts on ν-Al 2 O 3 , BaTiO 3 , BaO-ν-Al 2 O 3 substrates is described. The investigation of catalytic activity of catalysts was carried out at a pressure of 1 atm. in vertical reactor with volume rate of 15000 h - 1 in the temperature range of 350-425 deg. The amount of catalyst was 0.5-1 g, the volume- 0.5 ml, the size of granules- 2-3 mm. Rate constants of ammonia synthesis reaction were calculated. Seeming activation energies of the process have meanings wihtin the limits of 40-50 kcal/mol. It was shown that with increase in concentration of Tc on BaTiO 3 the catalytic activity rises in comparison with pure Tc. The reduction of catalytic activity with increase of metal content on Al 2 O 3 begins in the limits of 3.5-6.7% Tc/ν-Al 2 O 3 . The catalyst of 5.3% Tc/4.1% Ba/ν -Al 2 O 3 compound has the maximum activity. Technetium catalysts possess the stable catalytic activity and don't requre its reduction during several months

  2. Investigation on an ammonia supply system for flue gas denitrification of low-speed marine diesel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiankun; Yuan, Han; Zhao, Jian; Mei, Ning

    2017-12-01

    Low-speed marine diesel flue gas denitrification is in great demand in the ship transport industry. This research proposes an ammonia supply system which can be used for flue gas denitrification of low-speed marine diesel. In this proposed ammonia supply system, ammonium bicarbonate is selected as the ammonia carrier to produce ammonia and carbon dioxide by thermal decomposition. The diesel engine exhaust heat is used as the heating source for ammonium bicarbonate decomposition and ammonia gas desorption. As the ammonium bicarbonate decomposition is critical to the proper operation of this system, effects have been observed to reveal the performance of the thermal decomposition chamber in this paper. A visualization experiment for determination of the single-tube heat transfer coefficient and simulation of flow and heat transfer in two structures is conducted; the decomposition of ammonium bicarbonate is simulated by ASPEN PLUS. The results show that the single-tube heat transfer coefficient is 1052 W m2 °C-1; the thermal decomposition chamber fork-type structure gets a higher heat transfer compared with the row-type. With regard to the simulation of ammonium bicarbonate thermal decomposition, the ammonia production is significantly affected by the reaction temperature and the mass flow rate of the ammonium bicarbonate input.

  3. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Andrew H. Seltzer; Richard G. Herman

    2005-03-31

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DE-FC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia.

  4. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Andrew H. Seltzer

    2005-06-30

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia.

  5. Aquatic Life Criteria - Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Documents related to EPA's final 2013 Aquatic Life Ambient Water Quality Criteria for Ammonia (Freshwater). These documents pertain to the safe levels of Ammonia in water that should protect to the majority of species.

  6. Exhaust purification with on-board ammonia production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robel, Wade J [Peoria, IL; Driscoll, James Joshua [Dunlap, IL; Coleman, Gerald N [Peterborough, GB

    2008-05-13

    A system of ammonia production for a selective catalytic reduction system is provided. The system includes producing an exhaust gas stream within a cylinder group, wherein the first exhaust gas stream includes NOx. The exhaust gas stream may be supplied to an exhaust passage and cooled to a predetermined temperature range, and at least a portion of the NOx within the exhaust gas stream may be converted into ammonia.

  7. Liquid composition having ammonia borane and decomposing to form hydrogen and liquid reaction product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Benjamin L; Rekken, Brian D

    2014-04-01

    Liquid compositions of ammonia borane and a suitably chosen amine borane material were prepared and subjected to conditions suitable for their thermal decomposition in a closed system that resulted in hydrogen and a liquid reaction product.

  8. Composition decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyson, Mark

    2003-01-01

    . Not only have design tools changed character, but also the processes associated with them. Today, the composition of problems and their decomposition into parcels of information, calls for a new paradigm. This paradigm builds on the networking of agents and specialisations, and the paths of communication...

  9. Lethal concentration (CL50) of un-ionized ammonia for pejerrey larvae in acute exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Piedras, Sérgio Renato Noguez; Pouey, Juvêncio Luís Osório Fernandes; Moraes, Paulo Roberto Rocha; Cardoso, Daniela Fençon

    2006-01-01

    Ammonia results from decomposition of effluents organic matter, e.g. feed wastes and fish faeces. Its un-ionized form can be toxic because diffuses easily through fish respiratory membranes, damaging gill epithelium and impairing gas exchanges. The objective of this work was determining the 96-hour CL50 of un-ionized ammonia for newly hatched pejerrey Odontesthes bonariensis larvae. Trials were set up completely randomized design, with three different concentration of un-ionized ammonia (0.57...

  10. Development of Low Temperature Catalysts for an Integrated Ammonia PEM Fuel Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, Alfred

    2014-01-01

    It is proposed that an integrated ammonia-PEM fuel cell could unlock the potential of ammonia to act as a high capacity chemical hydrogen storage vector and enable renewable energy to be delivered eectively to road transport applications. Catalysts are developed for low temperature ammonia decomposition with activity from 450 K (ruthenium and cesium on graphitised carbon nanotubes). Results strongly suggest that the cesium is present on the surface and close proximity to ruthenium nanoparticl...

  11. Including lateral interactions into microkinetic models of catalytic reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellman, Anders; Honkala, Johanna Karoliina

    2007-01-01

    In many catalytic reactions lateral interactions between adsorbates are believed to have a strong influence on the reaction rates. We apply a microkinetic model to explore the effect of lateral interactions and how to efficiently take them into account in a simple catalytic reaction. Three differ...... different approximations are investigated: site, mean-field, and quasichemical approximations. The obtained results are compared to accurate Monte Carlo numbers. In the end, we apply the approximations to a real catalytic reaction, namely, ammonia synthesis....

  12. Influences of ammonia contamination on leaching from air-pollution-control residues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guan, Zhenzhen; Chen, Dezhen; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2014-01-01

    Application of selective non-catalytic reduction systems at municipal solid waste incinerators (MSWIs) often involves over-stoichiometric injection of ammonia into flue gases. Un-reacted ammonia may be deposited on fly ash particles and can ultimately influence the leaching behaviour of air...

  13. Promotional effect of Al2O3 on WO3/CeO2-ZrO2 monolithic catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides with ammonia after hydrothermal aging treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Haidi; Liu, Shuang; Wang, Yun; Lin, Qingjin; Lin, Chenlu; Lan, Li; Wang, Qin; Chen, Yaoqiang

    2018-01-01

    Hydrothermal stability of catalysts for selective catalytic reduction of NOx with NH3 (NH3-SCR) has always been recognized as a challenge in development of candidate catalysts for applications in diesel engine emissions. In this study, Al2O3 was introduced into CeO2-ZrO2 to improve the NH3-SCR activity of WO3/CeO2-ZrO2 after hydrothermal aging (HA) treatment at 800 °C for 12 h. The activity results indicated that the NH3-SCR activity of WO3/CeO2-ZrO2-HA was obviously improved in the whole reaction temperature range after doping Al2O3 into CeO2-ZrO2, for example, the average and maximum NOx conversion were separately increased by ca. 20% and 25% after HA treatment. XRD, Raman, TEM and EDX results revealed that the introduction of Al2O3 inhibited the sintering and agglomeration of CeO2-ZrO2 and WO3 and the formation of Ce2(WO4)3 after HA treatment. Accordingly, WO3/CeO2-ZrO2-Al2O3-HA showed remarkably improved structural stability and reducibility, increased surface acidity, and facilitated the reactivity between adsorbed NH3 and nitrate species, which together contributed to its better catalytic performance after hydrothermal aging treatment.

  14. Sources of atmospheric ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harriss, R.C.; Michaels, J.T.

    1982-01-01

    The information available on factors that influence emissions from the principal societal sources of ammonia to the atmosphere, namely combustion processes, volatilization of farm animal wastes, and volatilization of fertilizers, is reviewed. Emission factors are established for each major source of atmospheric ammonia. The factors are then multiplied by appropriate source characterization descriptors to obtain calculated fluxes of ammonia to the atmosphere on a state-by-state basis for the United States

  15. Advanced Heat Exchanger for Combustion/Gasification Task 3; Development of Ammonia Removal Options

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Magnus; Espenaes, Bengt-Goeran [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Studsvik (Sweden)

    2003-03-01

    The report contains two parts. The first part is a review on the different ammonia removal options that can be considered in gasification of solid fuels. Issues discussed are the formation of nitrogen compounds in the gasifier and measures that can be taken to reduce the formation of such compounds, gas cleaning options at high temperature, low temperature cleaning and low NO{sub x} combustion in turbine applications. The second part presents experimental work on the kinetics of decomposition of ammonia by two nickel catalysts in a simulated fuel gas. The conditions used for the most thoroughly investigated catalyst included concentrations of H{sub 2}S from 22 ppm to 800 ppm, temperature from 76 deg C to 950 deg C, and total pressure at 1, 4 and 20 bar. The influence from H{sub 2}S on the reaction rate of ammonia at atmospheric pressure was found to be qualitatively different at low and at high concentrations of sulphur. The activity decreased at increase of the H{sub 2}S concentration up to about 200 ppm. A minimum of activity was obtained at about 200-300 ppm H{sub 2}S, and the activity increased again at further increase of the H{sub 2}S content. A more detailed investigation was performed for the low concentration range up to about 200 ppm at 1 and at 4 bar. The deactivation by H{sub 2}S is only partly reversible, and the activity that is attained when H{sub 2}S is removed depends strongly on which maximum concentration the catalyst has been exposed to. The nickel catalyst was found to convert ammonia in a raw fuel gas containing about 70 ppm H{sub 2}S at nearly the same rate as would be expected from the experimental data for the synthetic gas mixtures. Thus, there is not any important retarding effect from competition with the reactions that convert tar components and hydrocarbons simultaneously. The reaction rate of NH{sub 3} was compared to the reaction rate of methane found in a previous work, using the same catalyst. It was concluded that the size of a

  16. Method for forming ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peter C.; Pink, Robert J.; Zuck, Larry D.

    2008-08-19

    A method for forming ammonia is disclosed and which includes the steps of forming a plasma; providing a source of metal particles, and supplying the metal particles to the plasma to form metal nitride particles; and providing a substance, and reacting the metal nitride particles with the substance to produce ammonia, and an oxide byproduct.

  17. Cuboid Ni2 P as a Bifunctional Catalyst for Efficient Hydrogen Generation from Hydrolysis of Ammonia Borane and Electrocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yeshuang; Liu, Chao; Cheng, Gongzhen; Luo, Wei

    2017-11-16

    The design of high-performance catalysts for hydrogen generation is highly desirable for the upcoming hydrogen economy. Herein, we report the colloidal synthesis of nanocuboid Ni 2 P by the thermal decomposition of nickel chloride hexahydrate (NiCl 2 ⋅6 H 2 O) and trioctylphosphine. The obtained nanocuboid Ni 2 P was characterized by using powder X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. For the first time, the as-synthesized nanocuboid Ni 2 P is used as a bifunctional catalyst for hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of ammonia borane and electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution. Owing to the strong synergistic electronic effect between Ni and P, the as-synthesized Ni 2 P exhibits catalytic performance that is superior to its counterpart without P doping. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Predicting catalysis: Understanding ammonia synthesis from first-principles calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmann, A.; Baerends, E.J.; Biczysko, M.

    2006-01-01

    . Furthermore, our studies provide new insight into several related fields, for instance, gas-phase and electrochemical ammonia synthesis. The success of predicting the outcome of a catalytic reaction from first-principles calculations supports our point of view that, in the future, theory will be a fully......Here, we give a full account of a large collaborative effort toward an atomic-scale understanding of modern industrial ammonia production over ruthenium catalysts. We show that overall rates of ammonia production can be determined by applying various levels of theory (including transition state...... for any given point along an industrial reactor, and the kinetic results can be integrated over the catalyst bed to determine the industrial reactor yield. We find that, given the present uncertainties, the rate of ammonia production is well-determined directly from our atomic-scale calculations...

  19. System and method for determining an ammonia generation rate in a three-way catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Min; Perry, Kevin L; Kim, Chang H

    2014-12-30

    A system according to the principles of the present disclosure includes a rate determination module, a storage level determination module, and an air/fuel ratio control module. The rate determination module determines an ammonia generation rate in a three-way catalyst based on a reaction efficiency and a reactant level. The storage level determination module determines an ammonia storage level in a selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst positioned downstream from the three-way catalyst based on the ammonia generation rate. The air/fuel ratio control module controls an air/fuel ratio of an engine based on the ammonia storage level.

  20. Catalytic Synthesis of Nitriles in Continuous Flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordvang, Emily Catherine

    , alternative path to acetonitrile from ethanol via the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethylamine. The catalytic activity and product ratios of the batch and continuous flow reactions are compared and the effect of reaction conditions on the reaction is investigated. The effects of ammonia in the reaction...... dehydrogenation of ethylamine and post-reaction purging.Chapter 4 outlines the application of RuO2/Al2O3 catalysts to the oxidative dehydrogenation of benzylamine in air, utilizing a new reaction setup. Again, batch and continuous flow reactions are compared and the effects of reaction conditions, ammonia...

  1. Ammonia Release on ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macatangay, Ariel

    2009-01-01

    Crew: Approximately 53% metabolic load Product of protein metabolism Limit production of ammonia by external regulation NOT possbile Payloads Potential source Scientific experiments Thorough safety review ensures sufficient levels of containment

  2. Reactor for removing ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Weifang [Livermore, CA; Stewart, Kenneth D [Valley Springs, CA

    2009-11-17

    Disclosed is a device for removing trace amounts of ammonia from a stream of gas, particularly hydrogen gas, prepared by a reformation apparatus. The apparatus is used to prevent PEM "poisoning" in a fuel cell receiving the incoming hydrogen stream.

  3. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Andrew H. Seltzer; Richard G. Herman

    2004-09-30

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia. This report describes the work performed during the July 1 to September 30, 2004 time period.

  4. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Andrew H. Seltzer

    2005-09-30

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia. This report describes the work performed during the July 1 to September 30, 2005 time period.

  5. Ammonia-Free NOx Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Richard G. Herman

    2004-12-31

    Research is being conducted under United States Department of Energy (DOE) Contract DEFC26-03NT41865 to develop a new technology to achieve very low levels of NOx emissions from pulverized coal fired boiler systems by employing a novel system level integration between the PC combustion process and the catalytic NOx reduction with CO present in the combustion flue gas. The combustor design and operating conditions will be optimized to achieve atypical flue gas conditions. This approach will not only suppress NOx generation during combustion but also further reduce NOx over a downstream catalytic reactor that does not require addition of an external reductant, such as ammonia. This report describes the work performed during the October 1 to December 30, 2004 time period.

  6. Titan's Ammonia Feature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smythe, W.; Nelson, R.; Boryta, M.; Choukroun, M.

    2011-01-01

    NH3 has long been considered an important component in the formation and evolution of the outer planet satellites. NH3 is particularly important for Titan, since it may serve as the reservoir for atmospheric nitrogen. A brightening seen on Titan starting in 2004 may arise from a transient low-lying fog or surface coating of ammonia. The spectral shape suggests the ammonia is anhydrous, a molecule that hydrates quickly in the presence of water.

  7. Catalytic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ming; Zhang, Xiang

    2018-01-23

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to catalytic devices. In one aspect, a device includes a substrate, an electrically insulating layer disposed on the substrate, a layer of material disposed on the electrically insulating layer, and a catalyst disposed on the layer of material. The substrate comprises an electrically conductive material. The substrate and the layer of material are electrically coupled to one another and configured to have a voltage applied across them.

  8. Life cycle assessment of selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) of nitrous oxides in a full-scale municipal solid waste incinerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jacob; Munk, Bjarne; Crillesen, Kim

    2011-01-01

    Selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) of nitrous oxides in a full-scale municipal solid waste incinerator was investigated using LCA. The relationship between NOx-cleaning and ammonia dosage was measured at the plant. Un-reacted ammonia – the ammonia slip – leaving the flue-gas cleaning system......-removal in flue-gas cleaning from waste incineration....

  9. Selective Catalytic Oxidation of NH3 to N2 for Catalytic Combustion of Low Heating Value Gas under Lean/Rich Conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kušar, H.M.J.; Ersson, A.G.; Vosecký, Martin; Järas, S.G.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 58, 1-2 (2005), s. 25-32 ISSN 0926-3373 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : catalytic combustion * selective catalytic oxidation * ammonia Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.809, year: 2005

  10. Ammonia diffusion through Nalophan™ bags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sironi, Selena; Eusebio, Lidia; Dentoni, Licinia; Capelli, Laura; Del Rosso, Renato

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the work is to verify the diffusion rate of ammonia through the Nalophan™ film that constitutes the sampling bag, considering storage times ranging from 1 to 26 h. The ammonia decay over time was evaluated using gas-chromatography for the quantification of ammonia concentration inside the bag. The research assesses the roles of both of ammonia and water concentration gradients at the polymeric film interface on the diffusion process. The results show that both the ammonia concentration gradient and, in a less pronounced way, the water concentration gradient are the main 'engines' of ammonia diffusion. Double bags seem to represent a simple solution for preventing ammonia losses during storage. Another interesting result concerns the role of the bag surface on the ammonia diffusion rate: the higher the surface/volume (S/V) ratio, the higher the ammonia diffusion rate through the polymeric film.

  11. Comparative study on the performance of a SDC-based SOFC fueled by ammonia and hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Guangyao; Jiang, Cairong; Ma, Jianjun; Ma, Qianli; Liu, Xingqin

    A nickel-based anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) was assembled with a 10 μm thick Ce 0.8Sm 0.2O 2- δ (SDC) electrolyte and a Ba 0.5Sr 0.5Co 0.8Fe 0.2O 3- δ (BSCF) cathode. The cell performance was investigated with hydrogen and ammonia gas evaporated from liquefied ammonia as fuel. Fueled by hydrogen the maximum power densities were 1872, 1357, and 748 mW cm -2 at 650, 600, and 550 °C, respectively. While with ammonia as fuel, the cell showed the maximum power densities of 1190, 434, and 167 mW cm -2, correspondingly. The power densities lower than that predicted, particularly at the lower operating temperatures for ammonia fuel cell, compared to hydrogen fuel cell, could be attributed to actual lower temperature than thermocouple display due to endothermic reaction of ammonia decomposition as well as the rather larger inlet ammonia flow rate. The results demonstrated that the ammonia was a right convenient liquid fuel for SOFCs as long as it was keeping the decomposition completion of ammonia in the cell or before entering the cell.

  12. Kinetics of bromochloramine formation and decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luh, Jeanne; Mariñas, Benito J

    2014-01-01

    Batch experiments were performed to study the kinetics of bromochloramine formation and decomposition from the reaction of monochloramine and bromide ion. The effects of pH, initial monochloramine and bromide ion concentrations, phosphate buffer concentration, and excess ammonia were evaluated. Results showed that the monochloramine decay rate increased with decreasing pH and increasing bromide ion concentration, and the concentration of bromochloramine increased to a maximum before decreasing gradually. The maximum bromochloramine concentration reached was found to decrease with increasing phosphate and ammonia concentrations. Previous models in the literature were not able to capture the decay of bromochloramine, and therefore we proposed an extended model consisting of reactions for monochloramine autodecomposition, the decay of bromamines in the presence of bromide, bromochloramine formation, and bromochloramine decomposition. Reaction rate constants were obtained through least-squares fitting to 11 data sets representing the effect of pH, bromide, monochloramine, phosphate, and excess ammonia. The reaction rate constants were then used to predict monochloramine and bromochloramine concentration profiles for all experimental conditions tested. In general, the modeled lines were found to provide good agreement with the experimental data under most conditions tested, with deviations occurring at low pH and high bromide concentrations.

  13. Tritiated ammonia formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heung, L.K.

    1995-01-01

    When nitrogen was selected as the glovebox atmosphere for the Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), a concern was raised as to the possibility of tritiated ammonia formation in the gloveboxes. Experimental data were produced to study the tritiated ammonia formation rate in a tritium and nitrogen mixture. A rate equation that closely simulates the experimental data was developed. This rate equation can be used to calculate the formation of tritiated ammonia from different concentrations of tritium and nitrogen. The reaction of T 2 and N 2 to form NT 3 is a slow process, particularly when the tritium concentration is low. The reaction requires weeks or months to reach radiochemical equilibrium dependent on the concentrations of the reactants. 4 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  14. AMMONIA-FREE NOx CONTROL SYSTEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song Wu; Zhen Fan; Andrew H. Seltzer; Richard G. Herman

    2006-06-01

    This report describes a novel NOx control system that has the potential to drastically reduce cost, and enhance performance, operation and safety of power plant NOx control. The new system optimizes the burner and the furnace to achieve very low NOx levels and to provide an adequate amount of CO, and uses the CO for reducing NO both in-furnace and over a downstream AFSCR (ammonia-free selective catalytic reduction) reactor. The AF-SCR combines the advantages of the highly successful SCR technology for power plants and the TWC (three-way catalytic converter) widely used on automobiles. Like the SCR, it works in oxidizing environment of combustion flue gas and uses only base metal catalysts. Like the TWC, the AF-SCR removes NO and excess CO simultaneously without using any external reagent, such as ammonia. This new process has been studied in a development program jointed funded by the US Department of Energy and Foster Wheeler. The report outlines the experimental catalyst work performed on a bench-scale reactor, including test procedure, operating conditions, and results of various catalyst formulations. Several candidate catalysts, prepared with readily available transition metal oxides and common substrate materials, have shown over 80-90% removal for both NO and CO in oxidizing gas mixtures and at elevated temperatures. A detailed combustion study of a 400 MWe coal-fired boiler, applying computational fluid dynamics techniques to model boiler and burner design, has been carried out to investigate ways to optimize the combustion process for the lowest NOx formation and optimum CO/NO ratios. Results of this boiler and burner optimization work are reported. The paper further discusses catalyst scale-up considerations and the conceptual design of a 400 MWe size AF-SCR reactor, as well as economics analysis indicating large cost savings of the ammonia-free NOx control process over the current SCR technology.

  15. Respiratory ammonia output and blood ammonia concentration during incremental exercise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ament, W; Huizenga, [No Value; Kort, E; van der Mark, TW; Grevink, RG; Verkerke, GJ

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the increase of ammonia concentration and lactate concentration in blood was accompanied by an increased expiration of ammonia during graded exercise. Eleven healthy subjects performed an incremental cycle ergometer test. Blood ammonia, blood lactate

  16. Liquid ammonia injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, A; Bang, R L; Lari, A R; Gang, R K; Kanjoor, J R

    2000-06-01

    The toxic effects of a gas depend on the time of exposure, concentration and its chemical nature. Pressurized liquids and gases exert an additional cold thermal injury and this may complicate the clinical picture. A patient who had an accidental exposure to liquid ammonia over a prolonged period, manifesting in cutaneous, respiratory and ocular damage in addition to a severe cold thermal injury (frostbite) with a fatal outcome is presented. The patient had flaccid quadriparesis and episodes of bradycardia, which has not been reported previously. These manifestations raise the possibility of the systemic toxicity in patients with prolonged exposure to ammonia.

  17. Ammonia emissions in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian H.

    2012-01-01

    The NEC (National Emission Ceiling) directive has set targets for the 2010 ammonia emissions from a number of European countries. The target will be reached by most EU-countries and the total emission for EU-27 has been reduced by 22% from 1990 to 2007. Denmark is one of the countries with the la......The NEC (National Emission Ceiling) directive has set targets for the 2010 ammonia emissions from a number of European countries. The target will be reached by most EU-countries and the total emission for EU-27 has been reduced by 22% from 1990 to 2007. Denmark is one of the countries...

  18. Isotopic exchange of nitrogen and ammonia synthesis on uranium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panov, G.I.; Boreskov, G.K.; Kharitonov, A.S.; Moroz, Eh.M.; Sobolev, V.I.

    1984-01-01

    The catalytic properties of uranium nitride samples of different chemical composition: α - U 2 N 3 and UNsub(1, 70) are compared. The isotopic exchange at 553-623 K in both cases is realized by reversible dissociative nitrogen adsorption. Despite the proximity of structural and thermodynamic phase characteristics, the nitrogen adsorption heat differs by 120 kJ/mol which leads to strong differences in catalytic sample properties. It is shown that the isotopic exchange serves a reliable characteristic of activation of molecular nitrogen and its ability to react with the ammonia synthesis

  19. Ammonia synthesis by means of plasma over MgO catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, K.; Akazawa, K.; Matsuda, T.; Miura, H.; Oshima, M.

    1986-01-01

    Ammonia synthesis from H 2 -N 2 mixed gas was studied at room temperature in a glow-discharge plasma in the presence of metals or metal oxides. Magnesia (Mg0) and calcia (CaO), which are oxides with solid basicity, revealed catalytic activity in the plasma synthesis of ammonia, although they are catalytically inactive in industrial ammonia synthesis. The acid oxides (Al 2 0 3 W0 3 , and Si0 2 -Al 2 0 3 ) lead to the consumption of the reactant, i.e., the H2-N2 mixed gas. No ammonia was isolated. Metal catalysts showed higher activity than the above basic oxides. They have, however, different activities. The reaction was faster over the active materials than over sodium chloride (NaCl) or glass wool or in a blank reactor without any catalyst

  20. The Ammonia-Soda Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tingle, M.

    1979-01-01

    This article is a condensed version of a commentary written to accompany a set of slides which describes the ammonia-soda process used by the ammonia-soda plant at Northwich of the United Kingdom. (HM)

  1. Liberation of ammonia by cyanobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, J.W.

    1986-04-01

    Photoheterotrophic nitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria release ammonia when treated with methionine sulfoximine (MSX) to inhibit nitrogen incorporation into protein. This released ammonia can be derived from recently fixed nitrogen (nitrogen atmosphere) or endogenous reserves (argon atmosphere). Anaerobic ammonia release requires light and is stimulated by the photosystem II herbicides DCMU and Atrazine, regardless of the source of ammonia. As much as one quarter of the total cellular nitrogen can be released as ammonia by cyanbacteria treated with MSX and DCMU under argon in light. Chromatography of cell extracts indicates that virtually all cellular proteins are degraded. DCMU and Atrazine, at very low concentration, inhibit sustained uptake of the ammonia analog /sup 14/C methylamine. These data indicate that the herbicides interrupt ammonia uptake and retention by the cells, and support a role for photosystem II in ammonia metabolism.

  2. Highly efficient Ru/MnO2 nano-catalysts for Li-O2 batteries: Quantitative analysis of catalytic Li2O2 decomposition by operando synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Ma, Yue; Roberts, Matthew; Gustafsson, Torbjörn; Edström, Kristina; Zhu, Jiefang

    2017-06-01

    In-situ or operando quantitative analysis is very important for Li-O2 batteries, in order to properly, accurately and comprehensively evaluate electrocatalysts and characterize Li-O2 electrochemistry in real-time. Synchrotron XRD can provide much higher X-ray intensity and time resolution than traditional in-house diffractometers, and therefore can contribute to quantitative analysis for Li-O2 batteries. Here, operando synchrotron XRD is further developed to quantitatively study Li-O2 batteries with nano-catalysts, Ru/MnO2. The time-resolved oxygen evolution reaction (OER) kinetics for Li-O2 cells with Ru/MNT was systematically investigated using operando synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD). Li2O2 decomposition in the electrodes with Ru/MNT catalysts during galvanostatic and potentiostatic charge processes followed pseudo-zero-order kinetics and showed ideal Coulombic efficiency (close to 100%). Furthermore, it was found that the OER kinetics for a cell with 2 wt% Ru/MNT charged at a constant potential of 4.3 V was even faster than that for a cell with the same amount of pure Ru nanoparticles, which have been considered as a highly active catalyst for Li-O2 batteries. These results indicated that Ru/MNT with a special nanostructure represented a very efficient electrocatalyst for promoting the OER in Li-O2 batteries. We also demonstrate that synchrotron radiation XRD can "highlight" a way to quantitative analysis for Li-O2 batteries.

  3. Hydroaminomethylation in supercritical ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, A.; Kant, M. [Leibniz-Institute for Catalysis, Berlin (Germany); Klein, H.; Jackstell, R.; Beller, M. [Leibniz-Institute for Catalysis, Rostock (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    Thermodynamic measurements were carried in the reaction system of hydroaminomethylation of olefins. Mixtures of ammonia, olefins, co-solvents, syngas and products such as nonylamine used as model and water were studied. In dependence on the reaction conditions and the mixtures selected opalescence points in a region from 92-290 bar and 120-172 C were found. (orig.)

  4. Contribution to the study of the catalytic properties of stoichiometric and non- stoichiometric alumina. Catalysis of the hydrogenation of ethylene and of the formic acid decomposition; Contribution a l'etude des proprietes catalytiques d'alumines stoechiometriques et non stoechiometriques. Catalyse de l'hydrogenation de l'ethylene et de la decomposition de l'acide formique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilaire, P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-07-01

    The alumina, of the delta crystalline form and composed of non-porous spherical grains of 150 A diameter, is cold pressed in a die at a pressure of 4 metric tons/sp.cm. On heating to 500 deg C in a high vacuum, the surface lattice of the alumina loses oxygen and becomes an n-type semi-conductor. The same treatment at 800 deg C causes a loss of aluminium and the appearance of p-type semi-conductivity. These samples are used as catalysts for reactions involving the hydrogenation of ethylene and the decomposition of formic acid. The kinetic study of the ethylene hydrogenation reaction at 500 deg C shows that when this gas is not in excess in the reaction mixture, the rate of reaction is proportional to the partial pressure of the hydrogen. The rate constants at 500 deg C are of the same order of magnitude, irrespective of the previous treatment of the alumina. This result is due to a compensation effect between the pre-exponential factor and the apparent activation energy. The nature of the various hydrogen adsorption sites is described in each case. The apparent activation energy is a minimum each time that the hydrogen is adsorbed covalently; it is a maximum for an ionic adsorption. All the samples show a strong activity for the decomposition of formic acid and direct this reaction towards the dehydration. The dehydrogenation represents only 5 per cent of the total reaction and is not influenced by the nature of the prior treatment of the alumina. But even in this case, the activation energy for the dehydrogenation is lowered when the hydrogen is adsorbed covalently, without the liberation of electrons. (author) [French] L'alumine, de forme cristalline delta, constituee de grains spheriques non poreux d'un diametre de 150 A, est comprimee a froid dans une motrice sous une pression de 4 t/cm{sup 2}, Lorsque les comprimes sont chauffes a 500 deg C sous vide pousse, il se produit un depart d'oxygene du reseau superficiel d'alumine qui devient semi

  5. Study of the synthesis of ammonia over technetium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spetsyn, V.I.; Mikhailenko, I.E.; Pokrovskaya, O.V.

    1982-01-01

    The catalytic properties of technetium in the synthesis of ammonia have been studied in the present work. Technetium catalysts according to specific yield surpass all know catalysts for the synthesis of ammonia. The enhanced catalytic activity of technetium compared to manganese and rhenium is apparently explained by the presence of the radioactivity of 99 Tc. The processes of adsorption, orientation of the adsorbed molecules, and their binding energies can differ during radiation action. Irradiation of the carrier, occurring through #betta#-emission of 99 Tc, with doses of 4-8 x 10 3 rad/day, increased the number of defects in the crystal structure where stabilization of technetium atoms was possible. The existence of charged centers can cause an increase in the dissociative chemisorption of nitrogen, which is the limiting stage of the process. Technetium catalysts possess a stable catalytic activity and do not require its restoration for several months. Results suggest that the use of technetium as a catalyst for the synthesis of ammonia has real advantages and potential possibilities

  6. Study of the catalytic activity of supported technetium catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitsyn, V.I.; Mikhailenko, I.E.; Pokorovskaya, O.V.

    1985-01-01

    The radioactive d metal 43 Tc 99 has catalytic properties in the synthesis of ammonia. For the purpose of reducing the quantity of the radioactive metal and of increasing the specific surface, the active component was applied to BaTiO 3 and gamma-Al 2 O 3 supports. This paper uses charcoal as a support and a table presents the catalytic activity of the samples during the synthesis of ammonia. X-ray diffractometric investigation of the catalysts was carried out with the use of Cu K /SUB alpha/ radiation. It is shown that the catalysts. The values of the specific rate constants of technetium in the catalysts. The values of the specific rate constants remain practically constant for all the catalyst samples studied, attesting to the absence of a specific metal-support interaction during the synthesis of ammonia

  7. Influence of tropical leaf litter on nitrogen mineralization and community structure of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Diallo, M. D.; Guisse, A.; Sall, S. N.; Dick, R. P.; Assigbetsé, Komi; Dieng, A. L.; Chotte, Jean-Luc

    2015-01-01

    Description of the subject. The present study concerns the relationships among leaf litter decomposition, substrate quality, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) community composition and nitrogen (N) availability. Decomposition of organic matter affects the biogeochemical cycling of carbon (C) and N. Since the composition of the soil microbial community can alter the physiological capacity of the community, it is timely to study the litter quality effect on N dynamic in ecosystems. Objectives. T...

  8. Ammonia abundances in comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, S.; Tegler, S.; Engel, L.

    The emission band strengths of the NH2 bands of Comets Halley, Hartley-Good, Thiele, and Borrelly were measured to determine the NH2 column densities for the comets. Production rates obtained using the Haser and vectorial models are in agreement within the observational errors, suggesting that a simple two-step decay model may be used to approximate the NH2 distribution in a comet's coma. Ammonia-to-water abundance ratios from 0.01 to 0.4 percent were found for the four comets. The ratio in Comet Halley is found to be Q(NH3)/Q(H2O) = 0.002 + or - 0.001. No significant difference in the ammonia abundance was found before or after perihelion in Comet Halley.

  9. Ready synthesis of free N-H 2-arylindoles via the copper-catalyzed amination of 2-bromo-arylacetylenes with aqueous ammonia and sequential intramolecular cyclization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huifeng; Li, Yaming; Jiang, Linlin; Zhang, Rong; Jin, Kun; Zhao, Defeng; Duan, Chunying

    2011-07-07

    A wide range of free N-H 2-arylindoles were synthesised via the copper(II)-catalyzed amination of 2-bromo-arylacetylenes with aqueous ammonia and sequential intramolecular cyclization. The convenience and atom economy of aqueous ammonia, and the low cost of the copper catalytic system make this protocol readily superior in practical application.

