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Sample records for catalysts molecular design

  1. Design strategies for the molecular level synthesis of supported catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Staci L; Marks, Tobin J; Stair, Peter C

    2012-02-21

    Supported catalysts, metal or oxide catalytic centers constructed on an underlying solid phase, are making an increasingly important contribution to heterogeneous catalysis. For example, in industry, supported catalysts are employed in selective oxidation, selective reduction, and polymerization reactions. Supported structures increase the thermal stability, dispersion, and surface area of the catalyst relative to the neat catalytic material. However, structural and mechanistic characterization of these catalysts presents a formidable challenge because traditional preparations typically afford complex mixtures of structures whose individual components cannot be isolated. As a result, the characterization of supported catalysts requires a combination of advanced spectroscopies for their characterization, unlike homogeneous catalysts, which have relatively uniform structures and can often be characterized using standard methods. Moreover, these advanced spectroscopic techniques only provide ensemble averages and therefore do not isolate the catalytic function of individual components within the mixture. New synthetic approaches are required to more controllably tailor supported catalyst structures. In this Account, we review advances in supported catalyst synthesis and characterization developed in our laboratories at Northwestern University. We first present an overview of traditional synthetic methods with a focus on supported vanadium oxide catalysts. We next describe approaches for the design and synthesis of supported polymerization and hydrogenation catalysts, using anchoring techniques which provide molecular catalyst structures with exceptional activity and high percentages of catalytically significant sites. We then highlight similar approaches for preparing supported metal oxide catalysts using atomic layer deposition and organometallic grafting. Throughout this Account, we describe the use of incisive spectroscopic techniques, including high

  2. Molecular-level Design of Heterogeneous Chiral Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gellman, Andrew John [Carnegie Mellon University; Sholl, David S. [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tysoe, Wilfred T. [University of Wisconsin - Milwaukee; Zaera, Francisco [University of California at Riverside

    2013-04-28

    Understanding and controlling selectivity is one of the key challenges in heterogeneous catalysis. Among problems in catalytic selectivity enantioselectivity is perhaps the most the most challenging. The primary goal of the project on “Molecular-level Design of Heterogeneous Chiral Catalysts” is to understand the origins of enantioselectivity on chiral heterogeneous surfaces and catalysts. The efforts of the project team include preparation of chiral surfaces, characterization of chiral surfaces, experimental detection of enantioselectivity on such surfaces and computational modeling of the interactions of chiral probe molecules with chiral surfaces. Over the course of the project period the team of PI’s has made some of the most detailed and insightful studies of enantioselective chemistry on chiral surfaces. This includes the measurement of fundamental interactions and reaction mechanisms of chiral molecules on chiral surfaces and leads all the way to rationale design and synthesis of chiral surfaces and materials for enantioselective surface chemistry. The PI’s have designed and prepared new materials for enantioselective adsorption and catalysis. Naturally Chiral Surfaces • Completion of a systematic study of the enantiospecific desorption kinetics of R-3-methylcyclohexanone (R-3-MCHO) on 9 achiral and 7 enantiomeric pairs of chiral Cu surfaces with orientations that span the stereographic triangle. • Discovery of super-enantioselective tartaric acid (TA) and aspartic acid (Asp) decomposition as a result of a surface explosion mechanism on Cu(643)R&S. Systematic study of super-enantiospecific TA and Asp decomposition on five enantiomeric pairs of chiral Cu surfaces. • Initial observation of the enantiospecific desorption of R- and S-propylene oxide (PO) from Cu(100) imprinted with {3,1,17} facets by L-lysine adsorption. Templated Chiral Surfaces • Initial observation of the enantiospecific desorption of R- and S-PO from Pt(111) and Pd(111

  3. Metalloporphyrin catalysts for oxygen reduction developed using computer-aided molecular design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryba, G.N.; Hobbs, J.D.; Shelnutt, J.A. [and others

    1996-04-01

    The objective of this project is the development of a new class of metalloporphyrin materials used as catalsyts for use in fuel cell applications. The metalloporphyrins are excellent candidates for use as catalysts at both the anode and cathode. The catalysts reduce oxygen in 1 M potassium hydroxide, as well as in 2 M sulfuric acid. Covalent attachment to carbon supports is being investigated. The computer-aided molecular design is an iterative process, in which experimental results feed back into the design of future catalysts.

  4. Design of biomimetic catalysts by molecular imprinting in synthetic polymers: the role of transition state stabilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulff, Günter; Liu, Junqiu

    2012-02-21

    The impressive efficiency and selectivity of biological catalysts has engendered a long-standing effort to understand the details of enzyme action. It is widely accepted that enzymes accelerate reactions through their steric and electronic complementarity to the reactants in the rate-determining transition states. Thus, tight binding to the transition state of a reactant (rather than to the corresponding substrate) lowers the activation energy of the reaction, providing strong catalytic activity. Debates concerning the fundamentals of enzyme catalysis continue, however, and non-natural enzyme mimics offer important additional insight in this area. Molecular structures that mimic enzymes through the design of a predetermined binding site that stabilizes the transition state of a desired reaction are invaluable in this regard. Catalytic antibodies, which can be quite active when raised against stable transition state analogues of the corresponding reaction, represent particularly successful examples. Recently, synthetic chemistry has begun to match nature's ability to produce antibody-like binding sites with high affinities for the transition state. Thus, synthetic, molecularly imprinted polymers have been engineered to provide enzyme-like specificity and activity, and they now represent a powerful tool for creating highly efficient catalysts. In this Account, we review recent efforts to develop enzyme models through the concept of transition state stabilization. In particular, models for carboxypeptidase A were prepared through the molecular imprinting of synthetic polymers. On the basis of successful experiments with phosphonic esters as templates to arrange amidinium groups in the active site, the method was further improved by combining the concept of transition state stabilization with the introduction of special catalytic moieties, such as metal ions in a defined orientation in the active site. In this way, the imprinted polymers were able to provide both an

  5. Mesoporous molecular sieve catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højholt, Karen Thrane

    This thesis deals with a very specific class of molecular sieves known as zeolites. Zeolites are a class of crystalline aluminosilicates characterised by pores or cavities of molecular dimensions as part of their crystal structure. In this work zeolites were modified for the use and understanding...

  6. Ni-based heterogeneous catalyst from a designed molecular precursor for the efficient electrochemical water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuznetsov, Denis A; Konev, Dmitry V; Komarova, Natal'ya S; Ionov, Andrey M; Mozhchil, Rais N; Fedyanin, Ivan V

    2016-07-28

    Bimetallic Ni-Mo alkoxide was synthesized and exploited as the single-source precursor for the solution-processed deposition of the mixed-oxide layers on different conducting surfaces. Upon potential cycling in 1 M NaOH, these composites convert, in situ, into highly porous NiOx/NiOOH catalysts characterized by the high electrocatalytic activity for water oxidation under both basic (pH 13.6) and near neutral (pH 9.2) conditions. PMID:27354324

  7. Catalyst design for biorefining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F

    2016-02-28

    The quest for sustainable resources to meet the demands of a rapidly rising global population while mitigating the risks of rising CO2 emissions and associated climate change, represents a grand challenge for humanity. Biomass offers the most readily implemented and low-cost solution for sustainable transportation fuels, and the only non-petroleum route to organic molecules for the manufacture of bulk, fine and speciality chemicals and polymers. To be considered truly sustainable, biomass must be derived from resources which do not compete with agricultural land use for food production, or compromise the environment (e.g. via deforestation). Potential feedstocks include waste lignocellulosic or oil-based materials derived from plant or aquatic sources, with the so-called biorefinery concept offering the co-production of biofuels, platform chemicals and energy; analogous to today's petroleum refineries which deliver both high-volume/low-value (e.g. fuels and commodity chemicals) and low-volume/high-value (e.g. fine/speciality chemicals) products, thereby maximizing biomass valorization. This article addresses the challenges to catalytic biomass processing and highlights recent successes in the rational design of heterogeneous catalysts facilitated by advances in nanotechnology and the synthesis of templated porous materials, as well as the use of tailored catalyst surfaces to generate bifunctional solid acid/base materials or tune hydrophobicity. PMID:26755755

  8. Design of heterogeneous catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frey, Anne Mette

    . Previously it has been shown that calcination of cobalt catalyst in a NO/He mixture resulted in improved catalytic activity compared to standard air calcined samples, since more homogenous cobalt particles with a narrow particle size distribution were formed. Unfortunately the C5+ selectivity decreased....... Since Mn is known to improve C5+ selectivity the addition of this promoter, combined with NO calcination, was studied. The influence of parameters such as Co:Mn ratio, drying conditions, and reduction temperatures on the catalytic performance were investigated. The promotion strategy turned out to work...... well, and the best catalyst prepared had a C5+ yield almost a factor of two higher than a standard air calcined Co catalyst. In the NH3-SCR reaction it is desirable to develop an active and stable catalyst for NOx removal in automotive applications, since the traditionally used vanadium-based catalyst...

  9. Efficient epoxidation of propene using molecular catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovits, Iulius I. E.; Anthofer, Michael H.; Kolding, Helene;

    2014-01-01

    The epoxidation of propene is performed in homogeneous phase using various molecular catalysts and H2O2 or tert-butyl hydroperoxide as oxidants. A comparison between some molybdenum catalysts and methyltrioxorhenium (MTO) shows that the well known Re catalyst is the best among the examined...

  10. Mesoporous Molecular Sieves as Supports for Metathesis Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcar, Hynek; Cejka, Jirí

    Mesoporous molecular sieves represent a new family of inorganic oxides with regular nanostructure, large surface areas, large void volumes, and narrow pore size distribution of mesopores. These materials offer new possibilities for designing highly active and selective catalysts for olefin metathesis and metathesis polymerization. Siliceous sieves MCM-41, MCM-48, SBA-15, and organized mesoporous alumina (OMA) were used as supports for preparation of new molybdenum and rhenium oxide catalysts, as well as for heterogenization of well-defined homogeneous catalysts.

  11. Towards the Rational Design of Nanoparticle Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Priyabrat

    This research is focused on development of routes towards the rational design of nanoparticle catalysts. Primarily, it is focused on two main projects; (1) the use of imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) as greener media for the design of quasi-homogeneous nanoparticle catalysts and (2) the rational design of heterogeneous-supported nanoparticle catalysts from structured nanoparticle precursors. Each project has different studies associated with the main objective of the design of nanoparticle catalysts. In the first project, imidazolium-based ionic liquids have been used for the synthesis of nanoparticle catalysts. In particular, studies on recyclability, reuse, mode-of-stability, and long-term stability of these ionic-liquid supported nanoparticle catalysts have been done; all of which are important factors in determining the overall "greenness" of such synthetic routes. Three papers have been published/submitted for this project. In the first publication, highly stable polymer-stabilized Au, Pd and bimetallic Au-Pd nanoparticle catalysts have been synthesized in imidazolium-based 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM]PF6) ionic liquid (Journal of Molecular Catalysis A: Chemical, 2008, 286, 114). The resulting nanoparticles were found to be effective and selective quasi-homogeneous catalysts towards a wide-range of hydrogenation reactions and the catalyst solution was reused for further catalytic reactions with minimal loss in activity. The synthesis of very pure and clean ILs has allowed a platform to study the effects of impurities in the imidazolium ILs on nanoparticle stability. In a later study, a new mode of stabilization was postulated where the presence of low amounts of 1-methylimidazole has substantial effects on the resulting stability of Au and Pd-Au nanoparticles in these ILs (Chemical Communications, 2009, 812). In further continuation of this study, a comparative study involving four stabilization protocols for nanoparticle

  12. Novel nanodispersed coal liquefaction catalysts: Molecular design via microemulsion-based synthesis. Final technical report, October 1990--December 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osseo-Asare, K.; Boakye, E.; Vittal, M. [and others

    1995-04-01

    This report described the synthesis of Molybdenum Sulfides in microemulsions by acidification of ammonium tetrathiomolybdate. Molybdenum Sulfides have been shown to be potential coal liquefaction catalysts. The importance of particle size, temperature effects, and coal surface chemistry to impregnation are discussed.

  13. Molecularly imprinted Ru complex catalysts integrated on oxide surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratsugu, Satoshi; Tada, Mizuki

    2013-02-19

    Selective catalysis is critical for the development of green chemical processes, and natural enzymes that possess specialized three-dimensional reaction pockets with catalytically active sites represent the most sophisticated systems for selective catalysis. A reaction space in an enzyme consists of an active metal center, functional groups for molecular recognition (such as amino acids), and a surrounding protein matrix to prepare the reaction pocket. The artificial design of such an integrated catalytic unit in a non-enzymatic system remains challenging. Molecular imprinting of a supported metal complex provides a promising approach for shape-selective catalysis. In this process, an imprinted cavity with a shape matched to a template molecule is created in a polymer matrix with a catalytically active metal site. In this Account, we review our studies on molecularly imprinted metal complex catalysts, focusing on Ru complexes, on oxide surfaces for shape-selective catalysis. Oxide surface-attached transition metal complex catalysts not only improve thermal stability and catalyst dispersion but also provide unique catalytic performance not observed in homogeneous precursors. We designed molecularly imprinted Ru complexes by using surface-attached Ru complexes with template ligands and inorganic/organic surface matrix overlayers to control the chemical environment around the active metal complex catalysts on oxide surfaces. We prepared the designed, molecularly imprinted Ru complexes on SiO(2) surfaces in a step-by-step manner and characterized them with solid-state (SS) NMR, diffuse-reflectance (DR) UV-vis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller isotherm (BET), X-ray fluorescence (XRF), and Ru K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The catalytic performances of these Ru complexes suggest that this process of molecular imprinting facilitates the artificial integration of catalytic functions at surfaces. Further advances such

  14. Towards the computational design of solid catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Jens Kehlet; Bligaard, Thomas; Rossmeisl, Jan;

    2009-01-01

    Over the past decade the theoretical description of surface reactions has undergone a radical development. Advances in density functional theory mean it is now possible to describe catalytic reactions at surfaces with the detail and accuracy required for computational results to compare favourably...... with experiments. Theoretical methods can be used to describe surface chemical reactions in detail and to understand variations in catalytic activity from one catalyst to another. Here, we review the first steps towards using computational methods to design new catalysts. Examples include screening for catalysts...

  15. Octahedral molecular sieve sorbents and catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liyu [Richland, WA; King, David L [Richland, WA

    2010-04-20

    Octahedral molecular sieve sorbents and catalysts are disclosed, including silver hollandite and cryptomelane. These materials can be used, for example, to catalyze the oxidation of CO.sub.x (e.g., CO), NO.sub.x (e.g., NO), hydrocarbons (e.g., C.sub.3H.sub.6) and/or sulfur-containing compounds. The disclosed materials also may be used to catalyze other reactions, such as the reduction of NO.sub.2. In some cases, the disclosed materials are capable of sorbing certain products from the reactions they catalyze. Silver hollandite, in particular, can be used to remove a substantial portion of certain sulfur-containing compounds from a gas or liquid by catalysis and/or sorption. The gas or liquid can be, for example, natural gas or a liquid hydrocarbon.

  16. A trinuclear ruthenium complex as a highly efficient molecular catalyst for water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L L; Gao, Y; Liu, Z; Ding, X; Yu, Z; Sun, L C

    2016-03-01

    A trinuclear ruthenium complex, 3, was designed and synthesized with the ligand 2,2'-bipyridine-6,6'-dicarboxylic acid (bda) and we found that this complex could function as a highly efficient molecular catalyst for water oxidation in homogeneous systems. This trinuclear molecular water oxidation catalyst, 3, displayed much higher efficiencies in terms of turnover numbers and initial oxygen evolution rate than its counterparts, a binuclear catalyst, 2, and a mononuclear catalyst, 1, in both chemically driven and photochemically driven water oxidation based on either the whole catalytic molecules or just the active Ru centers. The reasons for the superior performance of catalyst 3 were discussed and we believe that multiple Ru centers in a single molecule are indeed beneficial for increasing the probability of the formation of O-O bonds through an intramolecular radical coupling pathway.

  17. A pentanuclear iron catalyst designed for water oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, Masaya; Kondo, Mio; Kuga, Reiko; Kurashige, Yuki; Yanai, Takeshi; Hayami, Shinya; Praneeth, Vijayendran K. K.; Yoshida, Masaki; Yoneda, Ko; Kawata, Satoshi; Masaoka, Shigeyuki

    2016-02-01

    Although the oxidation of water is efficiently catalysed by the oxygen-evolving complex in photosystem II (refs 1 and 2), it remains one of the main bottlenecks when aiming for synthetic chemical fuel production powered by sunlight or electricity. Consequently, the development of active and stable water oxidation catalysts is crucial, with heterogeneous systems considered more suitable for practical use and their homogeneous counterparts more suitable for targeted, molecular-level design guided by mechanistic understanding. Research into the mechanism of water oxidation has resulted in a range of synthetic molecular catalysts, yet there remains much interest in systems that use abundant, inexpensive and environmentally benign metals such as iron (the most abundant transition metal in the Earth’s crust and found in natural and synthetic oxidation catalysts). Water oxidation catalysts based on mononuclear iron complexes have been explored, but they often deactivate rapidly and exhibit relatively low activities. Here we report a pentanuclear iron complex that efficiently and robustly catalyses water oxidation with a turnover frequency of 1,900 per second, which is about three orders of magnitude larger than that of other iron-based catalysts. Electrochemical analysis confirms the redox flexibility of the system, characterized by six different oxidation states between FeII5 and FeIII5; the FeIII5 state is active for oxidizing water. Quantum chemistry calculations indicate that the presence of adjacent active sites facilitates O-O bond formation with a reaction barrier of less than ten kilocalories per mole. Although the need for a high overpotential and the inability to operate in water-rich solutions limit the practicality of the present system, our findings clearly indicate that efficient water oxidation catalysts based on iron complexes can be created by ensuring that the system has redox flexibility and contains adjacent water-activation sites.

  18. Cooperative catalysis designing efficient catalysts for synthesis

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, René

    2015-01-01

    Written by experts in the field, this is a much-needed overview of the rapidly emerging field of cooperative catalysis. The authors focus on the design and development of novel high-performance catalysts for applications in organic synthesis (particularly asymmetric synthesis), covering a broad range of topics, from the latest progress in Lewis acid / Br?nsted base catalysis to e.g. metal-assisted organocatalysis, cooperative metal/enzyme catalysis, and cooperative catalysis in polymerization reactions and on solid surfaces. The chapters are classified according to the type of cooperating acti

  19. Concluding remarks: progress toward the design of solid catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Bruce C

    2016-07-01

    The 2016 Faraday Discussion on the topic "Designing New Heterogeneous Catalysts" brought together a group of scientists and engineers to address forefront topics in catalysis and the challenge of catalyst design-which is daunting because of the intrinsic non-uniformity of the surfaces of catalytic materials. "Catalyst design" has taken on a pragmatic meaning which implies the discovery of new and better catalysts on the basis of fundamental understanding of the catalyst structure and performance. The presentations and discussion at the meeting illustrate the rapid progress in this understanding linked with improvements in spectroscopy, microscopy, theory, and catalyst performance testing. The following text includes a statement of recurrent themes in the discussion and examples of forefront science that evidences progress toward catalyst design. PMID:27222485

  20. Design Principles for Oxygen Reduction and Evolution on Oxide Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao-Horn, Yang

    2012-02-01

    Driven by growing concerns about global warming and the depletion of petroleum resources, developing renewable energy production and storage technologies represent one of the major scientific challenges of the 21^st century. A critical element in pursuit of this quest is the discovery of efficient and cost-effective catalysts used in solar fuel production via electrochemical energy conversion processes such as oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), both of which are central to the efficiencies of direct-solar and electrolytic water-splitting devices, fuel cells, and metal-air batteries. Although the Sabatier's principle provides a qualitative argument in tuning catalytic activity by varying the bond strength between catalyst surface and reactant/product (neither too strong nor too weak leading to the maximum activity at moderate bond strength), it has no predictive power to find catalysts with enhanced activity. Identifying a ``design principle'' that links catalyst properties to the catalytic activity is critical to accelerate the search for highly active catalysts based on abundant elements, and minimize the use of precious metals. Here we establish a molecular principle that governs the activities of oxygen evolution reaction (OER) and oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) for oxide catalysts, where the activities primarily correlate to the σ* orbital (``eg'') occupation of surface transition-metal cations established by systematic examination of more than ten to fifteen transition-metal oxides. The intrinsic ORR and OER activities exhibit a volcano-shaped dependence on the eg occupancy and the activities peak at an eg occupancy close to unity. Our findings reflect the critical influence of the σ* orbital on the energetics of surface reaction intermediates on surface transition metal ions such as the O2^2-/OH^- displacement and the OH^- regeneration, and thus highlight the importance of surface oxide electronic structure in controlling

  1. Spiers Memorial Lecture. Heterogeneous catalysis: understanding the fundamentals for catalyst design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corma, Avelino

    2016-07-01

    Taking the chemoselective hydrogenation of substituted nitroaromatics as a base case, it will be shown that it is possible to design improved and new catalysts by attacking the problem in a multidisciplinary way. By combining molecular modeling with in situ operando spectroscopy, and with micro-kinetic and isotopic studies, it is possible to determine how and where on the catalysts the reactant molecules interact. Then, materials synthesis methods can be applied to prepare catalysts with the desired surface active sites and their selective interaction with the reactants. PMID:27173136

  2. Design criteria for stable Pt/C fuel cell catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef C. Meier

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Platinum and Pt alloy nanoparticles supported on carbon are the state of the art electrocatalysts in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. To develop a better understanding on how material design can influence the degradation processes on the nanoscale, three specific Pt/C catalysts with different structural characteristics were investigated in depth: a conventional Pt/Vulcan catalyst with a particle size of 3–4 nm and two Pt@HGS catalysts with different particle size, 1–2 nm and 3–4 nm. Specifically, Pt@HGS corresponds to platinum nanoparticles incorporated and confined within the pore structure of the nanostructured carbon support, i.e., hollow graphitic spheres (HGS. All three materials are characterized by the same platinum loading, so that the differences in their performance can be correlated to the structural characteristics of each material. The comparison of the activity and stability behavior of the three catalysts, as obtained from thin film rotating disk electrode measurements and identical location electron microscopy, is also extended to commercial materials and used as a basis for a discussion of general fuel cell catalyst design principles. Namely, the effects of particle size, inter-particle distance, certain support characteristics and thermal treatment on the catalyst performance and in particular the catalyst stability are evaluated. Based on our results, a set of design criteria for more stable and active Pt/C and Pt-alloy/C materials is suggested.

  3. Covalent Immobilization of a Molecular Catalyst on Cu2O Photocathodes for CO2 Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreier, Marcel; Luo, Jingshan; Gao, Peng; Moehl, Thomas; Mayer, Matthew T; Grätzel, Michael

    2016-02-17

    Sunlight-driven CO2 reduction is a promising way to close the anthropogenic carbon cycle. Integrating light harvester and electrocatalyst functions into a single photoelectrode, which converts solar energy and CO2 directly into reduced carbon species, is under extensive investigation. The immobilization of rhenium-containing CO2 reduction catalysts on the surface of a protected Cu2O-based photocathode allows for the design of a photofunctional unit combining the advantages of molecular catalysts with inorganic photoabsorbers. To achieve large current densities, a nanostructured TiO2 scaffold, processed at low temperature, was deposited on the surface of protected Cu2O photocathodes. This led to a 40-fold enhancement of the catalytic photocurrent as compared to planar devices, resulting in the sunlight-driven evolution of CO at large current densities and with high selectivity. Potentiodynamic and spectroelectrochemical measurements point toward a similar mechanism for the catalyst in the bound and unbound form, whereas no significant production of CO was observed from the scaffold in the absence of a molecular catalyst. PMID:26804626

  4. Reactivity and Selectivity of Heterogenized Homogeneous Catalysts: Insights from Molecular Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malek, Kourosh; van Santen, Rutger A.

    Immobilized metal complexes on nanoporous materials have recently been proposed as a novel class of heterogeneous enantioselective catalyst for epoxidation of unfunctionalized olefins as well as hydrogenation, alkylation, and nitroaldol reactions. The porous hosted materials affect catalytic performance due to a cooperative interaction among the nanoporous solid, immobilizing linker, and metal complex asymmetry. The effects of mesoporous materials and immobilizing agents on chiral catalysis are not well understood, however, the catalysts confined in nanopores show comparable or even higher conversions and enantioselectivity compared to their homogeneous counterparts. This chapter highlights major scientific problems for fundamental understanding and design of heterogenized homogeneous catalysts. It describes in detail the pivotal role of a sound framework in physical theory and molecular modeling in systematic efforts towards better materials and catalytic performance optimization. The common threads of the various topics addressed is the wide range of scales that has to be considered in establishing relations between structure, physicochemical properties, and catalytic performance. Physical theory and modeling employ a variety of methods, encompassing ab-initio calculations, molecular simulations, and the continuum model of transport and reaction in nanoporous materials. We particularly describe how molecular simulations can be used to investigate the origin of enantioselectivity of an anchored metal complex in nanoporous materials. These studies provide new insights into the steric effects that relate to choices of substrate and linker and to the interplay with mesopore confinement. We also bring detailed example of employing molecular simulations to unravel the catalytic properties of metallomacrocyclics for the electrochemical reduction of molecular oxygen in aqueous media. We rationalize the importance of immobilization and show how it relates to the steric

  5. Design of a surface alloy catalyst for steam reforming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Besenbacher, F.; Chorkendorff, Ib; Clausen, B.S.;

    1998-01-01

    Detailed studies of elementary chemical processes on well-characterized single crystal surfaces have contributed substantially to the understanding of heterogeneous catalysis. insight into the structure of surface alloys combined with an understanding of the relation between the surface compositi...... and reactivity is shown to lead directly to new ideas for catalyst design, The feasibility of such an approach is illustrated by the synthesis, characterization, and tests of a high-surface area gold-nickel catalyst for steam reforming....

  6. Molecular Simulation of Naphthenic Acid Removal on Acidic Catalyst Ⅱ. Experimental results of catalytic decarboxylation over acidic catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Xiaoqin; Tian Songbai; Hou Shuandi; Longjun; Wang Xieqing

    2008-01-01

    The energy barriers of thermal decarboxylation reactions of petroleum acids and catalytic decarboxylation reactions of Br(o)nsted acid and Lewis acid were analyzed using molecular simulation technology.Compared with thermal decarboxylation reactions of petroleum acids, the decarboxylation reactions by acid catalysts were easier to occur. The decarboxylaton effect by Lewis acid was better than Br(o)nsted acid. The mechanisms of catalytic decarboxylation over acid catalyst were also verified by experiments on a fixed bed and a fluidized bed, the experimental results showed that the rate of acid removal could reach up to 97% over the acidic catalyst at a temperature above 400℃.

  7. Theoretical Heterogeneous Catalysis: Scaling Relationships and Computational Catalyst Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greeley, Jeffrey

    2016-06-01

    Scaling relationships are theoretical constructs that relate the binding energies of a wide variety of catalytic intermediates across a range of catalyst surfaces. Such relationships are ultimately derived from bond order conservation principles that were first introduced several decades ago. Through the growing power of computational surface science and catalysis, these concepts and their applications have recently begun to have a major impact in studies of catalytic reactivity and heterogeneous catalyst design. In this review, the detailed theory behind scaling relationships is discussed, and the existence of these relationships for catalytic materials ranging from pure metal to oxide surfaces, for numerous classes of molecules, and for a variety of catalytic surface structures is described. The use of the relationships to understand and elucidate reactivity trends across wide classes of catalytic surfaces and, in some cases, to predict optimal catalysts for certain chemical reactions, is explored. Finally, the observation that, in spite of the tremendous power of scaling relationships, their very existence places limits on the maximum rates that may be obtained for the catalyst classes in question is discussed, and promising strategies are explored to overcome these limitations to usher in a new era of theory-driven catalyst design.

  8. Templating Routes to Supported Oxide Catalysts by Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notestein, Justin M [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States); Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Center for Catalysis and Surface Science; Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biological Engineering

    2016-09-08

    The rational design and understanding of supported oxide catalysts requires at least three advancements, in order of increasing complexity: the ability to quantify the number and nature of active sites in a catalytic material, the ability to place external controls on the number and structure of these active sites, and the ability to assemble these active sites so as to carry out more complex functions in tandem. As part of an individual investigator research program that is integrated with the Northwestern University Institute for Catalysis in Energy Processes (ICEP) as of 2015, significant advances were achieved in these three areas. First, phosphonic acids were utilized in the quantitative assessment of the number of active and geometrically-available sites in MOx-SiO2 catalysts, including nanocrystalline composites, co-condensed materials, and grafted structures, for M=Ti, Zr, Hf, Nb, and Ta. That work built off progress in understanding supported Fe, Cu, and Co oxide catalysts from chelating and/or multinuclear precursors to maximize surface reactivity. Secondly, significant progress was made in the new area of using thin oxide overcoats containing ‘nanocavities’ from organic templates as a method to control the dispersion and thermal stability of subsequently deposited metal nanoparticles or other catalytic domains. Similar methods were used to control surface reactivity in SiO2-Al2O3 acid catalysts and to control reactant selectivity in Al2O3-TiO2 photocatalysts. Finally, knowledge gained from the first two areas has been combined to synthesize a tandem catalyst for hydrotreating reactions and an orthogonal tandem catalyst system where two subsequent reactions in a reaction network are independently controlled by light and heat. Overall, work carried out under this project significantly advanced the knowledge of synthesis-structure-function relationships in supported oxide catalysts for energy applications.

  9. Templating Routes to Supported Oxide Catalysts by Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notestein, Justin M. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    2016-09-08

    The rational design and understanding of supported oxide catalysts requires at least three advancements, in order of increasing complexity: the ability to quantify the number and nature of active sites in a catalytic material, the ability to place external controls on the number and structure of these active sites, and the ability to assemble these active sites so as to carry out more complex functions in tandem. As part of an individual investigator research program that is integrated with the Northwestern University Institute for Catalysis in Energy Processes (ICEP) as of 2015, significant advances were achieved in these three areas. First, phosphonic acids were utilized in the quantitative assessment of the number of active and geometrically-available sites in MOx-SiO2 catalysts, including nanocrystalline composites, co-condensed materials, and grafted structures, for M=Ti, Zr, Hf, Nb, and Ta. That work built off progress in understanding supported Fe, Cu, and Co oxide catalysts from chelating and/or multinuclear precursors to maximize surface reactivity. Secondly, significant progress was made in the new area of using thin oxide overcoats containing ‘nanocavities’ from organic templates as a method to control the dispersion and thermal stability of subsequently deposited metal nanoparticles or other catalytic domains. Similar methods were used to control surface reactivity in SiO2-Al2O3 acid catalysts and to control reactant selectivity in Al2O3-TiO2 photocatalysts. Finally, knowledge gained from the first two areas has been combined to synthesize a tandem catalyst for hydrotreating reactions and an orthogonal tandem catalyst system where two subsequent reactions in a reaction network are independently controlled by light and heat. Overall, work carried out under this project significantly advanced the knowledge of synthesis-structure-function relationships in supported

  10. 固体催化剂活性中心的分子设计及其XAFS表征%Molecular Design and XAFS Characterization of Active Centers of Solid-State Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龙金林; 顾泉; 张子重; 王绪绪

    2011-01-01

    Surface organometallic chemistry(SOMC) is an effective route to design and prepare surface metal species with well-defined composition and molecular structure.Synchrotron radiation X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy(XAFS) technique is currently a powerful tool to characterize geometrical structure of active sites of solid-state catalysts.Their combination provided a method to design and construct in molecular level catalytic active centres,which was established to be one of the important goals in the field of heterogeneous catalysis.This article reviews the recent advancements in construction of single-site active metallic centre in the channels and cages of zeolite molecular sieves by the SOMC method and in characterizing geometrical structure of active sites of heterogeneous catalytic materials with XAFS,the physical fundament,experimental methods,and data analysis of XAFS technique and its merits and demerits in characterization of catalytic materials,the chemical fundament of SOMC.Single-site mononuclear or polynuclear Ti,Cu,and Fe active centers were successfully constructed in molecular level in the channels and cages of zeolite molecular sieves by the SOMC method.Their micro-structures were characterized in detail with XAFS combined other spectroscopic techniques and their catalytic properties were evaluated.The catalytic nature of these metallic centers was elucidated by establishing the inherent relationship among structure,activity,and composition.The study results revealed in molecular level the pyrolysis mechanism of Cu2 over the MCM-41 surface,and showed a novel route to prepare CuO,Cu2O and Cu(0)/MCM-41 materials with well-defined composition and micro-structure,clarifying the hydroxylation mechanism of phenol over copper active sites and the nuclearity-dependent catalytic function of iron-oxo species;based on the binuclear diiron [FeIII-(μ-O)(μ-OH)-FeⅢ] clusters with well-defined structure and composition constructed

  11. Bio-Inspired Molecular Catalysts for Hydrogen Oxidation and Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, Ming-Hsun; Chen, Shentan; Rousseau, Roger J.; Dupuis, Michel; Bullock, R. Morris; Raugei, Simone

    2013-06-03

    Recent advances in Ni-based bio-inspired catalysts obtained in the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center (EFRC) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, demonstrated the possibility of cleaving H2 or generating H2 heterolytically with turnover frequencies comparable or superior to those of hydrogenase enzymes. In these catalysts the transformation between H2 and protons proceeds via an interplay between proton, hydride and electron transfer steps and involves the interaction of a dihydrogen molecule with both a Ni(II) center and with pendant amine bases incorporated in a six-membered ring, which act as proton relays. These catalytic platforms are well designed in that when protons are correctly positioned (endo) toward the Raugei-ACS-Books.docxPrinted 12/18/12 2 metal center, catalysis proceeds at very high rates. We will show that the proton removal (for H2 oxidation) and proton delivery (for H2 production) are often the rate determining steps. Furthermore, the presence of multiple protonation sites gives rise to reaction intermediates with protons not correctly positioned (exo relative to the metal center). These isomers are easily accessible kinetically and are detrimental to catalysis because of the slow isomerization processes necessary to convert them to the catalytically competent endo isomers. In this chapter we will review the major findings of our computational investigation on the role of proton relays for H2 chemistry and provide guidelines for the design of new catalysts. This research was carried out in the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated for the U.S. Department of Energy by Battelle. Computational resources were provided at W. R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Science Laboratory (EMSL), a Raugei-Bio-Inspired Molecular-Catalysts-for-Hydrogen- Oxidation

  12. Catalyst design for enhanced sustainability through fundamental surface chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Personick, Michelle L; Montemore, Matthew M; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Madix, Robert J; Biener, Juergen; Friend, Cynthia M

    2016-02-28

    Decreasing energy consumption in the production of platform chemicals is necessary to improve the sustainability of the chemical industry, which is the largest consumer of delivered energy. The majority of industrial chemical transformations rely on catalysts, and therefore designing new materials that catalyse the production of important chemicals via more selective and energy-efficient processes is a promising pathway to reducing energy use by the chemical industry. Efficiently designing new catalysts benefits from an integrated approach involving fundamental experimental studies and theoretical modelling in addition to evaluation of materials under working catalytic conditions. In this review, we outline this approach in the context of a particular catalyst-nanoporous gold (npAu)-which is an unsupported, dilute AgAu alloy catalyst that is highly active for the selective oxidative transformation of alcohols. Fundamental surface science studies on Au single crystals and AgAu thin-film alloys in combination with theoretical modelling were used to identify the principles which define the reactivity of npAu and subsequently enabled prediction of new reactive pathways on this material. Specifically, weak van der Waals interactions are key to the selectivity of Au materials, including npAu. We also briefly describe other systems in which this integrated approach was applied. PMID:26755756

  13. Mechanisms of oxygen reduction reactions for carbon alloy catalysts via first principles molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon alloy catalysts (CACs) are one of promising candidates for platinum-substitute cathode catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells. We have investigated possible mechanisms of oxygen reduction reactions (ORRs) for CACs via first-principles-based molecular dynamics simulations. In this contribution, we review possible ORRs at likely catalytic sites of CACs suggested from our simulations. (author)

  14. Molecular design of allergy vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linhart, Birgit; Valenta, Rudolf

    2005-12-01

    Recombinant-allergen-based diagnostic tests enable the dissection and monitoring of the molecular reactivity profiles of allergic patients, resulting in more specific diagnosis, disease monitoring, prevention and therapy. In vitro experiments, animal studies and clinical trials in patients demonstrate that allergenic molecules can be engineered to induce different immune responses ranging from tolerance to vigorous immunity. The available data thus suggest that molecular engineering of the disease-related antigens is a technology that may be applicable not only for the design of allergy vaccines but also for the design of vaccines against infectious diseases, autoimmunity and cancer.

  15. Coupling molecular catalysts with nanostructured surfaces for efficient solar fuel production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tong

    Solar fuel generation via carbon dioxide (CO2) reduction is a promising approach to meet the increasing global demand for energy and to minimize the impact of energy consumption on climate change. However, CO2 is thermodynamically stable; its activation often requires the use of appropriate catalysts. In particular, molecular catalysts with well-defined structures and tunability have shown excellent activity in photochemical CO2 reduction. These homogenous catalysts, however, suffer from poor stability under photochemical conditions and difficulty in recycling from the reaction media. Heterogenized molecular catalysts, particularly those prepared by coupling molecular catalysts with solid-state surfaces, have attracted more attention in recent years as potential solutions to address the issues associated with molecular catalysts. In this work, solar CO2 reduction is investigated using systems coupling molecular catalysts with robust nanostructured surfaces. In Chapter 2, heterogenization of macrocyclic cobalt(III) and nickel (II) complexes on mesoporous silica surface was achieved by different methods. Direct ligand derivatization significantly lowered the catalytic activity of Co(III) complex, while grafting the Co(III) complex onto silica surface through Si-O-Co linkage resulted in hybrid catalysts with excellent activity in CO2 reduction in the presence of p-terphenyl as a molecular photosensitizer. An interesting loading effect was observed, in which the optimal activity was achieved at a medium Co(III) surface density. Heterogenization of the Ni(II) complex on silica surface has also been implemented, the poor photocatalytic activity of the hybrid catalyst can be attributed to the intrinsic nature of the homogeneous analogue. This study highlighted the importance of appropriate linking strategies in preparing functional heterogenized molecular catalysts. Coupling molecular complexes with light-harvesting surfaces could avoid the use of expensive molecular

  16. Catalyst design for the growth of highly packed nanotube forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esconjauregui, Santiago; Fouquet, Martin; Bayer, Bernhard C.; Robertson, John [Engineering Department, University of Cambridge, CB2 1PZ Cambridge (United Kingdom); Ducati, Caterina [Materials Science Department, University of Cambridge, CB2 3QZ Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2011-11-15

    We report a technique for the design of high-density catalyst nanoparticles (NPs) which allow the growth of highly packed forests of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The technique consists of cycles of deposition and annealing of thin metal films, followed by NP immobilisation. This allows a CNT areal density of at least 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Mesoporous Molecular Sieves Based Catalysts for Olefin Metathesis and Metathesis Polymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcar, Hynek; Čejka, Jiří

    Heterogeneous catalysts for olefin metathesis using different types of (i) siliceous mesoporous molecular sieves, and (ii) organized mesoporous alumina as supports are reported. The catalysts were prepared either by spreading of transition metal oxidic phase on the support surface or by immobilizing transition metal compounds (mostly organometallic) on the support. The activity of these catalysts in various types of metathesis reactions (i.e. alkene and diene metathesis, metathesis of unsaturated esters and ethers, RCM, ROMP and metathesis polymerization of alkynes) was described. The main advantages of these catalysts consist generally in their high activity and selectivity, easy separation of catalysts from reaction products and the preparation of products free of catalyst residue. The examples of pore size influence on the selectivity in metathesis reactions are also given.

  18. Molecular co-catalyst accelerating hole transfer for enhanced photocatalytic H2 evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Wentuan; Li, Xiaogang; Zhang, Lei; Jin, Tao; Zhang, Lidong; Zhang, Qun; Luo, Yi; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2015-10-01

    In artificial photocatalysis, sluggish kinetics of hole transfer and the resulting high-charge recombination rate have been the Achilles' heel of photocatalytic conversion efficiency. Here we demonstrate water-soluble molecules as co-catalysts to accelerate hole transfer for improved photocatalytic H2 evolution activity. Trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), by virtue of its reversible redox couple TFA./TFA-, serves as a homogeneous co-catalyst that not only maximizes the contact areas between co-catalysts and reactants but also greatly promotes hole transfer. Thus K4Nb6O17 nanosheet catalysts achieve drastically increased photocatalytic H2 production rate in the presence of TFA, up to 32 times with respect to the blank experiment. The molecular co-catalyst represents a new, simple and highly effective approach to suppress recombination of photogenerated charges, and has provided fertile new ground for creating high-efficiency photosynthesis systems, avoiding use of noble-metal co-catalysts.

  19. Catalysis Science Initiative: Catalyst Design by Discovery Informatics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgass, William Nicholas [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Abu-Omar, Mahdi [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States) Department of Chemistry; Caruthers, James [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Ribeiro, Fabio [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Thomson, Kendall [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Schneider, William [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2016-07-08

    Catalysts selectively enhance the rates of chemical reactions toward desired products. Such reactions provide great benefit to society in major commercial sectors such as energy production, protecting the environment, and polymer products and thereby contribute heavily to the country’s gross national product. Our premise is that the level of fundamental understanding of catalytic events at the atomic and molecular scale has reached the point that more predictive methods can be developed to shorten the cycle time to new processes. The field of catalysis can be divided into two regimes: heterogeneous and homogeneous. For the heterogeneous catalysis regime, we have used the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction (CO + H2O + CO2 + H2O) over supported metals as a test bed. Detailed analysis and strong coupling of theory with experiment have led to the following conclusions: • The sequence of elementary steps goes through a COOH intermediate • The CO binding energy is a strong function of coverage of CO adsorbed on the surface in many systems • In the case of Au catalysts, the CO adsorption is generally too weak on surface with close atomic packing, but the enhanced binding at corner atoms (which are missing bonding partners) of cubo-octahedral nanoparticles increases the energy to a near optimal value and produces very active catalysts. • Reaction on the metal alone cannot account for the experimental results. The reaction is dual functional with water activation occurring at the metal-support interface. It is clear from our work that the theory component is essential, not only for prediction of new systems, but also for reconciling data and testing hypotheses regarding potential descriptors. Particularly important is the finding that the interface between nano-sized metal particles and the oxides that are used to support them represent a new state of matter in the sense that the interfacial bonding perturbs the chemical state of both metals atoms and the support

  20. Large Scale Manufacture of Catalyst for Making DME Developed by Southwest Chemical Research and Design Institute

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ The Southwest Chemical Research and Design Institute (SCRDI) after tackling the key technology related with the catalyst for manufacture of DME through gas phase dehydration of methanol has made great breakthroughs in large scale preparation of catalyst for DME production.

  1. Inverse strategies for molecular design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An 'inverse' molecular design strategy is described to assist in the development of new molecules with optimized properties. This approach is based on a molecular orbital view and can be used to tailor ground state or excited state properties subject to particular constrains. In this scheme, wave functions are sought that optimize a chemical or electronic property, and then a Hamiltonian is constructed that generates these optimized wave functions. Analysis of the chemical properties in the optimized systems may suggest new synthetic targets. Examples are presented that optimize the transition dipole moment in some simple structures. 15 refs., 6 figs

  2. Highly efficient bioinspired molecular Ru water oxidation catalysts with negatively charged backbone ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Lele; Wang, Lei; Li, Fusheng; Li, Fei; Sun, Licheng

    2015-07-21

    The oxygen evolving complex (OEC) of the natural photosynthesis system II (PSII) oxidizes water to produce oxygen and reducing equivalents (protons and electrons). The oxygen released from PSII provides the oxygen source of our atmosphere; the reducing equivalents are used to reduce carbon dioxide to organic products, which support almost all organisms on the Earth planet. The first photosynthetic organisms able to split water were proposed to be cyanobacteria-like ones appearing ca. 2.5 billion years ago. Since then, nature has chosen a sustainable way by using solar energy to develop itself. Inspired by nature, human beings started to mimic the functions of the natural photosynthesis system and proposed the concept of artificial photosynthesis (AP) with the view to creating energy-sustainable societies and reducing the impact on the Earth environments. Water oxidation is a highly energy demanding reaction and essential to produce reducing equivalents for fuel production, and thereby effective water oxidation catalysts (WOCs) are required to catalyze water oxidation and reduce the energy loss. X-ray crystallographic studies on PSII have revealed that the OEC consists of a Mn4CaO5 cluster surrounded by oxygen rich ligands, such as oxyl, oxo, and carboxylate ligands. These negatively charged, oxygen rich ligands strongly stabilize the high valent states of the Mn cluster and play vital roles in effective water oxidation catalysis with low overpotential. This Account describes our endeavors to design effective Ru WOCs with low overpotential, large turnover number, and high turnover frequency by introducing negatively charged ligands, such as carboxylate. Negatively charged ligands stabilized the high valent states of Ru catalysts, as evidenced by the low oxidation potentials. Meanwhile, the oxygen production rates of our Ru catalysts were improved dramatically as well. Thanks to the strong electron donation ability of carboxylate containing ligands, a seven

  3. Utilizing interfaces: One-step forward for rational design of heterogeneous catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim H. Y.

    2013-06-20

    As far as heterogeneous catalysts are a composite material, physicochemical properties of the interfaces between individual components should be extensively studied for rational design of catalysts with desired properties. Here, I will present recent computational achievements in following three heterogeneous catalysts where the interface between composing materials plays a critical role

  4. The design and manufacture of the catalyst test equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, J. H.; Song, I. T. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-02-01

    The object of this report is to design and manufacture of the catalyst test equipment for removing tritium(H3) included in heavy water for the heavy water reactor. The design conditions of the reactor with the test equipment are summarized as follows 1) Flow rate : 336 l/min. 2) Pressure : 1.15kg/cm{sup 2}. 3) Maximum Temperature : 80 deg C. The test equipment is composed of the water jacket reactor, water equilibrator, heaters, condensers, tanks and pumps. As well as, it is composed of the water, hydrogen, helium, vacuum, emergency operation and control systems. This report will be used important data for the design and manufacture of the equipment for removing tritium. 30 tabs. (Author)

  5. Emergent strategies for inverse molecular design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BERATAN; David; N.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular design is essential and ubiquitous in chemistry,physics,biology,and material science.The immense space of available candidate molecules requires novel optimization strategies and algorithms for exploring the space and achieving efficient and effective molecular design.This paper summarizes the current progress toward developing practical theoretical optimization schemes for molecular design.In particular,we emphasize emergent strategies for inverse molecular design.Several representative design examples,based on recently developed strategies,are described to demonstrate the principles of inverse molecular design.

  6. The Design of Reactions, Catalysts and Materials with Aromatic Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandar, Jeffrey Scott

    This thesis details the use of aromatic ions, especially aminocyclopropenium ions, as empowering design elements in the development of new chemical reactions, organic catalysts and polymeric materials. A particular focus is placed throughout on understanding the relationship between the structure of aromatic ions and their performance in these novel applications. Additionally, the benefits that aromatic ions provide in these contexts are highlighted. The first chapter briefly summarizes the Lambert Group's prior efforts toward exploiting the unique reactivity profiles of aromatic ions in the context of new reaction design. Also provided in the first chapter is a comprehensive literature review of aminocyclopropenium ions, upon which the majority of advances described in this thesis are based. To set the stage for the first application of aminocyclopropenium ions, Chapter 2 provides an account of existing highly Bronsted basic functional groups, including guanidines, proazaphosphatranes and iminophosphoranes. The provided review on the synthesis and use in asymmetric catalysis of these bases indicates that there is a high need for conceptually new Bronsted basic functional groups. To address this need, the development of chiral 2,3-bis(dialkylamino)cyclopropenimines as a new platform for asymmetric Bronsted base catalysis is described in Chapter 3. This new class of Bronsted base is readily synthesized on scale, operates efficiently under practical conditions, and greatly outperforms closely related guanidine-based catalysts. Structure-activity relationship studies, mechanistic experiments and computational transition state modeling are all discussed in the context of asymmetric glycinate imine Michael reactions in order to arrive at a working model for cyclopropenimine chemistry. Cumulatively, this chapter provides a "user's guide" to understanding and developing further applications of 2,3-bis(dialkylamino)cyclopropenimines. The use of our optimal chiral 2,3-bis

  7. Catalysis Science Initiative: Catalyst Design by Discovery Informatics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgass, William Nicholas [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Abu-Omar, Mahdi [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States) Department of Chemistry; Caruthers, James [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Ribeiro, Fabio [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Thomson, Kendall [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Schneider, William [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2016-07-08

    Catalysts selectively enhance the rates of chemical reactions toward desired products. Such reactions provide great benefit to society in major commercial sectors such as energy production, protecting the environment, and polymer products and thereby contribute heavily to the country’s gross national product. Our premise is that the level of fundamental understanding of catalytic events at the atomic and molecular scale has reached the point that more predictive methods can be developed to shorten the cycle time to new processes. The field of catalysis can be divided into two regimes: heterogeneous and homogeneous. For the heterogeneous catalysis regime, we have used the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction (CO + H2O + CO2 + H2O) over supported metals as a test bed. Detailed analysis and strong coupling of theory with experiment have led to the following conclusions: • The sequence of elementary steps goes through a COOH intermediate • The CO binding energy is a strong function of coverage of CO adsorbed on the surface in many systems • In the case of Au catalysts, the CO adsorption is generally too weak on surface with close atomic packing, but the enhanced binding at corner atoms (which are missing bonding partners) of cubo-octahedral nanoparticles increases the energy to a near optimal value and produces very active catalysts. • Reaction on the metal alone cannot account for the experimental results. The reaction is dual functional with water activation occurring at the metal-support interface. It is clear from our work that the theory component is essential, not only for prediction of new systems, but also for reconciling data and testing hypotheses regarding potential descriptors. Particularly important is the finding that the interface between nano-sized metal particles and the oxides that are used to support them represent a new state of matter in the sense that the interfacial bonding perturbs the chemical state of both metals atoms and the support

  8. Preparation of Molecular Sieve Catalyst and Application in the Catalytic Oxidation Treatment of Waste Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ Citric acid is an important additive in foods, cosmetics, medicine and so on, but it discharges about 10 ton of factory effluent when 1 ton of citric acid is produced. The COD of the factory effluent is near 20000 mg/L. The treatment of citric acid factory effluent is a serious problem in environmental chemistry. It is found that molecular sieve support metal complexes have high catalytic activity in aerobic oxidation of alkene [1,2]. In this paper, a kind of molecular sieve catalyst was prepared. The catalyst was used for the treatment of citric acid factory effluent by method of catalytic oxygen oxidation.

  9. Supported Molecular Catalysts: Synthesis, In-Situ Characterization and Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, Mark E.

    2009-03-13

    The objectives of our work are: (i) to create solid catalysts with active sites that can function in a cooperative manner to enhance reactivity and selectivity, and (ii) to prepare solid catalysts that can perform multiple reactions in a network that in some cases would not be possible in solution due to the incompatibilities of the various catalytic entities (for example an acid and a base). We carried out extensive reactions to test the nature of the cooperative effect caused by thiol/sulfonic acid interactions. The acid/thiol combination provided an example where the two organic groups should be positioned as close to one another as possible. We also studied a system where this is not possible (acid-base). We investigated simultaneously incorporating acid and base groups into the same material. For the case of acid and bases, there is an optimal separation distance (too close allows for neutralization while too far eliminates any cooperative behavior).

  10. Catalyst design for natural-gas upgrading through oxybromination chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paunović, Vladimir; Zichittella, Guido; Moser, Maximilian; Amrute, Amol P.; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2016-08-01

    Natural gas contains large volumes of light alkanes, and its abundant reserves make it an appealing feedstock for value-added chemicals and fuels. However, selectively activating the C–H bonds in these useful hydrocarbons is one of the greatest challenges in catalysis. Here we report an attractive oxybromination method for the one-step functionalization of methane under mild conditions that integrates gas-phase alkane bromination with heterogeneously catalysed HBr oxidation, a step that is usually executed separately. Catalyst-design strategies to provide optimal synergy between these two processes are discussed. Among many investigated material families, vanadium phosphate (VPO) is identified as the best oxybromination catalyst, as it provides selectivity for CH3Br up to 95% and stable operation for over 100 hours on stream. The outstanding performance of VPO is rationalized by its high activity in HBr oxidation and low propensity for methane and bromomethane oxidation. Data on the oxybromination of ethane and propane over VPO suggest that the reaction network for higher alkanes is more complex.

  11. Catalyst design for natural-gas upgrading through oxybromination chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paunović, Vladimir; Zichittella, Guido; Moser, Maximilian; Amrute, Amol P; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2016-08-01

    Natural gas contains large volumes of light alkanes, and its abundant reserves make it an appealing feedstock for value-added chemicals and fuels. However, selectively activating the C-H bonds in these useful hydrocarbons is one of the greatest challenges in catalysis. Here we report an attractive oxybromination method for the one-step functionalization of methane under mild conditions that integrates gas-phase alkane bromination with heterogeneously catalysed HBr oxidation, a step that is usually executed separately. Catalyst-design strategies to provide optimal synergy between these two processes are discussed. Among many investigated material families, vanadium phosphate (VPO) is identified as the best oxybromination catalyst, as it provides selectivity for CH3Br up to 95% and stable operation for over 100 hours on stream. The outstanding performance of VPO is rationalized by its high activity in HBr oxidation and low propensity for methane and bromomethane oxidation. Data on the oxybromination of ethane and propane over VPO suggest that the reaction network for higher alkanes is more complex. PMID:27442287

  12. Catalyst design for natural-gas upgrading through oxybromination chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paunović, Vladimir; Zichittella, Guido; Moser, Maximilian; Amrute, Amol P; Pérez-Ramírez, Javier

    2016-08-01

    Natural gas contains large volumes of light alkanes, and its abundant reserves make it an appealing feedstock for value-added chemicals and fuels. However, selectively activating the C-H bonds in these useful hydrocarbons is one of the greatest challenges in catalysis. Here we report an attractive oxybromination method for the one-step functionalization of methane under mild conditions that integrates gas-phase alkane bromination with heterogeneously catalysed HBr oxidation, a step that is usually executed separately. Catalyst-design strategies to provide optimal synergy between these two processes are discussed. Among many investigated material families, vanadium phosphate (VPO) is identified as the best oxybromination catalyst, as it provides selectivity for CH3Br up to 95% and stable operation for over 100 hours on stream. The outstanding performance of VPO is rationalized by its high activity in HBr oxidation and low propensity for methane and bromomethane oxidation. Data on the oxybromination of ethane and propane over VPO suggest that the reaction network for higher alkanes is more complex.

  13. Can Contemporary Density Functional Theory Predict Energy Spans in Molecular Catalysis Accurately Enough To Be Applicable for in Silico Catalyst Design? A Computational/Experimental Case Study for the Ruthenium-Catalyzed Hydrogenation of Olefins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohmann, Kai; Hölscher, Markus; Leitner, Walter

    2016-01-13

    The catalytic hydrogenation of cyclohexene and 1-methylcyclohexene is investigated experimentally and by means of density functional theory (DFT) computations using novel ruthenium Xantphos(Ph) (4,5-bis(diphenylphosphino)-9,9-dimethylxanthene) and Xantphos(Cy) (4,5-bis(dicyclohexylphosphino)-9,9-dimethylxanthene) precatalysts [Ru(Xantphos(Ph))(PhCO2)(Cl)] (1) and [Ru(Xantphos(Cy))(PhCO2)(Cl)] (2), the synthesis, characterization, and crystal structures of which are reported. The intention of this work is to (i) understand the reaction mechanisms on the microscopic level and (ii) compare experimentally observed activation barriers with computed barriers. The Gibbs free activation energy ΔG(⧧) was obtained experimentally with precatalyst 1 from Eyring plots for the hydrogenation of cyclohexene (ΔG(⧧) = 17.2 ± 1.0 kcal/mol) and 1-methylcyclohexene (ΔG(⧧) = 18.8 ± 2.4 kcal/mol), while the Gibbs free activation energy ΔG(⧧) for the hydrogenation of cyclohexene with precatalyst 2 was determined to be 21.1 ± 2.3 kcal/mol. Plausible activation pathways and catalytic cycles were computed in the gas phase (M06-L/def2-SVP). A variety of popular density functionals (ωB97X-D, LC-ωPBE, CAM-B3LYP, B3LYP, B97-D3BJ, B3LYP-D3, BP86-D3, PBE0-D3, M06-L, MN12-L) were used to reoptimize the turnover determining states in the solvent phase (DF/def2-TZVP; IEF-PCM and/or SMD) to investigate how well the experimentally obtained activation barriers can be reproduced by the calculations. The density functionals B97-D3BJ, MN12-L, M06-L, B3LYP-D3, and CAM-B3LYP reproduce the experimentally observed activation barriers for both olefins very well with very small (0.1 kcal/mol) to moderate (3.0 kcal/mol) mean deviations from the experimental values indicating for the field of hydrogenation catalysis most of these functionals to be useful for in silico catalyst design prior to experimental work. PMID:26713773

  14. Titanium compounds as catalysts of higher alpha-olefin-based super-high-molecular polymers synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konovalov, K. B.; Kazaryan, M. A.; Manzhay, V. N.; Vetrova, O. V.

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis of polymers of 10 million or more molecular weight is a difficult task even in a chemical lab. Higher α-olefin-based polymer agents of such kind have found a narrow but quite important niche, the reduction of drag in the turbulent flow of hydrocarbon fluids such as oil and oil-products. In its turn, searching for a catalytic system capable to produce molecules of such a high length and to synthesize polymers of a low molecular-mass distribution is part of a global task of obtaining a high-quality product. In this paper we had observed a number of industrial catalysts with respect to their suitability for higher poly-α- olefins synthesis. A number samples representing copolymers of 1-hexene with 1-decene obtained on a previous generation catalyst, a microsphere titanium chloride catalytic agent had been compared to samples synthesized using a titanium-magnesium catalyst both in solution and in a polymer medium.

  15. Advances in HDS catalysts design: relation between catalyst structure and feed composition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kagami, Narinobu

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this work is to propose a better understanding of ultra deep HDS for diesel, to contribute to the development of advanced catalysts. The characterization of catalyst structure was examined by XRD, TPR, TPS and Raman spectroscopy. The ranking of catalytic activities were tested using vario

  16. 08-ERD-071 Final Report: New Molecular Probes and Catalysts for Bioenergy Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thelen, M P; Rowe, A A; Siebers, A K; Jiao, Y

    2011-03-07

    A major thrust in bioenergy research is to develop innovative methods for deconstructing plant cell wall polymers, such as cellulose and lignin, into simple monomers that can be biologically converted to ethanol and other fuels. Current techniques for monitoring a broad array of cell wall materials and specific degradation products are expensive and time consuming. To monitor various polymers and assay their breakdown products, molecular probes for detecting specific carbohydrates and lignins are urgently needed. These new probes would extend the limited biochemical techniques available, and enable realtime imaging of ultrastructural changes in plant cells. Furthermore, degradation of plant biomass could be greatly accelerated by the development of catalysts that can hydrolyze key cell wall polysaccharides and lignin. The objective of this project was to develop cheap and efficient DNA reagents (aptamers) used to detect and quantify polysaccharides, lignin, and relevant products of their breakdown. A practical goal of the research was to develop electrochemical aptamer biosensors, which could be integrated into microfluidic devices and used for high-throughput screening of enzymes or biological systems that degrade biomass. Several important model plant cell wall polymers and compounds were targeted for specific binding and purification of aptamers, which were then tested by microscopic imaging, circular dichroism, surface plasmon resonance, fluorescence anisotropy, and electrochemical biosensors. Using this approach, it was anticiated that we could provide a basis for more efficient and economically viable biofuels, and the technologies established could be used to design molecular tools that recognize targets sought in medicine or chemical and biological defense projects.

  17. Oxidations of amines with molecular oxygen using bifunctional gold–titania catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klitgaard, Søren Kegnæs; Egeblad, Kresten; Mentzel, Uffe Vie;

    2008-01-01

    Over the past decades it has become clear that supported gold nanoparticles are surprisingly active and selective catalysts for several green oxidation reactions of oxygen-containing hydrocarbons using molecular oxygen as the stoichiometric oxidant. We here report that bifunctional gold–titania c...

  18. Electrochemical CO2 Reduction to Hydrocarbons on a Heterogeneous Molecular Cu Catalyst in Aqueous Solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Zhe; Jiang, Jianbing; Wu, Yueshen; Wu, Zishan; Guo, Xiaoting; Materna, Kelly L; Liu, Wen; Batista, Victor S; Brudvig, Gary W; Wang, Hailiang

    2016-07-01

    Exploration of heterogeneous molecular catalysts combining the atomic-level tunability of molecular structures and the practical handling advantages of heterogeneous catalysts represents an attractive approach to developing high-performance catalysts for important and challenging chemical reactions such as electrochemical carbon dioxide reduction which holds the promise for converting emissions back to fuels utilizing renewable energy. Thus, far, efficient and selective electroreduction of CO2 to deeply reduced products such as hydrocarbons remains a big challenge. Here, we report a molecular copper-porphyrin complex (copper(II)-5,10,15,20-tetrakis(2,6-dihydroxyphenyl)porphyrin) that can be used as a heterogeneous electrocatalyst with high activity and selectivity for reducing CO2 to hydrocarbons in aqueous media. At -0.976 V vs the reversible hydrogen electrode, the catalyst is able to drive partial current densities of 13.2 and 8.4 mA cm(-2) for methane and ethylene production from CO2 reduction, corresponding to turnover frequencies of 4.3 and 1.8 molecules·site(-1)·s(-1) for methane and ethylene, respectively. This represents the highest catalytic activity to date for hydrocarbon production over a molecular CO2 reduction electrocatalyst. The unprecedented catalytic performance is attributed to the built-in hydroxyl groups in the porphyrin structure and the reactivity of the copper(I) metal center. PMID:27310487

  19. Current Issues in Molecular Catalysis Illustrated by Iron Porphyrins as Catalysts of the CO2-to-CO Electrochemical Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costentin, Cyrille; Robert, Marc; Savéant, Jean-Michel

    2015-12-15

    Recent attention aroused by the reduction of carbon dioxide has as main objective the production of useful products, the "solar fuels", in which solar energy would be stored. One route to this goal is the design of photochemical schemes that would operate this conversion using directly sun light energy. An indirect approach consists in first converting sunlight energy into electricity then using it to reduce CO2 electrochemically. Conversion of carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide is thus a key step through the classical dihydrogen-reductive Fischer-Tropsch chemistry. Direct and catalytic electrochemical CO2 reduction already aroused active interest during the 1980-1990 period. The new wave of interest for these matters that has been growing since 2012 is in direct conjunction with modern energy issues. Among molecular catalysts, electrogenerated Fe(0) porphyrins have proved to be particularly efficient and robust. Recent progress in this field has closely associated the search of more and more efficient catalysts in the iron porphyrin family with an unprecedentedly rigorous deciphering of mechanisms. Accordingly, the coupling of proton transfer with electron transfer and breaking of one of the two C-O bonds of CO2 have been the subjects of relentless scrutiny and mechanistic analysis with systematic investigation of the degree of concertedness of these three events. Catalysis of the electrochemical CO2-to-CO conversion has thus been a good testing ground for the mechanism diagnostic strategies and the all concerted reactivity model proposed then. The role of added Brönsted acids, both as H-bond providers and proton donors, has been elucidated. These efforts have been a preliminary to the inclusion of the acid functionalities within the catalyst molecule, giving rise to considerable increase of the catalytic efficiency. The design of more and more efficient catalysts made it necessary to propose "catalytic Tafel plots" relating the turnover frequency to the

  20. UPGRADING OF BIO-OIL MOLECULAR DISTILLATION FRACTION WITH SOLID ACID CATALYST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingjun Zhu

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Molecular distillation technology has been adopted to obtain a bio-oil fraction rich in carboxylic acids and ketones. This unique bio-oil fraction was then upgraded with a La-promoted solid acid catalyst. Three washing pretreatments were used to prepare catalysts A, B, and C, with the intention of reducing the amounts of residual sulfuric acid. Model reactions were used to estimate their catalytic activities and the residual amounts of sulfuric acid. Catalyst B, with washing after calcination, displayed higher catalytic activity (80.83% and lower residual amount of sulfuric acid (50 μmol/g. The catalysts were characterized by techniques such as BET, XRD, and SEM to explain the differences in their catalytic activities. The optimum catalyst B was used in the upgrading of the bio-oil molecular distillation fraction. After upgrading, the corrosivity of the bio-oil fraction declined and its storage stability was improved. The carboxylic acid content in the upgraded bio-oil fraction decreased from 18.39% to 2.70%, while the ester content increased from 0.72% to 31.17%. The conversion of corrosive carboxylic acids to neutral esters reduced the corrosivity of the bio-oil fraction. Moreover, the ketones with unsaturated carbon-carbon double bonds (such as 2-cyclopenten-1-one, 3-methyl-2-cyclopenten-1-one, etc. were converted into saturated compounds, which improved the stability of the bio-oil fraction.

  1. Catalysis by Design: Well-Defined Single-Site Heterogeneous Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Jérémie D A; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2016-04-19

    Heterogeneous catalysis, a field important industrially and scientifically, is increasingly seeking and refining strategies to render itself more predictable. The main issue is due to the nature and the population of catalytically active sites. Their number is generally low to very low, their "acid strengths" or " redox properties" are not homogeneous, and the material may display related yet inactive sites on the same material. In many heterogeneous catalysts, the discovery of a structure-activity reationship is at best challenging. One possible solution is to generate single-site catalysts in which most, if not all, of the sites are structurally identical. Within this context and using the right tools, the catalyst structure can be designed and well-defined, to reach a molecular understanding. It is then feasible to understand the structure-activity relationship and to develop predictable heterogeneous catalysis. Single-site well-defined heterogeneous catalysts can be prepared using concepts and tools of surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC). This approach operates by reacting organometallic compounds with surfaces of highly divided oxides (or of metal nanoparticles). This strategy has a solid track record to reveal structure-activity relationship to the extent that it is becoming now quite predictable. Almost all elements of the periodical table have been grafted on surfaces of oxides (from simple oxides such as silica or alumina to more sophisticated materials regarding composition or porosity). Considering catalytic hydrocarbon transformations, heterogeneous catalysis outcome may now be predicted based on existing mechanistic proposals and the rules of molecular chemistry (organometallic, organic) associated with some concepts of surface sciences. A thorough characterization of the grafted metal centers must be carried out using tools spanning from molecular organometallic or surface chemistry. By selection of the metal, its ligand set, and the support taken

  2. Catalysis by Design: Well-Defined Single-Site Heterogeneous Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Pelletier, Jeremie

    2016-03-09

    ConspectusHeterogeneous catalysis, a field important industrially and scientifically, is increasingly seeking and refining strategies to render itself more predictable. The main issue is due to the nature and the population of catalytically active sites. Their number is generally low to very low, their "acid strengths" or " redox properties" are not homogeneous, and the material may display related yet inactive sites on the same material. In many heterogeneous catalysts, the discovery of a structure-activity reationship is at best challenging. One possible solution is to generate single-site catalysts in which most, if not all, of the sites are structurally identical. Within this context and using the right tools, the catalyst structure can be designed and well-defined, to reach a molecular understanding. It is then feasible to understand the structure-activity relationship and to develop predictable heterogeneous catalysis. Single-site well-defined heterogeneous catalysts can be prepared using concepts and tools of surface organometallic chemistry (SOMC). This approach operates by reacting organometallic compounds with surfaces of highly divided oxides (or of metal nanoparticles). This strategy has a solid track record to reveal structure-activity relationship to the extent that it is becoming now quite predictable. Almost all elements of the periodical table have been grafted on surfaces of oxides (from simple oxides such as silica or alumina to more sophisticated materials regarding composition or porosity).Considering catalytic hydrocarbon transformations, heterogeneous catalysis outcome may now be predicted based on existing mechanistic proposals and the rules of molecular chemistry (organometallic, organic) associated with some concepts of surface sciences. A thorough characterization of the grafted metal centers must be carried out using tools spanning from molecular organometallic or surface chemistry. By selection of the metal, its ligand set, and the

  3. Design and Synthesis of Ruthenium based Olefin Metathesis Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Singstad, Åsmund

    2010-01-01

    The present Master thesis seeks to develop new unsymmetrical ruthenium-based olefin metathesis catalysts and therein a better understanding of olefin metathesis catalysis with unsymmetrical active complexes. Such catalysts have a potential for chemoselectivity and in best case, stereoselectivity. Two different classes of catalysts, coordinated by a hemilabile amine ligand and by a novel N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ligand respectively, have been investigated. Two new amine-based olefin metath...

