WorldWideScience

Sample records for catalyst packing mode

  1. Elastic moduli and vibrational modes in jammed particulate packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizuno, Hideyuki; Saitoh, Kuniyasu; Silbert, Leonardo E.

    2016-06-01

    When we elastically impose a homogeneous, affine deformation on amorphous solids, they also undergo an inhomogeneous, nonaffine deformation, which can have a crucial impact on the overall elastic response. To correctly understand the elastic modulus M , it is therefore necessary to take into account not only the affine modulus MA, but also the nonaffine modulus MN that arises from the nonaffine deformation. In the present work, we study the bulk (M =K ) and shear (M =G ) moduli in static jammed particulate packings over a range of packing fractions φ . The affine MA is determined essentially by the static structural arrangement of particles, whereas the nonaffine MN is related to the vibrational eigenmodes. We elucidate the contribution of each vibrational mode to the nonaffine MN through a modal decomposition of the displacement and force fields. In the vicinity of the (un)jamming transition φc, the vibrational density of states g (ω ) shows a plateau in the intermediate-frequency regime above a characteristic frequency ω*. We illustrate that this unusual feature apparent in g (ω ) is reflected in the behavior of MN: As φ →φc , where ω*→0 , those modes for ω ω* approach a constant value which results in MN to approach a critical value MN c, as MN-MN c˜ω* . At φc itself, the bulk modulus attains a finite value Kc=KA c-KN c>0 , such that KN c has a value that remains below KA c. In contrast, for the critical shear modulus Gc, GN c and GA c approach the same value so that the total value becomes exactly zero, Gc=GA c-GN c=0 . We explore what features of the configurational and vibrational properties cause such a distinction between K and G , allowing us to validate analytical expressions for their critical values.

  2. Catalyst-Packed Non-Thermal Plasma Reactor for Removal of Nitrogen Oxides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A single-stage plasma-catalytic reactor in which catalytic materials were packedwas used to remove nitrogen oxides. The packing material was scoria being made of various metaloxides including A12O3, MgO, TiO2, etc. Scoria was able to act not only as dielectric pelletsbut also as a catalyst in the presence of reducing agent such as ethylene and ammonia. Withoutplasma discharge, scoria did not work well as a catalyst in the temperature range of 100 °Cto 200 °C, showing less than 10% of NOx removal efficiency. When plasma is produced inside thereactor, the NOx removal efficiency could be increased to 60% in this temperature range.

  3. Periodic Packing Mode for Trickle-Bed Reactors:Experiments and Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘国柱; 米镇涛

    2004-01-01

    A periodic packing mode of trickle-bed reactor (TBR) for the gas limited reaction was proposed. Hydrogenation of 2-ethylanthraquinone over Pd/A12Oa in a laboratory-scale TBR was taken as a test reaction for determining whether the periodic packing mode is advantageous. The effects of operating conditions and packing type on TBR performance were experimentally examined to demonstrate the cause-effect relationships. A mathematic model of TBR considering axial dispersion and fractional wetting was developed to quantitatively illuminate the reason of performance enhancement.

  4. Modeling of methanol decomposition on Pt/CeO2/ZrO2 catalyst in a packed bed microreactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohar, Andrej; Belavič, Darko; Dolanc, Gregor; Hočevar, Stanko

    2014-06-01

    Methanol decomposition on Pt/CeO2/ZrO2 catalyst is studied inside a packed bed microreactor in the temperature range of 300-380 °C. The microreactor is fabricated using low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC) technology, which is well suited for the production of relatively complex three-dimensional structures. It is packed with 2 wt% Pt-CeO2 catalyst, which is deposited onto ZrO2 spherical particles. A 1D mathematical model, which incorporates diffusion, convection and mass transfer through the boundary layer to the catalyst particles, as well as a 3D computational fluid dynamics model, are developed to describe the methanol decomposition process inside the packed bed. The microreactor exhibits reliable operation and no catalyst deactivation was observed during three months of experimentation. A comparison between the 1D mathematical model and the 3D model, considering the full 3D geometry of the microreactor is made and the differences between the models are identified and evaluated.

  5. Catalytic wet air oxidation of phenol over CeO2-TiO2 catalyst in the batch reactor and the packed-bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaoxia; Zhu, Wanpeng; Wang, Jianbing; Chen, Zhengxiong

    2008-05-30

    CeO2-TiO2 catalysts are prepared by coprecipitation method, and the activity and stability in the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of phenol are investigated in a batch reactor and packed-bed reactor. CeO2-TiO2 mixed oxides show the higher activity than pure CeO2 and TiO2, and CeO2-TiO2 1/1 catalyst displays the highest activity in the CWAO of phenol. In a batch reactor, COD and TOC removals are about 100% and 77% after 120 min in the CWAO of phenol over CeO2-TiO2 1/1 catalyst at reaction temperature of 150 degrees C, the total pressure of 3 MPa, phenol concentration of 1000 mg/L, and catalyst dosage of 4 g/L. In a packed-bed reactor using CeO2-TiO2 1/1 particle catalyst, over 91% COD and 80% TOC removals are obtained at the reaction temperature of 140 degrees C, the air total pressure of 3.5 MPa, the phenol concentration of 1000 mg/L for 100 h continue reaction. Leaching of metal ions of CeO2-TiO2 1/1 particle catalyst is very low during the continuous reaction. CeO2-TiO2 1/1 catalyst exhibits the excellent activity and stability in the CWAO of phenol.

  6. Improved Packing Mode of Hospital Drugs%医院药品分装方式的改进

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁桂华; 王恒

    2015-01-01

    目的:改进医院药品的分装方式。方法通过手工分装方式和自动包药机分装方式,分别对10种片剂进行分装速度的比较分析。结果每月分装10种药品560袋,自动包药机比手工分装药品方式速度快,工作效率高,有效控制手工分装药品所造成的污染。结论自动包药机比手工分装药品方式提高了工作效率,降低费用,减轻了药师的工作负担,节约医院的运营成本,并能避免药品二次污染,强化了药房分装药品管理。%Objective Packing methods improve hospital drugs. Methods Through the manual packing mode and automatic medicine packaging machine packaging mode, each of the 10 tablets of the comparative analysis of packing speed. Results 10 kinds of drugs in 560 monthly packing bag, automatic medicine packaging machine packaging drug way speed than the hand, high work efficiency, effective control of pollution caused by manual containing drugs. Conclusion The automatic medicine packaging machine than the hand containing drugs method improves the work efficiency, reduce costs, reduce the burden of work of hospital pharmacists, save the operation cost, and can avoid the drug two times pollution, strengthen the management of pharmacy repack-aged drug.

  7. Active coupling control in densely packed subwavelength waveguides via dark mode

    CERN Document Server

    Suchowski, Haim; Hatakeyama, Taiki; Wu, Chihhui; Feng, Liang; OBrien, Kevin; Wang, Yuan; Zhang, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    The ever growing need for energy-efficient and fast communications is driving the development of highly integrated photonic circuits where controlling light at the nanoscale becomes the most critical aspect of information transfer . Directional couplers, two interacting optical waveguides placed in close proximity, are important building blocks in these integrated photonics circuits and have been employed as optical modulators and switches for high speed communication, data processing and integrated quantum operations. However, active control over the coupling between closely packed waveguides is highly desirable and yet remains a critical barrier towards ultra small footprint devices. A general approach to achieve active control in waveguide systems is to exploit optical nonlinearities enabled by a strong control pulse. However these devices suffer from the nonlinear absorption induced by the intense control pulse as the signal and its control propagate in the same waveguide. Here we experimentally demonstra...

  8. Removal of H2S from Biogas by Iron (Fe3+ Doped MgO on Ceramic Honeycomb Catalyst using Double Packed Columns System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juntima Chungsiriporn

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Hydrogen sulfide is a toxic and corrosive in nature, gas should be safely removed from the biogas streams before subjecting into the fuel cell. Fe3+ doped magnesium oxide was synthesized using sol-gel technique and dip coating process of Fe3+ doped MgO on foam ceramic honeycomb. XRD and SEM indicate that Fe3+ in Fe3+ doped MgO on foam ceramic honeycomb catalyst is finely dispersed in the MgO support. Performance of the synthesized Fe3+ doped magnesium oxide on the honeycomb catalyst was examined for hydrogen sulfide (H2S oxidation by double packed column scrubbers. The absorption column was used for H2S scrubbing from biogas by deionized water absorption and catalytic column was used as catalyst bed for degradation of absorbed H2S in scrubbing water. In the catalytic column, counter current flow of the scrubbing water and air through the catalyst pack was performed for H2S oxidation accompany with catalyst regeneration. System capacity for H2S removal from gas stream showed 98% constant along 3 hr testing time at room temperature.

  9. Electronically configured battery pack

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kemper, D.

    1997-03-01

    Battery packs for portable equipment must sometimes accommodate conflicting requirements to meet application needs. An electronically configurable battery pack was developed to support two highly different operating modes, one requiring very low power consumption at a low voltage and the other requiring high power consumption at a higher voltage. The configurable battery pack optimizes the lifetime and performance of the system by making the best use of all available energy thus enabling the system to meet its goals of operation, volume, and lifetime. This paper describes the cell chemistry chosen, the battery pack electronics, and tradeoffs made during the evolution of its design.

  10. Periodic Packing Mode for Trickle-Bed Reactors:Experiments and Modeling%滴流反应器的周期性填充:实验与模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘国柱; 米镇涛

    2004-01-01

    A periodic packing mode of trickle-bed reactor(TBR)for the gas limited reaction was proposed.Hydrogenation of 2-ethylanthraquinone over Pd/Al2O3 in a laboratory-scale TBR was taken as a test reaction for determining whether the periodic packing mode is advantageous.The effects of operating conditions and packing type on TBR performance were experimentally examined to demonstrate the cause-effect relationships.A mathematic model of TBR considering axial dispersion and fractional wetting was developed to quantitatively illuminate the reason of performance enhancement.

  11. Production of structured lipids by acidolysis of an EPA-enriched fish oil and caprylic acid in a packed bed reactor: analysis of three different operation modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Moreno, P A; Robles Medina, A; Camacho Rubio, F; Camacho Páez, B; Molina Grima, E

    2004-01-01

    Structured triacylglycerols (ST) enriched in eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) in position 2 of the triacylglycerol (TAG) backbone were synthesized by acidolysis of a commercially available EPA-rich oil (EPAX4510, 40% EPA) and caprylic acid (CA), catalyzed by the 1,3-specific immobilized lipase Lipozyme IM. The reaction was carried out in a packed bed reactor (PBR) operating in two ways: (1) by recirculating the reaction mixture from the exit of the bed to the substrate reservoir (discontinuous mode) and (2) in continuous mode, directing the product mixture leaving the PBR to a product reservoir. By operating in these two ways and using a simple kinetic model, representative values for the apparent kinetic constants (kX) for each fatty acid (native, Li or odd, M) were obtained. The kinetic model assumes that the rate of incorporation of a fatty acid into TAG per amount of enzyme, rX (mole/(h g lipase)) is proportional to the extent of the deviation from the equilibrium for each fatty acid (i.e., the difference of concentration between the fatty acid in the triacylglycerol and the concentration of the same fatty acid in the triacylglycerol once the equilibrium of the acidolysis reaction is reached). The model allows comparing the two operating modes through the processing intensity, defined as mLt/(V[TG]0) and mL/(q[TG]0), for the discontinuous and continuous operation modes, respectively. In discontinuous mode, ST with 59.5% CA and 9.6% EPA were obtained. In contrast, a ST with 51% CA and 19.6% EPA were obtained when using the continuous operation mode. To enhance the CA incorporation when operating in continuous mode, a two-step acidolysis reaction was performed (third operation mode). This continuous two-step process yields a ST with a 64% CA and a 15% EPA. Finally, after purifying the above ST in a preparative silica gel column, impregnated with boric acid, a ST with 66.9% CA and 19.6% EPA was obtained. The analysis by reverse phase and Ag+ liquid chromatography of

  12. Supported Tetrahedral Oxo-Sn Catalyst: Single Site, Two Modes of Catalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beletskiy, Evgeny V.; Hou, Xianliang; Shen, Zhongliang; Gallagher, James R.; Miller, Jeffrey T.; Wu, Yuyang; Li, Tiehu; Kung, Mayfair C.; Kung, Harold H.

    2016-03-17

    Mild calcination in ozone of a (POSS)-Sn- (POSS) complex grafted on silica generated a heterogenized catalyst that mostly retained the tetrahedral coordination of its homogeneous precursor, as evidenced by spectroscopic characterizations using EXAFS, NMR, UV-vis, and DRIFT. The Sn centers are accessible and uniform and can be quantified by stoichiometric pyridine poisoning. This Sn-catalyst is active in hydride transfer reactions as a typical solid Lewis acid. However, the Sn centers can also create Brønsted acidity with alcohol by binding the alcohol strongly as alkoxide and transferring the hydroxyl H to the neighboring Sn-O-Si bond. The resulting acidic silanol is active in epoxide ring opening and acetalization reactions.

  13. Optimal Switching Table-Based Sliding Mode Control of an Energy Recovery Li-Ion Power Accumulator Battery Pack Testing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kil To Chong

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the present work is to apply a sliding mode controller (SMC to medium voltage and high power output energy recovery Li-ion power accumulator battery pack testing systems (ERLPABTSs, which are composed of a three-level neutral-point-clamped (NPC three-phase voltage source inverter (VSI and a two-level buck-boost converter without an isolating transformer. An inner current decoupled control scheme for the aforementioned system is proposed and two sliding mode planes for active and reactive current control are designed based on the control scheme. An optimized switching table for current convergence is used according to the error sign of the equivalent input voltage and feedback voltage. The proposed ERLPABTS could be used to integrate discharging energy into the power grid when performing high accuracy current testing. The active and reactive power references for the grid-connected inverter are determined based on the discharging energy from the DC-DC converter. Simulations and experiments on a laboratory hardware platform using a 175 kW insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT-based ERLPABTS have been implemented and verified, and the performance is found satisfactory and superior to conventional ERLPABPTS.

  14. Equalizing Charging of Lithium Battery Pack on Change of Mode%更换模式下的锂电池组均衡充电

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    程昌银; 王桂棠; 赖雄辉; 江跃龙

    2012-01-01

    Aimming at the problem of short life and lack of stability for vehicle's Li-ion battery pack, this paper puts an equalization charging method of lithium battery on change of mode forward. The method combines a intelligence charging mode with the second equalization technology. It adopts a method of dissipation balance in first equalization design, the excess energy consumed in the resistance in the form of heat. In the second equalization design adopts energy transfer method, which divert the excess energy by capacitance to the battery of lower energy. The experiments show that the voltage of battery got a good consistency in this equalization method.%针对电动车的锂离子电池组寿命短、缺乏稳定性的问题,提出一种在更换模式下的充电均衡方案。采用了一次智能充电方式和二次均衡技术相结合,在第一次均衡设计中采用了耗散式均衡法,把多余能量以热能的形式在电阻消耗掉;在二次均衡设计中采用了能量转移的方法,通过电容把高能量电池的多余能量转移到低能量的电池中。实验表明该均衡方式得到很好的电压一致性。

  15. Packing Smart

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-08-22

    In this podcast for kids, the Kidtastics talk about packing a lunch that's not boring and is full of the power and energy kids need to make it through the day.  Created: 8/22/2011 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/22/2011.

  16. Power Packing

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-08-16

    In this podcast for kids, the Kidtastics talk about how to pack a lunch safely, to help keep you from getting sick.  Created: 8/16/2011 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 8/16/2011.

  17. Synthesis of Alcohols and Alkanes from CO and H2 over MoS2/γ-Al2O3 Catalyst in a Packed Bed with Continuous Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hung Chen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Effects of reaction conditions on the production of alcohols (AOHs and alkanes (Alk from CO and H2, which can be obtained from the gasification of biomass, using a molybdenum sulfide (MoS2-based catalyst of MoS2/γ-Al2O3 were studied. A high-pressure fixed packed bed (HPFPB was employed to carry out the reaction. The results indicate that the conversion of CO (XCO and specific production rates of alcohol (SPRAOH and alkane (SPRAlk are highly depended on temperature (T. In T = 423–573 K, maximum yield of alcohols (YAOH and SPRAOH occur at T = 523 K. In the meantime, well performance gives the selectivity of ethanol (SEtOH of 52.0 C%. For the studies on varying H2/CO mole ratio (MH/C from 1 to 4 at 523 K, the appropriate MH/C to produce EtOH is 2, giving higher ratios of SPRAOH/SPRAlk and YAOH/YAlk than those with other MH/C. As for varying the total gas flow rates (QG of 300, 450, 600 to 900 cm3 min−1 tested at T = 523 K and MH/C = 2, the lower QG provides longer reaction time (or gaseous retention time, tR thus offering higher XCO, however lower productivity. For setting pressure (PST = 225–540 psi, a supply of higher pressure is equivalent to providing a larger amount of reactants into the reaction system, this thus suggests the use of higher PST should give both higher XCO and productivity. The assessment of the above results indicates that the MoS2/γ-Al2O3 catalyst favors the production of alcohols over alkanes, especially for ethanol. The information obtained is useful for the proper utilization of biomass derived gases of CO and H2.

  18. Structured reactor packing and method of manufacturing same

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Bleek, C.M.; Calis, H.P.A.; Gerritsen, A.W.

    1996-01-01

    The invention comprises a method of manufacturing a catalyst element consisting of parallel rods of catalyst-containing material, which material has been provided around a rod-shaped support through pressing in a die. The invention further relates to structured catalyst packings consisting of elemen

  19. Valve Packing

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    "S Glass" yarn was originally developed by NASA for high temperature space and aeronautical applications. When John Crane, Inc. required material that would withstand temperatures higher than 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit, they contacted Owens-Corning, which had developed a number of applications for the material. John Crane combines the yarn with other components to make Style 287-I packing. The product can be used in chemical processing operations, nuclear power stations, petroleum products, etc. Advantages include increased service life and reduced maintenance costs.

  20. Comparison of the activities of binder-added and binder-free Mo/HZSM-5 catalysts in methane dehydroaromatization at 1073 K in periodic CH4-H2 switch operation mode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuebing Xu; Hongtao Ma; Yo Yamamoto; Yoshizo Suzuki; Zhanguo Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Three industry-supplied,well-shaped Mo/HZSM-5 catalysts,two binder-added and one binder-free,were tested for the first time in methane dehydroaromatization to benzene at 1073 K and 10000 mL/(g.h) in periodic CH4-H2 switch operation mode,and their catalytic performances were compared with those of three self-prepared,binder-free powder Mo/HZSM-5 catalysts.XRD,27Al NMR,SEM,BET and NH3-TPD characterizations of all the catalysts show that the zeolites in the two binder-added catalysts are comparable to those in the three binder-free powder catalysts in crystallinity,crystal size,micropore volume and Br(¢)nsted acidity.The test results,on the other hand,show that the catalytic performances of the two binder-added catalysts are worse than those of the four binder-free catalysts on both catalyst mass and zeolite mass bases.Then,TPO and BET measurements of all spent samples were conducted to get a deep insight into the negative effects of binder addition,and the results suggest that the binder additives functioned mainly to enhance the polyaromatization of formed aromatics to coke on their external surfaces and consequently lower the benzene formation activity and selectivity of the catalyst.

  1. Hydrodynamics of multi-phase packed bed micro-reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Márquez Luzardo, N.M.

    2010-01-01

    Why to use packed bed micro-reactors for catalyst testing? Miniaturized packed bed reactors have a large surface-to-volume ratio at the reactor and particle level that favors the heat- and mass-transfer processes at all scales (intra-particle, inter-phase and inter-particle or reactor level). If the

  2. The Performance of Structured Packings in Trickle-Bed Reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank, M.J.W.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, W.P.M. van

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate whether the use of structured packings might improve the mass transfer characteristics and the catalyst effectiveness of a trickle-bed reactor. Therefore, the performances of a structured packing, consisting of KATAPAK elements, and a dumped packi

  3. The performance of structured packings in trickle-bed reactors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frank, M.J.W.; Kuipers, J.A.M.; Versteeg, G.F.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.

    1999-01-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate whether the use of structured packings might improve the mass transfer characteristics and the catalyst effectiveness of a trickle-bed reactor. Therefore, the performances of a structured packing, consisting of KATAPAK elements, and a dumped packi

  4. Oxidation catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  5. MECHANICAL STRENGTH AND RELIABILITY OF SOLID CATALYSTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yongdan Li; Dongfang Wu; Y.S. Lin

    2004-01-01

    The mechanical strength of solid catalysts is one of the key parameters for reliable and efficient performance of a fixed bed reactor. Some recent developments and their basic mechanics within this context are reviewed. The main concepts discussed are brittle fracture which leads to the mechanical failure of the catalyst pellets, measurement and statistical properties of the catalyst strength data, and mechanical reliability of the catalyst pellets and their packed bed. The scientific basis for the issues on the catalyst mechanical properties calls yet for further elucidation and advancement.

  6. Manufacture of Catalyst Systems for Ammonia Conversion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAKH S.V.; SAVENKOV D.A.

    2012-01-01

    Platinum catalyst gauzes have been in use since the moment of development of the process of catalyst oxidation of ammonia for production of nitric acid or hydrocyanic acid.Catalyst gauzes are usually made of platinum or its alloys with rhodium and palladium.These precious metals have remarkable properties that make them ideal catalysts for acceleration of the ammonia/oxygen reaction.In 2008,OJSC "SIC ‘Supermetal’" and Umicore AG&Co.KG launched a production line for Pt-alloy-based catalyst systems to be used for ammonia oxidation in the production of weak nitric acid.Catalyst systems consist of a pack of catalyst gauzes and a pack of catchment gauzes,which are made using flat-bed knitting machines and wire-cloth looms.Today,up-to-date catalyst systems MKSpreciseTM are being manufactured,the basic advantages of which are an individual structure of gauzes and composition of the material,which allows to define precisely the position of each gauze in the catalyst pack,a high activity of the catalyst pack,direct catching of platinum and rhodium in the catalyst system,and a reasonable combination of single- and multilayer types of gauzes.This makes it possible to vary the configuration of the catalyst and select an optimum composition of the system to ensure the maximum efficiency of the ammonia oxidation process.We also produce the catchment systems that allow to find the best decision from the economic point view for each individual case.

  7. TLC Pack Unpacked

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberhofer, Margret; Colpaert, Jozef

    2015-01-01

    TLC Pack stands for Teaching Languages to Caregivers and is a course designed to support migrants working or hoping to work in the caregiving sector. The TLC Pack resources range from A2 to B2 level of the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR), and will be made available online in the six project languages: Dutch, English,…

  8. Optimal Packed String Matching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ben-Kiki, Oren; Bille, Philip; Breslauer, Dany

    2011-01-01

    In the packed string matching problem, each machine word accommodates – characters, thus an n-character text occupies n/– memory words. We extend the Crochemore-Perrin constantspace O(n)-time string matching algorithm to run in optimal O(n/–) time and even in real-time, achieving a factor – speedup...... over traditional algorithms that examine each character individually. Our solution can be efficiently implemented, unlike prior theoretical packed string matching work. We adapt the standard RAM model and only use its AC0 instructions (i.e., no multiplication) plus two specialized AC0 packed string...

  9. Propene and l-octene hydroformylation with silica-supported, ionic liquid-phase (SILP) Rh-phosphine catalysts in continuous fixed-bed mode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, Anders; Eriksen, Kim Michael; Wasserscheid, Peter;

    2003-01-01

    Supported ionic liquid-phase (SILP) catalysts were made by immobilizing Rh-monophosphine complexes of bis(m-phenylguanidinium) phenylphosphine 1 and NORBOS 2 ligands in 1-n-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate, [BMIM] [PF6], on a silica support. The catalysts were active in continuous gas...

  10. Optimized packings with applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pintér, János

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents a selection of case studies that address a substantial range of optimized object packings (OOP) and their applications. The contributing authors are well-recognized researchers and practitioners. The mathematical modelling and numerical solution aspects of each application case study are presented in sufficient detail. A broad range of OOP problems are discussed: these include various specific and non-standard container loading and object packing problems, as well as the stowing of hazardous and other materials on container ships, data centre resource management, automotive engineering design, space station logistic support, cutting and packing problems with placement constraints, the optimal design of LED street lighting, robust sensor deployment strategies, spatial scheduling problems, and graph coloring models and metaheuristics for packing applications. Novel points of view related to model development and to computational nonlinear, global, mixed integer optimization and heuristic st...

  11. Nasal packing and stenting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber, Rainer K.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Nasal packs are indispensable in ENT practice. This study reviews current indications, effectiveness and risks of nasal packs and stents. In endoscopic surgery, nasal packs should always have smooth surfaces to minimize mucosal damage, improve wound healing and increase patient comfort. Functional endoscopic endonasal sinus surgery allows the use of modern nasal packs, since pressure is no longer required. So called hemostatic/resorbable materials are a first step in this direction. However, they may lead to adhesions and foreign body reactions in mucosal membranes. Simple occlusion is an effective method for creating a moist milieu for improved wound healing and avoiding dryness. Stenting of the frontal sinus is recommended if surgery fails to produce a wide, physiologically shaped drainage path that is sufficiently covered by intact tissue.

  12. Layered circle packings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Dennis

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Given a bounded sequence of integers {d0,d1,d2,…}, 6≤dn≤M, there is an associated abstract triangulation created by building up layers of vertices so that vertices on the nth layer have degree dn. This triangulation can be realized via a circle packing which fills either the Euclidean or the hyperbolic plane. We give necessary and sufficient conditions to determine the type of the packing given the defining sequence {dn}.

  13. Hydrogen gettering packing material and process for making same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeMay, James D.; Thompson, Lisa M.; Smith, Henry Michael; Schicker, James R.

    1999-09-09

    A hydrogen gettering system for a sealed container is disclosed comprising packing material for use within the sealed container, and a coating film containing hydrogen gettering material on at least a portion of the surface of such packing material. The coating film containing the hydrogen gettering material comprises a mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and one or more catalysts capable of catalyzing the reaction of hydrogen with such one or more organic materials. The mixture of one or more organic materials capable of reacting with hydrogen and the one or more catalysts is dispersed in a suitable carrier which preferably is a curable film-forming material. In a preferred embodiment, the packing material comprises a foam material which is compatible with the coating film containing hydrogen gettering material thereon.

  14. Packing fraction of particles with lognormal size distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, H J H

    2014-05-01

    This paper addresses the packing and void fraction of polydisperse particles with a lognormal size distribution. It is demonstrated that a binomial particle size distribution can be transformed into a continuous particle-size distribution of the lognormal type. Furthermore, an original and exact expression is derived that predicts the packing fraction of mixtures of particles with a lognormal distribution, which is governed by the standard deviation, mode of packing, and particle shape only. For a number of particle shapes and their packing modes (close, loose) the applicable values are given. This closed-form analytical expression governing the packing fraction is thoroughly compared with empirical and computational data reported in the literature, and good agreement is found.

  15. Packing fraction of particles with lognormal size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, H. J. H.

    2014-05-01

    This paper addresses the packing and void fraction of polydisperse particles with a lognormal size distribution. It is demonstrated that a binomial particle size distribution can be transformed into a continuous particle-size distribution of the lognormal type. Furthermore, an original and exact expression is derived that predicts the packing fraction of mixtures of particles with a lognormal distribution, which is governed by the standard deviation, mode of packing, and particle shape only. For a number of particle shapes and their packing modes (close, loose) the applicable values are given. This closed-form analytical expression governing the packing fraction is thoroughly compared with empirical and computational data reported in the literature, and good agreement is found.

  16. Simulation of abuse tolerance of lithium-ion battery packs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spotnitz, Robert M.; Weaver, James; Yeduvaka, Gowri; Doughty, D. H.; Roth, E. P.

    A simple approach for using accelerating rate calorimetry data to simulate the thermal abuse resistance of battery packs is described. The thermal abuse tolerance of battery packs is estimated based on the exothermic behavior of a single cell and an energy balance than accounts for radiative, conductive, and convective heat transfer modes of the pack. For the specific example of a notebook computer pack containing eight 18650-size cells, the effects of cell position, heat of reaction, and heat-transfer coefficient are explored. Thermal runaway of the pack is more likely to be induced by thermal runaway of a single cell when that cell is in good contact with other cells and is close to the pack wall.

  17. Battery Pack Thermal Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, Ahmad

    2016-06-14

    This presentation describes the thermal design of battery packs at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. A battery thermal management system essential for xEVs for both normal operation during daily driving (achieving life and performance) and off-normal operation during abuse conditions (achieving safety). The battery thermal management system needs to be optimized with the right tools for the lowest cost. Experimental tools such as NREL's isothermal battery calorimeter, thermal imaging, and heat transfer setups are needed. Thermal models and computer-aided engineering tools are useful for robust designs. During abuse conditions, designs should prevent cell-to-cell propagation in a module/pack (i.e., keep the fire small and manageable). NREL's battery ISC device can be used for evaluating the robustness of a module/pack to cell-to-cell propagation.

  18. DIY Fraction Pack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Alan; Graham, Louise

    2003-01-01

    Describes a very successful attempt to teach fractions to year 5 pupils based on pupils making their own fraction pack. Children decided for themselves how to make the fractional slices used in the activity using colored cardboard sheets and templates of a paper circle consisting of 24 equal slices. (Author/NB)

  19. Mass transfer characteristics in a rotating packed bed with split packing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youzhi Liu; Deyin Gu; Chengcheng Xu; Guisheng Qi; Weizhou Jiao

    2015-01-01

    The rotating packed bed (RPB) with split packing is a novel gas–liquid contactor, which intensifies the mass transfer processes controlled by gas-side resistance. To assess its efficacy, the mass transfer characteristics with adjacent rings in counter-rotation and co-rotation modes in a split packing RPB were studied experimentally. The physical absorption system NH3–H2O was used for characterizing the gas volumetric mass transfer coeffi-cient (kyae) and the effective interfacial area (ae) was determined by chemical absorption in the CO2–NaOH sys-tem. The variation in kyae and ae with the operating conditions is also investigated. The experimental results indicated that kyae and ae for counter-rotation of the adjacent packing rings in the split packing RPB were higher than those for co-rotation, and both counter-rotation and co-rotation of the split packing RPB were superior over conventional RPBs under the similar operating conditions.

  20. The Six Pack Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Henrik; Ritter, Thomas

    Ever seen a growth strategies fail because it was not connect ed to the firm’s customer base? Or a customer relationship strategy falters just because it was the wrong thing to do with that given customer? This article presents the six pack model, a tool that makes growth profitable and predictable....... Not all customers can and should grow – thus a firm needs to classify its customers in order to implement the right customer strategy....

  1. Homogeneous catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Chadwick, John C; Freixa, Zoraida; van Leeuwen, Piet W N M

    2011-01-01

    This first book to illuminate this important aspect of chemical synthesis improves the lifetime of catalysts, thus reducing material and saving energy, costs and waste.The international panel of expert authors describes the studies that have been conducted concerning the way homogeneous catalysts decompose, and the differences between homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts. The result is a ready reference for organic, catalytic, polymer and complex chemists, as well as those working in industry and with/on organometallics.

  2. Heuristics for Multidimensional Packing Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeblad, Jens

    In this thesis we consider solution methods for packing problems. Packing problems occur in many different situations both directly in the industry and as sub-problems of other problems. High-quality solutions for problems in the industrial sector may be able to reduce transportation and production...... costs significantly. For packing problems in general are given a set of items and one of more containers. The items must be placed within the container such that some objective is optimized and the items do not overlap. Items and container may be rectangular or irregular (e.g. polygons and polyhedra...... methods. Two important problem variants are the knapsack packing problem and the strip-packing problem. In the knapsack packing problem, each item is given a profit value, and the problem asks for the subset with maximal profit that can be placed within one container. The strip-packing problem asks...

  3. New bounds for multi-dimensional packing

    OpenAIRE

    Seiden, S.; Stee, van, Rob

    2001-01-01

    New upper and lower bounds are presented for a multi-dimensional generalization of bin packing called box packing. Several variants of this problem, including bounded space box packing, square packing, variable sized box packing and resource augmented box packing are also studied. The main results, stated for d=2, are as follows: A new upper bound of 2.66013 for online box packing, a new $14/9 + varepsilon$ polynomial time offline approximation algorithm for square packing, a new upper bound ...

  4. Packing ellipsoids with overlap

    CERN Document Server

    Uhler, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    The problem of packing ellipsoids of different sizes and shapes into an ellipsoidal container so as to minimize a measure of overlap between ellipsoids is considered. A bilevel optimization formulation is given, together with an algorithm for the general case and a simpler algorithm for the special case in which all ellipsoids are in fact spheres. Convergence results are proved and computational experience is described and illustrated. The motivating application - chromosome organization in the human cell nucleus - is discussed briefly, and some illustrative results are presented.

  5. Packing anchored rectangles

    CERN Document Server

    Dumitrescu, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    Let $S$ be a set of $n$ points in the unit square $[0,1]^2$, one of which is the origin. We construct $n$ pairwise interior-disjoint axis-aligned empty rectangles such that the lower left corner of each rectangle is a point in $S$, and the rectangles jointly cover at least a positive constant area (about 0.09). This is a first step towards the solution of a longstanding conjecture that the rectangles in such a packing can jointly cover an area of at least 1/2.

  6. New bounds for multi-dimensional packing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seiden, S.; Stee, R. van

    2001-01-01

    New upper and lower bounds are presented for a multi-dimensional generalization of bin packing called box packing. Several variants of this problem, including bounded space box packing, square packing, variable sized box packing and resource augmented box packing are also studied. The main results,

  7. Cell packing structures

    KAUST Repository

    Pottmann, Helmut

    2015-03-03

    This paper is an overview of architectural structures which are either composed of polyhedral cells or closely related to them. We introduce the concept of a support structure of such a polyhedral cell packing. It is formed by planar quads and obtained by connecting corresponding vertices in two combinatorially equivalent meshes whose corresponding edges are coplanar and thus determine planar quads. Since corresponding triangle meshes only yield trivial structures, we focus on support structures associated with quad meshes or hex-dominant meshes. For the quadrilateral case, we provide a short survey of recent research which reveals beautiful relations to discrete differential geometry. Those are essential for successfully initializing numerical optimization schemes for the computation of quad-based support structures. Hex-dominant structures may be designed via Voronoi tessellations, power diagrams, sphere packings and various extensions of these concepts. Apart from the obvious application as load-bearing structures, we illustrate here a new application to shading and indirect lighting. On a higher level, our work emphasizes the interplay between geometry, optimization, statics, and manufacturing, with the overall aim of combining form, function and fabrication into novel integrated design tools.

  8. ExactPack Documentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singleton, Jr., Robert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Israel, Daniel M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Doebling, Scott William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Woods, Charles Nathan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kaul, Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Walter, Jr., John William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rogers, Michael Lloyd [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-09

    For code verification, one compares the code output against known exact solutions. There are many standard test problems used in this capacity, such as the Noh and Sedov problems. ExactPack is a utility that integrates many of these exact solution codes into a common API (application program interface), and can be used as a stand-alone code or as a python package. ExactPack consists of python driver scripts that access a library of exact solutions written in Fortran or Python. The spatial profiles of the relevant physical quantities, such as the density, fluid velocity, sound speed, or internal energy, are returned at a time specified by the user. The solution profiles can be viewed and examined by a command line interface or a graphical user interface, and a number of analysis tools and unit tests are also provided. We have documented the physics of each problem in the solution library, and provided complete documentation on how to extend the library to include additional exact solutions. ExactPack’s code architecture makes it easy to extend the solution-code library to include additional exact solutions in a robust, reliable, and maintainable manner.

  9. Haphazard Packing of Unequal Spheres

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶大年; 张金民

    1991-01-01

    Haphazard packing of equal and unequal spheres can be performed for the spheres of molecular sieve material with a density of 1.80.The packing of such spheres in air is equivalent to that of nat-ural grains in water.Packing concentrations of equal spheres have been obtained for different pac-king intensities.Unequal spheres can be regarded as equal ones in a wide range of diameter ratios,so far as the packing concentration is concerned.A threshold of diameter ratio exists at 0.70,be-low which the packing concentration is expected to increase.The variation curves of concentration vs.diameter ratio were established in the experiment.The result will help us to understand the process of sedimentation and the concentration of voids in sedimentary rocks.

  10. Method for dense packing discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallus, Yoav; Elser, Veit; Gravel, Simon

    2010-11-01

    The problem of packing a system of particles as densely as possible is foundational in the field of discrete geometry and is a powerful model in the material and biological sciences. As packing problems retreat from the reach of solution by analytic constructions, the importance of an efficient numerical method for conducting de novo (from-scratch) searches for dense packings becomes crucial. In this paper, we use the divide and concur framework to develop a general search method for the solution of periodic constraint problems, and we apply it to the discovery of dense periodic packings. An important feature of the method is the integration of the unit-cell parameters with the other packing variables in the definition of the configuration space. The method we present led to previously reported improvements in the densest-known tetrahedron packing. Here, we use the method to reproduce the densest-known lattice sphere packings and the best-known lattice kissing arrangements in up to 14 and 11 dimensions, respectively, providing numerical evidence for their optimality. For nonspherical particles, we report a dense packing of regular four-dimensional simplices with density ϕ=128/219≈0.5845 and with a similar structure to the densest-known tetrahedron packing.

  11. Polarizable protein packing

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Albert H.

    2011-01-24

    To incorporate protein polarization effects within a protein combinatorial optimization framework, we decompose the polarizable force field AMOEBA into low order terms. Including terms up to the third-order provides a fair approximation to the full energy while maintaining tractability. We represent the polarizable packing problem for protein G as a hypergraph and solve for optimal rotamers with the FASTER combinatorial optimization algorithm. These approximate energy models can be improved to high accuracy [root mean square deviation (rmsd) < 1 kJ mol -1] via ridge regression. The resulting trained approximations are used to efficiently identify new, low-energy solutions. The approach is general and should allow combinatorial optimization of other many-body problems. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Comput Chem, 2011 Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Catalyst mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masel, Richard I.; Rosen, Brian A.

    2017-02-14

    Catalysts that include at least one catalytically active element and one helper catalyst can be used to increase the rate or lower the overpotential of chemical reactions. The helper catalyst can simultaneously act as a director molecule, suppressing undesired reactions and thus increasing selectivity toward the desired reaction. These catalysts can be useful for a variety of chemical reactions including, in particular, the electrochemical conversion of CO.sub.2 or formic acid. The catalysts can also suppress H.sub.2 evolution, permitting electrochemical cell operation at potentials below RHE. Chemical processes and devices using the catalysts are also disclosed, including processes to produce CO, OH.sup.-, HCO.sup.-, H.sub.2CO, (HCO.sub.2).sup.-, H.sub.2CO.sub.2, CH.sub.3OH, CH.sub.4, C.sub.2H.sub.4, CH.sub.3CH.sub.2OH, CH.sub.3COO.sup.-, CH.sub.3COOH, C.sub.2H.sub.6, O.sub.2, H.sub.2, (COOH).sub.2, or (COO.sup.-).sub.2, and a specific device, namely, a CO.sub.2 sensor.

  13. Photo-oxidation catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, J. Roland; Liu, Ping; Smith, R. Davis

    2009-07-14

    Photo-oxidation catalysts and methods for cleaning a metal-based catalyst are disclosed. An exemplary catalyst system implementing a photo-oxidation catalyst may comprise a metal-based catalyst, and a photo-oxidation catalyst for cleaning the metal-based catalyst in the presence of light. The exposure to light enables the photo-oxidation catalyst to substantially oxidize absorbed contaminants and reduce accumulation of the contaminants on the metal-based catalyst. Applications are also disclosed.

  14. Sugar exported: sugar packed in containers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto Yemal

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study in the port sector specialized in handling of bagged sugar. Sugar has always been exported in bags of 50 kg, placed directly in the holds of ships for general cargo. It appears that this form of transport has become obsolete now, the market for the direct form of transport of sugar packed in containers. Companies involved in this type of port handling need understand the reasons that are influencing this new mode of transportation as a way to fit and remain active and competitive in the industry.

  15. Packing Products: Polystyrene vs. Cornstarch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Packing materials such as polystyrene take thousands of years to decompose, whereas packing peanuts made from cornstarch, which some companies are now using, can serve the same purpose, but dissolve in water. The author illustrates this point to her class one rainy day using the sculptures students made from polystyrene and with the cornstarch…

  16. Fast Searching in Packed Strings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip

    2009-01-01

    . However, most strings are stored in a computer in a packed representation with several characters in a single word, giving us the opportunity to read multiple characters simultaneously. In this paper we study the worst-case complexity of string matching on strings given in packed representation. Let m...

  17. Valve stem and packing assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wordin, J.J.

    1990-12-31

    A valve stem and packing assembly is provided in which a rotatable valve stem includes a first tractrix surface for sliding contact with a stem packing and also includes a second tractrix surface for sliding contact with a bonnet. Force is applied by means of a spring, gland flange, and gland on the stem packing so the stem packing seals to the valve stem and bonnet. This configuration serves to create and maintain a reliable seal between the stem packing and the valve stem. The bonnet includes a second complementary tractrix surface for contacting the second sliding tractrix surface, the combination serving as a journal bearing for the entire valve stem and packing assembly. The journal bearing so configured is known as a Schiele`s pivot. The Schiele`s pivot also serves to maintain proper alignment of the valve stem with respect to the bonnet. Vertical wear between the surfaces of the Schiele`s pivot is uniform at all points of contact between the second sliding tractrix surface and the second complementary tractrix surface of a bonnet. The valve stem is connected to a valve plug by means of a slip joint. The valve is opened and closed by rotating the valve stem. The slip joint compensates for wear on the Schiele`s pivot and on the valve plug. A ledge is provided on the valve bonnet for the retaining nut to bear against. The ledge prevents overtightening of the retaining nut and the resulting excessive friction between stem and stem packing.

  18. Highly dispersed metal catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Xin; West, William L.; Rhodes, William D.

    2016-11-08

    A supported catalyst having an atomic level single atom structure is provided such that substantially all the catalyst is available for catalytic function. A process of forming a single atom catalyst unto a porous catalyst support is also provided.

  19. Automotive Catalyst State Diagnosis Using Microwaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moos Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The state of catalysts plays a key role in automotive exhaust gas aftertreatment. The soot or ash loading of Diesel particulate filters, the oxygen loading degree in three-way catalysts, the amount of stored ammonia in SCR catalysts, or the NOx loading degree in NOx storage catalysts are important parameters that are today determined indirectly and in a model-based manner with gas sensors installed upstream and/or downstream of the catalysts. This contribution gives an overview on a novel approach to determine the catalyst state directly by a microwave-based technique. The method exploits the fact that the catalyst housing acts as a microwave cavity resonator. As “sensing” elements, one or two simple antennas are mounted inside the catalyst canning. The electrical properties of the catalyst device (ceramic honeycomb plus coating and storage material can be measured. Preferably, the resonance characteristics, e.g., the resonance frequencies, of selected cavity modes are observed. The information on the catalyst interior obtained in such a contactless manner is very well correlated with the catalyst state as will be demonstrated for different exhaust gas aftertreatment systems.

  20. Compactness Theorems for Geometric Packings

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Greg

    2000-01-01

    Moser asked whether the collection of rectangles of dimensions 1 x 1/2, 1/2 x 1/3, 1/3 x 1/4, ..., whose total area equals 1, can be packed into the unit square without overlap, and whether the collection of squares of side lengths 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, ... can be packed without overlap into a rectangle of area pi^2/6-1. Computational investigations have been made into packing these collections into squares of side length 1+epsilon and rectangles of area pi^2/6-1+epsilon, respectively, and one can c...

  1. Domain Discretization and Circle Packings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Kealey

    A circle packing is a configuration of circles which are tangent with one another in a prescribed pattern determined by a combinatorial triangulation, where the configuration fills a planar domain or a two-dimensional surface. The vertices in the triangulation correspond to centers of circles......, and edges correspond to two circles (having centers corresponding to the endpoints of the edge) being tangent to each other. This circle packing creates a rigid structure having an underlying geometric triangulation, where the centers of circles again correspond to vertices in the triangulation......, and the edges are geodesic segments (Euclidean, hyperbolic, or spherical) connecting centers of circles that are tangent to each other. Three circles that are mutually tangent form a face of the triangulation. Since circle packing is closely related to triangulation, circle packing methods can be applied...

  2. The pursuit of perfect packing

    CERN Document Server

    Weaire, Denis

    2008-01-01

    Coauthored by one of the creators of the most efficient space packing solution, the Weaire-Phelan structure, The Pursuit of Perfect Packing, Second Edition explores a problem of importance in physics, mathematics, chemistry, biology, and engineering: the packing of structures. Maintaining its mathematical core, this edition continues and revises some of the stories from its predecessor while adding several new examples and applications. The book focuses on both scientific and everyday problems ranging from atoms to honeycombs. It describes packing models, such as the Kepler conjecture, Voronoï decomposition, and Delaunay decomposition, as well as actual structure models, such as the Kelvin cell and the Weaire-Phelan structure. The authors discuss numerous historical aspects and provide biographical details on influential contributors to the field, including emails from Thomas Hales and Ken Brakke. With examples from physics, crystallography, engineering, and biology, this accessible and whimsical bo...

  3. Heterogeneous Catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dakka, J.; Sheldon, R.A.; Sanderson, W.A.

    1997-01-01

    Abstract of GB 2309655 (A) Heterogeneous catalysts comprising one or more metal compounds selected from the group consisting of tin, molybdenum, tungsten, zirconium and selenium compounds deposited on the surface of a silicalite are provided. Preferably Sn(IV) and/or Mo(VI) are employed. The cat

  4. Hydrodynamic behaviour of a gas—solid counter-current packed column at trickle flow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roes, A.W.M.; Swaaij, van W.P.M.

    1979-01-01

    Trickle flow of a more or less fluidized catalyst through a packed column is a promising new gas—solid counter-current operation. The hydrodynamic, behaviour of such a column, filled with dumped PALL rings, has been investigated, while some results have been obtained with RASCHIG rings and cylindric

  5. Pattern formations and optimal packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mityushev, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Patterns of different symmetries may arise after solution to reaction-diffusion equations. Hexagonal arrays, layers and their perturbations are observed in different models after numerical solution to the corresponding initial-boundary value problems. We demonstrate an intimate connection between pattern formations and optimal random packing on the plane. The main study is based on the following two points. First, the diffusive flux in reaction-diffusion systems is approximated by piecewise linear functions in the framework of structural approximations. This leads to a discrete network approximation of the considered continuous problem. Second, the discrete energy minimization yields optimal random packing of the domains (disks) in the representative cell. Therefore, the general problem of pattern formations based on the reaction-diffusion equations is reduced to the geometric problem of random packing. It is demonstrated that all random packings can be divided onto classes associated with classes of isomorphic graphs obtained from the Delaunay triangulation. The unique optimal solution is constructed in each class of the random packings. If the number of disks per representative cell is finite, the number of classes of isomorphic graphs, hence, the number of optimal packings is also finite.

  6. Packing Optimization of Sorbent Bed Containing Dissimilar and Irregular Shaped Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Nathan; Guttromson, Jayleen; Piowaty, Hailey

    2011-01-01

    The Fire Cartridge is a packed bed air filter with two different and separate layers of media designed to provide respiratory protection from combustion products after a fire event on the International Space Station (ISS). The first layer of media is a carbon monoxide catalyst and the second layer of media is universal carbon. During development of Fire Cartridge prototypes, the two media beds were noticed to have shifted inside the cartridge. The movement of media within the cartridge can cause mixing of the bed layers, air voids, and channeling, which could cause preferential air flow and allow contaminants to pass through without removal. An optimally packed bed mitigates these risks and ensures effective removal of contaminants from the air. In order to optimally pack each layer, vertical, horizontal, and orbital agitations were investigated and a packed bulk density was calculated for each method. Packed bulk density must be calculated for each media type to accommodate variations in particle size, shape, and density. Additionally, the optimal vibration parameters must be re-evaluated for each batch of media due to variations in particle size distribution between batches. For this application it was determined that orbital vibrations achieve an optimal pack density and the two media layers can be packed by the same method. Another finding was media with a larger size distribution of particles achieve an optimal bed pack easier than media with a smaller size distribution of particles.

