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Sample records for catalysts molecular design

  1. Molecular catalysts structure and functional design

    CERN Document Server

    Gade, Lutz H

    2014-01-01

    Highlighting the key aspects and latest advances in the rapidly developing field of molecular catalysis, this book covers new strategies to investigate reaction mechanisms, the enhancement of the catalysts' selectivity and efficiency, as well as the rational design of well-defined molecular catalysts. The interdisciplinary author team with an excellent reputation within the community discusses experimental and theoretical studies, along with examples of improved catalysts, and their application in organic synthesis, biocatalysis, and supported organometallic catalysis. As a result, readers wil

  2. Multiscale modeling for materials design: Molecular square catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Debarshi

    In a wide variety of materials, including a number of heterogeneous catalysts, the properties manifested at the process scale are a consequence of phenomena that occur at different time and length scales. Recent experimental developments allow materials to be designed precisely at the nanometer scale. However, the optimum design of such materials requires capabilities to predict the properties at the process scale based on the phenomena occurring at the relevant scales. The thesis research reported here addresses this need to develop multiscale modeling strategies for the design of new materials. As a model system, a new system of materials called molecular squares was studied in this research. Both serial and parallel multiscale strategies and their components were developed as parts of this work. As a serial component, a parameter estimation tool was developed that uses a hierarchical protocol and consists of two different search elements: a global search method implemented using a genetic algorithm that is capable of exploring large parametric space, and a local search method using gradient search techniques that accurately finds the optimum in a localized space. As an essential component of parallel multiscale modeling, different standard as well as specialized computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques were explored and developed in order to identify a technique that is best suited to solve a membrane reactor model employing layered films of molecular squares as the heterogeneous catalyst. The coupled set of non-linear partial differential equations (PDEs) representing the continuum model was solved numerically using three different classes of methods: a split-step method using finite difference (FD); domain decomposition in two different forms, one involving three overlapping subdomains and the other involving a gap-tooth scheme; and the multiple-timestep method that was developed in this research. The parallel multiscale approach coupled continuum

  3. Molecular-level Design of Heterogeneous Chiral Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gellman, Andrew John [Carnegie Mellon University; Sholl, David S. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tysoe, Wilfred T. [University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee; Zaera, Francisco [University of California at Riverside

    2013-04-28

    Understanding and controlling selectivity is one of the key challenges in heterogeneous catalysis. Among problems in catalytic selectivity enantioselectivity is perhaps the most the most challenging. The primary goal of the project on “Molecular-level Design of Heterogeneous Chiral Catalysts” is to understand the origins of enantioselectivity on chiral heterogeneous surfaces and catalysts. The efforts of the project team include preparation of chiral surfaces, characterization of chiral surfaces, experimental detection of enantioselectivity on such surfaces and computational modeling of the interactions of chiral probe molecules with chiral surfaces. Over the course of the project period the team of PI’s has made some of the most detailed and insightful studies of enantioselective chemistry on chiral surfaces. This includes the measurement of fundamental interactions and reaction mechanisms of chiral molecules on chiral surfaces and leads all the way to rationale design and synthesis of chiral surfaces and materials for enantioselective surface chemistry. The PI’s have designed and prepared new materials for enantioselective adsorption and catalysis. Naturally Chiral Surfaces • Completion of a systematic study of the enantiospecific desorption kinetics of R-3-methylcyclohexanone (R-3-MCHO) on 9 achiral and 7 enantiomeric pairs of chiral Cu surfaces with orientations that span the stereographic triangle. • Discovery of super-enantioselective tartaric acid (TA) and aspartic acid (Asp) decomposition as a result of a surface explosion mechanism on Cu(643)R&S. Systematic study of super-enantiospecific TA and Asp decomposition on five enantiomeric pairs of chiral Cu surfaces. • Initial observation of the enantiospecific desorption of R- and S-propylene oxide (PO) from Cu(100) imprinted with {3,1,17} facets by L-lysine adsorption. Templated Chiral Surfaces • Initial observation of the enantiospecific desorption of R- and S-PO from Pt(111) and Pd(111

  4. Metalloporphyrin catalysts for oxygen reduction developed using computer-aided molecular design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryba, G.N.; Hobbs, J.D.; Shelnutt, J.A. [and others

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this project is the development of a new class of metalloporphyrin materials used as catalsyts for use in fuel cell applications. The metalloporphyrins are excellent candidates for use as catalysts at both the anode and cathode. The catalysts reduce oxygen in 1 M potassium hydroxide, as well as in 2 M sulfuric acid. Covalent attachment to carbon supports is being investigated. The computer-aided molecular design is an iterative process, in which experimental results feed back into the design of future catalysts.

  5. Towards EMIC rational design: setting the molecular simulation toolbox for enantiopure molecularly imprinted catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Jalink, Tessa; Farrand, Tom; Herdes, Carmelo

    2016-01-01

    A critical appraisal of the current strategies for the synthesis of enantiopure drugs is presented, along with a systematic background for the computational design of stereoselective porous polymers. These materials aim to achieve the enantiomeric excess of any chiral drug, avoiding the racemic separation. Particular emphasis is given to link statistical mechanics methods to the description of each one of the experimental stages within the catalyst?s synthesis, setting a framework for the fun...

  6. Design of biomimetic catalysts by molecular imprinting in synthetic polymers: the role of transition state stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, Günter; Liu, Junqiu

    2012-02-21

    The impressive efficiency and selectivity of biological catalysts has engendered a long-standing effort to understand the details of enzyme action. It is widely accepted that enzymes accelerate reactions through their steric and electronic complementarity to the reactants in the rate-determining transition states. Thus, tight binding to the transition state of a reactant (rather than to the corresponding substrate) lowers the activation energy of the reaction, providing strong catalytic activity. Debates concerning the fundamentals of enzyme catalysis continue, however, and non-natural enzyme mimics offer important additional insight in this area. Molecular structures that mimic enzymes through the design of a predetermined binding site that stabilizes the transition state of a desired reaction are invaluable in this regard. Catalytic antibodies, which can be quite active when raised against stable transition state analogues of the corresponding reaction, represent particularly successful examples. Recently, synthetic chemistry has begun to match nature's ability to produce antibody-like binding sites with high affinities for the transition state. Thus, synthetic, molecularly imprinted polymers have been engineered to provide enzyme-like specificity and activity, and they now represent a powerful tool for creating highly efficient catalysts. In this Account, we review recent efforts to develop enzyme models through the concept of transition state stabilization. In particular, models for carboxypeptidase A were prepared through the molecular imprinting of synthetic polymers. On the basis of successful experiments with phosphonic esters as templates to arrange amidinium groups in the active site, the method was further improved by combining the concept of transition state stabilization with the introduction of special catalytic moieties, such as metal ions in a defined orientation in the active site. In this way, the imprinted polymers were able to provide both an

  7. Mesoporous molecular sieve catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højholt, Karen Thrane

    This thesis deals with a very specific class of molecular sieves known as zeolites. Zeolites are a class of crystalline aluminosilicates characterised by pores or cavities of molecular dimensions as part of their crystal structure. In this work zeolites were modified for the use and understanding...... of different catalytic applications. Primarily the zeolites were modified regarding the porosity and the introduction of metals to the framework. The obtained materials were used as solid acid catalysts, as an inert matrix for stabilising metal nanoparticles and as an anchoring material for molecular metal....... Furthermore, preliminary work was done using mesoporous ZSM-5 zeolites as support material for anchoring molecular CoMo6 species for the application as potential bi-functional catalyst in simultaneous hydrodesulfurisation (HDS) and hydrocracking. HDS activity tests revealed that the anchoring improved...

  8. Design of heterogeneous catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Anne Mette

    The title of my PhD thesis is “Design of Heterogeneous Catalysts”. Three reactions have been investigated: the methanation reaction, the Fischer-Tropsch reaction, and the NH3-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NO. The experimental work performed in connection with the methanation reaction...... hydrogenation. For both systems a maximum in catalytic activity was found for some of the bimetallic catalysts being superior to the monometallic catalysts. This resulted in volcano curves for all investigated systems. In the Fischer-Tropsch reaction promotion of cobalt catalysts with manganese was studied...... well, and the best catalyst prepared had a C5+ yield almost a factor of two higher than a standard air calcined Co catalyst. In the NH3-SCR reaction it is desirable to develop an active and stable catalyst for NOx removal in automotive applications, since the traditionally used vanadium-based catalyst...

  9. Toward molecular catalysts by computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raugei, Simone; DuBois, Daniel L; Rousseau, Roger; Chen, Shentan; Ho, Ming-Hsun; Bullock, R Morris; Dupuis, Michel

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Rational design of molecular catalysts requires a systematic approach to designing ligands with specific functionality and precisely tailored electronic and steric properties. It then becomes possible to devise computer protocols to design catalysts by computer. In this Account, we first review how thermodynamic properties such as redox potentials (E°), acidity constants (pKa), and hydride donor abilities (ΔGH(-)) form the basis for a framework for the systematic design of molecular catalysts for reactions that are critical for a secure energy future. We illustrate this for hydrogen evolution and oxidation, oxygen reduction, and CO conversion, and we give references to other instances where it has been successfully applied. The framework is amenable to quantum-chemical calculations and conducive to predictions by computer. We review how density functional theory allows the determination and prediction of these thermodynamic properties within an accuracy relevant to experimentalists (∼0.06 eV for redox potentials, ∼1 pKa unit for pKa values, and 1-2 kcal/mol for hydricities). Computation yielded correlations among thermodynamic properties as they reflect the electron population in the d shell of the metal center, thus substantiating empirical correlations used by experimentalists. These correlations point to the key role of redox potentials and other properties (pKa of the parent aminium for the proton-relay-based catalysts designed in our laboratory) that are easily accessible experimentally or computationally in reducing the parameter space for design. These properties suffice to fully determine free energies maps and profiles associated with catalytic cycles, i.e., the relative energies of intermediates. Their prediction puts us in a position to distinguish a priori between desirable and undesirable pathways and mechanisms. Efficient catalysts have flat free energy profiles that avoid high activation barriers due to low- and high

  10. Synthesis and characterization of alumina-supported vanadium oxide catalysts prepared by the molecular designed dispersion of VO(acac)2 complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Baltes, M.; Voort, P. van der; Ramachandra Rao, R.; Catana, Gabriela; Schoonheydt, R.A.; Vansant, E.F.

    2000-01-01

    Alumina-supported vanadium oxide catalysts have been prepared by the molecular designed dispersion method, using the vanadyl acetylacetonate complex (VO(acac)2). The complex has been adsorbed on the support from solution, followed by thermal conversion into the corresponding supported vanadium oxide

  11. Efficient epoxidation of propene using molecular catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovits, Iulius I. E.; Anthofer, Michael H.; Kolding, Helene

    2014-01-01

    The epoxidation of propene is performed in homogeneous phase using various molecular catalysts and H2O2 or tert-butyl hydroperoxide as oxidants. A comparison between some molybdenum catalysts and methyltrioxorhenium (MTO) shows that the well known Re catalyst is the best among the examined...

  12. Mesoporous Molecular Sieves as Supports for Metathesis Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcar, Hynek; Cejka, Jirí

    Mesoporous molecular sieves represent a new family of inorganic oxides with regular nanostructure, large surface areas, large void volumes, and narrow pore size distribution of mesopores. These materials offer new possibilities for designing highly active and selective catalysts for olefin metathesis and metathesis polymerization. Siliceous sieves MCM-41, MCM-48, SBA-15, and organized mesoporous alumina (OMA) were used as supports for preparation of new molybdenum and rhenium oxide catalysts, as well as for heterogenization of well-defined homogeneous catalysts.

  13. Predictive design of engineered multifunctional solid catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Robert; Potter, Matthew E; Newland, Stephanie H

    2014-06-07

    The ability to devise and design multifunctional active sites at the nanoscale, by drawing on the intricate ability of enzymes to evolve single-sites with distinctive catalytic function, has prompted complimentary and concordant developments in the field of catalyst design and in situ operando spectroscopy. Innovations in design-application approach have led to a more fundamental understanding of the nature of the active site and its mechanistic influence at a molecular level, that have enabled robust structure-property correlations to be established, which has facilitated the dextrous manipulation and predictive design of redox and solid-acid sites for industrially-significant, sustainable catalytic transformations.

  14. Novel nanodispersed coal liquefaction catalysts: Molecular design via microemulsion-based synthesis. Final technical report, October 1990--December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osseo-Asare, K.; Boakye, E.; Vittal, M. [and others

    1995-04-01

    This report described the synthesis of Molybdenum Sulfides in microemulsions by acidification of ammonium tetrathiomolybdate. Molybdenum Sulfides have been shown to be potential coal liquefaction catalysts. The importance of particle size, temperature effects, and coal surface chemistry to impregnation are discussed.

  15. Metal-Support Cooperative Catalysts for Environmentally Benign Molecular Transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Kiyotomi; Mitsudome, Takato

    2017-01-01

    Metal-support cooperative catalysts have been developed for sustainable and environmentally benign molecular transformations. The active metal centers and supports in these catalysts could cooperatively activate substrates, resulting in high catalytic performance for liquid-phase reactions under mild conditions. These catalysts involved hydrotalcite-supported gold and silver nanoparticles with high catalytic activity for organic reactions such as aerobic oxidation, oxidative carbonylation, and chemoselective reduction of epoxides to alkenes and nitrostyrenes to aminostyrenes using alcohols and CO/H 2 O as reducing reagents. This high catalytic performance was due to cooperative catalysis between the metal nanoparticles and basic sites of the hydrotalcite support. To increase the metal-support cooperative effect, core-shell nanostructured catalysts consisting of gold or silver nanoparticles in the core and ceria supports in the shell were designed. These core-shell nanocomposite catalysts were effective for the chemoselective hydrogenation of nitrostyrenes to aminostyrenes, unsaturated aldehydes to allyl alcohols, and alkynes to alkenes using H 2 as a clean reductant. In addition, these solid catalysts could be recovered easily from the reaction mixture by simple filtration, and were reusable with high catalytic activity. © 2017 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Molecular metal catalysts on supports: organometallic chemistry meets surface science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serna, Pedro; Gates, Bruce C

    2014-08-19

    Recent advances in the synthesis and characterization of small, essentially molecular metal complexes and metal clusters on support surfaces have brought new insights to catalysis and point the way to systematic catalyst design. We summarize recent work unraveling effects of key design variables of site-isolated catalysts: the metal, metal nuclearity, support, and other ligands on the metals, also considering catalysts with separate, complementary functions on supports. The catalysts were synthesized with the goal of structural simplicity and uniformity to facilitate incisive characterization. Thus, they are essentially molecular species bonded to porous supports chosen for their high degree of uniformity; the supports are crystalline aluminosilicates (zeolites) and MgO. The catalytic species are synthesized in reactions of organometallic precursors with the support surfaces; the precursors include M(L)2(acetylacetonate)1-2, with M = Ru, Rh, Ir, or Au and the ligands L = C2H4, CO, or CH3. Os3(CO)12 and Ir4(CO)12 are used as precursors of supported metal clusters, and some such catalysts are made by ship-in-a-bottle syntheses to trap the clusters in zeolite cages. The simplicity and uniformity of the supported catalysts facilitate precise structure determinations, even in reactive atmospheres and during catalysis. The methods of characterizing catalysts in reactive atmospheres include infrared (IR), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES), and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopies, and complementary methods include density functional theory and atomic-resolution aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy for imaging of individual metal atoms. IR, NMR, XANES, and microscopy data demonstrate the high degrees of uniformity of well-prepared supported species. The characterizations determine the compositions of surface metal complexes and clusters, including the ligands and the metal

  17. Activation of molecular catalysts using semiconductor quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Thomas J [Chapel Hill, NC; Sykora, Milan [Los Alamos, NM; Klimov, Victor I [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-10-04

    Photocatalytic materials based on coupling of semiconductor nanocrystalline quantum dots (NQD) and molecular catalysts. These materials have capability to drive or catalyze non-spontaneous chemical reactions in the presence of visible radiation, ultraviolet radiation, or both. The NQD functions in these materials as a light absorber and charge generator. Following light absorption, the NQD activates a molecular catalyst adsorbed on the surface of the NQD via transfer of one or more charges (either electrons or electron-holes) from the NQD to the molecular catalyst. The activated molecular catalyst can then drive a chemical reaction. A photoelectrolytic device that includes such photocatalytic materials is also described.

  18. Towards the computational design of solid catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Bligaard, Thomas; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Over the past decade the theoretical description of surface reactions has undergone a radical development. Advances in density functional theory mean it is now possible to describe catalytic reactions at surfaces with the detail and accuracy required for computational results to compare favourably...... with experiments. Theoretical methods can be used to describe surface chemical reactions in detail and to understand variations in catalytic activity from one catalyst to another. Here, we review the first steps towards using computational methods to design new catalysts. Examples include screening for catalysts...

  19. Octahedral molecular sieve sorbents and catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liyu [Richland, WA; King, David L [Richland, WA

    2010-04-20

    Octahedral molecular sieve sorbents and catalysts are disclosed, including silver hollandite and cryptomelane. These materials can be used, for example, to catalyze the oxidation of CO.sub.x (e.g., CO), NO.sub.x (e.g., NO), hydrocarbons (e.g., C.sub.3H.sub.6) and/or sulfur-containing compounds. The disclosed materials also may be used to catalyze other reactions, such as the reduction of NO.sub.2. In some cases, the disclosed materials are capable of sorbing certain products from the reactions they catalyze. Silver hollandite, in particular, can be used to remove a substantial portion of certain sulfur-containing compounds from a gas or liquid by catalysis and/or sorption. The gas or liquid can be, for example, natural gas or a liquid hydrocarbon.

  20. A pentanuclear iron catalyst designed for water oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Masaya; Kondo, Mio; Kuga, Reiko; Kurashige, Yuki; Yanai, Takeshi; Hayami, Shinya; Praneeth, Vijayendran K. K.; Yoshida, Masaki; Yoneda, Ko; Kawata, Satoshi; Masaoka, Shigeyuki

    2016-02-01

    Although the oxidation of water is efficiently catalysed by the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II (refs 1 and 2), it remains one of the main bottlenecks when aiming for synthetic chemical fuel production powered by sunlight or electricity. Consequently, the development of active and stable water oxidation catalysts is crucial, with heterogeneous systems considered more suitable for practical use and their homogeneous counterparts more suitable for targeted, molecular-level design guided by mechanistic understanding. Research into the mechanism of water oxidation has resulted in a range of synthetic molecular catalysts, yet there remains much interest in systems that use abundant, inexpensive and environmentally benign metals such as iron (the most abundant transition metal in the Earth’s crust and found in natural and synthetic oxidation catalysts). Water oxidation catalysts based on mononuclear iron complexes have been explored, but they often deactivate rapidly and exhibit relatively low activities. Here we report a pentanuclear iron complex that efficiently and robustly catalyses water oxidation with a turnover frequency of 1,900 per second, which is about three orders of magnitude larger than that of other iron-based catalysts. Electrochemical analysis confirms the redox flexibility of the system, characterized by six different oxidation states between FeII5 and FeIII5; the FeIII5 state is active for oxidizing water. Quantum chemistry calculations indicate that the presence of adjacent active sites facilitates O-O bond formation with a reaction barrier of less than ten kilocalories per mole. Although the need for a high overpotential and the inability to operate in water-rich solutions limit the practicality of the present system, our findings clearly indicate that efficient water oxidation catalysts based on iron complexes can be created by ensuring that the system has redox flexibility and contains adjacent water-activation sites.

  1. Concluding remarks: Progress toward the design of solid catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Gates, BC

    2016-01-01

    © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry. The 2016 Faraday Discussion on the topic "Designing New Heterogeneous Catalysts" brought together a group of scientists and engineers to address forefront topics in catalysis and the challenge of catalyst design - which is daunting because of the intrinsic non-uniformity of the surfaces of catalytic materials. "Catalyst design" has taken on a pragmatic meaning which implies the discovery of new and better catalysts on the basis of fundamental understandi...

  2. Cooperative catalysis designing efficient catalysts for synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, René

    2015-01-01

    Written by experts in the field, this is a much-needed overview of the rapidly emerging field of cooperative catalysis. The authors focus on the design and development of novel high-performance catalysts for applications in organic synthesis (particularly asymmetric synthesis), covering a broad range of topics, from the latest progress in Lewis acid / Br?nsted base catalysis to e.g. metal-assisted organocatalysis, cooperative metal/enzyme catalysis, and cooperative catalysis in polymerization reactions and on solid surfaces. The chapters are classified according to the type of cooperating acti

  3. Concluding remarks: progress toward the design of solid catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Bruce C

    2016-07-04

    The 2016 Faraday Discussion on the topic "Designing New Heterogeneous Catalysts" brought together a group of scientists and engineers to address forefront topics in catalysis and the challenge of catalyst design-which is daunting because of the intrinsic non-uniformity of the surfaces of catalytic materials. "Catalyst design" has taken on a pragmatic meaning which implies the discovery of new and better catalysts on the basis of fundamental understanding of the catalyst structure and performance. The presentations and discussion at the meeting illustrate the rapid progress in this understanding linked with improvements in spectroscopy, microscopy, theory, and catalyst performance testing. The following text includes a statement of recurrent themes in the discussion and examples of forefront science that evidences progress toward catalyst design.

  4. Design Principles for Oxygen Reduction and Evolution on Oxide Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao-Horn, Yang

    2012-02-01

    Driven by growing concerns about global warming and the depletion of petroleum resources, developing renewable energy production and storage technologies represent one of the major scientific challenges of the 21^st century. A critical element in pursuit of this quest is the discovery of efficient and cost-effective catalysts used in solar fuel production via electrochemical energy conversion processes such as oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), both of which are central to the efficiencies of direct-solar and electrolytic water-splitting devices, fuel cells, and metal-air batteries. Although the Sabatier's principle provides a qualitative argument in tuning catalytic activity by varying the bond strength between catalyst surface and reactant/product (neither too strong nor too weak leading to the maximum activity at moderate bond strength), it has no predictive power to find catalysts with enhanced activity. Identifying a ``design principle'' that links catalyst properties to the catalytic activity is critical to accelerate the search for highly active catalysts based on abundant elements, and minimize the use of precious metals. Here we establish a molecular principle that governs the activities of oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for oxide catalysts, where the activities primarily correlate to the σ* orbital (``eg'') occupation of surface transition-metal cations established by systematic examination of more than ten to fifteen transition-metal oxides. The intrinsic ORR and OER activities exhibit a volcano-shaped dependence on the eg occupancy and the activities peak at an eg occupancy close to unity. Our findings reflect the critical influence of the σ* orbital on the energetics of surface reaction intermediates on surface transition metal ions such as the O2^2-/OH^- displacement and the OH^- regeneration, and thus highlight the importance of surface oxide electronic structure in controlling

  5. Mesoporous Molecular Sieves as Advanced Supports for Olefin Metathesis Catalysts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balcar, Hynek; Čejka, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 293, č. 1 (2010), s. 43-47 ISSN 1022-1360 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400805; GA AV ČR KAN100400701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : heterogeneous catalysts * mesoporous molecular sieves * olefin metathesis Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  6. Mesoporous molecular sieves as advanced supports for olefin metathesis catalysts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balcar, Hynek; Čejka, Jiří

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 257, 21-22 (2013), s. 3107-3124 ISSN 0010-8545 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400805; GA ČR GBP106/12/G015 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Olefin metathesis * mesoporous molecular sieves * Heterogeneous catalysts Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 12.098, year: 2013

  7. Catalyst design for carbon nanotube growth using atomistic modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pint, Cary L; Bozzolo, Guillermo; Hauge, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The formation and stability of bimetallic catalyst particles, in the framework of carbon nanotube growth, is studied using the Bozzolo-Ferrante-Smith (BFS) method for alloys. Monte Carlo-Metropolis simulations with the BFS method are utilized in order to predict and study equilibrium configurations for nanoscale catalyst particles which are directly relevant to the catalyst state prior to growth of carbon nanotubes. At the forefront of possible catalyst combinations is the popular Fe-Mo bimetallic catalyst, which we have recently studied experimentally. We explain our experimental results, which indicate that the growth observed is dependent on the order of co-catalyst deposition, in the straightforward interpretation of BFS strain and chemical energy contributions toward the formation of Fe-Mo catalyst prior to growth. We find that the competition between the formation of metastable inner Mo cores and clusters of surface-segregated Mo atoms in Fe-Mo catalyst particles influences catalyst formation, and we investigate the role of Mo concentration and catalyst particle size in this process. Finally, we apply the same modeling approach to other prominent bimetallic catalysts and suggest that this technique can be a powerful tool to understand and manipulate catalyst design for highly efficient carbon nanotube growth

  8. Synthesis of a molecularly defined single-active site heterogeneous catalyst for selective oxidation of N-heterocycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujing; Pang, Shaofeng; Wei, Zhihong; Jiao, Haijun; Dai, Xingchao; Wang, Hongli; Shi, Feng

    2018-04-13

    Generally, a homogeneous catalyst exhibits good activity and defined active sites but it is difficult to recycle. Meanwhile, a heterogeneous catalyst can easily be reused but its active site is difficult to reveal. It is interesting to bridge the gap between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis via controllable construction of a heterogeneous catalyst containing defined active sites. Here, we report that a molecularly defined, single-active site heterogeneous catalyst has been designed and prepared via the oxidative polymerization of maleimide derivatives. These polymaleimide derivatives can be active catalysts for the selective oxidation of heterocyclic compounds to quinoline and indole via the recycling of -C=O and -C-OH groups, which was confirmed by tracing the reaction with GC-MS using maleimide as the catalyst and by FT-IR analysis with polymaleimide as the catalyst. These results might promote the development of heterogeneous catalysts with molecularly defined single active sites exhibiting a comparable activity to homogeneous catalysts.

  9. Catalyst design for clean and efficient fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Šaric, Manuel

    of synthesizing dimethyl carbonate electrochemically. Hydrodesulfurization is an industrial refining process in which sulfur is removed from oil in order to reduce SO2 emissions. The study on hydrodesulfurization involves determining the active sites and their atomic scale structure for the industrially used...... cobalt promoted MoS2 catalyst. Reactivity of a series of model molecules, found in oil prior to desulfurization, is studied on cobalt promoted MoS2. Such an approach has the potential to explain the underlying processes involved in the removal of sulfur at each specific site of the catalyst. The goal...... processes currently used. It is found that noble metals can be used as electrocatalysts for the synthesis of dimethyl carbonate, significantly lowering the potential when using copper instead of gold. Besides being active, copper was found to be selective towards dimethyl carbonate. A non-selective catalyst...

  10. Design criteria for stable Pt/C fuel cell catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef C. Meier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Platinum and Pt alloy nanoparticles supported on carbon are the state of the art electrocatalysts in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. To develop a better understanding on how material design can influence the degradation processes on the nanoscale, three specific Pt/C catalysts with different structural characteristics were investigated in depth: a conventional Pt/Vulcan catalyst with a particle size of 3–4 nm and two Pt@HGS catalysts with different particle size, 1–2 nm and 3–4 nm. Specifically, Pt@HGS corresponds to platinum nanoparticles incorporated and confined within the pore structure of the nanostructured carbon support, i.e., hollow graphitic spheres (HGS. All three materials are characterized by the same platinum loading, so that the differences in their performance can be correlated to the structural characteristics of each material. The comparison of the activity and stability behavior of the three catalysts, as obtained from thin film rotating disk electrode measurements and identical location electron microscopy, is also extended to commercial materials and used as a basis for a discussion of general fuel cell catalyst design principles. Namely, the effects of particle size, inter-particle distance, certain support characteristics and thermal treatment on the catalyst performance and in particular the catalyst stability are evaluated. Based on our results, a set of design criteria for more stable and active Pt/C and Pt-alloy/C materials is suggested.

  11. Design of porous nanostructured solid catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildstrøm, Jacob Oskar

    and activity. The basis of the catalyst is the yolk-shell particles consisting of small platinum nanoparticles and a shell of nitrogen doped carbon with graphitic elements. The carbon shell will be activated with potassium hydroxide to generate some microporosity in the shell, to improve the diffusion...

  12. Molecular heterogeneous catalysts derived from bipyridine-based organosilica nanotubes for C-H bond activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengbo; Wang, Hua; Li, Mei; Han, Jinyu; Liu, Xiao; Gong, Jinlong

    2017-06-01

    Heterogeneous metal complex catalysts for direct C-H activation with high activity and durability have always been desired for transforming raw materials into feedstock chemicals. This study described the design and synthesis of one-dimensional organosilica nanotubes containing 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) ligands in the framework (BPy-NT) and their post-synthetic metalation to provide highly active and robust molecular heterogeneous catalysts. By adjusting the ratios of organosilane precursors, very short BPy-NT with ∼50 nm length could be controllably obtained. The post-synthetic metalation of bipyridine-functionalized nanotubes with [IrCp*Cl(μ-Cl)] 2 (Cp* = η 5 -pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) and [Ir(cod)(OMe)] 2 (cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene) afforded solid catalysts, IrCp*-BPy-NT and Ir(cod)-BPy-NT, which were utilized for C-H oxidation of heterocycles and cycloalkanes as well as C-H borylation of arenes. The cut-short nanotube catalysts displayed enhanced activities and durability as compared to the analogous homogeneous catalysts and other conventional heterogeneous catalysts, benefiting from the isolated active sites as well as the fast transport of substrates and products. After the reactions, a detailed characterization of Ir-immobilized BPy-NT via TEM, SEM, nitrogen adsorption, UV/vis, XPS, and 13 C CP MAS NMR indicated the molecular nature of the active species as well as stable structures of nanotube scaffolds. This study demonstrates the potential of BPy-NT with a short length as an integration platform for the construction of efficient heterogeneous catalytic systems for organic transformations.

  13. Chemical Posttranslational Modification with Designed Rhodium(II) Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, S C; Minus, M B; Ball, Z T

    2016-01-01

    Natural enzymes use molecular recognition to perform exquisitely selective transformations on nucleic acids, proteins, and natural products. Rhodium(II) catalysts mimic this selectivity, using molecular recognition to allow selective modification of proteins with a variety of functionalized diazo reagents. The rhodium catalysts and the diazo reactivity have been successfully applied to a variety of protein folds, the chemistry succeeds in complex environments such as cell lysate, and a simple protein blot method accurately assesses modification efficiency. The studies with rhodium catalysts provide a new tool to study and probe protein-binding events, as well as a new synthetic approach to protein conjugates for medical, biochemical, or materials applications. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Design of sintering-stable heterogeneous catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallas-Hulin, Agata

    the crystalline framework of a zeolite creates a steric hindrance against agglomeration into larger clusters. In the present study, experimental protocols for encapsulation of metal nanoparticles inside zeolites were developed. Two different methodologies were proposed to encapsulate gold, palladium and platinum......One of the major issues in the use of metal nanoparticles in heterogeneous catalysis is sintering. Sintering occurs at elevated temperatures because of increased mobility of nanoparticles, leading to their agglomeration and, as a consequence, to the deactivation of the catalyst. It is an emerging...... problem especially for the noble metals-based catalysis. These metals being expensive and scarce, it is worth developing catalyst systems which preserve their activity over time. Encapsulation of nanoparticles inside zeolites is one of the ways to prevent sintering. Entrapment of nanoparticles inside...

  15. Design of a surface alloy catalyst for steam reforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besenbacher, F.; Chorkendorff, Ib; Clausen, B.S.

    1998-01-01

    Detailed studies of elementary chemical processes on well-characterized single crystal surfaces have contributed substantially to the understanding of heterogeneous catalysis. insight into the structure of surface alloys combined with an understanding of the relation between the surface compositi...... and reactivity is shown to lead directly to new ideas for catalyst design, The feasibility of such an approach is illustrated by the synthesis, characterization, and tests of a high-surface area gold-nickel catalyst for steam reforming....

  16. Molecular polypyridine-based metal complexes as catalysts for the reduction of CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elgrishi, Noémie; Chambers, Matthew B; Wang, Xia; Fontecave, Marc

    2017-02-06

    Polypyridyl transition metal complexes represent one of the more thoroughly studied classes of molecular catalysts towards CO 2 reduction to date. Initial reports in the 1980s began with an emphasis on 2nd and 3rd row late transition metals, but more recently the focus has shifted towards earlier metals and base metals. Polypyridyl platforms have proven quite versatile and amenable to studying various parameters that govern product distribution for CO 2 reduction. However, open questions remain regarding the key mechanistic steps that govern product selectivity and efficiency. Polypyridyl complexes have also been immobilized through a variety of methods to afford active catalytic materials for CO 2 reductions. While still an emerging field, materials incorporating molecular catalysts represent a promising strategy for electrochemical and photoelectrochemical devices capable of CO 2 reduction. In general, this class of compounds remains the most promising for the continued development of molecular systems for CO 2 reduction and an inspiration for the design of related non-polypyridyl catalysts.

  17. Direct observation of sequential oxidations of a titania-bound molecular proxy catalyst generated through illumination of molecular sensitizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiang-Yun; Ardo, Shane

    2018-01-01

    Natural photosynthesis uses the energy in sunlight to oxidize or reduce reaction centres multiple times, therefore preparing each reaction centre for a multiple-electron-transfer reaction that will ultimately generate stable reaction products. This process relies on multiple chromophores per reaction centre to quickly generate the active state of the reaction centre and to outcompete deleterious charge recombination. Using a similar design principle, we report spectroscopic evidence for the generation of a twice-oxidized TiO2-bound molecular proxy catalyst after low-intensity visible-light excitation of co-anchored molecular Ru(II)-polypyridyl dyes. Electron transfer from an excited dye to TiO2 generated a Ru(III) state that subsequently and repeatedly reacted with neighbouring Ru(II) dyes via self-exchange electron transfer to ultimately oxidize a distant co-anchored proxy catalyst before charge recombination. The largest yield for twice-oxidized proxy catalysts occurred when they were present at low coverage, suggesting that large dye/electrocatalyst ratios are also desired in dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical cells.

  18. Broadening of molecular weight distribution of polymers synthesized by metallocene-based dual-site catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Joao H.Z. dos; Fisch, Adriano G.; Cardozo, Nilo S.M.; Secchi, Argimiro R.

    2008-01-01

    The main topics related to the use of dual-site catalysts in the production of polymers with broad molecular weight distribution are reviewed. The polymerization using dual-site catalysts is more economical and allows to produce a higher quality product than other processes, such as polymer blend and multistage reactors. However, the formulation of these catalysts is quite complicated since the same catalyst must produce distinct polymer grades. In addition, the release of patents concerning the combination of metallocenes and new technologies for polymerization shows that polymerization processes using dual-site catalysts are of current industrial interest. (author)

  19. Homogeneous Molecular Catalysis of Electrochemical Reactions: Catalyst Benchmarking and Optimization Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costentin, Cyrille; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2017-06-21

    Modern energy challenges currently trigger an intense interest in catalysis of redox reactions-electrochemical and photochemical-particularly those involving small molecules such as water, hydrogen, oxygen, proton, carbon dioxide. A continuously increasing number of molecular catalysts of these reactions, mostly transition metal complexes, have been proposed, rendering necessary procedures for their rational benchmarking and fueling the quest for leading principles that could inspire the design of improved catalysts. The search of "volcano plots" correlating catalysis kinetics to the stability of the key intermediate is a popular approach to the question in catalysis by surface-active sites, with as foremost example the electrochemical reduction of aqueous proton on metal surfaces. We discussed here for the first time, on theoretical and experimental grounds, the pertinence of such an approach in the field of molecular catalysis. This is the occasion to insist on the virtue of careful mechanism assignments. Particular emphasis is put on the interest of expressing the catalysts' intrinsic kinetic properties by means of catalytic Tafel plots, which relate kinetics and overpotential. We also underscore that the principle and strategies put forward for the catalytic activation of the above-mentioned small molecules are general as illustrated by catalytic applications out of this particular field.

  20. Templating Routes to Supported Oxide Catalysts by Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notestein, Justin M. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2016-09-08

    The rational design and understanding of supported oxide catalysts requires at least three advancements, in order of increasing complexity: the ability to quantify the number and nature of active sites in a catalytic material, the ability to place external controls on the number and structure of these active sites, and the ability to assemble these active sites so as to carry out more complex functions in tandem. As part of an individual investigator research program that is integrated with the Northwestern University Institute for Catalysis in Energy Processes (ICEP) as of 2015, significant advances were achieved in these three areas. First, phosphonic acids were utilized in the quantitative assessment of the number of active and geometrically-available sites in MOx-SiO2 catalysts, including nanocrystalline composites, co-condensed materials, and grafted structures, for M=Ti, Zr, Hf, Nb, and Ta. That work built off progress in understanding supported Fe, Cu, and Co oxide catalysts from chelating and/or multinuclear precursors to maximize surface reactivity. Secondly, significant progress was made in the new area of using thin oxide overcoats containing ‘nanocavities’ from organic templates as a method to control the dispersion and thermal stability of subsequently deposited metal nanoparticles or other catalytic domains. Similar methods were used to control surface reactivity in SiO2-Al2O3 acid catalysts and to control reactant selectivity in Al2O3-TiO2 photocatalysts. Finally, knowledge gained from the first two areas has been combined to synthesize a tandem catalyst for hydrotreating reactions and an orthogonal tandem catalyst system where two subsequent reactions in a reaction network are independently controlled by light and heat. Overall, work carried out under this project significantly advanced the knowledge of synthesis-structure-function relationships in supported

  1. Design Innovation Catalysts: Education and Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara Wrigley

    Full Text Available Organizations globally look to design to help them innovate, differentiate, and compete in a changing economic climate. Consequently, design is increasingly being regarded as a dynamic and central tactical business resource. Considering this, the question is raised: how can the specific knowledge and skills of designers be better articulated, understood, implemented, and valued as core components of strategic innovation in businesses? In seeking to answer this question, this paper proposes a new frontier for the design profession, coined the “Design Innovation Catalyst” (DIC. This paper reflects on both extant literature and the teaching of seven DICs embedded in industry, conducting innovation projects run over a twelve to twenty-four month period. This paper reports on a unique set of six capabilities analyzed as being not only essential for the implementation of design-led innovation, but of great assistance in overcoming its associated challenges. This paper outlines the role of these new design professionals, and discusses the value these novel capabilities provide organizations through employing DICs. Furthermore, questions surrounding how designers will develop these new capabilities, and how the design-led innovation framework in application can contribute to the future of design will also be presented.

  2. De novo molecular design

    CERN Document Server

    Schneider, Gisbert

    2013-01-01

    Systematically examining current methods and strategies, this ready reference covers a wide range of molecular structures, from organic-chemical drugs to peptides, Proteins and nucleic acids, in line with emerging new drug classes derived from biomacromolecules. A leader in the field and one of the pioneers of this young discipline has assembled here the most prominent experts from across the world to provide first-hand knowledge. While most of their methods and examples come from the area of pharmaceutical discovery and development, the approaches are equally applicable for chemical probes an

  3. Current advances in precious metal core–shell catalyst design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaohong; He, Beibei; Hu, Zhiyu; Zeng, Zhigang; Han, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Precious metal nanoparticles are commonly used as the main active components of various catalysts. Given their high cost, limited quantity, and easy loss of catalytic activity under severe conditions, precious metals should be used in catalysts at low volumes and be protected from damaging environments. Accordingly, reducing the amount of precious metals without compromising their catalytic performance is difficult, particularly under challenging conditions. As multifunctional materials, core–shell nanoparticles are highly important owing to their wide range of applications in chemistry, physics, biology, and environmental areas. Compared with their single-component counterparts and other composites, core–shell nanoparticles offer a new active interface and a potential synergistic effect between the core and shell, making these materials highly attractive in catalytic application. On one hand, when a precious metal is used as the shell material, the catalytic activity can be greatly improved because of the increased surface area and the closed interfacial interaction between the core and the shell. On the other hand, when a precious metal is applied as the core material, the catalytic stability can be remarkably improved because of the protection conferred by the shell material. Therefore, a reasonable design of the core–shell catalyst for target applications must be developed. We summarize the latest advances in the fabrications, properties, and applications of core–shell nanoparticles in this paper. The current research trends of these core–shell catalysts are also highlighted. PMID:27877695

  4. Coupling molecular catalysts with nanostructured surfaces for efficient solar fuel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tong

    Solar fuel generation via carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction is a promising approach to meet the increasing global demand for energy and to minimize the impact of energy consumption on climate change. However, CO2 is thermodynamically stable; its activation often requires the use of appropriate catalysts. In particular, molecular catalysts with well-defined structures and tunability have shown excellent activity in photochemical CO2 reduction. These homogenous catalysts, however, suffer from poor stability under photochemical conditions and difficulty in recycling from the reaction media. Heterogenized molecular catalysts, particularly those prepared by coupling molecular catalysts with solid-state surfaces, have attracted more attention in recent years as potential solutions to address the issues associated with molecular catalysts. In this work, solar CO2 reduction is investigated using systems coupling molecular catalysts with robust nanostructured surfaces. In Chapter 2, heterogenization of macrocyclic cobalt(III) and nickel (II) complexes on mesoporous silica surface was achieved by different methods. Direct ligand derivatization significantly lowered the catalytic activity of Co(III) complex, while grafting the Co(III) complex onto silica surface through Si-O-Co linkage resulted in hybrid catalysts with excellent activity in CO2 reduction in the presence of p-terphenyl as a molecular photosensitizer. An interesting loading effect was observed, in which the optimal activity was achieved at a medium Co(III) surface density. Heterogenization of the Ni(II) complex on silica surface has also been implemented, the poor photocatalytic activity of the hybrid catalyst can be attributed to the intrinsic nature of the homogeneous analogue. This study highlighted the importance of appropriate linking strategies in preparing functional heterogenized molecular catalysts. Coupling molecular complexes with light-harvesting surfaces could avoid the use of expensive molecular

  5. Mesoporous Molecular Sieves Based Catalysts for Olefin Metathesis and Metathesis Polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcar, Hynek; Čejka, Jiří

    Heterogeneous catalysts for olefin metathesis using different types of (i) siliceous mesoporous molecular sieves, and (ii) organized mesoporous alumina as supports are reported. The catalysts were prepared either by spreading of transition metal oxidic phase on the support surface or by immobilizing transition metal compounds (mostly organometallic) on the support. The activity of these catalysts in various types of metathesis reactions (i.e. alkene and diene metathesis, metathesis of unsaturated esters and ethers, RCM, ROMP and metathesis polymerization of alkynes) was described. The main advantages of these catalysts consist generally in their high activity and selectivity, easy separation of catalysts from reaction products and the preparation of products free of catalyst residue. The examples of pore size influence on the selectivity in metathesis reactions are also given.

  6. Catalysis Science Initiative: Catalyst Design by Discovery Informatics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgass, William Nicholas [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Abu-Omar, Mahdi [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States) Department of Chemistry; Caruthers, James [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Ribeiro, Fabio [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Thomson, Kendall [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Schneider, William [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2016-07-08

    Catalysts selectively enhance the rates of chemical reactions toward desired products. Such reactions provide great benefit to society in major commercial sectors such as energy production, protecting the environment, and polymer products and thereby contribute heavily to the country’s gross national product. Our premise is that the level of fundamental understanding of catalytic events at the atomic and molecular scale has reached the point that more predictive methods can be developed to shorten the cycle time to new processes. The field of catalysis can be divided into two regimes: heterogeneous and homogeneous. For the heterogeneous catalysis regime, we have used the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction (CO + H2O + CO2 + H2O) over supported metals as a test bed. Detailed analysis and strong coupling of theory with experiment have led to the following conclusions: • The sequence of elementary steps goes through a COOH intermediate • The CO binding energy is a strong function of coverage of CO adsorbed on the surface in many systems • In the case of Au catalysts, the CO adsorption is generally too weak on surface with close atomic packing, but the enhanced binding at corner atoms (which are missing bonding partners) of cubo-octahedral nanoparticles increases the energy to a near optimal value and produces very active catalysts. • Reaction on the metal alone cannot account for the experimental results. The reaction is dual functional with water activation occurring at the metal-support interface. It is clear from our work that the theory component is essential, not only for prediction of new systems, but also for reconciling data and testing hypotheses regarding potential descriptors. Particularly important is the finding that the interface between nano-sized metal particles and the oxides that are used to support them represent a new state of matter in the sense that the interfacial bonding perturbs the chemical state of both metals atoms and the support

  7. The role of reticular chemistry in the design of CO2 reduction catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diercks, Christian S.; Liu, Yuzhong; Cordova, Kyle E.; Yaghi, Omar M.

    2018-02-01

    The problem with current state-of-the-art catalysts for CO2 photo- or electroreduction is rooted in the notion that no single system can independently control, and thus optimize, the interplay between activity, selectivity and efficiency. At its core, reticular chemistry is recognized for its ability to control, with atomic precision, the chemical and structural features (activity and selectivity) as well as the output optoelectronic properties (efficiency) of porous, crystalline materials. The molecular building blocks that are in a reticular chemist's toolbox are chosen in such a way that the structures are rationally designed, framework chemistry is performed to integrate catalytically active components, and the manner in which these building blocks are connected endows the material with the desired optoelectronic properties. The fact that these aspects can be fine-tuned independently lends credence to the prospect of reticular chemistry contributing to the design of next-generation CO2 reduction catalysts.

  8. Synthesis of cerium oxide catalysts supported on MCM-41 molecular sieve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, E.L.S.; Barros, T.R.B.; Sousa, B.V. de

    2016-01-01

    Porous materials have been widely studied as catalysts and catalyst support. The MCM-41 structure is the one that has been most studied because of its application possibilities in chemical processes. This work aimed to obtain and characterize cerium oxide catalysts supported on MCM-41 molecular sieve. The molecular sieve was synthesized by the conventional method with the following molar composition: 1 SiO2: 0.30 CTABr: NH3 11: 144 H2O. Then, 25% w/w cerium was incorporated into the MCM-41 using the wet impregnation process and the material obtained was activated by calcination. From the XRD patterns was confirmed the structure of the molecular sieve, and were identified the cerium oxide phases in its structure. The textural catalysts characteristics were investigated by isotherms of N2 adsorption/desorption (BET method). (author)

  9. Highly efficient bioinspired molecular Ru water oxidation catalysts with negatively charged backbone ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lele; Wang, Lei; Li, Fusheng; Li, Fei; Sun, Licheng

    2015-07-21

    The oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of the natural photosynthesis system II (PSII) oxidizes water to produce oxygen and reducing equivalents (protons and electrons). The oxygen released from PSII provides the oxygen source of our atmosphere; the reducing equivalents are used to reduce carbon dioxide to organic products, which support almost all organisms on the Earth planet. The first photosynthetic organisms able to split water were proposed to be cyanobacteria-like ones appearing ca. 2.5 billion years ago. Since then, nature has chosen a sustainable way by using solar energy to develop itself. Inspired by nature, human beings started to mimic the functions of the natural photosynthesis system and proposed the concept of artificial photosynthesis (AP) with the view to creating energy-sustainable societies and reducing the impact on the Earth environments. Water oxidation is a highly energy demanding reaction and essential to produce reducing equivalents for fuel production, and thereby effective water oxidation catalysts (WOCs) are required to catalyze water oxidation and reduce the energy loss. X-ray crystallographic studies on PSII have revealed that the OEC consists of a Mn4CaO5 cluster surrounded by oxygen rich ligands, such as oxyl, oxo, and carboxylate ligands. These negatively charged, oxygen rich ligands strongly stabilize the high valent states of the Mn cluster and play vital roles in effective water oxidation catalysis with low overpotential. This Account describes our endeavors to design effective Ru WOCs with low overpotential, large turnover number, and high turnover frequency by introducing negatively charged ligands, such as carboxylate. Negatively charged ligands stabilized the high valent states of Ru catalysts, as evidenced by the low oxidation potentials. Meanwhile, the oxygen production rates of our Ru catalysts were improved dramatically as well. Thanks to the strong electron donation ability of carboxylate containing ligands, a seven

  10. The design and manufacture of the catalyst test equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, J. H.; Song, I. T. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    The object of this report is to design and manufacture of the catalyst test equipment for removing tritium(H3) included in heavy water for the heavy water reactor. The design conditions of the reactor with the test equipment are summarized as follows 1) Flow rate : 336 l/min. 2) Pressure : 1.15kg/cm{sup 2}. 3) Maximum Temperature : 80 deg C. The test equipment is composed of the water jacket reactor, water equilibrator, heaters, condensers, tanks and pumps. As well as, it is composed of the water, hydrogen, helium, vacuum, emergency operation and control systems. This report will be used important data for the design and manufacture of the equipment for removing tritium. 30 tabs. (Author)

  11. Hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde over Pt-modified molecular sieve catalysts

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájek, J.; Kumar, N.; Francová, D.; Paseka, Ivo; Maki-Arvela, P.; Salmi, T.; Murzin, DY.

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 12 (2004), s. 1290-1295 ISSN 0930-7516 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/03/0409 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : liquid-phase hydrogenation * Y-zeolite catalysts * selective hydrogenation Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 0.791, year: 2004

  12. The Design of Reactions, Catalysts and Materials with Aromatic Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandar, Jeffrey Scott

    This thesis details the use of aromatic ions, especially aminocyclopropenium ions, as empowering design elements in the development of new chemical reactions, organic catalysts and polymeric materials. A particular focus is placed throughout on understanding the relationship between the structure of aromatic ions and their performance in these novel applications. Additionally, the benefits that aromatic ions provide in these contexts are highlighted. The first chapter briefly summarizes the Lambert Group's prior efforts toward exploiting the unique reactivity profiles of aromatic ions in the context of new reaction design. Also provided in the first chapter is a comprehensive literature review of aminocyclopropenium ions, upon which the majority of advances described in this thesis are based. To set the stage for the first application of aminocyclopropenium ions, Chapter 2 provides an account of existing highly Bronsted basic functional groups, including guanidines, proazaphosphatranes and iminophosphoranes. The provided review on the synthesis and use in asymmetric catalysis of these bases indicates that there is a high need for conceptually new Bronsted basic functional groups. To address this need, the development of chiral 2,3-bis(dialkylamino)cyclopropenimines as a new platform for asymmetric Bronsted base catalysis is described in Chapter 3. This new class of Bronsted base is readily synthesized on scale, operates efficiently under practical conditions, and greatly outperforms closely related guanidine-based catalysts. Structure-activity relationship studies, mechanistic experiments and computational transition state modeling are all discussed in the context of asymmetric glycinate imine Michael reactions in order to arrive at a working model for cyclopropenimine chemistry. Cumulatively, this chapter provides a "user's guide" to understanding and developing further applications of 2,3-bis(dialkylamino)cyclopropenimines. The use of our optimal chiral 2,3-bis

  13. Designing Catalysts for Clean Technology, Green Chemistry, and Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meurig Thomas, John; Raja, Robert

    2005-08-01

    There is a pressing need for cleaner fuels (free or aromatics and of minimal sulfur content) or ones that convert chemical energy directly to electricity, silently and without production of noxious oxides and particulates; chemical, petrochemical and pharmaceutical processes that may be conducted in a one-step, solvent-free manner and that use air as the preferred oxidant; and industrial processes that minimize consumption of energy, production of waste, or the use of corrosive, explosive, volatile, and nonbiodegradable materials. All these needs and other desiderata, such as the in situ production and containment of aggressive and hazardous reagents, and the avoidance of use of ecologically harmful elements, may be achieved by designing the appropriate heterogeneous inorganic catalyst, which ideally should be cheap, readily preparable and fully characterizable, preferably under in situ reaction conditions. A range of nanoporous and nanoparticle catalysts that meet most of the stringent demands of sustainable development and responsible (clean) technology is described. Specific examples that are highlighted include the production of adipic acid (precursor of polyamides and urethanes) without the use of concentrated nitric acid nor the production of greenhouse gases such as nitrous oxide; the production of caprolactam (precursor of nylon) without the use of oleum and hydroxylamine sulfate; and the terminal oxyfunctionalization of linear alkanes in air. The topic of biocatalysis and sustainable development is also briefly discussed for the epoxidation of terpenes and fatty acid methyl esters; for the generation of polymers, polylactides, and polyesters; and for the production of 1,3-propanediol from corn.

  14. Optimal catalyst curves: Connecting density functional theory calculations with industrial reactor design and catalyst selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, C.J.H.; Dahl, Søren; Boisen, A.

    2002-01-01

    For ammonia synthesis catalysts a volcano-type relationship has been found experimentally. We demonstrate that by combining density functional theory calculations with a microkinetic model the position of the maximum of the volcano curve is sensitive to the reaction conditions. The catalytic...... ammonia synthesis activity, to a first approximation, is a function only of the binding energy of nitrogen to the catalyst. Therefore, it is possible to evaluate which nitrogen binding energy is optimal under given reaction conditions. This leads to the concept of optimal catalyst curves, which illustrate...... the nitrogen binding energies of the optimal catalysts at different temperatures, pressures, and synthesis gas compositions. Using this concept together with the ability to prepare catalysts with desired binding energies it is possible to optimize the ammonia process. In this way a link between first...

  15. Oxidations of amines with molecular oxygen using bifunctional gold–titania catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, Søren Kegnæs; Egeblad, Kresten; Mentzel, Uffe Vie

    2008-01-01

    Over the past decades it has become clear that supported gold nanoparticles are surprisingly active and selective catalysts for several green oxidation reactions of oxygen-containing hydrocarbons using molecular oxygen as the stoichiometric oxidant. We here report that bifunctional gold...

  16. Hoveyda–Grubbs first generation type catalyst immobilized on mesoporous molecular sieves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pastva, Jakub; Čejka, Jiří; Žilková, Naděžda; Mestek, O.; Rangus, M.; Balcar, Hynek

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 378, NOV 2013 (2013), s. 184-192 ISSN 1381-1169 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400805 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Hoveyda–Grubbs type catalysts * Olefin metathesis * Mesoporous molecular sieves Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.679, year: 2013

  17. Optimal catalyst curves: Connecting density functional theory calculations with industrial reactor design and catalyst selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, C.J.H.; Dahl, Søren; Boisen, A.

    2002-01-01

    For ammonia synthesis catalysts a volcano-type relationship has been found experimentally. We demonstrate that by combining density functional theory calculations with a microkinetic model the position of the maximum of the volcano curve is sensitive to the reaction conditions. The catalytic...... ammonia synthesis activity, to a first approximation, is a function only of the binding energy of nitrogen to the catalyst. Therefore, it is possible to evaluate which nitrogen binding energy is optimal under given reaction conditions. This leads to the concept of optimal catalyst curves, which illustrate...

  18. 08-ERD-071 Final Report: New Molecular Probes and Catalysts for Bioenergy Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelen, M P; Rowe, A A; Siebers, A K; Jiao, Y

    2011-03-07

    A major thrust in bioenergy research is to develop innovative methods for deconstructing plant cell wall polymers, such as cellulose and lignin, into simple monomers that can be biologically converted to ethanol and other fuels. Current techniques for monitoring a broad array of cell wall materials and specific degradation products are expensive and time consuming. To monitor various polymers and assay their breakdown products, molecular probes for detecting specific carbohydrates and lignins are urgently needed. These new probes would extend the limited biochemical techniques available, and enable realtime imaging of ultrastructural changes in plant cells. Furthermore, degradation of plant biomass could be greatly accelerated by the development of catalysts that can hydrolyze key cell wall polysaccharides and lignin. The objective of this project was to develop cheap and efficient DNA reagents (aptamers) used to detect and quantify polysaccharides, lignin, and relevant products of their breakdown. A practical goal of the research was to develop electrochemical aptamer biosensors, which could be integrated into microfluidic devices and used for high-throughput screening of enzymes or biological systems that degrade biomass. Several important model plant cell wall polymers and compounds were targeted for specific binding and purification of aptamers, which were then tested by microscopic imaging, circular dichroism, surface plasmon resonance, fluorescence anisotropy, and electrochemical biosensors. Using this approach, it was anticiated that we could provide a basis for more efficient and economically viable biofuels, and the technologies established could be used to design molecular tools that recognize targets sought in medicine or chemical and biological defense projects.

  19. Toward Catalyst Design from Theoretical Calculations (464th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Ping (BNL Chemistry Dept)

    2010-12-15

    Catalysts have been used to speed up chemical reactions as long as yeast has been used to make bread rise. Today, catalysts are used everywhere from home kitchens to industrial chemical factories. In the near future, new catalysts being developed at Brookhaven Lab may be used to speed us along our roads and highways as they play a major role in solving the world’s energy challenges. During the lecture, Liu will discuss how theorists and experimentalists at BNL are working together to formulate and test new catalysts that could be used in real-life applications, such as hydrogen-fuel cells that may one day power our cars and trucks.

  20. Current Issues in Molecular Catalysis Illustrated by Iron Porphyrins as Catalysts of the CO2-to-CO Electrochemical Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costentin, Cyrille; Robert, Marc; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2015-12-15

    Recent attention aroused by the reduction of carbon dioxide has as main objective the production of useful products, the "solar fuels", in which solar energy would be stored. One route to this goal is the design of photochemical schemes that would operate this conversion using directly sun light energy. An indirect approach consists in first converting sunlight energy into electricity then using it to reduce CO2 electrochemically. Conversion of carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide is thus a key step through the classical dihydrogen-reductive Fischer-Tropsch chemistry. Direct and catalytic electrochemical CO2 reduction already aroused active interest during the 1980-1990 period. The new wave of interest for these matters that has been growing since 2012 is in direct conjunction with modern energy issues. Among molecular catalysts, electrogenerated Fe(0) porphyrins have proved to be particularly efficient and robust. Recent progress in this field has closely associated the search of more and more efficient catalysts in the iron porphyrin family with an unprecedentedly rigorous deciphering of mechanisms. Accordingly, the coupling of proton transfer with electron transfer and breaking of one of the two C-O bonds of CO2 have been the subjects of relentless scrutiny and mechanistic analysis with systematic investigation of the degree of concertedness of these three events. Catalysis of the electrochemical CO2-to-CO conversion has thus been a good testing ground for the mechanism diagnostic strategies and the all concerted reactivity model proposed then. The role of added Brönsted acids, both as H-bond providers and proton donors, has been elucidated. These efforts have been a preliminary to the inclusion of the acid functionalities within the catalyst molecule, giving rise to considerable increase of the catalytic efficiency. The design of more and more efficient catalysts made it necessary to propose "catalytic Tafel plots" relating the turnover frequency to the

  1. Catalysis by Design: Well-Defined Single-Site Heterogeneous Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Pelletier, Jeremie

    2016-03-09

    ConspectusHeterogeneous catalysis, a field important industrially and scientifically, is increasingly seeking and refining strategies to render itself more predictable. The main issue is due to the nature and the population of catalytically active sites. Their number is generally low to very low, their "acid strengths" or " redox properties" are not homogeneous, and the material may display related yet inactive sites on the same material. In many heterogeneous catalysts, the discovery of a structure-activity reationship is at best challenging. One possible solution is to generate single-site catalysts in which most, if not all, of the sites are structurally identical. Within this context and using the right tools, the catalyst structure can be designed and well-defined, to reach a molecular understanding. It is then feasible to understand the structure-activity relationship and to develop predictable heterogeneous catalysis. Single-site well-defined heterogeneous catalysts can be prepared using concepts and tools of surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC). This approach operates by reacting organometallic compounds with surfaces of highly divided oxides (or of metal nanoparticles). This strategy has a solid track record to reveal structure-activity relationship to the extent that it is becoming now quite predictable. Almost all elements of the periodical table have been grafted on surfaces of oxides (from simple oxides such as silica or alumina to more sophisticated materials regarding composition or porosity).Considering catalytic hydrocarbon transformations, heterogeneous catalysis outcome may now be predicted based on existing mechanistic proposals and the rules of molecular chemistry (organometallic, organic) associated with some concepts of surface sciences. A thorough characterization of the grafted metal centers must be carried out using tools spanning from molecular organometallic or surface chemistry. By selection of the metal, its ligand set, and the

  2. Catalysis by Design: Well-Defined Single-Site Heterogeneous Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jérémie D A; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2016-04-19

    Heterogeneous catalysis, a field important industrially and scientifically, is increasingly seeking and refining strategies to render itself more predictable. The main issue is due to the nature and the population of catalytically active sites. Their number is generally low to very low, their "acid strengths" or " redox properties" are not homogeneous, and the material may display related yet inactive sites on the same material. In many heterogeneous catalysts, the discovery of a structure-activity reationship is at best challenging. One possible solution is to generate single-site catalysts in which most, if not all, of the sites are structurally identical. Within this context and using the right tools, the catalyst structure can be designed and well-defined, to reach a molecular understanding. It is then feasible to understand the structure-activity relationship and to develop predictable heterogeneous catalysis. Single-site well-defined heterogeneous catalysts can be prepared using concepts and tools of surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC). This approach operates by reacting organometallic compounds with surfaces of highly divided oxides (or of metal nanoparticles). This strategy has a solid track record to reveal structure-activity relationship to the extent that it is becoming now quite predictable. Almost all elements of the periodical table have been grafted on surfaces of oxides (from simple oxides such as silica or alumina to more sophisticated materials regarding composition or porosity). Considering catalytic hydrocarbon transformations, heterogeneous catalysis outcome may now be predicted based on existing mechanistic proposals and the rules of molecular chemistry (organometallic, organic) associated with some concepts of surface sciences. A thorough characterization of the grafted metal centers must be carried out using tools spanning from molecular organometallic or surface chemistry. By selection of the metal, its ligand set, and the support taken

  3. Neutral nickel ethylene oligo- and polymerization catalysts: towards computational catalyst prediction and design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyndrickx, Wouter; Occhipinti, Giovanni; Jensen, Vidar R

    2014-06-23

    DFT calculations have been used to elucidate the chain termination mechanisms for neutral nickel ethylene oligo- and polymerization catalysts and to rationalize the kind of oligomers and polymers produced by each catalyst. The catalysts studied are the (κ(2)-O,O)-coordinated (1,1,1,5,5,5-hexafluoro-2,4-acetylacetonato)nickel catalyst I, the (κ(2)-P,O)-coordinated SHOP-type nickel catalyst II, the (κ(2)-N,O)-coordinated anilinotropone and salicylaldiminato nickel catalysts III and IV, respectively, and the (κ(2)-P,N)-coordinated phosphinosulfonamide nickel catalyst V. Numerous termination pathways involving β-H elimination and β-H transfer steps have been investigated, and the most probable routes identified. Despite the complexity and multitude of the possible termination pathways, the information most critical to chain termination is contained in only few transition states. In addition, by consideration of the propagation pathway, we have been able to estimate chain lengths and discriminate between oligo- and polymerization catalysts. In agreement with experiment, we found the Gibbs free energy difference between the overall barrier for the most facile propagation and termination pathways to be close to 0 kcal mol(-1) for the ethylene oligomerization catalysts I and V, whereas values of at least 7 kcal mol(-1) in favor of propagation were determined for the polymerization catalysts III and IV. Because of the shared intermediates between the termination and branching pathways, we have been able to identify the preferred cis/trans regiochemistry of β-H elimination and show that a pronounced difference in σ donation of the two bridgehead atoms of the bidentate ligand can suppress hydride formation and thus branching. The degree of rationalization obtained here from a handful of key intermediates and transition states is promising for the use of computational methods in the screening and prediction of new catalysts of the title class. © 2014 WILEY

  4. Tailor-made Molecular Cobalt Catalyst System for the Selective Transformation of Carbon Dioxide to Dialkoxymethane Ethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schieweck, Benjamin G; Klankermayer, Jürgen

    2017-08-28

    Herein a non-precious transition-metal catalyst system for the selective synthesis of dialkoxymethane ethers from carbon dioxide and molecular hydrogen is presented. The development of a tailored catalyst system based on cobalt salts in combination with selected Triphos ligands and acidic co-catalysts enabled a synthetic pathway, avoiding the oxidation of methanol to attain the formaldehyde level of the central CH 2 unit. This unprecedented productivity based on the molecular cobalt catalyst is the first example of a non-precious transition-metal system for this transformation utilizing renewable carbon dioxide sources. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Visible-light-driven methane formation from CO2 with a molecular iron catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Heng; Schmidt, Luciana C; Bonin, Julien; Robert, Marc

    2017-08-03

    Converting CO 2 into fuel or chemical feedstock compounds could in principle reduce fossil fuel consumption and climate-changing CO 2 emissions. One strategy aims for electrochemical conversions powered by electricity from renewable sources, but photochemical approaches driven by sunlight are also conceivable. A considerable challenge in both approaches is the development of efficient and selective catalysts, ideally based on cheap and Earth-abundant elements rather than expensive precious metals. Of the molecular photo- and electrocatalysts reported, only a few catalysts are stable and selective for CO 2 reduction; moreover, these catalysts produce primarily CO or HCOOH, and catalysts capable of generating even low to moderate yields of highly reduced hydrocarbons remain rare. Here we show that an iron tetraphenylporphyrin complex functionalized with trimethylammonio groups, which is the most efficient and selective molecular electro- catalyst for converting CO 2 to CO known, can also catalyse the eight-electron reduction of CO 2 to methane upon visible light irradiation at ambient temperature and pressure. We find that the catalytic system, operated in an acetonitrile solution containing a photosensitizer and sacrificial electron donor, operates stably over several days. CO is the main product of the direct CO 2 photoreduction reaction, but a two-pot procedure that first reduces CO 2 and then reduces CO generates methane with a selectivity of up to 82 per cent and a quantum yield (light-to-product efficiency) of 0.18 per cent. However, we anticipate that the operating principles of our system may aid the development of other molecular catalysts for the production of solar fuels from CO 2 under mild conditions.