  4. Mechanism-Based Design of Green Oxidation Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rybak-Akimova, Elena [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States)

    2015-03-16

    In modern era of scarce resources, developing chemical processes that can eventually generate useful materials and fuels from readily available, simple, cheap, renewable starting materials is of paramount importance. Small molecules, such as dioxygen, dinitrogen, water, or carbon dioxide, can be viewed as ideal sources of oxygen, nitrogen, or carbon atoms in synthetic applications. Living organisms perfected the art of utilizing small molecules in biosynthesis and in generating energy; photosynthesis, which couples carbohydrate synthesis from carbon dioxide with photocatalytic water splitting, is but one impressive example of possible catalytic processes. Small molecule activation in synthetic systems remains challenging, and current efforts are focused on developing catalytic reactions that can convert small molecules into useful building blocks for generating more complicated organic molecules, including fuels. Modeling nature is attractive in many respects, including the possibility to use non-toxic, earth-abundant metals in catalysis. Specific systems investigated in our work include biomimetic catalytic oxidations with dioxygen, hydrogen peroxide, and related oxygen atom donors. More recently, a new direction was been also pursued in the group, fixation of carbon dioxide with transition metal complexes. Mechanistic understanding of biomimetic metal-catalyzed oxidations is critical for the design of functional models of metalloenzymes, and ultimately for the rational synthesis of useful, selective and efficient oxidation catalysts utilizing dioxygen and hydrogen peroxide as terminal oxidants. All iron oxidases and oxygenases (both mononuclear and dinuclear) utilize metal-centered intermediates as reactive species in selective substrate oxidation. In contrast, free radical pathways (Fenton chemistry) are common for traditional inorganic iron compounds, producing hydroxyl radicals as very active, non-selective oxidants. Recent developments, however, changed this

  5. Development of group IV molecular catalysts for high temperature ethylene-α-olefin copolymerization reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosin, Jerzy; Fontaine, Philip P; Figueroa, Ruth

    2015-07-21

    This Account describes our research related to the development of molecular catalysts for solution phase olefin polymerization. Specifically, a series of constrained geometry and nonmetallocene (imino-amido-type) complexes were developed for high temperature olefin polymerization reactions. We have discovered many highly active catalysts that are capable of operating at temperatures above 120 °C and producing copolymers with a useful range of molecular weights (from medium to ultrahigh depending on precatalyst identity and polymerization conditions) and α-olefin incorporation capability. Constrained geometry catalysts (CGCs) exhibit very high activities and are capable of producing a variety of copolymers including ethylene-propylene and ethylene-1-octene copolymers at high reactor temperatures. Importantly, CGCs have much higher reactivity toward α-olefins than classical Ziegler-Natta catalysts, thus allowing for the production of copolymers with any desired level of comonomer. In search of catalysts with improved performance, we discovered 3-amino-substituted indenyl-based CGCs that exhibit the highest activity and produce copolymers with the highest molecular weight within this family of catalysts. Phenanthrenyl-based CGCs were found to be outstanding catalysts for the effective production of high styrene content ethylene-styrene copolymers under industrially relevant conditions. In contrast to CGC ligands, imino-amido-type ligands are bidentate and monoionic, leading to the use of trialkyl group IV precatalysts. The thermal instability of imino-amido complexes was addressed by the development of imino-enamido and amidoquinoline complexes, which are not only thermally very robust, but also produce copolymers with higher molecular weights, and exhibit improved α-olefin incorporation. Imido-amido and imino-enamido catalysts undergo facile chain transfer reactions with metal alkyls, as evidenced by a sharp decrease in polymer molecular weight when the

  6. Molecular molybdenum persulfide and related catalysts for generating hydrogen from water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Jeffrey R.; Chang, Christopher J.; Karunadasa, Hemamala I.; Majda, Marcin

    2016-04-19

    New metal persulfido compositions of matter are described. In one embodiment the metal is molybdenum and the metal persulfido complex mimics the structure and function of the triangular active edge site fragments of MoS.sub.2, a material that is the current industry standard for petroleum hydro desulfurization, as well as a promising low-cost alternative to platinum for electrocatalytic hydrogen production. This molecular [(PY5W.sub.2)MoS.sub.2].sup.x+ containing catalyst is capable of generating hydrogen from acidic-buffered water or even seawater at very low overpotentials at a turnover frequency rate in excess of 500 moles H.sub.2 per mole catalyst per second, with a turnover number (over a 20 hour period) of at least 19,000,000 moles H.sub.2 per mole of catalyst.

  7. Visible-light-driven selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol and thioanisole by molecular ruthenium catalyst modified hematite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Lichen; Li, Fei; Wang, Yong; Li, Hua; Jiang, Xiaojuan; Sun, Licheng

    2016-08-11

    Molecular ruthenium catalysts were found to selectively catalyze the oxidation of thioanisole to sulfoxide with a yield up to 100% in the presence of visible light and sacrificial reagents when they were anchored onto hematite powder. The composite photocatalysts also showed about 5 times higher efficiencies in benzyl alcohol oxidation than the system composed of dispersed molecular catalysts and hematite particles in aqueous solution. A photoelectrochemical cell based on a molecular catalyst modified hematite photoanode was further fabricated, which exhibited high activity towards the oxidation of organic substrates. PMID:27411498

  8. Kinetics assisted design of catalysts for coal liquefaction. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, M.T.; Foley, H.C.; Calkins, W.H.; Scouten, C.

    1998-02-01

    The thermal and catalytic reactions of 4-(1-naphthylmethyl)bibenzyl (NBBM), a resid and coal model compound, were examined. Catalytic reaction of NBBM was carried out at 400 C under hydrogen with a series of transition metal-based catalytic materials including Fe(CO){sub 4}PPh{sub 3}, Fe(CO){sub 3}(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2}, Fe(CO){sub 2}(PPh{sub 3}){sub 2}CS{sub 2}, Fe(CO){sub 5}, Mo(CO){sub 6}, Mn{sub 2}(CO){sub 10}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and MoS{sub 2}. Experimental findings and derived mechanistic insights were organized into molecular-level reaction models for NBBM pyrolysis and catalysis. Hydropyrolysis and catalysis reaction families occurring during NBBM hydropyrolysis at 420 C were summarized in the form of reaction matrices which, upon exhaustive application to the components of the reacting system, yielded the mechanistic reaction model. Each reaction family also had an associated linear free energy relationship (LFER) which provided an estimate of the rate constant k{sub i} given a structural property of species i or its reaction. Including the catalytic reaction matrices with those for the pyrolysis model provided a comprehensive NBBM catalytic reaction model and allowed regression of fundamental LFER parameters for the catalytic reaction families. The model also allowed specification of the property of an optimal catalyst. Iron, molybdenum and palladium were predicted to be most effective for model compound consumption. Due to the low costs associated with iron and its disposal, it is a good choice for coal liquefaction catalysis and the challenge remains to synthesize small particles able to access the full surface area of the coal macromolecule.

  9. Theoretical design of catalysts for the heterolytic splitting of H{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maj, L. [Laboratory of Intermolecular Interactions, Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteur 1, 02093 Warsaw (Poland); Grochala, W. [Laboratory of Intermolecular Interactions, Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, Pasteur 1, 02093 Warsaw (Poland); Laboratory of Technology of Novel Functional Materials, Interdisciplinary Center for Mathematical and Computational Modeling, University of Warsaw, Pawinskiego 5a, 02106 Warsaw (Poland)

    2006-10-20

    Here, we briefly review recent advances in H{sub 2} storage technologies relying on mixed proton-hydride and destabilized hydride materials. We establish a general relationship across different materials: the higher the effective H content, the higher the temperatures needed to completely desorb H{sub 2}. Nevertheless, several systems show promising thermodynamics for H{sub 2} desorption; however, the desorption kinetics still needs to be improved by the use of appropriate catalysts. Prompted by the importance of heterolytically splitting stable dihydrogen molecules for proton-hydride technologies, we attempt to theoretically design novel H{sub 2} transfer catalysts. We focus mainly on M{sub 4}Nm{sub 4}H{sub 8} catalysts (M = V, Ti, Zr, Hf, and Nm = Si, C, B, N), which should be able to preserve their functionality in the strongly reducing environment of a H{sub 2} storage system. We are able to determine the energy of H{sub 2} detachment from these molecules, as well as the associated energy barriers. In order to optimize the properties of the catalysts, we use isoelectronic atom-by-atom substitutions, vary the valence electron count, and borrow the concept of near-surface alloys from extended solids and apply it to molecular systems. We are able to obtain control over the enthalpy and electronic barriers for H{sub 2} detachment. Molecules with the coordinatively unsaturated > Ti=Si < unit exhibit particularly favorable thermodynamics and show unusually small electronic barriers for H{sub 2} detachment (> 0.27 eV) and attachment (> 0.07 eV). These and homologous ZrSi frameworks may serve as novel H{sub 2} transfer catalysts for use with emerging lightweight hydrogen storage materials holding 5.0-10.4 wt % hydrogen, such as Li{sub 2}NH, Li{sub 2}Mg(NH){sub 2}, Mg{sub 2}Si, and LiH/MgB{sub 2} (discharged forms). Catalytic properties are also anticipated for appropriate defects on the surfaces and crystal edges of solid Ti and Zr silicides, and for Ti=Si ad

  10. PGM-free Fe-N-C catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction: Catalyst layer design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stariha, Sarah; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Workman, Michael J.; Serov, Alexey; Mckinney, Sam; Halevi, Barr; Atanassov, Plamen

    2016-09-01

    This work studies the morphology of platinum group metal-free (PGM-free) iron-nitrogen-carbon (Fe-N-C) catalyst layers for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and compares catalytic performance via polarization curves. Three different nitrogen-rich organic precursors are used to prepare the catalysts. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and focused ion beam (FIB) tomography, the porosity, Euler number (pore connectivity), overall roughness, solid phase size and pore size are calculated for catalyst surfaces and volumes. Catalytic activity is determined using membrane electrode assembly (MEA) testing. It is found that the dominant factor in MEA performance is transport limitations. Through the 2D and 3D metrics it is concluded that pore connectivity has the biggest effect on transport performance.

  11. THE INFLUENCE OF SUBSTITUENT ELECTRONIC EFFECT ON ETHYLENE OLIGOMERIZATION ACTIVITIES OF BIS(IMINO)PYRIDYL Fe(II)CATALYSTS: A COMBINED MOLECULAR MECHANICS AND CHARGE EQUILIBRATION METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua-yi Li; Bao-gen Duan; You-liang Hu

    2009-01-01

    Bis(imino)pyridyl Fe(Ⅱ)complexes are important catalysts in ethylene oligomerization for preparing α-olefins.The metal net charge-activity relationship of bis(imino)pyridyl Fe(Ⅱ)complexes was investigated by molecular mechanics (MM)and net charge equilibration(QEq)method with modified Dreiding force field.It was found that metal net charge was in reverse ratio to ethylene oligomerization activity.Electron-donor substituents with less steric hindrance to the central metal were favorable to Fe complex activity.Metal net charge-activity relationship could be used to assist the design of new Fe oligomerization catalysts with higher activity.

  12. EFFECTS OF REACTION AND PROCESSING PARAMETERS ON ETHYLENE POLYMERIZATION USING DIFFERENT ZIEGLER-NATTA CATALYSTS:EMPLOYMENT OF TAGUCHI EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN AND RESPONSE SURFACE METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mohammad Najafi; Vahid Haddadi-Asl

    2007-01-01

    Different Ziegler-Natta catalysts were employed to polymerize ethylene.To investigate the influences of reaction parameters,namely Al/Ti molar ratio,hydrogen and processing parameters,I.e.ethylene pressure and temperature,a Taguchi experimental design was worked out.An L27 orthogonal array was chosen to take the above-mentioned parameters and relevant interactions into account.Response surface method was the tool used to analyze the experimental design results.Al/Ti,ethylene pressure and temperature were selected as experimental design factors.and catalyst activity and polymerization yield were the response parameters.Increasing pressure,due to an increment in monomer accessibility,and rising Al/Ti,because of higher reduction in the catalysts,cause an increase in both polymerization yield and catalyst activity.Nonetheless,a higher temperature,thanks to reducing ethylene solubility in the slurry medium and partially catalyst destruction.lead to a reduction in both response parameters.A synergistic eflfect was also observed between temperature and pressure.All catalyst activities will reduce in the presence of hydrogen.Molecular weight also shows a decline in the presence of hydrogen as a transfer agent.However,the polydispersity index remains approximately intact.Using SEM,various morphologies,owing to different catalyst morphologies,were seen for the polyethylene.

  13. Synthesis of Ultra—high Molecular Weight Polystyrene with a Catalyst System Based on Calixarene—Yttrium Complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈耀烽; 张一烽; 沈之荃

    2003-01-01

    Polymerization of styrene(St)with a new catalyst system composed of calixarene-yitrium complex,magnesium-aluminium alkyls and hexamethyl phosphoramide was studied.The catalyst system shows extremely high activity(>7×106gPSt/mol Y·h)and gives polystyrene with very high viscosity-average molecular weight(>5×105).

  14. Preparation of Molecular Sieve Catalyst and Application in the Catalytic Oxidation Treatment of Waste Water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG; RongMin

    2001-01-01

    Citric acid is an important additive in foods, cosmetics, medicine and so on, but it discharges about 10 ton of factory effluent when 1 ton of citric acid is produced. The COD of the factory effluent is near 20000 mg/L. The treatment of citric acid factory effluent is a serious problem in environmental chemistry.  It is found that molecular sieve support metal complexes have high catalytic activity in aerobic oxidation of alkene [1,2]. In this paper, a kind of molecular sieve catalyst was prepared. The catalyst was used for the treatment of citric acid factory effluent by method of catalytic oxygen oxidation.  ……

  15. Nanocasting Design and Spatially Selective Sulfonation of Polystyrene-Based Polymer Networks as Solid Acid Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Felix H; Sahraoui, Laila; Schüth, Ferdi

    2016-09-12

    Nanocasting is a general and widely applied method in the generation of porous materials during which a sacrificial solid template is used as a mold on the nanoscale. Ideally, the resulting structure is the inverse of the template. However, replication is not always as direct as anticipated, so the influences of the degree of pore filling and of potential restructuring processes after removal of the template need to be considered. These apparent limitations give rise to opportunities in the synthesis of poly(styrene-co-divinylbenzene) (PSD) polymer networks of widely varying porosities (BET surface area=63-562 m(2)  g(-1) ; Vtot =0.18-1.05 cm(3)  g(-1) ) by applying a single synthesis methodology. In addition, spatially selective sulfonation on the nanoscale seems possible. Together, nanocasting and sulfonation enable rational catalyst design. The highly porous nanocast and predominantly surface-sulfonated PSD networks approach the activity of the corresponding molecular catalyst, para-toluenesulfonic acid, and exceed those of commercial ion-exchange polymers in the depolymerization of macromolecular inulin.

  16. Optimal catalyst curves: Connecting density functional theory calculations with industrial reactor design and catalyst selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, C.J.H.; Dahl, Søren; Boisen, A.;

    2002-01-01

    For ammonia synthesis catalysts a volcano-type relationship has been found experimentally. We demonstrate that by combining density functional theory calculations with a microkinetic model the position of the maximum of the volcano curve is sensitive to the reaction conditions. The catalytic...

  17. Effect of water vapour on the molecular structures of supported vanadium oxide catalysts at elevated temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jehng, Jih-Mirn; Deo, G.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Wachs, I.E.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of water vapor on the molecular structures of V2O3-supported catalysts (SiO2, Al2o3, TiO2, and CeO2) was investigated by in situ Raman spectroscopy as a function of temperature (from 500°C to 120°C). Under dry conditions only isolated surface VO4 species are present on the dehydrated SiO2

  18. Hydrocarbon oxidation over catalysts prepared by the molecular layer deposition technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koltsov, S.I.; Smirnov, V.M.; Postnov, V.N.; Postnova, A.M.; Aleskovskii, V.B.

    1980-01-01

    By depositing consecutive uniform monolayers of phosphorus pentoxide and vanadium pentoxide on a large-surface-area (240 sq m/g) silica gel, active and selective catalysts for hydrocarbon oxidation were obtained. Thus, in piperylene oxidation by air at 330/sup 0/-430/sup 0/C and 2000-18,000/hr space velocity, a productive capacity of 220 g/l./hr with 41 mole % each maleic anhydride yield and selectivity was achieved over a SiO/sub 2/-P/sub 2/O/sub 5//P/sub 2/O/sub 5//V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ catalyst (120 sq cm/g surface area), compared with 80 g/l./hr for a P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ catalyst prepared by impregnation. In benzene oxidation, maleic anhydride yields of 52 and 60% and selectivities of 63 and 79% were achieved over SiO/sub 2/-P/sub 2/O/sub 5//V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and SiO/sub 2/-P/sub 2/O/sub 5//P/sub 2/O/sub 5//P/sub 2/O/sub 5//V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ catalysts, respectively, compared with a 6% yield and very low selectivity over the impregnated P/sub 2/O/sub 5/-V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ catalyst. The molecular-layer catalysts retained their total activity for 100 hr on stream and permitted to reduce the oxidation temperature by 50/sup 0/-70/sup 0/C.

  19. 'Design of CO-O2 recombination catalysts for closed-cycle CO2 lasers'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinn, K.; Goldblum, S.; Noskowski, E.; Herz, R.

    1989-01-01

    Pulsed CO2 lasers have many applications in aeronautics, space research, weather monitoring and other areas. Full exploitation of the potential of these lasers is hampered by the dissociation of CO2 that occurs during laser operation. The development of closed-cycle CO2 lasers requires active CO-O2 recombination (CO oxidation) catalysts and design methods for implementation of catalysts inside lasers. This paper will discuss the performance criteria and constraints involved in the design of monolith catalyst configurations for use in a closed-cycle laser and will present a design study performed with a computerized design program that had been written. Trade-offs between catalyst activity and dimensions, flow channel dimensions, pressure drop, O2 conversion and other variables will be discussed.

  20. Molecular dynamics study of the catalyst particle size dependence on carbon nanotube growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Feng; Rosén, Arne; Bolton, Kim

    2004-08-01

    The molecular dynamics method, based on an empirical potential energy surface, was used to study the effect of catalyst particle size on the growth mechanism and structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The temperature for nanotube nucleation (800-1100 K), which occurs on the surface of the cluster, is similar to that used in catalyst chemical vapor deposition experiments, and the growth mechanism, which is described within the vapor-liquid-solid model, is the same for all cluster sizes studied here (iron clusters containing between 10 and 200 atoms were simulated). Large catalyst particles, which contain at least 20 iron atoms, nucleate SWNTs that have a far better tubular structure than SWNTs nucleated from smaller clusters. In addition, the SWNTs that grow from the larger clusters have diameters that are similar to the cluster diameter, whereas the smaller clusters, which have diameters less than 0.5 nm, nucleate nanotubes that are ≈0.6-0.7 nm in diameter. This is in agreement with the experimental observations that SWNT diameters are similar to the catalyst particle diameter, and that the narrowest free-standing SWNT is 0.6-0.7 nm.

  1. Molecular Dissociation in Presence of a Catalyst II: The bond breaking role of the transition from virtual to localized states

    CERN Document Server

    Ruderman, Andres; Santos, Elizabeth; Pastawski, Horacio Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We address a molecular dissociation mechanism that is known to occur when a H 2 molecule approaches a catalyst with its molecular axis parallel to the surface. It is found that molecular dissociation is a form of quantum dynamical phase transition associated to an ana- lytic discontinuity of quite unusual nature: the molecule is destabilized by the transition from non-physical virtual states into actual local- ized states. Current description complements our recent results for a molecule approaching the catalyst with its molecular axis perpendicu- lar to the surface. Also, such a description can be seen as a further successful implementation of a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian in a well defined model.

  2. Design strategies for development of SCR catalyst: improvement of alkali poisoning resistance and novel regeneration method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yue; Li, Junhua; Shi, Wenbo; Xu, Jiayu; Hao, Jiming

    2012-11-20

    Based on the ideas of the additives modification and regeneration method update, two different strategies were designed to deal with the traditional SCR catalyst poisoned by alkali metals. First, ceria doping on the V(2)O(5)-WO(3)/TiO(2) catalyst could promote the SCR performance even reducing the V loading, which resulted in the enhancement of the catalyst's alkali poisoning resistance. Then, a novel method, electrophoresis treatment, was employed to regenerate the alkali poisoned V(2)O(5)-WO(3)/TiO(2) catalyst. This novel technique could dramatically enhance the SCR activities of the alkali poisoned catalysts by removing approximately 95% K or Na ions from the catalyst and showed less hazardous to the environment. Finally, the deactivation mechanisms by the alkali metals were extensively studied by employing both the experimental and DFT theoretical approaches. Alkali atom mainly influences the active site V species rather than W oxides. The decrease of catalyst surface acidity might directly reduce the catalytic activity, while the reducibility of catalysts could be another important factor.

  3. Design of stable catalysts for methane-carbon dioxide reforming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lercher, J.A.; Bitter, J.H.; Hally, W.; Niessen, W.; Seshan, K.

    2001-01-01

    The activity and stability of catalysts for methane-carbon dioxide reforming depend subtly upon the support and the active metal. Methane decomposes to carbon and hydrogen, forming carbon on the oxide support and the metal. Carbon on the metal is reactive and can be oxidized to CO by oxygen from dis

  4. Self-Healing of Molecular Catalyst and Photosensitizer on Metal-Organic Framework: Robust Molecular System for Photocatalytic H2 Evolution from Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongha; Whang, Dong Ryeol; Park, Soo Young

    2016-07-20

    Inspired by self-repair mechanism of PSII in plants, we report a self-healing system which spontaneously repairs molecular catalyst and photosensitizer during photocatalytic H2 evolution. A bipyridine-embedded UiO-type metal-organic framework (MOF), namely Ptn_Ir_BUiO, which incorporated H2-evolving catalyst and photosensitizer, was synthesized and subject to photocatalytic H2 evolution reaction (HER). Impressively, HER with Pt0.1_Ir_BUiO showed very stable molecular photocatalysis without significant decrease in its activity and colloidal formation for 6.5 days at least; in the homogeneous counterpart, the molecular catalyst became a colloid just after 7.5 h. It was revealed that the arrangement of diimine sites which closely and densely surrounded the H2-evolving catalyst and photosensitizer in the MOF enabled such a highly efficient self-healing. PMID:27356034

  5. Molecular Simulation of Naphthenic Acid Removal on Acidic Catalyst (Ⅰ) Mechanism of Catalytic Decarboxylation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fu Xiaoqin; Dai Zhenyu; Tian Songbai; Hou Suandi; Wang Xieqing

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the charge distribution, the chemical bond order and the reactive performance of carboxylic acid model compounds on acidic catalyst were investigated by using molecular simulation technology. The simulation results showed that the bond order of C-O was higher than that of C-C,and C-C bond connected to the carbon atom in the carboxyl radical had the lowest bond order. The charge distributions of model naphthenic acids were similar in characteristics that the negative charges were concentrated on carboxyls. According to the simulation results, the mechanisms of catalytic decarboxylation over acidic solid catalyst were proposed, and a new route was put forward regarding removal of the naphthenic acid from crude oil through catalytic decarboxylation.

  6. Syntheses of Ferrocenyl Schiff Bases Using Molecular Sieves and AlCl3 as Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    In order to study the donor ability of ferrocenylimines as directing ortho metalation group(DMG) to lithium alkylide to prepare planar chiral ferrocene, a series of ferrocenyl schiff bases were synthesized by new methods using molecular sieves(0.4nm) and AlCl3 as catalysts. The reaction periods were reduced using these two catalysts in contrast with Al2O3, which was a traditional method used in the literature. In addition, as an important feature of these schiff bases, we found that they were unstable as oils in air or when filtrated through silica gel, but were stable as solids. The structures of the new compounds were confirmed by IR, 1H NMR and HRMS.

  7. MOLECULAR SIEVES AS CATALYSTS FOR METHANOL DEHYDRATION IN THE LPDMEtm PROCESS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrew W. Wang

    2002-04-01

    Several classes of molecular sieves were investigated as methanol dehydration catalysts for the LPDME{trademark} (liquid-phase dimethyl ether) process. Molecular sieves offer a number of attractive features as potential catalysts for the conversion of methanol to DME. These include (1) a wide range of acid strengths, (2) diverse architectures and channel connectivities that provide latitude for steric control, (3) high active site density, (4) well-investigated syntheses and characterization, and (5) commercial availability in some cases. We directed our work in two areas: (1) a general exploration of the catalytic behavior of various classes of molecular sieves in the LPDME{trademark} system and (2) a focused effort to prepare and test zeolites with predominantly Lewis acidity. In our general exploration, we looked at such diverse materials as chabazites, mordenites, pentasils, SAPOs, and ALPOs. Our work with Lewis acidity sought to exploit the structural advantages of zeolites without the interfering effects of deleterious Broensted sites. We used zeolite Ultrastable Y (USY) as our base material because it possesses a high proportion of Lewis acid sites. This work was extended by modifying the USY through ion exchange to try to neutralize residual Broensted acidity.

  8. Molecular dissociation in the presence of catalysts: interpreting bond breaking as a quantum dynamical phase transition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we show that molecular chemical bond formation and dissociation in the presence of the d-band of a metal catalyst can be described as a quantum dynamical phase transition (QDPT). This agrees with DFT calculations that predict sudden jumps in some observables as the molecule breaks. According to our model this phenomenon emerges because the catalyst provides for a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian. We show that when the molecule approaches the surface, as occurs in the Heyrovsky reaction of H2, the bonding H2 orbital has a smooth crossover into a bonding molecular orbital built with the closest H orbital and the surface metal d-states. The same occurs for the antibonding state. Meanwhile, two resonances appear within the continuous spectrum of the d-band, which are associated with bonding and antibonding orbitals between the furthest H atom and the d-states at the second metallic layer. These move toward the band center, where they collapse into a pure metallic resonance and an almost isolated H orbital. This phenomenon constitutes a striking example of the non-trivial physics enabled when one deals with non-Hermitian Hamiltonian beyond the usual wide band approximation. (paper)

  9. Molecular dissociation in presence of catalysts: Interpreting bond breaking as a quantum dynamical phase transition

    CERN Document Server

    Ruderman, A; Santos, E; Pastawski, H M

    2015-01-01

    In this work we show that the molecular chemical bond formation and dissociation in presence of the d-band of a metal catalyst can be described as a Quantum Dynamical Phase Transition (QDPT). This agree with DFT calculations that predict sudden jumps in some observables as the molecule breaks. According to our model this phenomenon emerges because the catalyst provides for a non- Hermitian Hamiltonian. We show that when the molecule approaches the surface, as occurs in the Heyrovsky reaction of H 2, the bonding H 2 orbital has a smooth crossover into a bonding molecular orbital built with the closest H orbital and the surface metal d-states. The same occurs for the antibonding state. Meanwhile, two resonances appear within the continuous spectrum of the d- band which are associated with bonding and antibonding orbitals between the furthest H atom and the d-states at the second metallic layer. These move towards the band center where they collapse into a pure metallic resonance and an almost isolated H orbital...

  10. Dye-sensitised semiconductors modified with molecular catalysts for light-driven H2 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willkomm, Janina; Orchard, Katherine L; Reynal, Anna; Pastor, Ernest; Durrant, James R; Reisner, Erwin

    2016-01-01

    The development of synthetic systems for the conversion of solar energy into chemical fuels is a research goal that continues to attract growing interest owing to its potential to provide renewable and storable energy in the form of a 'solar fuel'. Dye-sensitised photocatalysis (DSP) with molecular catalysts is a relatively new approach to convert sunlight into a fuel such as H2 and is based on the self-assembly of a molecular dye and electrocatalyst on a semiconductor nanoparticle. DSP systems combine advantages of both homogenous and heterogeneous photocatalysis, with the molecular components providing an excellent platform for tuning activity and understanding performance at defined catalytic sites, whereas the semiconductor bridge ensures favourable multi-electron transfer kinetics between the dye and the fuel-forming electrocatalyst. In this tutorial review, strategies and challenges for the assembly of functional molecular DSP systems and experimental techniques for their evaluation are explained. Current understanding of the factors governing electron transfer across inorganic-molecular interfaces is described and future directions and challenges for this field are outlined.

  11. Design of Embedded Metal Catalysts via Reverser Micro-Emulsion System: a Way to Suppress Catalyst Deactivation by Metal Sintering

    KAUST Repository

    AlMana, Noor

    2016-06-19

    The development of highly selective and active, long-lasting, robust, low-cost and environmentally benign catalytic materials is the greatest challenge in the area of catalysis study. In this context, core-shell structures where the active sites are embedded inside the protecting shell have attracted a lot of researchers working in the field of catalysis owing to their enhanced physical and chemical properties suppress catalyst deactivation. Also, a new active site generated at the interface between the core and shell may increases the activity and efficiency of the catalyst in catalytic reactions especially for oxide shells that exhibit redox properties such as TiO2 and CeO2. Moreover, coating oxide layer over metal nanoparticles (NPs) can be designed to provide porosity (micropore/mesopore) that gives selectivity of the various reactants by the different gas diffusion rates. In this thesis, we will discuss the concept of catalyst stabilization against metal sintering by a core-shell system. In particular we will study the mechanistic of forming core-shell particles and the key parameters that can influence the properties and morphology of the Pt metal particle core and SiO2 shell (Pt@SiO2) using the reverse micro-emulsion method. The Pt@SiO2 core-shell catalysts were investigated for low-temperature CO oxidation reaction. The study was further extended to other catalytic applications by varying the composition of the core as well as the chemical nature of the shell material. The Pt NPs were embedded within another oxide matrix such as ZrO2 and TiO2 for CO oxidation reaction. These materials were studied in details to identify the factors governing the coating of the oxide around the metal NPs. Next, a more challenging system, namely, bimetallic Ni9Pt NPs embedded in TiO2 and ZrO2 matrix were investigated for dry reforming of methane reaction at high temperatures. The challenges of designing Ni9Pt@oxide core-shell structure with TiO2 and ZrO2 and their tolerance

  12. Cobalt-Catalyzed C(sp(2))-H Borylation: Mechanistic Insights Inspire Catalyst Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obligacion, Jennifer V; Semproni, Scott P; Pappas, Iraklis; Chirik, Paul J

    2016-08-24

    A comprehensive study into the mechanism of bis(phosphino)pyridine (PNP) cobalt-catalyzed C-H borylation of 2,6-lutidine using B2Pin2 (Pin = pinacolate) has been conducted. The experimentally observed rate law, deuterium kinetic isotope effects, and identification of the catalyst resting state support turnover limiting C-H activation from a fully characterized cobalt(I) boryl intermediate. Monitoring the catalytic reaction as a function of time revealed that borylation of the 4-position of the pincer in the cobalt catalyst was faster than arene borylation. Cyclic voltammetry established the electron withdrawing influence of 4-BPin, which slows the rate of C-H oxidative addition and hence overall catalytic turnover. This mechanistic insight inspired the next generation of 4-substituted PNP cobalt catalysts with electron donating and sterically blocking methyl and pyrrolidinyl substituents that exhibited increased activity for the C-H borylation of unactivated arenes. The rationally designed catalysts promote effective turnover with stoichiometric quantities of arene substrate and B2Pin2. Kinetic studies on the improved catalyst, 4-(H)2BPin, established a change in turnover limiting step from C-H oxidative addition to C-B reductive elimination. The iridium congener of the optimized cobalt catalyst, 6-(H)2BPin, was prepared and crystallographically characterized and proved inactive for C-H borylation, a result of the high kinetic barrier for reductive elimination from octahedral Ir(III) complexes. PMID:27476954

  13. Highlights from Faraday Discussion: Designing New Heterogeneous Catalysts, London, UK, April 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Nico; Manyar, Haresh G; Roldan, Alberto

    2016-06-28

    The Faraday Discussion on the design of new heterogeneous catalysts took place from 4-6 April 2016 in London, United Kingdom. It brought together world leading scientists actively involved in the synthesis, characterisation, modelling and testing of solid catalysts, attracting more than one hundred delegates from a broad spectrum of backgrounds and experience levels - academic and industrial researchers, experimentalists and theoreticians, and students. The meeting was a reflection of how big of an impact the ability to control and design catalysts with specific properties for particular processes can potentially have on the chemical industry, environment, economy and society as a whole. In the following, we give an overview of the topics covered during this meeting and briefly highlight the content of each presentation. PMID:27307017

  14. Highlights from Faraday Discussion: Designing New Heterogeneous Catalysts, London, UK, April 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Nico; Manyar, Haresh G; Roldan, Alberto

    2016-06-28

    The Faraday Discussion on the design of new heterogeneous catalysts took place from 4-6 April 2016 in London, United Kingdom. It brought together world leading scientists actively involved in the synthesis, characterisation, modelling and testing of solid catalysts, attracting more than one hundred delegates from a broad spectrum of backgrounds and experience levels - academic and industrial researchers, experimentalists and theoreticians, and students. The meeting was a reflection of how big of an impact the ability to control and design catalysts with specific properties for particular processes can potentially have on the chemical industry, environment, economy and society as a whole. In the following, we give an overview of the topics covered during this meeting and briefly highlight the content of each presentation.

  15. Surface Termination of M1 Phase and Rational Design of Propane Ammoxidation Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guliants, Vadim

    2015-02-16

    This final report describes major accomplishments in this research project which has demonstrated that the M1 phase is the only crystalline phase required for propane ammoxidation to acrylonitrile and that a surface monolayer terminating the ab planes of the M1 phase is responsible for their activity and selectivity in this reaction. Fundamental studies of the topmost surface chemistry and mechanism of propane ammoxidation over the Mo-V-(Te,Sb)-(Nb,Ta)-O M1 and M2 phases resulted in the development of quantitative understanding of the surface molecular structure – reactivity relationships for this unique catalytic system. These oxides possess unique catalytic properties among mixed metal oxides, because they selectively catalyze three alkane transformation reactions, namely propane ammoxidation to acrylonitrile, propane oxidation to acrylic acid and ethane oxidative dehydrogenation, all of considerable economic significance. Therefore, the larger goal of this research was to expand this catalysis to other alkanes of commercial interest, and more broadly, demonstrate successful approaches to rational design of improved catalysts that can be applied to other selective (amm)oxidation processes.

  16. Molecular understanding and design of zwitterionic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Qing; Jiang, Shaoyi

    2015-01-01

    Zwitterionic materials have moieties possessing cationic and anionic groups. This molecular structure leads to unique properties that can be the solutions of various application problems. A typical example is that zwitterionic carboxybetaine (CB) and sulfobetaine (SB) materials resist nonspecific protein adsorption in complex media. Considering the vast number of cationic and anionic groups in the current chemical inventory, there are many possible structural variations of zwitterionic materials. The diversified structures provide the possibility to achieve many desired properties and urge a better understanding of zwitterionic materials to provide design principles. Molecular simulations and modeling are a versatile tool to understand the structure-property relationships of materials at the molecular level. This progress report summarizes recent simulation and modeling studies addressing two fundamental questions regarding zwitterionic materials and their applications as biomaterials. First, what are the differences between zwitterionic and nonionic materials? Second, what are the differences among zwitterionic materials? This report also demonstrates a molecular design of new protein-resistant zwitterionic moieties beyond conventional CB and SB based on design principles developed from these simulation studies.

  17. A rational design approach to nanostructured catalysts for the oxidation of carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karwacki, Christopher

    :support interface. Furthermore, the primary interest is the energy associated Au NP in proximity to the support surface. Advancing the understanding of this region is believed to be crucial to the future design of active nanostructured materials that function under ambient conditions. The proposed model involves a structure consisting of properly sized and highly dispersed Au NP supported on a hydroxylated form of nanocrystalline zirconia. This type of zirconia is in a highly polymorphic form consisting of aggregates of small crystals less than 10 nm. The structure is highly porous, containing undercoordinated zirconium atoms, and provides an environment for rapid dissociation of molecular water. In this research and in collaboration with Mogilevsky et al., 37 I introduce a novel method for quantifying the surface concentration of two major forms of hydroxide that form on zirconia. Furthermore, in this research I show how both the porosity of the zirconia support and the size of the crystalline aggregates affect the type and surface concentration of hydroxyl groups. This relationship is thus directly related to the oxidation activity of the catalyst consisting of Au NP supported on hydroxylated ZrO 2. These phenomena are exemplified by a reduction in structural porosity and surface hydroxyl groups with increasing temperature treatments of the zirconia support. Gold NP and ZrO2 supports were extended to studies that included interactions with activated carbons. This work was done on the premise that graphitic carbons, based on their tunable porosities and surface chemistries, can enhance or stabilize the catalytic activity of neighboring Au NP. Gold dispersed on active carbon and hybrid structures consisting of Au/ZrO 2/C shows interesting properties, which lend themselves to catalytic particle stabilization and to the advancement of multifunctional material design.

  18. Design and Application of Latent Olefin Metathesis Catalysts Featuring S-Chelating Alkylidene Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szadkowska, Anna; Grela, Karol

    This review article is devoted to recent advances in the design and application of so-called “dormant” or “latent” ruthenium olefin metathesis catalysts bearing S-chelating alkylidene ligands. Selected ruthenium complexes containing S-donor ligands, which possess controllable initiation behaviour are presented. Applications of these complexes in olefin metathesis are described.

  19. Optimally designed fields for controlling molecular dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabitz, Herschel

    1991-10-01

    This research concerns the development of molecular control theory techniques for designing optical fields capable of manipulating molecular dynamic phenomena. Although is has been long recognized that lasers should be capable of manipulating dynamic events, many frustrating years of intuitively driven laboratory studies only serve to illustrate the point that the task is complex and defies intuition. The principal new component in the present research is the recognition that this problem falls into the category of control theory and its inherent complexities require the use of modern control theory tools largely developed in the engineering disciplines. Thus, the research has initiated a transfer of the control theory concepts to the molecular scale. Although much contained effort will be needed to fully develop these concepts, the research in this grant set forth the basic components of the theory and carried out illustrative studies involving the design of optical fields capable of controlling rotational, vibrational and electronic degrees of freedom. Optimal control within the quantum mechanical molecular realm represents a frontier area with many possible ultimate applications. At this stage, the theoretical tools need to be joined with merging laboratory optical pulse shaping capabilities to illustrate the power of the concepts.

  20. Strategies for designing supported gold-palladium bimetallic catalysts for the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Jennifer K; Freakley, Simon J; Carley, Albert F; Kiely, Christopher J; Hutchings, Graham J

    2014-03-18

    Hydrogen peroxide is a widely used chemical but is not very efficient to make in smaller than industrial scale. It is an important commodity chemical used for bleaching, disinfection, and chemical manufacture. At present, manufacturers use an indirect process in which anthraquinones are sequentially hydrogenated and oxidized in a manner that hydrogen and oxygen are never mixed. However, this process is only economic at a very large scale producing a concentrated product. For many years, the identification of a direct process has been a research goal because it could operate at the point of need, producing hydrogen peroxide at the required concentration for its applications. Research on this topic has been ongoing for about 100 years. Until the last 10 years, catalyst design was solely directed at using supported palladium nanoparticles. These catalysts require the use of bromide and acid to arrest peroxide decomposition, since palladium is a very active catalyst for hydrogen peroxide hydrogenation. Recently, chemists have shown that supported gold nanoparticles are active when gold is alloyed with palladium because this leads to a significant synergistic enhancement in activity and importantly selectivity. Crucially, bimetallic gold-based catalysts do not require the addition of bromide and acids, but with carbon dioxide as a diluent its solubility in the reaction media acts as an in situ acid promoter, which represents a greener approach for peroxide synthesis. The gold catalysts can operate under intrinsically safe conditions using dilute hydrogen and oxygen, yet these catalysts are so active that they can generate peroxide at commercially significant rates. The major problem associated with the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide concerns the selectivity of hydrogen usage, since in the indirect process this factor has been finely tuned over decades of operation. In this Account, we discuss how the gold-palladium bimetallic catalysts have active sites for the

  1. Bioinspired molecular co-catalysts bonded to a silicon photocathode for solar hydrogen evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Yidong; Abrams, Billie L.; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard;

    2011-01-01

    The production of fuels from sunlight represents one of the main challenges in the development of a sustainable energy system. Hydrogen is the simplest fuel to produce and although platinum and other noble metals are efficient catalysts for photoelectrochemical hydrogen evolution, earth......-abundant alternatives are needed for large-scale use. We show that bioinspired molecular clusters based on molybdenum and sulphur evolve hydrogen at rates comparable to that of platinum. The incomplete cubane-like clusters (Mo3S 4) efficiently catalyse the evolution of hydrogen when coupled to a p-type Si semiconductor...... that harvests red photons in the solar spectrum. The current densities at the reversible potential match the requirement of a photoelectrochemical hydrogen production system with a solar-to-hydrogen efficiency in excess of 10% (ref. 16). The experimental observations are supported by density functional theory...

  2. SchiffBase Dinuclear Complex Catalyst for Oxidation of Cyclohexene with Molecular Oxygen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    @@ In the past decades, the oxidation of hydrocarbons by transition metal complexes has been studied extensively. The current progress of the research on synthetic quasiporphyrin catalysts has led to the development of several systems that are able to reproduce the hene-enzyme mediated oxygenation and oxidation reactions[1]. In our group[2,51, the mononuclear complexes of amino acid Schiff base have been synthesized and their catalytic oxidation has been studied. In this paper, two dinuclear complexes, such as Salicylidence-β-alanine-Co(II)-Cu(II) and Salicylidence-β-alanine-Co(II)Mn(II), were prepared with amino acid Schiff bases and metal ions. In the presence of these dinuclear complexes, cyclohexene was effectively oxidized under 1 atm of molecular oxygen without any coreductants. The allylic hydroperoxide was obtained as an important product, which suggested a clear allylic pathway of oxidation of cyclohexene.

  3. SchiffBase Dinuclear Complex Catalyst for Oxidation of Cyclohexene with Molecular Oxygen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAO; DongXu

    2001-01-01

    In the past decades, the oxidation of hydrocarbons by transition metal complexes has been studied extensively. The current progress of the research on synthetic quasiporphyrin catalysts has led to the development of several systems that are able to reproduce the hene-enzyme mediated oxygenation and oxidation reactions[1]. In our group[2,51, the mononuclear complexes of amino acid Schiff base have been synthesized and their catalytic oxidation has been studied. In this paper, two dinuclear complexes, such as Salicylidence-β-alanine-Co(II)-Cu(II) and Salicylidence-β-alanine-Co(II)Mn(II), were prepared with amino acid Schiff bases and metal ions. In the presence of these dinuclear complexes, cyclohexene was effectively oxidized under 1 atm of molecular oxygen without any coreductants. The allylic hydroperoxide was obtained as an important product, which suggested a clear allylic pathway of oxidation of cyclohexene.  ……

  4. Molecular dissociation in presence of a catalyst: II. The bond breaking role of the transition from virtual to localized states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruderman, A.; Dente, A. D.; Santos, E.; Pastawski, H. M.

    2016-08-01

    We address a molecular dissociation mechanism that is known to occur when a H2 molecule approaches a catalyst with its molecular axis parallel to the surface. It is found that molecular dissociation is a form of quantum dynamical phase transition associated to an analytic discontinuity of quite unusual nature: the molecule is destabilized by the transition from non-physical virtual states into actual localized states. Current description complements our recent results for a molecule approaching the catalyst with its molecular axis perpendicular to the surface (Ruderman et al 2015 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 27 315501). Also, such a description can be seen as a further successful implementation of a non-Hermitian Hamiltonian in a well defined model.

  5. Clean Donor Oxidation Enhances the H2 Evolution Activity of a Carbon Quantum Dot-Molecular Catalyst Photosystem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martindale, Benjamin C M; Joliat, Evelyne; Bachmann, Cyril; Alberto, Roger; Reisner, Erwin

    2016-08-01

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) are new-generation light absorbers for photocatalytic H2 evolution in aqueous solution, but the performance of CQD-molecular catalyst systems is currently limited by the decomposition of the molecular component. Clean oxidation of the electron donor by donor recycling prevents the formation of destructive radical species and non-innocent oxidation products. This approach allowed a CQD-molecular nickel bis(diphosphine) photocatalyst system to reach a benchmark lifetime of more than 5 days and a record turnover number of 1094±61 molH2  (molNi )(-1) for a defined synthetic molecular nickel catalyst in purely aqueous solution under AM1.5G solar irradiation. PMID:27355200

  6. Gradient-Driven Molecule Construction: An Inverse Approach Applied to the Design of Small-Molecule Fixating Catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Weymuth, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Rational design of molecules and materials usually requires extensive screening of molecular structures for the desired property. The inverse approach to deduce a structure for a predefined property would be highly desirable, but is, unfortunately, not well-defined. However, feasible strategies for such an inverse design process may be successfully developed for specific purposes. We discuss options for calculating 'jacket' potentials that fulfill a predefined target requirement - a concept that we recently introduced [T. Weymuth, M. Reiher, MRS Proceediungs, 2013, 1524, DOI:10.1557/opl.2012.1764]. We consider the case of small-molecule activating transition metal catalysts. As a target requirement we choose the vanishing geometry gradients on all atoms of a subsystem consisting of a metal center binding the small molecule to be activated. The jacket potential can be represented within a full quantum model or by a sequence of approximations of which a field of electrostatic point charges is the simplest. In a...

  7. Characterization and Design of Zeolite Catalysts Solid Acidity, Shape Selectivity and Loading Properties

    CERN Document Server

    Niwa, Miki; Okumura, Kazu

    2010-01-01

    Zeolites are microporous, aluminosilicate minerals commonly used as commercial adsorbents. Zeolite-based catalysts are used by industrial chemical companies in the interconversion of hydrocarbons and the alkylation of aromatic compounds. The current book deals with the characterization of specific properties of Zeolites and calculations for the design of catalysts. Measurements and utilization of solid acidity, shape selectivity, and loading properties, that are three prominent properties of a Zeolite catalyst, are treated in detail. These features concern chemical vapor deposition of silica, shape selectivity, loading properties, solid activity, Brønsted or Lewis character, ammonia temperature programmed desorption, control of the pore-opening size by chemical vapor deposition of silica and XAFS analysis of metals being highly dispersed inside and outside a framework.

  8. 催化氧化脱硫分子筛催化剂研究进展%Research progress of molecular sieve catalyst for catalytic oxidative desulfurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    宋华; 穆金城

    2011-01-01

    The advance in catalytic oxidative desulfurization over molecular sieve, including TS molecular sieve catalyst, SBA molecular sieve catalyst, HMS molecular sieve catalyst, MCM molecular sieve catalyst, ZSM-5 molecular sieve catalyst, and aluminophosphate molecular sieve catalyst is summarized. Among these molecular sieve catalysts, SBA, HMS, MCM, aluminophosphate mesoporous molecular sieves catalysts have higher desulfurization rate of macromolecule sulfides and therefore have good prospect. The research of molecular sieve catalyst for oxidative desulfurization should be focused on developing large pore size general molecular sieve, investigating the mechanism and reducing the cost of oxidative desulfurization.%综述了催化氧化脱硫分子筛催化剂的研究进展.介绍了TS分子筛催化剂、SBA分子筛催化剂,HMS分子筛催化剂、MCM分子筛催化剂、ZSM-5分子筛催化剂和磷酸铝分子筛催化剂上油品的氧化脱硫方法,其中SBA、HMS、MCM和磷酸铝介孔分子筛催化剂对大分子的硫化物脱除率较高,具有很好的发展前景.今后分子筛催化氧化脱硫技术研究的重要方向是进一步开发通用性好的大孔径分子筛,研究脱硫机理和降低成本.

  9. Molecular Rift: Virtual Reality for Drug Designers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrby, Magnus; Grebner, Christoph; Eriksson, Joakim; Boström, Jonas

    2015-11-23

    Recent advances in interaction design have created new ways to use computers. One example is the ability to create enhanced 3D environments that simulate physical presence in the real world--a virtual reality. This is relevant to drug discovery since molecular models are frequently used to obtain deeper understandings of, say, ligand-protein complexes. We have developed a tool (Molecular Rift), which creates a virtual reality environment steered with hand movements. Oculus Rift, a head-mounted display, is used to create the virtual settings. The program is controlled by gesture-recognition, using the gaming sensor MS Kinect v2, eliminating the need for standard input devices. The Open Babel toolkit was integrated to provide access to powerful cheminformatics functions. Molecular Rift was developed with a focus on usability, including iterative test-group evaluations. We conclude with reflections on virtual reality's future capabilities in chemistry and education. Molecular Rift is open source and can be downloaded from GitHub. PMID:26558887

  10. Molecular Rift: Virtual Reality for Drug Designers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrby, Magnus; Grebner, Christoph; Eriksson, Joakim; Boström, Jonas

    2015-11-23

    Recent advances in interaction design have created new ways to use computers. One example is the ability to create enhanced 3D environments that simulate physical presence in the real world--a virtual reality. This is relevant to drug discovery since molecular models are frequently used to obtain deeper understandings of, say, ligand-protein complexes. We have developed a tool (Molecular Rift), which creates a virtual reality environment steered with hand movements. Oculus Rift, a head-mounted display, is used to create the virtual settings. The program is controlled by gesture-recognition, using the gaming sensor MS Kinect v2, eliminating the need for standard input devices. The Open Babel toolkit was integrated to provide access to powerful cheminformatics functions. Molecular Rift was developed with a focus on usability, including iterative test-group evaluations. We conclude with reflections on virtual reality's future capabilities in chemistry and education. Molecular Rift is open source and can be downloaded from GitHub.

  11. Adsorption and dissociation of molecular hydrogen on Pt/CeO2 catalyst in the hydrogen spillover process: A quantum chemical molecular dynamics study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ultra accelerated quantum chemical molecular dynamics method (UA-QCMD) was used to study the dynamics of the hydrogen spillover process on Pt/CeO2 catalyst surface for the first time. The direct observation of dissociative adsorption of hydrogen on Pt/CeO2 catalyst surface as well as the diffusion of dissociative hydrogen from the Pt/CeO2 catalyst surface was simulated. The diffusion of the hydrogen atom in the gas phase explains the high reactivity observed in the hydrogen spillover process. Chemical changes, change of adsorption states and structural changes were investigated. It was observed that parallel adsorption of hydrogen facilitates the dissociative adsorption leading to hydrogen desorption. Impact with perpendicular adsorption of hydrogen causes the molecular adsorption on the surface, which decelerates the hydrogen spillover. The present study also indicates that the CeO2 support has strong interaction with Pt catalyst, which may cause an increase in Pt activity as well as enhancement of the metal catalyst dispersions and hence increasing the rate of hydrogen spillover reaction.

  12. High-molecular-weight Polyethylene Prepared with Early Transition Metal Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Early transition metal catalysts [N,N]MCln, in which [N,N] is N-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)pyridine-2-carboxaldimine (C18H22N2, NN-1), N-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-6-methylpyridine-2-carboxaldimine (C19H24N2, NN-2), N-(2,4,6-trimethylphenyl)pyridine-2-carboxaldimine (C15H16 N2,NN-3), M is Ti, Zr and V, and n is 3 or 4, e.g. [NN-1]TiCl4 1a, [NN-1]ZrCl4 1b, [NN-1]VCl3 1c,[NN-2]TiCl4 2a, [NN-2]ZrCl4 2b, [NN-2]VCl3 2c, [NN-3]TiCl4 3a have been investigated to catalyze ethylene polymerization in the presence of methylaluminoxane (MAO). It was noteworthy that polyethylene characteristic of high molecular weight and wide or bimodal molecular weight distribution was formed with moderate to high activities.

  13. From porphyrins to pyrphyrins: adsorption study and metalation of a molecular catalyst on Au(111)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mette, Gerson; Sutter, Denys; Gurdal, Yeliz; Schnidrig, Stephan; Probst, Benjamin; Iannuzzi, Marcella; Hutter, Jürg; Alberto, Roger; Osterwalder, Jürg

    2016-04-01

    The molecular ligand pyrphyrin, a tetradentate bipyridine based macrocycle, represents an interesting but widely unexplored class of molecules. It resembles the well-known porphyrin, but consists of pyridyl subunits instead of pyrroles. Metal complexes based on pyrphyrin ligands have recently shown promise as water reduction catalysts in homogeneous photochemical water splitting reactions. In this study, the adsorption and metalation of pyrphyrin on a single crystalline Au(111) surface is investigated in an ultrahigh vacuum by means of scanning tunneling microscopy, low-energy electron diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory. Pyrphyrin coverages of approximately one monolayer and less are obtained by sublimation of the molecules on the substrate kept at room temperature. The molecules self-assemble in two distinct phases of long-range molecular ordering depending on the surface coverage. The deposition of cobalt metal and subsequent annealing lead to the formation of Co-ligated pyrphyrin molecules accompanied by a pronounced change of the molecular self-assembly. Electronic structure calculations taking the herringbone reconstruction of Au(111) into account show that the molecules are physisorbed, but preferred adsorption sites are identified where Co and the N atoms of the two terminal cyano groups are optimally coordinated to the surface Au atoms. An intermediate state of the metalation reaction is observed and the reaction steps for the Co metalation of pyrphyrin molecules on Au(111) are established in a joint experimental and computational effort.The molecular ligand pyrphyrin, a tetradentate bipyridine based macrocycle, represents an interesting but widely unexplored class of molecules. It resembles the well-known porphyrin, but consists of pyridyl subunits instead of pyrroles. Metal complexes based on pyrphyrin ligands have recently shown promise as water reduction catalysts in homogeneous photochemical water splitting

  14. The Manipulation of Hydrophobicity in Catalyst Design for Applications of Aerobic Alcohols Oxidation and Electrocatalytic Water Oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Batian

    2016-05-17

    Hydrophobicity is the generalized characteristic of non-polar substances that brings about their exclusion from aqueous phases. This property, entropic in its nature, drives key self-assembly and phase separation processes in water. Protein folding, the formation of DNA double helix, the existence of lipid bilayers and the wetting properties of leaf surfaces are all due to hydrophobic interactions. Inspired by Nature, we aimed to use hydrophobicity for creating novel and improved catalytic systems. (I) A number of fluorous amphiphilic star block-copolymers containing a tris(benzyltriazolylmethyl)amine motif have been prepared. These polymers assembled into well-defined nanostructures in water, and their mode of assembly could be controlled by changing the composition of the polymer. The polymers were used for enzyme-inspired catalysis of alcohol oxidation. (II) An enzyme-inspired catalytic system based on a rationally designed multifunctional surfactant was developed. The resulting micelles feature metal-binding sites and stable free radical moieties as well as fluorous pockets that attract and preconcentrate molecular oxygen. In the presence of copper ions, the micelles effect chemoselective aerobic alcohol oxidation under ambient conditions in water, a transformation that is challenging to achieve nonenzymatically. (III) Development of a facile means of photo/electrocatalytic water splitting is one of the main barriers to establishing of a solar hydrogen economy. Of the two half-reactions involved in splitting water into O2 and H2, water oxidation presents the most challenge due to its mechanistic complexity. A practical water oxidation catalyst must be highly active, yet inexpensive and indefinitely stable under harsh oxidative conditions. Here, I shall describe the synthesis of a library of molecular water oxidation catalysts based on the Co complex of tris(2-benzimidazolylmethyl)amine, (BimH)3. A wide range of catalysts differing in their electronic properties

  15. Highly active, recyclable catalyst for the manufacture of viscous, low molecular weight, CO–ethene–propene-based polyketone, base component for a new class of resins

    OpenAIRE

    Broekhuis, Antonius A.; Dirkzwager, Hendrik; Mul, Wilhelmus P.; Heeres, Hero J.; Linden, Adrianus J. van der; Orpen, A. Guy

    2002-01-01

    A highly active, recyclable homogeneous palladium(II) catalyst is described for the manufacture of viscous, low molecular weight CO–ethene–propene-based polyketone (Carilite Oligomer), used for the manufacture of a new class of resins (Carilite Resins). The catalyst is composed of palladium acetate, and a sulfonated diphosphine ligand, bdompp-S (1,3-bis(di-(2-methoxy, 5-sulfonatophenyl)phosphino)propane). In comparison with its non-sulfonated counterpart this catalyst not only exhibits a much...

  16. Highly active, recyclable catalyst for the manufacture of viscous, low molecular weight, CO–ethene–propene-based polyketone, base component for a new class of resins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekhuis, Antonius A.; Dirkzwager, Hendrik; Mul, Wilhelmus P.; Heeres, Hero J.; Linden, Adrianus J. van der; Orpen, A. Guy

    2002-01-01

    A highly active, recyclable homogeneous palladium(II) catalyst is described for the manufacture of viscous, low molecular weight CO–ethene–propene-based polyketone (Carilite Oligomer), used for the manufacture of a new class of resins (Carilite Resins). The catalyst is composed of palladium acetate,

  17. Bioinspired Molecular Co-Catalysts Bonded to a Silicon Photocathode for Solar Hydrogen Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Yidong

    2011-11-08

    The production of fuels from sunlight represents one of the main challenges in the development of a sustainable energy system. Hydrogen is the simplest fuel to produce and although platinum and other noble metals are efficient catalysts for photoelectrochemical hydrogen evolution earth-abundant alternatives are needed for large-scale use. We show that bioinspired molecular clusters based on molybdenum and sulphur evolve hydrogen at rates comparable to that of platinum. The incomplete cubane-like clusters (Mo{sub 3}S{sub 4}) efficiently catalyse the evolution of hydrogen when coupled to a p-type Si semiconductor that harvests red photons in the solar spectrum. The current densities at the reversible potential match the requirement of a photoelectrochemical hydrogen production system with a solar-to-hydrogen efficiency in excess of 10% (ref. 16). The experimental observations are supported by density functional theory calculations of the Mo{sub 3}S{sub 4} clusters adsorbed on the hydrogen-terminated Si(100) surface, providing insights into the nature of the active site.

  18. Design and Stereoselective Preparation of a New Class of Chiral Olefin Metathesis Catalysts and Application to Enantioselective Synthesis of Quebrachamine: Catalyst Development Inspired by Natural Product Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattely, Elizabeth S.; Meek, Simon J.; Malcolmson, Steven J.; Schrock, Richard R.; Hoveyda, Amir H.

    2010-01-01

    A total synthesis of the Aspidosperma alkaloid quebrachamine in racemic form is first described. A key catalytic ring-closing metathesis of an achiral triene is used to establish the all-carbon quaternary stereogenic center and the tetracyclic structure of the natural product; the catalytic transformation proceeds with reasonable efficiency through the use of existing achiral Ru or Mo catalysts. Ru- or Mo-based chiral olefin metathesis catalysts have proven to be inefficient and entirely nonselective in cases where the desired product is observed. In the present study, the synthesis route thus serves as a platform for the discovery of new olefin metathesis catalysts that allow for efficient completion of an enantioselective synthesis of quebrachamine. Accordingly, on the basis of mechanistic principles, stereogenic-at-Mo complexes bearing only monodentate ligands have been designed. The new catalysts provide significantly higher levels of activity than observed with the previously reported Ru- or Mo-based complexes. Enantiomerically enriched chiral alkylidenes are generated through diastereoselective reactions involving achiral Mo-based bispyrrolides and enantiomerically pure silyl-protected binaphthols. Such chiral catalysts initiate the key enantioselective ring-closing metathesis step in the total synthesis of quebrachamine efficiently (1 mol % loading, 22 °C, 1 h, >98% conversion, 84% yield) and with high selectivity (98:2 er, 96% ee). PMID:19113867

  19. Production of High Molecular Weight Organic Compounds on the Surfaces of Amorphous Iron Silicate Catalysts: Implications for Organic Synthesis in the Solar Nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmour, I.; Hill, H. G. M.; Pearson, V. K.; Sephton, M. A.; Nuth, J. A., III

    2002-01-01

    The high molecular weight organic products of Fischer-Tropsch/Haber-Bosch syntheses on the surfaces of Fe-silicate catalysts have been studied by GCMS. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  20. Membrane-electrode structures for molecular catalysts for use in fuel cells and other electrochemical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerr, John B.; Zhu, Xiaobing; Hwang, Gi Suk; Martin, Zulima; He, Qinggang; Driscoll, Peter; Weber, Adam; Clark, Kyle

    2016-09-27

    Water soluble catalysts, (M)meso-tetra(N-Methyl-4-Pyridyl)Porphinepentachloride (M=Fe, Co, Mn & Cu), have been incorporated into the polymer binder of oxygen reduction cathodes in membrane electrode assemblies used in PEM fuel cells and found to support encouragingly high current densities. The voltages achieved are low compared to commercial platinum catalysts but entirely consistent with the behavior observed in electroanalytical measurements of the homogeneous catalysts. A model of the dynamics of the electrode action has been developed and validated and this allows the MEA electrodes to be optimized for any chemistry that has been demonstrated in solution. It has been shown that improvements to the performance will come from modifications to the structure of the catalyst combined with optimization of the electrode structure and a well-founded pathway to practical non-platinum group metal catalysts exists.

  1. Medium Effects are as Important as Catalyst Design for Selectivity in Electrocatalytic Oxygen Reduction by Iron-porphyrin Complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rigsby, Matthew L.; Wasylenko, Derek J.; Pegis, Michael L.; Mayer, James M.

    2015-04-08

    Several substituted iron porphyrin com-plexes were evaluated for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) electrocatalysis in different homogeneous and heterogeneous media. The selectivity for 4-electron re-duction to H2O vs. 2-electron reduction to H2O2 varies substantially from one medium to another for a given catalyst. In many cases, the influence of the medium in which the catalyst is evaluated has a larger effect on the observed selectivity than the factors attributable to chemical modification of the catalyst. For instance, introduction of potential proton relays has variable effects depending on the catalyst medium. Thus, comparisons of ORR selectivity results need to be interpreted with caution, as the catalysis is a property not just of the catalyst, but also of the larger mesoscale environment be-yond the catalyst. Still, in all the direct pairwise comparisons in the same medium, the catalysts with potential proton relays have similar or better selectivity for the preferred 4e– path. This work was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

  2. CATALYSIS SCIENCE INITIATIVE: From First Principles Design to Realization of Bimetallic Catalysts for Enhanced Selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAVRIKAKIS, MANOS

    2007-05-03

    In this project, we have integrated state-of-the-art Density Functional Theory (DFT) models of heterogeneous catalytic processes with high-throughput screening of bimetallic catalytic candidates for important industrial problems. We have studied a new class of alloys characterized by a surface composition different from the bulk composition, and investigated their stability and activity for the water-gas shift reaction and the oxygen reduction reaction. The former reaction is an essential part of hydrogen production; the latter is the rate-limiting step in low temperature H2 fuel cells. We have identified alloys that have remarkable stability and activity, while having a much lower material cost for both of these reactions. Using this knowledge of bimetallic interactions, we have also made progress in the industrially relevant areas of carbohydrate reforming and conversion of biomass to liquid alkanes. One aspect of this work is the conversion of glycerol (a byproduct of biodiesel production) to synthesis gas. We have developed a bifunctional supported Pt catalyst that can cleave the carbon-carbon bond while also performing the water-gas shift reaction, which allows us to better control the H2:CO ratio. Knowledge gained from the theoretical metal-metal interactions was used to develop bimetallic catalysts that perform this reaction at low temperature, allowing for an efficient coupling of this endothermic reaction with other reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch or methanol synthesis. In our work on liquid alkane production from biomass, we have studied deactivation and selectivity in these areas as a function of metal-support interactions and reaction conditions, with an emphasis on the bifunctionality of the catalysts studied. We have identified a stable, active catalyst for this process, where the selectivity and yield can be controlled by the reaction conditions. While complete rational design of catalysts is still elusive, this work demonstrates the power of

  3. Aromatization of n-hexane by platinum-containing molecular sieves. 1. Catalyst preparation by the vapor phase impregnation method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suk Bong Hong; Mielczarski, E.; Davis, M.E. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States))

    1992-03-01

    A vapor phase impregnation method with Pt(acac){sub 2} has been developed and used to load Pt into aluminosilicate (KL, BaKL, NaY, CsNaY, cubic and hexagonal polytypes of faujasite, ZSM-12, and SSZ-24) and aluminophosphate (AlPO{sub 4}-5 and VPI-5) molecular sieves. Pt-containing molecular sieves are characterized by XRD,TPD, elemental analysis, {sup 13}C MAS NMR, TEM, and H{sub 2} chemisorption. {sup 13}C MAS NMR, TEM, and H{sub 2} chemisorption measurements reveal that Pt can be loaded into the micropores of molecular sieves with both charged and neutral frameworks. Pt impregnated into zeolites and aluminophosphates by this method does not migrate to the exterior surface of the molecular sieve catalysts at n-hexane aromatization reaction conditions of atmospheric pressure and temperatures between 460 and 510 C.

  4. Designation of highly efficient catalysts for one pot conversion of glycerol to lactic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Meilin; Dan Zhang; Guan, Hongyu; Huang, Guohui; Wang, Xiaohong

    2016-07-01

    Production of lactic acid from glycerol is a cascade catalytic procedure using multifunctional catalysts combined with oxidative and acidic catalytic sites. Therefore, a series of silver-exchanged phosphomolybdic acid catalysts (AgxH3‑xPMo12O40, x = 1 ~ 3, abbreviated as AgxPMo) was designed and applied in glycerol oxidation with O2 as an oxidant to produce lactic acid (LA) without adding any base. Among all, total silver exchanged phosphomolybdic acid (Ag3PMo) was found to be the most active one with LA selectivity of 93% at 99% conversion under mild conditions of 5 h at 60 °C. The exceptionally high efficiency was contributed to the generation of strong Lewis acid sites, enhanced redox potentials and water-tolerance. More importantly, Ag3PMo was tolerant in crude glycerol from biodiesel production. And the reaction mechanism was also discussed. Meanwhile, Ag3PMo acted as a heterogeneous catalyst for 12 recycles without loss of activity.

  5. Designation of highly efficient catalysts for one pot conversion of glycerol to lactic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Meilin; Dan Zhang; Guan, Hongyu; Huang, Guohui; Wang, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    Production of lactic acid from glycerol is a cascade catalytic procedure using multifunctional catalysts combined with oxidative and acidic catalytic sites. Therefore, a series of silver-exchanged phosphomolybdic acid catalysts (AgxH3-xPMo12O40, x = 1 ~ 3, abbreviated as AgxPMo) was designed and applied in glycerol oxidation with O2 as an oxidant to produce lactic acid (LA) without adding any base. Among all, total silver exchanged phosphomolybdic acid (Ag3PMo) was found to be the most active one with LA selectivity of 93% at 99% conversion under mild conditions of 5 h at 60 °C. The exceptionally high efficiency was contributed to the generation of strong Lewis acid sites, enhanced redox potentials and water-tolerance. More importantly, Ag3PMo was tolerant in crude glycerol from biodiesel production. And the reaction mechanism was also discussed. Meanwhile, Ag3PMo acted as a heterogeneous catalyst for 12 recycles without loss of activity. PMID:27431610

  6. Design of Pd-Based Bimetallic Catalysts for ORR: A DFT Calculation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lihui Ou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing Pd-lean catalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR is the key for large-scale application of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs. In the present paper, we have proposed a multiple-descriptor strategy for designing efficient and durable ORR Pd-based alloy catalysts. We demonstrated that an ideal Pd-based bimetallic alloy catalyst for ORR should possess simultaneously negative alloy formation energy, negative surface segregation energy of Pd, and a lower oxygen binding ability than pure Pt. By performing detailed DFT calculations on the thermodynamics, surface chemistry and electronic properties of Pd-M alloys, Pd-V, Pd-Fe, Pd-Zn, Pd-Nb, and Pd-Ta, are identified theoretically to have stable Pd segregated surface and improved ORR activity. Factors affecting these properties are analyzed. The alloy formation energy of Pd with transition metals M can be mainly determined by their electron interaction. This may be the origin of the negative alloy formation energy for Pd-M alloys. The surface segregation energy of Pd is primarily determined by the surface energy and the atomic radius of M. The metals M which have smaller atomic radius and higher surface energy would tend to favor the surface segregation of Pd in corresponding Pd-M alloys.

  7. From First Principles Design to Realization of Bimetallic Catalysts for Enhanced Selectivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo, Raul F.; Crooks, Richard M.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2014-04-08

    “Catalysis by design” has been a dream for decades. To specify the composition and structure of matter to effect a desired catalytic transformation with desired and predicted rate and selectivity remains a monumental challenge, especially in heterogeneous catalysis. Our research thrusts have been chosen not only for their practical and scientific relevance, e.g. for more efficient and sustainable chemicals and fuels production, but also because they provide a foundation for developing and exploring broadly applicable principles and strategies for catalyst design.

  8. SUPPORTED ZIEGLER-NATTA CATALYSTS FOR ETHYLENE SLURRY POLYMERIZATION AND CONTROL OF MOLECULAR WEIGHT DISTRIBUTION OF POLYETHYLENE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vladimir Zakharov; Ludmila Echevskaya; Tatiana Mikenas; Mikhail Matsko; Andrey Tregubov; Marina Vanina; Marina Nikolaeva

    2008-01-01

    The effect of chemical composition of highly active supported Ziegler-Natta catalysts with controlled morphology on the MWD of PE has been studied.It was shown the variation of transition metal compound in the MgCI2-supported catalyst affect of MWD of PE produced in broad range:Vanadium-magnesium catalyst(VMC)produce PE with broad and bimodal MWD(Mw、Mn=14-21).MWD of PE,produced over titanium-magnesium catalyst(TMC) is narrow or medium depending on Ti content in the catalyst(Mw/Mn=3.1-4.8).The oxidation state of the initial titanium compounds in TMC has only slight effeCt on MWD of PE produced.Based on MWD data of PE heterogeneity of active centers of TMC and VMC was studied.The results of resolution of experimental GPC curves into Flory components indicated three Flory components are snfficient to describe MWD curve of PE,produced with TMC:six Flory components are required in the case of VMC.In the case of copolymerization of ethylene with 1-hexene over TMC the addition of 1-hexene leads to decrease of MW and to slight effect on Mw/Mn values.On the contrary the strong effect of 1-hexene on MWD of PE produced over VMC was found:the introduction of 1-hexene results in considerable broadening of MWD due to the shifting of the main MWD peak tO low MW region.At that comonomer does not affect the position of high molecular weight shoulder The results indicate that some of active centers of VMC producing high MW polymer are not active in the reaction of chain transfer with comonomer.