  7. Valve stem and packing assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wordin, J.J.

    1991-09-03

    A valve stem and packing assembly is provided in which a rotatable valve stem includes a first tractrix surface for sliding contact with a stem packing and also includes a second tractrix surface for sliding contact with a bonnet. Force is applied by means of a spring, gland flange, and gland on the stem packing so the stem packing seals to the valve stem and bonnet. This configuration serves to create and maintain a reliable seal between the stem packing and the valve stem. The bonnet includes a second complementary tractrix surface for contacting the second sliding tractrix surface, the combination serving as a journal bearing for the entire valve stem and packing assembly. The journal bearing so configured is known as a Schiele's pivot. The Schiele's pivot also serves to maintain proper alignment of the valve stem with respect to the bonnet. Vertical wear between the surfaces of the Schiele's pivot is uniform at all points of contact between the second sliding tractrix surface and the second complementary tractrix surface of a bonnet. The valve stem is connected to a valve plug by means of a slip joint. The valve is opened and closed by rotating the valve stem. The slip joint compensates for wear on the Schiele's pivot and on the valve plug. A ledge is provided on the valve bonnet for the retaining nut to bear against. The ledge prevents over tightening of the retaining nut and the resulting excessive friction between stem and stem packing. 2 figures.

  8. Valve stem and packing assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wordin, John J. (Bingham County, ID)

    1991-01-01

    A valve stem and packing assembly is provided in which a rotatable valve stem includes a first tractrix surface for sliding contact with a stem packing and also includes a second tractrix surface for sliding contact with a bonnet. Force is applied by means of a spring, gland flange, and gland on the stem packing so the stem packing seals to the valve stem and bonnet. This configuration serves to create and maintain a reliable seal between the stem packing and the valve stem. The bonnet includes a second complementary tractrix surface for contacting the second sliding tractrix surface, the combination serving as a journal bearing for the entire valve stem and packing assembly. The journal bearing so configured is known as a Schiele's pivot. The Schiele's pivot also serves to maintain proper alignment of the valve stem with respect to the bonnet. Vertical wear between the surfaces of the Schiele's pivot is uniform at all points of contact between the second sliding tractrix surface and the second complementary tractrix surface of a bonnet. The valve stem is connected to a valve plug by means of a slip joint. The valve is opened and closed by rotating the valve stem. The slip joint compensates for wear on the Schiele's pivot and on the valve plug. A ledge is provided on the valve bonnet for the retaining nut to bear against. The ledge prevents overtightening of the retaining nut and the resulting excessive friction between stem and stem packing.

  9. Valve stem and packing assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wordin, J.J.

    1990-01-01

    A valve stem and packing assembly is provided in which a rotatable valve stem includes a first tractrix surface for sliding contact with a stem packing and also includes a second tractrix surface for sliding contact with a bonnet. Force is applied by means of a spring, gland flange, and gland on the stem packing so the stem packing seals to the valve stem and bonnet. This configuration serves to create and maintain a reliable seal between the stem packing and the valve stem. The bonnet includes a second complementary tractrix surface for contacting the second sliding tractrix surface, the combination serving as a journal bearing for the entire valve stem and packing assembly. The journal bearing so configured is known as a Schiele's pivot. The Schiele's pivot also serves to maintain proper alignment of the valve stem with respect to the bonnet. Vertical wear between the surfaces of the Schiele's pivot is uniform at all points of contact between the second sliding tractrix surface and the second complementary tractrix surface of a bonnet. The valve stem is connected to a valve plug by means of a slip joint. The valve is opened and closed by rotating the valve stem. The slip joint compensates for wear on the Schiele's pivot and on the valve plug. A ledge is provided on the valve bonnet for the retaining nut to bear against. The ledge prevents overtightening of the retaining nut and the resulting excessive friction between stem and stem packing.

  10. 7 CFR 51.310 - Packing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packing requirements. 51.310 Section 51.310... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apples Packing Requirements § 51.310 Packing requirements... the contents. (e) Tolerances: In order to allow for variations incident to proper packing, not...

  11. 7 CFR 51.1270 - Packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packing. 51.1270 Section 51.1270 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Summer and Fall Pears 1 Standard Pack § 51.1270 Packing. (a) Each package shall be packed...

  12. 7 CFR 51.1311 - Packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packing. 51.1311 Section 51.1311 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Standards for Winter Pears 1 Standard Pack § 51.1311 Packing. (a) Each package shall be packed so that...

  13. Commercial Application of Novel FDFCC Grid Packing Type Stripper

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Zhenqian; Tian Geng; Lei Shiyuan

    2007-01-01

    The novel FDFCC grid packing stripper is used to raise the stripping efficiency of the equipment.This technology aims to increase the gas-solid contact area and improve the gas-solid contact efficiency.This technology has been applied in the revamped 1.05 Mt/a No.1 FCC unit at the SINOPEC Changling Branch Company.The outcome on application of this equipment has revealed that the fluidization of the stripper was stable coupled with smooth operation.At a steam stripping load of less than 50%of the design value the spent catalyst had a lower H/C ratio,and the hydrogen content in the coke after revamp of the FCC unit decreased by 8.1%compared to the case before the equipment revamp.The spent catalyst had higher activity with the dry gasand coke yields reduced by over 0.5%.resulting in good economic benefits.

  14. Nature of packs used in propellant modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, F; Stafford, S; Jackson, T L; Buckmaster, J

    2008-04-01

    In recent years we have constructed closely packed spheres using the Lubachevsky-Stillinger algorithm to generate morphological models of heterogeneous solid propellants. Improvements to the algorithm now allow us to create large polydisperse packs on a laptop computer, and to create monodisperse packs with packing fractions greater than 70% which display significant crystal order. The use of these models in the physical context motivates efforts to examine in some detail the nature of the packs, including certain statistical properties. We compare packing fractions for binary packs with long-known experimental data. Also, we discuss the near-neighbor number and the radial distribution function (RDF) for monodisperse packs and make comparisons with experimental data. We also briefly discuss the RDF for bidisperse packs. We also consider bounded monodisperse packs, and pay particular attention to the near-wall structure where we identify significant order.

  15. Hard sphere packings within cylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lin; Steinhardt, William; Zhao, Hao; Socolar, Joshua E S; Charbonneau, Patrick

    2016-03-07

    Arrangements of identical hard spheres confined to a cylinder with hard walls have been used to model experimental systems, such as fullerenes in nanotubes and colloidal wire assembly. Finding the densest configurations, called close packings, of hard spheres of diameter σ in a cylinder of diameter D is a purely geometric problem that grows increasingly complex as D/σ increases, and little is thus known about the regime for D > 2.873σ. In this work, we extend the identification of close packings up to D = 4.00σ by adapting Torquato-Jiao's adaptive-shrinking-cell formulation and sequential-linear-programming (SLP) technique. We identify 17 new structures, almost all of them chiral. Beyond D ≈ 2.85σ, most of the structures consist of an outer shell and an inner core that compete for being close packed. In some cases, the shell adopts its own maximum density configuration, and the stacking of core spheres within it is quasiperiodic. In other cases, an interplay between the two components is observed, which may result in simple periodic structures. In yet other cases, the very distinction between the core and shell vanishes, resulting in more exotic packing geometries, including some that are three-dimensional extensions of structures obtained from packing hard disks in a circle.

  16. Towards optimal packed string matching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ben-Kiki, Oren; Bille, Philip; Breslauer, Dany;

    2014-01-01

    -size string-matching instruction wssm is available in contemporary commodity processors. The other word-size maximum-suffix instruction wslm is only required during the pattern pre-processing. Benchmarks show that our solution can be efficiently implemented, unlike some prior theoretical packed string......In the packed string matching problem, it is assumed that each machine word can accommodate up to α characters, thus an n-character string occupies n/α memory words.(a) We extend the Crochemore–Perrin constant-space O(n)-time string-matching algorithm to run in optimal O(n/α) time and even in real...... matching work.(b) We also consider the complexity of the packed string matching problem in the classical word-RAM model in the absence of the specialized micro-level instructions wssm and wslm. We propose micro-level algorithms for the theoretically efficient emulation using parallel algorithms techniques...

  17. The pursuit of perfect packing

    CERN Document Server

    Weaire, Denis

    2000-01-01

    In 1998 Thomas Hales dramatically announced the solution of a problem that has long teased eminent mathematicians: what is the densest possible arrangement of identical spheres? The Pursuit of Perfect Packing recounts the story of this problem and many others that have to do with packing things together. The examples are taken from mathematics, physics, biology, and engineering, including the arrangement of soap bubbles in foam, atoms in a crystal, the architecture of the bee''s honeycomb, and the structure of the Giant''s Causeway. Using an informal style and with key references, the book also includes brief accounts of the lives of many of the scientists who devoted themselves to problems of packing over many centuries, together with wry comments on their efforts. It is an entertaining introduction to the field for both specialists and the more general public.

  18. Heuristics for Multidimensional Packing Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Egeblad, Jens

    In this thesis we consider solution methods for packing problems. Packing problems occur in many different situations both directly in the industry and as sub-problems of other problems. High-quality solutions for problems in the industrial sector may be able to reduce transportation and production...... costs significantly. For packing problems in general are given a set of items and one of more containers. The items must be placed within the container such that some objective is optimized and the items do not overlap. Items and container may be rectangular or irregular (e.g. polygons and polyhedra......) and may be defined in any number of dimensions. Solution methods are based on theory from both computational geometry and operations research. The scientific contributions of this thesis are presented in the form of six papers and a section which introduces the many problem types and recent solution...

  19. Planet Packing in Circumbinary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kratter, Kaitlin M

    2013-01-01

    The recent discovery of planets orbiting main sequence binaries will provide crucial constraints for theories of binary and planet formation. The formation pathway for these planets is complicated by uncertainties in the formation mechanism of the host stars. In this paper, we compare the dynamical states of single and binary star planetary systems. Specifically, we pose two questions: (1) What does it mean for a circumbinary system to be dynamically packed? (2) How many systems are required to differentiate between a population of packed or sparse planets? We determine when circumbinary systems become dynamically unstable as a function of the separation between the host-stars and the inner planet, and the first and second planets. We show that these represent unique stability constraints compared to single-star systems. We find that although the existing Kepler data is insufficient to distinguish between a population of packed or sparse circumbinary systems, a more thorough study of circumbinary TTVs combine...

  20. Cylinder valve packing nut studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blue, S.C. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Paducah, KY (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The design, manufacture, and use of cylinder valve packing nuts have been studied to improve their resistance to failure from stress corrosion cracking. Stress frozen photoelastic models have been analyzed to measure the stress concentrations at observed points of failure. The load effects induced by assembly torque and thermal expansion of stem packing were observed by strain gaging nuts. The effects of finishing operations and heat treatment were studied by the strain gage hole boring and X-ray methods. Modifications of manufacturing and operation practices are reducing the frequency of stress corrosion failures.

  1. Electrolytic ammonia removal and current efficiency by a vermiculite-packed electrochemical reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Liang; Yao, Ji; Fang, Xueyou; Huang, Yuanxing; Mu, Yan

    2017-01-01

    The ammonia removal as well as the current efficiency during electrolysis was investigated by using a vermiculite-packed electrochemical reactor under continuous mode. Experimental results showed that adsorption of ammonia by vermiculite and electrolytic desorption of ammonia simultaneously existed in the reactor, leading to 89% removal of initial 30 mg N/L ammonia and current efficiency of 25% under the condition of 2.0 A, 6.0 min hydraulic retention time with 300 mg Cl/L chloride as the catalyst. The ammonia removal capacity had a linear relationship with the products of hydraulic retention time, current and chloride concentration within experimental conditions. The treatment results of secondary effluent indicated that 29.9 mg N/L ammonia can be reduced to 4.6 mg N/L with 72% removal of total nitrogen and a current efficiency of 23%, which was 2% less than synthetic wastewater due to the reducing components in the real wastewater.

  2. Packing Optimization of an Intentionally Stratified Sorbent Bed Containing Dissimilar Media Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Jessica; Guttromson, Jayleen; Holland, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    The Fire Cartridge is a packed bed air filter with two different and separate layers of media designed to provide respiratory protection from combustion products after a fire event on the International Space Station (ISS). The first layer of media is a carbon monoxide catalyst made from gold nanoparticles dispersed on iron oxide. The second layer of media is universal carbon, commonly used in commercial respirator filters. Each layer must be optimally packed to effectively remove contaminants from the air. Optimal packing is achieved by vibratory agitations. However, if post-packing movement of the media within the cartridge occurs, mixing of the bed layers, air voids, and channeling could cause preferential air flow and allow contaminants to pass. Several iterations of prototype fire cartridges were developed to reduce post-packing movement of the media within each layer (settling), and to prevent mixing of the two media types. Both types of movement of the media contribute to decreased fire cartridge performance. Each iteration of the fire cartridge design was tested to demonstrate mechanical loads required to cause detrimental movement within the bed, and resulting level of functionality of the media beds after movement was detected. In order to optimally pack each layer, vertical, horizontal, and orbital agitations were tested and a final packed bulk density was calculated for each method. Packed bulk density must be calculated for each lot of catalyst to accommodate variations in particle size, shape, and density. In addition, a physical divider sheet between each type of media was added within the fire cartridge design to further inhibit intermixing of the bed layers.

  3. Catalyst Architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiib, Hans; Marling, Gitte; Hansen, Peter Mandal

    2014-01-01

    of programs, have a role in mediating positive social and/or cultural development. In this sense, we talk about architecture as a catalyst for: sustainable adaptation of the city’s infrastructure appropriate renovation of dilapidated urban districts strengthening of social cohesiveness in the city development...... meaningful for everyone. The exhibited works are designed by SANAA, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, James Corner Field Operation, JBMC Arquitetura e Urbanismo, Atelier Bow-Wow, Ateliers Jean Nouvel, COBE, Transform, BIG, Topotek1, Superflex, and by visual artist Jane Maria Petersen....

  4. Pack cementation coatings for alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yi-Rong; Zheng, Minhui; Rapp, R.A. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The halide-activated pack cementation process was modified to produce a Ge-doped silicide diffusion coating on a Cr-Cr{sub 2}Nb alloy in a single processing step. The morphology and composition of the coating depended both on the composition of the pack and on the composition and microstructure of the substrate. Higher Ge content in the pack suppressed the formation of CrSi{sub 2} and reduced the growth kinetics of the coating. Ge was not homogeneously distributed in the coatings. In cyclic and isothermal oxidation in air at 700 and 1050{degrees}C, the Ge-doped silicide coating protected the Cr-Nb alloys from significant oxidation by the formation of a Ge-doped silica film. The codeposition and diffusion of aluminum and chromium into low alloy steel have been achieved using elemental Al and Cr powders and a two-step pack cementation process. Sequential process treatments at 925{degrees}C and 1150{degrees}C yield dense and uniform ferrite coatings, whose compositions are close to either Fe{sub 3}Al or else FeAl plus a lower Cr content, when processed under different conditions. The higher content of Al in the coatings was predicted by thermodynamic calculations of equilibrium in the gas phase. The effect of the particle size of the metal powders on the surface composition of the coating has been studied for various combinations of Al and Cr powders.

  5. Wire and Packing Tape Sandwiches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabinowitz, Sandy

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how students can combine craft wire with clear packing tape to create a two-dimensional design that can be bent and twisted to create a three-dimensional form. Students sandwich wire designs between two layers of tape. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  6. The Maximum Resource Bin Packing Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyar, J.; Epstein, L.; Favrholdt, L.M.

    2006-01-01

    Usually, for bin packing problems, we try to minimize the number of bins used or in the case of the dual bin packing problem, maximize the number or total size of accepted items. This paper presents results for the opposite problems, where we would like to maximize the number of bins used...... algorithms, First-Fit-Increasing and First-Fit-Decreasing for the maximum resource variant of classical bin packing. For the on-line variant, we define maximum resource variants of classical and dual bin packing. For dual bin packing, no on-line algorithm is competitive. For classical bin packing, we find...

  7. Performance characteristics of a new structured packing

    OpenAIRE

    Bessou, Vincent; Rouzineau, David; Prevost, Michel; Abbé, François; Dumont, Charles; Maumus, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Michel

    2010-01-01

    A new structured packing using carbon fibres, called Sepcarb® 4D, is presented. This packing has several attractive properties, such as high voidage (ε=94%) and high effective area (a=420 m2 m−3). These properties are advantageous for packing used as a gas–liquid contactor for separation units. To determine the internal characteristics of this packing, we performed several experiments using a 150-mm-internal-diameter column. Firstly, hydrodynamics experiments were conducted using an air–water...

  8. Cascaded process model based control: packed absorption column application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajan, Anand; Jayaraman, Suresh Kumar; Sethuraman, Vijayalakshmi; Raul, Pramod R; Rhinehart, R Russell

    2014-03-01

    Nonlinear, adaptive, process-model based control is demonstrated in a cascaded single-input-single-output mode for pressure drop control in a pilot-scale packed absorption column. The process is shown to be nonlinear. Control is demonstrated in both servo and regulatory modes, for no wind-up in a constrained situation, and for bumpless transfer. Model adaptation is demonstrated and shown to provide process insight. The application procedure is revealed as a design guide to aid others in implementing process-model based control.

  9. Complications of balloon packing in epistaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeeren, Lenka; Derks, Wynia; Fokkens, Wytske; Menger, Dirk Jan

    2015-01-01

    Although balloon packing appears to be efficient to control epistaxis, severe local complications can occur. We describe four patients with local lesions after balloon packing. Prolonged balloon packing can cause damage to nasal mucosa, septum and alar skin (nasal mucosa, the cartilaginous skeleton

  10. Random packing of colloids and granular matter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouterse, A.

    2008-01-01

    This thesis deals with the random packing of colloids and granular matter. A random packing is a stable disordered collection of touching particles, without long-range positional and orientational order. Experimental random packings of particles with the same shape but made of different materials sh

  11. Packing Superballs from Codes and Algebraic Curves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li LIU; Chao Ping XING

    2008-01-01

    In the present paper, we make use of codes with good parameters and algebraic curves over finite fields with many rational points to construct dense packings of superballs. It turns out that our packing density is quite reasonable. In particular, we improve some values for the best-known lower bounds on packing density.

  12. 7 CFR 51.1527 - Standard pack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... package. The number of plums or prunes in California peach boxes or lug boxes shall not vary more than 4... Standards for Grades of Fresh Plums and Prunes Standard Pack § 51.1527 Standard pack. (a) Packing. (1) All... plums or prunes in the top layer of any package shall be reasonably representative in quality and...

  13. Characteristics of fluidized-packed beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabor, J. D.; Mecham, W. J.

    1968-01-01

    Study of fluidized-packed bed includes investigation of heat transfer, solids-gas mixing, and elutriation characteristics. A fluidized-packed bed is a system involving the fluidization of small particles in the voids of a packed bed of larger nonfluidized particles.

  14. Packing defects into ordered structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechstein, R.; Kristoffersen, Henrik Høgh; Vilhelmsen, L.B.

    2012-01-01

    We have studied vicinal TiO2(110) surfaces by high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy and density functional theory calculations. On TiO2 surfaces characterized by a high density of ⟨11̅ 1⟩ steps, scanning tunneling microscopy reveals a high density of oxygen-deficient strandlike adstructur...... because building material is available at step sites. The strands on TiO2(110) represent point defects that are densely packed into ordered adstructures....

  15. Diffusion in Jammed Particle Packs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolintineanu, Dan S; Grest, Gary S; Lechman, Jeremy B; Silbert, Leonardo E

    2015-08-21

    Using random walk simulations we explore diffusive transport through monodisperse sphere packings over a range of packing fractions ϕ in the vicinity of the jamming transition at ϕ(c). Various diffusion properties are computed over several orders of magnitude in both time and packing pressure. Two well-separated regimes of normal "Fickian" diffusion, where the mean squared displacement is linear in time, are observed. The first corresponds to diffusion inside individual spheres, while the latter is the long-time bulk diffusion. The intermediate anomalous diffusion regime and the long-time value of the diffusion coefficient are both shown to be controlled by particle contacts, which in turn depend on proximity to ϕ(c). The time required to recover normal diffusion t* scales as (ϕ-ϕ(c))(-0.5) and the long-time diffusivity D(∞)∼(ϕ-ϕ(c))0.5, or D(∞)∼1/t*. It is shown that the distribution of mean first passage times associated with the escape of random walkers between neighboring particles controls both t* and D(∞) in the limit ϕ→ϕ(c).

  16. Vibrational Collapse of Hexapod Packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yuchen; Ding, Jingqiu; Barés, Jonathan; Dierichs, Karola; Behringer, Robert

    2016-11-01

    Columns made of convex noncohesive grains like sand collapse after being released from a confining container. However, structures built from concave grains can be stable without external support. Previous research show that the stability of the columns depends on column diameter and height, by observing column stability after carefully lifting their confinement tubes. Thinner and taller columns collapse with higher probability. While the column stability weakly depends on packing density, it strongly depends on inter-particle friction. Experiments that cause the column to collapse also reveal similar trends, as more effort (such as heavier loading or shearing) is required to destabilize columns that are intrinsically more stable. In the current experiments, we invesitage the effect of vibration on destructing a column. Short columns collapse following the relaxation dynamics of disorder systems, which coincides with similar experiments on staple packings. However, tall columns collapse faster at the beginning, in addition to the relaxation process coming after. Using high-speed imaging, we analyze column collapse data from different column geometries. Ongoing work is focusing on characterizing the stability of hexapod packings to vibration. We thanks NSF-DMR-1206351 and the William M. Keck Foundation.

  17. Electrochemical catalyst recovery method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Laura J.; Bray, Lane A.

    1995-01-01

    A method of recovering catalyst material from latent catalyst material solids includes: a) combining latent catalyst material solids with a liquid acid anolyte solution and a redox material which is soluble in the acid anolyte solution to form a mixture; b) electrochemically oxidizing the redox material within the mixture into a dissolved oxidant, the oxidant having a potential for oxidation which is effectively higher than that of the latent catalyst material; c) reacting the oxidant with the latent catalyst material to oxidize the latent catalyst material into at least one oxidized catalyst species which is soluble within the mixture and to reduce the oxidant back into dissolved redox material; and d) recovering catalyst material from the oxidized catalyst species of the mixture. The invention is expected to be particularly useful in recovering spent catalyst material from petroleum hydroprocessing reaction waste products having adhered sulfides, carbon, hydrocarbons, and undesired metals, and as well as in other industrial applications.

  18. Improved Online Square-into-Square Packing

    OpenAIRE

    Brubach, Brian

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we show an improved bound and new algorithm for the online square-into-square packing problem. This two-dimensional packing problem involves packing an online sequence of squares into a unit square container without any two squares overlapping. The goal is to find the largest area $\\alpha$ such that any set of squares with total area $\\alpha$ can be packed. We show an algorithm that can pack any set of squares with total area $\\alpha \\leq 3/8$ into a unit square in an online se...

  19. Pack of Applied Programs for Complex Analysis of Thermo-Compressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Zditovetskaya

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper proposes a pack of applied programs intended for conjugate calculation of cycle parameters with heat exchangers of thermo-compressor loop and a calculation of irreversible losses in the loop binding including non-stationary operational  mode is added to the pack.The paper contains investigations of thermo-compressor operation in the system of forced and exhaust ventilation for reduction of heat consumption by a heater in the cold season of the year

  20. Destabilization of confined granular packings due to fluid flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monloubou, Martin; Sandnes, Bjørnar

    2016-04-01

    Fluid flow through granular materials can cause fluidization when fluid drag exceeds the frictional stress within the packing. Fluid driven failure of granular packings is observed in both natural and engineered settings, e.g. soil liquefaction and flowback of proppants during hydraulic fracturing operations. We study experimentally the destabilization and flow of an unconsolidated granular packing subjected to a point source fluid withdrawal using a model system consisting of a vertical Hele-Shaw cell containing a water-grain mixture. The fluid is withdrawn from the cell at a constant rate, and the emerging flow patterns are imaged in time-lapse mode. Using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), we show that the granular flow gets localized in a narrow channel down the center of the cell, and adopts a Gaussian velocity profile similar to those observed in dry grain flows in silos. We investigate the effects of the experimental parameters (flow rate, grain size, grain shape, fluid viscosity) on the packing destabilization, and identify the physical mechanisms responsible for the observed complex flow behaviour.

  1. Adhesive loose packings of small dry particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenwei; Li, Shuiqing; Baule, Adrian; Makse, Hernán A.

    We explore adhesive loose packings of dry small spherical particles of micrometer size using 3D discrete-element simulations with adhesive contact mechanics. A dimensionless adhesion parameter ($Ad$) successfully combines the effects of particle velocities, sizes and the work of adhesion, identifying a universal regime of adhesive packings for $Ad>1$. The structural properties of the packings in this regime are well described by an ensemble approach based on a coarse-grained volume function that includes correlations between bulk and contact spheres. Our theoretical and numerical results predict: (i) An equation of state for adhesive loose packings that appears as a continuation from the frictionless random close packing (RCP) point in the jamming phase diagram; (ii) The existence of a maximal loose packing point at the coordination number $Z=2$ and packing fraction $\\phi=1/2^{3}$. Our results highlight that adhesion leads to a universal packing regime at packing fractions much smaller than the random loose packing, which can be described within a statistical mechanical framework. We present a general phase diagram of jammed matter comprising frictionless, frictional, adhesive as well as non-spherical particles, providing a classification of packings in terms of their continuation from the spherical frictionless RCP.

  2. Packing of crystalline structures of binary hard spheres: An analytical approach and application to amorphization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, H. J. H.

    2007-10-01

    The geometrical stability of the three lattices of the cubic crystal system, viz. face-centered cubic (fcc), body-centered cubic (bcc), and simple cubic (sc), consisting of bimodal discrete hard spheres, and the transition to amorphous packing is studied. First, the random close packing (rcp) fraction of binary mixtures of amorphously packed spheres is recapitulated. Next, the packing of a binary mixture of hard spheres in randomly disordered cubic structures is analyzed, resulting in original analytical expressions for the unit cell volume and the packing fraction, and which are also valid for the other five crystal systems. The bimodal fcc lattice parameter appears to be in close agreement with empirical hard sphere data from literature, and this parameter could be used to distinguish the size mismatch effect from all other effects in distorted binary lattices of materials. Here, as a first model application, bimodal amorphous and crystalline fcc/bcc packing fractions are combined, yielding the optimum packing configuration, which depends on mixture composition and diameter ratio only. Maps of the closest packing mode are established and applied to colloidal mixtures of polydisperse spheres and to binary alloys of bcc, fcc, and hcp metals. The extensive comparison between the analytical expressions derived here and the published numerical and empirical data yields good agreement. Hence, it is seen that basic space-filling theories on “simple” noninteracting hard spheres are a valuable tool for the study of crystalline materials.

  3. Packing of crystalline structures of binary hard spheres: an analytical approach and application to amorphization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouwers, H J H

    2007-10-01

    The geometrical stability of the three lattices of the cubic crystal system, viz. face-centered cubic (fcc), body-centered cubic (bcc), and simple cubic (sc), consisting of bimodal discrete hard spheres, and the transition to amorphous packing is studied. First, the random close packing (rcp) fraction of binary mixtures of amorphously packed spheres is recapitulated. Next, the packing of a binary mixture of hard spheres in randomly disordered cubic structures is analyzed, resulting in original analytical expressions for the unit cell volume and the packing fraction, and which are also valid for the other five crystal systems. The bimodal fcc lattice parameter appears to be in close agreement with empirical hard sphere data from literature, and this parameter could be used to distinguish the size mismatch effect from all other effects in distorted binary lattices of materials. Here, as a first model application, bimodal amorphous and crystalline fcc/bcc packing fractions are combined, yielding the optimum packing configuration, which depends on mixture composition and diameter ratio only. Maps of the closest packing mode are established and applied to colloidal mixtures of polydisperse spheres and to binary alloys of bcc, fcc, and hcp metals. The extensive comparison between the analytical expressions derived here and the published numerical and empirical data yields good agreement. Hence, it is seen that basic space-filling theories on "simple" noninteracting hard spheres are a valuable tool for the study of crystalline materials.

  4. Heat transfer effects on the methanol-steam reforming with partially filled catalyst layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chein, Rei-Yu.; Chen, Li-Chang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Chung-Hsing University, Taichung City, Taiwan 402 (China); Chen, Yen-Cho [Department of Energy and Resources, National United University, Miaoli City, Taiwan 360 (China); Chung, J.N. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611-6300 (United States)

    2009-07-15

    The heat transfer effects on a methanol-steam reforming (MSR) process are numerically investigated using a circular reformer with a partially (referred to as the wall-coated reformer) or entirely filled catalyst layer (referred to as the packed-bed reformer). The catalyst layer is formed by packing CuO/ZnO/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst particles with a certain porosity and permeability. The fluid flow characteristics are strongly affected by the catalyst-layer thickness. As a consequence, the heat and mass transfer also depend on the catalyst-layer thickness. Under heat supplied by wall heat flux conditions, it is found that higher reforming temperature can be obtained for the wall-coated reformer compared with the packed-bed reformer. This results in the wall-coated reformer having a better methanol conversion efficiency compared with the packed-bed reformer. Based on our study, the minimum heat transfer coefficient, maximum methanol conversion and maximum carbon monoxide production are obtained when the catalyst-layer thickness is 90% of the reformer radius. (author)

  5. Diffusion of light gases in advanced nanoporous membranes and catalysts via NMR diffusometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Robert A.

    Diffusion in nanoporous gas separation membranes and catalysts plays an important role in their selectivity and performance. As a result, there is an intense effort towards development of novel membranes and catalysts with microstructures tailored for improved transport properties. Fundamental understanding and prediction of the mass transport properties of these materials can be obtained by studies of mass transport on a broad range of microscopic length scales. In this dissertation, a novel NMR diffusometry technique is employed to study the influence of the pore network properties on light gas diffusion for several nanoporous systems, which represent promising advanced gas separation membranes and catalysts. The following systems were investigated: (i) carbon molecular sieve membranes, (ii) mixed-matrix membranes and (iii) rare-earth aerogel catalysts. For carbon molecular sieve membranes, the self-diffusion properties of several light gases of industrial importance are characterized by investigating the dependences of the self diffusivity on displacement length scale, temperature, sorbate loading and composition. Analysis of these dependences and comparison of the measured microscopic transport data with the corresponding results of membrane permeation enabled the determination of membrane structural properties which lead to the remarkable diffusion selectivity of these membranes. For mixed-matrix membranes, detailed measurements of light gas sorbate diffusion over a broad range of microscopic length scales enables resolution of the different modes of sorbate self-diffusion inside mixed-matrix membranes. Finally for samaria-aerogel catalyst, the influence of catalyst packing is explored based on detailed microscopic diffusion measurements over a broad range of sorbate loading pressures and detailed data analysis. These studies were enabled by application of a novel pulsed-field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance technique, developed in part by this work

  6. Foundation Flash Catalyst

    CERN Document Server

    Goralski, Greg

    2010-01-01

    This book offers an introduction to Flash Catalyst for designers with intermediate to advanced skills. It discusses where Catalyst sits within the production process and how it communicates with other programs. It covers all of the features of the Flash Catalyst workspace, teaching you how to create designs from scratch, how to build application designs and add functionality, and how to master the Catalyst/Flex workflow. * Introduces Flash Catalyst * Focuses on production process * Covers the interrelation between Flash Catalyst and Photoshop/Illustrator/Flex/Flash What you'll learn Starting f

  7. The “Theoreticals” Pack

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2011-01-01

    The Particle Zoo is a colourful set of hand-made soft toys representing the particles in the Standard Model and beyond. It includes a “theoreticals” pack where you can find yet undiscovered particles: the best-selling Higgs boson, the graviton, the tachyon, and dark matter. Supersymmetric particle soft toys are also available on demand. But what would happen to the zoo if Nature had prepared some unexpected surprises? Julie Peasley, the zookeeper, is ready to sew new smiling faces…   The "Theoreticals" pack in the Particle Zoo. There is only one place in the world where you can buy a smiling Higgs boson and it’s not at CERN, although this is where scientists hope to observe it. The blue star-shaped particle is the best seller of Julie Peasley’s Particle Zoo – a collection of tens of soft toys representing all sorts of particles, including composite and decaying particles.  Over the years Julie’s zoo ...

  8. Protein packing quality using Delaunay complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonseca, Rasmus; Winter, Pawel; Karplus, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    A new method for estimating the packing quality of protein structures is presented. Atoms in high quality protein crystal structures are very uniformly distributed which is difficult to reproduce using structure prediction methods. Packing quality measures can therefore be used to assess structures...... of low quality and even to refine them. Previous methods mainly use the Voronoi cells of atoms to assess packing quality. The presented method uses only the lengths of edges in the Delaunay complex which is faster to compute since volumes of Voronoi cells are not evaluated explicitly. This is a novel...... application of the Delaunay complex that can improve the speed of packing quality computations. Doing so is an important step for, e.g., integrating packing measures into structure refinement methods. High- and low-resolution X-ray crystal structures were chosen to represent well- and poorly-packed structures...

  9. L1-norm packings from function fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hongli

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we study some packings in a cube, namely, how to pack n points in a cube so as to maximize the minimal distance. The distance is induced by the L1-norm which is analogous to the Hamming distance in coding theory. Two constructions with reasonable parameters are obtained, by using some results from a function field including divisor class group, narrow ray class group, and so on. We also present some asymptotic results of the two packings.

  10. Circle Packing for Origami Design Is Hard

    CERN Document Server

    Demaine, Erik D; Lang, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    We show that deciding whether a given set of circles can be packed into a rectangle, an equilateral triangle, or a unit square are NP-hard problems, settling the complexity of these natural packing problems. On the positive side, we show that any set of circles of total area 1 can be packed into a square of size 8/pi=2.546... These results are motivated by problems arising in the context of origami design.

  11. Effect of Electric Discharge on Properties of Nano-Particulate Catalyst for Plasma-Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung Jun; Kim, Jip; Kim, Taegyu

    2016-02-01

    Heterogeneous catalytic processes have been used to produce hydrogen from hydrocarbons. However, high reforming temperature caused serious catalyst deteriorations and low energy efficiency. Recently, a plasma-catalyst hybrid process was used to reduce the reforming temperature and to improve the stability and durability of reforming catalysts. Effect of electric discharges on properties of nanoparticulate catalysts for plasma-catalysis was investigated in the present study. Catalyst-bed porosity was varied by packing catalyst beads with the different size in a reactor. Discharge power and onset voltage of the plasma were measured as the catalyst-bed porosity was varied. The effect of discharge voltage, frequency and voltage waveforms such as the sine, pulse and square was investigated. We found that the optimal porosity of the catalyst-bed exists to maximize the electric discharge. At a low porosity, the electric discharge was unstable to be sustained because the space between catalysts got narrow nearly close to the sheath region. On the other hand, at a high porosity, the electric discharge became weak because the plasma was not sufficient to interact with the surface of catalysts. The discharge power increased as the discharge voltage and frequency increased. The square waveform was more efficient than the sine and pulse one. At a high porosity, however, the effect of the voltage waveform was not considerable because the space between catalysts was too large for plasma to interact with the surface of catalysts.

  12. SPECTRUM OF DIRECTED KIRKMAN PACKING DESIGNS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhangYan; DuBeiliang

    2003-01-01

    The problem studied in this article is the directed Kirkman packing, the resolvable directed packing which requires all blocks to be of size three except that ,each resolution class should contain either one block of size two(when v=2(mod 3)) or one block of size four (when v=l (mod 3)). A directed Kirkman packing design DKPD(v) is a resolvable directed packing of a v-set by the maximum possible number of resolution classes of this type. This article investigates the spectrum of DKPD(v) and it is found that it contains all positive integers v≥3 and v≠5,6.

  13. Random close packing of polydisperse jammed emulsions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brujic, Jasna

    2010-03-01

    Packing problems are everywhere, ranging from oil extraction through porous rocks to grain storage in silos and the compaction of pharmaceutical powders into tablets. At a given density, particulate systems pack into a mechanically stable and amorphous jammed state. Theoretical frameworks have proposed a connection between this jammed state and the glass transition, a thermodynamics of jamming, as well as geometric modeling of random packings. Nevertheless, a simple underlying mechanism for the random assembly of athermal particles, analogous to crystalline ordering, remains unknown. Here we use 3D measurements of polydisperse packings of emulsion droplets to build a simple statistical model in which the complexity of the global packing is distilled into a local stochastic process. From the perspective of a single particle the packing problem is reduced to the random formation of nearest neighbors, followed by a choice of contacts among them. The two key parameters in the model, the available space around a particle and the ratio of contacts to neighbors, are directly obtained from experiments. Remarkably, we demonstrate that this ``granocentric'' view captures the properties of the polydisperse emulsion packing, ranging from the microscopic distributions of nearest neighbors and contacts to local density fluctuations and all the way to the global packing density. Further applications to monodisperse and bidisperse systems quantitatively agree with previously measured trends in global density. This model therefore reveals a general principle of organization for random packing and lays the foundations for a theory of jammed matter.

  14. Evaluation of a commercial packed bed flow hydrogenator for reaction screening, optimization, and synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian C. Bryan

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The performance of the ThalesNano H-Cube®, a commercial packed bed flow hydrogenator, was evaluated in the context of small scale reaction screening and optimization. A model reaction, the reduction of styrene to ethylbenzene through a 10% Pd/C catalyst bed, was used to examine performance at various pressure settings, over sequential runs, and with commercial catalyst cartridges. In addition, the consistency of the hydrogen flow was indirectly measured by in-line UV spectroscopy. Finally, system contamination due to catalyst leaching, and the resolution of this issue, is described. The impact of these factors on the run-to-run reproducibility of the H-Cube® reactor for screening and reaction optimization is discussed.

  15. Pd Close Coupled Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhong Hua SHI; Mao Chu GONG; Yao Qiang CHEN

    2006-01-01

    A catalyst comprised novel high surface area alumina support was prepared to control emission of automobiles. The results showed that prepared catalyst could satisfy the requirements of a high performance close coupled catalyst for its good catalytic activity at low temperature and good stability at high temperature.

  16. Minimally packed phases in holography

    CERN Document Server

    Donos, Aristomenis

    2015-01-01

    We numerically construct asymptotically AdS black brane solutions of $D=4$ Einstein-Maxwell theory coupled to a pseudoscalar. The solutions are holographically dual to $d=3$ CFTs held at constant chemical potential and magnetic field that spontaneously break translation invariance leading to the spontaneous formation of abelian and momentum magnetisation currents flowing around the plaquettes of a periodic Bravais lattice. We analyse the three-dimensional moduli space of lattice solutions, which are generically oblique, and show that the free energy is minimised by the triangular lattice, associated with minimal packing of circles in the plane. The triangular structure persists at low temperatures indicating the existence of novel crystalline ground states.

  17. Chemical imaging of Fischer-Tropsch catalysts under operating conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Stephen W. T.; Martin, David J.; Parsons, Aaron D.; Sławiński, Wojciech A.; Vamvakeros, Antonios; Keylock, Stephen J.; Beale, Andrew M.; Mosselmans, J. Frederick W.

    2017-01-01

    Although we often understand empirically what constitutes an active catalyst, there is still much to be understood fundamentally about how catalytic performance is influenced by formulation. Catalysts are often designed to have a microstructure and nanostructure that can influence performance but that is rarely considered when correlating structure with function. Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FTS) is a well-known and potentially sustainable technology for converting synthetic natural gas (“syngas”: CO + H2) into functional hydrocarbons, such as sulfur- and aromatic-free fuel and high-value wax products. FTS catalysts typically contain Co or Fe nanoparticles, which are often optimized in terms of size/composition for a particular catalytic performance. We use a novel, “multimodal” tomographic approach to studying active Co-based catalysts under operando conditions, revealing how a simple parameter, such as the order of addition of metal precursors and promoters, affects the spatial distribution of the elements as well as their physicochemical properties, that is, crystalline phase and crystallite size during catalyst activation and operation. We show in particular how the order of addition affects the crystallinity of the TiO2 anatase phase, which in turn leads to the formation of highly intergrown cubic close-packed/hexagonal close-packed Co nanoparticles that are very reactive, exhibiting high CO conversion. This work highlights the importance of operando microtomography to understand the evolution of chemical species and their spatial distribution before any concrete understanding of impact on catalytic performance can be realized. PMID:28345057

  18. Confined disordered strictly jammed binary sphere packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, D.; Torquato, S.

    2015-12-01

    Disordered jammed packings under confinement have received considerably less attention than their bulk counterparts and yet arise in a variety of practical situations. In this work, we study binary sphere packings that are confined between two parallel hard planes and generalize the Torquato-Jiao (TJ) sequential linear programming algorithm [Phys. Rev. E 82, 061302 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevE.82.061302] to obtain putative maximally random jammed (MRJ) packings that are exactly isostatic with high fidelity over a large range of plane separation distances H , small to large sphere radius ratio α , and small sphere relative concentration x . We find that packing characteristics can be substantially different from their bulk analogs, which is due to what we term "confinement frustration." Rattlers in confined packings are generally more prevalent than those in their bulk counterparts. We observe that packing fraction, rattler fraction, and degree of disorder of MRJ packings generally increase with H , though exceptions exist. Discontinuities in the packing characteristics as H varies in the vicinity of certain values of H are due to associated discontinuous transitions between different jammed states. When the plane separation distance is on the order of two large-sphere diameters or less, the packings exhibit salient two-dimensional features; when the plane separation distance exceeds about 30 large-sphere diameters, the packings approach three-dimensional bulk packings. As the size contrast increases (as α decreases), the rattler fraction dramatically increases due to what we call "size-disparity" frustration. We find that at intermediate α and when x is about 0.5 (50-50 mixture), the disorder of packings is maximized, as measured by an order metric ψ that is based on the number density fluctuations in the direction perpendicular to the hard walls. We also apply the local volume-fraction variance στ2(R ) to characterize confined packings and find that these

  19. Poisoning of vanadia based SCR catalysts by potassium:influence of catalyst composition and potassium mobility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Brian Kjærgaard; Kügler, Frauke; Jensen, Anker Degn

    2016-01-01

    aerosol (mass based distribution mode:1.3 μm) compared to that of the KCl aerosol (mass based distribution mode: 0.12 μm). The relative activities of exposed catalysts indicate that promotion with WO3 accelerates the deactivation, likely due to theenhanced Brønsted acidity which appears to promote...... the transport of potassium. Using a newly developed experimental protocol consisting of two-layer pellets of SCR catalysts, where one side is impregnated with KCl or K2SO4, the potassium transport in such systems, which is assumed to take place through reactionand diffusion over acid sites, was investigated...

  20. Assembly modes of dragonfly wings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong-Xiao; Yin, Ya-Jun; Zhong, Zheng

    2011-12-01

    The assembly modes of dragonfly wings are observed through FEG-ESEM. Different from airplane wings, dragonfly wings are found to be assembled through smooth transition mode and global package mode. First, at the vein/membrane conjunctive site, the membrane is divided into upper and lower portions from the center layer and transited smoothly to the vein. Then the two portions pack the vein around and form the outer surface of the vein. Second, at the vein/spike conjunctive site, the vein and spike are connected smoothly into a triplet. Last, at the vein/membrane/spike conjunctive site, the membrane (i.e., the outer layer of the vein) transits smoothly to the spike, packs it around, and forms its outer layer. In short, the membrane looks like a closed coat packing the wing as a whole. The smooth transition mode and the global package mode are universal assembly modes in dragonfly wings. They provide us the references for better understanding of the functions of dragonfly wings and the bionic manufactures of the wings of flights with mini sizes.

  1. Multi objective optimization of line pack management of gas pipeline system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebouba, A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses the Line Pack Management of the "GZ1 Hassi R'mell-Arzew" gas pipeline. For a gas pipeline system, the decision-making on the gas line pack management scenarios usually involves a delicate balance between minimization of the fuel consumption in the compression stations and maximizing gas line pack. In order to select an acceptable Line Pack Management of Gas Pipeline scenario from these two angles for "GZ1 Hassi R'mell- Arzew" gas pipeline, the idea of multi-objective decision-making has been introduced. The first step in developing this approach is the derivation of a numerical method to analyze the flow through the pipeline under transient isothermal conditions. In this paper, the solver NSGA-II of the modeFRONTIER, coupled with a matlab program was used for solving the multi-objective problem.

  2. Particle-size distribution and packing fraction of geometric random packings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, H.J.H.

    2006-01-01

    This paper addresses the geometric random packing and void fraction of polydisperse particles. It is demonstrated that the bimodal packing can be transformed into a continuous particle-size distribution of the power law type. It follows that a maximum packing fraction of particles is obtained when t

  3. Biodiesel production in packed-bed reactors using lipase-nanoparticle biocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xia; Liu, Xueying; Zhao, Chuanming; Ding, Yi; Xu, Ping

    2011-05-01

    The development of appropriate reactors is crucial for the production of biodiesel. In this study, a packed-bed reactor system using lipase-Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticle biocomposite catalyst was successfully developed for biodiesel production based on soybean oil methanolysis. Emulsification before methanolysis improved the reaction rate. The lipase-nanoparticle biocomposite showed high activity and stability in the single-packed-bed reactor at an optimal flow rate (0.25 mL min(-1)). After 240 h of reaction, the conversion rate was sustained as high as 45%. The conversion rate and stability achieved using the four-packed-bed reactor were much higher than those achieved using the single-packed-bed reactor. The conversion of biodiesel was maintained at a high rate of over 88% for 192 h, and it only slightly declined to approximately 75% after 240 h of reaction. The packed-bed reactor system, therefore, has a great potential for achieving the design and operation of enzymatic biodiesel production on the industrial scale.

  4. 7 CFR 51.1217 - Standard pack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... be ring faced and tightly packed with sufficient bulge to prevent any appreciable movement of the... the box. (d) Peaches packed in other type boxes such as wire-bound boxes and fiber-board boxes may be... than 10 percent of the packages in any lot may not meet these requirements. (i) “Well filled”...

  5. 7 CFR 29.1048 - Packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packing. 29.1048 Section 29.1048 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 92) § 29.1048 Packing. A lot of tobacco consisting of a number of packages submitted as...

  6. 7 CFR 29.6031 - Packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packing. 29.6031 Section 29.6031 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6031 Packing. A lot of tobacco consisting of a number of...

  7. 7 CFR 29.3538 - Packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packing. 29.3538 Section 29.3538 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Type 95) § 29.3538 Packing. A lot of tobacco consisting of a number of packages submitted as...

  8. Difference packing arrays and systematic authentication codes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, a type of combinatorial design (called difference packing array)is proposed and used to give a construction of systematic authentication codes. Taking advantage of this construction, some new series of systematic authentication codes are obtainable in terms of existing difference packing arrays.

  9. 7 CFR 29.2541 - Packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packing. 29.2541 Section 29.2541 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing...-Cured Tobacco (u.s. Types 22, 23, and Foreign Type 96) § 29.2541 Packing. A lot of tobacco consisting...

  10. 7 CFR 29.3048 - Packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packing. 29.3048 Section 29.3048 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Packing. A lot of tobacco consisting of a number of packages submitted as one definite unit for...

  11. 7 CFR 29.2289 - Packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packing. 29.2289 Section 29.2289 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... Packing. A lot of tobacco consisting of a number of packages submitted as one definite unit for...

  12. Monitoring three-dimensional packings in microgravity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yu, Peidong; Frank-Richter, Stefan; Börngen, Alexander; Sperl, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    We present results from experiments with granular packings in three dimensions in microgravity as realized on parabolic flights. Two different techniques are employed to monitor the inside of the packings during compaction: (1) X-ray radiography is used to measure in transmission the integrated fluc

  13. Pack formation in cycling and orienteering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackland, G J; Butler, D

    2001-09-13

    In cycling and orienteering competitions, competitors can become bunched into packs, which may mask an individual's true ability. Here we model this process with a view to determining when competitors' times are determined more by others than by their own ability. Our results may prove useful in helping to stage events so that pack formation can be avoided.