  6. Visible-light-driven methane formation from CO2 with a molecular iron catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Heng; Schmidt, Luciana C.; Bonin, Julien; Robert, Marc

    2017-08-01

    Converting CO2 into fuel or chemical feedstock compounds could in principle reduce fossil fuel consumption and climate-changing CO2 emissions. One strategy aims for electrochemical conversions powered by electricity from renewable sources, but photochemical approaches driven by sunlight are also conceivable. A considerable challenge in both approaches is the development of efficient and selective catalysts, ideally based on cheap and Earth-abundant elements rather than expensive precious metals. Of the molecular photo- and electrocatalysts reported, only a few catalysts are stable and selective for CO2 reduction; moreover, these catalysts produce primarily CO or HCOOH, and catalysts capable of generating even low to moderate yields of highly reduced hydrocarbons remain rare. Here we show that an iron tetraphenylporphyrin complex functionalized with trimethylammonio groups, which is the most efficient and selective molecular electro- catalyst for converting CO2 to CO known, can also catalyse the eight-electron reduction of CO2 to methane upon visible light irradiation at ambient temperature and pressure. We find that the catalytic system, operated in an acetonitrile solution containing a photosensitizer and sacrificial electron donor, operates stably over several days. CO is the main product of the direct CO2 photoreduction reaction, but a two-pot procedure that first reduces CO2 and then reduces CO generates methane with a selectivity of up to 82 per cent and a quantum yield (light-to-product efficiency) of 0.18 per cent. However, we anticipate that the operating principles of our system may aid the development of other molecular catalysts for the production of solar fuels from CO2 under mild conditions.

  7. [Synergetic effects of silicon carbide and molecular sieve loaded catalyst on microwave assisted catalytic oxidation of toluene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Hui; Bo, Long-Li; Liu, Hai-Nan; Zhang, Hao; Sun, Jian-Yu; Yang, Li; Cai, Li-Dong

    2013-06-01

    Molecular sieve loaded catalyst was prepared by impregnation method, microwave-absorbing material silicon carbide and the catalyst were investigated for catalytic oxidation of toluene by microwave irradiation. Research work examined effects of silicon carbide and molecular sieve loading Cu-V catalyst's mixture ratio as well as mixed approach changes on degradation of toluene, and characteristics of catalyst were measured through scanning electron microscope, specific surface area test and X-ray diffraction analysis. The result showed that the fixed bed reactor had advantages of both thermal storage property and low-temperature catalytic oxidation when 20% silicon carbide was filled at the bottom of the reactor, and this could effectively improve the utilization of microwave energy as well as catalytic oxidation efficiency of toluene. Under microwave power of 75 W and 47 W, complete-combustion temperatures of molecular sieve loaded Cu-V catalyst and Cu-V-Ce catalyst to toluene were 325 degrees C and 160 degrees C, respectively. Characteristics of the catalysts showed that mixture of rare-earth element Ce increased the dispersion of active components in the surface of catalyst, micropore structure of catalyst effectively guaranteed high adsorption capacity for toluene, while amorphous phase of Cu and V oxides increased the activity of catalyst greatly.

  8. Mechanism-Based Design of Green Oxidation Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybak-Akimova, Elena [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    2015-03-16

    In modern era of scarce resources, developing chemical processes that can eventually generate useful materials and fuels from readily available, simple, cheap, renewable starting materials is of paramount importance. Small molecules, such as dioxygen, dinitrogen, water, or carbon dioxide, can be viewed as ideal sources of oxygen, nitrogen, or carbon atoms in synthetic applications. Living organisms perfected the art of utilizing small molecules in biosynthesis and in generating energy; photosynthesis, which couples carbohydrate synthesis from carbon dioxide with photocatalytic water splitting, is but one impressive example of possible catalytic processes. Small molecule activation in synthetic systems remains challenging, and current efforts are focused on developing catalytic reactions that can convert small molecules into useful building blocks for generating more complicated organic molecules, including fuels. Modeling nature is attractive in many respects, including the possibility to use non-toxic, earth-abundant metals in catalysis. Specific systems investigated in our work include biomimetic catalytic oxidations with dioxygen, hydrogen peroxide, and related oxygen atom donors. More recently, a new direction was been also pursued in the group, fixation of carbon dioxide with transition metal complexes. Mechanistic understanding of biomimetic metal-catalyzed oxidations is critical for the design of functional models of metalloenzymes, and ultimately for the rational synthesis of useful, selective and efficient oxidation catalysts utilizing dioxygen and hydrogen peroxide as terminal oxidants. All iron oxidases and oxygenases (both mononuclear and dinuclear) utilize metal-centered intermediates as reactive species in selective substrate oxidation. In contrast, free radical pathways (Fenton chemistry) are common for traditional inorganic iron compounds, producing hydroxyl radicals as very active, non-selective oxidants. Recent developments, however, changed this

  9. Development of group IV molecular catalysts for high temperature ethylene-α-olefin copolymerization reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosin, Jerzy; Fontaine, Philip P; Figueroa, Ruth

    2015-07-21

    This Account describes our research related to the development of molecular catalysts for solution phase olefin polymerization. Specifically, a series of constrained geometry and nonmetallocene (imino-amido-type) complexes were developed for high temperature olefin polymerization reactions. We have discovered many highly active catalysts that are capable of operating at temperatures above 120 °C and producing copolymers with a useful range of molecular weights (from medium to ultrahigh depending on precatalyst identity and polymerization conditions) and α-olefin incorporation capability. Constrained geometry catalysts (CGCs) exhibit very high activities and are capable of producing a variety of copolymers including ethylene-propylene and ethylene-1-octene copolymers at high reactor temperatures. Importantly, CGCs have much higher reactivity toward α-olefins than classical Ziegler-Natta catalysts, thus allowing for the production of copolymers with any desired level of comonomer. In search of catalysts with improved performance, we discovered 3-amino-substituted indenyl-based CGCs that exhibit the highest activity and produce copolymers with the highest molecular weight within this family of catalysts. Phenanthrenyl-based CGCs were found to be outstanding catalysts for the effective production of high styrene content ethylene-styrene copolymers under industrially relevant conditions. In contrast to CGC ligands, imino-amido-type ligands are bidentate and monoionic, leading to the use of trialkyl group IV precatalysts. The thermal instability of imino-amido complexes was addressed by the development of imino-enamido and amidoquinoline complexes, which are not only thermally very robust, but also produce copolymers with higher molecular weights, and exhibit improved α-olefin incorporation. Imido-amido and imino-enamido catalysts undergo facile chain transfer reactions with metal alkyls, as evidenced by a sharp decrease in polymer molecular weight when the

  10. Molecular metal-Oxo catalysts for generating hydrogen from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jeffrey R; Chang, Christopher J; Karunadasa, Hemamala I

    2015-02-24

    A composition of matter suitable for the generation of hydrogen from water is described, the positively charged cation of the composition having the general formula [(PY5W.sub.2)MO].sup.2+, wherein PY5W.sub.2 is (NC.sub.5XYZ)(NC.sub.5H.sub.4).sub.4C.sub.2W.sub.2, M is a transition metal, and W, X, Y, and Z can be H, R, a halide, CF.sub.3, or SiR.sub.3, where R can be an alkyl or aryl group. The two accompanying counter anions, in one embodiment, can be selected from the following Cl.sup.-, I.sup.-, PF.sub.6.sup.-, and CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-. In embodiments of the invention, water, such as tap water containing electrolyte or straight sea water can be subject to an electric potential of between 1.0 V and 1.4 V relative to the standard hydrogen electrode, which at pH 7 corresponds to an overpotential of 0.6 to 1.0 V, with the result being, among other things, the generation of hydrogen with an optimal turnover frequency of ca. 1.5 million mol H.sub.2/mol catalyst per h.

  11. Nanostructured platinum-free electrocatalysts in alkaline direct alcohol fuel cells: catalyst design, principles and applications

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ozoemena, Kenneth I

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available and anode reactions of ADAFCs. This review is an attempt to find answers to questions such as “Why should I use a particular catalyst for the ADAFC?”, “What are the underlying principles that must inform my choice in designing such a catalyst?”, and “What...

  12. Chiral bicycle imidazole nucleophilic catalysts: rational design, facile synthesis, and successful application in asymmetric Steglich rearrangement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenfeng; Xie, Fang; Jia, Jia; Zhang, Wanbin

    2010-11-17

    A new type of chiral bicycle imidazole nucleophilic catalyst was rationally designed, facilely synthesized, and successfully applied in an asymmetric Steglich rearrangement with good to excellent yield and enantioselectivity at ambient temperature. Moreover, it can be easily recycled with almost no reduction of catalytic efficiency. This is the first example for the successful chiral imidazole nucleophilic catalyst without H-bonding assistance.

  13. Kinetics assisted design of catalysts for coal liquefaction. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, M.T.; Foley, H.C.; Calkins, W.H.; Scouten, C.

    1998-02-01

    The thermal and catalytic reactions of 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl (NBBM), a resid and coal model compound, were examined. Catalytic reaction of NBBM was carried out at 400 C under hydrogen with a series of transition metal-based catalytic materials including Fe(CO){sub 4}PPh{sub 3}, Fe(CO){sub 3}(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2}, Fe(CO){sub 2}(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2}CS{sub 2}, Fe(CO){sub 5}, Mo(CO){sub 6}, Mn{sub 2}(CO){sub 10}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MoS{sub 2}. Experimental findings and derived mechanistic insights were organized into molecular-level reaction models for NBBM pyrolysis and catalysis. Hydropyrolysis and catalysis reaction families occurring during NBBM hydropyrolysis at 420 C were summarized in the form of reaction matrices which, upon exhaustive application to the components of the reacting system, yielded the mechanistic reaction model. Each reaction family also had an associated linear free energy relationship (LFER) which provided an estimate of the rate constant k{sub i} given a structural property of species i or its reaction. Including the catalytic reaction matrices with those for the pyrolysis model provided a comprehensive NBBM catalytic reaction model and allowed regression of fundamental LFER parameters for the catalytic reaction families. The model also allowed specification of the property of an optimal catalyst. Iron, molybdenum and palladium were predicted to be most effective for model compound consumption. Due to the low costs associated with iron and its disposal, it is a good choice for coal liquefaction catalysis and the challenge remains to synthesize small particles able to access the full surface area of the coal macromolecule.

  14. Nanocasting Design and Spatially Selective Sulfonation of Polystyrene-Based Polymer Networks as Solid Acid Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Felix H; Sahraoui, Laila; Schüth, Ferdi

    2016-09-12

    Nanocasting is a general and widely applied method in the generation of porous materials during which a sacrificial solid template is used as a mold on the nanoscale. Ideally, the resulting structure is the inverse of the template. However, replication is not always as direct as anticipated, so the influences of the degree of pore filling and of potential restructuring processes after removal of the template need to be considered. These apparent limitations give rise to opportunities in the synthesis of poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) (PSD) polymer networks of widely varying porosities (BET surface area=63-562 m(2)  g(-1) ; Vtot =0.18-1.05 cm(3)  g(-1) ) by applying a single synthesis methodology. In addition, spatially selective sulfonation on the nanoscale seems possible. Together, nanocasting and sulfonation enable rational catalyst design. The highly porous nanocast and predominantly surface-sulfonated PSD networks approach the activity of the corresponding molecular catalyst, para-toluenesulfonic acid, and exceed those of commercial ion-exchange polymers in the depolymerization of macromolecular inulin. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Grubbs Catalysts Immobilized on Mesoporous Molecular Sieves via Phosphine and Pyridine Linkers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bek, David; Balcar, Hynek; Žilková, Naděžda; Zukal, Arnošt; Horáček, Michal; Čejka, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 1, č. 7 (2011), s. 709-718 ISSN 2155-5435 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400805; GA AV ČR KAN100400701; GA ČR GD203/08/H032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : Grubbs catalyst * mesoporous molecular sieves * olefin metathesis Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  16. Effect of water vapour on the molecular structures of supported vanadium oxide catalysts at elevated temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jehng, Jih-Mirn; Deo, G.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of water vapor on the molecular structures of V2O3-supported catalysts (SiO2, Al2o3, TiO2, and CeO2) was investigated by in situ Raman spectroscopy as a function of temperature (from 500°C to 120°C). Under dry conditions only isolated surface VO4 species are present on the dehydrated SiO2

  17. A Robust Molecular Catalyst Generated In Situ for Photo- and Electrochemical Water Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younus, Hussein A; Ahmad, Nazir; Chughtai, Adeel H; Vandichel, Matthias; Busch, Michael; Van Hecke, Kristof; Yusubov, Mekhman; Song, Shaoxian; Verpoort, Francis

    2017-03-09

    Water splitting is the key step towards artificial photosystems for solar energy conversion and storage in the form of chemical bonding. The oxidation of water is the bottle-neck of this process that hampers its practical utility; hence, efficient, robust, and easy to make catalytic systems based on cheap and earth-abundant materials are of exceptional importance. Herein, an in situ generated cobalt catalyst, [Co II (TCA) 2 (H 2 O) 2 ] (TCA=1-mesityl-1,2,3-1H-triazole-4-carboxylate), that efficiently conducts photochemical water oxidation under near-neutral conditions is presented. The catalyst showed high stability under photolytic conditions for more than 3 h of photoirradiation. During electrochemical water oxidation, the catalytic system assembled a catalyst film, which proved not to be cobalt oxide/hydroxide as normally expected, but instead, and for the first time, generated a molecular cobalt complex that incorporated the organic ligand bound to cobalt ions. The catalyst film exhibited a low overpotential for electrocatalytic water oxidation (360 mV) and high oxygen evolution peak current densities of 9 and 2.7 mA cm -2 on glassy carbon and indium-doped tin oxide electrodes, respectively, at only 1.49 and 1.39 V (versus a normal hydrogen electrode), respectively, under neutral conditions. This finding, exemplified on the in situ generated cobalt complex, might be applicable to other molecular systems and suggests that the formation of a catalytic film in electrochemical water oxidation experiments is not always an indication of catalyst decomposition and the formation of nanoparticles. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Rapid evaluation of catalysts and MAO activators by kinetics: what controls polymer molecular weight and activity in metallocene/MAO catalysts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiotto, Fabio; Pateraki, Chrysoula; Severn, John R; Friederichs, Nic; Bochmann, Manfred

    2013-07-07

    The influence of methylaluminoxane (MAO) catalyst activators of different concentrations and preparative histories on the performance of 1-hexene polymerisations was investigated by kinetic methods, using rac-Me2Si(2-Me-Benz[e]Ind)2ZrCl2 as the standard catalyst precursor. Fast sampling and analysis allow the time dependence of monomer conversion and the growth of the number-average polymer molecular weight to be determined at a sufficiently short timescale to make this a feasible method for routine catalyst evaluation. Differences in productivity, polymer molecular weight and active species count are shown to be primarily a linear function of the trimethylaluminium concentration. The results in toluene and heptane as solvents are compared; the data show that the inferior performance in heptane is due to a substantially lower active species concentration.

  19. Advanced technologies in biodiesel new advances in designed and optimized catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Islam, Aminul

    2015-01-01

    The inadequacy of fossil fuel is the main driving force of the future sustainable energy around the world. Since heterogeneous catalysis is used in chemical industry for biodiesel production, achieving optimal catalytic performance is a significant issue for chemical engineers and chemists. Enormous attention has been placed in recent years on the selection of heterogeneous catalyst in biodiesel industry, where the catalyst could be facilitated highly selective toward desired products, easily handled, separated from the reaction medium, and subsequently reused. This book stresses an overview on the contributions of tailored solid acid and base catalysts to catalytic biodiesel synthesis, and the in uences of heterogeneous catalyst properties on biodiesel yield in order to develop a better understanding of catalyst design for the green production process as well as practical applications in the biodiesel industry.

  20. Molecular Modeling: A Powerful Tool for Drug Design and Molecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 5. Molecular Modeling: A Powerful Tool for Drug Design and Molecular Docking. Rama Rao Nadendla. General Article Volume 9 Issue 5 May 2004 pp 51-60. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  1. Molecular Modeling: A Powerful Tool for Drug Design and Molecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Molecular modeling has become a valuable and essential tool to medicinal chemists in the drug design process. Molecular modeling describes the generation, manipula- tion or representation of three-dimensional structures of molecules and associated physico-chemical properties. It involves a range of computerized ...

  2. Enhanced Photochemical Hydrogen Production by a Molecular Diiron Catalyst Incorporated into a Metal-Organic Framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pullen, Sonja; Fei, Honghan; Orthaber, Andreas; Cohen, Seth M.; Ott, Sascha [Uppsala; (UCSD)

    2013-12-04

    A molecular proton reduction catalyst [FeFe](dcbdt)(CO)6 (1, dcbdt = 1,4-dicarboxylbenzene-2,3-dithiolate) with structural similarities to [FeFe]-hydrogenase active sites has been incorporated into a highly robust Zr(IV)-based metal–organic framework (MOF) by postsynthetic exchange (PSE). The PSE protocol is crucial as direct solvothermal synthesis fails to produce the functionalized MOF. The molecular integrity of the organometallic site within the MOF is demonstrated by a variety of techniques, including X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In conjunction with [Ru(bpy)3]2+ as a photosensitizer and ascorbate as an electron donor, MOF-[FeFe](dcbdt)(CO)6 catalyzes photochemical hydrogen evolution in water at pH 5. The immobilized catalyst shows substantially improved initial rates and overall hydrogen production when compared to a reference system of complex 1 in solution. Improved catalytic performance is ascribed to structural stabilization of the complex when incorporated in the MOF as well as the protection of reduced catalysts 1 and 12– from undesirable charge recombination with oxidized ascorbate.

  3. Preparation and application of zirconium sulfate supported on SAPO-34 molecular sieve as solid acid catalyst for esterification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Dongyan, E-mail: xdy0156@sina.com; Ma, Hong; Cheng, Fei

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • SAPO-34 supported zirconium sulfate solid acid catalyst was prepared. • Esterification of acetic acid with ethanol can be catalyzed by ZS/SAPO-34. • The hydration of ZS is vital to the acidic property and catalytic performance. • The ZS/SAPO-34 catalyst treated at 200 °C shows good reusability. - Abstract: Zirconium sulfate (ZS) was supported on SAPO-34 molecular sieve by using an incipient wetness impregnation method with zirconium sulfate as the precursor. The as-prepared catalysts were used as solid acid catalyst for esterification reaction of acetic acid with ethanol. The influence of calcination temperature on the acidic property, catalytic activity, and reusability of ZS/SAPO-34 catalysts were mainly investigated. FT-IR, SEM, EDS and TG analysis have been carried out to demonstrate the characteristics of ZS/SAPO-34 catalysts. It was found that the 30 wt%ZS/SAPO-34 catalysts display the property of superacid irrespective of calcination temperature. The ZS/SAPO-34 catalyst treated at 200 °C can enhance the interaction between the supported ZS and SAPO-34 and keep the catalyst remaining substantially active after several reaction cycles. However, further increasing calcination temperature will cause the transfer of ZS from hydrate to anhydrous phase, and thus the decrease of activity.

  4. Efficient production of hydrogen from formic acid using a covalent triazine framework supported molecular catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavykina, A V; Goesten, M G; Kapteijn, F; Makkee, M; Gascon, J

    2015-03-01

    A heterogeneous molecular catalyst based on Ir(III) Cp* (Cp*=pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) attached to a covalent triazine framework (CTF) is reported. It catalyses the production of hydrogen from formic acid with initial turnover frequencies (TOFs) up to 27,000 h(-1) and turnover numbers (TONs) of more than one million in continuous operation. The CTF support, with a Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area of 1800 m(2)  g(-1), was constructed from an optimal 2:1 ratio of biphenyl and pyridine carbonitrile building blocks. Biphenyl building blocks induce mesoporosity and, therefore, facilitate diffusion of reactants and products whereas free pyridinic sites activate formic acid towards β-hydride elimination at the metal, rendering unprecedented rates in hydrogen production. The catalyst is air stable, produces CO-free hydrogen, and is fully recyclable. Hydrogen production rates of more than 60 mol L(-1)  h(-1) were obtained at high catalyst loadings of 16 wt % Ir, making it attractive towards process intensification. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Design of Embedded Metal Catalysts via Reverser Micro-Emulsion System: a Way to Suppress Catalyst Deactivation by Metal Sintering

    KAUST Repository

    AlMana, Noor

    2016-06-19

    The development of highly selective and active, long-lasting, robust, low-cost and environmentally benign catalytic materials is the greatest challenge in the area of catalysis study. In this context, core-shell structures where the active sites are embedded inside the protecting shell have attracted a lot of researchers working in the field of catalysis owing to their enhanced physical and chemical properties suppress catalyst deactivation. Also, a new active site generated at the interface between the core and shell may increases the activity and efficiency of the catalyst in catalytic reactions especially for oxide shells that exhibit redox properties such as TiO2 and CeO2. Moreover, coating oxide layer over metal nanoparticles (NPs) can be designed to provide porosity (micropore/mesopore) that gives selectivity of the various reactants by the different gas diffusion rates. In this thesis, we will discuss the concept of catalyst stabilization against metal sintering by a core-shell system. In particular we will study the mechanistic of forming core-shell particles and the key parameters that can influence the properties and morphology of the Pt metal particle core and SiO2 shell (Pt@SiO2) using the reverse micro-emulsion method. The Pt@SiO2 core-shell catalysts were investigated for low-temperature CO oxidation reaction. The study was further extended to other catalytic applications by varying the composition of the core as well as the chemical nature of the shell material. The Pt NPs were embedded within another oxide matrix such as ZrO2 and TiO2 for CO oxidation reaction. These materials were studied in details to identify the factors governing the coating of the oxide around the metal NPs. Next, a more challenging system, namely, bimetallic Ni9Pt NPs embedded in TiO2 and ZrO2 matrix were investigated for dry reforming of methane reaction at high temperatures. The challenges of designing Ni9Pt@oxide core-shell structure with TiO2 and ZrO2 and their tolerance

  6. Molecular Weight and Structural Properties of Biodegradable PLA Synthesized with Different Catalysts by Direct Melt Polycondensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyung Woo Lee

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Production of biodegradable polylactic acid (PLA from biomassbased lactic acid is widely studied for substituting petro-based plastics or polymers. This study investigated PLA production from commercial lactic acid in a batch reactor by applying a direct melt polycondensation method with two kinds of catalyst, γ-aluminium(III oxide (γ-Al2O3 or zinc oxide (ZnO, in reduced pressure. The molecular weight of the synthesized PLA was determined by capillary viscometry and its structural properties were analyzed by functional group analysis using FT-IR. The yields of polymer production with respect to the theoretical conversion were 47% for γ-Al2O3 and 35% for ZnO. However, the PLA from ZnO had a higher molecular weight (150,600 g/mol than that from γ-Al2O3 (81,400 g/mol. The IR spectra of the synthesized PLA from both catalysts using polycondensation show the same behavior of absorption peaks at wave numbers from 4,500 cm-1 to 500 cm-1, whereas the PLA produced by two other polymerization methods – polycondensation and ring opening polymerization –showed a significant difference in % transmittance intensity pattern as well as peak area absorption at a wave number of 3,500 cm-1 as –OH vibration peak and at 1,750 cm-1 as –C=O carbonyl vibrational peak.

  7. Electro and photo-assisted carbon dioxide reduction on molecular catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stanbury, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The general context of this thesis is on CO 2 valorisation, and recounts fundamental research aimed at finding new molecular catalysts in order to achieve CO 2 conversion. The results obtained provide additional knowledge in view of developing an efficient and selective catalytic CO 2 reduction process. The first chapter begins with the general picture of CO 2 utilisation and contains a bibliographical overview on the use of molecular catalysts for CO 2 photo- and electroreduction. This short review demonstrates the wide variety of transition metal complexes used as catalysts, in particularly those based on rhenium. An analysis on the current state of CO 2 reduction research using molecular catalyst complexes of the manganese carbonyl type is then reported. In Chapter II, the discussion begins with a brief overview of the research developed during this thesis relating to new complexes of the general formula: [Mn(L)(CO) 3 (X)] (X = Br, n = 0 ou CH 3 CN, n = 1; L = terpyridine derivatives). The interest in these complexes is twofold, as their physico-chemical properties give them potential catalytic CO 2 reduction applications, as well as applications in the field relating to controlled CO release molecules. Developing new complexes based on ligands derived from terpy is one of the main routes that were chosen for catalyst performance optimisation and improvement. In this context, Mn complexes were synthesised, their photo- and electrochemical properties were studied in detail, before testing their activity with respect to catalytic CO 2 reduction. The most remarkable result comes from the unique ability of these species to release one of their carbonyl ligands in a controlled fashion, which led to the discovery of novel Mn dicarbonyl complexes which are selective catalysts for CO 2 reduction, and also to new molecules which are applicable in the release of small quantities of CO for therapeutic purposes. Chapter III covers the study of the complex [Mn

  8. Surface Termination of M1 Phase and Rational Design of Propane Ammoxidation Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guliants, Vadim [Univ. of Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2015-02-16

    This final report describes major accomplishments in this research project which has demonstrated that the M1 phase is the only crystalline phase required for propane ammoxidation to acrylonitrile and that a surface monolayer terminating the ab planes of the M1 phase is responsible for their activity and selectivity in this reaction. Fundamental studies of the topmost surface chemistry and mechanism of propane ammoxidation over the Mo-V-(Te,Sb)-(Nb,Ta)-O M1 and M2 phases resulted in the development of quantitative understanding of the surface molecular structure – reactivity relationships for this unique catalytic system. These oxides possess unique catalytic properties among mixed metal oxides, because they selectively catalyze three alkane transformation reactions, namely propane ammoxidation to acrylonitrile, propane oxidation to acrylic acid and ethane oxidative dehydrogenation, all of considerable economic significance. Therefore, the larger goal of this research was to expand this catalysis to other alkanes of commercial interest, and more broadly, demonstrate successful approaches to rational design of improved catalysts that can be applied to other selective (amm)oxidation processes.

  9. Design and Application of Latent Olefin Metathesis Catalysts Featuring S-Chelating Alkylidene Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szadkowska, Anna; Grela, Karol

    This review article is devoted to recent advances in the design and application of so-called “dormant” or “latent” ruthenium olefin metathesis catalysts bearing S-chelating alkylidene ligands. Selected ruthenium complexes containing S-donor ligands, which possess controllable initiation behaviour are presented. Applications of these complexes in olefin metathesis are described.

  10. Zr mesoporous molecular sieves as novel solid acid catalysts in synthesizing nitrile and caprolactam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedumaran, D; Pandurangan, A

    2014-04-01

    Zr mesoporous materials with different Si/Zr ratio were synthesized by the surfactant-templated method involving cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) as template and tetraethyl ortho silicate (TEOS) as organic source of silicon. The synthesized materials were labeled as SiZrMx (where x is Si/Zr = 10, 20 and 30). The BET analysis showed bimodal distribution of pores in SiZrMx structure. An attempt was made to generate super acidity on SiZrM20 by sulfation using sulfuric acid and ammonium sulfate (wt% = 4, 8 and 12). The NH3-TPD results revealed the presence of strong acidity in sulfated Zr-MCM-41. To understand the nature of acidity in Sulfated Zr-MCM-41, the efficiency of the materials is investigated in dehydration of Oximes. The industrially important materials caprolactam and intermediate nitrile were synthesized from their oximes in liquid phase system. Due to strong acidity in sulfated Zr-MCM-41, fast deactivation was observed during the synthesis of caprolactam but, the catalyst showed 96% nitrile selectivity. The strong acidity and medium strong acidity favoured the formation of nitrile and caprolactam respectively. This study revealed the molecular sieves were effective and eco-friendly solid acid catalysts for synthesizing caprolactam and nitrile.

  11. Crystal-plane-controlled selectivity of Cu(2)O catalysts in propylene oxidation with molecular oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Qing; Cao, Tian; Gu, Xiang-Kui; Lu, Jiqing; Jiang, Zhiquan; Pan, Xiaorong; Luo, Liangfeng; Li, Wei-Xue; Huang, Weixin

    2014-05-05

    The selective oxidation of propylene with O2 to propylene oxide and acrolein is of great interest and importance. We report the crystal-plane-controlled selectivity of uniform capping-ligand-free Cu2 O octahedra, cubes, and rhombic dodecahedra in catalyzing propylene oxidation with O2 : Cu2 O octahedra exposing {111} crystal planes are most selective for acrolein; Cu2 O cubes exposing {100} crystal planes are most selective for CO2 ; Cu2 O rhombic dodecahedra exposing {110} crystal planes are most selective for propylene oxide. One-coordinated Cu on Cu2 O(111), three-coordinated O on Cu2 O(110), and two-coordinated O on Cu2 O(100) were identified as the catalytically active sites for the production of acrolein, propylene oxide, and CO2 , respectively. These results reveal that crystal-plane engineering of oxide catalysts could be a useful strategy for developing selective catalysts and for gaining fundamental understanding of complex heterogeneous catalytic reactions at the molecular level. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Characterization and Design of Zeolite Catalysts Solid Acidity, Shape Selectivity and Loading Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Niwa, Miki; Okumura, Kazu

    2010-01-01

    Zeolites are microporous, aluminosilicate minerals commonly used as commercial adsorbents. Zeolite-based catalysts are used by industrial chemical companies in the interconversion of hydrocarbons and the alkylation of aromatic compounds. The current book deals with the characterization of specific properties of Zeolites and calculations for the design of catalysts. Measurements and utilization of solid acidity, shape selectivity, and loading properties, that are three prominent properties of a Zeolite catalyst, are treated in detail. These features concern chemical vapor deposition of silica, shape selectivity, loading properties, solid activity, Brønsted or Lewis character, ammonia temperature programmed desorption, control of the pore-opening size by chemical vapor deposition of silica and XAFS analysis of metals being highly dispersed inside and outside a framework.

  13. Newly designed PdRuBi/N-Graphene catalysts with synergistic effects for enhanced ethylene glycol electro-oxidation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Tengfei; Huang, Yiyin; Ding, Kui; Wu, Peng; Abbas, Syed Comail; Ghausi, Muhammad Arsalan; Zhang, Teng; Wang, Yaobing

    2016-01-01

    Graphical abstract: We rationally design and synthesize a ternary PdRuBi/NG catalyst with significantly enhanced catalytic activity with synergetic effect of Ru and Bi towards ethylene glycol electro-oxidation. - Abstract: Palladium (Pd)-based catalysts are appealing electro-catalysts for alcohol oxidation reaction in fuel cell, but still not efficient as the complicated oxidation process and sluggish kinetic. Here we rationally design and synthesize a PdRuBi/NG tri-metallic catalyst with space synergetic effect for enhanced ethylene glycol electro-oxidation, in which both Ru and Bi in the catalyst are synergistic effective in promoting catalytic activity of Pd catalytic interlayer by electronic effect and surface modification mechanism respectively. It shows 4.2 times higher peak current density towards ethylene glycol electro-oxidation than commercial Pd/C catalyst, and the catalytic durability is also greatly improved.

  14. Covalent organic frameworks as supports for a molecular Ni based ethylene oligomerization catalyst for the synthesis of long chain olefins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rozhko, E.; Bavykina, A.V.; Osadchii, D.; Makkee, M.; Gascon Sabate, J.

    2017-01-01

    The use of two different classes of covalent organic frameworks (covalent triazine and imine linked frameworks) as supports for molecular Ni2+ catalysts is presented. For COFs, a large concentration of N heteroatoms, either in the form of quasi bipyridine or as diiminopyridine

  15. Designer molecule for molecular recognition and photoinduced ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    amitava

    Designer molecule for molecular recognition and photoinduced energy/electron transfer processes p. A it. D. Central Salt and Marine Chemicals Research Institute (CSIR). Bhavnagar: 364002 Gujarat. Amitava Das. Bhavnagar: 364002, Gujarat. E-Mail: amitava@csmcri.org. IAS-2011 ...

  16. From Homogeneous to Heterogenized Solar Fuels Assemblies: Observation of Electron Transfer Events in Systems Containing Dye-Sensitized Semiconductors and Molecular Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamire, Rebecca Joy

    The conversion of solar energy into chemical energy by simultaneously oxidizing water and reducing protons to hydrogen could provide a much-needed fuel source within a more sustainable energy economy. Dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical cells (DSPECs) are capable of forming fuels using sunlight if photoexcited chromophores transfer charges to semiconductor electrodes and catalysts, and catalysis occurs, at rates exceeding those of charge recombination. The rational design of efficient DSPECs will require an understanding of the catalytic mechanisms and rate-limiting steps of the oxidative and reductive reactions. Here, we focus on how molecular and electrode design can be used to favor the desired charge transfer events from photoexcited perylene-3,4-dicarboximide (PMI) chromophores into semiconductor films and to molecular catalysts. Previous efforts with related chromophores have focused on charge transfer between dyes and catalysts in homogeneous covalent systems without the presence of a supporting electrode. In this work, femtosecond to millisecond transient absorption spectroscopies are utilized to identify a PMI derivative capable of injecting electrons into nanostructured semiconductor films with favorable rates and yields. The identified derivative is further used to oxidize covalently attached homogeneous water oxidation catalyst (WOC) precursor Cp*Ir III(ppy)Cl, where ppy = 2-phenylpyridine, on TiO2 and then incorporated into several photoelectrodes for photodriven water oxidation and hydrogen production. Atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 following chromophore adsorption is employed to improve the chemical stability of the chromophores and to prevent rapid electron-hole recombination. The TiO2-based photoanodes contain a coadsorbed WOC [(Ir IV(pyalc)(H2O)R)2(micro-O)] +2, where pyalc = 2-(2'pyridyl)-2-propanolate, or its mononuclear precursor functionalized with a siloxane binding group. NiO-based photocathodes include molecular cobaloxime- or [Ni(P2N2) 2

  17. Molecularly Tailored Nickel Precursor and Support Yield a Stable Methane Dry Reforming Catalyst with Superior Metal Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margossian, Tigran; Larmier, Kim; Kim, Sung Min; Krumeich, Frank; Fedorov, Alexey; Chen, Peter; Müller, Christoph R; Copéret, Christophe

    2017-05-24

    Syngas production via the dry reforming of methane (DRM) is a highly endothermic process conducted under harsh conditions; hence, the main difficulty resides in generating stable catalysts. This can, in principle, be achieved by reducing coke formation, sintering, and loss of metal through diffusion in the support. [{Ni(μ 2 -OCHO)(OCHO)(tmeda)} 2 (μ 2 -OH 2 )] (tmeda = tetramethylethylenediamine), readily synthesized and soluble in a broad range of solvents, was developed as a molecular precursor to form 2 nm Ni(0) nanoparticles on alumina, the commonly used support in DRM. While such small nanoparticles prevent coke deposition and increase the initial activity, operando X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Structure (XANES) spectroscopy confirms that deactivation largely occurs through the migration of Ni into the support. However, we show that Ni loss into the support can be mitigated through the Mg-doping of alumina, thereby increasing significantly the stability for DRM. The superior performance of our catalytic system is a direct consequence of the molecular design of the metal precursor and the support, resulting in a maximization of the amount of accessible metallic nickel in the form of small nanoparticles while preventing coke deposition.

  18. Bottom-Up Design of a Copper-Ruthenium Nanoparticulate Catalyst for Low-Temperature Ammonia Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chakraborty, Debasish; Damsgaard, Christian Danvad; Silva, Hugo José Lopes

    2017-01-01

    A novel nanoparticulate catalyst of copper (Cu) and ruthenium (Ru) was designed for low-temperature ammonia oxidation at near-stoichiometric mixtures using a bottom-up approach. A synergistic effect of the two metals was found. An optimum CuRu catalyst presents a reaction rate threefold higher than...

  19. Atomic-Scale Design of Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts: A Combined Computational Chemistry, Experimental, and Microkinetic Modeling Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manos Mavrikakis; James A. Dumesic; Amit A. Gokhale; Rahul P. Nabar; Calvin H. Bartholomew; Hu Zou; Brian Critchfield

    2006-03-03

    Efforts during this second year focused on four areas: (1) continued searching and summarizing of published Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) mechanistic and kinetic studies of FTS reactions on iron catalysts; (2) investigation of CO adsorption/desorption and temperature programmed hydrogenation (TPH) of carbonaceous species after FTS on unsupported iron and alumina-supported iron catalysts; (3) activity tests of alumina-supported iron catalysts in a fixed bed reactor; (4) sequential design of experiments, for the collection of rate data in a Berty CSTR reactor, and nonlinear-regression analysis to obtain kinetic parameters. Literature sources describing mechanistic and kinetic studies of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on iron catalysts were compiled in a review. Temperature-programmed desorption/reaction methods (the latter using mass-spectrometry detection and also thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA)) were utilized to study CO adsorption/-desorption on supported and unsupported iron catalysts. Molecular and dissociative adsorptions of CO occur on iron catalysts at 25-150 C. The amounts adsorbed and bond strengths of adsorption are influenced by supports and promoters. That CO adsorbs dissociatively on polycrystalline Fe at temperatures well below those of FT reaction indicates that CO dissociation is facile and unlikely to be the rate-limiting step during FTS. Carbonaceous species formed after FT reaction for only 5 minutes at 200 C were initially hydrogenated under mild, isothermal condition (200 C and 1 atm), followed by TPH to 800 C. During the mild, isothermal hydrogenation, only about 0.1-0.2 mL of atomic carbon is apparently removed, while during TPH to 800 C multilayer equivalents of atomic, polymeric, carbidic, and graphitic carbons are removed. Rates of CO conversion on alumina-supported iron catalysts at 220-260 C and 20 atm are correlated well by a Langmuir-Hinshelwood expression, derived assuming carbon hydrogenation to CH and OH recombination to water to be

  20. The Manipulation of Hydrophobicity in Catalyst Design for Applications of Aerobic Alcohols Oxidation and Electrocatalytic Water Oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Batian

    2016-05-17

    Hydrophobicity is the generalized characteristic of non-polar substances that brings about their exclusion from aqueous phases. This property, entropic in its nature, drives key self-assembly and phase separation processes in water. Protein folding, the formation of DNA double helix, the existence of lipid bilayers and the wetting properties of leaf surfaces are all due to hydrophobic interactions. Inspired by Nature, we aimed to use hydrophobicity for creating novel and improved catalytic systems. (I) A number of fluorous amphiphilic star block-copolymers containing a tris(benzyltriazolylmethyl)amine motif have been prepared. These polymers assembled into well-defined nanostructures in water, and their mode of assembly could be controlled by changing the composition of the polymer. The polymers were used for enzyme-inspired catalysis of alcohol oxidation. (II) An enzyme-inspired catalytic system based on a rationally designed multifunctional surfactant was developed. The resulting micelles feature metal-binding sites and stable free radical moieties as well as fluorous pockets that attract and preconcentrate molecular oxygen. In the presence of copper ions, the micelles effect chemoselective aerobic alcohol oxidation under ambient conditions in water, a transformation that is challenging to achieve nonenzymatically. (III) Development of a facile means of photo/electrocatalytic water splitting is one of the main barriers to establishing of a solar hydrogen economy. Of the two half-reactions involved in splitting water into O2 and H2, water oxidation presents the most challenge due to its mechanistic complexity. A practical water oxidation catalyst must be highly active, yet inexpensive and indefinitely stable under harsh oxidative conditions. Here, I shall describe the synthesis of a library of molecular water oxidation catalysts based on the Co complex of tris(2-benzimidazolylmethyl)amine, (BimH)3. A wide range of catalysts differing in their electronic properties

  1. Fluorine conformational effects in organocatalysis: an emerging strategy for molecular design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Lucie E; Sparr, Christof; Gilmour, Ryan

    2011-12-09

    Molecular design strategies that profit from the intrinsic stereoelectronic and electrostatic effects of fluorinated organic molecules have mainly been restricted to bio-organic chemistry. Indeed, many fluorine conformational effects remain academic curiosities with no immediate application. However, the renaissance of organocatalysis offers the possibility to exploit many of these well-described phenomena for molecular preorganization. In this minireview, we highlight examples of catalyst refinement by introduction of an aliphatic C-F bond which functions as a chemically inert steering group for conformational control. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Transitioning Rationally Designed Catalytic Materials to Real 'Working' Catalysts Produced at Commercial Scale: Nanoparticle Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaidle, Joshua A.; Habas, Susan E.; Baddour, Frederick G.; Farberow, Carrie A.; Ruddy, Daniel A.; Hensley, Jesse E.; Brutchey, Richard L.; Malmstadt, Noah; Robota, Heinz

    2017-02-01

    Catalyst design, from idea to commercialization, requires multi-disciplinary scientific and engineering research and development over 10-20 year time periods. Historically, the identification of new or improved catalyst materials has largely been an empirical trial-and-error process. However, advances in computational capabilities (new tools and increased processing power) coupled with new synthetic techniques have started to yield rationally-designed catalysts with controlled nano-structures and tailored properties. This technological advancement represents an opportunity to accelerate the catalyst development timeline and to deliver new materials that outperform existing industrial catalysts or enable new applications, once a number of unique challenges associated with the scale-up of nano-structured materials are overcome.

  3. Molecular Rift: Virtual Reality for Drug Designers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrby, Magnus; Grebner, Christoph; Eriksson, Joakim; Boström, Jonas

    2015-11-23

    Recent advances in interaction design have created new ways to use computers. One example is the ability to create enhanced 3D environments that simulate physical presence in the real world--a virtual reality. This is relevant to drug discovery since molecular models are frequently used to obtain deeper understandings of, say, ligand-protein complexes. We have developed a tool (Molecular Rift), which creates a virtual reality environment steered with hand movements. Oculus Rift, a head-mounted display, is used to create the virtual settings. The program is controlled by gesture-recognition, using the gaming sensor MS Kinect v2, eliminating the need for standard input devices. The Open Babel toolkit was integrated to provide access to powerful cheminformatics functions. Molecular Rift was developed with a focus on usability, including iterative test-group evaluations. We conclude with reflections on virtual reality's future capabilities in chemistry and education. Molecular Rift is open source and can be downloaded from GitHub.

  4. Highly active, recyclable catalyst for the manufacture of viscous, low molecular weight, CO–ethene–propene-based polyketone, base component for a new class of resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekhuis, Antonius A.; Dirkzwager, Hendrik; Mul, Wilhelmus P.; Heeres, Hero J.; Linden, Adrianus J. van der; Orpen, A. Guy

    2002-01-01

    A highly active, recyclable homogeneous palladium(II) catalyst is described for the manufacture of viscous, low molecular weight CO–ethene–propene-based polyketone (Carilite Oligomer), used for the manufacture of a new class of resins (Carilite Resins). The catalyst is composed of palladium acetate,

  5. Design and stereoselective preparation of a new class of chiral olefin metathesis catalysts and application to enantioselective synthesis of quebrachamine: catalyst development inspired by natural product synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattely, Elizabeth S; Meek, Simon J; Malcolmson, Steven J; Schrock, Richard R; Hoveyda, Amir H

    2009-01-28

    A total synthesis of the Aspidosperma alkaloid quebrachamine in racemic form is first described. A key catalytic ring-closing metathesis of an achiral triene is used to establish the all-carbon quaternary stereogenic center and the tetracyclic structure of the natural product; the catalytic transformation proceeds with reasonable efficiency through the use of existing achiral Ru or Mo catalysts. Ru- or Mo-based chiral olefin metathesis catalysts have proven to be inefficient and entirely nonselective in cases where the desired product is observed. In the present study, the synthesis route thus serves as a platform for the discovery of new olefin metathesis catalysts that allow for efficient completion of an enantioselective synthesis of quebrachamine. Accordingly, on the basis of mechanistic principles, stereogenic-at-Mo complexes bearing only monodentate ligands have been designed. The new catalysts provide significantly higher levels of activity than observed with the previously reported Ru- or Mo-based complexes. Enantiomerically enriched chiral alkylidenes are generated through diastereoselective reactions involving achiral Mo-based bispyrrolides and enantiomerically pure silyl-protected binaphthols. Such chiral catalysts initiate the key enantioselective ring-closing metathesis step in the total synthesis of quebrachamine efficiently (1 mol % loading, 22 degrees C, 1 h, >98% conversion, 84% yield) and with high selectivity (98:2 er, 96% ee).

  6. Design and Stereoselective Preparation of a New Class of Chiral Olefin Metathesis Catalysts and Application to Enantioselective Synthesis of Quebrachamine: Catalyst Development Inspired by Natural Product Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattely, Elizabeth S.; Meek, Simon J.; Malcolmson, Steven J.; Schrock, Richard R.; Hoveyda, Amir H.

    2010-01-01

    A total synthesis of the Aspidosperma alkaloid quebrachamine in racemic form is first described. A key catalytic ring-closing metathesis of an achiral triene is used to establish the all-carbon quaternary stereogenic center and the tetracyclic structure of the natural product; the catalytic transformation proceeds with reasonable efficiency through the use of existing achiral Ru or Mo catalysts. Ru- or Mo-based chiral olefin metathesis catalysts have proven to be inefficient and entirely nonselective in cases where the desired product is observed. In the present study, the synthesis route thus serves as a platform for the discovery of new olefin metathesis catalysts that allow for efficient completion of an enantioselective synthesis of quebrachamine. Accordingly, on the basis of mechanistic principles, stereogenic-at-Mo complexes bearing only monodentate ligands have been designed. The new catalysts provide significantly higher levels of activity than observed with the previously reported Ru- or Mo-based complexes. Enantiomerically enriched chiral alkylidenes are generated through diastereoselective reactions involving achiral Mo-based bispyrrolides and enantiomerically pure silyl-protected binaphthols. Such chiral catalysts initiate the key enantioselective ring-closing metathesis step in the total synthesis of quebrachamine efficiently (1 mol % loading, 22 °C, 1 h, >98% conversion, 84% yield) and with high selectivity (98:2 er, 96% ee). PMID:19113867

  7. Bioinspired Molecular Co-Catalysts Bonded to a Silicon Photocathode for Solar Hydrogen Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Yidong

    2011-11-08

    The production of fuels from sunlight represents one of the main challenges in the development of a sustainable energy system. Hydrogen is the simplest fuel to produce and although platinum and other noble metals are efficient catalysts for photoelectrochemical hydrogen evolution earth-abundant alternatives are needed for large-scale use. We show that bioinspired molecular clusters based on molybdenum and sulphur evolve hydrogen at rates comparable to that of platinum. The incomplete cubane-like clusters (Mo{sub 3}S{sub 4}) efficiently catalyse the evolution of hydrogen when coupled to a p-type Si semiconductor that harvests red photons in the solar spectrum. The current densities at the reversible potential match the requirement of a photoelectrochemical hydrogen production system with a solar-to-hydrogen efficiency in excess of 10% (ref. 16). The experimental observations are supported by density functional theory calculations of the Mo{sub 3}S{sub 4} clusters adsorbed on the hydrogen-terminated Si(100) surface, providing insights into the nature of the active site.

  8. Production of High Molecular Weight Organic Compounds on the Surfaces of Amorphous Iron Silicate Catalysts: Implications for Organic Synthesis in the Solar Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, I.; Hill, H. G. M.; Pearson, V. K.; Sephton, M. A.; Nuth, J. A., III

    2002-01-01

    The high molecular weight organic products of Fischer-Tropsch/Haber-Bosch syntheses on the surfaces of Fe-silicate catalysts have been studied by GCMS. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  9. Membrane-electrode structures for molecular catalysts for use in fuel cells and other electrochemical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, John B.; Zhu, Xiaobing; Hwang, Gi Suk; Martin, Zulima; He, Qinggang; Driscoll, Peter; Weber, Adam; Clark, Kyle

    2016-09-27

    Water soluble catalysts, (M)meso-tetra(N-Methyl-4-Pyridyl)Porphinepentachloride (M=Fe, Co, Mn & Cu), have been incorporated into the polymer binder of oxygen reduction cathodes in membrane electrode assemblies used in PEM fuel cells and found to support encouragingly high current densities. The voltages achieved are low compared to commercial platinum catalysts but entirely consistent with the behavior observed in electroanalytical measurements of the homogeneous catalysts. A model of the dynamics of the electrode action has been developed and validated and this allows the MEA electrodes to be optimized for any chemistry that has been demonstrated in solution. It has been shown that improvements to the performance will come from modifications to the structure of the catalyst combined with optimization of the electrode structure and a well-founded pathway to practical non-platinum group metal catalysts exists.

  10. CATALYSIS SCIENCE INITIATIVE: From First Principles Design to Realization of Bimetallic Catalysts for Enhanced Selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAVRIKAKIS, MANOS

    2007-05-03

    In this project, we have integrated state-of-the-art Density Functional Theory (DFT) models of heterogeneous catalytic processes with high-throughput screening of bimetallic catalytic candidates for important industrial problems. We have studied a new class of alloys characterized by a surface composition different from the bulk composition, and investigated their stability and activity for the water-gas shift reaction and the oxygen reduction reaction. The former reaction is an essential part of hydrogen production; the latter is the rate-limiting step in low temperature H2 fuel cells. We have identified alloys that have remarkable stability and activity, while having a much lower material cost for both of these reactions. Using this knowledge of bimetallic interactions, we have also made progress in the industrially relevant areas of carbohydrate reforming and conversion of biomass to liquid alkanes. One aspect of this work is the conversion of glycerol (a byproduct of biodiesel production) to synthesis gas. We have developed a bifunctional supported Pt catalyst that can cleave the carbon-carbon bond while also performing the water-gas shift reaction, which allows us to better control the H2:CO ratio. Knowledge gained from the theoretical metal-metal interactions was used to develop bimetallic catalysts that perform this reaction at low temperature, allowing for an efficient coupling of this endothermic reaction with other reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch or methanol synthesis. In our work on liquid alkane production from biomass, we have studied deactivation and selectivity in these areas as a function of metal-support interactions and reaction conditions, with an emphasis on the bifunctionality of the catalysts studied. We have identified a stable, active catalyst for this process, where the selectivity and yield can be controlled by the reaction conditions. While complete rational design of catalysts is still elusive, this work demonstrates the power of

  11. Solid-State Polymerization of Poly(ethylene furanoate Biobased Polyester, I: Effect of Catalyst Type on Molecular Weight Increase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nejib Kasmi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report the synthesis of poly(ethylene furanoate (PEF, catalyzed by three different catalysts, namely, titanium (IV isopropoxide (TIS, tetrabutyltitanate (TBT, and dibutyltin (IV oxide (DBTO, via the two-stage melt polycondensation method. Solid-state polymerization (SSP was conducted at different reaction times (1, 2, 3.5, and 5 h and temperatures 190, 200, and 205 °C, under vacuum. The resultant polymers were analyzed according to their intrinsic viscosity (IV, end groups (–COOH, and thermal properties, via differential scanning calorimetry. DSC results showed that the post polymerization process was favorable to enhance the melting point of the prepared PEF samples. As was expected, the intrinsic viscosity and the average molecular weight of PEF increased with the SSP time and temperature, whereas the number of carboxyl end-groups was decreased. A simple kinetic model was also developed and used to predict the time evolution of polymers IV, as well as the carboxyl and hydroxyl content of PEF during the SSP. From both the experimental measurements and the theoretical simulation results it was proved that the presence of the TIS catalyst resulted in higher transesterification kinetic rate constants and higher reaction rates. The activation energies were not much affected by the presence of different catalysts. Finally, using DBTO as a catalyst, the polyesters produced have higher crystallinity, and as a consequence, higher number of inactive carboxyl and hydroxyl groups.

  12. Design of Pd-Based Bimetallic Catalysts for ORR: A DFT Calculation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihui Ou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing Pd-lean catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR is the key for large-scale application of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs. In the present paper, we have proposed a multiple-descriptor strategy for designing efficient and durable ORR Pd-based alloy catalysts. We demonstrated that an ideal Pd-based bimetallic alloy catalyst for ORR should possess simultaneously negative alloy formation energy, negative surface segregation energy of Pd, and a lower oxygen binding ability than pure Pt. By performing detailed DFT calculations on the thermodynamics, surface chemistry and electronic properties of Pd-M alloys, Pd-V, Pd-Fe, Pd-Zn, Pd-Nb, and Pd-Ta, are identified theoretically to have stable Pd segregated surface and improved ORR activity. Factors affecting these properties are analyzed. The alloy formation energy of Pd with transition metals M can be mainly determined by their electron interaction. This may be the origin of the negative alloy formation energy for Pd-M alloys. The surface segregation energy of Pd is primarily determined by the surface energy and the atomic radius of M. The metals M which have smaller atomic radius and higher surface energy would tend to favor the surface segregation of Pd in corresponding Pd-M alloys.

  13. Designation of highly efficient catalysts for one pot conversion of glycerol to lactic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Meilin; Dan Zhang; Guan, Hongyu; Huang, Guohui; Wang, Xiaohong

    2016-07-01

    Production of lactic acid from glycerol is a cascade catalytic procedure using multifunctional catalysts combined with oxidative and acidic catalytic sites. Therefore, a series of silver-exchanged phosphomolybdic acid catalysts (AgxH3-xPMo12O40, x = 1 ~ 3, abbreviated as AgxPMo) was designed and applied in glycerol oxidation with O2 as an oxidant to produce lactic acid (LA) without adding any base. Among all, total silver exchanged phosphomolybdic acid (Ag3PMo) was found to be the most active one with LA selectivity of 93% at 99% conversion under mild conditions of 5 h at 60 °C. The exceptionally high efficiency was contributed to the generation of strong Lewis acid sites, enhanced redox potentials and water-tolerance. More importantly, Ag3PMo was tolerant in crude glycerol from biodiesel production. And the reaction mechanism was also discussed. Meanwhile, Ag3PMo acted as a heterogeneous catalyst for 12 recycles without loss of activity.

  14. Potent Heterogeneous Catalyst for Low Temperature Selective Oxidation of Cyclohexanol by Molecular Oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroon ur Rashid

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Platinum supported on zirconium dioxide catalyst was prepared by standard method and characterized by SEM, EDX, XRD, BET surface area and pore size analyzer, and FT-IR. The catalyst was screened for its catalytic activity in a model reaction, selective oxidation of cyclohexanol. The only one major product, cyclohexanone 31%, with 99.8% selectivity was obtained. Experimental data was analyzed through different kinetic models and we deduced that the reaction follows Langmuir-Hinshelwood mechanism. The apparent activation energy for the model reaction was calculated as 45 kJ/mole. The catalyst was regenerated several times with same efficiency.

  15. Molecular Mixed-Metal Manganese Oxido Cubanes as Precursors to Heterogeneous Oxygen Evolution Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suseno, Sandy; McCrory, Charles C L; Tran, Rosalie; Gul, Sheraz; Yano, Junko; Agapie, Theodor

    2015-09-14

    Well-defined mixed-metal [CoMn3 O4 ] and [NiMn3 O4 ] cubane complexes were synthesized and used as precursors for heterogeneous oxygen evolution reaction (OER) electrocatalysts. The discrete clusters were dropcasted onto glassy carbon (GC) and indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes, and the OER activities of the resulting films were evaluated. The catalytic surfaces were analyzed by various techniques to gain insight into the structure-function relationships of the electrocatalysts' heterometallic composition. Depending on preparation conditions, the Co-Mn oxide was found to change metal composition during catalysis, while the Ni-Mn oxides maintained the NiMn3 ratio. XAS studies provided structural insights indicating that the electrocatalysts are different from the molecular precursors, but that the original NiMn3 O4 cubane-like geometry was maintained in the absence of thermal treatment (2-Ni). In contrast, the thermally generated 3-Ni develops an oxide-like extended structure. Both 2-Ni and 3-Ni undergo structural changes upon electrolysis, but they do not convert into the same material. The observed structural motifs in these heterogeneous electrocatalysts are reminiscent of the biological oxygen-evolving complex in Photosystem II, including the MMn3 O4 cubane moiety. The reported studies demonstrate the use of discrete heterometallic oxide clusters as precursors for heterogeneous water oxidation catalysts of novel composition and the distinct behavior of two sets of mixed metal oxides. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. From First Principles Design to Realization of Bimetallic Catalysts for Enhanced Selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo, Raul F.; Crooks, Richard M.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2014-04-08

    “Catalysis by design” has been a dream for decades. To specify the composition and structure of matter to effect a desired catalytic transformation with desired and predicted rate and selectivity remains a monumental challenge, especially in heterogeneous catalysis. Our research thrusts have been chosen not only for their practical and scientific relevance, e.g. for more efficient and sustainable chemicals and fuels production, but also because they provide a foundation for developing and exploring broadly applicable principles and strategies for catalyst design.

  17. An Efficient and Stable Hydrophobic Molecular Cobalt Catalyst for Water Electro-oxidation at Neutral pH

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Ba-Tian

    2016-06-14

    The synthesis of a library of molecular water oxidation catalysts based on the Co complex of tris(2-benzimidazolylmethyl)amine is described. Hydrophobicity was identified as the key variable in mediating the catalytic competence of the complexes. The change in this parameter correlates with both the conformational mobility of the ligand core and the structural changes in the local solvent environment around the metal site. The optimal Co complex identified is hydrophobic, because of three semifluorinated side chains. It catalyzes water electro-oxidation efficiently at neutral pH, with an overpotential of 390 mV and a turnover frequency (TOF) of 1.83 s-1 in the absence of soluble Co salts. The catalyst can be immobilized through physisorption, and it remains stable in prolonged electrolysis experiments. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  18. Developing an approach for first-principles catalyst design: application to carbon-capture catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, Heather J; Wong, Sergio E; Baker, Sarah E; Valdez, Carlos A; Satcher, Joe H; Aines, Roger D; Lightstone, Felice C

    2014-02-01

    An approach to catalyst design is presented in which local potential energy surface models are first built to elucidate design principles and then used to identify larger scaffold motifs that match the target geometries. Carbon sequestration via hydration is used as the model reaction, and three- and four-coordinate sp(2) or sp(3) nitrogen-ligand motifs are considered for Zn(II) metals. The comparison of binding, activation and product release energies over a large range of interaction distances and angles suggests that four-coordinate short Zn(II)-Nsp(3) bond distances favor a rapid turnover for CO2 hydration. This design strategy is then confirmed by computationally characterizing the reactivity of a known mimic over a range of metal-nitrogen bond lengths. A search of existing catalysts in a chemical database reveals structures that match the target geometry from model calculations, and subsequent calculations have identified these structures as potentially effective for CO2 hydration and sequestration.

  19. An introduction to catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Hak Je

    1988-11-01

    This book explains basic conception of catalyst such as definition, velocity of chemical reaction and velocity of catalyst reaction, absorption with absorption energy and chemical absorption, pore structure with the role of pore and measurement of pore structure, catalyst activity on solid structure, electrical property on catalyst activity, choice and design of catalyst, catalytic reaction with reaction velocity and chemical equilibrium and reaction velocity model, measurement of reaction velocity and material analysis, catalyst for mixed compound, catalyst for solid acid and catalyst for supported metal.

  20. Thiolate-bridged dinuclear ruthenium and iron complexes as robust and efficient catalysts toward oxidation of molecular dihydrogen in protic solvents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuki, Masahiro; Sakata, Ken; Hirao, Yoshifumi; Nonoyama, Nobuaki; Nakajima, Kazunari; Nishibayashi, Yoshiaki

    2015-04-01

    Thiolate-bridged dinuclear ruthenium and iron complexes are found to work as efficient catalysts toward oxidation of molecular dihydrogen in protic solvents such as water and methanol under ambient reaction conditions. Heterolytic cleavage of the coordinated molecular dihydrogen at the dinuclear complexes and the sequential oxidation of the produced hydride complexes are involved as key steps to promote the present catalytic reaction. The catalytic activity of the dinuclear complexes toward the chemical oxidation of molecular dihydrogen achieves up to 10000 TON (turnover number), and electrooxidation of molecular dihydrogen proceeds quite rapidly. The result of the density functional theory (DFT) calculation on the reaction pathway indicates that a synergistic effect between the two ruthenium atoms plays an important role to realize the catalytic oxidation of molecular dihydrogen efficiently. The present dinuclear ruthenium complex is found to work as an efficient organometallic anode catalyst for the fuel cell. It is noteworthy that the present dinuclear complex worked not only as an effective catalyst toward chemical and electrochemical oxidation of molecular dihydrogen but also as a good anode catalyst for the fuel cell. We consider that the result described in this paper provides useful and valuable information to develop highly efficient and low-cost transition metal complexes as anode catalysts in the fuel cell.

  1. Superstructure-based Design and Optimization of Batch Biodiesel Production Using Heterogeneous Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuh, M. Z.; Nasir, N. F.