  9. Developing an approach for first-principles catalyst design: application to carbon-capture catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, Heather J; Wong, Sergio E; Baker, Sarah E; Valdez, Carlos A; Satcher, Joe H; Aines, Roger D; Lightstone, Felice C

    2014-02-01

    An approach to catalyst design is presented in which local potential energy surface models are first built to elucidate design principles and then used to identify larger scaffold motifs that match the target geometries. Carbon sequestration via hydration is used as the model reaction, and three- and four-coordinate sp(2) or sp(3) nitrogen-ligand motifs are considered for Zn(II) metals. The comparison of binding, activation and product release energies over a large range of interaction distances and angles suggests that four-coordinate short Zn(II)-Nsp(3) bond distances favor a rapid turnover for CO2 hydration. This design strategy is then confirmed by computationally characterizing the reactivity of a known mimic over a range of metal-nitrogen bond lengths. A search of existing catalysts in a chemical database reveals structures that match the target geometry from model calculations, and subsequent calculations have identified these structures as potentially effective for CO2 hydration and sequestration. PMID:24508957

  10. Developing an approach for first-principles catalyst design: application to carbon-capture catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulik, Heather J; Wong, Sergio E; Baker, Sarah E; Valdez, Carlos A; Satcher, Joe H; Aines, Roger D; Lightstone, Felice C

    2014-02-01

    An approach to catalyst design is presented in which local potential energy surface models are first built to elucidate design principles and then used to identify larger scaffold motifs that match the target geometries. Carbon sequestration via hydration is used as the model reaction, and three- and four-coordinate sp(2) or sp(3) nitrogen-ligand motifs are considered for Zn(II) metals. The comparison of binding, activation and product release energies over a large range of interaction distances and angles suggests that four-coordinate short Zn(II)-Nsp(3) bond distances favor a rapid turnover for CO2 hydration. This design strategy is then confirmed by computationally characterizing the reactivity of a known mimic over a range of metal-nitrogen bond lengths. A search of existing catalysts in a chemical database reveals structures that match the target geometry from model calculations, and subsequent calculations have identified these structures as potentially effective for CO2 hydration and sequestration.

  11. An Efficient and Stable Hydrophobic Molecular Cobalt Catalyst for Water Electro-oxidation at Neutral pH

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Ba-Tian

    2016-06-14

    The synthesis of a library of molecular water oxidation catalysts based on the Co complex of tris(2-benzimidazolylmethyl)amine is described. Hydrophobicity was identified as the key variable in mediating the catalytic competence of the complexes. The change in this parameter correlates with both the conformational mobility of the ligand core and the structural changes in the local solvent environment around the metal site. The optimal Co complex identified is hydrophobic, because of three semifluorinated side chains. It catalyzes water electro-oxidation efficiently at neutral pH, with an overpotential of 390 mV and a turnover frequency (TOF) of 1.83 s-1 in the absence of soluble Co salts. The catalyst can be immobilized through physisorption, and it remains stable in prolonged electrolysis experiments. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  12. Kinetics of Heterogeneous Solvent-free Liquid Phase Oxidation of Alcohol Using ZrO2 Catalyst with Molecular Oxygen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ILYAS Mohammad; SADIQ Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    Clean liquid phase solvent-free oxidation of alcohol to aldehyde/ketone using ZrO2 catalyst with molecular oxygen has been studied.Monoclinic phase ZrO2 has been synthesized and characterized by XRD,SEM,EDX and surface and pore size analyses.Oxidation of alcohol was carded out in a typical batch reactor at different sDeed of agitation(150-1200 r/min),temperature(373-413 K),catalyst loading(50-300 mg)and partial pressure of oxygen(12-101 kPa).These parameters influence alcohol conversion as well as selectivity.A handy touch of kinetics was given to the experimental data and apparent activation energy was calculated.

  13. Use of Yb-based catalyst for AGET ATRP of acrylonitrile to simultaneously control molecular mass distribution and tacticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yb-based catalyst was used for the first time for atom transfer radical polymerization using activators generated by electron transfer (AGET ATRP) of acrylonitrile (AN) with 2-bromopropionitrile (BPN) as initiator, 2, 2′-bipyridine (bipy) as ligand, and tisn(II) bis(2-ethylhexanoate) (Sn(EH)2) as reducing agent in the presence of air. With respect to AGET ATRP of AN catalyzed by CuBr2, an evident increase of polymer tacticity was observed for AGET ATRP of AN. The increase of syndiotacticity became more and more pronounced than the increase of isotacticity of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) along with YbBr3 content. The block copolymer PAN-b-PMMA with molecular weight at 60,000 and polydispersity at 1.36 was successfully prepared. - Graphical abstract: Yb-based catalyst was used for the first time for AGET ATRP of AN with BPN as the initiator, bipy as the ligand, and Sn(EH)2 as the reducing agent in the presence of air. With respect to AGET ATRP with CuBr2 as catalyst, an obvious increase of polymer tacticity was observed for AGET ATRP of AN. The increase of syndiotacticity became more and more pronounced than the increase of isotacticity of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) along with YbBr3 content. The block copolymer PAN-b-PMMA with molecular weight at 60000 and polydispersity at 1.36 was successfully prepared. Highlights: ► Yb-based catalyst was used for the first time for AGET ATRP of AN. ► The reaction simultaneously controls polydispersity and tacticity of PAN. ► Well-defined block copolymer PAN-b-PMMA was successfully prepared.

  14. Use of Yb-based catalyst for AGET ATRP of acrylonitrile to simultaneously control molecular mass distribution and tacticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Jing; Chen Hou, E-mail: lduchenhou@hotmail.com; Zhang Min; Wang Chunhua; Zhang Ying; Qu Rongjun

    2012-08-01

    Yb-based catalyst was used for the first time for atom transfer radical polymerization using activators generated by electron transfer (AGET ATRP) of acrylonitrile (AN) with 2-bromopropionitrile (BPN) as initiator, 2, 2 Prime -bipyridine (bipy) as ligand, and tisn(II) bis(2-ethylhexanoate) (Sn(EH){sub 2}) as reducing agent in the presence of air. With respect to AGET ATRP of AN catalyzed by CuBr{sub 2}, an evident increase of polymer tacticity was observed for AGET ATRP of AN. The increase of syndiotacticity became more and more pronounced than the increase of isotacticity of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) along with YbBr{sub 3} content. The block copolymer PAN-b-PMMA with molecular weight at 60,000 and polydispersity at 1.36 was successfully prepared. - Graphical abstract: Yb-based catalyst was used for the first time for AGET ATRP of AN with BPN as the initiator, bipy as the ligand, and Sn(EH){sub 2} as the reducing agent in the presence of air. With respect to AGET ATRP with CuBr{sub 2} as catalyst, an obvious increase of polymer tacticity was observed for AGET ATRP of AN. The increase of syndiotacticity became more and more pronounced than the increase of isotacticity of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) along with YbBr{sub 3} content. The block copolymer PAN-b-PMMA with molecular weight at 60000 and polydispersity at 1.36 was successfully prepared. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Yb-based catalyst was used for the first time for AGET ATRP of AN. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reaction simultaneously controls polydispersity and tacticity of PAN. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Well-defined block copolymer PAN-b-PMMA was successfully prepared.

  15. CFD aided optimization of an innovative SCR catalyst design for heavy-duty marine diesel engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krastev, V. K.; Russo, S.; Verdemare, D.; Recine, G.; Biferale, L.; Falcucci, G.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the design of a new system for reducing NOx from exhaust gases from marine engines is shown. The core of the system is represented by the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) reactor, in which the catalyst is made of titanium dioxide nano-fibers functionalized with metal oxides and deposited by electrospinning on a corrugated metal support. Compared to the current monolithic reactor designs, the high specific surface offered by the fibers allows in principle to satisfy the TIER III emission standards, with a consistent saving in the reactor volume. To optimize the reactor design process, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model has been developed, alongside experimental measurements and numerical simulations. Results of different configurations are reported and critically assessed.

  16. Brownian molecular rotors: Theoretical design principles and predicted realizations

    OpenAIRE

    Schönborn, Jan Boyke; Herges, Rainer; Hartke, Bernd

    2009-01-01

    We propose simple design concepts for molecular rotors driven by Brownian motion and external photochemical switching. Unidirectionality and efficiency of the motion is measured by explicit simulations. Two different molecular scaffolds are shown to yield viable molecular rotors when decorated with suitable substituents.

  17. Turning aluminium into a noble-metal-like catalyst for low-temperature activation of molecular hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Irinder S; Chaudhuri, Santanu; Veyan, Jean François; Chabal, Yves J

    2011-11-01

    Activation of molecular hydrogen is the first step in producing many important industrial chemicals that have so far required expensive noble-metal catalysts and thermal activation. We demonstrate here that aluminium doped with very small amounts of titanium can activate molecular hydrogen at temperatures as low as 90 K. Using an approach that uses CO as a probe molecule, we identify the atomistic arrangement of the catalytically active sites containing Ti on Al(111) surfaces, combining infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy and first-principles modelling. CO molecules, selectively adsorbed on catalytically active sites, form a complex with activated hydrogen that is removed at remarkably low temperatures (115 K; possibly as a molecule). These results provide the first direct evidence that Ti-doped Al can carry out the essential first step of molecular hydrogen activation under nearly barrierless conditions, thereby challenging the monopoly of noble metals in hydrogen activation. PMID:21946610

  18. Design of Highly Selective Platinum Nanoparticle Catalysts for the Aerobic Oxidation of KA-Oil using Continuous-Flow Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Arran M; Hinde, Christopher S; Leary, Rowan K; Potter, Matthew E; Jouve, Andrea; Wells, Peter P; Midgley, Paul A; Thomas, John M; Raja, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Highly active and selective aerobic oxidation of KA-oil to cyclohexanone (precursor for adipic acid and ɛ-caprolactam) has been achieved in high yields using continuous-flow chemistry by utilizing uncapped noble-metal (Au, Pt & Pd) nanoparticle catalysts. These are prepared using a one-step in situ methodology, within three-dimensional porous molecular architectures, to afford robust heterogeneous catalysts. Detailed spectroscopic characterization of the nature of the active sites at the molecular level, coupled with aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, reveals that the synthetic methodology and associated activation procedures play a vital role in regulating the morphology, shape and size of the metal nanoparticles. These active centers have a profound influence on the activation of molecular oxygen for selective catalytic oxidations.

  19. Examining Rhodium Catalyst complexes for Use with Conducting Polymers Designed for Fuel Cells in Preparing Biosensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpio, M.M.; Kerr, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Biosensing devices are important because they can detect, record, and transmit information regarding the presence of, or physiological changes in, different chemical or biological materials in the environment. The goal of this research is to prepare a biosensing device that is effective, quick, and low cost. This is done by examining which chemicals will work best when placed in a biosensor. The first study involved experimenting on a rhodium catalyst complexed with ligands such as bipyridine and imidazole. The rhodium catalyst is important because it is reduced from RhIII to RhI, forms a hydride by reaction with water and releases the hydride to react with nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to selectively produce 1,4-NADH, the reduced form of NAD+. The second study looked at different types of ketones and enzymes for the enzyme-substrate reaction converting a ketone into an alcohol. Preliminary results showed that the rhodium complexed with bipyridine was able to carry out all the reactions, while the rhodium complexed with imidazole was not able to produce and release hydrides. In addition, the most effective ketone to use is benzylacetone with the enzyme alcohol dehydrogenase from baker’s yeast. Future work includes experimenting with bis-imidazole, which mimics the structure of bipyridine to see if it has the capability to reduce and if the reduction rate is comparable to the bipyridine complex. Once all testing is completed, the fastest catalysts will be combined with polymer membranes designed for fuel cells to prepare biosensing devices that can be used in a variety of applications including ones in the medical and environmental fields.

  20. Efficient and limiting reactions in aqueous light-induced hydrogen evolution systems using molecular catalysts and quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimbert-Suriñach, Carolina; Albero, Josep; Stoll, Thibaut; Fortage, Jérôme; Collomb, Marie-Noëlle; Deronzier, Alain; Palomares, Emilio; Llobet, Antoni

    2014-05-28

    Hydrogen produced from water and solar energy holds much promise for decreasing the fossil fuel dependence. It has recently been proven that the use of quantum dots as light harvesters in combination with catalysts is a valuable strategy to obtain photogenerated hydrogen. However, the light to hydrogen conversion efficiency of these systems is reported to be lower than 40%. The low conversion efficiency is mainly due to losses occurring at the different interfacial charge-transfer reactions taking place in the multicomponent system during illumination. In this work we have analyzed all the involved reactions in the hydrogen evolution catalysis of a model system composed of CdTe quantum dots, a molecular cobalt catalyst and vitamin C as sacrificial electron donor. The results demonstrate that the electron transfer from the quantum dots to the catalyst occurs fast enough and efficiently (nanosecond time scale), while the back electron transfer and catalysis are much slower (millisecond and microsecond time scales). Further improvements of the photodriven proton reduction should focus on the catalytic rate enhancement, which should be at least in the hundreds of nanoseconds time scale. PMID:24799030

  1. Design Molecular Recognition Materials for Chiral Sensors, Separtations and Catalytic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, S.; Nenoff, T.M.; Provencio, P.; Qiu, Y.; Shelnutt, J.A.; Thoma, S.G.; Zhang, J.

    1998-11-01

    The goal is the development of materials that are highly sensitive and selective for chid chemicals and biochemical (such as insecticides, herbicides, proteins, and nerve agents) to be used as sensors, catalysts and separations membranes. Molecular modeling methods are being used to tailor chiral molecular recognition sites with high affinity and selectivity for specified agents. The work focuses on both silicate and non-silicate materials modified with chirally-pure fictional groups for the catalysis or separations of enantiomerically-pure molecules. Surfactant and quaternary amine templating is being used to synthesize porous frameworks, containing mesopores of 30 to 100 angstroms. Computer molecukw modeling methods are being used in the design of these materials, especially in the chid surface- modi~ing agents. Molecular modeling is also being used to predict the catalytic and separations selectivities of the modified mesoporous materials. The ability to design and synthesize tailored asymmetric molecular recognition sites for sensor coatings allows a broader range of chemicals to be sensed with the desired high sensitivity and selectivity. Initial experiments target the selective sensing of small molecule gases and non-toxic model neural compounds. Further efforts will address designing sensors that greatly extend the variety of resolvable chemical species and forming a predictive, model-based method for developing advanced sensors.

  2. Current Understanding of Cu-Exchanged Chabazite Molecular Sieves for Use as Commercial Diesel Engine DeNOx Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Feng; Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2013-11-03

    Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with ammonia using metal-exchanged molecular sieves with a chabazite (CHA) structure has recently been commercialized on diesel vehicles. One of the commercialized catalysts, i.e., Cu-SSZ-13, has received much attention for both practical and fundamental studies. For the latter, the particularly well-defined structure of this zeolite is allowing long-standing issues of the catalytically active site for SCR in metal-exchanged zeolites to be addressed. In this review, recent progress is summarized with a focus on two areas. First, the technical significance of Cu-SSZ-13 as compared to other Cu-ion exchanged zeolites (e.g., Cu-ZSM-5 and Cu-beta) is highlighted. Specifically, the much enhanced hydrothermal stability for Cu-SSZ-13 compared to other zeolite catalysts is addressed via performance measurements and catalyst characterization using several techniques. The enhanced stability of Cu-SSZ-13 is rationalized in terms of the unique small pore structure of this zeolite catalyst. Second, the fundamentals of the catalytically active center; i.e., the chemical nature and locations within the SSZ-13 framework are presented with an emphasis on understanding structure-function relationships. For the SCR reaction, traditional kinetic studies are complicated by intra-particle diffusion limitations. However, a major side reaction, nonselective ammonia oxidation by oxygen, does not suffer from mass-transfer limitations at relatively low temperatures due to significantly lower reaction rates. This allows structure-function relationships that are rather well understood in terms of Cu ion locations and redox properties. Finally, some aspects of the SCR reaction mechanism are addressed on the basis of in-situ spectroscopic studies.

  3. Elucidating molecular iridium water oxidation catalysts using metal-organic frameworks: a comprehensive structural, catalytic, spectroscopic, and kinetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cheng; Wang, Jin-Liang; Lin, Wenbin

    2012-12-01

    As a new class of porous, crystalline, molecular materials, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have shown great promise as recyclable and reusable single-site solid catalysts. Periodic order and site isolation of the catalytic struts in MOFs facilitate the studies of their activities and reaction mechanisms. Herein we report the construction of two highly stable MOFs (1 and 2) using elongated dicarboxylate bridging ligands derived from Cp*Ir(L)Cl complexes (L = dibenzoate-substituted 2,2'-bipyridine, bpy-dc, or dibenzoate-substituted 2-phenylpyridine, ppy-dc) and Zr(6)O(4)(OH)(4)(carboxylate)(12) cuboctahedral secondary building units (SBUs) and the elucidation of water oxidation pathways of the Cp*Ir(L)Cl catalysts using these MOFs. We carried out detailed kinetic studies of Ce(4+)-driven water oxidation reactions (WORs) catalyzed by the MOFs using UV-vis spectroscopy, phosphorescent oxygen detection, and gas chromatographic analysis. These results confirmed not only water oxidation activity of the MOFs but also indicated oxidative degradation of the Cp* rings during the WOR. The (bpy-dc)Ir(H(2)O)(2)XCl (X is likely a formate or acetate group) complex resulted from the oxidative degradation process was identified as a competent catalyst responsible for the water oxidation activity of 1. Further characterization of the MOFs recovered from WORs using X-ray photoelectron, diffuse-reflectance UV-vis absorption, luminescence, and infrared spectroscopies supported the identity of (bpy-dc)Ir(H(2)O)(2)XCl as an active water oxidation catalyst. Kinetics of MOF-catalyzed WORs were monitored by Ce(4+) consumptions and fitted with a reaction-diffusion model, revealing an intricate relationship between reaction and diffusion rates. Our work underscores the opportunity in using MOFs as well-defined single-site solid catalytic systems to reveal mechanistic details that are difficult to obtain for their homogeneous counterparts. PMID:23136923

  4. Computationally Designed Zirconium Organometallic Catalyst for Direct Epoxidation of Alkenes without Allylic H Atoms: Aromatic Linkage Eliminates Formation of Inert Octahedral Complexes

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    We used density functional theory to computationally design a Zr organometallic catalyst for selectively oxidizing substrates using molecular oxygen as oxidant without coreductant. Each selective oxidation cycle involves four general steps: (a) a peroxo or weakly adsorbed O2 group releases an O atom to substrate to form substrate oxide and an oxo group, (b) an oxygen molecule adds to the oxo group to generate an eta2-ozone group, (c) the eta2-ozone group rearranges to form an eta3-ozone group, and (d) the eta3-ozone group releases an O atom to substrate to form substrate oxide and regenerate the peroxo or weakly adsorbed O2 group. This catalyst could potentially be synthesized via the condensation reaction Zr(N(R)R')4 + 2 C6H4-1,6-(N(C6H3-2',6'-(CH(CH3)2)2)OH)2 --> Zr(C6H4-1,6-(N(C6H3-2',6'-(CH(CH3)2)2)O)2)2 [aka Zr_Benzol catalyst] + 4 N(R)(R')H where R and R' are CH3, CH2CH3, or other alkyl groups. For direct ethylene epoxidation, the computed enthalpic energetic span (i.e., effective activation energy for ...

  5. Methanol Oxidative Dehydrogenation on Oxide Catalysts: Molecular and Dissociative Routes and Hydrogen Addition Energies as Descriptors of Reactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deshlahra, Prashant; Iglesia, Enrique

    2014-11-13

    The oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH) of alkanols on oxide catalysts is generally described as involving H-abstraction from alkoxy species formed via O–H dissociation. Kinetic and isotopic data cannot discern between such routes and those involving kinetically-relevant H-abstraction from undissociated alkanols. Here, we combine such experiments with theoretical estimates of activation energies and entropies to show that the latter molecular routes prevail over dissociative routes for methanol reactions on polyoxometalate (POM) clusters at all practical reaction temperatures. The stability of the late transition states that mediate H-abstraction depend predominantly on the stability of the O–H bond formed, making H-addition energies (HAE) accurate and single-valued descriptors of reactivity. Density functional theory-derived activation energies depend linearly on HAE values at each O-atom location on clusters with a range of composition (H3PMo12, H4SiMo12, H3PW12, H4PV1Mo11, and H4PV1W11); both barriers and HAE values reflect the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy of metal centers that accept the electron and the protonation energy of O-atoms that accept the proton involved in the H-atom transfer. Bridging O-atoms form O–H bonds that are stronger than those of terminal atoms and therefore exhibit more negative HAE values and higher ODH reactivity on all POM clusters. For each cluster composition, ODH turnover rates reflect the reactivity-averaged HAE of all accessible O-atoms, which can be evaluated for each cluster composition to provide a rigorous and accurate predictor of ODH reactivity for catalysts with known structure. These relations together with oxidation reactivity measurements can then be used to estimate HAE values and to infer plausible structures for catalysts with uncertain active site structures.

  6. Synthesis and application of different phthalocyanine molecular sieve catalyst for oxidative desulfurization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Na; Li, Siwen; Wang, Jinyi; Zhang, Ronglan [Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry of Ministry of Education, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Physico-Inorganic Chemistry, College of Chemistry & Material Science, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069, Shaanxi (China); Composites Research Institute, Weinan Normal University, Weinan 714000 (China); Gao, Ruimin [Research Institute of Shaanxi Yanchang Petroleum Group Corp. Ltd., Xi’an 710075 (China); Composites Research Institute, Weinan Normal University, Weinan 714000 (China); Zhao, Jianshe, E-mail: jszhao@nwu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Synthetic and Natural Functional Molecule Chemistry of Ministry of Education, Shaanxi Key Laboratory of Physico-Inorganic Chemistry, College of Chemistry & Material Science, Northwest University, Xi’an 710069, Shaanxi (China); Composites Research Institute, Weinan Normal University, Weinan 714000 (China); Wang, Junlong [Research Institute of Shaanxi Yanchang Petroleum Group Corp. Ltd., Xi’an 710075 (China); Composites Research Institute, Weinan Normal University, Weinan 714000 (China)

    2015-05-15

    M{sub 2}(PcAN){sub 2} (M=Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Mn) anchored onto W-HZSM-5 (M{sub 2}(PcAN){sub 2}–W-HZSM-5) or the M{sub 2}(PcTN){sub 2} doping W-HZSM-5 (M{sub 2}(PcTN){sub 2}/W-HZSM-5) were prepared and their catalytic performances were tested for oxidative desulfurization in the presence of oxygen. Thiophene (T), benzothiophene (BT), and dibenzothiophene (DBT) were considered as sulfur compounds. Among zeolite-based catalysts, the Cu{sub 2}(PcAN){sub 2}–W-HZSM-5 and Cu{sub 2}(PcTN){sub 2}/W-HZSM-5 showed superior desulfurization performance and the activity of selectivity followed the order: T>BT>DBT. The effects of phthalocyanine concentration were studied by UV–Vis and calcination temperature was obtained by TG-DSC for Cu{sub 2}(PcTN){sub 2}/W-HZSM-5. Catalysts were characterized by EA, IR, XRD, SEM, TEM, ICP, and N{sub 2} adsorption. Reaction time, temperature and the amount of catalyst were investigated as the important parameters for optimization of the reaction. Furthermore, a possible process of oxidative desulfurization and the reaction products were proposed. - Graphical abstract: The ODS reaction schematic shows the reaction mechanism of ultra-deep desulfurization. The sulfur compounds are oxidized to their corresponding sulfoxides or sulfones through the use of oxygen and catalysts. The reaction process of ultra-deep desulfurization. - Highlights: • A kind of novel catalyst for deep desulfurization was synthesized. • Cu{sub 2}(PcAN){sub 2}–W-HZSM-5 exhibits excellent catalytic performance for desulfurization. • The reaction conditions that affect desulfurization efficiency are investigated. • The reaction process of model sulfur compounds is proposed.

  7. Molecular design of Mycoplasma hominis Vaa adhesin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Thomas; Fedosova, Natalya U.; Kjeldgaard, Morten;

    2001-01-01

    The variable adherence-associated (Vaa) adhesin of the opportunistic human pathogen Mycoplasma hominis is a surface-exposed, membrane-associated protein involved in the attachment of the bacterium to host cells. The molecular masses of recombinant 1 and 2 cassette forms of the protein determined...

  8. Nanopore and nanoparticle catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J M; Raja, R

    2001-01-01

    The design, atomic characterization, performance, and relevance to clean technology of two distinct categories of new nanocatalysts are described and interpreted. Exceptional molecular selectivity and high activity are exhibited by these catalysts. The first category consists of extended, crystallographically ordered inorganic solids possessing nanopores (apertures, cages, and channels), the diameters of which fall in the range of about 0.4 to about 1.5 nm, and the second of discrete bimetallic nanoparticles of diameter 1 to 2 nm, distributed more or less uniformly along the inner walls of mesoporous (ca. 3 to 10 nm diameter) silica supports. Using the principles and practices of solid-state and organometallic chemistry and advanced physico-chemical techniques for in situ and ex situ characterization, a variety of powerful new catalysts has been evolved. Apart from those that, inter alia, simulate the behavior of enzymes in their specificity, shape selectivity, regio-selectivity, and ability to function under ambient conditions, many of these new nanocatalysts are also viable as agents for effecting commercially significant processes in a clean, benign, solvent-free, single-step fashion. In particular, a bifunctional, molecular sieve nanopore catalyst is described that converts cyclohexanone in air and ammonia to its oxime and caprolactam, and a bimetallic nanoparticle catalyst that selectively converts cyclic polyenes into desirable intermediates. Nanocatalysts in the first category are especially effective in facilitating highly selective oxidations in air, and those in the second are well suited to effecting rapid and selective hydrogenations of a range of organic compounds.

  9. Biorefinery: a design tool for molecular gelators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, George; Shankar, Balachandran Vijai; Jadhav, Swapnil R; Vemula, Praveen Kumar

    2010-12-01

    Molecular gels, the macroscopic products of a nanoscale bottom-up strategy, have emerged as a promising functional soft material. The prospects of tailoring the architecture of gelator molecules have led to the formation of unique, highly tunable gels for a wide spectrum of applications from medicine to electronics. Biorefinery is a concept that integrates the processes of converting biomass/renewable feedstock and the associated infrastructure used to produce chemicals and materials, which is analogous to petroleum-based refinery. The current review assimilates the successful efforts to demonstrate the prospects of the biorefinery concept for developing new amphiphiles as molecular gelators. Amphiphiles based on naturally available raw materials such as amygdalin, vitamin C, cardanol, arjunolic acid, and trehalose that possess specific functionality were synthesized using biocatalysis and/or chemical synthesis. The hydrogels and organogels obtained from such amphiphiles were conceptually demonstrated for diverse applications including drug-delivery systems and the templated synthesis of hybrid materials. PMID:20465204

  10. Foundation Flash Catalyst

    CERN Document Server

    Goralski, Greg

    2010-01-01

    This book offers an introduction to Flash Catalyst for designers with intermediate to advanced skills. It discusses where Catalyst sits within the production process and how it communicates with other programs. It covers all of the features of the Flash Catalyst workspace, teaching you how to create designs from scratch, how to build application designs and add functionality, and how to master the Catalyst/Flex workflow. * Introduces Flash Catalyst * Focuses on production process * Covers the interrelation between Flash Catalyst and Photoshop/Illustrator/Flex/Flash What you'll learn Starting f

  11. Molecular-Level Design of Heterogeneous Chiral Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francisco Zaera

    2012-03-21

    The following is a proposal to continue our multi-institutional research on heterogeneous chiral catalysis. Our team combines the use of surface-sensitive analytical techniques for the characterization of model systems with quantum and statistical mechanical calculations to interpret experimental data and guide the design of future research. Our investigation focuses on the interrelation among the three main mechanisms by which enantioselectivity can be bestowed to heterogeneous catalysts, namely: (1) by templating chirality via the adsorption of chiral supramolecular assemblies, (2) by using chiral modifiers capable of forming chiral complexes with the reactant and force enantioselective surface reactions, and (3) by forming naturally chiral surfaces using imprinting chiral agents. Individually, the members of our team are leaders in these various aspects of chiral catalysis, but the present program provides the vehicle to generate and exploit the synergies necessary to address the problem in a comprehensive manner. Our initial work has advanced the methodology needed for these studies, including an enantioselective titration procedure to identify surface chiral sites, infrared spectroscopy in situ at the interface between gases or liquids and solids to mimic realistic catalytic conditions, and DFT and Monte Carlo algorithms to simulate and understand chirality on surfaces. The next step, to be funded by the monies requested in this proposal, is to apply those methods to specific problems in chiral catalysis, including the identification of the requirements for the formation of supramolecular surface structures with enantioselective behavior, the search for better molecules to probe the chiral nature of the modified surfaces, the exploration of the transition from supramolecular to one-to-one chiral modification, the correlation of the adsorption characteristics of one-to-one chiral modifiers with their physical properties, in particular with their configuration

  12. A Molecular Copper Catalyst for Hydrogenation of CO­2 to Formate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zall, Christopher M.; Linehan, John C.; Appel, Aaron M.

    2015-09-04

    There is widespread interest in the hydrogenation of CO2 to energy-rich products such as formate. However, first-row transition metal complexes that catalyze the hydrogenation of CO2 to formate remain rare. Copper phosphine complexes are widely used in the reduction of organic substrates but have not previously been used as catalysts for the conversion of H2 and CO2 to formate. Here we demonstrate that the triphosphine-ligated copper(I) complex LCu(MeCN)PF6 is an active catalyst for CO2 hydrogenation in the presence of a suitable base. Screening of bases and studies of catalytic reactions by in operando spectroscopy revealed important and unusual roles for the base in promoting H2 activation and turnover.

  13. Rational Catalyst Design of Titanium-Silica Materials Aided by Site-Specific Titration Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Todd Robert

    between particle and crystal size, as obtained from XRD. In the course of establishing these relationships we've gained the knowledge of how to control TiO x structure, which enables the design of new and better catalysts. Understanding the synthesis-structure-function relationships allow for the design of a tandem photo/thermocatalytic reaction system for producing and consuming H2O2. By partially overcoating a TiO 2 photocatalyst with a ˜2 nm silica layer we observe a 56-fold rate improvement compared to bare-TiO2 for H2O2 synthesis from the proton-assisted reduction of O2. Addition of metal-SiO2 thermocatalysts (metal=Ti, Nb, or Ta) with sites needed for H2O2 activation creates a tandem system wherein the H2O2 produced in situ is utilized for alkene epoxidation. Compared to a thermocatalytic-only system, the tandem system accelerates epoxidation for cis-cyclooctene(11x faster), styrene(20x) and 1-octene(30x). This approach demonstrates a means for epoxidation with O2 that avoids H2O2 purification and transport, simplifies the total process, provides new opportunities for control by independent H2O2 production and consumption in the same reactor, and enhances rates relative to thermocatalytic-only epoxidation by intimately coupling H2O2 generation and consumption. Critically, establishment of titanium-silica synthesis-structure-function relationships enables the design of new catalysts and systems that are less energy- and material-intensive, leading towards more sustainable chemistry.

  14. Benign by design: catalyst-free in-water, on-water green chemical methodologies in organic synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of organic synthesis under sustainable conditions is a primary goal of practicing green chemists who want to prevent pollution and design safer pathways. Although, it is challenging to avoid the use of catalysts, or solvents in all the organic reactions but progre...

  15. THE BIMODAL MOLECULAR WEIGHT DISTRIBUTION OF cis-POLYBUTADIENE POLYMERIZED WITH LANTHANIDE COMPLEX CATALYSTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG Rongshi; HU Huizhen; JIANG Liansheng

    1987-01-01

    The variation of the molecular weight and molecular weight distribution of cis-polybutadiene in the course of polymerization catalyzed by lanthanide complex composed of triisobutyl aluminium or diisobutyl aluminium hydride was investigated by osmometry, viscometry and size exclusion chromatography. By analyzing the experimental data, the reasons of the appearance of bimodal molecular weight distribution were elucidated and the possible mechanisms of polymerization were discussed.

  16. Methodologies for chemical utilization of C02 to valuable compounds through molecular activation by efficient catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liangnian HE; Ya DU; Chengxia MIAO; Jinquan WANG; Xiaoyong DOU; Ying WU

    2009-01-01

    The reactions of CO2 with oxirane to produce cyclic carbonate, and with aziridine to afford oxazolidine have been of interest as a useful method for its fixation by a chemical process. Highly efficient processes employing recyclable CO2-phlilic homogeneous catalyst were devised for environmentally benign synthesis of cyclic carbonates and oxazolidinones under supercritical CO2 without any organic solvent. These processes represent pathways for greener chemical fixations of CO2 to afford industrial useful materials such as organic carbonates and oxazolidinones with great potential applications.

  17. Using articulation and inscription as catalysts for reflection: Design principles for reflective inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loh, Ben Tun-Bin

    2003-07-01

    The demand for students to engage in complex student-driven and information-rich inquiry investigations poses challenges to existing learning environments. Students are not familiar with this style of work, and lack the skills, tools, and expectations it demands, often forging blindly forward in the investigation. If students are to be successful, they need to learn to be reflective inquirers, periodically stepping back from an investigation to evaluate their work. The fundamental goal of my dissertation is to understand how to design learning environments to promote and support reflective inquiry. I have three basic research questions: how to define this mode of work, how to help students learn it, and understanding how it facilitates reflection when enacted in a classroom. I take an exploratory approach in which, through iterative cycles of design, development, and reflection, I develop principles of design for reflective inquiry, instantiate those principles in the design of a software environment, and test that software in the context of classroom work. My work contributes to the understanding of reflective inquiry in three ways: First, I define a task model that describes the kinds of operations (cognitive tasks) that students should engage in as reflective inquirers. These operations are defined in terms of two basic tasks: articulation and inscription, which serve as catalysts for externalizing student thinking as objects of and triggers for reflection. Second, I instantiate the task model in the design of software tools (the Progress Portfolio). And, through proof of concept pilot studies, I examine how the task model and tools helped students with their investigative classroom work. Finally, I take a step back from these implementations and articulate general design principles for reflective inquiry with the goal of informing the design of other reflective inquiry learning environments. There are three design principles: (1) Provide a designated work space

  18. Web Based Learning Support for Experimental Design in Molecular Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmsen, Tinri; Bisseling, Ton; Hartog, Rob

    An important learning goal of a molecular biology curriculum is a certain proficiency level in experimental design. Currently students are confronted with experimental approaches in textbooks, in lectures and in the laboratory. However, most students do not reach a satisfactory level of competence in the design of experimental approaches. This…

  19. MOLECULAR THERMODYNAMICS IN THE DESIGN OF SUBSTITUTE SOLVENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of physical properties and fluid behavior from molecular thermodynamics can lead to better decision making in the design of substitute solvents and can greatly reduce the expense and time required to find substitutes compared to designing solvents by experiment. this pape...

  20. Catalyst-free highly vertically aligned ZnO nanoneedle arrays grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, J.S.; Chiu, K.C. [Chung Yuan Christian University, Department of Physics, Chung-Li (China); Chung Yuan Christian University, Center for Nano-Technology, Chung-Li (China); Yang, C.S. [Tatung University, Graduate Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, Taipei (China); Chen, P.I.; Su, C.F.; Chen, W.J. [Chung Yuan Christian University, Department of Physics, Chung-Li (China); Chou, W.C. [National Chiao Tung University, Department of Electrophysics, Hsin-Chu (China)

    2009-11-15

    This work describes the growth of highly vertically aligned ZnO nanoneedle arrays on wafer-scale catalyst-free c-plane sapphire substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under high Zn flux conditions. The photoluminescence spectrum of the as-grown samples reveals strong free exciton emissions and donor-bound exciton emissions with an excellent full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 1.4 meV. The field emission of highly vertically aligned ZnO nanoneedle arrays closely follows the Fowler-Nordheim theory. The turn-on electric field was about 5.9 V/{mu}m with a field enhancement factor {beta} of around 793. (orig.)

  1. Catalyst-free highly vertically aligned ZnO nanoneedle arrays grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J. S.; Yang, C. S.; Chen, P. I.; Su, C. F.; Chen, W. J.; Chiu, K. C.; Chou, W. C.

    2009-11-01

    This work describes the growth of highly vertically aligned ZnO nanoneedle arrays on wafer-scale catalyst-free c-plane sapphire substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under high Zn flux conditions. The photoluminescence spectrum of the as-grown samples reveals strong free exciton emissions and donor-bound exciton emissions with an excellent full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 1.4 meV. The field emission of highly vertically aligned ZnO nanoneedle arrays closely follows the Fowler-Nordheim theory. The turn-on electric field was about 5.9 V/µm with a field enhancement factor β of around 793.

  2. Use of Yb-based catalyst for AGET ATRP of acrylonitrile to simultaneously control molecular mass distribution and tacticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Chen, Hou; Zhang, Min; Wang, Chunhua; Zhang, Ying; Qu, Rongjun

    2012-08-01

    Yb-based catalyst was used for the first time for atom transfer radical polymerization using activators generated by electron transfer (AGET ATRP) of acrylonitrile (AN) with 2-bromopropionitrile (BPN) as initiator, 2, 2'-bipyridine (bipy) as ligand, and tisn(II) bis(2-ethylhexanoate) (Sn(EH)2) as reducing agent in the presence of air. With respect to AGET ATRP of AN catalyzed by CuBr2, an evident increase of polymer tacticity was observed for AGET ATRP of AN. The increase of syndiotacticity became more and more pronounced than the increase of isotacticity of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) along with YbBr3 content. The block copolymer PAN-b-PMMA with molecular weight at 60,000 and polydispersity at 1.36 was successfully prepared. PMID:24364980

  3. Hydration effects on the molecular structure of silica-supported vanadium oxide catalysts: A combined IR, Raman, UV–vis and EXAFS study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, D.E.; Visser, T.; Soulimani, F.; Koningsberger, D.C.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of hydration on the molecular structure of silica-supported vanadium oxide catalysts with loadings of 1–16 wt.% V has been systematically investigated by infrared, Raman, UV–vis and EXAFS spectroscopy. IR and Raman spectra recorded during hydration revealed the formation of V–OH groups, c

  4. PHENANTHROLINE-STABILIZED PALLADIUM NANOPARTICLES IN POLYETHYLENE GLYCOL—AN ACTIVE AND RECYCLABLE CATALYST SYSTEM FOR THE SELECTIVE HYDROGENATION OF OLEFINS USING MOLECULAR HYDROGEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    1,10-Phenanthroline-stabilized palladium nanoparticles dispersed in a polyethylene glycol (PEG) matrix is synthesized which is found to be a stable and active catalyst for the selective hydrogenation of olefins using molecular hydrogen under mild reaction conditions. A variety of...

  5. Designing for selectivity: weak interactions and the competition for reactive sites on gold catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siler, C G F; Madix, R J; Friend, C M

    2016-07-01

    A major challenge in heterogeneous catalysis is controlling reaction selectivity, especially in complex environments. When more than one species is present in the gas mixture, the competition for binding sites on the surface of a catalyst is an important factor in determining reaction selectivity and activity. We establish an experimental hierarchy for the binding of a series of reaction intermediates on Au(111) and demonstrate that this hierarchy accounts for reaction selectivity on both the single crystal surface and under operating catalytic conditions at atmospheric pressure using a nanoporous Au catalyst. A partial set of measurements of relative binding has been measured by others on other catalyst materials, including Ag, Pd and metal oxide surfaces; a comparison demonstrates the generality of this concept and identifies differences in the trends. Theoretical calculations for a subset of reactants on Au(111) show that weak van der Waals interactions are key to predicting the hierarchy of binding strengths for alkoxides bound to Au(111). This hierarchy is key to the control of the selectivity for partial oxidation of alcohols to esters on both Au surfaces and under working catalytic conditions using nanoporous gold. The selectivity depends on the competition for active sites among key intermediates. New results probing the effect of fluorine substitution are also presented to extend the relation of reaction selectivity to the hierarchy of binding. Motivated by an interest in synthetic manipulation of fluorinated organics, we specifically investigated the influence of the -CF3 group on alcohol reactivity and selectivity. 2,2,2-Trifluoroethanol couples on O-covered Au(111) to yield CF3CH2O-C([double bond, length as m-dash]O)(CF3), but in the presence of methanol or ethanol it preferentially forms the respective 2,2,2-trifluoroethoxy-esters. The ester is not the dominant product in any of these cases, though, indicating that the rate of β-H elimination from

  6. Direct Synthesis of Dimethyl Carbonate from CO2 and CH3OH Using 0.4 nm Molecular Sieve Supported Cu-Ni Bimetal Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈惠玲; 王栓紧; 肖敏; 韩冬梅; 卢一新; 孟跃中

    2012-01-01

    The 0.4 nm molecular sieve supported Cu-Ni bimetal catalysts for direct synthesis of dimethyl carbonate (DMC) from CO 2 and CH 3 OH were prepared and investigated. The synthesized catalysts were fully characterized by BET, XRD (X-ray diffraction), TPR (temperature programmed reduction), IR (infra-red adsorption), NH 3-TPD (temperature programmed desorption) and CO 2-TPD (temperature programmed desorption) techniques. The results showed that the surface area of catalysts decreased with increasing metal content, and the metals as well as Cu-Ni alloy co-existed on the reduced catalyst surface. There existed interaction between metal and carrier, and moreover, metal particles affected obviously the acidity and basicity of carrier. The large amount of basic sites facilitated the activation of methanol to methoxyl species and their subsequent reaction with activated carbon dioxide. The catalysts were evaluated in a continuous tubular fixed-bed micro-gaseous reactor and the catalyst with bimetal loading of 20% (by mass) had best catalytic activities. Under the conditions of 393 K, 1.1 MPa, 5 h and gas space velocity of 510 h 1 , the selectivity and yield of DMC were higher than 86.0 % and 5.0 %, respectively.

  7. Water reduction by a p-GaInP2 photoelectrode stabilized by an amorphous TiO2 coating and a molecular cobalt catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Jing; Yan, Yong; Young, James L.; Steirer, K. Xerxes; Neale, Nathan R.; Turner, John A.

    2015-12-21

    Producing hydrogen through solar water splitting requires the coverage of large land areas. Abundant metal-based molecular catalysts offer scalability, but only if they match noble metal activities. We report on a highly active p-GaInP2 photocathode protected through a 35-nm TiO2 layer functionalized by a cobaloxime molecular catalyst (GaInP2-TiO2-cobaloxime). This photoelectrode mediates H2 production with a current density of ~9"0mA"0cm-2 at a potential of 0"0V versus RHE under 1-sun illumination at pH"013. The calculated turnover number for the catalyst during a 20-h period is 139,000, with an average turnover frequency of 1.9"0s-1. Bare GaInP2 shows a rapid current decay, whereas the GaInP2-TiO2-cobaloxime electrode shows catalyst particle-modified interface. The activity and corrosion resistance of the GaInP2-TiO2-cobaloxime photocathode in basic solution is made possible by an atomic layer-deposited TiO2 and an attached cobaloxime catalyst.

  8. Design of Pt/Carbon Xerogel Catalysts for PEM Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Job

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of efficient catalytic layers of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs requires the preparation of highly-loaded and highly-dispersed Pt/C catalysts. During the last few years, our work focused on the preparation of Pt/carbon xerogel electrocatalysts, starting from simple impregnation techniques that were further optimized via the strong electrostatic adsorption (SEA method to reach high dispersion and a high metal weight fraction. The SEA method, which consists of the optimization of the precursor/support electrostatic impregnation through an adequate choice of the impregnation pH with regard to the support surface chemistry, leads to very well-dispersed Pt/C samples with a maximum 8 wt.% Pt after drying and reduction under H2. To increase the metal loading, the impregnation-drying-reduction cycle of the SEA method can be repeated several times, either with fresh Pt precursor solution or with the solution recycled from the previous cycle. In each case, a high dispersion (Pt particle size ~3 nm is obtained. Finally, the procedure can be simplified by combination of the SEA technique with dry impregnation, leading to no Pt loss during the procedure.

  9. Attaining control by design over the hydrolytic stability of Fe-TAML oxidation catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polshin, Victor; Popescu, Delia-Laura; Fischer, Andreas; Chanda, Arani; Horner, David C; Beach, Evan S; Henry, Jennifer; Qian, Yong-Li; Horwitz, Colin P; Lente, Gabor; Fabian, Istvan; Münck, Eckard; Bominaar, Emile L; Ryabov, Alexander D; Collins, Terrence J

    2008-04-01

    The iron(III) complexes of tetra amidato macrocyclic ligands (TAMLs) ([Fe{1-X1-2-X2C6H2-4,5-(NCOCMe2NCO)2CR2}(OH2)]- , 1: X1 = X2 = H, R2 = Me2 (a), R2 = (CH2)2 (b); X1 = X2 = Cl, R2 = F2 (c), etc.), which the proton is known to demetalate at pH constants for the demetalation (kobs) are linear functions of the acid concentrations, and the effective second-order rate constants k1,eff have a hyperbolic dependence on [H+] (k1,eff = a1[H+]/(b1+[H+]). The rate of demetalation of 1a in H2PO4-/HPO42- buffer is appreciable, but the kobs values for 1b and 1c are immeasurably low, showing that the rates are strongly affected by the CR2 or "tail" fragments, which are known to potently affect the TAML basicity. The reactivities of 1 depend insignificantly on the aromatic ring or "head" group of 1. The proposed mechanism involves precoordination of the acidic buffer species followed by hydrolysis. The demetalating abilities of buffer species depend on their structures and acidities. Thus, although pyridine-2-carboxylic (picolinic) acid catalyzes the demetalation, its 3- and 4-isomers (nicotinic and isonicotininc acids) are inactive. The difference is rationalized to result from the ability that only coordinated picolinic acid has to deliver a proton to an amidato nitrogen in an intramolecular manner. The reaction order in picolinic acid equals one for 1a and two for 1b. For 1b, "inactive" pyridine and nicotinic acid speed up the demetalation in the presence of picolinic acid, suggesting that the second order arises from the axial binding of two pyridine molecules, one of which must be picolinic acid. The binding of pyridine- and imidazole-type ligands was confirmed by UV/vis equilibrium measurements and X-ray crystallography. The implications of these mechanistic findings for designing superior Fe-TAML oxidation catalysts and catalyst formulations are discussed using the results of DFT calculations. PMID:18335938

  10. Photocatalytic water oxidation via combination of BiVO4-RGO and molecular cobalt catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Li, Fei; Li, Hua; Bai, Lichen; Sun, Licheng

    2016-02-18

    A BiVO4-reduced graphene oxide (RGO) composite in conjugation with the cubic molecular complex Co4O4(O2CMe)4(py)4 (py = pyridine) has been found to be highly efficient towards visible light-driven water oxidation. A 4-fold enhancement in the average oxygen evolution rate and 100% yield based on the consumption of the sacrificial electron acceptor were obtained upon the addition of molecular cocatalysts to BiVO4-RGO in pure water. PMID:26795211

  11. Computer aided molecular design with combined molecular modeling and group contribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harper, Peter Mathias; Gani, Rafiqul; Kolar, Petr;

    1999-01-01

    and on the availability of suitable models for property prediction. A new CAMD methodology that addresses this issue by combining molecular modeling techniques with a traditional CAMD approach is presented. The new method includes a new molecular/atomic structure generation algorithm, a large collection of property...... estimation methods, and, a link to molecular modelling tools. Application of the new CAMD method is highlighted through two industrial examples. (C) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.......Computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) provides a means for determining molecules or mixtures of molecules (CAMMD) having a desirable set of physicochemical properties. The application range of CAMD is restricted due to limitations on the complexity of the generated molecular structures...

  12. Information storage at the molecular level - The design of a molecular shift register memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beratan, David N.; Onuchic, Jose Nelson; Hopfield, J. J.

    1989-01-01

    The control of electron transfer rates is discussed and a molecular shift register memory at the molecular level is described. The memory elements are made up of molecules which can exist in either an oxidized or reduced state and the bits can be shifted between the cells with photoinduced electron transfer reactions. The device integrates designed molecules onto a VLSI substrate. A control structure to modify the flow of information along a shift register is indicated schematically.

  13. Beyond Molecular Wires: Design Molecular Electronic Functions Based on Dipolar Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wai-Yip; Zhang, Na; Cai, Zhengxu; Li, Lianwei; Yu, Luping

    2016-09-20

    As the semiconductor companies officially abandoned the pursuit of Moore's law, the limitation of silicone-based semiconductor electronic devices is approaching. Single molecular devices are considered as a potential solution to overcome the physical barriers caused by quantum interferences because the intermolecular interactions are mainly through weak van der Waals force between molecular building blocks. In this bottom-up approach, components are built from atoms up, allowing great control over the molecular properties. Moreover, single molecular devices are powerful tools to understand quantum physics, reaction mechanism, and electron and charge transfer processes in organic semiconductors and molecules. So far, a great deal of effort is focused on understanding charge transport through organic single-molecular wires. However, to control charge transport, molecular diodes, switches, transistors, and memories are crucial. Significant progress in these topics has been achieved in the past years. The introduction and advances of scanning tunneling microscope break-junction (STM-BJ) techniques have led to more detailed characterization of new molecular structures. The modern organic chemistry provides an efficient access to a variety of functional moieties in single molecular device. These moieties have the potential to be incorporated in miniature circuits or incorporated as parts in molecular machines, bioelectronics devices, and bottom-up molecular devices. In this Account, we discuss progress mainly made in our lab in designing and characterizing organic single-molecular electronic components beyond molecular wires and with varied functions. We have synthesized and demonstrated molecular diodes with p-n junction structures through various scanning probe microscopy techniques. The assembly of the molecular diodes was achieved by using Langmuir-Blodgett technique or thiol/gold self-assembly chemistry with orthogonal protecting groups. We have thoroughly

  14. Beyond Molecular Wires: Design Molecular Electronic Functions Based on Dipolar Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Wai-Yip; Zhang, Na; Cai, Zhengxu; Li, Lianwei; Yu, Luping

    2016-09-20

    As the semiconductor companies officially abandoned the pursuit of Moore's law, the limitation of silicone-based semiconductor electronic devices is approaching. Single molecular devices are considered as a potential solution to overcome the physical barriers caused by quantum interferences because the intermolecular interactions are mainly through weak van der Waals force between molecular building blocks. In this bottom-up approach, components are built from atoms up, allowing great control over the molecular properties. Moreover, single molecular devices are powerful tools to understand quantum physics, reaction mechanism, and electron and charge transfer processes in organic semiconductors and molecules. So far, a great deal of effort is focused on understanding charge transport through organic single-molecular wires. However, to control charge transport, molecular diodes, switches, transistors, and memories are crucial. Significant progress in these topics has been achieved in the past years. The introduction and advances of scanning tunneling microscope break-junction (STM-BJ) techniques have led to more detailed characterization of new molecular structures. The modern organic chemistry provides an efficient access to a variety of functional moieties in single molecular device. These moieties have the potential to be incorporated in miniature circuits or incorporated as parts in molecular machines, bioelectronics devices, and bottom-up molecular devices. In this Account, we discuss progress mainly made in our lab in designing and characterizing organic single-molecular electronic components beyond molecular wires and with varied functions. We have synthesized and demonstrated molecular diodes with p-n junction structures through various scanning probe microscopy techniques. The assembly of the molecular diodes was achieved by using Langmuir-Blodgett technique or thiol/gold self-assembly chemistry with orthogonal protecting groups. We have thoroughly

  15. A computational molecular design framework for crosslinked polymer networks

    OpenAIRE

    Eslick, J.C.; Q. Ye; J. Park; Topp, E.M.; Spencer, P.; Camarda, K.V.

    2008-01-01

    Crosslinked polymers are important in a very wide range of applications including dental restorative materials. However, currently used polymeric materials experience limited durability in the clinical oral environment. Researchers in the dental polymer field have generally used a time-consuming experimental trial-and-error approach to the design of new materials. The application of computational molecular design (CMD) to crosslinked polymer networks has the potential to facilitate developmen...

  16. Lattice enumeration for inverse molecular design using the signature descriptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Shawn

    2012-07-23

    We describe an inverse quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) framework developed for the design of molecular structures with desired properties. This framework uses chemical fragments encoded with a molecular descriptor known as a signature. It solves a system of linear constrained Diophantine equations to reorganize the fragments into novel molecular structures. The method has been previously applied to problems in drug and materials design but has inherent computational limitations due to the necessity of solving the Diophantine constraints. We propose a new approach to overcome these limitations using the Fincke-Pohst algorithm for lattice enumeration. We benchmark the new approach against previous results on LFA-1/ICAM-1 inhibitory peptides, linear homopolymers, and hydrofluoroether foam blowing agents. Software implementing the new approach is available at www.cs.otago.ac.nz/homepages/smartin. PMID:22657105

  17. Visible-Light-Responsive Photocatalysis: Ag-Doped TiO2 Catalyst Development and Reactor Design Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, Janelle L.; Hintze, Paul E.; Meier, Anne; Shah, Malay G.; Devor, Robert W.; Surma, Jan M.; Maloney, Phillip R.; Bauer, Brint M.; Mazyck, David W.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the alteration of titanium dioxide to become visible-light-responsive (VLR) has been a major focus in the field of photocatalysis. Currently, bare titanium dioxide requires ultraviolet light for activation due to its band gap energy of 3.2 eV. Hg-vapor fluorescent light sources are used in photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) reactors to provide adequate levels of ultraviolet light for catalyst activation; these mercury-containing lamps, however, hinder the use of this PCO technology in a spaceflight environment due to concerns over crew Hg exposure. VLR-TiO2 would allow for use of ambient visible solar radiation or highly efficient visible wavelength LEDs, both of which would make PCO approaches more efficient, flexible, economical, and safe. Over the past three years, Kennedy Space Center has developed a VLR Ag-doped TiO2 catalyst with a band gap of 2.72 eV and promising photocatalytic activity. Catalyst immobilization techniques, including incorporation of the catalyst into a sorbent material, were examined. Extensive modeling of a reactor test bed mimicking air duct work with throughput similar to that seen on the International Space Station was completed to determine optimal reactor design. A bench-scale reactor with the novel catalyst and high-efficiency blue LEDs was challenged with several common volatile organic compounds (VOCs) found in ISS cabin air to evaluate the system's ability to perform high-throughput trace contaminant removal. The ultimate goal for this testing was to determine if the unit would be useful in pre-heat exchanger operations to lessen condensed VOCs in recovered water thus lowering the burden of VOC removal for water purification systems.

  18. Partial Oxidation of Methane to Syngas Using Lattice Oxygen of La1-xSrxFeO3 Perovskite Oxide Catalysts Instead of Molecular Oxygen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ranjia Li; Changchun Yu; Shikong Shen

    2002-01-01

    Catalytic partial oxidation of methane to syngas using the lattice oxygen of La1-xSrxFeO3 perovskite oxide catalysts in place of molecular oxygen was studied. La1-xSrxFeO3 (x=0, 0.1, 0.2,0.5) perovskite oxides were prepared by the "auto-combustion method". XRD analysis showed that all La1-xSrxFeO3 samples have a single-phase perovskite-type oxide. The redox properties of the catalysts were investigated by temperature programmed reduction with hydrogen (H2-TPR). Reducibility of the catalysts increase with the increasing of the Sr2+ content. The oxygen species of the catalysts and their reaction with CH4 were studied by the temperature programmed surface reaction (CH4-TPSR). In the absence of gas phase oxygen, there exist two kinds of oxygen species on the catalysts. One kind of the oxygen species with strong oxidative ability is produced first, which can oxidize CH4 completely to CO2 and H2O.Then, the second oxygen species with weak oxidative ability is formed, which can oxidize CH4 partially to CO and H2 with high selectivity. The number of the oxygen species with strong oxidative ability in the CH4-TPSR tends to become zero at low x values (x≤0.1). Under suitable reaction conditions, switching alternatively the reactions of 11% O2-Ar and 11% CH4-He over a La0.sSr0.2FeO3 catalyst at 900 ℃ allows methane to be selectively converted to synthesis gas (CH4 conversion ~90%, CO selectivity >93%) using the lattice oxygen of the perovskite oxide catalyst in a redox mode.

  19. Pyridine-H5PMo10V2O40 hybrid catalysts for liquid-phase hydroxylation of benzene to phenol with molecular oxygen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Pyridine(Py)-modified Keggin-type vanadium-substituted heteropoly acids(PynPMo10V2O40,n=1 to 5) were prepared by a precipitation method as organic/inorganic hybrid catalysts for direct hydroxylation of benzene to phenol in a pressured batch reactor and their structures were detected by FT-IR.Among various catalysts,Py3PMo10V2O40 exhibits the highest catalytic activity(yield of phenol,11.5%),without observing the formation of catechol,hydroquinone and benzoquinone in the reaction with 80 vol% aqueous acetic acid,molecular oxygen and ascorbic acid used as the solvent,oxidant and reducing reagent,respectively.Influences of reaction temperature,reaction time,oxygen pressure,amount of ascorbic acid and catalyst on yield of phenol were investigated to obtain the optimal reaction conditions for phenol formation.Pyridine can greatly promote the catalytic activity of the Py-free catalyst(H5PMo10V2O40),mostly because the organic π electrons in the hybrid catalyst may extend their conjugation to the inorganic framework of heteropoly acid and dramatically modify the redox properties,at the same time,pyridine adsorbed on heteropoly acids can promote the effect of "pseudo-liquid phase",thus accounting for the enhancement of phenol yield.

  20. Pyridine-H5PMo10V2O40 hybrid catalysts for liquid-phase hydroxylation of benzene to phenol with molecular oxygen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GE HanQing; LENG Yan; ZHANG FuMin; PIAO JiaRui; ZHOU ChangJiang; WANG Jun

    2009-01-01

    Pyridine(Py)-modified Keggin-type vanadium-substituted heteropoly acids (PynPMo10V2O40,n=1 to 5) were prepared by a precipitation method as organic/inorganic hybrid catalysts for direct hydroxylation of benzene to phenol in a pressured batch reactor and their structures were detected by FT-IR.Among various catalysts,Py3PMo10V2O40 exhibits the highest catalytic activity (yield of phenol,11.5%),without observing the formation of catechol,hydroquinone and benzoquinone in the reaction with 80 vol% aqueous acetic acid,molecular oxygen and ascorbic acid used as the solvent,oxidant and reducing reagent,respectively.Influences of reaction temperature,reaction time,oxygen pressure,amount of ascorbic acid and catalyst on yield of phenol were investigated to obtain the optimal reaction conditions for phenol formation.Pyridine can greatly promote the catalytic activity of the Py-free catalyst (H5PMo10V2O40),mostly because the organic π electrons in the hybrid catalyst may extend their conjugation to the inorganic framework of heteropoly acid and dramatically modify the redox properties,at the same time,pyridine adsorbed on heteropoly acids can promote the effect of "pseudo-liquid phase",thus accounting for the enhancement of phenol yield.

  1. The role of surface reactions on the active and selective catalyst design for bioethanol steam reforming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benito, M. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie 2, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Ciemat, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Padilla, R.; Serrano-Lotina, A.; Rodriguez, L.; Daza, L. [Instituto de Catalisis y Petroleoquimica (CSIC), C/Marie Curie 2, Campus Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Brey, J.J. [Hynergreen Technologies, Av. Buhaira 2, 41018 Sevilla (Spain)

    2009-07-01

    In order to study the role of surface reactions involved in bioethanol steam reforming mechanism, a very active and selective catalyst for hydrogen production was analysed. The highest activity was obtained at 700 C, temperature at which the catalyst achieved an ethanol conversion of 100% and a selectivity to hydrogen close to 70%. It also exhibited a very high hydrogen production efficiency, higher than 4.5 mol H{sub 2} per mol of EtOH fed. The catalyst was operated at a steam to carbon ratio (S/C) of 4.8, at 700 C and atmospheric pressure. No by-products, such as ethylene or acetaldehyde were observed. In order to consider a further application in an ethanol processor, a long-term stability test was performed under the conditions previously reported. After 750 h, the catalyst still exhibited a high stability and selectivity to hydrogen production. Based on the intermediate products detected by temperature programmed desorption and reaction (TPD and TPR) experiments, a reaction pathway was proposed. Firstly, the adsorbed ethanol is dehydrogenated to acetaldehyde producing hydrogen. Secondly, the adsorbed acetaldehyde is transformed into acetone via acetic acid formation. Finally, acetone is reformed to produce hydrogen and carbon dioxide, which were the final reaction products. The promotion of such reaction sequence is the key to develop an active, selective and stable catalyst, which is the technical barrier for hydrogen production by ethanol reforming. (author)

  2. The role of surface reactions on the active and selective catalyst design for bioethanol steam reforming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, M.; Padilla, R.; Serrano-Lotina, A.; Rodríguez, L.; Brey, J. J.; Daza, L.

    In order to study the role of surface reactions involved in bioethanol steam reforming mechanism, a very active and selective catalyst for hydrogen production was analysed. The highest activity was obtained at 700 °C, temperature at which the catalyst achieved an ethanol conversion of 100% and a selectivity to hydrogen close to 70%. It also exhibited a very high hydrogen production efficiency, higher than 4.5 mol H 2 per mol of EtOH fed. The catalyst was operated at a steam to carbon ratio (S/C) of 4.8, at 700 °C and atmospheric pressure. No by-products, such as ethylene or acetaldehyde were observed. In order to consider a further application in an ethanol processor, a long-term stability test was performed under the conditions previously reported. After 750 h, the catalyst still exhibited a high stability and selectivity to hydrogen production. Based on the intermediate products detected by temperature programmed desorption and reaction (TPD and TPR) experiments, a reaction pathway was proposed. Firstly, the adsorbed ethanol is dehydrogenated to acetaldehyde producing hydrogen. Secondly, the adsorbed acetaldehyde is transformed into acetone via acetic acid formation. Finally, acetone is reformed to produce hydrogen and carbon dioxide, which were the final reaction products. The promotion of such reaction sequence is the key to develop an active, selective and stable catalyst, which is the technical barrier for hydrogen production by ethanol reforming.

  3. Surface Functionalization of g-C3 N4 : Molecular-Level Design of Noble-Metal-Free Hydrogen Evolution Photocatalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yin; Lin, Bin; Yu, Weili; Yang, Yong; Bashir, Shahid M; Wang, Hong; Takanabe, Kazuhiro; Idriss, Hicham; Basset, Jean-Marie

    2015-07-13

    A stable noble-metal-free hydrogen evolution photocatalyst based on graphite carbon nitride (g-C3 N4 ) was developed by a molecular-level design strategy. Surface functionalization was successfully conducted to introduce a single nickel active site onto the surface of the semiconducting g-C3 N4 . This catalyst family (with less than 0.1 wt % of Ni) has been found to produce hydrogen with a rate near to the value obtained by using 3 wt % platinum as co-catalyst. This new catalyst also exhibits very good stability under hydrogen evolution conditions, without any evidence of deactivation after 24 h. PMID:26073972

  4. Surface Functionalization of g-C 3 N 4 : Molecular-Level Design of Noble-Metal-Free Hydrogen Evolution Photocatalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Yin

    2015-06-12

    A stable noble-metal-free hydrogen evolution photocatalyst based on graphite carbon nitride (g-C3N4) was developed by a molecular-level design strategy. Surface functionalization was successfully conducted to introduce a single nickel active site onto the surface of the semiconducting g-C3N4. This catalyst family (with less than 0.1 wt% of Ni) has been found to produce hydrogen with a rate near to the value obtained by using 3 wt% platinum as co-catalyst. This new catalyst also exhibits very good stability under hydrogen evolution conditions, without any evidence of deactivation after 24h. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Molecular Design and Functional Control of Novel Self-Oscillating Polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Yoshida

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available If we could realize an autonomous polymer system driven under biological conditions by a tailor-made molecular design, human beings could create unprecedented biomimetic functions and materials such as heartbeats, autonomous peristaltic pumps, etc. In order to achieve this objective, we have investigated the molecular design of such a polymer system. As a result, we were the first to demonstrate a self-oscillating polymer system driven in a solution where only malonic acid existed, which could convert the chemical energy of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ reaction into a change in the conformation of the polymer chain. To cause the self-oscillation in solution, we have attempted to construct a built-in system where the required BZ system substrates other than the organic acid are incorporated into the polymer itself. That is, the novel polymer chain incorporated the metal catalyst of the BZ reaction, a pH-control site and an oxidant supply site at the same time. As a result of introducing the pH control and oxidant supply sites into the conventional-type self-oscillating polymer chain, the novel polymer chain caused aggregation-disaggregation self-oscillations in the solution. We clarified that the period of the self-oscillation of the novel self-oscillating polymer chain was proportional to the concentration of the malonic acid. Therefore, the concentration of the malonic acid can be determined by measuring the period of the novel self-oscillating polymer solution. In this review, we introduce the detailed molecular design of the novel self-oscillating polymer chain and its self-oscillating behavior. Moreover, we report an autonomous self-oscillating polymer gel actuator that causes a bending-stretching motion under the constant conditions.

  6. Micro-/nanostructured multicomponent molecular materials: design, assembly, and functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Dongpeng

    2015-03-23

    Molecule-based micro-/nanomaterials have attracted considerable attention because their properties can vary greatly from the corresponding macro-sized bulk systems. Recently, the construction of multicomponent molecular solids based on crystal engineering principles has emerged as a promising alternative way to develop micro-/nanomaterials. Unlike single-component materials, the resulting multicomponent systems offer the advantages of tunable composition, and adjustable molecular arrangement, and intermolecular interactions within their solid states. The study of these materials also supplies insight into how the crystal structure, molecular components, and micro-/nanoscale effects can influence the performance of molecular materials. In this review, we describe recent advances and current directions in the assembly and applications of crystalline multicomponent micro-/nanostructures. Firstly, the design strategies for multicomponent systems based on molecular recognition and crystal engineering principles are introduced. Attention is then focused on the methods of fabrication of low-dimensional multicomponent micro-/nanostructures. Their new applications are also outlined. Finally, we briefly discuss perspectives for the further development of these molecular crystalline micro-/nanomaterials.

  7. Molecular design of an epoxy for cryogenic temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawa, Fumio; Nishijima, Shigehiro; Okada, Toichi

    The mechanical and thermal properties of several epoxy resins were measured to obtain guidelines for the molecular design of an epoxy resin for cryogenic temperatures. Two types of epoxy resin with different numbers of epoxy groups were mixed (with different mixing ratios) and cured. Fracture toughness, flexural strength and thermal contraction of the hybrid epoxy resins were measured down to cryogenic temperatures. The results suggest that epoxies with larger molecular weights between crosslinkings relaxed stress at the crack tip, even at cryogenic temperatures. Intermolecular forces and stress relaxation at the crack tip were found to be important for high fracture toughness.

  8. Design of Carborane Molecular Architectures via Electronic Structure Computations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep M. Oliva

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantum-mechanical electronic structure computations were employed to explore initial steps towards a comprehensive design of polycarborane architectures through assembly of molecular units. Aspects considered were (i the striking modification of geometrical parameters through substitution, (ii endohedral carboranes and proposed ejection mechanisms for energy/ion/atom/energy storage/transport, (iii the excited state character in single and dimeric molecular units, and (iv higher architectural constructs. A goal of this work is to find optimal architectures where atom/ion/energy/spin transport within carborane superclusters is feasible in order to modernize and improve future photoenergy processes.

  9. Photoswitching a Molecular Catalyst to Regulate CO2 Hydrogenation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priyadarshani, Nilusha [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bays, J. Timothy [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Linehan, John C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shaw, Wendy J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-07-24

    Inspired by nature’s ability to regulate catalysis using physiological stimuli, azobenzene was incorporated into Rh(bis)diphosphine CO2 hydrogenation catalysts to photoinitiate structural changes to modulate the resulting catalytic activity. The rhodium bound diphosphine ligands (P(Ph2)-CH2-N(R) CH2-P(Ph2)) contain the terminal amine of a non-natural amino acid, either β-alanine (β-Ala) or γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). For both β-ala and GABA containing complexes, the carboxylic acids of the amino acids were coupled to the amines of diaminoazobenzene, creating a rhodium bound trans-spanning tetraphosphine complex. The photo-induced cis-trans isomerization of the azobenzene-containing complexes imposes structural changes on these complexes, as evidenced by 1H NMR. We found that the CO2 hydrogenation activity for the β-ala bound Rh complex is 40% faster with azobenzene in the cis configuration (16 s-1) than in the trans conformation (11 s-1), while the γ-aminobutyric acid containing Rh complex has the same rate (~17 s-1) in either the cis or the trans configuration at 27 °C. The corresponding complexes without the attached azobenzene were also prepared, characterized, and catalytically tested for comparison, and have rates of 30 s-1. Computational studies were undertaken to evaluate the difference in rate between the cis and trans isomers for the β-Ala bound Rh complex, and revealed major structural changes between all cis and trans structures, but only minor structural changes that would be unique to the β-Ala bound Rh complex. We postulate that the slower rate of the azobenzene-containing β-Ala bound Rh complex is due to subtle changes in the bite angle arising from steric strain due to the trans-spanning azobenzene, altering hydricity and consequently rate. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy

  10. Protein Scaffolding for Small Molecule Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, David [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2014-09-14

    We aim to design hybrid catalysts for energy production and storage that combine the high specificity, affinity, and tunability of proteins with the potent chemical reactivities of small organometallic molecules. The widely used Rosetta and RosettaDesign methodologies will be extended to model novel protein / small molecule catalysts in which one or many small molecule active centers are supported and coordinated by protein scaffolding. The promise of such hybrid molecular systems will be demonstrated with the nickel-phosphine hydrogenase of DuBois et. al.We will enhance the hydrogenase activity of the catalyst by designing protein scaffolds that incorporate proton relays and systematically modulate the local environment of the catalyticcenter. In collaboration with DuBois and Shaw, the designs will be experimentally synthesized and characterized.