  10. Impact of the spray-wall-interaction-model on the prediction of the ammonia homogenization in automotive SCR systems; Einfluss des Tropfen-Wand-Interaktions-Modells auf die Vorhersage der Ammoniak-Homogenisierung in PKW-SCR-Systemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, S.; Smith, H.; Lauer, T.; Geringer, B. [Technische Univ. Wien (Austria). Inst. fuer Fahrzeugantriebe und Automobiltechnik; Pessl, G.; Krenn, C. [BMW Motoren GmbH, Steyr (Austria)

    2012-11-01

    Nitrogen oxide emissions of diesel engine powered vehicles have to be significantly reduced in order to meet future international legislative restrictions. The Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) has meanwhile been established as a promising technology to cope with the challenging limits in the sector of mid-sized and large passenger cars. Despite its successful market launch, high optimization potentials remain for the automotive SCR system with respect to the fast preparation of the injected urea-water solution (UWS) and a sufficient ammonia homogenization at the SCR catalyst. In cooperation with BMW Motoren GmbH Steyr, the Institute for Powertrains and Automotive Technology from Vienna University of Technology implemented a CFD-simulation model of the UWS preparation and mixing processes upstream of the SCR-catalyst. A series type passenger car SCR system with a swirl mixing element has been investigated, to analyze the impact of the droplet-wall-interaction and liquid-film formation on the ammonia homogenization for a wide range of exhaust gas conditions. An optimized numerical description of the UWS-droplet-interaction with the hot surfaces of the exhaust system has been established and validated with engine test bed measurements of the ammonia homogenization. A remarkable correlation between a fast formation of ammonia and a high degree of uniformity at the catalyst was proven by the CFD. Especially for high exhaust temperatures an early UWS decomposition was hindered by the Leidenfrost effect, which leads to a high amount of droplets that reach the catalyst and a relatively low level of homogenization. (orig.)

  11. Solid state synthesis, characterization, surface and catalytic properties of Pr2CoO4 and Pr2NiO4 catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, K.K.; Indu, N.K.; Sinha, S.K.; Pankaj, A.K.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The most interesting non-stoichiometric oxides are found in transition metal and rare earth oxides at higher temperatures. The role of Solid State properties in the catalysis using mixed metal oxide as catalyst have wide applications in fertilizer, Petro-chemical, Pharmaceutical, cosmetic, paint detergents, plastics and food-stuff industries and these are also resistive towards acids and alkalies. The use of catalyst has opened up new process routes or revolutioned the existing process in terms of economics and efficiency and has radically changed the industrial scenario. The use of catalyst is so pervasive today that nearly 70 % of modern chemical processes are based on it at some stage or other and 90% new processes developed are catalytic nature. A series of non-stoichiometric spinel type of oxide catalyst of Praseodymium with cobalt and nickel were synthesized by their oxalates through Solid State reaction technique at different activation temperatures i.e. 600, 700, 800 and 900 deg C. The characterization of catalyst was done by XRD, FTIR and ESR methods. X-ray powder diffraction study shows that catalysts are made up of well grown crystallinities mostly in single phase crystal and system is of orthorhombic structure. FTIR is related to inadequate decomposition of oxalate ion from the Catalyst. The kinetic decomposition of Urea was employed as a model reaction to study the catalytic potentiality of different catalysts. Surface and Catalytic Properties of catalysts were measured. A relation between activation temperature and surface properties like excess surface oxygen (E.S.O.), surface acidity and surface area was observed. A linear relationship between the surface area of the catalyst and the amount of ammonia gas evolved per gm of the sample was observed also. Nickel containing catalysts were found a bit more catalytic active in comparison to cobalt oxide catalysts. Transition metal ions (i.e. Ni 2+ and Co 2+ ions) are mainly responsible for

  12. Method of production of ammonia synthesis gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1943-09-10

    In the catalytic synthesis of complicated hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen at normal or slightly increased pressures by the Fischer--Tropsch process, or carried out at higher pressures in some other proposals, the synthesis gas was incompletely transformed. After the conclusion of the synthesis, the residual gas, upon the separation of the liquid constituents, contained, in addition to the unreacted carbon moxoxide and hydrogen, also considerable amounts of methane, carbon dioxide, and nitrogen from the original synthesis gas. This residual gas had been used as fuel. It was, however, pure and contained no sulfur or other catalyst poisons and burning it was considered uneconomical. It was proposed to make better use of it by using it as fuel. It was, however, pure and contained no sulfur or other catalyst poisons and burning it was considered uneconomical. It was proposed to make better use of it by using it as a raw material for the production of synthesis gas by decomposing the methane present in it with steam according to the equation CH/sub 4/ + H/sub 2/O = CO + 3H/sub 2/. This conversion was to be brought about either by a return to the producers or else in special splitting units. Also, it had been found that the residual gas, possibly even in the presence of oxygen compounds, could be conveniently used for the synthesis of ammonia. Several examples of ammonia synthesis were discussed.

  13. Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spectral Decomposition Algorithm (SDA) is an unsupervised feature extraction technique similar to PCA that was developed to better distinguish spectral features in...

  14. Thermal decomposition of pyrite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Music, S.; Ristic, M.; Popovic, S.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal decomposition of natural pyrite (cubic, FeS 2 ) has been investigated using X-ray diffraction and 57 Fe Moessbauer spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction analysis of pyrite ore from different sources showed the presence of associated minerals, such as quartz, szomolnokite, stilbite or stellerite, micas and hematite. Hematite, maghemite and pyrrhotite were detected as thermal decomposition products of natural pyrite. The phase composition of the thermal decomposition products depends on the terature, time of heating and starting size of pyrite chrystals. Hematite is the end product of the thermal decomposition of natural pyrite. (author) 24 refs.; 6 figs.; 2 tabs

  15. Site-Specific Reactivity of Copper Chabazite Zeolites with Nitric Oxide, Ammonia, and Oxygen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godiksen, Anita; Isaksen, Oliver L.; Rasmussen, Søren B.

    2018-01-01

    In-situ electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was applied to dilute copper chabazite (CHA) zeolites under gas flows relevant for the selective catalytic reduction of NO with ammonia (NH3-SCR). Under both reducing and oxidizing conditions, we observed differences in reactivity between...... differences in reactivity of copper sites has implications for the mechanistic understanding of NH3-SCR with Cu-zeolites....

  16. Co-Mn-Al Mixed Oxides as Catalysts for Ammonia Oxidation to N2O.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ludvíková, Jana; Jablońska, M.; Jirátová, Květa; Chmielarz, L.; Balabánová, Jana; Kovanda, F.; Obalová, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 3 (2016), s. 2669-2690 ISSN 0922-6168 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-13750S Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : Co-Mn-Al mixed oxides * catalytic ammonia oxidation * N2O production * mechanochemical production Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.369, year: 2016

  17. Alteration of the Diastereoselectivity of 3-Methylaspartate Ammonia Lyase by Using Structure-Based Mutagenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raj, Hans; Weiner, Barbara; Puthan Veetil, Vinod; Reis, Carlos R.; Quax, Wim J.; Janssen, Dick B.; Feringa, Ben L.; Poelarends, Gerrit J.

    2009-01-01

    3-Methylaspartate ammonia-lyase (MAL) catalyzes the reversible amination of mesaconate to give both (2S,3S)-3-methylaspartic acid and (2S,3R)-3-methylaspartic acid as products. The deamination mechanism of MAL is likely to involve general base catalysis, in which a catalytic base abstracts the C3

  18. Interaction of intermetallic compounds formed by rare earths, scandium, yttrium and 3d-transition metals, with gaseous ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shilkin, S.P.; Volkova, L.S.

    1992-01-01

    Interaction of the RT n intermetallic compounds, where R Sc, Y, rare earths, T = Fe, Co, Ni; n = 2,3,5, with gaseous ammonia under pressure of 1MPa and at temperatures of 293, 723 and 798 K is studied. It is established on the basis of roentgenographic studied, chemical analysis data, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and specific surface measurements that metallic matrixes of intermetallides decompose into nitrides and transition metal phases at temperatures of 723 and 798 K under effect of ammonia and independent of structural types of the source materials; partial or complete decomposition of intermetallides through ammonia with formation of transition metal mixture, binary hydrides and nitrides of the most electropositive metal the above systems occurs at the temperature of 293 K depending on the heat of the source compounds and their tendency to decomposition under ammonia effect

  19. Low-temperature synthesis of Mn-based mixed metal oxides with novel fluffy structures as efficient catalysts for selective reduction of nitrogen oxides by ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Bo; Zhao, Zongbin; Chen, Yongsheng; Wang, Xuzhen; Li, Yong; Qiu, Jieshan

    2014-10-21

    A series of Mn-based mixed metal oxide catalysts (Co-Mn-O, Fe-Mn-O, Ni-Mn-O) with high surface areas were prepared via low temperature crystal splitting and exhibited extremely high catalytic activity for the low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides with ammonia.

  20. Decomposition of Sodium Tetraphenylborate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, M.J.

    1998-01-01

    The chemical decomposition of aqueous alkaline solutions of sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) has been investigated. The focus of the investigation is on the determination of additives and/or variables which influence NaTBP decomposition. This document describes work aimed at providing better understanding into the relationship of copper (II), solution temperature, and solution pH to NaTPB stability

  1. Probability matrix decomposition models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maris, E.; DeBoeck, P.; Mechelen, I. van

    1996-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a class of models for two-way matrices with binary entries of 0 and 1. First, we consider Boolean matrix decomposition, conceptualize it as a latent response model (LRM) and, by making use of this conceptualization, generalize it to a larger class of matrix decomposition

  2. Renal Ammonia Metabolism and Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, I. David; Verlander, Jill W.

    2015-01-01

    Renal ammonia metabolism and transport mediates a central role in acid-base homeostasis. In contrast to most renal solutes, the majority of renal ammonia excretion derives from intrarenal production, not from glomerular filtration. Renal ammoniagenesis predominantly results from glutamine metabolism, which produces 2 NH4+ and 2 HCO3− for each glutamine metabolized. The proximal tubule is the primary site for ammoniagenesis, but there is evidence for ammoniagenesis by most renal epithelial cells. Ammonia produced in the kidney is either excreted into the urine or returned to the systemic circulation through the renal veins. Ammonia excreted in the urine promotes acid excretion; ammonia returned to the systemic circulation is metabolized in the liver in a HCO3−-consuming process, resulting in no net benefit to acid-base homeostasis. Highly regulated ammonia transport by renal epithelial cells determines the proportion of ammonia excreted in the urine versus returned to the systemic circulation. The traditional paradigm of ammonia transport involving passive NH3 diffusion, protonation in the lumen and NH4+ trapping due to an inability to cross plasma membranes is being replaced by the recognition of limited plasma membrane NH3 permeability in combination with the presence of specific NH3-transporting and NH4+-transporting proteins in specific renal epithelial cells. Ammonia production and transport are regulated by a variety of factors, including extracellular pH and K+, and by several hormones, such as mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and angiotensin II. This coordinated process of regulated ammonia production and transport is critical for the effective maintenance of acid-base homeostasis. PMID:23720285

  3. Lethal concentration (CL50 of un-ionized ammonia for pejerrey larvae in acute exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piedras Sérgio Renato Noguez

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia results from decomposition of effluents organic matter, e.g. feed wastes and fish faeces. Its un-ionized form can be toxic because diffuses easily through fish respiratory membranes, damaging gill epithelium and impairing gas exchanges. The objective of this work was determining the 96-hour CL50 of un-ionized ammonia for newly hatched pejerrey Odontesthes bonariensis larvae. Trials were set up completely randomized design, with three different concentration of un-ionized ammonia (0.57, 0.94, and 1.45 mg L-1 NH3-N and a control treatment (n = 3. Experimental units were 20-L, aerated aquaria stocked with 20 larvae (average weight 3.9 mg. Pejerrey larvae exposed to un-ionized ammonia during 96 hours present 50% mortality at 0.71 mg L-1 NH3-N.

  4. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes by catalytic vapor decomposition ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and Y H Lee, Carbon 39, 655 (2001). [33] T R Ravindran, B R Jackson and J V Badding, Chem. Mater. 13, 4187 (2001). [34] H Ago, K Nakamura, N Uhera and T Masaharu, J. Phys. Chem. B108, 18908 (2004). [35] C V Santos, A L M Hernandez, M L Cassou, A A Castillo and V M Castano, Nan- otechnology 13, 495 (2002).

  5. Method of generating hydrogen by catalytic decomposition of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, Uthamalingam; Dorris, Stephen E.; Bose, Arun C.; Stiegel, Gary J.; Lee, Tae-Hyun

    2002-01-01

    A method for producing hydrogen includes providing a feed stream comprising water; contacting at least one proton conducting membrane adapted to interact with the feed stream; splitting the water into hydrogen and oxygen at a predetermined temperature; and separating the hydrogen from the oxygen. Preferably the proton conducting membrane comprises a proton conductor and a second phase material. Preferable proton conductors suitable for use in a proton conducting membrane include a lanthanide element, a Group VIA element and a Group IA or Group IIA element such as barium, strontium, or combinations of these elements. More preferred proton conductors include yttrium. Preferable second phase materials include platinum, palladium, nickel, cobalt, chromium, manganese, vanadium, silver, gold, copper, rhodium, ruthenium, niobium, zirconium, tantalum, and combinations of these. More preferably second phase materials suitable for use in a proton conducting membrane include nickel, palladium, and combinations of these. The method for generating hydrogen is preferably preformed in the range between about 600.degree. C. and 1,700.degree. C.

  6. Production of carbon nanotubes and hydrogen by catalytic ethanol decomposition

    OpenAIRE

    Jaime Gallego; Germán Sierra Gallego; Carlos Daza; Rafael Molina; Joel Barrault; Catherine Batiot-Dupeyat; Fanor Mondragón

    2013-01-01

    En este trabajo se sintetizaron nanotubos de carbono multicapa (MWCNTs) por medio de la reacción de descomposición de etanol usando como precursor del catalizador a la perovskita LaNiO. Los nanotubos de carbono de pared múltiple (MWCNTs) fueron caracterizados por microscopía electrónica de transmisión (TEM) y de barrido (SEM) y análisis termogravimétrico (TGA). Mediante SEM se observó que los MWCNTs poseen diámetros internos entre 3 nm y 12 nm con diámetros externos de hasta 42 nm, igualmente...

  7. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes by catalytic vapor decomposition ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We have achieved this by modified soap bubble flowmeter, which controlled the flow rates of two gases, simultaneously. With the help of this set-up, CNTs could be prepared in any common laboratory. Raman spectroscopy indicated the possibilities of formation of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). From scanning ...

  8. Catalytic thermal decomposition of polyethylene determined by thermogravimetric treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisar, J.; Khan, M.S.; Khan, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study low density polyethylene (LDPE) has been studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) using commercially available oxides as catalysts. TGA experiments were used to evaluate the activity of different catalysts on low density polyethylene (LDPE) degradation and to study the effect in terms of type and amount of catalyst used. All the catalysts used improved the pyrolysis of LDPE. The reaction rates were found to increase with increase in amount of catalyst. Among the catalysts used, alumina acidic active catalyst performed better at all four fractions. Moreover, alumina acidic active reduced weight loss temperature better than others tested catalysts. The effect of alumina neutral catalyst on the pyrolysis of LDPE is less pronounced due to its small surface area and pore size. The effect of these catalysts showed that surface area, number of acidic sites and pore size were found as the key factors for the energy efficient degradation of polymers. (author)

  9. Radiation decomposition of alcohols and chloro phenols in micellar systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno A, J.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of surfactants on the radiation decomposition yield of alcohols and chloro phenols has been studied with gamma doses of 2, 3, and 5 KGy. These compounds were used as typical pollutants in waste water, and the effect of the water solubility, chemical structure, and the nature of the surfactant, anionic or cationic, was studied. The results show that anionic surfactant like sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), improve the radiation decomposition yield of ortho-chloro phenol, while cationic surfactant like cetyl trimethylammonium chloride (CTAC), improve the radiation decomposition yield of butyl alcohol. A similar behavior is expected for those alcohols with water solubility close to the studied ones. Surfactant concentrations below critical micellar concentration (CMC), inhibited radiation decomposition for both types of alcohols. However radiation decomposition yield increased when surfactant concentrations were bigger than the CMC. Aromatic alcohols decomposition was more marked than for linear alcohols decomposition. On a mixture of alcohols and chloro phenols in aqueous solution the radiation decomposition yield decreased with increasing surfactant concentration. Nevertheless, there were competitive reactions between the alcohols, surfactants dimers, hydroxyl radical and other reactive species formed on water radiolysis, producing a catalytic positive effect in the decomposition of alcohols. Chemical structure and the number of carbons were not important factors in the radiation decomposition. When an alcohol like ortho-chloro phenol contained an additional chlorine atom, the decomposition of this compound was almost constant. In conclusion the micellar effect depend on both, the nature of the surfactant (anionic or cationic) and the chemical structure of the alcohols. The results of this study are useful for wastewater treatment plants based on the oxidant effect of the hydroxyl radical, like in advanced oxidation processes, or in combined treatment such as

  10. Catalytic abatement of nitrous oxide from nitric and production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oonk, J.

    1998-01-01

    Nitric acid production is identified as a main source of nitrous oxide. Options for emission reduction however are not available. TNO and Hydro Agri studied the technological and economic feasibility of catalytic decomposition of nitrous oxide in nitric acid tail-gases. Although in literature

  11. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of formic acid in wastewater with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-03

    Jul 3, 2016 ... ABSTRACT. The catalytic wet oxidation of formic acid, using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidizing agent over naturally-occurring iron ore, was explored. Firstly, the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to its hydroxyl radicals (HO• and HOO•) over naturally-occurring iron ore was investigated. The reaction was ...

  12. Synthesis, characterization, scale-up and catalytic behaviour of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Highly uniform cobalt oxide (Co3O4) nanoparticles were synthesized via thermal decomposition of cobalt hydroxy carbonates with particle size around 16 ± 1 nm. The process gives reproducible results in batches of 1–5 kg. The particles show good catalytic activity for the oxidation of oxalic acid and benzaldehyde under ...

  13. Catalytic wet peroxide oxidation of formic acid in wastewater with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The catalytic wet oxidation of formic acid, using hydrogen peroxide as the oxidizing agent over naturally-occurring iron ore, was explored. Firstly, the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide to its hydroxyl radicals (HO• and HOO•) over naturally-occurring iron ore was investigated. The reaction was monitored by ATR FTIR by ...

  14. Azimuthal decomposition of optical modes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This presentation analyses the azimuthal decomposition of optical modes. Decomposition of azimuthal modes need two steps, namely generation and decomposition. An azimuthally-varying phase (bounded by a ring-slit) placed in the spatial frequency...

  15. Predicting catalysis: understanding ammonia synthesis from first-principles calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellman, A; Baerends, E J; Biczysko, M; Bligaard, T; Christensen, C H; Clary, D C; Dahl, S; van Harrevelt, R; Honkala, K; Jonsson, H; Kroes, G J; Luppi, M; Manthe, U; Nørskov, J K; Olsen, R A; Rossmeisl, J; Skúlason, E; Tautermann, C S; Varandas, A J C; Vincent, J K

    2006-09-14

    Here, we give a full account of a large collaborative effort toward an atomic-scale understanding of modern industrial ammonia production over ruthenium catalysts. We show that overall rates of ammonia production can be determined by applying various levels of theory (including transition state theory with or without tunneling corrections, and quantum dynamics) to a range of relevant elementary reaction steps, such as N(2) dissociation, H(2) dissociation, and hydrogenation of the intermediate reactants. A complete kinetic model based on the most relevant elementary steps can be established for any given point along an industrial reactor, and the kinetic results can be integrated over the catalyst bed to determine the industrial reactor yield. We find that, given the present uncertainties, the rate of ammonia production is well-determined directly from our atomic-scale calculations. Furthermore, our studies provide new insight into several related fields, for instance, gas-phase and electrochemical ammonia synthesis. The success of predicting the outcome of a catalytic reaction from first-principles calculations supports our point of view that, in the future, theory will be a fully integrated tool in the search for the next generation of catalysts.

  16. A comparative kinetic study of SNCR process using ammonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Tayyeb Javed

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents comparative kinetic modelling of nitrogen oxides (NOx removal from flue gases by selective non-catalytic reduction process using ammonia as reducing agent. The computer code SENKIN is used in this study with the three published chemical kinetic mechanisms; Zanoelo, Kilpinen and Skreiberg. Kinetic modeling was performed for an isothermal plug flow reactor at atmospheric pressure so as to compare it with the experimental results. A 500 ppm NOx background in the flue gas is considered and kept constant throughout the investigation. The ammonia performance was modeled in the range of 750 to 1250 ºC using the molar ratios NH3/NOx from 0.25 to 3.0 and residence times up to 1.5 seconds. The modeling using all the mechanisms exhibits and confirms a temperature window of NOx reduction with ammonia. It was observed that 80% of NOx reduction efficiency could be achieved if the flue gas is given 300 msec to react with ammonia, while it is passing through a section within a temperature range of 910 to 1060 ºC (Kilpinen mechanism or within a temperature range of 925 to 1030 ºC (Zanoelo mechanism or within a temperature range of 890 to 1090 ºC (Skreiberg mechanism.

  17. CADDIS Volume 2. Sources, Stressors and Responses: Ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Introduction to the ammonia module, when to list ammonia as a candidate cause, ways to measure ammonia, simple and detailed conceptual diagrams for ammonia, literature reviews and references for the ammonia module.

  18. Dry and semi-dry methods for removal of ammonia from pulverized fuel combustion fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y. Gao; X. Chen; G. Fujisaki; A. Mehta; E. Suuberg; R. Hurt [Brown University, Providence, RI (United States). Division of Engineering

    2002-12-01

    Fly ash from pulverized solid fuel combustion can become contaminated by ammonia during selective catalytic/noncatalytic NOx reduction processes and/or electrostatic precipitator conditioning, resulting in problems with the commercial handling, disposal, and utilization of ash. The present paper investigates the chemistry of a class of postcombustion ammonia removal processes that operate near room temperature and in the dry or semi-dry state. Laboratory experiments are carried out in which ammonia is liberated from fly ash through introduction of controlled amounts of water to the interparticle spaces using static humid air, flowing humid air, and/or flowing fog (water aerosol). Additional experiments explore the possibility of destroying ammonia using ozone as a low-temperature oxidant under both dry and wet conditions, alone or in combination with hydrogen peroxide. 28 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. AMMONOX-Ammonia for enhancing biogas yield & reducing NOx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavala, Hariklia N.; Kristensen, P.G.; Paamand, K.

    2013-01-01

    The continuously increasing demand for renewable energy sources renders anaerobic digestion to one of the most promising technologies for renewable energy production. Due to the animal production intensification, manure is being used as the primary feedstock for most of the biogas plants. However......, biogas plants digesting liquid manure alone are not economically viable due to the relatively low organic content of the manure, usually 3-5%.Thus, their economical profitable operation relies partly on increasing the methane yield from manure, and especially of its solid fraction, usually called...... of innovative ammonia recovery technology and c) the coupling of the excess ammonia obtained from manure with the catalytic elimination of NOx emissions when the biogas is used for subsequent electricity generation with gas engines....

  20. Sustainable Ammonia Synthesis – Exploring the scientific challenges associated with discovering alternative, sustainable processes for ammonia production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nørskov, Jens [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); ; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Chen, Jingguang [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Miranda, Raul [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science; Fitzsimmons, Tim [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science; Stack, Robert [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States). Office of Science

    2016-02-18

    Ammonia (NH3) is essential to all life on our planet. Until about 100 years ago, NH3 produced by reduction of dinitrogen (N2) in air came almost exclusively from bacteria containing the enzyme nitrogenase.. DOE convened a roundtable of experts on February 18, 2016. Participants in the Roundtable discussions concluded that the scientific basis for sustainable processes for ammonia synthesis is currently lacking, and it needs to be enhanced substantially before it can form the foundation for alternative processes. The Roundtable Panel identified an overarching grand challenge and several additional scientific grand challenges and research opportunities: -Discovery of active, selective, scalable, long-lived catalysts for sustainable ammonia synthesis. -Development of relatively low pressure (<10 atm) and relatively low temperature (<200 C) thermal processes. -Integration of knowledge from nature (enzyme catalysis), molecular/homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis. -Development of electrochemical and photochemical routes for N2 reduction based on proton and electron transfer -Development of biochemical routes to N2 reduction -Development of chemical looping (solar thermochemical) approaches -Identification of descriptors of catalytic activity using a combination of theory and experiments -Characterization of surface adsorbates and catalyst structures (chemical, physical and electronic) under conditions relevant to ammonia synthesis.

  1. Catalytic reduction of N2O over Ag-Pd/Al2O3 bimetallic catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzitzios, V K; Georgakilas, V

    2005-05-01

    A study of the catalytic conversion of N2O to N2 over a bimetallic Ag-Pd catalyst is described in this article. Several Ag-Pd catalytic systems were prepared supported on Al2O3 with different ratios and their catalytic activity for the direct decomposition of N2O and their reduction with CO was measured. Based on the experimental results, it was observed that Ag-Pd bimetallic catalyst (5-0.5%) was the most active for both nitrous oxide reduction and direct decomposition. This high activity seems to be connected with a synergistic effect between Ag and Pd.

  2. Anhydrous Ammonia Frost on Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smythe, W. D.; Nelson, R.; Boryta, M. D.

    2009-12-01

    Ammonia has been suggested as a probable source for sustaining Titan's thick nitrogen-dominated atmosphere. Ammonia is believed to be important to maintaining nitrogen in Titan's atmosphere. Ammonia is seen in clouds in the atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn, but has yet to be detected on any of the satellites. This may be because all forms of NH3 are unstable in the ambient conditions of the satellites surfaces or that its spectral features are altered by other components of the surface, and have not been identified. It has recently been demonstrated[1] that brightening occurs in Titan’s atmosphere that is transient on the time-scale of months. The spectral shape of the brightening is more consistent with that of the transient apparition of a pure ammonia frost than of an ammonia monohydrate or ammonia dihydrate frost. However, the phase behavior of the ammonia water system has peritectics at compositions of 1:1 and 1:2. These hydrate forms would be expected to dominate if the frost, or the reservoir from which the frost was derived had any water present. Physical mechanisms for producing measurable quanitities of anhydrous ammonia can include chemical dehydration or dehydration of the vapor phase - but it is challenging to store significant quantities of the anhydrous material because of the phase behavior in the solid state. [1] Nelson, R.M., et al. Saturn’s Titan: Surface Change, Ammonia, and Implications for Atmospheric and Tectonic Activity., Icarus, 199, pp. 429-441, 2009 This work was performed at JPL under contract to NASA

  3. A low energy aqueous ammonia CO2 capture process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Waseem Arshad, Muhammad; Blaker, Eirik Ask

    2014-01-01

    based CO2 capture with a thermal decomposition reactor. The overall energy penalty is reduced at the expense of introducing a solid handling section which consists of a saturation reactor, a crystallizer and a belt filter. The feasibility of the present approach is demonstrated by simulation. Flow...... with the rich solution and it reduces below 100 ppm by washing with low temperature water.......The most pressing challenges regarding the use of ammonia for CO2 capture are the precipitation limitation and the energy penalty of solvent regeneration. Precipitation-free operation is a vital task since solids may cause the shutdown of the plant. Precipitation and slurry formation can be avoided...

  4. Radiation decomposition of chlorates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patil, S.F.; Patil, B.T.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation induced decomposition yields of chloride, hypochlorite and chlorite have been determined in chlorates of barium, calcium and strontium for different γ doses. The G-values of the products in anhydrous barium and calcium chlorates are found to be greater than in the corresponding hydrated forms showing that the water of crystallization plays a quenching role in the radiation decomposition of chlorates. The results are explained on the assumption that the excitation energy of the fraction of the metal ions is transferred to the water molecules in the crystal lattice resulting in the excitation or decomposition of the water molecules rather than chlorate ions. (orig.) [de

  5. Decompositions of manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Daverman, Robert J

    2007-01-01

    Decomposition theory studies decompositions, or partitions, of manifolds into simple pieces, usually cell-like sets. Since its inception in 1929, the subject has become an important tool in geometric topology. The main goal of the book is to help students interested in geometric topology to bridge the gap between entry-level graduate courses and research at the frontier as well as to demonstrate interrelations of decomposition theory with other parts of geometric topology. With numerous exercises and problems, many of them quite challenging, the book continues to be strongly recommended to eve

  6. Ammonia-based quantum computer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, Andrew J.; Cain, Paul A.; Williams, David A.; Briggs, G. Andrew D.

    2002-01-01

    We propose a scheme for quantum computation using two eigenstates of ammonia or similar molecules. Individual ammonia molecules are confined inside fullerenes and used as two-level qubit systems. Interaction between these ammonia qubits takes place via the electric dipole moments, and in particular we show how a controlled-NOT gate could be implemented. After computation the qubit is measured with a single-electron electrometer sensitive enough to differentiate between the dipole moments of different states. We also discuss a possible implementation based on a quantum cellular automaton

  7. Wastewater Treatment with Ammonia Recovery System

    OpenAIRE

    M. Örvös; T. Balázs; K. F. Both

    2008-01-01

    From environmental aspect purification of ammonia containing wastewater is expected. High efficiency ammonia desorption can be done from the water by air on proper temperature. After the desorption process, ammonia can be recovered and used in another technology. The calculation method described below give some methods to find either the minimum column height or ammonia rich solution of the effluent.

  8. Numerical Investigation of AdBlue Droplet Evaporation and Thermal Decomposition in the Context of NOx-SCR Using a Multi-Component Evaporation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushal Nishad

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To cope with the progressive tightening of the emission regulations, gasoline and diesel engines will continuously require highly improved exhaust after-treatment systems. In the case of diesel engines, the selective catalytic reduction (SCR appears as one of the widely adopted technologies to reduce NOx (nitrogen oxides emissions. Thereby, with the help of available heat from exhaust gas, the injected urea–water solution (UWS turns inside the exhaust port immediately into gaseous ammonia (NH3 by evaporation of mixture and thermal decomposition of urea. The reaction and conversion efficiency mostly depend upon the evaporation and subsequent mixing of the NH3 into the exhaust gas, which in turn depends upon the engine loading conditions. Up to now, the aggregation of urea after evaporation of water and during the thermal decomposition of urea is not clearly understood. Hence, various scenarios for the urea depletion in the gaseous phase that can be envisaged have to be appraised under SCR operating conditions relying on an appropriate evaporation description. The objective of the present paper is therefore fourfold. First, a reliable multi-component evaporation model that includes a proper binary diffusion coefficient is developed for the first time in the Euler–Lagrangian CFD (computational fluid dynamics framework to account properly for the distinct evaporation regimes of adBlue droplets under various operating conditions. Second, this model is extended for thermal decomposition of urea in the gaseous phase, where, depending on how the heat of thermal decomposition of urea is provided, different scenarios are considered. Third, since the evaporation model at and around the droplet surface is based on a gas film approach, how the material properties are evaluated in the film influences the process results is reported, also for the first time. Finally, the impact of various ambient temperatures on the adBlue droplet depletion characteristics

  9. Photochemical decomposition of catecholamines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mol, N.J. de; Henegouwen, G.M.J.B. van; Gerritsma, K.W.

    1979-01-01

    During photochemical decomposition (lambda=254 nm) adrenaline, isoprenaline and noradrenaline in aqueous solution were converted to the corresponding aminochrome for 65, 56 and 35% respectively. In determining this conversion, photochemical instability of the aminochromes was taken into account. Irradiations were performed in such dilute solutions that the neglect of the inner filter effect is permissible. Furthermore, quantum yields for the decomposition of the aminochromes in aqueous solution are given. (Author)

  10. Haber Process for Ammonia Synthesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C in order to obtain even a small percentage of ammonia. For this temperature range, however, no catalyst was available. By increasing the pressure to 75 bar the equilibrium conditions improved, but even at this pressure, and an operating.

  11. On possibility of preparation of catalysts for ammonia synthesis based on cyanocomplexes of some d-metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergeeva, A.N.; Dovgej, V.V.; Pavlenko, L.I.; Zubritskaya, D.I.; Tkachenko, Zh.I.; Okorskaya, A.P.; Lyubchenko, Yu.A.

    1983-01-01

    The catalytic properties of the systems prepared on the basis of coordination cyanides of iron, ruthenium, osmium, rhenium, molydenum, vanadium and other d-metals in the ammonia synthesis reaction are studied. It has been found that thermal stability of catalytic systems containing vanadium and molybdenum is considerably higher than that of the industrial sample of similar type containing aluminium. The systems prepared on the basis of hexacyanoferrates, ruthenates and osmates can be referred to low-temperature type catalysts

  12. Ammonia Synthesis at Low Pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cussler, Edward; McCormick, Alon; Reese, Michael; Malmali, Mahdi

    2017-08-23

    Ammonia can be synthesized at low pressure by the use of an ammonia selective absorbent. The process can be driven with wind energy, available locally in areas requiring ammonia for synthetic fertilizer. Such wind energy is often called "stranded," because it is only available far from population centers where it can be directly used. In the proposed low pressure process, nitrogen is made from air using pressure swing absorption, and hydrogen is produced by electrolysis of water. While these gases can react at approximately 400 °C in the presence of a promoted conventional catalyst, the conversion is often limited by the reverse reaction, which makes this reaction only feasible at high pressures. This limitation can be removed by absorption on an ammine-like calcium or magnesium chloride. Such alkaline metal halides can effectively remove ammonia, thus suppressing the equilibrium constraints of the reaction. In the proposed absorption-enhanced ammonia synthesis process, the rate of reaction may then be controlled not by the chemical kinetics nor the absorption rates, but by the rate of the recycle of unreacted gases. The results compare favorably with ammonia made from a conventional small scale Haber-Bosch process.