    2017-08-01

    Biodiesel as a fuel comprised of mono alkyl esters of long chain fatty acids derived from renewable lipid feedstock, such as vegetable oil and animal fat. Biodiesel production is complex process which need systematic design and optimization. However, no case study using the process system engineering (PSE) elements which are superstructure optimization of batch process, it involves complex problems and uses mixed-integer nonlinear programming (MINLP). The PSE offers a solution to complex engineering system by enabling the use of viable tools and techniques to better manage and comprehend the complexity of the system. This study is aimed to apply the PSE tools for the simulation of biodiesel process and optimization and to develop mathematical models for component of the plant for case A, B, C by using published kinetic data. Secondly, to determine economic analysis for biodiesel production, focusing on heterogeneous catalyst. Finally, the objective of this study is to develop the superstructure for biodiesel production by using heterogeneous catalyst. The mathematical models are developed by the superstructure and solving the resulting mixed integer non-linear model and estimation economic analysis by using MATLAB software. The results of the optimization process with the objective function of minimizing the annual production cost by batch process from case C is 23.2587 million USD. Overall, the implementation a study of process system engineering (PSE) has optimized the process of modelling, design and cost estimation. By optimizing the process, it results in solving the complex production and processing of biodiesel by batch.

  2. Design Criteria, Operating Conditions, and Nickel-Iron Hydroxide Catalyst Materials for Selective Seawater Electrolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionigi, Fabio; Reier, Tobias; Pawolek, Zarina; Gliech, Manuel; Strasser, Peter

    2016-05-10

    Seawater is an abundant water resource on our planet and its direct electrolysis has the advantage that it would not compete with activities demanding fresh water. Oxygen selectivity is challenging when performing seawater electrolysis owing to competing chloride oxidation reactions. In this work we propose a design criterion based on thermodynamic and kinetic considerations that identifies alkaline conditions as preferable to obtain high selectivity for the oxygen evolution reaction. The criterion states that catalysts sustaining the desired operating current with an overpotential seawater-mimicking electrolyte. The catalyst was synthesized by a solvothermal method and the activity, surface redox chemistry, and stability were tested electrochemically in alkaline and near-neutral conditions (borate buffer at pH 9.2) and under both fresh seawater conditions. The Tafel slope at low current densities is not influenced by pH or presence of chloride. On the other hand, the addition of chloride ions has an influence in the temporal evolution of the nickel reduction peak and on both the activity and stability at high current densities at pH 9.2. Faradaic efficiency close to 100 % under the operating conditions predicted by our design criteria was proven using in situ electrochemical mass spectrometry. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Examining Rhodium Catalyst complexes for Use with Conducting Polymers Designed for Fuel Cells in Preparing Biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpio, M.M.; Kerr, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Biosensing devices are important because they can detect, record, and transmit information regarding the presence of, or physiological changes in, different chemical or biological materials in the environment. The goal of this research is to prepare a biosensing device that is effective, quick, and low cost. This is done by examining which chemicals will work best when placed in a biosensor. The first study involved experimenting on a rhodium catalyst complexed with ligands such as bipyridine and imidazole. The rhodium catalyst is important because it is reduced from RhIII to RhI, forms a hydride by reaction with water and releases the hydride to react with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to selectively produce 1,4-NADH, the reduced form of NAD+. The second study looked at different types of ketones and enzymes for the enzyme-substrate reaction converting a ketone into an alcohol. Preliminary results showed that the rhodium complexed with bipyridine was able to carry out all the reactions, while the rhodium complexed with imidazole was not able to produce and release hydrides. In addition, the most effective ketone to use is benzylacetone with the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase from baker’s yeast. Future work includes experimenting with bis-imidazole, which mimics the structure of bipyridine to see if it has the capability to reduce and if the reduction rate is comparable to the bipyridine complex. Once all testing is completed, the fastest catalysts will be combined with polymer membranes designed for fuel cells to prepare biosensing devices that can be used in a variety of applications including ones in the medical and environmental fields.

  4. Bioinspired molecular co-catalysts bonded to a silicon photocathode for solar hydrogen evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Yidong; Abrams, Billie L.; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard

    2011-01-01

    The production of fuels from sunlight represents one of the main challenges in the development of a sustainable energy system. Hydrogen is the simplest fuel to produce and although platinum and other noble metals are efficient catalysts for photoelectrochemical hydrogen evolution, earth-abundant ......The production of fuels from sunlight represents one of the main challenges in the development of a sustainable energy system. Hydrogen is the simplest fuel to produce and although platinum and other noble metals are efficient catalysts for photoelectrochemical hydrogen evolution, earth...

  5. Lability and Basicity of Bipyridine-Carboxylate-Phosphonate Ligand Accelerate Single-Site Water Oxidation by Ruthenium-Based Molecular Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, David W; Xie, Yan; Szalda, David J; Concepcion, Javier J

    2017-11-01

    A critical step in creating an artificial photosynthesis system for energy storage is designing catalysts that can thrive in an assembled device. Single-site catalysts have an advantage over bimolecular catalysts because they remain effective when immobilized. Hybrid water oxidation catalysts described here, combining the features of single-site bis-phosphonate catalysts and fast bimolecular bis-carboxylate catalysts, have reached turnover frequencies over 100 s -1 , faster than both related catalysts under identical conditions. The new [(bpHc)Ru(L) 2 ] (bpH 2 cH = 2,2'-bipyridine-6-phosphonic acid-6'-carboxylic acid, L = 4-picoline or isoquinoline) catalysts proceed through a single-site water nucleophilic attack pathway. The pendant phosphonate base mediates O-O bond formation via intramolecular atom-proton transfer with a calculated barrier of only 9.1 kcal/mol. Additionally, the labile carboxylate group allows water to bind early in the catalytic cycle, allowing intramolecular proton-coupled electron transfer to lower the potentials for oxidation steps and catalysis. That a single-site catalyst can be this fast lends credence to the possibility that the oxygen evolving complex adopts a similar mechanism.

  6. Lability and Basicity of Bipyridine-Carboxylate-Phosphonate Ligand Accelerate Single-Site Water Oxidation by Ruthenium-Based Molecular Catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaffer, David W.; Xie, Yan; Szalda, David J.; Concepcion, Javier J.

    2017-01-01

    Here, a critical step in creating an artificial photosynthesis system for energy storage is designing catalysts that can thrive in an assembled device. Single-site catalysts have an advantage over bimolecular catalysts because they remain effective when immobilized. Hybrid water oxidation catalysts described here, combining the features of single-site bis-phosphonate catalysts and fast bimolecular bis-carboxylate catalysts, have reached turnover frequencies over 100 s –1 , faster than both related catalysts under identical conditions. The new [(bpHc)Ru(L) 2 ] (bpH 2 cH = 2,2'-bipyridine-6-phosphonic acid-6'-carboxylic acid, L = 4-picoline or isoquinoline) catalysts proceed through a single-site water nucleophilic attack pathway. The pendant phosphonate base mediates O–O bond formation via intramolecular atom-proton transfer with a calculated barrier of only 9.1 kcal/mol. Additionally, the labile carboxylate group allows water to bind early in the catalytic cycle, allowing intramolecular proton-coupled electron transfer to lower the potentials for oxidation steps and catalysis. That a single-site catalyst can be this fast lends credence to the possibility that the oxygen evolving complex adopts a similar mechanism.

  7. Molecular Modeling: A Powerful Tool for Drug Design and Molecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    data. GENERAL I ARTICLE of programmable calculators (starting around 1956 with the introduction of Fortran), computers as visualization aids (around. 1970) .... ous applications of computer assisted molecular modeling tech- niques are .... thods are less complicated, fast, and are able to handle very large systems ...

  8. Hoveyda-Grubbs type metathesis catalyst immobilized on mesoporous molecular sieves MCM-41 and SBA-15

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balcar, Hynek; Shinde, Tushar; Žilková, Naděžda; Bastl, Zdeněk

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 7, January (2011), s. 22-28 ISSN 1860-5397 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400805; GA AV ČR KAN100400701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : alkene metathesis * catalyst immobilization * hybrid catalysis Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.517, year: 2011

  9. Reactivation of a Palladium Catalyst during Glucose Oxidation by Molecular Oxygen

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gogová, Zuzana; Hanika, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 5 (2009), s. 520-526 ISSN 0366-6352 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD203/08/H032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : glucose * palladium catalyst * deactivation Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 0.791, year: 2009

  10. Molecular and Silica-Supported Molybdenum Alkyne Metathesis Catalysts: Influence of Electronics and Dynamics on Activity Revealed by Kinetics, Solid-State NMR, and Chemical Shift Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estes, Deven P; Gordon, Christopher P; Fedorov, Alexey; Liao, Wei-Chih; Ehrhorn, Henrike; Bittner, Celine; Zier, Manuel Luca; Bockfeld, Dirk; Chan, Ka Wing; Eisenstein, Odile; Raynaud, Christophe; Tamm, Matthias; Copéret, Christophe

    2017-12-06

    Molybdenum-based molecular alkylidyne complexes of the type [MesC≡Mo{OC(CH 3 ) 3-x (CF 3 ) x } 3 ] (MoF 0 , x = 0; MoF 3 , x = 1; MoF 6 , x = 2; MoF 9 , x = 3; Mes = 2,4,6-trimethylphenyl) and their silica-supported analogues are prepared and characterized at the molecular level, in particular by solid-state NMR, and their alkyne metathesis catalytic activity is evaluated. The 13 C NMR chemical shift of the alkylidyne carbon increases with increasing number of fluorine atoms on the alkoxide ligands for both molecular and supported catalysts but with more shielded values for the supported complexes. The activity of these catalysts increases in the order MoF 0 catalysts coupled with DFT/ZORA calculations rationalize the NMR spectroscopic signatures and discernible activity trends at the frontier orbital level: (1) increasing the number of fluorine atoms lowers the energy of the π*(M≡C) orbital, explaining the more deshielded chemical shift values; it also leads to an increased electrophilicity and higher reactivity for catalysts up to MoF 6 , prior to a sharp decrease in reactivity for MoF 9 due to the formation of stable metallacyclobutadiene intermediates; (2) the silica-supported catalysts are less active than their molecular analogues because they are less electrophilic and dynamic, as revealed by their 13 C NMR chemical shift tensors.

  11. Rational Catalyst Design of Titanium-Silica Materials Aided by Site-Specific Titration Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Todd Robert

    between particle and crystal size, as obtained from XRD. In the course of establishing these relationships we've gained the knowledge of how to control TiO x structure, which enables the design of new and better catalysts. Understanding the synthesis-structure-function relationships allow for the design of a tandem photo/thermocatalytic reaction system for producing and consuming H2O2. By partially overcoating a TiO 2 photocatalyst with a ˜2 nm silica layer we observe a 56-fold rate improvement compared to bare-TiO2 for H2O2 synthesis from the proton-assisted reduction of O2. Addition of metal-SiO2 thermocatalysts (metal=Ti, Nb, or Ta) with sites needed for H2O2 activation creates a tandem system wherein the H2O2 produced in situ is utilized for alkene epoxidation. Compared to a thermocatalytic-only system, the tandem system accelerates epoxidation for cis-cyclooctene(11x faster), styrene(20x) and 1-octene(30x). This approach demonstrates a means for epoxidation with O2 that avoids H2O2 purification and transport, simplifies the total process, provides new opportunities for control by independent H2O2 production and consumption in the same reactor, and enhances rates relative to thermocatalytic-only epoxidation by intimately coupling H2O2 generation and consumption. Critically, establishment of titanium-silica synthesis-structure-function relationships enables the design of new catalysts and systems that are less energy- and material-intensive, leading towards more sustainable chemistry.

  12. Ruthenium metathesis catalyst bearing chelating carboxylate ligand immobilized on mesoporous molecular sieve SBA-15

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bek, David; Gawin, R.; Grela, K.; Balcar, Hynek

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 21, MAY 5 2012 (2012), s. 42-45 ISSN 1566-7367 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400805; GA AV ČR KAN100400701; GA ČR GD203/08/H032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : olefin metathesis * hybrid catalyst * ruthenium complexes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.915, year: 2012

  13. Polymerization of aliphatic alkynes with heterogeneous Mo catalysts supported on mesoporous molecular sieves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balcar, Hynek; Topka, Pavel; Sedláček, J.; Zedník, J.; Čejka, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 46, č. 7 (2008), s. 2593-2599 ISSN 0887-624X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/2194; GA AV ČR IAA4040411; GA AV ČR KAN100400701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : alkyne polymerization * conjugated polymers * metathesis * Mo heterogeneous catalysts Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.821, year: 2008

  14. Thermodynamic guidelines for the design of bimetallic catalysts for oxygen electroreduction and rapid screening by scanning electrochemical microscopy. M-co (M: Pd, Ag, Au).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, José L; Walsh, Darren A; Bard, Allen J

    2005-01-12

    We propose guidelines for the design of improved bimetallic (and related) electrocatalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in acidic media. This guide is based on simple thermodynamic principles assuming a simple mechanism where one metal breaks the oxygen-oxygen bond of molecular O(2) and the other metal acts to reduce the resulting adsorbed atomic oxygen. Analysis of the Gibbs free energies of these two reactions guides the selection of combinations of metals that can produce alloy surfaces with enhanced activity for the ORR when compared to the constituent metals. Selected systems have been tested by fabricating arrays of metallic catalysts consisting of various binary and ternary combinations of Pd, Au, Ag, and Co deposited on glassy carbon (GC) substrates. The electrocatalytic activity of these materials for the ORR in acidic medium was examined using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM) in a new rapid-imaging mode. This was used to rapidly screen arrays covering a wide range of catalyst compositions for their activity for the ORR in 0.5 M H(2)SO(4). Using the SECM technique, we have identified combinations of metals with enhanced electrocatalytic activities when compared with the constituent, pure metals. Addition of Co to Pd, Au, and Ag clearly decreases the ORR overpotential, in agreement with the proposed model. Catalyst spots that exhibited enhanced electrocatalytic activity in the SECM screening technique were then examined using classical rotating disk electrode (RDE) experiments. The activity of carbon black supported catalyst mixtures on a GC RDE and the electrocatalytic activity determined using the SECM screening technique showed excellent agreement. C/Pd-Co electrodes (10-30% Co) exhibited remarkable activity for ORR catalysis, close to that of carbon-supported Pt.

  15. Report on DOE - industry workshop on Computer-Aided Catalyst Design (CACD)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hay, P.J. [comp.

    1994-07-01

    Representatives from industry, national laboratories, and the DOE met to review the status of the DOE-sponsored Computer-Aided Catalyst Design (CACD) program and to assess current industrial needs in CACD. Of the 40 participants at the workshop, nearly half were from industry representing 12 companies--Arco Chemical, Amoco Chemical, Biosym, Dow, DuPont, Exxon, Ford, General Motors, Mobil, Monsanto, W.R. Grace and Union Carbide--that included nine of the largest chemical producers in the U.S. representing $61 billion in chemical sales in 1993. An overview of developments in catalyst modeling at the national laboratories was presented, and current CACD-related activities at each of the companies were described by the industrial participants. The CACD program is addressing important industry needs and is having a significant impact despite the current limited scope and budget. The industrial participants urged the program to continue to target specific areas and to encourage collaborative work among the national labs. Industrial participants expressed strong interest in increased interactions with CACD activities at the national labs, where competencies in theory, modeling, and simulation complement the traditional strengths of catalysis expertise in industry. The chemical, refining and automotive industries face continual economic and environmental pressures for now or improved catalytic processes that are more efficient and produce fewer undesirable byproducts. CACD is viewed as an effective means to enhance experimental catalysis research. The industrial participants attested to the importance of developing and applying catalysis modeling capabilities. The companies represented at the meeting had varying degrees of activity in this area, and many already had significant interactions with national labs. As potential users of this technology, they strongly endorsed the work in the CACD program in the development of modeling capabilities.

  16. Design of a genetic algorithm for the simulated evolution of a library of asymmetric transfer hydrogenation catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vriamont, Nicolas; Govaerts, Bernadette; Grenouillet, Pierre; de Bellefon, Claude; Riant, Olivier

    2009-06-15

    A library of catalysts was designed for asymmetric-hydrogen transfer to acetophenone. At first, the whole library was submitted to evaluation using high-throughput experiments (HTE). The catalysts were listed in ascending order, with respect to their performance, and best catalysts were identified. In the second step, various simulated evolution experiments, based on a genetic algorithm, were applied to this library. A small part of the library, called the mother generation (G0), thus evolved from generation to generation. The goal was to use our collection of HTE data to adjust the parameters of the genetic algorithm, in order to obtain a maximum of the best catalysts within a minimal number of generations. It was namely found that simulated evolution's results depended on the selection of G0 and that a random G0 should be preferred. We also demonstrated that it was possible to get 5 to 6 of the ten best catalysts while investigating only 10 % of the library. Moreover, we developed a double algorithm making this result still achievable if the evolution started with one of the worst G0.

  17. Architectonics: Design of Molecular Architecture for Functional Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avinash, M B; Govindaraju, Thimmaiah

    2018-02-20

    The term architectonics has its roots in the architectural and philosophical (as early as 1600s) literature that refers to "the theory of structure" and "the structure of theory", respectively. The concept of architectonics has been adapted to advance the field of molecular self-assembly and termed as molecular architectonics. In essence, the methodology of organizing molecular units in the required and controlled configurations to develop advanced functional systems for materials and biological applications comprises the field of molecular architectonics. This concept of designing noncovalent systems enables to focus on different functional aspects of designer molecules for biological and nonbiological applications and also strengthens our efforts toward the mastery over the art of controlled molecular self-assemblies. Programming complex molecular interactions and assemblies for specific functions has been one of the most challenging tasks in the modern era. Meticulously ordered molecular assemblies can impart remarkable developments in several areas spanning energy, health, and environment. For example, the well-defined nano-, micro-, and macroarchitectures of functional molecules with specific molecular ordering possess potential applications in flexible electronics, photovoltaics, photonic crystals, microreactors, sensors, drug delivery, biomedicine, and superhydrophobic coatings, among others. The functional molecular architectures having unparalleled properties are widely evident in various designs of Nature. By drawing inspirations from Nature, intended molecular architectures can be designed and developed to harvest various functions, as there is an inexhaustible resource and scope. In this Account, we present exquisite designer molecules developed by our group and others with an objective to master the art of molecular recognition and self-assembly for functional applications. We demonstrate the tailor-ability of molecular self-assemblies by employing

  18. A molecular molybdenum–schiff base electro-catalyst for generating hydrogen from acetic acid or water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, Jie-Ping; Fang, Ting; Zhou, Ling-Ling; Fu, Ling-Zhi; Zhan, Shuzhong

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The reaction of ligand, H 2 L and MoCl 5 gives a Mo(VI) complex [MoL(O) 2 ] 1. • Complex 1 is capable of catalyzing hydrogen evolution from acetic acid and water. • TOF reaches a maximum of 68 (DMF) and 356 (buffer, pH 6) moles/h, respectively. • Sustained proton reduction catalysis occurs over a 69 h period and no decomposition of 1. - ABSTRACT: The reaction of 2-pyridylamino-N,N-bis(2-methylene-4-ethyl-6-tert-butylphenol) (H 2 L) and MoCl 5 gives a molybdenum(VI) complex [MoL(O) 2 ] 1, a new molecular electrocatalyst, which has been determined by X-ray crystallography. Electrochemical studies show that complex 1 can catalyze hydrogen evolution from acetic acid or aqueous buffer. Turnover frequency (TOF) reaches a maximum of 68 (in N,N-Dimethylformamide (DMF)) and 356 (in buffer, pH 6.0) moles of hydrogen per mole of catalyst per hour, respectively. Sustained proton reduction catalysis occurs at glassy carbon (GC) electrode to give H 2 over a 69 h electrolysis period and no observable decomposition of the catalyst

  19. A noble metal-free proton-exchange membrane fuel cell based on bio-inspired molecular catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, P D; Morozan, A; Archambault, S; Heidkamp, J; Chenevier, P; Dau, H; Fontecave, M; Martinent, A; Jousselme, B; Artero, V

    2015-03-01

    Hydrogen is a promising energy vector for storing renewable energies: obtained from water-splitting, in electrolysers or photoelectrochemical cells, it can be turned back to electricity on demand in fuel cells (FCs). Proton exchange membrane (PEM) devices with low internal resistance, high compactness and stability are an attractive technology optimized over decades, affording fast start-up times and low operating temperatures. However, they rely on the powerful catalytic properties of noble metals such as platinum, while lower cost, more abundant materials would be needed for economic viability. Replacing these noble metals at both electrodes has long proven to be a difficult task, so far incompatible with PEM technologies. Here we take advantage of newly developed bio-inspired molecular H 2 oxidation catalysts and noble metal-free O 2 -reducing materials, to fabricate a noble metal-free PEMFC, with an 0.74 V open circuit voltage and a 23 μW cm -2 output power under technologically relevant conditions. X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements confirm that the catalysts are stable and retain their structure during turnover.

  20. Design of a stable steam reforming catalyst - A promising route to sustainable hydrogen form biomass oxygenates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Matas Güell, B.; Babych, Igor V.; Nichols, K.P.F.; Gardeniers, Johannes G.E.; Lefferts, Leonardus; Seshan, Kulathuiyer

    2009-01-01

    The influence of the support and the presence of oxygen were investigated in the steam reforming of acetic acid, a bio-oil model compound, over Pt/ZrO2 and Pt/CeO2 catalysts. In the absence of oxygen, all catalysts suffered from deactivation. Acetone, formed via condensation/dehydration of acetic

  1. Molecular-Level Design of Heterogeneous Chiral Catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaera, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    The following is a proposal to continue our multi-institutional research on heterogeneous chiral catalysis. Our team combines the use of surface-sensitive analytical techniques for the characterization of model systems with quantum and statistical mechanical calculations to interpret experimental data and guide the design of future research. Our investigation focuses on the interrelation among the three main mechanisms by which enantioselectivity can be bestowed to heterogeneous catalysts, namely: (1) by templating chirality via the adsorption of chiral supramolecular assemblies, (2) by using chiral modifiers capable of forming chiral complexes with the reactant and force enantioselective surface reactions, and (3) by forming naturally chiral surfaces using imprinting chiral agents. Individually, the members of our team are leaders in these various aspects of chiral catalysis, but the present program provides the vehicle to generate and exploit the synergies necessary to address the problem in a comprehensive manner. Our initial work has advanced the methodology needed for these studies, including an enantioselective titration procedure to identify surface chiral sites, infrared spectroscopy in situ at the interface between gases or liquids and solids to mimic realistic catalytic conditions, and DFT and Monte Carlo algorithms to simulate and understand chirality on surfaces. The next step, to be funded by the monies requested in this proposal, is to apply those methods to specific problems in chiral catalysis, including the identification of the requirements for the formation of supramolecular surface structures with enantioselective behavior, the search for better molecules to probe the chiral nature of the modified surfaces, the exploration of the transition from supramolecular to one-to-one chiral modification, the correlation of the adsorption characteristics of one-to-one chiral modifiers with their physical properties, in particular with their configuration

  2. Molecular-Level Design of Heterogeneous Chiral Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francisco Zaera

    2012-03-21

    The following is a proposal to continue our multi-institutional research on heterogeneous chiral catalysis. Our team combines the use of surface-sensitive analytical techniques for the characterization of model systems with quantum and statistical mechanical calculations to interpret experimental data and guide the design of future research. Our investigation focuses on the interrelation among the three main mechanisms by which enantioselectivity can be bestowed to heterogeneous catalysts, namely: (1) by templating chirality via the adsorption of chiral supramolecular assemblies, (2) by using chiral modifiers capable of forming chiral complexes with the reactant and force enantioselective surface reactions, and (3) by forming naturally chiral surfaces using imprinting chiral agents. Individually, the members of our team are leaders in these various aspects of chiral catalysis, but the present program provides the vehicle to generate and exploit the synergies necessary to address the problem in a comprehensive manner. Our initial work has advanced the methodology needed for these studies, including an enantioselective titration procedure to identify surface chiral sites, infrared spectroscopy in situ at the interface between gases or liquids and solids to mimic realistic catalytic conditions, and DFT and Monte Carlo algorithms to simulate and understand chirality on surfaces. The next step, to be funded by the monies requested in this proposal, is to apply those methods to specific problems in chiral catalysis, including the identification of the requirements for the formation of supramolecular surface structures with enantioselective behavior, the search for better molecules to probe the chiral nature of the modified surfaces, the exploration of the transition from supramolecular to one-to-one chiral modification, the correlation of the adsorption characteristics of one-to-one chiral modifiers with their physical properties, in particular with their configuration

  3. Molecularly Designed Ultrafine/Nanostructured Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-04-08

    is most natural to imagine assembling structures piece by piece, in the same way that a house or an automobile is built. The movement of atoms by...that dehydroprotectants might solve the challenge of surface-facilitated molecular delivery was assessed. Previous work published in the agricultural ...10 Ledoux . C. Pham-Huu. Guille. J. and H. Dunlop, 134, 383-398)( 1992). 12 L. Volpe and M. Boudart, J. Solid State Chem. 59. 332- 356)(1985). 13

  4. Electrocatalytic oxidation of organic substrates with molecular oxygen using tetradentate ruthenium(III)-Schiff base complexes as catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ourari, Ali; Khelafi, Mostefa; Aggoun, Djouhra; Jutand, Anny; Amatore, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Three complexes Ru(III)ClL n involving different tetradentate Schiff base ligands L n (see L 1 , L 2 and L 3 in ) were used as catalysts in the oxidation of cyclooctene and tetraline in the presence of molecular dioxygen associated with benzoic anhydride. The efficiency of this oxidation reaction was tested in the presence of two apical bases: 1- or 2-methylimidazole. All complexes exhibit a quasi-reversible redox system. The electrolysis experiments were carried out at controlled potential for each complex, using different substrates such as cyclooctene and tetraline. The oxidized products are cyclooctene oxide (turnover 6.7), a mixture of 1-tetralol and 1-tetralone (turnover 7.6) respectively.

  5. A fast soluble carbon-free molecular water oxidation catalyst based on abundant metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qiushi; Tan, Jeffrey Miles; Besson, Claire; Geletii, Yurii V; Musaev, Djamaladdin G; Kuznetsov, Aleksey E; Luo, Zhen; Hardcastle, Ken I; Hill, Craig L

    2010-04-16

    Traditional homogeneous water oxidation catalysts are plagued by instability under the reaction conditions. We report that the complex [Co4(H2O)2(PW9O34)2]10-, comprising a Co4O4 core stabilized by oxidatively resistant polytungstate ligands, is a hydrolytically and oxidatively stable homogeneous water oxidation catalyst that self-assembles in water from salts of earth-abundant elements (Co, W, and P). With [Ru(bpy)3]3+ (bpy is 2,2'-bipyridine) as the oxidant, we observe catalytic turnover frequencies for O2 production > or = 5 s(-1) at pH = 8. The rate's pH sensitivity reflects the pH dependence of the four-electron O2-H2O couple. Extensive spectroscopic, electrochemical, and inhibition studies firmly indicate that [Co4(H2O)2(PW9O34)2]10- is stable under catalytic turnover conditions: Neither hydrated cobalt ions nor cobalt hydroxide/oxide particles form in situ.

  6. Hydration effects on the molecular structure of silica-supported vanadium oxide catalysts: A combined IR, Raman, UV–vis and EXAFS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, D.E.; Visser, T.; Soulimani, F.; Koningsberger, D.C.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of hydration on the molecular structure of silica-supported vanadium oxide catalysts with loadings of 1–16 wt.% V has been systematically investigated by infrared, Raman, UV–vis and EXAFS spectroscopy. IR and Raman spectra recorded during hydration revealed the formation of V–OH groups,

  7. PHENANTHROLINE-STABILIZED PALLADIUM NANOPARTICLES IN POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL—AN ACTIVE AND RECYCLABLE CATALYST SYSTEM FOR THE SELECTIVE HYDROGENATION OF OLEFINS USING MOLECULAR HYDROGEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    1,10-Phenanthroline-stabilized palladium nanoparticles dispersed in a polyethylene glycol (PEG) matrix is synthesized which is found to be a stable and active catalyst for the selective hydrogenation of olefins using molecular hydrogen under mild reaction conditions. A variety of...

  8. Alargamento da distribuição de massa molar de polímeros sintetizados com catalisadores metalocênicos dual-site Broadening of molecular weight distribution of polymers synthesized by metallocene-based dual-site catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João H. Z. dos Santos

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The main topics related to the use of dual-site catalysts in the production of polymers with broad molecular weight distribution are reviewed. The polymerization using dual-site catalysts is more economical and allows to produce a higher quality product than other processes, such as polymer blend and multistage reactors. However, the formulation of these catalysts is quite complicated since the same catalyst must produce distinct polymer grades. In addition, the release of patents concerning the combination of metallocenes and new technologies for polymerization shows that polymerization processes using dual-site catalysts are of current industrial interest.

  9. Broadening of molecular weight distribution of polymers synthesized by metallocene-based dual-site catalysts; Alargamento da distribuicao de massa molar de polimeros sintetizados com catalisadores metalocenicos dual-site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Joao H.Z. dos [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica]. E-mail: jhzds@iq.ufrgs.br; Fisch, Adriano G.; Cardozo, Nilo S.M.; Secchi, Argimiro R. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Quimica

    2008-07-01

    The main topics related to the use of dual-site catalysts in the production of polymers with broad molecular weight distribution are reviewed. The polymerization using dual-site catalysts is more economical and allows to produce a higher quality product than other processes, such as polymer blend and multistage reactors. However, the formulation of these catalysts is quite complicated since the same catalyst must produce distinct polymer grades. In addition, the release of patents concerning the combination of metallocenes and new technologies for polymerization shows that polymerization processes using dual-site catalysts are of current industrial interest. (author)

  10. Design and assembly of a catalyst bed gas generator for the catalytic decomposition of high concentration hydrogen peroxide propellants and the catalytic combustion of hydrocarbon/air mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohner, Kevin A. (Inventor); Mays, Jeffrey A. (Inventor); Sevener, Kathleen M. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A method for designing and assembling a high performance catalyst bed gas generator for use in decomposing propellants, particularly hydrogen peroxide propellants, for use in target, space, and on-orbit propulsion systems and low-emission terrestrial power and gas generation. The gas generator utilizes a sectioned catalyst bed system, and incorporates a robust, high temperature mixed metal oxide catalyst. The gas generator requires no special preheat apparatus or special sequencing to meet start-up requirements, enabling a fast overall response time. The high performance catalyst bed gas generator system has consistently demonstrated high decomposition efficiency, extremely low decomposition roughness, and long operating life on multiple test articles.

  11. Principles and Methods for the Rational Design of Core-Shell Nanoparticle Catalysts with Ultralow Noble Metal Loadings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Sean T; Román-Leshkov, Yuriy

    2018-03-06

    Conspecuts Commercial and emerging renewable energy technologies are underpinned by precious metal catalysts, which enable the transformation of reactants into useful products. However, the noble metals (NMs) comprise the least abundant elements in the lithosphere, making them prohibitively scarce and expensive for future global-scale technologies. As such, intense research efforts have been devoted to eliminating or substantially reducing the loadings of NMs in various catalytic applications. These efforts have resulted in a plethora of heterogeneous NM catalyst morphologies beyond the traditional supported spherical nanoparticle. In many of these new architectures, such as shaped, high index, and bimetallic particles, less than 20% of the loaded NMs are available to perform catalytic turnovers. The majority of NM atoms are subsurface, providing only a secondary catalytic role through geometric and ligand effects with the active surface NM atoms. A handful of architectures can approach 100% NM utilization, but severe drawbacks limit general applicability. For example, in addition to problems with stability and leaching, single atom and ultrasmall cluster catalysts have extreme metal-support interactions, discretized d-bands, and a lack of adjacent NM surface sites. While monolayer thin films do not possess these features, they exhibit such low surface areas that they are not commercially relevant, serving predominantly as model catalysts. This Account champions core-shell nanoparticles (CS NPs) as a vehicle to design highly active, stable, and low-cost materials with high NM utilization for both thermo- and electrocatalysis. The unique benefits of the many emerging NM architectures could be preserved while their fundamental limitations could be overcome through reformulation via a core-shell morphology. However, the commercial realization of CS NPs remains challenging, requiring concerted advances in theory and manufacturing. We begin by formulating seven

  12. Design of Pt/Carbon Xerogel Catalysts for PEM Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Job

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of efficient catalytic layers of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs requires the preparation of highly-loaded and highly-dispersed Pt/C catalysts. During the last few years, our work focused on the preparation of Pt/carbon xerogel electrocatalysts, starting from simple impregnation techniques that were further optimized via the strong electrostatic adsorption (SEA method to reach high dispersion and a high metal weight fraction. The SEA method, which consists of the optimization of the precursor/support electrostatic impregnation through an adequate choice of the impregnation pH with regard to the support surface chemistry, leads to very well-dispersed Pt/C samples with a maximum 8 wt.% Pt after drying and reduction under H2. To increase the metal loading, the impregnation-drying-reduction cycle of the SEA method can be repeated several times, either with fresh Pt precursor solution or with the solution recycled from the previous cycle. In each case, a high dispersion (Pt particle size ~3 nm is obtained. Finally, the procedure can be simplified by combination of the SEA technique with dry impregnation, leading to no Pt loss during the procedure.

  13. PSII as an in vivo molecular catalyst for the production of energy rich hydroquinones - A new approach in renewable energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sai; Maiti, Soumen K

    2018-03-01

    One of the pertinent issues in the field of energy science today is the quest for an abundant source of hydrogen or hydrogen equivalents. In this study, phenyl-p-benzoquinone (pPBQ) has been used to generate a molecular store of hydrogen equivalents (phenyl-p-hydroquinone; pPBQH 2 ) from thein vivo splitting of water by photosystem II of the marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus BDU 70542. Using this technique, 10.8 μmol of pPBQH 2 per mg chlorophyll a can be extracted per minute, an efficiency that is orders of magnitude higher when compared to the techniques present in the current literature. Moreover, the photo-reduction process was stable when tested over longer periods of time. Addition of phenyl-p-benzoquinone on an intermittent basis resulted in the precipitation of phenyl-p-hydroquinone, obviating the need for costly downstream processing units for product recovery. Phenyl-p-hydroquinone so obtained is a molecular store of free energy preserved through the light driven photolysis of water and can be used as a cheap and a renewable source of hydrogen equivalents by employing transition metal catalysts or fuel cells with the concomitant regeneration of phenyl-p-benzoquinone. The cyclic nature of this technique makes it an ideal candidate to be utilized in mankind's transition from fossil fuels to solar fuels. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Photo-driven electron transfer from the highly reducing excited state of naphthalene diimide radical anion to a CO 2 reduction catalyst within a molecular triad

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez, Jose F. [Department of Chemistry and Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) Center; Northwestern University; Evanston; USA; La Porte, Nathan T. [Department of Chemistry and Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) Center; Northwestern University; Evanston; USA; Mauck, Catherine M. [Department of Chemistry and Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) Center; Northwestern University; Evanston; USA; Wasielewski, Michael R. [Department of Chemistry and Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research (ANSER) Center; Northwestern University; Evanston; USA

    2017-01-01

    The naphthalene-1,4:5,8-bis(dicarboximide) radical anion (NDI-˙), which is easily produced by mild chemical or electrochemical reduction (-0.5 Vvs.SCE), can be photoexcited at wavelengths as long as 785 nm, and has an excited state (NDI-˙*) oxidation potential of -2.1 Vvs.SCE, making it a very attractive choice for artificial photosynthetic systems that require powerful photoreductants, such as CO2 reduction catalysts. However, once an electron is transferred from NDI-˙* to an acceptor directly bound to it, a combination of strong electronic coupling and favorable free energy change frequently make the back electron transfer rapid. To mitigate this effect, we have designed a molecular triad system comprising an NDI-˙ chromophoric donor, a 9,10-diphenylanthracene (DPA) intermediate acceptor, and a Re(dmb)(CO)3carbon dioxide reduction catalyst, where dmb is 4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine, as the terminal acceptor. Photoexcitation of NDI-˙ to NDI-˙* is followed by ultrafast reduction of DPA to DPA-˙, which then rapidly reduces the metal complex. The overall time constant for the forward electron transfer to reduce the metal complex is τ = 20.8 ps, while the time constant for back-electron transfer is six orders of magnitude longer, τ = 43.4 μs. Achieving long-lived, highly reduced states of these metal complexes is a necessary condition for their use as catalysts. The extremely long lifetime of the reduced metal complex is attributed to careful tuning of the redox potentials of the chromophore and intermediate acceptor. The NDI-˙–DPA fragment presents many attractive features for incorporation into other photoinduced electron transfer assemblies directed at the long-lived photosensitization of difficult-to-reduce catalytic centers.

  15. Computer aided molecular design with combined molecular modeling and group contribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harper, Peter Mathias; Gani, Rafiqul; Kolar, Petr

    1999-01-01

    Computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) provides a means for determining molecules or mixtures of molecules (CAMMD) having a desirable set of physicochemical properties. The application range of CAMD is restricted due to limitations on the complexity of the generated molecular structures and on th...

  16. Toward Rational Design of Cu/SSZ-13 Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalysts: Implications from Atomic-Level Understanding of Hydrothermal Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, James [Institute; The; amp, Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Washington State University, P.O. Box 646515, Pullman, Washington 99164, United States; Wang, Yilin [Institute; Walter, Eric D. [Environmental; Washton, Nancy M. [Environmental; Mei, Donghai [Institute; Kovarik, Libor [Environmental; Engelhard, Mark H. [Environmental; Prodinger, Sebastian [Institute; Wang, Yong [Institute; The; amp, Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Washington State University, P.O. Box 646515, Pullman, Washington 99164, United States; Peden, Charles H. F. [Institute; Gao, Feng [Institute

    2017-11-03

    The hydrothermal stability of Cu/SSZ-13 SCR catalysts has been extensively studied, yet atomic level understanding of changes to the zeolite support and the Cu active sites during hydrothermal aging are still lacking. In this work, via the utilization of spectroscopic methods including solid-state 27Al and 29Si NMR, EPR, DRIFTS, and XPS, together with imaging and elemental mapping using STEM, detailed kinetic analyses, and theoretical calculations with DFT, various Cu species, including two types of isolated active sites and CuOx clusters, were precisely quantified for samples hydrothermally aged under varying conditions. This quantification convincingly confirms the exceptional hydrothermal stability of isolated Cu2+-2Z sites, and the gradual conversion of [Cu(OH)]+-Z to CuOx clusters with increasing aging severity. This stability difference is rationalized from the hydrolysis activation barrier difference between the two isolated sites via DFT. Discussions are provided on the nature of the CuOx clusters, and their possible detrimental roles on catalyst stability. Finally, a few rational design principles for Cu/SSZ-13 are derived rigorously from the atomic-level understanding of this catalyst obtained here. The authors gratefully acknowledge the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Vehicle Technologies Office for the support of this work. Computing time was granted by a user proposal at the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL) and by the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC). The experimental studies described in this paper were performed in the EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the DOE’s Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated for the US DOE by Battelle.

  17. Molecular aluminum hydrides identified by inelastic neutron scattering during H2 regeneration of catalyst-doped NaAlH4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qi Jia; Ramirez-Cuesta, A J; Tsang, Shik Chi

    2006-01-19

    Catalyst-doped sodium aluminum hydrides have been intensively studied as solid hydrogen carriers for onboard proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Although the importance of catalyst choice in enhancing kinetics for both hydrogen uptake and release of this hydride material has long been recognized, the nature of the active species and the mechanism of catalytic action are unclear. We have shown by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) spectroscopy that a volatile molecular aluminum hydride is formed during the early stage of H2 regeneration of a depleted, catalyst-doped sodium aluminum hydride. Computational modeling of the INS spectra suggested the formation of AlH3 and oligomers (AlH3)n (Al2H6, Al3H9, and Al4H12 clusters), which are pertinent to the mechanism of hydrogen storage. This paper demonstrates, for the first time, the existence of these volatile species.

  18. Catalytic Hydrogenation and Hydrodeoxygenation of Furfural over Pt(111): A Model System for the Rational Design and Operation of Practical Biomass Conversion Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Furfural is a key bioderived platform chemical whose reactivity under hydrogen atmospheres affords diverse chemical intermediates. Here, temperature-programmed reaction spectrometry and complementary scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) are employed to investigate furfural adsorption and reactivity over a Pt(111) model catalyst. Furfural decarbonylation to furan is highly sensitive to reaction conditions, in particular, surface crowding and associated changes in the adsorption geometry: furfural adopts a planar geometry on clean Pt(111) at low coverage, tilting at higher coverage to form a densely packed furfural adlayer. This switch in adsorption geometry strongly influences product selectivity. STM reveals the formation of hydrogen-bonded networks for planar furfural, which favor decarbonylation on clean Pt(111) and hydrogenolysis in the presence of coadsorbed hydrogen. Preadsorbed hydrogen promotes furfural hydrogenation to furfuryl alcohol and its subsequent hydrogenolysis to methyl furan, while suppressing residual surface carbon. Furfural chemistry over Pt is markedly different from that over Pd, with weaker adsorption over the former affording a simpler product distribution than the latter; Pd catalyzes a wider range of chemistry, including ring-opening to form propene. Insight into the role of molecular orientation in controlling product selectivity will guide the design and operation of more selective and stable Pt catalysts for furfural hydrogenation. PMID:29225721

  19. MOLECULAR THERMODYNAMICS IN THE DESIGN OF SUBSTITUTE SOLVENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of physical properties and fluid behavior from molecular thermodynamics can lead to better decision making in the design of substitute solvents and can greatly reduce the expense and time required to find substitutes compared to designing solvents by experiment. this pape...

  20. Visible-Light-Responsive Photocatalysis: Ag-Doped TiO2 Catalyst Development and Reactor Design Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, Janelle L.; Hintze, Paul E.; Meier, Anne; Shah, Malay G.; Devor, Robert W.; Surma, Jan M.; Maloney, Phillip R.; Bauer, Brint M.; Mazyck, David W.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the alteration of titanium dioxide to become visible-light-responsive (VLR) has been a major focus in the field of photocatalysis. Currently, bare titanium dioxide requires ultraviolet light for activation due to its band gap energy of 3.2 eV. Hg-vapor fluorescent light sources are used in photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) reactors to provide adequate levels of ultraviolet light for catalyst activation; these mercury-containing lamps, however, hinder the use of this PCO technology in a spaceflight environment due to concerns over crew Hg exposure. VLR-TiO2 would allow for use of ambient visible solar radiation or highly efficient visible wavelength LEDs, both of which would make PCO approaches more efficient, flexible, economical, and safe. Over the past three years, Kennedy Space Center has developed a VLR Ag-doped TiO2 catalyst with a band gap of 2.72 eV and promising photocatalytic activity. Catalyst immobilization techniques, including incorporation of the catalyst into a sorbent material, were examined. Extensive modeling of a reactor test bed mimicking air duct work with throughput similar to that seen on the International Space Station was completed to determine optimal reactor design. A bench-scale reactor with the novel catalyst and high-efficiency blue LEDs was challenged with several common volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in ISS cabin air to evaluate the system's ability to perform high-throughput trace contaminant removal. The ultimate goal for this testing was to determine if the unit would be useful in pre-heat exchanger operations to lessen condensed VOCs in recovered water thus lowering the burden of VOC removal for water purification systems.

  1. Catalyst and Process Design for the Continuous Manufacture of Rare Sugar Alcohols by Epimerization-Hydrogenation of Aldoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lari, Giacomo M; Gröninger, Olivier G; Li, Qiang; Mondelli, Cecilia; López, Núria; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2016-12-20

    Sugar alcohols are applied in the food, pharmaceutical, polymer, and fuel industries and are commonly obtained by reduction of the corresponding saccharides. In view of the rarity of some sugar substrates, epimerization of a readily available monosaccharide has been proposed as a solution, but an efficient catalytic system has not yet been identified. Herein, a molybdenum heteropolyacid-based catalyst is developed to transform glucose, arabinose, and xylose into less-abundant mannose, ribose, and lyxose, respectively. Adsorption of molybdic acid onto activated carbon followed by ion exchange to the cesium form limits leaching of the active phase, which greatly improves the catalyst stability over 24 h on stream. The hydrogenation of mixtures of epimers is studied over ruthenium catalysts, and it is found that the precursor to the desired polyol is advantageously converted with faster kinetics. This is explained by density functional theory on the basis of its more favorable adsorption on the metal surface and the lower energy barrier for the addition of a hydrogen atom to the primary carbon atom. Finally, different designs for a continuous process for the conversion of glucose into mannitol are studied, and it is uncovered that two reactors in series with one containing the epimerization catalyst and the other containing a mixture of the epimerization and hydrogenation catalysts increases the mannitol/sorbitol ratio to 1.5 from 1 for a single mixed-bed reactor. This opens a prospective route to the efficient valorization of renewables to added-value chemicals. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Designing Laser Pulses to Control Molecular Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Qinghua; Balint-Kurti, Gabriel; Manby, Frederick; Artamonov, Maxim; Ho, Tak-San; Rabitz, Herschel

    2006-03-01

    A new method for incorporating polarization effects of the strong electric field into optimal control calculations is presented. An Electric-Nuclear Born-Oppenheimer approximation is introduced in which both the nuclear motion and the fluctuations of the external electric field are assumed to be slow compared with the speed at which the electronic wavefunction responds to these changes, which permits the generation of a potential energy surface that depends not only on the geometry of the nuclei, but also on the electric field strength and on the orientation of the molecule with respect to the electric field. As an illustration, it is firstly applied to the optimal control of the vibrational excitation of a hydrogen molecule aligned along with the field direction.^ [1] And then it is extended to full three dimensions by allowing the H2 molecules to rotate as well as vibrate.^ [2] All calculation results show that it is possible to design shaped laser pulses that can excite H2 either vibrationally, rotationally or both with a probability higher than 90%. ^[1] G. G. Balint-kurti, F. R. Manby, Q. Ren, M. Artamonov, T. Ho, and H. Rabitz, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 084110 (2005). ^[2] Q. Ren, G. G. Balint-kurti, F. R. Manby, M. Artamonov, T. Ho, and H. Rabitz, J. Chem. Phys. (in press).

  3. Tunable, Chemo- and Site-Selective Nitrene Transfer Reactions through the Rational Design of Silver(I) Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderson, Juliet M; Corbin, Joshua R; Schomaker, Jennifer M

    2017-09-19

    Carbon-nitrogen (C-N) bonds are ubiquitous in pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals, diverse bioactive natural products, and ligands for transition metal catalysts. An effective strategy for introducing a new C-N bond into a molecule is through transition metal-catalyzed nitrene transfer chemistry. In these reactions, a metal-supported nitrene can either add across a C═C bond to form an aziridine or insert into a C-H bond to furnish the corresponding amine. Typical catalysts for nitrene transfer include Rh 2 L n and Ru 2 L n complexes supported by bridging carboxylate and related ligands, as well as complexes based on Cu, Co, Ir, Fe, and Mn supported by porphyrins and related ligands. A limitation of metal-catalyzed nitrene transfer is the ability to predictably select which specific site will undergo amination in the presence of multiple reactive groups; thus, many reactions rely primarily on substrate control. Achieving true catalyst-control over nitrene transfer would open up exciting possibilities for flexible installation of new C-N bonds into hydrocarbons, natural product-inspired scaffolds, existing pharmaceuticals or biorenewable building blocks. Silver-catalyzed nitrene transfer enables flexible control over the position at which a new C-N bond is introduced. Ag(I) supported by simple N-donor ligands accommodates a diverse range of coordination geometries, from linear to tetrahedral to seesaw, enabling the electronic and steric parameters of the catalyst to be tuned independently. In addition, the ligand, Ag salt counteranion, Ag/ligand ratio and the solvent all influence the fluxional and dynamic behavior of Ag(I) complexes in solution. Understanding the interplay of these parameters to manipulate the behavior of Ag-nitrenes in a predictable manner is a key design feature of our work. In this Account, we describe successful applications of a variety of design principles to tunable, Ag-catalyzed aminations, including (1) changing Ag/ligand ratios to influence

  4. Multivalent Molecular Shuttles – Effect of Increasing the Number of Centers in Switchable Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Álvarez González, Celedonio; Barbero, Héctor; Miguel San José, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Producción Científica A family of three molecular shuttles based upon ammonium/triazolinium salt motifs with one, two, and three catalytic centers were prepared along with their corresponding non‐interlocked threads. The switching process for all rotaxanes was tested through an in situ procedure in solution. Furthermore, their organocatalysis of two Michale‐type reactions by iminium activation was tested to check whether the increase of the number of catalytic centers in the same shuttle i...

  5. Photoswitching a Molecular Catalyst to Regulate CO2 Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priyadarshani, Nilusha [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bays, J. Timothy [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Linehan, John C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shaw, Wendy J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-24

    Inspired by nature’s ability to regulate catalysis using physiological stimuli, azobenzene was incorporated into Rh(bis)diphosphine CO2 hydrogenation catalysts to photoinitiate structural changes to modulate the resulting catalytic activity. The rhodium bound diphosphine ligands (P(Ph2)-CH2-N(R) CH2-P(Ph2)) contain the terminal amine of a non-natural amino acid, either β-alanine (β-Ala) or γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). For both β-ala and GABA containing complexes, the carboxylic acids of the amino acids were coupled to the amines of diaminoazobenzene, creating a rhodium bound trans-spanning tetraphosphine complex. The photo-induced cis-trans isomerization of the azobenzene-containing complexes imposes structural changes on these complexes, as evidenced by 1H NMR. We found that the CO2 hydrogenation activity for the β-ala bound Rh complex is 40% faster with azobenzene in the cis configuration (16 s-1) than in the trans conformation (11 s-1), while the γ-aminobutyric acid containing Rh complex has the same rate (~17 s-1) in either the cis or the trans configuration at 27 °C. The corresponding complexes without the attached azobenzene were also prepared, characterized, and catalytically tested for comparison, and have rates of 30 s-1. Computational studies were undertaken to evaluate the difference in rate between the cis and trans isomers for the β-Ala bound Rh complex, and revealed major structural changes between all cis and trans structures, but only minor structural changes that would be unique to the β-Ala bound Rh complex. We postulate that the slower rate of the azobenzene-containing β-Ala bound Rh complex is due to subtle changes in the bite angle arising from steric strain due to the trans-spanning azobenzene, altering hydricity and consequently rate. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy

  6. Hoveyda-Grubbs type metathesis catalyst immobilized on mesoporous molecular sieves-The influence of pore size on the catalyst activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Shinde, Tushar; Žilková, Naděžda; Hanková, V.; Balcar, Hynek

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 179, č. 1 (2012), s. 123-129 ISSN 0920-5861 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400400805; GA AV ČR KAN100400701; GA ČR GD203/08/H032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : olefin metathesis * ring opening metathesis polymerization * Hoveyda-Grubbs catalyst Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.980, year: 2012

  7. Protein Scaffolding for Small Molecule Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, David [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-09-14

    We aim to design hybrid catalysts for energy production and storage that combine the high specificity, affinity, and tunability of proteins with the potent chemical reactivities of small organometallic molecules. The widely used Rosetta and RosettaDesign methodologies will be extended to model novel protein / small molecule catalysts in which one or many small molecule active centers are supported and coordinated by protein scaffolding. The promise of such hybrid molecular systems will be demonstrated with the nickel-phosphine hydrogenase of DuBois et. al.We will enhance the hydrogenase activity of the catalyst by designing protein scaffolds that incorporate proton relays and systematically modulate the local environment of the catalyticcenter. In collaboration with DuBois and Shaw, the designs will be experimentally synthesized and characterized.

  8. Molecular Catalysts for N2Reduction: State of the Art, Mechanism, and Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Yoann; Duboc, Carole; Gennari, Marcello

    2017-10-06

    Fixation of atmospheric nitrogen is central for the production of ammonia, which is the source of nitrogen fertilizers and is also emerging as a promising renewable fuel. While the development of efficient molecular-based artificial nitrogen fixation systems working under mild conditions is probably a Holy Grail, the catalytic reduction of N 2 by transition-metal complexes is-above all-the main instrument to progress in the mechanistic understanding of N 2 splitting. In this Minireview we first give an overview of molecular-based catalytic systems, including recent breakthroughs, and then we illustrate the alternative pathways for N 2 reduction. We mainly focus on multistep hydrogenation of N 2 by separated proton and electron sources, with a particular attention for the possibility of proton-coupled electron transfer events. Finally, we try to identify the key factors to achieve catalytic reduction of dinitrogen by metal complexes and to enhance their efficiency. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Pore design of pelletised VOX/ZrO2-SO4/Sepiolite composite catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Birk; Due-Hansen, Johannes; Yates, M.

    2010-01-01

    The NH3-SCR activities of a series of extruded and calcined VOX/ZrO2-SO4 - sepiolite catalysts were determined. The pore structures were heavily influenced by the clay content with macropore sizes ranging from 50 to >1000 nm. Mechanical strength and SCR activity measurements suggested that 25% w...

  10. Surface Functionalization of g-C 3 N 4 : Molecular-Level Design of Noble-Metal-Free Hydrogen Evolution Photocatalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yin

    2015-06-12

    A stable noble-metal-free hydrogen evolution photocatalyst based on graphite carbon nitride (g-C3N4) was developed by a molecular-level design strategy. Surface functionalization was successfully conducted to introduce a single nickel active site onto the surface of the semiconducting g-C3N4. This catalyst family (with less than 0.1 wt% of Ni) has been found to produce hydrogen with a rate near to the value obtained by using 3 wt% platinum as co-catalyst. This new catalyst also exhibits very good stability under hydrogen evolution conditions, without any evidence of deactivation after 24h. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. A systematic molecular circuit design method for gene networks under biochemical time delays and molecular noises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Yu-Te

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene networks in nanoscale are of nonlinear stochastic process. Time delays are common and substantial in these biochemical processes due to gene transcription, translation, posttranslation protein modification and diffusion. Molecular noises in gene networks come from intrinsic fluctuations, transmitted noise from upstream genes, and the global noise affecting all genes. Knowledge of molecular noise filtering and biochemical process delay compensation in gene networks is crucial to understand the signal processing in gene networks and the design of noise-tolerant and delay-robust gene circuits for synthetic biology. Results A nonlinear stochastic dynamic model with multiple time delays is proposed for describing a gene network under process delays, intrinsic molecular fluctuations, and extrinsic molecular noises. Then, the stochastic biochemical processing scheme of gene regulatory networks for attenuating these molecular noises and compensating process delays is investigated from the nonlinear signal processing perspective. In order to improve the robust stability for delay toleration and noise filtering, a robust gene circuit for nonlinear stochastic time-delay gene networks is engineered based on the nonlinear robust H∞ stochastic filtering scheme. Further, in order to avoid solving these complicated noise-tolerant and delay-robust design problems, based on Takagi-Sugeno (T-S fuzzy time-delay model and linear matrix inequalities (LMIs technique, a systematic gene circuit design method is proposed to simplify the design procedure. Conclusion The proposed gene circuit design method has much potential for application to systems biology, synthetic biology and drug design when a gene regulatory network has to be designed for improving its robust stability and filtering ability of disease-perturbed gene network or when a synthetic gene network needs to perform robustly under process delays and molecular noises.

  12. Reductive dehalogenation of aryl halides over palladium catalysts deposited on SBA-15 type molecular sieve modified with amine donor groups

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štěpnička, P.; Semler, M.; Demel, J.; Zukal, Arnošt; Čejka, Jiří

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 341, č. 1-2 (2011), s. 97-102 ISSN 1381-1169 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/0561 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : heterogeneous catalysts * supported catalysts * palladium Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.947, year: 2011

  13. Nanosized ruthenium particles decorated carbon nanofibers as active catalysts for the oxidation of p-cymene by molecular oxygen

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Makgwane, PR

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available catalysts was influenced by the structural properties that resulted from the different metal loadings and by various reaction variables, such as the temperature, the amount of catalyst and the type of radical–initiator substrate. Under optimized reaction...

  14. The Journal of Computer- Aided Molecular Design: a bibliometric note

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willett, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Summarizes the articles in, and the citations to, volumes 2-24 of the Journal of Computer- Aided Molecular Design. The citations to the journal come from almost 2000 different sources that span a very wide range of academic subjects, with the most heavily cited articles being descriptions of software systems and of computational methods.

  15. Dispersed metal cluster catalysts by design. Synthesis, characterization, structure, and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslan, Ilke [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dixon, David A. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Gates, Bruce C. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Katz, Alexander [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    To understand the class of metal cluster catalysts better and to lay a foundation for the prediction of properties leading to improved catalysts, we have synthesized metal catalysts with well-defined structures and varied the cluster structures and compositions systematically—including the ligands bonded to the metals. These ligands include supports and bulky organics that are being tuned to control both the electron transfer to or from the metal and the accessibility of reactants to influence catalytic properties. We have developed novel syntheses to prepare these well-defined catalysts with atomic-scale control the environment by choice and placement of ligands and applied state-of-the art spectroscopic, microscopic, and computational methods to determine their structures, reactivities, and catalytic properties. The ligands range from nearly flat MgO surfaces to enveloping zeolites to bulky calixarenes to provide controlled coverages of the metal clusters, while also enforcing unprecedented degrees of coordinative unsaturation at the metal site—thereby facilitating bonding and catalysis events at exposed metal atoms. With this wide range of ligand properties and our arsenal of characterization tools, we worked to achieve a deep, fundamental understanding of how to synthesize robust supported and ligand-modified metal clusters with controlled catalytic properties, thereby bridging the gap between active site structure and function in unsupported and supported metal catalysts. We used methods of organometallic and inorganic chemistry combined with surface chemistry for the precise synthesis of metal clusters and nanoparticles, characterizing them at various stages of preparation and under various conditions (including catalytic reaction conditions) and determining their structures and reactivities and how their catalytic properties depend on their compositions and structures. Key characterization methods included IR, NMR, and EXAFS spectroscopies to identify

  16. Molecular Design and Functional Control of Novel Self-Oscillating Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Yoshida

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available If we could realize an autonomous polymer system driven under biological conditions by a tailor-made molecular design, human beings could create unprecedented biomimetic functions and materials such as heartbeats, autonomous peristaltic pumps, etc. In order to achieve this objective, we have investigated the molecular design of such a polymer system. As a result, we were the first to demonstrate a self-oscillating polymer system driven in a solution where only malonic acid existed, which could convert the chemical energy of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ reaction into a change in the conformation of the polymer chain. To cause the self-oscillation in solution, we have attempted to construct a built-in system where the required BZ system substrates other than the organic acid are incorporated into the polymer itself. That is, the novel polymer chain incorporated the metal catalyst of the BZ reaction, a pH-control site and an oxidant supply site at the same time. As a result of introducing the pH control and oxidant supply sites into the conventional-type self-oscillating polymer chain, the novel polymer chain caused aggregation-disaggregation self-oscillations in the solution. We clarified that the period of the self-oscillation of the novel self-oscillating polymer chain was proportional to the concentration of the malonic acid. Therefore, the concentration of the malonic acid can be determined by measuring the period of the novel self-oscillating polymer solution. In this review, we introduce the detailed molecular design of the novel self-oscillating polymer chain and its self-oscillating behavior. Moreover, we report an autonomous self-oscillating polymer gel actuator that causes a bending-stretching motion under the constant conditions.

  17. Oxidation catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  18. Micro-/nanostructured multicomponent molecular materials: design, assembly, and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dongpeng

    2015-03-23

    Molecule-based micro-/nanomaterials have attracted considerable attention because their properties can vary greatly from the corresponding macro-sized bulk systems. Recently, the construction of multicomponent molecular solids based on crystal engineering principles has emerged as a promising alternative way to develop micro-/nanomaterials. Unlike single-component materials, the resulting multicomponent systems offer the advantages of tunable composition, and adjustable molecular arrangement, and intermolecular interactions within their solid states. The study of these materials also supplies insight into how the crystal structure, molecular components, and micro-/nanoscale effects can influence the performance of molecular materials. In this review, we describe recent advances and current directions in the assembly and applications of crystalline multicomponent micro-/nanostructures. Firstly, the design strategies for multicomponent systems based on molecular recognition and crystal engineering principles are introduced. Attention is then focused on the methods of fabrication of low-dimensional multicomponent micro-/nanostructures. Their new applications are also outlined. Finally, we briefly discuss perspectives for the further development of these molecular crystalline micro-/nanomaterials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Design of Carborane Molecular Architectures via Electronic Structure Computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva, J.M.; Serrano-Andres, L.; Klein, D.J.; Schleyer, P.V.R.; Mich, J.

    2009-01-01

    Quantum-mechanical electronic structure computations were employed to explore initial steps towards a comprehensive design of poly carborane architectures through assembly of molecular units. Aspects considered were (i) the striking modification of geometrical parameters through substitution, (ii) endohedral carboranes and proposed ejection mechanisms for energy/ion/atom/energy storage/transport, (iii) the excited state character in single and dimeric molecular units, and (iv) higher architectural constructs. A goal of this work is to find optimal architectures where atom/ion/energy/spin transport within carborane superclusters is feasible in order to modernize and improve future photo energy processes.

  20. A computer-aided molecular design framework for crystallization solvent design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karunanithi, Arunprakash T.; Achenie, Luke E.K.; Gani, Rafiqul

    2006-01-01

    One of the key decisions in designing solution crystallization processes is the selection of solvents. In this paper, we present a computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) framework for the design and selection of solvents and/or anti-solvents for solution crystallization. The CAMD problem is formu......One of the key decisions in designing solution crystallization processes is the selection of solvents. In this paper, we present a computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) framework for the design and selection of solvents and/or anti-solvents for solution crystallization. The CAMD problem...... solvent molecules. Solvent design and selection for two types of solution crystallization processes namely cooling crystallization and drowning out crystallization are presented. In the first case study, the design of single compound solvent for crystallization of ibuprofen, which is an important...

  1. Molecular Level Control Through Dual Site Participation Using Bimetallic Catalysts - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    d' Itri, Julie, L.; Kovalchuk, Vladimir, I.

    2010-02-08

    The overall goal of this research program was to explore the hypothesis that it is possible to design a bimetallic surface such that each metal catalyzes different elementary reaction steps in an overall reaction pathway. A corollary to this hypothesis is that the different ensemble size requirements for an elementary reaction step can be used to force an elementary reaction step to occur on only one of the metals. The research program involved a combination of materials synthesis, chemical kinetics experiments, spectroscopic studies and computational investigations. The major outcome of this research program was the development and dissemination of the Dual Site Model, for which chlorocarbon reactions in the presence of hydrogen were used as model systems.

  2. Catalysts and methods for converting carbonaceous materials to fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Jesse; Ruddy, Daniel A.; Schaidle, Joshua A.; Behl, Mayank

    2017-07-25

    Catalysts and processes designed to convert DME and/or methanol and hydrogen (H.sub.2) to desirable liquid fuels are described. These catalysts produce the fuels efficiently and with a high selectivity and yield, and reduce the formation of aromatic hydrocarbons by incorporating H.sub.2 into the products. Also described are process methods to further upgrade these fuels to higher molecular weight liquid fuel mixtures, which have physical properties comparable with current commercially used liquid fuels.