  11. Molecular docking and structure-based drug design strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Leonardo G; Dos Santos, Ricardo N; Oliva, Glaucius; Andricopulo, Adriano D

    2015-07-22

    Pharmaceutical research has successfully incorporated a wealth of molecular modeling methods, within a variety of drug discovery programs, to study complex biological and chemical systems. The integration of computational and experimental strategies has been of great value in the identification and development of novel promising compounds. Broadly used in modern drug design, molecular docking methods explore the ligand conformations adopted within the binding sites of macromolecular targets. This approach also estimates the ligand-receptor binding free energy by evaluating critical phenomena involved in the intermolecular recognition process. Today, as a variety of docking algorithms are available, an understanding of the advantages and limitations of each method is of fundamental importance in the development of effective strategies and the generation of relevant results. The purpose of this review is to examine current molecular docking strategies used in drug discovery and medicinal chemistry, exploring the advances in the field and the role played by the integration of structure- and ligand-based methods.

  12. Current status, key challenges and its solutions in the design and development of graphene based ORR catalysts for the microbial fuel cell applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannan, M V; Gnana Kumar, G

    2016-03-15

    Microbial fuel cells (MFC) are considered as the futuristic energy device that generates electricity from the catalytic degradation of biodegradable organic wastes using microbes, which exist in waste water. In MFCs, oxygen serves as a cathodic electron acceptor and oxygen reduction kinetics played a significant role in the determination of overall efficiency. A wide range of strategies have been developed for the preparation and substantial modification of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalysts to improve the maximum volumetric power density of MFCs, in which the efforts on graphene based ORR catalysts are highly imperative. Although numerous research endeavors have been achieved in relation with the graphene based ORR catalysts applicable for MFCs, still their collective summary has not been developed, which hinders the acquirement of adequate knowledge on tuning the specific properties of said catalysts. The intension of this review is to outline the significant role of ORR catalysts, factors influencing the ORR activity, strategies behind the modifications of ORR catalysts and update the research efforts devoted on graphene based ORR catalysts. This review can be considered as a pertinent guide to understand the design and developmental strategies of competent graphene based ORR catalysts, which are not only applicable for MFCs but also for number of electrochemical applications. PMID:26606182

  13. Probing the molecular design of hyper-branched aryl polyesters towards lubricant applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Joshua W; Zhou, Yan; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Erck, Robert; Qu, Jun; Bays, J Timothy; Cosimbescu, Lelia

    2016-01-01

    We report novel polymeric materials that may be used as viscosity index improvers (VII) for lubricant applications. Our efforts included probing the comb-burst hyper-branched aryl polyester architecture for beneficial viscosity and friction behavior when utilized as an additive in a group I oil. The monomer was designed as to undergo polymerization via polycondensation within the architectural construct (AB2), typical of hyperbranched polymers. The monomer design was comprised of aliphatic arms (12 or 16 methylenes) to provide the necessary lipophilicity to achieve solubility in a non-polar medium. Once polymerized, via catalyst and heat, the surface alcohols were functionalized with fatty acids (lauric and palmitic). Controlling the aliphatic nature of the internal arms and peripheral end-groups provided four unique flexible polymer designs. Changing the reaction time and concentration provided opportunities to investigate the influence of molecular weight and branching density on oil-solubility, viscosity, and friction. Oil-solubility was found to decrease with fewer internal carbons, but the number of internal carbons appears to have little influence on the bulk solution viscosity. At concentrations of 2 wt % in a group I base oil, these polymer additives demonstrated an improved viscosity index and reduced friction coefficient, validating the basic approach.

  14. Probing the molecular design of hyper-branched aryl polyesters towards lubricant applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Joshua W.; Zhou, Yan; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Erck, Robert; Qu, Jun; Bays, J. Timothy; Cosimbescu, Lelia

    2016-01-01

    We report novel polymeric materials that may be used as viscosity index improvers (VII) for lubricant applications. Our efforts included probing the comb-burst hyper-branched aryl polyester architecture for beneficial viscosity and friction behavior when utilized as an additive in a group I oil. The monomer was designed as to undergo polymerization via polycondensation within the architectural construct (AB2), typical of hyperbranched polymers. The monomer design was comprised of aliphatic arms (12 or 16 methylenes) to provide the necessary lipophilicity to achieve solubility in a non-polar medium. Once polymerized, via catalyst and heat, the surface alcohols were functionalized with fatty acids (lauric and palmitic). Controlling the aliphatic nature of the internal arms and peripheral end-groups provided four unique flexible polymer designs. Changing the reaction time and concentration provided opportunities to investigate the influence of molecular weight and branching density on oil-solubility, viscosity, and friction. Oil-solubility was found to decrease with fewer internal carbons, but the number of internal carbons appears to have little influence on the bulk solution viscosity. At concentrations of 2 wt % in a group I base oil, these polymer additives demonstrated an improved viscosity index and reduced friction coefficient, validating the basic approach.

  15. Pore design of pelletised VOX/ZrO2-SO4/Sepiolite composite catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Birk; Due-Hansen, Johannes; Yates, Malcolm;

    2010-01-01

    The NH3-SCR activities of a series of extruded and calcined VOX/ZrO2-SO4 - sepiolite catalysts were determined. The pore structures were heavily influenced by the clay content with macropore sizes ranging from 50 to >1000 nm. Mechanical strength and SCR activity measurements suggested that 25% w/...

  16. Tailor-Made Ruthenium-Triphos Catalysts for the Selective Homogeneous Hydrogenation of Lactams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuresch, Markus; Westhues, Stefan; Leitner, Walter; Klankermayer, Jürgen

    2016-01-22

    The development of a tailored tridentate ligand enabled the synthesis of a molecular ruthenium-triphos catalyst, eliminating dimerization as the major deactivation pathway. The novel catalyst design showed strongly increased performance and facilitated the hydrogenation of highly challenging lactam substrates with unprecedented activity and selectivity. PMID:26661531

  17. Direct oxidation of L-sorbose to 2-keto-L-gulonic acid with molecular oxygen on platinum- and palladium-based catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broennimann, C.; Bodnar, Z.; Mallat, T.; Baiker, A. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zuerich (Switzerland); Hug, P. [Univ. of Zuerich (Switzerland)

    1994-11-01

    The selective oxidation of the C1 hydroxyl group of L-sorbose to a carboxylic group without protection of the four other hydroxyl functions was investigated. The reactions were performed in slightly alkaline aqueous solutions with molecular oxygen over various alumina- and carbon-supported Pt and Pd catalysts. Optimum reaction conditions were 50{degrees}C, pH 7.3, and a catalyst:reactant ratio of 1:4 (wt/wt). The lower the pH and the temperature, the higher the selectivity toward 2-keto-L-gluonic acid. Catalyst deactivation was also found to increase with lower pH and temperature. A 5 wt% Pt/alumina catalyst showed the best catalytic performance (67% selectivity at 58% conversion). Promotion with Bi or Pb had a detrimental effect on selectivity for 2-keto-L-gulonic acid. Electrochemical measurements indicated that the reaction occurs in a rather narrow potential range, which corresponds to a moderate oxygen coverage of Pt or Pd. Four types of catalyst deactivation processes were identified, based on XPS and ICP-AES analysis and on the in situ determination of the oxidation state by monitoring the catalyst potential during reaction. A significant chemical poisoning of the active noble metal sites occurred during the initial, destructive adsorption of L-sorbose and during the oxidation reaction. The successive contamination of active sites resulted in overoxidation (too high oxygen coverage of Pt or Pd). The partially oxidized promoters and noble metals were corroded and dissolved in the presence of 2-keto-L-gulonic acid, resulting in an irreversible deactivation. 66 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Designing an university-level module on molecular imaging chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    training in radiopharmacy both in theory and hands-on practice. Final-year radiology students in Polytechnic have to go through a series of lectures on radiopharmacy and also practicals in hospital radiopharmacy laboratory. But due to the Government's initiatives on biomedical industries and also due to a global trend, interest in bio/medical imaging is rising among scientists and students. There is a need to fulfil this demand by introducing new course or modules at the University level. Designing an university-level module on molecular imaging chemistry: In National University of Singapore, a graduate student (MSc and PhD) level 5 module on ''Medical Imaging'' has already been introduced and a new module on ''Molecular Imaging Chemistry'' will be introduced soon. A module of this kind should serve as a link between chemistry, molecular imaging and clinical application with emphasis on chemical probe design. And should introduce contemporary topics and emerging concepts in chemistry related to molecular imaging. A brief introduction on different modalities of molecular imaging and principles of biomedical imaging should be introduced including principles of medical imaging equipment. How this knowledge will direct the chemical synthesis should be highlighted (lead directed synthesis). There should be a coverage on pharmacology and drug discovery process as imaging probes could be considered as drugs. Here is an example of an outline for such module: - Introduction: - What is molecular imaging? - Why molecular imaging? - What is biomedical imaging? - Different modalities of molecular imaging; - Different types of molecular imaging; - In vitro, ex vivo, in vivo imaging; Drug discovery process; - Pharmacological basis. Molecular Imaging Chemistry: - general construct of imaging probe (molecular reporter system); - Bioimaging factors influencing chemical probe synthesis; Optical imaging probes; - Radioimaging probes; - MR contrast agents; - Probes for other modalities, X ray

  19. Dispersed metal cluster catalysts by design. Synthesis, characterization, structure, and performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arslan, Ilke [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dixon, David A. [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Gates, Bruce C. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Katz, Alexander [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-09-30

    To understand the class of metal cluster catalysts better and to lay a foundation for the prediction of properties leading to improved catalysts, we have synthesized metal catalysts with well-defined structures and varied the cluster structures and compositions systematically—including the ligands bonded to the metals. These ligands include supports and bulky organics that are being tuned to control both the electron transfer to or from the metal and the accessibility of reactants to influence catalytic properties. We have developed novel syntheses to prepare these well-defined catalysts with atomic-scale control the environment by choice and placement of ligands and applied state-of-the art spectroscopic, microscopic, and computational methods to determine their structures, reactivities, and catalytic properties. The ligands range from nearly flat MgO surfaces to enveloping zeolites to bulky calixarenes to provide controlled coverages of the metal clusters, while also enforcing unprecedented degrees of coordinative unsaturation at the metal site—thereby facilitating bonding and catalysis events at exposed metal atoms. With this wide range of ligand properties and our arsenal of characterization tools, we worked to achieve a deep, fundamental understanding of how to synthesize robust supported and ligand-modified metal clusters with controlled catalytic properties, thereby bridging the gap between active site structure and function in unsupported and supported metal catalysts. We used methods of organometallic and inorganic chemistry combined with surface chemistry for the precise synthesis of metal clusters and nanoparticles, characterizing them at various stages of preparation and under various conditions (including catalytic reaction conditions) and determining their structures and reactivities and how their catalytic properties depend on their compositions and structures. Key characterization methods included IR, NMR, and EXAFS spectroscopies to identify

  20. Towards rational design of catalysts supported on a topological insulator substrate

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Jianping; Yam, Chi-Yung; Frauenheim, Thomas; Yan, Binghai

    2015-01-01

    Exotic and robust metallic surface states of topological insulators (TIs) have been expected to provide a promising platform for novel surface chemistry and catalysis. However, it is still an unprecedented field how TIs affect the activity of catalysts. In this work, we study the effects of topological surface states (TSSs) on the activity of transition metal clusters (Au, Ag, Cu, Pt, and Pd), which are supported on a TI Bi2Se3 substrate. It was found the adsorption energy of oxygen on the supported catalysts can be always enhanced due to the TSSs. However, it does not necessarily mean an increase of the activity in catalytic oxidation reaction. Rather, the enhanced adsorption behavior in the presence of TSSs exhibits dual effects, determined by the intrinsic reactivity of these catalysts with oxygen. For the Au case, the activity of catalytic oxidation can be improved because the intrinsic binding between Au and O is relatively weak. In contrast, a negative effect is found for the Pt and Pd clusters since th...

  1. A New Design Strategy for Observing Lithium Oxide Growth-Evolution Interactions Using Geometric Catalyst Positioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Won-Hee; Gittleson, Forrest S; Li, Jinyang; Tong, Xiao; Taylor, André D

    2016-08-10

    Understanding the catalyzed formation and evolution of lithium-oxide products in Li-O2 batteries is central to the development of next-generation energy storage technology. Catalytic sites, while effective in lowering reaction barriers, often become deactivated when placed on the surface of an oxygen electrode due to passivation by solid products. Here we investigate a mechanism for alleviating catalyst deactivation by dispersing Pd catalytic sites away from the oxygen electrode surface in a well-structured anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) porous membrane interlayer. We observe the cross-sectional product growth and evolution in Li-O2 cells by characterizing products that grow from the electrode surface. Morphological and structural details of the products in both catalyzed and uncatalyzed cells are investigated independently from the influence of the oxygen electrode. We find that the geometric decoration of catalysts far from the conductive electrode surface significantly improves the reaction reversibility by chemically facilitating the oxidation reaction through local coordination with PdO surfaces. The influence of the catalyst position on product composition is further verified by ex situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy in addition to morphological studies. PMID:27326464

  2. CeO_2-supported vanadium oxide catalysts for soot oxidation:the roles of molecular structure and nanometer effect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘坚; 赵震; 徐春明; 段爱军; 姜桂元

    2010-01-01

    The nanometer CeO2 powder was prepared by the method of microwave-assisted heating hydrolysis,and the nanometer CeO2-supported or ordinary CeO2-supported vanadia catalysts with different vanadium loadings(atomic ratios:100V/Ce=0.1,1,4,10,and 20) were prepared by an incipient-wetness impregnation method.Spectroscopic techniques(XRD,FT-IR,Raman and UV-Vis DRS) were utilized to characterize the structures of VOx/CeO2 catalysts.The results showed that the structures of CeO2-supported vanadium oxide catalysts de...

  3. MOLECULAR DESIGN OF NEW KINDS OF AUXETIC POLYMERS AND NETWORKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-mei Wu; Gao-yuan Wei

    2004-01-01

    Three new kinds of molecular networks are designed and predicted to exhibit negative Poisson ratios. Molecular mechanics calculations on these networks show that the magnitude of Poisson ratios depends on the relative flexibility of beam and arm structures. Several new kinds of auxetic polymers, whose successful synthesis should be easier than that of the corresponding auxetic networks, are then proposed. It is found that the kabob-like polymers with auxegens lying vertically on the main chain can acquire auxeticity while those with auxegens lying horizontally on the main chain cannot. Besides, a half kabob-like or pseudo-ladder polymer with auxegens linked at the intersection of the beam and the arm does show auxeticity when adopting constrictive conformers. It is, however, worthwhile noting that the origins of auxeticity still await and strongly deserve further experimental and theoretical investigations.

  4. The influence of the metal net charge of non-metallocene early transition metal catalyst on the ethylene polymerization activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU ChunHong; LI HuaYi; FENG YuQi; HU YouLiang

    2008-01-01

    The net charges on central metals of a serial non-metallocene early transition metal catalysts (FI cata-lyst) with similar steric hindrance were caculated with MM-QEq (molecular mechmism-charge equili-bration) method and associated with ethylene polymerization activities of these FI catalyts. It was found that the activity increased with the net charge on metal if ignoring the influence of the steric hindrance. In other words, introduction of strong and/or more electron-withdrawing groups onto the ligand of FI catalyst would enhance the activity of the catalyst. This conculsion gave a direction to designing new FI catalyst with higher activity.

  5. Catalyst Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiib, Hans; Marling, Gitte; Hansen, Peter Mandal

    2014-01-01

    How can architecture promote the enriching experiences of the tolerant, the democratic, and the learning city - a city worth living in, worth supporting and worth investing in? Catalyst Architecture comprises architectural projects, which, by virtue of their location, context and their combinatio...... meaningful for everyone. The exhibited works are designed by SANAA, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, James Corner Field Operation, JBMC Arquitetura e Urbanismo, Atelier Bow-Wow, Ateliers Jean Nouvel, COBE, Transform, BIG, Topotek1, Superflex, and by visual artist Jane Maria Petersen....

  6. Nano-nitride cathode catalysts of Ti, Ta, and Nb for polymer electrolyte fuel cells: Temperature-programmed desorption investigation of molecularly adsorbed oxygen at low temperature

    KAUST Repository

    Ohnishi, Ryohji

    2013-01-10

    TiN, NbN, TaN, and Ta3N5 nanoparticles synthesized using mesoporous graphitic (mpg)-C3N4 templates were investigated for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) as cathode catalysts for polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) of molecularly adsorbed O2 at 120-170 K from these nanoparticles was examined, and the resulting amount and temperature of desorption were key factors determining the ORR activity. The size-dependent TiN nanoparticles (5-8 and 100 nm) were then examined. With decreasing particle size, the density of molecularly adsorbed O2 per unit of surface area increased, indicating that a decrease in particle size increases the number of active sites. It is hard to determine the electrochemical active surface area for nonmetal electrocatalysts (such as oxides or nitrides), because of the absence of proton adsorption/desorption peaks in the voltammograms. In this study, O2-TPD for molecularly adsorbed O2 at low temperature demonstrated that the amount and strength of adsorbed O2 were key factors determining the ORR activity. The properties of molecularly adsorbed O2 on cathode catalysts are discussed against the ORR activity. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  7. Computationally Probing the Performance of Hybrid, Heterogeneous, and Homogeneous Iridium-Based Catalysts for Water Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    García-Melchor, Max [SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis, Department of Chemical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford CA (United States); Vilella, Laia [Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ), The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST),Tarragona (Spain); Departament de Quimica, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); López, Núria [Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ), The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology (BIST), Tarragona (Spain); Vojvodic, Aleksandra [SUNCAT Center for Interface Science and Catalysis, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park CA (United States)

    2016-04-29

    An attractive strategy to improve the performance of water oxidation catalysts would be to anchor a homogeneous molecular catalyst on a heterogeneous solid surface to create a hybrid catalyst. The idea of this combined system is to take advantage of the individual properties of each of the two catalyst components. We use Density Functional Theory to determine the stability and activity of a model hybrid water oxidation catalyst consisting of a dimeric Ir complex attached on the IrO2(110) surface through two oxygen atoms. We find that homogeneous catalysts can be bound to its matrix oxide without losing significant activity. Hence, designing hybrid systems that benefit from both the high tunability of activity of homogeneous catalysts and the stability of heterogeneous systems seems feasible.

  8. Oxidation catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  9. A computer-aided molecular design framework for crystallization solvent design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karunanithi, Arunprakash T.; Achenie, Luke E.K.; Gani, Rafiqul

    2006-01-01

    One of the key decisions in designing solution crystallization processes is the selection of solvents. In this paper, we present a computer-aided molecular design (CAMD) framework for the design and selection of solvents and/or anti-solvents for solution crystallization. The CAMD problem...... solvent molecules. Solvent design and selection for two types of solution crystallization processes namely cooling crystallization and drowning out crystallization are presented. In the first case study, the design of single compound solvent for crystallization of ibuprofen, which is an important...... pharmaceutical compound, is addressed. One of the important issues namely, the effect of solvent on the shape of ibuprofen crystals is also considered in the MINLP model. The second case study is a mixture design problem where an optimal solvent/anti-solvent mixture is designed for crystallization of ibuprofen...

  10. Central composite design approach towards optimization of flamboyant pods derived steam activated carbon for its use as heterogeneous catalyst in transesterification of Hevea brasiliensis oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Activated carbon was prepared from novel precursor flamboyant pods (Delonix regia). • Activation process was optimized using central composite design approach. • Prepared activated carbon at optimized condition was used as support for KOH. • Carbon based heterogeneous catalyst was used in transesterification of HBO. • Effect of catalyst loading and alcohol ratio on biodiesel yield was studied. - Abstract: The present investigation emphasises the preparation of carbon based KOH impregnated heterogeneous catalyst from flamboyant pods (Delonix regia) for the production of biodiesel from novel feedstock Hevea brasiliensis oil (HBO). Initially, carbonized char was physically activated by superheated steam and the process was optimized to study the effects of activation time and temperature by central composite design approach (CCD) using response surface methodology (RSM). Activated carbon was impregnated with KOH at four different ratios. Biodiesel production process was carried out at constant temperature 60 °C, reaction time 1 h, and 5 g of carbon based catalyst at varying quantities of catalyst loading (0.5, 2, 3.5, 5 wt%) and methanol to oil ratio (5:1–20:1). The influence of parameters on the biodiesel yield at varied condition was studied. Maximum yield of 89.3% was obtained at methanol to oil ratio 15:1 and catalyst loading 3.5 wt% and corresponding yield at same process parameters was observed to be 88.7% implying the significant activity of catalyst in reutilization. Produced biodiesel was characterized following ASTM standards. The experimental analysis confirmed that the carbonaceous catalyst developed from flamboyant pods under optimized condition is capable of transesterifying HBO into biodiesel

  11. Molecular Docking and Structure-Based Drug Design Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo G. Ferreira

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical research has successfully incorporated a wealth of molecular modeling methods, within a variety of drug discovery programs, to study complex biological and chemical systems. The integration of computational and experimental strategies has been of great value in the identification and development of novel promising compounds. Broadly used in modern drug design, molecular docking methods explore the ligand conformations adopted within the binding sites of macromolecular targets. This approach also estimates the ligand-receptor binding free energy by evaluating critical phenomena involved in the intermolecular recognition process. Today, as a variety of docking algorithms are available, an understanding of the advantages and limitations of each method is of fundamental importance in the development of effective strategies and the generation of relevant results. The purpose of this review is to examine current molecular docking strategies used in drug discovery and medicinal chemistry, exploring the advances in the field and the role played by the integration of structure- and ligand-based methods.

  12. Comparing Simulated Emission from Molecular Clouds Using Experimental Design

    CERN Document Server

    Yeremi, Miayan; Offner, Stella; Loeppky, Jason; Rosolowsky, Erik

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new approach to comparing simulated observations that enables us to determine the significance of the underlying physical effects. We utilize the methodology of experimental design, a subfield of statistical analysis, to establish a framework for comparing simulated position-position-velocity data cubes to each other. We propose three similarity metrics based on methods described in the literature: principal component analysis, the spectral correlation function, and the Cramer multi-variate two sample similarity statistic. Using these metrics, we intercompare a suite of mock observational data of molecular clouds generated from magnetohydrodynamic simulations with varying physical conditions. Using this framework, we show that all three metrics are sensitive to changing Mach number and temperature in the simulation sets, but cannot detect changes in magnetic field strength and initial velocity spectrum. We highlight the shortcomings of one-factor-at-a-time designs commonly used in astrophysics an...

  13. Molecular design of new chromophores for high performance poled polymers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Based on the principles of molecular engineering, a series of new chromophores with high second-or der nonlinear optical(NLO)activities have been designed for achieving a trade-off of the nonlinearity-transparency-ther mal stability. The NLO properties of these chromophores have been investigated theoretically by employing the AMI/Fi nite Field approach. It is found that the calculated μβ0 values of some designed chromophores can reach the magnitude of 10-45 esu, and the highest decomposition temperature Td can be as high as 377℃, the highest glass transition tem perature Ts of their donor-embedded addition-type polyimides can be as high as 324℃.

  14. EDITORIAL: Design and function of molecular and bioelectronics devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstic, Predrag; Forzani, Erica; Tao, Nongjian; Korkin, Anatoli

    2007-10-01

    Further rapid progress of electronics, in particular the increase of computer power and breakthroughs in sensor technology for industrial, medical diagnostics and environmental applications, strongly depends on the scaling of electronic devices, ultimately to the size of molecules. Design of controllable molecular-scale devices may resolve the problem of energy dissipation at the nanoscale and take advantage of molecular self-assembly in the so-called bottom-up approach. This special issue of Nanotechnology is devoted to a better understanding of the function and design of molecular-scale devices that are relevant to future electronics and sensor technology. Papers contained in this special issue are selected from the symposium Nano and Giga Challenges in Electronics and Photonics: From Atoms to Materials to Devices to System Architecture (12-16 March, 2007, Phoenix, Arizona, USA), as well as from original and novel scientific contributions of invited world-renown researchers. It addresses both theoretical and experimental achievements in the fields of molecular and bioelectronics, chemical and biosensors at the molecular level, including carbon nanotubes, novel nanostructures, as well as related research areas and industrial applications. The conference series Nano and Giga Challenges in Electronics and Photonics was launched as a truly interdisciplinary forum to bridge scientists and engineers to work across boundaries in the design of future information technologies, from atoms to materials to devices to system architecture. Following the first two successful meetings in Moscow, Russia (NGCM2002) and Krakow, Poland (NGCM2004), the third Nano and Giga Forum (NGC2007) was held in 2007 hosted by Arizona State University. Besides this special issue of Nanotechnology, two other collections (in the journal Solid State Electronics and the tutorial book in the series Nanostructure Science and Technology Springer) have published additional selected and invited papers

  15. Design and function of molecular and bioelectronics devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstic, Predrag; Forzani, Erica; Tao, Nongjian; Korkin, Anatoli

    2007-10-24

    Further rapid progress of electronics, in particular the increase of computer power and breakthroughs in sensor technology for industrial, medical diagnostics and environmental applications, strongly depends on the scaling of electronic devices, ultimately to the size of molecules. Design of controllable molecular-scale devices may resolve the problem of energy dissipation at the nanoscale and take advantage of molecular self-assembly in the so-called bottom-up approach. This special issue of Nanotechnology is devoted to a better understanding of the function and design of molecular-scale devices that are relevant to future electronics and sensor technology. Papers contained in this special issue are selected from the symposium Nano and Giga Challenges in Electronics and Photonics: From Atoms to Materials to Devices to System Architecture (12-16 March, 2007, Phoenix, Arizona, USA), as well as from original and novel scientific contributions of invited world-renown researchers. It addresses both theoretical and experimental achievements in the fields of molecular and bioelectronics, chemical and biosensors at the molecular level, including carbon nanotubes, novel nanostructures, as well as related research areas and industrial applications. The conference series Nano and Giga Challenges in Electronics and Photonics was launched as a truly interdisciplinary forum to bridge scientists and engineers to work across boundaries in the design of future information technologies, from atoms to materials to devices to system architecture. Following the first two successful meetings in Moscow, Russia (NGCM2002) and Krakow, Poland (NGCM2004), the third Nano and Giga Forum (NGC2007) was held in 2007 hosted by Arizona State University. Besides this special issue of Nanotechnology, two other collections (in the journal Solid State Electronics and the tutorial book in the series Nanostructure Science and Technology Springer) have published additional selected and invited papers

  16. Design and function of molecular and bioelectronics devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krstic, Predrag; Forzani, Erica; Tao, Nongjian; Korkin, Anatoli

    2007-10-24

    Further rapid progress of electronics, in particular the increase of computer power and breakthroughs in sensor technology for industrial, medical diagnostics and environmental applications, strongly depends on the scaling of electronic devices, ultimately to the size of molecules. Design of controllable molecular-scale devices may resolve the problem of energy dissipation at the nanoscale and take advantage of molecular self-assembly in the so-called bottom-up approach. This special issue of Nanotechnology is devoted to a better understanding of the function and design of molecular-scale devices that are relevant to future electronics and sensor technology. Papers contained in this special issue are selected from the symposium Nano and Giga Challenges in Electronics and Photonics: From Atoms to Materials to Devices to System Architecture (12-16 March, 2007, Phoenix, Arizona, USA), as well as from original and novel scientific contributions of invited world-renown researchers. It addresses both theoretical and experimental achievements in the fields of molecular and bioelectronics, chemical and biosensors at the molecular level, including carbon nanotubes, novel nanostructures, as well as related research areas and industrial applications. The conference series Nano and Giga Challenges in Electronics and Photonics was launched as a truly interdisciplinary forum to bridge scientists and engineers to work across boundaries in the design of future information technologies, from atoms to materials to devices to system architecture. Following the first two successful meetings in Moscow, Russia (NGCM2002) and Krakow, Poland (NGCM2004), the third Nano and Giga Forum (NGC2007) was held in 2007 hosted by Arizona State University. Besides this special issue of Nanotechnology, two other collections (in the journal Solid State Electronics and the tutorial book in the series Nanostructure Science and Technology Springer) have published additional selected and invited papers

  17. Molecular Design of Branched and Binary Molecules at Ordered Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genson, Kirsten Larson [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This study examined five different branched molecular architectures to discern the effect of design on the ability of molecules to form ordered structures at interfaces. Photochromic monodendrons formed kinked packing structures at the air-water interface due to the cross-sectional area mismatch created by varying number of alkyl tails and the hydrophilic polar head group. The lower generations formed orthorhombic unit cell with long range ordering despite the alkyl tails tilted to a large degree. Favorable interactions between liquid crystalline terminal groups and the underlying substrate were observed to compel a flexible carbosilane dendrimer core to form a compressed elliptical conformation which packed stagger within lamellae domains with limited short range ordering. A twelve arm binary star polymer was observed to form two dimensional micelles at the air-water interface attributed to the higher polystyrene block composition. Linear rod-coil molecules formed a multitude of packing structures at the air-water interface due to the varying composition. Tree-like rod-coil molecules demonstrated the ability to form one-dimensional structures at the air-water interface and at the air-solvent interface caused by the preferential ordering of the rigid rod cores. The role of molecular architecture and composition was examined and the influence chemically competing fragments was shown to exert on the packing structure. The amphiphilic balance of the different molecular series exhibited control on the ordering behavior at the air-water interface and within bulk structures. The shell nature and tail type was determined to dictate the preferential ordering structure and molecular reorganization at interfaces with the core nature effect secondary.

  18. Mesoporous molecular sieve catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Højholt, Karen Thrane; Nielsen, Michael Brorson; Fehrmann, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    Denne afhandling omhandler en specifik klasse af molekylesier, nemlig zeolitter. Zeolitter, der er en klasse af krystallinske aluminosilikater, er kendetegnet ved, at deres krystalstruktur indeholder kanaler og hulrum i samme størrelsesorden som små molekyler. I dette projekt er zeolitter blevet modificeret til brug i udvalgte katalytiske reaktioner, hvorved der også er opnået en dybere forståelse af reaktionerne. Zeolitter er hovedsageligt blevet modificeret med hensyn til porøsitet. Desuden...

  19. Defining Active Catalyst Structure and Reaction Pathways from ab Initio Molecular Dynamics and Operando XAFS: Dehydrogenation of Dimethylaminoborane by Rhodium Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousseau, Roger J.; Schenter, Gregory K.; Fulton, John L.; Linehan, John C.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Autrey, Thomas

    2009-08-05

    We present the results of a detailed operando XAFS and density functional theory (DFT) based ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) investigation of the proposed mechanism of dehydrogenation of dimethylaminoborane (DMAB) by a homogeneous Rh4 cluster catalyst. Our AIMD simulations reveal that the previously proposed Rh structures are highly fluxional exhibiting both metal cluster and ligand isomerizations and dissociaton which can only be accounted for by a examining finite temperature ensemble as generated by AIMD. It is found that a highly fluxional species Rh4((H2BNMe2)82+ is fully compatible with operando XAFS measurements which suggest that this species may be the catalyst resting state. Based on this assignment we propose a catalytic mechanism for DMAB dehydrogenation which exhibits a maximum energy barrier of 24 kcal/mol, which is half that observed for the uncatalyzed thermal reaction. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program, and was performed in part using the Molecular Science Computing Facility (MSCF) in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a DOE national scientific user facility located at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PNNL is operated by Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy.

  20. A computational molecular design framework for crosslinked polymer networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eslick, J C; Ye, Q; Park, J; Topp, E M; Spencer, P; Camarda, K V

    2009-05-21

    Crosslinked polymers are important in a very wide range of applications including dental restorative materials. However, currently used polymeric materials experience limited durability in the clinical oral environment. Researchers in the dental polymer field have generally used a time-consuming experimental trial-and-error approach to the design of new materials. The application of computational molecular design (CMD) to crosslinked polymer networks has the potential to facilitate development of improved polymethacrylate dental materials. CMD uses quantitative structure property relations (QSPRs) and optimization techniques to design molecules possessing desired properties. This paper describes a mathematical framework which provides tools necessary for the application of CMD to crosslinked polymer systems. The novel parts of the system include the data structures used, which allow for simple calculation of structural descriptors, and the formulation of the optimization problem. A heuristic optimization method, Tabu Search, is used to determine candidate monomers. Use of a heuristic optimization algorithm makes the system more independent of the types of QSPRs used, and more efficient when applied to combinatorial problems. A software package has been created which provides polymer researchers access to the design framework. A complete example of the methodology is provided for polymethacrylate dental materials. PMID:23904665

  1. Development of Optimal Catalyst Designs and Operating Strategies for Lean NOx Reduction in Coupled LNT-SCR Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harold, Michael; Crocker, Mark; Balakotaiah, Vemuri; Luss, Dan; Choi, Jae-Soon; Dearth, Mark; McCabe, Bob; Theis, Joe

    2013-09-30

    hydrocarbon component of diesel exhaust. First-principle models of the LNT and SCR converters, which utilized the mechanistic-based kinetics and realistic treatments of the flow and transport processes, in combination with bench-scale reactor experiments helped to identify the best designs for combining the NSR and SCR catalysts over a range of operating conditions encountered in practice. This included catalysts having multiple zones and layers and additives with the focus on determining the minimal precious metal component needed to meet emission abatement targets over a wide range of operating conditions. The findings from this study provide diesel vehicle and catalyst companies valuable information to develop more cost effective diesel emissions catalysts which helps to expand the use of more fuel efficient diesel power. The fundamental modeling and experimental tools and findings from this project can be applied to catalyst technologies used in the energy and chemical industries. Finally, the project also led to training of several doctoral students who were placed in research jobs in industry and academia.

  2. Design and synthesis of copper-cobalt catalysts for the selective conversion of synthesis gas to ethanol and higher alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Gonzalo; Beijer, Steven; Smith, Miranda L; He, Ming; Au, Yuen; Wang, Zi; Bruce, David A; de Jong, Krijn P; Spivey, James J; de Jongh, Petra E

    2014-06-16

    Combining quantum-mechanical simulations and synthesis tools allows the design of highly efficient CuCo/MoO(x) catalysts for the selective conversion of synthesis gas (CO+H2) into ethanol and higher alcohols, which are of eminent interest for the production of platform chemicals from non-petroleum feedstocks. Density functional theory calculations coupled to microkinetic models identify mixed Cu-Co alloy sites, at Co-enriched surfaces, as ideal for the selective production of long-chain alcohols. Accordingly, a versatile synthesis route is developed based on metal nanoparticle exsolution from a molybdate precursor compound whose crystalline structure isomorphically accommodates Cu(2+) and Co(2+) cations in a wide range of compositions. As revealed by energy-dispersive X-ray nanospectroscopy and temperature-resolved X-ray diffraction, superior mixing of Cu and Co species promotes formation of CuCo alloy nanocrystals after activation, leading to two orders of magnitude higher yield to high alcohols than a benchmark CuCoCr catalyst. Substantiating simulations, the yield to high alcohols is maximized in parallel to the CuCo alloy contribution, for Co-rich surface compositions, for which Cu phase segregation is prevented.

  3. From molecular design and materials construction to organic nanophotonic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chuang; Yan, Yongli; Zhao, Yong Sheng; Yao, Jiannian

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Nanophotonics has recently received broad research interest, since it may provide an alternative opportunity to overcome the fundamental limitations in electronic circuits. Diverse optical materials down to the wavelength scale are required to develop nanophotonic devices, including functional components for light emission, transmission, and detection. During the past decade, the chemists have made their own contributions to this interdisciplinary field, especially from the controlled fabrication of nanophotonic molecules and materials. In this context, organic micro- or nanocrystals have been developed as a very promising kind of building block in the construction of novel units for integrated nanophotonics, mainly due to the great versatility in organic molecular structures and their flexibility for the subsequent processing. Following the pioneering works on organic nanolasers and optical waveguides, the organic nanophotonic materials and devices have attracted increasing interest and developed rapidly during the past few years. In this Account, we review our research on the photonic performance of molecular micro- or nanostructures and the latest breakthroughs toward organic nanophotonic devices. Overall, the versatile features of organic materials are highlighted, because they brings tunable optical properties based on molecular design, size-dependent light confinement in low-dimensional structures, and various device geometries for nanophotonic integration. The molecular diversity enables abundant optical transitions in conjugated π-electron systems, and thus brings specific photonic functions into molecular aggregates. The morphology of these micro- or nanostructures can be further controlled based on the weak intermolecular interactions during molecular assembly process, making the aggregates show photon confinement or light guiding properties as nanophotonic materials. By adoption of some active processes in the composite of two or more

  4. Supported nano gold as a recyclable catalyst for green, selective and efficient oxidation of alcohol using molecular oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashir Dar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The myth that gold cannot act as a catalyst has been discarded in view of recent studies, which have demonstrated the high catalytic efficiency of pure nano-gold and supported nano-gold catalysts. In recent years, numerous papers have described the use of supported nano-gold particles for catalysis in view of their action on CO and O2 to form CO2, as well as a variety of other reactions. Special emphasis is placed on the oxidation studies undertaken on model nano-Au systems. In this work a solvent free oxidation of 1-phenyl ethanol was carried out using gold supported on ceria-silica, ceria-titania, ceria- zirconia and ceria-alumina at 160 0C. Almost 88-97% conversion was obtained with >99% selectivity. Temperature screening was done from 70 to 160 0C.Catalysts were prepared by deposition co-precipitation method and deposition was determined by EDEX analysis.

  5. Determination and Temperature Dependence of Plateau Modulus for Polymerization of Propylene to Isotactic Polypropylene with Ultra-high Molecular Weight under Catalysis of Ziegler-Natta Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Jian; DING Xue-jia; XU Ri-wei; YU Ding-sheng

    2005-01-01

    The viscoelastic behavior of isotactic polypropylene with ultra-high molecular weight (UHPPH) and broad molecular weight distribution(MWD), produced in the presence of Ziegler-Natta catalyst, was investigated by means of oscillatory rheometry at 180 and 200 ℃, whose loss modulus(G") plots at 180 and 200 ℃versus the natural logarithm of angular frequency(ω) present a pronounced maximum at 34.35 and 69.21 rad/s, respectively, and do not show a maximum peak at 0. 01-100 rad/s for Ziegler-Natta catalyzing ethylenepropylene random copolymerization (PPR) with a conventional molecular weight and broad MWD. The fact indicates that the high molecular weight is responsible for a maximum peak of G"(ω) vs. lnω curves for UHPPH. This makes it possible to determine the plateau modulus (G0N) of UHPPH from a certain experimental temperature G"(ω) curve directly. For UHPPH, the G0N determined to be 4. 28×105 and 3. 62×105 Pa at 180and 200 ℃, respectively, decreases with the increase of temperature and is independent of the molecular weight, which directly confirms reputation theoretical prediction that the G0N has no relation to the molecular weight.

  6. Rationally designed molecular beacons for bioanalytical and biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jing; Yang, Ronghua; Shi, Muling; Wu, Cuichen; Fang, Xiaohong; Li, Yinhui; Li, Jishan; Tan, Weihong

    2015-05-21

    Nucleic acids hold promise as biomolecules for future applications in biomedicine and biotechnology. Their well-defined structures and compositions afford unique chemical properties and biological functions. Moreover, the specificity of hydrogen-bonded Watson-Crick interactions allows the construction of nucleic acid sequences with multiple functions. In particular, the development of nucleic acid probes as essential molecular engineering tools will make a significant contribution to advancements in biosensing, bioimaging and therapy. The molecular beacon (MB), first conceptualized by Tyagi and Kramer in 1996, is an excellent example of a double-stranded nucleic acid (dsDNA) probe. Although inactive in the absence of a target, dsDNA probes can report the presence of a specific target through hybridization or a specific recognition-triggered change in conformation. MB probes are typically fluorescently labeled oligonucleotides that range from 25 to 35 nucleotides (nt) in length, and their structure can be divided into three components: stem, loop and reporter. The intrinsic merit of MBs depends on predictable design, reproducibility of synthesis, simplicity of modification, and built-in signal transduction. Using resonance energy transfer (RET) for signal transduction, MBs are further endowed with increased sensitivity, rapid response and universality, making them ideal for chemical sensing, environmental monitoring and biological imaging, in contrast to other nucleic acid probes. Furthermore, integrating MBs with targeting ligands or molecular drugs can substantially support their in vivo applications in theranositics. In this review, we survey advances in bioanalytical and biomedical applications of rationally designed MBs, as they have evolved through the collaborative efforts of many researchers. We first discuss improvements to the three components of MBs: stem, loop and reporter. The current applications of MBs in biosensing, bioimaging and therapy will then

  7. Gold-catalyzed aerobic epoxidation of trans-stilbene in methylcyclohexane. Part I: Design of a reference catalyst

    KAUST Repository

    Guillois, Kevin

    2012-02-01

    The kinetics of the heterogeneous gold-catalyzed aerobic epoxidation of stilbene in the liquid phase has been shown to be hindered by diffusion limitations, due to the use of supports which are unsuitable to apolar reaction media. The choice of these supports is generally dictated by the ability of standard methods of preparation to stabilize highly dispersed gold nanoparticles on them. Hence, new methods need to be designed in order to produce catalytically active gold nanoparticles on hydrophobic supports in general and on passivated silicas in particular. By investigating Tsukuda\\'s method to produce colloidal solutions of gold nanoparticles upon reduction of the triphenylphosphine gold chloride complex in solution, we found that direct reduction of AuPPh3Cl in the presence of a commercially available silica support functionalized with dimethylsiloxane, Aerosil R972, leads, in a highly reproducible and potentially scalable way, to the best catalyst ever reported for this reaction. (C) 2011 Elsevier BM. All rights reserved.

  8. Validation of Methods for Computational Catalyst Design: Geometries, Structures, and Energies of Neutral and Charged Silver Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duanmu, Kaining; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2015-04-30

    We report a systematic study of small silver clusters, Agn, Agn+, and Agn–, n = 1–7. We studied all possible isomers of clusters with n = 5–7. We tested 42 exchange–correlation functionals, and we assess these functionals for their accuracy in three respects: geometries (quantitative prediction of internuclear distances), structures (the nature of the lowest-energy structure, for example, whether it is planar or nonplanar), and energies. We find that the ingredients of exchange–correlation functionals are indicators of their success in predicting geometries and structures: local exchange–correlation functionals are generally better than hybrid functionals for geometries; functionals depending on kinetic energy density are the best for predicting the lowest-energy isomer correctly, especially for predicting two-dimensional to three-dimenstional transitions correctly. The accuracy for energies is less sensitive to the ingredient list. Our findings could be useful for guiding the selection of methods for computational catalyst design.

  9. Design and performance simulation of a molecular Doppler wind lidar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fahua Shen; Hyunki Cha; Jihui Dong; Dukhyeon Kim; Dongsong Sun; Sung Ok Kwon

    2009-01-01

    A mobile molecular Doppler wind lidar at an eye-safe wavelength of 355 nm based on double-edge technique is being built in Hefei (China) for wind measurement from 10-to 40-km altitude. The structure of this lidar system is described. A triple Fabry-Perot etalon is employed as a frequency discriminator whose parameters are optimized. The receiver system is designed to achieve compactness and stability by putting in a standard 19-inch socket bench. Simulation results show that within the wind speed dynamic range of ±100 m/s, the horizontal wind errors due to noise are less than 1 m/s below 20-km altitude for 100-m vertical resolution, and less than 5.5 m/s from 20 km up to 40 km for 500-m vertical resolution with 400-mJ laser energy, 30-min temporal resolution, and a 45-cm aperture telescope.

  10. Transformation of levoglucosan over H-MCM-22 zeolite and H-MCM-41 mesoporous molecular sieve catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalytic transformation of levoglucosan (1-6-anhdyro-β-D-glucopyranose) was carried out in a fixed bed reactor at 573 K over zeolite and mesoporous material catalysts. Proton forms of MCM-22-30 and MCM-41-20 catalysts were tested in the conversion, changing also the residence time. The yield of the transformation product phases was substantially influenced by the structures, at the same time the formation of the different compounds were dependent on the structures of the acidic zeolite catalysts. Oxygenated species were the main liquid product, consisting mainly of aldehydes and furfurals (glycolaldehyde, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, furfural, 5-methylfurfural, acetic acid). The formation of the liquid products was higher over MCM-41-20 than over MCM-22-30 for all the oxygenated species except acetic acid, indicating larger formation of non-condensable products over the microporous material. By increasing the residence time the formation of acetic acid increased in transformations over MCM-22, however, such increase also led to generation of more gases with both catalysts. The deactivation due to coking was more severe over the zeolite compared to the mesoporous material. It was, however, possible to successfully regenerate the spent zeolites without changing the structure. -- Highlights: → Transformation of levoglucosan (1-6-anhdyro-β-D-glucopyranose) was done at 573 K. → MCM-22-30 and MCM-41-20 catalysts were tested. → Oxygenated species (glycolaldehyde, formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, furfural, 5-methylfurfural, acetic acid) were the main liquid products. → Acidity had an influence on product distribution and deactivation.

  11. Theoretical Studies in Heterogenous Catalysis: Towards a Rational Design of Novel Catalysts for Hydrodesulfurization and Hydrogen Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez,J.A.; Liu, P.

    2008-10-01

    potential to become the next generation of industrial HDS catalysts. Then, systematic studies concerned with the hydrogen-evolution reaction (HER) on extended surfaces, organometallic complexes and enzymes are presented. Finally, the reasons for the high catalytic activity of Au-CeO{sub 2} and Cu-CeO{sub 2} in the production of hydrogen through the water-gas shift reaction (CO + H{sub 2}O {yields} H{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}) are analyzed. It is shown that theoretical methods are very valuable tools for helping in the rational design of heterogeneous catalysts.

  12. Intelligent Design of Nano-Scale Molecular Imaging Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeaki Ozawa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Visual representation and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within living subjects are gaining great interest in life science to address frontier issues in pathology and physiology. As intact living subjects do not emit any optical signature, visual representation usually exploits nano-scale imaging agents as the source of image contrast. Many imaging agents have been developed for this purpose, some of which exert nonspecific, passive, and physical interaction with a target. Current research interest in molecular imaging has mainly shifted to fabrication of smartly integrated, specific, and versatile agents that emit fluorescence or luminescence as an optical readout. These agents include luminescent quantum dots (QDs, biofunctional antibodies, and multifunctional nanoparticles. Furthermore, genetically encoded nano-imaging agents embedding fluorescent proteins or luciferases are now gaining popularity. These agents are generated by integrative design of the components, such as luciferase, flexible linker, and receptor to exert a specific on–off switching in the complex context of living subjects. In the present review, we provide an overview of the basic concepts, smart design, and practical contribution of recent nano-scale imaging agents, especially with respect to genetically encoded imaging agents.

  13. Experimental and Computational Mechanistic Studies Guiding the Rational Design of Molecular Electrocatalysts for Production and Oxidation of Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raugei, Simone; Helm, Monte L.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Appel, Aaron M.; O' Hagan, Molly J.; Wiedner, Eric S.; Bullock, R. Morris

    2016-01-19

    Understanding how to control the movement of protons and electrons is crucial to the design of fast, efficient electrocatalysts for hydrogen production and oxidation based on earth-abundant metals. Our work seeks to elucidate fundamental questions about proton movement. We have demonstrated that incorporating a pendant amine functioning as a proton relay in the second coordination sphere of a metal complex helps proton mobility, resulting in faster and more energy efficient catalysts. Proton transfer reactions are often rate limiting, and are influenced by several factors, such as pKa values, steric effects, hydrogen bonding, and solvation/desolvation of the exogenous base and acid employed. The presence of multiple protonation sites introduces branching points along the catalytic cycle, making less productive pathways accessible, or leading to the formation of stable off-cycle species. Using ligands with only one pendant amine mitigates this problem and results in catalysts with high rates for production of H2. For H2 oxidation catalysts, iron complexes with a high H2 binding affinity were developed. However, the improvement of H2 binding enthalpy resulted in a pKa mismatch between the protonated metal center and the protonated pendant amine, and consequently to rate-limiting intramolecular proton movement. Taken altogether, our results demonstrate the necessity of optimizing the entire catalytic cycle, as the optimization of a specific catalytic step can negatively influence another step, and not necessarily lead to better catalytic performance. We discuss a general procedure, based on thermodynamic arguments, which allows the simultaneous minimization of the free energy change of each catalytic step, yielding a nearly flat free energy surface, with no large barriers due to energy mismatches from either high- or low-energy intermediates. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by

  14. Rational design of gold catalysts with enhanced thermal stability: post modification of Au/TiO2 by amorphous SiO2 matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Haoguo [ORNL; Ma, Zhen [ORNL; Overbury, Steven {Steve} H [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL

    2007-01-01

    Au/TiO{sub 2} is highly active for CO oxidation, but it often suffers from sintering in high-temperature environments. In this work, we report on a novel design of gold catalysts, in which pre-formed Au/TiO{sub 2} catalysts were post decorated by amorphous SiO{sub 2} to suppress the agglomeration of gold particles. Even after being aged in O{sub 2}-He at 700 C, the SiO{sub 2}-decorated Au/TiO{sub 2} was still active for CO oxidation at ambient temperature.

  15. Designing zeolite catalysts for size- and shape-selective reactions: Selective hydrogenation of acetylene in the presence of butadiene and ethylene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbin, D.R.; Abrams, L.; Bonifaz, C. (E.I. du Pont de Nemours Company, Wilmington, DE (USA))

    1989-02-01

    In the production of ethylene from the steam cracking of natural gas, small amounts of acetylene and butadiene are produced. Downstream, acetylene can present a hazard in a cryogenic separation process while nonselective hydrogenation removes acetylene as well as valuable ethylene and butadiene. With the aid of adsorption measurements, a selective hydrogenation catalyst has been designed. Small-pore zeolites, which serve as catalytic supports and provide reactant selective control, were ion-exchanged with Ni{sup 2+} and subsequently reduced. Compared to a commercial catalyst in which 60% of butadiene and all of the acetylene are hydrogenated, these new catalysts totally hydrogenate acetylene with only 10-20% hydrogenation of the butadiene and almost no hydrogenation of ethylene. To achieve selective hydrogenation, poisoning of the metal sites on the external zeolite surface is essential in order to obtain a product spectrum dominated by catalytic sites within the zeolite framework.

  16. Fundamental Studies of Butane Oxidation over Model-Supported Vanadium Oxide Catalysts: Molecular Structure-Reactivity Relationships

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wachs, I.E.; Jehng, J.M.; Deo, G.; Weckhuysen, B.M.; Guliants, V.V.; Benziger, J.B.; Sundaresan, S.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride was investigated over a series of model-supported vanadia catalysts where the vanadia phase was present as a two-dimensional metal oxide overlayer on the different oxide supports (TiO2, ZrO2, CeO2, Nb2O5, Al2O3, and SiO2). No correlation was found betwee

  17. Development of heterogeneous olympic medal metal nanoparticle catalysts for environmentally benign molecular transformations based on the surface properties of hydrotalcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Kiyotomi; Mitsudome, Takato; Mizugaki, Tomoo; Jitsukawa, Koichiro

    2010-12-08

    In this review, we describe the development by our research group of highly functionalized heterogeneous Olympic medal metal (gold, silver, and copper) nanoparticle catalysts using hydrotalcite as a support, aimed towards Green and Sustainable Chemistry. Olympic medal metal nanoparticles can cooperate with the basic sites on the hydrotalcite surface, providing unique and high performance catalysis in environmentally-benign organic transformations such as aerobic oxidation of alcohols, lactonization of diols and selective deoxygenation of epoxides and nitro aromatic compounds.

  18. Development of Heterogeneous Olympic Medal Metal Nanoparticle Catalysts for Environmentally Benign Molecular Transformations Based on the Surface Properties of Hydrotalcite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koichiro Jitsukawa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we describe the development by our research group of highly functionalized heterogeneous Olympic medal metal (gold, silver, and copper nanoparticle catalysts using hydrotalcite as a support, aimed towards Green and Sustainable Chemistry. Olympic medal metal nanoparticles can cooperate with the basic sites on the hydrotalcite surface, providing unique and high performance catalysis in environmentally-benign organic transformations such as aerobic oxidation of alcohols, lactonization of diols and selective deoxygenation of epoxides and nitro aromatic compounds.

  19. Photochemical hydrogen production from water catalyzed by CdTe quantum dots/molecular cobalt catalyst hybrid systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Kai; Wang, Mei; Zhang, Shuai; Wu, Suli; Yang, Yong; Sun, Licheng

    2015-04-25

    A hybrid system with a coordinative interaction between a cobalt complex of a N2S2-tetradentate ligand and CdTe quantum dots displayed a high activity (initial TOF 850 h(-1)) and improved stability (TON 1.44 × 10(4) based on catalyst over 30 h) for the photochemical H2 generation from water, with a quantum efficiency of 5.32% at 400 nm. PMID:25800286

  20. Oxidation of primary amines to oximes with molecular oxygen using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl and WO3/Al2O3 as catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ken; Watanabe, Tomonari; Murahashi, Shun-Ichi

    2013-03-15

    The oxidative transformation of primary amines to their corresponding oximes proceeds with high efficiency under molecular oxygen diluted with molecular nitrogen (O2/N2 = 7/93 v/v, 5 MPa) in the presence of the catalysts 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and tungusten oxide/alumina (WO3/Al2O3). The method is environmentally benign, because the reaction requires only molecular oxygen as the terminal oxidant and gives water as a side product. Various alicyclic amines and aliphatic amines can be converted to their corresponding oximes in excellent yields. It is noteworthy that the oxidative transformation of primary amines proceeds chemoselectively in the presence of other functional groups. The key step of the present oxidation is a fast electron transfer from the primary amine to DPPH followed by proton transfer to give the α-aminoalkyl radical intermediate, which undergoes reaction with molecular oxygen and hydrogen abstraction to give α-aminoalkyl hydroperoxide. Subsequent reaction of the peroxide with WO3/Al2O3 gives oximes. The aerobic oxidation of secondary amines gives the corresponding nitrones. Aerobic oxidative transformation of cyclohexylamines to cyclohexanone oximes is important as a method for industrial production of ε-caprolactam, a raw material for Nylon 6.

  1. Strategy for Molecular Design of Photochromic Diarylethenes Having Thermal Functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Daichi; Kobatake, Seiya

    2016-08-01

    Thermal reactivities of photochromic diarylethene closed-ring isomers can be controlled by the introduction of substituents at the reactive positions. Diarylethenes having bulky alkyl groups undergo thermal cycloreversion reactions. When bulky alkoxy groups are introduced, the diarylethenes have both thermal cycloreversion reactivities and low photocycloreversion quantum yields. Such photochromic compounds can be applied to thermally reusable photoresponsive-image recordings. The thermal cycloreversion reactivity of the closed-ring isomers can be evaluated using specific steric substituent constants and be correlated with the parameters. By introduction of trimethylsilyl or methoxymethyl groups at the reactive positions, the diarylethene closed-ring isomers undergo thermal irreversible reactions to produce by-products at high temperatures. These diarylethenes may be useful for secret-image recordings. Furthermore, thiophene-S,S-dioxidized diarylethenes having secondary alkyl groups at the reactive positions undergo thermal by-product formation reactions, in addition to the photostability of the colored closed-ring isomers. Such materials may be used for light-starting thermosensors. The thermal by-product formation reactivity can be evaluated by the specific substituent constants and theoretical calculations of quantum chemistry. These results supply the strategy for the molecular design of the photochromic diarylethenes having thermal functionality. PMID:27321920

  2. Molecular and cellular designs of insect taste receptor system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunio Isono

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The insect gustatory receptors (GRs are members of a large G-protein coupled receptor family distantly related to the insect olfactory receptors. They are phylogenetically different from taste receptors of most other animals. GRs are often coexpressed with other GRs in single receptor neurons. Taste receptors other than GRs are also expressed in some neurons. Recent molecular studies in the fruitfly Drosophila revealed that the insect taste receptor system not only covers a wide ligand spectrum of sugars, bitter substances or salts that are common to mammals but also includes reception of pheromone and somatosensory stimulants. However, the central mechanism to perceive and discriminate taste information is not yet elucidated. Analysis of the primary projection of taste neurons to the brain shows that the projection profiles depend basically on the peripheral locations of the neurons as well as the GRs that they express. These results suggest that both peripheral and central design principles of insect taste perception are different from those of olfactory perception.

  3. Understanding the Electronic Structure of 4d Metal Complexes: From Molecular Spinors to L-Edge Spectra of a di-Ru Catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alperovich, Igor; Smolentsev, Grigory; Moonshiram, Dooshaye; Jurss, Jonah W.; Concepcion, Javier J.; Meyer, Thomas J.; Soldatov, Alexander; Pushkar, Yulia (UNC); (Purdue); (SFU-Russia); (Lund)

    2015-09-17

    L{sub 2,3}-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has demonstrated unique capabilities for the analysis of the electronic structure of di-Ru complexes such as the blue dimer cis,cis-[Ru{sub 2}{sup III}O(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(bpy){sub 4}]{sup 4+} water oxidation catalyst. Spectra of the blue dimer and the monomeric [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 3+} model complex show considerably different splitting of the Ru L{sub 2,3} absorption edge, which reflects changes in the relative energies of the Ru 4d orbitals caused by hybridization with a bridging ligand and spin-orbit coupling effects. To aid the interpretation of spectroscopic data, we developed a new approach, which computes L{sub 2,3}-edges XAS spectra as dipole transitions between molecular spinors of 4d transition metal complexes. This allows for careful inclusion of the spin-orbit coupling effects and the hybridization of the Ru 4d and ligand orbitals. The obtained theoretical Ru L{sub 2,3}-edge spectra are in close agreement with experiment. Critically, existing single-electron methods (FEFF, FDMNES) broadly used to simulate XAS could not reproduce the experimental Ru L-edge spectra for the [Ru(NH{sub 3}){sub 6}]{sup 3+} model complex nor for the blue dimer, while charge transfer multiplet (CTM) calculations were not applicable due to the complexity and low symmetry of the blue dimer water oxidation catalyst. We demonstrated that L-edge spectroscopy is informative for analysis of bridging metal complexes. The developed computational approach enhances L-edge spectroscopy as a tool for analysis of the electronic structures of complexes, materials, catalysts, and reactive intermediates with 4d transition metals.

  4. Electrocatalytic and Solar-Driven CO2 Reduction to CO with a Molecular Manganese Catalyst Immobilized on Mesoporous TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Timothy E; Windle, Christopher D; Reisner, Erwin

    2016-06-20

    Electrocatalytic CO2 reduction to CO was achieved with a novel Mn complex, fac-[MnBr(4,4'-bis(phosphonic acid)-2,2'-bipyridine)(CO)3 ] (MnP), immobilized on a mesoporous TiO2 electrode. A benchmark turnover number of 112±17 was attained with these TiO2 |MnP electrodes after 2 h electrolysis. Post-catalysis IR spectroscopy demonstrated that the molecular structure of the MnP catalyst was retained. UV/vis spectroscopy confirmed that an active Mn-Mn dimer was formed during catalysis on the TiO2 electrode, showing the dynamic formation of a catalytically active dimer on an electrode surface. Finally, we combined the light-protected TiO2 |MnP cathode with a CdS-sensitized photoanode to enable solar-light-driven CO2 reduction with the light-sensitive MnP catalyst. PMID:27110904

  5. Ceria-Based Mixed Oxide Supported Nano-Gold as an Efficient and Durable Heterogeneous Catalyst for Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Amines to Imines Using Molecular Oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bashir Ahmad Dar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work is intended to determine the catalytic activity of Mixed Oxide supported gold for aerobic oxidative dehydrogenation of amines to imines using Ceria as a main constituent of the each support. The model catalysts Au/CeO2:TiO2 Au/CeO2:SiO2, Au/CeO2:ZrO2 and Au/CeO2:Al2Os were prepared by deposition co-precipitation method and deposition of gold was determined by EDEX analysis. The supported nano-gold catalyzes the dehydrogenation of secondary amines to imines without loss of activity. On recycling good amount of product yield is obtained. Oxidation of secondary amines to imines is carried at 100˚C and almost 90 % conversion was obtained with >99% selectivity. © 2012 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reservedReceived: 26th December 2011; Revised: 7th June 2012; Accepted: 13rd June 2012[How to Cite: B.A. Dar, M. Sharma, B. Singh. (2012. Ceria-Based Mixed Oxide Supported Nano-Gold as an Efficient and Durable Heterogeneous Catalyst for Oxidative Dehydrogenation of Amines to Imines Using Molecular Oxygen. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering & Catalysis, 7(1: 79-84.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.7.1.1257.79-84][How to Link / DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.7.1.1257.79-84 ] | View in 

  6. Widely tunable alloy composition and crystal structure in catalyst-free InGaAs nanowire arrays grown by selective area molecular beam epitaxy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Treu, J., E-mail: Julian.Treu@wsi.tum.de, E-mail: Gregor.Koblmueller@wsi.tum.de; Speckbacher, M.; Saller, K.; Morkötter, S.; Xu, X.; Riedl, H.; Abstreiter, G.; Finley, J. J.; Koblmüller, G., E-mail: Julian.Treu@wsi.tum.de, E-mail: Gregor.Koblmueller@wsi.tum.de [Walter Schottky Institut, Physik Department, Center of Nanotechnology and Nanomaterials, Technische Universität München, Am Coulombwall 4, Garching 85748 (Germany); Döblinger, M. [Department of Chemistry, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, Butenandtstr. 5-13, Munich 81377 (Germany)

    2016-02-01

    We delineate the optimized growth parameter space for high-uniformity catalyst-free InGaAs nanowire (NW) arrays on Si over nearly the entire alloy compositional range using selective area molecular beam epitaxy. Under the required high group-V fluxes and V/III ratios, the respective growth windows shift to higher growth temperatures as the Ga-content x(Ga) is tuned from In-rich to Ga-rich InGaAs NWs. Using correlated x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy, we identify structural defects to govern luminescence linewidths in In-rich (x(Ga) < 0.4) and Ga-rich (x(Ga) > 0.6) NWs, whereas limitations at intermediate Ga-content (0.4 < x(Ga) < 0.6) are mainly due to compositional inhomogeneities. Most remarkably, the catalyst-free InGaAs NWs exhibit a characteristic transition in crystal structure from wurtzite to zincblende (ZB) dominated phase near x(Ga) ∼ 0.4 that is further reflected in a cross-over from blue-shifted to red-shifted photoluminescence emission relative to the band edge emission of the bulk ZB InGaAs phase.

  7. Fundamental Studies of Butane Oxidation over Model-Supported Vanadium Oxide Catalysts: Molecular Structure-Reactivity Relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Wachs, I.E.; Jehng, J.M.; Deo, G.; Weckhuysen, B. M.; Guliants, V.V.; Benziger, J. B.; Sundaresan, S.

    1997-01-01

    The oxidation of n-butane to maleic anhydride was investigated over a series of model-supported vanadia catalysts where the vanadia phase was present as a two-dimensional metal oxide overlayer on the different oxide supports (TiO2, ZrO2, CeO2, Nb2O5, Al2O3, and SiO2). No correlation was found between the properties of the terminal V==O bond and the butane oxidation turnover frequency (TOF) during in situ Raman spectroscopy study. Furthermore, neither the n-butane oxidation TOF nor maleic anhy...

  8. Design and Synthesis of Chiral Molecular Tweezers Based on Deoxycholic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A series of new chiral molecular tweezers have been designed and synthesized by using deoxycholic acid as spacer and aromatic amines as arms.Instead of using toxic phosgene,the triphosgene was employed in synthesis of the molecular tweezers receptors.These chiral molecular tweezers showed good enantioselectivity for D-amino acid methyl esters.

  9. Widely tunable alloy composition and crystal structure in catalyst-free InGaAs nanowire arrays grown by selective area molecular beam epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treu, J.; Speckbacher, M.; Saller, K.; Morkötter, S.; Döblinger, M.; Xu, X.; Riedl, H.; Abstreiter, G.; Finley, J. J.; Koblmüller, G.

    2016-02-01

    We delineate the optimized growth parameter space for high-uniformity catalyst-free InGaAs nanowire (NW) arrays on Si over nearly the entire alloy compositional range using selective area molecular beam epitaxy. Under the required high group-V fluxes and V/III ratios, the respective growth windows shift to higher growth temperatures as the Ga-content x(Ga) is tuned from In-rich to Ga-rich InGaAs NWs. Using correlated x-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy, we identify structural defects to govern luminescence linewidths in In-rich (x(Ga) 0.6) NWs, whereas limitations at intermediate Ga-content (0.4 blue-shifted to red-shifted photoluminescence emission relative to the band edge emission of the bulk ZB InGaAs phase.

  10. Self-assembly, redox activity, and charge transport of functional surface nano-architectures by molecular design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skomski, Daniel

    Surface-assisted molecular self-assembly is a promising strategy to program the structure and chemical state of atoms and molecules in nano-architectures to achieve a specific function. The experiments described in this thesis demonstrate that the design and programming of basic organic components leads to desired characteristics by self-assembly. The fabrication of uniform single-site metal centers at surfaces, important for high selectivity in next-generation catalysts, was accomplished by coordination to redox non-innocent phenanthroline and tetrazine-based ligands. These examples were the first demonstrating tuning of the metal oxidation state in surface coordination architectures through rational ligand design. The molecular-scale coordination architectures were the first formed from chromium and vanadium, and the first from platinum in a non-porphyrin system. The first mixed valence metal-ligand surface structure was fabricated that attained the same ligand coordination number for all metal sites. A new surface reaction method was demonstrated between an inexpensive sodium chloride reagent and carboxylate ligands. High-temperature, molecular-resolution microscopy and spectroscopy of the ordered metal-organic structures demonstrated thermal stability up to 300 °C, the highest molecular-level thermal stability in organic surface nanostructures yet achieved, making such systems potential candidates for moderate-temperature catalytic reactions. Molecular self-assembly was expanded into organic semiconductor thin films. In a two-component, bi-layered system, hydrogen bonding between carboxylates and carboxylic acid-substituted thiophenes was utilized, yielding the first real-space images of phenyl-thiophene stacking. In a one-component system, multiple donor-acceptor pi-pi contacts between phenyltriazole building blocks accomplished assembly of flat-lying molecules from a surface with molecular-scale precision through more than twenty molecular layers. Sufficient

  11. Design of Novel Biosensors for Determination of Phenolic Compounds using Catalyst-Loaded Reduced Graphene Oxide Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen Morrisey

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Facile and inexpensive method for designing high performance sensors for H2O2 and polyphenols has been developed. The proposed sensors are based on high electrocatalytic activity of Prussian Blue (PB nanoparticles deposited in situ on high surface area graphene nanosheet-based thin films on a graphite electrode. The exfoliated graphene nanosheets were formed by attaching graphene oxide to the electrode surface followed by their electrochemical reduction to obtain the reduced graphene oxide (rGO, providing high surface area and excellent current-carrying capabilities to the sensory film. The PB catalyst nanoparticles were deposited electrochemically on rGO. This procedure is very time efficient as it reduces the time of sensor preparation from 3 days (according to recent literature to several hours. The proposed method provides simple means to obtain highly reliable and stable sensory films. The sensor shows a dynamic range of 1–500 µM H2O2 and a rapid response of 5 s to reach 95% of a steady-state response. When combined with immobilized enzymes (horseradish peroxidase or laccase oxidase, it can serve as a biosensor for polyphenols. As the proof of concept, the response of the enzymatic biosensors to polyphenol catechin has been presented delineating different mechanisms of horseradish peroxidase and laccase operation. The proposed sensors are low cost, reliable, and scalable.

  12. Design for the" new consumer". The green kitchen as a catalyst for sustainable living

    OpenAIRE

    Casais, Mafalda Marques da Silva

    2011-01-01

    Tese de Mestrado em Design de Produto A presente dissertação é um estudo exploratório sobre o habitar sustentável. Nesta investigação pretende-se compreender o que pode ser o habitar sustentável urbano (no contexto das sociedades ocidentais), tendo como elemento estruturante uma “Cozinha Verde”. Para além da caracterização do habitar urbano sustentável, o trabalho foca-se também na identificação e descrição do seu ‘habitante’ – aqui chamado de “Novo Utilizador / Consumidor”....