  13. Study of the acceleration of ammonia generation process from poultry residues aiming at hydrogen production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egute, Nayara dos Santos

    2010-01-01

    The hydrogen, utilized in fuel cells, can be produced from a variety of intermediate chemicals, between them, the ammonia. The ammonia gas as a raw material for the hydrogen production has been used due to its high energetic content, facility of decomposition, high availability, low prices, low storage pressure and its by-products are environmentally correct. One of the sources of ammonia is poultry and egg production systems. In these systems the ammonia is produced from the decomposition of uric acid present in the excreta of birds. The residue from the poultry-rearing farms is the broiler litter and from the egg production system is the excreta without any substrate. The characterization of these residues was performed using the Wavelength-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (WDXRF), Elementary Analysis (CHN), Thermogravimetry and GC/MS - Gas chromatography/ Mass spectrometry. The studied factors which influence the ammonia volatilization were: nitrogen content, raising period, urease enzyme, temperature, pH and moisture content. The experiment results with poultry litter and excreta allow to conclude that the manipulation of the following parameters increased the ammonia emission: pH, nitrogen content, raising period, age of birds and excreta accumulation, urease enzyme and the temperature. The addition of different amounts of sand in the excreta and different volumes of water in the poultry litter inhibited the emission of ammonia. The variation of the quantity of material (broiler litter or excreta) and the volume of the flask used as incubator chamber showed no significant alterations to be chosen as a variable. The excreta was considered more appropriate than poultry litter for the objectives of this work due to the higher ammonia concentrations determined in this material. Due to the large amount of poultry litter and excreta from the production processes, the reuse of poultry residues to obtain ammonia is necessary to improve the quality of the local

  14. Crystal structure and characterization of a novel L-serine ammonia-lyase from Rhizomucor miehei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qin, Zhen [College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, Beijing Advanced Innovation Center of Food Nutrition and Human Health, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Yan, Qiaojuan [College of Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China); Ma, Qingjun [Key Laboratory of Experimental Marine Biology, Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071 (China); Jiang, Zhengqiang, E-mail: zhqjiang@cau.edu.cn [College of Food Science and Nutritional Engineering, Beijing Advanced Innovation Center of Food Nutrition and Human Health, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2015-10-23

    L-serine ammonia-lyase, as a member of the β-family of pyridoxal-5′-phosphate (PLP) dependent enzymes, catalyzes the conversion of L-serine (L-threonine) to pyruvate (α-ketobutyrate) and ammonia. The crystal structure of L-serine ammonia-lyase from Rhizomucor miehei (RmSDH) was solved at 1.76 Å resolution by X-ray diffraction method. The overall structure of RmSDH had the characteristic β-family PLP dependent enzyme fold. It consisted of two distinct domains, both of which show the typical open twisted α/β structure. A PLP cofactor was located in the crevice between the two domains, which was attached to Lys52 by a Schiff-base linkage. Unique residue substitutions (Gly78, Pro79, Ser146, Ser147 and Thr312) were discovered at the catalytic site of RmSDH by comparison of structures of RmSDH and other reported eukaryotic L-serine ammonia-lyases. Optimal pH and temperature of the purified RmSDH were 7.5 and 40 °C, respectively. It was stable in the pH range of 7.0–9.0 and at temperatures below 40 °C. This is the first crystal structure of a fungal L-serine ammonia-lyase. It will be useful to study the catalytic mechanism of β-elimination enzymes and will provide a basis for further enzyme engineering. - Highlights: • The crystal structure of a fungal L-serine ammonia-lyase (RmSDH) was solved. • Five unique residue substitutions are found at the catalytic site of RmSDH. • RmSDH was expressed in Pichia. pastoris and biochemically characterized. • RmSDH has potential application in splitting D/L-serine.

  15. Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity of CdO nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, G., E-mail: gsingh4us@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, D.D.U. Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur 273009 (India); Kapoor, I.P.S.; Dubey, Reena; Srivastava, Pratibha [Department of Chemistry, D.D.U. Gorakhpur University, Gorakhpur 273009 (India)

    2011-02-15

    In this paper, we report the synthesis of nanocrystalline cadmium oxide (CdO) and its characterization by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Its catalytic activity was investigated on the thermal decomposition of 1,2,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane (HMX), ammonium perchlorate (AP), hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) and composite solid propellants (CSPs) using thermogravimetric analysis (TG), simultaneous thermogravimerty and differential scanning calorimetry (TG-DSC) and ignition delay measurements. Kinetics of thermal decomposition of AP + CdO has also been investigated using model free (isoconversional) and model-fitting approaches which have been applied to data for isothermal TG decomposition. All these studies show enhancement in the rate of decomposition of AP, HTPB and CSPs but no effect on HMX. The burning rate of CSPs has also been found to be increased with CdO nanocrystals.

  16. Catalytic Oligopeptide Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zijian; Noda, Hidetoshi; Shibasaki, Masakatsu; Kumagai, Naoya

    2018-02-02

    Waste-free catalytic assembly of α-amino acids is fueled by a multiboron catalyst that features a characteristic B 3 NO 2 heterocycle, providing a versatile catalytic protocol wherein functionalized natural α-amino acid units are accommodated and commonly used protecting groups are tolerated. The facile dehydrative conditions eliminate the use of engineered peptide coupling reagents, exemplifying a greener catalytic alternative for peptide coupling. The catalysis is sufficiently robust to enable pentapeptide synthesis, constructing all four amide bond linkages in a catalytic fashion.

  17. Dimension meditated optic and catalytic performance over vanadium pentoxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Su, Dezhi; Zhao, Yongjie; Zhang, Ruibo; Ning, Mingqiang; Zhao, Yuzhen; Zhou, Heping; Li, Jingbo; Jin, Haibo

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • V 2 O 5 with diverse dimensional morphologies were synthesized. • The optic properties of diverse dimensional V 2 O 5 were investigated in detail. • The catalytic properties of diverse dimensional V 2 O 5 on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate were analyzed. - Abstract: Morphologies and sizes of V 2 O 5 had crucial effect on their optic and catalytic performance. Diverse dimensional V 2 O 5 were successfully synthesized by the combination of a hydrothermal and post heat treatment method. The as-obtained samples were characterized by X-ray power diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectra. Moreover, the optic properties of diverse dimensional V 2 O 5 were examined by Fourier transform imaging spectrometer and UV–vis-spectrophotometer. It showed that the IR transmittance of nanowire (at 1019 cm −1 is 85%) and UV absorbance of microflowers (at 480 nm) were high. Furthermore, the catalytic properties of diverse dimensional V 2 O 5 on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate were evaluated and compared by Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis and Differential Scanning Calorimetry. Moreover, the best catalytic performance was obtained with the morphology of nanowire. It showed the thermal decomposition temperatures of AP with nanowire, microflowers and microsphere were reduced to 373 °C, 382 °C and 376 °C (decreased by 52 °C, 43 °C and 49 °C).

  18. Development of analytical method used for the estimation of potassium amide in liquid ammonia at HWP (Tuticorin)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramanathan, A.V.

    2007-01-01

    Potassium amide in liquid ammonia is used as a homogeneous catalyst in mono-thermal ammonia-hydrogen isotopic chemical exchange process employed for the manufacture of heavy water. Estimation of concentration of potassium amide in liquid ammonia is vital for checking whether it is sufficient for catalysis in isotopic exchange towers or for purification in purifiers in the Heavy Water Plants. This estimation was carried out earlier by the conventional method involving evaporation of ammonia, decomposition of potassium amide with water and titration of liberated ammonia with sulphuric acid. This method has been replaced by a newly developed method involving direct titration of potassium amide in ammonia with ammonium bromide. This new method is based on the principle that ammonium bromide and potassium amide act as acid and base respectively in the non-aqueous solvent medium, liquid ammonia. This method has not only proved to be an alternative method of estimation of potassium amide in liquid ammonia but also has been serving as a developed analytical method, because it is faster (with fewer steps), more accurate, safer (as it excludes the use of corrosive sulphuric acid needed for the conventional method) and more convenient (as it doesn't need specially designed apparatus and inert gas like dry nitrogen used in the conventional method). (author)

  19. Gas desorption properties of ammonia borane and metal hydride composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matin, M.R.

    2009-01-01

    'Full text': Ammonia borane (NH 3 BH 3 ) has been of great interest owing to its ideal combination of low molecular weight and high H 2 storage capacity of 19.6 mass %, which exceeds the current capacity of gasoline. DOE's year 2015 targets involve gravimetric as well as volumetric energy densities. In this work, we have investigated thermal decomposition of ammonia borane and calcium hydride composites at different molar ratio. The samples were prepared by planetary ball milling under hydrogen gas atmosphere pressure of 1Mpa at room temperature for 2, and 10 hours. The gas desorption properties were examined by thermal desorption mass spectroscopy (TDMS). The identification of phases was carried out by X-ray diffraction. The results obtain were shown in fig (a),(b),and (c). Hydrogen desorption properties were observed at all molar ratios, but the desorption temperature is significantly lower at around 70 o C at molar ratio 1:1 as shown in fig (c), and unwanted gas (ammonia) emissions were remarkably suppressed by mixing with the calcium hydride. (author)

  20. Symmetric Tensor Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brachat, Jerome; Comon, Pierre; Mourrain, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    We present an algorithm for decomposing a symmetric tensor, of dimension n and order d, as a sum of rank-1 symmetric tensors, extending the algorithm of Sylvester devised in 1886 for binary forms. We recall the correspondence between the decomposition of a homogeneous polynomial in n variables...... of polynomial equations of small degree in non-generic cases. We propose a new algorithm for symmetric tensor decomposition, based on this characterization and on linear algebra computations with Hankel matrices. The impact of this contribution is two-fold. First it permits an efficient computation...... of the decomposition of any tensor of sub-generic rank, as opposed to widely used iterative algorithms with unproved global convergence (e.g. Alternate Least Squares or gradient descents). Second, it gives tools for understanding uniqueness conditions and for detecting the rank....

  1. Hierarchically porous MgCo2O4 nanochain networks: template-free synthesis and catalytic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Xiangfeng; Yu, Yunlong; Li, Xiaoyan; Chen, Dagui; Luo, Peihui; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Shanxin

    2018-01-01

    In this work, hierarchically porous MgCo2O4 nanochain networks were successfully synthesized by a novel template-free method realized via a facile solvothermal synthesis followed by a heat treatment. The morphologies of MgCo2O4 precursor could be adjusted from nanosheets to nanobelts and finally to interwoven nanowires, depending on the volume ratio of diethylene glycol to deionized water in the solution. After calcination, the interwoven precursor nanowires were transformed to hierarchical MgCo2O4 nanochain networks with marco-/meso-porosity, which are composed of 10-20 nm nanoparticles connected one by one. Moreover, the relative formation mechanism of the MgCo2O4 nanochain networks was discussed. More importantly, when evaluated as catalytic additive for AP thermal decomposition, the MgCo2O4 nanochain networks show excellent accelerating effect. It is benefited from the unique hierarchically porous network structure and multicomponent effect, which effectively accelerates ammonia oxidation and {{{{ClO}}}4}- species dissociation. This approach opens the way to design other hierarchically porous multicomponent metal oxides.

  2. Production of filamentous carbon and H{sub 2} by solarthermal catalytic cracking of CH{sub 4}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirillov, V.; Kuvshinov, G. [Boreskov Inst. of Catalysis (Russian Federation); Reller, A. [Hamburg Univ., Hamburg (Germany); Steinfeld, A. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-06-01

    The catalytic thermal decomposition of methane has been experimentally studied using high-temperature solar process heat. Nickel catalyst particles, fluidized in methane, were directly irradiated at the PSI solar furnace. Carbon deposition consisted of randomly interlaced filaments that grew as fibers and hollow nanotubes (of approx. 30 nm diameter) originating at each catalytic particle. (author) 4 figs., 7 refs.

  3. Abiotic nitrogen fixation on terrestrial planets: reduction of NO to ammonia by FeS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, David P; Basa, Ranor C B; Khare, Bishun; Rodoni, David

    2012-02-01

    Understanding the abiotic fixation of nitrogen and how such fixation can be a supply of prebiotic nitrogen is critical for understanding both the planetary evolution of, and the potential origin of life on, terrestrial planets. As nitrogen is a biochemically essential element, sources of biochemically accessible nitrogen, especially reduced nitrogen, are critical to prebiotic chemistry and the origin of life. Loss of atmospheric nitrogen can result in loss of the ability to sustain liquid water on a planetary surface, which would impact planetary habitability and hydrological processes that shape the surface. It is known that NO can be photochemically converted through a chain of reactions to form nitrate and nitrite, which can be subsequently reduced to ammonia. Here, we show that NO can also be directly reduced, by FeS, to ammonia. In addition to removing nitrogen from the atmosphere, this reaction is particularly important as a source of reduced nitrogen on an early terrestrial planet. By converting NO directly to ammonia in a single step, ammonia is formed with a higher product yield (~50%) than would be possible through the formation of nitrate/nitrite and subsequent conversion to ammonia. In conjunction with the reduction of NO, there is also a catalytic disproportionation at the mineral surface that converts NO to NO₂ and N₂O. The NO₂ is then converted to ammonia, while the N₂O is released back in the gas phase, which provides an abiotic source of nitrous oxide.

  4. Experimental study of trimethyl aluminum decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi; Pan, Yang; Yang, Jiuzhong; Jiang, Zhiming; Fang, Haisheng

    2017-09-01

    Trimethyl aluminum (TMA) is an important precursor used for metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) of most Al-containing structures, in particular of nitride structures. The reaction mechanism of TMA with ammonia is neither clear nor certain due to its complexity. Pyrolysis of trimethyl metal is the start of series of reactions, thus significantly affecting the growth. Experimental study of TMA pyrolysis, however, has not yet been conducted in detail. In this paper, a reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer is adopted to measure the TMA decomposition from room temperature to 800 °C in a special pyrolysis furnace, activated by soft X-ray from the synchrotron radiation. The results show that generation of methyl, ethane and monomethyl aluminum (MMA) indicates the start of the pyrolysis process. In the low temperature range from 25 °C to 700 °C, the main product is dimethyl aluminum (DMA) from decomposition of TMA. For temperatures larger than 700 °C, the main products are MMA, DMA, methyl and ethane.

  5. Phenol recovery with liquid ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilman

    1943-08-03

    This report covers the results of a phenol recovery plant at Ludwigshafen which had recently suffered a severe explosion. From a Gelsenberg hydrogenation middle oil with 18 percent phenol, an 86 to 96 percent phenol fraction was recovered. Because the occurring neutral oil was phenol-free and because with the process a phenol loss was impossible, it was assumed that the yield was quantitative. With regard to the working process, the middle oil was fed into the upper section of a column four feet high, in which liquid ammonia from below climbed upward. The ammonia thereby absorbed the phenol quantitatively, and the ammonium phenolate solution absorbed a certain amount of neutral oil. The loaded ammonia went over the top of the column while at the foot of the column the phenol-free neutral oil collected and was drawn off. The ammonium phenolate solution was then washed with light gasoline in a second column. For this, the ammonia was fed into the upper, the light gasoline into the lower part of the column. The light gasoline absorbed almost quantitatively the neutral oil which was molecularly or actually colloidally dissolved in the ammonium phenolate solution, and even a small amount of the phenol and ammonia. Thickening in concentration, the light gasoline was fed into a storage tank where it was freed of its dissolved components by atmospheric distillation and recycled into the process. The ammonium phenolate solution which before the gasoline wash left behind a vaporization residue with about 40 percent phenol afterwards produced a raw phenol of 86 to 96 percent pure phenol. Because of technical difficulties, the concentration of the washed ammonium phenolate solution could not be determined. It was gathered at the bottom of the second column and fed into a storage tank where the phenol was freed by pressure distillation. The ammonia was then recycled into the process.

  6. Ammonia abatement by slurry acidification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Søren O.; Hutchings, Nicholas J.; Hafner, Sasha D.

    2016-01-01

    Livestock production systems can be major sources of trace gases including ammonia (NH3), the greenhouse gases methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O), and odorous compounds such as hydrogen sulphide (H2S). Short-term campaigns have indicated that acidification of livestock slurry during in...... sections with 30-32 pigs with or without daily adjustment of slurry pH to below 6. Ammonia losses from reference sections with untreated slurry were between 9.5 and 12.4% of N excreted, and from sections with acidified slurry between 3.1 and 6.2%. Acidification reduced total emissions of NH3 by 66 and 71...

  7. Ammonia-water Rankine cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bo Hanliang; Ma Changwen; Wu Shaorong

    1997-01-01

    On characteristics of heating source and cooling source in nuclear heating reactor cooperation, the authors advance a new kind of power cycle in which a multicomponent mixture as the work fluid, ammonia-water Rankine cycle, describe its running principle, and compare it with steam Rankine cycle in the same situation. The result is that: the new kind of power cycle, ammonia-water Rankine cycle has higher electricity efficiency; it suits for the situation of heating source and cooling source which offered by nuclear heating reactor cooperation. For low temperature heating source, it maybe has a widely application

  8. RESULTS OF INITIAL AMMONIA OXIDATION TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nash, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Fowley, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-12-30

    This memo presents an experimental survey of aqueous phase chemical processes to remove aqueous ammonia from waste process streams. Ammonia is generated in both the current Hanford waste flowsheet and in future waste processing. Much ammonia will be generated in the Low Activity Waste (LAW) melters.i Testing with simulants in glass melters at Catholic University has demonstrated the significant ammonia production.ii The primary reaction there is the reducing action of sugar on nitrate in the melter cold cap. Ammonia has been found to be a problem in secondary waste stabilization. Ammonia vapors are noxious and destruction of ammonia could reduce hazards to waste treatment process personnel. It is easily evolved especially when ammonia-bearing solutions are adjusted to high pH.

  9. Clinical utility of breath ammonia for evaluation of ammonia physiology in healthy and cirrhotic adults

    OpenAIRE

    Spacek, Lisa A; Mudalel, Matthew; Tittel, Frank; Risby, Terence H; Solga, Steven F

    2015-01-01

    Blood ammonia is routinely used in clinical settings to assess systemic ammonia in hepatic encephalopathy and urea cycle disorders. Despite its drawbacks, blood measurement is often used as a comparator in breath studies because it is a standard clinical test. We sought to evaluate sources of measurement error and potential clinical utility of breath ammonia compared to blood ammonia.

  10. Determination of ammonia in ear-lobe capillary blood is an alternative to arterial blood ammonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizenga, J. R.; Gips, C. H.; Conn, H. O.; Jansen, P. L.

    1995-01-01

    Blood ammonia determination is a laboratory test to diagnose hepatic encephalopathy. Arterial blood is superior to peripheral venous blood ammonia because of ammonia metabolism in muscle. We have compared capillary with arterial whole blood ammonia as capillary sampling is an attractive alternative.

  11. DETERMINATION OF AMMONIA IN EAR-LOBE CAPILLARY BLOOD IS AN ALTERNATIVE TO ARTERIAL BLOOD AMMONIA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HUIZENGA, [No Value; GIPS, CH; CONN, HO; JANSEN, PLM

    1995-01-01

    Blood ammonia determination is a laboratory test to diagnose hepatic encephalopathy. Arterial blood is superior to peripheral venous blood ammonia because of ammonia metabolism in muscle. We have compared capillary with arterial whole blood ammonia as capillary sampling is an attractive alternative.

  12. Nitrate reduction to nitrite, nitric oxide and ammonia by gut bacteria under physiological conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Tiso

    Full Text Available The biological nitrogen cycle involves step-wise reduction of nitrogen oxides to ammonium salts and oxidation of ammonia back to nitrites and nitrates by plants and bacteria. Neither process has been thought to have relevance to mammalian physiology; however in recent years the salivary bacterial reduction of nitrate to nitrite has been recognized as an important metabolic conversion in humans. Several enteric bacteria have also shown the ability of catalytic reduction of nitrate to ammonia via nitrite during dissimilatory respiration; however, the importance of this pathway in bacterial species colonizing the human intestine has been little studied. We measured nitrite, nitric oxide (NO and ammonia formation in cultures of Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium species grown at different sodium nitrate concentrations and oxygen levels. We found that the presence of 5 mM nitrate provided a growth benefit and induced both nitrite and ammonia generation in E.coli and L.plantarum bacteria grown at oxygen concentrations compatible with the content in the gastrointestinal tract. Nitrite and ammonia accumulated in the growth medium when at least 2.5 mM nitrate was present. Time-course curves suggest that nitrate is first converted to nitrite and subsequently to ammonia. Strains of L.rhamnosus, L.acidophilus and B.longum infantis grown with nitrate produced minor changes in nitrite or ammonia levels in the cultures. However, when supplied with exogenous nitrite, NO gas was readily produced independently of added nitrate. Bacterial production of lactic acid causes medium acidification that in turn generates NO by non-enzymatic nitrite reduction. In contrast, nitrite was converted to NO by E.coli cultures even at neutral pH. We suggest that the bacterial nitrate reduction to ammonia, as well as the related NO formation in the gut, could be an important aspect of the overall mammalian nitrate/nitrite/NO metabolism and is yet another way in

  13. 46 CFR 154.1760 - Liquid ammonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Liquid ammonia. 154.1760 Section 154.1760 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CERTAIN BULK DANGEROUS CARGOES SAFETY STANDARDS FOR....1760 Liquid ammonia. The master shall ensure that no person sprays liquid ammonia into a cargo tank...

  14. 27 CFR 21.96 - Ammonia, aqueous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ammonia, aqueous. 21.96 Section 21.96 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Ammonia, aqueous. (a) Alkalinity. Strongly alkaline to litmus. (b) Ammonia content. 27 to 30 percent by...

  15. Synthesis of ammonia with microwave plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Wenguo; Yu Aimin; Liu Jun; Jin Qinhan

    1991-01-01

    THe synthesis of ammonia absorbed on 13X zeolite with the aid of microwave plasma is described. The ammonia molecule absorbed on 13X zeolite as ammonium ions were detected by IR spectroscopy. The results obtained show that the ammonia synthesis is facilitated by the surface reactions of NH x (x = 1, 2) radicals adsorbed on zeolite with hydrogen atoms

  16. Probing reversible chemistry in coenzyme B12-dependent ethanolamine ammonia lyase with kinetic isotope effects

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Alex R; Rentergent, Julius; Scrutton, NS; Hay, S

    2015-01-01

    Coenzyme B12-dependent enzymes such as ethanolamine ammonia lyase have remarkable catalytic power and some unique properties that enable detailed analysis of the reaction chemistry and associated dynamics. By selectively deuterating the substrate (ethanolamine) and/or the ?-carbon of the 5?-deoxyadenosyl moiety of the intrinsic coenzyme B12, it was possible to experimentally probe both the forward and reverse hydrogen atom transfers between the 5?-deoxyadenosyl radical and substrate during si...

  17. Hydrogen production using ammonia borane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Charles W; Baker, R. Thomas; Semelsberger, Troy A; Shrestha, Roshan P

    2013-12-24

    Hydrogen ("H.sub.2") is produced when ammonia borane reacts with a catalyst complex of the formula L.sub.nM-X wherein M is a base metal such as iron, X is an anionic nitrogen- or phosphorus-based ligand or hydride, and L is a neutral ancillary ligand that is a neutral monodentate or polydentate ligand.

  18. Reducing ammonia emissions in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Brian H.

    2011-01-01

    The NEC directive has set targets for the 2010 ammonia emissions from a number of European countries. The target will be reached by most EU-countries and the total emission for EU-27 has been reduced by 22% from 1990 to 2007. Denmark is one of the countries with the largest reductions since 1990...

  19. by thiocyanates in liquid ammonia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. Infrared and Raman spectroscopy techniques have been used to study the ionic interactions of strontium(II) and barium(II) with thiocyanate ion in liquid ammonia. A number of bands were observed in both ν(CN) and ν(CS) regions of infrared and Raman spectra and these were assigned to 1:1 contact ion pair, ...

  20. Haber Process for Ammonia Synthesis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 16; Issue 12. Haber Process for Ammonia Synthesis. Jayant M Modak. Volume 16 Issue 12 December 2011 pp 1159-1167. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/016/12/1159-1167. Keywords.

  1. Decomposition of silane on tungsten or other materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesmann, H.J.

    This invention relates to hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by thermally decomposing silane (SiH/sub 4/) or other gases comprising H and Si, from a W or foil heated to a temperature of about 1400 to 1600/sup 0/C, in a vacuum of about 10-/sup 6/ to 10-/sup 4/ torr. A gaseous mixture is formed of atomic hydrogen and atomic silicon. The gaseous mixture is deposited onto a substrate independent of and outside the source of thermal decomposition. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon is formed. The presence of an ammonia atmosphere in the vacuum chamber enhances the photoconductivity of the hydrogenated amorphous silicon film.

  2. Transcriptional Response of the Archaeal Ammonia Oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus to Low and Environmentally Relevant Ammonia Concentrations

    OpenAIRE

    Nakagawa, Tatsunori; Stahl, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of chemoautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing archaea to compete for ammonia among marine microorganisms at low ambient concentrations has been in part attributed to their extremely high affinity for ammonia, but as yet there is no mechanistic understanding of supporting metabolism. We examined transcription of selected genes for anabolic functions (CO2 fixation, ammonia transport, and cell wall synthesis) and a central catabolic function (ammonia oxidation) in the thaumarchaeon Nitrosopu...

  3. Catalytic distillation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1982-06-22

    A method is described for conducting chemical reactions and fractionation of the reaction mixture comprising feeding reactants to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone and concurrently contacting the reactants with a fixed bed catalytic packing to concurrently carry out the reaction and fractionate the reaction mixture. For example, a method for preparing methyl tertiary butyl ether in high purity from a mixed feed stream of isobutene and normal butene comprising feeding the mixed feed stream to a distillation column reactor into a feed zone at the lower end of a distillation reaction zone, and methanol into the upper end of said distillation reaction zone, which is packed with a properly supported cationic ion exchange resin, contacting the C[sub 4] feed and methanol with the catalytic distillation packing to react methanol and isobutene, and concurrently fractionating the ether from the column below the catalytic zone and removing normal butene overhead above the catalytic zone.

  4. Catalytic Functions of Standards

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Blind (Knut)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe three different areas and the examples have illustrated several catalytic functions of standards for innovation. First, the standardisation process reduces the time to market of inventions, research results and innovative technologies. Second, standards themselves promote the

  5. Transcriptional Response of the Archaeal Ammonia Oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus to Low and Environmentally Relevant Ammonia Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of chemoautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing archaea to compete for ammonia among marine microorganisms at low ambient concentrations has been in part attributed to their extremely high affinity for ammonia, but as yet there is no mechanistic understanding of supporting metabolism. We examined transcription of selected genes for anabolic functions (CO2 fixation, ammonia transport, and cell wall synthesis) and a central catabolic function (ammonia oxidation) in the thaumarchaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1 growing at two ammonia concentrations, as measured by combined ammonia and ammonium, one well above the Km for ammonia oxidation (∼500 μM) and the other well below the Km (ammonia-replete to ammonia-limiting conditions. Transcript levels for ammonia oxidation, CO2 fixation, and one of the ammonia transport genes were approximately the same at high and low ammonia availability. Transcripts for all analyzed genes decreased with time in the complete absence of ammonia, but with various rates of decay. The new steady-state mRNA levels established are presumably more reflective of the natural physiological state of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and offer a reference for interpreting message abundance patterns in the natural environment. PMID:23995944

  6. Catalytic distillation structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L.A. Jr.

    1984-04-17

    Catalytic distillation structure is described for use in reaction distillation columns, and provides reaction sites and distillation structure consisting of a catalyst component and a resilient component intimately associated therewith. The resilient component has at least about 70 volume % open space and is present with the catalyst component in an amount such that the catalytic distillation structure consists of at least 10 volume % open space. 10 figs.

  7. Inverse scale space decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Marie Foged; Benning, Martin; Schönlieb, Carola-Bibiane

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the inverse scale space flow as a decomposition method for decomposing data into generalised singular vectors. We show that the inverse scale space flow, based on convex and even and positively one-homogeneous regularisation functionals, can decompose data represented...... by the application of a forward operator to a linear combination of generalised singular vectors into its individual singular vectors. We verify that for this decomposition to hold true, two additional conditions on the singular vectors are sufficient: orthogonality in the data space and inclusion of partial sums...... of the subgradients of the singular vectors in the subdifferential of the regularisation functional at zero. We also address the converse question of when the inverse scale space flow returns a generalised singular vector given that the initial data is arbitrary (and therefore not necessarily in the range...

  8. Magic Coset Decompositions

    CERN Document Server

    Cacciatori, Sergio L; Marrani, Alessio

    2013-01-01

    By exploiting a "mixed" non-symmetric Freudenthal-Rozenfeld-Tits magic square, two types of coset decompositions are analyzed for the non-compact special K\\"ahler symmetric rank-3 coset E7(-25)/[(E6(-78) x U(1))/Z_3], occurring in supergravity as the vector multiplets' scalar manifold in N=2, D=4 exceptional Maxwell-Einstein theory. The first decomposition exhibits maximal manifest covariance, whereas the second (triality-symmetric) one is of Iwasawa type, with maximal SO(8) covariance. Generalizations to conformal non-compact, real forms of non-degenerate, simple groups "of type E7" are presented for both classes of coset parametrizations, and relations to rank-3 simple Euclidean Jordan algebras and normed trialities over division algebras are also discussed.

  9. Mechanism and kinetics of thermal decomposition of ammoniacal complex of copper oxalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prasad, R.

    2003-01-01

    A complex precursor has been synthesized by dissolving copper oxalate in liquor ammonia followed by drying. The thermal decomposition of the precursor has been studied in different atmospheres, air/nitrogen. The mechanism of decomposition of the precursor in air is not as simple one as in nitrogen. In nitrogen, it involves endothermic deammoniation followed by decomposition to finely divided elemental particles of copper. Whereas in air, decomposition and simultaneous oxidation of the residual products (oxidative decomposition), make the process complex and relatively bigger particle of cupric oxide are obtained as final product. The products of decomposition in different atmospheres have been characterized by X-ray diffraction and particle size analysis. The stoichiometric formula, Cu(NH 3 ) 2 C 2 O 4 of the precursor is established from elemental analysis and TG measurements, and it is designated as copper amino oxalate (CAO). In nitrogen atmosphere, the deammoniation and decomposition have been found to be zero and first order, respectively. The values of activation energy have been found to be 102.52 and 95.38 kJ/mol for deammoniation and decomposition, respectively

  10. Mechanism and kinetics of thermal decomposition of ammoniacal complex of copper oxalate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prasad, R

    2003-11-28

    A complex precursor has been synthesized by dissolving copper oxalate in liquor ammonia followed by drying. The thermal decomposition of the precursor has been studied in different atmospheres, air/nitrogen. The mechanism of decomposition of the precursor in air is not as simple one as in nitrogen. In nitrogen, it involves endothermic deammoniation followed by decomposition to finely divided elemental particles of copper. Whereas in air, decomposition and simultaneous oxidation of the residual products (oxidative decomposition), make the process complex and relatively bigger particle of cupric oxide are obtained as final product. The products of decomposition in different atmospheres have been characterized by X-ray diffraction and particle size analysis. The stoichiometric formula, Cu(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4} of the precursor is established from elemental analysis and TG measurements, and it is designated as copper amino oxalate (CAO). In nitrogen atmosphere, the deammoniation and decomposition have been found to be zero and first order, respectively. The values of activation energy have been found to be 102.52 and 95.38 kJ/mol for deammoniation and decomposition, respectively.

  11. Decomposition mechanisms of tertiarybutylarsine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, C. A.; Buchan, N. I.; Li, S. H.; Stringfellow, G. B.

    1989-03-01

    As a new source compound to replace AsH 3 for organometallic vapor phase epitaxy (OMVPE) of III/V semiconductors, tertiarybutylarsine (TBAs) has the advantages of low decomposition temperatures, lower safety hazards, and low carbon contamination in OMVPE grown GaAs layers. The vapor pressure of TBAs was measured, and is given by log 10P( Torr) = 7.500 - 1562.3/ T( K). The decomposition mechanisms of TBAs were studied in a D 2 ambient using a time-of-flight mass spectrometer to analyze the gaseous products. Although a free radical mechanisms would seem the most likely, it is not the dominant route for decomposition. Instead, unimolecular processes are the preferred pathway. Two such reactions are proposed. The major step is intramolecular coupling yielding AsH and isobutane. At higher temperatures β-elimination becomes important, producing AsH 3 and isobutene. The reactions are catalyzed by GaAs surfaces, but not by silica. The temperature dependence of the reaction rates was studied, and Arrhenius parameters for the rate constants are given.

  12. Synthesis, chemistry and catalytic activity of complexes of lanthanide and actinide metals in unusual oxidation states and coordination environments. Progress report, February 1, 1978--January 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, W.J.

    1978-11-01

    Previous syntheses of Ln(olefin) complexes and their catalytic effect on the hydrogenation of the olefin are discussed. The tert-butyl complexes of Sn, Er, and Yb were synthesized and their decomposition studied

  13. A hydrogen-bonding network plays a catalytic role in photosynthetic oxygen evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polander, Brandon C.; Barry, Bridgette A.