  3. Catalysts and methods for converting carbonaceous materials to fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hensley, Jesse; Ruddy, Daniel A.; Schaidle, Joshua A.; Behl, Mayank

    2017-10-31

    Catalysts and processes designed to convert DME and/or methanol and hydrogen (H.sub.2) to desirable liquid fuels are described. These catalysts produce the fuels efficiently and with a high selectivity and yield, and reduce the formation of aromatic hydrocarbons by incorporating H.sub.2 into the products. Also described are process methods to further upgrade these fuels to higher molecular weight liquid fuel mixtures, which have physical properties comparable with current commercially used liquid fuels.

  4. Catalysts and methods for converting carbonaceous materials to fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hensley, Jesse; Ruddy, Daniel A.; Schaidle, Joshua A.; Behl, Mayank

    2017-10-24

    This disclosure relates to catalysts and processes designed to convert DME and/or methanol and hydrogen (H.sub.2) to desirable liquid fuels. These catalysts produce the fuels efficiently and with a high selectivity and yield, and reduce the formation of aromatic hydrocarbons by incorporating H.sub.2 into the products. This disclosure also describes process methods to further upgrade these fuels to higher molecular weight liquid fuel mixtures, which have physical properties comparable with current commercially used liquid fuels.

  5. Resonance Raman and IR spectroscopy of aligned carbon nanotube arrays with extremely narrow diameters prepared with molecular catalysts on steel substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sagar Motilal; Cesano, Federico; Scarano, Domenica; Edvinsson, Tomas

    2017-11-22

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered promising for a large range of emerging technologies ranging from advanced electronics to utilization as nanoreactors. Here we report a controlled facile synthesis of aligned carbon nanotubes with very small dimensions directly grown on steel grid substrates via two-step catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) of a molecular catalyst (ferrocene) with ethylene as the carbon source. The system is characterized by resonance Raman spectroscopy and the results show single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) arrays composed of 0.80 nm to 1.24 nm semiconducting CNTs, as analyzed using Kataura analysis, which is approaching the lowest diameters attainable for SWCNTs. The G + and G - mode splitting, G - line shapes and ring breathing modes (RBMs) are analyzed to characterize the CNTs. The approach results in close packed and vertically aligned SWCNT bundles formed into hair shapes, with some contribution from multiwall CNTs (MWCNTs). IR spectroscopy is utilized to characterize the edge/defect states that have the ability to form esters and ether bonds in the as-prepared CNTs. The stepwise deposition of the catalyst followed by the carbon source gives control over the formation of small diameter single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The utilization of molecular catalysts for narrow diameter growth directly on steel grid substrates forms a promising approach for producing cost-effective CNT substrates for a plethora of sensing and catalytic applications.

  6. Computationally Probing the Performance of Hybrid, Heterogeneous, and Homogeneous Iridium-Based Catalysts for Water Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Melchor, Max [SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis, Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford CA (United States); Vilella, Laia [Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ), The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST),Tarragona (Spain); Departament de Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); López, Núria [Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ), The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST), Tarragona (Spain); Vojvodic, Aleksandra [SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park CA (United States)

    2016-04-29

    An attractive strategy to improve the performance of water oxidation catalysts would be to anchor a homogeneous molecular catalyst on a heterogeneous solid surface to create a hybrid catalyst. The idea of this combined system is to take advantage of the individual properties of each of the two catalyst components. We use Density Functional Theory to determine the stability and activity of a model hybrid water oxidation catalyst consisting of a dimeric Ir complex attached on the IrO2(110) surface through two oxygen atoms. We find that homogeneous catalysts can be bound to its matrix oxide without losing significant activity. Hence, designing hybrid systems that benefit from both the high tunability of activity of homogeneous catalysts and the stability of heterogeneous systems seems feasible.

  7. Probing the molecular design of hyper-branched aryl polyesters towards lubricant applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Joshua W; Zhou, Yan; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Erck, Robert; Qu, Jun; Bays, J Timothy; Cosimbescu, Lelia

    2016-01-05

    We report novel polymeric materials that may be used as viscosity index improvers (VII) for lubricant applications. Our efforts included probing the comb-burst hyper-branched aryl polyester architecture for beneficial viscosity and friction behavior when utilized as an additive in a group I oil. The monomer was designed as to undergo polymerization via polycondensation within the architectural construct (AB2), typical of hyperbranched polymers. The monomer design was comprised of aliphatic arms (12 or 16 methylenes) to provide the necessary lipophilicity to achieve solubility in a non-polar medium. Once polymerized, via catalyst and heat, the surface alcohols were functionalized with fatty acids (lauric and palmitic). Controlling the aliphatic nature of the internal arms and peripheral end-groups provided four unique flexible polymer designs. Changing the reaction time and concentration provided opportunities to investigate the influence of molecular weight and branching density on oil-solubility, viscosity, and friction. Oil-solubility was found to decrease with fewer internal carbons, but the number of internal carbons appears to have little influence on the bulk solution viscosity. At concentrations of 2 wt % in a group I base oil, these polymer additives demonstrated an improved viscosity index and reduced friction coefficient, validating the basic approach.

  8. Catalytic ethanolysis of Kraft lignin into high-value small-molecular chemicals over a nanostructured α-molybdenum carbide catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Rui; Hao, Wenyue; Ma, Xiaolei; Tian, Ye; Li, Yongdan

    2014-07-07

    We report the complete ethanolysis of Kraft lignin over an α-MoC1-x /AC catalyst in pure ethanol at 280 °C to give high-value chemicals of low molecular weight with a maximum overall yield of the 25 most abundant liquid products (LP25) of 1.64 g per gram of lignin. The LP25 products consisted of C6 -C10 esters, alcohols, arenes, phenols, and benzyl alcohols with an overall heating value of 36.5 MJ kg(-1) . C6 alcohols and C8 esters predominated and accounted for 82 wt % of the LP25 products. No oligomers or char were formed in the process. With our catalyst, ethanol is the only effective solvent for the reaction. Supercritical ethanol on its own degrades Kraft lignin into a mixture of small molecules and molecular fragments of intermediate size with molecular weights in the range 700-1400, differing in steps of 58 units, which is the weight of the branched-chain linkage C3 H6 O in lignin. Hydrogen was found to have a negative effect on the formation of the low-molecular-weight products. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Titanium(IV) in the organic-structure-directing-agent-free synthesis of hydrophobic and large-pore molecular sieves as redox catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingui; Yokoi, Toshiyuki; Kondo, Junko N; Tatsumi, Takashi; Zhao, Yanli

    2015-08-10

    Titanium(IV) incorporated into the framework of molecular sieves can be used as a highly active and sustainable catalyst for the oxidation of industrially important organic molecules. Unfortunately, the current process for the incorporation of titanium(IV) requires a large amount of expensive organic molecules used as organic-structure-directing agents (OSDAs), and this significantly increases the production costs and causes environmental problems owing to the removal of OSDAs by pyrolysis. Herein, an OSDA-free process was developed to incorporate titanium(IV) into BEA-type molecular sieves for the first time. More importantly, the hydrophobic environment and the robust, 3 D, and large pore structure of the titanium(IV)-incorporated molecular sieves fabricated from the OSDA-free process created a catalyst that was extremely active and selective for the epoxidation of bulky cyclooctene in comparison to Ti-incorporated BEA-type molecular sieves synthesized with OSDAs and commercial titanosilicate TS-1. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Nano-nitride cathode catalysts of Ti, Ta, and Nb for polymer electrolyte fuel cells: Temperature-programmed desorption investigation of molecularly adsorbed oxygen at low temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Ohnishi, Ryohji

    2013-01-10

    TiN, NbN, TaN, and Ta3N5 nanoparticles synthesized using mesoporous graphitic (mpg)-C3N4 templates were investigated for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as cathode catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of molecularly adsorbed O2 at 120-170 K from these nanoparticles was examined, and the resulting amount and temperature of desorption were key factors determining the ORR activity. The size-dependent TiN nanoparticles (5-8 and 100 nm) were then examined. With decreasing particle size, the density of molecularly adsorbed O2 per unit of surface area increased, indicating that a decrease in particle size increases the number of active sites. It is hard to determine the electrochemical active surface area for nonmetal electrocatalysts (such as oxides or nitrides), because of the absence of proton adsorption/desorption peaks in the voltammograms. In this study, O2-TPD for molecularly adsorbed O2 at low temperature demonstrated that the amount and strength of adsorbed O2 were key factors determining the ORR activity. The properties of molecularly adsorbed O2 on cathode catalysts are discussed against the ORR activity. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  11. The production of high efficiency Ziegler-Natta catalyst with dual active sites nature using cyclohexyl chloride as promoter with super activity and produced superior polyethylene with controllable molecular weight distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifali Abbas-Abadi, Mehrdad

    2017-01-01

    In the previous studies, the several halocarbons (HC) were tested as promoters for a Ti-based Ziegler-Natta (ZN) catalyst at different polymerization conditions. The Results showed that chloro cyclohexane has the best operation in catalyst activity, polymer particle size growth, hydrogen responsibility and wax reduction too. For the first time in this study, the effect of Al/Ti ratio on the optimum HC/Ti ratio has been considered and the results showed that the optimum HC/Ti ratio depends on the Al/Ti ratio directly. In the optimum HC/Ti ratio, the catalyst activity and hydrogen responsibility ratio of the catalyst increase up to 125 and 55% respectively. The acceptable growth of polymer powder up to 46%, lower flow rate ratio (FRR) up to 19% and decrease of wax amount up to 12%, completed the promotion results. Furthermore, in the next part of this study and as key note, a little dose of halocarbon was used in the catalyst preparation to produce the special catalysts with dual active sites. In the catalyst preparation, the concentration of each active sites depends on the halocarbon amount and it can control the molecular weight distribution of the produced polyethylene; because each active sites have different response to hydrogen. The halocarbon based catalysts showed the remarkable effect on the catalyst activity, the molecular weight and especially molecular weight distribution (MWD). The flow rate ratio and MWD could be increased up to 77 and 88% respectively as the main result of halocarbon addition during the catalyst preparation.

  12. Towards rational design of catalysts supported on a topological insulator substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Jianping; Kou, Liangzhi; Yam, Chi-Yung; Frauenheim, Thomas; Yan, Binghai

    2015-01-01

    Exotic and robust metallic surface states of topological insulators (TIs) have been expected to provide a promising platform for novel surface chemistry and catalysis. However, it is still an unprecedented field how TIs affect the activity of catalysts. In this work, we study the effects of topological surface states (TSSs) on the activity of transition metal clusters (Au, Ag, Cu, Pt, and Pd), which are supported on a TI Bi2Se3 substrate. It was found the adsorption energy of oxygen on the su...

  13. Molecular design of responsive fluids: molecular dynamics studies of viscoelastic surfactant solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boek, E. S.; Jusufi, A.; Löwen, H.; Maitland, G. C.

    2002-10-01

    Understanding how macroscopic properties depend on intermolecular interactions for complex fluid systems is an enormous challenge in statistical mechanics. This issue is of particular importance for designing optimal industrial fluid formulations such as responsive oilfield fluids, based on viscoelastic surfactant solutions. We have carried out extensive molecular dynamics simulations, resolving the full chemical details in order to study how the structure of the lamellar phase of viscoelastic surfactant solutions depends on the head group (HG) chemistry of the surfactant. In particular, we consider anionic carboxylate and quaternary ammonium HGs with erucyl tails in aqueous solutions together with their sodium and chloride counterions at room temperature. We find a strong HG dependence of the lamellar structure as characterized by suitable pair correlation functions and density distributions. The depth of penetration of water into the bilayer membrane, the nature of counterion condensation on the HGs and even the order and correlation of the tails in the lamellae depend sensitively on the chemical details of the HG. We also determine the compressibility of the lamellar system as a first step to using atom-resolved molecular dynamics in order to link the molecular and macroscopic scales of length and time. The results give important insight into the links between molecular details and surfactant phase structure which is being exploited to develop more systematic procedures for the molecular design and formulation of industrial systems.

  14. Design of non-molecular coordination solids from aqueous solution ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. Chem. Sci. Vol. 126, No. 5, September 2014, pp. 1433–1442. c Indian Academy of Sciences. Design of non-molecular coordination solids from aqueous solution: [Cu. II. LnX(H2O)], where X=SO4, Cl or H2O and L=pyrazole, imidazole or glutamic acid and n=1 or 4. VINEET KUMARa, ARITRA KUNDUa, MONIKA SINGHa,.

  15. Central composite design approach towards optimization of flamboyant pods derived steam activated carbon for its use as heterogeneous catalyst in transesterification of Hevea brasiliensis oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhawane, Sumit H.; Kumar, Tarkeshwar; Halder, Gopinath

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Activated carbon was prepared from novel precursor flamboyant pods (Delonix regia). • Activation process was optimized using central composite design approach. • Prepared activated carbon at optimized condition was used as support for KOH. • Carbon based heterogeneous catalyst was used in transesterification of HBO. • Effect of catalyst loading and alcohol ratio on biodiesel yield was studied. - Abstract: The present investigation emphasises the preparation of carbon based KOH impregnated heterogeneous catalyst from flamboyant pods (Delonix regia) for the production of biodiesel from novel feedstock Hevea brasiliensis oil (HBO). Initially, carbonized char was physically activated by superheated steam and the process was optimized to study the effects of activation time and temperature by central composite design approach (CCD) using response surface methodology (RSM). Activated carbon was impregnated with KOH at four different ratios. Biodiesel production process was carried out at constant temperature 60 °C, reaction time 1 h, and 5 g of carbon based catalyst at varying quantities of catalyst loading (0.5, 2, 3.5, 5 wt%) and methanol to oil ratio (5:1–20:1). The influence of parameters on the biodiesel yield at varied condition was studied. Maximum yield of 89.3% was obtained at methanol to oil ratio 15:1 and catalyst loading 3.5 wt% and corresponding yield at same process parameters was observed to be 88.7% implying the significant activity of catalyst in reutilization. Produced biodiesel was characterized following ASTM standards. The experimental analysis confirmed that the carbonaceous catalyst developed from flamboyant pods under optimized condition is capable of transesterifying HBO into biodiesel

  16. Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harold, Michael [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States); Crocker, Mark [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Balakotaiah, Vemuri [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States); Luss, Dan [Univ. of Houston, TX (United States); Choi, Jae-Soon [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Dearth, Mark [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); McCabe, Bob [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States); Theis, Joe [Ford Motor Company, Dearborn, MI (United States)

    2013-09-30

    alternative reductants such as propylene, representing the hydrocarbon component of diesel exhaust. First-principle models of the LNT and SCR converters, which utilized the mechanistic-based kinetics and realistic treatments of the flow and transport processes, in combination with bench-scale reactor experiments helped to identify the best designs for combining the NSR and SCR catalysts over a range of operating conditions encountered in practice. This included catalysts having multiple zones and layers and additives with the focus on determining the minimal precious metal component needed to meet emission abatement targets over a wide range of operating conditions. The findings from this study provide diesel vehicle and catalyst companies valuable information to develop more cost effective diesel emissions catalysts which helps to expand the use of more fuel efficient diesel power. The fundamental modeling and experimental tools and findings from this project can be applied to catalyst technologies used in the energy and chemical industries. Finally, the project also led to training of several doctoral students who were placed in research jobs in industry and academia.

  17. Enhanced Molecular Dynamics Methods Applied to Drug Design Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziada, Sonia; Braka, Abdennour; Diharce, Julien; Aci-Sèche, Samia; Bonnet, Pascal

    2018-01-01

    Nobel Laureate Richard P. Feynman stated: "[…] everything that living things do can be understood in terms of jiggling and wiggling of atoms […]." The importance of computer simulations of macromolecules, which use classical mechanics principles to describe atom behavior, is widely acknowledged and nowadays, they are applied in many fields such as material sciences and drug discovery. With the increase of computing power, molecular dynamics simulations can be applied to understand biological mechanisms at realistic timescales. In this chapter, we share our computational experience providing a global view of two of the widely used enhanced molecular dynamics methods to study protein structure and dynamics through the description of their characteristics, limits and we provide some examples of their applications in drug design. We also discuss the appropriate choice of software and hardware. In a detailed practical procedure, we describe how to set up, run, and analyze two main molecular dynamics methods, the umbrella sampling (US) and the accelerated molecular dynamics (aMD) methods.

  18. Biomimetic molecular design tools that learn, evolve, and adapt

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    A dominant hallmark of living systems is their ability to adapt to changes in the environment by learning and evolving. Nature does this so superbly that intensive research efforts are now attempting to mimic biological processes. Initially this biomimicry involved developing synthetic methods to generate complex bioactive natural products. Recent work is attempting to understand how molecular machines operate so their principles can be copied, and learning how to employ biomimetic evolution and learning methods to solve complex problems in science, medicine and engineering. Automation, robotics, artificial intelligence, and evolutionary algorithms are now converging to generate what might broadly be called in silico-based adaptive evolution of materials. These methods are being applied to organic chemistry to systematize reactions, create synthesis robots to carry out unit operations, and to devise closed loop flow self-optimizing chemical synthesis systems. Most scientific innovations and technologies pass through the well-known “S curve”, with slow beginning, an almost exponential growth in capability, and a stable applications period. Adaptive, evolving, machine learning-based molecular design and optimization methods are approaching the period of very rapid growth and their impact is already being described as potentially disruptive. This paper describes new developments in biomimetic adaptive, evolving, learning computational molecular design methods and their potential impacts in chemistry, engineering, and medicine. PMID:28694872

  19. Biomimetic molecular design tools that learn, evolve, and adapt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A Winkler

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available A dominant hallmark of living systems is their ability to adapt to changes in the environment by learning and evolving. Nature does this so superbly that intensive research efforts are now attempting to mimic biological processes. Initially this biomimicry involved developing synthetic methods to generate complex bioactive natural products. Recent work is attempting to understand how molecular machines operate so their principles can be copied, and learning how to employ biomimetic evolution and learning methods to solve complex problems in science, medicine and engineering. Automation, robotics, artificial intelligence, and evolutionary algorithms are now converging to generate what might broadly be called in silico-based adaptive evolution of materials. These methods are being applied to organic chemistry to systematize reactions, create synthesis robots to carry out unit operations, and to devise closed loop flow self-optimizing chemical synthesis systems. Most scientific innovations and technologies pass through the well-known “S curve”, with slow beginning, an almost exponential growth in capability, and a stable applications period. Adaptive, evolving, machine learning-based molecular design and optimization methods are approaching the period of very rapid growth and their impact is already being described as potentially disruptive. This paper describes new developments in biomimetic adaptive, evolving, learning computational molecular design methods and their potential impacts in chemistry, engineering, and medicine.

  20. Biomimetic molecular design tools that learn, evolve, and adapt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, David A

    2017-01-01

    A dominant hallmark of living systems is their ability to adapt to changes in the environment by learning and evolving. Nature does this so superbly that intensive research efforts are now attempting to mimic biological processes. Initially this biomimicry involved developing synthetic methods to generate complex bioactive natural products. Recent work is attempting to understand how molecular machines operate so their principles can be copied, and learning how to employ biomimetic evolution and learning methods to solve complex problems in science, medicine and engineering. Automation, robotics, artificial intelligence, and evolutionary algorithms are now converging to generate what might broadly be called in silico-based adaptive evolution of materials. These methods are being applied to organic chemistry to systematize reactions, create synthesis robots to carry out unit operations, and to devise closed loop flow self-optimizing chemical synthesis systems. Most scientific innovations and technologies pass through the well-known "S curve", with slow beginning, an almost exponential growth in capability, and a stable applications period. Adaptive, evolving, machine learning-based molecular design and optimization methods are approaching the period of very rapid growth and their impact is already being described as potentially disruptive. This paper describes new developments in biomimetic adaptive, evolving, learning computational molecular design methods and their potential impacts in chemistry, engineering, and medicine.

  1. Design of Polymer-Coated Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube/Carbon Black-based Fuel Cell Catalysts with High Durability and Performance Under Non-humidified Condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zehui; Berber, Mohamed R.; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-01-01

    To realize a high catalyst utilization, better fuel cell performance and durability as well as low production cost, an efficient design strategy of the catalyst layer that can improve both the oxygen accessibility and structure stability is highly required. Here, we describe the preparation of fuel cell electrocatalysts with an efficient fuel cell performance and better stability based on hybrids of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and carbon black (CB) which were wrapped by a proton conducting polymer, poly[2,2′-(2,6-pyridine)-5,5′-bibenzimidazole], before deposition of the platinum (Pt) metal catalyst. The catalyst mass activity after feeding only 10%-MWNTs to CB increased by 1.5 and 2 times than those of the MWNTs-based- and CB-based catalysts, respectively. The results also demonstrated that 90 wt% of the MWNTs in the catalyst layer allows it to be replaced by CB without any significant change in its durability and performance under 120 °C and non-humidified condition

  2. Hollow Nano- and Microstructures as Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Gonzalo; Tüysüz, Harun; Duyckaerts, Nicolas; Knossalla, Johannes; Wang, Guang-Hui; Schüth, Ferdi

    2016-11-23

    Catalysis is at the core of almost every established and emerging chemical process and also plays a central role in the quest for novel technologies for the sustainable production and conversion of energy. Particularly since the early 2000s, a great surge of interest exists in the design and application of micro- and nanometer-sized materials with hollow interiors as solid catalysts. This review provides an updated and critical survey of the ever-expanding material architectures and applications of hollow structures in all branches of catalysis, including bio-, electro-, and photocatalysis. First, the main synthesis strategies toward hollow materials are succinctly summarized, with emphasis on the (regioselective) incorporation of various types of catalytic functionalities within their different subunits. The principles underlying the scientific and technological interest in hollow materials as solid catalysts, or catalyst carriers, are then comprehensively reviewed. Aspects covered include the stabilization of catalysts by encapsulation, the introduction of molecular sieving or stimuli-responsive "auxiliary" functionalities, as well as the single-particle, spatial compartmentalization of various catalytic functions to create multifunctional (bio)catalysts. Examples are also given on the applications which hollow structures find in the emerging fields of electro- and photocatalysis, particularly in the context of the sustainable production of chemical energy carriers. Finally, a critical perspective is provided on the plausible evolution lines for this thriving scientific field, as well as the main practical challenges relevant to the reproducible and scalable synthesis and utilization of hollow micro- and nanostructures as solid catalysts.

  3. Developing Selective Oxidation Catalysts of Light Alkanes:. from Fundamental Understanding to Rational Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Gang; Yi, Xiaodong; Huang, Chuanjing; Xu, Xin; Weng, Weizheng; Xia, Wensheng; Wan, Hui-Lin

    Selective oxidation of light alkanes remains to be a great challenge for the wider use of alkanes as feedstocks. To achieve high activity and at the same time high selectivity, some key issues have to be addressed: (1) the stability of the desired products with respect to the reactants; (2) the roles of the active components in the catalysts, the structure and the functionality of the active centers; (3) the reducibility of the metal cations, the Lewis acid sites and their synergic effects with the basic sites of the lattice oxygen anions; (4) spatial isolation of the active centers; and (5) the mechanisms for the formation and transformation of the intermediates and their kinetic controls. In this contribution, we took selective oxidation of propane to acrolein as our target reaction, and reviewed mainly our own work, trying to provide some thinking and answers to these five questions.

  4. Supported nano gold as a recyclable catalyst for green, selective and efficient oxidation of alcohol using molecular oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashir Dar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The myth that gold cannot act as a catalyst has been discarded in view of recent studies, which have demonstrated the high catalytic efficiency of pure nano-gold and supported nano-gold catalysts. In recent years, numerous papers have described the use of supported nano-gold particles for catalysis in view of their action on CO and O2 to form CO2, as well as a variety of other reactions. Special emphasis is placed on the oxidation studies undertaken on model nano-Au systems. In this work a solvent free oxidation of 1-phenyl ethanol was carried out using gold supported on ceria-silica, ceria-titania, ceria- zirconia and ceria-alumina at 160 0C. Almost 88-97% conversion was obtained with >99% selectivity. Temperature screening was done from 70 to 160 0C.Catalysts were prepared by deposition co-precipitation method and deposition was determined by EDEX analysis.

  5. Molecular heterogeneous catalysts derived from bipyridine-based organosilica nanotubes for C–H bond activation† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, material characterization data, catalytic measurement details. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc00713b Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shengbo; Wang, Hua; Li, Mei; Han, Jinyu

    2017-01-01

    Heterogeneous metal complex catalysts for direct C–H activation with high activity and durability have always been desired for transforming raw materials into feedstock chemicals. This study described the design and synthesis of one-dimensional organosilica nanotubes containing 2,2′-bipyridine (bpy) ligands in the framework (BPy-NT) and their post-synthetic metalation to provide highly active and robust molecular heterogeneous catalysts. By adjusting the ratios of organosilane precursors, very short BPy-NT with ∼50 nm length could be controllably obtained. The post-synthetic metalation of bipyridine-functionalized nanotubes with [IrCp*Cl(μ-Cl)]2 (Cp* = η5-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) and [Ir(cod)(OMe)]2 (cod = 1,5-cyclooctadiene) afforded solid catalysts, IrCp*-BPy-NT and Ir(cod)-BPy-NT, which were utilized for C–H oxidation of heterocycles and cycloalkanes as well as C–H borylation of arenes. The cut-short nanotube catalysts displayed enhanced activities and durability as compared to the analogous homogeneous catalysts and other conventional heterogeneous catalysts, benefiting from the isolated active sites as well as the fast transport of substrates and products. After the reactions, a detailed characterization of Ir-immobilized BPy-NT via TEM, SEM, nitrogen adsorption, UV/vis, XPS, and 13C CP MAS NMR indicated the molecular nature of the active species as well as stable structures of nanotube scaffolds. This study demonstrates the potential of BPy-NT with a short length as an integration platform for the construction of efficient heterogeneous catalytic systems for organic transformations. PMID:28970878

  6. Application of Generative Autoencoder in De Novo Molecular Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaschke, Thomas; Olivecrona, Marcus; Engkvist, Ola; Bajorath, Jürgen; Chen, Hongming

    2018-01-01

    A major challenge in computational chemistry is the generation of novel molecular structures with desirable pharmacological and physiochemical properties. In this work, we investigate the potential use of autoencoder, a deep learning methodology, for de novo molecular design. Various generative autoencoders were used to map molecule structures into a continuous latent space and vice versa and their performance as structure generator was assessed. Our results show that the latent space preserves chemical similarity principle and thus can be used for the generation of analogue structures. Furthermore, the latent space created by autoencoders were searched systematically to generate novel compounds with predicted activity against dopamine receptor type 2 and compounds similar to known active compounds not included in the trainings set were identified. © 2018 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  7. Influence of Multi-Valency, Electrostatics and Molecular Recognition on the Adsorption of Transition Metal Complexes on Metal Oxides: A Molecular Approach to Catalyst Synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rioux, Robert M. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    2017-03-31

    In this work, we have primarily utilized isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and complimentary catalyst characterization techniques to study and assess the impact of solution conditions (i.e., solid-liquid) interface on the synthesis of heterogeneous and electro-catalysts. Isothermal titration calorimetry is well-known technique from biochemistry/physics, but has been applied to a far lesser extent to characterize buried solid-liquid interfaces in materials science. We demonstrate the utility and unique information provided by ITC for two distinct catalytic systems. We explored the thermodynamics associated catalyst synthesis for two systems: (i) ion-exchange or strong electrostatic adsorption for Pt and Pd salts on silica and alumina materials (ii) adsorption to provide covalent attachment of metal and metal-oxo clusters to Dion-Jacobsen perovskite materials.

  8. Gold-catalyzed aerobic epoxidation of trans-stilbene in methylcyclohexane. Part I: Design of a reference catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Guillois, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    The kinetics of the heterogeneous gold-catalyzed aerobic epoxidation of stilbene in the liquid phase has been shown to be hindered by diffusion limitations, due to the use of supports which are unsuitable to apolar reaction media. The choice of these supports is generally dictated by the ability of standard methods of preparation to stabilize highly dispersed gold nanoparticles on them. Hence, new methods need to be designed in order to produce catalytically active gold nanoparticles on hydrophobic supports in general and on passivated silicas in particular. By investigating Tsukuda\\'s method to produce colloidal solutions of gold nanoparticles upon reduction of the triphenylphosphine gold chloride complex in solution, we found that direct reduction of AuPPh3Cl in the presence of a commercially available silica support functionalized with dimethylsiloxane, Aerosil R972, leads, in a highly reproducible and potentially scalable way, to the best catalyst ever reported for this reaction. (C) 2011 Elsevier BM. All rights reserved.

  9. "Intelligent" design of molecular materials: Understanding the concepts of design in supramolecular synthesis of network solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulton, Brian D.

    This work endeavors to delineate modern paradigms for crystal engineering, i.e. the design and supramolecular synthesis of functional molecular materials. Paradigms predicated on an understanding of the geometry of polygons and polyhedra are developed. The primary focus is on structural determination by single crystal X-ray crystallography, structural interpretation using a suite of graphical visualization and molecular modeling software, and on the importance of proper graphical representation in the presentation and explanation of crystal structures. A detailed analysis of a selected series of crystal structures is presented. The reduction of these molecular networks to schematic representations that illustrate their fundamental connectivity facilitates the understanding of otherwise complex supramolecular solids. Circuit symbols and Schlafli notation are used to describe the network topologies, which enables networks of different composition and metrics to be easily compared. This reveals that molecular orientations in the crystals and networks are commensurate with networks that can be derived from spherical close packed lattices. The development of a logical design strategy for a new class of materials based on our understanding of the chemical composition and topology of these networks is described. The synthesis and crystal structure of a series of new materials generated by exploitation of this design strategy is presented, in addition to a detailed analysis of the topology of these materials and their relationship to a 'parent' structure. In summary, this dissertation demonstrates that molecular polygons can self-assemble at their vertexes to produce molecular architectures and crystal structures that are consistent with long established geometric dogma. The design strategy represents a potentially broad ranging approach to the design of nanoporous structures from a wide range of chemical components that are based on molecular shape rather than chemical

  10. Solar Hydrogen Production Using Molecular Catalysts Immobilized on Gallium Phosphide (111)A and (111)B Polymer-Modified Photocathodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beiler, Anna M; Khusnutdinova, Diana; Jacob, Samuel I; Moore, Gary F

    2016-04-20

    We report the immobilization of hydrogen-producing cobaloxime catalysts onto p-type gallium phosphide (111)A and (111)B substrates via coordination to a surface-grafted polyvinylimidazole brush. Successful grafting of the polymeric interface and subsequent assembly of cobalt-containing catalysts are confirmed using grazing angle attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Photoelectrochemical testing in aqueous conditions at neutral pH shows that cobaloxime modification of either crystal face yields a similar enhancement of photoperformance, achieving a greater than 4-fold increase in current density and associated rates of hydrogen production as compared to results obtained using unfunctionalized electrodes tested under otherwise identical conditions. Under simulated solar illumination (100 mW cm(-2)), the catalyst-modified photocathodes achieve a current density ≈ 1 mA cm(-2) when polarized at 0 V vs the reversible hydrogen electrode reference and show near-unity Faradaic efficiency for hydrogen production as determined by gas chromatography analysis of the headspace. This work illustrates the modularity and versatility of the catalyst-polymer-semiconductor approach for directly coupling light harvesting to fuel production and the ability to export this chemistry across distinct crystal face orientations.

  11. Application of the rotating ring-disc-electrode technique to water oxidation by surface-bound molecular catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concepcion, Javier J; Binstead, Robert A; Alibabaei, Leila; Meyer, Thomas J

    2013-10-07

    We report here the application of a simple hydrodynamic technique, linear sweep voltammetry with a modified rotating-ring-disc electrode, for the study of water oxidation catalysis. With this technique, we have been able to reliably obtain turnover frequencies, overpotentials, Faradaic conversion efficiencies, and mechanistic information from single samples of surface-bound metal complex catalysts.

  12. Synthesis and catalytic evaluation in the Heck reaction of deposited palladium catalysts immobilized via amide linkers and their molecular analogues

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Semler, M.; Čejka, Jiří; Štěpnička, P.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 227, MAY 2014 (2014), s. 207-214 ISSN 0920-5861 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/0561; GA ČR(CZ) GA13-08944S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : deposited catalysts * palladium * amide linkers Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.893, year: 2014

  13. Filter design for molecular factor computing using wavelet functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoyong; Xu, Zhihong; Cai, Wensheng; Shao, Xueguang

    2015-06-23

    Molecular factor computing (MFC) is a new strategy that employs chemometric methods in an optical instrument to obtain analytical results directly using an appropriate filter without data processing. In the present contribution, a method for designing an MFC filter using wavelet functions was proposed for spectroscopic analysis. In this method, the MFC filter is designed as a linear combination of a set of wavelet functions. A multiple linear regression model relating the concentration to the wavelet coefficients is constructed, so that the wavelet coefficients are obtained by projecting the spectra onto the selected wavelet functions. These wavelet functions are selected by optimizing the model using a genetic algorithm (GA). Once the MFC filter is obtained, the concentration of a sample can be calculated directly by projecting the spectrum onto the filter. With three NIR datasets of corn, wheat and blood, it was shown that the performance of the designed filter is better than that of the optimized partial least squares models, and commonly used signal processing methods, such as background correction and variable selection, were not needed. More importantly, the designed filter can be used as an MFC filter in designing MFC-based instruments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Transformation of levoglucosan over H-MCM-22 zeolite and H-MCM-41 mesoporous molecular sieve catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaeldstroem, M.; Kumar, N.; Heikkilae, T.; Tiitta, M.; Salmi, T.; Murzin, D. Yu.

    2011-01-01

    Catalytic transformation of levoglucosan (1-6-anhdyro-β-D-glucopyranose) was carried out in a fixed bed reactor at 573 K over zeolite and mesoporous material catalysts. Proton forms of MCM-22-30 and MCM-41-20 catalysts were tested in the conversion, changing also the residence time. The yield of the transformation product phases was substantially influenced by the structures, at the same time the formation of the different compounds were dependent on the structures of the acidic zeolite catalysts. Oxygenated species were the main liquid product, consisting mainly of aldehydes and furfurals (glycolaldehyde, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, furfural, 5-methylfurfural, acetic acid). The formation of the liquid products was higher over MCM-41-20 than over MCM-22-30 for all the oxygenated species except acetic acid, indicating larger formation of non-condensable products over the microporous material. By increasing the residence time the formation of acetic acid increased in transformations over MCM-22, however, such increase also led to generation of more gases with both catalysts. The deactivation due to coking was more severe over the zeolite compared to the mesoporous material. It was, however, possible to successfully regenerate the spent zeolites without changing the structure. -- Highlights: → Transformation of levoglucosan (1-6-anhdyro-β-D-glucopyranose) was done at 573 K. → MCM-22-30 and MCM-41-20 catalysts were tested. → Oxygenated species (glycolaldehyde, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, furfural, 5-methylfurfural, acetic acid) were the main liquid products. → Acidity had an influence on product distribution and deactivation.

  15. Theoretical Studies in Heterogenous Catalysis: Towards a Rational Design of Novel Catalysts for Hydrodesulfurization and Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez,J.A.; Liu, P.

    2008-10-01

    potential to become the next generation of industrial HDS catalysts. Then, systematic studies concerned with the hydrogen-evolution reaction (HER) on extended surfaces, organometallic complexes and enzymes are presented. Finally, the reasons for the high catalytic activity of Au-CeO{sub 2} and Cu-CeO{sub 2} in the production of hydrogen through the water-gas shift reaction (CO + H{sub 2}O {yields} H{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}) are analyzed. It is shown that theoretical methods are very valuable tools for helping in the rational design of heterogeneous catalysts.

  16. Molecular Design of Branched and Binary Molecules at Ordered Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genson, Kirsten Larson [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This study examined five different branched molecular architectures to discern the effect of design on the ability of molecules to form ordered structures at interfaces. Photochromic monodendrons formed kinked packing structures at the air-water interface due to the cross-sectional area mismatch created by varying number of alkyl tails and the hydrophilic polar head group. The lower generations formed orthorhombic unit cell with long range ordering despite the alkyl tails tilted to a large degree. Favorable interactions between liquid crystalline terminal groups and the underlying substrate were observed to compel a flexible carbosilane dendrimer core to form a compressed elliptical conformation which packed stagger within lamellae domains with limited short range ordering. A twelve arm binary star polymer was observed to form two dimensional micelles at the air-water interface attributed to the higher polystyrene block composition. Linear rod-coil molecules formed a multitude of packing structures at the air-water interface due to the varying composition. Tree-like rod-coil molecules demonstrated the ability to form one-dimensional structures at the air-water interface and at the air-solvent interface caused by the preferential ordering of the rigid rod cores. The role of molecular architecture and composition was examined and the influence chemically competing fragments was shown to exert on the packing structure. The amphiphilic balance of the different molecular series exhibited control on the ordering behavior at the air-water interface and within bulk structures. The shell nature and tail type was determined to dictate the preferential ordering structure and molecular reorganization at interfaces with the core nature effect secondary.

  17. Molecular Design of Phenanthrenequinone Derivatives as Organic Cathode Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liu-Bin; Gao, Shu-Ting; He, Rongxing; Shen, Wei; Li, Ming

    2018-01-29

    Conjugated carbonyl compounds have become the most promising type of organic electrode materials for rechargeable Li-ion batteries because only they can achieve simultaneously high energy density, high cycling stability, and high power density. In this work, we have performed first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations to explore the fundamental rules of how the electronic structure and redox properties of a typical conjugated carbonyl compound, phenanthrenequinone (PQ), are modified by adjusting the heteroaromatic building blocks. Such a molecular design strategy allows for the improvement in discharge potential while the specific capacity remains nearly unchanged. The correlation between the electronic structures and redox properties for the designed PQ derivatives is systematically discussed. It is demonstrated that the discharge potential of the PQ derivatives depends strongly on the frontier orbital levels, the electric potential, and the Li-bonding configurations. The electrostatic potential (ESP) maps show visible displays of molecular electric structures and can be applied to understand how the redox properties of the PQ derivatives are modified by the heteroaromatic building blocks. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Experiment Design for Early Molecular Events in HIV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagarapu, Aditya; Cannon, LaMont; Zurakowski, Ryan

    2017-05-01

    The recent introduction of integrase inhibitors to the HIV antiviral repertoire permits us to create in vitro experiments that reliably terminate HIV infection at the point of chromosomal integration. This allows us to isolate the dynamics of a single round of infection, without needing to account for the influence of multiple overlapping rounds of infection. By measuring the various nucleic acid concentrations in a population of infected target cells at multiple time points, we can infer the rates of these molecular events with great accuracy, which allows us to compare the rates between target cells with different functional phenotypes. This information will help in understanding the behavior of the various populations of reservoir cells such as active and quiescent T-cells which maintain HIV infection in treated patients. In this paper, we introduce a family of models of the early molecular events in HIV infection, with either linear dynamics or age-structured delays at each step. We introduce an experimental design metric based on the delta AIC (Akaike Information Criteria) between a model fit for simulated data from a matching model vs a mismatched model, which allows us to determine a candidate experiment design's ability to discriminate between models. Using parameters values drawn from experimentally-derived priors corrupted with appropriate measurement noise, we confirm that a proposed sampling schedule at different time points allows us to consistently discriminate between candidate models.

  19. From molecular design and materials construction to organic nanophotonic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuang; Yan, Yongli; Zhao, Yong Sheng; Yao, Jiannian

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Nanophotonics has recently received broad research interest, since it may provide an alternative opportunity to overcome the fundamental limitations in electronic circuits. Diverse optical materials down to the wavelength scale are required to develop nanophotonic devices, including functional components for light emission, transmission, and detection. During the past decade, the chemists have made their own contributions to this interdisciplinary field, especially from the controlled fabrication of nanophotonic molecules and materials. In this context, organic micro- or nanocrystals have been developed as a very promising kind of building block in the construction of novel units for integrated nanophotonics, mainly due to the great versatility in organic molecular structures and their flexibility for the subsequent processing. Following the pioneering works on organic nanolasers and optical waveguides, the organic nanophotonic materials and devices have attracted increasing interest and developed rapidly during the past few years. In this Account, we review our research on the photonic performance of molecular micro- or nanostructures and the latest breakthroughs toward organic nanophotonic devices. Overall, the versatile features of organic materials are highlighted, because they brings tunable optical properties based on molecular design, size-dependent light confinement in low-dimensional structures, and various device geometries for nanophotonic integration. The molecular diversity enables abundant optical transitions in conjugated π-electron systems, and thus brings specific photonic functions into molecular aggregates. The morphology of these micro- or nanostructures can be further controlled based on the weak intermolecular interactions during molecular assembly process, making the aggregates show photon confinement or light guiding properties as nanophotonic materials. By adoption of some active processes in the composite of two or more

  20. From First Principles Design to Realization of Bimetallic Catalysts for Ultrahigh Selectivity - Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard M. Crooks

    2007-04-11

    (A) Synthesis, Characterization, and Fundamental Properties of Bimetallic DENs. AuAg alloy and core/shell bimetallic DENs were synthesized and characterized. Selective extraction was used as a structural characterization tool for these bimetallic nanoparticles. This is significant because there are few easily accessible methods for structure elucidation of bimetallic nanoparticles in this size regime. As a first step towards the synthesis of catalytically active, bimetallic heterogeneous materials we reported the incorporation of Au and Pd monometallic DENs and AuPd bimetallic DENs into amorphous titania networks. The compositional fidelity of the original DENs, and to some extent their size, is retained following dendrimer removal. Gas-phase catalytic activity for CO oxidation is higher for the bimetallic catalysts than for the corresponding Pd-only and Au-only monometallics. (B) Electrocatalysts based on dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles. Platinum dendrimer-encapsulated nanoparticles (DENs) were prepared within fourth-generation, hydroxyl-terminated, poly(amidoamine) dendrimers and immobilized on glassy carbon electrodes using an electrochemical immobilization strategy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, electron microscopy, and electrochemical experiments confirm that the Pt DENs are about 1.4 nm in diameter and that they remain within the dendrimer following surface immobilization. The resulting Pt DEN films were electrocatalytically active for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The films are also robust, surviving up to 50 consecutive cyclic voltammograms and sonication. Monometallic Pd DENs were also prepared and found to have little catalytic activity for the ORR. However, PtPd bimetallic DENs had catalytic activity nearly identical to that found for Pt-only DENs. This indicates an overall catalytic enhancement for the bimetallic electrocatalysts.

  1. Adversarial Threshold Neural Computer for Molecular de Novo Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putin, Evgeny; Asadulaev, Arip; Vanhaelen, Quentin; Ivanenkov, Yan; Aladinskaya, Anastasia V; Aliper, Alex; Zhavoronkov, Alex

    2018-03-30

    In this article, we propose the deep neural network Adversarial Threshold Neural Computer (ATNC). The ATNC model is intended for the de novo design of novel small-molecule organic structures. The model is based on generative adversarial network architecture and reinforcement learning. ATNC uses a Differentiable Neural Computer as a generator and has a new specific block, called adversarial threshold (AT). AT acts as a filter between the agent (generator) and the environment (discriminator + objective reward functions). Furthermore, to generate more diverse molecules we introduce a new objective reward function named Internal Diversity Clustering (IDC). In this work, ATNC is tested and compared with the ORGANIC model. Both models were trained on the SMILES string representation of the molecules, using four objective functions (internal similarity, Muegge druglikeness filter, presence or absence of sp 3 -rich fragments, and IDC). The SMILES representations of 15K druglike molecules from the ChemDiv collection were used as a training data set. For the different functions, ATNC outperforms ORGANIC. Combined with the IDC, ATNC generates 72% of valid and 77% of unique SMILES strings, while ORGANIC generates only 7% of valid and 86% of unique SMILES strings. For each set of molecules generated by ATNC and ORGANIC, we analyzed distributions of four molecular descriptors (number of atoms, molecular weight, logP, and tpsa) and calculated five chemical statistical features (internal diversity, number of unique heterocycles, number of clusters, number of singletons, and number of compounds that have not been passed through medicinal chemistry filters). Analysis of key molecular descriptors and chemical statistical features demonstrated that the molecules generated by ATNC elicited better druglikeness properties. We also performed in vitro validation of the molecules generated by ATNC; results indicated that ATNC is an effective method for producing hit compounds.

  2. Tunable Molecular Logic Gates Designed for Imaging Released Neurotransmitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klockow, Jessica L; Hettie, Kenneth S; Secor, Kristen E; Barman, Dipti N; Glass, Timothy E

    2015-08-03

    Tunable dual-analyte fluorescent molecular logic gates (ExoSensors) were designed for the purpose of imaging select vesicular primary-amine neurotransmitters that are released from secretory vesicles upon exocytosis. ExoSensors are based on the coumarin-3-aldehyde scaffold and rely on both neurotransmitter binding and the change in environmental pH associated with exocytosis to afford a unique turn-on fluorescence output. A pH-functionality was directly integrated into the fluorophore π-system of the scaffold, thereby allowing for an enhanced fluorescence output upon the release of labeled neurotransmitters. By altering the pH-sensitive unit with various electron-donating and -withdrawing sulfonamide substituents, we identified a correlation between the pKa of the pH-sensitive group and the fluorescence output from the activated fluorophore. In doing so, we achieved a twelvefold fluorescence enhancement upon evaluating the ExoSensors under conditions that mimic exocytosis. ExoSensors are aptly suited to serve as molecular imaging tools that allow for the direct visualization of only the neurotransmitters that are released from secretory vesicles upon exocytosis. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Approach in Designing Thermostable Aspergillus niger Xylanase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malau, N. D.; Sianturi, M.

    2017-03-01

    Molecular dynamics methods we have applied as a tool in designing thermostable Aspergillus niger Xylanase, by examining Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) and The Stability of the Secondary Structure of enzymes structure at its optimum temperature and compare with its high temperature behavior. As RMSD represents structural fluctuation at a particular temperature, a better understanding of this factor will suggest approaches to bioengineer these enzymes to enhance their thermostability. In this work molecular dynamic simulations of Aspergillus niger xylanase (ANX) have been carried at 400K (optimum catalytic temperature) for 2.5 ns and 500K (ANX reported inactive temperature) for 2.5 ns. Analysis have shown that the Root Mean Square Deviation (RMSD) significant increase at higher temperatures compared at optimum temperature and some of the secondary structures of ANX that have been damaged at high temperature. Structural analysis revealed that the fluctuations of the α-helix and β-sheet regions are larger at higher temperatures compared to the fluctuations at optimum temperature.

  4. Synthetic Elucidation of Design Principles for Molecular Qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Michael James

    Quantum information processing (QIP) is an emerging computational paradigm with the potential to enable a vast increase in computational power, fundamentally transforming fields from structural biology to finance. QIP employs qubits, or quantum bits, as its fundamental units of information, which can exist in not just the classical states of 0 or 1, but in a superposition of the two. In order to successfully perform QIP, this superposition state must be sufficiently long-lived. One promising paradigm for the implementation of QIP involves employing unpaired electrons in coordination complexes as qubits. This architecture is highly tunable and scalable, however coordination complexes frequently suffer from short superposition lifetimes, or T2. In order to capitalize on the promise of molecular qubits, it is necessary to develop a set of design principles that allow the rational synthesis of complexes with sufficiently long values of T2. In this dissertation, I report efforts to use the synthesis of series of complexes to elucidate design principles for molecular qubits. Chapter 1 details previous work by our group and others in the field. Chapter 2 details the first efforts of our group to determine the impact of varying spin and spin-orbit coupling on T2. Chapter 3 examines the effect of removing nuclear spins on coherence time, and reports a series of vanadyl bis(dithiolene) complexes which exhibit extremely long coherence lifetimes, in excess of the 100 mus threshold for qubit viability. Chapters 4 and 5 form two complimentary halves of a study to determine the exact relationship between electronic spin-nuclear spin distance and the effect of the nuclear spins on T2. Finally, chapter 6 suggests next directions for the field as a whole, including the potential for work in this field to impact the development of other technologies as diverse as quantum sensors and magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents.

  5. Design of slurry bubble column reactors: novel technique for optimum catalyst size selection contractual origin of the invention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamwo, Isaac K [Murrysville, PA; Gidaspow, Dimitri [Northbrook, IL; Jung, Jonghwun [Naperville, IL

    2009-11-17

    A method for determining optimum catalyst particle size for a gas-solid, liquid-solid, or gas-liquid-solid fluidized bed reactor such as a slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) for converting synthesis gas into liquid fuels considers the complete granular temperature balance based on the kinetic theory of granular flow, the effect of a volumetric mass transfer coefficient between the liquid and the gas, and the water gas shift reaction. The granular temperature of the catalyst particles representing the kinetic energy of the catalyst particles is measured and the volumetric mass transfer coefficient between the gas and liquid phases is calculated using the granular temperature. Catalyst particle size is varied from 20 .mu.m to 120 .mu.m and a maximum mass transfer coefficient corresponding to optimum liquid hydrocarbon fuel production is determined. Optimum catalyst particle size for maximum methanol production in a SBCR was determined to be in the range of 60-70 .mu.m.

  6. Foreign-catalyst-free growth of InAs/InSb axial heterostructure nanowires on Si (111) by molecular-beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Hyok; Pan, Dong; Li, Lixia; Zhao, Jianhua

    2017-03-01

    Epitaxial high-quality InAs/InSb axial heterostructure nanowires are of great interest due to their distinct advantages in fundamental research as well as applications in semiconductor electronic and quantum devices. Currently, nearly all the growth of InAs/InSb axial heterostructure nanowires is assisted with foreign catalysts such as Au, and work on foreign-catalyst-free growth of InAs/InSb axial heterostructure nanowires is lacking. Here we report on the growth of InAs/InSb axial heterostructure nanowires on Si (111) substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy without using any foreign catalysts. The Sb/In beam equivalent pressure (BEP) ratio is found to have important influence on the heterostructure nanowire morphology, and InSb nanowires can be epitaxially grown on InAs nanowire stems with a hexagonal prism and nanosheet-like shapes when the Sb/In BEP ratio varies from 10 to 20. Transmission electron microscopy studies reveal that the InAs nanowire stems have a mixture of zincblende (ZB) and wurtzite (WZ) crystal structures, while InSb nanowire parts have a pure ZB crystal structure free of stacking faults. Composition analysis of axial heterostructure nanowires provides clear evidence that the InSb nanowires are epitaxially grown on InAs nanowires in an In self-assisted vapor-liquid-solid manner. This study paves a new route for growing narrow-gap semiconductor heterostructures with strong spin-orbit interaction for the study of topological states, and the growth manner presented here is expected to be used to grow other In-based axial heterostructure nanowires.

  7. Understanding the Electronic Structure of 4d Metal Complexes: From Molecular Spinors to L-Edge Spectra of a di-Ru Catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alperovich, Igor; Smolentsev, Grigory; Moonshiram, Dooshaye; Jurss, Jonah W.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Meyer, Thomas J.; Soldatov, Alexander; Pushkar, Yulia (UNC); (Purdue); (SFU-Russia); (Lund)

    2015-09-17

    L{sub 2,3}-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has demonstrated unique capabilities for the analysis of the electronic structure of di-Ru complexes such as the blue dimer cis,cis-[Ru{sub 2}{sup III}O(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(bpy){sub 4}]{sup 4+} water oxidation catalyst. Spectra of the blue dimer and the monomeric [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 3+} model complex show considerably different splitting of the Ru L{sub 2,3} absorption edge, which reflects changes in the relative energies of the Ru 4d orbitals caused by hybridization with a bridging ligand and spin-orbit coupling effects. To aid the interpretation of spectroscopic data, we developed a new approach, which computes L{sub 2,3}-edges XAS spectra as dipole transitions between molecular spinors of 4d transition metal complexes. This allows for careful inclusion of the spin-orbit coupling effects and the hybridization of the Ru 4d and ligand orbitals. The obtained theoretical Ru L{sub 2,3}-edge spectra are in close agreement with experiment. Critically, existing single-electron methods (FEFF, FDMNES) broadly used to simulate XAS could not reproduce the experimental Ru L-edge spectra for the [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 3+} model complex nor for the blue dimer, while charge transfer multiplet (CTM) calculations were not applicable due to the complexity and low symmetry of the blue dimer water oxidation catalyst. We demonstrated that L-edge spectroscopy is informative for analysis of bridging metal complexes. The developed computational approach enhances L-edge spectroscopy as a tool for analysis of the electronic structures of complexes, materials, catalysts, and reactive intermediates with 4d transition metals.

  8. Syngas Production from Catalytic CO2 Reforming of CH4 over CaFe2O4 Supported Ni and Co Catalysts: Full Factorial Design Screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Anwar Hossain

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the potential of dry reforming reaction over CaFe2O4 supported Ni and Co catalysts were investigated. The Co/CaFe2O4 and Ni/CaFe2O4 catalysts were synthesized using wet impregnation method by varying the metal loading from 5-15 %. The synthesized catalysts were tested in methane dry reforming reaction at atmospheric pressure and reaction temperature ranged 700-800 oC. The catalytic performance of the catalysts based on the initial screening is ranked as 5%Co/CaFe2O4 < 10%Co/CaFe2O4 < 5%Ni/CaFe2O4 < 10%Ni/CaFe2O4 according to their performance. The Ni/CaFe2O4 catalyst was selected for further investigation using full factorial design of experiment. The interaction effects of three factors namely metal loading (5-15 %, feed ratio (0.4-1.0, and reaction temperature (700-800 oC were evaluated on the catalytic activity in terms of CH4 and CO2 conversion as well as H2 and CO yield. The interaction between the factors showed significant effects on the catalyst performance at metal loading, feed ratio and reaction temperature of 15 %, 1.0, and 800 oC. respectively. The 15 wt% Ni/CaFe2O4 was subsequently characterized by Thermogravimetric (TGA, X-ray Diffraction (XRD, Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM, Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDX, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS, N2-physisorption, Temperature Programmed Desorption (TPD-NH3, TPD-CO2, and Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR to ascertain its physiochemical properties.  This study demonstrated that the CaFe2O4 supported Ni catalyst has a good potential to be used for syngas production via methane dry reforming. Copyright © 2018 BCREC Group. All rights reserved Received: 5th May 2017; Revised: 8th August 2017; Accepted: 9th August 2017; Available online: 22nd January 2018; Published regularly: 2nd April 2018 How to Cite: Hossain, M.A., Ayodele, B.V., Cheng, C.K., Khan, M.R. (2018. Syngas Production from Catalytic CO2 Reforming of CH4 over CaFe2O4 Supported

  9. Catalyst-free III-nitride Nanowires by Plasma-assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy: Growth, Characterization, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnevale, Santino D.

    In the past twenty years, III-nitride devices have had an enormous impact on semiconductor-based technologies. This impact is seen in both optoelectronic and electronic devices. The aim of this dissertation is to take advantage of III-nitride nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy to form heterostructures that are difficult or impossible to achieve in traditional, thin films. To do this, it is first necessary to establish the growth phase diagrams that correlate the characteristics of GaN nanowires to MBE growth conditions. By using the information in these growth maps we can control growth kinetics and the resulting nanowire structures by making strategic, timely changes to growth conditions. Using this control electronic and optoelectronic III-nitride nanowire devices are created. First, coaxially-oriented AlN/GaN nanowire resonant tunneling diodes are formed on Si substrates. Second, polarization-induced nanowire light emitting diodes (PINLEDs) are fabricated that exhibit electroluminescence at wavelengths from the deep UV into the visible. Because these PINLEDs utilize polarization doping, they can be formed with and without the use of dopants. Device and structural characterization are provided, including a detailed investigation of the mixed material polarity in these nanowires. Finally, the dissertation closes with a discussion of recent work and future ideas for optimizing the PINLED design.

  10. Bio-inspired computational design of iron catalysts for the hydrogenation of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinzheng

    2015-08-25

    Inspired by the active site structure of monoiron hydrogenase, a series of iron complexes are built using experimentally ready-made acylmethylpyridinol and aliphatic PNP pincer ligands. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the newly designed iron complexes are very promising to catalyze the formation of formic acid from H2 and CO2.

  11. Direct evidence of atomic-scale structural fluctuations in catalyst nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pin Ann; Gomez-Ballesteros, Jose L; Burgos, Juan C; Balbuena, Perla B; Natarajan, Bharath; Sharma, Renu

    2017-05-01

    Rational catalyst design requires an atomic scale mechanistic understanding of the chemical pathways involved in the catalytic process. A heterogeneous catalyst typically works by adsorbing reactants onto its surface, where the energies for specific bonds to dissociate and/or combine with other species (to form desired intermediate or final products) are lower. Here, using the catalytic growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a prototype reaction, we show that the chemical pathway may in-fact involve the entire catalyst particle, and can proceed via the fluctuations in the formation and decomposition of metastable phases in the particle interior. We record in situ and at atomic resolution, the dynamic phase transformations occurring in a Cobalt catalyst nanoparticle during SWCNT growth, using a state-of-the-art environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM). The fluctuations in catalyst carbon content are quantified by the automated, atomic-scale structural analysis of the time-resolved ETEM images and correlated with the SWCNT growth rate. We find the fluctuations in the carbon concentration in the catalyst nanoparticle and the fluctuations in nanotube growth rates to be of complementary character. These findings are successfully explained by reactive molecular dynamics (RMD) simulations that track the spatial and temporal evolution of the distribution of carbon atoms within and on the surface of the catalyst particle. We anticipate that our approach combining real-time, atomic-resolution image analysis and molecular dynamics simulations will facilitate catalyst design, improving reaction efficiencies and selectivity towards the growth of desired structure.

  12. Design of Novel Biosensors for Determination of Phenolic Compounds using Catalyst-Loaded Reduced Graphene Oxide Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Morrisey

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Facile and inexpensive method for designing high performance sensors for H2O2 and polyphenols has been developed. The proposed sensors are based on high electrocatalytic activity of Prussian Blue (PB nanoparticles deposited in situ on high surface area graphene nanosheet-based thin films on a graphite electrode. The exfoliated graphene nanosheets were formed by attaching graphene oxide to the electrode surface followed by their electrochemical reduction to obtain the reduced graphene oxide (rGO, providing high surface area and excellent current-carrying capabilities to the sensory film. The PB catalyst nanoparticles were deposited electrochemically on rGO. This procedure is very time efficient as it reduces the time of sensor preparation from 3 days (according to recent literature to several hours. The proposed method provides simple means to obtain highly reliable and stable sensory films. The sensor shows a dynamic range of 1–500 µM H2O2 and a rapid response of 5 s to reach 95% of a steady-state response. When combined with immobilized enzymes (horseradish peroxidase or laccase oxidase, it can serve as a biosensor for polyphenols. As the proof of concept, the response of the enzymatic biosensors to polyphenol catechin has been presented delineating different mechanisms of horseradish peroxidase and laccase operation. The proposed sensors are low cost, reliable, and scalable.

  13. The use of pyro-polymeric catalysts and a new cylindrical cell design in oxygen-aluminum generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiseleva, E. A.; Zhuk, A. Z.; Kleymenov, B. V.; Oudaltsov, V. G.

    2018-01-01

    The increase in energy consumption, the economic crisis, the development of certain areas of engineering and energy, as well as the related deterioration of the environmental situation, require the development of new electrochemical current sources with high specific characteristics. In the field of creating air-hydrogen fuel cells, the problems of safety and mobile storage of hydrogen have not been completely solved, stagnation in the development of lithium-ion, lithium-air and lithium-sulfur batteries has been outlined. All this requires searching for new technological solutions, ways to increase the energy and resource characteristics of electrochemical current sources (ECS), reducing their cost [1-2]. The use of metals (aluminum, zinc, magnesium) as an energy carrier is due to their high energy intensity (in combination with the lack of transport, storage and on-board storage problems) of the relatively low cost of metals, their availability, storage safety and the absence of harmful emissions when used. As in the chemical and electrochemical use of metals, safe products (oxides, hydroxides) are formed, which are reduced to metals within the framework of traditional production technologies. Thus, a closed cycle of energy use is organized. The task of this paper is to evaluate the possibility of reducing the cost and increasing the specific power of ECS using oxygen depolarization. The goal is achieved by using non-platinum catalysts and optimizing the design of the current source.

  14. Putting engineering back into protein engineering: bioinformatic approaches to catalyst design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafsson, Claes; Govindarajan, Sridhar; Minshull, Jeremy

    2003-08-01

    Complex multivariate engineering problems are commonplace and not unique to protein engineering. Mathematical and data-mining tools developed in other fields of engineering have now been applied to analyze sequence-activity relationships of peptides and proteins and to assist in the design of proteins and peptides with specified properties. Decreasing costs of DNA sequencing in conjunction with methods to quickly synthesize statistically representative sets of proteins allow modern heuristic statistics to be applied to protein engineering. This provides an alternative approach to expensive assays or unreliable high-throughput surrogate screens.

  15. Predictive Modelling of Phase-Transfer Catalyst Systems for Improved and Innovative Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anantpinijwatna, Amata; Hyung Kim, Sun; Sales-Cruz, Mauricio

    2016-01-01

    increasing attention as a novel organic synthesis option due to its flexible and easier operation, higher production yield, and ability to eliminate expensive solvents, although, not eliminating the use of solvents. New mathematical models of the PTC system, which includes physical and chemical equilibrium......, reaction mechanism and unit operation has been developed. In the developed model, the PTC system is divided into four sub-systems of aqueous-organic solvent partition, inorganic salt in aqueous phase, PTC in aqueous phase, and PTC in aqueous phase. Each subsystem requires an appropriate thermodynamic model...... significantly widened, making it feasible to identify new and innovative biphasic reaction options. In this paper, the predictive qualities of the new model together with the improvements in the predicted design and operation of reaction with PTC systems are highlighted. Also, applications of problem...

  16. Molecular de-novo design through deep reinforcement learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivecrona, Marcus; Blaschke, Thomas; Engkvist, Ola; Chen, Hongming

    2017-09-04

    This work introduces a method to tune a sequence-based generative model for molecular de novo design that through augmented episodic likelihood can learn to generate structures with certain specified desirable properties. We demonstrate how this model can execute a range of tasks such as generating analogues to a query structure and generating compounds predicted to be active against a biological target. As a proof of principle, the model is first trained to generate molecules that do not contain sulphur. As a second example, the model is trained to generate analogues to the drug Celecoxib, a technique that could be used for scaffold hopping or library expansion starting from a single molecule. Finally, when tuning the model towards generating compounds predicted to be active against the dopamine receptor type 2, the model generates structures of which more than 95% are predicted to be active, including experimentally confirmed actives that have not been included in either the generative model nor the activity prediction model. Graphical abstract .

  17. In silico evolution of guiding track designs for molecular shuttles powered by kinesin motors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunagawa, Takuya; Tanahashi, Akihito; Downs, Matthew E; Hess, Henry; Nitta, Takahiro

    2013-07-21

    Molecular shuttles powered by kinesin motors require guiding tracks to perform specific tasks in nanoscale devices. Here, using our simulation of molecular shuttle movements, we describe an in silico evolutionary design method that makes it possible to automatically design the guiding tracks in accordance with their functions defined by designers. With this design method, we designed two types of pre-existing guiding track modules with improved performances, as well as one with a novel function.