  14. Development of an effective valve packing program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hart, K.A.

    1996-12-01

    Current data now shows that graphite valve packing installed within the guidance of a controlled program produces not only reliable stem sealing but predictable running loads. By utilizing recent technological developments in valve performance monitoring for both MOV`s and AOV`s, valve packing performance can be enhanced while reducing maintenance costs. Once known, values are established for acceptable valve packing loads, the measurement of actual valve running loads via the current MOV/AOV diagnostic techniques can provide indication of future valve stem sealing problems, improper valve packing installation or identify the opportunity for valve packing program improvements. At times the full benefit of these advances in material and predictive technology remain under utilized due to simple past misconceptions associated with valve packing. This paper will explore the basis for these misconceptions, provide general insight into the current understanding of valve packing and demonstrate how with this new understanding and current valve diagnostic equipment the key aspects required to develop an effective, quality valve packing program fit together. The cost and operational benefits provided by this approach can be significant impact by the: elimination of periodic valve repacking, reduction of maintenance costs, benefits of leak-free valve operation, justification for reduced Post Maintenance Test Requirements, reduced radiation exposure, improved plant appearance.

  15. BIPP (BISMUTH IODINE PARAFFINE PASTE PACK REVISITED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balasubramanian Thiagarajan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This review article takes a new look at the use of BIPP pack following nasal and ear surgeries. It lists the advantages and pitfalls of using this packing material. Pubmed search revealed very little material on this topic hence I compiled existing data to bring out an article.

  16. HEXAGONAL CLOSE-PACKED C-60

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Jan; van Smaalen, Sander; Petricek, Vaclav; Dusek, Michal P.; Verheijen, Marcel A.; Meijer, G.

    1994-01-01

    C60 crystals were grown from purified powder material with a multiple sublimation technique. In addition to crystals wit a cubic close-packed (ccp) arrangement, crystals were found with a hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure. Detailed crystallographic evidence is given, including complete refineme

  17. Cluster and constraint analysis in tetrahedron packings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Weiwei; Lu, Peng; Liu, Lufeng; Li, Shuixiang

    2015-04-01

    The disordered packings of tetrahedra often show no obvious macroscopic orientational or positional order for a wide range of packing densities, and it has been found that the local order in particle clusters is the main order form of tetrahedron packings. Therefore, a cluster analysis is carried out to investigate the local structures and properties of tetrahedron packings in this work. We obtain a cluster distribution of differently sized clusters, and peaks are observed at two special clusters, i.e., dimer and wagon wheel. We then calculate the amounts of dimers and wagon wheels, which are observed to have linear or approximate linear correlations with packing density. Following our previous work, the amount of particles participating in dimers is used as an order metric to evaluate the order degree of the hierarchical packing structure of tetrahedra, and an order map is consequently depicted. Furthermore, a constraint analysis is performed to determine the isostatic or hyperstatic region in the order map. We employ a Monte Carlo algorithm to test jamming and then suggest a new maximally random jammed packing of hard tetrahedra from the order map with a packing density of 0.6337.

  18. 48 CFR 552.211-87 - Export packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Export packing. 552.211-87... packing. As prescribed in 511.204(b)(7), insert the following clause: Export Packing (JAN 2010) (a... packing. Military export packing, if offered, shall be in accordance with Mil-Std-2073-1 Level A or B...

  19. 7 CFR 51.2840 - Export packing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Export packing requirements. 51.2840 Section 51.2840...) Export Packing Requirements § 51.2840 Export packing requirements. Onions specified as meeting Export Packing Requirements shall be packed in containers having a net capacity of 25 kilograms (approximately...

  20. Hawking Colloquium Packed CERN Auditoriums

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Stephen Hawking's week long visit to CERN included an 'exceptional CERN colloquium' which filled six auditoriums. Stephen Hawking during his visit to the ATLAS experiment. Stephen Hawking, Lucasian Professor of Cambridge University, visited the Theory Unit of the Physics Department from 24 September to 1 October 2006. As part of his visit, he gave two lectures in the main auditorium - a theoretical seminar on 'The Semi-Classical Birth of The Universe', attended by about 120 specialists; and a colloquium titled 'The Origin of The Universe'. As a key public figure in theoretical physics, his presence was eagerly awaited on both occasions. Those who wanted to attend the colloquium had to arrive early and be equipped with plenty of patience. An hour before it was due to begin, the 400 capacity of the main auditorium was already full. The lecture, simultaneously broadcast to five other fully packed CERN auditoriums, was attended by an estimated total of 850. Stephen Hawking attracted a large CERN crowd, filling ...

  1. Co-Assembled Supported Catalysts: Synthesis of Nano-Structured Supported Catalysts with Hierarchic Pores through Combined Flow and Radiation Induced Co-Assembled Nano-Reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galip Akay

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A novel generic method of silica supported catalyst system generation from a fluid state is presented. The technique is based on the combined flow and radiation (such as microwave, thermal or UV induced co-assembly of the support and catalyst precursors forming nano-reactors, followed by catalyst precursor decomposition. The transformation from the precursor to supported catalyst oxide state can be controlled from a few seconds to several minutes. The resulting nano-structured micro-porous silica supported catalyst system has a surface area approaching 300 m2/g and X-ray Diffraction (XRD-based catalyst size controlled in the range of 1–10 nm in which the catalyst structure appears as lamellar sheets sandwiched between the catalyst support. These catalyst characteristics are dependent primarily on the processing history as well as the catalyst (Fe, Co and Ni studied when the catalyst/support molar ratio is typically 0.1–2. In addition, Ca, Mn and Cu were used as co-catalysts with Fe and Co in the evaluation of the mechanism of catalyst generation. Based on extensive XRD, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM studies, the micro- and nano-structure of the catalyst system were evaluated. It was found that the catalyst and silica support form extensive 0.6–2 nm thick lamellar sheets of 10–100 nm planar dimensions. In these lamellae, the alternate silica support and catalyst layer appear in the form of a bar-code structure. When these lamellae structures pack, they form the walls of a micro-porous catalyst system which typically has a density of 0.2 g/cm3. A tentative mechanism of catalyst nano-structure formation is provided based on the rheology and fluid mechanics of the catalyst/support precursor fluid as well as co-assembly nano-reactor formation during processing. In order to achieve these structures and characteristics, catalyst support must be in the form of silane coated silica nano

  2. Multistep continuous-flow synthesis of (R)- and (S)-rolipram using heterogeneous catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubogo, Tetsu; Oyamada, Hidekazu; Kobayashi, Shū

    2015-04-01

    Chemical manufacturing is conducted using either batch systems or continuous-flow systems. Flow systems have several advantages over batch systems, particularly in terms of productivity, heat and mixing efficiency, safety, and reproducibility. However, for over half a century, pharmaceutical manufacturing has used batch systems because the synthesis of complex molecules such as drugs has been difficult to achieve with continuous-flow systems. Here we describe the continuous-flow synthesis of drugs using only columns packed with heterogeneous catalysts. Commercially available starting materials were successively passed through four columns containing achiral and chiral heterogeneous catalysts to produce (R)-rolipram, an anti-inflammatory drug and one of the family of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) derivatives. In addition, simply by replacing a column packed with a chiral heterogeneous catalyst with another column packed with the opposing enantiomer, we obtained antipole (S)-rolipram. Similarly, we also synthesized (R)-phenibut, another drug belonging to the GABA family. These flow systems are simple and stable with no leaching of metal catalysts. Our results demonstrate that multistep (eight steps in this case) chemical transformations for drug synthesis can proceed smoothly under flow conditions using only heterogeneous catalysts, without the isolation of any intermediates and without the separation of any catalysts, co-products, by-products, and excess reagents. We anticipate that such syntheses will be useful in pharmaceutical manufacturing.

  3. A method for dense packing discovery

    CERN Document Server

    Kallus, Yoav; Gravel, Simon

    2010-01-01

    The problem of packing a system of particles as densely as possible is foundational in the field of discrete geometry and is a powerful model in the material and biological sciences. As packing problems retreat from the reach of solution by analytic constructions, the importance of an efficient numerical method for conducting de novo (from-scratch) searches for dense packings becomes crucial. In this paper, we use the divide and concur framework to develop a general search method for the solution of periodic constraint problems, and we apply it to the discovery of dense periodic packings. An important feature of the method is the integration of the unit cell parameters with the other packing variables in the definition of the configuration space. The method we present led to improvements in the densest-known tetrahedron packing which are reported in [arXiv:0910.5226]. Here, we use the method to reproduce the densest known lattice sphere packings and the best known lattice kissing arrangements in up to 14 and ...

  4. Catalyst Alloys Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xincai

    2014-10-01

    Catalysts are one of the key materials used for diamond formation at high pressures. Several such catalyst products have been developed and applied in China and around the world. The catalyst alloy most widely used in China is Ni70Mn25Co5 developed at Changsha Research Institute of Mining and Metallurgy. In this article, detailed techniques for manufacturing such a typical catalyst alloy will be reviewed. The characteristics of the alloy will be described. Detailed processing of the alloy will be presented, including remelting and casting, hot rolling, annealing, surface treatment, cold rolling, blanking, finishing, packaging, and waste treatment. An example use of the catalyst alloy will also be given. Industrial experience shows that for the catalyst alloy products, a vacuum induction remelt furnace can be used for remelting, a metal mold can be used for casting, hot and cold rolling can be used for forming, and acid pickling can be used for metal surface cleaning.

  5. Resin Catalyst Hybrids

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S. Asaoka

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction: What are resin catalyst hybrids? There are typically two types of resin catalyst. One is acidic resin which representative is polystyrene sulfonic acid. The other is basic resin which is availed as metal complex support. The objective items of this study on resin catalyst are consisting of pellet hybrid, equilibrium hybrid and function hybrid of acid and base,as shown in Fig. 1[1-5].

  6. Two-Dimensional Bipyramid Plasmonic Nanoparticle Liquid Crystalline Superstructure with Four Distinct Orientational Packing Orders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Qianqian; Si, Kae Jye; Sikdar, Debabrata; Yap, Lim Wei; Premaratne, Malin; Cheng, Wenlong

    2016-01-26

    Anisotropic plasmonic nanoparticles have been successfully used as constituent elements for growing ordered nanoparticle arrays. However, orientational control over their spatial ordering remains challenging. Here, we report on a self-assembled two-dimensional (2D) nanoparticle liquid crystalline superstructure (NLCS) from bipyramid gold nanoparticles (BNPs), which showed four distinct orientational packing orders, corresponding to horizontal alignment (H-NLCS), circular arrangement (C-NLCS), slanted alignment (S-NLCS), and vertical alignment (V-NLCS) of constituent particle building elements. These packing orders are characteristic of the unique shape of BNPs because all four packing modes were observed for particles with various sizes. Nevertheless, only H-NLCS and V-NLCS packing orders were observed for the free-standing ordered array nanosheets formed from a drying-mediated self-assembly at the air/water interface of a sessile droplet. This is due to strong surface tension and the absence of particle-substrate interaction. In addition, we found the collective plasmonic coupling properties mainly depend on the packing type, and characteristic coupling peak locations depend on particle sizes. Interestingly, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancements were heavily dependent on the orientational packing ordering. In particular, V-NLCS showed the highest Raman enhancement factor, which was about 77-fold greater than the H-NLCS and about 19-fold greater than C-NLCS. The results presented here reveal the nature and significance of orientational ordering in controlling plasmonic coupling and SERS enhancements of ordered plasmonic nanoparticle arrays.

  7. Packing of ganglioside-phospholipid monolayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Majewski, J.; Kuhl, T.L.; Kjær, K.

    2001-01-01

    DPPE monolayer and does not distort the hexagonal in-plane unit cell or out-of-plane two-dimensional (2-D) packing compared with a pure DPPE monolayer. The oligosaccharide headgroups were found to extend normally from the monolayer surface, and the incorporation of these glycolipids into DPPE...... monolayers did not affect hydrocarbon tail packing (fluidization or condensation of the hydrocarbon region). This is in contrast to previous investigations of lipopolymer-lipid mixtures, where the packing structure of phospholipid monolayers was greatly altered by the inclusion of lipids bearing hydrophilic...... polymer groups. Indeed, the lack of packing disruptions by the oligosaccharide groups indicates that protein-GM, interactions, including binding, insertion, chain fluidization, and domain formation (lipid rafts), can be studied in 2-D monolayers using scattering techniques....

  8. Electroosmotic Driving Liquid Using Nanosilica Packed Column

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ling Xin CHEN; Guo An LUO; Tao WEN

    2005-01-01

    The electroosmotic pump (EOP) using nanosilica particles packed-bed column was experimentally studied. The relationship between flowrate, pressure and applied voltage of the pump, and pressure-flowrate (P-Q) characteristic were investigated.

  9. Packing circles and spheres on surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Schiftner, Alexander

    2009-12-01

    Inspired by freeform designs in architecture which involve circles and spheres, we introduce a new kind of triangle mesh whose faces\\' incircles form a packing. As it turns out, such meshes have a rich geometry and allow us to cover surfaces with circle patterns, sphere packings, approximate circle packings, hexagonal meshes which carry a torsion-free support structure, hybrid tri-hex meshes, and others. We show how triangle meshes can be optimized so as to have the incircle packing property. We explain their relation to conformal geometry and implications on solvability of optimization. The examples we give confirm that this kind of meshes is a rich source of geometric structures relevant to architectural geometry.

  10. Packing circles and spheres on surfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Schiftner, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    Inspired by freeform designs in architecture which involve circles and spheres, we introduce a new kind of triangle mesh whose faces\\' incircles form a packing. As it turns out, such meshes have a rich geometry and allow us to cover surfaces with circle patterns, sphere packings, approximate circle packings, hexagonal meshes which carry a torsion-free support structure, hybrid tri-hex meshes, and others. We show how triangle meshes can be optimized so as to have the incircle packing property. We explain their relation to conformal geometry and implications on solvability of optimization. The examples we give confirm that this kind of meshes is a rich source of geometric structures relevant to architectural geometry. © 2009 ACM.

  11. Preparation of Weak Cation Exchange Packings Based on Monodisperse Poly (chloromethylstyrene-co-divinylbenzene) Particles and Its Chromatographic Properties

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卫引茂; 陈强; 耿信笃

    2001-01-01

    Monodisperse poly ( chloromethylstyrene-co-divinylbenzene )particles were firstly prepared by a two-step swelling method.Based on this media, one kind of weak cation ion exchange packings was prepared. It was demonstrated that the prepared packings have comparative advantages for biopolymer separation with high column efficiency, low interstitial volume and low column backpressure, and have good resolution to proteins. The effects of salt concentration and pH of mobile phase on protein retentions were investigated. The properties of the weak cation ion exchange packings were evaluated by the unified retention model for mixed-mode interaction mechanison in ion exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography.

  12. Preparation of biodiesel from soybean oil by using heterogeneous catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaniz Ferdous, M. Rakib Uddin, Maksudur R. Khan, M. A. Islam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The predicted shortage of fossil fuels and related environmental concerns has recently attracted significant attention to search alternative fuel. Biodiesel is one of the alternatives to fossil fuel. Now-a-days, most biodiesel is produced by the transesterification of oils using methanol and a homogeneous base catalyst. The use of homogeneous catalysts is normally limited to batch mode processing followed by a catalyst separation step. The immiscible glycerol phase, which accumulates during the course of the reaction, solubilizes the homogeneous base catalyst and therefore, withdraws from the reaction medium. Moreover, other difficulties of using homogeneous base catalysts relate to their sensitivity to free fatty acid (FFA and water and resulting saponification phenomenon. High energy consumption and costly separation of the catalyst from the reaction mixture have inspired the use of heterogeneous catalyst. The use of heterogeneous catalysts does not lead to the formation of soaps through neutralization of FFA and saponification of oil. In the present paper, biodiesel was prepared from crude (soybean oil by transesterification reaction using heterogeneous base catalyst name calcium oxide (CaO. Various reaction parameters were optimized and the biodiesel properties were evaluated.

  13. Preparation of biodiesel from soybean oil by using heterogeneous catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferdous, Kaniz; Rakib Uddin, M.; Islam, M.A. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Polymer Science, Shah Jalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet 3114 (Bangladesh); Khan, Maksudur R. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Polymer Science, Shah Jalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet 3114 (Bangladesh); Faculty of Chemical and Natural Resources Engineering, University Malaysia Pahang, 26300 Gambang, Kuantan, Pahang (Malaysia)

    2013-07-01

    The predicted shortage of fossil fuels and related environmental concerns has recently attracted significant attention to search alternative fuel. Biodiesel is one of the alternatives to fossil fuel. Now-a-days, most biodiesel is produced by the transesterification of oils using methanol and a homogeneous base catalyst. The use of homogeneous catalysts is normally limited to batch mode processing followed by a catalyst separation step. The immiscible glycerol phase, which accumulates during the course of the reaction, solubilizes the homogeneous base catalyst and therefore, withdraws from the reaction medium. Moreover, other difficulties of using homogeneous base catalysts relate to their sensitivity to free fatty acid (FFA) and water and resulting saponification phenomenon. High energy consumption and costly separation of the catalyst from the reaction mixture have inspired the use of heterogeneous catalyst. The use of heterogeneous catalysts does not lead to the formation of soaps through neutralization of FFA and saponification of oil. In the present paper, biodiesel was prepared from crude (soybean) oil by transesterification reaction using heterogeneous base catalyst name calcium oxide (CaO). Various reaction parameters were optimized and the biodiesel properties were evaluated.

  14. Phyllotaxis, disk packing, and Fibonacci numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mughal, A.; Weaire, D.

    2017-02-01

    We consider the evolution of the packing of disks (representing the position of buds) that are introduced at the top of a surface which has the form of a growing stem. They migrate downwards, while conforming to three principles, applied locally: dense packing, homogeneity, and continuity. We show that spiral structures characterized by the widely observed Fibonacci sequence (1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, ...), as well as related structures, occur naturally under such rules. Typical results are presented in an animation.

  15. Bifunctional anode catalysts for direct methanol fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Ferrin, Peter; Tritsaris, Georgios

    2012-01-01

    Using the binding energy of OH* and CO* on close-packed surfaces as reactivity descriptors, we screen bulk and surface alloy catalysts for methanol electro-oxidation activity. Using these two descriptors, we illustrate that a good methanol electro-oxidation catalyst must have three key properties......: (1) the ability to activate methanol, (2) the ability to activate water, and (3) the ability to react off surface intermediates (such as CO* and OH*). Based on this analysis, an alloy catalyst made up of Cu and Pt should have a synergistic effect facilitating the activity towards methanol electro....... Adding Cu to a Pt(111) surface increases the methanol oxidation current by more than a factor of three, supporting our theoretical predictions for improved electrocatalysts....

  16. Patchy particle packing under electric fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Pengcheng; Wang, Yufeng; Wang, Yu; Hollingsworth, Andrew D; Weck, Marcus; Pine, David J; Ward, Michael D

    2015-03-01

    Colloidal particles equipped with two, three, or four negatively charged patches, which endow the particles with 2-fold, 3-fold, or tetrahedral symmetries, form 1D chains, 2D layers, and 3D packings when polarized by an AC electric field. Two-patch particles, with two patches on opposite sides of the particle (2-fold symmetry) pack into the cmm plane group and 3D packings with I4mm space group symmetry, in contrast to uncharged spherical or ellipsoidal colloids that typically crystallize into a face-centered ABC layer packing. Three-patch particles (3-fold symmetry) form chains having a 21 screw axis symmetry, but these chains pair in a manner such that each individual chain has one-fold symmetry but the pair has 21 screw axis symmetry, in an arrangement that aligns the patches that would favor Coulombic interactions along the chain. Surprisingly, some chain pairs form unanticipated double-helix regions that result from mutual twisting of the chains about each other, illustrating a kind of polymorphism that may be associated with nucleation from short chain pairs. Larger 2D domains of the three-patch particles crystallize in the p6m plane group with alignment (with respect to the field) and packing densities that suggest random disorder in the domains, whereas four-patch particles form 2D domains in which close-packed rows are aligned with the field.

  17. Packing of elastic wires in flexible shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, R.; Wittel, F. K.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2015-11-01

    The packing problem of long thin filaments that are injected into confined spaces is of fundamental interest for physicists and biologists alike. How linear threads pack and coil is well known only for the ideal case of rigid containers, though. Here, we force long elastic rods into flexible spatial confinement borne by an elastic shell to examine under which conditions recently acquired knowledge on wire packing in rigid spheres breaks down. We find that unlike in rigid cavities, friction plays a key role by giving rise to the emergence of two distinct packing patterns. At low friction, the wire densely coils into an ordered toroidal bundle with semi-ellipsoidal cross-section, while at high friction, it packs into a highly disordered, hierarchic structure. These two morphologies are shown to be separated by a continuous phase transition. Our findings demonstrate the dramatic impact of friction and confinement elasticity on filamentous packing and might drive future research on such systems in physics, biology and even medical technology toward including these mutually interacting effects.

  18. Towards the Rational Design of Nanoparticle Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Priyabrat

    This research is focused on development of routes towards the rational design of nanoparticle catalysts. Primarily, it is focused on two main projects; (1) the use of imidazolium-based ionic liquids (ILs) as greener media for the design of quasi-homogeneous nanoparticle catalysts and (2) the rational design of heterogeneous-supported nanoparticle catalysts from structured nanoparticle precursors. Each project has different studies associated with the main objective of the design of nanoparticle catalysts. In the first project, imidazolium-based ionic liquids have been used for the synthesis of nanoparticle catalysts. In particular, studies on recyclability, reuse, mode-of-stability, and long-term stability of these ionic-liquid supported nanoparticle catalysts have been done; all of which are important factors in determining the overall "greenness" of such synthetic routes. Three papers have been published/submitted for this project. In the first publication, highly stable polymer-stabilized Au, Pd and bimetallic Au-Pd nanoparticle catalysts have been synthesized in imidazolium-based 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([BMIM]PF6) ionic liquid (Journal of Molecular Catalysis A: Chemical, 2008, 286, 114). The resulting nanoparticles were found to be effective and selective quasi-homogeneous catalysts towards a wide-range of hydrogenation reactions and the catalyst solution was reused for further catalytic reactions with minimal loss in activity. The synthesis of very pure and clean ILs has allowed a platform to study the effects of impurities in the imidazolium ILs on nanoparticle stability. In a later study, a new mode of stabilization was postulated where the presence of low amounts of 1-methylimidazole has substantial effects on the resulting stability of Au and Pd-Au nanoparticles in these ILs (Chemical Communications, 2009, 812). In further continuation of this study, a comparative study involving four stabilization protocols for nanoparticle

  19. Alloy catalyst material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel alloy catalyst material for use in the synthesis of hydrogen peroxide from oxygen and hydrogen, or from oxygen and water. The present invention also relates to a cathode and an electrochemical cell comprising the novel catalyst material, and the process use...

  20. Catalyst for Ammonia Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation, a method for producing a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation and a method for tuning the catalytic activity of a transition metal. By depositing an overlayer of less catalytic active metal onto a more catalytic...

  1. Reducible oxide based catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

    2010-04-06

    A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

  2. Magnetic catalyst bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teunissen, Wendy; Bol, A.A.; Geus, John W.

    2001-01-01

    After a discussion about the importance of the size of the catalyst bodies with reactions in the liquid-phase with a suspended catalyst, the possibilities of magnetic separation are dealt with. Deficiencies of the usual ferromagnetic particles are the reactivity and the clustering of the particles.

  3. Continuous Production of Lipase-Catalyzed Biodiesel in a Packed-Bed Reactor: Optimization and Enzyme Reuse Study

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiao-Ching Chen; Hen-Yi Ju; Tsung-Ta Wu; Yung-Chuan Liu; Chih-Chen Lee; Cheng Chang; Yi-Lin Chung; Chwen-Jen Shieh

    2010-01-01

    An optimal continuous production of biodiesel by methanolysis of soybean oil in a packed-bed reactor was developed using immobilized lipase (Novozym 435) as a catalyst in a tert-butanol solvent system. Response surface methodology (RSM) and Box-Behnken design were employed to evaluate the effects of reaction temperature, flow rate, and substrate molar ratio on the molar conversion of biodiesel. The results showed that flow rate and temperature have significant effects on the percentage of mol...

  4. A biphasic oxidation of alcohols to aldehydes and ketones using a simplified packed-bed microreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Bogdan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate the preparation and characterization of a simplified packed-bed microreactor using an immobilized TEMPO catalyst shown to oxidize primary and secondary alcohols via the biphasic Anelli-Montanari protocol. Oxidations occurred in high yields with great stability over time. We observed that plugs of aqueous oxidant and organic alcohol entered the reactor as plugs but merged into an emulsion on the packed-bed. The emulsion coalesced into larger plugs upon exiting the reactor, leaving the organic product separate from the aqueous by-products. Furthermore, the microreactor oxidized a wide range of alcohols and remained active in excess of 100 trials without showing any loss of catalytic activity.

  5. 48 CFR 1846.672-6 - Packing list instructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Packing list instructions... ADMINISTRATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE Material Inspection and Receiving Reports 1846.672-6 Packing list instructions. Copies of the MIRR may be used as a packing list. The packing list copies shall...

  6. 46 CFR 160.043-6 - Marking and packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Marking and packing. 160.043-6 Section 160.043-6... Marking and packing. (a) General. Jackknives specified by this subpart shall be stamped or otherwise... opener. (c) Packing. Each jackknife, complete with lanyard attached, shall be packed in a heat-sealed...

  7. Packing parameters effect on injection molding of polypropylene nanostructured surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calaon, Matteo; Tosello, Guido; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2012-01-01

    having a diameter of 500 nm was employed. The tool insert surface was produced using chemical-based-batch techniques such aluminum anodization and nickel electroplating. During the injection molding process, polypropylene (PP) was employed as material and packing phase parameters (packing time, packing...... to the polymer part was mainly influenced by packing pressure level and distance from the gate....

  8. 27 CFR 24.308 - Bottled or packed wine record.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bottled or packed wine... BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Records and Reports § 24.308 Bottled or packed wine record. A proprietor who bottles, packs, or receives bottled or packed beverage wine in bond...

  9. Catalysts, methods of making catalysts, and methods of use

    KAUST Repository

    Renard, Laetitia

    2014-03-06

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for catalysts, methods of making catalysts, methods of using catalysts, and the like. In an embodiment, the method of making the catalysts can be performed in a single step with a metal nanoparticle precursor and a metal oxide precursor, where a separate stabilizing agent is not needed.

  10. Quasistatic packings of droplets in flat microfluidic channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadivar, Erfan

    2016-02-01

    As observed in recent experiments, monodisperse droplets self-assemble spontaneously in different ordered packings. In this work, we present a numerical study of the droplet packings in the flat rectangular microfluidic channels. Employing the boundary element method, we numerically solve the Stokes equation in two-dimension and investigate the appearance of droplet packing and transition between one and two-row packings of monodisperse emulsion droplets. By calculating packing force applied on the droplet interface, we investigate the effect of flow rate, droplet size, and surface tension on the packing configurations of droplets and transition between different topological packings.

  11. Coalescence preference in dense packing of bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeseul; Gim, Bopil; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2015-11-01

    Coalescence preference is the tendency that a merged bubble from the contact of two original bubbles (parent) tends to be near to the bigger parent. Here, we show that the coalescence preference can be blocked by densely packing of neighbor bubbles. We use high-speed high-resolution X-ray microscopy to clearly visualize individual coalescence phenomenon which occurs in micro scale seconds and inside dense packing of microbubbles with a local packing fraction of ~40%. Previous theory and experimental evidence predict a power of -5 between the relative coalescence position and the parent size. However, our new observation for coalescence preference in densely packed microbubbles shows a different power of -2. We believe that this result may be important to understand coalescence dynamics in dense packing of soft matter. This work (NRF-2013R1A22A04008115) was supported by Mid-career Researcher Program through NRF grant funded by the MEST and also was supported by Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (2009-0082580) and by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry and Education, Science and Technology (NRF-2012R1A6A3A04039257).

  12. Direct contact condensation in packed beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yi; Klausner, James F.; Mei, Renwei; Knight, Jessica [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States)

    2006-12-15

    A diffusion driven desalination process was recently described where a very effective direct contact condenser with a packed bed is used to condense water vapor out of an air/vapor mixture. A laboratory scale direct contact condenser has been fabricated as a twin tower structure with two stages, co-current and countercurrent. Experiments have been operated in each stage with respective saturated air inlet temperatures of 36, 40 and 43{sup o}C. The temperature and humidity data have been collected at the inlet and exit of the packed bed for different water to air mass flow ratios that vary between 0 and 2.5. A one-dimensional model based on conservation principles has been developed, which predicts the variation of temperature, humidity, and condensation rate through the condenser stages. Agreement between the model and experiments is very good. It is observed that the countercurrent flow stage condensation effectiveness is significantly higher than that for the co-current stage. The condensation heat and mass transfer rates were found to decrease when water blockages occur within the packed bed. Using high-speed digital cinematography, it was observed that this problem can occur at any operating condition, and is dependent on the packing surface wetting characteristics. This observation is used to explain the requirement for two different empirical constants, depending on packing diameter, suggested by Onda for the air side mass transfer coefficient correlation. (author)

  13. Perfect arborescence packing in preflow mincut graphs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabow, H.N. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-12-31

    In a digraph with distinguished vertex a, for any vertex v {ne} a let {lambda}(v) equal the value of a maximum flow from a to v. A perfect packing of a-arborescences contains each vertex in {lambda}(v) arborescences and contains some fixed vertex in every arborescence. Determining if an arbitrary graph has a perfect packing is NP-complete. We present the most general known condition that guarantees the existence of a perfect packing: each vertex v {ne} a is separated from a by a set that has in-degree {lambda}(v) and out-degree no greater. This result is based on other useful properties of such graphs, e.g., they always have a pair of edges that can be {open_quotes}split off{close_quotes} preserving, values. We show a perfect packing can be found in O(nm{sup 2}) time, where n (m) is the number of vertices (edges). If the graph has a capacity function the time is the same as computing O(n{sup 2}) maximum network flows. We also show a preflow mincut graph has a fractional perfect packing using only m + n - 2 distinct arborescences.

  14. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Suyenty

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Currently Indonesia is the world largest palm oil producer with production volume reaching 16 million tones per annum. The high crude oil and ethylene prices in the last 3 – 4 years contribute to the healthy demand growth for basic oleochemicals: fatty acids and fatty alcohols. Oleochemicals are starting to replace crude oil derived products in various applications. As widely practiced in petrochemical industry, catalyst plays a very important role in the production of basic oleochemicals. Catalytic reactions are abound in the production of oleochemicals: Nickel based catalysts are used in the hydrogenation of unsaturated fatty acids; sodium methylate catalyst in the transesterification of triglycerides; sulfonic based polystyrene resin catalyst in esterification of fatty acids; and copper chromite/copper zinc catalyst in the high pressure hydrogenation of methyl esters or fatty acids to produce fatty alcohols. To maintain long catalyst life, it is crucial to ensure the absence of catalyst poisons and inhibitors in the feed. The preparation methods of nickel and copper chromite catalysts are as follows: precipitation, filtration, drying, and calcinations. Sodium methylate is derived from direct reaction of sodium metal and methanol under inert gas. The sulfonic based polystyrene resin is derived from sulfonation of polystyrene crosslinked with di-vinyl-benzene. © 2007 BCREC UNDIP. All rights reserved.[Presented at Symposium and Congress of MKICS 2007, 18-19 April 2007, Semarang, Indonesia][How to Cite: E. Suyenty, H. Sentosa, M. Agustine, S. Anwar, A. Lie, E. Sutanto. (2007. Catalyst in Basic Oleochemicals. Bulletin of Chemical Reaction Engineering and Catalysis, 2 (2-3: 22-31.  doi:10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31][How to Link/DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.9767/bcrec.2.2-3.6.22-31 || or local: http://ejournal.undip.ac.id/index.php/bcrec/article/view/6

  15. Deterioration of organic packing materials commonly used in air biofiltration: effect of VOC-packing interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebrero, Raquel; Estrada, José M; Muñoz, Raúl; Quijano, Guillermo

    2014-05-01

    The abiotic deterioration of three conventional organic packing materials used in biofiltration (compost, wood bark and Macadamia nutshells) caused by their interaction with toluene (used as a model volatile organic compound) was here studied. The deterioration of the materials was evaluated in terms of structural damage, release of co-substrates and increase of the packing biodegradability. After 21 days of exposure to toluene, all packing materials released co-substrates able to support microbial growth, which were not released by the control materials not exposed to toluene. Likewise, the exposure to toluene increased the packing material biodegradability by 26% in wood bark, 20% in compost and 17% in Macadamia nutshells. Finally, scanning electron microscopy analysis confirmed the deterioration in the structure of the packing materials evaluated due to the exposure to toluene, Macadamia nutshells being the material with the highest resistance to volatile organic compound attack.

  16. ALKALI RESISTANT CATALYST

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention concerns the selective removal of nitrogen oxides (NOx) from gasses. In particular, the invention concerns a process, a catalyst and the use of a catalyst for the selective removal of nitrogen oxides in the presence of ammonia from gases containing a significant amount...... of alkali metal and/or alkali-earth compounds which process comprises using a catalyst combined of (i) a formed porous superacidic support, said superacidic support having an Hammett acidity stronger than Ho=-12, and (ii) a metal oxide catalytic component deposited on said superacidic support selected from...

  17. Characterization of Deactivated Bio-oil Hydrotreating Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Huamin; Wang, Yong

    2015-10-06

    Deactivation of bio-oil hydrotreating catalysts remains a significant challenge because of the poor quality of pyrolysis bio-oil input for hydrotreating and understanding their deactivation mode is critical to developing improved catalysts and processes. In this research, we developed an understanding of the deactivation of two-step bio-oil hydrotreating catalysts (sulfided Ru/C and sulfided CoMo/C) through detailed characterization of the catalysts using various complimentary analytical techniques. Severe fouling of both catalysts by carbonaceous species was the major form of deactivation, which is consistent with the significant loss of surface area and pore volume of both deactivated catalysts and the significant increase of the bulk density. Further analysis of the carbonaceous species by thermogravimetric analysis and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy indicated that the carbonaceous species was formed by condensation reaction of active species such as sugars and sugar derivatives (aldehydes and ketones) in bio-oil feedstock during bio-oil hydrotreating under the conditions and catalysts used. Microscopy results did not show metal sintering of the Ru/C catalyst. However, X-ray diffraction indicated a probable transformation of the highly-active CoMoS phase in the sulfided CoMo/C catalyst to Co8S9 and MoS2 phase with low activity. Loss of the active site by transport of inorganic elements from the bio-oil and the reactor construction material onto the catalyst surface also might be a cause of deactivation as indicated by elemental analysis of spent catalysts.

  18. Hydrotreating of waste lube oil by rejuvenated spent hydrotreating catalyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadeek A. Sadeek

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Large quantities of catalysts are used in the Egyptian refining industry for the purification and upgrading of various petroleum streams. These catalysts gradually lose activity through deactivation with time and the spent catalysts were usually discarded as solid waste. On the other hand, waste lube oil contains heavy metals coming from undergirded base oil and additives, these metals have carcinogenic effect and cause serious environmental problems. Studies are conducted on the reclamation of metals, rejuvenation and reuse of the spent hydrotreating catalyst (Mo–Ni/Al which have been used in re-refining of waste lube oil at Alexandria Petroleum Company. Three leaching solvents were used: oxidized oxalic acid, benzoic acid and boric acid at different concentrations (4%, 8% and 16%, different oxidizing agents (H2O2 and Fe(NO33 and different modes of addition of oxidizing agents (batch and continuous. The results indicated that 4% oxalic acid + 5% Fe(NO33 at continuous addition of oxidizing agents was the most efficient leaching solvent to facilitate metal removal and rejuvenate catalyst. The fresh catalyst was applied for re-refining of waste lube oil under different reaction temperatures (320–410 °C in order to compare the hydrodesulphurization (HDS activity with both the fresh, treated and spent catalysts. The results indicated that the rejuvenation techniques introduce a catalyst have HDS activity nearly approach to that the fresh of the same type.

  19. Operation of FCC with mixtures of regenerated and deactivated catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spretz, R.; Sedran, U. [INCAPE, FIQ, UNL - CONICET, Instituto de Investigaciones en Catalisis y Petroquimica, Santiago del Estero 2654, 3000 Santa Fe (Argentina)

    2001-07-13

    The operation of FCC with mixtures of coked and regenerated catalyst was studied with a riser simulator reactor on two equilibrium catalysts at 550C. The coked catalysts maintain an activity level that enables them to be used in the mixtures. The catalytic performances of the regenerated catalysts were used as references against which the behaviors of 25:75 and 50:50 (coked:regenerated) mixtures were compared. It was observed that overall catoil has to be increased to maintain conversion. While the yields of gases, gasoline and LCO showed to be independent of the operative mode, changes were observed in the selectivity to light olefins C4-C6 that are mainly due to changes in the yields of the isoparaffins in the groups. In turn, these changes could be the consequence of the resulting density of paired acid sites in the zeolite components on hydrogen transfer reactions, due to the contributions by the coked and regenerated portions of catalysts. Coke yields in mixtures of coked and regenerated catalysts are not higher, which would allow increasing catalyst circulation without impacting on heat balance. The particularities of this new operation of FCC are very dependent on catalyst properties.

  20. Safety considerations for fabricating lithium battery packs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciesla, J. J.

    1986-09-01

    Lithium cell safety is a major issue with both manufacturers and end users. Most manufacturers have taken great strides to develop the safest cells possible while still maintaining performance characteristics. The combining of lithium cells for higher voltages, currents, and capacities requires the fabricator of lithium battery packs to be knowledgable about the specific electrochemical system being used. Relatively high rate, spirally wound (large surface area) sulfur oxychloride cells systems, such as Li/Thionyl or Sulfuryl chloride are considered. Prior to the start of a design of a battery pack, a review of the characterization studies for the cells should be conducted. The approach for fabricating a battery pack might vary with cell size.

  1. Generalized network improvement and packing problems

    CERN Document Server

    Holzhauser, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Michael Holzhauser discusses generalizations of well-known network flow and packing problems by additional or modified side constraints. By exploiting the inherent connection between the two problem classes, the author investigates the complexity and approximability of several novel network flow and packing problems and presents combinatorial solution and approximation algorithms. Contents Fractional Packing and Parametric Search Frameworks Budget-Constrained Minimum Cost Flows: The Continuous Case Budget-Constrained Minimum Cost Flows: The Discrete Case Generalized Processing Networks Convex Generalized Flows Target Groups Researchers and students in the fields of mathematics, computer science, and economics Practitioners in operations research and logistics The Author Dr. Michael Holzhauser studied computer science at the University of Kaiserslautern and is now a research fellow in the Optimization Research Group at the Department of Mathematics of the University of Kaiserslautern.

  2. Lattice approaches to packed column simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This work presents a review of the findings into the ability of a digitally based particle packing algorithm, called DigiPac, to predict bed structure in a variety of packed columns, for a range of generic pellet shapes frequently used in the chemical and process engineering industries.Resulting macroscopic properties are compared with experimental data derived from both invasive and non-destructive measurement techniques.Additionally, fluid velocity distributions, through samples of the resulting bed structures, are analysed using lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) simulations and are compared against experimental data from the literature.

  3. Non-Crystallographic Symmetry in Packing Spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery G. Rau

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In the following, isomorphism of an arbitrary finite group of symmetry, non-crystallographic symmetry (quaternion groups, Pauli matrices groups, and other abstract subgroups, in addition to the permutation group, are considered. Application of finite groups of permutations to the packing space determines space tilings by policubes (polyominoes and forms a structure. Such an approach establishes the computer design of abstract groups of symmetry. Every finite discrete model of the real structure is an element of symmetry groups, including non-crystallographic ones. The set packing spaces of the same order N characterizes discrete deformation transformations of the structure.

  4. Imaging of drug smuggling by body packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sica, Giacomo; Guida, Franco; Bocchini, Giorgio; Iaselli, Francesco; Iadevito, Isabella; Scaglione, Mariano

    2015-02-01

    Body packing, pushing, and stuffing are hazardous practices with complex medicolegal and social implications. A radiologist plays both a social and a medicolegal role in their assessment, and it should not be limited only to the identification of the packages but must also provide accurate information about their number and their exact location so as to prevent any package remains in the body packer. Radiologists must also be able to recognize the complications associated with these risky practices. Imaging assessment of body packing is performed essentially through plain abdominal X-ray and computed tomography scans. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging, although with some advantages, actually have a limited use.

  5. Packing Transitions in Nanosized Li Clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Sung, M W; Weare, J H; Sung, Ming Wen; Kawai, Ryoichi; Weare, John H.

    1994-01-01

    Packing transitions in the lowest energy structures of Li clusters as a function of size have been identified via simulated annealing. For N>21, the large $p$ character of Li leads to unexpected ionic structures. At N~25, a packing pattern based on interpenetrating 13-atom icosahedra and similar to that of Na and K appears. This pattern persists until at N=55, where another transition to a structure based on a Mackay icosahedron occurs. For clusters of size 55 and 147, the optimized FCC structure representative of the bulk is still slightly higher in energy than the optimal MIC. (RK-94-03)

  6. Catalyst for microelectromechanical systems microreactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Sopchak, David A.; Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Reynolds, John G.; Satcher, Joseph H.; Gash, Alex E.

    2010-06-29

    A microreactor comprising a silicon wafer, a multiplicity of microchannels in the silicon wafer, and a catalyst coating the microchannels. In one embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a nanostructured material. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises an aerogel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises a solgel. In another embodiment the catalyst coating the microchannels comprises carbon nanotubes.

  7. Packed column supercritical fluid chromatography using stainless steel particles and water as a stationary phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Jillian N; Thurbide, Kevin B

    2015-09-15

    Stainless steel (SS) particles were demonstrated as a novel useful support for a water stationary phase in packed column supercritical fluid chromatography using a CO2 mobile phase. Separations employed flame ionization detection, and the system was operated over a range of temperatures and pressures. Retention times reproduced well with RSD values of 2.6% or less. Compared to analogous separations employing a water stationary phase coated onto a SS capillary column, the packed column method provided separations that were about 10× faster, with nearly 8-fold larger analyte retention factors, while maintaining good peak shape and comparable column efficiency. Under normal operating conditions, the packed column contains about 131 ± 4 μL/m of water phase (around a 5% m/m coating), which is over 25× greater than the capillary column and also affords it a 20-fold larger sample capacity. Several applications of the packed column system are examined, and the results indicate that it is a useful alternative to the capillary column mode, particularly where analyte loads or sample matrix interference is a concern. Given its high sample capacity, this packed column method may also be useful to explore on a more preparative scale in the future.

  8. Epoxidation catalyst and process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linic, Suljo; Christopher, Phillip

    2010-10-26

    Disclosed herein is a catalytic method of converting alkenes to epoxides. This method generally includes reacting alkenes with oxygen in the presence of a specific silver catalyst under conditions suitable to produce a yield of the epoxides. The specific silver catalyst is a silver nanocrystal having a plurality of surface planes, a substantial portion of which is defined by Miller indices of (100). The reaction is performed by charging a suitable reactor with this silver catalyst and then feeding the reactants to the reactor under conditions to carry out the reaction. The reaction may be performed in batch, or as a continuous process that employs a recycle of any unreacted alkenes. The specific silver catalyst has unexpectedly high selectivity for epoxide products. Consequently, this general method (and its various embodiments) will result in extraordinarily high epoxide yields heretofore unattainable.

  9. New Catalysts for ROMP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. Berke; C. Frech; A. Lhamazares; O. Blacque; H.W. Schmalle; C. Adlhart; P. Chen

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Ring Opening Metathesis Polymerization (ROMP) is based on the olefin metathesis reaction, which requires transition metal catalysts. Mainly molybdenum, tungsten and ruthenium based catalysts have up to now been used. The "in-between" metal rhenium was only rarely applied in olefin metathesis reactions, and not at all in ROMP processes.We have found that cationic phosphine substituted dinitrosyl rhenium complexes[1]1a and 1b effectively catalyze ROMP of norbonene, dicyclopentadiene and of cyclooctene. See Fig. 1.

  10. Bin Packing via Discrepancy of Permutations

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenbrand, Friedrich; Rothvoß, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    A well studied special case of bin packing is the 3-partition problem, where n items of size >1/4 have to be packed in a minimum number of bins of capacity one. The famous Karmarkar-Karp algorithm transforms a fractional solution of a suitable LP relaxation for this problem into an integral solution that requires at most O(log n) additional bins. The three-permutations-conjecture of Beck is the following. Given any 3 permutations on n symbols, one can color the symbols red and blue, such that in any interval of any of those permutations, the number of red and blue symbols differs only by a constant. Beck's conjecture is well known in the field of discrepancy theory. We establish a surprising connection between bin packing and Beck's conjecture: If the latter holds true, then the additive integrality gap of the 3-partition linear programming relaxation is bounded by a constant. This result indicates that improving approximability results for bin packing requires a better understanding of discrepancy theory.

  11. 7 CFR 920.13 - Pack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Pack. 920.13 Section 920.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE KIWIFRUIT GROWN IN CALIFORNIA...

  12. Improved lower bound for online strip packing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harren, Rolf; Kern, Walter

    2015-01-01

    We study the online strip packing problem and derive an improved lower bound of ρ ≥ 2.589... for the competitive ratio of this problem. The construction is based on modified “Brown-Baker-Katseff sequences” (Brown et al. in Acta Inform. 18:207–225, 1982) using only two types of rectangles. In additio

  13. Computational Modelling of Particle Packing in Concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    He, H.

    2010-01-01

    Physical particle packing is becoming a hot topic in concrete technology as more and more types of granular materials are used in concrete either for ecological or for engineering purposes. Although various analytical methods have been developed for optimum mixture design, comprehensive information

  14. Bacteriological Survey of AFD (Meat Packing Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Rawal

    1974-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the manufacturing process of freeze dried mutton from slaughtering to packing and makes an assessment of microbial build-up on equipment, hands of workers and environment in which the mutton comes in contact during processing.

  15. Power generation by packed-bed air-cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan

    2013-08-01

    Catalysts and catalyst binders are significant portions of the cost of microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes. Many materials have been tested as aqueous cathodes, but air-cathodes are needed to avoid energy demands for water aeration. Packed-bed air-cathodes were constructed without expensive binders or diffusion layers using four inexpensive carbon-based materials. Cathodes made from activated carbon produced the largest maximum power density of 676±93mW/m2, followed by semi-coke (376±47mW/m2), graphite (122±14mW/m2) and carbon felt (60±43mW/m2). Increasing the mass of activated carbon and semi-coke from 5 to ≥15g significantly reduced power generation because of a reduction in oxygen transfer due to a thicker water layer in the cathode (~3 or ~6cm). These results indicate that a thin packed layer of activated carbon or semi-coke can be used to make inexpensive air-cathodes for MFCs. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Modified strip packing heuristics for the rectangular variable-sized bin packing problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FG Ortmann

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Two packing problems are considered in this paper, namely the well-known strip packing problem (SPP and the variable-sized bin packing problem (VSBPP. A total of 252 strip packing heuristics (and variations thereof from the literature, as well as novel heuristics proposed by the authors, are compared statistically by means of 1170 SPP benchmark instances in order to identify the best heuristics in various classes. A combination of new heuristics with a new sorting method yields the best results. These heuristics are combined with a previous heuristic for the VSBPP by the authors to find good feasible solutions to 1357 VSBPP benchmark instances. This is the largest statistical comparison of algorithms for the SPP and the VSBPP to the best knowledge of the authors.

  17. Fundamental Studies on Two-Phase Gas-Liquid Flows Through Packed Beds in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakotaiah, Vemuri; McCready, Mark J.; Motil, Brian J.