    2012-01-01

    In photosystem II, oxygen evolution occurs by the accumulation of photo-induced oxidizing equivalents at the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC). The sequentially oxidized states are called the S0-S4 states, and the dark stable state is S1. Hydrogen bonds to water form a network around the OEC; this network is predicted to involve multiple peptide carbonyl groups. In this work, we tested the idea that a network of hydrogen bonded water molecules plays a catalytic role in water oxidation. As probes, we used OEC peptide carbonyl frequencies, the substrate-based inhibitor, ammonia, and the sugar, trehalose. Reaction-induced FT-IR spectroscopy was used to describe the protein dynamics associated with the S1 to S2 transition. A shift in an amide CO vibrational frequency (1664 (S1) to 1653 (S2) cm-1) was observed, consistent with an increase in hydrogen bond strength when the OEC is oxidized. Treatment with ammonia/ammonium altered these CO vibrational frequencies. The ammonia-induced spectral changes are attributed to alterations in hydrogen bonding, when ammonia/ammonium is incorporated into the OEC hydrogen bond network. The ammonia-induced changes in CO frequency were reversed or blocked when trehalose was substituted for sucrose. This trehalose effect is attributed to a displacement of ammonia molecules from the hydrogen bond network. These results imply that ammonia, and by extension water, participate in a catalytically essential hydrogen bond network, which involves OEC peptide CO groups. Comparison to the ammonia transporter, AmtB, reveals structural similarities with the bound water network in the OEC. PMID:22474345

  14. A particle filter for ammonia coverage ratio and input simultaneous estimations in Diesel-engine SCR system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kangfeng; Ji, Fenzhu; Yan, Xiaoyu; Jiang, Kai; Yang, Shichun

    2018-01-01

    As NOx emissions legislation for Diesel-engines is becoming more stringent than ever before, an aftertreatment system has been widely used in many countries. Specifically, to reduce the NOx emissions, a selective catalytic reduction(SCR) system has become one of the most promising techniques for Diesel-engine vehicle applications. In the SCR system, input ammonia concentration and ammonia coverage ratio are regarded as essential states in the control-oriental model. Currently, an ammonia sensor placed before the SCR Can is a good strategy for the input ammonia concentration value. However, physical sensor would increase the SCR system cost and the ammonia coverage ratio information cannot be directly measured by physical sensor. Aiming to tackle this problem, an observer based on particle filter(PF) is investigated to estimate the input ammonia concentration and ammonia coverage ratio. Simulation results through the experimentally-validated full vehicle simulator cX-Emission show that the performance of observer based on PF is outstanding, and the estimation error is very small.

  15. Ammonia toxicity: from head to toe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasarathy, Srinivasan; Mookerjee, Rajeshwar P; Rackayova, Veronika; Rangroo Thrane, Vinita; Vairappan, Balasubramaniyan; Ott, Peter; Rose, Christopher F

    2017-04-01

    Ammonia is diffused and transported across all plasma membranes. This entails that hyperammonemia leads to an increase in ammonia in all organs and tissues. It is known that the toxic ramifications of ammonia primarily touch the brain and cause neurological impairment. However, the deleterious effects of ammonia are not specific to the brain, as the direct effect of increased ammonia (change in pH, membrane potential, metabolism) can occur in any type of cell. Therefore, in the setting of chronic liver disease where multi-organ dysfunction is common, the role of ammonia, only as neurotoxin, is challenged. This review provides insights and evidence that increased ammonia can disturb many organ and cell types and hence lead to dysfunction.

  16. Ruthenium-Catalyzed Ammonia Borane Dehydrogenation: Mechanism and Utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xingyue; Kam, Lisa; Trerise, Ryan; Williams, Travis J

    2017-01-17

    One of the greatest challenges in using H 2 as a fuel source is finding a safe, efficient, and inexpensive method for its storage. Ammonia borane (AB) is a solid hydrogen storage material that has garnered attention for its high hydrogen weight density (19.6 wt %) and ease of handling and transport. Hydrogen release from ammonia borane is mediated by either hydrolysis, thus giving borate products that are difficult to rereduce, or direct dehydrogenation. Catalytic AB dehydrogenation has thus been a popular topic in recent years, motivated both by applications in hydrogen storage and main group synthetic chemistry. This Account is a complete description of work from our laboratory in ruthenium-catalyzed ammonia borane dehydrogenation over the last 6 years, beginning with the Shvo catalyst and resulting ultimately in the development of optimized, leading catalysts for efficient hydrogen release. We have studied AB dehydrogenation with Shvo's catalyst extensively and generated a detailed understanding of the role that borazine, a dehydrogenation product, plays in the reaction: it is a poison for both Shvo's catalyst and PEM fuel cells. Through independent syntheses of Shvo derivatives, we found a protective mechanism wherein catalyst deactivation by borazine is prevented by coordination of a ligand that might otherwise be a catalytic poison. These studies showed how a bidentate N-N ligand can transform the Shvo into a more reactive species for AB dehydrogenation that minimizes accumulation of borazine. Simultaneously, we designed novel ruthenium catalysts that contain a Lewis acidic boron to replace the Shvo -OH proton, thus offering more flexibility to optimize hydrogen release and take on more general problems in hydride abstraction. Our scorpionate-ligated ruthenium species (12) is a best-of-class catalyst for homogeneous dehydrogenation of ammonia borane in terms of its extent of hydrogen release (4.6 wt %), air tolerance, and reusability. Moreover, a

  17. Chemical looping of metal nitride catalysts: low-pressure ammonia synthesis for energy storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalsky, R; Avram, A M; Peterson, B A; Pfromm, P H; Peterson, A A

    2015-07-01

    The activity of many heterogeneous catalysts is limited by strong correlations between activation energies and adsorption energies of reaction intermediates. Although the reaction is thermodynamically favourable at ambient temperature and pressure, the catalytic synthesis of ammonia (NH 3 ), a fertilizer and chemical fuel, from N 2 and H 2 requires some of the most extreme conditions of the chemical industry. We demonstrate how ammonia can be produced at ambient pressure from air, water, and concentrated sunlight as renewable source of process heat via nitrogen reduction with a looped metal nitride, followed by separate hydrogenation of the lattice nitrogen into ammonia. Separating ammonia synthesis into two reaction steps introduces an additional degree of freedom when designing catalysts with desirable activation and adsorption energies. We discuss the hydrogenation of alkali and alkaline earth metal nitrides and the reduction of transition metal nitrides to outline a promoting role of lattice hydrogen in ammonia evolution. This is rationalized via electronic structure calculations with the activity of nitrogen vacancies controlling the redox-intercalation of hydrogen and the formation and hydrogenation of adsorbed nitrogen species. The predicted trends are confirmed experimentally with evolution of 56.3, 80.7, and 128 μmol NH 3 per mol metal per min at 1 bar and above 550 °C via reduction of Mn 6 N 2.58 to Mn 4 N and hydrogenation of Ca 3 N 2 and Sr 2 N to Ca 2 NH and SrH 2 , respectively.

  18. Effect of Promoters in Co-Mn-Al Mixed Oxide Catalyst on N2O Decomposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karásková, K.; Obalová, L.; Jirátová, Květa; Kovanda, F.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 160, č. 2 (2010), s. 480-487 ISSN 1385-8947 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/09/1664 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : nitrous oxide * catalytic decomposition * promoter effect Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 3.074, year: 2010

  19. Decomposition and reduction of N2O over Limestone under FBC Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnsson, Jan Erik; Jensen, Anker; Vaaben, Rikke

    1997-01-01

    The addition of limestone for sulfur retention in FBC has in many cases been observed to influence the emission of N2O. The catalytic activity of N2O over calcined Stevns Chalk for decomposition of N2O in a laboratory fixed bed quartz reactor was measured. It was found that calcined Stevns Chalk ...

  20. Operation experience with elevated ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vankova, Katerina; Kysela, Jan; Malac, Miroslav; Petrecky, Igor; Svarc, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    The 10 VVER units in the Czech and Slovak Republics are all in very good water chemistry and radiation condition, yet questions have arisen regarding the optimization of cycle chemistry and improved operation in these units. To address these issues, a comprehensive experimental program for different water chemistries of the primary circuit was carried out at the Rez Nuclear Research Institute, Czech Republic, with the goal of judging the influence of various water chemistries on radiation build-up. Four types of water chemistries were compared: standard VVER water chemistry (in common use), direct hydrogen dosing without ammonia, standard VVER water chemistry with elevated ammonia levels, and zinc dosing to standard VVER water chemistry. The test results showed that the types of water chemistry other than the common one have benefits for the operation of the nuclear power plant (NPP) primary circuit. Operation experience with elevated ammonia at NPP Dukovany Units 3 and 4 is presented which validates the experimental results, demonstrating improved corrosion product volume activity. (orig.)

  1. Planar waveguide sensor of ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogoziński, Roman; Tyszkiewicz, Cuma; Karasiński, Paweł; Izydorczyk, Weronika

    2015-12-01

    The paper presents the concept of forming ammonia sensor based on a planar waveguide structure. It is an amplitude sensor produced on the basis of the multimode waveguide. The technological base for this kind of structure is the ion exchange method and the sol-gel method. The planar multimode waveguide of channel type is produced in glass substrate (soda-lime glass of Menzel-Glaser company) by the selective Ag+↔Na+ ion exchange. On the surface of the glass substrate a porous (~40%) silica layer is produced by the sol-gel method. This layer is sensitized to the presence of ammonia in the surrounding atmosphere by impregnation with Bromocresol Purple (BCP) dye. Therefore it constitutes a sensor layer. Spectrophotometric tests carried out showed about 50% reduction of cross-transmission changes of such sensor layer for a wave λ=593 nm caused by the presence of 25% ammonia water vapor in its ambience. The radiation source used in this type of sensor structure is a light emitting diode LED. The gradient channel waveguide is designed for frontal connection (optical glue) with a standard multimode telecommunications waveguide 62.5/125μm.

  2. Exergy analysis of industrial ammonia synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirova-Yordanova, Zornitza

    2004-01-01

    Exergy consumption of ammonia production plants depends strongly on the ammonia synthesis loop design. Due to the thermodynamically limited low degree of conversion of hydrogen-nitrogen mixture to ammonia, industrial ammonia synthesis is implemented as recycle process (so-called 'ammonia synthesis loop'). Significant quantities of reactants are recycled back to reactor, after the removal of ammonia at low temperatures. Modern ammonia synthesis plants use well-developed heat- and cold recovery to improve the reaction heat utilisation and to reduce the refrigeration costs. In this work, the exergy method is applied to estimate the effect of the most important process parameters on the exergy efficiency of industrial ammonia synthesis. A specific approach, including suitable definitions of the system boundaries and process parameters, is proposed. Exergy efficiency indexes are discussed in order to make the results applicable to ammonia synthesis loops of various designs. The dependence of the exergy losses on properly selected independent process parameters is studied. Some results from detailed exergy analysis of the most commonly used ammonia synthesis loop design configurations at a wide range of selected parameters values are shown

  3. Clustering via Kernel Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Have, Anna Szynkowiak; Girolami, Mark A.; Larsen, Jan

    2006-01-01

    Methods for spectral clustering have been proposed recently which rely on the eigenvalue decomposition of an affinity matrix. In this work it is proposed that the affinity matrix is created based on the elements of a non-parametric density estimator. This matrix is then decomposed to obtain...... posterior probabilities of class membership using an appropriate form of nonnegative matrix factorization. The troublesome selection of hyperparameters such as kernel width and number of clusters can be obtained using standard cross-validation methods as is demonstrated on a number of diverse data sets....

  4. Mode decomposition evolution equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Wei, Guo-Wei; Yang, Siyang

    2012-03-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE) based methods have become some of the most powerful tools for exploring the fundamental problems in signal processing, image processing, computer vision, machine vision and artificial intelligence in the past two decades. The advantages of PDE based approaches are that they can be made fully automatic, robust for the analysis of images, videos and high dimensional data. A fundamental question is whether one can use PDEs to perform all the basic tasks in the image processing. If one can devise PDEs to perform full-scale mode decomposition for signals and images, the modes thus generated would be very useful for secondary processing to meet the needs in various types of signal and image processing. Despite of great progress in PDE based image analysis in the past two decades, the basic roles of PDEs in image/signal analysis are only limited to PDE based low-pass filters, and their applications to noise removal, edge detection, segmentation, etc. At present, it is not clear how to construct PDE based methods for full-scale mode decomposition. The above-mentioned limitation of most current PDE based image/signal processing methods is addressed in the proposed work, in which we introduce a family of mode decomposition evolution equations (MoDEEs) for a vast variety of applications. The MoDEEs are constructed as an extension of a PDE based high-pass filter (Europhys. Lett., 59(6): 814, 2002) by using arbitrarily high order PDE based low-pass filters introduced by Wei (IEEE Signal Process. Lett., 6(7): 165, 1999). The use of arbitrarily high order PDEs is essential to the frequency localization in the mode decomposition. Similar to the wavelet transform, the present MoDEEs have a controllable time-frequency localization and allow a perfect reconstruction of the original function. Therefore, the MoDEE operation is also called a PDE transform. However, modes generated from the present approach are in the spatial or time domain and can be

  5. Recovery and removal of nutrients from swine wastewater by using a novel integrated reactor for struvite decomposition and recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haiming; Xiao, Dean; Liu, Jiahui; Hou, Li; Ding, Li

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, struvite decomposition was performed by air stripping for ammonia release and a novel integrated reactor was designed for the simultaneous removal and recovery of total ammonia-nitrogen (TAN) and total orthophosphate (PT) from swine wastewater by internal struvite recycling. Decomposition of struvite by air stripping was found to be feasible. Without supplementation with additional magnesium and phosphate sources, the removal ratio of TAN from synthetic wastewater was maintained at >80% by recycling of the struvite decomposition product formed under optimal conditions, six times. Continuous operation of the integrated reactor indicated that approximately 91% TAN and 97% PT in the swine wastewater could be removed and recovered by the proposed recycling process with the supplementation of bittern. Economic evaluation of the proposed system showed that struvite precipitation cost can be saved by approximately 54% by adopting the proposed recycling process in comparison with no recycling method. PMID:25960246

  6. Steam reformer with catalytic combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voecks, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A steam reformer is disclosed having an annular steam reforming catalyst bed formed by concentric cylinders and having a catalytic combustor located at the center of the innermost cylinder. Fuel is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and air is directed at the top of the combustor, creating a catalytic reaction which provides sufficient heat so as to maintain the catalytic reaction in the steam reforming catalyst bed. Alternatively, air is fed into the interior of the catalytic combustor and a fuel mixture is directed at the top. The catalytic combustor provides enhanced radiant and convective heat transfer to the reformer catalyst bed.

  7. Contribution of ammonia-oxidizing archaea and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria to ammonia oxidation in two nitrifying reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srithep, Papitchaya; Pornkulwat, Preeyaporn; Limpiyakorn, Tawan

    2018-03-01

    In this study, two laboratory nitrifying reactors (NRI and NRII), which were seeded by sludge from different sources and operated under different operating conditions, were found to possess distinct dominant ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms. Ammonia-oxidizing archaeal (AOA) amoA genes outnumbered ammonia-oxidizing bacterial (AOB) amoA genes in reactor NRI, while only AOB amoA genes were detectable in reactor NRII. The AOA amoA gene sequences retrieved from NRI were characterized within the Nitrososphaera sister cluster of the group 1.1b Thaumarchaeota. Two inhibitors for ammonia oxidation, allylthiourea (ATU) and 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl 3-oxide (PTIO), were applied individually and as a mixture to observe the ammonia-oxidizing activity of both microorganisms in the reactors' sludge. The results indicated that AOA and AOB jointly oxidized ammonia in NRI, while AOB played the main role in ammonia oxidation in NRII. DNA-stable isotope probing with labeled 13 C-HCO 3 - was performed on NRI sludge. Incorporation of 13 C into AOA and AOB implied that both microorganisms may perform autotrophy during ammonia oxidation. Taken together, the results from this study provide direct evidence demonstrating the contribution of AOA and AOB to ammonia oxidation in the nitrifying reactors.

  8. Perovskite-type catalytic materials for environmental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labhasetwar, Nitin; Saravanan, Govindachetty; Kumar Megarajan, Suresh; Manwar, Nilesh; Khobragade, Rohini; Doggali, Pradeep; Grasset, Fabien

    2015-06-01

    Perovskites are mixed-metal oxides that are attracting much scientific and application interest owing to their low price, adaptability, and thermal stability, which often depend on bulk and surface characteristics. These materials have been extensively explored for their catalytic, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties. They are promising candidates for the photocatalytic splitting of water and have also been extensively studied for environmental catalysis applications. Oxygen and cation non-stoichiometry can be tailored in a large number of perovskite compositions to achieve the desired catalytic activity, including multifunctional catalytic properties. Despite the extensive uses, the commercial success for this class of perovskite-based catalytic materials has not been achieved for vehicle exhaust emission control or for many other environmental applications. With recent advances in synthesis techniques, including the preparation of supported perovskites, and increasing understanding of promoted substitute perovskite-type materials, there is a growing interest in applied studies of perovskite-type catalytic materials. We have studied a number of perovskites based on Co, Mn, Ru, and Fe and their substituted compositions for their catalytic activity in terms of diesel soot oxidation, three-way catalysis, N 2 O decomposition, low-temperature CO oxidation, oxidation of volatile organic compounds, etc. The enhanced catalytic activity of these materials is attributed mainly to their altered redox properties, the promotional effect of co-ions, and the increased exposure of catalytically active transition metals in certain preparations. The recent lowering of sulfur content in fuel and concerns over the cost and availability of precious metals are responsible for renewed interest in perovskite-type catalysts for environmental applications.

  9. Ammonia Process by Pressure Swing Adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr Felix Jegede

    2010-12-27

    The overall objective of the project is to design, develop and demonstrate a technically feasible and commercially viable system to produce ammonia along with recovery of the products by adsorption separation methods and significantly decrease the energy requirement in ammonia production. This is achieved through a significantly more efficient ammonia psa recovery system. The new ammonia recovery system receives the reactor effluents and achieves complete ammonia recovery, (which completely eliminates the energy intensive refrigeration and condensation system currently used in ammonia production). It also recovers the unused reactants and recycles them back to the reactor, free of potential reactor contaminants, and without the need for re-compression and re-heat of recycle stream thereby further saving more energy. The result is a significantly lower energy consumption, along with capital cost savings.

  10. A STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF POST-COMBUSTION AMMONIA INJECTION ON FLY ASH QUALITY: CHARACTERIZATION OF AMMONIA RELEASE FROM CONCRETE AND MORTARS CONTAINING FLY ASH AS A POZZOLANIC ADMIXTURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert F. Rathbone; Thomas L. Robl

    2002-10-30

    The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 require large reductions in emissions of NO{sub x} from coal-fired electric utility boilers. This will necessitate the use of ammonia injection, such as in selective catalytic reduction (SCR), in many power plants, resulting in the deposition of ammonia on the fly ash. The presence of ammonia could create a major barrier to fly ash utilization in concrete because of odor concerns. Although there have been limited studies of ammonia emission from concrete, little is known about the quantity of ammonia emitted during mixing and curing, and the kinetics of ammonia release. This is manifested as widely varying opinions within the concrete and ash marketing industry regarding the maximum acceptable levels of ammonia in fly ash. Therefore, practical guidelines for using ammoniated fly ash are needed in advance of the installation of many more SCR systems. The goal of this project was to develop practical guidelines for the handling and utilization of ammoniated fly ash in concrete, in order to prevent a decrease in the use of fly ash for this application. The objective was to determine the amount of ammonia that is released, over the short- and long-term, from concrete that contains ammoniated fly ash. The technical approach in this project was to measure the release of ammonia from mortar and concrete during mixing, placement, and curing. Work initially focused on laboratory mortar experiments to develop fundamental data on ammonia diffusion characteristics. Larger-scale laboratory experiments were then conducted to study the emission of ammonia from concrete containing ammoniated fly ash. The final phase comprised monitoring ammonia emissions from large concrete slabs. The data indicated that, on average, 15% of the initial ammonia was lost from concrete during 40 minutes of mixing, depending on the mix proportions and batch size. Long-term experiments indicated that ammonia diffusion from concrete was relatively slow, with greater

  11. Evaluation of catalytic combustion of actual coal-derived gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanton, J. C.; Shisler, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    The combustion characteristics of a Pt-Pl catalytic reactor burning coal-derived, low-Btu gas were investigated. A large matrix of test conditions was explored involving variations in fuel/air inlet temperature and velocity, reactor pressure, and combustor exit temperature. Other data recorded included fuel gas composition, reactor temperatures, and exhaust emissions. Operating experience with the reactor was satisfactory. Combustion efficiencies were quite high (over 95 percent) over most of the operating range. Emissions of NOx were quite high (up to 500 ppm V and greater), owing to the high ammonia content of the fuel gas.

  12. Ammonia emission from crop residues : quantification of ammonia volatilization based on crop residue properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijter, de F.J.; Huijsmans, J.F.M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of available literature data on ammonia volatilization from crop residues. From these data, a relation is derived for the ammonia emission depending on the N-content of crop residue.

  13. New findings on cerebral ammonia uptake in HE using functional (13)N-ammonia PET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Michael; Keiding, Susanne

    2007-01-01

    ) analysed such data in patients with HE by a kinetic model accounting for transfer of (13)N-ammonia across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and intracellular formation of (13)N-glutamine. Initial unidirectional (13)N-ammonia transfer across BBB was characterized by the permeability-surface area product PS...... metabolites was linearly correlated to arterial ammonia. In conclusion, basic brain ammonia kinetics was not changed significantly in patients with cirrhosis +/- HE compared to healthy controls. Blood ammonia seems to be the more important factor for increased brain ammonia uptake in HE. Udgivelsesdato: 2007......PET is a functional imaging technique suitable for studies of brain ammonia metabolism. Dynamic (13)N-ammonia PET yields time-courses of radioactivity concentrations in brain (PET camera) and blood (samples). Ahl et al. (Hepatology 40:73-79, 2004) and Keiding et al. (Hepatology 43:42-50, 2006...

  14. 21 CFR 862.1065 - Ammonia test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ammonia test system. 862.1065 Section 862.1065....1065 Ammonia test system. (a) Identification. An ammonia test system is a device intended to measure ammonia levels in blood, serum, and plasma, Ammonia measurements are used in the diagnosis and treatment...

  15. Synthesis of ammonia using sodium melt

    OpenAIRE

    Kawamura, Fumio; Taniguchi, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Research into inexpensive ammonia synthesis has increased recently because ammonia can be used as a hydrogen carrier or as a next generation fuel which does not emit CO2. Furthermore, improving the efficiency of ammonia synthesis is necessary, because current synthesis methods emit significant amounts of CO2. To achieve these goals, catalysts that can effectively reduce the synthesis temperature and pressure, relative to those required in the Haber-Bosch process, are required. Although severa...

  16. Polyaniline-based optical ammonia detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Yixiang; Jin, Zhe; Su, Yongxuan

    2002-01-01

    Electronic absorption spectroscopy of a polyaniline film deposited on a polyethylene surface by chemical oxidation of aniline monomer at room temperature was used to quantitatively detect ammonia gas. The present optical ammonia gas detector was found to have a response time of less than 15 s, a regeneration time of less than 2 min. at room temperature, and a detection limit of 1 ppm (v/v) for ammonia, with a linear dynamic range from 180 ppm to 18,000 ppm.

  17. Ammonia separation in novel bio filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen Hahne

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Currently used bio filters are suited for odor reduction in livestock keeping but not for ammonia separation. Therefore it was the objective to develop a novel bio filter system which was able to ensure a high and long-lasting ammonia separation. This novel bio filter, which is equipped with a pH control in a water swamp beneath the filter layer and a conductivity control for water discharge, was investigated in terms of ammonia separation and nitrogen disposition over several months under practical conditions. The results show a stable ammonia separation of more than 88 % if certain consecutively described operating conditions are kept.

  18. Sizing of an Ammonia Discharge Tank

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuliagenda Beckfords

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Phosphate companies use well-stirred tanks to regulate the concentration of ammonia they discharge via their wastewater, preventing ammonia spikes from exceeding the cap set by the Environmental Protection Agency. This report discusses the methods used to determine the minimum possible volume of the tank required to regulate wastewater discharge. With this information, it was determined that the use of a stirring tank is an efficient and cost effective way to regulate ammonia discharge. Based on these results many other companies may use this method to decrease the negative effects of ammonia on the environment.

  19. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Preferred Customer

    acetylchlorophosphonazo(CPApA) by hydrogen peroxide in 0.10 M phosphoric acid. A novel catalytic kinetic-spectrophotometric method is proposed for the determination of copper based on this principle. Copper(II) can be determined spectrophotometrically ...

  20. CATALYTIC KINETIC SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC DETERMINATION ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Based on the property that in 0.12 M sulfuric acid medium titanium(IV) catalyzes the discoloring reaction of DBS-arsenazo oxidized by potassium bromate, a new catalytic kinetic spectrophotometric method for the determination of trace titanium (IV) was developed. The linear range of the determination of titanium is

  1. Bimetallic catalysts for HI decomposition in the iodine-sulfur thermochemical cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Laijun; Hu Songzhi; Xu Lufei; Li Daocai; Han Qi; Chen Songzhe; Zhang Ping; Xu Jingming

    2014-01-01

    Among the different kinds of thermochemical water-splitting cycles, the iodine-sulfur (IS) cycle has attracted more and more interest because it is one of the promising candidates for economical and massive hydrogen production. However, there still exist some science and technical problems to be solved before industrialization of the IS process. One such problem is the catalytic decomposition of hydrogen iodide. Although the active carbon supported platinum has been verified to present the excellent performance for HI decomposition, it is very expensive and easy to agglomerate under the harsh condition. In order to decrease the cost and increase the stability of the catalysts for HI decomposition, a series of bimetallic catalysts were prepared and studied at INET. This paper summarized our present research advances on the bimetallic catalysts (Pt-Pd, Pd-Ir and Pt-Ir) for HI decomposition. In the course of the study, the physical properties, structure, and morphology of the catalysts were characterized by specific surface area, X-ray diffractometer; and transmission electron microscopy, respectively. The catalytic activity for HI decomposition was investigated in a fixed bed reactor under atmospheric pressure. The results show that due to the higher activity and better stability, the active carbon supported bimetallic catalyst is more potential candidate than mono metallic Pt catalyst for HI decomposition in the IS thermochemical cycle. (author)

  2. Vertically-oriented graphenes supported Mn3O4 as advanced catalysts in post plasma-catalysis for toluene decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Zheng; Hao, Han; Yang, Shiling; Zhu, Jinhui; Yan, Jianhua; Cen, Kefa

    2018-04-01

    This work reports the catalytic performance of vertically-oriented graphenes (VGs) supported manganese oxide catalysts toward toluene decomposition in post plasma-catalysis (PPC) system. Dense networks of VGs were synthesized on carbon paper (CP) via a microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) method. A constant current approach was applied in a conventional three-electrode electrochemical system for the electrodeposition of Mn3O4 catalysts on VGs. The as-obtained catalysts were characterized and investigated for ozone conversion and toluene decomposition in a PPC system. Experimental results show that the Mn3O4 catalyst loading mass on VG-coated CP was significantly higher than that on pristine CP (almost 1.8 times for an electrodeposition current of 10 mA). Moreover, the decoration of VGs led to both enhanced catalytic activity for ozone conversion and increased toluene decomposition, exhibiting a great promise in PPC system for the effective decomposition of volatile organic compounds.

  3. Flame assisted synthesis of catalytic ceramic membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Johnny; Mosleh, Majid; Johannessen, Tue

    2004-01-01

    Membranes consisting of one or more metal oxides can be synthesized by flame pyrolysis. The general principle behind flame pyrolysis is the decomposition and oxidation of evaporated organo-metallic precursors in a flame, thereby forming metal oxide monomers. Because of the extreme supersaturation...... technology it is possible to make supported catalysts, composite metal oxides, catalytically active surfaces, and porous ceramic membranes. Membrane layers can be formed by using a porous substrate tube (or surface) as a nano-particle filter. The aerosol gas from the flame is led through a porous substrate......, membranes with pore sizes below 5 nm have been produced by this continuous filtration of nano-particles. In this way, top-layers with Knudsen separation have been achieved by a reduction of the pore size of three orders of magnitude within an hour. It has previously been shown that it also is possible...

  4. Dimension meditated optic and catalytic performance over vanadium pentoxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Dezhi [Beijing Key Laboratory of Construction Tailorable Advanced Functional Materials and Green Applications, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhao, Yongjie, E-mail: zhaoyjpeace@gmail.com [Beijing Key Laboratory of Construction Tailorable Advanced Functional Materials and Green Applications, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhang, Ruibo; Ning, Mingqiang [Beijing Key Laboratory of Construction Tailorable Advanced Functional Materials and Green Applications, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Zhao, Yuzhen; Zhou, Heping [State Key Laboratory of New Ceramics and Fine Processing, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Li, Jingbo; Jin, Haibo [Beijing Key Laboratory of Construction Tailorable Advanced Functional Materials and Green Applications, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • V{sub 2}O{sub 5} with diverse dimensional morphologies were synthesized. • The optic properties of diverse dimensional V{sub 2}O{sub 5} were investigated in detail. • The catalytic properties of diverse dimensional V{sub 2}O{sub 5} on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate were analyzed. - Abstract: Morphologies and sizes of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} had crucial effect on their optic and catalytic performance. Diverse dimensional V{sub 2}O{sub 5} were successfully synthesized by the combination of a hydrothermal and post heat treatment method. The as-obtained samples were characterized by X-ray power diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectra. Moreover, the optic properties of diverse dimensional V{sub 2}O{sub 5} were examined by Fourier transform imaging spectrometer and UV–vis-spectrophotometer. It showed that the IR transmittance of nanowire (at 1019 cm{sup −1} is 85%) and UV absorbance of microflowers (at 480 nm) were high. Furthermore, the catalytic properties of diverse dimensional V{sub 2}O{sub 5} on the thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate were evaluated and compared by Thermo-Gravimetric Analysis and Differential Scanning Calorimetry. Moreover, the best catalytic performance was obtained with the morphology of nanowire. It showed the thermal decomposition temperatures of AP with nanowire, microflowers and microsphere were reduced to 373 °C, 382 °C and 376 °C (decreased by 52 °C, 43 °C and 49 °C).

  5. Erbium hydride decomposition kinetics.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrizz, Robert Matthew

    2006-11-01

    Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is used to study the decomposition kinetics of erbium hydride thin films. The TDS results presented in this report are analyzed quantitatively using Redhead's method to yield kinetic parameters (E{sub A} {approx} 54.2 kcal/mol), which are then utilized to predict hydrogen outgassing in vacuum for a variety of thermal treatments. Interestingly, it was found that the activation energy for desorption can vary by more than 7 kcal/mol (0.30 eV) for seemingly similar samples. In addition, small amounts of less-stable hydrogen were observed for all erbium dihydride films. A detailed explanation of several approaches for analyzing thermal desorption spectra to obtain kinetic information is included as an appendix.

  6. Ammonia Synthesis using Ti and Nb Nitride Nano-particles Prepared by Mesoporous Graphitic C3N4

    KAUST Repository

    Kumagai, Hiromu

    2015-01-22

    TiN and NbN nanoparticles were synthesized from mesoporous graphitic C3N4 (mpg-C3N4) as a reactive template and used as the catalyst for ammonia synthesis. The obtained TiN and NbN nanoparticles possess high surface areas of 299 and 275 m2 g-1, respectively, making them attractive in the use of catalysis and support. Although most of the TiN and NbN particles show no measurable activity for ammonia formation, the nanoparticles enabled an ammonia synthesis rate of 31 μmol h-1 g-cat-1 at 673 K and 0.1 MPa of synthesis gas (N2 + 3H2) for both TiN and NbN catalysts. It is evident that the formation of nanoparticles with high nitride surface area is essential for the materials to function as catalysts in ammonia synthesis. The addition of Fe to TiN enhanced the ammonia synthesis activity, whereas it had detrimental effects on the catalytic activity of NbN. The properties of these catalysts in ammonia synthesis are discussed.

  7. Dihydrogen Phosphate Stabilized Ruthenium(0 Nanoparticles: Efficient Nanocatalyst for The Hydrolysis of Ammonia-Borane at Room Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feyyaz Durap

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Intensive efforts have been devoted to the development of new materials for safe and efficient hydrogen storage. Among them, ammonia-borane appears to be a promising candidate due to its high gravimetric hydrogen storage capacity. Ammonia-borane can release hydrogen on hydrolysis in aqueous solution under mild conditions in the presence of a suitable catalyst. Herein, we report the synthesis of ruthenium(0 nanoparticles stabilized by dihydrogenphosphate anions with an average particle size of 2.9 ± 0.9 nm acting as a water-dispersible nanocatalyst in the hydrolysis of ammonia-borane. They provide an initial turnover frequency (TOF value of 80 min−1 in hydrogen generation from the hydrolysis of ammonia-borane at room temperature. Moreover, the high stability of these ruthenium(0 nanoparticles makes them long-lived and reusable nanocatalysts for the hydrolysis of ammonia-borane. They provide 56,800 total turnovers and retain ~80% of their initial activity even at the fifth catalytic run in the hydrolysis of ammonia-borane at room temperature.

  8. Decomposition methods for unsupervised learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørup, Morten

    2008-01-01

    This thesis presents the application and development of decomposition methods for Unsupervised Learning. It covers topics from classical factor analysis based decomposition and its variants such as Independent Component Analysis, Non-negative Matrix Factorization and Sparse Coding...... methods and clustering problems is derived both in terms of classical point clustering but also in terms of community detection in complex networks. A guiding principle throughout this thesis is the principle of parsimony. Hence, the goal of Unsupervised Learning is here posed as striving for simplicity...... in the decompositions. Thus, it is demonstrated how a wide range of decomposition methods explicitly or implicitly strive to attain this goal. Applications of the derived decompositions are given ranging from multi-media analysis of image and sound data, analysis of biomedical data such as electroencephalography...

  9. Impact of Support and Potassium-Poisoning on the V2O5-WO3/ZrO2 Catalyst Performance in Ammonia Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Due-Hansen, Johannes; Kustov, Arkadii; Christensen, Claus H.

    2009-01-01

    A series of WO3-promoted zirconia supports were synthesized and calcined between 400 and 800C. Subsequently vanadium oxide was introduced to obtain 3.5 wt% V2O5. The influence of the calcination temperature and potassium-poisoning (K/V = 0.2, molar ratio) on the catalytic activity in the selective...... catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO with NH3 was previously studied. Here, we focus on the influence of these parameters on the catalytic activity for the undesirable oxidation of ammonia, which decrease the N2 selectivity of the SCR process. It is found that potassium doping of the catalysts results...