  18. The synthesis of 2-iminochromenes using mesoporous molecular sieve MCM-41 as a heterogeneous and recyclable catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid M. Heravi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available A highly efficient procedure for the synthesis of 2-iminochromenes via condensation of o-hydroxybenzaldehydes and malononitrile using a catalytic amount of mesoporous molecular sieve MCM-41 in good yields is achieved.

  19. Design of non-molecular coordination solids from aqueous solution ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    provides chemical insights to the supramolecular aggregation of a crystal driven by the various competing intermolecular forces. Keywords. Non-molecular coordination solids; supramolecular aggregation; coordination polymers. 1. Introduction. Non-molecular solids such as coordination polymers. (CPs) and metal organic ...

  20. Sabatier Catalyst Poisoning Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallette, Tim; Perry, Jay; Abney, Morgan; Knox, Jim; Goldblatt, Loel

    2013-01-01

    The Carbon Dioxide Reduction Assembly (CRA) on the International Space Station (ISS) has been operational since 2010. The CRA uses a Sabatier reactor to produce water and methane by reaction of the metabolic CO2 scrubbed from the cabin air and the hydrogen byproduct from the water electrolysis system used for metabolic oxygen generation. Incorporating the CRA into the overall air revitalization system has facilitated life support system loop closure on the ISS reducing resupply logistics and thereby enhancing longer term missions. The CRA utilizes CO2 which has been adsorbed in a 5A molecular sieve within the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly, CDRA. There is a potential of compounds with molecular dimensions similar to, or less than CO2 to also be adsorbed. In this fashion trace contaminants may be concentrated within the CDRA and subsequently desorbed with the CO2 to the CRA. Currently, there is no provision to remove contaminants prior to entering the Sabatier catalyst bed. The risk associated with this is potential catalyst degradation due to trace organic contaminants in the CRA carbon dioxide feed acting as catalyst poisons. To better understand this risk, United Technologies Aerospace System (UTAS) has teamed with MSFC to investigate the impact of various trace contaminants on the CRA catalyst performance at relative ISS cabin air concentrations and at about 200/400 times of ISS concentrations, representative of the potential concentrating effect of the CDRA molecular sieve. This paper summarizes our initial assessment results.

  1. Design and Use of Nanostructured Single-Site Heterogeneous Catalysts for the Selective Transformation of Fine Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimiro Dal Santo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured single-site heterogeneous catalysts possess the advantages of classical solid catalysts, in terms of easy recovery and recycling, together with a defined tailored chemical and steric environment around the catalytically active metal site. The use of inorganic oxide supports with selected shape and porosity at a nanometric level may have a relevant impact on the regio- and stereochemistry of the catalytic reaction. Analogously, by choosing the optimal preparation techniques to obtain spatially isolated and well-characterised active sites, it is possible to achieve performances that are comparable to (or, in the most favourable cases, better than those obtained with homogeneous systems. Such catalysts are therefore particularly suitable for the transformation of highly-functionalised fine chemicals and some relevant examples where high chemo-, regio- and stereoselectivity are crucial will be described.

  2. Atomic-Scale Design of Iron Fischer-Tropsch Catalysts; A Combined Computational Chemistry, Experimental, and Microkinetic Modeling Approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manos Mavrikakis; James Dumesic; Rahul Nabar; Calvin Bartholonew; Hu Zou; Uchenna Paul

    2008-09-29

    This work focuses on (1) searching/summarizing published Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) mechanistic and kinetic studies of FTS reactions on iron catalysts; (2) preparation and characterization of unsupported iron catalysts with/without potassium/platinum promoters; (3) measurement of H{sub 2} and CO adsorption/dissociation kinetics on iron catalysts using transient methods; (3) analysis of the transient rate data to calculate kinetic parameters of early elementary steps in FTS; (4) construction of a microkinetic model of FTS on iron, and (5) validation of the model from collection of steady-state rate data for FTS on iron catalysts. Three unsupported iron catalysts and three alumina-supported iron catalysts were prepared by non-aqueous-evaporative deposition (NED) or aqueous impregnation (AI) and characterized by chemisorption, BET, temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), extent-of-reduction, XRD, and TEM methods. These catalysts, covering a wide range of dispersions and metal loadings, are well-reduced and relatively thermally stable up to 500-600 C in H{sub 2} and thus ideal for kinetic and mechanistic studies. Kinetic parameters for CO adsorption, CO dissociation, and surface carbon hydrogenation on these catalysts were determined from temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of CO and temperature programmed surface hydrogenation (TPSR), temperature-programmed hydrogenation (TPH), and isothermal, transient hydrogenation (ITH). A microkinetic model was constructed for the early steps in FTS on polycrystalline iron from the kinetic parameters of elementary steps determined experimentally in this work and from literature values. Steady-state rate data were collected in a Berty reactor and used for validation of the microkinetic model. These rate data were fitted to 'smart' Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate expressions derived from a sequence of elementary steps and using a combination of fitted steady-state parameters and parameters specified from the transient

  3. Design and synthesis of palladium/graphitic carbon nitride/carbon black hybrids as high-performance catalysts for formic acid and methanol electrooxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Huayu; Huang, Huajie; Wang, Xin

    2015-02-01

    Here we report a facile two-step method to synthesize high-performance palladium/graphitic carbon nitride/carbon black (Pd/g-C3N4/carbon black) hybrids for electrooxidizing formic acid and methanol. The coating of g-C3N4 on carbon black surface is realized by a low-temperature heating treatment, followed by the uniform deposition of palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) via a wet chemistry route. Owning to the significant synergistic effects of the individual components, the preferred Pd/g-C3N4/carbon black electrocatalyst exhibits exceptional forward peak current densities as high as 2155 and 1720 mA mg-1Pd for formic acid oxidation in acid media and methanol oxidation in alkaline media, respectively, far outperforming the commercial Pd-C catalyst. The catalyst also shows reliable stability, demonstrating that the newly-designed hybrids have great promise in constructing high-performance portable fuel cell systems.

  4. Synergistic bifunctional catalyst design based on perovskite oxide nanoparticles and intertwined carbon nanotubes for rechargeable zinc-air battery applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Un; Park, Hey Woong; Park, Moon Gyu; Ismayilov, Vugar; Chen, Zhongwei

    2015-01-14

    Advanced morphology of intertwined core-corona structured bifunctional catalyst (IT-CCBC) is introduced where perovskite lanthanum nickel oxide nanoparticles (LaNiO3 NP) are encapsulated by high surface area network of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNT) to produce highly active and durable bifunctional catalyst for rechargeable metal-air battery applications. The unique composite morphology of IT-CCBC not only enhances the charge transport property by providing rapid electron-conduction pathway but also facilitates in diffusion of hydroxyl and oxygen reactants through the highly porous framework. Confirmed by electrochemical half-cell testing, IT-CCBC in fact exhibits very strong synergy between LaNiO3 NP and NCNT demonstrating bifunctionality with significantly improved catalytic activities of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and oxygen evolution reaction (OER). Furthermore, when compared to the state-of-art catalysts, IT-CCBC outperforms Pt/C and Ir/C in terms of ORR and OER, respectively, and shows improved electrochemical stability compared to them after cycle degradation testing. The practicality of the catalyst is corroborated by testing in a realistic rechargeable zinc-air battery utilizing atmospheric air in ambient conditions, where IT-CCBC demonstrates superior charge and discharge voltages and long-term cycle stability with virtually no battery voltage fading. These improved electrochemical properties of the catalyst are attributed to the nanosized dimensions of LaNiO3 NP controlled by simple hydrothermal technique, which enables prolific growth of and encapsulation by highly porous NCNT network. The excellent electrochemical results presented in this study highlight IT-CCBC as highly efficient and commercially viable bifunctional catalyst for rechargeable metal-air battery applications.

  5. Design of supramolecular nanomaterials : from molecular recognition to hierarchical self-assembly

    OpenAIRE

    El Idrissi, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    In the present thesis, are reported new strategies for the design of nanostructures to partly address environmental issues. The work carried out has been divided into three parts: the design of cyclodextrin (CD)-based polymeric materials, the molecular engineering of a pyrene derivative for the formation of self-assembled nanostructures and the design of smart nanocarriers. Considerable efforts have been devoted to the design of molecular receptors capable of specific recognition of a wid...

  6. Ruthenium-modified MCM-41 mesoporous molecular sieve and Y zeolite catalysts for selective hydrogenation of cinnamaldehyde

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hájek, J.; Kumar, N.; Mäki-Arvela, P.; Salmi, T.; Murzin, D. Z.; Paseka, Ivo; Heikkilä, T.; Laine, E.; Laukkanen, P.; Väyrynen, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 251, č. 2 (2003), s. 385-396 ISSN 0926-860X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/03/0409 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4032918 Keywords : mesoporous molecular sieve * zeolites * ruthenium Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.825, year: 2003

  7. The Design of Molecular Hosts, Guests, and Their Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cram, Donald J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the origins, definitions, tools, and principles of host-guest chemistry. Gives examples of chiral recognition in complexation, of partial transacylase mimics, of caviplexes, and of a synthetic molecular cell. (Author/RT)

  8. Non-PGM cell catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colon-Mercado, H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Elvington, M. [Savannah River Consulting, Aiken, SC (United States); Ganesan, P. [Savannah River Consulting, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2017-09-27

    A unique approach has been developed to probe the non-PGM catalyst active site for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction (ORR) for PEMFCs. Iron based functionalities have been engineered into a variety of catalysts to evaluate their impact on activity for the ORR. A series of high surface area catalysts were synthesized and the impact of the chemical structure on the electrochemical and electrocatalytic properties was investigated. Elemental and surface analyses of the prepared catalysts reveal the incorporation of iron in a targeted and controlled manner. A high surface area framework catalyst was prepared that shows exceptional activity, comparable to state-of-the-art materials. The results of this research project provided critical seed data for the newly awarded ElectroCat project, which focuses on rationally designed framework catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction.

  9. Catalytic Cracking of Palm Oil Over Zeolite Catalysts: Statistical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. A. Twaiq and S. Bhatia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic cracking of palm oil was conducted in a fixed bed micro-reactor over HZSM-5, zeolite ? and ultrastable Y (USY zeolite catalysts. The objective of the present investigation was to study the effect of cracking reaction variables such as temperature, weight hourly space velocity, catalyst pore size and type of palm oil feed of different molecular weight on the conversion, yield of hydrocarbons in gasoline boiling range and BTX aromatics in the organic liquid product.  Statistical Design of Experiment (DOE with 24 full factorial design was used in experimentation at the first stage.  The nonlinear model and Response Surface Methodology (RSM were utilized in the second stage of experimentation to obtain the optimum values of the variables for maximum yields of hydrocarbons in gasoline boiling range and aromatics.  The HZSM-5 showed the best performance amongst the three catalysts tested.  At 623 K and WHSV of 1 h-1, the highest experimental yields of gasoline and aromatics were 28.3 wt.% and 27 wt.%, respectively over the HZSM-5 catalyst.  For the same catalyst, the statistical model predicted that the optimum yield of gasoline was 28.1 wt.% at WHSV of 1.75 h-1 and 623 K.  The predicted optimum yield of gasoline was 25.5 wt.% at 623 K and WHSV of 1 h-1.KEY WORDS: Catalytic Cracking, Palm Oil, Zeolite, Design Of Experiment, Response Surface Methodology.

  10. Designed synthesis CuO hollow microboxes coated with Pd nanosheets and SnO2 nanoparticles as a highly efficient Rochow reaction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Junjie; Zhang, Zailei; An, Xuebin; Zhang, Yi

    2017-12-01

    We designed and synthesized CuO/SnO2/Pd hollow microboxes, which was developed based on prepared Cu2O cubes coated Pd nanosheets, controlled oxidation of Cu2O/Pd, and etching of Cu2O/CuO/Pd by SnCl4 solution. The catalytic property of the Cu2O, Cu2O/SnO2, Cu2O/Pd/SnO2, Cu2O/Pd, Cu2O/CuO/Pd, CuO/SnO2/Pd, CuO, and commercial catalyst for dimethyldichlorosilane synthesis via the Rochow reaction was investigated. As compared to control samples and commercial catalyst, the prepared CuO/Pd/SnO2 hollow microboxes exhibited much higher silicon conversion (76.6%), which is related to the synergistic effect between CuO, Pd and SnO2, and to the distinct catalyst hollow structure which allows the efficient transportation of the reactant molecules to the active component.

  11. Ring opening metathesis polymerization catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grubbs, R.H.; Johnson, L.K.; Novak, B.M.; Hillmyer, M.; Benedicto, A.; France, M.; Nguyen, S.T. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    Over the past eight years, a number of new catalysts for the ring opening metathesis polymerization of cyclic olefins have been developed. These catalysts are simple organometallic complexes containing metal carbon multiple bonds that in most cases polymerize olefins by a living process. These catalysts have been used to prepare a family of near monodispersed and structurally homogeneous polymers, a series of telechelic polymers with controlled molecular weight and functionality and triblock polymers with segments with potentially interesting electronic properties. A series of new group VIII catalysts are being developed that allow a wide range of functionality to be incorporated into the polymer side chains. The same catalysts can also be used in the synthesis of fine chemicals.

  12. The Molecular Design of High-Performance Carbon Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-30

    molecular makeup . The overall mol wt distribution of the dimer fraction is also approximately Gaussian, and the most prevalent species are consistent...accessed June 2008). 20] Silverstein RM, Webster FX , Kiemie D. Spectrometric Identification of Organic Compounds, 7th Edition. John Wiley & Sons Ltd

  13. Designing molecular printboards: a photolithographic platform for recodable surfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Abt, D.; Schmidt, B. V. K. J.; Pop-Georgievski, Ognen; Quick, A. S.; Danilov, D.; Kostina, Nina Yu.; Bruns, M.; Wenzel, W.; Wegener, M.; Rodriguez-Emmenegger, Cesar; Barner-Kowollik, C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 38 (2015), s. 13186-13190 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GJ15-09368Y Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : cyclodextrin * molecular printboard * photoconjugation Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.771, year: 2015

  14. Refrigeration Cycle Design for Refrigerant Mixtures by Molecular Simulation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Smith, W.R.; Francová, Magda; Kowalski, M.; Nezbeda, Ivo

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 75, č. 4 (2010), s. 383-391 ISSN 0010-0765 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400720710 Grant - others:NSERC(CA) OGP1041 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : refrigerants * molecular simulations * vapor–liquid equilibrium Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.853, year: 2010

  15. Design of thermolabile bacteriophage repressor mutants by comparative molecular modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, A; vandenBurg, B; Karsens, H; Venema, G; Kok, J; Burg, Bertus van den

    1997-01-01

    Comparative molecular modeling was performed with repressor protein Rro of the temperate Lactococcus lactis bacteriophage r1t using the known 3D-structures of related repressors in order to obtain thermolabile derivatives of Rro. Rro residues presumed to stabilize a nonhomologous but structurally

  16. A hemi-metallocene chromium catalyst with trimethylaluminum-free methylaluminoxane for the synthesis of disentangled ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Dario; Ronca, Sara; Rastogi, Sanjay

    2015-02-01

    Recently, it has been shown that by using a single-site catalytic system having titanium as a metallic center, it is possible to tailor the entanglement density in the amorphous region of a semi-crystalline ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). This route provides the possibility to make high-modulus, high-strength uniaxially and biaxially drawn tapes and films, without using any solvent during processing. In this publication, it is shown that a single-site catalyst having chromium as metallic center, proposed by Enders and co-workers, can also be tuned to provide control on the entanglement density during synthesis of the UHMWPE. However, to achieve the goal some modifications during the synthesis are required. The synthesized polymers can be processed in the solid state below the equilibrium melting temperature, resulting in uniaxially drawn tapes having tensile strength and modulus greater than 3.5 N/tex and 200 N/tex, respectively. Rheological studies have been performed to follow the increase in entanglement density in melt state with time. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Influence of the Electrostatic Interaction between a Molecular Catalyst and Semiconductor on Photocatalytic Hydrogen Evolution Activity in Cobaloxime/CdS Hybrid Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yuxing; Chen, Ruotian; Li, Zhen; Li, Ailong; Han, Hongxian; Li, Can

    2017-07-12

    The influence of the electrostatic interaction on photocatalytic H 2 evolution activity in cobaloxime/cadmium sulfide (CdS) hybrid systems was studied by measuring the charges of the cobaloximes and the zeta potentials of CdS under different pH conditions (pHs 4-7). Cobaloxime/CdS hybrid systems may have potential as a valid model for the investigation of the electrostatic interaction between a molecular catalyst and semiconductor because the kinetics of methanol oxidation and the driving force of electron transfer from photoirradiated CdS to cobaloxime have little effect on the pH-dependent photocatalytic H 2 evolution activity. Our experimental results suggest that electrostatic repulsion between cobaloxime and CdS disfavors the electron transfer from CdS to cobaloxime and hence lowers the photocatalytic H 2 evolution activity. Whereas, electrostatic attraction favors the electron transfer process and enhances the photocatalytic H 2 evolution activity. However, an electrostatic attraction interaction that is too strong may accelerate both forward and backward electron transfer processes, which would reduce charge separation efficiency and lower photocatalytic H 2 evolution activity.

  18. Catalysts preparing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Normatov, I.Sh.; Mirsaidov, U.M.

    2003-01-01

    One of the base area of zeolites industry using is catalysis. The catalytic properties of zeolites use in the carbonated reactions in the petrochemistry. Last years zeolite catalysts use in oxidative-reduction processes

  19. Lunar CATALYST

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown (Lunar CATALYST) is a NASA initiative to encourage the development of U.S. private-sector robotic lunar...

  20. Photo-oxidation catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, J Roland [Lakewood, CO; Liu, Ping [Irvine, CA; Smith, R Davis [Golden, CO

    2009-07-14

    Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

  1. Photodriven hydrogen evolution by molecular catalysts using Al2O3-protected perylene-3,4-dicarboximide on NiO electrodes† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details; additional electrochemical and photoelectrochemical characterization, UV-Vis spectra, and fsTA results; quantification of evolved hydrogen; and DFT-computed ground state structure of PMI diester. See DOI: 10.1039/c6sc02477g Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamire, Rebecca J.; Majewski, Marek B.; Hoffeditz, William L.; Phelan, Brian T.; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2017-01-01

    The design of efficient hydrogen-evolving photocathodes for dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical cells (DSPECs) requires the incorporation of molecular light absorbing chromophores that are capable of delivering reducing equivalents to molecular proton reduction catalysts at rates exceeding those of charge recombination events. Here, we report the functionalization and kinetic analysis of a nanostructured NiO electrode with a modified perylene-3,4-dicarboximide chromophore (PMI) that is stabilized against degradation by atomic layer deposition (ALD) of thick insulating Al2O3 layers. Following photoinduced charge injection into NiO in high yield, films with Al2O3 layers demonstrate longer charge separated lifetimes as characterized via femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy and photoelectrochemical techniques. The photoelectrochemical behavior of the electrodes in the presence of Co(ii) and Ni(ii) molecular proton reduction catalysts is examined, revealing reduction of both catalysts. Under prolonged irradiation, evolved H2 is directly observed by gas chromatography supporting the applicability of PMI embedded in Al2O3 as a photocathode architecture in DSPECs. PMID:28616134

  2. On the design of Pt based catalysts. Combining porous architecture with surface modification by Sn for electrocatalytic activity enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flórez-Montaño, Jonathan; García, Gonzalo; Rodríguez, José L.; Pastor, Elena; Cappellari, Paula; Planes, Gabriel A.

    2015-05-01

    Metallic mesoporous (MP) catalysts with large surface area can be obtained in-situ, in a single step, by electrochemical reduction. In this work, the electrochemical behavior of MPPt and Sn modified mesoporous Pt (MPPt/Sn) was studied and compared with commercial carbon supported PtSn alloy (3:1). The electrochemical activity toward carbon monoxide and methanol oxidation reactions were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry, whereas X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to determine the surface composition and oxidation state of the atoms in the top layers of the catalysts. The analysis of methanol conversion to CO2 was performed with aid of differential electrochemical mass spectrometry (DEMS). Results reveal a better performance of the MPPt/Sn, which shows higher current density and energy conversion efficiency of fuel to CO2 than conventional carbon supported PtSn alloy (3:1).

  3. Molecular Design of Soluble Biopolyimide with High Rigidity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumant Dwivedi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available New soluble biopolyimides were prepared from a diamine derived from an exotic amino acid (4-aminocinnamic acid with several kinds of tetracarboxylic dianhydride. The biopolyimide molecular structural flexibility was tailored by modifying the tetracarboxylic dianhydride moiety. The obtained polyimides were soluble in various solvents such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, N,N-dimethylacetamide, N,N-dimethylformamide, dimethyl sulfoxide, and even tetrahydrofuran. It was observed that the biopolyimide solubility was greatly dependent upon the structural flexibility (torsion energy. Flexible structure facilitated greater solubility. The synthesized biopolyimides were largely amorphous and had number-average molecular weight (Mn in the range (5–8 × 105. The glass transition temperatures (Tg of the polymers ranged from 259–294 °C. These polymers exhibited good thermal stability without significant weight loss up to 410 °C. The temperatures at 10% weight loss (Td10 for synthesized biopolyimide ranged from 375–397 °C.

  4. Recent advances in the molecular design of synthetic vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lyn H.

    2015-12-01

    Vaccines have typically been prepared using whole organisms. These are normally either attenuated bacteria or viruses that are live but have been altered to reduce their virulence, or pathogens that have been inactivated and effectively killed through exposure to heat or formaldehyde. However, using whole organisms to elicit an immune response introduces the potential for infections arising from a reversion to a virulent form in live pathogens, unproductive reactions to vaccine components or batch-to-batch variability. Synthetic vaccines, in which a molecular antigen is conjugated to a carrier protein, offer the opportunity to circumvent these problems. This Perspective will highlight the progress that has been achieved in developing synthetic vaccines using a variety of molecular antigens. In particular, the different approaches used to develop conjugate vaccines using peptide/proteins, carbohydrates and other small molecule haptens as antigens are compared.

  5. Molecular Assemblies of Finite Shapes: Design and Self-Assembly ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Assembly via Coordination · Slide 2 · Slide 3 · Slide 4 · Slide 5 · Slide 6 · Slide 7 · Slide 8 · Slide 9 · Slide 10 · Slide 11 · Slide 12 · Slide 13 · Slide 14 · Slide 15 · Slide 16 · Slide 17 · Slide 18 · Slide 19 · Slide 20 · Slide 21 · Molecular Box · Slide 23.

  6. Design of optimal laser pulses to control molecular rovibrational ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    all time, where χ(t) is a Lagrange multiplier intro- duced to assure satisfaction of the time-dependent. Schrödinger equation. ˆH(t) is the overall Hamiltonian of the system which includes laser-matter interaction term. The time evolution of the molecular wavefunction ψ(t) under the influence of external field ε(t) is gov- erned by ...

  7. Biomass Conversion over Heteropoly Acid Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Jizhe

    2015-04-01

    Biomass is a natural resource that is both abundant and sustainable. Its efficient utilization has long been the focus of research and development efforts with the aim to substitute it for fossil-based feedstock. In addition to the production of biofuels (e.g., ethanol) from biomass, which has been to some degree successful, its conversion to high value-added chemicals is equally important. Among various biomass conversion pathways, catalytic conversion is usually preferred, as it provides a cost-effective and eco-benign route to the desired products with high selectivities. The research of this thesis is focused on the conversion of biomass to various chemicals of commercial interest by selective catalytic oxidation. Molecular oxygen is chosen as the oxidant considering its low cost and environment friendly features in comparison with commonly used hydrogen peroxide. However, the activation of molecular oxygen usually requires high reaction temperatures, leading to over oxidation and thus lower selectivities. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop effective catalysts for such conversion systems. We use kegging-type heteropoly acids (HPAs) as a platform for catalysts design because of their high catalytic activities and ease of medication. Using HPA catalysts allows the conversion taking place at relatively low temperature, which is beneficial to saving production cost as well as to improving the reaction selectivity. The strong acidity of HPA promotes the hydrolysis of biomass of giant molecules (e.g. cellulose), which is the first as well as the most difficult step in the conversion process. Under certain circumstances, a HPA combines the merits of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts, acting as an efficient homogeneous catalyst during the reaction while being easily separated as a heterogeneous catalyst after the reaction. We have successfully applied HPAs in several biomass conversion systems. Specially, we prepared a HPA-based bi-functional catalyst

  8. Operando chemistry of catalyst surfaces during catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dou, Jian; Sun, Zaicheng; Opalade, Adedamola A; Wang, Nan; Fu, Wensheng; Tao, Franklin Feng

    2017-04-03

    Chemistry of a catalyst surface during catalysis is crucial for a fundamental understanding of mechanism of a catalytic reaction performed on the catalyst in the gas or liquid phase. Due to the pressure- or molecular density-dependent entropy contribution of gas or liquid phase of the reactants and the potential formation of a catalyst surface during catalysis different from that observed in an ex situ condition, the characterization of the surface of a catalyst under reaction conditions and during catalysis can be significant and even necessary for understanding the catalytic mechanism at a molecular level. Electron-based analytical techniques are challenging for studying catalyst nanoparticles in the gas or liquid phase although they are necessary techniques to employ. Instrumentation and further development of these electron-based techniques have now made in situ/operando studies of catalysts possible. New insights into the chemistry and structure of catalyst nanoparticles have been uncovered over the last decades. Herein, the origin of the differences between ex situ and in situ/operando studies of catalysts, and the technical challenges faced as well as the corresponding instrumentation and innovations utilized for characterizing catalysts under reaction conditions and during catalysis, are discussed. The restructuring of catalyst surfaces driven by the pressure of reactant(s) around a catalyst, restructuring in reactant(s) driven by reaction temperature and restructuring during catalysis are also reviewed herein. The remaining challenges and possible solutions are briefly discussed.

  9. DOE Award No. DE-FC36-03GO13108 NOVEL NON-PRECIOUS METAL CATALYSTS FOR PEMFC: CATALYST SELECTION THROUGH MOLECULAR MODELING AND DURABILITY STUDIES Final Report (September 2003 – October 2008)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branko N. Popov

    2009-02-20

    The objective of this project is to develop novel non-precious metal electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and demonstrate the potential of the catalysts to perform at least as good as conventional Pt catalysts currently in use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with a cost at least 50 % less than a target of 0.2 g (Pt loading)/peak kW and with durability > 2,000 h operation with less than 10 % power degradation. A novel nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst was obtained by modifying carbon black with nitrogen-containing organic precursor in the absence of transition metal precursor. The catalyst shows the onset potential of approximately 0.76 V (NHE) for ORR and the amount of H2O2 of approximately 3% at 0.5 V (NHE). Furthermore, a carbon composite catalyst was achieved through the high-temperature pyrolysis of the precursors of transition metal (Co and Fe) and nitrogen supported on the nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst, followed by chemical post-treatment. This catalyst showed an onset potential for ORR as high as 0.87 V (NHE), and generated less than 1 % of H2O2. The PEM fuel cell exhibited a current density of 2.3 A cm-2 at 0.2 V for a catalyst loading of 6.0 mg cm-2. No significant performance degradation was observed for 480 h continuous operation. The characterization studies indicated that the metal-nitrogen chelate complexes decompose at the temperatures above 800 oC. During the pyrolysis, the transition metals facilitate the incorporation of pyridinic and graphitic nitrogen groups into the carbon matrix, and the carbon surface modified with nitrogen is active for ORR. In order to elucidate the role of transition metal precursor played in the formation of active sites in the non-precious metal catalysts, a novel ruthenium-based chelate (RuNx) catalyst was synthesized by using RuCl3 and propylene diammine as the Ru and N precursors, respectively, followed by high-temperature pyrolysis. This catalyst exhibited comparable

  10. DOE Award No. DE-FC36-03GO13108 NOVEL NON-PRECIOUS METAL CATALYSTS FOR PEMFC: CATALYST SELECTION THROUGH MOLECULAR MODELING AND DURABILITY STUDIES Final Report (September 2003 – October 2008)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branko N. Popov

    2009-03-03

    The objective of this project is to develop novel non-precious metal electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and demonstrate the potential of the catalysts to perform at least as good as conventional Pt catalysts currently in use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with a cost at least 50 % less than a target of 0.2 g (Pt loading)/peak kW and with durability > 2,000 h operation with less than 10 % power degradation. A novel nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst was obtained by modifying carbon black with nitrogen-containing organic precursor in the absence of transition metal precursor. The catalyst shows the onset potential of approximately 0.76 V (NHE) for ORR and the amount of H2O2 of approximately 3% at 0.5 V (NHE). Furthermore, a carbon composite catalyst was achieved through the high-temperature pyrolysis of the precursors of transition metal (Co and Fe) and nitrogen supported on the nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst, followed by chemical post-treatment. This catalyst showed an onset potential for ORR as high as 0.87 V (NHE), and generated less than 1 % of H2O2. The PEM fuel cell exhibited a current density of 2.3 A cm-2 at 0.2 V for a catalyst loading of 6.0 mg cm-2. No significant performance degradation was observed for 480 h continuous operation. The characterization studies indicated that the metal-nitrogen chelate complexes decompose at the temperatures above 800 oC. During the pyrolysis, the transition metals facilitate the incorporation of pyridinic and graphitic nitrogen groups into the carbon matrix, and the carbon surface modified with nitrogen is active for ORR. In order to elucidate the role of transition metal precursor played in the formation of active sites in the non-precious metal catalysts, a novel ruthenium-based chelate (RuNx) catalyst was synthesized by using RuCl3 and propylene diammine as the Ru and N precursors, respectively, followed by high-temperature pyrolysis. This catalyst exhibited comparable

  11. Combinations of Aminocatalysts and Metal Catalysts: A Powerful Cooperative Approach in Selective Organic Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afewerki, Samson; Córdova, Armando

    2016-11-23

    The cooperation and interplay between organic and metal catalyst systems is of utmost importance in nature and chemical synthesis. Here innovative and selective cooperative catalyst systems can be designed by combining two catalysts that complement rather than inhibit one another. This refined strategy can permit chemical transformations unmanageable by either of the catalysts alone. This review summarizes innovations and developments in selective organic synthesis that have used cooperative dual catalysis by combining simple aminocatalysts with metal catalysts. Considerable efforts have been devoted to this fruitful field. This emerging area employs the different activation modes of amine and metal catalysts as a platform to address challenging reactions. Here, aminocatalysis (e.g., enamine activation catalysis, iminium activation catalysis, single occupied molecular orbital (SOMO) activation catalysis, and photoredox activation catalysis) is employed to activate unreactive carbonyl substrates. The transition metal catalyst complements by activating a variety of substrates through a range of interactions (e.g., electrophilic π-allyl complex formation, Lewis acid activation, allenylidene complex formation, photoredox activation, C-H activation, etc.), and thereby novel concepts within catalysis are created. The inclusion of heterogeneous catalysis strategies allows for "green" chemistry development, catalyst recyclability, and the more eco-friendly synthesis of valuable compounds.

  12. GABA uptake inhibitors. Design, molecular pharmacology and therapeutic aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard-Larsen, P; Frølund, B; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2000-01-01

    GABAA receptor agonists. The availability of these compounds made it possible to study the pharmacology of the GABA uptake systems and the GABAA receptors separately. Based on extensive cellular and molecular pharmacological studies using 23, 24, and a number of mono- and bicyclic analogues, it has been...... as well as glial GABA uptake in order to enhance the inhibitory effects of synaptically released GABA, or (2) selective blockade of glial GABA uptake in order to increase the amount of GABA taken up into, and subsequently released from, nerve terminals. The bicyclic compound (R)-N-Me-exo-THPO (17) has...

  13. Digital learning material for experimental design and model building in molecular biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aegerter-Wilmsen, T.

    2005-01-01

    Designing experimental approaches is a major cognitive skill in molecular biology research, and building models, including quantitative ones, is a cognitive skill which is rapidly gaining importance. Since molecular biology education at university level is aimed at educating future researchers, we

  14. Highly dispersed metal catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xin; West, William L.; Rhodes, William D.

    2016-11-08

    A supported catalyst having an atomic level single atom structure is provided such that substantially all the catalyst is available for catalytic function. A process of forming a single atom catalyst unto a porous catalyst support is also provided.

  15. GABA uptake inhibitors. Design, molecular pharmacology and therapeutic aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard-Larsen, P; Frølund, B; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2000-01-01

    GABAA receptor agonists. The availability of these compounds made it possible to study the pharmacology of the GABA uptake systems and the GABAA receptors separately. Based on extensive cellular and molecular pharmacological studies using 23, 24, and a number of mono- and bicyclic analogues, it has been...... demonstrated that neuronal and glial GABA transport mechanisms have dissimilar substrate specificities. With GABA transport mechanisms as pharmacological targets, strategies for pharmacological interventions with the purpose of stimulating GABA neurotransmission seem to be (1) effective blockade of neuronal...... recently been reported as the most selective glial GABA uptake inhibitor so far known and may be a useful tool for further elucidation of the pharmacology of GABA transporters. In recent years, a variety of lipophilic analogues of the amino acids 23 and 24 have been developed, and one of these compounds...

  16. Virtual Design of a 4-Bed Molecular Sieve for Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giesy, Timothy J.; Coker, Robert F.; O'Connor, Brian F.; Knox, James C.

    2017-01-01

    Simulations of six new 4-Bed Molecular Sieve configurations have been performed using a COMSOL (COMSOL Multiphysics - commercial software) model. The preliminary results show that reductions in desiccant bed size and sorbent bed size when compared to the International Space Station configuration are feasible while still yielding a process that handles at least 4.0 kilograms a day CO2. The results also show that changes to the CO2 sorbent are likewise feasible. Decreasing the bed sizes was found to have very little negative effect on the adsorption process; breakthrough of CO2 in the sorbent bed was observed for two of the configurations, but a small degree of CO2 breakthrough is acceptable, and water breakthrough in the desiccant beds was not observed. Both configurations for which CO2 breakthrough was observed still yield relatively high CO2 efficiency, and future investigations will focus on bed size in order to find the optimum configuration.

  17. Genetic breeding of silkworms: from traditional hybridization to molecular design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, San-Yuan; Xia, Qing-You

    2017-11-20

    Sericulture is one of the great inventions of the Chinese people and has become an important cultural feature of China. As China is the long-lasting center of silk production, genetic breeding of silkworm was highly developed historically, and has formed a comprehensive system for breeding and preservation of new varieties. However, silkworm breeding reached a bottleneck recently, because most of the traditional genetic resources have been utilized and silkworm strains have become homogeneous. Meanwhile, sericulture in China meets huge challenges in the 21 st century. In recent years, with the development and rapid application of molecular biology, genomics, transgene and genome editing, silkworm genetic breeding has entered a new era. In this review, we summarize the development of silkworm genetic breeding, especially the progress and perspective of transgene and genome editing in genetic engineering of silkworms. We also discuss the future development of silkworm genetic breeding.

  18. Solar-Driven Reduction of Aqueous Protons Coupled to Selective Alcohol Oxidation with a Carbon Nitride-Molecular Ni Catalyst System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasap, Hatice; Caputo, Christine A; Martindale, Benjamin C M; Godin, Robert; Lau, Vincent Wing-Hei; Lotsch, Bettina V; Durrant, James R; Reisner, Erwin

    2016-07-27

    Solar water-splitting represents an important strategy toward production of the storable and renewable fuel hydrogen. The water oxidation half-reaction typically proceeds with poor efficiency and produces the unprofitable and often damaging product, O2. Herein, we demonstrate an alternative approach and couple solar H2 generation with value-added organic substrate oxidation. Solar irradiation of a cyanamide surface-functionalized melon-type carbon nitride ((NCN)CNx) and a molecular nickel(II) bis(diphosphine) H2-evolution catalyst (NiP) enabled the production of H2 with concomitant selective oxidation of benzylic alcohols to aldehydes in high yield under purely aqueous conditions, at room temperature and ambient pressure. This one-pot system maintained its activity over 24 h, generating products in 1:1 stoichiometry, separated in the gas and solution phases. The (NCN)CNx-NiP system showed an activity of 763 μmol (g CNx)(-1) h(-1) toward H2 and aldehyde production, a Ni-based turnover frequency of 76 h(-1), and an external quantum efficiency of 15% (λ = 360 ± 10 nm). This precious metal-free and nontoxic photocatalytic system displays better performance than an analogous system containing platinum instead of NiP. Transient absorption spectroscopy revealed that the photoactivity of (NCN)CNx is due to efficient substrate oxidation of the material, which outweighs possible charge recombination compared to the nonfunctionalized melon-type carbon nitride. Photoexcited (NCN)CNx in the presence of an organic substrate can accumulate ultralong-lived "trapped electrons", which allow for fuel generation in the dark. The artificial photosynthetic system thereby catalyzes a closed redox cycle showing 100% atom economy and generates two value-added products, a solar chemical, and solar fuel.

  19. Molecular design, synthesis and evaluation of chemical biology tools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenboom, Jorin

    2017-01-01

    Chapter 1 provides a perspective of synthetic organic chemistry as a discipline involved in the design, synthesis and evaluation of complex molecules. The reader is introduced with a brief history of synthetic organic chemistry, all the while dealing with different aspects of

  20. Design of optimal laser pulses to control molecular rovibrational ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Optimal control theory in combination with time-dependent quantum dynamics is employed to design laser pulses which can perform selective vibrational and rotational excitations in a heteronuclear diatomic system. We have applied the conjugate gradient method for the constrained optimization of a suit-.

  1. Investigation of activity and selectivity of redox catalysts in oxidative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study, oxidative coupling of methane on Redox catalysts in fluidized bed reactor was investigated. For this purpose, the catalyst Mn-Na2WO4/SiO2 was selected as a Redox catalyst. In order to investigate this catalyst, transient state experiments were designed and performed. Then, the different reaction conditions on ...

  2. Bimetal catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, K. Y. Simon; Salley, Steve O.; Wang, Huali

    2017-10-03

    A catalyst comprises a carbide or nitride of a metal and a promoter element. The metal is selected from the group consisting of Mo, W, Co, Fe, Rh or Mn, and the promoter element is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Co, Al, Si, S or P, provided that the metal and the promoter element are different. The catalyst also comprises a mesoporous support having a surface area of at least about 170 m.sup.2 g.sup.-1, wherein the carbide or nitride of the metal and the promoter element is supported by the mesoporous support, and is in a non-sulfided form and in an amorphous form.

  3. Catalyst Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiib, Hans; Marling, Gitte; Hansen, Peter Mandal

    2014-01-01

    How can architecture promote the enriching experiences of the tolerant, the democratic, and the learning city - a city worth living in, worth supporting and worth investing in? Catalyst Architecture comprises architectural projects, which, by virtue of their location, context and their combination...... of programs, have a role in mediating positive social and/or cultural development. In this sense, we talk about architecture as a catalyst for: sustainable adaptation of the city’s infrastructure appropriate renovation of dilapidated urban districts strengthening of social cohesiveness in the city development...

  4. Defining a Materials Database for the Design of Copper Binary Alloy Catalysts for Electrochemical CO2Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chan Woo; Yang, Ki Dong; Nam, Dae-Hyun; Jang, Jun Ho; Cho, Nam Heon; Im, Sang Won; Nam, Ki Tae

    2018-01-24

    While Cu electrodes are a versatile material in the electrochemical production of desired hydrocarbon fuels, Cu binary alloy electrodes are recently proposed to further tune reaction directionality and, more importantly, overcome the intrinsic limitation of scaling relations. Despite encouraging empirical demonstrations of various Cu-based metal alloy systems, the underlying principles of their outstanding performance are not fully addressed. In particular, possible phase segregation with concurrent composition changes, which is widely observed in the field of metallurgy, is not at all considered. Moreover, surface-exposed metals can easily form oxide species, which is another pivotal factor that determines overall catalytic properties. Here, the understanding of Cu binary alloy catalysts for CO 2 reduction and recent progress in this field are discussed. From the viewpoint of the thermodynamic stability of the alloy system and elemental mixing, possible microstructures and naturally generated surface oxide species are proposed. These basic principles of material science can help to predict and understand metal alloy structure and, moreover, act as an inspiration for the development of new binary alloy catalysts to further improve CO 2 conversion and, ultimately, achieve a carbon-neutral cycle. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Simultaneous molecular and process design for waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palma-Flores, Oscar; Flores-Tlacuahuac, Antonio; Canseco-Melchor, Graciela

    2016-01-01

    Processing streams featuring low temperatures are common in industrial systems. Because of low temperatures it turns out to be a challenge to use these type of streams for energy recovery. This is especially true if water is used as the main fluid for energy recovery since large amounts of energy are required for water vaporization. To cope with this energy problem different types of organic fluids used in Rankine-like thermodynamic cycles have been proposed. However, high cost and sustainability issues (i.e. large toxicity) related to organic fluids call for the design of a new type of working fluids suitable for low-temperature energy recovery. This generation of new working fluids should feature target properties such as high vapor pressure and low flammability and toxicity values. Moreover, the performance of these new working fluids also depends on the operating conditions of the thermodynamic cycle where such working fluids will be used. In this work we address the simultaneous product and process design problem of working fluids for energy recovery from low-temperature energy sources in Rankine-like cycles to obtain improved optimal solutions. We compare the energy recovery performance of both the new family of working fluids and processing conditions against similar energy performance obtained using organic fluids previously used for the same aim. By using a system of coupled cycles, work production was increased. Moreover, the new working fluids feature improved safety margins. The results indicate the benefits of the simultaneous product and process design approach and permit us to identify a family of working fluids with better sustainability characteristics. - Highlights: • The efficient energy recovery from low-temperature sources is addressed. • A product/process design method is used for waste energy recovery. • The novel organic fluids lead to better energy recovery features. • Globally improved waste energy recovery was achieved.

  6. Solution Structures of Highly Active Molecular Ir Water-Oxidation Catalysts from Density Functional Theory Combined with High-Energy X-ray Scattering and EXAFS Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ke R; Matula, Adam J; Kwon, Gihan; Hong, Jiyun; Sheehan, Stafford W; Thomsen, Julianne M; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H; Tiede, David M; Chen, Lin X; Batista, Victor S

    2016-05-04

    The solution structures of highly active Ir water-oxidation catalysts are elucidated by combining density functional theory, high-energy X-ray scattering (HEXS), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. We find that the catalysts are Ir dimers with mono-μ-O cores and terminal anionic ligands, generated in situ through partial oxidation of a common catalyst precursor. The proposed structures are supported by (1)H and (17)O NMR, EPR, resonance Raman and UV-vis spectra, electrophoresis, etc. Our findings are particularly valuable to understand the mechanism of water oxidation by highly reactive Ir catalysts. Importantly, our DFT-EXAFS-HEXS methodology provides a new in situ technique for characterization of active species in catalytic systems.

  7. Glucose-responsive insulin by molecular and physical design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakh, Naveed A.; Cortinas, Abel B.; Weiss, Michael A.; Langer, Robert S.; Anderson, Daniel G.; Gu, Zhen; Dutta, Sanjoy; Strano, Michael S.

    2017-10-01

    The concept of a glucose-responsive insulin (GRI) has been a recent objective of diabetes technology. The idea behind the GRI is to create a therapeutic that modulates its potency, concentration or dosing relative to a patient's dynamic glucose concentration, thereby approximating aspects of a normally functioning pancreas. From the perspective of the medicinal chemist, the GRI is also important as a generalized model of a potentially new generation of therapeutics that adjust potency in response to a critical therapeutic marker. The aim of this Perspective is to highlight emerging concepts, including mathematical modelling and the molecular engineering of insulin itself and its potency, towards a viable GRI. We briefly outline some of the most important recent progress toward this goal and also provide a forward-looking viewpoint, which asks if there are new approaches that could spur innovation in this area as well as to encourage synthetic chemists and chemical engineers to address the challenges and promises offered by this therapeutic approach.

  8. A Multi-Step and Multi-Level Approach for Computer Aided Molecular Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harper, Peter Mathias; Gani, Rafiqul

    2001-01-01

    A general multi-step approach for setting up, solving and solution analysis of computer aided molecular design (CAMD) problems is presented. The approach differs from previous work within the field of CAMD since it also addresses the need for a computer aided problem formulation and result analysis....... The problem formulation step incorporates a knowledge base for the identification and setup of the design criteria. Candidate compounds are identified using a multi-level generate and test CAMD solution algorithm capable of designing molecules having a high level of molecular detail. A post solution step...

  9. Coal catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroenig, W.

    1944-02-11

    Some considerations in the selection of a catalyst for the liquid phase of coal hydrogenation are discussed. Some of the previous history of such selections is mentioned. At one stage of the development, the principal catalyst had been iron sulfate (FeSO/sub 4/.7H/sub 2/O). Later, for reasons of cost and availability of large supplies, selections had turned to mixtures of iron sulfate and one or another of some iron oxide- and aluminum oxide-containing byproducts of aluminum manufacture, namely Bayermasse, Luxamsse, or Lautamasse. Much of the discussion centered on optimal proportions for such mixtures, particularly as related to pH values of resulting coal pastes. Upper Silesian coal was more alkaline than Ruhr coal, and Bayermasse, etc., were quite alkaline. Thus, since the iron sulfate served as a partial neutralizer for the coal as well as a catalyst, it seemed necessary to increase the proportions of iron sulfate in the catalyst mixture when processing coal of greater alkalinity. A further reason for a greater proportion of iron sulfate seemed to be that most of the catalytic activity of the iron came from the ferrous iron of iron sulfate rather than from the ferric iron of the other materials. Ferrous-ferric ratios also seemed to indicate that Luxmasse or Lautamasse might be better catalyst components than Bayermasse but their water content sometimes caused handling problems, so Bayermasse had been more widely used. Formation of deposits in the preheater was more likely due to the Bayermasse than to the iron sulfate; sodium sulfide could help to prevent them.

  10. A Multi-step and Multi-level approach for Computer Aided Molecular Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A general multi-step approach for setting up, solving and solution analysis of computer aided molecular design (CAMD) problems is presented. The approach differs from previous work within the field of CAMD since it also addresses the need for a computer aided problem formulation and result analysis....... The problem formulation step incorporates a knowledge base for the identification and setup of the design criteria. Candidate compounds are identified using a multi-level generate and test CAMD solution algorithm capable of designing molecules having a high level of molecular detail. A post solution step...... using an Integrated Computer Aided System (ICAS) for result analysis and verification is included in the methodology. Keywords: CAMD, separation processes, knowledge base, molecular design, solvent selection, substitution, group contribution, property prediction, ICAS Introduction The use of Computer...

  11. SMART design to control over conformation and molecular packing in blue luminescent oligofluorenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Meng-Na; Ou, Chang-Jin; Liu, Bin; Xie, Ling-Hai; Lin, Jin-Yi; Wang, Sha-Sha; Wei, Ying; Huang, Wei

    2018-01-01

    The uncertainty evolution of conformation and molecular packing from solution to film is key challenge for the repeatability of procedures in organic optoelectronics. Herein, we observed the noncovalent force at the bulky groups to decode the supramolecular steric hindrance (SSH) effect and to propose synergistically molecular attractor-repulsor theory (SMART). The fine difference between ideal and real bulks were described and the SSH effect have been proved by two comparable stat-of-the-art models. The SMART design guide us to discover blue oligo/polydiarylfluorenes with beta phase as well as nanosheets with the paradigm of Interdigital Lipid Bilayer-like (ILB) mode. SMART address one kind of AR molecules with potential controllable behaviors. The design of bulk-withdraw and bulk-rich will exhibit the unreplaceable role in morphology-directed design that is just like the role of donor-acceptor molecular design of organic polymer semiconductors.

  12. Molecular design of sequence specific DNA alkylating agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoshima, Masafumi; Bando, Toshikazu; Shinohara, Ken-ichi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Sequence-specific DNA alkylating agents have great interest for novel approach to cancer chemotherapy. We designed the conjugates between pyrrole (Py)-imidazole (Im) polyamides and DNA alkylating chlorambucil moiety possessing at different positions. The sequence-specific DNA alkylation by conjugates was investigated by using high-resolution denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The results showed that polyamide chlorambucil conjugates alkylate DNA at flanking adenines in recognition sequences of Py-Im polyamides, however, the reactivities and alkylation sites were influenced by the positions of conjugation. In addition, we synthesized conjugate between Py-Im polyamide and another alkylating agent, 1-(chloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-1,2-dihydro-3H-benz[e]indole (seco-CBI). DNA alkylation reactivies by both alkylating polyamides were almost comparable. In contrast, cytotoxicities against cell lines differed greatly. These comparative studies would promote development of appropriate sequence-specific DNA alkylating polyamides against specific cancer cells.

  13. Green cellulose-based nanocomposite catalyst: Design and facile performance in aqueous synthesis of pyranopyrimidines and pyrazolopyranopyrimidines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Ali; Jafari, Abbas Ali; Yousefi, Somayeh

    2017-11-01

    A cellulose-based nanobiocomposite decorated with Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles was prepared, characterized and applied as an easily recoverable and reusable green nanocatalyst in the synthesis of pyrano[2,3-d]pyrimidine derivatives in water at room temperature. The characterization was performed by using a variety of conventional analytical instruments such as Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM), thermal analysis (TGA/DTA) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analyses. Two series of pyranopyrimidine and pyrazolopyranopyrimidines derivatives were synthesized by using the present cellulose-based nanocomposite. This protocol has valuable features like high yield of the products, short reaction times, mild conditions and easy work-up procedure. In addition, the catalyst can be prepared easily with cheap and green starting materials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Rational design of methicillin resistance staphylococcus aureus inhibitors through 3D-QSAR, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballu, Srilata; Itteboina, Ramesh; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2018-04-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a gram positive bacterium. It is the leading cause of skin and respiratory infections, osteomyelitis, Ritter's disease, endocarditis, and bacteraemia in the developed world. We employed combined studies of 3D QSAR, molecular docking which are validated by molecular dynamics simulations and in silico ADME prediction have been performed on Isothiazoloquinolones inhibitors against methicillin resistance Staphylococcus aureus. Three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) study was applied using comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) with Q 2 of 0.578, R 2 of 0.988, and comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) with Q 2 of 0.554, R 2 of 0.975. The predictive ability of these model was determined using a test set of molecules that gave acceptable predictive correlation (r 2 Pred) values 0.55 and 0.57 of CoMFA and CoMSIA respectively. Docking, simulations were employed to position the inhibitors into protein active site to find out the most probable binding mode and most reliable conformations. Developed models and Docking methods provide guidance to design molecules with enhanced activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Chapter 6 – Computer-Aided Molecular Design and Property Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul; Zhang, L.; Kalakul, Sawitree

    2017-01-01

    to meet the global challenges of resources, competition, and demand. Design/development of these products mostly follows experiment-based trial and error approaches. With the availability of reliable property prediction models, however, computer-aided techniques have become popular, at least...... for the initial stages of the design/development process. Therefore, computer-aided molecular design and property prediction techniques are two topics that play important roles in chemical product design, analysis, and application. In this chapter, an overview of the concepts, methods, and tools related...... to these two topics are given. In addition, a generic computer-aided framework for the design of molecules, mixtures, and blends is presented. The application of the framework is highlighted for molecular products through two case studies involving the design of refrigerants and surfactants....

  16. Oxide Nanocrystal Model Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Weixin

    2016-03-15

    as the active sites, respectively, to produce acrolein, propylene oxide, and CO2. Ceria rods enclosed with the {110} and {100} crystal planes, ceria cubes enclosed with the {100} crystal planes, and ceria octahedra enclosed with the {111} crystal planes exhibit distinct morphology-dependent oxygen vacancy concentrations and structures that can be well correlated with the surface compositions and structures of exposed crystal planes. Consequently, the metal-ceria interactions, structures, and catalytic performances of ceria-supported catalysts depend on the CeO2 morphology. Our results comprehensively reveal the morphology-dependent surface chemistry and catalysis of oxide nanocrystals that not only greatly deepen the fundamental understanding of oxide catalysis but also demonstrate a morphology-engineering strategy to optimize the catalytic performance of oxide catalysts. These results adequately exemplify the concept of oxide nanocrystal model catalysts for the fundamental investigations of oxide catalysis without the "materials gap" and "pressure gap". With the structure-catalytic property relationships learned from oxide nanocrystal model catalyst studies and the advancement of controlled-synthesis methods, it is promising to realize the structural design and controlled synthesis of novel efficient oxide catalysts in the future.

  17. Bifunctional cobalt F-T catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, J.G.; Coughlin, P.K.; Yang, C.L.; Rabo, J.A.

    1986-03-01

    Results on the catalytic screening of Fischer-Tropsch catalysts containing shape selective components are reported. Catalysts consist of promoted cobalt intimately contacted with Union Carbide molecular sieves and were tested using a Berty type internally recycled reactor. Methods of preparation, promoters and shape selective components were varied and aimed at improving catalyst performance. Catalysts were developed demonstrating high C/sub 5/ + yields with high olefin content and low methane production while maintaining stability under both low and high H/sub 2/:CO ratio conditions.

  18. Design, synthesis, α-glucosidase inhibitory activity, molecular docking and QSAR studies of benzimidazole derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinparast, Leila; Valizadeh, Hassan; Bahadori, Mir Babak; Soltani, Somaieh; Asghari, Behvar; Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-06-01

    In this study the green, one-pot, solvent-free and selective synthesis of benzimidazole derivatives is reported. The reactions were catalyzed by ZnO/MgO containing ZnO nanoparticles as a highly effective, non-toxic and environmentally friendly catalyst. The structure of synthesized benzimidazoles was characterized using spectroscopic technics (FT-IR, 1HNMR, 13CNMR). Synthesized compounds were evaluated for their α-glucosidase inhibitory potential. Compounds 3c, 3e, 3l and 4n were potent inhibitors with IC50 values ranging from 60.7 to 168.4 μM. In silico studies were performed to explore the binding modes and interactions between enzyme and synthesized benzimidazoles. Developed linear QSAR model based on density and molecular weight could predict bioactivity of newly synthesized compounds well. Molecular docking studies revealed the availability of some hydrophobic interactions. In addition, the bioactivity of most potent compounds had good correlation with estimated free energy of binding (ΔGbinding) which was calculated according to docked best conformations.

  19. Generic Mathematical Programming Formulation and Solution for Computer-Aided Molecular Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lei; Cignitti, Stefano; Gani, Rafiqul

    2015-01-01

    This short communication presents a generic mathematical programming formulation for Computer-Aided Molecular Design (CAMD). A given CAMD problem, based on target properties, is formulated as a Mixed Integer Linear/Non-Linear Program (MILP/MINLP). The mathematical programming model presented here......, which is formulated as an MILP/MINLP problem, considers first-order and second-order molecular groups for molecular structure representation and property estimation. It is shown that various CAMD problems can be formulated and solved through this model....

  20. First-Principles Design of Graphene-Based Active Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction and Evolution Reactions in the Aprotic Li-O2 Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Joonhee; Yu, Jong-Sung; Han, Byungchan

    2016-07-21

    Using first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we demonstrate that catalytic activities toward oxygen reduction and evolution reactions (ORR and OER) in a Li-O2 battery can be substantially improved with graphene-based materials. We accomplish the goal by calculating free energy diagrams for the redox reactions of oxygen to identify a rate-determining step controlling the overpotentials. We unveil that the catalytic performance is well described by the adsorption energies of the intermediates LiO2 and Li2O2 and propose that graphene-based materials can be substantially optimized through either by N doping or encapsulating Cu(111) single crystals. Furthermore, our systematic approach with DFT calculations applied to design of optimum catalysts enables screening of promising candidates for the oxygen electrochemistry leading to considerable improvement of efficiency of a range of renewable energy devices.

  1. Catalyst Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Catalyst Architecture’ takes its point of departure in a broadened understanding of the role of architecture in relation to developmental problems in large cities. Architectural projects frame particular functions and via their form language, they can provide the user with an aesthetic experience....... The broadened understanding of architecture consists in that an architectural project, by virtue of its placement in the context and of its composition of programs, can have a mediating role in a positive or cultural development of the district in question. In this sense, we talk about architecture as catalyst...... cities on the planet have growing pains and social cohesiveness is under pressure from an increased difference between rich and poor, social segregation, ghettoes, immigration of guest workers and refugees, commercial mass tourism etc. In this context, it is important to ask which role architecture...

  2. Design of two-photon molecular tandem architectures for solar cells by ab initio theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnsø, Kristian Baruël; García Lastra, Juan Maria; De La Torre, Gema

    2015-01-01

    An extensive database of spectroscopic properties of molecules from ab initio calculations is used to design molecular complexes for use in tandem solar cells that convert two photons into a single electron–hole pair, thereby increasing the output voltage while covering a wider spectral range...... of the structural and energetic properties of several thousand porphyrin dyes. The third design is a molecular analogy of the intermediate band solar cell, and involves a single dye molecule with strong intersystem crossing to ensure a long lifetime of the intermediate state. Based on the calculated energy levels...... and molecular orbitals, energy diagrams are presented for the individual steps in the operation of such tandem solar cells. We find that theoretical open circuit voltages of up to 1.8 V can be achieved using these tandem designs. Questions about the practical implementation of prototypical devices...

  3. Design of bimetal catalysts Pt-Ni/CeO2-1D for generation of H2 by the reforming reaction of methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarmiento F, I.

    2016-01-01

    CeO 2 nano rods were synthesized by hydrothermal method and were used as support for preparing catalysts bimetallic Pt Ni / CeO 2 -1D. The catalysts were prepared by classical impregnation by the conventional wet method. The prepared catalysts are Pt (0.5 %) - Ni (5 %) / CeO 2 and Pt (0.5 %) - Ni (15 %) / CeO 2 , which were characterized by different physico-chemical techniques: Bet, Sem, TPR and XRD, that were evaluated in the Auto thermal Steam reforming of Methanol for H 2 production. The Bet surface area results, show that the surface area of the catalysts decreases as the nominal load of Ni in the catalyst, increases. Sem shows, that the catalyst support (CeO 2 -1D) and the bimetallic catalysts are conformed by nano rods. By XRD were identified the crystalline phases present, in the catalytic material: cerianite distinctive phase of cerium oxide and metallic Ni; however it was not possible to observe diffraction peaks of Platinum using this technique. The temperature-programmed reduction (TPR) analysis allowed to obtain the reduction profiles, of the different species present on the catalysts. The catalytic activity tests carried out, showed that the catalysts total 100% methanol conversion is achieved at 300 degrees Celsius, making them excellent, to be used in reactions at low temperature conditions. Selectivity towards H 2 , is very similar in both catalysts, and it reaches a 50% yield per mole of methanol fed stoichiometrically. (Author)

  4. An analysis of simple computational strategies to facilitate the design of functional molecular information processors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yiling; Roslan, Rozieffa; Azizan, Shariza; Firdaus-Raih, Mohd; Ramlan, Effirul I

    2016-10-28

    Biological macromolecules (DNA, RNA and proteins) are capable of processing physical or chemical inputs to generate outputs that parallel conventional Boolean logical operators. However, the design of functional modules that will enable these macromolecules to operate as synthetic molecular computing devices is challenging. Using three simple heuristics, we designed RNA sensors that can mimic the function of a seven-segment display (SSD). Ten independent and orthogonal sensors representing the numerals 0 to 9 are designed and constructed. Each sensor has its own unique oligonucleotide binding site region that is activated uniquely by a specific input. Each operator was subjected to a stringent in silico filtering. Random sensors were selected and functionally validated via ribozyme self cleavage assays that were visualized via electrophoresis. By utilising simple permutation and randomisation in the sequence design phase, we have developed functional RNA sensors thus demonstrating that even the simplest of computational methods can greatly aid the design phase for constructing functional molecular devices.

  5. Bio-inspired CO2 reduction by a rhenium tricarbonyl bipyridine-based catalyst appended to amino acids and peptidic platforms: incorporating proton relays and hydrogen-bonding functional groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabolla, S A; Machan, C W; Yin, J; Dellamary, E A; Sahu, S; Gianneschi, N C; Gilson, M K; Tezcan, F A; Kubiak, C P

    2017-06-02

    Herein, we report a new approach to bio-inspired catalyst design. The molecular catalyst employed in these studies is based on the robust and selective Re(bpy)(CO) 3 Cl-type (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) homogeneous catalysts, which have been extensively studied for their ability to reduce CO 2 electrochemically or photochemically in the presence of a photosensitizer. These catalysts can be highly active photocatalysts in their own right. In this work, the bipyridine ligand was modified with amino acids and synthetic peptides. These results build on earlier findings wherein the bipyridine ligand was functionalized with amide groups to promote dimer formation and CO 2 reduction by an alternate bimolecular mechanism at lower overpotential (ca. 250 mV) than the more commonly observed unimolecular process. The bio-inspired catalysts were designed to allow for the incorporation of proton relays to support reduction of CO 2 to CO and H 2 O. The coupling of amino acids tyrosine and phenylalanine led to the formation of two structurally similar Re catalyst/peptide catalysts for comparison of proton transport during catalysis. This article reports the synthesis and characterization of novel catalyst/peptide hybrids by molecular dynamics (MD simulations of structural dynamics), NMR studies of solution phase structures, and electrochemical studies to measure the activities of new bio-inspired catalysts in the reduction of CO 2.

  6. Molecular modeling for the design of novel performance chemicals and materials

    CERN Document Server

    Rai, Beena

    2012-01-01

    Molecular modeling (MM) tools offer significant benefits in the design of industrial chemical plants and material processing operations. While the role of MM in biological fields is well established, in most cases MM works as an accessory in novel products/materials development rather than a tool for direct innovation. As a result, MM engineers and practitioners are often seized with the question: ""How do I leverage these tools to develop novel materials or chemicals in my industry?"" Molecular Modeling for the Design of Novel Performance Chemicals and Materials answers this important questio

  7. Recent Development of Palladium-Supported Catalysts for Chemoselective Hydrogenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monguchi, Yasunari; Ichikawa, Tomohiro; Sajiki, Hironao

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes practical and selective hydrogenation methodologies using heterogeneous palladium catalysts. Chemoselectivity develops dependent on the catalyst activity based on the characteristic of the supports, derived from structural components, functional groups, and/or morphologies. We especially focus on our recent development of heterogeneous palladium catalysts supported on chelate resin, ceramic, and spherically shaped activated carbon. In addition, the application of flow technology for chemoselective hydrogenation using the palladium catalysts immobilized on molecular sieves 3A and boron nitride is outlined.

  8. The Design of MnOx Based Catalyst in Post-Plasma Catalysis Configuration for Toluene Abatement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiping Ye

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This review provides an overview of our present state of knowledge using manganese oxide (MnOx-based catalysts for toluene abatement in PPC (Post plasma-catalysis configuration. The context of this study is concisely sum-up. After briefly screening the main depollution methods, the principles of PPC are exposed based on the coupling of two mature technologies such as NTP (Non thermal plasma and catalysis. In that respect, the presentation of the abundant manganese oxides will be firstly given. Then in a second step the main features of MnOx allowing better performances in the reactions expected to occur in the abatement of toluene in PPC process are reviewed including ozone decomposition, toluene ozonation, CO oxidation and toluene total oxidation. Finally, in a last part the current status of the applications of PPC using MnOx on toluene abatement are discussed. In a first step, the selected variables of the hybrid process related to the experimental conditions of toluene abatement in air are identified. The selected variables are those expected to play a role in the performances of PPC system towards toluene abatement. Then the descriptors linked to the performances of the hybrid process in terms of efficiency are given and the effects of the variables on the experimental outcomes (descriptors are discussed. The review would serve as a reference guide for the optimization of the PPC process using MnOx-based oxides for toluene abatement.