    2002-01-01

    In the typical operation of a packed-bed reactor, gas and liquid flow simultaneously through a fixed bed of solid particles. Depending on the application, the particles can be of various shapes and sizes and provide for intimate contact and high rates of transport between the phases needed to sustain chemical or biological reactions. The packing may also serve as either a catalyst or as a support for growing biological material. NASA has flown two of these packed-bed systems in a microgravity environment with limited or no success. The goal of this research is to develop models (with scale-up capability) needed for the design of the physicochemical equipment to carry out these unit operations in microgravity. New insight will also lead to improvements in normal gravity operations. Our initial experiment was flown using an existing KC-135 two-phase flow rig with a modified test section. The test section is a clear polycarbonate rectangular column with a depth of 2.54 cm, a width of 5.08 cm, and 60 cm long. The column was randomly packed with spherical glass beads by slowly dropping the beads into the bed. Even though care was taken in handling the column after it was filled with packing, the alternating high and low gravity cycles with each parabola created a slightly tighter packed bed than is typically reported for this type. By the usual method of comparing the weight difference of a completely dry column versus a column filled with water, the void fraction was found to be .345 for both sizes of beads used. Five flush mounted differential pressure transducers are spaced at even intervals with the first location 4 cm from the inlet port and the subsequent pressure transducers spaced at 13 cm intervals along the column. Differential pressure data was acquired at 1000 Hz to adequately observe pulse formation and characteristics. Visual images of the flow were recorded using a high-speed SVHS system at 500 frames per second. Over 250 different test conditions were

  18. A multiscale methodology for CFD simulation of catalytic distillation bale packings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Huidian

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A multiscale model for simulating the hydrodynamic behavior of catalytic bale packings has been proposed. This model combines computational fluid dynamics (CFD and macroscopic calculation. At small scale calculation, the CFD model includes 3-D volume-of-fluid (VOF simulation within representative elementary unit (REU under unsteady-state conditions. The REU constitutes gauze and catalyst domain, and porous media model is applied. At large scale calculation, a new mechanistic model deduced from the unit network model is employed. Based on liquid split proportion from small scale calculation, liquid distribution of the entire bale packing can be predicted. To evaluate different packing design, three common bale arrangements, i.e. one-bale, nine-bales and seven-bales, are compared. The area-weighted Christiansen uniformity coefficient is introduced to assess the distribution performance. A comparison between simulation and experimental results is made to validate the multiscale model. The present methodology is proved to be effective to analysis and design of catalytic distillation columns.

  19. Blister packing of copper hydroxide and titania nanoparticles on graphene and its recycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Vadahanambi; Gangaraju, Deepa; Chun, Ho-Hwan; Park, Hyun

    2013-12-11

    Metal nanoparticles anchored on a graphene substrate find many applications such as sensors, catalysts, lithium ion batteries, etc. However, to date, graphene-metal nanohybrids have been synthesized by either covalent or ionic interactions between the graphene substrate and the metal nanoparticles. In this manuscript, we report a green and facile method to "bubble pack" metal nanoparticles on a graphene substrate by a simple process utilizing eco-friendly ionic liquids in conjunction with microwave heating. Copper nanoparticles bubble packed on graphene showed enhanced glucose sensing when compared to covalently bonded copper/graphene hybrids. Titania nanoparticles bubble packed on graphene when applied as anode materials in lithium ion batteries exhibited two times more lithium ion retention when compared to covalently bonded titania/graphene hybrids. "End of life" disposal of nanomaterials into the environment is a growing area of concern in recent days. One way of dealing with this problem is to extend the life cycle of nanomaterials by reusing the nanomaterials in multiple applications. In this report, we also show the recyclability of our novel bubble packaging material, by etching out the metal nanoparticles resulting in a unique 3D hierarchical graphene nanocup decorated graphene. The applicability of this recycled material in super capacitors is also reported.

  20. Supported organoiridium catalysts for alkane dehydrogenation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, R. Thomas; Sattelberger, Alfred P.; Li, Hongbo

    2013-09-03

    Solid supported organoiridium catalysts, a process for preparing such solid supported organoiridium catalysts, and the use of such solid supported organoiridium catalysts in dehydrogenation reactions of alkanes is provided. The catalysts can be easily recovered and recycled.

  1. 29 CFR 784.135 - “Packing.”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false âPacking.â 784.135 Section 784.135 Labor Regulations... First Processing, Canning, Or Packing of Marine Products Under Section 13(a)(5) § 784.135 “Packing.” The packing of the various named marine products at sea as an incident to, or in conjunction with, the...

  2. Method of synthesizing bulk transition metal carbide, nitride and phosphide catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jae Soon; Armstrong, Beth L; Schwartz, Viviane

    2015-04-21

    A method for synthesizing catalyst beads of bulk transmission metal carbides, nitrides and phosphides is provided. The method includes providing an aqueous suspension of transition metal oxide particles in a gel forming base, dropping the suspension into an aqueous solution to form a gel bead matrix, heating the bead to remove the binder, and carburizing, nitriding or phosphiding the bead to form a transition metal carbide, nitride, or phosphide catalyst bead. The method can be tuned for control of porosity, mechanical strength, and dopant content of the beads. The produced catalyst beads are catalytically active, mechanically robust, and suitable for packed-bed reactor applications. The produced catalyst beads are suitable for biomass conversion, petrochemistry, petroleum refining, electrocatalysis, and other applications.

  3. Crystallographic dependence of CO activation on cobalt catalysts: HCP versus FCC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jin-Xun; Su, Hai-Yan; Sun, Da-Peng; Zhang, Bing-Yan; Li, Wei-Xue

    2013-11-06

    Identifying the structure sensitivity of catalysts in reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch synthesis from CO and H2 over cobalt catalysts, is an important yet challenging issue in heterogeneous catalysis. Based on a first-principles kinetic study, we find for the first time that CO activation on hexagonal close-packed (HCP) Co not only has much higher intrinsic activity than that of face centered-cubic (FCC) Co but also prefers a different reaction route, i.e., direct dissociation with HCP Co but H-assisted dissociation on the FCC Co. The origin is identified from the formation of various denser yet favorable active sites on HCP Co not available for FCC Co, due to their distinct crystallographic structure and morphology. The great dependence of the activity on the crystallographic structure and morphology of the catalysts revealed here may open a new avenue for better, stable catalysts with maximum mass-specific reactivity.

  4. Oxygen supply for CHO cells immobilized on a packed-bed of Fibra-Cel disks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuwly, F; Loviat, F; Ruffieux, P-A; Bernard, A R; Kadouri, A; von Stockar, U

    2006-03-05

    Packed-bed bioreactors (PBR) have proven to be efficient systems to culture mammalian cells at very high cell density in perfusion mode, thus leading to very high volumetric productivity. However, the immobilized cells must be continuously supplied with all nutrients in sufficient quantities to remain viable and productive over the full duration of the perfusion culture. Among all nutrients, oxygen is the most critical since it is present at very low concentration due to its low solubility in cell culture medium. This work presents the development of a model for oxygenation in a packed-bed bioreactor system. The experimental system used to develop the model was a packed-bed of Fibra-Cel disk carriers used to cultivate Chinese Hamster Ovary cells at high density ( approximately 6.1 x 10(7) cell/mL) in perfusion mode. With the help of this model, it was possible to identify if a PBR system is operated in optimal or sub-optimal conditions. Using the model, two options were proposed, which could improve the performance of the basal system by about twofold, that is, by increasing the density of immobilized cells per carrier volume from 6.1 x 10(7) to 1.2 x 10(8) cell/mL, or by increasing the packed-bed height from 0.2 to 0.4 m. Both strategies would be rather simple to test and implement in the packed-bed bioreactor system used for this study. As a result, it would be possible to achieve a substantial improvement of about twofold higher productivity as compared with the basal conditions.

  5. Investigations on a new internally-heated tubular packed-bed methanol–steam reformer

    KAUST Repository

    Nehe, Prashant

    2015-05-01

    Small-scale reformers for hydrogen production through steam reforming of methanol can provide an alternative solution to the demand of continuous supply of hydrogen gas for the operation of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFCs). A packed-bed type reformer is one of the potential designs for such purpose. An externally heated reformer has issues of adverse lower temperature in the core of the reformer and significant heat loss to the environment thus impacting its performance. Experimental and numerical studies on a new concept of internally heated tubular packed-bed methanol-steam reformer have been reported in this paper with improved performance in terms of higher methanol conversion and reduced heat losses to surroundings. CuO/ZnO/Al2O3 is used as the catalyst for the methanol-steam reforming reaction and a rod-type electric heater at the center of the reactor is used for supplying necessary heat for endothermic steam reforming reaction. The vaporizer and the reformer unit with a constant volume catalyst bed are integrated in the annular section of a tubular reformer unit. The performance of the reformer was investigated at various operating conditions like feed rate of water-methanol mixture, mass of the catalyst and reforming temperature. The experimental and numerical results show that the methanol conversion and CO concentration increase with internal heating for a wide range of operating conditions. The developed reformer unit generates 50-80W (based on lower heating value) of hydrogen gas for applications in PEMFCs. For optimized design and operating conditions, the reformer unit produced 298sccm reformed gas containing 70% H2, 27% CO2 and 3% CO at 200-240°C which can produce a power output of 25-32W assuming 60% fuel cell efficiency and 80% of hydrogen utilization in a PEMFC. © 2015 Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC.

  6. Helix-packing motifs in membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, R F S; DeGrado, W F

    2006-09-12

    The fold of a helical membrane protein is largely determined by interactions between membrane-imbedded helices. To elucidate recurring helix-helix interaction motifs, we dissected the crystallographic structures of membrane proteins into a library of interacting helical pairs. The pairs were clustered according to their three-dimensional similarity (rmsd universe of common transmembrane helix-pairing motifs is relatively simple. The largest cluster, which comprises 29% of the library members, consists of an antiparallel motif with left-handed packing angles, and it is frequently stabilized by packing of small side chains occurring every seven residues in the sequence. Right-handed parallel and antiparallel structures show a similar tendency to segregate small residues to the helix-helix interface but spaced at four-residue intervals. Position-specific sequence propensities were derived for the most populated motifs. These structural and sequential motifs should be quite useful for the design and structural prediction of membrane proteins.

  7. Pattern Generation by Bubble Packing Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goel V.K.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new computational method forornamental Pattern design. The work is a concerted effort ofevaluation of various methods and the comparatively betterprocess is used for designing keeping in mind the accuracyrequirement for such Indian traditional ethnic designs. The firststep in the process to apply the CAD tools to design the patterns.Small semantics (profile are made using the mathematicalmodelling to make different pattern. Geometric constraints suchas scaling, rotation, transformation etc. are applied to make andmodify the profiles. To create patterns, obtains node locationsthrough a physically based particle simulation, which we call'bubble packing. Bubbles are closely packed on the corners,edges and on the surface domain, and nodes are placed at thecenters of the bubbles. Experimental results show that ourmethod can create high quality ornamental patterns. Thefabrication of the ornaments is on rapid prototype machine.

  8. On Approximating Four Covering and Packing Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Ashley, Mary; Berman, Piotr; Chaovalitwongse, Wanpracha; DasGupta, Bhaskar; Kao, Ming-Yang; 10.1016/j.jcss.2009.01.002

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we consider approximability issues of the following four problems: triangle packing, full sibling reconstruction, maximum profit coverage and 2-coverage. All of them are generalized or specialized versions of set-cover and have applications in biology ranging from full-sibling reconstructions in wild populations to biomolecular clusterings; however, as this paper shows, their approximability properties differ considerably. Our inapproximability constant for the triangle packing problem improves upon the previous results; this is done by directly transforming the inapproximability gap of Haastad for the problem of maximizing the number of satisfied equations for a set of equations over GF(2) and is interesting in its own right. Our approximability results on the full siblings reconstruction problems answers questions originally posed by Berger-Wolf et al. and our results on the maximum profit coverage problem provides almost matching upper and lower bounds on the approximation ratio, answering a...

  9. Is incest common in gray wolf packs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D.; Meier, T.; Geffen, E.; Mech, L.D.; Burch, J.W.; Adams, L.G.; Wayne, R.K.

    1997-01-01

    Wolf packs generally consist of a breeding pair and their maturing offspring that help provision and protect pack young. Because the reproductive tenure in wolves often is short, reproductively mature offspring might replace their parents, resulting in sibling or parent-offspring matings. To determine the extent of incestuous pairings, we measure relatedness based on variability in 20 microsatellite loci of mated pairs, parent-offspring pairs and siblings in two populations of gray wolves. Our 16 sampled mated pairs had values of relatedness not overlapping those of known parent-offspring or sibling dyads, which is consistent with their being unrelated or distantly related. These results suggest that full siblings or a parent and their offspring rarely mate and that incest avoidance is an important constraint on gray wolf behavioral ecology.

  10. Packing and Disorder in Substituted Fullerenes

    KAUST Repository

    Tummala, Naga Rajesh

    2016-07-15

    Fullerenes are ubiquitous as electron-acceptor and electron-transport materials in organic solar cells. Recent synthetic strategies to improve the solubility and electronic characteristics of these molecules have translated into a tremendous increase in the variety of derivatives employed in these applications. Here, we use molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to examine the impact of going from mono-adducts to bis- and tris-adducts on the structural, cohesive, and packing characteristics of [6,6]-phenyl-C60-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and indene-C60. The packing configurations obtained at the MD level then serve as input for density functional theory calculations that examine the solid-state energetic disorder (distribution of site energies) as a function of chemical substitution. The variations in structural and site-energy disorders reflect the fundamental materials differences among the derivatives and impact the performance of these materials in thin-film electronic devices.

  11. Fuel cell catalyst degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arenz, Matthias; Zana, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Fuel cells are an important piece in our quest for a sustainable energy supply. Although there are several different types of fuel cells, the by far most popular is the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Among its many favorable properties are a short start up time and a high power density...... increasing focus. Activity of the catalyst is important, but stability is essential. In the presented perspective paper, we review recent efforts to investigate fuel cell catalysts ex-situ in electrochemical half-cell measurements. Due to the amount of different studies, this review has no intention to give...

  12. Aerogel derived catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, J. G., LLNL

    1996-12-11

    Aerogels area class of colloidal materials which have high surface areas and abundant mesoporous structure. SiO{sub 2} aerogels show unique physical, optical and structural properties. When catalytic metals are incorporated in the aerogel framework, the potential exists for new and very effective catalysts for industrial processes. Three applications of these metal-containing SiO{sub 2} aerogels as catalysts are briefly reviewed in this paper--NO{sub x} reduction, volatile organic compound destruction, and partial oxidation of methane.

  13. Olefin metathesis catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukes, S.G.; Banks, R.L.

    1986-05-20

    A process is described for preparing a disproportionation catalyst comprising admixing a catalytically effective amount of a calcined and activated catalyst consisting essentially of at least one metal oxide selected from molybdenum oxide and tungsten oxide and a support containing a major proportion of silica or alumina with a promoting amount of a methylating agent selected from the group consisting of dimethyl sulfate, dimethylsulfoxide, trimethyloxonium tetrafluorborate, methyl iodide, and methyl bromide, and subjecting same to inert atmospheric conditions for the methylating agent to promote the activity of the calcined molybdenum and tungsten oxides for the disproportionation of olefins.

  14. Mesoporous molecular sieve catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højholt, Karen Thrane

    be used as solid acid catalysts but can also be used as a size-selective matrix. It was shown that it is possible to encapsulate 1-2 nm sized gold nanoparticles by silicalite-1 or ZSM-5 zeolite crystals thereby forming a sintering-stable and substrate size-selective oxidation catalyst. After carrying out...... calcination experiments, both in situ and ex situ indicated that the gold nanoparticles embedded in the crystals were highly stable towards sintering. The catalytic tests proved that the embedded gold nanoparticles were active in selective aldehyde oxidation and were only accessible through the micropores...

  15. Dynamics of Catalyst Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thomas Willum; Cavalca, Filippo; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal

    under gas exposure, dynamic phenomena such as sintering and growth can be observed with sub-Ångstrøm resolution. Metal nanoparticles contain the active sites in heterogeneous catalysts, which are important for many industrial applications including the production of clean fuels, chemicals...... and pharmaceuticals, and the cleanup of exhaust from automobiles and stationary power plants. Sintering, or thermal deactivation, is an important mechanism for the loss of catalyst activity. In order to initiate a systematic study of the dynamics and sintering of nanoparticles, various catalytic systems have been...

  16. CoolPack – Simulation tools for refrigeration systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Arne; Rasmussen, Bjarne D.; Andersen, Simon Engedal

    1999-01-01

    CoolPack is a collection of programs used for energy analysis and optimisation of refrigeration systems. CoolPack is developed at the Department of Energy Engineering at the Technical University of Denmark. The Danish Energy Agency finances the project. CoolPack is freeware and can be downloaded...

  17. 48 CFR 552.211-75 - Preservation, Packaging and Packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... and Packing. 552.211-75 Section 552.211-75 Federal Acquisition Regulations System GENERAL SERVICES....211-75 Preservation, Packaging and Packing. As prescribed in 511.204(b)(2), insert the following clause: Preservation, Packaging, and Packing (FEB 1996) Unless otherwise specified, all items shall...

  18. 27 CFR 24.255 - Bottling or packing wine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bottling or packing wine..., DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Storage, Treatment and Finishing of Wine Bottling, Packing, and Labeling of Wine § 24.255 Bottling or packing wine. (a) General. Proprietors of a bonded wine premises...

  19. 7 CFR 319.37-9 - Approved packing material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Approved packing material. 319.37-9 Section 319.37-9..., and Other Plant Products 1,2 § 319.37-9 Approved packing material. Any restricted article at the time of importation or offer for importation into the United States shall not be packed in a...

  20. 48 CFR 211.272 - Alternate preservation, packaging, and packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., packaging, and packing. 211.272 Section 211.272 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION... Requirements Documents 211.272 Alternate preservation, packaging, and packing. Use the provision at 252.211-7004, Alternate Preservation, Packaging, and Packing, in solicitations which include...

  1. 75 FR 31283 - Clarification of Parachute Packing Authorization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-03

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 65 RIN 2120-AJ08 Clarification of Parachute Packing...) was expressly limited to packing a main parachute of a dual-parachute system for personal use...'' situations, parachute packing must be accomplished by or overseen by an appropriate current...

  2. 48 CFR 452.247-73 - Packing for Overseas Shipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Packing for Overseas Shipment. 452.247-73 Section 452.247-73 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... Packing for Overseas Shipment. As prescribed in 447.305-10(c), insert the following clause: Packing...

  3. 48 CFR 452.247-72 - Packing for Domestic Shipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Packing for Domestic Shipment. 452.247-72 Section 452.247-72 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... Packing for Domestic Shipment. As prescribed in 447.305-10(b), insert the following clause: Packing...

  4. 7 CFR 51.2927 - Marking and packing requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Marking and packing requirements. 51.2927 Section 51... STANDARDS) United States Standards for Grades of Apricots Marking and Packing Requirements § 51.2927 Marking and packing requirements. The minimum size or numerical count of the apricots in any package shall...

  5. 48 CFR 852.214-73 - Alternate packaging and packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... packing. 852.214-73 Section 852.214-73 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS....214-73 Alternate packaging and packing. As prescribed in 814.201-6(b)(3), insert the following provision: Alternate Packaging and Packing (JAN 2008) The bidder's offer must clearly indicate the...

  6. 48 CFR 552.211-77 - Packing List.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Packing List. 552.211-77... FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text of Provisions and Clauses 552.211-77 Packing List. As prescribed in 511.204(c), insert the following clause: Packing List (FEB 1996) (a) A...

  7. 36 CFR 1002.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 1002... AND RECREATION § 1002.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited: (a) The use of animals other than those designated as “pack animals” for purposes of transporting equipment. (b) The use...

  8. 36 CFR 34.10 - Saddle and pack animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Saddle and pack animals. 34... INTERIOR EL PORTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SITE REGULATIONS § 34.10 Saddle and pack animals. The use of saddle and pack animals is prohibited without a permit from the Superintendent....

  9. 36 CFR 2.16 - Horses and pack animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Horses and pack animals. 2.16... RESOURCE PROTECTION, PUBLIC USE AND RECREATION § 2.16 Horses and pack animals. The following are prohibited: (a) The use of animals other than those designated as “pack animals” for purposes of...

  10. Sensory Analysis of Stored Tray Pack Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-12-01

    Milk chocolate brown. ODOR: Sweet, typical of heat processed milk cocoa . FLAVOR: Sweet, full milk cocoa flavor. TEXTURE: Smooth, medium thick...7B DEGREES 100 DEGREES 6. DESSERTS Chocolate Pudding There was no significant finding with this Tray Pack item. Marble Cake At 70°F, the effect...and 6 months. The main effect of temperature on acceptability of this item was not significant. Chocolate Cake At 70°F, there was a significant

  11. Flaming Pear Creative Pack1.0

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kane

    2003-01-01

    Flaming Pear是个一直给我留下深刻印象的软件开发公司。我以前评论过很多这个公司的插件,每一次都是不错的经历。同样的优良传统同样体现在Flaming Pear的新品Creative Pack1.0

  12. A Controlled New Process of Pack Aluminization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zhi-rong; MA Liu-bao; LI Pei-ning; XU Hong

    2004-01-01

    Aluminum diffusion coatings are often prepared by a pack aluminization technique, which is a specific variety of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The coating process takes place in a bed containing a mixed powder that serves as a source of the coatings forming element. The phase composition of the diffusion layer obtained depends on the activity of the Al during the pack aluminization processing. In this work, the proportion of Al to special additive powder in the pack and the treatment temperature are adjusted to achieve the desired surface composition of aluminized layer. The aluminized 20 plain carbon steel and HK40 austenitic steel were investigated by optical microscopy (OM) , X-ray diffraction (XRD)and microsclerometer. The results showed that the desired FeAl, Fe3Al and NiAl were respectively formed on the 20 plain carbon steel and HK40 austenitic steel, and the aluminides FeAl3, Fe2Al5 or Ni2Al3, NiAl3 could be inhibited.

  13. A Controlled New Process of Pack Aluminization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANGZhi-rong; MALiu-bao; LIPei-ning; XUHong

    2004-01-01

    Aluminum diffusion coatings are often prepared by a pack aluminization technique, which is a specific variety of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The coating process takes place in a bed containing a mixed powder that serves as a source of the coatings forming element. The phase composition of the diffusion layer obtained depends on the activity of the Al during the pack aluminization processing. In this work, the proportion of Al to special additive powder in the pack and the treatment temperature are adjusted to achieve the desired surface composition of aluminized layer. The aluminized 20 plain carbon steel and HK40 austenitic steel were investigated by optical microscopy (OM) , X-ray diffraction (XRD) and microsclerometer. The results showed that the desired FeAl, Fe3Al and NiAl were respectively formed on the 20 plain carbon steel and HK40 austenitic steel, and the aluminides FeAl3, Fe2Al5 or Ni2Al3, NiAl3 could be inhibited.

  14. Deactivation-resistant catalyst for selective catalyst reduction of NOx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention relates to a catalyst for selective catalytic reduction of NOx in alkali metal containing flue gas using ammonia as reductant, the catalyst comprising a surface with catalytically active sites, wherein the surface is at least partly coated with a coating comprising at least...... one metal oxide. In another aspect the present invention relates to the use of said catalyst and to a method of producing said catalyst. In addition, the present invention relates to a method of treating an catalyst for conferring thereon an improved resistance to alkali poisoning....

  15. The mechanical behaviour of packed particulates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutton, R

    1998-01-01

    Within the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management program, the central concept is to package used fuel in containers that would be deposited in an underground vault in a plutonic rock formation. To provide internal mechanical support for the container, the reference design specifies it to be filled with a matrix of compacted particulate material (called 'packed particulate'), such as quartz sand granules. The focus of this report is on the mechanical properties of the packed-particulate material, based on information drawn from the extant literature. We first consider the packing density of particulate matrices to minimize the remnant porosity and maximize mechanical stability under conditions of external pressure. Practical methods, involving vibratory packing, are reviewed and recommendations made to select techniques to achieve optimum packing density. The behaviour of particulates under compressive loading has been of interest to the powder metallurgy industry (i.e., the manufacture of products from pressed/sintered metal and ceramic powders) since the early decades of this century. We review the evidence showing that in short timescales, stress induced compaction occurs by particle shuffling and rearrangement, elastic distortion, plastic yielding and microfracturing. Analytical expressions are available to describe these processes in a semiquantitative fashion. Time-dependent compaction, mainly via creep mechanisms, is more complex. Much of the theoretical and experimental information is confined to higher temperatures (> 500 degrees C), where deformation rates are more rapid. Thus, for the relatively low ambient temperatures of the waste container ({approx}100 degrees C), we require analytical techniques to extrapolate the collective particulate creep behaviour. This is largely accomplished by employing current theories of creep deformation, particularly in the form of Deformation Mechanism Maps, which allow estimation of creep rates over a wide

  16. Multi-Pack Disposal Concepts for Spent Fuel (Revision 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Matteo, Edward N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hadgu, Teklu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-01-01

    At the initiation of the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) R&D campaign, international geologic disposal programs and past work in the U.S. were surveyed to identify viable disposal concepts for crystalline, clay/shale, and salt host media. Concepts for disposal of commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW) from reprocessing are relatively advanced in countries such as Finland, France, and Sweden. The UFD work quickly showed that these international concepts are all “enclosed,” whereby waste packages are emplaced in direct or close contact with natural or engineered materials . Alternative “open” modes (emplacement tunnels are kept open after emplacement for extended ventilation) have been limited to the Yucca Mountain License Application Design. Thermal analysis showed that if “enclosed” concepts are constrained by peak package/buffer temperature, that waste package capacity is limited to 4 PWR assemblies (or 9 BWR) in all media except salt. This information motivated separate studies: 1) extend the peak temperature tolerance of backfill materials, which is ongoing; and 2) develop small canisters (up to 4-PWR size) that can be grouped in larger multi-pack units for convenience of storage, transportation, and possibly disposal (should the disposal concept permit larger packages). A recent result from the second line of investigation is the Task Order 18 report: Generic Design for Small Standardized Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister Systems. This report identifies disposal concepts for the small canisters (4-PWR size) drawing heavily on previous work, and for the multi-pack (16-PWR or 36-BWR).

  17. Multi-pack Disposal Concepts for Spent Fuel (Rev. 0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadgu, Teklu [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Matteo, Edward N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    At the initiation of the Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) R&D campaign, international geologic disposal programs and past work in the U.S. were surveyed to identify viable disposal concepts for crystalline, clay/shale, and salt host media (Hardin et al., 2012). Concepts for disposal of commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level waste (HLW) from reprocessing are relatively advanced in countries such as Finland, France, and Sweden. The UFD work quickly showed that these international concepts are all “enclosed,” whereby waste packages are emplaced in direct or close contact with natural or engineered materials . Alternative “open” modes (emplacement tunnels are kept open after emplacement for extended ventilation) have been limited to the Yucca Mountain License Application Design (CRWMS M&O, 1999). Thermal analysis showed that, if “enclosed” concepts are constrained by peak package/buffer temperature, waste package capacity is limited to 4 PWR assemblies (or 9-BWR) in all media except salt. This information motivated separate studies: 1) extend the peak temperature tolerance of backfill materials, which is ongoing; and 2) develop small canisters (up to 4-PWR size) that can be grouped in larger multi-pack units for convenience of storage, transportation, and possibly disposal (should the disposal concept permit larger packages). A recent result from the second line of investigation is the Task Order 18 report: Generic Design for Small Standardized Transportation, Aging and Disposal Canister Systems (EnergySolution, 2015). This report identifies disposal concepts for the small canisters (4-PWR size) drawing heavily on previous work, and for the multi-pack (16-PWR or 36-BWR).

  18. Fischer–Tropsch Synthesis: Effect of Reducing Agent for Aqueous-Phase Synthesis Over Ru Nanoparticle and Supported Ru Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pendyala, Venkat Ramana Rao [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Shafer, Wilson D. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Jacobs, Gary [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Graham, Uschi M. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Khalid, Syed [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Davis, Burtron H. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2014-12-27

    The effect of the reducing agent on the performance of a ruthenium nanoparticle catalyst was investigated during aqueous-phase Fischer–Tropsch synthesis using a 1 L stirred tank reactor in the batch mode of operation. For the purpose of comparison, the activity and selectivity of NaY zeolite supported Ru catalyst were also studied. NaBH4 and hydrogen were used as reducing agents in our study, and hydrogen reduced catalysts exhibited higher activities than the NaBH4 reduced catalysts, because of higher extent of reduction and a relatively lower tendency toward agglomeration of Ru particles. The Ru nanoparticle catalyst displayed higher activities than the NaY zeolite supported Ru catalyst for both reducing agents. NaBH4 reduced catalysts are less active and the carbon dioxide selectivity is higher than the hydrogen reduced catalysts. The activity of the supported Ru catalyst (Ru/NaY) was 75 % of that of the Ru nanoparticle catalyst, and has the benefit of easy wax/catalyst slurry separation by filtration. Finally, the hydrogen reduced supported Ru catalyst exhibited superior selectivity towards hydrocarbons (higher C5+ selectivity and lower selectivity to methane) than all other catalysts tested.

  19. Nanopore and nanoparticle catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J M; Raja, R

    2001-01-01

    The design, atomic characterization, performance, and relevance to clean technology of two distinct categories of new nanocatalysts are described and interpreted. Exceptional molecular selectivity and high activity are exhibited by these catalysts. The first category consists of extended, crystallographically ordered inorganic solids possessing nanopores (apertures, cages, and channels), the diameters of which fall in the range of about 0.4 to about 1.5 nm, and the second of discrete bimetallic nanoparticles of diameter 1 to 2 nm, distributed more or less uniformly along the inner walls of mesoporous (ca. 3 to 10 nm diameter) silica supports. Using the principles and practices of solid-state and organometallic chemistry and advanced physico-chemical techniques for in situ and ex situ characterization, a variety of powerful new catalysts has been evolved. Apart from those that, inter alia, simulate the behavior of enzymes in their specificity, shape selectivity, regio-selectivity, and ability to function under ambient conditions, many of these new nanocatalysts are also viable as agents for effecting commercially significant processes in a clean, benign, solvent-free, single-step fashion. In particular, a bifunctional, molecular sieve nanopore catalyst is described that converts cyclohexanone in air and ammonia to its oxime and caprolactam, and a bimetallic nanoparticle catalyst that selectively converts cyclic polyenes into desirable intermediates. Nanocatalysts in the first category are especially effective in facilitating highly selective oxidations in air, and those in the second are well suited to effecting rapid and selective hydrogenations of a range of organic compounds.

  20. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  1. Heterogeneous chromium catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to a heterogeneous chromium catalyst system for the polymerisation of ethylene and/or alpha olefins prepared by the steps of: (a) providing a silica-containing support, (b) treating the silica-containing support with a chromium compound to form a chromium-based silica-c

  2. Deactivation of Oxidation Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-01

    Levenspiel (Reference 10) have proposed an equivalent general expression of the form dS _KST (4) dtk to account for deactivation due to catalyst pore...Voorhies, A., IEC, 1954, vol. 37, p. 318. 10. Szepe, S., and 0. Levenspiel , Proc. 4th Europ. Symp. Chem. React. Eng., Pergamon Press, p. 265. 11. U.S

  3. Olefin metathesis and catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukes, S. G.; Banks, R. L.

    1985-05-14

    Olefins are converted into other olefins having different numbers of carbon atoms by contact with a catalyst comprising an inorganic refractory oxide support containing at least one of tungsten oxide and molybdenum oxide and a promoting amount of at least one methylating agent under conditions suitable for the methylating agent compounds to promote the activity of tungsten and molybdenum oxides for the disproportionation reaction.

  4. Catalysts for Environmental Remediation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrams, B. L.; Vesborg, Peter Christian Kjærgaard

    2013-01-01

    The properties of catalysts used in environmental remediation are described here through specific examples in heterogeneous catalysis and photocatalysis. In the area of heterogeneous catalysis, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx was used as an example reaction with vanadia and tungsta...

  5. Highly efficient capillary columns packed with superficially porous particles via sequential column packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treadway, James W; Wyndham, Kevin D; Jorgenson, James W

    2015-11-27

    Highly efficient capillary columns packed with superficially porous particles were created for use in ultrahigh pressure liquid chromatography. Superficially porous particles around 1.5μm in diameter were packed into fused silica capillary columns with 30, 50, and 75μm internal diameters. To create the columns, several capillary columns were serially packed from the same slurry, with packing progress plots being generated to follow the packing of each column. Characterization of these columns using hydroquinone yielded calculated minimum reduced plate heights as low as 1.24 for the most efficient 30μm internal diameter column, corresponding to over 500,000plates/m. At least one highly efficient column (minimum reduced plate height less than 2) was created for all three of the investigated column inner diameters, with the smallest diameter columns having the highest efficiency. This study proves that highly efficient capillary columns can be created using superficially porous particles and shows the efficiency potential of these particles.

  6. Removal NO with non-thermal plasma assisted catalyst modified activated carbon from coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, M.G. [Toyahashi Univ. of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi (Japan). Dept. of Ecological Engineering; Anhui Univ. of Science and Technology, Huainan, Anhui (China). School of Chemical Engineering; Takashima, T.; Mizuno, A. [Toyahashi Univ. of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi (Japan). Dept. of Ecological Engineering

    2010-07-01

    Non-thermal plasma can produce a significant number of free electrons, ions, reactive free radicals and a variety of free particles in excited states, containing a large number of active atomic oxygen (O) and higher activity energy so it can increase the chemical reaction rate. An effective way to generate the non-thermal plasma is through dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). There are three types of dielectric barrier discharge reactors: wire (or bar)-cylinder; wire-plate; and plate-plate structure. This paper examined the effect of gas concentration, space velocity, catalyst loading volume, and the input voltage on the removal ratio of nitric oxide (NO) in the process of non-thermal plasma assisted with modified activated carbon from coal. A form of bar-cylinder reactor was used and combined with a catalyst of modified activated carbon from coal. The catalyst was packed between the bar and the cylinder in the fixed bed reactor. It was concluded that a non-thermal plasma assisted catalyst which modifies activated carbon from coal is an effective way to remove NO, and the input voltage, gas concentration, gas space velocity and the catalyst packed weight has a certain degree of impact on the NO removal ratio. 17 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Random Close Packing with Tetrahedra

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Shui-Xiang; ZHAO Jian; ZHOU Xuan

    2008-01-01

    The densest packing of tetrahedra is still an unsolved problem.Numerical simulations of random close packing of tetrahedra are carried out with a sphere assembly model and improved relaxation algorithm. The packing density and average contact number obtained for random close packing of regular tetrahedra is 0.6817 and 7.21respectively,while the values of spheres are 0.6435 and 5.95.The simulation demonstrates that tetrahedra can be randomly packed denser than spheres.Random close packings of tetrahedra with a range of height are simulated as well.We find that the regular tetrahedron might be the optimal shape which gives the highest packing density of tetrahedra.

  8. Molybdenum sulfide/carbide catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, Gabriel; Chianelli, Russell R.; Fuentes, Sergio; Torres, Brenda

    2007-05-29

    The present invention provides methods of synthesizing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2) and carbon-containing molybdenum disulfide (MoS.sub.2-xC.sub.x) catalysts that exhibit improved catalytic activity for hydrotreating reactions involving hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrogenation. The present invention also concerns the resulting catalysts. Furthermore, the invention concerns the promotion of these catalysts with Co, Ni, Fe, and/or Ru sulfides to create catalysts with greater activity, for hydrotreating reactions, than conventional catalysts such as cobalt molybdate on alumina support.

  9. Effect of H2O2 injection patterns on catalyst bed characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hongjae; Lee, Dahae; Kang, Shinjae; Kwon, Sejin

    2017-01-01

    The decomposition process of hydrogen peroxide can be applied to a bipropellant thruster, as well as to monopropellant thruster. To provide a framework for the optimal design of the injector and catalyst bed depending on a type of thruster, this research scrutinizes the effect of injection patterns of the propellant on the performance of the catalyst bed. A showerhead injector and impinging jet injector were tested with a 50 N monopropellant thruster. Manganese oxide/γ-alumina catalyst and manganese oxide/lanthanum-doped alumina catalyst were prepared and tested. The showerhead injector provided a fast response time, suitable for pulse mode operation. The impinging jet injector mitigated the performance instability and catalyst attrition that is favorable for large scale bipropellant thrusters. The design of a dual catalyst bed was conceptually proposed based on the data obtained from firing tests.

  10. Ethylene Oligomerization and Polymerization: Alternative Iron Catalysts beyond 2,6-Bisiminopyridyl Iron Complexes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suyun Jie; Shu Zhang; Wenjuan Zhang; Yingxia Song; Junxian Hou; Wen-Hua Sun

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Polyolefin industry arrives the option to transfer from multiple-site systems of the classical Ziegler-Natta catalysts to more sophisticated single-site catalysts. The late-transition metal compounds were traditionally assumed with poor polymerization properties due to the highly competitive chain-termination step, and produced the short-chain oligomers up to 40 carbon atoms (SHOP catalysts). Recently the polyolefins employing latetransition metal complexes as catalysts became a hot research subject with the pioneering works by Brookhart and Gibson. It is promising for nickel catalysts to use solely ethylene as monomer for highly branched polyethylenes, and the designed nickel catalysts were not useful in industry. It is critical time to investigate the relationship of coordination modes of nickel complexes and its catalytic activities and the properties of resultant polyethylenes.

  11. Compressed Subsequence Matching and Packed Tree Coloring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Cording, Patrick Hagge; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2017-01-01

    We present a new algorithm for subsequence matching in grammar compressed strings. Given a grammar of size n compressing a string of size N and a pattern string of size m over an alphabet of size \\(\\sigma \\), our algorithm uses \\(O(n+\\frac{n\\sigma }{w})\\) space and \\(O(n+\\frac{n\\sigma }{w}+m\\log ...... a new data structure that allows us to efficiently find the next occurrence of a given character after a given position in a compressed string. This data structure in turn is based on a new data structure for the tree color problem, where the node colors are packed in bit strings....

  12. Comparing Online Algorithms for Bin Packing Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epstein, Leah; Favrholdt, Lene Monrad; Kohrt, Jens Svalgaard

    2012-01-01

    The relative worst-order ratio is a measure of the quality of online algorithms. In contrast to the competitive ratio, this measure compares two online algorithms directly instead of using an intermediate comparison with an optimal offline algorithm. In this paper, we apply the relative worst-ord......-order ratio to online algorithms for several common variants of the bin packing problem. We mainly consider pairs of algorithms that are not distinguished by the competitive ratio and show that the relative worst-order ratio prefers the intuitively better algorithm of each pair....

  13. Radiative transfer in closely packed realistic regoliths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vahidinia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a regolith radiative transfer model (RRT based on a first-principles approach to regolith modeling that is essential for near-to-far infrared observations of grainy surfaces, and is readily configured to answer fundamental questions about popular models with which all remote observations of all airless solar system bodies with granular surfaces are currently interpreted. Our model accounts for wavelength-size regolith particles which are closely packed and can be heterogeneous in composition and arbitrarily shaped. Here we present preliminary results showing the role of porosity on layer reflectivity.

  14. Importance of packing in spiral defect chaos

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Kapilanjan Krishna

    2008-04-01

    We develop two measures to characterize the geometry of patterns exhibited by the state of spiral defect chaos, a weakly turbulent regime of Rayleigh-Bénard convection. These describe the packing of contiguous stripes within the pattern by quantifying their length and nearest-neighbor distributions. The distributions evolve towards unique distribution with increasing Rayleigh number that suggests power-law scaling for the dynamics in the limit of infinite system size. The techniques are generally applicable to patterns that are reducible to a binary representation.

  15. Packed fluidized bed blanket for fusion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, John W. H.

    1984-01-01

    A packed fluidized bed blanket for a fusion reactor providing for efficient radiation absorption for energy recovery, efficient neutron absorption for nuclear transformations, ease of blanket removal, processing and replacement, and on-line fueling/refueling. The blanket of the reactor contains a bed of stationary particles during reactor operation, cooled by a radial flow of coolant. During fueling/refueling, an axial flow is introduced into the bed in stages at various axial locations to fluidize the bed. When desired, the fluidization flow can be used to remove particles from the blanket.

  16. The effect of nanoparticle packing on capacitive electrode performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Younghee; Noh, Seonmyeong; Kim, Min-Sik; Kong, Hye Jeong; Im, Kyungun; Kwon, Oh Seok; Kim, Sungmin; Yoon, Hyeonseok

    2016-06-09

    Nanoparticles pack together to form macro-scale electrodes in various types of devices, and thus, optimization of the nanoparticle packing is a prerequisite for the realization of a desirable device performance. In this work, we provide in-depth insight into the effect of nanoparticle packing on the performance of nanoparticle-based electrodes by combining experimental and computational findings. As a model system, polypyrrole nanospheres of three different diameters were used to construct pseudocapacitive electrodes, and the performance of the electrodes was examined at various nanosphere diameter ratios and mixed weight fractions. Two numerical algorithms are proposed to simulate the random packing of the nanospheres on the electrode. The binary nanospheres exhibited diverse, complicated packing behaviors compared with the monophasic packing of each nanosphere species. The packing of the two nanosphere species with lower diameter ratios at an optimized composition could lead to more dense packing of the nanospheres, which in turn could contribute to better device performance. The dense packing of the nanospheres would provide more efficient transport pathways for ions because of the reduced inter-nanosphere pore size and enlarged surface area for charge storage. Ultimately, it is anticipated that our approach can be widely used to define the concept of "the best nanoparticle packing" for desirable device performance.

  17. An efficient block-discriminant identification of packed malware

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Smita Naval; Vijay Laxmi; Manoj Singh Gaur; P Vinod

    2015-08-01

    Advanced persistent attacks, incorporated by sophisticated malware, are on the rise against hosts, user applications and utility software. Modern malware hide their malicious payload by applying packing mechanism. Packing tools instigate code encryption to protect the original malicious payload. Packing is employed in tandem with code obfuscation/encryption/compression to create malware variants. Despite being just a variant of known malware, the packed malware invalidates the traditional signature based malware detection as packing tools create an envelope of packer code around the original base malware. Therefore, unpacking becomes a mandatory phase prior to anti-virus scanning for identifying the known malware hidden behind packing layers. Existing techniques of unpacking solutions increase execution overhead of AV scanners in terms of time. This paper illustrates an easy to use approach which works in two phases to reduce this overhead. The first phase (ESCAPE) discriminates the packed code from the native code (non-packed) by using random block entropy. The second phase (PEAL) validates inferences of ESCAPE by employing bi-classification (packed vs native) model using relevant hex byte features extracted blockwise. The proposed approach is able to shrink the overall execution time of AV scanners by filtering out native samples and avoiding excessive unpacking overhead. Our method has been evaluated against a set consisting of real packed instances of malware and benign programs.

  18. Fluorination process using catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochel, R.C.; Saturday, K.A.

    1983-08-25

    A process is given for converting an actinide compound selected from the group consisting of uranium oxides, plutonium oxides, uranium tetrafluorides, plutonium tetrafluorides and mixtures of said oxides and tetrafluorides, to the corresponding volatile actinide hexafluoride by fluorination with a stoichiometric excess of fluorine gas. The improvement involves conducting the fluorination of the plutonium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF/sub 3/, AgF/sub 2/ and NiF/sub 2/, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced. The improvement also involves conducting the fluorination of one of the uranium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF/sub 3/ and AgF/sub 2/, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced.

  19. Fluorination process using catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochel, Robert C.; Saturday, Kathy A.

    1985-01-01

    A process for converting an actinide compound selected from the group consisting of uranium oxides, plutonium oxides, uranium tetrafluorides, plutonium tetrafluorides and mixtures of said oxides and tetrafluorides, to the corresponding volatile actinide hexafluoride by fluorination with a stoichiometric excess of fluorine gas. The improvement involves conducting the fluorination of the plutonium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF.sub.3, AgF.sub.2 and NiF.sub.2, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced. The improvement also involves conducting the fluorination of one of the uranium compounds in the presence of a fluoride catalyst selected from the group consisting of CoF.sub.3 and AgF.sub.2, whereby the fluorination is significantly enhanced.

  20. Photo catalyst; Ko shokubai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    While titanium oxide is excited by the light, electrons of titanium oxide are taken away by the light energy to form positive holes. Water will be decomposed into hydrogen ion and hydroxy radical (OH) by these positive holes. This hydroxy radical is a strong reactive substance called active oxygen, it decomposes organisms. Besides this photo- catalyst function, the titanium oxide can also make surface of a substance superhydrophilic. The super hydrophilicity results in not forming water drops on the glass surface but spreading all over the surface to prevent a covering of fog on the glass surface. The published patents concerning the photo catalysts were 593 from Jan. 1998 to Jan. 1999. The applicant order is the first TOTO 143, the second Daikin Industry 19, the third Toshiba Raitech, Nitto Denko, Hitachi 17 respectively. (NEDO)

  1. High-Activity Dealloyed Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kongkanand, Anusorn [General Motors LLC, Pontiac, MI (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Reduction of costly Pt usage in proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrodes is one of the major challenges towards development and commercialization of fuel cell vehicles. Although few have met the initial-kinetic activity requirements in a realistic fuel cell device, no catalyst material has ever met the demanding fuel cell durability targets set by DOE. In this project, a team of 4 universities and 2 companies came together to investigate a concept that appeared promising in preliminary non-fuel cell tests then to further develop the catalyst to a mature level ready for vehicle implementation. The team consists of academia with technical leadership in their respective areas, a catalyst supplier, and a fuel cell system integrator.The tightly collaborative project enabled development of a highly active and durable catalyst with performance that significantly exceeds that of previous catalysts and meets the DOE targets for the first time (Figure 1A). The catalyst was then further evaluated in full-active-area stack in a realistic vehicle operating condition (Figure 1B). This is the first public demonstration that one can realize the performance benefit and Pt cost reduction over a conventional pure Pt catalyst in a long-term realistic PEMFC system. Furthermore, systematic analyses of a range of catalysts with different performance after fuel cell testing allowed for correlation between catalyst microstructure and its electrocatalytic activity and durability. This will in turn aid future catalyst development.

  2. Olefin metathesis and catalyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukes, S. G.; Banks, R. L.

    1985-03-12

    Olefins are converted into other olefins having different numbers of carbon atoms by contact with a catalyst comprising an inorganic refractory material containing at least one of tungsten oxide and molybdenum oxide and a promoting amount of at least one treating agent selected from chlorinated silicon compounds, thionyl chloride, and sulfuryl chloride under conditions suitable for the treating agent to promote the activity of tungsten and molybdenum oxides for the disporoportionation reaction.

  3. Electrochemical removal of copper ions from dilute solutions using packed bed electrode. Part І

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Khattab

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Removal of some hazardous waste like copper from effluent streams has an industrial importance. In this field, this paper is directed towards electrochemical removal of copper ions from sulfate solution using packed bed electrode. The cathode packing is in static mode, consisted of graphite particles, with mean particle size equal to 0.125 cm. The high surface area of this cell is expected to give high current efficiency and removal percent. The effect of current density and liquid flow rate were tested. Experimental results obtained indicate that the efficiencies are in direct proportional with current density while inversely proportional with liquid flow rate. It was observed that, using this cell was effective in reducing copper concentration to less than 4 mg/l with R.E of 96.2% during 30 min electrolysis time.

  4. Preparation of HZSM-5 membrane packed CuO–ZnO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles for catalysing carbon dioxide hydrogenation to dimethyl ether

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Rong; Tian, Haifeng; Yang, Aimei; Zha, Fei, E-mail: zhafei@nwnu.edu.cn; Ding, Jian; Chang, Yue

    2015-08-01

    Highlights: • CuO–ZnO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} composite nanoparticles were successfully prepared using carbon sphere as template. • HZSM-5@CuO–ZnO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} capsule catalyst was prepared hydrothermally. • Zeolite capsule catalysts exhibited an extremely good selectivity for DME compared with the conventional hybrid catalyst. - Abstract: Spherical carbons were prepared successfully from aqueous glucose using hydrothermal method. After covered with aqueous Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+} and Al{sup 3+} ions during the co-precipitation treatment, carbons were removed via calcination to yield CuO–ZnO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. HZSM-5 membrane, which was synthesized using tetrapropylammonium hydroxide as templating agent, was packed onto CuO–ZnO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles hydrothermally to form HZSM-5 packed CuO–ZnO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles. It was characterized by the method of X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and nitrogen sorption measurement. HZSM-5 packed CuO–ZnO–Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles were used as catalysts for the CO{sub 2} hydrogenation to dimethyl ether. The catalyst activity was investigated in a fixed-bed reactor. Under the reaction conditions of pressure at 3.0 MPa, space velocity (SV) of 1800 mL g{sub cat}{sup −1} h{sup −1}, volume ratio of CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2} to 1:3 and temperature at 270 °C, the conversion of CO{sub 2} could reach to 48.3%, with a dimethyl ether yield and selectivity of 23.4% and 48.5%, respectively.