  13. The Design of Molecular Hosts, Guests, and Their Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cram, Donald J.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the origins, definitions, tools, and principles of host-guest chemistry. Gives examples of chiral recognition in complexation, of partial transacylase mimics, of caviplexes, and of a synthetic molecular cell. (Author/RT)

  14. Design of Multiple Metal Doped Ni Based Catalyst for Hydrogen Generation from Bio-oil Reforming at Mild-temperature

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-xia Yuan; Fang Ding; Jian-ming Yao; Xiang-song Chen; Wei-wei Liu; Jin-yong Wu; Fei-yan Gong

    2013-01-01

    A new kind of multiple metal (Cu,Mg,Ce) doped Ni based mixed oxide catalyst,synthesized by the co-precipitation method,was used for efficient production of hydrogen from bio-oil reforming at 250-500 ℃.Two reforming processes,the conventional steam reforming (CSR) and the electrochemical catalytic reforming (ECR),were performed for the bio-oil reforming.The catalyst with an atomic mol ratio of Ni∶Cu∶Mg∶Ce∶Al=5.6∶1.1∶1.9∶1.0∶9.9 exhibited very high reforming activity both in CSR and ECR processes,reaching 82.8% hydrogen yield at 500 ℃ in the CSR,yield of 91.1% at 400 ℃ and 3.1 A in the ECR,respectively.The influences of reforming temperature and the current through the catalyst in the ECR were investigated.It was observed that the reforming and decomposition of the bio-oil were significantly enhanced by the current.The promoting effects of current on the decomposition and reforming processes of bio-oil were further studied by using the model compounds of biooil (acetic acid and ethanol) under 101 kPa or low pressure (0.1 Pa) through the time of flight analysis.The catalyst also shows high water gas shift activity in the range of 300-600 ℃.The catalyst features and alterations in the bio-oil reforming were characterized by the ICP,XRD,XPS and BET measurements.The mechanism of bio-oil reforming was discussed based on the study of the elemental reactions and catalyst characterizations.The research catalyst,potentially,may be a practical catalyst for high efficient production of hydrogen from reforning of bio-oil at mild-temperature.

  15. Molecular design of electron transport with orbital rule: toward conductance-decay free molecular junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Tomofumi; Yoshizawa, Kazunari

    2015-12-28

    In this study, we report our viewpoint of single molecular conductance in terms of frontier orbitals. The orbital rule derived from orbital phase and amplitude is a powerful guideline for the qualitative understanding of molecular conductance in both theoretical and experimental studies. The essence of the orbital rule is the phase-related quantum interference, and on the basis of this rule a constructive or destructive pathway for electron transport is easily predicted. We have worked on the construction of the orbital rule for more than ten years and recently found from its application that π-stacked molecular junctions fabricated experimentally are in line with the concept for conductance-decay free junctions. We explain the orbital rule using benzene molecular junctions with the para-, meta- and ortho-connections and discuss linear π-conjugated chains and π-stacked molecular junctions with respect to their small decay factors in this manuscript.

  16. Designing supported palladium-on-gold bimetallic nano-catalysts for controlled hydrogenation of acetylene in large excess of ethylene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malla, Pavani

    Ethylene is used as a starting point for many chemical intermediates in the petrochemical industry. It is predominantly produced through steam cracking of higher hydrocarbons (ethane, propane, butane, naphtha, and gas oil). During the cracking process, a small amount of acetylene is produced as a side product. However, acetylene must be removed since it acts as a poison for ethylene polymerization catalysts at even ppm concentrations (>5 ppm). Thus, the selective hydrogenation of acetylene to ethylene is an important process for the purification of ethylene. Conventional, low weight loading Pd catalysts are used for this selective reaction in high concentration ethylene streams. Gold was initially considered to be catalytically inactive for a long time. This changed when gold was seen in the context of the nanometric scale, which has indeed shown it to have excellent catalytic activity as a homogeneous or a heterogeneous catalyst. Gold is proved to have high selectivity to ethylene but poor at conversion. Bimetallic Au and Pd catalysts have exhibited superior activity as compared to Pd particles in semi-hydrogenation. Hydrogenation of acetylene was tested using this bimetallic combination. The Pd-on-Au bimetallic catalyst structure provides a new synthesis approach in improving the catalytic properties of monometallic Pd materials. TiO 2 as a support material and 0.05%Pd loading on 1%Au on titania support and used different treatment methods like washing plasma and reduction between the two metal loadings and was observed under 2:1 ratio. In my study there were two set of catalysts which were prepared by a modified incipient wetness impregnation technique. Out of all the reaction condition the catalyst which was reduced after impregnating gold and then impregnating palladium which was further treated in non-thermal hydrogen plasma and then pretreated in hydrogen till 250°C for 1 hour produced the best activity of 76% yield at 225°C. Stability tests were conducted

  17. Property Integration - A New Approach for Simultaneous Solution of Process and Molecular Design Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    The objective of this paper is to introduce the new concept of property integration. It is based on tracking and integrating properties throughout the process. This is made possible by exploiting the unique features at the interface of process and molecular design. Recently developed clustering...... concepts are employed to identify optimal properties without commitment to specific species. Subsequently, group contribution methods and molecular design techniques are employed to solve the reverse property prediction problem to design molecules possessing the optimal properties....

  18. Quantum chemistry of the oxygen evolution reaction on cobalt(ii,iii) oxide - implications for designing the optimal catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaisance, Craig P; Reuter, Karsten; van Santen, Rutger A

    2016-07-01

    Density functional theory is used to examine the changes in electronic structure that occur during the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) catalyzed by active sites on three different surface terminations of Co3O4. These three active sites have reactive oxo species with differing degrees of coordination by Co cations - a μ(3)-oxo on the (311) surface, a μ(2)-oxo on the (110)-A surface, and an η-oxo on the (110)-B surface. The kinetically relevant step on all surfaces over a wide range of applied potentials is the nucleophilic addition of water to the oxo, which is responsible for formation of the O-O bond. The intrinsic reactivity of a site for this step is found to increase as the coordination of the oxo decreases with the μ(3)-oxo on the (311) surface being the least reactive and the η-oxo on the (110)-B surface being the most reactive. A detailed analysis of the electronic changes occurring during water addition on the three sites reveals that this trend is due to both a decrease in the attractive local Madelung potential on the oxo and a decrease in electron withdrawal from the oxo by Co neighbors. Applying a similar electronic structure analysis to the oxidation steps preceding water addition in the catalytic cycle shows that analogous electronic changes occur during this process, explaining a correlation observed between the oxidation potential of a site and its intrinsic reactivity for water addition. This concept is then used to specify criteria for the design of an optimal OER catalyst at a given applied potential. PMID:27108887

  19. Progress for Cu-based Small Pore Molecular Sieves as Disel De-NOx Catalysts%铜基小孔分子筛柴油车尾气脱硝催化材料研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翁端; 王蕾; 吴晓东; 冉锐; 司知蠢

    2013-01-01

    柴油车尾气排放是大气污染物氮氧化物(NOx)的主要来源之一.氨选择性催化还原技术(NH3-SCR)具有高效率、低成本等特征,已成为目前主要的移动源脱硝技术.传统铜基中孔分子筛高温水热稳定较差,而小孔分子筛负载催化材料具有优良的催化活性和水热稳定性,近年受到国内外研究者的广泛关注,成为一种新型NH3-SCR催化材料.综述了铜基小孔分子筛催化材料在柴油车尾气脱硝领域的研究进展.以Cu-SSZ-13和Cu-SAPO-34为例,论述了其突出的低温活性和水热稳定性,总结了Cu含量、Cu物种形态及表面酸性等因素对其催化活性、水热稳定性的影响,归纳其反应活性中心、反应路径等催化机理方面的研究进展.分析表明,该类催化材料是极具发展潜力的NH3-SCR催化材料.其新型催化材料设计、抗中毒机理等还有待进一步深入研究.%NOx is one of the main pollutants in diesel vehicle emissions.Selective catalytic reduction of NOx by ammonia (NH3-SCR) has been extensively studied for the lean NOx control due to its high performance and economic efficiency.Copper based zeolites have been widely used as the De-NOx catalysts and significant research efforts have concentrated on developing different types of zeolites to improve the activity and durability.Recently,SCR catalysts based on small-pore molecular sieves have been reported for NH3-SCR with much improved activities and high thermal durability and have received substantial attention.This review sums up the research progress related with Cu-based small pore molecular sieves,such as Cu-SSZ-13 and Cu-SAPO-34,as diesel De-NOx Catalysts with outstanding low temperature NH3-SCR activity and hydrothermal stability.The nature of the copper species and the surface acidity are the most important factors that affect the NH3-SCR performance.Important results on the active sites and catalytic mechanisms are especially discussed in details

  20. Rational design of Mg-Al mixed oxide-supported bimetallic catalysts for dry reforming of methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsyganok, Andrey I. [Centre for Catalysis Research and Innovation, Department of Chemistry, University of Ottawa, D' Iorio Hall, 10 Marie Curie Street, Ottawa, Ont. (Canada); Inaba, Mieko [Natural Gas Technology Development Team, Teikoku Oil Co., 9-23-30 Kitakarasuyama, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 157-0061 (Japan); Tsunoda, Tatsuo; Uchida, Kunio; Suzuki, Kunio; Hayakawa, Takashi [Institute for Materials and Chemical Process, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 5, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba 305-8565 (Japan); Takehira, Katsuomi [Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan)

    2005-09-18

    A novel synthetic strategy for preparing bimetallic Ru-M (M=Cr, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu) catalysts, supported on Mg-Al mixed oxide, has been introduced. It was based on a 'memory effect', i.e. on the ability of Mg-Al mixed oxide to reconstruct a layered structure upon rehydration with an aqueous solution. By repeated calcinations-rehydration cycles, layered double hydroxide (LDH) precursors of catalysts containing two different metals were synthesized. Bimetallic catalysts were then generated (1) in situ from LDH under methane reforming reaction conditions and (2) from mixed metal oxides obtained by preliminary LDH calcination. Among all the LDH-derived catalysts, a Ru{sup 0.1%}-Ni{sup 5.0%}/MgAlO{sub x} sample revealed the highest activity and selectivity to syngas, a suitable durability and a low coking capacity. A promoting effect of ruthenium on catalytic function of supported nickel was demonstrated. Preliminary LDH calcination was shown to markedly affect the catalytic activity of the derived catalysts and especially their coking properties.

  1. Homogeneous catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Chadwick, John C; Freixa, Zoraida; van Leeuwen, Piet W N M

    2011-01-01

    This first book to illuminate this important aspect of chemical synthesis improves the lifetime of catalysts, thus reducing material and saving energy, costs and waste.The international panel of expert authors describes the studies that have been conducted concerning the way homogeneous catalysts decompose, and the differences between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts. The result is a ready reference for organic, catalytic, polymer and complex chemists, as well as those working in industry and with/on organometallics.

  2. Advance in heterogeneous catalysts for styrene epoxidation to styrene oxide with molecular oxygen%分子氧氧化苯乙烯制备环氧苯乙烷的多相催化剂研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨瑞云; 王宪沛; 李文; 李小安; 闫俊; 张辉辉; 刘卫涛

    2013-01-01

    综述了分子氧氧化苯乙烯制备环氧苯乙烷的多相催化剂研究进展,重点介绍了Co系催化剂在苯乙烯环氧化方面的应用.其中,负载在Beta型分子筛上的Co-Beta催化剂具有较高的催化活性、选择性及稳定性.%The latest research progress in the heterogeneous catalysts for epoxidation of styrene to styrene oxide by molecular oxygen was reviewed,especially cobalt catalyst,among which Co-beta catalysts supported on beta zeolites exhibited higher catalytic activity,selectivity and stability.

  3. Design and Use of Nanostructured Single-Site Heterogeneous Catalysts for the Selective Transformation of Fine Chemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimiro Dal Santo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanostructured single-site heterogeneous catalysts possess the advantages of classical solid catalysts, in terms of easy recovery and recycling, together with a defined tailored chemical and steric environment around the catalytically active metal site. The use of inorganic oxide supports with selected shape and porosity at a nanometric level may have a relevant impact on the regio- and stereochemistry of the catalytic reaction. Analogously, by choosing the optimal preparation techniques to obtain spatially isolated and well-characterised active sites, it is possible to achieve performances that are comparable to (or, in the most favourable cases, better than those obtained with homogeneous systems. Such catalysts are therefore particularly suitable for the transformation of highly-functionalised fine chemicals and some relevant examples where high chemo-, regio- and stereoselectivity are crucial will be described.

  4. Incorporation of dynamic flexibility in the design of a methanol synthesis Loop in the presence of catalyst deactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parvasi, P.; Rahimpour, M.R.; Jahanmiri, A. [Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Shiraz University (Iran)

    2008-01-15

    A typical methanol loop reactor is analyzed in this study. All basic equipment in the Lurgi-type methanol loop is included in the proposed model. A detailed dynamic model described by a set of ordinary differential and algebraic equations is developed to predict the behavior of the overall process. The model is validated against plant data. A new deactivation model is proposed and its parameters are estimated using daily plant data. The interesting feature of this model is that it incorporates the effect of carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide on the catalyst deactivation. Using the model, the effect of various factors to compensate for the reduction of production rate due to catalyst deactivation has been examined. Some improvements can be achieved by adjusting the operating conditions. Finally, a strategy is proposed for prevention of reduced production due to catalyst deactivation. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Recent advances in the molecular design of synthetic vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lyn H.

    2015-12-01

    Vaccines have typically been prepared using whole organisms. These are normally either attenuated bacteria or viruses that are live but have been altered to reduce their virulence, or pathogens that have been inactivated and effectively killed through exposure to heat or formaldehyde. However, using whole organisms to elicit an immune response introduces the potential for infections arising from a reversion to a virulent form in live pathogens, unproductive reactions to vaccine components or batch-to-batch variability. Synthetic vaccines, in which a molecular antigen is conjugated to a carrier protein, offer the opportunity to circumvent these problems. This Perspective will highlight the progress that has been achieved in developing synthetic vaccines using a variety of molecular antigens. In particular, the different approaches used to develop conjugate vaccines using peptide/proteins, carbohydrates and other small molecule haptens as antigens are compared.

  6. ATOMIC-SCALE DESIGN OF IRON FISCHER-TROPSCH CATALYSTS: A COMBINED COMPUTATIONAL CHEMISTRY, EXPERIMENTAL, AND MICROKINETIC MODELING APPROACH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manos Mavrikakis; James A. Dumesic; Amit A. Gokhale; Rahul P. Nabar; Calvin H. Bartholomew; Hu Zou; Brian Critchfield

    2005-03-22

    Efforts during this first year focused on four areas: (1) searching/summarizing published FTS mechanistic and kinetic studies of FTS reactions on iron catalysts; (2) construction of mass spectrometer-TPD and Berty CSTR reactor systems; (3) preparation and characterization of unsupported iron and alumina-supported iron catalysts at various iron loadings (4) Determination of thermochemical parameters such as binding energies of reactive intermediates, heat of FTS elementary reaction steps, and kinetic parameters such as activation energies, and frequency factors of FTS elementary reaction steps on a number of model surfaces. Literature describing mechanistic and kinetic studies of Fischer-Tropsch synthesis on iron catalysts was compiled in a draft review. Construction of the mass spectrometer-TPD system is 90% complete and of a Berty CSTR reactor system 98% complete. Three unsupported iron catalysts and three alumina-supported iron catalysts were prepared by nonaqueous-evaporative deposition (NED) or aqueous impregnation (AI) and characterized by chemisorption, BET, extent-of-reduction, XRD, and TEM methods. These catalysts, covering a wide range of dispersions and metal loadings, are well-reduced and relatively thermally stable up to 500-600 C in H{sub 2}, thus ideal for kinetic and mechanistic studies. The alumina-supported iron catalysts will be used for kinetic and mechanistic studies. In the coming year, adsorption/desorption properties, rates of elementary steps, and global reaction rates will be measured for these catalysts, with and without promoters, providing a database for understanding effects of dispersion, metal loading, and support on elementary kinetic parameters and for validation of computational models that incorporate effects of surface structure and promoters. Furthermore, using state-of-the-art self-consistent Density Functional Theory (DFT) methods, we have extensively studied the thermochemistry and kinetics of various elementary steps on

  7. Engineering design and testing of a ground water remediation system using electrolytically generated hydrogen with a palladium catalyst for dehalogenation of chlorinated hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz, R.

    1997-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that dissolved hydrogen causes rapid dehalogenation of chlorinated hydrocarbons in the presence of a palladium catalyst. The speed and completeness of these reactions offer advantages in designing remediation technologies for certain ground water contamination problems. However, a practical design challenge arises in the need to saturate the aqueous phase with hydrogen in an expeditious manner. To address this issue, a two-stage treatment reactor has been developed. The first stage consists of an electrolytic cell that generates hydrogen by applying a voltage potential across the influent water stream. The second stage consists of a catalyst column of palladium metal supported on alumina beads. A bench-scale reactor has been used to test this design for treating ground water contaminated with trichloroethene and other chlorinated hydrocarbons. In influent streams containing contaminant concentrations up to 4 ppm, initial results confirm that destruction efficiencies greater than 95% may be achieved with residence times short enough to allow practical implementation in specially designed flow-through treatment wells. Results from the bench-scale tests are being used to design a pilot ground water treatment system.

  8. Digital learning material for experimental design and model building in molecular biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aegerter-Wilmsen, T.

    2005-01-01

    Designing experimental approaches is a major cognitive skill in molecular biology research, and building models, including quantitative ones, is a cognitive skill which is rapidly gaining importance. Since molecular biology education at university level is aimed at educating future researchers, we c

  9. Characterization-Based Molecular Design of Bio-Fuel Additives Using Chemometric and Property Clustering Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Subin eHada; Charles Conrad Solvason; Mario Richard Eden

    2014-01-01

    In this work, multivariate characterization data such as infrared spectroscopy was used as a source of descriptor data involving information on molecular architecture for designing structured molecules with tailored properties. Application of multivariate statistical techniques such as principal component analysis allowed capturing important features of the molecular architecture from enormous amount of complex data to build appropriate latent variable models. Combining the property clusterin...

  10. Design and synthesis of novel chiral molecular tweezers based on deoxycholic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Gang Zhao; Xing Li Liu; Yi Zhong

    2008-01-01

    A novel type of chiral molecular tweezers has been designed and synthesized by using deoxycholic acid as backbone and ethanoyl and the chiral unsymmetrical urea unit as arms. Their structures were characterized by 1H NMR, IR, MS spectra and elemental analysis. These molecular tweezers showed good binding ability for neutral molecules and chiral molecules.

  11. Design and Synthesis of Novel Molecular Tweezers Derived from Chenodeoxycholic Acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Gang ZHAO; Qi Ming MU; Shu Hua CHEN

    2004-01-01

    A novel type of chiral molecular tweezers has been designed and synthesized by using chenodeoxy cholic acid as spacer and the aromatic compounds as arm. Their structures were characterized by 1HNMR, IR, MS spectra and elemental analysis. These chiral molecular tweezers showed good enantioselectivity for D-amino acid methyl esters.

  12. Design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of potent discodermolide fluorescent and photoaffinity molecular probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Amos B; Rucker, Paul V; Brouard, Ignacio; Freeze, B Scott; Xia, Shujun; Horwitz, Susan Band

    2005-11-10

    [structure: see text] The design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of a series of (+)-discodermolide molecular probes possessing photoaffinity and fluorescent appendages has been achieved. Stereoselective olefin cross-metathesis comprised a key tactic for construction of two of the molecular probes. Three photoaffinity probes were radiolabeled with tritium.

  13. An algebraic approach for simultaneous solution of process and molecular design problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bommareddy

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The property integration framework has allowed for simultaneous representation of processes and products from a properties perspective and thereby established a link between molecular and process design problems. The simultaneous approach involves solving two reverse problems. The first reverse problem identifies the property targets corresponding to the desired process performance. The second reverse problem is the reverse of a property prediction problem, which identifies the molecular structures that match the targets identified in the first problem. Group Contribution Methods (GCM are used to form molecular property operators that will be used to track properties. Earlier contributions in this area have worked to include higher order estimation of GCM for solving the molecular design problem. In this work, the accuracy of the property prediction is further enhanced by improving the techniques to enumerate higher order groups. Incorporation of these higher order enumeration techniques increases the efficiency of property prediction and thus the application range of the group contribution methods in molecular design problems. Successful tracking of properties is the key in applying the reverse problem formulation for integrated process and product design problems. An algebraic technique has been developed for solving process and molecular design problems simultaneously. Since both process and molecular property operators target the same optimum process performance, the set of inequality expressions can be solved simultaneously to identify the molecules that meet the desired process performance. Since this approach is based on an algebraic algorithm, any number of properties can be tracked simultaneously.

  14. Bimetallic Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinfelt, John H.

    1985-01-01

    Chemical reaction rates can be controlled by varying composition of miniscule clusters of metal atoms. These bimetallic catalysts have had major impact on petroleum refining, where work has involved heterogeneous catalysis (reacting molecules in a phase separate from catalyst.) Experimentation involving hydrocarbon reactions, catalytic…

  15. Design of colloidal Pt catalysts encapsulated by silica nano membranes for enhanced stability in H2S streams

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Calderone, V.R.; Schütz-Widoniak, J.; Bezemer, G.L.; Bakker, G.; Steurs, C.; Philipse, A.P.

    2010-01-01

    Poisoning of platinum catalysts by sulphur compounds is a significant problem that prevents their application in untreated gas streams. We introduce a novel concept to circumvent the poisoning problem by encapsulating individual platinum nano-particles with silica layers that act as selective membra

  16. Design and Preparation of Supported Au Catalyst with Enhanced Catalytic Activities by Rationally Positioning Au Nanoparticles on Anatase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Wang, Hong; Rice, Andrew E; Zhang, Wei; Li, Xiaokun; Chen, Mingshu; Meng, Xiangju; Lewis, James P; Xiao, Feng-Shou

    2015-06-18

    A synergistic effect between individual components is crucial for increasing the activity of metal/metal oxide catalysts. The greatest challenge is how to control the synergistic effect to obtain enhanced catalytic performance. Through density functional theory calculations of model Au/TiO2 catalysts, it is suggested that there is strong interaction between Au nanoparticles and Ti species at the edge/corner sites of anatase, which is favorable for the formation of stable oxygen vacancies. Motivated by this theoretical analysis, we have rationally prepared Au nanoparticles attached to edge/corner sites of anatase support (Au/TiO2-EC), confirmed by their HR-TEM images. As expected, this strong interaction is well characterized by Raman, UV-visible, and XPS techniques. Very interestingly, compared with conventional Au catalysts, Au/TiO2-EC exhibits superior catalytic activity in the oxidations using O2. Our approach to controlling Au nanoparticle positioning on anatase to obtain enhanced catalytic activity offers an efficient strategy for developing more novel supported metal catalysts. PMID:26266615

  17. Design and Application of Surface Modification at Molecular Scale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Miao; XUE Qun-Ji; ZHOU Feng; GUAN Fei; LIU Wei-Min

    2004-01-01

    The structuring of surfaces on a nanoscale level-both chemically and topographically has become an increasingly relevant field of research in nanotechnology with widespread application potential in various fields of science ( e. g.surface engineering, electronics, biotechnology, optics). Two examples on surface modification at molecular scale with self-assembly monolayers are shown: ( 1 ) Chemically attaching ultra-thin polymer films through the self-assembly of silane fictionalized copolymer have been approved in this article. (2) The patterned films with microstructures on different substrates have been prepared through micro-contact printing technique and electro polymerization.

  18. Catalytic Cracking of Palm Oil Over Zeolite Catalysts: Statistical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. A. Twaiq and S. Bhatia

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The catalytic cracking of palm oil was conducted in a fixed bed micro-reactor over HZSM-5, zeolite ? and ultrastable Y (USY zeolite catalysts. The objective of the present investigation was to study the effect of cracking reaction variables such as temperature, weight hourly space velocity, catalyst pore size and type of palm oil feed of different molecular weight on the conversion, yield of hydrocarbons in gasoline boiling range and BTX aromatics in the organic liquid product.  Statistical Design of Experiment (DOE with 24 full factorial design was used in experimentation at the first stage.  The nonlinear model and Response Surface Methodology (RSM were utilized in the second stage of experimentation to obtain the optimum values of the variables for maximum yields of hydrocarbons in gasoline boiling range and aromatics.  The HZSM-5 showed the best performance amongst the three catalysts tested.  At 623 K and WHSV of 1 h-1, the highest experimental yields of gasoline and aromatics were 28.3 wt.% and 27 wt.%, respectively over the HZSM-5 catalyst.  For the same catalyst, the statistical model predicted that the optimum yield of gasoline was 28.1 wt.% at WHSV of 1.75 h-1 and 623 K.  The predicted optimum yield of gasoline was 25.5 wt.% at 623 K and WHSV of 1 h-1.KEY WORDS: Catalytic Cracking, Palm Oil, Zeolite, Design Of Experiment, Response Surface Methodology.

  19. Design of active and stable Co-Mo-Sx chalcogels as pH-universal catalyst for the hydrogen evolution reaction.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staszak-Jirkovsky, Jakub; Malliakas, Christos D.; Lopes, Pietro P.; Danilovic, Nemanja; Kota, Subrahmanyam S.; Chang, Kee-Chul; Genorio, Bostjan; Strmcnik, Dusan; Stamenkovic, Vojislav R.; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Markovic, Nenad M.

    2016-02-01

    Three of the fundamental catalytic limitations that have plagued the electrochemical production of hydrogen for decades still remain: low efficiency, short lifetime of catalysts and a lack of low-cost materials. Here, we address these three challenges by establishing and exploring an intimate functional link between the reactivity and stability of crystalline (CoS2 and MoS2) and amorphous (CoSx and MoSx) hydrogen evolution catalysts. We propose that Co2+ and Mo4+ centers promote the initial discharge of water (alkaline solutions) or hydronium ions (acid solutions). We establish that although CoSx materials are more active than MoSx they are also less stable, suggesting that the active sites are defects formed after dissolution of Co and Mo cations. By combining the higher activity of CoSx building blocks with the higher stability of MoSx units into a compact and robust CoMoSx structure, we are able to design a low-cost alternative to noble metal catalysts for efficient electrocatalytic production of hydrogen in both alkaline and acidic environments.

  20. A hemi-metallocene chromium catalyst with trimethylaluminum-free methylaluminoxane for the synthesis of disentangled ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, Dario; Ronca, Sara; Rastogi, Sanjay

    2015-02-01

    Recently, it has been shown that by using a single-site catalytic system having titanium as a metallic center, it is possible to tailor the entanglement density in the amorphous region of a semi-crystalline ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE). This route provides the possibility to make high-modulus, high-strength uniaxially and biaxially drawn tapes and films, without using any solvent during processing. In this publication, it is shown that a single-site catalyst having chromium as metallic center, proposed by Enders and co-workers, can also be tuned to provide control on the entanglement density during synthesis of the UHMWPE. However, to achieve the goal some modifications during the synthesis are required. The synthesized polymers can be processed in the solid state below the equilibrium melting temperature, resulting in uniaxially drawn tapes having tensile strength and modulus greater than 3.5 N/tex and 200 N/tex, respectively. Rheological studies have been performed to follow the increase in entanglement density in melt state with time.

  1. What did Erwin mean? The physics of information from the materials genomics of aperiodic crystals and water to molecular information catalysts and life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varn, D P; Crutchfield, J P

    2016-03-13

    Erwin Schrödinger famously and presciently ascribed the vehicle transmitting the hereditary information underlying life to an 'aperiodic crystal'. We compare and contrast this, only later discovered to be stored in the linear biomolecule DNA, with the information-bearing, layered quasi-one-dimensional materials investigated by the emerging field of chaotic crystallography. Despite differences in functionality, the same information measures capture structure and novelty in both, suggesting an intimate coherence between the information character of biotic and abiotic matter-a broadly applicable physics of information. We review layered solids and consider three examples of how information- and computation-theoretic techniques are being applied to understand their structure. In particular, (i) we review recent efforts to apply new kinds of information measures to quantify disordered crystals; (ii) we discuss the structure of ice I in information-theoretic terms; and (iii) we recount recent investigations into the structure of tris(bicyclo[2.1.1]hexeno)benzene, showing how an information-theoretic analysis yields additional insight into its structure. We then illustrate a new Second Law of Thermodynamics that describes information processing in active low-dimensional materials, reviewing Maxwell's Demon and a new class of molecular devices that act as information catalysts. Lastly, we conclude by speculating on how these ideas from informational materials science may impact biology.

  2. What did Erwin mean? The physics of information from the materials genomics of aperiodic crystals and water to molecular information catalysts and life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varn, D P; Crutchfield, J P

    2016-03-13

    Erwin Schrödinger famously and presciently ascribed the vehicle transmitting the hereditary information underlying life to an 'aperiodic crystal'. We compare and contrast this, only later discovered to be stored in the linear biomolecule DNA, with the information-bearing, layered quasi-one-dimensional materials investigated by the emerging field of chaotic crystallography. Despite differences in functionality, the same information measures capture structure and novelty in both, suggesting an intimate coherence between the information character of biotic and abiotic matter-a broadly applicable physics of information. We review layered solids and consider three examples of how information- and computation-theoretic techniques are being applied to understand their structure. In particular, (i) we review recent efforts to apply new kinds of information measures to quantify disordered crystals; (ii) we discuss the structure of ice I in information-theoretic terms; and (iii) we recount recent investigations into the structure of tris(bicyclo[2.1.1]hexeno)benzene, showing how an information-theoretic analysis yields additional insight into its structure. We then illustrate a new Second Law of Thermodynamics that describes information processing in active low-dimensional materials, reviewing Maxwell's Demon and a new class of molecular devices that act as information catalysts. Lastly, we conclude by speculating on how these ideas from informational materials science may impact biology. PMID:26857672

  3. Molecular Designs for Enhancement of Polarity in Ferroelectric Soft Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtani, Ryo; Nakaya, Manabu; Ohmagari, Hitomi; Nakamura, Masaaki; Ohta, Kazuchika; Lindoy, Leonard F.; Hayami, Shinya

    2015-11-01

    The racemic oxovanadium(IV) salmmen complexes, [VO((rac)-(4-X-salmmen))] (X = C12C10C5 (1), C16 (2), and C18 (3); salmmen = N,N‧-monomethylenebis-salicylideneimine) with “banana shaped” molecular structures were synthesized, and their ferroelectric properties were investigated. These complexes exhibit well-defined hysteresis loops in their viscous phases, moreover, 1 also displays liquid crystal behaviour. We observed a synergetic effect influenced by three structural aspects; the methyl substituents on the ethylene backbone, the banana shaped structure and the square pyramidal metal cores all play an important role in generating the observed ferroelectricity, pointing the way to a useful strategy for the creation of advanced ferroelectric soft materials.

  4. GABA uptake inhibitors. Design, molecular pharmacology and therapeutic aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsgaard-Larsen, P; Frølund, B; Frydenvang, Karla Andrea

    2000-01-01

    GABAA receptor agonists. The availability of these compounds made it possible to study the pharmacology of the GABA uptake systems and the GABAA receptors separately. Based on extensive cellular and molecular pharmacological studies using 23, 24, and a number of mono- and bicyclic analogues, it has been...... demonstrated that neuronal and glial GABA transport mechanisms have dissimilar substrate specificities. With GABA transport mechanisms as pharmacological targets, strategies for pharmacological interventions with the purpose of stimulating GABA neurotransmission seem to be (1) effective blockade of neuronal...... recently been reported as the most selective glial GABA uptake inhibitor so far known and may be a useful tool for further elucidation of the pharmacology of GABA transporters. In recent years, a variety of lipophilic analogues of the amino acids 23 and 24 have been developed, and one of these compounds...

  5. Molecular Design for Tuning Work Functions of Transparent Conducting Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koldemir, Unsal; Braid, Jennifer L; Morgenstern, Amanda; Eberhart, Mark; Collins, Reuben T; Olson, Dana C; Sellinger, Alan

    2015-06-18

    In this Perspective, we provide a brief background on the use of aromatic phosphonic acid modifiers for tuning work functions of transparent conducting oxides, for example, zinc oxide (ZnO) and indium tin oxide (ITO). We then introduce our preliminary results in this area using conjugated phosphonic acid molecules, having a substantially larger range of dipole moments than their unconjugated analogues, leading to the tuning of ZnO and ITO electrodes over a 2 eV range as derived from Kelvin probe measurements. We have found that these work function changes are directly correlated to the magnitude and the direction of the computationally derived molecular dipole of the conjugated phosphonic acids, leading to the predictive power of computation to drive the synthesis of new and improved phosphonic acid ligands. PMID:26266603

  6. A Multi-Step and Multi-Level Approach for Computer Aided Molecular Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harper, Peter Mathias; Gani, Rafiqul

    2001-01-01

    . The problem formulation step incorporates a knowledge base for the identification and setup of the design criteria. Candidate compounds are identified using a multi-level generate and test CAMD solution algorithm capable of designing molecules having a high level of molecular detail. A post solution step...

  7. A Multi-step and Multi-level approach for Computer Aided Molecular Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    . The problem formulation step incorporates a knowledge base for the identification and setup of the design criteria. Candidate compounds are identified using a multi-level generate and test CAMD solution algorithm capable of designing molecules having a high level of molecular detail. A post solution step...... using an Integrated Computer Aided System (ICAS) for result analysis and verification is included in the methodology. Keywords: CAMD, separation processes, knowledge base, molecular design, solvent selection, substitution, group contribution, property prediction, ICAS Introduction The use of Computer...

  8. DOE Award No. DE-FC36-03GO13108 NOVEL NON-PRECIOUS METAL CATALYSTS FOR PEMFC: CATALYST SELECTION THROUGH MOLECULAR MODELING AND DURABILITY STUDIES Final Report (September 2003 – October 2008)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branko N. Popov

    2009-02-20

    The objective of this project is to develop novel non-precious metal electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and demonstrate the potential of the catalysts to perform at least as good as conventional Pt catalysts currently in use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with a cost at least 50 % less than a target of 0.2 g (Pt loading)/peak kW and with durability > 2,000 h operation with less than 10 % power degradation. A novel nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst was obtained by modifying carbon black with nitrogen-containing organic precursor in the absence of transition metal precursor. The catalyst shows the onset potential of approximately 0.76 V (NHE) for ORR and the amount of H2O2 of approximately 3% at 0.5 V (NHE). Furthermore, a carbon composite catalyst was achieved through the high-temperature pyrolysis of the precursors of transition metal (Co and Fe) and nitrogen supported on the nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst, followed by chemical post-treatment. This catalyst showed an onset potential for ORR as high as 0.87 V (NHE), and generated less than 1 % of H2O2. The PEM fuel cell exhibited a current density of 2.3 A cm-2 at 0.2 V for a catalyst loading of 6.0 mg cm-2. No significant performance degradation was observed for 480 h continuous operation. The characterization studies indicated that the metal-nitrogen chelate complexes decompose at the temperatures above 800 oC. During the pyrolysis, the transition metals facilitate the incorporation of pyridinic and graphitic nitrogen groups into the carbon matrix, and the carbon surface modified with nitrogen is active for ORR. In order to elucidate the role of transition metal precursor played in the formation of active sites in the non-precious metal catalysts, a novel ruthenium-based chelate (RuNx) catalyst was synthesized by using RuCl3 and propylene diammine as the Ru and N precursors, respectively, followed by high-temperature pyrolysis. This catalyst exhibited comparable

  9. DOE Award No. DE-FC36-03GO13108 NOVEL NON-PRECIOUS METAL CATALYSTS FOR PEMFC: CATALYST SELECTION THROUGH MOLECULAR MODELING AND DURABILITY STUDIES Final Report (September 2003 – October 2008)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branko N. Popov

    2009-03-03

    The objective of this project is to develop novel non-precious metal electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and demonstrate the potential of the catalysts to perform at least as good as conventional Pt catalysts currently in use in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with a cost at least 50 % less than a target of 0.2 g (Pt loading)/peak kW and with durability > 2,000 h operation with less than 10 % power degradation. A novel nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst was obtained by modifying carbon black with nitrogen-containing organic precursor in the absence of transition metal precursor. The catalyst shows the onset potential of approximately 0.76 V (NHE) for ORR and the amount of H2O2 of approximately 3% at 0.5 V (NHE). Furthermore, a carbon composite catalyst was achieved through the high-temperature pyrolysis of the precursors of transition metal (Co and Fe) and nitrogen supported on the nitrogen-modified carbon-based catalyst, followed by chemical post-treatment. This catalyst showed an onset potential for ORR as high as 0.87 V (NHE), and generated less than 1 % of H2O2. The PEM fuel cell exhibited a current density of 2.3 A cm-2 at 0.2 V for a catalyst loading of 6.0 mg cm-2. No significant performance degradation was observed for 480 h continuous operation. The characterization studies indicated that the metal-nitrogen chelate complexes decompose at the temperatures above 800 oC. During the pyrolysis, the transition metals facilitate the incorporation of pyridinic and graphitic nitrogen groups into the carbon matrix, and the carbon surface modified with nitrogen is active for ORR. In order to elucidate the role of transition metal precursor played in the formation of active sites in the non-precious metal catalysts, a novel ruthenium-based chelate (RuNx) catalyst was synthesized by using RuCl3 and propylene diammine as the Ru and N precursors, respectively, followed by high-temperature pyrolysis. This catalyst exhibited comparable

  10. Biomass Conversion over Heteropoly Acid Catalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Jizhe

    2015-04-01

    Biomass is a natural resource that is both abundant and sustainable. Its efficient utilization has long been the focus of research and development efforts with the aim to substitute it for fossil-based feedstock. In addition to the production of biofuels (e.g., ethanol) from biomass, which has been to some degree successful, its conversion to high value-added chemicals is equally important. Among various biomass conversion pathways, catalytic conversion is usually preferred, as it provides a cost-effective and eco-benign route to the desired products with high selectivities. The research of this thesis is focused on the conversion of biomass to various chemicals of commercial interest by selective catalytic oxidation. Molecular oxygen is chosen as the oxidant considering its low cost and environment friendly features in comparison with commonly used hydrogen peroxide. However, the activation of molecular oxygen usually requires high reaction temperatures, leading to over oxidation and thus lower selectivities. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop effective catalysts for such conversion systems. We use kegging-type heteropoly acids (HPAs) as a platform for catalysts design because of their high catalytic activities and ease of medication. Using HPA catalysts allows the conversion taking place at relatively low temperature, which is beneficial to saving production cost as well as to improving the reaction selectivity. The strong acidity of HPA promotes the hydrolysis of biomass of giant molecules (e.g. cellulose), which is the first as well as the most difficult step in the conversion process. Under certain circumstances, a HPA combines the merits of homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts, acting as an efficient homogeneous catalyst during the reaction while being easily separated as a heterogeneous catalyst after the reaction. We have successfully applied HPAs in several biomass conversion systems. Specially, we prepared a HPA-based bi-functional catalyst

  11. Chapter 6 – Computer-Aided Molecular Design and Property Prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gani, Rafiqul; Zhang, L.; Kalakul, Sawitree;

    2017-01-01

    for the initial stages of the design/development process. Therefore, computer-aided molecular design and property prediction techniques are two topics that play important roles in chemical product design, analysis, and application. In this chapter, an overview of the concepts, methods, and tools related...... to these two topics are given. In addition, a generic computer-aided framework for the design of molecules, mixtures, and blends is presented. The application of the framework is highlighted for molecular products through two case studies involving the design of refrigerants and surfactants.......Today's society needs many chemical-based products for its survival, nutrition, health, transportation, agriculture, and the functioning of processes. Chemical-based products have to be designed/developed in order to meet these needs, while at the same time, they must be innovative and sustainable...

  12. Photo-oxidation catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, J. Roland; Liu, Ping; Smith, R. Davis

    2009-07-14

    Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

  13. Selective oxidation of methyl alpha-d-glucoside on carbon supported platinum catalysts. Doctoral thesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuurman, Y.

    1992-01-27

    The selective oxidation of methyl alpha-D-glucoside to sodium 1-O-methyl alpha-D-glucuronate by molecular oxygen on supported platinum was studied in a three-phase agitated tank reactor. Emphasis was put on the intrinsic kinetics and on the catalyst deactivation during oxidation. The obtained results were applied to the design of an industrial production unit.

  14. Spectroscopic investigation into the design of solid-acid catalysts for the low temperature dehydration of ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Matthew E; Aswegen, Sivan V; Gibson, Emma K; Silverwood, Ian P; Raja, Robert

    2016-07-14

    The increased demand for bulk hydrocarbons necessitates research into increasingly sustainable, energy-efficient catalytic processes. Owing to intricately designed structure-property correlations, SAPO-34 has become established as a promising material for the low temperature ethanol dehydration to produce ethylene. However, further optimization of this process requires a precise knowledge of the reaction mechanism at a molecular level. In order to achieve this a range of spectroscopic characterization techniques are required to probe both the interaction with the active site, and also the wider role of the framework. To this end we employ a combination of in situ infra-red and neutron scattering techniques to elucidate the influence of the surface ethoxy species in the activation of both diethyl ether and ethanol, towards the improved formation of ethylene at low temperatures. The combined conclusions of these studies is that the formation of ethylene is the rate determining step, which is of fundamental importance towards the development of this process and the introduction of bio-ethanol as a viable feedstock for ethylene production. PMID:27264938

  15. Design of molecularly imprinted polymers for sensors and solid phase extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Subrahmanyam, Sreenath

    2002-01-01

    This thesis presents broadly the applications of molecularly imprinted polymers in sensors and solid phase extraction. Sensors for creatine and creatinine have been reported using a novel method of rational design of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs), and solid phase extraction of aflatoxin-B 1 has also been described in the thesis. A method for the selective detection of creataine and creatinine is reported in this thesis, which is based on the reaction between polymeri...

  16. Molecular Design of Benzodithiophene-Based Organic Photovoltaic Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Huifeng; Ye, Long; Zhang, Hao; Li, Sunsun; Zhang, Shaoqing; Hou, Jianhui

    2016-06-22

    Advances in the design and application of highly efficient conjugated polymers and small molecules over the past years have enabled the rapid progress in the development of organic photovoltaic (OPV) technology as a promising alternative to conventional solar cells. Among the numerous OPV materials, benzodithiophene (BDT)-based polymers and small molecules have come to the fore in achieving outstanding power conversion efficiency (PCE) and breaking 10% efficiency barrier in the single junction OPV devices. Remarkably, the OPV device featured by BDT-based polymer has recently demonstrated an impressive PCE of 11.21%, indicating the great potential of this class of materials in commercial photovoltaic applications. In this review, we offered an overview of the organic photovoltaic materials based on BDT from the aspects of backbones, functional groups, alkyl chains, and device performance, trying to provide a guideline about the structure-performance relationship. We believe more exciting BDT-based photovoltaic materials and devices will be developed in the near future.

  17. Solar-Driven Reduction of Aqueous Protons Coupled to Selective Alcohol Oxidation with a Carbon Nitride-Molecular Ni Catalyst System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasap, Hatice; Caputo, Christine A; Martindale, Benjamin C M; Godin, Robert; Lau, Vincent Wing-Hei; Lotsch, Bettina V; Durrant, James R; Reisner, Erwin

    2016-07-27

    Solar water-splitting represents an important strategy toward production of the storable and renewable fuel hydrogen. The water oxidation half-reaction typically proceeds with poor efficiency and produces the unprofitable and often damaging product, O2. Herein, we demonstrate an alternative approach and couple solar H2 generation with value-added organic substrate oxidation. Solar irradiation of a cyanamide surface-functionalized melon-type carbon nitride ((NCN)CNx) and a molecular nickel(II) bis(diphosphine) H2-evolution catalyst (NiP) enabled the production of H2 with concomitant selective oxidation of benzylic alcohols to aldehydes in high yield under purely aqueous conditions, at room temperature and ambient pressure. This one-pot system maintained its activity over 24 h, generating products in 1:1 stoichiometry, separated in the gas and solution phases. The (NCN)CNx-NiP system showed an activity of 763 μmol (g CNx)(-1) h(-1) toward H2 and aldehyde production, a Ni-based turnover frequency of 76 h(-1), and an external quantum efficiency of 15% (λ = 360 ± 10 nm). This precious metal-free and nontoxic photocatalytic system displays better performance than an analogous system containing platinum instead of NiP. Transient absorption spectroscopy revealed that the photoactivity of (NCN)CNx is due to efficient substrate oxidation of the material, which outweighs possible charge recombination compared to the nonfunctionalized melon-type carbon nitride. Photoexcited (NCN)CNx in the presence of an organic substrate can accumulate ultralong-lived "trapped electrons", which allow for fuel generation in the dark. The artificial photosynthetic system thereby catalyzes a closed redox cycle showing 100% atom economy and generates two value-added products, a solar chemical, and solar fuel.

  18. Solar-Driven Reduction of Aqueous Protons Coupled to Selective Alcohol Oxidation with a Carbon Nitride-Molecular Ni Catalyst System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasap, Hatice; Caputo, Christine A; Martindale, Benjamin C M; Godin, Robert; Lau, Vincent Wing-Hei; Lotsch, Bettina V; Durrant, James R; Reisner, Erwin

    2016-07-27

    Solar water-splitting represents an important strategy toward production of the storable and renewable fuel hydrogen. The water oxidation half-reaction typically proceeds with poor efficiency and produces the unprofitable and often damaging product, O2. Herein, we demonstrate an alternative approach and couple solar H2 generation with value-added organic substrate oxidation. Solar irradiation of a cyanamide surface-functionalized melon-type carbon nitride ((NCN)CNx) and a molecular nickel(II) bis(diphosphine) H2-evolution catalyst (NiP) enabled the production of H2 with concomitant selective oxidation of benzylic alcohols to aldehydes in high yield under purely aqueous conditions, at room temperature and ambient pressure. This one-pot system maintained its activity over 24 h, generating products in 1:1 stoichiometry, separated in the gas and solution phases. The (NCN)CNx-NiP system showed an activity of 763 μmol (g CNx)(-1) h(-1) toward H2 and aldehyde production, a Ni-based turnover frequency of 76 h(-1), and an external quantum efficiency of 15% (λ = 360 ± 10 nm). This precious metal-free and nontoxic photocatalytic system displays better performance than an analogous system containing platinum instead of NiP. Transient absorption spectroscopy revealed that the photoactivity of (NCN)CNx is due to efficient substrate oxidation of the material, which outweighs possible charge recombination compared to the nonfunctionalized melon-type carbon nitride. Photoexcited (NCN)CNx in the presence of an organic substrate can accumulate ultralong-lived "trapped electrons", which allow for fuel generation in the dark. The artificial photosynthetic system thereby catalyzes a closed redox cycle showing 100% atom economy and generates two value-added products, a solar chemical, and solar fuel. PMID:27337491

  19. Solar-Driven Reduction of Aqueous Protons Coupled to Selective Alcohol Oxidation with a Carbon Nitride–Molecular Ni Catalyst System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Solar water-splitting represents an important strategy toward production of the storable and renewable fuel hydrogen. The water oxidation half-reaction typically proceeds with poor efficiency and produces the unprofitable and often damaging product, O2. Herein, we demonstrate an alternative approach and couple solar H2 generation with value-added organic substrate oxidation. Solar irradiation of a cyanamide surface-functionalized melon-type carbon nitride (NCNCNx) and a molecular nickel(II) bis(diphosphine) H2-evolution catalyst (NiP) enabled the production of H2 with concomitant selective oxidation of benzylic alcohols to aldehydes in high yield under purely aqueous conditions, at room temperature and ambient pressure. This one-pot system maintained its activity over 24 h, generating products in 1:1 stoichiometry, separated in the gas and solution phases. The NCNCNx–NiP system showed an activity of 763 μmol (g CNx)−1 h–1 toward H2 and aldehyde production, a Ni-based turnover frequency of 76 h–1, and an external quantum efficiency of 15% (λ = 360 ± 10 nm). This precious metal-free and nontoxic photocatalytic system displays better performance than an analogous system containing platinum instead of NiP. Transient absorption spectroscopy revealed that the photoactivity of NCNCNx is due to efficient substrate oxidation of the material, which outweighs possible charge recombination compared to the nonfunctionalized melon-type carbon nitride. Photoexcited NCNCNx in the presence of an organic substrate can accumulate ultralong-lived “trapped electrons”, which allow for fuel generation in the dark. The artificial photosynthetic system thereby catalyzes a closed redox cycle showing 100% atom economy and generates two value-added products, a solar chemical, and solar fuel. PMID:27337491

  20. Generic Mathematical Programming Formulation and Solution for Computer-Aided Molecular Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lei; Cignitti, Stefano; Gani, Rafiqul

    2015-01-01

    This short communication presents a generic mathematical programming formulation for Computer-Aided Molecular Design (CAMD). A given CAMD problem, based on target properties, is formulated as a Mixed Integer Linear/Non-Linear Program (MILP/MINLP). The mathematical programming model presented here......, which is formulated as an MILP/MINLP problem, considers first-order and second-order molecular groups for molecular structure representation and property estimation. It is shown that various CAMD problems can be formulated and solved through this model....

  1. Selective Oxidation of Methane to Methanol Using Molecular Oxygen on MoOx/(LaCoO3+Co3O4) Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xin ZHANG; De Hua HE; Qi Jiang ZHANG; Bo Qing XU; Qi Ming ZHU

    2003-01-01

    Comparatively high CH3OH selectivity (60.0%) and yield (6.7%) were obtained onMoOx/(LaCoO3+Co3O4) catalysts in selective oxidation of methane to methanol using molecularoxygen as oxidant. The interaction between MoOx and La-Co-oxide modified the molecularstructure of molybdenum oxide and the ratio of O7O2- on the catalyst surface, which controlled thecatalytic performance of MoOx/(LaCoO3+Co3O4) catalysts.

  2. Pentameric models as alternative molecular targets for the design of new antiaggregant agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera Guisasola, Exequiel E; Gutierrez, Lucas J; Andujar, Sebastián A; Angelina, Emilio; Rodríguez, Ana M; Enriz, Ricardo D

    2016-01-01

    The structure-based drug design has been an extremely useful technique used for searching and developing of new therapeutic agents in various biological systems. In the case of AD, this approach has been difficult to implement. Among other several causes, the main problem might be the lack of a specific stable and reliable molecular target. In this paper the results obtained using a pentameric amyloid beta (Aβ) model as a molecular target are discussed. Our MD simulations have shown that this system is relatively structured and stable, displaying a lightly conformational flexibility during 2.0 μs of simulation time. This study allowed us to distinguish characteristic structural features in specific regions of the pentamer which should be taken into account when choosing this model as a molecular target. This represents a clear advantage compared to the monomer or dimer models which are highly flexible structures with large numbers of possible conformers. Using this pentameric model we performed two types of studies usually carried out on a molecular target: a virtual screening and the design on structural basis of new mimetic peptides with antiaggregant properties. Our results indicate that this pentameric model might be a good molecular target for these particular studies of molecular modeling. Details about the predictive power of our virtual screening as well as about the molecular interactions that stabilize the mimetic peptide-pentamer Aβ complexes are discussed in this paper.

  3. Design of two-photon molecular tandem architectures for solar cells by ab initio theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørnsø, Kristian Baruël; García Lastra, Juan Maria; De La Torre, Gema;

    2015-01-01

    An extensive database of spectroscopic properties of molecules from ab initio calculations is used to design molecular complexes for use in tandem solar cells that convert two photons into a single electron–hole pair, thereby increasing the output voltage while covering a wider spectral range...... of the structural and energetic properties of several thousand porphyrin dyes. The third design is a molecular analogy of the intermediate band solar cell, and involves a single dye molecule with strong intersystem crossing to ensure a long lifetime of the intermediate state. Based on the calculated energy levels...... and molecular orbitals, energy diagrams are presented for the individual steps in the operation of such tandem solar cells. We find that theoretical open circuit voltages of up to 1.8 V can be achieved using these tandem designs. Questions about the practical implementation of prototypical devices...

  4. Design of highly active binary catalyst systems for CO2/epoxide copolymerization: polymer selectivity, enantioselectivity, and stereochemistry control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiao-Bing; Shi, Lei; Wang, Yi-Ming; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Ying-Ju; Peng, Xiao-Jun; Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Li, Bo

    2006-02-01

    Asymmetric, regio- and stereoselective alternating copolymerization of CO(2) and racemic aliphatic epoxides proceeds effectively under mild temperature and pressure by using a binary catalyst system of a chiral tetradentate Schiff base cobalt complex [SalenCo(III)X] as the electrophile in conjunction with an ionic organic ammonium salt or a sterically hindered strong organic base as the nucleophile. The substituent groups on the aromatic rings, chiral diamine backbone, and axial X group of the electrophile, as well as the nucleophilicity, leaving ability, and coordination ability of the nucleophile, all significantly affect the catalyst activity, polymer selectivity, enantioselectivity, and stereochemistry. A bulky chiral cyclohexenediimine backbone complex [SalcyCo(III)X] with an axial X group of poor leaving ability as the electrophile, combined with a bulky nuclephile with poor leaving ability and low coordination ability, is an ideal binary catalyst system for the copolymerization of CO(2) and a racemic aliphatic epoxide to selectively produce polycarbonates with relatively high enantioselectivity, >95% head-to-tail connectivity, and >99% carbonate linkages. A fast copolymerization of CO(2) and epoxides was observed when the concentration of the electrophile or/and the nucleophile was increased, and the number of polycarbonate chains was proportional to the concentration of the nucleophile. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, in combination with a kinetic study, showed that the copolymerization involved the coordination activation of the monomer by the electrophile and polymer chain growth predominately occurring in the nucleophile. Both the enantiomorphic site effect resulting from the chiral electrophile and the polymer chain end effect mainly from the bulky nucleophile cooperatively control the stereochemistry of the CO(2)/epoxide copolymerization.

  5. Antileishmanial activity of novel indolyl-coumarin hybrids: Design, synthesis, biological evaluation, molecular docking study and in silico ADME prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangshetti, Jaiprakash N; Khan, Firoz A Kalam; Kulkarni, Abhishek A; Patil, Rajendra H; Pachpinde, Amol M; Lohar, Kishan S; Shinde, Devanand B

    2016-02-01

    In present work we have designed and synthesized total twelve novel 3-(3-(1H-indol-3-yl)-3-phenylpropanoyl)-4-hydroxy-2H-chromen-2-one derivatives 13(a-l) using Ho(3+) doped CoFe2O4 nanoparticles as catalyst and evaluated for their potential antileishmanial and antioxidant activities. The compounds 13a, 13d and 13h were found to possess significant antileishmanial activity (IC50 value=95.50, 95.00 and 99.00μg/mL, respectively) when compared to the standard sodium stibogluconate (IC50=490.00 μg/mL). The compounds 13a (IC50=12.40 μg/mL), 13d (IC50=13.49 μg/mL), 13g (IC50=13.24 μg/mL) and 13l (IC50=13.74 μg/mL) had shown good antioxidant activity when compared with standards butylated hydroxy toluene (IC50=16.5 μg/mL) and ascorbic acid (IC50=12.8 μg/mL). After performing molecular docking studies, it was found that compounds 13a and 13d had potential to inhibit pteridine reductase 1 enzyme. In silico ADME pharmacokinetic parameters had shown promising results and none of the synthesized compounds had violated Lipinski's rule of five. Thus, suggesting that compounds from the present series can serve as important gateway for the design and development of new antileishmanial as well as antioxidant agent.

  6. Covalent Design for Dye-Sensitized H2-Evolving Photocathodes Based on a Cobalt Diimine-Dioxime Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeffer, Nicolas; Massin, Julien; Lebrun, Colette; Renault, Olivier; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Artero, Vincent

    2016-09-28

    Dye-sensitized photoelectrochemical cells (DS-PECs) for water splitting hold promise for the large-scale storage of solar energy in the form of (solar) fuels, owing to the low cost and ease to process of their constitutive photoelectrode materials. The efficiency of such systems ultimately depends on our capacity to promote unidirectional light-driven electron transfer from the electrode substrate to a catalytic moiety. We report here on the first noble-metal free and covalent dye-catalyst assembly able to achieve photoelectrochemical visible light-driven H2 evolution in mildly acidic aqueous conditions when grafted onto p-type NiO electrode substrate. PMID:27595317

  7. Development of design information for molecular-sieve type regenerative CO2-removal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, R. M.; Ruder, J. M.; Dunn, V. B.; Hwang, K. C.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental and analytic studies were conducted with molecular sieve sorbents to provide basic design information, and to develop a system design technique for regenerable CO2-removal systems for manned spacecraft. Single sorbate equilibrium data were obtained over a wide range of conditions for CO2, water, nitrogen, and oxygen on several molecular sieve and silica gel sorbents. The coadsorption of CO2 with water preloads, and with oxygen and nitrogen was experimentally evaluated. Mass-transfer, and some limited heat-transfer performance evaluations were accomplished under representative operating conditions, including the coadsorption of CO2 and water. CO2-removal system performance prediction capability was derived.

  8. Mechanism study and molecular design in controlled/“living” radical polymerization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    This tutorial review summarizes recent progress in the research field of controlled/"living" radical polymerization (CLRP) from Soochow University.The present paper gives a broad overview of the mechanism study and molecular design in CLRP.The mechanism study in CLRP aided by microwave,initiated by γ-radiation at low temperature,mediated by iron,in reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization and the mechanism transfer between different CLRP processes are reviewed and summarized.The molecular design in CLRP,especially in RAFT polymerization for mechanism study,and in achieving tailor-made functional polymers is studied and discussed in the later part.

  9. Molecular modeling for the design of novel performance chemicals and materials

    CERN Document Server

    Rai, Beena

    2012-01-01

    Molecular modeling (MM) tools offer significant benefits in the design of industrial chemical plants and material processing operations. While the role of MM in biological fields is well established, in most cases MM works as an accessory in novel products/materials development rather than a tool for direct innovation. As a result, MM engineers and practitioners are often seized with the question: ""How do I leverage these tools to develop novel materials or chemicals in my industry?"" Molecular Modeling for the Design of Novel Performance Chemicals and Materials answers this important questio

  10. Design, synthesis, α-glucosidase inhibitory activity, molecular docking and QSAR studies of benzimidazole derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinparast, Leila; Valizadeh, Hassan; Bahadori, Mir Babak; Soltani, Somaieh; Asghari, Behvar; Rashidi, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-06-01

    In this study the green, one-pot, solvent-free and selective synthesis of benzimidazole derivatives is reported. The reactions were catalyzed by ZnO/MgO containing ZnO nanoparticles as a highly effective, non-toxic and environmentally friendly catalyst. The structure of synthesized benzimidazoles was characterized using spectroscopic technics (FT-IR, 1HNMR, 13CNMR). Synthesized compounds were evaluated for their α-glucosidase inhibitory potential. Compounds 3c, 3e, 3l and 4n were potent inhibitors with IC50 values ranging from 60.7 to 168.4 μM. In silico studies were performed to explore the binding modes and interactions between enzyme and synthesized benzimidazoles. Developed linear QSAR model based on density and molecular weight could predict bioactivity of newly synthesized compounds well. Molecular docking studies revealed the availability of some hydrophobic interactions. In addition, the bioactivity of most potent compounds had good correlation with estimated free energy of binding (ΔGbinding) which was calculated according to docked best conformations.

  11. Catalyst composition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onodera, T.; Sakai, T.; Sumitani, K.; Yamasaki, Y.

    1984-11-27

    A catalyst composition comprising a crystalline aluminosilicate selected from the group consisting of zeolite ZSM-5, zeolite ZSM-11, zeolite ZSM-12, zeolite ZSM-35 and zeolite ZSM-38 and having a silica/alumina mole ratio of 20 to 1,000; and at least two metals which are platinum and at least one other metal selected from the group consisting of titanium, chromium, zinc, gallium, germanium, strontium, yttrium, zirconium, molybdenum, palladium, tin, barium, cerium, tungsten, osmium, lead, cadmium, mercury, indium, lanthanum and beryllium. This catalyst composition is useful particularly for the isomerization of aromatic hydrocarbons and reforming of naphtha.

  12. Self-Supporting Metal-Organic Layers as Single-Site Solid Catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lingyun; Lin, Zekai; Peng, Fei; Wang, Weiwei; Huang, Ruiyun; Wang, Cheng; Yan, Jiawei; Liang, Jie; Zhang, Zhiming; Zhang, Teng; Long, Lasheng; Sun, Junliang; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-04-11

    Metal-organic layers (MOLs) represent an emerging class of tunable and functionalizable two-dimensional materials. In this work, the scalable solvothermal synthesis of self-supporting MOLs composed of [Hf6 O4 (OH)4 (HCO2 )6 ] secondary building units (SBUs) and benzene-1,3,5-tribenzoate (BTB) bridging ligands is reported. The MOL structures were directly imaged by TEM and AFM, and doped with 4'-(4-benzoate)-(2,2',2''-terpyridine)-5,5''-dicarboxylate (TPY) before being coordinated with iron centers to afford highly active and reusable single-site solid catalysts for the hydrosilylation of terminal olefins. MOL-based heterogeneous catalysts are free from the diffusional constraints placed on all known porous solid catalysts, including metal-organic frameworks. This work uncovers an entirely new strategy for designing single-site solid catalysts and opens the door to a new class of two-dimensional coordination materials with molecular functionalities. PMID:26954885

  13. Computational Design of Intrinsic Molecular Rectifiers Based on Asymmetric Functionalization of N-Phenylbenzamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Wendu; Koepf, Matthieu; Koenigsmann, Christopher; Batra, Arunabh; Venkataraman, Latha; Negre, Christian F A; Brudvig, Gary W; Crabtree, Robert H; Schmuttenmaer, Charles A; Batista, Victor S

    2015-12-01

    We report a systematic computational search of molecular frameworks for intrinsic rectification of electron transport. The screening of molecular rectifiers includes 52 molecules and conformers spanning over 9 series of structural motifs. N-Phenylbenzamide is found to be a promising framework with both suitable conductance and rectification properties. A targeted screening performed on 30 additional derivatives and conformers of N-phenylbenzamide yielded enhanced rectification based on asymmetric functionalization. We demonstrate that electron-donating substituent groups that maintain an asymmetric distribution of charge in the dominant transport channel (e.g., HOMO) enhance rectification by raising the channel closer to the Fermi level. These findings are particularly valuable for the design of molecular assemblies that could ensure directionality of electron transport in a wide range of applications, from molecular electronics to catalytic reactions.

  14. Solution NMR structure of a designed metalloprotein and complementary molecular dynamics refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Jennifer R; Liu, Weixia; Spiegel, Katrin; Dal Peraro, Matteo; Klein, Michael L; Valentine, Kathleen G; Wand, A Joshua; DeGrado, William F

    2008-02-01

    We report the solution NMR structure of a designed dimetal-binding protein, di-Zn(II) DFsc, along with a secondary refinement step employing molecular dynamics techniques. Calculation of the initial NMR structural ensemble by standard methods led to distortions in the metal-ligand geometries at the active site. Unrestrained molecular dynamics using a nonbonded force field for the metal shell, followed by quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical dynamics of DFsc, were used to relax local frustrations at the dimetal site that were apparent in the initial NMR structure and provide a more realistic description of the structure. The MD model is consistent with NMR restraints, and in good agreement with the structural and functional properties expected for DF proteins. This work demonstrates that NMR structures of metalloproteins can be further refined using classical and first-principles molecular dynamics methods in the presence of explicit solvent to provide otherwise unavailable insight into the geometry of the metal center.

  15. Molecular docking as a popular tool in drug design, an in silico travel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruyck, Jerome; Brysbaert, Guillaume; Blossey, Ralf; Lensink, Marc F

    2016-01-01

    New molecular modeling approaches, driven by rapidly improving computational platforms, have allowed many success stories for the use of computer-assisted drug design in the discovery of new mechanism-or structure-based drugs. In this overview, we highlight three aspects of the use of molecular docking. First, we discuss the combination of molecular and quantum mechanics to investigate an unusual enzymatic mechanism of a flavoprotein. Second, we present recent advances in anti-infectious agents' synthesis driven by structural insights. At the end, we focus on larger biological complexes made by protein-protein interactions and discuss their relevance in drug design. This review provides information on how these large systems, even in the presence of the solvent, can be investigated with the outlook of drug discovery.

  16. Molecular docking as a popular tool in drug design, an in silico travel

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ruyck, Jerome; Brysbaert, Guillaume; Blossey, Ralf; Lensink, Marc F

    2016-01-01

    New molecular modeling approaches, driven by rapidly improving computational platforms, have allowed many success stories for the use of computer-assisted drug design in the discovery of new mechanism-or structure-based drugs. In this overview, we highlight three aspects of the use of molecular docking. First, we discuss the combination of molecular and quantum mechanics to investigate an unusual enzymatic mechanism of a flavoprotein. Second, we present recent advances in anti-infectious agents’ synthesis driven by structural insights. At the end, we focus on larger biological complexes made by protein–protein interactions and discuss their relevance in drug design. This review provides information on how these large systems, even in the presence of the solvent, can be investigated with the outlook of drug discovery. PMID:27390530

  17. Molecular Docking of Enzyme Inhibitors: A Computational Tool for Structure-Based Drug Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnitskaya, Aleksandra; Torok, Bela; Torok, Marianna

    2010-01-01

    Molecular docking is a frequently used method in structure-based rational drug design. It is used for evaluating the complex formation of small ligands with large biomolecules, predicting the strength of the bonding forces and finding the best geometrical arrangements. The major goal of this advanced undergraduate biochemistry laboratory exercise…

  18. Design and Application of Self-Assembled Low Molecular Weight Hydrogels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loos, Maaike de; Esch, Jan H. van; Feringa, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    Over the past years, the gelation of aqueous solutions by low molecular weight (LMW) compounds has become an area of increasing interest, owing to developments in the field of LMW organogelators. Until recently, LMW hydrogelators were found only by serendipity, nowadays rational design as well as ap

  19. Design and application of self-assembled low molecular weight hydrogels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Loos, M.; Feringa, B.L.; van Esch, J.

    2005-01-01

    Over the past years, the gelation of aqueous solutions by low molecular weight (LMW) compounds has become an area of increasing interest, owing to developments in the field of LMW organogelators. Until recently, LMW hydrogelators were found only by serendipity, nowadays rational design as well as ap

  20. Web based learning support for experimental design in molecular biology: a top-down approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aegerter-Wilmsen, T.; Hartog, R.; Bisseling, T.