  9. Molecular Cobalt Catalysts for O 2 Reduction: Low-Overpotential Production of H 2 O 2 and Comparison with Iron-Based Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yu-Heng [Department; Pegis, Michael L. [Department; Mayer, James M. [Department; Stahl, Shannon S. [Department

    2017-11-07

    A series of mononuclear pseudo-macrocyclic cobalt complexes have been investigated as catalysts for O2 reduction. Each of these complexes, with CoIII/II reduction potentials that span nearly 400 mV, mediate highly selective two- electron reduction of O2 to H2O2 (93–99%) using decamethylferrocene (Fc*) as the reductant and acetic acid as the proton source. Kinetic studies reveal that the rate exhibits a first- order dependence on [Co] and [AcOH], but no dependence on [O2] or [Fc*]. A linear correlation is observed between log(TOF) vs. E1/2(CoIII/II) for the different cobalt complexes (TOF = turnover frequency). The thermodynamic potential for+ O2 reduction to H2O2 was estimated by measuring the H /H2 open-circuit potential under the reaction conditions. This value provides the basis for direct assessment of the thermodynamic efficiency of the different catalysts and shows that H2O2 is formed with overpotentials as low as 90 mV. These results are compared with a recently reported series of Fe-porphyrin complexes, which catalyze four-electron reduction of O2 to H2O. The data show that the TOFs of the Co complexes exhibit a shallower dependence on E1/2(MIII/II) than the Fe complexes. This behavior, which underlies the low overpotential, is rationalized on the basis of the catalytic rate law.

  10. In situ UV–Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy — on line activity measurements of supported chromium oxide catalysts: relating isobutane dehydrogenation activity with Cr-speciation via experimental design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Verberckmoes, A.A.; Debaere, J.; Ooms, K.; Langhans, I.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    The dehydrogenation of isobutane over supported chromium oxide catalysts was studied by a combination of in situ UV–Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and on line GC analysis. A well-defined set of experiments, based on an experimental design, was carried out to develop mathematical models, which

  11. [Rh(cod)Cl]2 Complex Immobilized on Mesoporous Molecular Sieves MCM-41 ů A New Hybrid Catalyst for Polymerization of Phenylacetylene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balcar, Hynek; Čejka, Jiří; Sedláček, J.; Svoboda, J.; Zedník, J.; Bastl, Zdeněk; Bosáček, Vladimír; Vohlídal, J.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 203, 1/2 (2003), s. 287-298 ISSN 1381-1169 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/02/0976 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : hybrid catalyst * MCM-41 * rhodium complexes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.264, year: 2003

  12. Possibility designing half-wave and full-wave molecular rectifiers by using single benzene molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Mohammed A.; Hanoon, Falah H.; Al-Badry, Lafy F.

    2018-02-01

    This work focused on possibility designing half-wave and full-wave molecular rectifiers by using single and two benzene rings, respectively. The benzene rings were threaded by a magnetic flux that changes over time. The quantum interference effect was considered as the basic idea in the rectification action, the para and meta configurations were investigated. All the calculations are performed by using steady-state theoretical model, which is based on the time-dependent Hamiltonian model. The electrical conductance and the electric current are considered as DC output signals of half-wave and full-wave molecular rectifiers. The finding in this work opens up the exciting potential to use these molecular rectifiers in molecular electronics.

  13. Molecular catalysis science: Perspective on unifying the fields of catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Rong; Hurlburt, Tyler J; Sabyrov, Kairat; Alayoglu, Selim; Somorjai, Gabor A

    2016-05-10

    Colloidal chemistry is used to control the size, shape, morphology, and composition of metal nanoparticles. Model catalysts as such are applied to catalytic transformations in the three types of catalysts: heterogeneous, homogeneous, and enzymatic. Real-time dynamics of oxidation state, coordination, and bonding of nanoparticle catalysts are put under the microscope using surface techniques such as sum-frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy and ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy under catalytically relevant conditions. It was demonstrated that catalytic behavior and trends are strongly tied to oxidation state, the coordination number and crystallographic orientation of metal sites, and bonding and orientation of surface adsorbates. It was also found that catalytic performance can be tuned by carefully designing and fabricating catalysts from the bottom up. Homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts, and likely enzymes, behave similarly at the molecular level. Unifying the fields of catalysis is the key to achieving the goal of 100% selectivity in catalysis.

  14. Differentiating homogeneous and heterogeneous water oxidation catalysis: confirmation that [Co4(H2O)2(α-PW9O34)2]10- is a molecular water oxidation catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, James W; Lv, Hongjin; Sumliner, Jordan M; Zhu, Guibo; Luo, Zhen; Musaev, Djamaladdin G; Geletii, Yurii V; Hill, Craig L

    2013-09-25

    Distinguishing between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis is not straightforward. In the case of the water oxidation catalyst (WOC) [Co4(H2O)2(PW9O34)2](10-) (Co4POM), initial reports of an efficient, molecular catalyst have been challenged by studies suggesting that formation of cobalt oxide (CoOx) or other byproducts are responsible for the catalytic activity. Thus, we describe a series of experiments for thorough examination of active species under catalytic conditions and apply them to Co4POM. These provide strong evidence that under the conditions initially reported for water oxidation using Co4POM (Yin et al. Science, 2010, 328, 342), this POM anion functions as a molecular catalyst, not a precursor for CoOx. Specifically, we quantify the amount of Co(2+)(aq) released from Co4POM by two methods (cathodic adsorptive stripping voltammetry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) and show that this amount of cobalt, whatever speciation state it may exist in, cannot account for the observed water oxidation. We document that catalytic O2 evolution by Co4POM, Co(2+)(aq), and CoOx have different dependences on buffers, pH, and WOC concentration. Extraction of Co4POM, but not Co(2+)(aq) or CoOx into toluene from water, and other experiments further confirm that Co4POM is the dominant WOC. Recent studies showing that Co4POM decomposes to a CoOx WOC under electrochemical bias (Stracke and Finke, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2011, 133, 14872), or displays an increased ability to reduce [Ru(bpy)3](3+) upon aging (Scandola, et al., Chem. Commun., 2012, 48, 8808) help complete the picture of Co4POM behavior under various conditions but do not affect our central conclusions.

  15. Web-Supported Chemistry Education: Design of an Online Tutorial for Learning Molecular Symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Ali; Harwood, William S.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes our use of the ADDIE protocol to design and develop an interactive tutorial for students learning molecular symmetry operations and point groups. The tutorial provides a 3-D environment where students can examine molecules, structures, and symmetry elements. Most such tutorials are connected to courses or instructors in…

  16. Molecular Docking of Enzyme Inhibitors: A Computational Tool for Structure-Based Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnitskaya, Aleksandra; Torok, Bela; Torok, Marianna

    2010-01-01

    Molecular docking is a frequently used method in structure-based rational drug design. It is used for evaluating the complex formation of small ligands with large biomolecules, predicting the strength of the bonding forces and finding the best geometrical arrangements. The major goal of this advanced undergraduate biochemistry laboratory exercise…

  17. Interactive Multimodal Molecular Set – Designing Ludic Engaging Science Learning Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Tine Pinholt; Christiansen, Kasper Holm Bonde; Jakobsen Sillesen, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on an exploratory study investigating 10 primary school students’ interaction with an interactive multimodal molecular set fostering ludic engaging science learning content in primary schools (8th and 9th grade). The concept of the prototype design was to bridge the physical an...

  18. Quick Guide to Flash Catalyst

    CERN Document Server

    Elmansy, Rafiq

    2011-01-01

    How do you transform user interface designs created in Photoshop or Illustrator into interactive web pages? It's easier than you think. This guide shows you how to use Adobe Flash Catalyst to create interactive UIs and website wireframes for Rich Internet Applications-without writing a single line of code. Ideal for web designers, this book introduces Flash Catalyst basics with detailed step-by-step instructions and screenshots that illustrate every part of the process. You'll learn hands-on how to turn your static design or artwork into working user interfaces that can be implemented in Fla

  19. Thermally Stable, Latent Olefin Metathesis Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Renee M.; Fedorov, Alexey; Keitz, Benjamin K.; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Highly thermally stable N-aryl,N-alkyl N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ruthenium catalysts were designed and synthesized for latent olefin metathesis. These catalysts showed excellent latent behavior toward metathesis reactions, whereby the complexes were inactive at ambient temperature and initiated at elevated temperatures, a challenging property to achieve with second generation catalysts. A sterically hindered N-tert-butyl substituent on the NHC ligand of the ruthenium complex was found to i...

  20. Cobaltoporphyrin-Catalyzed CO 2 /Epoxide Copolymerization: Selectivity Control by Molecular Design

    KAUST Repository

    Anderson, Carly E.

    2012-09-11

    A series of cobalt(III) chloride porphyrin complexes of the general formula 5,10,15,20-tetra(p-alkoxy)phenylporphyrin cobalt chloride (4b-e) and the related 5,10,15,20-tetra(p-nitro)phenylporphyrin cobalt chloride (4f) are presented and their reactivity toward propylene oxide (PO)/CO 2 coupling/copolymerization is explored. While the nitro-substituted complex (4f), in conjunction with an onium salt, shows moderate activity toward cyclization, the 4b-e/onium systems show superior copolymerization activity in comparison to tetraphenylporphyrin Co(III) chloride (4a) with high selectivity and conversion to poly(propylene carbonate) (PPC). A comprehensive copolymerization behavior study of the alkoxy-substituted porphyrin complexes 4b-e in terms of reaction temperature and CO 2 pressure is presented. Complexes bearing longer alkoxy-substituents demonstrate the highest polymerization activity and molecular weights, however all substituted catalyst systems display a reduced tolerance to increased temperature with respect to PPC formation. Studies of the resulting polymer microstructures show excellent head-to-tail epoxide incorporation and near perfectly alternating poly(carbonate) character at lower polymerization temperatures. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  1. Nanostructured catalysts for organic transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chng, Leng Leng; Erathodiyil, Nandanan; Ying, Jackie Y

    2013-08-20

    The development of green, sustainable and economical chemical processes is one of the major challenges in chemistry. Besides the traditional need for efficient and selective catalytic reactions that will transform raw materials into valuable chemicals, pharmaceuticals and fuels, green chemistry also strives for waste reduction, atomic efficiency and high rates of catalyst recovery. Nanostructured materials are attractive candidates as heterogeneous catalysts for various organic transformations, especially because they meet the goals of green chemistry. Researchers have made significant advances in the synthesis of well-defined nanostructured materials in recent years. Among these are novel approaches that have permitted the rational design and synthesis of highly active and selective nanostructured catalysts by controlling the structure and composition of the active nanoparticles (NPs) and by manipulating the interaction between the catalytically active NP species and their support. The ease of isolation and separation of the heterogeneous catalysts from the desired organic product and the recovery and reuse of these NPs further enhance their attractiveness as green and sustainable catalysts. This Account reviews recent advances in the use of nanostructured materials for catalytic organic transformations. We present a broad overview of nanostructured catalysts used in different types of organic transformations including chemoselective oxidations and reductions, asymmetric hydrogenations, coupling reactions, C-H activations, oxidative aminations, domino and tandem reactions, and more. We focus on recent research efforts towards the development of the following nanostructured materials: (i) nanostructured catalysts with controlled morphologies, (ii) magnetic nanocomposites, (iii) semiconductor-metal nanocomposites, and (iv) hybrid nanostructured catalysts. Selected examples showcase principles of nanoparticle design such as the enhancement of reactivity, selectivity

  2. Large-scale theoretical calculations in molecular science - design of a large computer system for molecular science and necessary conditions for future computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kashiwagi, H.

    1982-01-01

    A large computer system was designed and established for molecular science under the leadership of molecular scientists. Features of the computer system are an automated operation system and an open self-service system. Large-scale theoretical calculations have been performed to solve many problems in molecular science, using the computer system. Necessary conditions for future computers are discussed on the basis of this experience. (orig.)

  3. A report template for molecular genetic tests designed to improve communication between the clinician and laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheuner, Maren T; Hilborne, Lee; Brown, Julie; Lubin, Ira M

    2012-07-01

    Errors are most likely to occur during the pre- and postanalytic phases of the genetic testing process, which can contribute to underuse, overuse, and misuse of genetic tests. To mitigate these errors, we created a template for molecular genetic test reports that utilizes the combined features of synoptic reporting and narrative interpretation. A variation of the Delphi consensus process with an expert panel was used to create a draft report template, which was further informed by focus group discussions with primary care physicians. There was agreement that molecular genetic test reports should present information in groupings that flow in a logical manner, and most participants preferred the following order of presentation: patient and physician information, test performed, test results and interpretation, guidance on next steps, and supplemental information. We define data elements for the report as "required," "optional," "possible," and "not necessary"; provide recommendations regarding the grouping of these data elements; and describe the ideal design of the report template, including the preferred order of the report sections, formatting of data, and length of the report. With input from key stakeholders and building upon prior work, we created a template for molecular genetic test reports designed to improve clinical decision making at the point of care. The template design should lead to more effective communication between the laboratory and ordering clinician. Studies are needed to assess the usefulness and effectiveness of molecular genetic test reports generated using this template.

  4. Palladium Catalysts Supported on Mesoporous Molecular Sieves Bearing Nitrogen Donor Groups: Preparation and Use in Heck and Suzuki C-C Bond-Forming Reactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Demel, Jan; Lamač, M.; Čejka, Jiří; Štěpnička, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 5 (2009), s. 442-451 ISSN 1864-5631 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06070; GA ČR GA104/09/0561 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : supported catalysts * Heck reaction * mesoporous materials * palladium * Suzuki reaction Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 4.767, year: 2009

  5. Preparation of heterogeneous catalysts supported on mesoporous molecular sieves modified with various N-groups and their use in the Heck reaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Demel, Jan; Sujandi, X.; Park, S.; Y.; Čejka, Jiří; Štěpnička, P.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 302, 1-2 (2009), s. 28-35 ISSN 1381-1169 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06070; GA ČR GA104/09/0561 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : supported catalysis * palladium * bifunctional catalysts * nanoparticles Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.135, year: 2009

  6. RuCl2(p-cymene)(PCy3) immobilized on mesoporous molecular sieves as catalyst for ROMP of norbornene and its derivatives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Balcar, Hynek; Bek, David; Sedláček, D.; Dědeček, Jiří; Bastl, Zdeněk; Lamač, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 332, 1-2 (2010), s. 19-24 ISSN 1381-1169 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN100400701; GA AV ČR IAA400400805; GA ČR GD203/08/H032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : Ru complex * heterogeneous catalyst * ROMP Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.872, year: 2010

  7. Manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve K-OMS-2 as catalyst in post plasma-catalysis for trichloroethylene degradation in humid air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen Dinh, M.T. [Université Lille, Sciences et Technologies, Unité de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide UMR CNRS UCCS 8181, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); The University of Da-Nang, University of Science and Technology, 54, Nguyen Luong Bang, Da-Nang (Viet Nam); Giraudon, J.-M., E-mail: jean-marc.giraudon@univ-lille1.fr [Université Lille, Sciences et Technologies, Unité de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide UMR CNRS UCCS 8181, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Vandenbroucke, A.M.; Morent, R.; De Geyter, N. [Ghent University, Faculty of Engineering and Architecture, Department of Applied Physics, Research Unit Plasma Technology, Sint-Pietersnieuwstraat 41, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Lamonier, J.-F. [Université Lille, Sciences et Technologies, Unité de Catalyse et Chimie du Solide UMR CNRS UCCS 8181, 59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq (France)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Post plasma catalysis: negative DC glow discharge combined with a cryptomelane. • The α-MnO{sub 2} catalyst totally decomposes the NTP generated ozone. • Active oxygen oxidizes the end-up plasma VOC by-products. - Abstract: The total oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in air at low relative humidity (RH = 10%) in the presence of CO{sub 2} (520 ppmv) was investigated in function of energy density using an atmospheric pressure negative DC luminescent glow discharge combined with a cryptomelane catalyst positioned downstream of the plasma reactor at a temperature of 150 °C. When using Non-Thermal Plasma (NTP) alone, it is found a low COx (x = 1–2) yield in agreement with the detection of gaseous polychlorinated by-products in the outlet stream as well as ozone which is an harmful pollutant. Introduction of cryptomelane enhanced trichloroethylene removal, totally inhibited plasma ozone formation and increased significantly the COx yield. The improved performances of the hybrid system were mainly ascribed to the total destruction of plasma generated ozone on cryptomelane surface to produce active oxygen species. Consequently these active oxygen species greatly enhanced the abatement of the plasma non-reacted TCE and completely destroyed the hazardous plasma generated polychlorinated intermediates. The facile redox of Mn species associated with oxygen vacancies and mobility as well as the textural properties of the catalyst might also contribute as a whole to the efficiency of the process.

  8. Design of catalysts by different substituent groups to the ;cut g-C3N4; single layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weiwei; Tang, Chao; Chen, Chongyang; Li, Youyong; Xu, Lai

    2017-09-01

    Graphitic carbon nitride has been wildly studied as a kind of promising photocatalysts for hydrogen evolution. However, it has a low intrinsic activity. Herein, we designed new periodic structures "cut g-C3N4", and adding the new substituent groups. We employed density functional theory to calculate the charge distribution and catalytic properties of hydrogen evolution on the structures. We got a theoretical view that introducing conjugate substituents can enhance the catalytic performance for hydrogen evolution. Furthermore, it provided a theoretical guidance for the reasonable design of two dimensional non-metallic photocatalysts, with lower activation barrier of the catalytic reaction.

  9. Reducing aquatic hazards of industrial chemicals: probabilistic assessment of sustainable molecular design guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Kristin A; Voutchkova-Kostal, Adelina M; Kostal, Jakub; Anastas, Paul; Zimmerman, Julie B; Brooks, Bryan W

    2014-08-01

    Basic toxicological information is lacking for the majority of industrial chemicals. In addition to increasing empirical toxicity data through additional testing, prospective computational approaches to drug development aim to serve as a rational basis for the design of chemicals with reduced toxicity. Recent work has resulted in the derivation of a "rule of 2," wherein chemicals with an octanol-water partition coefficient (log P) less than 2 and a difference between the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital and the highest occupied molecular orbital (ΔE) greater than 9 (log P9 eV) are predicted to be 4 to 5 times less likely to elicit acute or chronic toxicity to model aquatic organisms. The present study examines potential reduction of aquatic toxicity hazards from industrial chemicals if these 2 molecular design guidelines were employed. Probabilistic hazard assessment approaches were used to model the likelihood of encountering industrial chemicals exceeding toxicological categories of concern both with and without the rule of 2. Modeling predicted that utilization of these molecular design guidelines for log P and ΔE would appreciably decrease the number of chemicals that would be designated to be of "high" and "very high" concern for acute and chronic toxicity to standard model aquatic organisms and end points as defined by the US Environmental Protection Agency. For example, 14.5% of chemicals were categorized as having high and very high acute toxicity to the fathead minnow model, whereas only 3.3% of chemicals conforming to the design guidelines were predicted to be in these categories. Considerations of specific chemical classes (e.g., aldehydes), chemical attributes (e.g., ionization), and adverse outcome pathways in representative species (e.g., receptor-mediated responses) could be used to derive future property guidelines for broader classes of contaminants. © 2014 SETAC.

  10. Development of Advanced ISS-WPA Catalysts for Organic Oxidation at Reduced Pressure/Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; Nalette, Tim; Kayatin, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The Water Processor Assembly (WPA) at International Space Station (ISS) processes a waste stream via multi-filtration beds, where inorganic and non-volatile organic contaminants are removed, and a catalytic reactor, where low molecular weight organics not removed by the adsorption process are oxidized at elevated pressure in the presence of oxygen and elevated temperature above the normal water boiling point. Operation at an elevated pressure requires a more complex system design compared to a reactor that could operate at ambient pressure. However, catalysts currently available have insufficient activity to achieve complete oxidation of the organic load at a temperature less than the water boiling point and ambient pressure. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop a more active and efficient catalyst at ambient pressure and a moderate temperature that is less than water boiling temperature. This paper describes our efforts in developing high efficiency water processing catalysts. Different catalyst support structures and coating metals were investigated in subscale reactors and results were compared against the flight WPA catalyst. Detailed improvements achieved on alternate metal catalysts at ambient pressure and 200 F will also be presented in the paper.

  11. Model-Aided Design of Three-Phase Gas-Lift Reactor for Oxidation Accompanied by Catalyst Reversible Deactivation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gogová, Zuzana; Hanika, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 12 (2009), s. 1929-1940 ISSN 0930-7516 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GD203/08/H032 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : gas-lift reactor * multifunctional * design Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 1.266, year: 2009

  12. Walkable new urban LEED_Neighborhood-Development (LEED-ND) community design and children's physical activity: selection, environmental, or catalyst effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Interest is growing in physical activity-friendly community designs, but few tests exist of communities explicitly designed to be walkable. We test whether students living in a new urbanist community that is also a pilot LEED_ND (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design-Neighborhood Development) community have greater accelerometer-measured moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) across particular time periods compared to students from other communities. We test various time/place periods to see if the data best conform to one of three explanations for MVPA. Environmental effects suggest that MVPA occurs when individuals are exposed to activity-friendly settings; selection effects suggest that walkable community residents prefer MVPA, which leads to both their choice of a walkable community and their high levels of MVPA; catalyst effects occur when walking to school creates more MVPA, beyond the school commute, on schooldays but not weekends. Methods Fifth graders (n = 187) were sampled from two schools representing three communities: (1) a walkable community, Daybreak, designed with new urbanist and LEED-ND pilot design standards; (2) a mixed community (where students lived in a less walkable community but attended the walkable school so that part of the route to school was walkable), and (3) a less walkable community. Selection threats were addressed through controlling for parental preferences for their child to walk to school as well as comparing in-school MVPA for the walkable and mixed groups. Results Minutes of MVPA were tested with 3 × 2 (Community by Gender) analyses of covariance (ANCOVAs). Community walkability related to more MVPA during the half hour before and after school and, among boys only, more MVPA after school. Boys were more active than girls, except during the half hour after school. Students from the mixed and walkable communities--who attended the same school--had similar in-school MVPA levels, and community groups

  13. Study on molecular modelling of the selectivity of catalysts for heavy petroleum fractions hydrocracking; Etude sur molecule modele des parametres regissant la selectivite des catalyseurs d'hydrocraquage des charges lourdes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, L.

    2000-10-19

    Hydrocracking is a catalytic petroleum refining process that is commonly applied to upgrade the heavier fractions obtained from the distillation of crude oils. Nowadays the European demand for good quality middle distillates (kerosene and gas-oil) is high and one important goal for the refining is to transform selectively feedstocks into middle distillates. To understand how this transformation occurs, studies on model compounds have been investigated. Numerous studies have been devoted to paraffin hydrocracking. However theses molecules do not fully represent heavy petroleum fraction. Taking into account that the trend in the future will be to treat heavier feedstocks containing a large quantity of PNA (Polynuclear Aromatic hydrocarbons), the understanding of their transformation under hydrocracking conditions is a key point. In this study, we studied hydrocracking of phenanthrene over platinum on acid solids catalysts. Our main aim was to compare hydrocracking catalysts in term of catalytic activity and selectivity toward primary products thanks to our model reaction and to correlate these catalytic performances with acid solid properties and especially to rationalize the effects due to the acidity and the porosity of the acid solids. Catalytic experiments emphasised an effect of the porous structure on the selectivities. The acidity of the catalysts seemed to impose the catalytic activity but did not permit to explain the selectivities. This 'effect of the structure' has been clarified with the simulation of intermediate products adsorption and diffusion in the studied structures thanks to a molecular modelling study. Indeed, the selectivities obtained during phenanthrene hydrocracking have been linked up with the intermediate products adsorption energies in the structures. The results of this study permit to propose that the key-step for selectivities determination is the physical desorption of the primary products. (author)

  14. Design and Construction of a One-Dimensional DNA Track for an Artificial Molecular Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Kovacic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA is a versatile heteropolymer that shows great potential as a building block for a diverse array of nanostructures. We present here a solution to the problem of designing and synthesizing a DNA-based nanostructure that will serve as the track along which an artificial molecular motor processes. This one-dimensional DNA track exhibits periodically repeating elements that provide specific binding sites for the molecular motor. Besides these binding elements, additional sequences are necessary to label specific regions within the DNA track and to facilitate track construction. Designing an ideal DNA track sequence presents a particular challenge because of the many variable elements that greatly expand the number of potential sequences from which the ideal sequence must be chosen. In order to find a suitable DNA sequence, we have adapted a genetic algorithm which is well suited for a large but sparse search space. This algorithm readily identifies long DNA sequences that include all the necessary elements to both facilitate DNA track construction and to present appropriate binding sites for the molecular motor. We have successfully experimentally incorporated the sequence identified by the algorithm into a long DNA track meeting the criteria for observation of the molecular motor's activity.

  15. Liquid-Phase Exfoliation of Phosphorene: Design Rules from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sresht, Vishnu; Pádua, Agílio A H; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2015-08-25

    The liquid-phase exfoliation of phosphorene, the two-dimensional derivative of black phosphorus, in the solvents dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethylformamide (DMF), isopropyl alcohol, N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, and N-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidone is investigated using three molecular-scale "computer experiments". We modeled solvent-phosphorene interactions using an atomistic force field, based on ab initio calculations and lattice dynamics, that accurately reproduces experimental mechanical properties. We probed solvent molecule ordering at phosphorene/solvent interfaces and discovered that planar molecules such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone preferentially orient parallel to the interface. We subsequently measured the energy required to peel a single phosphorene monolayer from a stack of black phosphorus and analyzed the role of "wedges" of solvent molecules intercalating between phosphorene sheets in initiating exfoliation. The exfoliation efficacy of a solvent is enhanced when either molecular planarity "sharpens" this molecular wedge or strong phosphorene-solvent adhesion stabilizes the newly exposed phosphorene surfaces. Finally, we examined the colloidal stability of exfoliated flakes by simulating their aggregation and showed that dispersion is favored when the cohesive energy between the molecules in the solvent monolayer confined between the phosphorene sheets is high (as with DMSO) and is hindered when the adhesion between these molecules and phosphorene is strong; the molecular planarity in solvents like DMF enhances the cohesive energy. Our results are consistent with, and provide a molecular context for, experimental exfoliation studies of phosphorene and other layered solids, and our molecular insights into the significant role of solvent molecular geometry and ordering should complement prevalent solubility-parameter-based approaches in establishing design rules for effective nanomaterial exfoliation media.

  16. Molecular design toward highly efficient photovoltaic polymers based on two-dimensional conjugated benzodithiophene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Long; Zhang, Shaoqing; Huo, Lijun; Zhang, Maojie; Hou, Jianhui

    2014-05-20

    As researchers continue to develop new organic materials for solar cells, benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene (BDT)-based polymers have come to the fore. To improve the photovoltaic properties of BDT-based polymers, researchers have developed and applied various strategies leading to the successful molecular design of highly efficient photovoltaic polymers. Novel polymer materials composed of two-dimensional conjugated BDT (2D-conjugated BDT) have boosted the power conversion efficiency of polymer solar cells (PSCs) to levels that exceed 9%. In this Account, we summarize recent progress related to the design and synthesis of 2D-conjugated BDT-based polymers and discuss their applications in highly efficient photovoltaic devices. We introduce the basic considerations for the construction of 2D-conjugated BDT-based polymers and systematic molecular design guidelines. For example, simply modifying an alkoxyl-substituted BDT to form an alkylthienyl-substituted BDT can improve the polymer hole mobilities substantially with little effect on their molecular energy level. Secondly, the addition of a variety of chemical moieties to the polymer can produce a 2D-conjugated BDT unit with more functions. For example, the introduction of a conjugated side chain with electron deficient groups (such as para-alkyl-phenyl, meta-alkoxyl-phenyl, and 2-alkyl-3-fluoro-thienyl) allowed us to modulate the molecular energy levels of 2D-conjugated BDT-based polymers. Through the rational design of BDT analogues such as dithienobenzodithiophene (DTBDT) or the insertion of larger π bridges, we can tune the backbone conformations of these polymers and modulate their photovoltaic properties. We also discuss the influence of 2D-conjugated BDT on polymer morphology and the blends of these polymers with phenyl-C61 (or C71)-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). Finally, we summarize the various applications of the 2D-conjugated BDT-based polymers in highly efficient PSC devices. Overall, this Account

  17. Drug design based on x-ray diffraction and steered molecular dynamics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hašek, Jindřich; Skálová, Tereza; Dohnálek, Jan; Dušková, Jarmila; Petroková, Hana; Vondráčková, Eva; Zimmermann, K.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 3 (2005), s. 208-210 ISSN 1211-5894. [VUFB Conference on Modern Methods in Synthesis and Analysis of Active Pharmaceutical Substances /5./. Praha, 23.11.2005-24.11.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB4050312 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : drug design * X-ray diffraction * steered molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  18. Combining Rosetta with molecular dynamics (MD): A benchmark of the MD-based ensemble protein design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwiczak, Jan; Jarmula, Adam; Dunin-Horkawicz, Stanislaw

    2018-02-14

    Computational protein design is a set of procedures for computing amino acid sequences that will fold into a specified structure. Rosetta Design, a commonly used software for protein design, allows for the effective identification of sequences compatible with a given backbone structure, while molecular dynamics (MD) simulations can thoroughly sample near-native conformations. We benchmarked a procedure in which Rosetta design is started on MD-derived structural ensembles and showed that such a combined approach generates 20-30% more diverse sequences than currently available methods with only a slight increase in computation time. Importantly, the increase in diversity is achieved without a loss in the quality of the designed sequences assessed by their resemblance to natural sequences. We demonstrate that the MD-based procedure is also applicable to de novo design tasks started from backbone structures without any sequence information. In addition, we implemented a protocol that can be used to assess the stability of designed models and to select the best candidates for experimental validation. In sum our results demonstrate that the MD ensemble-based flexible backbone design can be a viable method for protein design, especially for tasks that require a large pool of diverse sequences. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Reaction pathways for oxygen evolution promoted by cobalt catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, Giuseppe; Giannozzi, Paolo; Amore Bonapasta, Aldo; Guidoni, Leonardo

    2013-10-16

    The in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulating the water oxidation catalysis is of key relevance for the rationalization and the design of efficient oxygen evolution catalysts based on earth-abundant transition metals. Performing ab initio DFT+U molecular dynamics calculations of cluster models in explicit water solution, we provide insight into the pathways for oxygen evolution of a cobalt-based catalyst (CoCat). The fast motion of protons at the CoCat/water interface and the occurrence of cubane-like Co-oxo units at the catalyst boundaries are the keys to unlock the fast formation of O-O bonds. Along the resulting pathways, we identified the formation of Co(IV)-oxyl species as the driving ingredient for the activation of the catalytic mechanism, followed by their geminal coupling with O atoms coordinated by the same Co. Concurrent nucleophilic attack of water molecules coming directly from the water solution is discouraged by high activation barriers. The achieved results suggest also interesting similarities between the CoCat and the Mn4Ca-oxo oxygen evolving complex of photosystem II.

  20. A New Optimization Model for Computer-Aided Molecular Design Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lei; Cignitti, Stefano; Gani, Rafiqul

    Computer-Aided Molecular Design (CAMD) is a method to design molecules with desired properties. That is, through CAMD, it is possible to generate molecules that match a specified set of target properties. CAMD has attracted much attention in recent years due to its ability to design novel as well...... with structure information considered due to the increased size of the mathematical problem and number of alternatives. Thus, decomposition-based approach is proposed to solve the problem. In this approach, only first-order groups are considered in the first step to obtain the building block of the designed...... molecule, then the property model is refined with second-order groups based on the results of the first step. However, this may result in the possibility of an optimal solution being excluded. Samudra and Sahinidis [4] used property relaxation method in the first step to avoid this situation...

  1. Coke Accumulation on Catalysts used in a Fluidized Bed Pyrolyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have examined the impact of various solid catalysts on the product distribution resulting from the pyrolysis of biomass. Though catalysts do have a discernible impact, this impact is small. In our bench-top pyrolyzer designed as a catalyst screening tool, we measure bulk product distribution as...

  2. Designing Efficient Solar-Driven Hydrogen Evolution Photocathodes Using Semitransparent MoQxCly(Q = S, Se) Catalysts on Si Micropyramids

    KAUST Repository

    Ding, Qi

    2015-09-21

    © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Silicon micropyramids with n+pp+ junctions are demonstrated to be efficient absorbers for integrated solar-driven hydrogen production systems enabling significant improvements in both photocurrent and onset potential. When conformally coated with MoSxCly, a catalyst that has excellent catalytic activity and high optical transparency, the highest photocurrent density for Si-based photocathodes with earth-abundant catalysts is achieved.

  3. Catalyst system of the structured type

    OpenAIRE

    Jansen, J.C.; Legein, C.H.; Calis, H.P.A.; Van Bekkum, H.; Gerritsen, A.W.; Van den Bleek, M.

    1994-01-01

    The invention relates to a catalyst system of the structured type, in which a structured support is covered with a layer of molecular sieve crystals and/or modifications thereof. These crystals have substantially the same orientation relative to the support surface. The invention further relates to a reactor in which this catalyst system is incorporated. Finally, the invention relates to a method for the selective reduction of nitrogen oxides utilizing a compound comprising a NH group, in whi...

  4. Designing an educative curriculum unit for teaching molecular geometry in high school chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarious, Nader N.

    Chemistry is a highly abstract discipline that is taught and learned with the aid of various models. Among the most challenging, yet a fundamental topic in general chemistry at the high school level, is molecular geometry. This study focused on developing exemplary educative curriculum materials pertaining to the topic of molecular geometry. The methodology used in this study consisted of several steps. First, a diverse set of models were analyzed to determine to what extent each model serves its purpose in teaching molecular geometry. Second, a number of high school teachers and college chemistry professors were asked to share their experiences on using models in teaching molecular geometry through an online questionnaire. Third, findings from the comparative analysis of models, teachers’ experiences, literature review on models and students’ misconceptions, the curriculum expectations of the Next Generation Science Standards and their emphasis on three-dimensional learning and nature of science (NOS) contributed to the development of the molecular geometry unit. Fourth, the developed unit was reviewed by fellow teachers and doctoral-level science education experts and was revised to further improve its coherence and clarity in support of teaching and learning of the molecular geometry concepts. The produced educative curriculum materials focus on the scientific practice of developing and using models as promoted in the Next Generations Science Standards (NGSS) while also addressing nature of science (NOS) goals. The educative features of the newly developed unit support teachers’ pedagogical knowledge (PK) and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK). The unit includes an overview, teacher’s guide, and eight detailed lesson plans with inquiry oriented modeling activities replete with models and suggestions for teachers, as well as formative and summative assessment tasks. The unit design process serves as a model for redesigning other instructional units in

  5. A new decomposition-based computer-aided molecular/mixture design methodology for the design of optimal solvents and solvent mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karunanithi, A.T.; Achenie, L.E.K.; Gani, Rafiqul

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a novel computer-aided molecular/mixture design (CAMD) methodology for the design of optimal solvents and solvent mixtures. The molecular/mixture design problem is formulated as a mixed integer nonlinear programming (MINLP) model in which a performance objective is to be optim......This paper presents a novel computer-aided molecular/mixture design (CAMD) methodology for the design of optimal solvents and solvent mixtures. The molecular/mixture design problem is formulated as a mixed integer nonlinear programming (MINLP) model in which a performance objective...... is to be optimized subject to structural, property, and process constraints. The general molecular/mixture design problem is divided into two parts. For optimal single-compound design, the first part is solved. For mixture design, the single-compound design is first carried out to identify candidates...... and then the second part is solved to determine the optimal mixture. The decomposition of the CAMD MINLP model into relatively easy to solve subproblems is essentially a partitioning of the constraints from the original set. This approach is illustrated through two case studies. The first case study involves...

  6. Preparation of Pt-Re/Vulcan carbon nanocomposites using a single-source molecular precursor and relative performance as a direct methanol fuel cell electrooxidation catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Angela D; Deluga, Gregg A; Moore, Joshua T; Vergne, Matthew J; Hercules, David M; Kenik, Edward A; Lukehart, C M

    2004-09-01

    Pt-Re/Vulcan carbon powder nanocomposites have been prepared with total metal loadings of 18 wt.% and 40 wt.% using a new non-cluster (1:1)-PtRe bimetallic precursor as the source of metal. Pt-Re nanoparticles having an average diameter of ca. 6 nm and atomic stoichiometry near 1:1 are formed. TEM, on-particle HR-EDS, and powder XRD data are consistent with the formation of Pt-Re alloy nanoparticles having a hexagonal unit cell with cell constants of a = 2.77 A and c = 4.47 A. A nanocomposite prepared at higher total metal loading under more rigorous thermal treatment also contains Pt-Re alloy nanoparticles having a fcc unit cell structure (a = 3.95 A). The precise dependence of Pt-Re nanocrystal structure on the thermal history of the nanocomposite specimen has not been investigated in detail. While these Pt-Re/carbon nanocomposites are active as anode catalysts in operating direct methanol fuel cells, the measured performance is less than that of commercial Pt-Ru/carbon catalysts and has marginal practical importance.

  7. Synthesis and physicochemical properties of Zr-MCM-41 mesoporous molecular sieves and Pt/H3PW12O40/Zr-MCM-41 catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, L.F.; Wang, J.A.; Norena, L.E.; Aguilar, J.; Navarrete, J.; Salas, P.; Montoya, J.A.; Del Angel, P.

    2007-01-01

    For the first time, modifications of the surface and framework of Si-MCM-41 by depositing a heteropolyacid on the surface and by introducing foreign Zr 4+ ions into the framework are investigated. The Zr-modified Si-MCM-41 mesoporous materials (hereafter referred as WSZn, n=Si/Zr=25, 15, 8, 4) were synthesized through a surfactant-templated preparation approach, using low-cost fumed silica as the Si precursor. After impregnation with 25 wt% of H 3 PW 12 O 40 , the surface Broensted acidity of the Pt/H 3 PW 12 O 40 /WSZn catalysts was greatly enhanced by 2-10 times relative to the bare WSZn support. Two kinds of supported heteropolyacids were formed: (i) bulk-like heteropolyacid crystals with unchanged Keggin structures, and (ii) highly dispersed heteropolyacid with distorted Keggin units. The formation of various kinds of heteropolyacid structures is closely related to the interaction between the heteropolyanions and the hydroxyl groups in the host support. - Graphical abstract: Modifications of the surface and framework of Si-MCM-41 by depositing a heteropolyacid on the surface and by introducing foreign Zr 4+ ions into the framework are investigated. Broensted acidity of the Pt/H 3 PW 12 O 40 /Zr-MCM-41 catalysts was greatly enhanced by 2-10 times relative to the bare Zr-MCM-41 support

  8. Manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve K-OMS-2 as catalyst in post plasma-catalysis for trichloroethylene degradation in humid air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen Dinh, M T; Giraudon, J-M; Vandenbroucke, A M; Morent, R; De Geyter, N; Lamonier, J-F

    2016-08-15

    The total oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in air at low relative humidity (RH=10%) in the presence of CO2 (520ppmv) was investigated in function of energy density using an atmospheric pressure negative DC luminescent glow discharge combined with a cryptomelane catalyst positioned downstream of the plasma reactor at a temperature of 150°C. When using Non-Thermal Plasma (NTP) alone, it is found a low COx (x=1-2) yield in agreement with the detection of gaseous polychlorinated by-products in the outlet stream as well as ozone which is an harmful pollutant. Introduction of cryptomelane enhanced trichloroethylene removal, totally inhibited plasma ozone formation and increased significantly the COx yield. The improved performances of the hybrid system were mainly ascribed to the total destruction of plasma generated ozone on cryptomelane surface to produce active oxygen species. Consequently these active oxygen species greatly enhanced the abatement of the plasma non-reacted TCE and completely destroyed the hazardous plasma generated polychlorinated intermediates. The facile redox of Mn species associated with oxygen vacancies and mobility as well as the textural properties of the catalyst might also contribute as a whole to the efficiency of the process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Methods of producing epoxides from alkenes using a two-component catalyst system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Mayfair C.; Kung, Harold H.; Jiang, Jian

    2013-07-09

    Methods for the epoxidation of alkenes are provided. The methods include the steps of exposing the alkene to a two-component catalyst system in an aqueous solution in the presence of carbon monoxide and molecular oxygen under conditions in which the alkene is epoxidized. The two-component catalyst system comprises a first catalyst that generates peroxides or peroxy intermediates during oxidation of CO with molecular oxygen and a second catalyst that catalyzes the epoxidation of the alkene using the peroxides or peroxy intermediates. A catalyst system composed of particles of suspended gold and titanium silicalite is one example of a suitable two-component catalyst system.

  10. Molecular Cloning Designer Simulator (MCDS): All-in-one molecular cloning and genetic engineering design, simulation and management software for complex synthetic biology and metabolic engineering projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Zhenyu; Vickers, Claudia E

    2016-12-01

    Molecular Cloning Designer Simulator (MCDS) is a powerful new all-in-one cloning and genetic engineering design, simulation and management software platform developed for complex synthetic biology and metabolic engineering projects. In addition to standard functions, it has a number of features that are either unique, or are not found in combination in any one software package: (1) it has a novel interactive flow-chart user interface for complex multi-step processes, allowing an integrated overview of the whole project; (2) it can perform a user-defined workflow of cloning steps in a single execution of the software; (3) it can handle multiple types of genetic recombineering, a technique that is rapidly replacing classical cloning for many applications; (4) it includes experimental information to conveniently guide wet lab work; and (5) it can store results and comments to allow the tracking and management of the whole project in one platform. MCDS is freely available from https://mcds.codeplex.com.

  11. In situ UV–Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy — on line activity measurements of supported chromium oxide catalysts: relating isobutane dehydrogenation activity with Cr-speciation via experimental design

    OpenAIRE

    Weckhuysen, B.M.; Verberckmoes, A.A.; Debaere, J.; Ooms, K.; Langhans, I.; Schoonheydt, R.A.

    2000-01-01

    The dehydrogenation of isobutane over supported chromium oxide catalysts was studied by a combination of in situ UV–Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and on line GC analysis. A well-defined set of experiments, based on an experimental design, was carried out to develop mathematical models, which quantitatively relate Cr-speciation and dehydrogenation activity with reaction temperature and time, support composition, gas composition and Cr loading. It will be shown that: (1) the dehydrogenat...

  12. Water Oxidation Mechanisms of Metal Oxide Catalysts by Vibrational Spectroscopy of Transient Intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Miao [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Frei, Heinz [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2017-02-22

    Water oxidation is an essential reaction of an artificial photosystem for solar fuel generation because it provides electrons needed to reduce carbon dioxide or protons to a fuel. Earth-abundant metal oxides are among the most attractive catalytic materials for this reaction because of their robustness and scalability, but their efficiency poses a challenge. Knowledge of catalytic surface intermediates gained by vibrational spectroscopy under reaction conditions plays a key role in uncovering kinetic bottlenecks and provides a basis for catalyst design improvements. Recent dynamic infrared and Raman studies reveal the molecular identity of transient surface intermediates of water oxidation on metal oxides. In conclusion, combined with ultrafast infrared observations of how charges are delivered to active sites of the metal oxide catalyst and drive the multielectron reaction, spectroscopic advances are poised to play a key role in accelerating progress toward improved catalysts for artificial photosynthesis.

  13. Quantifying the density and utilization of active sites in non-precious metal oxygen electroreduction catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahraie, Nastaran Ranjbar; Kramm, Ulrike I.; Steinberg, Julian; Zhang, Yuanjian; Thomas, Arne; Reier, Tobias; Paraknowitsch, Jens-Peter; Strasser, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Carbon materials doped with transition metal and nitrogen are highly active, non-precious metal catalysts for the electrochemical conversion of molecular oxygen in fuel cells, metal air batteries, and electrolytic processes. However, accurate measurement of their intrinsic turn-over frequency and active-site density based on metal centres in bulk and surface has remained difficult to date, which has hampered a more rational catalyst design. Here we report a successful quantification of bulk and surface-based active-site density and associated turn-over frequency values of mono- and bimetallic Fe/N-doped carbons using a combination of chemisorption, desorption and 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy techniques. Our general approach yields an experimental descriptor for the intrinsic activity and the active-site utilization, aiding in the catalyst development process and enabling a previously unachieved level of understanding of reactivity trends owing to a deconvolution of site density and intrinsic activity. PMID:26486465

  14. Molecular Design Properties of OxyVita Hemoglobin, a New Generation Therapeutic Oxygen Carrier: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Wollocko

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OxyVita Hb is a new generation hemoglobin based oxygen carrier (HBOC produced through modification of a zero-linked polymerization mechanism using activators which incorporate cross-linked bovine tetramer hemoglobin into “super-polymeric” macromolecules (Average molecular weight = 17 MDa for the purpose of oxygen delivery when whole blood or packed red cells are not available. This molecular design approach was generated in order to address several fundamental biochemical and physiological weaknesses of previous generations of HBOCs. Observation during pre-clinical and clinical studies provided evidence that these early generation acellular HBOCs were directly associated with loss of retention within the circulatory system, extravasation across endothelial tissue membranes due to their small molecular size leading to arterial and venous vasoconstriction with coupled increases in mean arterial pressure (MAP. The inherent increase in molecular size and structural stability of the OxyVita Hb is a direct response to addressing these serious weaknesses that have occurred during the evolution of HBOC development within the past two decades. The nature of the zero-linked synthetic route eliminates any chemical linkers remaining in the product, eliminating side reaction concerns, such as reversibility and decomposition due to weak chemical bonds, dependency on temperature and pressure, and residual toxicity.

  15. Novel ligands of Choline Acetyltransferase designed by in silico molecular docking, hologram QSAR and lead optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajnish; Långström, Bengt; Darreh-Shori, Taher

    2016-08-01

    Recent reports have brought back the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase in the mainstream research in dementia and the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. Here we report, a specific strategy for the design of novel ChAT ligands based on molecular docking, Hologram Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (HQSAR) and lead optimization. Molecular docking was performed on a series of ChAT inhibitors to decipher the molecular fingerprint of their interaction with the active site of ChAT. Then robust statistical fragment HQSAR models were developed. A library of novel ligands was generated based on the pharmacophoric and shape similarity scoring function, and evaluated in silico for their molecular interactions with ChAT. Ten of the top scoring invented compounds are reported here. We confirmed the activity of α-NETA, the only commercially available ChAT inhibitor, and one of the seed compounds in our model, using a new simple colorimetric ChAT assay (IC50 ~ 88 nM). In contrast, α-NETA exhibited an IC50 of ~30 μM for the ACh-degrading cholinesterases. In conclusion, the overall results may provide useful insight for discovering novel ChAT ligands and potential positron emission tomography tracers as in vivo functional biomarkers of the health of central cholinergic system in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease.

  16. In-silico design of computational nucleic acids for molecular information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan; Zauner, Klaus-Peter

    2013-05-07

    Within recent years nucleic acids have become a focus of interest for prototype implementations of molecular computing concepts. During the same period the importance of ribonucleic acids as components of the regulatory networks within living cells has increasingly been revealed. Molecular computers are attractive due to their ability to function within a biological system; an application area extraneous to the present information technology paradigm. The existence of natural information processing architectures (predominately exemplified by protein) demonstrates that computing based on physical substrates that are radically different from silicon is feasible. Two key principles underlie molecular level information processing in organisms: conformational dynamics of macromolecules and self-assembly of macromolecules. Nucleic acids support both principles, and moreover computational design of these molecules is practicable. This study demonstrates the simplicity with which one can construct a set of nucleic acid computing units using a new computational protocol. With the new protocol, diverse classes of nucleic acids imitating the complete set of boolean logical operators were constructed. These nucleic acid classes display favourable thermodynamic properties and are significantly similar to the approximation of successful candidates implemented in the laboratory. This new protocol would enable the construction of a network of interconnecting nucleic acids (as a circuit) for molecular information processing.

  17. Molecular Dynamic Analysis of Hyaluronic Acid and Phospholipid Interaction in Tribological Surgical Adjuvant Design for Osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siódmiak, Jacek; Bełdowski, Piotr; Augé, Wayne K; Ledziński, Damian; Śmigiel, Sandra; Gadomski, Adam

    2017-09-04

    Tribological surgical adjuvants constitute a therapeutic discipline made possible by surgical advances in the treatment of damaged articular cartilage beyond palliative care. The purpose of this study is to analyze interactions between hyaluronic acid and phospholipid molecules, and the formation of geometric forms, that play a role in the facilitated lubrication of synovial joint organ systems. The analysis includes an evaluation of the pathologic state to detail conditions that may be encountered by adjuvants during surgical convalescence. The synovial fluid changes in pH, hyaluronic acid polydispersity, and phospholipid concentration associated with osteoarthritis are presented as features that influence the lubricating properties of adjuvant candidates. Molecular dynamic simulation studies are presented, and the Rouse model is deployed, to rationalize low molecular weight hyaluronic acid behavior in an osteoarthritic environment of increased pH and phospholipid concentration. The results indicate that the hyaluronic acid radius of gyration time evolution is both pH- and phospholipid concentration-dependent. Specifically, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine induces hydrophobic interactions in the system, causing low molecular weight hyaluronic acid to shrink and at high concentration be absorbed into phospholipid vesicles. Low molecular weight hyaluronic acid appears to be insufficient for use as a tribological surgical adjuvant because an increased pH and phospholipid concentration induces decreased crosslinking that prevents the formation of supramolecular lubricating forms. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine remains an adjuvant candidate for certain clinical situations. The need to reconcile osteoarthritic phenotypes is a prerequisite that should serve as a framework for future adjuvant design and subsequent tribological testing.

  18. Modern drug design: the implication of using artificial neuronal networks and multiple molecular dynamic simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovenko, Oleksandr; Jones, Steven J. M.

    2018-01-01

    We report the implementation of molecular modeling approaches developed as a part of the 2016 Grand Challenge 2, the blinded competition of computer aided drug design technologies held by the D3R Drug Design Data Resource (https://drugdesigndata.org/). The challenge was focused on the ligands of the farnesoid X receptor (FXR), a highly flexible nuclear receptor of the cholesterol derivative chenodeoxycholic acid. FXR is considered an important therapeutic target for metabolic, inflammatory, bowel and obesity related diseases (Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol 4:523-532, 2015), but in the context of this competition it is also interesting due to the significant ligand-induced conformational changes displayed by the protein. To deal with these conformational changes we employed multiple simulations of molecular dynamics (MD). Our MD-based protocols were top-ranked in estimating the free energy of binding of the ligands and FXR protein. Our approach was ranked second in the prediction of the binding poses where we also combined MD with molecular docking and artificial neural networks. Our approach showed mediocre results for high-throughput scoring of interactions.

  19. Monodisperse metal nanoparticle catalysts on silica mesoporous supports: synthesis, characterizations, and catalytic reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, G.A.

    2009-09-14

    The design of high performance catalyst achieving near 100% product selectivity at maximum activity is one of the most important goals in the modern catalytic science research. To this end, the preparation of model catalysts whose catalytic performances can be predicted in a systematic and rational manner is of significant importance, which thereby allows understanding of the molecular ingredients affecting the catalytic performances. We have designed novel 3-dimensional (3D) high surface area model catalysts by the integration of colloidal metal nanoparticles and mesoporous silica supports. Monodisperse colloidal metal NPs with controllable size and shape were synthesized using dendrimers, polymers, or surfactants as the surface stabilizers. The size of Pt, and Rh nanoparticles can be varied from sub 1 nm to 15 nm, while the shape of Pt can be controlled to cube, cuboctahedron, and octahedron. The 3D model catalysts were generated by the incorporation of metal nanoparticles into the pores of mesoporous silica supports via two methods: capillary inclusion (CI) and nanoparticle encapsulation (NE). The former method relies on the sonication-induced inclusion of metal nanoparticles into the pores of mesoporous silica, whereas the latter is performed by the encapsulation of metal nanoparticles during the hydrothermal synthesis of mesoporous silica. The 3D model catalysts were comprehensively characterized by a variety of physical and chemical methods. These catalysts were found to show structure sensitivity in hydrocarbon conversion reactions. The Pt NPs supported on mesoporous SBA-15 silica (Pt/SBA-15) displayed significant particle size sensitivity in ethane hydrogenolysis over the size range of 1-7 nm. The Pt/SBA-15 catalysts also exhibited particle size dependent product selectivity in cyclohexene hydrogenation, crotonaldehyde hydrogenation, and pyrrole hydrogenation. The Rh loaded SBA-15 silica catalyst showed structure sensitivity in CO oxidation reaction. In

  20. Rational computational design for the development of andrographolide molecularly imprinted polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Hemavathi; Islam, K. M. Shafiqul; Hamzah, Zainab; Ahmad, Mohd Noor

    2017-10-01

    Andrographolide is a popular medicinal compound derived from Andrographis Paniculata (AP). Molecularly Imprint Polymer (MIP) is a "Lock and Key" approach, where MIP is the lock and Andrographolide is the key which fits to the MIP lock by both physically and chemically. MIP will be used as selective extraction tool to enrich Andrographolide bioactive compound. Pre-polymerization step is crucial to design MIP. This work investigates molecular interactions and the Gibbs free binding energies on the development of MIP. The structure of Andrographolide (template) and functional monomers were drawn in HyperChem 8.0.10. A hybrid quantum chemical model was used with a few functional monomers. Possible conformations of template and functional monomer as 1:n (n andrographolide MIP. This study demonstrates the importance of studying intermolecular interaction among template, functional monomer and template-monomer ratio in developing MIP.

  1. Ruthenium-based olefin metathesis catalysts bearing pH-responsive ligands: External control of catalyst solubility and activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balof, Shawna Lynn

    2011-12-01

    Sixteen novel, Ru-based olefin metathesis catalysts bearing pH responsive ligands were synthesized. The pH-responsive groups employed with these catalysts included dimethylamino (NMe2) modified NHC ligands as well as N-donor dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) and 3-(o-pyridyl)propylidene ligands. These pH-responsive ligands provided the means by which the solubility and/or activity profiles of the catalysts produced could be controlled via acid addition. The main goal of this dissertation was to design catalyst systems capable of performing ring opening metathesis (ROMP) and ring closing metathesis (RCM) reactions in both organic and aqueous media. In an effort to quickly gain access to new catalyst structures, a template synthesis for functionalized NHC ligand precursors was designed, in addition to other strategies, to obtain ligand precursors with ancillary NMe2 groups. Kinetic studies for the catalysts produced from these precursors showed external control of catalyst solubility was afforded via protonation of the NMe2 groups of their NHC ligands. Additionally, this protonation afforded external control of catalyst propagation rates for several catalysts. This is the first known independent external control for the propagation rates of ROMP catalysts. The incorporation of pH-responsive N-donor ligands into catalyst structures also provided the means for the external control of metathesis activity, as the protonation of these ligands resulted in an increased initiation rate based on their fast and irreversible dissociation from the metal center. The enhanced external control makes these catalysts applicable to a wide range of applications, some of which have been explored by us and/or through collaboration. Three of the catalysts designed showed remarkable metathesis activity in aqueous media. These catalysts displayed comparable RCM activity in aqueous media to a class of water-soluble catalysts reported by Grubbs et al., considered to be the most active catalyst for

  2. Designing molecular complexes using free-energy derivatives from liquid-state integral equation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrugalla, Florian; Kast, Stefan M.

    2016-09-01

    Complex formation between molecules in solution is the key process by which molecular interactions are translated into functional systems. These processes are governed by the binding or free energy of association which depends on both direct molecular interactions and the solvation contribution. A design goal frequently addressed in pharmaceutical sciences is the optimization of chemical properties of the complex partners in the sense of minimizing their binding free energy with respect to a change in chemical structure. Here, we demonstrate that liquid-state theory in the form of the solute-solute equation of the reference interaction site model provides all necessary information for such a task with high efficiency. In particular, computing derivatives of the potential of mean force (PMF), which defines the free-energy surface of complex formation, with respect to potential parameters can be viewed as a means to define a direction in chemical space toward better binders. We illustrate the methodology in the benchmark case of alkali ion binding to the crown ether 18-crown-6 in aqueous solution. In order to examine the validity of the underlying solute-solute theory, we first compare PMFs computed by different approaches, including explicit free-energy molecular dynamics simulations as a reference. Predictions of an optimally binding ion radius based on free-energy derivatives are then shown to yield consistent results for different ion parameter sets and to compare well with earlier, orders-of-magnitude more costly explicit simulation results. This proof-of-principle study, therefore, demonstrates the potential of liquid-state theory for molecular design problems.

  3. Designing molecular complexes using free-energy derivatives from liquid-state integral equation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrugalla, Florian; Kast, Stefan M

    2016-01-01

    Complex formation between molecules in solution is the key process by which molecular interactions are translated into functional systems. These processes are governed by the binding or free energy of association which depends on both direct molecular interactions and the solvation contribution. A design goal frequently addressed in pharmaceutical sciences is the optimization of chemical properties of the complex partners in the sense of minimizing their binding free energy with respect to a change in chemical structure. Here, we demonstrate that liquid-state theory in the form of the solute–solute equation of the reference interaction site model provides all necessary information for such a task with high efficiency. In particular, computing derivatives of the potential of mean force (PMF), which defines the free-energy surface of complex formation, with respect to potential parameters can be viewed as a means to define a direction in chemical space toward better binders. We illustrate the methodology in the benchmark case of alkali ion binding to the crown ether 18-crown-6 in aqueous solution. In order to examine the validity of the underlying solute–solute theory, we first compare PMFs computed by different approaches, including explicit free-energy molecular dynamics simulations as a reference. Predictions of an optimally binding ion radius based on free-energy derivatives are then shown to yield consistent results for different ion parameter sets and to compare well with earlier, orders-of-magnitude more costly explicit simulation results. This proof-of-principle study, therefore, demonstrates the potential of liquid-state theory for molecular design problems. (paper)

  4. Molecular Design and Evaluation of Biodegradable Polymers Using a Statistical Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewitus, Dan; Rios, Fabian; Rojas, Ramiro; Kohn, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    The challenging paradigm of bioresorbable polymers, whether in drug delivery or tissue engineering, states that a fine-tuning of the interplay between polymer properties (e.g., thermal, degradation), and the degree of cell/tissue replacement and remodeling is required. In this paper we describe how changes in the molecular architecture of a series of terpolymers allow for the design of polymers with varying glass transition temperatures and degradation rates. The effect of each component in the terpolymers is quantified via design of experiment (DoE) analysis. A linear relationship between terpolymer components and resulting Tg (ranging from 34 to 86 °C) was demonstrated. These findings were further supported with mass-per-flexible-bond (MPFB) analysis. The effect of terpolymer composition on the in vitro degradation of these polymers revealed molecular weight loss ranging from 20 to 60% within the first 24 hours. DoE modeling further illustrated the linear (but reciprocal) relationship between structure elements and degradation for these polymers. Thus, we describe a simple technique to provide insight into the structure property relationship of degradable polymers, specifically applied using a new family of tyrosine-derived polycarbonates, allowing for optimal design of materials for specific applications. PMID:23888354

  5. Molecular design and evaluation of biodegradable polymers using a statistical approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewitus, Dan Y; Rios, Fabian; Rojas, Ramiro; Kohn, Joachim

    2013-11-01

    The challenging paradigm of bioresorbable polymers, whether in drug delivery or tissue engineering, states that a fine-tuning of the interplay between polymer properties (e.g., thermal, degradation), and the degree of cell/tissue replacement and remodeling is required. In this paper we describe how changes in the molecular architecture of a series of terpolymers allow for the design of polymers with varying glass transition temperatures and degradation rates. The effect of each component in the terpolymers is quantified via design of experiment (DoE) analysis. A linear relationship between terpolymer components and resulting Tg (ranging from 34 to 86 °C) was demonstrated. These findings were further supported with mass-per-flexible-bond analysis. The effect of terpolymer composition on the in vitro degradation of these polymers revealed molecular weight loss ranging from 20 to 60 % within the first 24 h. DoE modeling further illustrated the linear (but reciprocal) relationship between structure elements and degradation for these polymers. Thus, we describe a simple technique to provide insight into the structure property relationship of degradable polymers, specifically applied using a new family of tyrosine-derived polycarbonates, allowing for optimal design of materials for specific applications.

  6. The Folding of de Novo Designed Protein DS119 via Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moye Wang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available As they are not subjected to natural selection process, de novo designed proteins usually fold in a manner different from natural proteins. Recently, a de novo designed mini-protein DS119, with a βαβ motif and 36 amino acids, has folded unusually slowly in experiments, and transient dimers have been detected in the folding process. Here, by means of all-atom replica exchange molecular dynamics (REMD simulations, several comparably stable intermediate states were observed on the folding free-energy landscape of DS119. Conventional molecular dynamics (CMD simulations showed that when two unfolded DS119 proteins bound together, most binding sites of dimeric aggregates were located at the N-terminal segment, especially residues 5–10, which were supposed to form β-sheet with its own C-terminal segment. Furthermore, a large percentage of individual proteins in the dimeric aggregates adopted conformations similar to those in the intermediate states observed in REMD simulations. These results indicate that, during the folding process, DS119 can easily become trapped in intermediate states. Then, with diffusion, a transient dimer would be formed and stabilized with the binding interface located at N-terminals. This means that it could not quickly fold to the native structure. The complicated folding manner of DS119 implies the important influence of natural selection on protein-folding kinetics, and more improvement should be achieved in rational protein design.

  7. Group Contribution Method-based Multi-objective Evolutionary Molecular Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörgő Gyula

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The search for compounds exhibiting desired physical and chemical properties is an essential, yet complex problem in the chemical, petrochemical, and pharmaceutical industries. During the formulation of this optimization-based design problem two tasks must be taken into consideration: the automated generation of feasible molecular structures and the estimation of macroscopic properties based on the resultant structures. For this structural characteristic-based property prediction task numerous methods are available. However, the inverse problem, the design of a chemical compound exhibiting a set of desired properties from a given set of fragments is not so well studied. Since in general design problems molecular structures exhibiting several and sometimes conflicting properties should be optimized, we proposed a methodology based on the modification of the multi-objective Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm-II (NSGA-II. The originally huge chemical search space is conveniently described by the Joback estimation method. The efficiency of the algorithm was enhanced by soft and hard structural constraints, which expedite the search for feasible molecules. These constraints are related to the number of available groups (fragments, the octet rule and the validity of the branches in the molecule. These constraints are also used to introduce a special genetic operator that improves the individuals of the populations to ensure the estimation of the properties is based on only reliable structures. The applicability of the proposed method is tested on several benchmark problems.