  5. Structural characterization of submerged granular packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakšić, Z. M.; Šćepanović, J. R.; Lončarević, I.; Budinski-Petković, Lj.; Vrhovac, S. B.; Belić, A.

    2014-12-01

    We consider the impact of the effective gravitational acceleration on microstructural properties of granular packings through experimental studies of spherical granular materials saturated within fluids of varying density. We characterize the local organization of spheres in terms of contact connectivity, distribution of the Delaunay free volumes, and the shape factor (parameter of nonsphericity) of the Voronoï polygons. The shape factor gives a clear physical picture of the competition between less and more ordered domains of particles in experimentally obtained packings. As the effective gravity increases, the probability distribution of the shape factor becomes narrower and more localized around the lowest values of the shape factor corresponding to regular hexagon. It is found that curves of the pore distributions are asymmetric with a long tail on the right-hand side, which progressively reduces while the effective gravity gets stronger for lower densities of interstitial fluid. We show that the distribution of local areas (Voronoï cells) broadens with decreasing value of the effective gravity due to the formation of lose structures such as large pores and chainlike structures (arches or bridges). Our results should be particularly helpful in testing the newly developed simulation techniques involving liquid-related forces associated with immersed granular particles.

  6. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Adsorbent Packed Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Hideo; Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Yoshida, Suguru

    The effective thermal conductivity of adsorbent packed beds of granular zeolite 13X and granular silica gel A in the presence of stagnant steam or air was measured under different conditions of the adsorbent bed temperature, particle size and filler-gas pressure. The measured effective thermal conductivity showed to become smaller with decreasing particle size or decreasing pressure, but it was nearly independent of the bed temperature. When steam was the filler-gas, the rise in the thermal conductivity of the adsorbent particles due to steam adsorption led to the increase in the effective thermal conductivity of the bed, and this effect was not negligible at high steam pressure for the bed of large particle size. It was found that both the predictions of the effective thermal conductivity by the Hayashi et al.'s model and the Bauer-Schlünder model generally agreed well with the measurements, by considering the particle thermal conductivity rise due to steam adsorption. The thermal conductivity of a consolidated bed of granular zeolite 13X was also measured, and it was found to be much larger than that of the packed bed especially at lower pressure. The above prediction models underestimated the effective thermal conductivity of the consolidated bed.

  7. Structured packing in revamping a topping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spekuljak, Zvonko; Monella, Horacio [SIT Ingenieria S.R.L., Santa Fe (Argentina); Carosio, Eduardo [REPSOL Yacimientos Petroliferos Fiscales S.A. (Argentina); Lara, Cesar Javier

    2000-07-01

    The Topping column had conventional gas-liquid plates, and live steam was no possible to inject, because of the substantial black colour in the distillates. The target was to increase the distillates ratio, in order to reduce the light components in the bottom stream and the asphalt content in the middle distillates. Revamping involves the Flash, the Slop-wash and the Bottom zones. In the Flash zone was arranged a flow distributor to segregate liquid-vapor phases and predistributed the vapor phase. In the Slop-wash bed a combination of Structured Packing and inertial drop capture proprietary Structured Geometry was installed. The column Bottom was filled with a proprietary Structured Grid. A chimneys tray is the actual liquid distributor on the grid bed. The main results of the revamping are: The light hydrocarbon in bottom stream reduction was 40%. The expected value in the project was 20%. Incrementation of medium distillates was 126 m{sup 3}. The expected value was 100 m{sup 3}. Colour reduction in G.O.V. from >8 to <3 ASTM 1500. Temperature reduction in Transfer Line 10 deg C. Structured packings and the appropriate auxiliaries devices allow to obtain significant improvements in Topping columns. The repayment time of the revamp is very satisfactory. (author)

  8. Reaction Engineering with Metal-Organic Framework Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melkonian, Arek Viken

    To date, there has been no comprehensive attempt to perform and/or describe catalytic reactions in the gas phase that utilize metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as catalysts. In addition, there has been no attempt to reaction engineer these MOF catalysts in order to determine their regimes of optimal catalytic activity and possible limitations to their use. A zinc-based MOF that has been post-synthetically modified with a homogeneous palladium catalyst, Pd(CH 3CN)2Cl2, is used to catalyze the hydrogenation of propylene. The catalyst is assembled in a packed-bed reactor under a continuous flow of reactants. The reaction is optimized with respect to isoreticular metalation, reactant flow rate, and reactor temperature. Maximum catalytic conversion is found at intermediate metalations of 40% and 60%, high hydrogen flow of 50 ccm, and intermediate reactor temperatures of 100 °C and 150 °C. The MOF-60 catalyst is exposed to a traditional catalyst poison, carbon monoxide (CO). It is found that the MOF is reversibly poisoned upon introduction of CO. Upon poisoning, catalytic conversions rates of 90%-100% are dramatically reduced to less than 10%-30%, depending on the CO flow rate and the reactor temperature. The CO poisoning is shown to be reversible, a similar effect as found with palladium on carbon (Pd/C). The time scale of poisoning and recovery is very fast for both the MOF catalyst and Pd/C (approximately 10-30 seconds). Other effects of temperature on the MOF-40 are also investigated. At fixed reactant flow, the temperature grid is partitioned into finer steps of 10 °C to determine the temperature that yields the highest catalytic conversion. It is found that conversion is nearly uniform in the range between the highest conversions, i.e., conversion plateaus between the optimum temperatures. The catalyst also exhibits a weak thermal hysteresis. There is no significant improvement in conversion with thermal cycling after alternating the reactor temperature between

  9. Comfort care packs: a little bit of hospice in hospital?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, Mark A; Hillock, Sharon; Moore, Carol; Goble, Hannah; Asbury, Nicky

    2010-10-01

    The Comfort Care Pack initiative is an innovation designed to enhance the inpatient experience of end-of-life patients and their carers. The carer is given a pleasantly decorated box containing a variety of items for use by the patient or the carer themselves: snacks, toiletries and items to promote comfort. This project set out to evaluate the impact of these packs by reviewing the returns of the feedback questionnaires included with the packs. From the first 220 packs, 58 questionnaires were returned, giving quantitative and qualitative data. The response to the packs was overwhelmingly positive and they were much valued by the carers. This was the case despite the fact that relatively few of the items were actually used by the recipients. It is suggested that the value of the packs to recipients lies in the gesture of being thought about during what is a difficult time for them. The implications of this are discussed.

  10. An amino acid code for β-sheet packing structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Hyun; Tsai, Jerry

    2014-09-01

    To understand the relationship between protein sequence and structure, this work extends the knob-socket model in an investigation of β-sheet packing. Over a comprehensive set of β-sheet folds, the contacts between residues were used to identify packing cliques: sets of residues that all contact each other. These packing cliques were then classified based on size and contact order. From this analysis, the two types of four-residue packing cliques necessary to describe β-sheet packing were characterized. Both occur between two adjacent hydrogen bonded β-strands. First, defining the secondary structure packing within β-sheets, the combined socket or XY:HG pocket consists of four residues i, i+2 on one strand and j, j+2 on the other. Second, characterizing the tertiary packing between β-sheets, the knob-socket XY:H+B consists of a three-residue XY:H socket (i, i+2 on one strand and j on the other) packed against a knob B residue (residue k distant in sequence). Depending on the packing depth of the knob B residue, two types of knob-sockets are found: side-chain and main-chain sockets. The amino acid composition of the pockets and knob-sockets reveal the sequence specificity of β-sheet packing. For β-sheet formation, the XY:HG pocket clearly shows sequence specificity of amino acids. For tertiary packing, the XY:H+B side-chain and main-chain sockets exhibit distinct amino acid preferences at each position. These relationships define an amino acid code for β-sheet structure and provide an intuitive topological mapping of β-sheet packing.

  11. Tray Pack Improved Durability Packaging Rough Handling Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    extra vacuum void volume space makes these underfilled Tray Packs much more susceptible to damage. It is the vacuum that causes the damage not the under...filled to 6 lb. 10 oz. The result of underfilling is that the vacuum level in the peas is much higher making it more susceptible to paneling damage...impact. (3) That the vacuum induced by underfilling and vacuum pack- ing Tray Packs filled with peas makes them highly suscep- tible to damage. (4) That

  12. Development of GREET Catalyst Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhichao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Benavides, Pahola T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cronauer, Donald C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-09-01

    In this report, we develop energy and material flows for the production of five different catalysts (tar reforming, alcohol synthesis, Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 [ZSM-5], Mo/Co/ γ-Al2O3, and Pt/ γ-Al2O3) and two chemicals (olivine, dimethyl ether of polyethylene glycol [DEPG]). These compounds and catalysts are now included in the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET™) catalyst module.

  13. Privileged chiral ligands and catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Zhou, Qi-Lin

    2011-01-01

    This ultimate ""must have"" and long awaited reference for every chemist working in the field of asymmetric catalysis starts with the core structure of the catalysts, explaining why a certain ligand or catalyst is so successful. It describes in detail the history, the basic structural characteristics, and the applications of these ""privileged catalysts"". A novel concept that gives readers a much deeper insight into the topic.

  14. Oxygen-reducing catalyst layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Dennis P. (Maplewood, MN); Schmoeckel, Alison K. (Stillwater, MN); Vernstrom, George D. (Cottage Grove, MN); Atanasoski, Radoslav (Edina, MN); Wood, Thomas E. (Stillwater, MN); Yang, Ruizhi (Halifax, CA); Easton, E. Bradley (Halifax, CA); Dahn, Jeffrey R. (Hubley, CA); O' Neill, David G. (Lake Elmo, MN)

    2011-03-22

    An oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, and a method of making the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer, where the oxygen-reducing catalyst layer includes a catalytic material film disposed on a substrate with the use of physical vapor deposition and thermal treatment. The catalytic material film includes a transition metal that is substantially free of platinum. At least one of the physical vapor deposition and the thermal treatment is performed in a processing environment comprising a nitrogen-containing gas.

  15. Catalyst systems and uses thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkan, Umit S.; Holmgreen, Erik M.; Yung, Matthew M.

    2012-07-24

    A method of carbon monoxide (CO) removal comprises providing an oxidation catalyst comprising cobalt supported on an inorganic oxide. The method further comprises feeding a gaseous stream comprising CO, and oxygen (O.sub.2) to the catalyst system, and removing CO from the gaseous stream by oxidizing the CO to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) in the presence of the oxidation catalyst at a temperature between about 20 to about 200.degree. C.

  16. Packed bed carburization of tantalum and tantalum alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Peter C.; Rodriguez, Patrick J.; Pereyra, Ramiro A.

    1999-01-01

    Packed bed carburization of a tantalum or tantalum alloy object. A method for producing corrosion-resistant tantalum or tantalum alloy objects is described. The method includes the steps of placing the object in contact with a carburizing pack, heating the packed object in vacuum furnace to a temperature whereby carbon from the pack diffuses into the object forming grains with tantalum carbide along the grain boundaries, and etching the surface of the carburized object. This latter step removes tantalum carbides from the surface of the carburized tantalum object while leaving the tantalum carbide along the grain boundaries.

  17. Obesity prevention and personal responsibility: the case of front-of-pack food labelling in Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnusson Roger S

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Australia, the food industry and public health groups are locked in serious struggle for regulatory influence over the terms of front-of-pack food labelling. Clear, unambiguous labelling of the nutritional content of pre-packaged foods and of standardized food items sold in chain restaurants is consistent with the prevailing philosophy of 'personal responsibility'. An interpretive, front-of-pack labelling scheme has the capacity to encourage healthier patterns of eating, and to be a catalyst for improvements in the nutritional quality of food products through re-formulation. On the other hand, the strength of opposition of the Australian Food and Grocery Council to 'Traffic Light Labelling', and its efforts to promote a non-interpretive, voluntary scheme, invite the interpretation that the food industry is resistant to any reforms that could destabilise current (unhealthy purchasing patterns and the revenues they represent. Discussion This article argues that although policies that aim to educate consumers about the nutritional content of food are welcome, they are only one part of a broader basket of policies that are needed to make progress on obesity prevention and public health nutrition. However, to the extent that food labelling has the capacity to inform and empower consumers to make healthier choices - and to be a catalyst for improving the nutritional quality of commercial recipes - it has an important role to play. Furthermore, given the dietary impact of meals eaten in fast food and franchise restaurants, interpretive labelling requirements should not be restricted to pre-packaged foods. Summary Food industry resistance to an interpretive food labelling scheme is an important test for government, and a case study of how self-interest prompts industry to promote weaker, voluntary schemes that pre-empt and undermine progressive public health regulation.

  18. Compaction dynamics of wet granular packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandewalle, Nicolas; Ludewig, Francois; Fiscina, Jorge E.; Lumay, Geoffroy

    2013-03-01

    The extremely slow compaction dynamics of wet granular assemblies has been studied experimentally. The cohesion, due to capillary bridges between neighboring grains, has been tuned using different liquids having specific surface tension values. The characteristic relaxation time for compaction τ grows strongly with cohesion. A kinetic model, based on a free volume kinetic equations and the presence of a capillary energy barrier (due to liquid bridges), is able to reproduce quantitatively the experimental curves. This model allows one to describe the cohesion in wet granular packing. The influence of relative humidity (RH) on the extremely slow compaction dynamics of a granular assembly has also been investigated in the range 20 % - 80 % . Triboelectric and capillary condensation effects have been introduced in the kinetic model. Results confirm the existence of an optimal condition at RH ~ 45 % for minimizing cohesive interactions between glass beads.

  19. School meal sociality or lunch pack individualism?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Sidse Schoubye; Holm, Lotte; Baarts, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    The present article specifies and broadens our understanding of the concept of commensality by investigating what it means to ‘share a meal’. The study utilizes a school meal intervention carried out in Denmark in 2011/2012. It shows how different types of school meal arrangement influence...... to school. The study discusses commensality by examining and comparing lunchtime interactions within the same group of children in the two contrasting meal situations. The results fail to confirm the conventional view that shared meals have greater social impacts and benefits than eating individualized...... foods. The article argues that the social entrepreneurship involved in sharing individual lunch packs might even outweigh some of the benefits of shared meals where everyone is served the same food....

  20. Hyperstaticity and loops in frictional granular packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tordesillas, Antoinette; Lam, Edward; Metzger, Philip T.

    2009-06-01

    The hyperstatic nature of granular packings of perfectly rigid disks is analyzed algebraically and through numerical simulation. The elementary loops of grains emerge as a fundamental element in addressing hyperstaticity. Loops consisting of an odd number of grains behave differently than those with an even number. For odd loops, the latent stresses are exterior and are characterized by the sum of frictional forces around each loop. For even loops, the latent stresses are interior and are characterized by the alternating sum of frictional forces around each loop. The statistics of these two types of loop sums are found to be Gibbsian with a "temperature" that is linear with the friction coefficient μ when μ<1.

  1. Packing of charged chains on toroidal geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhenwei; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera

    2013-01-01

    We study a strongly adsorbed flexible polyelectrolyte chain on tori. In this generalized Thomson problem, the patterns of the adsorbed chain are analyzed in the space of the toroidal coordinates and in terms of the orientation of each chain segment. Various patterns are found, including double spirals, disclination-like structures, Janus tori, and uniform wrappings, arising from the long-range electrostatic interaction and the toroidal geometry. Their broken mirror symmetry is quantitatively characterized by introducing an order parameter, an integral of the torsion. The uniform packing, which breaks the mirror symmetry the least, has the lowest value of the order parameter. In addition, it is found that the electrostatic energy of confined chains on tori conforms to a power law regardless of the screening effect in some typical cases studied. Furthermore, we study random walks on tori that generate chain configurations in the large screening limit or at large thermal fluctuation; some features associated with the toroidal geometry are discussed.

  2. Regulation relative to the packing and packing wastes; Reglementation relative aux emballages et dechets d'emballages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-08-01

    The objectives of the european directive 94/62/CE of the 20 december 1994, relative to the packing and the packing wastes, are the harmonization between the States members, the environment protection and a management of the internal market in agreement with the Treaty. This text recalls the regulations in the french domain. Industrial and municipal packings wastes are concerned. (A.L.B.)

  3. REACTOR FILLED WITH CATALYST MATERIAL, AND CATALYST THEREFOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sie, S.T.

    1995-01-01

    Abstract of WO 9521691 (A1) Described is a reactor (1) at least partially filled with catalyst granules (11), which is intended for catalytically reacting at least one gas and at least one liquid with each other. According to the invention the catalyst granules (11) are collected in agglomerates

  4. Mechanochemistry, catalysis, and catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butyagin, P.Yu.

    1987-07-01

    The physical basis of mechanochemistry and the reasons for the initiation and acceleration of chemical reactions upon the mechanical treatment of solids have been considered. The phenomenon of mechanical catalysis has been described in the example case of the oxidation of CO on oxide surfaces, and the nature of the active sites and the laws governing the mechanically activated chemisorption of gases on cleavage and friction surfaces of solids have been examined. The possibilities of the use of the methods of mechanochemistry in processes used to prepare catalysts have been analyzed in examples of decomposition reactions of inorganic compounds and solid-phase synthesis.

  5. SAR imagery of the Grand Banks (Newfoundland) pack ice pack and its relationship to surface features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argus, S. D.; Carsey, F. D.

    1988-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data and aerial photographs were obtained over pack ice off the East Coast of Canada in March 1987 as part of the Labrador Ice Margin Experiment (LIMEX) pilot project. Examination of this data shows that although the pack ice off the Canadian East Coast appears essentially homogeneous to visible light imagery, two clearly defined zones of ice are apparent on C-band SAR imagery. To identify factors that create the zones seen on the radar image, aerial photographs were compared to the SAR imagery. Floe size data from the aerial photographs was compared to digital number values taken from SAR imagery of the same ice. The SAR data of the inner zone acquired three days apart over the melt period was also examined. The studies indicate that the radar response is governed by floe size and meltwater distribution.

  6. Optical anisotropy in packed isotropic spherical particles: indication of nanometer scale anisotropy in packing structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Kohei; Inasawa, Susumu; Yamaguchi, Yukio

    2013-02-28

    We investigated the origin of birefringence in colloidal films of spherical silica particles. Although each particle is optically isotropic in shape, colloidal films formed by drop drying demonstrated birefringence. While periodic particle structures were observed in silica colloidal films, no regular pattern was found in blended films of silica and latex particles. However, since both films showed birefringence, regular film structure patterns were not required to exhibit birefringence. Instead, we propose that nanometer-scale film structure anisotropy causes birefringence. Due to capillary flow from the center to the edge of a cast suspension, particles are more tightly packed in the radial direction. Directional packing results in nanometer-scale anisotropy. The difference in the interparticle distance between radial and circumferential axes was estimated to be 10 nm at most. Nanometer-scale anisotropy in colloidal films and the subsequent optical properties are discussed.

  7. In-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    Rodriguez, Jose A; Chupas, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    Helps researchers develop new catalysts for sustainable fuel and chemical production Reviewing the latest developments in the field, this book explores the in-situ characterization of heterogeneous catalysts, enabling readers to take full advantage of the sophisticated techniques used to study heterogeneous catalysts and reaction mechanisms. In using these techniques, readers can learn to improve the selectivity and the performance of catalysts and how to prepare catalysts as efficiently as possible, with minimum waste. In-situ Characterization of Heterogeneous Catalysts feat

  8. Fermentative hydrogen production in packed-bed and packing-free upflow reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C; Zhang, T; Fang, H H P

    2006-01-01

    Fermentative hydrogen production from a synthetic wastewater containing 10 g/L of sucrose was studied in two upflow reactors at 26 degrees C for 400 days. One reactor was filled with packing rings (RP) and the other was packing free (RF). The effect of hydraulic retention time (HRT) from 2 h to 24 h was investigated. Results showed that, under steady state, the hydrogen production rate significantly increased from 0.63 L/L/d to 5.35 L/L/d in the RF when HRT decreased from 24 h to 2 h; the corresponding rates were 0.56 L/L/d to 6.17 L/L/d for the RP. In the RF, the hydrogen yield increased from 0.96 mol/mol-sucrose at 24 h of HRT to the maximum of 1.10 mol/mol-sucrose at 8 h of HRT, and then decreased to 0.68 mol/mol-sucrose at 2 h. In the RP, the yield increased from 0.86 mol/mol-sucrose at 24 h of HRT to the maximum of 1.22 mol/mol-sucrose at 14 h of HRT, and then decreased to 0.78 mol/mol-sucrose at 2 h. Overall, the reactor with packing was more effective than the one free of packing. In both reactors, sludge agglutinated into granules. The microbial community of granular sludge in RP was investigated using 16S rDNA based techniques. The distribution of bacterial cells and extracellular polysaccharides in hydrogen-producing granules was investigated by fluorescence-based techniques. Results indicated that most of the N-acetyl-galactosamine/galactose-containing extracellular polysaccharides were distributed on the outer layer of the granules with a filamentous structure.

  9. New series of paper pack vending machines; Paper pack jido hanbaiki no shin series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohashi, M. [Fuji Denki Reiki Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Umino, S. [Fuji Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-07-10

    This paper presents series of paper pack vending machines. These machines may be broadly classified into those of cold drinks and of hot and cold drinks depending on the storage temperature of products. The former is the machine for cooling dairy products at 10{degree}C with a combined stacking by direct-stacked racks and chain-multiracks. The latter is provided with divided storing chambers with each chamber selectively cooled or heated. Products in the hot chamber are canned coffee and the like set at 55{degree}C. The temperature control is performed by a microcomputer. The chain-multiracks are provided with advantages such as capability of handling various kinds of container shapes, storing drinks and foods vertically, replacing products by the change of a shelf attachment with one operation, and storing one liter packs by setting pair columns. The direct-stacked racks are provided with advantages such as versatility of handling various kinds of containers and miniaturization of the mechanism other than the storage part. The installation space was reduced by devising the opening and closing of the door. The control part is capable of setting temperatures differently for cans and paper packs. 7 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Measured black carbon deposition on the Sierra Nevada snow pack and implication for snow pack retreat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. L. Hadley

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Modeling studies show that the darkening of snow and ice by black carbon (BC deposition is a major factor for the rapid disappearance of arctic sea ice, mountain glaciers and snow packs. This study provides one of the first direct measurements for the efficient removal of black carbon from the atmosphere by snow and its subsequent deposition on the snow packs of California. The early melting of the snow packs in the Sierras is one of the contributing factors to the severe water problems in California. BC concentrations in falling snow were measured at two mountain locations and in rain at a coastal site. All three stations reveal large BC concentrations in precipitation, ranging from 1.7 ng/g to 12.9 ng/g. The BC concentrations in the air after the snow fall were negligible suggesting an extremely efficient removal of BC by snow. The data suggest that below cloud scavenging, rather than ice nuclei, was the dominant source of BC in the snow. A five-year comparison of BC, dust, and total fine aerosol mass concentrations at multiple sites reveals that the measurements made at the sampling sites were representative of large scale deposition in the Sierra Nevada. The relative concentration of iron and calcium in the mountain aerosol indicates that one-quarter to one-third of the BC may have been transported from Asia.

  11. Measured black carbon deposition on the Sierra Nevada snow pack and implication for snow pack retreat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. L. Hadley

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Modeling studies show that the darkening of snow and ice by black carbon deposition is a major factor for the rapid disappearance of arctic sea ice, mountain glaciers and snow packs. This study provides one of the first direct measurements for the efficient removal of black carbon from the atmosphere by snow and its subsequent deposition to the snow packs of California. The early melting of the snow packs in the Sierras is one of the contributing factors to the severe water problems in California. BC concentrations in falling snow were measured at two mountain locations and in rain at a coastal site. All three stations reveal large BC concentrations in precipitation, ranging from 1.7 ng/g to 12.9 ng/g. The BC concentrations in the air after the snow fall were negligible suggesting an extremely efficient removal of BC by snow. The data suggest that below cloud scavenging, rather than ice nuclei, was the dominant source of BC in the snow. A five-year comparison of BC, dust, and total fine aerosol mass concentrations at multiple sites reveals that the measurements made at the sampling sites were representative of large scale deposition in the Sierra Nevada. The relative concentration of iron and calcium in the mountain aerosol indicates that one-quarter to one-third of the BC may have been transported from Asia.

  12. Measured Black Carbon Deposition on the Sierra Nevada Snow Pack and Implication for Snow Pack Retreat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hadley, O.L.; Corrigan, C.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Cliff, S.S.; Ramanathan, V.

    2010-01-12

    Modeling studies show that the darkening of snow and ice by black carbon deposition is a major factor for the rapid disappearance of arctic sea ice, mountain glaciers and snow packs. This study provides one of the first direct measurements for the efficient removal of black carbon from the atmosphere by snow and its subsequent deposition to the snow packs of California. The early melting of the snow packs in the Sierras is one of the contributing factors to the severe water problems in California. BC concentrations in falling snow were measured at two mountain locations and in rain at a coastal site. All three stations reveal large BC concentrations in precipitation, ranging from 1.7 ng/g to 12.9 ng/g. The BC concentrations in the air after the snow fall were negligible suggesting an extremely efficient removal of BC by snow. The data suggest that below cloud scavenging, rather than ice nuclei, was the dominant source of BC in the snow. A five-year comparison of BC, dust, and total fine aerosol mass concentrations at multiple sites reveals that the measurements made at the sampling sites were representative of large scale deposition in the Sierra Nevada. The relative concentration of iron and calcium in the mountain aerosol indicates that one-quarter to one-third of the BC may have been transported from Asia.

  13. Fabrication and infrared-transmission properties of monolayer hexagonal-close-packed metallic nanoshells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jing; Xu, Rongqing; Liu, Zhengqi; Tang, Chaojun; Chen, Zhuo; Wang, Zhenlin

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a novel method for fabricating a monolayer of hexagonal-close-packed metallic nanoshells with a small opening, based on a combination of a porous polymer template and a nanocrystal-seeded electroless plating technique. Light transmission spectra of the metallic nanoshell arrays are measured, which show that light can transmit through the dense particle assemblies via excitations of a variety of surface-plasmons (SPs). Further numerical simulations confirm these transmission resonances and reveal that they are attributed to the excitations of localized quadrupolar spherelike and Fano-type hybridized SP modes supported by the specific structure. The present metallic microstructure could find applications in plasmonics.

  14. Latent catalyst; Senzaisei shokubai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Epoxy resin, an important function material to support such main industries as electric and electronic devices, automobiles, civil engineering, and building construction, is demanded of development of single liquid type resin having excellent quick hardening performance and storage stability. This requirement comes from environmental problems with an intention of saving energies and reducing resin wastes. The Company, using freely its independent phase separation technology that controls molecular structure of catalysts, developed a latent catalyst having excellent storage stability and high-temperature quick hardening performance. Its major features may be summarized as follows: (1) excellent storage stability at room temperature keeping the product stable for 2.5 months or longer (2 days in conventional products); (2) quick hardening performance hardening the resin in seven seconds at 150 degrees C (equivalent to conventional products); and (3) excellent insulation performance of hardened resin at 140 degrees C of 7 times 10 {sup 13} (ohm) (center dot) cm (2 times 10 {sup 12} (ohm) (center dot) cm in conventional products) (translated by NEDO)

  15. Catalyst design for biorefining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Karen; Lee, Adam F

    2016-02-28

    The quest for sustainable resources to meet the demands of a rapidly rising global population while mitigating the risks of rising CO2 emissions and associated climate change, represents a grand challenge for humanity. Biomass offers the most readily implemented and low-cost solution for sustainable transportation fuels, and the only non-petroleum route to organic molecules for the manufacture of bulk, fine and speciality chemicals and polymers. To be considered truly sustainable, biomass must be derived from resources which do not compete with agricultural land use for food production, or compromise the environment (e.g. via deforestation). Potential feedstocks include waste lignocellulosic or oil-based materials derived from plant or aquatic sources, with the so-called biorefinery concept offering the co-production of biofuels, platform chemicals and energy; analogous to today's petroleum refineries which deliver both high-volume/low-value (e.g. fuels and commodity chemicals) and low-volume/high-value (e.g. fine/speciality chemicals) products, thereby maximizing biomass valorization. This article addresses the challenges to catalytic biomass processing and highlights recent successes in the rational design of heterogeneous catalysts facilitated by advances in nanotechnology and the synthesis of templated porous materials, as well as the use of tailored catalyst surfaces to generate bifunctional solid acid/base materials or tune hydrophobicity.

  16. Bedded pack barns for dairy cattle in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galama, P.J.; Boer, de H.C.; Dooren, van H.J.C.; Ouweltjes, W.; Poelarends, J.J.; Driehuis, F.

    2014-01-01

    The bedded pack barn offers good perspective on animal welfare, animal health and public perception, but has disadvantages in terms of mineral management (nitrogen losses and fertilising value) and the presence of TAS (Thermophilic Aerobic Spore formers). Bedded packs with compost have a too high am

  17. 14 CFR 1214.605 - Preflight packing and storing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preflight packing and storing. 1214.605 Section 1214.605 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT Mementos Aboard Space Shuttle Flights § 1214.605 Preflight packing and storing. (a) Items intended for...

  18. Online Variable-Sized Bin Packing with Conflicts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Epstein, Leah; Favrholdt, Lene Monrad; Levin, Asaf

    2011-01-01

    We study a new kind of on-line bin packing with conflicts, motivated by a problem arising when scheduling jobs on the Grid. In this bin packing problem, the set of items is given at the beginning, together with a set of conflicts on pairs of items. A conflict on a pair of items implies...

  19. A relationship between maximum packing of particles and particle size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedors, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    Experimental data indicate that the volume fraction of particles in a packed bed (i.e. maximum packing) depends on particle size. One explanation for this is based on the idea that particle adhesion is the primary factor. In this paper, however, it is shown that entrainment and immobilization of liquid by the particles can also account for the facts.

  20. A selection-quotient process for packed word Hopf algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Duchamp, G H E; Tanasa, A

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we define a Hopf algebra structure on the vector space spanned by packed words using a selection-quotient coproduct. We show that this algebra is free on its irreducible packed words. Finally, we give some brief explanations on the Maple codes we have used.

  1. The sintering behavior of close-packed spheres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Tikare, V.; Frandsen, Henrik Lund

    2012-01-01

    The sintering behavior of close-packed spheres is investigated using a numerical model. The investigated systems are the body-centered cubic (bcc), face-centered cubic (fcc) and hexagonal close-packed spheres (hcp). The sintering behavior is found to be ideal, with no grain growth until full dens...

  2. Colonic perforation: a lethal consequence of cannabis body packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawich, Shamir O; Downes, Ross; Martin, Allie C; Evans, Necia R; Mitchell, Derek I G; Williams, Eric

    2010-07-01

    Body packing is one method of smuggling cannabis across international borders. The practice is prevalent in Jamaica. There has been one reported death from this practice in medical literature. We report a second fatal case of cannabis body packing, reinforcing the dangerous nature of this practice.

  3. Does the fluid elasticity influence the dispersion in packed beds?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerterp, K. Roel; Wijngaarden, Ruud J.; Nijhuis, Niek B.G.

    1996-01-01

    Reasons are given why the axial dispersion in a gas flowing through a packed bed may be influenced by the elasticity - or compressibility - of the fluid. To support this hypothesis, experiments have been done in a packed column at pressures from 0.13 to 2.0 MPa. The elasticity E of a gas is proporti

  4. Simulation and control of water-gas shift packed bed reactor with inter-stage cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, S. Z.; Nandong, J.

    2016-03-01

    Water-Gas Shift Reaction (WGSR) has become one of the well-known pathways for H2 production in industries. The issue with WGSR is that it is kinetically favored at high temperatures but thermodynamically favored at low temperatures, thus requiring careful consideration in the control design in order to ensure that the temperature used does not deactivate the catalyst. This paper studies the effect of a reactor arrangement with an inter-stage cooling implemented in the packed bed reactor to look at its effect on outlet temperature. A mathematical model is developed based on one-dimensional heat and mass transfers which incorporate the intra-particle effects. It is shown that the placement of the inter-stage cooling and the outlet temperature exiting the inter-stage cooling have strong influence on the reaction conversion. Several control strategies are explored for the process. It is shown that a feedback- feedforward control strategy using Multi-scale Control (MSC) is effective to regulate the reactor temperature profile which is critical to maintaining the catalysts activity.

  5. Discrete element modelling of pebble packing in pebble bed reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suikkanen, Heikki, E-mail: heikki.suikkanen@lut.fi; Ritvanen, Jouni, E-mail: jouni.ritvanen@lut.fi; Jalali, Payman, E-mail: payman.jalali@lut.fi; Kyrki-Rajamäki, Riitta, E-mail: riitta.kyrki-rajamaki@lut.fi

    2014-07-01

    Highlights: • A discrete element method code is developed for pebble bed reactor analyses. • Methods are established to extract packing information at various spatial scales. • Packing simulations inside annular core geometry are done varying input parameters. • The restitution coefficient has the strongest effect on the resulting packing density. • Detailed analyses reveal local densification especially near the walls. - Abstract: It is important to understand the packing characteristics and behaviour of the randomly packed pebble bed to further analyse the reactor physical and thermal-hydraulic behaviour and to design a safe and economically feasible pebble bed reactor. The objective of this work was to establish methods to model and analyse the pebble packing in detail to provide useful tools and data for further analyses. Discrete element method (DEM) is a well acknowledged method for analysing granular materials, such as the fuel pebbles in a pebble bed reactor. In this work, a DEM computer code was written specifically for pebble bed analyses. Analysis methods were established to extract data at various spatial scales from the pebble beds resulting from the DEM simulations. A comparison with available experimental data was performed to validate the DEM implementation. To test the code implementation in full-scale reactor calculations, DEM packing simulations were done in annular geometry with 450,000 pebbles. Effects of the initial packing configuration, friction and restitution coefficients and pebble size distribution to the resulting pebble bed were investigated. The packing simulations revealed that from the investigated parameters the restitution coefficient had the largest effect on the resulting average packing density while other parameters had smaller effects. Detailed local packing density analysis of pebble beds with different average densities revealed local variations especially strong in the regions near the walls. The implemented DEM

  6. Multilayer DNA Origami Packed on Hexagonal and Hybrid Lattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ke, Yonggang; Voigt, Niels Vinther; Shih, William M.;

    2012-01-01

    “Scaffolded DNA origami” has been proven to be a powerful and efficient approach to construct two-dimensional or three-dimensional objects with great complexity. Multilayer DNA origami has been demonstrated with helices packing along either honeycomb-lattice geometry or square-lattice geometry....... Here we report successful folding of multilayer DNA origami with helices arranged on a close-packed hexagonal lattice. This arrangement yields a higher density of helical packing and therefore higher resolution of spatial addressing than has been shown previously. We also demonstrate hybrid multilayer...... DNA origami with honeycomb-lattice, square-lattice, and hexagonal-lattice packing of helices all in one design. The availability of hexagonal close-packing of helices extends our ability to build complex structures using DNA nanotechnology....

  7. Multilayer DNA Origami Packed on Hexagonal and Hybrid Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yonggang; Voigt, Niels V.; Gothelf, Kurt V.; Shih, William M.

    2012-01-01

    “Scaffolded DNA origami” has been proven to be a powerful and efficient approach to construct two-dimensional or three-dimensional objects with great complexity. Multilayer DNA origami has been demonstrated with helices packing along either honeycomb-lattice geometry or square-lattice geometry. Here we report successful folding of multilayer DNA origami with helices arranged on a close-packed hexagonal lattice. This arrangement yields a higher density of helical packing and therefore higher resolution of spatial addressing than has been shown previously. We also demonstrate hybrid multilayer DNA origami with honeycomb-lattice, square-lattice, and hexagonal lattice packing of helices all in one design. The availability of hexagonal close packing of helices extends our ability to build complex structures using DNA nanotechnology. PMID:22187940

  8. Numerical optimization method for packing regular convex polygons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiev, Sh. I.; Lisafina, M. S.

    2016-08-01

    An algorithm is presented for the approximate solution of the problem of packing regular convex polygons in a given closed bounded domain G so as to maximize the total area of the packed figures. On G a grid is constructed whose nodes generate a finite set W on G, and the centers of the figures to be packed can be placed only at some points of W. The problem of packing these figures with centers in W is reduced to a 0-1 linear programming problem. A two-stage algorithm for solving the resulting problems is proposed. The algorithm finds packings of the indicated figures in an arbitrary closed bounded domain on the plane. Numerical results are presented that demonstrate the effectiveness of the method.

  9. An Amino Acid Code for Irregular and Mixed Protein Packing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Hyun; Chavan, Archana; Fraga, Keith; Tsai, Jerry

    2015-01-01

    To advance our understanding of protein tertiary structure, the development of the knob-socket model is completed in an analysis of the packing in irregular coil and turn secondary structure packing as well as between mixed secondary structure. The knob-socket model simplifies packing based on repeated patterns of 2 motifs: a 3 residue socket for packing within 2° structure and a 4 residue knob-socket for 3° packing. For coil and turn secondary structure, knob-sockets allow identification of a correlation between amino acid composition and tertiary arrangements in space. Coil contributes almost as much as α-helices to tertiary packing. Irregular secondary structure involves 3 residue cliques of consecutive contacting residues or XYZ sockets. In irregular sockets, Gly, Pro, Asp and Ser are favored, while Cys, His, Met and Trp are not. For irregular knobs, the preference order is Arg, Asp, Pro, Asn, Thr, Leu, and Gly, while Cys, His, Met and Trp are not. In mixed packing, the knob amino acid preferences are a function of the socket that they are packing into, whereas the amino acid composition of the sockets does not depend on the secondary structure of the knob. A unique motif of a coil knob with an XYZ β-sheet socket may potentially function to inhibit β-sheet extension. In addition, analysis of the preferred crossing angles for strands within a β-sheet and mixed α-helices/β-sheets identifies canonical packing patterns useful in protein design. Lastly, the knob-socket model abstracts the complexity of protein tertiary structure into an intuitive packing surface topology map. PMID:26370334

  10. Altering bio-oil composition by catalytic treatment of pinewood pyrolysis vapors over zeolites using an auger - packed bed integrated reactor system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vamshi Krishna Guda

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pine wood pyrolysis vapors were catalytically treated using Zeolite catalysts. An auger fed reactor was used for the pinewood pyrolysis while a packed bed reactor mounted on the top of the auger reactor housed the catalyst for the treatment of pinewood pyrolytic vapors. The pyrolytic vapors produced at 450 oC were passed through zeolite catalysts maintained at 425 oC at a weight hourly space velocity (WHSV of 12 h-1. Five zeolites, including ZSM-5, mordenite, ferrierite, Zeolite-Y, and Zeolite-beta (all in H form, were used to study the effect of catalyst properties such as acidity, pore size, and pore structure on catalytic cracking of pinewood pyrolysis vapors. Product bio-oils were analyzed for their chemical composition using GC-MS, water content, density, viscosity, acid value, pH, and elemental compositions. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA was performed to analyze the extent of coking on zeolite catalysts. Application of catalysis to biomass pyrolysis increased gas product yields at the expense of bio-oil yields. While all the zeolites deoxygenated the pyrolysis vapors, ZSM-5 was found to be most effective. The ZSM-5 catalyzed bio-oil, rich in phenolics and aromatic hydrocarbons, was less viscous, had relatively lower acid number and high pH, and possessed oxygen content nearly half that of un-catalyzed bio-oil. Brønsted acidity, pore size, and shape-selective catalysis of ZSM-5 catalyst proved to be the determining factors for its activity. TGA results implied that the pore size of catalysts highly influenced coking reactions. Regeneration of the used catalysts was successfully completed at 700 oC.

  11. Mechanochemical activation of iron ore-based catalysts for the hydrogenation of brown coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, P.N.; Kuznetsova, L.I.; Chumakov, V.G.; Moiseeva, G.A. [Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Krasnoyarsk (Russian Federation). Inst. of Chemistry and Chemical Technology

    2000-10-01

    Genesis of pyrrhotite catalysts from different iron ore concentrates and pure iron oxides was investigated using the method of mechanochemical treatment in a planetary mill. The dispersion and fine crystalline structure of oxide and pyrrhotite particles were studied as the function of mechanical load, sulfiding temperature and mode of preparation. Methods for the preparation of high performance iron ore-based catalysts for brown coal hydrogenation have been developed. (orig.)

  12. Too packed to change: side-chain packing and site-specific substitution rates in protein evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcos, María Laura; Echave, Julian

    2015-01-01

    In protein evolution, due to functional and biophysical constraints, the rates of amino acid substitution differ from site to site. Among the best predictors of site-specific rates are solvent accessibility and packing density. The packing density measure that best correlates with rates is the weighted contact number (WCN), the sum of inverse square distances between a site's C α and the C α of the other sites. According to a mechanistic stress model proposed recently, rates are determined by packing because mutating packed sites stresses and destabilizes the protein's active conformation. While WCN is a measure of C α packing, mutations replace side chains. Here, we consider whether a site's evolutionary divergence is constrained by main-chain packing or side-chain packing. To address this issue, we extended the stress theory to model side chains explicitly. The theory predicts that rates should depend solely on side-chain contact density. We tested this prediction on a data set of structurally and functionally diverse monomeric enzymes. We compared side-chain contact density with main-chain contact density measures and with relative solvent accessibility (RSA). We found that side-chain contact density is the best predictor of rate variation among sites (it explains 39.2% of the variation). Moreover, the independent contribution of main-chain contact density measures and RSA are negligible. Thus, as predicted by the stress theory, site-specific evolutionary rates are determined by side-chain packing.

  13. Packing schemes of cavities in selected clathrasils and zeolites and the analogous packings of atoms in crystal structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hem, Caroline Piper; Makovicky, Emil; Balic Zunic, Tonci

    2010-01-01

    Sizes of cavities and their packing schemes in selected zeolites and clathrasils were studied by means of least squares fitting of circumscribed spheres to them. Resulting packing of spheres of different diameters was analyzed by the coordinates of their centers, their volumes and sphericity...

  14. Too packed to change: side-chain packing and site-specific substitution rates in protein evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Laura Marcos

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In protein evolution, due to functional and biophysical constraints, the rates of amino acid substitution differ from site to site. Among the best predictors of site-specific rates are solvent accessibility and packing density. The packing density measure that best correlates with rates is the weighted contact number (WCN, the sum of inverse square distances between a site’s Cα and the Cα of the other sites. According to a mechanistic stress model proposed recently, rates are determined by packing because mutating packed sites stresses and destabilizes the protein’s active conformation. While WCN is a measure of Cα packing, mutations replace side chains. Here, we consider whether a site’s evolutionary divergence is constrained by main-chain packing or side-chain packing. To address this issue, we extended the stress theory to model side chains explicitly. The theory predicts that rates should depend solely on side-chain contact density. We tested this prediction on a data set of structurally and functionally diverse monomeric enzymes. We compared side-chain contact density with main-chain contact density measures and with relative solvent accessibility (RSA. We found that side-chain contact density is the best predictor of rate variation among sites (it explains 39.2% of the variation. Moreover, the independent contribution of main-chain contact density measures and RSA are negligible. Thus, as predicted by the stress theory, site-specific evolutionary rates are determined by side-chain packing.

  15. Pt-catalyzed ozonation of aqueous phenol solution using high-gravity rotating packed bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Chi; Chiu, Chun-Yu; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Chang, Chiung-Fen; Chen, Yi-Hung; Ji, Dar-Ren; Tseng, Jyi-Yeong; Yu, Yue-Hwa

    2009-09-15

    In this study, a high-gravity rotating packed bed (HGRPB or HG) was used as a catalytic ozonation (Cat-OZ) reactor to decompose phenol. The operation of HGRPB system was carried out in a semi-batch apparatus which combines two major parts, namely the rotating packed bed (RPB) and photo-reactor (PR). The high rotating speed of RPB can give a high volumetric gas-liquid mass transfer coefficient with one or two orders of magnitude higher than those in the conventional packed beds. The platinum-containing catalyst (Dash 220N, Pt/gamma-Al(2)O(3)) and activated alumina (gamma-Al(2)O(3)) were packed in the RPB respectively to adsorb molecular ozone and the target pollutant of phenol on the surface to catalyze the oxidation of phenol. An ultra violet (UV) lamp (applicable wavelength lambda=200-280 nm) was installed in the PR to enhance the self-decomposition of molecular ozone in water to form high reactive radical species. Different combinations of advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) with the HGRPB for the degradation of phenol were tested. These included high-gravity OZ (HG-OZ), HG catalytic OZ (HG-Cat-OZ), HG photolysis OZ (HG-UV-OZ) and HG-Cat-OZ with UV (HG-Cat-UV-OZ). The decomposition efficiency of total organic compound (eta(TOC)) of HG-UV-OZ with power of UV (P(UV)) of 16W is 54% at applied dosage of ozone per volume sample m(A,in)=1200 mg L(-1) (reaction time t=20 min), while that of HG-OZ without the UV irradiation is 24%. After 80 min oxidation (m(A,in)=4800 mg L(-1)), the eta(TOC) of HG-UV-OZ is as high as 94% compared to 82% of HG-OZ process. The values of eta(TOC) for HG-Cat-OZ process with m(S)=42 g are 56% and 87% at m(A,in)=1200 and 4800 mg L(-1), respectively. By increasing the catalyst mass to 77 g, the eta(TOC) for the HG-Cat-OZ process reaches 71% and 90% at m(A,in)=1200 and 4800 mg L(-1), respectively. The introduction of Pt/gamma-Al(2)O(3) as well as UV irradiation in the HG-OZ process can enhance the eta(TOC) of phenol significantly, while gamma

  16. Stereospecific olefin polymerization catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercaw, John E.; Herzog, Timothy A.

    1998-01-01

    A metallocene catalyst system for the polymerization of .alpha.-olefins to yield stereospecific polymers including syndiotactic, and isotactic polymers. The catalyst system includes a metal and a ligand of the formula ##STR1## wherein: R.sup.1, R.sup.2, and R.sup.3 are independently selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, 5 to 7 membered cycloalkyl, which in turn may have from 1 to 3 C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyls as a substituent, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or arylalkyl in which two adjacent radicals may together stand for cyclic groups having 4 to 15 carbon atoms which in turn may be substituted, or Si(R.sup.8).sub.3 where R.sup.8 is selected from the group consisting of C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.10 cycloalkyl; R.sup.4 and R.sup.6 are substituents both having van der Waals radii larger than the van der Waals radii of groups R.sup.1 and R.sup.3 ; R.sup.5 is a substituent having a van der Waals radius less than about the van der Waals radius of a methyl group; E.sup.1, E.sup.2 are independently selected from the group consisting of Si(R.sup.9).sub.2, Si(R.sup.9).sub.2 --Si(R.sup.9).sub.2, Ge(R.sup.9).sub.2, Sn(R.sup.9).sub.2, C(R.sup.9).sub.2, C(R.sup.9).sub.2 --C(R.sup.9).sub.2, where R.sup.9 is C.sub.1 to C.sub.10 alkyl, C.sub.6 to C.sub.15 aryl or C.sub.3 to C.sub.10 cycloalkyl; and the ligand may have C.sub.S or C.sub.1 -symmetry. Preferred metals are selected from the group consisting of group III, group IV, group V or lanthanide group elements. The catalysts are used to prepare stereoregular polymers including polypropylene from .alpha.-olefin monomers.

  17. NO_x-assisted soot oxidation over K/CuCe catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    翁端; 李佳; 吴晓东; 司知蠢

    2010-01-01

    CeO2 and CuOx-CeO2 supported potassium catalysts were synthesized by wetness impregnation method. The catalysts were characterized by BET, NO-TPO, NOx-TPD and soot-TPO measurements. By the decoration of potassium and copper, the maximum soot combustion temperature of the ceria-based catalyst decreased to 338 and 379 °C in the presence and absence of NO under a loose contact mode, re- spectively. The pronouncedly enhanced NO oxidation ability by copper introduction and NOx storage capacity by potassium modif...