  10. Life cycle assessment of selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) of nitrous oxides in a full-scale municipal solid waste incinerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Jacob; Munk, Bjarne; Crillesen, Kim; Christensen, Thomas H

    2011-06-01

    Selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) of nitrous oxides in a full-scale municipal solid waste incinerator was investigated using LCA. The relationship between NO(x)-cleaning and ammonia dosage was measured at the plant. Un-reacted ammonia - the ammonia slip - leaving the flue-gas cleaning system adsorbed to fly-ash or in the effluent of the acidic scrubber was quantified from the stoichiometric reaction of NO(x) and ammonia assuming no other reaction products was formed. Of the ammonia slip, 37% was associated with the fly-ash and 63% was in the effluent of the acidic scrubber. Based on NO(x)-cleaning efficiency, the fate of the ammonia slip as well as the environmental impact from ammonia production, the potential acidification and nutrient enrichment from NO(x)-cleaning was calculated as a function of ammonia dosage. Since the exact fate of the ammonia slip could not be measured directly, a number of scenarios were set up ranging from "best case" with no ammonia from the slip ending up in the environment to "worst case" where all the ammonia slip eventually ended up in the environment and contributed to environmental pollution. In the "best case" scenario the highest ammonia dosage was most beneficial demonstrating that the environmental load associated with ammonia production is of minor importance. In contrast, in a "worst case" scenario" NO(x)-cleaning using SNCR is not recommendable at all, since the impacts from the ammonia slip exceed the saved impacts from the NO(x) removal. Increased dosage of ammonia for removal of NO(x) is recommendable as long as less than 10-20% of the ammonia slip to the effluent of the acidic scrubber ends up in the environment and less than 40% of the slip to the fly-ash ends up in the environment. The study suggests that the actual fate of the ammonia slip is crucial, but since the release of the ammonia may take place during transport and at the facilities that treat the wastewater and treat the fly-ash this factor depends

  11. Kinetics of hydrogen release from dissolutions of ammonia borane in different ionic liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valero-Pedraza, María José; Martín-Cortés, Alexandra; Navarrete, Alexander; Bermejo, María Dolores; Martín, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Ammonia borane is a promising hydrogen storage material that liberates hydrogen by thermolysis at moderate temperatures, but it also presents major limitations for practical applications including a long induction time before the initiation of hydrogen release and a difficult regeneration. Previous works have demonstrated that by dissolution of ammonia borane into several ionic liquids, and particularly in 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride bmimCl, the induction period at the beginning of the thermolysis is eliminated, but some problems persist, including foaming and the formation of a residue after thermolysis that is insoluble in the ionic liquid. In this work, the release of hydrogen from ammonia borane dissolved in different ionic liquids has been analyzed, measuring the kinetics of hydrogen release, visually following the evolution of the sample during the process using pressure glass tube reactors, and analyzing the residue by spectroscopic techniques. While dissolutions of ammonia borane in most ionic liquids analyzed show similar properties as dissolutions in bmimCl, using ionic liquids with bis(trifluoromethylsulfanyl)imide Tf 2 N anion the foaming problem is reduced, and in some cases the residue remains dissolved in the ionic liquid, while with ionic liquids with choline anion higher hydrogen yields are achieved that indicate that the decomposition of ammonia borane proceeds through a different path. - Highlights: • Hydrogen release from ammonia borane dissolved in 13 ionic liquids has been studied. • Induction time is shortened and hydrogen release rate is accelerated in all cases. • The best results are obtained using ionic liquids with Tf 2 N anion. • Ch cation ionic liquids enable higher H 2 yield, but cyclotriborazane is produced.

  12. Method for releasing hydrogen from ammonia borane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Arvind; Diwan, Moiz; Shafirovich, Evgeny; Hwang, Hyun-Tae; Al-Kukhun, Ahmad

    2013-02-19

    A method of releasing hydrogen from ammonia borane is disclosed. The method comprises heating an aqueous ammonia borane solution to between about 80-135.degree. C. at between about 14.7 and 200 pounds per square inch absolute (psia) to release hydrogen by hydrothermolysis.

  13. Chilled ammonia process for CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darde, Victor Camille Alfred; Thomsen, Kaj; van Well, Willy J. M

    2009-01-01

    The chilled ammonia process absorbs the CO2 at low temperature (2-10 degrees C). The heat of absorption of carbon dioxide by ammonia is significantly lower than for amines. In addition, degradation problems can be avoided and a high carbon dioxide capacity is achieved. Hence, this process shows...

  14. Regeneration of ammonia borane from polyborazylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Andrew; Gordon, John C; Ott, Kevin C; Burrell, Anthony K

    2013-02-05

    Method of producing ammonia borane, comprising providing a reagent comprising a dehydrogenated material in a suitable solvent; and combining the reagent with a reducing agent comprising hydrazine, a hydrazine derivative, or combinations thereof, in a reaction which produces a mixture comprising ammonia borane.

  15. Chilled Ammonia Process for CO2 Capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darde, Victor Camille Alfred; Thomsen, Kaj; Well, Willy J.M. van

    2010-01-01

    The chilled ammonia process absorbs the CO2 at low temperature (2–10°C). The heat of absorption of carbon dioxide by ammonia is significantly lower than for amines. In addition, degradation problems can be avoided and a high carbon dioxide capacity is achieved. Hence, this process shows good...

  16. Atmospheric behaviour of ammonia and ammonium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Asman, W.A.H.

    1987-01-01

    1.4.1 Scope of this thesis

    A few models for ammonia and ammonium exist. Russell et al. (1983) made a multi-layer Lagrangian transport model describing the transport and formation of ammonium nitrate aerosol for California. They did not take reactions of ammonia and sulphuric acid

  17. Reducing ammonia volatilization from compound fertilizers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ammonia volatilization is a direct loss of available nitrogen in agriculture. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of amending NPK fertilizer with different rates of clinoptilolite zeolite on ammonia volatilization, soil exchangeable ammonium, and available nitrate. Seven treatments evaluated were: 250 g soil ...

  18. Ammonia Sensor Using Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Farooq, Aamir

    2015-09-01

    An ammonia sensor can include a laser detector configured to provide stable sample readings. The sensor can implement a method including processing the recorded intensity of the laser beam to determine a first harmonic component and a second harmonic component and the amount of ammonia in the sample.

  19. Ammonia Solubility in High Concentration Salt Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HEDENGREN, D.C.

    2000-01-01

    Solubility data for ammonia in water and various dilute solutions are abundant in the literature. However, there is a noticeable lack of ammonia solubility data for high salt, basic solutions of various mixtures of salts including those found in many of the Hanford Washington underground waste tanks. As a result, models based on solubility data for dilute salt solutions have been used to extrapolate to high salt solutions. These significant extrapolations need to be checked against actual laboratory data. Some indirect vapor measurements have been made. A more direct approach is to determine the ratio of solubility of ammonia in water to its solubility in high salt solutions. In various experiments, pairs of solutions, one of which is water and the other a high salt solution, are allowed to come to equilibrium with a common ammonia vapor pressure. The ratio of concentrations of ammonia in the two solutions is equal to the ratio of the respective ammonia solubilities (Henry's Law constants) at a given temperature. This information can then be used to refine the models that predict vapor space compositions of ammonia. Ammonia at Hanford is of concern because of its toxicity in the environment and its contribution to the flammability of vapor space gas mixtures in waste tanks

  20. Measuring ammonia emissions from manured fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, A.J.C.; Hoff, G.R.; Bergwerff, J.B.; Swart, D.P.J.; Hensen, A.; Kraai, A.; Bleeker, A.; Huijsmans, J.F.M.; Mosquera Losada, J.; Pul, van W.A.J.

    2008-01-01

    In this report, 2 novel instruments are described that are able to measure the ammonia emissions of manured fields. The 1st instrument, developed and operated by ECN, is a tuneable diode laser spectrometer (TDL), mounted in a van. It is used to measure the ammonia concentration patterns downwind

  1. New findings on cerebral ammonia uptake in HE using functional (13)N-ammonia PET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Michael; Keiding, Susanne

    2007-12-01

    PET is a functional imaging technique suitable for studies of brain ammonia metabolism. Dynamic (13)N-ammonia PET yields time-courses of radioactivity concentrations in brain (PET camera) and blood (samples). Ahl et al. (Hepatology 40:73-79, 2004) and Keiding et al. (Hepatology 43:42-50, 2006) analysed such data in patients with HE by a kinetic model accounting for transfer of (13)N-ammonia across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and intracellular formation of (13)N-glutamine. Initial unidirectional (13)N-ammonia transfer across BBB was characterized by the permeability-surface area product PS(BBB) (ml blood min(-1) ml(-1) tissue). There was a tendency to lower PS(BBB) values in patients with cirrhosis and HE than in patients with cirrhosis without HE and healthy controls but the differences were not statistically significant. Keiding et al. (Hepatology 43:42-50, 2006) also calculated PS(met) (ml blood min(-1) ml(-1) tissue) as a measure of the combined transfer of (13)N-ammonia across BBB and subsequent intracellular metabolism of (13)N-ammonia; neither did this PS-value show significant difference between the groups of subjects. Net flux of ammonia from blood into intracellular metabolites was linearly correlated to arterial ammonia. In conclusion, basic brain ammonia kinetics was not changed significantly in patients with cirrhosis +/- HE compared to healthy controls. Blood ammonia seems to be the more important factor for increased brain ammonia uptake in HE.

  2. Enrichment of ammonia concentration from aqua-ammonia vapors by using 3A molecular sieve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiou, J.S.; Lin, T.M.; She, K.Y.; Chen, W.M.

    2009-01-01

    In aqua-ammonia refrigeration systems, the ammonia is the refrigerant and the water is the absorbent, the vapor produced in the generator always contains a small fraction of water. The removed of this residual water is a crucial issue in order to guarantee a reliable and efficient operation of these systems. Currently, the thermal distillation methods (via a rectifier and/or an analyzer) are used to further separate the water from aqua-ammonia mixtures. In this study, a molecular sieve module is used for ammonia purification. A thermal system with a 3A molecular sieve module was set up, and the conditions of working fluid entering into the sieve module is similar to that entering into the rectifier tower of a typical aqua-ammonia absorption system. Results from ammonia enrichment tests indicate the concentration of ammonia can be raised from about 80% up to about 99% if siever installation was properly arranged.

  3. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Anand A.; Campbell, Christian X.; Subramanian, Ramesh

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  4. Ammonia and urea permeability of mammalian aquaporins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litman, Thomas; Søgaard, Rikke; Zeuthen, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    and 9 are found together with Rh proteins in cells exposed to portal blood coming from the intestine. In the kidney, AQP3 might participate in the excretion of NH(4) (+) in the collecting duct. The interplay between the ammonia-permeable aquaporins and the other types of ammonia- and urea......The human aquaporins,AQP3,AQP7, AQP8,AQP9, and possibly AQP10, are permeable to ammonia, and AQP7, AQP9, and possibly AQP3, are permeable to urea. In humans, these aquaporins supplement the ammonia transport of the Rhesus (Rh) proteins and the urea transporters (UTs). The mechanism by which...... ammonium is transported by aquaporins is not fully resolved. A comparison of transport equations, models, and experimental data shows that ammonia is transported in its neutral form, NH(3). In the presence of NH(3), the aquaporin stimulates H(+) transport. Consequently, this transport of H(+) is only...

  5. Ammonia transformation in a biotrickling air filter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Peter; Nielsen, Marie Louise; Andersen, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    A simple, tubular biotrickling filter was designed for optimal removal of ammonia and odour in ventilation air from a pig house. The removal and transformation of ammonia was studied in detail by analysis and modelling of chemical gradients through the filter. Good correspondence between...... measurements and model was obtained by using conventional substrate and inhibition kinetics of ammonium and nitrite oxidizing bacteria. Highest rates of ammonia removal were observed in the central section of the filter. Near the air outlet and water inlet the process was ammonia limited, while high nitrous...... acid concentrations almost excluded any biological activity near the air inlet and water outlet. Nitrous acid inhibition also stabilized pH at 6.5-7 all through the filter. Being sensitive to both ammonia and nitrous acid the nitrite oxidation process occurred mainly in the filter sections near the air...

  6. Selective catalytic reduction system and process for control of NO.sub.x emissions in a sulfur-containing gas stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly

    2015-08-11

    An exhaust gas treatment process, apparatus, and system for reducing the concentration of NOx, CO and hydrocarbons in a gas stream, such as an exhaust stream (29), via selective catalytic reduction with ammonia is provided. The process, apparatus and system include a catalytic bed (32) having a reducing only catalyst portion (34) and a downstream reducing-plus-oxidizing portion (36). Each portion (34, 36) includes an amount of tungsten. The reducing-plus-oxidizing catalyst portion (36) advantageously includes a greater amount of tungsten than the reducing catalyst portion (36) to markedly limit ammonia salt formation.

  7. Clinical utility of breath ammonia for evaluation of ammonia physiology in healthy and cirrhotic adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spacek, Lisa A; Mudalel, Matthew; Tittel, Frank; Risby, Terence H; Solga, Steven F

    2016-01-01

    Blood ammonia is routinely used in clinical settings to assess systemic ammonia in hepatic encephalopathy and urea cycle disorders. Despite its drawbacks, blood measurement is often used as a comparator in breath studies because it is a standard clinical test. We sought to evaluate sources of measurement error and potential clinical utility of breath ammonia compared to blood ammonia. We measured breath ammonia in real time by quartz enhanced photoacoustic spectrometry and blood ammonia in 10 healthy and 10 cirrhotic participants. Each participant contributed 5 breath samples and blood for ammonia measurement within 1 h. We calculated the coefficient of variation (CV) for 5 breath ammonia values, reported medians of healthy and cirrhotic participants, and used scatterplots to display breath and blood ammonia. For healthy participants, mean age was 22 years (±4), 70% were men, and body mass index (BMI) was 27 (±5). For cirrhotic participants, mean age was 61 years (±8), 60% were men, and BMI was 31 (±7). Median blood ammonia for healthy participants was within normal range, 10 μmol L−1 (interquartile range (IQR), 3–18) versus 46 μmol L−1 (IQR, 23–66) for cirrhotic participants. Median breath ammonia was 379 pmol mL−1 CO2 (IQR, 265–765) for healthy versus 350 pmol mL−1 CO2 (IQR, 180–1013) for cirrhotic participants. CV was 17 ± 6%. There remains an important unmet need in the evaluation of systemic ammonia, and breath measurement continues to demonstrate promise to fulfill this need. Given the many differences between breath and blood ammonia measurement, we examined biological explanations for our findings in healthy and cirrhotic participants. We conclude that based upon these preliminary data breath may offer clinically important information this is not provided by blood ammonia. PMID:26658550

  8. Hydrogenation and cleavage of dinitrogen to ammonia with a zirconium complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, Jaime A; Lobkovsky, Emil; Chirik, Paul J

    2004-02-05

    Molecular nitrogen is relatively inert owing to the strength of its triple bond, nonpolarity and high ionization potential. As a result, the fixation of atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia under mild conditions has remained a challenge to chemists for more than a century. Although the Haber-Bosch process produces over 100 million tons of ammonia annually for the chemical industry and agriculture, it requires high temperature and pressure, in addition to a catalyst, to induce the combination of hydrogen (H2) and nitrogen (N2). Coordination of molecular nitrogen to transition metal complexes can activate and even rupture the strong N-N bond under mild conditions, with protonation yielding ammonia in stoichiometric and even catalytic yields. But the assembly of N-H bonds directly from H2 and N2 remains challenging: adding H2 to a metal-N2 complex results in the formation of N2 and metal-hydrogen bonds or, in the case of one zirconium complex, in formation of one N-H bond and a bridging hydride. Here we extend our work on zirconium complexes containing cyclopentadienyl ligands and show that adjustment of the ligands allows direct observation of N-H bond formation from N2 and H2. Subsequent warming of the complex cleaves the N-N bond at 45 degrees C, and continued hydrogenation at 85 degrees C results in complete fixation to ammonia.

  9. Thermal decomposition of lutetium propionate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grivel, Jean-Claude

    2010-01-01

    The thermal decomposition of lutetium(III) propionate monohydrate (Lu(C2H5CO2)3·H2O) in argon was studied by means of thermogravimetry, differential thermal analysis, IR-spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. Dehydration takes place around 90 °C. It is followed by the decomposition of the anhydrous ...... of the oxycarbonate to the rare-earth oxide proceeds in a different way, which is here reminiscent of the thermal decomposition path of Lu(C3H5O2)·2CO(NH2)2·2H2O...

  10. AUTONOMOUS GAUSSIAN DECOMPOSITION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian; Heiles, Carl; Hennebelle, Patrick; Goss, W. M.; Dickey, John

    2015-01-01

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21 cm absorption spectra from the 21 cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the H i line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes

  11. AUTONOMOUS GAUSSIAN DECOMPOSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindner, Robert R.; Vera-Ciro, Carlos; Murray, Claire E.; Stanimirović, Snežana; Babler, Brian [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Heiles, Carl [Radio Astronomy Lab, UC Berkeley, 601 Campbell Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hennebelle, Patrick [Laboratoire AIM, Paris-Saclay, CEA/IRFU/SAp-CNRS-Université Paris Diderot, F-91191 Gif-sur Yvette Cedex (France); Goss, W. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box O, 1003 Lopezville, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Dickey, John, E-mail: rlindner@astro.wisc.edu [University of Tasmania, School of Maths and Physics, Private Bag 37, Hobart, TAS 7001 (Australia)

    2015-04-15

    We present a new algorithm, named Autonomous Gaussian Decomposition (AGD), for automatically decomposing spectra into Gaussian components. AGD uses derivative spectroscopy and machine learning to provide optimized guesses for the number of Gaussian components in the data, and also their locations, widths, and amplitudes. We test AGD and find that it produces results comparable to human-derived solutions on 21 cm absorption spectra from the 21 cm SPectral line Observations of Neutral Gas with the EVLA (21-SPONGE) survey. We use AGD with Monte Carlo methods to derive the H i line completeness as a function of peak optical depth and velocity width for the 21-SPONGE data, and also show that the results of AGD are stable against varying observational noise intensity. The autonomy and computational efficiency of the method over traditional manual Gaussian fits allow for truly unbiased comparisons between observations and simulations, and for the ability to scale up and interpret the very large data volumes from the upcoming Square Kilometer Array and pathfinder telescopes.

  12. Catalytic ozonation of sulfamethoxazole by composite iron-manganese silicate oxide: cooperation mechanism between adsorption and catalytic reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guoying; Kang, Jing; Shen, Jimin; Chen, Zhonglin; Chu, Wei

    2016-11-01

    A systematic investigation of the cooperation mechanism between adsorption and catalytic reaction during the catalytic ozonation of sulfamethoxazole (SMX) by composite iron-manganese silicate oxide (FMSO) was carried out in this work. Results showed that the total organic carbon (TOC) removal increased significantly from 27 % (sole-ozonation) to 79.8 % (FMSO catalytic ozonation). The presence of FMSO in the ozonation process effectively enhanced the ozone utilization efficiency and accelerated the transformation of ozone into hydroxyl radicals. The latter result was verified by the indirect method, using NaHSO 3 as the reductor, and the direct electron spin resonance (ESR) determination technology. The adsorption of SMX on FMSO was minimal (1.8 %). However, ozone rapidly converted SMX into various intermediates, which was exhibited by the much higher adsorption affinity on the surface of FMSO than that of SMX. The accumulation of various intermediates on the FMSO surface also increased their contact probability with the ·OH radicals generated by the ozone decomposition. The continuous interaction of intermediates with ·OH radicals could further promote the benign cycling of the release of adsorption sites and the succeeding adsorption/decomposition of ozone and intermediates on FMSO. This could be another reason for the higher and faster TOC removal rate.

  13. In Situ Formation of AgCo Stabilized on Graphitic Carbon Nitride and Concomitant Hydrolysis of Ammonia Borane to Hydrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The development of highly-efficient heterogeneous supported catalysts for catalytic hydrolysis of ammonia borane to yield hydrogen is of significant importance considering the versatile usages of hydrogen. Herein, we reported the in situ synthesis of AgCo bimetallic nanoparticles supported on g-C3N4 and concomitant hydrolysis of ammonia borane for hydrogen evolution at room temperature. The as-synthesized Ag0.1Co0.9/g-C3N4 catalysts displayed the highest turnover frequency (TOF value of 249.02 mol H2·(molAg·min−1 for hydrogen evolution from the hydrolysis of ammonia borane, which was higher than many other reported values. Furthermore, the Ag0.1Co0.9/g-C3N4 catalyst could be recycled during five consecutive runs. The study proves that Ag0.1Co0.9/g-C3N4 is a potential catalytic material toward the hydrolysis of ammonia borane for hydrogen production.

  14. Thermal behavior and kinetic study for catalytic co-pyrolysis of biomass with plastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Lei, Hanwu; Zhu, Lei; Zhu, Xiaolu; Qian, Moriko; Yadavalli, Gayatri; Wu, Joan; Chen, Shulin

    2016-11-01

    The present study aims to investigate the thermal decomposition behaviors and kinetics of biomass (cellulose/Douglas fir sawdust) and plastics (LDPE) in a non-catalytic and catalytic co-pyrolysis over ZSM-5 catalyst by using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). It was found that there was a positive synergistic interaction between biomass and plastics according to the difference of weight loss (ΔW), which could decrease the formation of solid residue at the end of the experiment. The first order reaction model well fitted for both non-catalytic and catalytic co-pyrolysis of biomass with plastics. The activation energy (E) of Cellulose-LDPE-Catalyst and DF-LDPE-Catalyst are only 89.51 and 54.51kJ/mol, respectively. The kinetics analysis showed that adding catalyst doesn't change the decomposition mechanism. As a result, the kinetic study on catalytic co-pyrolysis of biomass with plastics was suggested that the catalytic co-pyrolysis is a promising technique that can significantly reduce the energy input. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. N2 Reduction and Hydrogenation to Ammonia by a Molecular Iron-Potassium Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Meghan M.; Bill, Eckhard; Brennessel, William W.; Holland, Patrick L.

    2011-01-01

    The most common catalyst in the Haber-Bosch process for the hydrogenation of dinitrogen (N2) to ammonia is an iron surface promoted with K+, but soluble iron complexes have neither reduced the N-N bond of N2 to nitride nor produced large amounts of NH3 from N2. We report a molecular iron complex that reacts with N2 and a potassium reductant to give a complex with two nitrides, which are bound to iron and potassium cations. The product has a Fe3N2 core, implying that three iron atoms cooperate to break the N-N triple bond through a six-electron reduction. The nitride complex reacts with acid and with H2 to give substantial yields of N2-derived ammonia. These reactions, though not yet catalytic, give structural and spectroscopic insight into N2 cleavage and N-H bond-forming reactions of iron. PMID:22076372

  16. N₂reduction and hydrogenation to ammonia by a molecular iron-potassium complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Meghan M; Bill, Eckhard; Brennessel, William W; Holland, Patrick L

    2011-11-11

    The most common catalyst in the Haber-Bosch process for the hydrogenation of dinitrogen (N(2)) to ammonia (NH(3)) is an iron surface promoted with potassium cations (K(+)), but soluble iron complexes have neither reduced the N-N bond of N(2) to nitride (N(3-)) nor produced large amounts of NH(3) from N(2). We report a molecular iron complex that reacts with N(2) and a potassium reductant to give a complex with two nitrides, which are bound to iron and potassium cations. The product has a Fe(3)N(2) core, implying that three iron atoms cooperate to break the N-N triple bond through a six-electron reduction. The nitride complex reacts with acid and with H(2) to give substantial yields of N(2)-derived ammonia. These reactions, although not yet catalytic, give structural and spectroscopic insight into N(2) cleavage and N-H bond-forming reactions of iron.

  17. Síntese, caracterização e avaliação catalítica de Vo x/Mg yAlo x na reação de decomposição do isopropanol Synthesis, characterization and catalytic evaluation of Vo x/Mg yAlo x in the decomposition of isopropanol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto G. Cortez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Vanadium oxide supported on hydrotalcite-type precursors was studied in the decomposition of isopropanol. Hydrotalcite-type compounds with different y = Mg+2/Al+3 ratios were synthesized by the method of coprecipitating nitrates of Mg+2 and Al+3 cations with K2CO3 as precipitant. The X-ray diffraction patterns of Al-rich hydrotalcite precursors showed the presence of crystalline phases of brucite and gibbsite. It was shown that chemical composition, texture, acid-base properties of the active sites and also Mg/Al ratio strongly affect the formation of the products in the oxidation of isopropanol. The Al-rich catalysts were much more active than the Mg-rich ones, converting isopropanol mainly to propylene.

  18. Decomposition of Network Communication Games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietzenbacher, Bas; Borm, Peter; Hendrickx, Ruud

    2015-01-01

    Using network control structures this paper introduces network communication games as a generalization of vertex games and edge games corresponding to communication situations and studies their decomposition into unanimity games. We obtain a relation between the dividends of the network

  19. NRSA enzyme decomposition model data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Microbial enzyme activities measured at more than 2000 US streams and rivers. These enzyme data were then used to predict organic matter decomposition and microbial...

  20. Some nonlinear space decomposition algorithms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tai, Xue-Cheng; Espedal, M. [Univ. of Bergen (Norway)

    1996-12-31

    Convergence of a space decomposition method is proved for a general convex programming problem. The space decomposition refers to methods that decompose a space into sums of subspaces, which could be a domain decomposition or a multigrid method for partial differential equations. Two algorithms are proposed. Both can be used for linear as well as nonlinear elliptic problems and they reduce to the standard additive and multiplicative Schwarz methods for linear elliptic problems. Two {open_quotes}hybrid{close_quotes} algorithms are also presented. They converge faster than the additive one and have better parallelism than the multiplicative method. Numerical tests with a two level domain decomposition for linear, nonlinear and interface elliptic problems are presented for the proposed algorithms.

  1. IRIS Toxicological Review of Ammonia (Revised External ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    In August 2013, EPA submitted a revised draft IRIS assessment of ammonia to the agency's Science Advisory Board (SAB) and posted this draft on the IRIS website. EPA had previously released a draft of the assessment for public comment, held a public meeting about the draft, and then revised it based on the comments received. The SAB CAAC-Ammonia panel will review this draft assessment. Details about the meeting dates, times, and location are available via the Federal Register Notice posted on March 25, 2014. The SAB provided information on how the public can participate in the external peer review meetings, as well as instructions about how to provide comments to the SAB in the notice. Additional information on the SAB review of ammonia is on the SAB website. Report Information: The Toxicological Review of Ammonia was originally released for a 60-day public comment period on June 8, 2012. [Federal Register Notice Jun 8, 2012] EPA revised the toxicological review in response to the public comments received. EPA has released the revised external review draft ammonia assessment and the SAB CAAC is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the assessment that will appear in the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database. Information regarding the peer review can be found at the SAB review of ammonia website. EPA is undertaking an Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) health assessment for ammonia. IRIS is an EPA database cont

  2. Resveratrol Prevents Ammonia Toxicity in Astroglial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Maria Cristina; Leite, Marina Concli; Souza, Diogo Onofre; Gonçalves, Carlos-Alberto; Gottfried, Carmem

    2012-01-01

    Ammonia is implicated as a neurotoxin in brain metabolic disorders associated with hyperammonemia. Acute ammonia toxicity can be mediated by an excitotoxic mechanism, oxidative stress and nitric oxide (NO) production. Astrocytes interact with neurons, providing metabolic support and protecting against oxidative stress and excitotoxicity. Astrocytes also convert excess ammonia and glutamate into glutamine via glutamine synthetase (GS). Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in grapes and red wines, exhibits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and modulates glial functions, such as glutamate metabolism. We investigated the effect of resveratrol on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), GS activity, S100B secretion, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels in astroglial cells exposed to ammonia. Ammonia induced oxidative stress, decreased GS activity and increased cytokines release, probably by a mechanism dependent on protein kinase A (PKA) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathways. Resveratrol prevented ammonia toxicity by modulating oxidative stress, glial and inflammatory responses. The ERK and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) are involved in the protective effect of resveratrol on cytokines proinflammatory release. In contrast, other antioxidants (e.g., ascorbic acid and trolox) were not effective against hyperammonemia. Thus, resveratrol could be used to protect against ammonia-induced neurotoxicity. PMID:23284918

  3. Resveratrol prevents ammonia toxicity in astroglial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Daniele Bobermin

    Full Text Available Ammonia is implicated as a neurotoxin in brain metabolic disorders associated with hyperammonemia. Acute ammonia toxicity can be mediated by an excitotoxic mechanism, oxidative stress and nitric oxide (NO production. Astrocytes interact with neurons, providing metabolic support and protecting against oxidative stress and excitotoxicity. Astrocytes also convert excess ammonia and glutamate into glutamine via glutamine synthetase (GS. Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in grapes and red wines, exhibits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and modulates glial functions, such as glutamate metabolism. We investigated the effect of resveratrol on the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, GS activity, S100B secretion, TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 levels in astroglial cells exposed to ammonia. Ammonia induced oxidative stress, decreased GS activity and increased cytokines release, probably by a mechanism dependent on protein kinase A (PKA and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK pathways. Resveratrol prevented ammonia toxicity by modulating oxidative stress, glial and inflammatory responses. The ERK and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB are involved in the protective effect of resveratrol on cytokines proinflammatory release. In contrast, other antioxidants (e.g., ascorbic acid and trolox were not effective against hyperammonemia. Thus, resveratrol could be used to protect against ammonia-induced neurotoxicity.

  4. Low Temperature Selective Catalytic Reduction of Nitrogen Oxides in Production of Nitric Acid by the Use of Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabljanac, Ž.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the application of low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of nitrous oxides in the tail gas of the dual-pressure process of nitric acid production. The process of selective catalytic reduction is carried out using the TiO2/WO3 heterogeneous catalyst applied on a ceramic honeycomb structure with a high geometric surface area per volume. The process design parameters for nitric acid production by the dual-pressure procedure in a capacity range from 75 to 100 % in comparison with designed capacity for one production line is shown in the Table 1. Shown is the effectiveness of selective catalytic reduction in the temperature range of the tail gas from 180 to 230 °C with direct application of liquid ammonia, without prior evaporation to gaseous state. The results of inlet and outlet concentrations of nitrous oxides in the tail gas of the nitric acid production process are shown in Figures 1 and 2. Figure 3 shows the temperature dependence of the selective catalytic reduction of nitrous oxides expressed as NO2in the tail gas of nitric acid production with the application of a constant mass flow of liquid ammonia of 13,0 kg h-1 and average inlet mass concentration of the nitrous oxides expressed as NO2of 800,0 mgm-3 during 100 % production capacity. The specially designed liquid-ammonia direct-dosing system along with the effective homogenization of the tail gas resulted in emission levels of nitrous oxides expressed as NO2 in tail gas ranging from 100,0 to 185,0 mg m-3. The applied low-temperature selective catalytic reduction of the nitrous oxides in the tail gases by direct use of liquid ammonia is shown in Figure 4. It is shown that low-temperature selective catalytic reduction with direct application of liquid ammonia opens a new opportunity in the reduction of nitrous oxide emissions during nitric acid production without the risk of dangerous ammonium nitrate occurring in the process of subsequent energy utilization of

  5. Transformation of ammonia i biological airfilters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Peter; Sørensen, Karen; Andersen, Mathias

    2007-01-01

    Ammonia is a major compound in ventilation air from animal houses. In biological filters it is with varying efficiency transformed by physical, biological, and chemical processes and ends up as ammonium, nitrate, and nitrite dissolved in water and as dinitrogen, nitrous oxide and nitric oxide...... nitrite oxidation only appeared in locations with minimal ammonia and nitrite levels. Nitrous oxide emission depended on anoxic microsites, and nitric oxide production was associated with nitrite accumulation. Water and biomass management appear to be the important tools for optimization of ammonia...

  6. Electrochemical monitoring of ammonia during anaerobic digestion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Nannan; Angelidaki, Irini; Zhang, Yifeng

    Ammonia is known as key inhibitor to methanogens in anaerobic digestion (AD) process. It’s of importance to develop efficient tool for ammonia monitoring. In this study, an electrolysis cell (EC) coupled with a complete nitrification reactor was developed as sensor for real time and online......-rich digesters. It was observed that the initial transient currents (0 min) were linearly corresponding to the ammonia levels (from 0 to 95.75 mg/L NH4+-N, R2 = 0.9673). Finally, this new sensor was tested with real AD effluent and the results showed no significant difference with that measured by conventional...

  7. Catalytic reforming methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadd, Andrew R; Schwank, Johannes

    2013-05-14

    A catalytic reforming method is disclosed herein. The method includes sequentially supplying a plurality of feedstocks of variable compositions to a reformer. The method further includes adding a respective predetermined co-reactant to each of the plurality of feedstocks to obtain a substantially constant output from the reformer for the plurality of feedstocks. The respective predetermined co-reactant is based on a C/H/O atomic composition for a respective one of the plurality of feedstocks and a predetermined C/H/O atomic composition for the substantially constant output.

  8. Ammonia complexes of metals in aqueous solutions with high concentrations of ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padar, T.G.; Novikov, L.K.; Stupko, T.V.; Isaev, I.D.; Pashkov, G.L.; Mironov, V.E.

    1991-01-01

    Potentiometric method, glass electrodes and Bierrum function were used to study the formation of ammonia complexes of magnesium, calcium, cadmium, zinc, copper(2) and silver in 2.0 mol/dm 3 aqueous solutions of ammonia nitrate with 0-18 mol/dm 3 ammonia concentrations at 25.0 deg C. Step constants of stability of studied complexes were calculated and their compositions were determined with account of nonideal character of aqueous-salt solutions with ammonia concentrations above 1.0 mol/dm 3 . Values of correction effects on salting out ammonia action for Bierrum function in solutions with 1.0-18 mol/dm 3 ammonia concentrations were found

  9. Ammonia/Hydrogen Mixtures in an SI-Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Christian Sandersen; Bjerre, Andreas; Gøttrup, Morten Piil

    2011-01-01

    In recent years there has been increasing focus on using metal ammine complexes for ammonia storage. In this paper a fuel system for ammonia fuelled internal combustion engines using metal ammine complexes as ammonia storage is analyzed. The use of ammonia/hydrogen mixtures as an SI-engine fuel...