  8. PathogenMIPer: a tool for the design of molecular inversion probes to detect multiple pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhras Michael

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Here we describe PathogenMIPer, a software program for designing molecular inversion probe (MIP oligonucleotides for use in pathogen identification and detection. The software designs unique and specific oligonucleotide probes targeting microbial or other genomes. The tool tailors all probe sequence components (including target-specific sequences, barcode sequences, universal primers and restriction sites and combines these components into ready-to-order probes for use in a MIP assay. The system can harness the genetic variability available in an entire genome in designing specific probes for the detection of multiple co-infections in a single tube using a MIP assay. Results PathogenMIPer can accept sequence data in FASTA file format, and other parameter inputs from the user through a graphical user interface. It can design MIPs not only for pathogens, but for any genome for use in parallel genomic analyses. The software was validated experimentally by applying it to the detection of human papilloma virus (HPV as a model system, which is associated with various human malignancies including cervical and skin cancers. Initial tests of laboratory samples using the MIPs developed by the PathogenMIPer to recognize 24 different types of HPVs gave very promising results, detecting even a small viral load of single as well as multiple infections (Akhras et al, personal communication. Conclusion PathogenMIPer is a software for designing molecular inversion probes for detection of multiple target DNAs in a sample using MIP assays. It enables broader use of MIP technology in the detection through genotyping of pathogens that are complex, difficult-to-amplify, or present in multiple subtypes in a sample.

  9. Molecular design chemical structure generation from the properties of pure organic compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, AL

    1992-01-01

    This book is a systematic presentation of the methods that have been developed for the interpretation of molecular modeling to the design of new chemicals. The main feature of the compilation is the co-ordination of the various scientific disciplines required for the generation of new compounds. The five chapters deal with such areas as structure and properties of organic compounds, relationships between structure and properties, and models for structure generation. The subject is covered in sufficient depth to provide readers with the necessary background to understand the modeling

  10. Design of a Comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Experiment: Phase Variation Caused by Recombinational Regulation of Bacterial Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xiumei; Xu, Shungao; Lu, Renyun; Isaac, Dadzie; Zhang, Xueyi; Zhang, Haifang; Wang, Huifang; Qiao, Zheng; Huang, Xinxiang

    2014-01-01

    Scientific experiments are indispensable parts of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. In this study, a comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology experiment about "Salmonella enterica" serovar Typhi Flagellar phase variation has been designed. It consisted of three parts, namely, inducement of bacterial Flagellar phase variation,…

  11. Catalysts and process for liquid hydrocarbon fuel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mark G.; Ranaweera, Samantha A.; Henry, William P.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides a novel process and system in which a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen synthesis gas, or syngas, is converted into hydrocarbon mixtures composed of high quality distillates, gasoline components, and lower molecular weight gaseous olefins in one reactor or step. The invention utilizes a novel supported bimetallic ion complex catalyst for conversion, and provides methods of preparing such novel catalysts and use of the novel catalysts in the process and system of the invention.

  12. Nano-design of quantum dot-based photocatalysts for hydrogen generation using advanced surface molecular chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Weili

    2015-01-01

    Efficient photocatalytic hydrogen generation in a suspension system requires a sophisticated nano-device that combines a photon absorber with effective redox catalysts. This study demonstrates an innovative molecular linking strategy for fabricating photocatalytic materials that allow effective charge separation of excited carriers, followed by efficient hydrogen evolution. The method for the sequential replacement of ligands with appropriate molecules developed in this study tethers both quantum dots (QDs), as photosensitizers, and metal nanoparticles, as hydrogen evolution catalysts, to TiO2 surfaces in a controlled manner at the nano-level. Combining hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions on the surface, CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs and an Au-Pt alloy were attached to TiO2 without overlapping during the synthesis. The resultant nano-photocatalysts achieved substantially high-performance visible-light-driven photocatalysis for hydrogen evolution. All syntheses were conducted at room temperature and in ambient air, providing a promising route for fabricating visible-light-responsive photocatalysts.

  13. Quantitative structure-activity relationship and molecular docking studies on designing inhibitors of the perforin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Fucheng; Cui, Lianhua; Piao, Jinmei; Liang, Hui; Si, Hongzong; Duan, Yunbo; Zhai, Honglin

    2017-10-01

    Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies were performed on a series of 5-arylidene-2thioxoimidazolidin-4-ones derivatives as the inhibitors of perforin and to gain insights about the structural determinants for designing new drug molecules. The heuristic method could explore the descriptors responsible for bioactivity and gain a best linear model with R 2 .82. Gene expression programming method generated a novel nonlinear function model with R 2 .92 for training set and R 2 .85 for test set. The predicted IC 50 by QSAR, molecular docking analysis, and property explorer applet show that 42a acts as a well-pleasing potent inhibitor for perforin. This study may lay a reliable theoretical foundation for the development of designing perforin inhibitor structures. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  14. Molecular Design of Semiconducting Polymers for High-Performance Organic Electrochemical Transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Nielsen, Christian B.

    2016-07-22

    The organic electrochemical transistor (OECT), capable of transducing small ionic fluxes into electronic signals in an aqueous envi-ronment, is an ideal device to utilize in bioelectronic applications. Currently, most OECTs are fabricated with commercially availa-ble conducting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)-based suspensions and are therefore operated in depletion mode. Here, we present a series of semiconducting polymers designed to elucidate important structure-property guidelines required for accumulation mode OECT operation. We discuss key aspects relating to OECT performance such as ion and hole transport, elec-trochromic properties, operational voltage and stability. The demonstration of our molecular design strategy is the fabrication of accumulation mode OECTs that clearly outperform state-of-the-art PEDOT based devices, and show stability under aqueous oper-ation without the need for formulation additives and cross-linkers.

  15. Molecular Design of Bisphosphonate-Modified Proteins for Efficient Bone Targeting In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidemasa Katsumi

    Full Text Available To establish a rational molecular design for bisphosphonate (BP-modified proteins for efficient bone targeting, a pharmacokinetic study was performed using a series of alendronate (ALN, a nitrogen-containing BP, modified proteins with various molecular weights and varying degrees of modification. Four proteins with different molecular weight-yeast glutathione reductase (GR; MW: 112,000 Da, bovine serum albumin (BSA; MW: 67,000 Da, recombinant human superoxide dismutase (SOD; MW: 32,000 Da, and chicken egg white lysozyme (LZM; MW: 14,000 Da-were modified with ALN to obtain ALN-modified proteins. Pharmacokinetic analysis of the tissue distribution of the ALN-modified and unmodified proteins was performed after radiolabeling them with indium-111 (111In by using a bifunctional chelating agent. Calculation of tissue uptake clearances revealed that the bone uptake clearances of 111In-ALN-modified proteins were proportional to the degree of ALN modification. 111In-GR-ALN and BSA-ALN, the two high-molecular-weight proteins, efficiently accumulated in bones, regardless of the degree of ALN modification. Approximately 36 and 34% of the dose, respectively, was calculated to be delivered to the bones. In contrast, the maximum amounts taken up by bone were 18 and 13% of the dose for 111In-SOD-ALN(32 and LZM-ALN(9, respectively, because of their high renal clearance. 111In-SOD modified with both polyethylene glycol (PEG and ALN (111In-PEG-SOD-ALN was efficiently delivered to the bone. Approximately 36% of the dose was estimated to be delivered to the bones. In an experimental bone metastasis mouse model, treatment with PEG-SOD-ALN significantly reduced the number of tumor cells in the bone of the mice. These results indicate that the combination of PEG and ALN modification is a promising approach for efficient bone targeting of proteins with a high total-body clearance.

  16. Design of a comprehensive biochemistry and molecular biology experiment: phase variation caused by recombinational regulation of bacterial gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xiumei; Xu, Shungao; Lu, Renyun; Isaac, Dadzie; Zhang, Xueyi; Zhang, Haifang; Wang, Huifang; Qiao, Zheng; Huang, Xinxiang

    2014-01-01

    Scientific experiments are indispensable parts of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. In this study, a comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology experiment about Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi Flagellar phase variation has been designed. It consisted of three parts, namely, inducement of bacterial Flagellar phase variation, antibody agglutination test, and PCR analysis. Phase variation was observed by baterial motility assay and identified by antibody agglutination test and PCR analysis. This comprehensive experiment can be performed to help students improve their ability to use the knowledge acquired in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. Copyright © 2014 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  17. Computer-aided Molecular Design of Compounds Targeting Histone Modifying Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, Federico; Del Rio, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidences show that epigenetic mechanisms play crucial roles in the genesis and progression of many physiopathological processes. As a result, research in epigenetic grew at a fast pace in the last decade. In particular, the study of histone post-translational modifications encountered an extraordinary progression and many modifications have been characterized and associated to fundamental biological processes and pathological conditions. Histone modifications are the catalytic result of a large set of enzyme families that operate covalent modifications on specific residues at the histone tails. Taken together, these modifications elicit a complex and concerted processing that greatly contribute to the chromatin remodeling and may drive different pathological conditions, especially cancer. For this reason, several epigenetic targets are currently under validation for drug discovery purposes and different academic and industrial programs have been already launched to produce the first pre-clinical and clinical outcomes. In this scenario, computer-aided molecular design techniques are offering important tools, mainly as a consequence of the increasing structural information available for these targets. In this mini-review we will briefly discuss the most common types of known histone modifications and the corresponding operating enzymes by emphasizing the computer-aided molecular design approaches that can be of use to speed-up the efforts to generate new pharmaceutically relevant compounds. PMID:26082827

  18. Molecular Design of Doped Polymers for Thermoelectric Systems-Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabinyc, Michael L. [University of California, Santa Barbara; Hawker, Craig J. [University of California, Santa Barbara

    2013-10-09

    The self-assembly of organic semiconducting molecules and polymers is critical for their electrical properties. This project addressed the design of organic semiconductors with novel synthetic building blocks for proton-dopable conducting materials and the molecular order and microstructure of high performance semiconducting polymers blended with charge transfer dopants. Novel azulene donor-acceptor materials were designed and synthesized with unique electronic effects upon protonation to generate charged species in solution. The microstructure and optical properties of these derivatives were examined to develop structure-property relationships. Studies of the microstructure of blends of charge transfer doped semiconducting polymers revealed highly ordered conductive phases in blends. The molecular packing of one blend was studied in detail using a combination of solid-state NMR and x-ray scattering revealing that dopant incorporation is unlikely to be random as assumed in transport models. Studies of the electrical properties of these highly ordered blends revealed a universal trend between the thermopower and electrical conductivity of semiconducting polymers that is independent of the doping mechanism.

  19. Nanosheet Supported Single-Metal Atom Bifunctional Catalyst for Overall Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Chongyi; Shi, Li; Ouyang, Yixin; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Wang, Jinlan

    2017-08-09

    Nanosheet supported single-atom catalysts (SACs) can make full use of metal atoms and yet entail high selectivity and activity, and bifunctional catalysts can enable higher performance while lowering the cost than two separate unifunctional catalysts. Supported single-atom bifunctional catalysts are therefore of great economic interest and scientific importance. Here, on the basis of first-principles computations, we report a design of the first single-atom bifunctional eletrocatalyst, namely, isolated nickel atom supported on β 12 boron monolayer (Ni 1 /β 12 -BM), to achieve overall water splitting. This nanosheet supported SAC exhibits remarkable electrocatalytic performance with the computed overpotential for oxygen/hydrogen evolution reaction being just 0.40/0.06 V. The ab initio molecular dynamics simulation shows that the SAC can survive up to 800 K elevated temperature, while enacting a high energy barrier of 1.68 eV to prevent isolated Ni atoms from clustering. A viable experimental route for the synthesis of Ni 1 /β 12 -BM SAC is demonstrated from computer simulation. The desired nanosheet supported single-atom bifunctional catalysts not only show great potential for achieving overall water splitting but also offer cost-effective opportunities for advancing clean energy technology.

  20. POLYMER-BOUND BULKY-PHOSPHITE MODIFIED RHODIUM HYDROFORMYLATION CATALYSTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANLEEUWEN, PWNM; JONGSMA, T; CHALLA, G

    Attachment of phosphites to styrene copolymers is described which are used as rhodium hydroformylation catalysts. The influence of the chain loading on the activity and complex formation of three types of copolymer-bound rhodium hydroformylation catalysts in comparison with their low molecular

  1. Evaluation of an Inverse Molecular Design Algorithm in a Model Binding Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huggins, David J.; Altman, Michael D.; Tidor, Bruce

    2008-01-01

    Computational molecular design is a useful tool in modern drug discovery. Virtual screening is an approach that docks and then scores individual members of compound libraries. In contrast to this forward approach, inverse approaches construct compounds from fragments, such that the computed affinity, or a combination of relevant properties, is optimized. We have recently developed a new inverse approach to drug design based on the dead-end elimination and A* algorithms employing a physical potential function. This approach has been applied to combinatorially constructed libraries of small-molecule ligands to design high-affinity HIV-1 protease inhibitors [M. D. Altman et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 130: 6099–6013, 2008]. Here we have evaluated the new method using the well studied W191G mutant of cytochrome c peroxidase. This mutant possesses a charged binding pocket and has been used to evaluate other design approaches. The results show that overall the new inverse approach does an excellent job of separating binders from non-binders. For a few individual cases, scoring inaccuracies led to false positives. The majority of these involve erroneous solvation energy estimation for charged amines, anilinium ions and phenols, which has been observed previously for a variety of scoring algorithms. Interestingly, although inverse approaches are generally expected to identify some but not all binders in a library, due to limited conformational searching, these results show excellent coverage of the known binders while still showing strong discrimination of the non-binders. PMID:18831031

  2. Design of Molecular Solar Cells via Feedback from Soft X-ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himpsel, Franz J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-12

    Spectroscopy with soft X-rays was used to develop new materials and novel designs for solar cells and artificial photosynthesis. In order to go beyond the widely-used trial-and-error approach of gradually improving a particular design, we started from the most general layout of a solar cell (or a photo-electrochemical device) and asked which classes of materials are promising for best performance. For example, the most general design of a solar cell consists of a light absorber, an electron donor, and an electron acceptor. These are characterized by four energy levels, which were measured by a combination of spectroscopic X-ray techniques. Tuning synchrotron radiation to the absorption edges of specific elements provided element- and bond-selectivity. The spectroscopic results were complemented by state-of-the-art calculations of the electronic states. These helped explaining the observed energy levels and the orbitals associated with them. The calculations were extended to a large class of materials (for example thousands of porphyrin dye complexes) in order to survey trends in the energy level structure. A few highlights serve as examples: 1) Organic molecules combining absorber, donor, and acceptor with atomic precision. 2) Exploration of highly p-doped diamond films as inert, transparent electron donors. 3) Surface-sensitive characterization of nanorod arrays used as photoanodes in water splitting. 4) Computational design of molecular complexes for efficient solar cells using two photons.

  3. Metal-Organic Frameworks Stabilize Solution-Inaccessible Cobalt Catalysts for Highly Efficient Broad-Scope Organic Transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng; Manna, Kuntal; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-03-09

    New and active earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed to replace precious metal-based catalysts for sustainable production of commodity and fine chemicals. We report here the design of highly robust, active, and reusable cobalt-bipyridine- and cobalt-phenanthroline-based metal-organic framework (MOF) catalysts for alkene hydrogenation and hydroboration, aldehyde/ketone hydroboration, and arene C-H borylation. In alkene hydrogenation, the MOF catalysts tolerated a variety of functional groups and displayed unprecedentedly high turnover numbers of ∼2.5 × 10(6) and turnover frequencies of ∼1.1 × 10(5) h(-1). Structural, computational, and spectroscopic studies show that site isolation of the highly reactive (bpy)Co(THF)2 species in the MOFs prevents intermolecular deactivation and stabilizes solution-inaccessible catalysts for broad-scope organic transformations. Computational, spectroscopic, and kinetic evidence further support a hitherto unknown (bpy(•-))Co(I)(THF)2 ground state that coordinates to alkene and dihydrogen and then undergoing σ-complex-assisted metathesis to form (bpy)Co(alkyl)(H). Reductive elimination of alkane followed by alkene binding completes the catalytic cycle. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for discovering new base-metal molecular catalysts and exhibit enormous potential in sustainable chemical catalysis.

  4. Support effects on adsorption and catalytic activation of O2 in single atom iron catalysts with graphene-based substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zheng-Yang; Yang, Wei-Jie; Ding, Xun-Lei; Lv, Gang; Yan, Wei-Ping

    2018-03-07

    The adsorption and catalytic activation of O 2 on single atom iron catalysts with graphene-based substrates were investigated systematically by density functional theory calculation. It is found that the support effects of graphene-based substrates have a significant influence on the stability of the single atom catalysts, the adsorption configuration, the electron transfer mechanism, the adsorption energy and the energy barrier. The differences in the stable adsorption configuration of O 2 on single atom iron catalysts with different graphene-based substrates can be well understood by the symmetrical matching principle based on frontier molecular orbital analysis. There are two different mechanisms of electron transfer, in which the Fe atom acts as the electron donor in single vacancy graphene-based substrates while the Fe atom mainly acts as the bridge for electron transfer in double vacancy graphene-based substrates. The Fermi softness and work function are good descriptors of the adsorption energy and they can well reveal the relationship between electronic structure and adsorption energy. This single atom iron catalyst with single vacancy graphene modified by three nitrogen atoms is a promising non-noble metal single atom catalyst in the adsorption and catalytic oxidation of O 2 . Furthermore, the findings can lay the foundation for the further study of graphene-based support effects and provide a guideline for the development and design of new non-noble-metal single atom catalysts.

  5. A Molecular Cobalt Catalyst Architected and TiO2 Modified p-GaInP2 Photoelectrode for Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Jing; Yan, Yong; Young, James; Steirer, Kenneth; Neale, Nathan R.; Turner, John A.

    2017-05-01

    We demonstrate that by employing a hybrid molecular/semiconductor interface with atomic layer deposited (ALD) TiO2 as an intermediate layer, a robust and corrosion resistant GaInP2-TiO2-cobaltoxime-TiO2 photocathode can be operated in alkaline media (pH =13).

  6. Silica-supported (nBuCp)2ZrCl2: Effect of catalyst active center distribution on ethylene-1-hexene copolymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Atiqullah, Muhammad

    2013-08-12

    Metallocenes are a modern innovation in polyolefin catalysis research. Therefore, two supported metallocene catalysts-silica/MAO/(nBuCp)2ZrCl2 (Catalyst 1) and silica/nBuSnCl3/MAO/(nBuCp)2ZrCl2 (Catalyst 2), where MAO is methylaluminoxane-were synthesized, and subsequently used to prepare, without separate feeding of MAO, ethylene-1-hexene Copolymer 1 and Copolymer 2, respectively. Fouling-free copolymerization, catalyst kinetic stability and production of free-flowing polymer particles (replicating the catalyst particle size distribution) confirmed the occurrence of heterogeneous catalysis. The catalyst active center distribution was modeled by deconvoluting the measured molecular weight distribution and copolymer composition distribution. Five different active center types were predicted for each catalyst, which was corroborated by successive self-nucleation and annealing experiments, as well as by an extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy report published in the literature. Hence, metallocenes impregnated particularly on an MAO-pretreated support may be rightly envisioned to comprise an ensemble of isolated single sites that have varying coordination environments. This study shows how the active center distribution and the design of supported MAO anions affect copolymerization activity, polymerization mechanism and the resulting polymer microstructures. Catalyst 2 showed less copolymerization activity than Catalyst 1. Strong chain transfer and positive co-monomer effect-both by 1-hexene-were common. Each copolymer demonstrated vinyl, vinylidene and trans-vinylene end groups, and compositional heterogeneity. All these findings were explained, as appropriate, considering the modeled active center distribution, MAO cage structure repeat units, proposed catalyst surface chemistry, segregation effects and the literature that concerns and supports this study. While doing so, new insights were obtained. Additionally, future research, along the direction

  7. Enhanced gasification of wood in the presence of mixed catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, S. L.; Mudge, L. K.; Sealock, Jr., L. J.; Robertus, R. J.; Mitchell, D. E.

    Experimental results obtained in laboratory investigations of steam gasification of wood in the presence of mixed catalysts are presented. These studies are designed to test the technical feasibility of producing specific gaseous products from wood by enhancing its reactivity and product specificity through the use of combined catalysts. The desired products include substitute natural gas, hydrocarbon synthesis gas and ammonia synthesis gas. The gasification reactions are controlled through the use of specific catalyst combinations and operating parameters. A primary alkali carbonate gasification catalyst impregnated into the wood combined with specific commercially available secondary catalysts produced the desired products. A yield of 50 vol % methane was obtained with a randomly mixed combination of a commercial nickel methanation catalyst and silica-alumina cracking catalyst at a weight ratio of 3:1 respectively. Steam gasification of wood in the presence of a commercial Si-Al cracking catalyst produced the desired hydrocarbon synthesis gas. Hydrogen-to-carbon monoxide ratios needed for Fischer-Tropsch synthesis of hydrocarbons were obtained with this catalyst system. A hydrogen-to-nitrogen ratio of 3:1 for ammonia synthesis gas was achieved with steam-air gasification of wood in the presence of catalysts. The most effective secondary catalyst system employed to produce the ammonia synthesis gas included two commercially prepared catalysts formulated to promote the water-gas shift reaction.

  8. The innovation catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roger L

    2011-06-01

    A few years ago the software development company Intuit realized that it needed a new approach to galvanizing customers. The company's Net Promoter Score was faltering, and customer recommendations of new products were especially disappointing. Intuit decided to hold a two-day, off-site meeting for the company's top 300 managers with a focus on the role of design in innovation. One of the days was dedicated to a program called Design for Delight. The centerpiece of the day was a PowerPoint presentation by Intuit founder Scott Cook, who realized midway through that he was no Steve Jobs: The managers listened dutifully, but there was little energy in the room. By contrast, a subsequent exercise in which the participants worked through a design challenge by creating prototypes, getting feedback, iterating, and refining, had them mesmerized. The eventual result was the creation of a team of nine design-thinking coaches--"innovation catalysts"--from across Intuit who were made available to help any work group create prototypes, run experiments, and learn from customers. The process includes a "painstorm" (to determine the customer's greatest pain point), a "soljam" (to generate and then winnow possible solutions), and a "code-jam" (to write code "good enough" to take to customers within two weeks). Design for Delight has enabled employees throughout Intuit to move from satisfying customers to delighting them.

  9. Experimental and Computational Mechanistic Studies Guiding the Rational Design of Molecular Electrocatalysts for Production and Oxidation of Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raugei, Simone; Helm, Monte L.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Appel, Aaron M.; O’Hagan, Molly; Wiedner, Eric S.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2016-01-19

    Understanding how to control the movement of protons and electrons is crucial to the design of fast, efficient electrocatalysts for H2 production and oxidation based on earth-abundant metals. Our work seeks to address fundamental questions about proton movement. We have demonstrated that incorporating a pendant amine functioning as a proton relay in the second coordination sphere of a metal complex helps proton mobility, resulting in faster and more energy-efficient catalysts. Proton-transfer reactions can be rate-limiting and are influenced by several factors, such as pKa values, steric effects, hydrogen bonding, and solvation/desolvation of the exogenous base and acid employed. The presence of multiple protonation sites introduces branching points along the catalytic cycle, making less productive pathways accessible or leading to the formation of stable off-cycle species. Using ligands with only one pendant amine mitigates this problem and results in catalysts with high rates for production of H2, although generally at higher overpotentials. For H2 oxidation catalysts, iron complexes with a high H2 binding affinity were developed. However, these iron complexes had a pKa mismatch between the protonated metal center and the protonated pendant amine, and consequently intramolecular proton movement was slow. Taken altogether, our results demonstrate the necessity of optimizing the entire catalytic cycle because optimization of a specific catalytic step can negatively influence another step and not necessarily lead to a better catalytic performance. We discuss a general procedure, based on thermodynamic arguments, which allows the simultaneous minimization of the free-energy change of each catalytic step, yielding a nearly flat free-energy surface, with no large barriers due to energy mismatches from either high- or low-energy intermediates.

  10. Experimental and Computational Mechanistic Studies Guiding the Rational Design of Molecular Electrocatalysts for Production and Oxidation of Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raugei, Simone [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis,; Helm, Monte L. [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis,; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon [Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana—Champaign, 600 South Mathews Avenue, Urbana, Illinois 61801, United States; Appel, Aaron M. [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis,; O’Hagan, Molly [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis,; Wiedner, Eric S. [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis,; Bullock, R. Morris [Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis,

    2015-11-25

    Understanding how to control the movement of protons and electrons is crucial to the design of fast, efficient electrocatalysts for H2 production and oxidation based on earth-abundant metals. Our work seeks to address fundamental questions about proton movement. We have demonstrated that incorporating a pendant amine functioning as a proton relay in the second coordination sphere of a metal complex helps proton mobility, resulting in faster and more energy-efficient catalysts. Proton-transfer reactions can be rate-limiting and are influenced by several factors, such as pKa values, steric effects, hydrogen bonding, and solvation/desolvation of the exogenous base and acid employed. The presence of multiple protonation sites introduces branching points along the catalytic cycle, making less productive pathways accessible or leading to the formation of stable off-cycle species. Using ligands with only one pendant amine mitigates this problem and results in catalysts with high rates for production of H2, although generally at higher overpotentials. For H2 oxidation catalysts, iron complexes with a high H2 binding affinity were developed. However, these iron complexes had a pKa mismatch between the protonated metal center and the protonated pendant amine, and consequently intramolecular proton movement was slow. Taken altogether, our results demonstrate the necessity of optimizing the entire catalytic cycle because optimization of a specific catalytic step can negatively influence another step and not necessarily lead to a better catalytic performance. We discuss a general procedure, based on thermodynamic arguments, which allows the simultaneous minimization of the free-energy change of each catalytic step, yielding a nearly flat free-energy surface, with no large barriers due to energy mismatches from either high- or low-energy intermediates.

  11. Polypropylene obtained through zeolite supported catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Queli C. Bastos

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Propylene polymerizations were carried out with f2C(Flu(CpZrCl2 and SiMe2(Ind2ZrCl2 catalysts supported on silica, zeolite sodic mordenite (NaM and acid mordenite (HM. The polymerizations were performed at different temperatures and varying aluminium/zirconium molar ratios ([Al]/[Zr]. The effect of these reaction parameters on the catalyst activity was investigated using a proposed statistical experimental planning. In the case of f2C(Flu(CpZrCl2, SiO2 and NaM were used as support and the catalyst performance evaluated using toluene and pentane as polymerization solvent. The molecular weight, molecular weight distribution, melting point and crystallinity of the polymers were examined. The results indicate very high activities for the syndiospecific heterogeneous system. Also, the polymers obtained had superior Mw and stereoregularity.

  12. One-Pot Process for Hydrodeoxygenation of Lignin to Alkanes Using Ru-Based Bimetallic and Bifunctional Catalysts Supported on Zeolite Y

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongliang [Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Washington State University, Richland WA 99354 USA; Ruan, Hao [Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Washington State University, Richland WA 99354 USA; Feng, Maoqi [Chemistry & Chemical Engineering Division, Southwest Research Institute, San Antonio TX 78238 USA; Qin, Yuling [Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Washington State University, Richland WA 99354 USA; Job, Heather [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Blvd Richland WA 99354 USA; Luo, Langli [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, 3335 Q Ave Richland WA 99354 USA; Wang, Chongmin [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, 3335 Q Ave Richland WA 99354 USA; Engelhard, Mark H. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, 3335 Q Ave Richland WA 99354 USA; Kuhn, Erik [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO. 80401 USA; Chen, Xiaowen [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO. 80401 USA; Tucker, Melvin P. [National Bioenergy Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO. 80401 USA; Yang, Bin [Department of Biological Systems Engineering, Washington State University, Richland WA 99354 USA

    2017-03-16

    The synthesis of high-efficiency and low-cost multifunctional catalysts for hydrodeoxygenation (HDO) of waste lignin into advanced biofuels is crucial for enhancing current biorefinery processes. Inexpensive transition metals, including Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, were severally co-loaded with Ru on HY zeolite to form bimetallic and bifunctional catalysts. These catalysts were subsequently tested for HDO conversion of softwood lignin and several lignin model compounds. Results indicated that the inexpensive earth abundant metals could modulate the hydrogenolysis activity of Ru and decrease the yield of low molecular weight gaseous side-products. Among all the prepared catalysts, Ru-Cu/HY showed the best HDO performance, giving the highest selectivity to hydrocarbon products. The improved catalytic performance of Ru-Cu/HY was probably due to the following three factors: (1) high total and strong acid sites, (2) good dispersion of metal species and limited segregation, (3) high adsorption capacity for polar fractions, including hydroxyl groups and ether bonds. Moreover, all the bifunctional catalysts were proven to be superior over the combination catalysts of Ru/Al2O3 and HY zeolite, and this could be attributed to the “intimacy criterion”. The practical use of the designed catalysts would be promising in lignin valorization.

  13. The Design and Transformation of Biofundamentals: A Nonsurvey Introductory Evolutionary and Molecular Biology Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klymkowsky, Michael W; Rentsch, Jeremy D; Begovic, Emina; Cooper, Melanie M

    2016-01-01

    Many introductory biology courses amount to superficial surveys of disconnected topics. Often, foundational observations and the concepts derived from them and students' ability to use these ideas appropriately are overlooked, leading to unrealistic expectations and unrecognized learning obstacles. The result can be a focus on memorization at the expense of the development of a meaningful framework within which to consider biological phenomena. About a decade ago, we began a reconsideration of what an introductory course should present to students and the skills they need to master. The original Web-based course's design presaged many of the recommendations of the Vision and Change report; in particular, a focus on social evolutionary mechanisms, stochastic (evolutionary and molecular) processes, and core ideas (cellular continuity, evolutionary homology, molecular interactions, coupled chemical reactions, and molecular machines). Inspired by insights from the Chemistry, Life, the Universe & Everything general chemistry project, we transformed the original Web version into a (freely available) book with a more unified narrative flow and a set of formative assessments delivered through the beSocratic system. We outline how student responses to course materials are guiding future course modifications, in particular a more concerted effort at helping students to construct logical, empirically based arguments, explanations, and models. © 2016 M. W. Klymkowsky et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2016 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  14. Evaluation of peptide designing strategy against subunit reassociation in mucin 1: A steered molecular dynamics approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Lesitha Jeeva Kumari

    Full Text Available Subunit reassociation in mucin 1, a breast cancer tumor marker, is reported as one of the critical factors for its cytoplasmic activation. Inhibition of its heterodimeric association would therefore result in loss of its function and alter disease progression. The present study aimed at evaluating peptide inhibitor designing strategies that may serve as antagonist against this receptor-ligand alliance. Several peptides and their derivatives were designed based on native residues, subunit interface, hydrogen bonding and secondary structure. Docking studies with the peptides were carried on the receptor subunit and their binding affinities were evaluated using steered molecular dynamics simulation and umbrella sampling. Our results showed that among all the different classes of peptides evaluated, the receptor based peptide showed the highest binding affinity. This result was concurrent with the experimental observation that the receptor-ligand alliance in mucin 1 is highly specific. Our results also show that peptide ligand against this subunit association is only stabilized through native residue inter-protein interaction irrespective of the peptide structure, peptide length and number of hydrogen bonds. Consistency in binding affinity, pull force and free energy barrier was observed with only the receptor derived peptides which resulted in favorable interprotein interactions at the interface. Several observations were made and discussed which will eventually lead to designing efficient peptide inhibitors against mucin 1 heterodimeric subunit reassociation.

  15. Towards the design of new and improved drilling fluid additives using molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Richard L; Greenwel, H Christopher; Suter, James L; Jarvis, Rebecca M; Coveney, Peter V

    2010-03-01

    During exploration for oil and gas, a technical drilling fluid is used to lubricate the drill bit, maintain hydrostatic pressure, transmit sensor readings, remove rock cuttings and inhibit swelling of unstable clay based reactive shale formations. Increasing environmental awareness and resulting legislation has led to the search for new, improved biodegradable drilling fluid components. In the case of additives for clay swelling inhibition, an understanding of how existing effective additives interact with clays must be gained to allow the design of improved molecules. Owing to the disordered nature and nanoscopic dimension of the interlayer pores of clay minerals, computer simulations have become an increasingly useful tool for studying clay-swelling inhibitor interactions. In this work we briefly review the history of the development of technical drilling fluids, the environmental impact of drilling fluids and the use of computer simulations to study the interactions between clay minerals and swelling inhibitors. We report on results from some recent large-scale molecular dynamics simulation studies on low molecular weight water-soluble macromolecular inhibitor molecules. The structure and interactions of poly(propylene oxide)-diamine, poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(ethylene oxide)-diacrylate inhibitor molecules with montmorillonite clay are studied.

  16. Towards the design of new and improved drilling fluid additives using molecular dynamics simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Richard L.; Greenwel, H. Christopher; Suter, James L.; Coveney, Peter V.; Jarvis, Rebecca M.

    2010-01-01

    During exploration for oil and gas, a technical drilling fluid is used to lubricate the drill bit, maintain hydrostatic pressure, transmit sensor readings, remove rock cuttings and inhibit swelling of unstable clay based reactive shale formations. Increasing environmental awareness and resulting legislation has led to the search for new, improved biodegradable drilling fluid components. In the case of additives for clay swelling inhibition, an understanding of how existing effective additives interact with clays must be gained to allow the design of improved molecules. Owing to the disordered nature and nano scope dimension of the interlayer pores of clay minerals, computer simulations have become an increasingly useful tool for studying clay-swelling inhibitor interactions. In this work we briefly review the history of the development of technical drilling fluids, the environmental impact of drilling fluids and the use of computer simulations to study the interactions between clay minerals and swelling inhibitors. We report on results from some recent large-scale molecular dynamics simulation studies on low molecular weight water-soluble macromolecular inhibitor molecules. The structure and interactions of poly(propylene oxide)-diamine, poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(ethylene oxide)-diacrylate inhibitor molecules with montmorillonite clay are studied. (author)

  17. Novel α, β-Unsaturated Sophoridinic Derivatives: Design, Synthesis, Molecular Docking and Anti-Cancer Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiming Xu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Using sophoridine 1 and chalcone 3 as the lead compounds, a series of novel α, β-unsaturated sophoridinic derivatives were designed, synthesized, and evaluated for their in vitro cytotoxicity. Structure-activity relationship (SAR analysis indicated that introduction of α, β-unsaturated ketone moiety and heterocyclic group might significantly enhance anticancer activity. Among the compounds, 2f and 2m exhibited potential effects against HepG-2 and CNE-2 human cancer cell lines. Furthermore, molecular docking studies were performed to understand possible docking sites of the molecules on the target proteins and the mode of binding. This work provides a theoretical basis for structural optimizations and exploring anticancer pathways of this kind of compound.

  18. Four Bed Molecular Sieve - Exploration (4BMS-X) Virtual Heater Design and Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schunk, R. Gregory; Peters, Warren T.; Thomas, John T., Jr.

    2017-01-01

    A 4BMS-X (Four Bed Molecular Sieve - Exploration) design and heater optimization study for CO2 sorbent beds in proposed exploration system architectures is presented. The primary objectives of the study are to reduce heater power and thermal gradients within the CO2 sorbent beds while minimizing channeling effects. Some of the notable changes from the ISS (International Space Station) CDRA (Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly) to the proposed exploration system architecture include cylindrical beds, alternate sorbents and an improved heater core. Results from both 2D and 3D sorbent bed thermal models with integrated heaters are presented. The 2D sorbent bed models are used to optimize heater power and fin geometry while the 3D models address end effects in the beds for more realistic thermal gradient and heater power predictions.

  19. Modern dose-finding designs for cancer phase I trials drug combinations and molecularly targeted agents

    CERN Document Server

    Hirakawa, Akihiro; Daimon, Takashi; Matsui, Shigeyuki

    2018-01-01

    This book deals with advanced methods for adaptive phase I dose-finding clinical trials for combination of two agents and molecularly targeted agents (MTAs) in oncology. It provides not only methodological aspects of the dose-finding methods, but also software implementations and practical considerations in applying these complex methods to real cancer clinical trials. Thus, the book aims to furnish researchers in biostatistics and statistical science with a good summary of recent developments of adaptive dose-finding methods as well as providing practitioners in biostatistics and clinical investigators with advanced materials for designing, conducting, monitoring, and analyzing adaptive dose-finding trials. The topics in the book are mainly related to cancer clinical trials, but many of those topics are potentially applicable or can be extended to trials for other diseases. The focus is mainly on model-based dose-finding methods for two kinds of phase I trials. One is clinical trials with combinations of tw...

  20. Molecular design and ordering effects in π-functional materials for transistor and solar cell applications

    KAUST Repository

    Beaujuge, Pierre

    2011-12-21

    Organic electronics are broadly anticipated to impact the development of flexible thin-film device technologies. Among these, solution-processable π-conjugated polymers and small molecules are proving particularly promising in field-effect transistors and bulk heterojunction solar cells. This Perspective analyzes some of the most exciting strategies recently suggested in the design and structural organization of π-functional materials for transistor and solar cell applications. Emphasis is placed on the interplay between molecular structure, self-assembling properties, nanoscale and mesoscale ordering, and device efficiency parameters. A critical look at the various approaches used to optimize both materials and device performance is provided to assist in the identification of new directions and further advances. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  1. Molecular modeling study for inhibition mechanism of human chymase and its application in inhibitor design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahreen Arooj

    Full Text Available Human chymase catalyzes the hydrolysis of peptide bonds. Three chymase inhibitors with very similar chemical structures but highly different inhibitory profiles towards the hydrolase function of chymase were selected with the aim of elucidating the origin of disparities in their biological activities. As a substrate (angiotensin-I bound crystal structure is not available, molecular docking was performed to dock the substrate into the active site. Molecular dynamics simulations of chymase complexes with inhibitors and substrate were performed to calculate the binding orientation of inhibitors and substrate as well as to characterize conformational changes in the active site. The results elucidate details of the 3D chymase structure as well as the importance of K40 in hydrolase function. Binding mode analysis showed that substitution of a heavier Cl atom at the phenyl ring of most active inhibitor produced a great deal of variation in its orientation causing the phosphinate group to interact strongly with residue K40. Dynamics simulations revealed the conformational variation in region of V36-F41 upon substrate and inhibitor binding induced a shift in the location of K40 thus changing its interactions with them. Chymase complexes with the most active compound and substrate were used for development of a hybrid pharmacophore model which was applied in databases screening. Finally, hits which bound well at the active site, exhibited key interactions and favorable electronic properties were identified as possible inhibitors for chymase. This study not only elucidates inhibitory mechanism of chymase inhibitors but also provides key structural insights which will aid in the rational design of novel potent inhibitors of the enzyme. In general, the strategy applied in the current study could be a promising computational approach and may be generally applicable to drug design for other enzymes.

  2. Understanding of catalysis on early transition metal oxide-based catalysts through exploration of surface structure and chemistry during catalysis using in-situ approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Franklin [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering. Dept. of Chemistry

    2015-09-14

    Two main categories of heterogeneous catalysts are metal and metal oxide which catalyze 80% chemical reactions at solid-gas and solid-liquid interfaces. Metal oxide catalysts are much more complicated than metal catalysts. The reason is that the cations of the metal atoms could exhibit a few different oxidation states on surface of the same catalyst particle such as Co3O4 or change of their oxidation states under different reactive environments. For a metal catalyst, there is only one oxidation state typically. In addition, surface of a metal oxide can be terminated with multiple surface functionalities including O atoms with different binding configurations and OH group. For metal, only metal atoms are exposed typically. Obviously, the complication of surface chemistry and structure of a metal oxide makes studies of surface of an oxide catalyst very challenging. Due to the complication of surface of a meal oxide, the electronic and geometric structures of surface of a metal oxide and the exposed species have received enormous attention since oxide catalysts catalyze at least 1/3 chemical reactions in chemical and energy industries. Understanding of catalytic reactions on early transition metal oxide-based catalysts is fundamentally intriguing and of great practical interest in energy- and environment-related catalysis. Exploration of surface chemistry of oxide-based catalysts at molecular level during catalysis has remained challenging though it is critical in deeply understanding catalysis on oxide-based catalysts and developing oxide-based catalysts with high activity and selectivity. Thus, the overall objective of this project is to explore surface chemistry and structure of early transition metal oxide-based catalysts through in-situ characterization of surface of catalysts, measurements of catalytic performances, and then build an intrinsic correlation of surface chemistry and structure with their catalytic performances in a few

  3. Tetraalkylammonium Salts as Hydrogen-Bonding Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Shirakawa, Seiji; Liu, Shiyao; Kaneko, Shiho; Kumatabara, Yusuke; Fukuda, Airi; Omagari, Yumi; Maruoka, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    Although the hydrogen-bonding ability of the α hydrogen atoms on tetraalkylammonium salts is often discussed with respect to phase-transfer catalysts, catalysis that utilizes the hydrogen-bond-donor properties of tetraalkylammonium salts remains unknown. Herein, we demonstrate hydrogen-bonding catalysis with newly designed tetraalkylammonium salt catalysts in Mannich-type reactions. The structure and the hydrogen-bonding ability of the new ammonium salts were investigated by X-ray diffraction...

  4. Catalyst system of the structured type

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, J.C.; Legein, C.H.; Calis, H.P.A.; Van Bekkum, H.; Gerritsen, A.W.; Van den Bleek, M.

    1994-01-01

    The invention relates to a catalyst system of the structured type, in which a structured support is covered with a layer of molecular sieve crystals and/or modifications thereof. These crystals have substantially the same orientation relative to the support surface. The invention further relates to

  5. Molecular and macro-scale analysis of enzyme-crosslinked silk hydrogels for rational biomaterial design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Meghan; Coburn, Jeannine M; Partlow, Benjamin P; Mu, Xuan; Kaplan, David L

    2017-11-01

    Silk fibroin-based hydrogels have exciting applications in tissue engineering and therapeutic molecule delivery; however, their utility is dependent on their diffusive properties. The present study describes a molecular and macro-scale investigation of enzymatically-crosslinked silk fibroin hydrogels, and demonstrates that these systems have tunable crosslink density and diffusivity. We developed a liquid chromatography tandem mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS) method to assess the quantity and order of covalent tyrosine crosslinks in the hydrogels. This analysis revealed between 28 and 56% conversion of tyrosine to dityrosine, which was dependent on the silk concentration and reactant concentration. The crosslink density was then correlated with storage modulus, revealing that both crosslinking and protein concentration influenced the mechanical properties of the hydrogels. The diffusive properties of the bulk material were studied by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), which revealed a non-linear relationship between silk concentration and diffusivity. As a result of this work, a model for synthesizing hydrogels with known crosslink densities and diffusive properties has been established, enabling the rational design of silk hydrogels for biomedical applications. Hydrogels from naturally-derived silk polymers offer versitile opportunities in the biomedical field, however, their design has largely been an empirical process. We present a fundamental study of the crosslink density, storage modulus, and diffusion behavior of enzymatically-crosslinked silk hydrogels to better inform scaffold design. These studies revealed unexpected non-linear trends in the crosslink density and diffusivity of silk hydrogels with respect to protein concentration and crosslink reagent concentration. This work demonstrates the tunable diffusivity and crosslinking in silk fibroin hydrogels, and enables the rational design of biomaterials. Further, the characterization methods

  6. Methods of making textured catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werpy, Todd [West Richland, WA; Frye, Jr., John G.; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Zacher, Alan H [Kennewick, WA

    2010-08-17

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  7. Synthesis of Metallocene Catalyst for Terpolymerization of Ethylene, Propylene and Diene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.M.M. Mortazavi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The bis(indenyl zirconium dichloride catalyst was synthesized by a modified method at room temperature. Terpolymerization of ethylene, propylene and diene monomers were carried out using this metallocene catalyst under different conditions of different feed ratios of monomers, co-catalyst/catalyst ratios and polymerization temperatures. Methylaluminoxane (MAO was used as a co-catalyst. The highest activity of catalyst was obtained at total pressure 4 bar, co-catalyst/catalyst ratio [Al]/[Zr]=600, polymerization temperature 60°C and E/P=67:33 and momomer feed ratio of 1700 kgEPDM/molZrh. The activity of catalyst showed bell-shaped behaviors versus co-catalyst/catalyst ratio ([Al]/[Zr] and polymerization temperatures. The viscosity-average molecular weight (Mv of terpolymers increased with increasing total pressure at different feed ratios of monomers. However, the viscosity-average molecular weight of terpolymers decreased at higher co-catalyst/catalyst ratios ([Al]/[Zr] and higher polymerization temperatures. The increases in propylene and diene monomers in the feed ratios decreased the catalyst activity and viscosity-average molecular weight of terpolymers. The ratio of maximum average rate of terpolymerization to an average rate of terpolymerization at the end of the polymerization (DI for different terpolymerization conditions was relatively high; an indication of the decay kinetics for this type of metallocene catalyst. Increasing the co-catalyst/catalyst ratio up to [Al]/[Zr] = 500 increased the Et% and ENB% in the final obtained polymers. However, increasing the polymerization temperature, diene and propylene concentrations in the feed ratio decreased the Et% and increased the ENB% contents in the final obtained polymers. Tg of the final terpolymers was between -64 and -52°C. The study on microstructures of some polymer revealed block type of chain microstructures.

  8. Catalyst Alloys Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xincai

    2014-10-01

    Catalysts are one of the key materials used for diamond formation at high pressures. Several such catalyst products have been developed and applied in China and around the world. The catalyst alloy most widely used in China is Ni70Mn25Co5 developed at Changsha Research Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. In this article, detailed techniques for manufacturing such a typical catalyst alloy will be reviewed. The characteristics of the alloy will be described. Detailed processing of the alloy will be presented, including remelting and casting, hot rolling, annealing, surface treatment, cold rolling, blanking, finishing, packaging, and waste treatment. An example use of the catalyst alloy will also be given. Industrial experience shows that for the catalyst alloy products, a vacuum induction remelt furnace can be used for remelting, a metal mold can be used for casting, hot and cold rolling can be used for forming, and acid pickling can be used for metal surface cleaning.

  9. Alloy catalyst material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel alloy catalyst material for use in the synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water. The present invention also relates to a cathode and an electrochemical cell comprising the novel catalyst material, and the process use...... of the novel catalyst material for synthesising hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water....

  10. Design principles and optimal performance for molecular motors under realistic constraints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yuhai; Cao, Yuansheng

    2018-02-01

    The performance of a molecular motor, characterized by its power output and energy efficiency, is investigated in the motor design space spanned by the stepping rate function and the motor-track interaction potential. Analytic results and simulations show that a gating mechanism that restricts forward stepping in a narrow window in configuration space is needed for generating high power at physiologically relevant loads. By deriving general thermodynamics laws for nonequilibrium motors, we find that the maximum torque (force) at stall is less than its theoretical limit for any realistic motor-track interactions due to speed fluctuations. Our study reveals a tradeoff for the motor-track interaction: while a strong interaction generates a high power output for forward steps, it also leads to a higher probability of wasteful spontaneous back steps. Our analysis and simulations show that this tradeoff sets a fundamental limit to the maximum motor efficiency in the presence of spontaneous back steps, i.e., loose-coupling. Balancing this tradeoff leads to an optimal design of the motor-track interaction for achieving a maximum efficiency close to 1 for realistic motors that are not perfectly coupled with the energy source. Comparison with existing data and suggestions for future experiments are discussed.

  11. METHOD OF PURIFYING CATALYSTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joris, G.G.

    1958-09-01

    It has been fuund that the presence of chlorine as an impurity adversely affects the performance of finely divided platinum catalysts such as are used in the isotopic exchange process for the production of beavy water. This chlorine impurity may be removed from these catalysts by treating the catalyst at an elevated temperature with dry hydrogen and then with wet hydrogen, having a hydrogen-water vapor volume of about 8: 1. This alternate treatment by dry hydrogen and wet hydrogen is continued until the chlorine is largely removed from the catalyst.

  12. Hydroxide catalysts for lignin depolymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckham, Gregg T; Biddy, Mary J.; Kruger, Jacob S.; Chmely, Stephen C.; Sturgeon, Matthew

    2017-10-17

    Solid base catalysts and their use for the base-catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) of lignin to compounds such as aromatics are presented herein. Exemplary catalysts include layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as recyclable, heterogeneous catalysts for BCD of lignin.

  13. Hydroxide catalysts for lignin depolymerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckham, Gregg T.; Biddy, Mary J.; Chmely, Stephen C.; Sturgeon, Matthew

    2017-04-25

    Solid base catalysts and their use for the base-catalyzed depolymerization (BCD) of lignin to compounds such as aromatics are presented herein. Exemplary catalysts include layered double hydroxides (LDHs) as recyclable, heterogeneous catalysts for BCD of lignin.

  14. Stereogenic-Only-at-Metal Asymmetric Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lilu; Meggers, Eric

    2017-09-19

    Chirality is an essential feature of asymmetric catalysts. This review summarizes asymmetric catalysts that derive their chirality exclusively from stereogenic metal centers. Reported chiral-at-metal catalysts can be divided into two classes, namely, inert metal complexes, in which the metal fulfills a purely structural role, so catalysis is mediated entirely through the ligand sphere, and reactive metal complexes. The latter are particularly appealing because structural simplicity (only achiral ligands) is combined with the prospect of particularly effective asymmetric induction (direct contact of the substrate with the chiral metal center). Challenges and solutions for the design of such reactive stereogenic-only-at-metal asymmetric catalysts are discussed. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Highly sensitive silicon microreactor for catalyst testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Toke Riishøj; Olsen, Jakob Lind; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard

    2009-01-01

    by directing the entire gas flow through the catalyst bed to a mass spectrometer, thus ensuring that nearly all reaction products are present in the analyzed gas flow. Although the device can be employed for testing a wide range of catalysts, the primary aim of the design is to allow characterization of model...... catalysts which can only be obtained in small quantities. Such measurements are of significant fundamental interest but are challenging because of the low surface areas involved. The relationship between the reaction zone gas flow and the pressure in the reaction zone is investigated experimentally......, it is found that platinum catalysts with areas as small as 15 mu m(2) are conveniently characterized with the device. (C) 2009 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3270191]...

  16. A novel structural design of a Pt/C-CeO{sub 2} catalyst with improved performance for methanol electro-oxidation by {beta}-cyclodextrin carbonization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Yuan-Yuan; Jiang, Zheng-Zhi [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, No.92 West-Da Zhi Street, Harbin (China); School of Science, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Wang, Zhen-Bo; Yin, Ge-Ping [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Harbin Institute of Technology, No.92 West-Da Zhi Street, Harbin (China); Gu, Da-Ming [School of Science, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China)

    2011-07-19

    A novel structural Pt/C-CeO{sub 2} catalyst synthesized using MP-CeO{sub 2} coated with carbon by in situ {beta}-cyclodextrin carbonization and then depositing Pt nanoparticles using a fast and facile microwave-assisted polyol process. The increased electron conductivity and the more oxygen-containing species of carbon available for the Pt site contribute to the improved activity and stability for methanol oxidation compared to Pt/CeO{sub 2}. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Magnetic catalyst bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, Wendy; Bol, A.A.; Geus, John W.

    1999-01-01

    After a discussion about the importance of the size of the catalyst bodies with reactions in the liquid-phase with a suspended catalyst, the possibilities of magnetic separation are dealt with. Deficiencies of the usual ferromagnetic particles are the reactivity and the clustering of the

  18. Catalyst for Ammonia Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation, a method for producing a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation and a method for tuning the catalytic activity of a transition metal. By depositing an overlayer of less catalytic active metal onto a more catalytic...

  19. Nanostructured catalyst supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yimin; Goldman, Jay L.; Qian, Baixin; Stefan, Ionel C.

    2012-10-02

    The present invention relates to SiC nanostructures, including SiC nanopowder, SiC nanowires, and composites of SiC nanopowder and nanowires, which can be used as catalyst supports in membrane electrode assemblies and in fuel cells. The present invention also relates to composite catalyst supports comprising nanopowder and one or more inorganic nanowires for a membrane electrode assembly.

  20. Catalyst for hydrocarbon conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duhaut, P.; Miquel, J.

    1975-01-01

    A description is given for a catalyst and process for hydrocarbon conversions, e.g., reforming. The catalyst contains an alumina carrier, platinum, iridium, at least one metal selected from uranium, vanadium, and gallium, and optionally halogen in the form of metal halide of one of the aforesaid components. (U.S.)

  1. Towards the design of new and improved drilling fluid additives using molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L. Anderson

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available During exploration for oil and gas, a technical drilling fluid is used to lubricate the drill bit, maintain hydrostatic pressure, transmit sensor readings, remove rock cuttings and inhibit swelling of unstable clay based reactive shale formations. Increasing environmental awareness and resulting legislation has led to the search for new, improved biodegradable drilling fluid components. In the case of additives for clay swelling inhibition, an understanding of how existing effective additives interact with clays must be gained to allow the design of improved molecules. Owing to the disordered nature and nanoscopic dimension of the interlayer pores of clay minerals, computer simulations have become an increasingly useful tool for studying clay-swelling inhibitor interactions. In this work we briefly review the history of the development of technical drilling fluids, the environmental impact of drilling fluids and the use of computer simulations to study the interactions between clay minerals and swelling inhibitors. We report on results from some recent large-scale molecular dynamics simulation studies on low molecular weight water-soluble macromolecular inhibitor molecules. The structure and interactions of poly(propylene oxide-diamine, poly(ethylene glycol and poly(ethylene oxide-diacrylate inhibitor molecules with montmorillonite clay are studied.Durante a exploração de óleo e gás um fluido de perfuração é usado para lubrificar 'bit' da perfuradora, manter a pressão hidrostática, transmitir sensores de leitura, remover resíduos da rocha e inibir o inchamento da argila instável baseada nas formações dos folhelhos. O aumento das preocupações ambientais bem como a legislação resultante levou à procura de novos fluidos de perfuração com componentes biodegradáveis. No caso dos aditivos para inibir o inchamento das argilas o entendimento das interações entre os aditivos e as argilas tem que ser adquirido para permitir o

  2. Reaction selectivity studies on nanolithographically-fabricated platinum model catalyst arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunes, Jeffrey Benjamin [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2004-05-01

    In an effort to understand the molecular ingredients of catalytic activity and selectivity toward the end of tuning a catalyst for 100% selectivity, advanced nanolithography techniques were developed and utilized to fabricate well-ordered two-dimensional model catalyst arrays of metal nanostructures on an oxide support for the investigation of reaction selectivity. In-situ and ex-situ surface science techniques were coupled with catalytic reaction data to characterize the molecular structure of the catalyst systems and gain insight into hydrocarbon conversion in heterogeneous catalysis. Through systematic variation of catalyst parameters (size, spacing, structure, and oxide support) and catalytic reaction conditions (hydrocarbon chain length, temperature, pressures, and gas composition), the data presented in this dissertation demonstrate the ability to direct a reaction by rationally adjusting, through precise control, the design of the catalyst system. Electron beam lithography (EBL) was employed to create platinum nanoparticles on an alumina (Al2O3) support. The Pt nanoparticle spacing (100-150-nm interparticle distance) was varied in these samples, and they were characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), both before and after reactions. The TEM studies showed the 28-nm Pt nanoparticles with 100 and 150-nm interparticle spacing on alumina to be polycrystalline in nature, with crystalline sizes of 3-5 nm. The nanoparticle crystallites increased significantly after heat treatment. The nanoparticles were still mostly polycrystalline in nature, with 2-3 domains. The 28-nm Pt nanoparticles deposited on alumina were removed by the AFM tip in contact mode with a normal force of approximately 30 nN. After heat treatment at 500 C in vacuum for 3 hours, the AFM tip, even at 4000 nN, could not remove the platinum

  3. Tumor Heterogeneity: Mechanisms and Bases for a Reliable Application of Molecular Marker Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz-Cano, Salvador J.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneity is a confusing finding in the assessment of neoplasms, potentially resulting in inaccurate diagnostic, prognostic and predictive tests. This tumor heterogeneity is not always a random and unpredictable phenomenon, whose knowledge helps designing better tests. The biologic reasons for this intratumoral heterogeneity would then be important to understand both the natural history of neoplasms and the selection of test samples for reliable analysis. The main factors contributing to intratumoral heterogeneity inducing gene abnormalities or modifying its expression include: the gradient ischemic level within neoplasms, the action of tumor microenvironment (bidirectional interaction between tumor cells and stroma), mechanisms of intercellular transference of genetic information (exosomes), and differential mechanisms of sequence-independent modifications of genetic material and proteins. The intratumoral heterogeneity is at the origin of tumor progression and it is also the byproduct of the selection process during progression. Any analysis of heterogeneity mechanisms must be integrated within the process of segregation of genetic changes in tumor cells during the clonal expansion and progression of neoplasms. The evaluation of these mechanisms must also consider the redundancy and pleiotropism of molecular pathways, for which appropriate surrogate markers would support the presence or not of heterogeneous genetics and the main mechanisms responsible. This knowledge would constitute a solid scientific background for future therapeutic planning. PMID:22408433

  4. Combating mutations in genetic disease and drug resistance: understanding molecular mechanisms to guide drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanaz, Amanda T S; Rodrigues, Carlos H M; Pires, Douglas E V; Ascher, David B

    2017-06-01

    Mutations introduce diversity into genomes, leading to selective changes and driving evolution. These changes have contributed to the emergence of many of the current major health concerns of the 21st century, from the development of genetic diseases and cancers to the rise and spread of drug resistance. The experimental systematic testing of all mutations in a system of interest is impractical and not cost-effective, which has created interest in the development of computational tools to understand the molecular consequences of mutations to aid and guide rational experimentation. Areas covered: Here, the authors discuss the recent development of computational methods to understand the effects of coding mutations to protein function and interactions, particularly in the context of the 3D structure of the protein. Expert opinion: While significant progress has been made in terms of innovative tools to understand and quantify the different range of effects in which a mutation or a set of mutations can give rise to a phenotype, a great gap still exists when integrating these predictions and drawing causality conclusions linking variants. This often requires a detailed understanding of the system being perturbed. However, as part of the drug development process it can be used preemptively in a similar fashion to pharmacokinetics predictions, to guide development of therapeutics to help guide the design and analysis of clinical trials, patient treatment and public health policy strategies.

  5. Molecular Design of Bioinspired Nanostructures for Biomedical Applications: Synthesis, Self-Assembly and Functional Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hesheng Victor; Zheng, Xin Ting; Mok, Beverly Yin Leng; Ibrahim, Salwa Ali; Yu, Yong; Tan, Yen Nee

    2016-08-01

    Biomolecules are the nanoscale building blocks of cells, which play multifaceted roles in the critical biological processes such as biomineralization in a living organism. In these processes, the biological molecules such as protein and nucleic acids use their exclusive biorecognition properties enabled from their unique chemical composition, shape and function to initiate a cascade of cellular events. The exceptional features of these biomolecules, coupled with the recent advancement in nanotechnology, have led to the emergence of a new research field that focuses on the molecular design of bioinspired nanostructures that inherit the extraordinary function of natural biomaterials. These “bioinspired” nanostructures could be formulated by biomimetic approaches through either self-assembling of biomolecules or acting as a biomolecular template/precursor to direct the synthesis of nanocomposite. In either situation, the resulting nanomaterials exhibit phenomenal biocompatibility, superb aqueous solubility and excellent colloidal stability, branding them exceptionally desirable for both in vitro and in vivo biomedical applications. In this review, we will present the recent developments in the preparation of “bioinspired” nanostructures through biomimetic self-assembly and biotemplating synthesis, as well as highlight their functional properties and potential applications in biomedical diagnostics and therapeutic delivery. Lastly, we will conclude this topic with some personal perspective on the challenges and future outlooks of the “bioinspired” nanostructures for nanomedicine.

  6. Design, Synthesis, Characterization of Novel Ruthenium(II Catalysts: Highly Efficient and Selective Hydrogenation of Cinnamaldehyde to (E-3-Phenylprop-2-en-1-ol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany W. Darwish

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, two novel supported and non-supported ruthenium(II complexes of type [RuCl2(dppme(NN] where [dppme is H2C=C(CH2PPh22 and NN is N1-(3-(trimethoxysilylpropylethane-1,2-diamine] were prepared. The NN co-ligand caused release of one of the dppme ligands from [RuCl2(dppme2] precursor to yield complex 1. The process of substitution of dppme by NN was monitored by 31P{1H}-NMR. Taking advantage of the presence of trimethoxysilane group in the backbone of complex 1, polysiloxane xerogel counterpart, X1, was prepared via sol-gel immobilization using tetraethoxysilane as cross-linker. Both complexes 1 and X1 have been characterized via elemental analysis, CV and a number of spectroscopic techniques including FT-IR, 1H-, 13C-, and 31P-NMR, and mass spectrometry. Importantly, carbonyl selective hydrogenation was successfully accomplished under mild conditions using complex 1 as a homogenous catalyst and X1 as a heterogeneous catalyst, respectively.

  7. Biomimetic catalysts responsive to specific chemical signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Yan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2015-03-04

    Part 1. Design of Biomimetic Catalysts Based on Amphiphilic Systems The overall objective of our research is to create biomimetic catalysts from amphiphilic molecules. More specifically, we aim to create supramolecular systems that can be used to control the microenvironment around a catalytic center in a biomimetic fashion and apply the learning to construct supramolecular catalysts with novel functions found in enzymatic catalysts. We have prepared synthetic molecules (i.e., foldamers) that could fold into helical structures with nanometer-sized internal hydrophilic cavities. Cavities of this size are typically observed only in the tertiary and quaternary structures of proteins but were formed in our foldamer prepared in just a few steps from the monomer. Similar to many proteins, our foldamers displayed cooperativity in the folding/unfolding equilibrium and followed a two-state conformational transition. In addition, their conformational change could be triggered by solvent polarity, pH, or presence of metal ions and certain organic molecules. We studied their environmentally dependent conformational changes in solutions, surfactant micelles, and lipid bilayer membranes. Unlike conventional rigid supramolecular host, a foldamer undergoes conformational change during guest binding. Our study in the molecular recognition of an oligocholate host yielded some extremely exciting results. Cooperativity between host conformation and host–guest interactions was found to “magnify” weak binding interactions. In other words, since binding affinity is determined by the overall change of free energy during the binding, guest-induced conformational change of the host, whether near or far from the binding site, affects the binding. This study has strong implications in catalysis because enzymes have been hypothesized to harvest similar intramolecular forces to strengthen their binding with the transition state of an enzyme-catalyzed reaction. The supramolecular and

  8. Using multi-scale molecular simulations to guide experimental design of biomaterials for drug and DNA delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayaraman, Arthi

    2015-03-01

    In this talk I will present molecular simulations studies that guide experimental synthesis of polymers for efficient DNA delivery. Viruses, while effective at delivery and transfection of DNA, can elicit harmful immunogenic responses, thus motivating design of non-viral transfection agents. Polycations are a promising class of non-viral vectors that bind to the negatively charged DNA backbone to form a complex (polyplex) that is then internalized into the target cell. Combinatorial approaches have generated various polycations with differing DNA transfection efficacies, but there is a need for general design guidelines that can relate the molecular features of the polycation to its DNA transfection efficiency. Using atomistic and coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations we connect the thermodynamics of polycation-DNA binding and polyplex structure to experimentally observed transfection efficiency as a function of polycation chemistry and architecture.