  18. Percolation of disordered jammed sphere packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziff, Robert M.; Torquato, Salvatore

    2017-02-01

    We determine the site and bond percolation thresholds for a system of disordered jammed sphere packings in the maximally random jammed state, generated by the Torquato–Jiao algorithm. For the site threshold, which gives the fraction of conducting versus non-conducting spheres necessary for percolation, we find {{p}\\text{c}}=0.3116(3) , consistent with the 1979 value of Powell 0.310(5) and identical within errors to the threshold for the simple-cubic lattice, 0.311 608, which shares the same average coordination number of 6. In terms of the volume fraction ϕ, the threshold corresponds to a critical value {φ\\text{c}}=0.199 . For the bond threshold, which apparently was not measured before, we find {{p}\\text{c}}=0.2424(3) . To find these thresholds, we considered two shape-dependent universal ratios involving the size of the largest cluster, fluctuations in that size, and the second moment of the size distribution; we confirmed the ratios’ universality by also studying the simple-cubic lattice with a similar cubic boundary. The results are applicable to many problems including conductivity in random mixtures, glass formation, and drug loading in pharmaceutical tablets.

  19. Modeling the elution of organic chemicals from a melting homogeneous snow pack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Torsten; Wania, Frank

    2011-06-01

    Organic chemicals are often released in peak concentrations from melting snow packs. A simple, mechanistic snowmelt model was developed to simulate and predict the elution of organic substances from melting, homogeneous snow, as influenced by chemical properties and snow pack characteristics. The model calculates stepwise the chemical transport along with the melt water flow in a multi-layered snow pack, based on chemical equilibrium partitioning between the individual bulk snow phases. The model succeeds in reproducing the elution behavior of several organic contaminants observed in previously conducted cold room experiments. The model aided in identifying four different types of enrichment of organic substances during snowmelt. Water soluble substances experience peak releases early during a melt period (type 1), whereas chemicals that strongly sorb to particulate matter (PM) or snow grain surfaces elute at the end of melting (type 2). Substances that are somewhat water soluble and at the same time have a high affinity for snow grain surfaces may exhibit increasing concentrations in the melt water (type 3). Finally, elution sequences involving peak loads both at the beginning and the end of melting are simulated for chemicals that are partially dissolved in the aqueous melt water phase and partially sorbed to PM (type 4). The extent of type 1 enrichment mainly depends on the snow depth, whereby deeper snow generates more pronounced concentration peaks. PM influences the elution behavior of organic chemicals strongly because of the very large natural variability in the type and amount of particles present in snow. Urban and road-side snow rich in PM can generate type 2 concentration peaks at the end of the melt period for even relatively water soluble substances. From a clean, melting snow pack typical for remote regions, even fairly hydrophobic chemicals can be released in type 1 mode while being almost completely dissolved in the aqueous melt water phase. The

  20. Optimization of operating parameters for gas-phase photocatalytic splitting of H2S by novel vermiculate packed tubular reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preethi, V; Kanmani, S

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen production by gas-phase photocatalytic splitting of Hydrogen Sulphide (H2S) was investigated on four semiconductor photocatalysts including CuGa1.6Fe0.4O2, ZnFe2O3, (CdS + ZnS)/Fe2O3 and Ce/TiO2. The CdS and ZnS coated core shell particles (CdS + ZnS)/Fe2O3 shows the highest rate of hydrogen (H2) production under optimized conditions. Packed bed tubular reactor was used to study the performance of prepared photocatalysts. Selection of the best packing material is a key for maximum removal efficiency. Cheap, lightweight and easily adsorbing vermiculate materials were used as a novel packing material and were found to be effective in splitting H2S. Effect of various operating parameters like flow rate, sulphide concentration, catalyst dosage, light irradiation were tested and optimized for maximum H2 conversion of 92% from industrial waste H2S.

  1. Failure Modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, K. P.; Burcharth, H. F.; Ibsen, Lars Bo;

    1999-01-01

    The present appendix contains the derivation of ten different limit state equations divided on three different failure modes. Five of the limit state equations can be used independently of the characteristics of the subsoil, whereas the remaining five can be used for either drained or undrained...

  2. Ceramic catalyst materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sault, A.G.; Gardner, T.J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hanprasopwattanna, A.; Reardon, J.; Datye, A.K. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) ion-exchange materials show great potential as ceramic catalyst supports due to an inherently high ion-exchange capacity which allows facile loading of catalytically active transition metal ions, and an ability to be cast as thin films on virtually any substrate. By coating titania and HTO materials onto inexpensive, high surface area substrates such as silica and alumina, the economics of using these materials is greatly improved, particularly for the HTO materials, which are substantially more expensive in the bulk form than other oxide supports. In addition, the development of thin film forms of these materials allows the catalytic and mechanical properties of the final catalyst formulation to be separately engineered. In order to fully realize the potential of thin film forms of titania and HTO, improved methods for the deposition and characterization of titania and HTO films on high surface area substrates are being developed. By varying deposition procedures, titania film thickness and substrate coverage can be varied from the submonolayer range to multilayer thicknesses on both silica and alumina. HTO films can also be formed, but the quality and reproducibility of these films is not nearly as good as for pure titania films. The films are characterized using a combination of isopropanol dehydration rate measurements, point of zero charge (PZC) measurements, BET surface area, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and elemental analysis. In order to assess the effects of changes in film morphology on catalytic activity, the films are being loaded with MoO{sub 3} using either incipient wetness impregnation or ion-exchange of heptamolybdate anions followed by calcining. The MoO{sub 3} is then sulfided to form MOS{sub 2}, and tested for catalytic activity using pyrene hydrogenation and dibenzothiophene (DBT) desulfurization, model reactions that simulate reactions occurring during coal liquefaction.

  3. Localized lipid packing of transmembrane domains impedes integrin clustering.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Mehrbod

    Full Text Available Integrin clustering plays a pivotal role in a host of cell functions. Hetero-dimeric integrin adhesion receptors regulate cell migration, survival, and differentiation by communicating signals bidirectionally across the plasma membrane. Thus far, crystallographic structures of integrin components are solved only separately, and for some integrin types. Also, the sequence of interactions that leads to signal transduction remains ambiguous. Particularly, it remains controversial whether the homo-dimerization of integrin transmembrane domains occurs following the integrin activation (i.e. when integrin ectodomain is stretched out or if it regulates integrin clustering. This study employs molecular dynamics modeling approaches to address these questions in molecular details and sheds light on the crucial effect of the plasma membrane. Conducting a normal mode analysis of the intact αllbβ3 integrin, it is demonstrated that the ectodomain and transmembrane-cytoplasmic domains are connected via a membrane-proximal hinge region, thus merely transmembrane-cytoplasmic domains are modeled. By measuring the free energy change and force required to form integrin homo-oligomers, this study suggests that the β-subunit homo-oligomerization potentially regulates integrin clustering, as opposed to α-subunit, which appears to be a poor regulator for the clustering process. If α-subunits are to regulate the clustering they should overcome a high-energy barrier formed by a stable lipid pack around them. Finally, an outside-in activation-clustering scenario is speculated, explaining how further loading the already-active integrin affects its homo-oligomerization so that focal adhesions grow in size.

  4. Development of GREET Catalyst Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhichao [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Dunn, Jennifer B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division; Cronauer, Donald C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Energy Systems Division

    2014-09-01

    Catalysts are critical inputs for many pathways that convert biomass into biofuels. Energy consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions during the production of catalysts and chemical inputs influence the life-cycle energy consumption, and GHG emissions of biofuels and need to be considered in biofuel life-cycle analysis (LCA). In this report, we develop energy and material flows for the production of three different catalysts (tar reforming, alcohol synthesis, Zeolite Socony Mobil-5 [ZSM-5]) and two chemicals (olivine, dimethyl ether of polyethylene glycol [DEPG]). These compounds and catalysts are now included in the Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET™) catalyst module. They were selected because they are consumed in existing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) analyses of biofuel processes. For example, a thermochemical ethanol production pathway (indirect gasification and mixed alcohol synthesis) developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) uses olivine, DEPG, and tar reforming and alcohol synthesis catalysts (Dutta et al., 2011). ZSM-5 can be used in biofuel production pathways such as catalytic upgrading of sugars into hydrocarbons (Biddy and Jones, 2013). Other uses for these compounds and catalysts are certainly possible. In this report, we document the data sources and methodology we used to develop material and energy flows for the catalysts and compounds in the GREET catalyst module. In Section 2 we focus on compounds used in the model Dutta et al. (2011) developed. In Section 3, we report material and energy flows associated with ZSM-5 production. Finally, in Section 4, we report results.

  5. 75 FR 1788 - General Services Administration Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Packing List Clause

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-13

    ... ADMINISTRATION General Services Administration Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Packing List Clause AGENCY... approved information collection requirement regarding the packing list clause. A request for public..., Packing List Clause, in all correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Michael O....

  6. 77 FR 66466 - General Services Administration Regulation; Information Collection; Packing List Clause

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-05

    ... ADMINISTRATION General Services Administration Regulation; Information Collection; Packing List Clause AGENCY... packing list clause. Public comments are particularly invited on: Whether this collection of information..., Packing List Clause, by any of the following methods: Regulations.gov :...

  7. Optimization of heterogeneous Bin packing using adaptive genetic algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, R.; Chandrasekaran, M.; Sriramya, C.; Page, Tom

    2017-03-01

    This research is concentrates on a very interesting work, the bin packing using hybrid genetic approach. The optimal and feasible packing of goods for transportation and distribution to various locations by satisfying the practical constraints are the key points in this project work. As the number of boxes for packing can not be predicted in advance and the boxes may not be of same category always. It also involves many practical constraints that are why the optimal packing makes much importance to the industries. This work presents a combinational of heuristic Genetic Algorithm (HGA) for solving Three Dimensional (3D) Single container arbitrary sized rectangular prismatic bin packing optimization problem by considering most of the practical constraints facing in logistic industries. This goal was achieved in this research by optimizing the empty volume inside the container using genetic approach. Feasible packing pattern was achieved by satisfying various practical constraints like box orientation, stack priority, container stability, weight constraint, overlapping constraint, shipment placement constraint. 3D bin packing problem consists of ‘n’ number of boxes being to be packed in to a container of standard dimension in such a way to maximize the volume utilization and in-turn profit. Furthermore, Boxes to be packed may be of arbitrary sizes. The user input data are the number of bins, its size, shape, weight, and constraints if any along with standard container dimension. This user input were stored in the database and encoded to string (chromosomes) format which were normally acceptable by GA. GA operators were allowed to act over these encoded strings for finding the best solution.

  8. Enabling Microliquid Chromatography by Microbead Packing of Microchannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balvin, Manuel; Zheng, Yun

    2014-01-01

    The microbead packing is the critical element required in the success of on-chip microfabrication of critical microfluidic components for in-situ analysis and detection of chiral amino acids. In order for microliquid chromatography to occur, there must be a stationary phase medium within the microchannel that interacts with the analytes present within flowing fluid. The stationary phase media are the microbeads packed by the process discussed in this work. The purpose of the microliquid chromatography is to provide a lightweight, low-volume, and low-power element to separate amino acids and their chiral partners efficiently to understand better the origin of life. In order to densely pack microbeads into the microchannels, a liquid slurry of microbeads was created. Microbeads were extracted from a commercially available high-performance liquid chromatography column. The silica beads extracted were 5 microns in diameter, and had surface coating of phenyl-hexyl. These microbeads were mixed with a 200- proof ethanol solution to create a microbead slurry with the right viscosity for packing. A microfilter is placed at the outlet via of the microchannel and the slurry is injected, then withdrawn across a filter using modified syringes. After each injection, the channel is flushed with ethanol to enhance packing. This cycle is repeated numerous times to allow for a tightly packed channel of microbeads. Typical microbead packing occurs in the macroscale into tubes or channels by using highly pressurized systems. Moreover, these channels are typically long and straight without any turns or curves. On the other hand, this method of microbead packing is completed within a microchannel 75 micrometers in diameter. Moreover, the microbead packing is completed into a serpentine type microchannel, such that it maximizes microchannel length within a microchip. Doing so enhances the interactions of the analytes with the microbeads to separate efficiently amino acids and amino acid

  9. Impeded solid state reactions and transformations in ceramic catalysts supports and catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernő E. Kiss

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Impeded chemical reactions and impeded polymorphous transformation in materials are discussed, as desired effects, for stabilization of ceramic catalyst supports and ceramic based catalysts. This paper gives a short overview about the possibilities of slowing down the aging processes in ceramic catalyst supports and catalysts. Special attention is given to alumina and titania based catalysts.

  10. Multi-dimensional Bin Packing Problems with Guillotine Constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amossen, Rasmus Resen; Pisinger, David

    2010-01-01

    The problem addressed in this paper is the decision problem of determining if a set of multi-dimensional rectangular boxes can be orthogonally packed into a rectangular bin while satisfying the requirement that the packing should be guillotine cuttable. That is, there should exist a series of face...... parallel straight cuts that can recursively cut the bin into pieces so that each piece contains a box and no box has been intersected by a cut. The unrestricted problem is known to be NP-hard. In this paper we present a generalization of a constructive algorithm for the multi-dimensional bin packing...

  11. Mechanical stability of ordered droplet packings in microfluidic channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleury, Jean-Baptiste; Claussen, Ohle; Herminghaus, Stephan; Brinkmann, Martin; Seemann, Ralf

    2011-12-01

    The mechanical response and stability of one and two-row packing of monodisperse emulsion droplets are studied in quasi 2d microchannels under longitudinal compression. Depending on the choice of parameter, a considered droplet arrangement is either transformed continuously into another packing under longitudinal compression or becomes mechanically unstable and segregates into domains of higher and lower packing fraction. Our experimental results are compared to analytical calculations for 2d-droplet arrangements with good quantitative agreement. This study also predicts important consequences for the stability of droplet arrangements in flowing systems.

  12. The exact packing measure of L\\'evy trees

    CERN Document Server

    Duquesne, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    We study fine properties of L\\'evy trees that are random compact metric spaces introduced by Le Gall and Le Jan in 1998 as the genealogy of continuous state branching processes. L\\'evy trees are the scaling limits of Galton-Watson trees and they generalize Aldous's continuum random tree which corresponds to the Brownian case. In this paper we prove that L\\'evy trees have always an exact packing measure: We explicitely compute the packing gauge function and we prove that the corresponding packing measure coincides with the mass measure up to a multiplicative constant.

  13. UNIFORM PACKING DIMENSION RESULTS FOR MULTIPARAMETER STABLE PROCESSES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    In this article, authors discuss the problem of uniform packing dimension of the image set of multiparameter stochastic processes without random uniform H(o)lder condition, and obtain the uniform packing dimension of multiparameter stable processes.If Z is a stable (N, d, α)-process and αN ≤ d, then the following holds with probability 1 Dim Z(E) = α DimE for any Borel setE ∈ B(R+N),where Z(E) = {x: (E) t ∈ E, Z(t) = x}. Dim(E) denotes the packing dimension of E.

  14. Unusual coordination mode of tetradentate Schiff base cobalt(III) complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyriac, Anish; Jeon, Jong Yeob; Varghese, Jobi Kodiyan; Park, Ji Hae; Choi, Soo Young; Chung, Young Keun; Lee, Bun Yeoul

    2012-02-07

    Contrary to the stereotype, Jacobsen's catalyst, chiral (salcy)Co(III)OAc adopts an unusual binding mode. The tetradentate {ONNO} ligand does not form a square plane but wraps cobalt in a cis-β fashion while acetate is chelating.

  15. Catalytic wet air oxidation of aniline with nanocasted Mn-Ce-oxide catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, R; Milman, M; Landau, M V; Brenner, A; Herskowitz, M

    2008-07-15

    The catalytic wet air oxidation of aqueous solution containing 1000 ppm aniline was conducted in a trickle-bed reactor packed with a novel nanocasted Mn-Ce-oxide catalyst (surface area of 300 m2/g) prepared using SBA-15 silica as a hard template. A range of liquid hourly space velocities (5-20 h(-1)) and temperatures (110-140 degrees C) at 10 bar of oxygen were tested. The experiments were conducted to provide the intrinsic performance of the catalysts. Complete aniline conversion, 90% TOC conversion, and 80% nitrogen mineralization were achieved at 140 degrees C and 5 h(-1). Blank experiments yielded relatively low homogeneous aniline (<35%) and negligible TOC conversions. Fast deactivation of the catalysts was experienced due to leaching caused by complexation with aniline. Acidification of the solution with HCI (molar HCI to aniline ratio of 1.2) was necessary to avoid colloidization and leaching of the nanoparticulate catalyst components. The catalyst displayed stable performance for over 200 h on stream.

  16. Computational Chemistry-Based Identification of Ultra-Low Temperature Water-Gas-Shift Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manos Mavrikakis

    2008-08-31

    The current work seeks to identify novel, catalytically-active, stable, poison-resistant LWGS catalysts that retain the superior activity typical of conventional Cu catalysts but can be operated at similar or lower temperatures. A database for the Binding Energies (BEs) of the LWGS relevant species, namely CO, O and OH on the most-stable, close-packed facets of a set of 17 catalytically relevant transition metals was established. This BE data and a database of previously established segregation energies was utilized to predict the stability of bimetallic NSAs that could be synthesized by combinations of the 17 parent transition metals. NSAs that were potentially stable both in vacuo and under the influence of strong-binding WGS intermediates were then selected for adsorption studies. A set of 40 NSAs were identified that satisfied all three screener criteria and the binding energies of CO, O and OH were calculated on a set of 66, 43 and 79 NSA candidates respectively. Several NSAs were found that bound intermediates weaker than the monometallic catalysts and were thus potentially poison-resistant. Finally, kinetic studies were performed and resulted in the discovery of a specific NSA-based bimetallic catalyst Cu/Pt that is potentially a promising LWGS catalyst. This stable Cu/Pt subsurface alloy is expected to provide facile H{sub 2}O activation and remain relatively resistant from the poisoning by CO, S and formate intermediates.

  17. Preparation and characterization of hexagonal close-packed Ni nanoparticles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Hexagonal close-packed Ni nanoparticles were synthesized using a heat-treating technique with the precursors prepared by the sol-gel method.The synthesis condition,structure,and morphology of the samples were characterized and analysed by thermogravimetric analysis (TG),differential thermal analysis (DTA),X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).Results indicate that the hexagonal close packed Ni nanoparticles were synthesized at a heat-treating temperature of 300℃.The cell constants are calculated at a=0.2652 nm and c=0.4334 nm.The average grain size of the hexagonal close-packed Ni particles evaluated by Scherrer equation is about 12 nm.The phase transformation from a hexagonal close-packed Ni to a face-centered cubic Ni structure occurred when the heat-treating temperature was increased.

  18. A Breakthrough in Sphere Packing: The Search for Magic Functions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laat, D. de; Vallentin, F.

    2016-01-01

    This paper by David de Laat and Frank Vallentin is an exposition about the two recent breakthrough results in the theory of sphere packings. It includes an interview with Henry Cohn, Abhinav Kumar, Stephen D. Miller and Maryna Viazovska.

  19. Packing and viscosity of concentrated polydisperse coal-water slurries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veytsman, B.; Morrison, J.; Scaroni, A.; Painter, P. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). Energy Inst.

    1998-09-01

    The viscosity of polydisperse slurries close to the packing limit is discussed. It is shown that the divergence of the viscosity at the close packing limit causes the dependence of the slurry viscosity on loading to be universal. Ways of increasing the maximal loading of polydisperse slurries are described. A new theory of packing of powders based on a generalization of the Furnas telescopic tube method is proposed. Unlike the original Furnas model, this theory allows the calculation of the maximal packing for powders with an arbitrary size distribution of particles. The application of the theory to the problem of reducing the viscosity of coal-water slurries is discussed. 15 refs., 8 figs.

  20. An effective evolutionary algorithm for the multiple container packing problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sang-Moon Soak; Sang-Wook Lee; Gi-Tae Yeo; Moon-Gu Jeon

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on a new optimization problem, which is called "The Multiple Container Packing Problem (MCPP)" and proposes a new evolutionary approach for it. The proposed evolutionary approach uses "Adaptive Link Adjustment Evolutionary Algorithm (ALA-EA)" as a basic framework and it incorporates a heuristic local improvement approach into ALA-EA. The first step of the local search algorithm is to raise empty space through the exchange among the packed items and then to improve the fitness value through packing unpacked items into the raised empty space. The second step is to exchange the packed items and the unpacked items one another toward improving the fitness value. The proposed algorithm is compared to the previous evolutionary approaches at the benchmark instances (with the same container capacity) and the modified benchmark instances (with different container capacity) and that the algorithm is proved to be superior to the previous evolutionary approaches in the solution quality.

  1. Excise Tax Rates On Packs Of Cigarettes PDF Slides

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Download the current excise tax rates on packs of cigarettes slides. These slides are available in PDF and PowerPoint formats. The PowerPoint version can be found...

  2. Most Americans Favor Larger Health Warnings on Cigarette Packs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164398.html Most Americans Favor Larger Health Warnings on Cigarette Packs ... According to the study's first author, Sarah Kowitt, "Most adults, including smokers, have favorable attitudes towards larger ...

  3. Evaluation of Hematological Parameters in Partial Exchange and Packed Cell Transfusion in Treatment of Severe Anemia in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudha Salhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Anemia is a major public health problem throughout the world which assumes prominence in pregnant mothers. Patients with severe anemia continue to present themselves at term or in labor. This study was conducted to compare the improvements in hematological parameters of patients receiving partial exchange blood transfusion and transfusion of packed cells without exchange. Methods. One hundred and twenty-five severely anemic antenatal mothers were admitted from outpatient service. Partial exchange transfusion was given to sixty-six patients while fifty-nine received transfusion of packed cells with frusemide cover. Results. The two groups were comparable in terms of age, height, weight, religion, diet, education, occupation of self and husband, and income. Hemoglobin level in Group 1 was comparatively less than Group 2 at prelevel (5.2±1.5 versus 6.6±2.3, P=0.001 and postlevel (7.2±1.5 versus 8.6±1.8, P=0.001, respectively, but there was no significant difference between the two modes of transfusion (2.09±1.6 versus 2.01±1.5, P=0.78. Conclusion. The study produced an equally significant improvement in hematological parameters in partial exchange and packed cell transfusion. Platelet counts were significantly less in partial exchange as compared with packed cell transfusion.

  4. Evaluation of hematological parameters in partial exchange and packed cell transfusion in treatment of severe anemia in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhan, Sudha; Tripathi, Vrijesh; Singh, Rajvir; Gaikwad, Harsha S

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Anemia is a major public health problem throughout the world which assumes prominence in pregnant mothers. Patients with severe anemia continue to present themselves at term or in labor. This study was conducted to compare the improvements in hematological parameters of patients receiving partial exchange blood transfusion and transfusion of packed cells without exchange. Methods. One hundred and twenty-five severely anemic antenatal mothers were admitted from outpatient service. Partial exchange transfusion was given to sixty-six patients while fifty-nine received transfusion of packed cells with frusemide cover. Results. The two groups were comparable in terms of age, height, weight, religion, diet, education, occupation of self and husband, and income. Hemoglobin level in Group 1 was comparatively less than Group 2 at prelevel (5.2 ± 1.5 versus 6.6 ± 2.3, P = 0.001) and postlevel (7.2 ± 1.5 versus 8.6 ± 1.8, P = 0.001), respectively, but there was no significant difference between the two modes of transfusion (2.09 ± 1.6 versus 2.01 ± 1.5, P = 0.78). Conclusion. The study produced an equally significant improvement in hematological parameters in partial exchange and packed cell transfusion. Platelet counts were significantly less in partial exchange as compared with packed cell transfusion.

  5. Consideration of grain packing in granular iron treatability studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdous, R.; Devlin, J. F.

    2014-08-01

    Commercial granular iron (GI) is light steel that is used in Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRBs). Investigations into the reactivity of GI have focused on its chemical nature and relatively little direct work has been done to account for the effects of grain shape and packing. Both of these factors are expected to influence available grain surface area, which is known to correlate to reactivity. Commercial granular iron grains are platy and therefore pack in preferential orientations that could affect solution access to the surface. Three packing variations were investigated using Connelly Iron and trichloroethylene (TCE). Experimental kinetic data showed reaction rates 2-4 times higher when grains were packed with long axes preferentially parallel to flow (VP) compared to packings with long axes preferentially perpendicular to flow (HP) or randomly arranged (RP). The variations were found to be explainable by variations in reactive sorption capacities, i.e., sorption to sites where chemical transformations took place. The possibility that the different reactive sorption capacities were related to physical pore-scale differences was assessed by conducting an image analysis of the pore structure of sectioned columns. The analyses suggested that pore-scale factors - in particular the grain surface availability, reflected in the sorption capacity terms of the kinetic model used - could only account for a fraction of the observed reactivity differences between packing types. It is concluded that packing does affect observable reaction rates but that micro-scale features on the grain surfaces, rather than the pore scale characteristics, account for most of the apparent reactivity differences. This result suggests that treatability tests should consider the packing of columns carefully if they are to mimic field performance of PRBs to the greatest extent possible.

  6. [Promising technologies of packed red blood cells production and storage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, A G; Golota, A S; Krassiĭ, A B

    2013-10-01

    The current article is dedicated to promising technologies of packed red blood cells production and storage. The following new technical approaches are presented: (1) erythrocytes storage in strict anaerobic argon-hydrogen environment, (2) lyophilization of erythrocyte suspension by its atomization in nitrogen gas, (3) lyophilization of erythrocytes by directional freezing under the influence of radio frequency radiation, (4) automated pharming of antigen free packed red blood cells from progenitor cell directly at the battlefield.

  7. Consideration of grain packing in granular iron treatability studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firdous, R; Devlin, J F

    2014-08-01

    Commercial granular iron (GI) is light steel that is used in Permeable Reactive Barriers (PRBs). Investigations into the reactivity of GI have focused on its chemical nature and relatively little direct work has been done to account for the effects of grain shape and packing. Both of these factors are expected to influence available grain surface area, which is known to correlate to reactivity. Commercial granular iron grains are platy and therefore pack in preferential orientations that could affect solution access to the surface. Three packing variations were investigated using Connelly Iron and trichloroethylene (TCE). Experimental kinetic data showed reaction rates 2-4 times higher when grains were packed with long axes preferentially parallel to flow (VP) compared to packings with long axes preferentially perpendicular to flow (HP) or randomly arranged (RP). The variations were found to be explainable by variations in reactive sorption capacities, i.e., sorption to sites where chemical transformations took place. The possibility that the different reactive sorption capacities were related to physical pore-scale differences was assessed by conducting an image analysis of the pore structure of sectioned columns. The analyses suggested that pore-scale factors - in particular the grain surface availability, reflected in the sorption capacity terms of the kinetic model used - could only account for a fraction of the observed reactivity differences between packing types. It is concluded that packing does affect observable reaction rates but that micro-scale features on the grain surfaces, rather than the pore scale characteristics, account for most of the apparent reactivity differences. This result suggests that treatability tests should consider the packing of columns carefully if they are to mimic field performance of PRBs to the greatest extent possible.

  8. Preparation of Zirconia Based Packing Material and Its Evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new reversed-phase packing (C18-PBD-ZrO2) was prepared by depositing and cross-linking 1-octadecene (ODE or C18) and polybutadiene (PBD) onto the surface of porous zirconia microspheres (5~10 mm in diameter) which were synthesized by a sol-gel process. These novel column packings possess high mechanical and chemical stability,wider usable pH range and can be used to separate basic compounds with no observable peak tailing.

  9. Shock-Induced Flows through Packed Beds: Transient Regimes

    CERN Document Server

    Shtemler, Yuri M; Britan, Alex

    2006-01-01

    The early stage of the transient regimes in the shock-induced flows within solid-packed beds are investigated in the linear longwave and high-frequency approximation. The transient resistance law is refined as the Duhameltime integral that follows from the general concept of dynamic tortuosity and compressibility of the packed beds. A closed-form solution is expected to describe accurately the early stage of the transient regime flow and is in qualitative agreement with available experimental data.

  10. The innovation catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roger L

    2011-06-01

    A few years ago the software development company Intuit realized that it needed a new approach to galvanizing customers. The company's Net Promoter Score was faltering, and customer recommendations of new products were especially disappointing. Intuit decided to hold a two-day, off-site meeting for the company's top 300 managers with a focus on the role of design in innovation. One of the days was dedicated to a program called Design for Delight. The centerpiece of the day was a PowerPoint presentation by Intuit founder Scott Cook, who realized midway through that he was no Steve Jobs: The managers listened dutifully, but there was little energy in the room. By contrast, a subsequent exercise in which the participants worked through a design challenge by creating prototypes, getting feedback, iterating, and refining, had them mesmerized. The eventual result was the creation of a team of nine design-thinking coaches--"innovation catalysts"--from across Intuit who were made available to help any work group create prototypes, run experiments, and learn from customers. The process includes a "painstorm" (to determine the customer's greatest pain point), a "soljam" (to generate and then winnow possible solutions), and a "code-jam" (to write code "good enough" to take to customers within two weeks). Design for Delight has enabled employees throughout Intuit to move from satisfying customers to delighting them.

  11. Automating the packing heuristic design process with genetic programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Edmund K; Hyde, Matthew R; Kendall, Graham; Woodward, John

    2012-01-01

    The literature shows that one-, two-, and three-dimensional bin packing and knapsack packing are difficult problems in operational research. Many techniques, including exact, heuristic, and metaheuristic approaches, have been investigated to solve these problems and it is often not clear which method to use when presented with a new instance. This paper presents an approach which is motivated by the goal of building computer systems which can design heuristic methods. The overall aim is to explore the possibilities for automating the heuristic design process. We present a genetic programming system to automatically generate a good quality heuristic for each instance. It is not necessary to change the methodology depending on the problem type (one-, two-, or three-dimensional knapsack and bin packing problems), and it therefore has a level of generality unmatched by other systems in the literature. We carry out an extensive suite of experiments and compare with the best human designed heuristics in the literature. Note that our heuristic design methodology uses the same parameters for all the experiments. The contribution of this paper is to present a more general packing methodology than those currently available, and to show that, by using this methodology, it is possible for a computer system to design heuristics which are competitive with the human designed heuristics from the literature. This represents the first packing algorithm in the literature able to claim human competitive results in such a wide variety of packing domains.

  12. Dense packing properties of mineral admixtures in cementitious material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanzhou Peng; Shuguang Hu; Qingjun Ding

    2009-01-01

    The effect of ultra-fine fly ash (UFFA), steel slag (SS) and silica fume (SF) on packing density of binary, ternary and quaternary cementitious materials was studied in this paper in terms of minimum water requirement of cement. The influence of mineral admixtures on the relative density of pastes with low water/binder ratios was analyzed and the relationship between paste density and compressive strength of the corresponding hardened mortars was discussed. The results indicate that the incorporation of mineral admixtures can effectively improve the packing density of cementitious materials; the increase in packing density of a composite with incorporation of two or three kinds of mineral admixtures is even more obvious than that with only one mineral admixture. Moreover, an optimal amount of mineral admixture imparts to the mixture maximum packing density. The dense packing effect of a mineral admixture can increase the packing density of the resulting cementitious material and also the density of paste with low water/binder ratio, which evidently enhances the compressive strength of the hardened mortar.

  13. Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama. Topical report No. 14. Catalyst activity trends in two-stage coal liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-02-01

    The Two Stage Coal Liquefaction process became operational at Wilsonville in May 1981, with the inclusion of an H-OIL ebullated-bed catalytic reactor. The two stage process was initially operated in a nonintegrated mode and has recently been reconfigurated to fully integrate the thermal and the catalytic stages. This report focuses on catalyst activity trends observed in both modes of operation. A literature review of relevant catalyst screening studies in bench-scale and PDU units is presented. Existing kinetic and deactivation models were used to analyze process data over an extensive data base. Based on the analysis, three separate, application studies have been conducted. The first study seeks to elucidate the dependence of catalyst deactivation rate on type of coal feedstock used. A second study focuses on the significance of catalyst type and integration mode on SRC hydrotreatment. The third study presents characteristic deactivation trends observed in integrated operation with different first-stage thermal severities. In-depth analytical work was conducted at different research laboratories on aged catalyst samples from Run 242. Model hydrogenation and denitrogenation activity trends are compared with process activity trends and with changes observed in catalyst porosimetric properties. The accumulation of metals and coke deposits with increasing catalyst age, as well as their distribution across a pellet cross-section, are discussed. The effect of catalyst age and reactor temperature on the chemical composition of flashed bottoms product is addressed. Results from regenerating spent catalysts are also presented. 35 references, 31 figures, 18 tables.

  14. Synthesis and characterization of supported sugar catalyst by dip coating method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janaun, J.; Siambun, N. J.; Safie, N. N.

    2016-06-01

    Sugar catalyst is a novel solid acid catalyst with reactivity comparable to that of sulphuric acid in biodiesel production. However, the fine powder form of sugar catalyst with the non-porous structure might cause large pressure drop in a packed bed reactor due to low bed porosity, affecting the reaction conversion especially in gas phase reaction. Furthermore, higher pressure drop requires higher electrical energy to drive the fluid through. Increasing the particle size is anticipated to be able to overcome the pressure drop matter. Hence, a deposition of sugar catalyst on larger particle materials was studied. Three types of materials were used for this investigation namely aluminum, silica and clay. The deposition was done via dip-coating method. The materials were characterized for their total acidity, thermal stability, functional groups, surface area, and element composition. The total acidity for SCDCAl, SCDCSi, and SCDCCl were 0.9 mmol/g, 0.2 mmol/g, and 0.4 mmol/g, respectively. The ratio of char deposited on SCDCAl, SCDCSi and SCDCCl were 0.9 g of support/g of carbon, 0.040 g of support/g of carbon, and 0.014 g of support/g of carbon respectively. FTIR and EDX analyses were carried out to determine the presence of active sites of the catalysis by identifying the functional groups such as -COOH, -OH, -SO3H. The results showed that -SO3H was detected on the surface of synthesized catalysts, except for SCDCC1.The pore size of SCDCAl, SCDCSi and SCDCCl were classified as macropores because the average diameter were greater than 50nm.. The catalysts were stable up to 400°C. The results showed that the dipcoating method could deposit sugar catalyst on aluminum, silica, and clay at low total acidity concentration.

  15. To pack or not to pack: the current status of periodontal dressings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathariya, Rahul; Jain, Hansa; Jadhav, Tanya

    2015-07-04

    Surgical wound dressings have been employed over several centuries for the purpose of protection of surgical sites, to prevent postoperative infection and to accelerate healing. Periodontal dressings, also known as periodontal packs, provide similar benefits when applied after periodontal surgical procedures. They can broadly be categorized as eugenol-based dressings and noneugenol dressings. Over the years, many modifications have been made to the composition of such dressings to improve their physical and therapeutic properties. Controversies surrounding the rationale for their use, advantages and disadvantages of the most commonly employed periodontal dressings and their current status in clinical practice are described in this comprehensive review. From the evidence-based literature presented here, we have also attempted to answer the question of whether there is a universal need for the application of periodontal dressings.

  16. Acid monolayer functionalized iron oxide nanoparticle catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikenberry, Myles

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle functionalization is an area of intensely active research, with applications across disciplines such as biomedical science and heterogeneous catalysis. This work demonstrates the functionalization of iron oxide nanoparticles with a quasi-monolayer of 11-sulfoundecanoic acid, 10-phosphono-1-decanesulfonic acid, and 11-aminoundecanoic acid. The carboxylic and phosphonic moieties form bonds to the iron oxide particle core, while the sulfonic acid groups face outward where they are available for catalysis. The particles were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), potentiometric titration, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES), X-ray photoelectron spectrometry (XPS), and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The sulfonic acid functionalized particles were used to catalyze the hydrolysis of sucrose at 80° and starch at 130°, showing a higher activity per acid site than the traditional solid acid catalyst Amberlyst-15, and comparing well against results reported in the literature for sulfonic acid functionalized mesoporous silicas. In sucrose catalysis reactions, the phosphonic-sulfonic nanoparticles (PSNPs) were seen to be incompletely recovered by an external magnetic field, while the carboxylic-sulfonic nanoparticles (CSNPs) showed a trend of increasing activity over the first four recycle runs. Between the two sulfonic ligands, the phosphonates produced a more tightly packed monolayer, which corresponded to a higher sulfonic acid loading, lower agglomeration, lower recoverability through application of an external magnetic field, and higher activity per acid site for the hydrolysis of starch. Functionalizations with 11-aminoundecanoic acid resulted in some amine groups binding to the surfaces of iron oxide nanoparticles. This amine binding is commonly ignored in iron oxide

  17. Chemical transformations drive complex self-assembly of uracil on close-packed coinage metal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papageorgiou, Anthoula C; Fischer, Sybille; Reichert, Joachim; Diller, Katharina; Blobner, Florian; Klappenberger, Florian; Allegretti, Francesco; Seitsonen, Ari P; Barth, Johannes V

    2012-03-27

    We address the interplay of adsorption, chemical nature, and self-assembly of uracil on the Ag(111) and Cu(111) surfaces as a function of molecular coverage (0.3 to 1 monolayer) and temperature. We find that both metal surfaces act as templates and the Cu(111) surface acts additionally as a catalyst for the resulting self-assembled structures. With a combination of STM, synchrotron XPS, and NEXAFS studies, we unravel a distinct polymorphism on Cu(111), in stark contrast to what is observed for the case of uracil on the more inert Ag(111) surface. On Ag(111) uracil adsorbs flat and intact and forms close-packed two-dimensional islands. The self-assembly is driven by stable hydrogen-bonded dimers with poor two-dimensional order. On Cu(111) complex structures are observed exhibiting, in addition, a strong annealing temperature dependence. We determine the corresponding structural transformations to be driven by gradual deprotonation of the uracil molecules. Our XPS study reveals unambiguously the tautomeric signature of uracil in the contact layer and on Cu(111) the molecule's deprotonation sites. The metal-mediated deprotonation of uracil and the subsequent electron localization in the molecule determine important biological reactions. Our data show a dependence between molecular coverage and molecule-metal interaction on Cu(111), as the molecules tilt at higher coverages in order to accommodate a higher packing density. After deprotonation of both uracil N atoms, we observe an adsorption geometry that can be understood as coordinative anchoring with a significant charge redistribution in the molecule. DFT calculations are employed to analyze the surface bonding and accurately describe the pertaining electronic structure.

  18. Effects of Mode Shares on Mode Choice

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Carrion; Nebiyou Tilahun; David Levinson

    2011-01-01

    This study considers the influence of the knowledge of existing mode shares on travelers mode choice. This contrasts with traditional mode choice models, where the main objective is to predict the overall mode shares as the aggregate of individual mode choices according to variables encompassing attributes of the modes, and characteristics of the travelers. In this study, a computer-administered adaptive stated preference survey is developed and applied to a sample of subjects selected from t...

  19. Nasal packing in sphenopalatine artery bleeding: therapeutic or harmful?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sireci, F; Speciale, R; Sorrentino, R; Turri-Zanoni, M; Nicolotti, M; Canevari, F R

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study is to present our management protocol of sphenopalatine artery bleeding, demonstrating that nasoendoscopic cautery (NC) was a more effective method than the nasal packing, in terms of shorter inpatient stay and reduced complications rate. We present ten posterior epistaxis not resolved by nasal packing. Tabotamp(®) was placed in the area of sphenopalatine foramen and/or in those parts of the posterior nasal cavity, where it was suspected that bleeding origins. In two cases, the bleeding was resolved in this way, instead eight cases needed of subperiosteal cauterization of sphenopalatine artery by Dessi bipolar forceps (MicroFrance(®)). 4 of these 8 patients evidenced a remarkable bleeding removing nasal packing (Hb before-nasal packing = 15 ± 0.69 versus Hb after-nasal packing = 13.3 ± 0.81; t student = 2.94; p value = 0.025). These four patients showed a deviation of the nasal septum ipsilateral to epistaxis, and according our experience, a traumatism of sphenopalatine area can be caused by Merocel(®) nasal packing in this condition. During follow-up, no recurrences of nasal bleeding have been observed in such patients. Nasal packing must be considered if posterior epistaxis is severe, but always taking into account the specific anatomy of patient and in particular septal spurs that can further compromise sphenopalatine artery. In our experience, the endoscopic endonasal cauterization of the sphenopalatine branches represented a safe and effective procedure.

  20. 49 CFR 173.129 - Class 5, Division 5.2-Assignment of packing group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class 5, Division 5.2-Assignment of packing group... SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Definitions Classification, Packing Group... 5.2—Assignment of packing group. All Division 5.2 materials are assigned to Packing Group II...

  1. 7 CFR 330.210 - Packing materials and containers for plant pest movement; host materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Packing materials and containers for plant pest... Packing materials and containers for plant pest movement; host materials. Plant pests moved into or... packing materials are to be employed in the shipment of plant pests. Approved packing materials for...

  2. 49 CFR 173.141 - Class 9-Assignment of packing group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class 9-Assignment of packing group. 173.141...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Definitions Classification, Packing Group Assignments... packing group. The packing group of a Class 9 material is as indicated in column 5 of the § 172.101 table....

  3. The exact packing measure for a random re-ordering of the Cantor set

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡晓予

    1996-01-01

    The packing measure for a random re-ordering of the Cantor set, the packing dimension for the random set belonging to a sequence satisfying the Hausdorff and packing measures and packing measures for random subsets of R belonging to a regular sequence have been obtained.

  4. Pushing the glass transition towards random close packing using self-propelled hard

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ni, R.; Cohen Stuart, M.A.; Dijkstra, M.

    2013-01-01

    Although the concept of random close packing with an almost universal packing fraction of approximately 0.64 for hard spheres was introduced more than half a century ago, there are still ongoing debates. The main difficulty in searching the densest packing is that states with packing fractions beyon

  5. 49 CFR 173.145 - Other Regulated Materials-Assignment of packing group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Other Regulated Materials-Assignment of packing... SHIPPERS-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Definitions Classification, Packing Group... Materials—Assignment of packing group. Packing groups are not assigned to ORM-D materials....

  6. 49 CFR 173.125 - Class 4-Assignment of packing group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class 4-Assignment of packing group. 173.125...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Definitions Classification, Packing Group Assignments... packing group. (a) The packing group of a Class 4 material is assigned in column (5) of the §...

  7. 49 CFR 173.121 - Class 3-Assignment of packing group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class 3-Assignment of packing group. 173.121...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Definitions Classification, Packing Group Assignments... packing group. (a) The packing group of a Class 3 material is as assigned in column 5 of the §...

  8. 49 CFR 173.137 - Class 8-Assignment of packing group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class 8-Assignment of packing group. 173.137...-GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR SHIPMENTS AND PACKAGINGS Definitions Classification, Packing Group Assignments... packing group. The packing group of a Class 8 material is indicated in Column 5 of the § 172.101...

  9. Natural manganese oxides as catalysts for oxidative coupling of methane: a structural and degradation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ioffe, L.M.; Bosch, P.; Viveros, T.; Sanchez, H.; Borodko, Y.G. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana-Iztapalapa, Mexico (Mexico). Dept. of Chem.

    1997-12-01

    Natural manganese oxides were evaluated as oxidative coupling catalysts to convert methane into C{sub 2}-hydrocarbons. Reactions were done in a cyclic redox mode in which the oxidized catalyst was reacted with methane at 850 C in the absence of oxygen. The bulk and surface analyses (XRD, XPS, FT-IR) indicate that the catalyst deactivation in the methane atmosphere is related to reduction of manganese ions, oxygen depletion of the catalyst surface and formation of manganese carbide species. It is proposed that the XPS line of O1s electrons, Eb=528.6 eV should be assigned to the surface oxygen bound to the reduced Mn{sup 2+} cation with close oxygen vacancies, and lines ofMn2p{sub 3/2} electrons, Eb=641 eV and C1s at 282.5 eV may be assigned to the surface manganese carbide. (orig.) 27 refs.

  10. In-situ reduction of a methanol synthesis catalyst in a three-phase slurry reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sawant, A.; Ko, M.K.; Parameswaran, V.; Lee, S.; Kulik, C.J.

    1987-01-01

    A new method for the reduction of metal oxide catalysts (CuO, ZnO, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/) has been developed for liquid phase methanol synthesis. The reducing agent is a 5% hydrogen in nitrogen mixture and the operation is carried out at 446.09 KPa. This method makes it possible to reduce finely crushed catalyst (-100 + 120 mesh) in a three phase slurry reactor. This method offers several advantages over methods in which the catalyst is reduced in a gas-solid contact mode and then slurried for use. The catalyst has been shown to be very effectively reduced and reaches its full production capacity after reduction.

  11. Separation of Fischer-Tropsch Wax Products from Ultrafine Iron Catalyst Particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amitava Sarkar; James K. Neathery; Burtron H. Davis

    2006-12-31

    A fundamental filtration study was started to investigate the separation of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis (FTS) liquids from iron-based catalyst particles. Slurry-phase FTS in slurry bubble column reactor systems is the preferred mode of operation since the reaction is highly exothermic. Consequently, heavy wax products in one approach may be separated from catalyst particles before being removed from the reactor system. Achieving an efficient wax product separation from iron-based catalysts is one of the most challenging technical problems associated with slurry-phase iron-based FTS and is a key factor for optimizing operating costs. The separation problem is further compounded by attrition of iron catalyst particles and the formation of ultra-fine particles.

  12. Enhancing purification of an azo dye solution in nanosized zero-valent iron-ZnO photocatalyst system using subsequent semibatch packed-bed reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Khani, Ali; SOHRABI, Mahmoud Reza; KHOSRAVI, Morteza; DAVALLO, Mehran

    2013-01-01

    In this work, simultaneous synthesis-immobilization of nano zero-valent iron (reductive catalyst) and nano ZnO (photocatalyst) on perlite as a suitable bed (nZVI-P and nZnO-P) was done. Three processes (reduction, oxidation, and reduction-oxidation) were evaluated for removal of azo dye C.I. acid orange 7 (AO7) from aqueous solution in a semibatch packed-bed reactor. Our results show that AO7 was successfully removed, synchronously in terms of its total color and total organic carbon, using...

  13. Effect of gravity on colloid transport through water-saturated columns packed with glass beads: modeling and experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V; Syngouna, Vasiliki I

    2014-06-17

    The role of gravitational force on colloid transport in water-saturated columns packed with glass beads was investigated. Transport experiments were performed with colloids (clays: kaolinite KGa-1b, montmorillonite STx-1b). The packed columns were placed in various orientations (horizontal, vertical, and diagonal) and a steady flow rate of Q = 1.5 mL/min was applied in both up-flow and down-flow modes. All experiments were conducted under electrostatically unfavorable conditions. The experimental data were fitted with a newly developed, analytical, one-dimensional, colloid transport model. The effect of gravity is incorporated in the mathematical model by combining the interstitial velocity (advection) with the settling velocity (gravity effect). The results revealed that flow direction influences colloid transport in porous media. The rate of particle deposition was shown to be greater for up-flow than for down-flow direction, suggesting that gravity was a significant driving force for colloid deposition.

  14. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hui Su

    2001-05-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, we introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, we demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm{sub 2} for 40-{micro}m wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection.

  15. Laser-Induced Fluorescence Detection in High-Throughput Screening of Heterogeneous Catalysts and Single Cells Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Hui [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence detection is one of the most sensitive detection techniques and it has found enormous applications in various areas. The purpose of this research was to develop detection approaches based on laser-induced fluorescence detection in two different areas, heterogeneous catalysts screening and single cell study. First, we introduced laser-induced imaging (LIFI) as a high-throughput screening technique for heterogeneous catalysts to explore the use of this high-throughput screening technique in discovery and study of various heterogeneous catalyst systems. This scheme is based on the fact that the creation or the destruction of chemical bonds alters the fluorescence properties of suitably designed molecules. By irradiating the region immediately above the catalytic surface with a laser, the fluorescence intensity of a selected product or reactant can be imaged by a charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to follow the catalytic activity as a function of time and space. By screening the catalytic activity of vanadium pentoxide catalysts in oxidation of naphthalene, we demonstrated LIFI has good detection performance and the spatial and temporal resolution needed for high-throughput screening of heterogeneous catalysts. The sample packing density can reach up to 250 x 250 subunits/cm2 for 40-μm wells. This experimental set-up also can screen solid catalysts via near infrared thermography detection.