  10. Stereospecific 7α-alkylation of 20-hydroxyecdysone in a lithium-ammonia solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galyautdinov, Ilgiz V; Khairullina, Zarema R; Zaripova, Elvira R; Sametov, Valery P; Mescheryakova, Ekaterina S; Muslimov, Zabir S; Mozgovoi, Oleg S; Khalilov, Leonard M; Odinokov, Victor N

    2015-06-01

    The reaction of 20-hydroxyecdysone with methyl or ethyl iodide or allyl bromide in a lithium-ammonia solution results in stereospecific 7α-alkylation to give 7α-methyl-, 7α-ethyl-, and 7α-allyl-14-deoxy-Δ(8(14))-20-hydroxyecdysones, respectively. By catalytic hydrogenation (Pd-C/MeOH), the 7α-allyl derivative was converted to 7α-n-propyl-14-deoxy-Δ(8(14))-20-hydroxyecdysone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ammonia as a Suitable Fuel for Fuel Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, Rong; Tao, Shanwen

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia, an important basic chemical, is produced at a scale of 150 million tons per year. Half of hydrogen produced in chemical industry is used for ammonia production. Ammonia containing 17.5 wt% hydrogen is an ideal carbon-free fuel for fuel cells. Compared to hydrogen, ammonia has many advantages. In this mini-review, the suitability of ammonia as fuel for fuel cells, the development of different types of fuel cells using ammonia as the fuel and the potential applications of ammonia fuel cells are briefly reviewed.

  12. Ammonia as a Suitable Fuel for Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Lan, Rong; Tao, Shanwen

    2014-01-01

    Ammonia, an important basic chemical, is produced at a scale of 150 million tons per year. Half of hydrogen produced in chemical industry is used for ammonia production. Ammonia containing 17.5 wt% hydrogen is an ideal carbon-free fuel for fuel cells. Compared to hydrogen, ammonia has many advantages. In this mini-review, the suitability of ammonia as fuel for fuel cells, the development of different types of fuel cells using ammonia as the fuel and the potential applications of ammonia fuel ...

  13. Ammonia as a suitable fuel for fuel cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong eLan

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ammonia, an important basic chemical, is produced at a scale of 150 million tons per year. Half of hydrogen produced in chemical industry is used for ammonia production. Ammonia containing 17.5wt% hydrogen is an ideal carbon-free fuel for fuel cells. Compared to hydrogen, ammonia has many advantages. In this mini-review, the suitability of ammonia as fuel for fuel cells, the development of different types of fuel cells using ammonia as the fuel and the potential applications of ammonia fuel cells are briefly reviewed.

  14. Using a Hands-On Hydrogen Peroxide Decomposition Activity to Teach Catalysis Concepts to K-12 Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cybulskis, Viktor J.; Ribeiro, Fabio H.; Gounder, Rajamani

    2016-01-01

    A versatile and transportable laboratory apparatus was developed for middle and high school (6th-12th grade) students as part of a hands-on outreach activity to estimate catalytic rates of hydrogen peroxide decomposition from oxygen evolution rates measured by using a volumetric displacement method. The apparatus was constructed with inherent…

  15. Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stuart Nemser, PhD

    2010-10-01

    There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

  16. Catalytic gasification of automotive shredder residues with hydrogen generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kuen-Song; Chowdhury, Sujan; Wang, Ze-Ping

    Hydrogen is a clean and new energy carrier to generate power through the Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system. Hydrogen can be effectively turned out through the catalytic gasification of organic material such as automotive shredder residues (ASR). The main objective of this manuscript is to present an analysis of the catalytic gasification of ASR for the generation of high-purity hydrogen in a lab-scale fixed-bed downdraft gasifier using 15 wt.% NiO/Al 2O 3 catalysts at 760-900 K. In the catalytic gasification process, reduction of Ni(II) catalyst into Ni(0) has been confirmed through XANES spectra and consequently EXAFS data shows that the central Ni atoms have Ni-O and Ni-Ni bonds with bond distances of 2.03 ± 0.05 and 2.46 ± 0.05 Å, respectively. ASR is partially oxidized and ultimately converts into hydrogen rich syngas (CO and H 2) and increases of the reaction temperature are favored the generation of hydrogen with decomposition of the CO. As well, approximately 220 kg h -1 of ASR would be catalytically gasified at 760-900 K and 46.2 atm with the reactor volume 0.27 m 3 to obtain approximately 3.42 × 10 5 kcal h -1 of thermal energy during over 87% syngas generation with the generation of 100 kW electric powers.

  17. Catalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamal, Muhammad Shahzad; Razzak, Shaikh A.; Hossain, Mohammad M.

    2016-09-01

    Emission of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is one of the major contributors to air pollution. The main sources of VOCs are petroleum refineries, fuel combustions, chemical industries, decomposition in the biosphere and biomass, pharmaceutical plants, automobile industries, textile manufacturers, solvents processes, cleaning products, printing presses, insulating materials, office supplies, printers etc. The most common VOCs are halogenated compounds, aldehydes, alcohols, ketones, aromatic compounds, and ethers. High concentrations of these VOCs can cause irritations, nausea, dizziness, and headaches. Some VOCs are also carcinogenic for both humans and animals. Therefore, it is crucial to minimize the emission of VOCs. Among the available technologies, the catalytic oxidation of VOCs is the most popular because of its versatility of handling a range of organic emissions under mild operating conditions. Due to that fact, there are numerous research initiatives focused on developing advanced technologies for the catalytic destruction of VOCs. This review discusses recent developments in catalytic systems for the destruction of VOCs. Review also describes various VOCs and their sources of emission, mechanisms of catalytic destruction, the causes of catalyst deactivation, and catalyst regeneration methods.

  18. Aqueous Ammonia soaking of digested manure fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirtsou-Xanthopoulou, Chrysoula; Jurado, Esperanza; Skiadas, Ioannis

    2012-01-01

    , their economical profitable operation relies on increasing the methane yield from manure, and especially of its solid fraction which is not so easily degradable. In the present study, Aqueous Ammonia Soaking was successfully applied on digested fibers separated from the effluent of a manure-fed, full......-scale anaerobic digester to enhance their methane productivity. Soaking in six different reagent concentrations in ammonia (5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%, 32%) was applied for 3 days at 22°C. An overall methane yield increase from 85% to 110% was achieved compared to controls (digested manure fibers where AAS...... was not applied). The difference in reagent concentration at the range of 5-25% w/w in ammonia did not affect that much the overall methane yield resulting to an increase of 104-110% compared to the non AAS-treated fibers. Thus, an ammonia concentration as low as 5% is adequate for achieving the same increase...

  19. Ammonia Affects Astroglial Proliferation in Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Bodega

    Full Text Available Primary cultures of rat astroglial cells were exposed to 1, 3 and 5 mM NH4Cl for up to 10 days. Dose- and time-dependent reductions in cell numbers were seen, plus an increase in the proportion of cells in the S phase. The DNA content was reduced in the treated cells, and BrdU incorporation diminished. However, neither ammonia nor ammonia plus glutamine had any effect on DNA polymerase activity. iTRAQ analysis showed that exposure to ammonia induced a significant reduction in histone and heterochromatin protein 1 expression. A reduction in cell viability was also noted. The ammonia-induced reduction of proliferative activity in these cultured astroglial cells seems to be due to a delay in the completion of the S phase provoked by the inhibition of chromatin protein synthesis.

  20. Ammonia Affects Astroglial Proliferation in Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodega, Guillermo; Segura, Berta; Ciordia, Sergio; Mena, María del Carmen; López-Fernández, Luis Andrés; García, María Isabel; Trabado, Isabel; Suárez, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Primary cultures of rat astroglial cells were exposed to 1, 3 and 5 mM NH4Cl for up to 10 days. Dose- and time-dependent reductions in cell numbers were seen, plus an increase in the proportion of cells in the S phase. The DNA content was reduced in the treated cells, and BrdU incorporation diminished. However, neither ammonia nor ammonia plus glutamine had any effect on DNA polymerase activity. iTRAQ analysis showed that exposure to ammonia induced a significant reduction in histone and heterochromatin protein 1 expression. A reduction in cell viability was also noted. The ammonia-induced reduction of proliferative activity in these cultured astroglial cells seems to be due to a delay in the completion of the S phase provoked by the inhibition of chromatin protein synthesis. PMID:26421615

  1. DIRECT AMMONIA-AIR FUEL CELL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new type of direct oxidation ammonia fuel cell was investigated. This cell is based on the use of a non-aqueous fused hydroxide electrolyte matrix...EMF’s of 0.5 to 0.6 volts. At practical levels of current density the direct ammonia fuel cell has an overall efficiency of about 60% compared to 30-35% for the indirect-type fuel cell . (Author)

  2. Nitrocarburizing in ammonia-hydrocarbon gas mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Hanne; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2011-01-01

    The present work investigates the possibility of nitrocarburising in ammonia-acetylene-hydrogen and ammonia-propene-hydrogen gas mixtures, where unsaturated hydrocarbon gas is the carbon source during nitrocarburising. Consequently, nitrocarburising is carried out in a reducing atmosphere...... microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. It is shown that the use of unsaturated hydrocarbon gas in nitrocarburising processes is a viable alternative to traditional nitrocarburising methods....

  3. Selective catalytic reduction of NO in a reverse-flow reactor: Modelling and experimental validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muñoz, Emilio; Marín, Pablo; Díez, Fernando V.; Ordóñez, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Reverse-flow reactors easily overcome feed concentration disturbances. • Central feeding improves ammonia adsorption in reverse-flow reactors. • Dynamic heterogeneous model validated with bench-scale experiments. • Optimum reverse-flow reactor design improves efficiency and reduces reactor size. - Abstract: The abatement of nitrogen oxides produced in combustion processes and in the chemical industry requires efficient and reliable technologies capable of fulfilling strict environmental regulations. Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) with ammonia in fixed-bed (monolithic) reactors has stood out among other techniques in the last decades. In this work, the use of reverse-flow reactors, operated under the forced un-steady state generated by the periodic reversal of the flow direction, is studied for improving the SCR performance. This reactor can take advantage of ammonia adsorption in the catalyst to enhance concentration profiles in the reactor, increasing reaction rate, efficiency and reducing the emission of un-reacted ammonia. The process has been studied experimentally in a bench-scale device using a commercial monolithic catalyst. The optimum operating conditions, best ammonia feed configuration (side or central) and capacity of the reactor to deal with feed concentration disturbances is analysed. The experiments have also been used for validating a mathematical model of the reactor based on mass conservation equations, and the model has been used to design a full-size reverse-flow reactor able of operating at industrial conditions

  4. Thermoelectric Efficiency Improvement in Vacuum Tubes of Decomposing Liquid Lithium-Ammonia Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jungyoon; Kim, Miae; Shim, Kyuchol; Kim, Jibeom; Jeon, Joonhyeon

    2013-01-01

    Lithium-ammonia (Li-NH 3 ) solutions are possible to be successfully made under the vacuum condition but there still remains a problem of undergoing stable and reliable decomposition in vacuum for high-efficiency thermoelectric power generation. This paper describes a new method for improving the thermoelectric conversion efficiency of Li-NH 3 solutions in vacuum. The proposed method uses a ‘U’-shaped Pyrex vacuum tube for the preparation and decomposition of pure fluid Li-NH 3 solutions. The tube is shaped so that a gas passageway (‘U’) connecting both legs of the ‘U’ helps to balance pressure inside both ends of the tube (due to NH 3 gasification) during decomposition on the hot side. Thermoelectric experimental results show that solution reaction in the ‘U’-shaped tube proceeds more stably and efficiently than in the ‘U’-shaped tube, and consequently, thermoelectric conversion efficiency is improved. It is also proved that the proposed method can provide a reversible reaction, which can rotate between synthesis and decomposition in the tube, for deriving the long-time, high-efficiency thermoelectric power

  5. Corrosion inhibitor for aqueous ammonia absorption system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, B.A.; Whitlow, E.P.

    1998-09-22

    A method is described for inhibiting corrosion and the formation of hydrogen and thus improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption refrigeration, air conditioning or heat pump system by maintaining the hydroxyl ion concentration of the aqueous ammonia working fluid within a selected range under anaerobic conditions at temperatures up to 425 F. This hydroxyl ion concentration is maintained by introducing to the aqueous ammonia working fluid an inhibitor in an amount effective to produce a hydroxyl ion concentration corresponding to a normality of the inhibitor relative to the water content ranging from about 0.015 N to about 0.2 N at 25 C. Also, working fluids for inhibiting the corrosion of carbon steel and resulting hydrogen formation and improving absorption in an ammonia/water absorption system under anaerobic conditions at up to 425 F. The working fluids may be aqueous solutions of ammonia and a strong base or aqueous solutions of ammonia, a strong base, and a specified buffer. 5 figs.

  6. Ammonia and hydrazine. Transition-metal-catalyzed hydroamination and metal-free catalyzed functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertrand, Guy [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2012-06-29

    The efficient and selective preparation of organic molecules is critical for mankind. For the future, it is of paramount importance to find catalysts able to transform abundant and cheap feedstocks into useful compounds. Acyclic and heterocyclic nitrogen-containing derivatives are common components of naturally occurring compounds, agrochemicals, cosmetics, and pharmaceuticals; they are also useful intermediates in a number of industrial processes. One of the most widely used synthetic strategies, allowing the formation of an N-C bond, is the addition of an N-H bond across a carbon-carbon multiple bond, the so-called hydroamination reaction. This chemical transformation fulfills the principle of “green chemistry” since it ideally occurs with 100% atom economy. Various catalysts have been found to promote this reaction, although many limitations remain; one of the most prominent is the lack of methods that permit the use of NH3 and NH2NH2 as the amine partners. In fact, ammonia and hydrazine have rarely succumbed to homogeneous catalytic transformations. Considering the low cost and abundance of ammonia (136 million metric tons produced in 2011) and hydrazine, catalysts able to improve the reactivity and selectivity of the NH3- and NH2NH2-hydroamination reaction, and more broadly speaking the functionalization of these chemicals, are highly desirable. In the last funded period, we discovered the first homogeneous catalysts able to promote the hydroamination of alkynes and allenes with ammonia and the parent hydrazine. The key feature of our catalytic systems is that the formation of catalytically inactive Werner complexes is reversible, in marked contrast to most of the known ammonia and hydrazine transition metal complexes. This is due to the peculiar electronic properties of our neutral ancillary ligands, especially their strong donating capabilities. However, our catalysts currently require

  7. Decomposition mechanism of melamine borate in pyrolytic and thermo-oxidative conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffendahl, Carmen; Duquesne, Sophie; Fontaine, Gaëlle; Bourbigot, Serge, E-mail: serge.bourbigot@ensc-lille.fr

    2014-08-20

    Highlights: • Decomposition of melamine borate in pyrolytic and thermo-oxidative conditions was investigated. • With increasing temperature, orthoboric acid forms boron oxide releasing water. • Melamine decomposes evolving melamine, ammonia and other fragments. • Boron oxide is transformed into boron nitride and boron nitride-oxide structures through presence of ammonia. - Abstract: Decomposition mechanism of melamine borate (MB) in pyrolytic and thermo-oxidative conditions is investigated in the condensed and gas phases using solid state NMR ({sup 13}C and {sup 11}B), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), pyrolysis-gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (py-GCMS) and thermogravimetric analysis coupled with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (TGA–FTIR). It is evidenced that orthoboric acid dehydrates to metaboric and then to boron oxide. The melamine is partially sublimated. At the same time, melamine condensates, i.e., melem and melon are formed. Melon is only formed in thermo-oxidative conditions. At higher temperature, melem and melon decompose releasing ammonia which reacts with the boron oxide to form boron nitride (BN) and BNO structures.

  8. Thermal decomposition of biphenyl (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clerc, M.

    1962-06-01

    The rates of formation of the decomposition products of biphenyl; hydrogen, methane, ethane, ethylene, as well as triphenyl have been measured in the vapour and liquid phases at 460 deg. C. The study of the decomposition products of biphenyl at different temperatures between 400 and 460 deg. C has provided values of the activation energies of the reactions yielding the main products of pyrolysis in the vapour phase. Product and Activation energy: Hydrogen 73 ± 2 kCal/Mole; Benzene 76 ± 2 kCal/Mole; Meta-triphenyl 53 ± 2 kCal/Mole; Biphenyl decomposition 64 ± 2 kCal/Mole; The rate of disappearance of biphenyl is only very approximately first order. These results show the major role played at the start of the decomposition by organic impurities which are not detectable by conventional physico-chemical analysis methods and the presence of which accelerates noticeably the decomposition rate. It was possible to eliminate these impurities by zone-melting carried out until the initial gradient of the formation curves for the products became constant. The composition of the high-molecular weight products (over 250) was deduced from the mean molecular weight and the dosage of the aromatic C - H bonds by infrared spectrophotometry. As a result the existence in tars of hydrogenated tetra, penta and hexaphenyl has been demonstrated. (author) [fr

  9. High-pressure catalytic reactions over single-crystal metal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, JoséA.; Wayne Goodman, D.

    1991-11-01

    Studies dealing with high-pressure catalytic reactions over single-crystal surfaces are reviewed. The coupling of an apparatus for the measurement of reaction kinetics at elevated pressures with an ultrahigh vacuum system for surface analysis allows detailed study of structure sensitivity, the effects of promoters and inhibitors on catalytic activity, and, in certain cases, identification of reaction intermediates by post-reaction surface analysis. Examples are provided which demonstrate the relevance of single-crystal studies for modeling the behaviour of high-surface-area supported catalysts. Studies of CO methanation and CO oxidation over single-crystal surfaces provide convincing evidence that these reactions are structure insensitive. For structure-sensitive reactions (ammonia synthesis, alkane hydrogenolysis, alkane isomerization, water-gas shift reaction, etc.) model single-crystal studies allow correlations to be established between surface structure and catalytic activity. The effects of both electronegative (S and P) and electropositive (alkali metals) impurities upon the catalytic activity of metal single crystals for ammonia synthesis, CO methanation, alkane hydrogenolysis, ethylene epoxidation and water-gas shift are discussed. The roles of "ensemble" and "ligand" effects in bimetallic catalysts are examined in light of data obtained using surfaces prepared by vapor-depositing one metal onto a crystal face of a dissimilar metal.

  10. Catalytic Antibodies: Concept and Promise

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 11. Catalytic Antibodies: Concept and Promise. Desirazu N Rao Bharath Wootla. General Article Volume 12 Issue ... Keywords. Catalytic antibodies; abzymes; hybridome technology; Diels– Alder reaction; Michaelis– Menten kinetics; Factor VIII.

  11. Effects of chronic ammonia exposure on ammonia metabolism and excretion in marine medaka Oryzias melastigma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Na; Zhu, Limei; Guo, Zhiqiang; Yi, Meisheng; Zhang, Li

    2017-06-01

    Ammonia is highly toxic to aquatic organisms, but whether ammonia excretion or ammonia metabolism to less toxic compounds is the major strategy for detoxification in marine fish against chronic ammonia exposure is unclear to date. In this study, we investigated the metabolism and excretion of ammonia in marine medaka Oryzias melastigma during chronic ammonia exposure. The fish were exposed to 0, 0.1, 0.3, 0.6, and 1.1 mmol l -1  NH 4 Cl spiked seawater for 8 weeks. Exposure of 0.3-1.1 mmol l -1  NH 4 Cl had deleterious effects on the fish, including significant reductions in growth, feed intake, and total protein content. However, the fish could take strategies to detoxify ammonia. The tissue ammonia (T Amm ) in the 0.3-1.1 mmol l -1  NH 4 Cl treatments was significantly higher than those in the 0 and 0.1 mmol l -1  NH 4 Cl treatments after 2 weeks of exposure, but it recovered with prolonged exposure time, ultimately reaching the control level after 8 weeks. The amino acid catabolic rate decreased to reduce the gross ammonia production with the increasing ambient ammonia concentration. The concentrations of most metabolites remained constant in the 0-0.6 mmol l -1  NH 4 Cl treatments, whereas 5 amino acids and 3 energy metabolism-related metabolites decreased in the 1.1 mmol l -1  NH 4 Cl treatment. J Amm steadily increased in ambient ammonia from 0 to 0.6 mmol l -1 and slightly decreased when the ambient ammonia concentration increased to 1.1 mmol l -1 . Overall, marine medaka cope with sublethal ammonia environment by regulating the tissue T Amm via reducing the ammonia production and increasing ammonia excretion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Catalytic interface erosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng, H.; Cohen, E.G.D.

    1995-01-01

    We study interface erosion processes: catalytic erosions. We present two cases. (1) The erosion of a completely occupied lattice by one single moving particle starting from somewhere inside the lattice, considering deterministic as well as probabilistic erosion rules. In the latter case, the eroded regions appear to have interfaces with continuously tunable fractal dimensions. (2) The kinetic roughening of an initially flat surface, where ballistic or diffusion-limited particles, which remain intact themselves, erode the surface coming from the outside, using the same erosion rules as in (1). Many features resembling realistic interfaces, for example, islands and inlets, are generated. The dependence of the surface width on the system size is due to both the erosion mechanism and the way particles move before reaching the surface

  13. Catalytic detritiation of water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, M.L.; Lamberger, P.H.; Ellis, R.E.; Mills, T.K.

    1977-01-01

    A pilot-scale system has been used at Mound Laboratory to investigate the catalytic detritiation of water. A hydrophobic, precious metal catalyst is used to promote the exchange of tritium between liquid water and gaseous hydrogen at 60 0 C. Two columns are used, each 7.5 m long by 2.5 cm ID and packed with catalyst. Water flow is 5-10 cm 3 /min and countercurrent hydrogen flow is 9,000-12,000 cm 3 /min. The equipment, except for the columns, is housed in an inert atmosphere glovebox and is computer controlled. The hydrogen is obtained by electrolysis of a portion of the water stream. Enriched gaseous tritium is withdrawn for further enrichment. A description of the system is included along with an outline of its operation. Recent experimental data are discussed

  14. Spectral Tensor-Train Decomposition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bigoni, Daniele; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter; Marzouk, Youssef M.

    2016-01-01

    discretizations of the target function. We assess the performance of the method on a range of numerical examples: a modified set of Genz functions with dimension up to 100, and functions with mixed Fourier modes or with local features. We observe significant improvements in performance over an anisotropic......The accurate approximation of high-dimensional functions is an essential task in uncertainty quantification and many other fields. We propose a new function approximation scheme based on a spectral extension of the tensor-train (TT) decomposition. We first define a functional version of the TT.......e., the “cores”) comprising the functional TT decomposition. This result motivates an approximation scheme employing polynomial approximations of the cores. For functions with appropriate regularity, the resulting spectral tensor-train decomposition combines the favorable dimension-scaling of the TT...

  15. On the hadron mass decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorcé, Cédric

    2018-02-01

    We argue that the standard decompositions of the hadron mass overlook pressure effects, and hence should be interpreted with great care. Based on the semiclassical picture, we propose a new decomposition that properly accounts for these pressure effects. Because of Lorentz covariance, we stress that the hadron mass decomposition automatically comes along with a stability constraint, which we discuss for the first time. We show also that if a hadron is seen as made of quarks and gluons, one cannot decompose its mass into more than two contributions without running into trouble with the consistency of the physical interpretation. In particular, the so-called quark mass and trace anomaly contributions appear to be purely conventional. Based on the current phenomenological values, we find that in average quarks exert a repulsive force inside nucleons, balanced exactly by the gluon attractive force.

  16. Catalytic Combustion of Gasified Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusar, Henrik

    2003-09-01

    This thesis concerns catalytic combustion for gas turbine application using a low heating-value (LHV) gas, derived from gasified waste. The main research in catalytic combustion focuses on methane as fuel, but an increasing interest is directed towards catalytic combustion of LHV fuels. This thesis shows that it is possible to catalytically combust a LHV gas and to oxidize fuel-bound nitrogen (NH{sub 3}) directly into N{sub 2} without forming NO{sub x} The first part of the thesis gives a background to the system. It defines waste, shortly describes gasification and more thoroughly catalytic combustion. The second part of the present thesis, paper I, concerns the development and testing of potential catalysts for catalytic combustion of LHV gases. The objective of this work was to investigate the possibility to use a stable metal oxide instead of noble metals as ignition catalyst and at the same time reduce the formation of NO{sub x} In paper II pilot-scale tests were carried out to prove the potential of catalytic combustion using real gasified waste and to compare with the results obtained in laboratory scale using a synthetic gas simulating gasified waste. In paper III, selective catalytic oxidation for decreasing the NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen was examined using two different approaches: fuel-lean and fuel-rich conditions. Finally, the last part of the thesis deals with deactivation of catalysts. The various deactivation processes which may affect high-temperature catalytic combustion are reviewed in paper IV. In paper V the poisoning effect of low amounts of sulfur was studied; various metal oxides as well as supported palladium and platinum catalysts were used as catalysts for combustion of a synthetic gas. In conclusion, with the results obtained in this thesis it would be possible to compose a working catalytic system for gas turbine application using a LHV gas.

  17. Catalytic upgrading of gas from biofuels and implementation of electricity production. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Espenaes, Bengt-Goeran; Frostaeng, Sten [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2000-04-01

    components concerned are typically aromatic hydrocarbons. These investigations were done using basic oxides (e.g. dolomite), and nickel-based catalysts. Data were collected at different gas compositions and temperatures. Interdependence of reaction rates of some most stable tar components was investigated with dolomite as catalyst. New insights were obtained concerning the reaction mechanism of the decomposition of aromatic compounds catalysed by dolomite. Among issues studied were relations between pore structure and catalytic ability, and influences from the conditions during calcination. The role of intermediate carbon formation on dolomite during decomposition of aromatic hydrocarbons was investigated. Several suggested kinetic rate model equations were evaluated. Internal surface areas of calcined dolomite of different origin were investigated and correlated to their catalytic activity. Kinetics of tar conversion with dolomite and nickel catalysts was included in reactor models. Different models were formulated and tested for different types of reactors. A model for the physical degradation behaviour of dolomite and carry-over of fines in fluidized beds was formulated. A number of new suggested catalysts and catalyst combinations were tested. One interesting new approach is to use a SiO{sub 2} material with large surface area in combination with another catalyst, e.g. dolomite. Another novel catalyst gave very good conversion of benzene at 480 deg C in a 'clean' synthetic gas mixture. Further testing of this catalyst at realistic conditions will be needed. Relations between raw materials and tar formation was investigated in experiments with thermal and catalytic treatment in a secondary reactor after a pyrolyser and comparisons were done with results from gasification. Tar products distribution and amounts were found to be influenced by feedstock. These differences decrease with increasing cracking temperature and efficiency of the catalyst. The sampling and

  18. Electroreduction of N2 to ammonia at ambient conditions on mononitrides of Zr, Nb, Cr, and V – A DFT guide for experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abghoui, Younes; Garden, Anna L.; Howalt, Jakob Geelmuyden

    2016-01-01

    A rapid and facile reduction of nitrogen to achieve a sustainable and energy efficient production of ammonia is critical to its use as a hydrogen storage medium, chemical feedstock and especially for manufacturing inorganic fertilizers. For a decentralization of catalytic ammonia production, small......-scale N2 reduction devices are required that are equipped with the most stable, selective and active catalysts that operate at low temperature and ambient pressure. Here, we report the development of new and cost-efficient catalysts, transition metal nitrides, which enable electrochemical reduction...

  19. Water Quality of NPP Secondary Side with Combined Water Chemistry of Ammonia and Ethanolamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, In-H.; Jung, Hyun-jun; Cho, Daechul; Park, Byunggi

    2012-09-01

    Ammonia (AM) and Ethanolamine (ETA), as pH control additive agents, were injected to the secondary side in a Korean NPP for the even pH in the entire secondary system including the wet region and the condensate. Ammonia and ETA are dominant in the vapor and liquid phases, respectively, since the former and latter are more and less volatile than water in the temperature range of 30 to 300 . pH of 9.5 to 9.7 was maintained in the water-steam cycle at the concentrations of ammonia with ∼1.0 ppm and ETA of ∼1.8 ppm. From the standpoint of corrosion, i.g, concentration of Fe, the water quality of secondary side was improved by the combined water treatment of ammonia and ETA, compared to all volatile treatment of ammonia. The electrical conductivity was increased from 6 to 10 μS/cm due to the presence of organic carboxylates produced by the decomposition of ETA. ETA was broken down by <5% in steam generator and converted into formate, acetate, and glycolate, among which acetate was largely formed. But inorganic ions such as Na + , Cl - , and SO 4 2- are not changed because their ingress was not made and the selectivity of resin over those ions was not fairly altered. The runtime of demineralizer in steam generator blowdown was shortened by a third for a mixture of ammonia and ETA. Most of Fe was originated from the shell side of heat exchangers including the condenser as a result of corrosion. Fe was only eliminated by ion exchange demineralizers, i.e., 46% at CPP and 3% at SG BD and 70% of Fe oxides were accumulated at the steam generator, on the basis of Fe concentration at the final feedwater. In conclusion, ETA is preferable to ammonia for the enhancement of pH in the liquid phase of water-steam mixture such as the shell side of heat exchanger and also the full-flow operation of CPP is more desirable than partial-flow operation for the improved removal of corrosion products, regardless of hydrogen- or amine-type operation. (authors)

  20. Abstract decomposition theorem and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Grossberg, R; Grossberg, Rami; Lessmann, Olivier

    2005-01-01

    Let K be an Abstract Elementary Class. Under the asusmptions that K has a nicely behaved forking-like notion, regular types and existence of some prime models we establish a decomposition theorem for such classes. The decomposition implies a main gap result for the class K. The setting is general enough to cover \\aleph_0-stable first-order theories (proved by Shelah in 1982), Excellent Classes of atomic models of a first order tehory (proved Grossberg and Hart 1987) and the class of submodels of a large sequentially homogenuus \\aleph_0-stable model (which is new).

  1. Catalytic pyrolysis-gc/ms of spirulina: evaluation of a highly proteinaceous biomass source for production of fuels and chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyrolysis of microalgae offers a pathway towards the production of compounds derived from the thermal decomposition of triglycerides, proteins as well as lignocelluloses and their combinations thereof. When catalytically induced, this could lead to the production of fuels and chemicals including aro...

  2. Ammonia tolerant enriched methanogenic cultures as bioaugmentation inocula to alleviate ammonia inhibition in continuous anaerobic reactors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Wang, Han; Angelidaki, Irini

    Ammonia is the most common inhibitor of anaerobic digestion (AD) process, resulting in suboptimal exploitation of the biogas potential of the feedstocks, causing significant economic losses to the biogas plants. Ammonia is mainly inhibiting the aceticlastic methanogens, while the hydrogenotrophic...... methanogens are more robust to ammonia toxicity effect. It has been shown that bioaugmentation of a pure strain of a hydrogenotrophic methanogen (i.e. Methanoculleus bourgensis) in an ammonia inhibited continuous anaerobic reactor can improve methane production more than 30%. Nevertheless, cultivation...... of a pure culture, to be used as bioaugmentation inoculum, poses technical difficulties due to the required sterile conditions and the special growing media. On the contrary acclimatized enrichment methanogenic cultures have lower requirements to sterility. In the present study, we used an enriched ammonia...

  3. Solid state oxygen anion and electron mediating membrane and catalytic membrane reactors containing them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Michael; White, James H.; Sammels, Anthony F.

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to gas-impermeable, solid state materials fabricated into membranes for use in catalytic membrane reactors. This invention particularly relates to solid state oxygen anion- and electron-mediating membranes for use in catalytic membrane reactors for promoting partial or full oxidation of different chemical species, for decomposition of oxygen-containing species, and for separation of oxygen from other gases. Solid state materials for use in the membranes of this invention include mixed metal oxide compounds having the brownmillerite crystal structure.

  4. Catalytic production of biodiesel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Theilgaard Madsen, A.

    2011-07-01

    The focus of this thesis is the catalytic production of diesel from biomass, especially emphasising catalytic conversion of waste vegetable oils and fats. In chapter 1 an introduction to biofuels and a review on different catalytic methods for diesel production from biomass is given. Two of these methods have been used industrially for a number of years already, namely the transesterification (and esterification) of oils and fats with methanol to form fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), and the hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of fats and oils to form straight-chain alkanes. Other possible routes to diesel include upgrading and deoxygenation of pyrolysis oils or aqueous sludge wastes, condensations and reductions of sugars in aqueous phase (aqueous-phase reforming, APR) for monofunctional hydrocarbons, and gasification of any type of biomass followed by Fischer-Tropsch-synthesis for alkane biofuels. These methods have not yet been industrialised, but may be more promising due to the larger abundance of their potential feedstocks, especially waste feedstocks. Chapter 2 deals with formation of FAME from waste fats and oils. A range of acidic catalysts were tested in a model fat mixture of methanol, lauric acid and trioctanoin. Sulphonic acid-functionalised ionic liquids showed extremely fast convertion of lauric acid to methyl laurate, and trioctanoate was converted to methyl octanoate within 24 h. A catalyst based on a sulphonated carbon-matrix made by pyrolysing (or carbonising) carbohydrates, so-called sulphonated pyrolysed sucrose (SPS), was optimised further. No systematic dependency on pyrolysis and sulphonation conditions could be obtained, however, with respect to esterification activity, but high activity was obtained in the model fat mixture. SPS impregnated on opel-cell Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and microporous SiO{sub 2} (ISPS) was much less active in the esterification than the original SPS powder due to low loading and thereby low number of strongly acidic sites on the

  5. Ammonia stripping of biologically treated liquid manure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alitalo, Anni; Kyrö, Aleksis; Aura, Erkki

    2012-01-01

    A prerequisite for efficient ammonia removal in air stripping is that the pH of the liquid to be stripped is sufficiently high. Swine manure pH is usually around 7. At pH 7 (at 20°C), only 0.4% of ammonium is in ammonia form, and it is necessary to raise the pH of swine slurry to achieve efficient ammonia removal. Because manure has a very high buffering capacity, large amounts of chemicals are needed to change the slurry pH. The present study showed that efficient air stripping of manure can be achieved with a small amount of chemicals and without strong bases like NaOH. Slurry was subjected to aerobic biological treatment to raise pH before stripping. This facilitated 8 to 32% ammonia removal without chemical treatment. The slurry was further subjected to repeated cycles of stripping with MgO and Ca(OH)(2) additions after the first and second strippings, respectively, to raise slurry pH in between the stripping cycles. After three consecutive stripping cycles, 59 to 86% of the original ammonium had been removed. It was shown that the reduction in buffer capacity of the slurry was due to ammonia and carbonate removal during the stripping cycles. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  6. Study of Ammonia Emissions in a Ventilated Pig Pen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rong, Li

    Pig productions cause a wide emission of odors, such as ammonia (NH3), hydrogen sulfide (H2S), and methane (CH4). Ammonia is one of the most important emissions for evaluating the air quality either in animal buildings or atmospheric environment. In studies of ammonia emission from animal buildings...... reported in literature, little effort has been made to investigate the accuracy of current Henry’s law constant for modeling ammonia mass transfer process and study ammonia emissions in a full scale pig pen from fluid dynamics by CFD simulations. This will be the main objectives of this study. The ammonia...