    2003-01-01

    An important learning goal of a molecular biology curriculum is the attainment of a certain competence level in experimental design. Currently, undergraduate students are confronted with experimental approaches in textbooks, lectures and laboratory courses. However, most students do not reach a sati

  1. Hydride mobility in trinuclear sulfido clusters with the core [Rh3(μ-H)(μ3-S)2]: molecular models for hydrogen migration on metal sulfide hydrotreating catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, M Victoria; Lahoz, Fernando J; Lukešová, Lenka; Miranda, José R; Modrego, Francisco J; Nguyen, Duc H; Oro, Luis A; Pérez-Torrente, Jesús J

    2011-07-11

    The treatment of [{Rh(μ-SH){P(OPh)(3)}(2)}(2)] with [{M(μ-Cl)(diolef)}(2)] (diolef=diolefin) in the presence of NEt(3) affords the hydrido-sulfido clusters [Rh(3)(μ-H)(μ(3)-S)(2)(diolef){P(OPh)(3)}(4)] (diolef=1,5-cyclooctadiene (cod) for 1, 2,5-norbornadiene (nbd) for 2, and tetrafluorobenzo[5,6]bicyclo[2.2.2]octa-2,5,7-triene (tfb) for 3) and [Rh(2)Ir(μ-H)(μ(3)-S)(2)(cod){P(OPh)(3)}(4)] (4). Cluster 1 can be also obtained by treating [{Rh(μ-SH){P(OPh)(3)}(2)}(2)] with [{Rh(μ-OMe)(cod)}(2)], although the main product of the reaction with [{Ir(μ-OMe)(cod)}(2)] was [RhIr(2)(μ-H)(μ(3)-S)(2)(cod)(2){P(OPh)(3)}(2)] (5). The molecular structures of clusters 1 and 4 have been determined by X-ray diffraction methods. The deprotonation of a hydrosulfido ligand in [{Rh(μ-SH)(CO)(PPh(3))}(2)] by [M(acac)(diolef)] (acac=acetylacetonate) results in the formation of hydrido-sulfido clusters [Rh(3)(μ-H)(μ(3)-S)(2)(CO)(2) (diolef)(PPh(3))(2)] (diolef=cod for 6, nbd for 7) and [Rh(2)Ir(μ-H)(μ(3)-S)(2)(CO)(2)(cod)(PPh(3))(2)] (8). Clusters 1-3 and 5 exist in solution as two interconverting isomers with the bridging hydride ligand at different edges. Cluster 8 exists as three isomers that arise from the disposition of the PPh(3) ligands in the cluster (cis and trans) and the location of the hydride ligand. The dynamic behaviour of clusters with bulky triphenylphosphite ligands, which involves hydrogen migration from rhodium to sulfur with a switch from hydride to proton character, is significant to understand hydrogen diffusion on the surface of metal sulfide hydrotreating catalysts. PMID:21633978

  2. First-Principles Design of Graphene-Based Active Catalysts for Oxygen Reduction and Evolution Reactions in the Aprotic Li-O2 Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Joonhee; Yu, Jong-Sung; Han, Byungchan

    2016-07-21

    Using first-principles density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we demonstrate that catalytic activities toward oxygen reduction and evolution reactions (ORR and OER) in a Li-O2 battery can be substantially improved with graphene-based materials. We accomplish the goal by calculating free energy diagrams for the redox reactions of oxygen to identify a rate-determining step controlling the overpotentials. We unveil that the catalytic performance is well described by the adsorption energies of the intermediates LiO2 and Li2O2 and propose that graphene-based materials can be substantially optimized through either by N doping or encapsulating Cu(111) single crystals. Furthermore, our systematic approach with DFT calculations applied to design of optimum catalysts enables screening of promising candidates for the oxygen electrochemistry leading to considerable improvement of efficiency of a range of renewable energy devices. PMID:27392527

  3. Toward Rational Design of 3d Transition Metal Catalysts for CO2 Hydrogenation Based on Insights into Hydricity-Controlled Rate-Determining Steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Bhaskar; Neese, Frank; Ye, Shengfa

    2016-06-01

    Carbon dioxide functionalization attracts much interest due to the current environmental and energy challenges. Our earlier work (Mondal, B.; Neese, F.; Ye, S. Inorg. Chem. 2015, 54, 7192-7198) demonstrated that CO2 hydrogenation mediated by base metal catalysts [M(H)(η(2)-H2)(PP3(Ph))](n+) (M = Co(III) and Fe(II), n = 1, 2; PP3(Ph) = tris(2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl)phosphine) features discrete rate-determining steps (RDSs). Specifically, the reaction with [Co(III)(H)(η(2)-H2)(PP3(Ph))](2+) passes through a hydride-transfer RDS, whereas the conversion with [Fe(II)(H)(η(2)-H2)(PP3(Ph))](+) traverses a H2-splitting RDS. More importantly, we found that the nature and barrier of the RDS likely correlate with the hydride affinity or hydricity of the dihydride intermediate [M(H)2(PP3(Ph))]((n-1)+) generated by H2-splitting. In the present contribution, following this notion we design a series of potential Fe(II) and Co(III) catalysts, for which the respective dihydride species possess differential hydricities, and computationally investigated their reactivity toward CO2 hydrogenation. Our results reveal that lowering the hydrictiy of [Co(III)(H)2(PP3(Ph))](+) by introducing anionic anchors in PP3(Ph) dramatically decreases the hydride-transfer RDS barrier, as shown for the enhanced reactivity of [Co(H)(η(2)-H2)(CP3(Ph))](+) and [Co(H)(η(2)-H2)(SiP3(Ph))](+) (CP3(Ph) = tris(2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl)methyl, SiP3(Ph) = tris(2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl)silyl), while the same ligand modification increases the H2-splitting RDS barriers for [Fe(H)(η(2)-H2)(CP3(Ph))] and [Fe(H)(η(2)-H2)(SiP3(Ph))] relative to that for [Fe(H)(η(2)-H2)(PP3(Ph))](+). Conversely, upon increasing the hydricity of [Fe(II)(H)2(PP3(Ph))] by adding an electron-withdrawing group to PP3(Ph), the transformation with [Fe(H)(η(2)-H2)(PP3(PhNO2))](+) (PP3(PhNO2) = tris(2-(diphenylphosphino)-4-nitrophenyl)phosphine) is predicted to encounter a lower barrier for H2-splitting and a higher barrier for

  4. Toward Rational Design of 3d Transition Metal Catalysts for CO2 Hydrogenation Based on Insights into Hydricity-Controlled Rate-Determining Steps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Bhaskar; Neese, Frank; Ye, Shengfa

    2016-06-01

    Carbon dioxide functionalization attracts much interest due to the current environmental and energy challenges. Our earlier work (Mondal, B.; Neese, F.; Ye, S. Inorg. Chem. 2015, 54, 7192-7198) demonstrated that CO2 hydrogenation mediated by base metal catalysts [M(H)(η(2)-H2)(PP3(Ph))](n+) (M = Co(III) and Fe(II), n = 1, 2; PP3(Ph) = tris(2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl)phosphine) features discrete rate-determining steps (RDSs). Specifically, the reaction with [Co(III)(H)(η(2)-H2)(PP3(Ph))](2+) passes through a hydride-transfer RDS, whereas the conversion with [Fe(II)(H)(η(2)-H2)(PP3(Ph))](+) traverses a H2-splitting RDS. More importantly, we found that the nature and barrier of the RDS likely correlate with the hydride affinity or hydricity of the dihydride intermediate [M(H)2(PP3(Ph))]((n-1)+) generated by H2-splitting. In the present contribution, following this notion we design a series of potential Fe(II) and Co(III) catalysts, for which the respective dihydride species possess differential hydricities, and computationally investigated their reactivity toward CO2 hydrogenation. Our results reveal that lowering the hydrictiy of [Co(III)(H)2(PP3(Ph))](+) by introducing anionic anchors in PP3(Ph) dramatically decreases the hydride-transfer RDS barrier, as shown for the enhanced reactivity of [Co(H)(η(2)-H2)(CP3(Ph))](+) and [Co(H)(η(2)-H2)(SiP3(Ph))](+) (CP3(Ph) = tris(2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl)methyl, SiP3(Ph) = tris(2-(diphenylphosphino)phenyl)silyl), while the same ligand modification increases the H2-splitting RDS barriers for [Fe(H)(η(2)-H2)(CP3(Ph))] and [Fe(H)(η(2)-H2)(SiP3(Ph))] relative to that for [Fe(H)(η(2)-H2)(PP3(Ph))](+). Conversely, upon increasing the hydricity of [Fe(II)(H)2(PP3(Ph))] by adding an electron-withdrawing group to PP3(Ph), the transformation with [Fe(H)(η(2)-H2)(PP3(PhNO2))](+) (PP3(PhNO2) = tris(2-(diphenylphosphino)-4-nitrophenyl)phosphine) is predicted to encounter a lower barrier for H2-splitting and a higher barrier for

  5. Computer-Aided Molecular Design of Bis-phosphine Oxide Lanthanide Extractants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Billy W; Silva, Nuwan De; Windus, Theresa L; Gordon, Mark S; Moyer, Bruce A; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S; Hay, Benjamin P

    2016-06-20

    Computer-aided molecular design and high-throughput screening of viable host architectures can significantly reduce the efforts in the design of novel ligands for efficient extraction of rare earth elements. This paper presents a computational approach to the deliberate design of bis-phosphine oxide host architectures that are structurally organized for complexation of trivalent lanthanides. Molecule building software, HostDesigner, was interfaced with molecular mechanics software, PCModel, providing a tool for generating and screening millions of potential R2(O)P-link-P(O)R2 ligand geometries. The molecular mechanics ranking of ligand structures is consistent with both the solution-phase free energies of complexation obtained with density functional theory and the performance of known bis-phosphine oxide extractants. For the case where the link is -CH2-, evaluation of the ligand geometry provides the first characterization of a steric origin for the "anomalous aryl strengthening" effect. The design approach has identified a number of novel bis-phosphine oxide ligands that are better organized for lanthanide complexation than previously studied examples.

  6. Computer-Aided Molecular Design of Bis-phosphine Oxide Lanthanide Extractants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, Billy W; Silva, Nuwan De; Windus, Theresa L; Gordon, Mark S; Moyer, Bruce A; Bryantsev, Vyacheslav S; Hay, Benjamin P

    2016-06-20

    Computer-aided molecular design and high-throughput screening of viable host architectures can significantly reduce the efforts in the design of novel ligands for efficient extraction of rare earth elements. This paper presents a computational approach to the deliberate design of bis-phosphine oxide host architectures that are structurally organized for complexation of trivalent lanthanides. Molecule building software, HostDesigner, was interfaced with molecular mechanics software, PCModel, providing a tool for generating and screening millions of potential R2(O)P-link-P(O)R2 ligand geometries. The molecular mechanics ranking of ligand structures is consistent with both the solution-phase free energies of complexation obtained with density functional theory and the performance of known bis-phosphine oxide extractants. For the case where the link is -CH2-, evaluation of the ligand geometry provides the first characterization of a steric origin for the "anomalous aryl strengthening" effect. The design approach has identified a number of novel bis-phosphine oxide ligands that are better organized for lanthanide complexation than previously studied examples. PMID:26883005

  7. A New Optimization Model for Computer-Aided Molecular Design Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lei; Cignitti, Stefano; Gani, Rafiqul

    higher level analysis of the molecular structure and the final selection of the product. Samudra and Sahinidis [4] proposed a new optimization model using relaxed property targets and refined property targets with structural corrections. It is usually difficult to model and solve the MILP/MINLP problem...... developed for the consideration of higher order groups in the molecular generation step of CAMD through mathematical optimization [5]. The model can consider both first and second order groups simultaneously in the MILP/MINLP formulation through a set of mathematical constraints. Structural constraints...... applicability will be demonstrated through the solution of a range of product design problems from literature, such as design of simple molecules (solvents and refrigerants) to design of complex molecules (polymers, lipids and surfactants)....

  8. RESEARCH ON NEW TYPE AND HIGH EFFICIENCY QTE-1 CATALYST FOR UNLTRA HIGH MOLECULAR WEIGHT POLYETHYLENE%新型高效UHMWPE催化剂QTE-1的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晓庆; 周建勇; 毕晓龙; 李留忠; 齐立芳

    2012-01-01

    QTE-1 catalyst for production of ultra high molecular weight polyetnylene was prepared by adopting process intensification technology. Using laboratory polymerization evaluation device, the process conditions including process intensification technology, polymerization temperature, pressure and etc. were studied emphatically to understand their effects on the catalyst performances. The study results showed QTE-1 catalyst had the following features involving high reactivity, stable reaction kinetics and slow decay of activity, excellent properties of polymerized resin.%利用过程强化技术制备了UHMWPE催化剂QTE-1,并进行了小试聚合评价,蓖点考察了过程强化技术以及聚合温度、聚合压力等工艺条件对其性能的影响。研究结果表明,QTE-1催化剂具有聚合活性高、反应动力学曲线平稳、活性衰减缓慢等特点,聚合所得树脂性能优异。

  9. Characterization-Based Molecular Design of Biofuel Additives Using Chemometric and Property Clustering Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subin eHada

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, multivariate characterization data such as infrared (IR spectroscopy was used as a source of descriptor data involving information on molecular architecture for designing structured molecules with tailored properties. Application of multivariate statistical techniques such as principal component analysis (PCA allowed capturing important features of the molecular architecture from complex data to build appropriate latent variable models. Combining the property clustering techniques and group contribution methods (GCM based on characterization data in a reverse problem formulation enabled identifying candidate components by combining or mixing molecular fragments until the resulting properties match the targets. The developed methodology is demonstrated using molecular design of biodiesel additive which when mixed with off-spec biodiesel produces biodiesel that meets the desired fuel specifications. The contribution of this work is that the complex structures and orientations of the molecule can be included in the design, thereby allowing enumeration of all feasible candidate molecules that matched the identified target but were not part of original training set of molecules.

  10. Molecular Model Design and Quantum Chemistry Calculation of Cluster B4N4

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The B4N4 configurations were designed by using the molecular figure software. The full geometry optimization and harmonic vibration frequency analysis were performed at the 6-31G(d) level using density functional theory B3LYP method, which indicates that the five isomers are stationary points on the potential energy surface of B4N4 molecules. The geometry structure, frontier molecular orbital (FMO) and mulliken population have been analyzed. The bonding properties and hybrid type were also discussed in detail, showing the addition of hydro- gen atoms to boron or nitrogen atom would increase the stabilities of the BN clusters.

  11. Design of a molecular beam surface scattering apparatus for velocity and angular distribution measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceyer, S.T.; Siekhaus, W.J.; Somorjai, G.A.

    1981-09-01

    A molecular beam surface scattering apparatus designed for the study of corrosion and catalytic surface reactions is described. The apparatus incorporates two molecular or atomic beams aimed at a surface characterized by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), a rotatable, differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometer, and a versatile manipulator. Angular distributions and energy distributions as a function of angle and independent of the surface residence time can be measured. Typical data for the oxidation of deuterium to D/sub 2/O on a Pt(111) crystal surface are presented.

  12. DESIGN OF A MOLECULAR BEAM SURFACE SCATTERING APPARATUS FOR VELOCITY AND ANGULAR DISTRIBUTION MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceyer, S. T.; Siekhaus, W. J.; Somorjai, G. A.

    1980-11-01

    A molecular beam surface scattering apparatus designed for the study of corrosion and catalyticsurfacereactions is described. The apparatus incorporates two molecular or atomic beams aimed at a surface characterized by low energy electron diffraction (LEED) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), a rotatable, differentially pumped quadrupole mass spectrometer, and a versatile manipulator. Angular distributions and energy distributions as a funcion of angle and independent of the surface residence time can be measured. Typical data for the oxidation of deuterium to D{sub 2}O on a Pt(lll) crystal surface are presented.

  13. Identification of Extra-Framework Species on Fe/ZSM-5 and Cu/ZSM-5 Catalysts Typical Microporous Molecular Sieves with Zeolitic Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Urquieta-González E.A.; Martins L; Peguin R.P.S.; Batista M.S.

    2002-01-01

    Cu and Fe species formed during the preparation of Cu/ and Fe/ZSM-5 catalysts by ion exchange were studied. XRD, SEM, H2-TPR, DRS-UV-VIS, EPR, Mössbauer Spectroscopy (MÖSS) and chemical analysis (AAS) were used to sample characterization. Cu/ZSM-5 catalysts, irrespective of their Si/Al ratio and Cu content, showed a reduction peak at around 210°C, which was attributed to the reduction of Cu+2 to Cu+1. The reduction peak of Cu+1 to Cu0 shifted to higher temperatures with the increase of Si/Al ...

  14. Structure-based de novo design, molecular docking and molecular dynamics of primaquine analogues acting as quinone reductase II inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murce, Erika; Cuya-Guizado, Teobaldo Ricardo; Padilla-Chavarria, Helmut Isaac; França, Tanos Celmar Costa; Pimentel, Andre Silva

    2015-11-01

    Primaquine is a traditional antimalarial drug with low parasitic resistance and generally good acceptance at higher doses, which has been used for over 60 years in malaria treatment. However, several limitations related to its hematotoxicity have been reported. It is believed that this toxicity comes from the hydroxylation of the C-5 and C-6 positions of its 8-aminoquinoline ring before binding to the molecular target: the quinone reductase II (NQO2) human protein. In this study we propose primaquine derivatives, with substitution at position C-6 of the 8-aminoquinoline ring, planned to have better binding to NQO2, compared to primaquine, but with a reduced toxicity related to the C-5 position being possible to be oxidized. On this sense the proposed analogues were suggested in order to reduce or inhibit hydroxylation and further oxidation to hemotoxic metabolites. Five C-6 substituted primaquine analogues were selected by de novo design and further submitted to docking and molecular dynamics simulations. Our results suggest that all analogues bind better to NQO2 than primaquine and may become better antimalarials. However, the analogues 3 and 4 are predicted to have a better activity/toxicity balance.

  15. Cobaltoporphyrin-Catalyzed CO 2 /Epoxide Copolymerization: Selectivity Control by Molecular Design

    KAUST Repository

    Anderson, Carly E.

    2012-09-11

    A series of cobalt(III) chloride porphyrin complexes of the general formula 5,10,15,20-tetra(p-alkoxy)phenylporphyrin cobalt chloride (4b-e) and the related 5,10,15,20-tetra(p-nitro)phenylporphyrin cobalt chloride (4f) are presented and their reactivity toward propylene oxide (PO)/CO 2 coupling/copolymerization is explored. While the nitro-substituted complex (4f), in conjunction with an onium salt, shows moderate activity toward cyclization, the 4b-e/onium systems show superior copolymerization activity in comparison to tetraphenylporphyrin Co(III) chloride (4a) with high selectivity and conversion to poly(propylene carbonate) (PPC). A comprehensive copolymerization behavior study of the alkoxy-substituted porphyrin complexes 4b-e in terms of reaction temperature and CO 2 pressure is presented. Complexes bearing longer alkoxy-substituents demonstrate the highest polymerization activity and molecular weights, however all substituted catalyst systems display a reduced tolerance to increased temperature with respect to PPC formation. Studies of the resulting polymer microstructures show excellent head-to-tail epoxide incorporation and near perfectly alternating poly(carbonate) character at lower polymerization temperatures. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  16. Role of aromatic rings in the molecular recognition of aminoglycoside antibiotics: implications for drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacas, Tatiana; Corzana, Francisco; Jiménez-Osés, Gonzalo; González, Carlos; Gómez, Ana M; Bastida, Agatha; Revuelta, Julia; Asensio, Juan Luis

    2010-09-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics participate in a large variety of binding processes involving both RNA and proteins. The description, in recent years, of several clinically relevant aminoglycoside/receptor complexes has greatly stimulated the structural-based design of new bioactive derivatives. Unfortunately, design efforts have frequently met with limited success, reflecting our incomplete understanding of the molecular determinants for the antibiotic recognition. Intriguingly, aromatic rings of the protein/RNA receptors seem to be key actors in this process. Indeed, close inspection of the structural information available reveals that they are frequently involved in CH/pi stacking interactions with sugar/aminocyclitol rings of the antibiotic. While the interaction between neutral carbohydrates and aromatic rings has been studied in detail during past decade, little is known about these contacts when they involve densely charged glycosides. Herein we report a detailed experimental and theoretical analysis of the role played by CH/pi stacking interactions in the molecular recognition of aminoglycosides. Our study aims to determine the influence that the antibiotic polycationic character has on the stability, preferred geometry, and dynamics of these particular contacts. With this purpose, different aminoglycoside/aromatic complexes have been selected as model systems. They varied from simple bimolecular interactions to the more stable intramolecular CH/pi contacts present in designed derivatives. The obtained results highlight the key role played by electrostatic forces and the desolvation of charged groups in the molecular recognition of polycationic glycosides and have clear implications for the design of improved antibiotics.

  17. Reducing aquatic hazards of industrial chemicals: probabilistic assessment of sustainable molecular design guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Kristin A; Voutchkova-Kostal, Adelina M; Kostal, Jakub; Anastas, Paul; Zimmerman, Julie B; Brooks, Bryan W

    2014-08-01

    Basic toxicological information is lacking for the majority of industrial chemicals. In addition to increasing empirical toxicity data through additional testing, prospective computational approaches to drug development aim to serve as a rational basis for the design of chemicals with reduced toxicity. Recent work has resulted in the derivation of a "rule of 2," wherein chemicals with an octanol-water partition coefficient (log P) less than 2 and a difference between the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital and the highest occupied molecular orbital (ΔE) greater than 9 (log P9 eV) are predicted to be 4 to 5 times less likely to elicit acute or chronic toxicity to model aquatic organisms. The present study examines potential reduction of aquatic toxicity hazards from industrial chemicals if these 2 molecular design guidelines were employed. Probabilistic hazard assessment approaches were used to model the likelihood of encountering industrial chemicals exceeding toxicological categories of concern both with and without the rule of 2. Modeling predicted that utilization of these molecular design guidelines for log P and ΔE would appreciably decrease the number of chemicals that would be designated to be of "high" and "very high" concern for acute and chronic toxicity to standard model aquatic organisms and end points as defined by the US Environmental Protection Agency. For example, 14.5% of chemicals were categorized as having high and very high acute toxicity to the fathead minnow model, whereas only 3.3% of chemicals conforming to the design guidelines were predicted to be in these categories. Considerations of specific chemical classes (e.g., aldehydes), chemical attributes (e.g., ionization), and adverse outcome pathways in representative species (e.g., receptor-mediated responses) could be used to derive future property guidelines for broader classes of contaminants.

  18. Identification of Extra-Framework Species on Fe/ZSM-5 and Cu/ZSM-5 Catalysts Typical Microporous Molecular Sieves with Zeolitic Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Urquieta-González

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Cu and Fe species formed during the preparation of Cu/ and Fe/ZSM-5 catalysts by ion exchange were studied. XRD, SEM, H2-TPR, DRS-UV-VIS, EPR, Mössbauer Spectroscopy (MÖSS and chemical analysis (AAS were used to sample characterization. Cu/ZSM-5 catalysts, irrespective of their Si/Al ratio and Cu content, showed a reduction peak at around 210°C, which was attributed to the reduction of Cu+2 to Cu+1. The reduction peak of Cu+1 to Cu0 shifted to higher temperatures with the increase of Si/Al ratio or with the diminution of Cu/Al ratio, evidencing that isolated Cu cations present a higher interaction with the zeolite structure. The MÖSS data showed the presence of Fe+3 species in charge-compensation sites and a higher content of hematite (Fe2O3 in the catalysts prepared in aqueous medium. The EPR analysis also evidenced the Cu+2 and Fe+3 presence in Cu and Fe/ZSM-5 catalysts, respectively.

  19. A new decomposition-based computer-aided molecular/mixture design methodology for the design of optimal solvents and solvent mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karunanithi, A.T.; Achenie, L.E.K.; Gani, Rafiqul

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a novel computer-aided molecular/mixture design (CAMD) methodology for the design of optimal solvents and solvent mixtures. The molecular/mixture design problem is formulated as a mixed integer nonlinear programming (MINLP) model in which a performance objective...... is to be optimized subject to structural, property, and process constraints. The general molecular/mixture design problem is divided into two parts. For optimal single-compound design, the first part is solved. For mixture design, the single-compound design is first carried out to identify candidates...... the design of an optimal extractant for the separation of acetic acid from water by liquid-liquid extraction. The results suggest that the new extractant would be able to perform better than the extractant being widely used for this separation. The second case study is an industrial problem involving...

  20. Deactivation Correlations of Pd/Rh Three-way Catalysts Designed for Euro IV Emission Limits:effect of Ageing Atmosphere, Temperature and Time

    OpenAIRE

    Lassi, U. (Ulla)

    2003-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this thesis is the knowledge of the most relevant deactivation mechanisms of Pd/Rh three-way catalysts under different ageing conditions, the deactivation correlation of laboratory scale ageing and engine bench/vehicle ageings, and the evaluation of the deactivation correlation. In the literature review, the phenomena involved in the three-way catalyst operation and its deactivation are considered. In the experimental section, ageing-induced phenomena in the catalyst ar...

  1. Oxidative dehydrogenation of propane over vanadium based catalysts supported on Y molecular sieve%Y分子筛负载V基催化剂的丙烷氧化脱氢性能

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范爱鑫; 张聚华

    2016-01-01

    以 Y 分子筛为载体,采用浸渍法制备不同 V 含量的 V/ Y 系列催化剂,并考察其丙烷氧化脱氢制丙烯的催化性能。通过 BET、XRD、H2- TPR 和 NH3- TPD 等技术对催化剂的物化性能进行表征。结果表明,Y 分子筛具有大比表面积和窄孔径分布的特点,使负载的 V 能够形成高分散和孤立态V—O物种,负载的 V 物种堵塞了 Y 分子筛的小孔孔道,同时 Y 分子筛的弱酸性位有助于丙烷的吸附,对晶格氧活化丙烷起到了协同作用,负载 V 质量分数6%时,催化效果最好。%Using Y molecular sieve as the support,vanadium supported Y molecular sieve catalysts(V/ Y) with different vanadium contents were prepared by the impregnation method,and their catalytic perform-ance in the oxidative dehydrogenation of propane to propene was investigated. The catalysts were charac-terized by BET,XRD,H2-TPR and NH3-TPD. The results showed that Y molecular sieve possessed large specific surface area and narrow pore size distribution,which enabled vanadium to form highly dispersed and isolated state V—O species;the loading vanadium species blocked the small pore channels of Y molecular sieve;at the same time,the weak acid sites of Y molecular sieve was helpful to propane adsorp-tion,and had synergistic effect on propane activation by lattice oxygen. V/ Y catalyst with 6wt% vanadium exhibited better catalytic performance.

  2. Differentiating homogeneous and heterogeneous water oxidation catalysis: confirmation that [Co4(H2O)2(α-PW9O34)2]10- is a molecular water oxidation catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, James W; Lv, Hongjin; Sumliner, Jordan M; Zhu, Guibo; Luo, Zhen; Musaev, Djamaladdin G; Geletii, Yurii V; Hill, Craig L

    2013-09-25

    Distinguishing between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis is not straightforward. In the case of the water oxidation catalyst (WOC) [Co4(H2O)2(PW9O34)2](10-) (Co4POM), initial reports of an efficient, molecular catalyst have been challenged by studies suggesting that formation of cobalt oxide (CoOx) or other byproducts are responsible for the catalytic activity. Thus, we describe a series of experiments for thorough examination of active species under catalytic conditions and apply them to Co4POM. These provide strong evidence that under the conditions initially reported for water oxidation using Co4POM (Yin et al. Science, 2010, 328, 342), this POM anion functions as a molecular catalyst, not a precursor for CoOx. Specifically, we quantify the amount of Co(2+)(aq) released from Co4POM by two methods (cathodic adsorptive stripping voltammetry and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry) and show that this amount of cobalt, whatever speciation state it may exist in, cannot account for the observed water oxidation. We document that catalytic O2 evolution by Co4POM, Co(2+)(aq), and CoOx have different dependences on buffers, pH, and WOC concentration. Extraction of Co4POM, but not Co(2+)(aq) or CoOx into toluene from water, and other experiments further confirm that Co4POM is the dominant WOC. Recent studies showing that Co4POM decomposes to a CoOx WOC under electrochemical bias (Stracke and Finke, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2011, 133, 14872), or displays an increased ability to reduce [Ru(bpy)3](3+) upon aging (Scandola, et al., Chem. Commun., 2012, 48, 8808) help complete the picture of Co4POM behavior under various conditions but do not affect our central conclusions.

  3. Design and Construction of a One-Dimensional DNA Track for an Artificial Molecular Motor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Kovacic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA is a versatile heteropolymer that shows great potential as a building block for a diverse array of nanostructures. We present here a solution to the problem of designing and synthesizing a DNA-based nanostructure that will serve as the track along which an artificial molecular motor processes. This one-dimensional DNA track exhibits periodically repeating elements that provide specific binding sites for the molecular motor. Besides these binding elements, additional sequences are necessary to label specific regions within the DNA track and to facilitate track construction. Designing an ideal DNA track sequence presents a particular challenge because of the many variable elements that greatly expand the number of potential sequences from which the ideal sequence must be chosen. In order to find a suitable DNA sequence, we have adapted a genetic algorithm which is well suited for a large but sparse search space. This algorithm readily identifies long DNA sequences that include all the necessary elements to both facilitate DNA track construction and to present appropriate binding sites for the molecular motor. We have successfully experimentally incorporated the sequence identified by the algorithm into a long DNA track meeting the criteria for observation of the molecular motor's activity.

  4. Molecular design toward highly efficient photovoltaic polymers based on two-dimensional conjugated benzodithiophene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Long; Zhang, Shaoqing; Huo, Lijun; Zhang, Maojie; Hou, Jianhui

    2014-05-20

    As researchers continue to develop new organic materials for solar cells, benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b']dithiophene (BDT)-based polymers have come to the fore. To improve the photovoltaic properties of BDT-based polymers, researchers have developed and applied various strategies leading to the successful molecular design of highly efficient photovoltaic polymers. Novel polymer materials composed of two-dimensional conjugated BDT (2D-conjugated BDT) have boosted the power conversion efficiency of polymer solar cells (PSCs) to levels that exceed 9%. In this Account, we summarize recent progress related to the design and synthesis of 2D-conjugated BDT-based polymers and discuss their applications in highly efficient photovoltaic devices. We introduce the basic considerations for the construction of 2D-conjugated BDT-based polymers and systematic molecular design guidelines. For example, simply modifying an alkoxyl-substituted BDT to form an alkylthienyl-substituted BDT can improve the polymer hole mobilities substantially with little effect on their molecular energy level. Secondly, the addition of a variety of chemical moieties to the polymer can produce a 2D-conjugated BDT unit with more functions. For example, the introduction of a conjugated side chain with electron deficient groups (such as para-alkyl-phenyl, meta-alkoxyl-phenyl, and 2-alkyl-3-fluoro-thienyl) allowed us to modulate the molecular energy levels of 2D-conjugated BDT-based polymers. Through the rational design of BDT analogues such as dithienobenzodithiophene (DTBDT) or the insertion of larger π bridges, we can tune the backbone conformations of these polymers and modulate their photovoltaic properties. We also discuss the influence of 2D-conjugated BDT on polymer morphology and the blends of these polymers with phenyl-C61 (or C71)-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM). Finally, we summarize the various applications of the 2D-conjugated BDT-based polymers in highly efficient PSC devices. Overall, this Account

  5. Co-ETS-10 and Co-AM-6 as active catalysts for the oxidation of styrene to styrene oxide and benzaldehyde using molecular oxygen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuvo Jit Datta; Kyung Byung Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Pristine ETS-10 and AM-6 and their Co2+-exchanged forms were prepared, and their catalytic activi-ties toward the oxidation of styrene in oxygen atmosphere were studied in dimethylformamide. The catalysts were denoted as Co-E10-n (n=0, 9, 26, 68, 81) and Co-A6-m (m=0, 8, 23, 63, 79), where n and m denote the degree of Co2+exchange. The products of the oxidation process were identified as styrene epoxide (E) and benzaldehyde (B). Both the pristine forms, ETS-10 (Co-E10-0) and AM-6 (Co-A6-0), and Co2+-exchanged forms displayed catalytic activities. With increasing n or m, the con-version, and hence the rate, increased. Specifically, the rates varied from 6.1 to 12.5 mmol·g−1·h−1 with increasing n (Co-E10-n catalysts) and from 5.4 to 12.4 mmol·g−1·h−1 with increasing m (Co-A6-m catalysts). In contrast, the E/B ratio decreased with increasing n or m. More specifically, the E/B ratio decreased from 2.1 to 0.1 with increasing n from 0 to 81 (Co-E10-n catalysts) and from 1.3 to 0.1 with increasing m from 0 to 79 (Co-A6-m catalysts). Co-E10-9 displayed the highest E yield and Co-A6-79 generated the highest B yield. The highest turnover frequency obtained was 36.3 Co−1·h−1, which was the highest one obtained among those obtained for the Co2+-exchanged zeolites and mesoporous silica reference materials studied in this work.

  6. From Computational Photobiology to the Design of Vibrationally Coherent Molecular Devices and Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivucci, Massimo

    2014-03-01

    In the past multi-configurational quantum chemical computations coupled with molecular mechanics force fields have been employed to investigate spectroscopic, thermal and photochemical properties of visual pigments. Here we show how the same computational technology can nowadays be used to design, characterize and ultimately, prepare light-driven molecular switches which mimics the photophysics of the visual pigment bovine rhodopsin (Rh). When embedded in the protein cavity the chromophore of Rh undergoes an ultrafast and coherent photoisomerization. In order to design a synthetic chromophore displaying similar properties in common solvents, we recently focused on indanylidene-pyrroline (NAIP) systems. We found that these systems display light-induced ground state coherent vibrational motion similar to the one detected in Rh. Semi-classical trajectories provide a mechanistic description of the structural changes associated to the observed coherent motion which is shown to be ultimately due to periodic changes in the π-conjugation.

  7. Multi-objective molecular de novo design by adaptive fragment prioritization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reutlinger, Michael; Rodrigues, Tiago; Schneider, Petra; Schneider, Gisbert

    2014-04-14

    We present the development and application of a computational molecular de novo design method for obtaining bioactive compounds with desired on- and off-target binding. The approach translates the nature-inspired concept of ant colony optimization to combinatorial building block selection. By relying on publicly available structure-activity data, we developed a predictive quantitative polypharmacology model for 640 human drug targets. By taking reductive amination as an example of a privileged reaction, we obtained novel subtype-selective and multitarget-modulating dopamine D4 antagonists, as well as ligands selective for the sigma-1 receptor with accurately predicted affinities. The nanomolar potencies of the hits obtained, their high ligand efficiencies, and an overall success rate of 90 % demonstrate that this ligand-based computer-aided molecular design method may guide target-focused combinatorial chemistry. PMID:24623390

  8. Liquid-Phase Exfoliation of Phosphorene: Design Rules from Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sresht, Vishnu; Pádua, Agílio A H; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2015-08-25

    The liquid-phase exfoliation of phosphorene, the two-dimensional derivative of black phosphorus, in the solvents dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethylformamide (DMF), isopropyl alcohol, N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone, and N-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidone is investigated using three molecular-scale "computer experiments". We modeled solvent-phosphorene interactions using an atomistic force field, based on ab initio calculations and lattice dynamics, that accurately reproduces experimental mechanical properties. We probed solvent molecule ordering at phosphorene/solvent interfaces and discovered that planar molecules such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone preferentially orient parallel to the interface. We subsequently measured the energy required to peel a single phosphorene monolayer from a stack of black phosphorus and analyzed the role of "wedges" of solvent molecules intercalating between phosphorene sheets in initiating exfoliation. The exfoliation efficacy of a solvent is enhanced when either molecular planarity "sharpens" this molecular wedge or strong phosphorene-solvent adhesion stabilizes the newly exposed phosphorene surfaces. Finally, we examined the colloidal stability of exfoliated flakes by simulating their aggregation and showed that dispersion is favored when the cohesive energy between the molecules in the solvent monolayer confined between the phosphorene sheets is high (as with DMSO) and is hindered when the adhesion between these molecules and phosphorene is strong; the molecular planarity in solvents like DMF enhances the cohesive energy. Our results are consistent with, and provide a molecular context for, experimental exfoliation studies of phosphorene and other layered solids, and our molecular insights into the significant role of solvent molecular geometry and ordering should complement prevalent solubility-parameter-based approaches in establishing design rules for effective nanomaterial exfoliation media.

  9. Molecular design of seed storage proteins for enhanced food physicochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandang-Silvas, Mary Rose G; Tecson-Mendoza, Evelyn Mae; Mikami, Bunzo; Utsumi, Shigeru; Maruyama, Nobuyuki

    2011-01-01

    Seed storage proteins such as soybean globulins have been nutritionally and functionally valuable in the food industry. Protein structure-function studies are valuable in modifying proteins for enhanced functionality. Recombinant technology and protein engineering are two of the tools in biotechnology that have been used in producing soybean proteins with better gelling property, solubility, and emulsifying ability. This article reviews the molecular basis for the logical and precise protein designs that are important in obtaining the desired improved physicochemical properties.

  10. Quick Guide to Flash Catalyst

    CERN Document Server

    Elmansy, Rafiq

    2011-01-01

    How do you transform user interface designs created in Photoshop or Illustrator into interactive web pages? It's easier than you think. This guide shows you how to use Adobe Flash Catalyst to create interactive UIs and website wireframes for Rich Internet Applications-without writing a single line of code. Ideal for web designers, this book introduces Flash Catalyst basics with detailed step-by-step instructions and screenshots that illustrate every part of the process. You'll learn hands-on how to turn your static design or artwork into working user interfaces that can be implemented in Fla

  11. Molecular docking as a popular tool in drug design, an in silico travel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Ruyck J

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Jerome de Ruyck, Guillaume Brysbaert, Ralf Blossey, Marc F Lensink University Lille, CNRS UMR8576 UGSF, Lille, FranceAbstract: New molecular modeling approaches, driven by rapidly improving computational platforms, have allowed many success stories for the use of computer-assisted drug design in the discovery of new mechanism- or structure-based drugs. In this overview, we highlight three aspects of the use of molecular docking. First, we discuss the combination of molecular and quantum mechanics to investigate an unusual enzymatic mechanism of a flavoprotein. Second, we present recent advances in anti-infectious agents' synthesis driven by structural insights. At the end, we focus on larger biological complexes made by protein–protein interactions and discuss their relevance in drug design. This review provides information on how these large systems, even in the presence of the solvent, can be investigated with the outlook of drug discovery.Keywords: structure-based drug design, protein–protein docking, quaternary structure prediction, residue interaction networks, RINs, water position

  12. Molecular Dynamics Simulations Reveal the Mechanisms of Allosteric Activation of Hsp90 by Designed Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vettoretti, Gerolamo; Moroni, Elisabetta; Sattin, Sara; Tao, Jiahui; Agard, David A.; Bernardi, Anna; Colombo, Giorgio

    2016-04-01

    Controlling biochemical pathways through chemically designed modulators may provide novel opportunities to develop therapeutic drugs and chemical tools. The underlying challenge is to design new molecular entities able to act as allosteric chemical switches that selectively turn on/off functions by modulating the conformational dynamics of their target protein. We examine the origins of the stimulation of ATPase and closure kinetics in the molecular chaperone Hsp90 by allosteric modulators through atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and analysis of protein-ligand interactions. In particular, we focus on the cross-talk between allosteric ligands and protein conformations and its effect on the dynamic properties of the chaperone’s active state. We examine the impact of different allosteric modulators on the stability, structural and internal dynamics properties of Hsp90 closed state. A critical aspect of this study is the development of a quantitative model that correlates Hsp90 activation to the presence of a certain compound, making use of information on the dynamic adaptation of protein conformations to the presence of the ligand, which allows to capture conformational states relevant in the activation process. We discuss the implications of considering the conformational dialogue between allosteric ligands and protein conformations for the design of new functional modulators.

  13. Impact of Binding Site Comparisons on Medicinal Chemistry and Rational Molecular Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrt, Christiane; Brinkjost, Tobias; Koch, Oliver

    2016-05-12

    Modern rational drug design not only deals with the search for ligands binding to interesting and promising validated targets but also aims to identify the function and ligands of yet uncharacterized proteins having impact on different diseases. Additionally, it contributes to the design of inhibitors with distinct selectivity patterns and the prediction of possible off-target effects. The identification of similarities between binding sites of various proteins is a useful approach to cope with those challenges. The main scope of this perspective is to describe applications of different protein binding site comparison approaches to outline their applicability and impact on molecular design. The article deals with various substantial application domains and provides some outstanding examples to show how various binding site comparison methods can be applied to promote in silico drug design workflows. In addition, we will also briefly introduce the fundamental principles of different protein binding site comparison methods.

  14. Solution-Liquid-Solid Synthesis of Hexagonal Nickel Selenide Nanowire Arrays with a Nonmetal Catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kun; Ding, Hui; Jia, Kaicheng; Lu, Xiuli; Chen, Pengzuo; Zhou, Tianpei; Cheng, Han; Liu, Si; Wu, Changzheng; Xie, Yi

    2016-01-26

    Inorganic nanowire arrays hold great promise for next-generation energy storage and conversion devices. Understanding the growth mechanism of nanowire arrays is of considerable interest for expanding the range of applications. Herein, we report the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) synthesis of hexagonal nickel selenide nanowires by using a nonmetal molecular crystal (selenium) as catalyst, which successfully brings SLS into the realm of conventional low-temperature solution synthesis. As a proof-of-concept application, the NiSe nanowire array was used as a catalyst for electrochemical water oxidation. This approach offers a new possibility to design arrays of inorganic nanowires. PMID:26695560

  15. Duplex steam reformer: alternate catalyst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The manufacturing feasibility of a duplex steam reformer tube for potential use in a high temperature gas cooled reactor has been successfully demonstrated. This technique consists of explosively expanding the inner tube into the outer tube. To successfully achieve the desired 0 to 3 mil radial gap between the tubes it is necessary to perform the expansion in two steps with an intermediate anneal. A catalyst design that would have replaced the conventional Raschig rings with a metal supported catalyst has been evaluated and it has been concluded that further development and testing are needed before fabrication of a full scale prototype is warranted. Consequently, the immediate efforts are directed towards reevaluating the incentives for developing a catalyst and the probability of successfully developing a catalyst that could be used for steam reforming

  16. Tailor-made biocatalysts: combining thermodynamics, organic synthesis, molecular biology, biochemistry and microbiology for the design of enzyme selections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc Jestin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A general strategy for the isolation of catalysts for given chemical reactions was designed.A first link between genes and their corresponding proteins was established by phage display: using Darwin’s principles on evolution based on selection and amplification, rare protein molecules can then be selected for function from a large repertoire prior to their characterization by sequencing of their genes.A second link was created between enzymes and their products. By making use of the chelate effect and of Inovirus particles as a chemical, affinity chromatography for the reaction product is then sufficient to isolate among 106 to 1011 proteins and their genes, the rare ones coding for catalysts of interest. The strategy for the parallel processing of information on the catalytic activity of variants from a large protein repertoire is highlighted in this review.

  17. Thermally Stable, Latent Olefin Metathesis Catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Renee M.; Fedorov, Alexey; Keitz, Benjamin K.; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2011-01-01

    Highly thermally stable N-aryl,N-alkyl N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) ruthenium catalysts were designed and synthesized for latent olefin metathesis. These catalysts showed excellent latent behavior toward metathesis reactions, whereby the complexes were inactive at ambient temperature and initiated at elevated temperatures, a challenging property to achieve with second generation catalysts. A sterically hindered N-tert-butyl substituent on the NHC ligand of the ruthenium complex was found to i...

  18. Catalytic Oxidative Conversion from Naphthol to 2-Hydroxy-1, 4-naphthoquinone over Iron Porphyrin Catalysts by Molecular Oxygen in an Alkaline 2-Propanol Solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Ke-er; TONG Shan-ling; YAN Yan; KANG En-hua; XIAO Feng-shou; LI Qing; CHANG Xin; FANG Chi-guang

    2005-01-01

    In an alkaline 2-propanol solution with 5,10,15,20-tetra(4-methoxyl phenyl) porphyrin iron chloride(TOMPPFeCl) as a catalyst and oxygen as a cheap green oxidant, 2-naphthol was conversed to 2-hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone(HNQ) with a yield of 62.17% and a selectivity of 100%, and the conversion number of TMOPPFeCl catalyst was 8.32/min. The catalytic oxidation products were characterized by means of UV-Vis, IR, GC-MS, 1H NMR and melting point determination. In this catalytic oxidation, the catalytic activity of TMOPPFeCl was researched in detail and the reacting conditions were optimized. A possible reaction mechanism is summarized based on in situ EPR determination.

  19. Novel ligands of Choline Acetyltransferase designed by in silico molecular docking, hologram QSAR and lead optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajnish; Långström, Bengt; Darreh-Shori, Taher

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports have brought back the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase in the mainstream research in dementia and the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. Here we report, a specific strategy for the design of novel ChAT ligands based on molecular docking, Hologram Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (HQSAR) and lead optimization. Molecular docking was performed on a series of ChAT inhibitors to decipher the molecular fingerprint of their interaction with the active site of ChAT. Then robust statistical fragment HQSAR models were developed. A library of novel ligands was generated based on the pharmacophoric and shape similarity scoring function, and evaluated in silico for their molecular interactions with ChAT. Ten of the top scoring invented compounds are reported here. We confirmed the activity of α-NETA, the only commercially available ChAT inhibitor, and one of the seed compounds in our model, using a new simple colorimetric ChAT assay (IC50 ~ 88 nM). In contrast, α-NETA exhibited an IC50 of ~30 μM for the ACh-degrading cholinesterases. In conclusion, the overall results may provide useful insight for discovering novel ChAT ligands and potential positron emission tomography tracers as in vivo functional biomarkers of the health of central cholinergic system in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease.

  20. In-silico design of computational nucleic acids for molecular information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan; Zauner, Klaus-Peter

    2013-05-07

    Within recent years nucleic acids have become a focus of interest for prototype implementations of molecular computing concepts. During the same period the importance of ribonucleic acids as components of the regulatory networks within living cells has increasingly been revealed. Molecular computers are attractive due to their ability to function within a biological system; an application area extraneous to the present information technology paradigm. The existence of natural information processing architectures (predominately exemplified by protein) demonstrates that computing based on physical substrates that are radically different from silicon is feasible. Two key principles underlie molecular level information processing in organisms: conformational dynamics of macromolecules and self-assembly of macromolecules. Nucleic acids support both principles, and moreover computational design of these molecules is practicable. This study demonstrates the simplicity with which one can construct a set of nucleic acid computing units using a new computational protocol. With the new protocol, diverse classes of nucleic acids imitating the complete set of boolean logical operators were constructed. These nucleic acid classes display favourable thermodynamic properties and are significantly similar to the approximation of successful candidates implemented in the laboratory. This new protocol would enable the construction of a network of interconnecting nucleic acids (as a circuit) for molecular information processing.

  1. In-silico design of computational nucleic acids for molecular information processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramlan, Effirul Ikhwan; Zauner, Klaus-Peter

    2013-01-01

    Within recent years nucleic acids have become a focus of interest for prototype implementations of molecular computing concepts. During the same period the importance of ribonucleic acids as components of the regulatory networks within living cells has increasingly been revealed. Molecular computers are attractive due to their ability to function within a biological system; an application area extraneous to the present information technology paradigm. The existence of natural information processing architectures (predominately exemplified by protein) demonstrates that computing based on physical substrates that are radically different from silicon is feasible. Two key principles underlie molecular level information processing in organisms: conformational dynamics of macromolecules and self-assembly of macromolecules. Nucleic acids support both principles, and moreover computational design of these molecules is practicable. This study demonstrates the simplicity with which one can construct a set of nucleic acid computing units using a new computational protocol. With the new protocol, diverse classes of nucleic acids imitating the complete set of boolean logical operators were constructed. These nucleic acid classes display favourable thermodynamic properties and are significantly similar to the approximation of successful candidates implemented in the laboratory. This new protocol would enable the construction of a network of interconnecting nucleic acids (as a circuit) for molecular information processing. PMID:23647621

  2. Novel ligands of Choline Acetyltransferase designed by in silico molecular docking, hologram QSAR and lead optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajnish; Långström, Bengt; Darreh-Shori, Taher

    2016-01-01

    Recent reports have brought back the acetylcholine synthesizing enzyme, choline acetyltransferase in the mainstream research in dementia and the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. Here we report, a specific strategy for the design of novel ChAT ligands based on molecular docking, Hologram Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship (HQSAR) and lead optimization. Molecular docking was performed on a series of ChAT inhibitors to decipher the molecular fingerprint of their interaction with the active site of ChAT. Then robust statistical fragment HQSAR models were developed. A library of novel ligands was generated based on the pharmacophoric and shape similarity scoring function, and evaluated in silico for their molecular interactions with ChAT. Ten of the top scoring invented compounds are reported here. We confirmed the activity of α-NETA, the only commercially available ChAT inhibitor, and one of the seed compounds in our model, using a new simple colorimetric ChAT assay (IC50 ~ 88 nM). In contrast, α-NETA exhibited an IC50 of ~30 μM for the ACh-degrading cholinesterases. In conclusion, the overall results may provide useful insight for discovering novel ChAT ligands and potential positron emission tomography tracers as in vivo functional biomarkers of the health of central cholinergic system in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27507101

  3. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M.

    2016-05-01

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared – non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents.

  4. Mechanistic and quantitative insight into cell surface targeted molecular imaging agent design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Bhatnagar, Sumit; Deschenes, Emily; Thurber, Greg M

    2016-05-05

    Molecular imaging agent design involves simultaneously optimizing multiple probe properties. While several desired characteristics are straightforward, including high affinity and low non-specific background signal, in practice there are quantitative trade-offs between these properties. These include plasma clearance, where fast clearance lowers background signal but can reduce target uptake, and binding, where high affinity compounds sometimes suffer from lower stability or increased non-specific interactions. Further complicating probe development, many of the optimal parameters vary depending on both target tissue and imaging agent properties, making empirical approaches or previous experience difficult to translate. Here, we focus on low molecular weight compounds targeting extracellular receptors, which have some of the highest contrast values for imaging agents. We use a mechanistic approach to provide a quantitative framework for weighing trade-offs between molecules. Our results show that specific target uptake is well-described by quantitative simulations for a variety of targeting agents, whereas non-specific background signal is more difficult to predict. Two in vitro experimental methods for estimating background signal in vivo are compared - non-specific cellular uptake and plasma protein binding. Together, these data provide a quantitative method to guide probe design and focus animal work for more cost-effective and time-efficient development of molecular imaging agents.

  5. Bioprocess-centered molecular design (BMD) for the efficient production of an interfacially active peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morreale, Giacomo; Lee, Eun Gyo; Jones, Daniel B; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2004-09-30

    The efficient expression and purification of an interfacially active peptide (mLac21) was achieved by using bioprocess-centered molecular design (BMD), wherein key bioprocess considerations are addressed during the initial molecular biology work. The 21 amino acid mLac21 peptide sequence is derived from the lac repressor protein and is shown to have high affinity for the oil-water interface, causing a substantial reduction in interfacial tension following adsorption. The DNA coding for the peptide sequence was cloned into a modified pET-31(b) vector to permit the expression of mLac21 as a fusion to ketosteroid isomerase (KSI). Rational iterative molecular design, taking into account the need for a scaleable bioprocess flowsheet, led to a simple and efficient bioprocess yielding mLac21 at 86% purity following ion exchange chromatography (and >98% following chromatographic polishing). This case study demonstrates that it is possible to produce acceptably pure peptide for potential commodity applications using common scaleable bioprocess unit operations. Moreover, it is shown that BMD is a powerful strategy that can be deployed to reduce bioseparation complexity.

  6. Tuning Cellular Uptake of Molecular Probes by Rational Design of Their Assembly into Supramolecular Nanoprobes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Lye Lin; Reyes, Claudia D; Zhang, Pengcheng; Cui, Honggang

    2016-03-16

    Intracellular sensing of pathologically relevant biomolecules could provide essential information for accurate evaluation of disease staging and progression, yet the poor cellular uptake of water-soluble molecular probes limits their use as protease sensors. In other cases such as extracellular sensing, cellular uptake should be effectively inhibited. Self-assembly of molecular probes into supramolecular nanoprobes presents a potential strategy to alter their interaction mechanisms with cells to promote or reduce their cellular uptake. Here, we report on the design, synthesis, and assembly of peptide-based molecular beacons into supramolecular protease sensors of either spherical or filamentous shapes. We found that positively charged spherical nanobeacons demonstrate much higher cellular uptake efficiency than its monomeric form, thus making them most suitable for intracellular sensing of the lysosomal protease cathepsin B. Our results also suggest that assembly into filamentous nanobeacons significantly reduces their internalization by cancer cells, an important property that can be utilized for probing extracellular protease activities. These studies provide important guiding principles for rational design of supramolecular nanoprobes with tunable cellular uptake characteristics.

  7. De novo design of caseinolytic protein proteases inhibitors based on pharmacophore and 2D molecular fingerprints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guanzhong; Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Hong; Lin, Kejiang

    2015-06-01

    Caseinolytic protein proteases (ClpP) are large oligomeric protein complexes that contribute to cell homeostasis as well as virulence regulation in bacteria. Inhibitors of ClpP can significantly attenuate the capability to produce virulence factors of the bacteria. In this work, we developed a workflow to expand the chemical space of potential ClpP inhibitors based on a set of β-lactones. In our workflow, an artificial pharmacophore model was generated based on HipHop and HYPOGEN method. A de novo compound library based on molecular fingerprints was constructed and virtually screened by the pharmacophore model. The results were further investigated by molecular docking study. The workflow successfully achieved potential ClpP inhibitors. It could be applied to design more novel potential ClpP inhibitors and provide theoretical basis for the further optimization of the hit compounds.

  8. Development of Advanced ISS-WPA Catalysts for Organic Oxidation at Reduced Pressure/Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ping; Nalette, Tim; Kayatin, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The Water Processor Assembly (WPA) at International Space Station (ISS) processes a waste stream via multi-filtration beds, where inorganic and non-volatile organic contaminants are removed, and a catalytic reactor, where low molecular weight organics not removed by the adsorption process are oxidized at elevated pressure in the presence of oxygen and elevated temperature above the normal water boiling point. Operation at an elevated pressure requires a more complex system design compared to a reactor that could operate at ambient pressure. However, catalysts currently available have insufficient activity to achieve complete oxidation of the organic load at a temperature less than the water boiling point and ambient pressure. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop a more active and efficient catalyst at ambient pressure and a moderate temperature that is less than water boiling temperature. This paper describes our efforts in developing high efficiency water processing catalysts. Different catalyst support structures and coating metals were investigated in subscale reactors and results were compared against the flight WPA catalyst. Detailed improvements achieved on alternate metal catalysts at ambient pressure and 200 F will also be presented in the paper.

  9. Study on molecular modelling of the selectivity of catalysts for heavy petroleum fractions hydrocracking; Etude sur molecule modele des parametres regissant la selectivite des catalyseurs d'hydrocraquage des charges lourdes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leite, L.

    2000-10-19

    Hydrocracking is a catalytic petroleum refining process that is commonly applied to upgrade the heavier fractions obtained from the distillation of crude oils. Nowadays the European demand for good quality middle distillates (kerosene and gas-oil) is high and one important goal for the refining is to transform selectively feedstocks into middle distillates. To understand how this transformation occurs, studies on model compounds have been investigated. Numerous studies have been devoted to paraffin hydrocracking. However theses molecules do not fully represent heavy petroleum fraction. Taking into account that the trend in the future will be to treat heavier feedstocks containing a large quantity of PNA (Polynuclear Aromatic hydrocarbons), the understanding of their transformation under hydrocracking conditions is a key point. In this study, we studied hydrocracking of phenanthrene over platinum on acid solids catalysts. Our main aim was to compare hydrocracking catalysts in term of catalytic activity and selectivity toward primary products thanks to our model reaction and to correlate these catalytic performances with acid solid properties and especially to rationalize the effects due to the acidity and the porosity of the acid solids. Catalytic experiments emphasised an effect of the porous structure on the selectivities. The acidity of the catalysts seemed to impose the catalytic activity but did not permit to explain the selectivities. This 'effect of the structure' has been clarified with the simulation of intermediate products adsorption and diffusion in the studied structures thanks to a molecular modelling study. Indeed, the selectivities obtained during phenanthrene hydrocracking have been linked up with the intermediate products adsorption energies in the structures. The results of this study permit to propose that the key-step for selectivities determination is the physical desorption of the primary products. (author)

  10. Designing molecular complexes using free-energy derivatives from liquid-state integral equation theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrugalla, Florian; Kast, Stefan M

    2016-09-01

    Complex formation between molecules in solution is the key process by which molecular interactions are translated into functional systems. These processes are governed by the binding or free energy of association which depends on both direct molecular interactions and the solvation contribution. A design goal frequently addressed in pharmaceutical sciences is the optimization of chemical properties of the complex partners in the sense of minimizing their binding free energy with respect to a change in chemical structure. Here, we demonstrate that liquid-state theory in the form of the solute-solute equation of the reference interaction site model provides all necessary information for such a task with high efficiency. In particular, computing derivatives of the potential of mean force (PMF), which defines the free-energy surface of complex formation, with respect to potential parameters can be viewed as a means to define a direction in chemical space toward better binders. We illustrate the methodology in the benchmark case of alkali ion binding to the crown ether 18-crown-6 in aqueous solution. In order to examine the validity of the underlying solute-solute theory, we first compare PMFs computed by different approaches, including explicit free-energy molecular dynamics simulations as a reference. Predictions of an optimally binding ion radius based on free-energy derivatives are then shown to yield consistent results for different ion parameter sets and to compare well with earlier, orders-of-magnitude more costly explicit simulation results. This proof-of-principle study, therefore, demonstrates the potential of liquid-state theory for molecular design problems. PMID:27366935

  11. Designing molecular complexes using free-energy derivatives from liquid-state integral equation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrugalla, Florian; Kast, Stefan M.

    2016-09-01

    Complex formation between molecules in solution is the key process by which molecular interactions are translated into functional systems. These processes are governed by the binding or free energy of association which depends on both direct molecular interactions and the solvation contribution. A design goal frequently addressed in pharmaceutical sciences is the optimization of chemical properties of the complex partners in the sense of minimizing their binding free energy with respect to a change in chemical structure. Here, we demonstrate that liquid-state theory in the form of the solute-solute equation of the reference interaction site model provides all necessary information for such a task with high efficiency. In particular, computing derivatives of the potential of mean force (PMF), which defines the free-energy surface of complex formation, with respect to potential parameters can be viewed as a means to define a direction in chemical space toward better binders. We illustrate the methodology in the benchmark case of alkali ion binding to the crown ether 18-crown-6 in aqueous solution. In order to examine the validity of the underlying solute-solute theory, we first compare PMFs computed by different approaches, including explicit free-energy molecular dynamics simulations as a reference. Predictions of an optimally binding ion radius based on free-energy derivatives are then shown to yield consistent results for different ion parameter sets and to compare well with earlier, orders-of-magnitude more costly explicit simulation results. This proof-of-principle study, therefore, demonstrates the potential of liquid-state theory for molecular design problems.

  12. Design Through Simulation of a Molecular Sieve Column for Treatment of MON-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, A. Ben; Wilson, D. B.

    1999-01-01

    The presence of water in propellant-grade MON-3 is a concern in the Aerospace Industry. NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) Propulsion Department has evaluated many types of molecular sieves for control of iron, the corrosion product of water in Mixed Oxides of Nitrogen (MON-3). In 1995, WSTF initiated laboratory and pilot-scale testing of molecular sieve type 3A for removal of water and iron. These tests showed sufficient promise that a series of continuous recycle tests were conducted at WSTF. Periodic samples of the circulating MON-3 solution were analyzed for water (wt %) and iron (ppm, wt). This test column was modeled as a series of transfer units; i. e., each unit represented the height equivalent of a theoretical plate. Such a model assumes there is equilibrium between the adsorbent material and the effluent stream from the unit. Operational and design parameters were derived based on the simulation results. These parameters were used to predict the design characteristics of a proposed molecular sieve column for removal of water and iron from MON-3 at the NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC). In addition, these parameters were used to simulate a small, single-pass operation column at KSC currently used for treating MON-3. The results of this work indicated that molecular sieve type 3A in 1/16 in. diameter pellets, in a column 2.5 ft. in diameter, 18 ft. in height, and operated at 25 gpm is adequate for the required removal of water and iron from MON-3.

  13. Design of a Comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Experiment: Phase Variation Caused by Recombinational Regulation of Bacterial Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Xiumei; Xu, Shungao; Lu, Renyun; Isaac, Dadzie; Zhang, Xueyi; Zhang, Haifang; Wang, Huifang; Qiao, Zheng; Huang, Xinxiang

    2014-01-01

    Scientific experiments are indispensable parts of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. In this study, a comprehensive Biochemistry and Molecular Biology experiment about "Salmonella enterica" serovar Typhi Flagellar phase variation has been designed. It consisted of three parts, namely, inducement of bacterial Flagellar phase variation,…

  14. PathogenMIPer: a tool for the design of molecular inversion probes to detect multiple pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhras Michael

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Here we describe PathogenMIPer, a software program for designing molecular inversion probe (MIP oligonucleotides for use in pathogen identification and detection. The software designs unique and specific oligonucleotide probes targeting microbial or other genomes. The tool tailors all probe sequence components (including target-specific sequences, barcode sequences, universal primers and restriction sites and combines these components into ready-to-order probes for use in a MIP assay. The system can harness the genetic variability available in an entire genome in designing specific probes for the detection of multiple co-infections in a single tube using a MIP assay. Results PathogenMIPer can accept sequence data in FASTA file format, and other parameter inputs from the user through a graphical user interface. It can design MIPs not only for pathogens, but for any genome for use in parallel genomic analyses. The software was validated experimentally by applying it to the detection of human papilloma virus (HPV as a model system, which is associated with various human malignancies including cervical and skin cancers. Initial tests of laboratory samples using the MIPs developed by the PathogenMIPer to recognize 24 different types of HPVs gave very promising results, detecting even a small viral load of single as well as multiple infections (Akhras et al, personal communication. Conclusion PathogenMIPer is a software for designing molecular inversion probes for detection of multiple target DNAs in a sample using MIP assays. It enables broader use of MIP technology in the detection through genotyping of pathogens that are complex, difficult-to-amplify, or present in multiple subtypes in a sample.

  15. Development of Novel Resid Hydrometallization Catalyst RDM-3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Dawei; Niu Chuanfeng; Yang Qinghe; Liu Tao

    2007-01-01

    Based on the reaction mechanism of resid hydrodemetallization,a new catalyst carrier was designed and prepared.As compared with the similar type of catalyst carder,the said new carrier featured a higher pore volume,a larger pore diameter and a weaker surface acidity,which could improve the diffusion performance and stable reaction performance of the catalyst.The active metal components were loaded on the said carrier by a new technique for better metal dispersion,thus the impurity removal rate of the new catalyst,RDM-3,was improved significantly.The commercial test of the RDM-3 catalyst showed that the process of catalyst preparation was stable,the catalyst performance was slightly better than the catalyst prepared in the lab,therefore,the catalyst could be manufactured in commercial scale.

  16. Interactive Multimodal Molecular Set – Designing Ludic Engaging Science Learning Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Tine Pinholt; Christiansen, Kasper Holm Bonde; Jakobsen Sillesen, Kristian;

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on an exploratory study investigating 10 primary school students’ interaction with an interactive multimodal molecular set fostering ludic engaging science learning content in primary schools (8th and 9th grade). The concept of the prototype design was to bridge the physical...... collaboratorium sessions, interviews and observations. The results indicated that bridging the physical and digital worlds can support learning where the affordances of the technologies can be described in terms of meaningful activity: exploration, reasoning, reflection, and ludic engagement. Here, the electronic...... tags facilitate the application and provide the students to articulate knowledge through different modes; images, gestures, and 3D objects...

  17. Molecular design of luminescent Eu(III) complexes as lanthanide lasing material and their optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luminescent polymer (PMMA) containing a Eu(III) complex with a fast radiation rate and a high luminescence quantum efficiency (75 ± 5%) (bis-triphenylphosphineoxide)(tris-hexafluoroacetylacetonato)europium(III) (Eu(hfa)3(TPPO)2), was fabricated. The quantum yield and the radiation rate of the luminescent polymer were found to be 75 ± 5% and 1.1 x 103 s-1, respectively. An Eu(III) complex-doped polymer thin-film was also prepared by use of polyphenylsilsesquioxane (PPSQ) to construct a waveguide lanthanide laser. We propose a strategy for the molecular design of luminescent Eu(III) complexes aiming at lanthanide lasing

  18. Prediction of mutant activity and its application in molecular design of tumor necrosis factor-a

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐卫东; 奚涛; 王波; 郭冬林; 徐贤秀; 朱德煦

    1997-01-01

    Two models for prediction of the activity and stability of site-directed mutagenesis on tumor necrosis factor-α are established. The models are based on straightforward structural considerations, which do not require the elaboration of site-directed mutagenesis on the protein core and the hydrophobic surface area by analyzing the properties of the mutated amino acid residues. The reliabilities of the models have been tested by analyzing the mutants of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) whose two leucine residues (L29, L157) were mutated. Based on these models, a TNF-α mutant with high activity was created by molecular design.

  19. Molecular design chemical structure generation from the properties of pure organic compounds

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, AL

    1992-01-01

    This book is a systematic presentation of the methods that have been developed for the interpretation of molecular modeling to the design of new chemicals. The main feature of the compilation is the co-ordination of the various scientific disciplines required for the generation of new compounds. The five chapters deal with such areas as structure and properties of organic compounds, relationships between structure and properties, and models for structure generation. The subject is covered in sufficient depth to provide readers with the necessary background to understand the modeling

  20. Nano-colloidal functionalization of textiles based on polysiloxane as a novel photo-catalyst assistant: processing design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dastjerdi, Roya; Montazer, Majid

    2011-11-01

    Due to the opposite surface charge of TiO(2) and silver nano-particles, at around neutral pH, it is expected that the interaction between these particles and cross-linkable polysiloxane (XPs) resin and thus their final properties would be affected by their processing technique. This paper has focused on the effect of processing design on the interaction, surface orientation and final properties of surface nano-colloidal functionalization. The results disclosed the key role of the applied process on the properties of the treated fabrics which have been well discussed through the modeling of this effect on orientations of nanoparticles on the surface. The developed models are interestingly verified by various characterizations. Applying a premixed TiO(2)/XPs colloid as an after treatment on Ag treated samples caused more enhanced stain photo-degradability and UV protection properties, while the reduction of enhanced hydrophobicity, washing durability, and stain-repellency were observed as compared to applying Ag/XPs premixed colloid on TiO(2). The role of processing on XPs stabilizing efficiency and its co-photo-catalytic function on TiO(2) nanoparticles has been concluded and deeply discussed. The appropriate processing design can be tailored in order to accomplish desirable hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity with a granted bioactivity. The results reveal that ideal bioactivity, stain photo-degradability, self-cleaning, UV protection, anti-staining properties, and washing durability can be achieved by applying a mixture of silver and XPs as an after-treatment on TiO(2) treated fabrics.

  1. Halogen-directed drug design for Alzheimer's disease: a combined density functional and molecular docking study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Adhip; Ali, Mohammad Tuhin; Shawan, Mohammad Mahfuz Ali Khan; Sarwar, Mohammed Golam; Khan, Mohammad A K; Halim, Mohammad A

    2016-01-01

    A series of halogen-directed donepezil drugs has been designed to inhibit acetyl cholinesterase (AChE). Density Functional theory (DFT) has been employed to optimize the chair as well as boat conformers of the parent drug and modified ligands at B3LYP/MidiX and B3LYP/6-311G + (d,p) level of theories. Charge distribution, dipole moment, enthalpy, free energy and molecular orbitals of these ligands are also investigated to understand how the halogen-directed modifications impact the ligand structure and govern the non-bonding interactions with the receptors. Molecular docking calculation has been performed to understand the similarities and differences between the binding modes of unmodified and halogenated chair-formed ligands. Molecular docking indicated donepezil and modified ligands had non-covalent interactions with hydrophobic gorges and anionic subsites of AChE. The -CF3-directed ligand possessed the most negative binding affinity. Non-covalent interactions within the ligand-receptor systems were found to be mostly hydrophobic and π- stacking type. F, Cl and -CF3 containing ligands emerge as effective and selective AChE inhibitors, which can strongly interact with the two active sites of AChE. In addition, we have also investigated selected pharmacokinetic parameters of the parent and modified ligands.

  2. New mimetic peptides inhibitors of Αβ aggregation. Molecular guidance for rational drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera Guisasola, Exequiel E; Andujar, Sebastián A; Hubin, Ellen; Broersen, Kerensa; Kraan, Ivonne M; Méndez, Luciana; Delpiccolo, Carina M L; Masman, Marcelo F; Rodríguez, Ana M; Enriz, Ricardo D

    2015-05-01

    A new series of mimetic peptides possessing a significant Aβ aggregation modulating effect was reported here. These compounds were obtained based on a molecular modelling study which allowed us to perform a structural-based virtual selection. Monitoring Aβ aggregation by thioflavin T fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy revealed that fibril formation was significantly decreased upon prolonged incubation in presence of the active compounds. Dot blot analysis suggested a decrease of soluble oligomers strongly associated with cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease. For the molecular dynamics simulations, we used an Aβ42 pentameric model where the compounds were docked using a blind docking technique. To analyze the dynamic behaviour of the complexes, extensive molecular dynamics simulations were carried out in explicit water. We also measured parameters or descriptors that allowed us to quantify the effect of these compounds as potential inhibitors of Aβ aggregation. Thus, significant alterations in the structure of our Aβ42 protofibril model were identified. Among others we observed the destruction of the regular helical twist, the loss of a stabilizing salt bridge and the loss of a stabilizing hydrophobic interaction in the β1 region. Our results may be helpful in the structural identification and understanding of the minimum structural requirements for these molecules and might provide a guide in the design of new aggregation modulating ligands.

  3. Molecular design and control of fullerene-based bi-thermoelectric materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rincón-García, Laura; Ismael, Ali K; Evangeli, Charalambos; Grace, Iain; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Porfyrakis, Kyriakos; Agraït, Nicolás; Lambert, Colin J

    2016-03-01

    Molecular junctions are a versatile test bed for investigating nanoscale thermoelectricity and contribute to the design of new cost-effective environmentally friendly organic thermoelectric materials. It was suggested that transport resonances associated with discrete molecular levels could play a key role in thermoelectric performance, but no direct experimental evidence has been reported. Here we study single-molecule junctions of the endohedral fullerene Sc3N@C80 connected to gold electrodes using a scanning tunnelling microscope. We find that the magnitude and sign of the thermopower depend strongly on the orientation of the molecule and on applied pressure. Our calculations show that Sc3N inside the fullerene cage creates a sharp resonance near the Fermi level, whose energetic location, and hence the thermopower, can be tuned by applying pressure. These results reveal that Sc3N@C80 is a bi-thermoelectric material, exhibiting both positive and negative thermopower, and provide an unambiguous demonstration of the importance of transport resonances in molecular junctions.

  4. Molecular Design of Semiconducting Polymers for High-Performance Organic Electrochemical Transistors

    KAUST Repository

    Nielsen, Christian B.

    2016-07-22

    The organic electrochemical transistor (OECT), capable of transducing small ionic fluxes into electronic signals in an aqueous envi-ronment, is an ideal device to utilize in bioelectronic applications. Currently, most OECTs are fabricated with commercially availa-ble conducting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)-based suspensions and are therefore operated in depletion mode. Here, we present a series of semiconducting polymers designed to elucidate important structure-property guidelines required for accumulation mode OECT operation. We discuss key aspects relating to OECT performance such as ion and hole transport, elec-trochromic properties, operational voltage and stability. The demonstration of our molecular design strategy is the fabrication of accumulation mode OECTs that clearly outperform state-of-the-art PEDOT based devices, and show stability under aqueous oper-ation without the need for formulation additives and cross-linkers.