  16. Synthesis of PtRu nanoparticles from the hydrosilylation reaction and application as catalyst for direct methanol fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Junchao; Liu, Zhaolin; He, Chaobin; Gan, Leong Ming

    2005-09-08

    Nanosized Pt, PtRu, and Ru particles were prepared by a novel process, the hydrosilylation reaction. The hydrosilylation reaction is an effective method of preparation not only for Pt particles but also for other metal colloids, such as Ru. Vulcan XC-72 was selected as catalyst support for Pt, PtRu, and Ru colloids, and TEM investigations showed nanoscale particles and narrow size distribution for both supported and unsupported metals. All Pt and Pt-rich catalysts showed the X-ray diffraction pattern of a face-centered cubic (fcc) crystal structure, whereas the Ru and Ru-rich alloys were more typical of a hexagonal close-packed (hcp) structure. As evidenced by XPS, most Pt and Ru atoms in the nanoparticles were zerovalent, except a trace of oxidation-state metals. The electrooxidation of liquid methanol on these catalysts was investigated at room temperature by cyclic voltammetry and chronoamperometry. The results concluded that some alloy catalysts showed higher catalytic activities and better CO tolerance than the Pt-only catalyst; Pt56Ru44/C have displayed the best electrocatalytic performance among all carbon-supported catalysts.

  17. Influence of Catalyst Type and Regeneration on Upgrading of Crude Bio-oil through Catalytical Thermal Cracking

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭晓亚; 颜涌捷; 李庭琛

    2004-01-01

    Catalysts, such as HZSM-5(Si/Al=50), HZSM-5(25), zeolite 5A, CaHZSM-5(50), ZnHZSM-5(50), and Kaolin were used in upgrading of crude biomass oil from pyrolysis in a fixed-bed reactor under atmospheric pressure, in order to investigate the effects of catalyst type on the yield of desired product. A blank test was carried out in a bed of inert packings to determine the extent of non-catalytical thermal cracking. The gas produced in the reaction was analyzed by the chemical absorption method. Among those catalysts, HZSM-5(50) gave the highest yield of the desired organic distillate while Kaolin gave the least formation of coke. Regeneration of deactivated HZSM-5(50) was studied. In terms of yield of organic distillate and formation rate of coke, the catalytic activity did not change much during the first 3 times of regeneration.

  18. Regeneration of Hydrotreating and FCC Catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CM Wai; JG Frye; JL Fulton; LE Bowman; LJ Silva; MA Gerber

    1999-09-30

    Hydrotreating, hydrocracking, and fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts are important components of petroleum refining processes. Hydrotreating and hydrocracking catalysts are used to improve the yield of high-quality light oil fractions from heavier crude oil and petroleum feedstocks containing high levels of impurities. FCC catalysts improve the yield of higher octane gasoline from crude oil. Residuum hydrotreating and cracking catalysts are susceptible to irreversible deactivation caused by adsorption of sulfur and by metals impurities, such as vanadium and nickel. The gradual buildup of these impurities in a hydrotreating catalyst eventually plugs the pores and deactivates it. Nickel and vanadium adversely affect the behavior of cracking catalysts, reducing product yield and quality. Replacing deactivated catalysts represents a significant cost in petroleum refining. Equally important are the costs and potential liabilities associated with treating and disposing spent catalysts. For example, recent US Environmental Protection Agency rulings have listed spent hydrotreating and hydrorefining catalysts as hazardous wastes. FCC catalysts, though more easily disposed of as road-base or as filler in asphalt and cement, are still an economic concern mainly because of the large volumes of spent catalysts generated. New processes are being considered to increase the useful life of catalysts or for meeting more stringent disposal requirements for spent catalysts containing metals. This report discusses a collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Phillips Petroleum, Inc., to identify promising chemical processes for removing metals adhered to spent hydrodesulfurization (HDS, a type of hydrotreating catalyst) and FCC catalysts. This study, conducted by PNNL, was funded by the US Department of Energy's Bartlesville Project Office. Fresh and spent catalysts were provided by Phillips Petroleum. The FCC catalyst was a rare

  19. Performance of high-rate gravel-packed oil wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unneland, Trond

    2001-05-01

    Improved methods for the prediction, evaluation, and monitoring of performance in high-rate cased-hole gravel-packed oil wells are presented in this thesis. The ability to predict well performance prior to the gravel-pack operations, evaluate the results after the operation, and monitor well performance over time has been improved. This lifetime approach to performance analysis of gravel-packed oil wells contributes to increase oil production and field profitability. First, analytical models available for prediction of performance in gravel-packed oil wells are reviewed, with particular emphasis on high-velocity flow effects. From the analysis of field data from three North Sea oil fields, improved and calibrated cased-hole gravel-pack performance prediction models are presented. The recommended model is based on serial flow through formation sand and gravel in the perforation tunnels. In addition, new correlations for high-velocity flow in high-rate gravel-packed oil wells are introduced. Combined, this improves the performance prediction for gravel-packed oil wells, and specific areas can be targeted for optimized well design. Next, limitations in the current methods and alternative methods for evaluation and comparison of well performance are presented. The most widely used parameter, the skin factor, remains a convenient and important parameter. However, using the skin concept in direct comparisons between wells with different reservoir properties may result in misleading or even invalid conclusions. A discussion of the parameters affecting the skin value, with a clarification of limitations, is included. A methodology for evaluation and comparison of gravel-packed well performance is presented, and this includes the use of results from production logs and the use of effective perforation tunnel permeability as a parameter. This contributes to optimized operational procedures from well to well and from field to field. Finally, the data sources available for

  20. Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Jonathan A.; Wilson, Jamie R.; Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Petigny, Nathalie; Sarantopoulos, Christos

    2017-02-07

    A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a microstructure exhibiting substantially uniform pore size distribution as a result of using PMMA pore forming materials or a bi-modal particle size distribution of the porous support layer materials. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

  1. Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie Robyn; van Hassel, Bart Antonie

    2012-12-04

    A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a high average pore diameter and the intermediate porous layer has a lower permeability and lower pore diameter than the porous support layer. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

  2. A Geometric-Structure Theory for Maximally Random Jammed Packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jianxiang; Xu, Yaopengxiao; Jiao, Yang; Torquato, Salvatore

    2015-11-01

    Maximally random jammed (MRJ) particle packings can be viewed as prototypical glasses in that they are maximally disordered while simultaneously being mechanically rigid. The prediction of the MRJ packing density ϕMRJ, among other packing properties of frictionless particles, still poses many theoretical challenges, even for congruent spheres or disks. Using the geometric-structure approach, we derive for the first time a highly accurate formula for MRJ densities for a very wide class of two-dimensional frictionless packings, namely, binary convex superdisks, with shapes that continuously interpolate between circles and squares. By incorporating specific attributes of MRJ states and a novel organizing principle, our formula yields predictions of ϕMRJ that are in excellent agreement with corresponding computer-simulation estimates in almost the entire α-x plane with semi-axis ratio α and small-particle relative number concentration x. Importantly, in the monodisperse circle limit, the predicted ϕMRJ = 0.834 agrees very well with the very recently numerically discovered MRJ density of 0.827, which distinguishes it from high-density “random-close packing” polycrystalline states and hence provides a stringent test on the theory. Similarly, for non-circular monodisperse superdisks, we predict MRJ states with densities that are appreciably smaller than is conventionally thought to be achievable by standard packing protocols.

  3. The progress in the study of Arctic pack ice ecology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何剑锋; 王桂忠; 蔡明红; 李少菁

    2004-01-01

    The sea ice community plays an important role in the Arctic marine ecosystem. Because of the predicted environmental changes in the Arctic environment and specifically related to sea ice, the Arctic pack ice biota has received more attention in recent years using modern ice-breaking research vessels. Studies show that the Arctic pack ice contains a diverse biota and besides ice algae, the bacterial and protozoan biomasses can be high. Surprisingly high primary production values were observed in the pack ice of the central Arctic Ocean. Occasionally biomass maximum were discovered in the interior of the ice floes, a habitat that had been ignored in most Arctic studies. Many scientific questions, which deserve special attention, remained unsolved due to logistic limitations and the sea ice characteristics. Little is know about the pack ice community in the central Arctic Ocean. Almost no data exists from the pack ice zone for the winter season. Concerning the abundance of bacteria and protozoa, more studies are needed to understand the microbial network within the ice and its role in material and energy flows. The response of the sea ice biota to global change will impact the entire Arctic marine ecosystem and a long-term monitoring program is needed. The techniques, that are applied to study the sea ice biota and the sea ice ecology, should be improved.

  4. DEM simulation of particle percolation in a packed bed

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The phenomenon of spontaneous particle percolation under gravity is investigated by means of the discrete element method. Percolation behaviors such as percolation velocity,residence time distribution and radial dispersion are examined under various conditions. It is shown that the vertical velocity of a percolating particle moving down through a packing of larger particles decreases with increasing the restitution coefficient between particles and diameter ratio of the percolating to packing particles. With the increase of the restitution coefficient,the residence time and radial dispersion of the percolating particles increase. The packing height affects the residence time and radial dispersion. But,the effect can be eliminated in the analysis of the residence time and radial dispersion when they are normalized by the average residence time and the product of the packing height and packing particle diameter,respectively.In addition,the percolation velocity is shown to be related to the vertical acceleration of the percolating particle when an extra constant vertical force is applied. Increasing the feeding rate of percolating particles decreases the dispersion coefficient.

  5. Important notice for Windows 2000 Service Pack 3 computers

    CERN Multimedia

    The NICE Team

    2005-01-01

    Microsoft is ending support for Windows 2000 Service Pack 3, which was introduced in 2002. As a consequence, computers running Windows 2000 Service Pack 3 (or older versions1)) must be updated. It is recommended that Windows 2000 computers be re-installed with Windows XP Service Pack 2 (see http://cern.ch/Win/Services/Installation/Diane). If this is not possible for compatibility reasons, Windows 2000 Service Pack 4 must be installed to ensure the computers continue to receive security patches (see http://cern.ch/Win/Docs/2000SP4). In the next few days, NICE 2000 computers requiring an update will receive a pop-up window with instructions. Users requiring help with the update can contact Helpdesk@cern.ch or call 78888. If your computer needs to be updated you are recommended to read the additional information available at http://cern.ch/Win/Docs/2000SP3. The NICE Team 1) To determine your Windows service pack version, use the ‘Start' button and select ‘Run'. In the new window that open...

  6. Important notice for Windows 2000 Service Pack 3 computers

    CERN Multimedia

    The NICE Team

    2005-01-01

    Microsoft is ending support for Windows 2000 Service Pack 3, which was introduced in 2002. As a consequence, computers running Windows 2000 Service Pack 3 (or older versions1) ) must be updated. It is recommended that Windows 2000 computers be re-installed with Windows XP Service Pack 2 (see http://cern.ch/Win/Services/Installation/Diane). If this is not possible for compatibility reasons, Windows 2000 Service Pack 4 must be installed to ensure the computers continue to receive security patches (see http://cern.ch/Win/Docs/2000SP4). In the next few days, NICE 2000 computers requiring an update will receive a pop-up window with instructions. Users requiring help with the update can contact Helpdesk@cern.ch or call 78888. If your computer needs to be updated you are recommended to read the additional information available at http://cern.ch/Win/Docs/2000SP3. The NICE Team 1) To determine your Windows service pack version, use the ‘Start' button and select ‘Run'. In the new window that opens, type ‘wi...

  7. deNOx catalysts for biomass combustion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Steffen Buus

    industrial reference catalyst, after impregnation of 225 mole potassium/g of catalyst. A catalyst plate was synthesised using 20 wt.% sepiolite mixed with nano catalyst, supported by a SiO2-fibre mesh. Realistic potassium poisoning was performed on the catalyst plate, by exposure in a potassium aerosol...... for 632 hours at 350 C. Owing to physical blocking of potassium by sepiolite fibres the composite catalyst showed a further increase in potassium resistance compared with the unsupported catalyst. Finally a refined mechanism was proposed for the nano particle SCR catalyst explaining insitu FTIR...... observation done on the system. Most importantly it indicated that the V=O bond did not break during the SCR reaction, suggesting that another oxygen is responsible for the activity of the active vanadia site....

  8. Rhenium Nanochemistry for Catalyst Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim G. Kessler

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The review presents synthetic approaches to modern rhenium-based catalysts. Creation of an active center is considered as a process of obtaining a nanoparticle or a molecule, immobilized within a matrix of the substrate. Selective chemical routes to preparation of particles of rhenium alloys, rhenium oxides and the molecules of alkyltrioxorhenium, and their insertion into porous structure of zeolites, ordered mesoporous MCM matrices, anodic mesoporous alumina, and porous transition metal oxides are considered. Structure-property relationships are traced for these catalysts in relation to such processes as alkylation and isomerization, olefin metathesis, selective oxidation of olefins, methanol to formaldehyde conversion, etc.

  9. Quick Guide to Flash Catalyst

    CERN Document Server

    Elmansy, Rafiq

    2011-01-01

    How do you transform user interface designs created in Photoshop or Illustrator into interactive web pages? It's easier than you think. This guide shows you how to use Adobe Flash Catalyst to create interactive UIs and website wireframes for Rich Internet Applications-without writing a single line of code. Ideal for web designers, this book introduces Flash Catalyst basics with detailed step-by-step instructions and screenshots that illustrate every part of the process. You'll learn hands-on how to turn your static design or artwork into working user interfaces that can be implemented in Fla

  10. Synthesis and characterization of magnesium oxide supported catalysts with a meso-macropore structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Woo; Kim, Inho; Moon, Dong Ju

    2013-08-01

    Nanostructured magnesium oxide catalyst support materials with controlled morphology and size were synthesized from a supercritical carbon dioxide/ethanol solution via chemical reaction of soluble precursors and subsequent thermal decomposition. Leaf-like magnesium hydroxide precursors with high specific surface area were formed by a low-temperature chemical reaction at below 140 degrees C, while magnesium carbonate cubes with a very low surface area less than 3.3 m2/g were formed by temperature-induced phase transition from a loose to a dense structure during carbonation reaction at above 150 degrees C. The specific surface area has significantly increased higher than 90 m2/g due to the creation of highly porous MgO cubes with mesopore structure formed after thermal decomposition of the magnesium carbonate precursors. Ni-magnesium oxide catalysts with bimodal pore structure were finally formed by the consequence of packing heterogeneity of the porous magnesium oxides with different morphologies and sizes.

  11. Transesterification of propylene glycol methyl ether in chromatographic reactors using anion exchange resin as a catalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jungmin; Sreedhar, Balamurali; Donaldson, Megan E; Frank, Timothy C; Schultz, Alfred K; Bommarius, Andreas S; Kawajiri, Yoshiaki

    2016-09-30

    Reactive chromatography using an anion exchange resin is proposed for a transesterification reaction of propylene glycol methyl ether (DOWANOL™ PM) with ethyl acetate to produce propylene glycol methyl ether acetate (DOWANOL™ PMA). This reaction is studied in batch and chromatographic reactors catalyzed by an anion exchange resin. Several anion exchange resins are tested and compared based on the performance of resin as an adsorbent and a catalyst. A chromatographic column is packed with a selected catalyst, AMBERLITE™ IRA904, and both reaction and chromatographic elution are studied at different temperatures and feed concentrations. The resulting chromatograms are fitted to a mathematical model to obtain adsorption equilibrium and reaction kinetic parameters by the inverse method. Compared to esterification investigated in a previous study, transesterification has advantages such as a higher conversion at lower temperature and easy removal of the byproduct which may lead to higher productivity. Deactivation of anion exchange resins is observed and potential solutions are suggested.

  12. Recovery of Dilute Acetic Acid by Catalytic Distillation Using NKC-9 as Catalyst

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Zhigang; LI Xiaofeng; XU Shimin; LI Xingang

    2006-01-01

    The reaction kinetics of dilute acetic acid with methanol using NKC-9 as catalyst was studied at temperatures of 308 K, 318 K, 323 K, 328 K. The kinetic model based on Langmuir-Hinshelwood rate model was derived and the activation energy was 6.13 x 104 kJ/kmol. The experiment of recovery of dilute acetic acid was conducted in a packed bed catalytic distillation column. The optimal process parameters and operational conditions determined to make up to 85.9% conversion of acetic acid are as follows:the height of catalyst bed is 1 100 mm, reflux ratio is 4: 1, and the ratio of methanol to acetic acid is 2: 1. The method can be used as a guide in industrial scale recovery of 15%-30% dilute acetic acid.

  13. On-line regeneration of hydrodesulfurization catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Jr., John L.

    1980-01-01

    A hydrotreating catalyst is regenerated as it concurrently hydrotreats a hydrocarbon fuel by introducing a low concentration of oxygen into the catalyst bed either continuously or periodically. At low oxygen concentrations the carbon deposits on the catalyst are burned off without harming the catalyst and without significantly affecting the hydrotreating process. In a preferred embodiment the hydrotreating process is hydrodesulfurization, and regenerating is done periodically with oxygen concentrations between 0.1 and 0.5 volume percent.

  14. Catalytic flash pyrolysis of oil-impregnated-wood and jatropha cake using sodium based catalysts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ali Imran, A.; Bramer, E.A.; Seshan, K.; Brem, G.

    2016-01-01

    Catalytic pyrolysis of wood with impregnated vegetable oil was investigated and compared with catalytic pyrolysis of jatropha cake making use of sodium based catalysts to produce a high quality bio-oil. The catalytic pyrolysis was carried out in two modes: in-situ catalytic pyrolysis and post treatm

  15. Nonlinear model predictive control of a packed distillation column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patwardhan, A.A.; Edgar, T.F. (Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1993-10-01

    A rigorous dynamic model based on fundamental chemical engineering principles was formulated for a packed distillation column separating a mixture of cyclohexane and n-heptane. This model was simplified to a form suitable for use in on-line model predictive control calculations. A packed distillation column was operated at several operating conditions to estimate two unknown model parameters in the rigorous and simplified models. The actual column response to step changes in the feed rate, distillate rate, and reboiler duty agreed well with dynamic model predictions. One unusual characteristic observed was that the packed column exhibited gain-sign changes, which are very difficult to treat using conventional linear feedback control. Nonlinear model predictive control was used to control the distillation column at an operating condition where the process gain changed sign. An on-line, nonlinear model-based scheme was used to estimate unknown/time-varying model parameters.

  16. RELATIONS BETWEEN PACKING PREMEASURE AND MEASURE ON METRIC SPACE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Let X be a metric space andμ a finite Borel measure on X. Let (P)q,tμ and Pq,tμ be the packing premeasure and the packing measure on X, respectively, defined by the gauge (μB(x, r))q (2r)t, where q, t ∈ R. For any compact set E of finite packing premeasure the authors prove: (1) if q ≤ 0 then (P)q,tμ(E) =Pq,tμ(E); (2) if q > 0 andμ is doubling on E then (P)q,tμ(E) and Pq,tμ(E) are both zero or neither.

  17. A Personified Annealing Algorithm for Circles Packing Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGDe-Fu; LIXin

    2005-01-01

    Circles packing problem is an NP-hard problem and is difficult to solve. In this paper, a hybrid search strategy for circles packing problem is discussed. A way of generating new configuration is presented by simulating the moving of elastic objects, which can avoid the blindness of simulated annealing search and make iteration process converge fast. Inspired by the life experiences of people,an effective personified strategy to jump out of local minima is given. Based on the simulated annealing idea and personification strategy, an effective personified annealing algorithm for circles packing problem is developed. Numerical experiments on benchmark problem instances show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the best algorithm in the literature.

  18. A Heuristic Algorithm for Solving Triangle Packing Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruimin Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The research on the triangle packing problem has important theoretic significance, which has broad application prospects in material processing, network resource optimization, and so forth. Generally speaking, the orientation of the triangle should be limited in advance, since the triangle packing problem is NP-hard and has continuous properties. For example, the polygon is not allowed to rotate; then, the approximate solution can be obtained by optimization method. This paper studies the triangle packing problem by a new kind of method. Such concepts as angle region, corner-occupying action, corner-occupying strategy, and edge-conjoining strategy are presented in this paper. In addition, an edge-conjoining and corner-occupying algorithm is designed, which is to obtain an approximate solution. It is demonstrated that the proposed algorithm is highly efficient, and by the time complexity analysis and the analogue experiment result is found.

  19. A Hybrid Algorithm for Strip Packing Problem with Rotation Constraint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Huan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Strip packing is a well-known NP-hard problem and it was widely applied in engineering fields. This paper considers a two-dimensional orthogonal strip packing problem. Until now some exact algorithm and mainly heuristics were proposed for two-dimensional orthogonal strip packing problem. While this paper proposes a two-stage hybrid algorithm for it. In the first stage, a heuristic algorithm based on layering idea is developed to construct a solution. In the second stage, a great deluge algorithm is used to further search a better solution. Computational results on several classes of benchmark problems have revealed that the hybrid algorithm improves the results of layer-heuristic, and can compete with other heuristics from the literature.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Multiphase Flow in Structured Packings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Shojaee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A volume of fluid multiphase flow model was used to investigate the effective area and the created liquid film in the structured packings. The computational results revealed that the gas and liquid flow rates play significant roles in the effective interfacial area of the packing. In particular, the effective area increases as the flow rates of both phases increase. Numerical results were compared with the Brunazzi and SRP models, and a good agreement between them was found. Attention was given to the process of liquid film formation in both two-dimensional (2D and three-dimensional (3D models. The current study revealed that computational fluid dynamics (CFD can be used as an effective tool to provide information on the details of gas and liquid flows in complex packing geometries.

  1. Packing entropy of extended, hard, rigid objects on a lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenshuo; Freed, Karl F.; Nemirovsky, Adolfo M.

    1993-06-01

    We present a systematic method of evaluating the packing entropy for a set of mutually avoiding extended, hard, rigid objects on a lattice. The method generalizes a simple algebraic representation of the lattice cluster theory developed by Freed and co-workers for systems composed of flexible objects. The theory provides a power series expansion in z-1 for the corrections to the zeroth order mean field approximation partition function, where z is the lattice coordination number. We illustrate the general theory by calculating the packing entropy of four-unit rigid ``square'' objects on a hypercubic lattice as a function of the volume fraction of the squares. As a particular limiting case, we also evaluate for the packing entropy of two, three, and four squares on a two-dimensional square lattice and find agreement with the cluster expansion.

  2. Bin Completion Algorithms for Multicontainer Packing, Knapsack, and Covering Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Fukunaga, A S; 10.1613/jair.2106

    2011-01-01

    Many combinatorial optimization problems such as the bin packing and multiple knapsack problems involve assigning a set of discrete objects to multiple containers. These problems can be used to model task and resource allocation problems in multi-agent systems and distributed systms, and can also be found as subproblems of scheduling problems. We propose bin completion, a branch-and-bound strategy for one-dimensional, multicontainer packing problems. Bin completion combines a bin-oriented search space with a powerful dominance criterion that enables us to prune much of the space. The performance of the basic bin completion framework can be enhanced by using a number of extensions, including nogood-based pruning techniques that allow further exploitation of the dominance criterion. Bin completion is applied to four problems: multiple knapsack, bin covering, min-cost covering, and bin packing. We show that our bin completion algorithms yield new, state-of-the-art results for the multiple knapsack, bin covering,...

  3. Comparison study of catalyst nanoparticle formation and carbon nanotube growth: Support effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunyu; Luo, Zhiquan; Li, Bin; Ho, Paul S.; Yao, Zhen; Shi, Li; Bryan, Eugene N.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2007-06-01

    A comparison study has been conducted on the formation of catalyst nanoparticles on a high surface tension metal and low surface tension oxide for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth via catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD). Silicon dioxide (SiO2) and tantalum have been deposited as supporting layers before deposition of a thin layer of iron catalyst. Iron nanoparticles were formed after thermal annealing. It was found that densities, size distributions, and morphologies of iron nanoparticles were distinctly different on the two supporting layers. In particular, iron nanoparticles revealed a Volmer-Weber growth mode on SiO2 and a Stranski-Krastanov mode on tantalum. CCVD growth of CNTs was conducted on iron/tantalum and iron/SiO2. CNT growth on SiO2 exhibited a tip growth mode with a slow growth rate of less than 100nm /min. In contrast, the growth on tantalum followed a base growth mode with a fast growth rate exceeding 1μm/min. For comparison, plasma enhanced CVD was also employed for CNT growth on SiO2 and showed a base growth mode with a growth rate greater than 2μm /min. The enhanced CNT growth rate on tantalum was attributed to the morphologies of iron nanoparticles in combination with the presence of an iron wetting layer. The CNT growth mode was affected by the adhesion between the catalyst and support as well as CVD process.

  4. Hard, soft, and sticky spheres for dynamical studies of disordered colloidal packings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gratale, Matthew Daniel

    This thesis describes experiments which explore the role of interparticle interactions as a means to alter, and control, the properties of dense colloidal packings. The first set of experiments studied phonon modes in two-dimensional colloidal crystals composed of soft microgel particles with hard polystyrene particle dopants distributed randomly on the triangular lattice. By mixing hard and soft spheres we obtain close-packed lattices of spheres with random bond strength disorder, textit{i.e.,} the effective springs coupling nearest-neighbors are either very stiff, very soft, or of intermediate stiffness. Video microscopy, particle tracking, and covariance matrix techniques are employed to derive the phonon modes of the corresponding ``shadow'' crystals, thereby enabling us to study how bond strength disorder affects vibrational properties. Hard and soft particles participate equally in low frequency phonon modes, and the samples exhibit Debye-like density of states behavior characteristic of crystals at low frequency. For mid- and high-frequency phonons, the relative participation of hard versus soft particles in each mode is found to vary systematically with dopant concentration. The second set of experiments investigated depletion interaction potentials between micron-size colloidal particles induced by nanometer-scale micelles composed of the surfactant hexaethylene glycol monododecyl ether (C12E6). The strength and range of the depletion interaction is revealed to arise from variations in shape anisotropy of the rod-like surfactant micelles. This shape anisotropy increases with increasing sample temperature. By fitting the colloidal interaction potentials to theoretical models, we extract the rod-like micelle length and shape anisotropy as a function of temperature. This work introduces micelle shape anisotropy as a means to control interparticle interactions in colloidal suspensions, and shows how interparticle depletion potentials of micron-scale objects

  5. Characterization of maximally random jammed sphere packings: Voronoi correlation functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Michael A; Torquato, Salvatore

    2014-11-01

    We characterize the structure of maximally random jammed (MRJ) sphere packings by computing the Minkowski functionals (volume, surface area, and integrated mean curvature) of their associated Voronoi cells. The probability distribution functions of these functionals of Voronoi cells in MRJ sphere packings are qualitatively similar to those of an equilibrium hard-sphere liquid and partly even to the uncorrelated Poisson point process, implying that such local statistics are relatively structurally insensitive. This is not surprising because the Minkowski functionals of a single Voronoi cell incorporate only local information and are insensitive to global structural information. To improve upon this, we introduce descriptors that incorporate nonlocal information via the correlation functions of the Minkowski functionals of two cells at a given distance as well as certain cell-cell probability density functions. We evaluate these higher-order functions for our MRJ packings as well as equilibrium hard spheres and the Poisson point process. It is shown that these Minkowski correlation and density functions contain visibly more information than the corresponding standard pair-correlation functions. We find strong anticorrelations in the Voronoi volumes for the hyperuniform MRJ packings, consistent with previous findings for other pair correlations [A. Donev et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 090604 (2005)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.95.090604], indicating that large-scale volume fluctuations are suppressed by accompanying large Voronoi cells with small cells, and vice versa. In contrast to the aforementioned local Voronoi statistics, the correlation functions of the Voronoi cells qualitatively distinguish the structure of MRJ sphere packings (prototypical glasses) from that of not only the Poisson point process but also the correlated equilibrium hard-sphere liquids. Moreover, while we did not find any perfect icosahedra (the locally densest possible structure in which a

  6. A model for evaluating the ballistic resistance of stratified packs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirvu, C.; Georgescu, C.; Badea, S.; Deleanu, L.

    2016-08-01

    Models for evaluating the ballistic performance of stratified packs are useful in reducing the time for laboratory tests, understanding the failure process and identifying key factors to improve the architecture of the packs. The authors present the results of simulating the bullet impact on a packs made of 24 layers, taking into consideration the friction between layers (μ = 0.4) and the friction between bullet and layers (μ = 0.3). The aim of this study is to obtain a number of layers that allows for the bullet arrest in the packs and to have several layers undamaged in order to offer a high level of safety for this kind of packs that could be included in individual armors. The model takes into account the yield and fracture limits of the two materials the bullet is made of and those for one layer, here considered as an orthotropic material, having maximum equivalent plastic strain of 0.06. All materials are considered to have bilinear isotropic hardening behavior. After documentation, the model was designed as isothermal because thermal influence of the impact is considered low for these impact velocities. The model was developed with the help of Ansys 14.5. Each layer has 200 mm × 200 × 0.35 mm. The bullet velocity just before impact was 400 m/s, a velocity characterizing the average values obtained in close range with a ballistic barrel and the bullet model is following the shape and dimensions of the 9 mm FMJ (full metal jacket). The model and the results concerning the number of broken layers were validated by experiments, as the number of broken layers for the actual pack (made of 24 layers of LFT SB1) were also seven...eight. The models for ballistic impact are useful when they are particularly formulated for resembling to the actual system projectile - target.

  7. Novel non-platinum metal catalyst material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a novel non-platinum metal catalyst material for use in low temperature fuel cells and electrolysers and to fuel cells and electrolysers comprising the novel non-platinum metal catalyst material. The present invention also relates to a novel method for synthesizing...... the novel non-platinum metal catalyst material....

  8. Catalysts and methods of using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slowing, Igor Ivan; Kandel, Kapil

    2017-02-14

    The present invention provides a catalyst including a mesoporous silica nanoparticle and a catalytic material comprising iron. In various embodiments, the present invention provides methods of using and making the catalyst. In some examples, the catalyst can be used to hydrotreat fatty acids or to selectively remove fatty acids from feedstocks.

  9. Efficient epoxidation of propene using molecular catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markovits, Iulius I. E.; Anthofer, Michael H.; Kolding, Helene

    2014-01-01

    The epoxidation of propene is performed in homogeneous phase using various molecular catalysts and H2O2 or tert-butyl hydroperoxide as oxidants. A comparison between some molybdenum catalysts and methyltrioxorhenium (MTO) shows that the well known Re catalyst is the best among the examined...

  10. Statistical mechanics of the lattice sphere packing problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallus, Yoav

    2013-06-01

    We present an efficient Monte Carlo method for the lattice sphere packing problem in d dimensions. We use this method to numerically discover de novo the densest lattice sphere packing in dimensions 9 through 20. Our method goes beyond previous methods, not only in exploring higher dimensions but also in shedding light on the statistical mechanics underlying the problem in question. We observe evidence of a phase transition in the thermodynamic limit d→∞. In the dimensions explored in the present work, the results are consistent with a first-order crystallization transition but leave open the possibility that a glass transition is manifested in higher dimensions.

  11. Packing states of multilamellar vesicles in a nonionic surfactant system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Le, T.D.; Olsson, U.; Mortensen, K.

    2001-01-01

    under shear. Here, we focused only in the MLV region, L-alpha(*), of a temperature sensitive surfactant system (C12E4-water) to investigate the packing of multilamellar vesicles as a function of temperature under constant shear. Two sets of temperature scan experiments were performed in the L......-alpha(*) phase using the noninvasive small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique, one while heating and the other while cooling the sample. Data from the heating and cooling cycles were used to demonstrate reversibility of the system. Three states of packing can be identified from the scattering profiles...

  12. Simulator for a packing and weighing system of granulated powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couto Rodrigues de Oliveira, Rafael; Garcia, Claudio

    2013-09-01

    The development of a simulator for a packing and weighing system (PWS) of granulated powder is described. It employed system identification to obtain the deterministic part of the model and stochastic processes to reproduce disturbances. It reproduces the fluctuations in carton weight observed in real packing systems. Its final use is to evaluate proposed improvements in the PWS, aiming at reducing overweight and underweight. Its performance is satisfactory, as the oscillations observed in the carton weights, due to powder density variability, are close to reality as well as the monetary losses due to overweight and underweight and the power spectral density graphs of the real and simulated weights.

  13. Growth of Vanadium Carbide by Halide-Activated Pack Diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Dahl, Kristian Vinter;

    The present work investigates growth of vanadium carbide (VC) layers by the pack diffusion method on a Vanadis 6 tool steel. The VC layers were produced by pack diffusion at 1000°C for 1, 4 and 16 hours. The VC layers were characterized with optical and electron microscopy, Vickers hardness tests...... and X-ray diffraction. Homogeneous VC mono-phase layers with Vickers hardness of more than 2400 HV were obtained. Hardening and tempering of the vanadized Vanadis 6 steel did not affect the VC layers....

  14. Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Perovskites of the structure A.sub.2 B.sub.2 C.sub.3 O.sub.10 are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

  15. Biodiesel production using heterogenous catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    The current transesterification of triacylglycerides (TAG) to produce biodiesel is based on the homogenous catalyst method using strong base such as hydroxides or methoxides. However, this method results in a number of problems: (1) acid pre-treatment is required of feedstocks high in free fatty ac...

  16. Production and optimization of biodiesel using mixed immobilized biocatalysts in packed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkiyaraj, S; Syed, Mahin Basha; Devanesan, M G; Thangavelu, Viruthagiri

    2016-05-01

    Vegetable oils are used as raw materials for biodiesel production using transesterification reaction. Several methods for the production of biodiesel were developed using chemical (alkali and acidic compounds) and biological catalysts (lipases). Biodiesel production catalyzed by lipases is energy and cost-saving processes and is carried out at normal temperature and pressure. The need for an efficient method for screening larger number of variables has led to the adoption of statistical experimental design. In the present study, packed bed reactor was designed to study with mixed immobilized biocatalysts to have higher productivity under optimum conditions. Contrary to the single-step acyl migration mechanism, a two-step stepwise reaction mechanism involving immobilized Candida rugosa lipase and immobilized Rhizopus oryzae cells was employed for the present work. This method was chosen because enzymatic hydrolysis followed by esterification can tolerate high free fatty acid containing oils. The effects of flow rate and bed height on biodiesel yield were studied using two factors five-level central composite design (CCD) and response surface methodology (RSM). Maximum biodiesel yield of 85 and 81 % was obtained for jatropha oil and karanja oil with the optimum bed height and optimum flow rate of 32.6 cm and 1.35 L/h, and 32.6 cm and 1.36 L/h, respectively.

  17. Combined photolysis and catalytic ozonation of dimethyl phthalate in a high-gravity rotating packed bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chia-Chi; Chiu, Chun-Yu; Chang, Ching-Yuan; Chang, Chiung-Fen; Chen, Yi-Hung; Ji, Dar-Ren; Yu, Yue-Hwa; Chiang, Pen-Chi

    2009-01-15

    In this study, a high-gravity rotating packed bed (HGRPB) was used as a catalytic ozonation reactor to decompose dimethyl phthalate (DMP), an endocrine disrupting chemical commonly encountered. The HGRPB is an effective gas-liquid mixing equipment which can enhance the ozone mass transfer coefficient. Platinum-containing catalyst (Pt/-Al2O3) of Dash 220N and ultra violet (UV) lamp were combined in the high-gravity ozonation (HG-OZ) system to enhance the self-decomposition of molecular ozone in liquid to form highly reactive radical species. Different combinations of HG-OZ with Dash 220N and UV for the degradation of DMP were tested. These include HG-OZ, HG catalytic OZ (HG-Pt-OZ), HG photolysis OZ (HG-UV-OZ) and HG-UV-Pt-OZ. The result indicated that all the above four ozonation processes result in significant decomposition of DMP and mineralization of total organic carbon (TOC) at the applied ozone dosage per volume of liquid sample of 1.2gL(-1). The UV and Pt/gamma-Al2O3 combined in HG-OZ can enhance the TOC mineralization efficiency (eta(TOC)) to 56% (via HG-UV-OZ) and 57% (via HG-Pt-OZ), respectively, while only 45% with ozone only. The process of HG-UV-Pt-OZ offers the highest eta(TOC) of about 68%.

  18. Continuous production of lipase-catalyzed biodiesel in a packed-bed reactor: optimization and enzyme reuse study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsiao-Ching; Ju, Hen-Yi; Wu, Tsung-Ta; Liu, Yung-Chuan; Lee, Chih-Chen; Chang, Cheng; Chung, Yi-Lin; Shieh, Chwen-Jen

    2011-01-01

    An optimal continuous production of biodiesel by methanolysis of soybean oil in a packed-bed reactor was developed using immobilized lipase (Novozym 435) as a catalyst in a tert-butanol solvent system. Response surface methodology (RSM) and Box-Behnken design were employed to evaluate the effects of reaction temperature, flow rate, and substrate molar ratio on the molar conversion of biodiesel. The results showed that flow rate and temperature have significant effects on the percentage of molar conversion. On the basis of ridge max analysis, the optimum conditions were as follows: flow rate 0.1 mL/min, temperature 52.1°C, and substrate molar ratio 1 : 4. The predicted and experimental values of molar conversion were 83.31 ± 2.07% and 82.81 ± .98%, respectively. Furthermore, the continuous process over 30 days showed no appreciable decrease in the molar conversion. The paper demonstrates the applicability of using immobilized lipase and a packed-bed reactor for continuous biodiesel synthesis.

  19. Continuous Production of Lipase-Catalyzed Biodiesel in a Packed-Bed Reactor: Optimization and Enzyme Reuse Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Ching Chen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available An optimal continuous production of biodiesel by methanolysis of soybean oil in a packed-bed reactor was developed using immobilized lipase (Novozym 435 as a catalyst in a tert-butanol solvent system. Response surface methodology (RSM and Box-Behnken design were employed to evaluate the effects of reaction temperature, flow rate, and substrate molar ratio on the molar conversion of biodiesel. The results showed that flow rate and temperature have significant effects on the percentage of molar conversion. On the basis of ridge max analysis, the optimum conditions were as follows: flow rate 0.1 mL/min, temperature 52.1∘C, and substrate molar ratio 1 : 4. The predicted and experimental values of molar conversion were 83.31±2.07% and 82.81±.98%, respectively. Furthermore, the continuous process over 30 days showed no appreciable decrease in the molar conversion. The paper demonstrates the applicability of using immobilized lipase and a packed-bed reactor for continuous biodiesel synthesis.

  20. Part I: A Comparative Thermal Aging Study on the Regenerability of Rh/Al2O3 and Rh/CexOy-ZrO2 as Model Catalysts for Automotive Three Way Catalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qinghe Zheng

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The rhodium (Rh component in automotive three way catalysts (TWC experiences severe thermal deactivation during fuel shutoff, an engine mode (e.g., at downhill coasting used for enhancing fuel economy. In a subsequent switch to a slightly fuel rich condition, in situ catalyst regeneration is accomplished by reduction with H2 generated through steam reforming catalyzed by Rh0 sites. The present work reports the effects of the two processes on the activity and properties of 0.5% Rh/Al2O3 and 0.5% Rh/CexOy-ZrO2 (CZO as model catalysts for Rh-TWC. A very brief introduction of three way catalysts and system considerations is also given. During simulated fuel shutoff, catalyst deactivation is accelerated with increasing aging temperature from 800 °C to 1050 °C. Rh on a CZO support experiences less deactivation and faster regeneration than Rh on Al2O3. Catalyst characterization techniques including BET surface area, CO chemisorption, TPR, and XPS measurements were applied to examine the roles of metal-support interactions in each catalyst system. For Rh/Al2O3, strong metal-support interactions with the formation of stable rhodium aluminate (Rh(AlO2y complex dominates in fuel shutoff, leading to more difficult catalyst regeneration. For Rh/CZO, Rh sites were partially oxidized to Rh2O3 and were relatively easy to be reduced to active Rh0 during regeneration.

  1. Design of Engine-Generator Work Mode for Hybrid Electric Vehicle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何洪文; 余晓江; 孙逢春

    2004-01-01

    From electric circuit theory view, a system model of series hybrid electric vehicle was built which uses engine-generator and battery pack as its on-board energy source in this paper. Based on the analysis for the constant power work mode and constant bus voltage work mode of engine-generator, a third work mode was put forward which combined the advantages of constant power and constant bus voltage work modes. The new work mode is reasonable to keep the battery in good working conditions and to extend its life. Also the working conditions of engine can be bettered to get low pollution and high efficiency.

  2. Catalysis Science Initiative: Catalyst Design by Discovery Informatics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgass, William Nicholas [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Abu-Omar, Mahdi [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States) Department of Chemistry; Caruthers, James [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Ribeiro, Fabio [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Thomson, Kendall [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States). Chemical Engineering; Schneider, William [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    2016-07-08

    Catalysts selectively enhance the rates of chemical reactions toward desired products. Such reactions provide great benefit to society in major commercial sectors such as energy production, protecting the environment, and polymer products and thereby contribute heavily to the country’s gross national product. Our premise is that the level of fundamental understanding of catalytic events at the atomic and molecular scale has reached the point that more predictive methods can be developed to shorten the cycle time to new processes. The field of catalysis can be divided into two regimes: heterogeneous and homogeneous. For the heterogeneous catalysis regime, we have used the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction (CO + H2O + CO2 + H2O) over supported metals as a test bed. Detailed analysis and strong coupling of theory with experiment have led to the following conclusions: • The sequence of elementary steps goes through a COOH intermediate • The CO binding energy is a strong function of coverage of CO adsorbed on the surface in many systems • In the case of Au catalysts, the CO adsorption is generally too weak on surface with close atomic packing, but the enhanced binding at corner atoms (which are missing bonding partners) of cubo-octahedral nanoparticles increases the energy to a near optimal value and produces very active catalysts. • Reaction on the metal alone cannot account for the experimental results. The reaction is dual functional with water activation occurring at the metal-support interface. It is clear from our work that the theory component is essential, not only for prediction of new systems, but also for reconciling data and testing hypotheses regarding potential descriptors. Particularly important is the finding that the interface between nano-sized metal particles and the oxides that are used to support them represent a new state of matter in the sense that the interfacial bonding perturbs the chemical state of both metals atoms and the support

  3. Autothermal reforming catalyst having perovskite structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumpel, Michael; Liu, Di-Jia

    2009-03-24

    The invention addressed two critical issues in fuel processing for fuel cell application, i.e. catalyst cost and operating stability. The existing state-of-the-art fuel reforming catalyst uses Rh and platinum supported over refractory oxide which add significant cost to the fuel cell system. Supported metals agglomerate under elevated temperature during reforming and decrease the catalyst activity. The catalyst is a perovskite oxide or a Ruddlesden-Popper type oxide containing rare-earth elements, catalytically active firs row transition metal elements, and stabilizing elements, such that the catalyst is a single phase in high temperature oxidizing conditions and maintains a primarily perovskite or Ruddlesden-Popper structure under high temperature reducing conditions. The catalyst can also contain alkaline earth dopants, which enhance the catalytic activity of the catalyst, but do not compromise the stability of the perovskite structure.

  4. Cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts bearing phosphine ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Koji; Grubbs, Robert H

    2016-02-28

    The discovery of highly active catalysts and the success of ionic liquid immobilized systems have accelerated attention to a new class of cationic metathesis catalysts. We herein report the facile syntheses of cationic ruthenium catalysts bearing bulky phosphine ligands. Simple ligand exchange using silver(i) salts of non-coordinating or weakly coordinating anions provided either PPh3 or chelating Ph2P(CH2)nPPh2 (n = 2 or 3) ligated cationic catalysts. The structures of these newly reported catalysts feature unique geometries caused by ligation of the bulky phosphine ligands. Their activities and selectivities in standard metathesis reactions were also investigated. These cationic ruthenium alkylidene catalysts reported here showed moderate activity and very similar stereoselectivity when compared to the second generation ruthenium dichloride catalyst in ring-closing metathesis, cross metathesis, and ring-opening metathesis polymerization assays.

  5. High-performance liquid chromatography with packed microchips

    OpenAIRE

    Ehlert, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    This work is explaining the importance of generating a densely packed chromatographic bed to achieve optimum separation efficiency in miniaturized liquid chromatography. The reduction of peak dispersion and enhancement of separation efficiency is the important problem in micro- and nano-separation that is to be solved to generate highly efficient chromatographic systems that can exploit all advantages of miniaturization. Therefore...

  6. Designing Drill-in Fluids by Using Ideal Packing Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Wenqiang; Yan Jienian

    2007-01-01

    Selecting bridging agents properly is a critical factor in designing non-damaging or low-damaging drill-in fluids.Historically,Abrams' rule has been used for this purpose.However,Abrams' rule only addresses the size of particle required to initiate a bridge.The rule does not give an optimum size nor an ideal packing sequence for minimizing fluid invasion and optimizing sealing.This paper elaborates an ideal packing approach to solving the sealing problem by sealing pores with different sizes,especially those large pores which usually make dominant contribution to permeability and thereby effectively preventing the solids and filtrate of drill-in fluids from invading into formations,compared with the conventionally used techniques.Practical software has been developed to optimize the blending proportion of several bridging agents,so as to achieve ideal packing effectiveness.The method and its use in selecting the best blending proportion of several bridging agents are also discussed in this paper.A carefully designed drill-in fluid by using the ideal packing technique (named the IPT fluid) for offshore drilling operations at the Weizhou Oilfield,Nanhai West Company,CNOOC is presented.The near 100% return permeabilities from the dynamic damage tests using reservoir cores demonstrated the excellent bridging effect provided by this drill-in fluid.

  7. Moisture Transport in Silica Gel Packed Beds: II. Experimental Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesaran, A. A.; Mills, A. F.

    1986-08-01

    Experiments have been performed to obtain the transient response of a thin adiabatic packed bed of silica gel after a step change in inlet air conditions, comparisons are made with predictions using a solid-side resistance model and a pseudo-gas-side controlled model and better agreement obtained with the former model.

  8. A heuristic method for solving triangle packing problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chuan-bo; HE Da-hua

    2005-01-01

    Given a set of triangles and a rectangle container, the triangle packing problem is to determine ifthese triangles can be placed into the container without overlapping. Triangle packing problem is a special case of polygon packing problem and also NP-hard, so it is unlikely that an efficient and exact algorithm can be developed to solve this problem. In this paper, a new concept of rigid placement is proposed, based on which a discrete solution space called rigid solution space is constructed. Each solution in the rigid solution space can be built by continuously applying legal rigid placements one by one until all the triangles are placed into the rectangle container without overlapping. The proposed Least-Destruction-First (LDF) strategy determines which rigid placement has the privilege to go into the rectangle container. Based on this, a heuristic algorithm is proposed to solve the problem.Combining Least-Destruction-First strategy with backtracking, the corresponding backtracking algorithm is proposed. Computational results show that our proposed algorithms are efficient and robust. With slight modification, these techniques can be conveniently used for solving polygon packing problem.

  9. Demagnetization factor for a powder of randomly packed spherical particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Bahl, Christian R.H.

    2013-01-01

    The demagnetization factors for randomly packed spherical particle powders with different porosities, sample aspect ratios, and monodisperse, normal, and log-normal particle size distributions have been calculated using a numerical model. For a relative permeability of 2, comparable to room...... permeability. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC...

  10. Close Columnar Packing of Triangulenium Ions in Langmuir Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jens B.; Kjær, Kristian; Howes, Paul

    2009-01-01

    tilt and inferred a large anisotropy in the smearing/thermal displacement along the pi-pi stacking and lamellar packing directions. Specular X-ray reflectivity (SXR) was used to confirm the model derived from the GIXD data and elucidate the average position of the disordered PF6- ions, showing...

  11. Packing of protein structures in clusters with magic numbers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindgård, Per-Anker; Bohr, Henrik

    1997-01-01

    Recently we have proposed a model for folding proteins into packed `clusters'. We have constructed a local homology measure for protein fold classes by projecting consecutively secondary structures onto a lattice. Taking into account hydrophobic forces we have found a mechanism for formation...