  7. Decomposition of metal nitrate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, P.A.; Stines, W.B.

    1982-01-01

    Oxides in powder form are obtained from aqueous solutions of one or more heavy metal nitrates (e.g. U, Pu, Th, Ce) by thermal decomposition at 300 to 800 deg C in the presence of about 50 to 500% molar concentration of ammonium nitrate to total metal. (author)

  8. Decomposition of network communication games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietzenbacher, Bas; Borm, Peter; Hendrickx, Ruud

    Using network control structures, this paper introduces a general class of network communication games and studies their decomposition into unanimity games. We obtain a relation between the dividends in any network communication game and its underlying transferable utility game, which depends on the

  9. Kosambi and Proper Orthogonal Decomposition

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In 1943 Kosambi published a paper titled 'Statis- tics in function space' in the Journal of the Indian. Mathematical Society. This paper was the first to propose the technique of statistical analysis of- ten called proper orthogonal decomposition to- day. This article describes the contents of that paper and Kosambi's approach to ...

  10. Thermal decomposition of ammonium hexachloroosmate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asanova, T I; Kantor, Innokenty; Asanov, I. P.

    2016-01-01

    Structural changes of (NH4)2[OsCl6] occurring during thermal decomposition in a reduction atmosphere have been studied in situ using combined energy-dispersive X-ray absorption spectroscopy (ED-XAFS) and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). According to PXRD, (NH4)2[OsCl6] transforms directly...

  11. Modular Decomposition of Boolean Functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C. Bioch (Cor)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractModular decomposition is a thoroughly investigated topic in many areas such as switching theory, reliability theory, game theory and graph theory. Most appli- cations can be formulated in the framework of Boolean functions. In this paper we give a uni_ed treatment of modular

  12. Cartoon+Texture Image Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Buades

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article we give a thorough description of the algorithm proposed in [A. Buades, T. Le, J.M. Morel and L. Vese, Fast cartoon + texture image filters, IEEE Transactions on Image Processing, 2010] for cartoon+texture decomposition using of a nonlinear low pass-high pass filter pair.

  13. Probability inequalities for decomposition integrals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Agahi, H.; Mesiar, Radko

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 315, č. 1 (2017), s. 240-248 ISSN 0377-0427 Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Decomposition integral * Superdecomposition integral * Probability inequalities Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics OBOR OECD: Statistics and probability Impact factor: 1.357, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/E/mesiar-0470959.pdf

  14. Catalytic cracking with deasphalted oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaton, W.I.; Taylor, J.L.; Peck, L.B.; Mosby, J.F.

    1990-07-10

    This patent describes a catalytic cracking process. It comprises: hydrotreating resid; thereafter deasphalting the hydrotreated resid to produce substantially deasphalted oil; catalytically cracking the hydrotreated oil in a catalytic cracking unit in the presence of a cracking catalyst to produce upgraded oil leaving coked catalyst; and regenerating the coked catalyst in the presence of a combustion-supporting gas comprising excess molecular oxygen in an amount greater than the stoichiometric amount required for substantially completely combusting the coke on the catalyst to carbon dioxide.

  15. An experimental study of ammonia borane based hydrogen storage systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Kedaresh A.

    2011-12-01

    Hydrogen is a promising fuel for the future, capable of meeting the demands of energy storage and low pollutant emission. Chemical hydrides are potential candidates for chemical hydrogen storage, especially for automobile applications. Ammonia borane (AB) is a chemical hydride being investigated widely for its potential to realize the hydrogen economy. In this work, the yield of hydrogen obtained during neat AB thermolysis was quantified using two reactor systems. First, an oil bath heated glass reactor system was used with AB batches of 0.13 gram (+/- 0.001 gram). The rates of hydrogen generation were measured. Based on these experimental data, an electrically heated steel reactor system was designed and constructed to handle up to 2 grams of AB per batch. A majority of components were made of stainless-steel. The system consisted of an AB reservoir and feeder, a heated reactor, a gas processing unit and a system control and monitoring unit. An electronic data acquisition system was used to record experimental data. The performance of the steel reactor system was evaluated experimentally through batch reactions of 30 minutes each, for reaction temperatures in the range from 373 K to 430 K. The experimental data showed exothermic decomposition of AB accompanied by rapid generation of hydrogen during the initial period of the reaction. 90% of the hydrogen was generated during the initial 120 seconds after addition of AB to the reactor. At 430 K, the reaction produced 12 wt.% of hydrogen. The heat diffusion in the reactor system and the process of exothermic decomposition of AB were coupled in a two-dimensional model. Neat AB thermolysis was modeled as a global first order reactions based on Arrhenius theory. The values of equation constants were derived from curve fit of experimental data. The pre-exponential constant and the activation energy were estimated to be 4 s-1 (+/- 0.4 s-1) and 13000 J mol -1 s-1 (+/- 1050 J mol-1 s -1) respectively. The model was solved

  16. Radiation decomposition of alcohols and chloro phenols in micellar systems; Descomposicion por irradiacion de alcoholes y clorofenoles en sistemas micelares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno A, J

    1998-12-31

    The effect of surfactants on the radiation decomposition yield of alcohols and chloro phenols has been studied with gamma doses of 2, 3, and 5 KGy. These compounds were used as typical pollutants in waste water, and the effect of the water solubility, chemical structure, and the nature of the surfactant, anionic or cationic, was studied. The results show that anionic surfactant like sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), improve the radiation decomposition yield of ortho-chloro phenol, while cationic surfactant like cetyl trimethylammonium chloride (CTAC), improve the radiation decomposition yield of butyl alcohol. A similar behavior is expected for those alcohols with water solubility close to the studied ones. Surfactant concentrations below critical micellar concentration (CMC), inhibited radiation decomposition for both types of alcohols. However radiation decomposition yield increased when surfactant concentrations were bigger than the CMC. Aromatic alcohols decomposition was more marked than for linear alcohols decomposition. On a mixture of alcohols and chloro phenols in aqueous solution the radiation decomposition yield decreased with increasing surfactant concentration. Nevertheless, there were competitive reactions between the alcohols, surfactants dimers, hydroxyl radical and other reactive species formed on water radiolysis, producing a catalytic positive effect in the decomposition of alcohols. Chemical structure and the number of carbons were not important factors in the radiation decomposition. When an alcohol like ortho-chloro phenol contained an additional chlorine atom, the decomposition of this compound was almost constant. In conclusion the micellar effect depend on both, the nature of the surfactant (anionic or cationic) and the chemical structure of the alcohols. The results of this study are useful for wastewater treatment plants based on the oxidant effect of the hydroxyl radical, like in advanced oxidation processes, or in combined treatment such as

  17. Thermal and catalytic cracking of ethylene in presence of CaO, MgO, zeolite and calcined dolomite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taralas, G.; Sjoestroem, K.; Jaeraas, S.; Bjoernbom, E. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Technology

    1993-12-31

    The subject of the present work is to study the effect of catalysts such as calcined dolomite (CaO.MgO), CaO (quicklime), MgO and Zeolite (EKZ-4) on the cracking of ethylene in the presence and absence of steam. N-heptane, toluene, naphthalene, thiophene have been some suitable model compounds for studies of the thermal and catalytic decomposition of tar. Previous results showed that the reaction scheme of the thermal decomposition of n-heptane was consistent with the high yield of ethylene observed in thermal decomposition of n-heptane. The effect of the reactor wall and the ferric impurities in the dolomite are also subjects of the research in this study. The results may also throw some additional light on the nature of the gas-phase thermal and catalytic reactions occurring in the use of dolomite as tar cracking catalysts. 28 refs

  18. Ammonia synthesis using a stable electride as an electron donor and reversible hydrogen store

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitano, Masaaki; Inoue, Yasunori; Yamazaki, Youhei; Hayashi, Fumitaka; Kanbara, Shinji; Matsuishi, Satoru; Yokoyama, Toshiharu; Kim, Sung-Wng; Hara, Michikazu; Hosono, Hideo

    2012-11-01

    Industrially, the artificial fixation of atmospheric nitrogen to ammonia is carried out using the Haber-Bosch process, but this process requires high temperatures and pressures, and consumes more than 1% of the world's power production. Therefore the search is on for a more environmentally benign process that occurs under milder conditions. Here, we report that a Ru-loaded electride [Ca24Al28O64]4+(e-)4 (Ru/C12A7:e-), which has high electron-donating power and chemical stability, works as an efficient catalyst for ammonia synthesis. Highly efficient ammonia synthesis is achieved with a catalytic activity that is an order of magnitude greater than those of other previously reported Ru-loaded catalysts and with almost half the reaction activation energy. Kinetic analysis with infrared spectroscopy reveals that C12A7:e- markedly enhances N2 dissociation on Ru by the back donation of electrons and that the poisoning of ruthenium surfaces by hydrogen adatoms can be suppressed effectively because of the ability of C12A7:e- to store hydrogen reversibly.

  19. Simultaneous removal of SO2 and NOX with ammonia absorbent in a packed column

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jia, Yong; Du, Daqian; Zhang, Xinxi; Ding, Xilou; Zhong, Oin

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic oxidation of NO followed by simultaneous removal of SO 2 and NO X with ammonia is a promising method for control of coal-fired flue gas pollutants. We investigated simultaneous absorption of SO 2 and NO X in a packed column with ammonia, and found that SO 2 and NO X could promote absorption with each other in the process of simultaneous removal SO 2 and NO X . The removal efficiency of SO 2 and NO X was, respectively, about 98% and 70.9% at pH 5.5, temperature 323.15 K, SO 2 concentration 1,800x10 −6 , NO X concentration 400x10 −6 and m NO2 /m NO 1 in our experimental system. The experimental results also show that the formation of sulfite oxidized by reacting with dissolved NO 2 and the molar ratio of sulfite to total sulfur is more than 0.8 in the solution. Accordingly, the energy consumption for sulfite oxidation would be greatly reduced in the process of simultaneous desulfurization and denitrification with ammonia

  20. Alloying of Yb-Cu and Yb-Ag utilizing liquid ammonia metal solutions of ytterbium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imamura, H.; Yoshimura, T.; Sakata, Y.

    2003-01-01

    In the course of the studies on preparation of novel compounds using the dissolution of Eu or Yb metals in liquid ammonia, the formation of Yb-Cu and Yb-Ag intermetallic films has been found. When Cu or Ag metal powders were placed in a reactor containing a solution of Yb metal in liquid ammonia, the dissolved Yb readily react with the Cu or Ag metal particles to form surface alloy compounds. X-ray diffraction of Yb-Cu showed that upon thermal treatment above 673 K, the Yb metal deposited on the Cu particles reacted together to be transformed into the YbCu 6.5 intermetallic compound. A characteristic endothermic peak at 749 K, due to alloying of Yb-Cu, was observed by the differential scanning calorimeter measurements. By use of the high reactivity of liquid ammonia metal solutions of ytterbium, it was found that the ytterbium intermetallic films were readily formed under mild conditions. Yb-Cu and Yb-Ag exhibited enhanced catalytic activity for the hydrogenation of ethene as a result of alloying

  1. Promotion of Nb2O5 on the wustite-based iron catalyst for ammonia synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Wenfeng; Huang, Shiliang; Cheng, Tianhong; Tang, Haodong; Li, Ying; Liu, Huazhang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Niobium enhances the reduction of wustite-based ammonia synthesis catalyst significantly. • Nb 2 O 5 inhibits the segregation or formation of solid solutions on the catalyst surface. • Nb 2 O 5 doping enhances the growth rates of [2 1 1] and [2 0 0] planes rather than their amounts. - Abstract: Niobium was selected and investigated as a potential promoter for wustite-based catalyst (WBC) for ammonia synthesis. Experiments on reduction performance, activity test and H 2 -TGA, in situ XRD as well as XPS were carried out to obtain the promotion effect and mechanism involved. Niobium as a promoter was confirmed to enhance the reduction of WBC significantly. This behavior is highly desired for industry in terms of catalyst regeneration and lesser pretreatment time for fabrication regardless the unimproved catalytic performance for Nb 2 O 5 -doped wustite-based catalyst (Nb-WBC). Possible reasons for these phenomena are discussed. It is suggested that Nb 2 O 5 is not favorable for the segregation or formation of solid solutions on the catalyst surface, which are difficult to be reduced. However, it seems that niobium does not promote the growth of [2 1 1] plane, which is active for ammonia synthesis.

  2. Catalytic Membrane Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyle, T.J.; Brinker, C.J.; Gardner, T.J.; Hughes, R.C.; Sault, A.G.

    1998-12-01

    The proposed "catalytic membrane sensor" (CMS) was developed to generate a device which would selectively identify a specific reagent in a complex mixture of gases. This was to be accomplished by modifying an existing Hz sensor with a series of thin films. Through selectively sieving the desired component from a complex mixture and identifying it by decomposing it into Hz (and other by-products), a Hz sensor could then be used to detect the presence of the select component. The proposed "sandwich-type" modifications involved the deposition of a catalyst layered between two size selective sol-gel layers on a Pd/Ni resistive Hz sensor. The role of the catalyst was to convert organic materials to Hz and organic by-products. The role of the membraneo was to impart both chemical specificity by molecukir sieving of the analyte and converted product streams, as well as controlling access to the underlying Pd/Ni sensor. Ultimately, an array of these CMS elements encompassing different catalysts and membranes were to be developed which would enable improved selectivity and specificity from a compiex mixture of organic gases via pattern recognition methodologies. We have successfully generated a CMS device by a series of spin-coat deposited methods; however, it was determined that the high temperature required to activate the catalyst, destroys the sensor.

  3. Catalytic cracking of lignites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.; Nowak, S.; Naegler, T.; Zimmermann, J. [Hochschule Merseburg (Germany); Welscher, J.; Schwieger, W. [Erlangen-Nuernberg Univ. (Germany); Hahn, T. [Halle-Wittenberg Univ., Halle (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    A most important factor for the chemical industry is the availability of cheap raw materials. As the oil price of crude oil is rising alternative feedstocks like coal are coming into focus. This work, the catalytic cracking of lignite is part of the alliance ibi (innovative Braunkohlenintegration) to use lignite as a raw material to produce chemicals. With this new one step process without an input of external hydrogen, mostly propylene, butenes and aromatics and char are formed. The product yield depends on manifold process parameters. The use of acid catalysts (zeolites like MFI) shows the highest amount of the desired products. Hydrogen rich lignites with a molar H/C ratio of > 1 are to be favoured. Due to primary cracking and secondary reactions the ratio between catalyst and lignite, temperature and residence time are the most important parameter to control the product distribution. Experiments at 500 C in a discontinuous rotary kiln reactor show yields up to 32 wt-% of hydrocarbons per lignite (maf - moisture and ash free) and 43 wt-% char, which can be gasified. Particularly, the yields of propylene and butenes as main products can be enhanced four times to about 8 wt-% by the use of catalysts while the tar yield decreases. In order to develop this innovative process catalyst systems fixed on beads were developed for an easy separation and regeneration of the used catalyst from the formed char. (orig.)

  4. Structured materials for catalytic and sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hokenek, Selma

    been synthesized and characterized to establish the effects of nanoparticle size on catalytic activity in methanol decomposition. The physicochemical properties of the synthesized palladium-nickel nanoparticles will be discussed, as a function of the synthesis parameters. The optical characteristics of the Ag and Pd nanoparticles will be determined, with a view toward tuning the response of the nanoparticles for incorporation in sensors. Analysis of the monometallic palladium particles revealed a dependence of syngas production on nanoparticle size. The peak and steady state TOFs increased roughly linearly with the average nanoparticle diameter. The amount of coke deposited on the particle surfaces was found to be independent on the size of the nanoparticles. Shape control of the nickel-palladium nanoparticles with a high selectivity for (100) and (110) facets (≤ 80%) has been demonstrated. The resulting alloy nanoparticles were found to have homogeneous composition throughout their volume and maintain FCC crystal structure. Substitution of Ni atoms in the Pd lattice at a 1:3 molar ratio was found to induce lattice strains of ~1%. The Ag nanocubes synthesized exhibited behavior very similar to literature values, when taken on their own, exhibiting a pair of distinct absorbance peaks at 350 nm and 455 nm. In physical mixtures with the Pd nanoparticles synthesized, their behavior showed that the peak position of the Ag nanocubes' absorbance in UV-Vis could be tuned based on the relative proportions of the Ag and Pd nanoparticles present in the suspension analysed. The Ag polyhedra synthesized for comparison showed a broad doublet peak throughout the majority of the visible range before testing as a component in a physical mixture with the Pd nanoparticles. The addition of Pd nanoparticles to form a physical mixture resulted in some damping of the doublet peak observed as well as a corresponding shift in the baseline absorbance proportional to the amount of Pd added to

  5. Silver nanowires as catalytic cathodes for stabilizing lithium-oxygen batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Won-Jin; Jung, Hun-Gi; Lee, Seon-Hwa; Park, Jin-Bum; Aurbach, Doron; Sun, Yang-Kook

    2016-04-01

    Silver nanowires have been investigated as a catalytic cathode material for lithium-oxygen batteries. Their high aspect ratio contributes to the formation of a corn-shaped layer structure of the poorly crystalline lithium peroxide (Li2O2) nanoparticles produced by oxygen reduction in poly-ether based electrolyte solutions. The nanowire morphology seems to provide the necessary large contact area and facile electron supply for a very effective oxygen reduction reaction. The unique morphology and structure of the Li2O2 deposits and the catalytic nature of the silver nano-wires promote decomposition of Li2O2 at low potentials (below 3.4 V) upon the oxygen evolution. This situation avoids decomposition of the solution species and oxidation of the electrodes during the anodic (charge) reactions, leading to high electrical efficiently of lithium-oxygen batteries.

  6. Effect of dietary protein restriction on renal ammonia metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Osis, Gunars; Handlogten, Mary E.; Guo, Hui; Verlander, Jill W.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary protein restriction has multiple benefits in kidney disease. Because protein intake is a major determinant of endogenous acid production, it is important that net acid excretion change in parallel during protein restriction. Ammonia is the primary component of net acid excretion, and inappropriate ammonia excretion can lead to negative nitrogen balance. Accordingly, we examined ammonia excretion in response to protein restriction and then we determined the molecular mechanism of the changes observed. Wild-type C57Bl/6 mice fed a 20% protein diet and then changed to 6% protein developed an 85% reduction in ammonia excretion within 2 days, which persisted during a 10-day study. The expression of multiple proteins involved in renal ammonia metabolism was altered, including the ammonia-generating enzymes phosphate-dependent glutaminase (PDG) and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and the ammonia-metabolizing enzyme glutamine synthetase. Rhbg, an ammonia transporter, increased in expression in the inner stripe of outer medullary collecting duct intercalated cell (OMCDis-IC). However, collecting duct-specific Rhbg deletion did not alter the response to protein restriction. Rhcg deletion did not alter ammonia excretion in response to dietary protein restriction. These results indicate 1) dietary protein restriction decreases renal ammonia excretion through coordinated regulation of multiple components of ammonia metabolism; 2) increased Rhbg expression in the OMCDis-IC may indicate a biological role in addition to ammonia transport; and 3) Rhcg expression is not necessary to decrease ammonia excretion during dietary protein restriction. PMID:25925252

  7. Spatial and temporal variations in ammonia emissions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøth, Carsten Ambelas; Geels, Camilla; Berge, H

    2011-01-01

    Deriving a parameterisation of ammonia emissions for use in chemistry-transport models (CTMs) is a complex problem as the emission varies locally as a result of local climate and local agricultural management. In current CTMs such factors are generally not taken into account. This paper demonstra......Deriving a parameterisation of ammonia emissions for use in chemistry-transport models (CTMs) is a complex problem as the emission varies locally as a result of local climate and local agricultural management. In current CTMs such factors are generally not taken into account. This paper...... demonstrates how local climate and local management can be accounted for in CTMs by applying a modular approach for deriving data as input to a dynamic ammonia emission model for Europe. Default data are obtained from information in the RAINS system, and it is demonstrated how this dynamic emission model based...

  8. Enrichment of high ammonia tolerant methanogenic culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fotidis, Ioannis; Karakashev, Dimitar Borisov; Proietti, Nicolas

    Ammonia is the major toxicant in full scale anaerobic digesters of animal wastes which are rich in proteins and/or urea, such as pig or poultry wastes. Ammonia inhibition decreases methane production rates, increases volatile fatty acids concentration and leads to economic losses for the biogas...... was derived from a full scale biogas reactor (Hashøj, Denmark), fed with 75% animal manure and 25% food industries organic waste. Basal anaerobic medium was used for the enrichment along with sodium acetate (1 g HAc L-1) as a carbon source. Fluorescence insitu hybridization (FISH) was used to determine...... microbial community composition. The outcome of the enrichment process was a mesophilic aceticlastic methanogenic enriched culture able to withstand high ammonia loads and utilize acetate and form methane stoichiometrically. FISH analysis showed that the methanogens of the enriched culture belonged...

  9. Ammonia emission time profiles based on manure transport data improve ammonia modelling across north western Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, C.; Kranenburg, R.; Kuenen, J. J. P.; Van den Bril, B.; Verguts, V.; Schaap, M.

    2016-04-01

    Accurate modelling of mitigation measures for nitrogen deposition and secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA) episodes requires a detailed representation of emission patterns from agriculture. In this study the meteorological influence on the temporal variability of ammonia emissions from livestock housing and application of manure and fertilizer are included in the chemistry transport model LOTOS-EUROS. For manure application, manure transport data from Flanders (Belgium) were used as a proxy to derive the emission variability. Using improved ammonia emission variability strongly improves model performance for ammonia, mainly by a better representation of the spring maximum. The impact on model performance for SIA was negligible as explained by the limited, ammonia rich region in which the emission variability was updated. The contribution of Flemish agriculture to modelled annual mean ammonia and SIA concentrations in Flanders were quantified at respectively 7-8 and 1-2 μg/m3. A scenario study was performed to investigate the effects of reducing ammonia emissions from manure application during PM episodes by 75%, yielding a maximum reduction in modelled SIA levels of 1-3 μg/m3 during episodes. Year-to-year emission variability and a soil module to explicitly model the emission process from manure and fertilizer application are needed to further improve the modelling of the ammonia budget.

  10. Catalytic pyrolysis of lignocellulosic biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seshan, Kulathuiyer; Sa, Jacinto

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reports on the latest developments of biomass catalytic pyrolysis for the production of fuels. The primary focus is on the role of catalysts in the process, namely, their influence in the liquefaction of lignocellulosic biomass.

  11. Decomposition Mechanism and Decomposition Promoting Factors of Waste Hard Metal for Zinc Decomposition Process (ZDP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pee, J H; Kim, Y J; Kim, J Y; Cho, W S; Kim, K J [Whiteware Ceramic Center, KICET (Korea, Republic of); Seong, N E, E-mail: pee@kicet.re.kr [Recytech Korea Co., Ltd. (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-10-29

    Decomposition promoting factors and decomposition mechanism in the zinc decomposition process of waste hard metals which are composed mostly of tungsten carbide and cobalt were evaluated. Zinc volatility amount was suppressed and zinc steam pressure was produced in the reaction graphite crucible inside an electric furnace for ZDP. Reaction was done for 2 hrs at 650 deg. C, which 100% decomposed the waste hard metals that were over 30 mm thick. As for the separation-decomposition of waste hard metals, zinc melted alloy formed a liquid composed of a mixture of {gamma}-{beta}1 phase from the cobalt binder layer (reaction interface). The volume of reacted zone was expanded and the waste hard metal layer was decomposed-separated horizontally from the hard metal. Zinc used in the ZDP process was almost completely removed-collected by decantation and volatilization-collection process at 1000 deg. C. The small amount of zinc remaining in the tungsten carbide-cobalt powder which was completely decomposed was fully removed by using phosphate solution which had a slow cobalt dissolution speed.

  12. Investigating hydrogel dosimeter decomposition by chemical methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The chemical oxidative decomposition of leucocrystal violet micelle hydrogel dosimeters was investigated using the reaction of ferrous ions with hydrogen peroxide or sodium bicarbonate with hydrogen peroxide. The second reaction is more effective at dye decomposition in gelatin hydrogels. Additional chemical analysis is required to determine the decomposition products

  13. The Policy Significance of Inequality Decompositions

    OpenAIRE

    Kanbur, Ravi

    2003-01-01

    Economists are now familiar with “between” and “within” group inequality decompositions, for race, gender, spatial units, etc. But what exactly is the normative significance of the empirical results produced by these decompositions? This paper raises some basic questions about policy interpretations of decompositions that are found in the literature.

  14. Electronic factors in catalysis: the volcano curve and the effect of promotion in catalytic ammonia synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Søren; Logadottir, Ashildur; Jacobsen, C.J.H.

    2001-01-01

    industrial conditions can be determined as a function of the nitrogen-surface interaction energy by combining the calculated adsorption energy-activation energy relation with a micro-kinetic model. The result is a volcano curve and we illustrate such relationships for both the non-promoted and alkali metal...

  15. High performance vanadia-anatase nanoparticle catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of NO by ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Steffen Buus; Kunov-Kruse, Andreas Jonas; Riisager, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Highly active nanoparticle SCR deNO(x) catalysts composed of amorphous vanadia on crystalline anatase have been prepared by a sol-gel, co-precipitation method using decomposable crystallization seeds. The catalysts were characterized by means of XRPD, TEM/SEM, FT-IR, nitrogen physisorption and NH(3...

  16. Heteropoly acid promoted Cu and Fe catalysts for the selective catalytic reduction of NO with ammonia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putluru, Siva Sankar Reddy; Mossin, Susanne L.; Riisager, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Cu/TiO2, Fe/TiO2 and heteropoly acid promoted Cu/TiO2, Fe/TiO2 catalysts were prepared and characterized by N2 physisorption, XRPD, NH3-TPD, H2-TPR and EPR. The catalysts exhibited only crystalline TiO2 phases with the active metals and promoters in highly dispersed state. The acidic properties...... activity and acidity was lower for promoted catalysts than for unpromoted catalysts. In the heteropoly acid promoted catalysts the SCR active Cu and Fe metals were protected from potassium poisons by bonding of the potassium to the Brønsted acid centres. Thus heteropoly acid promoted catalysts might...

  17. Modelling of Ammonia Heat Pump Desuperheaters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Stefan Wuust; Elmegaard, Brian; Markussen, Wiebke Brix

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a study of modelling desuperheating in ammonia heat pumps. Focus is on the temperature profile of the superheated refrigerant. Typically, the surface area of a heat exchanger is estimated using the Log Mean Temperature Difference (LMTD) method. The assumption of this method...... is that the specific heat is constant throughout the temperature glide of the refrigerant in the heat exchanger. However, considering ammonia as refrigerant, the LMTD method does not give accurate results due to significant variations of the specific heat. By comparing the actual temperature profiles from a one...

  18. Biochemistry of Ammonia Monoxygenase from Nitrosomonas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan Hooper

    2009-07-15

    Major results. 1. CytochromecM552, a protein in the electron transfer chain to ammonia monooxygenase. Purification, modeling of protein structure based on primary structure, characterization of 4 hemes by magnetic spectroscopy, potentiometry, ligand binding and turnover. Kim, H. J., ,Zatsman, et al. 2008). 2. Characterization of proteins which thought to be involved in the AMO reaction or to protect AMO from toxic nitrogenous intermediates such as NO. Nitrosocyanin is a protein present only in bacteria which catalyze the ammonia monoxygenase reaction (1). Cytochrome c P460 beta and cytochrome c’ beta.

  19. Electrochemical ammonia production on molybdenum nitride nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howalt, Jakob Geelmuyden; Vegge, Tejs

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical investigations of electrochemical production of ammonia at ambient temperature and pressure on nitrogen covered molybdenum nanoparticles are presented. Density functional theory calculations are used in combination with the computational hydrogen electrode approach to calculate the free...... energy profile for electrochemical protonation of N2 and N adatoms on cuboctahedral Mo13 nanoparticles. Pathways for electrochemical ammonia production via direct protonation of N adatoms and N2 admolecules with an onset potential as low as -0.5 V and generally lower than -0.8 V on both a nitrogen...

  20. Role of tunable acid catalysis in decomposition of α-hydroxyalkyl hydroperoxides and mechanistic implications for tropospheric chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Busch, Daryle H; Subramaniam, Bala; Thompson, Ward H

    2014-10-16

    Electronic structure calculations have been used to investigate possible gas-phase decomposition pathways of α-hydroxyalkyl hydroperoxides (HHPs), an important source of tropospheric hydrogen peroxide and carbonyl compounds. The uncatalyzed as well as water- and acid-catalyzed decomposition of multiple HHPs have been examined at the M06-2X/aug-cc-pVTZ level of theory. The calculations indicate that, compared to an uncatalyzed or water-catalyzed reaction, the free-energy barrier of an acid-catalyzed decomposition leading to an aldehyde or ketone and hydrogen peroxide is dramatically lowered. The calculations also find a direct correlation between the catalytic effect of an acid and the distance separating its hydrogen acceptor and donor sites. Interestingly, the catalytic effect of an acid on the HHP decomposition resulting in the formation of carboxylic acid and water is relatively much smaller. Moreover, since the free-energy barrier of the acid-catalyzed aldehyde- or ketone-forming decomposition is ∼ 25% lower than that required to break the O-OH linkage of the HHP leading to the formation of hydroxyl radical, these results suggest that HHP decomposition is likely not an important source of tropospheric hydroxyl radical. Finally, transition state theory estimates indicate that the effective rate constants for the acid-catalyzed aldehyde- or ketone-forming HHP decomposition pathways are 2-3 orders of magnitude faster than those for the water-catalyzed reaction, indicating that an acid-catalyzed HHP decomposition is kinetically favored as well.

  1. Catalytic oxidation of carbon monoxide over supported palladium nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soni, Keshav Chand; Krishna, R.; Chandra Shekar, S.; Singh, Beer

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic oxidation of CO with ozone had been studied over Al2O3 and SiO2 supported Pd nanoparticles which was synthesized by two different methods. The polyol method mainly resulted in highly dispersed Pd particles on the support, while the impregnation method resulted in agglomeration Pd particles on the support. Supported Pd nanoparticles synthesized from PdCl2 in the presence of poly ( N-vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP) by chemical reduction. The catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction, N2 BET surface area, pore size distributions, CO chemisorption, TEM and H2-temperature programmed reduction. The physico-chemical properties were well correlated with activity data. Characterizations of XRD and TEM show that the surface Pd nanoparticles are highly dispersed over Al2O3 and SiO2. The catalytic activity was dependent upon ozone/CO ratio, contact times, and the reaction temperature. The extent of carbon monoxide oxidation was proportional to the catalytically ozone decomposition. The PVP synthesized Pd/A2O3 catalyst had been found to be highly active for complete CO removal at room temperature. The higher activity of the nanocatalyst was attributed to small particle size and higher dispersion of Pd over support.

  2. CFD modelling of a membrane reactor for hydrogen production from ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shwe Hla, San; Dolan, Michael D.

    2018-01-01

    Despite the growing use of hydrogen (H2) as a transport fuel, one of the major barriers still remaining is efficient and inexpensive fuel distribution and storage. Current approaches, such as compression, liquefaction or metal hydride formation, incur a significant energy penalty. Ammonia (NH3) has long been considered a prospective H2 medium, exhibiting a higher volumetric H2 density than liquid H2, through liquid-phase storage at mild pressure. Decomposition of NH3 into H2 and N2 can be achieved via use of catalytic reactors and fuel-cell-grade H2 can be produced using metal membranes at H2 distribution sites.In this study, a 3-Dimensional (3D) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model has been developed to understand the performance of the H2 separation process in gas mixtures derived from an NH3-cracking reaction. The reactor consists of 19 tubular membrane tubes, each 470 mm long, inside a tubular shell with an inner diameter of 130 mm. Standard transport and energy equations governing a 3D, pressure-based, steady-state model were derived from the laws of conservation of mass, momentum and energy. The governing equations were solved using commercial CFD software ANSYS Fluent 18.0. Gas flow and mixing were modelled by the two-equation standard k-epsilon model for closure. Coupled solver was used for pressure-velocity coupling, enabling a pseudo-transient option with pseudo time steps of 0.01 s. To estimate H2 permeation through the metal membrane, a constant H2 permeability of 3.0E-07 mol.m-1 s-1 Pa-0.5 derived from series of experiments tested under a range of industrial conditions, was used. Model simulations were conducted for an adiabatic temperature of 300 °C, a feed-side pressure of 7.8 bara and a permeate side pressure of 0.1 bara. A parametric analysis was carried out to explore the effects of variation in total feed-gas flow and effects of changes in NH3-cracking efficiency on H2 production rates and H2 yields. The model estimated that 4.6-11.6 kg H2

  3. An Intelligent Ammonia Sensor for Livestock Breeding Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Yang; Fu, Zetian; Zhang, Lingxian; Li, Xinxing; Xu, Dan; Zeng, Lihua; Ma, Juncheng; Peng, Fa

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Ammonia concentration is the major parameter to evaluate livestock breeding farms atmosphere quality and it also is regarded as the key indicator to describe the production of livestock breeding farms. Based on the oxidation characteristics of ammonia, this paper presented a new intelligent detecting instrument, the intelligent ammonia sensor, for the measurement of ammonia concentration, which used the microcontroller STM8L152 as the key control module. However, the T...