  5. Molecular Design of Semiconducting Polymers for High-Performance Organic Electrochemical Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Christian B; Giovannitti, Alexander; Sbircea, Dan-Tiberiu; Bandiello, Enrico; Niazi, Muhammad R; Hanifi, David A; Sessolo, Michele; Amassian, Aram; Malliaras, George G; Rivnay, Jonathan; McCulloch, Iain

    2016-08-17

    The organic electrochemical transistor (OECT), capable of transducing small ionic fluxes into electronic signals in an aqueous environment, is an ideal device to utilize in bioelectronic applications. Currently, most OECTs are fabricated with commercially available conducting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)-based suspensions and are therefore operated in depletion mode. Here, we present a series of semiconducting polymers designed to elucidate important structure-property guidelines required for accumulation mode OECT operation. We discuss key aspects relating to OECT performance such as ion and hole transport, electrochromic properties, operational voltage, and stability. The demonstration of our molecular design strategy is the fabrication of accumulation mode OECTs that clearly outperform state-of-the-art PEDOT-based devices, and show stability under aqueous operation without the need for formulation additives and cross-linkers. PMID:27444189

  6. Molecular Design of Semiconducting Polymers for High-Performance Organic Electrochemical Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Christian B; Giovannitti, Alexander; Sbircea, Dan-Tiberiu; Bandiello, Enrico; Niazi, Muhammad R; Hanifi, David A; Sessolo, Michele; Amassian, Aram; Malliaras, George G; Rivnay, Jonathan; McCulloch, Iain

    2016-08-17

    The organic electrochemical transistor (OECT), capable of transducing small ionic fluxes into electronic signals in an aqueous environment, is an ideal device to utilize in bioelectronic applications. Currently, most OECTs are fabricated with commercially available conducting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT)-based suspensions and are therefore operated in depletion mode. Here, we present a series of semiconducting polymers designed to elucidate important structure-property guidelines required for accumulation mode OECT operation. We discuss key aspects relating to OECT performance such as ion and hole transport, electrochromic properties, operational voltage, and stability. The demonstration of our molecular design strategy is the fabrication of accumulation mode OECTs that clearly outperform state-of-the-art PEDOT-based devices, and show stability under aqueous operation without the need for formulation additives and cross-linkers.

  7. Molecular design, synthesis and cell based HCV replicon assay of novel benzoxazole derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, M A H; Adel, M; Ismail, N S M; Abouzid, K A M

    2013-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus inhibitors based on benzoxazole scaffold were designed based on molecular modeling simulation study including docking into the NS5B polymerase active site. Several compounds showed significant high simulation docking scores relative to the assigned benzimidazole lead compound. The designed compounds were synthesized, structurally elucidated and their antiviral activity was evaluated through cell-based replicon in cultured Huh 5-2 cells. A number of the synthesized compounds showed significant inhibitory activity ranging from (52.2% inhibition up to 98% at<50 µg/mL). N-Benzyl-2-phenylbenzo[1,3]oxazole-5-carboxamide (8b) and N-Phenethyl-2-phenylbenzo[1,3] oxazole-5-carboxamide (8c) demonstrated genuine HCV inhibitory activity with EC50 values of 41.6 and 24.5 µg/mL respectively.

  8. Designing Efficient Solar-Driven Hydrogen Evolution Photocathodes Using Semitransparent MoQxCly(Q = S, Se) Catalysts on Si Micropyramids

    KAUST Repository

    Ding, Qi

    2015-09-21

    © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. Silicon micropyramids with n+pp+ junctions are demonstrated to be efficient absorbers for integrated solar-driven hydrogen production systems enabling significant improvements in both photocurrent and onset potential. When conformally coated with MoSxCly, a catalyst that has excellent catalytic activity and high optical transparency, the highest photocurrent density for Si-based photocathodes with earth-abundant catalysts is achieved.

  9. Coke Accumulation on Catalysts used in a Fluidized Bed Pyrolyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have examined the impact of various solid catalysts on the product distribution resulting from the pyrolysis of biomass. Though catalysts do have a discernible impact, this impact is small. In our bench-top pyrolyzer designed as a catalyst screening tool, we measure bulk product distribution as...

  10. Synthesis and physicochemical properties of Zr-MCM-41 mesoporous molecular sieves and Pt/H3PW12O40/Zr-MCM-41 catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the first time, modifications of the surface and framework of Si-MCM-41 by depositing a heteropolyacid on the surface and by introducing foreign Zr4+ ions into the framework are investigated. The Zr-modified Si-MCM-41 mesoporous materials (hereafter referred as WSZn, n=Si/Zr=25, 15, 8, 4) were synthesized through a surfactant-templated preparation approach, using low-cost fumed silica as the Si precursor. After impregnation with 25 wt% of H3PW12O40, the surface Broensted acidity of the Pt/H3PW12O40/WSZn catalysts was greatly enhanced by 2-10 times relative to the bare WSZn support. Two kinds of supported heteropolyacids were formed: (i) bulk-like heteropolyacid crystals with unchanged Keggin structures, and (ii) highly dispersed heteropolyacid with distorted Keggin units. The formation of various kinds of heteropolyacid structures is closely related to the interaction between the heteropolyanions and the hydroxyl groups in the host support. - Graphical abstract: Modifications of the surface and framework of Si-MCM-41 by depositing a heteropolyacid on the surface and by introducing foreign Zr4+ ions into the framework are investigated. Broensted acidity of the Pt/H3PW12O40/Zr-MCM-41 catalysts was greatly enhanced by 2-10 times relative to the bare Zr-MCM-41 support

  11. Manganese oxide octahedral molecular sieve K-OMS-2 as catalyst in post plasma-catalysis for trichloroethylene degradation in humid air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen Dinh, M T; Giraudon, J-M; Vandenbroucke, A M; Morent, R; De Geyter, N; Lamonier, J-F

    2016-08-15

    The total oxidation of trichloroethylene (TCE) in air at low relative humidity (RH=10%) in the presence of CO2 (520ppmv) was investigated in function of energy density using an atmospheric pressure negative DC luminescent glow discharge combined with a cryptomelane catalyst positioned downstream of the plasma reactor at a temperature of 150°C. When using Non-Thermal Plasma (NTP) alone, it is found a low COx (x=1-2) yield in agreement with the detection of gaseous polychlorinated by-products in the outlet stream as well as ozone which is an harmful pollutant. Introduction of cryptomelane enhanced trichloroethylene removal, totally inhibited plasma ozone formation and increased significantly the COx yield. The improved performances of the hybrid system were mainly ascribed to the total destruction of plasma generated ozone on cryptomelane surface to produce active oxygen species. Consequently these active oxygen species greatly enhanced the abatement of the plasma non-reacted TCE and completely destroyed the hazardous plasma generated polychlorinated intermediates. The facile redox of Mn species associated with oxygen vacancies and mobility as well as the textural properties of the catalyst might also contribute as a whole to the efficiency of the process. PMID:27107238

  12. Electrochemical catalyst recovery method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Laura J.; Bray, Lane A.

    1995-01-01

    A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications.

  13. A multiscale simulation technique for molecular electronics: design of a directed self-assembled molecular n-bit shift register memory device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambropoulos, Nicholas A; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Crossley, Maxwell J; Hush, Noel S; Silverbrook, Kia

    2013-12-20

    A general method useful in molecular electronics design is developed that integrates modelling on the nano-scale (using quantum-chemical software) and on the micro-scale (using finite-element methods). It is applied to the design of an n-bit shift register memory that could conceivably be built using accessible technologies. To achieve this, the entire complex structure of the device would be built to atomic precision using feedback-controlled lithography to provide atomic-level control of silicon devices, controlled wet-chemical synthesis of molecular insulating pillars above the silicon, and controlled wet-chemical self-assembly of modular molecular devices to these pillars that connect to external metal electrodes (leads). The shift register consists of n connected cells that read data from an input electrode, pass it sequentially between the cells under the control of two external clock electrodes, and deliver it finally to an output device. The proposed cells are trimeric oligoporphyrin units whose internal states are manipulated to provide functionality, covalently connected to other cells via dipeptide linkages. Signals from the clock electrodes are conveyed by oligoporphyrin molecular wires, and μ-oxo porphyrin insulating columns are used as the supporting pillars. The developed multiscale modelling technique is applied to determine the characteristics of this molecular device, with in particular utilization of the inverted region for molecular electron-transfer processes shown to facilitate latching and control using exceptionally low energy costs per logic operation compared to standard CMOS shift register technology.

  14. Oxytetracycline recovery from aqueous media using computationally designed molecularly imprinted polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Dorado, Rosalía; Carro, Antonia M; Chianella, Iva; Karim, Kal; Concheiro, Angel; Lorenzo, Rosa A; Piletsky, Sergey; Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen

    2016-09-01

    Polymers for recovery/removal of the antimicrobial agent oxytetracycline (OTC) from aqueous media were developed with use of computational design and molecular imprinting. 2-Hydroxyethyl methacrylate, 2-acrylamide-2-methylpropane sulfonic acid (AMPS), and mixtures of the two were chosen according to their predicted affinity for OTC and evaluated as functional monomers in molecularly imprinted polymers and nonimprinted polymers. Two levels of AMPS were tested. After bulk polymerization, the polymers were crushed into particles (200-1000 μm). Pressurized liquid extraction was implemented for template removal with a low amount of methanol (less than 20 mL in each extraction) and a few extractions (12-18 for each polymer) in a short period (20 min per extraction). Particle size distribution, microporous structure, and capacity to rebind OTC from aqueous media were evaluated. Adsorption isotherms obtained from OTC solutions (30-110 mg L(-1)) revealed that the polymers prepared with AMPS had the highest affinity for OTC. The uptake capacity depended on the ionic strength as follows: purified water > saline solution (0.9 % NaCl) > seawater (3.5 % NaCl). Polymer particles containing AMPS as a functional monomer showed a remarkable ability to clean water contaminated with OTC. The usefulness of the stationary phase developed for molecularly imprinted solid-phase extraction was also demonstrated. Graphical Abstract Selection of functional monomers by molecular modeling renders polymer networks suitable for removal of pollutants from contaminated aqueous environments, under either dynamic or static conditions. PMID:27488280

  15. Epitope engineering and molecular metrics of immunogenicity: a computational approach to VLP-based vaccine design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Harshad; Lewis, Kristen; Singharoy, Abhishek; Ortoleva, Peter J

    2013-10-01

    Developing antiviral vaccines is increasingly challenging due to associated time and cost of production as well as emerging drug-resistant strains. A computer-aided vaccine design strategy is presented that could greatly accelerate the discovery process and yield vaccines with high immunogenicity and thermal stability. Our strategy is based on foreign viral epitopes engineered onto well-established virus-like particles (VLPs) and demonstrates that such constructs present similar affinity for antibodies as does a native virus. This binding affinity serves as one molecular metric of immunogenicity. As a demonstration, we engineered a preS1 epitope of hepatitis B virus (HBV) onto the EF loop of human papillomavirus VLP (HPV-VLP). HBV-associated HzKR127 antibody displayed binding affinity for this structure at distances and strengths similar to those for the complex of the antibody with the full HBV (PDBID: 2EH8). This antibody binding affinity assessment, along with other molecular immunogenicity metrics, could be a key component of a computer-aided vaccine design strategy. PMID:23933338

  16. Computer-aided Molecular Design of Compounds Targeting Histone Modifying Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli, Federico; Del Rio, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidences show that epigenetic mechanisms play crucial roles in the genesis and progression of many physiopathological processes. As a result, research in epigenetic grew at a fast pace in the last decade. In particular, the study of histone post-translational modifications encountered an extraordinary progression and many modifications have been characterized and associated to fundamental biological processes and pathological conditions. Histone modifications are the catalytic result of a large set of enzyme families that operate covalent modifications on specific residues at the histone tails. Taken together, these modifications elicit a complex and concerted processing that greatly contribute to the chromatin remodeling and may drive different pathological conditions, especially cancer. For this reason, several epigenetic targets are currently under validation for drug discovery purposes and different academic and industrial programs have been already launched to produce the first pre-clinical and clinical outcomes. In this scenario, computer-aided molecular design techniques are offering important tools, mainly as a consequence of the increasing structural information available for these targets. In this mini-review we will briefly discuss the most common types of known histone modifications and the corresponding operating enzymes by emphasizing the computer-aided molecular design approaches that can be of use to speed-up the efforts to generate new pharmaceutically relevant compounds.

  17. Molecular Dynamics Driven Design of pH-Stabilized Mutants of MNEI, a Sweet Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Leone

    Full Text Available MNEI is a single chain derivative of monellin, a plant protein that can interact with the human sweet taste receptor, being therefore perceived as sweet. This unusual physiological activity makes MNEI a potential template for the design of new sugar replacers for the food and beverage industry. Unfortunately, applications of MNEI have been so far limited by its intrinsic sensitivity to some pH and temperature conditions, which could occur in industrial processes. Changes in physical parameters can, in fact, lead to irreversible protein denaturation, as well as aggregation and precipitation. It has been previously shown that the correlation between pH and stability in MNEI derives from the presence of a single glutamic residue in a hydrophobic pocket of the protein. We have used molecular dynamics to study the consequences, at the atomic level, of the protonation state of such residue and have identified the network of intramolecular interactions responsible for MNEI stability at acidic pH. Based on this information, we have designed a pH-independent, stabilized mutant of MNEI and confirmed its increased stability by both molecular modeling and experimental techniques.

  18. Molecular Design of Doped Polymers for Thermoelectric Systems-Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabinyc, Michael L. [University of California, Santa Barbara; Hawker, Craig J. [University of California, Santa Barbara

    2013-10-09

    The self-assembly of organic semiconducting molecules and polymers is critical for their electrical properties. This project addressed the design of organic semiconductors with novel synthetic building blocks for proton-dopable conducting materials and the molecular order and microstructure of high performance semiconducting polymers blended with charge transfer dopants. Novel azulene donor-acceptor materials were designed and synthesized with unique electronic effects upon protonation to generate charged species in solution. The microstructure and optical properties of these derivatives were examined to develop structure-property relationships. Studies of the microstructure of blends of charge transfer doped semiconducting polymers revealed highly ordered conductive phases in blends. The molecular packing of one blend was studied in detail using a combination of solid-state NMR and x-ray scattering revealing that dopant incorporation is unlikely to be random as assumed in transport models. Studies of the electrical properties of these highly ordered blends revealed a universal trend between the thermopower and electrical conductivity of semiconducting polymers that is independent of the doping mechanism.

  19. Activity origin and catalyst design principles for electrocatalytic hydrogen evolution on heteroatom-doped graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Yan; Zheng, Yao; Davey, Kenneth; Qiao, Shi-Zhang

    2016-10-01

    The hydrogen evolution reaction (HER) is a fundamental process in electrocatalysis and plays an important role in energy conversion through water splitting to produce hydrogen. Effective candidates for HER are often based on noble metals or transition metal dichalcogenides, while carbon-based metal-free electrocatalysts generally demonstrate poorer activity. Here we report evaluation of a series of heteroatom-doped graphene materials as efficient HER electrocatalysts by combining spectroscopic characterization, electrochemical measurements, and density functional theory calculations. Results of theoretical computations are shown to be in good agreement with experimental observations regarding the intrinsic electrocatalytic activity and the HER reaction mechanism. As a result, we establish a HER activity trend for graphene-based materials, and explore their reactivity origin to guide the design of more efficient electrocatalysts. We predict that by rationally modifying particular experimentally achievable physicochemical characteristics, a practically realizable graphene-based material will have the potential to exceed the performance of the metal-based benchmark for HER.

  20. Onboard functional and molecular imaging: A design investigation for robotic multipinhole SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Onboard imaging—currently performed primarily by x-ray transmission modalities—is essential in modern radiation therapy. As radiation therapy moves toward personalized medicine, molecular imaging, which views individual gene expression, may also be important onboard. Nuclear medicine methods, such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), are premier modalities for molecular imaging. The purpose of this study is to investigate a robotic multipinhole approach to onboard SPECT. Methods: Computer-aided design (CAD) studies were performed to assess the feasibility of maneuvering a robotic SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. In order to obtain fast, high-quality SPECT images, a 49-pinhole SPECT camera was designed which provides high sensitivity to photons emitted from an imaging region of interest. This multipinhole system was investigated by computer-simulation studies. Seventeen hot spots 10 and 7 mm in diameter were placed in the breast region of a supine female phantom. Hot spot activity concentration was six times that of background. For the 49-pinhole camera and a reference, more conventional, broad field-of-view (FOV) SPECT system, projection data were computer simulated for 4-min scans and SPECT images were reconstructed. Hot-spot localization was evaluated using a nonprewhitening forced-choice numerical observer. Results: The CAD simulation studies found that robots could maneuver SPECT cameras about patients in position for radiation therapy. In the imaging studies, most hot spots were apparent in the 49-pinhole images. Average localization errors for 10-mm- and 7-mm-diameter hot spots were 0.4 and 1.7 mm, respectively, for the 49-pinhole system, and 3.1 and 5.7 mm, respectively, for the reference broad-FOV system. Conclusions: A robot could maneuver a multipinhole SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. The system could provide onboard functional and molecular imaging with 4-min

  1. Molecular interactions in biomineralized hydroxyapatite amino acid modified nanoclay: In silico design of bone biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simulations driven approach to design of a novel biomaterial nanocomposite system is described in this study. Nanoclays modified with amino acids (OMMT) were used to mineralize hydroxyapatite (HAP), mimicking biomineralization. Representative models of organically modified montmorillonite clay (OMMT) and OMMT-hydroxyapatite (OMMT-HAP) were constructed using molecular dynamics and validated using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transforms Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Attractive interactions exist between Ca atoms of HAP and C=O group of aminovaleric acid, indicating chelate formation in OMMT-HAP. Interaction energy maps describe molecular interactions among different constituents and their quantitative contributions in the OMMT and OMMT-HAP systems at both parallel and perpendicular orientations. High attractive and high repulsive interactions were found between PO43− and MMT clay as well as aminovaleric molecules in OMMT-HAP perpendicular and parallel models. Large non-bonded interactions in OMMT-HAP indicate influence of neighboring environment on PO43− in in situ HAPclay. Extensive hydrogen bonds were observed between functional hydrogen atoms of modifier and MMT clay in OMMT-HAP as compared to OMMT. Thus, HAP interacts with clay through the aminovaleric acid. This computational study provides a framework for materials design and selection for biomaterials used in tissue engineering and other areas of regenerative medicine. - Highlights: • Representative models of a hybrid nanoclay-hydroxyapatite biomaterial are built. • Interaction energy maps are constructed using a molecular dynamics. • Quantitative interactions between the three components of the biomaterial are found. • The modeling and experimental approach provides insight into the complex nanomaterial

  2. Molecular interactions in biomineralized hydroxyapatite amino acid modified nanoclay: In silico design of bone biomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katti, Dinesh R., E-mail: Dinesh.Katti@ndsu.edu; Sharma, Anurag; Ambre, Avinash H.; Katti, Kalpana S.

    2015-01-01

    A simulations driven approach to design of a novel biomaterial nanocomposite system is described in this study. Nanoclays modified with amino acids (OMMT) were used to mineralize hydroxyapatite (HAP), mimicking biomineralization. Representative models of organically modified montmorillonite clay (OMMT) and OMMT-hydroxyapatite (OMMT-HAP) were constructed using molecular dynamics and validated using X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transforms Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Attractive interactions exist between Ca atoms of HAP and C=O group of aminovaleric acid, indicating chelate formation in OMMT-HAP. Interaction energy maps describe molecular interactions among different constituents and their quantitative contributions in the OMMT and OMMT-HAP systems at both parallel and perpendicular orientations. High attractive and high repulsive interactions were found between PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} and MMT clay as well as aminovaleric molecules in OMMT-HAP perpendicular and parallel models. Large non-bonded interactions in OMMT-HAP indicate influence of neighboring environment on PO{sub 4}{sup 3−} in in situ HAPclay. Extensive hydrogen bonds were observed between functional hydrogen atoms of modifier and MMT clay in OMMT-HAP as compared to OMMT. Thus, HAP interacts with clay through the aminovaleric acid. This computational study provides a framework for materials design and selection for biomaterials used in tissue engineering and other areas of regenerative medicine. - Highlights: • Representative models of a hybrid nanoclay-hydroxyapatite biomaterial are built. • Interaction energy maps are constructed using a molecular dynamics. • Quantitative interactions between the three components of the biomaterial are found. • The modeling and experimental approach provides insight into the complex nanomaterial.

  3. Onboard functional and molecular imaging: A design investigation for robotic multipinhole SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowsher, James, E-mail: james.bowsher@duke.edu; Giles, William; Yin, Fang-Fang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 and Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Yan, Susu [Medical Physics Graduate Program, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Roper, Justin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Onboard imaging—currently performed primarily by x-ray transmission modalities—is essential in modern radiation therapy. As radiation therapy moves toward personalized medicine, molecular imaging, which views individual gene expression, may also be important onboard. Nuclear medicine methods, such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), are premier modalities for molecular imaging. The purpose of this study is to investigate a robotic multipinhole approach to onboard SPECT. Methods: Computer-aided design (CAD) studies were performed to assess the feasibility of maneuvering a robotic SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. In order to obtain fast, high-quality SPECT images, a 49-pinhole SPECT camera was designed which provides high sensitivity to photons emitted from an imaging region of interest. This multipinhole system was investigated by computer-simulation studies. Seventeen hot spots 10 and 7 mm in diameter were placed in the breast region of a supine female phantom. Hot spot activity concentration was six times that of background. For the 49-pinhole camera and a reference, more conventional, broad field-of-view (FOV) SPECT system, projection data were computer simulated for 4-min scans and SPECT images were reconstructed. Hot-spot localization was evaluated using a nonprewhitening forced-choice numerical observer. Results: The CAD simulation studies found that robots could maneuver SPECT cameras about patients in position for radiation therapy. In the imaging studies, most hot spots were apparent in the 49-pinhole images. Average localization errors for 10-mm- and 7-mm-diameter hot spots were 0.4 and 1.7 mm, respectively, for the 49-pinhole system, and 3.1 and 5.7 mm, respectively, for the reference broad-FOV system. Conclusions: A robot could maneuver a multipinhole SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. The system could provide onboard functional and molecular imaging with 4-min

  4. A distance-dependent metal-enhanced fluorescence sensing platform based on molecular beacon design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhenpeng; Huang, Hongduan; Chen, Yang; Liu, Feng; Huang, Cheng Zhi; Li, Na

    2014-02-15

    A new metal-enhanced fluorescence (MEF) based platform was developed on the basis of distance-dependent fluorescence quenching-enhancement effect, which combined the easiness of Ag-thiol chemistry with the MEF property of noble-metal structures as well as the molecular beacon design. For the given sized AgNPs, the fluorescence enhancement factor was found to increase with a d(6) dependency in agreement with fluorescence resonance energy transfer mechanism at shorter distance and decrease with a d(-3) dependency in agreement with plasmonic enhancement mechanism at longer distance between the fluorophore and the AgNP surface. As a proof of concept, the platform was demonstrated by a sensitive detection of mercuric ions, using thymine-containing molecular beacon to tune silver nanoparticle (AgNP)-enhanced fluorescence. Mercuric ions were detected via formation of a thymine-mercuric-thymine structure to open the hairpin, facilitating fluorescence recovery and AgNP enhancement to yield a limit of detection of 1 nM, which is well below the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency regulation of the Maximum Contaminant Level Goal (10nM) in drinking water. Since the AgNP functioned as not only a quencher to reduce the reagent blank signal but also an enhancement substrate to increase fluorescence of the open hairpin when target mercuric ions were present, the quenching-enhancement strategy can greatly improve the detection sensitivity and can in principle be a universal approach for various targets when combined with molecular beacon design.

  5. Recent Progress on Molecular Modeling of Ethylene Polymerization/Oligomerization Catalyzed by Chromium-Based Catalysts%铬系催化乙烯配位聚合/齐聚分子模拟研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘振; 程瑞华; 何雪莲; 田洲; 刘柏平

    2014-01-01

    Phillips chromium-based catalysts are widely used in industrial production of polyethylene andα-olefins through ethylene selective oligomerization. Recently, molecular modeling has been playing more and more important role in understanding the mechanism of ethylene polymerization and selective trimerization. From this point of view, the active site transformation from polymerization to metathesis during the induction period of the Phillips catalyst, the effect of Ti-modification on the Phillips catalyst, the transformation from ethylene polymerization to selective trimerization of the Cr(III) 2-EH/PIBAO/DME system, and the effect of deprotonation and Cr oxidation states in the Cr-SNS system on the ethylene selective trimerization were reviewed. A much profound mechanistic understanding has been achieved through combination of molecular modeling with experiments.%针对工业中广泛应用的 Phillips 铬系乙烯聚合催化剂和铬系乙烯选择性齐聚催化体系,从分子模拟角度对近期相关研究进展进行综述。主要介绍了分子模拟在 Phillips 铬系催化剂诱导期内乙烯聚合活性中心向乙烯易位活性中心转换机理、Ti改性Phillips铬系催化剂的乙烯聚合行为、Cr(III)2-EH/PIBAO/DME体系乙烯聚合和三聚转换机理以及 Cr-SNS 体系去质子化对乙烯三聚活性的影响等方面的研究进展。通过计算机分子模拟和实验手段相结合,可以获得对催化反应机理更为深刻的认识,从而为新型催化剂的设计与开发提供理论指导。

  6. Pharmacogenomics of the human ABC transporter ABCG2: from functional evaluation to drug molecular design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Toshihisa; Tamura, Ai; Saito, Hikaru; Wakabayashi, Kanako; Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    2005-10-01

    In the post-genome-sequencing era, emerging genomic technologies are shifting the paradigm for drug discovery and development. Nevertheless, drug discovery and development still remain high-risk and high-stakes ventures with long and costly timelines. Indeed, the attrition of drug candidates in preclinical and development stages is a major problem in drug design. For at least 30% of the candidates, this attrition is due to poor pharmacokinetics and toxicity. Thus, pharmaceutical companies have begun to seriously re-evaluate their current strategies of drug discovery and development. In that light, we propose that a transport mechanism-based design might help to create new, pharmacokinetically advantageous drugs, and as such should be considered an important component of drug design strategy. Performing enzyme- and/or cell-based drug transporter, interaction tests may greatly facilitate drug development and allow the prediction of drug-drug interactions. We recently developed methods for high-speed functional screening and quantitative structure-activity relationship analysis to study the substrate specificity of ABC transporters and to evaluate the effect of genetic polymorphisms on their function. These methods would provide a practical tool to screen synthetic and natural compounds, and these data can be applied to the molecular design of new drugs. In this review article, we present an overview on the genetic polymorphisms of human ABC transporter ABCG2 and new camptothecin analogues that can circumvent AGCG2-associated multidrug resistance of cancer.

  7. Design of Molecular Solar Cells via Feedback from Soft X-ray Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himpsel, Franz J. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2015-06-12

    Spectroscopy with soft X-rays was used to develop new materials and novel designs for solar cells and artificial photosynthesis. In order to go beyond the widely-used trial-and-error approach of gradually improving a particular design, we started from the most general layout of a solar cell (or a photo-electrochemical device) and asked which classes of materials are promising for best performance. For example, the most general design of a solar cell consists of a light absorber, an electron donor, and an electron acceptor. These are characterized by four energy levels, which were measured by a combination of spectroscopic X-ray techniques. Tuning synchrotron radiation to the absorption edges of specific elements provided element- and bond-selectivity. The spectroscopic results were complemented by state-of-the-art calculations of the electronic states. These helped explaining the observed energy levels and the orbitals associated with them. The calculations were extended to a large class of materials (for example thousands of porphyrin dye complexes) in order to survey trends in the energy level structure. A few highlights serve as examples: 1) Organic molecules combining absorber, donor, and acceptor with atomic precision. 2) Exploration of highly p-doped diamond films as inert, transparent electron donors. 3) Surface-sensitive characterization of nanorod arrays used as photoanodes in water splitting. 4) Computational design of molecular complexes for efficient solar cells using two photons.

  8. Nano-design of quantum dot-based photocatalysts for hydrogen generation using advanced surface molecular chemistry

    KAUST Repository

    Yu, Weili

    2015-01-01

    Efficient photocatalytic hydrogen generation in a suspension system requires a sophisticated nano-device that combines a photon absorber with effective redox catalysts. This study demonstrates an innovative molecular linking strategy for fabricating photocatalytic materials that allow effective charge separation of excited carriers, followed by efficient hydrogen evolution. The method for the sequential replacement of ligands with appropriate molecules developed in this study tethers both quantum dots (QDs), as photosensitizers, and metal nanoparticles, as hydrogen evolution catalysts, to TiO2 surfaces in a controlled manner at the nano-level. Combining hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions on the surface, CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs and an Au-Pt alloy were attached to TiO2 without overlapping during the synthesis. The resultant nano-photocatalysts achieved substantially high-performance visible-light-driven photocatalysis for hydrogen evolution. All syntheses were conducted at room temperature and in ambient air, providing a promising route for fabricating visible-light-responsive photocatalysts.

  9. Methods of producing epoxides from alkenes using a two-component catalyst system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kung, Mayfair C.; Kung, Harold H.; Jiang, Jian

    2013-07-09

    Methods for the epoxidation of alkenes are provided. The methods include the steps of exposing the alkene to a two-component catalyst system in an aqueous solution in the presence of carbon monoxide and molecular oxygen under conditions in which the alkene is epoxidized. The two-component catalyst system comprises a first catalyst that generates peroxides or peroxy intermediates during oxidation of CO with molecular oxygen and a second catalyst that catalyzes the epoxidation of the alkene using the peroxides or peroxy intermediates. A catalyst system composed of particles of suspended gold and titanium silicalite is one example of a suitable two-component catalyst system.

  10. A Rational Design Strategy for the Selective Activity Enhancement of a Molecular Chaperone toward a Target Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprile, Francesco A; Sormanni, Pietro; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2015-08-18

    Molecular chaperones facilitate the folding and assembly of proteins and inhibit their aberrant aggregation. They thus offer several opportunities for biomedical and biotechnological applications, as for example they can often prevent protein aggregation more effectively than other therapeutic molecules, including small molecules and antibodies. Here we present a method of designing molecular chaperones with enhanced activity against specific amyloidogenic substrates while leaving unaltered their functions toward other substrates. The method consists of grafting onto a molecular chaperone a peptide designed to bind specifically an epitope in the target substrate. We illustrate this strategy by describing Hsp70 variants with increased affinities for α-synuclein and Aβ42 but otherwise unaltered affinities for other substrates. These designed variants inhibit protein aggregation and disaggregate preformed fibrils significantly more effectively than wild-type Hsp70 indicating that the strategy presented here provides a possible route for tailoring rationally molecular chaperones for specific purposes.

  11. A strategy of designing the ligand of antibody affinity chromatography based on molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lu; Li, Weikang; Sun, Fei; Li, Baizhi; Li, Hongrui; Zhang, Hongxing; Zheng, Qingchuan; Liang, Chongyang

    2016-09-01

    Designing affinity ligands has always been the development focus of affinity chromatography. Previous antibody affinity ligand designs were mostly based on the crystal structure of protein A (UniProt code number: P38507), and the antibody-binding domains were modified according to the properties of amino acid residues. Currently, more effective bioinformatic prediction and experimental validation has been used to improve the design of antibody affinity ligands. In the present study, the complex crystal structure (the domain D of protein A and the Fab segment of IgM, PDB code: 1DEE) was used as the model. The vital site that inhibits the binding between domain D and IgM was estimated by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, then MM-GBSA calculations were used to design a mutant of domain D (K46E) for improving affinity on the above vital site. The binding analysis using Biacore showed the association and dissociation parameters of K46E mutant that were optimized with IgM. The affinity increase of K46E mutant preferred for IgM, the affinity order is K46E tetramer (KD=6.02×10(-9)M)>K46E mutant (KD=6.66×10(-8)M)>domain D (KD=2.17×10(-7)M). Similar results were obtained when the optimized ligands were immobilized to the chromatography medium. A complete designing strategy was validated in this study, which will provide a novel insight into designing new ligands of antibody affinity chromatography media.

  12. A strategy of designing the ligand of antibody affinity chromatography based on molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lu; Li, Weikang; Sun, Fei; Li, Baizhi; Li, Hongrui; Zhang, Hongxing; Zheng, Qingchuan; Liang, Chongyang

    2016-09-01

    Designing affinity ligands has always been the development focus of affinity chromatography. Previous antibody affinity ligand designs were mostly based on the crystal structure of protein A (UniProt code number: P38507), and the antibody-binding domains were modified according to the properties of amino acid residues. Currently, more effective bioinformatic prediction and experimental validation has been used to improve the design of antibody affinity ligands. In the present study, the complex crystal structure (the domain D of protein A and the Fab segment of IgM, PDB code: 1DEE) was used as the model. The vital site that inhibits the binding between domain D and IgM was estimated by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulation, then MM-GBSA calculations were used to design a mutant of domain D (K46E) for improving affinity on the above vital site. The binding analysis using Biacore showed the association and dissociation parameters of K46E mutant that were optimized with IgM. The affinity increase of K46E mutant preferred for IgM, the affinity order is K46E tetramer (KD=6.02×10(-9)M)>K46E mutant (KD=6.66×10(-8)M)>domain D (KD=2.17×10(-7)M). Similar results were obtained when the optimized ligands were immobilized to the chromatography medium. A complete designing strategy was validated in this study, which will provide a novel insight into designing new ligands of antibody affinity chromatography media. PMID:27524303

  13. Monodisperse metal nanoparticle catalysts on silica mesoporous supports: synthesis, characterizations, and catalytic reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, G.A.

    2009-09-14

    The design of high performance catalyst achieving near 100% product selectivity at maximum activity is one of the most important goals in the modern catalytic science research. To this end, the preparation of model catalysts whose catalytic performances can be predicted in a systematic and rational manner is of significant importance, which thereby allows understanding of the molecular ingredients affecting the catalytic performances. We have designed novel 3-dimensional (3D) high surface area model catalysts by the integration of colloidal metal nanoparticles and mesoporous silica supports. Monodisperse colloidal metal NPs with controllable size and shape were synthesized using dendrimers, polymers, or surfactants as the surface stabilizers. The size of Pt, and Rh nanoparticles can be varied from sub 1 nm to 15 nm, while the shape of Pt can be controlled to cube, cuboctahedron, and octahedron. The 3D model catalysts were generated by the incorporation of metal nanoparticles into the pores of mesoporous silica supports via two methods: capillary inclusion (CI) and nanoparticle encapsulation (NE). The former method relies on the sonication-induced inclusion of metal nanoparticles into the pores of mesoporous silica, whereas the latter is performed by the encapsulation of metal nanoparticles during the hydrothermal synthesis of mesoporous silica. The 3D model catalysts were comprehensively characterized by a variety of physical and chemical methods. These catalysts were found to show structure sensitivity in hydrocarbon conversion reactions. The Pt NPs supported on mesoporous SBA-15 silica (Pt/SBA-15) displayed significant particle size sensitivity in ethane hydrogenolysis over the size range of 1-7 nm. The Pt/SBA-15 catalysts also exhibited particle size dependent product selectivity in cyclohexene hydrogenation, crotonaldehyde hydrogenation, and pyrrole hydrogenation. The Rh loaded SBA-15 silica catalyst showed structure sensitivity in CO oxidation reaction. In

  14. A New Strategy for the Synthesis of 3-Acyl-coumarin Using Mesoporous Molecular Sieve MCM-41 as a Novel and Efficient Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HERAVI,Majid M; POORMOHAMMAD,Nargess; BEHESHTIGA,Yahia Sh; BAGHERNEJAD,Bita; MALAKOOTI,Reihaneh

    2009-01-01

    3-Acyl-coumarins were obtained in high yields from ortho-hydroxybenzaldehydes and ethyl acetoacetate or ethyl benzoylacetate in acetonitrile in the presence of a catalytic amount of mesoporous molecular sieve MCM-41. 3-Acyl-coumarins were obtained in high yields from ortho-hydroxybenzaldehydes and ethyl acetoacetate or ethyl benzoylacetate in acetonitrile in the presence of a catalytic amount of mesoporous molecular sieve MCM-41.

  15. Estimation and Uncertainty Analysis of Flammability Properties for Computer-aided molecular design of working fluids for thermodynamic cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frutiger, Jerome; Abildskov, Jens; Sin, Gürkan

    Computer Aided Molecular Design (CAMD) is an important tool to generate, test and evaluate promising chemical products. CAMD can be used in thermodynamic cycle for the design of pure component or mixture working fluids in order to improve the heat transfer capacity of the system. The safety...

  16. Ruthenium-based olefin metathesis catalysts bearing pH-responsive ligands: External control of catalyst solubility and activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balof, Shawna Lynn

    2011-12-01

    Sixteen novel, Ru-based olefin metathesis catalysts bearing pH responsive ligands were synthesized. The pH-responsive groups employed with these catalysts included dimethylamino (NMe2) modified NHC ligands as well as N-donor dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP) and 3-(o-pyridyl)propylidene ligands. These pH-responsive ligands provided the means by which the solubility and/or activity profiles of the catalysts produced could be controlled via acid addition. The main goal of this dissertation was to design catalyst systems capable of performing ring opening metathesis (ROMP) and ring closing metathesis (RCM) reactions in both organic and aqueous media. In an effort to quickly gain access to new catalyst structures, a template synthesis for functionalized NHC ligand precursors was designed, in addition to other strategies, to obtain ligand precursors with ancillary NMe2 groups. Kinetic studies for the catalysts produced from these precursors showed external control of catalyst solubility was afforded via protonation of the NMe2 groups of their NHC ligands. Additionally, this protonation afforded external control of catalyst propagation rates for several catalysts. This is the first known independent external control for the propagation rates of ROMP catalysts. The incorporation of pH-responsive N-donor ligands into catalyst structures also provided the means for the external control of metathesis activity, as the protonation of these ligands resulted in an increased initiation rate based on their fast and irreversible dissociation from the metal center. The enhanced external control makes these catalysts applicable to a wide range of applications, some of which have been explored by us and/or through collaboration. Three of the catalysts designed showed remarkable metathesis activity in aqueous media. These catalysts displayed comparable RCM activity in aqueous media to a class of water-soluble catalysts reported by Grubbs et al., considered to be the most active catalyst for

  17. Molecular Understanding and Structural-Based Design of Polyacrylamides and Polyacrylates as Antifouling Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Zhao, Chao; Zhang, Mingzhen; Chen, Qiang; Ma, Jie; Zheng, Jie

    2016-04-12

    Design and synthesis of highly bioinert and biocompatible antifouling materials are crucial for a broad range of biomedical and engineering applications. Among antifouling materials, polyacrylamides and polyacrylates have proved so promising because of cheap raw materials, ease of synthesis and applicability, and abundant functional groups. The strong surface hydration and the high surface packing density of polyacrylamides and polyacrylates are considered to be the key contributors to their antifouling property. In this article, we review our studies on the design and synthesis of a series of polyacrylamides and polyacrylates with different molecular structures. These polymers can be fabricated into different architectural forms (brushes, nanoparticles, nanogels, and hydrogels), all of which are highly resistant to the attachment of proteins, cells, and bacteria. We find that small structural changes in the polymers can lead to large enhancement in surface hydration and antifouling performance, both showing a positive correlation. This reveals a general design rule for effective antifouling materials. Furthermore, polyacrylamides and polyacrylates are readily functionalized with other bioactive compounds to achieve different new multifunctionalities. PMID:26986442

  18. Molecular Understanding and Structural-Based Design of Polyacrylamides and Polyacrylates as Antifouling Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong; Zhao, Chao; Zhang, Mingzhen; Chen, Qiang; Ma, Jie; Zheng, Jie

    2016-04-12

    Design and synthesis of highly bioinert and biocompatible antifouling materials are crucial for a broad range of biomedical and engineering applications. Among antifouling materials, polyacrylamides and polyacrylates have proved so promising because of cheap raw materials, ease of synthesis and applicability, and abundant functional groups. The strong surface hydration and the high surface packing density of polyacrylamides and polyacrylates are considered to be the key contributors to their antifouling property. In this article, we review our studies on the design and synthesis of a series of polyacrylamides and polyacrylates with different molecular structures. These polymers can be fabricated into different architectural forms (brushes, nanoparticles, nanogels, and hydrogels), all of which are highly resistant to the attachment of proteins, cells, and bacteria. We find that small structural changes in the polymers can lead to large enhancement in surface hydration and antifouling performance, both showing a positive correlation. This reveals a general design rule for effective antifouling materials. Furthermore, polyacrylamides and polyacrylates are readily functionalized with other bioactive compounds to achieve different new multifunctionalities.

  19. Molecular Designs and Properties of Highly Efficient Blue Emitters for OLEDs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wong Ken-Tsung

    2004-01-01

    Advances made in the molecular design of modern optoelectronic materials have made significant contributions toward the development of organic electronics. The organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) employing monodisperse or polymeric conjugated materials possess the most promising prospects. However, materials suitable for long-term use as blue light emitters are still far from optimization in terms of stability.In the past few years, interesting materials based on 9,9-diaryl-substituted fluorene as a core structure have been developed in our laboratory. We developed a series of efficient and morphologically stable pyrimidine-containing 9,9'-spirobifluorene-cored oligoaryls as pure blue emitters. The steric hindrance inherent with the molecular structure renders the material with a record-high thin-film PL quantum yield of ~95% and a glass transition temperature (Tg) of ~200 ℃.Blue OLEDs employing this thermally stable compound as the emitting host exhibit unusual endurance for high currents. Injection current over 5,000 mA/cm2 and maximal brightness of~80,000 cd/m2 had been demonstrated, representing the highest values reported for blue OLEDs under dc driving. In addition, a series of oligofluorene homologues have been synthesized. These oligofluorenes exhibit interesting reversible bipolar redox properties and excellent morphological and thermal stability. Furthermore, nondispersive ambipolar high hole and electron mobilities over 10-3 cm2/V.s can be achieved with these oligo(9,9-diarylfluorene)s. In particular, the electron mobility observed represents the highest ever reported for amorphous molecular solids. These intriguing properties together with the high quantum yields in thin films make these oligo(9,9-diarylfluorene)s are promising for OLEDs applications as efficient blue emitters. In this meeting, the synthesis and properties of these materials and their highly efficient OLEDs device characteristics will be discussed.

  20. Molecular design, synthesis and physical properties of novel Cytisine-derivatives - Experimental and theoretical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Bojidarka; Spiteller, Michael

    2013-02-01

    The paper presented a comprehensive theoretical and experimental study on the molecular drugs-design, synthesis, isolation, physical spectroscopic and mass spectrometric elucidation of novel functionalization derivatives of Cytisine (Cyt), using nucleosidic residues. Since these alkaloids have established biochemical profile, related the binding affinity of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), particularly α7 sub-type, the presented correlation between the molecular structure and properties allowed to evaluated the highlights of the biochemical hypothesises related the Schizophrenia. The anticancer activity of α7 subtype agonists and the crucial role of the nucleoside-based medications in the cancer therapy provided opportunity for further study on the biochemical relationship between Schizophrenia and few kinds of cancers, which has been hypothesized recently. The physical electronic absorptions (EAs), circular dichroic (CD) and Raman spectroscopic (RS) properties as well as mass spectrometric (MS) data, obtained using electrospray ionization (ESI) and atmospheric-pressure chemical ionization (APCI) methods under the positive single (MS) and tandem (MS/MS) modes of operation are discussed. Taking into account reports on a fatal intoxication of Cyt, the presented data would be of interest in the field of forensic chemistry, through development of highly selective and sensitive analytical protocols. Quantum chemical method is used to predict the physical properties of the isolated alkaloids, their affinity to the receptor loop and gas-phase stabilized species, observed mass spectrometrically.

  1. Design of potentially active ligands for SH2 domains by molecular modeling methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hurmach V. V.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Search for new chemical structures possessing specific biological activity is a complex problem that needs the use of the latest achievements of molecular modeling technologies. It is well known that SH2 domains play a major role in ontogenesis as intermediaries of specific protein-protein interactions. Aim. Developing an algorithm to investigate the properties of SH2 domain binding, search for new potential active compounds for the whole SH2 domains class. Methods. In this paper, we utilize a complex of computer modeling methods to create a generic set of potentially active compounds targeting universally at the whole class of SH2 domains. A cluster analysis of all available three-dimensional structures of SH2 domains was performed and general pharmacophore models were formulated. The models were used for virtual screening of collection of drug-like compounds provided by Enamine Ltd. Results. The design technique for library of potentially active compounds for SH2 domains class was proposed. Conclusions. The original algorithm of SH2 domains research with molecular docking method was developed. Using our algorithm, the active compounds for SH2 domains were found.

  2. Molecular design and ordering effects in π-functional materials for transistor and solar cell applications

    KAUST Repository

    Beaujuge, Pierre

    2011-12-21

    Organic electronics are broadly anticipated to impact the development of flexible thin-film device technologies. Among these, solution-processable π-conjugated polymers and small molecules are proving particularly promising in field-effect transistors and bulk heterojunction solar cells. This Perspective analyzes some of the most exciting strategies recently suggested in the design and structural organization of π-functional materials for transistor and solar cell applications. Emphasis is placed on the interplay between molecular structure, self-assembling properties, nanoscale and mesoscale ordering, and device efficiency parameters. A critical look at the various approaches used to optimize both materials and device performance is provided to assist in the identification of new directions and further advances. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  3. Lessons from Nature: A Bio-Inspired Approach to Molecular Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Sarah A; Hill, Ethan A; Borovik, A S

    2015-07-14

    Metalloproteins contain actives sites with intricate structures that perform specific functions with high selectivity and efficiency. The complexity of these systems complicates the study of their function and the understanding of the properties that give rise to their reactivity. One approach that has contributed to the current level of understanding of their biological function is the study of synthetic constructs that mimic one or more aspects of the native metalloproteins. These systems allow individual contributions to the structure and function to be analyzed and also permit spectroscopic characterization of the metal cofactors without complications from the protein environment. This Current Topic is a review of synthetic constructs as probes for understanding the biological activation of small molecules. These topics are developed from the perspective of seminal molecular design breakthroughs from the past that provide the foundation for the systems used today.

  4. Design and growth of a P N diode by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, design, growth and characterization of a GaAs p-n contact is presented. The contact growth has been performed by Molecular Beam Epitaxy. The n layer with thickness of 1μm and electron concentration of 6 * 1017 cm-3 has been grown on a p-type GaAs substrate with hole concentration of 1 * 1017cm-3. During growth, in situ monitoring of the layer stoichiometry has been made possible by using Reflection High Energy Electron Diffraction technique. After growth characterization was performed by the use of Hall-effect measurement, the results for the carrier concentration was further confirmed by Electrochemical Capacitance-Voltage profiling technique

  5. Molecular docking sites designed for the generation of highly crystalline covalent organic frameworks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascherl, Laura; Sick, Torben; Margraf, Johannes T.; Lapidus, Saul H.; Calik, Mona; Hettstedt, Christina; Karaghiosoff, Konstantin; Döblinger, Markus; Clark, Timothy; Chapman, Karena W.; Auras, Florian; Bein, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Covalent organic frameworks (COFs) formed by connecting multidentate organic building blocks through covalent bonds provide a platform for designing multifunctional porous materials with atomic precision. As they are promising materials for applications in optoelectronics, they would benefit from a maximum degree of long-range order within the framework, which has remained a major challenge. We have developed a synthetic concept to allow consecutive COF sheets to lock in position during crystal growth, and thus minimize the occurrence of stacking faults and dislocations. Hereby, the three-dimensional conformation of propeller-shaped molecular building units was used to generate well-defined periodic docking sites, which guided the attachment of successive building blocks that, in turn, promoted long-range order during COF formation. This approach enables us to achieve a very high crystallinity for a series of COFs that comprise tri- and tetradentate central building blocks. We expect this strategy to be transferable to a broad range of customized COFs.

  6. Principles and design of a Zeeman-Sisyphus decelerator for molecular beams

    CERN Document Server

    Fitch, N J

    2016-01-01

    We explore a technique for decelerating molecules using a static magnetic field and optical pumping. Molecules travel through a spatially varying magnetic field and are repeatedly pumped into a weak-field seeking state as they move towards each strong field region, and into a strong-field seeking state as they move towards weak field. The method is time-independent and so is suitable for decelerating both pulsed and continuous molecular beams. By using guiding magnets at each weak field region, the beam can be simultaneously guided and decelerated. By tapering the magnetic field strength in the strong field regions, and exploiting the Doppler shift, the velocity distribution can be compressed during deceleration. We develop the principles of this deceleration technique, provide a realistic design, use numerical simulations to evaluate its performance for a beam of CaF, and compare this performance to other deceleration methods.

  7. Design, preparation, surface recognition properties, and characteristics of icariin molecularly imprinted polymers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohe Jia

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Icariin molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs were prepared by precipitation polymerization. Prior to the polymerization, computer simulation was performed to sketchily choose the suitable functional monomer and the corresponding polymerization solvent. The optimized synthesis parameters, including the functional monomer acrylamide, the mixture of methanol and acetonitrile (V:V = 3:1 as the polymerization solvent, and the reaction molar ratio (1:6:80 of template molecule, functional monomer and cross-linker, were respectively obtained by single factor analysis and orthogonal design methods. The results of the adsorption experiments showed that the resultant MIPs exhibited good adsorption and recognition abilities to icariin. Scatchard analysis illustrated that the homogeneous binding sites only for icariin molecules were formed in the prepared MIPs.

  8. Preparation of promoted platinum catalysts of designed geometry and the role of promoters in the liquid-phase oxidation of 1-methoxy-2-propanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallat, T.; Bodnar, Z.; Baiker, A. (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zuerich (Switzerland)); Greis, O.; Struebig, H. (Technical Univ., Hamburg (Germany)); Reller, A. (Univ. of Hamburg (Germany))

    1993-07-01

    Alumina-supported or unsupported M/Pt-type catalysts were prepared by consecutive reduction of Bi, Pb, Sn, Ru, Au, or Ag modifiers (M) onto Pt particles. Structural and chemical properties of the bimetallics were studied by electron microscopy combined with energy dispersive X-ray analysis and an electrochemical (cyclic voltammetric) polarization method. Preferential deposition of promoter metal submonolayers on Pt was observed at moderate surface coverages ([theta][sub M]<0.5-0.8). Some bulk metal crystallite formation as [open quotes]bridges[close quotes] between small Pt particles covered partially with promoter was also observed on alumina-supported Bi/Pt and Pb/Pt catalysts. Measurement of the electrochemical potential of the catalyst slurry during the oxidation of 1-methoxy-2-propanol to methoxyacetone and the cyclic voltammetric polarization of the bimetallic catalysts revealed that the catalysts are in an oxidized state during reaction. The following order of promoting influence was observed: Bi > Pb [approximately] Sn > Au [approximately] Ru. Two major effects of promoters are suggested: (i) they suppress the initial irreversible adsorption of the reactant alcohol on Pt which results in self-poisoning, and (ii) they form new active centers that adsorb the oxidizing species (OH) better than Pt. A formal rate equation is suggested (r = f [center dot] [theta][sub org] [center dot] [theta][sub OH]) which explains the optimum in promoter/platinum ratio. The different influences of the promoters are explained by their hydrogen and oxygen sorption characteristics and by the surface geometry of the bimetallic catalysts. 51 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  9. An integrated molecular modeling approach for in silico design of new tetracyclic derivatives as ALK inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddi, Saikiran Reddy; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2016-10-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), a promising therapeutic target for treatment of human cancers, is a receptor tyrosine kinase that instigates the activation of several signal transduction pathways. In the present study, in silico methods have been employed in order to explore the structural features and functionalities of a series of tetracyclic derivatives displaying potent inhibitory activity toward ALK. Initially docking was performed using GLIDE 5.6 to probe the bioactive conformation of all the compounds and to understand the binding modes of inhibitors. The docking results revealed that ligand interaction with Met 1199 plays a crucial role in binding of inhibitors to ALK. Further to establish a robust 3D-QSAR model using CoMFA and CoMSIA methods, the whole dataset was divided into three splits. Model obtained from Split 3 showed high accuracy ([Formula: see text] of 0.700 and 0.682, [Formula: see text] of 0.971 and 0.974, [Formula: see text] of 0.673 and 0.811, respectively for CoMFA and CoMSIA). The key structural requirements for enhancing the inhibitory activity were derived from CoMFA and CoMSIA contours in combination with site map analysis. Substituting small electronegative groups at Position 8 by replacing either morpholine or piperidine rings and maintaining hydrophobic character at Position 9 in tetracyclic derivatives can enhance the inhibitory potential. Finally, we performed molecular dynamics simulations in order to investigate the stability of protein ligand interactions and MM/GBSA calculations to compare binding free energies of co-crystal ligand and newly designed molecule N1. Based on the coherence of outcome of various molecular modeling studies, a set of 11 new molecules having potential predicted inhibitory activity were designed. PMID:26758803

  10. An integrated molecular modeling approach for in silico design of new tetracyclic derivatives as ALK inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peddi, Saikiran Reddy; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2016-10-01

    Anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), a promising therapeutic target for treatment of human cancers, is a receptor tyrosine kinase that instigates the activation of several signal transduction pathways. In the present study, in silico methods have been employed in order to explore the structural features and functionalities of a series of tetracyclic derivatives displaying potent inhibitory activity toward ALK. Initially docking was performed using GLIDE 5.6 to probe the bioactive conformation of all the compounds and to understand the binding modes of inhibitors. The docking results revealed that ligand interaction with Met 1199 plays a crucial role in binding of inhibitors to ALK. Further to establish a robust 3D-QSAR model using CoMFA and CoMSIA methods, the whole dataset was divided into three splits. Model obtained from Split 3 showed high accuracy ([Formula: see text] of 0.700 and 0.682, [Formula: see text] of 0.971 and 0.974, [Formula: see text] of 0.673 and 0.811, respectively for CoMFA and CoMSIA). The key structural requirements for enhancing the inhibitory activity were derived from CoMFA and CoMSIA contours in combination with site map analysis. Substituting small electronegative groups at Position 8 by replacing either morpholine or piperidine rings and maintaining hydrophobic character at Position 9 in tetracyclic derivatives can enhance the inhibitory potential. Finally, we performed molecular dynamics simulations in order to investigate the stability of protein ligand interactions and MM/GBSA calculations to compare binding free energies of co-crystal ligand and newly designed molecule N1. Based on the coherence of outcome of various molecular modeling studies, a set of 11 new molecules having potential predicted inhibitory activity were designed.

  11. Molecular modeling study for inhibition mechanism of human chymase and its application in inhibitor design.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahreen Arooj

    Full Text Available Human chymase catalyzes the hydrolysis of peptide bonds. Three chymase inhibitors with very similar chemical structures but highly different inhibitory profiles towards the hydrolase function of chymase were selected with the aim of elucidating the origin of disparities in their biological activities. As a substrate (angiotensin-I bound crystal structure is not available, molecular docking was performed to dock the substrate into the active site. Molecular dynamics simulations of chymase complexes with inhibitors and substrate were performed to calculate the binding orientation of inhibitors and substrate as well as to characterize conformational changes in the active site. The results elucidate details of the 3D chymase structure as well as the importance of K40 in hydrolase function. Binding mode analysis showed that substitution of a heavier Cl atom at the phenyl ring of most active inhibitor produced a great deal of variation in its orientation causing the phosphinate group to interact strongly with residue K40. Dynamics simulations revealed the conformational variation in region of V36-F41 upon substrate and inhibitor binding induced a shift in the location of K40 thus changing its interactions with them. Chymase complexes with the most active compound and substrate were used for development of a hybrid pharmacophore model which was applied in databases screening. Finally, hits which bound well at the active site, exhibited key interactions and favorable electronic properties were identified as possible inhibitors for chymase. This study not only elucidates inhibitory mechanism of chymase inhibitors but also provides key structural insights which will aid in the rational design of novel potent inhibitors of the enzyme. In general, the strategy applied in the current study could be a promising computational approach and may be generally applicable to drug design for other enzymes.

  12. Profiling physicochemical changes within catalyst bodies during preparation: new insights from invasive and noninvasive microspectroscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Alonso, Leticia; Beale, Andrew M; Weckhuysen, Bert M

    2010-09-21

    Cylindrical or spherical catalyst bodies with sizes ranging from tens of micrometers to a few millimeters have a wide variety of industrial applications. They are crucial in the oil refining industry and in the manufacture of bulk and fine chemicals. Their stability, activity, and selectivity are largely dependent on their preparation; thus, achieving the optimum catalyst requires a perfect understanding of the physicochemical processes occurring in a catalyst body during its synthesis. The ultimate goal of the catalyst researcher is to visualize these physicochemical processes as the catalyst is being prepared and without interfering with the system. In order to understand this chemistry and improve catalyst design, researchers need better, less invasive tools to observe this chemistry as it occurs, from the first stages in contact with a precursor all the way through its synthesis. In this Account, we provide an overview of the recent advances in the development of space- and time-resolved spectroscopic methods, from invasive techniques to noninvasive ones, to image the physicochemical processes taking place during the preparation of catalyst bodies. Although several preparation methods are available to produce catalyst bodies, the most common method used in industry is the incipient wetness impregnation. It is the most common method used in industry because it is simple and cost-effective. This method consists of three main steps each of which has an important role in the design of a catalytic material: pore volume impregnation, drying, and thermal treatment. During the impregnation step, the interface between the support surface and the precursor of the active phase at the solid-liquid interface is where the critical synthetic chemistry occurs. Gas-solid and solid-solid interfaces are critical during the drying and thermal treatment steps. Because of the length scale of these catalyst bodies, the interfacial chemistry that occurs during preparation is space

  13. Experimental and Computational Mechanistic Studies Guiding the Rational Design of Molecular Electrocatalysts for Production and Oxidation of Hydrogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raugei, Simone; Helm, Monte L; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon; Appel, Aaron M; O'Hagan, Molly; Wiedner, Eric S; Bullock, R Morris

    2016-01-19

    Understanding how to control the movement of protons and electrons is crucial to the design of fast, efficient electrocatalysts for H2 production and oxidation based on earth-abundant metals. Our work seeks to address fundamental questions about proton movement. We have demonstrated that incorporating a pendant amine functioning as a proton relay in the second coordination sphere of a metal complex helps proton mobility, resulting in faster and more energy-efficient catalysts. Proton-transfer reactions can be rate-limiting and are influenced by several factors, such as pKa values, steric effects, hydrogen bonding, and solvation/desolvation of the exogenous base and acid employed. The presence of multiple protonation sites introduces branching points along the catalytic cycle, making less productive pathways accessible or leading to the formation of stable off-cycle species. Using ligands with only one pendant amine mitigates this problem and results in catalysts with high rates for production of H2, although generally at higher overpotentials. For H2 oxidation catalysts, iron complexes with a high H2 binding affinity were developed. However, these iron complexes had a pKa mismatch between the protonated metal center and the protonated pendant amine, and consequently intramolecular proton movement was slow. Taken altogether, our results demonstrate the necessity of optimizing the entire catalytic cycle because optimization of a specific catalytic step can negatively influence another step and not necessarily lead to a better catalytic performance. We discuss a general procedure, based on thermodynamic arguments, which allows the simultaneous minimization of the free-energy change of each catalytic step, yielding a nearly flat free-energy surface, with no large barriers due to energy mismatches from either high- or low-energy intermediates. PMID:26653114

  14. Catalysts and process for liquid hydrocarbon fuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Mark G.; Ranaweera, Samantha A.; Henry, William P.

    2016-08-02

    The present invention provides a novel process and system in which a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen synthesis gas, or syngas, is converted into hydrocarbon mixtures composed of high quality distillates, gasoline components, and lower molecular weight gaseous olefins in one reactor or step. The invention utilizes a novel supported bimetallic ion complex catalyst for conversion, and provides methods of preparing such novel catalysts and use of the novel catalysts in the process and system of the invention.

  15. An attempt to selectively oxidize methane over supported gold catalysts

    OpenAIRE

    Hereijgers, B.P.C.; Weckhuysen, B. M.

    2011-01-01

    The potential of supported gold catalysts for the selective gas-phase oxidation of methane to methanol with molecular oxygen was investigated. A broad range of supported gold-based catalyst materials was synthesized using reducible and non-reducible support materials. Although the formation of small gold nanoparticles was established for all catalyst materials, only a very low activity for the total oxidation of methane was observed, at temperatures[250 C. Since no traces of partial oxidation...

  16. Design, validation, and absolute sensitivity of a novel test for the molecular detection of avian pneumovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchinato, Mattia; Catelli, Elena; Savage, Carol E; Jones, Richard C; Naylor, Clive J

    2004-11-01

    This study describes attempts to increase and measure sensitivity of molecular tests to detect avian pneumovirus (APV). Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) diagnostic tests were designed for the detection of nucleic acid from an A-type APV genome. The objective was selection of PCR oligonucleotide combinations, which would provide the greatest test sensitivity and thereby enable optimal detection when used for later testing of field materials. Relative and absolute test sensitivities could be determined because of laboratory access to known quantities of purified full-length DNA copies of APV genome derived from the same A-type virus. Four new nested PCR tests were designed in the fusion (F) protein (2 tests), small hydrophobic (SH) protein (1 test), and nucleocapsid (N) protein (1 test) genes and compared with an established test in the attachment (G) protein gene. Known amounts of full-length APV genome were serially diluted 10-fold, and these dilutions were used as templates for the different tests. Sensitivities were found to differ between the tests, the most sensitive being the established G test, which proved able to detect 6,000 copies of the G gene. The G test contained predominantly pyrimidine residues at its 3' termini, and because of this, oligonucleotides for the most sensitive F test were modified to incorporate the same residue types at their 3' termini. This was found to increase sensitivity, so that after full 3' pyrimidine substitutions, the F test became able to detect 600 copies of the F gene.

  17. Design, synthesis, antimicrobial activity and molecular modeling studies of novel benzofuroxan derivatives against Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Salomão Dória; Masunari, Andrea; Rangel-Yagui, Carlota Oliveira; Pasqualoto, Kerly Fernanda Mesquita; Tavares, Leoberto Costa

    2009-04-15

    Molecular modification is a quite promising strategy in the design and development of drug analogs with better bioavailability, higher intrinsic activity and less toxicity. In the search of new leads with potential antimicrobial activity, a new series of 14 4-substituted [N'-(benzofuroxan-5-yl)methylene]benzohydrazides, nifuroxazide derivatives, were synthesized and tested against standard and multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains. The selection of the substituent groups was based on physicochemical properties, such as hydrophobicity and electronic effect. These properties were also evaluated through the lipophilic and electrostatic potential maps, respectively, considering the compounds with better biological profile. Twelve compounds exhibited similar bacteriostatic activity against standard and multidrug-resistant strains. The most active compound was the 4-CF(3) substituted derivative, which presented a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 14.6-13.1 microg/mL, and a ClogP value of 1.87. The results highlight the benzofuroxan derivatives as potential leads for designing new future antimicrobial drug candidates. PMID:19324556

  18. Beyond Fullerenes: Designing Alternative Molecular Electron Acceptors for Solution-Processable Bulk Heterojunction Organic Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauvé, Geneviève; Fernando, Roshan

    2015-09-17

    Organic photovoltaics (OPVs) are promising candidates for providing a low cost, widespread energy source by converting sunlight into electricity. Solution-processable active layers have predominantly consisted of a conjugated polymer donor blended with a fullerene derivative as the acceptor. Although fullerene derivatives have been the acceptor of choice, they have drawbacks such as weak visible light absorption and poor energy tuning that limit overall efficiencies. This has recently fueled new research to explore alternative acceptors that would overcome those limitations. During this exploration, one question arises: what are the important design principles for developing nonfullerene acceptors? It is generally accepted that acceptors should have high electron affinity, electron mobility, and absorption coefficient in the visible and near-IR region of the spectra. In this Perspective, we argue that alternative molecular acceptors, when blended with a conjugated polymer donor, should also have large nonplanar structures to promote nanoscale phase separation, charge separation and charge transport in blend films. Additionally, new material design should address the low dielectric constant of organic semiconductors that have so far limited their widespread application.

  19. Pd Close Coupled Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Hua SHI; Mao Chu GONG; Yao Qiang CHEN

    2006-01-01

    A catalyst comprised novel high surface area alumina support was prepared to control emission of automobiles. The results showed that prepared catalyst could satisfy the requirements of a high performance close coupled catalyst for its good catalytic activity at low temperature and good stability at high temperature.

  20. Metal-Organic Frameworks Stabilize Solution-Inaccessible Cobalt Catalysts for Highly Efficient Broad-Scope Organic Transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Teng; Manna, Kuntal; Lin, Wenbin

    2016-03-01

    New and active earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed to replace precious metal-based catalysts for sustainable production of commodity and fine chemicals. We report here the design of highly robust, active, and reusable cobalt-bipyridine- and cobalt-phenanthroline-based metal-organic framework (MOF) catalysts for alkene hydrogenation and hydroboration, aldehyde/ketone hydroboration, and arene C-H borylation. In alkene hydrogenation, the MOF catalysts tolerated a variety of functional groups and displayed unprecedentedly high turnover numbers of ∼2.5 × 10(6) and turnover frequencies of ∼1.1 × 10(5) h(-1). Structural, computational, and spectroscopic studies show that site isolation of the highly reactive (bpy)Co(THF)2 species in the MOFs prevents intermolecular deactivation and stabilizes solution-inaccessible catalysts for broad-scope organic transformations. Computational, spectroscopic, and kinetic evidence further support a hitherto unknown (bpy(•-))Co(I)(THF)2 ground state that coordinates to alkene and dihydrogen and then undergoing σ-complex-assisted metathesis to form (bpy)Co(alkyl)(H). Reductive elimination of alkane followed by alkene binding completes the catalytic cycle. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for discovering new base-metal molecular catalysts and exhibit enormous potential in sustainable chemical catalysis. PMID:26864496

  1. Metal–Organic Frameworks Stabilize Solution-Inaccessible Cobalt Catalysts for Highly Efficient Broad-Scope Organic Transformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Teng; Manna, Kuntal; Lin, Wenbin (UC)

    2016-05-06

    New and active earth-abundant metal catalysts are critically needed to replace precious metal-based catalysts for sustainable production of commodity and fine chemicals. We report here the design of highly robust, active, and reusable cobalt-bipyridine- and cobalt-phenanthroline-based metal–organic framework (MOF) catalysts for alkene hydrogenation and hydroboration, aldehyde/ketone hydroboration, and arene C–H borylation. In alkene hydrogenation, the MOF catalysts tolerated a variety of functional groups and displayed unprecedentedly high turnover numbers of ~2.5 × 106 and turnover frequencies of ~1.1 × 105 h–1. Structural, computational, and spectroscopic studies show that site isolation of the highly reactive (bpy)Co(THF)2 species in the MOFs prevents intermolecular deactivation and stabilizes solution-inaccessible catalysts for broad-scope organic transformations. Computational, spectroscopic, and kinetic evidence further support a hitherto unknown (bpy•–)CoI(THF)2 ground state that coordinates to alkene and dihydrogen and then undergoing σ-complex-assisted metathesis to form (bpy)Co(alkyl)(H). Reductive elimination of alkane followed by alkene binding completes the catalytic cycle. MOFs thus provide a novel platform for discovering new base-metal molecular catalysts and exhibit enormous potential in sustainable chemical catalysis.

  2. Bio-inspired Design of Electrocatalysts for Oxalate Oxidation: a Combined Experimental and Computational Study of Mn–N–C Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matanovic, Ivana; Babanova, Sofia; Perry, Albert; Serov, Alexey; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen

    2015-05-28

    We report a novel non-platinum group metal (non-PGM) catalyst derived from Mn and amino- antipyrine (MnAAPyr) that shows electrochemical activity towards the oxidation of oxalic acid comparable to Pt with an onset potential for oxalate oxidation measured to be 0.714 * 0.002 V vs. SHE at pH = 4. The material has been synthesized using a templating Sacrificial Support Method with manganese nitrate and 4-aminoantipyrine as precursors. This catalyst is a nano-structured material in which Mn is atomically dispersed on a nitrogendoped graphene matrix. XPS studies reveal high abundance of pyridinic, Mn–Nx, and pyrrolic nitrogen pointing towards the conclusion that pyridinic nitrogen atoms coordinated to manganese constitute the active centers. Thus, the main features of the MnAAPyr catalyst are it exhibits similarity to the active sites of naturally occurring enzymes that are capable of efficient and selective oxidation of oxalic acid. Density functional theory in plane wave formalism with Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof functional was further used to study the stability and activity of different one-metal active centers that could exist in the catalyst. The results show that the stability of the Mn–Nx sites changes in the following order: MnN4 4 MnN3C 4 MnN2C2 4 MnN3. Based on the overpotentials of 0.64 V and 0.71 V vs. SHE, calculated using the free energy diagrams for the oxalate oxidation mechanism, we could conclude that the MnN3C and MnN2C2 sites are most probable Mn–Nx sites responsible for the reported catalytic activity of the new catalyst.

  3. An attempt to selectively oxidize methane over supported gold catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hereijgers, B.P.C.; Weckhuysen, B.M.