  12. Packing Bunker and Pile Silos to Minimize Porosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    This article discusses the issue of porosity (i.e., the portion of volume filled with gas) in silages. As porosity increases, the silage is subject to greater losses. Porosity can be reduced by adequately packing the crop at ensiling. To keep porosity below 40% a minimum bulk density of 44 lbs./cu. ...

  13. Optimizing packing fraction in granular media composed of overlapping spheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Leah K; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2016-01-28

    What particle shape will generate the highest packing fraction when randomly poured into a container? In order to explore and navigate the enormous search space efficiently, we pair molecular dynamics simulations with artificial evolution. Arbitrary particle shape is represented by a set of overlapping spheres of varying diameter, enabling us to approximate smooth surfaces with a resolution proportional to the number of spheres included. We discover a family of planar triangular particles, whose packing fraction of ϕ ∼ 0.73 is among the highest experimental results for disordered packings of frictionless particles. We investigate how ϕ depends on the arrangement of spheres comprising an individual particle and on the smoothness of the surface. We validate the simulations with experiments using 3D-printed copies of the simplest member of the family, a planar particle consisting of three overlapping spheres with identical radius. Direct experimental comparison with 3D-printed aspherical ellipsoids demonstrates that the triangular particles pack exceedingly well not only in the limit of large system size but also when confined to small containers.

  14. The use of particle packing models to design ecological concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, S.A.A.M.; Walraven, J.C.; Den Uijl, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Ecological concrete can be designed by replacing cement with fillers. With low amounts of cement it becomes increasingly important to control the water demand of concrete mixtures. In this paper a cyclic design method based on particle packing is presented and evaluated on the basis of experiments o

  15. Particle shape effects on the stress response of granular packings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Athanassiadis, Athanasios G; Miskin, Marc Z; Kaplan, Paul; Rodenberg, Nicholas; Lee, Seung Hwan; Merritt, Jason; Brown, Eric; Amend, John; Lipson, Hod; Jaeger, Heinrich M

    2014-01-01

    We present measurements of the stress response of packings formed from a wide range of particle shapes. Besides spheres these include convex shapes such as the Platonic solids, truncated tetrahedra, and triangular bipyramids, as well as more complex, non-convex geometries such as hexapods with various arm lengths, dolos, and tetrahedral frames. All particles were 3D-printed in hard resin. Well-defined initial packing states were established through preconditioning by cyclic loading under given confinement pressure. Starting from such initial states, stress-strain relationships for axial compression were obtained at four different confining pressures for each particle type. While confining pressure has the largest overall effect on the mechanical response, we find that particle shape controls the details of the stress-strain curves and can be used to tune packing stiffness and yielding. By correlating the experimentally measured values for the effective Young's modulus under compression, yield stress and energy loss during cyclic loading, we identify trends among the various shapes that allow for designing a packing's aggregate behavior.

  16. Inferior venacaval compression due to excessive abdominal packing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C.B. Santhosh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Inferior venacaval compression is a common problem in late pregnancy. It can also occur due to compression of inferior venacava by abdominal or pelvic tumors. We report a case of acute iatrogenic inferior venacaval compression due to excessive abdominal packing during an intraabdominal surgery.

  17. Tile-Packing Tomography Is NP-hard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chrobak, Marek; Dürr, Christoph; Guíñez, Flavio;

    2010-01-01

    Discrete tomography deals with reconstructing finite spatial objects from their projections. The objects we study in this paper are called tilings or tile-packings, and they consist of a number of disjoint copies of a fixed tile, where a tile is defined as a connected set of grid points. A row pr...

  18. Separating mixtures by exploiting molecular packing effects in microporous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Rajamani

    2015-01-07

    We examine mixture separations with microporous adsorbents such as zeolites, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) and zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs), operating under conditions close to pore saturation. Pore saturation is realized, for example, when separating bulk liquid phase mixtures of polar compounds such as water, alcohols and ketones. For the operating conditions used in industrial practice, pore saturation is also attained in separations of hydrocarbon mixtures such as xylene isomers and hexane isomers. Separations under pore saturation conditions are strongly influenced by differences in the saturation capacities of the constituent species; the adsorption is often in favor of the component with the higher saturation capacity. Effective separations are achieved by exploiting differences in the efficiency with which molecules pack within the ordered crystalline porous materials. For mixtures of chain alcohols, the shorter alcohol can be preferentially adsorbed because of its higher saturation capacity. With hydrophilic adsorbents, water can be selectively adsorbed from water-alcohol mixtures. For separations of o-xylene-m-xylene-p-xylene mixtures, the pore dimensions of MOFs can be tailored in such a manner as to allow optimal packing of the isomer that needs to be adsorbed preferentially. Subtle configurational differences between linear and branched alkane isomers result in significantly different packing efficiencies within the pore topology of MFI, AFI, ATS, and CFI zeolites. A common characteristic feature of most separations that are reliant on molecular packing effects is that adsorption and intra-crystalline diffusion are synergistic; this enhances the separation efficiencies in fixed bed adsorbers.

  19. Udder health in a Danish compost bedded pack barn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svennesen, Line; Enevoldsen, Carsten; Bjerg, Bjarne Schmidt;

    Besides welfare advantages of the compost bedded pack system (CBP) there could be a negative effect of the organic bedding on udder health. Our objectives were to evaluate the effects of a CBP on udder health compared to a free stall system (FS) with sand bedded cubicles. Within the same Danish...

  20. Realistic packed bed generation using small numbers of spheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavlidis, D., E-mail: dimitrios.pavlidis04@imperial.ac.uk; Lathouwers, D.

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • A method for generating 3D, periodic, closely packed beds of small numbers (<50) of spheres is presented. • The method is able to reproduce characteristics for the entirety (including nearwall area) of a randomly stacked bed. • Results are in good agreement with reference numerical data. -- Abstract: A method for stochastically generating three-dimensional, periodic, closely packed beds of small numbers (less than 50) of spheres is presented. This is an essential and integral part of realistic modelling of fluid flow and heat transfer through packed beds. In order to be able to reproduce the entirety of these complex geometries (in the radial direction) using small numbers of spheres, they are divided into two regions: the near-wall region (up to 4–5 sphere diameters from the solid wall in the wall-normal direction) and the core region. Near-wall stackings are doubly periodic and include a solid wall, while core stackings are triply periodic. A computational method for generating such geometries is presented for each region. Both are based on overlap removal methods. Results are compared against reference numerical data. Diagnostics used to evaluate the models include average packing fractions and coordination numbers, porosity profiles and distributions of the angle between two spheres which touch a common neighbour. Results are in good qualitative and quantitative agreement with the available reference data.

  1. An effective packing density of binary cubic crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eremin, I. E.; Eremina, V. V.; Sychev, M. S.; Moiseenko, V. G.

    2015-04-01

    The methodology of effective macroscopic calculation of numerical values of internuclear distances in binary crystals of a cubic crystal system is based on the use of coefficients of the structural packing density of the crystal lattice. The possibility of combining the reference data on the main physicochemical parameters of the substance is implemented by synthesis of the corresponding mathematical models.

  2. Means for sealing hemp packings in gas pipelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pistek, P.; Kubat, J.; Novak, L.

    1981-02-15

    The means for sealing hemp packings in gas pipelines has the following composition: 25-35% diethylene glycol, 10-15% glycerin, 10-15% triethylene glycol, 5-15% high ethylene glycols with an average molecular weight of 300, 20-35% the monobutyl ether of triethylene glycol, 4-7% ethoxylated p-chlorophenol, and 5-15% monoethanol amine.

  3. Success may be expected in packing with gravel and oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araujo, J.B.

    1976-01-01

    Quite successful has been the use of gravel packs to control sand production in heavy-oil wells at the Morichal field in E. Venezuela. However, the oil and gravel squeeze is not recommended for wells with a high water-oil ratio.

  4. Packed bed heat storage: Continuum mechanics model and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knödler, Philipp; Dreißigacker, Volker; Zunft, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    Thermal energy storage (TES) systems are key elements for various types of new power plant concepts. As possible cost-effective storage inventory option, packed beds of miscellaneous material come into consideration. However, high technical risks arise due to thermal expansion and shrinking of the packed bed's particles during cyclic thermal operation, possibly leading to material failure. Therefore, suitable tools for designing the heat storage system are mandatory. While particle discrete models offer detailed simulation results, the computing time for large scale applications is inefficient. In contrast, continuous models offer time-efficient simulation results but are in need of effective packed bed parameters. This work focuses on providing insight into some basic methods and tools on how to obtain such parameters and on how they are implemented into a continuum model. In this context, a particle discrete model as well as a test rig for carrying out uniaxial compression tests (UCT) is introduced. Performing of experimental validation tests indicate good agreement with simulated UCT results. In this process, effective parameters required for a continuous packed bed model were identified and used for continuum simulation. This approach is validated by comparing the simulated results with experimental data from another test rig. The presented method significantly simplifies subsequent design studies.

  5. Frac-and-pack stimulation: Application, design, and field experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roodhart, L.P.; Fokker, P.A.; Davies, D.R.; Shlyapobersky, J.; Wong, G.K.

    1994-03-01

    This paper discusses the criteria for selecting wells to be frac-and-packed. The authors show how systematic study of the inflow performance can be used to assess the potential of frac-and-packed wells, to identify the controlling factors, and to optimize design parameters. They also show that fracture conductivity is often the key to successful treatment. This conductivity depends largely on proppant size; formation permeability damage around the created fracture has less effect. Appropriate allowance needs to be made for flow restrictions caused by the presence of the perforations, partial penetration, and non-Darcy effects. They describe the application of the overpressure-calibrated hydraulic fracture model in frac-and-pack treatment design, and discuss some operational considerations with reference to field examples. The full potential of this promising new completion method can be achieved only if the design is tailored to the individual well. This demands high-quality input data, which can be obtained only from a calibration test. This paper presents their strategy for frac-and-pack design, drawing on examples from field experience. They also point out several areas that the industry needs to address, such as the sizing of proppant in soft formations and the interaction between fracturing fluids and resin in resin-coated proppant.

  6. A NOTE ON MULTIFRACTAL PACKING DIMENSION OF MEASURES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinjun Li

    2009-01-01

    The relations between the multifractal packing dimension of Borel probability measures and the asymptotic behavior of the function φ*(x)=lim sup/r→0 logv(V(x, r))-qlogμ(B(x, r))/logr are discussed and some applications are given.

  7. Consumer preferences for front-of-pack calories labelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleef, van E.; Trijp, van J.C.M.; Paeps, F.; Fernández-Celemín, L.

    2008-01-01

    Objective In light of the emerging obesity pandemic, front-of-pack calories labels may be an important tool to assist consumers in making informed healthier food choices. However, there is little prior research to guide key decisions on whether caloric content should be expressed in absolute terms o

  8. Strategies for catalyst development: possibilities of the ``rational approach`` illustrated with partial oxidation reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, W.; Schedel-Niedrig, T.; Schloegl, R. [Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Berlin (Germany). Abt. Oberflaechenphysik

    1998-12-31

    The paper discusses two petrochemical selective oxidation reactions namely the practised formation of styrene (STY) and the desired oxidative functionalisation of propane. The present knowledge about the mode of operation of oxide catalysts is critically considered. The dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene (EB) should be described by an oxidehydration with water acting as oxidant. The potential role of the coke formed during catalytic reaction as co-catalyst will be discussed. Selective oxidation is connected with the participation of lattice oxygen mechanism which transforms unselective gas phase oxygen into selective oxygen. The atomistic description of this process is still quite unclear as well as the electron structural properties of the activated oxygen atom. The Role of solid state acidity as compared to the role of lattice oxygen is much less well investigated modern multiphase-multielement oxide (MMO) catalysts. The rationale is that the significant efforts made to improve current MMO systems by chemical modifications can be very much more fruitful when in a first step the mode of action of a catalyst is clarified on the basis of suitable experiments. Such time-consuming experiments at the beginning of a campaign for catalyst improvement pay back their investment in later stages of the project when strategies of chemical development can be derived on grounds of understanding. (orig.)

  9. Highly stable precious metal-free cathode catalyst for fuel cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serov, Alexey; Workman, Michael J.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; McCool, Geoffrey; McKinney, Sam; Romero, Henry; Halevi, Barr; Stephenson, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    A platinum group metal-free (PGM-free) oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst engineered for stability has been synthesized using the sacrificial support method (SSM). This catalyst was comprehensively characterized by physiochemical analyses and tested for performance and durability in fuel cell membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). This catalyst, belonging to the family of Fe-N-C materials, is easily scalable and can be manufactured in batches up to 200 g. The fuel cell durability tests were performed in a single cell configuration at realistic operating conditions of 0.65 V, 1.25 atmgauge air, and 90% RH for 100 h. In-depth characterization of surface chemistry and morphology of the catalyst layer before and after durability tests were performed. The failure modes of the PGM-free electrodes were derived from structure-to-property correlations. It is suggested that under constant voltage operation, the performance loss results from degradation of the electrode pore structure, while under carbon corrosion accelerated test protocols the failure mode is catalyst corrosion.

  10. Disordered contact networks in jammed packings of frictionless disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramola, Kabir; Chakraborty, Bulbul

    2016-11-01

    We analyse properties of contact networks formed in packings of soft frictionless disks near the unjamming transition. We construct polygonal tilings and triangulations of the contact network that partitions space into convex regions which are either covered or uncovered. This allows us to characterize the local spatial structure of the packing near the transition using well-defined geometric objects. We construct bounds on the number of polygons and triangulation vectors that appear in such packings. We study these networks using simulations of bidispersed disks interacting via a one-sided linear spring potential. We find that several underlying geometric distributions are reproducible and display self averaging properties. We find that the total covered area is a reliable real space parameter that can serve as a substitute for the packing fraction. We find that the unjamming transition occurs at a fraction of covered area AG\\ast=0.446(1) . We determine scaling exponents of the excess covered area as the energy of the system approaches zero {{E}G}\\to {{0}+} , and the coordination number approaches its isostatic value Δ Z= -{\\text{iso}}\\to {{0}+} . We find Δ {{A}G}∼ Δ {{E}G}0.28(1) and Δ {{A}G}∼ Δ {{Z}1.00(1)} , representing new structural critical exponents. We use the distribution functions of local areas to study the underlying geometric disorder in the packings. We find that a finite fraction of order \\Psi O\\ast=0.369(1) persists as the transition is approached.

  11. High performance liquid chromatography column packings with deliberately broadened particle size distribution: relation between column performance and packing structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liekens, Anuschka; Billen, Jeroen; Sherant, Ron; Ritchie, Harald; Denayer, Joeri; Desmet, Gert

    2011-09-23

    The effect of the addition of 25%, 50% and 75% (weight percent, wt%) of larger particles (resp. 3 and 5 μm) to a commercial batch of 1.9 μm particles has been investigated as an academic exercise to study the effects of particle size distribution on the kinetic performance of packed bed columns in a magnified way. Comparing the performance of the different mixtures in a kinetic plot, it could be irrefutably shown that the addition of larger particles to a commercial batch of small particles cannot be expected to lead to an improved kinetic performance. Whereas the addition of 25 wt% of larger particles still only has a minor negative effect, a significantly deteriorated performance is obtained when 50 or 75 wt% of larger particles are added. In this case, separation impedance number increases up to 200% were observed. Studying the packing structure through computational packing simulations, together with the experimental determination of the external porosity, helped in understanding the obtained results. This showed that small particles tend to settle in the flow-through pores surrounding the larger particles, leading to very high packing densities (external porosities as low as 32% were observed) and also negatively influencing the column permeability as well as the band broadening (because of the broadened flow-through pore size range).

  12. Voltage Mode-to-Current Mode Transformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejmal S. Rathore

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a procedure for converting a class of Op Amp-, FTFN-, CC- and CFAbased voltage mode circuits to corresponding current mode circuits without requiring any additional circuit elements and finally from Op Amp-based voltage mode circuits to any of the FTFN, CC and CFA current mode circuits. The latter circuits perform better at high frequency than the former ones. The validity of the transformation has been checked on simulated circuits with PSPICE.

  13. Polymorphism in two biologically active dihydropyrimidinium hydrochloride derivatives: quantitative inputs towards the energetics associated with crystal packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panini, Piyush; Venugopala, K N; Odhav, Bharti; Chopra, Deepak

    2014-08-01

    A new polymorph belonging to the tetrahydropyrimidinium class of compounds, namely 6-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-(methoxycarbonyl)-4-methyl-2-(3-(trifluoromethylthio)phenylamino)-3,6-dihydropyrimidin-1-ium chloride, and a hydrate of 2-(3-bromophenylamino)-6-(4-chlorophenyl)-5-(methoxycarbonyl)-4-methyl-3,6-dihydropyrimidin-1-ium chloride, have been isolated and characterized using single-crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD). A detailed comprehensive analysis of the crystal packing in terms of the associated intermolecular interactions and a quantification of their interaction energies have been performed for both forms of the two different organic salts (A and B) using X-ray crystallography and computational methods such as density functional theory (DFT) quantum mechanical calculations, PIXEL lattice-energy calculations (with decomposition of total lattice energy into the Coulombic, polarization, dispersion and repulsion contribution), the calculation of the Madelung constant (the EUGEN method), Hirshfeld and two-dimensional fingerprint plots. The presence of ionic [N-H](+)···Cl(-) and [C-H](+)···Cl(-) hydrogen bonds mainly stabilizes the crystal packing in both forms A and B, while in the case of B·H2O [N-H](+)···O(water) and O(water)-H···Cl(-) hydrogen bonds along with [N-H](+)···Cl(-) and [C-H](+)···Cl(-) provide stability to the crystal packing. The lattice-energy calculations from both PIXEL and EUGEN methods revealed that in the case of A, form (I) (monoclinic) is more stable whereas for B it is the anhydrous form that is more stable. The analysis of the `Madelung mode' of crystal packing of two forms of A and B and its hydrates suggest that differences exist in the position of the charged ions/atoms in the organic solid state. The R/E (distance-energy) plots for all the crystal structures show that the molecular pairs in their crystal packing are connected with either highly stabilizing (due to the presence of organic R(+) and Cl(-)) or highly

  14. Active carbon-ceramic sphere as support of ruthenium catalysts for catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of resin effluent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Min; Hu, Yi-Qiang; Tu, Shan-Tung

    2010-07-15

    Active carbon-ceramic sphere as support of ruthenium catalysts were evaluated through the catalytic wet air oxidation (CWAO) of resin effluent in a packed-bed reactor. Active carbon-ceramic sphere and ruthenium catalysts were characterized by N(2) adsorption and chemisorption measurements. BET surface area and total pore volume of active carbon (AC) in the active carbon-ceramic sphere increase with increasing KOH-to-carbon ratio, and AC in the sample KC-120 possesses values as high as 1100 m(2) g(-1) and 0.69 cm(3) g(-1) (carbon percentage: 4.73 wt.%), especially. Active carbon-ceramic sphere supported ruthenium catalysts were prepared using the RuCl(3) solution impregnation onto these supports, the ruthenium loading was fixed at 1-5 wt.% of AC in the support. The catalytic activity varies according to the following order: Ru/KC-120>Ru/KC-80>Ru/KC-60>KC-120>without catalysts. It is found that the 3 wt.% Ru/KC-120 catalyst displays highest stability in the CWAO of resin effluent during 30 days. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) and phenol removal were about 92% and 96%, respectively at the reaction temperature of 200 degrees C, oxygen pressure of 1.5 MPa, the water flow rate of 0.75 L h(-1) and the oxygen flow rate of 13.5 L h(-1).

  15. MECHANISTIC KINETIC MODELS FOR STEAM REFORMING OF CONCENTRATED CRUDE ETHANOL ON NI/AL2O3 CATALYST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. OLAFADEHAN

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Mechanistic kinetic models were postulated for the catalytic steam reforming of concentrated crude ethanol on a Ni-based commercial catalyst at atmosphere pressure in the temperature range of 673-863 K, and at different catalyst weight to the crude ethanol molar flow rate ratio (in the range 0.9645-9.6451 kg catalyst h/kg mole crude ethanol in a stainless steel packed bed tubular microreactor. The models were based on Langmuir-Hinshelwood-Hougen-Watson (LHHW and Eley-Rideal (ER mechanisms. The optimization routine of Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm was used to estimate the inherent kinetic parameters in the proposed models. The selection of the best kinetic model amongst the rival kinetic models was based on physicochemical, statistical and thermodynamic scrutinies. The rate determining step for the steam reforming of concentrated crude ethanol on Ni/Al2O3 catalyst was found to be surface reaction between chemisorbed CH3O and O when hydrogen and oxygen were adsorbed as monomolecular species on the catalyst surface. Excellent agreement was obtained between the experimental rate of reaction and conversion of crude ethanol, and the simulated results, with ADD% being ±0.46.

  16. Biodiesel production using heterogeneous catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semwal, Surbhi; Arora, Ajay K; Badoni, Rajendra P; Tuli, Deepak K

    2011-02-01

    The production and use of biodiesel has seen a quantum jump in the recent past due to benefits associated with its ability to mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG). There are large number of commercial plants producing biodiesel by transesterification of vegetable oils and fats based on base catalyzed (caustic) homogeneous transesterification of oils. However, homogeneous process needs steps of glycerol separation, washings, very stringent and extremely low limits of Na, K, glycerides and moisture limits in biodiesel. Heterogeneous catalyzed production of biodiesel has emerged as a preferred route as it is environmentally benign needs no water washing and product separation is much easier. The present report is review of the progress made in development of heterogeneous catalysts suitable for biodiesel production. This review shall help in selection of suitable catalysts and the optimum conditions for biodiesel production.

  17. Fundamental investigations of catalyst nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elkjær, Christian Fink

    area Cu=ZnO=Al2O3 structure that is difficult to study by TEM. We therefore created size-selected CuZn alloy nanoparticles that were transformed by oxidation and reduction into Cu nanoparticles decorated with ZnO. This represents a simplified model system for the high surface area catalyst...... been unknown. We used nanoreactor technology which allows for simultaneous TEM imaging and activity measurement, also referred to as an Operando experiment. With this we revealed that the shape of the Pt nanoparticles changed in phase with changes in global reaction rate. By the use of reactor modeling...... fundamental understanding of catalytic processes and our ability to make use of that understanding. This thesis presents fundamental studies of catalyst nanoparticles with particular focus on dynamic processes. Such studies often require atomic-scale characterization, because the catalytic conversion takes...

  18. Alternative alkali resistant deNOx catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Putluru, Siva Sankar Reddy; Kristensen, Steffen Buus; Due-Hansen, Johannes;

    2012-01-01

    Alternative alkali resistant deNOx catalysts were prepared using three different supports ZrO2, TiO2 and Mordenite zeolite. The majority of the catalysts were prepared by incipient wetness impregnation of a commercial support, with vanadium, copper or iron precursor, one catalyst was prepared...... by onepot sol–gel method. All catalysts were characterized by BET, XRPD and NH3-TPD. Initial SCR activities of 8 out of 9 catalysts showed higher NO conversion at least at one temperature in the temperature range 300–500 ◦C compared to the conventional V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst. After potassium poisoning (100......–130 µmol of K/g of catalyst) the relative drop in SCR activity and acidity was lower for all the alternative catalysts compared to the industrial V2O5-WO3/TiO2 catalyst. Furthermore, Cu/MOR and Nano-V2O5/Sul-TiO2 catalysts showed 8–16 times higher SCR activities than the conventional even after high...

  19. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR PACKING AND SHIPPING STUDY SAMPLES (SOP-3.11)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This SOP describes the methods for packing and shipping study samples. These methods are for packing and shipping biological and environmental samples. The methods have been tested and used in the previous pilot studies.

  20. Fuel Cell Shaft Power Pack - Regulering af brændselsceller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    2009-01-01

    Afsluttende formidling af forskningsresultater i forbindelse med projektet Fuel Cell Shaft Power Pack......Afsluttende formidling af forskningsresultater i forbindelse med projektet Fuel Cell Shaft Power Pack...

  1. Catalysts for decomposing ozone tail gas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Chang-an; SUN De-zhi; WANG Hui; LI Wei

    2003-01-01

    The preparation of immobilizing-catalysts for decomposing ozone by using dipping method was studied. XRD, XPS and TEM were used to characterize the catalysts. The three kinds of catalysts were selected preferentially, and their catalytic activities were investigated. The results showed that the catalyst with activated carbon dipping acetate (active components are Mn: Cu = 3:2, active component proportion in catalyst is 15%, calcination temperature is 200℃ ) has the best catalytic activity for ozone decomposing. One gram of catalyst can decompose 17.6 g ozone at initial ozone concentration of 2.5 g/m3 and the residence time in reactor of 0.1 s. The experimental results also indicated that humidity of reaction system had negative effect on catalytic activity.

  2. Organic synthesis with olefin metathesis catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grubbs, R.H. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Over the past nine years, early transition metal catalysts for the ring opening metathesis polymerization of cyclic olefins have been developed. These catalysts are simple organometallic complexes containing metal carbon multiple bonds that in most cases polymerize olefins by a living process. These catalysts have been used to prepare a family of near monodispersed and structurally homogeneous polymers. A series of group VII ROMP catalysts that allow a wide range of functionality to be incorporated into the polymer side chains have been prepared. The most important member of this family of complexes are the bisphosphinedihalo-ruthenium carbene complexes. These polymerization catalysts can also be used in the synthesis of fine chemicals by ring closing (RCM) and vinyl coupling reactions. The availability of the group VII catalysts allow metathesis to be carried out on highly functionalized substrates such as polypeptides and in unusual environments such as in aqueous emulsions.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of mesoporous hydrocracking catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munir, D.; Usman, M. R.

    2016-08-01

    Mesoporous catalysts have shown great prospective for catalytic reactions due to their high surface area that aids better distribution of impregnated metal. They have been found to contain more adsorption sites and controlled pore diameter. Hydrocracking, in the presence of mesoporous catalyst is considered more efficient and higher conversion of larger molecules is observed as compared to the cracking reactions in smaller microporous cavities of traditional zeolites. In the present study, a number of silica-alumina based mesoporous catalysts are synthesized in the laboratory. The concentration and type of surfactants and quantities of silica and alumina sources are the variables studied in the preparation of catalyst supports. The supports prepared are well characterized using SEM, EDX, and N2-BET techniques. Finally, the catalysts are tested in a high pressure autoclave reactor to study the activity and selectivity of the catalysts for the hydrocracking of a model mixture of plastics comprising of LDPE, HDPE, PP, and PS.

  4. EFFECTS OF CATALYST MORPHOLOGY ON HYDROTREATING REACTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TYE CHING THIAN

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Due to the new environmental regulations for fuel quality, refineries need to process cleaner fuel. This requires an improvement in performance of hydrotreating catalysts. Improvements in catalyst activity require knowledge of the relationships between catalyst morphology and activity. Molybdenum sulfide, the generally agreed catalysts that give the best performance in hydrocracking and hydrotreating was investigated for its morphology effects on hydrotreating reactions. Three types of MoS2 catalysts with different morphology were studied. They are crystalline MoS2, exfoliated MoS2 and MoS2 derived from a precursor, molybdenum naphthenate. Exfoliated MoS2 with minimal long range order, with much higher rim edges has shown relative higher hydrogenation activity. Generally, results of MoS2 catalyst activities in hydrogenation, hydrodesulfurization, hydrodenitrogenation and hydrideoxy¬gena¬tion are in agreement with the rim-edge model.

  5. A comparative parametric study of a catalytic plate methane reformer coated with segmented and continuous layers of combustion catalyst for hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundhwa, Mayur; Parmar, Rajesh D.; Thurgood, Christopher P.

    2017-03-01

    A parametric comparison study is carried out between segmented and conventional continuous layer configurations of the coated combustion-catalyst to investigate their influence on the performance of methane steam reforming (MSR) for hydrogen production in a catalytic plate reactor (CPR). MSR is simulated on one side of a thin plate over a continuous layer of nickel-alumina catalyst by implementing an experimentally validated surface microkinetic model. Required thermal energy for the MSR reaction is supplied by simulating catalytic methane combustion (CMC) on the opposite side of the plate over segmented and continuous layer of a platinum-alumina catalyst by implementing power law rate model. The simulation results of both coating configurations of the combustion-catalyst are compared using the following parameters: (1) co-flow and counter-flow modes between CMC and MSR, (2) gas hourly space velocity and (3) reforming-catalyst thickness. The study explains why CPR designed with the segmented combustion-catalyst and co-flow mode shows superior performance not only in terms of high hydrogen production but also in terms of minimizing the maximum reactor plate temperature and thermal hot-spots. The study shows that the segmented coating requires 7% to 8% less combustion-side feed flow and 70% less combustion-catalyst to produce the required flow of hydrogen (29.80 mol/h) on the reforming-side to feed a 1 kW fuel-cell compared to the conventional continuous coating of the combustion-catalyst.

  6. Highly Active Carbon Supported Pd-Ag Nanofacets Catalysts for Hydrogen Production from HCOOH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenhui; He, Ting; Liu, Xuehua; He, Weina; Cong, Hengjiang; Shen, Yangbin; Yan, Liuming; Zhang, Xuetong; Zhang, Jinping; Zhou, Xiaochun

    2016-08-17

    Hydrogen is regarded as a future sustainable and clean energy carrier. Formic acid is a safe and sustainable hydrogen storage medium with many advantages, including high hydrogen content, nontoxicity, and low cost. In this work, a series of highly active catalysts for hydrogen production from formic acid are successfully synthesized by controllably depositing Pd onto Ag nanoplates with different Ag nanofacets, such as Ag{111}, Ag{100}, and the nanofacet on hexagonal close packing Ag crystal (Ag{hcp}). Then, the Pd-Ag nanoplate catalysts are supported on Vulcan XC-72 carbon black to prevent the aggregation of the catalysts. The research reveals that the high activity is attributed to the formation of Pd-Ag alloy nanofacets, such as Pd-Ag{111}, Pd-Ag{100}, and Pd-Ag{hcp}. The activity order of these Pd-decorated Ag nanofacets is Pd-Ag{hcp} > Pd-Ag{111} > Pd-Ag{100}. Particularly, the activity of Pd-Ag{hcp} is up to an extremely high value, i.e., TOF{hcp} = 19 000 ± 1630 h(-1) at 90 °C (lower limit value), which is more than 800 times higher than our previous quasi-spherical Pd-Ag alloy nanocatalyst. The initial activity of Pd-Ag{hcp} even reaches (3.13 ± 0.19) × 10(6) h(-1) at 90 °C. This research not only presents highly active catalysts for hydrogen generation but also shows that the facet on the hcp Ag crystal can act as a potentially highly active catalyst.

  7. Damped Arrow-Hurwicz algorithm for sphere packing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degond, Pierre; Ferreira, Marina A.; Motsch, Sebastien

    2017-03-01

    We consider algorithms that, from an arbitrarily sampling of N spheres (possibly overlapping), find a close packed configuration without overlapping. These problems can be formulated as minimization problems with non-convex constraints. For such packing problems, we observe that the classical iterative Arrow-Hurwicz algorithm does not converge. We derive a novel algorithm from a multi-step variant of the Arrow-Hurwicz scheme with damping. We compare this algorithm with classical algorithms belonging to the class of linearly constrained Lagrangian methods and show that it performs better. We provide an analysis of the convergence of these algorithms in the simple case of two spheres in one spatial dimension. Finally, we investigate the behaviour of our algorithm when the number of spheres is large in two and three spatial dimensions.

  8. Development of Vibro-packed fuel design code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Masahiro; Sekine, Nobuyuki; Pouchon, M.A.; Miyamoto, Hiroshi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai Works, Waste Management and Fuel Cycle Research Center, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Nakajima, Yasuo [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Heat Office, Executive Office for Policy Planning and Administration, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-06-01

    In the feasibility study of a FBR cycle system, Vibro-packed fuel is considered. For the design and evaluation, three Vibro-pack-specific models are incorporated into the design code. Matthews' sintering model is used to calculate the neck growth rate between particles. The SPACON model, introduced by Botta et al. is used to calculate the effective thermal conductivity of fuel and the heat transport between fuel and cladding. A three-dimensional distinct element method is applied to analyze the mechanical properties, resulting in empirical Young's module. Experimental data will be used for the evaluation of each model, and irradiation test data will be used for evaluation of the total code. Consequently, the code reliability will be determined and potentially increased. This will constitute an important step towards fuel licensing. (author)

  9. Liquid Axial Mixing in Packed Tower at Elevated Pressure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐忠利; 张鹏; 等

    2003-01-01

    Liquid phase axial mixing was measured with the tracer technique in a packed column with inner diameter of 0.15m,in which the structured packing,Mellapak 350Y,was installed.Tap water as the liquid phase flowed down through the column and stagnant gas was at elevated pressure ranging from atmospheric to 2.0MPa.The model parameters of Bo andθwere estimated with the least square method in the time domain.As liquid flow rate was increased,the liquid axial mixing decreased.under our experimental conditions,the effect of pressure on Bo number on single liquid phase was negligible,and eddy diffusion was believed to be the primary cause of axial mixing in liquid phase.

  10. Packing tight Hamilton cycles in 3-uniform hypergraphs

    CERN Document Server

    Frieze, Alan; Loh, Po-Shen

    2010-01-01

    Let H be a 3-uniform hypergraph with N vertices. A tight Hamilton cycle C \\subset H is a collection of N edges for which there is an ordering of the vertices v_1, ..., v_N such that every triple of consecutive vertices {v_i, v_{i+1}, v_{i+2}} is an edge of C (indices are considered modulo N). We develop new techniques which enable us to prove that under certain natural pseudo-random conditions, almost all edges of H can be covered by edge-disjoint tight Hamilton cycles, for N divisible by 4. Consequently, we derive the corollary that random 3-uniform hypergraphs can be almost completely packed with tight Hamilton cycles w.h.p., for N divisible by 4 and P not too small. Along the way, we develop a similar result for packing Hamilton cycles in pseudo-random digraphs with even numbers of vertices.

  11. Topological classification with Z2Pack (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresch, Dominik; Soluyanov, Alexey A.; Autés, Gabriel; Yazyev, Oleg; Bernevig, Bogdan A.; Vanderbilt, David H.; Troyer, Matthias

    2016-10-01

    We present a general technique for capturing various non-trivial topologies in the band structure of materials, which often arise from spin-orbit coupling. The technique is aimed at insulators and semimetals. Of insulators, Chern, Z2, and crystalline topological insulators can be identified. Of semimetals, the technique captures non-trivial topologies associated with the presence of Weyl and Dirac points in the spectrum. A public software package - Z2Pack - based on this technique will be presented. Z2Pack is an easy-to-use, well documented Python package that computes topological invariants and illustrates non-trivial features of Berry curvature. It works as a post-processing tool with all major first-principles codes, as well as with tight-binding models. As such, it can be used to investigate materials with strong spin-orbit coupling.

  12. Packing Different Cuboids with Rotations and Spheres into a Cuboid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. G. Stoyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a packing optimization problem of different spheres and cuboids into a cuboid of the minimal height. Translations and continuous rotations of cuboids are allowed. In the paper, we offer a way of construction of special functions (Φ-functions describing how rotations can be dealt with. These functions permit us to construct the mathematical model of the problem as a classical mathematical programming problem. Basic characteristics of the mathematical model are investigated. When solving the problem, the characteristics allow us to apply a number of original and state-of-the-art efficient methods of local and global optimization. Numerical examples of packing from 20 to 300 geometric objects are given.

  13. Integrating packing and distribution problems and optimization through mathematical programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Miguel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the integration of two combinatorial problems that frequently arise in production and distribution systems. One is the Bin Packing Problem (BPP problem, which involves finding an ordering of some objects of different volumes to be packed into the minimal number of containers of the same or different size. An optimal solution to this NP-Hard problem can be approximated by means of meta-heuristic methods. On the other hand, we consider the Capacitated Vehicle Routing Problem with Time Windows (CVRPTW, which is a variant of the Travelling Salesman Problem (again a NP-Hard problem with extra constraints. Here we model those two problems in a single framework and use an evolutionary meta-heuristics to solve them jointly. Furthermore, we use data from a real world company as a test-bed for the method introduced here.

  14. Combinatorically Prescribed Packings and Applications to Conformal and Quasiconformal Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Oded

    2007-09-01

    The Andreev-Thurston Circle Packing Theorem is generalized to packings of convex bodies in planar simply connected domains. This turns out to be a useful tool for constructing conformal and quasiconformal mappings with interesting geometric properties. We attempt to illustrate this with a few results about uniformizations of finitely connected planar domains. For example, the following variation of a theorem by Courant, Manel and Shiffman is proved and generalized. If G is an n+1-connected bounded planar domain, H is a simply connected bounded planar domain, and P_1,P_2,...,P_n are (compact) planar convex bodies, then sets P_j' can be found so that G is conformally equivalent to H-\\cup p_{j=1}^n P_j', and each P_j' is either a point, or is positively homothetic to P_j.

  15. Diffusive Wave Spectroscopy of a random close packing of spheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crassous, J.

    2007-06-01

    We are interested in the propagation of light in a random packing of dielectric spheres within the geometrical optics approximation. Numerical simulations are performed using a ray tracing algorithm. The effective refractive indexes and the transport mean free path are computed for different refractive indexes of spheres and intersticial media. The variations of the optical path length under small deformations of the spheres assembly are also computed and compared to the results of Diffusive Wave Spectroscopy experiments. Finally, we propose a measure of the transport mean free path and a Diffusive Wave Spectroscopy experiment on a packing of glass spheres. The results of those experiments agree with the predictions of this ray tracing approach.

  16. Construction of optimal supersaturated designs by the packing method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANG; Kaitai; GE; Gennian; LIU; Minqian

    2004-01-01

    A supersaturated design is essentially a factorial design with the equal occurrence of levels property and no fully aliased factors in which the number of main efits potential in factor screening experiments. A packing design is an important object in combinatorial design theory. In this paper, a strong link between the two apparently unrelated kinds of designs is shown. Several criteria for comparing supersaturated designs are proposed, their properties and connections with other existing criteria are discussed.A combinatorial approach, called the packing method, for constructing optimal supersaturated designs is presented, and properties of the resulting designs are also investigated.Comparisons between the new designs and other existing designs are given, which show that our construction method and the newly constructed designs have good properties.

  17. Packing properties 1-alkanols and alkanes in a phospholipid membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westh, Peter

    2006-01-01

    into the membrane, Vm(puremem), was positive for small (C4-C6) 1-alkanols while it was negative for larger alcohols and all alkanes. The magnitude of Vm(puremem) ranged from about +4 cm3/mol for alcohols with an alkyl chain about half the length of the fatty acids of DMPC, to -10 to -15 cm3/mol for the alkanes......We have used vibrating tube densitometry to investigate the packing properties of four alkanes and a homologous series of ten alcohols in fluid-phase membranes of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC). It was found that the volume change of transferring these compounds from their pure states...... and long chain alcohols. On the basis of these observations, previously published information on the structure of the membrane-solute complexes and the free volume properties of (pure) phospholipid membranes, we suggest that two effects dominate the packing properties of hydrophobic solutes in DMPC. First...

  18. Molecular packing in bone collagen fibrils prior to mineralization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Benjamin; Zhou, Hong-Wen; Burger, Christian; Chu, Benjamin; Glimcher, Melvin J.

    2012-02-01

    The three-dimensional packing of collagen molecules in bone collagen fibrils has been largely unknown because even in moderately mineralized bone tissues, the organic matrix structure is severely perturbed by the deposition of mineral crystals. During the past decades, the structure of tendon collagen (e.g. rat tail) --- a tissue that cannot mineralize in vivo, has been assumed to be representative for bone collagen fibrils. Small-angle X-ray diffraction analysis of the native, uncalcified intramuscular fish bone has revealed a new molecular packing scheme, significantly different from the quasi-hexagonal arrangement often found in tendons. The deduced structure in bone collagen fibrils indicates the presence of spatially discrete microfibrils, and an arrangement of intrafibrillar space to form ``channels'', which could accommodate crystals with dimensions typically found in bone apatite.

  19. PERFORMANCE OF A PACKED LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION COLUMN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İ. Metin HASDEMİR

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of feed ratios ((LE/LR on the performance of a packed liquid-liquid extraction column, with a diameter of 5.86 cm and a column height of 132 cm was investigated. The column is made of borosilicate glass and packed with 10 x 10 mm glass Raschig rings. In this study, a ternary system composed of water + propionic acid + trichloroethylene was used. The data used to triangular diagram were obtained experimentally. The overall mass transfer coefficients, the numbers of overall mass transfer units, the heights of mass transfer units, the numbers of theoretical stages and height equivalent to a theoretical stage (H. E. T. S. values were calculated and compared with each other.

  20. 19 CFR 10.462 - Packing materials and containers for shipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Packing materials and containers for shipment. 10... Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.462 Packing materials and containers for shipment. (a) Packing materials and containers for shipment, as defined in § 10.450(m), are to be disregarded...

  1. 7 CFR 330.210a - Administrative instructions listing approved packing materials for plant pests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrative instructions listing approved packing... Pests § 330.210a Administrative instructions listing approved packing materials for plant pests. (a) The following materials are approved as packing materials for use with any shipment of plant pests in...

  2. 19 CFR 10.602 - Packing materials and containers for shipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Packing materials and containers for shipment. 10...-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.602 Packing materials and containers for shipment. (a) Effect on tariff shift rule. Packing materials and containers for shipment,...

  3. 48 CFR 47.305-10 - Packing, marking, and consignment instructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Packing, marking, and... ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 47.305-10 Packing, marking, and consignment instructions. (a) Acquisition documents shall include packing and...

  4. 19 CFR 10.540 - Packing materials and containers for shipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Packing materials and containers for shipment. 10...-Singapore Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.540 Packing materials and containers for shipment. (a) Packing materials and containers for shipment, as defined in § 10.530(j) of this subpart, are to...

  5. Schwarz’s lemma for the circle packings with the general combinatorics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Rodin (1987) proved the Schwarz’s lemma analog for the circle packings based on the hexagonal combinatorics. In this paper, we prove the Schwarz’s lemma for the circle packings with the general combinatorics and our proof is more simpler than Rodin’s proof. At the same time, we obtain a rigidity property for those packings with the general combinatorics.

  6. 29 CFR 780.209 - Packing, storage, warehousing, and sale of nursery products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Packing, storage, warehousing, and sale of nursery products... Operations § 780.209 Packing, storage, warehousing, and sale of nursery products. Employees of a grower of nursery stock who work in packing and storage sheds sorting the stock, grading and trimming it, racking...

  7. 78 FR 11188 - General Services Administration Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Packing List Clause

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... ADMINISTRATION General Services Administration Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Packing List Clause AGENCY... packing list clause. A notice was published in the Federal Register at 77 FR 66466, on November 5, 2012...: Submit comments identified by Information Collection 3090- 0246, Packing List Clause, by any of...

  8. 48 CFR 252.211-7004 - Alternate preservation, packaging, and packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., packaging, and packing. 252.211-7004 Section 252.211-7004 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE... CLAUSES Text of Provisions And Clauses 252.211-7004 Alternate preservation, packaging, and packing. As prescribed in 211.272, use the following provision: Alternate Preservation, Packaging, and Packing (DEC...

  9. 9 CFR 381.126 - Date of packing and date of processing; contents of cans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Date of packing and date of processing... Containers § 381.126 Date of packing and date of processing; contents of cans. (a) Either the immediate... code or otherwise with the date of packing. If calendar dating is used, it must be accompanied by...

  10. 78 FR 69006 - Environmental Impact Statement for the Proposed Rule: Standards for Growing, Harvesting, Packing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ... Statement for the Proposed Rule: Standards for Growing, Harvesting, Packing, and Holding of Produce for..., Packing, and Holding of Produce for Human Consumption'' that appeared in the Federal Register of August 19..., Harvesting, Packing, and Holding of Produce for Human Consumption'' with a comment period extending...

  11. 7 CFR 319.69-5 - Types of soil authorized for packing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Types of soil authorized for packing. 319.69-5 Section... INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOREIGN QUARANTINE NOTICES Packing Materials Rules and Regulations § 319.69-5 Types of soil authorized for packing. The following types of soil or earth...

  12. 48 CFR 447.305-10 - Packing, marking, and consignment instructions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Packing, marking, and... AGRICULTURE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT TRANSPORTATION Transportation in Supply Contracts 447.305-10 Packing, marking... clause at 452.247-72, Packing for Domestic Shipment, in contracts when item(s) will be delivered...

  13. 48 CFR 552.211-76 - Charges for packaging, packing, and marking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., packing, and marking. 552.211-76 Section 552.211-76 Federal Acquisition Regulations System GENERAL... and Clauses 552.211-76 Charges for packaging, packing, and marking. As prescribed in 511.204(b)(3), insert a clause substantially as follows: Charges for Packaging, Packing, and Marking (JAN 2010)...

  14. Effect of particle shape on the random packing density of amorphous solids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kyrylyuk, A.V.; Philipse, A.P.

    2011-01-01

    The packing density of a particulate solid strongly depends on the shape of the particles that are jammed at random close packing (RCP). To investigate the effect of particle shape on the RCP density of an amorphous solid, we studied jammed packings of binary mixtures of a-thermal or granular sphero

  15. 7 CFR 915.306 - Florida avocado grade, pack, and container marking regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Florida avocado grade, pack, and container marking... AGRICULTURE AVOCADOS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA Container and Pack Regulations § 915.306 Florida avocado grade, pack, and container marking regulation. (a) No handler shall handle any variety of avocados grown...

  16. A Recursive Formulation of Cholesky Factorization of a Matrix in Packed Storage Format

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Bjarne Stig; Gustavson, Fred; Wasniewski, Jerzy

    2001-01-01

    A new compact way to store a symmetric or triangular matrix called RPF for Recursive Packed Format is fully described. Novel ways to transform RPF to and from standard packed format are included. A new algorithm, called RPC for Recursive Packed Cholesky that operates on the RPF format is presente...

  17. 7 CFR 906.340 - Container, pack, and container marking regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container, pack, and container marking regulations... AGRICULTURE ORANGES AND GRAPEFRUIT GROWN IN LOWER RIO GRANDE VALLEY IN TEXAS Container and Pack Requirements § 906.340 Container, pack, and container marking regulations. (a) No handler shall handle any variety...

  18. The pack size effect: Influence on consumer perceptions of portion sizes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hieke, Sophie; Palascha, Aikaterini; Jola, Corinne; Wills, Josephine; Raats, Monique M.

    2016-01-01

    Larger portions as well as larger packs can lead to larger prospective consumption estimates, larger servings and increased consumption, described as 'portion-size effects' and 'pack size effects'. Although related, the effects of pack sizes on portion estimates have received less attention. While i

  19. Biological treatment of textile dyes by agar-agar immobilized consortium in a packed bed reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Yogesh; Gupte, Akshaya

    2015-03-01

    The decolorization of Acid Maroon V was investigated using bacterial consortium EDPA containing Enterobacter dissolvens AGYP1 and Pseudomonas aeruginosa AGYP2 immobilized in different entrapment matrices. The consortium displayed 96% removal of dye (100 mg/l) within 6 h when immobilized in agar-agar. Under optimum concentrations of agar-agar (3.0% w/v) and cell biomass (0.9 g% w/v), the consortium displayed decolorization for 18 successive batches of Acid Maroon V and also decolorized 14 other different textile dyes. A packed bed reactor under batch mode showed 89% decolorization of dye after 56 repetitive cycles. Under continuous flow mode, maximum color removal was achieved with bed length of 36 cm, hydraulic retention time of 2.66 h, and dye concentration of 100 mg/l. Additionally, the reactor decolorized relatively higher concentrations (100-2000 mg/l) of dye. The synthetic dye wastewater containing five textile dyes was decolorized 92% with 62% COD reduction using an immobilized consortium.

  20. Oxidation catalysts on alkaline earth supports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2017-03-21

    An oxidation catalyst includes a support including particles of an alkaline earth salt, and first particles including a palladium compound on the support. The oxidation catalyst can also include precious metal group (PMG) metal particles in addition to the first particles intermixed together on the support. A gas permeable polymer that provides a continuous phase can completely encapsulate the particles and the support. The oxidation catalyst may be used as a gas sensor, where the first particles are chemochromic particles.