  4. Ammonia production, excretion, toxicity, and defense in fish: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex Y K Ip

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Many fishes are ammonotelic but some species can detoxify ammonia to glutamine or urea. Certain fish species can accumulate high levels of ammonia in the brain or defense against ammonia toxicity by enhancing the effectiveness of ammonia excretion through active NH4+ transport, manipulation of ambient pH, or reduction in ammonia permeability through the branchial and cutaneous epithelia. Recent reports on ammonia toxicity in mammalian brain reveal the importance of permeation of ammonia through the blood-brain barrier and passages of ammonia and water through transporters in the plasmalemma of brain cells. Additionally, brain ammonia toxicity could be related to the passage of glutamine through the mitochondrial membranes into the mitochondrial matrix. On the other hand, recent reports on ammonia excretion in fish confirm the involvement of Rhesus glycoproteins in the branchial and cutaneous epithelia. Therefore, this review focuses on both the earlier literature and the up-to-date information on the problems and mechanisms concerning the permeation of ammonia, as NH3, NH4+ or proton-neutral nitrogenous compounds, across mitochondrial membranes, the blood-brain barrier, the plasmalemma of neurons, and the branchial and cutaneous epithelia of fish. It also addresses how certain fishes with high ammonia tolerance defend against ammonia toxicity through the regulation of the permeation of ammonia and related nitrogenous compounds through various types of membranes. It is hoped that this review would revive the interests in investigations on the passage of ammonia through the mitochondrial membranes and the blood-brain barrier of ammonotelic fishes and fishes with high brain ammonia-tolerance, respectively.

  5. Dictionary-Based Tensor Canonical Polyadic Decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jeremy Emile; Gillis, Nicolas

    2018-04-01

    To ensure interpretability of extracted sources in tensor decomposition, we introduce in this paper a dictionary-based tensor canonical polyadic decomposition which enforces one factor to belong exactly to a known dictionary. A new formulation of sparse coding is proposed which enables high dimensional tensors dictionary-based canonical polyadic decomposition. The benefits of using a dictionary in tensor decomposition models are explored both in terms of parameter identifiability and estimation accuracy. Performances of the proposed algorithms are evaluated on the decomposition of simulated data and the unmixing of hyperspectral images.

  6. Variance decomposition in stochastic simulators

    KAUST Repository

    Le Maître, O. P.

    2015-06-28

    This work aims at the development of a mathematical and computational approach that enables quantification of the inherent sources of stochasticity and of the corresponding sensitivities in stochastic simulations of chemical reaction networks. The approach is based on reformulating the system dynamics as being generated by independent standardized Poisson processes. This reformulation affords a straightforward identification of individual realizations for the stochastic dynamics of each reaction channel, and consequently a quantitative characterization of the inherent sources of stochasticity in the system. By relying on the Sobol-Hoeffding decomposition, the reformulation enables us to perform an orthogonal decomposition of the solution variance. Thus, by judiciously exploiting the inherent stochasticity of the system, one is able to quantify the variance-based sensitivities associated with individual reaction channels, as well as the importance of channel interactions. Implementation of the algorithms is illustrated in light of simulations of simplified systems, including the birth-death, Schlögl, and Michaelis-Menten models.

  7. Regulation of the intersubunit ammonia tunnel in Mycobacterium tuberculosis glutamine-dependent NAD[superscript +] synthetase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuenchor, Watchalee; Doukov, Tzanko I.; Resto, Melissa; Chang, Andrew; Gerratana, Barbara (SSRL); (Maryland)

    2012-08-31

    Glutamine-dependent NAD{sup +} synthetase is an essential enzyme and a validated drug target in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (mtuNadE). It catalyses the ATP-dependent formation of NAD{sup +} from NaAD{sup +} (nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide) at the synthetase active site and glutamine hydrolysis at the glutaminase active site. An ammonia tunnel 40 {angstrom} (1 {angstrom} = 0.1 nm) long allows transfer of ammonia from one active site to the other. The enzyme displays stringent kinetic synergism; however, its regulatory mechanism is unclear. In the present paper, we report the structures of the inactive glutaminase C176A variant in an apo form and in three synthetase-ligand complexes with substrates (NaAD{sup +}/ATP), substrate analogue {l_brace}NaAD{sup +}/AMP-CPP (adenosine 5'-[{alpha},{beta}-methylene]triphosphate){r_brace} and intermediate analogues (NaAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi), as well as the structure of wild-type mtuNadE in a product complex (NAD{sup +}/AMP/PPi/glutamate). This series of structures provides snapshots of the ammonia tunnel during the catalytic cycle supported also by kinetics and mutagenesis studies. Three major constriction sites are observed in the tunnel: (i) at the entrance near the glutaminase active site; (ii) in the middle of the tunnel; and (iii) at the end near the synthetase active site. Variation in the number and radius of the tunnel constrictions is apparent in the crystal structures and is related to ligand binding at the synthetase domain. These results provide new insight into the regulation of ammonia transport in the intermolecular tunnel of mtuNadE.

  8. Multiple Descriptions Using Sparse Decompositions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tobias Lindstrøm; Østergaard, Jan; Dahl, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the design of multiple descriptions (MDs) using sparse decompositions. In a description erasure channel only a subset of the transmitted descriptions is received. The MD problem concerns the design of the descriptions such that they individually approximate the source...... first-order method to the proposed convex problem such that we can solve large-scale instances for image sequences....

  9. 46 CFR 151.50-32 - Ammonia, anhydrous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ammonia, anhydrous. 151.50-32 Section 151.50-32 Shipping... BULK LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Special Requirements § 151.50-32 Ammonia, anhydrous. (a) The anhydrous ammonia tanks may be installed in the bulk liquid cargo tanks provided the liquid surrounding the...

  10. Nitrite as a stimulus for ammonia-starved Nitrosomonas europaea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laanbroek, H.J.; Bär-Gilissen, M.J.; Hoogveld, H.L.

    2002-01-01

    Ammonia-starved cells of Nitrosomonas europaea are able to preserve a high level of ammonia-oxidizing activity in the absence of ammonium. However, when the nitrite-oxidizing cells that form part of the natural nitrifying community do not keep pace with the ammonia-oxidizing cells, nitrite

  11. Ammonia emission time profiles based on manure transport data improve ammonia modelling across north western Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, C.; Kranenburg, R.; Kuenen, J.J.P.; Bril, B. van den; Verguts, V.; Schaap, M.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate modelling of mitigation measures for nitrogen deposition and secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA) episodes requires a detailed representation of emission patterns from agriculture. In this study the meteorological influence on the temporal variability of ammonia emissions from livestock

  12. Chemical Safety Alert: Hazards of Ammonia Releases at Ammonia Refrigeration Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anhydrous ammonia is used as a refrigerant in mechanical compression systems, often liquefied under pressure which increases exposure risk due to potential for rapid release into the air as a toxic gas.

  13. Long-time experience in catalytic flue gas cleaning and catalytic NO{sub x} reduction in biofueled boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahonen, M. [Tampella Power Inc., Tampere (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    NO emissions are reduced by primary or secondary methods. Primary methods are based on NO reduction in the combustion zone and secondary methods on flue gas cleaning. The most effective NO reduction method is selective catalytic reduction (SCR). It is based on NO reduction by ammonia on the surface of a catalyst. Reaction products are water and nitrogen. A titanium-dioxide-based catalyst is very durable and selective in coal-fired power plants. It is not poisoned by sulphur dioxide and side reactions with ammonia and sulphur dioxide hardly occur. The long time experience and suitability of a titanium-dioxide-based catalyst for NO reduction in biofuel-fired power plants was studied. The biofuels were: peat, wood and bark. It was noticed that deactivation varied very much due to the type of fuel and content of alkalinities in fuel ash. The deactivation in peat firing was moderate, close to the deactivation noticed in coal firing. Wood firing generally had a greater deactivation effect than peat firing. Fuel and fly ash were analyzed to get more information on the flue gas properties. The accumulation of alkali and alkaline earth metals and sulphates was examined together with changes in the physical composition of the catalysts. In the cases where the deactivation was the greatest, the amount of alkali and alkaline earth metals in fuels and fly ashes and their accumulation were very significant. (author) (3 refs.)

  14. Planar optical waveguide sensor of ammonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkisov, Sergey S.; Curley, Michael J.; Boykin, Courtney; Diggs, Darnell E.; Grote, James G.; Hopkins, Frank K.

    2004-12-01

    We describe a novel sensor of ammonia based on a planar optical waveguide made of a thin film of polymer polyimide doped with indicator dye bromocresol purple. The film of dye-doped polyimide demonstrated reversible increase of absorption with a peak near 600 nm in response to presence of ammonia in ambient air. Coupling of input and output optic fibers with the waveguide was done by means of coupling prisms or coupling grooves. The latter configuration has the advantage of low cost, less sensitivity to temperature variation, and the possibility of coupling from both sides of the waveguide. Special experimental setup was built to test the sensor. It included test gas chamber with sealed optic fiber feed-throughs, gas filling line, laser source, photodetector, and signal processing hardware and software. The sensor was capable of detecting 100 ppm of ammonia in air within 8 seconds. Further increase of sensitivity can be achieved by adding more dye dopant to the polymer, increase of the length of the waveguide, and suppression of noise. Overexposure of the sensor to more than 5000 ppm of ammonia led to the saturation of the polymer film and, as a result, significant decrease of sensitivity and increase of the response time. The sensor can be used as low cost component of a distributed optical network of chemical sensors for monitoring presence of hazardous industrial pollutants in air.

  15. Effect of ammonia on Swiss albino mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilado, C. J.; Casey, C. J.; Furst, A.

    1977-01-01

    Times to incapacitation and death and LC /50/ values were determined for Swiss albino male mice exposed to different concentrations of ammonia in a 4.2 liter hemispherical chamber. The LC/50/ for a 30 minute exposure was 21,430 ppm.

  16. The synthesis of ammonia from its elements

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 9. The Synthesis of Ammonia from its Elements. Fritz Haber. Classics Volume 7 Issue 9 September 2002 pp 86-94. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/007/09/0086-0094 ...

  17. USDA-EPA Collaborative Ammonia Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2014, a work group was formed between USDA and EPA to facilitate information exchange on ammonia emissions from agriculture, air quality impacts and emission mitigation options and to identify opportunities for collaboration. This document provides background on the work grou...

  18. Adsorption of Ammonia on Regenerable Carbon Sorbents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wójtowicz, Marek A.; Cosgrove, Jesph E.; Serio, Michael A..; Wilburn, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Results are presented on the development of reversible sorbents for the combined carbon dioxide, moisture, and trace-contaminant (TC) removal for use in Extravehicular Activities (EVAs), and more specifically in the Primary Life Support System (PLSS). The currently available life support systems use separate units for carbon dioxide, trace contaminants, and moisture control, and the long-term objective is to replace the above three modules with a single one. Data on sorption and desorption of ammonia, which is a major TC of concern, are presented in this paper. The current TC-control technology involves the use of a packed bed of acid-impregnated granular charcoal, which is non-regenerable, and the carbon-based sorbent under development in this project can be regenerated by exposure to vacuum at room temperature. In this study, several carbon sorbents were fabricated and tested for ammonia sorption. Ammonia-sorption capacity was related to carbon pore structure characteristics, and the temperature of oxidative carbon-surface treatment was optimized for enhanced ammonia-sorption performance.

  19. Footprints on Ammonia Concentrations from Environmental Regulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøth, Carsten Ambelas; Ellermann, Thomas; Hertel, Ole

    2008-01-01

    Releases of ammonia (NH3) to the atmosphere contribute significantly to the desposition of nitrogen to both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. This is the background for the national NH3 emission ceilings in Europe. However, in some countries the national legislation aims not only to meet theese...

  20. Radiation Chemistry in Ammonia-Water Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Raut, U.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2010-01-01

    We studied the effects of 100 keV proton irradiation on films of ammonia-water mixtures between 20 and 120 K. Irradiation destroys ammonia, leading to the formation and trapping of H2, N2 NO, and N2O, the formation of cavities containing radiolytic gases, and ejection of molecules by sputtering. Using infrared spectroscopy, we show that at all temperatures the destruction of ammonia is substantial, but at higher temperatures (120 K), it is nearly complete (approximately 97% destroyed) after a fluence of 10(exp 16) ions per square centimeter. Using mass spectroscopy and microbalance gravimetry, we measure the sputtering yield of our sample and the main components of the sputtered flux. We find that the sputtering yield depends on fluence. At low temperatures, the yield is very low initially and increases quadratically with fluence, while at 120 K the yield is constant and higher initially. The increase in the sputtering yield with fluence is explained by the formation and trapping of the ammonia decay products, N2 and H2 which are seen to be ejected from the ice at all temperatures.

  1. Reducing ammonia volatilization from compound fertilizers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paul

    2012-09-13

    Sep 13, 2012 ... formulated fertilizer + 18.92 g zeolite (T5), 22.30 g 10:10:10 formulated fertilizer + 4.06 g zeolite (T6), and ... compound fertilizer could minimize ammonia loss. ..... North China Plan. Nutr. Cycl. Agroecosyst.63:187-195. Cottenie A (1980). Soil testing and plant testing as a basis of fertilizer recommendation.

  2. 1 Ammonia Concentrations in Different Aquaculture 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    density, low water exchange rates, water source and the alkaline medium of the systems. Low unionized ammonia in earthen pond and natural pond was attributed to the presence of phytoplankton, high water exchanges, feeding system, low acidity and relatively low temperature. Remediating measures such as the use of ...

  3. Ammonia synthesis from first principles calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honkala, Johanna Karoliina; Hellman, Anders; Remediakis, Ioannis

    2005-01-01

    The rate of ammonia synthesis over a nanoparticle ruthenium catalyst can be calculated directly on the basis of a quantum chemical treatment of the problem using density functional theory. We compared the results to measured rates over a ruthenium catalyst supported on magnesium aluminum spinet...

  4. System and method for selective catalytic reduction of nitrogen oxides in combustion exhaust gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolevskiy, Anatoly; Rossin, Joseph A

    2014-04-08

    A multi-stage selective catalytic reduction (SCR) unit (32) provides efficient reduction of NOx and other pollutants from about 50-550.degree. C. in a power plant (19). Hydrogen (24) and ammonia (29) are variably supplied to the SCR unit depending on temperature. An upstream portion (34) of the SCR unit catalyzes NOx+NH.sub.3 reactions above about 200.degree. C. A downstream portion (36) catalyzes NOx+H.sub.2 reactions below about 260.degree. C., and catalyzes oxidation of NH.sub.3, CO, and VOCs with oxygen in the exhaust above about 200.degree. C., efficiently removing NOx and other pollutants over a range of conditions with low slippage of NH.sub.3. An ammonia synthesis unit (28) may be connected to the SCR unit to provide NH.sub.3 as needed, avoiding transport and storage of ammonia or urea at the site. A carbonaceous gasification plant (18) on site may supply hydrogen and nitrogen to the ammonia synthesis unit, and hydrogen to the SCR unit.

  5. VUV photo-oxidation of gaseous benzene combined with ozone-assisted catalytic oxidation: Effect on transition metal catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Haibao, E-mail: seabao8@gmail.com [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University (China); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Environmental Pollution Control and Remediation Technology (Sun Yat-sen University) (China); Lu, Haoxian; Zhan, Yujie; Liu, Gaoyuan; Feng, Qiuyu; Huang, Huiling; Wu, Muyan; Ye, Xinguo [School of Environmental Science and Engineering, Sun Yat-Sen University (China)

    2017-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Mn nanoparticles are highly dispersed on ZSM-5 and most efficient in benzene degradation in the VUV-OZCO process. - Highlights: • Vacuum UV irradiation is well combined with O{sub 3} catalytic oxidation. • O{sub 3} byproducts was used to enhance catalytic oxidation of VOCs. • Mn/ZSM-5 achieved the best catalytic activity for benzene degradation. - Abstract: Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) cause the major air pollution concern. In this study, a series of ZSM-5 supported transition metals were prepared by impregnation method. They were combined with vacuum UV (VUV) photo-oxidation in a continuous-flow packed-bed reactor and used for the degradation of benzene, a typical toxic VOCs. Compared with VUV photo-oxidation alone, the introduction of catalysts can greatly enhance benzene oxidation under the help of O{sub 3}, the by-products from VUV irradiation, via ozone-assisted catalytic oxidation (OZCO). The catalytic activity of transition metals towards benzene oxidation followed the order: Mn > Co > Cu > Ni > Fe. Mn achieved the best catalytic activity due to the strongest capability for O{sub 3} catalytic decomposition and utilization. Benzene and O{sub 3} removal efficiency reached as high as 97% and 100% after 360 min, respectively. O{sub 3} was catalytically decomposed, generating highly reactive oxidants such as ·OH and ·O for benzene oxidation.

  6. Decomposition of toluene in a steady-state atmospheric-pressure glow discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trushkin, A. N.; Grushin, M. E.; Kochetov, I. V.; Trushkin, N. I.; Akishev, Yu. S.

    2013-02-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies of decomposition of toluene (C6H5CH3) in a polluted air flow by means of a steady-state atmospheric pressure glow discharge at different water vapor contents in the working gas. The experimental results on the degree of C6H5CH3 removal are compared with the results of computer simulations conducted in the framework of the developed kinetic model of plasma chemical decomposition of toluene in the N2: O2: H2O gas mixture. A substantial influence of the gas flow humidity on toluene decomposition in the atmospheric pressure glow discharge is demonstrated. The main mechanisms of the influence of humidity on C6H5CH3 decomposition are determined. The existence of two stages in the process of toluene removal, which differ in their duration and the intensity of plasma chemical decomposition of C6H5CH3 is established. Based on the results of computer simulations, the composition of the products of plasma chemical reactions at the output of the reactor is analyzed as a function of the specific energy deposition and gas flow humidity. The existence of a catalytic cycle in which hydroxyl radical OH acts a catalyst and which substantially accelerates the recombination of oxygen atoms and suppression of ozone generation when the plasma-forming gas contains water vapor is established.

  7. Decomposition of toluene in a steady-state atmospheric-pressure glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trushkin, A. N.; Grushin, M. E.; Kochetov, I. V.; Trushkin, N. I.; Akishev, Yu. S.

    2013-01-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies of decomposition of toluene (C 6 H 5 CH 3 ) in a polluted air flow by means of a steady-state atmospheric pressure glow discharge at different water vapor contents in the working gas. The experimental results on the degree of C 6 H 5 CH 3 removal are compared with the results of computer simulations conducted in the framework of the developed kinetic model of plasma chemical decomposition of toluene in the N 2 : O 2 : H 2 O gas mixture. A substantial influence of the gas flow humidity on toluene decomposition in the atmospheric pressure glow discharge is demonstrated. The main mechanisms of the influence of humidity on C 6 H 5 CH 3 decomposition are determined. The existence of two stages in the process of toluene removal, which differ in their duration and the intensity of plasma chemical decomposition of C 6 H 5 CH 3 is established. Based on the results of computer simulations, the composition of the products of plasma chemical reactions at the output of the reactor is analyzed as a function of the specific energy deposition and gas flow humidity. The existence of a catalytic cycle in which hydroxyl radical OH acts a catalyst and which substantially accelerates the recombination of oxygen atoms and suppression of ozone generation when the plasma-forming gas contains water vapor is established.

  8. Orion Ammonia Boiler System Preflight Test Preparations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitt, Julia L.

    2017-01-01

    The Environmental Controls and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) branch at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) is currently undergoing preparations for ground testing of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV) to prepare its subsystems for EM-1 (Exploration Mission-1). EM-1, Orions second unmanned flight, is a three-week long lunar mission during which the vehicle will complete a 6-day retrograde lunar orbit before returning to Earth. This paper focuses on the work done during the authors 16-week internship with the Mechanical Engineering Branch of KSCs Engineering Directorate. The authors project involved assisting with the preparations for testing the Orion MPCVs ammonia boiler system. The purpose of the ammonia boiler system is to keep the spacecraft sufficiently cool during the reentry portion of its mission, from service module (SM) separation to post-landing. This system is critical for keeping both the spacecraft (avionics and electronics) and crew alive during reentry, thus a successful test of the system is essential to the success of EM-1. XXXX The author was able to draft a detailed outline of the procedure for the ammonia system functional test. More work will need to be done on the vehicle power-up and power-down portions of the procedure, but the ammonia system testing portion of the procedure is thorough and includes vehicle test configurations, vehicle commands, and GSE. The author was able to compile a substantial list of questions regarding the ammonia system functional test with the help of her mentors. A significant number of these questions were answered in the teleconferences with Lockheed Martin.

  9. Ammonia and ammonium hydroxide sensors for ammonia/water absorption machines: Literature review and data compilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anheier, N. C., Jr.; McDonald, C. E.; Cuta, J. M.; Cuta, F. M.; Olsen, K. B.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes an evaluation of various sensing techniques for determining the ammonia concentration in the working fluid of ammonia/water absorption cycle systems. The purpose was to determine if any existing sensor technology or instrumentation could provide an accurate, reliable, and cost-effective continuous measure of ammonia concentration in water. The resulting information will be used for design optimization and cycle control in an ammonia-absorption heat pump. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) researchers evaluated each sensing technology against a set of general requirements characterizing the potential operating conditions within the absorption cycle. The criteria included the physical constraints for in situ operation, sensor characteristics, and sensor application. PNL performed an extensive literature search, which uncovered several promising sensing technologies that might be applicable to this problem. Sixty-two references were investigated, and 33 commercial vendors were identified as having ammonia sensors. The technologies for ammonia sensing are acoustic wave, refractive index, electrode, thermal, ion-selective field-effect transistor (ISFET), electrical conductivity, pH/colormetric, and optical absorption. Based on information acquired in the literature search, PNL recommends that follow-on activities focus on ISFET devices and a fiber optic evanescent sensor with a colormetric indicator. The ISFET and fiber optic evanescent sensor are inherently microminiature and capable of in situ measurements. Further, both techniques have been demonstrated selective to the ammonium ion (NH4(+)). The primary issue remaining is how to make the sensors sufficiently corrosion-resistant to be useful in practice.

  10. Rectal administration of 13N-ammonia in the study of ammonia metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koen, Hirofumi

    1980-01-01

    13 N-ammonia produced by the cyclotron was instilled intrarectally in patients with liver diseases for the study of the turnover of rectally absorbed 13 N-ammonia. A positron camera connected to an on-line computer system was used for imaging of the liver and heart; 13 N-activity over the head was also recorded. Sequential changes of 13 N-activity in blood was measured, and chromatographic analysis of 13 N-labeled substances in blood was carried out using a Dowex 50W x 8 column. In the control, 13 N-ammonia was absorbed quickly into blood visualizing the liver shortly after administration, and hepatic uptake of 13 N-ammonia reached a plateau in 10 -- 15 min, whereas in patients with cirrhosis, the lung and heart were visualized in 5 min when the liver image was still faint. 13 N-activity over the head was apparently higher in the cirrhotic group. It was suggested that a large proportion of absorbed 13 N-ammonia bypassed liver cells and reached peripheral tissues. The heart/liver ratio of 13 N and 13 N over the head were closely correlated with various indices of portal hypertension. The relative proportion of 13 N-metabolites in blood was lower at 5 min and 15 min after administration in cirrhosis, suggesting a reduced capacity of the liver to remove and metabolize ammonia. (author)

  11. Ammonia and ammonium hydroxide sensors for ammonia/water absorption machines: Literature review and data compilation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anheier, N.C. Jr.; McDonald, C.E.; Cuta, J.M.; Cuta, F.M.; Olsen, K.B.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes an evaluation of various sensing techniques for determining the ammonia concentration in the working fluid of ammonia/water absorption cycle systems. The purpose of this work was to determine if any existing sensor technology or instrumentation could provide an accurate, reliable, and cost-effective continuous measure of ammonia concentration in water. The resulting information will be used for design optimization and cycle control in an ammonia-absorption heat pump. PNL researchers evaluated each sensing technology against a set of general requirements characterizing the potential operating conditions within the absorption cycle. The criteria included the physical constraints for in situ operation, sensor characteristics, and sensor application. PNL performed an extensive literature search, which uncovered several promising sensing technologies that might be applicable to this problem. Sixty-two references were investigated, and 33 commercial vendors were identified as having ammonia sensors. The technologies for ammonia sensing are acoustic wave, refractive index, electrode, thermal, ion-selective field-effect transistor (ISFET), electrical conductivity, pH/colormetric, and optical absorption. Based on information acquired in the literature search, PNL recommends that follow-on activities focus on ISFET devices and a fiber optic evanescent sensor with a colormetric indicator. The ISFET and fiber optic evanescent sensor are inherently microminiature and capable of in situ measurements. Further, both techniques have been demonstrated selective to the ammonium ion (NH{sub 4}{sup +}). The primary issue remaining is how to make the sensors sufficiently corrosion-resistant to be useful in practice.

  12. SPONTANEOUS CATALYTIC WET AIR OXIDATION DURING PRE-TREATMENT OF HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE SLUDGE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, D.; Herman, C.; Pareizs, J.; Bannochie, C.; Best, D.; Bibler, N.; Fellinger, T.

    2009-10-01

    Savannah River Remediation, LLC (SRR) operates the Defense Waste Processing Facility for the U.S. Department of Energy at the Savannah River Site. This facility immobilizes high-level radioactive waste through vitrification following chemical pretreatment. Catalytic destruction of formate and oxalate ions to carbon dioxide has been observed during qualification testing of non-radioactive analog systems. Carbon dioxide production greatly exceeded hydrogen production, indicating the occurrence of a process other than the catalytic decomposition of formic acid. Statistical modeling was used to relate the new reaction chemistry to partial catalytic wet air oxidation of both formate and oxalate ions driven by the low concentrations of palladium, rhodium, and/or ruthenium in the waste. Variations in process conditions led to increases or decreases in the total oxidative destruction, as well as partially shifting the preferred species undergoing destruction from oxalate ion to formate ion.

  13. Cerebral ammonia uptake and accumulation during prolonged exercise in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybo, Lars; Dalsgaard, Mads K.; Steensberg, Adam

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated whether peripheral ammonia production during prolonged exercise enhances the uptake and subsequent accumulation of ammonia within the brain. Two studies determined the cerebral uptake of ammonia (arterial and jugular venous blood sampling combined with Kety-Schmidt-determined cerebral...... blood flow; n = 5) and the ammonia concentration in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF; n = 8) at rest and immediately following prolonged exercise either with or without glucose supplementation. There was a net balance of ammonia across the brain at rest and at 30 min of exercise, whereas 3 h of exercise...... exercise with glucose, and further to 16.1 ± 3.3 µM after the placebo trial (P

  14. Time-Frequency Decomposition of an Ultrashort Pulse: Wavelet Decomposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Khelladi

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available An efficient numerical algorithm is presented for the numerical modeling of the propagation of ultrashort pulses with arbitrary temporal and frequency characteristics through linear homogeneous dielectrics. The consequences of proper sampling of the spectral phase in pulse propagation and its influence on the efficiency of computation are discussed in detail. The numerical simulation presented here is capable of analyzing the pulse in the temporal-frequency domain. As an example, pulse propagation effects such as temporal and spectral shifts, pulse broadening effects, asymmetry and chirping in dispersive media are demonstrated for wavelet decomposition.

  15. Thermal decomposition of hydroiodic acid and hydrogen separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeheskel, J.; Leger, D.; Courvoisier, P.

    1978-01-01

    The reaction of decomposition of hydroiodic acid is included in a promising water splitting process (sulfur-iodine cycle). An experimental program is running in order to overcome some basic difficulties and data shortcomings which stand in the way of achieving that target. The core of the experimental system is the palladium silver (23% Ag) membrane tube reactor in which the feed gas entered the inner side of the tube. Four series of different kinds of experiments have been performed: 1) diffusion of hydrogen from a pure feed hydrogen stream through the membrane; the results are statistically analyzed due to the present correlations of the H 2 specific permeability as a function of temperature and pressure (up to 600 0 C and 20 bar); 2) separation of hydrogen from a binary feed mixture H 2 -He; a mathematical model is developed for this operation; 3) indication of the poisoning effect of a little amount of hydroiodic acid on the hydrogen pereability; this effect is partly reversible at high temperatures; 4) a performance of one continuous experiment of HI decomposition into the membrane tube at steady pressure and temperature of 8 bar and 500 0 C; the results prove the catalytic activity of the membrane surface

  16. Catalytic bioreactors and methods of using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, Robert Mark; Liu, Yangmu Chloe

    2017-07-25

    Various embodiments provide a bioreactor for producing a bioproduct comprising one or more catalytically active zones located in a housing and adapted to keep two incompatible gaseous reactants separated when in a gas phase, wherein each of the one or more catalytically active zones may comprise a catalytic component retainer and a catalytic component retained within and/or thereon. Each of the catalytically active zones may additionally or alternatively comprise a liquid medium located on either side of the catalytic component retainer. Catalytic component may include a microbial cell culture located within and/or on the catalytic component retainer, a suspended catalytic component suspended in the liquid medium, or a combination thereof. Methods of using various embodiments of the bioreactor to produce a bioproduct, such as isobutanol, are also provided.

  17. Investigations in anhydrous liquid ammonia. Reaction of group 2, 4, 5, 11 metal and actinoids compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woidy, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The solubility and reactivity of metal halides, transition metal halides, and actinoid halides in liquid ammonia can lead to new starting materials for the synthesis of fluorides in low oxidation states or for nitrides via a ''low-temperature route''. In this context the ability of metal and actinoid halides to act as an acceptor for or donor of fluoride ions is also of interest. Four different systems were investigated in this study. In the first section, the synthesis and characterization of new compounds were carried out in the system CuX/NH 3 (X = F, Cl, Br, I, and CN) and lead to a ligand stabilized monovalent copper fluoride as a main result. In the second section, the solubility of uranyl compounds and uranium halides in liquid ammonia was investigated and the products were characterized. In the third section, alkali metal thorates were synthesized. Their solubility in liquid ammonia and their behavior as an acceptor for fluoride ions was investigated. In the last section, the results on the solubility behavior of transition metal halides in liquid ammonia and their coordination behavior are presented. In the first system CuX/NH 3 several new compounds, such as [Cu(NH 3 ) 3 ]X (X = Br, I or CN) were synthesized and characterized. The reactions of this compounds with fluoride ion donors (NH 4 F or Me 4 NF) led unfortunately not to the monovalent copper fluoride CuF. The comproportionation reaction of Cu and CuF 2 in liquid ammonia lead to the compounds [Cu(NH 3 ) 3 ] 2 [Cu 2 (NH 3 ) 2 ] . 4 NH 3 and [Cu(NH 3 ) 2 ]F . NH 3 . For the preparation of binary CuF, various decomposition experiments were executed on the compound [Cu(NH 3 ) 2 ]F . NH 3 which resulted in different decomposition products. In additional studies various complexes of divalent copper was investigated and with the compound [Cu(NH 3 ) 5 ]F 2 . NH 3 the solubility of fluoride containing substances in liquid ammonia could be shown. Studies of six- and tetravalent uranium

  18. Observations of atmospheric ammonia from TANSO-FTS/GOSAT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someya, Yu; Imasu, Ryoichi; Saitoh, Naoko; Shiomi, Kei

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric ammonia has large impacts on the nitrogen cycles or atmospheric environment such as nucleation of PM2.5 particles. It is reported that ammonia in the atmosphere has been increasing rapidly with the growth of population globally and this trend must continue in the future. Satellite observation is an effective approach to get to know the global perspectives of the gas. Atmospheric ammonia is observable using the thermal infrared (TIR) spectra, and IASI, TES and CrIS had been revealed those distributions. GOSAT also has TIR band including the ammonia absorption bands. GOSAT has the shorter revisit cycle than that of the other hyper-spectral TIR sounders mentioned above, therefore, the shorter time-scale events can be represented. In addition to the importance of the impacts of ammonia itself, the concentration ratio between ammonia and the other trace gases such as CO which is one of the main targets of the GOSAT-2 project is useful as the indicator of their emission sources. In this study, we introduce an algorithm to retrieve the column amount of atmospheric ammonia based on non-linear optimal estimation (Rogers, 2000) from GOSAT spectra in the ammonia absorption band between 960 - 970 cm-1. Temperature and water vapor profiles are estimated in advance of the ammonia retrieval. The preliminary results showed significant high concentrations of ammonia in the Northern India and the Eastern China as pointed out in the previous researches. We will discuss the global distribution of ammonia in the presentation.

  19. Contents and implications of ammonia human and canine bile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderete, J S; Gaines, E L; Hudson, N L

    1978-08-01

    The quantification and physiological significance of ammonia in human and canine bile has not been clearly documented or analyzed previously. Bile from the gallbladder, common hepatic duct, and from T-tubes obtained from patients undergoing cholecystectomy and choledochotomy. Similar samples were obtained in 6 dogs by cannulation of their hepatic duct and various blood vessels. Simultaneous blood and bile samples were obtained at 15-min intervals before during, and after an exogenous load of ammonia, given intravenously. Ammonia levels were measured in all samples. Ammonia was measurable by conventional methods in human and canine bile. In both species the gallbladder bile contained at least twice as much ammonia as bile from the common hepatic duct. After an exogenous ammonia load, the levels of ammonia in canine bile increased in similar patterns, but in lesser magnitude than the ammonia levels measured at several sites in the circulation. The findings document that the bile contains ammonia in different quantities and suggest that bile could be an additional pathway for the removal of ammonia by the liver, in addition to the urea cycle. The loss of the biliary pathway for ammonia excretion could contribute to the pathophysiology of the signs and symptoms attributed to hyperammoniemia occurring in human beings and dogs with decreased hepatic function.

  20. A Comparative Study of TiO2-supported and Bulk Co-Mn-Al Catalysts for N2O Decomposition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Karásková, K.; Chromčáková, Ž.; Študentová, S.; Matějka, V.; Jirátová, Květa; Obalová, L.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 191, č. 1 (2012), s. 112-115 ISSN 0920-5861 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA106/09/1664 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : nitrous oxide * catalytic decomposition * layered double hydroxides Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.980, year: 2012