    2011-01-01

    The potential of supported gold catalysts for the selective gas-phase oxidation of methane to methanol with molecular oxygen was investigated. A broad range of supported gold-based catalyst materials was synthesized using reducible and non-reducible support materials. Although the formation of small

  4. Rational design of molecularly imprinted polymer: the choice of cross-linker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhammad, Turghun; Nur, Zohre; Piletska, Elena V; Yimit, Osmanjan; Piletsky, Sergey A

    2012-06-01

    The paper describes a rational approach for the selection of cross-linkers during the development of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). As a model system for this research MIPs specific for the drug zidovudine (AZT) were designed and tested. Three cross-linkers trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TRIM), ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) and divinylbenzene (DVB) were studied. The analogue of zidovudine (AZT) ester (AZT-ES) was used as a dummy template. The imprinting factors for all of the polymers in the static adsorption experiments were calculated. The data on the AZT adsorption by control polymers (CP), which were prepared with different cross-linkers without a functional monomer, was also analyzed. DVB was found to be more inert towards zidovudine than EGDMA and TRIM, which was confirmed by both molecular modelling and adsorption experiments. It was demonstrated that DVB-based polymers had a higher imprinting factor (I = 1.85) compared with other tested cross-linked polymers. It was suggested that the selection of the cross-linker should be based on the strength of the interaction with the template: the cross-linker which displays lower binding of the template should be preferential because it generates MIPs with lower non-specific binding and a higher imprinting factor, and therefore specificity. Which cross-linker to use for the preparation of any particular MIP can be determined by analysis of the interactions between the cross-linker and template. This could be done either virtually using computational modelling or by template adsorption using a small library of polymers prepared using different cross-linkers. PMID:22534800

  5. Silica-supported (nBuCp)2ZrCl2: Effect of catalyst active center distribution on ethylene-1-hexene copolymerization

    KAUST Repository

    Atiqullah, Muhammad

    2013-08-12

    Metallocenes are a modern innovation in polyolefin catalysis research. Therefore, two supported metallocene catalysts-silica/MAO/(nBuCp)2ZrCl2 (Catalyst 1) and silica/nBuSnCl3/MAO/(nBuCp)2ZrCl2 (Catalyst 2), where MAO is methylaluminoxane-were synthesized, and subsequently used to prepare, without separate feeding of MAO, ethylene-1-hexene Copolymer 1 and Copolymer 2, respectively. Fouling-free copolymerization, catalyst kinetic stability and production of free-flowing polymer particles (replicating the catalyst particle size distribution) confirmed the occurrence of heterogeneous catalysis. The catalyst active center distribution was modeled by deconvoluting the measured molecular weight distribution and copolymer composition distribution. Five different active center types were predicted for each catalyst, which was corroborated by successive self-nucleation and annealing experiments, as well as by an extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy report published in the literature. Hence, metallocenes impregnated particularly on an MAO-pretreated support may be rightly envisioned to comprise an ensemble of isolated single sites that have varying coordination environments. This study shows how the active center distribution and the design of supported MAO anions affect copolymerization activity, polymerization mechanism and the resulting polymer microstructures. Catalyst 2 showed less copolymerization activity than Catalyst 1. Strong chain transfer and positive co-monomer effect-both by 1-hexene-were common. Each copolymer demonstrated vinyl, vinylidene and trans-vinylene end groups, and compositional heterogeneity. All these findings were explained, as appropriate, considering the modeled active center distribution, MAO cage structure repeat units, proposed catalyst surface chemistry, segregation effects and the literature that concerns and supports this study. While doing so, new insights were obtained. Additionally, future research, along the direction

  6. Collimator design for a dedicated molecular breast imaging-guided biopsy system: Proof-of-concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinmann, Amanda L.; Hruska, Carrie B.; Conners, Amy L.; O' Connor, Michael K. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, 200 First Street SW, Rochester, Minnesota 55905 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: Molecular breast imaging (MBI) is a dedicated nuclear medicine breast imaging modality that employs dual-head cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) gamma cameras to functionally detect breast cancer. MBI has been shown to detect breast cancers otherwise occult on mammography and ultrasound. Currently, a MBI-guided biopsy system does not exist to biopsy such lesions. Our objective was to consider the utility of a novel conical slant-hole (CSH) collimator for rapid (<1 min) and accurate monitoring of lesion position to serve as part of a MBI-guided biopsy system. Methods: An initial CSH collimator design was derived from the dimensions of a parallel-hole collimator optimized for MBI performed with dual-head CZT gamma cameras. The parameters of the CSH collimator included the collimator height, cone slant angle, thickness of septa and cones of the collimator, and the annular areas exposed at the base of the cones. These parameters were varied within the geometric constraints of the MBI system to create several potential CSH collimator designs. The CSH collimator designs were evaluated using Monte Carlo simulations. The model included a breast compressed to a thickness of 6 cm with a 1-cm diameter lesion located 3 cm from the collimator face. The number of particles simulated was chosen to represent the count density of a low-dose, screening MBI study acquired with the parallel-hole collimator for 10 min after a {approx}150 MBq (4 mCi) injection of Tc-99m sestamibi. The same number of particles was used for the CSH collimator simulations. In the resulting simulated images, the count sensitivity, spatial resolution, and accuracy of the lesion depth determined from the lesion profile width were evaluated. Results: The CSH collimator design with default parameters derived from the optimal parallel-hole collimator provided 1-min images with error in the lesion depth estimation of 1.1 {+-} 0.7 mm and over 21 times the lesion count sensitivity relative to 1-min images

  7. The innovation catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roger L

    2011-06-01

    A few years ago the software development company Intuit realized that it needed a new approach to galvanizing customers. The company's Net Promoter Score was faltering, and customer recommendations of new products were especially disappointing. Intuit decided to hold a two-day, off-site meeting for the company's top 300 managers with a focus on the role of design in innovation. One of the days was dedicated to a program called Design for Delight. The centerpiece of the day was a PowerPoint presentation by Intuit founder Scott Cook, who realized midway through that he was no Steve Jobs: The managers listened dutifully, but there was little energy in the room. By contrast, a subsequent exercise in which the participants worked through a design challenge by creating prototypes, getting feedback, iterating, and refining, had them mesmerized. The eventual result was the creation of a team of nine design-thinking coaches--"innovation catalysts"--from across Intuit who were made available to help any work group create prototypes, run experiments, and learn from customers. The process includes a "painstorm" (to determine the customer's greatest pain point), a "soljam" (to generate and then winnow possible solutions), and a "code-jam" (to write code "good enough" to take to customers within two weeks). Design for Delight has enabled employees throughout Intuit to move from satisfying customers to delighting them. PMID:21714388

  8. The innovation catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roger L

    2011-06-01

    A few years ago the software development company Intuit realized that it needed a new approach to galvanizing customers. The company's Net Promoter Score was faltering, and customer recommendations of new products were especially disappointing. Intuit decided to hold a two-day, off-site meeting for the company's top 300 managers with a focus on the role of design in innovation. One of the days was dedicated to a program called Design for Delight. The centerpiece of the day was a PowerPoint presentation by Intuit founder Scott Cook, who realized midway through that he was no Steve Jobs: The managers listened dutifully, but there was little energy in the room. By contrast, a subsequent exercise in which the participants worked through a design challenge by creating prototypes, getting feedback, iterating, and refining, had them mesmerized. The eventual result was the creation of a team of nine design-thinking coaches--"innovation catalysts"--from across Intuit who were made available to help any work group create prototypes, run experiments, and learn from customers. The process includes a "painstorm" (to determine the customer's greatest pain point), a "soljam" (to generate and then winnow possible solutions), and a "code-jam" (to write code "good enough" to take to customers within two weeks). Design for Delight has enabled employees throughout Intuit to move from satisfying customers to delighting them.

  9. Designing and preparation of cytisine alkaloid surface-imprinted material and its molecular recognition characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Baojiao, E-mail: gaobaojiao@126.com [Department of Chemical Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); Bi, Concon [Department of Chemical Engineering, North University of China, Taiyuan 030051 (China); Fan, Li [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shanxi University, Taiyuan 030006 (China)

    2015-03-30

    Highlights: • An elaborate molecular design was well done for molecule surface-imprinting. • The new method of “pre-graft polymerizing and post-imprinting” was used. • Cytisine molecule surface-imprinted material was prepared. • Cytisine surface-imprinting depends on electrostatic interaction between host–guest. • The imprinted material has special recognition selectivity for template cytisine. - Abstract: Based on molecular design, a cytisine surface-imprinted material was prepared using the new surface-imprinting technique of “pre-graft polymerizing and post-imprinting”. The graft-polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) on the surfaces of micron-sized silica gel particles was first performed with a surface-initiating system, preparing the grafted particles PGMA/SiO{sub 2}. Subsequently, a polymer reaction, the ring-opening reaction of the epoxy groups of the grafted PGMA, was conducted with sodium 2,4-diaminobenzene sulfonate (SAS) as reagent, resulting in the functional grafted particles SAS-PGMA/SiO{sub 2}. The adsorption of cytisine on SAS-PGMA/SiO{sub 2} particles reached saturation via strong electrostatic interaction between the sulfonate groups of SAS-PGMA/SiO{sub 2} particles and the protonated N atoms in cytisine molecule. Finally, cytisine surface-imprinting was successfully carried out with glutaraldehyde as crosslinker, obtaining cytisine surface-imprinted material MIP-SASP/SiO{sub 2}. The binding and recognition characteristics of MIP-SASP/SiO{sub 2} towards cytisine were investigated in depth. The experimental results show that there is strong electrostatic interaction between particles and cytisine molecules, and on this basis, cytisine surface-imprinting can be smoothly performed. The surface-imprinted MIP-SASP/SiO{sub 2} has special recognition selectivity and excellent binding affinity for cytisine, and the selectivity coefficients of MIP-SASP/SiO{sub 2} particles for cytisine relative to matrine and oxymatrine, which

  10. Why does the Conductivity of a Nickel Catalyst Increase during Sulfidation? An Exemplary Study Using an In Operando Sensor Device

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Fremerey; Andreas Jess; Ralf Moos

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the sulfidation of a catalyst fixed bed, an in operando single pellet sensor was designed. A catalyst pellet from the fixed bed was electrically contacted and its electrical response was correlated with the catalyst behavior. For the sulfidation tests, a nickel catalyst was used and was sulfidized with H2S. This catalyst had a very low conductivity in the reduced state. During sulfidation, the conductivity of the catalyst increased by decades. A reaction from nickel to nicke...

  11. A systematic investigation of quaternary ammonium ions as asymmetric phase-transfer catalysts. Application of quantitative structure activity/selectivity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denmark, Scott E; Gould, Nathan D; Wolf, Larry M

    2011-06-01

    Although the synthetic utility of asymmetric phase-transfer catalysis continues to expand, the number of proven catalyst types and design criteria remains limited. At the origin of this scarcity is a lack in understanding of how catalyst structural features affect the rate and enantioselectivity of phase transfer catalyzed reactions. Described in this paper is the development of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSAR) and -selectivity relationships (QSSR) for the alkylation of a protected glycine imine with libraries of quaternary ammonium ion catalysts. Catalyst descriptors including ammonium ion accessibility, interfacial adsorption affinity, and partition coefficient were found to correlate meaningfully with catalyst activity. The physical nature of the descriptors was rationalized through differing contributions of the interfacial and extraction mechanisms to the reaction under study. The variation in the observed enantioselectivity was rationalized employing a comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) using both the steric and electrostatic fields of the catalysts. A qualitative analysis of the developed model reveals preferred regions for catalyst binding to afford both configurations of the alkylated product.

  12. Monte Carlo simulation of the PEMFC catalyst layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hongxing; CAO Pengzhen; WANG Yuxin

    2007-01-01

    The performance of the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is greatly controlled by the structure of the catalyst layer.Low catalyst utilization is still a significant obstacle to the commercialization of the PEMFC.In order to get a fundamental understanding of the electrode structure and to find the limiting factor in the low catalyst utilization,it is necessary to develop the mechanical model on the effect of catalyst layer structure on the catalyst utilization and the performance of the PEMFC.In this work,the structure of the catalyst layer is studied based on the lattice model with the Monte Carlo simulation.The model can predict the effects of some catalyst layer components,such as Pt/C catalyst,electrolyte and gas pores,on the utilization of the catalyst and the cell performance.The simulation result shows that the aggregation of conduction grains can greatly affect the degree of catalyst utilization.The better the dispersion of the conduction grains,the larger the total effective area of the catalyst is.To achieve higher utilization,catalyst layer components must be distributed by means of engineered design,which can prevent aggregation.

  13. Design and fabrication of a new class of nano hybrid materials based on reactive polymeric molecular cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, De Suo; Liu, Xiang Yang; Li, Jing Liang; Xu, Hong Yao; Lin, Hong; Chen, Yu Yue

    2013-09-10

    This paper describes a strategy of fabricating a new class of nano hybrid particles in terms of the "nanocages" of reactive molecular matrices/networks. The concept is to design molecular matrices functionalized with particular reactive groups, which can on-site synthesize and fix nanoparticles at the designated positions of the molecular networks. The cages of the molecular networks impose the confinement and protection to the nanoparticles so that the size and the stability of nano hybrid particles can be better controlled. To this end, polyamide network polymers (PNP) were synthesized and adopted as the reactive molecular cages for the control of silver nanoparticles formation. It follows that the silver nano hybrid particles fabricated by this method have an average diameter of 4.34 nm much smaller than any other or similar methods ie by a hyperbranched polyamide polymer (HB-PA). As per our design, the size of the silver nano hybrid particles can also be tuned by controlling the molar ratio between silver ions and the functional groups in the polymeric matrices. The silver nano hybrid particles reveal the substantially enhanced stability in aqueous solutions, which gives rise to the long stable performance of localized surface plasmon resonance. As the nano hybrid particles display long eminent nanoeffects, they exert broad implications for a wide range of applications such as biomedicine, catalysis, and optoelectronics. PMID:23980927

  14. Molecular design driving tetraporphyrin self-assembly on graphite: a joint STM, electrochemical and computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Garah, M.; Santana Bonilla, A.; Ciesielski, A.; Gualandi, A.; Mengozzi, L.; Fiorani, A.; Iurlo, M.; Marcaccio, M.; Gutierrez, R.; Rapino, S.; Calvaresi, M.; Zerbetto, F.; Cuniberti, G.; Cozzi, P. G.; Paolucci, F.; Samorì, P.

    2016-07-01

    Tuning the intermolecular interactions among suitably designed molecules forming highly ordered self-assembled monolayers is a viable approach to control their organization at the supramolecular level. Such a tuning is particularly important when applied to sophisticated molecules combining functional units which possess specific electronic properties, such as electron/energy transfer, in order to develop multifunctional systems. Here we have synthesized two tetraferrocene-porphyrin derivatives that by design can selectively self-assemble at the graphite/liquid interface into either face-on or edge-on monolayer-thick architectures. The former supramolecular arrangement consists of two-dimensional planar networks based on hydrogen bonding among adjacent molecules whereas the latter relies on columnar assembly generated through intermolecular van der Waals interactions. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) at the solid-liquid interface has been corroborated by cyclic voltammetry measurements and assessed by theoretical calculations to gain multiscale insight into the arrangement of the molecule with respect to the basal plane of the surface. The STM analysis allowed the visualization of these assemblies with a sub-nanometer resolution, and cyclic voltammetry measurements provided direct evidence of the interactions of porphyrin and ferrocene with the graphite surface and offered also insight into the dynamics within the face-on and edge-on assemblies. The experimental findings were supported by theoretical calculations to shed light on the electronic and other physical properties of both assemblies. The capability to engineer the functional nanopatterns through self-assembly of porphyrins containing ferrocene units is a key step toward the bottom-up construction of multifunctional molecular nanostructures and nanodevices.Tuning the intermolecular interactions among suitably designed molecules forming highly ordered self-assembled monolayers is a viable approach to

  15. Design and Synthesis of a Highly Stable Six-hydrogen-bonded Self-assembly Yellowish Green Electroluminescent Molecular Duplex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the design, synthesis and characterization of a hydrogen-bonded molecular duplex with 1,8-naphthalimide fluorescent pendants. The two oligoamide molecular strands, with complementary hydrogen bond sequences of DDADAA and AADADD, caa form an ultra stable self-assembly duplex. Its molecular structure was confirmed by 1H NMR and ESI-MS, and its photoluminescence properties were determined. The resulting duplex exhibited a dramatically enhanced photoluminescence (PL) quantum efficiency of 63.7% compared to the corresponding 1,8-naphthalimide segment (32.4%), suggesting that the formation of the duplex with larger molecular weight could successfully inhibit the quenching of the fluorescent pendant.This novel duplex is a prospective candidate for new electroluminescent emitter.

  16. Applying universal scaling laws to identify the best molecular design paradigms for second-order nonlinear optics

    CERN Document Server

    Perez-Moreno, Javier; Kuzyk, Mark G

    2016-01-01

    We apply scaling and the theory of the fundamental limits of the second-order molecular susceptibility to identify material classes with ultralarge nonlinear-optical response. Size effects are removed by normalizing all nonlinearities to get intrinsic values so that the scaling behavior of a series of molecular homologues can be determined. Several new figures of merit are proposed that quantify the desirable properties for molecules that can be designed by adding a sequence of repeat units, and used in the assessment of the data. Three molecular classes are found. They are characterized by sub-scaling, nominal scaling, or super-scaling. Super-scaling homologues most efficiently take advantage of increased size. We apply our approach to data currently available in the literature to identify the best super-scaling molecular paradigms with the aim of identifying desirable traits of new materials.

  17. Polypropylene obtained through zeolite supported catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Queli C. Bastos

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Propylene polymerizations were carried out with f2C(Flu(CpZrCl2 and SiMe2(Ind2ZrCl2 catalysts supported on silica, zeolite sodic mordenite (NaM and acid mordenite (HM. The polymerizations were performed at different temperatures and varying aluminium/zirconium molar ratios ([Al]/[Zr]. The effect of these reaction parameters on the catalyst activity was investigated using a proposed statistical experimental planning. In the case of f2C(Flu(CpZrCl2, SiO2 and NaM were used as support and the catalyst performance evaluated using toluene and pentane as polymerization solvent. The molecular weight, molecular weight distribution, melting point and crystallinity of the polymers were examined. The results indicate very high activities for the syndiospecific heterogeneous system. Also, the polymers obtained had superior Mw and stereoregularity.

  18. Polypropylene obtained through zeolite supported catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Propylene polymerizations were carried out with φ2C(Flu)(Cp)ZrCl2 and SiMe2(Ind)2ZrCl2 catalysts supported on silica, zeolite sodic mordenite (NaM) and acid mordenite (HM). The polymerizations were performed at different temperatures and varying aluminium/zirconium molar ratios ([Al]/[Zr]). The effect of these reaction parameters on the catalyst activity was investigated using a proposed statistical experimental planning. In the case of f2C(Flu)(Cp)ZrCl2, SiO2 and NaM were used as support and the catalyst performance evaluated using toluene and pentane as polymerization solvent. The molecular weight, molecular weight distribution, melting point and crystallinity of the polymers were examined. The results indicate very high activities for the syndiospecific heterogeneous system. Also, the polymers obtained had superior Mw and stereo regularity. (author)

  19. Molecular design driving tetraporphyrin self-assembly on graphite: a joint STM, electrochemical and computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Garah, M; Santana Bonilla, A; Ciesielski, A; Gualandi, A; Mengozzi, L; Fiorani, A; Iurlo, M; Marcaccio, M; Gutierrez, R; Rapino, S; Calvaresi, M; Zerbetto, F; Cuniberti, G; Cozzi, P G; Paolucci, F; Samorì, P

    2016-07-14

    Tuning the intermolecular interactions among suitably designed molecules forming highly ordered self-assembled monolayers is a viable approach to control their organization at the supramolecular level. Such a tuning is particularly important when applied to sophisticated molecules combining functional units which possess specific electronic properties, such as electron/energy transfer, in order to develop multifunctional systems. Here we have synthesized two tetraferrocene-porphyrin derivatives that by design can selectively self-assemble at the graphite/liquid interface into either face-on or edge-on monolayer-thick architectures. The former supramolecular arrangement consists of two-dimensional planar networks based on hydrogen bonding among adjacent molecules whereas the latter relies on columnar assembly generated through intermolecular van der Waals interactions. Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (STM) at the solid-liquid interface has been corroborated by cyclic voltammetry measurements and assessed by theoretical calculations to gain multiscale insight into the arrangement of the molecule with respect to the basal plane of the surface. The STM analysis allowed the visualization of these assemblies with a sub-nanometer resolution, and cyclic voltammetry measurements provided direct evidence of the interactions of porphyrin and ferrocene with the graphite surface and offered also insight into the dynamics within the face-on and edge-on assemblies. The experimental findings were supported by theoretical calculations to shed light on the electronic and other physical properties of both assemblies. The capability to engineer the functional nanopatterns through self-assembly of porphyrins containing ferrocene units is a key step toward the bottom-up construction of multifunctional molecular nanostructures and nanodevices. PMID:27376633

  20. Molecular Electrical Doping of Organic Semiconductors: Fundamental Mechanisms and Emerging Dopant Design Rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzmann, Ingo; Heimel, Georg; Oehzelt, Martin; Winkler, Stefanie; Koch, Norbert

    2016-03-15

    Today's information society depends on our ability to controllably dope inorganic semiconductors, such as silicon, thereby tuning their electrical properties to application-specific demands. For optoelectronic devices, organic semiconductors, that is, conjugated polymers and molecules, have emerged as superior alternative owing to the ease of tuning their optical gap through chemical variability and their potential for low-cost, large-area processing on flexible substrates. There, the potential of molecular electrical doping for improving the performance of, for example, organic light-emitting devices or organic solar cells has only recently been established. The doping efficiency, however, remains conspicuously low, highlighting the fact that the underlying mechanisms of molecular doping in organic semiconductors are only little understood compared with their inorganic counterparts. Here, we review the broad range of phenomena observed upon molecularly doping organic semiconductors and identify two distinctly different scenarios: the pairwise formation of both organic semiconductor and dopant ions on one hand and the emergence of ground state charge transfer complexes between organic semiconductor and dopant through supramolecular hybridization of their respective frontier molecular orbitals on the other hand. Evidence for the occurrence of these two scenarios is subsequently discussed on the basis of the characteristic and strikingly different signatures of the individual species involved in the respective doping processes in a variety of spectroscopic techniques. The critical importance of a statistical view of doping, rather than a bimolecular picture, is then highlighted by employing numerical simulations, which reveal one of the main differences between inorganic and organic semiconductors to be their respective density of electronic states and the doping induced changes thereof. Engineering the density of states of doped organic semiconductors, the Fermi

  1. Towards the design of new and improved drilling fluid additives using molecular dynamics simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard L. Anderson

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available During exploration for oil and gas, a technical drilling fluid is used to lubricate the drill bit, maintain hydrostatic pressure, transmit sensor readings, remove rock cuttings and inhibit swelling of unstable clay based reactive shale formations. Increasing environmental awareness and resulting legislation has led to the search for new, improved biodegradable drilling fluid components. In the case of additives for clay swelling inhibition, an understanding of how existing effective additives interact with clays must be gained to allow the design of improved molecules. Owing to the disordered nature and nanoscopic dimension of the interlayer pores of clay minerals, computer simulations have become an increasingly useful tool for studying clay-swelling inhibitor interactions. In this work we briefly review the history of the development of technical drilling fluids, the environmental impact of drilling fluids and the use of computer simulations to study the interactions between clay minerals and swelling inhibitors. We report on results from some recent large-scale molecular dynamics simulation studies on low molecular weight water-soluble macromolecular inhibitor molecules. The structure and interactions of poly(propylene oxide-diamine, poly(ethylene glycol and poly(ethylene oxide-diacrylate inhibitor molecules with montmorillonite clay are studied.Durante a exploração de óleo e gás um fluido de perfuração é usado para lubrificar 'bit' da perfuradora, manter a pressão hidrostática, transmitir sensores de leitura, remover resíduos da rocha e inibir o inchamento da argila instável baseada nas formações dos folhelhos. O aumento das preocupações ambientais bem como a legislação resultante levou à procura de novos fluidos de perfuração com componentes biodegradáveis. No caso dos aditivos para inibir o inchamento das argilas o entendimento das interações entre os aditivos e as argilas tem que ser adquirido para permitir o

  2. Designing a Highly Active Metal-Free Oxygen Reduction Catalyst in Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Alkaline Fuel Cells: Effects of Pore Size and Doping-Site Position.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seonggyu; Choun, Myounghoon; Ye, Youngjin; Lee, Jaeyoung; Mun, Yeongdong; Kang, Eunae; Hwang, Jongkook; Lee, Young-Ho; Shin, Chae-Ho; Moon, Seung-Hyeon; Kim, Soo-Kil; Lee, Eunsung; Lee, Jinwoo

    2015-08-01

    To promote the oxygen reduction reaction of metal-free catalysts, the introduction of porous structure is considered as a desirable approach because the structure can enhance mass transport and host many catalytic active sites. However, most of the previous studies reported only half-cell characterization; therefore, studies on membrane electrode assembly (MEA) are still insufficient. Furthermore, the effect of doping-site position in the structure has not been investigated. Here, we report the synthesis of highly active metal-free catalysts in MEAs by controlling pore size and doping-site position. Both influence the accessibility of reactants to doping sites, which affects utilization of doping sites and mass-transport properties. Finally, an N,P-codoped ordered mesoporous carbon with a large pore size and precisely controlled doping-site position showed a remarkable on-set potential and produced 70% of the maximum power density obtained using Pt/C. PMID:26087961

  3. Design, Development and Implementation of a Technology Enhanced Hybrid Course on Molecular Symmetry: Students' Outcomes and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonoglou, L. D.; Charistos, N. D.; Sigalas, M. P.

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid course of Molecular Symmetry and Group Theory which combines traditional face-to-face instruction with an online web enhanced learning environment within a Course Management System was designed, developed, and implemented with a purpose to establish an active and student-centred educational setting. Multi-representational educational…

  4. The Impact of Designing and Evaluating Molecular Animations on How Well Middle School Students Understand the Particulate Nature of Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hsin-Yi; Quintana, Chris; Krajcik, Joseph S.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we investigated whether the understanding of the particulate nature of matter by students was improved by allowing them to design and evaluate molecular animations of chemical phenomena. We developed Chemation, a learner-centered animation tool, to allow seventh-grade students to construct flipbook-like simple animations to show…

  5. Exploring the boundaries of a light-driven molecular motor design : new sterically overcrowded alkenes with preferred direction of rotation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Delden, Richard; ter Wiel, Matthijs; de Jong, Herman; Meetsma, Auke; Feringa, Bernard

    2004-01-01

    Insight in the steric and electronic parameters governing isomerization processes in artificial molecular motors is essential in order to design more advanced motor systems. A subtle balance of steric parameters and the combination of helical and central chirality are key features of light-driven un

  6. ADVANCED MOLECULAR DESIGN OF BIOPOLYMERS FOR TRANSMUCOSAL AND INTRACELLULAR DELIVERY OF CHEMOTHERAPEUTIC AGENTS AND BIOLOGICAL THERAPEUTICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liechty, William B.; Caldorera-Moore, Mary; Phillips, Margaret A.; Schoener, Cody; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogels have been instrumental in the development of polymeric systems for controlled release of therapeutic agents. These materials are attractive for transmucosal and intracellular drug delivery because of their facile synthesis, inherent biocompatibility, tunable physicochemical properties, and capacity to respond to various physiological stimuli. In this contribution, we outline a multifaceted hydrogel-based approach for expanding the range of therapeutics in oral formulations from classical small-molecule drugs to include proteins, chemotherapeutics, and nucleic acids. Through judicious materials selection and careful design of copolymer composition and molecular architecture, we can engineer systems capable of responding to distinct physiological cues, with tunable physicochemical properties that are optimized to load, protect, and deliver valuable macromolecular payloads to their intended site of action. These hydrogel carriers, including complexation hydrogels, tethered hydrogels, interpenetrating networks, nanoscale hydrogels, and hydrogels with decorated structures are investigated for their ability respond to changes in pH, to load and release insulin and fluorescein, and remain non-toxic to Caco-2 cells. Our results suggest these novel hydrogel networks have great potential for controlled delivery of proteins, chemotherapeutics, and nucleic acids. PMID:21699934

  7. Chalcone based azacarboline analogues as novel antitubulin agents: design, synthesis, biological evaluation and molecular modelling studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sahil; Kaur, Charanjit; Budhiraja, Abhishek; Nepali, Kunal; Gupta, Manish K; Saxena, A K; Bedi, P M S

    2014-10-01

    The present study involves the design of a series of 3-aryl-9-acetyl-pyridazino[3,4-b]indoles as constrained chalcone analogues. A retrosynthetic route was proposed for the synthesis of target compounds. All the synthesized compounds were evaluated for in-vitro cytotoxicity against THP-1, COLO-205, HCT-116 and A-549 human cancer cell lines. The results indicated that 2a, 3a, 5a and 6a possessed significant cytotoxic potential with an IC50 value ranging from 1.13 to 5.76 μM. Structure activity relationship revealed that the nature of both Ring A and Ring B influences the activity. Substitution of methoxy groups on the phenyl ring (Ring A) and unsubstituted phenyl ring (Ring B) were found to be the preferred structural features. The most potent compound 2a was further tested for tubulin inhibition. Compound 2a was found to significantly inhibit the tubulin polymerization (IC50 value - 2.41 μM against THP-1). Compound 2a also caused disruption of microtubule assembly as evidenced by Immunoflourescence technique. The significant cytotoxicity and tubulin inhibition by 2a was rationalized by molecular modelling studies. The most potent structure was docked at colchicine binding site (PDB ID-1SA0) and was found to be stabilized in the cavity via various hydrophobic and hydrogen bonding interactions. PMID:25128667

  8. Tumor Heterogeneity: Mechanisms and Bases for a Reliable Application of Molecular Marker Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador J. Diaz-Cano

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Tumor heterogeneity is a confusing finding in the assessment of neoplasms, potentially resulting in inaccurate diagnostic, prognostic and predictive tests. This tumor heterogeneity is not always a random and unpredictable phenomenon, whose knowledge helps designing better tests. The biologic reasons for this intratumoral heterogeneity would then be important to understand both the natural history of neoplasms and the selection of test samples for reliable analysis. The main factors contributing to intratumoral heterogeneity inducing gene abnormalities or modifying its expression include: the gradient ischemic level within neoplasms, the action of tumor microenvironment (bidirectional interaction between tumor cells and stroma, mechanisms of intercellular transference of genetic information (exosomes, and differential mechanisms of sequence-independent modifications of genetic material and proteins. The intratumoral heterogeneity is at the origin of tumor progression and it is also the byproduct of the selection process during progression. Any analysis of heterogeneity mechanisms must be integrated within the process of segregation of genetic changes in tumor cells during the clonal expansion and progression of neoplasms. The evaluation of these mechanisms must also consider the redundancy and pleiotropism of molecular pathways, for which appropriate surrogate markers would support the presence or not of heterogeneous genetics and the main mechanisms responsible. This knowledge would constitute a solid scientific background for future therapeutic planning.

  9. Molecular Design for Tailoring a Single-Source Precursor for Bismuth Ferrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendt, Georg; Schiwon, Rafael; Salamon, Soma; Landers, Joachim; Hagemann, Ulrich; Limberg, Christian; Wende, Heiko; Schulz, Stephan

    2016-08-01

    Nearly phase-pure bismuth ferrite particles were formed by thermolysis of the single-source precursor [Cp(CO)2FeBi(OAc)2] (1) in octadecene at 245 °C, followed by subsequent calcination at 600 °C for 3 h. In contrast, the slightly modified compound [Cp(CO)2FeBi(O2C(t)Bu)2] (2) yielded only mixtures of different bismuth oxide phases, revealing the distinctive influence of molecular design in material synthesis. The chemical composition, morphology, and crystallinity of the resulting materials were investigated by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. In addition, the optical properties were investigated by Fourier transform infrared and UV-vis spectroscopies, showing a strong band gap absorption in the visible range at 590 nm (2.2 eV). The magnetic behavior was probed by vibrating-sample and superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, as well as (57)Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy. PMID:27391769

  10. A QSAR study and molecular design of benzothiazole derivatives as potent anticancer agents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) of a series of benzothiazole derivatives showing a potent and selective cytotoxicity against a tumorigenic cell line has been studied by using the density functional theory (DFT), molecular mechanics (MM+) and statistical methods, and the QSAR equation was established via a correlation analysis and a stepwise regression analysis. A new scheme determining outliers by "leave-one-out" (LOO) cross-validation coefficient (q2n-i) was suggested and successfully used. In the established optimal equation (excluding two outliers), the steric parameter (MRR) and the net charge (QFR) of the first atom of the substituent (R), as well as the square of hydrophobic parameter (lgP)2 of the whole molecule, are the main independent factors contributing to the anticancer activities of the compounds. The fitting correlation coefficient (R2) and the cross-validation coefficient (q2) values are 0.883 and 0.797, respectively. It indicates that this model has a significantly statistical quality and an excellent prediction ability. Based on the QSAR studies, 4 new compounds with high predicted anticancer activities have been theoretically designed and they are expected to be confirmed experimentally.

  11. Molecular Design of Bioinspired Nanostructures for Biomedical Applications: Synthesis, Self-Assembly and Functional Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hesheng Victor; Zheng, Xin Ting; Mok, Beverly Yin Leng; Ibrahim, Salwa Ali; Yu, Yong; Tan, Yen Nee

    2016-08-01

    Biomolecules are the nanoscale building blocks of cells, which play multifaceted roles in the critical biological processes such as biomineralization in a living organism. In these processes, the biological molecules such as protein and nucleic acids use their exclusive biorecognition properties enabled from their unique chemical composition, shape and function to initiate a cascade of cellular events. The exceptional features of these biomolecules, coupled with the recent advancement in nanotechnology, have led to the emergence of a new research field that focuses on the molecular design of bioinspired nanostructures that inherit the extraordinary function of natural biomaterials. These “bioinspired” nanostructures could be formulated by biomimetic approaches through either self-assembling of biomolecules or acting as a biomolecular template/precursor to direct the synthesis of nanocomposite. In either situation, the resulting nanomaterials exhibit phenomenal biocompatibility, superb aqueous solubility and excellent colloidal stability, branding them exceptionally desirable for both in vitro and in vivo biomedical applications. In this review, we will present the recent developments in the preparation of “bioinspired” nanostructures through biomimetic self-assembly and biotemplating synthesis, as well as highlight their functional properties and potential applications in biomedical diagnostics and therapeutic delivery. Lastly, we will conclude this topic with some personal perspective on the challenges and future outlooks of the “bioinspired” nanostructures for nanomedicine.

  12. Design of a multi-purpose fragment screening library using molecular complexity and orthogonal diversity metrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Wan F; Withka, Jane M; Hepworth, David; Magee, Thomas V; Du, Yuhua J; Bakken, Gregory A; Miller, Michael D; Hendsch, Zachary S; Thanabal, Venkataraman; Kolodziej, Steve A; Xing, Li; Hu, Qiyue; Narasimhan, Lakshmi S; Love, Robert; Charlton, Maura E; Hughes, Samantha; van Hoorn, Willem P; Mills, James E

    2011-07-01

    Fragment Based Drug Discovery (FBDD) continues to advance as an efficient and alternative screening paradigm for the identification and optimization of novel chemical matter. To enable FBDD across a wide range of pharmaceutical targets, a fragment screening library is required to be chemically diverse and synthetically expandable to enable critical decision making for chemical follow-up and assessing new target druggability. In this manuscript, the Pfizer fragment library design strategy which utilized multiple and orthogonal metrics to incorporate structure, pharmacophore and pharmacological space diversity is described. Appropriate measures of molecular complexity were also employed to maximize the probability of detection of fragment hits using a variety of biophysical and biochemical screening methods. In addition, structural integrity, purity, solubility, fragment and analog availability as well as cost were important considerations in the selection process. Preliminary analysis of primary screening results for 13 targets using NMR Saturation Transfer Difference (STD) indicates the identification of uM-mM hits and the uniqueness of hits at weak binding affinities for these targets.

  13. Guidance to Design Grain Boundary Mobility Experiments with Molecular Dynamics and Phase-Field Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael R Tonks; Yongfeng Zhang; S.B. Biner; Paul C Millett; Xianming Bai

    2013-02-01

    Quantitative phase-field modeling can play an important role in designing experiments to measure the grain boundary (GB) mobility. In this work, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is employed to determine the GB mobility using Cu bicrystals. Two grain configurations are considered: a shrinking circular grain and a half loop grain. The results obtained from the half loop configuration approaches asymptotically to that obtained from the circular configuration with increasing half loop width. We then verify the phase- field model by directly comparing to the MD simulation results, obtaining excellent agreement. Next, this phase-field model is used to predict the behavior in a common experimental setup that utilizes a half loop grain configuration in a bicrystal to measure the GB mobility. With a 3D simulation, we identify the two critical times within the experiments to reach an accurate value of the GB mobility. We use a series of 2D simulations to investigate the impact of the notch angle on these two critical times and we identify an angle of 60? as an optimal value. We also show that if the notch does not have a sharp tip, it may immobilize the GB migration indefinitely.

  14. Donepezil-like multifunctional agents: Design, synthesis, molecular modeling and biological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming-Yu; Esteban, Gerard; Brogi, Simone; Shionoya, Masahi; Wang, Li; Campiani, Giuseppe; Unzeta, Mercedes; Inokuchi, Tsutomu; Butini, Stefania; Marco-Contelles, Jose

    2016-10-01

    Currently available drugs against Alzheimer's disease (AD) are only able to ameliorate the disease symptoms resulting in a moderate improvement in memory and cognitive function without any efficacy in preventing and inhibiting the progression of the pathology. In an effort to obtain disease-modifying anti-Alzheimer's drugs (DMAADs) following the multifactorial nature of AD, we have recently developed multifunctional compounds. We herein describe the design, synthesis, molecular modeling and biological evaluation of a new series of donepezil-related compounds possessing metal chelating properties, and being capable of targeting different enzymatic systems related to AD (cholinesterases, ChEs, and monoamine oxidase A, MAO-A). Among this set of analogues compound 5f showed excellent ChEs inhibition potency and a selective MAO-A inhibition (vs MAO-B) coupled to strong complexing properties for zinc and copper ions, both known to be involved in the progression of AD. Moreover, 5f exhibited moderate antioxidant properties as found by in vitro assessment. This compound represents a novel donepezil-hydroxyquinoline hybrid with DMAAD profile paving the way to the development of a novel class of drugs potentially able to treat AD.

  15. Discovery and design of cyclic peptides as dengue virus inhibitors through structure-based molecular docking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sobia Idrees; Usman Ali Ashfaq

    2014-01-01

    Objective:To find potential peptide inhibitors against theNS2B/NS3 protease ofDENV which in turn, can inhibit the viral replication inside host cell.Methods:Cyclic peptides were designed having combination of positively charged amino acids usingChemSketch software and were converted to3D structures.DENVNS3 protein structure was retrieved fromProteinDataBank (PDB) usingPDBId:2FOM.DENVNS3 and cylic peptides were docked usingMOE software after structural optimization.Results:Through molecular docking it was revealed that most of the peptides bound deeply in the binding pocket ofDENVNS2B/NS3 protease an had interactions with catalytic triad.Peptide2 successfully blocked the catalytic triad ofNS2B/NS3 protease. Peptide1, ,4 and6 also had potential interactions with active residues of theNS2B/NS3 protease while all other peptides were in close contact with the active sites ofNS2B/NS3 protease thus, these peptides can serve as a potential drug candidate to stop viral replication.Conclusions:Thus, it can be concluded from the study that these peptides could serve as important inhibitors to inhibit the viral replication and need further in-vitro investigations to confirm their efficacy.

  16. Development of a model for the rational design of molecular imprinted polymer: Computational approach for combined molecular dynamics/quantum mechanics calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Cunku [Department of Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Li Xin, E-mail: lixin@hit.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Guo Zechong [School of Municipal Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Qi Jingyao, E-mail: jyq@hit.edu.cn [School of Municipal Environmental Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China)

    2009-08-04

    A new rational approach for the preparation of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) based on the combination of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and quantum mechanics (QM) calculations is described in this work. Before performing molecular modeling, a virtual library of functional monomers was created containing forty frequently used monomers. The MD simulations were first conducted to screen the top three monomers from virtual library in each porogen-acetonitrile, chloroform and carbon tetrachloride. QM simulations were then performed with an aim to select the optimum monomer and progen solvent in which the QM simulations were carried out; the monomers giving the highest binding energies were chosen as the candidate to prepare MIP in its corresponding solvent. The acetochlor, a widely used herbicide, was chosen as the target analyte. According to the theoretical calculation results, the MIP with acetochlor as template was prepared by emulsion polymerization method using N,N-methylene bisacrylamide (MBAAM) as functional monomer and divinylbenzene (DVB) as cross-linker in chloroform. The synthesized MIP was then tested by equilibrium-adsorption method, and the MIP demonstrated high removal efficiency to the acetochlor. Mulliken charge distribution and {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy of the synthesized MIP provided insight on the nature of recognition during the imprinting process probing the governing interactions for selective binding site formation at a molecular level. We think the computer simulation method first proposed in this paper is a novel and reliable method for the design and synthesis of MIP.

  17. Molecular modeling methods in the study and design of bioactive compounds: An introduction [Métodos de Modelagem Molecular para estudo e planejamento de compostos bioativos: Uma introdução

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Mauricio R. Sant´Anna

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an introduction to the main methods used in molecular modeling calculations applied in the design of bioactive compounds. An introductory description of the two approaches methods predominantly used in molecular modeling studies is presented: the classical approach, which includes molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics; and the quantum mechanical approach, which includes ab initio and semi-empirical methods. We discuss how these methods can be applied to determine the ...

  18. Modular Homogeneous Chromophore-Catalyst Assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulfort, Karen L; Utschig, Lisa M

    2016-05-17

    supramolecular photocatalyst based on the [Ru(bpy)3](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine) light-harvesting module with cobaloxime-based catalyst module are compared, with progress in stabilizing photoinduced charge separation identified. These same modules embedded in the small electron transfer protein ferredoxin exhibit much longer charge-separation, enabled by stepwise electron transfer through the native [2Fe-2S] cofactor. We anticipate that the use of interchangeable, molecular modules which can interact in different coordination geometries or within entirely different structural platforms will provide important fundamental insights into the effect of environment on parameters such as electron transfer and charge separation, and ultimately drive more efficient designs for artificial photosynthesis.

  19. Computer-Assisted Drug Design: Genetic Algorithms and Structures of Molecular Clusters of Aromatic Hydrocarbons and Actinomycin D-Deoxyguanosine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yong Liang

    Molecular packing, clustering, and docking computations have been performed by empirical intermolecular energy minimization methods. The main focus of this study is finding a robust global search algorithm to solve intermolecular interaction problems, especially to apply an efficient algorithm to large-scale complex molecular systems such as drug-DNA binding or site selectivity which has increasing importance in drug design and drug discovery. Molecular packing in benzene, naphthalene, and anthracene crystals is analyzed in terms of molecular dimer interaction. Intermolecular energies of the gas dimer molecules are calculated for various intermolecular distances and orientations using empirical potential energy functions. The gas dimers are compared to pairs of molecules extracted from the observed crystal structures. Net atomic charges are obtained by the potential-derived method from 6-31G and 6-31G^{**} level ab initio wavefunctions. A new approach using a genetic algorithm is applied to predict structures of benzene, naphthalene, and anthracene molecular clusters. The computer program GAME (genetic algorithm for minimization of energy) has been developed to obtain the global energy minimum of clusters of dimer, trimer, and tetramer molecules. This test model has been further developed to applications of molecular docking. Docking calculations of deoxyguanosine molecules to actinomycin D were performed successfully to identify the binding sites of the drug molecule, which was revealed by actinomycin D-deoxyguanosine complex from the solved x-ray crystal structure. The comparison between the evolutionary computing method and conventional local optimization methods concluded that genetic algorithms are very competitive when it comes to complex, large-scale optimization. Full power of genetic algorithms can be unveiled in computer-assisted drug design only when the difficulties of including optimized molecular conformation in the algorithm are overcome. These

  20. Molecular mechanics approach for design and conformational studies of macrocyclic ligands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computational Chemistry has revolutionized way of viewing molecules at the quantum mechanical scale by allowing simulating various chemical scenarios that are not possible to study in a laboratory. The remarkable applications of computational chemistry have promoted to design and test of the effectiveness of various methods for searching the conformational space of highly flexible molecules. In this context, we conducted a series of optimization and conformational searches on macrocyclic based ligands, 9N3Me5Ox, (1,4,7-tris(5-methyl-8-hydroxyquinoline)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane) and 12N3Me5Ox, (1,5,9-tris(5-methyl-8-hydroxyquinoline)-1,5,9-triazacyclododecane) and studied their selectivity and coordination behavior with some lanthanide metal ions in molecular mechanics and semiempirical methods. The methods include both systematic and random conformational searches for dihedral angles, torsion angles and Cartesian coordinates. Structural studies were carried out by using geometry optimization, coordination scans and electronic properties were evaluated. The results clearly show that chair-boat conformational isomer of 9N3Me5Ox ligand is more stable due to lower eclipsing ethane interaction and form stronger adduct complexes with lanthanide metal ion. This is because of the fact that, in a central unit of 9N3 of the ligand form six endo type bonds out of nine. The rest of bonds have trans conformation. In contrast, for the adduct of 12N3Me5Ox, two C-C bonds have on eclipsed conformation, and others have synclinal and antiperiplanar confirmations. The distortion of the two eclipsed conformations may affect the yields and the stability of the complexes

  1. Designing molecular dynamics simulations to shift populations of the conformational states of calmodulin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayse Ozlem Aykut

    Full Text Available We elucidate the mechanisms that lead to population shifts in the conformational states of calcium-loaded calmodulin (Ca(2+-CaM. We design extensive molecular dynamics simulations to classify the effects that are responsible for adopting occupied conformations available in the ensemble of NMR structures. Electrostatic interactions amongst the different regions of the protein and with its vicinal water are herein mediated by lowering the ionic strength or the pH. Amino acid E31, which is one of the few charged residues whose ionization state is highly sensitive to pH differences in the physiological range, proves to be distinctive in its control of population shifts. E31A mutation at low ionic strength results in a distinct change from an extended to a compact Ca(2+-CaM conformation within tens of nanoseconds, that otherwise occur on the time scales of microseconds. The kinked linker found in this particular compact form is observed in many of the target-bound forms of Ca(2+-CaM, increasing the binding affinity. This mutation is unique in controlling C-lobe dynamics by affecting the fluctuations between the EF-hand motif helices. We also monitor the effect of the ionic strength on the conformational multiplicity of Ca(2+-CaM. By lowering the ionic strength, the tendency of nonspecific anions in water to accumulate near the protein surface increases, especially in the vicinity of the linker. The change in the distribution of ions in the vicinal layer of water allows N- and C- lobes to span a wide variety of relative orientations that are otherwise not observed at physiological ionic strength. E31 protonation restores the conformations associated with physiological environmental conditions even at low ionic strength.

  2. Hydration Free Energy as a Molecular Descriptor in Drug Design: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Ayesha; Reynisson, Jóhannes

    2016-05-01

    In this work the idea was investigated whether calculated hydration energy (ΔGhyd ) can be used as a molecular descriptor in defining promising regions of chemical space for drug design. Calculating ΔGhyd using the Density Solvation Model (SMD) in conjunction with the density functional theory (DFT) gave an excellent correlation with experimental values. Furthermore, calculated ΔGhyd correlates reasonably well with experimental water solubility (r(2) =0.545) and also log P (r(2) =0.530). Three compound collections were used: Known drugs (n=150), drug-like compounds (n=100) and simple organic compounds (n=140). As an approximation only molecules, which do not de/protonate at physiological pH were considered. A relatively broad distribution was seen for the known drugs with an average at -15.3 kcal/mol and a standard deviation of 7.5 kcal/mol. Interestingly, much lower averages were found for the drug-like compounds (-7.5 kcal/mol) and the simple organic compounds (-3.1 kcal/mol) with tighter distributions; 4.3 and 3.2 kcal/mol, respectively. This trend was not observed for these collections when calculated log P and log S values were used. The considerable greater exothermic ΔGhyd average for the known drugs clearly indicates in order to develop a successful drug candidate value of ΔGhyd <-5 kcal/mol or less is preferable. PMID:27492087

  3. Hydration Free Energy as a Molecular Descriptor in Drug Design: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, Ayesha; Reynisson, Jóhannes

    2016-05-01

    In this work the idea was investigated whether calculated hydration energy (ΔGhyd ) can be used as a molecular descriptor in defining promising regions of chemical space for drug design. Calculating ΔGhyd using the Density Solvation Model (SMD) in conjunction with the density functional theory (DFT) gave an excellent correlation with experimental values. Furthermore, calculated ΔGhyd correlates reasonably well with experimental water solubility (r(2) =0.545) and also log P (r(2) =0.530). Three compound collections were used: Known drugs (n=150), drug-like compounds (n=100) and simple organic compounds (n=140). As an approximation only molecules, which do not de/protonate at physiological pH were considered. A relatively broad distribution was seen for the known drugs with an average at -15.3 kcal/mol and a standard deviation of 7.5 kcal/mol. Interestingly, much lower averages were found for the drug-like compounds (-7.5 kcal/mol) and the simple organic compounds (-3.1 kcal/mol) with tighter distributions; 4.3 and 3.2 kcal/mol, respectively. This trend was not observed for these collections when calculated log P and log S values were used. The considerable greater exothermic ΔGhyd average for the known drugs clearly indicates in order to develop a successful drug candidate value of ΔGhyd <-5 kcal/mol or less is preferable.

  4. Design, synthesis, cytotoxic activity and molecular docking studies of new 20(S)-sulfonylamidine camptothecin derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zi-Long; Wang, Mei-Juan; Li, Lanlan; Wu, Dan; Wang, Yu-Han; Yan, Li-Ting; Morris-Natschke, Susan L; Liu, Ying-Qian; Zhao, Yong-Long; Wang, Chih-Ya; Liu, Huanxiang; Goto, Masuo; Liu, Heng; Zhu, Gao-Xiang; Lee, Kuo-Hsiung

    2016-06-10

    In an ongoing investigation of 20-sulfonylamidine derivatives (9, YQL-9a) of camptothecin (1) as potential anticancer agents directly and selectively inhibiting topoisomerase (Topo) I, the sulfonylamidine pharmacophore was held constant, and a camptothecin derivatives with various substitution patterns were synthesized. The new compounds were evaluated for antiproliferative activity against three human tumor cell lines, A-549, KB, and multidrug resistant (MDR) KB subline (KBvin). Several analogs showed comparable or superior antiproliferative activity compared to the clinically prescribed 1 and irinotecan (3). Significantly, the 20-sulfonylamidine derivatives exhibited comparable cytotoxicity against KBvin, while 1 and 3 were less active against this cell line. Among them, compound 15c displayed much better cytotoxic activity than the controls 1, 3, and 9. Novel key structural features related to the antiproliferative activities were identified by structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis. In a molecular docking model, compounds 9 and 15c interacted with Topo I-DNA through a different binding mode from 1 and 3. The sulfonylamidine side chains of 9 and 15c could likely form direct hydrogen bonds with Topo I, while hydrophobic interaction with Topo I and π-π stacking with double strand DNA were also confirmed as binding driving forces. The results from docking models were consistent with the SAR conclusions. The introduction of bulky substituents at the 20-position contributed to the altered binding mode of the compound by allowing them to form new interactions with Topo I residues. The information obtained in this study will be helpful for the design of new derivatives of 1 with most promising anticancer activity.

  5. Designing and preparation of cytisine alkaloid surface-imprinted material and its molecular recognition characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Baojiao; Bi, Concon; Fan, Li

    2015-03-01

    Based on molecular design, a cytisine surface-imprinted material was prepared using the new surface-imprinting technique of "pre-graft polymerizing and post-imprinting". The graft-polymerization of glycidyl methacrylate (GMA) on the surfaces of micron-sized silica gel particles was first performed with a surface-initiating system, preparing the grafted particles PGMA/SiO2. Subsequently, a polymer reaction, the ring-opening reaction of the epoxy groups of the grafted PGMA, was conducted with sodium 2,4-diaminobenzene sulfonate (SAS) as reagent, resulting in the functional grafted particles SAS-PGMA/SiO2. The adsorption of cytisine on SAS-PGMA/SiO2 particles reached saturation via strong electrostatic interaction between the sulfonate groups of SAS-PGMA/SiO2 particles and the protonated N atoms in cytisine molecule. Finally, cytisine surface-imprinting was successfully carried out with glutaraldehyde as crosslinker, obtaining cytisine surface-imprinted material MIP-SASP/SiO2. The binding and recognition characteristics of MIP-SASP/SiO2 towards cytisine were investigated in depth. The experimental results show that there is strong electrostatic interaction between particles and cytisine molecules, and on this basis, cytisine surface-imprinting can be smoothly performed. The surface-imprinted MIP-SASP/SiO2 has special recognition selectivity and excellent binding affinity for cytisine, and the selectivity coefficients of MIP-SASP/SiO2 particles for cytisine relative to matrine and oxymatrine, which were used as two contrast alkaloids, are 9.5 and 6.5, respectively.

  6. Synthesis and Evaluation of CO2 Thickeners Designed with Molecular Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert Enick; Erick Beckman; J. Karl Johnson

    2009-08-31

    The objective of this research was to use molecular modeling techniques, coupled with our prior experimental results, to design, synthesize and evaluate inexpensive, non-fluorous carbon dioxide thickening agents. The first type of thickener that was considered was associating polymers. Typically, these thickeners are copolymers that contain a highly CO{sub 2}-philic monomer, and a small concentration of a CO{sub 2}-phobic associating monomer. Yale University was solely responsible for the synthesis of a second type of thickener; small, hydrogen bonding compounds. These molecules have a core that contains one or more hydrogen-bonding groups, such as urea or amide groups. Non-fluorous, CO{sub 2}-philic functional groups were attached to the hydrogen bonding core of the compound to impart CO{sub 2} stability and macromolecular stability to the linear 'stack' of these compounds. The third type of compound initially considered for this investigation was CO{sub 2}-soluble surfactants. These surfactants contain conventional ionic head groups and composed of CO{sub 2}-philic oligomers (short polymers) or small compounds (sugar acetates) previously identified by our research team. Mobility reduction could occur as these surfactant solutions contacted reservoir brine and formed mobility control foams in-situ. The vast majority of the work conducted in this study was devoted to the copolymeric thickeners and the small hydrogen-bonding thickeners; these thickeners were intended to dissolve completely in CO{sub 2} and increase the fluid viscosity. A small but important amount of work was done establishing the groundwork for CO{sub 2}-soluble surfactants that reduced mobility by generating foams in-situ as the CO{sub 2}+surfactant solution mixed with in-situ brine.

  7. Pharmacophore modeling for anti-Chagas drug design using the fragment molecular orbital method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryunosuke Yoshino

    Full Text Available Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is a neglected tropical disease that causes severe human health problems. To develop a new chemotherapeutic agent for the treatment of Chagas disease, we predicted a pharmacophore model for T. cruzi dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (TcDHODH by fragment molecular orbital (FMO calculation for orotate, oxonate, and 43 orotate derivatives.Intermolecular interactions in the complexes of TcDHODH with orotate, oxonate, and 43 orotate derivatives were analyzed by FMO calculation at the MP2/6-31G level. The results indicated that the orotate moiety, which is the base fragment of these compounds, interacts with the Lys43, Asn67, and Asn194 residues of TcDHODH and the cofactor flavin mononucleotide (FMN, whereas functional groups introduced at the orotate 5-position strongly interact with the Lys214 residue.FMO-based interaction energy analyses revealed a pharmacophore model for TcDHODH inhibitor. Hydrogen bond acceptor pharmacophores correspond to Lys43 and Lys214, hydrogen bond donor and acceptor pharmacophores correspond to Asn67 and Asn194, and the aromatic ring pharmacophore corresponds to FMN, which shows important characteristics of compounds that inhibit TcDHODH. In addition, the Lys214 residue is not conserved between TcDHODH and human DHODH. Our analysis suggests that these orotate derivatives should preferentially bind to TcDHODH, increasing their selectivity. Our results obtained by pharmacophore modeling provides insight into the structural requirements for the design of TcDHODH inhibitors and their development as new anti-Chagas drugs.

  8. Molecular mechanics approach for design and conformational studies of macrocyclic ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohini,; Akbar, Rifat; Kanungo, B. K., E-mail: b.kanungo@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Sant Longowal Institute of Engineering & Technology, Longowal-148106 (India)

    2015-08-28

    Computational Chemistry has revolutionized way of viewing molecules at the quantum mechanical scale by allowing simulating various chemical scenarios that are not possible to study in a laboratory. The remarkable applications of computational chemistry have promoted to design and test of the effectiveness of various methods for searching the conformational space of highly flexible molecules. In this context, we conducted a series of optimization and conformational searches on macrocyclic based ligands, 9N3Me5Ox, (1,4,7-tris(5-methyl-8-hydroxyquinoline)-1,4,7-triazacyclononane) and 12N3Me5Ox, (1,5,9-tris(5-methyl-8-hydroxyquinoline)-1,5,9-triazacyclododecane) and studied their selectivity and coordination behavior with some lanthanide metal ions in molecular mechanics and semiempirical methods. The methods include both systematic and random conformational searches for dihedral angles, torsion angles and Cartesian coordinates. Structural studies were carried out by using geometry optimization, coordination scans and electronic properties were evaluated. The results clearly show that chair-boat conformational isomer of 9N3Me5Ox ligand is more stable due to lower eclipsing ethane interaction and form stronger adduct complexes with lanthanide metal ion. This is because of the fact that, in a central unit of 9N3 of the ligand form six endo type bonds out of nine. The rest of bonds have trans conformation. In contrast, for the adduct of 12N3Me5Ox, two C-C bonds have on eclipsed conformation, and others have synclinal and antiperiplanar confirmations. The distortion of the two eclipsed conformations may affect the yields and the stability of the complexes.

  9. Synthesis of Some New Long-chain Salen Catalysts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU JinCai; TANG Ning; SUN Yang; ZHANG Ling; Song Bo; TAN MinYu

    2001-01-01

    @@ In the research of enantioselective epoxidation of unfunctionalized alkenes using Salen compounds, Katasuki1 and Jacobsen2 pointed out that 3 and 3′ groups of Salen were very important to increase the e.e of the catalytic product. Recently, in order to explore useful information concerning molecular design of metal catalysts for enantioselective epoxidation of trans-disubstituted alkenes, which remains an unresolved problem in the field of metal-catalyzed asymmetric epoxidation of unfunctionalized alkenes,some new Salen compounds containing long-chain in 3 and 3′ were designed and synthesized. We think these 3 and 3′ long-chain groups not only do as bulky group, but also act as second introduced chiral source. The following is the route:

  10. Molecular studies of model surfaces of metals from single crystals to nanoparticles under catalytic reaction conditions. Evolution from prenatal and postmortem studies of catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somorjai, Gabor A; Aliaga, Cesar

    2010-11-01

    Molecular level studies of metal crystal and nanoparticle surfaces under catalytic reaction conditions at ambient pressures during turnover were made possible by the use of instruments developed at the University of California at Berkeley. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFGVS), owing to its surface specificity and sensitivity, is able to identify the vibrational features of adsorbed monolayers of molecules. We identified reaction intermediates, different from reactants and products, under reaction conditions and for multipath reactions on metal single crystals and nanoparticles of varying size and shape. The high-pressure scanning tunneling microscope (HP-STM) revealed the dynamics of a catalytically active metallic surface by detecting the mobility of the adsorbed species during catalytic turnover. It also demonstrated the reversible and adsorbate-driven surface restructuring of platinum when exposed to molecules such as CO and ethylene. Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) detected the reversible changes of surface composition in rhodium-palladium, platinum-palladium, and other bimetallic nanoparticles as the reactant atmosphere changed from oxidizing to reducing. It was found that metal nanoparticles of less than 2 nm in size are present in higher oxidation states, which alters and enhances their catalytic activity. The catalytic nanodiode (CND) confirmed that a catalytic reaction-induced current flow exists at oxide-metal interfaces, which correlates well with the reaction turnover.

  11. Alloy catalyst material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel alloy catalyst material for use in the synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water. The present invention also relates to a cathode and an electrochemical cell comprising the novel catalyst material, and the process use...... of the novel catalyst material for synthesising hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water....

  12. Resin Catalyst Hybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Asaoka

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction: What are resin catalyst hybrids? There are typically two types of resin catalyst. One is acidic resin which representative is polystyrene sulfonic acid. The other is basic resin which is availed as metal complex support. The objective items of this study on resin catalyst are consisting of pellet hybrid, equilibrium hybrid and function hybrid of acid and base,as shown in Fig. 1[1-5].

  13. Synergistic enhancement of the electro-oxidation of methanol at tailor-designed nanoparticle-based CoOx/MnOx/Pt ternary catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A novel ternary nanoparticle-based electrode is fabricated for MOR. • The loading level and deposition sequence of each constituent are crucial for MOR. • CoOx/MnOx/Pt/GC electrode showed a superb catalysis for MOR. • Activity for MOR at CoOx/MnOx/Pt/GC electrode increases with pH. - Abstract: The current study addresses the enhanced electroctrocatalytic activity of a nanoparticle-based ternary catalyst composed of Pt (nano-Pt), manganese oxide (nano-MnOx), and cobalt oxide (nano-CoOx) (all were assembled on a glassy carbon (GC) substrate) towards the direct methanol electro-oxidation reaction (MOR) in an alkaline medium. The electrocatalytic activity of the modified electrodes towards MOR depends on the loading level of nano-Pt, nano-MnOx, and nano-CoOx onto the GC electrode as well as the order of deposition of each component. Interestingly, the CoOx/MnOx/Pt/GC electrode (with nano-Pt firstly deposited onto the GC surface followed by nano-MnOx then nano-CoOx) shows the highest catalytic activity and stability towards MOR for a prolonged time of continuous electrolysis. This is revealed from the large increase (seven times) in the peak current of MOR at this electrode compared with that obtained at Pt/GC electrode. The influence of operating pH on the catalytic activity of the proposed catalyst is investigated. Several techniques including cyclic voltammetry, field-emission scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction are used to address the catalytic activity of the catalyst and to reveal its surface morphology and composition

  14. Theoretical design of the cyclic lipopeptide nanotube as a molecular channel in the lipid bilayer, molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khavani, Mohammad; Izadyar, Mohammad; Housaindokht, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-14

    In this article, cyclic peptides (CP) with lipid substituents were theoretically designed. The dynamical behavior of the CP dimers and the cyclic peptide nanotube (CPNT) without lipid substituents in the solution (water and chloroform) during the 50 ns molecular dynamic (MD) simulations has been investigated. As a result, the CP dimers and CPNT in a non-polar solvent are more stable than in a polar solvent and CPNT is a good container for non-polar small molecules such as chloroform. The effect of the lipid substituents on the CP dimers and CPNT has been investigated in the next stage of our studies. Accordingly, these substituents increase the stability of the CP dimers and CPNT, significantly, in polar solvents. MM-PBSA and MM-GBSA calculations confirm that substitution has an important effect on the stability of the CP dimers and CPNT. Finally, the dynamical behavior of CPNT with lipid substituents in a fully hydrated DMPC bilayer shows the high ability of this structure for molecule transmission across the lipid membrane. This structure is stable enough to be used as a molecular channel. DFT calculations on the CP dimers in the gas phase, water and chloroform, indicate that H-bond formation is the driving force for dimerization. CP dimers are more stable in the gas phase in comparison to in solution. HOMO-LUMO orbital analysis indicates that the interaction of the CP units in the dimer structures is due to the molecular orbital interactions between the NH and CO groups.

  15. Highly sensitive silicon microreactor for catalyst testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Toke Riishøj; Olsen, Jakob Lind; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard;

    2009-01-01

    by directing the entire gas flow through the catalyst bed to a mass spectrometer, thus ensuring that nearly all reaction products are present in the analyzed gas flow. Although the device can be employed for testing a wide range of catalysts, the primary aim of the design is to allow characterization of model...... catalysts which can only be obtained in small quantities. Such measurements are of significant fundamental interest but are challenging because of the low surface areas involved. The relationship between the reaction zone gas flow and the pressure in the reaction zone is investigated experimentally......, it is found that platinum catalysts with areas as small as 15 mu m(2) are conveniently characterized with the device. (C) 2009 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10.1063/1.3270191]...

  16. Catalysis by coke deposits: synthesis of isoprene over solid catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Irina; Sushkevich, Vitaly L; Kolyagin, Yury G; Ordomsky, Vitaly V

    2013-12-01

    A help rather than a hindrance: Carbonaceous deposits have been found to play a key role in the selective synthesis of isoprene from formaldehyde and isobutene over solid catalysts. They accumulate on the catalyst surface during the induction period and promote the interaction of the substrates at the steady state. The proposed mechanism shows the way forward for the design of efficient solid catalysts for the synthesis of isoprene. PMID:24129943

  17. Molecular modeling methods in the study and design of bioactive compounds: An introduction [Métodos de Modelagem Molecular para estudo e planejamento de compostos bioativos: Uma introdução

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Mauricio R. Sant´Anna

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an introduction to the main methods used in molecular modeling calculations applied in the design of bioactive compounds. An introductory description of the two approaches methods predominantly used in molecular modeling studies is presented: the classical approach, which includes molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics; and the quantum mechanical approach, which includes ab initio and semi-empirical methods. We discuss how these methods can be applied to determine the molecular structure and properties from these compounds and how to make the best choice according to the problem being addressed.

  18. Reaction selectivity studies on nanolithographically-fabricated platinum model catalyst arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grunes, Jeffrey Benjamin

    2004-05-15

    In an effort to understand the molecular ingredients of catalytic activity and selectivity toward the end of tuning a catalyst for 100% selectivity, advanced nanolithography techniques were developed and utilized to fabricate well-ordered two-dimensional model catalyst arrays of metal nanostructures on an oxide support for the investigation of reaction selectivity. In-situ and ex-situ surface science techniques were coupled with catalytic reaction data to characterize the molecular structure of the catalyst systems and gain insight into hydrocarbon conversion in heterogeneous catalysis. Through systematic variation of catalyst parameters (size, spacing, structure, and oxide support) and catalytic reaction conditions (hydrocarbon chain length, temperature, pressures, and gas composition), the data presented in this dissertation demonstrate the ability to direct a reaction by rationally adjusting, through precise control, the design of the catalyst system. Electron beam lithography (EBL) was employed to create platinum nanoparticles on an alumina (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) support. The Pt nanoparticle spacing (100-150-nm interparticle distance) was varied in these samples, and they were characterized using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscopy (AFM), both before and after reactions. The TEM studies showed the 28-nm Pt nanoparticles with 100 and 150-nm interparticle spacing on alumina to be polycrystalline in nature, with crystalline sizes of 3-5 nm. The nanoparticle crystallites increased significantly after heat treatment. The nanoparticles were still mostly polycrystalline in nature, with 2-3 domains. The 28-nm Pt nanoparticles deposited on alumina were removed by the AFM tip in contact mode with a normal force of approximately 30 nN. After heat treatment at 500 C in vacuum for 3 hours, the AFM tip, even at 4000 nN, could not remove the platinum nanoparticles. The

  19. Design, Synthesis, Characterization of Novel Ruthenium(II Catalysts: Highly Efficient and Selective Hydrogenation of Cinnamaldehyde to (E-3-Phenylprop-2-en-1-ol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany W. Darwish

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this contribution, two novel supported and non-supported ruthenium(II complexes of type [RuCl2(dppme(NN] where [dppme is H2C=C(CH2PPh22 and NN is N1-(3-(trimethoxysilylpropylethane-1,2-diamine] were prepared. The NN co-ligand caused release of one of the dppme ligands from [RuCl2(dppme2] precursor to yield complex 1. The process of substitution of dppme by NN was monitored by 31P{1H}-NMR. Taking advantage of the presence of trimethoxysilane group in the backbone of complex 1, polysiloxane xerogel counterpart, X1, was prepared via sol-gel immobilization using tetraethoxysilane as cross-linker. Both complexes 1 and X1 have been characterized via elemental analysis, CV and a number of spectroscopic techniques including FT-IR, 1H-, 13C-, and 31P-NMR, and mass spectrometry. Importantly, carbonyl selective hydrogenation was successfully accomplished under mild conditions using complex 1 as a homogenous catalyst and X1 as a heterogeneous catalyst, respectively.

  20. Design and fabrication of an automated temperature programmed reaction system to evaluate 3-way catalysts Ce1--(La/Y)PtO2-

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arup Gayen; Tinku Baidya; G S Ramesh; R Sriharia; M S Hegde

    2006-01-01

    A completely automated temperature-programmed reaction (TPR) system for carrying out gas-solid catalytic reactions under atmospheric flow conditions is fabricated to study CO and hydrocarbon oxidation, and NO reduction. The system consists of an all-stainless steel UHV system, quadrupole mass spectrometer SX200 (VG Scientific), a tubular furnace and micro-reactor, a temperature controller, a versatile gas handling system, and a data acquisition and analysis system. The performance of the system has been tested under standard experimental conditions for CO oxidation over well-characterized Ce1--Pt(La/Y)O2- catalysts. Testing of 3-way catalysis with CO, NO and C2H2 to convert to CO2, N2 and H2O is done with this catalyst which shows complete removal of pollutants below 325°C. Fixed oxide-ion defects in Pt substituted Ce1-(La/Y)O2-/2 show higher catalytic activity than Pt ion-substituted CeO2.