  9. Multiphase catalysts for selective reduction of NOx with hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maisuls, S.E.

    2000-01-01

    catalyst with Rh was studied and the results are summarized in Chapter 6. Chapter 7 presents a comparison between the Co-Pt and Co-Rh systems. Finally, we evaluate the results of this study and general conclusions with suggestions for the design of an optimal deNOx catalyst. refs

  10. Preparation of alveolate hydrophobic catalyst for tritium waste gas treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yong; Peng, Shuming; Wang, Heyi; Du, Yang; Li, Jiamao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The catalyst is hydrophobic, it will not be poisoned by steam in room air at room temperature which is better than Pt-Al 2 O 3 . • At room temperature, the conversion of low concentration of H2 and tritium gas in room air over the catalyst is high. • The air resistance of catalyst is much lower than graininess Pt-Al 2 O 3 . • It is inorganic and will not burn. - Abstract: To prepare a catalyst for the detritiation of waste gases at high flow rates, a heat-resistant hydrophobic zeolitic molecular sieve coating was synthesized on the surface of alveolate cordierite by hydrothermal processing. The alveolate hydrophobic catalyst prepared from the support was essentially waterproof and not easily poisoned by moisture. At room temperature, the conversion of low concentrations of H 2 in humid air over the catalyst was higher than 95% at different space velocities (0–16,000 h −1 ) and different relative humidities. The reaction rate constant of the oxidation of tritium over alveolate hydrophobic catalyst is 0.182 s −1 at 293.3 K–293.7 K and 59%–60% RH, it is much higher than the catalyst of reference honeycomb catalyst.

  11. Exploring the boundaries of a light-driven molecular motor design : new sterically overcrowded alkenes with preferred direction of rotation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Delden, Richard; ter Wiel, Matthijs; de Jong, Herman; Meetsma, Auke; Feringa, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    Insight in the steric and electronic parameters governing isomerization processes in artificial molecular motors is essential in order to design more advanced motor systems. A subtle balance of steric parameters and the combination of helical and central chirality are key features of light-driven

  12. The Impact of Designing and Evaluating Molecular Animations on How Well Middle School Students Understand the Particulate Nature of Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsin-Yi; Quintana, Chris; Krajcik, Joseph S.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether the understanding of the particulate nature of matter by students was improved by allowing them to design and evaluate molecular animations of chemical phenomena. We developed Chemation, a learner-centered animation tool, to allow seventh-grade students to construct flipbook-like simple animations to show…

  13. Catalysts, methods of making catalysts, and methods of use

    KAUST Repository

    Renard, Laetitia

    2014-03-06

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for catalysts, methods of making catalysts, methods of using catalysts, and the like. In an embodiment, the method of making the catalysts can be performed in a single step with a metal nanoparticle precursor and a metal oxide precursor, where a separate stabilizing agent is not needed.

  14. Peptide-templated noble metal catalysts: syntheses and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Anderson, Caleb F; Wang, Zongyuan; Wu, Wei; Cui, Honggang; Liu, Chang-Jun

    2017-05-01

    Noble metal catalysts have been widely used in many applications because of their high activity and selectivity. However, a controllable preparation of noble metal catalysts still remains as a significant challenge. To overcome this challenge, peptide templates can play a critical role in the controllable syntheses of catalysts owing to their flexible binding with specific metallic surfaces and self-assembly characteristics. By employing peptide templates, the size, shape, facet, structure, and composition of obtained catalysts can all be specifically controlled under the mild synthesis conditions. In addition, catalysts with spherical, nanofiber, and nanofilm structures can all be produced by associating with the self-assembly characteristics of peptide templates. Furthermore, the peptide-templated noble metal catalysts also reveal significantly enhanced catalytic behaviours compared with conventional catalysts because the electron conductivity, metal dispersion, and reactive site exposure can all be improved. In this review, we summarize the research progresses in the syntheses of peptide-templated noble metal catalysts. The applications of the peptide-templated catalysts in organic reactions, photocatalysis, and electrocatalysis are discussed, and the relationship between structure and activity of these catalysts are addressed. Future opportunities, including new catalytic materials designed by using biological principles, are indicated to achieve selective, eco-friendly, and energy neutral synthesis approaches.

  15. Single-Site Heterogeneous Catalysts: Innovations, Advantages, and Future Potential in Green Chemistry and Sustainable Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Robert; Thomas, John Meurig

    The advantages that flow from the availability of single-site heterogeneous catalysts are many. They facilitate the determination of the kinetics and mechanism of catalytic turnover and render accessible the energetics of various intermediates. More importantly, it is possible to prepare soluble molecular fragments that circumscribe the single site, thus enabling a direct comparison to be made between the catalytic performance of the same active site when functioning as a heterogeneous or a homogeneous catalyst. Our approach adopts the principles and practices of solid-state chemistry, augmented by lessons derived from enzymology, as well as computational chemistry. We have succeeded in designing a range of new catalysts to effect, inter alia, shape-selective, regioselective, bifunctional, and enantioselective catalytic conversions. In particular, large fractions of these catalysts are ideally suited for the era of clean technology in which single-step and/or solvent-free processes abound, and in which benign oxidants such as air or oxygen and inexpensive nanoporous materials are employed.

  16. Biomimetic Water-Oxidation Catalysts: Manganese Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation of water to molecular oxygen is a key process for the production of solar fuels. Inspired by the biological manganese-based active site for this reaction in the enzyme Photosystem II, researchers have made impressive progress in the last decades regarding the development of synthetic manganese catalysts for water oxidation. For this, it has been especially fruitful to explore the many different types of known manganese oxides MnOx. This chapter first offers an overview of the structural, thermodynamic, and mechanistic aspects of water-oxidation catalysis by MnOx. The different test systems used for catalytic studies are then presented together with general reactivity trends. As a result, it has been possible to identify layered, mixed Mn (III/IV)-oxides as an especially promising class of bio-inspired catalysts and an attempt is made to give structure-based reasons for the good performances of these materials. In the outlook, the challenges of catalyst screenings (and hence the identification of a "best MnOx catalyst") are discussed. There is a great variety of reaction conditions which might be relevant for the application of manganese oxide catalysts in technological solar fuel-producing devices, and thus catalyst improvements are currently still addressing a very large parameter space. Nonetheless, detailed knowledge about the biological catalyst and a solid experimental basis concerning the syntheses and water-oxidation reactivities of MnOx materials have been established in the last decade and thus this research field is well positioned to make important contributions to solar fuel research in the future.

  17. Molecular Modeling Study for the Design of Novel Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Gamma Agonists using 3D-QSAR and Molecular Docking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Yaning; He, Yuyu; Yang, Jingjing; Han, Wei; Zhai, Xifeng; Zhao, Ye; Li, Yang

    2018-02-23

    Type 2 diabetes is becoming a global pandemic disease. As an important target for the generation and development of diabetes mellitus, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) has been widely studied. PPARγ agonists have been designed as potential anti-diabetic agents. The advanced development of PPARγ agonists represents a valuable research tool for diabetes therapy. To explore the structural requirements of PPARγ agonists, three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D-QSAR) and molecular docking studies were performed on a series of N -benzylbenzamide derivatives employing comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA), comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA), and surflex-dock techniques. The generated models of CoMFA and CoMSIA exhibited a high cross-validation coefficient ( q ²) of 0.75 and 0.551, and a non-cross-validation coefficient ( r ²) of 0.958 and 0.912, respectively. The predictive ability of the models was validated using external validation with predictive factor ( r ² pred ) of 0.722 and 0.682, respectively. These results indicate that the model has high statistical reliability and good predictive power. The probable binding modes of the best active compounds with PPARγ active site were analyzed, and the residues His323, Tyr473, Ser289 and Ser342 were found to have hydrogen bond interactions. Based on the analysis of molecular docking results, and the 3D contour maps generated from CoMFA and CoMSIA models, the key structural features of PPARγ agonists responsible for biological activity could be determined, and several new molecules, with potentially higher predicted activity, were designed thereafter. This work may provide valuable information in further optimization of N -benzylbenzamide derivatives as PPARγ agonists.

  18. Fischer-Tropsch, hydrotreating and superClaus catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraan, A.M. van der

    1998-01-01

    In modern society the application of catalysts, and hence, research in the field of catalysis, is becoming more and more important. In the strongly increasing chemical industry most reaction processes are performed with the aid of catalysts. Knowledge about the structure of the active sites present at the surface of catalysts will facilitate the design of new catalysts with better performances. Such knowledge can be obtained by Moessbauer spectroscopy, which is an excellent in-situ characterization technique due to the high penetrating power of the γ-radiation used and the sensitivity of the spectral parameters for the chemical state and local environment of the Moessbauer atoms

  19. TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT FOR IRON FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, B.H.

    1998-07-22

    The goal of the proposed work described in this Final Report was the development of iron-based Fischer-Tropsch catalysts that combined high activity, selectivity and life with physical robustness for slurry phase reactors that will produce either low-alpha or high-alpha products. The work described here has optimized the catalyst composition and pretreatment operation for a low-alpha catalyst. In parallel, work has been conducted to design a high-alpha iron catalyst that is suitable for slurry phase synthesis. Studies have been conducted to define the chemical phases present at various stages of the pretreatment and synthesis stages and to define the course of these changes. The oxidation/reduction cycles that are anticipated to occur in large, commercial reactors have been studied at the laboratory scale. Catalyst performance has been determined for catalysts synthesized in this program for activity, selectivity and aging characteristics.

  20. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Suyenty

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently Indonesia is the world largest palm oil producer with production volume reaching 16 million tones per annum. The high crude oil and ethylene prices in the last 3 – 4 years contribute to the healthy demand growth for basic oleochemicals: fatty acids and fatty alcohols. Oleochemicals are starting to replace crude oil derived products in various applications. As widely practiced in petrochemical industry, catalyst plays a very important role in the production of basic oleochemicals. Catalytic reactions are abound in the production of oleochemicals: Nickel based catalysts are used in the hydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acids; sodium methylate catalyst in the transesterification of triglycerides; sulfonic based polystyrene resin catalyst in esterification of fatty acids; and copper chromite/copper zinc catalyst in the high pressure hydrogenation of methyl esters or fatty acids to produce fatty alcohols. To maintain long catalyst life, it is crucial to ensure the absence of catalyst poisons and inhibitors in the feed. The preparation methods of nickel and copper chromite catalysts are as follows: precipitation, filtration, drying, and calcinations. Sodium methylate is derived from direct reaction of sodium metal and methanol under inert gas. The sulfonic based polystyrene resin is derived from sulfonation of polystyrene crosslinked with di-vinyl-benzene. © 2007 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Presented at Symposium and Congress of MKICS 2007, 18-19 April 2007, Semarang, Indonesia][How to Cite: E. Suyenty, H. Sentosa, M. Agustine, S. Anwar, A. Lie, E. Sutanto. (2007. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 2 (2-3: 22-31.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/6

  1. Study of spent hydrorefining catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gellerman, M.M.; Aliev, R.R.; Sidel'kovskaya, V.G.

    1993-01-01

    Aluminonickelmolybdenum catalysts for diesel fuel hydrorefining have been studied by DTA, XSPS, and diffuse reflection spectroscopy. Chemical and phase states of molybdenum compounds in samples of fresh catalyst, regenerated one after one year operation, and clogged with coke catalyst after five year operation, are determined. Chemical reactions and crystal-phase transformations of the molybdenum compounds during catalyst deactivation and regeneration are discussed

  2. Designing molecular dynamics simulations to shift populations of the conformational states of calmodulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Ozlem Aykut

    Full Text Available We elucidate the mechanisms that lead to population shifts in the conformational states of calcium-loaded calmodulin (Ca(2+-CaM. We design extensive molecular dynamics simulations to classify the effects that are responsible for adopting occupied conformations available in the ensemble of NMR structures. Electrostatic interactions amongst the different regions of the protein and with its vicinal water are herein mediated by lowering the ionic strength or the pH. Amino acid E31, which is one of the few charged residues whose ionization state is highly sensitive to pH differences in the physiological range, proves to be distinctive in its control of population shifts. E31A mutation at low ionic strength results in a distinct change from an extended to a compact Ca(2+-CaM conformation within tens of nanoseconds, that otherwise occur on the time scales of microseconds. The kinked linker found in this particular compact form is observed in many of the target-bound forms of Ca(2+-CaM, increasing the binding affinity. This mutation is unique in controlling C-lobe dynamics by affecting the fluctuations between the EF-hand motif helices. We also monitor the effect of the ionic strength on the conformational multiplicity of Ca(2+-CaM. By lowering the ionic strength, the tendency of nonspecific anions in water to accumulate near the protein surface increases, especially in the vicinity of the linker. The change in the distribution of ions in the vicinal layer of water allows N- and C- lobes to span a wide variety of relative orientations that are otherwise not observed at physiological ionic strength. E31 protonation restores the conformations associated with physiological environmental conditions even at low ionic strength.

  3. Synthesis and Evaluation of CO2 Thickeners Designed with Molecular Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Enick; Erick Beckman; J. Karl Johnson

    2009-08-31

    The objective of this research was to use molecular modeling techniques, coupled with our prior experimental results, to design, synthesize and evaluate inexpensive, non-fluorous carbon dioxide thickening agents. The first type of thickener that was considered was associating polymers. Typically, these thickeners are copolymers that contain a highly CO{sub 2}-philic monomer, and a small concentration of a CO{sub 2}-phobic associating monomer. Yale University was solely responsible for the synthesis of a second type of thickener; small, hydrogen bonding compounds. These molecules have a core that contains one or more hydrogen-bonding groups, such as urea or amide groups. Non-fluorous, CO{sub 2}-philic functional groups were attached to the hydrogen bonding core of the compound to impart CO{sub 2} stability and macromolecular stability to the linear 'stack' of these compounds. The third type of compound initially considered for this investigation was CO{sub 2}-soluble surfactants. These surfactants contain conventional ionic head groups and composed of CO{sub 2}-philic oligomers (short polymers) or small compounds (sugar acetates) previously identified by our research team. Mobility reduction could occur as these surfactant solutions contacted reservoir brine and formed mobility control foams in-situ. The vast majority of the work conducted in this study was devoted to the copolymeric thickeners and the small hydrogen-bonding thickeners; these thickeners were intended to dissolve completely in CO{sub 2} and increase the fluid viscosity. A small but important amount of work was done establishing the groundwork for CO{sub 2}-soluble surfactants that reduced mobility by generating foams in-situ as the CO{sub 2}+surfactant solution mixed with in-situ brine.

  4. Pharmacophore modeling for anti-Chagas drug design using the fragment molecular orbital method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Ryunosuke; Yasuo, Nobuaki; Inaoka, Daniel Ken; Hagiwara, Yohsuke; Ohno, Kazuki; Orita, Masaya; Inoue, Masayuki; Shiba, Tomoo; Harada, Shigeharu; Honma, Teruki; Balogun, Emmanuel Oluwadare; da Rocha, Josmar Rodrigues; Montanari, Carlos Alberto; Kita, Kiyoshi; Sekijima, Masakazu

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is a neglected tropical disease that causes severe human health problems. To develop a new chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of Chagas disease, we predicted a pharmacophore model for T. cruzi dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (TcDHODH) by fragment molecular orbital (FMO) calculation for orotate, oxonate, and 43 orotate derivatives. Intermolecular interactions in the complexes of TcDHODH with orotate, oxonate, and 43 orotate derivatives were analyzed by FMO calculation at the MP2/6-31G level. The results indicated that the orotate moiety, which is the base fragment of these compounds, interacts with the Lys43, Asn67, and Asn194 residues of TcDHODH and the cofactor flavin mononucleotide (FMN), whereas functional groups introduced at the orotate 5-position strongly interact with the Lys214 residue. FMO-based interaction energy analyses revealed a pharmacophore model for TcDHODH inhibitor. Hydrogen bond acceptor pharmacophores correspond to Lys43 and Lys214, hydrogen bond donor and acceptor pharmacophores correspond to Asn67 and Asn194, and the aromatic ring pharmacophore corresponds to FMN, which shows important characteristics of compounds that inhibit TcDHODH. In addition, the Lys214 residue is not conserved between TcDHODH and human DHODH. Our analysis suggests that these orotate derivatives should preferentially bind to TcDHODH, increasing their selectivity. Our results obtained by pharmacophore modeling provides insight into the structural requirements for the design of TcDHODH inhibitors and their development as new anti-Chagas drugs.

  5. Catalysts for Environmental Remediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrams, B. L.; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard

    2013-01-01

    on titania (V2O5-WO3/TiO2) as the example catalyst. The main photocatalysts examined for mineralization of organic compounds were TiO2 and MoS2. It is important to obtain insight into the catalyst structure-to-activity relationship in order to understand and locate the active site(s). In this chapter......The properties of catalysts used in environmental remediation are described here through specific examples in heterogeneous catalysis and photocatalysis. In the area of heterogeneous catalysis, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx was used as an example reaction with vanadia and tungsta...

  6. Characteristics of Polyaniline Cobalt Supported Catalysts for Epoxidation Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Grzegorz; Pielichowski, Jan; Grzesik, Mirosław

    2014-01-01

    A study of polyaniline (PANI) doping with various cobalt compounds, that is, cobalt(II) chloride, cobalt(II) acetate, and cobalt(II) salen, is presented. The catalysts were prepared by depositing cobalt compounds onto the polymer surface. PANI powders containing cobalt ions were obtained by one- or two-step method suspending PANI in the following acetonitrile/acetic acid solution or acetonitrile and then acetic acid solution. Moreover different ratios of Co(II) : PANI were studied. Catalysts obtained with both methods and at all ratios were investigated using various techniques including AAS and XPS spectroscopy. The optimum conditions for preparation of PANI/Co catalysts were established. Catalytic activity of polyaniline cobalt(II) supported catalysts was tested in dec-1-ene epoxidation with molecular oxygen at room temperature. The relationship between the amount of cobalt species, measured with both AAS and XPS techniques, and the activity of PANI-Co catalysts has been established. PMID:24701183

  7. Characteristics of Polyaniline Cobalt Supported Catalysts for Epoxidation Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Kowalski

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A study of polyaniline (PANI doping with various cobalt compounds, that is, cobalt(II chloride, cobalt(II acetate, and cobalt(II salen, is presented. The catalysts were prepared by depositing cobalt compounds onto the polymer surface. PANI powders containing cobalt ions were obtained by one- or two-step method suspending PANI in the following acetonitrile/acetic acid solution or acetonitrile and then acetic acid solution. Moreover different ratios of Co(II : PANI were studied. Catalysts obtained with both methods and at all ratios were investigated using various techniques including AAS and XPS spectroscopy. The optimum conditions for preparation of PANI/Co catalysts were established. Catalytic activity of polyaniline cobalt(II supported catalysts was tested in dec-1-ene epoxidation with molecular oxygen at room temperature. The relationship between the amount of cobalt species, measured with both AAS and XPS techniques, and the activity of PANI-Co catalysts has been established.

  8. BINIVOX catalyst for hydrogen production from ethanol by low ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B PATIL

    2017-11-04

    Nov 4, 2017 ... Special Issue on Recent Trends in the Design and Development of Catalysts and their Applications. BINIVOX catalyst for hydrogen production from ethanol by low temperature steam reforming (LTSR). B PATIL, S SHARMA, H K MOHANTA and B ROY. ∗. Department of Chemical Engineering, Birla Institute ...

  9. Efficient utilization of bimetallic catalyst in low environment syngas ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sonal

    2017-10-26

    Oct 26, 2017 ... Special Issue on Recent Trends in the Design and Development of Catalysts and their Applications. Efficient utilization of bimetallic catalyst ... norms, the research is diverted towards Fisher Tropsch synthesis route. .... was done in GCMS and quantitative analysis was done using simulative distillation taking ...

  10. Catalytic water oxidation by single-site ruthenium catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concepcion, Javier J; Jurss, Jonah W; Norris, Michael R; Chen, Zuofeng; Templeton, Joseph L; Meyer, Thomas J

    2010-02-15

    A series of monomeric ruthenium polypyridyl complexes have been synthesized and characterized, and their performance as water oxidation catalysts has been evaluated. The diversity of ligand environments and how they influence rates and reaction thermodynamics create a platform for catalyst design with controllable reactivity based on ligand variations.

  11. Morphology-controlled Pd nanocrystals as catalysts in tandem ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MIRIAM NAVLANI-GARCÍA

    2017-09-22

    Sep 22, 2017 ... REGULAR ARTICLE. Special Issue on Recent Trends in the Design and Development of Catalysts and their Applications. Morphology-controlled Pd nanocrystals as catalysts ..... KBr in the synthesis of nanocubes, while keeping all the experimental conditions used in the synthesis of Cubes(S) (Figure S2).

  12. Chemomimetic biocatalysis: exploiting the synthetic potential of cofactor-dependent enzymes to create new catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prier, Christopher K; Arnold, Frances H

    2015-11-11

    Despite the astonishing breadth of enzymes in nature, no enzymes are known for many of the valuable catalytic transformations discovered by chemists. Recent work in enzyme design and evolution, however, gives us good reason to think that this will change. We describe a chemomimetic biocatalysis approach that draws from small-molecule catalysis and synthetic chemistry, enzymology, and molecular evolution to discover or create enzymes with non-natural reactivities. We illustrate how cofactor-dependent enzymes can be exploited to promote reactions first established with related chemical catalysts. The cofactors can be biological, or they can be non-biological to further expand catalytic possibilities. The ability of enzymes to amplify and precisely control the reactivity of their cofactors together with the ability to optimize non-natural reactivity by directed evolution promises to yield exceptional catalysts for challenging transformations that have no biological counterparts.

  13. Theoretical studies of homogeneous catalysts mimicking nitrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgrignani, Jacopo; Franco, Duvan; Magistrato, Alessandra

    2011-01-10

    The conversion of molecular nitrogen to ammonia is a key biological and chemical process and represents one of the most challenging topics in chemistry and biology. In Nature the Mo-containing nitrogenase enzymes perform nitrogen 'fixation' via an iron molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co) under ambient conditions. In contrast, industrially, the Haber-Bosch process reduces molecular nitrogen and hydrogen to ammonia with a heterogeneous iron catalyst under drastic conditions of temperature and pressure. This process accounts for the production of millions of tons of nitrogen compounds used for agricultural and industrial purposes, but the high temperature and pressure required result in a large energy loss, leading to several economic and environmental issues. During the last 40 years many attempts have been made to synthesize simple homogeneous catalysts that can activate dinitrogen under the same mild conditions of the nitrogenase enzymes. Several compounds, almost all containing transition metals, have been shown to bind and activate N₂ to various degrees. However, to date Mo(N₂)(HIPTN)₃N with (HIPTN)₃N= hexaisopropyl-terphenyl-triamidoamine is the only compound performing this process catalytically. In this review we describe how Density Functional Theory calculations have been of help in elucidating the reaction mechanisms of the inorganic compounds that activate or fix N₂. These studies provided important insights that rationalize and complement the experimental findings about the reaction mechanisms of known catalysts, predicting the reactivity of new potential catalysts and helping in tailoring new efficient catalytic compounds.

  14. Theoretical Studies of Homogeneous Catalysts Mimicking Nitrogenase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Magistrato

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The conversion of molecular nitrogen to ammonia is a key biological and chemical process and represents one of the most challenging topics in chemistry and biology. In Nature the Mo-containing nitrogenase enzymes perform nitrogen ‘fixation’ via an iron molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-co under ambient conditions. In contrast, industrially, the Haber-Bosch process reduces molecular nitrogen and hydrogen to ammonia with a heterogeneous iron catalyst under drastic conditions of temperature and pressure. This process accounts for the production of millions of tons of nitrogen compounds used for agricultural and industrial purposes, but the high temperature and pressure required result in a large energy loss, leading to several economic and environmental issues. During the last 40 years many attempts have been made to synthesize simple homogeneous catalysts that can activate dinitrogen under the same mild conditions of the nitrogenase enzymes. Several compounds, almost all containing transition metals, have been shown to bind and activate N2 to various degrees. However, to date Mo(N2(HIPTN3N with (HIPTN3N= hexaisopropyl-terphenyl-triamidoamine is the only compound performing this process catalytically. In this review we describe how Density Functional Theory calculations have been of help in elucidating the reaction mechanisms of the inorganic compounds that activate or fix N2. These studies provided important insights that rationalize and complement the experimental findings about the reaction mechanisms of known catalysts, predicting the reactivity of new potential catalysts and helping in tailoring new efficient catalytic compounds.

  15. Catalysis science of supported vanadium oxide catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachs, Israel E

    2013-09-07

    Supported vanadium oxide catalysts contain a vanadium oxide phase deposited on a high surface area oxide support (e.g., Al2O3, SiO2, TiO2, etc.) and have found extensive applications as oxidation catalysts in the chemical, petroleum and environmental industries. This review of supported vanadium oxide catalysts focuses on the fundamental aspects of this novel class of catalytic materials (molecular structures, electronic structures, surface chemistry and structure-reactivity relationships). The molecular and electronic structures of the supported vanadium oxide phases were determined by the application of modern in situ characterization techniques (Raman, IR, UV-vis, XANES, EXAFS, solid state (51)V NMR and isotopic oxygen exchange). The characterization studies revealed that the supported vanadium oxide phase consists of two-dimensional surface vanadia sites dispersed on the oxide supports. Corresponding surface chemistry and reactivity studies demonstrated that the surface vanadia sites are the catalytic active sites for oxidation reactions by supported vanadia catalysts. Combination of characterization and reactivity studies demonstrate that the oxide support controls the redox properties of the surface vanadia sites that can be varied by as much as a factor of ~10(3).

  16. Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Jeffrey D [Martinez, CA; Sopchak, David A [Livermore, CA; Upadhye, Ravindra S [Pleasanton, CA; Reynolds, John G [San Ramon, CA; Satcher, Joseph H [Patterson, CA; Gash, Alex E [Brentwood, CA

    2010-06-29

    A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

  17. Catalysts and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Charles E.; Noceti, Richard P.

    1991-01-01

    An improved catlayst and method for the oxyhydrochlorination of methane is disclosed. The catalyst includes a pyrogenic porous support on which is layered as active material, cobalt chloride in major proportion, and minor proportions of an alkali metal chloride and of a rare earth chloride. On contact of the catalyst with a gas flow of methane, HC1 and oxygen, more than 60% of the methane is converted and of that converted more than 40% occurs as monochloromethane. Advantageously, the monochloromethane can be used to produce gasoline boiling range hydrocarbons with the recycle of HCl for further reaction. This catalyst is also of value for the production of formic acid as are analogous catalysts with lead, silver or nickel chlorides substituted for the cobalt chloride.

  18. Epoxidation catalyst and process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linic, Suljo; Christopher, Phillip

    2010-10-26

    Disclosed herein is a catalytic method of converting alkenes to epoxides. This method generally includes reacting alkenes with oxygen in the presence of a specific silver catalyst under conditions suitable to produce a yield of the epoxides. The specific silver catalyst is a silver nanocrystal having a plurality of surface planes, a substantial portion of which is defined by Miller indices of (100). The reaction is performed by charging a suitable reactor with this silver catalyst and then feeding the reactants to the reactor under conditions to carry out the reaction. The reaction may be performed in batch, or as a continuous process that employs a recycle of any unreacted alkenes. The specific silver catalyst has unexpectedly high selectivity for epoxide products. Consequently, this general method (and its various embodiments) will result in extraordinarily high epoxide yields heretofore unattainable.

  19. Rational chemical design of the next generation of molecular imaging probes based on physics and biology: mixing modalities, colors and signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Hisataka; Longmire, Michelle R; Ogawa, Mikako; Choyke, Peter L

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, numerous in vivo molecular imaging probes have been developed. As a consequence, much has been published on the design and synthesis of molecular imaging probes focusing on each modality, each type of material, or each target disease. More recently, second generation molecular imaging probes with unique, multi-functional, or multiplexed characteristics have been designed. This critical review focuses on (i) molecular imaging using combinations of modalities and signals that employ the full range of the electromagnetic spectra, (ii) optimized chemical design of molecular imaging probes for in vivo kinetics based on biology and physiology across a range of physical sizes, (iii) practical examples of second generation molecular imaging probes designed to extract complementary data from targets using multiple modalities, color, and comprehensive signals (277 references). This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  20. Applications of the NRGsuite and the Molecular Docking Software FlexAID in Computational Drug Discovery and Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morency, Louis-Philippe; Gaudreault, Francis; Najmanovich, Rafael

    2018-01-01

    Docking simulations help us understand molecular interactions. Here we present a hands-on tutorial to utilize FlexAID (Flexible Artificial Intelligence Docking), an open source molecular docking software between ligands such as small molecules or peptides and macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids. The tutorial uses the NRGsuite PyMOL plugin graphical user interface to set up and visualize docking simulations in real time as well as detect and refine target cavities. The ease of use of FlexAID and the NRGsuite combined with its superior performance relative to widely used docking software provides nonexperts with an important tool to understand molecular interactions with direct applications in structure-based drug design and virtual high-throughput screening.

  1. Latent olefin metathesis catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Monsaert, Stijn; Lozano Vila, Ana; Drozdzak, Renata; Van Der Voort, Pascal; Verpoort, Francis

    2009-01-01

    Olefin metathesis is a versatile synthetic tool for the redistribution of alkylidene fragments at carbon-carbon double bonds. This field, and more specifically the development of task-specific, latent catalysts, attracts emerging industrial and academic interest. This tutorial review aims to provide the reader with a concise overview of early breakthroughs and recent key developments in the endeavor to develop latent olefin metathesis catalysts, and to illustrate their use by prominent exampl...

  2. Plasmatron-catalyst system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromberg, Leslie; Cohn, Daniel R.; Rabinovich, Alexander; Alexeev, Nikolai

    2007-10-09

    A plasmatron-catalyst system. The system generates hydrogen-rich gas and comprises a plasmatron and at least one catalyst for receiving an output from the plasmatron to produce hydrogen-rich gas. In a preferred embodiment, the plasmatron receives as an input air, fuel and water/steam for use in the reforming process. The system increases the hydrogen yield and decreases the amount of carbon monoxide.

  3. Catalyst system comprising a first catalyst system tethered to a supported catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelici, Robert J.; Gao, Hanrong

    1998-08-04

    The present invention provides new catalyst formats which comprise a supported catalyst tethered to a second and different catalyst by a suitable tethering ligand. A preferred system comprises a heterogeneous supported metal catalyst tethered to a homogeneous catalyst. This combination of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts has a sufficient lifetime and unusually high catalytic activity in arene hydrogenations, and potentially many other reactions as well, including, but not limited to hydroformylation, hydrosilation, olefin oxidation, isomerization, hydrocyanation, olefin metathesis, olefin polymerization, carbonylation, enantioselective catalysis and photoduplication. These catalysts are easily separated from the products, and can be reused repeatedly, making these systems very economical.

  4. New catalysts for exhaust gas cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haerkoenen, M. [Kemira Metalkat Oy, Oulu (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Major challenge for future catalyst systems was to develop thermally more stable washcoats for close coupled operating conditions and for engines operating under high speed and load conditions. To design these future emission systems extensive research and development was undertaken to develop methods to disperse and stabilize the key catalytic materials for operation at much higher temperatures. Second priority was to design catalysts that are more effective under low temperature exhaust conditions and have improved oxygen storage properties in the washcoats. Incorporating new materials and modified preparation technology a new generation of metallic catalyst formulations emerged, those being trimetallic K6 (Pt:Pd:Rh and bimetallic K7) (Pd+Pd:Rh). The target was to combine the best property of Pt:Rh (good NO{sub x} reduction) with that of the good HC oxidation activity of Pd and to ensure that precious metal/support interactions were positively maintained. Both K6 and K7 concepts contain special catalyst structures with optimized washcoat performance which can be brick converter configuration. Improvement in light-off, thermal stability and transient performance with these new catalyst formulations have clearly been shown in both laboratory and vehicle testing. (author) (20 refs.)

  5. Bifunctional catalysts for the direct production of liquid fuels from syngas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sartipi, S.

    2014-01-01

    Design and development of catalyst formulations that maximize the direct production of liquid fuels by combining Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS), hydrocarbon cracking, and isomerization into one single catalyst particle (bifunctional FTS catalyst) have been investigated in this thesis. To achieve

  6. Characteristics of honeycomb catalysts to recover tritiated hydrogen and methane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsuhiko, Uda; Masahiro, Tanaka; Kenzo, Munakata

    2007-01-01

    Applicability of honeycomb catalysts to the tritium recovery system was examined considering tritium release accidents in the fusion plant where large volumes of air would be processed by the air cleanup system. Catalytic oxidation of isotopic hydrogen isotopes including tritium is a conventional method for the removal of tritium from air in the working space. However, the high throughput of air causes pressure drop in catalyst beds, which results in high load to the process gas pumping system. The honeycomb catalyst has an advantage in terms of pressure drop, which is estimated to be far less than that in conventional particle-packed catalyst beds. Our previous studies revealed that honeycomb catalysts made of cordierite and Al-Cr-Fe metal alloy substances have preferable oxidizing performance. It was found that the platinum-deposited cordierite catalyst shows the higher oxidation rate for hydrogen gas, and the palladium-deposited metal honeycomb catalyst shows the higher oxidation rate for methane gas. In this study, the properties of honeycomb catalysts were more systematically studied by changing experimental parameters such as noble metal content, mesh density and so forth to obtain design data base for high performance honeycomb catalysts. With regard to catalysts, the amount of noble metal deposited on the honeycomb substrates were varied from 1 g/L to 4 g/L and the mesh density of the honeycombs were changed from 260 to 400 CPSI as well. For operating conditions, the flow rate of the process gases was varied from 0.016 to 0.12 m 3 /hr, and the concentration of water vapor was changed from 0 to 1.4 %. Results of experimental study suggest that honeycomb catalysts are useful for the treatment of gases with high volumetric velocity in a fusion plant because of their low pressure drop in the catalyst reactor. The platinum catalysts were found to be suitable for oxidation of hydrogen gas, while the palladium catalysts exhibit better performance for oxidation of

  7. Development of Sulfur and Carbon Tolerant Reforming Alloy Catalysts Aided Fundamental Atomistic Insights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suljo Linic

    2008-12-31

    Current hydrocarbon reforming catalysts suffer from rapid carbon and sulfur poisoning. Even though there is a tremendous incentive to develop more efficient catalysts, these materials are currently formulated using inefficient trial and error experimental approaches. We have utilized a hybrid experimental/theoretical approach, combining quantum Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculations and various state-of-the-art experimental tools, to formulate carbon tolerant reforming catalysts. We have employed DFT calculations to develop molecular insights into the elementary chemical transformations that lead to carbon poisoning of Ni catalysts. Based on the obtained molecular insights, we have identified, using DFT quantum calculation, various Ni alloy catalysts as potential carbon tolerant reforming catalysts. The alloy catalysts were synthesized and tested in steam reforming and partial oxidation of methane, propane, and isooctane. We demonstrated that the alloy catalysts are much more carbon-tolerant than monometallic Ni catalysts under nearly stoichiometric steam-to-carbon ratios. Under these conditions, monometallic Ni is rapidly poisoned by sp2 carbon deposits. The research approach is distinguished by two characteristics: (a) knowledge-based, bottomup approach, compared to the traditional trial and error approach, allows for a more efficient and systematic discovery of improved catalysts. (b) the focus is on exploring alloy materials which have been largely unexplored as potential reforming catalysts.

  8. Design of a core–shell Pt–SiO2 catalyst in a reverse microemulsion system: Distinctive kinetics on CO oxidation at low temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Al Mana, Noor

    2016-06-28

    The mechanism of formation of Pt@SiO2 as a model of core–shell nanoparticles via water-in-oil reverse microemulsions was studied in detail. By controlling the time of growth of Pt precursors, Pt(OH)x, after hydrolysis in NH3 aq. before adding SiO2 precursor (TEOS), Pt nanoparticles with a narrow size distribution were produced, from ultrafine metal nanoparticles (<1 nm) to 6 nm nanocrystals. Separately, the thickness of SiO2 was controllably synthesized from 1 to 15 nm to yield different Pt@SiO2 materials. The Pt@SiO2 core–shell catalysts exhibited a higher rate of CO oxidation by one order of magnitude with a positive order regarding CO pressure. The SiO2 shell did not perturb the Pt chemical nature, but it provided different coverage of CO in steady-state CO oxidation. © 2016 Elsevier Inc.

  9. Rational Design of Molecular Gelator - Solvent Systems Guided by Solubility Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Yaqi

    Self-assembled architectures, such as molecular gels, have attracted wide interest among chemists, physicists and engineers during the past decade. However, the mechanism behind self-assembly remains largely unknown and no capability exists to predict a priori whether a small molecule will gelate a specific solvent or not. The process of self-assembly, in molecular gels, is intricate and must balance parameters influencing solubility and those contrasting forces that govern epitaxial growth into axially symmetric elongated aggregates. Although the gelator-gelator interactions are of paramount importance in understanding gelation, the solvent-gelator specific (i.e., H-bonding) and nonspecific (dipole-dipole, dipole-induced and instantaneous dipole induced forces) intermolecular interactions are equally important. Solvent properties mediate the self-assembly of molecular gelators into their self-assembled fibrillar networks. Herein, solubility parameters of solvents, ranging from partition coefficients (logP), to Henry's law constants (HLC), to solvatochromic ET(30) parameters, to Kamlet-Taft parameters (beta, alpha and pi), to Hansen solubility parameters (deltap, deltad, deltah), etc., are correlated with the gelation ability of numerous classes of molecular gelators. Advanced solvent clustering techniques have led to the development of a priori tools that can identify the solvents that will be gelled and not gelled by molecular gelators. These tools will greatly aid in the development of novel gelators without solely relying on serendipitous discoveries.

  10. Estimation and Uncertainty Analysis of Flammability Properties for Computer-aided molecular design of working fluids for thermodynamic cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frutiger, Jerome; Abildskov, Jens; Sin, Gürkan

    Computer Aided Molecular Design (CAMD) is an important tool to generate, test and evaluate promising chemical products. CAMD can be used in thermodynamic cycle for the design of pure component or mixture working fluids in order to improve the heat transfer capacity of the system. The safety...... assessment of novel working fluids relies on accurate property data. Flammability data like the lower and upper flammability limit (LFL and UFL) play an important role in quantifying the risk of fire and explosion. For novel working fluid candidates experimental values are not available for the safety...

  11. Magnetic and dendritic catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Deraedt, Christophe; Ruiz, Jaime; Astruc, Didier

    2015-07-21

    The recovery and reuse of catalysts is a major challenge in the development of sustainable chemical processes. Two methods at the frontier between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis have recently emerged for addressing this problem: loading the catalyst onto a dendrimer or onto a magnetic nanoparticle. In this Account, we describe representative examples of these two methods, primarily from our research group, and compare them. We then describe new chemistry that combines the benefits of these two methods of catalysis. Classic dendritic catalysis has involved either attaching the catalyst covalently at the branch termini or within the dendrimer core. We have used chelating pyridyltriazole ligands to insolubilize catalysts at the termini of dendrimers, providing an efficient, recyclable heterogeneous catalysts. With the addition of dendritic unimolecular micelles olefin metathesis reactions catalyzed by commercial Grubbs-type ruthenium-benzylidene complexes in water required unusually low amounts of catalyst. When such dendritic micelles include intradendritic ligands, both the micellar effect and ligand acceleration promote faster catalysis in water. With these types of catalysts, we could carry out azide alkyne cycloaddition ("click") chemistry with only ppm amounts of CuSO4·5H2O and sodium ascorbate under ambient conditions. Alternatively we can attach catalysts to the surface of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), essentially magnetite (Fe3O4) or maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), offering the opportunity to recover the catalysts using magnets. Taking advantage of the merits of both of these strategies, we and others have developed a new generation of recyclable catalysts: dendritic magnetically recoverable catalysts. In particular, some of our catalysts with a γ-Fe2O3@SiO2 core and 1,2,3-triazole tethers and loaded with Pd nanoparticles generate strong positive dendritic effects with respect to ligand loading, catalyst loading, catalytic activity and

  12. Sulfur Deactivation of NOx Storage Catalysts: A Multiscale Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rankovic N.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Lean NOx Trap (LNT catalysts, a promising solution for reducing the noxious nitrogen oxide emissions from the lean burn and Diesel engines, are technologically limited by the presence of sulfur in the exhaust gas stream. Sulfur stemming from both fuels and lubricating oils is oxidized during the combustion event and mainly exists as SOx (SO2 and SO3 in the exhaust. Sulfur oxides interact strongly with the NOx trapping material of a LNT to form thermodynamically favored sulfate species, consequently leading to the blockage of NOx sorption sites and altering the catalyst operation. Molecular and kinetic modeling represent a valuable tool for predicting system behavior and evaluating catalytic performances. The present paper demonstrates how fundamental ab initio calculations can be used as a valuable source for designing kinetic models developed in the IFP Exhaust library, intended for vehicle simulations. The concrete example we chose to illustrate our approach was SO3 adsorption on the model NOx storage material, BaO. SO3 adsorption was described for various sites (terraces, surface steps and kinks and bulk for a closer description of a real storage material. Additional rate and sensitivity analyses provided a deeper understanding of the poisoning phenomena.

  13. Knowledge Based Catalyst Design by High Throughput Screening of Model Reactions and Statistical Modelling Conception de catalyseur par criblage à haut débit de réactions modèles et modélisation statistique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morra G.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Material design and synthesis are key steps in the development of catalysts. They are usually based on an empiric and/or theoretical approach. The recently developed high-throughput experimentation can accelerate optimisation of new catalytic formulations by systematic screening in a predefined study domain. This work aims at developing a QSAR (Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship method based on kinetic and mechanistic descriptors for metal and acid catalysis. Physico-chemicalfeatures of approximately sixty bimetallic catalysts have been measured according to their performance in two model reactions: xylene hydrogenation for catalysis on metallic sites and isomerisation of 3,3-dimethyl-l-butene for catalysis on acid sites. These descriptors were finally used to model the performances of around twenty catalysts for a more complex reaction: n-decane dehydrogenation. La définition et la préparation de matériaux sont des étapes clés dans le développement de catalyseurs. Celles-ci peuvent être effectuées de façon empirique et/ou à partir de bases théoriques. Par ailleurs, l’expérimentation à haut débit, technologie récente, permet d’accélérer l’optimisation de formulations catalytiques par exemple par criblage systématique d’un espace d’étude prédéfini. Cet article a pour objet de développer une méthode QSAR (Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship basée sur la recherche de descripteurs cinétiques et mécanistiques, dans le domaine de la catalyse acide et métallique supportée. Des caractéristiques physico-chimiques (descripteurs d’une soixantaine de catalyseurs bimétalliques ont été mesurées suivant leur performance dans deux réactions modèles : l’hydrogénation de ro-xylène pour rendre compte de la catalyse par le métal et l’isomérisation du diméthyl-3,3butène-1 pour la catalyse par les sites acides. Ces descripteurs ont été ensuite mis à profit pour modéliser les performances

  14. Ruthenium-Aryloxide Catalysts for Olefin Metathesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfette, Sebastien; Blacquiere, Johanna M.; Conrad, Jay C.; Beach, Nicholas J.; Fogg, Deryn E.

    : Advances in design of ruthenium aryloxide catalysts for olefin metathesis are described. The target complexes are accessible on reaction of RuCl2(NHC)(py)2 (CHPh) (NHC - N-heterocyclic carbene) with electron-deficient, monodentate aryl- oxides, or aryloxides that yield small, rigid chelate rings. The best of these catalysts offer activity comparable to or greater than that of the parent chloride (Grubbs) systems in ring-closing metathesis (RCM). Preliminary studies of the electronic nature of the Ru-X bond suggest that the metal center is more electropositive in the aryloxide complexes than in the Grubbs systems.

  15. Molecular Thermodynamic Modeling and Design of Microencapsulation Systems for Drug Delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abildskov, Jens; O’Connell, John P.

    2011-01-01

    A systematic design strategy is given for computer-aided design of microparticle drug-delivery systems produced by solvent evaporation. In particular, design of solvents, polymer material, and external phase composition are considered for the case when the active ingredient is known. The procedur...

  16. Weyl Semimetals as Hydrogen Evolution Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajamathi, Catherine R; Gupta, Uttam; Kumar, Nitesh; Yang, Hao; Sun, Yan; Süß, Vicky; Shekhar, Chandra; Schmidt, Marcus; Blumtritt, Horst; Werner, Peter; Yan, Binghai; Parkin, Stuart; Felser, Claudia; Rao, C N R

    2017-05-01

    The search for highly efficient and low-cost catalysts is one of the main driving forces in catalytic chemistry. Current strategies for the catalyst design focus on increasing the number and activity of local catalytic sites, such as the edge sites of molybdenum disulfides in the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). Here, the study proposes and demonstrates a different principle that goes beyond local site optimization by utilizing topological electronic states to spur catalytic activity. For HER, excellent catalysts have been found among the transition-metal monopnictides-NbP, TaP, NbAs, and TaAs-which are recently discovered to be topological Weyl semimetals. Here the study shows that the combination of robust topological surface states and large room temperature carrier mobility, both of which originate from bulk Dirac bands of the Weyl semimetal, is a recipe for high activity HER catalysts. This approach has the potential to go beyond graphene based composite photocatalysts where graphene simply provides a high mobility medium without any active catalytic sites that have been found in these topological materials. Thus, the work provides a guiding principle for the discovery of novel catalysts from the emerging field of topological materials. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Catalyst component interactions in nickel/alumina catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiš Erne E.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of nickel loading (5; 10; 20 wt% Ni, temperature of heat treatment (400; 700; 1100°C and way of catalyst preparation on the catalyst component interactions (CCI in the impregnated, mechanical powder mixed and co-precipitated catalyst was investigated. For sample characterization, low temperature nitrogen adsorption (LTNA and X-ray diffraction (XRD were applied. Significant differences were revealed, concerning CCI in dependence of nickel loading, temperature of heat treatment and way of catalyst preparation. The obtained results show that the support metal oxide interactions (SMI in impregnated and co-precipitated catalysts are more intensive than in the mechanical powder mixed catalyst. The degree and intensity of CCI is expressed by the ratio of real and theoretical surface area of the catalyst. This ratio can be used for a quantitative estimation of CCI and it is generally applicable to all types of heterogeneous catalysts.

  18. Supported organoiridium catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, R. Thomas; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Li, Hongbo

    2013-09-03

    Solid supported organoiridium catalysts, a process for preparing such solid supported organoiridium catalysts, and the use of such solid supported organoiridium catalysts in dehydrogenation reactions of alkanes is provided. The catalysts can be easily recovered and recycled.

  19. Development of the negative-tone molecular resists for EB/EUVL having high EUV absorption capacity and molecular design method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Takashi; Takigawa, Tomoaki; Togashi, Yuta; Toida, Takumi; Echigo, Masatoshi; Harada, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Takeo; Kudo, Hiroto

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, we designed the synthesis of negative-type molecular resist materials for EB and EUVL exposure tools, and their properties were examined. The resist materials for EUVL have been required showing higher sensitivity for high throughput in the lithographic process, and expecting lower shot noise to improve a roughness. In EUVL process, the resist materials must be ionized by absorbing EUV to emit more secondary electrons. The EUV absorption of the synthesized resist materials was measured using their thin films on the silicon wafer, and it was observed that the ratio of EUV absorption of the synthesized resist was higher than in the comparison of that of PHS as a reference., i.e., 2.4 times higher absorption was shown. Furthermore, we examined the relationship between the ratios of EUV absorptions and functional groups of the resist materials. As the result, the sensitivity of resist materials under EUV exposure tool was consistent with their structures.

  20. Interfacial charge distributions in carbon-supported palladium catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rao, Radhika G.; Blume, Raoul; Hansen, Thomas Willum

    2017-01-01

    trends between the charge distribution at the palladium-carbon interface and the metal's selectivity for hydrogenation of multifunctional chemicals. These electronic effects are strong enough to affect the performance of large (~5 nm) Pd particles. Our results also demonstrate how simple thermal...... treatments can be used to tune the interfacial charge distribution, hereby providing a strategy to rationally design carbon-supported catalysts.Control over charge transfer in carbon-supported metal nanoparticles is essential for designing new catalysts. Here, the authors show that thermal treatments...... effectively tune the interfacial charge distribution in carbon-supported palladium catalysts with consequential changes in hydrogenation performance....

  1. SnO2 Highly Sensitive CO Gas Sensor Based on Quasi-Molecular-Imprinting Mechanism Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenjia Li

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Response of highly sensitive SnO2 semiconductor carbon monoxide (CO gas sensors based on target gas CO quasi-molecular-imprinting mechanism design is investigated with gas concentrations varied from 50 to 3000 ppm. SnO2 nanoparticles prepared via hydrothermal method and gas sensor film devices SC (exposed to the target gas CO for 12 h after the suspension coating of SnO2 film to be fully dried, design of quasi-molecular-imprinting mechanism, the experiment group and SA (exposed to air after the suspension coating of SnO2 film to be fully dried, the comparison group made from SnO2 nanoparticles are all characterized by XRD, SEM and BET surface area techniques, respectively. The gas response experimental results reveal that the sensor SC demonstrates quicker response and higher sensitivity than the sensor SA does. The results suggest that in addition to the transformation of gas sensor materials, surface area, and porous membrane devices, the Molecular Imprinting Theory is proved to be another way to promote the performance of gas sensors.

  2. Catalyst, method of making, and reactions using the catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y [Pasco, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA; Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA

    2002-08-27

    The present invention includes a catalyst having a layered structure with, (1) a porous support, (2) a buffer layer, (3) an interfacial layer, and optionally (4) a catalyst layer. The invention also provides a process in which a reactant is converted to a product by passing through a reaction chamber containing the catalyst.

  3. TOPICAL REVIEW: Nanostructured catalysts in fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chuan-Jian; Luo, Jin; Fang, Bin; Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Njoki, Peter N.; Loukrakpam, Rameshwori; Yin, Jun

    2010-02-01

    One of the most important challenges for the ultimate commercialization of fuel cells is the preparation of active, robust, and low-cost catalysts. This review highlights some findings of our investigations in the last few years in developing advanced approaches to nanostructured catalysts that address this challenge. Emphasis is placed on nanoengineering-based fabrication, processing, and characterization of multimetallic nanoparticles with controllable size (1-10 nm), shape, composition (e.g. MlnM2100-n, M1nM2mM3100-n-m, M1@M2, where M (1 or 2) = Pt, Co, Ni, V, Fe, Cu, Pd, W, Ag, Au etc) and morphology (e.g. alloy, core@shell etc). In addition to an overview of the fundamental issues and the recent progress in fuel cell catalysts, results from evaluations of the electrocatalytic performance of nanoengineered catalysts in fuel cell reactions are discussed. This approach differs from other traditional approaches to the preparation of supported catalysts in the ability to control the particle size, composition, phase, and surface properties. An understanding of how the nanoscale properties of the multimetallic nanoparticles differ from their bulk-scale counterparts, and how the interaction between the nanoparticles and the support materials relates to the size sintering or evolution in the thermal activation process, is also discussed. The fact that the bimetallic gold-platinum nanoparticle system displays a single-phase character different from the miscibility gap known for its bulk-scale counterpart serves as an important indication of the nanoscale manipulation of the structural properties, which is useful for refining the design and preparation of the bimetallic catalysts. The insight gained from probing how nanoparticle-nanoparticle and nanoparticle-substrate interactions relate to the size evolution in the activation process of nanoparticles on planar substrates serves as an important guiding principle in the control of nanoparticle sintering on different

  4. Fuel cell catalyst degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arenz, Matthias; Zana, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells are an important piece in our quest for a sustainable energy supply. Although there are several different types of fuel cells, the by far most popular is the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Among its many favorable properties are a short start up time and a high power density...... increasing focus. Activity of the catalyst is important, but stability is essential. In the presented perspective paper, we review recent efforts to investigate fuel cell catalysts ex-situ in electrochemical half-cell measurements. Due to the amount of different studies, this review has no intention to give...

  5. Olefin metathesis catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukes, S.G.; Banks, R.L.

    1986-05-20

    A process is described for preparing a disproportionation catalyst comprising admixing a catalytically effective amount of a calcined and activated catalyst consisting essentially of at least one metal oxide selected from molybdenum oxide and tungsten oxide and a support containing a major proportion of silica or alumina with a promoting amount of a methylating agent selected from the group consisting of dimethyl sulfate, dimethylsulfoxide, trimethyloxonium tetrafluorborate, methyl iodide, and methyl bromide, and subjecting same to inert atmospheric conditions for the methylating agent to promote the activity of the calcined molybdenum and tungsten oxides for the disproportionation of olefins.

  6. Structure-based library design: molecular modelling merges with combinatorial chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, H J; Stahl, M

    2000-06-01

    Recent advances in both computational and experimental techniques now allow a very fruitful interplay of computational and combinatorial chemistry in the structure-based design of combinatorial libraries.

  7. Synthesis and application of aryl-ferrocenyl(pseudo-biarylic) complexes. Part 5. Design and synthesis of a new type of ferrocene-based planar chiral DMAP analogues. A new catalyst system for asymmetric nucleophilic catalysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seitzberg, J.G; Dissing, C; Søtofte, Inger

    2005-01-01

    . The syntheses are short, efficient, and enantioselective and X-ray crystal structures of both DMAP-derived catalysts are presented. The DMAP-based catalysts were tested in asymmetric reactions and the 3-derivative 14 showed good activity and a moderate level of enantioselectivity. The sense of induction...

  8. The Design of a Molecular Assembly Line Based on Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-01

    the biological molecules polyketide synthase and kinesin, and in some embodiments, may employ biomolecules like DNA as components of the system. The...and will demonstrate how one can construct a purely synthetic analogue of a polyketide synthase . 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...scaffold in programmed assembly and molecular electronics. It is based on the principles of the biological molecules polyketide synthase and kinesin, and in

  9. A Simple Nanocellulose Coating for Self-Cleaning upon Water Action: Molecular Design of Stable Surface Hydrophilicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shu; Wang, Dayang

    2017-07-24

    Coating solid surfaces with cellulose nanofibril (CNF) monolayers via physical deposition was found to keep the surfaces free of a variety of oils, ranging from viscous engine oil to polar n-butanol, upon water action. The self-cleaning function was well correlated with the unique molecular structure of the CNF, in which abundant surface carboxyl and hydroxy groups are uniformly, densely, and symmetrically arranged to form a polar corona on a crystalline nanocellulose strand. This isotropic core-corona configuration offers new and easily adoptable guidance to design self-cleaning surfaces at the molecular level. Thanks to its excellent self-cleaning behavior, the CNF coating converted conventional meshes into highly effective membranes for oil-water separation with no prior surface treatment required. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Synthetic Molecular Machines for Active Self-Assembly: Prototype Algorithms, Designs, and Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabby, Nadine L.

    Computer science and electrical engineering have been the great success story of the twentieth century. The neat modularity and mapping of a language onto circuits has led to robots on Mars, desktop computers and smartphones. But these devices are not yet able to do some of the things that life takes for granted: repair a scratch, reproduce, regenerate, or grow exponentially fast--all while remaining functional. This thesis explores and develops algorithms, molecular implementations, and theoretical proofs in the context of "active self-assembly" of molecular systems. The long-term vision of active self-assembly is the theoretical and physical implementation of materials that are composed of reconfigurable units with the programmability and adaptability of biology's numerous molecular machines. En route to this goal, we must first find a way to overcome the memory limitations of molecular systems, and to discover the limits of complexity that can be achieved with individual molecules. One of the main thrusts in molecular programming is to use computer science as a tool for figuring out what can be achieved. While molecular systems that are Turing-complete have been demonstrated [Winfree, 1996], these systems still cannot achieve some of the feats biology has achieved. One might think that because a system is Turing-complete, capable of computing "anything," that it can do any arbitrary task. But while it can simulate any digital computational problem, there are many behaviors that are not "computations" in a classical sense, and cannot be directly implemented. Examples include exponential growth and molecular motion relative to a surface. Passive self-assembly systems cannot implement these behaviors because (a) molecular motion relative to a surface requires a source of fuel that is external to the system, and (b) passive systems are too slow to assemble exponentially-fast-growing structures. We call these behaviors "energetically incomplete" programmable

  11. Recent Advancements in Stereoselective Olefin Metathesis Using Ruthenium Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Patrick Montgomery

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Olefin metathesis is a prevailing method for the construction of organic molecules. Recent advancements in olefin metathesis have focused on stereoselective transformations. Ruthenium olefin metathesis catalysts have had a particularly pronounced impact in the area of stereoselective olefin metathesis. The development of three categories of Z-selective olefin metathesis catalysts has made Z-olefins easily accessible to both laboratory and industrial chemists. Further design enhancements to asymmetric olefin metathesis catalysts have streamlined the construction of complex molecules. The understanding gained in these areas has extended to the employment of ruthenium catalysts to stereoretentive olefin metathesis, the first example of a kinetically E-selective process. These advancements, as well as synthetic applications of the newly developed catalysts, are discussed.

  12. Magnetic nanoparticles conjugated to chiral imidazolidinone as recoverable catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondini, Sara [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Laboratorio di Nanotecnologie, Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari (Italy); Puglisi, Alessandra; Benaglia, Maurizio, E-mail: maurizio.benaglia@unimi.it; Ramella, Daniela [Università degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Chimica (Italy); Drago, Carmelo [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Istituto di Chimica Biomolecolare (Italy); Ferretti, Anna M.; Ponti, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.ponti@istm.cnr.it [Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Laboratorio di Nanotecnologie, Istituto di Scienze e Tecnologie Molecolari (Italy)

    2013-11-15

    The immobilization of an ad hoc designed chiral imidazolidin-4-one onto iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) is described, to afford MNP-supported MacMillan’s catalyst. Morphological and structural analysis of the materials, during preparation, use, and recycle, has been carried out by transmission electron microscopy. The supported catalyst was tested in the Diels–Alder reaction of cyclopentadiene with cinnamic aldehyde, affording the products in good yields and enantiomeric excesses up to 93 %, comparable to those observed with the non-supported catalyst. Recovery of the chiral catalyst has been successfully performed by simply applying an external magnet to achieve a perfect separation of the MNPs from the reaction product. The recycle of the catalytic system has been also investigated. Noteworthy, this immobilized MacMillan’s catalyst proved to be able to efficiently promote the reaction in pure water.

  13. Deactivation-resistant catalyst for selective catalyst reduction of NOx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NOx in alkali metal containing flue gas using ammonia as reductant, the catalyst comprising a surface with catalytically active sites, wherein the surface is at least partly coated with a coating comprising at least...... one metal oxide. In another aspect the present invention relates to the use of said catalyst and to a method of producing said catalyst. In addition, the present invention relates to a method of treating an catalyst for conferring thereon an improved resistance to alkali poisoning....

  14. Water oxidation using earth-abundant transition metal catalysts: opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kärkäs, Markus D; Åkermark, Björn

    2016-10-07

    Catalysts for the oxidation of H2O are an integral component of solar energy to fuel conversion technologies. Although catalysts based on scarce and precious metals have been recognized as efficient catalysts for H2O oxidation, catalysts composed of inexpensive and earth-abundant element(s) are essential for realizing economically viable energy conversion technologies. This Perspective summarizes recent advances in the field of designing homogeneous water oxidation catalysts (WOCs) based on Mn, Fe, Co and Cu. It reviews the state of the art catalysts, provides insight into their catalytic mechanisms and discusses future challenges in designing bioinspired catalysts based on earth-abundant metals for the oxidation of H2O.

  15. Modified silica-based heterogeneous catalysts for etherification of glycerol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gholami, Zahra, E-mail: zahra.gholami@petronas.com.my [Centralized Analytical Laboratory, Universiti Teknologi PETRONAS, Bandar Seri Iskandar, 31750 Tronoh, Perak (Malaysia); Abdullah, Ahmad Zuhairi, E-mail: chzuhairi@usm.my; Gholami, Fatemeh, E-mail: fgholami59@gmail.com [School of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Engineering Campus,14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Vakili, Mohammadtaghi, E-mail: farshid3601@gmail.com [School of Industrial Technology, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia)

    2015-07-22

    The advent of mesoporous silicas such as MCM-41 has provided new opportunities for research into supported metal catalysis. The loading of metals into framework structures and particularly into the pores of porous molecular sieves, has long been of interest because of their potential catalytic activity. Stable heterogeneous mesoporous basic catalysts were synthesized by wet impregnation of MCM-41 with calcium nitrate and lanthanum nitrate. The surface and structural properties of the prepared catalysts were characterized using BET surface analysis, SEM and TEM. MCM-41 and modified MCM-41 were used in the solventless etherification of glycerol to produce diglycerol as the desired product. The reaction was performed at 250 °C for 8 h, and catalyst activity was evaluated. Catalytic etherification over the 20%Ca{sub 1.6}La{sub 0.6}/MCM-41 catalyst resulted in the highest glycerol conversion of 91% and diglycerol yield of 43%.

  16. Olefin metathesis and catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukes, S. G.; Banks, R. L.

    1985-05-14

    Olefins are converted into other olefins having different numbers of carbon atoms by contact with a catalyst comprising an inorganic refractory oxide support containing at least one of tungsten oxide and molybdenum oxide and a promoting amount of at least one methylating agent under conditions suitable for the methylating agent compounds to promote the activity of tungsten and molybdenum oxides for the disproportionation reaction.

  17. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  18. ALKALI RESISTANT CATALYST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    of alkali metal and/or alkali-earth compounds which process comprises using a catalyst combined of (i) a formed porous superacidic support, said superacidic support having an Hammett acidity stronger than Ho=-12, and (ii) a metal oxide catalytic component deposited on said superacidic support selected from...

  19. Analog series-based scaffolds: computational design and exploration of a new type of molecular scaffolds for medicinal chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimova, Dilyana; Stumpfe, Dagmar; Hu, Ye; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Computational design of and systematic search for a new type of molecular scaffolds termed analog series-based scaffolds. Materials & methods: From currently available bioactive compounds, analog series were systematically extracted, key compounds identified and new scaffolds isolated from them. Results: Using our computational approach, more than 12,000 scaffolds were extracted from bioactive compounds. Conclusion: A new scaffold definition is introduced and a computational methodology developed to systematically identify such scaffolds, yielding a large freely available scaffold knowledge base. PMID:28116132

  20. Design and synthesis of a fluorescent molecular imprinted polymer for use in an optical fibre-based cocaine sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, Stephen P.; Piletsky, Sergey A.; Karim, Kal; Gascoine, Paul; Lacey, Richard; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.

    2014-05-01

    Previously, we have developed chemical sensors using fibre optic-based techniques for the detection of Cocaine, utilising molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) containing fluorescein moieties as the signalling groups. Here, we report the computational design of a fluorophore which was incorporated into a MIP for the generation of a novel sensor that offers improved sensitivity for Cocaine with a detection range of 1-100μM. High selectivity for Cocaine over a suite of known Cocaine interferants (25μM) was also demonstrated by measuring changes in the intensity of fluorescence signals received from the sensor.